WorldWideScience

Sample records for reported grades world

  1. Meat standards and grading: a world view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polkinghorne, R J; Thompson, J M

    2010-09-01

    This paper addresses the principles relating to meat standards and grading of beef and advances the concept that potential exists to achieve significant desirable change from adopting more consumer focused systems within accurate value-based payment frameworks. The paper uses the definitions that classification is a set of descriptive terms describing features of the carcass that are useful to those involved in the trading of carcasses, whereas grading is the placing of different values on carcasses for pricing purposes, depending on the market and requirements of traders. A third definition is consumer grading, which refers to grading systems that seek to define or predict consumer satisfaction with a cooked meal. The development of carcass classification and grading schemes evolved from a necessity to describe the carcass using standard terms to facilitate trading. The growth in world trade of meat and meat products and the transition from trading carcasses to marketing individual meal portions raises the need for an international language that can service contemporary needs. This has in part been addressed by the United Nations promoting standard languages on carcasses, cuts, trim levels and cutting lines. Currently no standards exist for describing consumer satisfaction. Recent Meat Standards Australia (MSA) research in Australia, Korea, Ireland, USA, Japan and South Africa showed that consumers across diverse cultures and nationalities have a remarkably similar view of beef eating quality, which could be used to underpin an international language on palatability. Consumer research on the willingness to pay for eating quality shows that consumers will pay higher prices for better eating quality grades and generally this was not affected by demographic or meat preference traits of the consumer. In Australia the MSA eating quality grading system has generated substantial premiums to retailers, wholesalers and to the producer. Future grading schemes which measure

  2. World Food Day Curriculum, Grades K-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zander, Janet

    Hunger and malnutrition lead to the deaths of 13-18 million people a year; 75 percent of these victims are children. World Food Day was created to focus attention on the world's food and farm problems and to encourage the world's people to become directly involved in the solution of these problems. It is sponsored jointly by the United Nations…

  3. Incorporating Ninth-Grade PSAT/NMSQT® Scores into AP Potential™ Predictions for AP® European History and AP World History. Statistical Report 2014-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiuyuan; Patel, Priyank; Ewing, Maureen

    2015-01-01

    Historically, AP Potential™ correlations and expectancy tables have been based on 10th-and 11th-grade PSAT/NMSQT® examinees and 11th-and 12th-grade AP® examinees for all subjects (Zhang, Patel, & Ewing,2014; Ewing, Camara, & Millsap, 2006; Camara & Millsap, 1998). However, a large number of students take AP European History and AP…

  4. World Development Report 1984.

    Science.gov (United States)

    World Bank, Washington, DC.

    This report, seventh in a series of annual publications, examines the relationship between population change and development, showing why continuing rapid population growth in developing countries is likely to mean a lower quality of life for millions of people. The first part of the report concludes that the economies of developing countries can…

  5. World nuclear performance report 2017

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cobb, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    World Nuclear Association recently published the 2017 edition of the World Nuclear Performance Report. The report presents key metrics that illustrate current performance, both of reactors currently operating and those under construction. The article highlights some of the most important findings of the report. The pace of new build will need to accelerate if nuclear energy is going to make a growing contribution to the global electricity generation mix, a requirement of many projections of future scenarios that aim to meet the objective of limiting the rise average temperatures to below two degrees Celsius, while at the same time meeting the growing worldwide demand for electricity.

  6. World nuclear performance report 2017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cobb, Jonathan [World Nuclear Association, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-08-15

    World Nuclear Association recently published the 2017 edition of the World Nuclear Performance Report. The report presents key metrics that illustrate current performance, both of reactors currently operating and those under construction. The article highlights some of the most important findings of the report. The pace of new build will need to accelerate if nuclear energy is going to make a growing contribution to the global electricity generation mix, a requirement of many projections of future scenarios that aim to meet the objective of limiting the rise average temperatures to below two degrees Celsius, while at the same time meeting the growing worldwide demand for electricity.

  7. World Small Hydropower Development Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Heng; Esser, Lara [ICSGP (China); Masera, Diego [UNIDO, Vienna (Austria)

    2013-07-01

    Currently, small hydropower plants with a capacity of 10 MW, exist in 148 countries or territories worldwide. Four other countries have been identified with resource potential. This report aims to identify the development status and resource potential of small hydro in various countries, territories and regions throughout the world. Working with experts at the ground level to compile and share existing information, experiences and challenges, one comprehensive report was created. Decision-makers, stakeholders and potential investors clearly need this comprehensive information to more effectively promote small hydropower as a renewable and rural energy source for sustainable development and to overcome the existing development barriers. The findings of this report show that small hydropower potential globally is approximated at almost 173 GW. The figure is arrived by totaling data from a wide range of sources with potential compromise of data integrity to varying degrees. For example, research data on economically feasible potential were more readily available in developed countries than those in the least developed or developing countries. More than half of the world's known hydropower potential is located in Asia, around one third can be found in Europe and the Americas. It is possible in the future that more small hydropower potential might be identified both on the African and American continents. The installed small hydropower capacity (up to 10 MW) is estimated to be 75 GW in 2011/2012. The report provides detailed data for each country/region, including recommendations on the national, regional and international level.

  8. World Small Hydropower Development Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Heng; Esser, Lara (ICSGP (China)); Masera, Diego (UNIDO, Vienna (Austria))

    2013-07-01

    Currently, small hydropower plants with a capacity of 10 MW, exist in 148 countries or territories worldwide. Four other countries have been identified with resource potential. This report aims to identify the development status and resource potential of small hydro in various countries, territories and regions throughout the world. Working with experts at the ground level to compile and share existing information, experiences and challenges, one comprehensive report was created. Decision-makers, stakeholders and potential investors clearly need this comprehensive information to more effectively promote small hydropower as a renewable and rural energy source for sustainable development and to overcome the existing development barriers. The findings of this report show that small hydropower potential globally is approximated at almost 173 GW. The figure is arrived by totaling data from a wide range of sources with potential compromise of data integrity to varying degrees. For example, research data on economically feasible potential were more readily available in developed countries than those in the least developed or developing countries. More than half of the world's known hydropower potential is located in Asia, around one third can be found in Europe and the Americas. It is possible in the future that more small hydropower potential might be identified both on the African and American continents. The installed small hydropower capacity (up to 10 MW) is estimated to be 75 GW in 2011/2012. The report provides detailed data for each country/region, including recommendations on the national, regional and international level.

  9. Parents' job insecurity affects children's grade performance through the indirect effects of beliefs in an unjust world and negative mood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barling, J; Mendelson, M B

    1999-10-01

    The authors postulated a model in which children's perceptions of their parents' job insecurity indirectly affect their grade performance through the effects of beliefs in an unjust world and negative mood. A total of 127 undergraduate students (55 male, 72 female) completed questionnaires on their perceptions of their parents' job insecurity and their own beliefs in an unjust world and negative mood. The parents reported on their own job insecurity. In addition, students provided their course grades from the previous semester 3 months after completing the questionnaires. Support for the proposed model was provided using LISREL 8.

  10. NAEP 12th Grade World History Assessment: Issues and Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Robert B.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a snapshot of world history education to illuminate the challenges that the National Assessment Governing Board faces in creating a National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) world history framework. Using state standards documents, statutes concerning high school graduation, results from the NAEP transcript studies,…

  11. Cultures of the Western World. Grade Ten. Instructional Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West Chester School District, PA.

    This curriculum guide presents nine units for the study of western cultures in the tenth grade. The units contain up to 13 lessons each and comprise a two-semester course. Content includes ancient Greece and Rome, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance and Reformation, Great Britain, France as a case study of revolution, Russia, and nationalism and the…

  12. Long-Term Experience With World Health Organization Grade III (Malignant) Meningiomas at a Single Institution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, Lewis A.; Prayson, Richard A.; Lee, Joung; Reddy, Chandana; Chao, Samuel T.; Barnett, Gene H.; Vogelbaum, Michael A.; Suh, John H.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes for patients with Grade III meningiomas as defined by the 2007 World Health Organization standards. Methods and Materials: The slides from patients who had been treated at the Cleveland Clinic for malignant meningiomas were reviewed by a single neuropathologist. The data from 13 patients treated between 1984 and 2006 satisfied the World Health Organization 2007 definition of Grade III meningioma. A total of 24 surgeries were performed, including 13 primary, 7 salvage, and 4 second salvage. Also, 14 courses of radiotherapy (RT) were administered, including fractionated RT in 3 patients after primary surgery, fractionated RT in 4 patients after salvage surgery, salvage stereotactic radiosurgery to six separate areas in 3 patients, and salvage intensity-modulated RT in 1 patient. Results: From the primary surgery, the median survival was 3.4 years, the 5-year survival rate was 47.2%, and the 8-year survival rate was 12.2%. The median time to recurrence was 9.6 months. A trend was seen toward longer survival for patients who had received adjuvant RT after initial surgery compared with those treated with surgery alone. Two patients developed radiation necrosis, and three had surgical complications. Conclusion: This is one of the few studies reporting the outcomes for malignant meningioma patients according to recent definitions. Our results are consistent with existing reports of the overall poor outcomes for atypical and malignant meningioma patients. From the available data, surgical resection followed by RT and salvage therapy can lead to extended survival.

  13. You and Man in the Western World. A Cultural Approach. Eighth Grade Social Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsippany - Troy Hills Board of Education, Parsippany, NJ.

    GRADES OR AGES: Grade 8. SUBJECT MATTER: Social Studies--You and Man in the Western World. ORGANIZATION AND PHYSICAL APPEARANCE: The guide contains five units: 1) cultural orientation; 2) social studies dimensions in Western Europe; 3) social studies dimensions in Eastern Europe and Soviet Union; 4) social studies dimensions in Latin America; and…

  14. Predictors of outcome in World Federation of Neurologic Surgeons grade V aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, René; Foumani, Mahrouz; Schröder, Rosalie D.; Peerdeman, Saskia M.; Horn, Janneke; Bipat, Shandra; Vandertop, W. Peter

    2011-01-01

    Only a small percentage of World Federation of Neurologic Surgeons grade V aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage patients have a favorable outcome. The influence of clinical parameters on outcome was assessed. Retrospective evaluation of consecutive patients admitted from 2000-2007 with grade V

  15. Panama: World Oil Report 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that Texaco signed a contract to explore 1.1 million acres in Blocks 1 and 2, on and offshore the northwestern coast. The firm has not revealed any plans beyond conducting a preliminary analysis. No drilling was reported last year. Switzerland-based Idria Oil and Gas, which drilled and abandoned three offshore wells with oil and gas shows in 1989, the it has no plans for 1991. However, the firm the it may drill three wells in 1992

  16. World Food Day: Curriculum, Grades 8-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiman, David

    Over one billion of the world's people are chronically hungry. For them, life is a hunger cycle characterized by vulnerability to disease, stunted physical and mental development, reduced energy and motivation, and low work productivity. This curriculum guide is designed to channel student awareness and concern into effective action. The…

  17. 1999 Nuclear power world report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wesselmann, C.

    2000-01-01

    Last year, 1999, nuclear power plants were available for energy supply and under construction, respectively, in 33 countries. A total of 436 nuclear power plants with an aggregate net power of 350.228 MWe and an aggregate gross power of 366.988 MWe were in operation in 31 countries. Four units with an aggregate of 2.900 MWe, i.e. Civaux 2 in France, Kaiga 2 and Rajasthan 3 in India, and Wolsung-4 in the Republic of Korea, went critical for the first time or started commercial operation after having been synchronized with the power grid. After 26 years of operation, the BN 350 sodium cooled fast breeder was permanently decommissioned in Kazakhstan. The plant not only generated electricity (its capacity was 135 MWe) but also supplied process heat to a seawater desalination plant. In 1999, however, it did not contribute to the supply of electricity. In Sweden, unit 1 of the Barsebaeck nuclear power station (600 Mwe net) was decommissioned because of political decisions. This step entails financial compensation payments and substitute electricity generating capacity made available to the power plant operators. Net electricity generation in 1999 amounts to approx. 2.395 Twh, which marks a 100 TWh increase over the preceding year. Since the first generation of electricity from nuclear power in 1951, the cumulated world generation amounts to nearly 37.200 TWh of electricity, and experience in the operation of nuclear power plants has increased to 9414 years. Last year, 38 plants were under construction. This slight increase is due to the start of construction of a total of seven projects: Two each in Japan, the Republic of Korea and Taiwan, and one in China. Shares of nuclear power differ widely among the operator countries. They reach 75 per cent in France, 73 per cent in Lithuania, and 58 per cent in Belgium. With a share of approx. 20 per cent and more than 720 TWh, the US is the largest producer worldwide of electricity from nuclear power. As far as the aggregate

  18. World Development Report 2008: Agriculture for development

    OpenAIRE

    The World Bank

    2007-01-01

    The world's demand for food is expected to double within the next 50 years, while the natural resources that sustain agriculture will become increasingly scarce, degraded, and vulnerable to the effects of climate change. In many poor countries, agriculture accounts for at least 40 percent of GDP and 80 percent of employment. At the same time, about 70 percent of the world's poor live in rural areas and most depend on agriculture for their livelihoods. World Development Report 2008 seeks t...

  19. Nuclear power world report 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2014-01-01

    At the end of 2013, 435 nuclear power plants were available for energy supply in 31 countries of the world. This means that the number decreased by 2 units compared to the previous year's number on 31 December 2012. The aggregate gross power of the plants amounted to approx. 398,861 MWe, the aggregate net power, to 378,070 MWe (gross: 392,793 MWe, net: 372,572 MWe, new data base as of 2013: nameplate capacities). Four units were commissioned in 2014; three units in China and one in India. Eight units were shut down permanently in 2013; 2 units in Japan, and four units in the USA. Two units in Canada were declared permanently shut-down after a long-term shutdown. 70 nuclear generating units - 2 more than at the end of 2012 - were under construction in late 2013 in 15 countries with an aggregate gross power of approx. 73,814 MWe and net power of approx. 69,279 MWe. Six new projects have been started in 2013 in four countries (Belarus, China, the Republic of Korea, and the United Arab Emirates). Worldwide, some 125 new nuclear power plants are in the concrete project design, planning, and licensing phases; in some of these cases license applications have been submitted or contracts have already been signed. Some 100 further projects are planned. Net electricity generation in nuclear power plants worldwide in 2013 achieved a level of approx. 2,364.15 billion (109) kWh (2012: approx. 2,350.80 billion kWh). Since the first generation of electricity in a nuclear power plant in the EBR-I fast breeder (USA) on December 20, 1951, cumulated net production has reached approx. 70,310 billion kWh, and operating experience has grown to some 15,400 reactor years. (orig.)

  20. Nuclear power world report 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2014-07-15

    At the end of 2013, 435 nuclear power plants were available for energy supply in 31 countries of the world. This means that the number decreased by 2 units compared to the previous year's number on 31 December 2012. The aggregate gross power of the plants amounted to approx. 398,861 MWe, the aggregate net power, to 378,070 MWe (gross: 392,793 MWe, net: 372,572 MWe, new data base as of 2013: nameplate capacities). Four units were commissioned in 2014; three units in China and one in India. Eight units were shut down permanently in 2013; 2 units in Japan, and four units in the USA. Two units in Canada were declared permanently shut-down after a long-term shutdown. 70 nuclear generating units - 2 more than at the end of 2012 - were under construction in late 2013 in 15 countries with an aggregate gross power of approx. 73,814 MWe and net power of approx. 69,279 MWe. Six new projects have been started in 2013 in four countries (Belarus, China, the Republic of Korea, and the United Arab Emirates). Worldwide, some 125 new nuclear power plants are in the concrete project design, planning, and licensing phases; in some of these cases license applications have been submitted or contracts have already been signed. Some 100 further projects are planned. Net electricity generation in nuclear power plants worldwide in 2013 achieved a level of approx. 2,364.15 billion (109) kWh (2012: approx. 2,350.80 billion kWh). Since the first generation of electricity in a nuclear power plant in the EBR-I fast breeder (USA) on December 20, 1951, cumulated net production has reached approx. 70,310 billion kWh, and operating experience has grown to some 15,400 reactor years. (orig.)

  1. 2009 nuclear power world report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2010-01-01

    At the end of 2009, 437 nuclear power plants were available for energy supply in 30 countries of the world. This is 1 plant less than at the end of 2008. The aggregate gross power of the plants amounted to approx. 391.5 GWe, the aggregate net power, to 371.3 GWe. This capacity numbers are a little bit less than one year before (gross: 392.6 GWe, net: 372.2 GWe). Two units were commissioned in 2009; 1 unit in India (Rajasthan 5) and 1 unit in Japan (Tomari 3). Three nuclear power plant were shut down permanently in 2009 in Japan (Hamaoka 1 and Hamaoka 2) and in Lithuania (Ignalina 2). 52 nuclear generating units, i.e. 9 plants more than at the end of 2008, were under construction in late 2009 in 14 countries with an aggregate gross power of approx. 51.2 GWe. Worldwide, some 80 new nuclear power plants are in the concrete project design, planning, and licensing phases; in some of these cases license applications have been submitted or contracts have already been signed. Some 130 further projects are planned. Net electricity generation in nuclear power plants worldwide in 2009 achieved another reasonable ranking level of approx. 2,558 billion kWh (2008: approx. 2,628 billion kWh). Since the first generation of electricity in a nuclear power plant in the EBR-I fast breeder (USA) on December 20, 1951, cumulated net production has reached approx. 60,500 billion kWh, and operating experience has grown to some 13,950 reactor years. (orig.)

  2. 2006 nuclear power world report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2007-01-01

    At the turn of 2006/2007, 437 nuclear power plants were available for energy supply, or were being commissioned, in 31 countries of the world. This is seven plants less than at the turn of 2005/2006. The aggregate gross power of the plants amounted to approx. 389.5 GWe, the aggregate net power, to 370.5 GWe. This indicates a slight decrease of gross power by some 0.15 GWe compared to the level the year before, while the available net power increased, also slightly, by approx. 0.2 GWe. The Tarapur 3 nuclear generating unit in India, a D 2 O PWR of 540 MWe gross power, was newly commissioned. In 2006, 8 nuclear power plants in Europe (4 in the United Kingdom, 2 in Bulgaria, 1 each in the Slovak Republic and in Spain) discontinued power operation for good. 29 nuclear generating units, i.e. 6 plants more than at the end of 2005, were under construction in late 2006 in 9 countries with an aggregate gross power of approx. 25.5 GWe. Worldwide, some 40 new nuclear power plants are in the concrete project design, planning, and licensing phases; in some of these cases, contracts have already been signed. Net electricity generation in nuclear power plants worldwide in 2006 achieved another top ranking level of approx. 2,660 billion kWh (2005: approx. 2,750 billion kWh). Since the first generation of electricity in a nuclear power plant in the EBR-1 fast breeder (USA) on December 20, 1951, cumulated gross production has reached approx. 56,875 billion kWh, and operating experience has grown to some 12,399 reactor years. (orig.)

  3. 2010 nuclear power world report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2011-01-01

    At the end of 2010, 443 nuclear power plants were available for energy supply in 30 countries of the world. This are 6 plants more than at the end of 2009. The aggregate gross power of the plants amounted to approx. 396,118 MWe, the aggregate net power, to 375,947 MWe. This capacity numbers are a little bit more than one year before (gross: 391,551 MWe, net: 371,331 MWe). Six unites were commissioned in 2010; 2 units in China and India each and one unit in the Republic of Korea and Russia each. One unit, the Fast Breeder Pilot Reactor Monju in Japan, was connected to the grid after a long-term shutdown. One nuclear power plant, the Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor Phenix in France, was shut down permanently in 2010. 62 nuclear generating units, i.e. 9 plants more than at the end of 2009, were under construction in late 2010 in 15 countries with an aggregate gross power of approx. 63,998 MWe. Worldwide, some 90 new nuclear power plants are in the concrete project design, planning, and licensing phases; in some of these cases license applications have been submitted or contracts have already been signed. Some 120 further projects are planned. Net electricity generation in nuclear power plants worldwide in 2010 achieved another reasonable ranking level of approx. 2,627.5 billion kWh (2009: approx. 2,558 billion kWh). Since the first generation of electricity in a nuclear power plant in the EBR-I fast breeder (USA) on December 20, 1951, cumulated net production has reached approx. 63,100 billion kWh, and operating experience has grown to some 14,400 reactor years. (orig.)

  4. Carbonatites of the World, Explored Deposits of Nb and REE - Database and Grade and Tonnage Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Vladimir I.; Singer, Donald A.; Orris, Greta J.

    2009-01-01

    This report is based on published tonnage and grade data on 58 Nb- and rare-earth-element (REE)-bearing carbonatite deposits that are mostly well explored and are partially mined or contain resources of these elements. The deposits represent only a part of the known 527 carbonatites around the world, but they are characterized by reliable quantitative data on ore tonnages and grades of niobium and REE. Grade and tonnage models are an important component of mineral resource assessments. Carbonatites present one of the main natural sources of niobium and rare-earth elements, the economic importance of which grows consistently. A purpose of this report is to update earlier publications. New information about known deposits, as well as data on new deposits published during the last decade, are incorporated in the present paper. The compiled database (appendix 1; linked to right) contains 60 explored Nb- and REE-bearing carbonatite deposits - resources of 55 of these deposits are taken from publications. In the present updated grade-tonnage model we have added 24 deposits comparing with the previous model of Singer (1998). Resources of most deposits are residuum ores in the upper part of carbonatite bodies. Mineral-deposit models are important in exploration planning and quantitative resource assessments for two reasons: (1) grades and tonnages among deposit types vary significantly, and (2) deposits of different types are present in distinct geologic settings that can be identified from geologic maps. Mineral-deposit models combine the diverse geoscience information on geology, mineral occurrences, geophysics, and geochemistry used in resource assessments and mineral exploration. Globally based deposit models allow recognition of important features and demonstrate how common different features are. Well-designed deposit models allow geologists to deduce possible mineral-deposit types in a given geologic environment, and the grade and tonnage models allow economists to

  5. Volcanogenic Massive Sulfide Deposits of the World - Database and Grade and Tonnage Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosier, Dan L.; Berger, Vladimir I.; Singer, Donald A.

    2009-01-01

    Grade and tonnage models are useful in quantitative mineral-resource assessments. The models and database presented in this report are an update of earlier publications about volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) deposits. These VMS deposits include what were formerly classified as kuroko, Cyprus, and Besshi deposits. The update was necessary because of new information about some deposits, changes in information in some deposits, such as grades, tonnages, or ages, revised locations of some deposits, and reclassification of subtypes. In this report we have added new VMS deposits and removed a few incorrectly classified deposits. This global compilation of VMS deposits contains 1,090 deposits; however, it was not our intent to include every known deposit in the world. The data was recently used for mineral-deposit density models (Mosier and others, 2007; Singer, 2008). In this paper, 867 deposits were used to construct revised grade and tonnage models. Our new models are based on a reclassification of deposits based on host lithologies: Felsic, Bimodal-Mafic, and Mafic volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits. Mineral-deposit models are important in exploration planning and quantitative resource assessments for two reasons: (1) grades and tonnages among deposit types vary significantly, and (2) deposits of different types occur in distinct geologic settings that can be identified from geologic maps. Mineral-deposit models combine the diverse geoscience information on geology, mineral occurrences, geophysics, and geochemistry used in resource assessments and mineral exploration. Globally based deposit models allow recognition of important features and demonstrate how common different features are. Well-designed deposit models allow geologists to deduce possible mineral-deposit types in a given geologic environment and economists to determine the possible economic viability of these resources. Thus, mineral-deposit models play a central role in presenting geoscience

  6. Seychelles: World Oil Report 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on the small island group that was host to the first Indian Ocean Regional Seminar on Petroleum Exploration in mid-December. Efforts are under way to set up a regional system for cooperation in petroleum between countries in the region that hope to become oil producers. Offshore permits are held by Enterprise Oil and recently by Texaco. Ultamar Exploration Ltd. signed an eight-year offshore exploration contract becoming only the fourth company to attempt exploration off the archipelago

  7. Tunisia: World Oil Report 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on more attractive E and P terms, and the Abiod Chalk oil play which means busier exploration in Tunisia. E and P agreement terms and conditions have been liberalized in the face of declining oil and gas production, thus encouraging development of smaller, previously marginal prospects. Ownership and acreage changes may have significant impact in the next few years as Texaco, under a farm-in, has acquired 60% and operatorship of Conquest Exploration's El Jem onshore block and Samedan acquired large acreage interests from Royal Dutch Shell

  8. Bahrain: World Oil Report 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on Harken Energy Corp., which holds a production sharing contract on most of Bahrain's offshore area with Bahrain National Oil co. (Banoco), which plans to spud its first Permian Khuff wildcat this October on Fasht Al Jarim reef off the northwestern tip of the island Sheikdom. The location, in very shallow water, will be on an artificial island which will support a land rig. Bass Enterprise Production Co. of Ft. Worth, Texas, has farmed into the Harken project. Bass will finance seismic work and the three wells Harken is committed to drill under its contract

  9. Algeria: World Oil Report 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that Algeria is positioned to achieve important, new natural gas markets. Over half of its hydrocarbon income is from exports of gas and derived products, liquified petroleum gas (LPG) and condensates, which are not subject to Opec quotas. Officials are moving away from inflexible past policies and are becoming vastly more realistic now that foreign investment laws have been liberalized and there is a need to attract foreign investors. Sonatrach must address three key issues to consolidate recent progress. Sales to existing customers in Europe, like Italy, must be expanded; new customers and markets need to found: and U.S. liquified natural gas (LNG) markets must be revived

  10. Peru: World Oil Report 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on strong measures that are being taken to resuscitate Peru's hydrocarbon sector. The first step last August was the cutting of fuel subsidies in half. Then the administration issued tax vouchers to state utilities for the money they still owed national oil company Petroperu. A precursor to what are expected to be widespread changes to the existing petroleum legislation occurred last fall. As part of a package of fiscal reforms, the official base rate that the government paid Occidental Petroleum to produce crude for Petroperu was dropped. A new, free market rate was adopted, which was six times the old base rate

  11. Honduras: World Oil Report 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that after a lull last year, the Director General of Mines and Hydrocarbons the drilling is expected to resume this year with two onshore tests. Presumably, one of these will be a wildcat by Venezuela's Cambria Resources in the jungle area of the Mosquitia province along the Caribbean coast. Cambria Resources took over the Brus Laguna concession in this area from Bonavista Oil and Mining Corp. and finished a 348-mi seismic survey in 1989. Venezuela's PDVSA subsidiary, Maraven, also signed a deal in April to explore offshore this same area

  12. Iran: World Oil Report 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that at the end of its war with Iraq, Iran embarked on an urgent program to restore its productive capacity. This effort has been hindered by lack of hard currency and, hence, technology, parts, equipment, etc. Iran has been trying to improve relations with the U.S, over the past two years. Recently, the embargo on importing Iranian crude into the U.S. was lifted. Over the past year and a half, Iran accumulated enough money to resume imports of U.S. and other foreign drilling equipment. However, drilling has remained at a low level. Also, efforts to boost output have been slowed by war damage both on and offshore---particularly the latter---and serious BHP declines in major onshore fields that can only be corrected by ultra- high cost gas injection projects. Currently, large injection projects are only operating in three major fields: Gachsaran, Ahwaz and Marun

  13. Ecuador: World Oil Report 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that there has been considerable turbulence in Ecuador's E and P sector over the last year. For instance, Energy Minister Diego Tramariz was replaced by the country's Congress after he raised subsidized fuel prices. Ecuadoran and U.S. environmentalists, meanwhile, raised a firestorm of controversy over the on-again, off- again development of Conoco's Block 16 in Yasuni National Park. Finally, Unocal and PetroCanada this spring terminated their respective drilling operations after fruitless multiwell efforts. New Energy Minister Donald Castillo certainly has his work cut out in attempting to maintain stability in upstream activity. To that end, Castillo has stated that one of his top priorities will be to maintain a good working relationship with foreign operators. He also expected a seventh round of exploratory blocks to be offered before summer's end to shore up activity. Castillo reiterated in public statements that he stands by the administration's existing energy policies, including development of Block 16

  14. Guatemala: World Oil Report 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that government officials have been working on changes to the hydrocarbon law to make it easier for operators to explore. In a reform effort, Minister of Energy and Mines Carlos Hutarte brought a new staff dedicated to spurring oil development into office with him. This includes the Directorate of Hydrocarbons, which held a three-day seminar in Dallas, Texas, to acquaint U.S. firms with new policies. Only one company, Basic Resources International, has been operating in Guatemala over the last year. The firm drilled three onshore wells in 1990 for 16,499 ft, including one oil producer. Two further onshore wells are slated this year. Oil production from 14 active wells out of 16 capable averaged 3,943 bpd, up 8.4% from 1989. Reserves are 191 MMbbl

  15. Oman: World Oil Report 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that for the sixth consecutive year, Oman should retain its title as the biggest driller in the Middle East in 1991. An accelerated program in 1990 pushed production to an all-time record 700,000 bpd late in the year. Although not a member of Opec, Oman has cooperated with the group in restraining output as needed to support oil prices. Petroleum Development Oman (PDO), a partnership of the government (60%), Royal Dutch Shell (34%), Total (4%) and Partex (2%), remains by far the biggest producer. This year, PDO will begin work on its $500-million effort to boost production from its Lekhwair field from a current 24,000 bpd to 110,000 bpd by 1994. Last year, PDO also drilled 15 horizontal wells, most of which were successful in increasing per well production compared to conventional vertical holes. The horizontal program has been continued this year with two rings

  16. Angola: World Oil Report 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that prospects of Angola, free of political complications, are certain to bring a flurry of interest from oil firms and could mean an influx of foreign capital. Licensing will be under production-sharing terms, but incentives may be offered due to increased risks inherent in deeper water. Long term security and stability remain uncertain. In addition to Unita and previously communist MPLA, new factions from 16 years of civil war are gaining support and increasing possibilities for violence. Oil firms consider production-sharing terms high and current price cap clauses keep them from realizing benefits from price increases after contracts are signed. However, geology and exploration successes have overshadowed concerns

  17. Malaysia: World Oil Report 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khin, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that the Malaysian government announced tax incentives for fiscal year 1991/92 by cutting export duties on crude oil to encourage companies to develop more oil fields. The export duty exemption on cost recovery oil was increased from the current 20% to 50% on April 1, 1991. Nearly 115,200 sq mi of shallow-water acreage off Malaysia has been awarded to PS contractors, leaving only about five blocks remaining. Therefore, Petronas plans to award deeper water blocks (water depths of 655 ft or more) in the second half of this year, once terms are finalized. It is understood that these areas will be offshore of Sarawak and Sabah, covering in excess of 38,000 sq mi. Petronas the that there would be some improvement in the PSC terms for the deep-water areas

  18. Mexico: World Oil Report 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maciej, H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that state oil company Pemex appears to be in the middle of a mini-renaissance. Senior management proudly points to several areas of improvement, including a major reduction in the power of petroleum labor unions; a structural reorganization of the company into profit and cost centers; a significant trimming of foreign and domestic debt; and the growing readmittance of foreign investment and technology. Effects of these policy successes already are quantifiable and impressive. Restricting the unions' power has allowed Pemex to break the old habit of employing too many people and paying them too much. Indeed, the workforce has shrunk 30% to just below 150,000. Under the guidance of Finance Director Ernesto Marcos, Pemex has whittled its foreign debt to $5.6 billion from a 1982 high of $20 billion. Furthermore, the extra income provided by higher oil prices during the Persian Gulf war allowed Pemex in December to completely pay off its domestic debt, which has been nearly 2.5 trillion pesos (about $850 million) in the first quarter of 1990

  19. Brazil: World Oil Report 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that Brazil's state oil company Petrobras has racked up a significant period of achievement over the last 12 months. Average daily oil production hit a new high. A small portion of deepwater giant Marlim field came onstream. Risk contracts ended, and the firm assumed all responsibility for exploration activity in Brazil. Furthermore, Santos basin proved to be the nation's most recent oil province after two discoveries. Last, but not least, Petrobras assumed a dominant position worldwide in development of new deepwater technology, as evidenced by papers presented at the 1991 Offshore Technology Conference. What is remarkable is that all this was achieved while the company was experiencing political turmoil. Last Oct. 19, Petrobras President Luis Octavio Motta Veiga resigned in a dispute with the Ministry of Economy (MOE) over refined product pricing levels. His replacement, interestingly enough, was the 36-year-old executive secretary of the MOE, Eduardo de Freitas Teixeira. His term at Petrobras lasted less than six months

  20. Venezuela: World Oil Report 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on Venezuela's expansion by state oil company PDVSA has gone from a mere concept a year ago to a well-defined plan. The five-year project that began this year and runs through 1995 received a $4-billion upgrading last fall to $25 billion. Money will be spent in increments of $5 billion/year, and all sectors are involved. Largest share, about $10.5 billion, will go to upstream projects, with $6 billion to be invested in refining, $6 billion in petrochemicals, $1.5 billion in coal and $800 million in domestic marketing. PDVSA intends to finance most of the spending directly from its cash flow. The upstream spending will go toward boosting oil production to more than 3.6 MMbpd by the beginning of 1996, with capacity topping at 4.2 MMbopd. Such heavy spending should prove a boon to the Venezuelan economy. The oil industry constitutes 23% of Venezuela's GNP, accounts for 75% of governmental revenues and produces 70% of the nation's annual foreign exchange earnings. The Ministry of Planning already is forecasting a 7% leap in real growth of the GNP this year

  1. USSR: World Oil Report 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovring, M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that due to its lack of technology, the Soviet Union will have to double the number of wells it drills in the next five years in order to maintain today's oil output. It has been estimated that more than 11,000 new wells will have to be drilled in 1992 because of the declines in reserves and productivity per well. The only problem with this is that the USSR does not have the required funds at present. The Soviet Government has agreed to a 25-billion-rouble ($46 billion) cash injection for the oil industry to halt declining production. The USSR will need to find major new deposits to develop. There is oil in the exceptionally difficult geological conditions in Soviet central Asia and northern Siberia. However, the oil is located in hundreds of small fields. The only solution is to let international oil companies take part in development of production of these fields in order to raise the standard of technology employed

  2. The World Nuclear Industry Status Report: 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flavin, Christopher; Lenssen, Nicholas; Froggatt, Antony; Willis, John; Kondakji, Assad; Schneider, Mycle

    1992-05-01

    The World Nuclear Industry Status Report provides a comprehensive overview of nuclear power plant data, including information on operation, production and construction. The WNISR assesses the status of new-build programs in current nuclear countries as well as in potential newcomer countries. This first WNISR Report was issued in 1992 in a joint publication with WISE-Paris, Greenpeace International and the World Watch Institute, Washington

  3. Correlation of DNA content and nucleomorphometric features with World Health Organization grading of meningiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunewald, J P; Röhl, F W; Kirches, E; Dietzmann, K

    1998-02-01

    Many studies dealing with extracranial cancer showed a strong correlation of DNA ploidy to a poor clinical outcome, recurrence, or malignancy. In brain tumors, analysis of DNA content did not always provided significant diagnostic information. In this study, DNA density and karyometric parameters of 50 meningiomas (26 Grade I, 10 Grade II, 14 Grade III) were quantitatively evaluated by digital cell image analyses of Feulgen-stained nuclei. In particular, the densitometric parameter SEXT, which describes nuclear DNA content, as well as the morphometric values LENG (a computer-assisted measurement of nuclear circumference), AREA (a computer-assisted measurement of nuclear area), FCON (a parameter that describes nuclear roundness), and CONC (a describing nuclear contour), evaluated with the software IMAGE C, were correlated to World Health Organization (WHO) grading using univariate and multivariate methods. AREA and LENG values showed significant differences between tumors of Grades I and III. FCON values were unable to distinguish WHO Grade III from Grade I/II but were useful in clearly separating Grade II from Grade I tumors. CONC values detected differences between WHO Grades II and I/III tumors but not between the latter. SEXT values clearly distinguished Grade III from Grade I/II tumors. The 1c, 2c, 2.5c, and 5c exceeding rates showed no predictive values. Only the 6c exceeding rate showed a significant difference between Grades I and III. These results outline the characteristic features of the atypical (Grade II) meningiomas, which make them a recognizable tumor entity distinct from benign and anaplastic meningiomas. The combination of DNA densitometric and morphometric findings seems to be a powerful addition to the histopathologic classification of meningiomas, as suggested by the WHO.

  4. Matriculation Research Report: Incomplete Grades; Data & Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerda, Joe

    The policy on incomplete grades at California's College of the Canyons states that incompletes may only be given under circumstances beyond students' control and that students must make arrangements with faculty prior to the end of the semester to clear the incomplete. Failure to complete an incomplete may result in an "F" grade. While…

  5. The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Mycle; Froggatt, Antony; Hazemann, Julie

    2012-07-01

    Twenty years after its first edition, World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2012 portrays an industry suffering from the cumulative impacts of the world economic crisis, the Fukushima disaster, ferocious competitors and its own planning and management difficulties. The report provides a global overview of the history, the current status and trends of nuclear power programs in the world. It looks at units in operation and under construction. Annex 1 also provides detailed country-by-country information. A specific chapter assesses the situation in potential newcomer countries. For the first time, the report looks at the credit-rating performance of some of the major nuclear companies and utilities. A more detailed chapter on the development patterns of renewable energies versus nuclear power is also included. The performance of the nuclear industry over the 18 months since the beginning of 2011 is summed up in this report

  6. The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Mycle; Froggatt, Antony; Hosokawa, Komei; Thomas, Steve; Yamaguchi, Yukio; Hazemann, Julie; Bradford, Peter A.

    2013-07-01

    Two years after the Fukushima disaster started unfolding on 11 March 2011, its impact on the global nuclear industry has become increasingly visible. Global electricity generation from nuclear plants dropped by a historic 7 percent in 2012, adding to the record drop of 4 percent in 2011. This World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2013 (WNISR) provides a global overview of the history, the current status and the trends of nuclear power programs worldwide. It looks at nuclear reactor units in operation and under construction. Annex 1 provides 40 pages of detailed country-by-country information. A specific chapter assesses the situation in potential newcomer countries. For the second time, the report looks at the credit-rating performance of some of the major nuclear companies and utilities. A more detailed chapter on the development patterns of renewable energies versus nuclear power is also included. Annex 6 provides an overview table with key data on the world nuclear industry by country. The 2013 edition of the World Nuclear Industry Status Report also includes an update on nuclear economics as well as an overview of the status, on-site and off-site, of the challenges triggered by the Fukushima disaster. However, this report's emphasis on recent post-Fukushima developments should not obscure an important fact: as previous editions (see www.WorldNuclearReport.org) detail, the world nuclear industry already faced daunting challenges long before Fukushima, just as the U.S. nuclear power industry had largely collapsed before the 1979 Three Mile Island accident. The nuclear promoters' invention that a global nuclear renaissance was flourishing until 3/11 is equally false: Fukushima only added to already grave problems, starting with poor economics. The performance of the nuclear industry over the year from July 2012 to July 2013 is summed up in this report

  7. The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Mycle; Froggatt, Antony

    2004-12-01

    Fifty years ago, in September 1954, the head of the US Atomic Energy Commission stated that nuclear energy would become 'too cheap to meter': The cost to produce energy by nuclear power plants would be so low that the investment into electricity meters would not be justified. By coincidence the US prophecy came within three months of the announcement of the world's first nuclear power plant being connected to the grid in.. the then Soviet Union. In June 2004, the international nuclear industry celebrated the anniversary of the grid connection at the site of the world's first power reactor in Obninsk, Russia, under the original slogan '50 Years of Nuclear Power - The Next 50 Years'. This report aims to provide a solid basis for analysis into the prospects for the nuclear power industry. Twelve years ago, the Worldwatch Institute in Washington, WISE-Paris and Greenpeace International published the World Nuclear Industry Status Report 1992. In the current international atmosphere of revival of the nuclear revival debate - it has been a periodically recurring phenomenon for the past twenty years - two of the authors of the 1992 report, now independent consultants, have carried out an updated review of the status of the world nuclear industry. The performance of the nuclear industry over the past year is summed up in this report

  8. World Education Annual Report: 1973-1974.

    Science.gov (United States)

    World Education, Inc., New York, NY.

    Opening with a message from president Thomas B. Keehn, the publication presents the reports of four regional representatives for Asia, Africa, Latin America, and North America focusing on the following organizational goals: (1) developing and expanding the World Education program of integrating family life planning with functional literacy…

  9. 2015 Strategic Petroleum Reserve Bayou Choctaw Well Integrity Grading Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Barry L; Lord, David; Lord, Anna C. Snider; Bettin, Giorgia; Park, Byoung; Rudeen, D.K.; Eldredge, L.L.; Wynn, K.; Checkai, D.; Osborne, G.; Moore, D.

    2015-10-01

    This report summarizes the work performed in the prioritization of cavern access wells for remediation and monitoring at the Bayou Choctaw Strategic Petroleum Reserve site. The grading included consideration of all 15 wells at the Bayou Choctaw site, with each active well receiving a separate grade for remediation and monitoring. Numerous factors affecting well integrity were incorporated into the grading including casing survey results, cavern pressure history, results from geomechanical simulations, and site geologic factors. The factors and grading framework used here are the same as those used in developing similar well remediation and monitoring priorities at the Big Hill, Bryan Mound, and West Hackberry Strategic Petroleum Reserve Sites.

  10. 2015 Strategic Petroleum Reserve West Hackberry Well Integrity Grading Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Barry L; Lord, David; Lord, Anna C. Snider; Bettin, Giorgia; Sobolik, Steven R.; Rudeen, David Keith; Eldredge, Lisa L. (FFPO); Wynn, Karen (FFPO); Checkai, Dean (FFPO); Osborne, Gerad (FFPO); Moore, Darryl (FFPO)

    2015-04-01

    This report summarizes the work performed in the prioritization of cavern access wells for remediation and monitoring at the West Hackberry Strategic Petroleum Reserve site. The grading included consideration of all 31 wells at the West Hackberry site, with each well receiving a separate grade for remediation and monitoring. Numerous factors affecting well integrity were incorporated into the grading including casing survey results, cavern pressure history, results from geomechanical simulations, and site geologic factors. The factors and grading framework used here are the same as those used in developing similar well remediation and monitoring priorities at the Big Hill and Bryan Mound Strategic Petroleum Reserve Sites.

  11. 2014 Strategic Petroleum Reserve Bryan Mound Well Integrity Grading Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Barry L; Lord, David; Lord, Anna C. Snider; Bettin, Giorgia; Sobolik, Steven R.; Rudeen, David Keith; Eldredge, Lisa L. (FFPO); Wynn, Karen (FFPO); Checkai, Dean (FFPO); Osborne, Gerad (FFPO); Moore, Darryl (FFPO)

    2015-04-01

    This report summarizes the work performed in the prioritization of cavern access wells for remediation and monitoring at the Bryan Mound Strategic Petroleum Reserve site. The grading included consideration of all 47 wells at the Bryan Mound site, with each well receiving a separate grade for remediation and monitoring. Numerous factors affecting well integrity were incorporated into the grading including casing survey results, cavern pressure history, results from geomechanical simulations, and site geologic factors. The factors and grading framework used here are the same as those used in developing similar well remediation and monitoring priorities at the Big Hill Strategic Petroleum Reserve Site.

  12. Clear cell renal cell carcinoma: validation of World Health Organization/International Society of Urological Pathology grading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagher, Julien; Delahunt, Brett; Rioux-Leclercq, Nathalie; Egevad, Lars; Srigley, John R; Coughlin, Geoffrey; Dunglinson, Nigel; Gianduzzo, Troy; Kua, Boon; Malone, Greg; Martin, Ben; Preston, John; Pokorny, Morgan; Wood, Simon; Yaxley, John; Samaratunga, Hemamali

    2017-12-01

    In 2012, the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) introduced a novel grading system for clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) and papillary renal cell carcinoma. This system is incorporated into the latest World Health Organization renal tumour classification, being designated WHO/ISUP grading. This study was undertaken to compare WHO/ISUP and Fuhrman grading and to validate WHO/ISUP grading as a prognostic parameter in a series of clear cell RCC. Analysis of 681 cases of ccRCC showed that 144 tumours could not be assigned a Fuhrman grade on the basis of ambiguous grading features. The application of WHO/ISUP grading resulted in a general down-grading of cases when compared with Fuhrman grading. In a sub-group of 374 cases, for which outcome data were available, 9.3% were WHO/ISUP grade 1, 50.3% were grade 2, 24.1% grade 3 and 16.3% grade 4, while the distribution of Fuhrman grades was 0.4% grade 1, 48.7% grade 2, 29.4% grade 3 and 21.5% grade 4. There were no recurrence/metastases amongst patients with WHO/ISUP grade 1 tumours and there was a significant difference in outcome for WHO/ISUP grades 2, 3 and 4. For Fuhrman grading the cancer-free survival was not significantly different for grade 2 and grade 3 tumours. On multivariate analysis WHO/ISUP grade and pT staging category were found to retain prognostic significance. The study demonstrates that FG cannot be applied in >20% of cases of ccRCC and the WHO/ISUP provides superior prognostic information. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Sediment-Hosted Zinc-Lead Deposits of the World - Database and Grade and Tonnage Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Donald A.; Berger, Vladimir I.; Moring, Barry C.

    2009-01-01

    This report provides information on sediment-hosted zinc-lead mineral deposits based on the geologic settings that are observed on regional geologic maps. The foundation of mineral-deposit models is information about known deposits. The purpose of this publication is to make this kind of information available in digital form for sediment-hosted zinc-lead deposits. Mineral-deposit models are important in exploration planning and quantitative resource assessments: Grades and tonnages among deposit types are significantly different, and many types occur in different geologic settings that can be identified from geologic maps. Mineral-deposit models are the keystone in combining the diverse geoscience information on geology, mineral occurrences, geophysics, and geochemistry used in resource assessments and mineral exploration. Too few thoroughly explored mineral deposits are available in most local areas for reliable identification of the important geoscience variables, or for robust estimation of undiscovered deposits - thus, we need mineral-deposit models. Globally based deposit models allow recognition of important features because the global models demonstrate how common different features are. Well-designed and -constructed deposit models allow geologists to know from observed geologic environments the possible mineral-deposit types that might exist, and allow economists to determine the possible economic viability of these resources in the region. Thus, mineral-deposit models play the central role in transforming geoscience information to a form useful to policy makers. This publication contains a computer file of information on sediment-hosted zinc-lead deposits from around the world. It also presents new grade and tonnage models for nine types of these deposits and a file allowing locations of all deposits to be plotted in Google Earth. The data are presented in FileMaker Pro, Excel and text files to make the information available to as many as possible. The

  14. The World Report on Disability and People with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Officer, Alana; Shakespeare, Tom

    2013-01-01

    The "World Report on Disability" was requested by the World Health Assembly, the governing body of the World Health Organization (WHO). Because disability is broader than health, WHO partnered with the World Bank. The "World Report" was published in 2011 and provides a comprehensive scientific analysis on the global situation…

  15. Legitimising Corporate Sustainability Reporting Throughout the World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faisal

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores corporate sustainability disclosure practices in a global context. A unique sample of 2009 sustainability reports from some of the world’s largest companies in 24 diverse countries are examined using a comprehensive disclosure index. These reports are analysed to better understand how company characteristics and institutional factors explain sustainability communication using a legitimacy theory framework. The world renowned Global ReportingInitiative 2006 guidelines are used as the benchmark disclosure index checklist. The empirical results indicate that the average level of sustainability disclosure is a surprisingly high 61.9 percent.Statistical analysis indicates that high profile industries and additional assurance procedures influence the disclosure of more sustainability information. Interestingly, companies operating inemerging country systems disclose more sustainability information than Anglo-Saxon or Communitarian jurisdictions. Consistent with legitimacy theory, these results suggest that these globally well known firms use sustainability disclosure as a legitimising tool.

  16. The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Mycle; Froggatt, Antony; Hazemann, Julie; Katsuta, Tadahiro; Ramana, M.V.; Thomas, Steve; Porritt, Jonathon

    2015-07-01

    The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2015 provides a comprehensive overview of nuclear power plant data, including information on operation, production and construction. The WNISR assesses the status of new-build programs in current nuclear countries as well as in potential newcomer countries. Japan without nuclear power for a full calendar year for the first time since the first commercial nuclear power plant started up in the country 50 years ago. Nuclear plant construction starts plunge from fifteen in 2010 to three in 2014. 62 reactors under construction - five fewer than a year ago - of which at least three-quarters delayed. In 10 of the 14 building countries all projects are delayed, often by years. Five units have been listed as 'under construction' for over 30 years. Share of nuclear power in global electricity mix stable at less than 11% for a third year in a row. AREVA, technically bankrupt, downgraded to 'junk' by Standard and Poor's, sees its share value plunge to a new historic low on 9 July 2015-a value loss of 90 percent since 2007 China, Germany, Japan-three of the world's four largest economies-plus Brazil, India, Mexico, the Netherlands, and Spain, now all generate more electricity from non-hydro renewables than from nuclear power. These eight countries represent more than three billion people or 45 percent of the world's population. In the UK, electricity output from renewable sources, including hydropower, overtook the output from nuclear. Compared to 1997, when the Kyoto Protocol on climate change was signed, in 2014 there was an additional 694 TWh per year of wind power and 185 TWh of solar photovoltaics- each exceeding nuclear's additional 147 TWh

  17. Correlation Between Ki-67 Index, World Health Organization Grade and Patient Survival in Glial Tumors With Astrocytic Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhenkov, Deyan L; Kitanova, Martina; Donev, Ivan S; Ghenev, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a class IV astrocytic tumor, the most malignant of the four groups of World Health Organization (WHO) tumors with astrocytic differentiation. Aim The aim of this study was to estab­lish whether a correlation exists between the Ki-67 index of tumors with astrocytic differentiation, WHO grade, and patient survival. Materials and methods A retrospective non-clinical approach to patient selection was chosen for the aim of the study. A total of 47 patients diagnosed and treated for CNS tumors with astrocytic differentiation in the St. Marina University Hospital, Varna, Bulgaria, from September 2012 to July 2016 were retrospectively included into the study cohort. The cases were tested for their immunohistochemistry (IHC) reaction with Ki-67 after their original Hematoxylin and Eosin and IHC slides were reviewed by a single author and blind coded. The Ki-67 positivity index of the nuclei was estimated after digitalization of the slides and calculated by the ImmunoRatio automated count­ing tool. The individual Ki-67 index and patient survival of each case were statistically compared. Results The histopathological groups, after the blind Ki-67 index automated calculation was carried out, revealed no WHO grade I, two WHO grade II samples, four WHO grade III samples and 41 WHO grade IV cases, and these were included in the analysis. The two samples of WHO grade II astrocytic tumors had a mean Ki-67 index of 25%; however, they comprised tumors with an individual index of 43% and 7%, both individual values with a highly unlikely index for this group. The four samples of WHO grade III had a mean Ki-67 index of 4%, standard deviation ±2.16 (p>0.05), with the lowest index being 1% and the highest one being 6%. Both WHO grade II and III did not include enough samples to allow for a proper statistical analysis of patient survival. The 41 GBM cases had a mean Ki-67 index of 17.34%, standard deviation ±10.79 (p>0

  18. The world nuclear industry status report 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, M.; Froggatt, A

    2007-11-15

    The status and perspectives of the nuclear industry in the world have been subject to a large number of publications and considerable media attention over the last few years. The present report attempts to provide solid elements of key information for intelligent analysis and informed decision-making. As of 1 November 2007 there are 439 nuclear reactors operating in the world. That is five less than five years ago. There are 32 units listed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) as 'under construction'. That is about 20 less than in the late 1990's. In 1989 a total of 177 nuclear reactors had been operated in what are now the 27 EU Member States. That number shrank to 146 units as of 1 November 2007. In 1992 the Worldwatch Institute in Washington, WISE-Paris and Greenpeace International published the first World Nuclear Industry Status Report. As a first updated review in 2004 showed the 1992 analyses proved correct. In reality, the combined installed nuclear capacity of the 436 units operating in the world in the year 2000 was less than 352,000 megawatts - to be compared with the forecast of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) from the 1970's of up to 4,450,000 megawatts. Today the 439 worldwide operating reactors total 371,000 megawatts. Nuclear power plants provide 16% of the electricity, 6% of the commercial primary energy and 2-3% of the final energy in the world - the tendency is downwards - less than hydropower alone. Twenty-one of the 31 countries operating nuclear power plants decreased their share of nuclear power within the electricity mix if compared with 2003. The average age of the operating power plants is 23 years. Some nuclear utilities envisage reactor lifetimes of 40 years or more. Considering the fact that the average age of all 117 units that have already been closed is equally about 22 years, the doubling of the operational lifetime seems already rather optimistic. However, we have assumed an average

  19. The world nuclear industry status report 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, M.; Froggatt, A.

    2007-11-01

    The status and perspectives of the nuclear industry in the world have been subject to a large number of publications and considerable media attention over the last few years. The present report attempts to provide solid elements of key information for intelligent analysis and informed decision-making. As of 1 November 2007 there are 439 nuclear reactors operating in the world. That is five less than five years ago. There are 32 units listed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) as 'under construction'. That is about 20 less than in the late 1990's. In 1989 a total of 177 nuclear reactors had been operated in what are now the 27 EU Member States. That number shrank to 146 units as of 1 November 2007. In 1992 the Worldwatch Institute in Washington, WISE-Paris and Greenpeace International published the first World Nuclear Industry Status Report. As a first updated review in 2004 showed the 1992 analyses proved correct. In reality, the combined installed nuclear capacity of the 436 units operating in the world in the year 2000 was less than 352,000 megawatts - to be compared with the forecast of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) from the 1970's of up to 4,450,000 megawatts. Today the 439 worldwide operating reactors total 371,000 megawatts. Nuclear power plants provide 16% of the electricity, 6% of the commercial primary energy and 2-3% of the final energy in the world - the tendency is downwards - less than hydropower alone. Twenty-one of the 31 countries operating nuclear power plants decreased their share of nuclear power within the electricity mix if compared with 2003. The average age of the operating power plants is 23 years. Some nuclear utilities envisage reactor lifetimes of 40 years or more. Considering the fact that the average age of all 117 units that have already been closed is equally about 22 years, the doubling of the operational lifetime seems already rather optimistic. However, we have assumed an average lifetime of 40 years

  20. Multidimensional profiles of health status: an application of the grade of membership model to the world health survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Andreotti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The World Health Organization (WHO conducted the World Health Survey (WHS between 2002 and 2004 in 70 countries to provide cross-population comparable data on health, health-related outcomes and risk factors. The aim of this study was to apply Grade of Membership (GoM modelling as a means to condense extensive health information from the WHS into a set of easily understandable health profiles and to assign the degree to which an individual belongs to each profile. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This paper described the application of the GoM models to summarize population health status using World Health Survey data. Grade of Membership analysis is a flexible, non-parametric, multivariate method, used to calculate health profiles from WHS self-reported health state and health conditions. The WHS dataset was divided into four country economic categories based on the World Bank economic groupings (high, upper-middle, lower-middle and low income economies for separate GoM analysis. Three main health profiles were produced for each of the four areas: I. Robust; II. Intermediate; III. Frail; moreover population health, wealth and inequalities are defined for countries in each economic area as a means to put the health results into perspective. CONCLUSIONS: These analyses have provided a robust method to better understand health profiles and the components which can help to identify healthy and non-healthy individuals. The obtained profiles have described concrete levels of health and have clearly delineated characteristics of healthy and non-healthy respondents. The GoM results provided both a useable way of summarising complex individual health information and a selection of intermediate determinants which can be targeted for interventions to improve health. As populations' age, and with limited budgets for additional costs for health care and social services, applying the GoM methods may assist with identifying higher risk profiles for decision

  1. The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2017

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Mycle; Froggatt, Antony; Hazemann, Julie; Katsuta, Tadahiro; Ramana, M.V.; Rodriguez, Juan C.; Ruedinger, Andreas; Stienne, Agnes

    2017-09-01

    The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2017 (WNISR2017) provides a comprehensive overview of nuclear power plant data, including information on operation, production and construction. The WNISR assesses the status of new-build programs in current nuclear countries as well as in potential newcomer countries. The WNISR2017 edition includes a new assessment from an equity analyst view of the financial crisis of the nuclear sector and some of its biggest industrial players. The Fukushima Status Report provides not only an update on onsite and offsite issues six years after the beginning of the catastrophe, but also the latest official and new independent cost evaluations of the disaster. Focus chapters provide in-depth analysis of France, Japan, South Korea, the United Kingdom and the United States. The Nuclear Power vs. Renewable Energy chapter provides global comparative data on investment, capacity, and generation from nuclear, wind and solar energy. Finally, Annex 1 presents a country-by-country overview of all other countries operating nuclear power plants

  2. The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Mycle; Froggatt, Antony; Ayukawa, Yurika; Burnie, Shaun; Piria, Raffaele; Thomas, Steve; Hazemann, Julie; Suzuki, Tatsujiro

    2014-07-01

    The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2014 provides a comprehensive overview of nuclear power plant data, including information on operation, production and construction. The WNISR assesses the status of new-build programs in current nuclear countries as well as in potential newcomer countries. A 20-page chapter on nuclear economics looks at the rapidly changing market conditions for nuclear power plants, whether operating, under construction, or in the planning stage. Reactor vendor strategies and the 'Hinkley Point C Deal' are analyzed in particular. The performance on financial markets of major utilities is documented. The WNISR2013 featured for the first time a Fukushima Status Report that triggered widespread media and analyst attention. The 2014 edition entirely updates that Fukushima chapter. The Nuclear Power vs. Renewable Energy chapter that provides comparative data on investment, capacity, and generation has been greatly extended by a section on system issues. How does nuclear power perform in systems with high renewable energy share? Is this the end of traditional baseload/ peak-load concepts? Finally, the 45-page Annex 1 provides a country-by-country overview of all 31 countries operating nuclear power plants, with extended Focus sections on China, Japan, and the United States

  3. 2006 Toronto smog report card : final grade C-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    This annual report card evaluated the progress made by the City of Toronto toward reducing the environmental and health impacts of smog. The final grade for 2006 was a C-, the same as for 2005. The highest grade of B+ was issued in 2004. The report card evaluated City Council actions based on their clean air commitments. Although the summer of 2006 was one of the best on record, with only 11 smog days, the grade of C- was issued because the performance of the City's Air Quality Improvement record was poor. Toronto Environmental Alliance strongly recommended that important changes be made to improve air quality, transit and waste disposal. It recommended that the City should address the real causes of unclean air, which are motor vehicle exhaust and toxic pollution. This report card graded the performance on initiatives in the following six major areas: energy; transit; air quality plan; walking and biking; fleets and fuels; and, intergovernmental action. The report recommended that efforts should be made to reduce greenhouse gas emissions which cause global warming. refs., tabs., figs.

  4. The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Mycle; Froggatt, Antony; Hazemann, Julie; Katsuta, Tadahiro; Ramana, M.V.; Fairlie, Ian; Maltini, Fulcieri; Thomas, Steve; Kaaberger, Tomas

    2016-07-01

    The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2015 provides a comprehensive overview of nuclear power plant data, including information on operation, production and construction. The WNISR assesses the status of new-build programs in current nuclear countries as well as in potential newcomer countries. Nuclear power generation in the world increased by 1.3%, entirely due to a 31% increase in China. Ten reactors started up in 2015-more than in any other year since 1990-of which eight were in China. Construction on all of them started prior to the Fukushima disaster. Eight construction starts in the world in 2015-to which China contributed six-down from 15 in 2010 of which 10 were in China. No construction starts in the world in the first half of 2016. The number of units under construction is declining for the third year in a row, from 67 reactors at the end of 2013 to 58 by mid-2016, of which 21 are in China. China spent over US$100 billion on renewables in 2015, while investment decisions for six nuclear reactors amounted to US$18 billion. Eight early closure decisions taken in Japan, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan and the U.S. Nuclear phase-out announcements in the U.S. (California) and Taiwan. In nine of the 14 building countries all projects are delayed, mostly by several years. Six projects have been listed for over a decade, of which three for over 30 years. China is no exception here, at least 10 of 21 units under construction are delayed. With the exception of United Arab Emirates and Belarus, all potential newcomer countries delayed construction decisions. Chile suspended and Indonesia abandoned nuclear plans. AREVA has accumulated US$11 billion in losses over the past five years. French government decides euro 5.6 billion bailout and breaks up the company. Share value 95 percent below 2007 peak value. State utility EDF struggles with US$ 41.5 billion debt, downgraded by S and P. Chinese utility CGN, EDF partner for Hinkley Point C, loses 60% of its share value

  5. 2013 strategic petroleum reserve big hill well integrity grading report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lord, David L.; Roberts, Barry L.; Lord, Anna C. Snider; Bettin, Giorgia; Sobolik, Steven Ronald; Park, Byoung Yoon; Rudeen, David Keith; Eldredge, Lisa; Wynn, Karen; Checkai, Dean; Perry, James Thomas

    2014-02-01

    This report summarizes the work performed in developing a framework for the prioritization of cavern access wells for remediation and monitoring at the Big Hill Strategic Petroleum Reserve site. This framework was then applied to all 28 wells at the Big Hill site with each well receiving a grade for remediation and monitoring. Numerous factors affecting well integrity were incorporated into the grading framework including casing survey results, cavern pressure history, results from geomechanical simulations, and site geologic factors. The framework was developed in a way as to be applicable to all four of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites.

  6. World Employment, 1995. An ILO Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Labour Office, Geneva (Switzerland).

    The impact of globalization of the world economy on employment throughout the world was examined by determining the causes and effects of the reduction in economic growth that has occurred in most developed and developing countries since 1973. The following were among the factors considered: international inequality; new technologies; effects of…

  7. Sediment-hosted gold deposits of the world: database and grade and tonnage models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Vladimir I.; Mosier, Dan L.; Bliss, James D.; Moring, Barry C.

    2014-01-01

    All sediment-hosted gold deposits (as a single population) share one characteristic—they all have disseminated micron-sized invisible gold in sedimentary rocks. Sediment-hosted gold deposits are recognized in the Great Basin province of the western United States and in China along with a few recognized deposits in Indonesia, Iran, and Malaysia. Three new grade and tonnage models for sediment-hosted gold deposits are presented in this paper: (1) a general sediment-hosted gold type model, (2) a Carlin subtype model, and (3) a Chinese subtype model. These models are based on grade and tonnage data from a database compilation of 118 sediment-hosted gold deposits including a total of 123 global deposits. The new general grade and tonnage model for sediment-hosted gold deposits (n=118) has a median tonnage of 5.7 million metric tonnes (Mt) and a gold grade of 2.9 grams per tonne (g/t). This new grade and tonnage model is remarkable in that the estimated parameters of the resulting grade and tonnage distributions are comparable to the previous model of Mosier and others (1992). A notable change is in the reporting of silver in more than 10 percent of deposits; moreover, the previous model had not considered deposits in China. From this general grade and tonnage model, two significantly different subtypes of sediment-hosted gold deposits are differentiated: Carlin and Chinese. The Carlin subtype includes 88 deposits in the western United States, Indonesia, Iran, and Malaysia, with median tonnage and grade of 7.1 Mt and 2.0 g/t Au, respectively. The silver grade is 0.78 g/t Ag for the 10th percentile of deposits. The Chinese subtype represents 30 deposits in China, with a median tonnage of 3.9 Mt and medium grade of 4.6 g/t Au. Important differences are recognized in the mineralogy and alteration of the two sediment-hosted gold subtypes such as: increased sulfide minerals in the Chinese subtype and decalcification alteration dominant in the Carlin type. We therefore

  8. World Magnetic Model 2015 Technical Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The World Magnetic Model is the standard model used by the U.S. Department of Defense, the U.K. Ministry of Defence, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO)...

  9. The World Oral Health Report 2003

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Poul Erik

    2003-01-01

    of alcohol. In addition to socio-environmental determinants, oral disease is highly related to these lifestyle factors, which are risks to most chronic diseases as well as protective factors such as appropriate exposure to fluoride and good oral hygiene. Oral diseases qualify as major public health problems......Chronic diseases and injuries are the leading health problems in all but a few parts of the world. The rapidly changing disease patterns throughout the world are closely linked to changing lifestyles, which include diets rich in sugars, widespread use of tobacco, and increased consumption...... is a new strategy for managing prevention and control of oral diseases. The WHO Oral Health Programme has also strengthened its work for improved oral health globally through links with other technical programmes within the Department for Noncommunicable Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. The current...

  10. Evaluating the Impact of Road Grade on Simulated Commercial Vehicle Fuel Economy Using Real-World Drive Cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopp, Sean; Wood, Eric; Duran, Adam

    2015-10-13

    Commercial vehicle fuel economy is known to vary significantly with both positive and negative road grade. Medium- and heavy-duty vehicles operating at highway speeds require incrementally larger amounts of energy to pull heavy payloads up inclines as road grade increases. Non-hybrid vehicles are then unable to recapture energy on descent and lose energy through friction braking. While the on-road effects of road grade are well understood, the majority of standard commercial vehicle drive cycles feature no climb or descent requirements. Additionally, existing literature offers a limited number of sources that attempt to estimate the on-road energy implications of road grade in the medium- and heavy-duty space. This study uses real-world commercial vehicle drive cycles from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Fleet DNA database to simulate the effects of road grade on fuel economy across a range of vocations, operating conditions, and locations. Drive-cycles are matched with vocation-specific vehicle models and simulated with and without grade. Fuel use due to grade is presented, and variation in fuel consumption due to drive cycle and vehicle characteristics is explored through graphical and statistical comparison. The results of this study suggest that road grade accounts for 1%-9% of fuel use in commercial vehicles on average and up to 40% on select routes.

  11. Nuclear power: 2004 world report - evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2005-01-01

    Last year, 2004, 441 nuclear power plants were available for power supply in 31 countries of the world. Nuclear generating capacity attained its highest level so far at an aggregate gross power of 385,854 MWe and an aggregate net power of 366,682 MWe, respectively. Nine different reactor lines are operated in commercial nuclear power plants. Light water reactors (PWR and BWR) again are in the lead with 362 plants. At year's end, 22 nuclear power plants with an aggregate gross power of 18,553 MWe and an aggregate net power, respectively, of 17,591 MWe were under construction in nine countries. Of these, twelve are light water reactors, nine are CANDU-type reactors, and one is a fast breeder reactor. So far, 104 commercial reactors with powers in excess of 5 MWe have been decommissioned in eighteen countries, most of them low-power prototype plants. 228 nuclear power plants of those in operation, i.e. slightly more than half, were commissioned in the 1980es. Nuclear power plant availabilities in terms of capacity and time again reached record levels. Capacity availability was 84.30%, availability in terms of time, 85.60%. The four nuclear power plants in Finland continue to be world champions in this respect with a cumulated average capacity availability of 90.30%. (orig.)

  12. REPORT FOR COMMERCIAL GRADE NICKEL CHARACTERIZATION AND BENCHMARKING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2012-12-20

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, has completed the collection, sample analysis, and review of analytical results to benchmark the concentrations of gross alpha-emitting radionuclides, gross beta-emitting radionuclides, and technetium-99 in commercial grade nickel. This report presents methods, change management, observations, and statistical analysis of materials procured from sellers representing nine countries on four continents. The data suggest there is a low probability of detecting alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides in commercial nickel. Technetium-99 was not detected in any samples, thus suggesting it is not present in commercial nickel.

  13. 2004 world nuclear power report - evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2004-01-01

    Last year, 2003, 439 nuclear power plants were available for electricity generation in 31 countries of the world. With an aggregate gross capacity of 380,489 MWe and an aggregate net capacity of 361,476MWe, nuclear generating capacity reached its highest level so far. Nine different reactor lines are operated in the commercial nuclear power plants. Light water reactors (PWR and BWR) continue to be in the lead with 355 plants. Twenty-nine nuclear power plants with an aggregate gross capacity of 24,222 MWe and an aggregate net capacity of 23,066 MWe were under construction in eleven countries. Of these, twenty are light water reactors, and seven are CANDU-type reactors. Ninety-nine commercial reactors with a capacity in excess of 5 MWe have so far been decommissioned in eighteen countries, most of them prototype plants of low power. 228 plants, i. e. slightly more than half of the number of plants currently in operation, were commissioned in the 1980s. The oldest commercial nuclear power plant in the world, Calder Hall unit 1, was disconnected from the power grid for good in its 48th year of operation in 2003. For the first time in ten years, the availability in terms of time and capacity of nuclear power plants has decreased from 83,80% in 2002 to 80.50%, and from 84.60% to 81.50%, respectively, in 2003. The main causes are prolonged outages of high-capacity plants in Japan as a consequence of administrative restrictions. The four nuclear power plants in Finland continue to be at the top of the list worldwide with a cumulated average availability of capacity of 90.30%. (orig.)

  14. 2002 Nuclear Power World Report - Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2003-01-01

    Last year, in 2002, 441 nuclear power plants were available for power supply in 31 countries in the world. With an aggregate gross power of 377,359 MWe, and an aggregate net power of 359,429 MWe, respectively, the nuclear generating capacity reached its highest level so far. Nine different reactor lines are used in commercial facilities. Light water reactors (PWR and BWR) contribute 355 plants, which makes them the most common reactor line. In twelve countries, 32 nuclear power plants with an aggregate gross power of 26,842 MWe and an aggregate net power of 25,546 MWe, respectively, are under construction. Of these, 25 units are light water reactors while eight are CANDU-type plants. In eighteen countries, 94 commercial reactors with more than 5 MWe power have been decommissioned so far. Most of these plants are prototypes with low powers. 228 of the nuclear power plants currently in operation, i.e. slightly more than half of them, were commissioned in the eighties. The oldest commercial nuclear power plant, Calder Hall unit 1, supplied power into the public grid in its 47th year of operation in 2002. The availability in terms of time and capacity of nuclear power plants rose from 74.23% in 1991 to 83.40% in 2001. A continued rise to approx. 85% is expected for 2002. In the same way, the non-availability in terms of time (unscheduled) dropped from 6.90% to 3.48%. The four nuclear power plants in Finland are the world's leaders with a cumulated average capacity availability of 90.00%. (orig.) [de

  15. Workers in an Integrating World. World Development Report, 1995. Executive Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    World Bank, Washington, DC.

    This executive summary examines the rapid changes occurring in economic markets and employment around the world. The report concludes that problems of low incomes, poor working conditions, and insecurity affecting many of the world's workers can be tackled effectively in ways that reduce poverty and regional inequality. Sound domestic policy and a…

  16. Reporting Practice in the Real World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedler, Fred

    1978-01-01

    Reports the results of student-conducted field studies on attitudes toward returning lost money, policies on renting apartments to unmarried couples, college students' willingness to lend money to strangers, automobile mechanics' ability in diagnosing auto malfunctions, college students' willingness to reveal examination questions, and attitudes…

  17. 2005 Toronto smog report card : final grade C-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-10-01

    This annual Smog Report Card for Toronto evaluates the progress made by the City toward reducing the environmental and health impacts of smog. The final grade for the City in 2005 was a C-, a decrease over the B+ issued in 2004. The report card evaluates City Council actions based on their clean air commitments. In particular, the performance on initiatives in the following six major areas were graded: energy; transit; walking and biking; fleets and fuels; intergovernmental action; and new air quality strategies. Although Toronto had a record number of smog days due to high-temperatures and high pollution levels, it had a better record on smog and climate change than either the provincial or federal levels. Greenhouse gas emissions in Toronto are actually going down, but they are up 12 and 24 per cent at the federal and provincial levels respectively. In 2005, the City of Toronto developed a new Air Quality Management Strategy to replace the Smog Plan. Future evaluations will depend on whether the strategy is effective. The report recommends that efforts should be made to reduce greenhouse gas emissions which cause global warming, as well measures to reduce the urban heat island effect by planting trees, improving energy efficiency and using lighter-coloured materials for roads, parking lots and roofs. The report card criticized that there has been no green power purchased for the City and that the transit ridership growth strategy is behind schedule. It also noted that the City is not pedestrian or bike friendly. refs., tabs., figs.

  18. World bank and the environment. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The second annual report describes specific environmental strategies and environmental lending in the Bank's four operational regions: Africa; Asia; Europe, Middle East, and North Africa; and Latin America and the Caribbean. It details the Bank's progress in eight environmental categories: energy and the environment, pollution, urban environment, water resources management, forest and land management, social and cultural, environmental economics, and the global environment. One chapter is devoted exclusively to tropical forests, studying ways in which the Bank is dealing with deforestation as a part of the constant review of its forest policies. Suggestions are made for decreasing the degradation of tropical forests while meeting demands for forest products. This chapter reflects a shift in Bank emphasis from commercial ventures to conservation measures. The publication reports on other initiatives by the Bank during fiscal 1991, including the launching of the Global Environment Facility (GEF)--a pilot program to oversee reduction of global warming, preservation of biological diversity, protection of international waters, and prevention of ozone depletion

  19. Trinidad and Tobago: World Oil Report 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that Trinidad and Tobago has decided to increase its oil export revenue by pumping as much crude as possible. This island nation consequently has embarked on a $403-million expansion project that covers everything from initiating secondary recovery at a number of fields to upgrading the Point a Pierre refinery. Trinidad and Tobago Oil Co. (Trintoc) is operating the project and has received a $260-million loan from the Inter-American Development Bank. Another $75 million is coming from the Export-Import Bank of Japan and the European Investment Bank. Trintoc based the work on $22 oil, a level still not achieved for any duration, but the firm shows every sign of finishing the project as planned. Completion of work should impact the nation significantly. Crude oil and products account for 60% of all exports and 24% of governmental revenue. However, oil production has tumbled about 65,000 bpd from a 1978 peak of 215,000 bpd

  20. Toronto smog report card 2003 : final grade C -

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-10-01

    An annual Smog Report Card for Toronto has been published annually by the Toronto Environmental Alliance since 1997, evaluating the progress made by the City toward reducing the environmental and health impacts of smog. The final grade for the City in 2003 was a C -, an improvement over last year's D +. The evaluation examined the performance on 33 initiatives in six major areas: leadership, transit, electricity, fleets and fuels, bikes and pedestrians, and public education. Issues that stood out were: a $30 million increase in funding to the Toronto Transit Commission (TTC), and the release of the TTC's Ridership Growth Strategy depicting how transit ridership can be increased through improved service and lower fares. The drive-through and pesticide by-laws were passed by Council, which should result in smog reduction from unnecessary activities. Leadership was found to be lacking at City Hall in the area of clean air, in view of its decision to proceed with the expansion of Island Airport. The decision to move forward on only 20 per cent of planned green power and energy efficiency measures was a low point in 2002. The City's budget process, which effectively screened out most environmental initiatives was in part responsible for the lack of progress. The following grades were awarded: transit and trip reduction (B), energy efficiency and green power received (D), fleets and fuels (C), bikes and pedestrians (C), public education (B). Recommendations for next year included: implementation of the TTC's Ridership Growth Strategy; creation of a Smog Plan Implementation Fund of $20 million per year to invest in energy efficiency, green fleets, green power and other related measures; and stop the expansion of Island Airport

  1. World Development Report : Role of Agriculture in Poverty Reduction

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... inform research debate and development practice in the sector under study. The 2008 Report will address agriculture and rural development. Since the last World Development Report on agriculture was published in 1982, ... Economic Dimensions of Urban Agriculture in the Context of Urban Poverty Reduction Strategies.

  2. The world bank and the environment, exercise 1992. Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The report describes the Bank's activities in assisting countries with environmental management, such as programs to reduce poverty without exhausting natural resources. Included are assessments of the environmental impacts of projects supported by World Bank loans, and accounts of efforts to meet global environmental challenges with coordinated international action through the Global Environment Facility (GEF). Among the events in the period covered by the report are the affirmation of the World Bank's participation with United Nations organizations in the GEF and the Bank's administration of pilot programs aimed at finding solutions to such global environmental problems as pollution of international waters, global warming, depletion of the Earth's ozone layer, and dwindling biological diversity; the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development; and the publication of the World Development Report 1992, with its theme of development and the environment

  3. What Have You Got To Lose? New World Tropical Rainforests. Grades 3-8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphey, Carol E.

    In this unit, designed for use with grades three through eight, students explore the biology and peoples of Latin American rainforests and the problems caused by the interactions of people with this environment. The featured activities integrate art, science, language, and social studies. Fourteen lessons, arranged in sequential order, comprise…

  4. Latin America: A Cultural Region of the World; An Instructional Unit for Grades 8, 9, 10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Clark C.; Conroy, William B.

    This teaching package or unit is part of a sequence of materials developed by the Latin American Curriculum Project. Concepts, key ideas and facts introduced in earlier grades on socio-cultural patterns are reinforced by this multidisciplinary approach. The major topic emphasis is the history of the periods since the beginning of the Independence…

  5. Commercial-grade motors in safety-related applications: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzman, P.M.

    1988-04-01

    The objective of this project was to discuss the process necessary to utilize commercial grade equipment in safety related applications and to provide utilities with guidance for accepting commercial grade motors for safety-related applications. The generic commercial-grade concepts presented in this report can be successfully applied to motors. Commercial grade item utilization has the greatest applicability to motors in ''mild'' environments, because these motors are essentially similar to commercial grade motors in materials, construction methods, and capabilities. The acceptance process is less applicable to motors that are subject to ''harsh'' environments during postulated accidents, because of the unique design features and testing required to qualify these motors

  6. Overcoming World Hunger: The Challenge Ahead. Report of the Presidential Commission on World Hunger. An Abridged Version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Commission on World Hunger, Washington, DC.

    This U.S. presidential commission report outlines specific recommendations for eliminating world hunger in the 1980's. Following a summarization of world hunger problems, the report addresses specific ways to deal with world hunger. Short-term goals include taking immediate action to ensure that poor people are not hungry, assuring that infants…

  7. Estimation of intermediate grade uranium resources. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambie, F.W.; Kendall, G.R.; Klahn, L.J.; Davis, J.C.; Harbaugh, J.W.

    1980-12-01

    The purpose of this project is to analyze the technique currently used by DOE to estimate intermediate grade uranium (0.01 to 0.05% U 3 O 8 ) and, if possible, suggest alternatives to improve the accuracy and precision of the estimate. There are three principal conclusions resulting from this study. They relate to the quantity, distribution and sampling of intermediate grade uranium. While the results of this study must be validated further, they indicate that DOE may be underestimating intermediate level reserves by 20 to 30%. Plots of grade of U 3 O 8 versus tonnage of ore and tonnage U 3 O 8 indicate grade-tonnage relationships that are essentially log-linear, at least down to 0.01% U 3 O 8 . Though this is not an unexpected finding, it may provide a technique for reducing the uncertainty of intermediate grade endowment. The results of this study indicate that a much lower drill hole density is necessary for DOE to estimate uranium resources than for a mining company to calculate ore resources. Though errors in local estimates will occur, they will tend to cancel over the entire deposit

  8. Climate Change, Risks and Natural Resources didactic issues of educational content geography of Bulgaria and the world in 9th and 10th grade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dermendzhieva, Stela; Nejdet, Semra

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to follow "Climate change, risks and Natural Resources" in the curriculum of Geography of Bulgaria and the world in 9th and 10th grade and to interpret some didactic aspects. Analysis of key themes, concepts and categories related to the environment, events and approaches to environmental protection and the environmentally sound development of sectors of the economy is didikticheski targeted. Considering the emergence and development of geo-ecological issues, their scope and their importance to the environment, systematize some species and some approaches to solving them. Geography education in grade 9 and 10 involves acquiring knowledge, developing skills and composing behaviors of objective perception and assessment of the reality of globed, regional and local aspect. The emerging consumer and individualistic culture snowballing globalization, are increasingly occurring global warming, declining biodiversity form new realities which education must respond appropriately. The objective, consistency, accessibility and relevance in real terms are meaningful, logical accents. Whether and how reproduced in the study of Geography of Bulgaria and the world is the subject of research study in this report. Geoecological structuring of topics, concepts and categories can be done in different signs. In terms of their scope are local, national or regional, and global. Matter and interdisciplinary approach, which is to reveal the unity of the "man-society-nature" to clarify the complexity of their character with a view to forming a harmonious personality with high Geoecological consciousness and culture, and the activities carried out in their study.

  9. Making Real-World Issues Our Business: Critical Literacy in a Third-Grade Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan, Lee; Lewison, Mitzi

    2000-01-01

    Reflects on the events that occurred during a six-month period in a suburban classroom. Documents the transformation that took place in learning and teaching as students took part in a critical literacy curriculum. Examines the significant curricular changes that occur when the "real world" is allowed to enter classroom discussions and…

  10. [Competency-based training and work world: from grading to employability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, John H M

    2012-06-01

    Considered as an element of business discourse, the competence-based education emerges associated with processes of productive restructuring influencing the economy since 1970. These processes arise as a consequence of the crisis of the accumulation model based on mass production and consumption following the principles of taylorism and fordism. In the last decades, the State has been unable to solve the periodic crisis that afflicts late capitalism. Because of this, the State moves away from its economic mission, promotes marketing mechanisms and, in the meantime, it tries to manage the motivational crisis of the population. This challenge forces the State to take interest in the vital world of individuals trying to solve the legitimacy crisis through educational reforms that affect the world of work. The relationship between the vertiginous changes of working world and a new educational formation is explicit. This educational formation must consider (at the same time) the management capacity, learning capacity, teamwork capacity and self-training. Based on this situation, there is a direct relationship between technologic advances, the structural crisis of capitalism and work organization. Besides, the "qualification" term is replaced with "competency-based education".

  11. World wide web implementation of the Langley technical report server

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Michael L.; Gottlich, Gretchen L.; Bianco, David J.

    1994-01-01

    On January 14, 1993, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) made approximately 130 formal, 'unclassified, unlimited' technical reports available via the anonymous FTP Langley Technical Report Server (LTRS). LaRC was the first organization to provide a significant number of aerospace technical reports for open electronic dissemination. LTRS has been successful in its first 18 months of operation, with over 11,000 reports distributed and has helped lay the foundation for electronic document distribution for NASA. The availability of World Wide Web (WWW) technology has revolutionized the Internet-based information community. This paper describes the transition of LTRS from a centralized FTP site to a distributed data model using the WWW, and suggests how the general model for LTRS can be applied to other similar systems.

  12. World Energy Outlook Special Report 2012: Iraq Energy Outlook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    Iraq is already the world’s third largest oil exporter. It has the resources and intention to increase its oil production vastly. Contracts are already in place. Will Iraq’s ambitions be realised? And what would the implications be for Iraq’s economy and for world oil markets? The obstacles are formidable: political, logistical, legal, regulatory, financial, lack of security and sufficient skilled labour. One example: in 2011 grid electricity could meet only 55% of demand. The International Energy Agency has studied these issues with the support and close cooperation of the government of Iraq and many other leading officials, commentators, industry representatives and international experts. This special report, in the World Energy Outlook series, presents the findings.

  13. Cutaneous drug reaction case reports: from the world literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Skin disorders are the most common adverse reactions attributed to drugs. Any skin disorder can be imitated, induced or aggravated by drugs. To help you keep up-to-date with the very latest skin reactions occurring with both new and established drugs, this section of the journal brings you information selected from the adverse drug reaction alerting service Reactions Weekly. Reactions Weekly is the complete drug safety alerting service and summarizes information selected from over 1600 biomedical journals. This newsletter is produced by Adis International and is available in a variety of formats. Please contact your nearest Adis office for subscription details. The use of tradenames, identified by ['~'] or the use of a registered ((R)) or trade mark ( trade mark ), is for product identification purposes only and does not imply endorsement. The following case reports are selected from the very latest to be published in the world dermatology literature. Any claim of a first report has been verified by a search of AdisBase (a proprietary database of Adis International) and Medline. In addition, the World Health Organization (WHO) Adverse Drug Reactions database is also searched. This database, maintained by the Uppsala Monitoring Centre in Sweden, is the largest and most comprehensive adverse drug reaction source in the world, with information obtained from National Centers of 65 affiliate countries. Each case report is assessed for seriousness using the FDA MedWatch definition of serious (patient outcome is: death; life-threatening; hospitalization; disability; congenital anomaly; or requires intervention to prevent permanent impairment or damage).

  14. The World Bank Annual Report 2008 : Year in Review

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2008-01-01

    The World Bank Group's work focuses on achievement of the eight Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). The goals call for eliminating poverty and achieving inclusive and sustainable globalization. The MDGs lay out a blueprint for the World Bank Group, setting its priorities and measuring its results. The World Bank is the world's largest funder of education; the world's largest external fund...

  15. International political socialization of sixth grade elementary children: What and how do Japanese and Thai children know about the world?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Jo Ann Cutler; Zandan, Peter A.

    1981-09-01

    This study investigates cognitive and affective components of Japanese and Thai children's attitudes toward international political socialization. The survey results report how children feel about people from other nations, international political institutions, and their country's involvement with the world community. An important concern of the study is the assessment of how much accurate knowledge Japanese and Thai elementary school children have about other nations. This study includes information on children's feelings about, and knowledge of such problems as warfare between nations, world government, stereotypic thinking about people not belonging to one's own culture and awareness of cross-cultural diffusion between Japan, Thailand and other nations.

  16. World wide web-based cytological analysis of atypical squamous cells cannot exclude high-grade intraepithelial lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washiya, Kiyotada; Takamizu, Ryuichi; Kumagai, Yukie; Himeji, Yukari; Kobayashi, Takako; Iwai, Muneo; Watanabe, Jun

    2012-01-01

    It has been reported that the low level of consistency of diagnosis of atypical squamous cells cannot exclude high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (ASC-H) in uterine cervical cancer screening using the Bethesda System, indicating the necessity of a large-scale survey. We presented cases cytologically judged as ASC-H on our website and invited our members to give their opinions regarding the diagnosis by voting online. The Web voting results were analyzed and ASC-H was cytologically investigated. Virtual slides of atypical cells in cytology preparations of 53 cases were prepared and presented on a website. ASC-H cases were divided into 42 cases sampled by brush scraping and 11 cases sampled by cotton swab scraping. Fifty-three cases cytologically judged as ASC-H were classified into benign and CIN2/3, and their patterns of arrangement of atypical cells and 8 cytological parameters were morphologically investigated. The frequency of ASC-H diagnosis in the Web votes was low: 29.2% for brush-scraped and 26.2% for cotton swab-scraped cases. Three-dimensionality, coarse chromatin and irregular nuclei were significantly different between high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions and benign cases. Web-based surveys showed the difference of cytological findings between high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions and benign cases. To increase interobserver consistency, it may be useful to share information online, which avoids geographical and temporal limitations. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Natural gas in the world - Cedigaz annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecarpentier, A.

    2010-01-01

    The recent developments in gas E and P in the US with the huge ExxonMobil acquisition (41 Billion US $) of XTO Energy Inc and TOTAL's investment in Chesapeake Energy show if needed that the gas is more and more important in the world energy panorama. The new edition of the CEDIGAZ Annual Report is an indispensable tool for better knowledge of the international gas market. This report offers a compilation of the main statistical data in terms of reserves, gross and marketed production, the volume of international gas trade by pipe and by LNG Tanker, consumption, prices of the main contracts, new LNG Infrastructures in production, underground gas storage and so on

  18. Prognostic Performance and Reproducibility of the 1973 and 2004/2016 World Health Organization Grading Classification Systems in Non-muscle-invasive Bladder Cancer: A European Association of Urology Non-muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer Guidelines Panel Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soukup, Viktor; Čapoun, Otakar; Cohen, Daniel; Hernández, Virginia; Babjuk, Marek; Burger, Max; Compérat, Eva; Gontero, Paolo; Lam, Thomas; MacLennan, Steven; Mostafid, A Hugh; Palou, Joan; van Rhijn, Bas W G; Rouprêt, Morgan; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Sylvester, Richard; Yuan, Yuhong; Zigeuner, Richard

    2017-11-01

    Tumour grade is an important prognostic indicator in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). Histopathological classifications are limited by interobserver variability (reproducibility), which may have prognostic implications. European Association of Urology NMIBC guidelines suggest concurrent use of both 1973 and 2004/2016 World Health Organization (WHO) classifications. To compare the prognostic performance and reproducibility of the 1973 and 2004/2016 WHO grading systems for NMIBC. A systematic literature search was undertaken incorporating Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Library. Studies were critically appraised for risk of bias (QUIPS). For prognosis, the primary outcome was progression to muscle-invasive or metastatic disease. Secondary outcomes were disease recurrence, and overall and cancer-specific survival. For reproducibility, the primary outcome was interobserver variability between pathologists. Secondary outcome was intraobserver variability (repeatability) by the same pathologist. Of 3593 articles identified, 20 were included in the prognostic review; three were eligible for the reproducibility review. Increasing tumour grade in both classifications was associated with higher disease progression and recurrence rates. Progression rates in grade 1 patients were similar to those in low-grade patients; progression rates in grade 3 patients were higher than those in high-grade patients. Survival data were limited. Reproducibility of the 2004/2016 system was marginally better than that of the 1973 system. Two studies on repeatability showed conflicting results. Most studies had a moderate to high risk of bias. Current grading classifications in NMIBC are suboptimal. The 1973 system identifies more aggressive tumours. Intra- and interobserver variability was slightly less in the 2004/2016 classification. We could not confirm that the 2004/2016 classification outperforms the 1973 classification in prediction of recurrence and progression. This article

  19. Facilitating Improvements in Laboratory Report Writing Skills with Less Grading: A Laboratory Report Peer-Review Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer R. Brigati

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Incorporating peer-review steps in the laboratory report writing process provides benefits to students, but it also can create additional work for laboratory instructors. The laboratory report writing process described here allows the instructor to grade only one lab report for every two to four students, while giving the students the benefits of peer review and prompt feedback on their laboratory reports. Here we present the application of this process to a sophomore level genetics course and a freshman level cellular biology course, including information regarding class time spent on student preparation activities, instructor preparation, prerequisite student knowledge, suggested learning outcomes, procedure, materials, student instructions, faculty instructions, assessment tools, and sample data. T-tests comparing individual and group grading of the introductory cell biology lab reports yielded average scores that were not significantly different from each other (p = 0.13, n = 23 for individual grading, n = 6 for group grading. T-tests also demonstrated that average laboratory report grades of students using the peer-review process were not significantly different from those of students working alone (p = 0.98, n = 9 for individual grading, n = 6 for pair grading. While the grading process described here does not lead to statistically significant gains (or reductions in student learning, it allows student learning to be maintained while decreasing instructor workload. This reduction in workload could allow the instructor time to pursue other high-impact practices that have been shown to increase student learning. Finally, we suggest possible modifications to the procedure for application in a variety of settings.

  20. Facilitating improvements in laboratory report writing skills with less grading: a laboratory report peer-review process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigati, Jennifer R; Swann, Jerilyn M

    2015-05-01

    Incorporating peer-review steps in the laboratory report writing process provides benefits to students, but it also can create additional work for laboratory instructors. The laboratory report writing process described here allows the instructor to grade only one lab report for every two to four students, while giving the students the benefits of peer review and prompt feedback on their laboratory reports. Here we present the application of this process to a sophomore level genetics course and a freshman level cellular biology course, including information regarding class time spent on student preparation activities, instructor preparation, prerequisite student knowledge, suggested learning outcomes, procedure, materials, student instructions, faculty instructions, assessment tools, and sample data. T-tests comparing individual and group grading of the introductory cell biology lab reports yielded average scores that were not significantly different from each other (p = 0.13, n = 23 for individual grading, n = 6 for group grading). T-tests also demonstrated that average laboratory report grades of students using the peer-review process were not significantly different from those of students working alone (p = 0.98, n = 9 for individual grading, n = 6 for pair grading). While the grading process described here does not lead to statistically significant gains (or reductions) in student learning, it allows student learning to be maintained while decreasing instructor workload. This reduction in workload could allow the instructor time to pursue other high-impact practices that have been shown to increase student learning. Finally, we suggest possible modifications to the procedure for application in a variety of settings.

  1. Facilitating Improvements in Laboratory Report Writing Skills with Less Grading: A Laboratory Report Peer-Review Process†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigati, Jennifer R.; Swann, Jerilyn M.

    2015-01-01

    Incorporating peer-review steps in the laboratory report writing process provides benefits to students, but it also can create additional work for laboratory instructors. The laboratory report writing process described here allows the instructor to grade only one lab report for every two to four students, while giving the students the benefits of peer review and prompt feedback on their laboratory reports. Here we present the application of this process to a sophomore level genetics course and a freshman level cellular biology course, including information regarding class time spent on student preparation activities, instructor preparation, prerequisite student knowledge, suggested learning outcomes, procedure, materials, student instructions, faculty instructions, assessment tools, and sample data. T-tests comparing individual and group grading of the introductory cell biology lab reports yielded average scores that were not significantly different from each other (p = 0.13, n = 23 for individual grading, n = 6 for group grading). T-tests also demonstrated that average laboratory report grades of students using the peer-review process were not significantly different from those of students working alone (p = 0.98, n = 9 for individual grading, n = 6 for pair grading). While the grading process described here does not lead to statistically significant gains (or reductions) in student learning, it allows student learning to be maintained while decreasing instructor workload. This reduction in workload could allow the instructor time to pursue other high-impact practices that have been shown to increase student learning. Finally, we suggest possible modifications to the procedure for application in a variety of settings. PMID:25949758

  2. WMO World Record Lightning Extremes: Longest Reported Flash Distance and Longest Reported Flash Duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Timothy J; Pédeboy, Stéphane; Rison, William; Cerveny, Randall S; Montanyà, Joan; Chauzy, Serge; MacGorman, Donald R; Holle, Ronald L; Ávila, Eldo E; Zhang, Yijun; Carbin, Gregory; Mansell, Edward R; Kuleshov, Yuriy; Peterson, Thomas C; Brunet, Manola; Driouech, Fatima; Krahenbuhl, Daniel S

    2017-06-01

    A World Meteorological Organization weather and climate extremes committee has judged that the world's longest reported distance for a single lightning flash occurred with a horizontal distance of 321 km (199.5 mi) over Oklahoma in 2007, while the world's longest reported duration for a single lightning flash is an event that lasted continuously for 7.74 seconds over southern France in 2012. In addition, the committee has unanimously recommended amendment of the AMS Glossary of Meteorology definition of lightning discharge as a "series of electrical processes taking place within 1 second" by removing the phrase "within one second" and replacing with "continuously." Validation of these new world extremes (a) demonstrates the recent and on-going dramatic augmentations and improvements to regional lightning detection and measurement networks, (b) provides reinforcement regarding the dangers of lightning, and (c) provides new information for lightning engineering concerns.

  3. The development of learning competency and skills for the 21st century to integrate "TPCK" of world life with local environment in students grade 11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedaman, Pornchai; Kinboon, Nittayaporn; Suksup, Chareon; Kinboon, Wutcharapong

    2018-01-01

    The teaching strategies of append were the technological pedagogical content knowledge; TPCK. This description knowledge in a content to corresponds of a effective teaching. This article aims to address the relevance of; 1) the learning competency and skills for the 21st Century to integrate "TPCK" of a world life with local environment in the students grade 11, 2) the effective achievement of the learning competency and skills to integrate "TPCK" of world life with local environment in the students grade 11 were the passing score of a percentage 80 upwards (EI.), and 3) the attitudes for learning activities in the students grade 11. The study employed both quantitative and qualitative approaches for 9teachers of third schools were the participatory action research (PAR) in collecting data including a instructional, a testing, and a questionnaire surveywith 33 students grade 11 of Phuwiengwittayakom school. The participants werecluster random sampling. The data analysis of descriptive statistical, percentage, mean average, standard deviation. The findings in the study were to learning competency and skills for the 21st Century to integrate "TPCK" of a world life with local environment on TK, PK, CK, and TCK at a excellent levels (X¯ = 3.62, 3.57, 3.54, 3.51) respectively, and PCK, TPK,TPCK at a good levels (X¯ = 3.36, 3.23, 3.17) respectively. The effective achievement of the learning competency and skills to integrate "TPCK" of world life with local environment in 30 students grade 11 were the passing score (EI.) of a percentage at 90.91. The attitudes for learning activities in the students grade 11 at a high levels (X¯ =3.29). In addition of the students grade 11 to understanding of the importance were a local learning resources including the value integrating technology of the knowledge technology and to choose the right were create of an effective information.

  4. Polymorphous low grade adenocarcinoma of the palate a case report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The piezoelectric unit was used to excise the mass with no further metastasis or Involvement of the palatal vault. The site of excision healed uneventfully and the hlstopathologlcal report of the excised mass showed no signs of nerve Involvement. This tumor is not only a rare lesion but also depicts a similar clinical picture of ...

  5. Higher World Health Organization grades of follicular lymphoma correlate with better outcome in two Nordic Lymphoma Group trials of rituximab without chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlin, Björn Engelbrekt; Sundström, Christer; Sander, Birgitta

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A common treatment for follicular lymphoma is rituximab monotherapy. To identify patients for whom this regimen is adequate as first-line therapy, we applied the World Health Organization (WHO) classification for grading follicular lymphoma in a prospective central pathology review...... increased with the malignant cell size (p useful tool for personalized therapy....

  6. Contribution of Road Grade to the Energy Use of Modern Automobiles Across Large Datasets of Real-World Drive Cycles: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, E.; Burton, E.; Duran, A.; Gonder, J.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the real-world power demand of modern automobiles is of critical importance to engineers using modeling and simulation to inform the intelligent design of increasingly efficient powertrains. Increased use of global positioning system (GPS) devices has made large scale data collection of vehicle speed (and associated power demand) a reality. While the availability of real-world GPS data has improved the industry's understanding of in-use vehicle power demand, relatively little attention has been paid to the incremental power requirements imposed by road grade. This analysis quantifies the incremental efficiency impacts of real-world road grade by appending high fidelity elevation profiles to GPS speed traces and performing a large simulation study. Employing a large real-world dataset from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Transportation Secure Data Center, vehicle powertrain simulations are performed with and without road grade under five vehicle models. Aggregate results of this study suggest that road grade could be responsible for 1% to 3% of fuel use in light-duty automobiles.

  7. Physicians’ views of performance reports: grading the graders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landon Bruce E

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Quality measurement and feedback programs have become widespread and are looked upon as a cornerstone of quality improvement efforts. Often, such programs are used to motivate consumer choice through public report cards or to reward high quality care through pay for performance programs. Physicians’ views on performance measurement and feedback programs, however, are rarely sought, despite the potential usefulness for improving the impact of such programs. The new IJHPR paper by Nissanholtz-Gannot and colleagues provides important data on physicians’ views of the Israeli quality measurement program that demonstrates strong support for the program among Israeli physicians while also identifying potential areas for improvement.

  8. High-Grade Transformation of Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma Delineated with a Fibrous Rim: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamide Sayar

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: High-grade transformation or dedifferentiation in carcinoma is progression of a low-grade malignant neoplasm to a high-grade carcinoma or poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. This is rarely observed in adenoid cystic carcinoma of the salivary glands. Case Report: A 39 year-old woman presented with a painless mass at the left submandibulary region that had been growing slowly for 5 years. Submandibulary mass resection revealed a mass with peripheral adenoid cystic carcinoma and a central high-grade tumor delineated with a fibrous rim, raising the possibility of a hybrid or composite carcinoma, requiring differential diagnosis depending upon morphology and immunohistochemistry findings. The final histopathological diagnosis was high-grade transformation of adenoid cystic carcinoma. After surgical therapy, the patient was irradiated to the neck and submandibulary region. No sign of tumor recurrence has been evident for 36 months. Conclusion: This present case seems to be another rare case with high-grade transformation of adenoid cystic carcinoma and the fibrous rim may be a histopathological feature of such cases, which should be kept in mind.

  9. Report on World Workshops on Oral Medicine IV and V

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterson, DE; Lodi, Giovanni; Jensen, Siri Beier

    2014-01-01

    The first World Workshop on Oral Medicine (WWOM) was held in 1988. The portfolio has continued to expand in scope and impact over the past twenty-six years. Five World Workshops were conducted between 1988 and 2010, focusing on creation of systematic reviews in biomedicine and health care...

  10. World nuclear performance report 2016. A new study by World Nuclear Association

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cobb, Jonathan [World Nuclear Association, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-15

    A larger number of nuclear power units are under construction than at any other time in the last 25 years, and with another ten new reactors coming online 2015 demonstrated improving new build performance all round. The existing global fleet, totally 439 by year-end, generated roughly 10 % of the world's electricity, making up around one-third of the world's low-carbon electricity supply. Nevertheless, there are challenges ahead for the global nuclear industry. The World Nuclear Association's vision for the future global electricity system consists of a diverse mix of low-carbon technologies - where renewables, nuclear and a fossil fuels work together in harmony to ensure a reliable, affordable and clean energy supply.

  11. World nuclear performance report 2016. A new study by World Nuclear Association

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cobb, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    A larger number of nuclear power units are under construction than at any other time in the last 25 years, and with another ten new reactors coming online 2015 demonstrated improving new build performance all round. The existing global fleet, totally 439 by year-end, generated roughly 10 % of the world's electricity, making up around one-third of the world's low-carbon electricity supply. Nevertheless, there are challenges ahead for the global nuclear industry. The World Nuclear Association's vision for the future global electricity system consists of a diverse mix of low-carbon technologies - where renewables, nuclear and a fossil fuels work together in harmony to ensure a reliable, affordable and clean energy supply.

  12. To Design and Evaluate a 12th Grade Course in the Principles of Economics; Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, Suzanne E.; Sperling, John G.

    Reported is the design, development, and evaluation of a one-semester course on the principles of economics for twelfth grade students. The course is intended to develop students' capacity for economic reasoning through economic theory and empirical research. To do this, teaching materials and innovative techniques for teacher training were…

  13. Development of an Occupational Orientation Program for Grades K-6. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesler, Ray M.; Brown, Sandra

    This report presents the development, methodology, and findings of an Occupational Orientation Program for Grades K-6 in Monongalia County, West Virginia. The objectives of the program were to develop a curriculum for an elementary school that would give students the assistance needed to make realistic, attainable career choices, to assist…

  14. The Relationship between Interparental Conflict and Self-Reported Grade Point Average among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, S. Jane; Krueger, Lacy E.; Limberg, Dodie

    2017-01-01

    Interparental conflict has been shown to have a negative effect on the academic success of children and adolescents. This study examined the relationship between college students' (N = 143) perceived levels of interparental conflict, their living arrangement, and their current self-reported grade point average. Participants who experienced more…

  15. Parents' Reports of Sexual Communication with Children in Kindergarten to Grade 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byers, E. Sandra; Sears, Heather A.; Weaver, Angela D.

    2008-01-01

    We examined factors associated with parents' reports of three aspects of parent-child sexual communication, quality, frequency with which parents encouraged questions, and extent of communication, on each of 10 sexual health topics. Participants were 3,413 mothers and 426 fathers with children in kindergarten to grade 8. Parents' demographic…

  16. The Development of CBM Vocabulary Measures: Grade 5. Technical Report #1212

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, Julie; Anderson, Daniel; Park, Bitnara Jasmine; Tindal, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    In this technical report, we describe the development and piloting of a series of vocabulary assessments intended for use with students in grades two through eight. These measures, available as part of easyCBM[TM], an online progress monitoring and benchmark/screening assessment system, were developed in 2010 and administered to approximately 1200…

  17. The Development of CBM Vocabulary Measures: Grade 7. Technical Report #1214

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, Julie; Anderson, Daniel; Park, Bitnara Jasmine; Tindal, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    In this technical report, we describe the development and piloting of a series of vocabulary assessments intended for use with students in grades two through eight. These measures, available as part of easyCBM[TM], an online progress monitoring and benchmark/screening assessment system, were developed in 2010 and administered to approximately 1200…

  18. The Development of CBM Vocabulary Measures: Grade 6. Technical Report # 1213

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, Julie; Anderson, Daniel; Park, Bitnara Jasmine; Tindal, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    In this technical report, we describe the development and piloting of a series of vocabulary assessments intended for use with students in grades two through eight. These measures, available as part of easyCBM[TM], an online progress monitoring and benchmark/screening assessment system, were developed in 2010 and administered to approximately 1200…

  19. The Development of CBM Vocabulary Measures: Grade 3. Technical Report #1210

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, Julie; Anderson, Daniel; Park, Bitnara Jasmine; Tindal, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    In this technical report, we describe the development and piloting of a series of vocabulary assessments intended for use with students in grades two through eight. These measures, available as part of easyCBM[TM], an online progress monitoring and benchmark/screening assessment system, were developed in 2010 and administered to approximately 1200…

  20. The Development of CBM Vocabulary Measures: Grade 4. Technical Report #1211

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, Julie; Anderson, Daniel; Park, Bitnara Jasmine; Tindal, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    In this technical report, we describe the development and piloting of a series of vocabulary assessments intended for use with students in grades two through eight. These measures, available as part of easyCBM[TM], an online progress monitoring and benchmark/screening assessment system, were developed in 2010 and administered to approximately 1200…

  1. Technical Adequacy of the easyCBM Grade 2 Reading Measures. Technical Report #1004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamgochian, Elisa; Park, Bitnara Jasmine; Nese, Joseph F. T.; Lai, Cheng-Fei; Saez, Leilani; Anderson, Daniel; Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2010-01-01

    In this technical report, we provide reliability and validity evidence for the easyCBM[R] Reading measures for grade 2 (word and passage reading fluency and multiple choice reading comprehension). Evidence for reliability includes internal consistency and item invariance. Evidence for validity includes concurrent, predictive, and construct…

  2. Analyzing the Reliability of the easyCBM Reading Comprehension Measures: Grade 2. Technical Report #1201

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Cheng-Fei; Irvin, P. Shawn; Alonzo, Julie; Park, Bitnara Jasmine; Tindal, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    In this technical report, we present the results of a reliability study of the second-grade multiple choice reading comprehension measures available on the easyCBM learning system conducted in the spring of 2011. Analyses include split-half reliability, alternate form reliability, person and item reliability as derived from Rasch analysis,…

  3. Analyzing the Reliability of the easyCBM Reading Comprehension Measures: Grade 3. Technical Report #1202

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Cheng-Fei; Irvin, P. Shawn; Park, Bitnara Jasmine; Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    In this technical report, we present the results of a reliability study of the third-grade multiple choice reading comprehension measures available on the easyCBM learning system conducted in the spring of 2011. Analyses include split-half reliability, alternate form reliability, person and item reliability as derived from Rasch analysis,…

  4. The Development of CBM Vocabulary Measures: Grade 8. Technical Report #1215

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, Julie; Anderson, Daniel; Park, Bitnara Jasmine; Tindal, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    In this technical report, we describe the development and piloting of a series of vocabulary assessments intended for use with students in grades two through eight. These measures, available as part of easyCBM[TM], an online progress monitoring and benchmark/screening assessment system, were developed in 2010 and administered to approximately 1200…

  5. easyCBM® Reading Criterion Related Validity Evidence: Grades K-1. Technical Report #1309

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Cheng-Fei; Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    In this technical report, we present the results of a study to gather criterion-related evidence for Grade K-1 easyCBM® reading measures. We used correlations to examine the relation between the easyCBM® measures and other published measures with known reliability and validity evidence, including the Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy…

  6. Analyzing the Reliability of the easyCBM Reading Comprehension Measures: Grade 5. Technical Report #1204

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Bitnara Jasmine; Irvin, P. Shawn; Lai, Cheng-Fei; Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    In this technical report, we present the results of a reliability study of the fifth-grade multiple choice reading comprehension measures available on the easyCBM learning system conducted in the spring of 2011. Analyses include split-half reliability, alternate form reliability, person and item reliability as derived from Rasch analysis,…

  7. Analyzing the Reliability of the easyCBM Reading Comprehension Measures: Grade 4. Technical Report #1203

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Bitnara Jasmine; Irvin, P. Shawn; Alonzo, Julie; Lai, Cheng-Fei; Tindal, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    In this technical report, we present the results of a reliability study of the fourth-grade multiple choice reading comprehension measures available on the easyCBM learning system conducted in the spring of 2011. Analyses include split-half reliability, alternate form reliability, person and item reliability as derived from Rasch analysis,…

  8. easyCBM® Reading Criterion Related Validity Evidence: Grades 2-5. Technical Report #1310

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Cheng-Fei; Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    In this technical report, we present the results of a study to gather criterion-related evidence for Grade 2-5 easyCBM® reading measures. We used correlations to examine the relation between the easyCBM® measures and other published measures with known reliability and validity evidence, including the Gates-MacGinitie Reading Tests and the Dynamic…

  9. Analyzing the Reliability of the easyCBM Reading Comprehension Measures: Grade 6. Technical Report #1205

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvin, P. Shawn; Alonzo, Julie; Park, Bitnara Jasmine; Lai, Cheng-Fei; Tindal, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    In this technical report, we present the results of a reliability study of the sixth-grade multiple choice reading comprehension measures available on the easyCBM learning system conducted in the spring of 2011. Analyses include split-half reliability, alternate form reliability, person and item reliability as derived from Rasch analysis,…

  10. The Development of CBM Vocabulary Measures: Grade 2. Technical Report #1209

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, Julie; Anderson, Daniel; Park, Bitnara Jasmine; Tindal, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    In this technical report, we describe the development and piloting of a series of vocabulary assessments intended for use with students in grades two through eight. These measures, available as part of easyCBM[TM], an online progress monitoring and benchmark/screening assessment system, were developed in 2010 and administered to approximately 1200…

  11. Analyzing the Reliability of the easyCBM Reading Comprehension Measures: Grade 7. Technical Report #1206

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvin, P. Shawn; Alonzo, Julie; Lai, Cheng-Fei; Park, Bitnara Jasmine; Tindal, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    In this technical report, we present the results of a reliability study of the seventh-grade multiple choice reading comprehension measures available on the easyCBM learning system conducted in the spring of 2011. Analyses include split-half reliability, alternate form reliability, person and item reliability as derived from Rasch analysis,…

  12. Grade Point Average: Report of the GPA Pilot Project 2013-14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higher Education Academy, 2015

    2015-01-01

    This report is published as the result of a range of investigations and debates involving many universities and colleges and a series of meetings, presentations, discussions and consultations. Interest in a grade point average (GPA) system was originally initiated by a group of interested universities, progressing to the systematic investigation…

  13. Teaching Public Policy for the Arab World : final technical report

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-02-11

    Feb 11, 2016 ... Teaching Public Policy for the Arab World .... integrating politics, policy, economics and other social science research perspectives, this ..... The primary, successful output of this overall project is the viable MA program.

  14. JPRS Report, Soviet Union, The Working Class & The Contemporary World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-10-15

    Beatles and Rolling Stones groups, the astronaut J. Glenn, Dzh. (sic) Eisenhower and J. Kennedy, M.L. King and the screen actor M. Brando. At the ...JPRS-UWC-87-002 15 October 1987 FOREIGN BROADCAST INFORMATION SERVICE JPRS Report— Soviet Union THE WORKING CLASS & THE CONTEMPORARY WORLD...MmmKmoN STATEMENT A 19980714 146 mcWAUTtmBPBVmi Soviet Union The Working Class & The Contemporary World No 3, May-June 1987 JPRS-UWC-87-002

  15. Association of invasive breast carcinoma and multicentric high grade astrocytoma: a case report with a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pour, P Hossein; Forouzandeh, M; Beni, A Naderi; Beni, Z Naderi; Hoseinpour, P

    2011-03-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. Multicentric gliomas are uncommon lesions of the central nervous system (CNS) with an unprecise rate of occurrence that diffusely infiltrate large portions of the brain. High grade astrocytoma is the most agressive form of gliomas and often has a distinct neuroimaging pattern with a poor prognosis. We report a case of a 29-year-old woman patient with primary breast carcinoma and high grade astrocytoma subsequently developed. The woman was treated by mastectomy and 20 months post-diagnosis of the cancer she exhibited a transient facial paralysis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed two cranial masses suspicious of metastasis. A complete tumor removal from the brain was performed. On histological examination, this tumor was a high grade astrocytoma.

  16. Citizen Science: The Small World Initiative Improved Lecture Grades and California Critical Thinking Skills Test Scores of Nonscience Major Students at Florida Atlantic University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Joseph P; Israel, Natalie; Rowland, Kimberly; Lovelace, Matthew J; Saunders, Mary Jane

    2016-03-01

    Course-based undergraduate research is known to improve science, technology, engineering, and mathematics student achievement. We tested "The Small World Initiative, a Citizen-Science Project to Crowdsource Novel Antibiotic Discovery" to see if it also improved student performance and the critical thinking of non-science majors in Introductory Biology at Florida Atlantic University (a large, public, minority-dominant institution) in academic year 2014-15. California Critical Thinking Skills Test pre- and posttests were offered to both Small World Initiative (SWI) and control lab students for formative amounts of extra credit. SWI lab students earned significantly higher lecture grades than control lab students, had significantly fewer lecture grades of D+ or lower, and had significantly higher critical thinking posttest total scores than control students. Lastly, more SWI students were engaged while taking critical thinking tests. These results support the hypothesis that utilizing independent course-based undergraduate science research improves student achievement even in nonscience students.

  17. Making (up) the grade? estimating the genetic and environmental influences of discrepancies between self-reported grades and official GPA scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Joseph A; Beaver, Kevin M

    2015-05-01

    Academic achievement has been found to have a pervasive and substantial impact on a wide range of developmental outcomes and has also been implicated in the critical transition from adolescence into early adulthood. Previous research has revealed that self-reported grades tend to diverge from official transcript grade point average (GPA) scores, with students being more likely to report inflated scores. Making use of a sample of monozygotic twin (N = 282 pairs), dizygotic twin (N = 441 pairs), and full sibling (N = 1,757 pairs) pairs from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health; 65 % White; 50 % male; mean age = 16.14), the current study is the first to investigate the role that genetic and environmental factors play in misreporting grade information. A comparison between self-reported GPA (mean score of 2.86) and official transcript GPA scores (mean score of 2.44) revealed that self-reported scores were approximately one-half letter grade greater than official scores. Liability threshold models revealed that additive genetic influences explained between 40 and 63 % of the variance in reporting inflated grades and correctly reporting GPA, with the remaining variance explained by the nonshared environment. Conversely, 100 % of the variance in reporting deflated grade information was explained by nonshared environmental influences. In an effort to identify specific nonshared environmental influences on reporting accuracy, multivariate models that adequately control for genetic influences were estimated and revealed that siblings with lower transcript GPA scores were significantly less likely to correctly report their GPA and significantly more likely to report inflated GPA scores. Additional analyses revealed that verbal IQ and self-control were not significantly associated with self-reported GPA accuracy after controlling for genetic influences. These findings indicate that previous studies that implicate verbal IQ and self

  18. Should the World Stop Cloning Around? 12th Grade Lesson. Schools of California Online Resources for Education (SCORE): Connecting California's Classrooms to the World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, David R.; Karayan, Michael

    This lesson for grade 12 is designed to raise student awareness of the potential of human cloning and of the effects it could have on the present, naturally born population. Students work in teams to research the issue and are provided with background information, detailed instructions, on-line resources, and reflection questions. The teacher's…

  19. World Small Hydropower Development Report 2013 - South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jonker Klunne, W

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available of the world's biggest dry-cooled power stations - Matimba Power Station (coal-fired; installed capacity 3,990 MW). South Africa, which for many years operated with overcapacity, has begun to experience a power crisis induced by rapid growth in electricity...

  20. The Diverse World of Early Childhood. Global Status Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, Roger

    2002-01-01

    Examines demographic information about the status of young children around the world. Graphs nations with the largest populations of young children and highest percentage of their populations composed of young children in comparison to the aged, the percentage of regional populations under age 5 and over 64, and birth and infant mortality rates.…

  1. Low-grade osteosarcoma arising from cemento-ossifying fibroma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong Bin; Kim, Nam-Kyoo; Kim, Jae-Young; Kim, Hyung Jun

    2015-02-01

    Cemento-ossifying fibromas are benign tumors, and, although cases of an aggressive type have been reported, no cases of cemento-ossifying fibroma transforming into osteosarcoma have been documented previously. Low-grade osteosarcoma is a rare type of primary bone tumor, representing 1%-2% of all osteosarcomas. A 45-year-old female patient was diagnosed with cemento-ossifying fibroma, treated with mass excision several times over a period of two years and eight months, and followed up. After biopsy gathered because of signs of recurrence, she was diagnosed with low-grade osteosarcoma. The patient underwent wide excision, segmental mandibulectomy, and reconstruction with fibula free flap. The aim of this report is to raise awareness of the possibility that cemento-ossifying fibroma can transform into osteosarcoma and of the consequent necessity for careful diagnosis and treatment planning.

  2. Intraosseous Polymorphous Low Grade Adenocarcinoma of the Mandible: Report of a Rare Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SM R Prakash

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinoma (PLGA is an entity under the subclassification of adenocarcinoma from salivary glands. PLGA is an unusual tumor that occur: in the minor salivary gland, particularity in the palate followed by buccal mucosa, upper lip, retromolar area and base of the tongue- The occurance of PLGA in locations other than these is exceedingly rare. We report a rare case of PLGA occuring in the anterior mandible. The clinical, radiographic, computed tomographic and histopathologic findings are discussed.

  3. Low-grade chondrosarcoma of the cricoid cartilage: a case report and review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Chuan-Ping; Liu, Ji-Hua; Xu, Wen-Jian [The Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University, Department of Radiology, Qingdao (China); Hou, Feng [The Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University, Department of Pathology, Qingdao (China); Liu, Hua [The Shinanqu People Hospital, Department of Radiology, Qingdao (China)

    2017-11-15

    We report the case of a 60-year-old man with a 12-day history of vomiting whenever he had a meal. Computed tomography revealed a calcified mass in the right cricoid cartilage with intraluminal and extraluminal extension. The patient underwent surgical resection of the trachea with end-to-end anastomosis. Pathological examination of the surgical specimen showed a low-grade chondrosarcoma. Eighteen months after surgery, the patient is alive and disease-free. (orig.)

  4. Career Education Program: Geneva Area City Schools. [Grade 4 Units: Conservation, The World of Work, and This is My Life].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geneva Area City Schools, OH.

    The three curriculum units for the fourth grade level focus on: (1) conservation careers, systems, and needs; (2) occupational variety and qualifications; and (3) self awareness. Behavioral objectives range from helping students to become more aware of careers in a variety of occupations, including conservation. A chart format is used to list…

  5. Gold Rush. Fourth Grade Activity. Schools of California Online Resources for Education (SCORE): Connecting California's Classrooms to the World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupnick, Karen

    In 1875, a man fishing in the isolated Trout River of California discovered several large gold nuggets. This lesson plan asks fourth-grade students to develop a plan to avoid another 1849 gold rush. The plan is to design a new town while considering transportation, housing, food and goods for the miners, and the preservation of the area's…

  6. Math Around the World: Grades 5-8. Teachers' Guide. Great Explorations in Math and Science (GEMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braxton, Beverly; And Others

    This document is a collection of eight games from four continents. Students use mathematics that is directly relevant to them as they take part in the games. The first five games (NIM, Kalah, Tower of Hanoi, Shongo Networks, and Magic Squares) feature presentation instructions that describe multiple-session classroom activities for grades 5-8.…

  7. INEQUALITY IN THE MODERN WORLD: A REVIEW OF INTERNATIONAL REPORTS

    OpenAIRE

    I. A. Vershinina; T. S. Martynenko

    2016-01-01

    The article analyses two reports of the international organizations dedicated to the problem of social inequality in a global scale. It distinguishes the main issues and the main conclusions of the reports formulated by experts; it also considers the factors of social inequality and its basic forms. The article presents main features of social inequality in Russia on the basis of these reports. It analyses peculiarities of Russian inequality and the data on Russian citizens inclusion into the...

  8. The Turn of the Century. Tenth Grade Lesson. Schools of California Online Resources for Education (SCORE): Connecting California's Classrooms to the World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Dede

    In this 10th grade social studies and language arts interdisciplinary unit, students research and report on historical figures from the turn of the 20th century. Students are required to work in pairs to learn about famous and common individuals, including Andrew Carnegie, Samuel Gompers, Susan B. Anthony, Thomas Edison, Theodore Roosevelt, Booker…

  9. World Energy Outlook 2011 Special Report: Energy for All

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    What impact will the return of high energy prices have on the fragile economic recovery? Will geopolitical unrest, price volatility and policy inaction defer investment in the oil sector and amplify risks to our energy security? What will renewed uncertainty surrounding the role of nuclear power mean for future energy and environmental trends? Is the gap between our climate actions and our climate goals becoming insurmountable? World Energy Outlook 2011 tackles these and other pressing questions. The latest data, policy developments, and the experience of another turbulent year are brought together to provide robust analysis and insight into global energy markets. WEO-2011 once again gives detailed energy demand and supply projections out to 2035, broken down by region, fuel, sector and scenario.

  10. INEQUALITY IN THE MODERN WORLD: A REVIEW OF INTERNATIONAL REPORTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Vershinina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses two reports of the international organizations dedicated to the problem of social inequality in a global scale. It distinguishes the main issues and the main conclusions of the reports formulated by experts; it also considers the factors of social inequality and its basic forms. The article presents main features of social inequality in Russia on the basis of these reports. It analyses peculiarities of Russian inequality and the data on Russian citizens inclusion into the global elite and into the global middle class. 

  11. World Development Report 1998/1999 : Knowledge for Development

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    1998-01-01

    This is the twenty-first in the annual series assessing major development issues. This report acknowledges that knowledge, not capital, is the key to sustained economic growth and improvements in human well-being. It distinguishes between two sorts of knowledge: knowledge about technology, called technical knowledge or simply know-how, and knowledge about attributes, that is, knowledge about products, processes, or institutions. The report focuses on the relationship between the unequal distr...

  12. Report on World Homoeopathy Summit organized by Global Homeopathy Foundation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eswara Das

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Global Homeopathy Foundation (GHF organized the World Homoeopathy Summit (WHS at Birla Matoshree Sabhaghar, Mumbai, 400020, India on 11-12 April, 2015. Ministry of AYUSH, Central Council for Research in Homoeopathy, Central Council of Homoeopathy and Homoeopathic Pharmacopeia Laboratory were the institutional collaborators. Homoeopathic Medical Association of India, Indian Homoeopathic Medical Association and the Indian Chapter of Liga Medicorum Homeopathica Internationalis supported the event. The WHS was aimed at enhancing research aptitudes of young homoeopaths, increasing clinical proficiency of practitioners, encouraging scientists from pure and applied sciences to associate in fundamental research and also inviting government as well as non government institutions to patronize research in Homoeopathy. About 800 delegates from across the country, mainly practitioners, teaching faculties, postgraduate students, Ph.D. scholars and scientists attended the summit. Scientific sessions on nature of homoeopathic medicine, Evidence and Mechanism of its action were presented by molecular biologists, engineers, physicists, immunologists, pharmacologists, chemists, nano-technologists, zoologists, homeopaths and conventional doctors from some of the premium Universities. The conference ended with panel discussion moderated by Dr. Raj K. Manchanda and Dr. Rajesh Shah. It was recommended to encourage more scientific research and better documentation in Homoeopathy and to review the existing approaches in practice.

  13. Final Scientific/ Expert Report on Virtual World Entrepreneurship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølunde, Lisbeth; Teigland, Robin; Flåten, Bjørn-Tore

    This report reviews our approach, case studies, results, and implications for the NVWN Work Package 3: Entrepreneurship, and it is written with practitioners and policymakers in mind. We base our work on the concepts of affordances, or the material and social properties of any technology...

  14. The World Coal Quality Inventory: A status report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewalt, S.J.; Willett, J.C.; Finkelman, R.B.

    2005-01-01

    National and international policy makers and industry require accurate information on coal, including coal quality data, to make informed decisions regarding international import needs and export opportunities, foreign policy, technology transfer policies, foreign investment prospects, environmental and health assessments, and byproduct use and disposal issues. Unfortunately, the information needed is generally proprietary and does not exist in the public domain. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in conjunction with partners in about 60 countries, is developing a digital compilation of worldwide coal quality. The World Coal Quality Inventory (WoCQI) will contain coal quality information for samples obtained from major coal beds in countries having significant coal production, as well as from many countries producing smaller volumes of coal, with an emphasis on coals currently being burned. The information that will be incorporated includes, but is not limited to, proximate and ultimate analyses; sulfur-form data; major, minor, and trace element analysis; and semi-quantitative analyses of minerals, modes of occurrence, and petrography. The coal quality information will eventually be linked to a Geographic Information System (GIS) that shows the coal basins and sample locations along with geologic, land use, transportation, industrial, and cultural information. The WoCQI will be accessible on the USGS web page and new data added periodically. This multi-national collaboration is developing global coal quality data that contain a broad array of technologic, economic, and environmental parameters, which should help to ensure the efficient and environmentally compatible use of global coal resources in the 21st century.

  15. Status Report from the United Kingdom [Processing of Low-Grade Uranium Ores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    North, A A [Warren Spring Laboratory, Stevenage, Herts. (United Kingdom)

    1967-06-15

    The invitation to present this status report could have been taken literally as a request for information on experience gained in the actual processing of low-grade uranium ores in the United Kingdom, in which case there would have been very little to report; however, the invitation naturally was considered to be a request for a report on the experience gained by the United Kingdom of the processing of uranium ores. Lowgrade uranium ores are not treated in the United Kingdom simply because the country does not possess any known significant deposits of uranium ore. It is of interest to record the fact that during the nineteenth century mesothermal vein deposits associated with Hercynian granite were worked at South Terras, Cornwall, and ore that contained approximately 100 tons of uranium oxide was exported to Germany. Now only some 20 tons of contained uranium oxide remain at South Terras; also in Cornwall there is a small number of other vein deposits that each hold about five tons of uranium. Small lodes of uranium ore have been located in the southern uplands of Scotland; in North Wales lower palaeozoic black shales have only as much as 50 to 80 parts per million of uranium oxide, and a slightly lower grade carbonaceous shale is found near the base of the millstone grit that occurs in the north of England. Thus the experience gained by the United Kingdom has been of the treatment of uranium ores that occur abroad.

  16. Grade pending: lessons for hospital quality reporting from the New York City restaurant sanitation inspection program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Andrew M; Detsky, Allan S

    2015-02-01

    Public quality reporting programs have been widely implemented in hospitals in an effort to improve quality and safety. One such program is Hospital Compare, Medicare's national quality reporting program for US hospitals. The New York City sanitary grade inspection program is a parallel effort for restaurants. The aims of Hospital Compare and the New York City sanitary inspection program are fundamentally similar: to address a common market failure resulting from consumers' lack of information on quality and safety. However, by displaying easily understandable information at the point of service, the New York City sanitary inspection program is better designed to encourage informed consumer decision making. We argue that this program holds important lessons for public quality reporting of US hospitals. © 2014 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  17. World Energy Outlook 2007 Special Report: Focus on Energy Poverty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    Energy poverty affects many Indians and is an important issue for the Indian government. The number of households with access to electricity has risen over the past couple of decades, but access is still far from universal and the availability of modern cooking fuels and technologies is still limited, especially in rural areas. We use an energy development index, based on access to electricity and cleaner cooking fuels and on overall electricity generation per capita, to emphasise the disparity in energy poverty across India and relative to other developing countries. There are still some 412 million people without access to electricity in India. In all three WEO scenarios, the number of people without access declines, but it falls much faster in the High Growth Scenario. In that scenario, all households in India have access to electricity in 2030. In the Reference Scenario, the electrification rate in 2030 in India is 96% but nearly 60 million people in rural areas will still lack access. At an investment cost of $41 per person, it would cost some $17 billion to connect all those without electricity today to the central grid. But gridbased electrification is often not available to remote villages and households, because of the high cost of expanding the network. Diesel generators, mini-hydro, wind turbines, biomass gasifiers and photovoltaics, or a combination of these, could be more economic. The number of people relying on fuelwood and dung for cooking and heating declines from 668 million in 2005 to 395 million in 2030 in the High Growth Scenario, 77 million fewer people than in the Reference Scenario. About 22% of the population would still rely on these fuels in India in 2030, even with higher growth. According to the World Health Organization, the use of fuelwood and dung for cooking and heating causes over 400 000 premature deaths in India annually, mostly women and children. The concentration of particulate matter in the air in Indian households using

  18. 2012 nuclear power world report; Kernenergie Weltreport 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2013-06-15

    At the end of 2012, 437 nuclear power plants were available for energy supply in 31 countries of the world. This means that the number was unchanged compared to the previous year's number on 31 December 2011. The aggregate gross power of the plants amounted to approx. 392,793 MWe, the aggregate net power, to 372,572 MWe. This indicates a slight increase of gross and net capacity (gross: 389,367 MWe, net: 369,371 MWe) Two units were commissioned in 2012; 1 unit in China and the Republic of Korea each. Two reactors in Canada resumed commercial operation after a long-term shutdown. The units have been layed-up since the mid 1990ies. Four units were shut down permanently in 2012; 2 units in the United Kingdom, and one unit in Canada and Spain each. The shut-downs in the United Kingdom and Canada have been planned on a long-term base. 68 nuclear generating units - 5 more than at the end of 2011 - were under construction in late 2012 in 14 countries with an aggregate gross power of approx. 70,933 MWe and net power of approx. 66,244 MWe. 9 new projects have been started in 2012 in 3 countries (China, United Arab Emirates, USA). Worldwide, some 110 new nuclear power plants are in the concrete project design, planning, and licensing phases; in some of these cases license applications have been submitted or contracts have already been signed. Some 100 further projects are planned. Net electricity generation in nuclear power plants worldwide in 2012 achieved a level of approx. 2,346.16 billion kWh (2011: approx. 2,497.1 billion kWh). The main cause for the lower production have been the permanent shut-downs of almost all nuclear power plants in Japan since the natural disaster on 11 March 2011. Since the first generation of electricity in a nuclear power plant in the EBR-I fast breeder (USA) on December 20, 1951, cumulated net production has reached approx. 67,946 billion kWh, and operating experience has grown to some 15,050 reactor years. (orig.)

  19. Nuclear energy world Report 2012. September 2013 update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2013-11-15

    At the end of 2012, 437 nuclear power plants were available for energy supply in 31 countries of the world. This means that the number was unchanged compared to the previous year's number on 31 December 2011. The aggregate gross power of the plants amounted to approx. 392,793 MWe, the aggregate net power, to 372,572 MWe. This indicates a slight increase of gross and net capacity (gross: 389,367 MWe, net: 369,371 MWe). Two units were commissioned in 2012; one unit in China and the Republic of Korea each. Two reactors in Canada resumed commercial operation after a long-term shutdown. The units have been layed-up since the mid 1990ies. Four units were shut down permanently in 2012; 2 units in the United Kingdom, and one unit in Canada and Spain each. The shut-downs in the United Kingdom and Canada have been planned on a long-term base. 68 nuclear generating units - 5 more than at the end of 2011 - were under construction in late 2012 in 14 countries with an aggregate gross power of approx. 70,933 MWe and net power of approx. 66,244 MWe. 9 new projects have been started in 2012 in three countries (China, United Arab Emirates, USA). Worldwide, some 110 new nuclear power plants are in the concrete project design, planning, and licensing phases; in some of these cases license applications have been submitted or contracts have already been signed. Some 100 further projects are planned. Net electricity generation in nuclear power plants worldwide in 2012 achieved a level of approx. 2,350.80 billion (109) kWh (2011: approx. 2,497.10 billion kWh). The main cause for the lower production have been the permanent shut-downs of almost all nuclear power plants in Japan since the natural disaster on 11 March 2011. Since the first generation of electricity in a nuclear power plant in the EBR-I fast breeder (USA) on December 20, 1951, cumulated net production has reached approx. 67,950 billion kWh, and operating experience has grown to some 15,050 reactor years. (orig.)

  20. The world bank and the environment. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The second annual report describes specific environmental strategies and environmental lending in the Bank's four operational regions: Africa; Asia; Europe, Middle East, and North Africa; and Latin America and the Caribbean. It details the Bank's progress in eight environmental categories: energy and the environment, pollution, urban environment, water resources management, forest and land management, social and cultural, environmental economics, and the global environment. One chapter is devoted exclusively to tropical forests, studying ways in which the Bank is dealing with deforestation as a part of the constant review of its forest policies. Suggestions are made for decreasing the degradation of tropical forests while meeting demands for forest products. This chapter reflects a shift in Bank emphasis from commercial ventures to conservation measures. The publication reports on other initiatives by the Bank during fiscal 1991, including the launching of the Global Environment Facility (GEF)--a pilot program to oversee reduction of global warming, preservation of biological diversity, protection of international waters, and prevention of ozone depletion

  1. Polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinoma of the nasopharynx. Case report and review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lengyel, E.; Somogyi, A.; Nemeth, G. [National Institute of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Godeny, M. [National Institute of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary). Dept. of Radiology; Szerdahelyi, A. [National Institute of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary). Dept. of Pathology

    2000-01-01

    Background: The polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinoma of the nasopharynx is a rare disease. Polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinoma is a minor salivary gland neoplasm which occurs frequently in the mucosa of the soft and hard palates, in the buccal mucosa and in the upper lip. To date this entity has been identified within the oral cavity and only one case within the nasopharynx and some cases in the parotid gland. It has a slow infiltrating growing pattern with frequent perineural invasion and low metastatic potential. Case Report: We report on a patient with non-papillary polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinoma in the nasopharynx which extended intracranially. The patient underwent primary radiotherapy. The CT showed partial response to radiotherapy and the patient is alive 51 months after the diagnosis his state being unchanged. Conclusion: The treatment for minor salivary gland tumor is primarily surgical. It is reported that the polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinoma has been known to have poor response to radiotherapy. However, we believe that in addition to its favorable biological behavior, the radiotherapy in this localization may result in longer survival. (orig.) [German] Hintergrund: Das polymorphe Adenokarzinom des Nasopharynx mit niedrigem Malignitaetsgrad ist eine seltene Krankheit. Es handelt sich um eine Geschwulst der kleinen Speicheldruesen, die oft in der Schleimhaut des harten und weichen Gaumens, in der Mundschleimhaut und in der oberen Lippe vorkommt. Diese Krankheitsform wurde bisher in der Mundhoehle, nur in einem Fall im Nasenrachenraum und in einigen Faellen in der Ohrspeicheldruese nachgewiesen. Sie zeigt ein langsam infiltrierendes Wachstum, oft mit perineuraler Invasion und geringem metastatischen Potential. Fallbeschreibung: Wir berichten ueber einen Patienten mit intrakranial ausgedehntem nichtpapillaeren polymorphen Adenokarzinom des Nasopharynx. Der Patient erhielt eine primaere Strahlenbehandlung. Durch CT wurde danach eine partielle

  2. French Speaking Skills of Grade 8 English Program Students. Research Report 82-08.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wightman, Margaret

    The speaking skills of grade 8 students in a core French program in Ottawa were compared with the skills of grade 6 students enrolled in the core program. A total of 337 grade 8 students were given a French speaking test. Two-hundred and nine students had taken the test in grade 6. In general, the grade 8 students seemed prepared to express basic…

  3. [The whole world in a cup of coffee. Case reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Fiore, Luca

    2009-01-01

    There is a rising interest for clinical cases in medicine. Actually, they don't necessarily conflict with the evidence-based medicine approach; rather, as several authors made clear, EBM-oriented case reports and clinical trials could be complementary. Cases and case series could even represent the first line of evidence and they are extremely valuable in discovering new pathologies and monitoring unexpected drug effects. They also play a relevant role in continuing medical education. The new section of Recenti Progressi in Medicina is edited by a prominent Italian research Institute (Istituto di Fisiologia Clinica, CNR). It focuses on a single case, guiding the physicians' decision-making from differential diagnosis to the treatment options.

  4. USSR Report, World Economy and International Relations, No. 12, December 1986

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1987-01-01

    This report is a Translation of the Russian-language monthly journal MIROVAYA EKONOMIKA I MEZHDUNARODNYYE OTNOSHENIYA published in Moscow by the Institute of World Economy and international Relations...

  5. JPRS Report. Soviet Union: World Economy & International Relations, No. 4, April 1989

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1989-01-01

    This report is a translation of the Russian-language monthly journal MIROVAYA EKONOMIKA I MEZHDUNARODNYYE OTNOSHENIYA published in Moscow by the Institute of World Economy and International Relations...

  6. JPRS Report. Soviet Union: World Economy & International Relations, No. 2, February 1989

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1989-01-01

    This report is a translation of the Russian-language monthly journal MIROVAYA EKONOMIKA I MEZHDUNARODNYYE OTNOSHENIYA published in Moscow by the Institute of World Economy and International Relations...

  7. Low-grade myofibroblastic sarcoma arising in fibroadenoma of the breast-A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myong, Na-Hye; Min, Jun-Won

    2016-03-25

    Myofibroblastic sarcoma or myofibrosarcoma is a malignant tumor of myofibroblasts and known to develop rarely in the breast, but its underlying lesion and tumor cell origin have never been reported yet. A 61-year-old female presented with a gradually growing breast mass with well-demarcated ovoid nodular shape. The tumor was histologically characterized by fascicular-growing spindle cell proliferation with large areas of hyalinized fibrosis and focally ductal epithelial remnants embedded in myxoid stroma, mimicking a fibroadenomatous lesion. It had frequent mitoses of 5-16/10 high-power fields, hemorrhagic necrosis, and focally pericapsular invasion. The spindle cells were diffusely immunoreactive for fibronectin, smooth muscle actin, and calponin, which suggest a myofibroblastic origin. Multiple irregularly thickened vessels with medial or pericytic cell proliferation were found to be merged with the intrinsic tumor cells. The tumor could be diagnosed low-grade myofibroblastic sarcoma arising in an old fibroadenoma. We report a case of a low-grade mammary myofibrosarcoma that showed a background lesion of fibroadenoma first in the worldwide literature and suggest the pericytes or medial muscle cells of the intratumoral vessels as the cell origin of the myofibroblastic sarcoma.

  8. Implementing the World Report on Disability in West Africa: challenges and opportunities for Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuakli-Wosornu, Yetsa A; Haig, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    Disability issues have taken a prominent role on international stages in recent years. Beginning with the May 2005 World Health Assembly Resolution 58.23 and culminating in the June 2011 World Bank and World Health Organization World Report on Disability, comprehensive disability analyses from nations at various stages of development can now be accessed and used by relevant stakeholders in health, policy, and aide arenas. The implementation of this landmark report is critical for the advancement of social inclusion in diverse countries, including those with limited resources. However, activating the World Report on Disability in resource-limited countries remains a significant challenge because of threadbare data and cultural, institutional, and physical barriers to social inclusion. This review summarizes current national disability data and describes challenges and opportunities for the implementation of the World Report on Disability in Ghana. As a structural point of departure, the article uses the three broad categories of challenges outlined by the World Health Organization: attitudinal, physical, and institutional.

  9. Hazard report. Don't use industrial-grade gases for clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The use of industrial-grade gases instead of medical-grade gases for clinical applications increases the risk of introducing undesirable and even toxic contaminants into the clinical environment. Hospitals should have policies in place to ensure that gases of the appropriate type and grade are used for the intended application.

  10. The Earlier the Better? Taking the AP® in 10th Grade. Research Report No. 2012-10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Awilda; McKillip, Mary E. M.; Niu, Sunny X.

    2013-01-01

    In this report, the authors examine the impact of scoring a 1 or 2 on an AP® Exam in 10th grade on later AP Exam participation and performance. As access to AP courses increases within and across schools, a growing number of students are taking AP courses and exams in the earlier grades of high school. Using a matched sample of AP and no-AP…

  11. Neuroendocrine tumors of colon and rectum: validation of clinical and prognostic values of the World Health Organization 2010 grading classifications and European Neuroendocrine Tumor Society staging systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chaoyong; Yin, Yuan; Chen, Huijiao; Tang, Sumin; Yin, Xiaonan; Zhou, Zongguang; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Zhixin

    2017-03-28

    This study evaluated and compared the clinical and prognostic values of the grading criteria used by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the European Neuroendocrine Tumors Society (ENETS). Moreover, this work assessed the current best prognostic model for colorectal neuroendocrine tumors (CRNETs). The 2010 WHO classifications and the ENETS systems can both stratify the patients into prognostic groups, although the 2010 WHO criteria is more applicable to CRNET patients. Along with tumor location, the 2010 WHO criteria are important independent prognostic parameters for CRNETs in both univariate and multivariate analyses through Cox regression (P<0.05). Data from 192 consecutive patients histopathologically diagnosed with CRNETs and had undergone surgical resection from January 2009 to May 2016 in a single center were retrospectively analyzed. Findings suggest that the WHO classifications are superior over the ENETS classification system in predicting the prognosis of CRNETs. Additionally, the WHO classifications can be widely used in clinical practice.

  12. [High-grade small bowel angiosarcoma associated with angiosarcomatosis: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahbouni, Sanae; Barnoud, Raphaëlle; Watkin, Emmanuel; Devouassoux-Shisheboran, Mojgan

    2011-08-01

    Angiosarcoma is a rare soft-tissue neoplasm occurring most often in the skin and the subcutaneous tissues and very rarely in the gastrointestinal tract. We report a case of a 25-year-old woman who presented with a small intestinal angiosarcoma associated with angiosarcomatosis. The diagnosis was established on surgical intestinal resection, that showed a high-grade angiosarcoma with epithelioid component and foci of agressive form of hemangioendothelioma. Immunohistochemical study revealed tumour cell positivity with endothelial markers CD31 and factor VIII whereas CD34 and epithelial markers were negative. The tumour displayed KIT (CD117) immunoreactivity without KIT or PDGFRA mutation on molecular analysis. Clinical and pathological features as well as differential diagnosis of this rare entity in gastrointestinal tract are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Implementing recommendations of the World Report on Disability for indigenous populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westby, Carol

    2013-02-01

    Typically, the types of services provided for people with communication disorders (PWCD) and the ways the services are provided have been designed for dominant populations in the Minority World. If services are to be truly accessible and equitable, they must be designed to account for cultural variations in beliefs, needs, and desires of PWCD and their families. This article describes the health conditions that put indigenous populations at particular risk for communicative disorders and gives examples of ways in which speech-language pathologists (SLPs) have addressed the recommendations of the World Report on Disability when working with PWCD in indigenous communities in Minority World countries.

  14. The Misplaced Math Student: Lost in Eighth-Grade Algebra. The 2008 Brown Center Report on American Education. Special Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveless, Tom

    2008-01-01

    This new study is being released as an advance excerpt of the 2008 Brown Center Report on American Education. This new report finds that the nation's push to challenge more students by placing them in advanced math classes in eighth grade has had unintended and damaging consequences, as some 120,000 middle-schoolers are now struggling in advanced…

  15. Teachers' Grading Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isnawati, Ida; Saukah, Ali

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated teachers' grading decision making, focusing on their beliefs underlying their grading decision making, their grading practices and assessment types, and factors they considered in grading decision making. Two teachers from two junior high schools applying different curriculum policies in grade reporting in Indonesian…

  16. The World Bank and the environment, fiscal 1992, exercise 92. Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    The report describes the Bank's activities in assisting countries with environmental management, such as programs to reduce poverty without exhausting natural resources. Included are assessments of the environmental impacts of projects supported by World Bank loans, and accounts of efforts to meet global environmental challenges with coordinated international action through the Global Environment Facility (GEF). Among the events in the period covered by the report are the affirmation of the World Bank's participation with United Nations organizations in the GEF and the Bank's administration of pilot programs aimed at finding solutions to such global environmental problems as pollution of international waters, global warming, depletion of the Earth's ozone layer, and dwindling biological diversity; the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development; and the publication of the World Development Report 1992, with its theme of development and the environment

  17. Analysis and implementation of a World Health Organization health report: methodological concepts and strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Groote, Per Maximilian; Giustini, Alessandro; Bickenbach, Jerome Edmond

    2014-01-01

    A long-standing scientific discourse on the use of health research evidence to inform policy has come to produce multiple implementation theories, frameworks, models, and strategies. It is from this extensive body of research that the authors extract and present essential components of an implementation process in the health domain, gaining valuable guidance on how to successfully meet the challenges of implementation. Furthermore, this article describes how implementation content can be analyzed and reorganized, with a special focus on implementation at different policy, systems and services, and individual levels using existing frameworks and tools. In doing so, the authors aim to contribute to the establishment and testing of an implementation framework for reports such as the World Health Organization World Report on Disability, the World Health Organization International Perspectives on Spinal Cord Injury, and other health policy reports or technical health guidelines.

  18. Business use of the World Wide Web: a report on further investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hooi-Im Ng

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available As a continuation of a previous study this paper reports on a series of studies into business use of the World Wide Web and, more generally the Internet. The use of the World Wide Web as a business tool has increased rapidly for the past three years, and the benefits of the World Wide Web to business and customers are discussed, together with the barriers that hold back future development of electronic commerce. As with the previous study we report on a desk survey of 300 randomly selected business Web sites and on the results of an electronic mail questionnaire sent to the sample companies. An extended version of this paper has been submitted to the International Journal of Information Management

  19. Will Not Want: Self-Control Rather than Motivation Explains the Female Advantage in Report Card Grades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duckworth, Angela L.; Shulman, Elizabeth P.; Mastronarde, Andrew J.; Patrick, Sarah D.; Zhang, Jinghui; Druckman, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Girls earn better grades than boys, but the mechanism explaining this gender difference is not well understood. We examined the relative importance of self-control and motivation in explaining the female advantage in grades. In Study 1, we surveyed middle school teachers and found they judged girls to be higher in both school motivation and self-control. In Studies 2 and 3—using self-reported motivation and teacher- and/or parent-reported self-control, and quarterly and final grades obtained from school records—we find that self-control, but not school motivation, helps to explain the gender gap in academic performance. In these studies, girls appeared to be more self-controlled than boys, but—contrary to teacher judgments in Study 1—did not appear to be more motivated to do well in school. PMID:25883522

  20. Improving the Study Skills of Discrepant Achieving Seventh Grade Students. Research and Development Report 30.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Roger G.; Pappas, James P.

    Three approaches to the problem of helping underachieving seventh grade boys improve their study habits are compared: (1) behavior modification; (2) group counseling; and (3) didactic instruction. A pre-post criteria format sought to measure change in terms of: (1) academic achievement as measured by grade point average; and (2) study habits and…

  1. Evaluation of open-graded friction course mixture : technical assistance report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-10-01

    Open-graded friction course (OGFC) is a porous, gap-graded, predominantly single size aggregate bituminous mixture that contains a high percentage of air voids. The high air void content and the open structure of this mix promote the effective draina...

  2. FY17 Status Report on the Initial Development of a Constitutive Model for Grade 91 Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messner, M. C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Phan, V. -T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sham, T. -L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Grade 91 is a candidate structural material for high temperature advanced reactor applications. Existing ASME Section III, Subsection HB, Subpart B simplified design rules based on elastic analysis are setup as conservative screening tools with the intent to supplement these screening rules with full inelastic analysis when required. The Code provides general guidelines for suitable inelastic models but does not provide constitutive model implementations. This report describes the development of an inelastic constitutive model for Gr. 91 steel aimed at fulfilling the ASME Code requirements and being included into a new Section III Code appendix, HBB-Z. A large database of over 300 experiments on Gr. 91 was collected and converted to a standard XML form. Five families of Gr. 91 material models were identified in the literature. Of these five, two are potentially suitable for use in the ASME code. These two models were implemented and evaluated against the experimental database. Both models have deficiencies so the report develops a framework for developing and calibrating an improved model. This required creating a new modeling method for representing changes in material rate sensitivity across the full ASME allowable temperature range for Gr. 91 structural components: room temperature to 650° C. On top of this framework for rate sensitivity the report describes calibrating a model for work hardening and softening in the material using genetic algorithm optimization. Future work will focus on improving this trial model by including tension/compression asymmetry observed in experiments and necessary to capture material ratcheting under zero mean stress and by improving the optimization and analysis framework.

  3. Young Children and the Quality of Life: Report of XVIIIth World Congress of OMEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiser, Margaret G.

    1986-01-01

    Reports on some of the major issues addressed during the l8th World Congress of OMEP (Organisation Mondiale de l'Education Prescolaire). Topics discussed included maternal and infant malnutrition; social dynamics in developing (and developed) countries; the messages of high technology for children and the quality of life. (BB)

  4. Environmental Reporting for Global Higher Education Institutions using the World Wide Web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, J.; Alabaster, T.; Richardson, S.; Harrison, R.

    1997-01-01

    Proposes the value of voluntary environmental reporting by higher education institutions as an aid to implementing environmental policies. Suggests that the World Wide Web can provide a fast, up-to-date, flexible, participatory, multidimensional medium for information exchange and management. Contains 29 references. (PVD)

  5. Training for Social Development Staff at the World Bank, Volume 1. Main Report

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel R. Gross; Matthew LeDuc

    2010-01-01

    The social development family is facing a major challenge given the significant increase in lending made by the Bank in the last five years. Lending overall has more than doubled between FY05 and FY09; investment lending has increased by 82 percent and infrastructure lending by 125 percent. In this report, International Evaluation Group (IEG) suggests that the World Bank's safeguard policies ...

  6. JPRS Report, Soviet Union: The Working Class & The Contemporary World, No. 5, September-October 1987.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-03-24

    connected with the committee’s activity constituted in 3 years 5.5 percent; idling diminished from 10 to 3 percent of work time; absenteeism , from 15 to 7...34The Changing Situation of Workers and Their Unions...," p 10. 13. U.S. News and World Report, 16 May 1983, p 61; Labour Research, vol 73, No 2

  7. Article Review on World Bank Report, Optimal Design for a Minimum Wage Policy in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Nurrachmi, Rininta; Mad-Ahin, Ashanee; Waeowanjit, Phimpaporn; Kareemarif Arif, Naz Abdul

    2012-01-01

    There are many pros and cons with the implementation of minimum wage in Malaysia, since it is the first time. This article review is to analyze the World Bank report on Malaysian minimum wage policy that will be implemented in 2013. There are strength and weakness on the report. Moreover the review will also be analyzed from Islamic perspective since majority population in Malaysia is Muslim.

  8. Factors associated with self-reported inattentive driving at highway-rail grade crossings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shanshan; Khattak, Aemal J

    2017-12-01

    This research identified factors associated with inattentive driving at Highway-Rail Grade Crossings (HRGCs) by investigating drivers' self-reported inattentive driving experiences and factors pertaining to their socioeconomic, personality, attitudinal, and other characteristics. A random selection of 2500 households in Nebraska received a survey questionnaire designed for licensed motor vehicle drivers; respondents returned 980 questionnaires. Factor analysis identified latent variables evaluating drivers' patience and inclination to wait for trains, attitudes toward new technology, law enforcement or education regarding HRGC safety, and the propensity to commit serious traffic violations at HRGCs. The investigation utilized a structural equation model for analysis. This model indicated that drivers with a higher risk of inattentive driving at HRGCs were: female, younger in age, from households with higher incomes, with shorter tenure (in years) in their current city of residence, more frequently used HRGCs, received less information on safety at HRGCs, had less patience to wait for trains to pass and had less interest in safety improvement technology, law enforcement or safety education at HRGCs. These research findings provide useful information for future research and to policy makers for improving public safety. Additionally, the results are useful for safety educational program providers for targeted program delivery to drivers that are more vulnerable to distracted driving at HRGCs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Case Report: Microsurgical excision of grade 5 cerebral AVM [version 2; referees: 1 approved, 2 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Munakomi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this case report, we discuss the microsurgical management of a Spetzler-Martin grade 5 arteriovenous malformation (AVM in a young boy who presented with a hemorrhagic episode and had a high calculated risk of rebleeding. We also outline the rationale for choosing the management option.

  10. Internal Consistency of the easyCBM© CCSS Reading Measures: Grades 3-8. Technical Report #1407

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerreiro, Meg; Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    This technical report documents findings from a study of the internal consistency and split-half reliability of the easyCBM© CCSS Reading measures, grades 3-8. Data, drawn from an extant data set gathered in school year 2013-2014, include scores from over 150,000 students' fall and winter benchmark assessments. Findings suggest that the easyCBM©…

  11. Scanning WorldScan. Final report on the presentation and evaluation of WorldScan, a model of the WORLD economy for SCenario ANalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geurts, B.; Gielen, A.; Nahuis, R.; Tang, P.; Timmer, H.

    1997-01-01

    An overview is given of the efforts made to present and evaluate WorldScan, a long-term model of the world economy, developed at the Dutch Central Planning Bureau (CPB). One of the pivotal activities was the organisation of a peer review of the model during a two-day workshop. The reviewers were selected both from the academic and the policy field. The main recommendations of that review were (a) not to pursue a formal, full-scale linkage between WorldScan and the RIVM-developed climate model IMAGE. Instead, WorldScan should be used for separate economic analyses, which is input in the climate model; (b) to make more precise choices with respect to the underlying theories the time horizon of the analyses; (c) to improve the empirical base of WorldScan; and (d) to enhance the use of WorldScan for policy analyses on behalf of international policy fora. The review proved to be very beneficial for the evolution of WorldScan. Implementation of some of the recommendations has led to increased use of the model by international institutions. Since the review, WorldScan has been used on behalf of the European Union (EU), the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), the Energy Modelling Forum (EMF), the Centre for Global Trade Analysis (GTAP), the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences (CASS) and Indian Planning Commission (IPC). 110 refs

  12. Gender at Work : A Companion to the World Development Report on Jobs

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2014-01-01

    Today, many more girls are going to school and living longer, healthier lives than 30 or even 10 years ago. That was the good news in our flagship 2012 World Development Report on gender. But this has not translated into broader gains. Too many women still lack basic freedoms and opportunities and face huge inequalities in the world of work. Globally, fewer than half of women have jobs, compared with almost four-fifths of men. Girls and women still learn less, earn less, ...

  13. Investigation of optimize graded concrete for Oklahoma : phase 1 : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Optimized Graded Concrete has been a subject widely discussed through the history of concrete. Since aggregates make up over 70% of the volume in a mixture, gradation is critical to the strength, workability, and durability of concrete. In practice o...

  14. World Energy Outlook Special Report 2013: Redrawing the Energy Climate Map

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-06-01

    Governments have decided collectively that the world needs to limit the average global temperature increase to no more than 2°C and international negotiations are engaged to that end. Yet any resulting agreement will not emerge before 2015 and new legal obligations will not begin before 2020. Meanwhile, despite many countries taking new actions, the world is drifting further and further from the track it needs to follow. The energy sector is the single largest source of climate-changing greenhouse-gas emissions and limiting these is an essential focus of action. The World Energy Outlook has published detailed analysis of the energy contribution to climate change for many years. But, amid major international economic preoccupations, there are worrying signs that the issue of climate change has slipped down the policy agenda. This Special Report seeks to bring it right back on top by showing that the dilemma can be tackled at no net economic cost.

  15. World Energy Outlook Special Report 2013: Redrawing the Energy Climate Map (Executive Summary)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-06-01

    Governments have decided collectively that the world needs to limit the average global temperature increase to no more than 2 °C and international negotiations are engaged to that end. Yet any resulting agreement will not emerge before 2015 and new legal obligations will not begin before 2020. Meanwhile, despite many countries taking new actions, the world is drifting further and further from the track it needs to follow. The energy sector is the single largest source of climate-changing greenhouse-gas emissions and limiting these is an essential focus of action. The World Energy Outlook has published detailed analysis of the energy contribution to climate change for many years. But, amid major international economic preoccupations, there are worrying signs that the issue of climate change has slipped down the policy agenda. This Special Report seeks to bring it right back on top by showing that the dilemma can be tackled at no net economic cost.

  16. Primary tonsillar lymphomas according to the new World Health Organization classification: to report 87 cases and literature review and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadianpanah, Mohammad; Daneshbod, Yahya; Ramzi, Mani; Hamidizadeh, Nasrin; Dehghani, Seyed Javad; Bidouei, Farzad; Khademi, Bijan; Ahmadloo, Niloofar; Ansari, Mansour; Omidvari, Shapour; Mosalaei, Ahmad; Dehghani, Mehdi

    2010-10-01

    The present study aimed to define the natural history, World Health Organization (WHO) classification, prognostic factors, and treatment outcome of 87 patients with primary lymphoma of the palatine tonsil and literature review and analysis. Between 1990 and March 2008, 87 consecutive patients diagnosed with primary lymphoid malignancy of the palatine tonsil. All pathologic specimens were reviewed and reclassified according to the recent WHO classification. To investigate the association of tonsillar lymphomas with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), in situ hybridization was performed for 24 tonsillar lymphomas (23 diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBC) and one classic Hodgkin's disease) and ten normal tonsils as control group. In literature review, we found 26 major related series including 1,602 patients with primary tonsillar lymphoma. The median age of our patients was 52 years (range 11-86 years). There were 39 women and 48 men with a median follow-up of 67 months for living patients. The vast majority (95%) of patients had B-cell phenotype. DLBC was the most frequent histology. In situ hybridization revealed none of 23 DLBC to be positive for EBV. The 5-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 78.9% and 86%, respectively. In the literature review and by analyzing the data collection from 26 major reported series, the median age was 55 years and male/female ratio was 1.3:1. Intermediate grade tumors consisted of 72% of all tonsillar lymphomas and B-cell lymphomas constituted 82% of all cell immunophenotypes. The 5-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 61% and 67%, respectively. The vast majority of tonsillar lymphomas are of B-cell origin and with intermediate to high-grade histology. These neoplasms tend to present in early stage disease and to have favorable outcome. WHO classification predicts more accurately treatment outcome of patients with tonsillar lymphoma. The association of DLBC in the palatine tonsil with EBV infection is infrequent.

  17. Too Much Television? Prospective Associations Between Early Childhood Televiewing and Later Self-reports of Victimization by Sixth Grade Classmates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Emmalyne; Fitzpatrick, Caroline; Derevensky, Jeffrey L; Pagani, Linda S

    2015-01-01

    Using a birth cohort, this study aimed to verify whether televiewing at 29 months, a common early childhood pastime, is prospectively associated with self-reported victimization at age 12. Participants are 991 girls and 1006 boys from the Quebec Longitudinal Study of Child Development. The main predictor comprised parent-reported daily televiewing by their children at 29 months. In the sixth grade, children reported how often they experienced victimization by classmates in the past year. The authors conducted multivariate linear regression, in which child self-reports of victimization were linearly regressed on early televiewing and potential confounders. Every SD unit increase (0.88 hours) in daily televiewing at 29 months predicted an 11% SD unit increase in self-reported peer victimization by sixth grade classmates (unstandardized B = .031, p characteristics (gender, preexisting externalizing behaviors, baseline cognitive abilities, and televiewing at age 12) and family characteristics (family configuration, income, and functioning, and maternal education). Daily televiewing time at 29 months was associated with a subsequent increased risk of victimization by classmates at the end of sixth grade, a period which represents a critical developmental transition to middle school. Youth who experience peer victimization are at an increased risk of long-term mental health issues, such as depression, underachievement, and low self-esteem. This prospective association, across a 10-year period, suggests the need for better parental awareness, acknowledgement, and compliance with existing recommendations put forth by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  18. Low-grade extraskeletal osteosarcoma of the chest wall: case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatier, Renaud; Bouvier, Corinne; de Pinieux, Gonzague; Sarran, Anthony; Brenot-Rossi, Isabelle; Pedeutour, Florence; Chetaille, Bruno; Viens, Patrice; Weiller, Pierre-Jean; Bertucci, François

    2010-11-24

    Low-grade extraskeletal osteosarcomas (ESOS) are extremely rare. We present the first case of low-grade ESOS of the chest wall, which occurred in a 30-year-old man. Because of initial misdiagnosis and patient's refusal of surgery, the diagnosis was done after a 4-year history of a slowly growing mass in soft tissues, leading to a huge (30-cm diameter) calcified mass locally extended over the left chest wall. Final diagnosis was helped by molecular analysis of MDM2 and CDK4 oncogenes. Unfortunately, at this time, no surgical treatment was possible due to loco-regional extension, and despite chemotherapy, the patient died one year after diagnosis, five years after the first symptoms. We describe the clinical, radiological and bio-pathological features of this unique case, and review the literature concerning low-grade ESOS. Our case highlights the diagnostic difficulties for such very rare tumours and the interest of molecular analysis in ambiguous cases.

  19. Libraries, National Security, Freedom of Information Laws and Social Responsibilities. IFLA/FAIFE World Report Series Volume V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidelin, Susanne, Ed.; Hamilton, Stuart, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    The IFLA/FAIFE World Report Series is unique. It is the only source based on a systematic data collection process that provides an overview of how libraries around the world are tackling barriers to freedom of access to information and freedom of expression. This year's edition includes 84 country reports which detail the extent of Internet access…

  20. Carbon dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center: A for Atmospheric trace gases. Annual progress report, FY 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burtis, M.D. [comp.] [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment and Resources Center; Cushman, R.M.; Boden, T.A.; Jones, S.B.; Nelson, T.R.; Stoss, F.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-03-01

    This report summarizes the activities and accomplishments made by the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center-A for Atmospheric Trace Gases during the fiscal year 1994. Topics discussed in this report include; organization and staff, user services, systems, communications, Collaborative efforts with China, networking, ocean data and activities of the World Data Center-A.

  1. High School Grade Inflation from 2004 to 2011. ACT Research Report Series, 2013 (3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Sanchez, Edgar I.

    2013-01-01

    This study explores inflation in high school grade point average (HSGPA), defined as trend over time in the conditional average of HSGPA, given ACT® Composite score. The time period considered is 2004 to 2011. Using hierarchical linear modeling, the study updates a previous analysis of Woodruff and Ziomek (2004). The study also investigates…

  2. The Great Depression and Elementary School Teachers as Reported in "Grade Teacher" Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Sherry L.; Bellows, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    This study focuses on elementary school teachers during the Great Depression and the role that they played to sustain everyday school activity. The authors draw evidence primarily from the pages of "Grade Teacher" magazine, through teachers' letters written to its editor, Florence Hale, and her responses to them. Opportunities to study…

  3. The research reported in this article was conducted from a socio-environmental perspective on learners’ school readiness when entering Grade 1, as well as their school performance in Grade 1 and again in Grade 4. The relation between school readiness and

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erna van Zyl

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The research reported in this article was conducted from a socio-environmental perspective on learners’ school readiness when entering Grade 1, as well as their school performance in Grade 1 and again in Grade 4. The relation between school readiness and performance in Home Language and Numeracy in Grade 1, and performance in the same learning areas in Grade 4 were investigated by means of a longitudinal quantitative study. One school in the Free State province was purposefully selected. The Aptitude Test for School Beginners (ASB was implemented to capture school readiness, including school maturity and levels of development in physical, cognitive, emotional, social and normative domains. Results confirm that school readiness significantly correlated with academic performance of the respondents in Grade 1 as well as with their school performance in Grade 4.

  4. A study of variations in the reported haemophilia B prevalence around the world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stonebraker, J S; Bolton-Maggs, P H B; Michael Soucie, J; Walker, I; Brooker, M

    2012-05-01

    The objectives of this article were to study the reported prevalence of haemophilia B (HB) on a country-by-country basis and to analyse whether the prevalence of HB varied by national economy. The prevalence of HB is the proportion of diagnosed, reported cases of HB in a population at a specific point of time. We collected data on the HB prevalence for 105 countries from the World Federation of Hemophilia annual global surveys. Our results showed that the HB prevalence varied considerably among countries, even among the wealthiest of countries. The HB prevalence (per 100 000 males) for the highest income countries was 2.69 ± 1.61 (mean ± SD), whereas the prevalence for the rest of the world was 1.20 ± 1.33 (mean ± SD). Ireland had the highest reported HB prevalence of 8.07 per 100 000 males. There was a strong trend of increasing HB prevalence (per 100 000 males) over time. Prevalence data reported from the WFH compared well with prevalence data from the literature. The WFH annual global surveys have some limitations, but they are the best available source of worldwide haemophilia data. Prevalence data are extremely valuable information for the planning efforts of national healthcare agencies in setting priorities and allocating resources for the treatment of HB. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. First report on the state of the world's animal genetic resources. Views on biotechnology as expressed in country reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardellino, R.; Hoffmann, I.; Tempelman, K.A.

    2005-01-01

    As part of the country-driven strategy for the management of farm animal genetic resources, FAO invited 188 counties to participate in the First Report on the State of the World's Animal Genetic Resources, with 145 consenting. Their reports are an important source of information on the use of biotechnology, particularly biotechnical products and processes. This paper analyses information from country reports so far submitted, and is therefore preliminary. There is clearly a big gap in biotechnology applications between developed and developing countries, with artificial insemination the most common technology used in developing countries, although not everywhere. More complex techniques, such as embryo transfer (ET) and molecular tools, are even less frequent in developing countries. Most developing countries wish to expand ET and establish gene banks and cryoconservation techniques. There are very few examples in developing countries of livestock breeding programmes capable of incorporating molecular biotechnologies in livestock genetic improvement programmes. (author)

  6. Bevacizumab in High Grade Gliomas: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balana, Carme; Cardona, Andres Felipe

    2007-01-01

    Patients with anaplastic astrocytoma or glioblastoma generally have adverse prognosis. Currently, standard treatment for high grade glial cell tumors consists of the concomitant use of radiotherapy and Themozolamide, followed by six months with the alkilant. However, subjects diagnosed with novo or recurrent tumors have overall survival rates from 3 to 15 months. Multiple chemotherapeutic and biological agents have been used to control progression, with no improvement in survival rates. New medication is being developed aimed at molecular targets such as the endothelial growth factor which can be regulated by, among others, Bevacizumab (BEV). Recent results from phase 11 trials combining BEV and Irinotecan (CPT-11) in patients with high grade gliomas revealed improved response rates, as well as disease free and overall survival rates. The case of a female with recurrent glioblastoma who achieved complete response after initiating BEV/CPT- 11 is presented

  7. Low-grade extraskeletal osteosarcoma of the chest wall: case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chetaille Bruno

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low-grade extraskeletal osteosarcomas (ESOS are extremely rare. Case presentation We present the first case of low-grade ESOS of the chest wall, which occurred in a 30-year-old man. Because of initial misdiagnosis and patient's refusal of surgery, the diagnosis was done after a 4-year history of a slowly growing mass in soft tissues, leading to a huge (30-cm diameter calcified mass locally extended over the left chest wall. Final diagnosis was helped by molecular analysis of MDM2 and CDK4 oncogenes. Unfortunately, at this time, no surgical treatment was possible due to loco-regional extension, and despite chemotherapy, the patient died one year after diagnosis, five years after the first symptoms. Conclusion We describe the clinical, radiological and bio-pathological features of this unique case, and review the literature concerning low-grade ESOS. Our case highlights the diagnostic difficulties for such very rare tumours and the interest of molecular analysis in ambiguous cases.

  8. The World Report on Disability as a blueprint for international, national, and local aphasia services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worrall, Linda E; Howe, Tami; O'Callaghan, Anna; Hill, Anne J; Rose, Miranda; Wallace, Sarah J; Rose, Tanya; Brown, Kyla; Power, Emma; O'Halloran, Robyn; Rohde, Alexia

    2013-02-01

    This commentary aims to extend the debate of the lead article authors (Wylie, McAllister, Davidson, and Marshall, 2013) by translating the nine recommendations of the World Report on Disability into a plan of action for the aphasia community. Solutions for the advancement of aphasia science and services are presented at international (macro), national (meso), and local (micro) levels. Implications for speech-language pathologists and aphasia service delivery are discussed. An overarching call to action is the need for speech-language pathologists to support a strong and vibrant aphasia community at all levels, so that the voices of people with aphasia can be heard.

  9. State of the world 1993. A Worldwatch Institute report on progress towards a sustainable society

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, L R; Flavin, C; Postel, S; Starke, L [eds.

    1993-01-01

    The State of the World report is an annual attempt first to describe the intricate currents and countercurrents of humanity's interaction with the global environment, and then to proceed to recommend how to shift the currents in other directions. The chapters in this edition are called: a new era unfolds; facing water scarcity; reviving coral reefs; closing the gender gap in development; supporting indigenous peoples; providing energy in developing countries; rediscovering rail; preparing for peace; reconciling trade and the environment; and shaping the next industrial revolution. 685 refs., 7 figs., 30 tabs.

  10. Status report from India [Processing of Low-Grade Uranium Ores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fareeduddin, S [Atomic Energy Establishment, Trombay, Bombay (India)

    1967-06-15

    The Energy Survey Committee of India, in its report to the Government, has estimated that the energy requirements in the year 1985/86 would be 290X10{sup 9} kWh, i. e. eight times the present requirement, and in the year 2000 it would be 820X10{sup 9} kWh, which is about 22 times the present requirement. The hydropotential that can be developed during the next 20 years is estimated to be of the order of 150X10{sup 9} kWh and hence the difference of about 140X10{sup 9} kWh will have to be obtained from either fossil or nuclear fuel. This would mean installating a generation capacity of about 26 000 MW in the next 20 years. To conserve the limited fossil fuel reserves, it has been estimated that about 70% of this capacity, i. e. about 18 000 MW, should form the nuclear component. This will be about 25% of the total energy requirements by 1985/86. The uranium requirements to meet this growth will be about 10 000 tonnes by 1985/86 which, from the point of view of our resources, is a substantial quantity. The most important uranium deposits are located in South Bihar in the Singhbhum Thrust belt, which is well known for its copper, apatite magnetite and kyanite deposits. On the basis of their uranium contents, these ores can be classified into two broad categories - one with low copper and high uranium contents and the other with high copper and low uranium contents. Another source of uranium in India is monazite. Some particulars about these deposits are given. Facilities for the recovery of byproduct uranium from monazite already exist in the country. But its production from this source, conditioned as it is by the limited demand for thorium, cannot be very large. Both the categories of the ores from the Singhbhum belt can be considered as low grade. Uranium from the ores in category (B) can be recovered, in the present state of knowledge, only as a byproduct of the copper industry. In the case of ores in the category (A), attempts have been made to recover uranium

  11. Global Matrix 2.0 : Report Card Grades on the Physical Activity of Children and Youth Comparing 38 Countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tremblay, Mark S; Barnes, Joel D; González, Silvia A; Katzmarzyk, Peter T; Onywera, Vincent O; Reilly, John J; Tomkinson, Grant R; Takken, T

    2016-01-01

    The Active Healthy Kids Global Alliance organized the concurrent preparation of Report Cards on the physical activity of children and youth in 38 countries from 6 continents (representing 60% of the world's population). Nine common indicators were used (Overall Physical Activity, Organized Sport

  12. Impact of the Thinking Reader[R] Software Program on Grade 6 Reading Vocabulary, Comprehension, Strategies, and Motivation: Final Report. NCEE 2010-4035

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Kathryn; Chinen, Marjorie; Duncan, Teresa Garcia; Miller, H. Ray; Fryer, Lindsay; Zmach, Courtney; Culp, Katherine

    2011-01-01

    "Thinking Reader" is a software program for students in Grades 5-8 that incorporates elements commonly identified in policy reports as being key components of effective adolescent literacy instruction. This evaluation of the impact of "Thinking Reader" use by Grade 6 students focused on two confirmatory research questions about…

  13. The Development of K-8 Progress Monitoring Measures in Mathematics for Use with the 2% and General Education Populations: Grade 3. Technical Report # 09-02

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, Julie; Lai, Cheng Fei; Tindal, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    In this technical report, we describe the development and piloting of a series of mathematics progress monitoring measures intended for use with students in grades kindergarten through eighth grade. These measures, available as part of easyCBM[TM], an online progress monitoring assessment system, were developed in 2007 and 2008 and administered to…

  14. The Development of K-8 Progress Monitoring Measures in Mathematics for Use with the 2% and General Education Populations: Grade 5. Technical Report # 09-01

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Cheng Fei; Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    In this technical report, we describe the development and piloting of a series of mathematics progress monitoring measures intended for use with students in grades kindergarten through eighth grade. These measures, available as part of easyCBM[TM], an online progress monitoring assessment system, were developed in 2007 and 2008 and administered to…

  15. The Development of K-8 Progress Monitoring Measures in Mathematics for Use with the 2% and General Education Populations: Grade 2. Technical Report # 0920

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, Julie; Lai, Cheng Fei; Tindal, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    In this technical report, we describe the development and piloting of a series of mathematics progress monitoring measures intended for use with students in grades kindergarten through eighth grade. These measures, available as part of easyCBM[TM], an online progress monitoring assessment system, were developed in 2007 and 2008 and administered to…

  16. The Development of K-8 Progress Monitoring Measures in Mathematics for Use with the 2% and General Education Populations: Grade 7. Technical Report 0908

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Cheng Fei; Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    In this technical report, we describe the development and piloting of a series of mathematics progress monitoring measures intended for use with students in grades kindergarten through eighth grade. These measures, available as part of easyCBM[TM], an online progress monitoring assessment system, were developed in 2007 and 2008 and administered to…

  17. The Development of K-8 Progress Monitoring Measures in Mathematics for Use with the 2% and General Education Populations: Grade 4. Technical Report # 09-03

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, Julie; Lai, Cheng Fei; Tindal, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    In this technical report, we describe the development and piloting of a series of mathematics progress monitoring measures intended for use with students in grades kindergarten through eighth grade. These measures, available as part of easyCBM[TM], an online progress monitoring assessment system, were developed in 2007 and 2008 and administered to…

  18. The Development of K-8 Progress Monitoring Measures in Mathematics for Use with the 2% and General Education Populations: Grade 8. Technical Report # 09-04

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Cheng Fei; Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    In this technical report, we describe the development and piloting of a series of mathematics progress monitoring measures intended for use with students in grades kindergarten through eighth grade. These measures, available as part of easyCBM[TM], an online progress monitoring assessment system, were developed in 2007 and 2008 and administered to…

  19. Anthropometry of World-Class Elite Handball Players According to the Playing Position: Reports From Men's Handball World Championship 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghobadi, Hamid; Rajabi, Hamid; Farzad, Babak; Bayati, Mahdi; Jeffreys, Ian

    2013-12-18

    Identifying the anthropometric measures of successful and less successful handball players may be helpful in developing a talent identification and development model, allowing for the determination of key physical capacities required for elite performance. The purpose of the study was to describe the anthropometric characteristics, including age, standing stature, body mass and body mass index (BMI) in handball players who participated in the 2013 Men's Handball World Championships. Secondly, the objective was to identify the possible differences in these parameters in terms of individual playing positions (goalkeeper, back, center back, wing, line player). Rosters with handball player's age, standing stature, and body mass were obtained from the International Handball Federation website. The research material included 409 handball players (24 teams). National teams were organized by their ranks and sub-grouped using their continents and playing positions. The results of the analyses of variance demonstrated significant differences in age (F=2.30; p=0.044; Partial ŋ2=0.028), standing stature (F=14.02; p=0.0001; Partial ŋ2=0.148), and body mass (F=5.88; p=0.0001; Partial ŋ2=0.068) among the groups (G1-G6). Players in G1 had the highest standing stature and body mass, while players in G6 had the lowest age and body mass values. The backs and line players were the tallest. In addition, the measurement of body mass showed that the line players had the highest body mass and BMI values. In conclusion, this study presented anthropometric data that differentiated levels of success in male handball teams playing in the 2013 world championships. This information should serve as a reference for the average standing stature, body mass, and BMI of handball players for particular positions at the professional level.

  20. World Solar Challenge 1993 Technical Report. Part 1. Darwin to Adelaide. (November 7-November 16, 1993)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-01-01

    This is a report of the above-named solar car race from Darwin to Adelaide, Australia. On January 7, 1983, an Australian adventurer Mr. Hans Tholstrup succeeded in running from the Australian west coast to Sydney in a car driven solely by solar energy. The travel took 20 days, at an average speed of 23km per hour. The technology has made remarkable advances since his success and, in the World Solar Challenge 1993 held in November 1993, a Honda team crossed the Australian Continent at an average speed of 85km per hour. Technical challenges included the development of maximum-output solar cell panels, a car designed to make full use of such power, and a run at the maximum possible speed, all these dependent solely on the sun as energy source. This report Part I contains the details of the race, analysis, aerodynamics, car body structure, manufacture, materials, and so forth. (NEDO)

  1. Epitope finding in Zika virus molecule:The first world report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Somsri Wiwanitkit; Viroj Wiwanitkit

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus infection is a new problematic virus infection that becomes the present public health problem. Now this mosquito borne infectious disease can be seen worldwide and can cause dengue-like infection. In addition, it can also induce trans-placental infection and result in congenital neurological defect. To prevent this infec-tion, there is still no specific vaccine. To find a new vaccine, finding epitope is the first step. Here, the authors report the study to find epitope within Zika virus molecule. According to this study, the appropriate epitopes can be seen. This is the first world report on epitope finding for Zika virus. The data can be useful for further vaccine development.

  2. Some observations on World Development Report 2011: conflict, security and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangolli, Leena V

    2011-01-01

    The World Development Report 2011 describes the relationship between conflict, security and development and makes a strong argument in favour of strengthening legitimate institutions to reduce the fragility of countries facing protracted cycles of violence, and moving from violence to resilience in order to realise development goals. While highlighting some of the lessons learned from the report (the nature of violence in the 21st century, the global reach of seemingly local conflicts, the universality of conflict as an impediment to development, the role of the international community, and the impact on health), this comment discusses the role of development on conflict and security--particularly the role of imbalanced inequitable development on fuelling conflict and insecurity.

  3. Risoe energy report 10. Energy for smart cities in an urbanised world

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Hans; Soenderberg Petersen, L [eds.

    2011-11-15

    This Risoe Energy Report is the tenth in a series which began in 2002. Volume 10 takes as its point of reference the rapid urbanisation of the world. UN population statistics show that global population is expected to surpass 9 billion by 2050, and nearly 6.3 billion people will be living in urban areas. Urban regions will thus absorb most of the world's population increase in the next four decades while drawing in some of the rural population as well: by 2050 there will be 600 million fewer people in rural areas. The large cities and megacities created by this rapid urbanisation contribute to climate change, and in turn are affected by its consequences. For these and other reasons we need a new approach to what cities should do to become more liveable, economically successful, and environmentally responsible. Megacities of the future need to be smart cities: that is, energy-efficient, consumer-focused and technologydriven. This cannot be achieved simply by improving existing technologies. Instead we need a new smart approach based on smart solutions. With this background the report addresses energy related issues for smart cities, including energy infrastructure, onsite energy production, transport, economy, sustainability, housing, living and governance, including incentives and barriers influencing smart energy for smart cities. (LN)

  4. Risoe energy report 10. Energy for smart cities in an urbanised world

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Hans; Soenderberg Petersen, L. (eds.)

    2011-11-15

    This Risoe Energy Report is the tenth in a series which began in 2002. Volume 10 takes as its point of reference the rapid urbanisation of the world. UN population statistics show that global population is expected to surpass 9 billion by 2050, and nearly 6.3 billion people will be living in urban areas. Urban regions will thus absorb most of the world's population increase in the next four decades while drawing in some of the rural population as well: by 2050 there will be 600 million fewer people in rural areas. The large cities and megacities created by this rapid urbanisation contribute to climate change, and in turn are affected by its consequences. For these and other reasons we need a new approach to what cities should do to become more liveable, economically successful, and environmentally responsible. Megacities of the future need to be smart cities: that is, energy-efficient, consumer-focused and technologydriven. This cannot be achieved simply by improving existing technologies. Instead we need a new smart approach based on smart solutions. With this background the report addresses energy related issues for smart cities, including energy infrastructure, onsite energy production, transport, economy, sustainability, housing, living and governance, including incentives and barriers influencing smart energy for smart cities. (LN)

  5. Copper Mountain, Wyoming, intermediate-grade uranium resource assessment project. Final report. National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madson, M.E.; Ludlam, J.R.; Fukui, L.M.

    1982-11-01

    Intermediate-grade uranium resources were delineated and estimated for Eocene and Precambrian host rock environments in the 39.64 mi 2 Copper Mountain, Wyoming, assessment area. Geologic reconnaissance and geochemical, geophysical, petrologic, borehole, and structural data were interpreted and used to develop a genetic model for uranium mineralization in these environments. Development of a structural scoring system and application of computer graphics in a high-confidence control area established the basis for estimations of uranium resources in the total assessment area. 8 figures, 5 tables

  6. Case report 446: Multicentric, metachronous, low-grade, sclerosing osteogenic sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, E.F.; Tolo, V.T.; Dorfman, H.D.

    1987-01-01

    This case of multicentric osteosarcoma has overlying features of the clinical subgroups described by Amstutz and Mahoney. This 38-year-old woman has survived 6 years with metachronous multifocal osteosarcomas. She presently has at least seven sites of involvement. The lesions are all densely sclerotic and are confined to the axial skeleton. She has had no treatment except for release of compression syndromes. She has no evidence of pulmonary or other visceral metastases. The low grade nature of this type of multifocal osteosarcoma is confirmed by a six year survival in the absence of ablative surgery, radiotherapy or chemotherapy. (orig.)

  7. Law [Review of: World trade report 2011: the WTO and preferential trade agreements: from co-existence to coherence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathis, J.H.

    2012-01-01

    The World Trade Review asked distinguished scholars from the three different fields of economics (Pravin Krishna), political science (Edward D. Mansfield) and law (James H. Mathis) to independently review the WTO's annual World Trade Report for 2011, the theme of which is The WTO and Preferential

  8. Engineering report on drilling in the Sand Wash Basin intermediate grade project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-09-01

    The Sand Wash Basin Intermediate Grade Drilling Project was conducted by Bendix Field Engineering Corporation in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program. This project consisted of 19 drill holes ranging in depth from 275 to 1220 feet (83.9 to 372.1 m). A total of 11,569 feet (3528.5 m) was rotary drilled and 130 feet (39.7 m) were cored for a total of 11,699 feet (3568.2 m) for the project. The project objective was to provide comprehensive subsurface geologic data relevant to Intermediate Grade uranium mineralization of the Browns Park Formation in the Sugar Loaf Peak Site A, and the Little Juniper Mountain Site B areas. All boreholes are located on the USGS Juniper Hot Springs and the Lay 7.5-Minute Series (Topographic) Quadrangles. The project began May 2, 1980; drilling was completed June 3, 1980. Site restoration and clean up was initiated immediately upon the completion of the last borehole and was completed June 8, 1980

  9. Report on the feasibility of the in situ radiometric determination of uranium grade in Witwatersrand gold and uranium mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smit, C.J.B.; Wesolinski, E.S.; Corner, B.

    1982-08-01

    The chip-sampling technique currently employed by the South African gold and uranium-mining industry, for the prediction of face grade, has several drawbacks, namely: 1) it is labour-intensive; 2) sample volumes are often unrepresentative and prone to human error; and 3) the uranium mineralisation may be very erratic along the reef. In situ radiometric assaying for uranium along the reef, on the other hand, is a rapid, essentially one-man operation, enabling a much larger and hence a more representative sample volume to be measured. The high radiometric background inherent in any uranium mine necessitates some form of high-density shielding in order to facilitate quantitative in situ assaying. This report, therefore, briefly outlines the origin, nature, detection and shielding of gamma rays. Results obtained with a frontally shielded total-count instrument showed that radiometric estimates of uranium grade are comparable to those obtained by batch mining and can be used for the prediction of face grades, provided that the ore is in radiometric equilibrium and that thorium and potassium are either not present, or vary sympathetically with the uranium grade. Spectral analysis showed, however, that these circumstances will also permit the use of a collimated (side-shielded) detector of acceptable weight, provided that only the low-energy portion of the spectrum is measured. The advantages of a collimated detector over a frontally shielded detector are also noteworthy, viz.: 1) only one reading is taken per sample point rather than two, as is the case with the frontally shielded system, thus improving counting statistics; and 2) the shielding is permanently fixed to the detector. Comprehensive design considerations for a compact, portable instrument are suggested and methods for determining background radiation as applicable to a collimated detector are described

  10. Human Development report 2007/2008 - Fighting climate change: human solidarity in a divided world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    Climate change is the defining human development challenge of the 21. Century. Failure to respond to that challenge will stall and then reverse international efforts to reduce poverty. The poorest countries and most vulnerable citizens will suffer the earliest and most damaging setbacks, even though they have contributed least to the problem. Looking to the future, no country - however wealthy or powerful - will be immune to the impact of global warming. The Human Development Report 2007/2008 shows that climate change is not just a future scenario. Increased exposure to droughts, floods and storms is already destroying opportunity and reinforcing inequality. Meanwhile, there is now overwhelming scientific evidence that the world is moving towards the point at which irreversible ecological catastrophe becomes unavoidable. Business-as-usual climate change points in a clear direction: unprecedented reversal in human development in our lifetime, and acute risks for our children and their grandchildren. There is a window of opportunity for avoiding the most damaging climate change impacts, but that window is closing: the world has less than a decade to change course. Actions taken - or not taken - in the years ahead will have a profound bearing on the future course of human development. The world lacks neither the financial resources nor the technological capabilities to act. What is missing is a sense of urgency, human solidarity and collective interest. As the Human Development Report 2007/2008 argues, climate change poses challenges at many levels. In a divided but ecologically interdependent world, it challenges all people to reflect upon how we manage the environment of the one thing that we share in common: planet Earth. It challenges us to reflect on social justice and human rights across countries and generations. It challenges political leaders and people in rich nations to acknowledge their historic responsibility for the problem, and to initiate deep and

  11. Engineering, education, and public affairs programs earn high marks in U.S. News and World Report survey

    OpenAIRE

    Crumbley, Liz

    2008-01-01

    Graduate programs in three of Virginia Tech's colleges have been ranked nationally among the tops in their fields in the "America's Best Graduate Schools 2009" survey released today by U.S. News and World Report.

  12. The association of self-reported sleep, weight status, and academic performance in fifth-grade students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroebele, Nanette; McNally, Janise; Plog, Amy; Siegfried, Scott; Hill, James O

    2013-02-01

    To improve support and justification for health promotion efforts in schools, it is helpful to understand how students' health behaviors affect academic performance. Fifth-grade students completed an online school-administered health survey with questions regarding their eating behavior, physical activity, academic performance, and sleep patterns. Differences in health behaviors were examined by sex, self-reported weight status, and sufficient (≥9 hours) versus insufficient sleep. Logistic regression was used to determine the relationship between academic performance and the health behaviors. One third of the sample did not get the recommended amount of physical activity and more than half of the students watched television ≥ 2 hours/day. Self-reported overweight status was related to lower self-reported academic performance, fewer lunch and breakfast occasions, less physical activity, not meeting the recommendations for vegetable and soda consumption as well as hours of television watching. Sufficient sleep (≥9 hours/night) was associated with better grades, meeting the recommended hours of daily television watching and video game playing, being more physically active and increased breakfast and lunch frequency. Percentage of serving free/reduced lunch, soda consumption, breakfast frequency, amount of physical activity, and television watching were associated with academic performance. More positive health behaviors generally were associated with better academic performance. Promoting healthy behaviors in schools might improve not only students' health academic performance as well. © 2013, American School Health Association.

  13. Testing the accuracy of timing reports in visual timing tasks with a consumer-grade digital camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Rachael E; Oram Cardy, Janis; Purcell, David

    2017-06-01

    This study tested the accuracy of a visual timing task using a readily available and relatively inexpensive consumer grade digital camera. A visual inspection time task was recorded using short high-speed video clips and the timing as reported by the task's program was compared to the timing as recorded in the video clips. Discrepancies in these two timing reports were investigated further and based on display refresh rate, a decision was made whether the discrepancy was large enough to affect the results as reported by the task. In this particular study, the errors in timing were not large enough to impact the results of the study. The procedure presented in this article offers an alternative method for performing a timing test, which uses readily available hardware and can be used to test the timing in any software program on any operating system and display.

  14. Status Report from Czechoslovakia [Processing of Low-Grade Uranium Ores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Civin, V; Belsky, M [Research and Development Laboratory No.3 of the Uranium Industry, Prague, Czechoslovakia (Czech Republic)

    1967-06-15

    The present paper deals with the fundamental problems and the main routes followed in processing low-grade uranium ores in CSSR. In this connection it may be useful to discuss the definition of low-grade ore. In our country this term is applied to uraniferous material with a very low content of uranium (of the order of 0.01%) whose treatment causes no particular difficulty. However, the same term is also used to designate those materials whose processibility lies on the verge of economic profitability. In our view, this classification, of an ore using two independent criteria (i.e. uranium content and processing economy) is useful from the standpoint of technology. The treatment of both such ore types is as a rule carried out by specific technological processes. Consequently, low-grade uranium ores can be divided into two groups: (1) Ores with a low uranium content. To this category belong in our country uraniferous materials which originate as a by-product of technological processes used in processing other materials. This is primarily gangue and tailings of various physical or physico-chemical pretreatment operations to which the ore is subjected at the mining site. Mention should be made in this connection of mine waters, which represent a useful complementary source of uranium despite their low uranium content (of the order of milligrams per litre). (2) Ores whose economical treatment is problematic. To this category belong deposits of conventional ore types with a uranium content on the limit of profitable treatment. Also, those deposits containing atypical materials possessing such properties which impair the economy of their treatment. This includes ores with a considerable amount of components which are difficult to separate and which at the same time consume the leaching agents. Finally, it covers uranium-bearing materials in refractory forms which are difficult to dissolve and also some special materials, such as lignites, uranium-bearing shales, loams

  15. Status Report from the United States of America [Processing of Low-Grade Uranium Ores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, R H [United States Atomic Energy Commission, Washington, D.C. (United States)

    1967-06-15

    The US uranium production rate has been dropping gradually from a high of 17 760 tons in fiscal year 1961 to a level of about 10 400 tons in fiscal year 1966. As of 1 January 1966, there were 17 uranium mills in operation in the USA compared with a maximum of 26 during 1961, the peak production year. Uranium procurement contracts between the USAEC and companies operating 11 mills have been extended through calendar year 1970. The USAEC contracts for the other six mills are scheduled to expire 31 December 1966. Some of these mills, however, have substantial private orders for production of uranium for nuclear power plants and will continue to operate after completion of deliveries under USAEC contracts. No new uranium mills have been brought into production since 1962. Under these circumstances the emphasis in process development activities in recent years has tended toward improvements that could be incorporated within the general framework of the existing plants. Some major flowsheet changes have been made, however. For example, two of the ore-processing plants have shifted from acid leaching to sodium carbonate leach in order to provide the flexibility to process an increasing proportion of ores of high limestone content in the tributary areas. Several mills employing ion exchange as the primary step for recovery of uranium from solution have added an 'Eluex' solvent extraction step on the ion exchange eluate. This process not only results in a highgrade final product, but also eliminates several metallurgical problems formerly caused by the chloride and nitrate eluants. Such changes together with numerous minor improvements have gradually reduced production cost and increased recoveries. The domestic uranium milling companies have generally had reserves of normal-grade ores well in excess of the amounts required to fulfil the requirements for their contracts with the USAEC. Therefore, there has been little incentive to undertake the processing of lower grade

  16. Influences on participant reporting in the World Health Organisation drugs exposure pregnancy registry; a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Elizabeth N; Gomes, Melba; Yevoo, Lucy; Egesah, Omar; Clerk, Christine; Byamugisha, Josaphat; Mbonye, Anthony; Were, Edwin; Mehta, Ushma; Atuyambe, Lynn M

    2014-10-31

    The World Health Organisation has designed a pregnancy registry to investigate the effect of maternal drug use on pregnancy outcomes in resource-limited settings. In this sentinel surveillance system, detailed health and drug use data are prospectively collected from the first antenatal clinic visit until delivery. Over and above other clinical records, the registry relies on accurate participant reports about the drugs they use. Qualitative methods were incorporated into a pilot registry study during 2010 and 2011 to examine barriers to women reporting these drugs and other exposures at antenatal clinics, and how they might be overcome. Twenty-seven focus group discussions were conducted in Ghana, Kenya and Uganda with a total of 208 women either enrolled in the registry or from its source communities. A question guide was designed to uncover the types of exposure data under- or inaccurately reported at antenatal clinics, the underlying reasons, and how women prefer to be asked questions. Transcripts were analysed thematically. Women said it was important for them to report everything they had used during pregnancy. However, they expressed reservations about revealing their consumption of traditional, over-the-counter medicines and alcohol to antenatal staff because of anticipated negative reactions. Some enrolled participants' improved relationship with registry staff facilitated information sharing and the registry tools helped overcome problems with recall and naming of medicines. Decisions about where women sought care, which influenced medicines used and antenatal clinic attendance, were influenced by pressure within and outside of the formal healthcare system to conform to conflicting behaviours. Conversations also reflected women's responsibilities for producing a healthy baby. Women in this study commonly take traditional medicines in pregnancy, and to a lesser extent over-the-counter medicines and alcohol. The World Health Organisation pregnancy registry

  17. Visions for a sustainable world: A conference on science, technology and social responsibility. Conference report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    This report summarizes the organization, activities, and outcomes of Student Pugwash USA`s 1992 International Conference, Visions for a Sustainable World: A Conference on Science, Technology and Social Responsibility. The conference was held June 14--20, 1992 at Emory University, and brought together 94 students and over 65 experts from industry, academe, and government. The conference addressed issues ranging from global environmental cooperation to the social impacts of the Human Genome Project to minority concerns in the sciences. It provided a valuable forum for talented students and professionals to engage in critical dialogue on many interdisciplinary issues at the juncture of science, technology and society. The conference challenged students -- the world`s future scientists, engineers, and political leaders -- to think broadly about global problems and to devise policy options that are viable and innovative. The success of the conference in stimulating interest, understanding, and enthusiasm about interdisciplinary global issues is clearly evident from both the participants` feedback and their continued involvement in Student Pugwash USA programs. Six working groups met each morning. The working group themes included: environmental challenges for developing countries; energy options: their social and environmental impact; health care in developing countries; changing dynamics of peace and global security; educating for the socially responsible use of technology; ethics and the use of genetic information. The conference was specifically designed to include mechanisms for ensuring its long-term impact. Participants were encouraged to focus on their individual role in helping resolve global issues. This was achieved through each participant`s development of a Personal Plan of Action, a plan which mapped out activities the student could undertake after the conference to continue the dialogue and work towards the resolution of global and local problems.

  18. Readmission after treatment of Grade 3 and 4 renal injuries at a Level I trauma center: Statewide assessment using the Comprehensive Hospital Abstract Reporting System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, Brian; Wessells, Hunter; Voelzke, Bryan B

    2016-03-01

    One criticism of the existing renal trauma research is the limited outpatient follow-up after index hospitalization. We assessed readmission rates following treatment for American Association for the Surgery of Trauma (AAST) Grade 3 and 4 renal injury using the Comprehensive Hospital Abstract Reporting System (CHARS). We evaluated all patients with AAST Grade 3 and 4 renal injuries admitted to Harborview Medical Center (HMC) between 1998 and 2010, the only Level 1 trauma center in Washington state. Grade 4 renal injuries were stratified by collecting system laceration (CSL) or segmental vascular injury. Data were abstracted from the CHARS database for readmissions to any Washington state hospital within 6 months of renal injury. Clinical variables, diagnoses, and procedures were queried based on DRG International Classification of Diseases-9th Rev. codes. A total of 477 Grade 3 and 159 Grade 4 renal injuries were initially treated at HMC. On admission, 111 patients required intervention: 75 (16%) of 477 Grade 3 and 36 (23%) of 159 Grade 4 injuries. Within 6 months of index hospitalization, 86 (18%) of 477 Grade 3 and 38 (24%) of 159 Grade 4 patients were readmitted to any Washington state hospital. Eighty percent of Grade 3 injuries and 66% of Grade 4 injuries returned to HMC compared with secondary hospitals (p = 0.08). At readmission, 19 (22%) of 86 Grade 3 and 16 (42%) of 38 Grade 4 injuries had a urologic diagnosis. Subsequent procedural intervention was required on readmission in 6 (7%) of 86 Grade 3 and 5 (13%) of 38 Grade 4 renal injuries (all CSL injuries). A subset of patients treated for Grade 3 and 4 renal trauma will be readmitted for further management. While urologic diagnoses and additional procedures may be low overall, readmission to outside hospitals may preclude accurate determination of renal trauma outcomes. Based on these data, patients with Grade 4 CSL injuries seem to be at the highest risk for readmission and to require a subsequent

  19. Estimation of intermediate-grade uranium resources II. Proposed method for estimating intermediate-grade uranium resources in roll-front deposits. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambie, F.W.; Yee, S.N.

    1981-09-01

    The purpose of this and a previous project was to examine the feasibility of estimating intermediate grade uranium (0.01 to 0.05% U 3 O 8 ) on the basis of existing, sparsely drilled holes. All data are from the Powder River Basin in Wyoming. DOE makes preliminary estimates of endowment by calculating an Average Area of Influence (AAI) based on densely drilled areas, multiplying that by the thickness of the mineralization and then dividing by a tonnage factor. The resulting tonnage of ore is then multiplied by the average grade of the interval to obtain the estimate of U 3 O 8 tonnage. Total endowment is the sum of these values over all mineralized intervals in all wells in the area. In regions where wells are densely drilled and approximately regularly spaced this technique approaches the classical polygonal estimation technique used to estimate ore reserves and should be fairly reliable. The method is conservative because: (1) in sparsely drilled regions a large fraction of the area is not considered to contribute to endowment; (2) there is a bias created by the different distributions of point grades and mining block grades. A conservative approach may be justified for purposes of ore reserve estimation, where large investments may hinge on local forecasts. But for estimates of endowment over areas as large as 1 0 by 2 0 quadrangles, or the nation as a whole, errors in local predictions are not critical as long as they tend to cancel and a less conservative estimation approach may be justified.One candidate, developed for this study and described is called the contoured thickness technique. A comparison of estimates based on the contoured thickness approach with DOE calculations for five areas of Wyoming roll-fronts in the Powder River Basin is presented. The sensitivity of the technique to well density is examined and the question of predicting intermediate grade endowment from data on higher grades is discussed

  20. Low Grade Peritoneal Mucinous Carcinomatosis Associated with Human Papilloma Virus Infection: Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatalica, Zoran; Foster, Jason M.; Loggie, Brian W.

    2008-01-01

    Pseudomyxoma peritonei is a clinical syndrome characterized by peritoneal dissemination of a mucinous tumor with mucinous ascites. The vast majority of the pseudomyxoma peritoneis are associated with mucinous neoplasms of the appendix. We describe a case of pseudomyxoma peritonei associated with mucinous adenocarcinoma of the cervix in a 60-year-old woman. The patient developed low grade mucinous peritoneal carcinomatosis 8 years after hysterectomy for cervical adenocarcinoma. No other primary mucinous tumor was identified and peritoneal carcinomatosis tested positive for high-risk human papilloma virus (HPV), showing both integrated and episomal pattern. HPV has been previously associated with development of cervical carcinomas (both squamous and mucinous) but neither has cervical adenocarcinoma nor HPV been implicated in development of pseudomyxoma peritonei. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first description of HPV-associated malignancy presenting as pseudomyxoma peritonei. PMID:18925701

  1. Low-Grade Astrocytoma Associated with Abscess Formation: Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai-Hsin Tsai

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available A rare case of low-grade astrocytoma associated with abscess formation occurred in a 52-year-old man presenting with Broca's aphasia. He underwent craniotomy and tumor removal under the impression of brain tumor with necrotic cystic change. Abscess accumulation within the intra-axial tumor was found intraoperatively. Literature related to brain abscess with brain tumor is reviewed, with an emphasis on abscesses with astrocytoma. We discuss the common brain tumors that are associated with abscess, pathogens that coexist with brain tumor, and the pathogeneses of coexisting brain abscess and tumor. It is very important to know how to differentiate between and diagnose a brain abscess and tumor, or brain abscess with tumor, preoperatively from clinical presentation and through the use of computed tomography, conventional magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging or magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  2. Advances in hemophilia care: report of two symposia at the Hemophilia 2010 World Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Gerry; Cruz, Jussara Almeida; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Kessler, Craig; Haaning, Jesper; Lemm, Georg; Altisent, Carmen; Guerrero, Caesar; Hermans, Cedric; Riske, Brenda; Bolton-Maggs, Paula

    2012-04-01

    The World Federation of Hemophilia (WFH) 2010 World Congress held in Buenos Aires, Argentina, in July 2010, attracted more than 4,300 participants from 106 countries. This report summarizes two symposia held during the congress. The first, titled "Emerging Co-Morbidities in the Aging Hemophilia Population: Healthcare Challenges and Treatment Opportunities," chaired by Gerry Dolan, MD, and Jussara Almeida Cruz, MD, examined the co-morbidities experienced by the aging hemophilic patient population, such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, arthritis, osteoporosis, hypertension, and obesity. In addition, Bayer's products in preclinical and clinical development were reviewed, including a novel factor VIIa variant and a long-acting factor VIII molecule, i.e., one that has undergone site-specific PEGylation (attachment of polyethylene glycol [PEG] polymer chains to another molecule). The other symposium, titled "Practical Steps to Making Better Care for Hemophilia Patients a Reality," chaired by Carmen Altisent, MD, and Cesar Guerrero, RN, reviewed the steps that hemophilia caregivers can take to improve the care of their patients. Issues such as the treatment of hemarthroses, the role of the research nurse, and the management of pediatric patients transitioning to adulthood were discussed.

  3. World Energy Outlook 2012 Special Report: Golden Rules for a Golden Age of Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    Natural gas is poised to enter a golden age, but this future hinges critically on the successful development of the world’s vast unconventional gas resources. North American experience shows unconventional gas - notably shale gas - can be exploited economically. Many countries are lining up to emulate this success. But some governments are hesitant, or even actively opposed. They are responding to public concerns that production might involve unacceptable environmental and social damage. This report, in the World Energy Outlook series, treats these aspirations and anxieties with equal seriousness. It features two new cases: a Golden Rules Case, in which the highest practicable standards are adopted, gaining industry a {sup s}ocial licence to operate{sup ;} and its counterpart, in which the tide turns against unconventional gas as constraints prove too difficult to overcome.

  4. Status Report from Yugoslavia [Processing of Low-Grade Uranium Ores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunji, B [Institute for Technology of Nuclear and Other Raw Materials, Belgrade, Yugoslavia (Serbia)

    1967-06-15

    Full text: The greater part of our activities is connected with the problem of extracting uranium from low-grade ores. In this paper, a brief review of the most important recent developments will be presented. In this connection, it may be useful to determine the definition of low-grade ores. This term can be applied to ore from which the uranium content cannot be extracted under normal economic conditions. Thus this term can be applied to uranium-bearing material with a uranium content of no more than 0. 05%. But, in general, it could be said that there is a very large range of uranium content where uranium extraction may not be economic for such different reasons as; (a) the size or other facts in connection with the orebodies themselves; (b) refractory ore; or (c) other local conditions. During research on the treatment of low-grade ore from the deposit at Gabrovnica (Stara Planina, Yugoslavia) it became apparent that an alkaline leaching process would have to be carried out. The treatment of this granitic type of ore causes no particular difficulties. The required temperature is about 90{sup o}C. The retention time in the leaching stage is from 4 to 12 hours. Sodium carbonate consumption is not higher than 15 kg/t of ore. Pachuca-type leaching shows satisfactory maintenance and processing costs. At Kalna uranium precipitation by means of hydrogen pressure reduction has been developed, and is being developed and investigated in full-scale operation. Details of the process were published in Geneva in 1963. On the basis of the experience gained from full-scale operation, many refinements and cost-saving changes have been made. A normal steel wire screen used as a catalyst carrier shows a very good improvement over free-moving UO{sub 2} as catalyst. In large-scale operation (200 t/d), after the precipitation of uranium the barren solution content is about 1 g U/m{sup 3}. The content of the pregnant solution is of the order of 300-600 g/m{sup 3}. Recycling the

  5. World wide web for database of Japanese translation on international nuclear event scale reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Norio; Hirano, Masashi

    1999-01-01

    The International Nuclear Event Scale (INES) is a means designed for providing prompt, clear and consistent information related to nuclear events, that occurred at nuclear facilities, and facilitating communication between the nuclear community, the media and the public. The INES is jointly operated by the IAEA and the OECD-NEA. Nuclear events reported are rated by the Scale', a consistent safety significance indicator. The scale runs from level 0, for events with no safety significance, to level 7 for a major accident with widespread health and environmental effects. The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has been promptly translating the INES reports into Japanese and developing a world-wide-web database for the Japanese translation, aiming at more efficient utilization of the INES information inside Japan. The present paper briefly introduces the definitions of INES rating levels and the scope of the Scale, and describes the outlines of the database (the information stored in the database, its functions and how to use it). As well, technical use of the INES reports and the availability/ effectiveness of the database are discussed. (author)

  6. Ghana and Mali. Grade 7 Model Lesson for Standard 7.4. World History and Geography: Medieval Sub-Saharan Africa. California History-Social Science Course Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachlod, Michelle, Ed.

    California State Standard 7.4 is delineated in the following manner: "Students analyze the geographic, political, economic, religious, and social structures of the sub-Saharan civilizations of Ghana and Mali in Medieval Africa. Seventh-grade students focus on the Niger River and the growth of the Mali and Ghana empires; analyze the importance…

  7. Medieval Japan. Grade 7 Model Lesson for Standard 7.5. World History and Geography: Medieval and Early Modern Times. California History-Social Science Course Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachlod, Michelle, Ed.

    California State Standard 7.5 is delineated in the following manner: "Students analyze the geographic, political, economic, religious, and social structures of medieval Japan." Seventh-grade students describe the significance of Japan's proximity to China and Korea and the influence of these countries on Japan; discuss the reign of…

  8. Medieval Europe. Grade 7 Model Lesson for Standard 7.6. World History and Geography: Medieval and Early Modern Times. California History-Social Science Course Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachlod, Michelle, Ed.

    California State Standard 7.6 is delineated in the following manner: "Students analyze the geographic, political, economic, religious, and social structures of the civilizations of Medieval Europe." Seventh-grade students study the geography of Europe and the Eurasian land mass; describe the spread of Christianity north of the Alps and…

  9. A Picture Is Worth a Thousand Words. 7th Grade Lesson. Schools of California Online Resources for Education (SCORE): Connecting California's Classrooms to the World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, David R.

    This seventh-grade lesson plan asks students (working in teams) to create a multimedia advertising campaign on a current controversial issue. The lesson plan states that team members are not to apply any dialogue (either written or verbal) to any part of their presentation so that they may emulate the non-verbal, image only process that Martin…

  10. Work, Lyddie! Work! 8th Grade Activity. Schools of California Online Resources for Education (SCORE): Connecting California's Classrooms to the World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Darla

    This eighth grade lesson plan asks students to research and analyze primary source documents about early factory labor (mill workers during the period between 1840-1860) showing their hours of labor, ages of laborers, reasons for working, and working conditions. The lesson plan asks students to read a historical novel about the time,…

  11. International Committee for Monitoring Assisted Reproductive Technologies world report: Assisted Reproductive Technology 2008, 2009 and 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, S; Chambers, G M; de Mouzon, J; Nygren, K G; Zegers-Hochschild, F; Mansour, R; Ishihara, O; Banker, M; Adamson, G D

    2016-07-01

    were, in 2008, 2009 and 2010, 21.8, 20.5 and 20.4%, respectively, with a corresponding triplet rate of 1.3, 1.0 and 1.1%. Fresh IVF and ICSI carried a perinatal mortality rate per 1000 births of 22.8 (2008), 19.2 (2009) and 21.0 (2010), compared with 15.1, 12.8 and 14.6/1000 births following FET in the same periods of observation. The proportion of women aged 40 years or older undergoing non-donor ART increased from 20.8 to 23.2% from 2008 to 2010. The data presented are reliant on the quality and completeness of data submitted by individual countries. This report covers approximately two-thirds of the world ART activity. The ICMART World Reports provide the most comprehensive global statistical census and review of ART utilization, effectiveness, safety and quality. While ART treatment continues to increase globally, the wide disparities in access to treatment and embryo transfer practices warrant attention by clinicians and policy makers. The authors declare no conflict of interest and no specific support from any organizations in relation to this manuscript. ICMART acknowledges financial support from the following organizations: American Society for Reproductive Medicine; European Society for Human Reproduction and Embryology; Fertility Society of Australia; Japan Society for Reproductive Medicine; Japan Society of Fertilization and Implantation; Red Latinoamericana de Reproduccion Asistida; Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology; Government of Canada (Research grant), Ferring Pharmaceuticals (Grant unrelated to World Reports). not applicable. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. High-grade soft tissue sarcoma arising in a desmoid tumor: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertucci, François; Faure, Marjorie; Ghigna, Maria-Rosa; Chetaille, Bruno; Guiramand, Jérôme; Moureau-Zabotto, Laurence; Sarran, Anthony; Perrot, Delphine

    2015-01-01

    Desmoid tumors are rare benign monoclonal fibroblastic tumors. Their aggressiveness is local with no potential for metastasis or dedifferentiation. Here we report on a 61-year-old patient who presented a locally advanced breast desmoid tumor diagnosed 20 years after post-operative radiotherapy for breast carcinoma. After 2 years of medical treatment, a high-grade undifferentiated pleomorphic soft tissue sarcoma arose within the desmoid tumor. Despite extensive surgery removing both tumors, the patient showed locoregional relapse by the sarcoma, followed by multimetastatic progression, then death 25 months after the surgery. The arising of a soft tissue sarcoma in a desmoid tumor is an exceptional event since our case is the fourth one reported so far in literature. It reinforces the need for timely and accurate diagnosis when a new mass develops in the region of a preexisting desmoid tumor, and more generally when a desmoid tumor modifies its clinical or radiological aspect.

  13. JPRS Report, Soviet Union, World Economy and International Affairs, No. 4, April 1988.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-03

    to be correct to consider the UN as a certain " embryo " of the "world government" to come. Petrovsky is against counterposing the "diplomacy of...problems—Europe’s place in the modern world (and, correspondingly, the place of one’s country in Europe and the world) and Europe’s destiny (and

  14. Climate Change and Development Framings: A Comparative Analysis of the Human Development Report 2007/8 an the World Development Report 2010

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.R. Gasper (Des); A.V. Portocarrero (Ana Victoria); A. Lera St. Clair

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe Human Development Report 2007/8 (HDR) and the World Development Report 2010 (WDR) are both devoted to the connections between climate change and development. The reports provide very different perspectives on where the key challenges reside. Their policy proposals are also different,

  15. In Brief: Report predicts 57% growth in world energy use by 2030

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinski, Sarah

    2007-06-01

    Energy demand is expected to grow rapidly in the next decades, with world energy use rising by 57% by 2030, compared with 2004 levels, according to a new report from the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Much of this growth is expected outside of developed countries within the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development; these non-OECD countries will account for about 95% of the projected growth. Although rising oil prices are expected to dampen growth in this sector, their consumption is expected to reach 118 million barrels per day in 2030, 35 million barrels per day more than in 2004. Overall nuclear energy capacity will rise from 368 gigawatts in 2004 to 481 gigawatts in 2030, but declines are projected in several European countries that are planning to phase out the use of nuclear power. Renewable sources of energy are expected to rise at a rate of about 1.9 percent per year, with much of the growth coming from hydroelectric facilities in non-OECD countries in Asia and Central and South America. The report, ``International Energy Outlook 2007,'' is available at http://www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/ieo/

  16. The World Cancer Research Fund report 2007: A challenge for the meat processing industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demeyer, Daniël; Honikel, Karl; De Smet, Stefaan

    2008-12-01

    One of the 10 universal guidelines for healthy nutrition in a report of the World Cancer Research Fund released at the end of 2007 is to "limit intake of red meat and avoid processed meat", as a result of the "convincing evidence" for an association with an increased risk of colorectal cancer development. In the present paper, the scientific evidence for the association between processed meats intake and colorectal cancer development is explored and the most probable hypothesis on the mechanism underlying this relationship formulated. It seems that the present state of knowledge is not well understood but relates to a combination of haem iron, oxidative stress, formation of N-nitroso compounds and related residues in the digestive tract as the causal factors. Although criticisms of the inaccurate definition of processed meats and the insufficient accounting for the large variability in composition of meat products have been expressed, it is clear that the report urges proper action by the meat and nutrition research community and the meat industry. Research items that in our view should be addressed are discussed. They include: (1) evaluating the health risks associated with processed meats intake within the context of the supply of beneficial nutrients and other nutrition associated health risks; (2) definition of the role of nitrites and nitrates in meat processing; (3) investigating the role of red and processed meats on the endogenous formation of N-nitroso compounds in the digestive tract; and (4) developing improved processed meats using new ingredients.

  17. Dementia in a retired world boxing champion: case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, L A; Smith, G G; Reyes, P F

    2009-01-01

    Dementia in retired boxers, also referred to as "dementia pugilistica" (DP), is usually attributed to repeated concussive and subconcussive blows to the head. We report the case of a former world boxing champion whose progressive cognitive decline could be ascribed to DP, cerebral infarcts and Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. This case demonstrates that dementia in retired boxers may be caused and/or exacerbated by etiologic factors other than DP. We correlated the clinical features with the histochemical and immunohistochemical changes observed on autopsy brain material from a retired boxer, reviewed the literature on boxing-related dementia, and compared our findings with previous reports on DP. Neuropathologic examination revealed numerous neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), rare neuritic plaques (NPs), multiple cerebral infarcts, fenestrated septum pellucidum, atrophic and gliotic mamillary bodies, and pale substantia nigra and locus ceruleus. Our neuropathologic data confirmed the notion that dementia in retired boxers could be due to several factors such as DP, multiple cerebral infarcts and Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. Our findings illustrate the need to comprehensively examine former boxers with dementia as well as carefully evaluate the neuropathologic changes that may cause or contribute to the patient's cognitive and behavioral symptoms. Such an approach is crucial in order to provide prompt and more definitive therapies.

  18. Status Report from Canada [Processing of Low-Grade Uranium Ores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thunaes, A [Eldorado Mining and Refining Ltd., Ottawa (Canada)

    1967-06-15

    The Canadian production of uranium increased in a spectacular manner during the period 1955-1959 from 1000 to 15 500 tons U{sub 3}O{sub 8} per year. Since 1959 the production has declined to the 1966 level of 3900 tons U{sub 3}O{sub 8} per year; stretch-out of contracts and government stockpiling programmes has made the decline gradual, and is maintaining the current rate of production until 1970. Nineteen mills were in operation during the period of peak production but only three are operating today. Ten mills were shut down and dismantled because of exhaustion of ore bodies or because the operation was uneconomical; six mills are maintained in stand-by condition. The total daily capacity of mills in operation or standing by is about 28 000 tons ore, but some of these mills would not be reopened unless an appreciable increase in uranium price occurs. The tide of uranium demand is about ready to turn and prospecting for uranium is very active this year, particularly in the Elliot Lake and Beaverlodge areas. The estimates for uranium demand in 1975-1980 are such that new ore will have to be found and developed, and new treatment plants must be built. The new ore that is found will likely be of lower grade or more expensive to mine than most of the current proven reserves in Canada and the most efficient methods of treatment will be needed to avoid excessive increases in production costs. This seems an opportune time to review Canadian milling of uranium ore, the improvements that have been made and development work towards further improvements.

  19. Technical Report: Unmanned Helicopter Solution for Survey-Grade Lidar and Hyperspectral Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaňuk, Ján; Gallay, Michal; Eck, Christoph; Zgraggen, Carlo; Dvorný, Eduard

    2018-05-01

    Recent development of light-weight unmanned airborne vehicles (UAV) and miniaturization of sensors provide new possibilities for remote sensing and high-resolution mapping. Mini-UAV platforms are emerging, but powerful UAV platforms of higher payload capacity are required to carry the sensors for survey-grade mapping. In this paper, we demonstrate a technological solution and application of two different payloads for highly accurate and detailed mapping. The unmanned airborne system (UAS) comprises a Scout B1-100 autonomously operating UAV helicopter powered by a gasoline two-stroke engine with maximum take-off weight of 75 kg. The UAV allows for integrating of up to 18 kg of a customized payload. Our technological solution comprises two types of payload completely independent of the platform. The first payload contains a VUX-1 laser scanner (Riegl, Austria) and a Sony A6000 E-Mount photo camera. The second payload integrates a hyperspectral push-broom scanner AISA Kestrel 10 (Specim, Finland). The two payloads need to be alternated if mapping with both is required. Both payloads include an inertial navigation system xNAV550 (Oxford Technical Solutions Ltd., United Kingdom), a separate data link, and a power supply unit. Such a constellation allowed for achieving high accuracy of the flight line post-processing in two test missions. The standard deviation was 0.02 m (XY) and 0.025 m (Z), respectively. The intended application of the UAS was for high-resolution mapping and monitoring of landscape dynamics (landslides, erosion, flooding, or crops growth). The legal regulations for such UAV applications in Switzerland and Slovakia are also discussed.

  20. The Nation's Report Card Reading 2009 Trial Urban District Snapshot Report. Austin Independent School District. Grade 8, Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Each district that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2009 Trial Urban District Assessment in reading receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. This report presents the results for Austin Independent School District's student achievement in reading. In 2009,…

  1. The Nation's Report Card Reading 2009 Trial Urban District Snapshot Report. Austin Independent School District. Grade 4, Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Each district that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2009 Trial Urban District Assessment in reading receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. This report presents the results for Austin Independent School District's student achievement in reading. In 2009,…

  2. The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2009. With Particular Emphasis on Economic Issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Mycle; Thomas, Steve; Froggatt, Antony; Koplow, Doug; Hazemann, Julie

    2009-08-01

    The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2009 provides the reader with the basic quantitative and qualitative facts on the nuclear power plants in operation, under construction and in planning phases throughout the world. A detailed overview assesses the economic performance of past and current nuclear projects. As of 1 August 2009 there are 435 nuclear reactors operating in the world, nine less than in 2002. There are 52 units listed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) as 'under construction'. At the peak of the nuclear industry's growth phase in 1979 there were 233 reactors being built concurrently. Even at the end of 1987, there were still 120 reactors in process. Much has changed. For the first time since commercial use of nuclear energy began in the middle of the 1950's no new nuclear plant was connected to the grid in 2008. In fact, no start-up has been reported for the past two years, since Cernavoda-2 was connected to the grid on 7 August 2007, after 24 years of construction. In 1989 a total of 177 nuclear reactors had been operated in what are now the 27 EU Member States, but as of 1 August 2009 only 144 units were in operation. Today the worldwide operating reactors total 370,000 megawatts (370 GW), about 1,600 MW less than one year ago. In 2007 nuclear power plants generated about 2,600 TWh and provided 14% of the world's electricity. After an unprecedented drop in electricity generation of 2% in 2007, nuclear power plants' output lost another half percentage point in 2008. Nuclear power provided 5.5% of the commercial primary energy production and about 2% of the final energy in the world, and has trended downwards for several years. Twenty-seven of the 31 countries operating nuclear power plants maintained or decreased their share of nuclear power within the electricity mix in 2008 relative to 2007. Four countries (Czech Republic, Lithuania, Romania, Slovakia) increased their share. In addition to the 52 units currently under construction

  3. Pleomorphic malignant fibrous histiocytoma/undifferentiated high-grade pleomorphic sarcoma of the scrotum in a patient presenting as fournier gangrene: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Juan; Zhou, Shengmei; Rao, Nagesh P; Pez, Gholam H

    2010-10-01

    Pleomorphic malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH), also known as undifferentiated high-grade pleomorphic sarcoma according to the latest World Health Organization classification, is a diagnosis of exclusion and extremely rare in adult scrotal/paratesticular region. Clinical presentation of scrotal/paratesticular pleomorphic MFH is usually a painless and gradual scrotal swelling. We report a case of scrotal MFH in a 63-year-old man who presented as Fournier gangrene after 10-month painful scrotal swelling and multiple procedures. The specimen of emergent debridement was submitted for pathologic and bacteriologic examination. Microscopically, the lesion had marked architectural and cytologic pleomorphism. The neoplastic cells were positive for vimentin, but negative for all lineage-specific markers. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization showed an aneuploid karyotype and negative results for lipomatous tumor abnormalities. Bacterial cultures of the specimen showed extensive growth of virulent polymicrobes. The diagnosis of scrotal/paratesticular pleomorphic MFH with concurrent Fournier gangrene was made. Thoracic computed tomography scan showed bilateral multiple pulmonary nodules. The patient died 1 month later.

  4. Pancreatic Metastasis of High-Grade Papillary Serous Ovarian Carcinoma Mimicking Primary Pancreas Cancer: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Gunay

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Reports of epithelial ovarian carcinomas metastatic to the pancreas are very rare. We herein present a metastasis of high grade papillary serous ovarian cancer to mid portion of pancreas. Case. A 42-year-old patient was admitted with a non-specified malignant cystic lesion in midportion of pancreas. She had a history of surgical treatment for papillary serous ovarian adenocarcinoma. A cystic lesion was revealed by an abdominal computerized tomography (CT performed in her follow up . It was considered as primary mid portion of pancreatic cancer and a distal pancreatectomy was performed. The final pathology showed high-grade papillary serous adenocarcinoma morphologically similar to the previously diagnosed ovarian cancer. Discussion. Metastatic pancreatic cancers should be considered in patients who present with a solitary pancreatic mass and had a previous non-pancreatic malignancy. Differential diagnosis of primary pancreatic neoplasm from metastatic malignancy may be very difficult. A biopsy for tissue confirmation is required to differentiate primary and secondary pancreatic tumors. Although, the value of surgical resection is poorly documented, resection may be considered in selected patients. Conclusion. Pancreatic metastasis of ovarian papillary serous adenocarcinoma has to be kept in mind when a patient with pancreatic mass has a history of ovarian malignancy.

  5. Whole-Tumor Histogram and Texture Analyses of DTI for Evaluation of IDH1-Mutation and 1p/19q-Codeletion Status in World Health Organization Grade II Gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Y W; Han, K; Ahn, S S; Choi, Y S; Chang, J H; Kim, S H; Kang, S-G; Kim, E H; Lee, S-K

    2018-04-01

    Prediction of the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1)-mutation and 1p/19q-codeletion status of World Health Organization grade ll gliomas preoperatively may assist in predicting prognosis and planning treatment strategies. Our aim was to characterize the histogram and texture analyses of apparent diffusion coefficient and fractional anisotropy maps to determine IDH1 -mutation and 1p/19q-codeletion status in World Health Organization grade II gliomas. Ninety-three patients with World Health Organization grade II gliomas with known IDH1- mutation and 1p/19q-codeletion status (18 IDH1 wild-type, 45 IDH1 mutant and no 1p/19q codeletion, 30 IDH1- mutant and 1p/19q codeleted tumors) underwent DTI. ROIs were drawn on every section of the T2-weighted images and transferred to the ADC and the fractional anisotropy maps to derive volume-based data of the entire tumor. Histogram and texture analyses were correlated with the IDH1 -mutation and 1p/19q-codeletion status. The predictive powers of imaging features for IDH1 wild-type tumors and 1p/19q-codeletion status in IDH1 -mutant subgroups were evaluated using the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator. Various histogram and texture parameters differed significantly according to IDH1 -mutation and 1p/19q-codeletion status. The skewness and energy of ADC, 10th and 25th percentiles, and correlation of fractional anisotropy were independent predictors of an IDH1 wild-type in the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator. The area under the receiver operating curve for the prediction model was 0.853. The skewness and cluster shade of ADC, energy, and correlation of fractional anisotropy were independent predictors of a 1p/19q codeletion in IDH1 -mutant tumors in the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator. The area under the receiver operating curve was 0.807. Whole-tumor histogram and texture features of the ADC and fractional anisotropy maps are useful for predicting the IDH1 -mutation and 1p/19q

  6. FY17 Status Report on the Initial EPP Finite Element Analysis of Grade 91 Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messner, M. C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sham, T. -L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-07-01

    This report describes a modification to the elastic-perfectly plastic (EPP) strain limits design method to account for cyclic softening in Gr. 91 steel. The report demonstrates that the unmodified EPP strain limits method described in current ASME code case is not conservative for materials with substantial cyclic softening behavior like Gr. 91 steel. However, the EPP strain limits method can be modified to be conservative for softening materials by using softened isochronous stress-strain curves in place of the standard curves developed from unsoftened creep experiments. The report provides softened curves derived from inelastic material simulations and factors describing the transformation of unsoftened curves to a softened state. Furthermore, the report outlines a method for deriving these factors directly from creep/fatigue tests. If the material softening saturates the proposed EPP strain limits method can be further simplified, providing a methodology based on temperature-dependent softening factors that could be implemented in an ASME code case allowing the use of the EPP strain limits method with Gr. 91. Finally, the report demonstrates the conservatism of the modified method when applied to inelastic simulation results and two bar experiments.

  7. Status Report from Sweden [Processing of Low-Grade Uranium Ores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, A [AB Atomenergi, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1967-06-15

    The Ministry of Education was authorized in November 1945 to appoint a commission to study the organization of nuclear energy research. In April 1947 this commission, the Swedish Atomic Energy Commission, proposed the formation of a semi-state-owned company to be a central body for applied research work and development in the nuclear energy field in Sweden. In November 1947 the Atomic Energy Company (AB Atomenergi) had its statutory meeting. The State owns 4/7 of the share capital and the remaining 3/7 is owned by 71 private and municipal share-holders. Except for a part of the stock capital, all investments and running costs of the company have been financed by the Government. The company is in practice answerable to the Department of Commerce which has an advisory body, the Atomic Energy Board. AB Atomenergi is responsible for Government-financed research on the industrial applications of nuclear energy, the milling of uranium ores and refining of uranium. The total number of employees is at present about 1400, 800 of which work at the company's research establishment Studsvik about 120 km south of Stockholm. As early as 1945 the Research Institute of the Swedish National Defence started work in the field of uranium processing. Similar work was also started quite early by the Boliden Mining Company, the Swedish Shale Oil Company and Wargons AB. After the establishment of AB Atomenergi, all work in the uranium processing field was transferred to this company. In fact one of the main reasons for the formation of AB Atomenergi was the need for Swedish uranium production as there was no possibility of importing uranium at that time. As a result of research and development in uranium processing a pilot plant at Kvarntorp near Orebro in central Sweden started milling a low-grade uranium ore (shale) in 1953. The capacity of this plant was 5-10 tons of uranium a year. A uranium mill at Ranstad in south-west Sweden, near Skovde, with a capacity of 120 tons of uranium a

  8. Low-grade Myxofibrosarcoma in the Mandible: A Rare Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neda Kargahi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Myxofibrosarcoma is a malignant neoplasm of connective tissue origin commonly found in the extremities. It is very rare in the head and neck regions. Only 25 cases of myxofibrosarcoma have been reported in the head and neck regions until 2014. Here we report a 61-year-old male with this neoplasm in the lower border of his mandible. During a two-year follow-up, this case recurred four times despite a complete resection. This study suggested combined surgical and adjuvant radiotherapy for unresectable lesions and tumors with positive margins to prevent recurrence and risk of progression.

  9. Internal Consistency of General Outcome Measures in Grades 1-8. Technical Report # 0915

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Daniel; Tindal, Gerald; Alonzo, Julie

    2009-01-01

    We developed alternate forms of a math test for use in both screening students at risk of failure and monitoring their progress over time. In this technical report, we present results of the screener, used in the fall of 2009. The 48-item test was aligned to the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Curriculum Focal Point Standards…

  10. The Development of the easyCBM CCSS Reading Assessments: Grade 3. Technical Report #1221

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, Julie; Park, Bitnara Jasmine; Tindal, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    In this technical report, we document the development and piloting of easyCBM reading measures aligned to the Common Core State Standards, designed for use in screening students at risk for reading difficulty and monitoring their progress as they develop reading skills. The measures, which assess students' ability to respond to…

  11. FY17 Status Report on the Micromechanical Finite Element Modeling of Creep Fracture of Grade 91 Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messner, M. C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Truster, T. J. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Cochran, K. B. [DR& C Inc.; Parks, D. M. [DR& C Inc.; Sham, T. -L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Advanced reactors designed to operate at higher temperatures than current light water reactors require structural materials with high creep strength and creep-fatigue resistance to achieve long design lives. Grade 91 is a ferritic/martensitic steel designed for long creep life at elevated temperatures. It has been selected as a candidate material for sodium fast reactor intermediate heat exchangers and other advanced reactor structural components. This report focuses on the creep deformation and rupture life of Grade 91 steel. The time required to complete an experiment limits the availability of long-life creep data for Grade 91 and other structural materials. Design methods often extrapolate the available shorter-term experimental data to longer design lives. However, extrapolation methods tacitly assume the underlying material mechanisms causing creep for long-life/low-stress conditions are the same as the mechanisms controlling creep in the short-life/high-stress experiments. A change in mechanism for long-term creep could cause design methods based on extrapolation to be non-conservative. The goal for physically-based microstructural models is to accurately predict material response in experimentally-inaccessible regions of design space. An accurate physically-based model for creep represents all the material mechanisms that contribute to creep deformation and damage and predicts the relative influence of each mechanism, which changes with loading conditions. Ideally, the individual mechanism models adhere to the material physics and not an empirical calibration to experimental data and so the model remains predictive for a wider range of loading conditions. This report describes such a physically-based microstructural model for Grade 91 at 600° C. The model explicitly represents competing dislocation and diffusional mechanisms in both the grain bulk and grain boundaries. The model accurately recovers the available experimental creep curves at higher stresses

  12. Assessment of the Jabiluka Project - Report of the Supervising Scientist to the World heritage Committee. Supervising Scientist report 138

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, A.; Prendergast, J.B.

    1999-01-01

    This report has been prepared in response to the request of the World Heritage Committee that the Supervising Scientist conduct a full review of scientific issues raised by the Committee's Mission to Kakadu National Park in October-November 1998. Perceived scientific uncertainty with respect to these issues had led to the Mission's conclusion that the natural values of Kakadu are threatened by the Jabiluka project. This detailed review has demonstrated that there were a number of weaknesses in the hydrological modelling presented by ERA in the EIS and the PER. Accordingly, a number of recommendations have been made which should be implemented by ERA in completing the detailed design of the Jabiluka project. On the other hand, the review has demonstrated quite clearly that, if the design of the water management system proposed by ERA in the PER had been implemented, the risk to the wetlands of Kakadu National Park, and the risk of radiation exposure to people of the region would have been extremely low. This conclusion is valid even in extreme circumstances leading to the complete failure of the structure of the water retention pond at Jabiluka. Copyright (2000) Commonwealth of Australia

  13. Technical Evaluation Report 61: The World-Wide Inaccessible Web, Part 2: Internet routes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim Klaas

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available In the previous report in this series, Web browser loading times were measured in 12 Asian countries, and were found to be up to four times slower than commonly prescribed as acceptable. Failure of webpages to load at all was frequent. The current follow-up study compares these loading times with the complexity of the Internet routes linking the Web users and the Web servers hosting them. The study was conducted in the same 12 Asian countries, with the assistance of members of the International Development Research Centre’s PANdora distance education research network. The data were generated by network members in Bhutan, Cambodia, India, Indonesia, Laos, Mongolia, the Philippines, Sri Lanka, Pakistan, Singapore, Thailand, and Vietnam. Additional data for the follow-up study were collected in China. Using a ‘traceroute’ routine, the study indicates that webpage loading time is linked to the complexity of the Internet routes between Web users and the host server. It is indicated that distance educators can apply such information in the design of improved online delivery and mirror sites, notably in areas of the developing world which currently lack an effective infrastructure for online education.

  14. Twitter Activity Associated With U.S. News and World Report Reputation Scores for Urology Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciprut, Shannon; Curnyn, Caitlin; Davuluri, Meena; Sternberg, Kevan; Loeb, Stacy

    2017-10-01

    To analyze the association between US urology department Twitter presence and U.S. News and World Report (USNWR) reputation scores, to examine the content, informational value, and intended audience of these platforms, and to identify objectives for Twitter use. We identified Twitter accounts for urology departments scored in the 2016-2017 USNWR. Correlation coefficients were calculated between Twitter metrics (number of followers, following, tweets, and Klout influence scores) with USNWR reputation scores. We also performed a detailed content analysis of urology department tweets during a 6-month period to characterize the content. Finally, we distributed a survey to the urology department accounts via Twitter, inquiring who administers the content, and their objectives for Twitter use. Among 42 scored urology departments with Twitter accounts, the median number of followers, following, and tweets were 337, 193, and 115, respectively. All of these Twitter metrics had a statistically significant positive correlation with reputation scores (P twitter use among urology departments was visibility and reputation, and urologists are considered the most important target audience. There is statistically significant correlation between Twitter activity and USNWR reputation scores for urology departments. Our results suggest that Twitter provides a novel mechanism for urology departments to communicate about academic and educational topics, and social media engagement can enhance reputation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The Nation's Report Card Mathematics 2011 Trial Urban District Snapshot Report. Austin Independent School District. Grade 8, Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This one-page report presents overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, scores at selected percentiles, average scores for district and large cities, results for student groups (school race, gender, and eligibility for National School Lunch Program) in 2011, and score gaps for student groups. In 2011, the average…

  16. The Nation's Report Card Reading 2011 Trial Urban District Snapshot Report. Austin Independent School District. Grade 4, Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This one-page report presents overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, scores at selected percentiles, average scores for district and large cities, results for student groups (school race, gender, and eligibility for National School Lunch Program) in 2011, and score gaps for student groups. In 2011, the average…

  17. The Nation's Report Card Mathematics 2011 Trial Urban District Snapshot Report. Austin Independent School District. Grade 4, Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This one-page report presents overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, scores at selected percentiles, average scores for district and large cities, results for student groups (school race, gender, and eligibility for National School Lunch Program) in 2011, and score gaps for student groups. In 2011, the average…

  18. The Nation's Report Card Reading 2011 Trial Urban District Snapshot Report. Austin Independent School District. Grade 8, Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This one-page report presents overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, scores at selected percentiles, average scores for district and large cities, results for student groups (school race, gender, and eligibility for National School Lunch Program) in 2011, and score gaps for student groups. In 2011, the average…

  19. Measuring health-related quality of life in high-grade glioma patients at the end of life using a proxy-reported retrospective questionnaire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sizoo, E.M.; Dirven, L.; Reijneveld, J.C.; Postma, T.J.; Heimans, J.J.; Deliens, L.; Pasman, H.R.W.; Taphoorn, M.J.B.

    2014-01-01

    To develop, validate, and report on the use of a retrospective proxy-reported questionnaire measuring health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in the end-of-life (EOL) phase of high-grade glioma (HGG) patients. Items relevant for the defined construct were selected using existing questionnaires,

  20. Teacher and Learners' Belief in a Just World and Perspectives of Discipline of Grade 4-8 Learners in South African Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human-Vogel, Salomé; Morkel, Jorina

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, we examine the personal belief in a just world (PBJW) for teachers and learners in predominantly Afrikaans-speaking South African schools, and the relationship between teachers' PBJW and their perception of problem behaviour in the classroom. The study is informed by national debates of school violence in South African…

  1. A High Grade Gliomatosis Cerebri Case Report; MR, Diffusion MR and MR Spectroscopy Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Beyazal

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Gliomatosis cerebri is a rare primary diffuse cerebral malignity. It is characterized by diffuse proliferation of neoplastic glial cells that involve one or more cerebral lobes. For definitive diagnosis histopathological examination is required. Advanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques are very useful in pretreatment diagnosis-staging and post-treatment follow-up. In this report a patient with gliomatozis cerebri was presented associated with the findings of magnetic resonance images, diffusion weighted images and magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Also the importance and role of magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the diagnosis and staging gliomatosis cerebri, was discussed

  2. Work-related injuries and illnesses reported by World Trade Center response workers and volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perritt, Kara R; Herbert, Robin; Levin, Stephen M; Moline, Jacqueline

    2011-12-01

    In 2002, the Mount Sinai Center for Occupational and Environmental Medicine, with support from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), began coordinating the World Trade Center (WTC) Worker and Volunteer Medical Screening Program (MSP) to monitor the health of qualified WTC responders. Enrolled participants were offered a clinical examination; interviewed to collect medical, mental health, and exposure information; and requested to complete a self-administered medical questionnaire. The objective of this study was to better understand work-related injuries and illnesses sustained on-site by WTC responders. A descriptive analysis of select data from the MSP self-administered medical questionnaire was conducted. Data collected July 2002 through April 2004 from MSP participants enrolled at the Mount Sinai clinic were reviewed using univariate statistical techniques. Records from 7,810 participants were analyzed, with most participants associated with either the construction industry (n = 2,623, 34%) or law enforcement (n = 2,036, 26%). Approximately a third of the participants (n = 2,486, 32%) reported at least one injury or illness requiring medical treatment that was sustained during WTC work/volunteer activities. Of the total 4,768 injuries/illnesses reported by these participants, respiratory complaints were most common (n = 1,350, 28%), followed by traumatic injuries excluding eye injuries (n = 961, 20%), eye injuries/ailments (n = 709, 15%), chest pain (n = 375, 8%), headaches (n = 359, 8%), skin conditions (n = 178, 4%), and digestive system conditions (n = 163, 3%). Participants reported that 36% of injuries/illnesses were treated off-site and 29% were treated on-site, with the remaining not specifying treatment location. Off-site treatment was prevalent for respiratory complaints, psychological stress, and chest pain. On-site treatment was predominate for eye injuries/ailments and traumatic injuries excluding eye injuries. Study

  3. Environmental effects of marine energy development around the world. Annex IV Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copping, Andrea; Hanna, Luke; Whiting, Johnathan; Geerlofs, Simon; Grear, Molly; Blake, Kara [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Coffey, Anna; Massaua, Meghan; Brown-Saracino, Jocelyn; Battey, Hoyt [US Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Annex IV is an international collaborative project to examine the environmental effects of marine energy devices among countries through the International Energy Agency’s Ocean Energy Systems Initiative (OES). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) serves as the Operating Agent for the Annex, in partnership with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM; formerly the Minerals Management Service), the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), and National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Numerous ocean energy technologies and devices are being developed around the world, and the few data that exist about the environmental effects of these technologies are dispersed among countries and developers. The purpose of Annex IV is to facilitate efficient government oversight of the development of ocean energy systems by compiling and disseminating information about the potential environmental effects of marine energy technologies and to identify methods of monitoring for these effects. Beginning in 2010, this three-year effort produced a publicly available searchable online database of environmental effects information (Tethys). It houses scientific literature pertaining to the environmental effects of marine energy systems, as well as metadata on international ocean energy projects and research studies. Two experts’ workshops were held in Dublin, Ireland (September 2010 and October 2012) to engage with international researchers, developers, and regulators on the scope and outcomes of the Annex IV project. Metadata and information stored in the Tethys database and feedback obtained from the two experts’ workshops were used as resources in the development of this report. This Annex IV final report contains three case studies of specific interactions of marine energy devices with the marine environment that survey, compile, and analyze the best available information in one coherent location. These case studies address 1) the physical interactions

  4. Identifying Students Struggling in Courses by Analyzing Exam Grades, Self-reported Measures and Study Activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bianca Clavio; Bemman, Brian; Knoche, Hendrik

    2018-01-01

    . In this paper, we present a set of instrument`s designed to identify at-risk undergraduate students in a Problem-based Learning (PBL) university, using an introductory programming course between two campus locations as a case study. Collectively, these instruments form the basis of a proposed learning ecosystem...... in the prediction model. Results of a multiple linear regression model found several significant assessment predictors related to how often students attempted self-guided course assignments and their self-reported programming experience, among others.......Technical educations often experience poor student performance and consequently high rates of attrition. Providing students with early feedback on their learning progress can assist students in self-study activities or in their decision-making process regarding a change in educational direction...

  5. Chondrosarcoma of right 1st rib presenting as neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome; A 13th case report in world literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravisagar Patel

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Thoracic outlet syndrome [TOS] caused by a tumor of the rib is rare and has been reported only 12 times in the literature over the past one and one-half centuries, with the majority of cases due to osteochondroma. We report a case of chondrosarcoma of right 1st rib causing neurogenic TOS that was resected via posterolateral thoracotomy and biopsy confirmed a grade I chondrosarcoma. In the treatment of chondrosarcoma, chemotherapy and radiotherapy are less effective, and appropriate surgery is needed.

  6. Final report on characterization of time dependent deformations in concrete grades used in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramaswamy, Ananth; Chandra Kishen, J.M.

    2009-09-01

    Time dependent deformations in concrete, both creep and shrinkage, play a critical role in prestressed concrete structures, such as bridge girders, nuclear containment vessels, etc. These strains result in losses, through release of prestress, and thereby influence the safety of these structures. The present study comprises of an experimental and analytical program to assess the levels of creep and shrinkage in normal and heavy density concrete. The experimental program includes tests on creep using standard cylinder specimen, while shrinkage studies have been conducted using prism specimen, both under controlled environmental conditions. The experimental results suggest that creep and shrinkage strains are higher in heavy density concrete than in normal concrete. This may be attributed to the relatively smaller pore structure of heavy density concrete that results in larger availability of free water and a relatively slower hydration process in comparison to normal concrete. While there is some scatter in the results, creep strains decrease with age of loading and both creep and shrinkage strains are smaller when the relative humidity is higher. Statistical model reported in the literature for normal concrete is able to predict the test results for both normal and heavy density concrete quite well. Long term predictions of creep and shrinkage using this model, accounting for uncertainties, is also projected and shown to predict some long term measured results not used in the model calibration. The long term predictions are sensitive to the initial data used in model calibration. (author)

  7. Virtual nuclear capabilities and deterrence in a world without nuclear weapons. VERTIC research report no. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paloczi-Horvath, G.

    1998-01-01

    'Virtual nuclear capabilities' (VNC) can be defined as the ability of a state not equipped wth nuclear weapons to produce them within a matter of months or years, using fissile material and/or technological skills and materials available to it. 'Virtual nuclear deterrence' (VND) would use these capabilities to a specific end. It could be a temporary posture adopted by former nuclear weapon states as a guarantee against nuclear weapon 'break out'. VND could hence reinforce a temporary security architecture, even if in this instance 'temporary' might mean up to around ten years. In the context of getting to 'zero', VND could not be an end in itself, but rather serve as an element of the security architecture of a world free of nuclear weapons. VND would only be adopted by the acknowledged nuclear weapon states (NWS) - China, France, the Russian Federation, the United Kingdom and the United States of America - after the commit to complete nuclear disarmament, sign the appropriate treaties and perceive the temporary adoption of this form of deterrence to be in their political and security interests. As with the NWS, VND will only be accepted as an interim form of security by the de facto nuclear weapon states (DFNWS) - India, Israel and Pakistan - when they can be assured that their virtual security interests would be guaranteed by other means after they sign a nuclear disarmament treaty. There are several alternative approaches to VND. These range from various types of precise or explicit virtual deterrence to more implicit or tacit forms. An explicit VND posture might allow materials and capabilities relevant to the construction of a nuclear weapon to be retained under verified arrangements for a limited time. This report explains why explicit VND would not be a reliable tool for reinforcing a nuclear disarmament treaty, as it could undermine the treaty's whole purpose. An implicit VND posture would not permit the retention of any weapons-related fissile material or

  8. Notions of Video Game Addiction and Their Relation to Self-Reported Addiction among Players of World of Warcraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oggins, Jean; Sammis, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    In this study, 438 players of the online video game, World of Warcraft, completed a survey about video game addiction and answered an open-ended question about behaviors they considered characteristic of video game addiction. Responses were coded and correlated with players' self-reports of being addicted to games and scores on a modified video…

  9. Malaysia and the Knowledge Economy: Building a World-Class Higher Education System. Human Development Sector Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regel, Omporn; Salmi, Jamil; Watkins, Alfred; Tan, Hong; Dawkins, John; Saroyan, Alenoush; Vestergaard, Jakob

    2007-01-01

    This report was prepared at the request of the Government of Malaysia (GOM) as a contribution to the long term development objectives for the university sector under the Ninth Malaysia Plan. The GOM is considering new policy directions to make the country a more competitive player in the world economy. Such a strategy will require bold innovations…

  10. Toward Gender Equality in East Asia and the Pacific : A Companion to the World Development Report

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2012-01-01

    In recent decades, women across the globe have made positive strides toward gender equality. Literacy rates for young women and girls are higher than ever before, while gender gaps in primary education have closed in almost all countries. In the last three decades, over half a billion women have joined the world's labor force (World Bank 2011c). Progress toward gender equality in East Asia and the Pacific has been similarly noteworthy. Most countries in the region have either reached or surpa...

  11. Integrating Gender into World Bank Financed Transport Programs : Component 1. Case Study Summary and Final Report

    OpenAIRE

    IC Net

    2004-01-01

    The World Bank in November 2001 commissioned IC Net Limited of Japan to carry out a study titled 'Integrating Gender into World Bank Financed Transport Programs' in accord with the terms of reference (TOR) issued in June 2001. The study was financed by a grant from the Japanese Large Studies Trust Fund. The contract came into effect on 15 December 2001 and covers the period to 15 June 2004...

  12. A nuclear-weapon-free world. Report on working group 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The stages of nuclear material management are reviewed in respect to dismantlement of nuclear weapons, disposal of weapon-grade fissile materials and cut-off of their production as well as START I and II reduction which are underway. Separate chapters are dealing with the comprehensive test ban treaty, verification, control and regulation in this matter, and the advisory opinion of the International Court of Justice, Canberra Commission, the ABM USA-Soviet Treaty

  13. The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2010-2011. Nuclear Power in a Post-Fukushima World. 25 years after the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Mycle; Froggatt, Antony; Thomas, Steve; Hazemann, Julie; Mastny, Lisa

    2011-04-01

    The report provides the reader with the basic quantitative and qualitative facts about nuclear power plants in operation, under construction, and in planning phases throughout the world. It assesses the economic performance of past and current nuclear projects and compares their development to that of leading renewable energy sources. An extensive annex provides a country-by-country analysis of nuclear programs around the world. The report also includes the first published overview of reactions to the catastrophe in Japan. But developments even prior to March 11, when the Fukushima crisis began, illustrate that the international nuclear industry has been unable to stop the slow decline of nuclear energy. Not enough new units are coming online, and the world's reactor fleet is aging quickly. Moreover, it is now evident that nuclear power development cannot keep up with the pace of its renewable energy competitors. Annual renewables capacity additions have been outpacing nuclear start-ups for 15 years. In the United States, the share of renewables in new capacity additions skyrocketed from 2 percent in 2004 to 55 percent in 2009, with no new nuclear coming on line. In 2010, for the first time, worldwide cumulated installed capacity of wind turbines (193 GW), small hydro (80 GW, excluding large hydro) biomass and waste-to-energy plants (65 GW), and solar power (43 GW) reached 381 GW, outpacing the installed nuclear capacity of 375 GW prior to the Fukushima disaster. Total investment in renewable energy technologies has been estimated at $243 billion in 2010. As of April 1, 2011, there were 437 nuclear reactors operating in the world-seven fewer than in 2002. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) currently lists 64 reactors as 'under construction' in 14 countries. By comparison, at the peak of the industry's growth phase in 1979, there were 233 reactors being built concurrently. In 2008, for the first time since the beginning of the nuclear age, no new unit was

  14. Effectiveness of Acoustic and Conceptual Retrieval Cues in Memory for Words at Two Grade Levels. Technical Report No. 220.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghatala, Elizabeth S.; Hurlbut, Nancy L.

    The effectiveness of two types of retrieval cues was assessed with second- and sixth-grade children. After a single presentation of a list of words, the children first recalled as many of the words as they could. Following free recall, children in each grade were given either conceptual (category names for words on the input lists) or acoustic…

  15. Preliminary report from the World Health Organisation Chest Radiography in Epidemiological Studies project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahomed, Nasreen [University of the Witwatersrand, Department of Radiology, Johannesburg (South Africa); University of the Witwatersrand, Medical Research Council: Respiratory and Meningeal Pathogens Research Unit, Johannesburg (South Africa); Fancourt, Nicholas [Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore (United States); Murdoch Children' s Research Institute, Melbourne (Australia); De Campo, John; De Campo, Margaret [Murdoch Children' s Research Institute, Melbourne (Australia); Melbourne University, Melbourne (Australia); Akano, Aliu [Department of Radiology National Hospital, Abuja (Nigeria); Medical Research Council, Gambia (South Africa); Cherian, Thomas [World Health Organization, Geneva (Switzerland); Cohen, Olivia G. [Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore (United States); World Health Organization, Geneva (Switzerland); Greenberg, David [Soroka University Medical Center, Beer-Sheva (Israel); Lacey, Stephen [Murdoch Children' s Research Institute, Melbourne (Australia); Kohli, Neera [King George Medical University, Lucknow (India); Lederman, Henrique M. [Paulista School of Medicine, Hospital Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Madhi, Shabir A. [University of the Witwatersrand, Medical Research Council: Respiratory and Meningeal Pathogens Research Unit, Johannesburg (South Africa); University of the Witwatersrand, Department of Science and Technology/National Research Foundation: Vaccine Preventable Diseases, Johannesburg (South Africa); Manduku, Veronica [Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI), Nairobi (Kenya); McCollum, Eric D. [Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Eudowood Division of Pediatric Respiratory Sciences, Baltimore (United States); Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore (United States); Park, Kate [Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Oxford (United Kingdom); Ribo-Aristizabal, Jose Luis [Hospital Sant Joan de Deu, Barcelona (Spain); Bar-Zeev, Naor [University of Malawi, Malawi-Liverpool-Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Programme, College of Medicine, Blantyre (Malawi); University of Liverpool, Centre for Global Vaccine Research, Liverpool (United Kingdom); O' Brien, Katherine L. [Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore (United States); Mulholland, Kim [Murdoch Children' s Research Institute, Melbourne (Australia); London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-10-15

    Childhood pneumonia is among the leading infectious causes of mortality in children younger than 5 years of age globally. Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is the leading infectious cause of childhood bacterial pneumonia. The diagnosis of childhood pneumonia remains a critical epidemiological task for monitoring vaccine and treatment program effectiveness. The chest radiograph remains the most readily available and common imaging modality to assess childhood pneumonia. In 1997, the World Health Organization Radiology Working Group was established to provide a consensus method for the standardized definition for the interpretation of pediatric frontal chest radiographs, for use in bacterial vaccine efficacy trials in children. The definition was not designed for use in individual patient clinical management because of its emphasis on specificity at the expense of sensitivity. These definitions and endpoint conclusions were published in 2001 and an analysis of observer variation for these conclusions using a reference library of chest radiographs was published in 2005. In response to the technical needs identified through subsequent meetings, the World Health Organization Chest Radiography in Epidemiological Studies (CRES) project was initiated and is designed to be a continuation of the World Health Organization Radiology Working Group. The aims of the World Health Organization CRES project are to clarify the definitions used in the World Health Organization defined standardized interpretation of pediatric chest radiographs in bacterial vaccine impact and pneumonia epidemiological studies, reinforce the focus on reproducible chest radiograph readings, provide training and support with World Health Organization defined standardized interpretation of chest radiographs and develop guidelines and tools for investigators and site staff to assist in obtaining high-quality chest radiographs. (orig.)

  16. Preliminary report from the World Health Organisation Chest Radiography in Epidemiological Studies project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahomed, Nasreen; Fancourt, Nicholas; de Campo, John; de Campo, Margaret; Akano, Aliu; Cherian, Thomas; Cohen, Olivia G; Greenberg, David; Lacey, Stephen; Kohli, Neera; Lederman, Henrique M; Madhi, Shabir A; Manduku, Veronica; McCollum, Eric D; Park, Kate; Ribo-Aristizabal, Jose Luis; Bar-Zeev, Naor; O'Brien, Katherine L; Mulholland, Kim

    2017-10-01

    Childhood pneumonia is among the leading infectious causes of mortality in children younger than 5 years of age globally. Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is the leading infectious cause of childhood bacterial pneumonia. The diagnosis of childhood pneumonia remains a critical epidemiological task for monitoring vaccine and treatment program effectiveness. The chest radiograph remains the most readily available and common imaging modality to assess childhood pneumonia. In 1997, the World Health Organization Radiology Working Group was established to provide a consensus method for the standardized definition for the interpretation of pediatric frontal chest radiographs, for use in bacterial vaccine efficacy trials in children. The definition was not designed for use in individual patient clinical management because of its emphasis on specificity at the expense of sensitivity. These definitions and endpoint conclusions were published in 2001 and an analysis of observer variation for these conclusions using a reference library of chest radiographs was published in 2005. In response to the technical needs identified through subsequent meetings, the World Health Organization Chest Radiography in Epidemiological Studies (CRES) project was initiated and is designed to be a continuation of the World Health Organization Radiology Working Group. The aims of the World Health Organization CRES project are to clarify the definitions used in the World Health Organization defined standardized interpretation of pediatric chest radiographs in bacterial vaccine impact and pneumonia epidemiological studies, reinforce the focus on reproducible chest radiograph readings, provide training and support with World Health Organization defined standardized interpretation of chest radiographs and develop guidelines and tools for investigators and site staff to assist in obtaining high-quality chest radiographs.

  17. Preliminary report from the World Health Organisation Chest Radiography in Epidemiological Studies project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahomed, Nasreen; Fancourt, Nicholas; De Campo, John; De Campo, Margaret; Akano, Aliu; Cherian, Thomas; Cohen, Olivia G.; Greenberg, David; Lacey, Stephen; Kohli, Neera; Lederman, Henrique M.; Madhi, Shabir A.; Manduku, Veronica; McCollum, Eric D.; Park, Kate; Ribo-Aristizabal, Jose Luis; Bar-Zeev, Naor; O'Brien, Katherine L.; Mulholland, Kim

    2017-01-01

    Childhood pneumonia is among the leading infectious causes of mortality in children younger than 5 years of age globally. Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is the leading infectious cause of childhood bacterial pneumonia. The diagnosis of childhood pneumonia remains a critical epidemiological task for monitoring vaccine and treatment program effectiveness. The chest radiograph remains the most readily available and common imaging modality to assess childhood pneumonia. In 1997, the World Health Organization Radiology Working Group was established to provide a consensus method for the standardized definition for the interpretation of pediatric frontal chest radiographs, for use in bacterial vaccine efficacy trials in children. The definition was not designed for use in individual patient clinical management because of its emphasis on specificity at the expense of sensitivity. These definitions and endpoint conclusions were published in 2001 and an analysis of observer variation for these conclusions using a reference library of chest radiographs was published in 2005. In response to the technical needs identified through subsequent meetings, the World Health Organization Chest Radiography in Epidemiological Studies (CRES) project was initiated and is designed to be a continuation of the World Health Organization Radiology Working Group. The aims of the World Health Organization CRES project are to clarify the definitions used in the World Health Organization defined standardized interpretation of pediatric chest radiographs in bacterial vaccine impact and pneumonia epidemiological studies, reinforce the focus on reproducible chest radiograph readings, provide training and support with World Health Organization defined standardized interpretation of chest radiographs and develop guidelines and tools for investigators and site staff to assist in obtaining high-quality chest radiographs. (orig.)

  18. An Examination of Test-Retest, Alternate Form Reliability, and Generalizability Theory Study of the easyCBM Reading Assessments: Grade 1. Technical Report #1216

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Daniel; Park, Jasmine, Bitnara; Lai, Cheng-Fei; Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    This technical report is one in a series of five describing the reliability (test/retest/and alternate form) and G-Theory/D-Study research on the easy CBM reading measures, grades 1-5. Data were gathered in the spring 2011 from a convenience sample of students nested within classrooms at a medium-sized school district in the Pacific Northwest. Due…

  19. The Implementation and Effects of the Literacy Design Collaborative (LDC): Early Findings in Sixth-Grade Advanced Reading Courses. CRESST Report 846

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Joan L.; Epstein, Scott; Leon, Seth; Dai, Yunyun; La Torre Matrundola, Deborah; Reber, Sarah; Choi, Kilchan

    2015-01-01

    The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation invested in the Literacy Design Collaborative (LDC) as one strategy to support teachers' and students' transition to the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) in English language arts. This report provides an early look at the implementation of LDC in sixth-grade Advanced Reading classes in a large Florida…

  20. The Development of K-8 Progress Monitoring Measures in Mathematics for Use with the 2% and General Education Populations: Grade 1. Technical Report # 0919

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    In this technical report, we describe the development and piloting of a series of mathematics progress monitoring measures intended for use with students in grade 1. These measures, available as part of easyCBM [TM], an online progress monitoring assessment system, were developed in 2008 and administered to approximately 2800 students from schools…

  1. easyCBM CCSS Math Item Scaling and Test Form Revision (2012-2013): Grades 6-8. Technical Report #1313

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Daniel; Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this technical report is to document the piloting and scaling of new easyCBM mathematics test items aligned with the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) and to describe the process used to revise and supplement the 2012 research version easyCBM CCSS math tests in Grades 6-8. For all operational 2012 research version test forms (10…

  2. Technical Adequacy of the easyCBM Primary-Level Mathematics Measures (Grades K-2), 2009-2010 Version. Technical Report #1006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Daniel; Lai, Cheng-Fei; Nese, Joseph F. T.; Park, Bitnara Jasmine; Saez, Leilani; Jamgochian, Elisa; Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2010-01-01

    In the following technical report, we present evidence of the technical adequacy of the easyCBM[R] math measures in grades K-2. In addition to reliability information, we present criterion-related validity evidence, both concurrent and predictive, and construct validity evidence. The results represent data gathered throughout the 2009/2010 school…

  3. Technical Adequacy of the easyCBM[R] Mathematics Measures: Grades 3-8, 2009-2010 Version. Technical Report #1007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nese, Joseph F. T.; Lai, Cheng-Fei; Anderson, Daniel; Jamgochian, Elisa M.; Kamata, Akihito; Saez, Leilani; Park, Bitnara J.; Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2010-01-01

    In this technical report, data are presented on the practical utility, reliability, and validity of the easyCBM[R] mathematics (2009-2010 version) measures for students in grades 3-8 within four districts in two states. Analyses include: minimum acceptable within-year growth; minimum acceptable year-end benchmark performance; internal and…

  4. Bread for the World Membership Survey and Analysis Project. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, William H.; And Others

    This survey was conducted in 1984 of current and former members of Bread for the World (BFW) in order to further understanding of the characteristics, attitudes, level of participation, and needs of people involved with hunger issues and the needs of hungry people. A questionnaire was mailed to 1,296 current and 738 former members. This final…

  5. JPRS Report, Soviet Union, World Economy & International Relations, No. 7, July 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-12-29

    extensively in the monograph by A.P. Butenko "Sotsializm Kak Miro- vaya Sistema " [Socialism as a World System] (Moscow, 1984). The author names...nature (the episodic transportation of companions , casual repairs, various assistance and mutual assistance in looking after the sick or children

  6. World energy outlook 2006: the International energy Agency (I.E.A.) report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorin, F.

    2006-01-01

    Between the increasing of energy consumption and then, increasing of carbon dioxide emissions, and the decreasing of hydrocarbon reserves it is urgent to find others energy supplies strategies. The nuclear energy is able to bring a determining contribution to the solution of the world energy problem. (N.C.)

  7. JPRS Report, Soviet Union. World Economy & International Relations, No. 12, December 1988.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-04-18

    enterprises for the achievement of specific economic goals. Work is proceeding on the creation of a uniform taxation system, whose purpose is to ensure... canons of area studies. World practice has for many centuries testified that the motive in the choice of country as the subject of study has been

  8. Endangered Animals. Second Grade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popp, Marcia

    This second grade teaching unit centers on endangered animal species around the world. Questions addressed are: What is an endangered species? Why do animals become extinct? How do I feel about the problem? and What can I do? Students study the definition of endangered species and investigate whether it is a natural process. They explore topics…

  9. Attracting students and professionals into math, science, and technology education at the elementary and middle grades: Annual report, September 1, 1992--August 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flick, L.B.

    1995-12-31

    This report describes the progress of a project to encourage students and professionals to participate in math, science, and technology education at the elementary and middle grades. The topics of the report include developing a model laboratory/classroom for teacher education, providing financial incentives for students with technical majors to complete the program, and emphasizing issues of equity and minority participation in mathematics, science and technology education through recruitment procedures and in course content.

  10. What's Next for China and the U.S.? Grade 10 Lesson. Schools of California Online Resources for Education (SCORE): Connecting California's Classrooms to the World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, W. J.

    In this unit, students prepare a report on China, specifically on the relevance of key events in China's recent history (The Communist Revolution, The Great Leap Forward, The Cultural Revolution, Tiananmen Square) to its current economic and political changes. Students assume the role of presidential advisors who are expected to know the present…

  11. Will America Fall Apart Like the Maya? Grade 7 Lesson. Schools of California Online Resources for Education (SCORE): Connecting California's Classrooms to the World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, David

    If a civilization as powerful and technologically advanced during its time as the Maya could disappear, can the same tragic outcome befall the United States? In this lesson, students work in teams to research the ancient Mayan civilization, specifically the circumstances of its demise. Student teams prepare a report of their findings and recommend…

  12. [Progress report on a World Bank loan to China for a tuberculosis control project].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, F; Chi, Y; Wang, K

    1995-02-01

    The progress of the World Bank loaned TB control project implemented from the second quarter of 1991 to the fourth quarter of 1993 was described in this paper. In the past three years, 737 counties of the 12 provinces with the population of 360 million has been covered by the project. Among 95176 new smear positive cases discovered, 93909 patients received free treatment of TB. The treatment coverage is 98.7%, of which 95% were treated under full course supervision. The smear conversion rate at two, three months of new smear positive TB patients are 83.4% and 90.6% respectively. The cohort analysis showed that the cure rate is 89.8%, which has reached the advanced level of the modern national tuberculosis control programme in the world.

  13. The World Development Report 2009: The Beginning of A Space Odyssey?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Walther

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction It was exactly forty years ago. The World Bank followed the recommendations of the Pearson Commission, which had been set up in order to evaluate the consequences of development aid. It was necessary to combat urbanisation, the Commission stated, by means of policies acting upon factors triggering rural migration and by supporting small regional centres (Ramsamy 2006. For her part, the urban planner Jane Jacobs published The Economy of Cities (1969, a work which reversed the ev...

  14. China`s quest for security in the post cold war world. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S.S.

    1996-07-29

    The author argues that despite all the estimates that the post-Tiananmen People`s Republic of China is about to take the stage as a world power, the reality is far different. He believes that China, in fact, is a weak nation torn by internal economic and environmental problems. The author asserts that its communist leadership is desperately trying to put the democracy genie back in its bottle even while supporting a Leninist-capitalist economic approach which, ultimately, cannot succeed.

  15. Detroit, 22-27 September 1974: Report on ninth world energy conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1974-07-01

    The acceleration of world demand for energy during the last forty years has led to a projection of future needs far in excess of present capacity, and one which threatens exhaustion of today's conventional sources at some future time. Coupled with this premise is the realization of two inter-related facts: inadequate, uneconomic sources of energy cripple a man, his nation, and his world and lead to insecurity, famine and ignorance; on the other hand, excessive, uncontrolled use of energy sources leads to wastage of resources, pollution and human misery that likewise respects no national boundaries. These dominating concerns led to the selection of the main theme of the Ninth World Energy Conference - 'The Economic and Environmental Challenges of Future Energy Requirements'. This theme was broadly broken down into six main categories: energy needs, sources of energy, energy conversion and utilization, conservation of energy, economics and environmental considerations. A total of 229 formal papers were considered by the several thousand participants who represented more than 60 countries and a number of international organizations at the Conference.

  16. Detroit, 22-27 September 1974: Report on ninth world energy conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    The acceleration of world demand for energy during the last forty years has led to a projection of future needs far in excess of present capacity, and one which threatens exhaustion of today's conventional sources at some future time. Coupled with this premise is the realization of two inter-related facts: inadequate, uneconomic sources of energy cripple a man, his nation, and his world and lead to insecurity, famine and ignorance; on the other hand, excessive, uncontrolled use of energy sources leads to wastage of resources, pollution and human misery that likewise respects no national boundaries. These dominating concerns led to the selection of the main theme of the Ninth World Energy Conference - 'The Economic and Environmental Challenges of Future Energy Requirements'. This theme was broadly broken down into six main categories: energy needs, sources of energy, energy conversion and utilization, conservation of energy, economics and environmental considerations. A total of 229 formal papers were considered by the several thousand participants who represented more than 60 countries and a number of international organizations at the Conference

  17. Towards a war-free world. Report on working group five

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    While the group basically followed the agenda set out for it, it was felt that the three elements that it comprised - general and complete disarmament; world governance and peacekeeping and peace enforcement - were not the only ones or even the most apposite in considering how to attain a war-free world. A war-free world would be brought about not only by institutional means, as the agenda appeared to imply, but also by dramatic changes in the norms relating to the utility of the use of violence as a means of resolving human problems. There already appears to be a growing belief in the disutility of war as a means of settling issues between states, as witnessed by the current decline in the prevalence of inter-state wars. There are also strong indications of the growth of a norm, backed by the recent advisory opinions of the International Court of Justice (ICJ), against the legitimacy of the use or threat of use of nuclear weapons. However in large parts of the globe there appear to be quite flimsy norms against the use of violence to settle intra-state disputes, which are currently by far the predominant progenitors of armed conflict. Individuals and parties within states continue to regard war not only as legitimate but as necessary to help them retain or achieve power. Here democratization, economic justice and the establishment of the rule of law would meet the challenge

  18. Vancouver AIDS conference: special report. A verdict on the conference: sadly, not one world or one hope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, A

    1996-01-01

    Although the theme of the 11th International Conference on AIDS held in Vancouver during July 7-12, 1996, was "One World, One Hope," developed and developing countries have HIV/AIDS epidemics of different magnitudes, different levels of resources with which to combat the problems, and dissimilar objectives. The latest data released at the conference report an estimated 21.8 million people to be currently living with HIV/AIDS, the vast majority of whom live in developing countries. 84% of the estimated 7.7 million AIDS cases which have occurred since the beginning of the pandemic were in Africa or Asia; only 9% were in Europe and the US. The greatest burden of disease is and will be therefore experienced in the developing world which, relative to the developed world, has extremely limited resources. The epidemic continues to spread throughout much of the developing world, while levels of HIV infection in the developed world are largely remaining constant, with the center seemingly moving more into marginalized groups such as the homeless, drug users, and other groups. A whole range of new drugs will soon be available to treat HIV/AIDS among those who can afford them. It is possible that AIDS may simply become manageable as a chronic illness in the west. Such drugs, however, will be prohibitively expensive for almost all people infected with HIV. Moreover, the side effects of these new drugs remain to be seen, and it is possible that individuals will develop resistance to the treatment. The author laments the lack of papers at the conference analyzing the impact of the epidemic and hopes to see more representation and consideration of the developing world at the next conference, to be held in Geneva in 1998.

  19. More than just fun and games: the longitudinal relationships between strategic video games, self-reported problem solving skills, and academic grades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Paul J C; Willoughby, Teena

    2013-07-01

    Some researchers have proposed that video games possess good learning principles and may promote problem solving skills. Empirical research regarding this relationship, however, is limited. The goal of the presented study was to examine whether strategic video game play (i.e., role playing and strategy games) predicted self-reported problem solving skills among a sample of 1,492 adolescents (50.8 % female), over the four high school years. The results showed that more strategic video game play predicted higher self-reported problem solving skills over time than less strategic video game play. In addition, the results showed support for an indirect association between strategic video game play and academic grades, in that strategic video game play predicted higher self-reported problem solving skills, and, in turn, higher self-reported problem solving skills predicted higher academic grades. The novel findings that strategic video games promote self-reported problem solving skills and indirectly predict academic grades are important considering that millions of adolescents play video games every day.

  20. Review of voluntary and regulatory carbon reporting by companies around the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borie, Sylvain; Decq, Juliette; Wang, Xin; Alberola, Emilie; Afriat, Marion; Gourdon, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    What countries have instituted regulations requiring companies to measure their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions? How could these regulations be strengthened to help meet the '2 deg. C' goal adopted by all member countries at the COP21 summit? In what ways do new French regulations on reporting of significant GHG emissions constitute a major advance in carbon reporting? To complement recent news focusing on reporting of carbon emissions in France, Carbone 4 offers its readers this review to put voluntary and regulatory carbon reporting mechanisms used by companies in a global perspective

  1. High success rate with new modified endoscopic treatment for high-grade VUR: A pilot study with preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgari, S A; Asl, A S; Safarinejad, M R; Ghanaei, M M

    2016-04-01

    Despite the benefits of the minimally invasive endoscopic treatment for vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) it has a major drawback which is low success rate in high grade VUR. For overcoming this problem, we introduce a new modified technique of endoscopic treatment called periureteral injection technique (PIT). In a prospective study a total of 37 ureters in 19 boys and 14 girls were treated, including 3 bilateral cases. Of 37 units, 30 (81.1%) had grade IV and 7 (18.9%) had grade V primary VUR (18 right, 13 left and 3 bilateral units). Subureteral injection of Vantris(®) was done at the 5-o'clock and 7-o'clock positions in which the direction of injecting needles were almost parallel. Pre- and post-operative evaluation included urinalysis, urinary tract ultrasonography, voiding cystourethrography (VCUG), dimercaptosuccinic acid scan and urodynamic studies. The median age was 38 months (range 8-125). At 6 months follow up period confirmed with VCUG, the VUR has been disappeared in 34 (91.8%) units and 3 units [2 (5.4%) grade II and 1 (2.7%) had grade III)] had downgraded VUR. Complications included early fever due to urinary tract infection in 1 children, transient dysuria in 2 patients and low back pain in one patient (Summary Table). The success rate of PIT for treatment of high grade VUR is high. However, further studies with more patients and longer follow up periods are needed to draw final conclusion. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Benign (World Health Organization Grade I) Cavernous Sinus Meningiomas-International Stereotactic Radiosurgery Society (ISRS) Practice Guideline: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheng-Chia; Trifiletti, Daniel M; Sahgal, Arjun; DeSalles, Antonio; Fariselli, Laura; Hayashi, Motohiro; Levivier, Marc; Ma, Lijun; Álvarez, Roberto Martínez; Paddick, Ian; Regis, Jean; Ryu, Samuel; Slotman, Ben; Sheehan, Jason

    2018-03-15

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) has become popular as a standard treatment for cavernous sinus (CS) meningiomas. To summarize the published literature specific to the treatment of CS meningioma with SRS found through a systematic review, and to create recommendations on behalf of the International Stereotactic Radiosurgery Society. Articles published from January 1963 to December 2014 were systemically reviewed. Three electronic databases, PubMed, EMBASE, and The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, were searched. Publications in English with at least 10 patients (each arm) were included. Of 569 screened abstracts, a total of 49 full-text articles were included in the analysis. All studies were retrospective. Most of the reports had favorable outcomes with 5-yr progression-free survival (PFS) rates ranging from 86% to 99%, and 10-yr PFS rates ranging from 69% to 97%. The post-SRS neurological preservation rate ranged from 80% to 100%. Resection can be considered for the treatment of larger (>3 cm in diameter) and symptomatic CS meningioma in patients both receptive to and medically eligible for open surgery. Adjuvant or salvage SRS for residual or recurrent tumor can be utilized depending on factors such as tumor volume and proximity to adjacent critical organs at risk. The literature is limited to level III evidence with respect to outcomes of SRS in patients with CS meningioma. Based on the observed results, SRS offers a favorable benefit to risk profile for patients with CS meningioma.

  3. The Tropospheric Ozone Assessment Report (TOAR): A community-wide effort to quantify tropospheric ozone in a rapidly changing world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, O. R.; Schultz, M.; Paoletti, E.; Galbally, I. E.; Naja, M. K.; Tarasick, D. W.; Evans, M. J.; Thompson, A. M.

    2017-12-01

    Tropospheric ozone is a greenhouse gas and pollutant detrimental to human health and crop and ecosystem productivity. Since 1990 a large portion of the anthropogenic emissions that react in the atmosphere to produce ozone has shifted from North America and Europe to Asia. This rapid shift, coupled with limited ozone monitoring in developing nations, left scientists unable to answer the most basic questions: Which regions of the world have the greatest human and plant exposure to ozone pollution? Is ozone continuing to decline in nations with strong emissions controls? To what extent is ozone increasing in the developing world? How can the atmospheric sciences community facilitate access to the ozone metrics necessary for quantifying ozone's impact on human health and crop/ecosystem productivity? To answer these questions the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry Project (IGAC) initiated the Tropospheric Ozone Assessment Report (TOAR). With over 220 member scientists and air quality specialists from 36 nations, TOAR's mission is to provide the research community with an up-to-date scientific assessment of tropospheric ozone's global distribution and trends from the surface to the tropopause. TOAR has also built the world's largest database of surface ozone observations and generated ozone exposure and dose metrics at thousands of measurement sites around the world, freely accessible for research on the global-scale impact of ozone on climate, human health and crop/ecosystem productivity. Plots of these metrics show the regions of the world with the greatest ozone exposure for humans and crops/ecosystems, at least in areas where observations are available. The results also highlight regions where air quality is improving and where it has degraded. TOAR has also conducted the first intercomparison of tropospheric column ozone from ozonesondes and multiple satellite instruments, which provide similar estimates of the present-day tropospheric ozone burden.

  4. Learning about Our World and Our Past: Using the Tools and Resources of Geography and U.S. History. A Report of the 1994 NAEP Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Evelyn; Stancavage, Fran; Mitchell, Julia; Goodman, Madeline; Lazer, Stephen

    This report summarizes results from the 1994 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), specifically those results concerning geography and U. S. history. The 1994 NAEP asked 4th-, 8th-, and 12th-grade students a series of questions designed to assess their knowledge level and skills applications in specific subjects. This report provides…

  5. Report of studies programme of CME (Energy World Committee) from 1992 to 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergougnoux, J.

    1995-01-01

    Here is a forecasting in the energy area for the world. The increasing energy demand for developing countries, the situation of Eastern Europe going to a market economy are such factors which give some ideas how the demand in energy can evolve. The low prices of energy do not oblige to look after an efficiency of energy, the important needs for developing countries can make forget the environment problem with greenhouse effect, the increasing of energy demand for transport in developed and developing countries will make the demand grow up. The incertitudes about nuclear power future do not help to have ideas. All these questions and incertitudes make clear that the market cannot answer itself to solve all problems: financing, efficiency, transport, long term studies and rural energy development in developing countries are such priority themes

  6. Production of Solar Grade (SoG) Silicon by Refining Liquid Metallurgical Grade (MG) Silicon: Final Report, 19 April 2001; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khattack, C. P.; Joyce, D. B.; Schmid, F.

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of the developed technology for producing SoG silicon by upgrading MG silicon with a cost goal of$20/kg in large-scale production. A Heat Exchanger Method (HEM) furnace originally designed to produce multicrystalline ingots was modified to refine molten MG silicon feedstock prior to directional solidification. Based on theoretical calculations, simple processing techniques, such as gas blowing through the melt, reaction with moisture, and slagging have been used to remove B from molten MG silicon. The charge size was scaled up from 1 kg to 300 kg in incremental steps and effective refining was achieved. After the refining parameters were established, improvements to increase the impurity reduction rates were emphasized. With this approach, 50 kg of commercially available as-received MG silicon was processed for a refining time of about 13 hours. A half life of and lt;2 hours was achieved, and the B concentration was reduced to 0.3 ppma and P concentration to 10 ppma from the original values of 20 to 60 ppma, and all other impurities to and lt;0.1 ppma. Achieving and lt;1 ppma B by this simple refining technique is a breakthrough towards the goal of achieving low-cost SoG silicon for PV applications. While the P reduction process was being optimized, the successful B reduction process was applied to a category of electronics industry silicon scrap previously unacceptable for PV feedstock use because of its high B content (50-400 ppma). This material after refining showed that its B content was reduced by several orders of magnitude, to(approx)1 ppma (0.4 ohm-cm, or about 5x1016 cm-3). NREL's Silicon Materials Research team grew and wafered small and lt;100 and gt; dislocation-free Czochralski (Cz) crystals from the new feedstock material for diagnostic tests of electrical properties, C and O impurity levels, and PV performance relative to similar crystals grown from EG feedstock and commercial Cz wafers. The PV conversion

  7. Designing adverse event forms for real-world reporting: participatory research in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Emma C; Chandler, Clare I R; Innocent, Simeon H S; Kalumuna, Charles; Terlouw, Dianne J; Lalloo, David G; Staedke, Sarah G; Haaland, Ane

    2012-01-01

    The wide-scale roll-out of artemisinin combination therapies (ACTs) for the treatment of malaria should be accompanied by continued surveillance of their safety. Post-marketing pharmacovigilance (PV) relies on adverse event (AE) reporting by clinicians, but as a large proportion of treatments are provided by non-clinicians in low-resource settings, the effectiveness of such PV systems is limited. To facilitate reporting, AE forms should be easily completed; however, most are challenging for lower-level health workers and non-clinicians to complete. Through participatory research, we sought to develop user-friendly AE report forms to capture information on events associated with ACTs.Following situation analysis, we undertook workshops with community medicine distributors and health workers in Jinja, Uganda, to develop a reporting form based on experiences and needs of users, and communication and visual perception principles. Participants gave feedback for revisions of subsequent versions. We then conducted 8 pretesting sessions with 77 potential end users to test and refine passive and active versions of the form.The development process resulted in a form that included a pictorial storyboard to communicate the rationale for the information needed and facilitate rapport between the reporter and the respondent, and a diary format to record the drug administration and event details in chronological relation to each other. Successive rounds of pretesting used qualitative and quantitative feedback to refine the form, with the final round showing over 80% of the form completed correctly by potential end users.We developed novel AE report forms that can be used by non-clinicians to capture pharmacovigilance data for anti-malarial drugs. The participatory approach was effective for developing forms that are intuitive for reporters, and motivating for respondents. The forms, or their key components, could be adapted for use in other low-literacy settings to improve quality

  8. Designing adverse event forms for real-world reporting: participatory research in Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma C Davies

    Full Text Available The wide-scale roll-out of artemisinin combination therapies (ACTs for the treatment of malaria should be accompanied by continued surveillance of their safety. Post-marketing pharmacovigilance (PV relies on adverse event (AE reporting by clinicians, but as a large proportion of treatments are provided by non-clinicians in low-resource settings, the effectiveness of such PV systems is limited. To facilitate reporting, AE forms should be easily completed; however, most are challenging for lower-level health workers and non-clinicians to complete. Through participatory research, we sought to develop user-friendly AE report forms to capture information on events associated with ACTs.Following situation analysis, we undertook workshops with community medicine distributors and health workers in Jinja, Uganda, to develop a reporting form based on experiences and needs of users, and communication and visual perception principles. Participants gave feedback for revisions of subsequent versions. We then conducted 8 pretesting sessions with 77 potential end users to test and refine passive and active versions of the form.The development process resulted in a form that included a pictorial storyboard to communicate the rationale for the information needed and facilitate rapport between the reporter and the respondent, and a diary format to record the drug administration and event details in chronological relation to each other. Successive rounds of pretesting used qualitative and quantitative feedback to refine the form, with the final round showing over 80% of the form completed correctly by potential end users.We developed novel AE report forms that can be used by non-clinicians to capture pharmacovigilance data for anti-malarial drugs. The participatory approach was effective for developing forms that are intuitive for reporters, and motivating for respondents. The forms, or their key components, could be adapted for use in other low-literacy settings

  9. An Examination of Test-Retest, Alternate Form Reliability, and Generalizability Theory Study of the easyCBM Reading Assessments: Grade 5. Technical Report #1220

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Cheng-Fei; Park, Bitnara Jasmine; Anderson, Daniel; Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    This technical report is one in a series of five describing the reliability (test/retest and alternate form) and G-Theory/D-Study research on the easyCBM reading measures, grades 1-5. Data were gathered in the spring of 2011 from a convenience sample of students nested within classrooms at a medium-sized school district in the Pacific Northwest.…

  10. An Examination of Test-Retest, Alternate Form Reliability, and Generalizability Theory Study of the easyCBM Reading Assessments: Grade 2. Technical Report #1217

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Daniel; Lai, Cheg-Fei; Park, Bitnara Jasmine; Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    This technical report is one in a series of five describing the reliability (test/retest an alternate form) and G-Theory/D-Study on the easyCBM reading measures, grades 1-5. Data were gathered in the spring of 2011 from the convenience sample of students nested within classrooms at a medium-sized school district in the Pacific Northwest. Due to…

  11. The Effects of Teacher and Teacher-librarian High-end Collaboration on Inquiry-based Project Reports and School Monthly Test Scores of Fifth-grade Students

    OpenAIRE

    Hai-Hon Chen

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold. The first purpose was to establish the high level collaboration of integrated instruction model between social studies teacher and teacher-librarian. The second purpose was to investigate the effects of high-end collaboration on the individual and groups’ inquiry-based project reports, as well as monthly test scores of fifth-grade students. A quasi-experimental method was adopted, two classes of elementary school fifth graders in Tainan Municipal city, T...

  12. An Examination of Test-Retest, Alternate Form Reliability, and Generalizability Theory Study of the easyCBM Passage Reading Fluency Assessments: Grade 4. Technical Report #1219

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Bitnara Jasmine; Anderson, Daniel; Alonzo, Julie; Lai, Cheng-Fei; Tindal, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    This technical report is one in a series of five describing the reliability (test/retest and alternate form) and G-Theory/D-Study research on the easyCBM reading measures, grades 1-5. Data were gathered in the spring of 2011 from a convenience sample of students nested within classrooms at a medium-sized school district in the Pacific Northwest.…

  13. THE PRODUCTION AND EVALUATION OF THREE COMPUTER-BASED ECONOMICS GAMES FOR THE SIXTH GRADE. FINAL REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    WING, RICHARD L.; AND OTHERS

    THE PURPOSE OF THE EXPERIMENT WAS TO PRODUCE AND EVALUATE 3 COMPUTER-BASED ECONOMICS GAMES AS A METHOD OF INDIVIDUALIZING INSTRUCTION FOR GRADE 6 STUDENTS. 26 EXPERIMENTAL SUBJECTS PLAYED 2 ECONOMICS GAMES, WHILE A CONTROL GROUP RECEIVED CONVENTIONAL INSTRUCTION ON SIMILAR MATERIAL. IN THE SUMERIAN GAME, STUDENTS SEATED AT THE TYPEWRITER TERMINALS…

  14. Graded Reflectivity Mirror for the Solid State Heat Capacity Laser Final Report CRADA No. TC-2085-04

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Davis, J. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-27

    This was a collaborative effort between The Regents of the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the Boeing Company, to develop a Graded Reflectivity Mirror (GRM) to achieve improved near field fill and higher brightness in the far field output of LLNL’s Solid State Heat Capacity Laser (SSHCL).

  15. Short- and Long-Term Effects of Over-Reporting of Grades on Academic Self-Concept and Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sticca, Fabio; Goetz, Thomas; Nett, Ulrike E.; Hubbard, Kyle; Haag, Ludwig

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the short- and long-term effects of self-enhancement (i.e., overreporting of academic grades) on academic self-concept and academic achievement. A total of 916, 719, and 647 students participated in the first, second, and third waves of assessment, respectively (mean age at T1 = 15.6 years). At each assessment, students…

  16. The Nation's Report Card: Mathematics 2011. Trial Urban District Assessment Results at Grades 4 and 8. NCES 2012-452

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Representative samples of fourth- and eighth-grade public school students from 21 urban districts participated in the 2011 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) in mathematics. Eighteen of the districts participating in the 2011 NAEP Trial Urban District Assessment (TUDA) participated in earlier assessment years, while three districts…

  17. Case report of two patients having successful surgery for lung cancer after treatment for Grade 2 radiation pneumonitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Nakajima

    2016-02-01

    Conclusion: Surgery for lung cancer on patients with Grade 2 radiation pneumonitis should be deferred until the patients complete steroid therapy, and the clinical pneumonitis is cured. Moreover, it is believed that it is important to remove the resolved radiation pneumonitis without leaving any residual areas and not to cut into any areas of active radiation pneumonitis as much as possible.

  18. The Association of Self-Reported Sleep, Weight Status, and Academic Performance in Fifth-Grade Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroebele, Nanette; McNally, Janise; Plog, Amy; Siegfried, Scott; Hill, James O.

    2013-01-01

    Background: To improve support and justi?cation for health promotion efforts in schools, it is helpful to understand how students' health behaviors affect academic performance. Methods: Fifth-grade students completed an online school-administered health survey with questions regarding their eating behavior, physical activity, academic performance,…

  19. Climate Change Mitigation in a Sustainable World - Findings of the IPCC 4th Assessment Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sims, R. E. H.

    2007-01-01

    The 4th Assessment Report on climate change of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC, 2007) has recently been completed. The fi rst report in the IPCC 4th Assessment series by Working Group I outlined the latest knowledge on Climate Science. The second by Working Group 2 covered the possibilities for Adaptation of ecosystems, glaciers preceding, sea level rising, droughts etc in various regions. This paper is based on the findings of Working Group III as presented in the recently published report Climate Change 2007: Mitigation of Climate Change. The 27 paragraph Summary for Policy Makers was approved sentence by sentence over 4 days in May 2007 by 120 government delegations in Bangkok, Thailand. The three short Summaries for Policy Makers (SPM), Synthesis report, and the three full reports can be found at www.ipcc.ch. In addition the short Synthesis Report across all three working groups is soon to be released. The report on Mitigation attempted to compile the latest scientific knowledge relating to low-carbon emitting technologies; assessed their costs and potentials for greenhouse gas (GHG) emission avoidance; evaluated their long term prospects out to 2100 for stabilising atmospheric GHGs; provided a detailed list of policy options; and discussed the opportunities for sustainable development and equity linked with GHG abatement. Over the 3 year writing and review process, the author of this paper was the co-ordinating lead author of the writing team for the Working Group III chapter on Energy Supply. Of the 13 chapters, this one received the greatest attention with over 5000 review comments that were each responded to, and with the sections on nuclear and renewable energy receiving a major share of them. Since the 3rd Assessment Report (TAR) was published in 2001, the over-arching message now being delivered by Working Group III is a stronger but positive one: Action is required. The situation is urgent - but not beyond repair. Many energy

  20. World Energy Outlook 2004. The new report of the International Energy Agency; World Energy Outlook 2004. Le nouveau rapport de l'Agence Internationale de l'Energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2004-12-01

    Here is given the complete text of the summary of the World Energy Outlook report of the International Energy Agency. This report includes an alternative scenario which gives the image of an energy future more efficient and more respectful of the environment than those of the reference scenario. (O.M.)

  1. Beyond Self-Report: Tools to Compare Estimated and Real-World Smartphone Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Sally; Ellis, David A.; Shaw, Heather; Piwek, Lukasz

    2015-01-01

    Psychologists typically rely on self-report data when quantifying mobile phone usage, despite little evidence of its validity. In this paper we explore the accuracy of using self-reported estimates when compared with actual smartphone use. We also include source code to process and visualise these data. We compared 23 participants’ actual smartphone use over a two-week period with self-reported estimates and the Mobile Phone Problem Use Scale. Our results indicate that estimated time spent using a smartphone may be an adequate measure of use, unless a greater resolution of data are required. Estimates concerning the number of times an individual used their phone across a typical day did not correlate with actual smartphone use. Neither estimated duration nor number of uses correlated with the Mobile Phone Problem Use Scale. We conclude that estimated smartphone use should be interpreted with caution in psychological research. PMID:26509895

  2. Report of the world association of medical editors: agenda for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-04-01

    During a 3-day meeting at Bellagio in January 2001, a group of 20 editors from 12 countries in 5 continents met to map out a strategy for the World Association of Medical Editors (WAME)'s continued development in the service of medical editors over the next several years. The group: 1) Developed a statement of principles on the standards of professionalism and responsibilities of editors (this statement will be posted on the Web site after electronic consultation with and comment by WAME editors); 2) Agreed to assess the extent to which these principles are reflected in practice and to explore barriers to their adoption, using data from a survey and focus groups; 3) Developed and outlined an on-line program for distance learning, targeted at new editors; 4) Planned for formal evaluation of the educational outreach program; and 5) Agreed to support regional initiatives to strengthen local editorial capacity. Underpinning all past and proposed future activities is the WAME Web site. The ambitious plans outlined above will require extensive development of the site, plans for which were made at the Bellagio meeting.

  3. Attitudes of developing world physicians to where medical research is performed and reported

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kongpatanakul Supornchai

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the influence of the site of research or publication on the impact of the research findings on clinical practice, particularly in developing countries. The International Clinical Epidemiology Network (INCLEN is dedicated to improving the quality of health research in the Developing World through institutional capacity building for evidence based medicine, and provided the opportunity to examine the likely impact of research location and journal location on physicians' practice in a number of the participating countries. Methods Physicians from secondary and tertiary hospitals in six cities located in China, Thailand, India, Egypt and Kenya were enrolled in a cross-sectional questionnaire survey. The primary outcome measures were scores on a Likert scale reflecting stated likelihood of changing clinical practice depending on the source of the research or its publication. Results Overall, local research and publications were most likely to effect change in clinical practice, followed by North American, European and regional research/publications respectively, although there were significant variations between countries. The impact of local and regional research would be greater if the perceived research quality improved in those settings. Conclusion Conducting high quality local research is likely to be an effective way of getting research findings into practice in developing countries.

  4. Can the subaltern speak? Visibility of international migrants with communication and swallowing disabilities in the World Report on Disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillay, Mershen

    2013-02-01

    Wylie, McAllister, Davidson, and Marshal (2013) argued that the speech-language pathology profession must be encouraged to consider novel ways to deliver equitable services to people with communication disorders. People with communication disorders include the world's 215 million international migrants who deserve unique commentary when considering disability in the world. Hence, this paper focuses on invisibility of international migrants with communication or swallowing disorders in the World Report on Disability. The analysis of people with disabilities is biased towards citizenship. What of those who are non-citizens? Three issues are highlighted: (a) the demographic construction of migrants; (b) management of communication disability within the migrant patient-speech language pathologist dyad; and (c) strategic re-prioritization of dysphagia as a disability. While relevant to all people, re-prioritization of dysphagia as an impairment (of eating or drinking) resulting in restricted mealtime participation is especially relevant to the healthcare of international migrants. This issue is discussed in terms of how safe or adequate eating and drinking ought to constitute essential discharge criteria in medical settings where discharge (often resulting in deportation) may be decided on one's ability to walk or talk.

  5. Causes of Hunger: Hunger 1995. Fifth Annual Report on the State of World Hunger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Marc J., Ed.

    This comprehensive report shows how hunger is interrelated with other social ills, including powerlessness, violence, poverty, environmental destruction, and discrimination. More than a billion people are too poor to afford an adequate diet and other essential of life such as health care, housing, sanitation, safe water, and education. In the…

  6. Environmental Effects of Marine Energy Development Around the World. Annex IV Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copping, Andrea [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hanna, L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Whiting, J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Geerlofs, S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Grear, M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Blake, K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Coffey, A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Massaua, M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Brown-Saracino, J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Battey, H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This Annex IV report contains three case studies of specific interactions of marine energy devices with the marine environment addressing the physical interactions between animals and tidal turbines, the acoustic impact of marine energy devices on marine animals, and the effects of energy removal on physical systems.

  7. Water for development. World Water Day 2002 - March 22. A summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    'Water for Development' was the theme of the World Water Day 2002, which the IAEA coordinated fro the United Nations system. The IAEA transfers cutting edge nuclear technologies to scientists in developing countries to help them find a way to improve efficiency of water use, to better understand climatic change, to turn salt water into fresh water, and to grow healthy crops in saline lands. A comprehensive understanding of a hydrological system is necessary for a sustainable resource development without adverse effects on the environment. Isotope techniques are effective tools fro fulfilling critical hydrologic information needs, e.g. the origin of groundwater, recharge, residence time, interconnections between water bodies, etc. The cost of such investigations is often relatively small in comparison to the cost of classical hydrological techniques, and in addition isotopes provide information that sometimes could not be obtained by other techniques. Stable and radioactive environmental isotopes have now been used for more than four decades to study hydrological systems and have proved particularly useful for understanding groundwater systems. Applications of isotopes in hydrology are based on the general concept of 'tracing', in which either intentionally introduced isotopes or naturally occurring (environmental) isotopes are employed. Environmental isotopes (either radioactive or stable) have a distinct advantage over injected (artificial) tracers in that they facilitate the study of various hydrological processes on a much larger temporal and spatial scale through their natural distribution in a hydrological system. Thus, environmental isotope methodologies are unique in regional studies of water resources to obtain time and space integrated characteristics of groundwater systems. The use of artificial tracers generally is effective fro site-specific, local applications.

  8. Water for development. World Water Day 2002 - March 22. A summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    'Water for Development' was the theme of the World Water Day 2002, which the IAEA coordinated fro the United Nations system. The IAEA transfers cutting edge nuclear technologies to scientists in developing countries to help them find a way to improve efficiency of water use, to better understand climatic change, to turn salt water into fresh water, and to grow healthy crops in saline lands. A comprehensive understanding of a hydrological system is necessary for a sustainable resource development without adverse effects on the environment. Isotope techniques are effective tools fro fulfilling critical hydrologic information needs, e.g. the origin of groundwater, recharge, residence time, interconnections between water bodies, etc. The cost of such investigations is often relatively small in comparison to the cost of classical hydrological techniques, and in addition isotopes provide information that sometimes could not be obtained by other techniques. Stable and radioactive environmental isotopes have now been used for more than four decades to study hydrological systems and have proved particularly useful for understanding groundwater systems. Applications of isotopes in hydrology are based on the general concept of 'tracing', in which either intentionally introduced isotopes or naturally occurring (environmental) isotopes are employed. Environmental isotopes (either radioactive or stable) have a distinct advantage over injected (artificial) tracers in that they facilitate the study of various hydrological processes on a much larger temporal and spatial scale through their natural distribution in a hydrological system. Thus, environmental isotope methodologies are unique in regional studies of water resources to obtain time and space integrated characteristics of groundwater systems. The use of artificial tracers generally is effective fro site-specific, local applications

  9. Medium Truck Duty Cycle Data from Real-World Driving Environments: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lascurain, Mary Beth [ORNL; Franzese, Oscar [ORNL; Capps, Gary J [ORNL; Siekmann, Adam [ORNL; Thomas, Neil [ORNL; LaClair, Tim J [ORNL; Barker, Alan M [ORNL; Knee, Helmut E [ORNL

    2012-11-01

    Since the early part of the 20th century, the US trucking industry has provided a safe and economical means of moving commodities across the country. At present, nearly 80% of US domestic freight movement involves the use of trucks. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is spearheading a number of research efforts to improve heavy vehicle fuel efficiencies. This includes research in engine technologies (including hybrid and fuel cell technologies), lightweight materials, advanced fuels, and parasitic loss reductions. In addition, DOE is developing advanced tools and models to support heavy vehicle research and is leading the 21st Century Truck Partnership and the SuperTruck development effort. Both of these efforts have the common goal of decreasing the fuel consumption of heavy vehicles. In the case of SuperTruck, a goal of improving the overall freight efficiency of a combination tractor-trailer has been established. This Medium Truck Duty Cycle (MTDC) project is a critical element in DOE s vision for improved heavy vehicle energy efficiency; it is unique in that there is no other existing national database of characteristic duty cycles for medium trucks based on collecting data from Class 6 and 7 vehicles. It involves the collection of real-world data on medium trucks for various situational characteristics (e.g., rural/urban, freeway/arterial, congested/free-flowing, good/bad weather) and looks at the unique nature of medium trucks drive cycles (stop-and-go delivery, power takeoff, idle time, short-radius trips). This research provides a rich source of data that can contribute to the development of new tools for FE and modeling, provide DOE a sound basis upon which to make technology investment decisions, and provide a national archive of real-world-based medium-truck operational data to support energy efficiency research. The MTDC project involved a two-part field operational test (FOT). For the Part-1 FOT, three vehicles each from two vocations (urban transit and

  10. Reporting the incidence of school violence across grade levels in the U.S. using the Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lei

    2004-01-01

    School violence has increasingly captured public attention due to deadly school shootings. Controversy on school violence is demonstrated by a mixed picture of school safety and the lack of consensus on the definitions of violence, which makes comparison of findings across studies difficult. This study extended the application of the Rasch model to school violence research using TIMSS data. The results show that school violence occurred at a level much lower than the predictions of the measurement model. Across all grade levels the most frequently reported type of violence is intimidation or verbal abuse of students and the least frequently reported physical injury to teachers or staff. Copyright 2004

  11. International environmental atlas: Yearbook of world resources. Analyses -reports - data. Vol. 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Several general reports and three case studies show the importance of a continuous development in the industrial countries, the developing countries and in threshold countries. The serious ecologico-economic crisis in Central Europe is discussed. The latest developments in population growth, health, nutrition, agriculture, and the development of forests and pastures, fauna and fauna habitats, energy, drinking water, oceans and coasts, atmosphere and climate, political strategies and institutions are treated based on numerous data. (HP) [de

  12. World in transition: basic structure of global people-environment interactions. 1993 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    In spring 1992, increasingly concerned about the preservation of the natural basis for the life and development of humanity, the Federal Government of Germany established the German Advisory Council on Global Change. In its 1993 Annual Report, the Council endeavours to provide a holistic analysis of the Earth System, whereby the central focus is directed at the principal interactions between nature and society. The aim here is to demonstrate the complexity of environmental problems, on the one hand, and to create, on the other, the analytical basis for assessing the impact of current trends (increased greenhouse effect, declining biodiversity, loss of fertile soils, population growth, etc.) on the system as a whole. In-depth treatment of core topics will be related back continually to this global perspective, and vice versa, in order to contribute towards continuous improvement of our understanding of the system. The Report begins with a circumscription of its subject, i.e. a definition of what is meant by ''global environmental change''. This leads inevitably to the issue of ''sustainable development'', which will be dealt with in one of the Reports to follow. The highly condensed description of the ecosphere and the anthroposphere, and an analysis of the linkages between the two spheres in the Earth System, is followed by the examination of the main components and the relevant trends of global environmental change. (orig./UA)

  13. Data Quality Objectives Summary Report for the Release of the 105-C Below-Grade Structures and Underlying Soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, R.G.

    1999-01-01

    The C Reactor is associated with the 100-BC-2 Operable Unit. The below-ground structures of the C Reactor are scheduled for decontamination and decommissioning (D and D). These structures include the fuel storage basin, lift station, and other below-grade rooms and tunnels. The goal of the data quality objectives process is to establish the sampling and analysis design strategy to support decontamination and closeout decisions

  14. Data Quality Objectives Summary Report for the Release of the 105-C Below-Grade Structures and Underlying Soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, R.G.

    1998-01-01

    The C Reactor is associated with the 100-BC-2 Operable Unit. The below-ground structures of the C Reactor are scheduled for decontamination and decommissioning (D and D). These structures include the fuel storage basin, lift station, and other below-grade rooms and tunnels. The goal of the data quality objectives process is to establish the sampling and analysis design strategy to support decontamination and closeout decisions

  15. Exploring pulse shaping for Z using graded-density impactors on gas guns (final report for LDRD project 79879).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furnish, Michael David; Reinhart, William Dodd; Anderson, William W. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Vogler, Tracy John; Hixson, Rob (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Kipp, Marlin E.

    2005-10-01

    While isentropic compression experiment (ICE) techniques have proved useful in deducing the high-pressure compressibility of a wide range of materials, they have encountered difficulties where large-volume phase transitions exist. The present study sought to apply graded-density impactor methods for producing isentropic loading to planar impact experiments to selected such problems. Cerium was chosen due to its 20% compression between 0.7 and 1.0 GPa. A model was constructed based on limited earlier dynamic data, and applied to the design of a suite of experiments. A capability for handling this material was installed. Two experiments were executed using shock/reload techniques with available samples, loading initially to near the gamma-alpha transition, then reloading. As well, two graded-density impactor experiments were conducted with alumina. A method for interpreting ICE data was developed and validated; this uses a wavelet construction for the ramp wave and includes corrections for the ''diffraction'' of wavelets by releases or reloads reflected from the sample/window interface. Alternate methods for constructing graded-density impactors are discussed.

  16. Teaching about World War II in Sixth Grade World History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipton, Janet K.

    1995-01-01

    Recommends using "Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl: A Teacher Response Unit." Lists examples of activities contained in the unit, including timeliness, simulations, and writing assignments. Highlights specific activities concerning propaganda, discrimination, and prejudice. (MJP)

  17. Sustaining a verification regime in a nuclear weapon-free world. VERTIC research report no. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moyland, S. van

    1999-01-01

    Sustaining high levels of commitment to and enthusiasm for the verification regime in a nuclear weapon-free world (NWFW) would be a considerable challenge, but the price of failure would be high. No verification system for a complete ban on a whole of weapon of mass destruction (WMD) has been in existence long enough to provide a precedent or the requisite experience. Nevertheless, lessons from the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) nuclear safeguards system are instructive. A potential problem over the long haul is the gradual erosion of the deterrent effect of verification that may result from the continual overlooking of minor instances of non-compliance. Flaws in the verification system must be identified and dealt with early lest they also corrode the system. To achieve this the verification organisation's inspectors and analytical staff will need sustained support, encouragement, resources and training. In drawing attention to weaknesses, they must be supported by management and at the political level. The leaking of sensitive information, either industrial or military, by staff of the verification regime is a potential problem. 'Managed access' techniques should be constantly examined and improved. The verification organisation and states parties will need to sustain close co-operation with the nuclear and related industries. Frequent review mechanisms must be established. States must invest time and effort to make them effective. Another potential problem is the withering of resources for sustained verification. Verification organisations tend to be pressured by states to cut or last least cap costs, even if the verification workload increases. The verification system must be effective as knowledge and experience allows. The organisation will need continuously to update its scientific methods and technology. This requires in-house resources plus external research and development (R and D). Universities, laboratories and industry need incentives to

  18. Mobility - the motor of energy consumption. Swiss National Committee in the World Energy Council: Report on the 16th world energy congress in Tokyo in 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartl, R.

    1996-01-01

    Two events at the 16th World Energy Congress focussed on the subject of mobility, which is a determining factor of worldwide mineral oil consumption. The study 'Global transport sector energy demand towards 2020', written by a working group led by the Norwegian Statoil company, served as a basis for the debates. (orig.) [de

  19. The TIMSS Videotape Classroom Study: Methods and Findings from an Exploratory Research Project on Eighth-Grade Mathematics Instruction in Germany, Japan, and the United States. A Research and Development Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stigler, James W.; Gonzales, Patrick; Kwanaka, Takako; Knoll, Steffen; Serrano, Ana

    This report presents the methods and preliminary findings of the Videotape Classroom Study, a video study of eighth-grade mathematics lessons in Germany, Japan, and the United States. This exploratory research project is part of the Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS). The study included 231 eighth-grade mathematics…

  20. World Solar Challenge 1993 Technical Report. Part 2. Darwin to Adelaide. (November 7-November 16, 1993)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-01-01

    This is a report of the above-named solar car race from Darwin to Adelaide, Australia. In this Part II, details are described of motors, controllers, transmissions, batteries, battery management, suspensions, travelling wheels, tires, strategies, communications, weather prediction, safety, and so forth. As for motors, a regenerative motor which generates power during car deceleration may also be used. Nineteen manufacturers and six teams used various kinds of motors. One was equipped with a wheel motor devoid of a transmission, with the motor built into the wheel. While it is possible to drive across the continent without a storage battery as in the case of the 1990 event, one should be installed, to be stored up under favorable conditions for use in hill climbing. For the Honda and Nissan teams, tough and efficient batteries, though not high in energy density, were selected. (NEDO)

  1. Our World Their World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisco, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    Build, create, make, blog, develop, organize, structure, perform. These are just a few verbs that illustrate the visual world. These words create images that allow students to respond to their environment. Visual culture studies recognize the predominance of visual forms of media, communication, and information in the postmodern world. This…

  2. The patient-physician partnership in asthma: real-world observations associated with clinical and patient-reported outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, M; Vickers, A; Anderson, P; Kay, S

    2010-09-01

    It is hypothesized that a good partnership between asthma patients and their physicians has a direct and positive influence on the patients' clinical and patient-reported outcomes. Conversely, poor partnership has a detrimental effect on clinical and patient-reported outcomes. This paper uses data from a real-world observational study to define partnership through matched physician and patient data and correlate the quality of partnership with observed clinical and patient-reported outcomes. Data were drawn from Adelphi's Respiratory Disease Specific Programme, a cross-sectional study of consulting patients in five European countries undertaken between June and September 2009. A range of clinical and patient-reported outcomes were observed allowing analysis of the partnership between 2251 asthma patients and their physicians. Analysis demonstrates that the better the partnership between patient and physician, the more likely the patient is to have their asthma condition controlled (PPartnership is also associated with lower impact on lifestyle (Ppartnership is a contributory factor in the improvement of asthma treatment, and patient education may lead to improvement in a patient's ability to contribute to this. Device satisfaction is one of the markers of good partnership.

  3. Suitability of Different Food Grade Materials for the Encapsulation of Some Functional Foods Well Reported for Their Advantages and Susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wani, Touseef Ahmed; Shah, Adil Gani; Wani, Sajad Mohd; Wani, Idrees Ahmed; Masoodi, Farooq Ahmad; Nissar, Nazia; Shagoo, Mudasir Ahmad

    2016-11-17

    Functional foods find a very important place in the modern era, where different types of cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, etc. are on a high. Irrespective of the abundance of bioactive components in different fruits and vegetables, their low solubility in aqueous solution, vulnerability to destruction in different environmental and gastrointestinal conditions and a low intestinal absorption becomes a concern. Because it is quite difficult to commercialize non food materials for the food encapsulation purposes due to their safety concerns in the human body, scientists in the recent times have come up with the idea of encapsulating the different bioactive components in different food grade materials that are able to safeguard these bioactive components against the different environmental and gastrointestinal conditions and ensure their safe and targeted delivery at their absorption sites. Different food grade encapsulation materials including various oligosaccharides, polysaccharides (starch, cyclodextrins, alginates, chitosan, gum arabic, and carboxymethyl cellulose) and proteins and their suitability for encapsulating various bioactive components like flavonoids (catechins, rutin, curcumin, hesperetin, and vanillin), nonflavonoids (resveratrol), carotenoids (β-carotene, lycopene, and lutein), and fatty acids (fish oil, flaxseed oil, and olive oil) of high medical and nutritional value are reviewed here.

  4. Self-reported symptoms and risk factors for digital ischaemia among international world-class beach volleyball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van De Pol, Daan; Alaeikhanehshir, Sena; Maas, Mario; Kuijer, P Paul F M

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of ischaemia-related symptoms is remarkably high among elite indoor volleyball players. Since the exposure to sport-specific demands may be higher in beach volleyball compared to indoor volleyball, the aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of ischaemia-related symptoms and associated risk factors among world-class beach volleyball players. Therefore, a questionnaire survey was performed among beach volleyball players active during the 2013 Grand Slam Beach Volleyball in the Netherlands. In total, 60 of the 128 beach volleyball players (47%) participated: 26 males and 34 females from 17 countries. The self-reported prevalence of cold or blue or pale digits in the dominant hand during or immediately after practice or competition was 38% (n = 23). Two risk factors were independently associated with symptoms of blue or pale digits: more than 14 years playing volleyball (odds ratio (OR) 4.42, 90% confidence interval (90% CI) 1.30-15.07) and sex (female) (OR 4.62, 90% CI 1.15-18.57). In conclusion, the prevalence of symptoms associated with digital ischaemia is high among international world-class beach volleyball players. Female sex and the length of the volleyball career were independently associated with an increased risk of ischaemia-related symptoms. The high prevalence of these seemingly innocuous symptoms and possible associated risk factors warrant regular monitoring since early detection can potentially prevent thromboembolic complications and irreversible tissue damage.

  5. Environmental isotope data no. 10: World survey of isotope concentration in precipitation (1988-1991). Report from a network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This is the tenth volume of the publication Environmental Isotope Data: World Survey of Isotope Concentration in Precipitation. This volume is primarily concerned with the concentration of the environmental isotopes (tritium, deuterium and oxygen-18) in monthly samples of precipitation taken by a global network of 169 stations in the period 1988 to 1991. Selected meteorological data, such as the amount of precipitation, mean water vapour pressure and surface air temperature, are also presented. Data before 1988 which were unavailable at the time of the earlier issues have also been included in the latter part of this volume as late reports. The data are being widely used in hydrological, hydrometeorological and climatological studies. 9 refs, 2 figs

  6. Highway/Railroad Accident Report: Collision Of Northeast Illinois Regional Commuter Railroad Corporation (METRA) Train And Transportation Joint Agreement School District 47/155 School Bus At Railroad/Highway Grade Crossing In Fox River Grove, Illinois, On

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-10-29

    This report explains the collision of a Northeast Illinois Regional Commuter Railroad Corporation commuter train with a Transportation Joint Agreement School District 47/155 school bus that was stopped at a railroad/highway grade crossing in Fox Rive...

  7. World Literature - World Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Offering their own twenty-first-century perspectives - across generations, nationalities and disciplines -, the contributors to this anthology explore the idea of world literature for what it may add of new connections and itineraries to the study of literature and culture today. Covering a vast...... historical material these essays, by a diverse group of scholars, examine the pioneers of world literature and the roles played by translation, migration and literary institutions in the circulation and reception of both national and cosmopolitan literatures....

  8. Adaptation funding and the World Bank investment framework initiative. Background Report prepared for the Gleneagles Dialogue Government Working Groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, B.

    2006-06-01

    The recent World Bank Report on 'Clean Energy and Development: Towards an Investment Framework' estimates that 'climateproofing' investments in developing countries - excluding additional investment needed to reduce the exposure to current climate risks and unavoided climate related damages - would cost between $9 and $41 billions annually. This raises two key questions that the government working groups in Mexico might wish to consider: The first question is How are the costs of climate-proofing investments in particular, and adaptation in general to be covered and managed? Depending on the types of costs related to adaptation and impacts, different forms of disbursement will have to be used to achieve the desired results. A number of financial tools are already in place or are being introduced which could be used for this purpose. Apart from the traditional instruments used in climate change funding to-date - such as the hitherto sole operating entity of the financial mechanism of the UNFCCC, i.e. the GEF - there are the following: The World Bank concept of an Investment Framework - this is probably most suited to deal with the transfer of adaptation technologies; Climate impact risks could be addressed through insurance-related instruments - these might be strictly climate related, or more general, such as the proposed European Commission / World Bank Global Index Insurance Framework; The funding of relief efforts connected with climate/weather related disasters is probably best dealt with through the proposed reform of existing disaster relief fund, administered by the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA); and Economic shocks due to whether related disasters could be dealt with through the Exogenous Shock Facility of the IMF. The instruments for disbursement of adaptation funding thus need not deal solely with climate change aspects, nor is necessary that they should be governed exclusively by the UNFCCC (COP) or the Kyoto Protocol (COP

  9. Man and energy: Reality versus utopia. Swiss National Committee in the World Energy Council: Report on the 16th world energy congress in Tokyo in 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritsch, B.

    1996-01-01

    The future of our environmental and energy problems will be decided next century in today's developing countries, particularly in the large agglomerations of the Third World. It is unlikely that fossil fuels will to any great degree be replaced by renewable energy sources and/or nuclear energy. The excellent efficiency of thermal power plants now achieved in the industrial countries should as fast as possible also be realised in the developing countries, and the process of electrification there should be accelerated. The greatest obstacle to a rapid worldwide spread of efficient energy systems are the political imponderabilities in many developing countries. (orig.) [de

  10. Self-reported temporomandibular joint disorder symptoms, oral health, and quality of life of children in kindergarten through grade 5: Do sex, race, and socioeconomic background matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglehart, Marita R; Patel, Manan H; Widmalm, Sven-Erik; Briskie, Daniel M

    2016-02-01

    The authors' objectives were to determine the percentage of children in kindergarten through grade 5 who reported symptoms of temporomandibular joint disorder (TMJD); to assess whether sex, race, and socioeconomic background mattered; and to explore the relationships between TMJD and children's oral health and oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL). The research team conducted face-to-face interviews with 8,302 children in kindergarten through grade 5 (51% female, 49% male; 53% African American, 42% white). They conducted oral health screenings with 7,439 children. Overall, 23.6% of the children reported pain when chewing tough food, and 18.8% reported pain when opening their mouth wide; 23.2% reported hearing a sound (clicking) when opening their mouth wide. Female students were more likely than male students and African American children were more likely than white children to report TMJD symptoms. The prevalence of TMJD symptoms did not correlate with whether the children had a need for oral health care services or whether they had an abscess or carious teeth with pulpal involvement. TMJD symptoms were associated significantly with children's OHRQoL. Considerable percentages of 4- to 12-year-old children reported TMJD symptoms, with girls and African American children being more likely than their counterparts to be affected. Experiencing TMJD symptoms was associated significantly with poorer OHRQoL. Dental practitioners need to be aware that substantial percentages of kindergarten and elementary school-aged children experience TMJD symptoms. Taking a dental history and conducting an oral examination, therefore, should include assessments of the signs and symptoms of TMJD; treatment recommendations should be provided for affected children. Copyright © 2016 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. WHO Grade 2 Neuroendocrine Tumor in a 15-Year-Old Male: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Johannesen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuroendocrine tumors, distinguished from adenocarcinomas by their neuroendocrine differentiation, are the most common pediatric epithelial malignancy that most often occurs in the appendix. In 2010, the WHO classified neuroendocrine neoplasms into three grades based on morphology, mitotic count, and Ki67 proliferation index. A 15-year-old male with a history of anemia and failure to thrive was diagnosed with a well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor in the jejunum that invaded into the subserosal soft tissue and metastasized to four lymph nodes. Pediatric neuroendocrine tumors frequently arise within hereditary tumor syndromes with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors being the most common. Several studies also indicate an elevated risk of small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors in which children born to a parent with a history of neuroendocrine tumors in the small intestine have a significant increased risk of developing one.

  12. Early wound site seeding in a patient with CNS high-grade neuroepithelial tumor with BCOR alteration: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkman, Matthew A; Pickles, Jessica C; Fairchild, Amy R; Avery, Aimee; Pietsch, Torsten; Jacques, Thomas S; Aquilina, Kristian

    2018-05-30

    Advances in molecular profiling have facilitated the emergence of newly defined entities of central nervous system tumor, including CNS high-grade neuroepithelial tumor with BCOR alteration (CNS HGNET-BCOR). Relatively little is known about the clinical behaviour of these newly-characterized tumors. We describe a pediatric male patient with CNS HGNET-BCOR who developed seeding of the tumor into the site of the surgical wound within months of surgery for resection of a residual posterior fossa tumor. This case emphasises three important points. First, CNS HGNET-BCOR can be aggressive tumors that necessitate close clinical and radiological surveillance. Second, surveillance imaging in such cases should incorporate the surgical incision site into the field of view, and this should be closely scrutinised to ensure the timely detection of wound site seeding. Third, wound site seeding may still occur despite the use of meticulous surgical techniques. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Coal world market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    A brief analysis of major tendencies in the world market of coal is presented. It is pointed out that recent years, by and large, were favourable for the development of the world coal industry. Prices for coal (both for power-grade and coking one) in 1995 after many years of depressive state increased by nearly 20 % and reached a maximum of the last decade. International coal trading continues to grow and the tendency may persist in the mext two years

  14. Academic Ranking of World Universities and the Performance of East Asian Universities. RIHE International Seminar Reports. No. 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nian Cai

    2016-01-01

    The first multi-indicator ranking of world universities, "Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU)", was published by the Institute of Higher Education of Shanghai Jiao Tong University in June 2003. Although the initial purpose of ARWU was to find the global standing of top Chinese universities, it has been attracting world-wide…

  15. World Development Report, 1980. Part I: Adjustment and Growth in the 1980s. Part II: Poverty and Human Development. Annex: World Development Indicators. With Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isenman, Paul; And Others

    The report, third in a series of annual publications, examines some of the difficulties and prospects in areas of social and economic progress and human development which developing countries face during the next decade. Distinguishing oil-importing from oil-exporting developing countries, the first part of the report presents global and regional…

  16. World status report: plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dircks, W.

    1992-01-01

    In a recent speech in Japan, the Deputy Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) said that the economic case for reprocessing spent nuclear fuel had been severely eroded. An edited version of the speech is given. The changed prospects for nuclear energy is given as the reason why the demand for plutonium has declined sharply. The oil crisis of the 1970s reduced the demand for electric power and the economic justification for the use of recycled plutonium. The stockpile of isolated plutonium is growing rapidly giving rise to worries about its security. From this point of view, isolated plutonium is best kept in reactor fuel not separated out. In this connection the IAEA has offered to help in the storage of plutonium so that vigorous safety and security requirements are met. In Japan there is a debate about the plutonium which is dependent on the future of the fast breeder reactor programme. (UK)

  17. World Nuclear Association (WNA) internationally standardized reporting (checklist) on the sustainable development performance of uranium mining and processing sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, F.

    2014-01-01

    The World Nuclear Association (WNA) has developed internationally standardized reporting (‘Checklist’) for uranium mining and processing sites. This reporting is to achieve widespread utilities/miners agreement on a list of topics/indicators for common use in demonstrating miners’ adherence to strong sustainable development performance. Nuclear utilities are often required to evaluate the sustainable development performance of their suppliers as part of a utility operational management system. In the present case, nuclear utilities are buyers of uranium supplies from uranium miners and such purchases are often achieved through the utility uranium or fuel supply management function. This Checklist is an evaluation tool which has been created to collect information from uranium miners’ available annual reports, data series, and measurable indicators on a wide range of sustainable development topics to verify that best practices in this field are implemented throughout uranium mining and processing sites. The Checklist has been developed to align with the WNA’s policy document Sustaining Global Best Practices in Uranium Mining and Processing: Principles for Managing Radiation, Health and Safety, and Waste and the Environment which encompasses all applicable aspects of sustainable development to uranium mining and processing. The eleven sections of the Checklist are: 1. Adherence to Sustainable Development; 2. Health, Safety and Environmental Protection; 3. Compliance; 4. Social Responsibility and Stakeholder Engagement; 5. Management of Hazardous Materials; 6. Quality Management Systems; 7. Accidents and Emergencies; 8. Transport of Hazardous Materials; 9. Systematic Approach to Training; 10. Security of Sealed Radioactive Sources and Nuclear Substances; 11. Decommissioning and Site Closure. The Checklist benefits from many years of nuclear utility experience in verifying the sustainable development performance of uranium mining and processing sites. This

  18. Report of a case combining solitary Peutz-Jeghers polyp, colitis cystica profunda, and high-grade dysplasia of the epithelium of the colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalampros, Alexandros; Vailas, Michail G; Sotiropoulou, Maria; Baili, Efstratia; Davakis, Spiridon; Moris, Demetrios; Felekouras, Evangelos; Deladetsima, Ioanna

    2017-10-18

    Colitis cystica profunda is a rare nonneoplastic disease defined by the presence of intramural cysts that contain mucus, usually situated in the rectosigmoid area, which can mimic various malignant lesions and polyps. Its etiology still remains not fully elucidated, and several mechanisms such as congenital, post-traumatic, and infectious have been implicated in the development of this rare entity. Herein, we describe a unique case of colitis cystica profunda in the setting of Peutz-Jeghers-type polyp of the sigmoid colon, associated with high-grade dysplasia of the overlying epithelium in a 48-year-old female patient, who presented to the emergency room with signs of intestinal obstruction. To the best of our insight, this is the first manifestation ever reported in the literature regarding the coexistence of solitary Peutz-Jeghers-type polyp, colitis cystica profunda, and high-grade dysplasia of the epithelium of the colon. The purpose of this case report is to highlight colitis cystica profunda and its clinical significance. An uncommon nonneoplastic entity, many times masquerading as malignant lesion of the rectosigmoid area of the colon. Clinicians and pathologists should be aware of this benign condition that is found incidentally postoperatively in patients undergoing colectomies, leading to unnecessary increase of morbidity and mortality in these patients, who otherwise could have been cured with conservative treatment only.

  19. Implementing the World Report on Disability in Malaysia: a student-led service to promote knowledge and innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dort, Sandra; Coyle, Julia; Wilson, Linda; Ibrahim, Hasherah Mohd

    2013-02-01

    The lead article by Wylie, McAllister, Davidson, and Marshall (2013) puts forward pertinent issues facing the speech-language pathology profession raised by the World Report on Disability. This paper continues the discussion by reporting on a capacity building action research study on the development, implementation, and evaluation of a new approach to early intervention speech-language pathology through clinical education in Malaysia. This research evaluated a student-led service in community-based rehabilitation that supplemented existing and more typical institution-based services. A Malaysian community-based rehabilitation project was chosen due to its emphasis on increasing the equitability and accessibility of services for people with disabilities which was a catalyst for this research. Also, expanding awareness-building, education, and training activities about communication disability was important. The intention was to provide students with experience of working in such settings, and facilitate their development as advocates for broadening the scope of practice of speech-language pathology services in Malaysia. This article focuses on the findings pertaining to the collaborative process and the learning experiences of the adult participants. Through reflection on the positive achievements, as well as some failures, it aims to provide deeper understanding of the use of such a model.

  20. Anthropometry of World-Class Elite Handball Players According to the Playing Position: Reports From Men’s Handball World Championship 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghobadi, Hamid; Rajabi, Hamid; Farzad, Babak; Bayati, Mahdi; Jeffreys, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Identifying the anthropometric measures of successful and less successful handball players may be helpful in developing a talent identification and development model, allowing for the determination of key physical capacities required for elite performance. The purpose of the study was to describe the anthropometric characteristics, including age, standing stature, body mass and body mass index (BMI) in handball players who participated in the 2013 Men’s Handball World Championships. Secondly, the objective was to identify the possible differences in these parameters in terms of individual playing positions (goalkeeper, back, center back, wing, line player). Rosters with handball player’s age, standing stature, and body mass were obtained from the International Handball Federation website. The research material included 409 handball players (24 teams). National teams were organized by their ranks and sub-grouped using their continents and playing positions. The results of the analyses of variance demonstrated significant differences in age (F=2.30; p=0.044; Partial ŋ2=0.028), standing stature (F=14.02; p=0.0001; Partial ŋ2=0.148), and body mass (F=5.88; p=0.0001; Partial ŋ2=0.068) among the groups (G1–G6). Players in G1 had the highest standing stature and body mass, while players in G6 had the lowest age and body mass values. The backs and line players were the tallest. In addition, the measurement of body mass showed that the line players had the highest body mass and BMI values. In conclusion, this study presented anthropometric data that differentiated levels of success in male handball teams playing in the 2013 world championships. This information should serve as a reference for the average standing stature, body mass, and BMI of handball players for particular positions at the professional level. PMID:24511357

  1. The OIE World Animal Health Information System: the role of OIE Reference Laboratories and Collaborating Centres in disease reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Jebara, K

    2010-12-01

    One of the main objectives of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) is to ensure transparency in and knowledge of the world animal health situation. To achieve this objective, the OIE relies on its network of Member Countries, which is complemented by the activities of 221 Reference Laboratories (RLs) and Collaborating Centres. The RL mandate states that, in the case of positive results for diseases notifiable to the OIE, the laboratory should inform the OIE Delegate of the Member Country from which the samples originated and send a copy of the information to OIE Headquarters. However, since 2006 the OIE has received a lower than expected number of notifications from RLs, which implies eitherthat the majority of samples are sent to national laboratories or that some RLs are not fully complying with their mandate. The OIE sent a questionnaire to RLs in preparation for the Second Global Conference of OIE Reference Laboratories and Collaborating Centres (Paris, France, 21-23 June 2010). Two main factors emerged: the need for RLs to clarify their role and responsibilities in disease reporting and the need for an awareness campaign to sensitise national Veterinary Services to the importance of conducting more surveillance (and consequently of submitting samples to RLs) for all OIE-listed diseases. Reference laboratories indicated two main reasons for not sharing more data on positive samples with the OIE: i) a perceived contradiction between their mandate as OIE RLs and the standards of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) dealing with confidentiality; and ii) certain Member Countries or stakeholders asking RLs not to share positive results with the OIE, for political or economic reasons. The OIE has put forward proposals to help RLs resolve these problems in future. The use of ISO standards must be clarified and there must be improved communication between the OIE and its RLs. A lack of transparency about a significant disease event can

  2. $17 billion needed for population programme to year 2000: Dr. Nafis Sadik launches State of World Population Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Dr. Nafis Sadik, Executive Director of the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), in her address on July 11 to the Foreign Press Association in London on the occasion of the release of the "1995 State of the World Population Report," stated that governments needed to invest in people, and that the estimated amount needed to reduce population numbers in developing countries was $17 billion for the year 2000. Two-thirds of the cost would be supplied by the developing countries. She said that coordinating population policies globally through such documents as the Programme of Action from the Cairo Conference would aid in slowing population growth. World population, currently 5.7 billion, is projected to reach 7.1-7.83 billion in 2015 and 7.9-11.9 billion in 2050. She also noted that certain conditions faced by women bear upon unsustainable population growth. The cycle of poverty continues in developing countries because very young mothers, who face higher risks in pregnancy and childbirth than those who delay childbearing until after the age of 20, are less likely to continue their education, more likely to have lower-paying jobs, and have a higher rate of separation and divorce. The isolation of women from widespread political participation and the marginalization of women's concerns from mainstream topics has resulted in ineffective family planning programs, including prevention of illness or impairment related to pregnancy or childbirth. Women, in most societies, cannot fully participate in economic and public life, have limited access to positions of influence and power, have narrower occupational choices and lower earnings than men, and must struggle to reconcile activities outside the home with their traditional roles. Sustainable development can only be achieved when social development expands opportunities for individuals (men and women), and their families, empowering them in the attainment of their social, economic, political, and cultural aspirations.

  3. The Fifth Grade Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Michael; And Others

    An interdisciplinary design project report investigates the relationship of the fifth grade educational facility to the student and teacher needs in light of human and environmental factors. The classroom, activity and teaching spaces are analyzed with regard to the educational curriculum. Specifications and design criteria concerning equipment…

  4. Mapping World Hunger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Vliet, Lucille W.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a lesson designed to involve students in grades 6 through 8 in learning how geography was affected the problem of world hunger. Emphasis is placed on using maps, globes, atlases, and geographic dictionaries, as well as books, magazines, and other resources. (MES)

  5. One World: Service Bees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomason, Rhonda

    2009-01-01

    Bees are a vital part of the ecology. People of conscience are a vital part of society. In Nina Frenkel's "One World" poster, the bee is also a metaphor for the role of the individual in a diverse society. This article presents a lesson that uses Frenkel's poster to help early-grades students connect these ideas and explore both the importance of…

  6. A Reliable and Valid Weighted Scoring Instrument for Use in Grading APA-Style Empirical Research Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Kathleen Puglisi

    2012-01-01

    The scoring instrument described in this article is based on a deconstruction of the seven sections of an American Psychological Association (APA)-style empirical research report into a set of learning outcomes divided into content-, expression-, and format-related categories. A double-weighting scheme used to score the report yields a final grade…

  7. Global Matrix 2.0: Report Card Grades on the Physical Activity of Children and Youth Comparing 38 Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tremblay, Mark S.; Barnes, Joel; Gonzales, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    The Active Healthy Kids Global Alliance organized the concurrent preparation of Report Cards on the physical activity of children and youth in 38 countries from 6 continents (representing 60% of the world’s population). Nine common indicators were used (Overall Physical Activity, Organized Sport ...... reporting better infrastructure, suggests that autonomy to play, travel, or chore requirements and/or fewer attractive sedentary pursuits, rather than infrastructure and structured activities, may facilitate higher levels of physical activity....

  8. Global Matrix 2.0: Report Card Grades on the Physical Activity of Children and Youth Comparing 38 Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tremblay, Mark S.; Barnes, Joel; Gonzales, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    The Active Healthy Kids Global Alliance organized the concurrent preparation of Report Cards on the physical activity of children and youth in 38 countries from 6 continents (representing 60% of the world’s population). Nine common indicators were used (Overall Physical Activity, Organized Sport...... reporting better infrastructure, suggests that autonomy to play, travel, or chore requirements and/or fewer attractive sedentary pursuits, rather than infrastructure and structured activities, may facilitate higher levels of physical activity....

  9. The pathologist's mean grade is constant and individualizes the prognostic value of bladder cancer grading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rhijn, Bas W G; van Leenders, Geert J L H; Ooms, Bert C M; Kirkels, Wim J; Zlotta, Alexandre R; Boevé, Egbert R; Jöbsis, Adriaan C; van der Kwast, Theo H

    2010-06-01

    A new grading system for bladder cancer (BCa) was adopted in 2004 to reduce observer variability and provide better prognostic information. We compared the World Health Organization (WHO) 1973 and 2004 systems for observer variability and prognosis. Slides of 173 primary non-muscle-invasive BCa were reviewed two times by four pathologists. Intra- and interobserver variability were assessed using κ statistics. We determined the mean grade (eg, G1/low malignant potential is 1 grade point, G2/low grade is 2 grade points) of the pathologists per grading cycle. Kaplan-Meier analyses were applied for prediction of recurrence and progression. For WHO 2004 and 1973 grading, the agreement between the pathologists was 39-74% (κ: 0.14-0.58) and 39-64% (κ: 0.15-0.41), respectively. The intraobserver agreement varied from 71% to 88% (κ: 0.55-0.81). The mean grade of a pathologist was constant (difference below 0.1 grade point) irrespective of the grading system. Conversely, mean-grade differences among the pathologists were high, up to 0.7 grade point. The mean grades for the WHO 2004 system were 0.3-0.5 grade point higher than those of WHO 1973. Mean grade distinguished low and high graders among the pathologists and was strongly linked with risk of progression in each grade category. The variation in mean grade among individual pathologists exceeded the grade shift caused by WHO 2004 grading. Knowledge of the pathologist's mean grade allows a better assessment of the prognostic value of grading. Mean grade has the potential to become a tool for quality assurance in pathology. Copyright © 2009 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Twenty-fifth Semiannual Report of the Commission to the Congress, January 1959. Atomic Industrial Process and Second World Conference, July - December 1958

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCone, John A.

    1959-01-31

    The document represents the twenty-fifth semiannual Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) report to Congress. The report sums up the major activities and developments in the national atomic energy program in Part Three, covering the period July - December 1958. A special Part One of this semiannual report is titled ''Industrial Atomic Progress During 1958", and a Part Two entitled "Second World Conference on Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy".

  11. Spontaneous Remission of an Untreated, MYC and BCL2 Coexpressing, High-Grade B-Cell Lymphoma: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Alan Potts

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL are a heterogeneous group of hematologic malignancies typically treated with multiagent chemotherapy. Rarely, spontaneous remissions can be observed, particularly in more indolent subtypes. The prognosis of aggressive NHL can be predicted using clinical and histopathologic factors. In aggressive B-cell NHL, the importance of MYC and BCL2 proto-oncogene coexpression (as assessed by immunohistochemistry and high-grade histologic features are particularly noteworthy. We report a unique case of spontaneous remission in a patient with an aggressive B-cell NHL which harbored high-risk histopathologic features, including MYC protein expression at 70–80%, BCL2 protein expression, and morphologic features suggestive of high-grade B-cell lymphoma, NOS (formerly B-cell lymphoma unclassifiable with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and Burkitt lymphoma [BCLU]. After undergoing a biopsy to confirm this diagnosis, he opted to forego curative-intent chemotherapy. The single, yet relatively large area of involvement noted on 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography steadily resolved on subsequent follow-up studies. He remained without evidence of recurrence one year later, having never received treatment. This case emphasizes the potential for spontaneous remission in NHL and demonstrates that this phenomenon can be observed despite contemporary high-risk histopathologic features.

  12. Ethical issues in medical research in the developing world: a report on a meeting organised by Fondation Mérieux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrey, Christophe; Wassenaar, Douglas; Gilchrist, Shawn; Ivanoff, Bernard

    2009-08-01

    This paper reports on a multidisciplinary meeting held to discuss ethical issues in medical research in the developing world. Many studies, including clinical trials, are conducted in developing countries with a high burden of disease. Conditions under which this research is conducted vary because of differences in culture, public health, political, legal and social contexts specific to these countries. Research practices, including standards of care for participants, may vary as a result. It is therefore not surprising that ethical issues emerge. This meeting sought to identify and discuss these issues from the perspectives of the many actors in such research, including community representatives, with a view to finding ethical and pragmatic solutions to these issues. Dialogue between these actors was also promoted, with a view to identifying the need to develop such dialogue in future. Drawing from the experiences of the speakers, the colloquium attempted to outline some answers to several key questions characterising the field today. Experiences related to epidemiologic research, vaccine trials, drug trials, diagnostic tests and to some fundamental ethical issues in health research. Speakers were from different countries, disciplines and professions. The meeting provided a forum for consultation and debate between different ethics actors. Both encouraging findings and challenges emerged.

  13. The World Report on Disability in relation to the development of speech-language pathology in Viet Nam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherton, Marie; Dung, Nguyễn Thị Ngọc; Nhân, Võ Hoàng

    2013-02-01

    Wylie, McAllister, Davidson, and Marshall (2013) argue that recommendations made within the World Report on Disability provide an opportunity for speech-language pathologists to consider new ways of developing services for people with communication and swallowing disorders. They propose that current approaches to the delivery of speech-language pathology services are largely embedded within the medical model of impairment, thereby limiting the ability of services to meet the needs of people in a holistic manner. In this paper, the criticality of selecting an appropriate service delivery model is discussed within the context of a recently established post-graduate speech therapy education programme in Viet Nam. Driving forces for the implementation of the program will be explored, as will the factors that determined the choice of service delivery. Opportunities and challenges to the long-term viability of the program and the program's potential to meet the needs of persons with communication and swallowing disorders in Viet Nam will be considered.

  14. Promoting change through political consciousness: a South African speech-language pathology response to the World Report on Disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathard, Harsha; Pillay, Mershen

    2013-02-01

    In the context of the World Report on Disability, Wylie, McAllister, Davidson, and Marshall (2013) question how speech-language pathologists (SLPs) change practices to benefit under-served people with communication disability. This commentary provides a South African response premised on Political Consciousness. In South Africa, a grossly unequal society, the under-served population is not only those with communication disability but also include those who are at a communication disadvantage due to disabling conditions. As a consequence of the combined effects of a severe shortage of SLPs as well as maldistribution in service provision, the under-served are mainly poor Black South Africans who are the majority population. Political Consciousness allows one to examine how selected forces at the macro-level, meso-level, and micro-level may enable or limit services to the under-served majority. At a macro-level, this study appraises policies and actions advancing and impeding service delivery. At the meso-level it is argued that hegemonic professional knowledge is limiting and an equity-driven population-based approach is advocated. At a micro-level, the Relationship of Labouring Affinities is offered as a conceptual tool for critical engagement. In conclusion, it is suggested that the speech-language pathology profession must collectively become political actors at all levels to effect change.

  15. [Grading of tumors in the tubular digestive tract : Esophagus, stomach, colon and rectum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bläker, H

    2016-07-01

    Grading of tumors located in the tubular digestive tract is an integral component of pathology assessment reports but is subordinate to the histological typing of tumors with respect to the prognostic significance. Tumor grading has not been shown to be an independent prognostic marker for most tumor entities in the gastrointestinal tract; however, it may be relevant for further routine treatment decision making in early Union Internationale Contre le Cancer (UICC) stage cancers in which the prognosis for patients is less dominated by advanced tumor spread. Owing to the more favorable prognosis of microsatellite instability in colorectal cancer, the World Health Organization (WHO) has recommended that poorly differentiated tumors should be tested and graded as low grade (G1/G2) when microsatellite instability is detected. This recommendation has been integrated into the German S3 guidelines for colorectal cancers. Accordingly, microsatellite instability testing for grading purposes should become routine practice.

  16. Validation of EORTC Prognostic Factors for Adults With Low-Grade Glioma: A Report Using Intergroup 86-72-51

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniels, Thomas B.; Brown, Paul D.; Felten, Sara J.; Wu, Wenting; Buckner, Jan C.; Arusell, Robert M.; Curran, Walter J.; Abrams, Ross A.; Schiff, David; Shaw, Edward G.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: A prognostic index for survival was constructed and validated from patient data from two European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) radiation trials for low-grade glioma (LGG). We sought to independently validate this prognostic index with a separate prospectively collected data set (Intergroup 86-72-51). Methods and Materials: Two hundred three patients were treated in a North Central Cancer Treatment Group-led trial that randomized patients with supratentorial LGG to 50.4 or 64.8 Gy. Risk factors from the EORTC prognostic index were analyzed for prognostic value: histology, tumor size, neurologic deficit, age, and tumor crossing the midline. The high-risk group was defined as patients with more than two risk factors. In addition, the Mini Mental Status Examination (MMSE) score, extent of surgical resection, and 1p19q status were also analyzed for prognostic value. Results: On univariate analysis, the following were statistically significant (p < 0.05) detrimental factors for both progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS): astrocytoma histology, tumor size, and less than total resection. A Mini Mental Status Examination score of more than 26 was a favorable prognostic factor. Multivariate analysis showed that tumor size and MMSE score were significant predictors of OS whereas tumor size, astrocytoma histology, and MMSE score were significant predictors of PFS. Analyzing by the EORTC risk groups, we found that the low-risk group had significantly better median OS (10.8 years vs. 3.9 years, p < 0.0001) and PFS (6.2 years vs. 1.9 years, p < 0.0001) than the high-risk group. The 1p19q status was available in 66 patients. Co-deletion of 1p19q was a favorable prognostic factor for OS vs. one or no deletion (median OS, 12.6 years vs. 7.2 years; p = 0.03). Conclusions: Although the low-risk group as defined by EORTC criteria had a superior PFS and OS to the high-risk group, this is primarily because of the influence of

  17. The Development and Production of a Functionally Graded Composite for Pb-Bi Service.Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballinger, Ronald G.

    2011-01-01

    A material that resists lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) attack and retains its strength at 700 C would be an enabling technology for LBE-cooled reactors. No single alloy currently exists that can economically meet the required performance criteria of high strength and corrosion resistance. A Functionally Graded Composite (FGC) was developed with layers engineered to perform these functions. F91 was chosen as the structural layer of the composite for its strength and radiation resistance. Fe-12Cr-2Si, an alloy developed from previous work in the Fe-Cr-Si system, was chosen as the corrosion-resistant cladding layer because of its chemical similarity to F91 and its superior corrosion resistance in both oxidizing and reducing environments. Fe-12Cr-2Si experienced minimal corrosion due to its self-passivation in oxidizing and reducing environments. Extrapolated corrosion rates are below one micron per year at 700 C. Corrosion of F91 was faster, but predictable and manageable. Diffusion studies showed that 17 microns of the cladding layer will be diffusionally diluted during the three year life of fuel cladding. 33 microns must be accounted for during the sixty year life of coolant piping. 5 cm coolant piping and 6.35 mm fuel cladding preforms were produced on a commercial scale by weld-overlaying Fe-12Cr-2Si onto F91 billets and co-extruding them. An ASME certified weld was performed followed by the prescribed quench-and-tempering heat treatment for F91. A minimal heat affected zone was observed, demonstrating field weldability. Finally, corrosion tests were performed on the fabricated FGC at 700 C after completely breaching the cladding in a small area to induce galvanic corrosion at the interface. None was observed. This FGC has significant impacts on LBE reactor design. The increases in outlet temperature and coolant velocity allow a large increase in power density, leading to either a smaller core for the same power rating or more power output for the same size core

  18. Arbeit mit englischen Nachrichten auf der Sekundarstufe 1 (Work with English News Reports in Secondary Grade 1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegler, Klaus

    1976-01-01

    Reports on work done with the "Humboldt Service" of the Berlin Humboldt Oberschule. Shows how work with English news can be begun, how further oral training can be accomplished, and what problems arise at different stages of development. (Text is in German.) (IFS/WGA)

  19. A Progress Report of Econ 12: Design and Evaluation of a 12th Grade Course in the Principles of Economics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Jose State Coll., CA.

    This report gives background data and an overview of the development of the ECON 12 project, which was carried out in conjunction with the Developmental Economics Education Program (DEEP) grant from the Joint Council on Economic Education to the Contra Costa County (California) Department of Education. The program and its dissemination were…

  20. A Study of a Collaborative Instructional Project Informed by Systemic Functional Linguistic Theory: Report Writing in Elementary Grades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisk, Maria Estela; Hodgson-Drysdale, Tracy; O'Connor, Cheryl

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the teaching of report writing in PreK-5 through the lens of systemic functional linguistics theory. Teachers were part of a university-public school collaboration that included professional development on teaching genres, text organization, and language features. Grounded in this knowledge, teachers explicitly taught report…

  1. Criterion Validity Evidence for the easyCBM© CCSS Math Measures: Grades 6-8. Technical Report #1402

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Daniel; Rowley, Brock; Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    The easyCBM© CCSS Math tests were developed to help inform teachers' instructional decisions by providing relevant information on students' mathematical skills, relative to the Common Core State Standards (CCSS). This technical report describes a study to explore the validity of the easyCBM© CCSS Math tests by evaluating the relation between…

  2. High-grade poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma of the breast with low oncotype Dx recurrence score: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz-Zuluaga, Carlos A; Kotiah, Sandy; Studeman, Kimberley D

    2017-01-01

    Primary neuroendocrine carcinoma of the breast (NECB) is a rare malignant tumor with controversial biological behavior and a lack of data guiding treatment decisions due to its scarcity. Cancer gene-expression profiling tests provide a better indication of clinical prognosis and help determine the best clinical management versus the traditional clinical and pathological parameters. This is a report of a NECB with a genetic assay that showed a low-risk tumor despite high-grade and poorly differentiated histopathological features. Patient outcomes correlate with the low risk classification without the need for adjuvant chemotherapy despite the standard clinical-pathologic approach. Analysis of cancer related genes expression and outcomes in historical NECB may elucidate new insight of this rare disease.

  3. World law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold J. Berman

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available In the third millennium of the Christian era, which is characterised by the emergence of a world economy and eventually a world society, the concept of world law is needed to embrace not only the traditional disciplines of public international law, and comparative law, but also the common underlying legal principles applicable in world trade, world finance, transnational transfer of technology and other fields of world economic law, as well as in such emerging fields as the protection of the world's environment and the protection of universal human rights. World law combines inter-state law with the common law of humanity and the customary law of various world communities.

  4. Diagnostic terminology for urinary cytology reports including the new subcategories 'atypical urothelial cells of undetermined significance' (AUC-US) and 'cannot exclude high grade' (AUC-H).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piaton, E; Decaussin-Petrucci, M; Mege-Lechevallier, F; Advenier, A-S; Devonec, M; Ruffion, A

    2014-02-01

    We studied whether atypical, non-superficial urothelial cells (AUC) could be separated into new subcategories including AUC 'of undetermined significance' (AUC-US) and 'cannot exclude high grade'' (AUC-H) in order to help to standardize urine cytopathology reports, as it is widely accepted in the Bethesda system for gynaecological cytopathology. We investigated whether AUC-US and AUC-H, defined by distinctive cytological criteria, might be separated with statistical significance according to actual diagnosis and follow-up data. A series of 534 cyto-histological comparisons taken in 139 patients, including 221 AUC at various steps of their clinical history was studied. There were 513 (96.1%) postcystoscopy and 469 (87.8%) ThinPrep® liquid-based specimens (95.9% and 89.1% of AUC cases, respectively). Patients viewed between 1999 and 2011 had histological control in a 0- to 6-months delay and were followed-up during an additional 5.9 ± 9.2 (0- to 56-) months period. The 221 AUC represented 0.8-2% of the specimens viewed during the study period. Among AUC-H cases, 70 out of 185 (37.8%) matched with high-grade lesions, compared with 3 of 38 (8.3%) of AUC-US cases (P = 0.0003). Conservatively treated patients with AUC-H more frequently developed high-grade lesions than those with AUC-US (54.1% versus 16.7%, P = 0.0007) with a 17.6-months mean delay. Nuclear hyperchromasia, a nuclear to cytoplasm (N/C) ratio > 0.7 and the combination of both were the more informative diagnostic criteria, all with P < 0.01. We conclude that the new subcategories could help to standardize urine cytopathology reports and contribute to the patient's management, provided it is validated by multicentric studies. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. HIV/AIDS research conducted in the developing world and sponsored by the developed world: reporting of research ethics committee review in two countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Lisa Judy; Rifai-Bashjawish, Hoda; Kleinert, Kelly; Saltman, Alexandra; Leu, Cheng-Shiun; Klitzman, Robert

    2011-09-01

    We explored how often journal articles reporting HIV research sponsored by a developed country, but conducted in a developing country, mention research ethics committee (REC) approval from both countries, and what factors are involved. Of all such 2007 articles on Medline conducted in one of four developing countries (N = 154), only 52% mentioned such dual approval. Mention of dual vs. single approval was more likely among articles with ≥ 50% sponsor country authors, and the United States as the sponsor country. Also, dual approval was more likely among articles that mentioned informed consent and funding, had ≥ 50% sponsor country authors, were biomedical (vs. psychosocial), and appeared in journals adopting International Committee Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) guidelines. Dual approval was thus obtained in only half of the articles and was associated with ethical and logistic issues, indicating the need for clearer and more universally accepted guidelines.

  6. Alice in the Real World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Tom

    2012-01-01

    As a fifth-grade mathematics teacher, the author tries to create authentic problem-solving activities that connect to the world in which his students live. He discovered a natural connection to his students' real world at a computer camp. A friend introduced him to Alice, a computer application developed at Carnegie Mellon, under the leadership of…

  7. THE EFFECTIVENESS OF THREE READING APPROACHES AND AN ORAL LANGUAGE STIMULATION PROGRAM WITH DISADVANTAGED CHILDREN IN THE PRIMARY GRADES--AN INTERIM REPORT AFTER ONE YEAR OF THE COOPERATIVE READING PROJECT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DUNN, LLOYD M.; AND OTHERS

    THE EFFECTIVENESS OF THREE APPROACHES TO TEACHING BEGINNING READING AND THE INFLUENCE OF AN ORAL LANGUAGE STIMULATION PROGRAM ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF DISADVANTAGED CHILDREN IS REPORTED IN THE FIRST-YEAR REPORT OF A 2-YEAR INTERVENTION STUDY. SUBJECTS WERE 608 FIRST-GRADE PUPILS FROM 12 ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS IN AN INNER-CITY AREA. THE THREE EXPERIMENTAL…

  8. Casualty data analysis of the world merchant fleet for reported fire and explosion incidents resulting in marine pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-02-01

    World wide merchant vessel fire and explosion data were analyzed to determine the contribution of these casualties to the marine pollution problem. The source of information is the Lloyd's Casualty Information System Data Base. The major findings of ...

  9. Hands That Shape the World: Report on the Conditions of Immigrant Women in the U.S. Five Years after the Beijing Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Network for Immigrant and Refugee Rights, Oakland, CA.

    This report details the challenges that immigrant women in the United States have faced since the 1995 United Nations World Conference on Women in Beijing, China. It presents a compilation of research and synthesis by immigrants' rights activists and organizations. Data come from immigrant women's testimony. The following topics are featured:…

  10. The Complete Rankings from the U.S. News and World Report 1992 Survey of Doctoral Programs in Six Liberal Arts Disciplines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, David S.; Massey, Sherri Ward

    1992-01-01

    The full data set on which the "U.S. News and World Report" rankings of doctoral programs were based is presented and discussed. Rankings are for economics, English, history, political science, psychology, and sociology programs. Discussion addresses the methodology used and makes comparisons with National Academy of Sciences 1982…

  11. A rare case report of grade III gingival enlargement associated with chronic periodontitis: Comparison of two treatment techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, Vandana A; Pandey, Suraj

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic gingival enlargement (GE) is a rare entity characterized by massive enlargement of the gingiva. It may be associated with other diseases/conditions characterizing a syndrome, but rarely documented in literature occurring along with chronic periodontitis. This case report describes a rare case of long standing massive GE in a systemically healthy, nonsyndromic young female involving both the arches, thereby posing a diagnostic dilemma. Furthermore, in this case, we compared two surgical approaches, that is, scalpel and electrosurgery for the convenience as well as the postoperative comfort of the patient. Quadrants 1 and 3 were treated by ledge and wedge technique using scalpel and blade while quadrants 2 and 4 were treated by electrosurgery. The patient was followed postoperatively up to 1-year. The massive GE subsided without recurrence and patient was completely satisfied with the treatment, though better compliance was observed at the site treated by conventional scalpel and blade technique.

  12. The U.S. Constitution Power Grab Game. Grade 12--Principles of American Democracy Lesson. Schools of California Online Resources for Education (SCORE): Connecting California's Classrooms to the World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Don M.

    This activity for students in grade 12 aims to increase their knowledge of the U.S. Constitution and its fundamental ideas: checks and balances, separation of powers, Bill of Rights, and the amendments. Students judge the constitutional powers of each brand of government by participating in the power game. The activity explains how the game is…

  13. An uncommon manifestation of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration in a patient with high grade urothelial, carcinoma with squamous differentiation: A case report and literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Yaofeng; Chen, Shouzhen; Chen, Songyu; Song, Jing; Chen, Fan; Guo, Hu; Shang, Zhenhua; Wang, Yong; Zhou, Changkuo; Shi, Benkang

    2016-01-01

    Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS) are rare disorders associated with malignant tumours, which are triggered by autoimmune reactions. Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD) is the PNS type most commonly associated with ovarian and breast cancer. Two bladder cancers manifesting in PCD were previously reported. However, the cancers in these cases had poor outcomes. Here, we present a 68-year old man with history of high-grade papillary urothelial carcinoma of the bladder. The patient suffered from persistent cerebellar ataxia accompanied by bladder cancer recurrence five months after transurethral resection of the bladder tumour (TURBt). Laboratory screening for the specific antibodies of paraneoplastic neurological syndromes revealed no positive results. Symptoms were not remitted after a 7-day-course of high-dose glucocorticoid therapy. To our surprise, the patient recovered fully after laparoscopic radical cystectomy. Postoperative pathology revealed that surgical specimens were urothelial carcinoma in situ (CIS) and squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder. The patient remained asymptomatic and there was no evidence of recurrence after the followup period of 11 months. To our knowledge, this is the third report of PCD in a patient with bladder cancer. This case showed that tumour resection cured the PCD. To assist clinical evaluation and management, literature regarding basic PNS characteristics and bladder cancers was reviewed

  14. On the Association Between Self-Reported Own- and Other-Gender Similarity and the Use of Physical and Relational Aggression in Sixth Grade Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Naomi C Z; Martin, Carol Lynn; Gallagher, Annabella M

    2016-10-01

    The goal was to assess the association between felt similarity to each gender (an aspect of gender identity) and girls' and boys' differential use of relational versus physical aggression. We extend past research on gender differences in the use of aggression by expanding the gender dichotomy and allowing for more variations in an individual's gender identity. Students (N = 414, 47 % female, 6th grade) reported how similar they felt to both their own- and other-gender peers, from which cluster analyses derived four typologies of perceived gender similarity (those who feel similar to their own-gender group; those who feel similar to the other-gender group; those who feel similar to both gender groups; those who feel similar to neither gender group). Peers reported which classmates were relationally and physically aggressive. Analyses compared how girls and boys in each typology of gender similarity differed in their use of relational and physical aggression. Results indicated that most children were engaged in gender normative aggression more than gender non-normative aggression (with the notable exception of low-gender similar girls). Findings were discussed in terms of their importance both for examining a broad spectrum of gender similarity and for understanding the use of aggressive behavior among children.

  15. Teachers grading practices : an analysis of the reliability of teacher-assigned grade point average (GPA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Lans, R. M.; van de Grift, W. J. C. M.; van Veen, K.

    2015-01-01

    In previous research, teachers report that they use a hodgepodge of factors when grading students. This has led researchers to suspect that teacher-assigned grades are inflated by teacher-student interactions; the hodgepodge hypothesis. Teachers also are reported to differ in grading leniency; the

  16. Raising Questions About Capitalist Globalization and Universalizing Views on Women: A Transnational Feminist Critique of the World Development Report: Gender Equality and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheer, Victoria L; Stevens, Patricia E; Mkandawire-Valhmu, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    Nursing in the United States has embraced global health primarily from a clinical perspective, with emphasis on care delivery to populations in underserved, resource-poor settings. Less attention has been devoted to developing expertise about social, economic, and political contexts that produce ill health around the world. The purpose of this article is to offer a transnational feminist critique of the World Development Report: Gender Equality and Development and to illuminate implications such reports may have in the lives of the world's most marginalized women and girls. We examine the political economy idealized in the report, raising questions about the capitalist framework underpinning its agenda. Second, we examine the assumptive language used in the report, suggesting that it discursively constructs a problematic representation of women in low-income countries. We contend that the report perpetuates a hegemonic discourse of patriarchy and inequality for women in the Global South through the use of an uncontested economic framework and universalist reasoning. We conclude the article with discussion about a transformative policy making that could be more inclusive of the wisdoms, values, and everyday experiences of women living in the Global South and about the vital role nurses can play in advancing gender equity through their active collaboration in policy critique and policy formulation.

  17. The World Health Organization Adult Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Self-Report Screening Scale for DSM-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustun, Berk; Adler, Lenard A; Rudin, Cynthia; Faraone, Stephen V; Spencer, Thomas J; Berglund, Patricia; Gruber, Michael J; Kessler, Ronald C

    2017-05-01

    Recognition that adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is common, seriously impairing, and usually undiagnosed has led to the development of adult ADHD screening scales for use in community, workplace, and primary care settings. However, these scales are all calibrated to DSM-IV criteria, which are narrower than the recently developed DSM-5 criteria. To update for DSM-5 criteria and improve the operating characteristics of the widely used World Health Organization Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS) for screening. Probability subsamples of participants in 2 general population surveys (2001-2003 household survey [n = 119] and 2004-2005 managed care subscriber survey [n = 218]) who completed the full 29-question self-report ASRS, with both subsamples over-sampling ASRS-screened positives, were blindly administered a semistructured research diagnostic interview for DSM-5 adult ADHD. In 2016, the Risk-Calibrated Supersparse Linear Integer Model, a novel machine-learning algorithm designed to create screening scales with optimal integer weights and limited numbers of screening questions, was applied to the pooled data to create a DSM-5 version of the ASRS screening scale. The accuracy of the new scale was then confirmed in an independent 2011-2012 clinical sample of patients seeking evaluation at the New York University Langone Medical Center Adult ADHD Program (NYU Langone) and 2015-2016 primary care controls (n = 300). Data analysis was conducted from April 4, 2016, to September 22, 2016. The sensitivity, specificity, area under the curve (AUC), and positive predictive value (PPV) of the revised ASRS. Of the total 637 participants, 44 (37.0%) household survey respondents, 51 (23.4%) managed care respondents, and 173 (57.7%) NYU Langone respondents met DSM-5 criteria for adult ADHD in the semistructured diagnostic interview. Of the respondents who met DSM-5 criteria for adult ADHD, 123 were male (45.9%); mean (SD) age was 33.1 (11.4) years

  18. The World Health Organization Adult Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Self-Report Screening Scale for DSM-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustun, Berk; Adler, Lenard A.; Rudin, Cynthia; Faraone, Stephen V.; Spencer, Thomas J.; Berglund, Patricia; Gruber, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    Importance Recognition that adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is common, seriously impairing, and usually undiagnosed has led to the development of adult ADHD screening scales for use in community, workplace, and primary care settings. However, these scales are all calibrated to DSM-IV criteria, which are narrower than the recently developed DSM-5 criteria. Objectives To update for DSM-5 criteria and improve the operating characteristics of the widely used World Health Organization Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS) for screening. Design, Setting, and Participants Probability subsamples of participants in 2 general population surveys (2001-2003 household survey [n = 119] and 2004-2005 managed care subscriber survey [n = 218]) who completed the full 29-question self-report ASRS, with both subsamples over-sampling ASRS-screened positives, were blindly administered a semistructured research diagnostic interview for DSM-5 adult ADHD. In 2016, the Risk-Calibrated Supersparse Linear Integer Model, a novel machine-learning algorithm designed to create screening scales with optimal integer weights and limited numbers of screening questions, was applied to the pooled data to create a DSM-5 version of the ASRS screening scale. The accuracy of the new scale was then confirmed in an independent 2011-2012 clinical sample of patients seeking evaluation at the New York University Langone Medical Center Adult ADHD Program (NYU Langone) and 2015-2016 primary care controls (n = 300). Data analysis was conducted from April 4, 2016, to September 22, 2016. Main Outcomes and Measures The sensitivity, specificity, area under the curve (AUC), and positive predictive value (PPV) of the revised ASRS. Results Of the total 637 participants, 44 (37.0%) household survey respondents, 51 (23.4%) managed care respondents, and 173 (57.7%) NYU Langone respondents met DSM-5 criteria for adult ADHD in the semistructured diagnostic interview. Of the respondents who met

  19. Uranium - the world picture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, J.M.; Wright, W.J.

    1976-01-01

    The world resources of uranium and the future demand for uranium are discussed. The amount of uranium available depends on the price which users are prepared to pay for its recovery. As the price is increased, there is an incentive to recover uranium from lower grade or more difficult deposits. In view of this, attention is drawn to the development of the uranium industry in Australias

  20. The Relation of Visual and Auditory Aptitudes to First Grade Low Readers' Achievement under Sight-Word and Systematic Phonic Instructions. Research Report #36.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallistel, Elizabeth; And Others

    Ten auditory and ten visual aptitude measures were administered in the middle of first grade to a sample of 58 low readers. More than half of this low reader sample had scored more than a year below expected grade level on two or more aptitudes. Word recognition measures were administered after four months of sight word instruction and again after…

  1. Establishing Proficiency Levels for the Delaware Student Testing Program in Science and Social Studies, Grades 4 & 6. Report and Recommendations to the Delaware State Board of Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaware State Dept. of Education, Dover. Assessment and Accountability Branch.

    This document contains the results of a standard setting conducted in January 2002 on the Delaware Student Testing Program (DSTP) Science and Social Studies tests at grades 4 and 6. Each standard setting process entailed convening four groups, one for each grade level and content area, and each group met for 2 days. At the standard setting judges…

  2. Treatment of Spontaneous Subarachnoid Hemorrhage and Self-Reported Neuropsychological Performance at 6 Months - Results of a Prospective Clinical Pilot Study on Good-Grade Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bründl, Elisabeth; Schödel, Petra; Bele, Sylvia; Proescholdt, Martin; Scheitzach, Judith; Zeman, Florian; Brawanski, Alexander; Schebesch, Karl-Michael

    2018-01-01

    Limited focus has been placed on neuropsychological patient profiles after spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage (sSAH). We conducted a prospective controlled study in good-grade sSAH patients to evaluate the time course of treatment-specific differences in cognitive processing after sSAH. Twenty-six consecutive sSAH patients were enrolled (drop out n=5). Nine patients received endovascular aneurysm occlusion (EV), 6 patients were treated microsurgically (MS), and 6 patients with perimesencephalic SAH (pSAH) underwent standardized intensive medical care. No patient experienced serious vasospasm-related ischemic or hemorrhagic complications. All patients were subjected to neuropsychological self-report assessment (36-Item Short Form Health Survey and ICD-10-Symptom-Rating questionnaire) subacutely (day 11 - 35) after the onset of bleeding (t1) and at the 6-month follow-up (FU; t 2 ). From t1 to t 2 , MS and EV patients significantly improved in physical functioning (Pfi; p=.001 each) and the physical component summary (p=.010 vs. p=.015). Bodily pain (Pain; MS p=.034) and general health perceptions (EV p=.014) significantly improved, and nutrition disorder (EV p=.008) worsened. At FU, MS patients reported significantly better Pfi (vs. EV p=.046), less Pain (vs. EV p=.040), and more depression (vs. pSAH p=.035). Group-rate analyses of test differences showed a significant alleviation in nutrition disorder in MS (vs. EV p=.009). All sSAH groups reported a significant deterioration in health. Though both MS and EV patients, improved in several physical items over time, our data suggest a better short-term Pfi, less Pain and improved nutrition disorder in surgically treated patients. pSAH patients performed significantly better in various aspects of physical and psychological functioning than patients with aneurysmal SAH.

  3. Inflated Grades, Enrollments & Budgets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. Stone

    1995-06-01

    Full Text Available Reports of the past 13 years that call attention to deficient academic standards in American higher education are enumerated. Particular attention is given the Wingspread Group's recent An American Imperative: Higher Expectations for Higher Education. Low academic standards, grade inflation, and budgetary incentives for increased enrollment are analyzed and a call is made for research at the state level. Reported trends in achievement and GPAs are extrapolated to Tennessee and combined with local data to support the inference that 15% of the state's present day college graduates would not have earned a diploma by mid 1960s standards. A conspicuous lack of interest by public oversight bodies is noted despite a growing public awareness of low academic expectations and lenient grading and an implicit budgetary impact of over $100 million. Various academic policies and the dynamics of bureaucratic control are discussed in relationship to the maintenance of academic standards. The disincentives for challenging course requirements and responsible grading are examined, and the growing movement to address academic quality issues through better training and supervision of faculty are critiqued. Recommendations that would encourage renewed academic integrity and make learning outcomes visible to students, parents, employers, and the taxpaying public are offered and briefly discussed.

  4. Assessing the quality of media reporting of suicide news in India against World Health Organization guidelines: A content analysis study of nine major newspapers in Tamil Nadu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Gregory; Vijayakumar, Lakshmi; Niederkrotenthaler, Thomas; Jayaseelan, Mala; Kannan, Ramya; Pirkis, Jane; Jorm, Anthony F

    2018-05-01

    Suicide rates in India are among the highest in the world, resulting in an estimated 250,000 suicide deaths annually. How the media communicates with the Indian public on the topic of suicide has thus far gone without sufficient scrutiny. The objective of our study was to assess the quality of newspaper reporting of suicide-related news in India against World Health Organization suicide reporting guidelines. We used content analysis to assess the quality of suicide reporting against World Health Organization guidelines in nine of the most highly read daily newspapers in the southern state of Tamil Nadu between June and December 2016. Five of the nine newspapers under review were in the top 20 most circulated daily newspapers in the country. A total of 1681 suicide articles were retrieved. The mean number of suicide articles per day per newspaper was 0.9%, and 54.5% of articles were 10 sentences or less. The vast majority (95.9%) of articles primarily focused on reporting specific suicide incidents. Harmful reporting practices were very common (e.g. a detailed suicide method was reported in 43.3% of articles), while helpful reporting practices were rare (e.g. just 2.5% gave contact details for a suicide support service). We observed that a daily diet of short and explicit suicide-related news was served up to readers of newspapers. Attempts should be made to understand the perspectives of media professionals in relation to suicide reporting, and to devise strategies to boost the positive contribution that media can make to suicide prevention.

  5. Student Attitudes Toward Grades and Grading Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallings, William M.; Leslie, Elwood K.

    The result of a study designed to assess student attitudes toward grading practices are discussed. Questionnaire responses of 3439 students in three institutions were tabulated. Responses were generally negative toward conventional grading systems. (MS)

  6. Assessing the Use of Media Reporting Recommendations by the World Health Organization in Suicide News Published in the Most Influential Media Sources in China, 2003–2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Chu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Public media reports about suicide are likely to influence the population’s suicidal attempts and completed suicides. Irresponsible reports might trigger copycat suicidal behaviors, while responsible reports may help reduce suicide rates. The World Health Organization (WHO released recommendations to encourage responsible suicide reports in 2008. However, little is known about whether these recommendations are reflected in the suicide news for most countries, including China. In this study, we assessed the responsibility of suicide stories published in the most influential newspaper and Internet media sources in China from 2003 to 2015, using the media reporting recommendations by the World Health Organization (WHO. In total, 3965 and 1836 eligible stories from newspaper and Internet-based media, respectively, were included in the study. Newspapers and Internet-based media performed similarly in applying WHO recommendations to report suicide news. Three recommendations were applied in over 88% of suicide stories. However, four recommendations were seldom applied, including offering information about where to seek help and linking the suicide event to mental disorders. Government and the journalism industry should work together to improve media reporting of news about suicide in China.

  7. Assessing the Use of Media Reporting Recommendations by the World Health Organization in Suicide News Published in the Most Influential Media Sources in China, 2003-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Xin; Zhang, Xingyi; Cheng, Peixia; Schwebel, David C; Hu, Guoqing

    2018-03-05

    Public media reports about suicide are likely to influence the population's suicidal attempts and completed suicides. Irresponsible reports might trigger copycat suicidal behaviors, while responsible reports may help reduce suicide rates. The World Health Organization (WHO) released recommendations to encourage responsible suicide reports in 2008. However, little is known about whether these recommendations are reflected in the suicide news for most countries, including China. In this study, we assessed the responsibility of suicide stories published in the most influential newspaper and Internet media sources in China from 2003 to 2015, using the media reporting recommendations by the World Health Organization (WHO). In total, 3965 and 1836 eligible stories from newspaper and Internet-based media, respectively, were included in the study. Newspapers and Internet-based media performed similarly in applying WHO recommendations to report suicide news. Three recommendations were applied in over 88% of suicide stories. However, four recommendations were seldom applied, including offering information about where to seek help and linking the suicide event to mental disorders. Government and the journalism industry should work together to improve media reporting of news about suicide in China.

  8. THE GLOBALIZATION OF THE WORLD ECONOMY AND ITS IMPACT ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF ACCOUNTING REPORTS IN UKRAINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihail PRODANCIUK

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article explains the impact of the globalization processes in Ukraine's economy on the development of accounting reports systems. Also described is the essence of harmonization and standardization of accounting reports and financial reports. There are four scientific positions known that characterize standardization records worldwide. There are submitted proposals regarding accounting reports regulation in Ukraine in terms of economic globalization.

  9. Choosing the Adequate Level of Graded Readers--Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prtljaga, Jelena; Palinkaševic, Radmila; Brkic, Jovana

    2015-01-01

    Graded readers have been used as second language teaching material since the end of the Second World War. They are an important source of simplified material which provides comprehensible input on all levels. It is of crucial importance for a successful usage of graded readers in the classroom and in studies which focus on graded readers, that an…

  10. Low Cost Solar Array Project. Feasibility of the silane process for producing semiconductor-grade silicon. Final report, October 1975-March 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-06-01

    The commercial production of low-cost semiconductor-grade silicon is an essential requirement of the JPL/DOE (Department of Energy) Low-Cost Solar Array (LSA) Project. A 1000-metric-ton-per-year commercial facility using the Union Carbide Silane Process will produce molten silicon for an estimated price of $7.56/kg (1975 dollars, private financing), meeting the DOE goal of less than $10/kg. Conclusions and technology status are reported for both contract phases, which had the following objectives: (1) establish the feasibility of Union Carbide's Silane Process for commercial application, and (2) develop an integrated process design for an Experimental Process System Development Unit (EPSDU) and a commercial facility, and estimate the corresponding commercial plant economic performance. To assemble the facility design, the following work was performed: (a) collection of Union Carbide's applicable background technology; (b) design, assembly, and operation of a small integrated silane-producing Process Development Unit (PDU); (c) analysis, testing, and comparison of two high-temperature methods for converting pure silane to silicon metal; and (d) determination of chemical reaction equilibria and kinetics, and vapor-liquid equilibria for chlorosilanes.

  11. Paravertebral Well-Differentiated Liposarcoma with Low-Grade Osteosarcomatous Component: Case Report with 11-Year Follow-Up, Radiological, Pathological, and Genetic Data, and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Macagno

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite being one of the most frequent soft-tissue sarcomas, well-differentiated liposarcoma has never been reported near the spine. The authors present the case of a 67-year-old man with progressive history of back pain. Physical examination revealed a mass located within the right paravertebral muscles. MR and CT imaging showed a heavily ossified central mass surrounded by a peripheral fatty component. No connection with the underlying bone was detected on imagery and during surgery. After surgical resection, histopathological examination revealed a tumor harboring combined features of well-differentiated liposarcoma and low-grade osteosarcoma. Tumor cells displayed overexpression of MDM2, CDK4, and P16 by immunohistochemistry and CGH revealed amplification of 12q13-15 as the only genetic imbalance. MDM2 FISH analysis was performed but was inconclusive. The pathological, immunohistochemical, and genetic features, the differential diagnoses, and the therapeutic management of this unusual tumor are discussed. No complementary treatment was performed initially. Following first treatment, two recurrences occurred 6 and 9 years later, both displaying histological features similar to the first occurrence. Radiotherapy was started after the second recurrence. Follow-up shows no evidence of disease 11 years after initial diagnosis. This case was unusual due to the paravertebral location of the tumor and its divergent differentiation.

  12. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center for Atmospheric Trace Gases Fiscal Year 2001 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cushman, R.M.

    2002-10-15

    The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), which includes the World Data Center (WDC) for Atmospheric Trace Gases, is the primary global change data and information analysis center of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). More than just an archive of data sets and publications, CDIAC has, since its inception in 1982, enhanced the value of its holdings through intensive quality assurance, documentation, and integration. Whereas many traditional data centers are discipline-based (for example, meteorology or oceanography), CDIAC's scope includes potentially anything and everything that would be of value to users concerned with the greenhouse effect and global climate change, including concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and other radiatively active gases in the atmosphere; the role of the terrestrial biosphere and the oceans in the biogeochemical cycles of greenhouse gases; emissions of CO{sub 2} and other trace gases to the atmosphere; long-term climate trends; the effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on vegetation; and the vulnerability of coastal areas to rising sea levels. CDIAC is located within the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. CDIAC is co-located with ESD researchers investigating global-change topics, such as the global carbon cycle and the effects of carbon dioxide on climate and vegetation. CDIAC staff are also connected with current ORNL research on related topics, such as renewable energy and supercomputing technologies. CDIAC is supported by the Environmental Sciences Division (Jerry Elwood, Director) of DOE's Office of Biological and Environmental Research. CDIAC represents DOE in the multi-agency Global Change Data and Information System (GCDIS). Wanda Ferrell is DOE's Program Manager with overall responsibility for CDIAC. Roger Dahlman is responsible for CDIAC's AmeriFlux tasks, and Anna Palmisano for CDIAC's Ocean Data tasks. CDIAC is made

  13. USSR Report, Political and Sociological Affairs, The Working Class and the Contemporary World, No. 2, March - April 1985.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-09-02

    attack.20 Churchill also wrote in his memoirs about such moods of military leaders and politicians in Great Britain and the U. S.: "Almost all...system and the formation of the world socialist system, and it gave a powerful uplift to the national liberation movement of the peoples in the colonies...the function of direct force as the main way of implementing authority. "If society does not wish to become the victim of individual, changing moods

  14. The Effects of Teacher and Teacher-librarian High-end Collaboration on Inquiry-based Project Reports and School Monthly Test Scores of Fifth-grade Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Hon Chen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was twofold. The first purpose was to establish the high level collaboration of integrated instruction model between social studies teacher and teacher-librarian. The second purpose was to investigate the effects of high-end collaboration on the individual and groups’ inquiry-based project reports, as well as monthly test scores of fifth-grade students. A quasi-experimental method was adopted, two classes of elementary school fifth graders in Tainan Municipal city, Taiwan were used as samples. Students were randomly assigned to experimental conditions by class. Twenty eight students of the experimental group were taught by the collaboration of social studies teacher and teacher-librarian; while 27 students of the controlled group were taught separately by teacher in didactic teaching method. Inquiry-Based Project Record, Inquiry-Based Project Rubrics, and school monthly test scores were used as instruments for collecting data. A t-test and correlation were used to analyze the data. The results indicate that: (1 High-end collaboration model between social studies teacher and teacher-librarian was established and implemented well in the classroom. (2There was a significant difference between the experimental group and the controlled group in individual and groups’ inquiry-based project reports. Students that were taught by the collaborative teachers got both higher inquiry-based project reports’ scores than those that were taught separately by the teachers. Experimental group’s students got higher school monthly test scores than controlled groups. Suggestions for teachers’ high-end collaboration and future researcher are provided in this paper.

  15. Report of working committee 9 ''world gas prospects, strategies and economics''; Rapport du comite de travail 9 ''perspective, strategie et economie du gaz dans le monde''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokumoto, T

    2000-07-01

    This report is the product of investigations carried out by the following Study Groups in WOC9 in the triennium 1997-2000 based on the information supplied by the IGU member countries. - Study Group 9.1: World Gas Supply Prospects - Study Group 9.2: Prospects for World Gas Demand - Study Group 9.3: Gas Trade and World Investment Prospects - Study Group 9.4: Ultra Long-term Global Energy Scenario, Role of Natural Gas. The report includes the long-term prospects of natural gas supply, demand and inter-regional trade up to 2030 as well as various categories of natural gas reserves originally reviewed by WOC9. It was concluded that there are abundant reserves sufficient to support the expanding demand of natural gas well beyond 2030. Necessary investments to develop the infrastructure are also investigated. The role of natural gas throughout the 21. century in relation with other energy options was also analysed for the first time in IGU. All the results are presented in the Committee report session, and additional information is provided in Round Table sessions. The Statistics Team was also created in WOC9 to collect data on the current status of the gas industry through the IGU original data collection network. The results have been published on IGU web site, and will be revised regularly. (author)

  16. Mapping the Social World of Classrooms: A Multi-Level, Multi-Reporter Approach to Social Processes and Behavioral Engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ha Yeon; Cappella, Elise

    2016-03-01

    Understanding the social context of classrooms has been a central goal of research focused on the promotion of academic development. Building on the current literature on classroom social settings and guided by a risk and protection framework, this study examines the unique and combined contribution of individual relationships and quality of classroom interactions on behavioral engagement among low-income Latino students in kindergarten to fifth grade (N = 111). Findings indicate that individual relationships with teachers and peers and classroom quality, each independently predicted behavioral engagement. Moreover, high-quality classrooms buffered the negative influence of students' difficulties in individual relationships on behavioral engagement. Findings illuminate the need to consider multiple layers of social classroom relationships and interactions and suggest the potential benefit of targeting classroom quality as a mechanism for improving behavioral engagement in urban elementary schools. © Society for Community Research and Action 2016.

  17. World Radiopharmaceutical Therapy Council: A report on the 5th International Radiopharmaceutical Therapy Colloquium and the Final Planning Meeting of the World Radiopharmaceutical Therapy Council held at Santiago, Chile, 29 September, 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, J.V.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The 5th International Radiopharmaceutical Therapy Colloquium was held on 29th October 2002 as a pre-congress meeting of the World Federation of Nuclear Medicine and Biology Congress in Santiago, Chile. Work-in-Progress research papers were presented by leaders in the field of therapeutic nuclear oncology. Speakers gave untitled presentations without abstracts and reported data from studies performed only days or weeks before the meeting. Such cutting edge research presentations stimulated lively discussion which also addressed the problems encountered and ways in which they may be circumvented. Radioimmunotherapy of haematological malignancy was discussed by Greg Wiseman of the Mayo Clinic, and Thomas Behr of the University of Marburg. Radiopeptide therapy of neuroendocrine tumours was presented by Larry Kvols from the University of Florida, and locoregional therapy of glioma was presented by John Buscombe of the Royal Free Hospital, London. All speakers reported encouraging clinical results with objective tumour responses, increased survival and improved quality of life, which encourages wider clinical application of these novel radiopharmaceutical therapies. The Round Table Discussion on clinical applications of Rhenium-188 radiopharmaceuticals was chaired by Russ Knapp from Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Hans Biersack of the University of Bonn. Following an outline of current developments by Russ Knapp preliminary results of clinical trials were presented for discussion. Hans Biersack, Javier Gaudiano from Montevideo and Achim Kropp from Dresden reported effective palliation of painful skeletal metastases with 188Re-HEDP. Ajit Padhy gave an update of the IAEA multicentre trial of intrahepatic arterial 188Re-Lipiodol therapy of hepatocellular carcinoma and Harvey Turner reported preliminary results in hepatoma patients using an alternative kit formulation of 188Re-Lipiodol in Fremantle. Early experience with Rhenium 188 in the prevention of re

  18. Hello, World!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Janice

    1979-01-01

    Describes a program for teaching foreign languages in the elementary school classroom. Presents curriculum materials in three areas (vocabulary and contextual, language, and cultural) for grades K-3 and 4-6. (JMB)

  19. Exploration of novel multifunctional open graded friction courses for in-situ highway runoff treatment July 1, 2014-June 30, 2016 : final research report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Pervious Concrete Pavement (PCP), as one of open graded friction courses (OGFCs), has become attractive in roadway and parking lot constructions because of its economic, structural, and environmental advantages. It can facilitate the recharge of grou...

  20. Summary report on the performance of open graded friction course quieter pavements : I-5 Lynnwood, SR-520 Medina, I-405 Bellevue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    This document summarizes the acoustic properties and pavement performance of three asphalt quieter pavement projects. Each of the projects included open graded friction course pavement built with sections of crumb rubber and polymer modified asphalt ...

  1. [Reproducibility of Fuhrman nuclear grade: advantages of a two-grade system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letourneux, Hervé; Lindner, Véronique; Lang, Hervé; Massfelder, Thierry; Meyer, Nicolas; Saussine, Christian; Jacqmin, Didier

    2006-06-01

    The Fuhrman nuclear grade is the reference histoprognostic grading system routinely used all over the world for renal cell carcinoma. Studies measuring the inter-observer and intra-observer concordance of Fuhrman grade show poor results in terms of reproducibility and repeatability. These variations are due to a certain degree of subjectivity of the pathologist in application of the definition of tumour grade, particularly nuclear grade. Elements able to account for this subjectivity in renal cell carcinoma are identified from a review of the literature. To improve the reliability of nuclear grade, the territory occupied by the highest grade must be specified and the grades should probably be combined. At the present time, regrouping of grade 1 and 2 tumours as low grade and grade 3 and 4 tumours as high grade would achieve better reproducibility, while preserving the prognostic: value for overall survival. The development of new treatment modalities and their use in adjuvant situations will imply the use of reliable histoprognostic factors to specify, indications.

  2. World nuclear-fuel procurement: relationships between uranium and enrichment markets. Final report. International energies studies program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neff, T.L.

    1982-03-01

    This article explores the relationships between international uranium and enrichment markets under current contracting and equity arrangements and in comparison with actual feed requirements for existing and committed reactors. We begin with an overview of the world situation, examining current and prospective conditions. We then consider enrichment and uranium supply and demand situations of the three consumer nations outside the United States with the largest nuclear programs: France, Japan, and the Federal Republic of Germany. We conclude with an evaluation of likely directions of change in the coupled markets for uranium and enrichment services

  3. Trauma care in Africa: a status report from Botswana, guided by the World Health Organization's "Guidelines for Essential Trauma Care".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanche-Olsen, Terje Peder; Alemu, Lulseged; Viste, Asgaut; Wisborg, Torben; Hansen, Kari S

    2012-10-01

    Trauma represents a significant and increasing challenge to health care systems all over the world. This study aimed to evaluate the trauma care capabilities of Botswana, a middle-income African country, by applying the World Health Organization's Guidelines for Essential Trauma Care. All 27 government (16 primary, 9 district, 2 referral) hospitals were surveyed. A questionnaire and checklist, based on "Guidelines for Essential Trauma Care" and locally adapted, were developed as situation analysis tools. The questionnaire assessed local trauma organization, capacity, and the presence of quality improvement activity. The checklist assessed physical availability of equipment and timely availability of trauma-related skills. Information was collected by interviews with hospital administrators, key personnel within trauma care, and through on-site physical inspection. Hospitals in Botswana are reasonably well supplied with human and physical resources for trauma care, although deficiencies were noted. At the primary and district levels, both capacity and equipment for airway/breathing management and vascular access was limited. Trauma administrative functions were largely absent at all levels. No hospital in Botswana had any plans for trauma education, separate from or incorporated into other improvement activities. Team organization was nonexistent, and training activities in the emergency room were limited. This study draws a picture of trauma care capabilities of an entire African country. Despite good organizational structures, Botswana has room for substantial improvement. Administrative functions, training, and human and physical resources could be improved. By applying the guidelines, this study creates an objective foundation for improved trauma care in Botswana.

  4. Contribution of 99mTc-DTPA dynamic renal scintigraphy with furosemide test in the exploration of low grade urethra-pelvic junction syndrome. Report of 17 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghfir, I.; Ben Rais, N.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The renal scintigraphy using 99m Tc-DTPA with furosemide test constitutes a noninvasive and functional method that is of appreciable interest in the exploration of the upper urinary tract and in the evaluation of the separate renal function. It distinguishes the functional character of dilation from organic obstruction needing surgery or endoscopic treatment. Material and methods We report, through this work, the observations of 17 patients with a low grade urethra-pelvic junction syndrome detect by intravenous urography (I.V.U.). 99m Tc-DTPA renal scintigraphy with furosemide test was carried out among all our patients by means of a gamma-camera with large field equipped with a low energy high-resolution parallel collimator. The evaluation of images obtained consisted of analysis of urethra-pelvic permeability taking into account the semiquantitative parameters of time-activity curve or isotopic nephrogram (I.N.) obtained after digital reconstruction of sequential images. Results On the 17 studied cases, the sex-ratio was equal to 1.83; the average age was 18.92 years with extremes spanning from 4 years to 70 years. Renal scintigraphy categorized four patients groups. Group I: two patients (11.76%) with normal aspect of I.N.; group II; seven patients (41.17% of cases) with functional dilation; group III: five patients (29.41%) with organic obstruction and a group IV: three patients (17.64%) with intermediate response. Discussion 99m Tc-DTPA renal scintigraphy with furosemide test allowed, through our study, to obviate the limits of IVU and manometric explorations to distinguish functional dilation of organic obstruction. It permits the improvement of treatment with a favourable dosimetry. (authors)

  5. Weapons of Mass Destruction Commission, final report, 'Weapons of Terror: Freeing the World of Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Arms', Stockholm, Sweden, 1 June 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    Nuclear, biological and chemical weapons are rightly called weapons of mass destruction (WMD). Designed to terrify as well as destroy, they have the potential to kill thousands and thousands of people in a single attack, and their effects may persist in the environment and in our bodies, in some cases indefinitely. Many efforts have been made to free the world from the threat of these weapons and some progress has been made. Paradoxically, despite the end of the Cold War, the past decade has seen more setbacks than successes. States have failed to comply with their disarmament and non-proliferation commitments, and terrorist groups have emerged that recognize no restraints. In September 2005, the United Nations World Summit was unable to agree on a single recommendation on disarmament and non-proliferation. It is time for all to wake up to the awesome reality that many of the old threats continue to hang over the world and that many new ones have emerged. It is time for all governments to revive their cooperation and to breathe new life into the disarmament work of the United Nations. Efforts to eradicate poverty and to protect the global environment must be matched by a dismantling of the world's most destructive capabilities. The gearshift now needs to be moved from reverse to drive. Biological and chemical weapons have been comprehensively outlawed through global conventions, but these need to be universally accepted and fully implemented. Nuclear weapons must also be outlawed. Before this aim is realized, there must be new initiatives to reduce the number of nuclear weapons and the threat posed by them. It is equally urgent to prevent proliferation and to take special measures to ensure that terrorists do not acquire any weapons of mass destruction. This report presents ideas and recommendations on what the world community - including national governments and civil society - can and should do.

  6. Weapons of Mass Destruction Commission, final report, 'Weapons of Terror: Freeing the World of Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Arms', Stockholm, Sweden, 1 June 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear, biological and chemical weapons are rightly called weapons of mass destruction (WMD). Designed to terrify as well as destroy, they have the potential to kill thousands and thousands of people in a single attack, and their effects may persist in the environment and in our bodies, in some cases indefinitely. Many efforts have been made to free the world from the threat of these weapons and some progress has been made. Paradoxically, despite the end of the Cold War, the past decade has seen more setbacks than successes. States have failed to comply with their disarmament and non-proliferation commitments, and terrorist groups have emerged that recognize no restraints. In September 2005, the United Nations World Summit was unable to agree on a single recommendation on disarmament and non-proliferation. It is time for all to wake up to the awesome reality that many of the old threats continue to hang over the world and that many new ones have emerged. It is time for all governments to revive their cooperation and to breathe new life into the disarmament work of the United Nations. Efforts to eradicate poverty and to protect the global environment must be matched by a dismantling of the world's most destructive capabilities. The gearshift now needs to be moved from reverse to drive. Biological and chemical weapons have been comprehensively outlawed through global conventions, but these need to be universally accepted and fully implemented. Nuclear weapons must also be outlawed. Before this aim is realized, there must be new initiatives to reduce the number of nuclear weapons and the threat posed by them. It is equally urgent to prevent proliferation and to take special measures to ensure that terrorists do not acquire any weapons of mass destruction. This report presents ideas and recommendations on what the world community - including national governments and civil society - can and should do

  7. World lines.

    OpenAIRE

    Waser Jürgen; Fuchs Raphael; Ribicic Hrvoje; Schindler Benjamin; Blöschl Günther; Gröller Eduard

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present World Lines as a novel interactive visualization that provides complete control over multiple heterogeneous simulation runs. In many application areas decisions can only be made by exploring alternative scenarios. The goal of the suggested approach is to support users in this decision making process. In this setting the data domain is extended to a set of alternative worlds where only one outcome will actually happen. World Lines integrate simulation visualization and...

  8. Command World

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wong, Leah Y; Lange, Douglas S; Sebastyn, Jerome T; Roof, William H

    2006-01-01

    .... The Command World scenario was expressly designed as a crisis action planning exercise in order to replicate the communications, collaboration, and information requirements inherent in a military...

  9. Meeting report on the Bellagio Conference 'prevention of vascular diseases in the emerging world: An approach to global health equity'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirks, J H; Robinson, S W; Alderman, M; Couser, W G; Grundy, S M; Smith, S C; Remuzzi, G; Unwin, N

    2006-10-01

    Representatives from five international organizations (International Society of Nephrology, World Heart Federation, International Diabetes Federation, International Atherosclerosis Federation, and International Society of Hypertension) participated in a strategic planning workshop in December 2005 in Bellagio, Italy sponsored by the Rockefeller Foundation. There were equal representatives from developed and developing countries. Global perspectives on diabetes and cardiovascular and renal diseases were presented, with special emphasis on China, India, Latin America, and Africa. The rationale and effectiveness of preventive measures were discussed. It was apparent that measures for primary prevention and early intervention for all the chronic vascular diseases are similar. The five organizations agreed that an integrated global approach to chronic vascular diseases is needed. They resolved to collaborate and work towards an integrated approach to chronic vascular diseases with the establishment of a 5-year plan for the prevention and treatment of chronic vascular diseases, including public advocacy, advising international and national agencies, and improving education and the practice of established approaches.

  10. Sectoral effects of a world oil-price shock: economy-wide linkages to the agricultural sector. Staff report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, K.; Robinson, S.; Schluter, G.

    1991-10-01

    The effects of a world oil price shock on U.S. agriculture are analyzed in an economywide environment. The authors use an input-output model to analyze the direct and indirect cost linkages between energy and other sectors of the economy. Then, to allow sectoral output adjustment and the effects on the U.S. current account, they use the U.S. Department of Agriculture/Economic Research Service Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) model to analyze the sectoral effects under three different macro adjustment scenarios. The effects on agriculture are not limited to the direct and indirect energy costs. Exchange rate or foreign borrowing adjustments to higher oil import costs and government support programs for agriculture also matter

  11. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center - A for atmospheric trace gases. Fiscal year 1996, annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cushman, R.M.; Boden, T.A.; Jones, S.B. [and others

    1997-02-01

    Fiscal year 1996 was especially productive for the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This report describes publications and statistical data from the CDIAC.

  12. World Energy Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, G.; Schilling, H.D.

    1979-01-01

    After making some general remarks about goals, tasks, and works of the World Energy Conference the topics and the frame of the 11th World Energy Conference which will take place in Munich from 8th to 12th September 1980 are outlined. This conference is held under the general topic 'energy for our world' and deals with the reciprocal relation between energy supply, environment, and society. The main part of the publication presented here is the German version of the most important sections of the investigation 'World Energy-Looking Ahead to 2020' by the Conservation Commission (CC) of the World Energy Conference. Added to this is the German original brief version of a report by the Mining-Research Company (Bergbau-Forschung GmbH) to the CC which deals with the estimation of the world's coal resources and their future availability. This report was presented on the 10th World Energy Conference in Istanbul together with the corresponding reports concerning the other energy sources. Finally, an introduction to the technical programme for the 11th World Energy Conference 1980 is given. (UA) [de

  13. Conservative management of a grade V injury to an ectopic pelvic kidney following blunt trauma to the lower abdomen: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becker Adam M

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Ectopic pelvic kidneys represent an anatomic variant that remains clinically asymptomatic in most patients. While there is some literature to suggest that ectopic kidneys may be more predisposed to blunt trauma injuries, there are few examples to guide the management of these injuries. To our knowledge, we present the first case of a grade V renal injury to an ectopic pelvic kidney managed successfully with conservative measures. Case Presentation We present a case of grade V renal injury to an ectopic pelvic kidney in a 21 year-old African-American male. The clinical and radiographic findings are presented, along with the patient's conservative hospital course. Conclusion We suggest that management of grade V renal injuries to ectopic pelvic kidneys can be treated similarly to that of kidneys in normal anatomic position. Conservative measures may be considered in properly selected patients.

  14. Superhabitable worlds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, René; Armstrong, John

    2014-01-01

    To be habitable, a world (planet or moon) does not need to be located in the stellar habitable zone (HZ), and worlds in the HZ are not necessarily habitable. Here, we illustrate how tidal heating can render terrestrial or icy worlds habitable beyond the stellar HZ. Scientists have developed a language that neglects the possible existence of worlds that offer more benign environments to life than Earth does. We call these objects "superhabitable" and discuss in which contexts this term could be used, that is to say, which worlds tend to be more habitable than Earth. In an appendix, we show why the principle of mediocracy cannot be used to logically explain why Earth should be a particularly habitable planet or why other inhabited worlds should be Earth-like. Superhabitable worlds must be considered for future follow-up observations of signs of extraterrestrial life. Considering a range of physical effects, we conclude that they will tend to be slightly older and more massive than Earth and that their host stars will likely be K dwarfs. This makes Alpha Centauri B, which is a member of the closest stellar system to the Sun and is supposed to host an Earth-mass planet, an ideal target for searches for a superhabitable world.

  15. Gamma Knife treatment of low-grade gliomas in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekşi, Murat Şakir; Yılmaz, Baran; Akakın, Akın; Toktaş, Zafer Orkun; Kaur, Ahmet Cemil; Demir, Mustafa Kemal; Kılıç, Türker

    2015-11-01

    Low-grade gliomas have good overall survival rates in pediatric patients compared to adults. There are some case series that reported the effectiveness and safety of Gamma Knife radiosurgery, yet they are limited in number of patients. We aimed to review the relevant literature for pediatric low-grade glial tumors treated with stereotactic radiosurgery, specifically Gamma Knife radiosurgery, and to present an exemplary case. A 6-year-old boy was admitted to clinic due to head trauma. He was alert, cooperative, and had no obvious motor or sensorial deficit. A head CT scan depicted a hypodense zone at the right caudate nucleus. The brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) depicted a mass lesion at the same location. A stereotactic biopsy was performed. Histopathological diagnosis was low-grade astrocytoma (grade II, World Health Organization (WHO) classification, 2007). Gamma Knife radiosurgery was applied to the tumor bed. Tumor volume was 21.85 cm(3). Fourteen gray was given to 50% isodose segment of the lesion (maximal dose of 28 Gy). The tumor has disappeared totally in 4 months, and the patient was tumor-free 21 months after the initial treatment. The presented literature review represents mostly single-center experiences with different patient and treatment characteristics. Accordingly, a mean/median margin dose of 11.3-15 Gy with Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) is successful in treatment of pediatric and adult low-grade glial tumor patients. However, prospective studies with a large cohort of pediatric patients should be conducted to make a more comprehensive conclusion for effectiveness and safety of GKRS in pediatric low-grade glial tumors.

  16. Graded activity: legacy of the sanatorium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creighton, C

    1993-08-01

    Occupational therapists in all areas of practice grade therapeutic activities to help patients progress toward their goals. It is proposed in this paper that the concept of graded activity originated in German tuberculosis sanatoria in the late 1800s, when patients were required to walk on graded (sloped) land for exercise. British physician Marcus Paterson included work, as well as walking, in his graduated exercise program for tuberculosis patients and was honored for this innovation at the founding meeting of the National Society for the Promotion of Occupational Therapy (NSPOT). George Barton, Susan Tracy, and Herbert Hall were among the NSPOT members who contributed to the development of graded activity as a principle in occupational therapy intervention. The military rehabilitation programs established during World War I provided additional impetus, and by the mid-1920s, graded activity was recognized as central to the profession.

  17. Nuclear energy in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grippi, Sidney

    2006-01-01

    The chapter reports the nuclear energy beginning in the world including a chronology of the atomic bomb birth, the annual growth rate of electronuclear energy in the world, a comparison of energy production in thermoelectric bases

  18. World energy resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clerici A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As energy is the main “fuel” for social and economic development and since energy-related activities have significant environmental impacts, it is important for decision-makers to have access to reliable and accurate data in an user-friendly format. The World Energy Council (WEC has for decades been a pioneer in the field of energy resources and every three years publishes its flagship report Survey of Energy Resources. A commented analysis in the light of latest data summarized in such a report, World Energy Resources (WER 2013, is presented together with the evolution of the world energy resources over the last twenty years.

  19. World energy resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerici, A.; Alimonti, G.

    2015-08-01

    As energy is the main "fuel" for social and economic development and since energy-related activities have significant environmental impacts, it is important for decision-makers to have access to reliable and accurate data in an user-friendly format. The World Energy Council (WEC) has for decades been a pioneer in the field of energy resources and every three years publishes its flagship report Survey of Energy Resources. A commented analysis in the light of latest data summarized in such a report, World Energy Resources (WER) 2013, is presented together with the evolution of the world energy resources over the last twenty years.

  20. Management of overt upper gastrointestinal bleeding in a low resource setting: a real world report from Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alatise, Olusegun I; Aderibigbe, Adeniyi S; Adisa, Adewale O; Adekanle, Olusegun; Agbakwuru, Augustine E; Arigbabu, Anthony O

    2014-12-10

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) remains a common medical problem worldwide that has significant associated morbidity, mortality, and health care resource use. This study outlines the aetiology, clinical presentation, and treatment outcomes of patients with UGIB in a Nigerian low resource health facility. This was a descriptive study of consecutive patients who underwent upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy for upper GI bleeding in the endoscopy unit of the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital Complex, Ile-Ife, Osun State, Nigeria from January 2007 to December 2013. During the study period, 287 (12.4%) of 2,320 patients who underwent upper GI endoscopies had UGIB. Of these, 206 (72.0%) patients were males and their ages ranged from 3 to 100 years with a median age of 49 years. The main clinical presentation included passage of melaena stool in 268 (93.4%) of individuals, 173 (60.3%) had haematemesis, 110 (38.3%) had haematochezia, and 161 (56.1%) were dizzy at presentation. Observed in 88 (30.6%) of UGIB patients, duodenal ulcer was the most common cause, followed by varices [52 (18.1%)] and gastritis [51 (17.1%)]. For variceal bleeding, 15 (28.8%) and 21 (40.4%) of patients had injection sclerotherapy and variceal band ligation, respectively. The overall rebleeding rate for endoscopic therapy for varices was 16.7%. For patients with ulcers, only 42 of 55 who had Forrest grade Ia to IIb ulcers were offered endoscopic therapy. Endoscopic therapy was áin 90.5% of the cases. No rebleeding followed endoscopic therapy for the ulcers. The obtained Rockall scores ranged from 2 to 10 and the median was 5.0. Of all patients, 92.7% had medium or high risk scores. An increase in Rockall score was significantly associated with length of hospital stay and mortality (p < 0.001). The overall mortality rate was 5.9% (17 patients). Endoscopic therapy for UGIB in a resource-poor setting such as Nigeria is feasible, significantly reduces morbidity and mortality

  1. Mathematics in the Real World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borenstein, Matt

    1997-01-01

    The abstract nature of algebra causes difficulties for many students. Describes "Real-World Data," an algebra course designed for students with low grades in algebra and provides multidisciplinary experiments (linear functions and variations; quadratic, square-root, and inverse relations; and exponential and periodic variation)…

  2. Meeting report: Initial World Health Organization consultation on herpes simplex virus (HSV) vaccine preferred product characteristics, March 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Sami L; Giersing, Birgitte K; Hickling, Julian; Jones, Rebecca; Deal, Carolyn; Kaslow, David C

    2017-12-07

    The development of vaccines against herpes simplex virus (HSV) is an important global goal for sexual and reproductive health. A key priority to advance development of HSV vaccines is the definition of preferred product characteristics (PPCs), which provide strategic guidance on World Health Organization (WHO) preferences for new vaccines, specifically from a low- and middle-income country (LMIC) perspective. To start the PPC process for HSV vaccines, the WHO convened a global stakeholder consultation in March 2017, to define the priority public health needs that should be addressed by HSV vaccines and discuss the key considerations for HSV vaccine PPCs, particularly for LMICs. Meeting participants outlined an initial set of overarching public health goals for HSV vaccines in LMICs, which are: to reduce the acquisition of HIV associated with HSV-2 infection in high HIV-prevalence populations and to reduce the burden of HSV-associated disease, including mortality and morbidity due to neonatal herpes and impacts on sexual and reproductive health. Participants also considered the role of prophylactic versus therapeutic vaccines, whether both HSV-2 and HSV-1 should be targeted, important target populations, and infection and disease endpoints for clinical trials. This article summarizes the main discussions from the consultation. Copyright © 2017.

  3. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center for Atmospheric Trace Gases, Fiscal Year 2002 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cushman, R.M.

    2003-08-28

    The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), which includes the World Data Center (WDC) for Atmospheric Trace Gases, is the primary global change data and information analysis center of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). More than just an archive of data sets and publications, CDIAC has, since its inception in 1982, enhanced the value of its holdings through intensive quality assurance, documentation, and integration. Whereas many traditional data centers are discipline-based (for example, meteorology or oceanography), CDIAC's scope includes potentially anything and everything that would be of value to users concerned with the greenhouse effect and global climate change, including atmospheric concentrations and atmospheric emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and other radiatively active gases; the role of the terrestrial biosphere and the oceans in the biogeochemical cycles of greenhouse gases; long-term climate trends; the effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on vegetation; and the vulnerability of coastal areas to rising sea levels.

  4. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center for Atmospheric Trace Gases Fiscal Year 2000 Annual Report; ANNUAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cushman, R.M.

    2001-01-01

    The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), which includes the World Data Center (WDC) for Atmospheric Trace Gases, is the primary global change data and information analysis center of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). More than just an archive of data sets and publications, CDIAC has, since its inception in 1982, enhanced the value of its holdings through intensive quality assurance, documentation, and integration. Whereas many traditional data centers are discipline-based (for example, meteorology or oceanography), CDIAC's scope includes potentially anything and everything that would be of value to users concerned with the greenhouse effect and global climate change, including concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO(sub 2)) and other radiatively active gases in the atmosphere; the role of the terrestrial biosphere and the oceans in the biogeochemical cycles of greenhouse gases; emissions of CO(sub 2) and other trace gases to the atmosphere; long-term climate trends; the effects of elevated CO(sub 2) on vegetation; and the vulnerability of coastal areas to rising sea levels

  5. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center for Atmospheric Trace Gases Fiscal Year 2000 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cushman, R.M.

    2001-11-15

    The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), which includes the World Data Center (WDC) for Atmospheric Trace Gases, is the primary global change data and information analysis center of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). More than just an archive of data sets and publications, CDIAC has, since its inception in 1982, enhanced the value of its holdings through intensive quality assurance, documentation, and integration. Whereas many traditional data centers are discipline-based (for example, meteorology or oceanography), CDIAC's scope includes potentially anything and everything that would be of value to users concerned with the greenhouse effect and global climate change, including concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and other radiatively active gases in the atmosphere; the role of the terrestrial biosphere and the oceans in the biogeochemical cycles of greenhouse gases; emissions of CO{sub 2} and other trace gases to the atmosphere; long-term climate trends; the effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on vegetation; and the vulnerability of coastal areas to rising sea levels.

  6. Age-Related Grade Inflation Expectancies in a University Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald A. Loffredo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Grade inflation is a recognized problem in higher education in the United States. Age, gender, and ethnic differences in discrepancies between student reports of their expected grade in each course and their expectations for general university grading practices were explored in a survey of 166 (mostly female participants at a small upper-division university. Results revealed that while a small minority of students agreed that grading systems in college should only include A or B grades, a large majority of students expected A or B grades. Thus, student discrepancies between their expectations for grading systems and their expected class grades were in line with expectations that they should receive inflated grades. Results also revealed statistically significant age differences in grade expectation with students older than the age of 55 expecting lower grades relative to their younger counterparts.

  7. An Examination of Test-Retest, Alternate Form Reliability, and Generalizability Theory Study of the easyCBM Word and Passage Reading Fluency Assessments: Grade 3. Technical Report #1218

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Bitnara Jasmine; Anderson, Daniel; Alonzo, Julie; Lai, Cheng-Fei; Tindal, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    This technical report is one in a series of five describing the reliability (test/retest and alternate form) and G-Theory/D-Study research on the easyCBM reading measures, grades 1-5. Data were gathered in the spring of 2011 from a convenience sample of students nested within classrooms at a medium-sized school district in the Pacific Northwest.…

  8. Gender and Minority Achievement Gaps in Science in Eighth Grade: Item Analyses of Nationally Representative Data. Research Report. ETS RR-17-36

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Xiaoyu; Nandakumar, Ratna; Glutting, Joseoph; Ford, Danielle; Fifield, Steve

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we investigated gender and minority achievement gaps on 8th-grade science items employing a multilevel item response methodology. Both gaps were wider on physics and earth science items than on biology and chemistry items. Larger gender gaps were found on items with specific topics favoring male students than other items, for…

  9. World Witnesses a Tumultuous Year while India Reports an Eventful Decade in the Long Story of Polio Eradication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Sanjay

    2014-04-01

    With recent outbreaks in Syria and Horn of Africa, silent circulation of wild poliovirus type 1 (WPV1) in Israel, West Bank, and Gaza, and fresh spate of violence against vaccinators and their security personnel in Pakistan, the world is facing a turbulent final ascent to the summit of polio eradication. On the positive side, we may also be witnessing the end of wild poliovirus type 3 (WPV3) and defused programmatic crisis caused by funding gaps, while India registers third consecutive polio-free year. Having a cogent endgame plan 2013-2018, informed by some cardinal lessons learned from an eventful decade in India, is also a very significant development. Now, there is a parallel pursuit against WPV and vaccine-derived poliovirus (VDPV). Endgame would also involve integration of at least one dose of affordable inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) to up-scaled routine immunization (RI), switch from trivalent oral polio vaccine (tOPV) to bivalent oral polio vaccine (bOPV) in 144 countries before 2018, stockpiling of mOPV, and simultaneous global cessation of bOPV before 2020. Role of antivirals in post-eradication era is still unclear. Some specific threats emerging at this stage are as follows: Global buildup of new birth cohorts in non-endemic countries with weak RI and downscaled supplementary immunization activities (SIAs), tremendous pressure on peripheral health workers, and fatigued systems. Cultural resistance to transnational programs is taking a violent shape in some areas. Differential interpretations of 'right to say no', on both sides of the divide, are damaging a global cause. Amidst all these concerns, let us not forget to underline the sacrifice made by frontline vaccinators working in some of the most challenging circumstances.

  10. World witnesses a tumultuous year while India reports an eventful decade in the long story of polio eradication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Chaturvedi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With recent outbreaks in Syria and Horn of Africa, silent circulation of wild poliovirus type 1 (WPV1 in Israel, West Bank, and Gaza, and fresh spate of violence against vaccinators and their security personnel in Pakistan, the world is facing a turbulent final ascent to the summit of polio eradication. On the positive side, we may also be witnessing the end of wild poliovirus type 3 (WPV3 and defused programmatic crisis caused by funding gaps, while India registers third consecutive polio-free year. Having a cogent endgame plan 2013-2018, informed by some cardinal lessons learned from an eventful decade in India, is also a very significant development. Now, there is a parallel pursuit against WPV and vaccine-derived poliovirus (VDPV. Endgame would also involve integration of at least one dose of affordable inactivated polio vaccine (IPV to up-scaled routine immunization (RI, switch from trivalent oral polio vaccine (tOPV to bivalent oral polio vaccine (bOPV in 144 countries before 2018, stockpiling of mOPV, and simultaneous global cessation of bOPV before 2020. Role of antivirals in post-eradication era is still unclear. Some specific threats emerging at this stage are as follows: Global buildup of new birth cohorts in non-endemic countries with weak RI and downscaled supplementary immunization activities (SIAs, tremendous pressure on peripheral health workers, and fatigued systems. Cultural resistance to transnational programs is taking a violent shape in some areas. Differential interpretations of ′right to say no′, on both sides of the divide, are damaging a global cause. Amidst all these concerns, let us not forget to underline the sacrifice made by frontline vaccinators working in some of the most challenging circumstances.

  11. Steady advance of stem cell therapies: report from the 2011 World Stem Cell Summit, Pasadena, California, October 3-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, Melanie

    2011-12-01

    Stem cell research and related therapies (including regenerative medicine and cellular therapies) could have a significant near-term impact on worldwide public health and aging. One reason is the industry's strong linkage between policy, science, industry, and patient advocacy, as was clear in the attendance and programming at the 7(th) annual World Stem Cell Summit held in Pasadena, California, October 3-5, 2011. A special conference session sponsored by the SENS Foundation discussed how stem cell therapies are being used to extend healthy life span. Stem cells are useful not only in cell-replacement therapies, but also in disease modeling, drug discovery, and drug toxicity screening. Stem cell therapies are currently being applied to over 50 diseases, including heart, lung, neurodegenerative, and eye disease, cancer, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Dozens of companies are developing therapeutic solutions that are in different stages of clinical use and clinical trials. Some high-profile therapies include Dendreon's Provenge for prostate cancer, Geron's first-ever embryonic stem cell trials for spinal cord injury, Fibrocell's laViv cellular therapy for wrinkles, and well-established commercial skin substitutes (Organogenesis' Apligraf and Advanced BioHealing's Dermagraft). Stem cell policy issues under consideration include medical tourism, standards for large-scale stem cell manufacturing, and lingering ethical debates over the use of embryonic stem cells. Contemporary stem cell science advances include a focus on techniques for the direct reprogramming of cells from one lineage to another without returning to pluripotency as an intermediary step, improved means of generating and characterizing induced pluripotent cells, and progress in approaches to neurodegenerative disease.

  12. The New World economy. Report addressed to Ms Segolene Royal, Minister of Environment, Sustainable Development and Energy, working group led by Corinne Lepage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babinet, Gilles; Courousse, Christophe; Croise, Nathalie; Delanoy, Isabelle; Dupres, Stanislas; Ferrari, Romain; Feireira, Victor; Heron, Antoine; Kloboukoff, Charles; Lahiani, Mathias; Le Tyrant, Catherine; Lepercq, Thierry; Maestroni, Myriam; Massias, Louis; Novel, Anne-Sophie; Orru, Serge; Porcher, Thomas; Rapenne, Jean; Roquette, Marc; Siegel, Francois; Spiroux, Joel; Tenzer, Nicolas; Tincq, Benjamin; Tropper, Helene; Zimmer, Daniel; Damerval, Francois; Krabal, Nicolas; Berger, Arnaud

    2015-01-01

    The New World economy is an economy at the service of mankind, free of fossil and fissile energies, connected and relocated. Everywhere in the world, energy transition is taking place. France is no exception. We have in front of us living proof that an efficient, long-term economy serving the common good and creating employment is not only possible, but also capable to generate enthusiasm and confidence. A newer economic model becomes possible. Synergies are developing in France along this direction. Though, unfortunately, the tipping point has not yet been reached. Still, we have the capacity and it is our duty to commit ourselves to this new economy. The levers to be put in place are now clearly known: giving priority to health and well-being, acknowledging external factors, promoting intangible assets, innovating at the local level, and properly taking demand into account. It is also about bolstering the transformation of entrepreneur-ship already under way, introducing fairness in the economy by agreeing to address the question of profit distribution. Such revolutions imply that the rules of the game will change in the taxation, financial, legislative, and normative fields as well as in the area of vocational training. A number of reforms are recommended in the report: creation of certificates relating to systems of externality to finance the transition, a circular VAT as well as an incentive VAT for organic products and products of the circular economy, and massive development of complementary currencies, alternative financing and civic funds. The report also points to the necessary simplification of rules applicable to start-ups and small innovative companies, the promotion of Green Deals and the development of experimentation, the abolition of standards which favor entrenched privileges, as well as the support for state actors making innovative choices in terms of procurement in the public sector. We thus call for a Green Business Act that can put together

  13. World Wind

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — World Wind allows any user to zoom from satellite altitude into any place on Earth, leveraging high resolution LandSat imagery and SRTM elevation data to experience...

  14. On arbitrarily graded rings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    58

    paper is devoted to the study of arbitrary rings graded through arbitrary sets. .... which recover certain multiplicative relations among the homogeneous components ... instance the case in which the grading set A is an Abelian group, where the ...

  15. Graded manifolds and supermanifolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batchelor, M.

    1984-01-01

    In this paper, a review is presented on graded manifolds and supermanifolds. Many theorems, propositions, corrollaries, etc. are given with proofs or sketch proofs. Graded manifolds, supereuclidian space, Lie supergroups, etc. are dealt with

  16. World science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    The aim of the Third World Network of Scientific Organizations (TWNSO), established last year with its headquarters in Trieste, Italy, is to promote the role of science and technology in developing countries. TWNSO, under the presidency of Abdus Salam, is an offshoot of the Third World Academy of Sciences, which has pushed the cause of international scientific collaboration since its establishment in 1983. (orig./HSI).

  17. Reporting on the Strategies Needed to Implement Proven Interventions: An Example From a "Real-World" Cross-Setting Implementation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Rachel; Bunce, Arwen E; Cohen, Deborah J; Hollombe, Celine; Nelson, Christine A; Proctor, Enola K; Pope, Jill A; DeVoe, Jennifer E

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to empirically demonstrate the use of a new framework for describing the strategies used to implement quality improvement interventions and provide an example that others may follow. Implementation strategies are the specific approaches, methods, structures, and resources used to introduce and encourage uptake of a given intervention's components. Such strategies have not been regularly reported in descriptions of interventions' effectiveness, or in assessments of how proven interventions are implemented in new settings. This lack of reporting may hinder efforts to successfully translate effective interventions into "real-world" practice. A recently published framework was designed to standardize reporting on implementation strategies in the implementation science literature. We applied this framework to describe the strategies used to implement a single intervention in its original commercial care setting, and when implemented in community health centers from September 2010 through May 2015. Per this framework, the target (clinic staff) and outcome (prescribing rates) remained the same across settings; the actor, action, temporality, and dose were adapted to fit local context. The framework proved helpful in articulating which of the implementation strategies were kept constant and which were tailored to fit diverse settings, and simplified our reporting of their effects. Researchers should consider consistently reporting this information, which could be crucial to the success or failure of implementing proven interventions effectively across diverse care settings. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT02299791. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The fastest field sport in the world: A case report on 3-dimensional printed hurling gloves to help prevent injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harte, Daniel; Paterson, Abby

    2017-10-28

    Case series. Hand injuries are the most common injury observed in hurling although compliance in wearing protective gloves is reportedly low. To devise a glove that offers comfort, protection and freedom of movement, using the bespoke capabilities of 3-dimensional (3D) printing. Each player's "catching" hand was imaged using a 3D scanner to produce a bespoke glove that they later trialed and provided feedback. Nine players provided feedback. On average, the players favorably rated the glove for the protection offered. The average response on comfort was poor, and no players reported that glove aided performance during play. This feasibility study explores the versatility of 3D printing as a potential avenue to improve player compliance in wearing protective sportswear. Feedback will help refine glove design for future prototypes. Hurling is the primary focus in this study, but knowledge gains should be transferable to other sports that have a high incidence of hand injury. 4. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. GRADE Equity Guidelines 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welch, Vivian A; Akl, Elie A; Pottie, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this paper is to describe a conceptual framework for how to consider health equity in the GRADE (Grading Recommendations Assessment and Development Evidence) guideline development process. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: Consensus-based guidance developed by the GRADE working grou...

  20. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center for Atmospheric Trace Gases Fiscal Year 1999 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cushman, R.M.

    2000-03-31

    The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), which includes the World Data Center (WDC) for Atmospheric Trace Gases, is the primary global-change data and information analysis center of the Department of Energy (DOE). More than just an archive of data sets and publications, CDIAC has--since its inception in 1982--enhanced the value of its holdings through intensive quality assurance, documentation, and integration. Whereas many traditional data centers are discipline-based (for example, meteorology or oceanography), CDIAC's scope includes potentially anything and everything that would be of value to users concerned with the greenhouse effect and global climate change, including concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and other radiatively active gases in the atmosphere; the role of the terrestrial biosphere and the oceans in the biogeochemical cycles of greenhouse gases; emissions of CO{sub 2} and other trace gases to the atmosphere; long-term climate trends; the effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on vegetation; and the vulnerability of coastal areas to rising sea level. CDIAC is located within the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. CDIAC is co-located with ESD researchers investigating global-change topics, such as the global carbon cycle and the effects of carbon dioxide on vegetation. CDIAC staff are also connected with current ORNL research on related topics, such as renewable energy and supercomputing technologies. CDIAC is supported by the Environmental Sciences Division (Jerry Elwood, Acting Director) of DOE's Office of Biological and Environmental Research. CDIAC's FY 1999 budget was 2.2M dollars. CDIAC represents the DOE in the multi-agency Global Change Data and Information System. Bobbi Parra, and Wanda Ferrell on an interim basis, is DOE's Program Manager with responsibility for CDIAC. CDIAC comprises three groups, Global Change Data, Computer Systems, and

  1. Imaginary Worlds and the Institute for Clinical and Economic Review (ICER Evidence Report: Targeted Immune Modulators for Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul C Langley

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In April 2017, the Institute for Clinical and Economic Review (ICER issued its evidence report on the value of targeted immune modulators (TIMs in rheumatoid arthritis. The report made the case that for the TIMs to be accepted for formulary placement in the US, where notional willingness-to-pay thresholds are the ICER gateway criteria, manufacturers should be prepared to offer substantial unit price discounts. The purpose of this commentary is to make the case that the methodology underpinning the ICER claims for value assessment does not meet the required standards of normal science. None of the claims made for clinical and comparative cost-effectiveness are credible, evaluable and replicable. As such, formulary committees have no idea whether ICER recommendations are right or even if they are wrong. They are, in fact, immune to failure and should be rejected. Utilizing ICER claims generated by simulated projections, this review points out that it is entirely possible to justify the current WAC or net pricing structure of TIMS. The review concludes that if ICER is to contribute to the successful formulary placement of drugs and devices the methodology for pricing recommendation should be re-assessed. As it stands, questions must be raised regarding recommendations for, possibly unnecessary, price discounts. ICER needs to develop an assessment framework that focuses on developing claims for competing therapies that are robust, evaluable and replicable together with recommendations on how these claims are to be evaluated in a timeframe meaningful to health care decision makers.   Type: Commentary

  2. DETECTION AND REPORTING OF RANAVIRUS IN AMPHIBIANS: EVALUATION OF THE ROLES OF THE WORLD ORGANISATION FOR ANIMAL HEALTH AND THE PUBLISHED LITERATURE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Yvonne; Meredith, Anna; Price, Stephen J

    2017-07-01

    Pathogens of wildlife can have direct impacts on human and livestock health as well as on biodiversity, as causative factors in population declines and extinctions. The World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) seeks to facilitate rapid sharing of information about animal diseases to enable up-to-date risk assessments of translocations of animals and animal products. The OIE also produces manuals of recommended methods to standardize diagnostic testing. Ranaviruses are important amphibian pathogens that may have spread through international trade, and infections became notifiable to OIE in 2009. We surveyed and reviewed published literature for data on sampling, diagnostic testing, and reporting of ranavirus during 2009-14. We also investigated attitudes and awareness of the OIE and its recommendations for best practice. We found that sampling effort is uneven and concentrated in the northern hemisphere. We also identified citizen science projects that have the potential to improve the quantity and quality of data on the incidence of ranavirus infection and the circumstances surrounding disease outbreaks. We found reporting of infection to be inconsistent: reporting was split between the published literature (where it was subject to a 2-yr lag) and the OIE with little overlap, results of negative diagnostic tests were underreported, and scientific researchers lacked awareness of the role of the OIE. Approaches to diagnostic screening were poorly harmonized and heavily reliant on molecular methods. These flaws in the mechanisms of ranavirus detection and reporting hamper the construction of a comprehensive disease information database.

  3. Reporting Military Sexual Trauma: A Mixed-Methods Study of Women Veterans' Experiences Who Served From World War II to the War in Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Kristina B; Mills, Peter D

    2016-08-01

    Since 2004, there has been increased effort to reduce military sexual trauma (MST) in the U.S. military. Although MST covers a range of inappropriate behaviors, the majority of research, treatment, and outreach are focused on sexual assault and the experiences of individuals serving in Afghanistan and Iraq. During a study on veterans' involvement in a national peace organization, participants were asked about their military experiences. Veterans served from World War II to current conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Emerging out of the responses were descriptions of women's experiences with MST, barriers to reporting incidents of sexual misconduct and sexual assault, and the challenges they faced when seeking care. Data were gathered using anonymous questionnaires and semi-structured interviews. Out of 52 female veterans, the majority (90%) was subjected to at least one form of MST, and 15% (8) attempted to report the incident(s). Over half of the assailants were of a higher rank than the survivors. The majority of veterans remained silent due to lack of options to report, the status of perpetrators, and fear of retaliation. These data provide a glimpse into the challenges many women veterans faced when seeking assistance reporting incidents or obtaining health care for their MST. Reprint & Copyright © 2016 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  4. World-wide intercomparison exercise for the determination of trace elements in Fucus sample IAEA-140. Report no. 64

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coquery, M.; Carvalho, F.P.; Horvat, M.; Azemard, S.

    1997-09-01

    The accurate and precise determination of trace elements in marine samples is fundamental to pollution assessment in coastal and marine environments. Analyses of sea plants are important to investigate the uptake of toxic elements along the trophic chain and sea plants may be used as indicators for water pollution and to compare the levels of contamination of different aquatic environments. IAEA. together with UNEP and the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) work closely with other producers of Reference Materials in order to assure a continuous supply of these vital compounds for quality assurance procedures. A full catalogue of materials is published regularly. The Marine Environmental Studies Laboratory (MESL) of IAEA-MEL has conducted intercomparison exercises on trace elements for over twenty years as part of its contribution to IAEA's Analytical Quality Control Service, UNEP's Regional Seas Programme. and, occasionally, in association with the IOC GIPME (Global Investigation of the Pollution in the Marine Environment) programme. This report describes the performance of laboratories in one intercomparison run conducted during 1996 that was organized for the determination of trace elements in a marine macro algae (Fucus sp.) sample. This study was intended to give laboratories responsible for trace element analyses of marine materials an opportunity for checking their analytical performance

  5. The current state of research on psychiatric genetics in Poland and the world: A report covering recent years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Grzywacz

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article was to review the results of research carried out in recent years in relation to genetic studies in psychiatry. The authors’ focus is on the selected disorders, with particular emphasis on the reports from Poland. For this purpose, the most often mentioned studies describing genes and biomarkers involved in psychiatry were selected. Genetic polymorphisms were described in relation to schizophrenia, alcoholism, addiction to psychoactive substances, autistic spectrum, unipolar depression and bipolar disorder, eating disorders and other psychiatric disorders. Characterizing the impact of inheritance factors on the processes in the central nervous system, it can be observed that some biological mechanisms forms associations with tested genetic variants and this combination is linked with the risk of mental disorders. To understand the role of psychiatric genetics, surveys which join genotype and phenotype associations (endophenotype are essential. It seems important to study and search for associations of genes polymorphisms and biomarkers with mental and psychiatric disorders in order to better understanding the biological basis of the disease and more effective treatment of patients. In many cases, the variability analysis of selected genes sheds new light on understanding the etiology of diseases and mental disorders. Genetics is a powerful technique which allows us to study the impact of the inherited variance on changes in mental state, even without having prior knowledge about biological changes.

  6. Walking and Talking Geography: A Small-World Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fertig, Gary; Silverman, Rick

    2007-01-01

    When teaching geography to students in the primary grades, teachers should provide firsthand experiences that young children need to make meaningful sense of their world. David Sobel, author of "Mapmaking with Children: Sense of Place Education for the Elementary Years," suggests that teachers in the early grades adopt a small-world approach to…

  7. Processing of low grade uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, P.

    1978-10-01

    Four types of low-grade ores are studied: (1) Low-grade ores that must be extracted because they are enclosed in a normal-grade deposit. Heap leaching is the processing method which is largely used. (2) Normal-grade ores contained in low-amplitude deposits. They can be processed using in-place leaching as far as the operation does not need any large and expensive equipment. (3) Medium-grade ores in medium-amplitude deposits. A simplified conventional process can be applied using fast heap leaching. (4) Low-grade ores in large deposits. The report explains processing possibilities leading in most cases to the use of in-place leaching. The operating conditions of this method are laid out, especially the selection of the leaching agents and the preparation of the ore deposit

  8. Graded gauge theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerner, R.

    1983-01-01

    The mathematical background for a graded extension of gauge theories is investigated. After discussing the general properties of graded Lie algebras and what may serve as a model for a graded Lie group, the graded fiber bundle is constructed. Its basis manifold is supposed to be the so-called superspace, i.e. the product of the Minkowskian space-time with the Grassmann algebra spanned by the anticommuting Lorentz spinors; the vertical subspaces tangent to the fibers are isomorphic with the graded extension of the SU(N) Lie algebra. The connection and curvature are defined then on this bundle; the two different gradings are either independent of each other, or may be unified in one common grading, which is equivalent to the choice of the spin-statistics dependence. The Yang-Mills lagrangian is investigated in the simplified case. The conformal symmetry breaking is discussed, as well as some other physical consequences of the model. (orig.)

  9. Outcome of holiday and nonholiday admission patients with acute peptic ulcer bleeding: a real-world report from southern Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tsung-Chin; Chuah, Seng-Kee; Chang, Kuo-Chin; Wu, Cheng-Kun; Kuo, Chung-Huang; Wu, Keng-Liang; Chiu, Yi-Chun; Hu, Tsung-Hui; Tai, Wei-Chen

    2014-01-01

    Recent findings suggest that patients admitted on the weekend with peptic ulcer bleeding might be at increased risk of adverse outcomes. However, other reports found that there was no "holiday effect." The purpose of this study was to determine if these findings hold true for a real-life Taiwanese medical gastroenterology practice. We reviewed the medical files of hospital admissions for patients with peptic ulcer bleeding who received initial endoscopic hemostasis between January 2009 and March 2011. A total of 744 patients were enrolled (nonholiday group, n = 615; holiday group, n = 129) after applying strict exclusion criteria. Holidays were defined as weekends and national holidays in Taiwan. Our results showed that there was no significant difference in baseline characteristics between the two groups. We also observed that, compared to the nonholiday group, patients in the holiday group received earlier endoscopy treatment (12.20 hours versus 16.68 hours, P = 0.005), needed less transfused blood (4.8 units versus 6.6 units, P = 0.02), shifted from intravenous to oral proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) more quickly (5.3 days versus 6.9 days, P = 0.05), and had shorter hospital stays (13.05 days versus 17.36 days, P = 0.005). In the holiday and nonholiday groups, the rebleeding rates were 17.8% and 23.41% (P = 0.167), the mortality rates were 11.63% versus 13.66% (P = 0.537), and surgery was required in 2.11% versus 4.66% (P = 0.093), respectively. Patients who presented with peptic ulcer bleeding on holidays did not experience delayed endoscopy or increased adverse outcomes. In fact, patients who received endoscopic hemostasis on the holiday had shorter waiting times, needed less transfused blood, switched to oral PPIs quicker, and experienced shorter hospital stays.

  10. World energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, D.L.

    1990-01-01

    Three major concerns face mankind's future: the impending energy crisis as caused by the depletion of the world's fossil fuel reserves, world atmospheric pollution as caused by the burning of these fuels, and mankind's destruction if the vast energy contained in nuclear weapons stockpiles is released in a global conflict. This paper describes an ambitious, combined solution to these problems by the use of deep underground detonations of thermonuclear devices/bombs to provide a virtually pollution free, world energy source into the far distant future, while achieving a significant increase in mutual trust between the superpowers and all nations. The key is believed to be thermonuclear geothermal stimulation to produce the electrical power needed for a hydrogen economy

  11. World armament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stolle, H.

    1977-01-01

    Summary of consequences on: Armament expenditure of the world, arms trade, arms race and nuclear weapon arsenals, nuclear weapon proliferation, nuclear safety controls, nuclear carrier systems, international nuclear trade, nuclear weapon accidents, chemical wars, war law, ecological wars, armament limitations. (HP) [de

  12. Spinning worlds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwarz, H.

    2017-01-01

    The thesis "Spinning Worlds" is about the characterisation of two types of gas-giant exoplanets: Hot Jupiters, with orbital periods of fewer than five days, and young, wide-orbit gas giants, with orbital periods as long as thousands of years. The thesis is based on near-infrared observations of 1

  13. Synoptic tool for reporting of hematological and lymphoid neoplasms based on World Health Organization classification and College of American Pathologists checklist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winters Sharon B

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Synoptic reporting, either as part of the pathology report or replacing some free text component incorporates standardized data elements in the form of checklists for pathology reporting. This ensures the pathologists make note of these findings in their reports, thereby improving the quality and uniformity of information in the pathology reports. Methods The purpose of this project is to develop the entire set of elements in the synoptic templates or "worksheets" for hematologic and lymphoid neoplasms using the World Health Organization (WHO Classification and the College of American Pathologists (CAP Cancer Checklists. The CAP checklists' content was supplemented with the most updated classification scheme (WHO classification, specimen details, staging as well as information on various ancillary techniques such as cytochemical studies, immunophenotyping, cytogenetics including Fluorescent In-situ Hybridization (FISH studies and genotyping. We have used a digital synoptic reporting system as part of an existing laboratory information system (LIS, CoPathPlus, from Cerner DHT, Inc. The synoptic elements are presented as discrete data points, so that a data element such as tumor type is assigned from the synoptic value dictionary under the value of tumor type, allowing the user to search for just those cases that have that value point populated. Results These synoptic worksheets are implemented for use in our LIS. The data is stored as discrete data elements appear as an accession summary within the final pathology report. In addition, the synoptic data can be exported to research databases for linking pathological details on banked tissues. Conclusion Synoptic reporting provides a structured method for entering the diagnostic as well as prognostic information for a particular pathology specimen or sample, thereby reducing transcription services and reducing specimen turnaround time. Furthermore, it provides accurate and

  14. Development of a low grade lymphoma in the mastoid bone in a patient with atypical Cogan’s syndrome: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Kalogeropoulos

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Cogan’s syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by ocular and audiovestibular manifestations in its typical form and caries a wide variety of atypical manifestations. It is considered as an autoimmune disease. We present the first case in the literature of a 67 year old woman with the development of low grade non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL in the mastoid bone in a pre-existing history of atypical Cogan’s syndrome. The anatomical development of NHL was to a “target” organ of Cogan’s syndrome, which is the inner ear.

  15. High Performance Graded Index Polymer Optical Fibers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Garito, Anthony

    1998-01-01

    ...) plastic optical fibers (POF) and graded index (GI) POFs are reported. A set of criteria and analyses of physical parameters are developed in context to the major issues of POF applications in short-distance communication systems...

  16. Graded tensor calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheunert, M.

    1982-10-01

    We develop a graded tensor calculus corresponding to arbitrary Abelian groups of degrees and arbitrary commutation factors. The standard basic constructions and definitions like tensor products, spaces of multilinear mappings, contractions, symmetrization, symmetric algebra, as well as the transpose, adjoint, and trace of a linear mapping, are generalized to the graded case and a multitude of canonical isomorphisms is presented. Moreover, the graded versions of the classical Lie algebras are introduced and some of their basic properties are described. (orig.)

  17. Quantum Worlds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey A. Barrett

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1808-1711.2016v20n1p45 Because of the conceptual difficulties it faces, quantum mechanics provides a salient example of how alternative metaphysical commitments may clarify our understanding of a physical theory and the explanations it provides. Here we will consider how postulating alternative quantum worlds in the context of Hugh Everett III’s pure wave mechanics may serve to explain determinate measurement records and the standard quantum statistics. We will focus on the properties of such worlds, then briefly consider other metaphysical options available for interpreting pure wave mechanics. These reflections will serve to illustrate both the nature and the limits of naturalized metaphysics.

  18. Third World

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K, Peng K

    1980-12-01

    The disparity between the consumption patterns of industrialized and Third World countries reflects an increase in the numbers of people living in poverty who have yet to achieve basic needs. Third World planning, encouraged by transnational companies, too often model their development goals on importing artificial life styles. This exploits poor nations by creating unrealistic demands as well as by creating a market for products that are unacceptable elsewhere. The health and environmental effects of these practices prompted the formation of consumers' association of Penang (CAP), which is trying to make people aware of the need to give basic needs the highest priority. The CAP handles complaints, tests products, and studies the socio-economic-environmental implications of development as well as conducting a far-ranging educational program. Its procedures can be adapted by any country to examine consumer awareness and to press for social reform. (DCK)

  19. A scoping review of reporting 'Ethical Research Practices' in research conducted among refugees and war-affected populations in the Arab world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhoul, Jihad; Chehab, Rana F; Shaito, Zahraa; Sibai, Abla M

    2018-05-15

    Ethical research conduct is a cornerstone of research practice particularly when research participants include vulnerable populations. This study mapped the extent of reporting ethical research practices in studies conducted among refugees and war-affected populations in the Arab World, and assessed variations by time, country of study, and study characteristics. An electronic search of eight databases resulted in 5668 unique records published between 2000 and 2013. Scoping review yielded 164 eligible articles for analyses. Ethical research practices, including obtaining institutional approval, access to the community/research site, and informed consent/assent from the research participants, were reported in 48.2, 54.9, and 53.7% of the publications, respectively. Institutional approval was significantly more likely to be reported when the research was biomedical in nature compared to public health and social (91.7% vs. 54.4 and 32.4%), when the study employed quantitative compared to qualitative or mixed methodologies (61.7% vs. 26.8 and 42.9%), and when the journal required a statement on ethical declarations (57.4% vs. 27.1%). Institutional approval was least likely to be reported in papers that were sole-authored (9.5%), when these did not mention a funding source (29.6%), or when published in national journals (0%). Similar results were obtained for access to the community site and for seeking informed consent/assent from study participants. The responsibility of inadequacies in adherence to ethical research conduct in crisis settings is born by a multitude of stakeholders including funding agencies, institutional research boards, researchers and international relief organizations involved in research, as well as journal editors, all of whom need to play a more proactive role for enhancing the practice of ethical research conduct in conflict settings.

  20. 18F-FDG PET/CT for initial assessment and response monitoring in a case of high grade primary lymphoma of the thyroid gland: A case report and review of literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naswa, Niraj; Sharma, Punit; Nazar, Aftab Hasan; Mohapatra, Tushar Kumar; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Kumar, Rakesh

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid lymphoma is a rare disease entity of elderly females. Chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis is said to be the precursor of thyroid lymphoma, suggesting a role of chronic antigen stimulation in the development of the disease. We present a case of male with lymphocytic thyroiditis who presented with painless progressive neck enlargement and pathology revealed features of high grade lymphoma. Staging and posttreatment 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) was performed. This report reemphasizes the role of 18 F-FDG PET/CT in the diagnosis, staging, and assessment of therapy response in patients with extranodal lymphoma, including the primary thyroid lymphoma