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Sample records for reported favorable immune

  1. GRIZZLY/FAVOR Interface Project Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickson, Terry L [ORNL; Williams, Paul T [ORNL; Yin, Shengjun [ORNL; Klasky, Hilda B [ORNL; Tadinada, Sashi [ORNL; Bass, Bennett Richard [ORNL

    2013-06-01

    As part of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, the objective of the GRIZZLY/FAVOR Interface project is to create the capability to apply GRIZZLY 3-D finite element (thermal and stress) analysis results as input to FAVOR probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) analyses. The one benefit of FAVOR to Grizzly is the PROBABILISTIC capability. This document describes the implementation of the GRIZZLY/FAVOR Interface, the preliminary verification and tests results and a user guide that provides detailed step-by-step instructions to run the program.

  2. Cruzipain, a major Trypanosoma cruzi antigen, conditions the host immune response in favor of parasite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordanengo, Laura; Guiñazú, Natalia; Stempin, Cinthia; Fretes, Ricardo; Cerbán, Fabio; Gea, Susana

    2002-04-01

    We recently demonstrated that humoral immune response to cruzipain, a major antigen of Trypanosoma cruzi parasite, is implicated in the pathogenesis of experimental Chagas' disease. In the present study, the spleen cell phenotype and the cytokine profile induced by cruzipain in immunized mice were analyzed. The results showed that cruzipain increases the number of spleen cells with large size and granularity. Splenocyte populations with CD19(+), Mac-1(+), Gr-1(+) and CD11c(+) positive surface markers significantly increased in immune mice compared to controls ones. Histological study revealed the presence of high number of megacariocyte and granulocyte-macrophage progenitors, indicating extramedullary hemopoiesis in spleens of immune mice. The finding of high levels of IL-4, IL5 and IL-10 and low levels of IFN-gamma and IL-12 in supernatants of immune cells stimulated with cruzipain indicates a preferential activation of T2 type cells in immune animals. To investigate the role of innate immunity cells, the classical and alternative metabolic pathways of spleen macrophages from immune mice stimulated by cruzipain were also studied. The results showed an increase of urea associated with a decrease of nitrite levels, suggesting that cruzipain up-regulates the arginase way. Therefore, cruzipain leads to T2 type cytokine profile which may enhance the arginase via in the macrophages promoting a susceptible mechanism to infection. Thus, we postulate that during T. cruzi infection, cruzipain could be used by the parasite to spread inside the host.

  3. New concepts in immunity to Neisseria gonorrhoeae: innate responses and suppression of adaptive immunity favor the pathogen, not the host

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    Yingru eLiu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that gonorrhea can be acquired repeatedly with no apparent development of protective immunity arising from previous episodes of infection. Symptomatic infection is characterized by a purulent exudate, but the host response mechanisms are poorly understood. While the remarkable antigenic variability displayed by Neisseria gonorrhoeae and its capacity to inhibit complement activation allow it to evade destruction by the host’s immune defenses, we propose that it also has the capacity to avoid inducing specific immune responses. In a mouse model of vaginal gonococcal infection, N. gonorrhoeae elicits Th17-driven inflammatory- immune responses, which recruit innate defense mechanisms including an influx of neutrophils. Concomitantly, N. gonorrhoeae suppresses Th1- and Th2-dependent adaptive immunity, including specific antibody responses, through a mechanism involving TGF-β and regulatory T cells. Blockade of TGF-β alleviates the suppression of specific anti-gonococcal responses and allows Th1 and Th2 responses to emerge with the generation of immune memory and protective immunity. Genital tract tissues are naturally rich in TGF-β, which fosters an immunosuppressive environment that is important in reproduction. In exploiting this niche, N. gonorrhoeae exemplifies a well-adapted pathogen that proactively elicits from its host innate responses that it can survive and concomitantly suppresses adaptive immunity. Comprehension of these mechanisms of gonococcal pathogenesis should allow the development of novel approaches to therapy and facilitate the development of an effective vaccine.

  4. Vault nanocapsules as adjuvants favor cell-mediated over antibody-mediated immune responses following immunization of mice.

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    Upendra K Kar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Modifications of adjuvants that induce cell-mediated over antibody-mediated immunity is desired for development of vaccines. Nanocapsules have been found to be viable adjuvants and are amenable to engineering for desired immune responses. We previously showed that natural nanocapsules called vaults can be genetically engineered to elicit Th1 immunity and protection from a mucosal bacterial infection. The purpose of our study was to characterize immunity produced in response to OVA within vault nanoparticles and compare it to another nanocarrier. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We characterized immunity resulting from immunization with the model antigen, ovalbumin (OVA encased in vault nanocapsules and liposomes. We measured OVA responsive CD8(+ and CD4(+ memory T cell responses, cytokine production and antibody titers in vitro and in vivo. We found that immunization with OVA contain in vaults induced a greater number of anti-OVA CD8(+ memory T cells and production of IFNγ plus CD4(+ memory T cells. Also, modification of the vault body could change the immune response compared to OVA encased in liposomes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These experiments show that vault nanocapsules induced strong anti-OVA CD8(+ and CD4(+ T cell memory responses and modest antibody production, which markedly differed from the immune response induced by liposomes. We also found that the vault nanocapsule could be modified to change antibody isotypes in vivo. Thus it is possible to create a vault nanocapsule vaccine that can result in the unique combination of immunogen-responsive CD8(+ and CD4(+ T cell immunity coupled with an IgG1 response for future development of vault nanocapsule-based vaccines against antigens for human pathogens and cancer.

  5. Health economics of rotavirus immunization in Vietnam : Potentials for favorable cost-effectiveness in developing countries

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    Tu, Hong-Anh T.; Rozenbaum, Mark H.; Coyte, Peter C.; Li, Shu Chuen; Woerdenbag, Herman J.; Postma, Maarten J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Rotavirus is the most common cause of severe diarrhoea worldwide. Vietnam is situated in the region of high rotavirus infection incidence and eligible for financial support to introduce rotavirus vaccines into the Expanded Program of Immunization (EPI) from the GAVI. This study was des

  6. Health economics of rotavirus immunization in Vietnam : Potentials for favorable cost-effectiveness in developing countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tu, Hong-Anh T.; Rozenbaum, Mark H.; Coyte, Peter C.; Li, Shu Chuen; Woerdenbag, Herman J.; Postma, Maarten J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Rotavirus is the most common cause of severe diarrhoea worldwide. Vietnam is situated in the region of high rotavirus infection incidence and eligible for financial support to introduce rotavirus vaccines into the Expanded Program of Immunization (EPI) from the GAVI. This study was

  7. Non-favorable positioning of anterosuperior dental implants — case report

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    Tatiana Miranda DELIBERADOR

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The treatment with implants has demonstrated to be a good alternative to oral rehabilitation. However, it is important to follow some criteria in order to achieve success. Objective: This report showed an alternative approach to a clinical condition of non-favorable positioning of anterosuperior dental implants, added to an also non- favorable initial prosthetic planning. Case report: Female patient, 60 years old, with fixed prosthesis over labial inclined implants, in the central and lateral superior incisors region, and with peri-implant disease. A new approach with fixed prosthesis and single abutments, what allows cleaning, and also removable gingival mask was applied. Monitoring of 3, 6, 9 and 12 months were done. Conclusion: The use of a prosthetic alternative such as gingival mask demonstrated to be efficient regarding esthetic and masticatory functions, contributing to oral hygiene, an important factor to peri-implanttissues health.

  8. [Caroli's syndrome. Report of a case beginning in childhood with favorable course].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero, M J; Román, E; Cilleruelo, M L; Sánchez, F; Barrio, J

    2000-07-01

    Caroli's disease is a rare entity that is included in the fibropolycystic abnormalities of the bile ducts. Ultrasonographic patterns consist of evident dilatation of the bile ducts. Although it is thought to be a congenital disease, it usually presents in young adults and few cases have been reported in children. We present the case of a 10-year-old boy with Caroli's syndrome (Caroli's disease, congenital hepatic fibrosis and polycystic renal disease). Evolution was favorable.

  9. Registered report: Biomechanical remodeling of the microenvironment by stromal caveolin-1 favors tumor invasion and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiering, Steven; Ang, Lay-Hong; Lacoste, Judith; Smith, Tim D; Griner, Erin

    2015-07-16

    The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology seeks to address growing concerns about reproducibility in scientific research by conducting replicating selected results from a number of high-profile papers in the field of cancer biology. The papers, which were published between 2010 and 2012 were selected on the basis of citations and Altimetric scores (Errington et al., 2014). This Registered report describes the proposed replication plan of key experiments from 'Biomechanical remodeling of the microenvironment by stromal caveolin-1 favors tumor invasion and metastasis' by Goetz and colleagues, published in Cell in 2011 (Goetz et al., 2011). The key experiments being replicated are those reported in Figures 7C (a-d), Supplemental Figure S2A, and Supplemental Figure S7C (a-c) (Goetz et al., 2011). In these experiments, which are a subset of all the experiments reported in the original publication, Goetz and colleagues show in a subcutaneous xenograft model that stromal caveolin-1 remodels the intratumoral microenvironment, which is correlated with increased metastasis formation. The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology is a collaboration between the Center for Open Science and Science Exchange and the results of the replications will be published in eLife.

  10. Kell immunization: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Tasić Marija; Milošević Jelena; Stefanović Milan; Radović-Janošević Dragana; Krstić Miljan; Antić Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    Introduction. The frequency of occurrence of RhD alloimmunization, due to preventive protocols, is decreased in our country, but more often there are other antigens that emerge as a cause of hemolytic disease of fetus. The most prominent is Kell antigen, which promotes specific course of disease based on an innate pathogenetic mechanism. Anti- Kell antibody production is, just as in other atypical antibodies, provoked with transfusion of incompatible blood. Except for the immune-mediated hemo...

  11. Favorable Pregnancy Outcomes in a Patient with Takayasu’s Arteritis: A Case Report

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    Sima Kadkhodayan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Takayasu’s arteritis is a rare, chronic vasculitis, affecting women of reproductive age. With disease progression, evidence of vascular involvement and insufficiency becomes clinically apparent due to the narrowing or occlusion of the proximal or distal branches of the aorta. Therefore, pregnancy-related complications, such as superimposed preeclampsia, renal failure, and congestive heart failure, may be encountered in these patients. Case report: In this report, we present the case of a 23-year-old, Iranian, primigravida woman with a prior history of Takayasu’s arteritis, which was diagnosed two years before her pregnancy. The patient’s primary presentations were thrombocytosis (more than one million per milliliter, weight loss, and weakness in the shoulders and arms, appearing two years before her pregnancy. Following spontaneous pregnancy, the patient received regular perinatal care by a medical team, consisting of an obstetrician, a rheumatologist, a radiologist, and a nephrologist. Pregnancy termination was planned due to the preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM at 36 weeks of gestation. A normal live male neonate (weight= 3100 g was born with a normal Apgar score (8-8. Conclusion: Based on the findings, a multidisciplinary collaboration between rheumatologists, nephrologists, and obstetricians is required to achieve optimal maternal and neonatal outcomes.

  12. Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Linda M; Cowan, Morton J; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Kohn, Donald B; Puck, Jennifer M; Pai, Sung-Yun; Ballard, Barbara; Bauer, Sarah C; Bleesing, Jack J H; Boyle, Marcia; Brower, Amy; Buckley, Rebecca H; van der Burg, Mirjam; Burroughs, Lauri M; Candotti, Fabio; Cant, Andrew J; Chatila, Talal; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Dinauer, Mary C; Dvorak, Christopher C; Filipovich, Alexandra H; Fleisher, Thomas A; Bobby Gaspar, Hubert; Gungor, Tayfun; Haddad, Elie; Hovermale, Emily; Huang, Faith; Hurley, Alan; Hurley, Mary; Iyengar, Sumathi; Kang, Elizabeth M; Logan, Brent R; Long-Boyle, Janel R; Malech, Harry L; McGhee, Sean A; Modell, Fred; Modell, Vicki; Ochs, Hans D; O'Reilly, Richard J; Parkman, Robertson; Rawlings, David J; Routes, John M; Shearer, William T; Small, Trudy N; Smith, Heather; Sullivan, Kathleen E; Szabolcs, Paul; Thrasher, Adrian; Torgerson, Troy R; Veys, Paul; Weinberg, Kenneth; Zuniga-Pflucker, Juan Carlos

    2014-02-01

    The Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) is a network of 33 centers in North America that study the treatment of rare and severe primary immunodeficiency diseases. Current protocols address the natural history of patients treated for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, and chronic granulomatous disease through retrospective, prospective, and cross-sectional studies. The PIDTC additionally seeks to encourage training of junior investigators, establish partnerships with European and other International colleagues, work with patient advocacy groups to promote community awareness, and conduct pilot demonstration projects. Future goals include the conduct of prospective treatment studies to determine optimal therapies for primary immunodeficiency diseases. To date, the PIDTC has funded 2 pilot projects: newborn screening for SCID in Navajo Native Americans and B-cell reconstitution in patients with SCID after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Ten junior investigators have received grant awards. The PIDTC Annual Scientific Workshop has brought together consortium members, outside speakers, patient advocacy groups, and young investigators and trainees to report progress of the protocols and discuss common interests and goals, including new scientific developments and future directions of clinical research. Here we report the progress of the PIDTC to date, highlights of the first 2 PIDTC workshops, and consideration of future consortium objectives.

  13. Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.M. Griffith (Linda); M. Cowan (Morton); L.D. Notarangelo (Luigi Daniele); R. Kohn (Robert); J. Puck (Jennifer); S.-Y. Pai (Sung-Yun); B. Ballard (Barbara); S.C. Bauer (Sarah); J. Bleesing (Jack); M. Boyle (Marcia); R.W. Brower (Ronald); R.H. Buckley (Rebecca); M. van der Burg (Mirjam); L.M. Burroughs (Lauri); F. Candotti (Fabio); A. Cant (Andrew); T. Chatila (Talal); C. Cunningham-Rundles (Charlotte); M.C. Dinauer (Mary); J. Dvorak (Jennie); A. Filipovich (Alexandra); L.A. Fleisher (Lee); H.B. Gaspar (Bobby); T. Gungor (Tayfun); E. Haddad (Elie); E. Hovermale (Emily); F. Huang (Faith); A. Hurley (Alan); M. Hurley (Mary); S.K. Iyengar (Sudha); E.M. Kang (Elizabeth); B.R. Logan (Brent); J.R. Long-Boyle (Janel); H. Malech (Harry); S.A. McGhee (Sean); S. Modell (Sieglinde); S. Modell (Sieglinde); H.D. Ochs (Hans); R.J. O'Reilly (Richard); R. Parkman (Robertson); D. Rawlings (D.); J.M. Routes (John); P. Shearer (P.); T.N. Small (Trudy); H. Smith (H.); K.E. Sullivan (Kathleen); P. Szabolcs (Paul); A.J. Thrasher (Adrian); D. Torgerson; P. Veys (Paul); K. Weinberg (Kenneth); J.C. Zuniga-Pflucker (Juan Carlos)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThe Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) is a network of 33 centers in North America that study the treatment of rare and severe primary immunodeficiency diseases. Current protocols address the natural history of patients treated for severe combined immunodeficiency (SC

  14. Consumer reporting of adverse events following immunization.

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    Clothier, Hazel J; Selvaraj, Gowri; Easton, Mee Lee; Lewis, Georgina; Crawford, Nigel W; Buttery, Jim P

    2014-01-01

    Surveillance of adverse events following immunisation (AEFI) is an essential component of vaccine safety monitoring. The most commonly utilized passive surveillance systems rely predominantly on reporting by health care providers (HCP). We reviewed adverse event reports received in Victoria, Australia since surveillance commencement in July 2007, to June 2013 (6 years) to ascertain the contribution of consumer (vaccinee or their parent/guardian) reporting to vaccine safety monitoring and to inform future surveillance system development directions. Categorical data included were: reporter type; serious and non-serious AEFI category; and, vaccinee age group. Chi-square test and 2-sample test of proportions were used to compare categories; trend changes were assessed using linear regression. Consumer reporting increased over the 6 years, reaching 21% of reports received in 2013 (PConsumer reports were 5% more likely to describe serious AEFI than HCP (P=0.018) and 10% more likely to result in specialist clinic attendance (Preporting increased to 32% of all report since its introduction in 2010, 85% of consumers continued to report by phone. Consumer reporting of AEFI is a valuable component of vaccine safety surveillance in addition to HCP reporting. Changes are required to AEFI reporting systems to implement efficient consumer AEFI reporting, but may be justified for their potential impact on signal detection sensitivity.

  15. AIM2 co-immunization favors specific multifunctional CD8(+) T cell induction and ameliorates coxsackievirus B3-induced chronic myocarditis.

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    Chai, Dafei; Yue, Yan; Xu, Wei; Dong, Chunsheng; Xiong, Sidong

    2015-07-01

    Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) infection can cause acute myocarditis and chronic myocarditis, leading to dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) with no effective therapeutic strategy. Therefore, we investigated the potential of absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2) to enhance the therapeutic efficacy of DNA vaccine against CVB3-induced chronic myocarditis. Mice were infected with CVB3 and then intranasally immunized with chitosan-pcDNA3.1 (mock), chitosan-pAIM2 (CS-pAIM2), chitosan-pVP1 (CS-pVP1), or chitosan-pAIM2 plus chitosan-pVP1 (CS-pAIM2/CS-pVP1) at 7, 21, and 35d. Therapeutic efficacies of various vaccines were evaluated at day 56d. Compared with CS-pVP1 immunization, CS-pAIM2/CS-pVP1 co-immunization significantly increased survival rate, improved cardiac function, as well as decreased myocardial injury and fibrosis, this result indicated that CVB3-induced chronic myocarditis was alleviated. CVB3-specific T lymphocyte proliferation and cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses of the CS-pAIM2/CS-pVP1 co-immunization group were also increased. More interestingly, CS-pAIM2/CS-pVP1 co-immunization could facilitate CVB3-specific multifunctional CD8(+) T cell induction in the intestinal mucosa, and this induction was closely correlated with myocardial scores, this result indicated that CS-pAIM2/CS-pVP1 vaccine exhibits therapeutic efficacy by enhancing multifunctional CD8(+) T cells. This study may represent a novel therapy for CVB3-induced chronic myocarditis.

  16. Voluntarily Reported Immunization Registry Data: Reliability and Feasibility to Predict Immunization Rates, San Diego, California, 2013.

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    Madewell, Zachary J; Wester, Robert B; Wang, Wendy W; Smith, Tyler C; Peddecord, K Michael; Morris, Jessica; DeGuzman, Heidi; Sawyer, Mark H; McDonald, Eric C

    Accurate data on immunization coverage levels are essential to public health program planning. Reliability of coverage estimates derived from immunization information systems (IISs) in states where immunization reporting by medical providers is not mandated by the state may be compromised by low rates of participation. To overcome this problem, data on coverage rates are often acquired through random-digit-dial telephone surveys, which require substantial time and resources. This project tested both the reliability of voluntarily reported IIS data and the feasibility of using these data to estimate regional immunization rates. We matched telephone survey records for 553 patients aged 19-35 months obtained in 2013 to 430 records in the San Diego County IIS. We assessed concordance between survey data and IIS data using κ to measure the degree of nonrandom agreement. We used multivariable logistic regression models to investigate differences among demographic variables between the 2 data sets. These models were used to construct weights that enabled us to predict immunization rates in areas where reporting is not mandated. We found moderate agreement between the telephone survey and the IIS for the diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis (κ = 0.49), pneumococcal conjugate (κ = 0.49), and Haemophilus influenzae type b (κ = 0.46) vaccines; fair agreement for the varicella (κ = 0.39), polio (κ = 0.39), and measles, mumps, and rubella (κ = 0.35) vaccines; and slight agreement for the hepatitis B vaccine (κ = 0.17). Consistency in factors predicting immunization coverage levels in a telephone survey and IIS data confirmed the feasibility of using voluntarily reported IIS data to assess immunization rates in children aged 19-35 months.

  17. HPV Immunization | Cancer Trends Progress Report

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    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  18. Inhibition of IL-10 production by maternal antibodies against Group B Streptococcus GAPDH confers immunity to offspring by favoring neutrophil recruitment.

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    Pedro Madureira

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Group B Streptococcus (GBS is the leading cause of neonatal pneumonia, septicemia, and meningitis. We have previously shown that in adult mice GBS glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH is an extracellular virulence factor that induces production of the immunosuppressive cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10 by the host early upon bacterial infection. Here, we investigate whether immunity to neonatal GBS infection could be achieved through maternal vaccination against bacterial GAPDH. Female BALB/c mice were immunized with rGAPDH and the progeny was infected with a lethal inoculum of GBS strains. Neonatal mice born from mothers immunized with rGAPDH were protected against infection with GBS strains, including the ST-17 highly virulent clone. A similar protective effect was observed in newborns passively immunized with anti-rGAPDH IgG antibodies, or F(ab'(2 fragments, indicating that protection achieved with rGAPDH vaccination is independent of opsonophagocytic killing of bacteria. Protection against lethal GBS infection through rGAPDH maternal vaccination was due to neutralization of IL-10 production soon after infection. Consequently, IL-10 deficient (IL-10(-/- mice pups were as resistant to GBS infection as pups born from vaccinated mothers. We observed that protection was correlated with increased neutrophil trafficking to infected organs. Thus, anti-rGAPDH or anti-IL-10R treatment of mice pups before GBS infection resulted in increased neutrophil numbers and lower bacterial load in infected organs, as compared to newborn mice treated with the respective control antibodies. We showed that mothers immunized with rGAPDH produce neutralizing antibodies that are sufficient to decrease IL-10 production and induce neutrophil recruitment into infected tissues in newborn mice. These results uncover a novel mechanism for GBS virulence in a neonatal host that could be neutralized by vaccination or immunotherapy. As GBS GAPDH is a

  19. Assessing immunization data quality from routine reports in Mozambique

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    Mavimbe João C

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Worldwide immunization coverage shows an increase in the past years but the validity of the official reports for measuring change over time has been questioned. Facing this problem, donor supported initiatives like the Global Alliance for Vaccine and Immunizations, have been putting a lot of effort into assessing the quality of data used, since accurate immunization information is essential for the Expanded Program on Immunization managers to track and improve program performance. The present article, discusses the practices on record keeping, reporting and the support mechanism to ensure data quality in Mozambique. Methods A process evaluation study was carried out in Mozambique in one district (Cuamba in Niassa Province, between January and March 2003. The study was based on semi-structured interviews, participant observation and review of the data collection materials. Results Differences were found for all vaccine types when comparing facility reports with the tally sheets. The same applies when comparing facility reports with district reports. The study also showed that a routine practice during supervision visits was data quality assessment for the outpatient services but none related to data consistency between the tally sheets and the facility report. For the Expanded Program on Immunization, supervisors concentrated more on the consistency checks between data in the facility reports and the number of vaccines received during the same period. Meetings were based on criticism, for example, why health workers did not reach the target. Nothing in terms of data quality was addressed nor validation rules. Conclusion In this paper we have argued that the quality of data, and consequently of the information system, must be seen in a broader perspective not focusing only on technicalities (data collection tools and the reporting system but also on support mechanisms. Implications of a poor data quality system will be

  20. Adverse events due to the immunization: Case report

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    Medić Snežana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. An adverse event after immunization is a medical incident following the administration of vaccine, which can be connected with vaccine usage. This event could be a reaction to a vaccine component or lapse in vaccine handling, transport and storage or coincidental event. The assessment of severity of this reaction and the decision about prospective permanent contraindications for futher immunization are to be made by the regional expert team for permanent contraindications. This is regulated by low. Case report. A series of adverse events after immunization in three children of a single family is reported. As regulated by law, all three children were vaccinated with different vaccines, from 2007. to 2010. Although the recorded events were diverse by their nature, way of clinical manifestation and severity they all required hospitalization. In addition to being siblings, the three children had the same atopic diseases in their personal and family anamnesis. All adverse events were explored including allergological/immunological tests. Thanks to the good cooperation of involved general practicioners, pediatricians, members of expert team for permanent contraindications and clinicians, two of three children received the full series of vaccines in optimal time. Discussion. Decision making about futher immunization of children with adverse event after vaccine administration depends on the nature and severity of developed medical condition, results of medical exploration, existing immunity and personal risk of getting disease and subsequent complications. Conclusion. Bearing in mind the significance of immunization for personal and collective immunity, good cooperation of all physicians and experts involved in each single case of adverse event is required.

  1. Multiple immune disorders in unrecognized celiac disease: a case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giorgio La Villa; Peietro Pantaleo; Roberto Tarquini; Lino Cirami; Federico Perfetto; Francesco Mancuso; Giacomo Laffi

    2003-01-01

    We reported a female patient with unrecognized celiac disease and multiple extra intestinal manifestations, mainly related to a deranged immune function, including macroamilasemia, macrolipasemia, IgA nephropathy,thyroiditis, and anti-b2-glicoprotein-1 antibodies, that disappeared or improved after the implementation of a gluten-free diet.

  2. Treatment tolerance and patient-reported outcomes favor online hemodiafiltration compared to high-flux hemodialysis in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morena, Marion; Jaussent, Audrey; Chalabi, Lotfi; Leray-Moragues, Hélène; Chenine, Leila; Debure, Alain; Thibaudin, Damien; Azzouz, Lynda; Patrier, Laure; Maurice, Francois; Nicoud, Philippe; Durand, Claude; Seigneuric, Bruno; Dupuy, Anne-Marie; Picot, Marie-Christine; Cristol, Jean-Paul; Canaud, Bernard

    2017-03-15

    Large cohort studies suggest that high convective volumes associated with online hemodiafiltration may reduce the risk of mortality/morbidity compared to optimal high-flux hemodialysis. By contrast, intradialytic tolerance is not well studied. The aim of the FRENCHIE (French Convective versus Hemodialysis in Elderly) study was to compare high-flux hemodialysis and online hemodiafiltration in terms of intradialytic tolerance. In this prospective, open-label randomized controlled trial, 381 elderly chronic hemodialysis patients (over age 65) were randomly assigned in a one-to-one ratio to either high-flux hemodialysis or online hemodiafiltration. The primary outcome was intradialytic tolerance (day 30-day 120). Secondary outcomes included health-related quality of life, cardiovascular risk biomarkers, morbidity, and mortality. During the observational period for intradialytic tolerance, 85% and 84% of patients in high-flux hemodialysis and online hemodiafiltration arms, respectively, experienced at least one adverse event without significant difference between groups. As exploratory analysis, intradialytic tolerance was also studied, considering the sessions as a statistical unit according to treatment actually received. Over a total of 11,981 sessions, 2,935 were complicated by the occurrence of at least one adverse event, with a significantly lower occurrence in online hemodiafiltration with fewer episodes of intradialytic symptomatic hypotension and muscle cramps. By contrast, health-related quality of life, morbidity, and mortality were not different in both groups. An improvement in the control of metabolic bone disease biomarkers and β2-microglobulin level without change in serum albumin concentration was observed with online hemodiafiltration. Thus, overall outcomes favor online hemodiafiltration over high-flux hemodialysis in the elderly.

  3. Tailoring dialysis and resuming low-protein diets may favor chronic dialysis discontinuation: report on three cases.

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    Piccoli, Giorgina Barbara; Guzzo, Gabriella; Vigotti, Federica Neve; Capizzi, Irene; Clari, Roberta; Scognamiglio, Stefania; Consiglio, Valentina; Aroasio, Emiliano; Gonella, Silvana; Veltri, Andrea; Avagnina, Paolo

    2014-07-01

    Renal function recovery (RFR), defined as the discontinuation of dialysis after 3 months of replacement therapy, is reported in about 1% of chronic dialysis patients. The role of personalized, intensive dialysis schedules and of resuming low-protein diets has not been studied to date. This report describes three patients with RFR who were recently treated at a new dialysis unit set up to offer intensive hemodialysis. All three patients were females, aged 73, 75, and 78 years. Kidney disease included vascular-cholesterol emboli, diabetic nephropathy and vascular and dysmetabolic disease. At time of RFR, the patients had been dialysis-dependent from 3 months to 1 year. Dialysis was started with different schedules and was progressively discontinued with a "decremental" policy, progressively decreasing number and duration of the sessions. A moderately restricted low-protein diet (proteins 0.6 g/kg/day) was started immediately after dialysis discontinuation. The most recent update showed that two patients are well off dialysis for 5 and 6 months; the diabetic patient died (sudden death) 3 months after dialysis discontinuation. Within the limits of small numbers, our case series may suggest a role for personalized dialysis treatments and for including low-protein diets in the therapy, in enhancing long-term RFR in elderly dialysis patients.

  4. The quality of immunization data from routine primary health care reports

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Onta, S R; Sabroe, S; Hansen, E H

    1998-01-01

    , and measles; the number was lower for poliomyelitis. The overall number of immunizations was higher in the DHO Reports than in the Immunization Registers, by 31% for BCG, 44% for DPT, 155% for polio, and 71% for measles. We conclude that the official report overestimates the immunization coverage...

  5. Patient-reported treatment burden of chronic immune thrombocytopenia therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown T

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic immune thrombocytopenia (ITP is a debilitating autoimmune disorder that causes a reduction in blood platelets and increased risk of bleeding. ITP is currently managed with various pharmacologic therapies and splenectomy. This study was conducted to assess patient perceived and reported treatment side effects, as well as the perceived burden or bother, and need to reduce or stop treatment, associated with these side effects among adult patients with chronic ITP. Methods A Web-enabled survey was administered to members of a US-based ITP patient support group. Patients reported demographic and clinical characteristics, ITP treatments' side effects for treatments received since diagnosed, level of bother (or distress, and need to reduce or stop treatment, associated with side effects. Current and past exposure was assessed for five specific treatment types: corticosteroids (CS, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg, anti-D immunoglobulin (anti-D, rituximab (RT, and splenectomy (SPL, as well as for other patient-referenced therapies (captured as "other". Results The survey was completed by 589 patients; 78% female, 89% white, mean age 48 years (SD = 14.71, and 68% reported a typical low platelet count of P P P P Conclusions Current ITP treatments, particularly corticosteroids, are associated with multiple bothersome side effects that may lead to patients stopping or reducing therapy. Open, informed and complete communication between clinician and patient regarding both the benefits and the side effects of ITP treatment may better prepare patients for their prescribed regimens.

  6. Immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1992-01-01

    920630 Effects of the spleen on immunestate of patients with gastric cancer.QIUDengbo (仇登波), et al. Dept General Surg,Union Hosp, Tongji Med Univ, Wuhan, 430022.Natl Med J China 1992; 72(6): 334-337. For analysing the effects of the spleen on im-mune state of gastric cancer patients.T-lym-

  7. Consumer reporting of adverse events following immunization (AEFI): identifying predictors of reporting an AEFI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrella, Adriana; Gold, Michael; Braunack-Mayer, Annette; Baghurst, Peter; Marshall, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Passive reporting of adverse events following immunization (AEFI) by consumers or healthcare professionals is the primary mechanism for post-marketing surveillance of vaccine safety. Although recent initiatives have promoted consumer reporting, there is a lack of research concerning consumer reporters. Computer assisted telephone interviews (CATI) were conducted in 2011 of a cross-sectional, random, general population sample of 191 South Australian parents who stated that their children had previously experienced an AEFI. We compared awareness of surveillance, vaccine safety opinions, and demographics of parents reporting an AEFI to either healthcare professionals or surveillance authorities with those who did not report their children's AEFI. Multivariate regression analyses measured: the association between reporting and safety views; and demographic predictors of reporting an AEFI. Reporting an AEFI to a healthcare professional or a surveillance authority was not significantly associated with awareness of a surveillance system. AEFI reporters, when compared with non-reporters, were more likely to be Australian-born (OR = 4.58, [1.64, 12.78], P = 0.004); were associated with the perception that a serious reaction was more likely to occur at their children's last immunization (OR = 2.54 [95%CI 1.22, 5.30], P = 0.013); and were less accepting of the risk of febrile convulsion, (OR = 3.59 [95%CI 1.50, 8.57], P = 0.004). Although reporting an AEFI was not associated with awareness of surveillance or most socio-demographics, the results suggest some difference in safety opinions. Further studies are required to ascertain if these differences pre-date the occurrence of an AEFI or are a consequence of the AEFI and how consumers can contribute further to vaccine safety surveillance.

  8. Reporter gene imaging of immune responses to cancer: progress and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Purnima

    2012-01-01

    Immune responses to cancer are dynamic processes which take place through the concerted activity of innate and adaptive cell populations. In order to fully understand the efficacy of immune therapies for cancer, it is critical to understand how the treatment modulates the function of each cell type involved in the anti-tumor immune response. Molecular imaging is a versatile method for longitudinal studies of cellular localization and function. The development of reporter genes for tracking cell movement and function was a powerful addition to the immunologist's toolbox. This review will highlight the advances and challenges in the use of reporter gene imaging to track immune cell localization and function in cancer.

  9. Immune response profiles after caterpillar exposure: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamar A Smith-Norowitz

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Tamar A Smith-Norowitz1,3, Kevin B Norowitz1, Stephan Kohlhoff1,3, Kaushal Kalra1,3, Seto Chice2,3, Martin H Bluth41Departments of Pediatrics, 2Pathology, 3Center for Allergy and Asthma Research, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, NY, USA; 4Department of Pathology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI, USARationale: The role of the immune response to caterpillar exposure is not well described. This case study is the first to report a patient who presented with an allergic reaction after exposure to the larvae of the sycamore tussock moth, Halysidota harrisii Walsh, 1864.Methods: Blood was collected from an allergic asthmatic adult (m/42 y/o at 2 hrs – 2 wks after contact urticaria with associated dyspnea after exposure to the larvae of the sycamore tussock moth, Halysidota harrisii Walsh, 1864. Distributions of blood lymphocytes (CD4+, CD8+, CD8+CD60+, CD19+, CD23+, CD16/56+, CD25, CD45RA+, CD45RO+, monocytes (CD1d+, levels of serum immunoglobulins (IgM, IgG, IgA, IgE, and cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-4, TNF-a were studied (flow cytometry, nephelometry, UniCAP Total IgE Fluoroenzymeimmunoassay, cytokine ELISA, clinical toxicology.Results: Numbers of CD4+ T cells, CD25+ cells, CD19+ B cells, and CD1d+ monocytes decreased (22, 27, 33, 20%, respectively one week post reaction, CD45RA+ naïve T cells decreased at 36 hours (21%,while CD8+CD60+ T cells and CD23+ cells decreased 48 hrs (33, 74%, respectively post reaction. In contrast, numbers of CD16/56+ NK precursor cells increased (60% 12 hrs, then decreased (65% 48 hrs post reaction; other lymphocyte subsets were unaffected. Serum IgM, IgG and IgA were within normal range; however, serum IgE demonstrated a bimodal elevation at 2 hrs (15% and one week post reaction. Levels of IFN-γ, IL-4, and TNF-a were not detected in serum pre-exposure (<1.0–4.0 pg/mL. However, high levels of IFN-γ (187–319 pg/mL and TNF-a (549–749 pg/mL were detected in serum 24–36 hrs and 3.5–24 hrs post

  10. Immune disease expressed in liver and platelets in an adolescent: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Henedina; Rocha, Ruben; Silva, Nicole; Pontes, Teresa; Antunes, Ana; Martins, Sofia

    2010-06-11

    We report a case of a 15-year-old boy with autoimmune hepatitis lacking common serologic markers and normal gammaglobulinemia associated with immune thrombocytopenia and family history of psoriasis. He presented to our department with a 4-year history of a cervical posterior lymphadenopathy and recent petechiae. Previous laboratory results 6 months before already showed hepatocellular injury. After exclusion of other causes, the diagnosis of autoimmune hepatitis was made based on clinical grounds, associated immune disorder and histological features of liver biopsy.The authors alert for this atypical presentation of autoimmune hepatitis and associated immune thrombocytopenia.

  11. Immune disease expressed in liver and platelets in an adolescent: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pontes Teresa

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report a case of a 15-year-old boy with autoimmune hepatitis lacking common serologic markers and normal gammaglobulinemia associated with immune thrombocytopenia and family history of psoriasis. He presented to our department with a 4-year history of a cervical posterior lymphadenopathy and recent petechiae. Previous laboratory results 6 months before already showed hepatocellular injury. After exclusion of other causes, the diagnosis of autoimmune hepatitis was made based on clinical grounds, associated immune disorder and histological features of liver biopsy. The authors alert for this atypical presentation of autoimmune hepatitis and associated immune thrombocytopenia.

  12. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome unmasking erythema nodosum leprosum: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geeta Kiran Arakkal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS occurs as an acute symptomatic expression of a latent infection during the recovery of immune system in response to antiretroviral therapy in HIV patients. IRIS triggers both opportunistic and non-opportunistic infections. We report a case of IRIS in a patient with HIV, presenting as erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL, which led to unmasking of lepromatous leprosy following anti-retroviral therapy (ART.

  13. Cooperative Effects of Corticosteroids and Catecholamines upon Immune Deviation of the Type-1/Type-2 Cytokine Balance in Favor of Type-2 Expression in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salicru, A. N.; Sams, Clarence F.; Marshall, G. D.

    2007-01-01

    A growing number of studies show strong associations between stress and altered immune function. In vivo studies of chronic and acute stress have demonstrated that cognitive stressors are strongly correlated with high levels of catecholamines (CT) and corticosteroids (CS). Although both CS and CT individually can inhibit the production of T-helper 1 (TH1, type-1 like) cytokines and simultaneously promote the production of T-helper 2 (TH2, type-2 like) cytokines in antigen-specific and mitogen stimulated human leukocyte cultures in vitro, little attention has been focused on the effects of combination CT and CS in immune responses that may be more physiologically relevant. We therefore investigated the combined effects of in vitro CT and CS upon the type-1/type-2 cytokine balance of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) as a model to study the immunomodulatory effects of superimposed acute and chronic stress. Results demonstrated a significant decrease in type-1 cytokine production (IFN-gamma) and a significant increase in type-2 cytokine production (IL-4, IL-10) in our CS+CT incubated cultures when compared to either CT or CS agents alone. Furthermore, variable enhancement of type-1/type-2 immune deviation occurred depending upon when the CT was added. The data suggest that CS can increase the sensitivity of PBMC to the immunomodulatory effects of CT and establishes an in vitro model to study the combined effects of in vivo type-1/type-2 cytokine alterations observed in acute and chronic stress.

  14. MR imaging of cerebral aspergillosis in an infant with normal-immunity : a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Ji Yeoun; Choi, Jin Ok; Lee, Kang Soo; Chae, Soo Hyun; Joo, Myung Jin [Presbyterian Medical Center, Chunju (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-04-01

    Cerebral aspergillosis is a rare condition, and like other opportunistic fungal infections, it most commonly occurs in immunocompromised patients. Because of the increasing use of chemotherapy in organ transplantation, cases involving neoplasms, corticosteroid therapy, and cases of lymphoma and leukemia, the incidence of fungal infections in the brain has recently increased. Cerebral aspergillosis in an infant with normal immunity is a very rare condition, and has not been reported in Korea. We report the MR findings of this condition in an infant with normal immunity. (author)

  15. Immune thrombocytopenic purpura in ulcerative colitis: a case report and systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhash Chandra

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Over 100 extraintestinal manifestations are reported in ulcerative colitis (UC. A commonly reported hematological manifestation is autoimmune hemolytic anemia. On rare occasions, immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP has been reported with UC. The presence of thrombocytopenia can complicate the clinical scenario as the number of bloody bowel movements is an important indicator of disease activity in UC. A proposed theory for this association is antigenic mimicry between a platelet surface antigen and bacterial glycoprotein. We are reporting a case of UC and associated ITP managed successfully with anti-TNF therapy. We also performed a systemic review of case reports and a case series reporting this association.

  16. Common variable immune deficiency associated Hodgkin’s lymphoma complicated with EBV-linked hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkan, Umit Yavuz; Gunes, Gursel; Aslan, Tuncay; Etgul, Sezgin; Aydin, Seda; Buyukasik, Yahya

    2015-01-01

    Hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) is described by an increase in macrophages accountable for extensive phagocytosis of hematopoietic cells. Secondary HPS arises commonly in the presence of infections, neoplasia, autoimmune disorders and immune disorders. Here, we reported a patient with common variable immune deficiency (CVID) and Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL) who later developed EBV linked hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. 42 year old men underwent check-up because of back pain in July 2012. He had known CVID disease. In physical examination he had no lymphadenopathies however his spleen was palpable 3 cm under arcus costa. He had hypogammaglobulinemia with IgG levels around 500 mg/dl. In abdominal computed tomography (CT) multiple lymphadenopathies reaching maximum 26×17 cm size were seen so, PET-CT was performed. Involvement in thorax, abdomen, and bone was detected with maximum SUV max 11.5. He had undergone tru-cut biopsy from lymph node in November 2012 which revealed HL. Bone marrow investigation favored with mix cell type. His cytogenetic analysis was reported as 46 XY. He was considered as stage 4 disease and ABVD (Adriamycin, bleomycin, vincristine and dexamethasone). He was given six cycles of chemotherapy in May 2013 and complete remission was observed in control CT screening in July 2013. However pancytopenia evolved in August 2013. Bone marrow investigation revealed suspicious lymphohistiocytic infiltration. Treatment was planned to apply autologous stem cell transplantation (SCT) after salvage chemotherapy. Control bone marrow investigation again revealed the lymphohistiocytic aggregates with hemophagocytosis. Our patient showed 5 criteria of hemophagocytic syndrome. He had ferritin elevation (>5000 μg/dl), splenomegaly (13 cm) cytopenia, triglyceride elevation and hemophagocytosis. He had unrelated SCT transplantation however he died from transplant related toxicity. The primary and secondary immune deficiency caused by chemotherapy are the major causes

  17. Psychosurgery: National Commission Issues Surprisingly Favorable Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culliton, Barbara J.

    1976-01-01

    Presents results of a national commission's investigation of psychosurgery. Results indicate the procedure to be effective in the cure of patients suffering from pain accompanied by depression, while avoiding the destruction caused by prefrontal lobotomies. (SL)

  18. Brief Report: Dysregulated Immune System in Children with Autism: Beneficial Effects of Intravenous Immune Globulin on Autistic Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sudhir; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Children (ages 3-12) with autism (n=25) were given intravenous immune globulin (IVIG) treatments at 4-week intervals for at least 6 months. Marked abnormality of immune parameters was observed in subjects, compared to age-matched controls. IVIG treatment resulted in improved eye contact, speech, behavior, echolalia, and other autistic features.…

  19. The first report of cabergoline-induced immune hemolytic anemia in an adolescent with prolactinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürbüz, Fatih; Yağcı-Küpeli, Begül; Kör, Yılmaz; Yüksel, Bilgin; Zorludemir, Suzan; Gürbüz, Berrak Bilginer; Küpeli, Serhan

    2014-01-01

    Prolactinomas are common pituitary tumors that can cause gonadal dysfunction and infertility related to hyperprolactinemia. Dopamine agonists are the first-line treatment in these patients. Cabergoline leads to significant reduction in serum prolactin levels and tumor size in patients with prolactinoma. Dopamine agonists have been associated with adverse effects such as nausea, vomiting and psychosis. We report here a case with cabergoline-induced immune hemolytic anemia. The patient had cabergoline treatment history for prolactinoma and presented with weakness, fatigue, nausea, and paleness. Laboratory findings revealed severe anemia-related immune hemolysis. There were no causes identified to explain hemolytic anemia except cabergoline. Therefore, cabergoline therapy was stopped and subsequently hemolytic anemia resolved and did not occur again. This is the first reported pediatric case with prolactinoma and cabergoline-induced hemolytic anemia. Clinicians should be watchful for this rare side effect induced by cabergoline.

  20. Acute immune-mediated thrombocytopenia due to oxaliplatin administration: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrantonio, Filippo; Di Bartolomeo, Maria; Buzzoni, Roberto; Bajetta, Emilio

    2010-01-01

    Drug-induced acute thrombocytopenia is an extremely rare side effect that may occur immediately after oxaliplatin infusion. This potentially fatal reaction is immune mediated and can be anticipated by mild hemorrhagic signs during previous administrations. This is the first report of acute thrombocytopenia occurring during adjuvant treatment of colorectal cancer with oxaliplatin. Clinicians should be aware of this adverse event in order to prevent possible serious consequences and stop further oxaliplatin administration.

  1. Introduction of optical reporter gene into cancer and immune cells using lentiviral vector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Jung Joon; Le, Uyenchi N.; Moon, Sung Min; Heo, Young Jun; Song, Ho Chun; Bom, Hee Seung [School of Medicine, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yeon Soo [Schoole of Medicine, Inje University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    For some applications such as gene therapy or reporter gene imaging, a gene has to be introduced into the organism of interest. Adenoviral vectors are capable of transducing both replicating and non-dividing cells. The adenoviral vectors do not integrate their DNA into host DNA, but do lead to an immune response. Lentiviruses belong to the retrovirus family and are capable of infecting both dividing and non-dividing cells. The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is an example of a lentavirus. A disabled HIV virus has been developed and could be used for in vivo gene delivery. A portion of the viral genome which encodes for accessory proteins canbe deleted without affecting production of the vector and efficiency of infection. Lentiviral delivery into various rodent tissues shows sustained expression of the transgene of up to six months. Furthermore, there seems to be little or no immune response with these vectors. These lentiviral vectors hold significant promise for in vivo gene delivery. We constructed lentiviral vector encoding firefly luciferase (Fluc) and eGFP. Fluc-eGFP fusion gene was inserted into multiple cloning sites of pLentiM1.3 vector. Reporter gene (Fluc-eGFP) was designed to be driven by murine CMV promoter with enhanced efficacy of transgene expression as compared to human CMV promoter. We transfected pLenti1.3-Fluc into human cervix cancer cell line (HeLa) and murine T lymphocytes. We also constructed adenovirus encoding Fluc and transfected to HeLa and T cells. This LentiM1.3-Fluc was transfected into HeLa cells and murine T lymphocytes in vitro, showing consistent expression of eGFP under the fluorescence microscopy from the 2nd day of transfection. Firefly luciferase reporter gene was not expressed in immune cells when it is mediated by adenovirus. Lentivirus was validated as a useful vector for both immune and cancer cells.

  2. Bartonella Endocarditis and Pauci-Immune Glomerulonephritis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raybould, Jillian E; Raybould, Alison L; Morales, Megan K; Zaheer, Misbah; Lipkowitz, Michael S; Timpone, Joseph G; Kumar, Princy N

    2016-09-01

    Among culture-negative endocarditis in the United States, Bartonella species are the most common cause, with Bartonella henselae and Bartonella quintana comprising the majority of cases. Kidney manifestations, particularly glomerulonephritis, are common sequelae of infectious endocarditis, with nearly half of all Bartonella patients demonstrating renal involvement. Although a pauci-immune pattern is a frequent finding in infectious endocarditis-associated glomerulonephritis, it is rarely reported in Bartonella endocarditis. Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) positivity can be seen with many pathogens causing endocarditis and has been previously reported with Bartonella species. In addition, ANCA-associated vasculitis can also present with renal and cardiac involvement, including noninfectious valvular vegetations and pauci-immune glomerulonephritis. Given the overlap in their clinical presentation, it is difficult to differentiate between Bartonella endocarditis and ANCA-associated vasculitis but imperative to do so to guide management decisions. We present a case of ANCA-positive Bartonella endocarditis with associated pauci-immune glomerulonephritis that was successfully treated with medical management alone.

  3. Acute brucellosis as unusual cause of immune thrombocytopenia: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tajeldin Mohammedien Abdallah

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A 25 year-old male patient was admitted to the causality with complaints of fever, joints pain, epistaxis and gingival bleeding, for the last week, the complete blood count revealed pancytopenia. Serological test for brucella was reported positive as 1/320, but the patient failed to respond to brucella treatment for 4 d. On day 5th the diagnosis of immune thrombocytopenia was confirmed after bone marrow aspiration. Steroid was initiated on 6th day after admission and on the 3rd day of steroid therapy thrombocytes count was raised to 55×109/L and came up to 180×109/L on 12th day after admission. Brucella-induced immune thrombocytopenia should be considered in patient presenting with bleeding and febrile illness especially in endemic region.

  4. MPO-ANCA associated crescentic glomerulonephritis with numerous immune complexes: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morizane Ryuji

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA-associated crescentic glomerulonephritis (CGN is a major cause of rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (RPGN. ANCA-associated CGN is generally classified into pauci-immune RPGN, in which there are few or no immune complexes. Case Presentation A 78-year-old man presented with RPGN after a 7-year course of chronic proteinuria and hematuria with stable renal function. A blood examination showed a high titer of myeloperoxidase (MPO-ANCA. A renal biopsy showed crescentic glomerulonephritis with abundant subepithelial, intramenbranous and subendothelial deposits by electron microscopy, leading to the diagnosis of ANCA-associated CGN superimposed on type 3 membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN. Conclusions This case is unique in that type 3 MPGN and MPO-ANCA-associated CGN coexisted, and no similar case has been reported to date. Because ANCA-associated CGN has a predilection for elderly individuals and primary type 3 MPGN is rarely seen in this age group, coincidental existence appears less likely. This case may confer valuable information regarding the link between immune complex and ANCA-associated CGN.

  5. Long-term survival after a favorable response to anti-EGFR antibody plus chemotherapy to treat bone marrow metastasis: a case report of KRAS-wildtype rectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Sho; Fukui, Tadahisa; Suzuki, Shuhei; Takeda, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Kaname; Yoshioka, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Bone marrow metastasis is a rare consequence of colorectal cancer that results in a poor prognosis; few reports describe a favorable response to doublet chemotherapy combined with targeted therapy, which is currently the standard treatment. We experienced a case where anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibody produced a marked anti-tumor response to bone marrow metastasis that led to long-term survival. A 51-year-old man was diagnosed with a primary KRAS-wildtype rectal cancer with multiple metastases, including the bone marrow. Disease control was achieved for 10.8 months following chemotherapy with a modified FOLFOX6 regimen combined with an anti-EGFR antibody. He died of cancer 22.7 and 16.6 months after disease onset and first-line chemotherapy, respectively. This case shows that early tumor shrinkage and deepness of response to the anti-EGFR antibody were observed even in a patient with bone marrow metastasis. Anti-EGFR antibody therapy should therefore be considered even when a patient’s medical condition appears to be poor owing to bone marrow metastasis. Moreover, tumors that are likely to be sensitive to chemotherapy, such as RAS-wildtype colorectal cancers, can be considered for anti-EGFR antibody therapy even if the patient is considered unfit for chemotherapy.

  6. Contribution of magnetic resonance imaging to the diagnosis and prognosis of Marchiafava-Bignami disease. Report of a case with a favorable outcome; La maladie de Marchiafava-Bignami: apport diagnostique et pronostique de l`imagerie par resonance magnetique. A propos d`un cas d`evolution favorable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, J.Y.; Vincenti Rouquette, I.; Debourdeau, P.; Saissy, J.M. [Hopital des Armees Begin, 94 - Saint-Mande (France)

    1997-09-01

    A patient with a history of chronic alcohol abuse and metal disorders developed a coma due to Marchiafava-Bignami disease. A computed tomography study of the brain was normal, whereas magnetic resonance imaging disclosed a solitary circumscribed lesion in the middle part of the corpus callosum, generating a hypointense signal on T1 images and a hyperintense signal on T2 images. The outcome was favorable. A previous magnetic resonance imaging study done after the onset of the mental disorders was normal, supporting a diagnosis of acute regressive rather than mixed Marchiafava-Bignami disease. (authors). 15 refs.

  7. Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura Associated with Hepatitis A Infection in a Five-year Old Boy: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urganci, N; Kilicaslan, O; Kalyoncu, D; Yilmaz, S

    2014-09-01

    Acute hepatitis A infection is usually a self-limiting disease and mostly asymptomatic in children younger than six years old. Extrahepatic autoimmune manifestations such as immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) have been reported rarely in children with acute hepatitis A infection. We report herein a paediatric case with ITP which is due to hepatitis A virus infection.

  8. 78 FR 46588 - Solicitation of Written Comments on the Global Immunizations Working Group's Draft Report and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    ... immunization systems to ensure the full benefits of immunization are extended to all people, regardless of... protecting the health and economic investments of the U.S. Globalization, frequent travel, and the ongoing... represent both opportunities for improving global immunizations, as well as areas that will benefit the most...

  9. Autoimmune dermatologic toxicities from immune checkpoint blockade with anti-PD-1 antibody therapy: a report on bullous skin eruptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jour, George; Glitza, Isabella C; Ellis, Rachel M; Torres-Cabala, Carlos A; Tetzlaff, Michael T; Li, Janet Y; Nagarajan, Priyadharsini; Huen, Auris; Aung, Phyu P; Ivan, Doina; Drucker, Carol R; Prieto, Victor G; Rapini, Ronald P; Patel, Anisha; Curry, Jonathan L

    2016-08-01

    Monoclonal antibodies against the immune checkpoint programmed cell death receptor 1 (PD-1) improve the hosts' antitumor immune response and have showed tremendous promise in the treatment of advanced solid tumors and hematologic malignancies. Reports of serious autoimmune dermatologic toxicities from immune checkpoint blockade therapy, however, are emerging. We report our experience with five patients who presented with pruritic vesicles and blisters on the skin while treated with anti-PD-1 antibody immunotherapy with either nivolumab or pembrolizumab. Four of the patients' skin biopsies revealed subepidermal bullae with immunohistochemical study for type IV collagen labeling the floor of the blister cavity and direct immunofluorescence studies (in three of the four patients tested) decorated linear IgG and C3 immune deposits on the blister roof, diagnostic of bullous pemphigoid. One patient developed bullous erythema multiforme. All patients had partial or complete resolution of skin lesions following treatment with systemic corticosteroid and cessation of checkpoint blockade. Recognition and treatment of rare immune-related bullous dermatologic toxicities will become increasingly important as more patients are treated with effective and newer immune checkpoint blockade therapy. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Significance of Periodontal Health in Primary Immune Thrombocytopenia- A Case Report and Review of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajinder K Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary immune thrombocytopenia is an acquired bleeding disorder with no clinically apparent cause of thrombocytopenia. Clinical indicators of ITP include easy bruising of the skin, prolonged bleeding on injury, mucocutaneous lesions such as petechiae and ecchymosis, epistaxis, gastrointestinal bleeding, hematuria and bleeding from the gums. It is important for a dentist to be aware of the clinical manifestations of ITP as it may not only lead to successful management of the patient, but in some cases it may even lead to formation of a provisional diagnosis of the condition in previously undetected cases. However, very few cases of ITP have been reported in dental practice making it difficult for a dentist to identify the disorder when a patient suffering from ITP reports for dental treatment. A case report of a female patient with ITP is thus described with emphasis on the importance of periodontal health in such patients to prevent consequent unwanted sequelae. It is followed by discussion of oral manifestations of the disorder and dental management of such patients.

  11. Ipilimumab and immune-mediated adverse events: a case report of anti-CTLA4 induced ileitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venditti, Olga; De Lisi, Delia; Caricato, Marco; Caputo, Damiano; Capolupo, Gabriella Teresa; Taffon, Chiara; Pagliara, Elisa; Battisi, Sofia; Frezza, Anna Maria; Onetti Muda, Andrea; Tonini, Giuseppe; Santini, Daniele

    2015-03-01

    Ipilimumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody directed against cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 , a key negative regulator of T-cell activation approved by the Food and Drug Administration as of March 2011 for the treatment of metastatic melanoma. As a result of the up-regulation of the immune system, several immune-mediated adverse effects have been reported including colitis, dermatitis, hepatitis and rarely hypophysitis. The most frequent immune-mediated adverse effects described in literature include gastrointestinal toxicity such as diarrhea, colitis and case of colitis and ileitis. In this paper we report an interesting case of immune-mediate ileitis without colitis in a 54 years old woman with metastatic melanoma treated with ipilimumab. We also discuss about case management and the possible pathological mechanisms considering also previous reports. The aim of this article is to support further investigations concerning epigenetic and genetic analysis in order to personalize biological therapy and to reduce immune related adverse events observed after ipilimumab administration.

  12. Granulomatous skin lesions complicating Varicella infection in a patient with Rothmund-Thomson syndrome and immune deficiency: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Den Oord Joost

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rothmund-Thomson syndrome (RTS(OMIM 268400 is a rare autosomal recessive genodermatosis characterized by poikiloderma, small stature, skeletal and dental abnormalities, cataract and an increased risk of cancer. It is caused by mutations in RECQL4 at 8q24. Immune deficiency is not described as a classical feature of the disease. Here we report the appearance of granulomatous skin lesions complicating primary Varicella Zoster Virus infection in a toddler with Rothmund Thomson syndrome and immune deficiency. Although granulomatous disorders are sometimes seen after Herpes zoster, they are even more rare after Varicella primary infection. Granulomas have hitherto not been described in Rothmund-Thomson syndrome. With this report we aim to stress the importance of screening for immune deficiency in patients with Rothmund-Thomson syndrome.

  13. Penicillium marneffei chylous ascites in acquired immune deficiency syndrome: A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin-Zhong Shen; Zhen-Yan Wang; Hong-Zhou Lu

    2012-01-01

    Penicillium marneffei (P.marneffei) infection usually occurs with skin,bone marrow,lung or hepatic involvement.However,no cases of P.marneffei infection with chylous ascites have been reported thus far.In this report,we describe the first case of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) which has been complicated by a P.marneffei infection causing chylous ascites.We describe the details of the case,with an emphasis on treatment regimen.This patient was treated with amphotericin B for 3 mo,while receiving concomitant therapy with an efavirenz-containing antiretroviral regimen,but cultures in ascitic fluid were persistently positive for P.marneffei.The infection resolved after treatment with high-dose voriconazole (400 mg every 12 h) for 3 mo.P.marneffei should be considered in the differential diagnosis of chylous ascites in human immunodeficiency virus patients.High-dose voriconazole is an effective,well-tolerated and convenient option for the treatment of systemic infections with P.marneffei in AIDS patients on an efavirenz-containing antiretroviral regimen.

  14. Adverse events following yellow fever immunization: Report and analysis of 67 neurological cases in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Reinaldo de Menezes; Pavão, Ana Luiza Braz; de Oliveira, Patrícia Mouta Nunes; dos Santos, Paulo Roberto Gomes; Carvalho, Sandra Maria D; Mohrdieck, Renate; Fernandes, Alexandre Ribeiro; Sato, Helena Keico; de Figueiredo, Patricia Mandali; von Doellinger, Vanessa Dos Reis; Leal, Maria da Luz Fernandes; Homma, Akira; Maia, Maria de Lourdes S

    2014-11-20

    Neurological adverse events following administration of the 17DD substrain of yellow fever vaccine (YEL-AND) in the Brazilian population are described and analyzed. Based on information obtained from the National Immunization Program through passive surveillance or intensified passive surveillance, from 2007 to 2012, descriptive analysis, national and regional rates of YFV associated neurotropic, neurological autoimmune disease, and reporting rate ratios with their respective 95% confidence intervals were calculated for first time vaccinees stratified on age and year. Sixty-seven neurological cases were found, with the highest rate of neurological adverse events in the age group from 5 to 9 years (2.66 per 100,000 vaccine doses in Rio Grande do Sul state, and 0.83 per 100,000 doses in national analysis). Two cases had a combination of neurotropic and autoimmune features. This is the largest sample of YEL-AND already analyzed. Rates are similar to other recent studies, but on this study the age group from 5 to 9 years of age had the highest risk. As neurological adverse events have in general a good prognosis, they should not contraindicate the use of yellow fever vaccine in face of risk of infection by yellow fever virus.

  15. Placental immune editing switch (PIES): learning about immunomodulatory pathways from a unique case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronchud, Miguel H.; Tresserra, Francesc; Xu, Wenjie; Warren, Sarah; Cusido, Maite; Zantop, Bernat; Zenclussen, Ana Claudia; Cesano, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    The hypothesis of this work is that, in order to escape the natural immune surveillance mechanisms, cancer cells and the surrounding microenvironment might express ectopically genes that are physiologically present in the placenta to mediate fetal immune-tolerance. These natural “placental immune-editing switch” mechanisms (PIES) may represent the result of millions of years of mammalian evolution developed to allow materno-fetal tolerance. Here, we introduce genes of the immune regulatory pathways that are either similarly over- or under-expressed in tumor vs normal tissue. Our analysis was carried out in primary breast cancer with metastatic homolateral axillary lymph nodes as well as placenta tissue (both uterine decidual tissue and term placenta tissue) from a pregnant woman. Gene expression profiling of paired non-self and self tissues (i.e. placenta/uterus; breast cancer/normal breast tissue; metastatic lymphnode/normal lymphnode tissue) was performed using the PanCancer Immune gene panel, a 770 Nanostring gene expression panel. Our findings reveal overlapping in specific immune gene expression in placenta and cancer tissue, suggesting that these genes might play an important role in maintaining immune tolerance both physiologically (in the placenta) and pathologically (in the cancer setting). PMID:27852037

  16. The Role of the Immune Response in Merkel Cell Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Triozzi, Pierre L., E-mail: triozzp@ccf.org [Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, 9500 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44195 (United States); Fernandez, Anthony P. [Departments of Dermatology and Anatomic Pathology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, 9500 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44195 (United States)

    2013-02-28

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is an aggressive neuroendocrine skin cancer. The Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) is implicated in its pathogenesis. Immune mechanisms are also implicated. Patients who are immunosuppressed have an increased risk. There is evidence that high intratumoral T-cell counts and immune transcripts are associated with favorable survival. Spontaneous regressions implicate immune effector mechanisms. Immunogenicity is also supported by observation of autoimmune paraneoplastic syndromes. Case reports suggest that immune modulation, including reduction of immune suppression, can result in tumor regression. The relationships between MCPyV infection, the immune response, and clinical outcome, however, remain poorly understood. Circulating antibodies against MCPyV antigens are present in most individuals. MCPyV-reactive T cells have been detected in both MCC patients and control subjects. High intratumoral T-cell counts are also associated with favorable survival in MCPyV-negative MCC. That the immune system plays a central role in preventing and controlling MCC is supported by several observations. MCCs often develop, however, despite the presence of humoral and cellular immune responses. A better understanding on how MCPyV and MCC evade the immune response will be necessary to develop effective immunotherapies.

  17. Innate immune recognition and regulation in liver injury: A brief report from a series of studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN ZhiGang

    2009-01-01

    The discovery of innate immune receptors and the emergence of liver Immunology (high content of NK and NKT cells in liver) led to the second research summit in innate immunity since the finding of NK cells in the middle 1970s. Liver disease is one of the most dangerous threats to humans, and the pro-gress in innate immunology and liver immunology made it possible to re-explain the cellular end too-lecular immune mechanisms of liver disease. In the past ten years, we have found that innate recogni-tion of hepatic NK and NKT subsets were involved in murine liver injury. We established a novel NK cell-dependent acute murine hepatitis model by activating Toll-like receptor-3 (TLR-3) with an injection of poly I:C, which may mimic mild viral hepatitis (such as Chronic Hepatitis B). We observed that a network of innate immune cells including NK, NKT and Kupffer cells is involved in liver immune injury in our established NK cell-dependent murine model. We noted that TLR-3 on Kupffer ceils activated by pretreatment with poly I:C might protect against bacterial toxin (LPS)-induced fuIminant hepatitis by down-regulating TLR-4 function, while TLR-3 pre-activation of NK cells might reduce Con A-induced NKT cell-mediated fulminant hepatitis by blocking NKT cell recruitment to the liver. We also found that the oversensitivity to injury by immune stimulation in HBV (hepatitis B virus) transgenic mice (full HBV gene-tg or HBs-tg) correlated to the over-expression of Real, an NKG2D (natural killer cell group 2D) ligand of NK cells or CDld, a ligand of TCR-V14 of NKT cells, on HBV+ hepatocytes, which leads to an innate immune response against hepatocytes and is critical in liver immune injury and regeneration.

  18. The carcinogenic potential of tacrolimus ointment beyond immune suppression: a hypothesis creating case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vetter Claudia S

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since tacrolimus ointment was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA as a promising treatment for atopic dermatitis, it has been approved in more than 30 additional countries, including numerous European Union member nations. Moreover, in the current clinical routine the use of this drug is no longer restricted to the approved indication, but has been extended to a wide variety of inflammatory skin diseases including some with the potential of malignant transformation. So far, the side-effects reported from the topical use of tacrolimus have been relatively minor (e.g. burning, pruritus, erythema. Recently, however, the FDA reviewed the safety of topical tacrolimus, which resulted in a warning that the use of calcineurin inhibitors may be associated with an increased risk of cancer. Case presentation Oral lichen planus (OLP was diagnosed in a 56-year-old women in February 1999. After several ineffective local and systemic therapeutic measures an off-label treatment of this recalcitrant condition using Tacrolimus 0.1% ointment was initiated in May 2002. After a few weeks of treatment most of the lesions ameliorated, with the exception of the plaques on the sides of the tongue. Nevertheless, the patient became free of symptoms which, however, reoccurred once tacrolimus was weaned, as a consequence treatment was maintained. In April 2005, the plaques on the left side of the tongue appeared increasingly compact and a biopsy specimen confirmed the suspected diagnosis of an oral squamous cell carcinoma. Conclusion The suspected causal relationship between topical use of tacrolimus and the development of a squamous cell carcinoma prompted us to test the notion that the carcinogenicity of tacrolimus may go beyond mere immune suppression. To this end, tacrolimus has been shown to have an impact on cancer signalling pathways such as the MAPK and the p53 pathway. In the given case, we were able to demonstrate that these

  19. Nerve abscess in Hansen's disease as part of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Neema M; Nayak, Kashinath; Kumar, Pramod

    2017-02-01

    Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome is an inflammatory reaction in HIV-infected patients after initiation of antiretroviral therapy resulting from restored immunity to specific infectious or non-infectious antigens. A 36-year-old male patient on highly active antiretroviral therapy of six months duration, presented with reddish, tender lesions over medial aspect of arm and a single, anaesthetic patch. Tender fluctuant swellings were seen on the medial aspect of left forearm. A few of them had ruptured spontaneously discharging pus. A skin biopsy from the anaesthetic patch showed caseating epitheloid granulomas. A diagnosis of Hansen's disease borderline tuberculoid in type 1 reversal reaction, with formation of nerve abscess due to Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome was made. The patient was started on multibacillary multidrug therapy as per WHO guidelines and highly active antiretroviral therapy was continued.

  20. Self-reported parenting style is associated with children's inflammation and immune activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Michelle L; Badcock, Paul B; Simmons, Julian G; Whittle, Sarah; Pettitt, Adam; Olsson, Craig A; Mundy, Lisa K; Patton, George C; Allen, Nicholas B

    2017-04-01

    Family environments and parenting have been associated with inflammation and immune activation in children and adolescents; however, it remains unclear which specific aspects of parenting drive this association. In this study, we cross-sectionally examined the association between 5 discrete parenting styles and inflammation and immune activation in late childhood. Data were drawn from 102 families (55 with female children, mean age 9.50 years, SD = 0.34) participating in the Imaging Brain Development in the Childhood to Adolescence Transition Study. Children provided saliva samples from which inflammation (C-reactive protein) and immune competence/activation (secretory immunoglobulin A) were measured. Parents completed the Alabama Parenting Questionnaire, which measures 5 aspects of parenting style-positive parental involvement, positive disciplinary techniques, consistency in disciplinary techniques, corporal punishment, and monitoring and supervision. Results showed that higher scores on the poor parental monitoring scale were associated with higher levels of both inflammation and immune activation in children. This study highlights parental monitoring and supervision as a specific aspect of parenting behavior that may be important for children's physical and mental health. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. International consensus report on the investigation and management of primary immune thrombocytopenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Provan, Drew; Stasi, Roberto; Newland, Adrian C.; Blanchette, Victor S.; Bolton-Maggs, Paula; Bussel, James B.; Chong, Beng H.; Cines, Douglas B.; Gernsheimer, Terry B.; Godeau, Bertrand; Grainger, John; Greer, Ian; Hunt, Beverley J.; Imbach, Paul A.; Lyons, Gordon; McMillan, Robert; Rodeghiero, Francesco; Sanz, Miguel A.; Tarantino, Michael; Watson, Shirley; Young, Joan; Kuter, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Previously published guidelines for the diagnosis and management of primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) require updating largely due to the introduction of new classes of therapeutic agents, and a greater understanding of the disease pathophysiology. However, treatment-related decisions still rema

  2. Intestinal cell damage and systemic immune activation in individuals reporting sensitivity to wheat in the absence of coeliac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhde, Melanie; Ajamian, Mary; Caio, Giacomo; De Giorgio, Roberto; Indart, Alyssa; Green, Peter H; Verna, Elizabeth C; Volta, Umberto; Alaedini, Armin

    2016-12-01

    Wheat gluten and related proteins can trigger an autoimmune enteropathy, known as coeliac disease, in people with genetic susceptibility. However, some individuals experience a range of symptoms in response to wheat ingestion, without the characteristic serological or histological evidence of coeliac disease. The aetiology and mechanism of these symptoms are unknown, and no biomarkers have been identified. We aimed to determine if sensitivity to wheat in the absence of coeliac disease is associated with systemic immune activation that may be linked to an enteropathy. Study participants included individuals who reported symptoms in response to wheat intake and in whom coeliac disease and wheat allergy were ruled out, patients with coeliac disease and healthy controls. Sera were analysed for markers of intestinal cell damage and systemic immune response to microbial components. Individuals with wheat sensitivity had significantly increased serum levels of soluble CD14 and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding protein, as well as antibody reactivity to bacterial LPS and flagellin. Circulating levels of fatty acid-binding protein 2 (FABP2), a marker of intestinal epithelial cell damage, were significantly elevated in the affected individuals and correlated with the immune responses to microbial products. There was a significant change towards normalisation of the levels of FABP2 and immune activation markers in a subgroup of individuals with wheat sensitivity who observed a diet excluding wheat and related cereals. These findings reveal a state of systemic immune activation in conjunction with a compromised intestinal epithelium affecting a subset of individuals who experience sensitivity to wheat in the absence of coeliac disease. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  3. Intestinal cell damage and systemic immune activation in individuals reporting sensitivity to wheat in the absence of coeliac disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhde, Melanie; Ajamian, Mary; Caio, Giacomo; De Giorgio, Roberto; Indart, Alyssa; Green, Peter H; Verna, Elizabeth C; Volta, Umberto; Alaedini, Armin

    2016-01-01

    Objective Wheat gluten and related proteins can trigger an autoimmune enteropathy, known as coeliac disease, in people with genetic susceptibility. However, some individuals experience a range of symptoms in response to wheat ingestion, without the characteristic serological or histological evidence of coeliac disease. The aetiology and mechanism of these symptoms are unknown, and no biomarkers have been identified. We aimed to determine if sensitivity to wheat in the absence of coeliac disease is associated with systemic immune activation that may be linked to an enteropathy. Design Study participants included individuals who reported symptoms in response to wheat intake and in whom coeliac disease and wheat allergy were ruled out, patients with coeliac disease and healthy controls. Sera were analysed for markers of intestinal cell damage and systemic immune response to microbial components. Results Individuals with wheat sensitivity had significantly increased serum levels of soluble CD14 and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding protein, as well as antibody reactivity to bacterial LPS and flagellin. Circulating levels of fatty acid-binding protein 2 (FABP2), a marker of intestinal epithelial cell damage, were significantly elevated in the affected individuals and correlated with the immune responses to microbial products. There was a significant change towards normalisation of the levels of FABP2 and immune activation markers in a subgroup of individuals with wheat sensitivity who observed a diet excluding wheat and related cereals. Conclusions These findings reveal a state of systemic immune activation in conjunction with a compromised intestinal epithelium affecting a subset of individuals who experience sensitivity to wheat in the absence of coeliac disease. PMID:27459152

  4. Acute brucellosis as unusual cause of immune thrombocytopenia:a case report and review of the literature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tajeldin; Mohammedien; Abdallah; Omer; Mohammed; Abd; elbagi; Abuelgasim; OsmanKaroum; Abdel; Aziem; Abdallah; Ali

    2014-01-01

    A 25 year-old male patient was admitted to the causality with complaints of fever,joints pain,epislaxis and gingival bleeding,for the last week,the complete blood count revealed pancytopenia.Serological test for brucella was reported positive as 1/320,but the patient failed to respond lo brucella treatment for 4 d.On day 5th the diagnosis of immune thrombocytopenia was confirmed after bone marrow aspiration.Steroid was initiated on 6th day after admission and on the 3rd day of steroid therapy thrombocytes count was raised to 55×10~9/L and came up to 180×10~9/L on 12 th day after admission.Brucella-induced immune thrombocytopenia should be considered in patient presenting with bleeding and febrile illness especially in endemic region.

  5. Acute brucellosis as unusual cause of immune thrombocytopenia:a case report and review of the literature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tajeldin Mohammedien Abdallah; Omer Mohammed Abd elbagi; Abuelgasim OsmanKaroum; Abdel Aziem Abdallah Ali

    2014-01-01

    A 25 year-old male patient was admitted to the causality with complaints of fever, joints pain, epistaxis and gingival bleeding, for the last week, the complete blood count revealed pancytopenia. Serological test for brucella was reported positive as 1/320, but the patient failed to respond to brucella treatment for 4 d. On day 5th the diagnosis of immune thrombocytopenia was confirmed after bone marrow aspiration. Steroid was initiated on 6th day after admission and on the 3rd day of steroid therapy thrombocytes count was raised to 55í109/L and came up to 180í109/L on 12th day after admission. Brucella-induced immune thrombocytopenia should be considered in patient presenting with bleeding and febrile illness especially in endemic region.

  6. New Study Says CAI May Favor Introverts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopmeier, George

    1981-01-01

    A personality research study using the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator indicates that computer-assisted instruction programs favor introverts, i.e., those learners who can concentrate on details, memorize facts, and stay with a task until it is completed. (JJD)

  7. Generation Favorable Institutional Configuration Regional Business Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Zinovievna Solodilova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the theoretical issues of creating an enabling business environment, which is the base platform for the successful development of entrepreneurship in the regions. Provides A definition of a favorable institutional configuration of the regional business environment, which refers to forms of implementing the basic institutions and other regional institutions, taking into account existing regional system of formal and informal interaction between economic actors. States that despite the measures taken, the landscape of the Russian business community in terms of regions, remains uneven, with different indices of investment and business attractiveness, there is differentiation in business conditions in the regions with similar natural and geographical conditions and resource potential, which is primarily determined by , differences in the institutional configuration of the regional business environment and quality of interaction among the business community of the region. Hypothesis about the impossibility of creating a favorable business environment, institutional configurations at the same time in all regions of the country, as well as its limited duration. Conducted theoretical and probabilistic analysis of the parameters of creating an enabling institutional configuration of the business environment in the Russian regions. Grounded approach whereby institutional configuration of regional business environment, may be subject to management and control actions through targeted by the regional authorities can accept the specified (favorable to the business community parameters. The necessity of planning and effective management of a favorable institutional configuration of the business environment by regional authorities to increase the period of its existence.

  8. To Form a Favorable Idea of Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkinen, Henry W.

    2010-01-01

    "To confess the truth, Mrs. B., I am not disposed to form a very favorable idea of chemistry, nor do I expect to derive much entertainment from it." That 200-year-old statement by Caroline to Mrs. Bryan, her teacher, appeared on the first page of Jane Marcet's pioneering secondary school textbook, "Conversations on Chemistry". It was published 17…

  9. To Form a Favorable Idea of Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkinen, Henry W.

    2010-01-01

    "To confess the truth, Mrs. B., I am not disposed to form a very favorable idea of chemistry, nor do I expect to derive much entertainment from it." That 200-year-old statement by Caroline to Mrs. Bryan, her teacher, appeared on the first page of Jane Marcet's pioneering secondary school textbook, "Conversations on Chemistry". It was published 17…

  10. TCM Treatment of Male Immune Infertility--A Report of 100 Cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To observe the therapeutic effect of Yikang Tang (益抗汤 Yikang Decoction) for male immune infertility. Methods: 100 cases of male immune infertility in the treatment group were treated with Yikang Decoction, while 100 cases treated with prednisone as the controls. Physical exam, routine semen and prostate exams, and exams for presence of anti-sperm antibody (AsAb) and mycoplasma in the serum or seminal plasma were carried out. Results: 1) The serum and seminal plasma AsAb levels decreased significantly (P<0.01) in both the groups after treatment, with a more remarkable effect in the treatment group. 2) The sperm density and percentage of motile spermatozoa increased significantly in the two groups,but more significantly in the treatment group after treatment. The pregnancy rate of their wives was higher in the treatment group than that in the control group (P<0.01). 3) The sperm agglutination rate in the two groups decreased, but more significantly in the treatment group after treatment. 4) The improvement rate of the symptoms and the stability of the therapeutic effect were more dramatic in the treatment group than that in the control group (P<0.01)after termination of drug administration. Conclusion: The Yikang Decoction has a more stable effect for male immune infertility than prednisone.

  11. 76 FR 12117 - Call for Comments on the Draft Report of the Adult Immunization Working Group to the National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-04

    ... to vaccine-preventable disease reduction by improving adult immunization coverage levels.'' The Adult... reduction by improving adult immunization coverage levels.'' The NVAC includes representatives from...

  12. Familial risk factors favoring drug addiction onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimić, Jadranka Ivandić; Jukić, Vlado

    2012-01-01

    This study, primarily aimed at identification of familial risk factors favoring drug addiction onset, was carried out throughout 2008 and 2009. The study comprised a total of 146 addicts and 134 control subjects. Based on the study outcome, it can be concluded that in the families the addicts were born into, familial risk factors capable of influencing their psychosocial development and favoring drug addiction onset had been statistically more frequently encountered during childhood and adolescence as compared to the controls. The results also indicated the need for further research into familial interrelations and the structure of the families addicts were born into, as well as the need for the implementation of family-based approaches to both drug addiction prevention and therapy.

  13. Antibodies and immune profiles of individuals occupationally exposed to formaldehyde: six case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrasher, J D; Broughton, A; Micevich, P

    1988-01-01

    Six patients with multiple subjective health complaints, which have been correlated with chronic exposure to formaldehyde during the course of their education and occupations, were tested for the existence of antibodies (IgE, IgM, and IgG) to formaldehyde (F) conjugated to human serum albumin (F-HSA). In addition, the percentage and absolute numbers of peripheral lymphocyte subpopulations as determined by surface markers were investigated. Antibody titers to F-HSA were present as follows: IgE (2 patients), IgM (3 of 4 tested patients), and IgG (5 patients). Analysis of lymphocyte subpopulations showed T-helper/suppressor (H/S) ratios ranging from 0.8 to 3.3. All 6 patients had elevated Tal cells (antigen memory cells), whereas interleuken 2 receptor positive cells were within expected values. Following formaldehyde exposure, 5 of the patients complained of an initial flulike illness from which they have not completely recovered. The sixth individual had a history of recurrent respiratory infections and surgical removal of hyperplastic ethmoid sinus tissue. The common occurrence of anti-F-HSA antibodies, flulike illness, and Tal cells are interpreted as suggestive of a chronic antigenic stimulation of the immune system in these 6 patients. Further immunological work-up of additional subjects and immune parameters with similar history of formaldehyde exposure and subjective health complaints is warranted.

  14. Report of the ad-hoc consultation on aging and immunization for a future WHO research agenda on life-course immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas-Crusells, Judith; McElhaney, Janet E; Aguado, M Teresa

    2012-09-14

    WHO convened a meeting of around 30 experts to address the topic of aging and immunization in March 2011 in Geneva. The purpose of the meeting was to develop a global research agenda to eventually inform WHO policy recommendations regarding immunization beyond childhood and into old age. This issue is becoming more critical, since the population aged 60 and above will reach two billion people - three-quarters of whom will be in developing countries - in the next 40 years. The meeting reviewed current knowledge and gaps in information about: (1) the epidemiology of infectious diseases in the elderly in developed and developing countries and their contribution to disability in old age; (2) the deterioration of the immune system with age ("immune senescence") and possible ways to measure and counteract it; and (3) immunization approaches to maintain or improve health in older persons. These approaches include the concept of a "life-course vaccination" schedule to help sustain immunity to vaccine-preventable diseases beyond childhood and into old age; strategies to strengthen older persons' responses to vaccines (e.g., by adding adjuvants to vaccines, increasing vaccine dosage, and intradermal vaccine administration); and the possible development of new vaccines targeted specifically for older adults. Participants proposed priority research topics as well as strategies to facilitate and coordinate the research, including the establishment of networks of collaborators, with WHO playing a key coordinating role.

  15. When and why are reliable organizations favored?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ethiraj, Sendil; Yi, Sangyoon

    in this assertion. Principally, we show that whether reliable organizations are favored depends on the nature of the environment. When environments are complex, reliability is selected out. In more complex environments, variability is more valued by selection forces. Further, we also examine the consequences......In the 1980s, organization theory witnessed a decade long debate about the incentives and consequences of organizational change. Though the fountainhead of this debate was the observation that reliable organizations are the “consequence” rather than the “cause” of selection forces, much...

  16. Childhood hepatitis A virus infection associated with immune thrombocytopenic purpura: Report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswajit Biswas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis A virus (HAV infection is a benign, self-limited gastrointestinal infection of the children belonging to the developing countries. Extra-intestinal, especially autoimmune hematological manifestations rarely develop during the course of infection in children. We describe two children, aged 8 months and 5 years who developed immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP during the course of otherwise uncomplicated HAV infection. In both children, bleeding secondary to thrombocytopenia was the initial presentation. An 8-month-old infant was anicteric at presentation and HAV infection was discovered during the course of investigations. Both were treated with platelet concentrates and intravenous immunoglobulin therapy successfully. HAV should be included in the differentials in any child (including infants who presents with ITP, even in the absence of well-recognized features of the disease.

  17. Favorable outcome of Epstein-Barr virus-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder complicated by immunoglobulin G4-related disease treated with rituximab-based therapy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Koki; Ikeda, Kazuhiko; Ogawa, Kazuei; Sukegawa, Masumi; Sano, Takahiro; Kimura, Satoshi; Suzuki, Osamu; Hashimoto, Yuko; Takeishi, Yasuchika

    2016-08-24

    After acute infection of Epstein-Barr virus, Epstein-Barr virus-infected B cells survive but usually do not show clonal proliferation. However, Epstein-Barr virus-infected B cells occasionally acquire a proliferative capacity that provokes clonal lymphoproliferative disorders. We herein present a case with Epstein-Barr virus-infected CD30+ B cell and immunoglobulin G4+ plasmacytoid cell proliferation in the lymph nodes, suggesting a pathological and clinical interaction between Epstein-Barr virus-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders and immunoglobulin G4-related disease. Immunoglobulin G4-related disease has been recognized as a benign disease with proliferation of IgG4-related disease+ plasmacytoid cells. Several studies have recently reported the coexistence of immunoglobulin G4-related disease+ plasmacytoid cells with Epstein-Barr virus-infected B cells in lymph nodes in some immunoglobulin G4-related disease cases. However, the pathogenic role of the clonal proliferation of Epstein-Barr virus-infected B cells in immunoglobulin G4-related disease, as well as the treatments for patients with both Epstein-Barr virus-infected B cells and immunoglobulin G4-related disease, have never been discussed. A 50-year-old Japanese man was referred to us for persistent fatigue and lymphadenopathy. His blood examination showed elevated IgG4, and detected high levels of Epstein-Barr virus DNA. A lymph node biopsy revealed IgG4+ plasmacytoid cells and infiltration of large lymphoid cells, which were positive for CD20, CD30, Epstein-Barr virus-related late membrane protein 1, and Epstein-Barr virus-encoded RNA, and were negative for IgG4. Based on the diagnosis of both Epstein-Barr virus-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder and IgG4-related disease, the patient received eight cycles of rituximab combined with cyclophosphamide and prednisolone, which resulted in the complete disappearance of lymphadenopathy. Moreover, his serum IgG4 level was significantly

  18. Behavioral Immunity in Insects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry Lefèvre

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Parasites can dramatically reduce the fitness of their hosts, and natural selection should favor defense mechanisms that can protect hosts against disease. Much work has focused on understanding genetic and physiological immunity against parasites, but hosts can also use behaviors to avoid infection, reduce parasite growth or alleviate disease symptoms. It is increasingly recognized that such behaviors are common in insects, providing strong protection against parasites and parasitoids. We review the current evidence for behavioral immunity in insects, present a framework for investigating such behavior, and emphasize that behavioral immunity may act through indirect rather than direct fitness benefits. We also discuss the implications for host-parasite co-evolution, local adaptation, and the evolution of non-behavioral physiological immune systems. Finally, we argue that the study of behavioral immunity in insects has much to offer for investigations in vertebrates, in which this topic has traditionally been studied.

  19. Bioactive, mechanically favorable, and biodegradable copolymer nanocomposites for orthopedic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victor, Sunita Prem; Muthu, Jayabalan

    2014-06-01

    We report the synthesis of mechanically favorable, bioactive, and biodegradable copolymer nanocomposites for potential bone applications. The nanocomposites consist of in situ polymerized biodegradable copolyester with hydroxyapatite (HA). Biodegradable copolyesters comprise carboxy terminated poly(propylene fumarate) (CT-PPF) and poly(trimethylol propane fumarate co mannitol sebacate) (TF-Co-MS). Raman spectral imaging clearly reveals a uniform homogenous distribution of HA in the copolymer matrix. The mechanical studies reveal that improved mechanical properties formed when crosslinked with methyl methacrylate (MMA) when compared to N-vinyl pyrrolidone (NVP). The SEM micrographs of the copolymer nanocomposites reveal a serrated structure reflecting higher mechanical strength, good dispersion, and good interfacial bonding of HA in the polymer matrix. In vitro degradation of the copolymer crosslinked with MMA is relatively more than that of NVP and the degradation decreases with an increase in the amount of the HA filler. The mechanically favorable and degradable MMA based nanocomposites also have favorable bioactivity, blood compatibility, cytocompatibility and cell adhesion. The present nanocomposite is a more promising material for orthopedic applications.

  20. Absidia Corymbifera in an immune competent accident victim with multiple abdominal injuries: case report

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Belfiori, Rita; Terenzi, Adelmo; Marchesini, Laura; Repetto, Antonella

    2007-01-01

    We report a case of mucormycosis in a healthy 17-year-old accident victim with multiple abdominal injuries which was caused by infection with Absidia Corymbifera, a ubiquitous saphrophyte in the ground...

  1. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in HIV and sporotrichosis coinfection: report of two cases and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Rosandiski Lyra

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We report 2 cases of patients with immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS associated with cutaneous disseminated sporotrichosis and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV coinfection. The patients received specific treatment for sporotrichosis. However, after 4 and 5 weeks from the beginning of antiretroviral therapy, both patients experienced clinical exacerbation of skin lesions despite increased T CD4+ cells (T cells cluster of differentiation 4 positive count and decreased viral load. Despite this exacerbation, subsequent mycological examination after systemic corticosteroid administration did not reveal fungal growth. Accordingly, they were diagnosed with IRIS. However, the sudden withdrawal of the corticosteroids resulted in the recurrence of IRIS symptoms. No serious adverse effects could be attributed to prednisone. We recommend corticosteroid treatment for mild-to-moderate cases of IRIS in sporotrichosis and HIV coinfection with close follow-up.

  2. Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-negative Pauci-immune Crescentic Glomerulonephritis and Mantle-cell Lymphoma: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Wang*

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mantle-cell lymphoma (MCL is an aggressive lymphoid neoplasm of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL. Crescentic glomerulonephritis associated with NHL has rarely been reported. In this report, we present a case of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA-negative pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis (GN, presenting with the coexistence of proteinuria, haematuria, progressive renal failure and MCL infiltration in the kidney, in the setting of newly-diagnosed MCL. Following the chemotherapy, there was a resolution of renal function. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of ANCA-negative pauci-immune crescentic GN and MCL. The pathophysiologic relationship between ANCA-negative pauci-immune crescentic GN and MCL should be investigated further.

  3. Rare association of celiac disease with myasthenia gravis in a patient with other immune disorders: a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela de Almeida-Menezes

    Full Text Available Background: Celiac disease is described in association with several autoimmune diseases, but rarely with myasthenia gravis. Case Report: We describe the case of a 31-year-old white woman with celiac disease who presented manifestations related to a hyperactive immune system, including macroamylasemia, false-positive anti-HCV, positive antinuclear antibody, and Raynaud's phenomenon. The Introduction of a gluten-free diet (GFD resolved these features, but myasthenia gravis (MG symptoms unexpectedly occurred on that occasion. Discussion: The role of a GFD in the course of autoimmune diseases has been studied and improvement has been reported in many diseases. However, there is no consensus in the literature regarding the course of neurological disorders associated with celiac disease. In the present case, a GFD did not prevent the appearance of symptoms related to myasthenia gravis. There are few reports on the association of celiac disease with myasthenia gravis and therefore little is known about the course and time of onset of myasthenia in celiac patients. The present case increases the knowledge about this unusual autoimmune neurological disease associated with celiac disease.

  4. A rare radiological manifestation of disseminated tuberculous spondylitisin acquired immune deficiency syndrome patient: A case report

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    Kim, Sung Won; Koo, Joon Bum; Kim, Tae Eun [Dept. of of Radiology, Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital, Dongguk University School of Medicine, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    The spine is the most common site of skeletal involvement in tuberculosis. The radiologic features are reportedly characterized by destruction of the vertebral body, subligamentous extension or subchondral penetration, frequent paravertebral abscess formation and late involvement of the disk space. We experienced a case of a 25-year-old male who was a human immunodeficiency virus carrier without antiretroviral therapy. Incidental findings on abdominal computed tomography included multiple well-demarcated and ovoid osteolytic lesions with hyperdense rims disseminated in the thoracic, lumbar, and sacrum vertebrae, as well as in both ilii. On the lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging, multiple small round lesions of isointense signal intensity with peripheral hyperintense rims were found on both T1- and T2-weighted imaging. The lesions had peripheral rim enhancement on gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted imaging. Based on our experience, this rare image finding is one of the manifestations of disseminated tuberculosis.

  5. Streptococcus intermedius Causing Necrotizing Pneumonia in an Immune Competent Female: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faris Hannoodi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 52-year-old immunocompetent Caucasian female treated for necrotizing Streptococcus intermedius pneumonia and review available literature of similar cases. Our patient presented with respiratory failure and required hospitalization and treatment in the intensive care unit. Moreover, she required surgical drainage of right lung empyema as well as decortication and resection. The review of literature revealed three cases of S. intermedius pneumonia, one of which was a mortality. Comparison of the published cases showed a highly varied prehospital course and radiological presentations, with a symptomatic phase ranging from 10 days to five months. Radiological findings varied from an isolated pleural effusion to systemic disease with the presence of brain abscesses. Immunocompetence appears to correlate well with the overall prognosis. In addition, smoking appears to be an important risk factor for S. intermedius pneumonia. In 2 (50% of cases, pleural fluid analysis identified S. intermedius. In contrast, no organism was found in our patient, necessitating the acquisition of lung tissue sample for the diagnosis. In conclusion, both medical and surgical management are necessary for effective treatment of S. intermedius pneumonia. The outcome of treatment is good in immunocompetent individuals.

  6. Reported rabies pre-exposure immunization of students at US Colleges of Veterinary Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenmayer, Joann M; Wright, James C; Nusbaum, Kenneth E; Saville, William J A; Evanson, Timothy C; Pappaioanou, Marguerite

    2013-01-01

    In 2008, the US experienced a disruption in human rabies vaccine supplies, leading public health authorities to prioritize vaccine release for post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) and limit vaccine supplies for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PreEP) in high-risk groups. In 2008, the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges (AAVMC) surveyed its member institutions on rabies vaccination policies and practices. Senior administrators at Colleges of Veterinary Medicine (CVMs) and departments of veterinary science and comparative medicine were asked to identify the person most knowledgeable about their institution's student rabies vaccination program. Respondents were asked to describe their policies and procedures for administering PreEP to veterinary medical students and staff and to estimate the annual demand for student and staff PreEP vaccine. Twenty-one CVMs responded. Twenty (95%) reported requiring PreEP of veterinary medical students and 16 (80%) of those 20 required vaccination upon matriculation. An estimated 7,309 doses of vaccine were required for PreEP of an estimated 2,436 first-year US veterinary medical students. Seventy-two percent of respondents administered PreEP in August, September, and October, coinciding with the highest public demand for PEP. CVMs should consider altering the timing of rabies vaccine administration to veterinary medical students and staff to other months, thereby helping to ensure that PEP rabies vaccine will be available to people with validated rabies exposures and to ensure that supplies will be available for PreEP of students and staff. AAVMC may wish to identify and support a point of coordination to facilitate the purchase and distribution of human rabies vaccine among its US member CVMs.

  7. Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder coinciding with hematological immune disease: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patejdl, R; Wittstock, M; Zettl, U K; Jost, K; Grossmann, A; Prudlo, J

    2016-09-01

    Recently defined consensus criteria for the diagnosis of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD) allow establishing the diagnosis in patients without elevated AQP4-Ab and optic nerve involvement. According to the new extended definition, NMOSD is closely associated with extensive spinal cord inflammation occurring in the course of systemic autoimmune diseases as sarcoidosis or lupus erythematodes. NMOSD occurring in the course of hematological disease have not yet been reported in the literature. A 38 year old male subsequently developed thrombocytopenia, hemolytic anemia and agranulocytosis over a 23 month period. Three months after an episode of agranulocytosis, he noticed ascending sensory disturbances and progressive weakness of his legs. Within two days, symptoms worsened to give almost complete paraplegia and loss of sensation below a midthoracic level. MRI revealed signal hyperintensity and edema in T2-weighted sequences reaching from the 2nd cervical to the 9th thoracic vertebral body. Two years later, he developed a second episode with lesions in the spinal cord and periventricular areas of brain stem and thalamus. The relapsing time course and the topographical pattern of central nervous system lesions restricted to axial brain structures and the spinal cord fulfill the criteria that have recently been defined for AQP4-Ab-negative NMO-spectrum disease. Systematic studies on the association of hematological autoimmune phenomena and spinal cord disease are needed to clarify whether this coincidence is just a casual phenomenon or whether it points to a yet undiscovered but perhaps therapeutically interesting link of immunological mechanisms affecting both organ systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Absidia Corymbifera in an immune competent accident victim with multiple abdominal injuries: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marchesini Laura

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We report a case of mucormycosis in a healthy 17-year-old accident victim with multiple abdominal injuries which was caused by infection with Absidia Corymbifera, a ubiquitous saphrophyte in the ground. Case presentation The patient was admitted to hospital with massive abdominal trauma. During an 8-hour emergency operation he received transfusions of compacted red blood cells, plasma, platelets and hemagel. He developed a crush syndrome with acute renal failure, resolved with extra-corporeal dialysis and had to undergo splenectomy because of spleen hematoma. As wound secretion and central venous catheter (CVC blood cultures and drainage fluid were positive for Enterococcus Faecium, Providentia Rettgeri, Hafnia Alvei and Candida Albicans, tecoplanin, metronidazole, imipenem, and flucanozole were administered. Although the CVC was changed high fever persisted and discharge continued from the large abdominal wound. Repeated tampons in different sections and wound secretion smears were positive for A. corymbifera. Flucanozole was stopped and liposomal amphotericin (Ambisome; 5 mg/Kg i.v. given for over 3 months. The patient improved; fever gradually disappeared. After 8 days, tampons and wound secretion smears were negative for A. corymbifera. No other fungal infections developed. Drainage fluid was later positive for tecoplanin-resistant E. faecium and Pseudomonas Aeroginosa responding only to meropenem and ciprofloxacin. Abdominal computerized tomography visualized fluid accumulation around the iliac-femoral bypass. Abcess was ruled out when scintigraphy showed no tracer uptake. The lesion was drained. Drainage fluid cultures were negative for bacteria and fungi. Fluid accumulation gradually disappeared with prolonged antibiotic and antifungal therapy. One year after the accident the patient is in good health, with normal quality of life. Conclusion Successful outcome was due to early, specific antifungal therapy, at

  9. Treatment of patients with refractory immune thrombocytopenia: literature review and case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Ptushkin

    2014-07-01

    with severe bleeding. Patient received 1 mg/kg of romiplostim and a week later platelet count was 250  10 9/l. Successfully tumor resection was done. No romiplostim side effects or thrombotic complications during postoperative period were found. The obtained data together with similar case reports of successful surgery after TPO-agonists administration allow considering romiplostim as an effective method of thrombocytopenia therapy before surgery in ITP patients.

  10. Absidia Corymbifera in an immune competent accident victim with multiple abdominal injuries: case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfiori, Rita; Terenzi, Adelmo; Marchesini, Laura; Repetto, Antonella

    2007-01-01

    Background We report a case of mucormycosis in a healthy 17-year-old accident victim with multiple abdominal injuries which was caused by infection with Absidia Corymbifera, a ubiquitous saphrophyte in the ground. Case presentation The patient was admitted to hospital with massive abdominal trauma. During an 8-hour emergency operation he received transfusions of compacted red blood cells, plasma, platelets and hemagel. He developed a crush syndrome with acute renal failure, resolved with extra-corporeal dialysis and had to undergo splenectomy because of spleen hematoma. As wound secretion and central venous catheter (CVC) blood cultures and drainage fluid were positive for Enterococcus Faecium, Providentia Rettgeri, Hafnia Alvei and Candida Albicans, tecoplanin, metronidazole, imipenem, and flucanozole were administered. Although the CVC was changed high fever persisted and discharge continued from the large abdominal wound. Repeated tampons in different sections and wound secretion smears were positive for A. corymbifera. Flucanozole was stopped and liposomal amphotericin (Ambisome; 5 mg/Kg i.v.) given for over 3 months. The patient improved; fever gradually disappeared. After 8 days, tampons and wound secretion smears were negative for A. corymbifera. No other fungal infections developed. Drainage fluid was later positive for tecoplanin-resistant E. faecium and Pseudomonas Aeroginosa responding only to meropenem and ciprofloxacin. Abdominal computerized tomography visualized fluid accumulation around the iliac-femoral bypass. Abcess was ruled out when scintigraphy showed no tracer uptake. The lesion was drained. Drainage fluid cultures were negative for bacteria and fungi. Fluid accumulation gradually disappeared with prolonged antibiotic and antifungal therapy. One year after the accident the patient is in good health, with normal quality of life. Conclusion Successful outcome was due to early, specific antifungal therapy, at sufficiently high dosage which was

  11. Most Americans Favor Larger Health Warnings on Cigarette Packs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164398.html Most Americans Favor Larger Health Warnings on Cigarette Packs ... According to the study's first author, Sarah Kowitt, "Most adults, including smokers, have favorable attitudes towards larger ...

  12. Favorable prognosis of female patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xing Lu; Fei-Li Wang; Xiang Guo; Lin Wang; Hai-Bo Zhang; Wei-Xiong Xia; Si-Wei Li

    2013-01-01

    The female sex is traditionally considered a favorable prognostic factor for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC).However,no particular study has reported this phenomenon.To explore the prognostic impact of gender on patients with NPC after definitive radiotherapy,we reviewed the clinical data of 2,063 consecutive patients treated between 1st January 2000 and 31st December 2003 in the Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center.The median follow-up for the whole series was 81 months.The female and male patients with early stage disease comprised 49.4% and 28.1% of the patient population,respectively.Both the 5-year overall survival (OS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) rates of female patients were significantly higher than those of male patients (OS:79% vs.69%,P < 0.001; DSS:81% vs.70%,P < 0.001).For patients with Iocoregionally advanced NPC,the 5-year OS and DSS rates of female vs.male patients were 74% vs.63% (P < 0.001) and 76% vs.64%,respectively (P < 0.001).A multivariate analysis showed that gender,age,and TNM stage were independent prognostic factors for the 5-year OS and DSS of NPC patients.The favorable prognosis of female patients is not only attributed to the early diagnosis and treatment but might also be attributed to some intrinsic factors of female patients.

  13. 12 CFR 560.110 - Most favored lender usury preemption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Most favored lender usury preemption. 560.110... INVESTMENT Lending and Investment Provisions Applicable to all Savings Associations § 560.110 Most favored... permits its most favored lender to charge late fees, then a savings association located in that state...

  14. Delayed immune mediated adverse effects to hyaluronic acid fillers: report of five cases and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ora Bitterman-Deutsch

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hyaluronic acid (HA fillers in cosmetic medicine have been considered relatively safe, though fillers used in European countries and throughout the world are not necessarily approved by the Food and Drug Administration. As their use continues to expand worldwide, physicians in a wide range of medical specialties are authorized to perform HA injections, including general medicine practitioners and even dentists. An increasing number of reports have appeared regarding side effects to these products. It is now known that reactions to Hyaluronic acid are related not only to technical faults of the injections, but also to immune responses, including delayed hypersensitivity and granulomatous reactions. Herein, we describe five cases treated by a variety of treatment modalities, all with delayed reactions to different brands of hyaluronic acid fillers. As there is currently no standardization of treatment options of adverse effects, these cases accentuate the debate regarding the approach to the individual patient and the possible need for pre-testing in patients with an atopic tendency.

  15. Fusarium ramigenum, a novel human opportunist in a patient with common variable immunodeficiency and cellular immune defects: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroti, Ruxandra V; Gheorghita, Valeriu; Al-Hatmi, Abdullah M S; de Hoog, G Sybren; Meis, Jacques F; Netea, Mihai G

    2016-02-15

    Fusarium species are ubiquitous environmental fungi that occasionally provoke serious invasive infections in immunocompromised hosts. Among Fusarium species, Fusarium ramigenum, belonging to the Fusarium fujikuroi species complex, has thus far never been found to cause human infections. Here we describe the first case of invasive fusariosis caused by Fusarium ramigenum in a human and also identify immunological deficiencies that most likely contributed to invasiveness. A 32-year-old Caucasian male with a seemingly insignificant medical history of mild respiratory illness during the preceding two years, developed invasive pulmonary fusariosis. Detailed immunological assessment revealed the presence of common variable immunodeficiency, complicated by a severe impairment of the capacity of T-cells to produce both gamma-interferon and interleukin-17. In-depth microbiological assessment identified the novel human opportunistic pathogen Fusarium ramigenum as cause of the infection. This report demonstrated that an opportunistic invasive fungal infection may indicate an underlying cellular immune impairment of the host. The unexpected invasive infection with Fusarium ramigenum in this case unmasked a complex combined humoral and cellular immunological deficiency.

  16. Leptin Regulation of Immune Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Caitlin; Petri, William A

    2016-02-01

    Leptin is a regulatory hormone with multiple roles in the immune system. We favor the concept that leptin signaling 'licenses' various immune cells to engage in immune responses and/or to differentiate. Leptin is an inflammatory molecule that is capable of activating both adaptive and innate immunity. It can also 'enhance' immune functions, including inflammatory cytokine production in macrophages, granulocyte chemotaxis, and increased Th17 proliferation. Leptin can also 'inhibit' cells; CD4(+) T cells are inhibited from differentiating into regulatory T cells in the presence of elevated leptin, while NK cells can exhibit impaired cytotoxicity under the same circumstances. Consequently, understanding the effect of leptin signaling is important to appreciate various aspects of immune dysregulation observed in malnutrition, obesity, and autoimmunity.

  17. Immune thrombocytopenia of childhood responsive to tonsillectomy in the setting of chronic tonsillitis: A case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Richard William; Gungor, Anil

    2016-11-23

    Immune thrombocytopenia of childhood (platelet count children. Patients typically present with bruising and bleeding in the setting of thrombocytopenia. Although it is usually short-lived, some cases persist and are unresponsive to treatment. This can lead to exposure to a variety of treatment regimens including immunosuppressants and splenectomy. The goal of this report is to present a case of chronic ITP of childhood that responded to tonsillectomy addressing the tonsils as a source of chronic infection and inflammation triggering ITP. A 4-year-old male with ITP of childhood presented with enlarged tonsils and obstructive sleep apnea. History and physical were consistent with chronic tonsillitis/adenoiditis including malaise, poor oral intake, congestion, rhinorrhea, tonsil hypertrophy, and lymphadenopathy persisting despite antibiotic therapy. Tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy were performed. One, six, and eighteen weeks post-operatively the platelet count was 371, 215, and 205 respectively. Although at 12months two relapses had occurred, during the observed period, he had decreased incidence and severity of disease. In around 60% of ITP there is a history of prior infection within the last month but no systemic symptoms at time of diagnosis. Additionally, chronic ITP is characterized by relapses coinciding with infection. This case is unique because the patient had chronic ITP and a clinical history and physical exam concerning for a subclinical, indolent inflammatory process that responded to surgical intervention. Given that chronic ITP exacerbation has been associated with recurrent acute infections it seems probable that chronic tonsillitis could serve as a trigger for relapse or contribute to a prolonged and/or more severe disease course. Therefore, tonsillectomy may result in earlier treatment and/or an altered disease course with avoidance of the expense and morbidity associated with frequent exacerbations and multiple treatment regimens. Copyright © 2016

  18. Severe leukoencephalopathy with fulminant cerebral edema reflecting immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome during HIV infection: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niederstadt Thomas

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome is a well-known complication in HIV-infected patients after initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy resulting in rapid CD4+ cell count recovery and suppression of viral load. Generally, immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome is based on opportunistic infections, but rare cases of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome inducing demyelinization of the nervous system have also been observed. Case presentation A 37-year-old African woman with HIV infection diagnosed at 13 years of age was admitted to the emergency department after experiencing backache, severe headache, acute aphasia and psychomotor slowing for one week. Nine weeks earlier, highly active antiretroviral therapy in this patient had been changed because of loss of efficacy, and a rapid increase in CD4+ cell count and decrease of HIV viral load were observed. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed extensive white matter lesions, and analysis of cerebrospinal fluid revealed an immunoreactive syndrome. Intensive investigations detected no opportunistic infections. A salvage therapy, including osmotherapy, corticosteroids and treatment of epileptic seizures, was performed, but the patient died from brainstem herniation 48 hours after admission. Neuropathologic examination of the brain revealed diffuse swelling, leptomeningeal infiltration by CD8 cells and enhancement of perivascular spaces by CD8+ cells. Conclusion Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in this form seems to represent a severe autoimmunologic disease of the brain with specific histopathologic findings. This form of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome did not respond to therapy, and extremely rapid deterioration led to death within two days. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome may also occur as severe leukoencephalopathy with fulminant cerebral edema during HIV infection with rapid immune reconstitution.

  19. Trends in differences between births and surviving infants reported for immunization program planning and external data sources in Eastern and Southern Africa 2000-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Reinhard; Chakauya, Jethro M; Shibeshi, Messeret E

    2016-02-24

    To inform our WHO team's support for immunization programs in Member States in Eastern and Southern Africa, we compared annual trends from 2000 to 2013 in target populations reported by Member States through the WHO-UNICEF joint reporting form with United Nations (UN) population projections and modeled infant mortality estimates from the UN Inter-agency Group for Child Mortality Estimation. Our findings indicated a tendency of underestimating births and surviving infants used by Member States as denominators for administrative immunization coverage rates, resulting in or contributing to overestimation of coverage. The difference with UN estimates appeared to be more pronounced for surviving infants than births. Measures of central tendency for individual country differences indicated that those differences decreased over time. Comparing trends of births and surviving infants with external sources can help monitoring progress in efforts to provide accurate and reliable target population estimates and sampling frames.

  20. Favorable Outcome in Open Globe Injuries with Low OTS Score

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cillino Giovanni; Ferraro Lucia; Casuccio Alessandra; Cillino Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    Purpose:.Open globe eye injuries can have profound social and economic consequences. Here, we describe two cases of war and outdoor activity open globe eye injury where, despite a low OTS score,.current microsurgical technology allowed for a favorable outcome.Case report 1: A 33-year-old Libyan soldier had been treated for an open-globe grenade blast trauma to his left eye, which showed light perception and OTS score 2..He had undergone a lensectomy and PPV with silicone oil tamponade. Surgical treatment included scleral buckling,.cornea trephination, tem-porary Eckardt keratoprosthesis, PPV revision, intraocular lens (IOL) implantation, and corneal grafting. Six months later, his VA was improved to 20 / 70.Case report 2:.A 35-year-old man presented with a corneal laceration in his left eye from a meat skewer,.with marked hypotony and LP..After primary corneal wound closure,.B-scan ultrasonography revealed massive vitreous hemorrhage (OTS score 2). The patient underwent open cataract extraction with IOL implantation, 23 gauge PPV, laser photocoagulation of the retinochoroidal laceration, and a gas tamponade. After three weeks,.the patient underwent a 2nd 23G PPV due to a fibrinous reaction. Six month later, the patients exhibited 20 /25 VA.Conclusion:.These cases confirm that even for patients with a low OTS and poor visual prognosis,.an up-to-date surgery protocol may achieve visual results adequate for leading an autonomous daily life. (Eye Science 2014; 29:170-173)

  1. Favorable response to aggressive chemotherapy in a patient with primary plasma cell leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lishner, M; Lang, R; Jutrin, I; Ravid, M

    1985-01-01

    Primary plasma cell leukemia was diagnosed in a previously healthy 58-year-old man. The unusual presentation with concomitant multiple osteolytic lesions and hepatosplenomegaly, the favorable response to aggressive chemotherapy with COAP, and the relatively long survival of 22 months prompted this report. This and several other cases recently reported should encourage an aggressive therapeutic approach to this disease.

  2. Immune response

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and tetanus antitoxin are examples of passive immunization. BLOOD COMPONENTS The immune system includes certain types of white ... lymphocytes develop, they normally learn to tell the difference between your own body tissues and substances that ...

  3. 78 FR 46589 - Solicitation of Written Comments on the Draft Report of the National Adult Immunization Standards...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    ... low immunization rates still exist among many adults. Many adults are aware of annual influenza... on the NVAC Web site at http://www.hhs.gov/nvpo/nvac/ . In addition to general comments, NVPO is... in adults. Examples of potential responders include, but are not limited to the following:...

  4. Coping Strategies of Patients with Haemophilia as a Risk Group for AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome). Brief Research Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naji, Simon; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Plans are described for a 2-year project whose major focus is the identification of ways in which patients with hemophilia and their families assimilate, interpret, and act on information about Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Findings will be related to perceived risk, anxiety levels, and the development of coping strategies.…

  5. Pulmonary histoplasmosis presenting as chronic productive cough, fever, and massive unilateral consolidation in a 15-year-old immune-competent boy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mshana Stephen E

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Severe histoplasmosis is known to be among the AIDS-defining opportunistic infections affecting patients with very low CD4 cell counts in histoplasmosis-endemic areas. Histoplasma capsulatum var. duboisii is common in West and Central Africa, where it occurs in both HIV/AIDS and non-HIV patients. Few cases of life-threatening histoplasmosis in immune-competent individuals have been reported worldwide. Case report We describe a case of pulmonary histoplasmosis diagnosed on the basis of autopsy and histological investigations. A 15-year old East African immune-competent boy with a history of smear-positive tuberculosis and a two-year history of rock cutting presented to our hospital with chronic productive cough, fever, and massive unilateral consolidation. At the time of presentation to our hospital, this patient was empirically treated for recurrent tuberculosis without success, and he died on the seventh day after admission. The autopsy revealed a huge granulomatous lesion with caseation, but no acid-fast bacilli were detected on several Ziehl-Neelsen stains. However, periodic acid-Schiff staining was positive, and the histological examination revealed features suggestive of Histoplasma yeast cells. Conclusion Severe pulmonary histoplasmosis should be considered in evaluating immune-competent patients with risk factors for the disease who present with pulmonary symptoms mimicking tuberculosis.

  6. Patients with Spinal Cord Injuries Favor Administration of Methylprednisolone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian A Bowers

    Full Text Available Methylprednisolone sodium succinate (MPSS for treatment of acute spinal cord injury (SCI has been associated with both benefits and adverse events. MPSS administration was the standard of care for acute SCI until recently when its use has become controversial. Patients with SCI have had little input in the debate, thus we sought to learn their opinions regarding administration of MPSS. A summary of the published literature to date on MPSS use for acute SCI was created and adjudicated by 28 SCI experts. This summary was then emailed to 384 chronic SCI patients along with a survey that interrogated the patients' neurological deficits, communication with physicians and their views on MPSS administration. 77 out of 384 patients completed the survey. 28 respondents indicated being able to speak early after injury and of these 24 reported arriving at the hospital within 8 hours of injury. One recalled a physician speaking to them about MPSS and one patient reported choosing whether or not to receive MPSS. 59.4% felt that the small neurological benefits associated with MPSS were 'very important' to them (p<0.0001. Patients had 'little concern' for potential side-effects of MPSS (p = 0.001. Only 1.4% felt that MPSS should not be given to SCI patients regardless of degree of injury (p<0.0001. This is the first study to report SCI patients' preferences regarding MPSS treatment for acute SCI. Patients favor the administration of MPSS for acute SCI, however few had input into whether or not it was administered. Conscious patients should be given greater opportunity to decide their treatment. These results also provide some guidance regarding MPSS administration in patients unable to communicate.

  7. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome involving the central nervous system in a patient with HIV infection: a case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaffiri, Lorenzo; Verma, Rajanshu; Struzzieri, Kevin; Monterroso, Joanne; Batts, Donald H; Loehrke, Mark E

    2013-01-01

    IRIS is described as a paradoxical deterioration of clinical status upon initiation of combined anti-retroviral therapy (cART) in patients with HIV infection. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (CNS-IRIS) involving the central nervous system is rarely reported. We describe the case of 57-year-old man who developed a fatal case of CNS- IRIS. A rapid deterioration of neurological status was associated with progression of patchy T2-weighted hyperintensities involving different vascular territories on brain MRI. Diagnosis of CNS-IRIS is based of laboratory and radiologic findings, however brain biopsy is supportive. Despite immune restoration being involved in clinical deterioration, discontinuation of cART is not recommended. The use of corticosteroids is highly controversial. Prompt recognition of CNS-IRIS is crucial for preventing neurological complications and ensuing sequelae.

  8. Favorable outcome in open globe injuries with low OTS score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cillino, Giovanni; Ferraro, Lucia; Casuccio, Alessandra; Cillino Salvatore

    2014-09-01

    Open globe eye injuries can have profound social and economic consequences. Here, we describe two cases of war and outdoor activity open globe eye injury where, despite a low OTS score, current microsurgical technology allowed for a favorable outcome. A 33-year-old Libyan soldier had been treated for an open-globe grenade blast trauma to his left eye, which showed light perception and OTS score 2. He had undergone a lensectomy and PPV with silicone oil tamponade. Surgical treatment included scleral buckling, cornea trephination, temporary Eckardt keratoprosthesis, PPV revision, intraocular lens (IOL) implantation, and corneal grafting. Six months later, his VA was improved to 20/70. CASE REPORT 2: A 35-year-old man presented with a corneal laceration in his left eye from a meat skewer, with marked hypotony and LP. After primary corneal wound closure, B-scan ultrasonography revealed massive vitreous hemorrhage (OTS score 2). The patient underwent open cataract extraction with IOL implantation, 23 gauge PPV, laser photocoagulation of the retinochoroidal laceration, and a gas tamponade. After three weeks, the patient underwent a 2nd 23G PPV due to a fibrinous reaction. Six month later, the patients exhibited 20/25 VA. These cases confirm that even for patients with a low OTS and poor visual prognosis, an up-to-date surgery protocol may achieve visual results adequate for leading an autonomous daily life.

  9. Musical FAVORS: Reintroducing music to adult cochlear implant users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant, Geoff

    2015-09-01

    Music represents a considerable challenge for many adult users of cochlear implants (CIs). Around half of adult CI users report that they do not find music enjoyable, and, in some cases, despite enhanced speech perception skills, this leads to considerable frustration and disappointment for the CI user. This paper presents suggestions to improve the musical experiences of deafened adults with CIs. Interviews with a number of adult CI users revealed that there were a number of factors which could lead to enhanced music experiences. The acronym FAVORS (familiar music, auditory-visual access, open-mindedness, and simple arrangements) summarizes the factors that have been identified, which can help CI users in their early music listening experiences. Each of these factors is discussed in detail, along with suggestions for how they can be used in therapy sessions. The use of a group approach (music focus groups) is also discussed and an overview of the approach and exercises used is presented. The importance of live music experiences is also discussed.

  10. Effects of the Combined Therapy of Acupuncture with Herbal Drugs on Male Immune Infertility-- A Clinical Report of 50 Cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu Bing; Lun Xin; Gong Yuzhuo; Wang Xinzhong

    2005-01-01

    To study the clinical effects of the combined therapy of acupuncture with herbal drugs on male immune infertility and on antisperm antibody (AsAb), 100 male cases of infertility with positive AsAb were divided randomly into two groups, each consisting of 50 cases. The acupuncture-drug group was treated with acupuncture on Ganshu (BL 18), Shenshu (BL 23), Taichong (LR 3), Taixi (KI 3), Xinshu (BL 15),Geshu (BL 17), Shenmen (HT 7), and Xuehai (SP 10), combined with oral medication of Liuwei treated with oral prednisone. The clinical therapeutic effects and the impact on AsAb were observed in the two groups. The results showed that the total effective rate in the acupuncture-drug group was 90%;while that of the control group was 64%, the comparison showing a statistically significant difference (P<0.05). The positive rate of blood serum and/or AsAb in both the two groups decreased in varying degrees, but the negative-turning rate of AsAb in the acupuncture-drug group was more obvious, the comparison showing also a significant difference (P<0.05). Conclusion: The combined therapy of acupuncture with herbal drugs has definite therapeutic effects on male immune infertility, which can regulate AsAb and raise the immunity of the patients.

  11. MOC: Reducing Favorable Balance, 2007's Highest Priority

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Shuang

    2007-01-01

    @@ When attending the National Working Conference on Commerce on January 15th, Mr. Bo Xilai, the Minister of Commerce, said that the highest priority for China's international trade in 2007 is to reduce the favorable balance.

  12. 18 CFR 706.303 - Gifts, entertainment, and favors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... solicit from a person having business with the Council anything of value as a gift, gratuity, loan, entertainment, or favor for himself or another person, particularly one with whom he has family, business,...

  13. Responsiveness of a patient in a persistent vegetative state after a coma to weekly injections of autologous activated immune cells: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fellerhoff Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction An 82-year-old Caucasian woman had remained in a persistent vegetative state after a coma of seven months duration, which occurred after a stroke with hemiplegia, nine years previously. The persistent vegetative state could be reversed in part by weekly injections with activated immune cells. After therapy, our patient responded to commands in addition to regaining spontaneous movements of both arms and the ability to swallow. This is the first report on the treatment with activated immune cells of a patient in a persistent vegetative state after a coma. Case presentation An 82-year-old Caucasian woman presented with a persistent vegetative state subsequent to a coma. She retained respiratory and autonomic functions. As contact was not possible, physiotherapy was passive. Her skin was yellowish, and our patient did not move by herself. Vomiting repeatedly resulted from tube feeding. After a once-weekly treatment with activated immune cells sampled from our patient's blood and activated in vitro, several of her functions gradually returned. Our patient opened her eyes in the requested direction and turned her head toward people entering the room. She 'supported' nursing efforts, as the nurse noted a loss of spastic motions. The strength in both her arms returned, and she spontaneously moved her arm on the side experiencing hemiplegia. After three months, our patient could stick out her tongue upon demand. Finally, the swallow reflexes of our patient started to return. However, tube feeding was continued, and our patient died after aspiration of vomit following a feeding. Conclusion The success of treatment with autologous activated immune cells in this patient may have resulted from the production of neuroactive substances, such as neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor, by activated immune cells. The deterioration of our patient could be reversed, as demonstrated by the restoration of motor strength in her

  14. Systematic review of reporting rates of adverse events following immunization: an international comparison of post-marketing surveillance programs with reference to China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Biao; Page, Andrew; Wang, Huaqing; Taylor, Richard; McIntyre, Peter

    2013-01-11

    China is the most populous country in the world, with an annual birth cohort of approximately 16 million, requiring an average of 500 million vaccine doses administered annually. In China, over 30 domestic and less than 10 overseas vaccine manufacturers supply over 60 licensed vaccine products, representing a growing vaccine market mainly due to recent additions to the national immunization schedule, but data on post-marketing surveillance for adverse events following immunization (AEFI) are sparse. To compare reporting rates for various categories of AEFI from China with other routine post-marketing surveillance programs internationally. Systematic review of published studies reporting rates of AEFI by vaccine, category of reaction and age from post-marketing surveillance systems in English and Chinese languages. Overall AEFI reporting rates (all vaccines, all ages) in Chinese studies were consistent with those from similar international studies elsewhere, but there was substantial heterogeneity in regional reporting rates in China (range 2.3-37.8/100,000 doses). The highest AEFI reporting rates were for diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis whole-cell (DTwP) and acellular (DTaP) vaccines (range 3.3-181.1/100,000 doses for DTwP; range 3.5-92.6/100,000 doses for DTaP), with higher median rates for DTwP than DTaP, and higher than expected rates for DTaP vaccine. Similar higher rates for DTwP and DTaP containing vaccines, and relatively lower rates for vaccines against hepatitis B virus, poliovirus, and Japanese encephalitis virus were found in China and elsewhere in the world. Overall AEFI reporting rates in China were consistent with similar post-marketing surveillance systems in other countries. Sources of regional heterogeneity in AEFI reporting rates, and their relationships to differing vaccine manufacturers versus differing surveillance practices, require further exploration. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Experimenting with Innate Immunity

    CERN Document Server

    Twycross, Jamie

    2010-01-01

    In a previous paper the authors argued the case for incorporating ideas from innate immunity into artificial immune systems (AISs) and presented an outline for a conceptual framework for such systems. A number of key general properties observed in the biological innate and adaptive immune systems were highlighted, and how such properties might be instantiated in artificial systems was discussed in detail. The next logical step is to take these ideas and build a software system with which AISs with these properties can be implemented and experimentally evaluated. This paper reports on the results of that step - the libtissue system.

  16. libtissue - implementing innate immunity

    CERN Document Server

    Twycross, Jamie

    2010-01-01

    In a previous paper the authors argued the case for incorporating ideas from innate immunity into articficial immune systems (AISs) and presented an outline for a conceptual framework for such systems. A number of key general properties observed in the biological innate and adaptive immune systems were hughlighted, and how such properties might be instantiated in artificial systems was discussed in detail. The next logical step is to take these ideas and build a software system with which AISs with these properties can be implemented and experimentally evaluated. This paper reports on the results of that step - the libtissue system.

  17. Messages from the inside. The dynamic environment that favors intestinal homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcello eChieppa

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available An organism is defined as an individual living thing capable of responding to stimuli, growing, reproducing, and maintaining homeostasis. Early during evolution multicellular organisms explored the advantages of a symbiotic life. Mammals harbor a complex aggregate of microorganisms (called microbiota that includes bacteria, fungi and archaea. Some of these bacteria have already defined beneficial roles for the human host that include the ability to break-down nutrients that could not otherwise be digested, preventing the growth of harmful species, as well as the ability to produce vitamins or hormones. It is intuitive that along the evolutionary path several mechanisms favored bacteria that provided advantages to the host which, in return, avoided launching an aggressive immunological response against them. The intestinal immunological response does not ignore the lumenal content, on the contrary, immune surveillance is favored by continuous antigen sampling. Some intestinal epithelial cells are crucial during the sampling process, others actively participate in the defense mechanism. In essence the epithelium acts as a traffic light, communicating to the inside world whether conditions are safe or dangerous, and thus influencing immunological response. In this review we will discuss the dynamic factors that act on the intestinal epithelial cells and how they directly or indirectly influence immune cells during states of health and disease.

  18. Progress in the establishment and strengthening of national immunization technical advisory groups: analysis from the 2013 WHO/UNICEF joint reporting form, data for 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duclos, Philippe; Dumolard, Laure; Abeysinghe, Nihal; Adjagba, Alex; Janusz, Cara Bess; Mihigo, Richard; Mosina, Liudmila; Takashima, Yashohiro; Oztürk, Murat Hakan

    2013-11-04

    The majority of industrialized and some developing countries have established National Immunization Technical Advisory Groups (NITAGs). To enable systematic global monitoring of the existence and functionality of NITAGs, in 2011, WHO and UNICEF included related questions in the WHO/UNICEF Joint Reporting Form (JRF) that provides an official means to globally collect indicators of immunization program performance. These questions relate to six basic process indicators. According to the analysis of the 2013 JRF, data for 2012, notable progress was achieved between 2010 and 2012 and by the end of 2012, 99 countries (52%) reported the existence of a NITAG with a formal legislative or administrative basis (with a high of 86% in the Eastern Mediterranean Region - EMR), among the countries that reported data in the NITAG section of the JRF. There were 63 (33%) countries with a NITAG that met six process indicators (47% increase over the 43 reported in 2010) including a total of 38 developing countries. 11% of low income countries reported a NITAG that meets all six process criteria, versus 29% of middle income countries and 57% of the high income ones. Countries with smaller populations reported the existence of a NITAG that meets all six process criteria less frequently than more populated countries (23% for less populated countries versus 43% for more populated ones). However, progress needs to be accelerated to reach the Global Vaccine Action Plan (GVAP) target of ensuring all countries have support from a NITAG. The GVAP represents a major opportunity to boost the institutionalization of NITAGs. A special approach needs to be explored to allow small countries to benefit from sub-regional or other countries advisory groups. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Recurrent DGCR8, DROSHA, and SIX Homeodomain Mutations in Favorable Histology Wilms Tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.L. Walz (Amy L.); A.H.A.G. Ooms (Ariadne ); S. Gadd (Samantha); D.S. Gerhard (Daniela S.); M.A. Smith (Malcolm A.); J.M. GuidryAuvil (Jamie M.); D. Meerzaman (Daoud); Q.-R. Chen (Qing-Rong); C. Hsu (ChihHao); C. Yan (Chunhua); C. Nguyen (Cu); Y. Hu (Ying); R. Bowlby (Reanne); D. Brooks (Denise); Y. Ma (Yussanne); A.A. Mungall (Andrew J.); R.A. Moore (Richard A.); J. Schein (Jacqueline); M.A. Marra (Marco A.); V. Huff (Vicki); J.S. Dome (Jeffrey); Y.-Y. Chi (Yueh-Yun); C.G. Mullighan (Charles); J. Ma (Jing); D.A. Wheeler (David A.); O.A. Hampton (Oliver A.); N. Jafari (Nadereh); N. Ross (Nicole); J.M. Gastier-Foster (Julie); E.J. Perlman (Elizabeth J.)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractWe report the most common single-nucleotide substitution/deletion mutations in favorable histology Wilms tumors (FHWTs) to occur within SIX1/. 2 (7% of 534 tumors) and microRNA processing genes (miRNAPGs) DGCR8 and DROSHA (15% of 534 tumors). Comprehensive analysis of 77 FHWTs indicates

  20. Photodynamic immune modulation (PIM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, John R.; Hunt, David W. C.; Simkin, Guillermo O.; Ratkay, Leslie G.; Chan, Agnes H.; Lui, Harvey; Levy, Julia G.

    1999-09-01

    Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) is accepted for treatment of superficial and lumen-occluding tumors in regions accessible to activating light and is now known to be effective in closure of choroidal neovasculature in Age Related Macular Degeneration. PDT utilizes light absorbing drugs (photosensitizers) that generate the localized formation of reactive oxygen species after light exposure. In a number of systems, PDT has immunomodulatory effects; Photodynamic Immune Modulation (PIM). Using low- intensity photodynamic regimens applied over a large body surface area, progression of mouse autoimmune disease could be inhibited. Further, this treatment strongly inhibited the immunologically- medicated contact hypersensitivity response to topically applied chemical haptens. Immune modulation appears to result from selective targeting of activated T lymphocytes and reduction in immunostimulation by antigen presenting cells. Psoriasis, an immune-mediated skin condition, exhibits heightened epidermal cell proliferation, epidermal layer thickening and plaque formation at different body sites. In a recent clinical trial, approximately one-third of patients with psoriasis and arthritis symptoms (psoriatic arthritis) displayed a significant clinical improvement in several psoriasis-related parameters after four weekly whole-body PIM treatments with verteporfin. The safety profile was favorable. The capacity of PIM to influence other human immune disorders including rheumatoid arthritis is under extensive evaluation.

  1. Favorability for uranium in tertiary sedimentary rocks, southwestern Montana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wopat, M A; Curry, W E; Robins, J W; Marjaniemi, D K

    1977-10-01

    Tertiary sedimentary rocks in the basins of southwestern Montana were studied to determine their favorability for potential uranium resources. Uranium in the Tertiary sedimentary rocks was probably derived from the Boulder batholith and from silicic volcanic material. The batholith contains numerous uranium occurrences and is the most favorable plutonic source for uranium in the study area. Subjective favorability categories of good, moderate, and poor, based on the number and type of favorable criteria present, were used to classify the rock sequences studied. Rocks judged to have good favorability for uranium deposits are (1) Eocene and Oligocene strata and undifferentiated Tertiary rocks in the western Three Forks basin and (2) Oligocene rocks in the Helena basin. Rocks having moderate favorability consist of (1) Eocene and Oligocene strata in the Jefferson River, Beaverhead River, and lower Ruby River basins, (2) Oligocene rocks in the Townsend and Clarkston basins, (3) Miocene and Pliocene rocks in the Upper Ruby River basin, and (4) all Tertiary sedimentary formations in the eastern Three Forks basin, and in the Grasshopper Creek, Horse Prairie, Medicine Lodge Creek, Big Sheep Creek, Deer Lodge, Big Hole River, and Bull Creek basins. The following have poor favorability: (1) the Beaverhead Conglomerate in the Red Rock and Centennial basins, (2) Eocene and Oligocene rocks in the Upper Ruby River basin, (3) Miocene and Pliocene rocks in the Townsend, Clarkston, Smith River, and Divide Creek basins, (4) Miocene through Pleistocene rocks in the Jefferson River, Beaverhead River, and Lower Ruby River basins, and (5) all Tertiary sedimentary rocks in the Boulder River, Sage Creek, Muddy Creek, Madison River, Flint Creek, Gold Creek, and Bitterroot basins.

  2. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome presenting as chylothorax in a patient with HIV and Mycobacterium tuberculosis coinfection: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yen-Hsu

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection are at risk for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB coinfection. The advent of antiretroviral therapy restores immunity in HIV-infected patients, but predisposes patients to immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS. Case Presentation A 25-year-old HIV-infected male presented with fever, productive cough, and body weight loss for 2 months. His CD4 cell count was 11 cells/μl and HIV-1 viral load was 315,939 copies/ml. Antituberculosis therapy was initiated after the diagnosis of pulmonary TB. One week after antituberculosis therapy, antiretroviral therapy was started. However, multiple mediastinal lymphadenopathies and chylothorax developed. Adequate drainage of the chylothorax, suspension of antiretroviral therapy, and continued antituberculosis therapy resulted in successful treatment and good outcome. Conclusions Chylothorax is a rare manifestation of TB-associated IRIS in HIV-infected patients. Careful monitoring for development of IRIS during treatment of HIV-TB coinfection is essential to minimize the associated morbidity and mortality.

  3. Immune System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuper, C.F.; Ruehl-Fehlert, C.; Elmore, S.A.; Parker, G.A.

    2013-01-01

    Cells of the immune system are found in every organ, from the classic lymphoid organs to tissues such as liver, mucosae, and omental adipose tissue. Toxicity to the immune system may be from a direct or indirect injury to lymphoid organs. The morphological responses range from lymphocyte depletion t

  4. Immune System

    Science.gov (United States)

    A properly functioning immune system is essential to good health. It defends the body against infectious agents and in some cases tumor cells. Individuals with immune deficiencies resulting from genetic defects, diseases (e.g., AIDS, leukemia), or drug therapies are more suscepti...

  5. Search for nucleon decay via modes favored by supersymmetric grand unification models in Super-Kamiokande-I

    CERN Document Server

    Kobayashi, K; Ashie, Y; Hosaka, J; Ishihara, K; Itow, Y; Kameda, J; Koshio, Y; Minamino, A; Mitsuda, C; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Nakahata, M; Namba, T; Nambu, R; Obayashi, Y; Shiozawa, M; Suzuki, Y; Takeuchi, Y; Taki, K; Yamada, S; Ishitsuka, M; Kajita, T; Kaneyuki, K; Nakayama, S; Okada, A; Okumura, K; Ooyabu, T; Saji, C; Takenaga, Y; Desai, S; Kearns, E; Likhoded, S; Stone, J L; Sulak, L R; Wang, W; Goldhaber, M; Casper, D; Cravens, J P; Gajewski, W; Kropp, W R; Liu, D W; Mine, S; Smy, M B; Sobel, H W; Sterner, C W; Vagins, M R; Ganezer, K S; Hill, J E; Keig, W E; Jang, J S; Kim, J Y; Lim, I T; Scholberg, K; Walter, C W; Ellsworth, R W; Tasaka, S; Guillian, G; Kibayashi, A; Learned, J G; Matsuno, S; Takemori, D; Messier, M D; Hayato, Y; Ichikawa, A K; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Iwashita, T; Kobayashi, T; Maruyama, T; Nakamura, K; Nitta, K; Oyama, Y; Sakuda, M; Totsuka, Y; Suzuki, A T; Hasegawa, M; Hayashi, K; Kato, I; Maesaka, H; Morita, T; Nakadaira, T; Nakaya, T; Nishikawa, K; Sasaki, T; Ueda, S; Yamamoto, S; Yokoyama, M; Haines, T J; Dazeley, S; Hatakeyama, S; Svoboda, R; Blaufuss, E; Goodman, J A; Sullivan, G W; Turcan, D; Habig, A; Fukuda, Y; Jung, C K; Kato, T; Malek, M; Mauger, C; McGrew, C; Sarrat, A; Sharkey, E; Yanagisawa, C; Toshito, T; Miyano, K; Tamura, N; Ishii, J; Kuno, Y; Yoshida, M; Kim, S B; Yoo, J; Okazawa, H; Ishizuka, T; Choi, Y; Seo, H K; Gando, Y; Hasegawa, T; Inoue, K; Shirai, J; Suzuki, A; Koshiba, M; Nakajima, Y; Nishijima, K; Harada, T; Ishino, H; Watanabe, Y; Kielczewska, D; Zalipska, J; Berns, H G; Gran, R; Shiraishi, K K; Stachyra, A; Washburn, K; Wilkes, R J

    2005-01-01

    We report the results for nucleon decay searches via modes favored by supersymmetric grand unified models in Super-Kamiokande. Using 1489 days of full Super-Kamiokande-I data, we searched for $p \\to \\bar{\

  6. Report on: "The 1st Workshop on National Immunization Programs and Vaccine Coverage in ASEAN Countries, April 30, 2015, Pattaya, Thailand".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattasingh, Weerawan; Pengsaa, Krisana; Thisyakorn, Usa

    2016-03-04

    The 1st Workshop on National Immunization Programs and Vaccine Coverage in Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) Countries Group (WNIPVC-ASEAN) held a meeting on April 30, 2015, Pattaya, Thailand under the auspices of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society and the World Health Organization (WHO). Reports on the current status and initiatives of the national immunization program (NIP) in each ASEAN countries that attended were presented. These reports along with survey data collected from ministries of health in ASEAN countries NIPs demonstrate that good progress has been made toward the goal of the Global Vaccine Action Plan (GVAP). However, some ASEAN countries have fragile health care systems that still have insufficient vaccine coverage of some basic EPI antigens. Most ASEAN countries still do not have national coverage of some new and underused vaccines, and raising funds for the expansion of NIPs is challenging. Also, there is insufficient research into disease burden of vaccine preventable diseases and surveillance. Health care workers must advocate NIPs to government policy makers and other stakeholders as well as improve research and surveillance to achieve the goals of the GVAP.

  7. Immunity in urogenital protozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malla, N; Goyal, K; Dhanda, R S; Yadav, M

    2014-09-01

    Innate and adaptive immunity play a significant role in urogenital infections. Innate immunity is provided by the epithelial cells and mucus lining along with acidic pH, which forms a strong physical barrier against the pathogens in female reproductive tract. Cells of innate immune system, antimicrobial peptides, cytokines, chemokines and adaptive immunity in the reproductive tract are evolved during infection, and a pro-inflammatory response is generated to fight against the invading pathogen Trichomonas vaginalis, a primary urogenital protozoa, the etiological agent of human trichomoniasis, a curable sexually transmitted infection. The involvement of the urogenital tract by other protozoal infections such as P. falciparum, Trypanosoma, Leishmania, Toxoplasma, Entamoeba histolytica and Acanthamoeba infection is rarely reported. Trichomonas induce pro-inflammatory and immunosuppressive responses in infected subjects. Multifactorial pathogenic mechanisms including parasite adherence, cysteine proteases, lipophosphoglycan, free radical, cytokine generation and Toll-like receptors appear to interplay with the induction of local and systemic immune responses that ultimately determine the outcome of the infection. However, the involvement of urogenital pathogen-specific immune mechanisms and effect of normal local resident flora on the outcome (symptomatic vs. asymptomatic) of infection are poorly understood. Moreover, immune interactions in trichomoniasis subjects co-infected with bacterial and viral pathogens need to be elucidated.

  8. Self-reported history of vaccination and disease and immunity against hepatitis A, hepatitis B, tetanus, diphtheria and varicella among Spanish military recruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arteaga, Alejandro; Desviat, Pilar Vallejo; Jaqueti, Jeronimo; Santos, Juana; de Miguel, Angel Gil; Garcia, Rodrigo Jiménez

    2010-02-01

    This study aims to evaluate the immune status against hepatitis A, hepatitis B, tetanus, diphtheria and varicella in military recruits and the validity of self-reporting of their disease and vaccination history. A total of 226 participants were studied (mean age, 20.2 years; SD 1.7). 10.4% presented antibodies to hepatitis A, 78.3% to hepatitis B, 94.2% to tetanus, 77.4% to diphtheria and 81.9% to varicella. The relationship between self-reporting of vaccination history and seroprotection showed a high Positive Predictive Value for tetanus (98.8%) and a high Negative Predictive Value for hepatitis A (91%). Hepatitis A vaccination and serology testing for varicella and Hepatitis B on joining the Spanish armed forces are recommended.

  9. Photosensitizers for photodynamic immune modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, John R.; Boch, Ronald; Hunt, David W. C.; Ratkay, Leslie G.; Simkin, Guillermo O.; Tao, Jing-Song; Richter, Anna M.; Levy, Julia G.

    2000-06-01

    PDT may be an effective treatment for certain immune-mediated disorders. The immunomodulatory action of PDT is likely a consequence of effects exerted at a number of levels including stimulation of specific cell signaling pathways, selective depletion of activated immune cells, alteration of receptor expression by immune and non-immune cells, and the modulation of cytokine availability. QLT0074, a potent photosensitizer that exhibits rapid clearance kinetics in vivo, is in development for the treatment of immune disorders. In comparison to the well-characterized and structurally related photosensitizer verteporfin, lower concentrations of QLT0074 were required to induce apoptosis in human blood T cells and keratinocytes using blue light for photoactivation. Both photosensitizers triggered the stress activated protein kinase (SAPK) and p38 (HOG1) pathways but not extracellularly regulated kinase (ERK) activity in mouse Pam212 keratinocytes. In cell signaling responses, QLT0074 was active at lower concentrations than verteporfin. For all in vitro test systems, the stronger photodynamic activity of QLT0074 was associated with a greater cell uptake of this photosensitize than verteporfin. In mouse immune models, sub-erythemogenic doses of QLT0074 in combination with whole body blue light irradiation inhibited the contact hypersensitivity response and limited the development of adjuvant-induced arthritis. QLT0074 exhibits activities that indicate it may be a favorable agent for the photodynamic treatment of human immune disease.

  10. Favorable Policy for Foreign Investors in Dagang Oilfield

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Mingfa

    1995-01-01

    @@ Apart from series kinds of good products, advanced techniques, convenient communications and electric power and water supply in Dagand Oilfield, foreign investors who have investment in New Industrial Area of Dagang Oilfield will enjoy the same favourable policies as Tianjin Economic Develoment Zone. Main favorable policies are follows:

  11. Charcoal kiln relicts - a favorable site for tree growth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buras, Allan; Hirsch, Florian; van der Maaten, Ernst; Takla, Melanie; Räbiger, Christin; Cruz Garcia, Roberto; Schneider, Anna; Raab, Alexandra; Raab, Thomas; Wilmking, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Soils with incompletely combusted organic material (aka 'black carbon') are considered fertile for plant growth. Considerable enrichment of soils with black carbon is known from Chernozems, from anthropogenic induced altering of soils like the 'Terra Preta' in South America (e.g. Glaser, 2001), and from charcoal kiln relicts. Recent studies have reported a high spatial frequency of charcoal kiln relicts in the Northeastern German lowlands (Raab et al., 2015), which today are often overgrown by forest plantations. In this context the question arises whether these sites are favorable for tree growth. Here we compare the performance of 22 Pinus sylvestris individuals - a commonly used tree species in forestry - growing on charcoal kiln relicts with 22 control trees. Growth performance (height growth and diameter growth) of the trees was determined using dendrochronological techniques, i.e. standard ring-width measurements were undertaken on each two cores per tree and tree height was measured in the field. Several other wood properties such as annual wood density, average resin content, as well as wood chemistry were analyzed. Our results indicate that trees growing on charcoal kiln relicts grow significantly less and have a significantly lower wood density in comparison with control trees. Specific chemical components such as Manganese as well as resin contents were significantly higher in kiln trees. These results highlight that tree growth on charcoal kiln relicts is actually hampered instead of enhanced. Possibly this is a combined effect of differing physical soil properties which alter soil water accessibility for plants and differing chemical soil properties which may negatively affect tree growth either if toxic limits are surpassed or if soil nutrient availability is decreased. Additional soil analyses with respect to soil texture and soil chemistry shall reveal further insight into this hypothesis. Given the frequent distribution of charcoal kiln relicts in

  12. Expression of Innate Immunity Genes in Epithelial Cells of Hypertrophic Adenoids with and without Pediatric Chronic Rhinosinusitis: A Preliminary Report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Peng Qu; Zhen-Xiao Huang; Yan Sun; Ting Ye; Shun-Jiu Cui; Qian Huang; Li-Jing Ma

    2015-01-01

    Background:Adenoid hypertrophy (AH) is associated with pediatric chronic rhinosinusitis (pCRS),but its role in the inflammatory process of pCRS is unclear.It is thought that innate immunity gene expression is disrupted in the epithelium of patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS),including antimicrobial peptides and pattern recognition receptors (PRRs).The aim of this preliminary study was to detect the expression of innate immunity genes in epithelial cells of hypertrophic adenoids with and without pCRS to better understand their role in pCRS.Methods:Nine pCRS patients and nine simple AH patients undergoing adenoidectomy were recruited for the study.Adenoidal epithelium was isolated,and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) was employed to measure relative expression levels of the following messenger RNAs in hypertrophic adenoid epithelial cells of pediatric patients with and without CRS:Human β-defensin (HBD) 2 and 3,surfactant protein (SP)-A and D,toll-like receptors 1-10,nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors NOD 1,NOD 2,and NACHT,LRR and PYD domains-containing protein 3,retinoic acid-induced gene 1,melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5,and nuclear factor-KB (NF-κB).RT-qPCR data from two groups were analyzed by independent sample t-tests and Mann-Whitney U-tests.Results:The relative expression of SP-D in adenoidal epithelium of pCRS group was significantly lower than that in AH group (pCRS 0.73 ± 0.10 vs.AH 1.21 ± 0.15;P =0.0173,t =2.654).The relative expression levels of all tested PRRs and NF-κB,as well as HBD-2,HBD-3,and SP-A,showed no statistically significant differences in isolated adenoidal epithelium between pCRS group and AH group.Conclusions:Down-regulated SP-D levels in adenoidal epithelium may contribute to the development of pCRS.PRRs,however,are unlikely to play a significant role in the inflammatory process of pCRS.

  13. Expression of Innate Immunity Genes in Epithelial Cells of Hypertrophic Adenoids with and without Pediatric Chronic Rhinosinusitis: A Preliminary Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Peng Qu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adenoid hypertrophy (AH is associated with pediatric chronic rhinosinusitis (pCRS, but its role in the inflammatory process of pCRS is unclear. It is thought that innate immunity gene expression is disrupted in the epithelium of patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS, including antimicrobial peptides and pattern recognition receptors (PRRs. The aim of this preliminary study was to detect the expression of innate immunity genes in epithelial cells of hypertrophic adenoids with and without pCRS to better understand their role in pCRS. Methods: Nine pCRS patients and nine simple AH patients undergoing adenoidectomy were recruited for the study. Adenoidal epithelium was isolated, and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR was employed to measure relative expression levels of the following messenger RNAs in hypertrophic adenoid epithelial cells of pediatric patients with and without CRS: Human β-defensin (HBD 2 and 3, surfactant protein (SP-A and D, toll-like receptors 1-10, nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD-like receptors NOD 1, NOD 2, and NACHT, LRR and PYD domains-containing protein 3, retinoic acid-induced gene 1, melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5, and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB. RT-qPCR data from two groups were analyzed by independent sample t-tests and Mann-Whitney U-tests. Results: The relative expression of SP-D in adenoidal epithelium of pCRS group was significantly lower than that in AH group (pCRS 0.73 ± 0.10 vs. AH 1.21 ± 0.15; P = 0.0173, t = 2.654. The relative expression levels of all tested PRRs and NF-κB, as well as HBD-2, HBD-3, and SP-A, showed no statistically significant differences in isolated adenoidal epithelium between pCRS group and AH group. Conclusions: Down-regulated SP-D levels in adenoidal epithelium may contribute to the development of pCRS. PRRs, however, are unlikely to play a significant role in the inflammatory process of pCRS.

  14. Immunization Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Brazil, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Nigeria, Pakistan and South Africa. Monitoring ... information on vaccines and immunization You are here: Media centre Fact sheets Quick Links Sitemap Home Health ...

  15. The Immunization Programme In India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokhey J

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available The immunization Programme was started in India in 1978 with the objective of reducing the mortality due to vaccine preventable diseases. Immunization coverage levels in infants and pregnant women have increased substantially over the last decade. Immunization coverage levels of 69 to 82% with various vaccines were reported in 1989-90. There is however, a wide disparity in the coverage levels in states and in the districts. While the priority to remains to increase immunization coverage levels, surveillance of vaccine preventable diseases is receiving high priority to identify weak pockets for intensification of immunization services and to document impact. Besides completeness of reporting., emphasis of the surveillance system in many areas has shifted to obtaining information on cases as early as possible to allow epidemiological investigations and effective follow-up action. The achievements in a large number of districts show that the goal of universal immunization, while difficult and challenging, is attainable.

  16. "In vitro systems to characterize the immune response to HIV-1 and HIV-1 vaccine candidates", NIAID Workshop Report, Bethesda, August 4, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaspina, Angela; Rinaldo, Charles R; Sekaly, Rafick P; Flores, Jorge; D'Souza, Patricia M

    2011-06-24

    Although clinical trials are the ultimate way to prove vaccine safety and efficacy, the complexity, cost and time required to develop a product to enter human trials demand a serious, long-term investment. Lack of knowledge on immune correlates of protection from HIV infections makes investments in HIV vaccine research significantly risky. Preclinical testing of HIV vaccines is routinely carried out in non-human primate models however these studies have a significant cost and their predictive value is still questionable. The potential value of screening new HIV-1 vaccine candidates on human cells and tissues via high throughput in vitro systems that allow rapid, cost-effective and accurate predictions of in vivo immune responses would be enormous. A one-day workshop was convened by Division of AIDS, National Institutes of Health on August 4, 2010 to address the benefits and challenges of assessing HIV-1 vaccine responses in alternative ways. Consideration was given to the use of various in vitro model systems, human mucosal tissue explants and humanized mouse models as ways to predict immunogenicity and efficacy of HIV-1 vaccines early in the development process, and support decisions on whether a product may be worthy of moving into non-human primates or human trials. This report summarizes the outcome of the workshop.

  17. Epstein-Barr virus myelitis and Castleman's disease in a patient with acquired immune deficiency syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balderacchi Jasminka

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Few cases of Epstein-Barr virus myelitis have been described in the literature. Multi-centric Castleman's disease is a lymphoproliferative disorder that is well known for its associations with the human immunodeficiency virus, human herpes virus 8, and Kaposi's sarcoma. The concurrent presentation of these two diseases in a patient at the same time is extremely unusual. Case Presentation We describe the case of a 43-year-old Caucasian man with acquired immune deficiency syndrome who presented with fever, weight loss and diffuse lymphadenopathy, and was diagnosed with multi-centric Castleman's disease. He presented three weeks later with lower extremity weakness and urinary retention, at which time cerebrospinal fluid contained lymphocytic pleocytosis and elevated protein. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated abnormal spinal cord signal intensity over several cervical and thoracic segments, suggesting the diagnosis of myelitis. Our patient was ultimately diagnosed with Epstein-Barr virus myelitis, as Epstein-Barr virus DNA was detected by polymerase chain reaction in the cerebrospinal fluid. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of multi-centric Castleman's disease followed by acute Epstein-Barr virus myelitis in a human immunodeficiency virus-infected patient. Clinicians caring for human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients should be vigilant about monitoring patients with increasing lymphadenopathy, prompting thorough diagnostic investigations when necessary.

  18. Multidimensional protein fractionation using ProteomeLab PF 2D™ for profiling amyotrophic lateral sclerosis immunity: A preliminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosley R Lee

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ProteomeLab™ PF 2D platform is a relatively new approach to global protein profiling. Herein, it was used for investigation of plasma proteome changes in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS patients before and during immunization with glatiramer acetate (GA in a clinical trial. Results The experimental design included immunoaffinity depletion of 12 most abundant proteins from plasma samples with the ProteomeLab™ IgY-12 LC10 column kit as first dimension separation, also referred to as immuno-partitioning. Second and third dimension separations of the enriched proteome were performed on the PF 2D platform utilizing 2D isoelectric focusing and RP-HPLC with the resulting fractions collected for analysis. 1D gel electrophoresis was added as a fourth dimension when sufficient protein was available. Protein identification from collected fractions was performed using nano-LC-MS/MS approach. Analysis of differences in the resulting two-dimensional maps of fractions obtained from the PF 2D and the ability to identify proteins from these fractions allowed sensitivity threshold measurements. Masked proteins in the PF 2D fractions are discussed. Conclusion We offer some insight into the strengths and limitations of this emerging proteomic platform.

  19. Immunity in Chagas’ Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is the final report on the immunity in Chagas ’ disease contract and it summarizes the results of a diversity of studies directed toward...antibody test for Chagas ’ disease . Also mentioned are the facts that the cell membranes of live trypomastigotes are not immunoreactive with the...humoral immune response of an infected host and that suppression of parasitemias in chronic Chagas ’ disease is probably a function of the cell immune system of the host. (Author)

  20. The Impact of Two Different Transfusion Strategies on Patient Immune Response during Major Abdominal Surgery: A Preliminary Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kassiani Theodoraki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood transfusion is associated with well-known risks. We investigated the difference between a restrictive versus a liberal transfusion strategy on the immune response, as expressed by the production of inflammatory mediators, in patients subjected to major abdominal surgery procedures. Fifty-eight patients undergoing major abdominal surgery were randomized preoperatively to either a restrictive transfusion protocol or a liberal transfusion protocol (with transfusion if hemoglobin dropped below 7.7 g dL−1 or 9.9 g dL−1, respectively. In a subgroup of 20 patients randomly selected from the original allocation groups, blood was sampled for measurement of IL-6, IL-10, and TNFα. Postoperative levels of IL-10 were higher in the liberal transfusion group on the first postoperative day (49.82±29.07 vs. 15.83±13.22 pg mL−1, P<0.05. Peak postoperative IL-10 levels correlated with the units of blood transfused as well as the mean duration of storage and the storage time of the oldest unit transfused (r2=0.38, P=0.032, r2=0.52, P=0.007, and r2=0.68, P<0.001, respectively. IL-10 levels were elevated in patients with a more liberal red blood cell transfusion strategy. The strength of the association between anti-inflammatory IL-10 and transfusion variables indicates that IL-10 may be an important factor in transfusion-associated immunomodulation. This trial is registered under ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02020525.

  1. Cancer Immunity: Lessons From Infectious Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinchieri, Giorgio

    2015-07-15

    Innate and adaptive immunity are activated by both infections and tumors. The immune cells infiltrating infected tissues are similar to those infiltrating neoplastic tissues, but their function in the first setting is quite different from that in the latter. Infected tissues are usually characterized by an acute inflammatory environment that favors the generation of protective immunity, whereas tumors are characterized by chronic inflammation that suppresses antitumor immune responses and promotes tumor growth and escape from the immune system. During resolution of the immune response to infection or in chronic infections, immunosuppressive mechanisms that are typical of the tumor microenvironment are observed in infected tissues. Conversely, immunotherapy and chemotherapy may redirect the tumor microenvironment and allow the activation of effective anticancer immune responses. The transformation of neoplastic cells is determined by intrinsic genetic alteration but tumor progression is controlled by the tumor microenvironment and by the inflammatory and immune response to the tumors. Commensal microorganisms live in great numbers in all our barrier epithelia and control inflammation and immunity both locally and systemically. The commensal microbiota is essential for optimal immune response to pathogens and for the establishment of autoimmunity. It also modulates inflammation and immune responses that affect tumor growth and it is required for the effectiveness of anticancer immunotherapy and chemotherapy.

  2. Factorization in Color-Favored B Meson Decays to Charm

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Z; Luo, Zumin; Rosner, Jonathan L.

    2001-01-01

    With the improvement of data on $B$ meson decays to various channels it has become possible to test more incisively some factorization predictions made a number of years ago. A concurrent benefit is the ability to constrain the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element $V_{cb}$. Using a simultaneous fit to the rates for the color-favored decays $\\ob \\to D^{(*)+} \\pi^-$ and $\\ob \\to D^{(*)+} \\rho^-$ and to a differential distribution $d \\Gamma(\\ob \\to D^{*+} l^- \\bar \

  3. Coevolution of robustness, epistasis, and recombination favors asexual reproduction

    OpenAIRE

    MacCarthy, Thomas; Bergman, Aviv

    2007-01-01

    The prevalence of sexual reproduction remains one of the most perplexing phenomena in evolutionary biology. The deterministic mutation hypothesis postulates that sexual reproduction will be advantageous under synergistic epistasis, a condition in which mutations cause a greater reduction in fitness when combined than would be expected from their individual effects. The inverse condition, antagonistic epistasis, correspondingly is predicted to favor asexual reproduction. To assess this hypothe...

  4. Immune regulation by pericytes: modulating innate and adaptive immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navarro, Rocio; Compte, Marta; Álvarez-Vallina, Luis;

    2016-01-01

    respond to a series of proinflammatory stimuli and are able to sense different types of danger through expression of functional pattern recognition receptors, contributing to the onset of innate immune responses. In this context, PC not only secrete a variety of chemokines, but they also overexpress...... adhesion molecules such as ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 involved in the control of immune cell trafficking across vessel walls. In addition to their role in innate immunity, pericytes are involved in adaptive immunity. It has been reported that interaction with PC anergizes T cells, attributed, at least in part...

  5. Menor valor: ¿oferta más favorable?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván Alirio Ramírez Rusinque

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available La más importante transformación establecida por la Ley 1150 de 2007 en la contratación estatal radicó en la determinación del menor valor como la oferta más favorable para las entidades estatales, cuando se trate de la adquisición o suministro de bienes y servicios de características técnicas uniformes y de común utilización. Por ello, reviste de gran importancia realizar un análisis desde el punto de vista jurídico y normativo, que permita establecer si la mutación sufrida al concepto de oferta más favorable trajo consigo los fines perseguidos por la reforma, o en su defecto fue perjudicial la solución, al afectar el deber de selección objetiva, los principios de la contratación estatal de igualdad, eficacia, transparencia, planeación y equilibrio financiero del contrato y el principio constitucional de la libre competencia. Para de esta forma establecer si el modelo del menor valor como criterio de la oferta más favorable resulta eficiente jurídicamente en el campo de la contratación estatal, y si las reglas establecidas en la actualidad permiten el desarrollo armónico del sistema establecido por la Ley 1150 de 2007.

  6. Favorable results with syringosubarachnoid shunts for treatment of syringomyelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tator, C H; Meguro, K; Rowed, D W

    1982-04-01

    From 1969 to 1979, 20 patients with syringomyelia were treated with a syringosubarachnoid shunt. The principal indications for this procedure were: significant progressive neurological deterioration and absent or minimal tonsillar ectopia. There were 15 patients with idiopathic syringomyelia, four with posttraumatic syringomyelia, and one with syringomyelia secondary to spinal arachnoiditis. The operations were performed with an operating microscope, and attention was directed to preserving thearachnoid membrane to ensure proper placement of the distal end of the shunt in an intact subarachnoid space. In all cases, a silicone rubber ventricular catheter was inserted into the syrinx through a posterior midline myelotomy. The average follow-up period was 5 years. A favorable result was obtained in 15 of the 20 patients (75%), including an excellent result with improvement of neurological deficit in 11 patients and a good result with cessation of progression in four patients. In the remaining five patients the result was poor with further progression of neurological deficit. A short duration of preoperative symptoms was usually a favorable prognostic feature. Four patients with a history of less than 6 months all had excellent results. Thirteen patients had a syringosubarachnoid shunt only, and all had good or excellent results. Seven patients had other surgical procedures, before, accompanying, or after shunt placement, and two had favorable results. Thus, the syringosubarachnoid shunt is an effective therapeutic modality for many patients with syringomyelia, particularly if there is little or no tonsillar herniation.

  7. Uranium favorability of the San Rafael Swell area, east-central Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mickle, D G; Jones, C A; Gallagher, G L; Young, P; Dubyk, W S

    1977-10-01

    The San Rafael Swell project area in east-central Utah is approximately 3,000 sq mi and includes the San Rafael Swell anticline and the northern part of the Waterpocket Fold monocline at Capitol Reef. Rocks in the area are predominantly sedimentary rocks of Pennsylvanian through Cretaceous age. Important deposits of uranium in the project area are restricted to two formations, the Chinle (Triassic) and Morrison (Jurassic) Formations. A third formation, the White Rim Sandstone (Permian), was also studied because of reported exploration activity. The White Rim Sandstone is considered generally unfavorable on the basis of lithologic characteristics, distance from a possible source of uranium, lack of apparent mineralization, and the scarcity of anomalies on gamma-ray logs or in rock, water, and stream-sediment samples. The lower Chinle from the Moss Back Member down to the base of the formation is favorable because it is a known producer. New areas for exploration are all subsurface. Both Salt Wash and Brushy Basin Members of the Morrison Formation are favorable. The Salt Wash Member is favorable because it is a known producer. The Brushy Basin Member is favorable as a low-grade resource.

  8. Correlation of the patient's reported outcome Inflammatory-RODS with an objective metric in immune-mediated neuropathies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Draak, T.H.; Gorson, K.C.; Vanhoutte, E.K.; Nes, S.I. van; Doorn, P.A. van; Cornblath, D.R.; Berg, L.H. van den; Faber, C.G.; Merkies, I.S.; Raaphorst, J.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: There is increasing interest in using patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) in clinical studies to capture individual changes over time. However, PROMs have also been criticized because they are entirely subjective. Our objective was to examine the relationship between a

  9. Candida Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian R. Naglik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The human pathogenic fungus Candida albicans is the predominant cause of both superficial and invasive forms of candidiasis. C. albicans primarily infects immunocompromised individuals as a result of either immunodeficiency or intervention therapy, which highlights the importance of host immune defences in preventing fungal infections. The host defence system utilises a vast communication network of cells, proteins, and chemical signals distributed in blood and tissues, which constitute innate and adaptive immunity. Over the last decade the identity of many key molecules mediating host defence against C. albicans has been identified. This review will discuss how the host recognises this fungus, the events induced by fungal cells, and the host innate and adaptive immune defences that ultimately resolve C. albicans infections during health.

  10. Self-reported adverse reactions in 4337 healthcare workers immunizations against novel H1N1 influenza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seybold Joachim

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose The use of the 2009 H1N1 vaccine has generated much debate concerning safety issues among the general population and physicians. It was questioned if this is a safe vaccine. Therefore, we investigated the safety of an inactivated monovalent H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccine Methods We focused on the H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccine Pandemrix® and applied a self reporting questionnaire in a population of healthcare workers (HCWs and medical students at a major university hospital. Results In total, 4337 individuals were vaccinated, consisting of 3808 HCWs and 529 medical students. The vaccination rate of the employees was higher than 40%. The majority of individuals were vaccinated in November 2009. In total, 291 of the 4337 vaccinations were reported to lead to one or more adverse reactions (6.7%. Local reactions were reported in 3.8%, myalgia and arthralgia in 3.7%, fatigue in 3.7%, headache in 3.1%. Conclusions Our data together with available data from several national and international institutions points to a safe pandemic influenza vaccine.

  11. HYPOTHALAMIC NEUROHORMONES AND IMMUNE RESPONSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Luis eQuintanar

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive examination of the current literature describing the neural-immune interactions, with emphasis on the most recent findings of the effects of neurohormones on immune system. Particularly, the role of hypothalamic hormones such as Thyrotropin-releasing hormone, Corticotropin-releasing hormone and Gonadotropin-releasing hormone. In the past few years, interest has been raised in extrapituitary actions of these neurohormones due to their receptors have been found in many non-pituitary tissues. Also, the receptors are present in immune cells, suggesting an autocrine or paracrine role within the immune system. In general, these neurohormones have been reported to exert immunomodulatory effects on cell proliferation, immune mediators release and cell function. The implications of these findings in understanding the network of hypothalamic neuropeptides and immune system are discussed.

  12. Catalytically favorable surface patterns in Pt-Au nanoclusters

    KAUST Repository

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by recent experimental demonstrations of novel PtAu nanoparticles with highly enhanced catalytic properties, we present a systematic theoretical study that explores principal catalytic indicators as a function of the particle size and composition. We find that Pt electronic states in the vicinity of the Fermi level combined with a modified electron distribution in the nanoparticle due to Pt-to-Au charge transfer are the origin of the outstanding catalytic properties. From our model we deduce the catalytically favorable surface patterns that induce ensemble and ligand effects. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2013.

  13. Observations favor the crossing of phantom divide lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Using three different parameterized dark energy models, we reconstruct the properties of dark energy from the latest 397 Sne Ia, CMB and BAO with the present matter density, Ωm0, given prior. We find that, when Ωm0 is not small, for example, Ωm0 = 0.28 or 0.32, an evolving dark energy with a crossing of phantom divide line is favored and this conclusion seems to be model independent. We also find that the evolving properties of dark energy become more and more evident with the increase of Ωm0 given prior.

  14. Potato: A Favorable Crop for Plant Molecular Farming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sunil Kumar G B; Ganapathi T R; Bapat V A

    2006-01-01

    Potato is one of the important food crops with a high yield potential and nutritional value. It has been used extensively for molecular farming to produce vaccines, antibodies and industrial enzymes. It has several desirable attributes as a favorable crop for the production of recombinant proteins. Potato tubers were employed for bulk production of recombinant antibodies. Vaccine production in potato has progressed to human clinical trials. Human milk proteins were successfully expressed in potato tubers. Potato hairy roots offer as another attractive system for the production of useful recombinant proteins both as intra cellular and secreted forms. This review describes the use of potato as a prospective host for plant molecular farming.

  15. CKM favored semileptonic decays of heavy hadrons at zero recoil

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, T M; Yu, H L; Yan, Tung Mow; Cheng, Hai Yang

    1996-01-01

    We study the properties of Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) favored semileptonic decays of mesons and baryons containing a heavy quark at the point of no recoil. We first use a diagrammatic analysis to rederive the result observed by earlier authors that at this kinematic point the B meson decays via b\\to c transitions can only produce a D or D^* meson. The result is generalized to include photon emissions which violate heavy quark flavor symmetry. We show that photons emitted by the heavy quarks and the charged lepton are the only light particles that can decorate the decays \\bar{B}\\to D(D^*) + \\ell\

  16. Pneumonia and disseminated bacteremia with Pasteurella multocida in the immune competent host: A case report and a review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pasteurella multocida is primarily an opportunistic infection, most commonly of skin and soft tissue following animal bites particularly in the elderly and immunocompromised. While invasive disease with P. multocida has been documented in patients at high risk, such as those with organ transplants, malignancy, and cirrhosis, infections other than cellulitis associated with this pathogen are exceedingly rare in the immunocompetent population. We report a 70 year old Caucasian female with occurrence of a P. multocida pneumonia and resultant bacteremia in an immunocompetent host. Similar to prior case studies, the patient presented with a history of having significant exposure to animals at her residence. We undertook a review of the literature for reports of disseminated P. multocida in immunocompotent hosts in the absence of the typical presentation of cellulitis. Literature has suggested the possibility of nasal and oropharyngeal colonization of patients with frequent interactions with domestic animals, in whom periods of suppressed immune function may lead to activation of infection. P. multocida is commonly susceptible to most beta-lactams, including those utilized for the treatment of community acquired pneumonia. The utilization of macrolides should be avoided in these patients as susceptibilities are unpredictable, however fluoroquinolones maintain activity and may be an alternative therapy.

  17. VACCINES AND IMMUNIZATION: WORLD SITUATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.H. Brundtland

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The last issue of the report «vaccines and immunization: world situation» stresses considerable success in immunization at the global level since the mid 90 s — completely total eradication of poliomyelitis across the world, as well as the drastic reduction of the new measles and tetanus cases among mothers and newborns in some poor countries. The report also briefly describes the progress in the development and implementation of the new life saving vaccines, which may save millions of lives annually. The authors have explained some of the reasons, why the global community should invest in immunization, as well as the perspectives for the use of vaccines and immunization in future.Key words: vaccine, immunization, children.

  18. GWAS of self-reported mosquito bite size, itch intensity and attractiveness to mosquitoes implicates immune-related predisposition loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Amy V; Tilley, Mera; Gutteridge, Alex; Hyde, Craig; Nagle, Michael; Ziemek, Daniel; Gorman, Donal; Fauman, Eric B; Chen, Xing; Miller, Melissa R; Tian, Chao; Hu, Youna; Hinds, David A; Cox, Peter; Scollen, Serena

    2017-04-01

    Understanding the interaction between humans and mosquitoes is a critical area of study due to the phenomenal burdens on public health from mosquito-transmitted diseases. In this study, we conducted the first genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of self-reported mosquito bite reaction size (n = 84,724), itchiness caused by bites (n = 69,057), and perceived attractiveness to mosquitoes (n = 16,576). In total, 15 independent significant (P mosquitoes is driven, at least in part, by the genetic determinants of bite reaction size.Our findings illustrate the complex genetic and immunological landscapes underpinning human interactions with mosquitoes. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  19. Salinity inversions in the thermocline under upwelling favorable winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchard, Hans; Basdurak, N. Berkay; Gräwe, Ulf; Knoll, Michaela; Mohrholz, Volker; Müller, Selina

    2017-02-01

    This paper discusses and explains the phenomenon of salinity inversions in the thermocline offshore from an upwelling region during upwelling favorable winds. Using the nontidal central Baltic Sea as an easily accessible natural laboratory, high-resolution transect and station observations in the upper layers are analyzed. The data show local salinity minima in the strongly stratified seasonal thermocline during summer conditions under the influence of upwelling favorable wind. A simple analytical box model using parameters (including variation by means of a Monte Carlo method) estimated from a hindcast model for the Baltic Sea is constructed to explain the observations. As a result, upwelled water with high salinity and low temperature is warmed up due to downward surface heat fluxes while it is transported offshore by the Ekman transport. The warming of upwelled surface water allows maintenance of stable stratification despite the destabilizing salinity stratification, such that local salinity minima in the thermocline can be generated. Inspection of published observations from the Benguela, Peruvian, and eastern tropical North Atlantic upwelling systems shows that also there salinity inversions occur in the thermocline, but in these cases thermocline salinity shows local maxima, since upwelled water has a lower salinity than the surface water. It is hypothesized that thermocline salinity inversions should generally occur offshore from upwelling regions whenever winds are steady enough and surface warming is sufficiently strong.

  20. Immunizations: Active vs. Passive

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention > Immunizations > Immunizations: Active vs. Passive Safety & Prevention Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Immunizations: Active vs. Passive Page Content Article Body Pediatricians can ...

  1. Adult Immunization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Coskun

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite the many advances in modern medicine, each year thousands of people in the world die from diseases that are easily prevented by safe and effective vaccines. Few measures in preventive medicine are of such proven value and as easy to implement as routine immunization against infectious diseases. Prevention of infection by immunization is a lifelong process. There are a number of vaccines that all adults (¡I18 years require. There are also other vaccines that need to be tailored to meet individual variations in risk resulting from occupation, foreign travel, underlying illness, lifestyle and age. In this study, we tried to review this important subject. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2008; 7(2.000: 159-166

  2. New opioid prescribing guidelines favor non-opioid alternatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Determined to make a dent in the growing problem of opioid addiction, the CDC has unveiled new guidelines for opioid prescribing for chronic pain. The recommendations urge providers to be more judicious in their prescribing, opting for opioids only after carefully weighing substantial risks and benefits. Public health authorities note the rampant use and misuse of opioids have "blurred the lines" between prescription opioids and illicit opioids. The new guidelines are designed to help frontline providers balance the need to manage their patients' chronic pain with the duty to curb dangerous prescribing practices. The recommendations are built around three principles: favor non-opioid alternatives for most cases of chronic pain, use the lowest effective dose when prescribing opioids, and exercise caution/monitor patients who are treated with opioids.

  3. Habitat heterogeneity favors asexual reproduction in natural populations of grassthrips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavanchy, Guillaume; Strehler, Marie; Llanos Roman, Maria Noemi; Lessard-Therrien, Malie; Humbert, Jean-Yves; Dumas, Zoé; Jalvingh, Kirsten; Ghali, Karim; Fontcuberta García-Cuenca, Amaranta; Zijlstra, Bart; Arlettaz, Raphaël; Schwander, Tanja

    2016-08-01

    Explaining the overwhelming success of sex among eukaryotes is difficult given the obvious costs of sex relative to asexuality. Different studies have shown that sex can provide benefits in spatially heterogeneous environments under specific conditions, but whether spatial heterogeneity commonly contributes to the maintenance of sex in natural populations remains unknown. We experimentally manipulated habitat heterogeneity for sexual and asexual thrips lineages in natural populations and under seminatural mesocosm conditions by varying the number of hostplants available to these herbivorous insects. Asexual lineages rapidly replaced the sexual ones, independently of the level of habitat heterogeneity in mesocosms. In natural populations, the success of sexual thrips decreased with increasing habitat heterogeneity, with sexual thrips apparently only persisting in certain types of hostplant communities. Our results illustrate how genetic diversity-based mechanisms can favor asexuality instead of sex when sexual lineages co-occur with genetically variable asexual lineages.

  4. Structures of Neural Correlation and How They Favor Coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Felix; Fiscella, Michele; Sevelev, Maksim; Roska, Botond; Hierlemann, Andreas; da Silveira, Rava Azeredo

    2017-01-01

    Summary The neural representation of information suffers from “noise”—the trial-to-trial variability in the response of neurons. The impact of correlated noise upon population coding has been debated, but a direct connection between theory and experiment remains tenuous. Here, we substantiate this connection and propose a refined theoretical picture. Using simultaneous recordings from a population of direction-selective retinal ganglion cells, we demonstrate that coding benefits from noise correlations. The effect is appreciable already in small populations, yet it is a collective phenomenon. Furthermore, the stimulus-dependent structure of correlation is key. We develop simple functional models that capture the stimulus-dependent statistics. We then use them to quantify the performance of population coding, which depends upon interplays of feature sensitivities and noise correlations in the population. Because favorable structures of correlation emerge robustly in circuits with noisy, nonlinear elements, they will arise and benefit coding beyond the confines of retina. PMID:26796692

  5. Immune regulation by pericytes: modulating innate and adaptive immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navarro, Rocio; Compte, Marta; Álvarez-Vallina, Luis

    2016-01-01

    adhesion molecules such as ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 involved in the control of immune cell trafficking across vessel walls. In addition to their role in innate immunity, pericytes are involved in adaptive immunity. It has been reported that interaction with PC anergizes T cells, attributed, at least in part...... respond to a series of proinflammatory stimuli and are able to sense different types of danger through expression of functional pattern recognition receptors, contributing to the onset of innate immune responses. In this context, PC not only secrete a variety of chemokines, but they also overexpress......Pericytes (PC) are mural cells that surround endothelial cells (EC) in small blood vessels. PC have traditionally been endowed with structural functions, being essential for vessel maturation and stabilization. However, accumulating evidence suggest that PC also display immune properties. They can...

  6. Vaccines against Human Carcinomas: Strategies to Improve Antitumor Immune Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Palena

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple observations in preclinical and clinical studies support a role for the immune system in controlling tumor growth and progression. Various components of the innate and adaptive immune response are able to mediate tumor cell destruction; however, certain immune cell populations can also induce a protumor environment that favors tumor growth and the development of metastasis. Moreover, tumor cells themselves are equipped with various mechanisms that allow them to evade surveillance by the immune system. The goal of cancer vaccines is to induce a tumor-specific immune response that ultimately will reduce tumor burden by tipping the balance from a protumor to an antitumor immune environment. This review discusses common mechanisms that govern immune cell activation and tumor immune escape, and some of the current strategies employed in the field of cancer vaccines aimed at enhancing activation of tumor-specific T-cells with concurrent reduction of immunosuppression.

  7. Isoniazid-resistant Mycobacterium kansasii in an HIV-positive patient, and possible development of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome after initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Despotovic

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-tuberculous mycobacteria are rare but important causes of infection in HIV-positive individuals. A 28-year-old HIV-positive male presented with a high fever, non-productive cough, right subcostal pain, splenomegaly, a very low CD4 count, elevated C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and a normal white blood cell count. The suspicion of tuberculosis (TB was very high, and sputum samples were positive for acid-fast bacilli. Standard quadruple anti-TB therapy was initiated, but once culture of the sample revealed Mycobacterium kansasii, pyrazinamide was withdrawn. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART was initiated soon after, consisting of abacavir/lamivudine and efavirenz. The patient's general condition deteriorated 2 weeks after HAART initiation, which could have been due to the development of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS. The patient recovered and was discharged in good condition. However, the results of resistance testing of the isolated organism arrived after discharge, and showed isoniazid and streptomycin resistance. This is the first case report of M. kansasii infection from Serbia and shows the difficulties encountered during the course of treatment.

  8. Women's health and fertility, family planning and pregnancy in immune-mediated rheumatic diseases: a report from a south-eastern European Expert Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntali, Stella; Damjanov, Nemanja; Drakakis, Peter; Ionescu, Ruxandra; Kalinova, Desislava; Rashkov, Rasho; Malamitsi-Puchner, Ariadne; Mantzaris, Gerassimos; Michala, Lina; Pamfil, Cristina; Rednic, Simona; Tektonidou, Maria G; Tsiodras, Sotirios; Vassilopoulos, Dimitrios; Vojinovic, Jelena; Bertsias, George K; Boumpas, Dimitrios T

    2014-01-01

    With current advances in medical treatment, reproductive issues have become more important for women with chronic immune-mediated diseases. Most, if not all, patients report that their disease affects their personal relationships, their decision to have children, and the size of their family. These decisions are multi-factorial, influenced mainly by concerns over the effect of pregnancy on the rheumatic disease, the impact of disease activity during pregnancy on foetal health, the patient's ability to care for the child, and the possible harmful effects medication could have on the child, both pre- and post-natally during breastfeeding. Apart from that, women's health issues tend to be overlooked in favour of the management of the underlying rheumatic disease. To this end, we convened an expert panel to review the published literature on women's health and reproductive issues and provide evidence- and eminence-based points to consider for the treating physicians. We conclude that there is a need for a change in mind-set from one which 'cautions against pregnancy' to one which 'embraces pregnancy' through the practice of individualised, pre- and post-conceptual, multi-disciplinary care.

  9. Melatonin: Buffering the Immune System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan M. Guerrero

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin modulates a wide range of physiological functions with pleiotropic effects on the immune system. Despite the large number of reports implicating melatonin as an immunomodulatory compound, it still remains unclear how melatonin regulates immunity. While some authors argue that melatonin is an immunostimulant, many studies have also described anti-inflammatory properties. The data reviewed in this paper support the idea of melatonin as an immune buffer, acting as a stimulant under basal or immunosuppressive conditions or as an anti-inflammatory compound in the presence of exacerbated immune responses, such as acute inflammation. The clinical relevance of the multiple functions of melatonin under different immune conditions, such as infection, autoimmunity, vaccination and immunosenescence, is also reviewed.

  10. Immune deficiency augments the prevalence of p53 loss of heterozygosity in spontaneous tumors but not bi-directional loss of heterozygosity in bone marrow progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetzer, Yoav; Napchan, Yael; Kaufman, Tom; Molchadsky, Alina; Tal, Perry; Goldfinger, Naomi; Rotter, Varda

    2017-03-15

    p53 loss of heterozygosity (LOH) is a frequent event in tumors of somatic and Li-Fraumeni syndrome patients harboring p53 mutation. Here, we focused on resolving a possible crosstalk between the immune-system and p53 LOH. Previously, we reported that p53 heterozygous bone-marrow mesenchymal progenitor cells undergo p53 LOH in-vivo. Surprisingly, the loss of either the wild-type p53 allele or mutant p53 allele was detected with a three-to-one ratio in favor of losing the mutant allele. In this study, we examined whether the immune-system can affect the LOH directionality in bone marrow progenitors. We found that mesenchymal progenitor cells derived from immune-deficient mice exhibited the same preference of losing the mutant p53 allele as immune-competent matched cells, nevertheless, these animals showed a significantly shorter tumor-free survival, indicating the possible involvement of immune surveillance in this model. Surprisingly, spontaneous tumors of p53 heterozygous immune-deficient mice exhibited a significantly higher incidence of p53 LOH compared to that observed in tumors derived of p53 heterozygous immune-competent mice. These findings indicate that the immune-system may affect the p53 LOH prevalence in spontaneous tumors. Thus suggesting that the immune-system may recognize and clear cells that underwent p53 LOH, whereas in immune-compromised mice, those cells will form tumors with shorter latency. In individuals with a competent immune-system, p53 LOH independent pathways may induce malignant transformation which requires a longer tumor latency. Moreover, this data may imply that the current immunotherapy treatment aimed at abrogating the inhibition of cellular immune checkpoints may be beneficial for LFS patients.

  11. Immunity to amoeba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Barbara; Valdenegro-Vega, Victoria; Crosbie, Philip; Bridle, Andrew

    2014-04-01

    Amoebic infections in fish are most likely underestimated and sometimes overlooked due to the challenges associated with their diagnosis. Amoebic diseases reported in fish affect either gills or internal organs or may be systemic. Host response ranges from hyperplastic response in gill infections to inflammation (including granuloma formation) in internal organs. This review focuses on the immune response of Atlantic salmon to Neoparamoeba perurans, the causative agent of Amoebic Gill Disease (AGD).

  12. An Investigation into Bilingual Education for Children from Favored Socio-Economic Backgrounds. Problemes linguistiques des enfants de travailleurs migrants (Linguistic Problems of the Children of Migrant Workers).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baetens Beardsmore, Hugo

    The investigation reported sought to discover: (1) whether the problems faced by children of favored socio-economic backgrounds residing in countries other than those of origin are the same as or different from those faced by less favored groups, and (2) whether the techniques and programs provided for these privileged children can give any…

  13. A systematic review of humoral immune responses against tumor antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuschenbach, Miriam; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus; Wentzensen, Nicolas

    2009-10-01

    This review summarizes studies on humoral immune responses against tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) with a focus on antibody frequencies and the potential diagnostic, prognostic, and etiologic relevance of antibodies against TAAs. We performed a systematic literature search in Medline and identified 3,619 articles on humoral immune responses and TAAs. In 145 studies, meeting the inclusion criteria, humoral immune responses in cancer patients have been analyzed against over 100 different TAAs. The most frequently analyzed antigens were p53, MUC1, NY-ESO-1, c-myc, survivin, p62, cyclin B1, and Her2/neu. Antibodies against these TAAs were detected in 0-69% (median 14%) of analyzed tumor patients. Antibody frequencies were generally very low in healthy individuals, with the exception of few TAAs, especially MUC1. For several TAAs, including p53, Her2/neu, and NY-ESO-1, higher antibody frequencies were reported when tumors expressed the respective TAA. Antibodies against MUC1 were associated with a favorable prognosis while antibodies against p53 were associated with poor disease outcome. These data suggest different functional roles of endogenous antibodies against TAAs. Although data on prediagnostic antibody levels are scarce and antibody frequencies for most TAAs are at levels precluding use in diagnostic assays for cancer early detection, there is some promising data on achieving higher sensitivity for cancer detection using panels of TAAs.

  14. Some concepts of favorability for world-class-type uranium deposits in the northeastern United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adler, H.H.

    1981-03-01

    An account is given of concepts of favorability of geologic environments in the eastern United States for uranium deposits of several major types existing elsewhere in the world. The purpose is to convey some initial ideas about the interrelationships of the geology of the eastern United States and the geologic settings of certain of these world-class deposits. The study and report include consideration of uranium deposits other than those generally manifesting the geologic, geochemical and genetic characteristics associated with the conventional sandstone-type ores of the western United States.

  15. Competition favors elk over beaver in a riparian willow ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, B.W.; Peinetti, H.R.; Coughenour, M.C.; Johnson, T.L.

    2012-01-01

    Beaver (Castor spp.) conservation requires an understanding of their complex interactions with competing herbivores. Simulation modeling offers a controlled environment to examine long-term dynamics in ecosystems driven by uncontrollable variables. We used a new version of the SAVANNA ecosystem model to investigate beaver (C. Canadensis) and elk (Cervus elapses) competition for willow (Salix spp.). We initialized the model with field data from Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado, USA, to simulate a 4-ha riparian ecosystem containing beaver, elk, and willow. We found beaver persisted indefinitely when elk density was or = 30 elk km_2. The loss of tall willow preceded rapid beaver declines, thus willow condition may predict beaver population trajectory in natural environments. Beaver were able to persist with slightly higher elk densities if beaver alternated their use of foraging sites in a rest-rotation pattern rather than maintained continuous use. Thus, we found asymmetrical competition for willow strongly favored elk over beaver in a simulated montane ecosystem. Finally, we discuss application of the SAVANNA model and mechanisms of competition relative to beaver persistence as metapopulations, ecological resistance and alternative state models, and ecosystem regulation.

  16. Adaptation of Cupriavidus necator to conditions favoring polyhydroxyalkanoate production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalheiro, João M B T; de Almeida, M Catarina M D; da Fonseca, M Manuela R; de Carvalho, Carla C C R

    2012-12-15

    The fatty acid (FA) composition of the bacterial membrane of Cupriavidus necator DSM 545 was assessed during the time course of two-stage fed-batch cultivations for the production of short-chain polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA). Changes in the relative proportion of straight, methyl and cyclopropyl saturated, unsaturated, hydroxy substituted and polyunsaturated FA were observed, depending on the C sources and cultivation conditions used to favor the synthesis of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (P(3HB)), poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-4-hydroxybutyrate) (P(3HB-co-4HB)) or poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-4-hydroxybutyrate-3-hydroxyvalerate) (P(3HB-4HB-3HV)), under N limiting conditions. The relative percentage of each FA class was studied using glucose or waste glycerol (GRP), as main C source for P(3HB) production. The FA profile was also assessed when GRP was used together with i) γ-butyrolactone (GBL) (precursor of 4HB monomers) for P(3HB-4HB) synthesis and ii) GBL and propionic acid (PA) (3HV precursor) to yield P(3HB-4HB-3HV). The effect of GBL and PA utilization as PHA monomer precursors on the FA profile of the cell membrane was studied under two different dissolved oxygen concentrations (DOC). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Coevolution of robustness, epistasis, and recombination favors asexual reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacCarthy, Thomas; Bergman, Aviv

    2007-07-31

    The prevalence of sexual reproduction remains one of the most perplexing phenomena in evolutionary biology. The deterministic mutation hypothesis postulates that sexual reproduction will be advantageous under synergistic epistasis, a condition in which mutations cause a greater reduction in fitness when combined than would be expected from their individual effects. The inverse condition, antagonistic epistasis, correspondingly is predicted to favor asexual reproduction. To assess this hypothesis, we introduce a finite population evolutionary process that combines a recombination modifier formalism with a gene-regulatory network model. We demonstrate that when reproductive mode and epistasis are allowed to coevolve, asexual reproduction outcompetes sexual reproduction. In addition, no correlation is found between the level of synergistic epistasis and the fixation time of the asexual mode. However, a significant correlation is found between the level of antagonistic epistasis and asexual mode fixation time. This asymmetry can be explained by the greater reduction in fitness imposed by sexual reproduction as compared with asexual reproduction. Our findings present evidence and suggest plausible explanations that challenge both the deterministic mutation hypothesis and recent arguments asserting the importance of emergent synergistic epistasis in the maintenance of sexual reproduction.

  18. Ecological conditions favoring budding in colonial organisms under environmental disturbance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayuko Nakamaru

    Full Text Available Dispersal is a topic of great interest in ecology. Many organisms adopt one of two distinct dispersal tactics at reproduction: the production of small offspring that can disperse over long distances (such as seeds and spawned eggs, or budding. The latter is observed in some colonial organisms, such as clonal plants, corals and ants, in which (superorganisms split their body into components of relatively large size that disperse to a short distance. Contrary to the common dispersal viewpoint, short-dispersal colonial organisms often flourish even in environments with frequent disturbances. In this paper, we investigate the conditions that favor budding over long-distance dispersal of small offspring, focusing on the life history of the colony growth and the colony division ratio. These conditions are the relatively high mortality of very small colonies, logistic growth, the ability of dispersers to peacefully seek and settle unoccupied spaces, and small spatial scale of environmental disturbance. If these conditions hold, budding is advantageous even when environmental disturbance is frequent. These results suggest that the demography or life history of the colony underlies the behaviors of the colonial organisms.

  19. What favors the occurrence of subduction mega-earthquakes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brizzi, Silvia; Funiciello, Francesca; Corbi, Fabio; Sandri, Laura; van Zelst, Iris; Heuret, Arnauld; Piromallo, Claudia; van Dinther, Ylona

    2017-04-01

    Most of mega-earthquakes (MEqs; Mw > 8.5) occur at shallow depths along the subduction thrust fault (STF). The contribution of each subduction zone to the globally released seismic moment is not homogenous, as well as the maximum recorded magnitude MMax. Highlighting the ingredients likely responsible for MEqs nucleation has great implications for hazard assessment. In this work, we investigate the conditions favoring the occurrence of MEqs with a multi-disciplinary approach based on: i) multivariate statistics, ii) analogue- and iii) numerical modelling. Previous works have investigated the potential dependence between STF seismicity and various subduction zone parameters using simple regression models. Correlations are generally weak due to the limited instrumental seismic record and multi-parameter influence, which make the forecasting of the potential MMax rather difficult. To unravel the multi-parameter influence, we perform a multivariate statistical study (i.e., Pattern Recognition, PR) of the global database on convergent margins (Heuret et al., 2011), which includes seismological, geometrical, kinematic and physical parameters of 62 subduction segments. PR is based on the classification of objects (i.e., subduction segments) belonging to different classes through the identification of possible repetitive patterns. Tests have been performed using different MMax datasets and combination of inputs to indirectly test the stability of the identified patterns. Results show that the trench-parallel width of the subducting slab (Wtrench) and the sediment thickness at the trench (Tsed) are the most recurring parameters for MEqs occurrence. These features are mostly consistent, independently of the MMax dataset and combination of inputs used for the analysis. MEqs thus seem to be promoted for high Wtrench and Tsed, as their combination may potentially favor extreme (i.e., in the order of thousands of km) trench-parallel rupture propagation. To tackle the

  20. Immune-mediated hemolytic anemia - report of three cases / Anemia hemolítica imunomediada em cães - relato de três casos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Curotto Nolasco de Carvalho

    Full Text Available Immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IMHA is a common type of anemia in dogs and cats. The disease é most common in middle-aged female dogs, especially American Cocker Spaniel. The clinical signs are associated with severe anemia. There is no pathognomonic test for IMHA, but the presence of hemolytic anemia in a young adult or middle age, autoagglutination and spherocytosis or positive results of Coombs test, elimination of any other underlying cause of anemia and an appropriate response to immunosuppressive therapy are suggestive of it. The aim of the present paper is to report of three cases of serious IMHA, and highlighting the therapeutic modalities and prognosis associated with them.A anemia hemolítica imunomediada (AHIM é um tipo comum de anemia em cães e gatos. A doença é mais comum em fêmeas caninas de meia-idade, especialmente Cocker Spaniel Americano. Os sinais clínicos estão associados com a anemia severa. Não há achados patognomônicos, mas a presença de anemia hemolítica em um cão jovem ou de meia idade, auto-aglutinação e esferócitos ou teste de Coombs positivo, eliminação de outros diagnósticos diferenciais e a resposta apropriada a terapia imunossupressora indicam AHIM. Apesar de inúmeras opções terapêuticas, os índices de mortalidade permanecem elevados. O objetivo do presente trabalho é relatar três casos graves de AHIM, ressaltando as modalidades terapêuticas e o prognóstico associado a elas.

  1. Mechanical heterogeneity favors fragmentation of strained actin filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Cruz, Enrique M; Martiel, Jean-Louis; Blanchoin, Laurent

    2015-05-05

    We present a general model of actin filament deformation and fragmentation in response to compressive forces. The elastic free energy density along filaments is determined by their shape and mechanical properties, which were modeled in terms of bending, twisting, and twist-bend coupling elasticities. The elastic energy stored in filament deformation (i.e., strain) tilts the fragmentation-annealing reaction free-energy profile to favor fragmentation. The energy gradient introduces a local shear force that accelerates filament intersubunit bond rupture. The severing protein, cofilin, renders filaments more compliant in bending and twisting. As a result, filaments that are partially decorated with cofilin are mechanically heterogeneous (i.e., nonuniform) and display asymmetric shape deformations and energy profiles distinct from mechanically homogenous (i.e., uniform), bare actin, or saturated cofilactin filaments. The local buckling strain depends on the relative size of the compliant segment as well as the bending and twisting rigidities of flanking regions. Filaments with a single bare/cofilin-decorated boundary localize energy and force adjacent to the boundary, within the compliant cofilactin segment. Filaments with small cofilin clusters were predicted to fragment within the compliant cofilactin rather than at boundaries. Neglecting contributions from twist-bend coupling elasticity underestimates the energy density and gradients along filaments, and thus the net effects of filament strain to fragmentation. Spatial confinement causes compliant cofilactin segments and filaments to adopt higher deformation modes and store more elastic energy, thereby promoting fragmentation. The theory and simulations presented here establish a quantitative relationship between actin filament fragmentation thermodynamics and elasticity, and reveal how local discontinuities in filament mechanical properties introduced by regulatory proteins can modulate both the severing efficiency

  2. High expression of HLA-E in colorectal carcinoma is associated with a favorable prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monaco Elisa Lo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA-E is a non-classical class I HLA molecule that can be stabilized by ligands donated by other classical (HLA-A, -B, -C and non-classical (HLA-G family members. HLA-E engages a variety of immune receptors expressed by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs, Natural killer (NK cells and NK-CTLs. In view of the opposing outcomes (activation or inhibition of the different HLA-E receptors, the preferred role (if any of HLA-E expressed in vivo on tumor cells remains to be established. Methods Taking advantage of MEM-E/02, a recently characterized antibody to denatured HLA-E molecules, HLA-E expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry on an archival collection (formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded of 149 colorectal primary carcinoma lesions paired with their morphologically normal mucosae. Lymphoid infiltrates were assessed for the expression of the HLA-E-specific, inhibitory, non-rearranging receptor NKG2A. Results High HLA-E expression did not significantly correlate with the expression of classical HLA-B and HLA-C molecules, but it did correlate with high expression of its preferential ligand donor HLA-A. In addition, it correlated with lymphoid cell infiltrates expressing the inhibitory NKG2A receptor, and was an independent predictor of good prognosis, particularly in a subset of patients whose tumors express HLA-A levels resembling those of their paired normal counterparts (HLA-A. Thus, combination phenotypes (HLA-Elo-int/HLA-AE and HLA-Ehi/HLA-AE of classical and non-classical class I HLA molecules mark two graded levels of good prognosis. Conclusions These results suggest that HLA-E favors activating immune responses to colorectal carcinoma. They also provide evidence in humans that tumor cells entertain extensive negotiation with the immune system until a compromise between recognition and escape is reached. It is implied that this process occurs stepwise, as predicted by the widely accepted

  3. Tuberculosis presenting as immune thrombocytopenic purpura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahadir-Erdogan Beril

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although various hematologic abnormalities are seen in tuberculosis, immune thrombocytopenic purpura is a rare event. Case Presentation We report a case of a 29 year-old male who was presented with immune thrombocytopenia-induced hemoptysis, macroscopic hematuria and generalized petechiae. The patient was found to have clinical, microbiological and radiological evidence of active pulmonary tuberculosis. The immune thrombocytopenic purpura was successfully treated with anti-tuberculous drugs combined with corticosteroids and high dose immune globulin therapy. Conclusion Immune thrombocytopenic purpura can be one of the hematological manifestations of tuberculosis which has a global prevalence with increasing incidence secondary to HIV infection.

  4. The commensal microbiota drives immune homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Claire eArrieta

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available For millions of years, microbes have coexisted with eukaryotic cells at the mucosal surfaces of vertebrates in a complex, yet usually harmonious symbiosis. An ever-expanding number of reports describe how eliminating or shifting the intestinal microbiota has profound effects on the development and functionality of the mucosal and systemic immune systems. Here, we examine some of the mechanisms by which bacterial signals affect immune homeostasis. Focusing on the strategies that microbes use to keep our immune system healthy, as opposed to trying to correct the immune imbalances caused by dysbiosis, may prove to be a more astute and efficient way of treating immune-mediated disease.

  5. Membrane anchoring stabilizes and favors secretion of New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Lisandro J; Bahr, Guillermo; Nakashige, Toshiki G; Nolan, Elizabeth M; Bonomo, Robert A; Vila, Alejandro J

    2016-07-01

    Carbapenems, 'last-resort' β-lactam antibiotics, are inactivated by zinc-dependent metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs). The host innate immune response withholds nutrient metal ions from microbial pathogens by releasing metal-chelating proteins such as calprotectin. We show that metal sequestration is detrimental for the accumulation of MBLs in the bacterial periplasm, because those enzymes are readily degraded in their nonmetallated form. However, the New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase (NDM-1) can persist under conditions of metal depletion. NDM-1 is a lipidated protein that anchors to the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. Membrane anchoring contributes to the unusual stability of NDM-1 and favors secretion of this enzyme in outer-membrane vesicles (OMVs). OMVs containing NDM-1 can protect nearby populations of bacteria from otherwise lethal antibiotic levels, and OMVs from clinical pathogens expressing NDM-1 can carry this MBL and the blaNDM gene. We show that protein export into OMVs can be targeted, providing possibilities of new antibacterial therapeutic strategies.

  6. 获得性免疫缺陷综合征合并肠结核1例%A case report of acquired immune deficiency syndrome complicated with intestinal tuberculosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄绍萍; 程计林; 赵玉洁; 史佩炯; 马学东; 冯艳玲

    2009-01-01

    Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) complicated with intestinal tuberculosis is rarely reported. Due to lack of typical clinical and endoscopic characteristics,it is easy to be misdiagnosed. In this article,we report and analyze a case of AIDS patient with intestinal tuberculosis,which might be helpful to raise awareness and reduce misdiagnosis or mistreatment.%文献报道获得性免疫缺陷综合征(acquired immune deficiency syndrome,AIDS)合并肠结核很少,临床表现和内镜特点不典型,易误诊.本文对1例手术证实为合并肠结核的AIDS病例进行分析,旨在提高对AIDS继发肠病的诊断认识,减少误诊误治.

  7. Analysis of Conditions favorable for Ball Lightning Creation

    CERN Document Server

    Boerner, H

    2016-01-01

    This report uses a few well documented cases of Ball Lightning (or BL for short) observations to demonstrate a correlation between BL and positive lightning, especially strong positive lightning. This allows to draw conclusions and predictions about future BL observations and the pro- duction of these objects in the laboratory. Contrary to many current BL theories, these objects can be created without direct contact to a lightning channel. Very high electric fields appear to be essential for the creation, together with the proper temporal structure of the field. So far no experiments have been performed along the ideas presented in this report.

  8. Immunity and immunization in elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourée, Patrice

    2003-12-01

    As the average life expectancy increases, retired people want to travel. Five to 8% of travellers in tropical areas are old persons. Immune system suffers of old age as the other organs. The number and the functions of the T-lymphocytes decrease, but the B-lymphocytes are not altered. So, the response to the vaccinations is slower and lower in the elderly. Influenza is a great cause of death rate in old people. The seroconversion, after vaccine, is 50% from 60 to 70 years old, 31% from 70 to 80 years old, and only 11% after 80 years old. But in public health, the vaccination reduced the morbidity by 25%, admission to hospital by 20%, pneumonia by 50%, and mortality by 70%. Antipoliomyelitis vaccine is useful for travellers, as the vaccines against hepatitis and typhoid fever. Pneumococcal vaccine is effective in 60%. Tetanus is fatal in at last 32% of the people above 80 years, therefore this vaccine is very important.

  9. 22 CFR 1203.735-202 - Gifts, entertainment, and favors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... the gift with the hope or expectation of obtaining advantage or preferment in dealing with the U.S... transaction of business, acceptance is not permitted, except if there is justification and reporting in..., corporation, or other entity, or the regulations governing its dining facilities, finds it inconvenient...

  10. Immune System Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Know About Puberty Train Your Temper Quiz: Immune System KidsHealth > For Kids > Quiz: Immune System Print A A A How much do you know about your immune system? Find out by taking this quiz! About KidsHealth ...

  11. Self-Directed Learning Favors Local, Rather Than Global, Uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markant, Douglas B; Settles, Burr; Gureckis, Todd M

    2016-01-01

    Collecting (or "sampling") information that one expects to be useful is a powerful way to facilitate learning. However, relatively little is known about how people decide which information is worth sampling over the course of learning. We describe several alternative models of how people might decide to collect a piece of information inspired by "active learning" research in machine learning. We additionally provide a theoretical analysis demonstrating the situations under which these models are empirically distinguishable, and we report a novel empirical study that exploits these insights. Our model-based analysis of participants' information gathering decisions reveals that people prefer to select items which resolve uncertainty between two possibilities at a time rather than items that have high uncertainty across all relevant possibilities simultaneously. Rather than adhering to strictly normative or confirmatory conceptions of information search, people appear to prefer a "local" sampling strategy, which may reflect cognitive constraints on the process of information gathering. Copyright © 2015 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  12. Plant immunity against viruses: antiviral immune receptors in focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calil, Iara P; Fontes, Elizabeth P B

    2017-03-01

    Among the environmental limitations that affect plant growth, viruses cause major crop losses worldwide and represent serious threats to food security. Significant advances in the field of plant-virus interactions have led to an expansion of potential strategies for genetically engineered resistance in crops during recent years. Nevertheless, the evolution of viral virulence represents a constant challenge in agriculture that has led to a continuing interest in the molecular mechanisms of plant-virus interactions that affect disease or resistance. This review summarizes the molecular mechanisms of the antiviral immune system in plants and the latest breakthroughs reported in plant defence against viruses. Particular attention is given to the immune receptors and transduction pathways in antiviral innate immunity. Plants counteract viral infection with a sophisticated innate immune system that resembles the non-viral pathogenic system, which is broadly divided into pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity and effector-triggered immunity. An additional recently uncovered virus-specific defence mechanism relies on host translation suppression mediated by a transmembrane immune receptor. In all cases, the recognition of the virus by the plant during infection is central for the activation of these innate defences, and, conversely, the detection of host plants enables the virus to activate virulence strategies. Plants also circumvent viral infection through RNA interference mechanisms by utilizing small RNAs, which are often suppressed by co-evolving virus suppressors. Additionally, plants defend themselves against viruses through hormone-mediated defences and activation of the ubiquitin-26S proteasome system (UPS), which alternatively impairs and facilitates viral infection. Therefore, plant defence and virulence strategies co-evolve and co-exist; hence, disease development is largely dependent on the extent and rate at which these opposing

  13. First prospective report on immune tolerance in poor risk haemophilia A inhibitor patients with a single factor VIII/von Willebrand factor concentrate in an observational immune tolerance induction study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuz, W; Escuriola Ettingshausen, C; Vdovin, V; Zozulya, N; Plyushch, O; Svirin, P; Andreeva, T; Bubanská, E; Campos, M; Benedik-Dolničar, M; Jiménez-Yuste, V; Kitanovski, L; Klukowska, A; Momot, A; Osmulskaya, N; Prieto, M; Šalek, S Z; Velasco, F; Pavlova, A; Oldenburg, J; Knaub, S; Jansen, M; Belyanskaya, L; Walter, O

    2016-01-01

    Development of neutralizing inhibitors against factor VIII (FVIII) is a major complication of haemophilia A treatment. The ongoing, international, open-label, uncontrolled, observational immune tolerance induction (ObsITI) study evaluates ITI, the standard of care in patients with inhibitors. Forty-eight prospective patients in this interim analysis received a single plasma-derived, von Willebrand factor-stabilized, FVIII concentrate (pdFVIII/VWF) for ITI. According to recommended Bonn protocol, 'low responders' at ITI start (2 years since inhibitor diagnosis, inhibitor titre ≥10 BU at the start of ITI, or prior ITI failure). Nonetheless, 34 patients (70.8%) achieved complete success, 3 (6.3%) partial success, 1 (2.1%) partial response; ITI failed in 10 patients (20.8%), all with poor prognosis factors. All six low responders achieved complete success. ITI outcome was significantly associated with inhibitor titre level at ITI start (P = 0.0068), number of poor prognosis factors for ITI success (P = 0.0187), monthly bleeding rate during ITI (P = 0.0005) and peak inhibitor titre during ITI (P = 0.0007). Twenty-two of 35 high responder patients (62.9%) with ≥1 poor prognosis factor achieved complete success. Treatment with a single pdFVIII/VWF concentrate, mainly according to the Bonn protocol, resulted in a high ITI success rate in haemophilia A patients with inhibitors and poor prognosis for ITI success. © 2015 The Authors. Haemophilia Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. The experience of freedom in decisions - Questioning philosophical beliefs in favor of psychological determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Stephan; Hiemisch, Anette; Baumeister, Roy F

    2015-05-01

    Six experiments tested two competing models of subjective freedom during decision-making. The process model is mainly based on philosophical conceptions of free will and assumes that features of the process of choosing affect subjective feelings of freedom. In contrast, the outcome model predicts that subjective freedom is due to positive outcomes that can be expected or are achieved by a decision. Results heavily favored the outcome model over the process model. For example, participants felt freer when choosing between two equally good than two equally bad options. Process features including number of options, complexity of decision, uncertainty, having the option to defer the decision, conflict among reasons, and investing high effort in choosing generally had no or even negative effects on subjective freedom. In contrast, participants reported high freedom with good outcomes and low freedom with bad outcomes, and ease of deciding increased subjective freedom, consistent with the outcome model. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Favorable effect of aerobic exercise on arterial pressure and aortic pulse wave velocity during stress testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milatz, Florian; Ketelhut, Sascha; Ketelhut, Sascha; Ketelhut, Reinhard G

    2015-07-01

    Increased central pulse wave velocity is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The favorable influence of exercise on arterial stiffness (AS) and blood pressure (BP) has been reported exclusively at rest. The present study investigated the influence of a single bout of acute cycling on AS and BP during recovery and, moreover, during cold pressor stress testing. 32 healthy men (33.7 ± 8 years, BMI 24 ± 2.5 kg/m²) performed a 60 minute endurance exercise on a bicycle ergometer (45 % VO2max). Before and after exercise aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV) as well as central and peripheral BP were measured non-invasively at rest and at the end of a 2 minute cold pressor test (CPT). Even after 60 minutes of recovery aPWV (- 0.22 ± 0.3 m / sec) was significantly reduced (p testing.

  16. Recurrent DGCR8, DROSHA, and SIX homeodomain mutations in favorable histology Wilms tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walz, Amy L; Ooms, Ariadne; Gadd, Samantha; Gerhard, Daniela S; Smith, Malcolm A; Guidry Auvil, Jaime M; Guidry Auvil, Jamie M; Meerzaman, Daoud; Chen, Qing-Rong; Hsu, Chih Hao; Yan, Chunhua; Nguyen, Cu; Hu, Ying; Bowlby, Reanne; Brooks, Denise; Ma, Yussanne; Mungall, Andrew J; Moore, Richard A; Schein, Jacqueline; Marra, Marco A; Huff, Vicki; Dome, Jeffrey S; Chi, Yueh-Yun; Mullighan, Charles G; Ma, Jing; Wheeler, David A; Hampton, Oliver A; Jafari, Nadereh; Ross, Nicole; Gastier-Foster, Julie M; Perlman, Elizabeth J

    2015-02-09

    We report the most common single-nucleotide substitution/deletion mutations in favorable histology Wilms tumors (FHWTs) to occur within SIX1/2 (7% of 534 tumors) and microRNA processing genes (miRNAPGs) DGCR8 and DROSHA (15% of 534 tumors). Comprehensive analysis of 77 FHWTs indicates that tumors with SIX1/2 and/or miRNAPG mutations show a pre-induction metanephric mesenchyme gene expression pattern and are significantly associated with both perilobar nephrogenic rests and 11p15 imprinting aberrations. Significantly decreased expression of mature Let-7a and the miR-200 family (responsible for mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition) in miRNAPG mutant tumors is associated with an undifferentiated blastemal histology. The combination of SIX and miRNAPG mutations in the same tumor is associated with evidence of RAS activation and a higher rate of relapse and death.

  17. Small-Molecule Anticonvulsant Agents with Potent in vitro Neuroprotection and Favorable Drug-like Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Garry R.; Brenneman, Douglas E.; Zhang, Yan; Du, Yanming; Reitz, Allen B.

    2014-01-01

    Severe seizure activity is associated with reoccurring cycles of excitotoxicity and oxidative stress that result in progressive neuronal damage and death. Intervention with these pathological processes is a compelling disease-modifying strategy for the treatment of seizure disorders. We have optimized a series of small molecules for neuroprotective and anticonvulsant activity as well as altered their physical properties to address potential metabolic liabilities, to improve CNS penetration and to prolong the duration of action in vivo. Utilizing phenotypic screening of hippocampal cultures with nutrient medium depleted of antioxidants as a disease model, cell death and decreased neuronal viability produced by acute treatment with glutamate or hydrogen peroxide were prevented. Modifications to our previously reported proof of concept compounds have resulted in a lead which has full neuroprotective action at anticonvulsants are feasible within a single molecular entity which also possesses favorable CNS-active drug properties in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24277343

  18. 1(st) EMBL/DFG Women in Science Network Conference Heidelberg 2016: From Genes, Cells and the Immune System towards Therapies - Meeting Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stripecke, Renata; Gouttefangeas, Cécile; Förster, Irmgard

    2016-11-01

    The 1(st) EMBL/DFG Women in Science (WiS) Conference "From Genes, Cells and the Immune System towards Therapies" was held on 19(th) - 20(th) September 2016 in Heidelberg, Germany. The WiS conference was funded by nine Collaborative Research Centers (CRCs) of the German Research Council (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, DFG; Table 1) and benefited from an outstanding hosting environment at the Advanced Training Center of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL). Scientific talks focused at genetic, cellular and immunologic mechanisms, and immune therapy, and progress from all stages of development covering basic research to clinical developments was described. The presentations were embedded between structured networking sessions and a round table discussion with representatives of the DFG, EMBL, European Molecular Biology Organisation (EMBO), and the German Society of Immunology (DGfI). © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Understanding Herd Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalf, C J E; Ferrari, M; Graham, A L; Grenfell, B T

    2015-12-01

    Individual immunity is a powerful force affecting host health and pathogen evolution. Importantly, the effects of individual immunity also scale up to affect pathogen transmission dynamics and the success of vaccination campaigns for entire host populations. Population-scale immunity is often termed 'herd immunity'. Here we outline how individual immunity maps to population outcomes and discuss implications for control of infectious diseases. Particular immunological characteristics may be more or less likely to result in a population level signature of herd immunity; we detail this and also discuss other population-level outcomes that might emerge from individual-level immunity.

  20. Successful immune tolerance induction consisting of high-dose factor VIII rich in von Willebrand factor and pulsed intravenous immunoglobulin: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubisz Peter

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The development of factor VIII inhibitors is a serious complication of replacement therapy in patients with congenital hemophilia A. Immune tolerance induction has been accepted as the only clinically proven treatment allowing antigen-specific tolerance to factor VIII. However, some of its issues, such as patient selection, timing, factor VIII dosing, use of immunosuppressive or immunomodulatory procedures, still remain the subject of debate. Case presentation A case of a 3-year-old Caucasian boy with severe congenital hemophilia A, intron 22 inversion of the F8 gene and high-titer inhibitor, who underwent an immune tolerance induction according to the modified Bonn regimen (high doses of plasma-derived factor VIII rich in von Willebrand factor and pulsed intravenous immunoglobulin is presented. The treatment lasted for 13 months and led to the eradication of inhibitor. Conclusion Addition of intravenous immunoglobulin did not negatively affect the course of immune tolerance induction and led to the rapid eradication of factor VIII inhibitor.

  1. Beyond immune checkpoint blockade: new approaches to targeting host-tumor interactions in prostate cancer: report from the 2014 Coffey-Holden prostate cancer academy meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyahira, Andrea K; Kissick, Haydn T; Bishop, Jennifer L; Takeda, David Y; Barbieri, Christopher E; Simons, Jonathan W; Pienta, Kenneth J; Soule, Howard R

    2015-03-01

    The 2014 Coffey-Holden Prostate Cancer Academy Meeting, held in La Jolla, CA from June 26 to 29, 2014, was themed: "Beyond Immune Checkpoint Blockade: New Approaches to Targeting Host-Tumor Interactions in Prostate Cancer." Sponsored by the Prostate Cancer Foundation (PCF), this annual, invitation-only meeting is structured as an action-tank, and brought together 72 investigators with diverse academic backgrounds to discuss the most relevant topics in the fields of prostate cancer immunotherapy and the tumor microenvironment. The questions addressed at the meeting included: mechanisms underlying the successes and failures of prostate cancer immunotherapies, how to trigger an effective immune response against prostate cancer, the tumor microenvironment and its role in therapy resistance and tumor metastasis, clinically relevant prostate cancer mouse models, how host-tumor interactions affect current therapies and tumor phenotypes, application of principles of precision medicine to prostate cancer immunotherapy, optimizing immunotherapy clinical trial design, and complex multi-system interactions that affect prostate cancer and immune responses including the effects of obesity and the potential role of the host microbiome. This article highlights the most significant recent progress and unmet needs that were discussed at the meeting toward the goal of speeding the development of optimal immunotherapies for the treatment of prostate cancer. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Gap junctions in cells of the immune system: structure, regulation and possible functional roles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C. Sáez

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Gap junction channels are sites of cytoplasmic communication between contacting cells. In vertebrates, they consist of protein subunits denoted connexins (Cxs which are encoded by a gene family. According to their Cx composition, gap junction channels show different gating and permeability properties that define which ions and small molecules permeate them. Differences in Cx primary sequences suggest that channels composed of different Cxs are regulated differentially by intracellular pathways under specific physiological conditions. Functional roles of gap junction channels could be defined by the relative importance of permeant substances, resulting in coordination of electrical and/or metabolic cellular responses. Cells of the native and specific immune systems establish transient homo- and heterocellular contacts at various steps of the immune response. Morphological and functional studies reported during the last three decades have revealed that many intercellular contacts between cells in the immune response present gap junctions or "gap junction-like" structures. Partial characterization of the molecular composition of some of these plasma membrane structures and regulatory mechanisms that control them have been published recently. Studies designed to elucidate their physiological roles suggest that they might permit coordination of cellular events which favor the effective and timely response of the immune system.

  3. Explaining financial and prosocial biases in favor of attractive people: Interdisciplinary perspectives from economics, social psychology, and evolutionary psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestripieri, Dario; Henry, Andrea; Nickels, Nora

    2017-01-01

    Financial and prosocial biases in favor of attractive adults have been documented in the labor market, in social transactions in everyday life, and in studies involving experimental economic games. According to the taste-based discrimination model developed by economists, attractiveness-related financial and prosocial biases are the result of preferences or prejudices similar to those displayed toward members of a particular sex, racial, ethnic, or religious group. Other explanations proposed by economists and social psychologists maintain that attractiveness is a marker of personality, intelligence, trustworthiness, professional competence, or productivity. Evolutionary psychologists have argued that attractive adults are favored because they are preferred sexual partners. Evidence that stereotypes about attractive people are causally related to financial or prosocial biases toward them is weak or nonexistent. Consistent with evolutionary explanations, biases in favor of attractive women appear to be more consistent or stronger than those in favor of attractive men, and biases are more consistently reported in interactions between opposite-sex than same-sex individuals. Evolutionary explanations also account for increased prosocial behavior in situations in which attractive individuals are simply bystanders. Finally, evolutionary explanations are consistent with the psychological, physiological, and behavioral changes that occur when individuals are exposed to potential mates, which facilitate the expression of courtship behavior and increase the probability of occurrence of mating. Therefore, multiple lines of evidence suggest that mating motives play a more important role in driving financial and prosocial biases toward attractive adults than previously recognized.

  4. PIERCING THE DIPLOMATIC IMMUNITY VEIL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    10332324

    2014-01-15

    Jan 15, 2014 ... From time to time the media reports on diplomats residing in a ... "mistreatment", but has since received diplomatic immunity and left the US for India. ... Section 213 of the Labour Relations Act 66 of 1995 (hereafter the "LRA").

  5. Innovations in cold chain equipment for immunization supply chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Joanie; Franzel, Lauren; Maire, Denis

    2017-04-19

    Since 2010, numerous new technologies have entered the immunization cold chain equipment market. The World Health Organization (WHO) Immunization Devices Programme-Performance, Quality and Safety (PQS)-has played a key role in bringing these to market. In this article, the authors explore the emergence of new cold chain equipment technologies from 2004 to 2016 and the role of PQS in this evolution. This review focuses on three major vaccine cold chain technology innovations-solar direct-drive refrigerators, long-term passive cold boxes, and equipment with user-independent freeze prevention. For the review, we used online data from WHO PQS, a literature search, and unpublished research reports. Timelines with key milestones in the emergence of the three focus technologies show delays of between one and three years between earliest field trials and publication of WHO specifications; procurement builds after the WHO prequalification of initial devices. The timelines show the role of PQS as both gatekeeper and enabler for cold chain equipment technologies. The use of target product profiles by PQS has increased its ability to signal preferred attributes and to engage with manufacturers during the product-development stage. Procurement data show how demand for solar direct-drive refrigerators increased over time. Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, is employing demand-generation strategies to try to drive procurement of technologies with favorable technical attributes. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Innate immune recognition of hepatitis B virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Yan; Liu; Xiao-Yong; Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus(HBV) is a hepatotropic DNA virus and its infection results in acute or chronic hepatitis. It is reported that the host innate immune system contributes to viral control and liver pathology, while whether and how HBV can trigger the components of innate immunity remains controversial. In recent years, the data accumulated from HBV-infected patients, cellular and animal models have challenged the concept of a stealth virus for HBV infection. This editorial focuses on the current findings about the innate immune recognition to HBV. Such evaluation could help us to understand HBV immunopathogenesis and develop novel immune therapeutic strategies to combat HBV infection.

  7. Immune regulation of ovarian development: programming by neonatal immune challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luba eSominsky

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal immune challenge by administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS produces enduring alterations in the development and activity of neuroendocrine, immune and other physiological systems. We have recently reported that neonatal exposure to an immune challenge by administration of LPS results in altered reproductive development in the female Wistar rat. Specifically, LPS-treated animals exhibited diminished ovarian reserve and altered reproductive lifespan. In the current study, we examined the cellular mechanisms that lead to the previously documented impaired ovulation and reduced follicular pool. Rats were administered intraperitoneally either 0.05mg/kg of LPS (Salmonella Enteritidis or an equivalent volume of non-pyrogenic saline on postnatal days (PNDs 3 and 5, and ovaries were obtained on PND 7. Microarray analysis revealed a significant upregulation in transcript expression (2-fold change; p<.05 for a substantial number of genes in the ovaries of LPS-treated animals, implicated in immune cell signalling, inflammatory responses, reproductive system development and disease. Several canonical pathways involved in immune recognition were affected by LPS treatment, such as nuclear factor-κB (NF-kB activation and LPS-stimulated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signalling. Real-time PCR analysis supported the microarray results. Protein expression analysis of several components of the MAPK signalling pathway revealed a significant upregulation in the expression of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 in the neonatal ovary of LPS-treated animals. These results indicate that neonatal immune challenge by administration of LPS has a direct effect on the ovary during the sensitive period of follicular formation. Given the pivotal role of inflammatory processes in the regulation of reproductive health, our findings suggest that early life immune activation via TLR signalling may have significant implications for the programming of ovarian development

  8. Characterization of NF-κB Reporter U937 Cells and Their Application for the Detection of Inflammatory Immune-Complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csilla Kecse-Nagy

    Full Text Available Our study tested the hypothesis that immunoglobulins differ in their ability to activate the nuclear factor-κB pathway mediated cellular responses. These responses are modulated by several properties of the immune complex, including the ratio of antibody isotypes binding to antigen. Immunoassays allow the measurement of antigen specific antibodies belonging to distinct immunoglobulin classes and subclasses but not the net biological effect of the combination of these antibodies. We set out to develop a biosensor that is suitable for the detection and characterization of antigen specific serum antibodies. We genetically modified the monocytoid U937 cell line carrying Fc receptors with a plasmid encoding NF-κB promoter-driven GFP. This clone, U937-NF-κB, was characterized with respect to FcR expression and response to solid-phase immunoglobulins. Human IgG3, IgG4 and IgG1 induced GFP production in a time- and dose-dependent manner, in this order of efficacy, while IgG2 triggered no activation at the concentrations tested. IgA elicited no response alone but showed significant synergism with IgG3 and IgG4. We confirmed the importance of activation via FcγRI by direct stimulation with monoclonal antibody and by competition assays. We used citrullinated peptides and serum from rheumatoid arthritis patients to generate immune complexes and to study the activation of U937-NF-κB, observing again a synergistic effect between IgG and IgA. Our results show that immunoglobulins have distinct pro-inflammatory potential, and that U937-NF-κB is suitable for the estimation of biological effects of immune-complexes, offering insight into monocyte activation and pathogenesis of antibody mediated diseases.

  9. Immune Compromise in HIV-1/HTLV-1 Coinfection With Paradoxical Resolution of CD4 Lymphocytosis During Antiretroviral Therapy: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwood, N; Cook, L; Kagdi, H; Basnayake, S; Bangham, C R M; Pozniak, A L; Taylor, G P

    2015-12-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) and human T lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) infections have complex effects on adaptive immunity, with specific tropism for, but contrasting effects on, CD4 T lymphocytes: depletion with HIV-1, proliferation with HTLV-1. Impaired T lymphocyte function occurs early in HIV-1 infection but opportunistic infections (OIs) rarely occur in the absence of CD4 lymphopenia. In the unusual case where a HIV-1 infected individual with a high CD4 count presents with recurrent OIs, a clinician is faced with the possibility of a second underlying comorbidity. We present a case of pseudo-adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) in HIV-1/HTLV-1 coinfection where the individual fulfilled Shimoyama criteria for chronic ATLL and had pulmonary Mycobacterium kansasii, despite a high CD4 lymphocyte count. However, there was no evidence of clonal T-cell proliferation by T-cell receptor gene rearrangement studies nor of monoclonal HTLV-1 integration by high-throughput sequencing. Mutually beneficial interplay between HIV-1 and HTLV-1, maintaining high level HIV-1 and HTLV-1 viremia and proliferation of poorly functional CD4 cells despite chronicity of infection is a postulated mechanism. Despite good microbiological response to antimycobacterial therapy, the patient remained systemically unwell with refractory anemia. Subsequent initiation of combined antiretroviral therapy led to paradoxical resolution of CD4 T lymphocytosis as well as HIV-1 viral suppression and decreased HTLV-1 proviral load. This is proposed to be the result of attenuation of immune activation post-HIV virological control. This case illustrates the importance of screening for HTLV-1 in HIV-1 patients with appropriate clinical presentation and epidemiological risk factors and explores mechanisms for the complex interactions on HIV-1/HTLV-1 adaptive immunity.

  10. Protein phosphatase methylesterase-1 (PME-1) expression predicts a favorable clinical outcome in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Amanpreet; Elzagheid, Adam; Birkman, Eva-Maria; Avoranta, Tuulia; Kytölä, Ville; Korkeila, Eija; Syrjänen, Kari; Westermarck, Jukka; Sundström, Jari

    2015-12-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) accounts for high mortality. So far, there is lack of markers capable of predicting which patients are at risk of aggressive course of the disease. Protein phosphatase-2A (PP2A) inhibitor proteins have recently gained interest as markers of more aggressive disease in certain cancers. Here, we report the role of PP2A inhibitor PME-1 in CRC. PME-1 expression was assessed from a rectal cancer patient cohort by immunohistochemistry, and correlations were performed for various clinicopathological variables and patient survival. Rectal cancer patients with higher cytoplasmic PME-1 protein expression (above median) had less recurrences (P = 0.003, n = 195) and better disease-free survival (DFS) than the patients with low cytoplasmic PME-1 protein expression (below median). Analysis of PPME-1 mRNA expression from TCGA dataset of colon and rectal adenocarcinoma (COADREAD) patient cohort confirmed high PPME1 expression as an independent protective factor predicting favorable overall survival (OS) (P = 0.005, n = 396) compared to patients with low PPME1 expression. CRC cell lines were used to study the effect of PME-1 knockdown by siRNA on cell survival. Contrary to other cancer types, PME-1 inhibition in CRC cell lines did not reduce the viability of cells or the expression of active phosphorylated AKT and ERK proteins. In conclusion, PME-1 expression predicts for a favorable outcome of CRC patients. The unexpected role of PME-1 in CRC in contrast with the oncogenic role of PP2A inhibitor proteins in other malignancies warrants further studies of cancer-specific function for each of these proteins.

  11. Computation assisted design of favored composition for ternary Mg-Cu-Y metallic glass formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q; Li, J H; Liu, B X

    2015-06-14

    With the aid of ab initio calculations, a realistic interatomic potential was constructed for the Mg-Cu-Y ternary system under the proposed formalism of smoothed and long-range second-moment approximation of tight-binding. Taking the potential as the starting base, an atomistic computation/simulation route was developed for designing favored and optimized compositions for Mg-Cu-Y metallic glass formation. Simulations revealed that the physical origin of metallic glass formation is the collapse of crystalline lattice when solute concentration exceeds a critical value, thus leading to predict a hexagonal region in the Mg-Cu-Y composition triangle, within which metallic glass formation is energetically favored. It is proposed that the hexagonal region can be defined as the intrinsic glass formation region, or quantitative glass formation ability of the system. Inside the hexagonal region, the driving force for formation of each specific glassy alloy was further calculated and correlated with its forming ability in practice. Calculations pinpointed the optimized stoichiometry in the Mg-Cu-Y system to be Mg64Cu16Y20, at which the formation driving force reaches its maximum, suggesting that metallic glasses designed to have compositions around Mg64Cu16Y20 are most stable or easiest to obtain. The predictions derived directly from the atomistic simulations are supported by experimental observations reported so far in the literature. Furthermore, Honeycutt-Anderson analysis indicated that pentagonal bipyramids (although not aggregating to form icosahedra) dominate in the local structure of the Mg-Cu-Y metallic glasses. A microscopic picture of the medium-range packing can then be described as an extended network of the pentagonal bipyramids, entangled with the fourfold and sixfold disclination lines, jointly fulfilling the space of the metallic glasses.

  12. Skin innate immune system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berna Aksoy

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available All multicellular organisms protect themselves from external universe and microorganisms by innate immune sytem that is constitutively present. Skin innate immune system has several different components composed of epithelial barriers, humoral factors and cellular part. In this review information about skin innate immune system and its components are presented to the reader. Innate immunity, which wasn’t adequately interested in previously, is proven to provide a powerfull early protection system, control many infections before the acquired immunity starts and directs acquired immunity to develop optimally

  13. Innate immune targets of hepatitis B virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, Li; Wang, Kai; Yu, Ji-Guang

    2016-06-18

    Approximately 400 million people are chronically infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) globally despite the widespread immunization of HBV vaccine and the development of antiviral therapies. The immunopathogenesis of HBV infection is initiated and driven by complexed interactions between the host immune system and the virus. Host immune responses to viral particles and proteins are regarded as the main determinants of viral clearance or persistent infection and hepatocyte injury. Innate immune system is the first defending line of host preventing from virus invasion. It is acknowledged that HBV has developed active tactics to escape innate immune recognition or actively interfere with innate immune signaling pathways and induce immunosuppression, which favor their replication. HBV reduces the expression of pattern-recognition receptors in the innate immune cells in humans. Also, HBV may interrupt different parts of antiviral signaling pathways, leading to the reduced production of antiviral cytokines such as interferons that contribute to HBV immunopathogenesis. A full comprehension of the mechanisms as to how HBV inactivates various elements of the innate immune response to initiate and maintain a persistent infection can be helpful in designing new immunotherapeutic methods for preventing and eradicating the virus. In this review, we aimed to summarize different branches the innate immune targeted by HBV infection. The review paper provides evidence that multiple components of immune responses should be activated in combination with antiviral therapy to disrupt the tolerance to HBV for eliminating HBV infection.

  14. Innate immune targets of hepatitis B virus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Qiang; Zou; Li; Wang; Kai; Wang; Ji-Guang; Yu

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 400 million people are chronically infected with hepatitis B virus(HBV) globally despitethe widespread immunization of HBV vaccine and the development of antiviral therapies. The immunopathogenesis of HBV infection is initiated and driven by complexed interactions between the host immune system and the virus. Host immune responses to viral particles and proteins are regarded as the main determinants of viral clearance or persistent infection and hepatocyte injury. Innate immune system is the first defending line of host preventing from virus invasion. It is acknowledged that HBV has developed active tactics to escape innate immune recognition or actively interfere with innate immune signaling pathways and induce immunosuppression, which favor their replication. HBV reduces the expression of pattern-recognition receptors in the innate immune cells in humans. Also, HBV may interrupt different parts of antiviral signaling pathways, leading to the reduced production of antiviral cytokines such as interferons that contribute to HBV immunopathogenesis. A full comprehension of the mechanisms as to how HBV inactivates various elements of the innate immune response to initiate and maintain a persistent infection can be helpful in designing new immunotherapeutic methods for preventing and eradicating the virus. In this review, we aimed to summarize different branches the innate immune targeted by HBV infection. The review paper provides evidence that multiple components of immune responses should be activated in combination with antiviral therapy to disrupt the tolerance to HBV for eliminating HBV infection.

  15. Humoral immunity in Hansen's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldenise Cossermelli-Messina

    Full Text Available For many years immune response in leprosy has been studied. Since 1960 several reports dealing with humoral immunity have been described in the literature. Different autoantibody rates occur in leprosy. There is an increase in the prevalence of autoantibodies in elderly patients with long standing disease, in lepromatous leprosy and in those with reactional states. The diferences in rates among various studies are attributed to different methods and variations among patient samples concerning age, gender, polar forms, therapy and other elements. The prevalence of numerous antibodies, immune complexes, cryoglobulins and complement levels have been studied by many authors. This also highlights the importance of the more recent reviews of anti-Mycobacterium leprae glycolipid antibodies such as the anti-phenolic glycolipid-I antibodies in which titers are variable and depend on genetic factors.

  16. Immunity in a Social Insect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosengaus, Rebeca B.; Traniello, James F. A.; Chen, Tammy; Brown, Julie J.; Karp, Richard D.

    Although pathogens appear to have exerted significant selective pressure on various aspects of sociality, mechanisms of disease resistance in the social insects are poorly understood. We report here on an immune response to infection by the dampwood termite, Zootermopsis angusticollis. Nymphs immunized with an injection of 7.6×107, 7.6×105, or 7.6×104 cells/ml glutaraldehyde-killed solution of the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa had significantly higher survivorship than controls following a challenge with a lethal concentration of active bacteria. Similarly, nymphs exposed to a 9×10-1 spores/ml suspension of the fungus Metarhizium anisopliae had higher survivorship than controls after a challenge with a lethal concentration of spores. Prior exposure to a pathogen thus conferred upon termites a degree of protection during a subsequent encounter with the same pathogen. This represents the first demonstration of immune function in vivo in a social insect.

  17. Effects of alcohol consumption on the allergen-specific immune response in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linneberg, Allan; Roursgaard, Martin; Hersoug, Lars-Georg;

    2008-01-01

    There is evidence that chronic alcohol consumption impairs the T-helper 1 (Th1) lymphocyte-regulated cell-mediated immune response possibly favoring a Th2 deviation of the immune response. Moreover, a few epidemiological studies have linked alcohol consumption to allergen-specific IgE sensitization....

  18. Favorable alteration of tumor microenvironment by immunomodulatory cytokines for efficient T-cell therapy in solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tähtinen, Siri; Kaikkonen, Saija; Merisalo-Soikkeli, Maiju; Grönberg-Vähä-Koskela, Susanna; Kanerva, Anna; Parviainen, Suvi; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Hemminki, Akseli

    2015-01-01

    Unfavorable ratios between the number and activation status of effector and suppressor immune cells infiltrating the tumor contribute to resistance of solid tumors to T-cell based therapies. Here, we studied the capacity of FDA and EMA approved recombinant cytokines to manipulate this balance in favor of efficient anti-tumor responses in B16.OVA melanoma bearing C57BL/6 mice. Intratumoral administration of IFN-α2, IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2 significantly enhanced the anti-tumor effect of ovalbumin-specific CD8+ T-cell (OT-I) therapy, whereas GM-CSF increased tumor growth in association with an increase in immunosuppressive cell populations. None of the cytokines augmented tumor trafficking of OT-I cells significantly, but injections of IFN-α2, IFN-γ and IL-2 increased intratumoral cytokine secretion and recruitment of endogenous immune cells capable of stimulating T-cells, such as natural killer and maturated CD11c+ antigen-presenting cells. Moreover, IFN-α2 and IL-2 increased the levels of activated tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T-cells concomitant with reduction in the CD8+ T-cell expression of anergy markers CTLA-4 and PD-1. In conclusion, intratumoral administration of IFN-α2, IFN-γ and IL-2 can lead to immune sensitization of the established tumor, whereas GM-CSF may contribute to tumor-associated immunosuppression. The results described here provide rationale for including local administration of immunostimulatory cytokines into T-cell therapy regimens. One appealing embodiment of this would be vectored delivery which could be advantageous over direct injection of recombinant molecules with regard to efficacy, cost, persistence and convenience.

  19. Favorable alteration of tumor microenvironment by immunomodulatory cytokines for efficient T-cell therapy in solid tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siri Tähtinen

    Full Text Available Unfavorable ratios between the number and activation status of effector and suppressor immune cells infiltrating the tumor contribute to resistance of solid tumors to T-cell based therapies. Here, we studied the capacity of FDA and EMA approved recombinant cytokines to manipulate this balance in favor of efficient anti-tumor responses in B16.OVA melanoma bearing C57BL/6 mice. Intratumoral administration of IFN-α2, IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2 significantly enhanced the anti-tumor effect of ovalbumin-specific CD8+ T-cell (OT-I therapy, whereas GM-CSF increased tumor growth in association with an increase in immunosuppressive cell populations. None of the cytokines augmented tumor trafficking of OT-I cells significantly, but injections of IFN-α2, IFN-γ and IL-2 increased intratumoral cytokine secretion and recruitment of endogenous immune cells capable of stimulating T-cells, such as natural killer and maturated CD11c+ antigen-presenting cells. Moreover, IFN-α2 and IL-2 increased the levels of activated tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T-cells concomitant with reduction in the CD8+ T-cell expression of anergy markers CTLA-4 and PD-1. In conclusion, intratumoral administration of IFN-α2, IFN-γ and IL-2 can lead to immune sensitization of the established tumor, whereas GM-CSF may contribute to tumor-associated immunosuppression. The results described here provide rationale for including local administration of immunostimulatory cytokines into T-cell therapy regimens. One appealing embodiment of this would be vectored delivery which could be advantageous over direct injection of recombinant molecules with regard to efficacy, cost, persistence and convenience.

  20. Immunization with HBsAg-Fc fusion protein induces a predominant production of Th1 cytokines and reduces HBsAg level in transgenic mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Zhe-feng; WANG Hua-jing; YAO Xin; WANG Xuan-yi; WEN Yu-mei; DAI Jian-xin; XIE You-hua; XU Jian-qing

    2012-01-01

    Background The Fc receptor associated pathway might improve the immune responses against hepatitis B virus (HBV) as previously described by us.In addition,the Flt3 ligand (FL) has been reported to potentiate antigen presenting cells in vivo and may act as a potential adjuvant to boost antigen-specific immune responses.In this study,the immune efficacies of a set of fusion proteins of HBsAg and Fc and/or FL were evaluated in HBsAg transgenic mice.Methods The fusion proteins composed of HBsAg and the Fc domain of murine IgG1 (HBsAg-Fc) and/or the Flt3 ligand,and yeast-derived recombinant HBsAg were used as immunogen to immunize HBsAg transgenic mice,respectively.Serum and liver HBsAg levels,serum anti-HBsAg and cytokine profile,and the activities of alanine aminotransferase (ALT)/AST were investigated after immunization.Results After six injections,the most pronounced decrease in serum and liver HBsAg levels was observed in the HBsAg-Fc immunized group.In addition,serum Th1 cytokines and ALT/AST activities were highest in this group,indicating an effective induction of a favorable cellular immune response.Interestingly,the fusion protein containing HBsAg-Fc and the Flt3 ligand stimulated an alternative Th1-type immune response featured with high level productions of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF- α) and monocyte chemoabstractant protein 1 (MCP-1),causing a more severe cytotoxicity in hepatocytes while showed less effective in reducing serum HBsAg level.Conclusion HBsAg-Fc is effective in eliciting both the humoral and cellular immune responses against HBsAg in HBsAg transgenic mice,which makes it a potential immunogen for the immunotherapy of chronic hepatitis B.

  1. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for small lung tumors with a moderate dose. Favorable results and low toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncker-Rohr, V.; Nestle, U. [Universitaetsklinikum Freiburg (Germany); Momm, F. [Ortenau Klinikum Offenburg (Germany)] [and others

    2013-01-15

    Background: Stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SBRT, SABR) is being increasingly applied because of its high local efficacy, e.g., for small lung tumors. However, the optimum dosage is still under discussion. Here, we report data on 45 lung lesions [non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) or metastases] in 39 patients treated between 2009 and 2010 by SABR. Patients and methods: SABR was performed with total doses of 35 Gy (5 fractions) or 37.5 Gy (3 fractions) prescribed to the 60% isodose line encompassing the planning target volume. Three-monthly follow-up CT scans were supplemented by FDG-PET/CT if clinically indicated. Results: The median follow-up was 17 months. Local progression-free survival rates were 90.5% (all patients), 95.0% (NSCLC), and 81.8% (metastases) at 1 year. At 2 years, the respective local progression-free survival rates were 80.5%, 95.0%, and 59.7%. Overall survival rates were 71.1% (all patients), 65.4% (NSCLC), and 83.3% (metastases) at 1 year. Overall survival rates at 2 years were 52.7%, 45.9%, and 66.7%, respectively. Acute side effects were mild. Conclusion: With the moderate dose schedule used, well-tolerated SABR led to favorable local tumor control as in other published series. Standardization in reporting the dose prescription for SABR is needed to allow comparison of different series in order to determine optimum dosage. (orig.)

  2. Probiotics as an Immune Modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hye-Ji; Im, Sin-Hyeog

    2015-01-01

    Probiotics are nonpathogenic live microorganism that can provide a diverse health benefits on the host when consumed in adequate amounts. Probiotics are consumed in diverse ways including dairy product, food supplements and functional foods with specific health claims. Recently, many reports suggest that certain probiotic strains or multi strain mixture have potent immunomodulatory activity in diverse disorders including allergic asthma, atopic dermatitis and rheumatoid arthritis. However, underlying mechanism of action is still unclear and efficacy of probiotic administration is quite different depending on the type of strains and the amounts of doses. We and others have suggested that live probiotics or their metabolites could interact with diverse immune cells (antigen presenting cells and T cells) and confer them to have immunoregulatory functions. Through this interaction, probiotics could contribute to maintaining immune homeostasis by balancing pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory immune responses. However, the effect of probiotics in prevention or modulation of ongoing disease is quite diverse even within a same species. Therefore, identification of functional probiotics with specific immune regulatory property is a certainly important issue. Herein, we briefly review selection methods for immunomodulatory probiotic strains and the mechanism of action of probiotics in immune modulation.

  3. Aging changes in immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/004008.htm Aging changes in immunity To use the sharing features ... cells and antibodies that destroy these harmful substances. AGING CHANGES AND THEIR EFFECTS ON THE IMMUNE SYSTEM ...

  4. Immune System and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your immune system is a complex network of cells, tissues, and organs that work together to defend against germs. It ... t, to find and destroy them. If your immune system cannot do its job, the results can be ...

  5. Immunity by equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberl, Gérard

    2016-08-01

    The classical model of immunity posits that the immune system reacts to pathogens and injury and restores homeostasis. Indeed, a century of research has uncovered the means and mechanisms by which the immune system recognizes danger and regulates its own activity. However, this classical model does not fully explain complex phenomena, such as tolerance, allergy, the increased prevalence of inflammatory pathologies in industrialized nations and immunity to multiple infections. In this Essay, I propose a model of immunity that is based on equilibrium, in which the healthy immune system is always active and in a state of dynamic equilibrium between antagonistic types of response. This equilibrium is regulated both by the internal milieu and by the microbial environment. As a result, alteration of the internal milieu or microbial environment leads to immune disequilibrium, which determines tolerance, protective immunity and inflammatory pathology.

  6. Exercise and immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007165.htm Exercise and immunity To use the sharing features on this page, ... know exactly if or how exercise increases your immunity to certain illnesses. There are several theories. However, ...

  7. Report on the second WHO integrated meeting on development and clinical trials of influenza vaccines that induce broadly protective and long-lasting immune responses: Geneva, Switzerland, 5-7 May 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Nancy J; Hickling, Julian; Jones, Rebecca; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F; Lambert, Linda C; Boslego, John; Rudenko, Larisa; Yeolekar, Leena; Robertson, James S; Hombach, Joachim; Ortiz, Justin R

    2015-11-27

    On 5-7 May 2014, the World Health Organization (WHO) convened the second integrated meeting on "influenza vaccines that induce broadly protective and long-lasting immune responses". Around 100 invited experts from academia, the vaccine industry, research and development funders, and regulatory and public health agencies attended the meeting. Areas covered included mechanisms of protection in natural influenza-virus infection and vaccine-induced immunity, new approaches to influenza-vaccine design and production, and novel routes of vaccine administration. A timely focus was on how this knowledge could be applied to both seasonal influenza and emerging viruses with pandemic potential such as influenza A (H7N9), currently circulating in China. Special attention was given to the development of possible universal influenza vaccines, given that the Global Vaccine Action Plan calls for at least one licensed universal influenza vaccine by 2020. This report highlights some of the topics discussed and provides an update on studies published since the report of the previous meeting.

  8. Hepatitis B Immunization Policies of United States Pharmacy Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Hanaa A.; Catania, Patrick N.

    1993-01-01

    A survey of 53 pharmacy schools investigated immunization requirements and policies, both on admission and before students begin clerkships. Results are reported, highlighting schools' hepatitis B immunization policies. Results indicate that most schools lack an immunization requirement for this disease. (Author/MSE)

  9. Immune Disorder HSCT Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Immune Deficiency Disorders; Severe Combined Immunodeficiency; Chronic Granulomatous Disease; X-linked Agammaglobulinemia; Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome; Hyper-IgM; DiGeorge Syndrome; Chediak-Higashi Syndrome; Common Variable Immune Deficiency; Immune Dysregulatory Disorders; Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis; IPEX; Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome; X-linked Lymphoproliferative Syndrome

  10. The Immune System Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Work, Kirsten A.; Gibbs, Melissa A.; Friedman, Erich J.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a card game that helps introductory biology students understand the basics of the immune response to pathogens. Students simulate the steps of the immune response with cards that represent the pathogens and the cells and molecules mobilized by the immune system. In the process, they learn the similarities and differences between the…

  11. MEASLES VIRUS IMMUNITY LEVEL STUDY IN PARTICULAR POPULATION GROUPS OF THE REPUBLIC OF GUINEA WITHIN THE FRAMEWORK OF GLOBAL MEASLES ELIMINATION PROGRAM. REPORT 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yu. Popova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A goal for measles elimination globally by 2010–2020 was recognized as one of the priorities in the WHO program “Health for All in the 21st Century” (1998. However measles outbreaks occurred in 2010–2016 in countries with high level of measles vaccine coverage including USA and some European countries.Large measles outbreaks were also registered on the African continent and particular in the Republic of Guinea as a result of the decline of measles vaccine coverage due to the Ebola virus epidemic in the Republic of Guinea in 2014–2015. WHO recommends carrying out the routine measles vaccination as well as the supplemental immunization activities after the stop of the Ebola virus transmission. Effectiveness of the activities is definitely connected with the detection of the epidemically significant for the supplemental immunization age groups. The aim of the study was to evaluate the measles immunity level in different age groups of population in the Republic of Guinea. Materials and methods. Twenty five blood serum samples of healthy adult Guineans aged 28–66 and 121 blood serum samples of adolescences and adults admitted to hospital in the town of Kindia (Republic of Guinea for indoor treatment were tested by ELISA. The specific measles virus antibodies were detected using the following commercial ELISA test-systems produced by Euroimmun Medizinische Labordiagnostika AG Company (Germany: IgM-antibodies — by “Anti-Measles Virus ELISA (IgM”, IgG-antibodi es — by “Anti-Measles Virus ELISA (IgG”, IgG-avidity measles virus antibodies — by “Avidity: Anti-Measles Virus ELISA (IgG”. A part of sera was studied by “Vector-Best IgM-measles” and “Vector-Best IgG-measles” ELISA test-systems (Russia. Results and discussion. The comparative quantitative study of the measles immunity level (i.e. IgG-antibodies titers of the healthy adult Guineans in 2015 and 2016 revealed the lack of IgGantibodies in serum

  12. Intestinal barrier and gut microbiota: Shaping our immune responses throughout life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takiishi, Tatiana; Fenero, Camila Ideli Morales; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva

    2017-09-06

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is considered the largest immunological organ in the body having a central role in regulating immune homeostasis. Contrary to earlier belief, the intestinal epithelial barrier is not a static physical barrier but rather strongly interacts with the gut microbiome and cells of the immune system. This intense communication between epithelial cells, immune cells and microbiome will shape specific immune responses to antigens, balancing tolerance and effector immune functions. Recent studies indicate that composition of the gut microbiome affects immune system development and modulates immune mediators, which in turn affect the intestinal barrier. Moreover, dysbiosis may favor intestinal barrier disruption and could be related to increased susceptibility to certain diseases. This review will be focused on the development of the intestinal barrier and its function in host immune defense and how gut microbiome composition throughout life can affect this role.

  13. [Innate immunity against viruses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drutskaia, M S; Belousov, P V; Nedospasov, S A

    2011-01-01

    Viruses are obligate parasites which are able to infect cells of all living organisms. Multiple antiviral defense mechanisms have appeared early in evolution of the immune system. Higher vertebrates have the most complex antiviral immunity which is based on both innate and adoptive immune responses. However, majority of living organisms, including plants and invertebrates, rely exclusively on innate immune mechanisms for protection against viral infections. There are some striking similarities in several components of the innate immune recognition between mammals, plants and insects, rendering these signaling cascades as highly conserved in the evolution of the immune system. This review summarizes recent advances in the field of innate immune recognition of viruses, with particular interest on pattern-recognition receptors.

  14. Sex Differences and Bone Metastases of Breast, Lung, and Prostate Cancers: Do Bone Homing Cancers Favor Feminized Bone Marrow?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary C. Farach-Carson

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Sex-associated differences in bone metastasis formation from breast, lung, and prostate cancer exist in clinical studies, but have not been systematically reviewed. Differences in the bone marrow niche can be attributed to sexual dimorphism, to genetic variations that affect sex hormone levels, or to the direct effects of sex hormones, natural or exogenously delivered. This review describes the present understanding of sex-associated and sex hormone level differences in the marrow niche and in formation of bone metastasis during the transition of these three cancers from treatable disease to an often untreatable, lethal metastatic one. Our purpose is to provide insight into some underlying molecular mechanisms for hormonal influence in bone metastasis formation, and to the potential influence of sexual dimorphism, genetic differences affecting sex assignment, and sex hormone level differences on the bone niche and its favorability for metastasis formation. We reviewed publications in PubMed and EMBASE, including full length manuscripts, case reports, and clinical studies of relevance to our topic. We focused on bone metastasis formation in breast, lung, and prostate cancer because all three commonly present with bone metastases. Several clear observations emerged. For breast cancer bone metastasis formation, estrogen receptor (ER signaling pathways indicate a role for ER beta (ERβ. Estrogen influences the bone microenvironment, creating and conditioning a favorable niche for colonization and breast cancer progression. For lung cancer, studies support the hypothesis that females have a more favorable bone microenvironment for metastasis formation. For prostate cancer, a decrease in the relative androgen to estrogen balance or a “feminization” of bone marrow favors bone metastasis formation, with a potentially important role for ERβ that may be similar to that in breast cancer. Long-term estrogen administration or androgen blockade in males

  15. Implementing efficient and sustainable collaboration between National Immunization Technical Advisory Groups: Report on the 3rd International Technical Meeting, Paris, France, 8-9 December 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perronne, Christian; Adjagba, Alex; Duclos, Philippe; Floret, Daniel; Houweling, Hans; Le Goaster, Corinne; Lévy-Brühl, Daniel; Meyer, François; Senouci, Kamel; Wichmann, Ole

    2016-03-08

    Many experts on vaccination are convinced that efforts should be made to encourage increased collaboration between National Immunization Technical Advisory Groups on immunization (NITAGs) worldwide. International meetings were held in Berlin, Germany, in 2010 and 2011, to discuss improvement of the methodologies for the development of evidence-based vaccination recommendations, recognizing the need for collaboration and/or sharing of resources in this effort. A third meeting was held in Paris, France, in December 2014, to consider the design of specific practical activities and an organizational structure to enable effective and sustained collaboration. The following conclusions were reached: (i) The proposed collaboration needs a core functional structure and the establishment or strengthening of an international network of NITAGs. (ii) Priority subjects for collaborative work are background information for recommendations, systematic reviews, mathematical models, health economic evaluations and establishment of common frameworks and methodologies for reviewing and grading the evidence. (iii) The programme of collaborative work should begin with participation of a limited number of NITAGs which already have a high level of expertise. The amount of joint work could be increased progressively through practical activities and pragmatic examples. Due to similar priorities and already existing structures, this should be organized at regional or subregional level. For example, in the European Union a project is funded by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) with the aim to set up a network for improving data, methodology and resource sharing and thereby supporting NITAGs. Such regional networking activities should be carried out in collaboration with the World Health Organization (WHO). (iv) A global steering committee should be set up to promote international exchange between regional networks and to increase the involvement of less experienced

  16. Anticipated detection of favorable periods for wind energy production by means of information theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Eugenio; Saravia, Gonzalo; Kobe, Sigismund; Schumann, Rolf; Schuster, Rolf

    Managing the electric power produced by different sources requires mixing the different response times they present. Thus, for instance, coal burning presents large time lags until operational conditions are reached while hydroelectric generation can react in a matter of some seconds or few minutes to reach the desired productivity. Wind energy production (WEP) can be instantaneously fed to the network to save fuels with low thermal inertia (gas burning for instance), but this source presents sudden variations within few hours. We report here for the first time a method based on information theory to handle WEP. This method has been successful in detecting dynamical changes in magnetic transitions and variations of stock markets. An algorithm called wlzip based on information recognition is used to recognize the information content of a time series. We make use of publically available energy data in Germany to simulate real applications. After a calibration process the system can recognize directly on the WEP data the onset of favorable periods of a desired strength. Optimization can lead to a few hours of anticipation which is enough to control the mixture of WEP with other energy sources, thus saving fuels.

  17. Successful treatment of acute myelogenous leukemia with favorable cytogenetics by reduced-intensity stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Takeshi; Yasumoto, Atsushi; Arita, Kotaro; Sugita, Jun-Ichi; Shigematsu, Akio; Okada, Kohei; Takahata, Mutsumi; Onozawa, Masahiro; Kahata, Kaoru; Takeda, Yukari; Obara, Masato; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Endo, Tomoyuki; Nishio, Mitsufumi; Sato, Norihiro; Tanaka, Junji; Hashino, Satoshi; Koike, Takao; Asaka, Masahiro; Imamura, Masahiro

    2010-03-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) with favorable cytogenetics responds well to chemotherapy. If the leukemia relapses, allogenic hematopoietic stem transplantation (allo-HSCT) is considered as a treatment option. Since the efficacy of reduced-intensity stem cell transplantation (RIST) for AML with favorable cytogenetics has not been established, we retrospectively analyzed the outcomes of allo-HSCT in AML patients according to cytogenetic risks. The outcome of allo-HSCT for AML patients with favorable cytogenetics seemed to be superior to that for AML patients with intermediate cytogenetics. In AML patients with favorable cytogenetics, the 3-year overall survival (OS) and relapse-free survival (RFS) rates were 88 and 76%, respectively, in the RIST group. Both the 3-year OS and RFS rates were 81% in the conventional stem cell transplantation (CST) group. The outcome of RIST for AML patients with favorable cytogenetics was comparable to that for patients who received CST despite the more advanced age and greater organ dysfunction in RIST group than in CST group. None of the patients died within 90 days after RIST. Moreover, there was no relapse in patients with favorable cytogenetics who were in hematological remission prior to RIST. Thus, RIST for AML patients with favorable cytogenetics in remission is safe and effective.

  18. A generalização a partir do tratamento com fricativas: ambientes favoráveis versus ambientes pouco favoráveis e neutros The generalization through the treatment with fricatives: favorable environments versus unfavorable and neutral environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Marafiga Wiethan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi analisar e comparar a ocorrência e os tipos de generalização observados a partir do tratamento das fricativas /z/, /ζ/ e /k/ em dois grupos de crianças, um utilizando palavras com contextos fonológicos favoráveis e outro os contextos pouco favoráveis e neutros. Seis crianças com desvio fonológico e idades entre 4:7 e 7:8 participaram do estudo com a autorização dos responsáveis. Realizaram-se avaliações fonoaudiológicas e complementares para o diagnóstico do desvio fonológico. Os sujeitos foram pareados de acordo com a gravidade do desvio, sexo, faixa etária e aspectos do sistema fonológico em relação aos fonemas alterados. Metade das crianças foi tratada com palavras em que os fonemas /z/, /ζ/ e /k/ encontravam-se em ambientes fonológicos favoráveis e a outra metade com ambientes pouco favoráveis e neutros. Foram realizadas oito sessões e, após estas, nova avaliação de fala foi realizada para verificar os tipos de generalização obtidos. Os percentuais de generalizações foram comparados entre os grupos por meio do teste estatístico de Mann-Whitney (pThe aim of this study was to analyze and compare the occurrence and the types of generalization observed through the treatment of the fricatives /z/, /ζ/ and /k/ in two groups of children, one using words with favorable phonological contexts and another with unfavorable and neutral contexts. Six children with phonological disorder between 4:7 and 7:8 year-old participated in the study, with their parents' authorization. There were speech-language and complementary evaluations to diagnose the phonological disorder. The subjects were matched according to the severity of the phonological disorder, sex, age and aspects of the phonological system in relation to the altered phonemes. Half the children were treated with words in which the phonemes /z/, /ζ/ and /k/ were in favorable phonological environments and the other half with unfavorable

  19. Favorable prognostic value of SOCS2 and IGF-I in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daxenbichler Günter

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS proteins comprise a protein family, which has initially been described as STAT induced inhibitors of the Jak/Stat pathway. Recent in vivo and in vitro studies suggest that SOCS proteins are also implicated in cancer. The STAT5 induced IGF-I acts as an endocrine and para/autocrine growth and differentiation factor in mammary gland development. Whereas high levels of circulating IGF-I have been associated with increased cancer risk, the role of autocrine acting IGF-I is less clear. The present study is aimed to elucidate the clinicopathological features associated with SOCS1, SOCS2, SOCS3, CIS and IGF-I expression in breast cancer. Methods We determined the mRNA expression levels of SOCS1, SOCS2, SOCS3, CIS and IGF-I in 89 primary breast cancers by reverse transcriptase PCR. SOCS2 protein expression was further evaluated by immuno-blot and immunohistochemistry. Results SOCS2 expression inversely correlated with histopathological grade and ER positive tumors exhibited higher SOCS2 levels. Patients with high SOCS2 expression lived significantly longer (108.7 vs. 77.7 months; P = 0.015 and high SOCS2 expression proved to be an independent predictor for good prognosis (HR = 0.45, 95% CI 0.23 – 0.91, P = 0.026. In analogy to SOCS2, high IGF-I expression was an independent predictor for good prognosis in the entire patient cohort. In the subgroup of patients with lymph-node negative disease, high IGF-I was a strong predictor for favorable outcome in terms of overall survival and relapse free survival (HR = 0.075, 95% CI 0.014 – 0.388, P = 0.002. Conclusion This is the first report on the favorable prognostic value of high SOCS2 expression in primary mammary carcinomas. Furthermore a strong association of high IGF-I expression levels with good prognosis was observed especially in lymph-node negative patients. Our results suggest that high expression of the STAT5 target genes SOCS2 and IGF

  20. Measuring the immune system: a comprehensive approach for the analysis of immune functions in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claus, Maren; Dychus, Nicole; Ebel, Melanie; Damaschke, Jürgen; Maydych, Viktoriya; Wolf, Oliver T; Kleinsorge, Thomas; Watzl, Carsten

    2016-10-01

    The immune system is essential to provide protection from infections and cancer. Disturbances in immune function can therefore directly affect the health of the affected individual. Many extrinsic and intrinsic factors such as exposure to chemicals, stress, nutrition and age have been reported to influence the immune system. These influences can affect various components of the immune system, and we are just beginning to understand the causalities of these changes. To investigate such disturbances, it is therefore essential to analyze the different components of the immune system in a comprehensive fashion. Here, we demonstrate such an approach which provides information about total number of leukocytes, detailed quantitative and qualitative changes in the composition of lymphocyte subsets, cytokine levels in serum and functional properties of T cells, NK cells and monocytes. Using samples from a cohort of 24 healthy volunteers, we demonstrate the feasibility of our approach to detect changes in immune functions.

  1. Simultaneous immunization against tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elma Z Tchilian

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: BCG, the only licensed vaccine against tuberculosis, provides some protection against disseminated disease in infants but has little effect on prevention of adult pulmonary disease. Newer parenteral immunization prime boost regimes may provide improved protection in experimental animal models but are unproven in man so that there remains a need for new and improved immunization strategies. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Mice were immunized parenterally, intranasally or simultaneously by both routes with BCG or recombinant mycobacterial antigens plus appropriate adjuvants. They were challenged with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb and the kinetics of Mtb growth in the lungs measured. We show that simultaneous immunization (SIM of mice by the intranasal and parenteral routes is highly effective in increasing protection over parenteral BCG administration alone. Intranasal immunization induces local pulmonary immunity capable of inhibiting the growth of Mtb in the early phase (the first week of infection, while parenteral immunization has a later effect on Mtb growth. Importantly, these two effects are additive and do not depend on priming and boosting the immune response. The best SIM regimes reduce lung Mtb load by up to 2 logs more than BCG given by either route alone. CONCLUSIONS: These data establish SIM as a novel and highly effective immunization strategy for Mtb that could be carried out at a single clinic visit. The efficacy of SIM does not depend on priming and boosting an immune response, but SIM is complementary to prime boost strategies and might be combined with them.

  2. Canine immune complex diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plechner, A J

    1976-11-01

    Though not conclusive, our primary findings indicate that a feature common to many of our tumor and ICD patients is depressed cortisol production. Additionally, the response to ACTH adrenal cortex stimulation tests, at 2-hour intervals between rest and stimulation, have ranged from negative to substantially less than would be expected in normal subjects. Peripheral plasma cortisol values for dogs, at rest and 2 hours after ACTH stimulation, respectively, have been reported as 2-10 and 25-30 mug/dl, 3-8 and 7.5-18 mug/dl, and 1-12.5 and 9.5-22 mug/dl. For representative patients, our resting values have been 1.2-5.2 mug/dl, vs 1.2-7.6 mug after ACTH stimulation (Table 2). Altogether we have studied 42 cases in detail, and we feel that a post-ACTH level of 8.0 mug/dl or less is a conservative indication of adrenocortical insufficiency; all levels have been between 1 and 8 mug/dl. We believe these low cortisol levels indicate either a genetically-induced adrenal cortical insufficiency (evident at 2 months to 1 year of age) or an immune complex adrenal cortical suppression (occurring after 1 year of age in association with other immunodeficiency disorders). Our studies demonstrate a need for biphasic therapy. We have found it necessary to not only initiate cortisone acetate therapy to support the deficient adrenal cortical secretion, but also use other immunosuppressive drugs to control the ICD. If the target organ has been suppressed or destroyed, the need for supplementation is obvious. However, other immune-injury moieties must be suppressed also, eg, ANA, anti-IgG antibodies, etc.

  3. Modeling rejection immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaetano Andrea De

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transplantation is often the only way to treat a number of diseases leading to organ failure. To overcome rejection towards the transplanted organ (graft, immunosuppression therapies are used, which have considerable side-effects and expose patients to opportunistic infections. The development of a model to complement the physician’s experience in specifying therapeutic regimens is therefore desirable. The present work proposes an Ordinary Differential Equations model accounting for immune cell proliferation in response to the sudden entry of graft antigens, through different activation mechanisms. The model considers the effect of a single immunosuppressive medication (e.g. cyclosporine, subject to first-order linear kinetics and acting by modifying, in a saturable concentration-dependent fashion, the proliferation coefficient. The latter has been determined experimentally. All other model parameter values have been set so as to reproduce reported state variable time-courses, and to maintain consistency with one another and with the experimentally derived proliferation coefficient. Results The proposed model substantially simplifies the chain of events potentially leading to organ rejection. It is however able to simulate quantitatively the time course of graft-related antigen and competent immunoreactive cell populations, showing the long-term alternative outcomes of rejection, tolerance or tolerance at a reduced functional tissue mass. In particular, the model shows that it may be difficult to attain tolerance at full tissue mass with acceptably low doses of a single immunosuppressant, in accord with clinical experience. Conclusions The introduced model is mathematically consistent with known physiology and can reproduce variations in immune status and allograft survival after transplantation. The model can be adapted to represent different therapeutic schemes and may offer useful indications for the optimization of

  4. Modeling rejection immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Gaetano, Andrea; Matone, Alice; Agnes, Annamaria; Palumbo, Pasquale; Ria, Francesco; Magalini, Sabina

    2012-05-20

    Transplantation is often the only way to treat a number of diseases leading to organ failure. To overcome rejection towards the transplanted organ (graft), immunosuppression therapies are used, which have considerable side-effects and expose patients to opportunistic infections. The development of a model to complement the physician's experience in specifying therapeutic regimens is therefore desirable. The present work proposes an Ordinary Differential Equations model accounting for immune cell proliferation in response to the sudden entry of graft antigens, through different activation mechanisms. The model considers the effect of a single immunosuppressive medication (e.g. cyclosporine), subject to first-order linear kinetics and acting by modifying, in a saturable concentration-dependent fashion, the proliferation coefficient. The latter has been determined experimentally. All other model parameter values have been set so as to reproduce reported state variable time-courses, and to maintain consistency with one another and with the experimentally derived proliferation coefficient. The proposed model substantially simplifies the chain of events potentially leading to organ rejection. It is however able to simulate quantitatively the time course of graft-related antigen and competent immunoreactive cell populations, showing the long-term alternative outcomes of rejection, tolerance or tolerance at a reduced functional tissue mass. In particular, the model shows that it may be difficult to attain tolerance at full tissue mass with acceptably low doses of a single immunosuppressant, in accord with clinical experience. The introduced model is mathematically consistent with known physiology and can reproduce variations in immune status and allograft survival after transplantation. The model can be adapted to represent different therapeutic schemes and may offer useful indications for the optimization of therapy protocols in the transplanted patient.

  5. Cervical neuroblastoma in eleven infants--a tumor with favorable prognosis. Clinical and radiologic (US, CT, MRI) findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramson, S J; Berdon, W E; Ruzal-Shapiro, C; Stolar, C; Garvin, J

    1993-01-01

    Cervical neuroblastoma, a disease primarily of infants, has a favorable prognosis. Eleven patients are reported. Clinical presentations (other than mass) included stridor and swallowing problems. Masses when felt were commonly mistaken for infectious adenitis. Imaging studies (US, CT, MRI) showed solid masses with vascular displacement and narrowing; intraspinal extension was absent though extension into the adjacent sites of mediastinum and skull occurred. Horner syndrome was seen in five patients with accompanying heterochromia iridis in one. Five tumors had calcification. A high index of suspicion will lead to biopsy and less delay in diagnosis once a mass is felt or imaged.

  6. Recurrent DGCR8, DROSHA, and SIX homeodomain mutations in favorable histology Wilms tumors | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    We report the most common single-nucleotide substitution/deletion mutations in favorable histology Wilms tumors (FHWTs) to occur within SIX1/2 (7% of 534 tumors) and microRNA processing genes (miRNAPGs) DGCR8 and DROSHA (15% of 534 tumors). Comprehensive analysis of 77 FHWTs indicates that tumors with SIX1/2 and/or miRNAPG mutations show a pre-induction metanephric mesenchyme gene expression pattern and are significantly associated with both perilobar nephrogenic rests and 11p15 imprinting aberrations.

  7. Geothermal Favorability Map Derived From Logistic Regression Models of the Western United States (favorabilitysurface.zip)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This is a surface showing relative favorability for the presence of geothermal systems in the western United States. It is an average of 12 models that correlates...

  8. Path to impact: A report from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation convening on maternal immunization in resource-limited settings; Berlin - January 29-30, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobanjo-Ter Meulen, Ajoke; Abramson, Jon; Mason, Elizabeth; Rees, Helen; Schwalbe, Nina; Bergquist, Sharon; Klugman, Keith P

    2015-11-25

    Global initiatives such as the Millennium Development Goals have led to major improvements in the health of women and children, and significant reductions in childhood mortality. Worldwide, maternal mortality has decreased by 45% and under-five mortality has fallen by over 50% over the past two decades [1]. However, improvements have not been achieved evenly across all ages; since 1990, under-five mortality has declined by ∼5% annually, but the average decrease in neonatal mortality is only ∼3% per year. Against this background, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF) convened a meeting in Berlin on January 29-30, 2015 of global health stakeholders, representing funders, academia, regulatory agencies, non-governmental organizations, vaccine manufacturers, and Ministries of Health from Africa and Asia. The topic of discussion was the potential of maternal immunization (MI) to achieve further improvements in under-five morbidity and mortality rates in children, and particularly neonates and young infants, through targeting infectious diseases that are not preventable by other interventions in these age groups. The meeting focused on effective and appropriately priced MI vaccines against influenza, pertussis, and tetanus, as well as against respiratory syncytial virus, and the group B Streptococcus, for which no licensed vaccines currently exist. The primary goals of the BMGF 2015 convening were to bring together the global stakeholders in vaccine development, policy and delivery together with the Maternal, Newborn and Child Health (MNCH) community, to get recognition that MI is a strategy shared between these groups and so encourage increased collaboration, and obtain alignment on the next steps toward achieving a significant health impact through implementation of a MI program. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. A generalização a partir do tratamento com fricativas: ambientes favoráveis versus ambientes pouco favoráveis e neutros

    OpenAIRE

    Fernanda Marafiga Wiethan; Helena Bolli Mota

    2014-01-01

    O objetivo deste estudo foi analisar e comparar a ocorrência e os tipos de generalização observados a partir do tratamento das fricativas /z/, /ʃ/ e /ʒ/ em dois grupos de crianças, um utilizando palavras com contextos fonológicos favoráveis e outro os contextos pouco favoráveis e neutros. Seis crianças com desvio fonológico e idades entre 4:7 e 7:8 participaram do estudo com a autorização dos responsáveis. Realizaram-se avaliações fonoaudiológicas e complementares para o diagnóstico do desvio...

  10. Origins of adaptive immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liongue, Clifford; John, Liza B; Ward, Alister

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive immunity, involving distinctive antibody- and cell-mediated responses to specific antigens based on "memory" of previous exposure, is a hallmark of higher vertebrates. It has been argued that adaptive immunity arose rapidly, as articulated in the "big bang theory" surrounding its origins, which stresses the importance of coincident whole-genome duplications. Through a close examination of the key molecules and molecular processes underpinning adaptive immunity, this review suggests a less-extreme model, in which adaptive immunity emerged as part of longer evolutionary journey. Clearly, whole-genome duplications provided additional raw genetic materials that were vital to the emergence of adaptive immunity, but a variety of other genetic events were also required to generate some of the key molecules, whereas others were preexisting and simply co-opted into adaptive immunity.

  11. Human immune system variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodin, Petter; Davis, Mark M

    2017-01-01

    The human immune system is highly variable between individuals but relatively stable over time within a given person. Recent conceptual and technological advances have enabled systems immunology analyses, which reveal the composition of immune cells and proteins in populations of healthy individuals. The range of variation and some specific influences that shape an individual's immune system is now becoming clearer. Human immune systems vary as a consequence of heritable and non-heritable influences, but symbiotic and pathogenic microbes and other non-heritable influences explain most of this variation. Understanding when and how such influences shape the human immune system is key for defining metrics of immunological health and understanding the risk of immune-mediated and infectious diseases.

  12. Proteomics and insect immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Shi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Insect innate immunity is both a model for vertebrate immunity as well as a key system that impactsmedically important pathogens that are transmitted by insects. Recent developments in proteomics andprotein identification techniques combined with the completion of genome sequences for Anophelesgambiae and Drosophila melanogaster provided the tools for examining insect immunity at a new level ofmolecular detail. Application of proteomics to insect immunity resulted in predictions of new roles inimmunity for proteins already known in other contexts (e.g. ferritin, transferrin, Chi-lectins and helped totarget specific members of multi-gene families that respond to different pathogens (e.g. serine proteases,thioester proteins. In addition, proteomics studies verify that post-translational modifications play a keyrole in insect immunity since many of the identified proteins are modified in some way. These studiescomplement recent work on insect transcriptomes and provide new directions for further investigation ofinnate immunity.

  13. Immune hemolytic anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - immune hemolytic; Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) ... for no reason, the condition is called idiopathic autoimmune hemolytic anemia . The antibodies may also be caused by: Complication ...

  14. Health care provider experience with canagliflozin in real-world clinical practice: favorability, treatment patterns, and patient outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolge SC

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Susan C Bolge,1 Natalia M Flores,2 Shu Huang,3 Jennifer Cai1 1Janssen Scientific Affairs, LLC, Titusville, NJ, 2Kantar Health, Foster City, CA, 3Kantar Health, New York, NY, USA Purpose: This study describes how health care providers approach canagliflozin for the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM in the real world.Patients and methods: An Internet-based questionnaire was completed by 101 endocrinologists, 101 primary care physicians, and 100 nurse practitioners/physician assistants (NP/PAs. Health care providers were required to have experience prescribing or managing patients using canagliflozin to be included in the study. Health care providers compared canagliflozin with other T2DM medication classes on clinical characteristics, costs, and patient satisfaction. Confidence in canagliflozin was also measured. Health care providers reported their canagliflozin prescribing experience and good candidate characteristics for treatment. Finally, providers reported on patient outcomes among those receiving canagliflozin. All variables were compared across provider type.Results: Health care providers reported higher favorability for canagliflozin for blood pressure and body weight compared with dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4 inhibitors and higher favorability for effect on blood pressure, body weight, treatment satisfaction, and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c compared with sulfonylureas (SUs, with differences observed for effect on blood pressure. Health care providers reported being very/extremely confident (55%–74% with canagliflozin as a second- to fourth-line treatment. The top 3 characteristics reported by the providers, in terms of describing a good candidate for canagliflozin, include those concerned about their weight, insurance coverage/affordability, and avoiding injectable treatments. Finally, providers reported often/always observing patients’ lowering or controlling HbA1c (82%–88% and improvement in overall

  15. Reduction of endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ levels favors plasma membrane surface exposure of calreticulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufi, R; Panaretakis, T; Bianchi, K; Criollo, A; Fazi, B; Di Sano, F; Tesniere, A; Kepp, O; Paterlini-Brechot, P; Zitvogel, L; Piacentini, M; Szabadkai, G; Kroemer, G

    2008-02-01

    Some chemotherapeutic agents can elicit apoptotic cancer cell death, thereby activating an anticancer immune response that influences therapeutic outcome. We previously reported that anthracyclins are particularly efficient in inducing immunogenic cell death, correlating with the pre-apoptotic exposure of calreticulin (CRT) on the plasma membrane surface of anthracyclin-treated tumor cells. Here, we investigated the role of cellular Ca(2+) homeostasis on CRT exposure. A neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y) failed to expose CRT in response to anthracyclin treatment. This defect in CRT exposure could be overcome by the overexpression of Reticulon-1C, a manipulation that led to a decrease in the Ca(2+) concentration within the endoplasmic reticulum lumen. The combination of Reticulon-1C expression and anthracyclin treatment yielded more pronounced endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) depletion than either of the two manipulations alone. Chelation of intracellular (and endoplasmic reticulum) Ca(2+), targeted expression of the ligand-binding domain of the IP(3) receptor and inhibition of the sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase pump reduced endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) load and promoted pre-apoptotic CRT exposure on the cell surface, in SH-SY5Y and HeLa cells. These results provide evidence that endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) levels control the exposure of CRT.

  16. A generalização a partir do tratamento com fricativas: ambientes favoráveis versus ambientes pouco favoráveis e neutros

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Marafiga Wiethan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi analisar e comparar a ocorrência e os tipos de generalização observados a partir do tratamento das fricativas /z/, /ʃ/ e /ʒ/ em dois grupos de crianças, um utilizando palavras com contextos fonológicos favoráveis e outro os contextos pouco favoráveis e neutros. Seis crianças com desvio fonológico e idades entre 4:7 e 7:8 participaram do estudo com a autorização dos responsáveis. Realizaram-se avaliações fonoaudiológicas e complementares para o diagnóstico do desvio fonológico. Os sujeitos foram pareados de acordo com a gravidade do desvio, sexo, faixa etária e aspectos do sistema fonológico em relação aos fonemas alterados. Metade das crianças foi tratada com palavras em que os fonemas /z/, /ʃ/ e /ʒ/ encontravam-se em ambientes fonológicos favoráveis e a outra metade com ambientes pouco favoráveis e neutros. Foram realizadas oito sessões e, após estas, nova avaliação de fala foi realizada para verificar os tipos de generalização obtidos. Os percentuais de generalizações foram comparados entre os grupos por meio do teste estatístico de Mann-Whitney (p<0.05. Ao término da terapia, observou-se aumento dos percentuais de generalização para todos os sujeitos. Na comparação entre os grupos não foi verificada diferença estatística para as generalizações analisadas. Entretanto, houve vantagem do grupo favorável em relação às generalizações “para outra posição na palavra” e “dentro de uma classe de sons”. Os resultados obtidos podem estar relacionados ao pequeno número de sujeitos ou a outros fatores mencionados no artigo.

  17. Microscale Immune Studies Laboratory.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poschet, Jens Fredrich; Carroll-Portillo, Amanda; Wu, Meiye; Manginell, Ronald Paul; Herr, Amy Elizabeth; Martino, Anthony A.; Perroud, Thomas D.; Branda, Catherine; Srivastava, Nimisha; Sinclair, Michael B.; Moorman, Matthew Wallace; Apblett, Christopher Alan; Sale, Kenneth L.; James, Conrad D.; Carles, Elizabeth L.; Lidke, Diane S. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Van Benthem, Mark Hilary; Rebeil, Roberto; Kaiser, Julie; Seaman, William (University of California, San Francisco, CA); Rempe, Susan; Brozik, Susan Marie; Jones, Howland D. T.; Gemperline, Paul (East Carolina University, Greenville, NC); Throckmorton, Daniel J.; Misra, Milind; Murton, Jaclyn K.; Carson, Bryan D.; Zhang, Zhaoduo; Plimpton, Steven James; Renzi, Ronald F.; Lane, Todd W.; Ndiaye-Dulac, Elsa; Singh, Anup K.; Haaland, David Michael; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Davis, Ryan W.; Ricken, James Bryce; Branda, Steven S.; Patel, Kamlesh D.; Joo, Jaewook; Kubiak, Glenn D.; Brennan, James S.; Martin, Shawn Bryan; Brasier, Allan (University of Texas Mecial Branch, Galveston, TX)

    2009-01-01

    The overarching goal is to develop novel technologies to elucidate molecular mechanisms of the innate immune response in host cells to pathogens such as bacteria and viruses including the mechanisms used by pathogens to subvert/suppress/obfuscate the immune response to cause their harmful effects. Innate immunity is our first line of defense against a pathogenic bacteria or virus. A comprehensive 'system-level' understanding of innate immunity pathways such as toll-like receptor (TLR) pathways is the key to deciphering mechanisms of pathogenesis and can lead to improvements in early diagnosis or developing improved therapeutics. Current methods for studying signaling focus on measurements of a limited number of components in a pathway and hence, fail to provide a systems-level understanding. We have developed a systems biology approach to decipher TLR4 pathways in macrophage cell lines in response to exposure to pathogenic bacteria and their lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Our approach integrates biological reagents, a microfluidic cell handling and analysis platform, high-resolution imaging and computational modeling to provide spatially- and temporally-resolved measurement of TLR-network components. The Integrated microfluidic platform is capable of imaging single cells to obtain dynamic translocation data as well as high-throughput acquisition of quantitative protein expression and phosphorylation information of selected cell populations. The platform consists of multiple modules such as single-cell array, cell sorter, and phosphoflow chip to provide confocal imaging, cell sorting, flow cytomtery and phosphorylation assays. The single-cell array module contains fluidic constrictions designed to trap and hold single host cells. Up to 100 single cells can be trapped and monitored for hours, enabling detailed statistically-significant measurements. The module was used to analyze translocation behavior of transcription factor NF-kB in macrophages upon activation

  18. Microscale Immune Studies Laboratory.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poschet, Jens Fredrich; Carroll-Portillo, Amanda; Wu, Meiye; Manginell, Ronald Paul; Herr, Amy Elizabeth; Martino, Anthony A.; Perroud, Thomas D.; Branda, Catherine; Srivastava, Nimisha; Sinclair, Michael B.; Moorman, Matthew Wallace; Apblett, Christopher Alan; Sale, Kenneth L.; James, Conrad D.; Carles, Elizabeth L.; Lidke, Diane S. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Van Benthem, Mark Hilary; Rebeil, Roberto; Kaiser, Julie; Seaman, William (University of California, San Francisco, CA); Rempe, Susan; Brozik, Susan Marie; Jones, Howland D. T.; Gemperline, Paul (East Carolina University, Greenville, NC); Throckmorton, Daniel J.; Misra, Milind; Murton, Jaclyn K.; Carson, Bryan D.; Zhang, Zhaoduo; Plimpton, Steven James; Renzi, Ronald F.; Lane, Todd W.; Ndiaye-Dulac, Elsa; Singh, Anup K.; Haaland, David Michael; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Davis, Ryan W.; Ricken, James Bryce; Branda, Steven S.; Patel, Kamlesh D.; Joo, Jaewook; Kubiak, Glenn D.; Brennan, James S.; Martin, Shawn Bryan; Brasier, Allan (University of Texas Mecial Branch, Galveston, TX)

    2009-01-01

    The overarching goal is to develop novel technologies to elucidate molecular mechanisms of the innate immune response in host cells to pathogens such as bacteria and viruses including the mechanisms used by pathogens to subvert/suppress/obfuscate the immune response to cause their harmful effects. Innate immunity is our first line of defense against a pathogenic bacteria or virus. A comprehensive 'system-level' understanding of innate immunity pathways such as toll-like receptor (TLR) pathways is the key to deciphering mechanisms of pathogenesis and can lead to improvements in early diagnosis or developing improved therapeutics. Current methods for studying signaling focus on measurements of a limited number of components in a pathway and hence, fail to provide a systems-level understanding. We have developed a systems biology approach to decipher TLR4 pathways in macrophage cell lines in response to exposure to pathogenic bacteria and their lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Our approach integrates biological reagents, a microfluidic cell handling and analysis platform, high-resolution imaging and computational modeling to provide spatially- and temporally-resolved measurement of TLR-network components. The Integrated microfluidic platform is capable of imaging single cells to obtain dynamic translocation data as well as high-throughput acquisition of quantitative protein expression and phosphorylation information of selected cell populations. The platform consists of multiple modules such as single-cell array, cell sorter, and phosphoflow chip to provide confocal imaging, cell sorting, flow cytomtery and phosphorylation assays. The single-cell array module contains fluidic constrictions designed to trap and hold single host cells. Up to 100 single cells can be trapped and monitored for hours, enabling detailed statistically-significant measurements. The module was used to analyze translocation behavior of transcription factor NF-kB in macrophages upon activation

  19. STAT6 Deletion Enhances Immunity to Mammary Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-01

    Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of Maryland Baltimore County Baltimore, MD 21250 REPORT DATE: June 2005 TYPE OF REPORT: Final PREPARED FOR... CONTRACT NUMBER STAT6 Deletion Enhances Immunity to Mammary Carcinoma 5b. GRANT NUMBER DAMD17-01-1-0312 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d...ductal epithelium; [33,47] immune response to immunization with PSA. Mucl.Tg Endogenous human/ Mucl C57BL/6 Mucl tissue distribution similar to human Mucl

  20. Effects of the immunization program in Vojvodina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šeguljev Zorica

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. With the widespread use of active immunization, significant results have been achieved in the control and prevention of numerous communicable diseases. The Expanded Programme on Immunization of the World Health Organization is intended to strengthen national programs for the reduction in the incidence and mortality rates and global elimination or eradication of communicable diseases. The aim of this paper is to analyze results of the immunization program in Vojvodina. Material and methods. The results of the immunization program were analyzed on the basis of the incidence rates, since the introduction of the mandatory reporting system, till 2006. The analysis included immunization coverage against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, poliomyelitis and measles as well as reported cases of missed opportunities in the period from 1997 to 2006. Results. Poliomyelitis has not been reported in Vojvodina since 1963, diphtheria since 1978 and measles in the period from 2001 to 2006. Sporadic cases of pertussis have been reported in unimmunized children of the youngest age, and tetanus in unimmunized elderly population. Vaccination coverage against poliomyelitis, diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis was above 96%. Vaccination coverage against measles was lower (95% vaccination, 87% revaccination. The highest proportion of missed opportunities was caused by not responding to immunization calls (46.6%. Conclusion. These results can be maintained by up-to-date (UTD immunization and high vaccination coverage without territorial and population differences. Data on the total number of children without up-to-date vaccination cannot be obtained on the basis of administrative coverage follow-up. It is necessary to establish follow-up mechanisms for UTD immunization, which would reveal the number of children at risk from vaccine preventable diseases and characteristics of unimmunized population.

  1. Mucosal immunity in the female genital tract, HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis Machado, Juliana; da Silva, Marcos Vinícius; Cavellani, Camila Lourencini; dos Reis, Marlene Antônia; Monteiro, Maria Luiza Gonçalves dos Reis; Teixeira, Vicente de Paula Antunes; Miranda Corrêa, Rosana Rosa

    2014-01-01

    Mucosal immunity consists of innate and adaptive immune responses which can be influenced by systemic immunity. Despite having been the subject of intensive studies, it is not fully elucidated what exactly occurs after HIV contact with the female genital tract mucosa. The sexual route is the main route of HIV transmission, with an increased risk of infection in women compared to men. Several characteristics of the female genital tract make it suitable for inoculation, establishment of infection, and systemic spread of the virus, which causes local changes that may favor the development of infections by other pathogens, often called sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). The relationship of these STDs with HIV infection has been widely studied. Here we review the characteristics of mucosal immunity of the female genital tract, its alterations due to HIV/AIDS, and the characteristics of coinfections between HIV/AIDS and the most prevalent STDs.

  2. Mucosal Immunity in the Female Genital Tract, HIV/AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Reis Machado

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucosal immunity consists of innate and adaptive immune responses which can be influenced by systemic immunity. Despite having been the subject of intensive studies, it is not fully elucidated what exactly occurs after HIV contact with the female genital tract mucosa. The sexual route is the main route of HIV transmission, with an increased risk of infection in women compared to men. Several characteristics of the female genital tract make it suitable for inoculation, establishment of infection, and systemic spread of the virus, which causes local changes that may favor the development of infections by other pathogens, often called sexually transmitted diseases (STDs. The relationship of these STDs with HIV infection has been widely studied. Here we review the characteristics of mucosal immunity of the female genital tract, its alterations due to HIV/AIDS, and the characteristics of coinfections between HIV/AIDS and the most prevalent STDs.

  3. Local Ambient Seismic Noise Survey in Dixie Valley, NV for Engineered Geothermal System Favorability Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibuleac, I. M.; Iovenitti, J. L.; von Seggern, D. H.; Sainsbury, J.

    2013-12-01

    The primary objective of this study is to develop and test the seismic component of a calibrated exploration method that integrated geological, geophysical, and geochemical data to identify potential drilling targets for Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS). In exploring for EGS sites, the selection criteria identified by the AltaRock Energy, Inc. (AltaRock) and University of Nevada, Reno teams are, in order of importance, (1) temperature greater than 200C at 1.5 km depth, (2) rock type at the depth of interest (porous rocks at 1-3 km); and (3) favorable stress regime (tensional environment). To improve spatial resolution, a dense seismic array (21 three-component, broadband sensors, with an overall array aperture of 45km) was installed in two deployments in Dixie Valley, NV, each deployment having a three-month duration Ambient seismic noise and signal were used to retrieve inter-station and same-station Green's Functions (GFs), to be used for subsurface imaging. We used ambient seismic noise interferometry to extract GFs from crosscorrelation of continuous records. An innovative aspect of the seismic work was estimating the receiver functions beneath the stations using noise auto-correlation which was used to image the substructure. We report results of applying the technique to estimate a P/S velocity model from the GF surface wave components and from the GF body-wave reflection component, retrieved from ambient noise and signal cross-correlation and auto-correlation beams. We interpret our results in terms of temperature, pressure and rock composition. The estimated seismic velocity model capability to infer temperature is statistically assessed, in combination with other geophysical technique results.

  4. Favorable responses to acute and chronic exercise in McArdle patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maté-Muñoz, José L; Moran, Maria; Pérez, Margarita; Chamorro-Viña, Carolina; Gómez-Gallego, Félix; Santiago, Catalina; Chicharro, Luis; Foster, Carl; Nogales-Gadea, Gisela; Rubio, Juan C; Andreu, Antoni L; Martín, Miguel A; Arenas, Joaquín; Lucia, Alejandro

    2007-07-01

    This study reports acute exercise responses in a large (N = 46) series of patients with McArdle disease and responses to exercise training in a smaller (n = 9) set of patients. Patients were studied during both incremental and steady-state cycle ergometer exercise, using cardiopulmonary testing, and the patients were compared with age- and gender-matched controls. The study was performed in a university setting (clinical exercise physiology laboratory). The 46 patients showed common features of McArdle disease. They were definitively diagnosed by histochemistry, biochemistry, and/or molecular genetic analysis. The 46 controls were healthy, sedentary individuals. Nine patients were studied before and after an 8-month supervised aerobic exercise training program (including five weekly sessions of walking and/or cycling exercise with a duration no greater than 60 minutes). The main indicators of exercise capacity that we measured were peak power output, peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak), and ventilatory threshold (VT). Exercise capacity (peak power output, 35% control; VO2peak, 44% control; VT, 66% control) was markedly depressed in the patients. The patients who trained improved peak power output (25%), VO2peak (44%), and VT (27%), with no evidence of negative outcomes from training. Although not achieving normal values, the response to training put the patients into the lower limit of normal controls. Under carefully controlled conditions, patients with McArdle disease may perform acute exercise safely, and they may respond favorably to training. This may offer an additional therapeutic option to help normalize the lifestyles of these patients.

  5. Your Child's Immunizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Your Child's Immunizations KidsHealth > For Parents > Your Child's Immunizations Print A A A en español Las vacunas ... determine the best vaccinations and schedule for your child. Recommended vaccinations: ... (varicella) vaccine Diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis vaccine ( ...

  6. The genetics of immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzaro, Brian P; Schneider, David S

    2014-06-17

    In this commentary, Brian P. Lazzaro and David S. Schneider examine the topic of the Genetics of Immunity as explored in this month's issues of GENETICS and G3: Genes|Genomes|Genetics. These inaugural articles are part of a joint Genetics of Immunity collection (ongoing) in the GSA journals. Copyright © 2014 Lazzaro and Schneider.

  7. Carbohydrate-based immune adjuvants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovsky, Nikolai; Cooper, Peter D

    2011-01-01

    The role for adjuvants in human vaccines has been a matter of vigorous scientific debate, with the field hindered by the fact that for over 80 years, aluminum salts were the only adjuvants approved for human use. To this day, alum-based adjuvants, alone or combined with additional immune activators, remain the only adjuvants approved for use in the USA. This situation has not been helped by the fact that the mechanism of action of most adjuvants has been poorly understood. A relative lack of resources and funding for adjuvant development has only helped to maintain alum’s relative monopoly. To seriously challenge alum’s supremacy a new adjuvant has many major hurdles to overcome, not least being alum’s simplicity, tolerability, safety record and minimal cost. Carbohydrate structures play critical roles in immune system function and carbohydrates also have the virtue of a strong safety and tolerability record. A number of carbohydrate compounds from plant, bacterial, yeast and synthetic sources have emerged as promising vaccine adjuvant candidates. Carbohydrates are readily biodegradable and therefore unlikely to cause problems of long-term tissue deposits seen with alum adjuvants. Above all, the Holy Grail of human adjuvant development is to identify a compound that combines potent vaccine enhancement with maximum tolerability and safety. This has proved to be a tough challenge for many adjuvant contenders. Nevertheless, carbohydrate-based compounds have many favorable properties that could place them in a unique position to challenge alum’s monopoly over human vaccine usage. PMID:21506649

  8. Immune cells and prognosis in HPV-associated oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saber, Camelia Nami; Grønhøj Larsen, Christian; Dalianis, Tina;

    2016-01-01

    prognosis should be offered altered treatment. Besides the well-known biomarkers of HPV and p16, new promising immune cells and markers might nuance the prognosis and treatment for patients with HPV+ OPSCC. We systematically reviewed the literature on immunological features of HPV-associated OPSCCs......Currently, oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OPSCC) are treated based on the traditional TNM-classification, although this scheme might be inadequate for the subgroup of human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated OPSCCs. It remains debatable whether this subgroup of patients with favorable......, and report that a high number of cytotoxic T cells (CD8s) and a low number of CD98 positive cells is associated with better outcome, while an increased CD4/CD8 ratio and a high human leukocyte antigen 1 (HLA1) intensity is most likely associated with worse outcome. These findings might contribute to future...

  9. Transplantation Immunity. Contemporary Views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaretskaya, Yuliya M.

    1999-12-01

    "Transplantation immunity in Cyclosporin era" is a special chapter in science under name transplantation immunity. Nowadays, practically all the organs can be grafted: kidney, heart, lung, liver, pancreas both as organ, and as islet cells, bone marrow from relative and unrelative donors. The broad spectrum of grafted organs gave one more surprising peculiarity of transplantation immunity: it operates with different strength after transplantation of various organs. If the decreasing gradient of transplantation immunity could be composed, then it appeared to be approximately in the following order: bone marrow - skin - kidney - heart - lung. The most complicated operating activity of transplantation immunity is occurring after bone marrow transplantation, especially from unrelative donor, because in bone marrow transplantation immunological process develops in both directions. Therefore now, bone marrow is the only organ (tissue), when the complete compatibility between donor and recipient is required after its transplantation; especially in cases with unrelative donors.

  10. Adaptive immunity to fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Akash; Wüthrich, Marcel; Deepe, George; Klein, Bruce

    2014-11-06

    Life-threatening fungal infections have risen sharply in recent years, owing to the advances and intensity of medical care that may blunt immunity in patients. This emerging crisis has created the growing need to clarify immune defense mechanisms against fungi with the ultimate goal of therapeutic intervention. We describe recent insights in understanding the mammalian immune defenses that are deployed against pathogenic fungi. We focus on adaptive immunity to the major medically important fungi and emphasize three elements that coordinate the response: (1) dendritic cells and subsets that are mobilized against fungi in various anatomical compartments; (2) fungal molecular patterns and their corresponding receptors that signal responses and shape the differentiation of T-cell subsets and B cells; and, ultimately (3) the effector and regulatory mechanisms that eliminate these invaders while constraining collateral damage to vital tissue. These insights create a foundation for the development of new, immune-based strategies for prevention or enhanced clearance of systemic fungal diseases.

  11. Cytokines in Drosophila immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanha-Aho, Leena-Maija; Valanne, Susanna; Rämet, Mika

    2016-02-01

    Cytokines are a large and diverse group of small proteins that can affect many biological processes, but most commonly cytokines are known as mediators of the immune response. In the event of an infection, cytokines are produced in response to an immune stimulus, and they function as key regulators of the immune response. Cytokines come in many shapes and sizes, and although they vary greatly in structure, their functions have been well conserved in evolution. The immune signaling pathways that respond to cytokines are remarkably conserved from fly to man. Therefore, Drosophila melanogaster, provides an excellent platform for studying the biology and function of cytokines. In this review, we will describe the cytokines and cytokine-like molecules found in the fly and discuss their roles in host immunity.

  12. Artificial Immune Systems (2010)

    CERN Document Server

    Greensmith, Julie; Aickelin, Uwe

    2010-01-01

    The human immune system has numerous properties that make it ripe for exploitation in the computational domain, such as robustness and fault tolerance, and many different algorithms, collectively termed Artificial Immune Systems (AIS), have been inspired by it. Two generations of AIS are currently in use, with the first generation relying on simplified immune models and the second generation utilising interdisciplinary collaboration to develop a deeper understanding of the immune system and hence produce more complex models. Both generations of algorithms have been successfully applied to a variety of problems, including anomaly detection, pattern recognition, optimisation and robotics. In this chapter an overview of AIS is presented, its evolution is discussed, and it is shown that the diversification of the field is linked to the diversity of the immune system itself, leading to a number of algorithms as opposed to one archetypal system. Two case studies are also presented to help provide insight into the m...

  13. Mechanisms of innate immunity: cytoplasmic granules of polymorphonuclear neutrophilic granulocytes, antimicrobial action, translocation, role, and fate in antimicrobial phagocytosis. Progress report, March 1976--June 30, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitznagel, J.K.

    1977-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: characterization of the III f granules of human neutrophil polymorphonuclear granulocytes (PMN); studies on glycosidases using methylumbelliferyl derivatives of the sugars with spectrofluorometry; distribution of proteinases and cationic proteins in human PMN; comparison of granules of eosinophils with those of other PMN; identification of a cyanide-resistant NADPH oxidase in PMN; subcellular localization of superoxide dismutase in PMN; oxygen-independent antimicrobial activities of each granule class; the phagocytic and intraleukocytic killing capacity of PMN deprived of their specific granules with phorbol myristate acetate; and studies on the PMN of an infant with the Chediak Higashi syndrome. (HLW)

  14. Nucleic Acid Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, G

    2017-01-01

    Organisms throughout biology need to maintain the integrity of their genome. From bacteria to vertebrates, life has established sophisticated mechanisms to detect and eliminate foreign genetic material or to restrict its function and replication. Tremendous progress has been made in the understanding of these mechanisms which keep foreign or unwanted nucleic acids from viruses or phages in check. Mechanisms reach from restriction-modification systems and CRISPR/Cas in bacteria and archaea to RNA interference and immune sensing of nucleic acids, altogether integral parts of a system which is now appreciated as nucleic acid immunity. With inherited receptors and acquired sequence information, nucleic acid immunity comprises innate and adaptive components. Effector functions include diverse nuclease systems, intrinsic activities to directly restrict the function of foreign nucleic acids (e.g., PKR, ADAR1, IFIT1), and extrinsic pathways to alert the immune system and to elicit cytotoxic immune responses. These effects act in concert to restrict viral replication and to eliminate virus-infected cells. The principles of nucleic acid immunity are highly relevant for human disease. Besides its essential contribution to antiviral defense and restriction of endogenous retroelements, dysregulation of nucleic acid immunity can also lead to erroneous detection and response to self nucleic acids then causing sterile inflammation and autoimmunity. Even mechanisms of nucleic acid immunity which are not established in vertebrates are relevant for human disease when they are present in pathogens such as bacteria, parasites, or helminths or in pathogen-transmitting organisms such as insects. This review aims to provide an overview of the diverse mechanisms of nucleic acid immunity which mostly have been looked at separately in the past and to integrate them under the framework nucleic acid immunity as a basic principle of life, the understanding of which has great potential to

  15. Fulminant Staphylococcus lugdunensis septicaemia following a pelvic varicella-zoster virus infection in an immune-deficient patient: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woznowski M

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The deadly threat of systemic infections with coagulase negative Staphylococcus lugdunensis despite an appropriate antibiotic therapy has only recently been recognized. The predominant infectious focus observed so far is left-sided native heart valve endocarditis, but bone and soft tissue infections, septicaemia and vascular catheter-related bloodstream infections have also been reported. We present a patient with a fatal Staphylococcus lugdunensis septicaemia following zoster bacterial superinfection of the pelvic region. Case presentation A 71-year old male diagnosed with IgG kappa plasmocytoma presented with a conspicuous weight loss, a hypercalcaemic crisis and acute renal failure. After initiation of haemodialysis treatment his condition improved rapidly. However, he developed a varicella-zoster virus infection of the twelfth thoracic dermatome requiring intravenous acyclovir treatment. Four days later the patient presented with a fulminant septicaemia. Despite an early intravenous antibiotic therapy with ciprofloxacin, piperacillin/combactam and vancomycin the patient died within 48 hours, shortly before the infective isolate was identified as Staphylococcus lugdunensis by polymerase chain reaction. Conclusion Despite S. lugdunensis belonging to the family of coagulase-negative staphylococci with an usually low virulence, infections with S. lugdunensis may be associated with an aggressive course and high mortality. This is the first report on a Staphylococcus lugdunensis septicaemia following a zoster bacterial superinfection of the pelvic region.

  16. New insights into immune mechanisms of vitiligo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boniface, Katia; Taïeb, Alain; Seneschal, Julien

    2016-02-01

    Vitiligo is the most common depigmenting disorder, affecting 0.5% of the population. This stigmatizing disease has a major social impact with high unmet needs, and no real curative intervention has been reported so far. Vitiligo is characterized by the development of white macules resulting from a loss of epidermal melanocytes, which can result from cell destruction through melanocyte-specific cytotoxic immune response and melanocyte detachment through a defective adhesion system. Multiple mechanisms have been suggested to be involved in melanocyte disappearance: genetic predisposition, environmental triggers, metabolic abnormalities, altered inflammatory and immune responses. The autoimmune and inflammatory theory is the leading hypothesis. Indeed, vitiligo is often associated with autoimmune diseases; genome-wide association studies and functional pathway analyses have shown that most vitiligo susceptibility loci encode components of the immune system; and immune cells are found in the perilesional margin of actively depigmenting skin of vitiligo patients. However, studies support melanocytes intrinsic abnormalities in vitiligo associated with increased melanocytes stress leading to the release of dangers signals important for the activation of the immune system. This review aimed to overview the link between cellular stress, melanocyte function, and the abnormal inflammatory immune response in vitiligo. The involvement of innate and adaptive immune cells in the pathomechanisms leading to melanocyte loss observed in vitiligo will be discussed.

  17. General recommendations on immunization: recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroger, Andrew T; Atkinson, William L; Marcuse, Edgar K; Pickering, Larry K

    2006-12-01

    This report is a revision of General Recommendations on Immunization and updates the 2002 statement by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) (CDC. General recommendations on immunization: recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices and the American Academy of Family Physicians. MMWR 2002;51[No. RR-2]). This report is intended to serve as a general reference on vaccines and immunization. The principal changes include 1) expansion of the discussion of vaccination spacing and timing; 2) an increased emphasis on the importance of injection technique/age/body mass in determining appropriate needle length; 3) expansion of the discussion of storage and handling of vaccines, with a table defining the appropriate storage temperature range for inactivated and live vaccines; 4) expansion of the discussion of altered immunocompetence, including new recommendations about use of live-attenuated vaccines with therapeutic monoclonal antibodies; and 5) minor changes to the recommendations about vaccination during pregnancy and vaccination of internationally adopted children, in accordance with new ACIP vaccine-specific recommendations for use of inactivated influenza vaccine and hepatitis B vaccine. The most recent ACIP recommendations for each specific vaccine should be consulted for comprehensive discussion. This report, ACIP recommendations for each vaccine, and other information about vaccination can be accessed at CDC's National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (proposed) (formerly known as the National Immunization Program) website at http//:www.cdc.gov/nip.

  18. Gender related differences in response to "in favor of myself" wellness program to enhance positive self & body image among adolescents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moria Golan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Physical, neurological and psychological changes are often experienced differently by male and female adolescents. Positive self-esteem, emotional well-being, school achievements, and family connectedness are considered as protective factors against health-compromising behaviors. This study examines the gender differences in respect to the effect of a school-based interactive wellness program--"In Favor of Myself"--on self-image, body image, eating attitudes and behaviors of young adolescents. METHODS: Two hundred and ten adolescents (mean age 13.5 participated in the intervention group, 55% were girls and 45% boys. Program consisted of eight 90-minutes structured sessions integrated into a regular school coping skills curriculum. The program focused on self-esteem, self-image, body image, media literacy and cognitive dissonance. The overall impact of the program and the study protocol were previously published. RESULTS: Overall, there are gender related differences in respect to body image and self-image in young adolescents in response to "In Favor of Myself". Compared to boys, girls reported at baseline higher self-esteem, being more contingent by appearance, and their self-image was more influenced by popularity, appearance, interpersonal communication and admired people. Furthermore girls presented greater gap between current body figure and perceived ideal figure. Not only were girls more dissatisfied with their body, but they were more active in attempts to become and/or remain "thin". At program termination, gender × time effect was detected in reduction of self-worth contingent by others, change in importance given to achievements at schools, parents' perceptions, as well as the impact of comparisons to friends and family members on self-image. CONCLUSIONS: Girls exhibited more gains than boys from 'In Favor of Myself' which raise the questions about how effective would be the program when delivered in mixed gender groups

  19. Gender related differences in response to "in favor of myself" wellness program to enhance positive self & body image among adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golan, Moria; Hagay, Noa; Tamir, Snait

    2014-01-01

    Physical, neurological and psychological changes are often experienced differently by male and female adolescents. Positive self-esteem, emotional well-being, school achievements, and family connectedness are considered as protective factors against health-compromising behaviors. This study examines the gender differences in respect to the effect of a school-based interactive wellness program--"In Favor of Myself"--on self-image, body image, eating attitudes and behaviors of young adolescents. Two hundred and ten adolescents (mean age 13.5) participated in the intervention group, 55% were girls and 45% boys. Program consisted of eight 90-minutes structured sessions integrated into a regular school coping skills curriculum. The program focused on self-esteem, self-image, body image, media literacy and cognitive dissonance. The overall impact of the program and the study protocol were previously published. Overall, there are gender related differences in respect to body image and self-image in young adolescents in response to "In Favor of Myself". Compared to boys, girls reported at baseline higher self-esteem, being more contingent by appearance, and their self-image was more influenced by popularity, appearance, interpersonal communication and admired people. Furthermore girls presented greater gap between current body figure and perceived ideal figure. Not only were girls more dissatisfied with their body, but they were more active in attempts to become and/or remain "thin". At program termination, gender × time effect was detected in reduction of self-worth contingent by others, change in importance given to achievements at schools, parents' perceptions, as well as the impact of comparisons to friends and family members on self-image. Girls exhibited more gains than boys from 'In Favor of Myself' which raise the questions about how effective would be the program when delivered in mixed gender groups vs. mono-gender groups.

  20. Postmating sexual selection favors males that sire offspring with low fitness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bilde, T.; Foged, Anne; Schilling, Nadia

    2009-01-01

    Despite the costs of mating, females of most taxa mate with multiple males. Polyandrous females are hypothesized to gain genetic benefits for their offspring, but this assumes paternity bias favoring male genotypes that enhance offspring viability. We determined net male genetic effects on female...... and offspring fitness in a seed beetle and then tested whether fertilization success was biased in favor of high-quality male genotypes in double mating experiments. Contrary to expectations, high-quality male genotypes consistently had a lower postmating fertilization success in two independent assays. Our...

  1. [Scleroderma related to specific immunotherapy. A report of a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morfín Maciel, Blanca María; Castillo Morfín, Blanca María

    2009-01-01

    It has been described two main phenotypes of helper T cells. On activation, the immune system develops the most effective Th response. Whereas Th1 cells promote cell-mediate immunity against intracellular pathogens and an over expression could favor autoimmune diseases; Th2 cells develop humoral immunity against extracellular pathogens promoting allergic response. Normally, the two profiles coexist in the same individual with different grades of expression. Recently, it has been described a new subset: Th17, which is related to tissue injury in autoimmune diseases. Then, allergic and autoimmune diseases result from an unbalanced response of the immune system. Allergen-specific immunotherapy is the only curative treatment of a specific allergy, which leads to a life-long tolerance against allergens. There are no controlled studies about the effectiveness or risks associated with allergen-specific immunotherapy in patients with autoimmune disorders. On the other hand, scleroderma is an autoimmune chronic systemic disorder of unknown etiology characterized by excess collagen deposition in the skin and viscera, along with vascular injury. We report a girl with allergic asthma and with a second degree family history of systemic sclerosis who developed localized scleroderma during allergen specific immunotherapy. Because allergy vaccination alter the balance between effector and regulatory T-cell populations, which regulate immune tolerance, a positive family history of autoimmunity in first or second degree, could be a contraindication for allergen-specific immunotherapy.

  2. What the world's religions teach, applied to vaccines and immune globulins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabenstein, John D

    2013-04-12

    For millennia, humans have sought and found purpose, solace, values, understanding, and fellowship in religious practices. Buddhist nuns performed variolation against smallpox over 1000 years ago. Since Jenner developed vaccination against smallpox in 1796, some people have objected to and declined vaccination, citing various religious reasons. This paper reviews the scriptural, canonical basis for such interpretations, as well as passages that support immunization. Populous faith traditions are considered, including Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Subjects of concern such as blood components, pharmaceutical excipients of porcine or bovine origin, rubella strain RA 27/3, and cell-culture media with remote fetal origins are evaluated against the religious concerns identified. The review identified more than 60 reports or evaluations of vaccine-preventable infectious-disease outbreaks that occurred within religious communities or that spread from them to broader communities. In multiple cases, ostensibly religious reasons to decline immunization actually reflected concerns about vaccine safety or personal beliefs among a social network of people organized around a faith community, rather than theologically based objections per se. Themes favoring vaccine acceptance included transformation of vaccine excipients from their starting material, extensive dilution of components of concern, the medicinal purpose of immunization (in contrast to diet), and lack of alternatives. Other important features included imperatives to preserve health and duty to community (e.g., parent to child, among neighbors). Concern that 'the body is a temple not to be defiled' is contrasted with other teaching and quality-control requirements in manufacturing vaccines and immune globulins. Health professionals who counsel hesitant patients or parents can ask about the basis for concern and how the individual applies religious understanding to decision-making about

  3. Developmental origins of inflammatory and immune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ting; Liu, Han-Xiao; Yan, Hui-Yi; Wu, Dong-Mei; Ping, Jie

    2016-08-01

    Epidemiological and experimental animal studies show that suboptimal environments in fetal and neonatal life exert a profound influence on physiological function and risk of diseases in adult life. The concepts of the 'developmental programming' and Developmental Origins of Health and Diseases (DOHaD) have become well accepted and have been applied across almost all fields of medicine. Adverse intrauterine environments may have programming effects on the crucial functions of the immune system during critical periods of fetal development, which can permanently alter the immune function of offspring. Immune dysfunction may in turn lead offspring to be susceptible to inflammatory and immune diseases in adulthood. These facts suggest that inflammatory and immune disorders might have developmental origins. In recent years, inflammatory and immune disorders have become a growing health problem worldwide. However, there is no systematic report in the literature on the developmental origins of inflammatory and immune diseases and the potential mechanisms involved. Here, we review the impacts of adverse intrauterine environments on the immune function in offspring. This review shows the results from human and different animal species and highlights the underlying mechanisms, including damaged development of cells in the thymus, helper T cell 1/helper T cell 2 balance disturbance, abnormal epigenetic modification, effects of maternal glucocorticoid overexposure on fetal lymphocytes and effects of the fetal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis on the immune system. Although the phenomena have already been clearly implicated in epidemiologic and experimental studies, new studies investigating the mechanisms of these effects may provide new avenues for exploiting these pathways for disease prevention.

  4. Analysing immune cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltman, Joost B; Marée, Athanasius F M; de Boer, Rob J

    2009-11-01

    The visualization of the dynamic behaviour of and interactions between immune cells using time-lapse video microscopy has an important role in modern immunology. To draw robust conclusions, quantification of such cell migration is required. However, imaging experiments are associated with various artefacts that can affect the estimated positions of the immune cells under analysis, which form the basis of any subsequent analysis. Here, we describe potential artefacts that could affect the interpretation of data sets on immune cell migration. We propose how these errors can be recognized and corrected, and suggest ways to prevent the data analysis itself leading to biased results.

  5. Immune system simulation online

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapin, Nicolas; Lund, Ole; Castiglione, Filippo

    2011-01-01

    MOTIVATION: The recognition of antigenic peptides is a major event of an immune response. In current mesoscopic-scale simulators of the immune system, this crucial step has been modeled in a very approximated way. RESULTS: We have equipped an agent-based model of the immune system with immuno......-informatics methods to allow the simulation of the cardinal events of the antigenic recognition, going from single peptides to whole proteomes. The recognition process accounts for B cell-epitopes prediction through Parker-scale affinity estimation, class I and II HLA peptide prediction and binding through position...

  6. Evolution of immune systems from self/not self to danger to artificial immune systems (AIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Edwin L.

    2010-03-01

    self/not self model. The review will end with certain perspectives on artificial immune systems new on the scene and the product of computational immunologists. The tentative view is to question if the immune systems of invertebrates might be amenable to such an analysis? This would offer more credence to the innate system, often pushed aside thus favoring the adaptive responses.

  7. Severe immune thrombocytopenia after peg-interferonalpha2a,ribavirin and telaprevir treatment completion: acase report and systematic review of literature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Mild to moderate autoimmune thrombocytopenia (AITP)is a common finding in patients receiving interferonbasedantiviral treatment, due to bone marrow suppression.Here we report the case of a patient with chronicgenotype 1b hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection treatedwith pegylated-interferon alpha-2a, ribavirin andtelaprevir for 24 wk; the patient developed severe AITPthree weeks after treatment withdrawal. We performeda systematic literature search in order to reviewall published cases of AITP related to HCV antiviraltreatment. To our knowledge, this is the second case ofAITP observed after antiviral treatment withdrawal. Inmost published cases AITP occurred during treatment;in fact, among 24 cases of AITP related to interferonbasedantiviral treatment, only one occurred afterdiscontinuation. Early diagnosis of AITP is a key factor inorder to achieve an early interferon discontinuation; inthe era of new direct antiviral agents those patients haveto be considered for interferon-free treatment regimens.Prompt prescription of immuno-suppressant treatment(i.e. , corticosteroids, immunoglobulin infusion and evenrituximab for unresponsive cases) leads to favourableprognosis in most of cases. Physicians using interferonbasedtreatments should be aware that AITP can occurboth during and after treatment, specially in the new eraof interferon-free antiviral treatment. Finally, in the caseof suspected AITP, presence of anti-platelet antibodiesshould be checked not only during treatment but also after discontinuation.

  8. Does Favorable Selection Among Medicare Advantage Enrollees Affect Measurement of Hospital Readmission Rates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Edwin S; Hebert, Paul L; Maciejewski, Matthew L; Perkins, Mark; Bryson, Chris L; Au, David H; Liu, Chuan-Fen

    2014-08-01

    Literature indicates favorable selection among Medicare Advantage (MA) enrollees compared with fee-for-service (FFS) enrollees. This study examined whether favorable selection into MA affected readmission rates among Medicare-eligible veterans following hospitalization for congestive heart failure in the Veterans Affairs Health System (VA). We measured total (VA + Medicare FFS) 30-day all-cause readmission rates across hospitals and all of VA. We used Heckman's correction to adjust readmission rates to be representative of all Medicare-eligible veterans, not just FFS-enrolled veterans. The adjusted all-cause readmission rate among FFS veterans was 27.1% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 26.5% to 27.7%), while the adjusted readmission rate among Medicare-eligible veterans was 25.3% (95% CI = 23.6% to 27.1%) after correcting for favorable selection. Readmission rate estimates among FFS veterans generalize to all Medicare-eligible veterans only after accounting for favorable selection into MA. Estimation of quality metrics should carefully consider sample selection to produce valid policy inferences.

  9. Frequency Affects Object Relative Clause Processing: Some Evidence in Favor of Usage-Based Accounts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reali, Florencia

    2014-01-01

    The processing difficulty of nested grammatical structure has been explained by different psycholinguistic theories. Here I provide corpus and behavioral evidence in favor of usage-based models, focusing on the case of object relative clauses in Spanish as a first language. A corpus analysis of spoken Spanish reveals that, as in English, the…

  10. Correlates of Perceived Favorability of Online Courses for Quantitative versus Qualitative Undergraduate Business Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blau, Gary; Pred, Robert; Drennan, Rob B., Jr.; Kapanjie, Darin

    2016-01-01

    An online survey tested the association among background, technological, and course-related variables with perceived favorability of online courses for two independent samples of fall 2015 and spring 2016 business undergraduates taking at least one online or hybrid course. Results showed that perceived learning was a consistent positive correlate…

  11. Intercultural Attitudes Predict Favorable Study Abroad Expectations of U.S. College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Randi I.; Goldstein, Susan B.

    2005-01-01

    This study focused on identifying intercultural attitudes associated with favorable expectations about participation in study abroad programs. A total of 282 U.S. 1st-year college students completed a questionnaire that included measures of ethnocentrism, intercultural communication apprehension, language interest and competence, prejudice,…

  12. High procedural fairness heightens the effect of outcome favorability on self-evaluations : An attributional analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brockner, J.; Heuer, L.; Magner, N.; Folger, R.; Umphress, E.; Bos, K. van den; Vermunt, Riël; Magner, M.; Siegel, P.

    2003-01-01

    Previous research has shown that outcome favorability and procedural fairness often interact to influence employees work attitudes and behaviors. Moreover, the form of the interaction effect depends upon the dependent variable. Relative to when procedural fairness is low, high procedural fairness:

  13. Favorable effects of skeletal muscle on bone are distinguished according to gender and skeletal sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung Min Kim

    2017-03-01

    Conclusions: Higher RASM was significantly associated with lower risk for osteoporosis and the areas at the femur neck and total hip appeared to more likely be affected positively by muscle. Moreover, because males showed faster muscle loss with aging than females, the bones of males may be more prone to favorable effects of muscle.

  14. The Effect of Attitude and Statement Favorability Upon the Judgment of Attitude Statements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corenblum, B.; Corfield, Vera K.

    1976-01-01

    Male and female introductory psychology students (N=96) who held extreme attitudes toward legalized abortion judged the favorability of attitude statements on that issue. Judgments of the statements were shown to be largely inconsistent with predictions from social judgment theory and adaptation-level theory, but consistent with accentuation…

  15. Non-take-up of Tax-favored Savings Plans: Are Household Portfolios Optimal?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alessie, R.J.M.; Hochguertel, Stefan; Soest, van Arthur

    2002-01-01

    Since the early nineties, the Dutch tax system allows for a tax-favored form of risk free savings through employer-sponsored savings plans (ESSPs). Under some conditions and up to a certain amount, the contributions to this plan are tax-deductible, and the returns as well as the withdrawals are tax-

  16. Non-take-up of Tax-favored Savings Plans: Are Household Portfolios Optimal?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alessie, R.J.M.; Hochguertel, Stefan; Soest, van Arthur

    2002-01-01

    Since the early nineties, the Dutch tax system allows for a tax-favored form of risk free savings through employer-sponsored savings plans (ESSPs). Under some conditions and up to a certain amount, the contributions to this plan are tax-deductible, and the returns as well as the withdrawals are tax-

  17. Non-take-up of Tax-favored Savings Plans : Are Household Portfolios Optimal?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alessie, R.J.M.; Hochgürtel, S.; van Soest, A.H.O.

    2001-01-01

    Since the early nineties, the Dutch tax system allows for a tax-favored form of risk free savings through employer-sponsored savings plans (ESSPs).Under some conditions and up to a certain amount, the contributions to this plan are tax-deductible, and the returns as well as the withdrawals are tax-f

  18. Amplification of D22S283 as a favorable prognostic indicator in liver fluke related cholangiocarcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jongkonnee Thanasai; Temduang Limpaiboon; Patcharee Jearanaikoon; Vajarabhongsa Bhudhisawasdi; Narong Khuntikeo; Banchob Sripa; Masanao Miwa

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the DNA copy number of target genes NF2, TIMP3, ST13, TOB2, BIK,, and TP and the reference microsatellite markers D22S283, D22S423, and D22S274 mapped on 22q12-qter in liver fluke related cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) and define its correlation with clinical parameters.METHODS: Quantitative real time PCR (qPCR) was used for determining allelic imbalances in 65 liver fluke related CCA tissues. Statistical correlations between allelic imbalances and clinicopathological parameters, i.e. age,sex, tumor stage, histological type, blood vessel invasion,nerve invasion and lymphatic invasion were evaluated by means of the χ2 test. Cox regression analysis was used for determining patient's survival.RESULTS: Amplifications of the TP (22q13.33), TOB2(22q13.2-13.31), D22S283 (22q12.3), TIMP3 (22q12.3)and NF2 (22q12.2) were found in 35 (53.8%), 28(43.1%), 27 (41.5%), 24 (36.9%), and 24 (36.9%),respectively. Losses at the D22S423 (22q13.1-13.2)and BIK (22q13.31) were detected in 26 (40%) and 23 (35.4%), respectively. Significant correlations were observed between lymphatic invasion and allelic losses of BIK (P = 0.025) and D22S283 (P = 0.041). Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed D22S283 amplification as an independent predictor of good prognosis (P = 0.006, death hazard ratio = 0.411,95% CI = 0.217-0.779) and blood vessel invasion as an independent poor prognostic factor (P = 0.042, death hazard ratio = 1.911, 95% CI = 1.022-3.571) in CCA patients.CONCLUSION: This study provides evidence for the involvement of gene amplification and deletion on chromosome 22q in liver fluke related CCA. This is the first report of D22S283 amplification as an independent indicator of favorable prognosis in liver fluke related CCA.

  19. Annealing to sequences within the primer binding site loop promotes an HIV-1 RNA conformation favoring RNA dimerization and packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seif, Elias; Niu, Meijuan; Kleiman, Lawrence

    2013-10-01

    The 5' untranslated region (5' UTR) of HIV-1 genomic RNA (gRNA) includes structural elements that regulate reverse transcription, transcription, translation, tRNA(Lys3) annealing to the gRNA, and gRNA dimerization and packaging into viruses. It has been reported that gRNA dimerization and packaging are regulated by changes in the conformation of the 5'-UTR RNA. In this study, we show that annealing of tRNA(Lys3) or a DNA oligomer complementary to sequences within the primer binding site (PBS) loop of the 5' UTR enhances its dimerization in vitro. Structural analysis of the 5'-UTR RNA using selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension (SHAPE) shows that the annealing promotes a conformational change of the 5' UTR that has been previously reported to favor gRNA dimerization and packaging into virus. The model predicted by SHAPE analysis is supported by antisense experiments designed to test which annealed sequences will promote or inhibit gRNA dimerization. Based on reports showing that the gRNA dimerization favors its incorporation into viruses, we tested the ability of a mutant gRNA unable to anneal to tRNA(Lys3) to be incorporated into virions. We found a ∼60% decrease in mutant gRNA packaging compared with wild-type gRNA. Together, these data further support a model for viral assembly in which the initial annealing of tRNA(Lys3) to gRNA is cytoplasmic, which in turn aids in the promotion of gRNA dimerization and its incorporation into virions.

  20. Featured Immune System Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AMCase, an enzyme present in humans and other mammals, plays a key role in initiating protective immune ... Facilities Biosafety Laboratory Sites Rutgers University University of Alabama George Mason University Tufts University Tulane University Regional ...

  1. Vaccines (immunizations) - overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... how to defend itself when germs, such as viruses or bacteria, invade it: They expose you to a very small, very safe amount of viruses or bacteria that have been weakened or killed. Your immune ...

  2. HIV and Immunizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    HIV Treatment HIV and Immunizations (Last updated 2/24/2017; last reviewed 2/24/2017) Key Points Vaccines protect people from ... a disease outbreak. Is there a vaccine against HIV? Testing is underway on experimental vaccines to prevent ...

  3. Immunity of international organizations

    CERN Document Server

    Schrijver, Nico

    2015-01-01

    Immunity rules are part and parcel of the law of international organizations. It has long been accepted that international organizations and their staff need to enjoy immunity from the jurisdiction of national courts. However, it is the application of these rules in practice that increasingly causes controversy. Claims against international organizations are brought before national courts by those who allegedly suffer from their activities. These can be both natural and legal persons such as companies. National courts, in particular lower courts, have often been less willing to recognize the immunity of the organization concerned than the organization s founding fathers. Likewise, public opinion and legal writings frequently criticize international organizations for invoking their immunity and for the lack of adequate means of redress for claimants. It is against this background that an international conference was organized at Leiden University in June 2013. A number of highly qualified academics and practit...

  4. Immunization Schedules for Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Everyone: Easy-to-read Schedules Infants and Children Preteens and Teens Adults Display Immunization Schedules and Quiz ... file Microsoft Word file Microsoft Excel file Audio/Video file Apple Quicktime file RealPlayer file Text file ...

  5. Instant Childhood Immunization Schedule

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Everyone: Easy-to-read Schedules Infants and Children Preteens and Teens Adults Display Immunization Schedules and Quiz ... file Microsoft Word file Microsoft Excel file Audio/Video file Apple Quicktime file RealPlayer file Text file ...

  6. Antiviral immunity in amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guangchun; Robert, Jacques

    2011-11-01

    Although a variety of virus species can infect amphibians, diseases caused by ranaviruses ([RVs]; Iridoviridae) have become prominent, and are a major concern for biodiversity, agriculture and international trade. The relatively recent and rapid increase in prevalence of RV infections, the wide range of host species infected by RVs, the variability in host resistance among population of the same species and among different developmental stages, all suggest an important involvement of the amphibian immune system. Nevertheless, the roles of the immune system in the etiology of viral diseases in amphibians are still poorly investigated. We review here the current knowledge of antiviral immunity in amphibians, focusing on model species such as the frog Xenopus and the salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum), and on recent progress in generating tools to better understand how host immune defenses control RV infections, pathogenicity, and transmission.

  7. Undifferentiated Pleomorphic Sarcoma and the Importance of Considering the Oncogenic and Immune-Suppressant Role of the Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Lupo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionSoft-tissue sarcomas account for 0.7% of all malignant tumors, with an incidence rate of 3 per 100,000 persons/year. The undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma (UPS with giant cells, a high grade tumor of soft tissue, is very unusual, especially in young adults before the age of 40. Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1 is a human retrovirus, classified as group 1 human carcinogens by The International Agency for Research on Cancer, that causes an aggressive malignancy known as adult T-cell lymphoma/leukemia and a progressive chronic inflammatory neurological disease named HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP. HTLV-1 causes accumulation of genetic mutations in the host genome that could contribute to cellular transformation, one of the oncogenic features of HTLV-1.Case reportWe describe a case of a young woman with UPS who suffered from HAM/TSP with 3 years of evolution. In 2013, the patient started with neurological symptoms: weakness in the legs and bladder dysfunction. One year later, the patient developed a mild paraparesis in both extremities, anti-HTLV-1 antibodies were detected in plasma and in cerebrospinal fluid, and HAM/TSP was confirmed. In November 2015, a benign ganglion cyst was first suspected without intervention and by March 2016 a sarcoma was diagnosed. Three weeks after surgical resection, the tumor aroused in deep tissue and behaved aggressively, implicating a curative wide resection of the fibula, joint reconstruction, and soft-tissue graft. Histopathological examination confirmed UPS with giant cells.Concluding remarksThe unapparent subclinical immunodeficiency state due to HTLV-1 infection deserves to be considered in order to carefully monitor the possibility of developing any type of cancer. Besides, reaching an accurate and timely diagnosis of UPS can be challenging due to the difficulty in diagnosis/classification and delayed consultation. In this particular case

  8. Adults Need Immunizations, Too!

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-03-19

    In this podcast, Dr. Andrew Kroger from CDC’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases discusses simple, safe, and effective ways adults can help protect themselves, their family, and their community from serious and deadly diseases.  Created: 3/19/2012 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 3/19/2012.

  9. Innate Immunity and Neuroinflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Shastri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation of central nervous system (CNS is usually associated with trauma and infection. Neuroinflammation occurs in close relation to trauma, infection, and neurodegenerative diseases. Low-level neuroinflammation is considered to have beneficial effects whereas chronic neuroinflammation can be harmful. Innate immune system consisting of pattern-recognition receptors, macrophages, and complement system plays a key role in CNS homeostasis following injury and infection. Here, we discuss how innate immune components can also contribute to neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration.

  10. Innate immunity and neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shastri, Abhishek; Bonifati, Domenico Marco; Kishore, Uday

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation of central nervous system (CNS) is usually associated with trauma and infection. Neuroinflammation occurs in close relation to trauma, infection, and neurodegenerative diseases. Low-level neuroinflammation is considered to have beneficial effects whereas chronic neuroinflammation can be harmful. Innate immune system consisting of pattern-recognition receptors, macrophages, and complement system plays a key role in CNS homeostasis following injury and infection. Here, we discuss how innate immune components can also contribute to neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration.

  11. Pentraxins and immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Priya Nagar; Deepak Viswanath; Munivenkatappa Lakshmaiah Venkatesh Prabhuji

    2014-01-01

    Pentraxin-3 (PTX3) is a multifactorial protein involved in immunity and inflammation, which is rapidly produced and released by several cell types in response to inflammatory signals. It may be suggested that PTX3 is related to periodontal tissue inflammation. Its salivary concentrations may have a diagnostic potential. Pentraxin-3 (PTX3) is an ancient family of multifactorial proteins involved in immunity and inflammation. They are rapidly produced and released by various types of cells when...

  12. The immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Lindsay B

    2016-10-31

    All organisms are connected in a complex web of relationships. Although many of these are benign, not all are, and everything alive devotes significant resources to identifying and neutralizing threats from other species. From bacteria through to primates, the presence of some kind of effective immune system has gone hand in hand with evolutionary success. This article focuses on mammalian immunity, the challenges that it faces, the mechanisms by which these are addressed, and the consequences that arise when it malfunctions.

  13. Testosterone Replacement Therapy and Risk of Favorable and Aggressive Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeb, Stacy; Folkvaljon, Yasin; Damber, Jan-Erik; Alukal, Joseph; Lambe, Mats; Stattin, Pär

    2017-05-01

    Purpose The association between exposure to testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) and prostate cancer risk is controversial. The objective was to examine this association through nationwide, population-based registry data. Methods We performed a nested case-control study in the National Prostate Cancer Register of Sweden, which includes all 38,570 prostate cancer cases diagnosed from 2009 to 2012, and 192,838 age-matched men free of prostate cancer. Multivariable conditional logistic regression was used to examine associations between TRT and risk of prostate cancer (overall, favorable, and aggressive). Results Two hundred eighty-four patients with prostate cancer (1%) and 1,378 control cases (1%) filled prescriptions for TRT. In multivariable analysis, no association was found between TRT and overall prostate cancer risk (odds ratio [OR], 1.03; 95% CI, 0.90 to 1.17). However, patients who received TRT had more favorable-risk prostate cancer (OR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.16 to 1.56) and a lower risk of aggressive prostate cancer (OR, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.37 to 0.67). The increase in favorable-risk prostate cancer was already observed within the first year of TRT (OR, 1.61; 95% CI, 1.10 to 2.34), whereas the lower risk of aggressive disease was observed after > 1 year of TRT (OR, 0.44; 95% CI, 0.32 to 0.61). After adjusting for previous biopsy findings as an indicator of diagnostic activity, TRT remained significantly associated with more favorable-risk prostate cancer and lower risk of aggressive prostate cancer. Conclusion The early increase in favorable-risk prostate cancer among patients who received TRT suggests a detection bias, whereas the decrease in risk of aggressive prostate cancer is a novel finding that warrants further investigation.

  14. Immune Gamma Globulin Therapeutic Indications in Immune Deficiency and Autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Luanna; Wu, Eveline Y; Tarrant, Teresa K

    2016-07-01

    Immune gamma globulin (IgG) has a long history in the treatment of both primary immune deficiency and autoimmune disorders. Disease indications continue to expand and new-generation products increase the versatility of delivery. This review encompasses a historical perspective as well as current and future implications of human immune globulin for the treatment of immune-mediated illness.

  15. Mammalian gut immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit Chassaing

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian intestinal tract is the largest immune organ in the body and comprises cells from non-hemopoietic (epithelia, Paneth cells, goblet cells and hemopoietic (macrophages, dendritic cells, T-cells origin, and is also a dwelling for trillions of microbes collectively known as the microbiota. The homeostasis of this large microbial biomass is prerequisite to maintain host health by maximizing beneficial symbiotic relationships and minimizing the risks of living in such close proximity. Both microbiota and host immune system communicate with each other to mutually maintain homeostasis in what could be called a "love-hate relationship." Further, the host innate and adaptive immune arms of the immune system cooperate and compensate each other to maintain the equilibrium of a highly complex gut ecosystem in a stable and stringent fashion. Any imbalance due to innate or adaptive immune deficiency or aberrant immune response may lead to dysbiosis and low-grade to robust gut inflammation, finally resulting in metabolic diseases.

  16. Artificial Immune Systems Tutorial

    CERN Document Server

    Aickelin, Uwe

    2008-01-01

    The biological immune system is a robust, complex, adaptive system that defends the body from foreign pathogens. It is able to categorize all cells (or molecules) within the body as self-cells or non-self cells. It does this with the help of a distributed task force that has the intelligence to take action from a local and also a global perspective using its network of chemical messengers for communication. There are two major branches of the immune system. The innate immune system is an unchanging mechanism that detects and destroys certain invading organisms, whilst the adaptive immune system responds to previously unknown foreign cells and builds a response to them that can remain in the body over a long period of time. This remarkable information processing biological system has caught the attention of computer science in recent years. A novel computational intelligence technique, inspired by immunology, has emerged, called Artificial Immune Systems. Several concepts from the immune have been extracted an...

  17. Artificial Immune Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Aickelin, Uwe

    2009-01-01

    The biological immune system is a robust, complex, adaptive system that defends the body from foreign pathogens. It is able to categorize all cells (or molecules) within the body as self-cells or non-self cells. It does this with the help of a distributed task force that has the intelligence to take action from a local and also a global perspective using its network of chemical messengers for communication. There are two major branches of the immune system. The innate immune system is an unchanging mechanism that detects and destroys certain invading organisms, whilst the adaptive immune system responds to previously unknown foreign cells and builds a response to them that can remain in the body over a long period of time. This remarkable information processing biological system has caught the attention of computer science in recent years. A novel computational intelligence technique, inspired by immunology, has emerged, called Artificial Immune Systems. Several concepts from the immune have been extracted an...

  18. Military Healthcare Battlefield Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, J C

    2012-12-01

    The combatant soldier on the battlefield remains protected from any claim in negligence by the doctrine of combat immunity for any negligent act or omission they may make when fighting. In other words, the combatant soldier does not owe a fellow soldier a duty of care on the battlefield, as the duty of care is non-justiciable. However, the non-combatant Military Healthcare Professional, although sometimes operating in the same hostile circumstances as the fighting soldier, is unlikely to benefit from combat immunity for any clinical negligence on the battlefield. This is because they continue to owe their patient a duty of care, although this has not been tested in the courts. This paper considers if any military healthcare professional could ever benefit from combat immunity, which is unlikely due to their non-combatant status. Instead, this paper suggests that a modified form of immunity; namely, Military Healthcare Battlefield Immunity could be a new, unique and viable doctrine, however, this could only be granted in rare circumstances and to a much lesser degree than combat immunity.

  19. Structures, roles, and procedures of state advisory committees on immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolen, Virginia; Talkington, Kathy; Bhatt, Achal; Rodewald, Lance

    2013-01-01

    Advisory committees have the potential to play a critical role in decision making and implementation at the state level. Many states have advisory committees for their immunization programs to assist in decision making on topics such as implementing new vaccines in their states, school and childcare requirements and exemptions and addressing concerns about vaccine safety. This article describes how immunization advisory committees work; their roles, formation, organization, and structure; membership; the issues they address; and their benefit to state immunization programs. In 2011, the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, conducted an online survey of immunization program managers to determine which states have immunization advisory committees, how these committees function, and the perceived benefits of the committees to state immunization programs. Follow-up half-hour telephone interviews were conducted with 5 states to gain in-depth information on specific advisory committees. One hundred percent of states and 3 territories responded, giving an overall response rate of 91%. Thirty-four of the 53 respondents (64%) reported having an advisory committee for immunization issues. Membership is composed of physicians, public health representatives, and nurses as well as public advocates and members of the public. States reported a variety of issues their committee has worked on; the most frequently mentioned issue was school and childcare vaccination requirements. Others included immunization information systems and vaccination of health care personnel. Overall, states with immunization advisory committees reported that the committees were helpful on issues faced by the program and worth the time and monetary commitment. Given the reported benefits of state immunization advisory committees and the complex program and policy decisions that states face in the dynamic immunization

  20. Impact of Tetanus Toxoid, Reduced Diphtheria Toxoid, and Acellular Pertussis Vaccinations on Reported Pertussis Cases Among Those 11 to 18 Years of Age in an Era of Waning Pertussis Immunity: A Follow-up Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoff, Tami H; Martin, Stacey W

    2016-05-01

    There is accumulating literature on waning acellular pertussis vaccine-induced immunity, confirming the results of studies assessing the duration of protection of pertussis vaccines. To evaluate the tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid, and acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccine's effect over time among those 11 to 18 years old, while accounting for the transition from whole-cell to acellular pertussis vaccines for the childhood primary series. Extended, retrospective analysis of reported pertussis cases between January 1, 1990, and December 31, 2014, in the United States. The analysis included all nationally reported pertussis cases. US Tdap vaccination program and the transition from whole-cell to acellular pertussis vaccines. Rate ratios of reported pertussis incidence (defined as incidence among 11- to 18-year-old individuals divided by the combined incidence in all other age groups) modeled with segmented regression analysis and age-specific trends in reported pertussis incidence over time. Between 1990 and 2014, 356 557 pertussis cases were reported in the United States. Of those, 191 914 (53.8%) were female and 240 665 (67.5%) were white. Overall incidence increased from 1.7 in 100 000 to 4.0 in 100 000 between 1990 and 2003, while latter years were dominated by epidemic peaks. Incidence was highest among infants younger than 1 year throughout the analysis period. Pertussis rates were comparable among all other age groups until the late 2000s, when an increased burden of pertussis emerged among children 1 to 10 years old, resulting in the second highest age-specific incidence. By 2014, 11- to 18-year-old individuals once again had the second highest incidence. While slope coefficients from segmented regression analysis showed a positive impact of Tdap immediately following introduction (slope, -0.4959; P < .001), a reversal in trends was observed in 2010 when rates of disease among 11- to 18-year-old individuals increased at a faster rate than

  1. Tetanus trismus in a 2 year old child: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menon Narayanankutty Sunilkumar, Vadakut Krishnan Parvathy

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Tetanus is still a major cause of mortality and morbidity in developing countries. It occurs in children mainly in the unimmunized, due to parental ignorance and objection to vaccination. This potentially fatal disease caused by a neurotoxin, tetanospasmin released from wounds infected with Clostridium tetani, an anaerobic gram–positive bacillus. As tetanus becomes less common, cases are likely to be misdiagnosed or go unrecognized. In this case report, we present a case of tetanus in a partially immunized 2 year old girl who presented with trismus. She was treated with the recent recommendations and adequate supportive care. Detection of tetanus at a very early stage can favor lifesaving interventions. Trismus, infected wound and partially immunized/unimmunized status of a child were the key features leading to the prompt diagnosis and early treatment.

  2. Thrombophilia in patients with chronic immune thrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Raymond S M; Bakshi, Kalpana; Brainsky, Andres

    2015-01-01

    An increased risk of thromboembolic events among patients with chronic immune thrombocytopenia has been reported but is still not fully understood. A thrombophilia panel (factors suspected/known to denote a thrombophilic state or indicate activation of the clotting cascade) was measured in previously treated patients with chronic immune thrombocytopenia enrolled in an eltrombopag trial to assess potential thrombophilia risk markers. Of 167 patients, 136 (81%) had abnormal levels of at least 1 known or suspected thrombosis risk marker or coagulation cascade activation marker. Six patients reported thromboembolic events, and all of these patients had at least two abnormal analytes in the thrombophilia panel. The presence of multiple baseline thrombophilia risk markers support the theory that chronic immune thrombocytopenia is a pro-thrombotic disease.

  3. A survey of pediatricians' attitudes regarding influenza immunization in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambrose Christopher S

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices advocates that influenza immunization is the most effective method for prevention of illness due to influenza. Recommendations for vaccination of children against influenza have been revised several times since 2002, and as of 2008 include all children 6 months to 18 years of age. Nevertheless, influenza immunization rates have remained low. Methods We surveyed practicing pediatricians in Maryland in the spring of 2007 to determine their attitudes and practices toward childhood influenza immunization. Results The overall response to the survey was 21%. A total of 61% of respondents reported that immunization either is cost neutral or produces a loss, and 36.6% noted it was minimally profitable. Eighty-six percent of respondents were receptive to supporting school-based immunization programs, and 61% indicated that they would participate in such programs. Respondents reported higher rates of immunization of select patient groups than those noted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Conclusion Vaccination was reported to occur at multiple types of patient encounters, as recommended. Survey respondents stated that practice-based immunization was not a profitable service. Pediatricians were supportive of school-based immunization programs, and more than half stated they would be actively involved in such programs. School-based programs may be critical to achieving high vaccination coverage in the school-aged population.

  4. Immune response to gut Escherichia coli and susceptibility to adjuvant arthritis in the rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovačević-Jovanović, Vesna; Miletić, Tatjana; Stanojević, Stanislava; Mitić, Katarina; Dimitrijević, Mirjana

    2015-03-01

    We have investigated the humoral immune response to antigens of predominant gut aerobic bacterial strains (i.e. Escherichia coli) over the course of adjuvant arthritis and oil-induced arthritis in two inbred rat strains: Dark Agouti (DA) and Albino Oxford (AO). We report the presence of antibodies specific to proteins of E. coli in molecular weight range between 20-30 kDa in sera of diseased DA rats, and the absence of these antibodies in the sera of AO rats. In DA rats, CFA and IFA provoked a stronger antibody response to E. coli, especially of the IgG2b antibody class. Intramuscular administration of E. coli preceding the adjuvant arthritis induction had no effect on the development and course of disease, as well as on the activation of T cells in the draining inguinal lymph nodes. Higher serum levels of natural and induced IgA antibodies, combined with a higher CD3+CD26+ cell percentage were found in AO rats. The observed correlation between the serologic response to commensal flora and rats' genetic background as a defining factor for arthritis susceptibility may contribute to the process of creating a favorable (or less favorable) milieu for arthritis development.

  5. Immunizations climb, then falter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, H

    1994-01-01

    The extended immunization campaign began in the mid 1980s and contributed to immunization of 4 out of every 5 infants worldwide, or 80% by the end of the 1980s. There was a slight relaxation of effort around 1990 and 1991, and declines occurred in 28 developing countries. In developing countries, 101 countries maintained or increased immunization in 1991. Rates dropped in Brazil and Venezuela and sub-Saharan Africa. Rates remained constant in 1992, except for the declines in women's tetanus immunization. Distribution is 4-5 times a year to 100 million infants. The savings in lives amounted to 3 million 1992, and further extension could have saved another 1.7 million. The cost in low income countries is $6 to $20, with an average of $15. Five visits are required for complete immunization into one dose; costs could then be reduced by 70%. Total annual costs amount to $2.2 to $2.4 billion for the United Nations Expanded Programme on Immunization. This sum amounts to 2% of public health expenditures in developing countries. The benefits are in reduction in health care costs and expanded productive potential of people. The measles vaccine alone reduced the death rate from 2.5 million in 1980 to 900,000 in 1990. Nonfatal measles morbidity was reduced from 75 million to 25 million for the same period. From averted measles incidents, the savings in treatment costs and productive potential are immeasurable. The first smallpox vaccine was developed in 1796 by Edward Jenner, but it took nearly two for final smallpox eradication in 1979 worldwide. Over the past 10 years, polio eradication has cost $1.4 billion, but without polio vaccines, the cost would reach $500 million annually. Refrigeration and transportation to remote areas has made immunization difficult. The development of low-dose vaccines that would maintain potency in tropical temperatures would be a welcome contribution.

  6. Private provider participation in statewide immunization registries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cowan Anne E

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Population-based registries have been promoted as an effective method to improve childhood immunization rates, yet rates of registry participation in the private sector are low. We sought to describe, through a national overview, the perspectives of childhood immunization providers in private practice regarding factors associated with participation or non-participation in immunization registries. Methods Two mailed surveys, one for 264 private practices identified as registry non-participants and the other for 971 identified as registry participants, from 15 of the 31 states with population-based statewide immunization registries. Frequency distributions were calculated separately for non-participants and participants regarding the physician-reported factors that influenced decisions related to registry participation. Pearson chi-square tests of independence were used to assess associations among categorical variables. Results Overall response rate was 62% (N = 756. Among non-participants, easy access to records of vaccines provided at other sites (N = 101, 68% and printable immunization records (N = 82, 55% were most often cited as "very important" potential benefits of a registry, while the most commonly cited barriers to participation were too much cost/staff time (N = 36, 38% and that the practice has its own system for recording and monitoring immunizations (N = 35, 37%. Among registry participants, most reported using the registry to input data on vaccines administered (N = 326, 87% and to review immunization records of individual patients (N = 302, 81%. A minority reported using it to assess their practice's immunization coverage (N = 110, 29% or generate reminder/recall notices (N = 54, 14%. Few participants reported experiencing "significant" problems with the registry; the most often cited was cost/staff time to use the registry (N = 71, 20%. Conclusion Most registry participants report active participation with few

  7. ROUTINE IMMUNIZATION IN INDIA: A PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Taneja

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The Universal Immunization Programme is possibly the longest and one of the biggest public health intervention measures undertaken in India. To improve immunization coverage in the country various initiatives have been undertaken since the inception of the programme in 1985; key inputs being strengthening and expanding the cold chain system, establishing a network of outreach immunization sites, alternate vaccine delivery model, capacity building of health functionaries and medical officers and intensified polio control measures. Introduction of new and underutilized vaccines, drafting of the national vaccine policy, tracking of beneficiaries through the Maternal and Child Tracking system are some of the recent developments. However in spite of more than 25 years since inception the programme is still adversely impacted by challenges across key thematic areas of programme management, cold chain and vaccine management, recording and reporting and injection safety. To further strengthen and improve service delivery 2012-13 has been declared as the “Year of Intensification of Routine Immunization” with the objective of improving immunization coverage rates across poor performing districts and states so as to attain Global Immunization Vision and Strategy goals of 90% coverage at national and more than 80% coverage at district level. Key activities planned during the year include sustained advocacy at all levels, improved communication and social mobilization, robust and regular program reviews, comprehensive microplanning, strengthening cold chain and vaccine logistics system, special catch up rounds through immunization weeks, piloting the teeka express, improved surveillance systems, strengthened partnerships and operational research activities. The current review pertains to the existing scenario of Universal Immunization Program in the country with impetus on the existing challenges, progress achieved till date as a result of various

  8. Evasion of adaptive immunity by HIV through the action of host APOBEC3G/F enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Michael; Larijani, Mani

    2017-09-12

    APOBEC3G (A3G) and APOBEC3F (A3F) are DNA-mutating enzymes expressed in T cells, dendritic cells and macrophages. A3G/F have been considered innate immune host factors, based on reports that they lethally mutate the HIV genome in vitro. In vivo, A3G/F effectiveness is limited by viral proteins, entrapment in inactive complexes and filtration of mutations during viral life cycle. We hypothesized that the impact of sub-lethal A3G/F action could extend beyond the realm of innate immunity confined to the cytoplasm of infected cells. We measured recognition of wild type and A3G/F-mutated epitopes by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) from HIV-infected individuals and found that A3G/F-induced mutations overwhelmingly diminished CTL recognition of HIV peptides, in a human histocompatibility-linked leukocyte antigen (HLA)-dependent manner. Furthermore, we found corresponding enrichment of A3G/F-favored motifs in CTL epitope-encoding sequences within the HIV genome. These findings illustrate that A3G/F-mediated mutations mediate immune evasion by HIV in vivo. Therefore, we suggest that vaccine strategies target T cell or antibody epitopes that are not poised for mutation into escape variants by A3G/F action.

  9. Designing convex repulsive pair potentials that favor assembly of kagome and snub square lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñeros, William D.; Baldea, Michael; Truskett, Thomas M.

    2016-08-01

    Building on a recently introduced inverse strategy, isotropic and convex repulsive pair potentials were designed that favor assembly of particles into kagome and equilateral snub square lattices. The former interactions were obtained by a numerical solution of a variational problem that maximizes the range of density for which the ground state of the potential is the kagome lattice. Similar optimizations targeting the snub square lattice were also carried out, employing a constraint that required a minimum chemical potential advantage of the target over select competing structures. This constraint helped to discover isotropic interactions that meaningfully favored the snub square lattice as the ground state structure despite the asymmetric spatial distribution of particles in its coordination shells and the presence of tightly competing structures. Consistent with earlier published results [W. Piñeros et al., J. Chem. Phys. 144, 084502 (2016)], enforcement of greater chemical potential advantages for the target lattice in the interaction optimization led to assemblies with enhanced thermal stability.

  10. Perceived Distributive Fairness of EU Transfer Payments, Outcome Favorability, Identity, and EU-Tax Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartner, Martina; Rechberger, Silvia; Kirchler, Erich; Wenzel, Michael

    2011-01-01

    In a representative UK study (N = 1000) the link between distributive fairness perceptions, outcome favorability, identity, and tax compliance was researched in the context of European transfer payments. Results showed that both forms of tax compliance (i.e., individual and collective EU-tax compliance) were influenced by perceived distributive fairness judgments of EU transfer payments. Fairness itself was related to perceived outcome favorability (i.e., whether their own nation benefits from the EU in financial as well as socio-political terms). Additionally, national identifiers (i.e., people identifying with their own nation, but not with Europe) perceived EU membership as unbeneficial in financial as well as in socio-political terms and thus considered the transfer payments as less fair. Dual identifiers (i.e., people identifying with their own nation and with Europe) perceived the socio-political outcomes from EU membership as more beneficial and thus evaluated the transfer payments as fairer.

  11. A favorable effect of hydroxychloroquine on glucose and lipid metabolism beyond its anti-inflammatory role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hage, Mirella P; Al-Badri, Marwa R; Azar, Sami T

    2014-08-01

    Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), a commonly used antimalarial drug in rheumatic diseases, has shown favorable metabolic effects on both glucose control and lipid profiles. We describe a case of a young woman with type 1 diabetes whose glycemic control was optimized with the introduction of HCQ as a treatment for her Sjogren syndrome in addition to a subtle yet measurable improvement in her lipid profile. An increasing body of evidence supports the beneficial impacts of HCQ in various ancillary conditions, including diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia. However, mechanisms of action responsible for these effects remain ill-defined and may include alterations in insulin metabolism and signaling through cellular receptors. These favorable metabolic effects of HCQ and further understanding of underlying mechanisms may provide an additional rational for its use in rheumatic diseases, conditions associated with an elevated cardiovascular risk.

  12. Influences of Mental Illness Stigma on Perceptions of and Responses to Requests for Favors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Tatsuya; Dailey, René

    2016-07-01

    This article examines mental illness stigma effects on a request for a favor from a mentally ill individual. Four hundred and fourteen participants interacted with a hypothetical target on Facebook who was believed to have schizophrenia, depression, or a tooth cavity (i.e., the control group). Participants were asked to rate the favor request in terms of face threat, in addition to writing a response, which was then coded using message design logics. Results indicated that a request by a schizophrenic target threatened participants' positive face more significantly than that of a target with depression or without any mental illness. Participants' responses to the schizophrenic target were more likely to be conventional messages, whereas responses to the depressed target were more likely to be rhetorical messages. Theoretical and practical contributions are considered.

  13. Macroevolutionary Immunology: A Role for Immunity in the Diversification of Animal life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loker, Eric S

    2012-01-01

    An emerging picture of the nature of immune systems across animal phyla reveals both conservatism of some features and the appearance among and within phyla of novel, lineage-specific defense solutions. The latter collectively represent a major and underappreciated form of animal diversity. Factors influencing this macroevolutionary (above the species level) pattern of novelty are considered and include adoption of different life styles, life histories, and body plans; a general advantage of being distinctive with respect to immune defenses; and the responses required to cope with parasites, many of which afflict hosts in a lineage-specific manner. This large-scale pattern of novelty implies that immunological phenomena can affect microevolutionary processes (at the population level within species) that can eventually lead to macroevolutionary events such as speciation, radiations, or extinctions. Immunologically based phenomena play a role in favoring intraspecific diversification, specialization and host specificity of parasites, and mechanisms are discussed whereby this could lead to parasite speciation. Host switching - the acquisition of new host species by parasites - is a major mechanism that drives parasite diversity and is frequently involved in disease emergence. It is also one that can be favored by reductions in immune competence of new hosts. Mechanisms involving immune phenomena favoring intraspecific diversification and speciation of host species are also discussed. A macroevolutionary perspective on immunology is invaluable in today's world, including the need to study a broader range of species with distinctive immune systems. Many of these species are faced with extinction, another macroevolutionary process influenced by immune phenomena.

  14. Immunity to Fish Rhabdoviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maureen K. Purcell

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Members of the family Rhabdoviridae are single-stranded RNA viruses and globally important pathogens of wild and cultured fish and thus relatively well studied in their respective hosts or other model systems. Here, we review the protective immune mechanisms that fish mount in response to rhabdovirus infections. Teleost fish possess the principal components of innate and adaptive immunity found in other vertebrates. Neutralizing antibodies are critical for long-term protection from fish rhabdoviruses, but several studies also indicate a role for cell-mediated immunity. Survival of acute rhabdoviral infection is also dependent on innate immunity, particularly the interferon (IFN system that is rapidly induced in response to infection. Paradoxically, rhabdoviruses are sensitive to the effects of IFN but virulent rhabdoviruses can continue to replicate owing to the abilities of the matrix (M protein to mediate host-cell shutoff and the non‑virion (NV protein to subvert programmed cell death and suppress functional IFN. While many basic features of the fish immune response to rhabdovirus infections are becoming better understood, much less is known about how factors in the environment affect the ecology of rhabdovirus infections in natural populations of aquatic animals.

  15. Immune memory in invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milutinović, Barbara; Kurtz, Joachim

    2016-08-01

    Evidence for innate immune memory (or 'priming') in invertebrates has been accumulating over the last years. We here provide an in-depth review of the current state of evidence for immune memory in invertebrates, and in particular take a phylogenetic viewpoint. Invertebrates are a very heterogeneous group of animals and accordingly, evidence for the phenomenon of immune memory as well as the hypothesized molecular underpinnings differ largely for the diverse invertebrate taxa. The majority of research currently focuses on Arthropods, while evidence from many other groups of invertebrates is fragmentary or even lacking. We here concentrate on immune memory that is induced by pathogenic challenges, but also extent our view to a non-pathogenic context, i.e. allograft rejection, which can also show forms of memory and can inform us about general principles of specific self-nonself recognition. We discuss definitions of immune memory and a number of relevant aspects such as the type of antigens used, the route of exposure, and the kinetics of reactions following priming. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Adaptive Immunity to Fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Akash; Wüthrich, Marcel; Deepe, George; Klein, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Life-threatening fungal infections have risen sharply in recent years, owing to the advances and intensity of medical care that may blunt immunity in patients. This emerging crisis has created the growing need to clarify immune defense mechanisms against fungi with the ultimate goal of therapeutic intervention. We describe recent insights in understanding the mammalian immune defenses that are deployed against pathogenic fungi. We focus on adaptive immunity to the major medically important fungi and emphasize three elements that coordinate the response: (1) dendritic cells and subsets that are mobilized against fungi in various anatomical compartments; (2) fungal molecular patterns and their corresponding receptors that signal responses and shape the differentiation of T-cell subsets and B cells; and, ultimately (3) the effector and regulatory mechanisms that eliminate these invaders while constraining collateral damage to vital tissue. These insights create a foundation for the development of new, immune-based strategies for prevention or enhanced clearance of systemic fungal diseases. PMID:25377140

  17. Inflammation, Immunity, and Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agita, Arisya; Alsagaff, M Thaha

    2017-04-01

    The immune system, inflammation and hypertension are related to each other. Innate and adaptive immunity system triggers an inflammatory process, in which blood pressure may increase, stimulating organ damage. Cells in innate immune system produce ROS, such as superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, which aimed at killing pathogens. Long-term inflammation process increases ROS production, causing oxidative stress which leads to endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial function is to regulate blood vessel tone and structure. When inflammation lasts, NO bioavailability decreases, disrupting its main function as vasodilator, so that blood vessels relaxation and vasodilatation are absent. Effector T cells and regulatory lymphocytes, part of the adaptive immune system, plays role in blood vessels constriction in hypertension. Signals from central nervous system and APC activates effector T lymphocyte differentiation and accelerate through Th-1 and Th-17 phenotypes. Th-1 and Th-17 effectors participate in inflammation which leads to increased blood pressure. One part of CD4+ is the regulatory T cells (Tregs) that suppress immune response activation as they produce immunosuppressive cytokines, such as TGF-β and IL-10. Adoptive transfer of Tregs cells can reduce oxidative stress in blood vessels, endothelial dysfunction, infiltration of aortic macrophages and T cells as well as proinflammatory cytokine levels in plasma circulation.

  18. Inflammation, Immunity, and Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arisya Agita

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The immune system, inflammation and hypertension are related to each other. Innate and adaptive immunity system triggers an inflammatory process, in which blood pressure may increase, stimulating organ damage. Cells in innate immune system produce ROS, such as superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, which aimed at killing pathogens. Long-term inflammation process increases ROS production, causing oxidative stress which leads to endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial function is to regulate blood vessel tone and structure. When inflammation lasts, NO bioavailability decreases, disrupting its main function as vasodilator, so that blood vessels relaxation and vasodilatation are absent. Effector T cells and regulatory lymphocytes, part of the adaptive immune system, plays role in blood vessels constriction in hypertension. Signals from central nervous system and APC activates effector T lymphocyte differentiation and accelerate through Th-1 and Th-17 phenotypes. Th-1 and Th-17 effectors participate in inflammation which leads to increased blood pressure. One part of CD4+ is the regulatory T cells (Tregs that suppress immune response activation as they produce immunosuppressive cytokines, such as TGF-β and IL-10. Adoptive transfer of Tregs cells can reduce oxidative stress in blood vessels, endothelial dysfunction, infiltration of aortic macrophages and T cells as well as proinflammatory cytokine levels in plasma circulation.

  19. Aging, immunity, and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulop, Tamas; Larbi, Anis; Kotb, Rami; de Angelis, Flavia; Pawelec, Graham

    2011-06-01

    Age is the most important risk factor for tumorigenesis. More than 60% of new cancers and more than 70% of cancer deaths occur in elderly subjects >65 years. The immune system plays an important role in the battle of the host against cancer development. Deleterious alterations occur to the immune response with aging, termed immunosenescence. It is tempting to speculate that this waning immune response contributes to the higher incidence of cancer, but robust data on this important topic are few and far between. This review is devoted to discussing state of the art knowledge on the relationship between immunosenescence and cancer. Emerging understanding of the aging process at the molecular level is viewed from the perspective of this increased tumorigenesis. We also consider some of the most recent means to intervene in the modulation of immunosenescence to increase the ability of the immune system to fight against tumors. Future research will unravel new aspects of the immune response against tumors which will be modulable to decrease the burden of cancer in elderly individuals.

  20. Immunity to fish rhabdoviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Laing, Kerry J.; Winton, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Members of the family Rhabdoviridae are single-stranded RNA viruses and globally important pathogens of wild and cultured fish and thus relatively well studied in their respective hosts or other model systems. Here, we review the protective immune mechanisms that fish mount in response to rhabdovirus infections. Teleost fish possess the principal components of innate and adaptive immunity found in other vertebrates. Neutralizing antibodies are critical for long-term protection from fish rhabdoviruses, but several studies also indicate a role for cell-mediated immunity. Survival of acute rhabdoviral infection is also dependent on innate immunity, particularly the interferon (IFN) system that is rapidly induced in response to infection. Paradoxically, rhabdoviruses are sensitive to the effects of IFN but virulent rhabdoviruses can continue to replicate owing to the abilities of the matrix (M) protein to mediate host-cell shutoff and the non-virion (NV) protein to subvert programmed cell death and suppress functional IFN. While many basic features of the fish immune response to rhabdovirus infections are becoming better understood, much less is known about how factors in the environment affect the ecology of rhabdovirus infections in natural populations of aquatic animals.

  1. Iron overload and immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gra(c)a Porto; Maria De Sousa

    2007-01-01

    Progress in the characterization of genes involved in the control of iron homeostasis in humans and in mice has improved the definition of iron overload and of the cells affected by it. The cell involved in iron overload with the greatest effect on immunity is the macrophage.Intriguing evidence has emerged, however, in the last 12 years indicating that parenchymal iron overload is linked to genes classically associated with the immune system. This review offers an update of the genes and proteins relevant to iron metabolism expressed in cells of the innate immune system, and addresses the question of how this system is affected in clinical situations of iron overload. The relationship between iron and the major cells of adaptive immunity, the T lymphocytes,will also be reviewed. Most studies addressing this last question in humans were performed in the clinical model of Hereditary Hemochromatosis. Data will also be reviewed demonstrating how the disruption of molecules essentially involved in adaptive immune responses result in the spontaneous development of iron overload and how they act as modifiers of iron overload.

  2. Favored subjects and psychosocial needs in music therapy in terminally ill cancer patients: a content analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Preissler, Pia; Kordovan, Sarah; Ullrich, Anneke; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Oechsle, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Background Research has shown positive effects of music therapy on the physical and mental well-being of terminally ill patients. This study aimed to identify favored subjects and psychosocial needs of terminally ill cancer patients during music therapy and associated factors. Methods Forty-one Patients receiving specialized inpatient palliative care prospectively performed a music therapy intervention consisting of at least two sessions (total number of sessions: 166; per patient average: 4,...

  3. Lithofacies paleogeography and favorable gas exploration zones of Qixia and Maokou Fms in the Sichuan Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingao Zhou

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In the Sichuan Basin, the Middle Permian marine carbonate rocks are important natural gas pay zones with immense exploration potential, but the facies belts and distribution situations of layered dolomite reservoirs are not clear, which hinders the progress in natural gas exploration. In view of the sedimentary background of the Sichuan Basin, field outcrop section, drilling data and seismic data were comprehensively analyzed with the favorable reservoir intervals in the framework of sequence stratigraphy as the key research units. Research results about its lithofacies paleogeography were obtained as follows. First, a gentle slope SW high and NE low was presented during the sedimentation of the Qixia Fm in the Middle Permian. In the Maokou Fm of the Middle Permian, however, a series of the N–W trending intra-platform rifts were developed in this setting, and eventually a paleogeographic pattern of NE-dipping alternative uplift and depression was evolved. Second, in the Qixia Fm, the transgressive tract was in an open platform environment and the highstand system tract evolved into a rimmed platform. And the platform margin beach in the area of Jiange–Ya'an is the favorable reservoir facies belt. And third, in the Maokou Fm, the transgressive tract was in the carbonate shelf environment and the highstand system tract evolved into a rimmed platform. And the platform margin reef flat in the area of Jiange–Ya'an and the syneclise margin beach in the area of Yanting–Guang'an are favorable reservoir facies belts. It is concluded that the two grain beach facies belts in the areas of Jiange–Ya'an and Yanting–Guang'an were the favorable zones for the large-scale development of Middle Permian layered dolomite reservoirs and they are the main target of subsequent natural gas exploration.

  4. Wide and Fast: Monitoring the Sky in Subsecond Domain with the FAVOR and TORTORA Cameras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Karpov

    2010-01-01

    natural and artificial, it is necessary to perform the systematic monitoring of large regions of the sky with high temporal resolution. Here we discuss the criteria for a system that is able to perform such a task and describe two cameras we created for wide-field monitoring with high temporal resolution—FAVOR and TORTORA. Also, we describe basic principles of real-time data processing for the high frame rates needed to achieve subsecond temporal resolution on a typical hardware.

  5. Space-Constrained Massive MIMO: Hitting the Wall of Favorable Propagation

    OpenAIRE

    Masouros, Christos; Matthaiou, Michail

    2015-01-01

    The recent development of the massive multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) paradigm, has been extensively based on the pursuit of favorable propagation: in the asymptotic limit, the channel vectors become nearly orthogonal and interuser interference tends to zero [1]. In this context, previous studieshave considered fixed inter-antenna distance, which implies an increasing array aperture as the number of elements increases. Here, we focus on a practical, space-constrained topology, where an ...

  6. A favorable effect of hydroxychloroquine on glucose and lipid metabolism beyond its anti-inflammatory role

    OpenAIRE

    Hage, Mirella P.; Al-Badri, Marwa R.; Azar, Sami T.

    2014-01-01

    Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), a commonly used antimalarial drug in rheumatic diseases, has shown favorable metabolic effects on both glucose control and lipid profiles. We describe a case of a young woman with type 1 diabetes whose glycemic control was optimized with the introduction of HCQ as a treatment for her Sjogren syndrome in addition to a subtle yet measurable improvement in her lipid profile. An increasing body of evidence supports the beneficial impacts of HCQ in various ancillary condi...

  7. Misperceiving Bullshit as Profound Is Associated with Favorable Views of Cruz, Rubio, Trump and Conservatism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfattheicher, Stefan; Schindler, Simon

    2016-01-01

    The present research investigates the associations between holding favorable views of potential Democratic or Republican candidates for the US presidency 2016 and seeing profoundness in bullshit statements. In this contribution, bullshit is used as a technical term which is defined as communicative expression that lacks content, logic, or truth from the perspective of natural science. We used the Bullshit Receptivity scale (BSR) to measure seeing profoundness in bullshit statements. The BSR scale contains statements that have a correct syntactic structure and seem to be sound and meaningful on first reading but are actually vacuous. Participants (N = 196; obtained via Amazon Mechanical Turk) rated the profoundness of bullshit statements (using the BSR) and provided favorability ratings of three Democratic (Hillary Clinton, Martin O'Malley, and Bernie Sanders) and three Republican candidates for US president (Ted Cruz, Marco Rubio, and Donald Trump). Participants also completed a measure of political liberalism/conservatism. Results revealed that favorable views of all three Republican candidates were positively related to judging bullshit statements as profound. The smallest correlation was found for Donald Trump. Although we observe a positive association between bullshit and support for the three Democrat candidates, this relationship is both substantively small and statistically insignificant. The general measure of political liberalism/conservatism was also related to judging bullshit statements as profound in that individuals who were more politically conservative had a higher tendency to see profoundness in bullshit statements. Of note, these results were not due to a general tendency among conservatives to see profoundness in everything: Favorable views of Republican candidates and conservatism were not significantly related to profoundness ratings of mundane statements. In contrast, this was the case for Hillary Clinton and Martin O'Malley. Overall, small

  8. Misperceiving Bullshit as Profound Is Associated with Favorable Views of Cruz, Rubio, Trump and Conservatism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Pfattheicher

    Full Text Available The present research investigates the associations between holding favorable views of potential Democratic or Republican candidates for the US presidency 2016 and seeing profoundness in bullshit statements. In this contribution, bullshit is used as a technical term which is defined as communicative expression that lacks content, logic, or truth from the perspective of natural science. We used the Bullshit Receptivity scale (BSR to measure seeing profoundness in bullshit statements. The BSR scale contains statements that have a correct syntactic structure and seem to be sound and meaningful on first reading but are actually vacuous. Participants (N = 196; obtained via Amazon Mechanical Turk rated the profoundness of bullshit statements (using the BSR and provided favorability ratings of three Democratic (Hillary Clinton, Martin O'Malley, and Bernie Sanders and three Republican candidates for US president (Ted Cruz, Marco Rubio, and Donald Trump. Participants also completed a measure of political liberalism/conservatism. Results revealed that favorable views of all three Republican candidates were positively related to judging bullshit statements as profound. The smallest correlation was found for Donald Trump. Although we observe a positive association between bullshit and support for the three Democrat candidates, this relationship is both substantively small and statistically insignificant. The general measure of political liberalism/conservatism was also related to judging bullshit statements as profound in that individuals who were more politically conservative had a higher tendency to see profoundness in bullshit statements. Of note, these results were not due to a general tendency among conservatives to see profoundness in everything: Favorable views of Republican candidates and conservatism were not significantly related to profoundness ratings of mundane statements. In contrast, this was the case for Hillary Clinton and Martin O

  9. Meningococcal C specific immune responses: immunity in an era of immunization with vaccine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Voer, R.M.

    2010-01-01

    Meningococcal serogroup C conjugate immunization was introduced in the Dutch national immunization schedule at the age of 14 months, together with a large catch-up campaign in 2002. After introduction of this MenC immunization, the incidence of MenC completely disappeared from the immunized populati

  10. Influence of prebiotics on the human immune system (GALT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodera, Pawel

    2008-06-01

    Prebiotics have great potential to improve human health in specific intestinal disorders. The knowledge about the influence of prebiotics on the gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT) for the improvement of human health is still growing. This paper reviews the latest evidence for the immunity-enhancing effects of prebiotics. Prebiotics, include inulin, fructooligosaccharides, mannosoligosaccharides, and arabinogalactans, are a therapeutic nutritional preparation used for the gut function favoring growth of normal bacterial flora and impedes growth of pathogenic organisms. There is convincing preliminary data to suggest that the consumption of prebiotics can modulate immune parameters in GALT, secondary lymphoid tissues and peripheral circulation. There is increasing evidence that the newly described prebiotics and innovative means of administration can modulate various properties of the immune system, including those of the gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT). Authors of recently published patents showed new mechanisms for immuno-modulation, and the ultimate impact on immunological health of prebiotics.

  11. The Study of Relationship Between Work Teams and Favoring Knowledge Management (Case: Bank Keshavarzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamze Jamshidi Kohsari

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge management is a process that has been recently generated as an activity which isvery important in the dynamic environment, and in the competitive scene. We believe that KM is aprocess which its organizational knowledge is created from the individual knowledge of themembers of the organization. The relevant studies have indicated that organizing based on workteams could be considered a way to create the appropriate context for KM. However, thisorganizing based on work teams is not enough; it only has the necessary characteristics of the workteams that favor KM. Moreover, based on studies done, we distinguish which characteristics ofwork teams favor the KM process in its different phases (i.e. creation, transfer and integration. Inthis study, we conducted multiple regression and analysis of variance.Complementary skills (H2 and a climate of trust (H3 in work teams were more importantfactors that favor the management of organizational knowledge.This research is based on the Zarraga and Perez studies in 2006.

  12. Intravascular immune hemolysis caused by the contrast medium iomeprol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mayer, Beate; Leo, Albrecht; Herziger, Angela; Houben, Philipp; Schemmer, Peter; Salama, Abdulgabar

    2013-01-01

    BackgroundImmune-mediated hemolysis is not included in the list of adverse reactions related to contrast medium (CM). Here, we report on a patient who developed immune hemolytic anemia (IHA) related to iomeprol, a nonionic CM. Study Design and MethodsA 34-year-old female patient developed massive he

  13. Innate immune receptors in carp: recognition of protozoan parasites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ribeiro, C.M.S.

    2010-01-01

    This PhD thesis reports on pattern recognition receptors involved in the immune responses of common carp (Cyprinus carpio) to two protozoan parasites Trypanoplasma borreli and Trypanosoma carassii. The immune responses of carp are fundamentally different when comparing these two extracellular blood

  14. Effects of thermal stress on tumor antigenicity and recognition by immune effector cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, Valeria; Noessner, Elfriede

    2006-03-01

    The primary rationale for the application of clinical hyperthermia in the therapy of cancer is based on the direct cytotoxic effect of heat and the radio-chemosensitization of tumor cells. More recently, additional attention is given to the observation that heat and heat-shock proteins can activate the host's immune system. The expression of heat-shock genes and proteins provides an adaptive mechanism for stress tolerance, allowing cells to survive non-physiologic conditions. However, the same adaptive mechanism can ultimately favor malignant transformation by interfering with pathways that regulate cell growth and apoptosis. Cytoprotection and thermotolerance raised the concern that heat-treated tumor cells might also be resistant to attack by immune effector mechanisms. Many studies, including those from our group, address this concern and document that heat-exposure, although transiently modulating sensitivity to CTL, do not hinder CTL attack. Moreover, there are promising reports of heat-related upregulation of NK-activating ligands, rendering those tumors which have lost MHC class I molecules target for NK cell attack. Heat-induced cytoprotection, therefore, does not necessarily extend protection from cytotoxic immune mechanisms. When interpreting the effects of heat, it is important to keep in mind that thermal effects on cell physiology are strongly dependent on the thermal dose, which is a function of the magnitude of change in temperature and the duration of heat exposure. The thermal dose required to induce cell death in vitro strongly varies from cell type to cell type and depends on microenvironmental factors (Dewey 1994). Therefore, to dissect the immunological behaviour of a given tumor and its micro-environment at different thermal doses, it is essential to characterize the thermosensitivity of every single tumor type and assess the proportion of cells surviving a given heat treatment. In this review, we summarize the pleiotropic effects that heat

  15. Fully immunized child

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mutua, Martin Kavao; Kimani-Murage, Elizabeth; Ngomi, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Background: More efforts have been put in place to increase full immunization coverage rates in the last decade. Little is known about the levels and consequences of delaying or vaccinating children in different schedules. Vaccine effectiveness depends on the timing of its administration......, and it is not optimal if given early, delayed or not given as recommended. Evidence of non-specific effects of vaccines is well documented and could be linked to timing and sequencing of immunization. This paper documents the levels of coverage, timing and sequencing of routine childhood vaccines. Methods: The study...... was conducted between 2007 and 2014 in two informal urban settlements in Nairobi. A total of 3856 children, aged 12-23 months and having a vaccination card seen were included in analysis. Vaccination dates recorded from the cards seen were used to define full immunization coverage, timeliness and sequencing...

  16. Immune system simulation online

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapin, Nicolas; Lund, Ole; Castiglione, Filippo

    2011-01-01

    MOTIVATION: The recognition of antigenic peptides is a major event of an immune response. In current mesoscopic-scale simulators of the immune system, this crucial step has been modeled in a very approximated way. RESULTS: We have equipped an agent-based model of the immune system with immuno......-informatics methods to allow the simulation of the cardinal events of the antigenic recognition, going from single peptides to whole proteomes. The recognition process accounts for B cell-epitopes prediction through Parker-scale affinity estimation, class I and II HLA peptide prediction and binding through position...... simulation. AVAILABILITY: http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/C-ImmSim-10.1/ CONTACT: f.castiglione@iac.cnr.it...

  17. [Immune-mediated neuropathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, G; Reiners, K

    2016-08-01

    The Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) are the most common immune-mediated polyneuropathies, which can show variable clinical and electrophysiological manifestations. Rarer immune-mediated neuropathies encompass paraproteinemic neuropathies (PPN), multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) and vasculitic neuropathies. The diagnosis usually relies on the history of symptom evolution, distribution of nerve dysfunction and particularly on characteristic features in nerve conduction studies, aided by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination and nerve biopsy findings. The therapeutic toolbox encompasses corticosteroids, immunoglobulins and plasmapheresis often accompanied by long-term immunosuppression. It is important to note that immune-mediated neuropathies selectively respond to treatment and contraindications need to be considered. Despite treatment a considerable number of patients suffer from permanent neurological deficits.

  18. TSLP and Immune Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shino Hanabuchi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In an immune system, dendritic cells (DCs are professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs as well as powerful sensors of danger signals. When DCs receive signals from infection and tissue stress, they immediately activate and instruct the initiation of appropriate immune responses to T cells. However, it has remained unclear how the tissue microenvironment in a steady state shapes the function of DCs. Recent many works on thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP, an epithelial cell-derived cytokine that has the strong ability to activate DCs, provide evidence that TSLP mediates crosstalk between epithelial cells and DCs, involving in DC-mediated immune homeostasis. Here, we review recent progress made on how TSLP expressed within the thymus and peripheral lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues regulates DC-mediated T-cell development in the thymus and T-cell homeostasis in the periphery.

  19. MVA-based H5N1 vaccine affords cross-clade protection in mice against influenza A/H5N1 viruses at low doses and after single immunization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joost H C M Kreijtz

    Full Text Available Human infections with highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses of the H5N1 subtype, frequently reported since 2003, result in high morbidity and mortality. It is feared that these viruses become pandemic, therefore the development of safe and effective vaccines is desirable. MVA-based H5N1 vaccines already proved to be effective when two immunizations with high doses were used. Dose-sparing strategies would increase the number of people that can be vaccinated when the amount of vaccine preparations that can be produced is limited. Furthermore, protective immunity is induced ideally after a single immunization. Therefore the minimal requirements for induction of protective immunity with a MVA-based H5N1 vaccine were assessed in mice. To this end, mice were vaccinated once or twice with descending doses of a recombinant MVA expressing the HA gene of influenza virus A/Vietnam/1194/04. The protective efficacy was determined after challenge infection with the homologous clade 1 virus and a heterologous virus derived from clade 2.1, A/Indonesia/5/05 by assessing weight loss, virus replication and histopathological changes. It was concluded that MVA-based vaccines allowed significant dose-sparing and afford cross-clade protection, also after a single immunization, which are favorable properties for an H5N1 vaccine candidate.

  20. Prehospital Intubation is Associated with Favorable Outcomes and Lower Mortality in ProTECT III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denninghoff, Kurt R; Nuño, Tomas; Pauls, Qi; Yeatts, Sharon D; Silbergleit, Robert; Palesch, Yuko Y; Merck, Lisa H; Manley, Geoff T; Wright, David W

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes more than 2.5 million emergency department visits, hospitalizations, or deaths annually. Prehospital endotracheal intubation has been associated with poor outcomes in patients with TBI in several retrospective observational studies. We evaluated the relationship between prehospital intubation, functional outcomes, and mortality using high quality data on clinical practice collected prospectively during a randomized multicenter clinical trial. ProTECT III was a multicenter randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of early administration of progesterone in 882 patients with acute moderate to severe nonpenetrating TBI. Patients were excluded if they had an index GCS of 3 and nonreactive pupils, those with withdrawal of life support on arrival, and if they had documented prolonged hypotension and/or hypoxia. Prehospital intubation was performed as per local clinical protocol in each participating EMS system. Models for favorable outcome and mortality included prehospital intubation, method of transport, index GCS, age, race, and ethnicity as independent variables. Significance was set at α = 0.05. Favorable outcome was defined by a stratified dichotomy of the GOS-E scores in which the definition of favorable outcome depended on the severity of the initial injury. Favorable outcome was more frequent in the 349 subjects with prehospital intubation (57.3%) than in the other 533 patients (46.0%, p = 0.003). Mortality was also lower in the prehospital intubation group (13.8% v. 19.5%, p = 0.03). Logistic regression analysis of prehospital intubation and mortality, adjusted for index GCS, showed that odds of dying for those with prehospital intubation were 47% lower than for those that were not intubated (OR = 0.53, 95% CI = 0.36-0.78). 279 patients with prehospital intubation were transported by air. Modeling transport method and mortality, adjusted for index GCS, showed increased odds of dying in those transported by ground

  1. Inflammatory bowel disease related innate immunity and adaptive immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuan; Chen, Zhonge

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic nonspecific intestinal inflammatory disease, including ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease (CD). Its pathogenesis remains not yet clear. Current researchers believe that after environmental factors act on individuals with genetic susceptibility, an abnormal intestinal immune response is launched under stimulation of intestinal flora. However, previous studies only focused on adaptive immunity in the pathogenesis of IBD. Currently, roles of innate immune response in the pathogenesis of intestinal inflammation have also drawn much attention. In this study, IBD related innate immunity and adaptive immunity were explained, especially the immune mechanisms in the pathogenesis of IBD. PMID:27398134

  2. Vaccines and Immunization Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogue, Michael D; Meador, Anna E

    2016-03-01

    Vaccines are among most cost-effective public health strategies. Despite effective vaccines for many bacterial and viral illnesses, tens of thousands of adults and hundreds of children die each year in the United States from vaccine-preventable diseases. Underutilization of vaccines requires rethinking the approach to incorporating vaccines into practice. Arguably, immunizations could be a part all health care encounters. Shared responsibility is paramount if deaths are to be reduced. This article reviews the available vaccines in the US market, as well as practice recommendations of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. IL–18 AND IMMUNITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Yakushenko

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Interleukin–18 is one of the main cytokines, inducing production of IFNg. It is the important factor of anti–infectious and anti–tumor immunity. The review represent molecular–genetic and biochemical characteristics of IL–18. The data about producers, the structure of the receptor and of IL–18 binding protein, as well as signal transduction in the cell are considered. Besides that, the main immune effects of IL–18 are discussed. (Med. Immunol., 2005, vol.7, № 4, pp 355–364

  4. Quercetin, Inflammation and Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yao; Yao, Jiaying; Han, Chunyan; Yang, Jiaxin; Chaudhry, Maria Tabassum; Wang, Shengnan; Liu, Hongnan; Yin, Yulong

    2016-03-15

    In vitro and some animal models have shown that quercetin, a polyphenol derived from plants, has a wide range of biological actions including anti-carcinogenic, anti-inflammatory and antiviral activities; as well as attenuating lipid peroxidation, platelet aggregation and capillary permeability. This review focuses on the physicochemical properties, dietary sources, absorption, bioavailability and metabolism of quercetin, especially main effects of quercetin on inflammation and immune function. According to the results obtained both in vitro and in vivo, good perspectives have been opened for quercetin. Nevertheless, further studies are needed to better characterize the mechanisms of action underlying the beneficial effects of quercetin on inflammation and immunity.

  5. Exercise boosts immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Ruth

    2012-06-29

    Ageing is associated with a decline in normal functioning of the immune system described as 'immunosenescence'. This contributes to poorer vaccine response and increased incidence of infection and malignancy seen in older people. Regular exercise can enhance vaccination response, increase T-cells and boost the function of the natural killer cells in the immune system. Exercise also lowers levels of the inflammatory cytokines that cause the 'inflamm-ageing' that is thought to play a role in conditions including cardiovascular disease; type 2 diabetes; Alzheimer's disease; osteoporosis and some cancers.

  6. Pentraxins and immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Nagar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pentraxin-3 (PTX3 is a multifactorial protein involved in immunity and inflammation, which is rapidly produced and released by several cell types in response to inflammatory signals. It may be suggested that PTX3 is related to periodontal tissue inflammation. Its salivary concentrations may have a diagnostic potential. Pentraxin-3 (PTX3 is an ancient family of multifactorial proteins involved in immunity and inflammation. They are rapidly produced and released by various types of cells when there are indications of inflammation. PTX3 is related to inflammation in the periodontal tissue and it can be suggested that salivary concentrations may be used for diagnosing the same.

  7. Immune dysregulation in offspring of a bipolar parent. Altered serum levels of immune growth factors at adolescent age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijders, J.G.; Mesman, E.; de Wit, H.; Wijkhuijs, AJM; Nolen, W. A.; Drexhage, H. A.; Hillegers, M. H. J.

    Immune dysregulation plays a role in the vulnerability for mood disorders. Immune growth factors, such as Stem Cell Factor (SCF), Insulin-like Growth Factor-Binding Protein-2 (IGF-BP2), Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF), IL-7 and sCD25 have repeatedly been reported altered in patients with mood

  8. Tumor-infiltrating immune cells and prognosis: the potential link between conventional cancer therapy and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochems, Caroline; Schlom, Jeffrey

    2011-05-01

    Numerous studies have now documented a link between the immune infiltrate in several human carcinoma types and prognosis and response to therapy. The most comprehensive of these studies were in colorectal cancer with similar conclusions by numerous groups. Analyses of immune infiltrate of several other carcinoma types also showed general correlations between immune infiltrate and prognosis, but with some conflicting results. This review will attempt to summarize the current state of this field and point out what factors may be responsible for some of the conflicting findings. Nonetheless, the breadth of reports drawing similar conclusions for some cancer cell types leads one to more seriously consider the link between immune cell infiltrate and tumor prognosis and/or response to therapy, and the potential for combining conventional cancer therapy with active immunotherapy employing therapeutic cancer vaccines.

  9. Universal immunization in urban areas: Calcutta's success story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, E R

    1990-01-01

    The Central Government of Calcutta, India aimed to immunize 85% (85,262) of the city's 12 month old infants against polio, diphtheria, measles, tuberculosis, pertussis and tetanus. The Universal Immunization Program (UIP) achieved this target 3 months earlier than intended. In fact, at the end of December 1990, it achieved 110.6% for DPT3, 142.16% for OPV3, 151.96% for BCG, and 97% for measles. UIP was able to surpass its targets by emphasizing team work. Government, the private sector, UNICEF, and the voluntary sector made up the Apex Coordination Committee on Immunization headed up by the mayor. The committee drafted an action plan which included routine immunization sessions on a fixed day and intensive immunization drives. Further the involved organizations pooled together cold chain equipment. In addition, the District Family Welfare Bureau was the distribution center for vaccines, syringes, immunization cards, report formats, vaccine carriers, and ice packs. Health workers administered immunizations from about 300 centers generally on Wednesday, National Immunization Day. Intensive immunization drives focused on measles immunizations. UIP leaders encouraged all center to routinely record coverage and submit monthly progress reports to the District Family Welfare Bureau. The Calcutta Municipal Corporation coordinated promotion activities and social mobilization efforts. Promotion included radio and TV announcements, newspaper advertisements, cinema slides, billboards, and posters. The original UIP plan to use professional communicators to mobilize communities was ineffective, so nongovernmental organizations entered the slums to encourage people to encourage their neighbors to immunize their children. Further Islamic, Protestant, and Catholic leaders encouraged the faithful to immunize their children. A UNICEF officer noted that this success must be sustained, however.

  10. The Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Genetic Variant rs5068 Is Associated With a Favorable Cardiometabolic Phenotype in a Mediterranean Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannone, Valentina; Cefalu’, Angelo Baldassare; Noto, Davide; Scott, Christopher G.; Bailey, Kent R.; Cavera, Giovanni; Pagano, Michele; Sapienza, Michelangelo; Averna, Maurizio R.; Burnett, John C.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We hypothesized that the minor allele of the atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) genetic variant rs5068 is associated with a favorable cardiometabolic phenotype in a general Mediterranean population. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We genotyped a random sample of the residents of Ventimiglia di Sicilia, Sicily, for rs5068. RESULTS Genotype frequencies of rs5068 are AA, 93.5%; AG, 6.4%; and GG, 0.1%. All subsequent analyses are AA versus AG+GG. After adjusting for age and sex, the minor G allele is associated with lower BMI (estimate [SE]: −1.7 kg/m2 [0.8], P = 0.04). In the AG+GG group, males with HDL cholesterol levels <40 mg/dL are less frequent (P = 0.05) and obesity tends to be less prevalent (P = 0.07). Importantly, the G allele is associated with a lower prevalence of metabolic syndrome (P = 0.02). After adjusting for BMI, the above associations were attenuated. Independently of age, sex, and BMI, the minor allele is also associated with lower systolic blood pressure (−6.0 mmHg [2.5], P = 0.02) and lower prevalence of hypertension (odds ratio 0.41 [95% CI 0.20–0.83], P = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS The association between the minor allele of rs5068 and a favorable cardiometabolic phenotype that we previously reported in a U.S. population is now replicated in a Mediterranean population in which the G allele of rs5068 is associated with lower blood pressure, BMI, and prevalence of hypertension and metabolic syndrome. These findings may lead to a diagnostic strategy to assess cardiometabolic risk and lay the foundation for the future development of an ANP or ANP-like therapy for metabolic syndrome. PMID:23637347

  11. Identification of genetic determinants of breast cancer immune phenotypes by integrative genome-scale analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeone, Ines; Anjum, Samreen; Mokrab, Younes; Bertucci, François; Finetti, Pascal; Curigliano, Giuseppe; Cerulo, Luigi; Tomei, Sara; Delogu, Lucia Gemma; Maccalli, Cristina; Miller, Lance D.; Ceccarelli, Michele

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cancer immunotherapy is revolutionizing the clinical management of several tumors, but has demonstrated limited activity in breast cancer. The development of more effective treatments is hindered by incomplete knowledge of the genetic determinant of immune responsiveness. To fill this gap, we mined copy number alteration, somatic mutation, and expression data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). By using RNA-sequencing data from 1,004 breast cancers, we defined distinct immune phenotypes characterized by progressive expression of transcripts previously associated with immune-mediated rejection. The T helper 1 (Th-1) phenotype (ICR4), which also displays upregulation of immune-regulatory transcripts such as PDL1, PD1, FOXP3, IDO1, and CTLA4, was associated with prolonged patients' survival. We validated these findings in an independent meta-cohort of 1,954 breast cancer gene expression data. Chromosome segment 4q21, which includes genes encoding for the Th-1 chemokines CXCL9-11, was significantly amplified only in the immune favorable phenotype (ICR4). The mutation and neoantigen load progressively decreased from ICR4 to ICR1 but could not fully explain immune phenotypic differences. Mutations of TP53 were enriched in the immune favorable phenotype (ICR4). Conversely, the presence of MAP3K1 and MAP2K4 mutations were tightly associated with an immune-unfavorable phenotype (ICR1). Using both the TCGA and the validation dataset, the degree of MAPK deregulation segregates breast tumors according to their immune disposition. These findings suggest that mutation-driven perturbations of MAPK pathways are linked to the negative regulation of intratumoral immune response in breast cancer. Modulations of MAPK pathways could be experimentally tested to enhance breast cancer immune sensitivity. PMID:28344865

  12. Immune recovery vitritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dujić Mirjana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Immune recovery vitritis (IRV is symptomatic vitritis of > 1+ severity associated with inactive cytomegalovirus (CMV retinitis. It is an opportunistic infection of the eye, in the patients who suffer from AIDS, and is treated with a highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART. As a result of this therapy, there is an immune reconstitution in the body and inflammation of the vitreous body. Objective The aim of the study was to show the incidence of IRV in patients treated with HAART. Method A retrospective study was conducted in patients who suffered from CMV retinitis. Twenty-one were treated with HAART and had the diagnosis of CMV retinitis, as well. All of them were examined by the same ophthalmologist who peformed slit lamp examination with mydriasis and indirect ophthalmoscopy. Results Nine of 21 patients developed IRV as a complication of HAART, two had cystoid macular edema (CMO. Conclusion CMV retinitis develops when the number of CD4+ T lymphocytes drops below 50/mm3. This results in necrotic retinitis which, if untreated, leads to complete loss of vision. With the introduction of HAART, we learned that the reconstitution of immune status was achieved as well as life expectancy, but there was a dramatic decline in the opportunistic infection, including CMV retinitis, as well. With the immune reconstitution, the inflammation develops in the eye, known as IRV. Sometimes, it is necessary to treat this condition, but in the case of our patients, the inflammation was mild, and no treatment was necessary.

  13. Lymphoma: Immune Evasion Strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhyay, Ranjan; Hammerich, Linda; Peng, Paul [Division of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Brown, Brian [Department of Genetics and Genomic Sciences, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Merad, Miriam [Department of Oncological Sciences, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Brody, Joshua D., E-mail: joshua.brody@mssm.edu [Division of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029 (United States)

    2015-04-30

    While the cellular origin of lymphoma is often characterized by chromosomal translocations and other genetic aberrations, its growth and development into a malignant neoplasm is highly dependent upon its ability to escape natural host defenses. Neoplastic cells interact with a variety of non-malignant cells in the tumor milieu to create an immunosuppressive microenvironment. The resulting functional impairment and dysregulation of tumor-associated immune cells not only allows for passive growth of the malignancy but may even provide active growth signals upon which the tumor subsequently becomes dependent. In the past decade, the success of immune checkpoint blockade and adoptive cell transfer for relapsed or refractory lymphomas has validated immunotherapy as a possible treatment cornerstone. Here, we review the mechanisms by which lymphomas have been found to evade and even reprogram the immune system, including alterations in surface molecules, recruitment of immunosuppressive subpopulations, and secretion of anti-inflammatory factors. A fundamental understanding of the immune evasion strategies utilized by lymphomas may lead to better prognostic markers and guide the development of targeted interventions that are both safer and more effective than current standards of care.

  14. Genetic Immunity to AIDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    In an article on genetic immunity to AIDS published in Science magazine, American and Chinese scientists claim to have discovered why certain HIV carriers do not develop full-blown AIDS. They say that the key to this conundrum lies in a particular protein in the endocrine system that inhibits development of HIV.

  15. Immune System (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... infections, but the condition is usually not severe. Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is also known as the "bubble boy disease" after a Texas boy with SCID who lived in a germ-free plastic bubble. SCID is a serious immune system disorder that occurs because of a lack of both ...

  16. Lipids and immune function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, J J; Broitman, S A

    1981-09-01

    There is in vitro and in vivo evidence to suggest that dietary lipids play a role in modulating immune function. A review of the current literature on the interrelationships among dietary lipids, blood cholesterol levels, immunosuppression, and tumorigenesis makes for a very strong argument that (a) immunosuppression may be causally related to lymphoproliferative disorders, as well as to tumorigenesis and (b) diets high in polyunsaturated fat, relative to diets high in saturated fat, are more immunosuppressive and are better promotors of tumorigenesis. The effects of dietary fat on immune function seem to be mediated though its component parts, the unsaturated fatty acids, specially linoleic, linolenic, and arachidonic. It is not clear how these components affect immune function. Several studies suggest that one effect is mediated by altering the lipid component of the cell membrane and thus its fluidity; the more fluid the membrane, the less responsive it is. Thus, fluidity of both immune cells and those to be destroyed or protected may be affected. The effects of saturated as well as unsaturated fatty acids may be mediated by modulating serum lipoprotein levels, prostaglandin metabolism, and cholesterol concentrations and metabolism.

  17. Neuroendocrine-immune interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemenade, van Lidy; Cohen, Nicholas; Chadzinska, Magdalena

    2017-01-01

    It has now become accepted that the immune system and neuroendocrine system form an integrated part of our physiology. Immunological defense mechanisms act in concert with physiological processes like growth and reproduction, energy intake and metabolism, as well as neuronal development. Not only

  18. Transcriptional changes in canine distemper virus-induced demyelinating leukoencephalitis favor a biphasic mode of demyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Reiner; Puff, Christina; Wewetzer, Konstantin; Kalkuhl, Arno; Deschl, Ulrich; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV)-induced demyelinating leukoencephalitis in dogs (Canis familiaris) is suggested to represent a naturally occurring translational model for subacute sclerosing panencephalitis and multiple sclerosis in humans. The aim of this study was a hypothesis-free microarray analysis of the transcriptional changes within cerebellar specimens of five cases of acute, six cases of subacute demyelinating, and three cases of chronic demyelinating and inflammatory CDV leukoencephalitis as compared to twelve non-infected control dogs. Frozen cerebellar specimens were used for analysis of histopathological changes including demyelination, transcriptional changes employing microarrays, and presence of CDV nucleoprotein RNA and protein using microarrays, RT-qPCR and immunohistochemistry. Microarray analysis revealed 780 differentially expressed probe sets. The dominating change was an up-regulation of genes related to the innate and the humoral immune response, and less distinct the cytotoxic T-cell-mediated immune response in all subtypes of CDV leukoencephalitis as compared to controls. Multiple myelin genes including myelin basic protein and proteolipid protein displayed a selective down-regulation in subacute CDV leukoencephalitis, suggestive of an oligodendrocyte dystrophy. In contrast, a marked up-regulation of multiple immunoglobulin-like expressed sequence tags and the delta polypeptide of the CD3 antigen was observed in chronic CDV leukoencephalitis, in agreement with the hypothesis of an immune-mediated demyelination in the late inflammatory phase of the disease. Analysis of pathways intimately linked to demyelination as determined by morphometry employing correlation-based Gene Set Enrichment Analysis highlighted the pathomechanistic importance of up-regulated genes comprised by the gene ontology terms "viral replication" and "humoral immune response" as well as down-regulated genes functionally related to "metabolite and energy generation".

  19. Transcriptional changes in canine distemper virus-induced demyelinating leukoencephalitis favor a biphasic mode of demyelination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiner Ulrich

    Full Text Available Canine distemper virus (CDV-induced demyelinating leukoencephalitis in dogs (Canis familiaris is suggested to represent a naturally occurring translational model for subacute sclerosing panencephalitis and multiple sclerosis in humans. The aim of this study was a hypothesis-free microarray analysis of the transcriptional changes within cerebellar specimens of five cases of acute, six cases of subacute demyelinating, and three cases of chronic demyelinating and inflammatory CDV leukoencephalitis as compared to twelve non-infected control dogs. Frozen cerebellar specimens were used for analysis of histopathological changes including demyelination, transcriptional changes employing microarrays, and presence of CDV nucleoprotein RNA and protein using microarrays, RT-qPCR and immunohistochemistry. Microarray analysis revealed 780 differentially expressed probe sets. The dominating change was an up-regulation of genes related to the innate and the humoral immune response, and less distinct the cytotoxic T-cell-mediated immune response in all subtypes of CDV leukoencephalitis as compared to controls. Multiple myelin genes including myelin basic protein and proteolipid protein displayed a selective down-regulation in subacute CDV leukoencephalitis, suggestive of an oligodendrocyte dystrophy. In contrast, a marked up-regulation of multiple immunoglobulin-like expressed sequence tags and the delta polypeptide of the CD3 antigen was observed in chronic CDV leukoencephalitis, in agreement with the hypothesis of an immune-mediated demyelination in the late inflammatory phase of the disease. Analysis of pathways intimately linked to demyelination as determined by morphometry employing correlation-based Gene Set Enrichment Analysis highlighted the pathomechanistic importance of up-regulated genes comprised by the gene ontology terms "viral replication" and "humoral immune response" as well as down-regulated genes functionally related to "metabolite and energy

  20. CD8+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes predict favorable prognosis in malignant pleural mesothelioma after resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Noriyuki; Oizumi, Satoshi; Kikuchi, Eiki; Shinagawa, Naofumi; Konishi-Sakakibara, Jun; Ishimine, Atsushi; Aoe, Keisuke; Gemba, Kenichi; Kishimoto, Takumi; Torigoe, Toshihiko; Nishimura, Masaharu

    2010-10-01

    Defects in human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I expression may allow tumor cells to escape immune recognition. T cell infiltration is associated with a good prognosis in many cancers. However, the role of HLA class I expression and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) has not been fully analyzed. In the present study, we investigated the immune profiles and conducted outcome analyses of MPM patients. HLA class I expression and TILs (CD4(+), CD8(+), and NK cells) were detected by immunohistochemistry in a series of 44 MPM cases. To detect HLA class I expression, specimens were stained with the anti-pan HLA class I monoclonal antibody EMR8-5. The expression of HLA class I was positive in all patients. There was no case that showed negative HLA class I expression. The density of CD4(+) and CD8(+) TILs were strongly correlated (R = 0.76, p < 0.001). A high density of CD8(+) TILs was a significantly better prognostic factor for the survival of patients with extrapleural pneumonectomy (p < 0.05). Multivariate analysis revealed that a high density of CD8(+) TILs is an independent prognostic factor for patients who underwent extrapleural pneumonectomy. The presence of intratumoral CD8(+) T cells was correlated with an improved clinical outcome, raising the possibility that CD8(+) T cells might play a pivotal role in the antitumor immune response against MPMs. Thus, the stimulation of CD8(+) lymphocytes might be an efficacious immunotherapy for MPM patients.

  1. Description of electromagnetic and favored α transitions in heavy odd-mass nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitrescu, A.; Delion, D. S.

    2016-02-01

    We describe electromagnetic and favored α transitions to rotational bands in odd-mass nuclei built upon a single particle state with angular momentum projection Ω ≠1/2 in the region 88 ≤Z ≤98 . We use the particle coupled to an even-even core approach described by the coherent state model and the coupled channels method to estimate partial α -decay widths. We reproduce the energy levels of the rotational band where favored α transitions occur for 26 nuclei and predict B (" close=")E 2 )">E 2 values for electromagnetic transitions to the band head using a deformation parameter and a Hamiltonian strength parameter for each nucleus, together with an effective collective charge depending linearly on the deformation parameter. Where experimental data are available, the contribution of the single particle effective charge to the total B value is calculated. The Hamiltonian describing the α -nucleus interaction contains two terms, a spherically symmetric potential given by the double-folding of the M3Y nucleon-nucleon interaction plus a repulsive core simulating the Pauli principle and a quadrupole-quadrupole (QQ) interaction. The α -decaying state is identified as a narrow outgoing resonance in this potential. The intensity of the transition to the first excited state is reproduced by the QQ coupling strength. It depends linearly both on the nuclear deformation and the square of the reduced width for the decay to the band head, respectively. Predicted intensities for transitions to higher excited states are in a reasonable agreement with experimental data. This formalism offers a unified description of energy levels, electromagnetic and favored α transitions for known heavy odd-mass α emitters.

  2. Immune checkpoint receptors in regulating immune reactivity in rheumatic disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ceeraz, Sabrina; Nowak, Elizabeth C.; Burns, Christopher M.; Noelle, Randolph J.

    2014-01-01

    Immune checkpoint regulators are critical modulators of the immune system, allowing the initiation of a productive immune response and preventing the onset of autoimmunity. Co-inhibitory and co-stimulatory immune checkpoint receptors are required for full T-cell activation and effector functions such as the production of cytokines. In autoimmune rheumatic diseases, impaired tolerance leads to the development of diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and Sjogren’s...

  3. HLA Immune Function Genes in Autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony R. Torres

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The human leukocyte antigen (HLA genes on chromosome 6 are instrumental in many innate and adaptive immune responses. The HLA genes/haplotypes can also be involved in immune dysfunction and autoimmune diseases. It is now becoming apparent that many of the non-antigen-presenting HLA genes make significant contributions to autoimmune diseases. Interestingly, it has been reported that autism subjects often have associations with HLA genes/haplotypes, suggesting an underlying dysregulation of the immune system mediated by HLA genes. Genetic studies have only succeeded in identifying autism-causing genes in a small number of subjects suggesting that the genome has not been adequately interrogated. Close examination of the HLA region in autism has been relatively ignored, largely due to extraordinary genetic complexity. It is our proposition that genetic polymorphisms in the HLA region, especially in the non-antigen-presenting regions, may be important in the etiology of autism in certain subjects.

  4. Heat Shock Protein and Innate Immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min-FuTsan; BaochongGao

    2004-01-01

    In addition to serving as molecular chaperones, heat shock proteins (HSPs) have been implicated in autoimmune diseases, antigen presentation and tumor immunity. Extensive work in the last 10 years has also suggested that HSPs such as Hsp60, Hsp70, Hsp90 and gp96, may be potent activators of the innate immune system capable of inducing the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines by the monocyte-macrophage system, and the activation and maturation of dendritic cells via the Toll-like receptor 2 and 4 signal transduction pathways. However, recent evidence suggests that the reported cytokine effects of HSPs may be a result of the contaminating bacterial cell-wall products. This concise review summarizes the current controversy over the role of HSPs in innate immunity. Cellular & Molecular Immunology.

  5. Heat Shock Protein and Innate Immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min-Fu Tsan; Baochong Gao

    2004-01-01

    In addition to serving as molecular chaperones, heat shock proteins (HSPs) have been implicated in autoimmune diseases, antigen presentation and tumor immunity. Extensive work in the last 10 years has also suggested that HSPs such as Hsp60, Hsp70, Hsp90 and gp96, may be potent activators of the innate immune system capable of inducing the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines by the monocyte-macrophage system, and the activation and maturation of dendritic cells via the Toll-like receptor 2 and 4 signal transduction pathways. However, recent evidence suggests that the reported cytokine effects of HSPs may be a result of the contaminating bacterial cell-wall products. This concise review summarizes the current controversy over the role of HSPs in innate immunity.

  6. Immune Vasculitis Induced Atherosclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The relationship between immune vasculitis and atherosclerosis was studied. The experimental model of weanling rabbits for immune vasculitis was reproduced by intravenous injection of 10 % bovine serum albumin. There were 6 groups: group A, 25 weanling rabbits with immune vasculitis subject to coronary arteriography; group B, 10 normal mature rabbits subject to coronary arteriography; group C, 10 weanling rabbits subject to coronary arteriography; group D, 8 weanling rabbits with vasculitis and cholesterol diet; group E, 8 weanling rabbits receiving single cholesterol diet; group F: 8 weanling rabbits receiving basic diet. Four weeks later, coronary arteriography was performed in groups A, B and C. The rabbits in groups D, E and F were sacrificed for the study of pathological changes in the coronary artery after 12 weeks. The results showed that the dilatation of coronary artery occurred in 6 rabbits of group A, but in groups B and C, no dilatation of coronary artery appeared. In comparison with group E, more severe atherosclerosis occurred in group D, showing the thickened plaque, fibrous sclerosis and atherosclerotic lesion. Percentage of plaques covering aortic intima, incidence of atherosclerosis of small coronary arteries and degree of stenosis of coronary arteries were significantly higher in group D than in group E (P<0.01). No atherosclerosis changes were found in group F. It was concluded that in the acute phase, the serum immune vasculitis can induce the dilatation of coronary artery of some weanling rabbits, and aggravate the formation of atherosclerosis in rabbits fed with cholesterol diet. Immune vasculitis is a new risk factor of atherosclerosis and ischemic heart disease.

  7. Bt transgenic crops do not have favorable effects on resistant insects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce E. Tabashnik

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available hypothesized that insecticidal Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt toxins produced by transgenic crops could have nutritionally favorable effects that increase the fitness of resistant insects eating such crops. This idea was based on increased pupal weight of resistant larvae of diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L., fed leaf discs treated externally with a Bt toxin. We summarize evidence from diamondback moth and other pests showing that the Bt toxins in transgenic crops do not enhance performance of resistant insects. Aside from a few notable exceptions in which performance of resistant insects did not differ between Bt and non-Bt crops, Bt crops had adverse affects on resistant insects.

  8. Tau neutrinos favored over sterile neutrinos in atmospheric muon neutrino oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, S; Fukuda, Y; Ishitsuka, M; Kajita, T; Kameda, J; Kaneyuki, K; Kobayashi, K; Koshio, Y; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Nakahata, M; Nakayama, S; Obayashi, Y; Okada, A; Okumura, K; Sakurai, N; Shiozawa, M; Suzuki, Y; Takeuchi, H; Takeuchi, Y; Toshito, T; Totsuka, Y; Yamada, S; Earl, M; Habig, A; Kearns, E; Messier, M D; Scholberg, K; Stone, J L; Sulak, L R; Walter, C W; Goldhaber, M; Barszczak, T; Casper, D; Gajewski, W; Kropp, W R; Mine, S; Price, L R; Smy, M; Sobel, H W; Vagins, M R; Ganezer, K S; Keig, W E; Ellsworth, R W; Tasaka, S; Kibayashi, A; Learned, J G; Matsuno, S; Takemori, D

    2000-11-01

    The previously published atmospheric neutrino data did not distinguish whether muon neutrinos were oscillating into tau neutrinos or sterile neutrinos, as both hypotheses fit the data. Using data recorded in 1100 live days of the Super-Kamiokande detector, we use three complementary data samples to study the difference in zenith angle distribution due to neutral currents and matter effects. We find no evidence favoring sterile neutrinos, and reject the hypothesis at the 99% confidence level. On the other hand, we find that oscillation between muon and tau neutrinos suffices to explain all the results in hand.

  9. ORGANIC PRODUCT MARKET DEVELOPMENT – FAVORABLE CONDITIONS AND LIMITS IN ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FRUNTE Ş CRISTINA FLORINA

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The modern global tendencies, the care for environment, aspirations to a different lifestyle of an increasingly large group of people retain in the foreground of current preoccupations the organic products. During the last decade, the market of such products grows and the trends are constantly upwards in Europe and all over the world. Romania makes no exception. The Romanian market for organic products finds itself in an incipient stage. Obviously, there is a series of special features of Romanian market that might turn into favorable factors or limits for development

  10. ORGANIC PRODUCT MARKET DEVELOPMENT – FAVORABLE CONDITIONS AND LIMITS IN ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FRUNTEŞ CRISTINA FLORINA

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The modern global tendencies, the care for environment, aspirations to a different lifestyle of an increasingly large group of people retain in the foreground of current preoccupations the organic products. During the last decade, the market of such products grows and the trends are constantly upwards in Europe and all over the world. Romania makes no exception. The Romanian market for organic products finds itself in an incipient stage. Obviously, there is a series of special features of Romanian market that might turn into favorable factors or limits for development.

  11. Tau Neutrinos Favored over Sterile Neutrinos in Atmospheric Muon Neutrino Oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Fukuda, S; Ishitsuka, M; Itow, Y; Kajita, T; Kameda, J; Kaneyuki, K; Kobayashi, K; Koshio, Y; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Nakahata, M; Nakayama, S; Obayashi, Y; Okada, A; Okumura, K; Sakurai, N; Shiozawa, M; Suzuki, Y; Takeuchi, H; Takeuchi, Y; Toshito, T; Totsuka, Y; Yamada, S; Earl, M A; Habig, A; Kearns, E T; Messier, M D; Scholberg, K; Stone, J L; Sulak, Lawrence R; Walter, C W; Goldhaber, M; Barszczak, T; Casper, David William; Gajewski, W; Kropp, W R; Mine, S; Price, L R AU Fukuda, S; Smy, M B; Sobel, H W; Vagins, M R; Ganezer, K S; Keig, W E; Ellsworth, R W; Tasaka, S; Kibayashi, A; Learned, J G; Matsuno, S; Takemori, D; Hayato, Y; Ishii, T; Kobayashi, T; Nakamura, K; Oyama, Y; Sakai, A; Sakuda, M; Sasaki, O; Kohama, M; Suzuki, A T; Inagaki, T; Nishikawa, K; Haines, T J; Blaufuss, E; Kim, B K; Sanford, R; Svoboda, R; Chen, M L; Goodman, J A; Guillian, G; Sullivan, G W; Hill, J; Jung, C K; Martens, K; Malek, M; Mauger, C; McGrew, C; Sharkey, E; Viren, B M; Yanagisawa, C; Kirisawa, M; Inaba, S; Mitsuda, C; Miyano, K; Okazawa, H; Saji, C; Takahashi, M; Takahata, M; Nagashima, Y; Nitta, K; Takita, M; Yoshida, M; Kim, S B; Ishizuka, T; Etoh, M; Gando, Y; Hasegawa, T; Inoue, K; Ishihara, K; Maruyama, T; Shirai, J; Suzuki, A; Koshiba, M; Hatakeyama, Y; Ichikawa, Y; Koike, M; Nishijima, K; Fujiyasu, H; Ishino, H; Morii, M; Watanabe, Y; Golebiewska, U; Kielczewska, D; Boyd, S C; Stachyra, A L; Wilkes, R J; Young, K K

    2000-01-01

    The previously published atmospheric neutrino data did not distinguish whether muon neutrinos were oscillating into tau neutrinos or sterile neutrinos, as both hypotheses fit the data. Using data recorded in 1100 live-days of the Super-Kamiokande detector, we use three complementary data samples to study the difference in zenith angle distribution due to neutral currents and matter effects. We find no evidence favoring sterile neutrinos, and reject the hypothesis at the 99% confidence level. On the other hand, we find that oscillation between muon and tau neutrinos suffices to explain all the results in hand.

  12. Favorable areas for prospecting adjacent to the Roberts Mountains thrust in southern Lander County, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, John Harris; McKee, Edwin H.

    1968-01-01

    Recent geologic mapping by the U.S. Geological Survey of more than 2,500 square miles of a relatively little-studied part of central Nevada has outlined four areas favorable for the discovery of metallic mineral deposits. In these areas, lower Paleozoic carbonate rocks crop out below the Roberts Mountains thrust, a widespread fault in central and north-central Nevada. These areas have a stratigraphic and structural setting similar to that of the areas where large, open-pit gold deposits have been discovered recently at Carlin and Cortez in north-central Nevada.

  13. IMPACT OF ISLAMIC RELIGIOUS SYMBOL IN PRODUCING FAVORABLE ATTITUDE TOWARD ADVERTISEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas NASERI

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A review of the literature on religion and advertisement led to the identification of three lines of studies examining the influence of religion on advertising. These three lines of studies focused on attitude toward advertising of controversial products, presence of religious values in advertisements executions, and the consumers’ reactions to advertisement containing religious cues or symbols. The latter line has been followed modestly in Christian context but not in Islamic context of advertising. Hijab as a significant religious cue might peripherally generates a favorable attitude toward advertisement among Muslims. It is suggested that information processing theories like Elaboration Likelihood Model provides a pertinent theoretical framework to examine this effect empirically.

  14. Theory Construction in Second Language Acquisition In Favor of the Rationalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Shokouhi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the most controversial issues in second language acquisition (SLA seems to be the issue of theory construction. There are mainly two opposing views considering the SLA theory construction namely the Rationalist view and the Relativist view. The former tries to reasons that there should be a few theories of SLA at work while the latter favors as many theories as possible. However, the present paper tries to take a supportive stance with regard to the rationalism reasoning that the rationalist view seems to be more fruitful, practical, and above all beneficial considering theory construction in SLA. Keywords: Rationalism, Relativism, SLA, Theory construction

  15. Control of favorable lithology on Jinlongshan micro-fine disseminated gold deposits, southern Qinling Mountains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵利青; 冯钟燕

    2002-01-01

    Jinlongshan gold orebelt, a newly discovered one in sedimentary rock region in southern Qinling Mountains, is mainly located in upper Devonian and lower Carboniferous calcareous siltstone and argillic silty limestone of later Paleozoic era. Typical disseminated gold mineralization occurred in calcareous siltstone, which is major host rock and mainly composed of silt (SiO2 mostly varies from 38% to 73%) and calcite (CaO mostly varies from 10% to 25%). Pyrite created by living beings in Nanyangshan formation may be poor in gold. Faults and favorable layers jointly control disseminated gold mineralization. The significance of this opinion is very great for gold exploration.

  16. Sex differences favoring women in verbal but not in visuospatial episodic memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewin, C; Wolgers, G; Herlitz, A

    2001-04-01

    Sex differences favoring women have been found in a number of studies of episodic memory. This study examined sex differences in verbal, nonverbal, and visuospatial episodic memory tasks. Results showed that although women performed at a higher level on a composite verbal and nonverbal episodic memory score, men performed at a higher level on a composite score of episodic memory tasks requiring visuospatial processing. Thus, men can use their superior visuospatial abilities to excel in highly visuospatial episodic memory tasks, whereas women seem to excel in episodic memory tasks in which a verbalization of the material is possible.

  17. Problematic Internet Usage and Immune Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phil Reed

    Full Text Available Problematic internet use has been associated with a variety of psychological comorbidities, but it relationship with physical illness has not received the same degree of investigation. The current study surveyed 505 participants online, and asked about their levels of problematic internet usage (Internet Addiction Test, depression and anxiety (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scales, social isolation (UCLA Loneliness Questionnaire, sleep problems (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and their current health - General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28, and the Immune Function Questionnaire. The results demonstrated that around 30% of the sample displayed mild or worse levels of internet addiction, as measured by the IAT. Although there were differences in the purposes for which males and females used the internet, there were no differences in terms of levels of problematic usage between genders. The internet problems were strongly related to all of the other psychological variables such as depression, anxiety, social-isolation, and sleep problems. Internet addiction was also associated with reduced self-reported immune function, but not with the measure of general health (GHQ-28. This relationship between problematic internet use and reduced immune function was found to be independent of the impact of the co-morbidities. It is suggested that the negative relationship between level of problematic internet use and immune function may be mediated by levels of stress produced by such internet use, and subsequent sympathetic nervous activity, which related to immune-supressants, such as cortisol.

  18. Problematic Internet Usage and Immune Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Phil; Vile, Rebecca; Osborne, Lisa A; Romano, Michela; Truzoli, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Problematic internet use has been associated with a variety of psychological comorbidities, but it relationship with physical illness has not received the same degree of investigation. The current study surveyed 505 participants online, and asked about their levels of problematic internet usage (Internet Addiction Test), depression and anxiety (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scales), social isolation (UCLA Loneliness Questionnaire), sleep problems (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index), and their current health - General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28), and the Immune Function Questionnaire. The results demonstrated that around 30% of the sample displayed mild or worse levels of internet addiction, as measured by the IAT. Although there were differences in the purposes for which males and females used the internet, there were no differences in terms of levels of problematic usage between genders. The internet problems were strongly related to all of the other psychological variables such as depression, anxiety, social-isolation, and sleep problems. Internet addiction was also associated with reduced self-reported immune function, but not with the measure of general health (GHQ-28). This relationship between problematic internet use and reduced immune function was found to be independent of the impact of the co-morbidities. It is suggested that the negative relationship between level of problematic internet use and immune function may be mediated by levels of stress produced by such internet use, and subsequent sympathetic nervous activity, which related to immune-supressants, such as cortisol.

  19. Problematic Internet Usage and Immune Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Phil; Vile, Rebecca; Osborne, Lisa A.; Romano, Michela; Truzoli, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Problematic internet use has been associated with a variety of psychological comorbidities, but it relationship with physical illness has not received the same degree of investigation. The current study surveyed 505 participants online, and asked about their levels of problematic internet usage (Internet Addiction Test), depression and anxiety (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scales), social isolation (UCLA Loneliness Questionnaire), sleep problems (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index), and their current health – General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28), and the Immune Function Questionnaire. The results demonstrated that around 30% of the sample displayed mild or worse levels of internet addiction, as measured by the IAT. Although there were differences in the purposes for which males and females used the internet, there were no differences in terms of levels of problematic usage between genders. The internet problems were strongly related to all of the other psychological variables such as depression, anxiety, social-isolation, and sleep problems. Internet addiction was also associated with reduced self-reported immune function, but not with the measure of general health (GHQ-28). This relationship between problematic internet use and reduced immune function was found to be independent of the impact of the co-morbidities. It is suggested that the negative relationship between level of problematic internet use and immune function may be mediated by levels of stress produced by such internet use, and subsequent sympathetic nervous activity, which related to immune-supressants, such as cortisol. PMID:26244339

  20. Immunization practices among pediatric transplant hepatologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Amy G; Kempe, Allison; Beaty, Brenda L; Sundaram, Shikha S

    2016-12-01

    Vaccination of pediatric liver transplant candidates and recipients represents an opportunity to decrease infectious complications following transplant. Although vaccine recommendations exist, studies have shown that many transplant candidates and recipients are under-immunized. The goals of this study were to assess among pediatric transplant hepatologists: (i) current immunization practices before and after transplantation, (ii) involvement of an ID physician in the transplant evaluation, and (iii) perceptions about vaccine safety and barriers to immunization. An 80-item e-mail survey of pediatric transplant hepatologists at centers in the United States and Canada participating in the SPLIT consortium was conducted from December 2014 to March 2015. The overall response rate was 80% (73/91), representing 97% (32/33) of SPLIT centers. Fifty percent of programs routinely involved an ID physician in the transplant evaluation. Administration of palivizumab was routinely considered by 48% of hepatologists pre-transplant and by 41% post-transplant. Live vaccines were recommended by 26% of hepatologists after transplant. About 10% of hepatologists reported concern that live vaccines after transplant could induce rejection. There is wide variation in immunization practices among transplant hepatologists. Specific evidence-based protocols are needed to guide immunization practices in transplant candidates and recipients. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Artroplastía de superficie en cadera. Resultados iniciales favorables en pacientes selectos. [Hip resurfacing arthroplasty: favorable initial results in selected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Martín Comba

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In­tro­duc­ción El objetivo del presente trabajo es reportar los resultados clínicos y radiológicos iniciales de una serie consecutiva de pacientes selectos tratados en nuestra institución con un único diseño de artroplastia de superficie, comparando además la tasa de revisión temprana con un grupo control de pacientes tratados en el mismo lapso con una artroplastia total de cadera no cementada. Material y ­Métodos Cuarenta y siete pacientes de sexo masculino (49 caderas con diagnóstico de artrosis de cadera que fueron tratados quirúrgicamente con una artroplastia híbrida de superficie, entre noviembre de 2006 y julio de 2009. La edad promedio fue de 44,5 años (rango de 21 a 57. En todos los casos, la indicación de la artroplastia de superficie se realizó en pacientes jóvenes con alta expectativa funcional y siguiendo estrictos criterios de selección radiológicos. Se efectuó un seguimiento clínico y un meticuloso análisis radiológico. Resultados La escala funcional posoperatoria de Merle D’Aubigné-Postel fue, en promedio, de 17,3 puntos a los 43 meses de seguimiento promedio (rango 24-62 meses. El 85% de los pacientes refirió que practicaba alguna actividad deportiva con una escala UCLA promedio de 9,5 (rango 8-10. Un paciente requirió una cirugía de revisión (2,04% por fractura de cuello femoral. No existieron diferencias estadísticamente significativas en cuanto a la tasa de revisión temprana comparando con el grupo control (p = 0,55. Conclusiones En nuestra experiencia inicial con artroplastia de superficie, obtuvimos resultados a corto plazo favorables, en una serie de hombres con artrosis y alta demanda funcional, estrictamente seleccionados.

  2. Surgery Effective Against Immune Disorder That Weakens Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... html Surgery Effective Against Immune Disorder That Weakens Muscles Myasthenia gravis affects 60,000 Americans, but removal ... gravis, an autoimmune disorder that causes life-threatening muscle weakness, researchers report. Since the 1940s, doctors have ...

  3. National Network for Immunization Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... worry that the vaccines their child receives may overload his or her immune system. But a new ... on the latest immunization research and downloadable vaccine information fact sheets. Evaluating Info on the Web Are ...

  4. Innate immune memory in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimer-Michalski, Eva-Maria; Conrath, Uwe

    2016-08-01

    The plant innate immune system comprises local and systemic immune responses. Systemic plant immunity develops after foliar infection by microbial pathogens, upon root colonization by certain microbes, or in response to physical injury. The systemic plant immune response to localized foliar infection is associated with elevated levels of pattern-recognition receptors, accumulation of dormant signaling enzymes, and alterations in chromatin state. Together, these systemic responses provide a memory to the initial infection by priming the remote leaves for enhanced defense and immunity to reinfection. The plant innate immune system thus builds immunological memory by utilizing mechanisms and components that are similar to those employed in the trained innate immune response of jawed vertebrates. Therefore, there seems to be conservation, or convergence, in the evolution of innate immune memory in plants and vertebrates.

  5. Frequently Asked Questions about Immunizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... get sick. This is called immunity . Will my child's immune system be weaker by relying on a vaccine? ... is one of the most common causes of diarrhea in young children. In 1999, a rotavirus vaccine was taken off ...

  6. Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akin Aydogan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Gossypiboma (GP is a term used to express the mass resulting from forgotten cotton sponge in operations. Rarely, a transmural migration may occur into the gastrointestinal lumen without creating any defect by GP. Laparotomy or endoscopic removal may be required, by the way it can be taken out of the body itself by intestinal ways. In this study, we reported a case of mechanical intestinal obstruction causing GP. Case. The fifty-one-year-old female patient admitted to the emergency department with the complaints of mechanical intestinal obstruction and had a history of open cholecystectomy 20 years ago. There were the findings of intestinal obstruction in abdominal plain radiography and computerized tomography. The sponge that obstructed the lumen completely 40 cm proximal to the ileocecal valve was identified in the laparotomy with the diagnosis of brid ileus. The small intestine was closed over double-fold after removal of sponge. Transmural migration of abdominal-remained sponge was thought to be occurred without creating a defect after cholecystectomy. Postoperatively, the patient was discharged without having any problems at 4th day of hospitalization. Conclusion. Although it is a rare situation in routine clinical practice, GP should be considered as a differential diagnosis in the patients who had a diagnosis of mechanical intestinal obstruction, and laparotomy was applied before. As GP may lead to situations which cause mortality, all precautions should be taken to prevent it.

  7. Glutamine supplementation favors weight loss in nondieting obese female patients. A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laviano, A; Molfino, A; Lacaria, M T; Canelli, A; De Leo, S; Preziosa, I; Rossi Fanelli, F

    2014-11-01

    Glutamine supplementation improves insulin sensitivity in critically ill patients, and prevents obesity in animals fed a high-fat diet. We hypothesized that glutamine supplementation favors weight loss in humans. Obese and overweight female patients (n=6) were enrolled in a pilot, cross-over study. After recording anthropometric (that is, body weight, waist circumference) and metabolic (that is, glycemia, insulinemia, homeostatic model of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR)) characteristics, patients were randomly assigned to 4-week supplementation with glutamine or isonitrogenous protein supplement (0.5 g/KgBW/day). During supplementation, patients did not change their dietary habits nor lifestyle. At the end, anthropometric and metabolic features were assessed, and after 2 weeks of washout, patients were switched to the other supplement for 4 weeks. Body weight and waist circumference significantly declined only after glutamine supplementation (85.0±10.4 Kg vs 82.2±10.1 Kg, and 102.7±2.0 cm vs 98.9±2.9 cm, respectively; P=0.01). Insulinemia and HOMA-IR declined by 20% after glutamine, but not significantly so. This pilot study shows that glutamine is safe and effective in favoring weight loss and possibly enhancing glucose metabolism.

  8. Bond population analysis on combination of favorable growth unit of Al(OH)3 crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The quantum chemical calculation on four representative combination modes of the favorable growth unit Al6(OH)18(H2O)6of Al(OH)3 crystals and the single unit were calculated. On the base of the prior investigation, and from the point of view of bond population and net atomic charge, the relationships between the combination mode of the favorable growth unit and the relative intensity of chemical bond of the systems were discussed. The quantum chemistry calculations were performed at RB3LYP/6-31G and RHF/6-31G levels by ab initio and DFT methods respectively. From the point of view of bond population, it can be preliminarily presumed that the interatomic bond force of the system with side-face-combination-B mode is weaker to a certain extent. From the point of view of the net charge, when the combination mode is obverse-face-combination-D, the interatomic bond force will be enhanced.

  9. ESTIMATING VITICULTURAL FAVORABILITY OF COTNARI VINEYARD AREA AND IDENTIFYING LIMITING FACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Chiriac

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available For estimating the favorability of agricultural lands for vine in Cotnari vineyard area, we used 16 indicators provided in the Methodology of Soil Survey (Second part and third part - 1986. To determine the average coefficient of evaluation, respectively the class of favorability for the vine in Cotnari Vineyard, we calculated the notes of evaluation for 10 administrative units from Cotnari Vineyard: Flămânzi, Frumuşica, Deleni, Hârlău, Scobinţi, Cepleniţa, Cotnari, Cucuteni, Todireşti, Târgu Frumos. For each administrative unit were selected the territorial units of soil (U.S. within Cotnari Vineyard, from which we extracted only the ecological homogeneous territories (TEO's that are planted with vine. Among the limiting factors identified in Cotnari Vineyard we mention the geomorphologic factor (slope, landslides, the pedological factor (gleying, stagnogleying,salinization/alkalization, texture, reaction, humus content, edaphic volume and the hydrological factor (groundwater depth, excess moisture in surface, flooding by overflow.

  10. Spatial structure favors cooperative behavior in the snowdrift game with multiple interactive dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Qi; Li, Aming; Wang, Long

    2017-02-01

    Spatial reciprocity is generally regarded as a positive rule facilitating the evolution of cooperation. However, a few recent studies show that, in the snowdrift game, spatial structure still could be detrimental to cooperation. Here we propose a model of multiple interactive dynamics, where each individual can cooperate and defect simultaneously against different neighbors. We realize individuals' multiple interactions simply by endowing them with strategies relevant to probabilities, and every one decides to cooperate or defect with a probability. With multiple interactive dynamics, the cooperation level in square lattices is higher than that in the well-mixed case for a wide range of cost-to-benefit ratio r, implying that spatial structure favors cooperative behavior in the snowdrift game. Moreover, in square lattices, the most favorable strategy follows a simple relation of r, which confers theoretically the average evolutionary frequency of cooperative behavior. We further extend our study to various homogeneous and heterogeneous networks, which demonstrates the robustness of our results. Here multiple interactive dynamics stabilizes the positive role of spatial structure on the evolution of cooperation and individuals' distinct reactions to different neighbors can be a new line in understanding the emergence of cooperation.

  11. Spatial heterogeneity in human activities favors the persistence of wolves in agroecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Mohsen; López-Bao, José Vicente; Kaboli, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    As human populations expand, there is increasing demand and pressure for land. Under this scenario, behavioural flexibility and adaptation become important processes leading to the persistence of large carnivores in human-dominated landscapes such as agroecosystems. A growing interest has recently emerged on the outcome of the coexistence between wolves and humans in these systems. It has been suggested that spatial heterogeneity in human activities would be a major environmental factor modulating vulnerability and persistence of this contentious species in agroecosystems. Here, we combined information from 35 den sites detected between 2011 and 2012 in agroecosystems of western Iran (Hamedan province), a set of environmental variables measured at landscape and fine spatial scales, and generalized linear models to identify patterns of den site selection by wolves in a highly-modified agroecosystem. On a landscape level, wolves selected a mixture of rangelands with scattered dry-farms on hillsides (showing a low human use) to locate their dens, avoiding areas with high densities of settlements and primary roads. On a fine spatial scale, wolves primarily excavated dens into the sides of elevated steep-slope hills with availability of water bodies in the vicinity of den sites, and wolves were relegated to dig in places with coarse-soil particles. Our results suggest that vulnerability of wolves in human-dominated landscapes could be compensated by the existence of spatial heterogeneity in human activities. Such heterogeneity would favor wolf persistence in agroecosystems favoring a land sharing model of coexistence between wolves and people.

  12. Bound on the Slope of Steady Water Waves with Favorable Vorticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Walter A.; Wheeler, Miles H.

    2016-12-01

    We consider the angle {θ} of inclination (with respect to the horizontal) of the profile of a steady two dimensional inviscid symmetric periodic or solitary water wave subject to gravity. Although {θ} may surpass 30° for some irrotational waves close to the extreme wave, Amick (Arch Ration Mech Anal 99(2):91-114, 1987) proved that for any irrotational wave the angle must be less than 31.15°. Is the situation similar for periodic or solitary waves that are not irrotational? The extreme Gerstner wave has infinite depth, adverse vorticity and vertical cusps ( θ = 90°). Moreover, numerical calculations show that even waves of finite depth can overturn if the vorticity is adverse. In this paper, on the other hand, we prove an upper bound of 45° on {θ} for a large class of waves with favorable vorticity and finite depth. In particular, the vorticity can be any constant with the favorable sign. We also prove a series of general inequalities on the pressure within the fluid, including the fact that any overturning wave must have a pressure sink.

  13. Resource allocation in offspring provisioning: An evaluation of the conditions favoring the evolution of matrotrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trexler, Joel C.; DeAngelis, Donald L.

    2003-01-01

    We used analytic and simulation models to determine the ecological conditions favoring evolution of a matrotrophic fish from a lecithotrophic ancestor given a complex set of trade‐offs. Matrotrophy is the nourishment of viviparous embryos by resources provided between fertilization and parturition, while lecithotrophy describes embryo nourishment provided before fertilization. In fishes and reptiles, embryo nourishment encompasses a continuum from solely lecithotrophic to primarily matrotrophic. Matrotrophy has evolved independently from lecithotrophic ancestors many times in many groups. We assumed matrotrophy increased the number of offspring a viviparous female could gestate and evaluated conditions of food availability favoring lecithotrophy or matrotrophy. The matrotrophic strategy was superior when food resources exceeded demand during gestation but at a risk of overproduction and reproductive failure if food intake was limited. Matrotrophic females were leaner during gestation than lecithotrophic females, yielding shorter life spans. Our models suggest that matrotrophic embryo nourishment evolved in environments with high food availability, consistently exceeding energy requirements for maintaining relatively large broods. Embryo abortion with some resorption of invested energy is a necessary preadaptation to the evolution of matrotrophy. Future work should explore trade‐offs of age‐specific mortality and reproductive output for females maintaining different levels of fat storage during gestation.

  14. Biomechanical remodeling of the microenvironment by stromal Caveolin-1 favors tumor invasion and metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Jacky G.; Minguet, Susana; Navarro-Lérida, Inmaculada; Lazcano, Juan José; Samaniego, Rafael; Calvo, Enrique; Tello, Marta; Osteso-Ibáñez, Teresa; Pellinen, Teijo; Echarri, Asier; Cerezo, Ana; Klein-Szanto, Andres J.P.; Garcia, Ricardo; Keely, Patricia J.; Sánchez-Mateos, Paloma; Cukierman, Edna; Del Pozo, Miguel A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Mechanotransduction, a key determinant of tissue homeostasis and tumor progression, is driven by intercellular adhesions, cell contractility and forces generated with the microenvironment, dependent on extracellular matrix composition, organization and compliance. Caveolin-1 (Cav1) favors cell elongation in 3D cultures and promotes Rho-and force-dependent contraction, matrix alignment and microenvironment stiffening through regulation of p190RhoGAP. In turn, microenvironment remodeling by Cav1-fibroblasts forces cell elongation. Cav1-deficient mice have disorganized stromal tissue architecture. Stroma associated with human carcinomas and melanoma metastases is enriched in Cav1-expressing carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs). Cav1 expression in breast CAFs correlates with low survival, and Cav1 depletion in CAFs decreases CAF contractility. Consistently, fibroblast expression of Cav1, through p190RhoGAP regulation, favors directional migration and invasiveness of carcinoma cells in vitro. In vivo, stromal Cav1 remodels peri- and intratumoral microenvironments to facilitate tumor invasion, correlating with increased metastatic potency. Thus, Cav1 modulates tissue responses through force-dependent architectural regulation of the microenvironment. PMID:21729786

  15. Nut consumption has favorable effects on lipid profiles of Korean women with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Joo; Nam, Ga Eun; Seo, Ji A; Yoon, Taehyung; Seo, Ilwon; Lee, Jin Hee; Im, Donggil; Bahn, Kyeong-Nyeo; Jeong, Si An; Kang, Tae Seok; Ahn, Jae Hee; Kim, Do Hoon; Kim, Nan Hee

    2014-09-01

    Nut consumption has been studied for its cardioprotective effects. However, the findings of clinical intervention studies are inconsistent; and no intervention studies have been conducted in the Korean population. We hypothesized that nut supplementation may have favorable influence on metabolic markers. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effects of nut consumption on metabolic parameters and biomarkers related to inflammation, oxidative stress, and endothelial function in Korean adults with metabolic syndrome. To this end, we designed a randomized, parallel, controlled dietary intervention study (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02023749). Subjects with metabolic syndrome and a body mass index of at least 23 kg/m(2) were randomized to the Control group and the Nut group, which received supplementation with 30 g/d of mixed nuts (walnuts, peanuts, and pine nuts) for 6 weeks. Sixty volunteers were included in the final analysis. Metabolic markers were evaluated at baseline and at the end of the study. Total cholesterol and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels significantly improved in the Nut group compared to those in the Control group (P = .023 and P = .016, respectively) in women. Biomarkers related to inflammation, oxidative stress, and endothelial function did not significantly change from baseline in either group. Thus, supplementing a usual diet with mixed nuts for 6 weeks had favorable effects on several lipid parameters in Korean women with metabolic syndrome. These findings present a possible mechanism for the cardioprotective effects of nut consumption.

  16. Ubiquitin in the immune system

    OpenAIRE

    Julia Zinngrebe; Antonella Montinaro; Nieves Peltzer; Henning Walczak

    2013-01-01

    Ubiquitination is a post-translational modification process that has been implicated in the regulation of innate and adaptive immune responses. There is increasing evidence that both ubiquitination and its reversal, deubiquitination, play crucial roles not only during the development of the immune system but also in the orchestration of an immune response by ensuring the proper functioning of the different cell types that constitute the immune system. Here, we provide an overview of the lates...

  17. Investigating the adaptive immune response in influenza and secondary bacterial pneumonia and nanoparticle based therapeutic delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarthy, Krishnan V.

    In early 2000, influenza and its associated complications were the 7 th leading cause of death in the United States[1-4]. As of today, this major health problem has become even more of a concern, with the possibility of a potentially devastating avian flu (H5N1) or swine flu pandemic (H1N1). According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), over 10 countries have reported transmission of influenza A (H5N1) virus to humans as of June 2006 [5]. In response to this growing concern, the United States pledged over $334 million dollars in international aid for battling influenza[1-4]. The major flu pandemic of the early 1900's provided the first evidence that secondary bacterial pneumonia (not primary viral pneumonia) was the major cause of death in both community and hospital-based settings. Secondary bacterial infections currently account for 35-40% mortality following a primary influenza viral infection [1, 6]. The first component of this work addresses the immunological mechanisms that predispose patients to secondary bacterial infections following a primary influenza viral infection. By assessing host immune responses through various immune-modulatory tools, such as use of volatile anesthetics (i.e. halothane) and Apilimod/STA-5326 (an IL-12/Il-23 transcription blocker), we provide experimental evidence that demonstrates that the overactive adaptive Th1 immune response is critical in mediating increased susceptibility to secondary bacterial infections. We also present data that shows that suppressing the adaptive Th1 immune response enhances innate immunity, specifically in alveolar macrophages, by favoring a pro anti-bacterial phenotype. The second component of this work addresses the use of nanotechnology to deliver therapeutic modalities that affect the primary viral and associated secondary bacterial infections post influenza. First, we used surface functionalized quantum dots for selective targeting of lung alveolar macrophages both in vitro and in vivo

  18. miRNA-124 in Immune System and Immune Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, miR-124 has emerged as a critical modulator of immunity and inflammation. Here, we summarize studies on the function and mechanism of miR-124 in the immune system and immunity-related diseases. They indicated that miR-124 exerts a crucial role in the development of immune system, regulation of immune responses, and inflammatory disorders. It is evident that miR-124 may serve as an informative diagnostic biomarker and therapeutic target in the future.

  19. Immune memory, immune oblivion: a lesson from Funes the memorious.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuman, Yair

    2007-01-01

    We commonly think of the immune system as having a memory. However, memory is always accompanied by a complementary process of oblivion. Is there immune oblivion? In this theoretical paper, I address this question and suggest that oblivion is an integral aspect of memorization. In this context, I suggest that immune memory is an orchestration of reversible and irreversible processes of biological computation through feedback loops. Drawing on the linguistic metaphor, I inquire into the implications of this idea for a better understanding of immune memory and immune deficiency among the elderly.

  20. Adaptive immune resistance: How cancer protects from immune attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribas, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive immune resistance is a process where the cancer changes its phenotype in response to a cytotoxic or pro-inflammatory immune response, thereby evading it. This adaptive process is triggered by the specific recognition of cancer cells by T cells, which leads to the production of immune-activating cytokines. Cancers then hijack mechanisms developed to limit inflammatory and immune responses and protect themselves from the T cell attack. Inhibiting adaptive immune resistance is the mechanistic basis of responses to PD-1 or PD-L1 blocking antibodies, and may be of relevance for the development of other cancer immunotherapy strategies. PMID:26272491

  1. In silico interaction of methyl isocyanate with immune protein responsible for Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection using molecular docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Rahul; Yasir, Mohammad; Tripathi, Manish; Singh, Pushpendra

    2016-01-01

    This article reports in silico analysis of methyl isocyanate (MIC) on different key immune proteins against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The analysis shows that MIC is released in the Bhopal gas tragedy in 1984, which is highly toxic and extremely hazardous to human health. In this study, we have selected immune proteins to perform molecular docking with the help of Autodock 4.0. Results show that the CD40 ligand and alpha5beta1 integrin have higher inhibition compared to plasminogen activator urokinase, human glutathione synthetase, mitogen-activated protein kinase (P38 MAPK 14), surfactant protein-B, -D (SP-D), and pulmonary SP-D. MIC interacted with His-125, Try-146 residue of CD40 ligand and Ala-149, and Arg-152 residue of alpha5beta1 integrin and affects the proteins functioning by binding on their active sites. These inhibitory conformations were energetically and statistically favored and supported the evidence from wet laboratory experiments reported in the literature. We can conclude that MIC directly or indirectly affects these proteins, which shows that survivals of the disaster suffer from the diseases like tuberculosis infection and lung cancer.

  2. [State of collective immunity to poliomyelitis in Moscow donors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seĭbil', V B; Malyshkina, L P; Lavrova, I K; Efimova, V F; Sadovnikova, V N

    2002-01-01

    Immunity induced by immunization with oral poliomyelitis vaccine has long been considered to last for life, similarly to immunity developing after infection with wild poliomyelitis virus. Vaccine virus cannot circulate among the immune population for a long time. The vaccination of children against poliomyelitis, carried out in the course of many years, has made it possible to suggest that a considerable number of immune persons were present among the adult population. The examination of 1,030 Moscow donors has revealed that antibodies to poliomyelitis virus of types 1, 2 and 3 were detected in 47.3%, 45.5% and 76.4% of the examinees respectively, the values of the average geometric titers being low. It is known that passages of poliomyelitis vaccine virus through nonimmune persons may result in emergence of revertant viruses with increased neurovirulence. The nonimmune adult population, especially the mothers of vaccinated and revaccinated children, may serve as favorable environment for the circulation of vaccine viruses and the appearance of revertant viruses.

  3. Review of Winograd and Flores'"Understanding Computers and Cognition": A Favorable Interpretation. ONR Technical Report #21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancey, William J.

    Artificial Intelligence researchers and cognitive scientists commonly believe that thinking involves manipulating representations. Thinking involves search, inference, and making choices. This is how we model reasoning and what goes on in the brain is similar. Winograd and Flores present a radically different view, claiming that our knowledge is…

  4. 8 CFR 316.11 - Attachment to the Constitution; favorable disposition towards the good order and happiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... disposition towards the good order and happiness. 316.11 Section 316.11 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF... the Constitution; favorable disposition towards the good order and happiness. (a) General. An... favorably disposed toward the good order and happiness of the United States. Attachment implies a depth of...

  5. Is there a psychoneuroimmunological pathway between alexithymia and immunity? Immune and physiological correlates of alexithymia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilbaud, Olivier; Corcos, Maurice; Hjalmarsson, Linnea; Loas, Gwenolé; Jeammet, Philippe

    2003-09-01

    The term "alexithymia" was coined by Sifneos. It is characterised by a lack of words to express emotion (a: absence of; lexi: words; thymia: emotions, affects). Its characteristics were suggested to occur more frequently in individuals with so-called "psychosomatic disorders", but this is still a matter of controversy. Here we review the psychosomatic network of alexithymia, i.e. the immune and physiological correlates of alexithymia. Some studies suggest that inaccuracy in recognising emotional states, or the way of coping with negative emotions, may influence immune function. Alexithymia is associated with higher tonic baseline levels of sympathetic activity and lower sympathetic reactivity during acute stress. Few studies have reported a diminished immune-mediated cellular response in alexithymics with oversecretion of glucocorticoids. We hypothesise that alexithymic subjects may suffer from unnoticed chronic stress with physiological and endocrine and immune consequences. Alexithymia may skew the Th-1/Th-2 balance toward Th-2 dominant immunity and lower cell-mediated (Th-1) immune response and may increase an individual's risk for stress-related disorder.

  6. Training and natural immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bente Klarlund; Helge, Jørn Wulff; Richter, Erik

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate whether a carbohydrate-rich versus fat-rich diet influenced the effect of training on the immune system. Ten untrained young men ingested a carbohydrate-rich diet [65 energy percent (E%) carbohydrate] and ten subjects a fat-rich diet (62E% fat) while...... endurance training was performed 3-4 times a week for 7 weeks. Maximal oxygen uptake increased by 11% in both groups. Blood samples for immune monitoring were collected before and at the end of the study. Blood samples were also collected, in parallel, from 20 age-matched subjects, and data from...... these subjects were used to eliminate day-to-day variation in the immunological tests. Independently of diet, training increased the percentage of CD3-CD16+ CD56+ natural killer (NK) cells from [mean (SEM)] 14 (1) % to 20 (3) % (P = 0.05), whereas the NK-cell activity, either unstimulated or stimulated...

  7. Hyperthyroidism caused by acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J-J; Zhou, J-J; Yuan, X-L; Li, C-Y; Sheng, H; Su, B; Sheng, C-J; Qu, S; Li, H

    2014-01-01

    Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is an immune deficiency disease. The etiology of hyperthyroidism, which can also be immune-related, is usually divided into six classical categories, including hypophyseal, hypothalamic, thyroid, neoplastic, autoimmune and inflammatory hyperthyroidism. Hyperthyroidism is a rare complication of highly active antimicrobial therapy (HAART) for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Hyperthyroidism caused directly by AIDS has not been previously reported. A 29-year-old man who complained of dyspnea and asthenia for 1 month, recurrent fever for more than 20 days, and breathlessness for 1 week was admitted to our hospital. The thyroid function test showed that the level of free thyroxine (FT4) was higher than normal and that the level of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) was below normal. He was diagnosed with hyperthyroidism. Additional investigations revealed a low serum albumin level and chest infection, along with diffuse lung fibrosis. Within 1 month, he experienced significant weight loss, no hand tremors, intolerance of heat, and perspiration proneness. We recommended an HIV examination; subsequently, AIDS was diagnosed based on the laboratory parameters. This is the first reported case of hyperthyroidism caused by AIDS. AIDS may cause hyperthyroidism by immunization regulation with complex, atypical, and easily ignored symptoms. Although hyperthyroidism is rare in patients with AIDS, clinicians should be aware of this potential interaction and should carefully monitor thyroid function in HIV-positive patients.

  8. Alarmins, inflammasomes and immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najwane Saïd-Sadier

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The elaboration of an effective immune response against pathogenic microbes such as viruses, intracellular bacteria or protozoan parasites relies on the recognition of microbial products called pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs. Ligation of the PRRs leads to synthesis and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Infected cells and other stressed cells also release host-cell derived molecules, called damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs, danger signals, or alarmins, which are generic markers for damage. DAMPs are recognized by specific receptors on both immune and nonimmune cells, which, depending on the target cell and the cellular context, can lead to cell differentiation or cell death, and either inflammation or inhibition of inflammation. Recent research has revealed that DAMPs and PAMPs synergize to permit secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β: PAMPs stimulate synthesis of pro-IL-1β, but not its secretion; while DAMPs can stimulate assembly of an inflammasome containing, usually, a Nod-like receptor (NLR member, and activation of the protease caspase-1, which cleaves pro-IL-1β into IL-1β, allowing its secretion. Other NLR members do not participate in formation of inflammasomes but play other essential roles in regulation of the innate immune response.

  9. Cystatins in immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magister, Spela; Kos, Janko

    2013-01-01

    Cystatins comprise a large superfamily of related proteins with diverse biological activities. They were initially characterised as inhibitors of lysosomal cysteine proteases, however, in recent years some alternative functions for cystatins have been proposed. Cystatins possessing inhibitory function are members of three families, family I (stefins), family II (cystatins) and family III (kininogens). Stefin A is often linked to neoplastic changes in epithelium while another family I cystatin, stefin B is supposed to have a specific role in neuredegenerative diseases. Cystatin C, a typical type II cystatin, is expressed in a variety of human tissues and cells. On the other hand, expression of other type II cystatins is more specific. Cystatin F is an endo/lysosome targeted protease inhibitor, selectively expressed in immune cells, suggesting its role in processes related to immune response. Our recent work points on its role in regulation of dendritic cell maturation and in natural killer cells functional inactivation that may enhance tumor survival. Cystatin E/M expression is mainly restricted to the epithelia of the skin which emphasizes its prominent role in cutaneous biology. Here, we review the current knowledge on type I (stefins A and B) and type II cystatins (cystatins C, F and E/M) in pathologies, with particular emphasis on their suppressive vs. promotional function in the tumorigenesis and metastasis. We proposed that an imbalance between cathepsins and cystatins may attenuate immune cell functions and facilitate tumor cell invasion.

  10. Hepatitis B vaccine: prospects for duration of immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krugman, S.; Davidson, M.

    1987-01-01

    The duration of hepatitis B vaccine-induced immunity was studied in a group of 54 seronegative health professionals who received plasma-derived hepatitis B vaccine (Merck's Heptavax) in 1978 and 1979. Five to seven years later, 52 vaccinees received a booster dose of yeast recombinant hepatitis B vaccine (Merck's Recombivax). Of 54 vaccinees, 47 (87 percent) had a favorable anti-HBs response (greater than 10 S/N RIA units) and 7 (13 percent) had low (2.1-10 S/N) or undetectable levels (less than 2.1 S/N) one year after primary immunization. After five to seven years, the anti-HBs values had declined to undetectable levels in 25 percent and to low levels in 23 percent. A booster dose of vaccine induced an anamnestic response in 90 percent of vaccinees by two weeks. The results of this study indicate that persons who respond favorably to primary immunization may be protected for at least seven years. PMID:3660859

  11. Innate immune memory in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamon, Melanie A; Quintin, Jessica

    2016-08-01

    Innate and adaptive immunity have evolved as sophisticated mechanisms of host defence against invading pathogens. Classically the properties attributed to innate immunity are its rapid pleiotropic response, and to adaptive immunity its specificity and ability to retain a long-term memory of past infections. It is now clear that innate immunity also contributes to raising a memory response upon pathogenic assault. In this review we will discuss the interaction between bacterial, viral, fungal and parasitic molecular patterns and innate immune cells in which a memory response is imposed, or has the potential to be imposed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Possível intermediação do sistema imune na polineuropatia periférica plúmbica: relato de caso Possible role of the immune system in lead neuropathy: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elza Dias-Tosta

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Relata-se o caso de paciente de 25 anos com ferimento por arma de fogo na articulação coxo-femural esquerda que desenvolveu, entre outros sinais de intoxicação plúmbica, polineuropatia periférica axonal predominantemente motora. Tratado inicialmente com corticosteróides em doses imunossupressoras obteve melhora, mas apresentava recidiva a cada tentativa de retirada da medicação. Demonstrados laboratorialmente níveis séricos tóxicos de chumbo, foi submetido à quelação com EDTA e à retirada cirúrgica do projétil, com boa recuperação da polineuropatia, sem necessidade ulterior de corticosteróides. Enfatiza-se: 1 o possível papel do sistema imune na fisiopatogenia da intoxicação por chumbo, podendo ser um dos motivos das diferentes apresentações clínicas das neuropatias plúmbicas na infância e no adulto; 2 a importância da retirada do material plúmbeo quando alojado em articulações.This is a case report of a twenty-five years old man who developed, due to lead intoxication, a severe axonal peripheral predominantly motor neuropathy, after a shotgun injury. The projectile was retained in the right hip. Before this diagnosis had been done he was treated with corticosteroids in immunosuppressive doses and showed an improvement, but he had worsened at each attempt to interrupt the drug. Because he had also other signs of lead intoxication, such as abdominal cramps, severe anemia and seizures it was search for the blood levels of lead that was 101.2 }μg/dl. The patient was treated with calcium disodium edetate and surgical removal of lead fragments. After that he had a good outcome with no need of corticosteroids. It is emphasized the possible relevance of the immune system on the mechanism of plumbic intoxication and the importance of the withdrawal of the lead material retained in joints.

  13. Teaching accreditation exams reveal grading biases favor women in male-dominated disciplines in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breda, Thomas; Hillion, Mélina

    2016-07-29

    Discrimination against women is seen as one of the possible causes behind their underrepresentation in certain STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) subjects. We show that this is not the case for the competitive exams used to recruit almost all French secondary and postsecondary teachers and professors. Comparisons of oral non-gender-blind tests with written gender-blind tests for about 100,000 individuals observed in 11 different fields over the period 2006-2013 reveal a bias in favor of women that is strongly increasing with the extent of a field's male-domination. This bias turns from 3 to 5 percentile ranks for men in literature and foreign languages to about 10 percentile ranks for women in math, physics, or philosophy. These findings have implications for the debate over what interventions are appropriate to increase the representation of women in fields in which they are currently underrepresented.

  14. Tunable Degradation Rate and Favorable Bioactivity of Porous Calcium Sulfate Scaffolds by Introducing Nano-Hydroxyapatite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Zhou

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The bone scaffolds should possess suitable physicochemical properties and osteogenic activities. In this study, porous calcium sulfate (CaSO4 scaffolds were fabricated successfully via selected laser sintering (SLS. Nano-hydroxyapatite (nHAp, a bioactive material with a low degradation rate, was introduced into CaSO4 scaffolds to overcome the overquick absorption. The results demonstrated that nHAp could not only control the degradation rate of scaffolds by adjusting their content, but also improve the pH environment by alleviating the acidification progress during the degradation of CaSO4 scaffolds. Moreover, the improved scaffolds were covered completely with the apatite spherulites in simulated body fluid (SBF, showing their favorable bioactivity. In addition, the compression strength and fracture toughness were distinctly enhanced, which could be ascribed to large specific area of nHAp and the corresponding stress transfer.

  15. Case-based ethics education: the impact of cause complexity and outcome favorability on ethicality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, James F; Bagdasarov, Zhanna; Connelly, Shane; Harkrider, Lauren; Devenport, Lynn D; Mumford, Michael D; Thiel, Chase E

    2012-07-01

    Case-based learning has been used across multiple disciplines, including ethics education, as an effective instructional tool. However, the value of case-based learning in ethics education has varied widely regarding case quality. Case content may significantly impact the ability of case-based ethics education to promote knowledge acquisition and knowledge transfer to future situations requiring ethical decision-making. This study examined two critical areas of ethical case content--causes and outcomes. Complexity of described causes and outcome favorability were manipulated in two ethical cases used during an ethics education course. Results suggest that including information in case studies reflecting clear, simple key causes and negative outcomes results in better ethical sensemaking and ethical decision-making. Implications regarding case content and case-based ethics education are explored.

  16. The spreading front of invasive species in favorable habitat or unfavorable habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Chengxia; Lin, Zhigui; Zhang, Qunying

    2014-07-01

    Spatial heterogeneity and habitat characteristic are shown to determine the asymptotic profile of the solution to a reaction-diffusion model with free boundary, which describes the moving front of the invasive species. A threshold value R0Fr(D,t) is introduced to determine the spreading and vanishing of the invasive species. We prove that if R0Fr(D,t0)⩾1 for some t0⩾0, the spreading must happen; while if R0Fr(D,0)species in the favorable habitat can establish itself if the diffusion is slow or the occupying habitat is large. In an unfavorable habitat, the species dies out if the initial value of the species is small. However, big initial number of the species is benefit for the species to survive. When the species spreads in the whole habitat, the asymptotic spreading speed is given. Some implications of these theoretical results are also discussed.

  17. Balanced bilinguals favor lexical processing in their opaque language and conversion system in their shallow language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buetler, Karin A; de León Rodríguez, Diego; Laganaro, Marina; Müri, René; Nyffeler, Thomas; Spierer, Lucas; Annoni, Jean-Marie

    2015-11-01

    Referred to as orthographic depth, the degree of consistency of grapheme/phoneme correspondences varies across languages from high in shallow orthographies to low in deep orthographies. The present study investigates the impact of orthographic depth on reading route by analyzing evoked potentials to words in a deep (French) and shallow (German) language presented to highly proficient bilinguals. ERP analyses to German and French words revealed significant topographic modulations 240-280 ms post-stimulus onset, indicative of distinct brain networks engaged in reading over this time window. Source estimations revealed that these effects stemmed from modulations of left insular, inferior frontal and dorsolateral regions (German>French) previously associated to phonological processing. Our results show that reading in a shallow language was associated to a stronger engagement of phonological pathways than reading in a deep language. Thus, the lexical pathways favored in word reading are reinforced by phonological networks more strongly in the shallow than deep orthography.

  18. Large-scale identification of membrane proteins with properties favorable for crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jared; Kagawa, Allison; Kurasaki, Kellie; Ataie, Niloufar; Cho, Il Kyu; Li, Qing X; Ng, Ho Leung

    2015-11-01

    Membrane protein crystallography is notoriously difficult due to challenges in protein expression and issues of degradation and structural stability. We have developed a novel method for large-scale screening of native sources for integral membrane proteins that have intrinsic biochemical properties favorable for crystallization. Highly expressed membrane proteins that are thermally stable and nonaggregating in detergent solutions were identified by mass spectrometry from Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Sus scrofa cerebrum. Many of the membrane proteins identified had been crystallized previously, supporting the promise of the approach. Most identified proteins have known functions and include high-value targets such as transporters and ATPases. To validate the method, we recombinantly expressed and purified the yeast protein, Yop1, which is responsible for endoplasmic reticulum curvature. We demonstrate that Yop1 can be purified with the detergent dodecylmaltoside without aggregating.

  19. Prejudice, Social Dominance, and Similarity among People who Favor Integration of Minorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Carmen; Saiz, José; Angosto, Josefa

    2016-04-12

    This study examines differences in prejudice, perceived similarity, and social dominance in members of the majority who favor integration as a means of minority acculturation. A total of 342 non-Gypsy Spanish participants filled out a questionnaire about their relationship to one of three outgroups: Maghrebians, Gypsies, and Latin Americans. Hierarchical cluster analysis showed that a three-cluster solution was most fitting for every outgroup. ANOVAs applied to the three clusters indicated significant differences in prejudice, perceived similarity, and social dominance. Referring to Gypsies the largest effect size was observed in manifest prejudice (η2 = .63), in Maghrebians, the largest effect size was observed in subtle prejudice (η2 =.77), while for Latin Americans, perceived similarity had the largest effect size η2 ( = .60). The results reveal a need to modify existing measures of integration; we recommend using questionnaires to measure behaviors that members of the majority would be willing to implement.

  20. Bt transgenic crops do not have favorable effects on resistant insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabashnik, Bruce E; Carrière, Yves

    2004-01-01

    Sayyed et al. (Ecology Letters (2003) 6: 167-169) hypothesized that insecticidal Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins produced by transgenic crops could have nutritionally favorable effects that increase the fitness of resistant insects eating such crops. This idea was based on increased pupal weight of resistant larvae of diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.), fed leaf discs treated externally with a Bt toxin. We summarize evidence from diamondback moth and other pests showing that the Bt toxins in transgenic crops do not enhance performance of resistant insects. Aside from a few notable exceptions in which performance of resistant insects did not differ between Bt and non-Bt crops, Bt crops had adverse affects on resistant insects.

  1. Luminal cells are favored as the cell of origin for prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhu A.; Toivanen, Roxanne; Bergren, Sarah K.; Chambon, Pierre; Shen, Michael M.

    2014-01-01

    The identification of cell types of origin for cancer has important implications for tumor stratification and personalized treatment. For prostate cancer, the cell of origin has been intensively studied, but it has remained unclear whether basal or luminal epithelial cells, or both, represent cells of origin under physiological conditions in vivo. Here, we use a novel lineage-tracing strategy to assess the cell of origin in a diverse range of mouse models, including Nkx3.1+/–; Pten+/–, Pten+/–, Hi-Myc, and TRAMP mice, as well as a hormonal carcinogenesis model. Our results show that luminal cells are consistently the observed cell of origin for each model in situ; however, explanted basal cells from these mice can generate tumors in grafts. Consequently, we propose that luminal cells are favored as cells of origin in many contexts, whereas basal cells only give rise to tumors after differentiation into luminal cells. PMID:25176651

  2. How to Ask for a Favor: A Case Study on the Success of Altruistic Requests

    CERN Document Server

    Althoff, Tim; Jurafsky, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Requests are at the core of many social media systems such as question & answer sites and online philanthropy communities. While the success of such requests is critical to the success of the community, the factors that lead community members to satisfy a request are largely unknown. Success of a request depends on factors like who is asking, how they are asking, when are they asking, and most critically what is being requested, ranging from small favors to substantial monetary donations. We present a case study of altruistic requests in an online community where all requests ask for the very same contribution and do not offer anything tangible in return, allowing us to disentangle what is requested from textual and social factors. Drawing from social psychology literature, we extract high-level social features from text that operationalize social relations between recipient and donor and demonstrate that these extracted relations are predictive of success. More specifically, we find that clearly communic...

  3. Auditing the quality of immunization data in Tunisia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Kouni Chahed

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To carry out a data quality audit for the consistency and quality of immunization monitoring in Kasserine governorate in Tunisia, where immunization coverage rates more than 100%, negative dropout and conflicting coverage rates had been reported. Methods: In a randomly selected sample of 12 primary health care facilities in 2 districts all files used to record immunization data were checked to verify the accuracy of the reported 3rd dose of diphtheriatetanus-pertussis vaccine during a calendar year. Results: The results found frequent overreporting or under-reporting of doses being administrated in all health facilities. The regional verification factor was estimated as 85% and quality index was 55%. Conclusions: Data quality audit provides a effective tool for self-assessment implementation and developing a critical analysis of the quality of routine immunization data at all levels of health service.

  4. Platelets in inflammation and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herter, J M; Rossaint, J; Zarbock, A

    2014-11-01

    The paradigm of platelets as mere mediators of hemostasis has long since been replaced by a dual role: hemostasis and inflammation. Now recognized as key players in innate and adaptive immune responses, platelets have the capacity to interact with almost all known immune cells. These platelet-immune cell interactions represent a hallmark of immunity, as they can potently enhance immune cell functions and, in some cases, even constitute a prerequisite for host defense mechanisms such as NETosis. In addition, recent studies have revealed a new role for platelets in immunity: They are ubiquitous sentinels and rapid first-line immune responders, as platelet-pathogen interactions within the vasculature appear to precede all other host defense mechanisms. Here, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of platelets as inflammatory cells, and provide an exemplary review of their role in acute inflammation.

  5. Insect Immunity to Entomopathogenic Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, H-L; St Leger, R J

    2016-01-01

    The study of infection and immunity in insects has achieved considerable prominence with the appreciation that their host defense mechanisms share many fundamental characteristics with the innate immune system of vertebrates. Studies on the highly tractable model organism Drosophila in particular have led to a detailed understanding of conserved innate immunity networks, such as Toll. However, most of these studies have used opportunistic human pathogens and may not have revealed specialized immune strategies that have arisen through evolutionary arms races with natural insect pathogens. Fungi are the commonest natural insect pathogens, and in this review, we focus on studies using Metarhizium and Beauveria spp. that have addressed immune system function and pathogen virulence via behavioral avoidance, the use of physical barriers, and the activation of local and systemic immune responses. In particular, we highlight studies on the evolutionary genetics of insect immunity and discuss insect-pathogen coevolution.

  6. Multiple-Element Matching Reservoir Formation and Quantitative Prediction of Favorable Areas in Superimposed Basins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Huaijie; PANG Xiongqi; WANG Zhaoming; YU Qiuhua; HUO Zhipeng; MENG Qingyang

    2010-01-01

    Superimposed basins in West China have experienced multi-stage tectonic events and multicycle hydrocarbon reservoir formation,and complex hydrocarbon reservoirs have been discovered widely in basins of this kind.Most of the complex hydrocarbon reservoirs are characterized by relocation,scale re-construction,component variation and phase state transformation,and their distributions are very difficult to predict.Research shows that regional caprock(C),high-quality sedimentary facies(Deposits,D),paleohighs(Mountain,M)and source rock(S)are four geologic elements contributing to complex hydrocarbon reservoir formation and distribution of western superimposed basins.Longitudinal sequential combinations of the four elements control the strata of hydrocarbon reservoir formation,and planar superimpositions and combinations control the range of hydrocarbon reservoir and their simultaneous joint effects in geohistory determine the time of hydrocarbon reservoir formation.Multiple-element matching reservoir formation presents a basic mode of reservoir formation in superimposed basins,and we recommend it is expressed as T-CDMS.Based on the multiple-element matching reservoir formation mode,a comprehensive reservoir formation index(Tcdms)is developed in this paper to characterize reservoir formation conditions,and a method is presented to predict reservoir formation range and probability of occurrence in superimposed basins.Through application of new theory,methods and technology,the favorable reservoir formation range and probability of occurrence in the Ordovician target zone in Tarim Basin in four different reservoir formation periods are predicted.Results show that central Tarim,Yinmaili and Lunnan are the three most favorable regions where Ordovician oil and gas fields may have formed.The coincidence of prediction results with currently discovered hydrocarbon reservoirs reaches 97%.This reflects the effectiveness and reliability of the new theory,methods and technology.

  7. Carbohydrate restriction has a more favorable impact on the metabolic syndrome than a low fat diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volek, Jeff S; Phinney, Stephen D; Forsythe, Cassandra E; Quann, Erin E; Wood, Richard J; Puglisi, Michael J; Kraemer, William J; Bibus, Doug M; Fernandez, Maria Luz; Feinman, Richard D

    2009-04-01

    We recently proposed that the biological markers improved by carbohydrate restriction were precisely those that define the metabolic syndrome (MetS), and that the common thread was regulation of insulin as a control element. We specifically tested the idea with a 12-week study comparing two hypocaloric diets (approximately 1,500 kcal): a carbohydrate-restricted diet (CRD) (%carbohydrate:fat:protein = 12:59:28) and a low-fat diet (LFD) (56:24:20) in 40 subjects with atherogenic dyslipidemia. Both interventions led to improvements in several metabolic markers, but subjects following the CRD had consistently reduced glucose (-12%) and insulin (-50%) concentrations, insulin sensitivity (-55%), weight loss (-10%), decreased adiposity (-14%), and more favorable triacylglycerol (TAG) (-51%), HDL-C (13%) and total cholesterol/HDL-C ratio (-14%) responses. In addition to these markers for MetS, the CRD subjects showed more favorable responses to alternative indicators of cardiovascular risk: postprandial lipemia (-47%), the Apo B/Apo A-1 ratio (-16%), and LDL particle distribution. Despite a threefold higher intake of dietary saturated fat during the CRD, saturated fatty acids in TAG and cholesteryl ester were significantly decreased, as was palmitoleic acid (16:1n-7), an endogenous marker of lipogenesis, compared to subjects consuming the LFD. Serum retinol binding protein 4 has been linked to insulin-resistant states, and only the CRD decreased this marker (-20%). The findings provide support for unifying the disparate markers of MetS and for the proposed intimate connection with dietary carbohydrate. The results support the use of dietary carbohydrate restriction as an effective approach to improve features of MetS and cardiovascular risk.

  8. Spatial heterogeneity in human activities favors the persistence of wolves in agroecosystems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Ahmadi

    Full Text Available As human populations expand, there is increasing demand and pressure for land. Under this scenario, behavioural flexibility and adaptation become important processes leading to the persistence of large carnivores in human-dominated landscapes such as agroecosystems. A growing interest has recently emerged on the outcome of the coexistence between wolves and humans in these systems. It has been suggested that spatial heterogeneity in human activities would be a major environmental factor modulating vulnerability and persistence of this contentious species in agroecosystems. Here, we combined information from 35 den sites detected between 2011 and 2012 in agroecosystems of western Iran (Hamedan province, a set of environmental variables measured at landscape and fine spatial scales, and generalized linear models to identify patterns of den site selection by wolves in a highly-modified agroecosystem. On a landscape level, wolves selected a mixture of rangelands with scattered dry-farms on hillsides (showing a low human use to locate their dens, avoiding areas with high densities of settlements and primary roads. On a fine spatial scale, wolves primarily excavated dens into the sides of elevated steep-slope hills with availability of water bodies in the vicinity of den sites, and wolves were relegated to dig in places with coarse-soil particles. Our results suggest that vulnerability of wolves in human-dominated landscapes could be compensated by the existence of spatial heterogeneity in human activities. Such heterogeneity would favor wolf persistence in agroecosystems favoring a land sharing model of coexistence between wolves and people.

  9. Adaptation in the innate immune system and heterologous innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Stefan F

    2014-11-01

    The innate immune system recognizes deviation from homeostasis caused by infectious or non-infectious assaults. The threshold for its activation seems to be established by a calibration process that includes sensing of microbial molecular patterns from commensal bacteria and of endogenous signals. It is becoming increasingly clear that adaptive features, a hallmark of the adaptive immune system, can also be identified in the innate immune system. Such adaptations can result in the manifestation of a primed state of immune and tissue cells with a decreased activation threshold. This keeps the system poised to react quickly. Moreover, the fact that the innate immune system recognizes a wide variety of danger signals via pattern recognition receptors that often activate the same signaling pathways allows for heterologous innate immune stimulation. This implies that, for example, the innate immune response to an infection can be modified by co-infections or other innate stimuli. This "design feature" of the innate immune system has many implications for our understanding of individual susceptibility to diseases or responsiveness to therapies and vaccinations. In this article, adaptive features of the innate immune system as well as heterologous innate immunity and their implications are discussed.

  10. Evaluation of a social marketing campaign to increase awareness of immunizations for urban low-income children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngui, Emmanuel M; Hamilton, Chelsea; Nugent, Melodee; Simpson, Pippa; Willis, Earnestine

    2015-02-01

    To assess community awareness of childhood immunizations and intent to immunize children after a social marketing immunization campaign. We used 2 interviewer-assisted street-intercept surveys to evaluate awareness of childhood immunizations and intent to immunize low-income children. The "Take Control! Immunize" social marketing campaign was developed using a community-based participatory research approach and used billboards, flyers, and various "walking billboard" (eg, backpacks, pens) to deliver immunization messages in the community settings. Over 85% of community members recalled the "Take Control! Immunize" message. Almost half of those who saw the immunization message indicated that the message motivated them to act, including getting their children immunized or calling their physician to inquire about their children's immunizations status. All respondents indicated that immunizations were important for children and that they were likely or very likely to immunize their children. Respondents who reported that "Take Control!" messages motivated them to act in the first intercept survey were significantly more likely than those in the second intercept to report being likely or very likely to immunize their children. Culturally appropriate social marketing immunization messages in targeted urban settings can increase parental awareness and behavioral intention to immunize children.

  11. Linfoma hepático primario: Evolución favorable con quimioterapia combinada con rituximab Primary hepatic lymphoma: favorable outcome with chemotherapy plus rituximab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Serrano-Navarro

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Comunicamos el caso de una paciente con un linfoma hepático primario tratado con éxito con quimioterapia combinada con rituximab. Utilizando los "encabezamientos estándar para búsquedas bibliográficas informatizadas" (Medical Subject Heading revisamos los casos publicados hasta la fecha de esta infrecuente entidad.This article describes the case of a patient with a non-Hodgkin primary hepatic lymphoma who was successfully treated with chemotherapy combined with rituximab. Using the Medical Subject Headings the published reports of this rare entity were reviewed.

  12. Simulating the 'other-race' effect with autoassociative neural networks: further evidence in favor of the face-space model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldara, Roberto; Hervé, Abdi

    2006-01-01

    Other-race (OR) faces are less accurately recognized than same-race (SR) faces, but faster classified by race. This phenomenon has often been reported as the 'other-race' effect (ORE). Valentine (1991 Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology A: Human Experimental Psychology 43 161-204) proposed a theoretical multidimensional face-space model that explained both of these results, in terms of variations in exemplar density between races. According to this model, SR faces are more widely distributed across the dimensions of the space than OR faces. However, this model does not quantify nor state the dimensions coded within this face space. The aim of the present study was to test the face-space explanation of the ORE with neural network simulations by quantifying its dimensions. We found the predicted density properties of Valentine's framework in the face-projection spaces of the autoassociative memories. This was supported by an interaction for exemplar density between the race of the learned face set and the race of the faces. In addition, the elaborated face representations showed optimal responses for SR but not for OR faces within SR face spaces when explored at the individual level, as gender errors occurred significantly more often in OR than in SR face-space representations. Altogether, our results add further evidence in favor of a statistical exemplar density explanation of the ORE as suggested by Valentine, and question the plausibility of such coding for faces in the framework of recent neuroimaging studies.

  13. A fully synthetic human Fab antibody library based on fixed VH/VL framework pairings with favorable biophysical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiller, Thomas; Schuster, Ingrid; Deppe, Dorothée; Siegers, Katja; Strohner, Ralf; Herrmann, Tanja; Berenguer, Marion; Poujol, Dominique; Stehle, Jennifer; Stark, Yvonne; Heßling, Martin; Daubert, Daniela; Felderer, Karin; Kaden, Stefan; Kölln, Johanna; Enzelberger, Markus; Urlinger, Stefanie

    2013-01-01

    This report describes the design, generation and testing of Ylanthia, a fully synthetic human Fab antibody library with 1.3E+11 clones. Ylanthia comprises 36 fixed immunoglobulin (Ig) variable heavy (VH)/variable light (VL) chain pairs, which cover a broad range of canonical complementarity-determining region (CDR) structures. The variable Ig heavy and Ig light (VH/VL) chain pairs were selected for biophysical characteristics favorable to manufacturing and development. The selection process included multiple parameters, e.g., assessment of protein expression yield, thermal stability and aggregation propensity in fragment antigen binding (Fab) and IgG1 formats, and relative Fab display rate on phage. The framework regions are fixed and the diversified CDRs were designed based on a systematic analysis of a large set of rearranged human antibody sequences. Care was taken to minimize the occurrence of potential posttranslational modification sites within the CDRs. Phage selection was performed against various antigens and unique antibodies with excellent biophysical properties were isolated. Our results confirm that quality can be built into an antibody library by prudent selection of unmodified, fully human VH/VL pairs as scaffolds.

  14. Human longevity is associated with regular sleep patterns, maintenance of slow wave sleep, and favorable lipid profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzotti, Diego Robles; Guindalini, Camila; Moraes, Walter André dos Santos; Andersen, Monica Levy; Cendoroglo, Maysa Seabra; Ramos, Luiz Roberto; Tufik, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Some individuals are able to successfully reach very old ages, reflecting higher adaptation against age-associated effects. Sleep is one of the processes deeply affected by aging; however few studies evaluating sleep in long-lived individuals (aged over 85) have been reported to date. The aim of this study was to characterize the sleep patterns and biochemical profile of oldest old individuals (N = 10, age 85–105 years old) and compare them to young adults (N = 15, age 20–30 years old) and older adults (N = 13, age 60–70 years old). All subjects underwent full-night polysomnography, 1-week of actigraphic recording and peripheral blood collection. Sleep electroencephalogram spectral analysis was also performed. The oldest old individuals showed lower sleep efficiency and REM sleep when compared to the older adults, while stage N3 percentage and delta power were similar across the groups. Oldest old individuals maintained strictly regular sleep-wake schedules and also presented higher HDL-cholesterol and lower triglyceride levels than older adults. The present study revealed novel data regarding specific sleep patterns and maintenance of slow wave sleep in the oldest old group. Taken together with the favorable lipid profile, these results contribute with evidence to the importance of sleep and lipid metabolism regulation in the maintenance of longevity in humans. PMID:25009494

  15. Cellular metabolism as a basis for immune privilege.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, M Karen; Villalobos-Menuey, Elizabeth; Schweitzer, Susan C; Harper, Mary-Ellen; Camley, Robert E

    2006-03-17

    We hypothesize that the energy strategy of a cell is a key factor for determining how, or if, the immune system interacts with that cell. Cells have a limited number of metabolic states, in part, depending on the type of fuels the cell consumes. Cellular fuels include glucose (carbohydrates), lipids (fats), and proteins. We propose that the cell's ability to switch to, and efficiently use, fat for fuel confers immune privilege. Additionally, because uncoupling proteins are involved in the fat burning process and reportedly in protection from free radicals, we hypothesize that uncoupling proteins play an important role in immune privilege. Thus, changes in metabolism (caused by oxidative stresses, fuel availability, age, hormones, radiation, or drugs) will dictate and initiate changes in immune recognition and in the nature of the immune response. This has profound implications for controlling the symptoms of autoimmune diseases, for preventing graft rejection, and for targeting tumor cells for destruction.

  16. Fracture Analysis of Vessels. Oak Ridge FAVOR, v06.1, Computer Code: Theory and Implementation of Algorithms, Methods, and Correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, P. T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dickson, T. L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yin, S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2007-12-01

    The current regulations to insure that nuclear reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) maintain their structural integrity when subjected to transients such as pressurized thermal shock (PTS) events were derived from computational models developed in the early-to-mid 1980s. Since that time, advancements and refinements in relevant technologies that impact RPV integrity assessment have led to an effort by the NRC to re-evaluate its PTS regulations. Updated computational methodologies have been developed through interactions between experts in the relevant disciplines of thermal hydraulics, probabilistic risk assessment, materials embrittlement, fracture mechanics, and inspection (flaw characterization). Contributors to the development of these methodologies include the NRC staff, their contractors, and representatives from the nuclear industry. These updated methodologies have been integrated into the Fracture Analysis of Vessels -- Oak Ridge (FAVOR, v06.1) computer code developed for the NRC by the Heavy Section Steel Technology (HSST) program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The FAVOR, v04.1, code represents the baseline NRC-selected applications tool for re-assessing the current PTS regulations. This report is intended to document the technical bases for the assumptions, algorithms, methods, and correlations employed in the development of the FAVOR, v06.1, code.

  17. Corticosteroids for the management of severe intracranial hypertension in meningoencephalitis caused by Cryptococcus gattii: A case report and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciel, R-A; Ferreira, L-S; Wirth, F; Rosa, P-D; Aves, M; Turra, E; Goldani, L-Z

    2017-03-01

    Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in meningitis caused by Cryptococcus gattii in immunocompetent patients after initiation of antifungal therapy appears to be the result of paradoxical antifungal treatment-induced clinical deterioration due to improved local immune responses to cryptococcal organisms. Recent anecdotal reports have suggested a favorable clinical response to corticosteroids in select patients with C. gattii central nervous system (CNS) infections. In this report, we describe a 65-year-old patient with meningoencephalitis caused by C. gattii who developed persistent intracranial hypertension and was successfully managed with antifungal therapy, repeated lumbar puncture and corticosteroids. Our observations suggest a possible benefit of dexamethasone in the management of select cases of C. gattii CNS infection with intracranial hypertension. Further studies are necessary to evaluate the long-term use of steroids in select patients with C. gattii with intracranial hypertension. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy as a Monotherapy for Favorable-Risk Prostate Cancer: A Phase II Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkati, Maroie [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Williams, Scott G., E-mail: scott.williams@petermac.org [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Department of Pathology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Foroudi, Farshad; Tai, Keen Hun; Chander, Sarat [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Department of Pathology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Dyk, Sylvia van [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); See, Andrew [Ballarat Austin Radiation Oncology Centre, Ballarat (Australia); Duchesne, Gillian M. [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Department of Pathology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: There are multiple treatment options for favorable-risk prostate cancer. High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy as a monotherapy is appealing, but its use is still investigational. A Phase II trial was undertaken to explore the value of such treatment in low-to-intermediate risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: This was a single-institution, prospective study. Eligible patients had low-risk prostate cancer features but also Gleason scores of 7 (51% of patients) and stage T2b to T2c cancer. Treatment with HDR brachytherapy with a single implant was administered over 2 days. One of four fractionation schedules was used in a dose escalation study design: 3 fractions of 10, 10.5, 11, or 11.5 Gy. Patients were assessed with the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 2.0 for urinary toxicity, the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer scoring schema for rectal toxicity, and the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC) questionnaire to measure patient-reported health-related quality of life. Biochemical failure was defined as a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir plus 2 ng/ml. Results: Between 2003 and 2008, 79 patients were enrolled. With a median follow-up of 39.5 months, biochemical relapse occurred in 7 patients. Three- and 5-year actuarial biochemical control rates were 88.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 78.0-96.2%) and 85.1% (95% CI, 72.5-94.5%), respectively. Acute grade 3 urinary toxicity was seen in only 1 patient. There was no instance of acute grade 3 rectal toxicity. Rates of late grade 3 rectal toxicity, dysuria, hematuria, urinary retention, and urinary incontinence were 0%, 10.3%, 1.3%, 9.0%, and 0%, respectively. No grade 4 or greater toxicity was recorded. Among the four (urinary, bowel, sexual, and hormonal) domains assessed with the EPIC questionnaire, only the sexual domain did not recover with time. Conclusions: HDR brachytherapy as a monotherapy for favorable

  19. Immune mechanisms in hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ciuceis, Carolina; Rossini, Claudia; La Boria, Elisa; Porteri, Enzo; Petroboni, Beatrice; Gavazzi, Alice; Sarkar, Annamaria; Rosei, Enrico Agabiti; Rizzoni, Damiano

    2014-12-01

    Low grade inflammation may have a key role in the pathogenesis of hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Several studies showed that both innate and adaptive immune systems may be involved, being T cells the most important players. Particularly, the balance between Th1 effector lymphocytes and Treg lymphocytes may be crucial for blood pressure elevation and related organ damage development. In the presence of a mild elevation of blood pressure, neo-antigens are produced. Activated Th1 cells may then contribute to the persistent elevation of blood pressure by affecting vasculature, kidney and perivascular fat. On the other hand, Tregs represent a lymphocyte subpopulation with an anti-inflammatory role, being their activity crucial for the maintenance of cardiovascular homeostasis. Indeed, Tregs were demonstrated to be able to protect from blood pressure elevation and from the development of organ damage, including micro and macrovascular alterations, in different animal models of genetic or experimental hypertension. In the vasculature, inflammation leads to vascular remodeling through cytokine activity, smooth muscle cell proliferation and oxidative stress. It is also known that a consistent part of ischemia-reperfusion-induced acute kidney injury is mediated by inflammatory infiltration and that Treg cell infusion have a protective role. Also the central nervous system has an important role in the maintenance of cardiovascular homeostasis. In conclusion, hypertension development involves chronic inflammatory process. Knowledge of cellular and molecular players in the progression of hypertension has dramatically improved in the last decade, by assessing the central role of innate and adaptive immunity cells and proinflammatory cytokines driving the development of target organ damage. The new concept of role of immunity, especially implicating T lymphocytes, will eventually allow discovery of new therapeutic targets that may improve outcomes in hypertension and

  20. Private sector contribution to childhood immunization: Sri Lankan experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agampodi S

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Background : The main service provider for childhood immunization in Sri Lanka is the government sector. However, utilization of private sector for childhood immunization is increasing rapidly. Existing national immunization data does not routinely include statistics on private sector immunization delivery adequately. Objective : To estimate the proportion of children immunized in the private sector; describe socio-demographic characteristics of private sector users and compare these with government sector users. Materials and Methods : A community-based crosssectional descriptive study was conducted using a pre-tested interviewer-administered structured questionnaire. This was done in the Colombo municipal council area using the WHO 30 cluster methodology. The total number of households in the sample was 553. Results : Out of the 5,028 total immunizations reported in the present study, around one-third (2,544 was obtained through the private sector. Nineteen percent (104 of children were exclusively immunized from the private sector. The distribution of usual immunization provider was - government sector 72.3% (400 and private sector 27.7% (153. Significant differences were observed (P < 0.001 between private and government sector users with regard to family income, social class, ethnicity, religion and educational level of the mother. The age-appropriate immunization among the 12- to 23-month age group was 92.3% (144 in the government sector, whereas it was 95% (38 in the private sector. Among the 24- to 35-month age group, it was 91.7% (121 and 92.7% (76 respectively. The age-adjusted immunization coverage rates were almost same among the government and private sector users except for the measles vaccine, where the private sector users had significantly (P = 0.016 higher coverage. Conclusions :Utilization of private sector immunization services is high in the Colombo municipal council area.

  1. ASSESSMENT OF IMMUNIZATION COVERAGE IN IRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiumarss Nasseri

    1985-08-01

    Full Text Available In an effort towards complying with the WHO,s global policy of achieving Health For All by the year 2000 and also with the pledge made by the Government of Iran to that effect, a national headquarters has been set up to speed the implementation of the Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI in the country. This paper aims to report the results of evaluations made at various times since the beginning of the implementation of EPI in 1983.

  2. A role for PML in innate immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Lunardi, Andrea; Gaboli, Mirella; Giorgio, Marco; Rivi, Roberta; Bygrave, Anne; Drabek, Dubravka; Dzierzak, Elaine; Fagioli, Marta; Salmena, Leonardo; Antoniou, Michael; Botto, Marina; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Luzzatto, Lucio; Pelicci, P G; Grosveld, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The promyelocytic leukemia gene (PML) of acute promyelocytic leukemia is an established tumor suppressor gene with critical functions in growth suppression, induction of apoptosis, and cellular senescence. Interestingly, although less studied, PML seems to play a key role also in immune response to viral infection. Herein, we report that Pml −/− mice spontaneously develop an atypical invasive and lethal granulomatous lesion known as botryomycosis (BTM). In Pml ...

  3. Single Nutrients and Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-02-01

    allergic Proc 198140:344. encephalomyelitis. J Nutr 1975105:288-300. 198. Rice C, Hudig D. Redelman D, Mendelsohn J, 180. Weston PG. Johnston PV...Pediatr 1978;93:71-3. AE. Defect of cell-mediated immunity in patients 272. Weston WL, Huff JC, Humbert JR, et al. Zinc with iron-deficiency anaemia...Methylmercuy: ogy. Hagerstown Md: Harper & Row, 1980:155-97. effect on serum enzymes and humoral antibody. J 385. Ota DM. Copeland EM. Dudrick SJ, et al. The

  4. FOXP3-specific immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Hald

    2013-01-01

    Forkhead box P3 (FOXP3)-specific cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells are present among human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), especially in cancer patients. Such T lymphocytes are able not only to specifically recognize dendritic cells (DCs) that have been exposed to recombinant FOXP3 and regulat...... and regulatory T cells, but also to kill FOXP3(+) malignant T cells. The natural occurrence of FOXP3-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes among human PBMCs suggests a general role for these cells in the complex network of immune regulation....

  5. MAR binding protein SMAR1 favors IL-10 mediated regulatory T cell function in acute colitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirlekar, Bhalchandra; Patil, Sachin [Chromatin and Disease Biology Laboratory, National Centre for Cell Science, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India); Bopanna, Ramanamurthy [Experimental Animal Facility, National Centre for Cell Science, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India); Chattopadhyay, Samit, E-mail: samit@nccs.res.in [Chromatin and Disease Biology Laboratory, National Centre for Cell Science, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India)

    2015-08-21

    T{sub reg} cells are not only crucial for controlling immune responses to autoantigens but also prevent those directed towards commensal pathogens. Control of effector immune responses by T{sub reg} cells depend on their capacity to accumulate at inflammatory site and accordingly accommodate to inflammatory environment. Till date, the factors associated with maintaining these aspects of T{sub reg} phenotype is not understood properly. Here we have shown that a known nuclear matrix binding protein SMAR1 is selectively expressed more in colonic T{sub reg} cells and is required for their ability to accumulate at inflammatory site and to sustain high levels of Foxp3 and IL-10 expression during acute colitis. Elimination of anti-inflammatory subsets revealed a protective role for IL-10 producing T{sub reg} cells in SMAR1{sup −/−} mice. Moreover, a combined action of Foxp3 and SMAR1 restricts effector cytokine production and enhance the production of IL-10 by colonic T{sub reg} cells that controls acute colitis. This data highlights a critical role of SMAR1 in maintaining T{sub reg} physiology during inflammatory disorders. - Highlights: • SMAR1 is essential to sustain high level of Foxp3 and IL-10 in T{sub reg} cells. • SMAR1{sup −/−} T{sub reg} cells produce pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-17 leads to inflammation. • IL-10 administration can control the inflammation in SMAR1{sup −/−} mice. • Both Foxp3 and SMAR1 maintain T{sub reg} phenotype that controls colitis.

  6. Apicidin and Docetaxel Combination Treatment Drives CTCFL Expression and HMGB1 Release Acting as Potential Antitumor Immune Response Inducers in Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Buoncervello

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Currently approved combination regimens available for the treatment of metastatic tumors, such as breast cancer, have been shown to increase response rates, often at the cost of a substantial increase in toxicity. An ideal combination strategy may consist of agents with different mechanisms of action leading to complementary antitumor activities and safety profiles. In the present study, we investigated the effects of the epigenetic modulator apicidin in combination with the cytotoxic agent docetaxel in tumor breast cell lines characterized by different grades of invasiveness. We report that combined treatment of apicidin and docetaxel, at low toxicity doses, stimulates in metastatic breast cancer cells the expression of CTCF-like protein and other cancer antigens, thus potentially favoring an antitumor immune response. In addition, apicidin and docetaxel co-treatment specifically stimulates apoptosis, characterized by an increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and caspase-8 activation. Importantly, following combined exposure to these agents, metastatic cells were also found to induce signals of immunogenic apoptosis such as cell surface expression of calreticulin and release of considerable amounts of high-mobility group box 1 protein, thus potentially promoting the translation of induced cell death into antitumor immune response. Altogether, our results indicate that the combined use of apicidin and docetaxel, at a low toxicity profile, may represent a potential innovative strategy able to activate complementary antitumor pathways in metastatic breast cancer cells, associated with a potential control of metastatic growth and possible induction of antitumor immunity.

  7. Induction of mucosal immunity through systemic immunization: Phantom or reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Fei; Patel, Girishchandra B; Hu, Songhua; Chen, Wangxue

    2016-04-02

    Generation of protective immunity at mucosal surfaces can greatly assist the host defense against pathogens which either cause disease at the mucosal epithelial barriers or enter the host through these surfaces. Although mucosal routes of immunization, such as intranasal and oral, are being intensely explored and appear promising for eliciting protective mucosal immunity in mammals, their application in clinical practice has been limited due to technical and safety related challenges. Most of the currently approved human vaccines are administered via systemic (such as intramuscular and subcutaneous) routes. Whereas these routes are acknowledged as being capable to elicit antigen-specific systemic humoral and cell-mediated immune responses, they are generally perceived as incapable of generating IgA responses or protective mucosal immunity. Nevertheless, currently licensed systemic vaccines do provide effective protection against mucosal pathogens such as influenza viruses and Streptococcus pneumoniae. However, whether systemic immunization induces protective mucosal immunity remains a controversial topic. Here we reviewed the current literature and discussed the potential of systemic routes of immunization for the induction of mucosal immunity.

  8. Immunity's fourth dimension: approaching the circadian-immune connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjona, Alvaro; Silver, Adam C; Walker, Wendy E; Fikrig, Erol

    2012-12-01

    The circadian system ensures the generation and maintenance of self-sustained ~24-h rhythms in physiology that are linked to internal and environmental changes. In mammals, daily variations in light intensity and other cues are integrated by a hypothalamic master clock that conveys circadian information to peripheral molecular clocks that orchestrate physiology. Multiple immune parameters also vary throughout the day and disruption of circadian homeostasis is associated with immune-related disease. Here, we discuss the molecular links between the circadian and immune systems and examine their outputs and disease implications. Understanding the mechanisms that underlie circadian-immune crosstalk may prove valuable for devising novel prophylactic and therapeutic interventions.

  9. Immune-Related Adverse Events Associated with Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Daphne; Hansen, Aaron R

    2016-12-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs), including antibodies targeting cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed cell death protein-1 (PD-1), have shown durable treatment responses in multiple tumor types by enhancing antitumor immunity. However, removal of self-tolerance can induce autoimmunity and produce a unique immune-driven toxicity profile, termed immune-related adverse events (irAEs). As ICIs gain approval for a growing number of indications, it is imperative clinicians increase their knowledge of and ability to manage irAEs. This review examines the etiology, presentation, kinetics, and treatment of irAEs and aims to provide practical guidance for clinicians.

  10. Deficit of sand in a sediment transport model favors coral reef development in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abílio C.S.P. Bittencourt

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows that the location of the shoreface bank reefs along the northeastern and eastern coasts of Brazil, in a first order approximation, seem to be controlled by the deficit of sediment in the coastal system. The sediment transport pattern defined by a numerical modeling of wave refraction diagrams, representing circa 2000 km of the northeastern and eastern coasts of Brazil, permitted the regional-scale reproduction of several drift cells of net longshore sediment transport. Those drift cells can reasonably explain the coastal sections that present sediment surplus or sediment deficit, which correspond, respectively, to regions where there is deposition and erosion or little/no deposition of sand. The sediment deficit allows the exposure and maintenance of rocky substrates to be free of sediment, a favorable condition for the fixation and development of coral larvae.Este trabalho mostra que a localização dos recifes de coral ao longo dos litorais leste e nordeste do Brasil, em uma aproximação de primeira ordem, parece ser controlada pelo déficit de sedimentos no sistema costeiro. O padrão de transporte de sedimentos definido por modelagem numérica a partir de diagramas de refração de ondas, representando cerca de 2000 km dos litorais leste e nordeste do Brasil, permitiu a reprodução, em escala regional, de várias células de deriva litorânea efetiva de sedimentos. Essas células de deriva podem razoavelmente explicar os segmentos costeiros que representam superávit, ou deficit de sedimentos que correspondem, respectivamente, a regiões onde existe deposição e erosão ou pouca/nenhuma deposição de areia. O deficit de sedimentos propicia a exposição e manutenção de substratos rochosos livres de sedimento, uma condição favorável para a fixação e desenvolvimento das larvas de coral.

  11. Plant innate immunity: An updated insight into defense mechanism

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mehanathan Muthamilarasan; Manoj Prasad

    2013-06-01

    Plants are invaded by an array of pathogens of which only a few succeed in causing disease. The attack by others is countered by a sophisticated immune system possessed by the plants. The plant immune system is broadly divided into two, viz. microbial-associated molecular-patterns-triggered immunity (MTI) and effector-triggered immunity (ETI). MTI confers basal resistance, while ETI confers durable resistance, often resulting in hypersensitive response. Plants also possess systemic acquired resistance (SAR), which provides long-term defense against a broad-spectrum of pathogens. Salicylic-acid-mediated systemic acquired immunity provokes the defense response throughout the plant system during pathogen infection at a particular site. Trans-generational immune priming allows the plant to heritably shield their progeny towards pathogens previously encountered. Plants circumvent the viral infection through RNA interference phenomena by utilizing small RNAs. This review summarizes the molecular mechanisms of plant immune system, and the latest breakthroughs reported in plant defense. We discuss the plant–pathogen interactions and integrated defense responses in the context of presenting an integral understanding in plant molecular immunity.

  12. Altered Allogeneic Immune Responses in Middle-Aged Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yimin Sun; Hanhan Li; Alan N. Langnas; Yong Zhao

    2004-01-01

    It is well known that leukocyte composition, T cell phenotypes and immune function change in aged mice and humans. However, limited and conflicting results on the age-related immune changes in middle-aged mice were reported. Identification of the characteristics of allogeneic immune responses in aging mice may offer important information for transplantation immunology. The major age-related changes in the immune cell phenotypes and function of 12 months old mice include: 1) the significantly decreased CD4+ cell population in the peripheral blood, the major peripheral CD4+ cells is CD45RBlowCD62Llow memory phenotype; 2) the in vitro responses to alloantigens and Con A of splenocytes markedly reduced; 3) the in vivo secondary humoral immune responses to alloantigens significantly declined; 4) the age-related alteration in the thymus mainly occurred in CD4/CD8 double positive (DP) stage; and 5) increased CD80+ and MHC class Ⅱ+ cell population in spleens. Thus, the major age-related immune changes in 12 months old mice occurred in CD4+ T cells in the periphery and DP stage in the thymus, which may subsequently lead to the decreased allogeneic immune responses and the different sensitivity to immunosuppressive drugs and treatments. Further studies on the characteristics of allogeneic immunity in aging individuals may help to determine the appropriated treatment for transplant aging individuals. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004; 1(6) :440-446.

  13. Altered Allogeneic Immune Responses in Middle-Aged Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YiminSun; HanhanLi; AlanN.Langnas

    2004-01-01

    It is well known that leukocyte composition, T cell phenotypes and immune function change in aged mice and humans. However, limited and conflicting results on the age-related immune changes in middle-aged mice were reported. Identification of the characteristics of allogeneic immune responses in aging mice may offer important information for transplantation immunology. The major age-related changes in the immune cell phenotypes and function of 12 months old mice include: 1) the significantly decreased CD4+ cell population in the peripheral blood, the major peripheral CD4+ cells is CD45RBlowCD62Llow memory phenotype; 2) the in vitro responses to alloantigens and Con A of splenocytes markedly reduced; 3) the in vivo secondary humoral immune responses to alloantigens significantly declined; 4) the age-related alteration in the thymus mainly occurred in CD4/CD8 double positive (DP) stage; and 5) increased CD80+ and MHC class II+ cell population in spleens. Thus, the major age-related immune changes in 12 months old mice occurred in CD4+ T cells in the periphery and DP stage in the thymus, which may subsequently lead to the decreased allogeneic immune responses and the different sensitivity to immunosuppressive drugs and treatments. Further studies on the characteristics of allogeneic immunity in aging individuals may help to determine the appropriated treatment for transplant aging individuals. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(6):440-446.

  14. Estrogen receptors regulate innate immune cells and signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovats, Susan

    2015-04-01

    Humans show strong sex differences in immunity to infection and autoimmunity, suggesting sex hormones modulate immune responses. Indeed, receptors for estrogens (ERs) regulate cells and pathways in the innate and adaptive immune system, as well as immune cell development. ERs are ligand-dependent transcription factors that mediate long-range chromatin interactions and form complexes at gene regulatory elements, thus promoting epigenetic changes and transcription. ERs also participate in membrane-initiated steroid signaling to generate rapid responses. Estradiol and ER activity show profound dose- and context-dependent effects on innate immune signaling pathways and myeloid cell development. While estradiol most often promotes the production of type I interferon, innate pathways leading to pro-inflammatory cytokine production may be enhanced or dampened by ER activity. Regulation of innate immune cells and signaling by ERs may contribute to the reported sex differences in innate immune pathways. Here we review the recent literature and highlight several molecular mechanisms by which ERs regulate the development or functional responses of innate immune cells.

  15. Diuretics prime plant immunity in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiteru Noutoshi

    Full Text Available Plant activators are agrochemicals that activate the plant immune system, thereby enhancing disease resistance. Due to their prophylactic and durable effects on a wide spectrum of diseases, plant activators can provide synergistic crop protection when used in combination with traditional pest controls. Although plant activators have achieved great success in wet-rice farming practices in Asia, their use is still limited. To isolate novel plant activators applicable to other crops, we screened a chemical library using a method that can selectively identify immune-priming compounds. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of three diuretics, bumetanide, bendroflumethiazide and clopamide, as immune-priming compounds. These drugs upregulate the immunity-related cell death of Arabidopsis suspension-cultured cells induced with an avirulent strain of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato in a concentration-dependent manner. The application of these compounds to Arabidopsis plants confers disease resistance to not only the avirulent but also a virulent strain of the pathogen. Unlike salicylic acid, an endogenous phytohormone that governs disease resistance in response to biotrophic pathogens, the three diuretic compounds analyzed here do not induce PR1 or inhibit plant growth, showing potential as lead compounds in a practical application.

  16. Diuretics Prime Plant Immunity in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noutoshi, Yoshiteru; Ikeda, Mika; Shirasu, Ken

    2012-01-01

    Plant activators are agrochemicals that activate the plant immune system, thereby enhancing disease resistance. Due to their prophylactic and durable effects on a wide spectrum of diseases, plant activators can provide synergistic crop protection when used in combination with traditional pest controls. Although plant activators have achieved great success in wet-rice farming practices in Asia, their use is still limited. To isolate novel plant activators applicable to other crops, we screened a chemical library using a method that can selectively identify immune-priming compounds. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of three diuretics, bumetanide, bendroflumethiazide and clopamide, as immune-priming compounds. These drugs upregulate the immunity-related cell death of Arabidopsis suspension-cultured cells induced with an avirulent strain of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato in a concentration-dependent manner. The application of these compounds to Arabidopsis plants confers disease resistance to not only the avirulent but also a virulent strain of the pathogen. Unlike salicylic acid, an endogenous phytohormone that governs disease resistance in response to biotrophic pathogens, the three diuretic compounds analyzed here do not induce PR1 or inhibit plant growth, showing potential as lead compounds in a practical application. PMID:23144763

  17. Application of Immune Algorithm to Evaluation of Soil Resource Quality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Hai-Dong; HU Yue-Ming; DENG Fei-Qi; CHEN Fei-Xiang; WANG Fei

    2005-01-01

    Based on the geographic information system (GIS) technology, ArcInfo software was adopted to collect, process and analyze spatial data of Guangdong Province for an evaluation of soil resource quality. The overlay analysis method was used in combining evaluation factors of Guangdong soil resource quality to determine the evaluation units. Because of its favorable convergent speed and its ability to search solutions, the immune algorithm was applied to the soil resource quality evaluation model. At the same time, the evaluation results of this newly proposed method were compared to two other methods: sum of index and fuzzy synthetic. The results indicated that the immune algorithm reflected the actual condition of soil resource quality more exactly.

  18. IMMUNOLOGICAL PROCESSES IN CANCER: A LINK BETWEEN INFLAMMATION AND IMMUNITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Jacob Victorino

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a worldwide issue and one of the most relevant death causes in child and adults. There are several causes that can lead to cancer development. It is well known that inflammation is one known hallmark of cancer and it favors tumor cells growth. Several alterations in immunological and inflammatory processes are caused in response to tumor presence and both innate and adaptive immunity have effective mechanism to destroy tumor cells. Nevertheless, distinct tumor types developed mechanisms to evade anti-tumor immunological responses. Here, we revise researches regarding inflammation and immune response during cancer development, as well as cancer signaling pathways and immunotherapy that have been performed in Brazil. The better understanding of the mechanisms regarding cancer and immunological processes is of huge importance and it may support the development of new cancer targets.

  19. Plant LysM proteins: modules mediating symbiosis and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gust, Andrea A; Willmann, Roland; Desaki, Yoshitake; Grabherr, Heini M; Nürnberger, Thorsten

    2012-08-01

    Microbial glycans, such as bacterial peptidoglycans, fungal chitin or rhizobacterial Nod factors (NFs), are important signatures for plant immune activation or for the establishment of beneficial symbioses. Plant lysin motif (LysM) domain proteins serve as modules mediating recognition of these different N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc)-containing ligands, suggesting that this class of proteins evolved from an ancient sensor for GlcNAc. During early plant evolution, these glycans probably served as immunogenic patterns activating LysM protein receptor-mediated plant immunity and stopping microbial infection. The biochemical potential of plant LysM proteins for sensing microbial GlcNAc-containing glycans has probably since favored the evolution of receptors facilitating microbial infection and symbiosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Chemokines and immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomino, Diana Carolina Torres; Marti, Luciana Cavalheiro

    2015-01-01

    Chemokines are a large family of small cytokines and generally have low molecular weight ranging from 7 to 15kDa. Chemokines and their receptors are able to control the migration and residence of all immune cells. Some chemokines are considered pro-inflammatory, and their release can be induced during an immune response at a site of infection, while others are considered homeostatic and are involved in controlling of cells migration during tissue development or maintenance. The physiologic importance of this family of mediators is resulting from their specificity − members of the chemokine family induce recruitment of well-defined leukocyte subsets. There are two major chemokine sub-families based upon cysteine residues position: CXC and CC. As a general rule, members of the CXC chemokines are chemotactic for neutrophils, and CC chemokines are chemotactic for monocytes and sub-set of lymphocytes, although there are some exceptions. This review discusses the potential role of chemokines in inflammation focusing on the two best-characterized chemokines: monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, a CC chemokine, and interleukin-8, a member of the CXC chemokine sub-family. PMID:26466066

  1. Immune Aspects of Female Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Brazdova

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Immune infertility, in terms of reproductive failure, has become a serious health issue involving approximately 1 out of 5 couples at reproductive age. Semen that is defined as a complex fluid containing sperm, cellular vesicles and other cells and components, could sensitize the female genital tract. The immune rejection of male semen in the female reproductive tract is explained as the failure of natural tolerance leading to local and/or systemic immune response. Present active immune mechanism may induce high levels of anti-seminal/sperm antibodies. It has already been proven that iso-immunization is associated with infertility. Comprehensive studies with regards to the identification of antibody-targets and the determination of specific antibody class contribute to the development of effective immuno-therapy and, on the other hand, potential immuno-contraception, and then of course to complex patient diagnosis. This review summarizes the aspects of female immune infertility.

  2. The Effect of "In Favor of Myself": Preventive Program to Enhance Positive Self and Body Image among Adolescents: e78223

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moria Golan; Noaa Hagay; Snait Tamir

    2013-01-01

    .... This study examined the effect of an interactive, community-based, media literacy and dissonance wellness program, In Favor of Myself, on the self-image, body image, eating attitudes and behavior of young adolescents...

  3. The effect of "in favor of myself": preventive program to enhance positive self and body image among adolescents

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Golan, Moria; Hagay, Noaa; Tamir, Snait

    2013-01-01

    .... This study examined the effect of an interactive, community-based, media literacy and dissonance wellness program, In Favor of Myself, on the self-image, body image, eating attitudes and behavior of young adolescents...

  4. Fruit polyphenols, immunity and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Gallego, Javier; García-Mediavilla, M Victoria; Sánchez-Campos, Sonia; Tuñón, María J

    2010-10-01

    Flavonoids are a large class of naturally occurring compounds widely present in fruits, vegetables and beverages derived from plants. These molecules have been reported to possess a wide range of activities in the prevention of common diseases, including CHD, cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, gastrointestinal disorders and others. The effects appear to be related to the various biological/pharmacological activities of flavonoids. A large number of publications suggest immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties of these compounds. However, almost all studies are in vitro studies with limited research on animal models and scarce data from human studies. The majority of in vitro research has been carried out with single flavonoids, generally aglycones, at rather supraphysiological concentrations. Few studies have investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of physiologically attainable flavonoid concentrations in healthy subjects, and more epidemiological studies and prospective randomised trials are still required. This review summarises evidence for the effects of fruit and tea flavonoids and their metabolites in inflammation and immunity. Mechanisms of effect are discussed, including those on enzyme function and regulation of gene and protein expression. Animal work is included, and evidence from epidemiological studies and human intervention trials is reviewed. Biological relevance and functional benefits of the reported effects, such as resistance to infection or exercise performance, are also discussed.

  5. Fluorescent Pseudomonas Strains with only Few Plant-Beneficial Properties Are Favored in the Maize Rhizosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacheron, Jordan; Moënne-Loccoz, Yvan; Dubost, Audrey; Gonçalves-Martins, Maximilien; Muller, Daniel; Prigent-Combaret, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR) enhance plant health and growth using a variety of traits. Effective PGPR strains typically exhibit multiple plant-beneficial properties, but whether they are better adapted to the rhizosphere than PGPR strains with fewer plant-beneficial properties is unknown. Here, we tested the hypothesis that strains with higher numbers of plant-beneficial properties would be preferentially selected by plant roots. To this end, the co-occurrence of 18 properties involved in enhanced plant nutrition, plant hormone modulation, or pathogen inhibition was analyzed by molecular and biochemical methods in a collection of maize rhizosphere and bulk soil isolates of fluorescent Pseudomonas. Twelve plant-beneficial properties were found among the 698 isolates. Contrarily to expectation, maize preferentially selected pseudomonads with low numbers of plant-beneficial properties (up to five). This selection was not due to the predominance of strains with specific assortments of these properties, or with specific taxonomic status. Therefore, the occurrence of only few plant-beneficial properties appeared favorable for root colonization by pseudomonads. PMID:27610110

  6. Favorable prognostic influence of T-box transcription factor Eomesodermin in metastatic renal cell cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dielmann, Anastasia; Letsch, Anne; Nonnenmacher, Anika; Miller, Kurt; Keilholz, Ulrich; Busse, Antonia

    2016-02-01

    T-box transcription factors, T-box expressed in T cells (T-bet) encoded by Tbx21 and Eomesodermin (Eomes), drive the differentiation of effector/memory T cell lineages and NK cells. The aim of the study was to determine the prognostic influence of the expression of these transcription factors in peripheral blood (pB) in a cohort of 41 metastatic (m) RCC patients before receiving sorafenib treatment and to analyze their association with the immunophenotype in pB. In contrast to Tbx21, in the multivariate analysis including clinical features, Eomes mRNA expression was identified as an independent good prognostic factor for progression-free survival (PFS, p = 0.042) and overall survival (OS, p = 0.001) in addition to a favorable ECOG performance status (p = 0.01 and p = 0.008, respectively). Eomes expression correlated positively not only with expression of Tbx21 and TGFβ1 mRNA, but also with mRNA expression of the activation marker ICOS, and with in vivo activated HLA-DR(+) T cells. Eomes expression was negatively associated with TNFα-producing T cells. On protein level, Eomes was mainly expressed by CD56(+)CD3(-) NK cells in pB. In conclusion, we identified a higher Eomes mRNA expression as an independent good prognostic factor for OS and PFS in mRCC patients treated with sorafenib.

  7. Experimental Evolution Reveals Favored Adaptive Routes to Cell Aggregation in Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, Elyse A; Amorosi, Clara J; Miller, Aaron W; Dang, Kolena; Heil, Caiti Smukowski; Dunham, Maitreya J

    2017-06-01

    Yeast flocculation is a community-building cell aggregation trait that is an important mechanism of stress resistance and a useful phenotype for brewers; however, it is also a nuisance in many industrial processes, in clinical settings, and in the laboratory. Chemostat-based evolution experiments are impaired by inadvertent selection for aggregation, which we observe in 35% of populations. These populations provide a testing ground for understanding the breadth of genetic mechanisms Saccharomyces cerevisiae uses to flocculate, and which of those mechanisms provide the biggest adaptive advantages. In this study, we employed experimental evolution as a tool to ask whether one or many routes to flocculation are favored, and to engineer a strain with reduced flocculation potential. Using a combination of whole genome sequencing and bulk segregant analysis, we identified causal mutations in 23 independent clones that had evolved cell aggregation during hundreds of generations of chemostat growth. In 12 of those clones, we identified a transposable element insertion in the promoter region of known flocculation gene FLO1, and, in an additional five clones, we recovered loss-of-function mutations in transcriptional repressor TUP1, which regulates FLO1 and other related genes. Other causal mutations were found in genes that have not been previously connected to flocculation. Evolving a flo1 deletion strain revealed that this single deletion reduces flocculation occurrences to 3%, and demonstrated the efficacy of using experimental evolution as a tool to identify and eliminate the primary adaptive routes for undesirable traits. Copyright © 2017 Hope et al.

  8. Social heuristics and social roles: Intuition favors altruism for women but not for men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, David G; Brescoll, Victoria L; Everett, Jim A C; Capraro, Valerio; Barcelo, Hélène

    2016-04-01

    Are humans intuitively altruistic, or does altruism require self-control? A theory of social heuristics, whereby intuitive responses favor typically successful behaviors, suggests that the answer may depend on who you are. In particular, evidence suggests that women are expected to behave altruistically, and are punished for failing to be altruistic, to a much greater extent than men. Thus, women (but not men) may internalize altruism as their intuitive response. Indeed, a meta-analysis of 13 new experiments and 9 experiments from other groups found that promoting intuition relative to deliberation increased giving in a Dictator Game among women, but not among men (Study 1, N = 4,366). Furthermore, this effect was shown to be moderated by explicit sex role identification (Study 2, N = 1,831): the more women described themselves using traditionally masculine attributes (e.g., dominance, independence) relative to traditionally feminine attributes (e.g., warmth, tenderness), the more deliberation reduced their altruism. Our findings shed light on the connection between gender and altruism, and highlight the importance of social heuristics in human prosociality.

  9. Genotypic diversity effects on the performance of Taraxacum officinale populations increase with time and environmental favorability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily B M Drummond

    Full Text Available Within-population genetic diversity influences many ecological processes, but few studies have examined how environmental conditions may impact these short-term diversity effects. Over four growing seasons, we followed experimental populations of a clonal, ubiquitous weed, Taraxacum officinale, with different numbers of genotypes in relatively favorable fallow field and unfavorable mowed lawn environmental treatments. Population performance (measured as total leaf area, seed production or biomass clearly and consistently increased with diversity, and this effect became stronger over the course of the experiment. Diversity effects were stronger, and with different underlying mechanisms, in the fallow field versus the mowed lawn. Large genotypes dominated in the fallow field driving overyielding (via positive selection effects, whereas in the mowed lawn, where performance was limited by regular disturbance, there was evidence for complementarity among genotypes (with one compact genotype in particular performing better in mixture than monoculture. Hence, we predict stronger genotypic diversity effects in environments where intense intraspecific competition enhances genotypic differences. Our four-year field experiment plus seedling establishment trials indicate that genotypic diversity effects have far-reaching and context-dependent consequences across generations.

  10. FLARE STARS—A FAVORABLE OBJECT FOR STUDYING MECHANISMS OF NONTHERMAL ASTROPHYSICAL PHENOMENA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oks, E. [Physics Department, 206 Allison Lab., Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849 (United States); Gershberg, R. E. [Crimean Astrophysical Observatory, Nauchny, Bakhchisaray region, Crimea, 298409 (Russian Federation)

    2016-03-01

    We present a spectroscopic method for diagnosing a low-frequency electrostatic plasma turbulence (LEPT) in plasmas of flare stars. This method had been previously developed by one of us and successfully applied to diagnosing the LEPT in solar flares. In distinction to our previous applications of the method, here we use the latest advances in the theory of the Stark broadening of hydrogen spectral lines. By analyzing observed emission Balmer lines, we show that it is very likely that the LEPT was developed in several flares of AD Leo, as well as in one flare of EV Lac. We found the LEPT (though of different field strengths) both in the explosive/impulsive phase and at the phase of the maximum, as well as at the gradual phase of the stellar flares. While for solar flares our method allows diagnosing the LEPT only in the most powerful flares, for the flare stars it seems that the method allows revealing the LEPT practically in every flare. It should be important to obtain new and better spectrograms of stellar flares, allowing their analysis by the method outlined in the present paper. This can be the most favorable way to the detailed understanding of the nature of nonthermal astrophysical phenomena.

  11. Anthropogenic N deposition slows decay by favoring bacterial metabolism: Insights from metagenomic analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary B. Freedman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Litter decomposition is an enzymatically-complex process that is mediated by a diverse assemblage of saprophytic microorganisms. It is a globally important biogeochemical process that can be suppressed by anthropogenic N deposition. In a northern hardwood forest ecosystem located in Michigan, USA, 20 years of experimentally increased atmospheric N deposition has reduced forest floor decay and increased soil C storage. Here, we paired extracellular enzyme assays with shotgun metagenomics to assess if anthropogenic N deposition has altered the functional potential of microbial communities inhabiting decaying forest floor. Experimental N deposition significantly reduced the activity of extracellular enzymes mediating plant cell wall decay, which occurred concurrently with changes in the relative abundance of metagenomic functional gene pathways mediating the metabolism of carbohydrates, aromatic compounds, as well as microbial respiration. Moreover, experimental N deposition increased the relative abundance of 50 of the 60 gene pathways, the majority of which were associated with saprotrophic bacteria. Conversely, the relative abundance and composition of fungal genes mediating the metabolism of plant litter was not affected by experimental N deposition. Future rates of atmospheric N deposition have favored saprotrophic soil bacteria, whereas the metabolic potential of saprotrophic fungi appears resilient to this agent of environmental change. Results presented here provide evidence that changes in the functional capacity of saprotrophic soil microorganisms mediate how anthropogenic N deposition increases C storage in soil.

  12. Intragenomic conflict produces sex ratio dynamics that favor maternal sex ratio distorters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rood, Elaine S; Freedberg, Steven

    2016-11-01

    Maternal sex ratio distorters (MSDs) are selfish elements that enhance their transmission by biasing their host's sex allocation in favor of females. While previous models have predicted that the female-biased populations resulting from sex ratio distortion can benefit from enhanced productivity, these models neglect Fisherian selection for nuclear suppressors, an unrealistic assumption in most systems. We used individual-based computer simulation modeling to explore the intragenomic conflict between sex ratio distorters and their suppressors and explored the impacts of these dynamics on population-level competition between species characterized by MSDs and those lacking them. The conflict between distorters and suppressors was capable of producing large cyclical fluctuations in the population sex ratio and reproductive rate. Despite fitness costs associated with the distorters and suppressors, MSD populations often exhibited enhanced productivity and outcompeted non-MSD populations in single and multiple-population competition simulations. Notably, the conflict itself is beneficial to the success of populations, as sex ratio oscillations limit the competitive deficits associated with prolonged periods of male rarity. Although intragenomic conflict has been historically viewed as deleterious to populations, our results suggest that distorter-suppressor conflict can provide population-level advantages, potentially helping to explain the persistence of sex ratio distorters in a range of taxa.

  13. The cohesion stabilizer sororin favors DNA repair and chromosome segregation during mouse oocyte meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chun-Jie; Yuan, Yi-Feng; Wu, Di; Khan, Faheem Ahmed; Jiao, Xiao-Fei; Huo, Li-Jun

    2017-03-01

    Maintenance and timely termination of cohesion on chromosomes ensures accurate chromosome segregation to guard against aneuploidy in mammalian oocytes and subsequent chromosomally abnormal pregnancies. Sororin, a cohesion stabilizer whose relevance in antagonizing the anti-cohesive property of Wings-apart like protein (Wapl), has been characterized in mitosis; however, the role of Sororin remains unclear during mammalian oocyte meiosis. Here, we show that Sororin is required for DNA damage repair and cohesion maintenance on chromosomes, and consequently, for mouse oocyte meiotic program. Sororin is constantly expressed throughout meiosis and accumulates on chromatins at germinal vesicle (GV) stage/G2 phase. It localizes onto centromeres from germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) to metaphase II stage. Inactivation of Sororin compromises the GVBD and first polar body extrusion (PBE). Furthermore, Sororin inactivation induces DNA damage indicated by positive γH2AX foci in GV oocytes and precocious chromatin segregation in MII oocytes. Finally, our data indicate that PlK1 and MPF dissociate Sororin from chromosome arms without affecting its centromeric localization. Our results define Sororin as a determinant during mouse oocyte meiotic maturation by favoring DNA damage repair and chromosome separation, and thereby, maintaining the genome stability and generating haploid gametes.

  14. The multiscale factors favorable for a persistent heavy rain event over Hainan Island in October 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huijie; Sun, Jianhua; Zhao, Sixiong; Wei, Jie

    2016-06-01

    A case study is presented of the multiscale characteristics that produced the record-breaking persistent heavy rainfall event (PHRE) over Hainan Island, northern South China Sea (SCS), in autumn 2010. The study documents several key weather systems, from planetary scale to mesoscale, that contributed to the extreme rainfall during this event. The main findings of this study are as follows. First, the convectively active phase of the MJO was favorable for the establishment of a cyclonic circulation and the northward expansion of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). The active disturbances in the northward ITCZ helped direct abundant moisture from adjacent oceans towards Hainan Island continuously throughout the event, where it interacted with cold air from the midlatitudes and caused heavy rain. Second, the 8-day-long PHRE can be divided into three processes according to different synoptic systems: peripheral cloud clusters of a tropical depression-type disturbance over the central SCS in process 1; interactions between the abnormally far north ITCZ and the invading cold air in process 2; and the newly formed tropical depression near Hainan Island in process 3. In the relatively stable synoptic background of each process, meso- α- and meso- β-scale cloud clusters repeatedly traveled along the same path to Hainan Island. Finally, based on these analyses, a conceptual model is proposed for this type of PHRE in autumn over the northern SCS, which demonstrates the influences of multiscale systems.

  15. Evaluation of Anteroposterior Lip Positions in the Most-Favored Iranian Facial Profiles Using Silhouette

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darab Gholami Borujeni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: One of the most important goals of orthodontic treatment is to create an esthetic, well balanced facial profile. However, the components of a well-balanced Iranian facial profile have not yet been established. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the anteroposterior lip position of the Iranian population and to compare the perception of orthodontists, dental students and orthodontic patients using a series of silhouettes with varying anteroposterior lip positions.Materials and Methods: Average female and male silhouette profiles were constructed from the profiles of 30 Iranian men and women with a normal skeletal relationship. The lips in each average profile were protruded or retruded in 2-mm increments and the 7 images were arranged randomly. Thirty orthodontists, 30 dental students and 30 orthodontic patients were asked to score each silhouette from 1 (very bad to 5 (very good.Results: Both the orthodontists and the students preferred the average profile for men and slightly more retruded lip position for women. Orthodontic patients had a wide range of preference for men and selected more retruded lip positions for women. The least-favored profile was the most protrusive in the 3 groups.Conclusion: These findings suggest that Iranian orthodontists, dental students and orthodontic patients prefer an average profile for men and slightly retruded profiles for women.

  16. Using data from colloid transport experiments to parameterize filtration model parameters for favorable conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamai, Tamir; Nassar, Mohamed K.; Nelson, Kirk E.; Ginn, Timothy R.

    2017-04-01

    Colloid filtration in porous media spans across many disciplines and includes scenarios such as in-situ bioremediation, colloid-facilitated transport, water treatment of suspended particles and pathogenic bacteria, and transport of natural and engineered nanoparticles in the environment. Transport and deposition of colloid particles in porous media are determined by a combination of complex processes and forces. Given the convoluted physical, chemical, and biological processes involved, and the complexity of porous media in natural settings, it should not come as surprise that colloid filtration theory does not always sufficiently predict colloidal transport, and that there is still a pressing need for improved predictive capabilities. Here, instead of developing the macroscopic equation from pore-scale models, we parametrize the different terms in the macroscopic collection equation through fitting it to experimental data, by optimizing the parameters in the different terms of the equation. This way we combine a mechanistically-based filtration-equation with empirical evidence. The impact of different properties of colloids and porous media are studied by comparing experimental properties with different terms of the correlation equation. This comparison enables insight about different processes that occur during colloid transport and retention under in porous media under favorable conditions, and provides directions for future theoretical developments.

  17. Local skull trephination before transfer is associated with favorable outcomes in cerebral herniation from epidural hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, James A

    2011-01-01

    The patient with epidural hematoma and cerebral herniation has a good prognosis with immediate drainage, but a poor prognosis with delay to decompression. Such patients who present to nonneurosurgical hospitals are commonly transferred without drainage to the nearest neurosurgical center. This practice has never been demonstrated to be the safest approach to treating these patients. A significant minority of emergency physicians (EPs) have advised and taught bedside burr hole drainage or skull trephination before transfer for herniating patients. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of nonneurosurgeon drainage on neurologic outcome in patients with cerebral herniation from epidural hematoma. A structured literature review was performed using EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and the Emergency Medicine Abstracts database. No evidence meeting methodologic criteria was found describing outcomes in patients transferred without decompressive procedures. For patients receiving local drainage before transfer, 100% had favorable outcomes. Although the total number of patients is small and the population highly selected, the natural history of cerebral herniation from epidural hematoma and the best available evidence suggests that herniating patients have improved outcomes with drainage procedures before transport. © 2010 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  18. An electron-accepting molecular unit exhibiting an orientational preference favorable for organic photovoltaic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akaike, Kouki, E-mail: kakaike@physik.hu-berlin.de [RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Ando, Shinji; Enozawa, Hideo [RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Kosaka, Atsuko; Kajitani, Takashi [RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Chemical Resources Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8503 (Japan); Fukushima, Takanori, E-mail: fukushima@res.titech.ac.jp [RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Chemical Resources Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8503 (Japan)

    2015-05-29

    Control of molecular orientation of organic semiconductor is essential for efficient light absorption and charge-carrier transport in organic optoelectronic devices. We synthesized compound 1 as a fundamental electron-accepting building block for the design of n-type semiconductors and conducting polymers. We found that this molecule, upon evaporation onto a substrate such as SiO{sub 2} and electron-donor films, spontaneously assembles with a face-on orientation relative to the substrate surface. This orientation is favorable for thin-film organic photovoltaics. Despite relatively small π-conjugation, 1 showed strong absorption in visible-light region and an appropriate lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy for electron transfer with electron donors including copper phthalocyanine and poly(3-hexylthiophene). Accordingly, thin-film devices, fabricated using 1 and electron donors, exhibited a clear photovoltaic response. This suggests that compound 1 provides a promising building block for the development of active materials in organic photovoltaics. - Highlights: • An electron acceptor (1) featuring an indacenetetraone core was designed. • Acceptor 1 exhibits strong electronic absorption in visible-light region. • Acceptor 1 spontaneously adopts face-on orientation on SiO{sub 2} and organic substrates. • Thin film of 1 shows an n-type semiconducting property. • Electron donor/1 bilayer films display a clear photovoltaic response.

  19. Genotypic diversity effects on the performance of Taraxacum officinale populations increase with time and environmental favorability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Emily B M; Vellend, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Within-population genetic diversity influences many ecological processes, but few studies have examined how environmental conditions may impact these short-term diversity effects. Over four growing seasons, we followed experimental populations of a clonal, ubiquitous weed, Taraxacum officinale, with different numbers of genotypes in relatively favorable fallow field and unfavorable mowed lawn environmental treatments. Population performance (measured as total leaf area, seed production or biomass) clearly and consistently increased with diversity, and this effect became stronger over the course of the experiment. Diversity effects were stronger, and with different underlying mechanisms, in the fallow field versus the mowed lawn. Large genotypes dominated in the fallow field driving overyielding (via positive selection effects), whereas in the mowed lawn, where performance was limited by regular disturbance, there was evidence for complementarity among genotypes (with one compact genotype in particular performing better in mixture than monoculture). Hence, we predict stronger genotypic diversity effects in environments where intense intraspecific competition enhances genotypic differences. Our four-year field experiment plus seedling establishment trials indicate that genotypic diversity effects have far-reaching and context-dependent consequences across generations.

  20. Fluorescent Pseudomonas strains with only few plant-beneficial properties are favored in the maize rhizosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan VACHERON

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR enhance plant health and growth using a variety of traits. Effective PGPR strains typically exhibit multiple plant-beneficial properties, but whether they are better adapted to the rhizosphere than PGPR strains with fewer plant-beneficial properties is unknown. Here, we tested the hypothesis that strains with higher numbers of plant-beneficial properties would be preferentially selected by plant roots. To this end, the co-occurrence of 18 properties involved in enhanced plant nutrition, plant hormone modulation, or pathogen inhibition was analyzed by molecular and biochemical methods in a collection of maize rhizosphere and bulk soil isolates of fluorescent Pseudomonas. Twelve plant-beneficial properties were found among the 698 isolates. Contrarily to expectation, maize preferentially selected pseudomonads with low numbers of plant-beneficial properties (up to five. This selection was not due to the predominance of strains with specific assortments of these properties, or with specific taxonomic status. Therefore, the occurrence of only few plant-beneficial properties appeared favorable for root colonization by pseudomonads.