WorldWideScience

Sample records for reported detection limit

  1. Detecting Ebola with limited laboratory access in the Democratic Republic of Congo: evaluation of a clinical passive surveillance reporting system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashbaugh, Hayley R; Kuang, Brandon; Gadoth, Adva; Alfonso, Vivian H; Mukadi, Patrick; Doshi, Reena H; Hoff, Nicole A; Sinai, Cyrus; Mossoko, Mathias; Kebela, Benoit Ilunga; Muyembe, Jean-Jacques; Wemakoy, Emile Okitolonda; Rimoin, Anne W

    2017-09-01

    Ebola virus disease (EVD) can be clinically severe and highly fatal, making surveillance efforts for early disease detection of paramount importance. In areas with limited access to laboratory testing, the Integrated Disease Surveillance and Response (IDSR) strategy in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) may be a vital tool in improving outbreak response. Using DRC IDSR data from the nation's four EVD outbreak periods from 2007-2014, we assessed trends of Viral Hemorrhagic Fever (VHF) and EVD differential diagnoses reportable through IDSR. With official case counts from active surveillance of EVD outbreaks, we assessed accuracy of reporting through the IDSR passive surveillance system. Although the active and passive surveillance represent distinct sets of data, the two were correlated, suggesting that passive surveillance based only on clinical evaluation may be a useful predictor of true cases prior to laboratory confirmation. There were 438 suspect VHF cases reported through the IDSR system and 416 EVD cases officially recorded across the outbreaks examined. Although collected prior to official active surveillance cases, case reporting through the IDSR during the 2007, 2008 and 2012 outbreaks coincided with official EVD epidemic curves. Additionally, all outbreak areas experienced increases in suspected cases for both malaria and typhoid fever during EVD outbreaks, underscoring the importance of training health care workers in recognising EVD differential diagnoses and the potential for co-morbidities. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. A socio-psychological investigation into limitations and incentives concerning reporting a clinically suspect situation aimed at improving early detection of classical swine fever outbreaks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elbers, A.R.W.; Gorgievski-Duijvesteijn, M.J.; Velden, P.G.; Loeffen, W.L.A.; Zarafshani, K.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify limitations and incentives in reporting clinically suspect situations, possibly caused by classical swine fever (CSF), to veterinary authorities with the ultimate aim to facilitate early detection of CSF outbreaks. Focus group sessions were held with policy make

  3. A socio-psychological investigation into limitations and incentives concerning reporting a clinically suspect situation aimed at improving early detection of classical swine fever outbreaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbers, A R W; Gorgievski-Duijvesteijn, M J; van der Velden, P G; Loeffen, W L A; Zarafshani, K

    2010-04-21

    The aim of this study was to identify limitations and incentives in reporting clinically suspect situations, possibly caused by classical swine fever (CSF), to veterinary authorities with the ultimate aim to facilitate early detection of CSF outbreaks. Focus group sessions were held with policy makers from the veterinary authorities, and representatives of veterinary practitioners and pig farmer unions. Personal interviews with a small group of pig farmers and practitioners were held to check limitations raised and solutions proposed during the focus group sessions. An electronic questionnaire was mailed to pig farmers and practitioners to investigate perceptions and attitudes with respect to clinically suspect situations possibly caused by CSF. After triangulating the responses of veterinary authorities, veterinary practitioners and farmers, six themes emerged across all groups: (1) lack of knowledge on the early signs of CSF; (2) guilt, shame and prejudice; (3) negative opinion on control measures; (4) dissatisfaction with post-reporting procedures; (5) lack of trust in government bodies; (6) uncertainty and lack of transparency of reporting procedures. The following solutions to facilitate early detection of CSF were put forward: (a) development of a clinical decision-support system for vets and farmers, in order to get faster diagnosis and detection of CSF; (b) possibility to submit blood samples directly to the reference laboratory to exclude CSF in a clinical situation with non-specific clinical signs, without isolation of the farm and free of charge for the individual farmer; (c) decrease social and economic consequences of reporting CSF, for example by improving the public opinion on first reports; (d) better schooling of veterinary officers to deal with emotions and insecurity of farmers in the process after reporting; (e) better communication of rules and regulations, where to report, what will happen next; (f) up-to-date website with information and

  4. Material limitations on the detection limit in refractometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skafte-Pedersen, Peder; Nunes, Pedro S; Xiao, Sanshui; Mortensen, Niels Asger

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the detection limit for refractometric sensors relying on high-Q optical cavities and show that the ultimate classical detection limit is given by min {Δn} ≳ η, with n + iη being the complex refractive index of the material under refractometric investigation. Taking finite Q factors and filling fractions into account, the detection limit declines. As an example we discuss the fundamental limits of silicon-based high-Q resonators, such as photonic crystal resonators, for sensing in a bio-liquid environment, such as a water buffer. In the transparency window (λ ≳ 1100 nm) of silicon the detection limit becomes almost independent on the filling fraction, while in the visible, the detection limit depends strongly on the filling fraction because the silicon absorbs strongly.

  5. Material Limitations on the Detection Limit in Refractometry

    CERN Document Server

    Skafte-Pedersen, Peder; Xiao, Sanshui; Mortensen, Niels Asger; 10.3390/s91108382

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the detection limit for refractometric sensors relying on high-Q optical cavities and show that the ultimate classical detection limit is given by min{Dn} > eta with n+i*eta being the complex refractive index of the material under refractometric investigation. Taking finite Q factors and filling fractions into account, the detection limit declines. As an example we discuss the fundamental limits of silicon-based high-Q resonators, such as photonic crystal resonators, for sensing in a bio-liquid environment, such as a water buffer. In the transparency window of silicon the detection limit becomes almost independent on the filling fraction, while in the visible, the detection limit depends strongly on the filling fraction because silicon absorbs strongly.

  6. Material Limitations on the Detection Limit in Refractometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Asger Mortensen

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the detection limit for refractometric sensors relying on high-Q optical cavities and show that the ultimate classical detection limit is given by min {Δn} ≳ η with n + iη being the complex refractive index of the material under refractometric investigation. Taking finite Q factors and filling fractions into account, the detection limit declines. As an example we discuss the fundamental limits of silicon-based high-Q resonators, such as photonic crystal resonators, for sensing in a bio-liquid environment, such as a water buffer. In the transparency window (λ ≳ 1100 nm of silicon the detection limit becomes almost independent on the filling fraction, while in the visible, the detection limit depends strongly on the filling fraction because the silicon absorbs strongly.

  7. Material limitations on the detection limit in refractometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skafte-Pedersen, Peder; Nunes, Pedro; Xiao, Sanshui

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the detection limit for refractometric sensors relying on high-Q optical cavities and show that the ultimate classical detection limit is given by min {Δn} ≳ η with n + iη being the complex refractive index of the material under refractometric investigation. Taking finite Q factors...... and filling fractions into account, the detection limit declines. As an example we discuss the fundamental limits of silicon-based high-Q resonators, such as photonic crystal resonators, for sensing in a bio-liquid environment, such as a water buffer. In the transparency window (λ ≳ 1100 nm) of silicon...... the detection limit becomes almost independent on the filling fraction, while in the visible, the detection limit depends strongly on the filling fraction because the silicon absorbs strongly....

  8. Material Limitations on the Detection Limit in Refractometry

    OpenAIRE

    Niels Asger Mortensen; Sanshui Xiao; Peder Skafte-Pedersen; Nunes, Pedro S.

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the detection limit for refractometric sensors relying on high-Q optical cavities and show that the ultimate classical detection limit is given by min {Δn} ≳ η, with n + iη being the complex refractive index of the material under refractometric investigation. Taking finite Q factors and filling fractions into account, the detection limit declines. As an example we discuss the fundamental limits of silicon-based high-Q resonators, such as photonic crystal resonators, for sensing in ...

  9. DISCUSSION ON DECISION LIMIT AND DETECTION LIMIT IN SPECTROSCOPY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑仁圻; 余君岳; 等

    1995-01-01

    Based on fundamental arguments,the expressions for the decision limit and the detection limit both in the count domain and in the cout rate domain are derive4d.These expressions are found to be different from those shown in the existing literature.

  10. Controlled Limiter in the Synchronous Detection Circuit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yauheni Bialetski

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This variant of construction of the electrical circuit is aimed at reducing the effects of impulse noise. The measuring channels of the primary transducers are subject to interference of various types. In the case of a small ratio between a useful signal and noise level, synchronous detection is used. Impulse noise leaves a big mark even after using synchronous detection. To improve the performance of such measuring devices, it is proposed to use a controlled amplitude limiter at the input. Comparative analysis of solutions with controlled limiters is carried out in the article and conditions for its optimal operation are determined.

  11. Quantum limited heterodyne detection of spin noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronenberger, S.; Scalbert, D.

    2016-09-01

    Spin noise spectroscopy is a powerful technique for studying spin relaxation in semiconductors. In this article, we propose an extension of this technique based on optical heterodyne detection of spin noise, which provides several key advantages compared to conventional spin noise spectroscopy: detection of high frequency spin noise not limited by detector bandwidth or sampling rates of digitizers, quantum limited sensitivity even in case of very weak probe power, and possible amplification of the spin noise signal. Heterodyne detection of spin noise is demonstrated on insulating n-doped GaAs. From measurements of spin noise spectra up to 0.4 Tesla, we determined the distribution of g-factors, Δg/g = 0.49%.

  12. Limits of detection and decision. Part 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voigtman, E. [Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts-Amherst, 710 N. Pleasant St., Amherst, MA 01003-9336 (United States)], E-mail: voigtman@chem.umass.edu

    2008-02-15

    It has been shown that the MARLAP (Multi-Agency Radiological Laboratory Analytical Protocols) for estimating the Currie detection limit, which is based on 'critical values of the non-centrality parameter of the non-central t distribution', is intrinsically biased, even if no calibration curve or regression is used. This completed the refutation of the method, begun in Part 2. With the field cleared of obstructions, the true theory underlying Currie's limits of decision, detection and quantification, as they apply in a simple linear chemical measurement system (CMS) having heteroscedastic, Gaussian measurement noise and using weighted least squares (WLS) processing, was then derived. Extensive Monte Carlo simulations were performed, on 900 million independent calibration curves, for linear, 'hockey stick' and quadratic noise precision models (NPMs). With errorless NPM parameters, all the simulation results were found to be in excellent agreement with the derived theoretical expressions. Even with as much as 30% noise on all of the relevant NPM parameters, the worst absolute errors in rates of false positives and false negatives, was only 0.3%.

  13. Optimal Watermark Embedding and Detection Strategies Under Limited Detection Resources

    CERN Document Server

    Merhav, Neri

    2007-01-01

    An information-theoretic approach is proposed to watermark embedding and detection under limited detector resources. First, we consider the attack-free scenario under which asymptotically optimal decision regions in the Neyman-Pearson sense are proposed, along with the optimal embedding rule. Later, we explore the case of zero-mean i.i.d. Gaussian covertext distribution with unknown variance under the attack-free scenario. For this case, we propose a lower bound on the exponential decay rate of the false-negative probability and prove that the optimal embedding and detecting strategy is superior to the customary linear, additive embedding strategy in the exponential sense. Finally, these results are extended to the case of memoryless attacks and general worst case attacks. Optimal decision regions and embedding rules are offered, and the worst attack channel is identified.

  14. Local resolution-limit-free Potts model for community detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronhovde, Peter; Nussinov, Zohar

    2010-04-01

    We report on an exceptionally accurate spin-glass-type Potts model for community detection. With a simple algorithm, we find that our approach is at least as accurate as the best currently available algorithms and robust to the effects of noise. It is also competitive with the best currently available algorithms in terms of speed and size of solvable systems. We find that the computational demand often exhibits superlinear scaling O(L1.3) where L is the number of edges in the system, and we have applied the algorithm to synthetic systems as large as 40 x 10(6) nodes and over 1 x 10(9) edges. A previous stumbling block encountered by popular community detection methods is the so-called "resolution limit." Being a "local" measure of community structure, our Potts model is free from this resolution-limit effect, and it further remains a local measure on weighted and directed graphs. We also address the mitigation of resolution-limit effects for two other popular Potts models.

  15. Determination of detection limits for a VPD ICPMS method of analysis; Determination des limites de detection d'une methode d'analyse VPD ICPMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badard, M.; Veillerot, M

    2007-07-01

    This training course report presents the different methods of detection and quantifying of metallic impurities in semiconductors. One of the most precise technique is the collection of metal impurities by vapor phase decomposition (VPD) followed by their analysis by ICPMS (inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry). The study shows the importance of detection limits in the domain of chemical analysis and the way to determine them for the ICPMS analysis. The results found on detection limits are excellent. Even if the detection limits reached with ICPMS performed after manual or automatic VPD are much higher than detection limits of ICPMS alone, this method remains one of the most sensible for ultra-traces analysis. (J.S.)

  16. Shot-noise limited detection sensitivity in multiplex CARS microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müller, M.; Schins, J.M.; Wurpel, G.W.H.

    2004-01-01

    In multiplex CARS microscopy the generated anti-Stokes signal is generated and detected simultaneously over a significant part of the vibrational spectrum. The signal-to-noise ratio of the thus detected spectra is limited only by shot-noise. This principle is demonstrated using a dilution series of

  17. Empirical Limits on Radial Velocity Planet Detection for Young Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Hillenbrand, Lynne; Marcy, Geoffrey; Barenfeld, Scott; Fischer, Debra; Howard, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    We report initial results from our long term search using precision radial velocities for planetary-mass companions located within a few AU of stars younger than the Sun. Based on a sample of >150 stars, we define a floor in the radial velocity scatter, sigma_RV, as a function of the chromospheric activity level R'_{HK}. This lower bound to the jitter, which increases with increasing stellar activity, sets the minimum planet mass that could be detected. Adopting a median activity-age relationship reveals the astrophysical limits to planet masses discernable via radial velocity monitoring, as a function of stellar age. Considering solar-mass primaries having the mean jitter-activity level, when they are younger than 100 / 300 / 1000 Myr, the stochastic jitter component in radial velocity measurements restricts detectable companion masses to > 0.3 / 0.2 / 0.1 M_Jupiter. These numbers require a large number -- several tens -- of radial velocity observations taken over a time frame longer than the orbital period....

  18. The limit of detection for explosives in spectroscopic differential reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubroca, Thierry; Vishwanathan, Karthik; Hummel, Rolf E.

    2011-05-01

    In the wake of recent terrorist attacks, such as the 2008 Mumbai hotel explosion or the December 25th 2009 "underwear bomber", our group has developed a technique (US patent #7368292) to apply differential reflection spectroscopy to detect traces of explosives. Briefly, light (200-500 nm) is shone on a surface such as a piece of luggage at an airport. Upon reflection, the light is collected with a spectrometer combined with a CCD camera. A computer processes the data and produces in turn a differential reflection spectrum involving two adjacent areas of the surface. This differential technique is highly sensitive and provides spectroscopic data of explosives. As an example, 2,4,6, trinitrotoluene (TNT) displays strong and distinct features in differential reflectograms near 420 nm. Similar, but distinctly different features are observed for other explosives. One of the most important criteria for explosive detection techniques is the limit of detection. This limit is defined as the amount of explosive material necessary to produce a signal to noise ratio of three. We present here, a method to evaluate the limit of detection of our technique. Finally, we present our sample preparation method and experimental set-up specifically developed to measure the limit of detection for our technology. This results in a limit ranging from 100 nano-grams to 50 micro-grams depending on the method and the set-up parameters used, such as the detector-sample distance.

  19. Fundamental statistical limitations of future dark matter direct detection experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strege, C.; Trotta, F.; Bertone, G.; Peter, A.H.G.; Scott, P.

    2012-01-01

    We discuss irreducible statistical limitations of future ton-scale dark matter direct detection experiments. We focus in particular on the coverage of confidence intervals, which quantifies the reliability of the statistical method used to reconstruct the dark matter parameters and the bias of the r

  20. No evidence for an item limit in change detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaiyan Keshvari

    Full Text Available Change detection is a classic paradigm that has been used for decades to argue that working memory can hold no more than a fixed number of items ("item-limit models". Recent findings force us to consider the alternative view that working memory is limited by the precision in stimulus encoding, with mean precision decreasing with increasing set size ("continuous-resource models". Most previous studies that used the change detection paradigm have ignored effects of limited encoding precision by using highly discriminable stimuli and only large changes. We conducted two change detection experiments (orientation and color in which change magnitudes were drawn from a wide range, including small changes. In a rigorous comparison of five models, we found no evidence of an item limit. Instead, human change detection performance was best explained by a continuous-resource model in which encoding precision is variable across items and trials even at a given set size. This model accounts for comparison errors in a principled, probabilistic manner. Our findings sharply challenge the theoretical basis for most neural studies of working memory capacity.

  1. Final report, Feedback limitations of photosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharkey, Thomas D.

    1999-07-22

    Final report of research on carbon metabolism of photosynthesis. The feedback from carbon metabolism to primary photosynthetic processes is summarized, and a comprehensive list of published scientific papers is provided.

  2. Approaching the Heisenberg Limit without Single-Particle Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Emily; Bentsen, Gregory; Schleier-Smith, Monika

    2016-02-05

    We propose an approach to quantum phase estimation that can attain precision near the Heisenberg limit without requiring single-particle-resolved state detection. We show that the "one-axis twisting" interaction, well known for generating spin squeezing in atomic ensembles, can also amplify the output signal of an entanglement-enhanced interferometer to facilitate readout. Applying this interaction-based readout to oversqueezed, non-Gaussian states yields a Heisenberg scaling in phase sensitivity, which persists in the presence of detection noise as large as the quantum projection noise of an unentangled ensemble. Even in dissipative implementations-e.g., employing light-mediated interactions in an optical cavity or Rydberg dressing-the method significantly relaxes the detection resolution required for spectroscopy beyond the standard quantum limit.

  3. Understanding Detection Limits in Fluid Inclusion Analysis Using an Incremental Crush Fast Scan Method for Planetary Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blamey, N. J. F.; Parnell, J.; Longerich, H. P.

    2012-03-01

    We propose formulae for the determination of the detection and reporting limits applied to fluid inclusion volatile analysis, adapted from LA-ICP-MS formulae, and applicable to samples of limited size that are available in planetary science studies.

  4. Detection limits in plasmonic whispering gallery mode biosensors

    CERN Document Server

    Swaim, Jon D; Bowen, Warwick P

    2011-01-01

    We analyze a whispering gallery mode biosensor with a metallic nanorod bound to its surface. It is found that a localized surface plasmon resonance in the nanorod can reduce the optical mode volume of the resonator by as much as four orders of magnitude via a local enhancement of the electric field, thus improving the detection sensitivity. Optical frequency shifts as large as 15 MHz are predicted for typical proteins and, for typical experimental parameters, the biosensor is predicted to be limited by laser frequency noise, leading to a minimum detectable polarizability on the order of 10 cubic angstroms.

  5. Electrostrictive limit and focusing effects in pulsed photoacoustic detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heritier, J.-M.

    1983-01-01

    We give an analytical solution in the time and frequency domain for the cylindrical pressure wave generated by a laser pulse traveling in a liquid, which is valid over a wide range of laser beam dimensions and pulse durations. This leads to a simple prediction of the ultimate limitation set by the electrostrictive coupling and an easy analysis of the focusing effects on the photoacoustic signal. Two separate detection schemes were considered and show different behavior.

  6. Limitations of Colposcopy in Early Invasive Cervical Cancer Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Grubišić, Goran

    2007-01-01

    Colposcopy is a key element in the diagnostic chain required to reduce cervical cancer mortality but it has limitations in the diagnosis of malignant disease. In the Republic of Croatia the Croatian Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology started constructing guidelines for early detection, therapy and follow-up of patients with early invasive cervical cancer in order to achieve the best possible results in diagnosis, therapy and follow-up. From 2001 to 2006 Croatian society ...

  7. Strategies for low detection limit measurements with cyclic voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemann, D J; Kawagoe, K T; Kennedy, R T; Ciolkowski, E L; Wightman, R M

    1991-12-15

    Cyclic voltammetry of Nafion-coated, carbon-fiber electrodes is used to detect trace concentrations of dopamine, both in a flow injection apparatus and in the brain of an anaesthetized rat. To improve signal-to-noise ratios, the sources of noise during cyclic voltammetry have been determined and strategies have been developed to decrease the noise. With the potentiostat employed, the measured noise is comparable to that expected for Johnson noise from the feedback resistor of the current transducer. Additional noise arises from the waveform generator employed and, in some cases, line noise. Line noise is discriminated against by starting each cyclic voltammogram either in phase or 180 degrees out of phase with the line frequency. When used in vivo, additional noise also arises from the physiological activity of the animal. Detection limits are found to closely correspond to those predicted on the basis of simulation of the voltammetric shape and the measured noise. Detection limits are improved by the use of appropriate analog and digital filtering, ensemble averaging, and appropriate timing of repetitive cyclic voltammograms. The combined use of these techniques enables the in vivo detection of approximately 100 nM of dopamine with a signal-to-noise ratio of 25.

  8. Stochastic fluctuations and the detectability limit of network communities

    CERN Document Server

    Lucio, Floretta; Alessandro, Flammini; Paolo, De Los Rios

    2013-01-01

    We have analyzed the detectability limits of network communities in the framework of the popular Girvan and Newman benchmark. By carefully taking into account the inevitable stochastic fluctuations that affect the construction of each and every instance of the benchmark, we come to the conclusions that the native, putative partition of the network is completely lost even before the in-degree/out-degree ratio becomes equal to the one of a structure-less Erd\\"os-R\\'enyi network. We develop a simple iterative scheme, analytically well described by an infinite branching-process, to provide an estimate of the true detectability limit. Using various algorithms based on modularity optimization, we show that all of them behave (semi-quantitatively) in the same way, with the same functional form of the detectability threshold as a function of the network parameters. Because the same behavior has also been found by further modularity-optimization methods and for methods based on different heuristics implementations, we...

  9. A mathematical model to detect inspiratory flow limitation during sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Khaled F; Rowley, James A; Meshenish, A A; Shkoukani, Mahdi A; Badr, M Safwan

    2002-09-01

    The physiological significance of inspiratory flow limitation (IFL) has recently been recognized, but methods of detecting IFL can be subjective. We sought to develop a mathematical model of the upper airway pressure-flow relationship that would objectively detect flow limitation. We present a theoretical discussion that predicts that a polynomial function [F(P) = AP(3) + BP(2) + CP + D, where F(P) is flow and P is supraglottic pressure] best characterizes the pressure-flow relationship and allows for the objective detection of IFL. In protocol 1, step 1, we performed curve-fitting of the pressure-flow relationship of 20 breaths to 5 mathematical functions and found that highest correlation coefficients (R(2)) for quadratic (0.88 +/- 0.10) and polynomial (0.91 +/- 0.05; P polynomial functions and found that the error fit was lowest for the polynomial function (3.3 +/- 0.06 vs. 21.1 +/- 19.0%; P 99% for each). We conclude that a polynomial function can be used to predict the relationship between pressure and flow in the upper airway and objectively determine the presence of IFL.

  10. Weighted Polynomial Approximation for Automated Detection of Inspiratory Flow Limitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Cheng Huang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Inspiratory flow limitation (IFL is a critical symptom of sleep breathing disorders. A characteristic flattened flow-time curve indicates the presence of highest resistance flow limitation. This study involved investigating a real-time algorithm for detecting IFL during sleep. Three categories of inspiratory flow shape were collected from previous studies for use as a development set. Of these, 16 cases were labeled as non-IFL and 78 as IFL which were further categorized into minor level (20 cases and severe level (58 cases of obstruction. In this study, algorithms using polynomial functions were proposed for extracting the features of IFL. Methods using first- to third-order polynomial approximations were applied to calculate the fitting curve to obtain the mean absolute error. The proposed algorithm is described by the weighted third-order (w.3rd-order polynomial function. For validation, a total of 1,093 inspiratory breaths were acquired as a test set. The accuracy levels of the classifications produced by the presented feature detection methods were analyzed, and the performance levels were compared using a misclassification cobweb. According to the results, the algorithm using the w.3rd-order polynomial approximation achieved an accuracy of 94.14% for IFL classification. We concluded that this algorithm achieved effective automatic IFL detection during sleep.

  11. Weighted Polynomial Approximation for Automated Detection of Inspiratory Flow Limitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sheng-Cheng; Jan, Hao-Yu; Fu, Tieh-Cheng; Lin, Wen-Chen; Lin, Geng-Hong; Lin, Wen-Chi; Tsai, Cheng-Lun; Lin, Kang-Ping

    2017-01-01

    Inspiratory flow limitation (IFL) is a critical symptom of sleep breathing disorders. A characteristic flattened flow-time curve indicates the presence of highest resistance flow limitation. This study involved investigating a real-time algorithm for detecting IFL during sleep. Three categories of inspiratory flow shape were collected from previous studies for use as a development set. Of these, 16 cases were labeled as non-IFL and 78 as IFL which were further categorized into minor level (20 cases) and severe level (58 cases) of obstruction. In this study, algorithms using polynomial functions were proposed for extracting the features of IFL. Methods using first- to third-order polynomial approximations were applied to calculate the fitting curve to obtain the mean absolute error. The proposed algorithm is described by the weighted third-order (w.3rd-order) polynomial function. For validation, a total of 1,093 inspiratory breaths were acquired as a test set. The accuracy levels of the classifications produced by the presented feature detection methods were analyzed, and the performance levels were compared using a misclassification cobweb. According to the results, the algorithm using the w.3rd-order polynomial approximation achieved an accuracy of 94.14% for IFL classification. We concluded that this algorithm achieved effective automatic IFL detection during sleep.

  12. Detection limit for rate fluctuations in inhomogeneous Poisson processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shintani, Toshiaki; Shinomoto, Shigeru

    2012-04-01

    Estimations of an underlying rate from data points are inevitably disturbed by the irregular occurrence of events. Proper estimation methods are designed to avoid overfitting by discounting the irregular occurrence of data, and to determine a constant rate from irregular data derived from a constant probability distribution. However, it can occur that rapid or small fluctuations in the underlying density are undetectable when the data are sparse. For an estimation method, the maximum degree of undetectable rate fluctuations is uniquely determined as a phase transition, when considering an infinitely long series of events drawn from a fluctuating density. In this study, we analytically examine an optimized histogram and a Bayesian rate estimator with respect to their detectability of rate fluctuation, and determine whether their detectable-undetectable phase transition points are given by an identical formula defining a degree of fluctuation in an underlying rate. In addition, we numerically examine the variational Bayes hidden Markov model in its detectability of rate fluctuation, and determine whether the numerically obtained transition point is comparable to those of the other two methods. Such consistency among these three principled methods suggests the presence of a theoretical limit for detecting rate fluctuations.

  13. Limitations of Aneuploidy and Anomaly Detection in the Obese Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Zozzaro-Smith

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a worldwide epidemic and can have a profound effect on pregnancy risks. Obese patients tend to be older and are at increased risk for structural fetal anomalies and aneuploidy, making screening options critically important for these women. Failure rates for first-trimester nuchal translucency (NT screening increase with obesity, while the ability to detect soft-markers declines, limiting ultrasound-based screening options. Obesity also decreases the chances of completing the anatomy survey and increases the residual risk of undetected anomalies. Additionally, non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT is less likely to provide an informative result in obese patients. Understanding the limitations and diagnostic accuracy of aneuploidy and anomaly screening in obese patients can help guide clinicians in counseling patients on the screening options.

  14. Application of Statistical Methods to Activation Analytical Results near the Limit of Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydorn, Kaj; Wanscher, B.

    1978-01-01

    Reporting actual numbers instead of upper limits for analytical results at or below the detection limit may produce reliable data when these numbers are subjected to appropriate statistical processing. Particularly in radiometric methods, such as activation analysis, where individual standard...... deviations of analytical results may be estimated, improved discrimination may be based on the Analysis of Precision. Actual experimental results from a study of the concentrations of arsenic in human skin demonstrate the power of this principle....

  15. Evaluation of probe chemistries and platforms to improve the detection limit of real-time PCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reynisson, E.; Josefsen, Mathilde Hartmann; Krause, Michael

    2006-01-01

    A validated PCR-based Salmonella method targeting a 94-bp sequence of the ttr gene was used as a model to compare six different combinations of reporter and quencher dyes of a TaqMan probe, on three different instruments, to improve the detection limit in a real-time PCR assay with the aim of a s...

  16. Double-well atom trap for fluorescence detection at the Heisenberg limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroescu, Ion; Hume, David B.; Oberthaler, Markus K.

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate an atom number detector capable of simultaneous detection of two mesoscopic ensembles with single-atom resolution. Such a sensitivity is a prerequisite for quantum metrology at a precision approaching the Heisenberg limit. Our system is based on fluorescence detection of atoms in a hybrid trap in which a dipole barrier divides a magneto-optical trap into two separated wells. We introduce a noise model describing the various sources contributing to the measurement error and report a limit of up to 500 atoms for single-atom resolution in the atom number difference.

  17. Limitations and obstacles of the spontaneous adverse drugs reactions reporting: Two "challenging" case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Palleria

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nowadays, based on several epidemiological data, iatrogenic disease is an emerging public health problem, especially in industrialized countries. Adverse drugs reactions (ADRs are extremely common and, therefore, clinically, socially, and economically worthy of attention. Spontaneous reporting system for suspected ADRs represents the cornerstone of the pharmacovigilance, because it allows rapid detection of potential alarm signals related to drugs use. However, spontaneous reporting system shows several limitations, which are mainly related to under-reporting. In this paper, we describe two particular case reports, which emphasize some reasons of under-reporting and other common criticisms of spontaneous reporting systems. Materials and Methods: We performed a computer-aided search of Medline, PubMed, Embase, Cochrane library databases, national and international databases of suspected ADRs reports in order to identify previous published case reports and spontaneous reports about the ADRs reviewed in this paper, and to examine the role of suspected drugs in the pathogenesis of the described adverse reactions. Results: First, we reported a case of tizanidine-induced hemorrhagic cystitis. In the second case report, we presented an episode of asthma exacerbation after taking bimatoprost. Through the review of these two cases, we highlighted some common criticisms of spontaneous reporting systems: under-reporting and false causality attribution. Discussion and Conclusion: Healthcare workers sometimes do not report ADRs because it is challenging to establish with certainty the causal relationship between drug and adverse reaction; however, according to a key principle of pharmacovigilance, it is always better to report even a suspicion to generate an alarm in the interest of protecting public health.

  18. Uranium Detection - Technique Validation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colletti, Lisa Michelle [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Chemistry Division; Garduno, Katherine [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Chemistry Division; Lujan, Elmer J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Chemistry Division; Mechler-Hickson, Alexandra Marie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Chemistry Division; Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); May, Iain [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Chemistry Division; Reilly, Sean Douglas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Chemistry Division

    2016-04-14

    As a LANL activity for DOE/NNSA in support of SHINE Medical Technologies™ ‘Accelerator Technology’ we have been investigating the application of UV-vis spectroscopy for uranium analysis in solution. While the technique has been developed specifically for sulfate solutions, the proposed SHINE target solutions, it can be adapted to a range of different solution matrixes. The FY15 work scope incorporated technical development that would improve accuracy, specificity, linearity & range, precision & ruggedness, and comparative analysis. Significant progress was achieved throughout FY 15 addressing these technical challenges, as is summarized in this report. In addition, comparative analysis of unknown samples using the Davies-Gray titration technique highlighted the importance of controlling temperature during analysis (impacting both technique accuracy and linearity/range). To fully understand the impact of temperature, additional experimentation and data analyses were performed during FY16. The results from this FY15/FY16 work were presented in a detailed presentation, LA-UR-16-21310, and an update of this presentation is included with this short report summarizing the key findings. The technique is based on analysis of the most intense U(VI) absorbance band in the visible region of the uranium spectra in 1 M H2SO4, at λmax = 419.5 nm.

  19. Fundamental limits of target detection performance in passive polarization imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudail, François; Boffety, Matthieu

    2017-04-01

    We quantitatively determine the target detection performance of different passive polarization imaging architectures perturbed by signal-independent detection noise or signal-dependent Poisson shot noise. We compare the fully adaptive polarimetric imager and the best channel of a static polarimetric imager, and in each case, we compare the use of a polarizer and a polarizing beam splitter as the polarization analyzing device. For all these configurations, we derive a closed-form expression of the target/background separability and quantify the performance gain brought by polarization imaging compared to standard intensity imaging. We show in particular that all the considered polarimetric imaging configurations but one require a minimum value of the polarimetric contrast in order to outperform intensity imaging. The only configuration that always performs better than intensity imaging uses a polarizing beam splitter in the presence of background shot noise. These results are useful in evaluating the fundamental limits of the gain brought by polarization imaging and determining, in practice, which type of imaging architecture is preferable for a given application.

  20. PCR detection of aflatoxin producing fungi and its limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Robert E

    2012-05-01

    Unlike bacterial toxins that are primarily peptides and are therefore encoded by a single gene, fungal toxins such as the aflatoxins are multi-ring structures and therefore require a sequence of structural genes for their biological synthesis. There is therefore no specific PCR for any one of the four biologically produced aflatoxins. Unfortunately, the structural genes presently in use for PCR detection of aflatoxin producing fungi are also involved in the synthesis of other fungal toxins such as sterigmatocystin by Aspergillus versicolor and Aspergillus nidulans and therefore lack absolute specificity for aflatoxin producing fungi (Table 1). In addition, the genomic presence of several structural genes involved in aflatoxin biosynthesis does not guarantee the production of aflatoxin by all isolates of Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus. The most widely used DNA target regions for discriminating Aspergillus species are those of the rDNA complex, mainly the internal transcribed spacer regions 1 and 2 (ITS1 and ITS2) and the variable regions in the 5'-end of the 28S rRNA gene. Since these sequence regions are unrelated to the structural genes involved in aflatoxin biosynthesis there successful amplification can be used for species identification but do not confirm aflatoxin production. This review therefore presents the various approaches and limitations in the use of the PCR in attempting to detect aflatoxin producing fungi.

  1. Theoretical limits on detection and analysis of small earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatek, Grzegorz; Ben-Zion, Yehuda

    2016-08-01

    We investigate theoretical limits on detection and reliable estimates of source characteristics of small earthquakes using synthetic seismograms for shear/tensile dislocations on kinematic circular ruptures and observed seismic noise and properties of several acquisition systems (instrument response, sampling rate). Simulated source time functions for shear/tensile dislocation events with different magnitudes, static stress drops, and rupture velocities provide estimates for the amplitude and frequency content of P and S phases at various observation angles. The source time functions are convolved with a Green's function for a homogenous solid assuming given P, S wave velocities and attenuation coefficients and a given instrument response. The synthetic waveforms are superposed with average levels of the observed ambient seismic noise up to 1 kHz. The combined seismograms are used to calculate signal-to-noise ratios and expected frequency content of P and S phases at various locations. The synthetic simulations of signal-to-noise ratio reproduce observed ratios extracted from several well-recorded data sets. The results provide guidelines on detection of small events in various geological environments, along with information relevant to reliable analyses of earthquake source properties.

  2. Physiological techniques for detecting expiratory flow limitation during tidal breathing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.G. Koulouris

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD often exhale along the same flow–volume curve during quiet breathing as they do during the forced expiratory vital capacity manoeuvre, and this has been taken as an indicator of expiratory flow limitation at rest (EFLT. Therefore, EFLT, namely attainment of maximal expiratory flow during tidal expiration, occurs when an increase in transpulmonary pressure causes no increase in expiratory flow. EFLT leads to small airway injury and promotes dynamic pulmonary hyperinflation, with concurrent dyspnoea and exercise limitation. In fact, EFLT occurs commonly in COPD patients (mainly in Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease III and IV stage, in whom the latter symptoms are common, but is not exclusive to COPD, since it can also be detected in other pulmonary and nonpulmonary diseases like asthma, acute respiratory distress syndrome, heart failure and obesity, etc. The existing up to date physiological techniques of assessing EFLT are reviewed in the present work. Among the currently available techniques, the negative expiratory pressure has been validated in a wide variety of settings and disorders. Consequently, it should be regarded as a simple, noninvasive, practical and accurate new technique.

  3. Wave Detection Beyond the Standard Quantum Limit via EPR Entanglement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yiqiu; Miao, Haixing; Pang, Belinda; Evans, Matthew; Zhao, Chunnong; Harms, Jan; Schnabel, Roman; Chen, Yanbei

    2017-01-01

    The Standard Quantum Limit in continuous monitoring of a system is given by the trade-off of shot noise and back-action noise. In gravitational-wave detectors, such as Advanced LIGO, both contributions can simultaneously be squeezed in a broad frequency band by injecting a spectrum of squeezed vacuum states with a frequency-dependent squeeze angle. This approach requires setting up an additional long base-line, low-loss filter cavity in a vacuum system at the detector's site. Here, we show that the need for such a filter cavity can be eliminated, by exploiting EPR-entangled signal and idler beams. By harnessing their mutual quantum correlations and the difference in the way each beam propagates in the interferometer, we can engineer the input signal beam to have the appropriate frequency dependent conditional squeezing once the out-going idler beam is detected. Our proposal is appropriate for all future gravitational-wave detectors for achieving sensitivities beyond the Standard Quantum Limit.

  4. In-depth Evaluation of Content-Based Phishing Detection to Clarify Its Strengths and Limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komiyama, Koichiro; Seko, Toshinori; Ichinose, Yusuke; Kato, Kei; Kawano, Kohei; Yoshiura, Hiroshi

    Zhang et al. proposed a method for content-based phishing detection (CBD) and reported its high performance in detecting phishing sites written in English. However, the evaluations of the CBD method performed by Zhang et al. and others were small-scale and simply measured the detection and error rates, i.e, they did not analyze the causes of the detection errors. Moreover, the effectiveness of the CBD method with non-English sites, such as Japanese and Chinese language sites, has never been tested. This paper reports our in-depth evaluation and analysis of the CBD method using 843 actual phishing sites (including 475 English and 368 Japanese sites), and explains both the strengths of the CBD method and its limitations. Our work provides a base for using the CBD method in the real world.

  5. Arms Limitation and Disarmament: Seventeenth Strategy for Peace Conference Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley Foundation, Muscatine, IA.

    The report discusses issues relating to arms limitation and disarmament. Leaders in U. S. government, professionals from a wide spectrum of disciplines, and other international statesmen participated in the conference in an attempt to define a more enlightened foreign policy. Six major topics were discussed. The first report considered five…

  6. Automated weed detection in the field - possibilities and limits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pflanz, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV have become omnipresent and adequate tools to generate high-resolution spatial data of agricultural cropland. Their implementation into remote sensing approaches of weeds provides suitable applications for a site-specific herbicide management. In general, an increasingly use of innovative technologies gradually leads from agricultural research into the practical application. This requires an evaluation of possibilities and limits of UAV-based remote sensing procedures. While spectrals from UAVs are being used already for mapping needs of nutrient or water, the image supported weed detection is much more complex and at the moment not relevant in practice. In this regard, there is a lack of weed and crop differentiation through spectral analyses and object-based approaches separate different plants not species-specific or are not adapted to morphologic changes of the growth. Moreover, there is a need for alternative positioning techniques without GPS, as it is required for a precise optical imaging analysis at low altitudes. To evaluate the possibilities and limitations of automated weed identification regarding the optical and sampling requirements, flights were carried out with a hexacopter at an altitude of 5 m over agricultural crop land with variable weed patches. The altitude was controlled by the GPS-autopilot. Images were captured at geo-referenced points and the number of different weed species was simultaneously determined by manually counting. The required optical resolution on the ground was estimated by comparing the number of weeds between image analysis on the PC and with the field rating data.

  7. Current limitations and challenges in nanowaste detection, characterisation and monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Part, Florian; Zecha, Gudrun [Department of Water-Atmosphere-Environment, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Institute of Waste Management, Muthgasse 107, 1190 Vienna (Austria); Causon, Tim [Department of Chemistry, Division of Analytical Chemistry, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Muthgasse 18, 1190 Vienna (Austria); Sinner, Eva-Kathrin [Department of Nanobiotechnology, Institute for Synthetic Bioarchitectures, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Muthgasse 11/II, 1190 Vienna (Austria); Huber-Humer, Marion, E-mail: marion.huber-humer@boku.ac.at [Department of Water-Atmosphere-Environment, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Institute of Waste Management, Muthgasse 107, 1190 Vienna (Austria)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • First review on detection of nanomaterials in complex waste samples. • Focus on nanoparticles in solid, liquid and gaseous waste samples. • Summary of current applicable methods for nanowaste detection and characterisation. • Limitations and challenges of characterisation of nanoparticles in waste. - Abstract: Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) are already extensively used in diverse consumer products. Along the life cycle of a nano-enabled product, ENMs can be released and subsequently accumulate in the environment. Material flow models also indicate that a variety of ENMs may accumulate in waste streams. Therefore, a new type of waste, so-called nanowaste, is generated when end-of-life ENMs and nano-enabled products are disposed of. In terms of the precautionary principle, environmental monitoring of end-of-life ENMs is crucial to allow assessment of the potential impact of nanowaste on our ecosystem. Trace analysis and quantification of nanoparticulate species is very challenging because of the variety of ENM types that are used in products and low concentrations of nanowaste expected in complex environmental media. In the framework of this paper, challenges in nanowaste characterisation and appropriate analytical techniques which can be applied to nanowaste analysis are summarised. Recent case studies focussing on the characterisation of ENMs in waste streams are discussed. Most studies aim to investigate the fate of nanowaste during incineration, particularly considering aerosol measurements; whereas, detailed studies focusing on the potential release of nanowaste during waste recycling processes are currently not available. In terms of suitable analytical methods, separation techniques coupled to spectrometry-based methods are promising tools to detect nanowaste and determine particle size distribution in liquid waste samples. Standardised leaching protocols can be applied to generate soluble fractions stemming from solid wastes, while

  8. Estimation of the limit of detection using information theory measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonollosa, Jordi; Vergara, Alexander; Huerta, Ramón; Marco, Santiago

    2014-01-31

    Definitions of the limit of detection (LOD) based on the probability of false positive and/or false negative errors have been proposed over the past years. Although such definitions are straightforward and valid for any kind of analytical system, proposed methodologies to estimate the LOD are usually simplified to signals with Gaussian noise. Additionally, there is a general misconception that two systems with the same LOD provide the same amount of information on the source regardless of the prior probability of presenting a blank/analyte sample. Based upon an analogy between an analytical system and a binary communication channel, in this paper we show that the amount of information that can be extracted from an analytical system depends on the probability of presenting the two different possible states. We propose a new definition of LOD utilizing information theory tools that deals with noise of any kind and allows the introduction of prior knowledge easily. Unlike most traditional LOD estimation approaches, the proposed definition is based on the amount of information that the chemical instrumentation system provides on the chemical information source. Our findings indicate that the benchmark of analytical systems based on the ability to provide information about the presence/absence of the analyte (our proposed approach) is a more general and proper framework, while converging to the usual values when dealing with Gaussian noise.

  9. Detection of bacteria with bioluminescent reporter bacteriophage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klumpp, Jochen; Loessner, Martin J

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that exclusively infect bacteria. They are ideally suited for the development of highly specific diagnostic assay systems. Bioluminescent reporter bacteriophages are designed and constructed by integration of a luciferase gene in the virus genome. Relying on the host specificity of the phage, the system enables rapid, sensitive, and specific detection of bacterial pathogens. A bioluminescent reporter phage assay is superior to any other molecular detection method, because gene expression and light emission are dependent on an active metabolism of the bacterial cell, and only viable cells will yield a signal. In this chapter we introduce the concept of creating reporter phages, discuss their advantages and disadvantages, and illustrate the advances made in developing such systems for different Gram-negative and Gram-positive pathogens. The application of bioluminescent reporter phages for the detection of foodborne pathogens is emphasized.

  10. A double-well atom trap for fluorescence detection at the Heisenberg limit

    CERN Document Server

    Stroescu, Ion; Oberthaler, Markus K

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate an atom number detector capable of simultaneous detection of two mesoscopic ensembles with single atom resolution. Such a sensitivity is a prerequisite for going beyond quantum metrology with spin-squeezed states. Our system is based on fluorescence detection of atoms in a novel hybrid trap in which a dipole barrier divides a magneto-optical trap into two separated wells. We introduce a noise model describing the various sources contributing to the measurement error and report a limit of up to 500 atoms for the exact determination of the atom number difference.

  11. Sensitivity and detection limit of dual-waveguide coupled microring resonator biosensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhixuan Xia; Huaxiang Yi; Yao Chen; Zhiping Zhou

    2009-01-01

    We show that a linear relation exists between the device sensitivity and the quality (Q) factor of a dual-waveguide coupled microring resonator optical biosensor when the optimal conditions are satisfied. We also show that the detection limit depends on the loss coefficient and signal-to-nosie ratio (SNR) of the overall system, rather than the circumference of the ring. For a microring resonator sensor whose Q factor is 20000, the detection limit is found to be about 10-7 with 30-dB SNR, which is in good agreement with reported experimental data. These results indicate that loss reduction is the top priority in the design and fabrication of highly sensitive microring resonator optical biosensors.

  12. SPA enhanced FPIA-based detection of pesticide residue with ppb/ppt level detection limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korrapati, Swathi; Pullela, Phani Kumar; Vijayalakshmi, Uthirapathy

    2017-02-01

    Pesticide residue in fruits & vegetables is one of the key issues affecting the export of rural products in India. Pesticide exposure or intake causes major nervous system problems in children. The solutions to quantitate them in field are rare and the pesticide residue detection in the parts per billion (ppb) ranges is challenging. Except ELISA, none of the existing methods can detect pesticide residues in ppb range in the field. We employed a new approach of concentrating field samples and used sodium polyacrylate (SPA) as water absorbing material. The SPA beads concentrate the field samples and obtained a sub ppb range detection using an existing FPIA system and could improve overall sensitivity by 10-100 fold. The developed assay can be done in few seconds. We have used three pesticides 2,4-D, atrazine and methyl parathion with 0.1, 0.5 and 3 ppb detection limit respectively. We developed a simple field ready FPIA device and used sodium poly acrylate (SPA) in this biochemical FPIA to enhance sensitivity. Our tests with spiked field samples offers a possibility of using SPA concentration assisted FPIA in field. This study will have far reaching applications of both qualitative & quantitative analysis chemical analytes in field samples.

  13. Detection of Forward Flight Limitations of Unmanned Helicopters

    OpenAIRE

    Voigt, Andreas; Dauer, Johann; Krenik, Alex; Dittrich, Jörg Steffen

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a method is proposed to determine the flight envelope limitations for steady forward flight with the purpose of performing a flight envelope expansion. First, the rotary wing system is analyzed. In this paper, an intermeshing rotor configuration, a SwissDrones Dragon 50, is used to demonstrate the approach. Next, relevant limitations of the forward flight are reviewed and analyzed with the help of the Helicopter Overall Simulation Tool (HOST). From this analysis, relevant measu...

  14. Community detection in weighted brain connectivity networks beyond the resolution limit

    CERN Document Server

    Nicolini, Carlo; Bifone, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Graph theory provides a powerful framework to investigate brain functional connectivity networks and their modular organization. However, most graph-based methods suffer from a fundamental resolution limit that may have affected previous studies and prevented detection of modules, or communities, that are smaller than a specific scale. Surprise, a resolution-limit-free function rooted in discrete probability theory, has been recently introduced and applied to brain networks, revealing a wide size-distribution of functional modules, in contrast with many previous reports. However, the use of Surprise is limited to binary networks, while brain networks are intrinsically weighted, reflecting a continuous distribution of connectivity strengths between different brain regions. Here, we propose Asymptotical Surprise, a continuous version of Surprise, for the study of weighted brain connectivity networks, and validate this approach in synthetic networks endowed with a ground-truth modular structure. We compare Asymp...

  15. RCRA materials analysis by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy: Detection limits in soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koskelo, A.; Cremers, D.A.

    1994-09-01

    The goal of the Technical Task Plan (TTP) that this report supports is research, development, testing and evaluation of a portable analyzer for RCRA and other metals. The instrumentation to be built will be used for field-screening of soils. Data quality is expected to be suitable for this purpose. The data presented in this report were acquired to demonstrate the detection limits for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) of soils using instrument parameters suitable for fieldable instrumentation. The data are not expected to be the best achievable with the high pulse energies available in laboratory lasers. The report presents work to date on the detection limits for several elements in soils using LIBS. The elements targeted in the Technical Task Plan are antimony, arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, lead, selenium, and zirconium. Data for these elements are presented in this report. Also included are other data of interest to potential customers for the portable LIBS apparatus. These data are for barium, mercury, cesium and strontium. Data for uranium and thorium will be acquired during the tasks geared toward mixed waste characterization.

  16. Exploring the limits of community detection strategies in complex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Aldecoa, Rodrigo

    2013-01-01

    The characterization of network community structure has profound implications in several scientific areas. Therefore, testing the algorithms developed to establish the optimal division of a network into communities is a fundamental problem in the field. We performed here a highly detailed evaluation of community detection algorithms, which has two main novelties: 1) using complex closed benchmarks, which provide precise ways to assess whether the solutions generated by the algorithms are optimal; and, 2) A novel type of analysis, based on hierarchically clustering the solutions suggested by multiple community detection algorithms, which allows to easily visualize how different are those solutions. Surprise, a global parameter that evaluates the quality of a partition, confirms the power of these analyses. We show that none of the community detection algorithms tested provide consistently optimal results in all networks and that Surprise maximization, obtained by combining multiple algorithms, obtains quasi-op...

  17. ROC-curve approach for determining the detection limit of a field chemical sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraga, Carlos G; Melville, Angela M; Wright, Bob W

    2007-03-01

    The detection limit of a field chemical sensor under realistic operating conditions is determined by receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves. The chemical sensor is an ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) device used to detect a chemical marker in diesel fuel. The detection limit is the lowest concentration of the marker in diesel fuel that obtains the desired true-positive probability (TPP) and false-positive probability (FPP). A TPP of 0.90 and a FPP of 0.10 were selected as acceptable levels for the field sensor in this study. The detection limit under realistic operating conditions is found to be between 2 to 4 ppm (w/w). The upper value is the detection limit under challenging conditions. The ROC-based detection limit is very reliable because it is determined from multiple and repetitive sensor analyses under realistic circumstances. ROC curves also clearly illustrate and gauge the effects data preprocessing and sampling environments have on the sensor's detection limit.

  18. DCE Bio Detection System Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lind, Michael A.; Batishko, Charles R.; Morgen, Gerald P.; Owsley, Stanley L.; Dunham, Glen C.; Warner, Marvin G.; Willett, Jesse A.

    2007-12-01

    The DCE (DNA Capture Element) Bio-Detection System (Biohound) was conceived, designed, built and tested by PNNL under a MIPR for the US Air Force under the technical direction of Dr. Johnathan Kiel and his team at Brooks City Base in San Antonio Texas. The project was directed toward building a measurement device to take advantage of a unique aptamer based assay developed by the Air Force for detecting biological agents. The assay uses narrow band quantum dots fluorophores, high efficiency fluorescence quenchers, magnetic micro-beads beads and selected aptamers to perform high specificity, high sensitivity detection of targeted biological materials in minutes. This final report summarizes and documents the final configuration of the system delivered to the Air Force in December 2008

  19. Technical Limitations in Detection of Gastroesophageal Reflux (GER) in Neonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fiore, Juliann M.; Arko, Marina; Churbock, Kim; Hibbs, Anna Maria; Martin, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Characterize the incidence and possible etiologies of acid reflux events detected by pH and not identified by intraluminal impedance (MII) monitoring. Methods Acid reflux events detected by pH but not identified by MII (pH-only) were documented in 80 preterm and 39 term infants. Reason for failure of MII to detect these events were classified as failure to meet MII scoring criteria, presence of an air bolus, technical artifact, and no change in impedance. Events with no change in impedance were stratified to; 1) low impedance throughout the study (possible esophageal inflammation), 2) transient decrease in pre-event impedance (presence of refluxate), 3) occurrence <30 seconds of a preceding event and 4) no explanation. Results 2572 events were detected by pH with 59% of events not identified by MII. A higher incidence of pH-only events occurred in preterm versus term infants (54±27% vs 42±23%, p=.025, respectively). Thirteen percent of pH-only events were missed due to MII scoring criteria, 12% due to technical artifact, 11% due to an air bolus and 64% had no change in impedance. Of the 978 events with no change in impedance 154 were associated with low impedance throughout the study, 430 with a transient decrease in pre-event impedance, and 175 were preceded by a reflux episode within 30sec. Conclusion There was a high incidence of acid reflux events detected by pH but not identified by MII. This occurred more often in the least mature infants and we speculate that delayed esophageal fluid clearance is the major underlying mechanism. PMID:19581816

  20. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited annual report 2000-2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This is the annual report of the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited for the year ending March 31, 2001 and summarizes the activities of AECL during the period 2000-2001. The activities covered in this report include the CANDU reactor business, with progress being reported in the construction of two CANDU 6 reactors for the Qinshan CANDU project in China, the anticipated completion of Cernavoda unit 2, the completion of spent fuel storage at Cernavoda unit 1 in Romania, as well as the service business with New Brunswick Power, Ontario Power Generation, Bruce Power and Hydro Quebec in the refurbishment of operating, CANDU reactors. In the R and D programs discussions continue on funding for the Canadian Neutron Facility for Materials Research (CNF) and progress on the Maple medical isotope reactor.

  1. Spectral characterization of hierarchical network modularity and limits of modularity detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somwrita Sarkar

    Full Text Available Many real world networks are reported to have hierarchically modular organization. However, there exists no algorithm-independent metric to characterize hierarchical modularity in a complex system. The main results of the paper are a set of methods to address this problem. First, classical results from random matrix theory are used to derive the spectrum of a typical stochastic block model hierarchical modular network form. Second, it is shown that hierarchical modularity can be fingerprinted using the spectrum of its largest eigenvalues and gaps between clusters of closely spaced eigenvalues that are well separated from the bulk distribution of eigenvalues around the origin. Third, some well-known results on fingerprinting non-hierarchical modularity in networks automatically follow as special cases, threreby unifying these previously fragmented results. Finally, using these spectral results, it is found that the limits of detection of modularity can be empirically established by studying the mean values of the largest eigenvalues and the limits of the bulk distribution of eigenvalues for an ensemble of networks. It is shown that even when modularity and hierarchical modularity are present in a weak form in the network, they are impossible to detect, because some of the leading eigenvalues fall within the bulk distribution. This provides a threshold for the detection of modularity. Eigenvalue distributions of some technological, social, and biological networks are studied, and the implications of detecting hierarchical modularity in real world networks are discussed.

  2. A point-of-care PCR test for HIV-1 detection in resource-limited settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jangam, Sujit R; Agarwal, Abhishek K; Sur, Kunal; Kelso, David M

    2013-04-15

    A low-cost, fully integrated sample-to-answer, quantitative PCR (qPCR) system that can be used for detection of HIV-1 proviral DNA in infants at the point-of-care in resource-limited settings has been developed and tested. The system is based on a novel DNA extraction method, which uses a glass fiber membrane, a disposable assay card that includes on-board reagent storage, provisions for thermal cycling and fluorescence detection, and a battery-operated portable analyzer. The system is capable of automated PCR mix assembly using a novel reagent delivery system and performing qPCR. HIV-1 and internal control targets are detected using two spectrally separated fluorophores, FAM and Quasar 670. In this report, a proof-of-concept of the platform is demonstrated. Initial results with whole blood demonstrate that the test is capable of detecting HIV-1 in blood samples containing greater than 5000 copies of HIV-1. In resource-limited settings, a point-of-care HIV-1 qPCR test would greatly increase the number of test results that reach the infants caregivers, allowing them to pursue anti-retroviral therapy.

  3. NADIR (Network Anomaly Detection and Intrusion Reporter): A prototype network intrusion detection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, K.A.; DuBois, D.H.; Stallings, C.A.

    1990-01-01

    The Network Anomaly Detection and Intrusion Reporter (NADIR) is an expert system which is intended to provide real-time security auditing for intrusion and misuse detection at Los Alamos National Laboratory's Integrated Computing Network (ICN). It is based on three basic assumptions: that statistical analysis of computer system and user activities may be used to characterize normal system and user behavior, and that given the resulting statistical profiles, behavior which deviates beyond certain bounds can be detected, that expert system techniques can be applied to security auditing and intrusion detection, and that successful intrusion detection may take place while monitoring a limited set of network activities such as user authentication and access control, file movement and storage, and job scheduling. NADIR has been developed to employ these basic concepts while monitoring the audited activities of more than 8000 ICN users.

  4. Limits of Precipitation Detection from Microwave Radiometers and Sounders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munchak, S. J.; Skofronick-Jackson, G.; Johnson, B. T.

    2012-04-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission will unify and draw from numerous microwave conical scanning imaging radiometers and cross-track sounders, many of which already in operation, to provide near real-time precipitation estimates worldwide at 3-hour intervals. Some of these instruments were designed for primary purposes unrelated to precipitation remote sensing. Therefore it is worthwhile to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of each set of channels with respect to precipitation detection to fully understand their role in the GPM constellation. The GPM radiometer algorithm will use an observationally-based Bayesian retrieval with common databases of precipitation profiles for all sensors. Since these databases are still under development and will not be truly complete until the GPM core satellite has completed at least one year of dual-frequency radar observations, a screening method based upon retrieval of non-precipitation parameters related to the surface and atmospheric state is used in this study. A cost function representing the departure of modeled radiances from their observed values plus the departure of surface and atmospheric parameters from the TELSEM emissivity atlas and MERRA reanalysis is used as an indicator of precipitation. Using this method, two datasets are used to evaluate precipitation detection: One year of matched AMSR-E and AMSU-B/MHS overpasses with CloudSat used as validation globally; and SSMIS overpasses over the United States using the National Mosaic and QPE (NMQ) as validation. The Heidke Skill Score (HSS) is used as a metric to evaluate detection skill over different surfaces, seasons, and across different sensors. Non-frozen oceans give the highest HSS for all sensors, followed by bare land and coasts, then snow-covered land and sea ice. Negligible skill is present over ice sheets. Sounders tend to have higher skill than imagers over complex surfaces (coast, snow, and sea ice), whereas imagers have higher skill

  5. METHODS OF DEALING WITH VALUES BELOW THE LIMIT OF DETECTION USING SAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Due to limitations of chemical analysis procedures, small concentrations cannot be precisely measured. These concentrations are said to be below the limit of detection (LOD). In statistical analyses, these values are often censored and substituted with a constant value, such ...

  6. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited annual report 1999-2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    This is the annual report of the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited for the year ending March 31, 2000, and summarizes the activities of AECL during the period 1999-2000. The activities covered in this report include the CANDU reactor business, with the completion of the Wolsong unit 4 in the Republic of Korea, progress in the construction of two CANDU reactors for the Qinshan CANDU project in China, as well as the service business with Ontario Power Generation in the rehabilitation and life extension of operating CANDU reactors. In the R and D programs there is on-going effort towards the next generation of reactor technologies for CANDU nuclear power plants, discussions continue on the funding for the Canadian Neutron Facility for materials research (CNF) and progress being made on the Maple medical isotope reactor.

  7. Quantum Limits of Interferometer Topologies for Gravitational Radiation Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Miao, Haixing; Adhikari, Rana X; Chen, Yanbei

    2013-01-01

    In order to expand the astrophysical reach of gravitational wave detectors, several interferometer topologies have been proposed to evade the thermodynamic and quantum mechanical limits in future detectors. In this work, we make a systematic comparison among them by considering their sensitivities and complexities. We numerically optimize their sensitivities by introducing a cost function that tries to maximize the broadband improvement over the sensitivity of current detectors. We find that frequency-dependent squeezed-light injection with a hundred-meter scale filter cavity yields a good broadband sensitivity, with low complexity, and good robustness against optical loss. This study gives us a guideline for the near-term experimental research programs in enhancing the performance of future gravitational-wave detectors.

  8. Effectiveness of hairpin probe in increasing the limit of detection for gold nanowire based-biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tien Cao, Huu; Pham, Xuan Thanh Tung; Linh Ha, Van; Hieu Le, Van

    2014-12-01

    Electrochemical DNA (E-DNA) sensors, which are rapid, reagentless and readily integrated into microelectronics and microfluidics, appear a promising alternative to optical methods for the detection of specific nucleic acid sequences. In keeping with this, a large number of distinct E-DNA architectures have been reported to date. Most, however, suffer from one or more drawbacks, including low signal gain, signal-off behavior or instability. To remedy these problems, we report here the development of a signal-on E-DNA architecture that achieves both high signal gain and good stability. This new sensor employs a commercially synthesized, asymmetric hairpin DNA as its recognition and signaling probe, the shorter arm of which is labeled with a redox reporting methylene blue at its free end. Unlike all prior E-DNA architectures, in which the recognition probe is attached via a terminal functional group to its underlying electrode, the probe employed here is affixed using a thiol group located internally, in the turn region of the hairpin. Hybridization of a target DNA to the longer arm of the hairpin displaces the shorter arm, allowing the reporter to approach the electrode surface and transfer electrons. The observed signal gain is sufficient to achieve a demonstrated detection limit of 25 pM.

  9. Detecting shifts in diversity limits from molecular phylogenies: what can we know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnes, Lynsey; Orme, C David L; Purvis, A

    2011-11-01

    Large complete species-level molecular phylogenies can provide the most direct information about the macroevolutionary history of clades having poor fossil records. However, extinction will ultimately erode evidence of pulses of rapid speciation in the deep past. Assessment of how well, and for how long, phylogenies retain the signature of such pulses has hitherto been based on a--probably untenable--model of ongoing diversity-independent diversification. Here, we develop two new tests for changes in diversification 'rules' and evaluate their power to detect sudden increases in equilibrium diversity in clades simulated with diversity-dependent speciation and extinction rates. Pulses of diversification are only detected easily if they occurred recently and if the rate of species turnover at equilibrium is low; rates reported for fossil mammals suggest that the power to detect a doubling of species diversity falls to 50 per cent after less than 50 Myr even with a perfect phylogeny of extant species. Extinction does eventually draw a veil over past dynamics, suggesting that some questions are beyond the limits of inference, but sudden clade-wide pulses of speciation can be detected after many millions of years, even when overall diversity is constrained. Applying our methods to existing phylogenies of mammals and angiosperms identifies intervals of elevated diversification in each.

  10. Qualitative Contrast between Knowledge-Limited Mixed-State and Variable-Resources Models of Visual Change Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosofsky, Robert M.; Donkin, Chris

    2016-01-01

    We report an experiment designed to provide a qualitative contrast between knowledge-limited versions of mixed-state and variable-resources (VR) models of visual change detection. The key data pattern is that observers often respond "same" on big-change trials, while simultaneously being able to discriminate between same and small-change…

  11. Effect of sample aliquot size on the limit of detection and reproducibility of clinical assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guorong; Kobayashi, Lori; Nazarenko, Irina

    2007-11-01

    Nucleic acid amplification technologies significantly improved the limit of detection (LOD) for diagnostic assays. The ability of these assays to amplify fewer than 10 target copies of DNA or RNA imposes new requirements on the preparation of clinical samples. We report a statistical method to determine how large of an aliquot is necessary to reproducibly provide a detectable number of cells. We determined the success probability (p) based on aliquot size and sample volume. The binomial distribution, based on p and the concentration of cells in sample, was used to calculate the probability of getting no target objects in an aliquot and to determine the minimum number of objects per aliquot necessary to generate a reproducible clinical assay. The described method was applied to find a minimum aliquot volume required for a set LOD, false-negative rate (FNR), and %CV. For example, to keep FNR FNRs are 47.2% and 44.9%. This probability model is a useful tool to predict the impact of aliquot volume on the LOD and reproducibility of clinical assays. Even for samples for which pathogens are homogeneously distributed, it is theoretically impossible to collect a single pathogen consistently if the concentration of pathogen is below a certain limit.

  12. Limiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, S.A.; Hosea, J.C.; Timberlake, J.R.

    1984-10-19

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face is provided. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution. This limiter shape accommodates the various power scrape-off distances lambda p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V/sub parallel/, of the impacting particles.

  13. The COBE Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment search for thecosmic infrared background. I. Limits and detections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauser, M.G.; Arendt, R.G.; Kelsall, T.; Dwek, E.; Odegard, N.; Weiland, J.L.; Freudenreich, H.T.; Reach, W.T.; Silverberg, R.F.; Moseley, S.H.; Pei, Y.C.; Lubin, P.; Mather, J.C.; Shafer, R.A.; Smoot,G.F.; Weiss, R.; Wilkinson, D.T.; Wright, E.L.

    1998-01-06

    The Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) on the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) spacecraft was designed primarily to conduct a systematic search for an isotropic cosmic infrared background (CIB) in 10 photometric bands from 1.25 to 240 mu m. The results of that search are presented here. Conservative limits on the CIB are obtained from the minimum observed brightness in all-sky maps at each wavelength, with the faintest limits in the DIRBE spectral range being at 3.5 mu m(nu l nu<64 nW m-2 sr-1, 95 percent confidence level) and at 240 mu m (nu l nu < 28 nW m-1 sr-1, 95 percent confidence level). The bright foregrounds from interplanetary dust scattering and emission, stars, and interstellar dust emission are the principal impediments to the DIRBE measurements of the CIB. These foregrounds have been modeled and removed from the sky maps. Assessment of the random and systematic uncertainties in the residuals and tests for isotropy show that only the 140 and 240 mum data provide candidate detections of the CIB. The residuals and their uncertainties provide CIB upper limits more restrictive than the dark sky limits at wavelengths from 1.25 to 100 mu m. No plausible solar system or Galactic source of the observed 140 and 240 mu m residuals can be identified, leading to the conclusion that the CIB has been detected at levels of nu l nu = 25 +- 7 and 14 +- 3 nW m-2 sr-1 at 140 and 240 mu m, respectively. The integrated energy from 140 to 240 mu m, 10.3 nW m-2sr-1, is about twice the integrated optical light from the galaxies in the Hubble Deep Field, suggesting that star formation might have been heavily enshrouded by dust at high redshift. The detections and upper limits reported here provide new constraints on models of the history of energy-releasing processes and dust production since the decoupling of the cosmic microwave background from matter.

  14. Predicting detection limits of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and bioanalytical techniques in general.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shiyun; Garcia-D'Angeli, Alexa; Brennan, Joseph P; Huo, Qun

    2014-01-21

    The detection limit is one of the most important performance parameters for bioanalytical techniques. Here we present a generic method to estimate the detection limit of biomolecular assays based on a step-by-step analysis of the assay procedure. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is used here as an example; however, much of the information presented in this article may be applied to other types of biomolecular assays and analytical techniques. A clear understanding of what affects the detection limit can help researchers to evaluate different bio-analytical techniques properly, and to design better strategies to optimize and achieve the best analytical performance.

  15. Detection Limit of Glucose Concentration with Near-Infrared Absorption and Scattering Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Yun-Han; HUANG Fu-Rong; LI Shi-Ping; CHEN Zhe

    2008-01-01

    @@ Theoretical analyses and Monte Carlo simulation are performed to investigate the detection limit of glucose concentration with near-infrared spectroscopy.The relation between detection limitation of glucose concentration and source-detector separation is derived.Monte Carlo simulation performed with a skin-layered model shows that the ratio of effective photons from the target layer could excess 50% by selecting proper source-detector separation,and that the detection limit of glucose concentration approaches to 0.28mM,which satisfies the requirement of food and drug administration for noninvasive glucose sensing.

  16. Nanodroplet quantification: pushing the detection limits of micro x-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, T. C. (Thomasin C.); Havrilla, G. J. (George J.)

    2002-01-01

    In this study, detection limits for a variety of elements were determined on an EDAX Eagle I1 MXRF system equipped with a polycapillary and a Rh X-ray source. Both mass, volume, and spot diameter detection limits were established using dried spot technology, where various volumes and/or masses of different elements were deposited on different substrates, dried, and quantitatively analyzed by MXRF. Preliminary results have shown that sub-nanogram levels of material can be detected in less than 200 pm diameter spot sizes deposited on thin polymer films. Specifically, detection limits were found for a given element as a function of mass deposited for a given spot volume, and volume deposited for a given mass. The effect of the presence of multiple elements in a droplet on the detection limit was also investigated. For example, the detection limit for copper was determined when it was deposited as a single Cu solution and in various multielement mixtures containing from 2 up to 10 different elements. To determine how the substrate affects the detection limit of different species, elemental dried spots were analyzed on different polymer films, including polypropylene and AP 1 . Comparisons were also made to elements deposited on different spherical, resin substrates such as polystyrene beads.

  17. Limited interlaboratory comparison of Schmallenberg virus antibody detection in serum samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Poel, W. H. M.; Cay, B.; Zientara, S.;

    2014-01-01

    Eight veterinary institutes in seven different countries in Europe participated in a limited interlaboratory comparison trial to evaluate laboratory performances of Schmallenberg virus (SBV) antibody detection in serum. Seven different sheep sera and three different cattle sera were circulated, a...

  18. Limited interlaboratory comparison of Schmallenberg virus antibody detection in serum samples.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poel, van der W.H.M.; Cay, B.; Zientara, S.; Steinbach, F.; Valarcher, J.F.; Botner, A.; Mars, M.H.; Hakze-van der Honing, van der R.W.; Schirrmeier, H.; Beer, M.

    2014-01-01

    Eight veterinary institutes in seven different countries in Europe participated in a limited interlaboratory comparison trial to evaluate laboratory performances of Schmallenberg virus (SBV) antibody detection in serum. Seven different sheep sera and three different cattle sera were circulated, and

  19. Quantum limits on the detection sensitivity of a linear detector with feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang

    2017-03-01

    We show that the detection sensitivity of a linear detector is lower bounded by some quantum limits. For the force sensitivity, which is relevant for atomic force microscopes, the lower bound is given by the so-called ultimate quantum limit (UQL). For the displacement sensitivity, which is relevant for detecting gravitational waves, a generalized lower bound that can overcome the usual UQL is obtained.

  20. Final Technical Report: PV Fault Detection Tool.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Bruce Hardison [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jones, Christian Birk [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The PV Fault Detection Tool project plans to demonstrate that the FDT can (a) detect catastrophic and degradation faults and (b) identify the type of fault. This will be accomplished by collecting fault signatures using different instruments and integrating this information to establish a logical controller for detecting, diagnosing and classifying each fault.

  1. Detection and Imaging of Moving Targets with LiMIT SAR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-03

    1 Detection and Imaging of Moving Targets with LiMIT SAR Data Michael Newey, Gerald Benitz, David Barrett MIT Lincoln Laboratory Lexington...sandeep.mishra@baesystems.com Abstract Detecting moving targets in SAR imagery has recently gained a lot of interest as a way to replace optical...moving target detection and classification in adverse (e.g. cloudy) weather conditions. This can be particularly important for small radar antennas

  2. Potential and limits of Raman spectroscopy for carotenoid detection in microorganisms: implications for astrobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehlička, Jan; Edwards, Howell G M; Osterrothová, Kateřina; Novotná, Julie; Nedbalová, Linda; Kopecký, Jiří; Němec, Ivan; Oren, Aharon

    2014-12-13

    In this paper, it is demonstrated how Raman spectroscopy can be used to detect different carotenoids as possible biomarkers in various groups of microorganisms. The question which arose from previous studies concerns the level of unambiguity of discriminating carotenoids using common Raman microspectrometers. A series of laboratory-grown microorganisms of different taxonomic affiliation was investigated, such as halophilic heterotrophic bacteria, cyanobacteria, the anoxygenic phototrophs, the non-halophilic heterotrophs as well as eukaryotes (Ochrophyta, Rhodophyta and Chlorophyta). The data presented show that Raman spectroscopy is a suitable tool to assess the presence of carotenoids of these organisms in cultures. Comparison is made with the high-performance liquid chromatography approach of analysing pigments in extracts. Direct measurements on cultures provide fast and reliable identification of the pigments. Some of the carotenoids studied are proposed as tracers for halophiles, in contrast with others which can be considered as biomarkers of other genera. The limits of application of Raman spectroscopy are discussed for a few cases where the current Raman spectroscopic approach does not allow discriminating structurally very similar carotenoids. The database reported can be used for applications in geobiology and exobiology for the detection of pigment signals in natural settings.

  3. MOTOR VEHICLE SAFETY: NHTSA’s Ability to Detect and Recall Defective Replacement Crash Parts Is Limited

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    recycled airbag systems. However, NHTSA’s defect identification and recall system has limitations. The key database used to identify unsafe parts...product safety recall . The two studies on the safety of recycled airbags that we identified concluded that they can be a potentially safe...GAO United States General Accounting OfficeReport to Congressional RequestersJanuary 2001 MOTOR VEHICLE SAFETY NHTSA’s Ability to Detect and Recall

  4. [On-site detection of bioterrorism-relevant agents : Rapid detection methods for viruses, bacteria and toxins - capabilities and limitations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Daniel; Richter, Martin; Schrick, Livia; Lasch, Peter; Keeren, Kathrin; Polleichtner, Angela; Lemmer, Karin; Nitsche, Andreas; Grunow, Roland; Herzog, Christian; Dorner, Brigitte G; Schaade, Lars

    2016-12-01

    In Europe, besides the threat of terrorist attacks involving conventional methods such as explosive devices and automatic weapons, there is also a potential threat of terrorist groups using non-conventional material like biological agents in the scope of future attacks. Consequently, rapid and reliable detection systems for biological agents are being developed and tested continuously to inform crisis management. For environmental detection, a broad spectrum of different laboratory-based techniques has been developed for relevant biological agents. However for environmental samples, fast and reliable on-site detection methods are desired by first responders for rapid assessment.Based on different functional principles, generic, immunological and nucleic-acid-based on-site detection methods can be distinguished. Those should be facile, fast, sensitive, and specific. However, commercially available kits usually have limited sensitivity and often have not been validated independently. Furthermore in this context, the multitude of relevant biological agents that potentially have to be considered present in complex environmental matrices poses a serious challenge for reliable detection. Therefore, detailed knowledge of the specific scope of applications and the limitations of different analytical systems is necessary to evaluate the results obtained purposefully.The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the analytical principles, benefits and limitations of prevailing on-site environmental detection systems for bioterrorism-relevant viruses, bacteria and toxins. Despite promising developments the informative value of currently available on-site tests is still limited. Thus, expert laboratories have to conduct confirmatory testing.

  5. Modeling the performance limits of novel microcantilever heaters for volatile organic compound detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangir, Ifat; Koley, Goutam

    2017-01-01

    We present a theoretical model estimating the performance limits of novel AlGaN/GaN heterostructure based microcantilever heater sensors to perform advanced volatile organic compound (VOC) detection and mixture analysis. Operating without any specific surface functionalization or treatment; these devices utilize the strong surface polarization of AlGaN as well as the unique device geometries, to perform selective detection of analytes based on their latent heat of evaporation and molecular dipole moment over a wide concentration range. The presented model incorporates heat transfer, Joule heating, thermal expansion and evaporative heat loss mechanisms, to predict device behaviors such as temperature profiles and sensing performance limits under various steady-state and transient test conditions. In addition, the versatility of the proposed model enables us to successfully predict the capability of the device to perform mixture analysis, and provides guidelines to further optimize the device properties to achieve a limit of detection in sub-ppm concentration.

  6. Anomaly Detection from ASRS Databases of Textual Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Our primary goal is to automatically analyze textual reports from the Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) database to detect/discover the anomaly categories...

  7. Comparing determination methods of detection and quantification limits for aflatoxin analysis in hazelnut

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Hazelnut is a type of plant that grows in wet and humid climatic conditions. Adverse climatic conditions result in the formation of aflatoxin in hazelnuts during the harvesting, drying, and storing processes. Aflatoxin is considered an important food contaminant, which makes aflatoxin analysis important in the international produce trade. For this reason, validation is important for the analysis of aflatoxin in hazelnuts. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) are two ...

  8. Background vapor from six ionic liquids and the partition coefficients and limits of detection for 10 different analytes in those ionic liquids measured using headspace gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Wald, Grant; Albers, David; Cortes, Hernan; McCabe, Terry

    2008-08-01

    The concentration and identity of the compounds detected in the vapor above six ionic liquids by headspace gas chromatography (HS-GC) at 100 degrees C are reported. In addition, the partition coefficients for 10 different compounds in these ionic liquids and limits of detection were measured. These results provide quantitative guidance for the application of ionic liquids for HS-GC.

  9. Improved detection limits for phthalates by selective solid-phase micro-extraction

    KAUST Repository

    Zia, Asif I.

    2016-03-30

    Presented research reports on an improved method and enhanced limits of detection for phthalates; a hazardous additive used in the production of plastics by solid-phase micro-extraction (SPME) polymer in comparison to molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction (MISPE) polymer. The polymers were functionalized on an interdigital capacitive sensor for selective binding of phthalate molecules from a complex mixture of chemicals. Both polymers owned predetermined selectivity by formation of valuable molecular recognition sites for Bis (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP). Polymers were immobilized on planar electrochemical sensor fabricated on a single crystal silicon substrate with 500 nm sputtered gold electrodes fabricated using MEMS fabrication techniques. Impedance spectra were obtained using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) to determine sample conductance for evaluation of phthalate concentration in the spiked sample solutions with various phthalate concentrations. Experimental results revealed that the ability of SPME polymer to adsorb target molecules on the sensing surface is better than that of MISPE polymer for phthalates in the sensing system. Testing the extracted samples using high performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detectors validated the results.

  10. Improvements of low-detection-limit filter-free fluorescence sensor developed by charge accumulation operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kiyotsugu; Choi, Yong Joon; Moriwaki, Yu; Hizawa, Takeshi; Iwata, Tatsuya; Dasai, Fumihiro; Kimura, Yasuyuki; Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Sawada, Kazuaki

    2017-04-01

    We developed a low-detection-limit filter-free fluorescence sensor by a charge accumulation technique. For charge accumulation, a floating diffusion amplifier (FDA), which included a floating diffusion capacitor, a transfer gate, and a source follower circuit, was used. To integrate CMOS circuits with the filter-free fluorescence sensor, we adopted a triple-well process to isolate transistors from the sensor on a single chip. We detected 0.1 nW fluorescence under the illumination of excitation light by 1.5 ms accumulation, which was one order of magnitude greater than that of a previous current detection sensor.

  11. Detecting Careless Responses to Self-Reported Questionnaires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kountur, Ronny

    2016-01-01

    Problem Statement: The use of self-report questionnaires may lead to biases such as careless responses that distort the research outcomes. Early detection of careless responses in self-report questionnaires may reduce error, but little guidance exists in the literature regarding techniques for detecting such careless or random responses in…

  12. Influence of Background Exposure on TLD Minimum Dose Detection and Determination Limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traino, A.C.; Perrone, F.; Luperini, C.; Tana, L.; Lazzeri, M.; D' Errico, F

    1998-07-01

    Thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLD) are widely used to monitor personal doses due to photon fields in the radiation protection of workers. For these low dose range applications it is essential to decide whether a single TLD retains an occupational air kerma value above background or not. In other words, it is important to determine the detection limit L{sub D} and the determination limit L{sub Q} of the whole dosimetric system. L{sub D} is the smallest value of air kerma that can be detected at a specified confidence level, L{sub Q} is the minimum value of air kerma that can be measured with a given precision. ICRP 60 recommends an annual dose limit of 1 mSv for the public. Thus it is possible to take this value as the limit between public and exposed workers, as recommended by the European Community Directive and corresponding local laws. Therefore if NL{sub D}({gamma}), the annual detection limit of the TLD system, is considerably less than 1 mSv, TLD evaluation can also be used to decide whether a worker can be considered exposed or not. N is the number of annual TLD readings, L{sub D} is the detection limit of the TLD system. Both N and L{sub D} depend on the monitoring interval time {gamma}. The dependence of L{sub D} and L{sub Q} on the background radiation level and on the monitoring intervals, i.e. on N, is investigated. Assuming that the background air kerma level is approximately constant, it can be shown that the shorter the time of exposure, the higher the annual detection limit. Furthermore, if one considers an annual dose limit of 1 mSv, L{sub D} is seen to be greater than the recording level Lr for short exposure times and the system is not able to evaluate it. A set of 15 TLD-100(LiF: Mg, Ti) dosimetric cards and a Harshaw 6000 TLD automatic card reader have been used in order to determine L{sub D} and L{sub Q}. It has been found that an increase of the monitoring time {gamma} from 30 to 180 days leads to a reduction of the annual detection limit

  13. Aerosol quantification with the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer: detection limits and ionizer background effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Drewnick

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Systematic laboratory experiments were performed to investigate quantification of various species with two versions of the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer, a Q-AMS and a c-ToF-AMS. Here we present a new method to continuously determine the detection limits of the AMS analyzers during regular measurements, yielding DL information under various measurement conditions. Minimum detection limits range from 0.03 μg m−3 (nitrate, sulfate, and chloride up to 0.5 μg m−3 (organics for the Q-AMS. Those of the c-ToF-AMS are found between 0.003 μg m−3 (nitrate, sulfate and 0.03 μg m−3 (ammonium, organics. The DL values found for the c-ToF-AMS were ~10 times lower than those of the Q-AMS, mainly due to differences in ion duty cycle. Effects causing an increase of the detection limits include long-term instrument contamination, measurement of high aerosol mass concentrations and short-term instrument history. The self-cleaning processes which reduce the instrument background after measurement of large aerosol concentrations as well as the influences of increased instrument background on mass concentration measurements are discussed. Finally, improvement of detection limits by extension of averaging time intervals, selected or reduced ion monitoring, and variation of particle-to-background measurement ratio are investigated.

  14. Change detection in variable speed limits: failed to look or looked but failed to see?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harms, Ilse M.; Brookhuis, Karel A.

    2012-01-01

    Variable speed limits (VSL) are used to adjust real-time driver speed to the circumstances of the road condition. Based on theoretical research it has been proposed that change blindness - the failure to detect, identify and localise changes - might play a role in the effectiveness of VSL in terms o

  15. Detection limit of Clostridium botulinum spores in dried mushroom samples sourced from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malakar, Pradeep K; Plowman, June; Aldus, Clare F; Xing, Zengtao; Zhao, Yong; Peck, Michael W

    2013-08-16

    A survey of dried mushrooms (Lentinula edodes (Shiitake) and Auricularia auricula (Wood Ear)) sourced from China was carried out to determine the natural contamination of these mushrooms with spores of proteolytic Clostridium botulinum and non-proteolytic C. botulinum. The mushrooms were collected from supermarkets and retailers in 21 cities in China during October 2008. Spore loads of C. botulinum in mushrooms have a degree of uncertainty and variability and this study contributes valuable data for determining prevalence of spores of C. botulinum in mushrooms. An optimized detection protocol that combined selective enrichment culture with multiplex PCR was used to test for spores of proteolytic and non-proteolytic C. botulinum. Detection limits were calculated, using a maximum likelihood protocol, from mushroom samples inoculated with defined numbers of spores of proteolytic C. botulinum or non-proteolytic C. botulinum. Based on the maximum likelihood detection limit, it is estimated that dried mushroom A. auricula contained <550spores/kg of proteolytic C. botulinum, and <350spores/kg of non-proteolytic C. botulinum. Dried L. edodes contained <1500spores/kg of proteolytic C. botulinum and it was not possible to determine reliable detection limits for spores of non-proteolytic C. botulinum using the current detection protocol.

  16. Distributed Detection in Sensor Networks with Limited Range Multi-Modal Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Ermis, E

    2008-01-01

    We consider a multi-object detection problem over a sensor network (SNET) with limited range multi-modal sensors. Limited range sensing environment arises in a sensing field prone to signal attenuation and path losses. The general problem complements the widely considered decentralized detection problem where all sensors observe the same object. In this paper we develop a distributed detection approach based on recent development of the false discovery rate (FDR) and the associated BH test procedure. The BH procedure is based on rank ordering of scalar test statistics. We first develop scalar test statistics for multidimensional data to handle multi-modal sensor observations and establish its optimality in terms of the BH procedure. We then propose a distributed algorithm in the ideal case of infinite attenuation for identification of sensors that are in the immediate vicinity of an object. We demonstrate communication message scalability to large SNETs by showing that the upper bound on the communication mes...

  17. Link community detection through global optimization and the inverse resolution limit of partition density

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Juyong; Lee, Jooyoung; Brooks, Bernard R; Ahn, Yong-Yeol

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the possibility of global optimization-based overlapping community detection, using link community framework. We first show that partition density, the original quality function used in link community detection method, is not suitable as a quality function for global optimization because it prefers breaking communities into triangles except in highly limited conditions. We analytically derive those conditions and confirm it with computational results on direct optimization of various synthetic and real-world networks. To overcome this limitation, we propose alternative approaches combining the weighted line graph transformation and existing quality functions for node-based communities. We suggest a new line graph weighting scheme, a normalized Jaccard index. Computational results show that community detection using the weighted line graphs generated with the normalized Jaccard index leads to a more accurate community structure.

  18. Guidelines for Improving the Lower Detection Limit of Ion-Selective Electrodes: A Systematic Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radu, Aleksandar; Peper, Shane M.; Bakker, Eric; Diamond, Dermot

    2007-01-01

    Zero-current membrane fluxes are the principal source of bias that has prohibited researchers from obtaining true, thermodynamic selectivity coefficients for membrane-based ion selective electrodes (ISEs). They are also responsible for the mediocre detection limits historically seen with these types of potentiometric sensors. By choosing an experimental protocol that suppresses these fluxes, it becomes possible to obtain unbiased thermodynamic selectivity coefficients that are needed to produce ISEs with greatly improved detection limits. In this work, a Cs+-selective electrode based on calix[6]arene-hexaacetic acid hexaethyl ester (Cs I) is used to systematically demonstrate how unbiased selectivity coefficients can be obtained, and how they can be used to optimize inner filling solutions for low detection limit measurements. A comparison of biased selectivity methods (e.g., classical separate solution method (SSM), fixed interference method (FIM), matched potential method (MPM)) with the unbiased modified separate solution method (MSSM) found that selectivity coefficients were underestimated in several cases by more than 4 orders of magnitude. The importance of key experimental parameters, including diffusion coefficients and diffusion layer thicknesses in the aqueous and organic phases, on the minimization of ion fluxes and the improvement of lower detection limits is also described. A dramatic reduction of membrane fluxes by the covalent attachment of a Ca2+-selective ionophore to a methyl methacrylate-decyl methacrylate copolymer matrix is also demonstrated. The ionophore-immobilized ISE exhibited no super-Nernstian response and yielded a detection limit of 40 ppt with an inner filling solution of 1 x 10-3 M KCl. Finally, a set of guidelines for experimental protocols leading to obtaining unbiased selectivity coefficients and producing ISEs for trace level analyses is given.

  19. Aerosol quantification with the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer: detection limits and ionizer background effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Borrmann

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Systematic laboratory experiments were performed to investigate quantification of various species with two versions of the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer, a Quadrupole Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (Q-AMS and a compact Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (c-ToF-AMS. Here we present a new method to continuously determine the detection limits of the AMS analyzers during regular measurements, yielding detection limit (DL information under various measurement conditions. Minimum detection limits range from 0.03 μg m−3 (nitrate, sulfate, and chloride up to 0.5 μg m−3 (organics for the Q-AMS. Those of the c-ToF-AMS are found between 0.003 μg m−3 (nitrate, sulfate and 0.03 μg m−3 (ammonium, organics. The DL values found for the c-ToF-AMS were ~10 times lower than those of the Q-AMS, mainly due to differences in ion duty cycle. Effects causing an increase of the detection limits include long-term instrument contamination, measurement of high aerosol mass concentrations and short-term instrument history. The self-cleaning processes which reduce the instrument background after measurement of large aerosol concentrations as well as the influences of increased instrument background on mass concentration measurements are discussed. Finally, improvement of detection limits by extension of averaging time intervals, selected or reduced ion monitoring, and variation of particle-to-background measurement ratio are investigated.

  20. Determination of target detection limits in hyperspectral data using band selection and dimensionality reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, W.; Boehler, J.; Twizer, K.; Kedem, B.; Lenz, A.; Kneubuehler, M.; Wellig, P.; Oechslin, R.; Schilling, H.; Rotman, S.; Middelmann, W.

    2016-10-01

    Hyperspectral remote sensing data can be used for civil and military applications to robustly detect and classify target objects. High spectral resolution of hyperspectral data can compensate for the comparatively low spatial resolution, which allows for detection and classification of small targets, even below image resolution. Hyperspectral data sets are prone to considerable spectral redundancy, affecting and limiting data processing and algorithm performance. As a consequence, data reduction strategies become increasingly important, especially in view of near-real-time data analysis. The goal of this paper is to analyze different strategies for hyperspectral band selection algorithms and their effect on subpixel classification for different target and background materials. Airborne hyperspectral data is used in combination with linear target simulation procedures to create a representative amount of target-to-background ratios for evaluation of detection limits. Data from two different airborne hyperspectral sensors, AISA Eagle and Hawk, are used to evaluate transferability of band selection when using different sensors. The same target objects were recorded to compare the calculated detection limits. To determine subpixel classification results, pure pixels from the target materials are extracted and used to simulate mixed pixels with selected background materials. Target signatures are linearly combined with different background materials in varying ratios. The commonly used classification algorithms Adaptive Coherence Estimator (ACE) is used to compare the detection limit for the original data with several band selection and data reduction strategies. The evaluation of the classification results is done by assuming a fixed false alarm ratio and calculating the mean target-to-background ratio of correctly detected pixels. The results allow drawing conclusions about specific band combinations for certain target and background combinations. Additionally

  1. Detection limits of the strip test and PCR for genetically modified corn in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, V E; Von Pinho, É V R; Von Pinho, R G; do Nascimento, A D

    2012-08-16

    Brazilian legislation establishes a labeling limit for products that contain more than 1% material from genetically modified organisms (GMOs). We assessed the sensitivity of the lateral flow strip test in detection of the GMO corn varieties Bt11 and MON810 and the specificity and sensitivity of PCR techniques for their detection. For the strip test, the GMO seeds were mixed with conventional seeds at levels of 0.2, 0.4 and 0.8% for Bt11, and 0.4, 0.8 and 1.6% for MON810. Three different methodologies were assessed and whole seeds, their endosperm and embryonic axis were used. For the PCR technique, the GMO seeds of each of the two varieties were mixed with conventional seeds at levels of 20, 10, 5, 2, 1, and 0.5%. The seeds were ground and the DNA extracted. For detection of the GMO material, specific primers were used for MON810 and Bt11 and maize zein as an endogenous control. The sensitivity of the strip test varied for both maize varieties and methodologies. The test was positive for Bt11 only at 0.8%, in contrast with the detection limit of 0.4% indicated by the manufacturer. In the multiplex PCR, the primers proved to be specific for the different varieties. These varieties were detected in samples with one GMO seed in 100. Thus, this technique proved to be efficient in detecting contaminations equal to or greater than 1%.

  2. Construct and predictive validity of a self-reported measure of preclinical mobility limitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mänty, Minna; Heinonen, Ari; Leinonen, Raija; Törmäkangas, Timo; Sakari-Rantala, Ritva; Hirvensalo, Mirja; von Bonsdorff, Mikaela B; Rantanen, Taina

    2007-09-01

    To validate self-reported preclinical mobility limitation concept and self-report assessment method against muscle power and walking speed, and to study the predictive validity of preclinical mobility limitation with respect to future risk of manifest mobility limitation. Observational prospective cohort study and cross-sectional analysis. Research laboratory and community. A total of 632 community-living (age range, 75-81 y) women and men took part in the baseline assessments and 302 persons in the semi-annual interviews on mobility limitation over 2 years. Not applicable. Walking speed, muscle power, and self-reported preclinical and manifest mobility limitation. Preclinical mobility limitation was defined as self-reported tiredness or modification of task performance without task difficulty. At baseline, 4 subgroups were created according to self-reported preclinical mobility limitation in any of 3 mobility tasks (walking 2 km, walking 0.5 km, climbing up stairs): no limitation, preclinical limitation, and minor and major manifest limitation. At baseline, participants with preclinical mobility limitation showed intermediate levels of walking speed and muscle power, compared with those with no limitation or manifest mobility limitation. Participants reporting baseline preclinical mobility limitation had 3- to 6-fold higher age- and sex-adjusted risk of progressing to major manifest mobility limitation during the 2-year follow-up compared with participants with no limitation at baseline, whereas the risk among those with minor limitation at baseline was 14- to 18-fold higher compared with those with no limitation. The self-report assessment tool proved to be a valid measure to capture the early signs of disability and may serve as an inexpensive tool for identifying those nondisabled persons at high risk for future disability.

  3. Clinical utility and limitations of tumor-feeder detection software for liver cancer embolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwazawa, Jin, E-mail: iwazawa.jin@nissay-hp.or.jp [Department of Radiology, Nissay Hospital, 6-3-8 Itachibori, Nishiku, Osaka 550-0012 (Japan); Ohue, Shoichi, E-mail: ponpoko_tanuki.1125@softbank.ne.jp [Department of Radiology, Komatsu Hospital, 11-6 Kawakatsucho, Neyagawa 572-8567 (Japan); Hashimoto, Naoko, E-mail: nhashimoto0316@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Nissay Hospital, 6-3-8 Itachibori, Nishiku, Osaka 550-0012 (Japan); Muramoto, Osamu, E-mail: muramoto.osamu@nissay-hp.or.jp [Department of Gastroenterology, Nissay Hospital, 6-3-8 Itachibori, Nishiku, Osaka 550-0012 (Japan); Mitani, Takashi, E-mail: mitani.takashi@nissay-hp.or.jp [Department of Radiology, Nissay Hospital, 6-3-8 Itachibori, Nishiku, Osaka 550-0012 (Japan)

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical utility and limitations of a computer software program for detecting tumor feeders of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) during transarterial chemoembolization (TACE). Materials and methods: Forty-six patients with 59 HCC nodules underwent nonselective digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and C-arm computed tomography (CT) in the same hepatic artery. C-arm CT data sets were analyzed using the software to identify potential tumor feeders during each TACE session. For DSA analysis, 3 radiologists were independently assigned to identify tumor feeders using the DSA images in a separate session. The sensitivity of the 2 techniques in detecting tumor feeders was compared, with TACE findings as the reference standard. Factors affecting the failure of the software to detect tumor feeders were assessed by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: We detected 65 tumor feeders supplying 59 HCC nodules during TACE sessions. The sensitivity of the software to detect tumor feeders was significantly higher than that of the manual assessment using DSA (87.7% vs. 71.8%, P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that a tumor feeder diameter of <1.0 mm (hazard ratio [HR], 56.3; P = 0.003) and lipiodol accumulation adjacent to the tumor (HR, 11.4; P = 0.044) were the significant predictors for failure to detect tumor feeders. Conclusion: The software analysis was superior to manual assessment with DSA in detecting tumor feeders during TACE for HCC. However, the capability of the software to detect tumor feeders was limited by vessel caliber and by prior lipiodol accumulation to the tumor.

  4. Two-orders of magnitude improvement detection limit of lateral flow assays using isotachophoresis

    CERN Document Server

    Moghadam, Babak Y; Posner, Jonathan D

    2014-01-01

    Lateral flow (LF) immunoassays are one of the most prevalent point-of-care (POC) diagnostics due to their simplicity, low cost, and robust operation. A common criticism of LF tests is that they have poor detection limits compared to analytical techniques, like ELISA, which confines their application as a diagnostic tool. The low detection limit of LF assays and associated long equilibration times is due to kinetically limited surface reactions that result from low target concentrations. Here we use isotachophoresis (ITP), a powerful electrokinetic preconcentration and separation technique, to focus target analytes into a thin band and transport them to the LF capture line resulting is a dramatic increase in the surface reaction rate and equilibrium binding. We show that ITP is able to improve limit of detection (LOD) of LF assays by 400-fold for 90 second assay time and by 160-fold for a longer 5 minutes time scale. ITP-enhanced LF (ITP-LF) also shows up to 30% target extraction from 100 uL of the sample, whi...

  5. Real-time apta-PCR for 20 000-fold improvement in detection limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Alessandro; Bermudo Redondo, M Carmen; Ozalp, V Cengiz; O'Sullivan, Ciara K

    2009-05-01

    A real-time apta-PCR for the ultrasensitive detection of thrombin is reported, where the thrombin aptamer acts not only as a biomolecular recognition element, but also as a label for amplification via real-time PCR. Aptamers can be easily converted to a reporter agent for detection by real-time PCR, simply via flanking of the aptamer's recognition moiety with primer sequences. The reported technique has the advantage of the ultrasensitivity achievable with immuno-PCR, but without the complications of addition of a DNA label, and is a technique generically applicable to all aptamers. Here, we use a sandwich format, where two existing thrombin binding aptamers with distinct binding epitopes have been utilised to capture and detect thrombin in a streptavidin-coated microtiter plate. The amount of thrombin is calculated from real-time PCR analysis of eluted captured reporter aptamer. However, the technique can also be used for aptamer-antibody sandwiches, or simply with single aptamers. A greater than 20 000-fold increase in sensitivity is achieved, highlighting the potential of this approach for the detection of very low levels of target analytes. The use of the aptamer itself as the reporter molecule eliminates the necessity of laborious enzyme/DNA labelling, facilitating a significantly more straightforward assay with a vastly enhanced sensitivity.

  6. Quantitative detection of RT activity by PERT assay: feasibility and limits to a standardized screening assay for human vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, M; Morgeaux, S; Fuchs, F

    2000-06-01

    The detection of adventitious retroviruses has always been critical for assessing the safety concerns associated with viral vaccines. Assays for the enzymatic activity of reverse transcriptase (RT) are used as general methods for the detection of both known and unknown retroviruses. Several studies using newly-developed ultrasensitive PCR-based RT assays reported RT activity in viral vaccines grown in chicken cells. Here, we have assessed the performances of such a PCR-based RT assay--PERT assay--for the quantitative detection of RT activity in vaccines. Sensitivity, linearity and reproducibility of the method were studied on purified RT and viral vaccines treated to release RT from potentially contaminant retroviruses. The level of RT activity detected in chicken cell-derived vaccines was higher for live attenuated vaccines compared to inactivated ones. Contrary to other studies, RT activity was found in some mammalian cell-derived vaccines. AZT-TP sensitivity of RT activities detected in these vaccines and discrimination between retroviral and RT-like activities was further investigated. Feasibility and limits of PERT assay as a broad-spectrum retroviruses detection method in vaccines are discussed.

  7. Finite-size analysis of the detectability limit of the stochastic block model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jean-Gabriel; Desrosiers, Patrick; Hébert-Dufresne, Laurent; Laurence, Edward; Dubé, Louis J.

    2017-06-01

    It has been shown in recent years that the stochastic block model is sometimes undetectable in the sparse limit, i.e., that no algorithm can identify a partition correlated with the partition used to generate an instance, if the instance is sparse enough and infinitely large. In this contribution, we treat the finite case explicitly, using arguments drawn from information theory and statistics. We give a necessary condition for finite-size detectability in the general SBM. We then distinguish the concept of average detectability from the concept of instance-by-instance detectability and give explicit formulas for both definitions. Using these formulas, we prove that there exist large equivalence classes of parameters, where widely different network ensembles are equally detectable with respect to our definitions of detectability. In an extensive case study, we investigate the finite-size detectability of a simplified variant of the SBM, which encompasses a number of important models as special cases. These models include the symmetric SBM, the planted coloring model, and more exotic SBMs not previously studied. We conclude with three appendices, where we study the interplay of noise and detectability, establish a connection between our information-theoretic approach and random matrix theory, and provide proofs of some of the more technical results.

  8. Statistical analysis of water-quality data containing multiple detection limits: S-language software for regression on order statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, L.; Helsel, D.

    2005-01-01

    Trace contaminants in water, including metals and organics, often are measured at sufficiently low concentrations to be reported only as values below the instrument detection limit. Interpretation of these "less thans" is complicated when multiple detection limits occur. Statistical methods for multiply censored, or multiple-detection limit, datasets have been developed for medical and industrial statistics, and can be employed to estimate summary statistics or model the distributions of trace-level environmental data. We describe S-language-based software tools that perform robust linear regression on order statistics (ROS). The ROS method has been evaluated as one of the most reliable procedures for developing summary statistics of multiply censored data. It is applicable to any dataset that has 0 to 80% of its values censored. These tools are a part of a software library, or add-on package, for the R environment for statistical computing. This library can be used to generate ROS models and associated summary statistics, plot modeled distributions, and predict exceedance probabilities of water-quality standards. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Improving the sensitivity limit of surface plasmon resonance biosensors by detecting mixed interference signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, W.; Ho, H. P.; Suen, Y. K.; Kong, S. K.; Lin, Chinlon

    2007-11-01

    We demonstrate that the sensitivity limit of intensity-based surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensors can be enhanced when we combine the effects of the phase and amplitude contributions instead of detecting the amplitude variation only. Experimental results indicate that an enhancement factor of as much as 20 times is achievable, yet with no compromise in measurement dynamic range. While existing SPR biosensor systems are predominantly based on the angular scheme, which relies on detecting intensity variations associated with amplitude changes only, the proposed scheme may serve as a direct system upgrade approach for these systems. The new measurement scheme may therefore lead to a strong impact in the design of SPR biosensors.

  10. Detecting terrestrial nutrient limitation: a global meta-analysis of foliar nutrient concentrations after fertilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostertag, Rebecca; DiManno, Nicole

    2016-03-01

    Examining foliar nutrient concentrations after fertilization provides an alternative method for detecting nutrient limitation of ecosystems, which is logistically simpler to measure than biomass change. We present a meta-analysis of response ratios of foliar nitrogen and phosphorus (RRN, RRP) after addition of fertilizer of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), or the two elements in combination, in relation to climate, ecosystem type, life form, family, and methodological factors. Results support other meta-analyses using biomass, and demonstrate there is strong evidence for nutrient limitation in natural communities. However, because N fertilization experiments greatly outnumber P fertilization trials, it is difficult to discern the absolute importance of N vs. P vs. co-limitation across ecosystems. Despite these caveats, it is striking that results did not follow "conventional wisdom" that temperate ecosystems are N-limited and tropical ones are P-limited. In addition, the use of ratios of N-to-P rather than response ratios also are a useful index of nutrient limitation, but due to large overlap in values, there are unlikely to be universal cutoff values for delimiting N vs. P limitation. Differences in RRN and RRP were most significant across ecosystem types, plant families, life forms, and between competitive environments, but not across climatic variables.

  11. Statistical power calculation and sample size determination for environmental studies with data below detection limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Quanxi; Wang, You-Gan

    2009-09-01

    Power calculation and sample size determination are critical in designing environmental monitoring programs. The traditional approach based on comparing the mean values may become statistically inappropriate and even invalid when substantial proportions of the response values are below the detection limits or censored because strong distributional assumptions have to be made on the censored observations when implementing the traditional procedures. In this paper, we propose a quantile methodology that is robust to outliers and can also handle data with a substantial proportion of below-detection-limit observations without the need of imputing the censored values. As a demonstration, we applied the methods to a nutrient monitoring project, which is a part of the Perth Long-Term Ocean Outlet Monitoring Program. In this example, the sample size required by our quantile methodology is, in fact, smaller than that by the traditional t-test, illustrating the merit of our method.

  12. Thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) of actinides: Pushing the limits of accuracy and detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buerger, Stefan; Boulyga, Sergei; Cunningham, Alan; Klose, Dilani; Koepf, Andreas; Poths, Jane [Safeguards Analytical Laboratory, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Richter, Stephan [Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, JRC-EU, Geel (Belgium)

    2010-07-01

    New method developments in multi-collector thermal ionization mass spectrometry (MC-TIMS) for actinide isotope ratio analysis to improve accuracy and limits of detection will be presented. With respect to limits of detection, results on improving work function using various carbon additives will be reviewed and presented as well as developments in cavity ion source (as compared to standard flat ribbon filament ion source) for femto- and attogram levels of uranium, plutonium, and americium. With respect to accuracy, results on isotope ratio measurements of isotopes of uranium (relative accuracy of 0.3% to 0.01%) are presented with an example being U-234-Th-230 age-dating (NBL CRM 112-A). In this context, the importance of traceability (to the S.I. units) and the use of (certified) reference materials are emphasized. The focus of this presentation is on applications to nuclear safeguards / forensics.

  13. Indirect dark matter detection limits from the ultrafaint Milky Way satellite Segue 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essig, Rouven; Sehgal, Neelima; Strigari, Louis E.; Geha, Marla; Simon, Joshua D.

    2010-12-01

    We use new kinematic data from the ultrafaint Milky Way satellite Segue 1 to model its dark matter distribution and derive upper limits on the dark matter annihilation cross section. Using gamma-ray flux upper limits from the Fermi satellite and MAGIC, we determine cross section exclusion regions for dark matter annihilation into a variety of different particles including charged leptons. We show that these exclusion regions are beginning to probe the regions of interest for a dark matter interpretation of the electron and positron fluxes from PAMELA, Fermi, and HESS, and that future observations of Segue 1 have strong prospects for testing such an interpretation. We additionally discuss prospects for detecting annihilation with neutrinos using the IceCube detector, finding that in an optimistic scenario a few neutrino events may be detected. Finally, we use the kinematic data to model the Segue 1 dark matter velocity dispersion and constrain Sommerfeld enhanced models.

  14. Indirect Dark Matter Detection Limits from the Ultra-Faint Milky Way Satellite Segue 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Essig, Rouven; /SLAC; Sehgal, Neelima; Strigari, Louis E.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Geha, Marla; /Yale U.; Simon, Joshua D.; /Carnegie Inst. Observ.

    2011-08-11

    We use new kinematic data from the ultra-faint Milky Way satellite Segue 1 to model its dark matter distribution and derive upper limits on the dark matter annihilation cross-section. Using gamma-ray ux upper limits from the Fermi satellite and MAGIC, we determine cross-section exclusion regions for dark matter annihilation into a variety of different particles including charged leptons. We show that these exclusion regions are beginning to probe the regions of interest for a dark matter interpretation of the electron and positron uxes from PAMELA, Fermi, and HESS, and that future observations of Segue 1 have strong prospects for testing such an interpretation. We additionally discuss prospects for detecting annihilation with neutrinos using the IceCube detector, finding that in an optimistic scenario a few neutrino events may be detected. Finally we use the kinematic data to model the Segue 1 dark matter velocity dispersion and constrain Sommerfeld enhanced models.

  15. Limited magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine has high sensitivity for detection of acute fractures, infection, and malignancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Benjamin; Fintelmann, Florian J.; Kamath, Ravi S.; Kattapuram, Susan V.; Rosenthal, Daniel I. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-12-15

    The objective of this study is to determine how a limited protocol MR examination compares to a full conventional MR examination for the detection of non-degenerative pathology such as acute fracture, infection, and malignancy. A sample of 349 non-contrast MR exams was selected retrospectively containing a 3:1:1:1 distribution of negative/degenerative change only, acute fracture, infection, and malignancy. This resulted in an even distribution of pathology and non-pathology. A limited protocol MR exam was simulated by extracting T1-weighted sagittal and T2-weighted fat-saturated (or STIR) sagittal sequences from each exam and submitting them for blinded review by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists. The exams were evaluated for the presence or absence of non-degenerative pathology. Interpretation of the limited exam was compared to the original report of the full examination. If either reader disagreed with the original report, the case was submitted for an unblinded adjudication process with the participation of a third musculoskeletal radiologist to establish a consensus diagnosis. There were five false negatives for a sensitivity of 96.9 % for the limited protocol MR exam. Infection in the psoas, paraspinal muscles, and sacroiliac joint, as well as acute fractures in transverse processes and sacrum were missed by one or more readers. No cases of malignancy were missed. Overall diagnostic accuracy was 96.0 % (335/349). MR imaging of the lumbar spine limited to sagittal T1-weighted and sagittal T2 fat-saturated (or STIR) sequences has high sensitivity for the detection of acute fracture, infection, or malignancy compared to a conventional MR examination. (orig.)

  16. Phase sensitivity at the Heisenberg limit in an SU(1,1) interferometer via parity detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong; Gard, Bryan T.; Gao, Yang; Yuan, Chun-Hua; Zhang, Weiping; Lee, Hwang; Dowling, Jonathan P.

    2016-12-01

    We theoretically investigate the phase sensitivity with parity detection on an SU(1,1) interferometer with a coherent state combined with a squeezed vacuum state. This interferometer is formed with two parametric amplifiers for beam splitting and recombination instead of beam splitters. We show that the sensitivity of phase estimation approaches the Heisenberg limit and give the corresponding optimal condition. Moreover, we derive the quantum Cramér-Rao bound of the SU(1,1) interferometer.

  17. Determining lower limits of detection of digital PCR assays for cancer-related gene mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coren A. Milbury

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Digital PCR offers very high sensitivity compared to many other technologies for processing molecular detection assays. Herein, a process is outlined for determining the lower limit of detection (LoD of two droplet-based digital PCR assays for point mutations of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR gene. Hydrolysis probe mutation-detection assays for EGFR p.L858R and p.T790M mutations were characterized in detail. Furthermore, sixteen additional cancer-related mutation assays were explored by the same approach. For the EGFR L8585R assay, the assay sensitivity is extremely good, and thus, the LoD is limited by the amount of amplifiable DNA that is analyzed. With 95% confidence limits, the LoD is one mutant in 180,000 wild-type molecules for the evaluation of 3.3 μg of genomic DNA, and detection of one mutant molecule in over 4 million wild-type molecules was achieved when 70 million copies of DNA were processed. The measured false-positive rate for the EGFR L8585R assay is one in 14 million, which indicates the theoretical LoD if an unlimited amount of DNA is evaluated. For the EFGR T790M assay, the LoD is one mutant in 13,000 for analysis of a 3.3 μg sample of genomic DNA, and the dPCR assay limit sensitivity approaches one mutant in 22,000 wild-type molecules.

  18. Diffuse reflectance optical topography: location of inclusions in 3D and detectability limits

    OpenAIRE

    Carbone, Nicolás Abel; Baez, Guido Rodrigo; García, Héctor Alfredo; Waks Serra, María Victoria; Di Rocco, Hector Omar; Iriarte, Daniela Ines; Pomarico, Juan Antonio; Grosenick, D.; MacDonald, R.

    2014-01-01

    In the present contribution we investigate the images of CW diffusely reflected light for a point-like source, registered by a CCD camera imaging a turbid medium containing an absorbing lesion. We show that detection of μa variations (absorption anomalies) is achieved if images are normalized to background intensity. A theoretical analysis based on the diffusion approximation is presented to investigate the sensitivity and the limitations of our proposal and a novel procedure to find the loca...

  19. A distribution of tumor size at detection and its limiting form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovlev, A Y; Hanin, L G; Rachev, S T; Tsodikov, A D

    1996-01-01

    A distribution of tumor size at detection is derived within the framework of a mechanistic model of carcinogenesis with the object of estimating biologically meaningful parameters of tumor latency. Its limiting form appears to be a generalization of the distribution that arises in the length-biased sampling from stationary point processes. The model renders the associated estimation problems tractable. The usefulness of the proposed approach is illustrated with an application to clinical data on premenopausal breast cancer. PMID:8692876

  20. Photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence using a quartz substrate to reduce limits of detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokhriyal, Anusha; Lu, Meng; Chaudhery, Vikram; Huang, Cheng-Sheng; Schulz, Stephen; Cunningham, Brian T

    2010-11-22

    A Photonic Crystal (PC) surface fabricated upon a quartz substrate using nanoimprint lithography has been demonstrated to enhance light emission from fluorescent molecules in close proximity to the PC surface. Quartz was selected for its low autofluorescence characteristics compared to polymer-based PCs, improving the detection sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of PC Enhanced Fluorescence (PCEF). Nanoimprint lithography enables economical fabrication of the subwavelength PCEF surface structure over entire 1x3 in2 quartz slides. The demonstrated PCEF surface supports a transverse magnetic (TM) resonant mode at a wavelength of λ = 632.8 nm and an incident angle of θ = 11°, which amplifies the electric field magnitude experienced by surface-bound fluorophores. Meanwhile, another TM mode at a wavelength of λ = 690 nm and incident angle of θ = 0° efficiently directs the fluorescent emission toward the detection optics. An enhancement factor as high as 7500 × was achieved for the detection of LD-700 dye spin-coated upon the PC, compared to detecting the same material on an unpatterned glass surface. The detection of spotted Alexa-647 labeled polypeptide on the PC exhibits a 330 × SNR improvement. Using dose-response characterization of deposited fluorophore-tagged protein spots, the PCEF surface demonstrated a 140 × lower limit of detection compared to a conventional glass substrate.

  1. Rotating electrode potentiometry: lowering the detection limits of nonequilibrium polyion-sensitive membrane electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Q; Meyerhoff, M E

    2001-01-15

    A rotating electrode configuration is evaluated as a means to lower the detection limits of newly devised polyion-sensitive membrane electrodes (PSEs). Planar potentiometric polycation and polyanion PSEs are prepared by incorporating tridodecylmethylammonium chloride and calcium dinonylnaphthalenesulfonate, respectively, into plasticized PVC or polyurethane membranes and mounting disks of such films on an electrode body housed in a conventional rotating disk electrode apparatus. Rotation of the PSEs at 5000 rpm results in an enhancement in the detection limits toward heparin (polyanion) and protamine (polycation) of at least 1 order of magnitude (to 0.01 unit/mL for heparin; 0.02 microg/mL for protamine) over that observed when the EMF responses of the same electrodes are assessed using a stir-bar to achieve convective mass transport. A linear relationship between omega(-1/2), where omega is the rotating angular frequency, and C1/2, the polyion concentration corresponding to half the total maximum deltaEMF response toward the polyion species, is observed. It is further shown that the rotating polycation sensor can be used as an end-point detector to greatly enhance (relative to nonrotated indicator electrode) the analytical resolution and precision for measurement of low concentrations of heparin when such samples are titrated with protamine. The theoretical basis for lowering the detection limits by rotating PSEs is discussed based on the unique nonequilibrium response mechanism of such sensors.

  2. Predictive inference for best linear combination of biomarkers subject to limits of detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coolen-Maturi, Tahani

    2017-08-15

    Measuring the accuracy of diagnostic tests is crucial in many application areas including medicine, machine learning and credit scoring. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve is a useful tool to assess the ability of a diagnostic test to discriminate between two classes or groups. In practice, multiple diagnostic tests or biomarkers are combined to improve diagnostic accuracy. Often, biomarker measurements are undetectable either below or above the so-called limits of detection (LoD). In this paper, nonparametric predictive inference (NPI) for best linear combination of two or more biomarkers subject to limits of detection is presented. NPI is a frequentist statistical method that is explicitly aimed at using few modelling assumptions, enabled through the use of lower and upper probabilities to quantify uncertainty. The NPI lower and upper bounds for the ROC curve subject to limits of detection are derived, where the objective function to maximize is the area under the ROC curve. In addition, the paper discusses the effect of restriction on the linear combination's coefficients on the analysis. Examples are provided to illustrate the proposed method. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. An adaptive confidence limit for periodic non-steady conditions fault detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tianzhen; Wu, Hao; Ni, Mengqi; Zhang, Milu; Dong, Jingjing; Benbouzid, Mohamed El Hachemi; Hu, Xiong

    2016-05-01

    System monitoring has become a major concern in batch process due to the fact that failure rate in non-steady conditions is much higher than in steady ones. A series of approaches based on PCA have already solved problems such as data dimensionality reduction, multivariable decorrelation, and processing non-changing signal. However, if the data follows non-Gaussian distribution or the variables contain some signal changes, the above approaches are not applicable. To deal with these concerns and to enhance performance in multiperiod data processing, this paper proposes a fault detection method using adaptive confidence limit (ACL) in periodic non-steady conditions. The proposed ACL method achieves four main enhancements: Longitudinal-Standardization could convert non-Gaussian sampling data to Gaussian ones; the multiperiod PCA algorithm could reduce dimensionality, remove correlation, and improve the monitoring accuracy; the adaptive confidence limit could detect faults under non-steady conditions; the fault sections determination procedure could select the appropriate parameter of the adaptive confidence limit. The achieved result analysis clearly shows that the proposed ACL method is superior to other fault detection approaches under periodic non-steady conditions.

  4. Evaluation on the detection limit of blood hemoglobin using photolepthysmography based on path-length optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Di; Guo, Chao; Zhang, Ziyang; Han, Tongshuai; Liu, Jin

    2016-10-01

    The blood hemoglobin concentration's (BHC) measurement using Photoplethysmography (PPG), which gets blood absorption to near infrared light from the instantaneous pulse of transmitted light intensity, has not been applied to the clinical use due to the non-enough precision. The main challenge might be caused of the non-enough stable pulse signal when it's very weak and it often varies in different human bodies or in the same body with different physiological states. We evaluated the detection limit of BHC using PPG as the measurement precision level, which can be considered as a best precision result because we got the relative stable subject's pulse signals recorded by using a spectrometer with high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) level, which is about 30000:1 in short term. Moreover, we optimized the used pathlength using the theory based on optimum pathlength to get a better sensitivity to the absorption variation in blood. The best detection limit was evaluated as about 1 g/L for BHC, and the best SNR of pulse for in vivo measurement was about 2000:1 at 1130 and 1250 nm. Meanwhile, we conclude that the SNR of pulse signal should be better than 400:1 when the required detection limit is set to 5 g/L. Our result would be a good reference to the BHC measurement to get a desired BHC measurement precision of real application.

  5. Radiometric Short-Term Fourier Transform analysis of photonic Doppler velocimetry recordings and detectivity limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudhomme, G.; Berthe, L.; Bénier, J.; Bozier, O.; Mercier, P.

    2017-01-01

    Photonic Doppler Velocimetry is a plug-and-play and versatile diagnostic used in dynamic physic experiments to measure velocities. When signals are analyzed using a Short-Time Fourier Transform, multiple velocities can be distinguished: for example, the velocities of moving particle-cloud appear on spectrograms. In order to estimate the back-scattering fluxes of target, we propose an original approach "PDV Radiometric analysis" resulting in an expression of time-velocity spectrograms coded in power units. Experiments involving micron-sized particles raise the issue of detection limit; particle-size limit is very difficult to evaluate. From the quantification of noise sources, we derive an estimation of the spectrogram noise leading to a detectivity limit, which may be compared to the fraction of the incoming power which has been back-scattered by the particle and then collected by the probe. This fraction increases with their size. At last, some results from laser-shock accelerated particles using two different PDV systems are compared: it shows the improvement of detectivity with respect to the Effective Number of Bits (ENOB) of the digitizer.

  6. Dynamic traffic management on a familiar road : Failing to detect changes in variable speed limits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harms, Ilse M.; Brookhuis, Karel A.

    2016-01-01

    Variable speed limits (VSL) are used more commonly around the globe lately. Although on a macroscopic level positive effects of VSLs have been reported, the caveat is that the impact of VSLs is very sensitive to the level of driver compliance. Thus far it is unknown whether all individual drivers ar

  7. Detection limits for real-time source water monitoring using indigenous freshwater microalgae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Jr, Miguel [ORNL; Greenbaum, Elias [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    This research identified toxin detection limits using the variable fluorescence of naturally occurring microalgae in source drinking water for five chemical toxins with different molecular structures and modes of toxicity. The five chemicals investigated were atrazine, Diuron, paraquat, methyl parathion, and potassium cyanide. Absolute threshold sensitivities of the algae for detection of the toxins in unmodified source drinking water were measured. Differential kinetics between the rate of action of the toxins and natural changes in algal physiology, such as diurnal photoinhibition, are significant enough that effects of the toxin can be detected and distinguished from the natural variance. This is true even for physiologically impaired algae where diminished photosynthetic capacity may arise from uncontrollable external factors such as nutrient starvation. Photoinhibition induced by high levels of solar radiation is a predictable and reversible phenomenon that can be dealt with using a period of dark adaption of 30 minutes or more.

  8. Detection of satellite remnants in the Galactic Halo with Gaia III. Detection limits for Ultra Faint Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Antoja, Teresa; Aguilar, Luis; Figueras, Francesca; Antiche, Erika; Hernandez-Perez, Fabiola; Brown, Anthony; Valenzuela, Octavio; Aparicio, Antonio; Hidalgo, Sebastian; Velazquez, Hector

    2015-01-01

    We present a method to identify Ultra Faint Dwarf Galaxy (UFDG) candidates in the halo of the Milky Way using the future Gaia catalogue and we explore its detection limits and completeness. The method is based on the Wavelet Transform and searches for over-densities in the combined space of sky coordinates and proper motions, using kinematics in the search for the first time. We test the method with a Gaia mock catalogue that has the Gaia Universe Model Snapshot (GUMS) as a background, and use a library of around 30 000 UFDGs simulated as Plummer spheres with a single stellar population. For the UFDGs we use a wide range of structural and orbital parameters that go beyond the range spanned by real systems, where some UFDGs may remain undetected. We characterize the detection limits as function of the number of observable stars by Gaia in the UFDGs with respect to that of the background and their apparent sizes in the sky and proper motion planes. We find that the addition of proper motions in the search impro...

  9. Contamination limits for real and personal property. Progress report, January--June 1976. [Plutonium in soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Healy, J.W.; Wenzel, W.J.

    1976-09-01

    Progress is reported on the plutonium in soils limit and on the surface contamination study. The report on the soils limit is being typed in draft form for review at other ERDA facilities. A model for surface contamination was derived and programmed but parametric studies have not yet been done.

  10. 10 CFR 51.49 - Environmental report-limited work authorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Environmental report-limited work authorization. 51.49... Implementing Section 102(2) Environmental Reports-Production and Utilization Facilities § 51.49 Environmental..., entitled, “Applicant's Environmental Report—Limited Work Authorization Stage,” which is in addition to...

  11. FY2011 Annual Report for the Actinide Isomer Detection Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Glen A.; Francy, Christopher J.; Ressler, Jennifer J.; Erikson, Luke E.; Tatishvili, Gocha; Hatarik, R.

    2011-10-01

    This project seeks to identify a new signature for actinide element detection in active interrogation. This technique works by exciting and identifying long-lived nuclear excited states (isomers) in the actinide isotopes and/or primary fission products. Observation of isomers in the fission products will provide a signature for fissile material. For the actinide isomers, the decay time and energy of the isomeric state is unique to a particular isotope, providing an unambiguous signature for SNM. This project entails isomer identification and characterization and neutron population studies. This document summarizes activities from its third year - completion of the isomer identification characterization experiments and initialization of the neutron population experiments. The population and decay of the isomeric state in 235U remain elusive, although a number of candidate gamma rays have been identified. In the course of the experiments, a number of fission fragment isomers were populated and measured [Ressler 2010]. The decays from these isomers may also provide a suitable signature for the presence of fissile material. Several measurements were conducted throughout this project. This report focuses on the results of an experiment conducted collaboratively by PNNL, LLNL and LBNL in December 2010 at LBNL. The measurement involved measuring the gamma-rays emitted from an HEU target when bombarded with 11 MeV neutrons. This report discussed the analysis and resulting conclusions from those measurements. There was one strong candidate, at 1204 keV, of an isomeric signature of 235U. The half-life of the state is estimated to be 9.3 {mu}s. The measured time dependence fits the decay time structure very well. Other possible explanations for the 1204-keV state were investigated, but they could not explain the gamma ray. Unfortunately, the relatively limited statistics of the measurement limit, and the lack of understanding of some of the systematic of the experiment, limit

  12. Engineering Research on Quality Detection of Pickling Cucumbers: 2009 Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report briefly summarizes the three studies performed in 2009 on cucumber defect detection. Hyperspectral imaging transmittance mode has demonstrated great potential for online sorting and grading of cucumbers and pickles. However, the technique is still limited by its speed in acquiring and pr...

  13. Useful Interplay Between Spontaneous ADR Reports and Electronic Healthcare Records in Signal Detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C. Pacurariu (Alexandra C.); S.M.J.M. Straus (Sabine); G. Trifirò (Gianluca); M.J. Schuemie (Martijn); R. Gini (Rosa); R.M.C. Herings (Ron); G. Mazzaglia (Giampiero); G. Picelli (Gino); L. Scotti (Lorenza); L. Pedersen (Lars); P. Arlett (Peter); J. van der Lei (Johan); M.C.J.M. Sturkenboom (Miriam); P.M. Coloma (Preciosa)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground and Objective: Spontaneous reporting systems (SRSs) remain the cornerstone of post-marketing drug safety surveillance despite their well-known limitations. Judicious use of other available data sources is essential to enable better detection, strengthening and validation of si

  14. Rapid Detection Strategies for the Global Threat of Zika Virus: Current State, New Hypotheses and Limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Shukla

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The current scenario regarding the widespread Zika virus (ZIKV has resulted in numerous diagnostic studies, specifically in South America and in locations where there is frequent entry of travelers returning from ZIKV-affected areas, including pregnant women with or without clinical symptoms of ZIKV infection. The World Health Organization, WHO, announced that millions of cases of ZIKV are likely to occur in the United States of America in the near future. This situation has created an alarming public health emergency of international concern requiring the detection of this life-threatening viral candidate due to increased cases of newborn microcephaly associated with ZIKV infection. Hence, this review reports possible methods and strategies for the fast and reliable detection of ZIKV with particular emphasis on current updates, knowledge and new hypotheses that might be helpful for medical professionals in poor and developing countries that urgently need to address this problem. In particular, we emphasize liposome-based biosensors. Although these biosensors are currently among the less popular tools for human disease detection, they have become useful tools for the screening and detection of pathogenic bacteria, fungi and viruses because of their versatile advantageous features compared to other sensing devices. This review summarizes the currently available methods employed for the rapid detection of ZIKV and suggests an innovative approach involving the application of a liposome-based hypothesis for the development of new strategies for ZIKV detection and their use as effective biomedicinal tools.

  15. Estimation of the limit of detection with a bootstrap-derived standard error by a partly non-parametric approach. Application to HPLC drug assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linnet, Kristian

    2005-01-01

    Bootstrap, HPLC, limit of blank, limit of detection, non-parametric statistics, type I and II errors......Bootstrap, HPLC, limit of blank, limit of detection, non-parametric statistics, type I and II errors...

  16. Detection limits of 405 nm and 633 nm excited PpIX fluorescence for brain tumor detection during stereotactic biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markwardt, Niklas; Götz, Marcus; Haj-Hosseini, Neda; Hollnburger, Bastian; Sroka, Ronald; Stepp, Herbert; Zelenkov, Petr; Rühm, Adrian

    2016-04-01

    5-aminolevulinic-acid-(5-ALA)-induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) fluorescence may be used to improve stereotactic brain tumor biopsies. In this study, the sensitivity of PpIX-based tumor detection has been investigated for two potential excitation wavelengths (405 nm, 633 nm). Using a 200 μm fiber in contact with semi-infinite optical phantoms containing ink and Lipovenös, PpIX detection limits of 4.0 nM and 200 nM (relating to 1 mW excitation power) were determined for 405 nm and 633 nm excitation, respectively. Hence, typical PpIX concentrations in glioblastomas of a few μM should be well detectable with both wavelengths. Additionally, blood layers of selected thicknesses were placed between fiber and phantom. Red excitation was shown to be considerably less affected by blood interference: A 50 μm blood layer, for instance, blocked the 405- nm-excited fluorescence completely, but reduced the 633-nm-excited signal by less than 50%. Ray tracing simulations demonstrated that - without blood layer - the sensitivity advantage of 405 nm rises for decreasing fluorescent volume from 50-fold to a maximum of 100-fold. However, at a tumor volume of 1 mm3, which is a typical biopsy sample size, the 633-nm-excited fluorescence signal is only reduced by about 10%. Further simulations revealed that with increasing fiber-tumor distance, the signal drops faster for 405 nm. This reduces the risk of detecting tumor tissue outside the needle's coverage, but diminishes the overlap between optically and mechanically sampled volumes. While 405 nm generally offers a higher sensitivity, 633 nm is more sensitive to distant tumors and considerably superior in case of blood-covered tumor tissue.

  17. Airborne virus sampling: Efficiencies of samplers and their detection limits for infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhao

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available [b]Introduction[/b]. The airborne transmission of infectious diseases in livestock production is increasingly receiving research attention. Reliable techniques of air sampling are crucial to underpin the findings of such studies. This study evaluated the physical and biological efficiencies and detection limits of four samplers (Andersen 6-stage impactor, all-glass impinger “AGI-30”, OMNI-3000 and MD8 with gelatin filter for collecting aerosols of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV. [b]Materials and Method[/b]. IBDV aerosols mixed with a physical tracer (uranine were generated in an isolator, and then collected by the bioaerosol samplers. Samplers’ physical and biological efficiencies were derived based on the tracer concentration and the virus/tracer ratio, respectively. Detection limits for the samplers were estimated with the obtained efficiency data. [b]Results.[/b] Physical efficiencies of the AGI-30 (96% and the MD8 (100% were significantly higher than that of the OMNI-3000 (60%. Biological efficiency of the OMNI-3000 (23% was significantly lower than 100% (P < 0.01, indicating inactivation of airborne virus during sampling. The AGI-30, the Andersen impactor and the MD8 did not significantly inactivate virus during sampling. The 2-min detection limits of the samplers on airborne IBDV were 4.1 log[sub]10[/sub] 50% egg infective dose (EID[sub]50[/sub] m [sup]-3[/sup] for the Andersen impactor, 3.3 log[sub]10[/sub] EID50 m [sup]-3[/sup] for the AGI-30, 2.5 log[sub]10[/sub] EID50 m [sup]-3[/sup] for the OMNI-3000, and 2.9 log[sub]10[/sub] EID[sub]50[/sub] m [sup]-3[/sup] for the MD8. The mean half-life of IBDV aerosolized at 20 °C and 70% was 11.9 min. Conclusion. Efficiencies of different samplers vary. Despite its relatively low sampling efficiency, the OMNI-3000 is suitable for use in environments with low viral concentrations because its high flow rate gives a low detection limit. With the 4 samplers investigated, negative air

  18. Evaluation of regression methods when immunological measurements are constrained by detection limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uh, Hae-Won; Hartgers, Franca C; Yazdanbakhsh, Maria; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J

    2008-10-17

    The statistical analysis of immunological data may be complicated because precise quantitative levels cannot always be determined. Values below a given detection limit may not be observed (nondetects), and data with nondetects are called left-censored. Since nondetects cannot be considered as missing at random, a statistician faced with data containing these nondetects must decide how to combine nondetects with detects. Till now, the common practice is to impute each nondetect with a single value such as a half of the detection limit, and to conduct ordinary regression analysis. The first aim of this paper is to give an overview of methods to analyze, and to provide new methods handling censored data other than an (ordinary) linear regression. The second aim is to compare these methods by simulation studies based on real data. We compared six new and existing methods: deletion of nondetects, single substitution, extrapolation by regression on order statistics, multiple imputation using maximum likelihood estimation, tobit regression, and logistic regression. The deletion and extrapolation by regression on order statistics methods gave biased parameter estimates. The single substitution method underestimated variances, and logistic regression suffered loss of power. Based on simulation studies, we found that tobit regression performed well when the proportion of nondetects was less than 30%, and that taken together the multiple imputation method performed best. Based on simulation studies, the newly developed multiple imputation method performed consistently well under different scenarios of various proportion of nondetects, sample sizes and even in the presence of heteroscedastic errors.

  19. Sensitivity and Limit of Detection of biosensors based on ring resonators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Guider

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we present a study of the Sensitivity (S and Limit of Detection (LOD of microring based photonic biosensors as a function of the waveguide composition and dimensions. The target is Aflatoxin, which is a toxin of major concern for south Europe dairy industry. The sensing device is based on an array of multiple SiON microring resonators, fiber-coupled to both an 850 nm VCSEL and a silicon photodetectors, packaged with a microfluidic circuit. Volumetric sensing with glucose–water solutions of various concentrations yields a best sensitivity of 112 nm/RIU. To link these results to the Limit of Detection of the sensors, we also measured the noise of our experimental readout system and then calculated the LOD of our sensors. We found a best value of LOD of 1.6 × 10−6 RIU (referred to volumetric sensing. Finally, we detected Aflatoxin in solutions of various concentrations (down to 1.58 nM by functionalized sensors. The functionalization is based on a wet silanization and specific DNA-aptamer binding on the chip. Reproducibility and re-usability of the sensor are investigated by several chemical treatments. Optimum procedure allows multiple sequential measurements with a good endurance. This work was supported by the FP7 EU project “Symphony” (Grant agreement no.: 610580.

  20. Real-time wavelet detection of crashes in limit cycles of non-stationary fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkel, M. van, E-mail: m.v.berkel@tue.nl [Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Control Systems Technology Group, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Witvoet, G.; Baar, M.R. de [Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Control Systems Technology Group, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Nuij, P.W.J.M. [Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Control Systems Technology Group, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Morsche, H.G. ter [Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Steinbuch, M. [Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Control Systems Technology Group, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We propose a new wavelet-based method for accurate and robust detection of limit cycle crashes in fusion plasmas. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method is optimized for real-time applications such that it has small delay. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method is implemented in a real-time algorithm and is tested on experimental data. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Almost all crashes are detected flawlessly including off-waveforms with high SNR. - Abstract: The high performance mode (H-mode) is one of the baseline plasma scenarios for the experimental fusion reactor ITER. This scenario features a periodic crash-like reorganization of the plasma pressure and the magnetic flux in the plasma core and plasma periphery. The core instability is often referred to as the sawtooth instability while the instability at the edge of the plasma is referred to as ELM. In this paper we present an algorithm for optimized (low latency, robust and high fidelity) real-time sensing of the crashes. The algorithm is based on time-scale wavelet theory and edge-detection. It is argued that detection of crashes has considerably less delay than the other methods. The realized accuracy of the detection algorithm is well below the uncertainty of the crash period for most crashes. Multiresolution analysis enables distinction between different sizes of sawtooth crashes due to the different sizes of wavelets (scales), resulting in an algorithm, which is robust and accurate. Although strictly speaking, the crash detection method is demonstrated for sawteeth measured with ECE only, it can be applied to any periodic crash, measured with any temporally resolved data. Note that the possibility of differentiating between crash like events of different nature depends on their individual time-scales and used measurement setup.

  1. Limit of detection of Toxocara canis larvae in experimentally contaminated bovine milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edlayne Larissa Gretter Machado Pereira

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the limit of detection of Toxocara canis larvae in experimentally contaminated commercial bovine milk samples, based on a centrifuge-sedimentation technique. Firstly, bovine milk (whole and skim samples were contaminated with 50 T. canis larvae in order to evaluate the interference of milk fat with the recovery of the larvae. Next, the effects of 10% formalin (100 ?L, ether (100 ?L, and a combination of both solutions on the recovery of the larvae was examined. Thereafter, the limit of detection of the larvae was determined using the solution (from step 2 considered optimal for degreasing the milk sample. Samples were contaminated with aliquots of 1, 5, 10, 25, and 50 larvae. For each milk sample (1.0 mL, 15 repetitions were analysed. The recovery of the larvae from the skim milk samples was higher (p = 0.0031 than that from the whole milk samples. No significant difference (p = 0.5681 was observed with regard to the percentage of recovered larvae when comparing the degreasing solutions. Nevertheless, the formalin-ether combination was more efficient for recovering the larvae (73.1% than ether (71.9%, formalin (67.6%, and pure whole milk (70.0%. Concerning the limit of detection (using formalin-ether, all the samples contaminated with 5, 10, 25, and 50 larvae tested positive (minimum: 62.7%. Of the samples contaminated with a single larva, 66.7% tested positive. These results suggest that the centrifugation-sedimentation technique may be useful for recovering larvae of Toxocara spp. in naturally or experimentally contaminated milk samples obtained from a wide range of animal species.

  2. Rotating disk potentiometry for inner solution optimization of low-detection-limit ion-selective electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radu, Aleksandar; Telting-Diaz, Martin; Bakker, Eric

    2003-12-15

    The extent of optimization of the lower detection limit of ion-selective electrodes (ISEs) can be assessed with an elegant new method. At the detection limit (i.e., in the absence of primary ions in the sample), one can observe a reproducible change in the membrane potential upon alteration of the aqueous diffusion layer thickness. This stir effect is predicted to depend on the composition of the inner solution, which is known to influence the lower detection limit of the potentiometric sensor dramatically. For an optimized electrode, the stir effect is calculated to be exactly one-half the value of the case when substantial coextraction occurs at the inner membrane side. In contrast, there is no stir effect when substantial ion exchange occurs at the inner membrane side. Consequently, this experimental method can be used to determine how well the inner filling solution has been optimized. A rotating disk electrode was used in this study because it provides adequate control of the aqueous diffusion layer thickness. Various ion-selective membranes with a variety of inner solutions that gave different calculated concentrations of the complex at the inner membrane side were studied to evaluate this principle. They contained the well-examined silver ionophore O,O' '-bis[2-(methylthio)ethyl]-tert-butylcalix[4]arene, the potassium ionophore valinomycin, or the iodide carrier [9]mercuracarborand-3. Stir effects were determined in different background solutions and compared to theoretical expectations. Correlations were good, and the results encourage the use of such stir-effect measurements to optimize ISE compositions for real-world applications. The technique was also found to be useful in estimating the level of primary ion impurities in the sample. For an iodide-selective electrode measured in phosphoric acid, for example, apparent iodide impurity levels were calculated as 5 x 10(-10) M.

  3. Displacement detection with a vibrating rf superconducting interference device: beating the standard linear limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buks, Eyal; Zaitsev, Stav; Segev, Eran; Abdo, Baleegh; Blencowe, M P

    2007-08-01

    We study a configuration for displacement detection consisting of a nanomechanical resonator coupled to both a radio frequency superconducting interference device and to a superconducting stripline resonator. We employ an adiabatic approximation and rotating wave approximation and calculate the displacement sensitivity. We study the performance of such a displacement detector when the stripline resonator is driven into a region of nonlinear oscillations. In this region the system exhibits noise squeezing in the output signal when homodyne detection is employed for readout. We show that displacement sensitivity of the device in this region may exceed the upper bound imposed upon the sensitivity when operating in the linear region. On the other hand, we find that the high displacement sensitivity is accompanied by a slowing down of the response of the system, resulting in a limited bandwidth.

  4. Analysis of background components in Ge-spectrometry and their influence on detection limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heusser, G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany)

    1997-03-01

    In low radioactivity measurements the system own background of the spectrometer is, besides the counting efficiency, the limiting factor for the achievable sensitivity. Since the latter is mostly fixed, background reduction is the only way to gain sensitivity, although it is inversely proportional only to the square root of the background rate but directly proportional to the counting efficiency. A thorough understanding of the background sources and their quantitative contribution helps to choose the most adequate suppression method in order to reach a certain required level of detection limit. For Ge-spectrometry the background can be reduced by 5 to 6 orders of magnitude compared to the unshielded case applying state-of-the-art techniques. This reduction factor holds for the continuous background spectrum as well as for the line background as demonstrated for a Ge detector of the Heidelberg-Moscow double beta decay experiment. (orig./DG)

  5. First direct detection limits on sub-GeV dark matter from XENON10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essig, Rouven; Manalaysay, Aaron; Mardon, Jeremy; Sorensen, Peter; Volansky, Tomer

    2012-07-13

    The first direct detection limits on dark matter in the MeV to GeV mass range are presented, using XENON10 data. Such light dark matter can scatter with electrons, causing ionization of atoms in a detector target material and leading to single- or few-electron events. We use 15  kg day of data acquired in 2006 to set limits on the dark-matter-electron scattering cross section. The strongest bound is obtained at 100 MeV where σ(e)dark-matter masses between 20 MeV and 1 GeV are bounded by σ(e)dark-matter candidates with masses well below the GeV scale.

  6. Incidentally Detected Blue Nevus of Endocervix: a Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Shaila Talengala; Shivamurthy, Archana; Kini Rao, Anuradha Calicut

    2015-01-01

    Blue nevi are uncommon, asymptomatic lesions of the uterine cervix. These lesions are not often detected clinically or on colposcopy. Careful histopathological examination is required. The nevus cells are said to originate from the immature melanoblasts of the neural crest. These lesions need to be differentiated from malignant melanoma and melanosis of the cervix. We present here a case report of incidentally detected cervical blue nevus in a 52 year old lady. PMID:26351493

  7. Implementation of a high-impedance fault detection algorithm. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balser, S.J.; Lawrence, D.J.; Caprino, B.; Delaney, L.

    1985-05-01

    A digital computer based algorithm was developed to detect high impedance faults on distribution systems using statistical methods. The algorithm is written in PL/M 86 and PASCAL and implemented on an INTEL SYS380 microcomputer system, designed to operate in real time and interface with acquisition software. The report contains a description of the calculation procedures comprising the detection algorithm, implementation requirements, and test results for algorithm verification. A discussion of hardware limitations and an estimation of fault detection rate based on historical records is also presented.

  8. Subnanomolar Detection Limit Application of Ion-Selective Electrodes with Three-Dimensionally Ordered Macroporous (3DOM) Carbon Solid Contacts

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Solid-contact ion-selective electrodes (SC-ISEs) can exhibit very low detection limits and, in contrast to conventional ISEs, do not require an optimization of the inner filling solution. This work shows that subnanomolar detection limits can also be achieved with SC-ISEs with three-dimensionally ordered macroporous (3DOM) carbon contacts, which have been shown recently to exhibit excellent long-term stabilities and good resistance to the interferences from oxygen and light. The detection lim...

  9. Interpolation of groundwater quality parameters with some values below the detection limit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bárdossy

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available For many environmental variables, measurements cannot deliver exact observation values as their concentration is below the sensibility of the measuring device (detection limit. These observations provide useful information but cannot be treated in the same manner as the other measurements. In this paper a methodology for the spatial interpolation of these values is described. The method is based on spatial copulas. Here two copula models – the Gaussian and a non-Gaussian v-copula are used. First a mixed maximum likelihood approach is used to estimate the marginal distributions of the parameters. After removal of the marginal distributions the next step is the maximum likelihood estimation of the parameters of the spatial dependence including values below the detection limit into account. Interpolation using copulas yields full conditional distributions for the unobserved sites and can be used to estimate confidence intervals, and provides a good basis for spatial simulation. The methodology is demonstrated on three different groundwater quality parameters, i.e. arsenic, chloride and deethylatrazin, measured at more than 2000 locations in South-West Germany. The chloride values are artificially censored at different levels in order to evaluate the procedures on a complete dataset. Interpolation results are evaluated using a cross validation approach. The method is compared with ordinary kriging and indicator kriging. The uncertainty measures of the different approaches are also compared.

  10. Interpolation of groundwater quality parameters with some values below the detection limit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bárdossy

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available For many environmental variables, measurements cannot deliver exact observation values as their concentration is below the sensitivity of the measuring device (detection limit. These observations provide useful information but cannot be treated in the same manner as the other measurements. In this paper a methodology for the spatial interpolation of these values is described. The method is based on spatial copulas. Here two copula models – the Gaussian and a non-Gaussian v-copula are used. First a mixed maximum likelihood approach is used to estimate the marginal distributions of the parameters. After removal of the marginal distributions the next step is the maximum likelihood estimation of the parameters of the spatial dependence including taking those values below the detection limit into account. Interpolation using copulas yields full conditional distributions for the unobserved sites and can be used to estimate confidence intervals, and provides a good basis for spatial simulation. The methodology is demonstrated on three different groundwater quality parameters, i.e. arsenic, chloride and deethylatrazin, measured at more than 2000 locations in South-West Germany. The chloride values are artificially censored at different levels in order to evaluate the procedures on a complete dataset by progressive decimation. Interpolation results are evaluated using a cross validation approach. The method is compared with ordinary kriging and indicator kriging. The uncertainty measures of the different approaches are also compared.

  11. Detection of Gait Perturbations Based on Proprioceptive Information. Application to Limit Cycle Walkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Gallego

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Walking on irregular surfaces and in the presence of unexpected events is a challenging problem for bipedal machines. Up to date, their ability to cope with gait disturbances is far less successful than humans’: Neither trajectory controlled robots, nor dynamic walking machines (Limit Cycle Walkers are able to handle them satisfactorily. On the contrary, humans reject gait perturbations naturally and efficiently relying on their sensory organs that, if needed, elicit a recovery action. A similar approach may be envisioned for bipedal robots and exoskeletons: An algorithm continuously observes the state of the walker and, if an unexpected event happens, triggers an adequate reaction. This paper presents a monitoring algorithm that provides immediate detection of any type of perturbation based solely on a phase representation of the normal walking of the robot. The proposed method was evaluated in a Limit Cycle Walker prototype that suffered push and trip perturbations at different moments of the gait cycle, providing 100% successful detections for the current experimental apparatus and adequately tuned parameters, with no false positives when the robot is walking unperturbed.

  12. Approaching the ppb detection limits for copper in water using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawfik, Walid; Sawaf, Sausan

    2014-05-01

    Copper concentrations in drinking-water is very important to be monitored which can cause cancer if it exceed about 10 mg/liter. In the present work, we have developed a simple, low laser power method to improve the detection limits of laser induced plasma spectroscopy LIBS for copper in aqueous solutions with different concentrations. In this method a medium density fiberboard (MDF) wood have been used as a substrate that absorbs the liquid sample to transform laser liquid interaction to laser solid interaction. Using the fundamental wavelength of Nd:YAG laser, the constructed plasma emissions were monitored for elemental analysis. The signal-to-noise ratio SNR was optimized using low laser fluence of 32 J cm-2, and detector (CDD camera) gate delay of 0.5 μs. Both the electron temperature and density of the induced plasma were determined using Boltzmann plot and the FWHM of the Cu at 324.7 nm, respectively. The plasma temperature was found to be 1.197 eV, while the plasma density was about 1.66 x 1019 cm-3. The detection limits for Cu at 324.7 nm is found to be 131 ppb comparable to the results by others using complicated system.

  13. Determining the 95% limit of detection for waterborne pathogen analyses from primary concentration to qPCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokdyk, Joel P.; Firnstahl, Aaron; Spencer, Susan K.; Burch, Tucker R; Borchardt, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    The limit of detection (LOD) for qPCR-based analyses is not consistently defined or determined in studies on waterborne pathogens. Moreover, the LODs reported often reflect the qPCR assay alone rather than the entire sample process. Our objective was to develop an approach to determine the 95% LOD (lowest concentration at which 95% of positive samples are detected) for the entire process of waterborne pathogen detection. We began by spiking the lowest concentration that was consistently positive at the qPCR step (based on its standard curve) into each procedural step working backwards (i.e., extraction, secondary concentration, primary concentration), which established a concentration that was detectable following losses of the pathogen from processing. Using the fraction of positive replicates (n = 10) at this concentration, we selected and analyzed a second, and then third, concentration. If the fraction of positive replicates equaled 1 or 0 for two concentrations, we selected another. We calculated the LOD using probit analysis. To demonstrate our approach we determined the 95% LOD for Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, adenovirus 41, and vaccine-derived poliovirus Sabin 3, which were 11, 12, and 6 genomic copies (gc) per reaction (rxn), respectively (equivalent to 1.3, 1.5, and 4.0 gc L−1 assuming the 1500 L tap-water sample volume prescribed in EPA Method 1615). This approach limited the number of analyses required and was amenable to testing multiple genetic targets simultaneously (i.e., spiking a single sample with multiple microorganisms). An LOD determined this way can facilitate study design, guide the number of required technical replicates, aid method evaluation, and inform data interpretation.

  14. Evaluation of regression methods when immunological measurements are constrained by detection limits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yazdanbakhsh Maria

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The statistical analysis of immunological data may be complicated because precise quantitative levels cannot always be determined. Values below a given detection limit may not be observed (nondetects, and data with nondetects are called left-censored. Since nondetects cannot be considered as missing at random, a statistician faced with data containing these nondetects must decide how to combine nondetects with detects. Till now, the common practice is to impute each nondetect with a single value such as a half of the detection limit, and to conduct ordinary regression analysis. The first aim of this paper is to give an overview of methods to analyze, and to provide new methods handling censored data other than an (ordinary linear regression. The second aim is to compare these methods by simulation studies based on real data. Results We compared six new and existing methods: deletion of nondetects, single substitution, extrapolation by regression on order statistics, multiple imputation using maximum likelihood estimation, tobit regression, and logistic regression. The deletion and extrapolation by regression on order statistics methods gave biased parameter estimates. The single substitution method underestimated variances, and logistic regression suffered loss of power. Based on simulation studies, we found that tobit regression performed well when the proportion of nondetects was less than 30%, and that taken together the multiple imputation method performed best. Conclusion Based on simulation studies, the newly developed multiple imputation method performed consistently well under different scenarios of various proportion of nondetects, sample sizes and even in the presence of heteroscedastic errors.

  15. Gel-based nonradioactive single-strand conformational polymorphism and mutation detection: limitations and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vibhuti; Arora, Reetakshi; Gochhait, Sailesh; Bairwa, Narendra K; Bamezai, Rameshwar N K

    2014-01-01

    Single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) for screening mutations/single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) is a simple, cost-effective technique, saving an expensive exercise of sequencing each and every polymerase chain reaction product and assisting in choosing only the amplicons of interest with expected mutations. The principle of detection of small changes in DNA sequences is based on changes in single-strand DNA conformations. The changes in electrophoretic mobility that SSCP detects are sequence dependent. The limitations faced in SSCP range from routine polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) problems to the problems of resolving mutant DNA bands. Both these problems can be solved by controlling PAGE conditions and by varying physical and environmental conditions such as pH, temperature, voltage, gel type and percentage, addition of additives or denaturants, and others. Despite much upgrading of the technology for mutation detection, SSCP remains the method of choice to analyze mutations and SNPs in order to understand genomic variations, both spontaneous and induced, and the genetic basis of diseases.

  16. Detection limit of molasses spirits mixed in rice spirits using the SNIF-NMR method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Hung Lai

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Traditional Taiwanese rice spirits were made from rice, which is their only ingredient and ethanol source. Site-specific natural isotopic fractionation by nuclear magnetic resonance (SNIF-NMR methods were used to investigate molasses spirits usually mixed in rice spirits. The mean ratios for the parameters in five rice spirits labeled as Taikeng 8, Taikeng 9, Taichung sen 10, Tainan 11, and Tainung 71 were (D/HI, 99.0–100.3 ppm; (D/HII, 121.3–123.0 ppm; whereas for molasses spirits labeled as MS, the mean ratios were 108.7 ppm and 126.8 ppm, respectively. A close and reproducible correlation was found for (D/HI values of the mixtures in which MS was mixed with authentic rice spirit samples. The 3.62% MS mixed in Tainung 71 was detected through calculation, whereas the detectable limit for MS mixed in other rice spirits ranged from 8.20% to 11.73%. The SNIF-NMR analysis provides a powerful method for the detection of rice spirits adulteration and can determine the extent to which the rice spirit product is mixed with MS.

  17. Fine Structure ENA Sources Beyond the Termination Shock: Observational Constraints and Detection Limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demajistre, R.; Janzen, P. H.; Allegrini, F.; Dayeh, M. A.; McComas, D. J.; Schwadron, N.

    2015-12-01

    High spatial resolution maps from the IBEX mission (McComas et al, Science, 2009) suggest the presence of "fine structure" in the signal from beyond the termination shock. That is, areas of enhanced ENA emission that span less than a degree in the IBEX sky map. If confirmed, this would suggest very concentrated areas of emission from sources with scales of a few AU embedded in the outer heliosphere (or proportionally larger if they are located beyond the heliopause). This, in turn, would require the presence of unanticipated structures (plasma or neutral) beyond the termination shock for which the physics is poorly defined. It is therefore crucial to confirm the presence of these structures through careful analysis, or to establish the detection limits if the data taken to date is not sufficient for such a confirmation. In this work, we use 5 years worth of IBEX data to examine the statistical significance of these enhancements. We examine correlations in time, ENA energy and coincidence type for evidence of these small-scale spatial structures. Then, using the known spatial response of the IBEX instrument, establish the conditions under which such structure, if present, would be detectable. This detection threshold analysis is fully applicable future measurements, such as those planned for IMAP.

  18. AN ALTERNATIVE CALIBRATION OF CR-39 DETECTORS FOR RADON DETECTION BEYOND THE SATURATION LIMIT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franci, Daniele; Aureli, Tommaso; Cardellini, Francesco

    2016-12-01

    Time-integrated measurements of indoor radon levels are commonly carried out using solid-state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs), due to the numerous advantages offered by this radiation detection technique. However, the use of SSNTD also presents some problems that may affect the accuracy of the results. The effect of overlapping tracks often results in the underestimation of the detected track density, which leads to the reduction of the counting efficiency for increasing radon exposure. This article aims to address the effect of overlapping tracks by proposing an alternative calibration technique based on the measurement of the fraction of the detector surface covered by alpha tracks. The method has been tested against a set of Monte Carlo data and then applied to a set of experimental data collected at the radon chamber of the Istituto Nazionale di Metrologia delle Radiazioni Ionizzanti, at the ENEA centre in Casaccia, using CR-39 detectors. It has been proved that the method allows to extend the detectable range of radon exposure far beyond the intrinsic limit imposed by the standard calibration based on the track density. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Limit of detection of a fiber optics gyroscope using a super luminescent radiation source

    CERN Document Server

    Sandoval, G E

    2003-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to establish the dependence of characteristics of the fiber optics gyroscope (FOG) with respect to the parameters of the super luminescent emission source based on doped optical fiber with rare earth elements (Super luminescent Fiber Source, SFS), argument the pumping rate election of the SFS to obtain characteristics limits of the FOG sensibility. By using this type of emission source in the FOG is recommend to use the rate when the direction of the pumping signal coincide with the super luminescent signal. The most results are the proposition and argumentation of the SFS election as emission source to be use in the FOG of the phase type. Such a decision allow to increase the characteristics of the FOG sensibility in comparison with the use of luminescent source of semiconductors emission which are extensively used in the present time. The use of emission source of the SFS type allow to come closer to the threshold of the obtained sensibility limit (detection limit) which i...

  20. A Control Allocation System for Automatic Detection and Compensation of Phase Shift Due to Actuator Rate Limiting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Yidiray; Kolmanovsky, Ilya V.; Acosta, Diana

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a control allocation system that can detect and compensate the phase shift between the desired and the actual total control effort due to rate limiting of the actuators. Phase shifting is an important problem in control system applications since it effectively introduces a time delay which may destabilize the closed loop dynamics. A relevant example comes from flight control where aggressive pilot commands, high gain of the flight control system or some anomaly in the system may cause actuator rate limiting and effective time delay introduction. This time delay can instigate Pilot Induced Oscillations (PIO), which is an abnormal coupling between the pilot and the aircraft resulting in unintentional and undesired oscillations. The proposed control allocation system reduces the effective time delay by first detecting the phase shift and then minimizing it using constrained optimization techniques. Flight control simulation results for an unstable aircraft with inertial cross coupling are reported, which demonstrate phase shift minimization and recovery from a PIO event.

  1. The {ital COBE} Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment Search for the Cosmic Infrared Background. I. Limits and Detections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauser, M.G. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Arendt, R.G. [Raytheon STX, Code 685, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Kelsall, T.; Dwek, E. [Code 685, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Odegard, N.; Weiland, J.L.; Freudenreich, H.T. [Raytheon STX, Code 685, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Reach, W.T. [California Institute of Technology, IPAC/JPL, MS 100-22, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Silverberg, R.F.; Moseley, S.H. [Code 685, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Pei, Y.C. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Lubin, P. [Physics Department, University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Mather, J.C.; Shafer, R.A. [Code 685, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Smoot, G.F. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Space Sciences Laboratory, Department of Physics, UC Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Weiss, R. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Room 20F-001, Department of Physics, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Wilkinson, D.T. [Princeton University, Department of Physics, Jadwin Hall, Box 708, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Wright, E.L. [UCLA, Astronomy Department, Los Angeles, CA 90024-1562 (United States)

    1998-11-01

    The Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) on the Cosmic Background Explorer ({ital COBE}) spacecraft was designed primarily to conduct a systematic search for an isotropic cosmic infrared background (CIB) in 10 photometric bands from 1.25 to 240 {mu}m. The results of that search are presented here. Conservative limits on the CIB are obtained from the minimum observed brightness in all-sky maps at each wavelength, with the faintest limits in the DIRBE spectral range being at 3.5 {mu}m ({nu}{ital I}{sub {nu}} {lt} 64 nW m{sup {minus}2} sr{sup {minus}1}, 95{percent} confidence level) and at 240 {mu}m ({nu}{ital I}{sub {nu}} {lt} 28 nW m{sup {minus}2} sr{sup {minus}1}, 95{percent} confidence level). The bright foregrounds from interplanetary dust scattering and emission, stars, and interstellar dust emission are the principal impediments to the DIRBE measurements of the CIB. These foregrounds have been modeled and removed from the sky maps. Assessment of the random and systematic uncertainties in the residuals and tests for isotropy show that only the 140 and 240 {mu}m data provide candidate detections of the CIB. The residuals and their uncertainties provide CIB upper limits more restrictive than the dark sky limits at wavelengths from 1.25 to 100 {mu}m. No plausible solar system or Galactic source of the observed 140 and 240 {mu}m residuals can be identified, leading to the conclusion that the CIB has been detected at levels of {nu}{ital I}{sub {nu}} = 25 {plus_minus} 7 and 14 {plus_minus} 3 nW m{sup {minus}2} sr{sup {minus}1} at 140 and 240 {mu}m, respectively. The integrated energy from 140 to 240 {mu}m, 10.3 nW m{sup {minus}2} sr{sup {minus}1}, is about twice the integrated optical light from the galaxies in the Hubble Deep Field, suggesting that star formation might have been heavily enshrouded by dust at high redshift. The detections and upper limits reported here provide new constraints on models of the history of energy-releasing processes and dust

  2. Evaluation of MidIR fibre optic reflectance: detection limit, reproducibility and binary mixture discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessa, Clarimma; Bagán, Héctor; García, José Francisco

    2013-11-01

    MidIR fibre optic reflectance (MidIR-FORS) is a promising analytical technique in the field of science conservation, especially because it is non-destructive. Another advantage of MidIR-FORS is that the obtained information is representative, as a large amount of spectral data can be collected. Although the technique has a high potential and is almost routinely applied, its quality parameters have not been thoroughly studied in the specific application of analysis of artistic materials. The objective of this study is to evaluate the instrumental capabilities of MidIR-FORS for the analysis of artwork materials in terms of detection limit, reproducibility, and mixture characterisation. The study has been focused on oil easel painting and several paints of known composition have been analysed. Paint layers include blue pigments not only because of their important role along art history, but also because their physical and spectroscopic characteristics allow a better evaluation of the MidIR-FORS capabilities. The results of the analysis indicate that MidIR-FORS supplies a signal affected by different factors, such as the optical, morphological and physical properties of the surface, in addition to the composition of materials analysed. Consequently, the detection limits established are relatively high for artistic objects (Prussian blue - PB 2.1-6.5%; Phthalocyanine blue - Pht 6.3-10.2%; synthetic Ultramarine blue - UM 12.1%) and may therefore lead to an incomplete description of the artwork. Reproducibility of the technique over time and across surface has been determined. The results show that the major sources of dispersion are the heterogeneity of the pigments distribution, physical features, and band shape distortions. The total dispersion is around 4% for the most intense bands (oil) and increases up to 26% when weak or overlapped bands are considered (PB, Pht, UM). The application of different pre-treatments (cutoff of fibres absorption, Savizky-Golay smoothing

  3. Effect of consumer reporting on signal detection: using disproportionality analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Isaac W; Rich, Donna S; Gibbs, Trevor G

    2007-11-01

    Pharmacovigilance objectives and activities are designed to protect the health of consumers and are generally based on data acquisition from spontaneous adverse event reports (SADRs). SADRs come from different sources, including healthcare professionals, consumers, lawyers, other pharmaceutical companies, regulatory agencies and so on. Pharmacovigilance activities derived from SADRs include signal detection and description of the safety profile of the drug. Consumers are the most frequent source of most SADRs, even though the system was originally designed to receive reports from healthcare professionals. Most spontaneous adverse event reports are received from the US. GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) conducts monthly signal detection on all marketed compounds in its global database using disproportionality analysis, the empirical Bayesian algorithm known as a multiple-item gamma-Poisson shrinker. There are no systematic survey data or reviews of actual experiences within existing safety surveillance databases of how pharmaceutical companies handle consumer reports. Thus, a study was undertaken to determine the impact of consumer reports on signal detection using MGPS disproportionality analysis. Two data sets were created for four randomly selected GSK marketed compounds; one data set included reports from both consumer and healthcare providers and the second included only reports from healthcare providers. Disproportionality analysis was then used to evaluate the two data sets. A total of 23 signals were identified with a mean difference in time to signal detection of 1.8 years. The difference was in the range of -8-10 years. In 52.2% of events (12/23), the signal was identified earlier when consumer reports were included in the data. In 34.8% of events (8/23), the signal was identified in the same year in both data sets and, in 13% of the events (3/23), the signal was identified later when consumer reports were included in the data. It was concluded from this study that

  4. Magnetic Lenz lenses increase the limit-of-detection in nuclear magnetic resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Spengler, Nils; Meissner, Markus V; Wallrabe, Ulrike; Korvink, Jan G

    2016-01-01

    A high NMR detection sensitivity is indispensable when dealing with mass and volume-limited samples, or whenever a high spatial resolution is required. The use of miniaturised RF coils is a proven way to increase sensitivity, but may be impractical and is not applicable to every experimental situation. We present the use of magnetic lenses, denoted as Lenz lenses due to their working principle, to focus the magnetic flux of a macroscopic RF coil into a smaller volume and thereby locally enhance the sensitivity of the NMR experiment - at the expense of the total sensitive volume. Besides focusing, such lenses facilitate re-guiding or re-shaping of magnetic fields much like optical lenses do with light beams. For the first time we experimentally demonstrate the use of Lenz lenses in magnetic resonance and provide a compact mathematical description of the working principle. Through simulations we show that optimal arrangements can be found.

  5. The role of refractive index gradient on sensitivity and limit of detection of microdisk sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, Zohreh; Vahedi, Mohammad; Behjat, Abbas

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a new type of microdisk resonator sensor with a gradient refractive index (GRIN) that can achieve higher sensitivity with respect to constant refractive index disks. The behavior of the microdisk resonator is simulated by 2D-FDTD method. The shift in the resonance frequency for different thicknesses of the absorbed layer and different refractive index gradients of the microdisks are studied. The best refractive index gradient function is found that leads to the largest sensitivity and smallest limit of detection. The sensitivity of a GRIN microresonator sensor (GMS) with a convex quadratic refractive index function is approximately 11 times as much as that of homogeneous microdisk sensor, which is the best record among GMSs.

  6. The ability of animal studies to detect serious post marketing adverse events is limited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Meer, Peter J K; Kooijman, Marlous; Gispen-de Wied, Christine C; Moors, Ellen H M; Schellekens, Huub

    2012-12-01

    The value of animal studies to assess drug safety is unclear because many such studies are biased and have methodological shortcomings. We studied whether post-marketing serious adverse reactions to small molecule drugs could have been detected on the basis of animal study data included in drug registration files. Of 93 serious adverse reactions related to 43 small molecule drugs, only 19% were identified in animal studies as a true positive outcome, which suggests that data from animal studies are of limited value to pharmacovigilance activities. Our study shows that drug registration files can be used to study the predictive value of animal studies and that the value of animal studies in all stages of the drug development should be investigated in a collaborative endeavour between regulatory authorities, industry, and academia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Attack Detection and Identification in Cyber-Physical Systems -- Part I: Models and Fundamental Limitations

    CERN Document Server

    Pasqualetti, Fabio; Bullo, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Cyber-physical systems integrate computation, communication, and physical capabilities to interact with the physical world and humans. Besides failures of components, cyber-physical systems are prone to malignant attacks, and specific analysis tools as well as monitoring mechanisms need to be developed to enforce system security and reliability. This paper proposes a unified framework to analyze the resilience of cyber-physical systems against attacks cast by an omniscient adversary. We model cyber-physical systems as linear descriptor systems, and attacks as exogenous unknown inputs. Despite its simplicity, our model captures various real-world cyber-physical systems, and it includes and generalizes many prototypical attacks, including stealth, (dynamic) false-data injection and replay attacks. First, we characterize fundamental limitations of static, dynamic, and active monitors for attack detection and identification. Second, we provide constructive algebraic conditions to cast undetectable and unidentifia...

  8. Polarization-resolved sensing with tilted fiber Bragg gratings: theory and limits of detection

    CERN Document Server

    Bialiayeu, Aliaksandr; Albert, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Polarization based sensing with tilted fiber Bragg grating (TFBG) sensors is analysed theoretically by two alternative approaches. The first method is based on tracking the grating transmission for two orthogonal states of linear polarized light that are extracted from the measured Jones matrix or Stokes vectors of the TFBG transmission spectra. The second method is based on the measurements along the system principle axes and polarization dependent loss (PDL) parameter, also calculated from measured data. It is shown that the frequent crossing of the Jones matrix eigenvalues as a function of wavelength leads to a non-physical interchange of the calculated principal axes; a method to remove this unwanted mathematical artefact and to restore the order of the system eigenvalues and the corresponding principal axes is provided. A comparison of the two approaches reveals that the PDL method provides a smaller standard deviation and therefore lower limit of detection in refractometric sensing. Furthermore, the pol...

  9. The effectiveness and limitations of triphenyltetrazolium chloride to detect acute myocardial infarction at forensic autopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakimoto, Yu; Tsuruyama, Tatsuaki; Miyao, Masashi; Abiru, Hitoshi; Sumiyoshi, Shinji; Kotani, Hirokazu; Haga, Hironori; Tamaki, Keiji

    2013-09-01

    Triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) is one of the most conventional stains to detect infarcted area of the heart in animal experiments. However, its availability and limitations have not been thoroughly discussed in the forensic field. Here, authors stained human hearts with TTC soon after the harvest. Photographs of the samples were analyzed using image analysis software, which evaluated the occupying ratio of the stained area on the surface of each slice. The results showed that the stainability of TTC declines with the length of the postmortem interval (PMI). Specimens reacted well to TTC within 1.5 days after death and then decreased the stainability logarithmically with PMI (y = - 0.294 In (x) + 1.0441; x = PMI, y = TTC-stained area / total myocardial area, R = 0.5673). Samples with old myocardial infarction produced clear TTC contrast; normal tissue is vivid red, and fibrotic myocardium is white discoloration. In acute myocardial infarction cases where death occurred within 9 hours after the attack, however, the detection of infarcted area was very difficult even when PMI was less than 1.5 days. In summary, the TTC method may be useful within 1.5 days after death, but short suffering period before death disturbs its staining efficiency.

  10. Comparing determination methods of detection and quantification limits for aflatoxin analysis in hazelnut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ümit Şengül

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hazelnut is a type of plant that grows in wet and humid climatic conditions. Adverse climatic conditions result in the formation of aflatoxin in hazelnuts during the harvesting, drying, and storing processes. Aflatoxin is considered an important food contaminant, which makes aflatoxin analysis important in the international produce trade. For this reason, validation is important for the analysis of aflatoxin in hazelnuts. The limit of detection (LOD and limit of quantification (LOQ are two important parameters in validation. In this study, the LOD and LOQ values have been determined using the Association of Official Agricultural Chemists (AOAC Method 991.31, which is one of the most viable high-performance liquid chromatography analysis methods in the analysis of aflatoxin in hazelnuts. Several approaches can be used to calculate LOD and LOQ values. In this study, to calculate the LOD and LOQ values, the visual evaluation (empirical method, the signal-to-noise method, and calibration curve approaches were applied. The most appropriate approaches were compared. Our conclusion is that the visual evaluation method provided much more realistic LOD and LOQ values.

  11. Multivariate normally distributed biomarkers subject to limits of detection and receiver operating characteristic curve inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Neil J; Schisterman, Enrique F; Vexler, Albert

    2013-07-01

    Biomarkers are of ever-increasing importance to clinical practice and epidemiologic research. Multiple biomarkers are often measured per patient. Measurement of true biomarker levels is limited by laboratory precision, specifically measuring relatively low, or high, biomarker levels resulting in undetectable levels below, or above, a limit of detection (LOD). Ignoring these missing observations or replacing them with a constant are methods commonly used although they have been shown to lead to biased estimates of several parameters of interest, including the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and regression coefficients. We developed asymptotically consistent, efficient estimators, via maximum likelihood techniques, for the mean vector and covariance matrix of multivariate normally distributed biomarkers affected by LOD. We also developed an approximation for the Fisher information and covariance matrix for our maximum likelihood estimations (MLEs). We apply these results to an ROC curve setting, generating an MLE for the area under the curve for the best linear combination of multiple biomarkers and accompanying confidence interval. Point and confidence interval estimates are scrutinized by simulation study, with bias and root mean square error and coverage probability, respectively, displaying behavior consistent with MLEs. An example using three polychlorinated biphenyls to classify women with and without endometriosis illustrates how the underlying distribution of multiple biomarkers with LOD can be assessed and display increased discriminatory ability over naïve methods. Properly addressing LODs can lead to optimal biomarker combinations with increased discriminatory ability that may have been ignored because of measurement obstacles. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Linearity study on detection and quantification limits for the determination of avermectins using linear regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafidah Ismail

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, linear relationships between response and concentration were used to estimate the detection limit (DL and quantification limit (QL for five avermectins: emamectin, abamectin, doramectin, moxidectin, and ivermectin. Estimation of DL and QL was based on the standard deviation of residual and y-intercept of the regression line at low concentrations of avermectins, using the dispersive solid-phase extraction procedure. Avermectin extracts were analyzed using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Based on the regression slope, DL and QL were higher at concentrations of 0.3–0.4 μg/kg and 1 μg/kg, respectively, for all avermectin compounds. Linearity assessment was performed by linear regression, which incorporated a regression model, outlier rejection, and evaluation of the assumption with a significant test. For all avermectins, there is a significant correlation between response and concentration in the range 1–15 μg/kg, and the y-intercept passes through origin (zero.

  13. Extending the Dynamic Range in Metabolomics Experiments by Automatic Correction of Peaks Exceeding the Detection Limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisec, Jan; Hoffmann, Friederike; Schmitt, Clemens; Jaeger, Carsten

    2016-08-02

    Metabolomics, the analysis of potentially all small molecules within a biological system, has become a valuable tool for biomarker identification and the elucidation of biological processes. While metabolites are often present in complex mixtures at extremely different concentrations, the dynamic range of available analytical methods to capture this variance is generally limited. Here, we show that gas chromatography coupled to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (GC-APCI-MS), a state of the art analytical technology applied in metabolomics analyses, shows an average linear range (LR) of 2.39 orders of magnitude for a set of 62 metabolites from a representative compound mixture. We further developed a computational tool to extend this dynamic range on average by more than 1 order of magnitude, demonstrated with a dilution series of the compound mixture, using robust and automatic reconstruction of intensity values exceeding the detection limit. The tool is freely available as an R package (CorrectOverloadedPeaks) from CRAN ( https://cran.r-project.org/ ) and can be incorporated in a metabolomics data processing pipeline facilitating large screening assays.

  14. Breath analysis using laser spectroscopic techniques: breath biomarkers, spectral fingerprints, and detection limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chuji; Sahay, Peeyush

    2009-01-01

    Breath analysis, a promising new field of medicine and medical instrumentation, potentially offers noninvasive, real-time, and point-of-care (POC) disease diagnostics and metabolic status monitoring. Numerous breath biomarkers have been detected and quantified so far by using the GC-MS technique. Recent advances in laser spectroscopic techniques and laser sources have driven breath analysis to new heights, moving from laboratory research to commercial reality. Laser spectroscopic detection techniques not only have high-sensitivity and high-selectivity, as equivalently offered by the MS-based techniques, but also have the advantageous features of near real-time response, low instrument costs, and POC function. Of the approximately 35 established breath biomarkers, such as acetone, ammonia, carbon dioxide, ethane, methane, and nitric oxide, 14 species in exhaled human breath have been analyzed by high-sensitivity laser spectroscopic techniques, namely, tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS), cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS), integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS), cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS), cavity leak-out spectroscopy (CALOS), photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS), quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS), and optical frequency comb cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (OFC-CEAS). Spectral fingerprints of the measured biomarkers span from the UV to the mid-IR spectral regions and the detection limits achieved by the laser techniques range from parts per million to parts per billion levels. Sensors using the laser spectroscopic techniques for a few breath biomarkers, e.g., carbon dioxide, nitric oxide, etc. are commercially available. This review presents an update on the latest developments in laser-based breath analysis.

  15. Breath Analysis Using Laser Spectroscopic Techniques: Breath Biomarkers, Spectral Fingerprints, and Detection Limits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peeyush Sahay

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Breath analysis, a promising new field of medicine and medical instrumentation, potentially offers noninvasive, real-time, and point-of-care (POC disease diagnostics and metabolic status monitoring. Numerous breath biomarkers have been detected and quantified so far by using the GC-MS technique. Recent advances in laser spectroscopic techniques and laser sources have driven breath analysis to new heights, moving from laboratory research to commercial reality. Laser spectroscopic detection techniques not only have high-sensitivity and high-selectivity, as equivalently offered by the MS-based techniques, but also have the advantageous features of near real-time response, low instrument costs, and POC function. Of the approximately 35 established breath biomarkers, such as acetone, ammonia, carbon dioxide, ethane, methane, and nitric oxide, 14 species in exhaled human breath have been analyzed by high-sensitivity laser spectroscopic techniques, namely, tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS, cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS, integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS, cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS, cavity leak-out spectroscopy (CALOS, photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS, quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS, and optical frequency comb cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (OFC-CEAS. Spectral fingerprints of the measured biomarkers span from the UV to the mid-IR spectral regions and the detection limits achieved by the laser techniques range from parts per million to parts per billion levels. Sensors using the laser spectroscopic techniques for a few breath biomarkers, e.g., carbon dioxide, nitric oxide, etc. are commercially available. This review presents an update on the latest developments in laser-based breath analysis.

  16. Automated baseline change detection phase I. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    The Automated Baseline Change Detection (ABCD) project is supported by the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) as part of its ER&WM cross-cutting technology program in robotics. Phase 1 of the Automated Baseline Change Detection project is summarized in this topical report. The primary objective of this project is to apply robotic and optical sensor technology to the operational inspection of mixed toxic and radioactive waste stored in barrels, using Automated Baseline Change Detection (ABCD), based on image subtraction. Absolute change detection is based on detecting any visible physical changes, regardless of cause, between a current inspection image of a barrel and an archived baseline image of the same barrel. Thus, in addition to rust, the ABCD system can also detect corrosion, leaks, dents, and bulges. The ABCD approach and method rely on precise camera positioning and repositioning relative to the barrel and on feature recognition in images. In support of this primary objective, there are secondary objectives to determine DOE operational inspection requirements and DOE system fielding requirements.

  17. The minimum detection limits of RDX and TNT deposited on various surfaces as determined by ion mobility spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodacy, P.

    1993-08-01

    An Ion Mobility Spectrometer (IMS) was used to determine the detection limits of RDX and TNT on six different substrates. The preparation of the explosive deposits on the surfaces is examined as well as effects due to the size, uniformity, method of application, and time that a deposit has been on a surface. Sampling methods are discussed along with effects of the surface topology. The transfer of explosives from a hand to a surface, and methods to reduce the detection limits are presented.

  18. Computing limits on medicine risks based on collections of individual case reports

    OpenAIRE

    Caster, Ola; Norén, G. Niklas; Edwards, I. Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Background Quantifying a medicine’s risks for adverse effects is crucial in assessing its value as a therapeutic agent. Rare adverse effects are often not detected until after the medicine is marketed and used in large and heterogeneous patient populations, and risk quantification is even more difficult. While individual case reports of suspected harm from medicines are instrumental in the detection of previously unknown adverse effects, they are currently not used for risk quantification. Th...

  19. A New Method for Decreasing Mass Limit of Detection and Increasing Number of Theoretical Plates in Capillary Electrophoresis with Amperometric Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A new method was developed to decrease the mass limit of detection (LOD) and increase the number of theoretical plates (N) in capillary electrophoresis with amperometric detection. When the single microcylinder electrode, the 10 μm ID capillary with the etched detection end and the in-capillary alignment were used, the mass LOD for phenol was reduced 124 times and N was increased 36 times in comparison with the normal situation.

  20. A progress report on UNICOS misuse detection at Los Alamos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, J.L.; Jackson, K.A.; Stallings, C.A.; Simmonds, D.D.; Siciliano, C.L.B.; Pedicini, G.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Computing, Information and Communications Div.

    1995-10-01

    An effective method for detecting computer misuse is the automatic monitoring and analysis of on-line user activity. During the past year, Los Alamos enhanced its Network Anomaly Detection and Intrusion Reporter (NADIR) to include analysis of user activity on Los Alamos` UNICOS Crays. In near real-time, NADIR compares user activity to historical profiles and tests activity against expert rules. The expert rules express Los Alamos` security policy and define improper or suspicious behavior. NADIR reports suspicious behavior to security auditors and provides tools to aid in follow-up investigations. This paper describes the implementation to date of the UNICOS component of NADIR, along with the operational experiences and future plans for the system.

  1. Development of automated detection of radiology reports citing adrenal findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zopf, Jason; Langer, Jessica; Boonn, William; Kim, Woojin; Zafar, Hanna

    2011-03-01

    Indeterminate incidental findings pose a challenge to both the radiologist and the ordering physician as their imaging appearance is potentially harmful but their clinical significance and optimal management is unknown. We seek to determine if it is possible to automate detection of adrenal nodules, an indeterminate incidental finding, on imaging examinations at our institution. Using PRESTO (Pathology-Radiology Enterprise Search tool), a newly developed search engine at our institution that mines dictated radiology reports, we searched for phrases used by attendings to describe incidental adrenal findings. Using these phrases as a guide, we designed a query that can be used with the PRESTO index. The results were refined using a modified version of NegEx to eliminate query terms that have been negated within the report text. In order to validate these findings we used an online random date generator to select two random weeks. We queried our RIS database for all reports created on those dates and manually reviewed each report to check for adrenal incidental findings. This survey produced a ground- truth dataset of reports citing adrenal incidental findings against which to compare query performance. We further reviewed the false positives and negatives identified by our validation study, in an attempt to improve the performance query. This algorithm is an important step towards automating the detection of incidental adrenal nodules on cross sectional imaging at our institution. Subsequently, this query can be combined with electronic medical record data searches to determine the clinical significance of these findings through resultant follow-up.

  2. Assessment of strength limiting flaws in ceramic heat exchanger components: Phase 1, Final report, September 28, 1984-June 30, 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, T.; Snyder, J.

    1986-10-01

    Assurance of energy efficient design lifetimes of high temperature structural ceramics requires the ability to specify acceptance criteria and to test to those criteria. These criteria will be established through nondestructive testing, to determine which defects are detectable, together with fracture mechanics, to calculate effects of indetectable flaws. The first phase of this program is to examine heat exchanger material with four test methods which have shown promise for use in ceramics; ultrasonic scanning, microfocus x-ray, Scanning Laser Acoustic Microscope, and Acoustic Holography. The capabilities, limits, and potential for improvement of these are presented in this report. Destructive testing, material sectioning, and fractography are included. 24 refs., 68 figs., 6 tabs.

  3. Relationship between patient-reported symptoms, limitations in daily activities, and psychological impact in varicose veins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, Rajiv; Lal, Brajesh Kumar; Daugherty, Claire

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between patient-reported symptoms, functional limitations, and psychological impact of varicose veins (VVs) vs pathophysiologic mechanism, incorporating demographic and behavioral factors. We conducted a pooled analysis from two clinical studies (Efficacy and Safety Study of Polidocanol Injectable Foam for the Treatment of Saphenofemoral Junction Incompetence [VANISH-1] and Polidocanol Endovenous Microfoam Versus Vehicle for the Treatment of Saphenofemoral Junction Incompetence [VANISH-2]) in patients with VVs (superficial venous reflux only). Health outcomes were classified on the basis of the Wilson-Cleary conceptual framework continuum linking clinical and anatomic factors (Clinical, Etiology, Anatomy, and Pathophysiology [CEAP] clinical class and great saphenous vein [GSV] diameter, respectively) to patient-reported outcomes: Varicose Vein Symptoms Questionnaire (VVSymQ) score; modified Venous Insufficiency Epidemiologic and Economic Study on Quality of Life/Symptoms (m-VEINES-QOL/Sym) limitations in daily activities (functional limitations hereafter) score; and m-VEINES-QOL/Sym psychological impact score. Association of clinical and anatomic categories with each of the patient-reported outcomes was assessed using analysis of variance for statistical significance and standardized mean differences for clinical meaningfulness. Hierarchical regression modeling was applied to evaluate the direct association of the VVSymQ symptom score with the m-VEINES-QOL/Sym functional limitations score and the indirect association with the m-VEINES-QOL/Sym psychological impact score, adjusting for clinical, behavioral, and demographic factors. Among 516 patients, approximately three-fourths were women (mean age, 49 years), approximately 70% were overweight or obese, 42% were C2 and 32% were C3, and 88% reported never or only intermittently wearing compression stockings. VVSymQ (symptom) scores did not vary by GSV

  4. Discussing study limitations in reports of biomedical studies- the need for more transparency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puhan Milo A

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Unbiased and frank discussion of study limitations by authors represents a crucial part of the scientific discourse and progress. In today's culture of publishing many authors or scientific teams probably balance 'utter honesty' when discussing limitations of their research with the risk of being unable to publish their work. Currently, too few papers in the medical literature frankly discuss how limitations could have affected the study findings and interpretations. The goals of this commentary are to review how limitations are currently acknowledged in the medical literature, to discuss the implications of limitations in biomedical studies, and to make suggestions as to how to openly discuss limitations for scientists submitting their papers to journals. This commentary was developed through discussion and logical arguments by the authors who are doing research in the area of hedging (use of language to express uncertainty and who have extensive experience as authors and editors of biomedical papers. We strongly encourage authors to report on all potentially important limitations that may have affected the quality and interpretation of the evidence being presented. This will not only benefit science but also offers incentives for authors: If not all important limitations are acknowledged readers and reviewers of scientific articles may perceive that the authors were unaware of them. Authors should take advantage of their content knowledge and familiarity with the study to prevent misinterpretations of the limitations by reviewers and readers. Articles discussing limitations help shape the future research agenda and are likely to be cited because they have informed the design and conduct of future studies. Instead of perceiving acknowledgment of limitations negatively, authors, reviewers and editors should recognize the potential of a frank and unbiased discussion of study limitations that should not jeopardize acceptance of

  5. Detection limits for actinides in a monochromatic, wavelength-dispersive x-ray fluorescence instrument

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Michael L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Havrilla, George J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Recent developments in x-ray optics have made it possible to examine the L x-rays of actinides using doubly-curved crystals in a bench-top device. A doubly-curved crystal (DCC) acts as a focusing monochromatic filter for polychromatic x-rays. A Monochromatic, Wavelength-Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (MWDXRF) instrument that uses DCCs to measure Cm and Pu in reprocessing plant liquors was proposed in 2007 by the authors at Los Alamos National Laboratory. A prototype design of this MWDXRF instrument was developed in collaboration with X-ray Optical Systems Inc. (XOS), of East Greenbush, New York. In the MWDXRF instrument, x-rays from a Rhodium-anode x-ray tube are passed through a primary DCC to produce a monochromatic beam of 20.2-keV photons. This beam is focused on a specimen that may contain actinides. The 20.2-keV interrogating beam is just above the L3 edge of Californium; each actinide (with Z = 90 to 98) present in the specimen emits characteristic L x-rays as the result of L3-shell vacancies. In the LANL-XOS prototype MWDXRf, these x-rays enter a secondary DCC optic that preferentially passes 14.961-keV photons, corresponding to the L-alpha-1 x-ray peak of Curium. In the present stage of experimentation, Curium-bearing specimens have not been analyzed with the prototype MWDXRF instrument. Surrogate materials for Curium include Rubidium, which has a K-beta-l x-ray at 14.961 keV, and Yttrium, which has a K-alpha-1 x-ray at 14.958 keV. In this paper, the lower limit of detection for Curium in the LANL-XOS prototype MWDXRF instrument is estimated. The basis for this estimate is described, including a description of computational models and benchmarking techniques used. Detection limits for other actinides are considered, as well as future safeguards applications for MWDXRF instrumentation.

  6. Detection limits of tidal-wetland sequences to identify variable rupture modes of megathrust earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shennan, Ian; Garrett, Ed; Barlow, Natasha

    2016-10-01

    Recent paleoseismological studies question whether segment boundaries identified for 20th and 21st century great, >M8, earthquakes persist through multiple earthquake cycles or whether smaller segments with different boundaries rupture and cause significant hazards. The smaller segments may include some currently slipping rather than locked. In this review, we outline general principles regarding indicators of relative sea-level change in tidal wetlands and the conditions in which paleoseismic indicators must be distinct from those resulting from non-seismic processes. We present new evidence from sites across southcentral Alaska to illustrate different detection limits of paleoseismic indicators and consider alternative interpretations for marsh submergence and emergence. We compare predictions of coseismic uplift and subsidence derived from geophysical models of earthquakes with different rupture modes. The spatial patterns of agreement and misfits between model predictions and quantitative reconstructions of coseismic submergence and emergence suggest that no earthquake within the last 4000 years had a pattern of rupture the same as the Mw 9.2 Alaska earthquake in 1964. From the Alaska examples and research from other subduction zones we suggest that If we want to understand whether a megathrust ruptures in segments of variable length in different earthquakes, we need to be site-specific as to what sort of geological-based criteria eliminate the possibility of a particular rupture mode in different earthquakes. We conclude that coastal paleoseismological studies benefit from a methodological framework that employs rigorous evaluation of five essential criteria and a sixth which may be very robust but only occur at some sites: 1 - lateral extent of peat-mud or mud-peat couplets with sharp contacts; 2 - suddenness of submergence or emergence, and replicated within each site; 3 - amount of vertical motion, quantified with 95% error terms and replicated within each

  7. Determination of detection limits for SEM-EDS and m-FTIR analysis of artwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessa, C; Vila, A; García, J F

    2011-06-01

    Scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) and micro-Fourier transform infrared (m-FTIR) spectroscopy are two of the primary analytical techniques used for the characterisation of artwork (Casadio and Toniolo, J. Cult. Herit. 2:71-78, 2001; Bruni et al., Vibr. Spectrosc. 20:15-25, 1999; Bouchard et al., e-Preserv. Sci. 6:27-37, 2009). Despite wide application of these techniques, no studies have been performed to evaluate their detection limits for this type of analysis. The characterisation of minor components used in a piece of art is important because these components may provide key information about the process of creation and answer questions regarding conservation and restoration (Casadio and Toniolo, J. Cult. Herit. 2:71-78, 2001; Bicchieri et al., Spectrochim. Acta B At. Spectrosc. 56:915-922, 2001). This study focused on easel paintings. Several mock-ups were prepared, and the painting layers were created with binary mixtures of three different blues (Prussian blue, phthalocyanine blue and ultramarine blue). Blue pigments have been used extensively in many art pieces and several studies have described problems related to their determination in low concentrations (Bouchard et al., e-Preserv. Sci. 6:27-37, 2009; Bicchieri et al., Spectrochim. Acta B At. Spectrosc. 56:915-922, 2001; Osticiolia et al., Spectrochim. Acta A Mol. Biomol. Spectrosc. 73:525-531, 2009; Giaccai, Mater. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. 1047:233-242, 2008; Lutzenberger and Stege, e-Preserv. Sci. 6:89-100, 2009). This study indicated that the minimum concentrations at which the presence of the minor pigment is detected in at least half of the determinations performed are between 0.9% and 1.5% for phthalocyanine blue, between 0.8% and 1.3% for Prussian blue and between 0.3% and 1% for ultramarine blue with SEM-EDS; with m-FTIR spectroscopy, the minimum concentrations are between 0.9% and 1.5% for phthalocyanine blue, 2.4% or more for Prussian blue and 19% or

  8. Detecting regime shifts in marine systems with limited biological data: An example from southeast Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litzow, Michael A.; Hobday, Alistair J.; Frusher, Stewart D.; Dann, Peter; Tuck, Geoffrey N.

    2016-02-01

    The ability to detect ecological regime shifts in a data-limited setting was investigated, using southeast Australian ecosystems as a model. Community variability was summarized for 1968-2008 with the first two principal components (PCs) of recruitment estimates for six fish stocks and reproductive parameters for four seabird species; regional climate was summarized for 1953-2008 with the first two PCs for three parameters (sea surface temperature [SST], sea surface salinity, surface nitrate) measured at two stations; and basin-scale climate variability was summarized for 1950-2012 with mean South Pacific SST and the first two PCs of detrended South Pacific SST. The first two biology PCs explained 45% of total community variability. The first two PCs of basin-scale SST showed abrupt shifts similar to "regime" behavior observed in other ocean basins, and the first PC of basin-scale SST showed significant covariation with the first PC of regional climate. Together, these results are consistent with the strong community variability and decadal-scale red noise climatic variability associated with Northern Hemisphere regime shifts. However, statistical model selection showed that the first two PCs of regional climate and the first PC of biology time series all exhibited linear change, rather than abrupt shifts. This result is consistent with previous studies documenting rapid linear change in the climate and biology of southeast Australian shelf ecosystems, and we conclude that there is no evidence for regime shift behavior in the region's ecology. However, analysis of a large set of previously-published biological time series from the North Pacific (n = 64) suggests that studies using fewer than ∼30 biological time series, such as this one, may be unable to detect regime shifts. Thus we conclude that the nature of ecological variability in the region cannot be determined with available data. The development of additional long-term biological observations is needed

  9. Comparison of different DIAGNOdent cut-off limits for in vivo detection of occlusal caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich-Weltzien, Roswitha; Kühnisch, J; Oehme, T; Ziehe, A; Stösser, L; García-Godoy, F

    2003-01-01

    This study tested recently recommended cut-off limits for the laser fluorescence based device DIAGNOdent (KaVo) for detection of occlusal caries. Two hundred and forty-eight permanent molars from 94 patients (mean age 19.2 years) of a general dental practice were included. After professional tooth cleaning, the teeth were examined visually and by the laser fluorescence method. The extent of occlusal lesions (gold standard) was determined after minimal operative intervention. Upon fissure opening, 24 teeth had enamel caries and 224 teeth revealed dentin caries, of which 58 and 166, respectively, were up to or beyond half the dentin. The optimal cut-off limits based on the highest kappa-values (0.51 and 0.54) were > 18 for superficial dentinal caries (D3) and > 37 for deep dentinal caries (D4). The comparison with DIAGNOdent cut-offs given by the manufacturer (n = 4) and those based on clinical trials with in vivo validation (n = 4) and in vitro studies with histological validation (n = 3) revealed a considerable variation in performance. Recommended cut-offs between 17 and 21 for superficial dentin lesions were in the same order of magnitude (0.48-0.51). On the D4 level, only the manufacturer's cut-off of > 34 achieved the best performance (0.51). According to the highest kappa-values and the area under the ROC curves (D3: A(z) = 0.903; D4: A(z) = 0.830), the agreement between the extent of validated caries and laser fluorescence value is still unsatisfactory.

  10. A Investigation of Dynamic Laser Speckle Phenomena Using Photon Limited Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Jeffrey Daniel

    The statistical properties of dynamic laser speckle patterns are investigated in theory and in experiment using photon limited pulse counting techniques. The primary analytic tool for these investigations is the spatio-temporal correlation of intensity fluctuations which is shown to yield detailed structural information about the source intensity distribution behind the scatterer and the scattering plane motion. It is demonstrated that the intensity correlation structure of fluctuating optical fields can be measured simultaneously in the spatial and temporal domains using a two dimensional imaging photodetector (IPD) and time marking electronics. Preliminary measurements with this device show that the method is well suited for use in a variety of practical measurement schemes including speckle velocimetry and stellar speckle interferometry. The present configuration relies on a software based delayed coincidence counter which is approximately 200 time too slow to keep up with the data in real time. The total data base is limited to 5 x 10('4) detected photoevents from which the correlation function is estimated at over 2 x 10('3) space -time lags with a signal to noise ratio of 15:1. The practical limitations associated with IPD correlation measurements are discussed in detail. The properties of dynamic speckle from pseudo -random scattering surfaces, which contains both random and non-random phase structures are investigated. It is shown in the special case of a phase grating placed behind a diffuser that the grating structure may be uniquely recovered from both spatial and temporal intensity correlation measurements of the scattered light. In particular, the temporal autocorrelation measurements are shown to reveal the grating structure under conditions of arbitrarily diffuse scattering, e.g. when there is no visual indication of the grating's presence in the diffraction pattern. The possible use of these results for a commercial optical information coding scheme

  11. ASTRO-F\\/FIS Observing Simulation I. Detection Limits for Point Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Jeong, W S; Lee, H M; Nakagawa, T; Sohn, J; Ahn, I; Yamamura, I; Watanabe, M; Kawada, M K; Shibai, H; Jeong, Woong-Seob; Pak, Soojong; Lee, Hyung Mok; Nakagawa, Takao; Sohn, Jungjoo; Ahn, Insun; Yamamura, Issei; Watanabe, Masaru; Kawada, Mitsunobu; Shibai, Hiroshi

    2002-01-01

    We describe the observing simulation software FISVI (FIS Virtual Instrument), which was developed for the Far-Infrared Surveyor (FIS) that will be on the Japanese infrared astronomy mission ASTRO-F. The FISVI has two purposes: one is to check the specifications and performances of the ASTRO-F/FIS as a whole, and the other is to prepare input data sets for the data analysis softwares prior to launch. In the FISVI, a special care was taken by introducing the `Compiled PSF (Point Spread Function)' to optimise inevitable but time-consuming convolution processes. With the Compiled PSF, we reduce the computation time by an order of magnitude. The photon and readout noises are included in the simulations. We estimate the detection limits for point sources from the simulation of virtual patches of the sky mostly consisting of distant galaxies. We studied the importance of the source confusion for simple power-law models for N(>S), the number of sources brighter than S. We found that source confusion plays a dominant ...

  12. New lead-sensitive ion selective electrode with low detection limit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wardak C.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A new polyvinylchloride membrane sensor for Pb2+ with solid contact has been prepared. The electrode membrane phase contains 1-heksyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (HMImPF6 as lipophilic ionic additive. The electrode shows a Nernstian response for lead ions over a wide concentration range (1×10−8−1×10−1 mol L−1 and the slope of 28.1 mV/decade. The limit of detection is 2.3×10−9 mol L−1. It has a fast response time of 5-7 s and can be used more than 2 months without any divergence in potential. The proposed sensor is not pH sensitive in the range 4.0-6.9 and shows a very good discriminating ability towards Pb2+ ion in comparison with some alkali, alkaline earth, transition and heavy metal ions. It was successfully applied as an indicator electrode in potentiometric titration of lead ions with K2CrO4 and for direct determination of Pb2+ ions in real sample solution.

  13. Unveiling the Gamma-ray Source Count Distribution below the Fermi Detection Limit with Photon Statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Zechlin, Hannes-S; Donato, Fiorenza; Fornengo, Nicolao; Vittino, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The source-count distribution as a function of their flux, dN/dS, is one of the main quantities characterizing gamma-ray source populations. We employ statistical properties of the Fermi-LAT photon counts map to measure the composition of the extragalactic gamma-ray sky at high latitudes (|b|>30 deg) between 1 GeV and 10 GeV. We present a new method, generalizing the use of standard pixel-count statistics, to decompose the total observed gamma-ray emission into: (a) point-source contributions, (b) the Galactic foreground contribution, and (c) a truly diffuse isotropic background contribution. Using the 6-year Fermi-LAT data set (P7REP), we show that the dN/dS distribution in the regime of so far undetected point sources can be consistently described with a power-law of index between 1.9 and 2.0. We measure dN/dS down to an integral flux of ~2x10^{-11} cm^{-2}s^{-1}, improving beyond the 3FGL catalog detection limit by about one order of magnitude. The overall dN/dS distribution is consistent with a broken pow...

  14. Nanoscale Biomolecular Detection Limit for Gold Nanoparticles Based on Near-Infrared Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario D’Acunto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticles have been widely used during the past few years in various technical and biomedical applications. In particular, the resonance optical properties of nanometer-sized particles have been employed to design biochips and biosensors used as analytical tools. The optical properties of nonfunctionalized gold nanoparticles and core-gold nanoshells play a crucial role for the design of biosensors where gold surface is used as a sensing component. Gold nanoparticles exhibit excellent optical tunability at visible and near-infrared frequencies leading to sharp peaks in their spectral extinction. In this paper, we study how the optical properties of gold nanoparticles and core-gold nanoshells are changed as a function of different sizes, shapes, composition, and biomolecular coating with characteristic shifts towards the near-infrared region. We show that the optical tenability can be carefully tailored for particle sizes falling in the range 100–150 nm. The results should improve the design of sensors working at the detection limit.

  15. Probe-Specific Procedure to Estimate Sensitivity and Detection Limits for 19F Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Alexander J.; Granwehr, Josef; Lesbats, Clémentine; Krupa, James L.; Six, Joseph S.; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Thomas, Neil R.; Auer, Dorothee P.; Meersmann, Thomas; Faas, Henryk M.

    2016-01-01

    Due to low fluorine background signal in vivo, 19F is a good marker to study the fate of exogenous molecules by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using equilibrium nuclear spin polarization schemes. Since 19F MRI applications require high sensitivity, it can be important to assess experimental feasibility during the design stage already by estimating the minimum detectable fluorine concentration. Here we propose a simple method for the calibration of MRI hardware, providing sensitivity estimates for a given scanner and coil configuration. An experimental “calibration factor” to account for variations in coil configuration and hardware set-up is specified. Once it has been determined in a calibration experiment, the sensitivity of an experiment or, alternatively, the minimum number of required spins or the minimum marker concentration can be estimated without the need for a pilot experiment. The definition of this calibration factor is derived based on standard equations for the sensitivity in magnetic resonance, yet the method is not restricted by the limited validity of these equations, since additional instrument-dependent factors are implicitly included during calibration. The method is demonstrated using MR spectroscopy and imaging experiments with different 19F samples, both paramagnetically and susceptibility broadened, to approximate a range of realistic environments. PMID:27727294

  16. Estimation of exposure distribution adjusting for association between exposure level and detection limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuchen; Shelton, Brent J; Tucker, Thomas T; Li, Li; Kryscio, Richard; Chen, Li

    2017-08-15

    In environmental exposure studies, it is common to observe a portion of exposure measurements to fall below experimentally determined detection limits (DLs). The reverse Kaplan-Meier estimator, which mimics the well-known Kaplan-Meier estimator for right-censored survival data with the scale reversed, has been recommended for estimating the exposure distribution for the data subject to DLs because it does not require any distributional assumption. However, the reverse Kaplan-Meier estimator requires the independence assumption between the exposure level and DL and can lead to biased results when this assumption is violated. We propose a kernel-smoothed nonparametric estimator for the exposure distribution without imposing any independence assumption between the exposure level and DL. We show that the proposed estimator is consistent and asymptotically normal. Simulation studies demonstrate that the proposed estimator performs well in practical situations. A colon cancer study is provided for illustration. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. A comparative investigation of methods for longitudinal data with limits of detection through a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, P; Hughes, J; Zeng, G; Hanook, S; Orem, J; Mwanda, O W; Remick, S C

    2016-02-01

    The statistical analysis of continuous longitudinal data may be complicated since quantitative levels of bioassay cannot always be determined. Values beyond the limits of detection (LOD) in the assays may not be observed and thus censored, rendering complexity to the analysis of such data. This article examines how both left-censoring and right censoring of HIV-1 plasma RNA measurements, collected for the study on AIDS-related Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (AR-NHL) in East Africa, affects the quantification of viral load and explores the natural history of viral load measurements over time in AR-NHL patients receiving anticancer chemotherapy. Data analyses using Monte Carlo EM algorithm (MCEM) are compared to analyses where the LOD or LOD/2 (left censoring) value is substituted for the censored observations, and also to other methods such as multiple imputation, and maximum likelihood estimation for censored data (generalized Tobit regression). Simulations are used to explore the sensitivity of the results to changes in the model parameters. In conclusion, the antiretroviral treatment was associated with a significant decrease in viral load after controlling the effects of other covariates. A simulation study with finite sample size shows MCEM is the least biased method and the estimates are least sensitive to the censoring mechanism.

  18. Pushing the detection limit of infrared spectroscopy for structural analysis of dilute protein samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldassarre, Maurizio; Barth, Andreas

    2014-11-07

    Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy is a powerful and versatile tool to investigate the structure and dynamics of proteins in solution. The intrinsically low extinction coefficient of the amide I mode, the main structure-related oscillator, together with the high infrared absorptivity of aqueous media, requires that proteins are studied at high concentrations (>10 mg L(-1)). This may represent a challenge in the study of aggregation-prone proteins and peptides, and questions the significance of structural data obtained for proteins physiologically existing at much lower concentrations. Here we describe the development of a simple experimental approach that increases the detection limit of protein structure analysis by infrared spectroscopy. Our approach relies on custom-made filters to isolate the amide I region (1700-1600 cm(-1)) from irrelevant spectral regions. The sensitivity of the instrument is then increased by background attenuation, an approach consisting in the use of a neutral density filter, such as a non-scattering metal grid, to attentuate the intensity of the background spectrum. When the filters and grid are combined, a 2.4-fold improvement in the noise level can be obtained. We have successfully tested this approach using a highly diluted solution of pyruvate kinase in deuterated medium (0.2% w/v), and found that it provides spectra of a quality comparable to those recorded with a 10-fold higher protein concentration.

  19. Warnock or Warlock? The Sorcery of Definitions: The Limitations of the Report on Special Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Ian; Vulliamy, Graham

    1980-01-01

    The authors critique the Warnock Report on Special Education for its limited focus, the nature of the evidence used, and its conclusions and recommendations about classifying and identifying students in need of special education services, which the authors feel deal too exclusively with psychological and medical issues, ignoring social contexts.…

  20. Illness perceptions and activity limitations in osteoarthritis of the knee: a case report in intervention study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edwin de Raaij; Dr. H.M. Wittink; Francois Maissan; Jan Pool

    2013-01-01

    This case report describes the process and outcome of an intervention where illness perceptions (IPs) were targeted in order to reduce limitations in daily activities. The patient was a 45-year-old woman diagnosed with posttraumatic secondary osteoarthritis of the lateral patella-femoral cartilage

  1. Method to Solve the Problem of the Radioactivity Detection in Environmental Samples. Characteristic Limits; Metodos para la Resolucion del Problema de la Detecfcion de Radiactividad en Muestras Ambientales. Limites Caracteristicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasco, C.; Martinez, M.; Heras, M.

    2009-07-21

    The problem of the detection or when the radioactivity can be considered as higher than the background using different measurement techniques has been the objective of several statistical studies and controversies. The detection limit and the critical limit were studied by Currie in year 1968 and used by radiochemistry laboratories considering different ways of calculation that introduced confusion and not correct implementations. In the last few years, and due to the increasing number of standardization processes on the field of radioactivity and accreditation, several international institutions have chosen to unify the criteria for using common determination of detection limits. The most used methods are those developed by MARLAP and International Standard Organization ISO (Standard-11929). In this report are summarised both standards doing a comparative study and giving some examples of how to apply these limits. In same cases, little differences in the uncertainty calculation have been observed but the final results have been concordant. A deeply study of these standards can be done consulting the web page of the American Labs that developed MARLAP or buying the original ISO standard ISO-11929 recently approved (2009). (Author) 17 refs.

  2. Instructions to authors for case reporting are limited: A review of a core journal list

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olufowobi Olufemi

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Case reports are frequently published in the health care literature, however advice on preparing such reports using the "instructions to authors" pages of journals is alleged to be limited. However, to our knowledge, this has not been formally evaluated. As roles of case reports may vary according to the case and the clinical specialities, one might expect the advice to authors to vary according to journal clinical grouping. Methods We surveyed the current advice available to authors of case reports from 'instructions to authors' pages of a core collection of 249 journals ('Hague' list. These were examined and compared for advice or recommendation on writing case reports. Of these, 163 (65% published case reports and provided instructions on this publication type. Data were extracted on items of style and content of case reports, using a piloted data extraction form. Results Journals that published case reports were grouped into medical (n = 81, 50%, surgical (n = 38, 23% and generic or multidisciplinary (n = 44, 27% categories. There was a difference among the medical, surgical and generic or multidisciplinary journals in the maximum number of words and pages allowed but no difference in the number of figures, tables, references, authors, abstract or synopsis, indexing or key words and consent. Additionally, there was no statistically significant difference among the three different categories of journals regarding the content of the case reports. Conclusions Of the journals reviewed, we found that 'instructions to authors' pages provided limited and varied information for preparing a case report. There is a need for consensus, and more consistent guidance for authors of case report.

  3. Final Report on the Detection of Green Monopropellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Tracy L.; DeVor, Robert W.; Bauer, Brint M.; Captain, James; Coutts, Janelle L.; Surma, Jan M.

    2015-01-01

    In 2014, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Kennedy Space Center (KSC) funded a project titled "Familiarization and Detection of Green Monopropellants" utilizing Independent Research and Technology Development (IR&TD) and Center Innovation Fund (CIF) funding. The purpose of the project was to evaluate methods of detection for ammonium dinitramide (ADN) and hydroxylammonium nitrate (HAN). An Engineering Services Contract (ESC) task order was created with the scope of evaluation of several methods of detecting ADN- and HAN-based propellants, as well as development of methods for detection. Detection methods include developed methods such as colorimetric indicating absorbent socks, and commercial-off-the- shelf (COTS) units for ammonia detection. An additional goal of the task order was for ESC to become familiar with ADN's and HAN's material properties and material compatibility. Two approaches were initially investigated as possible methods for the detection of HAN (or AFM315E) and ADN (or LMP-103S). These approaches were colorimetric analysis and instrumentation-based COTS vapor sensors utilization. Initial testing showed that the relatively non-existent vapor pressure of the AF-M315E (of which HAN is a major component) propellant would make the use of COTS sensors difficult for real-time area monitoring of HAN; a small response was detected through the use of active COTS sensors, including the RAE Systems MultiRAE Lite and Drager X-act (registered) 5000, but the levels detected were below the threshold limit value for the toxic gas ammonia. Therefore, a detection system ased upon a colorimetric indicator impregnated into an absorbent material was developed. Preliminary analysis (ESC-245-FDG-001) identified a particularly outstanding candidate as a colorimetric indicator for the detection of the presence of AF-M315E in the form of a Methyl Red (Basic) indicator. Materials impregnated with this indicator exhibit significant color change and the

  4. Children’s Self-Reports of Pain Intensity: Scale Selection, Limitations and Interpretation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl L von Baeyer

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Most children aged five years and older can provide meaningful self-reports of pain intensity if they are provided with age-appropriate tools and training. Self-reports of pain intensity are an oversimplification of the complexity of the experience of pain, but one that is necessary to evaluate and titrate pain-relieving treatments. There are many sources of bias and error in self-reports of pain, so ratings need to be interpreted in light of information from other sources such as direct observation of behaviour, knowledge of the circumstances of the pain and parents’ reports. The pain intensity scales most commonly used with children – faces scales, numerical rating scales, visual analogue scales and others – are briefly introduced. The selection, limitations and interpretation of self-report scales are discussed.

  5. Obstacle detection for autonomous navigation : an LDRD final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padilla, Denise D.

    2004-03-01

    This report summarizes the analytical and experimental efforts for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project entitled 'Obstacle Detection for Autonomous Navigation'. The principal goal of this project was to develop a mathematical framework for obstacle detection. The framework provides a basis for solutions to many complex obstacle detection problems critical to successful autonomous navigation. Another goal of this project was to characterize sensing requirements in terms of physical characteristics of obstacles, vehicles, and terrain. For example, a specific vehicle traveling at a specific velocity over a specific terrain requires a sensor with a certain range of detection, resolution, field-of-view, and sufficient sensitivity to specific obstacle characteristics. In some cases, combinations of sensors were required to distinguish between different hazardous obstacles and benign terrain. In our framework, the problem was posed as a multidimensional, multiple-hypothesis, pattern recognition problem. Features were extracted from selected sensors that allow hazardous obstacles to be distinguished from benign terrain and other types of obstacles. Another unique thrust of this project was to characterize different terrain classes with respect to both positive (e.g., rocks, trees, fences) and negative (e.g., holes, ditches, drop-offs) obstacles. The density of various hazards per square kilometer was statistically quantified for different terrain categories (e.g., high desert, ponderosa forest, and prairie). This quantification reflects the scale, or size, and mobility of different types of vehicles. The tradeoffs between obstacle detection, position location, path planning, and vehicle mobility capabilities were also to be characterized.

  6. Low-limit detection of NO2 by longitudinal mode selection in a photoacoustic resonant system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    F Yehya; A K Chaudhary

    2013-09-01

    The paper reports the pulsed laser-based photoacoustic (PA) spectroscopy of NO2 in a resonant PA cavity with special filters made of stainless steel. The PA cell along with special types of sound filters are designed and fabricated to excite only the second-order longitudinal mode inside the cavity. The second harmonic, i.e. = 532 nm pulse width, of 7 ns obtained from -switched Nd:YAG laser at 10 Hz repetition rate has been used to study the saturation behaviour of the PA signal and absorption coefficient with respect to the input laser energy. Generally, the -factor of longitudinal modes in the acoustic cavities is quite low. However, by modifying the design of the cell and the filter, we can achieve high value of = 30. The combination of special filter along with the experimental data acquisition technique helped us to achieve the minimum detection concentration of NO2 of the order of 9 ppbV which is much better than the previous value of the same PA cell without filter [Yehya and Chaudhary, Appl. Phys. B 106, 953 (2012)].

  7. Osteosarcoma Microenvironment: Whole-Slide Imaging and Optimized Antigen Detection Overcome Major Limitations in Immunohistochemical Quantification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Pierre; Fellenberg, Jörg; Moskovszky, Linda; Sápi, Zoltan; Krenacs, Tibor; Poeschl, Johannes; Lehner, Burkhard; Szendrõi, Miklos; Ewerbeck, Volker; Kinscherf, Ralf; Fritzsching, Benedikt

    2014-01-01

    Background In osteosarcoma survival rates could not be improved over the last 30 years. Novel biomarkers are warranted to allow risk stratification of patients for more individual treatment following initial diagnosis. Although previous studies of the tumor microenvironment have identified promising candidates, novel biomarkers have not been translated into routine histopathology. Substantial difficulties regarding immunohistochemical detection and quantification of antigens in decalcified and heterogeneous osteosarcoma might largely explain this translational short-coming. Furthermore, we hypothesized that conventional hot spot analysis is often not representative for the whole section when applied to heterogeneous tissues like osteosarcoma. We aimed to overcome these difficulties for major biomarkers of the immunovascular microenvironment. Methods Immunohistochemistry was systematically optimized for cell surface (CD31, CD8) and intracellular antigens (FOXP3) including evaluation of 200 different antigen retrieval conditions. Distribution patterns of these antigens were analyzed in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded samples from 120 high-grade central osteosarcoma biopsies and computer-assisted whole-slide analysis was compared with conventional quantification methods including hot spot analysis. Results More than 96% of osteosarcoma samples were positive for all antigens after optimization of immunohistochemistry. In contrast, standard immunohistochemistry retrieved false negative results in 35–65% of decalcified osteosarcoma specimens. Standard hot spot analysis was applicable for homogeneous distributed FOXP3+ and CD8+ cells. However, heterogeneous distribution of vascular CD31 did not allow reliable quantification with hot spot analysis in 85% of all samples. Computer-assisted whole-slide analysis of total CD31- immunoreactive area proved as the most appropriate quantification method. Conclusion Standard staining and quantification procedures are not

  8. An Official American Thoracic Society Workshop Report: Noninvasive Identification of Inspiratory Flow Limitation in Sleep Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamidi, Sushmita; Redline, Susan; Rapoport, David; Ayappa, Indu; Palombini, Luciana; Farre, Ramon; Kirkness, Jason; Pépin, Jean-Louis; Polo, Olli; Wellman, Andrew; Kimoff, R John

    2017-07-01

    This report summarizes the proceedings of the American Thoracic Society Workshop on the Noninvasive Identification of Inspiratory Flow Limitation in Sleep Studies held on May 16, 2015, in Denver, Colorado. The goal of the workshop was to discuss methods for standardizing the scoring of flow limitation from nasal cannula pressure tracings. The workshop began with presentations on the physiology underlying flow limitation, existing methods of scoring flow limitation, the effects of signal acquisition and filtering on flow shapes, and a review of the literature examining the adverse outcomes related to flow limitation. After these presentations, the results from online scoring exercises, which were crowdsourced to workshop participants in advance of the workshop, were reviewed and discussed. Break-out sessions were then held to discuss potential algorithms for scoring flow limitation. Based on these discussions, subsequent online scoring exercises, and webinars after the workshop, a consensus-based set of recommendations for a scoring algorithm for flow limitation was developed. Key conclusions from the workshop were: (1) a standardized and automated approach to scoring flow limitation is needed to provide a metric of nonepisodic elevated upper airway resistance, which can then be related to clinical outcomes in large cohorts and patient groups; (2) at this time, the most feasible method for standardization is by proposing a consensus-based framework, which includes scoring rules, developed by experts (3) hardware and software settings of acquisition devices, including filter settings, affect the shape of the flow curve, and should be clearly specified; and (4) a priority for future research is the generation of an open-source, expert-derived training set to encourage and support validation of automated flow limitation scoring algorithms.

  9. Exploring the limits of waveform correlation event detection as applied to three earthquake aftershock sequences.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resor, Megan E.; Carr, Dorthe Bame; Young, Christopher John

    2010-05-01

    Swarms of earthquakes and/or aftershock sequences can dramatically increase the level of seismicity in a region for a period of time lasting from days to months, depending on the swarm or sequence. Such occurrences can provide a large amount of useful information to seismologists. For those who monitor seismic events for possible nuclear explosions, however, these swarms/sequences are a nuisance. In an explosion monitoring system, each event must be treated as a possible nuclear test until it can be proven, to a high degree of confidence, not to be. Seismic events recorded by the same station with highly correlated waveforms almost certainly have a similar location and source type, so clusters of events within a swarm can quickly be identified as earthquakes. We have developed a number of tools that can be used to exploit the high degree of waveform similarity expected to be associated with swarms/sequences. Dendro Tool measures correlations between known events. The Waveform Correlation Detector is intended to act as a detector, finding events in raw data which correlate with known events. The Self Scanner is used to find all correlated segments within a raw data steam and does not require an event library. All three techniques together provide an opportunity to study the similarities of events in an aftershock sequence in different ways. To comprehensively characterize the benefits and limits of waveform correlation techniques, we studied 3 aftershock sequences, using our 3 tools, at multiple stations. We explored the effects of station distance and event magnitudes on correlation results. Lastly, we show the reduction in detection threshold and analyst workload offered by waveform correlation techniques compared to STA/LTA based detection. We analyzed 4 days of data from each aftershock sequence using all three methods. Most known events clustered in a similar manner across the toolsets. Up to 25% of catalogued events were found to be a member of a cluster. In

  10. Feature Detection, Characterization and Confirmation Methodology: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karasaki, Kenzi; Apps, John; Doughty, Christine; Gwatney, Hope; Onishi, Celia Tiemi; Trautz, Robert; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2007-03-01

    This is the final report of the NUMO-LBNL collaborative project: Feature Detection, Characterization and Confirmation Methodology under NUMO-DOE/LBNL collaboration agreement, the task description of which can be found in the Appendix. We examine site characterization projects from several sites in the world. The list includes Yucca Mountain in the USA, Tono and Horonobe in Japan, AECL in Canada, sites in Sweden, and Olkiluoto in Finland. We identify important geologic features and parameters common to most (or all) sites to provide useful information for future repository siting activity. At first glance, one could question whether there was any commonality among the sites, which are in different rock types at different locations. For example, the planned Yucca Mountain site is a dry repository in unsaturated tuff, whereas the Swedish sites are situated in saturated granite. However, the study concludes that indeed there are a number of important common features and parameters among all the sites--namely, (1) fault properties, (2) fracture-matrix interaction (3) groundwater flux, (4) boundary conditions, and (5) the permeability and porosity of the materials. We list the lessons learned from the Yucca Mountain Project and other site characterization programs. Most programs have by and large been quite successful. Nonetheless, there are definitely 'should-haves' and 'could-haves', or lessons to be learned, in all these programs. Although each site characterization program has some unique aspects, we believe that these crosscutting lessons can be very useful for future site investigations to be conducted in Japan. One of the most common lessons learned is that a repository program should allow for flexibility, in both schedule and approach. We examine field investigation technologies used to collect site characterization data in the field. An extensive list of existing field technologies is presented, with some discussion on usage and limitations

  11. Feature Detection, Characterization and Confirmation Methodology: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karasaki, Kenzi; Apps, John; Doughty, Christine; Gwatney, Hope; Onishi, Celia Tiemi; Trautz, Robert; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2007-03-01

    This is the final report of the NUMO-LBNL collaborative project: Feature Detection, Characterization and Confirmation Methodology under NUMO-DOE/LBNL collaboration agreement, the task description of which can be found in the Appendix. We examine site characterization projects from several sites in the world. The list includes Yucca Mountain in the USA, Tono and Horonobe in Japan, AECL in Canada, sites in Sweden, and Olkiluoto in Finland. We identify important geologic features and parameters common to most (or all) sites to provide useful information for future repository siting activity. At first glance, one could question whether there was any commonality among the sites, which are in different rock types at different locations. For example, the planned Yucca Mountain site is a dry repository in unsaturated tuff, whereas the Swedish sites are situated in saturated granite. However, the study concludes that indeed there are a number of important common features and parameters among all the sites--namely, (1) fault properties, (2) fracture-matrix interaction (3) groundwater flux, (4) boundary conditions, and (5) the permeability and porosity of the materials. We list the lessons learned from the Yucca Mountain Project and other site characterization programs. Most programs have by and large been quite successful. Nonetheless, there are definitely 'should-haves' and 'could-haves', or lessons to be learned, in all these programs. Although each site characterization program has some unique aspects, we believe that these crosscutting lessons can be very useful for future site investigations to be conducted in Japan. One of the most common lessons learned is that a repository program should allow for flexibility, in both schedule and approach. We examine field investigation technologies used to collect site characterization data in the field. An extensive list of existing field technologies is presented, with some discussion on usage and limitations

  12. Detection methods for legionellae. Possibilities and limitations of detection methods; Niet alle detectiemethoden geschikt voor legionellagroei. Mogelijkheden en beperkingen detectiemethoden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheffer, W.

    2011-06-15

    This article provides an overview of existing and new methods for detecting legionella in water. It offers insight in the characteristics and applications of existing and new detection methods. However, it is impossible to assess the value of alternative methods at the moment. That will require additional research. [Dutch] Een overzicht is gemaakt van bestaande en nieuwe methoden om legionella in water aan te tonen. Daarmee wordt inzicht verkregen in de kenmerken en toepassingsmogelijkheden van bestaande en nieuwe detectiemethoden. De waarde van alternatieve methoden in een installatie kan echter nog niet worden beoordeeld. Daarvoor is nader onderzoek nodig.

  13. Are we there yet? Time to detection of nanohertz gravitational waves based on pulsar-timing array limits

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, S R; Ellis, J A; Mingarelli, C M F; Lazio, T J W; van Haasteren, R

    2015-01-01

    Decade-long timing observations of arrays of millisecond pulsars have placed highly constraining upper limits on the amplitude of the nanohertz gravitational-wave stochastic signal from the mergers of supermassive black-hole binaries ($\\sim 10^{-15}$ strain at $f = 1/\\mathrm{yr}$). These limits suggest that binary merger rates have been overestimated, or that environmental influences from nuclear gas or stars accelerate orbital decay, reducing the gravitational-wave signal at the lowest, most sensitive frequencies. This prompts the question whether nanohertz gravitational waves are likely to be detected in the near future. In this letter, we answer this question quantitatively using simple statistical estimates, deriving the range of true signal amplitudes that are compatible with current upper limits, and computing expected detection probabilities as a function of observation time. We conclude that small arrays consisting of the pulsars with the least timing noise, which yield the tightest upper limits, have...

  14. Addressing the Limit of Detectability of Residual Oxide Discontinuities in Friction Stir Butt Welds of Aluminum using Phased Array Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, P. H.

    2008-01-01

    This activity seeks to estimate a theoretical upper bound of detectability for a layer of oxide embedded in a friction stir weld in aluminum. The oxide is theoretically modeled as an ideal planar layer of aluminum oxide, oriented normal to an interrogating ultrasound beam. Experimentally-measured grain scattering level is used to represent the practical noise floor. Echoes from naturally-occurring oxides will necessarily fall below this theoretical limit, and must be above the measurement noise to be potentially detectable.

  15. Final Report on Actinide Glass Scintillators for Fast Neutron Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bliss, Mary; Stave, Jean A.

    2012-10-01

    This is the final report of an experimental investigation of actinide glass scintillators for fast-neutron detection. It covers work performed during FY2012. This supplements a previous report, PNNL-20854 “Initial Characterization of Thorium-loaded Glasses for Fast Neutron Detection” (October 2011). The work in FY2012 was done with funding remaining from FY2011. As noted in PNNL-20854, the glasses tested prior to July 2011 were erroneously identified as scintillators. The decision was then made to start from “scratch” with a literature survey and some test melts with a non-radioactive glass composition that could later be fabricated with select actinides, most likely thorium. The normal stand-in for thorium in radioactive waste glasses is cerium in the same oxidation state. Since cerium in the 3+ state is used as the light emitter in many scintillating glasses, the next most common substitute was used: hafnium. Three hafnium glasses were melted. Two melts were colored amber and a third was clear. It barely scintillated when exposed to alpha particles. The uses and applications for a scintillating fast neutron detector are important enough that the search for such a material should not be totally abandoned. This current effort focused on actinides that have very high neutron capture energy releases but low neutron capture cross sections. This results in very long counting times and poor signal to noise when working with sealed sources. These materials are best for high flux applications and access to neutron generators or reactors would enable better test scenarios. The total energy of the neutron capture reaction is not the only factor to focus on in isotope selection. Many neutron capture reactions result in energetic gamma rays that require large volumes or high densities to detect. If the scintillator is to separate neutrons from gamma rays, the capture reactions should produce heavy particles and few gamma rays. This would improve the detection of a

  16. Automated baseline change detection -- Phases 1 and 2. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byler, E.

    1997-10-31

    The primary objective of this project is to apply robotic and optical sensor technology to the operational inspection of mixed toxic and radioactive waste stored in barrels, using Automated Baseline Change Detection (ABCD), based on image subtraction. Absolute change detection is based on detecting any visible physical changes, regardless of cause, between a current inspection image of a barrel and an archived baseline image of the same barrel. Thus, in addition to rust, the ABCD system can also detect corrosion, leaks, dents, and bulges. The ABCD approach and method rely on precise camera positioning and repositioning relative to the barrel and on feature recognition in images. The ABCD image processing software was installed on a robotic vehicle developed under a related DOE/FETC contract DE-AC21-92MC29112 Intelligent Mobile Sensor System (IMSS) and integrated with the electronics and software. This vehicle was designed especially to navigate in DOE Waste Storage Facilities. Initial system testing was performed at Fernald in June 1996. After some further development and more extensive integration the prototype integrated system was installed and tested at the Radioactive Waste Management Facility (RWMC) at INEEL beginning in April 1997 through the present (November 1997). The integrated system, composed of ABCD imaging software and IMSS mobility base, is called MISS EVE (Mobile Intelligent Sensor System--Environmental Validation Expert). Evaluation of the integrated system in RWMC Building 628, containing approximately 10,000 drums, demonstrated an easy to use system with the ability to properly navigate through the facility, image all the defined drums, and process the results into a report delivered to the operator on a GUI interface and on hard copy. Further work is needed to make the brassboard system more operationally robust.

  17. Scattering of light by a periodic structure in the presence of randomness IV. Limit of detection by curve fitting

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Chatterjee; V C Vani

    2005-09-01

    In the context of scattering of light, we determine the extent of randomness within which a hidden periodic part can still be detected. The detection is carried out using a technique called the extended matched filtering, first introduced by us in this context. The earlier prediction, before our technique was introduced, had placed the limit of detection, by intensity measurements alone, at (0/) ∼ 0.33, where 0 is the coherence length of light for scattering by the rough part of the surface and is the wavelength of the periodic part of the surface. In our earlier works we have shown that by intensity measurements alone, the limit of detection can be taken to a much lower value of (0/), when the extended matched filtering method is employed. In this paper we follow the extended matched filtering method, and try to reach the lowest possible value of detection in (0/) by fitting the data to a polynomial. It is concluded by our numerical work that the lowest possible limit for detection from intensity measurements alone is (0/) = 0.11.

  18. Pushing the limits: detecting H2 emission from faint bipolar planetary nebulae in the IPHAS sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Larios, G.; Guerrero, M. A.; Sabin, L.; Santamaría, E.

    2017-09-01

    We have obtained deep narrowband images in the near-infrared H2 λ2.122 μm emission line for a sample of 15 faint Isaac Newton Telescope Photometric H α Survey (IPHAS) bipolar planetary nebulae (PNe) to search for molecular material. H2 emission is found in most of them (14 out of 15), mostly associated with rings at their equatorial regions and with their bipolar lobes. These detections add to the high occurrence of H2 emission among bipolar PNe reported in previous works, resulting from the large reservoir of molecular material in these sources and the suitable excitation conditions for H2 emission. The correlation between detailed bipolar morphology and H2 luminosity is also confirmed: bipolar PNe with broad equatorial rings (R-BPNe) have almost no continuum emission, are H2 brighter and have larger H2/Br γ line ratio than bipolar PNe with pinched equatorial waists (W-BPNe). The origin of this dichotomy is unclear. The larger size and age of R-BPNe are consistent with shock excitation of H2, whereas ultraviolet pumping is most likely the excitation mechanism in the smaller and younger W-BPNe, which would explain their lower H2 luminosity. Although both types of bipolar PNe seem to proceed from the same progenitor population, this does not imply that R-BPNe descend from W-BPNe. Otherwise, we note that some of the H2-weak bipolar PNe harbor post-common envelope binary systems and symbiotic stars. Finally, we suggest that the long-living H2 emission from R-BPNe arises from a discrete distribution of compact knots embedded within the ionized gas at the equatorial region.

  19. Management of Limited Interocclusal Distance with the Aid of a Modified Surgical Guide: A Clinical Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Geramipanah

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In completely edentulous patients, limited interarch distance can compromise conventional prosthetic fabrication. Bone reduction through various surgical procedures has been recommended to restore an acceptable interarch distance. In such circumstances, a surgical guide built on a mounted cast can be used to minimize and control the amount of bone reduction performed. In the present report, an innovative method of fabrication of surgical guide has been described.Keywords: Osteotomy; Stents; Dental Articulators; Denture, Complete

  20. Unveiling the Gamma-Ray Source Count Distribution Below the Fermi Detection Limit with Photon Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zechlin, Hannes-S.; Cuoco, Alessandro; Donato, Fiorenza; Fornengo, Nicolao; Vittino, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    The source-count distribution as a function of their flux, {dN}/{dS}, is one of the main quantities characterizing gamma-ray source populations. We employ statistical properties of the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) photon counts map to measure the composition of the extragalactic gamma-ray sky at high latitudes (| b| ≥slant 30°) between 1 and 10 GeV. We present a new method, generalizing the use of standard pixel-count statistics, to decompose the total observed gamma-ray emission into (a) point-source contributions, (b) the Galactic foreground contribution, and (c) a truly diffuse isotropic background contribution. Using the 6 yr Fermi-LAT data set (P7REP), we show that the {dN}/{dS} distribution in the regime of so far undetected point sources can be consistently described with a power law with an index between 1.9 and 2.0. We measure {dN}/{dS} down to an integral flux of ˜ 2× {10}-11 {{cm}}-2 {{{s}}}-1, improving beyond the 3FGL catalog detection limit by about one order of magnitude. The overall {dN}/{dS} distribution is consistent with a broken power law, with a break at {2.1}-1.3+1.0× {10}-8 {{cm}}-2 {{{s}}}-1. The power-law index {n}1={3.1}-0.5+0.7 for bright sources above the break hardens to {n}2=1.97+/- 0.03 for fainter sources below the break. A possible second break of the {dN}/{dS} distribution is constrained to be at fluxes below 6.4× {10}-11 {{cm}}-2 {{{s}}}-1 at 95% confidence level. The high-latitude gamma-ray sky between 1 and 10 GeV is shown to be composed of ˜25% point sources, ˜69.3% diffuse Galactic foreground emission, and ˜6% isotropic diffuse background.

  1. Eddy-covariance data with low signal-to-noise ratio: time-lag determination, uncertainties and limit of detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Langford

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available All eddy-covariance flux measurements are associated with random uncertainties which are a combination of sampling error due to natural variability in turbulence and sensor noise. The former is the principal error for systems where the signal-to-noise ratio of the analyser is high, as is usually the case when measuring fluxes of heat, CO2 or H2O. Where signal is limited, which is often the case for measurements of other trace gases and aerosols, instrument uncertainties dominate. We are here applying a consistent approach based on auto- and cross-covariance functions to quantifying the total random flux error and the random error due to instrument noise separately. As with previous approaches, the random error quantification assumes that the time-lag between wind and concentration measurement is known. However, if combined with commonly used automated methods that identify the individual time-lag by looking for the maximum in the cross-covariance function of the two entities, analyser noise additionally leads to a systematic bias in the fluxes. Combining datasets from several analysers and using simulations we show that the method of time-lag determination becomes increasingly important as the magnitude of the instrument error approaches that of the sampling error. The flux bias can be particularly significant for disjunct data, whereas using a prescribed time-lag eliminates these effects (provided the time-lag does not fluctuate unduly over time. We also demonstrate that when sampling at higher elevations, where low frequency turbulence dominates and covariance peaks are broader, both the probability and magnitude of bias are magnified. We show that the statistical significance of noisy flux data can be increased (limit of detection can be decreased by appropriate averaging of individual fluxes, but only if systematic biases are avoided by using a prescribed time-lag. Finally, we make recommendations for the analysis and reporting of data with

  2. Improving the detection limits of antispasmodic drugs electrodes by using modified membrane sensors with inner solid contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Hosny; Issa, Y M; Abu-Shawish, Hazem M

    2007-05-09

    Three coated wire electrodes (CWEs) for the antispasmodic drugs; dicyclomine (Dc), mebeverine (Mv) and drotaverine (Dv) hydrochlorides were developed. Each electrode based on ion-associate of a heteropoly anion with the drug cation incorporated in membrane sensor modified with graphite and deposited on silver internal solid contact. The influence of addition of graphite to the membranes and the type of the internal solid contact on the potentiometric responses of the electrodes was investigated. The characteristics of the new electrodes were compared to the characteristics of previously reported traditional liquid inner contact electrodes of the same drugs. The lower detection limits of the proposed electrodes were somewhat better than those observed with the corresponding liquid contact ISEs and reached (1.2-2.0)x10(-7)M. The potentiometric selectivity of the CWEs revealed a significant improvement and much faster response times compared to the liquid contact ISEs. The practical utility of each electrode has been demonstrated by using it successfully in potentiometric determination of its respective drug in pharmaceutical preparations both in batch and flow injection conditions. Each electrode was also used as an indicator electrode in the potentiometric titration of the drug against standard silicotungstic acid and in potentiometric determination of the drug concentration in urine samples.

  3. Rapid methods for the detection of foodborne bacterial pathogens: principles, applications, advantages and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Jodi Woan-Fei; Ab Mutalib, Nurul-Syakima; Chan, Kok-Gan; Lee, Learn-Han

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of foodborne diseases has increased over the years and resulted in major public health problem globally. Foodborne pathogens can be found in various foods and it is important to detect foodborne pathogens to provide safe food supply and to prevent foodborne diseases. The conventional methods used to detect foodborne pathogen are time consuming and laborious. Hence, a variety of methods have been developed for rapid detection of foodborne pathogens as it is required in many food analyses. Rapid detection methods can be categorized into nucleic acid-based, biosensor-based and immunological-based methods. This review emphasizes on the principles and application of recent rapid methods for the detection of foodborne bacterial pathogens. Detection methods included are simple polymerase chain reaction (PCR), multiplex PCR, real-time PCR, nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA), loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) and oligonucleotide DNA microarray which classified as nucleic acid-based methods; optical, electrochemical and mass-based biosensors which classified as biosensor-based methods; enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and lateral flow immunoassay which classified as immunological-based methods. In general, rapid detection methods are generally time-efficient, sensitive, specific and labor-saving. The developments of rapid detection methods are vital in prevention and treatment of foodborne diseases. PMID:25628612

  4. Rapid methods for the detection of foodborne bacterial pathogens: principles, applications, advantages and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Jodi Woan-Fei; Ab Mutalib, Nurul-Syakima; Chan, Kok-Gan; Lee, Learn-Han

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of foodborne diseases has increased over the years and resulted in major public health problem globally. Foodborne pathogens can be found in various foods and it is important to detect foodborne pathogens to provide safe food supply and to prevent foodborne diseases. The conventional methods used to detect foodborne pathogen are time consuming and laborious. Hence, a variety of methods have been developed for rapid detection of foodborne pathogens as it is required in many food analyses. Rapid detection methods can be categorized into nucleic acid-based, biosensor-based and immunological-based methods. This review emphasizes on the principles and application of recent rapid methods for the detection of foodborne bacterial pathogens. Detection methods included are simple polymerase chain reaction (PCR), multiplex PCR, real-time PCR, nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA), loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) and oligonucleotide DNA microarray which classified as nucleic acid-based methods; optical, electrochemical and mass-based biosensors which classified as biosensor-based methods; enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and lateral flow immunoassay which classified as immunological-based methods. In general, rapid detection methods are generally time-efficient, sensitive, specific and labor-saving. The developments of rapid detection methods are vital in prevention and treatment of foodborne diseases.

  5. Rapid Methods for the Detection of Foodborne Bacterial Pathogens: Principles, Applications, Advantages and Limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Law eJodi Woan-Fei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of foodborne diseases has increased over the years and resulted in major public health problem globally. Foodborne pathogens can be found in various foods and it is important to detect foodborne pathogens to provide safe food supply and to prevent foodborne diseases. The conventional methods used to detect foodborne pathogen are time consuming and laborious. Hence, a variety of methods have been developed for rapid detection of foodborne pathogens as it is required in many food analyses. Rapid detection methods can be categorized into nucleic acid-based, biosensor-based and immunological-based methods. This review emphasizes on the principles and application of recent rapid methods for the detection of foodborne bacterial pathogens. Detection methods included are simple polymerase chain reaction (PCR, multiplex PCR, real-time PCR, nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA, loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP and oligonucleotide DNA microarray which classified as nucleic acid-based methods; optical, electrochemical and mass-based biosensors which classified as biosensor-based methods; enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and lateral flow immunoassay which classified as immunological-based methods. In general, rapid detection methods are generally time-efficient, sensitive, specific and labor-saving. The developments of rapid detection methods are vital in prevention and treatment of foodborne diseases.

  6. Antimony speciation in soils: improving the detection limits using post-column pre-reduction hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectroscopy (HPLC/pre-reduction/HG-AFS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, Waldo; Olivares, David; Bravo, Manuel; Feldmann, Jorg; Raab, Andrea

    2011-04-15

    HG-AFS is highly sensitive and low cost detection system and its use for antimony chemical speciation coupled to HPLC is gaining popularity. However speciation analysis in soils is strongly hampered because the most efficient extractant reported in the literature (oxalic acid) strongly inhibits the generation of SbH(3) by Sb(V), the major species in this kind of matrix, severely affecting its detection limits. The purpose of this research is to reduce the detection limit of Sb(V), by using a post column on-line reduction system with l-cysteine reagent (HPLC/pre-reduction/HG-AFS). The system was optimized by experimental design, optimum conditions found were 2% (w/v) and 10°C temperature coil. Detection limits of Sb(V) and Sb(III) in oxalic acid (0.25 mol L(-1)) were improved from 0.3 and 0.1 μg L(-1) to 0.07 and 0.07 μg L(-1), respectively. The methodology developed was applied to Chilean soils, where Sb(V) was the predominant species. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Reporter-encapsulated liposomes on graphene field effect transistors for signal enhanced detection of physiological enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hu; Lim, Seng Koon; Chen, Peng; Huang, Jingfeng; Wang, Yi; Palaniappan, Alagappan; Platt, Mark; Liedberg, Bo; Tok, Alfred Iing Yoong

    2015-02-01

    A novel approach for enzymatic assay using reporter-encapsulated liposomes on graphene field effect transistors (FET) is proposed. This approach involves real time monitoring of drain current (Id) of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) upon rupture of reporter-encapsulated 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) liposomes triggered by enzymes. For validation of the proposed approach, 2,4,6-trinitrophenol (TNP) is used as the reporter for specific detection of phospholipase A2 (PLA2), a key enzyme in various membrane related physiological processes. Experimental results revealed that Id increased with PLA2 concentration, which is attributed to the interaction between released TNP and rGO. The limit of detection (LOD) achieved by the proposed approach was 80 pM, which is superior to most assays reported previously and much lower than the cut-off level of circulating secretory PLA2 (2.07 nM). Besides the high accuracy of the electronic detection methodology, the signal enhancement effect realized by the excess concentration of TNP (approximately 1 mM) in liposomes is believed to be the main reason for the significantly enhanced sensitivity of the proposed assay, indicating great potential for further improvement in the sensitivity by increasing the concentration of TNP. In addition, the proposed approach is rapid (incubation time ≤ 10 min) and label-free, thus showing great potential for practical applications in the future.

  8. Fast Detection of Nutrient Limitation in Macroalgae and Seagrass with Nutrient-Induced Fluorescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Haan, J.; Huisman, J.; Dekker, F.; ten Brinke, J.L.; Ford, A.K.; van Ooijen, J.; van Duyl, F.C.; Vermeij, M.J.A.; Visser, P.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Rapid determination of which nutrients limit the primary production of macroalgae and seagrasses is vital for understanding the impacts of eutrophication on marine and freshwater ecosystems. However, current methods to assess nutrient limitation are often cumbersome and time consuming. F

  9. The Medicare Cost Report and the limits of hospital accountability: improving financial accounting data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, N M; Magnus, S A

    2001-02-01

    Health policy makers, legislators, providers, payers, and a broad range of other players in the health care market routinely seek information on hospital financial performance. Yet the data at their disposal are limited, especially since hospitals' audited financial statements--the "gold standard" in hospital financial reporting--are not publicly available in many states. As a result, the Medicare Cost Report (MCR), filed annually by most U.S. hospitals in order to receive payment for treating Medicare patients, has become the primary public source of hospital financial information. However, financial accounting elements in the MCR are unreliable, poorly defined, and lacking in critical detail. Comparative analyses of MCRs and matched, audited financial statements reveal long-standing problems with the MCR's data, including major differences in reported profits; variations in the reporting of both revenues and expenses; an absence of relevant details, such as charity care, bad debt, operating versus nonoperating income, and affiliate transactions; an inconsistent classification of changes in net assets; and a failure to provide cash flow statements. Because of these problems, MCR financial data give only a limited and often inaccurate picture of the financial position of hospitals. Audited financial statements provide a more complete perspective, enabling analysts to address important questions left unanswered by the MCR data. Regulatory action is needed to create a national database of financial information based upon audited statements.

  10. Electrochemical flow injection analysis of hydrazine in an excess of an active pharmaceutical ingredient: achieving pharmaceutical detection limits electrochemically.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Channon, Robert B; Joseph, Maxim B; Bitziou, Eleni; Bristow, Anthony W T; Ray, Andrew D; Macpherson, Julie V

    2015-10-06

    The quantification of genotoxic impurities (GIs) such as hydrazine (HZ) is of critical importance in the pharmaceutical industry in order to uphold drug safety. HZ is a particularly intractable GI and its detection represents a significant technical challenge. Here, we present, for the first time, the use of electrochemical analysis to achieve the required detection limits by the pharmaceutical industry for the detection of HZ in the presence of a large excess of a common active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), acetaminophen (ACM) which itself is redox active, typical of many APIs. A flow injection analysis approach with electrochemical detection (FIA-EC) is utilized, in conjunction with a coplanar boron doped diamond (BDD) microband electrode, insulated in an insulating diamond platform for durability and integrated into a two piece flow cell. In order to separate the electrochemical signature for HZ such that it is not obscured by that of the ACM (present in excess), the BDD electrode is functionalized with Pt nanoparticles (NPs) to significantly shift the half wave potential for HZ oxidation to less positive potentials. Microstereolithography was used to fabricate flow cells with defined hydrodynamics which minimize dispersion of the analyte and optimize detection sensitivity. Importantly, the Pt NPs were shown to be stable under flow, and a limit of detection of 64.5 nM or 0.274 ppm for HZ with respect to the ACM, present in excess, was achieved. This represents the first electrochemical approach which surpasses the required detection limits set by the pharmaceutical industry for HZ detection in the presence of an API and paves the wave for online analysis and application to other GI and API systems.

  11. DNA isolation protocols affect the detection limit of PCR approaches of bacteria in samples from the human gastrointestinal tract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zoetendal, E.G.; Ben-Amor, K.; Akkermans, A.D.L.; Abee, T.; Vos, de W.M.

    2001-01-01

    A major concern in molecular ecological studies is the lysis efficiency of different bacteria in a complex ecosystem. We used a PCR-based 16S rDNA approach to determine the effect of two DNA isolation protocols (i.e. the bead beating and Triton-X100 method) on the detection limit of seven feces-asso

  12. SUPPLEMENT TO EPA COMPENDIUM METHOD TO-15 - REDUCTION OF METHOD DETECTION LIMITS TO MEET VAPOR INTRUSION MONITORING NEEDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Supplement to EPA Compendium Method TO-15 provides guidance for reducing the method detection limit (MDL) for the compound 1,1- dichloroethene (1,1-DCE) and for other volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from 0.5 ppbv, as cited in Method TO-15, to much lower concentrations. R...

  13. Re-evaluation of groundwater monitoring data for glyphosate and bentazone by taking detection limits into account

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Claus Toni; Ritz, Christian; Gerhard, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    .e. samples with concentrations below the detection limit, as left-censored observations. The median calculated pesticide concentrations are shown to be reduced 10(4) to 10(5) fold for two representative herbicides (glyphosate and bentazone) relative to the median concentrations based upon observations above...

  14. Maximum detection range limitation of pulse laser radar with Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hanjun; Xu, Benlian; Xu, Huigang; Chen, Jingbo; Fu, Yadan

    2015-05-01

    When designing and evaluating the performance of laser radar system, maximum detection range achievable is an essential parameter. The purpose of this paper is to propose a theoretical model of maximum detection range for simulating the Geiger-mode laser radar's ranging performance. Based on the laser radar equation and the requirement of the minimum acceptable detection probability, and assuming the primary electrons triggered by the echo photons obey Poisson statistics, the maximum range theoretical model is established. By using the system design parameters, the influence of five main factors, namely emitted pulse energy, noise, echo position, atmospheric attenuation coefficient, and target reflectivity on the maximum detection range are investigated. The results show that stronger emitted pulse energy, lower noise level, more front echo position in the range gate, higher atmospheric attenuation coefficient, and higher target reflectivity can result in greater maximum detection range. It is also shown that it's important to select the minimum acceptable detection probability, which is equivalent to the system signal-to-noise ratio for producing greater maximum detection range and lower false-alarm probability.

  15. Final LDRD report : advanced plastic scintillators for neutron detection.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vance, Andrew L.; Mascarenhas, Nicholas; O' Bryan, Greg; Mrowka, Stanley

    2010-09-01

    This report summarizes the results of a one-year, feasibility-scale LDRD project that was conducted with the goal of developing new plastic scintillators capable of pulse shape discrimination (PSD) for neutron detection. Copolymers composed of matrix materials such as poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and blocks containing trans-stilbene (tSB) as the scintillator component were prepared and tested for gamma/neutron response. Block copolymer synthesis utilizing tSBMA proved unsuccessful so random copolymers containing up to 30% tSB were prepared. These copolymers were found to function as scintillators upon exposure to gamma radiation; however, they did not exhibit PSD when exposed to a neutron source. This project, while falling short of its ultimate goal, demonstrated the possible utility of single-component, undoped plastics as scintillators for applications that do not require PSD.

  16. Glanzmann thrombasthenia detected because of knee hemarthrosis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urakawa, Hiroshi; Nishida, Yoshihiro; Tsukushi, Satoshi; Katsumi, Akira; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2010-11-01

    Glanzmann thrombasthenia (GT) is a rare bleeding syndrome, which is characterized by a lack of platelet aggregation. We report a case of GT that was first detected because of the presence of hemarthrosis of the knee. The patient was an 8-year-old boy who presented with a sudden, painful left knee after outdoor games. Till the first visit to our hospital, he had not been diagnosed with GT despite a history of bleeding tendency, notably purpura in areas of easy bruising and prolonged bleeding time after abrasions and insect stings. Gross blood was found at arthrocentesis of the left knee, and GT was diagnosed on the basis of prolonged bleeding time, lack of platelet aggregation with ADP and collagen, and absence of platelet surface glycoprotein IIb/IIIa. Although hemarthrosis of GT is rare, this disease should be considered in a patient with bleeding tendency and prolonged bleeding time.

  17. Registered Report: Measuring Unconscious Deception Detection by Skin Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Elisabeth Van 't Veer

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Findings from the deception detection literature suggest that although people are not skilled in consciously detecting a liar, they may intuit that something about the person telling a lie is off. In the current proposal, we argue that observing a liar influences the observer’s physiology even though the observer may not be consciously aware of being lied to (i.e., the observers’ direct deception judgment does not accurately differentiate between liars and truth-tellers. To test this hypothesis, participants’ finger temperature will be measured while they watch videos of persons who are either honest or dishonest about their identity. We hypothesize that skin temperature will be lower when observing a liar than when observing a truth-teller. Additionally, we test whether perceiving a liar influences finger skin temperature differently when an individual is, or is not, alerted to the possibility of deceit. We do this by varying participants’ awareness of the fact that they might be lied to. Next to measuring physiological responses to liars and truth-tellers, self-reported direct and indirect veracity judgments (i.e., trustworthiness and liking of the target persons will be assessed. We hypothesize that indirect veracity judgments will better distinguish between liars and truth-tellers than direct veracity judgments.

  18. Limits on surface gravities of Kepler planet-candidate host stars from non-detection of solar-like oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campante, T. L.; Chaplin, W. J.; Handberg, R.; Miglio, A.; Davies, G. R.; Elsworth, Y. P. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Lund, M. N.; Arentoft, T.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Karoff, C.; Kjeldsen, H.; Lundkvist, M. [Stellar Astrophysics Centre (SAC), Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Huber, D. [NASA Ames Research Center, MS 244-30, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Hekker, S. [Astronomical Institute, " Anton Pannekoek," University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); García, R. A. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Université Paris Diderot (France); IRFU/SAp, Centre de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Corsaro, E. [Instituut voor Sterrenkunde, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Basu, S. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Bedding, T. R. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia); Gilliland, R. L. [Center for Exoplanets and Habitable Worlds, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Kawaler, S. D., E-mail: campante@bison.ph.bham.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); and others

    2014-03-10

    We present a novel method for estimating lower-limit surface gravities (log g) of Kepler targets whose data do not allow the detection of solar-like oscillations. The method is tested using an ensemble of solar-type stars observed in the context of the Kepler Asteroseismic Science Consortium. We then proceed to estimate lower-limit log g for a cohort of Kepler solar-type planet-candidate host stars with no detected oscillations. Limits on fundamental stellar properties, as provided by this work, are likely to be useful in the characterization of the corresponding candidate planetary systems. Furthermore, an important byproduct of the current work is the confirmation that amplitudes of solar-like oscillations are suppressed in stars with increased levels of surface magnetic activity.

  19. Limits on surface gravities of Kepler planet-candidate host stars from non-detection of solar-like oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Campante, T L; Lund, M N; Huber, D; Hekker, S; García, R A; Corsaro, E; Handberg, R; Miglio, A; Arentoft, T; Basu, S; Bedding, T R; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Davies, G R; Elsworth, Y P; Gilliland, R L; Karoff, C; Kawaler, S D; Kjeldsen, H; Lundkvist, M; Metcalfe, T S; Aguirre, V Silva; Stello, D

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel method for estimating lower-limit surface gravities log g of Kepler targets whose data do not allow the detection of solar-like oscillations. The method is tested using an ensemble of solar-type stars observed in the context of the Kepler Asteroseismic Science Consortium. We then proceed to estimate lower-limit log g for a cohort of Kepler solar-type planet-candidate host stars with no detected oscillations. Limits on fundamental stellar properties, as provided by this work, are likely to be useful in the characterization of the corresponding candidate planetary systems. Furthermore, an important byproduct of the current work is the confirmation that amplitudes of solar-like oscillations are suppressed in stars with increased levels of surface magnetic activity.

  20. Airborne virus sampling - Efficiencies of samplers and their detection limits for infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang Zhao, Yang; Aarnink, A.J.A.; Wang, Wei; Fabri, T.; Groot Koerkamp, P.W.G.; Jong, de M.C.M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. The airborne transmission of infectious diseases in livestock production is increasingly receiving research attention. Reliable techniques of air sampling are crucial to underpin the findings of such studies. This study evaluated the physical and biological efficiencies and detection l

  1. Limits to detectability of land degradation by trend analysis of vegetation index data

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wessels, Konrad J

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper demonstrates a simulation approach for testing the sensitivity of linear and non-parametric trend analysis methods applied to remotely sensed vegetation index data for the detection of land degradation. The intensity, rate and timing...

  2. Exploring the Thermal Limits of IR-Based Automatic Whale Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    whilst concurrently recording their position with visual observations through a theodolite . We deployed a team of 2 (IR technology) plus 6 (visual...recorded. Theodolite measurements of whales were conducted (as part of different protocols, see table below) for a total of 170h distributed across this...of pods which were already detected. Open squares: detections by the theodolite team to obtain ground truth. IMPACT/APPLICATIONS The data

  3. ARE WE THERE YET? TIME TO DETECTION OF NANOHERTZ GRAVITATIONAL WAVES BASED ON PULSAR-TIMING ARRAY LIMITS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, S. R.; Vallisneri, M.; Ellis, J. A.; Mingarelli, C. M. F.; Lazio, T. J. W.; Haasteren, R. van, E-mail: Stephen.R.Taylor@jpl.nasa.gov [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Decade-long timing observations of arrays of millisecond pulsars have placed highly constraining upper limits on the amplitude of the nanohertz gravitational-wave stochastic signal from the mergers of supermassive black hole binaries (∼10{sup −15} strain at f = 1 yr{sup −1}). These limits suggest that binary merger rates have been overestimated, or that environmental influences from nuclear gas or stars accelerate orbital decay, reducing the gravitational-wave signal at the lowest, most sensitive frequencies. This prompts the question whether nanohertz gravitational waves (GWs) are likely to be detected in the near future. In this Letter, we answer this question quantitatively using simple statistical estimates, deriving the range of true signal amplitudes that are compatible with current upper limits, and computing expected detection probabilities as a function of observation time. We conclude that small arrays consisting of the pulsars with the least timing noise, which yield the tightest upper limits, have discouraging prospects of making a detection in the next two decades. By contrast, we find large arrays are crucial to detection because the quadrupolar spatial correlations induced by GWs can be well sampled by many pulsar pairs. Indeed, timing programs that monitor a large and expanding set of pulsars have an ∼80% probability of detecting GWs within the next 10 years, under assumptions on merger rates and environmental influences ranging from optimistic to conservative. Even in the extreme case where 90% of binaries stall before merger and environmental coupling effects diminish low-frequency gravitational-wave power, detection is delayed by at most a few years.

  4. Development of ion-selective electrodes: application in detection system of FIA and strategies for the improvement of detection limit

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Resumo: O presente trabalho de doutorado descreve o desenvolvimento de eletrodos íon-seletivos para cálcio, potássio, sódio e cloreto em sistema de injeção em fluxo e sua aplicação para determinação simultânea em sucos de frutas, bem como o desenvolvimento de eletrodos íon-seletivos de contato sólido com baixo limite de detecção. A construção dos eletrodos íon-seletivos para os íons cálcio, potássio, sódio e cloreto foi primeiramente realizado em estado estacionário para logo ser incorporada ...

  5. Reporting surgical site infections following total hip and knee arthroplasty: impact of limiting surveillance to the operative hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoe, Deborah S; Avery, Taliser R; Platt, Richard; Huang, Susan S

    2013-11-01

    Public reporting of surgical site infections (SSIs) by hospitals is largely limited to infections detected during surgical hospitalizations or readmissions to the same facility. SSI rates may be underestimated if patients with SSIs are readmitted to other hospitals. We assessed the impact of readmissions to other facilities on hospitals' SSI rates following primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA). This was a retrospective cohort study of all patients who underwent primary THA or TKA at California hospitals between 1 January 2006 and 31 December 2009. SSIs were identified using ICD-9-CM diagnosis codes predictive of SSI assigned at any California hospital within 365 days of surgery using a statewide repository of hospital data that allowed tracking of patients between facilities. We used statewide data to estimate the fraction of each hospital's THA and TKA SSIs identified at the operative hospital versus other hospitals. A total of 91 121 THA and 121 640 TKA procedures were identified. Based on diagnosis codes, SSIs developed following 2214 (2.3%) THAs and 2465 (2.0%) TKAs. Seventeen percent of SSIs would have been missed by operative hospital surveillance alone. The proportion of hospitals' SSIs detected at nonoperative hospitals ranged from 0% to 100%. Including SSIs detected at nonoperative hospitals resulted in better relative ranking for 61% of THA hospitals and 61% of TKA hospitals. Limiting SSI surveillance to the operative hospital caused varying degrees of SSI underestimation and substantially impacted hospitals' relative rankings, suggesting that alternative methods for comprehensive postdischarge surveillance are needed for accurate benchmarking.

  6. On Varying Topology of Complex Networks and Performance Limitations of Community Detection Algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Pasta, Muhammad Qasim; Melançon, Guy

    2016-01-01

    One of the most widely studied problem in mining and analysis of complex networks is the detection of community structures. The problem has been extensively studied by researchers due to its high utility and numerous applications in various domains. Many algorithmic solutions have been proposed for the community detection problem but the quest to find the best algorithm is still on. More often than not, researchers focus on developing fast and accurate algorithms that can be generically applied to networks from a variety of domains without taking into consideration the structural and topological variations in these networks. In this paper, we evaluate the performance of different clustering algorithms as a function of varying network topology. Along with the well known LFR model to generate benchmark networks with communities,we also propose a new model named Naive Scale Free Model to study the behavior of community detection algorithms with respect to different topological features. More specifically, we are...

  7. Limits in detecting an individual dopant atom embedded in a crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Anudha; Mkhoyan, K Andre

    2011-07-01

    Annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscope (ADF-STEM) images allow detection of individual dopant atoms located on the surface of or inside a crystal. Contrast between intensities of an atomic column containing a dopant atom and a pure atomic column in ADF-STEM image depends strongly on specimen parameters and microscope conditions. Analysis of multislice-based simulations of ADF-STEM images of crystals doped with one substitutional dopant atom for a wide range of crystal thicknesses, types and locations of dopant atom inside the crystal, and crystals with different atoms reveal some interesting trends and non-intuitive behaviours in visibility of the dopant atom. The results provide practical guidelines to determine the optimal microscope and specimen conditions to detect a dopant atom in experiment, obtain information about the 3-d location of a dopant atom, and recognize cases where detecting a single dopant atom is not possible. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Detection of bacteria based on the thermomechanical noise of a nanomechanical resonator: origin of the response and detection limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, D [BioNanoMechanics Lab, National Centre for Microelectronics, IMM-CNM, CSIC Isaac Newton 8 (PTM), Tres Cantos E-28760, Madrid (Spain); Tamayo, J [BioNanoMechanics Lab, National Centre for Microelectronics, IMM-CNM, CSIC Isaac Newton 8 (PTM), Tres Cantos E-28760, Madrid (Spain); Mertens, J [BioNanoMechanics Lab, National Centre for Microelectronics, IMM-CNM, CSIC Isaac Newton 8 (PTM), Tres Cantos E-28760, Madrid (Spain); Calleja, M [BioNanoMechanics Lab, National Centre for Microelectronics, IMM-CNM, CSIC Isaac Newton 8 (PTM), Tres Cantos E-28760, Madrid (Spain); Villanueva, L G [STI-IMM-LMIS1, EPFL-Station 17, CH-1015, Lausanne (Switzerland); Zaballos, A [Genomics Functional Unit, Department of Immunology and Oncology, CNB-CSIC, Darwin 3, Madrid E-28049 (Spain)

    2008-01-23

    We have measured the effect of bacteria adsorption on the resonant frequency of microcantilevers as a function of the adsorption position and vibration mode. The resonant frequencies were measured from the Brownian fluctuations of the cantilever tip. We found that the sign and amount of the resonant frequency change is determined by the position and extent of the adsorption on the cantilever with regard to the shape of the vibration mode. To explain these results, a theoretical one-dimensional model is proposed. We obtain analytical expressions for the resonant frequency that accurately fit the data obtained by the finite element method. More importantly, the theory data shows a good agreement with the experiments. Our results indicate that there exist two opposite mechanisms that can produce a significant resonant frequency shift: the stiffness and the mass of the bacterial cells. Based on the thermomechanical noise, we analyse the regions of the cantilever of lowest and highest sensitivity to the attachment of bacteria. The combination of high vibration modes and the confinement of the adsorption to defined regions of the cantilever allows the detection of single bacterial cells by only measuring the Brownian fluctuations. This study can be extended to smaller cantilevers and other biological systems such as proteins and nucleic acids.

  9. Evaluation of a single-item screening question to detect limited health literacy in peritoneal dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Deepika; Sheth, Heena; Bender, Filitsa H; Weisbord, Steven D; Green, Jamie A

    2014-01-01

    Studies have shown that a single-item question might be useful in identifying patients with limited health literacy. However, the utility of the approach has not been studied in patients receiving maintenance peritoneal dialysis (PD). We assessed health literacy in a cohort of 31 PD patients by administering the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine (REALM) and a single-item health literacy (SHL) screening question "How confident are you filling out medical forms by yourself?" (Extremely, Quite a bit, Somewhat, A little bit, or Not at all). To determine the accuracy of the single-item question for detecting limited health literacy, we performed sensitivity and specificity analyses of the SHL and plotted the area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curve using the REALM as a reference standard. Using a cut-off of "Somewhat" or less confident, the sensitivity of the SHL for detecting limited health literacy was 80%, and the specificity was 88%. The positive likelihood ratio was 6.9. The SHL had an AUROC of 0.79 (95% confidence interval: 0.52 to 1.00). Our results show that the SHL could be effective in detecting limited health literacy in PD patients.

  10. The detection of landmines by neutron backscattering: Exploring the limits of the technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viesti, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Padova and INFN Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy)]. E-mail: giuseppe.viesti@pd.infn.it; Lunardon, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Padova and INFN Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Nebbia, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Padova and INFN Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Barbui, M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Viale dell' Universita 2, I-35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Cinausero, M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Viale dell' Universita 2, I-35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); D' Erasmo, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Bari and INFN Sezione di Bari, Via E. Orabona 4, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Palomba, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Bari and INFN Sezione di Bari, Via E. Orabona 4, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Pantaleo, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Bari and INFN Sezione di Bari, Via E. Orabona 4, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Obhodas, J. [Department of Experimental Physics, Ruder Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka c.54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Valkovic, V. [Department of Experimental Physics, Ruder Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka c.54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2006-06-15

    Neutron backscattering (NB) sensors have been proposed for Humanitarian De-mining applications. Recently, a prototype hand-held system integrating a NB sensor in a metal detector has been developed within the EU-funded DIAMINE Project. The results obtained in terms of performance of the NB systems and limitations in its use are presented in this work. It is found that the performance of NB sensors is strongly limited by the presence of the soil moisture and by its small-scale variations. The use of the neutron hit distribution to reduce false alarms is explored.

  11. The Limitations of Exfoliative Cytology for the Detection of Epithelial Atypia in Oral Leukoplakias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabelsteen, E.; Roed-Petersen, B.; Smith, C. J.; Pindborg, J. J.

    1971-01-01

    Two hundred and ninety-nine oral leukoplakias were examined by exfoliative cytology; 83 of these lesions were biopsied because of clinical or previous histological features. Epithelial atypia was found in 16 of these biopsies, exfoliative cytology detecting epithelial atypia in only 6 of these cases. Thus exfoliative cytology used alone would have led to a false negative diagnosis in 10 out of 16 (62%) of the cases with epithelial atypia verified by histology. In addition, in no instance was exfoliative cytology responsible for the detection of an epithelial atypia that had been overlooked by consideration of clinical or previous histological features. Exfoliative cytology was successful in the detection of atypia only in those cases in which the surface of the lesion was either ulcerated or not keratinized; all keratinized lesions with atypia yielded negative cytology. The results of this study lead to the conclusion that exfoliative cytology is not to be recommended as a routine diagnostic or screening procedure for the detection of possibly pre-malignant features in oral leukoplakias. PMID:5581297

  12. Potentiometry at trace levels in confined samples: ion-selective electrodes with subfemtomole detection limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malon, Adam; Vigassy, Tamas; Bakker, Eric; Pretsch, Ernö

    2006-06-28

    We explore here for the first time the direct potentiometric detectability of calcium, lead, and silver ions in amounts on the order of 300 attomoles at 100 picomolar concentrations without any preconcentration, analyte recycling, or electrocatalytic signal enhancement. The results presented here place zero-current potentiometry among the most sensitive electrochemical methods available.

  13. Limited evidence for the use of imaging to detect prostate cancer: A systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomqvist, L., E-mail: lennart.k.blomqvist@ki.se [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna (Sweden); Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Carlsson, S. [Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Urology, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna (Sweden); Gjertsson, P. [Department of Clinical Physiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Heintz, E.; Hultcrantz, M.; Mejare, I. [The Swedish Council on Health Technology Assessment, Stockholm (Sweden); Andrén, O. [School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro (Sweden); Department of Urology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro (Sweden)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • In men with clinical suspicion of prostate cancer, ultrasound guided systematic biopsies is the golden standard for diagnosis. • Diagnostic imaging techniques, especially magnetic resonance imaging, is being used in trials to aid detection of prostate cancer. • To date, there is insufficient scientific evidence for the use of imaging techniques to detect prostate cancer. - Abstract: Objective: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of imaging technologies for detecting prostate cancer in patients with elevated PSA-values or suspected findings on clinical examination. Methods: The databases Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane, CRD HTA/DARE/NHS EED and EconLit were searched until June 2013. Pre-determined inclusion criteria were used to select full text articles. Risk of bias in individual studies was rated according to QUADAS or AMSTAR. Abstracts and full text articles were assessed independently by two reviewers. The performance of diagnostic imaging was compared with systematic biopsies (reference standard) and sensitivity and specificity were calculated. Results: The literature search yielded 5141 abstracts, which were reviewed by two independent reviewers. Of these 4852 were excluded since they did not meet the inclusion criteria. 288 articles were reviewed in full text for quality assessment. Six studies, three using MRI and three using transrectal ultrasound were included. All were rated as high risk of bias. Relevant studies on PET/CT were not identified. Conclusion: Despite clinical use, there is insufficient evidence regarding the accuracy of imaging technologies for detecting cancer in patients with suspected prostate cancer using TRUS guided systematic biopsies as reference standard.

  14. The ability of animal studies to detect serious post marketing adverse events is limited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Meer, P.J.K.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/34153790X; Kooijman, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/322905788; Gispen-de Wied, C.C.; Moors, E.H.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/20241664X; Schellekens, H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/068406762

    2012-01-01

    The value of animalstudies to the assessment of drug safety is unclear because many such studies are biased and have methodological shortcomings. We studied whether post-marketing seriousadverse reactions to small molecule drugs could have been detected on the basis of animalstudy data included in

  15. Detection Limits for Natural Circular Dichroism of Chiral Complexes in the X-ray Range

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goulon, José; Sette, Francesco; Moise, Claude; Fontaine, Alain; Perey, Danièle; Rudolf, Petra; Baudelet, François

    1993-01-01

    Whereas both Magnetic Circular Dichroism and Faraday Rotation studies have been successfully carried out at the K-, L- and M- absorption edges of metal atoms in ferromagnetic systems, Natural optical activity of chiral complexes has not yet been detected quite unambiguously in the X-ray range. We re

  16. Detection Limits for Natural Circular Dichroism of Chiral Complexes in the X-ray Range

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goulon, José; Sette, Francesco; Moise, Claude; Fontaine, Alain; Perey, Danièle; Rudolf, Petra; Baudelet, François

    1993-01-01

    Whereas both Magnetic Circular Dichroism and Faraday Rotation studies have been successfully carried out at the K-, L- and M- absorption edges of metal atoms in ferromagnetic systems, Natural optical activity of chiral complexes has not yet been detected quite unambiguously in the X-ray range. We

  17. Detection limits of quantitative and digital PCR assays and their influence in presence-absence surveys of environmental DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Margaret; Dorazio, Robert M.; Butterfield, John S.; Meigs-Friend, Gaia; Nico, Leo; Ferrante, Jason

    2017-01-01

    A set of universal guidelines is needed to determine the limit of detection (LOD) in PCR-based analyses of low concentration DNA. In particular, environmental DNA (eDNA) studies require sensitive and reliable methods to detect rare and cryptic species through shed genetic material in environmental samples. Current strategies for assessing detection limits of eDNA are either too stringent or subjective, possibly resulting in biased estimates of species’ presence. Here, a conservative LOD analysis grounded in analytical chemistry is proposed to correct for overestimated DNA concentrations predominantly caused by the concentration plateau, a nonlinear relationship between expected and measured DNA concentrations. We have used statistical criteria to establish formal mathematical models for both quantitative and droplet digital PCR. To assess the method, a new Grass Carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) TaqMan assay was developed and tested on both PCR platforms using eDNA in water samples. The LOD adjustment reduced Grass Carp occupancy and detection estimates while increasing uncertainty – indicating that caution needs to be applied to eDNA data without LOD correction. Compared to quantitative PCR, digital PCR had higher occurrence estimates due to increased sensitivity and dilution of inhibitors at low concentrations. Without accurate LOD correction, species occurrence and detection probabilities based on eDNA estimates are prone to a source of bias that cannot be reduced by an increase in sample size or PCR replicates. Other applications also could benefit from a standardized LOD such as GMO food analysis, and forensic and clinical diagnostics.

  18. Spectroelectrochemical sensing based on multimode selectivity simultaneously achievable in a single device. 17. Improvement in detection limits using ultrathin perfluorosulfonated ionomer films in conjunction with continuous sample flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andria, Sara E; Richardson, John N; Kaval, Necati; Zudans, Imants; Seliskar, Carl J; Heineman, William R

    2004-06-01

    We report herein an attenuated total reflectance (ATR) absorbance-based spectroelectrochemical sensor for tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II) ion [Ru(bpy)(3)(2+)] that employs ultrathin (24-50 nm) Nafion films as the charge-selective layer. This film serves to sequester and preconcentrate the analyte at the optically transparent electrode surface such that it can be efficiently detected optically via electrochemical modulation. Our studies indicate that use of ultrathin films in tandem with continuous flow of sample solution through the cell compartment leads to a 100-500-fold enhancement in detection limit (10 nM) compared to earlier absorbance-based spectroelectrochemical sensors ( approximately 1-5 microM); markedly shorter analysis times also result. We report the dependence of the measured absorbance on sample flow rate and Nafion film thickness, and also provide calibration curves that illustrate the linear range and detection limits of the sensor using a 24 nm film at a constant sample flow rate of 0.07 mL/min.

  19. Assessment of strength limiting flaws in ceramic heat exchanger components. Final report, September 1984--June 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bower, J.R.; Buttram, J.D.; Edwards, M.J.; Okes, L.R.; Powers, T.; Robertson, M.O.; Sandifer, J.B.

    1993-06-01

    The ability to predict energy efficient lifetimes for ceramic heat exchanger components is necessary for their design, manufacture, and sale. The ability to inspect components for critical defects and adherence to specifications is also vital. This is the final report of a three phase program. In phase 1, various nondestructive evaluation methods were evaluated for use on siliconized silicon carbide heat exchanger tubes. The more promising ones were further developed for use in phase 2. These methods were used to examine samples used in a mechanical testing program, carried out at room temperature and at high temperature, to determine the detectability of defects and the effects of load at high temperature. A model was developed for fast fracture reliability. During phase 3, the equipment installed during phase 2 was modified for faster, easier ultrasonic scanning and microfocus X-ray computed tomography. This report describes the methods used to improve ultrasonic scanning of tubes, to reduce artifacts and enhance defect detection by X-ray computed tomography, to carry out pressure tests and high temperature C-ring tests with acoustic emission monitoring, and to generate a lifetime prediction model. The final model, the verification test results, and a general procedure for establishing specifications and acceptance tests for ceramics are presented.

  20. Molecular and cellular approaches for the detection of protein-protein interactions: latest techniques and current limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalonde, Sylvie; Ehrhardt, David W; Loqué, Dominique; Chen, Jin; Rhee, Seung Y; Frommer, Wolf B

    2008-02-01

    Homotypic and heterotypic protein interactions are crucial for all levels of cellular function, including architecture, regulation, metabolism, and signaling. Therefore, protein interaction maps represent essential components of post-genomic toolkits needed for understanding biological processes at a systems level. Over the past decade, a wide variety of methods have been developed to detect, analyze, and quantify protein interactions, including surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, NMR, yeast two-hybrid screens, peptide tagging combined with mass spectrometry and fluorescence-based technologies. Fluorescence techniques range from co-localization of tags, which may be limited by the optical resolution of the microscope, to fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based methods that have molecular resolution and can also report on the dynamics and localization of the interactions within a cell. Proteins interact via highly evolved complementary surfaces with affinities that can vary over many orders of magnitude. Some of the techniques described in this review, such as surface plasmon resonance, provide detailed information on physical properties of these interactions, while others, such as two-hybrid techniques and mass spectrometry, are amenable to high-throughput analysis using robotics. In addition to providing an overview of these methods, this review emphasizes techniques that can be applied to determine interactions involving membrane proteins, including the split ubiquitin system and fluorescence-based technologies for characterizing hits obtained with high-throughput approaches. Mass spectrometry-based methods are covered by a review by Miernyk and Thelen (2008; this issue, pp. 597-609). In addition, we discuss the use of interaction data to construct interaction networks and as the basis for the exciting possibility of using to predict interaction surfaces.

  1. The value and limitations of contrast-enhanced transrectal ultrasonography for the detection of prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Han-Xue, E-mail: zhaohx861@163.com [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Dong-Jiao-Min-Xiang, Dong Cheng District, Beijing 100730 (China); Xia, Chun-Xia, E-mail: star9901482@163.com [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Dong-Jiao-Min-Xiang, Dong Cheng District, Beijing 100730 (China); Yin, Hong-Xia, E-mail: hongxia_yin79@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Radiology, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Dong-Jiao-Min-Xiang, Dong Cheng District, Beijing 100730 (China); Guo, Ning, E-mail: ningguo99@sina.com.cn [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Dong-Jiao-Min-Xiang, Dong Cheng District, Beijing 100730 (China); Zhu, Qiang, E-mail: qzhutrhos@gmail.com [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Dong-Jiao-Min-Xiang, Dong Cheng District, Beijing 100730 (China)

    2013-11-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the role of contrast-enhanced transrectal ultrasonography (CE-TRUS) for detecting prostate carcinoma. Methods: Sixty-five patients with elevated serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and/or abnormal digital rectal examination (DRE) were assessed using transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and CE-TRUS. In all the patients, CE-TRUS was performed with intravenous injection of contrast agent (SonoVue, 2.4 ml) before biopsy. The cancer detection rates of the two techniques were compared. False-positive and false-negative findings related to CE-TRUS were analyzed in comparison to the pathological results of biopsy or radical prostatectomy. The targeted biopsy to abnormal CE-TRUS areas was also compared to systematic biopsy. Results: Prostate cancer was detected in 29 of the 65 patients. CE-TRUS showed rapid focal enhancement or asymmetric vessels of peripheral zones in 28 patients; 23 of them had prostate cancer. CE-TRUS had 79.3% sensitivity, compared to 65.5% of TRUS (P < 0.05). There were five false-positive and six false-negative findings from CE-TRUS. Benign prostate hyperplasia, and acute and chronic prostatitis were important causes related to the false-positive results of CE-TRUS. Prostate cancer originating from the transition zone or peripheral zone with lower PSA levels, small-size foci, and moderately or well-differentiated tumor was missed by CE-TRUS. The cancer detection rate of targeted biopsy (75%, 33/44 cores) was significantly higher than one of systematic biopsy (48.2%, 162/336) in those 28 cases (P < 0.05). In addition, no significant correlation was found between the cancer detection rate with CE-TRUS and serum PSA levels. Conclusion: CE-TRUS may improve the detection rate of prostate cancer through targeted biopsy of contrast-enhanced abnormalities. Our findings indicate that systematic biopsies should not be eliminated on the basis of false-positive and false-negative findings related to CE-TRUS.

  2. Increased levels of HIV RNA detected in samples with viral loads close to the detection limit collected in Plasma Preparation Tubes (PPT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Brigitte P; Mayo, Donald R

    2006-02-01

    The accurate and reliable quantification of HIV RNA is an essential part of the management of HIV infected individuals, and elucidation of factors that may affect HIV RNA measurements, such as the use of Vacutainer Plasma Preparation Tubes (PPT), is crucial. The objective of this study was to determine if plasma samples with viral loads close to the lower limit of the dynamic range of the assay collected in PPT tubes had increased levels of HIV RNA as compared to samples collected in standard EDTA tubes. HIV RNA levels were compared in 112 paired plasma samples collected in PPT and standard EDTA tubes. All samples had been frozen prior to testing. Discrepancies between PPT and EDTA tubes did not occur for samples with high viral loads. However, in samples with viral loads close to the lower limit of the dynamic range, levels of HIV RNA detected were higher in a large proportion of PPT as compared to the corresponding EDTA plasma samples. Forty percent of plasma pairs had no detectable HIV RNA in the EDTA aliquot, but had low levels of HIV RNA in the corresponding PPT aliquot. This prospective study underlines the need for cautious interpretation of small transient viral load changes in samples with values close to the detection limit.

  3. Limited diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging and clinical tests for detecting partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockmeyer, Matthias; Schmitt, Cornelia; Haupert, Alexander; Kohn, Dieter; Lorbach, Olaf

    2017-09-23

    The reliable diagnosis of partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff is still elusive in clinical practise. Therefore, the purpose of the study was to determine the diagnostic accuracy of MR imaging and clinical tests for detecting partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff as well as the combination of these parameters. 334 consecutive shoulder arthroscopies for rotator cuff pathologies performed during the time period between 2010 and 2012 were analyzed retrospectively for the findings of common clinical signs for rotator cuff lesions and preoperative MR imaging. These were compared with the intraoperative arthroscopic findings as "gold standard". The reports of the MR imaging were evaluated with regard to the integrity of the rotator cuff. The Ellman Classification was used to define partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff in accordance with the arthroscopic findings. Descriptive statistics, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value were calculated. MR imaging showed 80 partial-thickness and 70 full-thickness tears of the rotator cuff. The arthroscopic examination confirmed 64 partial-thickness tears of which 52 needed debridement or refixation of the rotator cuff. Sensitivity for MR imaging to identify partial-thickness tears was 51.6%, specificity 77.2%, positive predictive value 41.3% and negative predictive value 83.7%. For the Jobe-test, sensitivity was 64.1%, specificity 43.2%, positive predictive value 25.9% and negative predictive value 79.5%. Sensitivity for the Impingement-sign was 76.7%, specificity 46.6%, positive predictive value 30.8% and negative predictive value 86.5%. For the combination of MR imaging, Jobe-test and Impingement-sign sensitivity was 46.9%, specificity 85.4%, positive predictive value 50% and negative predictive value 83.8%. The diagnostic accuracy of MR imaging and clinical tests (Jobe-test and Impingement-sign) alone is limited for detecting partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff. Additionally

  4. Study of Laser Produced Plasma of Limiter of the Aditya Tokomak for Detection of Molecular Bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Awadhesh Kumar

    2016-06-01

    The tokamak wall protection is one of the prime concerns, and for this purpose, limiters are used. Graphite is commonly used as a limiter material and first wall material for complete coverage of the internal vacuum vessel surfaces of the tokamak. From the past few years, we are working to identify and quantify the impurities deposited on the different part of Aditya Tokamak in collaboration with the Scientists at Institute of Plasma Research, Ahmedabad, India using Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) [1-3]. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) spectra of limiter of Aditya Tokamak have been recorded in the spectral range of 200-900 nm in open atmosphere. Along with atomic and ionic spectral lines of the constituent elements of the limiter (1-3), LIBS spectra also give the molecular bands. When a high power laser beam is focused on the sample, laser induced plasma is produced on its surface. In early stage of the plasma Back ground continuum is dominated due to free-free or free-bound emission. Just after few nanoseconds the light from the plasma is dominated by ionic emission. Atomic emission spectra is dominated from the laser induced plasma during the first few microsecond after an ablation pulse where as molecular spectra is generated later when the plasma further cools down. For this purpose the LIBS spectra has been recorded with varying gate delay and gate width. The spectra of the limiter show the presence of molecular bands of CN and C2. To get better signal to background ratios of the molecular bands, different experimental parameters like gate delay, gate width, collection angle and collection point (spatial analysis off the plasama) of the plasma have been optimized. Thus the present paper deals with the variation of spectral intensity of the molecular bands with different experimental parameters. Keywords: Limiter, Molecular bands, C2, CN. References: 1. Proof-of-concept experiment for On-line LIBS Analysis of Impurity Layer Deposited on

  5. Vertical Root Fracture Detection Using Limited-FOV Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    longitudinal orientation along the root (1). The prevalence in extracted endodontically treated teeth is 10.9% (2). Mandibular and maxillary premolars, and...significant, more artificial fractures were detected using both CBCT and PAs. It is possible that fracturing the tooth on the bench- top creates larger...397-403. 8. Huumonen S, Kvist T, Grondahl K, Molander A. Diagnostic value of computed tomography in re-treatment of root fillings in maxillary

  6. On the importance of direct detection combined limits for spin independent and spin dependent dark matter interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Marcos, Cristina; Robles, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    In this work we show how the inclusion of dark matter (DM) direct detection upper bounds in a theoretically consistent manner can affect the allowed parameter space of a DM model. Traditionally the limits from DM direct detection experiments on the elastic scattering cross section of DM particles as a function of their mass are extracted under simplifying assumptions. Relaxing those assumptions related to the DM particle nature, such as the proton to neutron ratio of the interactions, or the possibility of having similar contributions from the spin independent (SI) and spin dependent (SD) interactions vary significantly the upper limits. Furthermore, it is known that astrophysical and nuclear uncertainties can also affect the upper bounds. To exemplify the impact of including these bounds properly we analyse two well motivated and popular DM scenarios: neutralinos in the NMSSM and a Z' portal with Dirac DM. We show how the allowed parameter space of these models is subject to important variations when one inc...

  7. Lower limit of detection: definition and elaboration of a proposed position for radiological effluent and environmental measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Currie, L.A.

    1984-09-01

    A manual is provided to define and illustrate a proposed use of the Lower Limit of Detection (LLD) for Radiological Effluent and Environmental Measurements. The manual contains a review of information regarding LLD practices gained from site visits; a review of the literature and a summary of basic principles underlying the concept of detection in Nuclear and Analytical Chemistry; a detailed presentation of the application of LLD principles to a range of problem categories (simple counting to multinuclide spectroscopy), including derivations, equations, and numerical examples; and a brief examination of related issues such as reference samples, numerical quality control, and instrumental limitations. An appendix contains a summary of notation and terminology, a bibliography, and worked-out examples. 100 references, 10 figures, 7 tables.

  8. Super-resolving quantum radar: Coherent-state sources with homodyne detection suffice to beat the diffraction limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Kebei; Lee, Hwang [Hearne Institute for Theoretical Physics and Department of Physics and Astronomy Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Gerry, Christopher C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Lehman College, The City University of New York, Bronx, New York 10468-1589 (United States); Dowling, Jonathan P., E-mail: jdowling@lsu.edu [Hearne Institute for Theoretical Physics and Department of Physics and Astronomy Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Computational Science Research Center, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2013-11-21

    There has been much recent interest in quantum metrology for applications to sub-Raleigh ranging and remote sensing such as in quantum radar. For quantum radar, atmospheric absorption and diffraction rapidly degrades any actively transmitted quantum states of light, such as N00N states, so that for this high-loss regime the optimal strategy is to transmit coherent states of light, which suffer no worse loss than the linear Beer's law for classical radar attenuation, and which provide sensitivity at the shot-noise limit in the returned power. We show that coherent radar radiation sources, coupled with a quantum homodyne detection scheme, provide both longitudinal and angular super-resolution much below the Rayleigh diffraction limit, with sensitivity at shot-noise in terms of the detected photon power. Our approach provides a template for the development of a complete super-resolving quantum radar system with currently available technology.

  9. Current Challenges and Limitations in Antibody-Based Detection of Citrullinated Histones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neeli, Indira; Radic, Marko

    2016-01-01

    Studies on NETosis demand reliable and convenient markers to monitor the progress of this form of cell death. Because a determining step in the release of nuclear chromatin NETs requires the conversion of arginine residues to citrulline residues in histones by peptidylarginine deiminase, citrullinated histones can provide such a marker. Here, we evaluate antibody reagents for the detection of citrulline residues in histones and observe alarming differences between commercial antisera and mouse and rabbit monoclonal antibodies in their ability to detect their nominal target residues. Differences between antibodies that are currently used to detect citrulline residues in histones could jeopardize efforts to reach a scientific consensus and instead lead to inconsistent and even conflicting conclusions regarding the regulation of histone deimination. Our results will assist others in planning their initial or ongoing studies on peptidylarginine deiminase activity with the use of currently available antibodies. Furthermore, we argue that, along with the careful attention to experimental conditions and calcium concentrations, validated antibody reagents are urgently needed to avoid possible setbacks in the research on NETosis. PMID:27933065

  10. Current Challenges and Limitations in Antibody-Based Detection of Citrullinated Histones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indira Neeli

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Studies on NETosis demand reliable and convenient markers to monitor the progress of this form of cell death. Because a determining step in the release of nuclear chromatin NETs requires the conversion of arginine residues to citrulline residues in histones by peptidylarginine deiminase, citrullinated histones can provide such a marker. Here, we evaluate antibody reagents for the detection of citrulline residues in histones and observe alarming differences between commercial antisera and mouse and rabbit monoclonal antibodies in their ability to detect their nominal target residues. Differences between antibodies that are currently used to detect citrulline residues in histones could jeopardize efforts to reach a scientific consensus and instead lead to inconsistent and even conflicting conclusions regarding the regulation of histone deimination. Our results will assist others in planning their initial or ongoing studies on peptidylarginine deiminase activity with the use of currently available antibodies. Further, we argue that, along with the careful attention to experimental conditions and calcium concentrations, validated antibody reagents are urgently needed to avoid possible setbacks in the research on NETosis.

  11. Clinical utility and limitations of FDG PET in detecting recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma in postoperative patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Nobuyuki; Nakamoto, Yuji; Nakatani, Koya; Hatano, Etsuro; Seo, Satoru; Higashi, Tatsuya; Saga, Tsuneo; Uemoto, Shinji; Togashi, Kaori

    2014-12-01

    The clinical usefulness of positron emission tomography (PET) with (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) for the detection of recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is controversial because HCC displays varying FDG avidity. The purposes of this study were to re-evaluate the utility of FDG PET for the detection of recurrent HCC, and to assess its prognostic value in a large series of postoperative patients. We retrospectively reviewed 113 scans in 86 patients undergoing FDG PET after curative surgery for HCC. These scans were performed for suspected recurrence on radiologic imaging (group A: n = 44) because of an elevated tumor marker level with negative prior imaging results (group B: n = 32) or with no suspicion of recurrence (group C: n = 37). FDG PET's accuracy for recurrence detection and its value as a predictor of survival were assessed. The sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy were 53, 100, and 55 % for group A; 34, 100, and 41 % for group B; and 11, 100, and 78 % for group C, respectively. A change in therapy resulted from the scan results in 7, 9, and 8 % in groups A, B, and C, respectively. The combined sensitivities for intra- and extrahepatic recurrence were 30 and 42 %, respectively. Histopathological features at initial surgery did not affect the sensitivity. The overall survival of patients with positive scans was significantly poorer than that of patients with negative scans (P = 0.008). The sensitivity of FDG PET for recurrent HCC was low, with little change in treatment resulting. However, it can predict prognosis in postoperative patients.

  12. Photoinduced triplet-state electron transfer of platinum porphyrin: a one-step direct method for sensing iodide with an unprecedented detection limit

    KAUST Repository

    Masih, Dilshad

    2015-02-05

    Here, we report for the first time a one-step direct method for sensing halides in aqueous solution using phosphorescence quenching of platinum-cationic porphyrin. This method offers an easy, rapid, environmentally friendly, ultra-sensitive (with a previously unattained detection limit of 1 × 10−12 M) and economical method for the determination of iodide. To fully understand the reaction mechanism responsible for the phosphorescence quenching process, we have employed cutting-edge time-resolved laser spectroscopy with broadband capabilities.

  13. Photoinduced triplet-state electron transfer of platinum porphyrin: A one-step direct method for sensing iodide with an unprecedented detection limit

    KAUST Repository

    Masih, Dilshad

    2014-02-05

    Here, we report for the first time a one-step direct method for sensing halides in aqueous solution using phosphorescence quenching of platinum-cationic porphyrin. This method offers an easy, rapid, environmentally friendly, ultra-sensitive (with a previously unattained detection limit of 1 × 10-12 M) and economical method for the determination of iodide. To fully understand the reaction mechanism responsible for the phosphorescence quenching process, we have employed cutting-edge time-resolved laser spectroscopy with broadband capabilities. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2015.

  14. Limitations on detecting Higgs in the Lamb shift of light muonic atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Krivec, Rajmund

    2016-01-01

    In light of the known Higgs mass, the current presumed range of the quark-lepton Higgs coupling, and the large allowed range of the coupling modifier of the Standard Model electron-Higgs coupling, a recent work has proposed to test the Higgs term in heavy atoms. This approach is on the verge of experimentally possible and hinges on electron coupling modifier remaining orders of magnitude larger than 1, and the availability of only limited-precision electron wave functions. We instead revisit the feasibility of the decades old idea of deducing limits on muon-nucleus Higgs coupling from measurements on light muonic atoms or ions for which locally and globally precise solutions of the three body-problem can be obtained, and the muon-nucleus Higgs coupling is enhanced by about $10^7$ due to larger muon wave function at origin. It turns out that due to the large Higgs mass, and the currently equal experimental limits on electron-Higgs and muon-Higgs couplings placing the muon coupling modifier close to 1, even an ...

  15. Membrane-based lateral flow immunochromatographic strip with nanoparticles as reporters for detection: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaolin; Aguilar, Zoraida P; Xu, Hengyi; Lai, Weihua; Xiong, Yonghua

    2016-01-15

    Membrane-based lateral flow immunochromatographic strip (LFICS) is widely used in various fields because of its simplicity, rapidity (detection within 10min), and low cost. However, early designs of membrane-based LFICS for preliminary screening only provide qualitative ("yes/no" signal) or semi-quantitative results without quantitative information. These designs often suffer from low-signal intensity and poor sensitivity and are only capable of single analyte detection, not simultaneous multiple detections. The performance of existing techniques used for detection using LFICS has been considerably improved by incorporating different kinds of nanoparticles (NPs) as reporters. NPs can serve as alternative labels and improve analytical sensitivity or limit of detection of LFICS because of their unique properties, such as optical absorption, fluorescence spectra, and magnetic properties. The controlled manipulation of NPs allows simultaneous or multiple detections by using membrane-based LFICS. In this review, we discuss how colored (e.g., colloidal gold, carbon, and colloidal selenium NPs), luminescent (e.g., quantum dots, up-converting phosphor NPs, and dye-doped NPs), and magnetic NPs are integrated into membrane-based LFICS for the detection of target analytes. Gold NPs are also featured because of their wide applications. Different types and unique properties of NPs are briefly explained. This review focuses on examples of NP-based LFICS to illustrate novel concepts in various devices with potential applications as screening tools. This review also highlights the superiority of NP-based approaches over existing conventional strategies for clinical analysis, food safety, and environmental monitoring. This paper is concluded by a short section on future research trends regarding NP-based LFICS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Methylene blue not ferrocene: Optimal reporters for electrochemical detection of protease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Fernández, Eva; Avlonitis, Nicolaos; Murray, Alan F; Mount, Andrew R; Bradley, Mark

    2016-10-15

    Electrochemical peptide-based biosensors are attracting significant attention for the detection and analysis of proteins. Here we report the optimisation and evaluation of an electrochemical biosensor for the detection of protease activity using self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold surfaces, using trypsin as a model protease. The principle of detection was the specific proteolytic cleavage of redox-tagged peptides by trypsin, which causes the release of the redox reporter, resulting in a decrease of the peak current as measured by square wave voltammetry. A systematic enhancement of detection was achieved through optimisation of the properties of the redox-tagged peptide; this included for the first time a side-by-side study of the applicability of two of the most commonly applied redox reporters used for developing electrochemical biosensors, ferrocene and methylene blue, along with the effect of changing both the nature of the spacer and the composition of the SAM. Methylene blue-tagged peptides combined with a polyethylene-glycol (PEG) based spacer were shown to be the best platform for trypsin detection, leading to the highest fidelity signals (characterised by the highest sensitivity (signal gain) and a much more stable background than that registered when using ferrocene as a reporter). A ternary SAM (T-SAM) configuration, which included a PEG-based dithiol, minimised the non-specific adsorption of other proteins and was sensitive towards trypsin in the clinically relevant range, with a Limit of Detection (LoD) of 250pM. Kinetic analysis of the electrochemical response with time showed a good fit to a Michaelis-Menten surface cleavage model, enabling the extraction of values for kcat and KM. Fitting to this model enabled quantitative determination of the solution concentration of trypsin across the entire measurement range. Studies using an enzyme inhibitor and a range of real world possible interferents demonstrated a selective response to trypsin

  17. Early breast cancer screening using iron/iron oxide-based nanoplatforms with sub-femtomolar limits of detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinusha N. Udukala

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Proteases, including matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, tissue serine proteases, and cathepsins (CTS exhibit numerous functions in tumor biology. Solid tumors are characterized by changes in protease expression levels by tumor and surrounding tissue. Therefore, monitoring protease levels in tissue samples and liquid biopsies is a vital strategy for early cancer detection. Water-dispersable Fe/Fe3O4-core/shell based nanoplatforms for protease detection are capable of detecting protease activity down to sub-femtomolar limits of detection. They feature one dye (tetrakis(carboxyphenylporphyrin (TCPP that is tethered to the central nanoparticle by means of a protease-cleavable consensus sequence and a second dye (Cy 5.5 that is directly linked. Based on the protease activities of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA, MMPs 1, 2, 3, 7, 9, and 13, as well as CTS B and L, human breast cancer can be detected at stage I by means of a simple serum test. By monitoring CTS B and L stage 0 detection may be achieved. This initial study, comprised of 46 breast cancer patients and 20 apparently healthy human subjects, demonstrates the feasibility of protease-activity-based liquid biopsies for early cancer diagnosis.

  18. Potentials and Limitations of Real-Time Elastography for Prostate Cancer Detection: A Whole-Mount Step Section Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Junker

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To evaluate prostate cancer (PCa detection rates of real-time elastography (RTE in dependence of tumor size, tumor volume, localization and histological type. Materials and Methods. Thirdy-nine patients with biopsy proven PCa underwent RTE before radical prostatectomy (RPE to assess prostate tissue elasticity, and hard lesions were considered suspicious for PCa. After RPE, the prostates were prepared as whole-mount step sections and were compared with imaging findings for analyzing PCa detection rates. Results. RTE detected 6/62 cancer lesions with a maximum diameter of 0–5 mm (9.7%, 10/37 with a maximum diameter of 6–10 mm (27%, 24/34 with a maximum diameter of 11–20 20 mm (70.6%, 14/14 with a maximum diameter of >20 mm (100% and 40/48 with a volume ≥0.2 cm3 (83.3%. Regarding cancer lesions with a volume ≥ 0.2 cm³ there was a significant difference in PCa detection rates between Gleason scores with predominant Gleason pattern 3 compared to those with predominant Gleason pattern 4 or 5 (75% versus 100%; P=0.028. Conclusions. RTE is able to detect PCa of significant tumor volume and of predominant Gleason pattern 4 or 5 with high confidence, but is of limited value in the detection of small cancer lesions.

  19. Early breast cancer screening using iron/iron oxide-based nanoplatforms with sub-femtomolar limits of detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udukala, Dinusha N; Wang, Hongwang; Wendel, Sebastian O; Malalasekera, Aruni P; Samarakoon, Thilani N; Yapa, Asanka S; Abayaweera, Gayani; Basel, Matthew T; Maynez, Pamela; Ortega, Raquel; Toledo, Yubisela; Bossmann, Leonie; Robinson, Colette; Janik, Katharine E; Koper, Olga B; Li, Ping; Motamedi, Massoud; Higgins, Daniel A; Gadbury, Gary; Zhu, Gaohong; Troyer, Deryl L; Bossmann, Stefan H

    2016-01-01

    Proteases, including matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), tissue serine proteases, and cathepsins (CTS) exhibit numerous functions in tumor biology. Solid tumors are characterized by changes in protease expression levels by tumor and surrounding tissue. Therefore, monitoring protease levels in tissue samples and liquid biopsies is a vital strategy for early cancer detection. Water-dispersable Fe/Fe3O4-core/shell based nanoplatforms for protease detection are capable of detecting protease activity down to sub-femtomolar limits of detection. They feature one dye (tetrakis(carboxyphenyl)porphyrin (TCPP)) that is tethered to the central nanoparticle by means of a protease-cleavable consensus sequence and a second dye (Cy 5.5) that is directly linked. Based on the protease activities of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), MMPs 1, 2, 3, 7, 9, and 13, as well as CTS B and L, human breast cancer can be detected at stage I by means of a simple serum test. By monitoring CTS B and L stage 0 detection may be achieved. This initial study, comprised of 46 breast cancer patients and 20 apparently healthy human subjects, demonstrates the feasibility of protease-activity-based liquid biopsies for early cancer diagnosis.

  20. Detection, size, measurement and structural analysis limits for the 2MASS, UKIDSS-LAS & VISTA VIKING surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, Stephen K; Driver, Simon P; Robotham, Aaron S G

    2013-01-01

    The 2MASS, UKIDSS-LAS and VISTA VIKING surveys have all now observed the GAMA 9hr region in the $K_s$ band. Here we compare the detection rates, photometry, basic size measurements, and single-component GALFIT structural measurements for a sample of 37,591 galaxies. We explore the sensitivity limits where the data agree for a variety of issues including: detection, star-galaxy separation, photometric measurements, size and ellipticity measurements, and S\\'{e}rsic measurements. We find that 2MASS fails to detect at least 20% of the galaxy population within all magnitude bins, however for those that are detected we find photometry is robust ($\\pm$ 0.2 mag) to 14.7 AB mag and star-galaxy separation to 14.8 AB mag. For UKIDSS-LAS we find incompleteness starts to enter at a flux limit of 18.9 AB mag, star-galaxy separation is robust to 16.3 AB mag and structural measurements are robust to 17.7 AB mag. VISTA VIKING data is complete to approximately 20.0 AB mag and structural measurements appear robust to 18.8 AB ma...

  1. Enhanced detection limit by dark mode perturbation in 2D photonic crystal slab refractive index sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaou, Costa; Lau, Wah Tung; Gad, Raanan; Akhavan, Hooman; Schilling, Ryan; Levi, Ofer

    2013-12-16

    We demonstrate for the first time a 300nm thick, 300μm × 300μm 2D dielectric photonic crystal slab membrane with a quality factor of 10,600 by coupling light to slightly perturbed dark modes through alternating nano-hole sizes. The newly created fundamental guided resonances greatly reduce nano-fabrication accuracy requirements. Moreover, we created a new layer architecture resulting in electric field enhancement at the interface between the slab and sensing regions, and spectral sensitivity of >800 nm/RIU, that is, >0.8 of the single-mode theoretical upper limit of spectral sensitivity.

  2. Information Limited Oligonucleotide Amplification Assay for Affinity-Based, Parallel Detection Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harish Bokkasam

    Full Text Available Molecular communication systems encounter similar constraints as telecommunications. In either case, channel crosstalk at the receiver end will result in information loss that statistical analysis cannot compensate. This is because in any communication channel there is a physical limit to the amount of information that can be transmitted. We present a novel and simple modified end amplification (MEA technique to generate reduced and defined amounts of specific information in form of short fragments from an oligonucleotide source that also contains unrelated and redundant information. Our method can be a valuable tool to investigate information overflow and channel capacity in biomolecular recognition systems.

  3. Automatic microseismic event detection by band-limited phase-only correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shaojiang; Wang, Yibo; Zhan, Yi; Chang, Xu

    2016-12-01

    Identification and detection of microseismic events is a significant issue in source locations and source mechanism analysis. The number of the records is notably large, especially in the case of some real-time monitoring, and while the majority of microseismic events are highly weak and sparse, automatic algorithms are indispensable. In this study, we introduce an effective method for the identification and detection of microseismic events by judging whether the P-wave phase exists in a local segment from a single three-component microseismic records. The new judging algorithm consists primarily of the following key steps: 1) transform the waveform time series into time-varying spectral representations using the S-transform; 2) calculate the similarity of the frequency content in the time-frequency domain using the phase-only correlation function; and 3) identify the P-phase by the combination analysis between any two components. The proposed algorithm is compared to a similar approach using the cross-correlation in the time domain between any two components and later tested with synthetic microseismic datasets and real field-recorded datasets. The results indicate that the proposed algorithm is able to distinguish similar and dissimilar waveforms, even for low signal noise ratio and emergent events, which is important for accurate and rapid selection of microseismic events from a large number of records. This method can be applied to other geophysical analyses based on the waveform data.

  4. Phase-noise limitations in continuous-variable quantum key distribution with homodyne detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corvaja, Roberto

    2017-02-01

    In continuous-variables quantum key distribution with coherent states, the advantage of performing the detection by using standard telecoms components is counterbalanced by the lack of a stable phase reference in homodyne detection due to the complexity of optical phase-locking circuits and to the unavoidable phase noise of lasers, which introduces a degradation on the achievable secure key rate. Pilot-assisted phase-noise estimation and postdetection compensation techniques are used to implement a protocol with coherent states where a local laser is employed and it is not locked to the received signal, but a postdetection phase correction is applied. Here the reduction of the secure key rate determined by the laser phase noise, for both individual and collective attacks, is analytically evaluated and a scheme of pilot-assisted phase estimation proposed, outlining the tradeoff in the system design between phase noise and spectral efficiency. The optimal modulation variance as a function of the phase-noise amount is derived.

  5. A Limit on the Number of Isolated Neutron Stars Detected in the ROSAT Bright Source Catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Rutledge, R E; Bogosavljevic, M; Mahabal, A A; Rutledge, Robert E.; Fox, Derek W.; Bogosavljevic, Milan; Mahabal, Ashish

    2003-01-01

    The challenge in searching for non-radio-pulsing isolated neutron stars (INSs) is in excluding association with objects in the very large error boxes (~13", 1 sigma radius) typical of sources from the largest X-ray all-sky survey, the ROSAT All-Sky-Survey/Bright Source Catalog (RASS/BSC). We search for candidate INSs using statistical analysis of optical (USNO-A2), infrared (IRAS), and radio (NVSS) sources near the ROSAT X-ray localization, and show that this selection would find 20% of the INSs in the RASS/BSC. This selection finds 32 candidates at declinations greater than -39 deg, among which are two previously known INSs, seventeen sources which we show are not INSs, and thirteen the classification of which are as yet undetermined. These results require a limit of <67 INSs (90% confidence, full sky, assuming isotropy) in the RASS/BSC. This limit modestly constrains a naive and optimistic model for cooling NSs in the galaxy.

  6. Limited field investigation report for the 100-HR-1 Operable Unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    This limited field investigation (LFI) report summarizes the data collection and analysis activities conducted during the 100-HR-1 Source Operable Unit LFI and the associated qualitative risk assessment (QRA) (WHC 1993a), and makes recommendations on the continued candidacy of high-priority sites for interim remedial measures (IRM). The results and recommendations presented in this report are generally independent of future land use scenarios. A LFI Report is required, in accordance with the HPPS, when waste sites are to be considered for IRMs. The LFI is an integral part of the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) facility investigation/corrective measures study (RFI/CMS) and process and functions as a focused RI or RFI for selection of IRMs. The purpose of the report is to identify those sites that are recommended to remain as candidates for IRMs, provide a preliminary summary of site characterization studies, refine the conceptual model as needed, identify contaminant- and location-specific applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARA), and provide a qualitative assessment of the risks associated with the sites. This assessment includes consideration of whether contaminant concentrations pose an unacceptable risk that warrants action through IRMs. The 100-HR-1 unit encompasses approximately 100 acres adjacent to the Columbia River shoreline. It contains waste units associated with the original plant facilities constructed to support the H Reactor. The area also contains evaporation basins which received liquid process wastes and nonroutine deposits of chemical wastes from the 300 Area, where fuel elements for the N Reactor were produced.

  7. JET-ISX-B beryllium limiter experiment safety analysis report and operational safety requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edmonds, P.H.

    1985-09-01

    An experiment to evaluate the suitability of beryllium as a limiter material has been completed on the ISX-B tokamak. The experiment consisted of two phases: (1) the initial operation and characterization in the ISX experiment, and a period of continued operation to the specified surface fluence (10/sup 22/ atoms/cm/sup 2/) of hydrogen ions; and (2) the disassembly, decontamination, or disposal of the ISX facility. During these two phases of the project, the possibility existed for beryllium and/or beryllium oxide powder to be produced inside the vacuum vessel. Beryllium dust is a highly toxic material, and extensive precautions are required to prevent the release of the beryllium into the experimental work area and to prevent the contamination of personnel working on the device. Details of the health hazards associated with beryllium and the appropriate precautions are presented. Also described in appendixes to this report are the various operational safety requirements for the project.

  8. Final Progress Report on Model-Based Diagnosis of Soil Limitations to Forest Productivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luxmoore, R.J.

    2004-08-30

    This project was undertaken in support of the forest industry to link modeling of nutrients and productivity with field research to identify methods for enhancing soil quality and forest productivity and for alleviating soil limitations to sustainable forest productivity. The project consisted of a series of related tasks, including (1) simulation of changes in biomass and soil carbon with nitrogen fertilization, (2) development of spreadsheet modeling tools for soil nutrient availability and tree nutrient requirements, (3) additional modeling studies, and (4) evaluation of factors involved in the establishment and productivity of southern pine plantations in seasonally wet soils. This report also describes the two Web sites that were developed from the research to assist forest managers with nutrient management of Douglas-fir and loblolly pine plantations.

  9. Modifications of alpha processing software to improve calculation of limits for qualitative detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkpatrick, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    The work described in this report was done for the Bioassay Counting Laboratory (BCL) of the Center of Excellence for Bioassay of the Analytical Services Organization at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. BCL takes urine and fecal samples and tests for alpha radiation. An automated system, supplied by Canberra Industries, counts the activities in the samples and processes the results. The Canberra system includes hardware and software. The managers of BCL want to improve the accuracy of the results they report to their final customers. The desired improvements are of particular interest to the managers of BCL because the levels of alpha-emitting radionuclides in samples measured at BCL are usually so low that a significant fraction of the measured signal is due to background and to the reagent material used to extract the radioactive nuclides from the samples. Also, the background and reagent signals show a significant level of random variation. The customers at BCL requested four major modifications of the software. The requested software changes have been made and tested. The present report is in two parts. The first part describes what the modifications were supposed to accomplish. The second part describes the changes on a line-by-line basis. The second part includes listings of the changed software and discusses possible steps to correct a particular error condition. Last, the second part describes the effect of truncation errors on the standard deviations calculated from samples whose signals are very nearly the same.

  10. Oscillation Detection Algorithm Development Summary Report and Test Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Ning; Huang, Zhenyu; Tuffner, Francis K.; Jin, Shuangshuang

    2009-10-03

    Small signal stability problems are one of the major threats to grid stability and reliability in California and the western U.S. power grid. An unstable oscillatory mode can cause large-amplitude oscillations and may result in system breakup and large-scale blackouts. There have been several incidents of system-wide oscillations. Of them, the most notable is the August 10, 1996 western system breakup produced as a result of undamped system-wide oscillations. There is a great need for real-time monitoring of small-signal oscillations in the system. In power systems, a small-signal oscillation is the result of poor electromechanical damping. Considerable understanding and literature have been developed on the small-signal stability problem over the past 50+ years. These studies have been mainly based on a linearized system model and eigenvalue analysis of its characteristic matrix. However, its practical feasibility is greatly limited as power system models have been found inadequate in describing real-time operating conditions. Significant efforts have been devoted to monitoring system oscillatory behaviors from real-time measurements in the past 20 years. The deployment of phasor measurement units (PMU) provides high-precision time-synchronized data needed for estimating oscillation modes. Measurement-based modal analysis, also known as ModeMeter, uses real-time phasor measure-ments to estimate system oscillation modes and their damping. Low damping indicates potential system stability issues. Oscillation alarms can be issued when the power system is lightly damped. A good oscillation alarm tool can provide time for operators to take remedial reaction and reduce the probability of a system breakup as a result of a light damping condition. Real-time oscillation monitoring requires ModeMeter algorithms to have the capability to work with various kinds of measurements: disturbance data (ringdown signals), noise probing data, and ambient data. Several measurement

  11. The Approach to Reducing the Detection Limit for LA-ICP-MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poteshin, S. S.; Sysoev, Alexey A.; Torbotryas, R.

    This work is a part of the RED-100 big project. The aim of the RED-100 experiment is to detect the presently undiscovered coherent neutrino scattering off xenon atomic nuclei. The manufacture of such detectors requires ultrapure materials with very low content of natural radioactive elements. So the pure titanium was selected to assay the uranium and thorium contaminations on 1 ng/g level. In this paper we investigate the possibility of reducing the LOD for LA-ICP-MS analysis by increasing the pulse repetition rate of solid-state laser irradiation up to 4,000 Hz and appropriate adjusting the irradiation power. LODs for U and Th in titanium matrix estimation fell in the sub 10-10 g g- 1 level.

  12. Lower Limits on Aperture Size for an ExoEarth-Detecting Coronagraphic Mission

    CERN Document Server

    Stark, Christopher C; Mandell, Avi; Clampin, Mark; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn D; McElwain, Michael W; Stapelfeldt, Karl R

    2015-01-01

    The yield of Earth-like planets will likely be a primary science metric for future space-based missions that will drive telescope aperture size. Maximizing the exoEarth candidate yield is therefore critical to minimizing the required aperture. Here we describe a method for exoEarth candidate yield maximization that simultaneously optimizes, for the first time, the targets chosen for observation, the number of visits to each target, the delay time between visits, and the exposure time of every observation. This code calculates both the detection time and multi-wavelength spectral characterization time required for planets. We also refine the astrophysical assumptions used as inputs to these calculations, relying on published estimates of planetary occurrence rates as well as theoretical and observational constraints on terrestrial planet sizes and classical habitable zones. Given these astrophysical assumptions, optimistic telescope and instrument assumptions, and our new completeness code that produces the hi...

  13. Sequential anomaly detection in the presence of noise and limited feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Raginsky, Maxim; Silva, Jorge; Willett, Rebecca

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a method for detecting anomalies from sequentially observed and potentially noisy data. The proposed approach consists of two main elements: (1) filtering, or assigning a belief or likelihood to each successive measurement based upon our ability to predict it from previous noisy observations, and (2) hedging, or flagging potential anomalies by comparing the current belief against a time-varying and data-adaptive threshold. The threshold is adjusted based on the available feedback from an end user. Our algorithms, inspired by recent work on online convex programming, do not require computing posterior distributions given all current observations and involve simple primal-dual parameter updates. At the heart of the proposed approach lie exponential-family models which can be used in a wide variety of contexts and applications, and which yield methods that achieve sublinear per-round regret against both static and slowly varying product distributions with marginals drawn from the same expone...

  14. Detecting gravitational decoherence with clocks: Limits on temporal resolution from a classical channel model of gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Khosla, Kiran

    2016-01-01

    The notion of time is given a different footing in Quantum Mechanics and General Relativity, treated as a parameter in the former and being an observer dependent property in the later. From a operational point of view time is simply the correlation between a system and a clock, where an idealized clock can be modelled as a two level systems. We investigate the dynamics of clocks interacting gravitationally by treating the gravitational interaction as a classical information channel. In particular, we focus on the decoherence rates and temporal resolution of arrays of $N$ clocks showing how the minimum dephasing rate scales with $N$, and the spatial configuration. Furthermore, we consider the gravitational redshift between a clock and massive particle and show that a classical channel model of gravity predicts a finite dephasing rate from the non-local interaction. In our model we obtain a fundamental limitation in time accuracy that is intrinsic to each clock.

  15. Radiation Detection Scenario Analysis Toolbox (RADSAT) Test Case Implementation Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaver, Mark W.

    2010-09-27

    Final report for the project. This project was designed to demonstrate the use of the Radiation Detection Scenario Analysis Toolbox (RADSAT) radiation detection transport modeling package (developed in a previous NA-22 project) for specific radiation detection scenarios important to proliferation detection.

  16. Variation in the limit-of-detection of the ProSpecT Campylobacter microplate enzyme immunoassay in stools spiked with emerging Campylobacter species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojanić, Krunoslav; Midwinter, Anne Camilla; Marshall, Jonathan Craig; Rogers, Lynn Elizabeth; Biggs, Patrick Jon; Acke, Els

    2016-08-01

    Campylobacter enteritis in humans is primarily associated with C. jejuni/coli infection. The impact of other Campylobacter spp. is likely to be underestimated due to the bias of culture methods towards Campylobacter jejuni/coli diagnosis. Stool antigen tests are becoming increasingly popular and appear generally less species-specific. A review of independent studies of the ProSpecT® Campylobacter Microplate enzyme immunoassay (EIA) developed for C. jejuni/coli showed comparable diagnostic results to culture methods but the examination of non-jejuni/coli Campylobacter spp. was limited and the limit-of-detection (LOD), where reported, varied between studies. This study investigated LOD of EIA for Campylobacter upsaliensis, Campylobacter hyointestinalis and Campylobacter helveticus spiked in human stools. Multiple stools and Campylobacter isolates were used in three different concentrations (10(4)-10(9)CFU/ml) to reflect sample heterogeneity. All Campylobacter species evaluated were detectable by EIA. Multivariate analysis showed LOD varied between Campylobacter spp. and faecal consistency as fixed effects and individual faecal samples as random effects. EIA showed excellent performance in replicate testing for both within and between batches of reagents, in agreement between visual and spectrophotometric reading of results, and returned no discordance between the bacterial concentrations within independent dilution test runs (positive results with lower but not higher concentrations). This study shows how limitations in experimental procedures lead to an overestimation of consistency and uniformity of LOD for EIA that may not hold under routine use in diagnostic laboratories. Benefits and limitations for clinical practice and the influence on estimates of performance characteristics from detection of multiple Campylobacter spp. by EIA are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. PV Systems Reliability Final Technical Report: Ground Fault Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavrova, Olga [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Flicker, Jack David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Johnson, Jay [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-01-01

    We have examined ground faults in PhotoVoltaic (PV) arrays and the efficacy of fuse, current detection (RCD), current sense monitoring/relays (CSM), isolation/insulation (Riso) monitoring, and Ground Fault Detection and Isolation (GFID) using simulations based on a Simulation Program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis SPICE ground fault circuit model, experimental ground faults installed on real arrays, and theoretical equations.

  18. 241-AY-102 Leak Detection Pit Drain Line Inspection Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boomer, Kayle D. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (United States); Engeman, Jason K. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (United States); Gunter, Jason R. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (United States); Joslyn, Cameron C. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (United States); Vazquez, Brandon J. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (United States); Venetz, Theodore J. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (United States); Garfield, John S. [AEM Consulting (United States)

    2014-01-20

    This document provides a description of the design components, operational approach, and results from the Tank AY-102 leak detection pit drain piping visual inspection. To perform this inspection a custom robotic crawler with a deployment device was designed, built, and operated by IHI Southwest Technologies, Inc. for WRPS to inspect the 6-inch leak detection pit drain line.

  19. Detection limits of quantitative and digital PCR assays and their influence in presence-absence surveys of environmental DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Margaret E; Dorazio, Robert M; Butterfield, John S S; Meigs-Friend, Gaia; Nico, Leo G; Ferrante, Jason A

    2017-03-01

    A set of universal guidelines is needed to determine the limit of detection (LOD) in PCR-based analyses of low-concentration DNA. In particular, environmental DNA (eDNA) studies require sensitive and reliable methods to detect rare and cryptic species through shed genetic material in environmental samples. Current strategies for assessing detection limits of eDNA are either too stringent or subjective, possibly resulting in biased estimates of species' presence. Here, a conservative LOD analysis grounded in analytical chemistry is proposed to correct for overestimated DNA concentrations predominantly caused by the concentration plateau, a nonlinear relationship between expected and measured DNA concentrations. We have used statistical criteria to establish formal mathematical models for both quantitative and droplet digital PCR. To assess the method, a new Grass Carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) TaqMan assay was developed and tested on both PCR platforms using eDNA in water samples. The LOD adjustment reduced Grass Carp occupancy and detection estimates while increasing uncertainty-indicating that caution needs to be applied to eDNA data without LOD correction. Compared to quantitative PCR, digital PCR had higher occurrence estimates due to increased sensitivity and dilution of inhibitors at low concentrations. Without accurate LOD correction, species occurrence and detection probabilities based on eDNA estimates are prone to a source of bias that cannot be reduced by an increase in sample size or PCR replicates. Other applications also could benefit from a standardized LOD such as GMO food analysis and forensic and clinical diagnostics. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  20. Mangroves at Their Limits: Detection and Area Estimation of Mangroves along the Sahara Desert Coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviana Otero

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The northernmost and most arid mangrove ecosystem of West Africa is found in Mauritania, in the Parc National du Banc d’Arguin (PNBA. The existing global and regional maps of Mauritania’s mangroves have little detail, and available estimates of the mangrove area differ among studies. We assessed the use of automated Remote Sensing classification techniques to calculate the extent and map the distribution of the mangrove patches located at Cap Timiris, PNBA, using QuickBird and GeoEye imagery. It was possible to detect the northernmost contiguous mangrove patches of West Africa with an accuracy of 87% ± 2% using the Maximum Likelihood algorithm. The main source of error was the low spectral difference between mangroves and other types of terrestrial vegetation, which resulted in an erroneous classification between these two types of land cover. The most reliable estimate for the mangrove area obtained in this study was 19.48 ± 5.54 ha in 2011. Moreover, we present a special validation procedure that enables a detailed and reliable validation of the land cover maps.

  1. Kinetics of heterogeneous nucleation in supersaturated vapor: Fundamental limits to neutral particle detection revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGraw R.; Wang, J.; Kuang, C.

    2012-04-26

    We examine the nucleated (with barrier) activation of perfectly wetting (zero contact angle) particles ranging from essentially bulk size down to approximately 1-nm mass diameter. While similar studies trace back to the pioneering work of Fletcher, we present here a novel approach to the analysis based on general area constructions that enable key thermodynamic properties, including surface and bulk contributions to nucleation work, to be interpreted geometrically with reference to the Kelvin curve. The kinetics of activation are described in more detail in terms of the mean first passage time (MFPT) for barrier crossing. MFPT theory and benchmark calculations are used to develop and test a new approximate-but-simpler-to-use analytic expression for the barrier crossing rate. The present study is motivated by recent condensation particle counter (CPC) studies that appear to finally establish the long-predicted detection of 'sub-Kelvin' particles in the nano-size regime. Corresponding states thermodynamic and kinetic scaling approaches are used to facilitate the correlation and selection of optimal CPC working fluids and operating conditions based on a new metric for heterogeneous nucleation, the signal-to-noise ratio, and physical and chemical properties.

  2. The simulation of multiple scattering and its effect on the detection limit of HIBS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, M.M.; O`Connor, D.J. [Newcastle University, Newcastle, NSW (Australia). Dept. of Physics

    1998-06-01

    With the development of heavy ion backscattering spectrometry (HIBS) for the detection of trace impurities, it is necessary to quantify the multiple scattering contributions to the spectral background. In the present work, the Monte Carlo computer simulation program TRIM has been used to study the backscattering spectrum and the multiple scattering features for heavy ions C, Ne, Si, Ar and Kr impinging on four types of targets: a very thin layer Au with thickness of 10 Angstroms, a 10 Angstroms Au thin layer covering a 50 Angstroms Si thick layer, a 10 Angstroms Au thin layer covering on Si substrate (10000 Angstroms), and a thick target of pure Si with thickness of 10000 Angstroms. By fitting the simulation results we have derived the ratio of signal from the thin Au layer to the background due to multiple scattering. From the simulation results, we found that the Si substrate plays a role in generating the low energy background tail due to ion`s multiple scattering in the substrate. Such a background is generated neither by the thin Au layer nor by the pure Si substrate independently. The corresponding mechanism of multiple scattering in the target can be explained as one large-angle scattering event in Au layer and subsequently several small angle scattering events in the substrate. (authors). 4 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs.

  3. Artifactual mutations resulting from DNA lesions limit detection levels in ultrasensitive sequencing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbeithuber, Barbara; Makova, Kateryna D; Tiemann-Boege, Irene

    2016-12-01

    The need in cancer research or evolutionary biology to detect rare mutations or variants present at very low frequencies (DNA lesions introduce important error sources in ultrasensitive technologies such as single molecule PCR (smPCR) applications (e.g. droplet-digital PCR), or next-generation sequencing (NGS) based methods. Using templates with known amplifiable lesions (8-oxoguanine, deaminated 5-methylcytosine, uracil, and DNA heteroduplexes), we assessed with smPCR and duplex sequencing that templates with these lesions were amplified very efficiently by proofreading polymerases (except uracil), leading to G->T, and to a lesser extent, to unreported G->C substitutions at 8-oxoguanine lesions, and C->T transitions in amplified uracil containing templates. Long heat incubations common in many DNA extraction protocols significantly increased the number of G->T substitutions. Moreover, in ∼50-80% smPCR reactions we observed the random amplification preference of only one of both DNA strands explaining the known 'PCR jackpot effect', with the result that a lesion became indistinguishable from a true mutation or variant. Finally, we showed that artifactual mutations derived from uracil and 8-oxoguanine could be significantly reduced by DNA repair enzymes. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute.

  4. Early detection of diabetic kidney disease: Present limitations and future perspectives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chih-Hung; Lin; Yi-Cheng; Chang; Lee-Ming; Chuang

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic kidney disease(DKD) is one of the most common diabetic complications, as well as the leading cause of chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease around the world. To prevent the dreadful consequence, development of new assays for diagnostic of DKD has always been the priority in the research field of diabetic complications. At present, urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio and estimated glomerular filtration rate(eG FR) are the standard methods for assessing glomerular damage and renal function changes in clinical practice. However, due to diverse tissue involvement in different individuals, the so-called "non-albuminuric renal impairment" is not uncommon, especially in patients with type 2 diabetes. On the other hand, the precision of creatinine-based GFR estimates is limited in hyperfiltration status. These facts make albuminuria and eG FR less reliable indicators for early-stage DKD. In recent years, considerable progress has been made in the understanding of the pathogenesis of DKD, along with the elucidation of its genetic profiles and phenotypic expression of different molecules. With the help of ever-evolving technologies, it has gradually become plausible to apply the thriving information in clinical practice. The strength and weakness of several novel biomarkers, genomic, proteomic and metabolomic signatures in assisting the early diagnosis of DKD will be discussed in this article.

  5. Quantum-limited detection of millimeter waves using superconducting tunnel junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mears, C.A.

    1991-09-01

    The quasiparticle tunneling current in a superconductor-insulator- superconductor (SIS) tunnel junction is highly nonlinear. Such a nonlinearity can be used to mix two millimeter wave signals to produce a signal at a much lower intermediate frequency. We have constructed several millimeter and sub-millimeter wave SIS mixers in order to study high frequency response of the quasiparticle tunneling current and the physics of high frequency mixing. We have made the first measurement of the out-of-phase tunneling currents in an SIS tunnel junction. We have developed a method that allows us to determine the parameters of the high frequency embedding circuit by studying the details of the pumped I-V curve. We have constructed a 80--110 GHz waveguide-based mixer test apparatus that allows us to accurately measure the gain and added noise of the SIS mixer under test. Using extremely high quality tunnel junctions, we have measured an added mixer noise of 0.61 {plus_minus} 0.36 quanta, which is within 25 percent of the quantum limit imposed by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. This measured performance is in excellent agreement with that predicted by Tucker`s theory of quantum mixing. We have also studied quasioptically coupled millimeter- and submillimeter-wave mixers using several types of integrated tuning elements. 83 refs.

  6. Quantum-limited detection of millimeter waves using superconducting tunnel junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mears, C.A.

    1991-09-01

    The quasiparticle tunneling current in a superconductor-insulator- superconductor (SIS) tunnel junction is highly nonlinear. Such a nonlinearity can be used to mix two millimeter wave signals to produce a signal at a much lower intermediate frequency. We have constructed several millimeter and sub-millimeter wave SIS mixers in order to study high frequency response of the quasiparticle tunneling current and the physics of high frequency mixing. We have made the first measurement of the out-of-phase tunneling currents in an SIS tunnel junction. We have developed a method that allows us to determine the parameters of the high frequency embedding circuit by studying the details of the pumped I-V curve. We have constructed a 80--110 GHz waveguide-based mixer test apparatus that allows us to accurately measure the gain and added noise of the SIS mixer under test. Using extremely high quality tunnel junctions, we have measured an added mixer noise of 0.61 {plus minus} 0.36 quanta, which is within 25 percent of the quantum limit imposed by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. This measured performance is in excellent agreement with that predicted by Tucker's theory of quantum mixing. We have also studied quasioptically coupled millimeter- and submillimeter-wave mixers using several types of integrated tuning elements. 83 refs.

  7. Water vapour emission in vegetable fuel: absorption cell measurements and detection limits of our CO II Dial system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellecci, C.; De Leo, L.; Gaudio, P.; Gelfusa, M.; Lo Feudo, T.; Martellucci, S.; Richetta, M.

    2006-09-01

    Forest fires can be the cause of serious environmental and economic damages. For this reason a considerable effort has been directed toward the forest protection and fire fighting. In the early forest fire detection, Lidar technique present considerable advantages compared to the passive detection methods based on infrared cameras currently in common use, due its higher sensitivity and ability to accurately locate the fire. The combustion phase of the vegetable matter causes a great amount of water vapour emission, thus the water molecule behaviour will be studied to obtain a fire detection system ready and efficient also before the flame propagation. A first evaluation of increment of the water vapour concentration compared to standard one will be estimated by a numerical simulation. These results will be compared with the experimental measurements carried out into a cell with a CO II Dial system, burning different kinds of vegetable fuel. Our results and their comparison will be reported in this paper.

  8. Limited role of gadolinium to detect active sacroiliitis on MRI in juvenile spondyloarthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herregods, N.; Leus, A.; Verstraete, K.; Jans, L. [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, Ghent (Belgium); Jaremko, J.L. [University of Alberta Hospital, Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Baraliakos, X. [Ruhr-University Bochum, Rheumazentrum Ruhrgebiet, Herne (Germany); Dehoorne, J. [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Ghent (Belgium)

    2015-11-15

    The aim of this study is to determine the added diagnostic value of contrast-enhanced (CE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compared to routine non contrast-enhanced MRI to detect active sacroiliitis in clinically juvenile spondyloarthritis (JSpA). A total of 80 children clinically suspected for sacroiliitis prospectively underwent MRI of the sacroiliac (SI) joints. Axial and coronal T1-weighted (T1), Short-tau inversion recovery (STIR) and fat-saturated T1-weighted gadolinium-DTPA (Gd) contrast-enhanced (T1/Gd) sequences were obtained. The presence of bone marrow edema (BME), capsulitis, enthesitis, high intra-articular STIR signal, synovial enhancement and a global diagnostic impression of the MRI for diagnosis of sacroiliitis was recorded. STIR and T1/Gd sequences had 100 % agreement for depiction of BME, capsulitis and enthesitis. High intra-articular STIR signal was seen in 18/80 (22.5 %) patients, 15 (83 %) of whom also showed synovial enhancement in the T1/Gd sequence. Sensitivity (SN) and specificity (SP) for a clinical diagnosis of JSpA were similar for high STIR signal (SN = 33 %, SP = 85 %) and T1/Gd synovial enhancement (SN = 36 %, SP = 92 %). Positive likelihood ratio (LR+) for JSpA was twice as high for synovial enhancement than high STIR signal (4.5 compared to 2.2). Global diagnostic impression was similar (STIR: SN = 55 %, SP = 87 %, LR + =4.2; T1/Gd: SN = 55 %, SP = 92 %, LR + = 6.9). MRI without contrast administration is sufficient to identify bone marrow edema, capsulitis and retroarticular enthesitis as features of active sacroiliitis in juvenile spondyloarthritis. In selected cases when high STIR signal in the joint is the only finding, gadolinium-enhanced images may help to confirm the presence of synovitis. (orig.)

  9. Recovery efficiency and limit of detection of aerosolized Bacillus anthracis Sterne from environmental surface samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estill, Cheryl Fairfield; Baron, Paul A; Beard, Jeremy K; Hein, Misty J; Larsen, Lloyd D; Rose, Laura; Schaefer, Frank W; Noble-Wang, Judith; Hodges, Lisa; Lindquist, H D Alan; Deye, Gregory J; Arduino, Matthew J

    2009-07-01

    After the 2001 anthrax incidents, surface sampling techniques for biological agents were found to be inadequately validated, especially at low surface loadings. We aerosolized Bacillus anthracis Sterne spores within a chamber to achieve very low surface loading (ca. 3, 30, and 200 CFU per 100 cm(2)). Steel and carpet coupons seeded in the chamber were sampled with swab (103 cm(2)) or wipe or vacuum (929 cm(2)) surface sampling methods and analyzed at three laboratories. Agar settle plates (60 cm(2)) were the reference for determining recovery efficiency (RE). The minimum estimated surface concentrations to achieve a 95% response rate based on probit regression were 190, 15, and 44 CFU/100 cm(2) for sampling steel surfaces and 40, 9.2, and 28 CFU/100 cm(2) for sampling carpet surfaces with swab, wipe, and vacuum methods, respectively; however, these results should be cautiously interpreted because of high observed variability. Mean REs at the highest surface loading were 5.0%, 18%, and 3.7% on steel and 12%, 23%, and 4.7% on carpet for the swab, wipe, and vacuum methods, respectively. Precision (coefficient of variation) was poor at the lower surface concentrations but improved with increasing surface concentration. The best precision was obtained with wipe samples on carpet, achieving 38% at the highest surface concentration. The wipe sampling method detected B. anthracis at lower estimated surface concentrations and had higher RE and better precision than the other methods. These results may guide investigators to more meaningfully conduct environmental sampling, quantify contamination levels, and conduct risk assessment for humans.

  10. Detection Limits for Blood on Fabrics Using Attenuated Total Reflection Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR FT-IR) Spectroscopy and Derivative Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhenyu; DeJong, Stephanie A; Cassidy, Brianna M; Belliveau, Raymond G; Myrick, Michael L; Morgan, Stephen L

    2016-06-27

    Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR FT-IR) was used to detect blood stains based on signature protein absorption in the mid-IR region, where intensity changes in the spectrum can be related to blood concentration. Partial least squares regression (PLSR) was applied for multivariate calibrations of IR spectra of blood dilutions on four types of fabric (acrylic, nylon, polyester, and cotton). Gap derivatives (GDs) were applied as a preprocessing technique to optimize the performance of calibration models. We report a much improved IR detection limit (DL) for blood on cotton (2700× in dilution factor units) and the first IR DL reported for blood on nylon (250×). Due to sample heterogeneity caused by fabric hydrophobicity, acrylic fabric produced variable ATR FT-IR spectra that caused poor DLs in concentration units compared to previous work. Polyester showed a similar problem at low blood concentrations that lead to a relatively poor DL as well. However, the increased surface sensitivity and decreased penetration depth of ATR FT-IR make it an excellent choice for detection of small quantities of blood on the front surface of all fabrics tested (0.0010 µg for cotton, 0.0077 µg for nylon, 0.011 µg for acrylic, and 0.0066 µg for polyester).

  11. Astrophysical limitations to the identification of dark matter: indirect neutrino signals vis-a-vis direct detection recoil rates

    CERN Document Server

    Serpico, Pasquale D

    2010-01-01

    A convincing identification of dark matter (DM) particles can probably be achieved only through a combined analysis of different detections strategies, which provides an effective way of removing degeneracies in the parameter space of DM models. In practice, however, this program is made complicated by the fact that different strategies depend on different physical quantities, or on the same quantities but in a different way, making the treatment of systematic errors rather tricky. We discuss here the uncertainties on the recoil rate in direct detection experiments and on the muon rate induced by neutrinos from dark matter annihilations in the Sun, and we show that, contrarily to the local DM density or overall cross section scale, irreducible astrophysical uncertainties affect the two rates in a different fashion, therefore limiting our ability to reconstruct the parameters of the dark matter particle. By varying within their respective errors astrophysical parameters such as the escape velocity and the velo...

  12. Possibilities for decreasing detection limits of analytical methods for determination of transformation products of unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine in environmental samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulat Kenessov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Most rockets of middle and heavy class launched from Kazakhstan, Russia, China and other countries still use highly toxic unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine (UDMH as a liquid propellant. Study of migration, distribution and accumulation of UDMH transformation products in environment and human health impact assessment of space rocket activity are currently complicated due to the absence of analytical methods allowing detection of trace concentrations of these compounds in analyzed samples. This paper reviews methods and approaches, which can be applied for development of such methods. Detection limits at a part-per-trillion (ppt level may be achieved using most selective and sensitive methods based on gas or liquid chromatography in combination of tandem or high-resolution mass spectrometry. In addition, 1000-fold concentration of samples or integrated sample preparation methods, e.g., dynamic headspace extraction, are required. Special attention during development and application of such methods must be paid to purity of laboratory air, reagents, glassware and analytical instruments.

  13. Finding binaries from phase modulation of pulsating stars with Kepler. IV. Detection limits and radial velocity verification

    CERN Document Server

    Murphy, Simon J; Bedding, Timothy R

    2016-01-01

    We explore the detection limits of the phase modulation (PM) method of finding binary systems among multi-periodic pulsating stars. The method is an attractive way of finding non-transiting planets in the habitable zones of intermediate mass stars, whose rapid rotation inhibits detections via the radial velocity (RV) method. While oscillation amplitudes of a few mmag are required to find planets, many $\\delta$ Scuti stars have these amplitudes. In sub-optimal cases where the signal-to-noise of the oscillations is lower, low-mass brown dwarfs ($\\sim$13 M$_{\\rm Jup}$) are detectable at orbital periods longer than about 1 yr, and the lowest mass main-sequence stars (0.1-0.2 M$_{\\odot}$) are detectable at all orbital periods where the PM method can be applied. We use purpose-written Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) software for the calculation of the PM orbits, which offers robust uncertainties for comparison with RV solutions. Using Kepler data and ground-based RVs, we verify that these two methods are in agreeme...

  14. Self-reported preclinical mobility limitation and fall history as predictors of future falls in older women: prospective cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mänty, Minna Regina; Heinonen, A; Viljanen, A

    2010-01-01

    We studied if self-reported preclinical mobility limitation, described as modification of task performance without perception of difficulty, predicts future falls in older women with and without fall history. Our results suggest that combined measure of self-reported preclinical mobility limitation...... and fall history may offer one possibility for inexpensive fall-risk evaluation in clinical practice. INTRODUCTION: We studied if self-reported preclinical mobility limitation predicts future falls in older women with and without fall history. METHODS: The study population consisted of 428 community...... mobility limitation. Fall history was recalled for previous 12 months and dichotomized. The incidence of future falls over 12 months was followed up with fall calendars. RESULTS: During the fall follow-up, a total of 440 falls were reported by 201 participants. Among those with fall history, women...

  15. Impact of reduced dose limits on NRC licensed activities. Major issues in the implementation of ICRP/NCRP dose limit recommendations: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meinhold, C.B. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1995-05-01

    This report summarizes information required to estimate, at least qualitatively, the potential impacts of reducing occupational dose limits below those given in 10 CFR 20 (Revised). For this study, a questionnaire was developed and widely distributed to the radiation protection community. The resulting data together with data from existing surveys and sources were used to estimate the impact of three dose-limit options; 10 mSv yr{sup {minus}1} (1 rem yr{sup {minus}1}), 20 mSv yr{sup {minus}1} (2 rem yr{sup {minus}1}), and a combination of an annual limit of 50 mSv yr{sup {minus}1} (5 rem yr{sup {minus}1}) coupled with a cumulative limit, in rem, equal to age in years. Due to the somewhat small number of responses and the lack of data in some specific areas, a working committee of radiation protection experts from a variety of licensees was employed to ensure the exposure data were representative. The following overall conclusions were reached: (1) although 10 mSv yr{sup {minus}1} is a reasonable limit for many licensees, such a limit could be extraordinarily difficult to achieve and potentially destructive to the continued operation of some licensees, such as nuclear power, fuel fabrication, and medicine; (2) twenty mSv yr{sup {minus}1} as a limit is possible for some of these groups, but for others it would prove difficult. (3) fifty mSv yr{sup {minus}1} and age in 10s of mSv appear reasonable for all licensees, both in terms of the lifetime risk of cancer and severe genetic effects to the most highly exposed workers, and the practicality of operation.

  16. Extending the Sensitivity to the Detection of WIMP Dark Matter with an Improved Understanding of the Limiting Neutron Backgrounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamat, Sharmila [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2005-01-01

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) uses position-sensitive Germanium and Silicon crystals in the direct detection of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) believed to constitute most of the dark matter in the Universe. WIMP interactions with matter being rare, identifying and eliminating known backgrounds is critical for detection. Event-by-event discrimination by the detectors rejects the predominant gamma and beta backgrounds while Monte Carlo simulations help estimate, and subtract, the contribution from the neutrons. This thesis describes the effort to understand neutron backgrounds as seen in the two stages of the CDMS search for WIMPs. The first stage of the experiment was at a shallow site at the Stanford Underground Facility where the limiting background came from high-energy neutrons produced by cosmic-ray muon interactions in the rock surrounding the cavern. Simulations of this background helped inform the analysis of data from an experimental run at this site and served as input for the background reduction techniques necessary to set new exclusion limits on the WIMP-nucleon cross-section, excluding new parameter space for WIMPs of masses 8-20 GeV/c2. This thesis considers the simulation methods used as well as how various event populations in the data served as checks on the simulations to allow them to be used in the interpretation of the WIMP-search data. The studies also confirmed the presence of a limiting neutron background at the shallow site, necessitating the move to the 713-meter deep Soudan Underground Facility. Similar computer-based studies helped quantify the neutron background seen at the deeper site and informed the analysis of the data emerging from the first physics run of the experiment at Soudan. In conjunction with the WIMP-search and calibration data, the simulations confirmed that increased depth considerably reduced the neutron backgrounds seen, greatly improving the sensitivity to WIMP detection. The data

  17. Resistance of lichens to simulated galactic cosmic radiation: limits of survival capacity and biosignature detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Torre Noetzel, Rosa; Miller, Ana Z.; Cubero, Beatriz; Raguse, Marina; Meessen, Joachim

    2016-04-01

    Space constitutes an extremely harmful environment for survival of terrestrial organisms. Amongst extremophiles on Earth, lichens are one of the most resistant organisms to harsh terrestrial environments, as well as some species of microorganisms, such as bacteria (Moeller et al., 2010), criptoendolithic cyanobacteria and lithic fungi (de los Ríos et al. 2004). To study the survival capacity of lichens to the harmful radiation environment of space, we have selected the lichen Circinaria gyrosa, an astrobiological model defined by its high capacity of resistance to space conditions (De la Torre et al. 2010) and to a simulated Mars environment (Sanchez et al., 2012). Samples were irradiated with four types of space-relevant ionizing radiation in the STARLIFE campaign: helium and iron ion doses (up to 2,000 Gy), X-ray doses (up to 5,000 Gy) and ultra-high γ-ray doses (from 6 to 113 kGy). Results on resistance of C. gyrosa to space-relevant ionizing radiation and its post-irradiation viability were obtained by: (i) chlorophyll a fluorescence of photosystem II (PS II); (ii) epifluorescence microscopy; (iii) confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM), and (iv) field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). Results of photosynthetic activity and epifluorescence showed no significant changes on the viability of C. gyrosa with increasing doses of helium and iron ions as well as X-rays. In contrast, γ-irradiation elicited significant dose-correlated effects as revealed by all applied techniques. Relevant is the presence of whewellite-like crystals, detected by FESEM on C. gyrosa thalli after high irradiation doses, which has been also identified in previous Mars simulation studies (Böttcher et al., 2014). These studies contribute to the better understanding of the adaptability of extremophile organisms to harsh environments, as well as to estimate the habitability of a planet's surface, like Mars; they will be important for planning experiments on the search of life

  18. Medication incident reporting in residential aged care facilities: Limitations and risks to residents’ safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tariq Amina

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medication incident reporting (MIR is a key safety critical care process in residential aged care facilities (RACFs. Retrospective studies of medication incident reports in aged care have identified the inability of existing MIR processes to generate information that can be used to enhance residents’ safety. However, there is little existing research that investigates the limitations of the existing information exchange process that underpins MIR, despite the considerable resources that RACFs’ devote to the MIR process. The aim of this study was to undertake an in-depth exploration of the information exchange process involved in MIR and identify factors that inhibit the collection of meaningful information in RACFs. Methods The study was undertaken in three RACFs (part of a large non-profit organisation in NSW, Australia. A total of 23 semi-structured interviews and 62 hours of observation sessions were conducted between May to July 2011. The qualitative data was iteratively analysed using a grounded theory approach. Results The findings highlight significant gaps in the design of the MIR artefacts as well as information exchange issues in MIR process execution. Study results emphasized the need to: a design MIR artefacts that facilitate identification of the root causes of medication incidents, b integrate the MIR process within existing information systems to overcome key gaps in information exchange execution, and c support exchange of information that can facilitate a multi-disciplinary approach to medication incident management in RACFs. Conclusions This study highlights the advantages of viewing MIR process holistically rather than as segregated tasks, as a means to identify gaps in information exchange that need to be addressed in practice to improve safety critical processes.

  19. 77 FR 8258 - Availability of ICCVAM Evaluation Report and Recommendations on the Usefulness and Limitations of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-14

    .... Addendum to ICCVAM Evaluation of In Vitro Test Methods for Detecting Potential Endocrine Disruptors... Methods For Detecting Potential Endocrine Disruptors: Estrogen Receptor and Androgen Receptor Binding and.... 2002a. Background Review Document. Current Status of Test Methods for Detecting Endocrine Disruptors:...

  20. Automated detection of ambiguity in BI-RADS assessment categories in mammography reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkurt, Selen; Rubin, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    An unsolved challenge in biomedical natural language processing (NLP) is detecting ambiguities in the reports that can help physicians to improve report clarity. Our goal was to develop NLP methods to tackle the challenges of identifying ambiguous descriptions of the laterality of BI-RADS Final Assessment Categories in mammography radiology reports. We developed a text processing system that uses a BI-RADS ontology we built as a knowledge source for automatic annotation of the entities in mammography reports relevant to this problem. We used the GATE NLP toolkit and developed customized processing resources for report segmentation, named entity recognition, and detection of mismatches between BI-RADS Final Assessment Categories and mammogram laterality. Our system detected 55 mismatched cases in 190 reports and the accuracy rate was 81%. We conclude that such NLP techniques can detect ambiguities in mammography reports and may reduce discrepancy and variability in reporting.

  1. [Rosai-Dorfman disease limited to the skin. Four case reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Hidalgo, Carlos; Cuesta-Mejías, Teresa C; Ochoa-Ochoa, Concepción; Valenzuela-Espinosa, Alfonso; Toussaint-Caire, Sonia

    2003-01-01

    Sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy (SHML), or Rosai-Dorfman Disease, presents with bilateral painless cervical adenomegaly, fever, and several hematologic abnormalities. Skin is the extranodal site most frequently affected. We described four additional cases of SHML limited to the skin, emphasizing possible confusion with other dermatoses. Clinical, morphologic, and immunohistochemical aspects of four patients with cutaneous SHLM, three diagnosed in the ABC Medical Center in Mexico City and the other at the Hermanos Ameijeiras Hospital of Havana, Cuba, are reviewed. Three males and one female, 48, 35, 42, and 55 years of age, presented with chronic asymptomatic dermal nodules, papules, or plaques on trunk, extremities, and face. Skin biopsies showed dense infiltrates of foamy histiocytes, lymphocytes, and plasma cells; histiocytes presented with prominent emperipolesis and intense S100 and CD68 immunostain. The four cases reported here had histiocytic benign proliferative disorder corresponding with cutaneous SHML: Emperipolesis suggested the diagnosis. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated positivity for S100 protein in macrophages. Cutaneous lesions of SHML are easily recognized when they are found in the classical clinical picture, but as purely skin disease could be confused with other dermatoses.

  2. Working Group Report: WIMP Dark Matter Direct Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cushman, P.; Galbiati, C.; McKinsey, D. N.; Robertson, H.; Tait, T. M.P.

    2013-10-30

    As part of the Snowmass process, the Cosmic Frontier WIMP Direct Detection subgroup (CF1) has drawn on input from the Cosmic Frontier and the broader Particle Physics community to produce this document. The charge to CF1 was (a) to summarize the current status and projected sensitivity of WIMP direct detection experiments worldwide, (b) motivate WIMP dark matter searches over a broad parameter space by examining a spectrum of WIMP models, (c) establish a community consensus on the type of experimental program required to explore that parameter space, and (d) identify the common infrastructure required to practically meet those goals.

  3. Improving the Detection Limit in a Capillary Raman System for In Situ Gas Analysis by Means of Fluorescence Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Simone; Off, Andreas; Seitz-Moskaliuk, Hendrik; James, Timothy M; Telle, Helmut H

    2015-09-11

    Raman spectroscopy for low-pressure or trace gas analysis is rather challenging, in particular in process control applications requiring trace detection and real-time response; in general, enhancement techniques are required. One possible enhancement approach which enjoys increasing popularity makes use of an internally-reflective capillary as the gas cell. However, in the majority of cases, such capillary systems were often limited in their achievable sensitivity by a significant fluorescence background, which is generated as a consequence of interactions between the laser light and optical glass components in the setup. In order to understand and counteract these problems we have investigated a range of fluorescence-reducing measures, including the rearrangement of optical elements, and the replacement of glass components--including the capillary itself--by metal alternatives. These studies now have led to a capillary setup in which fluorescence is practically eliminated and substantial signal enhancement over standard Raman setups is achieved. With this improved (prototype) setup, detection limits of well below 1 mbar could be obtained in sub-second acquisition times, demonstrating the potential of capillary Raman spectroscopy for real-time, in situ gas sensing and process control applications, down to trace level concentrations.

  4. Educating Limited-English-Proficient Students in Washington State: Annual Report of the State Transitional Bilingual Instruction Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bylsma, Pete; Ireland, Lisa; Malagon, Helen

    2002-01-01

    This report provides information on the program for students with limited English proficiency (LEP) in school year 2000-2001 as well as historical information. Specifically, this report discusses the following topics: (1) staffing patterns and instruction to implement the program; (2) enrollment patterns of students who have participated in the…

  5. Factors affecting the sensitivity and detection limits of MRI, CT, and SPECT for multimodal diagnostic and therapeutic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seevinck, Peter R; Seppenwoolde, Jan-Henry; de Wit, Tim C; Nijsen, Johannes F W; Beekman, Freek J; van Het Schip, Alfred D; Bakker, Chris J G

    2007-05-01

    Noninvasive imaging techniques like magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) play an increasingly important role in the diagnostic workup and treatment of cancerous disease. In this context, a distinct trend can be observed towards the development of contrast agents and radiopharmaceuticals that open up perspectives on a multimodality imaging approach, involving all three aforementioned techniques. To promote insight into the potentialities of such an approach, we prepared an overview of the strengths and limitations of the various imaging techniques, in particular with regard to their capability to quantify the spatial distribution of a multimodal diagnostic agent. To accomplish this task, we used a two-step approach. In the first step, we examined the situation for a particular therapeutic anti-cancer agent with multimodal imaging opportunities, viz. holmium-loaded microspheres (HoMS). Physical phantom experiments were performed to enable a comparative evaluation of the three modalities assuming the use of standard equipment, standard clinical scan protocols, and signal-known-exactly conditions. These phantom data were then analyzed so as to obtain first order estimates of the sensitivity and detection limits of MRI, CT and SPECT for HoMS. In the second step, the results for HoMS were taken as a starting point for a discussion of the factors affecting the sensitivity and detection limits of MRI, CT and SPECT for multimodal agents in general. In this, emphasis was put on the factors that must be taken into account when extrapolating the findings for HoMS to other diagnostic tasks, other contrast agents, other experimental conditions, and other scan protocols.

  6. Does parallel item content on WOMAC's Pain and Function Subscales limit its ability to detect change in functional status?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kennedy Deborah M

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC is considered the leading outcome measure for patients with osteoarthritis of the lower extremity, recent work has challenged its factorial validity and the physical function subscale's ability to detect valid change when pain and function display different profiles of change. This study examined the etiology of the WOMAC's physical function subscale's limited ability to detect change in the presence of discordant changes for pain and function. We hypothesized that the duplication of some items on the WOMAC's pain and function subscales contributed to this shortcoming. Methods Two eight-item physical function scales were abstracted from the WOMAC's 17-item physical function subscale: one contained activities and themes that were duplicated on the pain subscale (SIMILAR-8; the other version avoided overlapping activities (DISSIMILAR-8. Factorial validity of the shortened measures was assessed on 310 patients awaiting hip or knee arthroplasty. The shortened measures' abilities to detect change were examined on a sample of 104 patients following primary hip or knee arthroplasty. The WOMAC and three performance measures that included activity specific pain assessments – 40 m walk test, stair test, and timed-up-and-go test – were administered preoperatively, within 16 days of hip or knee arthroplasty, and at an interval of greater than 20 days following the first post-surgical assessment. Standardized response means were used to quantify change. Results The SIMILAR-8 did not demonstrate factorial validity; however, the factorial structure of the DISSIMILAR-8 was supported. The time to complete the performance measures more than doubled between the preoperative and first postoperative assessments supporting the theory that lower extremity functional status diminished over this interval. The DISSIMILAR-8 detected this deterioration in functional

  7. THE FIRM REDSHIFT LOWER LIMIT OF THE MOST DISTANT TeV-DETECTED BLAZAR PKS 1424+240

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furniss, A.; Williams, D. A.; Primack, J. [Santa Cruz Institute of Particle Physics, and Department of Physics, University of California Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Danforth, C.; Stocke, J. [CASA, Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, 389-UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Fumagalli, M. [Carnegie Observatories, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Prochaska, J. X. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Urry, C. M. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520-8120 (United States); Filippenko, A. V. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Neely, W. [NF/Observatory, Silver City, NM 88041 (United States)

    2013-05-10

    We present the redshift lower limit of z {>=} 0.6035 for the very high energy (VHE; E {>=} 100 GeV) emitting blazar PKS 1424+240 (PG 1424+240). This limit is inferred from Ly{beta} and Ly{gamma} absorption observed in the far-ultraviolet spectra from the Hubble Space Telescope/Cosmic Origins Spectrograph. No VHE-detected blazar has shown solid spectroscopic evidence of being more distant. At this distance, VHE observations by VERITAS are shown to sample historically large gamma-ray opacity values at 500 GeV, extending beyond {tau} = 4 for low-level models of the extragalactic background light (EBL) and beyond {tau} = 5 for high levels. The majority of the z = 0.6035 absorption-corrected VHE spectrum appears to exhibit a lower flux than an extrapolation of the contemporaneous Large Area Telescope power-law fit beyond 100 GeV. However, the highest energy VERITAS point is the only point showing agreement with this extrapolation, possibly implying the overestimation of the gamma-ray opacity or the onset of an unexpected VHE spectral feature. A curved log parabola is favored when fitting the full range of gamma-ray data (0.5-500 GeV). While fitting the absorption-corrected VHE data alone results in a harder differential power law than that from the full range, the indices derived using three EBL models are consistent with the physically motivated limit set by Fermi acceleration processes.

  8. A Limit on the Number of Isolated Neutron Stars Detected in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey Bright Source Catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Turner, Monica L; Letcavage, Ryan; Shevchuk, Andrew S H; Fox, Derek B

    2010-01-01

    Using new and archival observations made with the Swift satellite and other facilities, we examine 147 X-ray sources selected from the ROSAT All-Sky-Survey Bright Source Catalog (RASS/BSC) to produce a new limit on the number of isolated neutron stars (INSs) in the RASS/BSC, the most constraining such limit to-date. Independent of X-ray spectrum and variability, the number of INSs is <=48 (90% confidence). Restricting attention to soft (having an effective temperature of < 200 eV), non-variable X-ray sources -- as in a previous study -- yields an all-sky limit of <=31 INSs. In the course of our analysis, we identify five new high-quality INS candidates for targeted follow-up observations. A future all-sky X-ray survey with eROSITA, or another mission with similar capabilities, can be expected to increase the detected population of X-ray-discovered INSs from the 8 to 50 in the BSC, to (for a disk population) 240 to 1500, which will enable a more detailed study of neutron star population models.

  9. Application of quantitative signal detection in the Dutch spontaneous reporting system for adverse drug reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Puijenbroek, Eugène; Diemont, Willem; van Grootheest, Kees

    2003-01-01

    The primary aim of spontaneous reporting systems (SRSs) is the timely detection of unknown adverse drug reactions (ADRs), or signal detection. Generally this is carried out by a systematic manual review of every report sent to an SRS. Statistical analysis of the data sets of an SRS, or quantitative

  10. Detection with Enhanced Energy Windowing Phase I Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bass, David A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Enders, Alexander L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-12-01

    This document reviews the progress of Phase I of the Detection with Enhanced Energy Windowing (DEEW) project. The DEEW project is the implementation of software incorporating an algorithm which reviews data generated by radiation portal monitors and utilizes advanced and novel techniques for detecting radiological and fissile material while not alarming on Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material. Independent testing indicated that the Enhanced Energy Windowing algorithm showed promise at reducing the probability of alarm in the stream of commerce compared to existing algorithms and other developmental algorithms, while still maintaining adequate sensitivity to threats. This document contains a brief description of the project, instructions for setting up and running the applications, and guidance to help make reviewing the output files and source code easier.

  11. Preliminary Report of Molecular Detection of Retinoblastoma Gene Mutations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1994-01-01

    To develop gene diagnosis for retinoblastoma predisposition, it is necessary to disclose the retinoblastoma gene mutations or deletions in detail. Genomic DNA from tumor and peripheral white blood cells in 33 patients with retinoblastoma was detected with 3.8kb probe derived from 3' end of retinoblastoma gene cDNA. The gene abnormalities, including deletion, partial deletion and rearrangement, were found in 18 patients. Further research will be aimed at microdeletions or mutations for those patients wti...

  12. Limited Wegener's granulomatosis presenting as lung nodules in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Sushma; Panda, Mukta

    2008-12-23

    Rheumatoid arthritis has varied pleuroparenchymal manifestations. Wegener's granulomatosis can develop in an established case of rheumatoid arthritis and this association although previously reported is very rare. A 60-year-old lady had been diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis on the basis of her clinical symptoms and serological tests which were positive RA factor and anti-CCP antibodies. Her rheumatoid arthritis activity had been mild and well controlled with hydroxychloroquine and low dose prednisone. She presented with a productive cough and right-sided pleuritic chest pain. CT scan of the chest showed three lung nodules with increased uptake on PET CT scan, raising concerns for an inflammatory or malignant process. The differential diagnosis included rheumatoid nodules, infections or malignancy. A CT-guided needle biopsy of the largest nodule was undertaken which showed vasculitis typical of Wegener's granulomatosis. Stains and cultures of the biopsy specimen were negative for bacteria, fungi and acid fast bacilli. A panel of serological tests for vasculitis were checked and showed elevated titers of cANCA and anti-proteinase 3 antibodies. Urine analysis and CT scan of paranasal sinuses was normal. Since the upper respiratory tract and the kidneys were spared a diagnosis of limited Wegener's granulomatosis affecting only the lungs was made. Due to the toxicity of cyclophosphamide, her relatively mild disease sparing the kidneys and the underlying rheumatoid arthritis, weekly methotrexate was started and low dose prednisone was continued. She had marked symptomatic improvement and complete resolution of the nodules was documented on subsequent imaging. Wegener's granulomatosis developing in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis is very rare but should be considered as it warrants a different and possibly more aggressive treatment approach.

  13. Evaluating detection limits of next-generation sequencing for the surveillance and monitoring of international marine pests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pochon, Xavier; Bott, Nathan J; Smith, Kirsty F; Wood, Susanna A

    2013-01-01

    Most surveillance programmes for marine invasive species (MIS) require considerable taxonomic expertise, are laborious, and are unable to identify species at larval or juvenile stages. Therefore, marine pests may go undetected at the initial stages of incursions when population densities are low. In this study, we evaluated the ability of the benchtop GS Junior™ 454 pyrosequencing system to detect the presence of MIS in complex sample matrices. An initial in-silico evaluation of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) and the nuclear small subunit ribosomal DNA (SSU) genes, found that multiple primer sets (targeting a ca. 400 base pair region) would be required to obtain species level identification within the COI gene. In contrast a single universal primer set was designed to target the V1-V3 region of SSU, allowing simultaneous PCR amplification of a wide taxonomic range of MIS. To evaluate the limits of detection of this method, artificial contrived communities (10 species from 5 taxonomic groups) were created using varying concentrations of known DNA samples and PCR products. Environmental samples (water and sediment) spiked with one or five 160 hr old Asterias amurensis larvae were also examined. Pyrosequencing was able to recover DNA/PCR products of individual species present at greater than 0.64% abundance from all tested contrived communities. Additionally, single A. amurensis larvae were detected from both water and sediment samples despite the co-occurrence of a large array of environmental eukaryotes, indicating an equivalent sensitivity to quantitative PCR. NGS technology has tremendous potential for the early detection of marine invasive species worldwide.

  14. Evaluating detection limits of next-generation sequencing for the surveillance and monitoring of international marine pests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Pochon

    Full Text Available Most surveillance programmes for marine invasive species (MIS require considerable taxonomic expertise, are laborious, and are unable to identify species at larval or juvenile stages. Therefore, marine pests may go undetected at the initial stages of incursions when population densities are low. In this study, we evaluated the ability of the benchtop GS Junior™ 454 pyrosequencing system to detect the presence of MIS in complex sample matrices. An initial in-silico evaluation of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI and the nuclear small subunit ribosomal DNA (SSU genes, found that multiple primer sets (targeting a ca. 400 base pair region would be required to obtain species level identification within the COI gene. In contrast a single universal primer set was designed to target the V1-V3 region of SSU, allowing simultaneous PCR amplification of a wide taxonomic range of MIS. To evaluate the limits of detection of this method, artificial contrived communities (10 species from 5 taxonomic groups were created using varying concentrations of known DNA samples and PCR products. Environmental samples (water and sediment spiked with one or five 160 hr old Asterias amurensis larvae were also examined. Pyrosequencing was able to recover DNA/PCR products of individual species present at greater than 0.64% abundance from all tested contrived communities. Additionally, single A. amurensis larvae were detected from both water and sediment samples despite the co-occurrence of a large array of environmental eukaryotes, indicating an equivalent sensitivity to quantitative PCR. NGS technology has tremendous potential for the early detection of marine invasive species worldwide.

  15. Finding binaries from phase modulation of pulsating stars with Kepler - IV. Detection limits and radial velocity verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Simon J.; Shibahashi, Hiromoto; Bedding, Timothy R.

    2016-10-01

    We explore the detection limits of the phase modulation (PM) method of finding binary systems among multiperiodic pulsating stars. The method is an attractive way of finding non-transiting planets in the habitable zones of intermediate-mass stars, whose rapid rotation inhibits detections via the radial velocity (RV) method. While oscillation amplitudes of a few mmag are required to find planets, many δ Scuti stars have these amplitudes. In suboptimal cases where the signal to noise of the oscillations is lower, low-mass brown dwarfs (˜13MJup) are detectable at orbital periods longer than about 1 yr, and the lowest mass main-sequence stars (0.1-0.2 M⊙) are detectable at all orbital periods where the PM method can be applied. We use purpose-written Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) software for the calculation of the PM orbits, which offers robust uncertainties for comparison with RV solutions. Using Kepler data and ground-based RVs, we verify that these two methods are in agreement, even at short orbital periods where the PM method undersamples the orbit. We develop new theory to account for the undersampling of the time delays, which is also necessary for the inclusion of RVs as observational data in the MCMC software. We show that combining RVs with time delays substantially refines the orbits because of the complementarity of working in both the spatial (PM) and velocity (RV) domains simultaneously. Software outputs were tested through an extensive hare-and-hounds exercise, covering a wide range of orbital configurations including binaries containing two pulsators.

  16. Detection of Bioaerosols Using Single Particle Thermal Emission Spectroscopy (First-year Report)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Detection of Bioaerosols using Single Particle Thermal Emission Spectroscopy (First-year Report) by Dr. Kristan P. Gurton, Melvin Felton, and...Research Laboratory Adelphi, MD 20783-1197 ARL-TR-5934 February 2012 Detection of Bioaerosols using Single Particle Thermal Emission...October 2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Detection of Bioaerosols using Single Particle Thermal Emission Spectroscopy (First-year Report) 5a. CONTRACT

  17. Methods for automatized detection of rapid changes in lateral boundary condition fields for NWP limited area models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudor, M.

    2015-08-01

    Three-hourly temporal resolution of lateral boundary data for limited area models (LAMs) can be too infrequent to resolve rapidly moving storms. This problem is expected to be worse with increasing horizontal resolution. In order to detect intensive disturbances in surface pressure moving rapidly through the model domain, a filtered surface pressure field (MCUF) is computed operationally in the ARPEGE global model of Météo France. The field is distributed in the coupling files along with conventional meteorological fields used for lateral boundary conditions (LBCs) for the operational forecast using limited area model ALADIN (Aire Limitée Adaptation dynamique Développement InterNational) in the Meteorological and Hydrological Service of Croatia (DHMZ). Here an analysis is performed of the MCUF field for the LACE coupling domain for the period from 23 January 2006, when it became available, until 15 November 2014. The MCUF field is a good indicator of rapidly moving pressure disturbances (RMPDs). Its spatial and temporal distribution can be associated with the usual cyclone tracks and areas known to be supporting cyclogenesis. An alternative set of coupling files from the IFS operational run in the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) is also available operationally in DHMZ with 3-hourly temporal resolution, but the MCUF field is not available. Here, several methods are tested that detect RMPDs in surface pressure a posteriori from the IFS model fields provided in the coupling files. MCUF is computed by running ALADIN on the coupling files from IFS. The error function is computed using one-time-step integration of ALADIN on the coupling files without initialization, initialized with digital filter initialization (DFI) or scale-selective DFI (SSDFI). Finally, the amplitude of changes in the mean sea level pressure is computed from the fields in the coupling files. The results are compared to the MCUF field of ARPEGE and the results of same

  18. Development of a balanced detector with biased synchronous detection and application to near shot noise limited noise cancelling of supercontinuum pulse light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Keisuke; Tsukada, Toshiaki; Okuda, Yoshinao; Tokunaga, Eiji; Kobayashi, Takayoshi

    2014-02-01

    We report on the development of a balanced detector suited for multicolor imaging. The source pulsed light is split into probe and reference pulsed light. The reference pulse is delayed through an optical path and the probe and reference pulses are detected by a single photodetector. The signs of the detected signals of the probe and reference pulses are flipped based on a signal synchronous to the light source. Then, the signals are averaged through a low-pass filter. The output signal is proportional to the intensity difference between the probe and the reference. This balanced detector has two features: (1) both the probe and reference pulsed lights are detected by a single photodetector and (2) a voltage bias on the sign flipping compensates for the optical-intensity unbalance between the probe and reference pulsed lights. The first feature enables the probe and reference pulses to travel along a common optical path from a sample through a spectrograph to the photodetector, which minimizes the intensity unbalance between the probe and reference pulses during imaging and spectroscopy. The second feature ensures the complete balanced-detection in whole wavelength range by compensating for the optical unbalance created by deviations in the splitting ratios of the probe and reference lights at different wavelengths. Although a higher signal to noise ratio (SNR) reached to near shot noise limited SNR is attained by attaching a resonator to the photodetector for pulse repetition, the electrical bias cannot compensate for the optical balance. This unbalance is, however, corrected by adjusting the phase of the synchronous signal. We applied the present balanced detection to a stimulated Raman microscope with supercontinuum probe light and demonstrated its noise cancelling performance through capturing polystyrene beads.

  19. Structured reporting ensures complete content and quick detection of essential data in pathology reports of oncological breast resection specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aumann, Konrad; Niermann, Kathrin; Asberger, Jasmin; Wellner, Ulrich; Bronsert, Peter; Erbes, Thalia; Hauschke, Dieter; Stickeler, Elmar; Gitsch, Gerald; Kayser, Gian; Werner, Martin

    2016-04-01

    There is increasing evidence that not only the way of data acquisition but also the design of data visualization (i.e., the format) has impact on the quality of pathology reports. Therefore, we investigated the correlation between the format of pathology reports and the amount as well as the detection time of transmitted data. All reports of oncological breast resection specimens referred to the Institute for Surgical Pathology, University Medical Center Freiburg, between 2003 and 2011 (n = 4181) were classified into descriptive reports (DR, n = 856), structured reports (SR, n = 2455), or template-based synoptic reports (TBSR, n = 870). The reports were screened regarding the content of nine organ-specific essential data. The amount of recorded essential data per report was summarized in an essential data score (EDS) and the format types were statistically compared regarding their EDS. Additionally, we measured the time a gynecologist needed to detect all nine essential data within a subset of reports and compared the format types regarding the detection times statistically. A full-score EDS of 9 was seen in 28.4 % of all reports, in 4 % of DRs, in 21.4 % of SRs, and in 72.3 % of TBSRs (p < 0.0001). Median EDS of DRs was 7, of SRs 8, and of TBSRs 9 (p < 0.0001). Data regarding tumor localization, tumor size, specific grading, angioinvasion, hormone receptor status, and additional findings were mentioned more frequently in TBSRs compared to other format type reports with a statistically highly significant difference (p < 0.0001). Mean data detection time decreased significantly from 26 to 20 and 14 s in DRs, SRs, and TBSRs, respectively. Our results clearly show that due to the use of TBSRs reporting of oncological breast resection specimens are improved regarding the content of essential data and the clarity of the data layout resulting in a rapid detection of essential data by clinicians.

  20. Aviation Weather Observations for Supplementary Aviation Weather Reporting Stations (SAWRS) and Limited Aviation Weather Reporting Stations (LAWRS). Federal Meteorological Handbook No. 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation, Washington, DC.

    This handbook provides instructions for observing, identifying, and recording aviation weather at Limited Aviation Weather Reporting Stations (LAWRS) and Supplementary Aviation Weather Reporting Stations (SAWRS). Official technical definitions, meteorological and administrative procedures are outlined. Although this publication is intended for use…

  1. Hemoglobin Q-Iran detected in family members from Northern Iran: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khorshidi Mohammad

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Hemoglobin Q-Iran (α75Asp→His is an important member of the hemoglobin Q family, molecularly characterized by the replacement of aspartic acid by histidine. The first report of hemoglobin Q-Iran and the nomenclature of this hemoglobinopathy dates back to 1970. Iran is known as a country with a high prevalence of α- and β-thalassemia and different types of hemoglobinopathy. Many of these variants are yet to be identified as the practice of molecular laboratory techniques is limited in this part of the world. Applying such molecular methods, we report the first hemoglobin Q-Iran cases in Northern Iran. Case presentation An unusual band was detected in an isoelectric focusing test and cellulose acetate electrophoresis of a sample from a 22-year-old Iranian man from Mazandaran Province. Capillary zone electrophoresis analysis identified this band as hemoglobin Q. A similar band was also detected in his mother's electrophoresis (38 years, Iranian ethnicity. The cases underwent molecular investigation and the presence of a hemoglobin Q-Iran mutation was confirmed by the amplification refractory mutation system polymerase chain reaction method. Direct conventional sequencing revealed a single guanine to cytosine missense mutation (c.226G > C; GAC >CAC at codon 75 in the α-globin gene in both cases. Conclusion The wide spectrum and high frequency of nondeletional α-globin mutations in Mazandaran Province is remarkable and seem to differ considerably from what has been found in Mediterranean populations. This short communication reports the first cases of patients with hemoglobin Q found in that region.

  2. A method detection limit for the analysis of natural organic matter via Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Thomas; Dittmar, Thorsten

    2014-08-19

    Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance mass spectra (FT-ICR-MS) of natural organic matter are complex and consist of several thousands of peaks. The corresponding mass to charge ratios (m/z) and signal intensities result from analytes and noise. The most commonly applied way of distinguishing between analyte and noise is a fixed signal-to-noise ratio below which a detected peak is considered noise. However, this procedure is problematic and can yield ambiguous results. For example, random noise peaks can occur slightly above the signal-to-noise threshold (false positives), while peaks of low abundance analytes may occasionally fall below the fixed threshold (false negatives). Thus, cumulative results from repeated measurements of the same sample contain more peaks than a single measurement. False positive and false negative signals are difficult to distinguish, which affects the reproducibility between replicates of a sample. To target this issue, we tested the feasibility of a method detection limit (MDL) for the analysis of natural organic matter to identify peaks that can reliably be distinguished from noise by estimating the uncertainty of the noise. We performed 556 replicate analyses of a dissolved organic matter sample from the deep North Pacific on a 15 T FT-ICR-MS; each of these replicate runs consisted of 500 cumulated broadband scans. To unambiguously identify analyte peaks in the mass spectra, the sample was also run at time-consuming high-sensitivity settings. The resulting data set was used to establish and thoroughly test a MDL. The new method is easy to establish with software help, does only require the additional analysis of replicate blanks (low time increase), and can implement all steps of sample preparation. Especially when analysis time does not allow for replicate runs, major merits of the MDL are reliable removal of false positive (noise) peaks and better reproducibility, while the risk of losing analytes with low signal intensities

  3. Using European travellers as an early alert to detect emerging pathogens in countries with limited laboratory resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grais Rebecca

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The volume, extent and speed of travel have dramatically increased in the past decades, providing the potential for an infectious disease to spread through the transportation network. By collecting information on the suspected place of infection, existing surveillance systems in industrialized countries may provide timely information for areas of the world without adequate surveillance currently in place. We present the results of a case study using reported cases of Shigella dysenteriae serotype 1 (Sd1 in European travellers to detect "events" of Sd1, related to either epidemic cases or endemic cases in developing countries. Methods We identified papers from a Medline search for reported events of Sd1 from 1940 to 2002. We requested data on shigella infections reported to the responsible surveillance entities in 17 European countries. Reports of Sd1 from the published literature were then compared with Sd1 notified cases among European travellers from 1990 to 2002. Results Prior to a large epidemic in 1999–2000, no cases of Sd1 had been identified in West Africa. However, if travellers had been used as an early warning, Sd1 could have been identified in this region as earlier as 1992. Conclusion This project demonstrates that tracking diseases in European travellers could be used to detect emerging disease in developing countries. This approach should be further tested with a view to the continuous improvement of national health surveillance systems and existing European networks, and may play a significant role in aiding the international public health community to improve infectious disease control.

  4. MAGIC Upper Limits for two Milagro-detected, Bright Fermi Sources in the Region of SNR G65.1+0.6

    CERN Document Server

    Aleksić, J; Antoranz, P; Backes, M; Barrio, J A; Bastieri, D; González, J Becerra; Bednarek, W; Berdyugin, A; Berger, K; Bernardini, E; Biland, A; Blanch, O; Bock, R K; Boller, A; Bonnoli, G; Bordas, P; Tridon, D Borla; Bosch-Ramon, V; Bose, D; Braun, I; Bretz, T; Camara, M; Carmona, E; Carosi, A; Colin, P; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Covino, S; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; del Pozo, E De Cea; De Lotto, B; De Maria, M; De Sabata, F; DelgadoMendez, C; Ortega, A Diago; Doert, M; Domínguez, A; Prester, D Dominis; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Elsaesser, D; Errando, M; Ferenc, D; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; López, R J García; Garczarczyk, M; Gaug, M; Giavitto, G; Godinović, N; Hadasch, D; Herrero, A; Hildebrand, D; Höhne-Mönch, D; Hose, J; Hrupec, D; Jogler, T; Klepser, S; Krähenbühl, T; Kranich, D; Krause, J; La Barbera, A; Leonardo, E; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; Longo, F; López, M; Lorenz, E; Majumdar, P; Maneva, G; Mankuzhiyil, N; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Meucci, M; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Miyamoto, H; Moldón, J; Moralejo, A; Nieto, D; Nilsson, K; Orito, R; Oya, I; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Partini, S; Pasanen, M; Pauss, F; Pegna, R G; Perez-Torres, M A; Persic, M; Peruzzo, L; Pochon, J; Prada, F; Moroni, P G Prada; Prandini, E; Puchades, N; Puljak, I; Reichardt, I; Reinthal, R; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Rissi, M; Rügamer, S; Saggion, A; Saito, K; Saito, T Y; Salvati, M; Sánchez-Conde, M; Satalecka, K; Scalzotto, V; Scapin, V; Schultz, C; Schweizer, T; Shayduk, M; Shore, S N; Sierpowska-Bartosik, A; Sillanpää, A; Sitarek, J; Sobczynska, D; Spanier, F; Spiro, S; Stamerra, A; Steinke, B; Storz, J; Strah, N; Struebig, J C; Suric, T; Takalo, L; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Terzić, T; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Torres, D F; Vankov, H; Wagner, R M; Weitzel, Q; Zabalza, V; Zandanel, F; Zanin, R

    2010-01-01

    We report on the observation of the region around supernova remnant G65.1+0.6 with the stand-alone MAGIC-I telescope. This region hosts the two bright GeV gamma-ray sources 1FGL J1954.3+2836 and 1FGL J1958.6+2845. They are identified as GeV pulsars and both have a possible counterpart detected at about 35 TeV by the Milagro observatory. MAGIC collected 25.5 hours of good quality data, and found no significant emission in the range around 1 TeV. We therefore report differential flux upper limits, assuming the emission to be point-like (<0.1 deg) or within a radius of 0.3 deg. In the point-like scenario, the flux limits around 1 TeV are at the level of 3 % and 2 % of the Crab Nebula flux, for the two sources respectively. This implies that the Milagro emission is either extended over a much larger area than our point spread function, or it must be peaked at energies beyond 1 TeV, resulting in a photon index harder than 2.2 in the TeV band.

  5. MAGIC Upper Limits for Two Milagro-detected Bright Fermi Sources in the Region of SNR G65.1+0.6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksić, J.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Backes, M.; Barrio, J. A.; Bastieri, D.; Becerra González, J.; Bednarek, W.; Berdyugin, A.; Berger, K.; Bernardini, E.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bock, R. K.; Boller, A.; Bonnoli, G.; Bordas, P.; Borla Tridon, D.; Bosch-Ramon, V.; Bose, D.; Braun, I.; Bretz, T.; Camara, M.; Carmona, E.; Carosi, A.; Colin, P.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Covino, S.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Cea del Pozo, E.; De Lotto, B.; De Maria, M.; De Sabata, F.; Delgado Mendez, C.; Diago Ortega, A.; Doert, M.; Domínguez, A.; Dominis Prester, D.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Elsaesser, D.; Errando, M.; Ferenc, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Gaug, M.; Giavitto, G.; Godinović, N.; Hadasch, D.; Herrero, A.; Hildebrand, D.; Höhne-Mönch, D.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Jogler, T.; Klepser, S.; Krähenbühl, T.; Kranich, D.; Krause, J.; La Barbera, A.; Leonardo, E.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; Longo, F.; López, M.; Lorenz, E.; Majumdar, P.; Maneva, G.; Mankuzhiyil, N.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Meucci, M.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Miyamoto, H.; Moldón, J.; Moralejo, A.; Nieto, D.; Nilsson, K.; Orito, R.; Oya, I.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Partini, S.; Pasanen, M.; Pauss, F.; Pegna, R. G.; Perez-Torres, M. A.; Persic, M.; Peruzzo, L.; Pochon, J.; Prada, F.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Prandini, E.; Puchades, N.; Puljak, I.; Reichardt, I.; Reinthal, R.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Rissi, M.; Rügamer, S.; Saggion, A.; Saito, K.; Saito, T. Y.; Salvati, M.; Sánchez-Conde, M.; Satalecka, K.; Scalzotto, V.; Scapin, V.; Schultz, C.; Schweizer, T.; Shayduk, M.; Sierpowska-Bartosik, A.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Sobczynska, D.; Spanier, F.; Spiro, S.; Stamerra, A.; Steinke, B.; Storz, J.; Strah, N.; Struebig, J. C.; Suric, T.; Takalo, L.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Torres, D. F.; Vankov, H.; Wagner, R. M.; Weitzel, Q.; Zabalza, V.; Zandanel, F.; Zanin, R.

    2010-12-01

    We report on the observation of the region around supernova remnant G65.1+0.6 with the stand-alone MAGIC-I telescope. This region hosts the two bright GeV gamma-ray sources 1FGL J1954.3+2836 and 1FGL J1958.6+2845. They are identified as GeV pulsars and both have a possible counterpart detected at about 35 TeV by the Milagro observatory. MAGIC collected 25.5 hr of good quality data and found no significant emission in the range around 1 TeV. We therefore report differential flux upper limits, assuming the emission to be point-like (<=0fdg1) or within a radius of 0fdg3. In the point-like scenario, the flux limits around 1 TeV are at the level of 3% and 2% of the Crab Nebula flux for the two sources, respectively. This implies that the Milagro emission is either extended over a much larger area than our point-spread function or it must be peaked at energies beyond 1 TeV, resulting in a photon index harder than 2.2 in the TeV band.

  6. Conference Report: Biosignature Preservation and Detection in Mars Analog Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Lindsay; Beaty, David

    2017-01-01

    The Conference on Biosignature Preservation and Detection in Mars Analog Environments held in May 2016 brought together scientists to discuss microbial biosignatures in Mars analog habitable environments. Five analog environments were discussed: (1) hydrothermal spring systems, (2) subaqueous environments, (3) subaerial environments, (4) subsurface environments, and (5) iron-rich systems. This paper details the major messages that resulted from the discussions and will be followed by a review paper that adds significant detail from the published literature and interpretations from the writing committee of the workshop for future research and application to astrobiological exploration missions.

  7. Do simple screening statistical tools help to detect reporting bias?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirracchio, Romain; Resche-Rigon, Matthieu; Chevret, Sylvie; Journois, Didier

    2013-09-02

    As a result of reporting bias, or frauds, false or misunderstood findings may represent the majority of published research claims. This article provides simple methods that might help to appraise the quality of the reporting of randomized, controlled trials (RCT). This evaluation roadmap proposed herein relies on four steps: evaluation of the distribution of the reported variables; evaluation of the distribution of the reported p values; data simulation using parametric bootstrap and explicit computation of the p values. Such an approach was illustrated using published data from a retracted RCT comparing a hydroxyethyl starch versus albumin-based priming for cardiopulmonary bypass. Despite obvious nonnormal distributions, several variables are presented as if they were normally distributed. The set of 16 p values testing for differences in baseline characteristics across randomized groups did not follow a Uniform distribution on [0,1] (p = 0.045). The p values obtained by explicit computations were different from the results reported by the authors for the two following variables: urine output at 5 hours (calculated p value 0.05 in only 5 of the 10,000 simulated datasets concerning urine output 5 hours after surgery. Concerning PRBC transfused during surgery, parametric bootstrap showed that only the corresponding p value had less than a 50% chance to be inferior to 0.05 (3,920/10,000, p value < 0.05). Such simple evaluation methods might offer some warning signals. However, it should be emphasized that such methods do not allow concluding to the presence of error or fraud but should rather be used to justify asking for an access to the raw data.

  8. Using rapid-scan EPR to improve the detection limit of quantitative EPR by more than one order of magnitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möser, J; Lips, K; Tseytlin, M; Eaton, G R; Eaton, S S; Schnegg, A

    2017-08-01

    X-band rapid-scan EPR was implemented on a commercially available Bruker ELEXSYS E580 spectrometer. Room temperature rapid-scan and continuous-wave EPR spectra were recorded for amorphous silicon powder samples. By comparing the resulting signal intensities the feasibility of performing quantitative rapid-scan EPR is demonstrated. For different hydrogenated amorphous silicon samples, rapid-scan EPR results in signal-to-noise improvements by factors between 10 and 50. Rapid-scan EPR is thus capable of improving the detection limit of quantitative EPR by at least one order of magnitude. In addition, we provide a recipe for setting up and calibrating a conventional pulsed and continuous-wave EPR spectrometer for rapid-scan EPR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. AN EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF THE 236U DETECTION LIMIT IN THE SURFACE AIR USING RADIOCHEMICAL SEPARATION AND ALPHA-SPECTROMETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Gedeonov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to nuclear weapon testing, nuclear reactor accidents, uranium mining and nuclear fuel reprocessing, additional uranium has been introduced into the environment. 236U isotope is produced from 235U by capture of a thermal neutron and it can be used as an indicator for artificial uranium in the environment. In this paper the sensitive method for236U determination in the surface air is described. This method includes a total dissolution of the air dust in a mixture of mineral acids, uranium concentration and purification by anion-exchange chromatography. Long time measurements of the separated uranium fraction are made with the use of alpha-spectrometer based on PIPS-detector. The lower limit of detection for 236U in the surface air is determined as 5 • 10-9 Bq/m3 (2 ng/m3.

  10. Detection of single atoms and buried defects in three dimensions by aberration-corrected electron microscope with 0.5-A information limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisielowski, C; Freitag, B; Bischoff, M; van Lin, H; Lazar, S; Knippels, G; Tiemeijer, P; van der Stam, M; von Harrach, S; Stekelenburg, M; Haider, M; Uhlemann, S; Müller, H; Hartel, P; Kabius, B; Miller, D; Petrov, I; Olson, E A; Donchev, T; Kenik, E A; Lupini, A R; Bentley, J; Pennycook, S J; Anderson, I M; Minor, A M; Schmid, A K; Duden, T; Radmilovic, V; Ramasse, Q M; Watanabe, M; Erni, R; Stach, E A; Denes, P; Dahmen, U

    2008-10-01

    The ability of electron microscopes to analyze all the atoms in individual nanostructures is limited by lens aberrations. However, recent advances in aberration-correcting electron optics have led to greatly enhanced instrument performance and new techniques of electron microscopy. The development of an ultrastable electron microscope with aberration-correcting optics and a monochromated high-brightness source has significantly improved instrument resolution and contrast. In the present work, we report information transfer beyond 50 pm and show images of single gold atoms with a signal-to-noise ratio as large as 10. The instrument's new capabilities were exploited to detect a buried Sigma3 {112} grain boundary and observe the dynamic arrangements of single atoms and atom pairs with sub-angstrom resolution. These results mark an important step toward meeting the challenge of determining the three-dimensional atomic-scale structure of nanomaterials.

  11. Association of measured physical performance and demographic and health characteristics with self-reported physical function: implications for the interpretation of self-reported limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louie Grant H

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Self-reported limitations in physical function often have only weak associations with measured performance on physical tests, suggesting that factors other than performance commonly influence self-reports. We tested if personal or health characteristics influenced self-reported limitations in three tasks, controlling for measured performance on these tasks. Methods We used cross-sectional data on adults aged ≥ 60 years (N = 5396 from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey to examine the association between the repeated chair rise test and self-reported difficulty rising from a chair. We then tested if personal characteristics, health indicators, body composition, and performance on unrelated tasks were associated with self-reported limitations in this task. We used the same approach to examine associations between personal and health characteristics and self-reported difficulty walking between rooms, controlling for timed 8-foot walk, and self-reported difficulty getting out of bed, controlling for repeated chair rise test results. Results In multivariate analyses, participants who performed worse on the repeated chair rise test were more likely to report difficulty with chair rise. However, older age, lower education level, lower serum albumin, comorbidities, knee pain, and being underweight were also significantly associated with self-reported limitations with chair rise. Results were similar for difficulty walking between rooms and getting out of bed. Conclusions Self-reports of limitations in physical function are influenced by personal and health characteristics that reflect frailty, and should not be interpreted solely as measured difficulty performing the task.

  12. Foundations for Improvements to Passive Detection Systems - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labov, S E; Pleasance, L; Sokkappa, P; Craig, W; Chapline, G; Frank, M; Gronberg, J; Jernigan, J G; Johnson, S; Kammeraad, J; Lange, D; Meyer, A; Nelson, K; Pohl, B; Wright, D; Wurtz, R

    2004-10-07

    This project explores the scientific foundation and approach for improving passive detection systems for plutonium and highly enriched uranium in real applications. Sources of gamma-ray radiation of interest were chosen to represent a range of national security threats, naturally occurring radioactive materials, industrial and medical radiation sources, and natural background radiation. The gamma-ray flux emerging from these sources, which include unclassified criticality experiment configurations as surrogates for nuclear weapons, were modeled in detail. The performance of several types of gamma-ray imaging systems using Compton scattering were modeled and compared. A mechanism was created to model the combine sources and background emissions and have the simulated radiation ''scene'' impinge on a model of a detector. These modeling tools are now being used in various projects to optimize detector performance and model detector sensitivity in complex measuring environments. This study also developed several automated algorithms for isotope identification from gamma-ray spectra and compared these to each other and to algorithms already in use. Verification testing indicates that these alternative isotope identification algorithms produced less false positive and false negative results than the ''GADRAS'' algorithms currently in use. In addition to these algorithms that used binned spectra, a new approach to isotope identification using ''event mode'' analysis was developed. Finally, a technique using muons to detect nuclear material was explored.

  13. Limit of detection and threshold for positivity of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention assay for factor VIII inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, C H; Boylan, B; Shapiro, A D; Lentz, S R; Wicklund, B M

    2017-08-10

    Essentials Immunologic methods detect factor VIII (FVIII) antibodies in some inhibitor-negative specimens. Specimens were tested by modified Nijmegen-Bethesda assay (NBA) and fluorescence immunoassay. The NBA with preanalytical heat inactivation detects FVIII inhibitors down to 0.2 NBU. IgG4 frequency validates the established threshold for positivity of ≥ 0.5 NBU for this NBA. Background The Bethesda assay for measurement of factor VIII inhibitors called for quantification of positive inhibitors by using dilutions producing 25-75% residual activity (RA), corresponding to 0.4-2.0 Bethesda units, with the use of 'more sensitive methods' for samples with RA closer to 100% being recommended. The Nijmegen modification (Nijmegen-Bethesda assay [NBA]) changed the reagents used but not these calculations. Some specimens negative by the NBA have been shown to have FVIII antibodies detectable with sensitive immunologic methods. Objective To examine the performance at very low inhibitor titers of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)-modified NBA (CDC-NBA), which includes preanalytic heat inactivation to liberate bound anti-FVIII antibodies. Methods Specimens with known inhibitors were tested with the CDC-NBA. IgG4 anti-FVIII antibodies were measured by fluorescence immunoassay (FLI). Results Diluted inhibitors showed linearity below 0.4 Nijmegen-Bethesda units (NBU). With four statistical methods, the limit of detection of the CDC-NBA was determined to be 0.2 NBU. IgG4 anti-FVIII antibodies, which correlate most strongly with functional inhibitors, were present at rates above the background rate of healthy controls in specimens with titers ≥ 0.2 NBU and showed an increase in frequency from 14.3% at 0.4 NBU to 67% at the established threshold for positivity of 0.5 NBU. Conclusions The CDC-NBA can detect inhibitors down to 0.2 NBU. The FLI, which is more sensitive, demonstrates anti-FVIII IgG4 in some patients with negative (NBA, supporting the need for

  14. Measuring Disability in Population Based Surveys: The Interrelationship between Clinical Impairments and Reported Functional Limitations in Cameroon and India

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the relationship between two distinct measures of disability: self-reported functional limitations and objectively-screened clinical impairments. Methods We undertook an all age population-based survey of disability in two areas: North-West Cameroon (August/October 2013) and Telangana State, India (Feb/April 2014). Participants were selected for inclusion via two-stage cluster randomised sampling (probability proportionate to size cluster selection and compact segment sampling within clusters). Disability was defined as the presence of self-reported functional limitations across eight domains, or presence of moderate or greater clinical impairments. Clinical impairment screening comprised of visual acuity testing for vision impairment, pure tone audiometry for hearing impairment, musculoskeletal functioning assessment for musculoskeletal impairment, reported seizure history for epilepsy and reported symptoms of clinical depression (depression adults only). Information was collected using structured questionnaires, observations and examinations. Results Self-reported disability prevalence was 5.9% (95% CI 4.7–7.4) and 7.5% (5.9–9.4) in Cameroon and India respectively. The prevalence of moderate or greater clinical impairments in the same populations were 8.4% (7.5–9.4) in Cameroon and 10.5% (9.4–11.7) in India. Overall disability prevalence (self-report and/or screened positive to a moderate or greater clinical impairment) was 10.5% in Cameroon and 12.2% in India, with limited overlap between the sub-populations identified using the two types of tools. 33% of participants in Cameroon identified to have a disability, and 45% in India, both reported functional limitations and screened positive to objectively-screened impairments, whilst the remainder were identified via one or other tool only. A large proportion of people with moderate or severe clinical impairments did not self-report functional difficulties despite reporting

  15. Measuring Disability in Population Based Surveys: The Interrelationship between Clinical Impairments and Reported Functional Limitations in Cameroon and India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mactaggart, Islay; Kuper, Hannah; Murthy, G V S; Oye, Joseph; Polack, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between two distinct measures of disability: self-reported functional limitations and objectively-screened clinical impairments. We undertook an all age population-based survey of disability in two areas: North-West Cameroon (August/October 2013) and Telangana State, India (Feb/April 2014). Participants were selected for inclusion via two-stage cluster randomised sampling (probability proportionate to size cluster selection and compact segment sampling within clusters). Disability was defined as the presence of self-reported functional limitations across eight domains, or presence of moderate or greater clinical impairments. Clinical impairment screening comprised of visual acuity testing for vision impairment, pure tone audiometry for hearing impairment, musculoskeletal functioning assessment for musculoskeletal impairment, reported seizure history for epilepsy and reported symptoms of clinical depression (depression adults only). Information was collected using structured questionnaires, observations and examinations. Self-reported disability prevalence was 5.9% (95% CI 4.7-7.4) and 7.5% (5.9-9.4) in Cameroon and India respectively. The prevalence of moderate or greater clinical impairments in the same populations were 8.4% (7.5-9.4) in Cameroon and 10.5% (9.4-11.7) in India. Overall disability prevalence (self-report and/or screened positive to a moderate or greater clinical impairment) was 10.5% in Cameroon and 12.2% in India, with limited overlap between the sub-populations identified using the two types of tools. 33% of participants in Cameroon identified to have a disability, and 45% in India, both reported functional limitations and screened positive to objectively-screened impairments, whilst the remainder were identified via one or other tool only. A large proportion of people with moderate or severe clinical impairments did not self-report functional difficulties despite reporting participation restrictions. Tools to

  16. Quantifying efficacy and limits of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) technology for weed seedling detection as affected by sensor resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, José M; Torres-Sánchez, Jorge; Serrano-Pérez, Angélica; de Castro, Ana I; López-Granados, Francisca

    2015-03-06

    In order to optimize the application of herbicides in weed-crop systems, accurate and timely weed maps of the crop-field are required. In this context, this investigation quantified the efficacy and limitations of remote images collected with an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) for early detection of weed seedlings. The ability to discriminate weeds was significantly affected by the imagery spectral (type of camera), spatial (flight altitude) and temporal (the date of the study) resolutions. The colour-infrared images captured at 40 m and 50 days after sowing (date 2), when plants had 5-6 true leaves, had the highest weed detection accuracy (up to 91%). At this flight altitude, the images captured before date 2 had slightly better results than the images captured later. However, this trend changed in the visible-light images captured at 60 m and higher, which had notably better results on date 3 (57 days after sowing) because of the larger size of the weed plants. Our results showed the requirements on spectral and spatial resolutions needed to generate a suitable weed map early in the growing season, as well as the best moment for the UAV image acquisition, with the ultimate objective of applying site-specific weed management operations.

  17. Multivariate detection limits of on-line NIR model for extraction process of chlorogenic acid from Lonicera japonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhisheng; Sui, Chenglin; Xu, Bing; Ai, Lu; Ma, Qun; Shi, Xinyuan; Qiao, Yanjiang

    2013-04-15

    A methodology is proposed to estimate the multivariate detection limits (MDL) of on-line near-infrared (NIR) model in Chinese Herbal Medicines (CHM) system. In this paper, Lonicera japonica was used as an example, and its extraction process was monitored by on-line NIR spectroscopy. Spectra of on-line NIR could be collected by two fiber optic probes designed to transmit NIR radiation by a 2mm-flange. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used as a reference method to determine the content of chlorogenic acid in the extract solution. Multivariate calibration models were carried out including partial least squares regression (PLS) and interval partial least-squares (iPLS). The result showed improvement of model performance: compared with PLS model, the root mean square errors of prediction (RMSEP) of iPLS model decreased from 0.111mg to 0.068mg, and the R(2) parameter increased from 0.9434 to 0.9801. Furthermore, MDL values were determined by a multivariate method using the type of errors and concentration ranges. The MDL of iPLS model was about 14ppm, which confirmed that on-line NIR spectroscopy had the ability to detect trace amounts of chlorogenic acid in L. japonica. As a result, the application of on-line NIR spectroscopy for monitoring extraction process in CHM could be very encouraging and reliable.

  18. Quantifying Efficacy and Limits of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV Technology for Weed Seedling Detection as Affected by Sensor Resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José M. Peña

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to optimize the application of herbicides in weed-crop systems, accurate and timely weed maps of the crop-field are required. In this context, this investigation quantified the efficacy and limitations of remote images collected with an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV for early detection of weed seedlings. The ability to discriminate weeds was significantly affected by the imagery spectral (type of camera, spatial (flight altitude and temporal (the date of the study resolutions. The colour-infrared images captured at 40 m and 50 days after sowing (date 2, when plants had 5–6 true leaves, had the highest weed detection accuracy (up to 91%. At this flight altitude, the images captured before date 2 had slightly better results than the images captured later. However, this trend changed in the visible-light images captured at 60 m and higher, which had notably better results on date 3 (57 days after sowing because of the larger size of the weed plants. Our results showed the requirements on spectral and spatial resolutions needed to generate a suitable weed map early in the growing season, as well as the best moment for the UAV image acquisition, with the ultimate objective of applying site-specific weed management operations.

  19. Advantages and Limitations of Androgen Receptor-Based Methods for Detecting Anabolic Androgenic Steroid Abuse as Performance Enhancing Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Kathy; Yazdi, Tahmineh; Masharani, Umesh; Tyrrell, Blake; Butch, Anthony; Schaufele, Fred

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone (T) and related androgens are performance enhancing drugs (PEDs) abused by some athletes to gain competitive advantage. To monitor unauthorized androgen abuse, doping control programs use mass spectrometry (MS) to detect androgens, synthetic anabolic-androgenic steroids (AASs) and their metabolites in an athlete's urine. AASs of unknown composition will not be detected by these procedures. Since AASs achieve their anabolic effects by activating the Androgen Receptor (AR), cell-based bioassays that measure the effect of a urine sample on AR activity are under investigation as complementary, pan-androgen detection methods. We evaluated an AR BioAssay as a monitor for androgen activity in urine pre-treated with glucuronidase, which releases T from the inactive T-glucuronide that predominates in urine. AR BioAssay activity levels were expressed as 'T-equivalent' concentrations by comparison to a T dose response curve. The T-equivalent concentrations of androgens in the urine of hypogonadal participants supplemented with T (in whom all androgenic activity should arise from T) were quantitatively identical to the T measurements conducted by MS at the UCLA Olympic Analytical Laboratory (0.96 ± 0.22). All 17 AASs studied were active in the AR BioAssay; other steroids were inactive. 12 metabolites of 10 commonly abused AASs, which are used for MS monitoring of AAS doping because of their prolonged presence in urine, had reduced or no AR BioAssay activity. Thus, the AR BioAssay can accurately and inexpensively monitor T, but its ability to monitor urinary AASs will be limited to a period immediately following doping in which the active AASs remain intact.

  20. Limiting Short-term Noise versus Optical Density in a Direct Absorption Spectrometer for Trace Gas Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jervis, D.

    2016-12-01

    Field-deployable trace gas monitors are important for understanding a multitude of atmospheric processes: from forest photosynthesis and respiration [1], to fugitive methane emissions [2] and satellite measurement validation [3]. Consequently, a detailed knowledge of the performance limitations of these instruments is essential in order to establish reliable datasets. We present the short-term ( >1 Hz) performance of a long-pass direct absorption spectrometer as a function of the optical density of the absorption transition being probed. In particular, we identify fluctuations in the laser intensity as limiting the optical density uncertainty to 4x10-6/√Hz for weak transitions, and noise in the laser drive current as limiting the fractional noise in the optical density to 4x10-5/√Hz for deep transitions. We provide numerical and analytical predictions for both effects, as well as using the understanding of this phenomena to estimate how noise on neighboring strong and weak transitions couple to each other. All measurements were performed using the Aerodyne Research TILDAS Monitor, but are general to any instrument that uses direct absorption spectroscopy as a detection method. Wehr, R., et al. "Seasonality of temperate forest photosynthesis and daytime respiration." Nature 534.7609 (2016): 680-683. Conley, S., et al. "Methane emissions from the 2015 Aliso Canyon blowout in Los Angeles, CA." Science 351.6279 (2016): 1317-1320. Emmons, L. K., et al. "Validation of Measurements of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT) CO retrievals with aircraft in situ profiles." Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres 109.D3 (2004).

  1. [Study on limit detection of flavones in diterpene ginkgolides meglumine injection materials by LC-MS and HPLC-DAD].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Sen; Li, Yan-jing; Huang, Wen-zhe; Kang, Dan-yu; Ding, Gang; Xiao, Wei

    2015-08-01

    Limit test of flavones in diterpene ginkgolides meglumine injection materials by UV-Vis and HPLC-DAD method was studied in this essay. The HPLC-DAD method has lower LOD (about 1% of the UV-Vis), that is, the sensitivity is higher than UV-Vis method. Through the analysis of the kinds of flavonoids ingredients in the samples by LC-MS, the three compounds with highest contents are kaempferol, quercetin and isorhamnetin. Kaempferol, quercetin and isorhamnetin were chosen as reference compounds for HPLC analysis, and the HPLC separation analysis was carried on an Agilent Eclipse plus C18 column (4.6 mm x 250 mm, 5 μm) with methanol and water containing 0.4% phosphoric acid (50: 50) as mobile phase, and the flow rate was 1.0 mL x min(-1). The detection wavelength was set at 360 nm. This method has good specificity, precision and reproducibility. The LODs of quercetin, kaempferide and isorhamnetin were 27.6, 22.3, 29.5 μg x L(-1). The average recovery was 87.9% (RSD 3.3%), 91.7% (RSD 3.1%), 88.3 (RSD 1.3%) for quercetin, kaempferide and isorhamnetin, respectively. Based on the 10 batches of sample results and sensitivity of different HPLC, the content of total flavonoids ingredients of diterpene ginkgolides meglumine injection materials was limited no more than 2 x 10(-5). This method is simple, quick and has good maneuverability, and could be used to the limit test of flavonoids in the diterpene ginkgolides meglumine injection materials.

  2. Evaluation of the Charm maximum residue limit β-lactam and tetracycline test for the detection of antibiotics in ewe and goat milk

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Beltrán, M C; Romero, T; Althaus, R L; Molina, M P

    2013-01-01

    The Charm maximum residue limit β-lactam and tetracycline test (Charm MRL BLTET; Charm Sciences Inc., Lawrence, MA) is an immunoreceptor assay utilizing Rapid One-Step Assay lateral flow technology that detects...

  3. The contribution of patient reporting to signal detection in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Hunsel, Florence; Van Puijenbroek, Eugene; Van Grootheest, Kees

    2010-01-01

    Background: Reporting ADRs by patients has been incorporated into pharmacovigilance systems in several countries. It is not clear if reporting by patients contributes to the detection of signals and to what extend the source of the reports influences the selection of signals. Objectives: Primary aim

  4. The contribution of patient reporting to signal detection in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Hunsel, Florence; Van Puijenbroek, Eugene; Van Grootheest, Kees

    Background: Reporting ADRs by patients has been incorporated into pharmacovigilance systems in several countries. It is not clear if reporting by patients contributes to the detection of signals and to what extend the source of the reports influences the selection of signals. Objectives: Primary aim

  5. Automatic detection of surface changes on Mars - a status report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidiropoulos, Panagiotis; Muller, Jan-Peter

    2016-10-01

    Orbiter missions have acquired approximately 500,000 high-resolution visible images of the Martian surface, covering an area approximately 6 times larger than the overall area of Mars. This data abundance allows the scientific community to examine the Martian surface thoroughly and potentially make exciting new discoveries. However, the increased data volume, as well as its complexity, generate problems at the data processing stages, which are mainly related to a number of unresolved issues that batch-mode planetary data processing presents. As a matter of fact, the scientific community is currently struggling to scale the common ("one-at-a-time" processing of incoming products by expert scientists) paradigm to tackle the large volumes of input data. Moreover, expert scientists are more or less forced to use complex software in order to extract input information for their research from raw data, even though they are not data scientists themselves.Our work within the STFC and EU FP7 i-Mars projects aims at developing automated software that will process all of the acquired data, leaving domain expert planetary scientists to focus on their final analysis and interpretation. Moreover, after completing the development of a fully automated pipeline that processes automatically the co-registration of high-resolution NASA images to ESA/DLR HRSC baseline, our main goal has shifted to the automated detection of surface changes on Mars. In particular, we are developing a pipeline that uses as an input multi-instrument image pairs, which are processed by an automated pipeline, in order to identify changes that are correlated with Mars surface dynamic phenomena. The pipeline has currently been tested in anger on 8,000 co-registered images and by the time of DPS/EPSC we expect to have processed many tens of thousands of image pairs, producing a set of change detection results, a subset of which will be shown in the presentation.The research leading to these results has received

  6. First report of human parvovirus 4 detection in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asiyabi, Sanaz; Nejati, Ahmad; Shoja, Zabihollah; Shahmahmoodi, Shohreh; Jalilvand, Somayeh; Farahmand, Mohammad; Gorzin, Ali-Akbar; Najafi, Alireza; Haji Mollahoseini, Mostafa; Marashi, Sayed Mahdi

    2016-08-01

    Parvovirus 4 (PARV4) is an emerging and intriguing virus that currently received many attentions. High prevalence of PARV4 infection in high-risk groups such as HIV infected patients highlights the potential clinical outcomes that this virus might have. Molecular techniques were used to determine both the presence and the genotype of circulating PARV4 on previously collected serum samples from 133 HIV infected patients and 120 healthy blood donors. Nested PCR was applied to assess the presence of PARV4 DNA genome in both groups. PARV4 DNA was detected in 35.3% of HIV infected patients compared to 16.6% healthy donors. To genetically characterize the PARV4 genotype in these groups, positive samples were randomly selected and subjected for sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. All PARV4 sequences were found to be genotype 1 and clustered with the reference sequences of PARV4 genotype 1. J. Med. Virol. 88:1314-1318, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Missile launch detection electric field perturbation experiment. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kane, R.J.; Rynne, T.M.

    1993-04-28

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and SARA Inc. participated in the ATMD missile launch activities that occurred at WSMR during January 1993. LLNL and SARA deployed sensors for monitoring of basic phenomena. An attempt was made to measure perturbations of the earth geo-potential during the launch of a Lance missile. The occurrence of the perturbation is expected from the conducting body of the missile and the exhaust plume. A set of voltage-probe antennas were used to monitor the local electric field perturbation from the launch at ranges of approximately 1 km. Examination of the data acquired during the launch period failed to show identifiable correlation of the field variations with the launch event. Three reasons are ascribed to this lack of event data: (1) The electric field potential variations have a limited spatial correlation length - the fields measured in one region have little correlation to measurements made at distances of a kilometer away. The potential variations are related to localized atmospheric disturbances and are generally unpredictable. A value for the spatial correlation length is also not known. (2) The conductivity of the plume and missile body are not adequate to produce a field perturbation of adequate magnitude. Phenomena related to the exhaust plume and missile may exist and be outside of the collection range of the equipment employed for these measurements. (3) The presence of 60 Hz power line noise was of sufficient magnitude to irreversibly contaminate measurements.

  8. Automatic gender detection of dream reports: A promising approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Christina; Amini, Reza; De Koninck, Joseph

    2016-08-01

    A computer program was developed in an attempt to differentiate the dreams of males from females. Hypothesized gender predictors were based on previous literature concerning both dream content and written language features. Dream reports from home-collected dream diaries of 100 male (144 dreams) and 100 female (144 dreams) adolescent Anglophones were matched for equal length. They were first scored with the Hall and Van de Castle (HVDC) scales and quantified using DreamSAT. Two male and two female undergraduate students were asked to read all dreams and predict the dreamer's gender. They averaged a pairwise percent correct gender prediction of 75.8% (κ=0.516), while the Automatic Analysis showed that the computer program's accuracy was 74.5% (κ=0.492), both of which were higher than chance of 50% (κ=0.00). The prediction levels were maintained when dreams containing obvious gender identifiers were eliminated and integration of HVDC scales did not improve prediction.

  9. Subgenomic reporter RNA system for detection of alphavirus infection in mosquitoes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Jordan Steel

    Full Text Available Current methods for detecting real-time alphavirus (Family Togaviridae infection in mosquitoes require the use of recombinant viruses engineered to express a visibly detectable reporter protein. These altered viruses expressing fluorescent proteins, usually from a duplicated viral subgenomic reporter, are effective at marking infection but tend to be attenuated due to the modification of the genome. Additionally, field strains of viruses cannot be visualized using this approach unless infectious clones can be developed to insert a reporter protein. To circumvent these issues, we have developed an insect cell-based system for detecting wild-type sindbis virus infection that uses a virus inducible promoter to express a fluorescent reporter gene only upon active virus infection. We have developed an insect expression system that produces sindbis virus minigenomes containing a subgenomic promoter sequence, which produces a translatable RNA species only when infectious virus is present and providing viral replication proteins. This subgenomic reporter RNA system is able to detect wild-type Sindbis infection in cultured mosquito cells. The detection system is relatively species specific and only detects closely related viruses, but can detect low levels of alphavirus specific replication early during infection. A chikungunya virus detection system was also developed that specifically detects chikungunya virus infection. Transgenic Aedes aegypti mosquito families were established that constitutively express the sindbis virus reporter RNA and were found to only express fluorescent proteins during virus infection. This virus inducible reporter system demonstrates a novel approach for detecting non-recombinant virus infection in mosquito cell culture and in live transgenic mosquitoes.

  10. Subgenomic reporter RNA system for detection of alphavirus infection in mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, J Jordan; Franz, Alexander W E; Sanchez-Vargas, Irma; Olson, Ken E; Geiss, Brian J

    2013-01-01

    Current methods for detecting real-time alphavirus (Family Togaviridae) infection in mosquitoes require the use of recombinant viruses engineered to express a visibly detectable reporter protein. These altered viruses expressing fluorescent proteins, usually from a duplicated viral subgenomic reporter, are effective at marking infection but tend to be attenuated due to the modification of the genome. Additionally, field strains of viruses cannot be visualized using this approach unless infectious clones can be developed to insert a reporter protein. To circumvent these issues, we have developed an insect cell-based system for detecting wild-type sindbis virus infection that uses a virus inducible promoter to express a fluorescent reporter gene only upon active virus infection. We have developed an insect expression system that produces sindbis virus minigenomes containing a subgenomic promoter sequence, which produces a translatable RNA species only when infectious virus is present and providing viral replication proteins. This subgenomic reporter RNA system is able to detect wild-type Sindbis infection in cultured mosquito cells. The detection system is relatively species specific and only detects closely related viruses, but can detect low levels of alphavirus specific replication early during infection. A chikungunya virus detection system was also developed that specifically detects chikungunya virus infection. Transgenic Aedes aegypti mosquito families were established that constitutively express the sindbis virus reporter RNA and were found to only express fluorescent proteins during virus infection. This virus inducible reporter system demonstrates a novel approach for detecting non-recombinant virus infection in mosquito cell culture and in live transgenic mosquitoes.

  11. Detection limits for blood on four fabric types using infrared diffuse reflection spectroscopy in mid- and near-infrared spectral windows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJong, Stephanie A; Lu, Zhenyu; Cassidy, Brianna M; O'Brien, Wayne L; Morgan, Stephen L; Myrick, Michael L

    2015-09-01

    Detection limits (DL) for blood on four fabric types were estimated for calibrations derived using partial least squares regression applied to infrared (IR) diffuse reflection spectra. Samples were prepared by dip-coating acrylic, cotton, nylon, and polyester fabrics from solutions of diluted rat blood. While DLs often appear in terms of dilution factor in the forensic community, mass percentage, coverage (mass per unit area), or film thickness are often more relevant when comparing experimental methods. These alternate DL units are related to one another and presented here. The best IR diffuse reflection DLs for blood on acrylic and cotton fabrics were in the mid-IR spectral window corresponding to the protein Amide I/II absorption bands. These DLs were dilution by a factor of 2300 (0.019% w/w blood solids) for acrylic and a factor of 610 (0.055% w/w blood solids) for cotton. The best DL for blood on polyester was found in the mid-IR spectral window corresponding to the protein Amide A absorption band at dilution by a factor of 900 (0.034% w/w blood solids). Because of the similarity between the IR spectra of blood solids and nylon fabrics, no satisfactory IR DLs were determined for the calibration of blood on nylon. We compare our values to DLs reported for blood detection using the standard luminol method. The most commonly reported luminol DLs are of the order of 1000-fold dilution, which we estimate are a factor of 2-7 lower than our reported IR DLs on a coverage basis.

  12. Lowering detection limits for 1,2,3-trichloropropane in water using solid phase extraction coupled to purge and trap sample introduction in an isotope dilution GC-MS method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wenta; Ghabour, Miriam; Draper, William M; Chandrasena, Esala

    2016-09-01

    Purge and trap sample introduction (PTI) has been the premier sampling and preconcentration technique for gas chromatographic determination of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in drinking water for almost 50 years. PTI affords sub parts-per-billion (ppb) detection limits for purgeable VOCs including fixed gases and higher boiling hydrocarbons and halocarbons. In this study the coupling of solid phase extraction (SPE) to PTI was investigated as a means to substantially increase enrichment and lower detection limits for the emerging contaminant, 1,2,3-trichloropropane (TCP). Water samples (500 mL) were dechlorinated, preserved with a biocide, and spiked with the isotope labeled internal standard, d5-TCP. The entire 500 mL sample was extracted with activated carbon or carbon molecular sieve SPE cartridges, and then eluted with dichloromethane -- excess solvent was removed in a nitrogen evaporator and diethylene glycol "keeper" remaining was dispersed in 5 mL of water for PTI GC-MS analysis. The experimental Method Detection Limit (MDL) for TCP was 0.11 ng/L (ppt) and accuracy was 95-103% in sub-ppt determinations. Groundwater samples including impaired California sources and treated water (n = 21) were analyzed with results ranging from below the method reporting limit (0.30 ng/L) to > 250 ng/L. Coupling of SPE with PTI may provide similar reductions in detection limits for other VOCs with appropriate physical-chemical properties.

  13. Exploration of new perspectives and limitations in Agrobacterium mediated gene transfer technology. Progress report, [June 1, 1992-- May 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marton, L.

    1994-12-31

    This report describes progress aimed at constructing gene-transfer technology for Nicotiana plumbaginifolia. Most actual effort as described herein has so far been directed at exploring new perspectives and limitations in Agrobacterium mediated gene transfer. Accomplishments are described using a core homologous gene targeting vector.

  14. Exploration of the association rules mining technique for the signal detection of adverse drug events in spontaneous reporting systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The detection of signals of adverse drug events (ADEs has increased because of the use of data mining algorithms in spontaneous reporting systems (SRSs. However, different data mining algorithms have different traits and conditions for application. The objective of our study was to explore the application of association rule (AR mining in ADE signal detection and to compare its performance with that of other algorithms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Monte Carlo simulation was applied to generate drug-ADE reports randomly according to the characteristics of SRS datasets. Thousand simulated datasets were mined by AR and other algorithms. On average, 108,337 reports were generated by the Monte Carlo simulation. Based on the predefined criterion that 10% of the drug-ADE combinations were true signals, with RR equaling to 10, 4.9, 1.5, and 1.2, AR detected, on average, 284 suspected associations with a minimum support of 3 and a minimum lift of 1.2. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve of the AR was 0.788, which was equivalent to that shown for other algorithms. Additionally, AR was applied to reports submitted to the Shanghai SRS in 2009. Five hundred seventy combinations were detected using AR from 24,297 SRS reports, and they were compared with recognized ADEs identified by clinical experts and various other sources. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: AR appears to be an effective method for ADE signal detection, both in simulated and real SRS datasets. The limitations of this method exposed in our study, i.e., a non-uniform thresholds setting and redundant rules, require further research.

  15. Detecting Signals of Disproportionate Reporting from Singapore's Spontaneous Adverse Event Reporting System: An Application of the Sequential Probability Ratio Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Cheng Leng; Rudrappa, Sowmya; Ang, Pei San; Li, Shu Chuen; Evans, Stephen J W

    2017-08-01

    The ability to detect safety concerns from spontaneous adverse drug reaction reports in a timely and efficient manner remains important in public health. This paper explores the behaviour of the Sequential Probability Ratio Test (SPRT) and ability to detect signals of disproportionate reporting (SDRs) in the Singapore context. We used SPRT with a combination of two hypothesised relative risks (hRRs) of 2 and 4.1 to detect signals of both common and rare adverse events in our small database. We compared SPRT with other methods in terms of number of signals detected and whether labelled adverse drug reactions were detected or the reaction terms were considered serious. The other methods used were reporting odds ratio (ROR), Bayesian Confidence Propagation Neural Network (BCPNN) and Gamma Poisson Shrinker (GPS). The SPRT produced 2187 signals in common with all methods, 268 unique signals, and 70 signals in common with at least one other method, and did not produce signals in 178 cases where two other methods detected them, and there were 403 signals unique to one of the other methods. In terms of sensitivity, ROR performed better than other methods, but the SPRT method found more new signals. The performances of the methods were similar for negative predictive value and specificity. Using a combination of hRRs for SPRT could be a useful screening tool for regulatory agencies, and more detailed investigation of the medical utility of the system is merited.

  16. On the methodological limitations of detecting oxidative stress: effects of paraquat on measures of oxidative status in greenfinches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meitern, Richard; Sild, Elin; Kilk, Kalle; Porosk, Rando; Hõrak, Peeter

    2013-07-15

    Oxidative stress (OS) is widely believed to be responsible for the generation of trade-offs in evolutionary ecology by means of constraining investment into a number of components of fitness. Yet, progress in understanding the true role of OS in ecology and evolution has remained elusive. Interpretation of current findings is particularly hampered by the scarcity of experiments demonstrating which of the many available parameters of oxidative status respond most sensitively to and are relevant for measuring OS. We addressed these questions in wild-caught captive greenfinches (Carduelis chloris) by experimental induction of OS by administration of the pro-oxidant compound paraquat with drinking water. Treatment induced 50% mortality, a significant drop in body mass and an increase in oxidative DNA damage and glutathione levels in erythrocytes among the survivors of the high paraquat (0.2 g l(-1) over 7 days) group. Samples taken 3 days after the end of paraquat treatment showed no effect on the peroxidation of lipids (plasma malondialdehyde), carbonylation of proteins (in erythrocytes), parameters of plasma antioxidant protection (total antioxidant capacity and oxygen radical absorbance), uric acid or carotenoids. Our findings of an increase in one marker of damage and one marker of protection from the multitude of measured variables indicate that detection of OS is difficult even under the most stringent experimental induction of oxidative insult. We hope that this study highlights the need for reconsideration of over-simplistic models of OS and draws attention to the limitations of detection of OS due to time-lagged and hormetic upregulation of protective mechanisms. This study also underpins the diagnostic value of measurement of oxidative damage to DNA bases and assessment of erythrocyte glutathione levels.

  17. Study of the art: canine olfaction used for cancer detection on the basis of breath odour. Perspectives and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jezierski, Tadeusz; Walczak, Marta; Ligor, Tomasz; Rudnicka, Joanna; Buszewski, Bogusław

    2015-05-06

    Experimental studies using trained dogs to identify breath odour markers of human cancer, published in the recent decade, have been analyzed and compared with the authors' own results. Particular published studies differ as regards the experimental setup, kind of odour samples (breath, urine, tumor tissue, serum), sample collection methods, dogs' characteristics and dog training methods as well as in results presented in terms of detection sensitivity and specificity. Generally it can be stated that trained dogs are able to distinguish breath odour samples typical for patients with lung cancer and other cancers from samples typical for healthy humans at a 'better than by chance' rate. Dogs' indications were positively correlated with content of 2-pentanone and ethyl acetate (r = 0.97 and r = 0.85 respectively) and negatively correlated with 1-propanol and propanal in breath samples (r = -0.98 and -0.87 respectively). The canine method has some advantages as a potential cancer-screening method, due to its non-invasiveness, simplicity of odour sampling and storage, ease of testing and interpretation of results and relatively low costs. Disadvantages and limitations of this method are related to the fact that it is still not known exactly to which chemical compounds and/or their combinations the dogs react. So far it could not be confirmed that dogs are able to sniff out early preclinical cancer stages with approximately the same accuracy as already diagnosed cases. The detection accuracy may vary due to failure in conditioning of dogs, decreasing motivation or confounding factors. The dogs' performance should be systematically checked in rigorous double-blind procedures. Recommendations for methodological standardization have been proposed.

  18. Geometrical configurations of unphased diffraction-limited antennas in passive millimetre-wave imaging systems for concealed weapon detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serenelli, Roberto

    2004-12-01

    This paper analyzes simple imaging configurations to scan a human body, suitable as passive or active millimetre-wave imaging systems for concealed weapon detection (CWD). The first cylindrical configuration allows a 360 degrees scan: N unphased diffraction-limited antennas each of size L are placed on a circular support surrounding the subject (allowing scanning in the horizontal plane with N non-overlapping independent beams), and this circle is mechanically displaced over the whole body height. An analytical formula gives the maximum obtainable spatial resolution for different dimensions of the circular scanning device and operating frequencies, and the number of receivers achieving this optimal resolution. Constraints to be taken into account are diffraction, the usable total length of the circle, and the full coverage by the N beams over the subject, which is modelled as a cylinder with variable radius, coaxial with the scanning circle. Numerical calculations of system resolution are shown for different operating microwave (MW) and millimetre-wave (MMW) frequencies; in order to study off-axis performances, situations where the subject is not coaxial with the scanning device are also considered. For the case of a parallelepiped to be imaged instead of a cylinder, a linear array configuration is analyzed similarly to the circular one. A theoretical study is carried out to design other curved arrays, filled with unphased diffraction-limited antennas, for the imaging of linear subjects with finer resolution. Finally, the application of such configurations is considered for the design of active imaging systems, and different system architectures are discussed.

  19. Limit of detection studies for application to natural product identification using high performance liquid chromatography coupled to nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brkljača, Robert; Urban, Sylvia

    2015-01-02

    In the pursuit of new natural products, the demand to rapidly identify compounds present, in ever decreasing amounts, in complex crude extracts has become a limiting factor. Despite improvements in HPLC-NMR hardware and pulse sequences, no extensive limit of detection (LOD) investigations have been reported for the acquisition of 2D NMR spectroscopic experiments acquired through HPLC-NMR. In this study the LOD for five key 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic experiments have been established, using two reference compounds, including the on-flow (WET 1D proton), stop-flow (WET1D proton), gCOSY, HSQCAD and gHMBCAD NMR experiments. The LOD for all of the NMR experiments were within the range of 700ng to 1mg for the set of fixed experimental parameters implemented. For principle components in a complex multi-component mixture, this would allow for in situ compound identification. HPLC-NMR analysis was employed to investigate the principle components present in a marine brown alga crude extract, Cystophora subfarcinata.

  20. Report: EPA Has Developed Guidance for Disaster Debris but Has Limited Knowledge of State Preparedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report #16-P-0219, June 29, 2016. The EPA can reduce the risk of future unsafe debris disposal practices by improving its understanding and awareness of the quality and completeness of state disaster debris management plans.

  1. Technology and Plagiarism in the University: Brief Report of a Trial in Detecting Cheating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Rob; Johnson, Diane; Bimber, Bruce; Almeroth, Kevin; Michaels, George

    2004-01-01

    College students exploit information technology to cheat on papers and assignments, but for the most part university faculty employ few technological techniques to detect cheating. This paper reports on a trial of software for the detection of cheating in a large undergraduate survey class. The paper discusses the decision to adopt electronic…

  2. Detection of Oil in Water Column, Final Report: Detection Prototype Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Michele Fitzpatrick, Alexander Balsley, and Kurt A. Hansen 8. Performing Report No. RDC UDI #1290 9. Performing Organization Name and Address...Public July 2014 1 INTRODUCTION The Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico revealed several glaring technological gaps in responding...2011). Tracking Oil Dispersion in the Gulf of Mexico by Fluorescence Intensity (FI) and the Fluorescence Intensity Ratio (FIR), 2011 International Oil

  3. Evaluation of the odd-even effect in limits of detection for electron microprobe analysis of natural minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Surendra P., E-mail: spv@cie.unam.mx [Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Centro de Investigacion en Energia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Priv. Xochicalco s/no., Col Centro, A.P. 34, Temixco, Mor. 62580 (Mexico); Pandarinath, Kailasa [Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Centro de Investigacion en Energia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Priv. Xochicalco s/no., Col Centro, A.P. 34, Temixco, Mor. 62580 (Mexico); Velasco-Tapia, Fernando [Facultad de Ciencias de la Tierra, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Carretera Linares-Cerro Prieto km. 8, Linares, N.L. 67700 (Mexico); Rodriguez-Rios, Rodolfo [Facultad de Ingenieria e Instituto de Geologia, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Av. Dr. Manuel Nava No. 8, Zona Universitaria, San Luis Potosi, S.L.P. 78240 (Mexico)

    2009-04-13

    Limit of detection (LOD), being a fundamental quality parameter for analytical techniques, has been recently investigated and a systematic behavior has been observed for most odd-even element pairs for many techniques. However, to the best of our knowledge very few LOD data are available in published literature for electron microprobe analysis; these consist of three papers, two being on rare-earth elements and the third covering a large number of elements of atomic number between 21 and 92. These data confirm the systematic behavior of LODs for many odd-even pairs. To initiate to full this gap, we determined LODs for several major rock-forming chemical elements from Na to Fe with atomic numbers between 11 and 26, during the microprobe analysis of common minerals (olivine, plagioclase, pyroxene, amphibole, quartz, and opaques) in volcanic rocks. The odd-even effect of nuclear stability seems to be present in LOD data for most odd-even pairs investigated. Nevertheless, the experimental strategy concerning the reference materials, calibration procedure, and blank measurements, should be substantially modified to better evaluate the systematic behavior of LOD values in microprobe analysis.

  4. Detection limit calculations for peak evaluation methods in HPGe gamma-ray spectrometry according to ISO 11929

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanisch, Günter

    2017-05-01

    Two peak area estimation methods in gamma-ray spectrometry, the total peak area (TPA) and the background step function (BSF) methods are re-considered first. For least-squares (LS) peak fitting then, a new net peak area uncertainty model is established. It results in a new function fB replacing a TPA method internal design factor. This allows applying the TPA-related decision threshold (DT) and detection limit (DL) formulae, based on ISO 11929(2010), also for peak fitting. Linear LS adapted to Poisson counting data is suggested to derive fB values for a single peak and different combinations of background shape components including a fitted BSF. fB is then adapted to penalized non-linear fitting including Poisson maximum likelihood estimation by MC simulations. Within the DL iteration the fB method is much faster than with non-linear re-fitting. The fitted peak area uncertainty can be safely modeled for peak areas up to 10 DT which is sufficient for DL calculations. The extension for peak multiplets is indicated.

  5. Imaging search for the unseen companion to Eps Ind A -- Improving the detection limits with 4 micron observations

    CERN Document Server

    Janson, M; Zechmeister, M; Brandner, W; Kürster, M; Kasper, M; Reffert, S; Endl, M; Lafrenière, D; Geissler, K; Hippler, S; Henning, T

    2009-01-01

    Eps Ind A is one of the nearest sun-like stars, located only 3.6 pc away. It is known to host a binary brown dwarf companion, Eps Ind Ba/Bb, at a large projected separation of 6.7", but radial velocity measurements imply that an additional, yet unseen component is present in the system, much closer to Eps Ind A. Previous direct imaging has excluded the presence of any stellar or high-mass brown dwarf companion at small separations, indicating that the unseen companion may be a low-mass brown dwarf or high-mass planet. We present the results of a deep high-contrast imaging search for the companion, using active angular differential imaging (aADI) at 4 micron, a particularly powerful technique for planet searches around nearby and relatively old stars. We also develop an additional PSF reference subtraction scheme based on locally optimized combination of images (LOCI) to further enhance the detection limits. No companion is seen in the images, although we are sensitive to significantly lower masses than previo...

  6. Natural history of optical coherence tomography-detected non-flow-limiting edge dissections following drug-eluting stent implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radu, Maria D; Räber, Lorenz; Heo, Jungho

    2014-01-01

    . The median longitudinal dissection length was 2.9 mm (interquartile range [IQR] 1.6-4.2 mm), whereas the circumferential and axial extensions amounted to 1.2 mm (IQR: 0.9-1.7 mm) and 0.6 mm (IQR: 0.4-0.7 mm), respectively. Dissections extended into the media and adventitia in seven (33%) and four (20%) cases......, and clinical outcomes were assessed. Sixty-three lesions (57 patients) were studied with OCT at baseline and one-year follow-up. Twenty-two non-flow-limiting edge dissections in 21 lesions (20 patients) were identified by OCT; only two (9%) were angiographically visible. Flaps were found in 96% of cases...... healed on OCT. The two cases exhibiting persistent dissection had the longest flaps (2.81 mm and 2.42 mm) at baseline. CONCLUSIONS: OCT-detected edge dissections which are angiographically silent in the majority of cases are not associated with acute stent thrombosis or restenosis up to one-year follow-up....

  7. Joint disorder: nonreducing disc displacement with mouth opening limitation - report of a case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hellen Cordeiro Corrêa

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ represents 8% of all cases of temporomandibular disorders (TMD posing difficulties to establish an accurate diagnosis and treatment because of its low prevalence. This article presents the case of an 18-year-old Caucasian female patient who came to our Orofacial Pain and TMD Outpatient Service with complaints of intense pain on the right TMJ and limitation of mouth opening (maximum interincisal opening of 29 mm with deviation to right, which she had been experiencing for the past 3 years. After a detailed clinical interview, a diagnosis hypothesis of nonreducing disc displacement with mouth opening limitation was established. The proposed treatment consisted of intra-joint infiltration with anesthetic in the right TMJ followed by jaw manipulation to recapture the articular disc, which was impeding the complete translation movement of the affected TMJ. After jaw manipulation, a new evaluation was done and showed the re-establishment of jaw dynamics with mouth opening and closing without deviation to the right side, clicking, opening limitation or pain. The patient was followed up at 6 months intervals. Two years after treatment, the patient was reevaluated and her mandibular range of motion without aid increased to 54 mm with no clicking, deviation to right, trismus or pain on the TMJ, indicating success of the treatment approach without recurrence of the pathology.

  8. Multiplex real-time quantitative PCR, microscopy and rapid diagnostic immuno-chromatographic tests for the detection of Plasmodium spp: performance, limit of detection analysis and quality assurance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralevski Filip

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate laboratory diagnosis of malaria species in returning travelers is paramount in the treatment of this potentially fatal infectious disease. Materials and methods A total of 466 blood specimens from returning travelers to Africa, Asia, and South/Central America with suspected malaria infection were collected between 2007 and 2009 at the reference public health laboratory. These specimens were assessed by reference microscopy, multipex real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR, and two rapid diagnostic immuno-chromatographic tests (ICT in a blinded manner. Key clinical laboratory parameters such as limit of detection (LOD analysis on clinical specimens by parasite stage, inter-reader variability of ICTs, staffing implications, quality assurance and cost analysis were evaluated. Results QPCR is the most analytically sensitive method (sensitivity 99.41%, followed by CARESTART (sensitivity 88.24%, and BINAXNOW (sensitivity 86.47% for the diagnosis of malaria in returning travelers when compared to reference microscopy. However, microscopy was unable to specifically identify Plasmodia spp. in 18 out of 170 positive samples by QPCR. Moreover, the 17 samples that were negative by microscopy and positive by QPCR were also positive by ICTs. Quality assurance was achieved for QPCR by exchanging a blinded proficiency panel with another reference laboratory. The Kappa value of inter-reader variability among three readers for BINAXNOW and CARESTART was calculated to be 0.872 and 0.898 respectively. Serial dilution studies demonstrated that the QPCR cycle threshold correlates linearly with parasitemia (R2 = 0.9746 in a clinically relevant dynamic range and retains a LOD of 11 rDNA copies/μl for P. falciparum, which was several log lower than reference microscopy and ICTs. LOD for QPCR is affected not only by parasitemia but the parasite stage distribution of each clinical specimen. QPCR was approximately 6-fold more

  9. Methodology applied by the Petroleum, Natural Gas and Bio fuels National Agency for detection of cartels - their limits and perspectives; Metodology adotada pela Agencia Nacional do Petroleo, Gas Natural e Biocombustiveis para detectecao de carteis - seus limites e perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedra, Douglas Pereira; Sales, Orlando de Araujo Vilela; Baran, Patricia Huguenin; Paiva, Rodrigo Milao de [Agencia Nacional do Petroleo, Gas Natural e Biocombustiveis (ANP), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Regulacao de Petroleo, seus Derivados, Alcool Combustivel e Gas Natural; Bicalho, Lucia Maria de Oliveira Navegantes [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (PPE/COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Planejamento Energetico

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents the present methodology used by the Defense Competition Coordination of the Petroleum National Agency for detection of vestiges of cartels in the Brazilian fuel market, their limits, in view of the instruments presently at the disposal of the Agency and perspectives of modification from the eventual availability of new instruments.

  10. [Possibilities and limitations of fiscal policies as health instruments: taxes on harmful consumption. SESPAS Report 2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Nicolás, Angel; Viudes de Velasco, Arántzazu

    2010-12-01

    This article discusses the possibilities of indirect taxation as a mechanism that alters the relative prices of goods and services and hence encourages citizens to adopt healthy lifestyles. We review the case of smoking and unhealthy diet. These two cases were chosen because these are the two lifestyle factors with the greatest impact on morbidity and mortality in Spain and because they highlight the possibilities of tax policy (smoking) and its limitations (unhealthy diet). After discussion of these issues, we recommend gradually increasing the level of the minimum special tax on cigarettes and avoiding erosion of its value by inflation, as well as aligning the level of the minimum special tax on fine cut tobacco with that borne by cigarettes, to avoid the already perceived shift of demand toward the former variety. The main recommendation for the case of unhealthy diet is to obtain a more solid evidence base than that currently available on the relationship between food prices and body mass index in Spain. The scarce evidence available for the USA nevertheless suggests that the possibilities of price-based policies to reduce the problems of overweight and obesity are highly limited. Copyright © 2010 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. MRI of the breast: does the internet accurately report its beneficial uses and limitations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekhlyudov, Larissa; Kiarsis, Keith; Elmore, Joann G

    2009-01-01

    As consumer use of the Internet for medical information grows, continuing evaluation of the medical content on the Internet is needed. We evaluated Internet sites describing breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), an emerging technology tool in breast cancer diagnosis and screening. We searched Google for sites describing breast MRI and abstracted the affiliation, content, media type, readability, and quality of 90 most popular unique sites. Over half (56%) of the sites were commercially sponsored. The content varied by site and included medical and procedural facts, information about clinical trials, grants and journal articles, as well as human interest stories. Most (82%) sites described potentially beneficial uses of breast MRI, such as further evaluation of newly diagnosed breast cancers (58%); screening women at high risk for breast cancer (54%); evaluation of abnormal breast findings (48%); screening women with dense breasts (48%) or implants (27%); and surveillance for breast cancer recurrences (24%). Approximately half (56%) of the sites described the limitations of breast MRI, most commonly false positive findings (44%) and costs (24%). Website quality, including the display of contact information, sponsorship, currency of information, authorship, and references varied. The reading level was close to high school graduate. Internet sites describing breast MRI were mostly commercially sponsored, more often described the potential beneficial uses of the procedure than its limitations, and were of variable quality and high reading level. With the lack of enforceable standards for display of medical information on the Internet, providers should encourage patients to direct their searches to the most credible sites.

  12. Calculation on Batch Standard Deviation of the Blank and Methods Detection Limit%空白批内标准偏差和方法检出限的计算

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    祝旭初

    2014-01-01

    In environmental analytical chemistry,especially trace analysis,the methods detection limit for the reported results of the monitoring is extremely important. Determination of the detection limit often involves with calculating the standard deviation of the blank. Based on the analysis of a typical case,it was pointed out that part of the revised environmental standard method of using the new system between batches blank to calculate the standard deviation of the detection limit was unreasonable. Before calculating the detection limit it is necessary to determine whether there are significant differences between batches.%环境分析化学中,尤其痕量分析时,方法检出限对于监测结果的报出很重要。检出限的确定常会涉及空白标准偏差的计算。通过对一典型案例剖析,指出一部分新制修订环境标准方法采用空白批间标准偏差计算检出限是不合理的。在求算检出限时应先判断批间是否存在显著性差异。

  13. Prosthetic rehabilitation of edentulous patient with limited oral access: A clinical report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Microstomia may result from surgical treatment of orofacial neoplasms, cleft lips, maxillofacial trauma, burns, radiotherapy or scleroderma. A maximal oral opening that is smaller than the size of a complete denture can make prosthetic treatment challenging. This clinical report presents the prosthodontic management of a total edentulous patient with microstomia. Sectional mandibular and maxillary trays and foldable mandibular and maxillary denture were fabricated for the total edentulous patient.

  14. Interaction of cosmic ray muons with spent nuclear fuel dry casks and determination of lower detection limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzidakis, S.; Choi, C. K.; Tsoukalas, L. H.

    2016-08-01

    The potential non-proliferation monitoring of spent nuclear fuel sealed in dry casks interacting continuously with the naturally generated cosmic ray muons is investigated. Treatments on the muon RMS scattering angle by Moliere, Rossi-Greisen, Highland and, Lynch-Dahl were analyzed and compared with simplified Monte Carlo simulations. The Lynch-Dahl expression has the lowest error and appears to be appropriate when performing conceptual calculations for high-Z, thick targets such as dry casks. The GEANT4 Monte Carlo code was used to simulate dry casks with various fuel loadings and scattering variance estimates for each case were obtained. The scattering variance estimation was shown to be unbiased and using Chebyshev's inequality, it was found that 106 muons will provide estimates of the scattering variances that are within 1% of the true value at a 99% confidence level. These estimates were used as reference values to calculate scattering distributions and evaluate the asymptotic behavior for small variations on fuel loading. It is shown that the scattering distributions between a fully loaded dry cask and one with a fuel assembly missing initially overlap significantly but their distance eventually increases with increasing number of muons. One missing fuel assembly can be distinguished from a fully loaded cask with a small overlapping between the distributions which is the case of 100,000 muons. This indicates that the removal of a standard fuel assembly can be identified using muons providing that enough muons are collected. A Bayesian algorithm was developed to classify dry casks and provide a decision rule that minimizes the risk of making an incorrect decision. The algorithm performance was evaluated and the lower detection limit was determined.

  15. BACKGROUND TRACK DENSITY REDUCTION OF 50-HZ-HV ECE-PROCESSED THICK POLYCARBONATE DETECTORS TO IMPROVE LOWER DETECTION LIMIT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohrabi, M; Hakimi, A; Soltani, Z

    2016-12-01

    A recent novel development of 50-Hz-HV ECE of 1-mm-thick and 250-µm-thick polycarbonate track detectors (PCTDs) has proved some promising results for some health physics, dosimetry and ion-beam-related applications. The method while proved having some good characteristics for some applications provided a relatively higher background track density (BGTD) in particular when very high voltages are applied to the PCTDs. In order to decrease the minimum detection limit (MDL) of the PCTDs and to further promote its applications for low dose, the BGTD was reduced by applying a layer removal methodology applying ethylendiamine (EDA). The effects of EDA concentrations (50, 60, 65, 70, 75, 80, 85 and 90 %) in water at room temperature (26°C) and soaking durations up to 100 min at different EDA concentration on BGTD reduction were studied. The thickness of the layer removed from the surface of a PCTD highly depends on the soaking time and EDA concentration; it increases as the EDA concentration increases up to for example 700 µm after 2 h of soaking in the EDA solution. After ∼10 min of soaking duration at any of the above-stated concentrations, the BGTD reaches its minimum value, a value which differs from concentration to concentration. An EDA concentration of 85 % in water provided the lowest BGTD of 64.06 ± 3.12 tracks cm(- 2); ∼6 times lower than that of its original value. It is shown that the layer removal process does not change the registration characteristics of the PCTD and its appearance significantly. The MDL of the PCTDs depends strongly on the BGTD. The MDL values for a desired confidence level were also studied by three calculation methods. The results of the BGTD and the MDL studies under different conditions applied are presented and discussed.

  16. Detection of bone metastasis in nasopharyngeal carcinoma by bone scintigraphy: A retrospective study in perspective of limited resource settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhil Kapoor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC is an aggressive tumor with a significant proportion of patients presenting with distant metastasis. The skeleton is one of the most common sites of distant failure. This retrospective study was performed to analyze the incidence and patterns of skeletal metastasis in NPC detected by bone scintigraphy in resource-poor settings. Materials and Methods: We analyzed records of 301 NPC patients attending our oncology outpatient department from January 2002 to December 2012. Of these, 33 patients who presented with bony pain underwent bone scan (BS for suspect of skeletal metastasis. In patients with positive scans, histological diagnosis to confirm metastasis was attempted. Results: Bone metastasis (BM was found in 19 patients (57.6% of patients undergoing BS, 6.3% of total NPC patients. About 36.8% and 15.8% of BM cases were in the age group 20-29 and 30-39 years, respectively (P = 0.27. 63.1% of metastatic cases were of World Health Organization type-II histology (P = 0.021. Of the patients diagnosed with BM, 52.6% belonged to stage IV at presentation (P = 0.022. Spine was involved in 56% of the positive cases, followed by the pelvis (32%, and ribs (24%. On univariate analysis, histology (P < 0.001, stage at diagnosis (P = 0.007 and age group (P = 0.001 were identified as significant factors affecting BM. However, on multivariate analysis, only stage (P = 0.001 was a significant factor. Conclusion: Bone scintigraphy can be considered in limited resource settings for the evaluation of distant metastasis in the patients of advanced NPC.

  17. Improvements on Near Real Time Detection of Volcanic Ash Emissions for Emergency Monitoring with Limited Satellite Bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torge Steensen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Quantifying volcanic ash emissions syneruptively is an important task for the global aviation community. However, due to the near real time nature of volcano monitoring, many parameters important for accurate ash mass estimates cannot be obtained easily. Even when using the best possible estimates of those parameters, uncertainties associated with the ash masses remain high, especially if the satellite data is only available in the traditional 10.8 and 12.0 μm bands. To counteract this limitation, we developed a quantitative comparison between the ash extents in satellite and model data. The focus is the manual cloud edge definition based on the available satellite reverse absorption (RA data as well as other knowledge like pilot reports or ground-based observations followed by an application of the Volcanic Ash Retrieval on the defined subset with an RA threshold of 0 K. This manual aspect, although subjective to the experience of the observer, can show a significant improvement as it provides the ability to highlight ash that otherwise would be obscured by meteorological clouds or, by passing over different surfaces with unaccounted temperatures, might be lost entirely and thus remains undetectable for an automated satellite approach. We show comparisons to Volcanic Ash Transport and Dispersion models and outline a quantitative match as well as percentages of overestimates based on satellite or dispersion model data which can be converted into a level of reliability for near real time volcano monitoring. 

  18. Measurement of the Depth of Penetration of UV Photons into Mars Relevant Rock Samples to Constrain Habitability and Limits of Detection for the SHERLOC Mars 2020 Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrier, B. L.; Beegle, L. W.; Bhartia, R.; Abbey, W. J.

    2015-12-01

    We report on the depth of penetration of UV photons into a suite of Mars relevant materials in order to better characterize what constitutes a habitable environment on Mars, as well as to characterize the sensitivities of the Scanning Habitable Environments with Raman and Luminescence for Organics and Chemicals (SHERLOC) instrument on the Mars 2020 payload. To date, UV transparency of these rock types have not been fully characterized, and we have performed a systematic study to better constrain the UV attenuation over a wide range of materials relevant to Mars. At one point during the history of Mars, the surface may have been habitable, with flowing liquid water and access to food and energy sources. As surface conditions changed, it is not unreasonable to assume that life would have migrated into the protected interior of porous rocks, veins, fissures, and the subsurface as a means to protect itself from harsh surface conditions, such as the UV flux that we observe today. Given geological time, the depth that UV light penetrates into the subsurface will play a role in altering and/or effecting the preservation of organic molecule containing biosignatures. However, the extent to which various rock types can shield organic material currently is not well understood. In addition to constraining the UV-driven habitable "zone", the data also helps constrain the SHERLOC instrument limits of detection. SHERLOC is a deep UV fluorescence and Raman imaging instrument. This is achieved by spatially scanning a deep UV laser at 248.6 nm to stimulate fluorescence emissions and Raman scattering from the sample. Specifically, fluorescence is generated from electronic transition from aromatic organics and Raman scatter is generated from vibrational bonds from both organics and minerals. Given the excitation wavelength, and the emission/scattering wavelengths (250-350), the mineral transparency will affect the interrogation volume of analysis and thus constrain the limits of

  19. Nucleic Acid-Based Detection and Identification of Bacterial and Fungal Plant Pathogens - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kingsley, Mark T.

    2001-03-13

    The threat to American interests from terrorists is not limited to attacks against humans. Terrorists might seek to inflict damage to the U.S. economy by attacking our agricultural sector. Infection of commodity crops by bacterial or fungal crop pathogens could adversely impact U.S. agriculture, either directly from damage to crops or indirectly from damage to our ability to export crops suspected of contamination. Recognizing a terrorist attack against U.S. agriculture, to be able to prosecute the terrorists, is among the responsibilities of the members of Hazardous Material Response Unit (HMRU) of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). Nucleic acid analysis of plant pathogen strains by the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification techniques is a powerful method for determining the exact identity of pathogens, as well as their possible region of origin. This type of analysis, however, requires that PCR assays be developed specific to each particular pathogen strain, and analysis protocols developed that are specific to the particular instrument used for detection. The objectives of the work described here were threefold: 1) to assess the potential terrorist threat to U.S. agricultural crops, 2) to determine whether suitable assays exist to monitor that threat, and 3) where assays are needed for priority plant pathogen threats, to modify or develop those assays for use by specialists at the HMRU. The assessment of potential threat to U.S. commodity crops and the availability of assays for those threats were described in detail in the Technical Requirements Document (9) and will be summarized in this report. This report addresses development of specific assays identified in the Technical Requirements Document, and offers recommendations for future development to ensure that HMRU specialists will be prepared with the PCR assays they need to protect against the threat of economic terrorism.

  20. Creating a Successful Citizen Science Model to Detect and Report Invasive Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Travis; Waitt, Damon

    2011-01-01

    The Invaders of Texas program is a successful citizen science program in which volunteers survey and monitor invasive plants throughout Texas. Invasive plants are being introduced at alarming rates, and our limited knowledge about their distribution is a major cause for concern. The Invaders of Texas program trains citizen scientists to detect the…

  1. Creating a Successful Citizen Science Model to Detect and Report Invasive Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Travis; Waitt, Damon

    2011-01-01

    The Invaders of Texas program is a successful citizen science program in which volunteers survey and monitor invasive plants throughout Texas. Invasive plants are being introduced at alarming rates, and our limited knowledge about their distribution is a major cause for concern. The Invaders of Texas program trains citizen scientists to detect the…

  2. Indolent systemic mastocytosis limited to the bone: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Pinto-Lopes

    Full Text Available CONTEXT Systemic mastocytosis is defined as a clonal disorder of mast cells and their precursor cells and is currently classified as a myeloproliferative neoplasm. Its clinical course has a wide spectrum, ranging from indolent disease, with normal life expectancy, to highly aggressive disease, associated with multisystemic involvement and poor overall survival. The aim of this study was to report a case of indolent systemic mastocytosis, focusing on the diagnostic challenges, with a review of the literature. CASE REPORT A 79-year-old Caucasian woman with osteoporosis was evaluated at the Emergency Department because of complaints of low back pain. Before this, she had consulted an orthopedist and had undergone some imaging examinations, namely a bone scan that revealed a “superscan” pattern. Due to her pain complaints and these test results, the patient was admitted to the Department of Internal Medicine. After undergoing several analytical tests and some additional imaging examinations to rule out some important differential diagnoses, she then underwent bone marrow biopsy, which made it possible to identify indolent systemic mastocytosis. CONCLUSION Systemic mastocytosis is a rare entity that is difficult to diagnose. Its symptoms are often unspecific and frequently ignored. Skeletal changes may be the first and only manifestation of the disease and in some cases, like this one, the diagnosis is made only after histological examination. The key point for the diagnosis is to contemplate the possibility of systemic mastocytosis.

  3. [Public health crises in a developed society. Successes and limitations in Spain. SESPAS report 2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gérvas, Juan; Meneu, Ricard

    2010-12-01

    The perception, acceptability and management of risks are social construction. Consequently, in managing public health crises, the gap between facts, beliefs and feelings tests the responsiveness of official institutions to health alarms that can be objective, potential, or imaginary. On balance, a strong point of the Spanish experience of health crises is the presence of clinicians and public health officers working in an organization capable of responding adequately, although the quasi-federal Spanish political structure has both advantages and disadvantages. Weaknesses include the low profile given to public health and a management structure that relies too heavily on partitocracy. The management of these crises could be improved by transferring greater scope to health professionals in decisions about crisis identification and management (with transparency) and limiting bureaucratic inertia. For some, health crises involve visibility or business opportunities (not always legitimate). Therefore, the perception of crisis will increasingly rest less in the hands of experts and more in those of groups interested in spreading these crises or in providing solutions. While progress is needed to develop participation in strategies to respond to emerging crises, even more essential is the involvement of all healthcare levels in their preparation and dissemination.

  4. Exposure limits for nanoparticles: report of an international workshop on nano reference values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Broekhuizen, Pieter; van Veelen, Wim; Streekstra, Willem-Henk; Schulte, Paul; Reijnders, Lucas

    2012-07-01

    This article summarizes the outcome of the discussions at the international workshop on nano reference values (NRVs), which was organized by the Dutch trade unions and employers' organizations and hosted by the Social Economic Council in The Hague in September 2011. It reflects the discussions of 80 international participants representing small- and medium-size enterprises (SMEs), large companies, trade unions, governmental authorities, research institutions, and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) from many European countries, USA, India, and Brazil. Issues that were discussed concerned the usefulness and acceptability of precaution-based NRVs as a substitute for health-based occupational exposure limits (OELs) and derived no-effect levels (DNELs) for manufactured nanoparticles (NPs). Topics concerned the metrics for measuring NPs, the combined exposure to manufactured nanomaterials (MNMs) and process-generated NPs, the use of the precautionary principle, the lack of information about the presence of nanomaterials, and the appropriateness of soft regulation for exposure control. The workshop concluded that the NRV, as an 8-h time-weighted average, is a comprehensible and useful instrument for risk management of professional use of MNMs with a dispersible character. The question remains whether NRVs, as advised for risk management by the Dutch employers' organization and trade unions, should be under soft regulation or that a more binding regulation is preferable.

  5. The Detection Limit of Fluoride With Ion Chromatography%离子色谱法中氟化物检出限确定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李石

    2013-01-01

      根据离子色谱法检出限定义,运用离子色谱仪反复测定水中氟离子检出限,对不同定义检出限进行推算并比较,各项结果满足JJG823-1993《离子色谱仪检定规程》。%The detection limits of fluoride under different conditions were repeatedly determined with ion chromatography, and the detection limits were calculated and compared. The results met the demand of JJG823-1993 the verification regulation for ion chromatography.

  6. Source evaluation report phase 2 investigation: Limited field investigation. Final report: United States Air Force Environmental Restoration Program, Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-10-01

    This report describes the limited field investigation work done to address issues and answer unresolved questions regarding a collection of potential contaminant sources at Eielson Air Force Base (AFB), near Fairbanks, Alaska. These sources were listed in the Eielson AFB Federal Facility Agreement supporting the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) cleanup of the base. The limited field investigation began in 1993 to resolve all remaining technical issues and provide the data and analysis required to evaluate the environmental hazard associated with these sites. The objective of the limited field investigation was to allow the remedial project managers to sort each site into one of three categories: requiring remedial investigation/feasibility study, requiring interim removal action, or requiring no further remedial action.

  7. [Four bone versus capito-lunate limited carpal fusion. Report of 40 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadji, O; Duteille, F; Dautel, G; Merle, M

    2002-01-01

    Fourty patients with limited carpal fusion have been retrospectively reviewed. The aim of this study was to compare the results of four bone fusions (30 wrists) versus capitolunate fusion (11 wrists). Follow-up averaged 30 months with a range of 15-96 months. Twelve patients presented SLAC-wrist (scapho-lunate advanced collapse) and fourteen with SNAC-wrist (sapho-non union advanced collapse). There were seven cases of primitive wrist arthritis, one mid-carpal instability, one sequella of Fenton's syndrome, one Preiser's disease and two Kienbock's disease. All 40 patients were evaluated by the same observer. In terms of range of motion, the capito-lunate fusion led to better results than the four bone fusions with a gain of 10 degrees in volar flexion and 12 degrees in radial deviation. Results in term of post operative pain are similar in the two groups of patients with 90% painless wrist in four bone fusion and 81% with capito-lunate fusion. Results for strength were equivalent. Radiological bone fusion was obtained within nine weeks. Absence of fusion was observed in two patients with capito-lunate fusion. Our result in terms of joint motion and strength are similar to those found in the literature. Correction or not of the DISI deformity during the procedure did not affect the results (on 19 patients). The Four bone fusion procedure is still a good treatment in SLAC or SNAC wrist. Capito-lunate fusion remains a good choice, despite the risk of non-fusion.

  8. Intrinsic TLI surface tag directly authenticated by a SEM (closeout report). [Treaty Limited Item (TLI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaluzec, N.J.; Philippedes, A.; Palm, R.G.; De Volpi, A.; Holland, J.W.

    1991-11-01

    The objective of this task was to develop a unique identifier (tag) for Treaty-Limited Items (TLIs) in arms control applications. This tag is authenticated by the direct attachment of a portable Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) to the TLI. It is an intrinsic tag with two distinct TLI surface-authentication signatures, consisting of topography and atomic composition. Authentication is accomplished by comparing the field-inspection signature with the baseline signature. Because this tag has two unique signatures, it is considered extremely resistant to counterfeit attempts. Since commercial SEMs are large instruments intended to observe small samples introduced into a vacuum chamber integral to the instrument, it was initially necessary to demonstrate that interfacing an SEM to a large TLI was feasible. The first phase demonstrated that an SEM could obtain high- resolution images of a large, curved, simulated TLI surface. A used commercial SEM was modified to accomplish the first phase. The second phase began with a systematic evaluation of the design alternatives necessary to produce a portable SEM suitable for TLI tag authentication. Since the electron column design of the SEM was the central component that drove the selection of the rest of the system, this phase continued with a preliminary design of the column. A novel design of the column's electromagnetic lenses combined both permanent magnets and magnetic coils, significantly reducing the required lens power and weight. Prototype condenser and objective lenses were built and tested to prove that this approach was viable. Based upon the results of the second phase, a 0.1-micrometer (4-micro-inch) resolution SEM is feasible. The total system would weigh 52-Kg including a 7-Kg electron column.

  9. Limited field investigation report for the 100-HR-3 operable unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    This limited field investigation (LFI) was conducted to assess the applicability of interim remedial measures (IRM) for reducing human health and environmental risks within the 100-HR-3 Groundwater Operable Unit. The 100-HR-3 Operable Unit is comprised of three subareas; the 100 D Area, the 100 H Area and those portions of the 600 Area between the two reactor areas. The operable unit is one of seven operable units associated with the 100 D and H Areas. Operable units 100-DR-1, 100-DR-2, 100-DR-3, 100-HR-1, 100-HR-2 and 100-IU-4 address contaminant sources while 100-HR-3 addresses contamination present in the underlying groundwater. The primary method of field investigation used during this LFI was the installation and sampling of monitoring wells. Samples were collected from the groundwater and soils, and submitted for laboratory analysis. Boreholes were surveyed for radiological contamination using downhole geophysical techniques to further delineate the locations and levels of contaminants. All samples were screened to ascertain the presence of volatile organic compounds and radionuclides. Analytical data were subjected to validation; all round one, two and three and a minimum of 10% of round four data associated with the LFI were validated. A screening method was used to identify contaminants of potential concern (COPC). This screening method eliminated from further consideration, constituents that were below background. Constituents which are considered non-toxic to humans were eliminated from the human health evaluation. Data consistency and blank contamination were also evaluated in the screening process. These COPC were then evaluated further in the qualitative risk assessment (QRA). A human health QRA was performed using conservative (maximum equilibrated contaminant levels from the LFI) analyses.

  10. The First Case Report in Italy of Di George Syndrome Detected by Noninvasive Prenatal Testing

    OpenAIRE

    Giuseppina Rapacchia; Cristina Lapucci; Maria Carla Pittalis; Aly Youssef; Antonio Farina

    2015-01-01

    Panorama Plus (Natera), a single-nucleotide polymorphism- (SNP-) based approach that relies on the identification of maternal and fetal allele distributions, allows the detection of common aneuploidies and also incorporates a panel of 5 microdeletions including Di George syndrome. We report here the first case of Di George syndrome detected by NIPT in Italy; blood was drawn at 12 weeks’ gestation. The patient had an amniocentesis to confirm the diagnosis by MLPA (multiplex ligation-dependent ...

  11. Changes in respiratory function impairment following the treatment of severe pulmonary tuberculosis – limitations for the underlying COPD detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radovic M

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Milan Radovic,1,2 Lidija Ristic,1,2 Zorica Ciric,1,2 Violeta Dinic-Radovic,3 Ivana Stankovic,1,2 Tatjana Pejcic,1,2 Milan Rancic,1,2 Dragan Bogdanovic4 1Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Nis, 2Clinic for Lung Diseases, 3Clinic for Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Clinical Centre of Nis, 4Public Health Institute Nis, Nis, Republic of Serbia Background: During the treatment phase of active pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB, respiratory function impairment is usually restrictive. This may become obstructive, as a PTB-associated airflow obstruction (AFO or as a later manifestation of underlying COPD.Purpose: The aim of the study was to examine the potential causes and risks for AFO development in PTB by exploring the aspects of spirometry limitations and clinical implications for the underlying COPD detection, taking into account various confounding factors.Patients and methods: Prospective, nest case–control study on 40 new cases of PTB with initial restrictive respiratory function impairment, diagnosed and treated according to the directly observed treatment short course (DOTS strategy.Results: From all observed patients, 37.5% of them developed AFO upon the completion of PTB treatment, with significantly increased average of forced vital capacity (% (P<0.01. Their changes in forced expiratory volume in the first second (% during the PTB treatment were strongly associated with the air pollution exposure in living (0.474%–20.971% for 95% confidence interval [CI]; P=0.041 and working environments (3.928%–20.379% for 95% CI; P=0.005, initial radiological extent of PTB lesions (0.018%–0.700% for 95% CI; P=0.047, leukocyte count (0.020%–1.328% for 95% CI; P=0.043, and C-reactive protein serum level (0.046%–0.205% for 95% CI; P=0.003 compared to the other patients. The multivariate logistic regression analysis model shows initial radiological extent of pulmonary tuberculosis lesions (OR 1.01–1.05 for 95% CI; P=0

  12. IUDs as EC? Limited awareness and high reported acceptability: evidence from Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichardo, Margaret; Arribas, Lia; Coccio, Elina; Heredia, Graciela; Jagroep, Sherani; Palermo, Tia

    2014-11-01

    We explored knowledge and attitudes regarding the copper intrauterine device (IUD) as emergency contraception (EC) among women in Buenos Aires, Argentina. We interviewed a convenience sample of women attending a family planning center at a public hospital. Participants were asked about knowledge and use of contraceptives, including EC (pre-script). Then they were given information about the IUD as EC and subsequently asked about acceptability of using the copper IUD as EC (post-script), the primary outcome in this analysis. We analyzed data on 273 women. While only 1.83% of participants knew the IUD served as EC at baseline, 79.85% said they would be willing to use the device as such if the need arose after given relevant information. Multivariate results from a pre-script revealed that women with low levels of education and those born outside of Argentina were less knowledgeable about EC pills. Only previous use of the IUD was associated with high levels of IUD knowledge. Post-script, results indicated that being Argentine [odds ratio (OR)=2.15, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.21, 3.81] and previous IUD use (OR=2.12, 95% CI=1.07, 4.19) were positively associated with considering the IUD as EC. Nulliparity was negatively associated with willingness to use the IUD as EC (OR=0.44, 95% CI 0.22, 0.86). We examined acceptability of the copper IUD as EC in a Latin American setting and found that, while prior levels of knowledg'e were low, acceptability of the IUD as EC was high. Implications for programming and policy include outreach and education regarding this highly effective method and advocacy to change existing regulations in Argentina prohibiting the use of IUD as EC. After given information about the IUD as a method of EC, women interviewed said they would be willing to use the IUD EC despite their limited prior knowledge of this method. With more widespread information and availability of the IUD as EC, more women may opt for this highly effective method, which

  13. Biomedical journals lack a consistent method to detect outcome reporting bias: a cross-sectional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huan, L N; Tejani, A M; Egan, G

    2014-10-01

    An increasing amount of recently published literature has implicated outcome reporting bias (ORB) as a major contributor to skewing data in both randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews; however, little is known about the current methods in place to detect ORB. This study aims to gain insight into the detection and management of ORB by biomedical journals. This was a cross-sectional analysis involving standardized questions via email or telephone with the top 30 biomedical journals (2012) ranked by impact factor. The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews was excluded leaving 29 journals in the sample. Of 29 journals, 24 (83%) responded to our initial inquiry of which 14 (58%) answered our questions and 10 (42%) declined participation. Five (36%) of the responding journals indicated they had a specific method to detect ORB, whereas 9 (64%) did not have a specific method in place. The prevalence of ORB in the review process seemed to differ with 4 (29%) journals indicating ORB was found commonly, whereas 7 (50%) indicated ORB was uncommon or never detected by their journal previously. The majority (n = 10/14, 72%) of journals were unwilling to report or make discrepancies found in manuscripts available to the public. Although the minority, there were some journals (n = 4/14, 29%) which described thorough methods to detect ORB. Many journals seemed to lack a method with which to detect ORB and its estimated prevalence was much lower than that reported in literature suggesting inadequate detection. There exists a potential for overestimation of treatment effects of interventions and unclear risks. Fortunately, there are journals within this sample which appear to utilize comprehensive methods for detection of ORB, but overall, the data suggest improvements at the biomedical journal level for detecting and minimizing the effect of this bias are needed. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Single molecule detection using charge-coupled device array technology. Technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denton, M.B.

    1992-07-29

    A technique for the detection of single fluorescent chromophores in a flowing stream is under development. This capability is an integral facet of a rapid DNA sequencing scheme currently being developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory. In previous investigations, the detection sensitivity was limited by the background Raman emission from the water solvent. A detection scheme based on a novel mode of operating a Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) is being developed which should greatly enhance the discrimination between fluorescence from a single molecule and the background Raman scattering from the solvent. Register shifts between rows in the CCD are synchronized with the sample flow velocity so that fluorescence from a single molecule is collected in a single moving charge packet occupying an area approaching that of a single pixel while the background is spread evenly among a large number of pixels. Feasibility calculations indicate that single molecule detection should be achieved with an excellent signal-to-noise ratio.

  15. A Thickened Coracohumeral Ligament and Superomedial Capsule Limit Internal Rotation of the Shoulder Joint: Report of Three Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masashi Koide

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder (also known as frozen shoulder is a painful and disabling disorder with an estimated prevalence ranging from 2% to 5% in the general population. Although the precise pathogenesis of frozen shoulder is unclear, thickened capsule and coracohumeral ligament (CHL have been documented to be one of the most specific manifestations. The thickened CHL has been understood to limit external rotation of the shoulder, and restriction of internal rotation of the shoulder has been believed to be related to posterior capsular tightness. In this paper, three cases of refractory frozen shoulder treated through arthroscopic release of a contracted capsule including CHL were reported. Two cases in which there is recalcitrant severe restriction of internal rotation after manipulation under anesthesia (MUA were finally treated with arthroscopic surgery. Although MUA could release the posterior capsule, internal rotation did not improve in our cases. After release of the thickened CHL, range of motion of internal rotation was significantly improved. This report demonstrates the role of the thickened CHL in limiting the internal rotation of the shoulder. We highlight the importance of release of thickened CHL in addition to the pancapsular release, in case of severe limitation of internal rotation of shoulder.

  16. Optimal labeling dose, labeling time, and magnetic resonance imaging detection limits of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticle labeled mesenchymal stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiasen, Anders Bruun; Hansen, Louise; Friis, Tina;

    2013-01-01

    Background. Regenerative therapy is an emerging treatment modality. To determine migration and retention of implanted cells, it is crucial to develop noninvasive tracking methods. The aim was to determine ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detection limits of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron...

  17. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization. Quarterly report, January 1, 1997--March 31, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-04-01

    This document contains the quarterly report dated January 1-March 31, 1997 for the Naturally Fractured Tight Gas Reservoir Detection Optimization project. Topics covered in this report include AVOA modeling using paraxial ray tracing, AVOA modeling for gas- and water-filled fractures, 3-D and 3-C processing, and technology transfer material. Several presentations from a Geophysical Applications Workshop workbook, workshop schedule, and list of workshop attendees are also included.

  18. Atlantoaxial Ankylosis Detected on Neck CT Scans in a Patient with Ankylosing Spondylitis: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Ah; Lee, Seung Hun; Joo, Kyung Bin [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul Hospital, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Jeong Ah [Dept. of Radiology, Guri Hospital, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Guri (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Hwan [Dept. of Rheynmatology, Seoul Hospital, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-07-15

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a chronic inflammatory disorder of unknown cause that principally affects the axial skeleton. The cervical spine is also vulnerable to this disease process and the characteristic feature of cervical involvement is atlantoaxial subluxation. However, only a few cases of atlantoaxial ankylosis have been reported to date. We report a case of atlantoaxial ankylosis in a patient with ankylosing spondylitis with radiologic findings incidentally detected on neck CT scans.

  19. A Cholecystocolonic Fistula Detected by MRCP in a Patient with Chronic Cholecystitis: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Seong Su; Park, Soo Youn [Catholic University St. Vincent' s Hospital, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-08-15

    A cholecystocolonic fistula is an uncommon late complication of chronic gallstone disease. Although it may cause acute life-threatening complications such as bowel obstruction or massive hemorrhaging, its accurate preoperative diagnosis may be difficult due to minimal or nonspecific symptoms. Cholecystocolonic fistulas have been diagnosed by various methods, including ERCP. However, the diagnosis of a cholecystocolonic fistula using MRCP has not been reported in the literature. In this case report, we describe a case of a cholecystocolonic fistula detected by MRCP.

  20. Quantitative assessment of a data-limited recreational bonefish fishery using a time-series of fishing guides reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Rolando O; Rehage, Jennifer S; Adams, Aaron J; Black, Brooke D; Osborne, Jason; Kroloff, Emily K N

    2017-01-01

    Recreational fisheries can be prone to severe declines, yet these fisheries, particularly catch-and-release, are often data-limited, constraining our ability to conduct stock assessments. A combination of catch and effort indices derived from fisheries-dependent data (FDD) gathered from fishing logbooks could be a powerful approach to inform these data gaps. This study demonstrates the utility of using different catch metrics such as indices of abundance, species richness associated with reported catch, and the success rate of targeted trips, to assess historical shifts in the trajectory of the data-limited bonefish (Albula vulpes) fishery in Florida Bay, an economically-important recreational fishery within the Caribbean Basin. We used FDD from fishing guide reports submitted to Everglades National Park to determine temporal patterns in the bonefish population over the past 35 years. These reports indicated a decline in recreational catches in Florida Bay since the late 1980s, with an accelerated decline starting in the late 1990s-early 2000s. Analyses showed an overall 42% reduction in bonefish catches. Trends in the proportion of positive trips (i.e., the probability of catching success) followed the declining catch patterns, suggesting major population changes starting in 1999-2000. As bonefish catches declined, species richness in bonefish trips increased by 34%, suggesting a decrease in bonefish abundance and/or shift in fishing effort (e.g., giving-up time, changes in preferred species). Results provide additional resolution to a pattern of decline for bonefish in South Florida and highlight the value of reconstructing time-series for the development of hypotheses about the potential driving mechanisms of species decline. Further, the data-limited nature of most recreational fisheries, and the increase in a use of catch-and-release as a fisheries management strategy point to the need to develop further data integration tools to assess population trends and

  1. Signal Detection of Adverse Drug Reaction of Amoxicillin Using the Korea Adverse Event Reporting System Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soukavong, Mick; Kim, Jungmee; Park, Kyounghoon; Yang, Bo Ram; Lee, Joongyub; Jin, Xue Mei; Park, Byung Joo

    2016-09-01

    We conducted pharmacovigilance data mining for a β-lactam antibiotics, amoxicillin, and compare the adverse events (AEs) with the drug labels of 9 countries including Korea, USA, UK, Japan, Germany, Swiss, Italy, France, and Laos. We used the Korea Adverse Event Reporting System (KAERS) database, a nationwide database of AE reports, between December 1988 and June 2014. Frequentist and Bayesian methods were used to calculate disproportionality distribution of drug-AE pairs. The AE which was detected by all the three indices of proportional reporting ratio (PRR), reporting odds ratio (ROR), and information component (IC) was defined as a signal. The KAERS database contained a total of 807,582 AE reports, among which 1,722 reports were attributed to amoxicillin. Among the 192,510 antibiotics-AE pairs, the number of amoxicillin-AE pairs was 2,913. Among 241 AEs, 52 adverse events were detected as amoxicillin signals. Comparing the drug labels of 9 countries, 12 adverse events including ineffective medicine, bronchitis, rhinitis, sinusitis, dry mouth, gastroesophageal reflux, hypercholesterolemia, gastric carcinoma, abnormal crying, induration, pulmonary carcinoma, and influenza-like symptoms were not listed on any of the labels of nine countries. In conclusion, we detected 12 new signals of amoxicillin which were not listed on the labels of 9 countries. Therefore, it should be followed by signal evaluation including causal association, clinical significance, and preventability.

  2. Signal Detection of Adverse Drug Reaction of Amoxicillin Using the Korea Adverse Event Reporting System Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    We conducted pharmacovigilance data mining for a β-lactam antibiotics, amoxicillin, and compare the adverse events (AEs) with the drug labels of 9 countries including Korea, USA, UK, Japan, Germany, Swiss, Italy, France, and Laos. We used the Korea Adverse Event Reporting System (KAERS) database, a nationwide database of AE reports, between December 1988 and June 2014. Frequentist and Bayesian methods were used to calculate disproportionality distribution of drug-AE pairs. The AE which was detected by all the three indices of proportional reporting ratio (PRR), reporting odds ratio (ROR), and information component (IC) was defined as a signal. The KAERS database contained a total of 807,582 AE reports, among which 1,722 reports were attributed to amoxicillin. Among the 192,510 antibiotics-AE pairs, the number of amoxicillin-AE pairs was 2,913. Among 241 AEs, 52 adverse events were detected as amoxicillin signals. Comparing the drug labels of 9 countries, 12 adverse events including ineffective medicine, bronchitis, rhinitis, sinusitis, dry mouth, gastroesophageal reflux, hypercholesterolemia, gastric carcinoma, abnormal crying, induration, pulmonary carcinoma, and influenza-like symptoms were not listed on any of the labels of nine countries. In conclusion, we detected 12 new signals of amoxicillin which were not listed on the labels of 9 countries. Therefore, it should be followed by signal evaluation including causal association, clinical significance, and preventability. PMID:27510377

  3. Installation of high-resolution ERDA in UTTAC at the University of Tsukuba: Determination of the energy resolution and the detection limit for hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekiba, D., E-mail: sekiba@tac.tsukuba.ac.jp [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tennodai 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); University of Tsukuba, Tandem Accelerator Complex (UTTAC), Tennodai 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Chito, K.; Harayama, I. [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tennodai 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Watahiki, Y.; Ishii, S. [University of Tsukuba, Tandem Accelerator Complex (UTTAC), Tennodai 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Ozeki, K. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ibaraki University, Nakanarusawa 4-12-1, Hitachi, Ibaraki 316-8511 (Japan)

    2017-06-15

    A newly developed high-resolution elastic recoil detection analysis (HERDA) system installed at the 1 MV Tandetron in UTTAC at the University of Tsukuba is introduced. The effective solid angle of detector, energy resolution and detection limit for hydrogen are, for the first time, determined quantitatively by the measurements on an a-C:H (and D) film deposited on a Si substrate. In the case of a 500 keV {sup 16}O{sup +} as the incident beam, an energy resolution of ∼0.45 keV and a detection limit of ∼3.8 × 10{sup 20} atoms/cm{sup 3} (∼0.18 at.%) with a data acquisition time of ∼310 s are derived.

  4. Application of quantitative signal detection in the Dutch spontaneous reporting system for adverse drug reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Puijenbroek, Eugène; Diemont, Willem; van Grootheest, Kees

    2003-01-01

    The primary aim of spontaneous reporting systems (SRSs) is the timely detection of unknown adverse drug reactions (ADRs), or signal detection. Generally this is carried out by a systematic manual review of every report sent to an SRS. Statistical analysis of the data sets of an SRS, or quantitative signal detection, can provide additional information concerning a possible relationship between a drug and an ADR. We describe the role of quantitative signal detection and the way it is applied at the Netherlands Pharmacovigilance Centre Lareb. Results of the statistical analysis are implemented in the traditional case-by-case analysis. In addition, for data-mining purposes, a list of associations of ADRs and suspected drugs that are disproportionally present in the database is periodically generated. Finally, quantitative signal generation can be used to study more complex relationships, such as drug-drug interactions and syndromes. The results of quantitative signal detection should be considered as an additional source of information, complementary to the traditional analysis. Techniques for the detection of drug interactions and syndromes offer a new challenge for pharmacovigilance in the near future.

  5. Cholestrol granuloma of the breast incidentally detected on dynamic abdominal CT: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Sun Hye; Lee, Eun Hye; Hong, Hyun Sook; Kwak, Jeong Ja [Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    A breast cholesterol granuloma is an uncommon nodular breast lesion. We incidentally detected a persistently enhancing breast mass on the dynamic abdominal computed tomography (CT) of a 78-year-old woman. The mass decreased in diameter over 50 days following a core needle biopsy. This report is the first to describe the dynamic-enhanced CT features of a breast cholesterol granuloma.

  6. High Blood Cholesterol in Adults. Report of the Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Heart, Lung, and Blood Inst. (DHHS/NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    This report offers a patient-based approach to lowering blood cholesterol levels which seeks to identify individuals at high risk who will benefit from intensive intervention efforts. The goal is to establish criteria that define the candidates for medical intervention and to provide guidelines on how to detect, set goals for, treat, and monitor…

  7. Detection of Histamine in Fish and Fishery Products in Osaka Prefecture (Fiscal 2015 Report).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awazu, Kaoru; Takatori, Satoshi; Kakimoto, Sachiko; Nomura, Chie; Masayama, Atsushi; Yamaguchi, Mizuka; Kakimoto, You; Kajimura, Keiji

    2017-01-01

    Histamine food poisoning is caused by ingestion of spoiled fish containing high levels of histamine. This paper reports cases in which histamine was detected in Osaka prefecture in fiscal year 2015 in a survey of fish and fishery products on the market and the food poisoning. A suspected case of histamine food poisoning was also evaluated to investigate the cause and minimize further problems. Histamine in food was separated on SPE cartridge columns, and analyzed after derivatization with fluorescamine by means of HPLC-FL. Histamine was detected in some fishery products on the market and in food that had caused poisoning. The samples in which histamine was detected were semi-dried whole round herring (Urumeiwashi-maruboshi), mackerel (Saba) and sardine dumpling (Iwashi-tsumire). These foods were the main causes of histamine food poisoning according to the report of the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, Government of Japan.

  8. 酶联免疫法检测血清乙型肝炎表面抗原的空白限检出限及定量限的建立与评价%The establishment and evaluation of limit of blank, limit of detection and limit of quantitation for detection of serum hepatitis B surface antigens by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭丽娜; 杨泽华; 赵克斌

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the question of serum hepatitis B surface antigens(HBsAg) results detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay(ELISA) so as to prevent undetection of weakly positive samples, and to establish limit of blank (LOB), limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantitation (LOQ). Methods Refering to CLSI EP17-A file, the HBsAg blank sample and a series of samples with low concentrations were performed ELJSA detection. According to the distribution, the results were analyzed using the relative statistical method. ELJSA was used to detect LOB, LOD and LOQ of HBsAg. Results The results were LOB=0.117 μg/L, LOD=0.317 μg/L and LOQ= 0.500 μg/L Conclusion The LOB established by referring to CLSI EP17-file was more scientific and reasonable than that established by conventional method and thus it might satisfy the clinical lab requirements better.%目的 探讨酶联免疫吸附试验(ELISA)检测血清乙型肝炎表面抗原(HBsAg)结果检测限的问题,防止漏检弱阳性标本,建立本实验室的空白限(LOB)、检出限(LOD)及定量限(LOQ).方法 参考美国临床实验室标准化委员会(CISI)发布的《确定检测低限和定量检测限的方案》(EP17-A)文件,将HBsAg的空白样本及一系列的低浓度样本进行ELISA检测,对得到的结果根据其分布状态,采用百分位数进行统计描述,建立ELISA法检测HBsAg的空白限、检出限及定量限.结果 空白限为0.117 μg/L,检出限为0.317 μg/L,定量限为0.500μg/L.结论 参考CLSI EP17-A文件建立的检测限比常规方法建立的检测限科学合理,更能满足临床实验室的要求.

  9. Do ICF core sets for low back pain include patients' self-reported activity limitations because of back problems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lygren, Hildegunn; Strand, Liv Inger; Anderson, Bodil; Magnussen, Liv Heide

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate content validity of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) Core Sets for low back pain (LBP), by examining whether common activities reported as difficult to perform are included in the Core Sets. A cross-sectional design was used. Ninety-eight patients with long-lasting back pain (>3 months) between 18 and 65 years of age were consecutively recruited from a Multidisciplinary Outpatient Spine Clinic. Difficulties with daily life and work task activities because of back pain were examined by asking the patients two questions: 1) can you specify activities that are difficult to perform because of your back pain? and 2) are there specific work tasks that you are unable to do because of your back pain? Two raters independently classified the written responses according to the ICF Core Sets' component Activities and Participation. Activities and work tasks were linked to 15 of 29 categories (52%) in the Comprehensive Core Set, and 9 of 12 (75%) in the Brief Core Set, and the initial agreement between the two raters in coding the answers according to the Core Sets was (83%, k = 0.80) and (93%, k = 0.9), respectively, before consensus was reached. The Comprehensive Core Set for LBP to a large degree contains daily life and work-related activities frequently reported as difficult to perform by patients with long-lasting LBP. The categories, however, are very broad and do not provide specified descriptions of the most frequently reported activity limitations such as sitting, standing and walking. The Brief Core Set does not include categories for frequently reported activities such as pulling/pushing and leisure/recreation activities. ICF Core Sets for LBP seem suitable for obtaining a gross overview of the patients' functional limitations, but do not give sufficient information from a therapeutic point of view. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. The application of reporter gene assays for the detection of endocrine disruptors in sport supplements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plotan, Monika; Elliott, Christopher T. [Institute of Agri-Food and Land Use, School of Biological Sciences, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT95AG, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Scippo, Marie Louise [Department of Food Sciences, University of Liege, 4000 Liege (Belgium); Muller, Marc [Molecular Biology and Genetic Engineering GIGA-R, University of Liege, 4000 Liege (Belgium); Antignac, Jean-Philippe [LABERCA, ENVN, USC INRA 2013, BP 50707, 44 307, Nantes (France); Malone, Edward [The State Laboratory, Young' s Cross, Celbridge, Co. Kildare (Ireland); Bovee, Toine F.H. [RIKILT Institute of Food Safety, P.O. Box 230, AE Wageningen 6700 (Netherlands); Mitchell, Samuel [Agri-Food and Biosciences Institute, Belfast BT9 5PX (United Kingdom); Connolly, Lisa, E-mail: l.connolly@qub.ac.uk [Institute of Agri-Food and Land Use, School of Biological Sciences, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT95AG, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

    2011-08-26

    The increasing availability and use of sports supplements is of concern as highlighted by a number of studies reporting endocrine disruptor contamination in such products. The health food supplement market, including sport supplements, is growing across the Developed World. Therefore, the need to ensure the quality and safety of sport supplements for the consumer is essential. The development and validation of two reporter gene assays coupled with solid phase sample preparation enabling the detection of estrogenic and androgenic constituents in sport supplements is reported. Both assays were shown to be of high sensitivity with the estrogen and androgen reporter gene assays having an EC{sub 50} of 0.01 ng mL{sup -1} and 0.16 ng mL{sup -1} respectively. The developed assays were applied in a survey of 63 sport supplements samples obtained across the Island of Ireland with an additional seven reference samples previously investigated using LC-MS/MS. Androgen and estrogen bio-activity was found in 71% of the investigated samples. Bio-activity profiling was further broken down into agonists, partial agonists and antagonists. Supplements (13) with the strongest estrogenic bio-activity were chosen for further investigation. LC-MS/MS analysis of these samples determined the presence of phytoestrogens in seven of them. Supplements (38) with androgen bio-activity were also selected for further investigation. Androgen agonist bio-activity was detected in 12 supplements, antagonistic bio-activity was detected in 16 and partial antagonistic bio-activity was detected in 10. A further group of supplements (7) did not present androgenic bio-activity when tested alone but enhanced the androgenic agonist bio-activity of dihydrotestosterone when combined. The developed assays offer advantages in detection of known, unknown and low-level mixtures of endocrine disruptors over existing analytical screening techniques. For the detection and identification of constituent hormonally

  11. The First Case Report in Italy of Di George Syndrome Detected by Noninvasive Prenatal Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Rapacchia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Panorama Plus (Natera, a single-nucleotide polymorphism- (SNP- based approach that relies on the identification of maternal and fetal allele distributions, allows the detection of common aneuploidies and also incorporates a panel of 5 microdeletions including Di George syndrome. We report here the first case of Di George syndrome detected by NIPT in Italy; blood was drawn at 12 weeks’ gestation. The patient had an amniocentesis to confirm the diagnosis by MLPA (multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and an ultrasound aimed to detect the features associated with the syndrome. A right aortic arch and suspect of thymus atrophy were detected, but not other severe malformations typical of the disease. The patient terminated the pregnancy at 17 weeks. NIPT allowed an early screening of Di George syndrome. As the patient was at low risk, it is likely that an ultrasound would have missed the condition.

  12. The First Case Report in Italy of Di George Syndrome Detected by Noninvasive Prenatal Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapacchia, Giuseppina; Lapucci, Cristina; Pittalis, Maria Carla; Youssef, Aly; Farina, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Panorama Plus (Natera), a single-nucleotide polymorphism- (SNP-) based approach that relies on the identification of maternal and fetal allele distributions, allows the detection of common aneuploidies and also incorporates a panel of 5 microdeletions including Di George syndrome. We report here the first case of Di George syndrome detected by NIPT in Italy; blood was drawn at 12 weeks' gestation. The patient had an amniocentesis to confirm the diagnosis by MLPA (multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification) and an ultrasound aimed to detect the features associated with the syndrome. A right aortic arch and suspect of thymus atrophy were detected, but not other severe malformations typical of the disease. The patient terminated the pregnancy at 17 weeks. NIPT allowed an early screening of Di George syndrome. As the patient was at low risk, it is likely that an ultrasound would have missed the condition. PMID:26346617

  13. Health care professionals' perspectives on barriers to elder abuse detection and reporting in primary care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeidel, Amy N; Daly, Jeanette M; Rosenbaum, Marcy E; Schmuch, Gretchen A; Jogerst, Gerald J

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore health care professionals' perspectives on elder abuse to achieve a better understanding of the problems of reporting and to generate ideas for improving the detection and reporting process. Through a mailed survey, nurses, physicians, and social workers were invited to participate in an interview. Nine nurses, 8 physicians, and 6 social workers were interviewed, and thematic analysis was used to identify the following core themes: preconceptions, assessment, interpretation, systems, and knowledge and education. Participants suggested a reorganization of the external reporting system. More frequent and pragmatic education is necessary to strengthen practical knowledge about elder abuse.

  14. Final LDRD report : infrared detection and power generation using self-assembled quantum dots.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cederberg, Jeffrey George; Ellis, Robert; Shaner, Eric Arthur

    2008-02-01

    Alternative solutions are desired for mid-wavelength and long-wavelength infrared radiation detection and imaging arrays. We have investigated quantum dot infrared photodetectors (QDIPs) as a possible solution for long-wavelength infrared (8 to 12 {mu}m) radiation sensing. This document provides a summary for work done under the LDRD 'Infrared Detection and Power Generation Using Self-Assembled Quantum Dots'. Under this LDRD, we have developed QDIP sensors and made efforts to improve these devices. While the sensors fabricated show good responsivity at 80 K, their detectivity is limited by high noise current. Following efforts concentrated on how to reduce or eliminate this problem, but with no clear path was identified to the desired performance improvements.

  15. Overcoming the detection bandwidth limit in precision spectroscopy: The analytical apparatus function for a stepped frequency scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohart, François

    2017-01-01

    In a previous paper [Rohart et al., Phys Rev A 2014;90(042506)], the influence of detection-bandwidth properties on observed line-shapes in precision spectroscopy was theoretically modeled for the first time using the basic model of a continuous sweeping of the laser frequency. Specific experiments confirmed general theoretical trends but also revealed several insufficiencies of the model in case of stepped frequency scans. As a consequence in as much as up-to-date experiments use step-by-step frequency-swept lasers, a new model of the influence of the detection-bandwidth is developed, including a realistic timing of signal sampling and frequency changes. Using Fourier transform techniques, the resulting time domain apparatus function gets a simple analytical form that can be easily implemented in line-shape fitting codes without any significant increase of computation durations. This new model is then considered in details for detection systems characterized by 1st and 2nd order bandwidths, underlining the importance of the ratio of detection time constant to frequency step duration, namely for the measurement of line frequencies. It also allows a straightforward analysis of corresponding systematic deviations on retrieved line frequencies and broadenings. Finally, a special attention is paid to consequences of a finite detection-bandwidth in Doppler Broadening Thermometry, namely to experimental adjustments required for a spectroscopic determination of the Boltzmann constant at the 1-ppm level of accuracy. In this respect, the interest of implementing a Butterworth 2nd order filter is emphasized.

  16. A small azide-modified thiazole-based reporter molecule for fluorescence and mass spectrometric detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Wolfram

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Molecular probes are widely used tools in chemical biology that allow tracing of bioactive metabolites and selective labeling of proteins and other biomacromolecules. A common structural motif for such probes consists of a reporter that can be attached by copper(I-catalyzed 1,2,3-triazole formation between terminal alkynes and azides to a reactive headgroup. Here we introduce the synthesis and application of the new thiazole-based, azide-tagged reporter 4-(3-azidopropoxy-5-(4-bromophenyl-2-(pyridin-2-ylthiazole for fluorescence, UV and mass spectrometry (MS detection. This small fluorescent reporter bears a bromine functionalization facilitating the automated data mining of electrospray ionization MS runs by monitoring for its characteristic isotope signature. We demonstrate the universal utility of the reporter for the detection of an alkyne-modified small molecule by LC–MS and for the visualization of a model protein by in-gel fluorescence. The novel probe advantageously compares with commercially available azide-modified fluorophores and a brominated one. The ease of synthesis, small size, stability, and the universal detection possibilities make it an ideal reporter for activity-based protein profiling and functional metabolic profiling.

  17. Non-invasive detection of animal nerve impulses with an atomic magnetometer operating near quantum limited sensitivity

    CERN Document Server

    Jensen, Kasper; Thomas, Rodrigo A; Wang, Tian; Fuchs, Annette; Balabas, Mikhail V; Vasilakis, Georgios; Mosgaard, Lars; Heimburg, Thomas; Olesen, Søren-Peter; Polzik, Eugene S

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic fields generated by human and animal organs, such as the heart, brain and nervous system carry information useful for biological and medical purposes. These magnetic fields are most commonly detected using cryogenically-cooled superconducting magnetometers. Here we present the frst detection of action potentials from an animal nerve using an optical atomic magnetometer. Using an optimal design we are able to achieve the sensitivity dominated by the quantum shot noise of light and quantum projection noise of atomic spins. Such sensitivity allows us to measure the nerve impulse with a miniature room-temperature sensor which is a critical advantage for biomedical applications. Positioning the sensor at a distance of a few millimeters from the nerve, corresponding to the distance between the skin and nerves in biological studies, we detect the magnetic field generated by an action potential of a frog sciatic nerve. From the magnetic field measurements we determine the activity of the nerve and the tempor...

  18. Enhancement of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) Detection limit using a low-pressure and short-pulse laser-induced plasma process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen Zhen; Deguchi, Yoshihiro; Kuwahara, Masakazu; Yan, Jun Jie; Liu, Ji Ping

    2013-11-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technology is an appealing technique compared with many other types of elemental analysis because of the fast response, high sensitivity, real-time, and noncontact features. One of the challenging targets of LIBS is the enhancement of the detection limit. In this study, the detection limit of gas-phase LIBS analysis has been improved by controlling the pressure and laser pulse width. In order to verify this method, low-pressure gas plasma was induced using nanosecond and picosecond lasers. The method was applied to the detection of Hg. The emission intensity ratio of the Hg atom to NO (IHg/INO) was analyzed to evaluate the LIBS detection limit because the NO emission (interference signal) was formed during the plasma generation and cooling process of N2 and O2 in the air. It was demonstrated that the enhancement of IHg/INO arose by decreasing the pressure to a few kilopascals, and the IHg/INO of the picosecond breakdown was always much higher than that of the nanosecond breakdown at low buffer gas pressure. Enhancement of IHg/INO increased more than 10 times at 700 Pa using picosecond laser with 35 ps pulse width. The detection limit was enhanced to 0.03 ppm (parts per million). We also saw that the spectra from the center and edge parts of plasma showed different features. Comparing the central spectra with the edge spectra, IHg/INO of the edge spectra was higher than that of the central spectra using the picosecond laser breakdown process.

  19. Bacillus anthracis diagnostic detection and rapid antibiotic susceptibility determination using 'bioluminescent' reporter phage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, David A; Sharp, Natasha J; Vandamm, Joshua; Molineux, Ian J; Spreng, Krista A; Rajanna, Chythanya; Westwater, Caroline; Stewart, George C

    2013-11-01

    Genetically modified phages have the potential to detect pathogenic bacteria from clinical, environmental, or food-related sources. Herein we assess an engineered 'bioluminescent' reporter phage (Wß::luxAB) as a clinical diagnostic tool for Bacillus anthracis, the etiological agent of anthrax. Wß::luxAB is able to rapidly (within minutes) detect a panel of B. anthracis strains by transducing a bioluminescent phenotype. The reporter phage displays species specificity by its inability, or significantly reduced ability, to detect members of the closely related Bacillus cereus group and other common bacterial pathogens. Using spiked clinical specimens, Wß::luxAB detects B. anthracis within 5 h at clinically relevant concentrations, and provides antibiotic susceptibility information that mirrors the CLSI method, except that data are obtained at least 5-fold faster. Although anthrax is a treatable disease, a positive patient prognosis is dependent on timely diagnosis and appropriate therapy. Wß::luxAB rapidly detects B. anthracis and determines antibiotic efficacy, properties that will help patient outcome.

  20. Rapid Detection of Viable Bacillus anthracis Spores in Environmental Samples by Using Engineered Reporter Phages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Natasha J; Molineux, Ian J; Page, Martin A; Schofield, David A

    2016-04-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, was utilized as a bioterrorism agent in 2001 when spores were distributed via the U.S. postal system. In responding to this event, the Federal Bureau of Investigation used traditional bacterial culture viability assays to ascertain the extent of contamination of the postal facilities within 24 to 48 h of environmental sample acquisition. Here, we describe a low-complexity, second-generation reporter phage assay for the rapid detection of viableB. anthracis spores in environmental samples. The assay uses an engineered B. anthracis reporter phage (Wβ::luxAB-2) which transduces bioluminescence to infected cells. To facilitate low-level environmental detection and maximize the signal response, expression of luxABin an earlier version of the reporter phage (Wβ::luxAB-1) was optimized. These alterations prolonged signal kinetics, increased light output, and improved assay sensitivity. Using Wβ::luxAB-2, detection of B. anthracis spores was 1 CFU in 8 h from pure cultures and as low as 10 CFU/g in sterile soil but increased to 10(5)CFU/g in unprocessed soil due to an unstable signal and the presence of competing bacteria. Inclusion of semiselective medium, mediated by a phage-expressed antibiotic resistance gene, maintained signal stability and enabled the detection of 10(4)CFU/g in 6 h. The assay does not require spore extraction and relies on the phage infecting germinating cells directly in the soil sample. This reporter phage displays promise for the rapid detection of low levels of spores on clean surfaces and also in grossly contaminated environmental samples from complex matrices such as soils.

  1. Rapid Detection of Viable Bacillus anthracis Spores in Environmental Samples by Using Engineered Reporter Phages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Natasha J.; Molineux, Ian J.; Page, Martin A.

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, was utilized as a bioterrorism agent in 2001 when spores were distributed via the U.S. postal system. In responding to this event, the Federal Bureau of Investigation used traditional bacterial culture viability assays to ascertain the extent of contamination of the postal facilities within 24 to 48 h of environmental sample acquisition. Here, we describe a low-complexity, second-generation reporter phage assay for the rapid detection of viable B. anthracis spores in environmental samples. The assay uses an engineered B. anthracis reporter phage (Wβ::luxAB-2) which transduces bioluminescence to infected cells. To facilitate low-level environmental detection and maximize the signal response, expression of luxAB in an earlier version of the reporter phage (Wβ::luxAB-1) was optimized. These alterations prolonged signal kinetics, increased light output, and improved assay sensitivity. Using Wβ::luxAB-2, detection of B. anthracis spores was 1 CFU in 8 h from pure cultures and as low as 10 CFU/g in sterile soil but increased to 105 CFU/g in unprocessed soil due to an unstable signal and the presence of competing bacteria. Inclusion of semiselective medium, mediated by a phage-expressed antibiotic resistance gene, maintained signal stability and enabled the detection of 104 CFU/g in 6 h. The assay does not require spore extraction and relies on the phage infecting germinating cells directly in the soil sample. This reporter phage displays promise for the rapid detection of low levels of spores on clean surfaces and also in grossly contaminated environmental samples from complex matrices such as soils. PMID:26873316

  2. Speciation analysis of arsenic by selective hydride generation-cryotrapping-atomic fluorescence spectrometry with flame-in-gas-shield atomizer: achieving extremely low detection limits with inexpensive instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musil, Stanislav; Matoušek, Tomáš; Currier, Jenna M; Stýblo, Miroslav; Dědina, Jiří

    2014-10-21

    This work describes the method of a selective hydride generation-cryotrapping (HG-CT) coupled to an extremely sensitive but simple in-house assembled and designed atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS) instrument for determination of toxicologically important As species. Here, an advanced flame-in-gas-shield atomizer (FIGS) was interfaced to HG-CT and its performance was compared to a standard miniature diffusion flame (MDF) atomizer. A significant improvement both in sensitivity and baseline noise was found that was reflected in improved (4 times) limits of detection (LODs). The yielded LODs with the FIGS atomizer were 0.44, 0.74, 0.15, 0.17 and 0.67 ng L(-1) for arsenite, total inorganic, mono-, dimethylated As and trimethylarsine oxide, respectively. Moreover, the sensitivities with FIGS and MDF were equal for all As species, allowing for the possibility of single species standardization with arsenate standard for accurate quantification of all other As species. The accuracy of HG-CT-AFS with FIGS was verified by speciation analysis in two samples of bottled drinking water and certified reference materials, NRC CASS-5 (nearshore seawater) and SLRS-5 (river water) that contain traces of methylated As species. As speciation was in agreement with results previously reported and sums of all quantified species corresponded with the certified total As. The feasibility of HG-CT-AFS with FIGS was also demonstrated by the speciation analysis in microsamples of exfoliated bladder epithelial cells isolated from human urine. The results for the sums of trivalent and pentavalent As species corresponded well with the reference results obtained by HG-CT-ICPMS (inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry).

  3. Recovery Efficiency, False Negative Rate, and Limit of Detection Performance of a Validated Macrofoam-Swab Sampling Method with Low Surface Concentrations of Two Bacillus anthracis Surrogates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piepel, Gregory F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hutchison, Janine R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Deatherage Kaiser, Brooke L [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Amidan, Brett G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sydor, Michael A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Barrett, Christopher A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-03-31

    The performance of a macrofoam-swab sampling method was evaluated using Bacillus anthracis Sterne (BAS) and Bacillus atrophaeus Nakamura (BG) spores applied at nine low target amounts (2-500 spores) to positive-control plates and test coupons (2 in. × 2 in.) of four surface materials (glass, stainless steel, vinyl tile, and plastic). Test results from cultured samples were used to evaluate the effects of surrogate, surface concentration, and surface material on recovery efficiency (RE), false negative rate (FNR), and limit of detection. For RE, surrogate and surface material had statistically significant effects, but concentration did not. Mean REs were the lowest for vinyl tile (50.8% with BAS, 40.2% with BG) and the highest for glass (92.8% with BAS, 71.4% with BG). FNR values ranged from 0 to 0.833 for BAS and 0 to 0.806 for BG, with values increasing as concentration decreased in the range tested (0.078 to 19.375 CFU/cm2, where CFU denotes ‘colony forming units’). Surface material also had a statistically significant effect. A FNR-concentration curve was fit for each combination of surrogate and surface material. For both surrogates, the FNR curves tended to be the lowest for glass and highest for vinyl title. The FNR curves for BG tended to be higher than for BAS at lower concentrations, especially for glass. Results using a modified Rapid Viability-Polymerase Chain Reaction (mRV-PCR) analysis method were also obtained. The mRV-PCR results and comparisons to the culture results will be discussed in a subsequent report.

  4. Evaluation of National Seismograph Network detection capabilities. Annual report, July 1994--July 1995: Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLaughlin, K.L.; Bennett, T.J. [S-Cubed, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    1996-03-01

    This first annual report presents detection thresholds and probabilities, and location error ellipse projects for the United States National Seismic Network (USNSN) with and without cooperative stations in the eastern US. Network simulation methods are used with spectral noise levels at stations to simulate the processes of excitation, propagation, detection, and processing of seismic phases. USNSN alone should be capable of detecting 4 or more P waves for shallow crustal earthquakes in nearly all the eastern and central US at magnitude 3.8 level. When cooperative stations are added, the network should be able to detect 4 or more P waves from events 0.2 to 0.3 magnitude units lower. Planned expansion of USNSN and cooperative stations should improve detection levels by an additional 0.2-0.3 magnitudes units in many areas. Location uncertainties for USNSN can be improved by adding real-time cooperative stations. Median error ellipses for magnitude 4.5 earthquakes depend strongly on location, but uncertainties should be less than 100 km{sup 2} in the central US and degrade to 200 km{sup 2} or more offshore and sosuth and north of the international boundaries. Close cooperation with the Canadian National Network should substantially improve detection thresholds and location uncertainties along the Canadian border.

  5. Detection limits of about 350 prominent lines of 65 elements observed in 50 and 27 MHz inductively coupled plasmas (ICP): effects of source characteristics, noise and spectral bandwidth-"Standard" values for the 50 MHz ICP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boumans, P. W. J. M.; Vrakking, J. J. A. M.

    This paper links up with a previous publication by the same authors [ Spectrochim. Acta41B, 1235 (1986)] dealing with the measurement of the effective line profiles of about 350 prominent lines at high spectral resolution and the determination of the physical widths of these lines. In the present work the line widths are used for a breakdown of the detection limits obtained with these lines using different ICPs and different spectrometers. This breakdown takes into account the separate effects of source characteristics, noise, and spectral bandwidth. The availability of the numerical values of the physical widths of a large number of lines permitted a more rigorous approach than in a previous work [ Spectrochim. Acta40B, 1437 (1985)]. The present approach was applied to detection limits obtained in this work with a 50 MHz ICP at high spectral resolution and to results reported by W INGEet al. [ Appl. Spectrosc.33, 206 (1979)] and WOHLERS [ ICP Information Newslett.10, 601 (1985)]for 27 MHz ICPs. The 50 MHz ICP was shown to have an advantage in source signal-to-background ratio (SBR) with respect to either of the two 27 MHz ICPs. This SBR advantage was a factor of 3-15 with respect to the "Winge ICP" and a factor of 2-6 with respect to the "Wohlers ICP". The approach was also used to convert detection limits measured in the 50 MHz ICP at high resolution into values for 15 pm spectral bandwidth and a relative standard deviation of the background signal equal to 1%. These values are recommended as standards of performance for the conventional argon ICP. The paper comprises a tabulation of the complete results for the 350 prominent lines and includes four sets of detection limits for these lines.

  6. Markov dynamics as a zooming lens for multiscale community detection: non clique-like communities and the field-of-view limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaub, Michael T; Delvenne, Jean-Charles; Yaliraki, Sophia N; Barahona, Mauricio

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a surge of interest in community detection algorithms for complex networks. A variety of computational heuristics, some with a long history, have been proposed for the identification of communities or, alternatively, of good graph partitions. In most cases, the algorithms maximize a particular objective function, thereby finding the 'right' split into communities. Although a thorough comparison of algorithms is still lacking, there has been an effort to design benchmarks, i.e., random graph models with known community structure against which algorithms can be evaluated. However, popular community detection methods and benchmarks normally assume an implicit notion of community based on clique-like subgraphs, a form of community structure that is not always characteristic of real networks. Specifically, networks that emerge from geometric constraints can have natural non clique-like substructures with large effective diameters, which can be interpreted as long-range communities. In this work, we show that long-range communities escape detection by popular methods, which are blinded by a restricted 'field-of-view' limit, an intrinsic upper scale on the communities they can detect. The field-of-view limit means that long-range communities tend to be overpartitioned. We show how by adopting a dynamical perspective towards community detection [1], [2], in which the evolution of a Markov process on the graph is used as a zooming lens over the structure of the network at all scales, one can detect both clique- or non clique-like communities without imposing an upper scale to the detection. Consequently, the performance of algorithms on inherently low-diameter, clique-like benchmarks may not always be indicative of equally good results in real networks with local, sparser connectivity. We illustrate our ideas with constructive examples and through the analysis of real-world networks from imaging, protein structures and the power grid, where a

  7. Detection and differentiation of herpes simplex viruses by use of the viper platform: advantages, limitations, and concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Amanda L S; Roberts, Catherine; Mazzulli, Tony; Hatchette, Todd F; LeBlanc, Jason J

    2014-06-01

    The Viper HSV-Q(x) assay was evaluated for the detection of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2 in specimens from oral, anogenital, and other miscellaneous sites. The HSV-Q(x) assay was found to be highly sensitive and accurate; however, a gray zone may be required for specimens with values falling between 50 and 800 maximum relative fluorescence units.

  8. Comparison of models for analyzing two-group, cross-sectional data with a Gaussian outcome subject to a detection limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegand, Ryan E; Rose, Charles E; Karon, John M

    2016-12-01

    A potential difficulty in the analysis of biomarker data occurs when data are subject to a detection limit. This detection limit is often defined as the point at which the true values cannot be measured reliably. Multiple, regression-type models designed to analyze such data exist. Studies have compared the bias among such models, but few have compared their statistical power. This simulation study provides a comparison of approaches for analyzing two-group, cross-sectional data with a Gaussian-distributed outcome by exploring statistical power and effect size confidence interval coverage of four models able to be implemented in standard software. We found using a Tobit model fit by maximum likelihood provides the best power and coverage. An example using human immunodeficiency virus type 1 ribonucleic acid data is used to illustrate the inferential differences in these models.

  9. Non-invasive detection of animal nerve impulses with an atomic magnetometer operating near quantum limited sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Kasper; Budvytyte, Rima; Thomas, Rodrigo A.; Wang, Tian; Fuchs, Annette M.; Balabas, Mikhail V.; Vasilakis, Georgios; Mosgaard, Lars D.; Stærkind, Hans C.; Müller, Jörg H.; Heimburg, Thomas; Olesen, Søren-Peter; Polzik, Eugene S.

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic fields generated by human and animal organs, such as the heart, brain and nervous system carry information useful for biological and medical purposes. These magnetic fields are most commonly detected using cryogenically-cooled superconducting magnetometers. Here we present the first detection of action potentials from an animal nerve using an optical atomic magnetometer. Using an optimal design we are able to achieve the sensitivity dominated by the quantum shot noise of light and quantum projection noise of atomic spins. Such sensitivity allows us to measure the nerve impulse with a miniature room-temperature sensor which is a critical advantage for biomedical applications. Positioning the sensor at a distance of a few millimeters from the nerve, corresponding to the distance between the skin and nerves in biological studies, we detect the magnetic field generated by an action potential of a frog sciatic nerve. From the magnetic field measurements we determine the activity of the nerve and the temporal shape of the nerve impulse. This work opens new ways towards implementing optical magnetometers as practical devices for medical diagnostics.

  10. Non-invasive detection of animal nerve impulses with an atomic magnetometer operating near quantum limited sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Kasper; Budvytyte, Rima; Thomas, Rodrigo A; Wang, Tian; Fuchs, Annette M; Balabas, Mikhail V; Vasilakis, Georgios; Mosgaard, Lars D; Stærkind, Hans C; Müller, Jörg H; Heimburg, Thomas; Olesen, Søren-Peter; Polzik, Eugene S

    2016-07-15

    Magnetic fields generated by human and animal organs, such as the heart, brain and nervous system carry information useful for biological and medical purposes. These magnetic fields are most commonly detected using cryogenically-cooled superconducting magnetometers. Here we present the first detection of action potentials from an animal nerve using an optical atomic magnetometer. Using an optimal design we are able to achieve the sensitivity dominated by the quantum shot noise of light and quantum projection noise of atomic spins. Such sensitivity allows us to measure the nerve impulse with a miniature room-temperature sensor which is a critical advantage for biomedical applications. Positioning the sensor at a distance of a few millimeters from the nerve, corresponding to the distance between the skin and nerves in biological studies, we detect the magnetic field generated by an action potential of a frog sciatic nerve. From the magnetic field measurements we determine the activity of the nerve and the temporal shape of the nerve impulse. This work opens new ways towards implementing optical magnetometers as practical devices for medical diagnostics.

  11. Final Scientific Report, Integrated Seismic Event Detection and Location by Advanced Array Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kvaerna, T.; Gibbons. S.J.; Ringdal, F; Harris, D.B.

    2007-01-30

    In the field of nuclear explosion monitoring, it has become a priority to detect, locate, and identify seismic events down to increasingly small magnitudes. The consideration of smaller seismic events has implications for a reliable monitoring regime. Firstly, the number of events to be considered increases greatly; an exponential increase in naturally occurring seismicity is compounded by large numbers of seismic signals generated by human activity. Secondly, the signals from smaller events become more difficult to detect above the background noise and estimates of parameters required for locating the events may be subject to greater errors. Thirdly, events are likely to be observed by a far smaller number of seismic stations, and the reliability of event detection and location using a very limited set of observations needs to be quantified. For many key seismic stations, detection lists may be dominated by signals from routine industrial explosions which should be ascribed, automatically and with a high level of confidence, to known sources. This means that expensive analyst time is not spent locating routine events from repeating seismic sources and that events from unknown sources, which could be of concern in an explosion monitoring context, are more easily identified and can be examined with due care. We have obtained extensive lists of confirmed seismic events from mining and other artificial sources which have provided an excellent opportunity to assess the quality of existing fully-automatic event bulletins and to guide the development of new techniques for online seismic processing. Comparing the times and locations of confirmed events from sources in Fennoscandia and NW Russia with the corresponding time and location estimates reported in existing automatic bulletins has revealed substantial mislocation errors which preclude a confident association of detected signals with known industrial sources. The causes of the errors are well understood and are

  12. Models for residential- and commercial-sector energy-conservation analysis: applications, limitations, and future potential. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, Henry E.; Fullen, Robert E.

    1980-09-01

    This report reviews four of the major models used by the Department of Energy (DOE) for energy conservation analyses in the residential- and commercial-building sectors. The objective is to provide a critical analysis of how these models can serve as tools for DOE and its Conservation Policy Office in evaluating and quantifying their policy and program requirements. For this, the study brings together information on the models' analytical structure and their strengths and limitations in policy applications these are then employed to assess the most-effective role for each model in addressing future issues of buildings energy-conservation policy and analysis. The four models covered are: Oak Ridge Residential Energy Model; Micro Analysis of Transfers to Households/Comprehensive Human Resources Data System (MATH/CHRDS) Model; Oak Ridge Commercial Energy Model; and Brookhaven Buildings Energy Conservation Optimization Model (BECOM).

  13. Antarctica X-band MiniSAR crevasse detection radar : final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sander, Grant J.; Bickel, Douglas Lloyd

    2007-09-01

    This document is the final report for the Antarctica Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Project. The project involved the modification of a Sandia National Laboratories MiniSAR system to operate at X-band in order to assess the feasibility of an airborne radar to detect crevasses in Antarctica. This radar successfully detected known crevasses at various geometries. The best results were obtained for synthetic aperture radar resolutions of at most one foot and finer. In addition to the main goal of detecting crevasses, the radar was used to assess conops for a future operational radar. The radar scanned large areas to identify potential safe landing zones. In addition, the radar was used to investigate looking at objects on the surface and below the surface of the ice. This document includes discussion of the hardware development, system capabilities, and results from data collections in Antarctica.

  14. A case of polyarteritis nodosa limited to the right calf muscles, fascia, and skin: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett Francesca

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Limited polyarteritis nodosa is a rare benign disease that usually responds well to systemic corticosteroid treatment. We report a case limited to calf muscles, fascia, and skin treated with local corticosteroid therapy directed to the affected areas by ultrasound guidance. Case presentation A 36-year-old Caucasian woman presented with a 10-month history of progressive right calf pain and swelling, which were unresponsive to treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and physiotherapy. An examination revealed a swollen tender right calf with indurated overlying skin. Laboratory investigations showed an erythrocyte sedimentation rate of 24 mm/hour and a C-reactive protein of 15 mg/dl. Full blood count, renal profile, and creatinine kinase level were normal. A full autoantibody screen and hepatitis B and C serology results were negative. A chest X-ray was unremarkable. Magnetic resonance imaging of the right leg revealed increased signal intensity in T2-weighted images and this was suggestive of extensive inflammatory changes of the gastrocnemius muscle and, to a lesser extent, the soleus muscle. There were marked inflammatory changes throughout the gastrocnemius muscle and the subcutaneous tissue circumferentially around the right lower leg. A biopsy of affected skin, muscle, and fascia showed histopathological features consistent with polyarteritis nodosa, including small-vessel vasculitis with fibrinoid changes in the vessel wall and intense perivascular and focal mural chronic inflammatory changes. Our patient declined treatment with oral steroids. She received a course of ultrasound-guided injections of steroid (Depo-Medrone, methylprednisolone in the involved muscle area and commenced maintenance azathioprine with a good response. Conclusions Limited polyarteritis nodosa is rare and affects middle-aged individuals. In most cases, treatment with moderate- to high-dose corticosteroids gives symptomatic relief

  15. Detection of Quorum Sensing Signals in Gram-Negative Bacteria by Using Reporter Strain CV026

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Humayan KABIR

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Quorum sensing signals are referred to as acylated homoserine lactones (AHL that are mainly found in Gram-negative bacteria. It implies the ability of certain bacteria of producing different AHL molecules. The bacteria Pseudomonas aureofaciens and Xenorhabdus nematophila were cultured in Luria-Bertani (LB10 media and CV026 was used as a reporter strain to detect the presence of AHLs produced by the cultured bacteria. In this study, the reporter strain has revealed the quorum sensing ability of P. aureofaciens and X. nematophila by producing the purple pigment violacein in the supply of external AHLs molecules. Thin layer chromatography (TLC bioassay having four controls was conducted to detect specific AHL molecule supplied by P. aureofaciens and X. nematophila. The specific AHL molecule was observed to be migrated according to their polarity on the TLC plate.

  16. Self-reported health and functional limitations among older people in the Kassena-Nankana District, Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelius Debpuur

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ghana is experiencing significant increases in its ageing population, yet research on the health and quality of life of older people is limited. Lack of data on the health and well-being of older people in the country makes it difficult to monitor trends in the health status of adults and the impact of social policies on their health and welfare. Research on ageing is urgently required to provide essential data for policy formulation and programme implementation. Objective: To describe the health status and identify factors associated with self-rated health (SRH among older adults in a rural community in northern Ghana. Methods: The data come from a survey on Adult Health and Ageing in the Kassena-Nankana District involving 4,584 people aged 50 and over. Survey participants answered questions pertaining to their health status, including self-rated overall health, perceptions of well-being and quality of life, and self-reported assessment of functioning on a range of different health domains. Socio-demographic information such as age, sex, marital status and education were obtained from a demographic surveillance database. Results: The majority of older people rated their health status as good, with the oldest old reporting poorer health. Multivariate regression analysis showed that functional ability and sex are significant factors in SRH status. Adults with higher levels of functional limitations were much more likely to rate their health as being poorer compared with those having lower disabilities. Household wealth was significantly associated with SRH, with wealthier adults more likely to rate their health as good. Conclusion: The depreciation in health and daily functioning with increasing age is likely to increase people's demand for health care and other services as they grow older. There is a need for regular monitoring of the health status of older people to provide public health agencies with the data they need to assess

  17. Applying ISO 11929:2010 Standard to detection limit calculation in least-squares based multi-nuclide gamma-ray spectrum evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanisch, G.

    2017-05-01

    The concepts of ISO 11929 (2010) are applied to evaluation of radionuclide activities from more complex multi-nuclide gamma-ray spectra. From net peak areas estimated by peak fitting, activities and their standard uncertainties are calculated by weighted linear least-squares method with an additional step, where uncertainties of the design matrix elements are taken into account. A numerical treatment of the standard's uncertainty function, based on ISO 11929 Annex C.5, leads to a procedure for deriving decision threshold and detection limit values. The methods shown allow resolving interferences between radionuclide activities also in case of calculating detection limits where they can improve the latter by including more than one gamma line per radionuclide. The co"mmon single nuclide weighted mean is extended to an interference-corrected (generalized) weighted mean, which, combined with the least-squares method, allows faster detection limit calculations. In addition, a new grouped uncertainty budget was inferred, which for each radionuclide gives uncertainty budgets from seven main variables, such as net count rates, peak efficiencies, gamma emission intensities and others; grouping refers to summation over lists of peaks per radionuclide.

  18. Signal detection of methylphenidate by comparing a spontaneous reporting database with a claims database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, JaYoung; Kim, Munsin; Ha, Ji-Hye; Jang, Junghoon; Hwang, Myungsil; Lee, Byung Koo; Chung, Myeon Woo; Yoo, Tae Moo; Kim, Myung Jung

    2011-11-01

    Data mining is critical for signal detection in pharmacovigilance systems. In this study, we compared signals between spontaneous reporting data and health insurance claims data for a socially issued drug, methylphenidate. We implemented data-mining tools for signal detection in both databases: Reporting Odds Ratios (ROR), Proportional Reporting Ratios (PRR), Chi-squared test, and Information Component (IC), in addition to a Relative Risk (RR) tool in the claims database. The claims database generated 15, 15, 36, 1, and 1 adverse drug reactions (ADRs) by ROR, PRR, chi-square, IC, and RR, respectively. The World Health Organization (WHO) spontaneous database generated 91, 91, 137, and 96 ADRs by ROR, PRR, chi-square, and IC, respectively. We found seven potential matching associations from the claims and WHO databases, but only one of them was present in the Korean spontaneous reporting database. In Korea, spontaneous reporting is still underreported and there is a small amount of data for Koreans. Signal comparison between the claims and WHO databases can provide additional regulatory insight.

  19. Template reporter bacteriophage platform and multiple bacterial detection assays based thereon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodridge, Lawrence (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    The invention is a method for the development of assays for the simultaneous detection of multiple bacteria. A bacteria of interest is selected. A host bacteria containing plasmid DNA from a T even bacteriophage that infects the bacteria of interest is infected with T4 reporter bacteriophage. After infection, the progeny bacteriophage are plating onto the bacteria of interest. The invention also includes single-tube, fast and sensitive assays which utilize the novel method.

  20. Final Technical Report for the Neutron Detection without Helium-3 Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ely, James H.; Bliss, Mary; Kouzes, Richard T.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Robinson, Sean M.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Woodring, Mitchell L.

    2013-11-01

    This report details the results of the research and development work accomplished for the ‘Neutron Detection without Helium-3’ project conducted during the 2011-2013 fiscal years. The primary focus of the project was to investigate commercially available technologies that might be used in safeguards applications in the relatively near term. Other technologies that are being developed may be more applicable in the future, but were outside the scope of this study.

  1. COST AND PERFORMANCE REPORT: INNOVATIVE ACOUSTIC SENSOR TECHNOLOGIES FOR LEAK DETECTION IN CHALLENGING PIPE TYPES

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-30

    Technologies for Leak Detection in Challenging Pipe Types (Cost and Performance Report) Gary Anguiano Edwin Chiang Martha Araujo Stuart Strum Dr. Victor...N3943013C1256 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Gary Anguiano; Edwin Chiang; Martha Araujo; and Stuart Strum (NAVFAC EXWC...Principal Investigator Scott Waisner U.S. Army Engineer R&D Center 3909 Halls Ferry Rd. Vicksburg, MS 39180 (601) 634-2286 (601) 634

  2. Students' Reports of Severe Violence in School as a Tool for Early Detection and Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yablon, Yaacov B.

    2017-01-01

    Early detection of severe violence is a significant challenge for many schools. Three studies were conducted on samples of 6th, 8th, and 10th graders (12-16 years old). The first study, based on paired reports of teachers and students (n = 130), showed that a high percentage of both victims and perpetrators of severe violence are not identified by…

  3. Focal epithelial hyperplasia (Heck's disease): report of two cases with PCR detection of human papillomavirus DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasooriya, P R; Abeyratne, S; Ranasinghe, A W; Tilakaratne, W M

    2004-07-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH) (Heck's disease) is essentially a benign oral infection produced by the human papillomavirus (HPV). Although this condition is known to exist in numerous populations and ethnic groups, it is relatively rare in South-East Asia. The following report is based on two cases of adult FEH with histopathological features in favour of the disease. In addition, polymerase chain reaction was performed to detect the presence of HPV DNA in the lesions in order to confirm the histopathological diagnosis.

  4. E-SMART system for in-situ detection of environmental contaminants. Quarterly progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    Environmental Systems Management, Analysis and Reporting neTwork (E-SMART) is a comprehensive, fully-integrated approach to in-situ, real-time detection and monitoring of environmental contaminants. E-SMART will provide new class of smart, highly sensitive, chemically-specific, in-situ, multichannel microsensors utilizing integrated optical interferometry technology, large, commercially viable set of E-SMART-compatible sensors, samplers, and network management components, and user-friendly graphical user interface for data evaluation and visualization.

  5. Markov dynamics as a zooming lens for multiscale community detection: non clique-like communities and the field-of-view limit

    CERN Document Server

    Schaub, Michael T; Yaliraki, Sophia N; Barahona, Mauricio

    2011-01-01

    Recently, there has been a surge of interest in community detection algorithms for complex networks. The proposed algorithms are based on a variety of heuristics, some with a long history, for the identification of communities or, alternatively, of good graph partitions. In most cases, the algorithms proceed by maximizing a particular objective function, thereby finding the `right' split into communities. Although a thorough comparative analysis of these algorithms is still lacking, there has also been an effort to design random graph models with known community structure against which the performance of different algorithms can be benchmarked. However, such benchmarks normally impose not only a known community structure but also a clique-like random structure for the communities which may differ significantly from those found in real networks. We show here that popular community detection methods are affected by a restricted `field-of-view' limit, an intrinsic upper scale that does not allow them to detect c...

  6. How to calculate dark matter direct detection exclusion limits that are consistent with gamma rays from annihilation in the Milky Way halo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerdeño, David G.; Fornasa, Mattia; Green, Anne M.; Peiró, Miguel

    2016-08-01

    When comparing constraints on the weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) properties from direct and indirect detection experiments it is crucial that the assumptions made about the dark matter (DM) distribution are realistic and consistent. For instance, if the Fermi-LAT Galactic center GeV gamma-ray excess was due to WIMP annihilation, its morphology would be incompatible with the standard halo model that is usually used to interpret data from direct detection experiments. In this article, we calculate exclusion limits from direct detection experiments using self-consistent velocity distributions, derived from mass models of the Milky Way where the DM halo has a generalized Navarro-Frenk-White profile. We use two different methods to make the mass model compatible with a DM interpretation of the Galactic center gamma-ray excess. First, we fix the inner slope of the DM density profile to the value that best fits the morphology of the excess. Second, we allow the inner slope to vary and include the morphology of the excess in the data sets used to constrain the gravitational potential of the Milky Way. The resulting direct detection limits differ significantly from those derived using the standard halo model, in particular for light WIMPs, due to the differences in both the local DM density and velocity distribution.

  7. Testing the discrimination and detection limits of WorldView-2 imagery on a challenging invasive plant target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, T. P.; Wardell-Johnson, G. W.; Pracilio, G.; Brown, C.; Corner, R.; van Klinken, R. D.

    2016-02-01

    Invasive plants pose significant threats to biodiversity and ecosystem function globally, leading to costly monitoring and management effort. While remote sensing promises cost-effective, robust and repeatable monitoring tools to support intervention, it has been largely restricted to airborne platforms that have higher spatial and spectral resolutions, but which lack the coverage and versatility of satellite-based platforms. This study tests the ability of the WorldView-2 (WV2) eight-band satellite sensor for detecting the invasive shrub mesquite (Prosopis spp.) in the north-west Pilbara region of Australia. Detectability was challenged by the target taxa being largely defoliated by a leaf-tying biological control agent (Gelechiidae: Evippe sp. #1) and the presence of other shrubs and trees. Variable importance in the projection (VIP) scores identified bands offering greatest capacity for discrimination were those covering the near-infrared, red, and red-edge wavelengths. Wavelengths between 400 nm and 630 nm (coastal blue, blue, green, yellow) were not useful for species level discrimination in this case. Classification accuracy was tested on three band sets (simulated standard multispectral, all bands, and bands with VIP scores ≥1). Overall accuracies were comparable amongst all band-sets (Kappa = 0.71-0.77). However, mesquite omission rates were unacceptably high (21.3%) when using all eight bands relative to the simulated standard multispectral band-set (9.5%) and the band-set informed by VIP scores (11.9%). An incremental cover evaluation on the latter identified most omissions to be for objects 16 m2 allows application for mapping mesquite shrubs and coalesced stands, the former not previously possible, even with 3 m resolution hyperspectral imagery. WV2 imagery offers excellent portability potential for detecting other species where spectral/spatial resolution or coverage has been an impediment. New generation satellite sensors are removing barriers

  8. Non-detection of Previously Reported Transits of HD 97658b with MOST Photometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragomir, Diana; Matthews, Jaymie M.; Howard, Andrew W.

    2012-01-01

    The radial velocity-discovered exoplanet HD 97658b was recently announced to transit, with a derived planetary radius of 2.93 ± 0.28 R ⊕. As a transiting super-Earth orbiting a bright star, this planet would make an attractive candidate for additional observations, including studies of its...... out transits for a planet with radius larger than 2.09 R ⊕, corresponding to the reported 3σ lower limit. We also report new radial velocity measurements which continue to support the existence of an exoplanet with a period of 9.5 days, and obtain improved orbital parameters....

  9. Psychometric properties of self-reported questionnaires for the evaluation of symptoms and functional limitations in individuals with rotator cuff disorders: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Pierre, Corinne; Desmeules, François; Dionne, Clermont E; Frémont, Pierre; MacDermid, Joy C; Roy, Jean-Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    To conduct a systematic review of the psychometric properties (reliability, validity and responsiveness) of self-report questionnaires used to assess symptoms and functional limitations of individuals with rotator cuff (RC) disorders. A systematic search in three databases (Cinahl, Medline and Embase) was conducted. Data extraction and critical methodological appraisal were performed independently by three raters using structured tools, and agreement was achieved by consensus. A descriptive synthesis was performed. One-hundred and twenty articles reporting on 11 questionnaires were included. All questionnaires were highly reliable and responsive to change, and showed construct validity; seven questionnaires also shown known-group validity. The minimal detectable change ranged from 6.4% to 20.8% of total score; only two questionnaires (American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeon questionnaire [ASES] and Upper Limb Functional Index [ULFI]) had a measurement error below 10% of global score. Minimal clinically important differences were established for eight questionnaires, and ranged from 8% to 20% of total score. Overall, included questionnaires showed acceptable psychometric properties for individuals with RC disorders. The ASES and ULFI have the smallest absolute error of measurement, while the Western Ontario RC Index is one of the most responsive questionnaires for individuals suffering from RC disorders. All included questionnaires are reliable, valid and responsive for the evaluation of individuals with RC disorders. As all included questionnaires showed good psychometric properties for the targeted population, the choice should be made according to the purpose of the evaluation and to the construct being evaluated by the questionnaire. The WORC, a RC-specific questionnaire, appeared to be more responsive. It should therefore be used to evaluate change in time. If the evaluation is time-limited, shorter questionnaires or short versions should be considered (such as

  10. Bioagent detection using miniaturized NMR and nanoparticle amplification : final LDRD report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clewett, C. F. M.; Adams, David Price; Fan, Hongyou; Williams, John D.; Sillerud, Laurel O.; Alam, Todd Michael; Aldophi, Natalie L. (New Mexico Resonance, Albuquerque, NM); McDowell, Andrew F. (New Mexico Resonance, Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-11-01

    This LDRD program was directed towards the development of a portable micro-nuclear magnetic resonance ({micro}-NMR) spectrometer for the detection of bioagents via induced amplification of solvent relaxation based on superparamagnetic nanoparticles. The first component of this research was the fabrication and testing of two different micro-coil ({micro}-coil) platforms: namely a planar spiral NMR {micro}-coil and a cylindrical solenoid NMR {micro}-coil. These fabrication techniques are described along with the testing of the NMR performance for the individual coils. The NMR relaxivity for a series of water soluble FeMn oxide nanoparticles was also determined to explore the influence of the nanoparticle size on the observed NMR relaxation properties. In addition, The use of commercially produced superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) for amplification via NMR based relaxation mechanisms was also demonstrated, with the lower detection limit in number of SPIONs per nanoliter (nL) being determined.

  11. A rapid and noninvasive method for detecting tissue-limited mosaicism: detection of i(12)(p10) in buccal smear from a child with Pallister-Killian syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velagaleti, Gopalrao V N; Tapper, Jill K; Rampy, Bill A; Zhang, Shuliu; Hawkins, Judy C; Lockhart, Lillian H

    2003-01-01

    Pallister-Killian syndrome (PKS), a rare disorder, is characterized by tissue-limited or tissue-specific mosaicism. The characteristic chromosome abnormality associated with PKS is i(12p), which is seen predominantly in skin fibroblast cultures. Diagnosis of i(12p) has been carried out on buccal smears before and was shown to be an easy and feasible method. All previously published studies used alpha-satellite probes for the diagnosis and as such have several pitfalls. Our approach, using dual-color, locus-specific probes, has high specificity and sensitivity for the diagnosis of i(12p). Using statistical analysis, we have also confirmed that the signal pattern in interphase nuclei is consistent with isochromosome 12p.

  12. Sensitive detection of a small parathyroid adenoma using fluorocholine PET/CT: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padinhare-Keloth, Thanseer N. T. K.; Bhadada, Sanjay K.; Sood, Ashwani; Kumar, Rajender; Behera, Arunanshu; Radotra, Bishan D.; Mittal, Bhagwant R. [PGIMER, Chandigarh (India)

    2017-06-15

    Primary hyperparathyroidism is caused by parathyroid adenoma in the majority of cases and diagnosis is usually made biochemically. Pre-surgical localization of parathyroid adenoma is essential to limit the extent of surgery and avoid missing them at ectopic sites. Anatomical and functional imaging are used for the localization, but may fail to identify the small and ectopic parathyroid adenoma. We present a case of small sized ectopic parathyroid adenoma at unusual location detected by F-18 fluorocholine (FCH) PET/CT, where other imaging modalities failed. The post-operative histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of ectopic parathyroid adenoma.

  13. Mobile phone imaging and cloud-based analysis for standardized malaria detection and reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherr, Thomas F.; Gupta, Sparsh; Wright, David W.; Haselton, Frederick R.

    2016-06-01

    Rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) have been widely deployed in low-resource settings. These tests are typically read by visual inspection, and accurate record keeping and data aggregation remains a substantial challenge. A successful malaria elimination campaign will require new strategies that maximize the sensitivity of RDTs, reduce user error, and integrate results reporting tools. In this report, an unmodified mobile phone was used to photograph RDTs, which were subsequently uploaded into a globally accessible database, REDCap, and then analyzed three ways: with an automated image processing program, visual inspection, and a commercial lateral flow reader. The mobile phone image processing detected 20.6 malaria parasites/microliter of blood, compared to the commercial lateral flow reader which detected 64.4 parasites/microliter. Experienced observers visually identified positive malaria cases at 12.5 parasites/microliter, but encountered reporting errors and false negatives. Visual interpretation by inexperienced users resulted in only an 80.2% true negative rate, with substantial disagreement in the lower parasitemia range. We have demonstrated that combining a globally accessible database, such as REDCap, with mobile phone based imaging of RDTs provides objective, secure, automated, data collection and result reporting. This simple combination of existing technologies would appear to be an attractive tool for malaria elimination campaigns.

  14. Special Issues Analysis Center (SIAC). Annual Report: Year Three. Volume V: Task Order D100 Report--An Analysis of Language Minority and Limited English Proficient Students from NELS:88. Task Order D150 Report--An Analysis of Educational Services for Language Minority and Limited English Proficient Early Elementary School Students Based on Prospects: The Congressionally Mandated Study of Compensatory Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennici, Frank J.; And Others

    Two reports concerning the education of limited-English-proficient (LEP) students are presented. The Task D100 report summarizes demographic characteristics and key research issues associated with high-school-age youth, including students and dropouts, who are identifiable as language minority and LEP in the National Educational Longitudinal Study…

  15. The phantom menace. Determination of the true Method Detection Limit (MDL) for background levels of PCDDs, PCDFs, and cPCBs in human serum by high-resolution mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, W.; Welch, S.; DiPietro, E.; Cash, T.; McClure, C.; Needham, L.; Patterson, D. [CDC/ATSDR, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2004-09-15

    The recent worldwide decline in background serum levels of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, furans, and coplanar biphenyls (PCDDs/PCDFs/cPCBs) is unquestionably an important finding. However, as serum levels continue to diminish, our analytical methods for measuring these toxicants will continue to be ''pushed to their limit''. In a previous article, we investigated some of the variables that influence the quantification of ''ultra-trace'' (fg/g) concentrations of PCDDs/PCDFs and cPCBs in human serum. In this report, we continue to explore parameters that can affect the determination of the ''true'' detection limit of our method (MDL), using both analytical standards and matrix-based samples.

  16. Limit of detection of a fiber optics gyroscope using a super luminescent radiation source; Limite de deteccion de un giroscopio de fibra optica usando una fuente de radiacion superluminiscente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandoval R, G.E. [Laboratorio de Optica Aplicada, Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnologico, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-186, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Nikolaev, V.A. [Departamento de Optica y Radiofisica Cuantica, Universidad Estatal de Telecomunicaciones de San Petersburgo, M.A. Bonch-Bruyevich, Kanal Moika 61, Saint Petersburg 191186, (Russian Federation)

    2003-07-01

    The main objective of this work is to establish the dependence of characteristics of the fiber optics gyroscope (FOG) with respect to the parameters of the super luminescent emission source based on doped optical fiber with rare earth elements (Super luminescent Fiber Source, SFS), argument the pumping rate election of the SFS to obtain characteristics limits of the FOG sensibility. By using this type of emission source in the FOG is recommend to use the rate when the direction of the pumping signal coincide with the super luminescent signal. The most results are the proposition and argumentation of the SFS election as emission source to be use in the FOG of the phase type. Such a decision allow to increase the characteristics of the FOG sensibility in comparison with the use of luminescent source of semiconductors emission which are extensively used in the present time. The use of emission source of the SFS type allow to come closer to the threshold of the obtained sensibility limit (detection limit) which is determined with the shot noise. (Author)

  17. Decision Threshold and Detection Limit in Spectrometric Measurements. Part 1: Application to Gamma Spectrometry; Umbral de Decision y Limite de Deteccion en Medidas Espectrometricas. Parte 1: Aplicacion a la Espectrometria Gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, C.; Gasco, C.; Lopez, M.A.

    2010-03-03

    This report summarised the author's lecture of the advanced gamma spectrometry course organised by CIEMAT. The characteristic limits determination in gamma spectrometry generally is obtained through the programming that the trade marks offers to the client with the objective of the automatic calculation of the activity concentrations existing in a sample. In this report, the examples shown in the ISO 11929 standard are compared to the programming realised by Genie 2k for determining characteristic limits. The main difference of both is located in the uncertainty calculations due to the efficiency calibration that is considered by ISO and not by Genie 2K. Through implementation in the software developed by trade marks will be possible to introduce this uncertainty and to assimilate to the calculation done by ISO 11929. In the second part of this report will be analyzed the more complicated samples of this application as counting in a whole body counter (following ISO-28218 about Performance Criteria for radio bioassay), multiplet, overlapping, addition of several peaks for obtaining the activity concentration, etc. (Author) 19 refs.

  18. New Functionalities for Paper-Based Sensors Lead to Simplified User Operation, Lower Limits of Detection, and New Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Josephine C; DeGregory, Paul R; Crooks, Richard M

    2016-06-12

    In the last decade, paper analytical devices (PADs) have evolved into sophisticated yet simple sensors with biological and environmental applications in the developed and developing world. The focus of this review is the technological improvements that have over the past five years increased the applicability of PADs to real-world problems. Specifically, this review reports on advances in sample processing, fluid flow control, signal amplification, and component integration. Throughout, we have sought to emphasize advances that retain the main virtues of PADs: low cost, portability, and simplicity.

  19. A fast response & recovery H{sub 2}S gas sensor based on α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles with ppb level detection limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhijie, E-mail: zhijieli@uestc.edu.cn [School of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Huang, Yanwu; Zhang, Shouchao; Chen, Weimei; Kuang, Zhong; Ao, Dongyi; Liu, Wei [School of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Fu, Yongqing [Department of Physics and Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Environment, Northumbria University, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE1 8ST, England (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-30

    Highlights: • A H{sub 2}S gas sensor based on α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles were prepared by hydrothermal route. • The detection limit of the sensor for H{sub 2}S gas is as low as 0.05 ppm at 300 °C. • The response and recovery time of the sensors for detecting H{sub 2}S less than 30 s and 5 s at 300 °C. • The sensor possesses an excellent reproducibility and long-term stability in H{sub 2}S detection. - Abstract: H{sub 2}S gas sensor based on α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles was fabricated by post-thermal annealing of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} precursor which was synthesized using a facile hydrothermal route. The characteristic techniques including X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were adopted to characterize the chemical composition and microstructure of the obtained samples. Gas-sensing performance of the sensor was investigated at different operation temperatures from 100 °C to 400 °C. Results showed that the sensor exhibited the best sensitivity, reproducibility and long-term stability for detecting H{sub 2}S gas at an operating temperature of 300 °C. The detection limit towards H{sub 2}S gas was 0.05 ppm, and the response time and recovery time was 30 s and 5 s, respectively. In addition, sensing mechanism of the sensor towards H{sub 2}S was discussed.

  20. Statistical detection of fraud in the reporting of Croatian public companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siniša Slijepčević

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Statistical methods based on Benford’s distribution, Z- and χ2-statistics are being successfully applied to detect likely accounting and reporting fraud, for example in the daily usage of the Internal Revenue Service in the USA, and in historical analysis of Greek macroeconomic reporting. We adapt and apply the methodology to the analysis of the reporting of some leading Croatian public companies. We find indications of reporting fraud in several of the companies analyzed. In particular we find correlation between the likelihood of reporting fraud, measured as a deviation from Benford’s law, and reported net income losses, for companies large enough (with a revenue of at least 1 billion kuna. Finally, we suggest application of the methodology to improve the internal processes, efficiency and effectiveness of the State Auditing Office.Data availability: The data used in the study are corporate data in the public domain. For legal reasons, however, the identities of the companies are disguised. Contact the first author for the sanitized data sets that can be used to verify and replicate the analysis.

  1. Detection of Target Biomolecules by Magnetic Reporting Using Rod-Like Nanosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guertin, R. P.; Goldberg, E.; Harrah, T. P.; Sonkusale, S.; Park, K.; Sun, S.; Oh, J. I.; Naughton, M.

    2008-03-01

    We describe the ongoing development of a device to assay a variety of cellular, viral and molecular targets by measuring the increase of the Brownian relaxation time, τ, in solution of magnetically-tagged nanoscale detectors. The shift shows as a frequency reduction of the peak of the complex magnetic susceptibility, χ(φ)''. Measurements of χ(φ)'' with 12 nm monodisperse nanoparticles of CoFe2O4 coated with polyethelyne glycol reveal spectra with the narrowest lines yet reported. Thin avidin coating of these particles reveals small shifts in χ(φ)''. Bacteriophage T4 tail fibers, engineered to specific lengths (30-150 nm), were employed as the platform for magnetic nanoparticle attachment and at the other end for an inserted target peptide epitope. Attachment of the nanoparticles to bacteriophage T4 tail fibers was successful, though no detectable shifts in χ(φ)'' were detected due to weak attachment. The advantages associated with non-spherical geometry detectors will be discussed, as will preliminary measurements with rare earth oxide magnetic nanoparticles. Progress on miniaturization and low power requirements of the electronic detection system will be reported. Supported by NERCE/BEID (NIAID).

  2. Congenital Left Circumflex Coronary Artery Atresia Detected by 64-Slice Computed Tomography: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Yuan Liu

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available A variety of coronary artery disorders, including intramyocardial coronary segments and coronary artery anomalies, can result in sudden cardiac death, especially in young adults. The detection of structural coronary artery abnormalities is important in the management of patients at risk of sudden cardiac death. Coronary artery anomalies occur in about 1% of the population. Congenital absence of left circumflex coronary artery (LCX is a very rare vascular anomaly, and few cases have been reported in the literature, with a frequency of only 0.003% in all patients who underwent coronary angiography. Although coronary catheterization is the gold standard for the evaluation of coronary arterial patency disease, noninvasive computed tomography (CT is considered the diagnostic method of choice for the detection and evaluation of coronary artery anomaly. Herein, we report the case of a 17-year-old girl who presented with exertional dyspnea and chest pain and who was studied at our emergency department with the final diagnosis of LCX atresia detected by 64-slice CT. She may be the first case of congenital LCX atresia proved by multislice CT.

  3. Study of boron detection limit using the in-air PIGE set-up at LAMFI-USP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, M. V.; Silva, T. F.; Trindade, G. F.; Added, N.; Tabacniks, M. H.

    2014-11-01

    The quantification of small amounts of boron in materials is of extreme importance in different areas of materials science. Boron is an important contaminant and also a silicon dopant in the semiconductor industry. Boron is also extensively used in nuclear power plants, either for neutron shielding or for safety control and boron is an essential nutrient for life, either vegetable or animal. The production of silicon solar cells, by refining metallurgical-grade silicon (MG-Si) requires the control and reduction of several silicon contaminants to very low concentration levels. Boron is one of the contaminants of solar-grade silicon (SG-Si) that must be controlled and quantified at sub-ppm levels. In the metallurgical purification, boron quantification is usually made by Inductive Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry, (ICP-MS) but the results need to be verified by an independent analytical method. In this work we present the results of the analysis of silicon samples by Particle Induced Gamma-Ray Emission (PIGE) aiming the quantification of low concentrations of boron. PIGE analysis was carried out using the in-air external beam line of the Laboratory for Materials Analysis with Ion Beans (LAMFI-USP) by the 10B ( p ,αγ(7Be nuclear reaction, and measuring the 429 keV γ-ray. The in-air PIGE measurements at LAMFI have a quantification limit of the order of 1016 at/cm2.

  4. Study of boron detection limit using the in-air PIGE set-up at LAMFI-USP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moro, M. V.; Silva, T. F.; Trindade, G. F.; Added, N.; Tabacniks, M. H. [Institute of Physics, University of São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-11-11

    The quantification of small amounts of boron in materials is of extreme importance in different areas of materials science. Boron is an important contaminant and also a silicon dopant in the semiconductor industry. Boron is also extensively used in nuclear power plants, either for neutron shielding or for safety control and boron is an essential nutrient for life, either vegetable or animal. The production of silicon solar cells, by refining metallurgical-grade silicon (MG-Si) requires the control and reduction of several silicon contaminants to very low concentration levels. Boron is one of the contaminants of solar-grade silicon (SG-Si) that must be controlled and quantified at sub-ppm levels. In the metallurgical purification, boron quantification is usually made by Inductive Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry, (ICP-MS) but the results need to be verified by an independent analytical method. In this work we present the results of the analysis of silicon samples by Particle Induced Gamma-Ray Emission (PIGE) aiming the quantification of low concentrations of boron. PIGE analysis was carried out using the in-air external beam line of the Laboratory for Materials Analysis with Ion Beams (LAMFI-USP) by the {sup 10}B(p,αγ({sup 7}Be nuclear reaction, and measuring the 429 keV γ-ray. The in-air PIGE measurements at LAMFI have a quantification limit of the order of 10{sup 16} at/cm{sup 2}.

  5. People who undergo revision arthroplasty report more limitations but no decrease in physical activity compared with primary total hip arthroplasty : an observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevens, Martin; Hoekstra, Tsjerk; Wagenmakers, Robert; Bulstra, Sjoerd K.; van den Akker-Scheek, Inge

    2009-01-01

    Question: Do people who have had revision arthroplasty report more limitations and less physical activity than those after primary total hip arthroplasty? Can degree of limitation and physical activity be predicted by revision arthroplasty, after adjustment for age, gender, and Charnley classificati

  6. Combined diversity and improved energy detection in cooperative spectrum sensing with faded reporting channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivas Nallagonda

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we evaluate the performance of cooperative spectrum sensing (CSS where each cognitive radio (CR employs an improved energy detector (IED with multiple antennas and uses selection combining (SC for detecting the primary user (PU in noisy and faded sensing (S channels. We derive an expression for the probability of false alarm and expressions for probability of missed detection in non-faded (AWGN and Rayleigh faded sensing environments in terms of cumulative distribution function (CDF. Each CR transmits its decision about PU via noisy and faded reporting (R channel to fusion center (FC. In this paper we assume that S-channels are noisy and Rayleigh faded while several cases of fading are considered for R-channels such as: (i Hoyt (or Nakagami-q, (ii Rayleigh, (iii Rician (or Nakagami-n, and (iv Weibull. A Binary Symmetric channel (BSC with a fixed error probability (r in the R-channel is also considered. The impact of fading in R-channel, S-channel and several network parameters such as IED parameter, normalized detection threshold, number of CRs, and number of antennas on missed detection and total error probability is assessed. The effects of Hoyt, Rician, and Weibull fading parameters on overall performance of IED-CSS are also highlighted.

  7. Optimization of reporter gene assay: several factors influencing detection of promoter activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Li-xiang; WENG Mo; ZHANG Zong-yu; TONG Tan-jun

    2007-01-01

    Background Promoter analysis is currently applied to detect the expression of the targeted gene in studies of signal transduction and transcriptional regulation. As a reporter gene, luciferase plays an important role and has been used widely in the promoter assay.Methods Human embryonic lung fibroblast cells (2BS), HeLa cells and MCF-7 cells were transfected with various genes embedded by lipofectamine. This study determined various factors that affect promoter activity determination,such as the selection of the reporter genes and internal references, the dose and the type of the vectors carrying the transcription factors, the host cells and the instruments.Results The sensitivity of the luciferase assay was much higher than that of enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP). Moreover, promoter activity is increased in a dose-related manner only in certain ranges outside of which the results may be reversed and the promoter activity is related to the expression vector which is carrying the cDNA.Otherwise, the length of the promoter, internal references and the host cell can also influence the promoter activity.Conclusions To detect the promoter activity accurately, a few factors including dose, vector, length and host cell which influence reporter gene assay aforementioned should be considered.

  8. Biophysics of Electroreception Workshop on Transduction of Nanovolt Signals: Limits of Electric-Field Detection Held in La Jolla, California on 19- 21 November 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-11-21

    Oceanography 99University of California, San Diego La Jolla, California -A C)b FINAL REPORT BIOPHYSICS OF ELECTRORECEPTION WORKSHOP November 19-21...electric-field detection. To obtain detailed information on the electroreceptive membrane and its ionic channels, high-resolution recording techniques...tissues, and organs of the human body. The electroreceptive membranes also provide a unique opportunity for com- paring the ionic mechanism of the animals

  9. A fast response & recovery H2S gas sensor based on α-Fe2O3 nanoparticles with ppb level detection limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhijie; Huang, Yanwu; Zhang, Shouchao; Chen, Weimei; Kuang, Zhong; Ao, Dongyi; Liu, Wei; Fu, Yongqing

    2015-12-30

    H2S gas sensor based on α-Fe2O3 nanoparticles was fabricated by post-thermal annealing of Fe3O4 precursor which was synthesized using a facile hydrothermal route. The characteristic techniques including X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were adopted to characterize the chemical composition and microstructure of the obtained samples. Gas-sensing performance of the sensor was investigated at different operation temperatures from 100°C to 400°C. Results showed that the sensor exhibited the best sensitivity, reproducibility and long-term stability for detecting H2S gas at an operating temperature of 300°C. The detection limit towards H2S gas was 0.05 ppm, and the response time and recovery time was 30s and 5s, respectively. In addition, sensing mechanism of the sensor towards H2S was discussed.

  10. PCR approach for detection of Fragile X syndrome and Huntington disease based on modified DNA: limits and utility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales-Reynoso, Mónica Alejandra; Vilatela, Elisa Alonso; Ojeda, Rosario Macias; Arce-Rivas, Aura; Sandoval, Lucila; Troyo-Sanromán, Rogelio; Barros-Núñez, Patricio

    2007-01-01

    A group of mutations characterized by trinucleotide repeat expansion causes human diseases such as the Fragile X syndrome, Huntington disease (HD