WorldWideScience

Sample records for reported detection limit

  1. Activation analysis. Detection limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revel, G.

    1999-01-01

    Numerical data and limits of detection related to the four irradiation modes, often used in activation analysis (reactor neutrons, 14 MeV neutrons, photon gamma and charged particles) are presented here. The technical presentation of the activation analysis is detailed in the paper P 2565 of Techniques de l'Ingenieur. (A.L.B.)

  2. What value, detection limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currie, L.A.

    1986-01-01

    Specific approaches and applications of LLD's to nuclear and ''nuclear-related'' measurements are presented in connection with work undertaken for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the International Atomic Energy Agency. In this work, special attention was given to assumptions and potential error sources, as well as to different types of analysis. For the former, the authors considered random and systematic error associated with the blank and the calibration and sample preparation processes, as well as issues relating to the nature of the random error distributions. Analysis types considered included continuous monitoring, ''simple counting'' involving scalar quantities, and spectrum fitting involving data vectors. The investigation of data matrices and multivariate analysis is also described. The most important conclusions derived from this study are: that there is a significant lack of communication and compatibility resulting from diverse terminology and conceptual bases - including no-basis ''ad hoc'' definitions; that the distinction between detection decisions and detection limits is frequently lost sight of; and that quite erroneous LOD estimates follow from inadequate consideration of the actual variability of the blank, and systematic error associated with the blank, the calibration-recovery factor, matrix effects, and ''black box'' data reduction models

  3. Detecting Ebola with limited laboratory access in the Democratic Republic of Congo: evaluation of a clinical passive surveillance reporting system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashbaugh, Hayley R; Kuang, Brandon; Gadoth, Adva; Alfonso, Vivian H; Mukadi, Patrick; Doshi, Reena H; Hoff, Nicole A; Sinai, Cyrus; Mossoko, Mathias; Kebela, Benoit Ilunga; Muyembe, Jean-Jacques; Wemakoy, Emile Okitolonda; Rimoin, Anne W

    2017-09-01

    Ebola virus disease (EVD) can be clinically severe and highly fatal, making surveillance efforts for early disease detection of paramount importance. In areas with limited access to laboratory testing, the Integrated Disease Surveillance and Response (IDSR) strategy in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) may be a vital tool in improving outbreak response. Using DRC IDSR data from the nation's four EVD outbreak periods from 2007-2014, we assessed trends of Viral Hemorrhagic Fever (VHF) and EVD differential diagnoses reportable through IDSR. With official case counts from active surveillance of EVD outbreaks, we assessed accuracy of reporting through the IDSR passive surveillance system. Although the active and passive surveillance represent distinct sets of data, the two were correlated, suggesting that passive surveillance based only on clinical evaluation may be a useful predictor of true cases prior to laboratory confirmation. There were 438 suspect VHF cases reported through the IDSR system and 416 EVD cases officially recorded across the outbreaks examined. Although collected prior to official active surveillance cases, case reporting through the IDSR during the 2007, 2008 and 2012 outbreaks coincided with official EVD epidemic curves. Additionally, all outbreak areas experienced increases in suspected cases for both malaria and typhoid fever during EVD outbreaks, underscoring the importance of training health care workers in recognising EVD differential diagnoses and the potential for co-morbidities. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Material limitations on the detection limit in refractometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skafte-Pedersen, Peder; Nunes, Pedro S; Xiao, Sanshui; Mortensen, Niels Asger

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the detection limit for refractometric sensors relying on high-Q optical cavities and show that the ultimate classical detection limit is given by min {Δn} ≳ η, with n + iη being the complex refractive index of the material under refractometric investigation. Taking finite Q factors and filling fractions into account, the detection limit declines. As an example we discuss the fundamental limits of silicon-based high-Q resonators, such as photonic crystal resonators, for sensing in a bio-liquid environment, such as a water buffer. In the transparency window (λ ≳ 1100 nm) of silicon the detection limit becomes almost independent on the filling fraction, while in the visible, the detection limit depends strongly on the filling fraction because the silicon absorbs strongly.

  5. Material Limitations on the Detection Limit in Refractometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Asger Mortensen

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the detection limit for refractometric sensors relying on high-Q optical cavities and show that the ultimate classical detection limit is given by min {Δn} ≳ η with n + iη being the complex refractive index of the material under refractometric investigation. Taking finite Q factors and filling fractions into account, the detection limit declines. As an example we discuss the fundamental limits of silicon-based high-Q resonators, such as photonic crystal resonators, for sensing in a bio-liquid environment, such as a water buffer. In the transparency window (λ ≳ 1100 nm of silicon the detection limit becomes almost independent on the filling fraction, while in the visible, the detection limit depends strongly on the filling fraction because the silicon absorbs strongly.

  6. Detection Limits for Nanoscale Biosensors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sheehan, Paul E; Whitman, Lloyd J

    2005-01-01

    We examine through analytical calculations and finite element simulations how the detection efficiency of disk and wire-like biosensors in unmixed fluids varies with size from the micrometer to nanometer scales...

  7. Material limitations on the detection limit in refractometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skafte-Pedersen, Peder; Nunes, Pedro; Xiao, Sanshui

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the detection limit for refractometric sensors relying on high-Q optical cavities and show that the ultimate classical detection limit is given by min {Δn} ≳ η with n + iη being the complex refractive index of the material under refractometric investigation. Taking finite Q factors and...

  8. Material Limitations on the Detection Limit in Refractometry

    OpenAIRE

    Skafte-Pedersen, Peder; Nunes, Pedro S.; Xiao, Sanshui; Mortensen, Niels Asger

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the detection limit for refractometric sensors relying on high-Q optical cavities and show that the ultimate classical detection limit is given by min {Δn} ≳ η with n + iη being the complex refractive index of the material under refractometric investigation. Taking finite Q factors and filling fractions into account, the detection limit declines. As an example we discuss the fundamental limits of silicon-based high-Q resonators, such as photonic crystal resonators, for sensing in a...

  9. Limits of detection and decision. Part 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voigtman, E.

    2008-01-01

    Probability density functions (PDFs) have been derived for a number of commonly used limit of detection definitions, including several variants of the Relative Standard Deviation of the Background-Background Equivalent Concentration (RSDB-BEC) method, for a simple linear chemical measurement system (CMS) having homoscedastic, Gaussian measurement noise and using ordinary least squares (OLS) processing. All of these detection limit definitions serve as both decision and detection limits, thereby implicitly resulting in 50% rates of Type 2 errors. It has been demonstrated that these are closely related to Currie decision limits, if the coverage factor, k, is properly defined, and that all of the PDFs are scaled reciprocals of noncentral t variates. All of the detection limits have well-defined upper and lower limits, thereby resulting in finite moments and confidence limits, and the problem of estimating the noncentrality parameter has been addressed. As in Parts 1-3, extensive Monte Carlo simulations were performed and all the simulation results were found to be in excellent agreement with the derived theoretical expressions. Specific recommendations for harmonization of detection limit methodology have also been made

  10. Establishment of limits of detection and decision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mende, O.; Michel, R.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop and test procedures to establish limits of decision and detection for spectrometric nuclear radiation measurements. Beside the determination of the limits of application of DIN 25482 part 2 and 5 - both primarily suitable for high resoluted spectra areas -the statistical model was expanded in such a way that henceforth blanks and influences of sample treatment can also be taken into account; the corresponding procedures to calculate the limits of decision and detection have a high precision. Additional procedures of calculation were developed to take the special characteristics of the analysis of complex spectra areas into account. (orig.) [de

  11. Pushing the limits of NAA. Accuracy, uncertainty and detection limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenberg, R.R.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes some highlights from the author's efforts to improve neutron activation analysis (NAA) detection limits through development and optimization of radiochemical separations, as well as to improve the overall accuracy of NAA measurements by identifying, quantifying and reducing measurement biases and uncertainties. Efforts to demonstrate the metrological basis of NAA, and to establish it as a 'Primary Method of Measurement' will be discussed. (author)

  12. Limits of qualitative detection and quantitative determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curie, L.A.

    1976-01-01

    The fact that one can find a series of disagreeing and limiting definitions of the detection limit leads to the reinvestigation of the problems of signal detection and signal processing in analytical and nuclear chemistry. Three cut-off levels were fixed: Lsub(C) - the net signal level (sensitivity of the equipment), above which an observed signal can be reliably recognized as 'detected'; Lsub(D) - the 'true' net signal level, from which one can a priori expect a detection; Lsub(Q) - the level at which the measuring accuracy is sufficient for quantitative determination. Exact definition equations as well as a series of working formulae are given for the general analytical case and for the investigation of radioactivity. As it is assumed that the radioactivity of the Poisson distribution is determined, it is dealt with in such a manner that precise limits can be derived for short-lived and long-lived radionuclides with or without disturbance. The fundamentals are made clear by simple examples for spectrophotometry and radioactivity and by a complicated example for activation analysis in which one must choose between alternative nuclear reactions. (orig./LH) [de

  13. Detection limits for radioanalytical counting techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartwell, J.K.

    1975-06-01

    In low-level radioanalysis it is usually necessary to test the sample net counts against some ''Critical Level'' in order to determine if a given result indicates detection. This is an interpretive review of the work by Nicholson (1963), Currie (1968) and Gilbert (1974). Nicholson's evaluation of three different computational formulas for estimation of the ''Critical Level'' is discussed. The details of Nicholson's evaluation are presented along with a basic discussion of the testing procedures used. Recommendations are presented for calculation of confidence intervals, for reporting of analytical results, and for extension of the derived formula to more complex cases such as multiple background counts, multiple use of a single background count, and gamma spectrometric analysis

  14. Determining the lower limit of detection for personnel dosimetry systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberson, P.L.; Carlson, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    A simple method for determining the lower limit of detection (LLD) for personnel dosimetry systems is described. The method relies on the definition of a critical level and a detection level. The critical level is the signal level above which a result has a small probability of being due to a fluctuation of the background. All results below the critical level should not be reported as an indication of a positive result. The detection level is the net signal level (i.e., dose received) above which there is a high confidence that a true reading will be detected and reported as a qualitatively positive result. The detection level may be identified as the LLD. A simple formula is derived to allow the calculation of the LLD under various conditions. This type of formula is being used by the Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) for personnel dosimetry. Participants in either the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP) for personnel dosimetry or DOELAP can use performance test results along with a measurement of background levels to estimate the LLDs for their dosimetry system. As long as they maintain their dosimetry system such that the LLDs are less than half the lower limit of the NVLAP or DOELAP test exposure ranges, dosimetry laboratories can avoid testing failures due to poor performance at very low exposures

  15. Methodologies for the practical determination and use of method detection limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rucker, T.L.

    1995-01-01

    Method detection limits have often been misunderstood and misused. The basic definitions developed by Lloyd Currie and others have been combined with assumptions that are inappropriate for many types of radiochemical analyses. A partical way for determining detection limits based on Currie's basic definition is presented that removes the reliance on assumptions and that accounts for the total measurement uncertainty. Examples of proper and improper use of detection limits are also presented, including detection limits reported by commercial software for gamma spectroscopy and neutron activation analyses. (author) 6 refs.; 2 figs

  16. Determination of detection limits for a VPD ICPMS method of analysis; Determination des limites de detection d'une methode d'analyse VPD ICPMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badard, M.; Veillerot, M

    2007-07-01

    This training course report presents the different methods of detection and quantifying of metallic impurities in semiconductors. One of the most precise technique is the collection of metal impurities by vapor phase decomposition (VPD) followed by their analysis by ICPMS (inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry). The study shows the importance of detection limits in the domain of chemical analysis and the way to determine them for the ICPMS analysis. The results found on detection limits are excellent. Even if the detection limits reached with ICPMS performed after manual or automatic VPD are much higher than detection limits of ICPMS alone, this method remains one of the most sensible for ultra-traces analysis. (J.S.)

  17. On the lower of limit detection of radiometric systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamburov, H.; Boneva, S.

    1983-01-01

    The existing definitions of the quantity Asub(min), the lower detection limit, introduced as a characteristic of the sensitivity of radiometric systems are reviewed. A convenient way is found for comparing the different definitions by showing that each definition is connected with a specific value of the probability a of Type I error. The detection limits are calculated for a normal and Poisson distributions of the measured quantities. A criterion is proposed for the applicability of the normal distiribution to the problem of determining the lower detection limit

  18. Gulf Canada Resources Limited 1998 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    A review of operations in 1998 and financial information from Gulf Canada Resources Limited is provided to keep shareholders abreast of company performance. Gulf Canada Resources Limited explores for, develops, produces and markets conventional and synthetic crude oil, natural gas and natural gas liquids. In 1998, the company's main operating centres were in western Canada (where it owns a nine per cent interest in the Syncrude Joint Venture), Indonesia, the North Sea and Australia. The report summarizes the company's energy resource activities, presents a detailed review of operations, and provides consolidated financial statements, and common share information. Although Gulf Canada Resources sold $ 1.2 billion worth of non-producing assets during the year, year end proved reserves of 838 million barrels of oil equivalent were less than ten per cent lower than a year earlier, reflecting reserve additions of 100 million barrels of oil equivalent. tabs., figs

  19. Detection limit calculations for different total reflection techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, H.J.

    2000-01-01

    In this work, theoretical calculations of detection limits for different total-reflection techniques are presented.. Calculations include grazing incidence (TXRF) and gracing exit (GEXRF) conditions. These calculations are compared with detection limits obtained for conventional x-ray fluorescence (XRF). In order to compute detection limits the Shiraiwa and Fujino's model to calculate x-ray fluorescence intensities was used. This model made certain assumptions and approximations to achieve the calculations, specially in the case of the geometrical conditions of the sample, and the incident and takeoff beams. Nevertheless the calculated data of detection limits for conventional XRF and total-reflection XRF show a good agreement with previous results. The model proposed here allows to analyze the different sources of background and the influence of the excitation geometry, which contribute to the understanding of the physical processes involved in the XRF analysis by total reflection. Finally, a comparison between detection limits in total-reflection analysis at grazing incidence and at grazing exit is carried out. Here a good agreement with the theoretical predictions of the reversibility principle is found, showing that detection limits are similar for both techniques. (author)

  20. Shell Canada Limited 1996 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    Shell Canada Resources Limited is one of Canada's largest producers of crude oil, natural gas, natural gas liquids, sulphur and bitumen. This annual report for 1996 presented a summary review of operations and a summary of the Company's audited consolidated financial statements. Overall, the resources business delivered exceptional results in 1996. The oil products and chemicals businesses did not perform as well as expected. This less than satisfactory performance of the oil products and chemicals divisions of the the Company is reflected in the financial returns which, after excluding revenues from asset sales, left operating earnings $ 59 million below those of 1996. tabs., figs

  1. Improved detection limits for phthalates by selective solid-phase micro-extraction

    KAUST Repository

    Zia, Asif I.; Afsarimanesh, Nasrin; Xie, Li; Nag, Anindya; Al-Bahadly, I. H.; Yu, P. L.; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2016-01-01

    Presented research reports on an improved method and enhanced limits of detection for phthalates; a hazardous additive used in the production of plastics by solid-phase micro-extraction (SPME) polymer in comparison to molecularly imprinted solid

  2. Importance of the lower limit of detection in radiological safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafael Terol T.; Hermenegildo Maldonado M.

    1991-01-01

    The concept of the Lower Limit of Detection (LLD) it contributes in the solution of some problems related with the radiological safety, such as the realization of the tests of flight of the sealed radioactive sources; the determination of radioisotopes in environmental samples; the estimate of present radionuclides in polluted foods; in general, the detection of small quantities of radioactive materials present in materials of use or consumption by part of the man in his daily life; as the one Lower Limit of Detection is related with topics of statistics, in this work a small review of them is made, it was superficially discussed the mensuration problems related with the establishment of the Lower Limit of Detection

  3. TXRF 'measurements' of concentration distribution below the detection limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubala-Kukus, A.; Banas, D.; Braziewicz, J.; Majewska, U.; Mrowczynski, S.; Pajek, M.

    2000-01-01

    We demonstrate that a shape of the concentration distribution of the element in a set of samples, as measured by the TXRF method, can be determined even for the concentrations below the detection limit (DL). This can be done, when the measurements reporting the concentration below DL level are included properly in the analysis of the results. The method developed for such correction is presented and discussed. It is demonstrated that this correction is particularly important when the studied concentrations are close to the DL level of the method, which is a common case for TXRF. In the paper a precision of the developed correction is discussed in details, by using the results of numerical simulations of experiments for different concentration distributions and number of performed measurements. It is demonstrated that the factor, which limits the accuracy of the correction, is the number of measurements, not the correction procedure itself. The applicability and importance of the developed correction is demonstrated for routine TXRF analysis of different types of samples of bio-medical interest. (author)

  4. The limit of detection for explosives in spectroscopic differential reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubroca, Thierry; Vishwanathan, Karthik; Hummel, Rolf E.

    2011-05-01

    In the wake of recent terrorist attacks, such as the 2008 Mumbai hotel explosion or the December 25th 2009 "underwear bomber", our group has developed a technique (US patent #7368292) to apply differential reflection spectroscopy to detect traces of explosives. Briefly, light (200-500 nm) is shone on a surface such as a piece of luggage at an airport. Upon reflection, the light is collected with a spectrometer combined with a CCD camera. A computer processes the data and produces in turn a differential reflection spectrum involving two adjacent areas of the surface. This differential technique is highly sensitive and provides spectroscopic data of explosives. As an example, 2,4,6, trinitrotoluene (TNT) displays strong and distinct features in differential reflectograms near 420 nm. Similar, but distinctly different features are observed for other explosives. One of the most important criteria for explosive detection techniques is the limit of detection. This limit is defined as the amount of explosive material necessary to produce a signal to noise ratio of three. We present here, a method to evaluate the limit of detection of our technique. Finally, we present our sample preparation method and experimental set-up specifically developed to measure the limit of detection for our technology. This results in a limit ranging from 100 nano-grams to 50 micro-grams depending on the method and the set-up parameters used, such as the detector-sample distance.

  5. Confirmation of identity and detection limit in neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yustina Tri Handayani; Slamet Wiyuniati; Tulisna

    2010-01-01

    Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) based on neutron capture by nuclides. Of the various possibilities of radionuclides that occur, radionuclides and gamma radiation which provides the identity of the element were analyzed and the best sensitivity should be determined. Confirmation for elements in sediment samples was done theoretically and experimentally. The result of confirmation shows that Al, V, Cr K, Na, Ca and Zn were analyzed based on radionuclides of Al-28, V-52, Cr-51 , K-42, Na-24, Ca-48, Zn-65. Elements of Mg, Mn, Fe, Co were analyzed based on radionuclides of Mg-27, Mn-56, Fe-59, Co-60 through peak which the highest value of combined probability of radiation emission and efficiency. Cu can be analyzed through Cu-64 or Cu-66, but the second is more sensitive. Detection limit is determined at a certain measurement conditions carried out by a laboratory. Detection limit in the NAA is determined based on the Compton continue area by Curie method. The detection limit of Al, V, Ca, Mg, Mn, As, K, Na, Mg, Ce, Co, Cr, Fe, La, Sc, and Zn in sediment samples are 240, 27, 4750, 2600, 21, 3.3 , 75, 1.4, 1.8, 0.5, 2.7, 29, 1, 0.05, and 37 ppm. Analysis of Cu in sediments which concentrations of 98.6 ppm, Cu-66 is not detected. Tests using pure standard solutions of Cu obtained detection limit of 0.12 µg, or 7.9 ppm in samples of 15 mg. In general, the detection limit obtained was higher than the detection limit of the reference, it was caused by the differences in the sample matrix and analytical conditions. (author)

  6. Limits of Tumor Detectability in Nuclear Medicine and PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Emre Erdi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Nuclear medicine is becoming increasingly important in the early detection of malignancy. The advantage of nuclear medicine over other imaging modalities is the high sensitivity of the gamma camera. Nuclear medicine counting equipment has the capability of detecting levels of radioactivity which exceed background levels by as little as 2.4 to 1. This translates to only a few hundred counts per minute on a regular gamma camera or as few as 3 counts per minute when using coincidence detection on a positron emission tomography (PET camera. Material and Methods: We have experimentally measured the limits of detectability using a set of hollow spheres in a Jaszczak phantom at various tumor-to-background ratios. Imaging modalities for this work were (1 planar, (2 SPECT, (3 PET, and (4 planar camera with coincidence detection capability (MCD. Results: When there is no background (infinite contrast activity present, the detectability of tumors is similar for PET and planar imaging. With the presence of the background activity , PET can detect objects in an order of magnitude smaller in size than that can be seen by conventional planar imaging especially in the typical clinical low (3:1 T/B ratios. The detection capability of the MCD camera lies between a conventional nuclear medicine (planar / SPECT scans and the detection capability of a dedicated PET scanner Conclusion: Among nuclear medicine’s armamentarium, PET is the closest modality to CT or MR imaging in terms of limits of detection. Modern clinical PET scanners have a resolution limit of 4 mm, corresponding to the detection of tumors with a volume of 0.2 ml (7 mm diameter in 5:1 T/B ratio. It is also possible to obtain better resolution limits with dedicated brain and animal scanners. The future holds promise in development of new detector materials, improved camera design, and new reconstruction algorithms which will improve sensitivity, resolution, contrast, and thereby further

  7. No evidence for an item limit in change detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaiyan Keshvari

    Full Text Available Change detection is a classic paradigm that has been used for decades to argue that working memory can hold no more than a fixed number of items ("item-limit models". Recent findings force us to consider the alternative view that working memory is limited by the precision in stimulus encoding, with mean precision decreasing with increasing set size ("continuous-resource models". Most previous studies that used the change detection paradigm have ignored effects of limited encoding precision by using highly discriminable stimuli and only large changes. We conducted two change detection experiments (orientation and color in which change magnitudes were drawn from a wide range, including small changes. In a rigorous comparison of five models, we found no evidence of an item limit. Instead, human change detection performance was best explained by a continuous-resource model in which encoding precision is variable across items and trials even at a given set size. This model accounts for comparison errors in a principled, probabilistic manner. Our findings sharply challenge the theoretical basis for most neural studies of working memory capacity.

  8. Improvement of detection limits of PIXE by substrate signal reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaulieu, S.; Nejedly, Z.; Campbell, J.L.; Edwards, G.C.; Dias, G.M.

    2002-01-01

    Limits of detection (LODs) for aerosol samples collected using PIXE International cascade impactors, were improved approximately 50% after reducing the cross-sectional area of the analytical beam based on results obtained from microscope photographs of aerosol deposits. Improvements in LODs were most noticeable for selected elements collected on the smaller stages of the impactor (stages 1-3)

  9. Determination of detection limits for a VPD ICPMS method of analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badard, M.; Veillerot, M.

    2007-01-01

    This training course report presents the different methods of detection and quantifying of metallic impurities in semiconductors. One of the most precise technique is the collection of metal impurities by vapor phase decomposition (VPD) followed by their analysis by ICPMS (inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry). The study shows the importance of detection limits in the domain of chemical analysis and the way to determine them for the ICPMS analysis. The results found on detection limits are excellent. Even if the detection limits reached with ICPMS performed after manual or automatic VPD are much higher than detection limits of ICPMS alone, this method remains one of the most sensible for ultra-traces analysis. (J.S.)

  10. Improvement in Limit of Detection of Enzymatic Biogas Sensor Utilizing Chromatography Paper for Breath Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motooka, Masanobu; Uno, Shigeyasu

    2018-02-02

    Breath analysis is considered to be an effective method for point-of-care diagnosis due to its noninvasiveness, quickness and simplicity. Gas sensors for breath analysis require detection of low-concentration substances. In this paper, we propose that reduction of the background current improves the limit of detection of enzymatic biogas sensors utilizing chromatography paper. After clarifying the cause of the background current, we reduced the background current by improving the fabrication process of the sensors utilizing paper. Finally, we evaluated the limit of detection of the sensor with the sample vapor of ethanol gas. The experiment showed about a 50% reduction of the limit of detection compared to previously-reported sensor. This result presents the possibility of the sensor being applied in diagnosis, such as for diabetes, by further lowering the limit of detection.

  11. Realistic limitations of detecting planets around young active stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinfield D.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Current planet hunting methods using the radial velocity method are limited to observing middle-aged main-sequence stars where the signatures of stellar activity are much less than on young stars that have just arrived on the main-sequence. In this work we apply our knowledge from the surface imaging of these young stars to place realistic limitations on the possibility of detecting orbiting planets. In general we find that the magnitude of the stellar jitter is directly proportional to the stellar vsini. For G and K dwarfs, we find that it is possible, for models with high stellar activity and low stellar vsini, to be able to detect a 1 MJupiter mass planet within 50 epochs of observations and for the M dwarfs it is possible to detect a habitable zone Earth-like planet in 10s of observational epochs.

  12. Austen and Butta Limited annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-01-01

    Austen and Butta's annual report includes a chairman's report on the company and the Australia coal industry. Also included is a market report, and reports of operations including German Creek, Invincible Colliery, Avon Colliery, Grose Valley, and Yellow Rock Colliery. Profit and loss accounts and balance sheets are presented with a statistical summary for 1979 to 1983.

  13. Stochastic fluctuations and the detectability limit of network communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floretta, Lucio; Liechti, Jonas; Flammini, Alessandro; De Los Rios, Paolo

    2013-12-01

    We have analyzed the detectability limits of network communities in the framework of the popular Girvan and Newman benchmark. By carefully taking into account the inevitable stochastic fluctuations that affect the construction of each and every instance of the benchmark, we come to the conclusion that the native, putative partition of the network is completely lost even before the in-degree/out-degree ratio becomes equal to that of a structureless Erdös-Rényi network. We develop a simple iterative scheme, analytically well described by an infinite branching process, to provide an estimate of the true detectability limit. Using various algorithms based on modularity optimization, we show that all of them behave (semiquantitatively) in the same way, with the same functional form of the detectability threshold as a function of the network parameters. Because the same behavior has also been found by further modularity-optimization methods and for methods based on different heuristics implementations, we conclude that indeed a correct definition of the detectability limit must take into account the stochastic fluctuations of the network construction.

  14. Elder Abuse Reporting: Limitations of Statutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salend, Elyse; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Compares 16 state elder abuse reporting statutes and analyzes their implementation. Generally, the statutes have failed to ensure consistent information about elder abuse within or across states. Neglect is more often reported than abuse and little prosecutory activity was noted. Suggestions for improving reporting policies are made. (JAC)

  15. Limiter discriminator detection of M-ary FSK signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseka, John P.

    1990-10-01

    The performance of limiter discriminator detection of M-ary FSK signals is analyzed at arbitrary modulation indices. It is shown that the error rate performance of limiter discriminator detection can be significantly improved by increasing the modulation index above 1/M. The optimum modulation index that minimizes the overall error probability is determined for the cases M = 2, 4 and 8. The analysis is carried out for wideband and bandlimited channels with Gaussian and second-order Butterworth filters. It is shown that the optimum modulation index depends on the signal/noise ratio (SNR), in a wideband channel, and on both SNR and time-bandwidth product in a bandlimited channel. Finally, it is shown that the optimum sampling instance in presence of a nonzero phase IF filter can be approximately determined by using only the worst case symbol pattern.

  16. Detection limit of 238U by gamma spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tartaglione, A.; Blostein, J.; Mayer, R

    2004-01-01

    The detection limit of 238 U was determined by gamma spectra measurements of a depleted uranium sample using four NaI(Tl) scintillators in a compact arrangement.The sample was shielded with 5 and 10 cm of lead.Two different methods for data processing were used and compared.It was established that an appropriate array of 40 detectors could establish the presence of 220 g of this material in only 5 minutes [es

  17. Signal detection without finite-energy limits to quantum resolution

    OpenAIRE

    Luis Aina, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    We show that there are extremely simple signal detection schemes where the finiteness of energy resources places no limit on the resolution. On the contrary, larger resolution can be obtained with lower energy. To this end the generator of the signal-dependent transformation encoding the signal information on the probe state must be different from the energy. We show that the larger the deviation of the probe state from being the minimum-uncertainty state, the better the resolution.

  18. Accuracy, precision, and lower detection limits (a deficit reduction approach)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishop, C.T.

    1993-01-01

    The evaluation of the accuracy, precision and lower detection limits of the determination of trace radionuclides in environmental samples can become quite sophisticated and time consuming. This in turn could add significant cost to the analyses being performed. In the present method, a open-quotes deficit reduction approachclose quotes has been taken to keep costs low, but at the same time provide defensible data. In order to measure the accuracy of a particular method, reference samples are measured over the time period that the actual samples are being analyzed. Using a Lotus spreadsheet, data are compiled and an average accuracy is computed. If pairs of reference samples are analyzed, then precision can also be evaluated from the duplicate data sets. The standard deviation can be calculated if the reference concentrations of the duplicates are all in the same general range. Laboratory blanks are used to estimate the lower detection limits. The lower detection limit is calculated as 4.65 times the standard deviation of a set of blank determinations made over a given period of time. A Lotus spreadsheet is again used to compile data and LDLs over different periods of time can be compared

  19. Detection of colloidal silver chloride near solubility limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putri, K. Y.; Adawiah, R.

    2018-03-01

    Detection of nanoparticles in solution has been made possible by several means; one of them is laser-induced breakdown detection (LIBD). LIBD is able to distinguish colloids of various sizes and concentrations. This technique has been used in several solubility studies. In this study, the formation of colloids in a mixed system of silver nitrate and sodium chloride was observed by acoustic LIBD. Silver chloride has low solubility limit, therefore LIBD measurement is appropriate. Silver and chloride solutions with equal concentrations, set at below and above the solubility of silver chloride as the expected solid product, were mixed and the resulting colloids were observed. The result of LIBD measurement showed that larger particles were present as more silver and chloride introduced. However, once the concentrations exceeded the solubility limit of silver chloride, the detected particle size seemed to be decreasing, hence suggested the occurrence of coprecipitation process. This phenomenon indicated that the ability of LIBD to detect even small changes in colloid amounts might be a useful tool in study on formation and stability of colloids, i.e. to confirm whether nanoparticles synthesis has been successfully performed and whether the system is stable or not.

  20. Final report, Feedback limitations of photosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharkey, Thomas D.

    1999-07-22

    Final report of research on carbon metabolism of photosynthesis. The feedback from carbon metabolism to primary photosynthetic processes is summarized, and a comprehensive list of published scientific papers is provided.

  1. Updated clinical guidelines experience major reporting limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin W.M. Vernooij

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Checklist for the Reporting of Updated Guidelines (CheckUp was recently developed. However, so far, no systematic assessment of the reporting of updated clinical guidelines (CGs exists. We aimed to examine (1 the completeness of reporting the updating process in CGs and (2 the inter-observer reliability of CheckUp. Methods We conducted a systematic assessment of the reporting of the updating process in a sample of updated CGs using CheckUp. We performed a systematic search to identify updated CGs published in 2015, developed by a professional society, reporting a systematic review of the evidence, and containing at least one recommendation. Three reviewers independently assessed the CGs with CheckUp (16 items. We calculated the median score per item, per domain, and overall, converting scores to a 10-point scale. Multiple linear regression analyses were used to identify differences according to country, type of organisation, scope, and health topic of updated CGs. We calculated the intraclass coefficient (ICC and 95% confidence interval (95% CI for domains and overall score. Results We included in total 60 updated CGs. The median domain score on a 10-point scale for presentation was 5.8 (range 1.7 to 10, for editorial independence 8.3 (range 3.3 to 10, and for methodology 5.7 (range 0 to 10. The median overall score on a 10-point scale was 6.3 (range 3.1 to 10. Presentation and justification items at recommendation level (respectively reported by 27 and 38% of the CGs and the methods used for the external review and implementing changes in practice were particularly poorly reported (both reported by 38% of the CGs. CGs developed by a European or international institution obtained a statistically significant higher overall score compared to North American or Asian institutions (p = 0.014. Finally, the agreement among the reviewers on the overall score was excellent (ICC 0.88, 95% CI 0.75 to 0.95. Conclusions The

  2. Working with Detection Limits in X-Ray and Nuclear Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Espen, P.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text: Detection limits are important in many measurement procedures. Especially in analytical work we often need to take a decision about the presence or absence of a compound, or we need to guarantee that or instrument can detect the compound. Especially in regulatory work the concept of detection limits plays a crucial role. Data acquisition in x-ray and gamma-ray spectrometry is done by counting events for a preset time; hence the fluctuations in the observed spectra are governed by Poisson (counting) statistics. This makes the calculation of detection limits in principle very easy. However it is observed that there exists a great deal of confusion concerning the definition(s) and especially concerning the practical calculation and reporting of detection limits. In this contribution a simple but rigorous treatment of the concept of detection limits will be given, emphasizing on aspects such as a-priori and a-posterior i limits and on the effect of sample blank and instrumental blank in the calculation of the true detection limit. The problem of near zero background as observed in e.g. total reflection x-ray fluorescence analysis (T-XRF) and some low level counting applications will also be discussed. In this case Poisson statistics might not be applicable, affecting the decision limits with respect to the presence of absence of a signal. Finally handling data sets that contain detection limit values next to normal measured values, the so called problem of missing data will be discussed. Some suggestions to deal with this frequently occurring situation will be given

  3. Weighted Polynomial Approximation for Automated Detection of Inspiratory Flow Limitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Cheng Huang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Inspiratory flow limitation (IFL is a critical symptom of sleep breathing disorders. A characteristic flattened flow-time curve indicates the presence of highest resistance flow limitation. This study involved investigating a real-time algorithm for detecting IFL during sleep. Three categories of inspiratory flow shape were collected from previous studies for use as a development set. Of these, 16 cases were labeled as non-IFL and 78 as IFL which were further categorized into minor level (20 cases and severe level (58 cases of obstruction. In this study, algorithms using polynomial functions were proposed for extracting the features of IFL. Methods using first- to third-order polynomial approximations were applied to calculate the fitting curve to obtain the mean absolute error. The proposed algorithm is described by the weighted third-order (w.3rd-order polynomial function. For validation, a total of 1,093 inspiratory breaths were acquired as a test set. The accuracy levels of the classifications produced by the presented feature detection methods were analyzed, and the performance levels were compared using a misclassification cobweb. According to the results, the algorithm using the w.3rd-order polynomial approximation achieved an accuracy of 94.14% for IFL classification. We concluded that this algorithm achieved effective automatic IFL detection during sleep.

  4. Detection limits for nanoparticles in solution with classical turbidity spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Blevennec, G.

    2013-09-01

    Detection of nanoparticles in solution is required to manage safety and environmental problems. Spectral transmission turbidity method has now been known for a long time. It is derived from the Mie Theory and can be applied to any number of spheres, randomly distributed and separated by large distance compared to wavelength. Here, we describe a method for determination of size, distribution and concentration of nanoparticles in solution using UV-Vis transmission measurements. The method combines Mie and Beer Lambert computation integrated in a best fit approximation. In a first step, a validation of the approach is completed on silver nanoparticles solution. Verification of results is realized with Transmission Electronic Microscopy measurements for size distribution and an Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry for concentration. In view of the good agreement obtained, a second step of work focuses on how to manage the concentration to be the most accurate on the size distribution. Those efficient conditions are determined by simple computation. As we are dealing with nanoparticles, one of the key points is to know what the size limits reachable are with that kind of approach based on classical electromagnetism. In taking into account the transmission spectrometer accuracy limit we determine for several types of materials, metals, dielectrics, semiconductors the particle size limit detectable by such a turbidity method. These surprising results are situated at the quantum physics frontier.

  5. MIM Holdings Limited 1984 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    M.I.M. Holdings Limited is a major mining and mineral processing company formed in 1970. The group traces its origins to 1924 following the discovery of silver lead zinc started in 1931 and parallel production of silver lead zinc ore at Mount Isa the previous year. Today the MIM group is a diversified mineral, coal and metal producing and marketing organisation. Details of the company's principal activities over the last year, and accounts and management information for the last year are presented.

  6. Detection limit for rate fluctuations in inhomogeneous Poisson processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shintani, Toshiaki; Shinomoto, Shigeru

    2012-04-01

    Estimations of an underlying rate from data points are inevitably disturbed by the irregular occurrence of events. Proper estimation methods are designed to avoid overfitting by discounting the irregular occurrence of data, and to determine a constant rate from irregular data derived from a constant probability distribution. However, it can occur that rapid or small fluctuations in the underlying density are undetectable when the data are sparse. For an estimation method, the maximum degree of undetectable rate fluctuations is uniquely determined as a phase transition, when considering an infinitely long series of events drawn from a fluctuating density. In this study, we analytically examine an optimized histogram and a Bayesian rate estimator with respect to their detectability of rate fluctuation, and determine whether their detectable-undetectable phase transition points are given by an identical formula defining a degree of fluctuation in an underlying rate. In addition, we numerically examine the variational Bayes hidden Markov model in its detectability of rate fluctuation, and determine whether the numerically obtained transition point is comparable to those of the other two methods. Such consistency among these three principled methods suggests the presence of a theoretical limit for detecting rate fluctuations.

  7. Detection limit for rate fluctuations in inhomogeneous Poisson processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shintani, Toshiaki; Shinomoto, Shigeru

    2012-04-01

    Estimations of an underlying rate from data points are inevitably disturbed by the irregular occurrence of events. Proper estimation methods are designed to avoid overfitting by discounting the irregular occurrence of data, and to determine a constant rate from irregular data derived from a constant probability distribution. However, it can occur that rapid or small fluctuations in the underlying density are undetectable when the data are sparse. For an estimation method, the maximum degree of undetectable rate fluctuations is uniquely determined as a phase transition, when considering an infinitely long series of events drawn from a fluctuating density. In this study, we analytically examine an optimized histogram and a Bayesian rate estimator with respect to their detectability of rate fluctuation, and determine whether their detectable-undetectable phase transition points are given by an identical formula defining a degree of fluctuation in an underlying rate. In addition, we numerically examine the variational Bayes hidden Markov model in its detectability of rate fluctuation, and determine whether the numerically obtained transition point is comparable to those of the other two methods. Such consistency among these three principled methods suggests the presence of a theoretical limit for detecting rate fluctuations.

  8. Limits of detection of americium-241 in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bereznai, T.

    1995-01-01

    Seven semiconductor detectors with various characteristics (type, form, size, etc.) were tested and compared in gamma-spectrometric assays for Am-241 aerosols in air. The problem at hand (determining a low activity or attaining a set detection limit (approx. 2 mBq/m 3 ) as soon as possible after sampling) was solved best by a large-volume n-type detector with a Be-window. In addition to the detector parameters commonly used (energy resolution and effectiveness), the peak-to-background ratio and the background counting rate at the gamma-energy of the nuclide to be determined are important criteria influencing the choice of equipment. (orig.) [de

  9. CARIES DETECTION WITH LASER FLUORESCENCE DEVICES. LIMITATIONS OF THEIR USE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Spaveras

    2017-03-01

    Data synthesis: DD and DDPen are useful devices for caries detection on the occlusal tooth surfaces. Their main advantages are the very high reproducibility of measurements (>0.90, the ease of handling and the quantification and monitoring capacity. Their main limitations are the relatively low specificity for enamel lesions, the necessity of unstained surfaces and absence of plaque and pastes during measurements and the absence of a universal, clinically functional calibration value (COV. Conclusion: Further studies are required for more reliable data analysis and clinical interpretation of the relevant results.

  10. Determination and Interpretation of Characteristic Limits for Radioactivity Measurements: Decision Threshhold, Detection Limit and Limits of the Confidence Interval

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    Since 2004, the environment programme of the IAEA has included activities aimed at developing a set of procedures for analytical measurements of radionuclides in food and the environment. Reliable, comparable and fit for purpose results are essential for any analytical measurement. Guidelines and national and international standards for laboratory practices to fulfil quality assurance requirements are extremely important when performing such measurements. The guidelines and standards should be comprehensive, clearly formulated and readily available to both the analyst and the customer. ISO 11929:2010 is the international standard on the determination of the characteristic limits (decision threshold, detection limit and limits of the confidence interval) for measuring ionizing radiation. For nuclear analytical laboratories involved in the measurement of radioactivity in food and the environment, robust determination of the characteristic limits of radioanalytical techniques is essential with regard to national and international regulations on permitted levels of radioactivity. However, characteristic limits defined in ISO 11929:2010 are complex, and the correct application of the standard in laboratories requires a full understanding of various concepts. This publication provides additional information to Member States in the understanding of the terminology, definitions and concepts in ISO 11929:2010, thus facilitating its implementation in Member State laboratories.

  11. Shell Canada Limited 1998 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    A report of operational and financial achievements is reported. Shell Canada's Resources Division is one of Canada's largest producers of crude oil, natural gas, natural gas liquids, sulphur and bitumen. This report presents an operations review, provides consolidated financial statements, and common share information, and summarizes revenue and expenditure statements. The company was one of Canada's most profitable integrated oil and gas companies in 1998. It was the second most profitable year in the company's history for continuing operations. Oil products earnings for 1998 were a record $275 million, mostly because of strong sales volumes and increased retail market share. The company also confronted several environmental issues in 1998, including climate change and the reduction of greenhouse gases. Construction of the Sable Project, offshore Nova Scotia, continued on budget and on schedule to bring natural gas to market by early 2000. Plans for the three elements of the Oil Sands project (the Muskeg River mine in the Athabaska Region, an upgrader at Shell's Scotford site and the Corridor Pipeline) proceeded on schedule. The Caroline complex made its expected contribution to the company's overall performance. Improved seismic technology helped to add new reserves through Shell's interest in wells in southern Alberta. Exploration activity in northeastern British Columbia and northern Alberta produced encouraging results. The work will continue in 1999. The company plans to invest some 4.9 billion dollars over the next five years in capital expenditures. Shell remains committed to the Voluntary Challenge and Registry Program. Annual reduction of CO 2 emissions increased by an estimated 800,000 tonnes

  12. Union Gas Limited Year 2000 progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoey, P.

    1999-04-01

    Union Gas Ltd., a subsidiary of Westcoast Energy Inc., serves approximately 1.1 million customers in more than 400 communities in Ontario. The company has $3.6 billion worth of assets including distribution, storage and transmission facilities. This report outlines the company's Year 2000 (Y2K) preparedness efforts. The company does not see any Year 2000 challenges which would impede the flow of natural gas. Union Gas has contingency plans in place to provide business continuity in the event of any internal system failures. Currently, the following systems are 100 per cent Y2K ready: (1) gas flow and control systems, (2) information technology, (3) telecommunications systems, and (4) the billing system. The remaining systems are expected to be Y2K ready by mid-1999

  13. Application of Statistical Methods to Activation Analytical Results near the Limit of Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydorn, Kaj; Wanscher, B.

    1978-01-01

    Reporting actual numbers instead of upper limits for analytical results at or below the detection limit may produce reliable data when these numbers are subjected to appropriate statistical processing. Particularly in radiometric methods, such as activation analysis, where individual standard...... deviations of analytical results may be estimated, improved discrimination may be based on the Analysis of Precision. Actual experimental results from a study of the concentrations of arsenic in human skin demonstrate the power of this principle....

  14. ROBUST ESTIMATION OF MEAN AND VARIANCE USING ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SETS WITH BELOW DETECTION LIMIT OBSERVATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists, especially environmental scientists often encounter trace level concentrations that are typically reported as less than a certain limit of detection, L. Type 1, left-censored data arise when certain low values lying below L are ignored or unknown as they cannot be mea...

  15. Determining pump limits. Fianal report; Pumpgrenzbestimmung. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riess, W; Gehring, S

    1997-12-31

    A considerable part of the work is concerned with KOCH`s model, which belongs to the group of empirical processes. According to CUMSTY and KERREBROK, the model is suitable for practical compressor design, as it takes into account important parameters. The processes of GRAHL et al and MOORE are checked, from the group of mathematical models. Both processes are based on the theory of small disturbances; however, the GRAHL model examines flow in the individual compressor grid, while MOORE examines the flow of a multi-stage compressor. To check the models, the stability limits known from experiments on a 6 stage and a 3 stage compressor are calculated. The experimental data and the results of a characteristic calculation of the 3 stage compressor act as input data. For the 6 stage compressor, the results of extensive non-steady state measurements are available, which give a detailed idea of the causation mechanism of the instability. (orig./AKF) [Deutsch] Ein wesentlicher Teil der Arbeit befasst sich mit dem Modell nach KOCH, das zur Gruppe der empirischen Verfahren gehoert. CUMPSTY und KERREBROK zufolge ist das Modell fuer die praktische Verdichterauslegung geeignet, da es wesentliche Einflussfaktoren beruecksichtigt. Aus der Gruppe der mathematischen Modelle werden Verfahren von GRAHL et al. und MOORE ueberprueft. Beide Verfahren basieren auf der Theorie der kleinen Stoerungen; jedoch untersucht das Modell von GRAHL die Stroemung im einzelnen Verdichtergitter waehrend MOORE die Stroemung eines vielstufigen Verdichters untersucht. Zur Ueberpruefung der Modelle werden die aus Experimenten bekannten Stabilitaetsgrenzen eines 6- und eines 3-stufigen Verdichters nachgerechnet. Als Eingabedaten dienen die experimentellen Daten sowie die Ergebnisse einer Kennfeldberechnung des 3-stufigen Verdichters. Fuer den 6-stufigen Verdichter stehen ebenfalls die Resultate umfangreicher instationaerer Messungen zur Verfuegung, die einen detaillierten Einblick in den

  16. Determining pump limits. Fianal report; Pumpgrenzbestimmung. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riess, W.; Gehring, S.

    1996-12-31

    A considerable part of the work is concerned with KOCH`s model, which belongs to the group of empirical processes. According to CUMSTY and KERREBROK, the model is suitable for practical compressor design, as it takes into account important parameters. The processes of GRAHL et al and MOORE are checked, from the group of mathematical models. Both processes are based on the theory of small disturbances; however, the GRAHL model examines flow in the individual compressor grid, while MOORE examines the flow of a multi-stage compressor. To check the models, the stability limits known from experiments on a 6 stage and a 3 stage compressor are calculated. The experimental data and the results of a characteristic calculation of the 3 stage compressor act as input data. For the 6 stage compressor, the results of extensive non-steady state measurements are available, which give a detailed idea of the causation mechanism of the instability. (orig./AKF) [Deutsch] Ein wesentlicher Teil der Arbeit befasst sich mit dem Modell nach KOCH, das zur Gruppe der empirischen Verfahren gehoert. CUMPSTY und KERREBROK zufolge ist das Modell fuer die praktische Verdichterauslegung geeignet, da es wesentliche Einflussfaktoren beruecksichtigt. Aus der Gruppe der mathematischen Modelle werden Verfahren von GRAHL et al. und MOORE ueberprueft. Beide Verfahren basieren auf der Theorie der kleinen Stoerungen; jedoch untersucht das Modell von GRAHL die Stroemung im einzelnen Verdichtergitter waehrend MOORE die Stroemung eines vielstufigen Verdichters untersucht. Zur Ueberpruefung der Modelle werden die aus Experimenten bekannten Stabilitaetsgrenzen eines 6- und eines 3-stufigen Verdichters nachgerechnet. Als Eingabedaten dienen die experimentellen Daten sowie die Ergebnisse einer Kennfeldberechnung des 3-stufigen Verdichters. Fuer den 6-stufigen Verdichter stehen ebenfalls die Resultate umfangreicher instationaerer Messungen zur Verfuegung, die einen detaillierten Einblick in den

  17. Union Gas Limited 2000 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Financial information from Union Gas was presented along with a review of their operations throughout 2000. Union Gas is a major Canadian natural gas utility providing energy services to more than 1.1 million residential, commercial and industrial customers in more than 400 communities in Ontario. The company also provides natural gas storage and transportation services for other utilities and energy market participants in Ontario, Quebec and the United States. Revenue for 2000 was reported to be $1.6 billion, net income was $113 million and assets totaled $3.9 billion. Total throughput for 2000 was 35.8 billion cubic meters. Union Gas is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Westcoast Energy Inc. of Vancouver, British Columbia. In 2000, progress was made toward the introduction of performance-based regulation to replace the cost of service regulation currently in use. This initiative will enable the company to provide competitively priced services to customers, allowing them, along with shareholders to benefit from efficiency enhancements and new service offerings. tabs., figs

  18. STATISTICAL METHODS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL APPLICATIONS USING DATA SETS WITH BELOW DETECTION LIMIT OBSERVATIONS AS INCORPORTED IN PROUCL 4.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nondetect (ND) or below detection limit (BDL) results cannot be measured accurately, and, therefore, are reported as less than certain detection limit (DL) values. However, since the presence of some contaminants (e.g., dioxin) in environmental media may pose a threat to human he...

  19. Evaluation of uncertainty and detection limits in radioactivity measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herranz, M. [Universidad del Pais Vasco/Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieria de Bilbao, Alda. Urquijo, s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain); Idoeta, R. [Universidad del Pais Vasco/Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieria de Bilbao, Alda. Urquijo, s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain)], E-mail: raquel.idoeta@ehu.es; Legarda, F. [Universidad del Pais Vasco/Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieria de Bilbao, Alda. Urquijo, s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain)

    2008-10-01

    The uncertainty associated with the assessment of the radioactive content of any sample depends on the net counting rate registered during the measuring process and on the different weighting factors needed to transform this counting rate into activity, activity per unit mass or activity concentration. This work analyses the standard uncertainties in these weighting factors as well as their contribution to the uncertainty in the activity reported for three typical determinations for environmental radioactivity measurements in the laboratory. It also studies the corresponding characteristic limits and their dependence on the standard uncertainty related to those weighting factors, offering an analysis of the effectiveness of the simplified characteristic limits as evaluated by various measuring software and laboratories.

  20. Evaluation of uncertainty and detection limits in radioactivity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herranz, M.; Idoeta, R.; Legarda, F.

    2008-01-01

    The uncertainty associated with the assessment of the radioactive content of any sample depends on the net counting rate registered during the measuring process and on the different weighting factors needed to transform this counting rate into activity, activity per unit mass or activity concentration. This work analyses the standard uncertainties in these weighting factors as well as their contribution to the uncertainty in the activity reported for three typical determinations for environmental radioactivity measurements in the laboratory. It also studies the corresponding characteristic limits and their dependence on the standard uncertainty related to those weighting factors, offering an analysis of the effectiveness of the simplified characteristic limits as evaluated by various measuring software and laboratories

  1. Limits of detection in instrumental neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guinn, V.P.

    1990-01-01

    Lower limits of detection (LLODs), frequently referred to simply as limits of detection and abbreviated as LODs, often appear in the literature of analytical chemistry - for numerous different methods of elemental and/or molecular analysis. In this chapter, one particular method of quantitative elemental analysis, that of instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA), is the subject discussed, with reference to LODs. Particularly in the literature of neutron activation analysis (NAA), many tables of 'interference-free' NAA LODs are available. Not all of these are of much use, because (1) for many the definition used for LOD is not clear, or reasonable, (2) for many, the analysis conditions used are not clearly specified, and (3) for many, the analysis conditions used are specified, but not very practicable for most laboratories. For NAA work, such tables of interference-free LODs are, in any case, only applicable to samples in which, at the time of counting, only one radionuclide is present to any significant extent in the activated sample. It is important to note that tables of INAA LODs, per se, do not exist - since the LOD for a given element, under stated analysis conditions, can vary by orders of magnitude, depending on the elemental composition of the matrix in which it is present. For any given element, its INAA LOD will always be as large as, and usually much larger than, its tabulated 'interference-free' NAA LOD - how much larger depending upon the elemental composition of the matrix in which it is present. As discussed in this chapter, however, an INAA computer program exists that can calculate realistic INAA LODs for any elements of interest, in any kind of specified sample matrix, under any given set of analysis conditions

  2. Uranium Detection - Technique Validation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colletti, Lisa Michelle [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Chemistry Division; Garduno, Katherine [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Chemistry Division; Lujan, Elmer J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Chemistry Division; Mechler-Hickson, Alexandra Marie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Chemistry Division; Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); May, Iain [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Chemistry Division; Reilly, Sean Douglas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Chemistry Division

    2016-04-14

    As a LANL activity for DOE/NNSA in support of SHINE Medical Technologies™ ‘Accelerator Technology’ we have been investigating the application of UV-vis spectroscopy for uranium analysis in solution. While the technique has been developed specifically for sulfate solutions, the proposed SHINE target solutions, it can be adapted to a range of different solution matrixes. The FY15 work scope incorporated technical development that would improve accuracy, specificity, linearity & range, precision & ruggedness, and comparative analysis. Significant progress was achieved throughout FY 15 addressing these technical challenges, as is summarized in this report. In addition, comparative analysis of unknown samples using the Davies-Gray titration technique highlighted the importance of controlling temperature during analysis (impacting both technique accuracy and linearity/range). To fully understand the impact of temperature, additional experimentation and data analyses were performed during FY16. The results from this FY15/FY16 work were presented in a detailed presentation, LA-UR-16-21310, and an update of this presentation is included with this short report summarizing the key findings. The technique is based on analysis of the most intense U(VI) absorbance band in the visible region of the uranium spectra in 1 M H2SO4, at λmax = 419.5 nm.

  3. Development and implementation of an on-line monitoring system for the detection of the surge limit of multi stage axial compressors. Final report; Ueberwachungssystem zur Pumpgrenzdetektion in vielstufigen Axialverdichtern. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoenen, H.; Niehuis, R.

    2003-07-01

    A monitoring system for the prediction of the stability limit of a multi-stage axial compressor has been developed. Based on the pressure fluctuations in the casing above a first compressor rotor the approach to the search limit can be detected. By means of a computer system equipped with a digital signal processor board the dynamic pressure signals are picked up and analyzed. Based on FFT-Spectra suitable parameters for the estimation of the stability limit can be calculated. Measurement data from various test runs at different gas turbine compressors demonstrated the reliability of the system. Mean issue of the system is the a ability of real time detection which allows an application in industrial environment. In order to guarantee the long term stability and security the soft ware has been programmed so that a permanent self control as well as a control by a connected host computer is possible. By means of these control mechanism the proper function of the measurement transducers the data acquisition and the communication with the host computer is assured. This guarantees a high operational reliability which also allows a safe integration in a gas turbine control system. The soft ware is based on the programming environment DASYLAB in order to provide a maximum of user friendliness The up to date test with the system on the gas turbine tests field of Siemens have been performed successfully. A long term test in a power plant has not jet been carried out. (orig.) [German] Es wurde ein Ueberwachungssystem entwickelt, das die Voraussage der Stabilitaetsgrenze eines mehrstufigen Axialverdichters ermoeglicht. Basierend auf den Druckfluktuationen ueber dem ersten Verdichterlaufrad koennen Aussagen ueber die Annaeherung an die Pumpgrenze getroffen werden. Mit Hilfe eines Rechnersystems mit integrierter Signalprozessorkarte werden die dynamischen Drucksignale aufgenommen und verarbeitet. Basierend auf einer FFT-Analyse werden geeignete Parameter bestimmt, die die

  4. Physiological techniques for detecting expiratory flow limitation during tidal breathing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.G. Koulouris

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD often exhale along the same flow–volume curve during quiet breathing as they do during the forced expiratory vital capacity manoeuvre, and this has been taken as an indicator of expiratory flow limitation at rest (EFLT. Therefore, EFLT, namely attainment of maximal expiratory flow during tidal expiration, occurs when an increase in transpulmonary pressure causes no increase in expiratory flow. EFLT leads to small airway injury and promotes dynamic pulmonary hyperinflation, with concurrent dyspnoea and exercise limitation. In fact, EFLT occurs commonly in COPD patients (mainly in Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease III and IV stage, in whom the latter symptoms are common, but is not exclusive to COPD, since it can also be detected in other pulmonary and nonpulmonary diseases like asthma, acute respiratory distress syndrome, heart failure and obesity, etc. The existing up to date physiological techniques of assessing EFLT are reviewed in the present work. Among the currently available techniques, the negative expiratory pressure has been validated in a wide variety of settings and disorders. Consequently, it should be regarded as a simple, noninvasive, practical and accurate new technique.

  5. Optimising Mycobacterium tuberculosis detection in resource limited settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfred, Nwofor; Lovette, Lawson; Aliyu, Gambo; Olusegun, Obasanya; Meshak, Panwal; Jilang, Tunkat; Iwakun, Mosunmola; Nnamdi, Emenyonu; Olubunmi, Onuoha; Dakum, Patrick; Abimiku, Alash'le

    2014-03-03

    The light-emitting diode (LED) fluorescence microscopy has made acid-fast bacilli (AFB) detection faster and efficient although its optimal performance in resource-limited settings is still being studied. We assessed the optimal performances of light and fluorescence microscopy in routine conditions of a resource-limited setting and evaluated the digestion time for sputum samples for maximum yield of positive cultures. Cross-sectional study. Facility-based involving samples of routine patients receiving tuberculosis treatment and care from the main tuberculosis case referral centre in northern Nigeria. The study included 450 sputum samples from 150 new patients with clinical diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis. The 450 samples were pooled into 150 specimens, examined independently with mercury vapour lamp (FM), LED CysCope (CY) and Primo Star iLED (PiLED) fluorescence microscopies, and with the Ziehl-Neelsen (ZN) microscopy to assess the performance of each technique compared with liquid culture. The cultured specimens were decontaminated with BD Mycoprep (4% NaOH-1% NLAC and 2.9% sodium citrate) for 10, 15 and 20 min before incubation in Mycobacterium growth incubator tube (MGIT) system and growth examined for acid-fast bacilli (AFB). Of the 150 specimens examined by direct microscopy: 44 (29%), 60 (40%), 49 (33%) and 64 (43%) were AFB positive by ZN, FM, CY and iLED microscopy, respectively. Digestion of sputum samples for 10, 15 and 20 min yielded mycobacterial growth in 72 (48%), 81 (54%) and 68 (45%) of the digested samples, respectively, after incubation in the MGIT system. In routine laboratory conditions of a resource-limited setting, our study has demonstrated the superiority of fluorescence microscopy over the conventional ZN technique. Digestion of sputum samples for 15 min yielded more positive cultures.

  6. Neutron activation analysis detection limits using 252Cf sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiPrete, D.P.; Sigg, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) developed a neutron activation analysis (NAA) facility several decades ago using low-flux 252 Cf neutron sources. Through this time, the facility has addressed areas of applied interest in managing the Savannah River Site (SRS). Some applications are unique because of the site's operating history and its chemical-processing facilities. Because sensitivity needs for many applications are not severe, they can be accomplished using an ∼6-mg 252 Cf NAA facility. The SRTC 252 Cf facility continues to support applied research programs at SRTC as well as other SRS programs for environmental and waste management customers. Samples analyzed by NAA include organic compounds, metal alloys, sediments, site process solutions, and many other materials. Numerous radiochemical analyses also rely on the facility for production of short-lived tracers, yielding by activation of carriers and small-scale isotope production for separation methods testing. These applications are more fully reviewed in Ref. 1. Although the flux [approximately2 x 10 7 n/cm 2 ·s] is low relative to reactor facilities, more than 40 elements can be detected at low and sub-part-per-million levels. Detection limits provided by the facility are adequate for many analytical projects. Other multielement analysis methods, particularly inductively coupled plasma atomic emission and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, can now provide sensitivities on dissolved samples that are often better than those available by NAA using low-flux isotopic sources. Because NAA allows analysis of bulk samples, (a) it is a more cost-effective choice when its sensitivity is adequate than methods that require digestion and (b) it eliminates uncertainties that can be introduced by digestion processes

  7. Current limitations and challenges in nanowaste detection, characterisation and monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Part, Florian; Zecha, Gudrun [Department of Water-Atmosphere-Environment, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Institute of Waste Management, Muthgasse 107, 1190 Vienna (Austria); Causon, Tim [Department of Chemistry, Division of Analytical Chemistry, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Muthgasse 18, 1190 Vienna (Austria); Sinner, Eva-Kathrin [Department of Nanobiotechnology, Institute for Synthetic Bioarchitectures, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Muthgasse 11/II, 1190 Vienna (Austria); Huber-Humer, Marion, E-mail: marion.huber-humer@boku.ac.at [Department of Water-Atmosphere-Environment, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Institute of Waste Management, Muthgasse 107, 1190 Vienna (Austria)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • First review on detection of nanomaterials in complex waste samples. • Focus on nanoparticles in solid, liquid and gaseous waste samples. • Summary of current applicable methods for nanowaste detection and characterisation. • Limitations and challenges of characterisation of nanoparticles in waste. - Abstract: Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) are already extensively used in diverse consumer products. Along the life cycle of a nano-enabled product, ENMs can be released and subsequently accumulate in the environment. Material flow models also indicate that a variety of ENMs may accumulate in waste streams. Therefore, a new type of waste, so-called nanowaste, is generated when end-of-life ENMs and nano-enabled products are disposed of. In terms of the precautionary principle, environmental monitoring of end-of-life ENMs is crucial to allow assessment of the potential impact of nanowaste on our ecosystem. Trace analysis and quantification of nanoparticulate species is very challenging because of the variety of ENM types that are used in products and low concentrations of nanowaste expected in complex environmental media. In the framework of this paper, challenges in nanowaste characterisation and appropriate analytical techniques which can be applied to nanowaste analysis are summarised. Recent case studies focussing on the characterisation of ENMs in waste streams are discussed. Most studies aim to investigate the fate of nanowaste during incineration, particularly considering aerosol measurements; whereas, detailed studies focusing on the potential release of nanowaste during waste recycling processes are currently not available. In terms of suitable analytical methods, separation techniques coupled to spectrometry-based methods are promising tools to detect nanowaste and determine particle size distribution in liquid waste samples. Standardised leaching protocols can be applied to generate soluble fractions stemming from solid wastes, while

  8. Lower detectable limit of sulfur by fast neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shani, G; Cohen, D [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beersheba (Israel). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    1976-07-01

    For the purpose of air pollution research, the possibility of fast neutron activation analysis of sulfur was investigated. The only reaction that can be used for this purpose is S/sup 34/(n, p)P/sup 34/. A rabbit system was installed, synchronized with a 150 kV D-T neutron generator and an electronic analysing system. The whole system was operated so that the sample was irradiated for 10 sec and the 2.13 MeV ..gamma..-ray was counted for 10 sec. 5 samples were prepared containing sulfur from 0.5 to 0.1 g. Each measurement lasted 30 min and the activity was plotted as a function of sulfur weight. The relative error is increased very much when the amount of sulfur is below 0.1 g. This is what sets the lower detectable limit. Collection of more than 0.1 g of sulfur even during a long collection time means a very high SO/sub 2/ concentration in the air.

  9. Quarry detection monitoring wells completion report WP-166

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the activities undertaken during implementation of Work Package 166, Quarry Detection Monitoring Wells, for the Weldon Spring Site Remedial action project, Weldon Spring, Missouri. The subcontract specifications should be consulted for specific details regarding this work effort. Analytical parameters for soil samples collected for all but one borehole were analyzed for uranium, thorium, cyanide, nitroaromatics, and all Hazardous Substance List parameters including volatiles, semivolatiles, pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and metals. No soil samples were collected at other borehole as per specifications. With Z exceptions, uranium results for all boreholes sampled were at background levels. Nitroaromatics and cyanide were not detected in any of the samples collected. Volatile and semivolatile organics were not detected in the soil samples collected from the boreholes, with the exception of common lab contaminants such as methylene chloride, toluene, acetone, and pathalates. All metals results were either within their natural background ranges or below the detection limit of the instrument. PCB's were not detected within any of the boreholes. Pesticides detected (aldrin and methoxychlor) at one borehole near the surface may be attributed to previous spraying of pesticides on the highway right-of-way. In conclusion, the analytical results show that only uranium was detected in significant quantities; all other results were below the detection limit, very near the detection limit, or within natural background ranges. 1 fig

  10. Limitations and obstacles of the spontaneous adverse drugs reactions reporting: Two “challenging” case reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palleria, Caterina; Leporini, Christian; Chimirri, Serafina; Marrazzo, Giuseppina; Sacchetta, Sabrina; Bruno, Lucrezia; Lista, Rosaria M.; Staltari, Orietta; Scuteri, Antonio; Scicchitano, Francesca; Russo, Emilio

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Nowadays, based on several epidemiological data, iatrogenic disease is an emerging public health problem, especially in industrialized countries. Adverse drugs reactions (ADRs) are extremely common and, therefore, clinically, socially, and economically worthy of attention. Spontaneous reporting system for suspected ADRs represents the cornerstone of the pharmacovigilance, because it allows rapid detection of potential alarm signals related to drugs use. However, spontaneous reporting system shows several limitations, which are mainly related to under-reporting. In this paper, we describe two particular case reports, which emphasize some reasons of under-reporting and other common criticisms of spontaneous reporting systems. Materials and Methods: We performed a computer-aided search of Medline, PubMed, Embase, Cochrane library databases, national and international databases of suspected ADRs reports in order to identify previous published case reports and spontaneous reports about the ADRs reviewed in this paper, and to examine the role of suspected drugs in the pathogenesis of the described adverse reactions. Results: First, we reported a case of tizanidine-induced hemorrhagic cystitis. In the second case report, we presented an episode of asthma exacerbation after taking bimatoprost. Through the review of these two cases, we highlighted some common criticisms of spontaneous reporting systems: under-reporting and false causality attribution. Discussion and Conclusion: Healthcare workers sometimes do not report ADRs because it is challenging to establish with certainty the causal relationship between drug and adverse reaction; however, according to a key principle of pharmacovigilance, it is always better to report even a suspicion to generate an alarm in the interest of protecting public health. PMID:24347986

  11. Limitations and obstacles of the spontaneous adverse drugs reactions reporting: Two "challenging" case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palleria, Caterina; Leporini, Christian; Chimirri, Serafina; Marrazzo, Giuseppina; Sacchetta, Sabrina; Bruno, Lucrezia; Lista, Rosaria M; Staltari, Orietta; Scuteri, Antonio; Scicchitano, Francesca; Russo, Emilio

    2013-12-01

    Nowadays, based on several epidemiological data, iatrogenic disease is an emerging public health problem, especially in industrialized countries. Adverse drugs reactions (ADRs) are extremely common and, therefore, clinically, socially, and economically worthy of attention. Spontaneous reporting system for suspected ADRs represents the cornerstone of the pharmacovigilance, because it allows rapid detection of potential alarm signals related to drugs use. However, spontaneous reporting system shows several limitations, which are mainly related to under-reporting. In this paper, we describe two particular case reports, which emphasize some reasons of under-reporting and other common criticisms of spontaneous reporting systems. We performed a computer-aided search of Medline, PubMed, Embase, Cochrane library databases, national and international databases of suspected ADRs reports in order to identify previous published case reports and spontaneous reports about the ADRs reviewed in this paper, and to examine the role of suspected drugs in the pathogenesis of the described adverse reactions. First, we reported a case of tizanidine-induced hemorrhagic cystitis. In the second case report, we presented an episode of asthma exacerbation after taking bimatoprost. Through the review of these two cases, we highlighted some common criticisms of spontaneous reporting systems: under-reporting and false causality attribution. Healthcare workers sometimes do not report ADRs because it is challenging to establish with certainty the causal relationship between drug and adverse reaction; however, according to a key principle of pharmacovigilance, it is always better to report even a suspicion to generate an alarm in the interest of protecting public health.

  12. The ground fault detection system for the Tore Supra toroidal pump limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zunino, K.; Cara, P.; Fejoz, P.; Hourtoule, J.; Loarer, T.; Pomaro, N.; Santagiustina, A.; Spuig, P.; Villecroze, F.

    2003-01-01

    The toroidal pump limiter (TPL) of Tore Supra is electrically insulated from the vacuum-vessel, to allow its polarization at a voltage of up to 1 kV. In order to monitor continuously the integrity of the TPL electrical insulation, an electronic diagnostic system called TPL ground fault detection system (GFDS) has been developed. The paper will report on the design and the operation experience of the GFD system and on the evolution of the TPL grounding

  13. Relationship of employee-reported work limitations to work productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Debra; Amick, Benjamin C; Lee, Jennifer C; Rooney, Ted; Rogers, William H; Chang, Hong; Berndt, Ernst R

    2003-05-01

    Work limitation rates are crucial indicators of the health status of working people. If related to work productivity, work limitation rates may also supply important information about the economic burden of illness. Our objective was to assess the productivity impact of on-the-job work limitations due to employees' physical or mental health problems. Subjects were asked to complete a self-administered survey on the job during 3 consecutive months. Using robust regression analysis, we tested the relationship of objectively-measured work productivity to employee-reported work limitations. We attempted to survey employees of a large firm within 3 different jobs. The survey response rate was 2245 (85.9%). Full survey and productivity data were available for 1827 respondents. Each survey included a validated self-report instrument, the Work Limitations Questionnaire (WLQ). The firm provided objective, employee-level work productivity data. In adjusted regression analyses (n = 1827), employee work productivity (measured as the log of units produced/hour) was significantly associated with 3 dimensions of work limitations: limitations handling the job's time and scheduling demands (P = 0.003), physical job demands (P = 0.001), and output demands (P = 0.006). For every 10% increase in on-the-job work limitations reported on each of the 3 WLQ scales, work productivity declined approximately 4 to 5%. Employee work limitations have a negative impact on work productivity. Employee assessments of their work limitations supply important proxies for the economic burden of health problems.

  14. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited annual report 1987-88

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The annual report of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1988 covers: Research Company; CANDU Operations; Radiochemical Company; Medical Products Division; The Future; Financial Sections; Board of Directors and Officers; and AECL locations

  15. Arms Limitation and Disarmament: Seventeenth Strategy for Peace Conference Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley Foundation, Muscatine, IA.

    The report discusses issues relating to arms limitation and disarmament. Leaders in U. S. government, professionals from a wide spectrum of disciplines, and other international statesmen participated in the conference in an attempt to define a more enlightened foreign policy. Six major topics were discussed. The first report considered five…

  16. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited annual report 1986-87

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The annual report of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1987 covers the followings subjects: report from the president; research company; CANDU operations; radiochemical company; the future; financial section and board of directors and officers

  17. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited annual report 1985-86

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The annual report of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1986 covers the following subjects: report from the chairman and the president; research company; CANDU operations; radiochemical company; employee performance; nuclear Canada; Financial section; and board of directors and officers

  18. New limits on the detection of a composition-dependent macroscopic force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boynton, P.; Aronson, S.

    1990-01-01

    We report here on a continuing experimental search for a macroscopic, composition dependent force coupling to ordinary matter. Within the phenomenological framework commonly employed -- a Yukawa representation of the interaction potential, and composition specified as some linear combination of baryon and lepton numbers -- the Index 3 experiment sets the most stringent upper limits yet on the interaction strength for coupling from B-2L to B-L, and for an interaction range from 200 m to 10 km. It is also the first null result to conflict with the marginal detection reported for the Index 1 experiment for all relevant values of the composition and range parameters

  19. Limited irrigation research and infrared thermometry for detecting water stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    The USDA-ARS Limited Irrigation Research Farm, located outside of Greeley Colorado, is an experiment evaluating management perspectives of limited irrigation water. An overview of the farm systems is shown, including drip irrigation systems, water budgeting, and experimental design, as well as preli...

  20. Method to Solve the Problem of the Radioactivity Detection in Environmental Samples. Characteristic Limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasco, C.; Martinez, M.; Heras, M.

    2009-01-01

    The problem of the detection or when the radioactivity can be considered as higher than the background using different measurement techniques has been the objective of several statistical studies and controversies. The detection limit and the critical limit were studied by Currie in year 1968 and used by radiochemistry laboratories considering different ways of calculation that introduced confusion and not correct implementations. In the last few years, and due to the increasing number of standardization processes on the field of radioactivity and accreditation, several international institutions have chosen to unify the criteria for using common determination of detection limits. The most used methods are those developed by MARLAP and International Standard Organization ISO (Standard-11929). In this report are summarised both standards doing a comparative study and giving some examples of how to apply these limits. In same cases, little differences in the uncertainty calculation have been observed but the final results have been concordant. A deeply study of these standards can be done consulting the web page of the American Labs that developed MARLAP or buying the original ISO standard ISO-11929 recently approved (2009). (Author) 17 refs

  1. DETECTING ALIEN LIMIT CYCLES NEAR A HAMILTONIAN 2-SADDLE CYCLE

    OpenAIRE

    LUCA, Stijn; DUMORTIER, Freddy; Caubergh, M.; Roussarie, R.

    2009-01-01

    This paper aims at providing and example of a cubic Hamiltonian 2-saddle cycle that after bifurcation can give rise to an alien limit cycle; this is a limit cycle that is not controlled by a zero of the related Abelian integral. To guarantee the existence of an alien limit cycle one can verify generic conditions on the Abelian integral and on the transition map associated to the connections of the 2-saddle cycle. In this paper, a general method is developed to compute the first and second der...

  2. Detection limits of intraoperative near infrared imaging for tumor resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, Greg M; Figueiredo, Jose-Luiz; Weissleder, Ralph

    2010-12-01

    The application of fluorescent molecular imaging to surgical oncology is a developing field with the potential to reduce morbidity and mortality. However, the detection thresholds and other requirements for successful intervention remain poorly understood. Here we modeled and experimentally validated depth and size of detection of tumor deposits, trade-offs in coverage and resolution of areas of interest, and required pharmacokinetics of probes based on differing levels of tumor target presentation. Three orthotopic tumor models were imaged by widefield epifluorescence and confocal microscopes, and the experimental results were compared with pharmacokinetic models and light scattering simulations to determine detection thresholds. Widefield epifluorescence imaging can provide sufficient contrast to visualize tumor margins and detect tumor deposits 3-5  mm deep based on labeled monoclonal antibodies at low objective magnification. At higher magnification, surface tumor deposits at cellular resolution are detectable at TBR ratios achieved with highly expressed antigens. A widefield illumination system with the capability for macroscopic surveying and microscopic imaging provides the greatest utility for varying surgical goals. These results have implications for system and agent designs, which ultimately should aid complete resection in most surgical beds and provide real-time feedback to obtain clean margins. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Physics of detecting torsion and placing limits on its effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoeger, W.R.

    1985-01-01

    The essential principles of torsion-detection physics are presented, and an evaluation is conducted of several conceivable types of experiments and observations for actually detecting torsion fields, reemphasizing also the evident impossibility of successfully searching for its manifestations among cosmological relics. In particular, a polarized body, with net intrinsic (fundamental-particle) spin, is essential for detecting a torsion field. One which possesses only orbital angular momentum - rotation - or an unpolarized intrinsic spin density will not feel torsion. The fundamental problem in searching for such fields is the extremely small basic unit of the coupling or interaction energy between the torsion field and spin. The best way of maximizing the total interaction energy is to increase the spin density of the source sigma-s and at the same time the spin number SD of the detector. 15 references

  4. In vitro bioassays for detecting dioxin-like activity--application potentials and limits of detection, a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichbaum, Kathrin; Brinkmann, Markus; Buchinger, Sebastian; Reifferscheid, Georg; Hecker, Markus; Giesy, John P; Engwall, Magnus; van Bavel, Bert; Hollert, Henner

    2014-07-15

    Use of in vitro assays as screening tool to characterize contamination of a variety of environmental matrices has become an increasingly popular and powerful toolbox in the field of environmental toxicology. While bioassays cannot entirely substitute analytical methods such as gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), the increasing improvement of cell lines and standardization of bioassay procedures enhance their utility as bioanalytical pre-screening tests prior to more targeted chemical analytical investigations. Dioxin-receptor-based assays provide a holistic characterization of exposure to dioxin-like compounds (DLCs) by integrating their overall toxic potential, including potentials of unknown DLCs not detectable via e.g. GC-MS. Hence, they provide important additional information with respect to environmental risk assessment of DLCs. This review summarizes different in vitro bioassay applications for detection of DLCs and considers the comparability of bioassay and chemical analytically derived toxicity equivalents (TEQs) of different approaches and various matrices. These range from complex samples such as sediments through single reference to compound mixtures. A summary of bioassay derived detection limits (LODs) showed a number of current bioassays to be equally sensitive as chemical methodologies, but moreover revealed that most of the bioanalytical studies conducted to date did not report their LODs, which represents a limitation with regard to low potency samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Importance of the lower limit of detection in radiological safety; Importancia del limite inferior de deteccion en seguridad radiologica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafael, Terol T; Hermenegildo, Maldonado M [Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias (Mexico)

    1991-07-01

    The concept of the Lower Limit of Detection (LLD) it contributes in the solution of some problems related with the radiological safety, such as the realization of the tests of flight of the sealed radioactive sources; the determination of radioisotopes in environmental samples; the estimate of present radionuclides in polluted foods; in general, the detection of small quantities of radioactive materials present in materials of use or consumption by part of the man in his daily life; as the one Lower Limit of Detection is related with topics of statistics, in this work a small review of them is made, it was superficially discussed the mensuration problems related with the establishment of the Lower Limit of Detection.

  6. RCRA materials analysis by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy: Detection limits in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koskelo, A.; Cremers, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    The goal of the Technical Task Plan (TTP) that this report supports is research, development, testing and evaluation of a portable analyzer for RCRA and other metals. The instrumentation to be built will be used for field-screening of soils. Data quality is expected to be suitable for this purpose. The data presented in this report were acquired to demonstrate the detection limits for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) of soils using instrument parameters suitable for fieldable instrumentation. The data are not expected to be the best achievable with the high pulse energies available in laboratory lasers. The report presents work to date on the detection limits for several elements in soils using LIBS. The elements targeted in the Technical Task Plan are antimony, arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, lead, selenium, and zirconium. Data for these elements are presented in this report. Also included are other data of interest to potential customers for the portable LIBS apparatus. These data are for barium, mercury, cesium and strontium. Data for uranium and thorium will be acquired during the tasks geared toward mixed waste characterization

  7. Detection Limits Of The 125I Air Sampler ''RIS125''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belaish, I.; Levinson, S.; German, U.; Kravchik, T.

    1999-01-01

    A system for 125 I monitoring in air (RIS-125) was designed and manufactured at NRCN. The main features of the system are described elsewhere. The system can monitor 125 I air contamination in gaseous and aerosol forms. An air monitoring system should have a fast response and the lowest available Minimum Detectable Activity (MDA). The present work presents the characteristic MDA values of the system

  8. Limited scleroderma and early detection of visceral changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalyuzhnaya, L.D.; Potsibina, V.V.; Stychinskaya, L.P.; Turik, N.V.

    1989-01-01

    The state of liver, kidneys, osteoarticular apparatus at the early stages of development of limited scleroderma and with the exclusion of visceral changes on the basis of clinical-laboratory studies is investigated. 11 patients with scleroderma in the age of 7-18 years were examined. Osteoscintigraphy with 99m TC-phosphone and dynamic scintigraphy of kidneys without additional introduction of RF, and hepatocholecyctoscintigraphy with 99m tc-HIPA of the patients were realized. The conclusion is made that radionuclide investigation methods permit to reveal various visceral changes, which are not recognizable by clinical methods

  9. Practical low dose limits for passive personal dosemeters and the implications for uncertainties close to the limit of detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilvin, P. J.; Perks, C. A.

    2011-01-01

    Recent years have seen the increasing use of passive dosemeters that have high sensitivities and, in laboratory conditions, detection limits of <10 μSv. However, in real operational use the detection limits will be markedly higher, because a large fraction of the accrued dose will be due to natural background, and this must be subtracted in order to obtain the desired occupational dose. No matter how well known the natural background is, the measurement uncertainty on doses of a few tens of microsieverts will be large. Individual monitoring services need to recognise this and manage the expectations of their clients by providing sufficient information. (authors)

  10. Currie detection limits in gamma-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geer, L.-E. de

    2004-01-01

    Currie Hypothesis testing is applied to gamma-ray spectral data, where an optimum part of the peak is used and the background is considered well known from nearby channels. With this, the risk of making Type I errors is about 100 times lower than commonly assumed. A programme, PeakMaker, produces random peaks with given characteristics on the screen and calculations are done to facilitate a full use of Poisson statistics in spectrum analyses. Short technical note summary: The Currie decision limit concept applied to spectral data is reinterpreted, which gives better consistency between the selected error risk and the observed error rates. A PeakMaker program is described and the few count problem is analyzed

  11. Improved detection limit for {sup 59}Ni using the technique of accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, Per; Erlandsson, Bengt; Hellborg, Ragnar; Kiisk, Madis; Larsson, Ragnar; Skog, Goeran; Stenstroem, Kristina [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Nuclear Physics

    2002-11-01

    59 Ni is produced by neutron activation in the stainless steel close to the core of a nuclear reactor. To be able to classify the different parts of the reactor with respect to their content of long-lived radionuclides before final storage it is important to measure the 59 Ni level. Accelerator mass spectrometry is an ultra-sensitive method for counting atoms, suitable for 59 Ni measurements. Improvements in the reduction of the background and in the chemical reduction of cobalt, the interfering isobar, have been made. This chemical purification is essential when using small tandem accelerators, <3 MV, combined with the detection of characteristic projectile X-rays. These improvements have lowered the detection limit for 59 Ni by a factor of twenty compared with the first value reported for the Lund AMS facility. Material from the Swedish nuclear industry has been analysed and examples of the results are presented.

  12. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited 2007 annual financial report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    This is the annual report of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited for the year ending March 31, 2007 and summarizes the financial activities of AECL during the period 2006-2007. The highlights for this period include increase in consolidated commercial revenue by 40%, progress on the Cernavoda reactor, increased investment in the safety and performance of the CANDU fleet and a memorandum of understanding with Natural Resources Canada to govern implementation of a five-year waste management and decommissioning plan.

  13. Current limitations and challenges in nanowaste detection, characterisation and monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Part, Florian; Zecha, Gudrun; Causon, Tim; Sinner, Eva-Kathrin; Huber-Humer, Marion

    2015-09-01

    Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) are already extensively used in diverse consumer products. Along the life cycle of a nano-enabled product, ENMs can be released and subsequently accumulate in the environment. Material flow models also indicate that a variety of ENMs may accumulate in waste streams. Therefore, a new type of waste, so-called nanowaste, is generated when end-of-life ENMs and nano-enabled products are disposed of. In terms of the precautionary principle, environmental monitoring of end-of-life ENMs is crucial to allow assessment of the potential impact of nanowaste on our ecosystem. Trace analysis and quantification of nanoparticulate species is very challenging because of the variety of ENM types that are used in products and low concentrations of nanowaste expected in complex environmental media. In the framework of this paper, challenges in nanowaste characterisation and appropriate analytical techniques which can be applied to nanowaste analysis are summarised. Recent case studies focussing on the characterisation of ENMs in waste streams are discussed. Most studies aim to investigate the fate of nanowaste during incineration, particularly considering aerosol measurements; whereas, detailed studies focusing on the potential release of nanowaste during waste recycling processes are currently not available. In terms of suitable analytical methods, separation techniques coupled to spectrometry-based methods are promising tools to detect nanowaste and determine particle size distribution in liquid waste samples. Standardised leaching protocols can be applied to generate soluble fractions stemming from solid wastes, while micro- and ultrafiltration can be used to enrich nanoparticulate species. Imaging techniques combined with X-ray-based methods are powerful tools for determining particle size, morphology and screening elemental composition. However, quantification of nanowaste is currently hampered due to the problem to differentiate engineered from

  14. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited annual report 2000-2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This is the annual report of the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited for the year ending March 31, 2001 and summarizes the activities of AECL during the period 2000-2001. The activities covered in this report include the CANDU reactor business, with progress being reported in the construction of two CANDU 6 reactors for the Qinshan CANDU project in China, the anticipated completion of Cernavoda unit 2, the completion of spent fuel storage at Cernavoda unit 1 in Romania, as well as the service business with New Brunswick Power, Ontario Power Generation, Bruce Power and Hydro Quebec in the refurbishment of operating, CANDU reactors. In the R and D programs discussions continue on funding for the Canadian Neutron Facility for Materials Research (CNF) and progress on the Maple medical isotope reactor

  15. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited annual report 2000-2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This is the annual report of the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited for the year ending March 31, 2001 and summarizes the activities of AECL during the period 2000-2001. The activities covered in this report include the CANDU reactor business, with progress being reported in the construction of two CANDU 6 reactors for the Qinshan CANDU project in China, the anticipated completion of Cernavoda unit 2, the completion of spent fuel storage at Cernavoda unit 1 in Romania, as well as the service business with New Brunswick Power, Ontario Power Generation, Bruce Power and Hydro Quebec in the refurbishment of operating, CANDU reactors. In the R and D programs discussions continue on funding for the Canadian Neutron Facility for Materials Research (CNF) and progress on the Maple medical isotope reactor.

  16. Search times and probability of detection in time-limited search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, David; Devitt, Nicole; Maurer, Tana

    2005-05-01

    When modeling the search and target acquisition process, probability of detection as a function of time is important to war games and physical entity simulations. Recent US Army RDECOM CERDEC Night Vision and Electronics Sensor Directorate modeling of search and detection has focused on time-limited search. Developing the relationship between detection probability and time of search as a differential equation is explored. One of the parameters in the current formula for probability of detection in time-limited search corresponds to the mean time to detect in time-unlimited search. However, the mean time to detect in time-limited search is shorter than the mean time to detect in time-unlimited search and the relationship between them is a mathematical relationship between these two mean times. This simple relationship is derived.

  17. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited annual report 2002-2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This is the annual report of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited for the year ending March 31, 2003 and summarizes the activities of AECL during the period 2002-2003. It outlines the strategic objectives that include growing the market and market share, maximize return on resources, evolve the business structure to support business growth, grow knowledge assets, be a technology and knowledge-based innovative leader, leverage intellectual property to provide marketable products and services and establish nuclear power as a clean air and public policy solution.

  18. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited 2008 annual financial report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This is the annual report of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited for the year ending March 31, 2008 and summarizes the financial activities of AECL during the period 2007-2008. The major highlights for this period include increase of consolidated revenue by 4%, significant progress on Liquid Waste Transfer and Storage (LWTS) and the Fuel Packaging and Storage (FPS) project, feasibility study of a new ACR-1000 plant in New Brunswick and a memorandum of understanding with CNSC for pre project design review of ACR-1000.

  19. Gulf Canada Resources Limited 1996 annual report - mission 2006: possible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    Gulf Canada Resources Limited, which trades under the symbol GOU, is a publicly traded company that explores, develops, produces and markets conventional and synthetic crude oil, natural gas and natural gas liquids. In 1996, the company's main operating centres were in western Canada, Indonesia, Algeria, Australia, and the United States. This report presents an operations review for all theatres of operation, a consolidated financial statement, revenues and expenditures by source and common share information. GOU's acquisition of Clyde Petroleum in early 1997 has added significant producing assets and exploration lands in the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, Indonesia, Australia, Libya, Syria, Yemen, the Falkland Islands and Argentina. tabs., figs

  20. Direct fast neutron detection: A status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peurrung, A.J.; Hansen, R.R.; Craig, R.A.; Hensley, W.K.; Hubbard, C.W.; Keller, P.E.; Reeder, P.L.; Sunberg, D.S.

    1997-12-01

    This report describes the status of efforts to develop direct fast-neutron detection via proton recoil within plastic scintillator. Since recording proton recoil events is of little practical use without a means to discriminate effectively against gamma-ray interactions, the present effort is concentrated on demonstrating a method that distinguishes between pulse types. The proposed method exploits the different pulse shapes that are to be expected primarily on the basis of the slower speed of the recoiling fission neutrons. Should this effort ultimately prove successful, the resulting novel technology will have the potential to significantly lower cost and increase capability for a number of critical neutron-detection applications. Considerable progress has been made toward a clear and compelling demonstration of this new technique. An exhaustive theoretical and numerical investigation of the method has been completed. The authors have been able to better understand the laboratory results and estimate the performance that could ultimately be achieved using the proposed technique. They have assessed the performance of a number of different algorithms for discriminating between neutron and gamma ray events. The results of this assessment will be critical when the construction of low-cost, field-portable neutron detectors becomes necessary. Finally, a laboratory effort to realize effective discrimination is well underway and has resulted in partial success

  1. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited annual report 1999-2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    This is the annual report of the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited for the year ending March 31, 2000, and summarizes the activities of AECL during the period 1999-2000. The activities covered in this report include the CANDU reactor business, with the completion of the Wolsong unit 4 in the Republic of Korea, progress in the construction of two CANDU reactors for the Qinshan CANDU project in China, as well as the service business with Ontario Power Generation in the rehabilitation and life extension of operating CANDU reactors. In the R and D programs there is on-going effort towards the next generation of reactor technologies for CANDU nuclear power plants, discussions continue on the funding for the Canadian Neutron Facility for materials research (CNF) and progress being made on the Maple medical isotope reactor

  2. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited annual report 1999-2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    This is the annual report of the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited for the year ending March 31, 2000, and summarizes the activities of AECL during the period 1999-2000. The activities covered in this report include the CANDU reactor business, with the completion of the Wolsong unit 4 in the Republic of Korea, progress in the construction of two CANDU reactors for the Qinshan CANDU project in China, as well as the service business with Ontario Power Generation in the rehabilitation and life extension of operating CANDU reactors. In the R and D programs there is on-going effort towards the next generation of reactor technologies for CANDU nuclear power plants, discussions continue on the funding for the Canadian Neutron Facility for materials research (CNF) and progress being made on the Maple medical isotope reactor.

  3. Analysis of detection limit to time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering nanoscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wei; Liu Shuang-Long; Chen Dan-Ni; Niu Han-Ben

    2014-01-01

    In the implementation of CARS nanoscopy, signal strength decreases with focal volume size decreasing. A crucial problem that remains to be solved is whether the reduced signal generated in the suppressed focal volume can be detected. Here reported is a theoretical analysis of detection limit (DL) to time-resolved CARS (T-CARS) nanoscopy based on our proposed additional probe-beam-induced phonon depletion (APIPD) method for the low concentration samples. In order to acquire a detailed shot-noise limited signal-to-noise (SNR) and the involved parameters to evaluate DL, the T-CARS process is described with full quantum theory to estimate the extreme power density levels of the pump and Stokes beams determined by saturation behavior of coherent phonons, which are both actually on the order of ∼ 10 9 W/cm 2 . When the pump and Stokes intensities reach such values and the total intensity of the excitation beams arrives at a maximum tolerable by most biological samples in a certain suppressed focal volume (40-nm suppressed focal scale in APIPD method), the DL correspondingly varies with exposure time, for example, DL values are 10 3 and 10 2 when exposure times are 20 ms and 200 ms respectively. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  4. Assessment of detection limits of fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing for detection of illicit connections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nienhuis, J.; De Haan, C.; Langeveld, J.G.; Klootwijk, M.; Clemens, F.H.L.R.

    2012-01-01

    Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) with fiber-optic cables is a powerful tool to detect illicit connections in storm sewer systems. High frequency temperature measurements along the in-sewer cable create a detailed representation of temperature anomalies due to illicit discharges. The detection

  5. Impact of sensor detection limits on protecting water distribution systems from contamination events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenna, Sean Andrew; Hart, David Blaine; Yarrington, Lane

    2006-01-01

    Real-time water quality sensors are becoming commonplace in water distribution systems. However, field deployable, contaminant-specific sensors are still in the development stage. As development proceeds, the necessary operating parameters of these sensors must be determined to protect consumers from accidental and malevolent contamination events. This objective can be quantified in several different ways including minimization of: the time necessary to detect a contamination event, the population exposed to contaminated water, the extent of the contamination within the network, and others. We examine the ability of a sensor set to meet these objectives as a function of both the detection limit of the sensors and the number of sensors in the network. A moderately sized distribution network is used as an example and different sized sets of randomly placed sensors are considered. For each combination of a certain number of sensors and a detection limit, the mean values of the different objectives across multiple random sensor placements are calculated. The tradeoff between the necessary detection limit in a sensor and the number of sensors is evaluated. Results show that for the example problem examined here, a sensor detection limit of 0.01 of the average source concentration is adequate for maximum protection. Detection of events is dependent on the detection limit of the sensors, but for those events that are detected, the values of the performance measures are not a function of the sensor detection limit. The results of replacing a single sensor in a network with a sensor having a much lower detection limit show that while this replacement can improve results, the majority of the additional events detected had performance measures of relatively low consequence.

  6. Calculation of the detection limits for radionuclides identified in gamma-ray spectra based on post-processing peak analysis results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korun, M; Vodenik, B; Zorko, B

    2018-03-01

    A new method for calculating the detection limits of gamma-ray spectrometry measurements is presented. The method is applicable for gamma-ray emitters, irrespective of the influences of the peaked background, the origin of the background and the overlap with other peaks. It offers the opportunity for multi-gamma-ray emitters to calculate the common detection limit, corresponding to more peaks. The detection limit is calculated by approximating the dependence of the uncertainty in the indication on its value with a second-order polynomial. In this approach the relation between the input quantities and the detection limit are described by an explicit expression and can be easy investigated. The detection limit is calculated from the data usually provided by the reports of peak-analyzing programs: the peak areas and their uncertainties. As a result, the need to use individual channel contents for calculating the detection limit is bypassed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Fraud diamond: Detection analysis on the fraudulent financial reporting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefani Lily Indarto

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The accounting scandal became one of the reasons for analyzing financial statements in order to minimize fraud against the financial reporting. Therefore, companies use the services of a public accountant to audit the financial statements of companies that are expected to limit the fraudulent practices that increase the public’s confidence in the company’s financial statements. This study aims to detect fraud by using analysis of fraud diamond . This study takes banking companies listed on the Indonesian Stock Exchange in 2009-2014, with a total sample of 149 banks. Based on the results the external pressure, financial stability and capability have influence on fraudulent financial reporting. While target financial, ineffective monitoring and rationalization does not affect the fraudulent financial reporting

  8. Limited interlaboratory comparison of Schmallenberg virus antibody detection in serum samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Poel, W. H. M.; Cay, B.; Zientara, S.

    2014-01-01

    Eight veterinary institutes in seven different countries in Europe participated in a limited interlaboratory comparison trial to evaluate laboratory performances of Schmallenberg virus (SBV) antibody detection in serum. Seven different sheep sera and three different cattle sera were circulated, a...

  9. Correction to the count-rate detection limit and sample/blank time-allocation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, Joseph L.

    2013-01-01

    A common form of count-rate detection limits contains a propagation of uncertainty error. This error originated in methods to minimize uncertainty in the subtraction of the blank counts from the gross sample counts by allocation of blank and sample counting times. Correct uncertainty propagation showed that the time allocation equations have no solution. This publication presents the correct form of count-rate detection limits. -- Highlights: •The paper demonstrated a proper method of propagating uncertainty of count rate differences. •The standard count-rate detection limits were in error. •Count-time allocation methods for minimum uncertainty were in error. •The paper presented the correct form of the count-rate detection limit. •The paper discussed the confusion between count-rate uncertainty and count uncertainty

  10. Minimum detection limit and spatial resolution of thin-sample field-emission electron probe microanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, Yugo; Hamada, Kotaro; Urano, Akira

    2013-01-01

    The minimum detection limit and spatial resolution for a thinned semiconductor sample were determined by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) using a Schottky field emission (FE) electron gun and wavelength dispersive X-ray spectrometry. Comparison of the FE-EPMA results with those obtained using energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry in conjunction with scanning transmission electron microscopy, confirmed that FE-EPMA is largely superior in terms of detection sensitivity. Thin-sample FE-EPMA is demonstrated as a very effective method for high resolution, high sensitivity analysis in a laboratory environment because a high probe current and high signal-to-noise ratio can be achieved. - Highlights: • Minimum detection limit and spatial resolution determined for FE-EPMA. • Detection sensitivity of FE-EPMA greatly superior to that of STEM-EDX. • Minimum detection limit and spatial resolution controllable by probe current

  11. Final Technical Report: PV Fault Detection Tool.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Bruce Hardison [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jones, Christian Birk [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The PV Fault Detection Tool project plans to demonstrate that the FDT can (a) detect catastrophic and degradation faults and (b) identify the type of fault. This will be accomplished by collecting fault signatures using different instruments and integrating this information to establish a logical controller for detecting, diagnosing and classifying each fault.

  12. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited annual report 1989-1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    In 1990, after a comprehensive industry review, the Canadian government announced that steps would be taken to revitalize the nuclear industry. Canada's nuclear utilities made a commitment to bear a large share of the cost of nuclear research and development. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) reported its first financial loss in twelve years, as anticipated at the start of the year. Four of the 20 CANDU reactors operating worldwide were in the top ten based on lifetime performance. By year-end one foreign and two domestic utilities had announced their intention to build more CANDU units. The federal government has agreed to stabilize AECL's research funding at 1989-90 levels ($31.5 million above levels planned in 1985), has authorized AECL to negotiate with New Brunswick to build Point Lepreau-2 as the prototype for the CANDU-3 reactor, and has allowed the restructuring of AECL so utility and private sector investors can become equity partners in AECL CANDU

  13. Censoring: a new approach for detection limits in total-reflection X-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pajek, M.; Kubala-Kukus, A.; Braziewicz, J.

    2004-01-01

    It is shown that the detection limits in the total-reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF), which restrict quantification of very low concentrations of trace elements in the samples, can be accounted for using the statistical concept of censoring. We demonstrate that the incomplete TXRF measurements containing the so-called 'nondetects', i.e. the non-measured concentrations falling below the detection limits and represented by the estimated detection limit values, can be viewed as the left random-censored data, which can be further analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier (KM) method correcting for nondetects. Within this approach, which uses the Kaplan-Meier product-limit estimator to obtain the cumulative distribution function corrected for the nondetects, the mean value and median of the detection limit censored concentrations can be estimated in a non-parametric way. The Monte Carlo simulations performed show that the Kaplan-Meier approach yields highly accurate estimates for the mean and median concentrations, being within a few percent with respect to the simulated, uncensored data. This means that the uncertainties of KM estimated mean value and median are limited in fact only by the number of studied samples and not by the applied correction procedure for nondetects itself. On the other hand, it is observed that, in case when the concentration of a given element is not measured in all the samples, simple approaches to estimate a mean concentration value from the data yield erroneous, systematically biased results. The discussed random-left censoring approach was applied to analyze the TXRF detection-limit-censored concentration measurements of trace elements in biomedical samples. We emphasize that the Kaplan-Meier approach allows one to estimate the mean concentrations being substantially below the mean level of detection limits. Consequently, this approach gives a new access to lower the effective detection limits for TXRF method, which is of prime interest for

  14. To report or not to report: a psychosocial investigation aimed at improving early detection of avian influenza outbreaks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elbers, A.R.W.; Gorgievski, M.J.; Zarafshani, K.; Koch, G.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify limitations - and solutions for those limitations – with respect to reporting clinically suspect situations on poultry farms, possibly caused by Avian Influenza (AI) with the ultimate aim to facilitate early detection of AI-outbreaks. Focus group sessions were

  15. Visualizing the Limits of Low Vision in Detecting Natural Image Features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogervorst, M.A.; Damme, W.J.M. van

    2008-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of our study was to develop a tool to visualize the limitations posed by visual impairments in detecting small and low-contrast elements in natural images. This visualization tool incorporates existing models of several aspects of visual perception, such as the band-limited

  16. Investigation of a gamma sensitive Ge-detector with Marinelligeometry. Determination of the detection limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moricz, P.

    1984-01-01

    Different Marinelli geometries have been compared with a 180 ml standard plastic breaker geometry as a reference. The results show that the Marinelli geometries are the best. E.g. the detection limit with a Marinelli geometry of 0.5 l is only half compared with the limit when the standard geometry is used. (Edv)

  17. Decreasing of the detection limit for gamma-ray Spectrometry with the influence of sample treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karami, M.; Sadighzadeh, A.; Asgharizadeh, F.; Sardari, D.; Tavassoli, A.; Arbabi, A.; Hochaghani, O.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: In this study the ash method has been applied for environmental sample treatment in order to decrease of the detection limit in gamma-ray spectrometry for low level radioactivity measurements. Detection limit in gamma ray spectrometry is the smallest expectation value of the net counting rate that can be detected on given probabilities. The environmental test samples have been changed into ash using a suitable oven. The heating were made under controlled temperature to avoid the escape of some radionuclides such as radiocaesium. The ash samples were measured by high resolution gamma-ray spectrometry system. (author)

  18. Potential and limits of Raman spectroscopy for carotenoid detection in microorganisms: implications for astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehlička, Jan; Edwards, Howell G. M.; Osterrothová, Kateřina; Novotná, Julie; Nedbalová, Linda; Kopecký, Jiří; Němec, Ivan; Oren, Aharon

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, it is demonstrated how Raman spectroscopy can be used to detect different carotenoids as possible biomarkers in various groups of microorganisms. The question which arose from previous studies concerns the level of unambiguity of discriminating carotenoids using common Raman microspectrometers. A series of laboratory-grown microorganisms of different taxonomic affiliation was investigated, such as halophilic heterotrophic bacteria, cyanobacteria, the anoxygenic phototrophs, the non-halophilic heterotrophs as well as eukaryotes (Ochrophyta, Rhodophyta and Chlorophyta). The data presented show that Raman spectroscopy is a suitable tool to assess the presence of carotenoids of these organisms in cultures. Comparison is made with the high-performance liquid chromatography approach of analysing pigments in extracts. Direct measurements on cultures provide fast and reliable identification of the pigments. Some of the carotenoids studied are proposed as tracers for halophiles, in contrast with others which can be considered as biomarkers of other genera. The limits of application of Raman spectroscopy are discussed for a few cases where the current Raman spectroscopic approach does not allow discriminating structurally very similar carotenoids. The database reported can be used for applications in geobiology and exobiology for the detection of pigment signals in natural settings. PMID:25368348

  19. The clinical case report: a review of its merits and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissen, Trygve; Wynn, Rolf

    2014-04-23

    The clinical case report has a long-standing tradition in the medical literature. While its scientific significance has become smaller as more advanced research methods have gained ground, case reports are still presented in many medical journals. Some scholars point to its limited value for medical progress, while others assert that the genre is undervalued. We aimed to present the various points of view regarding the merits and limitations of the case report genre. We searched Google Scholar, PubMed and select textbooks on epidemiology and medical research for articles and book-chapters discussing the merits and limitations of clinical case reports and case series. The major merits of case reporting were these: Detecting novelties, generating hypotheses, pharmacovigilance, high applicability when other research designs are not possible to carry out, allowing emphasis on the narrative aspect (in-depth understanding), and educational value. The major limitations were: Lack of ability to generalize, no possibility to establish cause-effect relationship, danger of over-interpretation, publication bias, retrospective design, and distraction of reader when focusing on the unusual. Despite having lost its central role in medical literature in the 20th century, the genre still appears popular. It is a valuable part of the various research methods, especially since it complements other approaches. Furthermore, it also contributes in areas of medicine that are not specifically research-related, e.g. as an educational tool. Revision of the case report genre has been attempted in order to integrate the biomedical model with the narrative approach, but without significant success. The future prospects of the case report could possibly be in new applications of the genre, i.e. exclusive case report databases available online, and open access for clinicians and researchers.

  20. Calculation of the detection limit in radiation measurements with systematic uncertainties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkpatrick, J.M.; Russ, W.; Venkataraman, R.; Young, B.M.

    2015-01-01

    The detection limit (L D ) or Minimum Detectable Activity (MDA) is an a priori evaluation of assay sensitivity intended to quantify the suitability of an instrument or measurement arrangement for the needs of a given application. Traditional approaches as pioneered by Currie rely on Gaussian approximations to yield simple, closed-form solutions, and neglect the effects of systematic uncertainties in the instrument calibration. These approximations are applicable over a wide range of applications, but are of limited use in low-count applications, when high confidence values are required, or when systematic uncertainties are significant. One proposed modification to the Currie formulation attempts account for systematic uncertainties within a Gaussian framework. We have previously shown that this approach results in an approximation formula that works best only for small values of the relative systematic uncertainty, for which the modification of Currie's method is the least necessary, and that it significantly overestimates the detection limit or gives infinite or otherwise non-physical results for larger systematic uncertainties where such a correction would be the most useful. We have developed an alternative approach for calculating detection limits based on realistic statistical modeling of the counting distributions which accurately represents statistical and systematic uncertainties. Instead of a closed form solution, numerical and iterative methods are used to evaluate the result. Accurate detection limits can be obtained by this method for the general case

  1. Censoring approach to the detection limits in X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pajek, M.; Kubala-Kukus, A.

    2004-01-01

    We demonstrate that the effect of detection limits in the X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF), which limits the determination of very low concentrations of trace elements and results in appearance of the so-called 'nondetects', can be accounted for using the statistical concept of censoring. More precisely, the results of such measurements can be viewed as the left random censored data, which can further be analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method correcting the data for the presence of nondetects. Using this approach, the results of measured, detection limit censored concentrations can be interpreted in a nonparametric manner including the correction for the nondetects, i.e. the measurements in which the concentrations were found to be below the actual detection limits. Moreover, using the Monte Carlo simulation technique we show that by using the Kaplan-Meier approach the corrected mean concentrations for a population of the samples can be estimated within a few percent uncertainties with respect of the simulated, uncensored data. This practically means that the final uncertainties of estimated mean values are limited in fact by the number of studied samples and not by the correction procedure itself. The discussed random-left censoring approach was applied to analyze the XRF detection-limit-censored concentration measurements of trace elements in biomedical samples

  2. Prediction of the limit of detection of an optical resonant reflection biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jongcheol; Kim, Kyung-Hyun; Shin, Jae-Heon; Huh, Chul; Sung, Gun Yong

    2007-07-09

    A prediction of the limit of detection of an optical resonant reflection biosensor is presented. An optical resonant reflection biosensor using a guided-mode resonance filter is one of the most promising label-free optical immunosensors due to a sharp reflectance peak and a high sensitivity to the changes of optical path length. We have simulated this type of biosensor using rigorous coupled wave theory to calculate the limit of detection of the thickness of the target protein layer. Theoretically, our biosensor has an estimated ability to detect thickness change approximately the size of typical antigen proteins. We have also investigated the effects of the absorption and divergence of the incident light on the detection ability of the biosensor.

  3. Theoretical detection limit of PIXE analysis using 20 MeV proton beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Keizo; Hitomi, Keitaro

    2018-02-01

    Particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis is usually performed using proton beams with energies in the range 2∼3 MeV because at these energies, the detection limit is low. The detection limit of PIXE analysis depends on the X-ray production cross-section, the continuous background of the PIXE spectrum and the experimental parameters such as the beam currents and the solid angle and detector efficiency of X-ray detector. Though the continuous background increases as the projectile energy increases, the cross-section of the X-ray increases as well. Therefore, the detection limit of high energy proton PIXE is not expected to increase significantly. We calculated the cross sections of continuous X-rays produced in several bremsstrahlung processes and estimated the detection limit of a 20 MeV proton PIXE analysis by modelling the Compton tail of the γ-rays produced in the nuclear reactions, and the escape effect on the secondary electron bremsstrahlung. We found that the Compton tail does not affect the detection limit when a thin X-ray detector is used, but the secondary electron bremsstrahlung escape effect does have an impact. We also confirmed that the detection limit of the PIXE analysis, when used with 4 μm polyethylene backing film and an integrated beam current of 1 μC, is 0.4∼2.0 ppm for proton energies in the range 10∼30 MeV and elements with Z = 16-90. This result demonstrates the usefulness of several 10 MeV cyclotrons for performing PIXE analysis. Cyclotrons with these properties are currently installed in positron emission tomography (PET) centers.

  4. Discuss the technology for decrease the detection limit of NaI(Tl) gamma spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Xiaobin; Qu Guopu; Liu Zhiying; Wang Hongyan; Wang Lieming

    2011-01-01

    The radioelement species is complex and quantity is few after nuclear explosion, thus it is hard to tell the difference when using the Nal (TI) Gamma spectrometer detection due to several kinds of the peak of nuclide overlapped in the scattering region. So there is a high demand for spectrometer stability, energy resolution, solution spectrum and minimum detective activity. The paper analysed the influenced factors to Nal (TI) Gamma spectrometer and the measures of detection limit decrease by experiments and MCNP simulation, which proposed the methods to reduce background through shielding in order to improve minimum detective activity. The experiment shows that choosing reasonable shielding can reduce the background effectively and improve the spectrometer low level radioactive detect ability. (authors)

  5. Current methods of handling less-than-detectable measurements and detection limits in statistical analysis of environmental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hertzler, C.L.; Atwood, C.L.; Harris, G.A.

    1989-09-01

    A search was made of statistical literature that might be applicable in environmental assessment contexts, when some of the measured quantities are reported as less than detectable (LTD). Over 60 documents were reviewed, and the findings are described in this report. The methodological areas considered are parameter estimation (point estimates and confidence intervals), tolerance intervals and prediction intervals, regression, trend analysis, comparisons of populations (including two-sample comparisons and analysis of variance), and goodness of fit tests. The conclusions are summarized at the end of the report. 68 refs., 1 tab

  6. The Use and Abuse of Limits of Detection in Environmental Analytical Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J. C. Brown

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The limit of detection (LoD serves as an important method performance measure that is useful for the comparison of measurement techniques and the assessment of likely signal to noise performance, especially in environmental analytical chemistry. However, the LoD is only truly related to the precision characteristics of the analytical instrument employed for the analysis and the content of analyte in the blank sample. This article discusses how other criteria, such as sampling volume, can serve to distort the quoted LoD artificially and make comparison between various analytical methods inequitable. In order to compare LoDs between methods properly, it is necessary to state clearly all of the input parameters relating to the measurements that have been used in the calculation of the LoD. Additionally, the article discusses that the use of LoDs in contexts other than the comparison of the attributes of analytical methods, in particular when reporting analytical results, may be confusing, less informative than quoting the actual result with an accompanying statement of uncertainty, and may act to bias descriptive statistics.

  7. Improved detection limits for phthalates by selective solid-phase micro-extraction

    KAUST Repository

    Zia, Asif I.

    2016-03-30

    Presented research reports on an improved method and enhanced limits of detection for phthalates; a hazardous additive used in the production of plastics by solid-phase micro-extraction (SPME) polymer in comparison to molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction (MISPE) polymer. The polymers were functionalized on an interdigital capacitive sensor for selective binding of phthalate molecules from a complex mixture of chemicals. Both polymers owned predetermined selectivity by formation of valuable molecular recognition sites for Bis (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP). Polymers were immobilized on planar electrochemical sensor fabricated on a single crystal silicon substrate with 500 nm sputtered gold electrodes fabricated using MEMS fabrication techniques. Impedance spectra were obtained using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) to determine sample conductance for evaluation of phthalate concentration in the spiked sample solutions with various phthalate concentrations. Experimental results revealed that the ability of SPME polymer to adsorb target molecules on the sensing surface is better than that of MISPE polymer for phthalates in the sensing system. Testing the extracted samples using high performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detectors validated the results.

  8. Detecting Careless Responses to Self-Reported Questionnaires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kountur, Ronny

    2016-01-01

    Problem Statement: The use of self-report questionnaires may lead to biases such as careless responses that distort the research outcomes. Early detection of careless responses in self-report questionnaires may reduce error, but little guidance exists in the literature regarding techniques for detecting such careless or random responses in…

  9. The detection limits of antimicrobial agents in cow's milk by a simple Yoghurt Culture Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohsenzadeh, M; Bahrainipour, A

    2008-09-15

    The aim of this study was to study performance of Yoghurt Culture Test (YCT) in the detection of antimicrobial residues in milk. For this purpose, the sensitivity of YCT for 15 antibiotics were determined. For each drug, 8 concentrations were tested. The detection limits of YCT at 2.5 h and 4 h incubation were determined (microg kg(-1)): 15 and 37.5, penicillin G; 4 and 5, ampicillin; 5 and 7.5, amoxycillin; 100 and 200, cephalexin; 80 and 100, cefazoline; 100 and 200, oxytetracycline; 500 and 100, chlortetracycline; 100 and 200, tetracycline; 150 and 200, doxycycline; 200 and 400, sulphadimidine; 500 and 1000, gentamycin; 1000 and 1500, spectinomycin; 400 and 500, erythromycin; 50 and 100, tylosin; 5000 and 10000, chloramphenicol. The YCT detection limits at 2.5 h incubation for ampicillin, cephalexin, tetracycline, oxytetracycline and tylosin are similar to those obtained as Maximum Residue Limit (MRL) according to Regulation 2377/90 EEC as set out by the European Union. In addition the detection limits of YCT for some antibiotics were lower than some of microbial inhibitor test.

  10. Detection limits of antimicrobials in ewe milk by delvotest photometric measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althaus, R L; Torres, A; Montero, A; Balasch, S; Molina, M P

    2003-02-01

    The Delvotest method detection limits per manufacturer's instructions at a fixed reading time of 3 h for 24 antimicrobial agents were determined in ewe milk by photometric measurement. For each drug, eight concentrations were tested on 20 ewe milk samples from individual ewes. Detection limits, determined by means of logistic regression models, were (microg/kg): 3, amoxycillin; 2, ampicillin; 18, cloxacillin; 1, penicillin "G"; 34, cefadroxil; 430, cephalosporin "C"; 40, cephalexin; 20, cefoperazone; 33, Ceftiofur; 18, cefuroxime; 6100, streptomycin; 1200, gentamycin; 2600, neomycin; 830, erythromycin; 100, tylosin; 180, doxycycline; 320, oxytetracycline; 590, tetracycline; 88, sulfadiazine; 44, sulfamethoxazole; 140, sulfametoxypyridazine; 48, sulfaquinoxaline; 12,000, chloramphenicol; and 290, trimethoprim. Whereas the beta-lactam antibiotics, sulphonamides, and tylosin were detected by Delvotest method at levels equal to those of maximum residue limits, its sensitivity needs to be enhanced to detect aminoglycosides, tetracyclines, streptomycin, chloramphenicol, and trimethoprim residues in ewe milk or to develop an integrated residue detection system for ewe milk with different sensitive microorganisms for each group of antiinfectious agents.

  11. Investigation on feasibility and detection limits for determination of coating film thickness by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Maoying; Xu Jiayun; Zhang Dida; Yang Zunyong; Yao Zhenqiang; Wang Mingqiu; Gao Dangzhong

    2010-01-01

    A method for the determination of coating film thickness by neutron activation was proposed in this paper. After Au, Al and Cu et al.films were activated with a Am-Be neutron source, the characteristic γ-rays emitted by the activated nuclides in the films were counted with a HPGe γ spectrometer. The detection limits of film thickness by using a nuclear reactor neutron source were deduced on the basis of the γ-ray counts and the Monte-Carlo simulated detection efficiencies. The possible detection limits are typically 4-5 orders of magnitude better than those by fluorescent X-ray method, which is currently widely used to determine coating film thickness. (authors)

  12. REPORTING SOCIETAL : LIMITES ET ENJEUX DE LA PROPOSITION DE NORMALISATION INTERNATIONALE " GLOBAL REPORTING INITIATIVE "

    OpenAIRE

    Michel Capron; Françoise Quairel

    2003-01-01

    International audience; En s'inspirant de la normalisation comptable anglo-saxonne, la Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) propose un référentiel de publication volontaire d'informations sociétales. La transposition présente des limites qui rendent en fait ses principes inapplicables. Néanmoins il tend à s'imposer et les grandes entreprises peuvent y trouver le moyen d'éviter une régulation contraignante.

  13. Aerosol quantification with the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer: detection limits and ionizer background effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Borrmann

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Systematic laboratory experiments were performed to investigate quantification of various species with two versions of the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer, a Quadrupole Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (Q-AMS and a compact Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (c-ToF-AMS. Here we present a new method to continuously determine the detection limits of the AMS analyzers during regular measurements, yielding detection limit (DL information under various measurement conditions. Minimum detection limits range from 0.03 μg m−3 (nitrate, sulfate, and chloride up to 0.5 μg m−3 (organics for the Q-AMS. Those of the c-ToF-AMS are found between 0.003 μg m−3 (nitrate, sulfate and 0.03 μg m−3 (ammonium, organics. The DL values found for the c-ToF-AMS were ~10 times lower than those of the Q-AMS, mainly due to differences in ion duty cycle. Effects causing an increase of the detection limits include long-term instrument contamination, measurement of high aerosol mass concentrations and short-term instrument history. The self-cleaning processes which reduce the instrument background after measurement of large aerosol concentrations as well as the influences of increased instrument background on mass concentration measurements are discussed. Finally, improvement of detection limits by extension of averaging time intervals, selected or reduced ion monitoring, and variation of particle-to-background measurement ratio are investigated.

  14. Resistive current limiter with high-temperature superconductors. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubert, M.

    1995-12-01

    Fundamental results of the possibility of using high temperature superconductors (HTSC) in resistive fault current limiters are discussed. Measurement of the homogeneity of BSCCO-powder-in-tube materials were made. In addition, investigations of the transition from superconducting to normalconducting state under AC-current conditions were carried out. Based on these results, simulations of HTSC-materials on ceramic substrate were made and recent results are presented. Important results of the investigations are: 1. Current-limiting without external trigger only possible when the critical current density of HTSC exceeds 10 4 A/cm 2 . 2. Inhomogeneities sometimes cause problems with local destruction. This can be solved by parallel-elements or external trigger. 3. Fast current-limiting causes overvoltages which can be reduced by using parallel-elements. (orig.) [de

  15. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, annual report, 1995-1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The 1996 Annual Report of Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL) is published and submitted to the Honourable member of Parliament, Minister of Natural Resources. Included in this report are messages from Marketing and Commercial Operation, Product Development, i e.CANDU and Research Reactors, CANDU research, Waste Management, Environmental Management, Financial Review and also included are copies of the financial statements.

  16. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, annual report, 1995-1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The 1996 Annual Report of Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL) is published and submitted to the Honourable member of Parliament, Minister of Natural Resources. Included in this report are messages from Marketing and Commercial Operation, Product Development, i e.CANDU and Research Reactors, CANDU research, Waste Management, Environmental Management, Financial Review and also included are copies of the financial statements

  17. Detection and quantification limits: basic concepts, international harmonization, and outstanding ('low-level') issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currie, L.A.

    2004-01-01

    A brief review is given of concepts, basic definitions, and terminology for metrological detection and quantification capabilities, representing harmonized recommendations and norms of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), respectively. Treatment of the (low-level) blank and variance function are discussed in some detail, together with special problems arising with detection decisions and the reporting of low-level data. Key references to the international documents follow, as well as specialized references addressing very low-level counting data, skewed environmental blank distributions, and multiple and multivariate detection decisions

  18. Gold nanoparticle-based low limit of detection Love wave biosensor for carcinoembryonic antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuangming; Wan, Ying; Su, Yan; Fan, Chunhai; Bhethanabotla, Venkat R

    2017-09-15

    In this work, a Love wave biosensing platform is described for detecting cancer-related biomarker carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). An ST 90°-X quartz Love wave device with a layer of SiO 2 waveguide was combined with gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) to amplify the mass loading effect of the acoustic wave sensor to achieve a limit of detection of 37pg/mL. The strategy involves modifying the Au NPs with anti-CEA antibody conjugates to form nanoprobes in a sandwich immunoassay. The unamplified detection limit of the Love wave biosensor is 9.4ng/mL. This 2-3 order of magnitude reduction in the limit of detection brings the SAW platform into the range useful for clinical diagnosis. Measurement electronics and microfluidics are easily constructed for acoustic wave biosensors, such as the Love wave device described here, allowing for robust platforms for point of care applications for cancer biomarkers in general. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Limits of 2D-TCA in detecting BOLD responses to epileptic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatamian, Yasha Borna; Fahoum, Firas; Gotman, Jean

    2011-05-01

    Two-dimensional temporal clustering analysis (2D-TCA) is a relatively new functional MRI (fMRI) based technique that breaks blood oxygen level dependent activity into separate components based on timing and has shown potential for localizing epileptic activity independently of electroencephalography (EEG). 2D-TCA has only been applied to detect epileptic activity in a few studies and its limits in detecting activity of various forms (i.e. activation size, amplitude, and frequency) have not been investigated. This study evaluated 2D-TCA's ability to detect various forms of both simulated epileptic activity and EEG-fMRI activity detected in patients. When applied to simulated data, 2D-TCA consistently detected activity in 6min runs containing 5 spikes/run, 10 spikes/run, and one 5s long event with hemodynamic response function amplitudes of at least 1.5%, 1.25%, and 1% above baseline respectively. When applied to patient data, while detection of interictal spikes was inconsistent, 2D-TCA consistently produced results similar to those obtained by EEG-fMRI when at least 2 prolonged interictal events (a few seconds each) occurred during the run. However, even for such cases it was determined that 2D-TCA can only be used to validate localization by other means or to create hypotheses as to where activity may occur, as it also detects changes not caused by epileptic activity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. NNC Limited (formerly National Nuclear Corporation Limited) report and financial statements 31 March 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    Developments in the year ending 31st March 1989 within NNC Ltd. are reviewed in outline. These include work on the Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor Power Stations under construction at Heysham 2 and Torness; operational support and maintenance work on most of the UK's nuclear power stations; Pressurized Water Reactor work on systems and safety, engineering support and research and development; management support of the Ministry of Defence at the AWE site at Aldermaston and a range of services relating to nuclear submarines. Financial statements for the year conclude, and form the bulk of the report. (UK)

  1. Bayesian-statistical decision threshold, detection limit, and confidence interval in nuclear radiation measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weise, K.

    1998-01-01

    When a contribution of a particular nuclear radiation is to be detected, for instance, a spectral line of interest for some purpose of radiation protection, and quantities and their uncertainties must be taken into account which, such as influence quantities, cannot be determined by repeated measurements or by counting nuclear radiation events, then conventional statistics of event frequencies is not sufficient for defining the decision threshold, the detection limit, and the limits of a confidence interval. These characteristic limits are therefore redefined on the basis of Bayesian statistics for a wider applicability and in such a way that the usual practice remains as far as possible unaffected. The principle of maximum entropy is applied to establish probability distributions from available information. Quantiles of these distributions are used for defining the characteristic limits. But such a distribution must not be interpreted as a distribution of event frequencies such as the Poisson distribution. It rather expresses the actual state of incomplete knowledge of a physical quantity. The different definitions and interpretations and their quantitative consequences are presented and discussed with two examples. The new approach provides a theoretical basis for the DIN 25482-10 standard presently in preparation for general applications of the characteristic limits. (orig.) [de

  2. Compact quantum dot-antibody conjugates for FRET immunoassays with subnanomolar detection limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattera, Lucia; Bhuckory, Shashi; Wegner, K. David; Qiu, Xue; Agnese, Fabio; Lincheneau, Christophe; Senden, Tim; Djurado, David; Charbonnière, Loïc J.; Hildebrandt, Niko; Reiss, Peter

    2016-05-01

    A novel two-step approach for quantum dot (QD) functionalization and bioconjugation is presented, which yields ultra-compact, stable, and highly luminescent antibody-QD conjugates suitable for use in FRET immunoassays. Hydrophobic InPZnS/ZnSe/ZnS (emission wavelength: 530 nm), CdSe/ZnS (605 nm), and CdSeTe/ZnS (705 nm) QDs were surface functionalized with zwitterionic penicillamine, enabling aqueous phase transfer under conservation of the photoluminescence properties. Post-functionalization with a heterobifunctional crosslinker, containing a lipoic acid group and a maleimide function, enabled the subsequent coupling to sulfhydryl groups of proteins. This was demonstrated by QD conjugation with fragmented antibodies (F(ab)). The obtained F(ab)-QD conjugates range among the smallest antibody-functionalized nanoprobes ever reported, with a hydrodynamic diameter coating for FRET could be demonstrated by an 6.2 and 2.5 fold improvement of the limit of detection (LOD) for PSA compared to commercially available hydrophilic QDs emitting at 605 and 705 nm, respectively. While the commercial QDs contain identical inorganic cores responsible for their fluorescence, they are coated with a comparably thick amphiphilic polymer layer leading to much larger hydrodynamic diameters (>26 nm without biomolecules). The LODs of 0.8 and 3.7 ng mL-1 obtained in 50 μL serum samples are below the clinical cut-off level of PSA (4 ng mL-1) and demonstrate their direct applicability in clinical diagnostics.A novel two-step approach for quantum dot (QD) functionalization and bioconjugation is presented, which yields ultra-compact, stable, and highly luminescent antibody-QD conjugates suitable for use in FRET immunoassays. Hydrophobic InPZnS/ZnSe/ZnS (emission wavelength: 530 nm), CdSe/ZnS (605 nm), and CdSeTe/ZnS (705 nm) QDs were surface functionalized with zwitterionic penicillamine, enabling aqueous phase transfer under conservation of the photoluminescence properties. Post

  3. Improved sensitivity and limit-of-detection of lateral flow devices using spatial constrictions of the flow-path.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katis, Ioannis N; He, Peijun J W; Eason, Robert W; Sones, Collin L

    2018-05-03

    We report on the use of a laser-direct write (LDW) technique that allows the fabrication of lateral flow devices with enhanced sensitivity and limit of detection. This manufacturing technique comprises the dispensing of a liquid photopolymer at specific regions of a nitrocellulose membrane and its subsequent photopolymerisation to create impermeable walls inside the volume of the membrane. These polymerised structures are intentionally designed to create fluidic channels which are constricted over a specific length that spans the test zone within which the sample interacts with pre-deposited reagents. Experiments were conducted to show how these constrictions alter the fluid flow rate and the test zone area within the constricted channel geometries. The slower flow rate and smaller test zone area result in the increased sensitivity and lowered limit of detection for these devices. We have quantified these via the improved performance of a C-Reactive Protein (CRP) sandwich assay on our lateral flow devices with constricted flow paths which demonstrate an improvement in its sensitivity by 62x and in its limit of detection by 30x when compared to a standard lateral flow CRP device. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Detecting terrestrial nutrient limitation: a global meta-analysis of foliar nutrient concentrations after fertilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca eOstertag

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Examining foliar nutrient concentrations after fertilization provides an alternative method for detecting nutrient limitation of ecosystems, which is logistically simpler to measure than biomass change. We present a meta-analysis of response ratios of foliar nitrogen and phosphorus (RRN, RRP after addition of fertilizer of nitrogen (N, phosphorus (P, or the two elements in combination, in relation to climate, ecosystem type, life form, family, and methodological factors. Results support other meta-analyses using biomass, and demonstrate there is strong evidence for nutrient limitation in natural communities. However, because N fertilization experiments greatly outnumber P fertilization trials, it is difficult to discern the absolute importance of N vs. P vs. co-limitation across ecosystems. Despite these caveats, it is striking that results did not follow conventional wisdom that temperate ecosystems are N-limited and tropical ones are P-limited. In addition, the use of ratios of N-to-P rather than response ratios also are a useful index of nutrient limitation, but due to large overlap in values, there are unlikely to be universal cutoff values for delimiting N vs. P limitation. Differences in RRN and RRP were most significant across ecosystem types, plant families, life forms, and between competitive environments, but not across climatic variables.

  5. Thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) of actinides: Pushing the limits of accuracy and detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buerger, Stefan; Boulyga, Sergei; Cunningham, Alan; Klose, Dilani; Koepf, Andreas; Poths, Jane [Safeguards Analytical Laboratory, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Richter, Stephan [Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, JRC-EU, Geel (Belgium)

    2010-07-01

    New method developments in multi-collector thermal ionization mass spectrometry (MC-TIMS) for actinide isotope ratio analysis to improve accuracy and limits of detection will be presented. With respect to limits of detection, results on improving work function using various carbon additives will be reviewed and presented as well as developments in cavity ion source (as compared to standard flat ribbon filament ion source) for femto- and attogram levels of uranium, plutonium, and americium. With respect to accuracy, results on isotope ratio measurements of isotopes of uranium (relative accuracy of 0.3% to 0.01%) are presented with an example being U-234-Th-230 age-dating (NBL CRM 112-A). In this context, the importance of traceability (to the S.I. units) and the use of (certified) reference materials are emphasized. The focus of this presentation is on applications to nuclear safeguards / forensics.

  6. Flexible Modeling of Survival Data with Covariates Subject to Detection Limits via Multiple Imputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, Paul W; Wang, Huixia Judy; Zhang, Daowen

    2014-01-01

    Models for survival data generally assume that covariates are fully observed. However, in medical studies it is not uncommon for biomarkers to be censored at known detection limits. A computationally-efficient multiple imputation procedure for modeling survival data with covariates subject to detection limits is proposed. This procedure is developed in the context of an accelerated failure time model with a flexible seminonparametric error distribution. The consistency and asymptotic normality of the multiple imputation estimator are established and a consistent variance estimator is provided. An iterative version of the proposed multiple imputation algorithm that approximates the EM algorithm for maximum likelihood is also suggested. Simulation studies demonstrate that the proposed multiple imputation methods work well while alternative methods lead to estimates that are either biased or more variable. The proposed methods are applied to analyze the dataset from a recently-conducted GenIMS study.

  7. Detection limits of pollutants in water for PGNAA using Am-Be source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khelifi, R.; Amokrane, A.; Bode, P.

    2007-01-01

    A basic PGNAA facility with an Am-Be neutron source is described to analyze the pollutants in water. The properties of neutron flux were determined by MCNP calculations. In order to determine the efficiency curve of a HPGe detector, the prompt-gamma rays from chlorine were used and an exponential curve was fitted. The detection limits for typical water sample are also estimated using the statistical fluctuations of the background level in the areas of recorded the prompt-gamma spectrum

  8. Molecular techniques for detection and identification of pathogens in food: advantages and limitations

    OpenAIRE

    Palomino-Camargo, Carolina; Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnología de Alimentos, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Central de Venezuela. Caracas, Venezuela. Magíster en Ciencia y Tecnología de los Alimentos licenciada en Biología; González-Muñoz, Yuniesky; Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnología de Alimentos, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Central de Venezuela. Caracas, Venezuela. Ministerio del Poder Popular para la Alimentación. Caracas, Venezuela. licenciado en Ciencias de los Alimentos.

    2014-01-01

    Foodborne diseases, caused by pathogenic microorganisms, are a major public health problem worldwide. Microbiological methods commonly used in the detection of these foodborne pathogens are laborious and time consuming. This situation, coupled with the demand for immediate results and with technological advances, has led to the development of a wide range of rapid methods in recent decades. On this basis, this review describes the advantages and limitations of the main molecular methods used ...

  9. On the definition of the detection limit for non-selective determination of low activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tschurlovits, M.

    1977-01-01

    Based on the latest published results, a detection limit which is easy to use in practical work without intensive consideration of counting statistics, is presented. The primary application of the given definition is the determination of gross activity. In the definition the error of the second kind as well as one-sided boundedness of the normal distribution are included. The results are given in graphical form. (orig.) [de

  10. Evaluation on the detection limit of blood hemoglobin using photolepthysmography based on path-length optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Di; Guo, Chao; Zhang, Ziyang; Han, Tongshuai; Liu, Jin

    2016-10-01

    The blood hemoglobin concentration's (BHC) measurement using Photoplethysmography (PPG), which gets blood absorption to near infrared light from the instantaneous pulse of transmitted light intensity, has not been applied to the clinical use due to the non-enough precision. The main challenge might be caused of the non-enough stable pulse signal when it's very weak and it often varies in different human bodies or in the same body with different physiological states. We evaluated the detection limit of BHC using PPG as the measurement precision level, which can be considered as a best precision result because we got the relative stable subject's pulse signals recorded by using a spectrometer with high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) level, which is about 30000:1 in short term. Moreover, we optimized the used pathlength using the theory based on optimum pathlength to get a better sensitivity to the absorption variation in blood. The best detection limit was evaluated as about 1 g/L for BHC, and the best SNR of pulse for in vivo measurement was about 2000:1 at 1130 and 1250 nm. Meanwhile, we conclude that the SNR of pulse signal should be better than 400:1 when the required detection limit is set to 5 g/L. Our result would be a good reference to the BHC measurement to get a desired BHC measurement precision of real application.

  11. Predictive inference for best linear combination of biomarkers subject to limits of detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coolen-Maturi, Tahani

    2017-08-15

    Measuring the accuracy of diagnostic tests is crucial in many application areas including medicine, machine learning and credit scoring. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve is a useful tool to assess the ability of a diagnostic test to discriminate between two classes or groups. In practice, multiple diagnostic tests or biomarkers are combined to improve diagnostic accuracy. Often, biomarker measurements are undetectable either below or above the so-called limits of detection (LoD). In this paper, nonparametric predictive inference (NPI) for best linear combination of two or more biomarkers subject to limits of detection is presented. NPI is a frequentist statistical method that is explicitly aimed at using few modelling assumptions, enabled through the use of lower and upper probabilities to quantify uncertainty. The NPI lower and upper bounds for the ROC curve subject to limits of detection are derived, where the objective function to maximize is the area under the ROC curve. In addition, the paper discusses the effect of restriction on the linear combination's coefficients on the analysis. Examples are provided to illustrate the proposed method. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Detection and grading of dAVF: prospects and limitations of 3T MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bink, Andrea; Berkefeld, Joachim; Wagner, Marlies; You, Se-Jong; Ackermann, Hanns; Lorenz, Matthias W; Senft, Christian; du Mesnil de Rochemont, Richard

    2012-02-01

    DSA is currently the criterion standard for the assessment of dural arteriovenous fistulas (dAVF). Recently, evolving MRA techniques have emerged as a non-invasive alternative. The aim of this study is to assess the value of 3 T MRI in detecting and describing dAVF and to determine whether MRI can replace DSA as diagnostic procedure. A total of 19 patients with dAVF and 19 without dAVF underwent the same MRI protocol, including 3D time-of-flight MRA and time-resolved contrast-enhanced MRA. The images were evaluated retrospectively by three independent readers with different levels of experience blinded to clinical information. The readers assessed the presence, the site, the venous drainage and the feeders of dAVF. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, intertechnique and interobserver agreements were calculated. DAVF can be detected with high sensitivity, specificity and accuracy by experienced and also by less experienced readers. However, MRI has limitations when used for grading and evaluation of the angioarchitecture of the dAVF. Different experience, the limited resolution of MRI and its inability to selectively display arteries were the reasons for these limitations. With MRI dAVF can be detected reliably. Nevertheless, at present MRI can not fully replace DSA, especially for treatment planning.

  13. Detection limits for real-time source water monitoring using indigenous freshwater microalgae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Jr, Miguel [ORNL; Greenbaum, Elias [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    This research identified toxin detection limits using the variable fluorescence of naturally occurring microalgae in source drinking water for five chemical toxins with different molecular structures and modes of toxicity. The five chemicals investigated were atrazine, Diuron, paraquat, methyl parathion, and potassium cyanide. Absolute threshold sensitivities of the algae for detection of the toxins in unmodified source drinking water were measured. Differential kinetics between the rate of action of the toxins and natural changes in algal physiology, such as diurnal photoinhibition, are significant enough that effects of the toxin can be detected and distinguished from the natural variance. This is true even for physiologically impaired algae where diminished photosynthetic capacity may arise from uncontrollable external factors such as nutrient starvation. Photoinhibition induced by high levels of solar radiation is a predictable and reversible phenomenon that can be dealt with using a period of dark adaption of 30 minutes or more.

  14. Effects of line dancing on physical function and perceived limitation in older adults with self-reported mobility limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Crystal G; Hackney, Madeleine E

    2018-06-01

    Older adults with mobility limitations are at greater risk for aging-related declines in physical function. Line dancing is a popular form of exercise that can be modified, and is thus feasible for older adults with mobility limitations. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of 8 weeks of line dancing on balance, muscle strength, lower extremity function, endurance, gait speed, and perceived mobility limitations. An experimental design randomly assigned older adults to either an 8-week line dancing or usual care group. The convenience sample consisted of 23 participants with mobility limitations (age range: 65-93 years). The intervention used simple routines from novice line dance classes. At baseline and at 8 weeks, balance, knee muscle strength, lower extremity function, endurance, gait speed, and mobility limitations were measured. ANCOVA tests were conducted on each dependent variable to assess the effects of the intervention over time. Results found significant positive differences for the intervention group in lower extremity function (p dancing significantly improved physical function and reduced self-reported mobility limitations in these individuals. Line dancing could be recommended by clinicians as a potential adjunct therapy that addresses mobility limitations. Implications for Rehabilitation Line dancing may be an alternative exercise for older adults who need modifications due to mobility limitations. Line dancing incorporates cognitive and motor control. Line dancing can be performed alone or in a group setting. Dancing improves balance which can reduce risk of falls.

  15. Limited magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine has high sensitivity for detection of acute fractures, infection, and malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Benjamin; Fintelmann, Florian J.; Kamath, Ravi S.; Kattapuram, Susan V.; Rosenthal, Daniel I.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine how a limited protocol MR examination compares to a full conventional MR examination for the detection of non-degenerative pathology such as acute fracture, infection, and malignancy. A sample of 349 non-contrast MR exams was selected retrospectively containing a 3:1:1:1 distribution of negative/degenerative change only, acute fracture, infection, and malignancy. This resulted in an even distribution of pathology and non-pathology. A limited protocol MR exam was simulated by extracting T1-weighted sagittal and T2-weighted fat-saturated (or STIR) sagittal sequences from each exam and submitting them for blinded review by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists. The exams were evaluated for the presence or absence of non-degenerative pathology. Interpretation of the limited exam was compared to the original report of the full examination. If either reader disagreed with the original report, the case was submitted for an unblinded adjudication process with the participation of a third musculoskeletal radiologist to establish a consensus diagnosis. There were five false negatives for a sensitivity of 96.9 % for the limited protocol MR exam. Infection in the psoas, paraspinal muscles, and sacroiliac joint, as well as acute fractures in transverse processes and sacrum were missed by one or more readers. No cases of malignancy were missed. Overall diagnostic accuracy was 96.0 % (335/349). MR imaging of the lumbar spine limited to sagittal T1-weighted and sagittal T2 fat-saturated (or STIR) sequences has high sensitivity for the detection of acute fracture, infection, or malignancy compared to a conventional MR examination. (orig.)

  16. Limited magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine has high sensitivity for detection of acute fractures, infection, and malignancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Benjamin; Fintelmann, Florian J.; Kamath, Ravi S.; Kattapuram, Susan V.; Rosenthal, Daniel I. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-12-15

    The objective of this study is to determine how a limited protocol MR examination compares to a full conventional MR examination for the detection of non-degenerative pathology such as acute fracture, infection, and malignancy. A sample of 349 non-contrast MR exams was selected retrospectively containing a 3:1:1:1 distribution of negative/degenerative change only, acute fracture, infection, and malignancy. This resulted in an even distribution of pathology and non-pathology. A limited protocol MR exam was simulated by extracting T1-weighted sagittal and T2-weighted fat-saturated (or STIR) sagittal sequences from each exam and submitting them for blinded review by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists. The exams were evaluated for the presence or absence of non-degenerative pathology. Interpretation of the limited exam was compared to the original report of the full examination. If either reader disagreed with the original report, the case was submitted for an unblinded adjudication process with the participation of a third musculoskeletal radiologist to establish a consensus diagnosis. There were five false negatives for a sensitivity of 96.9 % for the limited protocol MR exam. Infection in the psoas, paraspinal muscles, and sacroiliac joint, as well as acute fractures in transverse processes and sacrum were missed by one or more readers. No cases of malignancy were missed. Overall diagnostic accuracy was 96.0 % (335/349). MR imaging of the lumbar spine limited to sagittal T1-weighted and sagittal T2 fat-saturated (or STIR) sequences has high sensitivity for the detection of acute fracture, infection, or malignancy compared to a conventional MR examination. (orig.)

  17. Rapid Detection Strategies for the Global Threat of Zika Virus: Current State, New Hypotheses and Limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Shukla

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The current scenario regarding the widespread Zika virus (ZIKV has resulted in numerous diagnostic studies, specifically in South America and in locations where there is frequent entry of travelers returning from ZIKV-affected areas, including pregnant women with or without clinical symptoms of ZIKV infection. The World Health Organization, WHO, announced that millions of cases of ZIKV are likely to occur in the United States of America in the near future. This situation has created an alarming public health emergency of international concern requiring the detection of this life-threatening viral candidate due to increased cases of newborn microcephaly associated with ZIKV infection. Hence, this review reports possible methods and strategies for the fast and reliable detection of ZIKV with particular emphasis on current updates, knowledge and new hypotheses that might be helpful for medical professionals in poor and developing countries that urgently need to address this problem. In particular, we emphasize liposome-based biosensors. Although these biosensors are currently among the less popular tools for human disease detection, they have become useful tools for the screening and detection of pathogenic bacteria, fungi and viruses because of their versatile advantageous features compared to other sensing devices. This review summarizes the currently available methods employed for the rapid detection of ZIKV and suggests an innovative approach involving the application of a liposome-based hypothesis for the development of new strategies for ZIKV detection and their use as effective biomedicinal tools.

  18. How low can the detection limit go with VPD-TXRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.; Balazs, M.; Pianetta, P.; Baur, K.; Brennan, S.; Boone, T.; Rosamilia, J.

    2000-01-01

    The detection limit for synchrotron radiation total reflection x-ray fluorescence (TXRF) that can routinely be achieved for transition metals is about 8E7 atoms/cm 2 for a standard 1000 second counting time. This high sensitivity can be further improved by using a pre-concentration process such as vapor phase decomposition (VPD). The sensitivity enhancement of VPD-TXRF over TXRF is usually estimated from the ratio of the total wafer surface area to the instrumental sampling area on the wafer. For example, a 200 mm wafer with a 5 mm edge exclusion has a total surface area of 283.5 cm 2 . Assuming a sampling area of 0.126 cm 2 for the TXRF instrument at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) the gain in sensitivity for the VPD-TXRF technique will be 1 : 2250. This means, theoretically, that the TXRF detection limit of 8E7 atoms/cm 2 could be further reduced to 3.6 E4 atoms/cm 2 by applying this technique. During the VPD process, the contaminants on the wafer surface will be collected into a single droplet and dried on the wafer surface for TXRF analysis. However, impurities in the UPW (ultra pure water), chemicals or from handling cannot be ignored. Our investigation of wafers subjected, to different cleaning processes has revealed that background signals on the dry spot could arise from the VPD process itself. Therefore, the baseline determined by the purity of the UPW and starting chemicals limits the detection limits of VPD-SR-TXRF. (author)

  19. FY2011 Annual Report for the Actinide Isomer Detection Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, Glen A.; Francy, Christopher J.; Ressler, Jennifer J.; Erikson, Luke E.; Tatishvili, Gocha; Hatarik, R.

    2011-01-01

    This project seeks to identify a new signature for actinide element detection in active interrogation. This technique works by exciting and identifying long-lived nuclear excited states (isomers) in the actinide isotopes and/or primary fission products. Observation of isomers in the fission products will provide a signature for fissile material. For the actinide isomers, the decay time and energy of the isomeric state is unique to a particular isotope, providing an unambiguous signature for SNM. This project entails isomer identification and characterization and neutron population studies. This document summarizes activities from its third year - completion of the isomer identification characterization experiments and initialization of the neutron population experiments. The population and decay of the isomeric state in 235U remain elusive, although a number of candidate gamma rays have been identified. In the course of the experiments, a number of fission fragment isomers were populated and measured (Ressler 2010). The decays from these isomers may also provide a suitable signature for the presence of fissile material. Several measurements were conducted throughout this project. This report focuses on the results of an experiment conducted collaboratively by PNNL, LLNL and LBNL in December 2010 at LBNL. The measurement involved measuring the gamma-rays emitted from an HEU target when bombarded with 11 MeV neutrons. This report discussed the analysis and resulting conclusions from those measurements. There was one strong candidate, at 1204 keV, of an isomeric signature of 235U. The half-life of the state is estimated to be 9.3 μs. The measured time dependence fits the decay time structure very well. Other possible explanations for the 1204-keV state were investigated, but they could not explain the gamma ray. Unfortunately, the relatively limited statistics of the measurement limit, and the lack of understanding of some of the systematic of the experiment, limit

  20. Lower Churchill Development Corporation Limited: 1998 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-06-01

    This is the 20th annual report to the Board of Directors of the Lower Churchill Development Corp. Ltd. for the year ending Dec. 31, 1998. The Corp. remains ready to proceed with hydroelectric power developments at Gull Island and/or Muskrat Falls following definitive shareholder direction. The accounting policy followed by the Corp. is in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles in Canada. It follows the practice of capitalizing the cost related to studies in respect of the development of the Lower Churchill Basis, as well administrative and other costs. Pursuant to the provisions of the Principal Agreement, Newfoundland agreed to enter into an Option Agreement, dated Nov. 24, 1978, with the Corp. in respect of the Gull Island Power Corp. Ltd. assets and the hydroelectric development rights to the Lower Churchill River. The Class A shares issued in the Corp. as of Dec. 31, 1998 are listed. Under an agreement between Hydro and the Corp., Hydro provides certain administrative and engineering services to the Corp. as needed. No fees were paid to Hydro for 2 years. In connection with the Y2K problem, management developed and is implementing a plan designed to identify and address the expected effects of the Year 2000 issue on the company

  1. Detection limits of Legionella pneumophila in environmental samples after co-culture with Acanthamoeba polyphaga

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The efficiency of recovery and the detection limit of Legionella after co-culture with Acanthamoeba polyphaga are not known and so far no investigations have been carried out to determine the efficiency of the recovery of Legionella spp. by co-culture and compare it with that of conventional culturing methods. This study aimed to assess the detection limits of co-culture compared to culture for Legionella pneumophila in compost and air samples. Compost and air samples were spiked with known concentrations of L. pneumophila. Direct culturing and co-culture with amoebae were used in parallel to isolate L. pneumophila and recovery standard curves for both methods were produced for each sample. Results The co-culture proved to be more sensitive than the reference method, detecting 102-103 L. pneumophila cells in 1 g of spiked compost or 1 m3 of spiked air, as compared to 105-106 cells in 1 g of spiked compost and 1 m3 of spiked air. Conclusions Co-culture with amoebae is a useful, sensitive and reliable technique to enrich L. pneumophila in environmental samples that contain only low amounts of bacterial cells. PMID:23442526

  2. Estimation of the detection limit of an experimental model of tritium storage bed designed for 'in-situ' accountability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulubasa, Gheorghe; Bidica, Nicolae; Stefanescu, Ioan; Bucur, Ciprian; Deaconu, Mariea

    2009-01-01

    During the water detritiation process most of the tritium inventory is transferred from water into the gaseous phase, then it is further enriched and finally extracted and safely stored. The control of tritium inventory is an acute issue from several points of view: - Financially - tritium is an expensive material; - Safeguard - tritium is considered as nuclear material of strategic importance; - Safety - tritium is a radioactive material: requirements for documented safety analysis report (to ensure strict limits on the total tritium allowed) and for evaluation of accident consequences associated with that inventory. Large amounts of tritium can be stored, in a very safely manner, as metal tritides. A bench-scale experiment of a tritium storage bed with integrated system for in-situ tritium inventory accountancy was designed and developed at ICSI Rm. Valcea. The calibration curve and the detection limit for this experimental model of tritium storage bed were determined. The experimental results are presented in this paper. (authors)

  3. Including Below Detection Limit Samples in Post Decommissioning Soil Sample Analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Hwan; Yim, Man Sung [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    To meet the required standards the site owner has to show that the soil at the facility has been sufficiently cleaned up. To do this one must know the contamination of the soil at the site prior to clean up. This involves sampling that soil to identify the degree of contamination. However there is a technical difficulty in determining how much decontamination should be done. The problem arises when measured samples are below the detection limit. Regulatory guidelines for site reuse after decommissioning are commonly challenged because the majority of the activity in the soil at or below the limit of detection. Using additional statistical analyses of contaminated soil after decommissioning is expected to have the following advantages: a better and more reliable probabilistic exposure assessment, better economics (lower project costs) and improved communication with the public. This research will develop an approach that defines an acceptable method for demonstrating compliance of decommissioned NPP sites and validates that compliance. Soil samples from NPP often contain censored data. Conventional methods for dealing with censored data sets are statistically biased and limited in their usefulness.

  4. Gravitational wave detection using laser interferometry beyond the standard quantum limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heurs, M.

    2018-05-01

    Interferometric gravitational wave detectors (such as advanced LIGO) employ high-power solid-state lasers to maximize their detection sensitivity and hence their reach into the universe. These sophisticated light sources are ultra-stabilized with regard to output power, emission frequency and beam geometry; this is crucial to obtain low detector noise. However, even when all laser noise is reduced as far as technically possible, unavoidable quantum noise of the laser still remains. This is a consequence of the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle, the basis of quantum mechanics: in this case, it is fundamentally impossible to simultaneously reduce both the phase noise and the amplitude noise of a laser to arbitrarily low levels. This fact manifests in the detector noise budget as two distinct noise sources-photon shot noise and quantum radiation pressure noise-which together form a lower boundary for current-day gravitational wave detector sensitivities, the standard quantum limit of interferometry. To overcome this limit, various techniques are being proposed, among them different uses of non-classical light and alternative interferometer topologies. This article explains how quantum noise enters and manifests in an interferometric gravitational wave detector, and gives an overview of some of the schemes proposed to overcome this seemingly fundamental limitation, all aimed at the goal of higher gravitational wave event detection rates. This article is part of a discussion meeting issue `The promises of gravitational-wave astronomy'.

  5. The Impact of Including Below Detection Limit Samples in Post Decommissioning Soil Sample Analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Hwan; Yim, Man-Sung [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    To meet the required standards the site owner has to show that the soil at the facility has been sufficiently cleaned up. To do this one must know the contamination of the soil at the site prior to clean up. This involves sampling that soil to identify the degree of contamination. However there is a technical difficulty in determining how much decontamination should be done. The problem arises when measured samples are below the detection limit. Regulatory guidelines for site reuse after decommissioning are commonly challenged because the majority of the activity in the soil at or below the limit of detection. Using additional statistical analyses of contaminated soil after decommissioning is expected to have the following advantages: a better and more reliable probabilistic exposure assessment, better economics (lower project costs) and improved communication with the public. This research will develop an approach that defines an acceptable method for demonstrating compliance of decommissioned NPP sites and validates that compliance. Soil samples from NPP often contain censored data. Conventional methods for dealing with censored data sets are statistically biased and limited in their usefulness. In this research, additional methods are performed using real data from a monazite manufacturing factory.

  6. Estimation of the limit of detection with a bootstrap-derived standard error by a partly non-parametric approach. Application to HPLC drug assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linnet, Kristian

    2005-01-01

    Bootstrap, HPLC, limit of blank, limit of detection, non-parametric statistics, type I and II errors......Bootstrap, HPLC, limit of blank, limit of detection, non-parametric statistics, type I and II errors...

  7. Accuracy and detection limits for bioassay measurements in radiation protection. Statistical considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, A.

    1986-04-01

    This report provides statistical concepts and formulas for defining minimum detectable amount (MDA), bias and precision of sample analytical measurements of radioactivity for radiobioassay purposes. The defined statistical quantities and accuracy criteria were developed for use in standard performance criteria for radiobioassay, but are also useful in intralaboratory quality assurance programs. This report also includes a literature review and analysis of accuracy needs and accuracy recommendations of national and international scientific organizations for radiation or radioactivity measurements used for radiation protection purposes. Computer programs are also included for calculating the probabilities of passing or failing multiple analytical tests for different acceptable ranges of bias and precision

  8. Estimation of the limit of detection in semiconductor gas sensors through linearized calibration models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgués, Javier; Jiménez-Soto, Juan Manuel; Marco, Santiago

    2018-07-12

    The limit of detection (LOD) is a key figure of merit in chemical sensing. However, the estimation of this figure of merit is hindered by the non-linear calibration curve characteristic of semiconductor gas sensor technologies such as, metal oxide (MOX), gasFETs or thermoelectric sensors. Additionally, chemical sensors suffer from cross-sensitivities and temporal stability problems. The application of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) recommendations for univariate LOD estimation in non-linear semiconductor gas sensors is not straightforward due to the strong statistical requirements of the IUPAC methodology (linearity, homoscedasticity, normality). Here, we propose a methodological approach to LOD estimation through linearized calibration models. As an example, the methodology is applied to the detection of low concentrations of carbon monoxide using MOX gas sensors in a scenario where the main source of error is the presence of uncontrolled levels of humidity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Radioactivity analyses and detection limit problems of environmental surveillance at a gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.E.; Johnson, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    The lower limit of detection (LLD) values required by the USNRC for nuclear power facilities are often difficult to attain even using state of the art detection systems, e.g. the required LLD for I-131 in air is 70 fCi/m 3 . For a gas-cooled reactor where I-131 has never been observed in effluents, occasional false positive values occur due to: Counting statistics using high resolution Ge(Li) detectors, contamination from nuclear medicine releases and spectrum analysis systematic error. Statistically negative concentration values are often observed. These measurements must be included in the estimation of true mean values. For this and other reasons, the frequency distributions of this and other reasons, the frequency distributions of measured values appear to be log-normal. Difficulties in stating the true means and standard deviations are discussed for these situations

  10. Intrinsic spatial resolution limitations due to differences between positron emission position and annihilation detection localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, Pedro; Malano, Francisco; Valente, Mauro

    2012-01-01

    Since its successful implementation for clinical diagnostic, positron emission tomography (PET) represents the most promising medical imaging technique. The recent major growth of PET imaging is mainly due to its ability to trace the biologic pathways of different compounds in the patient's body, assuming the patient can be labeled with some PET isotope. Regardless of the type of isotope, the PET imaging method is based on the detection of two 511-keV gamma photons being emitted in opposite directions, with almost 180 deg between them, as a consequence of electron-positron annihilation. Therefore, this imaging method is intrinsically limited by random uncertainties in spatial resolutions, related with differences between the actual position of positron emission and the location of the detected annihilation. This study presents an approach with the Monte Carlo method to analyze the influence of this effect on different isotopes of potential implementation in PET. (author)

  11. Diamond-based electrochemical aptasensor realizing a femtomolar detection limit of bisphenol A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yibo; Liu, Junsong; Li, Hongdong

    2017-06-15

    In this study, we designed and fabricated an electrochemical impedance aptasensor based on Au nanoparticles (Au-NPs) coated boron-doped diamond (BDD) modified with aptamers, and 6-mercapto-1-hexanol (MCH) for the detection of bisphenol A (BPA). The constructed BPA aptasensor exhibits good linearity from 1.0×10 -14 to 1.0×10 -9 molL -1 . The detection limitation of 7.2×10 -15 molL -1 was achieved, which can be attributed to the synergistic effect of combining BDD with Au-NPs, aptamers, and MCH. The examine results of BPA traces in Tris-HCl buffer and in milk, UV spectra of aptamer/BPA and interference test revealed that the novel aptasensors are of high sensitivity, specificity, stability and repeatability, which could be promising in practical applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Trace element analysis by EPMA in geosciences: detection limit, precision and accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batanova, V. G.; Sobolev, A. V.; Magnin, V.

    2018-01-01

    Use of the electron probe microanalyser (EPMA) for trace element analysis has increased over the last decade, mainly because of improved stability of spectrometers and the electron column when operated at high probe current; development of new large-area crystal monochromators and ultra-high count rate spectrometers; full integration of energy-dispersive / wavelength-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS/WDS) signals; and the development of powerful software packages. For phases that are stable under a dense electron beam, the detection limit and precision can be decreased to the ppm level by using high acceleration voltage and beam current combined with long counting time. Data on 10 elements (Na, Al, P, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Zn) in olivine obtained on a JEOL JXA-8230 microprobe with tungsten filament show that the detection limit decreases proportionally to the square root of counting time and probe current. For all elements equal or heavier than phosphorus (Z = 15), the detection limit decreases with increasing accelerating voltage. The analytical precision for minor and trace elements analysed in olivine at 25 kV accelerating voltage and 900 nA beam current is 4 - 18 ppm (2 standard deviations of repeated measurements of the olivine reference sample) and is similar to the detection limit of corresponding elements. To analyse trace elements accurately requires careful estimation of background, and consideration of sample damage under the beam and secondary fluorescence from phase boundaries. The development and use of matrix reference samples with well-characterised trace elements of interest is important for monitoring and improving of the accuracy. An evaluation of the accuracy of trace element analyses in olivine has been made by comparing EPMA data for new reference samples with data obtained by different in-situ and bulk analytical methods in six different laboratories worldwide. For all elements, the measured concentrations in the olivine reference sample

  13. Picomolar detection limits with current-polarized Pb2+ ion-selective membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pergel, E; Gyurcsányi, R E; Tóth, K; Lindner, E

    2001-09-01

    Minor ion fluxes across ion-selective membranes bias submicromolar activity measurements with conventional ion-selective electrodes. When ion fluxes are balanced, the lower limit of detection is expected to be dramatically improved. As proof of principle, the flux of lead ions across an ETH 5435 ionophore-based lead-selective membrane was gradually compensated by applying a few nanoamperes of galvanostatic current. When the opposite ion fluxes were matched, and the undesirable leaching of primary ions was eliminated, Nernstian response down to 3 x 10(-12) M was achieved.

  14. Analysis of background components in Ge-spectrometry and their influence on detection limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heusser, G [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany)

    1997-03-01

    In low radioactivity measurements the system own background of the spectrometer is, besides the counting efficiency, the limiting factor for the achievable sensitivity. Since the latter is mostly fixed, background reduction is the only way to gain sensitivity, although it is inversely proportional only to the square root of the background rate but directly proportional to the counting efficiency. A thorough understanding of the background sources and their quantitative contribution helps to choose the most adequate suppression method in order to reach a certain required level of detection limit. For Ge-spectrometry the background can be reduced by 5 to 6 orders of magnitude compared to the unshielded case applying state-of-the-art techniques. This reduction factor holds for the continuous background spectrum as well as for the line background as demonstrated for a Ge detector of the Heidelberg-Moscow double beta decay experiment. (orig./DG)

  15. First direct detection limits on sub-GeV dark matter from XENON10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essig, Rouven; Manalaysay, Aaron; Mardon, Jeremy; Sorensen, Peter; Volansky, Tomer

    2012-07-13

    The first direct detection limits on dark matter in the MeV to GeV mass range are presented, using XENON10 data. Such light dark matter can scatter with electrons, causing ionization of atoms in a detector target material and leading to single- or few-electron events. We use 15  kg day of data acquired in 2006 to set limits on the dark-matter-electron scattering cross section. The strongest bound is obtained at 100 MeV where σ(e)dark-matter masses between 20 MeV and 1 GeV are bounded by σ(e)dark-matter candidates with masses well below the GeV scale.

  16. Power-limited low-thrust trajectory optimization with operation point detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Zhemin; Li, Haiyang; Jiang, Fanghua; Li, Junfeng

    2018-06-01

    The power-limited solar electric propulsion system is considered more practical in mission design. An accurate mathematical model of the propulsion system, based on experimental data of the power generation system, is used in this paper. An indirect method is used to deal with the time-optimal and fuel-optimal control problems, in which the solar electric propulsion system is described using a finite number of operation points, which are characterized by different pairs of thruster input power. In order to guarantee the integral accuracy for the discrete power-limited problem, a power operation detection technique is embedded in the fourth-order Runge-Kutta algorithm with fixed step. Moreover, the logarithmic homotopy method and normalization technique are employed to overcome the difficulties caused by using indirect methods. Three numerical simulations with actual propulsion systems are given to substantiate the feasibility and efficiency of the proposed method.

  17. Cs2AgBiBr6 single-crystal X-ray detectors with a low detection limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Weicheng; Wu, Haodi; Luo, Jiajun; Deng, Zhenzhou; Ge, Cong; Chen, Chao; Jiang, Xiaowei; Yin, Wan-Jian; Niu, Guangda; Zhu, Lujun; Yin, Lixiao; Zhou, Ying; Xie, Qingguo; Ke, Xiaoxing; Sui, Manling; Tang, Jiang

    2017-11-01

    Sensitive X-ray detection is crucial for medical diagnosis, industrial inspection and scientific research. The recently described hybrid lead halide perovskites have demonstrated low-cost fabrication and outstanding performance for direct X-ray detection, but they all contain toxic Pb in a soluble form. Here, we report sensitive X-ray detectors using solution-processed double perovskite Cs2AgBiBr6 single crystals. Through thermal annealing and surface treatment, we largely eliminate Ag+/Bi3+ disordering and improve the crystal resistivity, resulting in a detector with a minimum detectable dose rate as low as 59.7 nGyair s-1, comparable to the latest record of 0.036 μGyair s-1 using CH3NH3PbBr3 single crystals. Suppressed ion migration in Cs2AgBiBr6 permits relatively large external bias, guaranteeing efficient charge collection without a substantial increase in noise current and thus enabling the low detection limit.

  18. Group-focused morality is associated with limited conflict detection and resolution capacity: Neuroanatomical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Kyle; Baumgartner, Thomas; Knoch, Daria

    2017-02-01

    Group-focused moral foundations (GMFs) - moral values that help protect the group's welfare - sharply divide conservatives from liberals and religiously devout from non-believers. However, there is little evidence about what drives this divide. Moral foundations theory and the model of motivated social cognition both associate group-focused moral foundations with differences in conflict detection and resolution capacity, but in opposing directions. Individual differences in conflict detection and resolution implicate specific neuroanatomical differences. Examining neuroanatomy thus affords an objective and non-biased opportunity to contrast these influential theories. Here, we report that increased adherence to group-focused moral foundations was strongly associated (whole-brain corrected) with reduced gray matter volume in key regions of the conflict detection and resolution system (anterior cingulate cortex and lateral prefrontal cortex). Because reduced gray matter is reliably associated with reduced neural and cognitive capacity, these findings support the idea outlined in the model of motivated social cognition that belief in group-focused moral values is associated with reduced conflict detection and resolution capacity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Calculation of risk-based detection limits for radionuclides in the liquid effluents from Korean nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheong, Jae Hak

    2017-01-01

    In order to review if present detection limits of radionuclides in liquid effluent from nuclear power plants are effective enough to warrant compliance with regulatory discharge limits, a risk-based approach is developed to derive a new detection limit for each radionuclide based on radiological criteria. Equations and adjustment factors are also proposed to discriminate the validity of the detection limits for multiple radionuclides in the liquid effluent with or without consideration of the nuclide composition. From case studies to three nuclear power plants in Korea with actual operation data from 2006 to 2015, the present detection limits have turned out to be effective for Hanul Unit 1 but may not be sensitive enough for Kori Unit 1 (8 out of 14 radionuclides) and Wolsong Unit 1 (9 out of 42 radionuclides). However, it is shown that the present detection limits for the latter two nuclear power plants can be justified, if credit is given to the radionuclide composition. Otherwise, consideration should be given to adjustment of the present detection limits. The risk-based approach of this study can be used to determine the validity of established detection limits of a specific nuclear power plant. (author)

  20. Determining the 95% limit of detection for waterborne pathogen analyses from primary concentration to qPCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokdyk, Joel P.; Firnstahl, Aaron; Spencer, Susan K.; Burch, Tucker R; Borchardt, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    The limit of detection (LOD) for qPCR-based analyses is not consistently defined or determined in studies on waterborne pathogens. Moreover, the LODs reported often reflect the qPCR assay alone rather than the entire sample process. Our objective was to develop an approach to determine the 95% LOD (lowest concentration at which 95% of positive samples are detected) for the entire process of waterborne pathogen detection. We began by spiking the lowest concentration that was consistently positive at the qPCR step (based on its standard curve) into each procedural step working backwards (i.e., extraction, secondary concentration, primary concentration), which established a concentration that was detectable following losses of the pathogen from processing. Using the fraction of positive replicates (n = 10) at this concentration, we selected and analyzed a second, and then third, concentration. If the fraction of positive replicates equaled 1 or 0 for two concentrations, we selected another. We calculated the LOD using probit analysis. To demonstrate our approach we determined the 95% LOD for Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, adenovirus 41, and vaccine-derived poliovirus Sabin 3, which were 11, 12, and 6 genomic copies (gc) per reaction (rxn), respectively (equivalent to 1.3, 1.5, and 4.0 gc L−1 assuming the 1500 L tap-water sample volume prescribed in EPA Method 1615). This approach limited the number of analyses required and was amenable to testing multiple genetic targets simultaneously (i.e., spiking a single sample with multiple microorganisms). An LOD determined this way can facilitate study design, guide the number of required technical replicates, aid method evaluation, and inform data interpretation.

  1. The study on the lidar's detection limit for Iodine Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong-lyul; Baik, Seung-Hoon; Park, Seung-Kyu; Park, Nak-Gyu; Ahn, Yong-Jin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    A powerful and reliable tool for range-resolved remote sensing of gas concentrations that has proven its capabilities in a variety of studies is the differential absorption lidar (DIAL). Differential absorption lidar (DIAL) is frequently used for atmospheric gas monitoring to detect impurities such as nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, iodine, and ozone. DIAL can measure air pollutant concentrations with a high spatial resolution by adopting two laser systems with different degrees of absorption between the two different wavelengths. The absorption of the reference wavelength is very weak, while the absorption of the other wavelength is very strong. In this paper, we measured the limit of detection capability of our designed DIAL system. The DIAL measurements were performed using a target iodine cell in the laboratory. We confirmed that the concentration of iodine gas ratio increased after the laser passed through the iodine cell. The system of DIAL(Differential Absorption Lidar) was effective to detect the iodine gas. We obtained the signals from the iodine target cell and the lidar signal from the iodine target cell was proportional to frequency locking ratios.

  2. Confocal laser-induced fluorescence detector for narrow capillary system with yoctomole limit of detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Mitchell T; Lynch, Kyle B; Zhu, Zaifang; Chen, Huang; Lu, Joann J; Pu, Qiaosheng; Liu, Shaorong

    2017-04-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detectors for low-micrometer and sub-micrometer capillary on-column detection are not commercially available. In this paper, we describe in details how to construct a confocal LIF detector to address this issue. We characterize the detector by determining its limit of detection (LOD), linear dynamic range (LDR) and background signal drift; a very low LOD (~70 fluorescein molecules or 12 yoctomole fluorescein), a wide LDR (greater than 3 orders of magnitude) and a small background signal drift (~1.2-fold of the root mean square noise) are obtained. For detecting analytes inside a low-micrometer and sub-micrometer capillary, proper alignment is essential. We present a simple protocol to align the capillary with the optical system and use the position-lock capability of a translation stage to fix the capillary in position during the experiment. To demonstrate the feasibility of using this detector for narrow capillary systems, we build a 2-μm-i.d. capillary flow injection analysis (FIA) system using the newly developed LIF prototype as a detector and obtain an FIA LOD of 14 zeptomole fluorescein. We also separate a DNA ladder sample by bare narrow capillary - hydrodynamic chromatography and use the LIF prototype to monitor the resolved DNA fragments. We obtain not only well-resolved peaks but also the quantitative information of all DNA fragments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A novel dNTP-limited PCR and HRM assay to detect Williams-Beuren syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lichen; Zhang, Xiaoqing; You, Guoling; Yu, Yongguo; Fu, Qihua

    2018-06-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) is caused by a microdeletion of chromosome arm 7q11.23. A rapid and inexpensive genotyping method to detect microdeletion on 7q11.23 needs to be developed for the diagnosis of WBS. This study describes the development of a new type of molecular diagnosis method to detect microdeletion on 7q11.23 based upon high-resolution melting (HRM). Four genes on 7q11.23 were selected as the target genes for the deletion genotyping. dNTP-limited duplex PCR was used to amplify the reference gene, CFTR, and one of the four genes respectively on 7q11.23. An HRM assay was performed on the PCR products, and the height ratio of the negative derivative peaks between the target gene and reference gene was employed to analyze the copy number variation of the target region. A new genotyping method for detecting 7q11.23 deletion was developed based upon dNTP-limited PCR and HRM, which cost only 96 min. Samples from 15 WBS patients and 12 healthy individuals were genotyped by this method in a blinded fashion, and the sensitivity and specificity was 100% (95% CI, 0.80-1, and 95% CI, 0.75-1, respectively) which was proved by CytoScan HD array. The HRM assay we developed is an rapid, inexpensive, and highly accurate method for genotyping 7q11.23 deletion. It is potentially useful in the clinical diagnosis of WBS. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. WE-H-207A-09: Theoretical Limits to Molecular Biomarker Detection Using Magnetic Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, J [Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, NH (United States); Geisel School of Medicine, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Estimate the limits of molecular biomarker detection using magnetic nanoparticle methods like in vivo ELISA. Methods: Magnetic nanoparticles in an alternating magnetic field produce a magnetization that can be detected at exceedingly low levels because the signal at the harmonic frequencies is uniquely produced by the nanoparticles. Because the magnetization can also be used to characterize the nanoparticle rotational freedom, the bound state can be found. If the nanoparticles are coated with molecules that bind the desired biomarker, the rotational freedom reflects the biomarker concentration. The irreducible noise limit is the thermal noise or Johnson noise of the tissue and the contrast that can be measured must be larger than that limit. The contrast produced is a function of the applied field and depends strongly on nanoparticle volume. We have estimated the contrast using a Langevin function of a single composite variable to approximate the full stochastic Langevin equation for nanoparticle dynamics. Results: The thermal noise for a bandwidth reasonable for spectroscopy suggests mid zeptomolar (10–21) to low attomolar (10–18) concentrations can be measured in a volume that is 10cm in scale. The suggested sensitivity is far below the physiologically concentrations of almost all critical biomarkers including cytokines (picomolar), hormones (nanomolar) and heat shock proteins. Conclusion: The sensitivity of in vivo ELISA concentration measurements should be sufficient to measure physiological concentrations of critical biomarkers like cytokines in vivo. Further the sensitivity should be sufficient to measure concentrations of other biomarkers that are six to eight orders of magnitude lower in concentration than immune signaling molecules like cytokines. NIH - 1U54CA151662-01 Department of Radiology.

  5. Contamination limits for real and personal property. Progress report, January--June 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Healy, J.W.; Wenzel, W.J.

    1976-09-01

    Progress is reported on the plutonium in soils limit and on the surface contamination study. The report on the soils limit is being typed in draft form for review at other ERDA facilities. A model for surface contamination was derived and programmed but parametric studies have not yet been done

  6. Improved detection limit in rapid detection of human enterovirus 71 and coxsackievirus A16 by a novel reverse transcription-isothermal multiple-self-matching-initiated amplification assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiong; Nie, Kai; Shi, Lei; Zhang, Yong; Guan, Li; Zhang, Dan; Qi, Shunxiang; Ma, Xuejun

    2014-06-01

    Rapid detection of human enterovirus 71 (EV71) and coxsackievirus A16 (CVA16) is important in the early phase of hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD). In this study, we developed and evaluated a novel reverse transcription-isothermal multiple-self-matching-initiated amplification (RT-IMSA) assay for the rapid detection of EV71 and CVA16 by use of reverse transcriptase, together with a strand displacement DNA polymerase. Real-time RT-IMSA assays using a turbidimeter and visual RT-IMSA assays to detect EV71 and CVA16 were established and completed in 1 h, and the reported corresponding real-time reverse transcription-loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assays targeting the same regions of the VP1 gene were adopted as parallel tests. Through testing VP1 RNAs transcribed in vitro, the real-time RT-IMSA assays exhibited better linearity of quantification, with R(2) values of 0.952 (for EV71) and 0.967 (for CVA16), than the real-time RT-LAMP assays, which had R(2) values of 0.803 (for EV71) and 0.904 (for CVA16). Additionally, the detection limits of the real-time RT-IMSA assays (approximately 937 for EV71 and 67 for CVA16 copies/reaction) were higher than those of real-time RT-LAMP assays (approximately 3,266 for EV71 and 430 for CVA16 copies/reaction), and similar results were observed in the visual RT-IMSA assays. The new approaches also possess high specificities for the corresponding targets, with no cross-reactivity observed. In clinical assessment, compared to commercial reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) kits, the diagnostic sensitivities of the real-time RT-IMSA assays (96.4% for EV71 and 94.6% for CVA16) were higher than those of the real-time RT-LAMP assays (91.1% for EV71 and 90.8% for CVA16). The visual RT-IMSA assays also exhibited the same results. In conclusion, this proof-of-concept study suggests that the novel RT-IMSA assay is superior to the RT-LAMP assay in terms of detection limit and has the potential to rapidly detect EV71

  7. Limit of detection of a fiber optics gyroscope using a super luminescent radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandoval R, G.E.; Nikolaev, V.A.

    2003-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to establish the dependence of characteristics of the fiber optics gyroscope (FOG) with respect to the parameters of the super luminescent emission source based on doped optical fiber with rare earth elements (Super luminescent Fiber Source, SFS), argument the pumping rate election of the SFS to obtain characteristics limits of the FOG sensibility. By using this type of emission source in the FOG is recommend to use the rate when the direction of the pumping signal coincide with the super luminescent signal. The most results are the proposition and argumentation of the SFS election as emission source to be use in the FOG of the phase type. Such a decision allow to increase the characteristics of the FOG sensibility in comparison with the use of luminescent source of semiconductors emission which are extensively used in the present time. The use of emission source of the SFS type allow to come closer to the threshold of the obtained sensibility limit (detection limit) which is determined with the shot noise. (Author)

  8. Limit of detection of a fiber optics gyroscope using a super luminescent radiation source

    CERN Document Server

    Sandoval, G E

    2003-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to establish the dependence of characteristics of the fiber optics gyroscope (FOG) with respect to the parameters of the super luminescent emission source based on doped optical fiber with rare earth elements (Super luminescent Fiber Source, SFS), argument the pumping rate election of the SFS to obtain characteristics limits of the FOG sensibility. By using this type of emission source in the FOG is recommend to use the rate when the direction of the pumping signal coincide with the super luminescent signal. The most results are the proposition and argumentation of the SFS election as emission source to be use in the FOG of the phase type. Such a decision allow to increase the characteristics of the FOG sensibility in comparison with the use of luminescent source of semiconductors emission which are extensively used in the present time. The use of emission source of the SFS type allow to come closer to the threshold of the obtained sensibility limit (detection limit) which i...

  9. 40 CFR Appendix B to Part 136 - Definition and Procedure for the Determination of the Method Detection Limit-Revision 1.11

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... calculated method detection limit. To insure that the estimate of the method detection limit is a good...) where: MDL = the method detection limit t(n-1,1- α=.99) = the students' t value appropriate for a 99... Determination of the Method Detection Limit-Revision 1.11 B Appendix B to Part 136 Protection of Environment...

  10. Accuracy of self-report in detecting taste dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soter, Ana; Kim, John; Jackman, Alexis; Tourbier, Isabelle; Kaul, Arti; Doty, Richard L

    2008-04-01

    To determine the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive value of responses to the following questionnaire statements in detecting taste loss: "I can detect salt in chips, pretzels, or salted nuts," "I can detect sourness in vinegar, pickles, or lemon," "I can detect sweetness in soda, cookies, or ice cream," and "I can detect bitterness, in coffee, beer, or tonic water." Responses to an additional item, "I can detect chocolate in cocoa, cake or candy," was examined to determine whether patients clearly differentiate between taste loss and flavor loss secondary to olfactory dysfunction. A total of 469 patients (207 men, mean age = 54 years, standard deviation = 15 years; and 262 women, mean age = 54 years, standard deviation = 14 years) were administered a questionnaire containing these questions with the response categories of "easily," "somewhat," and "not at all," followed by a comprehensive taste and smell test battery. The questionnaire items poorly detected bona fide taste problems. However, they were sensitive in detecting persons without such problems (i.e., they exhibited low positive but high negative predictive value). Dysfunction categories of the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT) were not meaningfully related to subjects' responses to the questionnaire statements. Both sex and age influenced performance on most of the taste tests, with older persons performing more poorly than younger ones and women typically outperforming men. Although it is commonly assumed that straight-forward questions concerning taste may be useful in detecting taste disorders, this study suggests this is not the case. However, patients who specifically report having no problems with taste perception usually do not exhibit taste dysfunction. The difficulty in detecting true taste problems by focused questionnaire items likely reflects a combination of factors. These include the relatively low prevalence of taste deficits in the

  11. Evaluation of MidIR fibre optic reflectance: Detection limit, reproducibility and binary mixture discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessa, Clarimma; Bagán, Héctor; García, José Francisco

    2013-11-01

    MidIR fibre optic reflectance (MidIR-FORS) is a promising analytical technique in the field of science conservation, especially because it is non-destructive. Another advantage of MidIR-FORS is that the obtained information is representative, as a large amount of spectral data can be collected. Although the technique has a high potential and is almost routinely applied, its quality parameters have not been thoroughly studied in the specific application of analysis of artistic materials. The objective of this study is to evaluate the instrumental capabilities of MidIR-FORS for the analysis of artwork materials in terms of detection limit, reproducibility, and mixture characterisation. The study has been focused on oil easel painting and several paints of known composition have been analysed. Paint layers include blue pigments not only because of their important role along art history, but also because their physical and spectroscopic characteristics allow a better evaluation of the MidIR-FORS capabilities. The results of the analysis indicate that MidIR-FORS supplies a signal affected by different factors, such as the optical, morphological and physical properties of the surface, in addition to the composition of materials analysed. Consequently, the detection limits established are relatively high for artistic objects (Prussian blue - PB 2.1-6.5%; Phthalocyanine blue - Pht 6.3-10.2%; synthetic Ultramarine blue - UM 12.1%) and may therefore lead to an incomplete description of the artwork. Reproducibility of the technique over time and across surface has been determined. The results show that the major sources of dispersion are the heterogeneity of the pigments distribution, physical features, and band shape distortions. The total dispersion is around 4% for the most intense bands (oil) and increases up to 26% when weak or overlapped bands are considered (PB, Pht, UM). The application of different pre-treatments (cutoff of fibres absorption, Savizky-Golay smoothing

  12. Decision Threshold and Detection Limit in Spectrometric Measurements. Part 1: Application to Gamma Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, C.; Gasco, C.; Lopez, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    This report summarised the author's lecture of the advanced gamma spectrometry course organised by CIEMAT. The characteristic limits determination in gamma spectrometry generally is obtained through the programming that the trade marks offers to the client with the objective of the automatic calculation of the activity concentrations existing in a sample. In this report, the examples shown in the ISO 11929 standard are compared to the programming realised by Genie 2k for determining characteristic limits. The main difference of both is located in the uncertainty calculations due to the efficiency calibration that is considered by ISO and not by Genie 2K. Through implementation in the software developed by trade marks will be possible to introduce this uncertainty and to assimilate to the calculation done by ISO 11929. In the second part of this report will be analyzed the more complicated samples of this application as counting in a whole body counter (following ISO-28218 about Performance Criteria for radio bioassay), multiplet, overlapping, addition of several peaks for obtaining the activity concentration, etc. (Author) 19 refs.

  13. Composite Estimation for Single-Index Models with Responses Subject to Detection Limits

    KAUST Repository

    Tang, Yanlin; Wang, Huixia Judy; Liang, Hua

    2017-01-01

    We propose a semiparametric estimator for single-index models with censored responses due to detection limits. In the presence of left censoring, the mean function cannot be identified without any parametric distributional assumptions, but the quantile function is still identifiable at upper quantile levels. To avoid parametric distributional assumption, we propose to fit censored quantile regression and combine information across quantile levels to estimate the unknown smooth link function and the index parameter. Under some regularity conditions, we show that the estimated link function achieves the non-parametric optimal convergence rate, and the estimated index parameter is asymptotically normal. The simulation study shows that the proposed estimator is competitive with the omniscient least squares estimator based on the latent uncensored responses for data with normal errors but much more efficient for heavy-tailed data under light and moderate censoring. The practical value of the proposed method is demonstrated through the analysis of a human immunodeficiency virus antibody data set.

  14. Towards improving the detection limit of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimetry of drywall (wallboard)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mistry, R.; Thompson, J.W. [Dept. of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Rink, W.J. [School of Geography and Earth Sciences, McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Boreham, D. [Dept. of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    The intensity of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) line corresponding to the carbonate free radical (CO{sub 3}{sup -}) in gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O) drywall was previously shown to be proportional to absorbed dose. Heating irradiated drywall reduces the radiosensitive signal of the CO{sub 3}{sup -} radical. The response of the CO{sub 3}{sup -} EPR line to heat treatments is being studied in order to determine a background for an arbitrary drywall sample. Ultimately this is expected to improve the precision of dose measurements with drywall and to reduce the detection limit. Controlled heating of irradiated drywall was performed at temperatures between 50{sup o}C and 100{sup o}C. Although higher temperatures reduce the radiosensitive signal rapidly, the non-radiosensitive EPR signals are affected dramatically as well, presumably due to a phrase change from gypsum to plaster of Paris to anhydrite. (author)

  15. Determination of limits for smallest detectable and largest subcritical leakage cracks in piping systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieselt, R.; Wolf, M.

    1995-01-01

    Nuclear power plant piping systems - those still in their original as-built condition as well as upgraded designs - are subject to safety analysis. In order to limit the consequences of postulated piping failures, the basic safety concept incorporating rupture preclusion criteria is applied to specific high-energy piping systems. Leak-before-break analyses are also conducted within the framework of this concept. These analyses serve to determine the potential consequences of jet and reaction forces due to maximum subcritical leakage cracks while also establishing the minimum crack sizes that would be reliably detectable by the leakage rates resulting from these cracks. The boundary conditions for these analyses are not clearly defined. Using various examples as a basis, this paper presents and discusses how the leak-before-break concept can be applied. (orig.)

  16. Composite Estimation for Single-Index Models with Responses Subject to Detection Limits

    KAUST Repository

    Tang, Yanlin

    2017-11-03

    We propose a semiparametric estimator for single-index models with censored responses due to detection limits. In the presence of left censoring, the mean function cannot be identified without any parametric distributional assumptions, but the quantile function is still identifiable at upper quantile levels. To avoid parametric distributional assumption, we propose to fit censored quantile regression and combine information across quantile levels to estimate the unknown smooth link function and the index parameter. Under some regularity conditions, we show that the estimated link function achieves the non-parametric optimal convergence rate, and the estimated index parameter is asymptotically normal. The simulation study shows that the proposed estimator is competitive with the omniscient least squares estimator based on the latent uncensored responses for data with normal errors but much more efficient for heavy-tailed data under light and moderate censoring. The practical value of the proposed method is demonstrated through the analysis of a human immunodeficiency virus antibody data set.

  17. Coincidence detection of single-photon responses in the inner retina at the sensitivity limit of vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ala-Laurila, Petri; Rieke, Fred

    2014-12-15

    Vision in starlight relies on our ability to detect single absorbed photons. Indeed, the sensitivity of dark-adapted vision approaches limits set by the quantal nature of light. This sensitivity requires neural mechanisms that selectively transmit quantal responses and suppress noise. Such mechanisms face an inevitable tradeoff because signal and noise cannot be perfectly separated, and rejecting noise also means rejecting signal. We report measurements of single-photon responses in the output signals of the primate retina. We find that visual signals arising from a few absorbed photons are read out fundamentally differently by primate On and Off parasol ganglion cells, key retinal output neurons. Off parasol cells respond linearly to near-threshold flashes, retaining sensitivity to each absorbed photon but maintaining a high level of noise. On parasol cells respond nonlinearly due to thresholding of their excitatory synaptic inputs. This nonlinearity reduces neural noise but also limits information about single-photon absorptions. The long-standing idea that information about each photon absorption is available for behavior at the sensitivity limit of vision is not universally true across retinal outputs. More generally, our work shows how a neural circuit balances the competing needs for sensitivity and noise rejection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Amorphous semiconductors for particle detection: Physical and technical limits and possibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Equer, B.; Karar, A.

    1989-01-01

    Amorphous silicon is used, at an industrial level, in at least three different fields of application: photovoltaic cells, flat TV screens and line scanners for image processing. In the last two cases, thin film transistors (TFT) are produced with the same technology. Particle detection with amorphous silicon has been demonstrated, but present performances are limited to ionizing particles. In this paper, we discuss the physical basis of amorphous semiconductors and the possible future development that can be expected on the basis of the existing technology. It is concluded that substitution of amorphous for crystalline silicon brings no clear advantage, if possible at all. Positive assets are to be found in using specific properties of thin layers: large area structures like arrays of photodiodes with associated readout are in the state of the art; vertical structures alternating layers of differently doped materials and/or of different semiconductors can be produced by the same technique. The development of large area pixel detectors is technically feasible but requires a very large effort. A joint development effort with industries involved in X-ray detection and 2D photodetectors might be the most appropriate solution. (orig.)

  19. Diagnostic accuracy of the detection of bone change using panoramic TMJ projection. Comparative study with limited cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araki, Kazuyuki; Okano, Tomohiro; Kataoka, Ryuta; Honda, Kazuya; Endo, Atsushi; Kaneko, Norikazu; Funahashi, Itsuo

    2008-01-01

    Panoramic temporoman joint (TMJ) projection is one of the alternative methods of conventional radiography, such as transcranial projection, for diagnosing temporomandibular joint disorder. There have been a few reports describing the diagnostic ability of this method. We evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of detecting bone change with panoramic TMJ projection. Fifty TMJs in 25 patients were examined. All TMJs were examined by panoramic TMJ projection (Hyper XF) and limited cone-beam CT (3D Accuitomo FPD; 3DX). Two observers evaluated the presence of bone change in the TMJ region using panoramic TMJ projection. One other observer evaluated the limited cone-beam CT for the presence and the pattern of bone changes in the TMJ region as the gold standard. Panoramic TMJ findings were evaluated with regard to sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the panoramic TMJ projection were 0.86, 0.76, and 0.82, respectively. These results and those of previous reports on other radiographic methods for TMJ suggest that panoramic TMJ projection is a useful method of screening for bone change due to TMJ disorder. (author)

  20. Breath Analysis Using Laser Spectroscopic Techniques: Breath Biomarkers, Spectral Fingerprints, and Detection Limits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peeyush Sahay

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Breath analysis, a promising new field of medicine and medical instrumentation, potentially offers noninvasive, real-time, and point-of-care (POC disease diagnostics and metabolic status monitoring. Numerous breath biomarkers have been detected and quantified so far by using the GC-MS technique. Recent advances in laser spectroscopic techniques and laser sources have driven breath analysis to new heights, moving from laboratory research to commercial reality. Laser spectroscopic detection techniques not only have high-sensitivity and high-selectivity, as equivalently offered by the MS-based techniques, but also have the advantageous features of near real-time response, low instrument costs, and POC function. Of the approximately 35 established breath biomarkers, such as acetone, ammonia, carbon dioxide, ethane, methane, and nitric oxide, 14 species in exhaled human breath have been analyzed by high-sensitivity laser spectroscopic techniques, namely, tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS, cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS, integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS, cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS, cavity leak-out spectroscopy (CALOS, photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS, quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS, and optical frequency comb cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (OFC-CEAS. Spectral fingerprints of the measured biomarkers span from the UV to the mid-IR spectral regions and the detection limits achieved by the laser techniques range from parts per million to parts per billion levels. Sensors using the laser spectroscopic techniques for a few breath biomarkers, e.g., carbon dioxide, nitric oxide, etc. are commercially available. This review presents an update on the latest developments in laser-based breath analysis.

  1. Chlorine-trapped CVD bilayer graphene for resistive pressure sensor with high detection limit and high sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phuong Pham, Viet; Triet Nguyen, Minh; Park, Jin Woo; Kwak, Sung Soo; Nguyen, Dieu Hien Thi; Kyeom Mun, Mu; Danh Phan, Hoang; San Kim, Doo; Kim, Ki Hyun; Lee, Nae-Eung; Yeom, Geun Young

    2017-06-01

    Pressure sensing is one of the key functions for smart electronics. Considerably more effort is required to achieve the fabrication of pressure sensors that can imitate and overcome the sophisticated pressure sensing characteristics in nature and industry, especially in the innovation of materials and structures. Almost all of the pressure sensors reported until now have a high sensitivity at a low-pressure detection limit (type chlorine trap doping in the channel graphene with chlorine radicals without damaging the graphene. This work indicates that the ZGClG channel used for the pressure sensing device could also provide a simple and essential sensing platform for chemical-, medical-, and biological-sensing for future smart electronics.

  2. Left ventricular time volume curve analysis in the detection of limited ischaemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liechtenstein, M.; Blanchett, W.; Andrews, J.; Hunt, D.

    1982-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether limited coronary artery disease (CAD) could be accurately detected using the Cardiac Gated Blood Pool (CGBP) scan with exercise. Regional left ventricular time volume curves (RLTVD) were generated from 52 studies (46 patients: 22 normals, 24 abnormals). The parameters assessed both globally and regionally and at rest (R) and exercise (Ex) were: (1) the ejection fraction (EF) (2) the change in ejection fraction from R to Ex (δEF) (3) an early contraction index (ECI) (4) a maximal emptying index (DR) and (5) a maximal refilling index (AR). After careful analysis of these parameters it was decided that our diagnostic criteria would rely on the following: (1) the EF at R and Ex (2) the δ EF (3) the ECI at Ex (4) the AR at Ex This study showed that both the sensitivity and the specificity of the CGBP scan can be improved considerably with the inclusion of RLTVC from the levels obtained when the EF parameters alone are considered. It is possible with this technique to accurately diagnose limited CAD. (Author)

  3. Comparison of detection limits in environmental analysis--is it possible? An approach on quality assurance in the lower working range by verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiss, S; Einax, J W

    2001-07-01

    Detection limit, reporting limit and limit of quantitation are analytical parameters which describe the power of analytical methods. These parameters are used for internal quality assurance and externally for competing, especially in the case of trace analysis in environmental compartments. The wide variety of possibilities for computing or obtaining these measures in literature and in legislative rules makes any comparison difficult. Additionally, a host of terms have been used within the analytical community to describe detection and quantitation capabilities. Without trying to create an order for the variety of terms, this paper is aimed at providing a practical proposal for answering the main questions for the analysts concerning quality measures above. These main questions and related parameters were explained and graphically demonstrated. Estimation and verification of these parameters are the two steps to get real measures. A rule for a practical verification is given in a table, where the analyst can read out what to measure, what to estimate and which criteria have to be fulfilled. In this manner verified parameters detection limit, reporting limit and limit of quantitation now are comparable and the analyst himself is responsible to the unambiguity and reliability of these measures.

  4. Automated baseline change detection phase I. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    The Automated Baseline Change Detection (ABCD) project is supported by the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) as part of its ER&WM cross-cutting technology program in robotics. Phase 1 of the Automated Baseline Change Detection project is summarized in this topical report. The primary objective of this project is to apply robotic and optical sensor technology to the operational inspection of mixed toxic and radioactive waste stored in barrels, using Automated Baseline Change Detection (ABCD), based on image subtraction. Absolute change detection is based on detecting any visible physical changes, regardless of cause, between a current inspection image of a barrel and an archived baseline image of the same barrel. Thus, in addition to rust, the ABCD system can also detect corrosion, leaks, dents, and bulges. The ABCD approach and method rely on precise camera positioning and repositioning relative to the barrel and on feature recognition in images. In support of this primary objective, there are secondary objectives to determine DOE operational inspection requirements and DOE system fielding requirements.

  5. Automated baseline change detection phase I. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-12-01

    The Automated Baseline Change Detection (ABCD) project is supported by the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) as part of its ER ampersand WM cross-cutting technology program in robotics. Phase 1 of the Automated Baseline Change Detection project is summarized in this topical report. The primary objective of this project is to apply robotic and optical sensor technology to the operational inspection of mixed toxic and radioactive waste stored in barrels, using Automated Baseline Change Detection (ABCD), based on image subtraction. Absolute change detection is based on detecting any visible physical changes, regardless of cause, between a current inspection image of a barrel and an archived baseline image of the same barrel. Thus, in addition to rust, the ABCD system can also detect corrosion, leaks, dents, and bulges. The ABCD approach and method rely on precise camera positioning and repositioning relative to the barrel and on feature recognition in images. In support of this primary objective, there are secondary objectives to determine DOE operational inspection requirements and DOE system fielding requirements

  6. Investigation of detection limits for diffuse optical tomography systems: II. Analysis of slab and cup geometry for breast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Ronny; Brendel, Bernhard; Rinneberg, Herbert; Nielsen, Tim

    2009-01-21

    Using a statistical (chi-square) test on simulated data and a realistic noise model derived from the system's hardware we study the performance of diffuse optical tomography systems for fluorescence imaging. We compare the predicted smallest size of detectable lesions at various positions in slab and cup geometry and model how detection sensitivity depends on breast compression and lesion fluorescence contrast. Our investigation shows that lesion detection is limited by relative noise in slab geometry and by absolute noise in cup geometry.

  7. Detection of maximum loadability limits and weak buses using Chaotic PSO considering security constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acharjee, P.; Mallick, S.; Thakur, S.S.; Ghoshal, S.P.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The unique cost function is derived considering practical Security Constraints. → New innovative formulae of PSO parameters are developed for better performance. → The inclusion and implementation of chaos in PSO technique is original and unique. → Weak buses are identified where FACTS devices can be implemented. → The CPSO technique gives the best performance for all the IEEE standard test systems. - Abstract: In the current research chaotic search is used with the optimization technique for solving non-linear complicated power system problems because Chaos can overcome the local optima problem of optimization technique. Power system problem, more specifically voltage stability, is one of the practical examples of non-linear, complex, convex problems. Smart grid, restructured energy system and socio-economic development fetch various uncertain events in power systems and the level of uncertainty increases to a great extent day by day. In this context, analysis of voltage stability is essential. The efficient method to assess the voltage stability is maximum loadability limit (MLL). MLL problem is formulated as a maximization problem considering practical security constraints (SCs). Detection of weak buses is also important for the analysis of power system stability. Both MLL and weak buses are identified by PSO methods and FACTS devices can be applied to the detected weak buses for the improvement of stability. Three particle swarm optimization (PSO) techniques namely General PSO (GPSO), Adaptive PSO (APSO) and Chaotic PSO (CPSO) are presented for the comparative study with obtaining MLL and weak buses under different SCs. In APSO method, PSO-parameters are made adaptive with the problem and chaos is incorporated in CPSO method to obtain reliable convergence and better performances. All three methods are applied on standard IEEE 14 bus, 30 bus, 57 bus and 118 bus test systems to show their comparative computing effectiveness and

  8. 100-FR-3 groundwater/soil gas supplemental limited field investigation report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-04-01

    In 1993, a Limited Field Investigation (LFI) was conducted for the 100-FR-3 Operable Unit which identified trichloroethylene (TCE) as a contaminant of potential concern (COPC) (DOE-RL 1994). In groundwater samples collected for the LFI, TCE was detected in well 199-177-1 at a concentration exceeding the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) maximum contaminant level (5 μg/L) and Washington State groundwater criteria (3 μg/L). With the concurrence of the EPA and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), a supplemental LFI was conducted to determine the extent and potential source of TCE groundwater contamination associated with the 100-FR-3 Operable Unit. This report summarizes the activities and results of the groundwater/soil gas supplemental LFI for the 100-FR-3 Operable Unit. The primary objective of this investigation was to assess the lateral distribution of TCE in shallow (3 to 5 ft below the water table) groundwater associated with the 100-FR-3 Operable Unit. The second objective was to assess soil gas (3 to 5 concentrations in the study area in an attempt to identify potential sources of TCE and develop a correlation between soil gas and groundwater concentrations). Finally, the third objective of the investigation was to refine the site conceptual model

  9. Sandwiched gold/PNIPAm/gold microstructures for smart plasmonics application: towards the high detection limit and Raman quantitative measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elashnikov, R; Mares, D; Podzimek, T; Švorčík, V; Lyutakov, O

    2017-08-07

    A smart plasmonic sensor, comprising a layer of a stimuli-responsive polymer sandwiched between two gold layers, is reported. As a stimuli-responsive material, a monolayer of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAm) crosslinked globules is used. A quasi-periodic structure of the top gold layer facilitates efficient excitation and serves as a support for plasmon excitation and propagation. The intermediate layer of PNIPAm efficiently entraps targeted molecules from solutions. The sensor structure was optimized for efficient light focusing in the "active" PNIPAm layer. The optimization was based on the time-resolved finite-element simulations, which take into account the thickness of gold layers, size of PNIPAm globules and Raman excitation wavelength (780 nm). The prepared structures were characterized using SEM, AFM, UV-Vis refractometry and goniometry. Additional AFM scans were performed in water at two temperatures corresponding to the collapsed and swollen PNIPAm states. The Raman measurements demonstrate a high detection limit and perfect reproducibility of the Raman scattering signal for the prepared sensor. In addition, the use of created SERS structures for the detection of relevant molecules in the medical, biological and safety fields was demonstrated.

  10. Proposal for a methodology for the determination of the Detection Limit: Case of bulks detector for the Chlorothalonil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez G, J.; Parra M, C.M.; Romero R, R.M.

    1998-01-01

    As it usually found in the literature, the Lower Detection Limit for an analytical method is obtained by means of a simple statistical exercise whose value is seldom attained in practice. For this reason a method was designed for achieving a Practical Lower Detection Limit for the lowest concentration of the compound that could be detected, S= 2 R, with a probability of at least, 0.90. A methodological design was formulated to get a Practical Lower Detection Limit that is not timed consuming for the analyst. It is presented using an example and, additionally its benefits are discussed versus the unattainable values that are obtained by the traditional use of the standard deviation of a series of measurements of the compound at concentrations near zero, which is then multiplied by the t student for a one tailed test for n-1 degrees of freedom

  11. Probe-Specific Procedure to Estimate Sensitivity and Detection Limits for 19F Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander J Taylor

    Full Text Available Due to low fluorine background signal in vivo, 19F is a good marker to study the fate of exogenous molecules by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI using equilibrium nuclear spin polarization schemes. Since 19F MRI applications require high sensitivity, it can be important to assess experimental feasibility during the design stage already by estimating the minimum detectable fluorine concentration. Here we propose a simple method for the calibration of MRI hardware, providing sensitivity estimates for a given scanner and coil configuration. An experimental "calibration factor" to account for variations in coil configuration and hardware set-up is specified. Once it has been determined in a calibration experiment, the sensitivity of an experiment or, alternatively, the minimum number of required spins or the minimum marker concentration can be estimated without the need for a pilot experiment. The definition of this calibration factor is derived based on standard equations for the sensitivity in magnetic resonance, yet the method is not restricted by the limited validity of these equations, since additional instrument-dependent factors are implicitly included during calibration. The method is demonstrated using MR spectroscopy and imaging experiments with different 19F samples, both paramagnetically and susceptibility broadened, to approximate a range of realistic environments.

  12. Probe-Specific Procedure to Estimate Sensitivity and Detection Limits for 19F Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Alexander J; Granwehr, Josef; Lesbats, Clémentine; Krupa, James L; Six, Joseph S; Pavlovskaya, Galina E; Thomas, Neil R; Auer, Dorothee P; Meersmann, Thomas; Faas, Henryk M

    2016-01-01

    Due to low fluorine background signal in vivo, 19F is a good marker to study the fate of exogenous molecules by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using equilibrium nuclear spin polarization schemes. Since 19F MRI applications require high sensitivity, it can be important to assess experimental feasibility during the design stage already by estimating the minimum detectable fluorine concentration. Here we propose a simple method for the calibration of MRI hardware, providing sensitivity estimates for a given scanner and coil configuration. An experimental "calibration factor" to account for variations in coil configuration and hardware set-up is specified. Once it has been determined in a calibration experiment, the sensitivity of an experiment or, alternatively, the minimum number of required spins or the minimum marker concentration can be estimated without the need for a pilot experiment. The definition of this calibration factor is derived based on standard equations for the sensitivity in magnetic resonance, yet the method is not restricted by the limited validity of these equations, since additional instrument-dependent factors are implicitly included during calibration. The method is demonstrated using MR spectroscopy and imaging experiments with different 19F samples, both paramagnetically and susceptibility broadened, to approximate a range of realistic environments.

  13. On the limitations introduced by energy spread in elastic recoil detection analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szilagyi, E.

    2001-01-01

    Improvements in experimental techniques have led to monolayer depth resolution in heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis (HI-ERDA). Evaluation of the spectra, however, is not trivial. The spectra, using even the best experimental set-up, are subject to finite energy resolution of both extrinsic and intrinsic origin. A proper account for energy spread is necessary to extract the correct depth profile from the measured spectra. With calculation of the correct energy (or depth) resolution of a given method, one can decide in advance whether or not the method will resolve details of interest in the depth profile. To achieve the best depth resolution, it is also possible to find optimum parameters for the experiments. The limitations introduced by the energy spread effects are discussed. An example for simulation is shown for high energy resolution HI-ERDA measurements. Satisfactory agreement between the simulated and the measured HI-ERDA spectra taken by 60 MeV 127 I 23+ ions on highly oriented pyrolythic graphite (HOPG) sample is found, in spite of the non-equilibrium charge state of the recoils and the difference in the stopping powers caused by the given charge state of the incident ion and the recoil, which are not taken into account. To achieve more precise data evaluation these effects should be included in simulation codes, or all the subspectra corresponding to different recoils charge states should be measured and summed

  14. On the limitations introduced by energy spread in elastic recoil detection analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szilagyi, E. E-mail: szilagyi@rmki.kfki.hu

    2001-07-01

    Improvements in experimental techniques have led to monolayer depth resolution in heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis (HI-ERDA). Evaluation of the spectra, however, is not trivial. The spectra, using even the best experimental set-up, are subject to finite energy resolution of both extrinsic and intrinsic origin. A proper account for energy spread is necessary to extract the correct depth profile from the measured spectra. With calculation of the correct energy (or depth) resolution of a given method, one can decide in advance whether or not the method will resolve details of interest in the depth profile. To achieve the best depth resolution, it is also possible to find optimum parameters for the experiments. The limitations introduced by the energy spread effects are discussed. An example for simulation is shown for high energy resolution HI-ERDA measurements. Satisfactory agreement between the simulated and the measured HI-ERDA spectra taken by 60 MeV {sup 127}I{sup 23+} ions on highly oriented pyrolythic graphite (HOPG) sample is found, in spite of the non-equilibrium charge state of the recoils and the difference in the stopping powers caused by the given charge state of the incident ion and the recoil, which are not taken into account. To achieve more precise data evaluation these effects should be included in simulation codes, or all the subspectra corresponding to different recoils charge states should be measured and summed.

  15. Direct Detection Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy: A Method to Push the Limits of Resolution and Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, James L; Lang, Andrew C; Leff, Asher C; Longo, Paolo; Trevor, Colin; Twesten, Ray D; Taheri, Mitra L

    2017-08-15

    In many cases, electron counting with direct detection sensors offers improved resolution, lower noise, and higher pixel density compared to conventional, indirect detection sensors for electron microscopy applications. Direct detection technology has previously been utilized, with great success, for imaging and diffraction, but potential advantages for spectroscopy remain unexplored. Here we compare the performance of a direct detection sensor operated in counting mode and an indirect detection sensor (scintillator/fiber-optic/CCD) for electron energy-loss spectroscopy. Clear improvements in measured detective quantum efficiency and combined energy resolution/energy field-of-view are offered by counting mode direct detection, showing promise for efficient spectrum imaging, low-dose mapping of beam-sensitive specimens, trace element analysis, and time-resolved spectroscopy. Despite the limited counting rate imposed by the readout electronics, we show that both core-loss and low-loss spectral acquisition are practical. These developments will benefit biologists, chemists, physicists, and materials scientists alike.

  16. Incidentally detected gastrointestinal stromal tumor: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolga Canbak

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST are mesenchymal tumors located primarily in the gastrointestinal tract. We aimed to present a case report of GIST incidentally detected during laparoscopic cholecystectomy.A 60-year-old woman was admitted to the emergency room due to abdominal pain for one day. The physical examination revealed sensitivity on the right upper quadrant. In the laboratory examinations, white blood cell count 6,490 k/uL, hemoglobin 12 g/dL, hematocrit 35% and other biochemical tests were normal. Abdominal ultrasound revealed hydropic gallbladder, several gallstones with a maximum diameter of 15 mm and pericholecystic fluid collection was present. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy was planned due to acute cholecystitis. In exploration, beside the presence of acute cholecystitis, a mass of approximately 5 cm, located 15 cm distal to the ligament of Treitz was detected. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy was performed. Conversion to open laparotomy was done; small intestine resection with end-to-end anastomosis was performed. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor with CD117, CD34 and S100 positivity was detected on histopathologic examination.It is thought that GISTs are mesenchymal tumors originating from precursors of Kajal cells. GISTs are usually detected in their 60s. The first option for treatment is surgical resection.

  17. Final Report on the Detection of Green Monopropellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Tracy L.; DeVor, Robert W.; Bauer, Brint M.; Captain, James; Coutts, Janelle L.; Surma, Jan M.

    2015-01-01

    In 2014, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Kennedy Space Center (KSC) funded a project titled "Familiarization and Detection of Green Monopropellants" utilizing Independent Research and Technology Development (IR&TD) and Center Innovation Fund (CIF) funding. The purpose of the project was to evaluate methods of detection for ammonium dinitramide (ADN) and hydroxylammonium nitrate (HAN). An Engineering Services Contract (ESC) task order was created with the scope of evaluation of several methods of detecting ADN- and HAN-based propellants, as well as development of methods for detection. Detection methods include developed methods such as colorimetric indicating absorbent socks, and commercial-off-the- shelf (COTS) units for ammonia detection. An additional goal of the task order was for ESC to become familiar with ADN's and HAN's material properties and material compatibility. Two approaches were initially investigated as possible methods for the detection of HAN (or AFM315E) and ADN (or LMP-103S). These approaches were colorimetric analysis and instrumentation-based COTS vapor sensors utilization. Initial testing showed that the relatively non-existent vapor pressure of the AF-M315E (of which HAN is a major component) propellant would make the use of COTS sensors difficult for real-time area monitoring of HAN; a small response was detected through the use of active COTS sensors, including the RAE Systems MultiRAE Lite and Drager X-act (registered) 5000, but the levels detected were below the threshold limit value for the toxic gas ammonia. Therefore, a detection system ased upon a colorimetric indicator impregnated into an absorbent material was developed. Preliminary analysis (ESC-245-FDG-001) identified a particularly outstanding candidate as a colorimetric indicator for the detection of the presence of AF-M315E in the form of a Methyl Red (Basic) indicator. Materials impregnated with this indicator exhibit significant color change and the

  18. Autonomous long-range open area fire detection and reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhaupt, Darell E.; Reardon, Patrick J.; Blackwell, Lisa; Warden, Lance; Ramsey, Brian D.

    2005-03-01

    Approximately 5 billion dollars in US revenue was lost in 2003 due to open area fires. In addition many lives are lost annually. Early detection of open area fires is typically performed by manned observatories, random reporting and aerial surveillance. Optical IR flame detectors have been developed previously. They typically have experienced high false alarms and low flame detection sensitivity due to interference from solar and other causes. Recently a combination of IR detectors has been used in a two or three color mode to reduce false alarms from solar, or background sources. A combination of ultra-violet C (UVC) and near infra-red (NIR) detectors has also been developed recently for flame discrimination. Relatively solar-blind basic detectors are now available but typically detect at only a few tens of meters at ~ 1 square meter fuel flame. We quantify the range and solar issues for IR and visible detectors and qualitatively define UV sensor requirements in terms of the mode of operation, collection area issues and flame signal output by combustion photochemistry. We describe innovative flame signal collection optics for multiple wavelengths using UV and IR as low false alarm detection of open area fires at long range (8-10 km/m2) in daylight (or darkness). A circular array detector and UV-IR reflective and refractive devices including cylindrical or toroidal lens elements for the IR are described. The dispersion in a refractive cylindrical IR lens characterizes the fire and allows a stationary line or circle generator to locate the direction and different flame IR "colors" from a wide FOV. The line generator will produce spots along the line corresponding to the fire which can be discriminated with a linear detector. We demonstrate prototype autonomous sensors with RF digital reporting from various sites.

  19. Method to Solve the Problem of the Radioactivity Detection in Environmental Samples. Characteristic Limits; Metodos para la Resolucion del Problema de la Detecfcion de Radiactividad en Muestras Ambientales. Limites Caracteristicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasco, C.; Martinez, M.; Heras, M.

    2009-07-21

    The problem of the detection or when the radioactivity can be considered as higher than the background using different measurement techniques has been the objective of several statistical studies and controversies. The detection limit and the critical limit were studied by Currie in year 1968 and used by radiochemistry laboratories considering different ways of calculation that introduced confusion and not correct implementations. In the last few years, and due to the increasing number of standardization processes on the field of radioactivity and accreditation, several international institutions have chosen to unify the criteria for using common determination of detection limits. The most used methods are those developed by MARLAP and International Standard Organization ISO (Standard-11929). In this report are summarised both standards doing a comparative study and giving some examples of how to apply these limits. In same cases, little differences in the uncertainty calculation have been observed but the final results have been concordant. A deeply study of these standards can be done consulting the web page of the American Labs that developed MARLAP or buying the original ISO standard ISO-11929 recently approved (2009). (Author) 17 refs.

  20. Detection methods for legionellae. Possibilities and limitations of detection methods; Niet alle detectiemethoden geschikt voor legionellagroei. Mogelijkheden en beperkingen detectiemethoden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheffer, W.

    2011-06-15

    This article provides an overview of existing and new methods for detecting legionella in water. It offers insight in the characteristics and applications of existing and new detection methods. However, it is impossible to assess the value of alternative methods at the moment. That will require additional research. [Dutch] Een overzicht is gemaakt van bestaande en nieuwe methoden om legionella in water aan te tonen. Daarmee wordt inzicht verkregen in de kenmerken en toepassingsmogelijkheden van bestaande en nieuwe detectiemethoden. De waarde van alternatieve methoden in een installatie kan echter nog niet worden beoordeeld. Daarvoor is nader onderzoek nodig.

  1. Differences in self-reported physical limitation among older women and men in Ismailia, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadr, Zeinab; Yount, Kathryn

    2012-09-01

    This study explores the reasons for gender differences in self-reported physical limitation among older adults in Ismailia, Egypt. 435 women and 448 men, 50 years and older in Ismailia, Egypt, participated in a social survey and tests of physical performance. Ordered logit models were estimated to compare unadjusted gender differences in reported disability with these differences adjusted sequentially for (a) age and objective measures of physical performance, (b) self-reported morbidities and health care use, and (c) social and economic attributes. Compared with men, women more often reported higher levels of limitation in activities of daily living (ADLs), upper-extremity range of motion (ROM), and lower-extremity gross mobility (GM). Adjusting for age and objective measures of physical performance, women and men had similar odds of self-reporting difficulty with ADLs. With sequential adjustments for the remaining variables, women maintained significantly higher odds of self-reported difficulty with upper-extremity ROM and lower-extremity GM. Cross-culturally, gender differences in self-reported disability may arise from objective and subjective perceptions of disability. Collectively, these results and those from prior studies in Bangladesh and the United States suggest that gender gaps in self-reported physical limitation may be associated with the degree of gender equality in society.

  2. 40 CFR 60.2215 - What else must I report if I have a deviation from the operating limits or the emission limitations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... performance test was conducted that deviated from any emission limitation. (b) The deviation report must be... deviation from the operating limits or the emission limitations? 60.2215 Section 60.2215 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR...

  3. A program for the a priori evaluation of detection limits in instrumental neutron activation analysis using a SLOWPOKE II reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galinier, J.L.; Zikovsky, L.

    1982-01-01

    A program that permits the a priori calculation of detection limits in monoelemental matrices, adapted to instrumental neutron activation analysis using a SLOWPOKE II reactor, is described. A simplified model of the gamma spectra is proposed. Products of (n,p) and (n,α) reactions induced by the fast components of the neutron flux that accompanies the thermal flux at the level of internal irradiation sites in the reactor have been included in the list of interfering radionuclides. The program calculates in a systematic way the detection limits of 66 elements in an equal number of matrices using 153 intermediary radionuclides. Experimental checks carried out with silicon (for short lifetimes) and aluminum and magnesium (for intermediate lifetimes) show satisfactory agreement with the calculations. These results show in particular the importance of the contribution of the (n,p) and (n,α) reactions in the a priori evaluation of detection limits with a SLOWPOKE type reactor [fr

  4. Calculating exclusion limits for weakly interacting massive particle direct detection experiments without background subtraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Anne M.

    2002-01-01

    Competitive limits on the weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) spin-independent scattering cross section are currently being produced by 76 Ge detectors originally designed to search for neutrinoless double beta decay, such as the Heidelberg-Moscow and IGEX experiments. In the absence of background subtraction, limits on the WIMP interaction cross section are set by calculating the upper confidence limit on the theoretical event rate, given the observed event rate. The standard analysis technique involves calculating the 90% upper confidence limit on the number of events in each bin, and excluding any set of parameters (WIMP mass and cross section) which produces a theoretical event rate for any bin which exceeds the 90% upper confidence limit on the event rate for that bin. We show that, if there is more than one energy bin, this produces exclusion limits that are actually at a lower degree of confidence than 90%, and are hence erroneously tight. We formulate criteria which produce true 90% confidence exclusion limits in these circumstances, including calculating the individual bin confidence limit for which the overall probability that no bins exceed this confidence limit is 90% and calculating the 90% minimum confidence limit on the number of bins which exceed their individual bin 90% confidence limits. We then compare the limits on the WIMP cross section produced by these criteria with those found using the standard technique, using data from the Heidelberg-Moscow and IGEX experiments

  5. Masticatory muscle pain and progressive mouth opening limitation caused by amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Kang Mi; Park, Ji Woon

    2015-01-01

    This article reports a case of masticatory muscle pain and progressive limited mouth opening secondary to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), popularly known as Lou Gehrig's disease. The symptoms were first mistaken as those of temporomandibular disorders, before fatty degeneration of all masticatory muscles were discovered on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). ALS should be considered in the differential diagnosis process when the patient presents with longstanding progressive mouth opening limitation associated with pain. MRI could facilitate the diagnostic process.

  6. Symptom report in detecting breast cancer-related lymphedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu MR

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Mei R Fu,1 Deborah Axelrod,2,3 Charles M Cleland,1 Zeyuan Qiu,4 Amber A Guth,2,3 Robin Kleinman,2 Joan Scagliola,2 Judith Haber1 1College of Nursing, New York University, 2Department of Surgery, NYU School of Medicine, 3NYU Clinical Cancer Center, New York, NY, 4Department of Chemistry and Environmental Science, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ, USA Abstract: Breast cancer-related lymphedema is a syndrome of abnormal swelling coupled with multiple symptoms resulting from obstruction or disruption of the lymphatic system associated with cancer treatment. Research has demonstrated that with increased number of symptoms reported, breast cancer survivors' limb volume increased. Lymphedema symptoms in the affected limb may indicate a latent stage of lymphedema in which changes cannot be detected by objective measures. The latent stage of lymphedema may exist months or years before overt swelling occurs. Symptom report may play an important role in detecting lymphedema in clinical practice. The purposes of this study were to: 1 examine the validity, sensitivity, and specificity of symptoms for detecting breast cancer-related lymphedema and 2 determine the best clinical cutoff point for the count of symptoms that maximized the sum of sensitivity and specificity. Data were collected from 250 women, including healthy female adults, breast cancer survivors with lymphedema, and those at risk for lymphedema. Lymphedema symptoms were assessed using a reliable and valid instrument. Validity, sensitivity, and specificity were evaluated using logistic regression, analysis of variance, and areas under receiver operating characteristic curves. Count of lymphedema symptoms was able to differentiate healthy adults from breast cancer survivors with lymphedema and those at risk for lymphedema. A diagnostic cutoff of three symptoms discriminated breast cancer survivors with lymphedema from healthy women with a sensitivity of 94% and a specificity of 97

  7. Pushing the limits: detecting H2 emission from faint bipolar planetary nebulae in the IPHAS sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Larios, G.; Guerrero, M. A.; Sabin, L.; Santamaría, E.

    2017-09-01

    We have obtained deep narrowband images in the near-infrared H2 λ2.122 μm emission line for a sample of 15 faint Isaac Newton Telescope Photometric H α Survey (IPHAS) bipolar planetary nebulae (PNe) to search for molecular material. H2 emission is found in most of them (14 out of 15), mostly associated with rings at their equatorial regions and with their bipolar lobes. These detections add to the high occurrence of H2 emission among bipolar PNe reported in previous works, resulting from the large reservoir of molecular material in these sources and the suitable excitation conditions for H2 emission. The correlation between detailed bipolar morphology and H2 luminosity is also confirmed: bipolar PNe with broad equatorial rings (R-BPNe) have almost no continuum emission, are H2 brighter and have larger H2/Br γ line ratio than bipolar PNe with pinched equatorial waists (W-BPNe). The origin of this dichotomy is unclear. The larger size and age of R-BPNe are consistent with shock excitation of H2, whereas ultraviolet pumping is most likely the excitation mechanism in the smaller and younger W-BPNe, which would explain their lower H2 luminosity. Although both types of bipolar PNe seem to proceed from the same progenitor population, this does not imply that R-BPNe descend from W-BPNe. Otherwise, we note that some of the H2-weak bipolar PNe harbor post-common envelope binary systems and symbiotic stars. Finally, we suggest that the long-living H2 emission from R-BPNe arises from a discrete distribution of compact knots embedded within the ionized gas at the equatorial region.

  8. Detection limits should be a thing of the past in gamma-ray spectrometry in general as well as in neutron activation analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaauw, Menno

    2016-01-01

    In gamma-ray spectrometry with high-resolution detectors, full-energy peaks are often to be detected by a peak-search algorithm, with a threshold for detection. Detection limits can be derived from this. Detection limits are often computed along with measured activities or concentrations. When an

  9. Automated baseline change detection - Phases 1 and 2. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byler, E.

    1997-01-01

    The primary objective of this project is to apply robotic and optical sensor technology to the operational inspection of mixed toxic and radioactive waste stored in barrels, using Automated Baseline Change Detection (ABCD), based on image subtraction. Absolute change detection is based on detecting any visible physical changes, regardless of cause, between a current inspection image of a barrel and an archived baseline image of the same barrel. Thus, in addition to rust, the ABCD system can also detect corrosion, leaks, dents, and bulges. The ABCD approach and method rely on precise camera positioning and repositioning relative to the barrel and on feature recognition in images. The ABCD image processing software was installed on a robotic vehicle developed under a related DOE/FETC contract DE-AC21-92MC29112 Intelligent Mobile Sensor System (IMSS) and integrated with the electronics and software. This vehicle was designed especially to navigate in DOE Waste Storage Facilities. Initial system testing was performed at Fernald in June 1996. After some further development and more extensive integration the prototype integrated system was installed and tested at the Radioactive Waste Management Facility (RWMC) at INEEL beginning in April 1997 through the present (November 1997). The integrated system, composed of ABCD imaging software and IMSS mobility base, is called MISS EVE (Mobile Intelligent Sensor System--Environmental Validation Expert). Evaluation of the integrated system in RWMC Building 628, containing approximately 10,000 drums, demonstrated an easy to use system with the ability to properly navigate through the facility, image all the defined drums, and process the results into a report delivered to the operator on a GUI interface and on hard copy. Further work is needed to make the brassboard system more operationally robust

  10. Discussing study limitations in reports of biomedical studies- the need for more transparency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puhan, Milo A; Akl, Elie A; Bryant, Dianne; Xie, Feng; Apolone, Giovanni; ter Riet, Gerben

    2012-02-23

    Unbiased and frank discussion of study limitations by authors represents a crucial part of the scientific discourse and progress. In today's culture of publishing many authors or scientific teams probably balance 'utter honesty' when discussing limitations of their research with the risk of being unable to publish their work. Currently, too few papers in the medical literature frankly discuss how limitations could have affected the study findings and interpretations. The goals of this commentary are to review how limitations are currently acknowledged in the medical literature, to discuss the implications of limitations in biomedical studies, and to make suggestions as to how to openly discuss limitations for scientists submitting their papers to journals. This commentary was developed through discussion and logical arguments by the authors who are doing research in the area of hedging (use of language to express uncertainty) and who have extensive experience as authors and editors of biomedical papers. We strongly encourage authors to report on all potentially important limitations that may have affected the quality and interpretation of the evidence being presented. This will not only benefit science but also offers incentives for authors: If not all important limitations are acknowledged readers and reviewers of scientific articles may perceive that the authors were unaware of them. Authors should take advantage of their content knowledge and familiarity with the study to prevent misinterpretations of the limitations by reviewers and readers. Articles discussing limitations help shape the future research agenda and are likely to be cited because they have informed the design and conduct of future studies. Instead of perceiving acknowledgment of limitations negatively, authors, reviewers and editors should recognize the potential of a frank and unbiased discussion of study limitations that should not jeopardize acceptance of manuscripts.

  11. Discussing study limitations in reports of biomedical studies- the need for more transparency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puhan Milo A

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Unbiased and frank discussion of study limitations by authors represents a crucial part of the scientific discourse and progress. In today's culture of publishing many authors or scientific teams probably balance 'utter honesty' when discussing limitations of their research with the risk of being unable to publish their work. Currently, too few papers in the medical literature frankly discuss how limitations could have affected the study findings and interpretations. The goals of this commentary are to review how limitations are currently acknowledged in the medical literature, to discuss the implications of limitations in biomedical studies, and to make suggestions as to how to openly discuss limitations for scientists submitting their papers to journals. This commentary was developed through discussion and logical arguments by the authors who are doing research in the area of hedging (use of language to express uncertainty and who have extensive experience as authors and editors of biomedical papers. We strongly encourage authors to report on all potentially important limitations that may have affected the quality and interpretation of the evidence being presented. This will not only benefit science but also offers incentives for authors: If not all important limitations are acknowledged readers and reviewers of scientific articles may perceive that the authors were unaware of them. Authors should take advantage of their content knowledge and familiarity with the study to prevent misinterpretations of the limitations by reviewers and readers. Articles discussing limitations help shape the future research agenda and are likely to be cited because they have informed the design and conduct of future studies. Instead of perceiving acknowledgment of limitations negatively, authors, reviewers and editors should recognize the potential of a frank and unbiased discussion of study limitations that should not jeopardize acceptance of

  12. Geodesy cannot presently detect the up-dip limit of frictional locking on megathrusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, R. V.; Lindsey, E. O.; Bradley, K.; Hubbard, J.; Sathiakumar, S.; Malick, R.; Hill, E.

    2017-12-01

    Most discussions of interseismic behavior on megathrust faults focus on whether they are frictionally locked or creeping. Unfortunately, many geodetic studies of subduction zone megathrusts equate fault coupling with frictional locking. This comparison is not appropriate, as one reflects the physical properties of the fault, and the other reflects the kinematics of the fault. Much of the uncertainty about slip behavior is because in subduction zones, the shallow part of the fault is far from land, and therefore creep is not detectable by land-based GPS. Published coupling maps of subduction zone megathrusts often assume a low coupling ratio near the trench, updip from fully coupled regions. Yet, if the megathrust attains a coupling ratio of 1 anywhere on the fault (i.e., the hanging wall is moving with the same velocity as the footwall), a lower value of coupling updip of this location requires interseismic extension at a rate proportional to the decrease (Wang and Dixon, 2004). We argue that the shallow region of megathrusts lie in updip stress shadows, and do not (except under rare circumstances) experience appropriate driving forces to cause significant creep during the interseismic period. Therefore it may not be possible to determine whether these regions are frictionally locked by examining interseismic geodetic records. We demonstrate this effect using a boundary element model with rate-strengthening friction and a simplified subduction zone geometry. We show that a coupling value of zero at the trench is physically unrealistic even if only a small portion of the downdip fault zone is locked. The maximum creep at the trench depends on the width of the transition of the frictionally locked zone, but should be small (<30% of plate rate) under most circumstances. During the interseismic period, even if the shallow parts of megathrusts are frictionally unlocked, creep is likely smaller than the resolution of current seafloor geodetic techniques (which is

  13. Fabrication of Stretchable Copper Coated Carbon Nanotube Conductor for Non-Enzymatic Glucose Detection Electrode with Low Detection Limit and Selectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawei Jiang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The increasing demand for wearable glucose sensing has stimulated growing interest in stretchable electrodes. The development of the electrode materials having large stretchability, low detection limit, and good selectivity is the key component for constructing high performance wearable glucose sensors. In this work, we presented fabrication of stretchable conductor based on the copper coated carbon nanotube sheath-core fiber, and its application as non-enzymatic electrode for glucose detection with high stretchability, low detection limit, and selectivity. The sheath-core fiber was fabricated by coating copper coated carbon nanotube on a pre-stretched rubber fiber core followed by release of pre-stretch, which had a hierarchically buckled structure. It showed a small resistance change as low as 27% as strain increasing from 0% to 500% strain, and a low resistance of 0.4 Ω·cm−1 at strain of 500%. This electrode showed linear glucose concentration detection in the range between 0.05 mM and 5 mM and good selectivity against sucrose, lactic acid, uric acid, acrylic acid in phosphate buffer saline solution, and showed stable signal in high salt concentration. The limit of detection (LOD was 0.05 mM, for the range of 0.05–5 mM, the sensitivity is 46 mA·M−1. This electrode can withstand large strain of up to 60% with negligible influence on its performance.

  14. EDF Energy Holdings Limited, Registered Number 06930266, Annual report and financial statements 31 December 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    EDF Energy Holdings Limited and subsidiaries make up EDF Energy. The companies' principal activities are to provide and supply electricity and gas to commercial, residential and industrial customers, and to generate electricity through a portfolio of generation assets including nuclear, coal fired, gas and renewable generation. EDF Energy is also involved in the construction of new build nuclear assets. This document is the annual report and financial statements of the company for the year 2016. Contents: 1 - Strategic report; 2 - Directors' report; 3 - Directors' responsibility statement; 4 - Independent Auditor's report to the Members of EDF Energy Holdings Limited; 5 - Consolidated income statement; 6 - Consolidated statement of comprehensive income; 7 - Consolidated balance sheet; 8 - Consolidated cash flow statement; 9 - Consolidated statement of changes in equity 10 - Notes to the consolidated financial statements; 11 - Company balance sheet; 12 - Company statement of changes in equity; 13 - Notes to the Company financial statements

  15. Rapid Methods for the Detection of Foodborne Bacterial Pathogens: Principles, Applications, Advantages and Limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Law eJodi Woan-Fei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of foodborne diseases has increased over the years and resulted in major public health problem globally. Foodborne pathogens can be found in various foods and it is important to detect foodborne pathogens to provide safe food supply and to prevent foodborne diseases. The conventional methods used to detect foodborne pathogen are time consuming and laborious. Hence, a variety of methods have been developed for rapid detection of foodborne pathogens as it is required in many food analyses. Rapid detection methods can be categorized into nucleic acid-based, biosensor-based and immunological-based methods. This review emphasizes on the principles and application of recent rapid methods for the detection of foodborne bacterial pathogens. Detection methods included are simple polymerase chain reaction (PCR, multiplex PCR, real-time PCR, nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA, loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP and oligonucleotide DNA microarray which classified as nucleic acid-based methods; optical, electrochemical and mass-based biosensors which classified as biosensor-based methods; enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and lateral flow immunoassay which classified as immunological-based methods. In general, rapid detection methods are generally time-efficient, sensitive, specific and labor-saving. The developments of rapid detection methods are vital in prevention and treatment of foodborne diseases.

  16. In-Situ Radiation Detection Demonstration Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohagheghi, Amir H.; Reese, Robert; Miller, David R.; Miller, Mark Laverne; Duce, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    The Department of Defense (DoD) has hundreds of facilities where radioactive materials have been used or are being used, including firing ranges, low-level radioactive waste disposal areas, and areas where past activities have resulted in environmental contamination. Affected sites range in size from a few acres to square miles. Impact to the DoD comes through military base closure and release to the public. It is important that radioactive contaminants are remediated to levels that result in acceptable risk to the public. Remediation requires characterization studies, e.g., sampling and surveys, to define the affected areas, removal actions, and final confirmatory sampling and surveys. Characterization of surface contamination concentrations has historically been performed using extensive soil sampling programs in conjunction with surface radiation surveys conducted with hand-held radiation monitoring equipment. Sampling is required within the suspect affected area and a large buffer area. Surface soil contaminant characterization using soil sampling and hand held monitoring are costly, time consuming, and result in long delays between submission of samples for analysis and obtaining of final results. This project took an existing, proven radiation survey technology that has had limited exposure and improved its capabilities by documenting correlation factors for various detector/radionuclide geometries that commonly occur in field surveys. With this tool, one can perform characterization and final release surveys much more quickly than is currently possible, and have detection limits that are as good as or better than current technology. This paper will discuss the capabilities of a large area plastic scintillation detector used in conjunction with a global positioning system (GPS) to improve site characterization, remediation, and final clearance surveys of the radioactively contaminated site. Survey results can rapidly identify areas that require remediation as

  17. Evaluation of the limits of visual detection of image misregistration in a brain fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose PET-MRI study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, J.C.H.; Studholme, C.; Hawkes, D.J.; Maisey, M.N.

    1997-01-01

    In routine clinical work, registration accuracy is assessed by visual inspection. However, the accuracy of visual assessment of registration has not been evaluated. This study establishes the limits of visual detection of misregistration in a registered brain fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography to magnetic resonance image volume. The ''best'' registered image volume was obtained by automatic registration using mutual information optimization. Translational movements by 1 mm, 2 mm, 3 mm and 4 mm, and rotational movements by 1 , 2 , 3 and 4 in the positive and negative directions in the x- (lateral), y- (anterior-posterior) and z- (axial) axes were introduced to this standard. These 48 images plus six ''best'' registered images were presented in random sequence to five observers for visual categorization of registration accuracy. No observer detected a definite misregistration in the ''best'' registered image. Evaluation for inter-observer variation using observer pairings showed a high percentage of agreement in assigned categories for both translational and rotational misregistrations. Assessment of the limits of detection of misregistration showed that a 2-mm translational misregistration was detectable by all observers in the x- and y-axes and 3-mm translational misregistration in the z-axis. With rotational misregistrations, rotation around the z-axis was detectable by all at 2 rotation whereas rotation around the y-axis was detected at 3-4 . Rotation around the x-axis was not symmetric with a positive rotation being identified at 2 whereas negative rotation was detected by all only at 4 . Therefore, visual analysis appears to be a sensitive and practical means to assess image misregistration accuracy. The awareness of the limits of visual detection of misregistration will lead to increase care when evaluating registration quality in both research and clinical settings. (orig.). With 6 figs., 3 tabs

  18. National Nuclear Corporation Limited report and financial statements 31 March 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The paper contains the directors' annual report and the audited financial statements of the National Nuclear Corporation Limited, 1985/6. The company is engaged in designing and constructing power stations and nuclear power reactors, and other related work, and in associated research and development. (U.K.)

  19. National Nuclear Corporation Limited report and financial statements 31 March 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    The paper contains the directors' annual report and the audited financial statements of the National Nuclear Corporation Limited, 1985/6. The company is engaged in designing and constructing power stations and nuclear power reactors, and other related work, and in associated research and development. (U.K.).

  20. The detection and stabilisation of limit cycle for deterministic finite automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiaoguang; Chen, Zengqiang; Liu, Zhongxin; Zhang, Qing

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, the topological structure properties of deterministic finite automata (DFA), under the framework of the semi-tensor product of matrices, are investigated. First, the dynamics of DFA are converted into a new algebraic form as a discrete-time linear system by means of Boolean algebra. Using this algebraic description, the approach of calculating the limit cycles of different lengths is given. Second, we present two fundamental concepts, namely, domain of attraction of limit cycle and prereachability set. Based on the prereachability set, an explicit solution of calculating domain of attraction of a limit cycle is completely characterised. Third, we define the globally attractive limit cycle, and then the necessary and sufficient condition for verifying whether all state trajectories of a DFA enter a given limit cycle in a finite number of transitions is given. Fourth, the problem of whether a DFA can be stabilised to a limit cycle by the state feedback controller is discussed. Criteria for limit cycle-stabilisation are established. All state feedback controllers which implement the minimal length trajectories from each state to the limit cycle are obtained by using the proposed algorithm. Finally, an illustrative example is presented to show the theoretical results.

  1. DNA isolation protocols affect the detection limit of PCR approaches of bacteria in samples from the human gastrointestinal tract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zoetendal, E.G.; Ben-Amor, K.; Akkermans, A.D.L.; Abee, T.; Vos, de W.M.

    2001-01-01

    A major concern in molecular ecological studies is the lysis efficiency of different bacteria in a complex ecosystem. We used a PCR-based 16S rDNA approach to determine the effect of two DNA isolation protocols (i.e. the bead beating and Triton-X100 method) on the detection limit of seven

  2. Re-evaluation of groundwater monitoring data for glyphosate and bentazone by taking detection limits into account

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Claus Toni; Ritz, Christian; Gerhard, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    .e. samples with concentrations below the detection limit, as left-censored observations. The median calculated pesticide concentrations are shown to be reduced 10(4) to 10(5) fold for two representative herbicides (glyphosate and bentazone) relative to the median concentrations based upon observations above...

  3. Analysis of uncertainties and detection limits for the double measurement method of {sup 90}Sr and {sup 89}Sr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herranz, M., E-mail: m.herranz@ehu.es [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Fluid Mechanics, University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), Alameda de Urquijo s/n 48013 Bilbao (Spain); Idoeta, R.; Legarda, F. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Fluid Mechanics, University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), Alameda de Urquijo s/n 48013 Bilbao (Spain)

    2011-08-15

    The determination process of the {sup 90}Sr and {sup 89}Sr contents in a sample, although it involves their radiochemical isolation, results always in a complex measurement process due to the interferences among their respective beta emissions and also among those of the daughter of {sup 90}Sr, {sup 90}Y, a beta emitter as well. In this paper, the process consisting in a double measurement method after the Sr radiochemical isolation is analyzed, developing the formulae to obtain activity concentrations, uncertainties and detection limits. A study of the trend of uncertainties and detection limits as function of the time in which the first measurement since the isolation is done, the delay between the two measurements and the activity concentration of each strontium isotope in the sample is carried out as well. Results show that with a very precise determination of the times involved in the whole process (isolation, measurement and duration of measurements) this method permits a reliable assessment of both strontium radioisotopes. The quicker the first measurement since the isolation is done and the longer the delay between measurements is chosen, the lower are the detection limits and the uncertainties of the activities obtained. - Highlights: > The double measurement method for {sup 90}Sr and {sup 89}Sr determination is analysed. > Uncertainties and detection limits are determined and their dependences studied. > Proposals for the optimization of the method are given.

  4. 40 CFR Appendix C to Part 425 - Definition and Procedure for the Determination of the Method Detection Limit 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Definition and Procedure for the Determination of the Method Detection Limit 1 C Appendix C to Part 425 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS LEATHER TANNING AND FINISHING POINT SOURCE...

  5. Consistent Practices for Characterizing the Detection Limits of Fracture Critical Metallic Component Inspection Systems

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA-STD-5009 requires that successful flaw detection by NDE methods be statistically qualified for use on fracture critical metallic components using Probability of...

  6. Limitations and Strengths of the Fourier Transform Method to Detect Accelerating Targets

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thayaparan, Thayananthan

    2000-01-01

    .... In using a Pulse Doppler Radar to detect a non-accelerating target in additive white Gaussian noise and to estimate its radial velocity, the Fourier method provides an output signal-to-noise ratio (SNR...

  7. Healthcare Professionals’ Perspectives on Barriers to Elder Abuse Detection and Reporting in Primary Care Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    SCHMEIDEL, AMY N.; DALY, JEANETTE M.; ROSENBAUM, MARCY E.; SCHMUCH, GRETCHEN A.; JOGERST, GERALD J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore through interviews of healthcare professionals their perspectives on elder abuse to achieve a better understanding of the problems of reporting and generate ideas for improving the process. Through a mailed survey, nurses, physicians, and social workers were invited to participate in an interview. Nine nurses, 8 physicians, and 6 social workers were interviewed and thematic analysis was used to identify the following core themes: professional orientation, assessment, interpretation, systems, and knowledge and education. The impact by healthcare professionals in recognizing and reporting elder abuse and obtaining resources for those mistreated can be profound. Nurses tended to perceive elder abuse as uncommon and generally did not feel it was their role nor did they have time to assess patients for potential abuse. Physicians felt that other patient care issues, time limitations and maintaining trust in the clinician-patient relationship outweighed the importance of detecting and pursuing suspected cases of elder abuse. Social workers, although having the most knowledge and experience related to elder abuse, relied on nurses and physicians to detect potential abusive situations and to work with them in making appropriate referrals. The three disciplines acknowledged the need for more and better education about elder abuse detection and reporting. Participants suggested a reorganization of the external reporting system. More frequent and pragmatic education is necessary to strengthen practical knowledge about elder abuse. PMID:22206510

  8. Limit of detection for the determination of Pt in biological material by RNAA using electrolytic separation of gold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xilei, L.; Heydorn, K.; Rietz, B.

    1992-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis based on the 199 Au indicator for platinum requires the separation of gold at high radiochemical purity. The limit of detection is strongly affected by the presence of gold; with a gold content of 50 pg/g, irradiating for 5 days at 5*10 13 n/cm 2 is needed to achieve a limit of detection of approximately 30 pg/g. In this case the nuclear interference from gold will exceeded the level of platium by several orders of magnitude and has to be determined with exceedingly high precision. Preliminary results for SRM 1577 Bovine Liver with 95% yield gave consistent results for Au, but Pt could not be detected. (author) 23 refs.; 3 figs.; 4 tabs

  9. Final LDRD report : advanced plastic scintillators for neutron detection.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vance, Andrew L.; Mascarenhas, Nicholas; O' Bryan, Greg; Mrowka, Stanley

    2010-09-01

    This report summarizes the results of a one-year, feasibility-scale LDRD project that was conducted with the goal of developing new plastic scintillators capable of pulse shape discrimination (PSD) for neutron detection. Copolymers composed of matrix materials such as poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and blocks containing trans-stilbene (tSB) as the scintillator component were prepared and tested for gamma/neutron response. Block copolymer synthesis utilizing tSBMA proved unsuccessful so random copolymers containing up to 30% tSB were prepared. These copolymers were found to function as scintillators upon exposure to gamma radiation; however, they did not exhibit PSD when exposed to a neutron source. This project, while falling short of its ultimate goal, demonstrated the possible utility of single-component, undoped plastics as scintillators for applications that do not require PSD.

  10. Registered Report: Measuring Unconscious Deception Detection by Skin Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Elisabeth Van 't Veer

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Findings from the deception detection literature suggest that although people are not skilled in consciously detecting a liar, they may intuit that something about the person telling a lie is off. In the current proposal, we argue that observing a liar influences the observer’s physiology even though the observer may not be consciously aware of being lied to (i.e., the observers’ direct deception judgment does not accurately differentiate between liars and truth-tellers. To test this hypothesis, participants’ finger temperature will be measured while they watch videos of persons who are either honest or dishonest about their identity. We hypothesize that skin temperature will be lower when observing a liar than when observing a truth-teller. Additionally, we test whether perceiving a liar influences finger skin temperature differently when an individual is, or is not, alerted to the possibility of deceit. We do this by varying participants’ awareness of the fact that they might be lied to. Next to measuring physiological responses to liars and truth-tellers, self-reported direct and indirect veracity judgments (i.e., trustworthiness and liking of the target persons will be assessed. We hypothesize that indirect veracity judgments will better distinguish between liars and truth-tellers than direct veracity judgments.

  11. Limits on surface gravities of Kepler planet-candidate host stars from non-detection of solar-like oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campante, T. L.; Chaplin, W. J.; Handberg, R.; Miglio, A.; Davies, G. R.; Elsworth, Y. P. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Lund, M. N.; Arentoft, T.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Karoff, C.; Kjeldsen, H.; Lundkvist, M. [Stellar Astrophysics Centre (SAC), Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Huber, D. [NASA Ames Research Center, MS 244-30, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Hekker, S. [Astronomical Institute, " Anton Pannekoek," University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); García, R. A. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Université Paris Diderot (France); IRFU/SAp, Centre de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Corsaro, E. [Instituut voor Sterrenkunde, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Basu, S. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Bedding, T. R. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia); Gilliland, R. L. [Center for Exoplanets and Habitable Worlds, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Kawaler, S. D., E-mail: campante@bison.ph.bham.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); and others

    2014-03-10

    We present a novel method for estimating lower-limit surface gravities (log g) of Kepler targets whose data do not allow the detection of solar-like oscillations. The method is tested using an ensemble of solar-type stars observed in the context of the Kepler Asteroseismic Science Consortium. We then proceed to estimate lower-limit log g for a cohort of Kepler solar-type planet-candidate host stars with no detected oscillations. Limits on fundamental stellar properties, as provided by this work, are likely to be useful in the characterization of the corresponding candidate planetary systems. Furthermore, an important byproduct of the current work is the confirmation that amplitudes of solar-like oscillations are suppressed in stars with increased levels of surface magnetic activity.

  12. Detection of bacteria based on the thermomechanical noise of a nanomechanical resonator: origin of the response and detection limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, D; Tamayo, J; Mertens, J; Calleja, M; Villanueva, L G; Zaballos, A

    2008-01-01

    We have measured the effect of bacteria adsorption on the resonant frequency of microcantilevers as a function of the adsorption position and vibration mode. The resonant frequencies were measured from the Brownian fluctuations of the cantilever tip. We found that the sign and amount of the resonant frequency change is determined by the position and extent of the adsorption on the cantilever with regard to the shape of the vibration mode. To explain these results, a theoretical one-dimensional model is proposed. We obtain analytical expressions for the resonant frequency that accurately fit the data obtained by the finite element method. More importantly, the theory data shows a good agreement with the experiments. Our results indicate that there exist two opposite mechanisms that can produce a significant resonant frequency shift: the stiffness and the mass of the bacterial cells. Based on the thermomechanical noise, we analyse the regions of the cantilever of lowest and highest sensitivity to the attachment of bacteria. The combination of high vibration modes and the confinement of the adsorption to defined regions of the cantilever allows the detection of single bacterial cells by only measuring the Brownian fluctuations. This study can be extended to smaller cantilevers and other biological systems such as proteins and nucleic acids

  13. Improved detection limits for electrospray ionization on a magnetic sector mass spectrometer by using an array detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cody, R B; Tamura, J; Finch, J W; Musselman, B D

    1994-03-01

    Array detection was compared with point detection for solutions of hen egg-white lysozyme, equine myoglobin, and ubiquitin analyzed by electrospray ionization with a magnetic sector mass spectrometer. The detection limits for samples analyzed by using the array detector system were at least 10 times lower than could be achieved by using a point detector on the same mass spectrometer. The minimum detectable quantity of protein corresponded to a signal-to-background ratio of approximately 2∶1 for a 500 amol/μL solution of hen egg-white lysozyme. However, the ultimate practical sample concentrations appeared to be in the 10-100 fmol/μL range for the analysis of dilute solutions of relatively pure proteins or simple mixtures.

  14. The physics of detecting torsion and placing limits on its effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoeger, W.R.

    1985-01-01

    The essential principles of torsion-detection physics are presented and several conceivable types of experiments and observations for actually detecting torsion fields are evaluated reemphasizing also the evident impossibility of successfully searching for its manifestations among cosmological relics. In particular, a polarized body, with net intrinsic (fundamental-particle) spin, is essential for detecting a torsion field. One which possesses only orbital angular momentum-rotation-or an unpolarized intrinsic spin density will not feel torsion. The fundamental problem in searching for such fields is the extremely small basic unit of the coupling or interaction energy between the torsion field and spin, epsilonapprox.(8πG'/c 2 )(h 2 /4). The best way of maximizing the total interaction energy is to increase the spin density of the source σ 5 and, at the same time the ''spin number'' Ssub(D) of the detector. (author)

  15. The significance of reporting to the thousandths place: Figuring out the laboratory limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joely A. Straseski

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: A request to report laboratory values to a specific number of decimal places represents a delicate balance between clinical interpretation of a true analytical change versus laboratory understanding of analytical imprecision and significant figures. Prostate specific antigen (PSA was used as an example to determine if an immunoassay routinely reported to the hundredths decimal place based on significant figure assessment in our laboratory was capable of providing analytically meaningful results when reported to the thousandths places when requested by clinicians. Design and methods: Results of imprecision studies of a representative PSA assay (Roche MODULAR E170 employing two methods of statistical analysis are reported. Sample pools were generated with target values of 0.01 and 0.20 μg/L PSA as determined by the E170. Intra-assay imprecision studies were conducted and the resultant data were analyzed using two independent statistical methods to evaluate reporting limits. Results: These statistical methods indicated reporting results to the thousandths place at the two assessed concentrations was an appropriate reflection of the measurement imprecision for the representative assay. This approach used two independent statistical tests to determine the ability of an analytical system to support a desired reporting level. Importantly, data were generated during a routine intra-assay imprecision study, thus this approach does not require extra data collection by the laboratory. Conclusions: Independent statistical analysis must be used to determine appropriate significant figure limitations for clinically relevant analytes. Establishing these limits is the responsibility of the laboratory and should be determined prior to providing clinical results. Keywords: Significant figures, Imprecision, Prostate cancer, Prostate specific antigen, PSA

  16. Limitations to depth resolution in high-energy, heavy-ion elastic recoil detection analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliman, R.G.; Palmer, G.R.; Ophel, T.R.; Timmers, H.

    1998-01-01

    The depth resolution of heavy-ion elastic recoil detection analysis was examined for Al and Co thin films ranging in thickness from 100 to 400 nm. Measurements were performed with 154 MeV Au ions as the incident beam, and recoils were detected using a gas ionisation detector. Energy spectra were extracted for the Al and Co recoils and the depth resolution determined as a function of film thickness from the width of the high- and low- energy edges. These results were compared with theoretical estimates calculated using the computer program DEPTH. (authors)

  17. Feature Detection, Characterization and Confirmation Methodology: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karasaki, Kenzi; Apps, John; Doughty, Christine; Gwatney, Hope; Onishi, Celia Tiemi; Trautz, Robert; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2007-03-01

    This is the final report of the NUMO-LBNL collaborative project: Feature Detection, Characterization and Confirmation Methodology under NUMO-DOE/LBNL collaboration agreement, the task description of which can be found in the Appendix. We examine site characterization projects from several sites in the world. The list includes Yucca Mountain in the USA, Tono and Horonobe in Japan, AECL in Canada, sites in Sweden, and Olkiluoto in Finland. We identify important geologic features and parameters common to most (or all) sites to provide useful information for future repository siting activity. At first glance, one could question whether there was any commonality among the sites, which are in different rock types at different locations. For example, the planned Yucca Mountain site is a dry repository in unsaturated tuff, whereas the Swedish sites are situated in saturated granite. However, the study concludes that indeed there are a number of important common features and parameters among all the sites--namely, (1) fault properties, (2) fracture-matrix interaction (3) groundwater flux, (4) boundary conditions, and (5) the permeability and porosity of the materials. We list the lessons learned from the Yucca Mountain Project and other site characterization programs. Most programs have by and large been quite successful. Nonetheless, there are definitely 'should-haves' and 'could-haves', or lessons to be learned, in all these programs. Although each site characterization program has some unique aspects, we believe that these crosscutting lessons can be very useful for future site investigations to be conducted in Japan. One of the most common lessons learned is that a repository program should allow for flexibility, in both schedule and approach. We examine field investigation technologies used to collect site characterization data in the field. An extensive list of existing field technologies is presented, with some discussion on usage and limitations

  18. Feature Detection, Characterization and Confirmation Methodology: Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karasaki, Kenzi; Apps, John; Doughty, Christine; Gwatney, Hope; Onishi, Celia Tiemi; Trautz, Robert; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2007-01-01

    This is the final report of the NUMO-LBNL collaborative project: Feature Detection, Characterization and Confirmation Methodology under NUMO-DOE/LBNL collaboration agreement, the task description of which can be found in the Appendix. We examine site characterization projects from several sites in the world. The list includes Yucca Mountain in the USA, Tono and Horonobe in Japan, AECL in Canada, sites in Sweden, and Olkiluoto in Finland. We identify important geologic features and parameters common to most (or all) sites to provide useful information for future repository siting activity. At first glance, one could question whether there was any commonality among the sites, which are in different rock types at different locations. For example, the planned Yucca Mountain site is a dry repository in unsaturated tuff, whereas the Swedish sites are situated in saturated granite. However, the study concludes that indeed there are a number of important common features and parameters among all the sites--namely, (1) fault properties, (2) fracture-matrix interaction (3) groundwater flux, (4) boundary conditions, and (5) the permeability and porosity of the materials. We list the lessons learned from the Yucca Mountain Project and other site characterization programs. Most programs have by and large been quite successful. Nonetheless, there are definitely 'should-haves' and 'could-haves', or lessons to be learned, in all these programs. Although each site characterization program has some unique aspects, we believe that these crosscutting lessons can be very useful for future site investigations to be conducted in Japan. One of the most common lessons learned is that a repository program should allow for flexibility, in both schedule and approach. We examine field investigation technologies used to collect site characterization data in the field. An extensive list of existing field technologies is presented, with some discussion on usage and limitations. Many of the

  19. Limited evidence for the use of imaging to detect prostate cancer: A systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomqvist, L.; Carlsson, S.; Gjertsson, P.; Heintz, E.; Hultcrantz, M.; Mejare, I.; Andrén, O.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • In men with clinical suspicion of prostate cancer, ultrasound guided systematic biopsies is the golden standard for diagnosis. • Diagnostic imaging techniques, especially magnetic resonance imaging, is being used in trials to aid detection of prostate cancer. • To date, there is insufficient scientific evidence for the use of imaging techniques to detect prostate cancer. - Abstract: Objective: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of imaging technologies for detecting prostate cancer in patients with elevated PSA-values or suspected findings on clinical examination. Methods: The databases Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane, CRD HTA/DARE/NHS EED and EconLit were searched until June 2013. Pre-determined inclusion criteria were used to select full text articles. Risk of bias in individual studies was rated according to QUADAS or AMSTAR. Abstracts and full text articles were assessed independently by two reviewers. The performance of diagnostic imaging was compared with systematic biopsies (reference standard) and sensitivity and specificity were calculated. Results: The literature search yielded 5141 abstracts, which were reviewed by two independent reviewers. Of these 4852 were excluded since they did not meet the inclusion criteria. 288 articles were reviewed in full text for quality assessment. Six studies, three using MRI and three using transrectal ultrasound were included. All were rated as high risk of bias. Relevant studies on PET/CT were not identified. Conclusion: Despite clinical use, there is insufficient evidence regarding the accuracy of imaging technologies for detecting cancer in patients with suspected prostate cancer using TRUS guided systematic biopsies as reference standard

  20. Limited evidence for the use of imaging to detect prostate cancer: A systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomqvist, L., E-mail: lennart.k.blomqvist@ki.se [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna (Sweden); Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Carlsson, S. [Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Urology, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna (Sweden); Gjertsson, P. [Department of Clinical Physiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Heintz, E.; Hultcrantz, M.; Mejare, I. [The Swedish Council on Health Technology Assessment, Stockholm (Sweden); Andrén, O. [School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro (Sweden); Department of Urology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro (Sweden)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • In men with clinical suspicion of prostate cancer, ultrasound guided systematic biopsies is the golden standard for diagnosis. • Diagnostic imaging techniques, especially magnetic resonance imaging, is being used in trials to aid detection of prostate cancer. • To date, there is insufficient scientific evidence for the use of imaging techniques to detect prostate cancer. - Abstract: Objective: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of imaging technologies for detecting prostate cancer in patients with elevated PSA-values or suspected findings on clinical examination. Methods: The databases Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane, CRD HTA/DARE/NHS EED and EconLit were searched until June 2013. Pre-determined inclusion criteria were used to select full text articles. Risk of bias in individual studies was rated according to QUADAS or AMSTAR. Abstracts and full text articles were assessed independently by two reviewers. The performance of diagnostic imaging was compared with systematic biopsies (reference standard) and sensitivity and specificity were calculated. Results: The literature search yielded 5141 abstracts, which were reviewed by two independent reviewers. Of these 4852 were excluded since they did not meet the inclusion criteria. 288 articles were reviewed in full text for quality assessment. Six studies, three using MRI and three using transrectal ultrasound were included. All were rated as high risk of bias. Relevant studies on PET/CT were not identified. Conclusion: Despite clinical use, there is insufficient evidence regarding the accuracy of imaging technologies for detecting cancer in patients with suspected prostate cancer using TRUS guided systematic biopsies as reference standard.

  1. Detecting gravitational waves from precessing binaries of spinning compact objects: Adiabatic limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buonanno, Alessandra; Chen Yanbei; Vallisneri, Michele

    2003-01-01

    Black-hole (BH) binaries with single-BH masses m=(5-20)M · , moving on quasicircular orbits, are among the most promising sources for first-generation ground-based gravitational-wave (GW) detectors. Until now, the development of data-analysis techniques to detect GWs from these sources has been focused mostly on nonspinning BHs. The data-analysis problem for the spinning case is complicated by the necessity to model the precession-induced modulations of the GW signal, and by the large number of parameters needed to characterize the system, including the initial directions of the spins, and the position and orientation of the binary with respect to the GW detector. In this paper we consider binaries of maximally spinning BHs, and we work in the adiabatic-inspiral regime to build families of modulated detection templates that (i) are functions of very few physical and phenomenological parameters, (ii) model remarkably well the dynamical and precessional effects on the GW signal, with fitting factors on average > or approx. 0.97, (iii) but, however, might require increasing the detection thresholds, offsetting at least partially the gains in the fitting factors. Our detection-template families are quite promising also for the case of neutron-star-black-hole binaries, with fitting factors on average ≅0.93. For these binaries we also suggest (but do not test) a further template family, which would produce essentially exact waveforms written directly in terms of the physical spin parameters

  2. Adaptive Framework for Classification and Novel Class Detection over Evolving Data Streams with Limited Labeled Data.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haque, Ahsanul [Univ. of Texas, Dallas, TX (United States); Khan, Latifur [Univ. of Texas, Dallas, TX (United States); Baron, Michael [Univ. of Texas, Dallas, TX (United States); Ingram, Joey Burton [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Most approaches to classifying evolving data streams either divide the stream of data into fixed-size chunks or use gradual forgetting to address the problems of infinite length and concept drift. Finding the fixed size of the chunks or choosing a forgetting rate without prior knowledge about time-scale of change is not a trivial task. As a result, these approaches suffer from a trade-off between performance and sensitivity. To address this problem, we present a framework which uses change detection techniques on the classifier performance to determine chunk boundaries dynamically. Though this framework exhibits good performance, it is heavily dependent on the availability of true labels of data instances. However, labeled data instances are scarce in realistic settings and not readily available. Therefore, we present a second framework which is unsupervised in nature, and exploits change detection on classifier confidence values to determine chunk boundaries dynamically. In this way, it avoids the use of labeled data while still addressing the problems of infinite length and concept drift. Moreover, both of our proposed frameworks address the concept evolution problem by detecting outliers having similar values for the attributes. We provide theoretical proof that our change detection method works better than other state-of-the-art approaches in this particular scenario. Results from experiments on various benchmark and synthetic data sets also show the efficiency of our proposed frameworks.

  3. Evaluation of a single-item screening question to detect limited health literacy in peritoneal dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Deepika; Sheth, Heena; Bender, Filitsa H; Weisbord, Steven D; Green, Jamie A

    2014-01-01

    Studies have shown that a single-item question might be useful in identifying patients with limited health literacy. However, the utility of the approach has not been studied in patients receiving maintenance peritoneal dialysis (PD). We assessed health literacy in a cohort of 31 PD patients by administering the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine (REALM) and a single-item health literacy (SHL) screening question "How confident are you filling out medical forms by yourself?" (Extremely, Quite a bit, Somewhat, A little bit, or Not at all). To determine the accuracy of the single-item question for detecting limited health literacy, we performed sensitivity and specificity analyses of the SHL and plotted the area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curve using the REALM as a reference standard. Using a cut-off of "Somewhat" or less confident, the sensitivity of the SHL for detecting limited health literacy was 80%, and the specificity was 88%. The positive likelihood ratio was 6.9. The SHL had an AUROC of 0.79 (95% confidence interval: 0.52 to 1.00). Our results show that the SHL could be effective in detecting limited health literacy in PD patients.

  4. EDF Energy Holdings Limited, Registered Number 06930266, Annual report and financial statements 31 December 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    EDF Energy Holdings Limited and subsidiaries make up EDF Energy. The companies' principal activities are to provide and supply electricity and gas to commercial, residential and industrial customers, and to generate electricity through a portfolio of generation assets including nuclear, coal fired, gas and renewable generation. EDF Energy is also involved in the construction of new build nuclear assets. This document is the annual report and financial statements of the company for the year 2013. Contents: 1 - Strategic report; 2 - Directors' report; 3 - Directors' responsibility statement; 4 - Independent Auditor's report; 5 - Consolidated income statement; 6 - Consolidated statement of comprehensive income; 7 - Consolidated balance sheet; 8 - Consolidated cash flow statement; 9 - Consolidated statement of changes in equity 10 - Notes to the consolidated financial statements; 11 - Company balance sheet; 12 - Notes to the Company financial statements

  5. EDF Energy Holdings Limited, Registered Number 06930266, Annual report and financial statements 31 December 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    EDF Energy Holdings Limited and subsidiaries make up EDF Energy. The companies' principal activities are to provide and supply electricity and gas to commercial, residential and industrial customers, and to generate electricity through a portfolio of generation assets including nuclear, coal fired, gas and renewable generation. EDF Energy is also involved in the construction of new build nuclear assets. This document is the annual report and financial statements of the company for the year 2014. Contents: 1 - Strategic report; 2 - Directors' report; 3 - Directors' responsibility statement; 4 - Independent Auditor's report; 5 - Consolidated income statement; 6 - Consolidated statement of comprehensive income; 7 - Consolidated balance sheet; 8 - Consolidated cash flow statement; 9 - Consolidated statement of changes in equity 10 - Notes to the consolidated financial statements; 11 - Company balance sheet; 12 - Notes to the Company financial statements

  6. EDF Energy Holdings Limited, Registered Number 06930266, Annual report and financial statements 31 December 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    EDF Energy Holdings Limited and subsidiaries make up EDF Energy. The companies' principal activities are to provide and supply electricity and gas to commercial, residential and industrial customers, and to generate electricity through a portfolio of generation assets including nuclear, coal fired, gas and renewable generation. EDF Energy is also involved in the construction of new build nuclear assets. This document is the annual report and financial statements of the company for the year 2015. Contents: 1 - Strategic report; 2 - Directors' report; 3 - Directors' responsibility statement; 4 - Independent Auditor's report; 5 - Consolidated income statement; 6 - Consolidated statement of comprehensive income; 7 - Consolidated balance sheet; 8 - Consolidated cash flow statement; 9 - Consolidated statement of changes in equity 10 - Notes to the consolidated financial statements; 11 - Company balance sheet; 12 - Company statement of changes in equity; 13 - Notes to the Company financial statements

  7. Detection of dechallenge in spontaneous reporting systems: a comparison of Bayes methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banu, A Bazila; Alias Balamurugan, S Appavu; Thirumalaikolundusubramanian, Ponniah

    2014-01-01

    Dechallenge is a response observed for the reduction or disappearance of adverse drug reactions (ADR) on withdrawal of a drug from a patient. Currently available algorithms to detect dechallenge have limitations. Hence, there is a need to compare available new methods. To detect dechallenge in Spontaneous Reporting Systems, data-mining algorithms like Naive Bayes and Improved Naive Bayes were applied for comparing the performance of the algorithms in terms of accuracy and error. Analyzing the factors of dechallenge like outcome and disease category will help medical practitioners and pharmaceutical industries to determine the reasons for dechallenge in order to take essential steps toward drug safety. Adverse drug reactions of the year 2011 and 2012 were downloaded from the United States Food and Drug Administration's database. The outcome of classification algorithms showed that Improved Naive Bayes algorithm outperformed Naive Bayes with accuracy of 90.11% and error of 9.8% in detecting the dechallenge. Detecting dechallenge for unknown samples are essential for proper prescription. To overcome the issues exposed by Naive Bayes algorithm, Improved Naive Bayes algorithm can be used to detect dechallenge in terms of higher accuracy and minimal error.

  8. The value and limitations of contrast-enhanced transrectal ultrasonography for the detection of prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Han-Xue, E-mail: zhaohx861@163.com [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Dong-Jiao-Min-Xiang, Dong Cheng District, Beijing 100730 (China); Xia, Chun-Xia, E-mail: star9901482@163.com [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Dong-Jiao-Min-Xiang, Dong Cheng District, Beijing 100730 (China); Yin, Hong-Xia, E-mail: hongxia_yin79@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Radiology, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Dong-Jiao-Min-Xiang, Dong Cheng District, Beijing 100730 (China); Guo, Ning, E-mail: ningguo99@sina.com.cn [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Dong-Jiao-Min-Xiang, Dong Cheng District, Beijing 100730 (China); Zhu, Qiang, E-mail: qzhutrhos@gmail.com [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Dong-Jiao-Min-Xiang, Dong Cheng District, Beijing 100730 (China)

    2013-11-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the role of contrast-enhanced transrectal ultrasonography (CE-TRUS) for detecting prostate carcinoma. Methods: Sixty-five patients with elevated serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and/or abnormal digital rectal examination (DRE) were assessed using transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and CE-TRUS. In all the patients, CE-TRUS was performed with intravenous injection of contrast agent (SonoVue, 2.4 ml) before biopsy. The cancer detection rates of the two techniques were compared. False-positive and false-negative findings related to CE-TRUS were analyzed in comparison to the pathological results of biopsy or radical prostatectomy. The targeted biopsy to abnormal CE-TRUS areas was also compared to systematic biopsy. Results: Prostate cancer was detected in 29 of the 65 patients. CE-TRUS showed rapid focal enhancement or asymmetric vessels of peripheral zones in 28 patients; 23 of them had prostate cancer. CE-TRUS had 79.3% sensitivity, compared to 65.5% of TRUS (P < 0.05). There were five false-positive and six false-negative findings from CE-TRUS. Benign prostate hyperplasia, and acute and chronic prostatitis were important causes related to the false-positive results of CE-TRUS. Prostate cancer originating from the transition zone or peripheral zone with lower PSA levels, small-size foci, and moderately or well-differentiated tumor was missed by CE-TRUS. The cancer detection rate of targeted biopsy (75%, 33/44 cores) was significantly higher than one of systematic biopsy (48.2%, 162/336) in those 28 cases (P < 0.05). In addition, no significant correlation was found between the cancer detection rate with CE-TRUS and serum PSA levels. Conclusion: CE-TRUS may improve the detection rate of prostate cancer through targeted biopsy of contrast-enhanced abnormalities. Our findings indicate that systematic biopsies should not be eliminated on the basis of false-positive and false-negative findings related to CE-TRUS.

  9. National Nuclear Corporation Limited report and financial statements 31 March 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The paper presents the annual report and audited financial statements of the National Nuclear Corporation Limited, 31 March 1987. The company is engaged in designing and constructing power stations and nuclear power reactors and other related work. A review of the development work carried out on power stations is briefly given, along with the research and development work on reactors. Future prospects concerning the Sizewell-'B' project are briefly outlined. (U.K.)

  10. Limited diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging and clinical tests for detecting partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockmeyer, Matthias; Schmitt, Cornelia; Haupert, Alexander; Kohn, Dieter; Lorbach, Olaf

    2017-12-01

    The reliable diagnosis of partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff is still elusive in clinical practise. Therefore, the purpose of the study was to determine the diagnostic accuracy of MR imaging and clinical tests for detecting partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff as well as the combination of these parameters. 334 consecutive shoulder arthroscopies for rotator cuff pathologies performed during the time period between 2010 and 2012 were analyzed retrospectively for the findings of common clinical signs for rotator cuff lesions and preoperative MR imaging. These were compared with the intraoperative arthroscopic findings as "gold standard". The reports of the MR imaging were evaluated with regard to the integrity of the rotator cuff. The Ellman Classification was used to define partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff in accordance with the arthroscopic findings. Descriptive statistics, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value were calculated. MR imaging showed 80 partial-thickness and 70 full-thickness tears of the rotator cuff. The arthroscopic examination confirmed 64 partial-thickness tears of which 52 needed debridement or refixation of the rotator cuff. Sensitivity for MR imaging to identify partial-thickness tears was 51.6%, specificity 77.2%, positive predictive value 41.3% and negative predictive value 83.7%. For the Jobe-test, sensitivity was 64.1%, specificity 43.2%, positive predictive value 25.9% and negative predictive value 79.5%. Sensitivity for the Impingement-sign was 76.7%, specificity 46.6%, positive predictive value 30.8% and negative predictive value 86.5%. For the combination of MR imaging, Jobe-test and Impingement-sign sensitivity was 46.9%, specificity 85.4%, positive predictive value 50% and negative predictive value 83.8%. The diagnostic accuracy of MR imaging and clinical tests (Jobe-test and Impingement-sign) alone is limited for detecting partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff. Additionally

  11. Lower limit of detection: definition and elaboration of a proposed position for radiological effluent and environmental measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currie, L.A.

    1984-09-01

    A manual is provided to define and illustrate a proposed use of the Lower Limit of Detection (LLD) for Radiological Effluent and Environmental Measurements. The manual contains a review of information regarding LLD practices gained from site visits; a review of the literature and a summary of basic principles underlying the concept of detection in Nuclear and Analytical Chemistry; a detailed presentation of the application of LLD principles to a range of problem categories (simple counting to multinuclide spectroscopy), including derivations, equations, and numerical examples; and a brief examination of related issues such as reference samples, numerical quality control, and instrumental limitations. An appendix contains a summary of notation and terminology, a bibliography, and worked-out examples. 100 references, 10 figures, 7 tables

  12. Detection limits in the chromatographic element trace analysis - quantitative TLC, HPLC and GC with the example of beryllium acetylacetonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwedt, G.

    1981-01-01

    Chromatographic analyses of beryllium acetylacetonate are carried out in synthetic solutions within the nano- and picogram range of beryllium. For thin-layer chromatography (TLC) normal and silanized silica gel is used, for high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) silica gel of 7 μm particles, for gas chromatography (GC) silicone SE-30 as stationary phase. Visual evaluation and remission measurements in TLC, UV-254 nm absorption measurements in HPLC and measurements with a FID in GC are employed for the determination of the calibration curves. A calibration curve through the origin and a detection limit of 150 pg Be determinable form are received by HPLC only. For trace analyses by GC a new definition of a detection limit for the evaluation of substance peaks on a solvent tailing is suggested. (orig.) [de

  13. Potentials and Limitations of Real-Time Elastography for Prostate Cancer Detection: A Whole-Mount Step Section Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Junker

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To evaluate prostate cancer (PCa detection rates of real-time elastography (RTE in dependence of tumor size, tumor volume, localization and histological type. Materials and Methods. Thirdy-nine patients with biopsy proven PCa underwent RTE before radical prostatectomy (RPE to assess prostate tissue elasticity, and hard lesions were considered suspicious for PCa. After RPE, the prostates were prepared as whole-mount step sections and were compared with imaging findings for analyzing PCa detection rates. Results. RTE detected 6/62 cancer lesions with a maximum diameter of 0–5 mm (9.7%, 10/37 with a maximum diameter of 6–10 mm (27%, 24/34 with a maximum diameter of 11–20 20 mm (70.6%, 14/14 with a maximum diameter of >20 mm (100% and 40/48 with a volume ≥0.2 cm3 (83.3%. Regarding cancer lesions with a volume ≥ 0.2 cm³ there was a significant difference in PCa detection rates between Gleason scores with predominant Gleason pattern 3 compared to those with predominant Gleason pattern 4 or 5 (75% versus 100%; P=0.028. Conclusions. RTE is able to detect PCa of significant tumor volume and of predominant Gleason pattern 4 or 5 with high confidence, but is of limited value in the detection of small cancer lesions.

  14. Reporting and management of breast lesions detected using MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dall, B.J.G.; Vinnicombe, S.; Gilbert, F.J.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the most accurate technique for diagnosing and delineating the extent of both invasive and in-situ breast cancer and is increasingly being used as part of the preoperative work-up to assess the local extent of disease. It is proving invaluable in providing information that allows successful single-stage surgery. An inevitable consequence of the high sensitivity of MRI is that it will identify additional lesions that may or may not represent significant extra disease. This may complicate and delay the preoperative process. This paper outlines a strategy for managing MRI-detected lesions to optimize the benefits of breast MRI as a local staging tool while minimizing the false-positive diagnoses. It discusses the importance of good technique to reduce the number of indeterminate lesions. Methods to refine the patient pathway to minimize delays are discussed. The format of MRI reporting is discussed in detail as is the usefulness of discussion of cases at multidisciplinary meetings. Illustrative cases are used to clarify the points made.

  15. Sensitivities and detection limits of X-ray fluorescence analysis with a 10 mCi241Am source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wundt, K.; Janghorbani, M.; Starke, K.

    1976-01-01

    Seven trace elements ranging from chromium to barium were preconcentrated on Amberlite IR-120 cation exchange paper and determined in an energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence system using a 10 mCi 241 Am source. Sensitivities were experimentally determined and checked with theoretically calculated values. The detection limits are compared with elemental levels present in typical surface waters and those allowed in drinking water. Appropriate conclusions as to feasibility of such a system for environmental monitoring are drawn. (orig.) [de

  16. The Medicare Cost Report and the limits of hospital accountability: improving financial accounting data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, N M; Magnus, S A

    2001-02-01

    Health policy makers, legislators, providers, payers, and a broad range of other players in the health care market routinely seek information on hospital financial performance. Yet the data at their disposal are limited, especially since hospitals' audited financial statements--the "gold standard" in hospital financial reporting--are not publicly available in many states. As a result, the Medicare Cost Report (MCR), filed annually by most U.S. hospitals in order to receive payment for treating Medicare patients, has become the primary public source of hospital financial information. However, financial accounting elements in the MCR are unreliable, poorly defined, and lacking in critical detail. Comparative analyses of MCRs and matched, audited financial statements reveal long-standing problems with the MCR's data, including major differences in reported profits; variations in the reporting of both revenues and expenses; an absence of relevant details, such as charity care, bad debt, operating versus nonoperating income, and affiliate transactions; an inconsistent classification of changes in net assets; and a failure to provide cash flow statements. Because of these problems, MCR financial data give only a limited and often inaccurate picture of the financial position of hospitals. Audited financial statements provide a more complete perspective, enabling analysts to address important questions left unanswered by the MCR data. Regulatory action is needed to create a national database of financial information based upon audited statements.

  17. Detection Limits for Spectro-fluorometry: A Case Study in the Region of Finstersee, Canton Zug, Northern Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otz, M. H.; Otz, H. K.; Keller, P.

    2002-05-01

    Synthetic fluorescent dyes, applied below the visual detection limit (< 0.1 mg/L), have been used as tracers of ground water flow paths since the beginning of the 1950s. Since 1965, we have used spectro-fluorometers with photomultipliers to measure low concentrations of fluorescent dyes in ground water in Switzerland. In collaboration with the Engineering Geology Department of the ETH, we have separated uranine at 0.1 ng/L and Na-naphtionate at 1 ng/L from background fluorescence of spring water in the Finstersee region. These values are 10-100 times lower than postulated detection limits in the literature. The use of low dye concentrations prevents a study region from being contaminated by increased background levels due to remnant dye within the aquifer, thereby leaving the region available for future dye tracing studies. Lower detection limits also can solve particular hydraulic problems where conventional methods fail and enhance the possibility for using artificial dyes in environmentally sensitive aquifer settings.

  18. Generalized linear mixed model for binary outcomes when covariates are subject to measurement errors and detection limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xianhong; Xue, Xiaonan; Strickler, Howard D

    2018-01-15

    Longitudinal measurement of biomarkers is important in determining risk factors for binary endpoints such as infection or disease. However, biomarkers are subject to measurement error, and some are also subject to left-censoring due to a lower limit of detection. Statistical methods to address these issues are few. We herein propose a generalized linear mixed model and estimate the model parameters using the Monte Carlo Newton-Raphson (MCNR) method. Inferences regarding the parameters are made by applying Louis's method and the delta method. Simulation studies were conducted to compare the proposed MCNR method with existing methods including the maximum likelihood (ML) method and the ad hoc approach of replacing the left-censored values with half of the detection limit (HDL). The results showed that the performance of the MCNR method is superior to ML and HDL with respect to the empirical standard error, as well as the coverage probability for the 95% confidence interval. The HDL method uses an incorrect imputation method, and the computation is constrained by the number of quadrature points; while the ML method also suffers from the constrain for the number of quadrature points, the MCNR method does not have this limitation and approximates the likelihood function better than the other methods. The improvement of the MCNR method is further illustrated with real-world data from a longitudinal study of local cervicovaginal HIV viral load and its effects on oncogenic HPV detection in HIV-positive women. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Internal Dosimetry Monitoring- Detection Limits for a Selected Set of Radionuclides and Their Translation Into Committed Effective Dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandl, A.; Hrnecek, E.; Steger, F.

    2004-01-01

    To harmonize the practice of internal dosimetry monitoring across the country, the Austrian Standards Institute is currently drafting a new set of standards which are concerned with occupational incorporation monitoring of individuals handling non-sealed radioactive material. This set of standards is expected to consist of three parts discussing the general necessity and frequency, the requirements for monitoring institutions, and the determination and rigorous calculation of committed effective dose after incorporation of radioactive material, respectively. Considerations of the requirements for routine monitoring laboratories have led to an evaluation of the detection limits for routine monitoring equipment. For a selected set of radionuclides, these detection limits are investigated in detail. The main emphasis is placed on the decay chains of naturally occurring radionuclides showing some significant potential for being out of equilibrium due to chemical processes in certain mining industries. The radionuclides considered in this paper are 226Ra, 228Ra, 228Th, 232Th, 234U, 235U, and 238U. Given the routine monitoring intervals of the Austrian Standard, these detection limits are translated into information on committed effective dose. This paper investigates whether routine monitoring equipment is sufficient to ensure compliance with EC directive 96/29/Euratom for this selected set of radionuclides. (Author) 9 refs

  20. Detection limits by EPR spectroscopy of cumulated doses ionizing radiations in molluscs shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostrowski, K.; Burlinska, G.; Dziedzic-Goclawska, A.; Stachowicz, W.; Michalik, J.; Sadlo, J.

    1997-01-01

    The exposure of waters to ionizing radiation from radionuclides stored in concrete containers or freed in nuclear accidents or underwater eruption might be difficult to be proved, when currents, rains, exchange of water displace sand soils or rocks in the bottom. Ionizing radiation evokes stable paramagnetic centers in the crystalline lattice of mineral components in bones as well as in exoskeletons of most molluscs, which are detected by the EPR spectroscopy and could be used as an indicator of the exposure to the action of radiation during prolonged period of time. (authors)

  1. Photoinduced triplet-state electron transfer of platinum porphyrin: a one-step direct method for sensing iodide with an unprecedented detection limit

    KAUST Repository

    Masih, Dilshad

    2015-02-05

    Here, we report for the first time a one-step direct method for sensing halides in aqueous solution using phosphorescence quenching of platinum-cationic porphyrin. This method offers an easy, rapid, environmentally friendly, ultra-sensitive (with a previously unattained detection limit of 1 × 10−12 M) and economical method for the determination of iodide. To fully understand the reaction mechanism responsible for the phosphorescence quenching process, we have employed cutting-edge time-resolved laser spectroscopy with broadband capabilities.

  2. The value and limitation thallium scintigraphy in the detection of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.; Rehman, A.; Amin, W.; Khan, Z.A.; Ahmed, S.A.

    1986-01-01

    In this study we randomly selected 45 patients whose coronary angiograms were abnormal i.e. showing triple, double and single vessel disease out of a pool of 80 patients who had undergone stress thallium imaging and coronary angiography during the one year. Majority of these patients were males, their ages ranged between 34-54 years. Resting ECG's were normal in 25 patients, 15 patients had suffered inferior myocardial infraction and 5 had sustained anterior myocardial infraction in the past. Coronary angiography revealed triple vessel disease in 20 patients, double vessel disease in 15, and single vessel coronary artery disease in 10. We analysed their coronary angiograms and compared them with the scintigraphic finding. It is concluded that although thallium scanning has high sensitivity for detection of coronary artery disease in general, it has only moderate sensitivity for detection of stenosis in individual coronary arteries. In this study thallium scan identified 75% of RCA lesions, 66% of LAD lesions and 38% of circumflex lesions. The sensitivity is much higher in single vessel coronary artery disease. (author)

  3. Leak Detection in Waterworks: Comparison Between STFT and FFT with an Overcoming of Limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lay-Ekuakille Aimé

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Detection of leakages in pipelines is a matter of continuous research because of the basic importance for a waterworks system is finding the point of the pipeline where a leak is located and − in some cases − a nature of the leak. There are specific difficulties in finding leaks by using spectral analysis techniques like FFT (Fast Fourier Transform, STFT (Short Term Fourier Transform, etc. These difficulties arise especially in complicated pipeline configurations, e.g. a zigzag one. This research focuses on the results of a new algorithm based on FFT and comparing them with a developed STFT technique. Even if other techniques are used, they are costly and difficult to be managed. Moreover, a constraint in the leak detection is the pipeline diameter because it influences accuracy of the adopted algorithm. FFT and STFT are not fully adequate for complex configurations dealt with in this paper, since they produce ill-posed problems with an increasing uncertainty. Therefore, an improved Tikhonov technique has been implemented to reinforce FFT and STFT for complex configurations of pipelines. Hence, the proposed algorithm overcomes the aforementioned difficulties due to applying a linear algebraic approach.

  4. Information Limited Oligonucleotide Amplification Assay for Affinity-Based, Parallel Detection Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harish Bokkasam

    Full Text Available Molecular communication systems encounter similar constraints as telecommunications. In either case, channel crosstalk at the receiver end will result in information loss that statistical analysis cannot compensate. This is because in any communication channel there is a physical limit to the amount of information that can be transmitted. We present a novel and simple modified end amplification (MEA technique to generate reduced and defined amounts of specific information in form of short fragments from an oligonucleotide source that also contains unrelated and redundant information. Our method can be a valuable tool to investigate information overflow and channel capacity in biomolecular recognition systems.

  5. Reporting surgical site infections following total hip and knee arthroplasty: impact of limiting surveillance to the operative hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoe, Deborah S; Avery, Taliser R; Platt, Richard; Huang, Susan S

    2013-11-01

    Public reporting of surgical site infections (SSIs) by hospitals is largely limited to infections detected during surgical hospitalizations or readmissions to the same facility. SSI rates may be underestimated if patients with SSIs are readmitted to other hospitals. We assessed the impact of readmissions to other facilities on hospitals' SSI rates following primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA). This was a retrospective cohort study of all patients who underwent primary THA or TKA at California hospitals between 1 January 2006 and 31 December 2009. SSIs were identified using ICD-9-CM diagnosis codes predictive of SSI assigned at any California hospital within 365 days of surgery using a statewide repository of hospital data that allowed tracking of patients between facilities. We used statewide data to estimate the fraction of each hospital's THA and TKA SSIs identified at the operative hospital versus other hospitals. A total of 91 121 THA and 121 640 TKA procedures were identified. Based on diagnosis codes, SSIs developed following 2214 (2.3%) THAs and 2465 (2.0%) TKAs. Seventeen percent of SSIs would have been missed by operative hospital surveillance alone. The proportion of hospitals' SSIs detected at nonoperative hospitals ranged from 0% to 100%. Including SSIs detected at nonoperative hospitals resulted in better relative ranking for 61% of THA hospitals and 61% of TKA hospitals. Limiting SSI surveillance to the operative hospital caused varying degrees of SSI underestimation and substantially impacted hospitals' relative rankings, suggesting that alternative methods for comprehensive postdischarge surveillance are needed for accurate benchmarking.

  6. Opportunistic mammography screening provides effective detection rates in a limited resource healthcare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, Yew-Ching; Tan, Gie-Hooi; Taib, Nur Aishah; Rahmat, Kartini; Westerhout, Caroline Judy; Fadzli, Farhana; See, Mee-Hoong; Jamaris, Suniza; Yip, Cheng-Har

    2015-05-15

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in women world-wide. In low and middle income countries, where there are no population-based mammographic screening programmes, late presentation is common, and because of inadequate access to optimal treatment, survival rates are poor. Mammographic screening is well-studied in high-income countries in western populations, and because it has been shown to reduce breast cancer mortality, it has become part of the healthcare systems in such countries. However the performance of mammographic screening in a developing country is largely unknown. This study aims to evaluate the performance of mammographic screening in Malaysia, a middle income country, and to compare the stage and surgical treatment of screen-detected and symptomatic breast cancer. A retrospective review of 2510 mammograms performed from Jan to Dec 2010 in a tertiary medical centre is carried out. The three groups identified are the routine (opportunistic) screening group, the targeted (high risk) screening group and the diagnostic group. The performance indicators of each group is calculated, and stage at presentation and treatment between the screening and diagnostic group is analyzed. The cancer detection rate in the opportunistic screening group, targeted screening group, and the symptomatic group is 0.5 %, 1.25 % and 26 % respectively. The proportion of ductal carcinoma in situ is 23.1 % in the two screening groups compared to only 2.5 % in the diagnostic group. Among the opportunistic screening group, the cancer detection rate was 0.2 % in women below 50 years old compared to 0.65 % in women 50 years and above. The performance indicators are within international standards. Early-staged breast cancer (Stage 0-2) were 84.6 % in the screening groups compared to 61.1 % in the diagnostic group. From the results, in a setting with resource constraints, targeted screening of high risk individuals will give a higher yield, and if more resources are

  7. The limitations on organic detection in Mars-like soils by thermal volatilization-gas chromatography-MS and their implications for the Viking results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-González, Rafael; Navarro, Karina F; de la Rosa, José; Iñiguez, Enrique; Molina, Paola; Miranda, Luis D; Morales, Pedro; Cienfuegos, Edith; Coll, Patrice; Raulin, François; Amils, Ricardo; McKay, Christopher P

    2006-10-31

    The failure of Viking Lander thermal volatilization (TV) (without or with thermal degradation)-gas chromatography (GC)-MS experiments to detect organics suggests chemical rather than biological interpretations for the reactivity of the martian soil. Here, we report that TV-GC-MS may be blind to low levels of organics on Mars. A comparison between TV-GC-MS and total organics has been conducted for a variety of Mars analog soils. In the Antarctic Dry Valleys and the Atacama and Libyan Deserts we find 10-90 mug of refractory or graphitic carbon per gram of soil, which would have been undetectable by the Viking TV-GC-MS. In iron-containing soils (jarosites from Rio Tinto and Panoche Valley) and the Mars simulant (palogonite), oxidation of the organic material to carbon dioxide (CO(2)) by iron oxides and/or their salts drastically attenuates the detection of organics. The release of 50-700 ppm of CO(2) by TV-GC-MS in the Viking analysis may indicate that an oxidation of organic material took place. Therefore, the martian surface could have several orders of magnitude more organics than the stated Viking detection limit. Because of the simplicity of sample handling, TV-GC-MS is still considered the standard method for organic detection on future Mars missions. We suggest that the design of future organic instruments for Mars should include other methods to be able to detect extinct and/or extant life.

  8. The limitations on organic detection in Mars-like soils by thermal volatilization–gas chromatography–MS and their implications for the Viking results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-González, Rafael; Navarro, Karina F.; de la Rosa, José; Iñiguez, Enrique; Molina, Paola; Miranda, Luis D.; Morales, Pedro; Cienfuegos, Edith; Coll, Patrice; Raulin, François; Amils, Ricardo; McKay, Christopher P.

    2006-01-01

    The failure of Viking Lander thermal volatilization (TV) (without or with thermal degradation)–gas chromatography (GC)–MS experiments to detect organics suggests chemical rather than biological interpretations for the reactivity of the martian soil. Here, we report that TV–GC–MS may be blind to low levels of organics on Mars. A comparison between TV–GC–MS and total organics has been conducted for a variety of Mars analog soils. In the Antarctic Dry Valleys and the Atacama and Libyan Deserts we find 10–90 μg of refractory or graphitic carbon per gram of soil, which would have been undetectable by the Viking TV–GC–MS. In iron-containing soils (jarosites from Rio Tinto and Panoche Valley) and the Mars simulant (palogonite), oxidation of the organic material to carbon dioxide (CO2) by iron oxides and/or their salts drastically attenuates the detection of organics. The release of 50–700 ppm of CO2 by TV–GC–MS in the Viking analysis may indicate that an oxidation of organic material took place. Therefore, the martian surface could have several orders of magnitude more organics than the stated Viking detection limit. Because of the simplicity of sample handling, TV–GC–MS is still considered the standard method for organic detection on future Mars missions. We suggest that the design of future organic instruments for Mars should include other methods to be able to detect extinct and/or extant life. PMID:17060639

  9. System for detecting and limiting electrical ground faults within electrical devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaubatz, D.C.

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses, in a nuclear power plant of a variety wherein a reactor is provided including a reactor vessel retaining a liquid metal coolant, a reactor core and an electromagnetic pump having inductive windings insulatively retained within the electrically conductive wall of an enclosure, the method for controlling electrical ground fault current between a the inductive winding and the walls. It comprises providing an electrically isolated power source by inductive coupling with the plant power supply; rectifying the power source to provide an isolated d.c. power source; providing an inverter powered from the isolated d.c. power source under the control of the plant control system for selectively energizing the inductive windings; providing a fault control conductor electrically connected with the pump enclosure wall and extending as an electrical return for ground fault current to the inverter; and providing an electrical resistance between the conductor and the isolated inverter having an impedance selected to limit the fault current below a predetermined value limiting arc damage at any the electrical ground fault location

  10. Sputum-Based Molecular Biomarkers for the Early Detection of Lung Cancer: Limitations and Promise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Connie E. [Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine. 462 First Avenue, NBV 7N24, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Tchou-Wong, Kam-Meng; Rom, William N., E-mail: william.rom@nyumc.org [Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine. 462 First Avenue, NBV 7N24, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, 57 Old Forge Road, Tuxedo, NY 10987 (United States)

    2011-07-19

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths, with an overall survival of 15% at five years. Biomarkers that can sensitively and specifically detect lung cancer at early stage are crucial for improving this poor survival rate. Sputum has been the target for the discovery of non-invasive biomarkers for lung cancer because it contains airway epithelial cells, and molecular alterations identified in sputum are most likely to reflect tumor-associated changes or field cancerization caused by smoking in the lung. Sputum-based molecular biomarkers include morphology, allelic imbalance, promoter hypermethylation, gene mutations and, recently, differential miRNA expression. To improve the sensitivity and reproducibility of sputum-based biomarkers, we recommend standardization of processing protocols, bronchial epithelial cell enrichment, and identification of field cancerization biomarkers.

  11. On-state voltage drop based power limit detection of IGBT inverters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trintis, Ionut; Ghimire, Pramod; Munk-Nielsen, Stig

    2015-01-01

    Power density is a key performance factor in order to reduce the cost and size of a power converter. Because of the unknown junction temperature, today’s design margins are relatively high to ensure safe and a reliable operation. In this paper, the on-state voltage drop is measured online for all...... insulated gate bipolar transistors (IGBTs) in the inverter, using advanced gate driver. The die temperature is estimated and monitored on each device during power converter operation. Based on the monitored temperature in real time, the maximum power capability is detected. The output power is increased...... until a safe operating temperature of power modules. This enable a power density is increased by 11.16 kW/litre to 19.13 kW/litre in a low voltage power stack which is typically used in wind power converters. Experiment results are shown for safe operation of converter at around 1.2 MW, which is built...

  12. The Impact of an ECV Service is Limited by Antenatal Breech Detection: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemelaar, Joris; Lim, Lee N; Impey, Lawrence W

    2015-06-01

    External cephalic version (ECV) reduces the chance of breech presentation at term birth and lowers the chance of a cesarean delivery. ECV services are now in place in many units in the United Kingdom but their effectiveness is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the reasons for breech presentation at term birth. We performed a retrospective cohort study of 394 consecutive babies who were in breech presentation at term birth in a large United Kingdom maternity unit that offers ECV. The cohort was analyzed over two time periods 10 years apart: 1998-1999 and 2008-2009. Only 33.8 percent of women had undergone a (failed) ECV attempt. This low proportion was mainly because breech presentation was not diagnosed antenatally (27.9%). Other contributing factors were: ECV not offered by clinicians (12.2%), ECV declined by women (14%), and contraindications to ECV (10.7%). Over the 10-year period, the proportion of breech presentations that were not diagnosed antenatally increased from 23.2 to 32.5 percent (p = 0.04), which constituted 52.8 percent of women who had not undergone an ECV attempt in 2008-2009. Failure of clinicians to offer ECV reduced from 21.6 to 3.0 percent (p = 0.0001) and the proportion of women declining ECV decreased from 19.1 to 9.0 percent (p = 0.005). Overall, ECV attempts increased from 28.9 to 38.5 percent (p = 0.05). Although ECV counseling, referral, and attempt rates have increased, failure to detect breech presentation antenatally is the principal barrier to successful ECV. Improved breech detection would have a greater impact than methods to increase ECV success rates. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Beta-trace protein in ascites and pleural effusions: limits of CSF leakage detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietzel, Joanna; Krebs, Alexander; Böttcher, Dominique; Sieb, Manuela; Glocker, Michael O; Lüdemann, Jan; Roser, Markus; Dressel, Alexander

    2012-06-10

    Rhino- and/or otoliquorrhea can be diagnosed by detecting beta-trace protein (β-TP) in nasal or ear secretions, as β-TP is found in high concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) but not in serum. CSF fistulae following trauma or surgery can also occur at other anatomical sites, resulting in CSF leakage into the thoracic and abdominal cavities. By analogy, determination of ß-TP has also been used to diagnose CSF admixture in pleural effusions and ascites. However, no systematic study has yet evaluated the concentrations of β-TP in such fluids in the absence of CSF. To determine the validity of β-TP determination as a marker for the presence of CSF, we investigated β-TP concentrations in pleural effusions and ascites without CSF admixture. Patients from whom samples of ascites or pleural effusion and a paired plasma sample were available were investigated. One hundred sixty-four patients were prospectively recruited. ß-TP concentrations were determined by nephelometry. Mass spectrometric proteome analysis confirmed the presence of ß-TP in the samples. Median β-TP concentrations detected in ascites and pleural effusions (range, 0.014-26.5 mg/L, median 2.29 mg/L) exceeded the corresponding plasma concentrations 2.6-fold. According to cutoffs published to diagnose rhino- and otoliquorrhea, between 6.1% and 95.7% of the specimens would have been erroneously rated CSF-positive. Protein analysis confirmed the presence of β-TP in pleural effusion and ascites. Ascites and pleural effusion contain high concentrations of β-TP that exceed the levels in corresponding plasma. Therefore, β-TP is not a specific marker for the presence of CSF in these fluids.

  14. Modifications of alpha processing software to improve calculation of limits for qualitative detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkpatrick, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    The work described in this report was done for the Bioassay Counting Laboratory (BCL) of the Center of Excellence for Bioassay of the Analytical Services Organization at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. BCL takes urine and fecal samples and tests for alpha radiation. An automated system, supplied by Canberra Industries, counts the activities in the samples and processes the results. The Canberra system includes hardware and software. The managers of BCL want to improve the accuracy of the results they report to their final customers. The desired improvements are of particular interest to the managers of BCL because the levels of alpha-emitting radionuclides in samples measured at BCL are usually so low that a significant fraction of the measured signal is due to background and to the reagent material used to extract the radioactive nuclides from the samples. Also, the background and reagent signals show a significant level of random variation. The customers at BCL requested four major modifications of the software. The requested software changes have been made and tested. The present report is in two parts. The first part describes what the modifications were supposed to accomplish. The second part describes the changes on a line-by-line basis. The second part includes listings of the changed software and discusses possible steps to correct a particular error condition. Last, the second part describes the effect of truncation errors on the standard deviations calculated from samples whose signals are very nearly the same.

  15. Modifications of alpha processing software to improve calculation of limits for qualitative detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkpatrick, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    The work described in this report was done for the Bioassay Counting Laboratory (BCL) of the Center of Excellence for Bioassay of the Analytical Services Organization at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. BCL takes urine and fecal samples and tests for alpha radiation. An automated system, supplied by Canberra Industries, counts the activities in the samples and processes the results. The Canberra system includes hardware and software. The managers of BCL want to improve the accuracy of the results they report to their final customers. The desired improvements are of particular interest to the managers of BCL because the levels of alpha-emitting radionuclides in samples measured at BCL are usually so low that a significant fraction of the measured signal is due to background and to the reagent material used to extract the radioactive nuclides from the samples. Also, the background and reagent signals show a significant level of random variation. The customers at BCL requested four major modifications of the software. The requested software changes have been made and tested. The present report is in two parts. The first part describes what the modifications were supposed to accomplish. The second part describes the changes on a line-by-line basis. The second part includes listings of the changed software and discusses possible steps to correct a particular error condition. Last, the second part describes the effect of truncation errors on the standard deviations calculated from samples whose signals are very nearly the same

  16. Superconducting fault current limiter. Fifth quarterly technical progress report, August 8, 1978-November 7, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    Progress in the development of fault current limiters for superconducting power transmission systems is reported. The analysis and design of a magnetically switched resistive device and the experimental program were emphasized and reported. A transient heat transfer model was developed which indicates the parameters which are important in determining the thermal heating and recovery of the superconduting film. Designs for the switching coil and the S/C element were also carried out and are reported. A four-pole magnetic coil is recommended; this generates a magnetic field which is nearly perpendicular to spiral or helical S/C film geometrics. A spirally-designed, 3000 ohm limiter is shown to be able to fit within a .5 to 1m inner radius, .05 to .03 m wide, 1.3 to 3.9 m long annualr region. The experimental program has included work on materials development and on prepartion of the switching and thermal recovery experimental facility. The material development program has uncovered several serious short-comings of NbN as the S/C film material. Macroscopic holes and surface debris, and microscopic imperfections reduce the critical current density below the expected value and, in addition, cause nonuniform switching. Reasons for these effects are postulated, and a continuing, vigorous materials program is suggested in hopes of alleviating these problems. Virtually all of the experimental equipment had been installed, and so the magnetic switching and thermal recovery experiments can begin and progress during the next quarter. (LCL)

  17. Sytemic lupus erythematosus presenting with protein losing enteropathy in a resource limited centre: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratnayake Eranda C

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Systemic lupus erythematosus is a disease which may initially present with varying symptoms, most commonly a photosensitive rash and arthritis. Protein losing enteropathy is a recognized but rare presenting manifestation. Diagnosing protein losing enteropathy in resource limited centres is challenging but possible through the exclusion of other possible causes of hypoalbunaemia. Case Presentation We report a case of protein losing gastroenteropathy secondary to intestinal lymphangiectasia as the initial manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus in a 57 year old Sri Lankan (South Asian male patient. The diagnosis was made by the exclusion of other causes of hypoalbuminaemia as the gold standard investigations for protein losing enteropathy were not available at this centre. Conclusions Protein losing enteropathy is a diagnosis of exclusion in resource limited centres in the world. Systemic lupus erythematosus should be considered in the differential diagnosis of protein losing enteropathy. Intestinal lymphangiectasia should also be recognized as a possible pathophysiological mechanism.

  18. Detecting deep venous thrombosis with limited flip angle gradient refocused MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spritzer, C.E.; Sussman, S.K.; Herfkens, R.J.; Blinder, R.A.; Saeed, M.; Vogler, J.A.; Baker, M.E.

    1987-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine if limited flip angle gradient refocused MR pulse sequences (GRASS) could be used to accurately diagnose deep venous thrombosis (DVT). Sixteen patients (17 extremities) with possible DVT were prospectively evaluated with MR imaging and venography. Typical imaging parameters included a 16-msec echo time, 33-msec repetition time, 30 0 flip angle, and section thickness of 2 nex. MR imaging correctly disclosed the presence (nine cases) or absence (eight cases) of DVT. In one study, GRASS images overestimated the extent of clot due to slow venous blood flow. Subsequently the flip angle was varied to distinguish between venous thrombus and slow flow. When this technique was used, no false-positive studies occurred in the remaining patients. MR gradient refocused imaging appears to be an accurate aid for the diagnosis of DVT

  19. PV Systems Reliability Final Technical Report: Ground Fault Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavrova, Olga [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Flicker, Jack David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Johnson, Jay [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-01-01

    We have examined ground faults in PhotoVoltaic (PV) arrays and the efficacy of fuse, current detection (RCD), current sense monitoring/relays (CSM), isolation/insulation (Riso) monitoring, and Ground Fault Detection and Isolation (GFID) using simulations based on a Simulation Program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis SPICE ground fault circuit model, experimental ground faults installed on real arrays, and theoretical equations.

  20. 241-AY-102 Leak Detection Pit Drain Line Inspection Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boomer, Kayle D.; Engeman, Jason K.; Gunter, Jason R.; Joslyn, Cameron C.; Vazquez, Brandon J.; Venetz, Theodore J.; Garfield, John S.

    2014-01-01

    This document provides a description of the design components, operational approach, and results from the Tank AY-102 leak detection pit drain piping visual inspection. To perform this inspection a custom robotic crawler with a deployment device was designed, built, and operated by IHI Southwest Technologies, Inc. for WRPS to inspect the 6-inch leak detection pit drain line

  1. Lower limits of detection in using carbon nanotubes as thermoluminescent dosimeters of beta radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alanazi, Abdulaziz; Jurewicz, Izabela; Alalawi, Amani I.; Alyahyawi, Amjad; Alsubaie, Abdullah; Hinder, Steven; Bañuls-Ciscar, Jorge; Alkhorayef, Mohammed; Bradley, D. A.

    2017-11-01

    World-wide, on-going intensive research is being seen in adaptation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for a wide variety of applications, particular interest herein being in the thermoluminescent (TL) properties of CNTs and their sensitivity towards energetic radiations. Using beta radiation delivering dose levels of a few Gy it has been observed in previous study that strain and impurity defects in CNTs give rise to significant TL yields, providing an initial measure of the extent to which electron trapping centres exist in various qualities of CNT, from super-pure to raw. This in turn points to the possibility that there may be considerable advantage in using such media for radiation dosimetry applications, including for in vivo dosimetry. CNTs also have an effective atomic number similar to that of adipose tissue, making them suitable for soft tissue dosimetry. In present investigations various single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) samples in the form of buckypaper have been irradiated to doses in the range 35-1.3 Gy, use being made of a 90Sr beta source, the response of the CNTs buckypaper with dose showing a trend towards linearity. It is shown for present production methodology for buckypaper samples that the raw SWCNT buckypaper offer the greatest sensitivity, detecting doses down to some few tens of mGy.

  2. Improving the limits of detection of low background alpha emission measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Brendan D.; Coleman, Stuart; Harris, Jack T.; Warburton, William K.

    2018-01-01

    Alpha particle emission - even at extremely low levels - is a significant issue in the search for rare events (e.g., double beta decay, dark matter detection). Traditional measurement techniques require long counting times to measure low sample rates in the presence of much larger instrumental backgrounds. To address this, a commercially available instrument developed by XIA uses pulse shape analysis to discriminate alpha emissions produced by the sample from those produced by other surfaces of the instrument itself. Experience with this system has uncovered two residual sources of background: cosmogenics and radon emanation from internal components. An R&D program is underway to enhance the system and extend the pulse shape analysis technique further, so that these residual sources can be identified and rejected as well. In this paper, we review the theory of operation and pulse shape analysis techniques used in XIA's alpha counter, and briefly explore data suggesting the origin of the residual background terms. We will then present our approach to enhance the system's ability to identify and reject these terms. Finally, we will describe a prototype system that incorporates our concepts and demonstrates their feasibility.

  3. Limitations of the radioimmunoprecipitation polyethylene glycol assay (RIPEGA) for detection of filarial antigens in serum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, R.G.; Alexander, E.; Adkinson, N.F.

    1984-01-01

    The performance of the radioimmunoprecipitation polyethylene glycol assay (RIPEGA) was examined for quantitation of filarial antigens (Brugia malayi and Dirofilaria immitis) in serum from infected human and animal hosts and non-infected controls. Multiple PEG concentrations were employed to determine the level of non-specific binding (NSB) in non-exposed human sera (NEHS) containing no filarial antigen. The NSB observed when 3 different 125 I-labelled IgG antibodies were added to 26 NEHS varied 3-fold and was correlated significantly with total serum IgM (r = 0.80, P 2 fragment of the 125 I-labelled antibody was used, but the correlation of NSB with total serum IgM remained significant (r = 0.57, P < 0.01). The presence of rheumatoid factor in NEHS sera also significantly increased NSB by an average of 3-fold. These effects eliminated the assay's ability to detect in sera from infected hosts filarial antigen the presence of which could be readily demonstrated by an immunoradiometric assay. The RIPEGA's precision (intra-assay coefficient of variation (CV) = 21% at 35% Bsub(max)) and reproducibility (inter-assay CV = 29% at 35% Bsub(max)) are less satisfactory than many alternative immunoassays. (Auth.)

  4. Military Personnel: DOD's Predatory Lending Report Addressed Mandated Issues, but Support Is Limited for Some Findings and Recommendations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Farrell, Brenda S

    2007-01-01

    ... (see the list of related GAO products at the end of this report). In conducting our review, we limited the scope of our work to the types of loans that DOD identified as being predatory in its mandated 2006 report...

  5. Detecting position using ARKit II: generating position-time graphs in real-time and further information on limitations of ARKit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilek, Ufuk; Erol, Mustafa

    2018-05-01

    ARKit is a framework which allows developers to create augmented reality apps for the iPhone and iPad. In a previous study, we had shown that it could be used to detect position in educational physics experiments and emphasized that the ability to provide position data in real-time was one of the prominent features of this newly emerging technology. In this study, we demonstrate an example of how real-time data acquisition can be employed in educational settings, report some of the limitations of ARKit and how we have overcome these limitations. By means of ARKit or a similar framework, ordinary mobile devices can be adapted for use in microcomputer-based lab activities.

  6. Quantum-limited detection of millimeter waves using superconducting tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mears, C.A.

    1991-09-01

    The quasiparticle tunneling current in a superconductor-insulator- superconductor (SIS) tunnel junction is highly nonlinear. Such a nonlinearity can be used to mix two millimeter wave signals to produce a signal at a much lower intermediate frequency. We have constructed several millimeter and sub-millimeter wave SIS mixers in order to study high frequency response of the quasiparticle tunneling current and the physics of high frequency mixing. We have made the first measurement of the out-of-phase tunneling currents in an SIS tunnel junction. We have developed a method that allows us to determine the parameters of the high frequency embedding circuit by studying the details of the pumped I-V curve. We have constructed a 80--110 GHz waveguide-based mixer test apparatus that allows us to accurately measure the gain and added noise of the SIS mixer under test. Using extremely high quality tunnel junctions, we have measured an added mixer noise of 0.61 ± 0.36 quanta, which is within 25 percent of the quantum limit imposed by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. This measured performance is in excellent agreement with that predicted by Tucker's theory of quantum mixing. We have also studied quasioptically coupled millimeter- and submillimeter-wave mixers using several types of integrated tuning elements. 83 refs

  7. Detection Limits of DLS and UV-Vis Spectroscopy in Characterization of Polydisperse Nanoparticles Colloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Tomaszewska

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic light scattering is a method that depends on the interaction of light with particles. This method can be used for measurements of narrow particle size distributions especially in the range of 2–500 nm. Sample polydispersity can distort the results, and we could not see the real populations of particles because big particles presented in the sample can screen smaller ones. Although the theory and mathematical basics of DLS technique are already well known, little has been done to determine its limits experimentally. The size and size distribution of artificially prepared polydisperse silver nanoparticles (NPs colloids were studied using dynamic light scattering (DLS and ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis spectroscopy. Polydisperse colloids were prepared based on the mixture of chemically synthesized monodisperse colloids well characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, DLS, and UV-Vis spectroscopy. Analysis of the DLS results obtained for polydisperse colloids reveals that several percent of the volume content of bigger NPs could screen completely the presence of smaller ones. The presented results could be extremely important from nanoparticles metrology point of view and should help to understand experimental data especially for the one who works with DLS and/or UV-Vis only.

  8. Variation in the limit-of-detection of the ProSpecT Campylobacter microplate enzyme immunoassay in stools spiked with emerging Campylobacter species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojanić, Krunoslav; Midwinter, Anne Camilla; Marshall, Jonathan Craig; Rogers, Lynn Elizabeth; Biggs, Patrick Jon; Acke, Els

    2016-08-01

    Campylobacter enteritis in humans is primarily associated with C. jejuni/coli infection. The impact of other Campylobacter spp. is likely to be underestimated due to the bias of culture methods towards Campylobacter jejuni/coli diagnosis. Stool antigen tests are becoming increasingly popular and appear generally less species-specific. A review of independent studies of the ProSpecT® Campylobacter Microplate enzyme immunoassay (EIA) developed for C. jejuni/coli showed comparable diagnostic results to culture methods but the examination of non-jejuni/coli Campylobacter spp. was limited and the limit-of-detection (LOD), where reported, varied between studies. This study investigated LOD of EIA for Campylobacter upsaliensis, Campylobacter hyointestinalis and Campylobacter helveticus spiked in human stools. Multiple stools and Campylobacter isolates were used in three different concentrations (10(4)-10(9)CFU/ml) to reflect sample heterogeneity. All Campylobacter species evaluated were detectable by EIA. Multivariate analysis showed LOD varied between Campylobacter spp. and faecal consistency as fixed effects and individual faecal samples as random effects. EIA showed excellent performance in replicate testing for both within and between batches of reagents, in agreement between visual and spectrophotometric reading of results, and returned no discordance between the bacterial concentrations within independent dilution test runs (positive results with lower but not higher concentrations). This study shows how limitations in experimental procedures lead to an overestimation of consistency and uniformity of LOD for EIA that may not hold under routine use in diagnostic laboratories. Benefits and limitations for clinical practice and the influence on estimates of performance characteristics from detection of multiple Campylobacter spp. by EIA are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Limited role of gadolinium to detect active sacroiliitis on MRI in juvenile spondyloarthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herregods, N.; Leus, A.; Verstraete, K.; Jans, L. [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, Ghent (Belgium); Jaremko, J.L. [University of Alberta Hospital, Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Baraliakos, X. [Ruhr-University Bochum, Rheumazentrum Ruhrgebiet, Herne (Germany); Dehoorne, J. [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Ghent (Belgium)

    2015-11-15

    The aim of this study is to determine the added diagnostic value of contrast-enhanced (CE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compared to routine non contrast-enhanced MRI to detect active sacroiliitis in clinically juvenile spondyloarthritis (JSpA). A total of 80 children clinically suspected for sacroiliitis prospectively underwent MRI of the sacroiliac (SI) joints. Axial and coronal T1-weighted (T1), Short-tau inversion recovery (STIR) and fat-saturated T1-weighted gadolinium-DTPA (Gd) contrast-enhanced (T1/Gd) sequences were obtained. The presence of bone marrow edema (BME), capsulitis, enthesitis, high intra-articular STIR signal, synovial enhancement and a global diagnostic impression of the MRI for diagnosis of sacroiliitis was recorded. STIR and T1/Gd sequences had 100 % agreement for depiction of BME, capsulitis and enthesitis. High intra-articular STIR signal was seen in 18/80 (22.5 %) patients, 15 (83 %) of whom also showed synovial enhancement in the T1/Gd sequence. Sensitivity (SN) and specificity (SP) for a clinical diagnosis of JSpA were similar for high STIR signal (SN = 33 %, SP = 85 %) and T1/Gd synovial enhancement (SN = 36 %, SP = 92 %). Positive likelihood ratio (LR+) for JSpA was twice as high for synovial enhancement than high STIR signal (4.5 compared to 2.2). Global diagnostic impression was similar (STIR: SN = 55 %, SP = 87 %, LR + =4.2; T1/Gd: SN = 55 %, SP = 92 %, LR + = 6.9). MRI without contrast administration is sufficient to identify bone marrow edema, capsulitis and retroarticular enthesitis as features of active sacroiliitis in juvenile spondyloarthritis. In selected cases when high STIR signal in the joint is the only finding, gadolinium-enhanced images may help to confirm the presence of synovitis. (orig.)

  10. Specialists' meeting on sodium boiling noise detection. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of the meeting was to review and discuss methods available for detection of the initial stage of accidents in fast reactors, with most attention on reliable detection by acoustic techniques, which could provide a valuable addition to the safety protection. Results obtained from reactor experiments were also discussed and recommendations made for future developments. The meeting was divided into five technical sessions as follows: Signals from sodium boiling; Transmission of acoustic waves and background noise; Detection techniques; Reactor experiments; and Future requirements

  11. Specialists' meeting on sodium boiling noise detection. Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of the meeting was to review and discuss methods available for detection of the initial stage of accidents in fast reactors, with most attention on reliable detection by acoustic techniques, which could provide a valuable addition to the safety protection. Results obtained from reactor experiments were also discussed and recommendations made for future developments. The meeting was divided into five technical sessions as follows: Signals from sodium boiling; Transmission of acoustic waves and background noise; Detection techniques; Reactor experiments; and Future requirements.

  12. Limited field investigation report for the 100-NR-1 operable unit. Draft A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    This limited field investigation (LFI) report summarizes the data collection and analysis activities conducted during the 100-NR-1 Source Operable Unit LFI and the associated qualitative risk assessment (QRA), and makes recommendations on the continued candidacy of high-priority sites for interim remedial measures (IRM). The results and recommendations presented in this report are generally independent of future land-use scenarios. An LFI report is required when waste sites are to be considered for IRM and existing data are insufficient to formulate a conceptual model or perform a QRA. The purpose of the report is to identify those sites that are recommended to remain as candidates for IRM, provide a preliminary summary of site characterization studies, refine the conceptual model as needed, identify potential contaminant and location-specific applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARAR), and provide a qualitative assessment of the risks associated with the sites. This assessment includes consideration of whether contaminant concentrations pose a risk to human health or the environment that warrants action through IRM. Seven sites were intrusively investigated: 1322-N, 116-N-2, 119-N, 120-N-2, 120-N-1, South Settling Pond, and the 166-N Tank Farm (UN-100-N-17) unplanned release at the 166-N Tank Farm. Vadose zone sediments from these sites were sampled and analyzed. Radiological contamination is the primary concern as confirmed through this study

  13. Alternative vehicle detection technologies for traffic signal systems : technical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    Due to the well-documented problems associated with inductive loops, most jurisdictions have : replaced many intersection loops with video image vehicle detection systems (VIVDS). While VIVDS : have overcome some of the problems with loops such as tr...

  14. Detection limits of absorbed dose of ionizing radiation in molluscan shells as determined by e.p.r. spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stachowicz, W.; Michalik, J.; Burlinska, G.; Sadlo, J.; Dziedzic-Goclawska, A.; Ostrowski, K.

    1995-01-01

    The exposure of waters to ionizing radiation from radionuclides imprisoned in dumped nuclear waste containers, freed in nuclear submarine accidents or released in underwater magma eruptions are difficult to be evaluated by conventional radiometric methods. Ionizing radiation evokes stable paramagnetic centers in crystalline lattice of mineral components in bone skeletons of mammals and fishes as well as in exoskeletons of mollusca. They give rise in e.p.r. to specific, extremely stable signals which are proposed to be applied as indicators of radiation exposure levels. In the present study the e.p.r. detection limits of the dose of ionizing radiation absorbed in shells of fresh water and marine mollusca (selected species) have been estimated. It has been found that with fresh water mollusca the dose of 1-2 Gy can be detected, while the sea water mollusca by one order of magnitude lower, i.e. about 0.1 Gy. (author)

  15. Possibilities for decreasing detection limits of analytical methods for determination of transformation products of unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine in environmental samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulat Kenessov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Most rockets of middle and heavy class launched from Kazakhstan, Russia, China and other countries still use highly toxic unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine (UDMH as a liquid propellant. Study of migration, distribution and accumulation of UDMH transformation products in environment and human health impact assessment of space rocket activity are currently complicated due to the absence of analytical methods allowing detection of trace concentrations of these compounds in analyzed samples. This paper reviews methods and approaches, which can be applied for development of such methods. Detection limits at a part-per-trillion (ppt level may be achieved using most selective and sensitive methods based on gas or liquid chromatography in combination of tandem or high-resolution mass spectrometry. In addition, 1000-fold concentration of samples or integrated sample preparation methods, e.g., dynamic headspace extraction, are required. Special attention during development and application of such methods must be paid to purity of laboratory air, reagents, glassware and analytical instruments.

  16. Protein biomarkers on tissue as imaged via MALDI mass spectrometry: A systematic approach to study the limits of detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Ven, Stephanie M W Y; Bemis, Kyle D; Lau, Kenneth; Adusumilli, Ravali; Kota, Uma; Stolowitz, Mark; Vitek, Olga; Mallick, Parag; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2016-06-01

    MALDI mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is emerging as a tool for protein and peptide imaging across tissue sections. Despite extensive study, there does not yet exist a baseline study evaluating the potential capabilities for this technique to detect diverse proteins in tissue sections. In this study, we developed a systematic approach for characterizing MALDI-MSI workflows in terms of limits of detection, coefficients of variation, spatial resolution, and the identification of endogenous tissue proteins. Our goal was to quantify these figures of merit for a number of different proteins and peptides, in order to gain more insight in the feasibility of protein biomarker discovery efforts using this technique. Control proteins and peptides were deposited in serial dilutions on thinly sectioned mouse xenograft tissue. Using our experimental setup, coefficients of variation were biomarkers and a new benchmarking strategy that can be used for comparing diverse MALDI-MSI workflows. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Detection Limit of Smectite by Chemin IV Laboratory Instrument: Preliminary Implications for Chemin on the Mars Science Laboratory Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archilles, Cherie; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Blake, D. F.

    2011-01-01

    The CheMin instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) is an miniature X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) instrument capable of detecting the mineralogical and elemental compositions of rocks, outcrops and soils on the surface of Mars. CheMin uses a microfocus-source Co X-ray tube, a transmission sample cell, and an energy-discriminating X-ray sensitive CCD to produce simultaneous 2-D XRD patterns and energy-dispersive X-ray histograms from powdered samples. CRISM and OMEGA have identified the presence of phyllosilicates at several locations on Mars including the four candidate MSL landing sites. The objective of this study was to conduct preliminary studies to determine the CheMin detection limit of smectite in a smectite/olivine mixed mineral system.

  18. Scheme for efficient extraction of low-frequency signal beyond the quantum limit by frequency-shift detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, R G; Zhang, J; Zhai, Z H; Zhai, S Q; Liu, K; Gao, J R

    2015-08-10

    Low-frequency (Hz~kHz) squeezing is very important in many schemes of quantum precision measurement. But it is more difficult than that at megahertz-frequency because of the introduction of laser low-frequency technical noise. In this paper, we propose a scheme to obtain a low-frequency signal beyond the quantum limit from the frequency comb in a non-degenerate frequency and degenerate polarization optical parametric amplifier (NOPA) operating below threshold with type I phase matching by frequency-shift detection. Low-frequency squeezing immune to laser technical noise is obtained by a detection system with a local beam of two-frequency intense laser. Furthermore, the low-frequency squeezing can be used for phase measurement in Mach-Zehnder interferometer, and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) can be enhanced greatly.

  19. Effect of sample matrix composition on INAA sample weights, measurement precisions, limits of detection, and optimum conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guinn, V.P.; Nakazawa, L.; Leslie, J.

    1984-01-01

    The instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) Advance Prediction Computer Program (APCP) is extremely useful in guiding one to optimum subsequent experimental analyses of samples of all types of matrices. By taking into account the contributions to the cumulative Compton-continuum levels from all significant induced gamma-emitting radionuclides, it provides good INAA advance estimates of detectable photopeaks, measurement precisions, concentration lower limits of detection (LOD's) and optimum irradiation/decay/counting conditions - as well as of the very important maximum allowable sample size for each set of conditions calculated. The usefulness and importance of the four output parameters cited in the title are discussed using the INAA APCP outputs for NBS SRM-1632 Coal as the example

  20. Experimental study to optimize time resolution and detection limit of online 222Rn-in-water measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Just, G.; Freyer, K.; Treutler, H.C.; Philipsborn, H. von

    2001-01-01

    The possibility to detect short-term variations of the activity concentration of 222 Rn in water by online monitoring with temporal resolutions of a few minutes and a lower limit of detection of about 1 Bq/l enhances the applicability of such measurements. New applications would be possible in the field of hydro-geology in which Rn is used as tracer gas, the monitoring of pumping procedures, for the study of exchange processes during groundwater sampling and for various applications with geophysical effects. A suitable, simple method is the measuring principle proposed by Surbeck (Fribourg) some years ago which is based on the separation of air and water by a diffusion membrane. Process parameters enhancing the time resolution of the method as well as the efficiency of different radon detectors have been studied. (orig.) [de

  1. Environmental distributions and the practical utilisation of detection limited environment measurement data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniels, W.M.; Higgins, N.A.

    2002-01-01

    This study investigated methods of providing summary statistics for measurements of radioactive contamination in food when the available measurements are incomplete. Several techniques to calculate, for instance, the mean level of contamination when a significant number of samples are found to have less than the minimum level reported by measurements, are discussed. To support the estimation of summary statistics the study identifies physical processes that give rise to observed distributions, eg lognormal for the range of radioactivity levels found in environmental and food samples. The improved estimates possible by application of the methods reviewed will allow the Food Standards Agency to gain a better understanding of the levels of radioactivity in the environment and if required direct effort to minimising the most significant uncertainties in these estimates. The Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, Radiological Safety and Nutrition Division (now part of the Food Standards Agency) funded this study, under contract RP0342. This work was undertaken under the Environmental Assessments and Emergency Response Group's Quality Management System, which has been approved by Lloyd's Register Quality Assurance to the Quality Management Standards ISO 9001:2000 and TickIT Guide Issue 5, certificate number 956546. (author)

  2. Growing within limits. A report to the Global Assembly 2009 of the Club of Rome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Vuuren, D.P.; Faber, A.

    2009-10-01

    Current trends in fossil-fuel use and inefficient land use will lead to large global environmental problems with respect to climate change and biodiversity loss. Technical and economically feasible options are available to meet the challenge to avoid these problems. The main issue is that of creating institutional and policy conditions for a more sustainable economy. This report looks into the possible developments in the climate and energy system on the one hand, and biodiversity and land use on the other hand. Obviously, also other important global environmental problems exist, but these are outside the scope of this report. The report presents two scenarios: a baseline, business-as-usual scenario (Trend scenario) explores the risks of climate change and biodiversity loss, while the Challenge scenario explores the pathway and required actions to bring about a more environmentally sustainable future (Chapter 2). This chapter also briefly assesses whether the threat of overshoot and collapse, as identified in The Limits to Growth, is still valid and which 'safe' constraints could be defined that characterise a sustainable development.Chapter 3 focuses further on the issue of climate change, exploring the requirements for a low-carbon society, by 2050, compared with the Trend scenario. What would the energy mix in such a future look like? What crucial technological choices are there to be made? Which combinations of technological and non-technological solutions are possible? Chapter 4 focuses on the issues of land use and biodiversity loss. Could agricultural productivity be increased to such an extent that it is possible to use less land for food production and more land for bio-energy? What can be the contribution of dietary changes? This report takes an explicitly global perspective, but occasionally lower levels are included to do justice to the multi-level complexity of the issues at stake. The concluding Chapter 5 looks at a range of strategies and measures on

  3. Work Functioning Among Firefighters: A Comparison Between Self-Reported Limitations and Functional Task Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDermid, Joy C; Tang, Kenneth; Sinden, Kathryn E; D'Amico, Robert

    2018-05-25

    Purpose Performance-based and disease indicators have been widely studied in firefighters; self-reported work role limitations have not. The aim of this study was to describe the distributions and correlations of a generic self-reported Work Limitations Questionnaire (WLQ-26) and firefighting-specific task performance-based tests. Methods Active firefighters from the City of Hamilton Fire Services (n = 293) were recruited. Participants completed the WLQ-26 to quantify on-the-job difficulties over five work domains: work scheduling (4 items), output demands (7 items), physical demands (8 items), mental demands (4 items), and social demands (3 items). A subset of participants (n = 149) were also assessed on hose drag and stair climb with a high-rise pack performance-based tests. Descriptive statistics and correlations were used to compare item/subscale performance; and to describe the inter-relationships between tests. Results The mean WLQ-26 item scores (/5) ranged from 4.1 to 4.4 (median = 5 for all items); most firefighters (54.5-80.5%) selected "difficult none of the time" response option on all items. A substantial ceiling effect was observed across all five WLQ-26 subscales as 44.0-55.6% were in the highest category. Subscale means ranged from 61.8 (social demands) to 78.7 (output demands and physical demands). Internal consistency exceeded 0.90 on all subscales. For the hose drag task, the mean time-to-completion was 48.0 s (SD = 14.5; range 20.4-95.0). For the stair climb task, the mean time-to-completion was 76.7 s (SD = 37.2; range 21.0-218.0). There were no significant correlations between self-report work limitations and performance of firefighting tasks. Conclusions The WLQ-26 measured five domains, but had ceiling effects in firefighters. Performance-based testing showed wider score range, lacked ceiling effects and did not correlate to the WLQ-26. A firefighter-specific, self-report role functioning scale may be needed to identify

  4. Resistance of lichens to simulated galactic cosmic radiation: limits of survival capacity and biosignature detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Torre Noetzel, Rosa; Miller, Ana Z.; Cubero, Beatriz; Raguse, Marina; Meessen, Joachim

    2016-04-01

    Space constitutes an extremely harmful environment for survival of terrestrial organisms. Amongst extremophiles on Earth, lichens are one of the most resistant organisms to harsh terrestrial environments, as well as some species of microorganisms, such as bacteria (Moeller et al., 2010), criptoendolithic cyanobacteria and lithic fungi (de los Ríos et al. 2004). To study the survival capacity of lichens to the harmful radiation environment of space, we have selected the lichen Circinaria gyrosa, an astrobiological model defined by its high capacity of resistance to space conditions (De la Torre et al. 2010) and to a simulated Mars environment (Sanchez et al., 2012). Samples were irradiated with four types of space-relevant ionizing radiation in the STARLIFE campaign: helium and iron ion doses (up to 2,000 Gy), X-ray doses (up to 5,000 Gy) and ultra-high γ-ray doses (from 6 to 113 kGy). Results on resistance of C. gyrosa to space-relevant ionizing radiation and its post-irradiation viability were obtained by: (i) chlorophyll a fluorescence of photosystem II (PS II); (ii) epifluorescence microscopy; (iii) confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM), and (iv) field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). Results of photosynthetic activity and epifluorescence showed no significant changes on the viability of C. gyrosa with increasing doses of helium and iron ions as well as X-rays. In contrast, γ-irradiation elicited significant dose-correlated effects as revealed by all applied techniques. Relevant is the presence of whewellite-like crystals, detected by FESEM on C. gyrosa thalli after high irradiation doses, which has been also identified in previous Mars simulation studies (Böttcher et al., 2014). These studies contribute to the better understanding of the adaptability of extremophile organisms to harsh environments, as well as to estimate the habitability of a planet's surface, like Mars; they will be important for planning experiments on the search of life

  5. Comparison of approximate formulas for decision levels and detection limits for paired counting with the exact results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potter, W.E.

    2005-01-01

    The exact probability density function for paired counting can be expressed in terms of modified Bessel functions of integral order when the expected blank count is known. Exact decision levels and detection limits can be computed in a straightforward manner. For many applications perturbing half-integer corrections to Gaussian distributions yields satisfactory results for decision levels. When there is concern about the uncertainty for the expected value of the blank count, a way to bound the errors of both types using confidence intervals for the expected blank count is discussed. (author)

  6. Detection limit improvements forecasted at CTBTO IMS radionuclide stations based on size separation of aerosols by aerodynamic diameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biegalski, S.; Ezekoye, O.A.; Pena, J.M.; Waye, S.; Pickering, M.

    2008-01-01

    Studies show that aerosols with natural activity have an aerodynamic diameter in the range of 0.1 to 1 μm. In contrast, nuclear explosions generally produce radioactive aerosols with aerodynamic diameters less than 0.1 μm and greater than 1 μm. These differences in aerosol sizes are quite fortuitous because they allow aerosol aerodynamic diameter to be utilized as a physical property to separate aerosols of natural origin from those produced in a nuclear explosion. Data collected in Austin, TX and at U.S. CTBT IMS radionuclide stations have been utilized to forecast detection limit improvements possible given an aerosol size separation capability. (author)

  7. Statistical data treatment of environmental radiological measurements extracted by the CSN and submitted to a lower limit of detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felipe, A.; Martin, M.; Valdes, T.

    1992-01-01

    The quantification of radiological environmental contamination is usually carried out by mean of sample measurements around the emission points. These data are submitted to the so called Lower Limit of Detection which makes data to be statistically censored. The following topics have been included in our work: (a) Correction of mean values of the radiological contamination levels by the estimation of its distribution. (b) Development of the computer programs to carry out the former correction of estimators. (c) Estimation of the existing correlation among the different types of measurements. (author)

  8. Limited field investigation report for the 100-NR-1 Operable Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-03-01

    This limited field investigation (LFI) report summarizes the data collection and analysis activities conducted during the 100-NR-1 Source Operable Unit LFI and the associated qualitative risk assessment (QRA), and makes recommendations on the continued candidacy of high-priority sites for interim remedial measures (IRM). The results and recommendations presented in this report are generally independent of future land-use scenarios. This report is unique in that it is based on Hanford-specific agreements discussed in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) (Ecology et al. 1992), the Hanford Site Risk Assessment Methodology (DOE-RL 1994a), the Remedial Investigation Feasibility Study Work Plan for the 100-NR-1 Operable Unit (DOE-RL 1992a), and the Hanford Past-Practice Strategy (HPPS) (DOE-RL 1991), and must be viewed in this context. The HPPS emphasizes initiating and completing waste site cleanup through interim actions. The strategy includes paths for interim decision-making and a final remedy-selection process for the operable unit. A LFI report is required, in accordance with the HPPS, when waste sites are to be considered for IRM and existing data are insufficient to formulate a conceptual model or perform a QRA. The purpose of the report is to identify those sites that are recommended to remain as candidates for IRM, provide a preliminary summary of site characterization studies, refine the conceptual model as needed, identify potential contaminant- and location-specific applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARAR), and provide a qualitative assessment of the risks associated with the sites. This assessment includes consideration of whether contaminant concentrations pose a risk to human health or the environment that warrants action through IRM

  9. Limitations of poster presentations reporting educational innovations at a major international medical education conference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris Gordon

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: In most areas of medical research, the label of ‘quality’ is associated with well-accepted standards. Whilst its interpretation in the field of medical education is contentious, there is agreement on the key elements required when reporting novel teaching strategies. We set out to assess if these features had been fulfilled by poster presentations at a major international medical education conference. Methods: Such posters were analysed in four key areas: reporting of theoretical underpinning, explanation of instructional design methods, descriptions of the resources needed for introduction, and the offering of materials to support dissemination. Results: Three hundred and twelve posters were reviewed with 170 suitable for analysis. Forty-one percent described their methods of instruction or innovation design. Thirty-three percent gave details of equipment, and 29% of studies described resources that may be required for delivering such an intervention. Further resources to support dissemination of their innovation were offered by 36%. Twenty-three percent described the theoretical underpinning or conceptual frameworks upon which their work was based. Conclusions: These findings suggest that posters presenting educational innovation are currently limited in what they offer to educators. Presenters should seek to enhance their reporting of these crucial aspects by employing existing published guidance, and organising committees may wish to consider explicitly requesting such information at the time of initial submission.

  10. Limitations of poster presentations reporting educational innovations at a major international medical education conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Morris; Darbyshire, Daniel; Saifuddin, Aamir; Vimalesvaran, Kavitha

    2013-02-19

    In most areas of medical research, the label of 'quality' is associated with well-accepted standards. Whilst its interpretation in the field of medical education is contentious, there is agreement on the key elements required when reporting novel teaching strategies. We set out to assess if these features had been fulfilled by poster presentations at a major international medical education conference. Such posters were analysed in four key areas: reporting of theoretical underpinning, explanation of instructional design methods, descriptions of the resources needed for introduction, and the offering of materials to support dissemination. Three hundred and twelve posters were reviewed with 170 suitable for analysis. Forty-one percent described their methods of instruction or innovation design. Thirty-three percent gave details of equipment, and 29% of studies described resources that may be required for delivering such an intervention. Further resources to support dissemination of their innovation were offered by 36%. Twenty-three percent described the theoretical underpinning or conceptual frameworks upon which their work was based. These findings suggest that posters presenting educational innovation are currently limited in what they offer to educators. Presenters should seek to enhance their reporting of these crucial aspects by employing existing published guidance, and organising committees may wish to consider explicitly requesting such information at the time of initial submission.

  11. Limited field investigation report for the 100-FR-1 Operable Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    This limited field investigation (LFI) report summarizes the data collection and analysis activities conducted during the 100-FR-1 Source Operable Unit LFI and the associated qualitative risk assessment (QRA), and makes recommendations on the continued candidacy of high-priority sites for interim remedial measures (IRM). The results and recommendations presented in this report are generally independent of future land use scenarios. An LFI is required when existing data are insufficient to formulate a conceptual model and perform a QRA. The purpose of the report is to identify those sites that are recommended to remain as candidates for IRM, provide a preliminary summary of site characterization studies, refine the conceptual model as needed, identify contaminant- and location-specific applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARAR), and provide a qualitative assessment of the risks associated with the sites. This assessment includes consideration of whether contaminant concentrations pose an unacceptable risk that warrants action through IRM. The final decision to conduct an IRM will rely on many factors including risk, ARAR, future land use, point of compliance, time of compliance, a bias-for-action, and the threat to human health and the environment

  12. Working Group Report: WIMP Dark Matter Direct Detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cushman, P.; Galbiati, C.; McKinsey, D. N.; Robertson, H.; Tait, T. M.P.

    2013-01-01

    As part of the Snowmass process, the Cosmic Frontier WIMP Direct Detection subgroup (CF1) has drawn on input from the Cosmic Frontier and the broader Particle Physics community to produce this document. The charge to CF1 was (a) to summarize the current status and projected sensitivity of WIMP direct detection experiments worldwide, (b) motivate WIMP dark matter searches over a broad parameter space by examining a spectrum of WIMP models, (c) establish a community consensus on the type of experimental program required to explore that parameter space, and (d) identify the common infrastructure required to practically meet those goals.

  13. Working Group Report: WIMP Dark Matter Direct Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cushman, P.; Galbiati, C.; McKinsey, D. N.; Robertson, H.; Tait, T. M.P.

    2013-10-30

    As part of the Snowmass process, the Cosmic Frontier WIMP Direct Detection subgroup (CF1) has drawn on input from the Cosmic Frontier and the broader Particle Physics community to produce this document. The charge to CF1 was (a) to summarize the current status and projected sensitivity of WIMP direct detection experiments worldwide, (b) motivate WIMP dark matter searches over a broad parameter space by examining a spectrum of WIMP models, (c) establish a community consensus on the type of experimental program required to explore that parameter space, and (d) identify the common infrastructure required to practically meet those goals.

  14. Systematic optimization of multiplex zymography protocol to detect active cathepsins K, L, S, and V in healthy and diseased tissue: compromise among limits of detection, reduced time, and resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Jerald E; Platt, Manu O

    2013-07-01

    Cysteine cathepsins are a family of proteases identified in cancer, atherosclerosis, osteoporosis, arthritis, and a number of other diseases. As this number continues to rise, so does the need for low cost, broad use quantitative assays to detect their activity and can be translated to the clinic in the hospital or in low resource settings. Multiplex cathepsin zymography is one such assay that detects subnanomolar levels of active cathepsins K, L, S, and V in cell or tissue preparations observed as clear bands of proteolytic activity after gelatin substrate SDS-PAGE with conditions optimal for cathepsin renaturing and activity. Densitometric analysis of the zymogram provides quantitative information from this low cost assay. After systematic modifications to optimize cathepsin zymography, we describe reduced electrophoresis time from 2 h to 10 min, incubation assay time from overnight to 4 h, and reduced minimal tissue protein necessary while maintaining sensitive detection limits; an evaluation of the pros and cons of each modification is also included. We further describe image acquisition by Smartphone camera, export to Matlab, and densitometric analysis code to quantify and report cathepsin activity, adding portability and replacing large scale, darkbox imaging equipment that could be cost prohibitive in limited resource settings.

  15. Systematic optimization of multiplex zymography protocol to detect active cathepsins K, L, S, and V in healthy and diseased tissue: compromise between limits of detection, reduced time, and resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Jerald E.; Platt, Manu O.

    2013-01-01

    Cysteine cathepsins are a family of proteases identified in cancer, atherosclerosis, osteoporosis, arthritis and a number of other diseases. As this number continues to rise, so does the need for low cost, broad use quantitative assays to detect their activity and can be translated to the clinic in the hospital or in low resource settings. Multiplex cathepsin zymography is one such assay that detects subnanomolar levels of active cathepsins K, L, S, and V in cell or tissue preparations observed as cleared bands of proteolytic activity after gelatin substrate SDS-PAGE with conditions optimal for cathepsin renaturing and activity. Densitometric analysis of the zymogram provides quantitative information from this low cost assay. After systematic modifications to optimize cathepsin zymography, we describe reduced electrophoresis time from 2 hours to 10 minutes, incubation assay time from overnight to 4 hours, and reduced minimal tissue protein necessary while maintaining sensitive detection limits; an evaluation of the pros and cons of each modification is also included. We further describe image acquisition by smartphone camera, export to Matlab, and densitometric analysis code to quantify and report cathepsin activity, adding portability and replacing large scale, darkbox imaging equipment that could be cost prohibitive in limited resource settings. PMID:23532386

  16. Detections and Sensitive Upper Limits for Methane and Related Trace Gases on Mars during 2003-2014, and planned extensions in 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumma, Michael J.; Villanueva, Geronimo L.; Novak, Robert E.

    2015-11-01

    Five groups report methane detections on Mars; all results suggest local release and high temporal variability [1-7]. Our team searched for CH4 on many dates and seasons and detected it on several dates [1, 9, 10]. TLS (Curiosity rover) reported methane upper limits [6], and then detections [7] that were consistent in size with earlier reports and that also showed rapid modulation of CH4 abundance.[8] argued that absorption features assigned to Mars 12CH4 by [1] might instead be weak lines of terrestrial 13CH4. If not properly removed, terrestrial 13CH4 signatures would appear on the blue wing of terrestrial 12CH4 even when Mars is red-shifted - but they do not (Fig. S6 of [1]), demonstrating that terrestrial signatures were correctly removed. [9] demonstrated that including the dependence of δ13CH4 with altitude did not affect the residual features, nor did taking δ13CH4 as zero. Were δ13CH4 important, its omission would have overemphasized the depth of 13CH4 terrestrial absorption, introducing emission features in the residual spectra [1]. However, the residual features are seen in absorption, establishing their origin as non-terrestrial - [8] now agrees with this view.We later reported results for multiple organic gases (CH4, CH3OH, H2CO, C2H6, C2H2, C2H4), hydroperoxyl (HO2), three nitriles (N2O, NH3, HCN) and two chlorinated species (HCl, CH3Cl) [9]. Most of these species cannot be detected with current space assets, owing to instrumental limitations (e.g., spectral resolving power). However, the high resolution infrared spectrometers (NOMAD, ACS) on ExoMars 2016 (Trace Gas Orbiter) will begin measurements in late 2016. In solar occultation, TGO sensitivities will far exceed prior capabilities.We published detailed hemispheric maps of H2O and HDO on Mars, inferring the size of a lost early ocean [10]. In 2016, we plan to acquire 3-D spatial maps of HDO and H2O with ALMA, and improved maps of organics with iSHELL/NASA-IRTF.References: [1] Mumma et al. Sci09

  17. Limited field investigation report for the 100-HR-1 Operable Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    This limited field investigation (LFI) report summarizes the data collection and analysis activities conducted during the 100-HR-1 Source Operable Unit LFI and the associated qualitative risk assessment (QRA) (WHC 1993a), and makes recommendations on the continued candidacy of high-priority sites for interim remedial measures (IRM). The results and recommendations presented in this report are generally independent of future land use scenarios. A LFI Report is required, in accordance with the HPPS, when waste sites are to be considered for IRMs. The LFI is an integral part of the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) facility investigation/corrective measures study (RFI/CMS) and process and functions as a focused RI or RFI for selection of IRMs. The purpose of the report is to identify those sites that are recommended to remain as candidates for IRMs, provide a preliminary summary of site characterization studies, refine the conceptual model as needed, identify contaminant- and location-specific applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARA), and provide a qualitative assessment of the risks associated with the sites. This assessment includes consideration of whether contaminant concentrations pose an unacceptable risk that warrants action through IRMs. The 100-HR-1 unit encompasses approximately 100 acres adjacent to the Columbia River shoreline. It contains waste units associated with the original plant facilities constructed to support the H Reactor. The area also contains evaporation basins which received liquid process wastes and nonroutine deposits of chemical wastes from the 300 Area, where fuel elements for the N Reactor were produced

  18. JET-ISX-B beryllium limiter experiment safety analysis report and operational safety requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edmonds, P.H.

    1985-09-01

    An experiment to evaluate the suitability of beryllium as a limiter material has been completed on the ISX-B tokamak. The experiment consisted of two phases: (1) the initial operation and characterization in the ISX experiment, and a period of continued operation to the specified surface fluence (10 22 atoms/cm 2 ) of hydrogen ions; and (2) the disassembly, decontamination, or disposal of the ISX facility. During these two phases of the project, the possibility existed for beryllium and/or beryllium oxide powder to be produced inside the vacuum vessel. Beryllium dust is a highly toxic material, and extensive precautions are required to prevent the release of the beryllium into the experimental work area and to prevent the contamination of personnel working on the device. Details of the health hazards associated with beryllium and the appropriate precautions are presented. Also described in appendixes to this report are the various operational safety requirements for the project

  19. Final Progress Report on Model-Based Diagnosis of Soil Limitations to Forest Productivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luxmoore, R.J.

    2004-08-30

    This project was undertaken in support of the forest industry to link modeling of nutrients and productivity with field research to identify methods for enhancing soil quality and forest productivity and for alleviating soil limitations to sustainable forest productivity. The project consisted of a series of related tasks, including (1) simulation of changes in biomass and soil carbon with nitrogen fertilization, (2) development of spreadsheet modeling tools for soil nutrient availability and tree nutrient requirements, (3) additional modeling studies, and (4) evaluation of factors involved in the establishment and productivity of southern pine plantations in seasonally wet soils. This report also describes the two Web sites that were developed from the research to assist forest managers with nutrient management of Douglas-fir and loblolly pine plantations.

  20. Astrophysical limitations to the identification of dark matter: Indirect neutrino signals vis-a-vis direct detection recoil rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serpico, Pasquale D.; Bertone, Gianfranco

    2010-01-01

    A convincing identification of dark matter (DM) particles can probably be achieved only through a combined analysis of different detections strategies, which provides an effective way of removing degeneracies in the parameter space of DM models. In practice, however, this program is made complicated by the fact that different strategies depend on different physical quantities, or on the same quantities but in a different way, making the treatment of systematic errors rather tricky. We discuss here the uncertainties on the recoil rate in direct-detection experiments and on the muon rate induced by neutrinos from dark matter annihilations in the Sun, and we show that, contrarily to the local DM density or overall cross section scale, irreducible astrophysical uncertainties affect the two rates in a different fashion, therefore limiting our ability to reconstruct the parameters of the dark matter particles. By varying within their respective errors astrophysical parameters such as the escape velocity and the velocity dispersion of dark matter particles, we show that the uncertainty on the relative strength of the neutrino and direct-detection signal is as large as a factor of 2 for typical values of the parameters, but can be even larger in some circumstances.

  1. A quantitative method for determining a representative detection limit of the forensic luminol test for latent bloodstains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Brianna M; Lu, Zhenyu; Martin, Jennifer P; Tazik, Shawna K; Kellogg, Katie W; DeJong, Stephanie A; Belliveau, Elle O; Kilgore, Katherine E; Ervin, Samantha M; Meece-Rayle, Mackenzie; Abraham, Alyssa M; Myrick, Michael L; Morgan, Stephen L

    2017-09-01

    The luminol test has been used for over 60 years by forensic investigators for presumptive identification of blood and visualization of blood splatter patterns. Multiple studies have estimated the limit of detection (LD) for bloodstains when luminol is employed, with results ranging from 100× to 5,000,000× dilute. However, these studies typically have not identified and controlled important experimental variables which may affect the luminol LD for bloodstains. Without control of experimental parameters in the laboratory, variables which affect the potential of presumptive bloodstain test methods remain largely unknown, and comparisons required to establish new, more powerful detection methods are simply impossible. We have developed a quantitative method to determine the relationship between the amount of blood present and its reaction with luminol by measuring, under controlled conditions, the resulting chemiluminescent intensity with a video camera, combined with processing of the digital intensity data. The method resulted in an estimated LD for bloodstains on cotton fabric at ∼200,000× diluted blood with a specific luminol formulation. Although luminol is the focus of this study, the experimental protocol used could be modified to study effects of variables using other blood detection reagents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Does parallel item content on WOMAC's Pain and Function Subscales limit its ability to detect change in functional status?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kennedy Deborah M

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC is considered the leading outcome measure for patients with osteoarthritis of the lower extremity, recent work has challenged its factorial validity and the physical function subscale's ability to detect valid change when pain and function display different profiles of change. This study examined the etiology of the WOMAC's physical function subscale's limited ability to detect change in the presence of discordant changes for pain and function. We hypothesized that the duplication of some items on the WOMAC's pain and function subscales contributed to this shortcoming. Methods Two eight-item physical function scales were abstracted from the WOMAC's 17-item physical function subscale: one contained activities and themes that were duplicated on the pain subscale (SIMILAR-8; the other version avoided overlapping activities (DISSIMILAR-8. Factorial validity of the shortened measures was assessed on 310 patients awaiting hip or knee arthroplasty. The shortened measures' abilities to detect change were examined on a sample of 104 patients following primary hip or knee arthroplasty. The WOMAC and three performance measures that included activity specific pain assessments – 40 m walk test, stair test, and timed-up-and-go test – were administered preoperatively, within 16 days of hip or knee arthroplasty, and at an interval of greater than 20 days following the first post-surgical assessment. Standardized response means were used to quantify change. Results The SIMILAR-8 did not demonstrate factorial validity; however, the factorial structure of the DISSIMILAR-8 was supported. The time to complete the performance measures more than doubled between the preoperative and first postoperative assessments supporting the theory that lower extremity functional status diminished over this interval. The DISSIMILAR-8 detected this deterioration in functional

  3. Screening for genital tuberculosis in a limited resource country: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namani, Sadie; Qehaja-Buçaj, Emine; Namani, Diellëza

    2017-02-07

    Screening for benign or malignant process of pelvis in young females is a challenge for a physician in a limited resource country. Tuberculosis should be always considered in the differential diagnosis of a pelvic mass in countries with high prevalence of tuberculosis. Negative results of analysis of peritoneal fluid for acid-fast staining, late cultures, and unavailability of new diagnostics methods such as polymerase chain reaction and adenosine deaminase of the aspirated fluid from peritoneal cavity can often result in invasive diagnostic procedures such as laparotomy. We report a case of a 24 year old Albanian unemployed female living in urban place in Kosovo who presented with abdominal pain, loss of appetite, fever, headache, a weight loss, nonproductive cough and menstrual irregularity for three weeks. In this example case, the patient with cystic mass in tubo-ovarial complex and elevated serum cancer antigen 125 levels was diagnosed for genital tuberculosis after performing laparotomy. Caseose mass found in left tubo-ovarial complex and histopathological examination of biopsied tissue were the fastest diagnostic tools for confirming pelvis TB. The Lowenstein-Jensen cultures were positive after six weeks and her family history was positive for tuberculosis. Young females with abdominopelvic mass, ascites, a positive family history for tuberculosis and high serum cancer antigen 125, should always raise suspicion of tuberculosis especially in a limited resource country. A laparoscopy combined with peritoneal biopsy should be performed to confirm the diagnosis as this could lead to a prevention of unnecessary laparotomies.

  4. The use of a European coinage alloy to compare the detection limits of mobile XRF systems. A feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cesareo, R. [Struttura Dipartimentale di Matematica e Fisica, Universita di Sassari, Sassari (Italy); Ferretti, M. [CNR-Istituto per le Tecnologie Applicate ai Beni Culturali, Rome (Italy); Gigante, G.E. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma ' La Sapienza' , Rome (Italy); Guida, G. [Laboratorio di Chimica, Istituto Centrale per il Restauro, Rome (Italy); Moioli, P. [Unita Tecnico-Scientifica Materiali e Nuove Tecnologie, ENEA, Rome (Italy); Ridolfi, S. [Ars Mensurae, Rome (Italy); Roldan Garcia, C. [Unidad de Arqueometria, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales, Universidad de Valencia, Valencia (Spain)

    2007-05-15

    The investigation of archaeological and historical materials makes use of techniques that, though borrowed from other fields of research and industrial production, frequently have to be 're-invented' because of peculiar characteristics of the analysed objects. Artistic relevance, limited movability, compositional and structural heterogeneity radically change the experimental approach and often require ad hoc designed equipment. These considerations also apply to x-ray fluorescence, especially regarding mobile systems. The extensive development and use of mobile spectrometers has produced an extremely diversified context and created the need for common criteria to evaluate their performances as well as the advisability of a survey on the existing equipment. This paper shows the feasibility of such an idea through a demonstrative survey that was carried out among users of different mobile x-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) systems in the areas of Rome, Italy and Valencia, Spain. The experimental protocol was based on measuring spectrometer detection limits with the single standard method. The standard was the 50 Euro-cent coin, whose alloy is made of 89% Cu, 5% Al, 5% Zn, 1% Sn; the large spread of the European currency guarantees maximum availability. The experimental data show that the use of different x-ray tubes and detectors results in detection limits that may differ from each other by a factor of 6 for Zn and almost 100 for Sn; despite the large number of variables that in principle affect the performance, it was observed that the high voltage of the x-ray tube is the most important parameter. (authors)

  5. A LIMIT ON THE NUMBER OF ISOLATED NEUTRON STARS DETECTED IN THE ROSAT ALL-SKY-SURVEY BRIGHT SOURCE CATALOG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, Monica L.; Rutledge, Robert E.; Letcavage, Ryan; Shevchuk, Andrew S. H.; Fox, Derek B.

    2010-01-01

    Using new and archival observations made with the Swift satellite and other facilities, we examine 147 X-ray sources selected from the ROSAT All-Sky-Survey Bright Source Catalog (RASS/BSC) to produce a new limit on the number of isolated neutron stars (INSs) in the RASS/BSC, the most constraining such limit to date. Independent of X-ray spectrum and variability, the number of INSs is ≤48 (90% confidence). Restricting attention to soft (kT eff < 200 eV), non-variable X-ray sources-as in a previous study-yields an all-sky limit of ≤31 INSs. In the course of our analysis, we identify five new high-quality INS candidates for targeted follow-up observations. A future all-sky X-ray survey with eROSITA, or another mission with similar capabilities, can be expected to increase the detected population of X-ray-discovered INSs from the 8-50 in the BSC, to (for a disk population) 240-1500, which will enable a more detailed study of neutron star population models.

  6. Detection with Enhanced Energy Windowing Phase I Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bass, David A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Enders, Alexander L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-12-01

    This document reviews the progress of Phase I of the Detection with Enhanced Energy Windowing (DEEW) project. The DEEW project is the implementation of software incorporating an algorithm which reviews data generated by radiation portal monitors and utilizes advanced and novel techniques for detecting radiological and fissile material while not alarming on Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material. Independent testing indicated that the Enhanced Energy Windowing algorithm showed promise at reducing the probability of alarm in the stream of commerce compared to existing algorithms and other developmental algorithms, while still maintaining adequate sensitivity to threats. This document contains a brief description of the project, instructions for setting up and running the applications, and guidance to help make reviewing the output files and source code easier.

  7. DETECTING AND REPORTING THE FRAUDS AND ERRORS BY THE AUDITOR

    OpenAIRE

    Ovidiu Constantin Bunget; Alin Constantin Dumitrescu

    2009-01-01

    Responsibility for preventing and detecting fraud rest with management entities.Although the auditor is not and cannot be held responsible for preventing fraud and errors, in yourwork, he can have a positive role in preventing fraud and errors by deterring their occurrence. Theauditor should plan and perform the audit with an attitude of professional skepticism, recognizingthat condition or events may be found that indicate that fraud or error may exist.Based on the audit risk assessment, aud...

  8. Limited field investigation report for the 100-DR-1 Operable Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    This limited field investigation (LFI) report summarizes the data collection and analysis activities conducted during the 100-DR-1 Source Operable Unite LFI and the associated qualitative risk assessment (QRA), and makes recommendations on the continued candidacy of high-priority sites for interim remedial measures (IRM). The results and recommendations presented in this report are generally independent of future land use scenarios. The 100-DR-1 Operable Unit is one of four operable units associated with the 100 D/DR Area at the Hanford Site. The 100-DR-1 Operable Unit encompasses approximately 1.5 km 2 (0.59 mi 2 ) and is located immediately adjacent to the Columbia River shoreline. In general, it contains waste facilities associated with the original plant facilities constructed to support D Reactor facilities, as well as cooling water retention basin systems for both D and DR Reactors. The 100-DR-1 LFI began the investigative phase of the remedial investigation for a select number of high-priority sites. The LFI was performed to provide additional data needed to support selection, design and implementation of IRM, if needed. The LFI included data compilation, nonintrusive investigations, intrusive investigations, summarization of 100 Area aggregate studies, and data evaluation

  9. Mass Spectrometric C-14 Detection Techniques: Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synal, H.

    2013-12-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) has been established as the best-suited radiocarbon detection technique. In the past years, significant progress with AMS instrumentation has been made resulting in a boom of new AMS facilities around the World. Today, carbon only AMS systems predominantly utilize 1+ charge state and molecule destruction in multiple ion gas collisions in stripper gas cell. This has made possible a significant simplification of the instruments, a reduction of ion energies and related to this less required space of the installations. However, state-of-the-art AMS instruments have still not reached a development stage where they can be regarded as table-top systems. In this respect, more development is needed to further advance the applicability of radiocarbon not only in the traditional fields of dating but also in biomedical research and new fields in Earth and environmental sciences. In a the proof-of-principle experiment the feasibility of radiocarbon detection over the entire range of dating applications was demonstrated using a pure mass spectrometer and ion energies below 50 keV. Now an experimental platform has been completed to test performance and to explore operation and measurement conditions of pure mass spectrometric radiocarbon detection. This contribution will overview the physical principles, which make this development possible and discuss key parameters of the instrumental design and performance of such an instrument.

  10. Matrix effect on the detection limit and accuracy in total reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis of trace elements in environmental and biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karjou, J.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of matrix contents on the detection limit of total reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis was experimentally investigated using a set of multielement standard solutions (500 ng/mL of each element) in variable concentrations of NH 4 NO 3 . It was found that high matrix concentration, i.e. 0.1-10% NH 4 NO 3 , had a strong effect on the detection limits for all investigated elements, whereas no effect was observed at lower matrix concentration, i.e. 0-0.1% NH 4 NO 3 . The effect of soil and blood sample masses on the detection limit was also studied. The results showed decreasing the detection limit (in concentration unit, μg/g) with increasing the sample mass. However, the detection limit increased (in mass unit, ng) with increasing sample mass. The optimal blood sample mass of ca. 200 μg was sufficient to improve the detection limit of Se determination by total reflection X-ray fluorescence. The capability of total reflection X-ray fluorescence to analyze different kinds of samples was discussed with respect to the accuracy and detection limits based on certified and reference materials. Direct analysis of unknown water samples from several sources was also presented in this work

  11. COST AND PERFORMANCE REPORT: INNOVATIVE ACOUSTIC SENSOR TECHNOLOGIES FOR LEAK DETECTION IN CHALLENGING PIPE TYPES

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-30

    to limit the drawdown of local water supplies . Implementation of improved leak detection technologies and the timely repair of water mains will...functions and to limit the drawdown of local water supplies . DoD installations lose significant amounts of water through leaking pipe systems that are near... Water Supply Practices M36: Water Audits and Loss Control Programs (2009), leak detection surveys should be conducted every three years. Therefore, it

  12. Using European travellers as an early alert to detect emerging pathogens in countries with limited laboratory resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grais Rebecca

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The volume, extent and speed of travel have dramatically increased in the past decades, providing the potential for an infectious disease to spread through the transportation network. By collecting information on the suspected place of infection, existing surveillance systems in industrialized countries may provide timely information for areas of the world without adequate surveillance currently in place. We present the results of a case study using reported cases of Shigella dysenteriae serotype 1 (Sd1 in European travellers to detect "events" of Sd1, related to either epidemic cases or endemic cases in developing countries. Methods We identified papers from a Medline search for reported events of Sd1 from 1940 to 2002. We requested data on shigella infections reported to the responsible surveillance entities in 17 European countries. Reports of Sd1 from the published literature were then compared with Sd1 notified cases among European travellers from 1990 to 2002. Results Prior to a large epidemic in 1999–2000, no cases of Sd1 had been identified in West Africa. However, if travellers had been used as an early warning, Sd1 could have been identified in this region as earlier as 1992. Conclusion This project demonstrates that tracking diseases in European travellers could be used to detect emerging disease in developing countries. This approach should be further tested with a view to the continuous improvement of national health surveillance systems and existing European networks, and may play a significant role in aiding the international public health community to improve infectious disease control.

  13. Attempts to lower the detection limits of heavy metals in standardized grass cultures by using alternative growth substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winter, A.; Mueller, P.; Wagner, G.

    1992-01-01

    In addition to the use of standardized grass cultures (cf. VDI 3792) within the framework of an effect cadastre, grass cultures were tested on two non-contaminated substrates with nutrient solution in the greenhouse and in the open land during different exposure cycles. The results: As compared to the standard cultures on standardized soil, the cultures have the same or a better growth performance and better dry resistance on the artificial substrates; the blind values and the refore the detection limits in particular for cadmium are by far lower; four-week exposure periods with a two-week overlap have an improved information yield for the same amount of work throughout the investigation period as compared to a two-week exposure. Recommendations are derived from the results for a simplified application of the grass culture method in practice. (orig.) [de

  14. Using rapid-scan EPR to improve the detection limit of quantitative EPR by more than one order of magnitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möser, J; Lips, K; Tseytlin, M; Eaton, G R; Eaton, S S; Schnegg, A

    2017-08-01

    X-band rapid-scan EPR was implemented on a commercially available Bruker ELEXSYS E580 spectrometer. Room temperature rapid-scan and continuous-wave EPR spectra were recorded for amorphous silicon powder samples. By comparing the resulting signal intensities the feasibility of performing quantitative rapid-scan EPR is demonstrated. For different hydrogenated amorphous silicon samples, rapid-scan EPR results in signal-to-noise improvements by factors between 10 and 50. Rapid-scan EPR is thus capable of improving the detection limit of quantitative EPR by at least one order of magnitude. In addition, we provide a recipe for setting up and calibrating a conventional pulsed and continuous-wave EPR spectrometer for rapid-scan EPR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [Plant growth with limited water]. [Annual report, December 15, 1992--December 14, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-01

    We used a soybean seedling system to explore the mechanism of growth limitation by water deficiency (low {Psi}{sub W}). Our prior work had show that (low {Psi}{sub W} inhibited plant growth initially because of a physical limitation to water uptake that appeared to result from a decrease in the {Psi}{sub W} gradient feeding water to the enlarging cells. The gradient was shown to originate from cell wall yielding and was altered primarily at the vascular tissue. In the present grant, we reported the detailed shape of the gradient. We also found that growth could mobilize water from mature tissues in the complete absence of external water using the gradient in {Psi}{sub W}. Growth was maintained by this mobilization. After growth has been inhibited a few hours, metabolic changes occur and a 28kD protein accumulates in the wall fraction of the growth-affected cells. In the present grant, we showed that the mRNA for the protein accumulated in a tissue-specific manner similar to that of the protein, and the accumulation was correlated with the growth response. Other investigators working independently with an acid phosphatase found a deduced amino acid sequence similar to that for the 28kD protein we had published. Biochemical tests showed that the 28kD protein and a related 3lkD protein expressed acid phosphatase activity. We found that the acid phosphatase Of the 28kD protein was in the cell walls of intact plants (in addition to being in the cytoplasm). Current work focuses on the role of this protein. Efforts were made to reverse the growth inhibition at low {Phi}{sub W} by treating growing tissues with low pH buffer, but the protons apparently failed to penetrate the cuticle.

  16. Foundations for Improvements to Passive Detection Systems - Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labov, S E; Pleasance, L; Sokkappa, P; Craig, W; Chapline, G; Frank, M; Gronberg, J; Jernigan, J G; Johnson, S; Kammeraad, J; Lange, D; Meyer, A; Nelson, K; Pohl, B; Wright, D; Wurtz, R

    2004-01-01

    This project explores the scientific foundation and approach for improving passive detection systems for plutonium and highly enriched uranium in real applications. Sources of gamma-ray radiation of interest were chosen to represent a range of national security threats, naturally occurring radioactive materials, industrial and medical radiation sources, and natural background radiation. The gamma-ray flux emerging from these sources, which include unclassified criticality experiment configurations as surrogates for nuclear weapons, were modeled in detail. The performance of several types of gamma-ray imaging systems using Compton scattering were modeled and compared. A mechanism was created to model the combine sources and background emissions and have the simulated radiation ''scene'' impinge on a model of a detector. These modeling tools are now being used in various projects to optimize detector performance and model detector sensitivity in complex measuring environments. This study also developed several automated algorithms for isotope identification from gamma-ray spectra and compared these to each other and to algorithms already in use. Verification testing indicates that these alternative isotope identification algorithms produced less false positive and false negative results than the ''GADRAS'' algorithms currently in use. In addition to these algorithms that used binned spectra, a new approach to isotope identification using ''event mode'' analysis was developed. Finally, a technique using muons to detect nuclear material was explored

  17. Hemoglobin Q-Iran detected in family members from Northern Iran: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khorshidi Mohammad

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Hemoglobin Q-Iran (α75Asp→His is an important member of the hemoglobin Q family, molecularly characterized by the replacement of aspartic acid by histidine. The first report of hemoglobin Q-Iran and the nomenclature of this hemoglobinopathy dates back to 1970. Iran is known as a country with a high prevalence of α- and β-thalassemia and different types of hemoglobinopathy. Many of these variants are yet to be identified as the practice of molecular laboratory techniques is limited in this part of the world. Applying such molecular methods, we report the first hemoglobin Q-Iran cases in Northern Iran. Case presentation An unusual band was detected in an isoelectric focusing test and cellulose acetate electrophoresis of a sample from a 22-year-old Iranian man from Mazandaran Province. Capillary zone electrophoresis analysis identified this band as hemoglobin Q. A similar band was also detected in his mother's electrophoresis (38 years, Iranian ethnicity. The cases underwent molecular investigation and the presence of a hemoglobin Q-Iran mutation was confirmed by the amplification refractory mutation system polymerase chain reaction method. Direct conventional sequencing revealed a single guanine to cytosine missense mutation (c.226G > C; GAC >CAC at codon 75 in the α-globin gene in both cases. Conclusion The wide spectrum and high frequency of nondeletional α-globin mutations in Mazandaran Province is remarkable and seem to differ considerably from what has been found in Mediterranean populations. This short communication reports the first cases of patients with hemoglobin Q found in that region.

  18. Limit of detection and threshold for positivity of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention assay for factor VIII inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, C H; Boylan, B; Shapiro, A D; Lentz, S R; Wicklund, B M

    2017-10-01

    Essentials Immunologic methods detect factor VIII (FVIII) antibodies in some inhibitor-negative specimens. Specimens were tested by modified Nijmegen-Bethesda assay (NBA) and fluorescence immunoassay. The NBA with preanalytical heat inactivation detects FVIII inhibitors down to 0.2 NBU. IgG 4 frequency validates the established threshold for positivity of ≥ 0.5 NBU for this NBA. Background The Bethesda assay for measurement of factor VIII inhibitors called for quantification of positive inhibitors by using dilutions producing 25-75% residual activity (RA), corresponding to 0.4-2.0 Bethesda units, with the use of 'more sensitive methods' for samples with RA closer to 100% being recommended. The Nijmegen modification (Nijmegen-Bethesda assay [NBA]) changed the reagents used but not these calculations. Some specimens negative by the NBA have been shown to have FVIII antibodies detectable with sensitive immunologic methods. Objective To examine the performance at very low inhibitor titers of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)-modified NBA (CDC-NBA), which includes preanalytic heat inactivation to liberate bound anti-FVIII antibodies. Methods Specimens with known inhibitors were tested with the CDC-NBA. IgG 4 anti-FVIII antibodies were measured by fluorescence immunoassay (FLI). Results Diluted inhibitors showed linearity below 0.4 Nijmegen-Bethesda units (NBU). With four statistical methods, the limit of detection of the CDC-NBA was determined to be 0.2 NBU. IgG 4 anti-FVIII antibodies, which correlate most strongly with functional inhibitors, were present at rates above the background rate of healthy controls in specimens with titers ≥ 0.2 NBU and showed an increase in frequency from 14.3% at 0.4 NBU to 67% at the established threshold for positivity of 0.5 NBU. Conclusions The CDC-NBA can detect inhibitors down to 0.2 NBU. The FLI, which is more sensitive, demonstrates anti-FVIII IgG 4 in some patients with negative (NBA, supporting the need for

  19. Impact of reduced dose limits on NRC licensed activities. Major issues in the implementation of ICRP/NCRP dose limit recommendations: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meinhold, C.B. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1995-05-01

    This report summarizes information required to estimate, at least qualitatively, the potential impacts of reducing occupational dose limits below those given in 10 CFR 20 (Revised). For this study, a questionnaire was developed and widely distributed to the radiation protection community. The resulting data together with data from existing surveys and sources were used to estimate the impact of three dose-limit options; 10 mSv yr{sup {minus}1} (1 rem yr{sup {minus}1}), 20 mSv yr{sup {minus}1} (2 rem yr{sup {minus}1}), and a combination of an annual limit of 50 mSv yr{sup {minus}1} (5 rem yr{sup {minus}1}) coupled with a cumulative limit, in rem, equal to age in years. Due to the somewhat small number of responses and the lack of data in some specific areas, a working committee of radiation protection experts from a variety of licensees was employed to ensure the exposure data were representative. The following overall conclusions were reached: (1) although 10 mSv yr{sup {minus}1} is a reasonable limit for many licensees, such a limit could be extraordinarily difficult to achieve and potentially destructive to the continued operation of some licensees, such as nuclear power, fuel fabrication, and medicine; (2) twenty mSv yr{sup {minus}1} as a limit is possible for some of these groups, but for others it would prove difficult. (3) fifty mSv yr{sup {minus}1} and age in 10s of mSv appear reasonable for all licensees, both in terms of the lifetime risk of cancer and severe genetic effects to the most highly exposed workers, and the practicality of operation.

  20. Impact of reduced dose limits on NRC licensed activities. Major issues in the implementation of ICRP/NCRP dose limit recommendations: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meinhold, C.B.

    1995-05-01

    This report summarizes information required to estimate, at least qualitatively, the potential impacts of reducing occupational dose limits below those given in 10 CFR 20 (Revised). For this study, a questionnaire was developed and widely distributed to the radiation protection community. The resulting data together with data from existing surveys and sources were used to estimate the impact of three dose-limit options; 10 mSv yr -1 (1 rem yr -1 ), 20 mSv yr -1 (2 rem yr -1 ), and a combination of an annual limit of 50 mSv yr -1 (5 rem yr -1 ) coupled with a cumulative limit, in rem, equal to age in years. Due to the somewhat small number of responses and the lack of data in some specific areas, a working committee of radiation protection experts from a variety of licensees was employed to ensure the exposure data were representative. The following overall conclusions were reached: (1) although 10 mSv yr -1 is a reasonable limit for many licensees, such a limit could be extraordinarily difficult to achieve and potentially destructive to the continued operation of some licensees, such as nuclear power, fuel fabrication, and medicine; (2) twenty mSv yr -1 as a limit is possible for some of these groups, but for others it would prove difficult. (3) fifty mSv yr -1 and age in 10s of mSv appear reasonable for all licensees, both in terms of the lifetime risk of cancer and severe genetic effects to the most highly exposed workers, and the practicality of operation

  1. Upper limits to the detection of ammonia from protoplanetary disks around HL Tauri and L1551-IRS 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Jose F.; Torrelles, Jose M.; Ho, Paul T. P.; Rodriguez, Luis F.; Canto, Jorge

    1993-01-01

    We present NH3(1, 1) and (2, 2) observations of the young stellar sources HL Tau and L1551-IRS 5 using the VLA in its B-configuration, which provides an angular resolution of about 0.4 arcsec (about 50 AU at 140 pc) at 1.3 cm wavelength. Our goal was to detect and resolve circumstellar molecular disks with radius of the order of 100 AU around these two sources. No ammonia emission was detected toward either of them. The 3-sigma levels were 2.7 mJy/beam and 3.9 mJy/beam for HL Tau and L1551-IRS 5, respectively, with a velocity resolution of about 5 km/s. With this nondetection, we estimate upper limits to the mass of the proposed protoplanetary molecular disks (within a radius of 10 AU from the central stars) on the order of 0.02/(X(NH3)/10 exp -8) solar mass for HL Tau and 0.1/(X(NH3)/10 exp -8) solar mass for L1551-IRS 5.

  2. Quantifying Efficacy and Limits of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV Technology for Weed Seedling Detection as Affected by Sensor Resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José M. Peña

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to optimize the application of herbicides in weed-crop systems, accurate and timely weed maps of the crop-field are required. In this context, this investigation quantified the efficacy and limitations of remote images collected with an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV for early detection of weed seedlings. The ability to discriminate weeds was significantly affected by the imagery spectral (type of camera, spatial (flight altitude and temporal (the date of the study resolutions. The colour-infrared images captured at 40 m and 50 days after sowing (date 2, when plants had 5–6 true leaves, had the highest weed detection accuracy (up to 91%. At this flight altitude, the images captured before date 2 had slightly better results than the images captured later. However, this trend changed in the visible-light images captured at 60 m and higher, which had notably better results on date 3 (57 days after sowing because of the larger size of the weed plants. Our results showed the requirements on spectral and spatial resolutions needed to generate a suitable weed map early in the growing season, as well as the best moment for the UAV image acquisition, with the ultimate objective of applying site-specific weed management operations.

  3. Quantifying efficacy and limits of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) technology for weed seedling detection as affected by sensor resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, José M; Torres-Sánchez, Jorge; Serrano-Pérez, Angélica; de Castro, Ana I; López-Granados, Francisca

    2015-03-06

    In order to optimize the application of herbicides in weed-crop systems, accurate and timely weed maps of the crop-field are required. In this context, this investigation quantified the efficacy and limitations of remote images collected with an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) for early detection of weed seedlings. The ability to discriminate weeds was significantly affected by the imagery spectral (type of camera), spatial (flight altitude) and temporal (the date of the study) resolutions. The colour-infrared images captured at 40 m and 50 days after sowing (date 2), when plants had 5-6 true leaves, had the highest weed detection accuracy (up to 91%). At this flight altitude, the images captured before date 2 had slightly better results than the images captured later. However, this trend changed in the visible-light images captured at 60 m and higher, which had notably better results on date 3 (57 days after sowing) because of the larger size of the weed plants. Our results showed the requirements on spectral and spatial resolutions needed to generate a suitable weed map early in the growing season, as well as the best moment for the UAV image acquisition, with the ultimate objective of applying site-specific weed management operations.

  4. Changes in respiratory function impairment following the treatment of severe pulmonary tuberculosis - limitations for the underlying COPD detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radovic, Milan; Ristic, Lidija; Ciric, Zorica; Dinic-Radovic, Violeta; Stankovic, Ivana; Pejcic, Tatjana; Rancic, Milan; Bogdanovic, Dragan

    2016-01-01

    During the treatment phase of active pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB), respiratory function impairment is usually restrictive. This may become obstructive, as a PTB-associated airflow obstruction (AFO) or as a later manifestation of underlying COPD. The aim of the study was to examine the potential causes and risks for AFO development in PTB by exploring the aspects of spirometry limitations and clinical implications for the underlying COPD detection, taking into account various confounding factors. Prospective, nest case-control study on 40 new cases of PTB with initial restrictive respiratory function impairment, diagnosed and treated according to the directly observed treatment short course (DOTS) strategy. From all observed patients, 37.5% of them developed AFO upon the completion of PTB treatment, with significantly increased average of forced vital capacity (%) (Ppulmonary tuberculosis lesions (OR 1.01-1.05 for 95% CI; P=0.02) and sputum conversion rate on culture (OR 1.02-1.68 for 95% CI; P=0.04) as the most significant predictors for the risk of AFO development. AFO upon PTB treatment is a common manifestation of underlying COPD, which mostly occurs later, during the reparative processes in active PTB, even in the absence of major risk factors, such as cigarette smoking and biomass fuel dust exposure. Initial spirometry testing in patients with active PTB is not a sufficient and accurate approach in the detection of underlying COPD, which may lead to their further potential health deterioration.

  5. Advantages and Limitations of Androgen Receptor-Based Methods for Detecting Anabolic Androgenic Steroid Abuse as Performance Enhancing Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Kathy; Yazdi, Tahmineh; Masharani, Umesh; Tyrrell, Blake; Butch, Anthony; Schaufele, Fred

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone (T) and related androgens are performance enhancing drugs (PEDs) abused by some athletes to gain competitive advantage. To monitor unauthorized androgen abuse, doping control programs use mass spectrometry (MS) to detect androgens, synthetic anabolic-androgenic steroids (AASs) and their metabolites in an athlete’s urine. AASs of unknown composition will not be detected by these procedures. Since AASs achieve their anabolic effects by activating the Androgen Receptor (AR), cell-based bioassays that measure the effect of a urine sample on AR activity are under investigation as complementary, pan-androgen detection methods. We evaluated an AR BioAssay as a monitor for androgen activity in urine pre-treated with glucuronidase, which releases T from the inactive T-glucuronide that predominates in urine. AR BioAssay activity levels were expressed as ‘T-equivalent’ concentrations by comparison to a T dose response curve. The T-equivalent concentrations of androgens in the urine of hypogonadal participants supplemented with T (in whom all androgenic activity should arise from T) were quantitatively identical to the T measurements conducted by MS at the UCLA Olympic Analytical Laboratory (0.96 ± 0.22). All 17 AASs studied were active in the AR BioAssay; other steroids were inactive. 12 metabolites of 10 commonly abused AASs, which are used for MS monitoring of AAS doping because of their prolonged presence in urine, had reduced or no AR BioAssay activity. Thus, the AR BioAssay can accurately and inexpensively monitor T, but its ability to monitor urinary AASs will be limited to a period immediately following doping in which the active AASs remain intact. PMID:26998755

  6. Advantages and Limitations of Androgen Receptor-Based Methods for Detecting Anabolic Androgenic Steroid Abuse as Performance Enhancing Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Kathy; Yazdi, Tahmineh; Masharani, Umesh; Tyrrell, Blake; Butch, Anthony; Schaufele, Fred

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone (T) and related androgens are performance enhancing drugs (PEDs) abused by some athletes to gain competitive advantage. To monitor unauthorized androgen abuse, doping control programs use mass spectrometry (MS) to detect androgens, synthetic anabolic-androgenic steroids (AASs) and their metabolites in an athlete's urine. AASs of unknown composition will not be detected by these procedures. Since AASs achieve their anabolic effects by activating the Androgen Receptor (AR), cell-based bioassays that measure the effect of a urine sample on AR activity are under investigation as complementary, pan-androgen detection methods. We evaluated an AR BioAssay as a monitor for androgen activity in urine pre-treated with glucuronidase, which releases T from the inactive T-glucuronide that predominates in urine. AR BioAssay activity levels were expressed as 'T-equivalent' concentrations by comparison to a T dose response curve. The T-equivalent concentrations of androgens in the urine of hypogonadal participants supplemented with T (in whom all androgenic activity should arise from T) were quantitatively identical to the T measurements conducted by MS at the UCLA Olympic Analytical Laboratory (0.96 ± 0.22). All 17 AASs studied were active in the AR BioAssay; other steroids were inactive. 12 metabolites of 10 commonly abused AASs, which are used for MS monitoring of AAS doping because of their prolonged presence in urine, had reduced or no AR BioAssay activity. Thus, the AR BioAssay can accurately and inexpensively monitor T, but its ability to monitor urinary AASs will be limited to a period immediately following doping in which the active AASs remain intact.

  7. Natural activity in Hudson River estuary samples and their influence on the detection limits for gamma emitting radionuclides using NaI gamma spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrenn, M.E.; Jinks, S.M.; Hairr, L.M.; Paschoa, A.S.; Lentsch, J.W.

    1972-01-01

    Sources of natural radioactivity in Hudson River Estuary are described. The technique of analysis for gamma spectrometry of environmental samples is presented and its pros and cons discussed. The distribution of natural radioactivity in water, biota and sediment was reported as well as the role played by the vertical distribution of cesium-137 in sediments as an indicator of the rate of sedimentation. The effect of the presence of natural radionuclides on the detection limits of man-made nuclides in the Hudson River environment is thoroughly examined. The results obtained with a 4-in. sodium iodide well crystal housed in a low background mercury shielding compare favorably with a more sophisticated Ge(Li) system which uses anticoincidence, as far as the analysis of environmental samples is concerned. (U.S.)

  8. Medication incident reporting in residential aged care facilities: Limitations and risks to residents’ safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tariq Amina

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medication incident reporting (MIR is a key safety critical care process in residential aged care facilities (RACFs. Retrospective studies of medication incident reports in aged care have identified the inability of existing MIR processes to generate information that can be used to enhance residents’ safety. However, there is little existing research that investigates the limitations of the existing information exchange process that underpins MIR, despite the considerable resources that RACFs’ devote to the MIR process. The aim of this study was to undertake an in-depth exploration of the information exchange process involved in MIR and identify factors that inhibit the collection of meaningful information in RACFs. Methods The study was undertaken in three RACFs (part of a large non-profit organisation in NSW, Australia. A total of 23 semi-structured interviews and 62 hours of observation sessions were conducted between May to July 2011. The qualitative data was iteratively analysed using a grounded theory approach. Results The findings highlight significant gaps in the design of the MIR artefacts as well as information exchange issues in MIR process execution. Study results emphasized the need to: a design MIR artefacts that facilitate identification of the root causes of medication incidents, b integrate the MIR process within existing information systems to overcome key gaps in information exchange execution, and c support exchange of information that can facilitate a multi-disciplinary approach to medication incident management in RACFs. Conclusions This study highlights the advantages of viewing MIR process holistically rather than as segregated tasks, as a means to identify gaps in information exchange that need to be addressed in practice to improve safety critical processes.

  9. Medication incident reporting in residential aged care facilities: Limitations and risks to residents’ safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Medication incident reporting (MIR) is a key safety critical care process in residential aged care facilities (RACFs). Retrospective studies of medication incident reports in aged care have identified the inability of existing MIR processes to generate information that can be used to enhance residents’ safety. However, there is little existing research that investigates the limitations of the existing information exchange process that underpins MIR, despite the considerable resources that RACFs’ devote to the MIR process. The aim of this study was to undertake an in-depth exploration of the information exchange process involved in MIR and identify factors that inhibit the collection of meaningful information in RACFs. Methods The study was undertaken in three RACFs (part of a large non-profit organisation) in NSW, Australia. A total of 23 semi-structured interviews and 62 hours of observation sessions were conducted between May to July 2011. The qualitative data was iteratively analysed using a grounded theory approach. Results The findings highlight significant gaps in the design of the MIR artefacts as well as information exchange issues in MIR process execution. Study results emphasized the need to: a) design MIR artefacts that facilitate identification of the root causes of medication incidents, b) integrate the MIR process within existing information systems to overcome key gaps in information exchange execution, and c) support exchange of information that can facilitate a multi-disciplinary approach to medication incident management in RACFs. Conclusions This study highlights the advantages of viewing MIR process holistically rather than as segregated tasks, as a means to identify gaps in information exchange that need to be addressed in practice to improve safety critical processes. PMID:23122411

  10. Sonographic detection of intrathyroidal branchial cleft cyst: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hye-Jeong; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Hong, Soon-Won [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-06-15

    We report here on an extremely rare case of an intrathyroidal branchial cleft cyst. Intrathyroidal branchial cleft cyst is rare disease entity and it nonspecific findings on sonography, so the diagnosis of the lesion is very difficult. However, during aspiration, if pus-like materials are aspirated from a thyroid cyst, we should consider the possibility of intrathyroidal branchial cleft cyst in the differential diagnosis.

  11. Sonographic detection of intrathyroidal branchial cleft cyst: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hye-Jeong; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Hong, Soon-Won

    2006-01-01

    We report here on an extremely rare case of an intrathyroidal branchial cleft cyst. Intrathyroidal branchial cleft cyst is rare disease entity and it nonspecific findings on sonography, so the diagnosis of the lesion is very difficult. However, during aspiration, if pus-like materials are aspirated from a thyroid cyst, we should consider the possibility of intrathyroidal branchial cleft cyst in the differential diagnosis

  12. The Climate Science Special Report: Detection and Attribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehner, M. F.

    2017-12-01

    The Climate Science Special Report reiterates previous findings about the human influence on global mean surface air temperature with the statement "…it is extremely likely that human activities, especially emissions of greenhouse gases, are the dominant cause of the observed warming since the mid 20th century. For the warming over the last century, there is no convincing alternative explanation supported by the extent of the observational evidence." This is a statement made with high confidence and supported by multiple lines of evidence. The report also assesses the latest developments in the field of probabilistic extreme event attribution—the quantification of the influence of anthropogenic climate change on individual extreme weather events—with a focus on those recent events within the United States that have been analyzed. Thirty different events within the US are reported on including heat waves, cold snaps, wet seasons, individual storms and droughts. Most but not all of the individual US events studied revealed an influence from human induced changes to the climate system.

  13. [Organic and functional limitations due to milking phenomenon: a clinical case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Henry, Juan Carlos; Rodríguez-Pérez, Francisco Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of milking phenomenon is between 0.6 and 4 % in angiographic series; however, autopsy studies raise the incidence of myocardial bridges up to 85 %. This malformation goes unnoticed in most cases but can have a big impact on personal and professional level. The objective was to present an example of milking phenomenon with disability and professional consequences. Male, 44 years old, bricklayer and farmhand laborer. He referred tonsillectomy and osteoarthritis and being a smoker of 10 cigarettes per day, drinking 2-3 cups of coffee daily and 2-3 glasses of wine at the weekends. The primary care physician referred him to cardiologist with suspicion of arrhythmia. The cardiology service report mentioned electrocardiogram at sinusal rhythm, 90 beats per minute and incomplete right bundle-branch block. At ergonomics test, in the first stage of Bruce protocol, the patient's development of hypertensive crisis suggested a milking phenomenon. Finally, the diagnosis was established by angiographic studies with left common branch, circumflex coronary artery, right coronary artery and anterior descendent artery, without evidence of pathology but it was seen systolic compression on the medial segment. The case was concluded by the disability assessment team, recognizing a total permanent disability with limitations for activities requiring moderate physical efforts. The milking phenomenon diagnosis that could be related with ischemic heart disease is by angiography. Finally, the patient ended with total permanent disability.

  14. Eccentric Macular Hole after Pars Plana Vitrectomy for Epiretinal Membrane Without Internal Limiting Membrane Peeling: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnavou-Xirou, Christina; Xirou, Tina; Kabanarou, Stamatina; Gkizis, Ilias; Velissaris, Stavros; Chatziralli, Irini

    2017-12-01

    Postoperative eccentric macular hole formation is an uncommon complication after pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) without internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling for the treatment of epiretinal membrane (ERM). We present a case of eccentric macular hole formation after PPV for ERM without ILM peeling. A 68-year-old male patient presented with ERM and visual acuity of 6/24 in his left eye. He underwent 23-gauge PPV without ILM peeling for treatment of ERM. One week postoperatively the retina was attached and the epiretinal membrane was successfully removed, while visual acuity was 6/9. One month after PPV, a single eccentric retinal hole below the macula was detected using fundoscopy and subsequently confirmed by optical coherence tomography. At this time the visual acuity was 6/9 and the patient reported no symptoms. No further intervention was attempted and at the 9-month follow-up, the visual acuity and the size of the eccentric macular hole remained stable. Eccentric macular holes can be developed after PPV even without ILM peeling and are usually managed conservatively by observation.

  15. To report or not to report: a psychosocial investigation aimed at improving early detection of Avian Influenza outbreaks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.R.W. Elbers; M.J. Gorgievski-Duijvesteijn (Marjan); K. Zarafshani (Kiumars); G. Koch (Guus)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractSummary: The aim of this study was to identify difficulties and barriers to reporting clinically suspect situations, possibly caused by avian influenza (AI), and to explore possible incentives to reporting such situations, with the ultimate aim of facilitating early detection of AI

  16. Detection and location of multiple events by MARS. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.; Masso, J.F.; Archambeau, C.B.; Savino, J.M.

    1980-09-01

    Seismic data from two explosions was processed using the Systems Science and Software MARS (Multiple Arrival Recognition System) seismic event detector in an effort to determine their relative spatial and temporal separation on the basis of seismic data alone. The explosions were less than 1.0 kilometer apart and were separated by less than 0.5 sec in origin times. The seismic data consisted of nine local accelerograms (r < 1.0 km) and four regional (240 through 400 km) seismograms. The MARS processing clearly indicates the presence of multiple explosions, but the restricted frequency range of the data inhibits accurate time picks and hence limits the precision of the event location

  17. Automatic detection of surface changes on Mars - a status report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidiropoulos, Panagiotis; Muller, Jan-Peter

    2016-10-01

    Orbiter missions have acquired approximately 500,000 high-resolution visible images of the Martian surface, covering an area approximately 6 times larger than the overall area of Mars. This data abundance allows the scientific community to examine the Martian surface thoroughly and potentially make exciting new discoveries. However, the increased data volume, as well as its complexity, generate problems at the data processing stages, which are mainly related to a number of unresolved issues that batch-mode planetary data processing presents. As a matter of fact, the scientific community is currently struggling to scale the common ("one-at-a-time" processing of incoming products by expert scientists) paradigm to tackle the large volumes of input data. Moreover, expert scientists are more or less forced to use complex software in order to extract input information for their research from raw data, even though they are not data scientists themselves.Our work within the STFC and EU FP7 i-Mars projects aims at developing automated software that will process all of the acquired data, leaving domain expert planetary scientists to focus on their final analysis and interpretation. Moreover, after completing the development of a fully automated pipeline that processes automatically the co-registration of high-resolution NASA images to ESA/DLR HRSC baseline, our main goal has shifted to the automated detection of surface changes on Mars. In particular, we are developing a pipeline that uses as an input multi-instrument image pairs, which are processed by an automated pipeline, in order to identify changes that are correlated with Mars surface dynamic phenomena. The pipeline has currently been tested in anger on 8,000 co-registered images and by the time of DPS/EPSC we expect to have processed many tens of thousands of image pairs, producing a set of change detection results, a subset of which will be shown in the presentation.The research leading to these results has received

  18. First report of human parvovirus 4 detection in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asiyabi, Sanaz; Nejati, Ahmad; Shoja, Zabihollah; Shahmahmoodi, Shohreh; Jalilvand, Somayeh; Farahmand, Mohammad; Gorzin, Ali-Akbar; Najafi, Alireza; Haji Mollahoseini, Mostafa; Marashi, Sayed Mahdi

    2016-08-01

    Parvovirus 4 (PARV4) is an emerging and intriguing virus that currently received many attentions. High prevalence of PARV4 infection in high-risk groups such as HIV infected patients highlights the potential clinical outcomes that this virus might have. Molecular techniques were used to determine both the presence and the genotype of circulating PARV4 on previously collected serum samples from 133 HIV infected patients and 120 healthy blood donors. Nested PCR was applied to assess the presence of PARV4 DNA genome in both groups. PARV4 DNA was detected in 35.3% of HIV infected patients compared to 16.6% healthy donors. To genetically characterize the PARV4 genotype in these groups, positive samples were randomly selected and subjected for sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. All PARV4 sequences were found to be genotype 1 and clustered with the reference sequences of PARV4 genotype 1. J. Med. Virol. 88:1314-1318, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Evaluation of the CAARS Infrequency Index for the Detection of Noncredible ADHD Symptom Report in Adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuermaier, Anselm B. M.; Tucha, Lara; Koerts, Janneke; Weisbrod, Matthias; Grabemann, Marco; Zimmermann, Marco; Mette, Christian; Aschenbrenner, Steffen; Tucha, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    The reliance on self-reports in detecting noncredible symptom report of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in adulthood (aADHD) has been questioned due to findings showing that symptoms can easily be feigned on self-report scales. In response, Suhr and colleagues developed an infrequency index for the Conners' Adult ADHD Rating Scale (CII)…

  20. Charged Particle Tracking and Vertex Detection Group summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, G.; Meyer, D.

    1984-09-01

    Charged particle tracking is essential in order to investigate the new physics expected at the SSC. The Tracking Group studied radiation damage and rate limitations to tracking devices, vertex detectors, and central tracking. The Group concluded that silicon strips and large wire tracking chambers with small cells can probably survive at the design luminosity of 10 33 cm -2 sec -1 ; however, the presently designed electronics for silicon strip vertex detectors can withstand a luminosity of only 10 31 cm -2 sec -1 . Wire chambers at a radius of less than about 25 cm can withstand a luminosity of less than or equal to 10 32 cm -2 sec -1 only. Actual tracking and pattern recognition in central tracking chambers at a luminosity of 10 33 cm -2 sec -1 will be very difficult because of multiple interactions within the resolving time of the chambers; detailed simulations are needed in order to decide whether tracking is indeed possible at this luminosity. Scintillating glass fibers are an interesting possibility both for vertex detectors and for central trackers, but much research and development is still needed both on the fibers themselves and on the readout

  1. Subgenomic reporter RNA system for detection of alphavirus infection in mosquitoes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Jordan Steel

    Full Text Available Current methods for detecting real-time alphavirus (Family Togaviridae infection in mosquitoes require the use of recombinant viruses engineered to express a visibly detectable reporter protein. These altered viruses expressing fluorescent proteins, usually from a duplicated viral subgenomic reporter, are effective at marking infection but tend to be attenuated due to the modification of the genome. Additionally, field strains of viruses cannot be visualized using this approach unless infectious clones can be developed to insert a reporter protein. To circumvent these issues, we have developed an insect cell-based system for detecting wild-type sindbis virus infection that uses a virus inducible promoter to express a fluorescent reporter gene only upon active virus infection. We have developed an insect expression system that produces sindbis virus minigenomes containing a subgenomic promoter sequence, which produces a translatable RNA species only when infectious virus is present and providing viral replication proteins. This subgenomic reporter RNA system is able to detect wild-type Sindbis infection in cultured mosquito cells. The detection system is relatively species specific and only detects closely related viruses, but can detect low levels of alphavirus specific replication early during infection. A chikungunya virus detection system was also developed that specifically detects chikungunya virus infection. Transgenic Aedes aegypti mosquito families were established that constitutively express the sindbis virus reporter RNA and were found to only express fluorescent proteins during virus infection. This virus inducible reporter system demonstrates a novel approach for detecting non-recombinant virus infection in mosquito cell culture and in live transgenic mosquitoes.

  2. Limitations in SELDI-TOF MS whole serum proteomic profiling with IMAC surface to specifically detect colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Qi; Gu, Jin; Shen, Jing; Li, Zhen-fu; Jie, Jian-zheng; Wang, Wen-yue; Wang, Jin; Zhang, Zhong-tao; Li, Zhi-xia; Yan, Li

    2009-01-01

    Surface enhanced laser desorption and ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS) analysis on serum samples was reported to be able to detect colorectal cancer (CRC) from normal or control patients. We carried out a validation study of a SELDI-TOF MS approach with IMAC surface sample processing to identify CRC. A retrospective cohort of 338 serum samples including 154 CRCs, 67 control cancers and 117 non-cancerous conditions was profiled using SELDI-TOF-MS. No CRC 'specific' classifier was found. However, a classifier consisting of two protein peaks separates cancer from non-cancerous conditions with high accuracy. In this study, the SELDI-TOF-MS-based protein expression profiling approach did not perform to identify CRC. However, this technique is promising in distinguishing patients with cancer from a non-cancerous population; it may be useful for monitoring recurrence of CRC after treatment

  3. Radiological pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis associated to limited cutaneous systemic sclerosis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassoun, D; Dirou, S; Arrigoni, P P; Durant, C; Hamidou, M; Néel, A; Agard, C

    2018-05-18

    Pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis (PPFE) is a very rare interstitial lung disease (ILD) characterized by progressive fibrotic lesions of the visceral pleura and the sub-pleural parenchyma, affecting predominantly the upper lobes. PPFE may occur in different contextes like bone marrow or lung transplantations, but also in the context of telomeropathy with mutations of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), telomerase RNA component (TERC) or regulator of telomere elongation helicase 1 (RTEL1) genes. PPFE-like lesions have recently been described in patients with connective tissue disease (CTD)-related ILD. We report here the first detailed case of PPFE associated to systemic sclerosis (SSc) in a woman free of telomeropathy mutations. A caucasian 46 year old woman was followed for SSc in a limited form with anti-centromere Ab since 1998, and seen in 2008 for a routine visit. Her SSc was stable, and she had no respiratory signs. Pulmonary function tests showed an isolated decreased cTLCO at 55.9% (of predicted value). Cardiac ultrasonography was normal. Thoracic CT-scan showed upper lobes predominant mild and focal pleural and subpleural thickenings, suggestive of PPFE, with a slight worsening at 8 years of follow-up. She remained clinically stable. Biology only found a moderate and stable peripheral thrombocytopenia, and sequencing analysis did not find any mutations in TERT and TERC genes. ILD is frequent in SSc but isolated PPFE has never been described so far. In our case, PPFE is not related to telomeropathy, has indolent outcome and seems to have good prognosis. PPFE might be an extremely rare form of SSc-related ILD, although a fortuitous association remains possible.

  4. The Fatty Liver Index has limited utility for the detection and quantification of hepatic steatosis in obese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borman, Meredith A; Ladak, Farah; Crotty, Pam; Pollett, Aaron; Kirsch, Richard; Pomier-Layrargues, Gilles; Beaton, Melanie; Duarte-Rojo, Andres; Elkashab, Magdy; Myers, Robert P

    2013-06-01

    Noninvasive tools for the detection of hepatic steatosis are needed. The Fatty Liver Index (FLI), which includes body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, triglycerides, and γ-glutamyl-transferase, has been proposed as a screening tool for fatty liver. Our objective was to validate the FLI for the detection and quantification of hepatic steatosis in an obese population. Patients with chronic liver disease and BMI ≥ 28 kg/m(2) underwent liver biopsy and FLI determination. FLI performance for diagnosing steatosis compared with biopsy was assessed using areas under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUROCs), and a novel model for the prediction of significant steatosis (≥5 %) was derived. Among 250 included patients, 65 % were male, and the median BMI was 33 kg/m(2); 48 % had nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and 77 % had significant (≥5 %) steatosis. The FLI was weakly correlated with the percentage (ρ = 0.25, p = 0.0001) and grade of steatosis (ρ = 0.28, p steatosis (91 vs. 80 with steatosis; p = 0.0001) and the AUROC for this outcome was 0.67 (95 % CI 0.59-0.76). At an optimal FLI cut-off of 79, the FLI was 81 % sensitive and 49 % specific, and had positive and negative predictive values of 84 and 43 %, respectively. A novel index including triglycerides, glucose, alkaline phosphatase, and BMI outperformed the FLI for predicting significant steatosis [AUROCs 0.78 vs. 0.68; p = 0.009 (n = 247)]. In obese patients, the FLI is a poor predictor of significant steatosis and has limited utility for steatosis quantification compared with liver histology. A novel index including triglycerides, glucose, alkaline phosphatase, and BMI may be useful, but requires validation.

  5. SERS activity with tenfold detection limit optimization on a type of nanoporous AAO-based complex multilayer substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Chaofan; Wang, Kaige; Wang, Shuang; Ren, Junying; Bai, Xiaohong; Bai, Jintao

    2016-03-01

    Most of SERS applications are constricted by heterogeneous hotspots and aggregates of nanostructure, which result in low sensitivity and poor reproducibility of characteristic signals. This work intends to introduce SERS properties of a type of SERS-active substrate, Au-CuCl2-AAO, which is innovatively developed on a porous anodic alumina oxide (AAO) template. Spectral measuring results of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) on this substrate optimized by controlling morphology and gold thickness showed that enhancement factor (2.30 × 107) and detection limit (10-10 M) were both improved and represented better performance than its template AAO. Homogenous hot spots across the region of interest were achieved by scanning SERS intensity distribution for the band at 1505 cm-1 in 5 × 5 μm2 area. Furthermore, the promising SERS activity of the flower-patterned substrate was theoretically explained through simulation of the electromagnetic field distribution. In addition, this SERS substrate is proposed for applications within the field of chemical and biochemical analyses.Most of SERS applications are constricted by heterogeneous hotspots and aggregates of nanostructure, which result in low sensitivity and poor reproducibility of characteristic signals. This work intends to introduce SERS properties of a type of SERS-active substrate, Au-CuCl2-AAO, which is innovatively developed on a porous anodic alumina oxide (AAO) template. Spectral measuring results of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) on this substrate optimized by controlling morphology and gold thickness showed that enhancement factor (2.30 × 107) and detection limit (10-10 M) were both improved and represented better performance than its template AAO. Homogenous hot spots across the region of interest were achieved by scanning SERS intensity distribution for the band at 1505 cm-1 in 5 × 5 μm2 area. Furthermore, the promising SERS activity of the flower-patterned substrate was theoretically explained through simulation of the

  6. Automatic gender detection of dream reports: A promising approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Christina; Amini, Reza; De Koninck, Joseph

    2016-08-01

    A computer program was developed in an attempt to differentiate the dreams of males from females. Hypothesized gender predictors were based on previous literature concerning both dream content and written language features. Dream reports from home-collected dream diaries of 100 male (144 dreams) and 100 female (144 dreams) adolescent Anglophones were matched for equal length. They were first scored with the Hall and Van de Castle (HVDC) scales and quantified using DreamSAT. Two male and two female undergraduate students were asked to read all dreams and predict the dreamer's gender. They averaged a pairwise percent correct gender prediction of 75.8% (κ=0.516), while the Automatic Analysis showed that the computer program's accuracy was 74.5% (κ=0.492), both of which were higher than chance of 50% (κ=0.00). The prediction levels were maintained when dreams containing obvious gender identifiers were eliminated and integration of HVDC scales did not improve prediction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Exploiting Novel Radiation-Induced Electromagnetic Material Changes for Remote Detection and Monitoring: Final Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Exploiting Novel Radiation -Induced Electromagnetic Material Changes for Remote Detection and Monitoring: Final Progress Report Distribution...assess the effects of ionizing radiation on at least three classes of electromagnetic materials. The proposed approach for radiation detection was...that was desired to be monitored remotely. Microwave or low millimeter wave electromagnetic radiation would be used to interrogate the device

  8. Discussing study limitations in reports of biomedical studies-the need for more transparency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Puhan, Milo A.; Akl, Elie A.; Bryant, Dianne; Xie, Feng; Apolone, Giovanni; ter Riet, Gerben

    2012-01-01

    Unbiased and frank discussion of study limitations by authors represents a crucial part of the scientific discourse and progress. In today's culture of publishing many authors or scientific teams probably balance 'utter honesty' when discussing limitations of their research with the risk of being

  9. Multiplex real-time quantitative PCR, microscopy and rapid diagnostic immuno-chromatographic tests for the detection of Plasmodium spp: performance, limit of detection analysis and quality assurance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralevski Filip

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate laboratory diagnosis of malaria species in returning travelers is paramount in the treatment of this potentially fatal infectious disease. Materials and methods A total of 466 blood specimens from returning travelers to Africa, Asia, and South/Central America with suspected malaria infection were collected between 2007 and 2009 at the reference public health laboratory. These specimens were assessed by reference microscopy, multipex real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR, and two rapid diagnostic immuno-chromatographic tests (ICT in a blinded manner. Key clinical laboratory parameters such as limit of detection (LOD analysis on clinical specimens by parasite stage, inter-reader variability of ICTs, staffing implications, quality assurance and cost analysis were evaluated. Results QPCR is the most analytically sensitive method (sensitivity 99.41%, followed by CARESTART (sensitivity 88.24%, and BINAXNOW (sensitivity 86.47% for the diagnosis of malaria in returning travelers when compared to reference microscopy. However, microscopy was unable to specifically identify Plasmodia spp. in 18 out of 170 positive samples by QPCR. Moreover, the 17 samples that were negative by microscopy and positive by QPCR were also positive by ICTs. Quality assurance was achieved for QPCR by exchanging a blinded proficiency panel with another reference laboratory. The Kappa value of inter-reader variability among three readers for BINAXNOW and CARESTART was calculated to be 0.872 and 0.898 respectively. Serial dilution studies demonstrated that the QPCR cycle threshold correlates linearly with parasitemia (R2 = 0.9746 in a clinically relevant dynamic range and retains a LOD of 11 rDNA copies/μl for P. falciparum, which was several log lower than reference microscopy and ICTs. LOD for QPCR is affected not only by parasitemia but the parasite stage distribution of each clinical specimen. QPCR was approximately 6-fold more

  10. Role, limitations and place of medical imaging in the prevention, screening and early detection of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamarque, J.L.; Pujol, J.; Rodiere, M.J.; Laurent, J.C.; Prat, X.; Martin, J.M.; Khodr, A.

    1986-01-01

    For prevention and screening of breast cancer the triad of CLINICAL SIGNS - RADIOLOGY - CYTOLOGY constitutes the most efficient and least costly method. If properly done, clinical examinations can predict the benignity or malignancy of a lesion with an accuracy rate of 80%. While self-examinations are of interest, they cannot replace a proper medical examination. Self-palpation may cause anxiety and cancerophobia both of which may have an as yet poorly understood effect on benign mastopathis. Mammography is currently the most reliable and specific imaging technique. While it can identify stage 0 lesions, it reaches its technical limits in patients with dense breast tissue. It is reserved for high-risk patients. Aspiration cytology is an excellent technique for evaluating areas with a diameter of 1 cm and more. While it cannot diagnose breast cancers in a very early stage, it helps avoid delays in the diagnosis by providing supportive evidence for radiological and clinical findings. Recent pathologic studies showed cancers to develop most often in the presence of proliferative epithelial lesions. This would seem to suggest the need for cytohistologic typing, which can be expected to pick out high-risk patients effectively, to ensure a truly early detection and diagnosis of cancer and to provide for a meaningful prevention. (Author)

  11. Evaluation of the odd-even effect in limits of detection for electron microprobe analysis of natural minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Surendra P., E-mail: spv@cie.unam.mx [Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Centro de Investigacion en Energia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Priv. Xochicalco s/no., Col Centro, A.P. 34, Temixco, Mor. 62580 (Mexico); Pandarinath, Kailasa [Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Centro de Investigacion en Energia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Priv. Xochicalco s/no., Col Centro, A.P. 34, Temixco, Mor. 62580 (Mexico); Velasco-Tapia, Fernando [Facultad de Ciencias de la Tierra, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Carretera Linares-Cerro Prieto km. 8, Linares, N.L. 67700 (Mexico); Rodriguez-Rios, Rodolfo [Facultad de Ingenieria e Instituto de Geologia, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Av. Dr. Manuel Nava No. 8, Zona Universitaria, San Luis Potosi, S.L.P. 78240 (Mexico)

    2009-04-13

    Limit of detection (LOD), being a fundamental quality parameter for analytical techniques, has been recently investigated and a systematic behavior has been observed for most odd-even element pairs for many techniques. However, to the best of our knowledge very few LOD data are available in published literature for electron microprobe analysis; these consist of three papers, two being on rare-earth elements and the third covering a large number of elements of atomic number between 21 and 92. These data confirm the systematic behavior of LODs for many odd-even pairs. To initiate to full this gap, we determined LODs for several major rock-forming chemical elements from Na to Fe with atomic numbers between 11 and 26, during the microprobe analysis of common minerals (olivine, plagioclase, pyroxene, amphibole, quartz, and opaques) in volcanic rocks. The odd-even effect of nuclear stability seems to be present in LOD data for most odd-even pairs investigated. Nevertheless, the experimental strategy concerning the reference materials, calibration procedure, and blank measurements, should be substantially modified to better evaluate the systematic behavior of LOD values in microprobe analysis.

  12. Evaluation of the odd-even effect in limits of detection for electron microprobe analysis of natural minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, Surendra P.; Pandarinath, Kailasa; Velasco-Tapia, Fernando; Rodriguez-Rios, Rodolfo

    2009-01-01

    Limit of detection (LOD), being a fundamental quality parameter for analytical techniques, has been recently investigated and a systematic behavior has been observed for most odd-even element pairs for many techniques. However, to the best of our knowledge very few LOD data are available in published literature for electron microprobe analysis; these consist of three papers, two being on rare-earth elements and the third covering a large number of elements of atomic number between 21 and 92. These data confirm the systematic behavior of LODs for many odd-even pairs. To initiate to full this gap, we determined LODs for several major rock-forming chemical elements from Na to Fe with atomic numbers between 11 and 26, during the microprobe analysis of common minerals (olivine, plagioclase, pyroxene, amphibole, quartz, and opaques) in volcanic rocks. The odd-even effect of nuclear stability seems to be present in LOD data for most odd-even pairs investigated. Nevertheless, the experimental strategy concerning the reference materials, calibration procedure, and blank measurements, should be substantially modified to better evaluate the systematic behavior of LOD values in microprobe analysis.

  13. Morpholinoethanesulfonic acid-based buffer system for improved detection limit and stability of the fluoride ion selective electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fouskaki, M.; Sotiropoulou, S.; Koci, M.; Chaniotakis, N.A.

    2002-01-01

    The zwitterionic morpholinoethanesulfonic acid (MES) is used as the basis for the development of a new total ionic strength adjustor buffer system for improving the analytical characteristics of fluoride sensor. Impedance analysis, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and dissolution studies of the LaF 3 crystal, together with the potential stability and sensor sensitivity over time have aided in the elucidation of the processes that take place at the surface of the LaF 3 crystal, that seem to determine the sensor behaviour. Even though AFM analysis shows that both buffers used (MES or acetate) cause a similar increase in surface roughness, the data from the other studies suggest that in the first case there is a reversible ion exchange process at the interface, while in the second case this process is irreversible, leading to fast poisoning of the crystal surface. The use of 0.5 M MES and NaCl buffer adjusted to pH 5.50 allows for the continuous operation of the sensor under flow injection analysis conditions for at least 5 days with sensitivity of 60 mV per decade [F - ], detection limit of 2.1x10 -7 M [F - ] and fast response time

  14. Time-dependent, low-dose reporting limit for dosimeters that are taken home at the end of the workday

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonder, E.

    1994-01-01

    In routine personnel dosimetry, it is usual to report doses only where th occupational dose (measured dose with background subtracted) is greater than previously determined reporting limit. The reporting limit, although se administratively, should be justified by an assessment of the errors inherent in th personnel and background dose measurements, and estimates of the probability that a zero exposure will yield a dosimeter response equal to the reporting limit. For background subtraction and reporting limits, it was realized that the source of low-dose uncertainty is very much dependent on whether dosimeters are held in racks at the work site or remain with the employee. The External dosimetry Program for the DOE facilities at Oak Ridge, Tennessee, is operated such that dosimeters are taken home by the employee at the end of each workday. This report is a summary measurements of background radiation in a variety of home locations, and calculations of the effect of the variation of this background on the uncertainty low-level occupational dose and on the reporting level. When dosimeters are stored at a given location (e.g., the facility gate), it theoretically possible to determine the background there to any desired accuracy; the errors in occupational dose are then those due to measurement noise and dosimeter calibration. However, when different dosimeters are stored in different homes, th difference in background between a particular location and the average for a locations appears as an added uncertainty in the occupational dose. Since this difference is not random, but fixed for a given location, the error due to this difference increases linearly with assignment time. From the background measurements, time-dependent values of the standard deviation of occupational do and critical levels are derived and used to define an expression for the reporting limit

  15. Limiting factor analysis of high availability nuclear plants (boiling water reactors). Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frederick, L.G.; Brady, R.M.; Shor, S.W.W.; McCusker, J.T.; Alden, W.M.; Kovacs, S.

    1979-08-01

    The pertinent results are presented of a 16-month study conducted for Electric Power Research Institute by General Electric Company, Bechtel Power Corporation, and Philadelphia Electric Company. The study centered around the Peach Bottom 2 Atomic Power Station, but also included limited study of operations at 20 additional operating boiling water reactors. The purpose of the study was to identify and evaluate key factors limiting plant availability, and to identify potential improvements for eliminating or alleviating those limitations. The key limiting factors were found to be refueling activities; activities related to the reactor fuel; reactor scrams; activities related to 20 operating systems or major components; delays due to radiation, turbid water during refueling operations, facilities/working conditions, and dirt/foreign material; and general maintenance/repair of valves and piping. Existing programs to reduce the effect on plant unavailability are identified, and suggestions for further action are made

  16. Measuring Disability in Population Based Surveys: The Interrelationship between Clinical Impairments and Reported Functional Limitations in Cameroon and India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mactaggart, Islay; Kuper, Hannah; Murthy, G V S; Oye, Joseph; Polack, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between two distinct measures of disability: self-reported functional limitations and objectively-screened clinical impairments. We undertook an all age population-based survey of disability in two areas: North-West Cameroon (August/October 2013) and Telangana State, India (Feb/April 2014). Participants were selected for inclusion via two-stage cluster randomised sampling (probability proportionate to size cluster selection and compact segment sampling within clusters). Disability was defined as the presence of self-reported functional limitations across eight domains, or presence of moderate or greater clinical impairments. Clinical impairment screening comprised of visual acuity testing for vision impairment, pure tone audiometry for hearing impairment, musculoskeletal functioning assessment for musculoskeletal impairment, reported seizure history for epilepsy and reported symptoms of clinical depression (depression adults only). Information was collected using structured questionnaires, observations and examinations. Self-reported disability prevalence was 5.9% (95% CI 4.7-7.4) and 7.5% (5.9-9.4) in Cameroon and India respectively. The prevalence of moderate or greater clinical impairments in the same populations were 8.4% (7.5-9.4) in Cameroon and 10.5% (9.4-11.7) in India. Overall disability prevalence (self-report and/or screened positive to a moderate or greater clinical impairment) was 10.5% in Cameroon and 12.2% in India, with limited overlap between the sub-populations identified using the two types of tools. 33% of participants in Cameroon identified to have a disability, and 45% in India, both reported functional limitations and screened positive to objectively-screened impairments, whilst the remainder were identified via one or other tool only. A large proportion of people with moderate or severe clinical impairments did not self-report functional difficulties despite reporting participation restrictions. Tools to

  17. Simultaneous estimation of vitamin K1 and heparin with low limit of detection using cascaded channels fiber optic surface plasmon resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabassum, Rana; Gupta, Banshi D

    2016-12-15

    We report an approach for the simultaneous estimation of vitamin K1 (VK1) and heparin via cascaded channel multianalyte sensing probe employing fiber optic surface plasmon resonance technique. Cladding from two well separated portions of the fiber is removed and are respectively coated with thin films of silver (channel-1) and copper (channel-2). The nanohybrid of multiwalled carbon nanotube in chitosan is fabricated over silver layer for the sensing of VK1 whereas core shell nanostructure of polybrene@ZnO is coated over copper layer for the sensing of heparin. Spectral interrogation method is used for the characterization of the sensor. Analyte selectivity of both the channels is performed by carrying out experiments using independent solutions of VK1 and heparin. Experiments performed on the solution of the mixture of VK1 and heparin show red shifts in both the channels on changing the concentration of both the analytes in the mixture. The operating range of both VK1 and heparin is from 0 to 10(-3)g/l. The limit of detection of the sensor is 2.66×10(-4)µg/l and 2.88×10(-4)µg/l for VK1 and heparin respectively which are lower than the reported ones. The additional advantages of the present sensor are low cost, possibility of online monitoring and remote sensing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Multivariate estimation of the limit of detection by orthogonal partial least squares in temperature-modulated MOX sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgués, Javier; Marco, Santiago

    2018-08-17

    Metal oxide semiconductor (MOX) sensors are usually temperature-modulated and calibrated with multivariate models such as partial least squares (PLS) to increase the inherent low selectivity of this technology. The multivariate sensor response patterns exhibit heteroscedastic and correlated noise, which suggests that maximum likelihood methods should outperform PLS. One contribution of this paper is the comparison between PLS and maximum likelihood principal components regression (MLPCR) in MOX sensors. PLS is often criticized by the lack of interpretability when the model complexity increases beyond the chemical rank of the problem. This happens in MOX sensors due to cross-sensitivities to interferences, such as temperature or humidity and non-linearity. Additionally, the estimation of fundamental figures of merit, such as the limit of detection (LOD), is still not standardized in multivariate models. Orthogonalization methods, such as orthogonal projection to latent structures (O-PLS), have been successfully applied in other fields to reduce the complexity of PLS models. In this work, we propose a LOD estimation method based on applying the well-accepted univariate LOD formulas to the scores of the first component of an orthogonal PLS model. The resulting LOD is compared to the multivariate LOD range derived from error-propagation. The methodology is applied to data extracted from temperature-modulated MOX sensors (FIS SB-500-12 and Figaro TGS 3870-A04), aiming at the detection of low concentrations of carbon monoxide in the presence of uncontrolled humidity (chemical noise). We found that PLS models were simpler and more accurate than MLPCR models. Average LOD values of 0.79 ppm (FIS) and 1.06 ppm (Figaro) were found using the approach described in this paper. These values were contained within the LOD ranges obtained with the error-propagation approach. The mean LOD increased to 1.13 ppm (FIS) and 1.59 ppm (Figaro) when considering validation samples

  19. Temporal limits of selection and memory encoding: A comparison of whole versus partial report in rapid serial visual presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieuwenstein, Mark R; Potter, Mary C

    2006-06-01

    People often fail to recall the second of two visual targets presented within 500 ms in rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP). This effect is called the attentional blink. One explanation of the attentional blink is that processes involved in encoding the first target into memory are slow and capacity limited. Here, however, we show that the attentional blink should be ascribed to attentional selection, not consolidation of the first target. Rapid sequences of six letters were presented, and observers had to report either all the letters (whole-report condition) or a subset of the letters (partial-report condition). Selection in partial report was based on color (e.g., report the two red letters) or identity (i.e., report all letters from a particular letter onward). In both cases, recall of letters presented shortly after the first selected letter was impaired, whereas recall of the corresponding letters was relatively accurate with whole report.

  20. Methodology applied by the Petroleum, Natural Gas and Bio fuels National Agency for detection of cartels - their limits and perspectives; Metodology adotada pela Agencia Nacional do Petroleo, Gas Natural e Biocombustiveis para detectecao de carteis - seus limites e perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedra, Douglas Pereira; Sales, Orlando de Araujo Vilela; Baran, Patricia Huguenin; Paiva, Rodrigo Milao de [Agencia Nacional do Petroleo, Gas Natural e Biocombustiveis (ANP), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Regulacao de Petroleo, seus Derivados, Alcool Combustivel e Gas Natural; Bicalho, Lucia Maria de Oliveira Navegantes [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (PPE/COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Planejamento Energetico

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents the present methodology used by the Defense Competition Coordination of the Petroleum National Agency for detection of vestiges of cartels in the Brazilian fuel market, their limits, in view of the instruments presently at the disposal of the Agency and perspectives of modification from the eventual availability of new instruments.

  1. Text mining to detect indications of fraud in annual reports worldwide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fissette, Marcia Valentine Maria

    2017-01-01

    The research described in this thesis examined the contribution of text analysis to detecting indications of fraud in the annual reports of companies worldwide. A total of 1,727 annual reports have been collected, of which 402 are of the years and companies in which fraudulent activities took place,

  2. Interaction of cosmic ray muons with spent nuclear fuel dry casks and determination of lower detection limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatzidakis, S., E-mail: schatzid@purdue.edu; Choi, C.K.; Tsoukalas, L.H.

    2016-08-21

    The potential non-proliferation monitoring of spent nuclear fuel sealed in dry casks interacting continuously with the naturally generated cosmic ray muons is investigated. Treatments on the muon RMS scattering angle by Moliere, Rossi-Greisen, Highland and, Lynch-Dahl were analyzed and compared with simplified Monte Carlo simulations. The Lynch-Dahl expression has the lowest error and appears to be appropriate when performing conceptual calculations for high-Z, thick targets such as dry casks. The GEANT4 Monte Carlo code was used to simulate dry casks with various fuel loadings and scattering variance estimates for each case were obtained. The scattering variance estimation was shown to be unbiased and using Chebyshev's inequality, it was found that 10{sup 6} muons will provide estimates of the scattering variances that are within 1% of the true value at a 99% confidence level. These estimates were used as reference values to calculate scattering distributions and evaluate the asymptotic behavior for small variations on fuel loading. It is shown that the scattering distributions between a fully loaded dry cask and one with a fuel assembly missing initially overlap significantly but their distance eventually increases with increasing number of muons. One missing fuel assembly can be distinguished from a fully loaded cask with a small overlapping between the distributions which is the case of 100,000 muons. This indicates that the removal of a standard fuel assembly can be identified using muons providing that enough muons are collected. A Bayesian algorithm was developed to classify dry casks and provide a decision rule that minimizes the risk of making an incorrect decision. The algorithm performance was evaluated and the lower detection limit was determined.

  3. Application and Limitations of GPS Radio Occultation (GPS-RO) Data for Atmospheric Boundary Layer Height Detection over the Arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganeshan, M.; Wu, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    Due to recent changes in the Arctic environment, it is important to monitor the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) properties over the Arctic Ocean, especially to explore the variability in ABL clouds (such as sensitivity and feedback to sea ice loss). For example, radiosonde and satellite observations of the Arctic ABL height (and low-cloud cover) have recently suggested a positive response to sea ice loss during October that may not occur during the melt season (June-September). Owing to its high vertical and spatiotemporal resolution, an independent ABL height detection algorithm using GPS Radio Occultation (GPS-RO) refractivity in the Arctic is explored. Similar GPS-RO algorithms developed previously typically define the level of the most negative moisture gradient as the ABL height. This definition is favorable for subtropical oceans where a stratocumulus-topped ABL is often capped by a layer of sharp moisture lapse rate (coincident with the temperature inversion). The Arctic Ocean is also characterized by stratocumulus cloud cover, however, the specific humidity does not frequently decrease in the ABL capping inversion. The use of GPS-RO refractivity for ABL height retrieval therefore becomes more complex. During winter months (December-February), when the total precipitable water in the troposphere is a minimum, a fairly straightforward algorithm for ABL height retrieval is developed. The applicability and limitations of this method for other seasons (Spring, Summer, Fall) is determined. The seasonal, interannual and spatial variability in the GPS-derived ABL height over the Arctic Ocean, as well as its relation to the underlying surface (ice vs. water), is investigated. The GPS-RO profiles are also explored for the evidence of low-level moisture transport in the cold Arctic environment.

  4. Improvements on Near Real Time Detection of Volcanic Ash Emissions for Emergency Monitoring with Limited Satellite Bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torge Steensen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Quantifying volcanic ash emissions syneruptively is an important task for the global aviation community. However, due to the near real time nature of volcano monitoring, many parameters important for accurate ash mass estimates cannot be obtained easily. Even when using the best possible estimates of those parameters, uncertainties associated with the ash masses remain high, especially if the satellite data is only available in the traditional 10.8 and 12.0 μm bands. To counteract this limitation, we developed a quantitative comparison between the ash extents in satellite and model data. The focus is the manual cloud edge definition based on the available satellite reverse absorption (RA data as well as other knowledge like pilot reports or ground-based observations followed by an application of the Volcanic Ash Retrieval on the defined subset with an RA threshold of 0 K. This manual aspect, although subjective to the experience of the observer, can show a significant improvement as it provides the ability to highlight ash that otherwise would be obscured by meteorological clouds or, by passing over different surfaces with unaccounted temperatures, might be lost entirely and thus remains undetectable for an automated satellite approach. We show comparisons to Volcanic Ash Transport and Dispersion models and outline a quantitative match as well as percentages of overestimates based on satellite or dispersion model data which can be converted into a level of reliability for near real time volcano monitoring. 

  5. Creating a Successful Citizen Science Model to Detect and Report Invasive Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Travis; Waitt, Damon

    2011-01-01

    The Invaders of Texas program is a successful citizen science program in which volunteers survey and monitor invasive plants throughout Texas. Invasive plants are being introduced at alarming rates, and our limited knowledge about their distribution is a major cause for concern. The Invaders of Texas program trains citizen scientists to detect the…

  6. 10 CFR 51.49 - Environmental report-limited work authorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... reduce environmental impacts. (b) Phased application for limited work authorization and construction... where an environmental impact statement was prepared, but the facility construction was not completed... Commission has previously prepared an environmental impact statement for the construction and operation of a...

  7. Contamination limits for real and personal property. Progress report, July--December 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Healy, J.W.; Wenzel, W.J.

    1976-05-01

    Studies of surface contamination continued with an attempt to apply previous concepts. Revision of the proposed limit for plutonium in soils was started with major efforts on wind resuspension and the use of data on environmental lead to estimate intake by children

  8. Nucleic Acid-Based Detection and Identification of Bacterial and Fungal Plant Pathogens - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kingsley, Mark T.

    2001-03-13

    The threat to American interests from terrorists is not limited to attacks against humans. Terrorists might seek to inflict damage to the U.S. economy by attacking our agricultural sector. Infection of commodity crops by bacterial or fungal crop pathogens could adversely impact U.S. agriculture, either directly from damage to crops or indirectly from damage to our ability to export crops suspected of contamination. Recognizing a terrorist attack against U.S. agriculture, to be able to prosecute the terrorists, is among the responsibilities of the members of Hazardous Material Response Unit (HMRU) of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). Nucleic acid analysis of plant pathogen strains by the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification techniques is a powerful method for determining the exact identity of pathogens, as well as their possible region of origin. This type of analysis, however, requires that PCR assays be developed specific to each particular pathogen strain, and analysis protocols developed that are specific to the particular instrument used for detection. The objectives of the work described here were threefold: 1) to assess the potential terrorist threat to U.S. agricultural crops, 2) to determine whether suitable assays exist to monitor that threat, and 3) where assays are needed for priority plant pathogen threats, to modify or develop those assays for use by specialists at the HMRU. The assessment of potential threat to U.S. commodity crops and the availability of assays for those threats were described in detail in the Technical Requirements Document (9) and will be summarized in this report. This report addresses development of specific assays identified in the Technical Requirements Document, and offers recommendations for future development to ensure that HMRU specialists will be prepared with the PCR assays they need to protect against the threat of economic terrorism.

  9. Self-reported preclinical mobility limitation and fall history as predictors of future falls in older women: prospective cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mänty, Minna Regina; Heinonen, A; Viljanen, A

    2010-01-01

    mobility limitation. Fall history was recalled for previous 12 months and dichotomized. The incidence of future falls over 12 months was followed up with fall calendars. RESULTS: During the fall follow-up, a total of 440 falls were reported by 201 participants. Among those with fall history, women...

  10. Exploration of new perspectives and limitations in Agrobacterium mediated gene transfer technology. Progress report, [June 1, 1992-- May 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marton, L.

    1994-12-31

    This report describes progress aimed at constructing gene-transfer technology for Nicotiana plumbaginifolia. Most actual effort as described herein has so far been directed at exploring new perspectives and limitations in Agrobacterium mediated gene transfer. Accomplishments are described using a core homologous gene targeting vector.

  11. Innovative methods for calculation of freeway travel time using limited data : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Description: Travel time estimations created by processing of simulated freeway loop detector data using proposed method have been compared with travel times reported from VISSIM model. An improved methodology was proposed to estimate freeway corrido...

  12. Screening for genital tuberculosis in a limited resource country: case report

    OpenAIRE

    Namani, Sadie; Qehaja-Bu?aj, Emine; Namani, Diell?za

    2017-01-01

    Background Screening for benign or malignant process of pelvis in young females is a challenge for a physician in a limited resource country. Tuberculosis should be always considered in the differential diagnosis of a pelvic mass in countries with high prevalence of tuberculosis. Negative results of analysis of peritoneal fluid for acid-fast staining, late cultures, and unavailability of new diagnostics methods such as polymerase chain reaction and adenosine deaminase of the aspirated fluid f...

  13. Methane Flux Estimation from Point Sources using GOSAT Target Observation: Detection Limit and Improvements with Next Generation Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuze, A.; Suto, H.; Kataoka, F.; Shiomi, K.; Kondo, Y.; Crisp, D.; Butz, A.

    2017-12-01

    Atmospheric methane (CH4) has an important role in global radiative forcing of climate but its emission estimates have larger uncertainties than carbon dioxide (CO2). The area of anthropogenic emission sources is usually much smaller than 100 km2. The Thermal And Near infrared Sensor for carbon Observation Fourier-Transform Spectrometer (TANSO-FTS) onboard the Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) has measured CO2 and CH4 column density using sun light reflected from the earth's surface. It has an agile pointing system and its footprint can cover 87-km2 with a single detector. By specifying pointing angles and observation time for every orbit, TANSO-FTS can target various CH4 point sources together with reference points every 3 day over years. We selected a reference point that represents CH4 background density before or after targeting a point source. By combining satellite-measured enhancement of the CH4 column density and surface measured wind data or estimates from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, we estimated CH4emission amounts. Here, we picked up two sites in the US West Coast, where clear sky frequency is high and a series of data are available. The natural gas leak at Aliso Canyon showed a large enhancement and its decrease with time since the initial blowout. We present time series of flux estimation assuming the source is single point without influx. The observation of the cattle feedlot in Chino, California has weather station within the TANSO-FTS footprint. The wind speed is monitored continuously and the wind direction is stable at the time of GOSAT overpass. The large TANSO-FTS footprint and strong wind decreases enhancement below noise level. Weak wind shows enhancements in CH4, but the velocity data have large uncertainties. We show the detection limit of single samples and how to reduce uncertainty using time series of satellite data. We will propose that the next generation instruments for accurate anthropogenic CO2 and CH

  14. Functional limitations as potential mediators of the effects of self-reported vision status on fall risk of older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinman, Bernard A; Allen, Susan M; Chen, Jie; Pynoos, Jon

    2015-02-01

    To test whether limitations in mobility and large-muscle functioning mediate self-reported vision status to increase fall risk among respondents age 65 and above. This study used two waves from the Health and Retirement Study. We conducted binary logistic and negative binomial regression analyses to test indirect paths leading from self-reported vision status to falls, via indices of mobility and large-muscle functioning. Limited evidence was found for a mediating effect among women; however, large-muscle groups were implicated as partially mediating risk factors for falls among men with fair self-reported vision status. Implications of these findings are discussed including the need for prioritizing improved muscle strength of older men and women with poor vision as a preventive measure against falls. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Biomedical journals lack a consistent method to detect outcome reporting bias: a cross-sectional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huan, L N; Tejani, A M; Egan, G

    2014-10-01

    An increasing amount of recently published literature has implicated outcome reporting bias (ORB) as a major contributor to skewing data in both randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews; however, little is known about the current methods in place to detect ORB. This study aims to gain insight into the detection and management of ORB by biomedical journals. This was a cross-sectional analysis involving standardized questions via email or telephone with the top 30 biomedical journals (2012) ranked by impact factor. The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews was excluded leaving 29 journals in the sample. Of 29 journals, 24 (83%) responded to our initial inquiry of which 14 (58%) answered our questions and 10 (42%) declined participation. Five (36%) of the responding journals indicated they had a specific method to detect ORB, whereas 9 (64%) did not have a specific method in place. The prevalence of ORB in the review process seemed to differ with 4 (29%) journals indicating ORB was found commonly, whereas 7 (50%) indicated ORB was uncommon or never detected by their journal previously. The majority (n = 10/14, 72%) of journals were unwilling to report or make discrepancies found in manuscripts available to the public. Although the minority, there were some journals (n = 4/14, 29%) which described thorough methods to detect ORB. Many journals seemed to lack a method with which to detect ORB and its estimated prevalence was much lower than that reported in literature suggesting inadequate detection. There exists a potential for overestimation of treatment effects of interventions and unclear risks. Fortunately, there are journals within this sample which appear to utilize comprehensive methods for detection of ORB, but overall, the data suggest improvements at the biomedical journal level for detecting and minimizing the effect of this bias are needed. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Latency and mode of error detection as reflected in Swedish licensee event reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svenson, Ola; Salo, Ilkka [Stockholm Univ., (Sweden). Dept. of Psychology

    2002-03-01

    Licensee event reports (LERs) from an industry provide important information feedback about safety to the industry itself, the regulators and to the public. LERs from four nuclear power reactors were analyzed to find out about detection times, mode of detection and qualitative differences in reports from different reactors. The reliability of the coding was satisfactory and measured as the covariance between the ratings from two independent judges. The results showed differences in detection time across the reactors. On the average about ten percent of the errors remained undetected for 100 weeks or more, but the great majority of errors were detected soon after their first appearance in the plant. On the average 40 percent of the errors were detected in regular tests and 40 per cent through alarms. Operators found about 10 per cent of the errors through noticing something abnormal in the plant. The remaining errors were detected in various other ways. There were qualitative differences between the LERs from the different reactors reflecting the different conditions in the plants. The number of reports differed by a magnitude 1:2 between the different plants. However, a greater number of LERs can indicate both higher safety standards (e.g., a greater willingness to report all possible events to be able to learn from them) and lower safety standards (e.g., reporting as few events as possible to make a good impression). It was pointed out that LERs are indispensable in order to maintain safety of an industry and that the differences between plants found in the analyses of this study indicate how error reports can be used to initiate further investigations for improved safety.

  17. Latency and mode of error detection as reflected in Swedish licensee event reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svenson, Ola; Salo, Ilkka

    2002-03-01

    Licensee event reports (LERs) from an industry provide important information feedback about safety to the industry itself, the regulators and to the public. LERs from four nuclear power reactors were analyzed to find out about detection times, mode of detection and qualitative differences in reports from different reactors. The reliability of the coding was satisfactory and measured as the covariance between the ratings from two independent judges. The results showed differences in detection time across the reactors. On the average about ten percent of the errors remained undetected for 100 weeks or more, but the great majority of errors were detected soon after their first appearance in the plant. On the average 40 percent of the errors were detected in regular tests and 40 per cent through alarms. Operators found about 10 per cent of the errors through noticing something abnormal in the plant. The remaining errors were detected in various other ways. There were qualitative differences between the LERs from the different reactors reflecting the different conditions in the plants. The number of reports differed by a magnitude 1:2 between the different plants. However, a greater number of LERs can indicate both higher safety standards (e.g., a greater willingness to report all possible events to be able to learn from them) and lower safety standards (e.g., reporting as few events as possible to make a good impression). It was pointed out that LERs are indispensable in order to maintain safety of an industry and that the differences between plants found in the analyses of this study indicate how error reports can be used to initiate further investigations for improved safety

  18. The Uses and Limits of Social Reinforcement and Industriousness for Learning to Read. Technical Report #60.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharp, Roland G.; Gallimore, Ronald

    This report describes a study of the use of social reinforcement to increase the industriousness, and subsequently the reading competence, of children in the kindergarten through third grade classes of the Kamehameha Early Education Program (KEEP) demonstration school. Teacher behaviors, pupil industriousness, and pupil reading performance were…

  19. 77 FR 8258 - Availability of ICCVAM Evaluation Report and Recommendations on the Usefulness and Limitations of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-14

    ... and antagonist activity. This use is based on an evaluation of results from an international... activity. This use is based on an evaluation of available validation study data and corresponding accuracy... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Availability of ICCVAM Evaluation Report and...

  20. MRI of the breast: does the internet accurately report its beneficial uses and limitations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekhlyudov, Larissa; Kiarsis, Keith; Elmore, Joann G

    2009-01-01

    As consumer use of the Internet for medical information grows, continuing evaluation of the medical content on the Internet is needed. We evaluated Internet sites describing breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), an emerging technology tool in breast cancer diagnosis and screening. We searched Google for sites describing breast MRI and abstracted the affiliation, content, media type, readability, and quality of 90 most popular unique sites. Over half (56%) of the sites were commercially sponsored. The content varied by site and included medical and procedural facts, information about clinical trials, grants and journal articles, as well as human interest stories. Most (82%) sites described potentially beneficial uses of breast MRI, such as further evaluation of newly diagnosed breast cancers (58%); screening women at high risk for breast cancer (54%); evaluation of abnormal breast findings (48%); screening women with dense breasts (48%) or implants (27%); and surveillance for breast cancer recurrences (24%). Approximately half (56%) of the sites described the limitations of breast MRI, most commonly false positive findings (44%) and costs (24%). Website quality, including the display of contact information, sponsorship, currency of information, authorship, and references varied. The reading level was close to high school graduate. Internet sites describing breast MRI were mostly commercially sponsored, more often described the potential beneficial uses of the procedure than its limitations, and were of variable quality and high reading level. With the lack of enforceable standards for display of medical information on the Internet, providers should encourage patients to direct their searches to the most credible sites.

  1. [Possibilities and limitations of fiscal policies as health instruments: taxes on harmful consumption. SESPAS Report 2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Nicolás, Angel; Viudes de Velasco, Arántzazu

    2010-12-01

    This article discusses the possibilities of indirect taxation as a mechanism that alters the relative prices of goods and services and hence encourages citizens to adopt healthy lifestyles. We review the case of smoking and unhealthy diet. These two cases were chosen because these are the two lifestyle factors with the greatest impact on morbidity and mortality in Spain and because they highlight the possibilities of tax policy (smoking) and its limitations (unhealthy diet). After discussion of these issues, we recommend gradually increasing the level of the minimum special tax on cigarettes and avoiding erosion of its value by inflation, as well as aligning the level of the minimum special tax on fine cut tobacco with that borne by cigarettes, to avoid the already perceived shift of demand toward the former variety. The main recommendation for the case of unhealthy diet is to obtain a more solid evidence base than that currently available on the relationship between food prices and body mass index in Spain. The scarce evidence available for the USA nevertheless suggests that the possibilities of price-based policies to reduce the problems of overweight and obesity are highly limited. Copyright © 2010 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Partial Least Squares Calibration Modeling Towards the Multivariate Limit of Detection for Enriched Isotopic Mixtures via Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Candace [Florida Agriculture & Mechanic Univ.; Profeta, Luisa [Alakai Defense Systems, Inc.; Akpovo, Codjo [Florida Agriculture & Mechanic Univ.; Stowe, Ashley [Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Johnson, Lewis [Florida Agriculture & Mechanic Univ.

    2017-10-09

    The psuedo univariate limit of detection was calculated to compare to the multivariate interval. ompared with results from the psuedounivariate LOD, the multivariate LOD includes other factors (i.e. signal uncertainties) and the reveals the significance in creating models that not only use the analyte’s emission line but also its entire molecular spectra.

  3. DETERMINATION OF LIMIT DETECTION OF THE ELEMENTS N, P, K, Si, Al, Fe, Cu, Cd, WITH FAST NEUTRON ACTIVATION USING NEUTRON GENERATOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunardi Sunardi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Determination of limit detection of the elements N, P, K, Si, Al, Fe, Cu, Cd, with fast neutron activation using neutron generator has been done.  Samples prepared from SRM 2704, N, P, K elements from MERCK, Cu, Cd, Al from activation foil made in San Carlos, weighted and packed for certain weight then iradiated during 30 minutes with 14 MeV fast neutron using the neutron generator and then counted with gamma spectrometry (accuspec.  At this research condition of neutron generator was set at current 1 mA that produced neutron flux about 5,47.107 n/cm2.s and  experimental result shown that the limit detection for the elements N, P, K, Si, Al, Fe, Cu, Cd are  2,44 ppm, 1,88 ppm, 2,15 ppm, 1,44 ppm, 1,26 ppm, 1,35 ppm, 1,05 ppm, 2,99 ppm, respectively.  The data  indicate that the limit detection or sensitivity of appliance of neutron generator to analyze the element is very good, which is feasible to get accreditation AANC laboratory using neutron generator.   Keywords: limit detection, AANC, neutron generator

  4. A need for standardization in drinking water analysis – an investigation of DNA extraction procedure, primer choice and detection limit of 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Jakob; Nielsen, Per Halkjær; Albertsen, Mads

    have been made to illuminate the effects specifically related to bacterial communities in drinking water. In this study, we investigated the impact of the DNA extraction and primer choice on the observed community structure, and we also estimated the detection limit of the 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing...

  5. Photoinduced triplet-state electron transfer of platinum porphyrin: a one-step direct method for sensing iodide with an unprecedented detection limit

    KAUST Repository

    Masih, Dilshad; Aly, Shawkat Mohammede; Alarousu, Erkki; Mohammed, Omar F.

    2015-01-01

    previously unattained detection limit of 1 × 10−12 M) and economical method for the determination of iodide. To fully understand the reaction mechanism responsible for the phosphorescence quenching process, we have employed cutting-edge time-resolved laser

  6. Prosthetic rehabilitation of edentulous patient with limited oral access: A clinical report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Microstomia may result from surgical treatment of orofacial neoplasms, cleft lips, maxillofacial trauma, burns, radiotherapy or scleroderma. A maximal oral opening that is smaller than the size of a complete denture can make prosthetic treatment challenging. This clinical report presents the prosthodontic management of a total edentulous patient with microstomia. Sectional mandibular and maxillary trays and foldable mandibular and maxillary denture were fabricated for the total edentulous patient.

  7. Self-limiting Spontaneous Isolated Celiac Artery Dissection: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.D. Morzycki

    Full Text Available : Introduction: Isolated dissection of the celiac artery is rare, with less then 100 cases reported to date. Although some patients present with epigastric pain and tenderness, many cases are asymptomatic and found incidentally on CT. The appropriate management of isolated celiac artery dissections is unclear. This report illustrates an observational approach to a symptomatic case of isolated celiac artery dissection. Report: A 55-year-old Caucassian male presented to the emergency department with epigastric pain. His Initial CT revealed possible celiac artery dissection with associated intramural hematoma. Due to continued pain, a subsequent CTA was ordered. This scan showed progression of the intramural hematoma to near occlusion of the hepatic artery. Despite this, there were no signs of ischemic hepatitis as indicated by normal levels of liver transaminases. There was also no evidence to suggest propagation of the dissection or pseudo-aneurysm formation. We therefore choose a conservative and observational approach to this isolated celiac artery dissection. His dissection was managed with ASA and metoprolol, and he was discharged after 1 week of observation. 3 week follow-up CTA showed spontaneous resolution of the intramural hematoma and improved patency of the hepatic artery. There was no change at 3 months follow-up. Conclusion: This case highlights that an observational approach to cases of isolated celiac artery dissection may be indicated if there is no evident end organ disease or malperfusion. Keywords: Celiac artery, Dissection, Management

  8. Detection limits for close eclipsing and transiting sub-stellar and planetary companions to white dwarfs in the WASP survey

    OpenAIRE

    Faedi, F.; West, R. G.; Burleigh, M. R.; Goad, M. R.; Hebb, L.

    2010-01-01

    We have performed extensive simulations to explore the possibility of detecting eclipses and transits of close, sub-stellar and planetary companions to white dwarfs in WASP light-curves. Our simulations cover companions $\\sim0.3\\Re

  9. Limited diagnostic capacities of two commercial assays for the detection of Leptospira immunoglobulin M antibodies in Laos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blacksell, Stuart D.; Smythe, Lee; Phetsouvanh, Rattanaphone; Dohnt, Michael; Hartskeerl, Rudy; SymondS, Meegan; Slack, Andrew; Vongsouvath, Manivanh; Davong, Viengmone; Lattana, Olay; Phongmany, Simmaly; Keolouangkot, Valy; White, Nicholas J.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Newton, Paul N.

    2006-01-01

    The diagnostic utility of immunochromatographic (Leptotek) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA; Panbio) tests for the detection of Leptospira immunoglobulin M antibodies was assessed in febrile adults admitted in Vientiane, Laos. Both tests demonstrated poor diagnostic accuracy using

  10. TransCanada PipeLines Limited 1998 annual report : TransCanada energy solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Financial information from TransCanada PipeLines Limited and a review of the company's 1998 operations was made available for the benefit of shareholders. TransCanada's pipeline system transports natural gas and crude oil from Western Canada Sedimentary Basin to North America's major energy markets. Net earnings from continuing operations for 1998, before unusual charges, were $575 million ($ 355 million after unusual charges) compared to $522 million for 1997. Solid performances from the energy transmission and international business, when compared to 1997, were more than offset by a decreased contribution from energy processing. TransCanada recorded integration costs of $166 million, after tax, related to the merger with NOVA in 1998, which was the major operational accomplishment during the year, creating a seamless economic energy delivery, processing and marketing system from the wellhead to the market. tabs., figs

  11. TransCanada PipeLines Limited 1996 annual report : profitable today, prepared for tomorrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    Operations and financial activities of TransCanada PipeLines Limited (TPL) during 1996 were reviewed and made available for the benefit of shareholders. TransCanada PipeLines Limited is a Canadian company with assets in excess of $12 billion. Its pipeline system transports natural gas and crude oil from the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin to North America's major energy markets. By all accounts the company had a successful year in 1996, having delivered a record 2.4 Bcf of gas, up 3.7 per cent from 1995, through the Canadian Mainline, TransCanada's largest asset. Among other notable achievements was the decision to join the Portland Natural Gas Transmission System as a 20 per cent partner in a project to construct a natural gas pipeline between Quebec and Haverhill, Massachusetts. Another accomplishment was the completion of the acquisition of all remaining shares of Alberta Natural Gas company, thereby extending the company's energy transmission, gas processing and specialty chemical operations. Other achievements were the purchase of Enron Louisiana Energy Company, the acquisition of assets that position TPL as one of the largest natural gas liquids processors in North America and the completion and commissioning of two new independent power generation plants in Ontario. Shareholder's return on investment was 34 per cent, more than double the target of between 12 to 15 per cent. Net income to common shares amounted to $1.85 per share, up from $1.75 in 1995. The strong performance was attributed to continued growth in all four segments of TPL's business, i. e. energy transmission, energy marketing, energy processing and international. tabs., figs

  12. 40 CFR 60.2957 - What else must I report if I have a deviation from the operating limits or the emission limitations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., or if a performance test was conducted that showed a deviation from any emission limitation. (b) The... deviation from the operating limits or the emission limitations? 60.2957 Section 60.2957 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR...

  13. Installation of high-resolution ERDA in UTTAC at the University of Tsukuba: Determination of the energy resolution and the detection limit for hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekiba, D., E-mail: sekiba@tac.tsukuba.ac.jp [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tennodai 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); University of Tsukuba, Tandem Accelerator Complex (UTTAC), Tennodai 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Chito, K.; Harayama, I. [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tennodai 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Watahiki, Y.; Ishii, S. [University of Tsukuba, Tandem Accelerator Complex (UTTAC), Tennodai 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Ozeki, K. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ibaraki University, Nakanarusawa 4-12-1, Hitachi, Ibaraki 316-8511 (Japan)

    2017-06-15

    A newly developed high-resolution elastic recoil detection analysis (HERDA) system installed at the 1 MV Tandetron in UTTAC at the University of Tsukuba is introduced. The effective solid angle of detector, energy resolution and detection limit for hydrogen are, for the first time, determined quantitatively by the measurements on an a-C:H (and D) film deposited on a Si substrate. In the case of a 500 keV {sup 16}O{sup +} as the incident beam, an energy resolution of ∼0.45 keV and a detection limit of ∼3.8 × 10{sup 20} atoms/cm{sup 3} (∼0.18 at.%) with a data acquisition time of ∼310 s are derived.

  14. Atlantoaxial Ankylosis Detected on Neck CT Scans in a Patient with Ankylosing Spondylitis: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Ah; Lee, Seung Hun; Joo, Kyung Bin [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul Hospital, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Jeong Ah [Dept. of Radiology, Guri Hospital, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Guri (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Hwan [Dept. of Rheynmatology, Seoul Hospital, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-07-15

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a chronic inflammatory disorder of unknown cause that principally affects the axial skeleton. The cervical spine is also vulnerable to this disease process and the characteristic feature of cervical involvement is atlantoaxial subluxation. However, only a few cases of atlantoaxial ankylosis have been reported to date. We report a case of atlantoaxial ankylosis in a patient with ankylosing spondylitis with radiologic findings incidentally detected on neck CT scans.

  15. Atlantoaxial Ankylosis Detected on Neck CT Scans in a Patient with Ankylosing Spondylitis: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Ah; Lee, Seung Hun; Joo, Kyung Bin; Ryu, Jeong Ah; Kim, Tae Hwan

    2011-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a chronic inflammatory disorder of unknown cause that principally affects the axial skeleton. The cervical spine is also vulnerable to this disease process and the characteristic feature of cervical involvement is atlantoaxial subluxation. However, only a few cases of atlantoaxial ankylosis have been reported to date. We report a case of atlantoaxial ankylosis in a patient with ankylosing spondylitis with radiologic findings incidentally detected on neck CT scans.

  16. Limited copy number-high resolution melting (LCN-HRM) enables the detection and identification by sequencing of low level mutations in cancer biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Hongdo; Dobrovic, Alexander

    2009-10-08

    Mutation detection in clinical tumour samples is challenging when the proportion of tumour cells, and thus mutant alleles, is low. The limited sensitivity of conventional sequencing necessitates the adoption of more sensitive approaches. High resolution melting (HRM) is more sensitive than sequencing but identification of the mutation is desirable, particularly when it is important to discriminate false positives due to PCR errors or template degradation from true mutations.We thus developed limited copy number - high resolution melting (LCN-HRM) which applies limiting dilution to HRM. Multiple replicate reactions with a limited number of target sequences per reaction allow low level mutations to be detected. The dilutions used (based on Ct values) are chosen such that mutations, if present, can be detected by the direct sequencing of amplicons with aberrant melting patterns. Using cell lines heterozygous for mutations, we found that the mutations were not readily detected when they comprised 10% of total alleles (20% tumour cells) by sequencing, whereas they were readily detectable at 5% total alleles by standard HRM. LCN-HRM allowed these mutations to be identified by direct sequencing of those positive reactions.LCN-HRM was then used to review formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) clinical samples showing discordant findings between sequencing and HRM for KRAS exon 2 and EGFR exons 19 and 21. Both true mutations present at low levels and sequence changes due to artefacts were detected by LCN-HRM. The use of high fidelity polymerases showed that the majority of the artefacts were derived from the damaged template rather than replication errors during amplification. LCN-HRM bridges the sensitivity gap between HRM and sequencing and is effective in distinguishing between artefacts and true mutations.

  17. Economic benefits of final effluent limitations guidelines and standards for the offshore oil and gas industry. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The report provides an overview of the benefits analysis of the effluent limitation guidelines for offshore oil and gas facilities. Regulatory options were evaluated for two wastestreams: (1) drilling fluids (muds) and cuttings; and (2) produced water. The analysis focuses on the human health-related benefits of the regulatory options considered. These health risk reduction benefits are associated with reduced human exposure to various carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic contaminants, including lead, by way of consumption of shrimp and recreationally caught finfish from the Gulf of Mexico. Most of the health-risk reduction benefits analysis is based upon a previous report (RCG/Hagler, Bailly, January 1991), developed in support of the proposed rulemaking. Recreational, commercial, and nonuse benefits have not been estimated for these regulations, due to data limitations and the difficulty of estimating these values for effluent controls in the open-water marine environment

  18. Cholestrol granuloma of the breast incidentally detected on dynamic abdominal CT: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Sun Hye; Lee, Eun Hye; Hong, Hyun Sook; Kwak, Jeong Ja [Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    A breast cholesterol granuloma is an uncommon nodular breast lesion. We incidentally detected a persistently enhancing breast mass on the dynamic abdominal computed tomography (CT) of a 78-year-old woman. The mass decreased in diameter over 50 days following a core needle biopsy. This report is the first to describe the dynamic-enhanced CT features of a breast cholesterol granuloma.

  19. Detecting, reporting, and analysis of priority diseases for routine public health surveillance in Liberia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frimpong, Joseph Asamoah; Park, Meeyoung Mattie; Amo-Addae, Maame Pokuah; Adewuyi, Peter Adebayo; Nagbe, Thomas Knue

    2017-01-01

    An essential component of a public health surveillance system is its ability to detect priority diseases which fall within the mandate of public health officials at all levels. Early detection, reporting and response to public health events help to reduce the burden of mortality and morbidity on communities. Analysis of reliable surveillance data provides relevant information which can enable implementation of timely and appropriate public health interventions. To ensure that a resilient system is in place, the World Health Organization (WHO) has provided guidelines for detection, reporting and response to public health events in the Integrated Disease Surveillance and Response (IDSR) strategy. This case study provides training on detection, reporting and analysis of priority diseases for routine public health surveillance in Liberia and highlights potential errors and challenges which can hinder effective surveillance. Table-top exercises and group discussion lead participants through a simulated verification and analyses of summary case reports in the role of the District Surveillance Officer. This case study is intended for public health training in a classroom setting and can be accomplished within 2 hours 30 minutes. The target audience include residents in Frontline Epidemiology Training Programs (FETP-Frontline), Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programs (FELTPs), and others who are interested in this topic.

  20. [Public health crises in a developed society. Successes and limitations in Spain. SESPAS report 2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gérvas, Juan; Meneu, Ricard

    2010-12-01

    The perception, acceptability and management of risks are social construction. Consequently, in managing public health crises, the gap between facts, beliefs and feelings tests the responsiveness of official institutions to health alarms that can be objective, potential, or imaginary. On balance, a strong point of the Spanish experience of health crises is the presence of clinicians and public health officers working in an organization capable of responding adequately, although the quasi-federal Spanish political structure has both advantages and disadvantages. Weaknesses include the low profile given to public health and a management structure that relies too heavily on partitocracy. The management of these crises could be improved by transferring greater scope to health professionals in decisions about crisis identification and management (with transparency) and limiting bureaucratic inertia. For some, health crises involve visibility or business opportunities (not always legitimate). Therefore, the perception of crisis will increasingly rest less in the hands of experts and more in those of groups interested in spreading these crises or in providing solutions. While progress is needed to develop participation in strategies to respond to emerging crises, even more essential is the involvement of all healthcare levels in their preparation and dissemination. Copyright © 2010 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. Limited field investigation report for the 100-KR-4 Operable Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-07-01

    This limited field investigation (LFI) was conducted to optimize the use of interim remedial measures (IRM) for expediting clean up while maintaining a technically sound and cost-effective program. The 100-KR-4 Operable Unit is one of four operable units associated with the 100 K Area. Operable units KR-1, KR-2 and KR-3 address contaminant sources while 100-KR-4 addresses contamination present in the underlying groundwater. The IRM decision process for groundwater operable units is based on three aspects: (1) Is the concentration greater than Hanford background? (2) Does the concentration present a medium or high human-health risk? (3) Does the concentration exceed an ecologically based applicable, relevant and appropriate requirements (ARAR) or present an environmental hazard quotient > I? The primary methods of investigation used during this LFI were the installation of monitoring wells and sampling of groundwater. The samples collected from the groundwater and soils were submitted for laboratory analysis. Boreholes were surveyed for radiological contamination using downhole geophysical techniques to further delineate the location and degree of contamination. All soil samples were screened to ascertain the presence of volatile organic compounds and radionuclides. Analytical data were subjected to validation; all first round and a minimum of 10% of subsequent round data were validated

  2. Urban-rural differences in self-reported limiting long-term illness in Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Kate A

    2003-12-01

    Previous research suggests that there are significant differences in health between urban and rural areas. The aim of this study is to describe the pattern and magnitude of urban-rural variation in health in Scotland and to examine the factors associated with health inequalities in urban and rural areas. The data used in this study were limiting long-term illness (LLTI) and socio-economic data collected by the 1991 Census. A rurality indicator was created using Scottish Household Survey rurality classifications. Multilevel Poisson regression modelling was carried out with LLTI as a health indicator for each type of rurality within Scotland. A variety of socio-economic factors were investigated for each rurality. Areas with the highest Standardized Illness Ratios (SIRs) (>125) are predominantly urban whereas the lowest SIRs (rural areas. Rural communities are more heterogeneous than urban areas in terms of their social make-up with relation to health; however, when these areas are split according to minor road length and different socio-economic factors are added, the model fit for each new model is improved and the reduction in total variation is comparable with that of the urban models. These findings suggest that rural areas should not be treated as a homogeneous group but should be subdivided into rural types.

  3. The application of reporter gene assays for the detection of endocrine disruptors in sport supplements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plotan, Monika; Elliott, Christopher T. [Institute of Agri-Food and Land Use, School of Biological Sciences, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT95AG, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Scippo, Marie Louise [Department of Food Sciences, University of Liege, 4000 Liege (Belgium); Muller, Marc [Molecular Biology and Genetic Engineering GIGA-R, University of Liege, 4000 Liege (Belgium); Antignac, Jean-Philippe [LABERCA, ENVN, USC INRA 2013, BP 50707, 44 307, Nantes (France); Malone, Edward [The State Laboratory, Young' s Cross, Celbridge, Co. Kildare (Ireland); Bovee, Toine F.H. [RIKILT Institute of Food Safety, P.O. Box 230, AE Wageningen 6700 (Netherlands); Mitchell, Samuel [Agri-Food and Biosciences Institute, Belfast BT9 5PX (United Kingdom); Connolly, Lisa, E-mail: l.connolly@qub.ac.uk [Institute of Agri-Food and Land Use, School of Biological Sciences, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT95AG, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

    2011-08-26

    The increasing availability and use of sports supplements is of concern as highlighted by a number of studies reporting endocrine disruptor contamination in such products. The health food supplement market, including sport supplements, is growing across the Developed World. Therefore, the need to ensure the quality and safety of sport supplements for the consumer is essential. The development and validation of two reporter gene assays coupled with solid phase sample preparation enabling the detection of estrogenic and androgenic constituents in sport supplements is reported. Both assays were shown to be of high sensitivity with the estrogen and androgen reporter gene assays having an EC{sub 50} of 0.01 ng mL{sup -1} and 0.16 ng mL{sup -1} respectively. The developed assays were applied in a survey of 63 sport supplements samples obtained across the Island of Ireland with an additional seven reference samples previously investigated using LC-MS/MS. Androgen and estrogen bio-activity was found in 71% of the investigated samples. Bio-activity profiling was further broken down into agonists, partial agonists and antagonists. Supplements (13) with the strongest estrogenic bio-activity were chosen for further investigation. LC-MS/MS analysis of these samples determined the presence of phytoestrogens in seven of them. Supplements (38) with androgen bio-activity were also selected for further investigation. Androgen agonist bio-activity was detected in 12 supplements, antagonistic bio-activity was detected in 16 and partial antagonistic bio-activity was detected in 10. A further group of supplements (7) did not present androgenic bio-activity when tested alone but enhanced the androgenic agonist bio-activity of dihydrotestosterone when combined. The developed assays offer advantages in detection of known, unknown and low-level mixtures of endocrine disruptors over existing analytical screening techniques. For the detection and identification of constituent hormonally

  4. The application of reporter gene assays for the detection of endocrine disruptors in sport supplements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plotan, Monika; Elliott, Christopher T.; Scippo, Marie Louise; Muller, Marc; Antignac, Jean-Philippe; Malone, Edward; Bovee, Toine F.H.; Mitchell, Samuel; Connolly, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    The increasing availability and use of sports supplements is of concern as highlighted by a number of studies reporting endocrine disruptor contamination in such products. The health food supplement market, including sport supplements, is growing across the Developed World. Therefore, the need to ensure the quality and safety of sport supplements for the consumer is essential. The development and validation of two reporter gene assays coupled with solid phase sample preparation enabling the detection of estrogenic and androgenic constituents in sport supplements is reported. Both assays were shown to be of high sensitivity with the estrogen and androgen reporter gene assays having an EC 50 of 0.01 ng mL -1 and 0.16 ng mL -1 respectively. The developed assays were applied in a survey of 63 sport supplements samples obtained across the Island of Ireland with an additional seven reference samples previously investigated using LC-MS/MS. Androgen and estrogen bio-activity was found in 71% of the investigated samples. Bio-activity profiling was further broken down into agonists, partial agonists and antagonists. Supplements (13) with the strongest estrogenic bio-activity were chosen for further investigation. LC-MS/MS analysis of these samples determined the presence of phytoestrogens in seven of them. Supplements (38) with androgen bio-activity were also selected for further investigation. Androgen agonist bio-activity was detected in 12 supplements, antagonistic bio-activity was detected in 16 and partial antagonistic bio-activity was detected in 10. A further group of supplements (7) did not present androgenic bio-activity when tested alone but enhanced the androgenic agonist bio-activity of dihydrotestosterone when combined. The developed assays offer advantages in detection of known, unknown and low-level mixtures of endocrine disruptors over existing analytical screening techniques. For the detection and identification of constituent hormonally active compounds the

  5. "Watching the Detectives" report of the general assembly of the EU project DETECTIVE Brussels, 24-25 November 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Ruani N; Chaudhari, Umesh; Escher, Sylvia E; Hengstler, Jan G; Hescheler, Jürgen; Jennings, Paul; Keun, Hector C; Kleinjans, Jos C S; Kolde, Raivo; Kollipara, Laxmikanth; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Limonciel, Alice; Nemade, Harshal; Nguemo, Filomain; Peterson, Hedi; Prieto, Pilar; Rodrigues, Robim M; Sachinidis, Agapios; Schäfer, Christoph; Sickmann, Albert; Spitkovsky, Dimitry; Stöber, Regina; van Breda, Simone G J; van de Water, Bob; Vivier, Manon; Zahedi, René P; Vinken, Mathieu; Rogiers, Vera

    2016-06-01

    SEURAT-1 is a joint research initiative between the European Commission and Cosmetics Europe aiming to develop in vitro- and in silico-based methods to replace the in vivo repeated dose systemic toxicity test used for the assessment of human safety. As one of the building blocks of SEURAT-1, the DETECTIVE project focused on a key element on which in vitro toxicity testing relies: the development of robust and reliable, sensitive and specific in vitro biomarkers and surrogate endpoints that can be used for safety assessments of chronically acting toxicants, relevant for humans. The work conducted by the DETECTIVE consortium partners has established a screening pipeline of functional and "-omics" technologies, including high-content and high-throughput screening platforms, to develop and investigate human biomarkers for repeated dose toxicity in cellular in vitro models. Identification and statistical selection of highly predictive biomarkers in a pathway- and evidence-based approach constitute a major step in an integrated approach towards the replacement of animal testing in human safety assessment. To discuss the final outcomes and achievements of the consortium, a meeting was organized in Brussels. This meeting brought together data-producing and supporting consortium partners. The presentations focused on the current state of ongoing and concluding projects and the strategies employed to identify new relevant biomarkers of toxicity. The outcomes and deliverables, including the dissemination of results in data-rich "-omics" databases, were discussed as were the future perspectives of the work completed under the DETECTIVE project. Although some projects were still in progress and required continued data analysis, this report summarizes the presentations, discussions and the outcomes of the project.

  6. The Choice of thermal reactor systems. A report by the National Nuclear Corporation Limited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The report to the Secretary of State in Great Britain by the National Nuclear Corporation following their assessment of the three thermal reactor systems, the AGR, PWR and SGHWR type reactors, which was performed in order to assist in the decision on the choice of thermal reactors for the U.K., is in three parts. Part I is an assessment of the three systems. It comprises: a description of the general method of assessment; a commentary in which are summarised discussions on the most important issues influencing reactor choice, i.e. safety, component failure, operational characteristics, development programme, construction programme; implications for the U.K. industry; costs; and reference design of each system. Part II consists of related questions and answers accompanied by commentaries on public acceptability and views from industry. Part III contains some conclusions including an analysis on the implications of the choices open and a summary of the main features of the assessment. (U.K.)

  7. Limited field investigation report for the 100-HR-2 Operable Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    This report summarizes the data collection and analysis activities conducted during the 100-HR-2 Operable Unit investigative phase and the associated qualitative risk assessment (QRA). The 100-HR-2 Operable Unit contains solid waste burial grounds, an ash pit, bum pits, electrical facilities, septic systems, and support facilities. All known and suspected areas of contamination were classified as solid waste burial grounds or low-priority waste sites based on the collective knowledge of the operable unit managers (representatives from the US Department of Energy [DOE], the US Environmental Protection Agency [EPA], and Washington Department of Ecology [Ecology]) during the preparation of the 100-HR-2 Operable Unit work plan (DOE/RL 1993f). Solid waste burial grounds were judged to pose sufficient risk(s), through one or more pathways, to require evaluation for an interim remedial measure (IRM) as per the Hanford Past-Practice Strategy (HPPS) (DOE/RL 1991) and negotiations with DOE, EPA, and Ecology. An IRM is intended to achieve remedies that are likely to lead to a final record of decision. Low-priority sites are those judged not to pose significant risk to require the streamlined evaluation. There were six low-priority waste sites and seven solid waste burial grounds identified. The investigative phase was conducted in accordance with the RCRA Facility Investigation/Corrective Measures Study Work Plan for the 100-HR-2 Operable Unit (DOE/RL 1993f). The QRA was performed in accordance with the Hanford Site Baseline Risk Assessment Methodology (DOE/RL 1993b) and the recommendations incorporate the strategies of the HPPS. The purpose of this report is to: (1) provide a summary of site investigative activities; (2) refine the conceptual exposure model (as needed); (3) identify chemical- and location-specific corrective action requirements; and (4) provide a human health and ecological QRA associated with solid waste burial grounds

  8. Limited field investigation report for the 100-HR-2 Operable Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-07-01

    This report summarizes the data collection and analysis activities conducted during the 100-HR-2 Operable Unit investigative phase and the associated qualitative risk assessment. The 100-HR-2 Operable Unit contains solid waste burial grounds, an ash pit, burn pits, electrical facilities, septic systems, and support facilities. All known and suspected areas of contamination were classified as solid waste burial grounds or low-priority waste sites based on the collective knowledge of the operable unit managers (representatives from the US Department of Energy, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and Washington State Department of Ecology during the preparation of the 100-HR-2 Operable Unit Work Plan (DOE-RL 1993f). Solid waste burial grounds were judged to pose sufficient risk(s), through one or more pathways, to require evaluation for an interim remedial measure as per the Hanford Past-Practice Strategy (DOE-RL 1991) and negotiations with the Department of Energy, US Environmental Protection Agency, and Washington State Department of Ecology. An interim remedial measure is intended to achieve remedies that are likely to lead to a final record of decision. Low-priority sites are those judged not to pose significant risk to require the streamlined evaluation. There were six low-priority waste sites and seven solid waste burial grounds identified. The purpose of this report is to: (1) provide a summary of site investigative activities; (2) refine the conceptual exposure model (as needed); (3) identify chemical- and location-specific corrective action requirements; and 4) provide a human health and ecological QRA associated with solid waste burial grounds

  9. Limited field investigation report for the 100-HR-3 operable unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    This limited field investigation (LFI) was conducted to assess the applicability of interim remedial measures (IRM) for reducing human health and environmental risks within the 100-HR-3 Groundwater Operable Unit. The 100-HR-3 Operable Unit is comprised of three subareas; the 100 D Area, the 100 H Area and those portions of the 600 Area between the two reactor areas. The operable unit is one of seven operable units associated with the 100 D and H Areas. Operable units 100-DR-1, 100-DR-2, 100-DR-3, 100-HR-1, 100-HR-2 and 100-IU-4 address contaminant sources while 100-HR-3 addresses contamination present in the underlying groundwater. The primary method of field investigation used during this LFI was the installation and sampling of monitoring wells. Samples were collected from the groundwater and soils, and submitted for laboratory analysis. Boreholes were surveyed for radiological contamination using downhole geophysical techniques to further delineate the locations and levels of contaminants. All samples were screened to ascertain the presence of volatile organic compounds and radionuclides. Analytical data were subjected to validation; all round one, two and three and a minimum of 10% of round four data associated with the LFI were validated. A screening method was used to identify contaminants of potential concern (COPC). This screening method eliminated from further consideration, constituents that were below background. Constituents which are considered non-toxic to humans were eliminated from the human health evaluation. Data consistency and blank contamination were also evaluated in the screening process. These COPC were then evaluated further in the qualitative risk assessment (QRA). A human health QRA was performed using conservative (maximum equilibrated contaminant levels from the LFI) analyses

  10. Adding insult to injury: intimate partner violence among women and men reporting activity limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Marsha M; Forte, Tonia; Du Mont, Janice; Hyman, Ilene; Romans, Sarah

    2006-08-01

    Women with activity limitations (ALs) are at risk for Intimate partner violence (IPV). This study examined IPV in men versus women with ALs. Data from the Canadian 1999 General Social Survey compared physical, sexual, emotional, and financial IPV from a current/expartner in 5 years for men and women with ALs compared with those without ALs. Logistic regression examined sex differences in IPV among those with ALs, adjusting for sociodemographic factors. Rates of physical (11.9% versus 7.8%; p women with compared with without ALs. A similar pattern was seen for men, with greater rates of physical (9.2% versus 6.6%; p = 0.006), emotional (22.6% versus 18.2%; p = 0.002), and financial (2.6% versus 1.4%; p = 0.005) IPV in men with ALs than men without ALs. Risk factors for IPV included younger age, being divorced/separated or single, and having lower income and poorer health. Women with ALs were more likely than men to experience any IPV (29.1% versus 24.9%) and more severe and more incidents of IPV. In multivariable analysis, women were no longer at greater risk for "any IPV" after adjusting for sociodemographic variables (odds ratio = 1.09; 95% confidence interval, 0.88-1.36). This is the first study to document IPV rates in men with ALs. Women with ALs were more likely to be divorced/separated, living in poverty, and in poorer health than men with ALs. These factors accounted for sex differences in IPV rates.

  11. Setting Authorized Limits for Radioactive Discharges: Practical Issues to Consider. Report for Discussion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-03-01

    Application of the principles of radioactive waste management requires the implementation of measures that afford protection of human health and of the environment, now and in the future. The IAEA has issued safety standards and other publications that provide a framework for the control of releases of radionuclides to the environment. This framework is relevant for regulatory bodies that issue authorizations and for organizations that (i) use radionuclides for medical or research purposes, (ii) operate nuclear reactors or (iii) reprocess nuclear material. An IAEA Safety Guide on Regulatory Control of Radioactive Discharges to the Environment was issued in 2000 that outlines the roles and responsibilities of regulatory bodies, licensees and registrants and provides guidance on the authorization procedure. However, there have been significant developments in radiological protection policy since the publication of this Safety Guide, most notably the issue of ICRP Publications No. 101 on Assessing Dose of the Representative Person for the Purpose of Radiation Protection of the Public and the Optimisation of Radiological Protection and No. 103 on The 2007 Recommendations of the ICRP. The objective of this IAEA-TECDOC is to stimulate discussion on the practical implementation of the control of radioactive releases in order to inform the review and revision of IAEA guidance on this subject. This IAEA-TECDOC is based on the practical experience of Member States and on information provided at Technical Committee Meetings held in 2003 and 2008 and gained by means of a questionnaire. It summarizes international experience on the optimization of discharges and the setting by the regulatory body of authorized limits on discharges for nuclear installations and non-nuclear facilities. Its issue at this stage is intended for consultation as a preparatory step pending the current process of revision of the IAEA's International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing

  12. A small azide-modified thiazole-based reporter molecule for fluorescence and mass spectrometric detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Wolfram

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Molecular probes are widely used tools in chemical biology that allow tracing of bioactive metabolites and selective labeling of proteins and other biomacromolecules. A common structural motif for such probes consists of a reporter that can be attached by copper(I-catalyzed 1,2,3-triazole formation between terminal alkynes and azides to a reactive headgroup. Here we introduce the synthesis and application of the new thiazole-based, azide-tagged reporter 4-(3-azidopropoxy-5-(4-bromophenyl-2-(pyridin-2-ylthiazole for fluorescence, UV and mass spectrometry (MS detection. This small fluorescent reporter bears a bromine functionalization facilitating the automated data mining of electrospray ionization MS runs by monitoring for its characteristic isotope signature. We demonstrate the universal utility of the reporter for the detection of an alkyne-modified small molecule by LC–MS and for the visualization of a model protein by in-gel fluorescence. The novel probe advantageously compares with commercially available azide-modified fluorophores and a brominated one. The ease of synthesis, small size, stability, and the universal detection possibilities make it an ideal reporter for activity-based protein profiling and functional metabolic profiling.

  13. [New valvular homografts. Prospects and limits of their viability. Report of 42 implantations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, G; Mesnildrey, P; Hanotel, M C; Heurtematte, Y; Cachera, J P; Paul, M; Astier, A; Beaujean, F; Dubertret, L; Galle, P

    1990-10-01

    The regain of interest in aortic homograft bioprostheses is related to the prospects of improved viability resulting from explanation from organ donors, preservation in rich tissue culture media, together with the progress made in techniques of cryopreservation. Viability studies examining morphology of electron microscopy and tests of tissue culture confirm this notion of longer viability. These properties raise hopes of satisfactory long-term results while acknowledging outstanding antigenic problems which require strict A-B-O system compatibility. The results of a preliminary series of 42 valve homografts implanted at Henri Mondor Hospital over the last 5 years are reported. Twenty-one bioprostheses were implanted on the right side in congenital heart disease with good results in every case. Twenty-one were implanted in the aortic position in children and show no signs of degeneration as yet. One poor result was related to a technical error in calibration. The rebirth of this technique raises certain hopes, especially in aortic valve replacement.

  14. Report of task group on the biological basis for dose limitation in the skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-08-01

    Researchers have drawn attention to what they consider inconsistencies in the manner in which ICRP have considered skin in relation to the effective dose equivalent. They urge that the dose to the skin should be considered routinely for inclusion in the effective dose equivalent in the context of protection of individuals and population groups. They note that even with a weighting factor of only 0.01 that the dose to the skin can be a significant contributor to the effective dose equivalent including skin for practical exposure conditions. In the case of many exposures the risk to the skin can be ignored but exposure in an uniformly contaminated cloud that might occur with 85 Kr the dose to the skin could contribute 60% of the stochastic risk if included in the effective dose equivalent with a W T of 0.01. Through the years and even today the same questions about radiation effects in the skin and dosimetry keep being asked. This report collates the available data and current understanding of radiation effects on the skin, and may make it possible to estimate risks more accurately and to improve the approach to characterizing skin irradiations. 294 refs., 29 figs

  15. Scope and limitations of the TEMPO/EPR method for singlet oxygen detection: the misleading role of electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, Giacomo; Manet, Ilse; Monti, Sandra; Miranda, Miguel A; Lhiaubet-Vallet, Virginie

    2014-12-01

    For many biological and biomedical studies, it is essential to detect the production of (1)O2 and quantify its production yield. Among the available methods, detection of the characteristic 1270-nm phosphorescence of singlet oxygen by time-resolved near-infrared (TRNIR) emission constitutes the most direct and unambiguous approach. An alternative indirect method is electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) in combination with a singlet oxygen probe. This is based on the detection of the TEMPO free radical formed after oxidation of TEMP (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine) by singlet oxygen. Although the TEMPO/EPR method has been widely employed, it can produce misleading data. This is demonstrated by the present study, in which the quantum yields of singlet oxygen formation obtained by TRNIR emission and by the TEMPO/EPR method are compared for a set of well-known photosensitizers. The results reveal that the TEMPO/EPR method leads to significant overestimation of singlet oxygen yield when the singlet or triplet excited state of the photosensitizer is efficiently quenched by TEMP, acting as electron donor. In such case, generation of the TEMP(+) radical cation, followed by deprotonation and reaction with molecular oxygen, gives rise to an EPR-detectable TEMPO signal that is not associated with singlet oxygen production. This knowledge is essential for an appropriate and error-free application of the TEMPO/EPR method in chemical, biological, and medical studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Detecting Position Using ARKit II: Generating Position-Time Graphs in Realtime and Further Information on Limitations of ARKit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilek, Ufuk; Erol, Mustafa

    2018-01-01

    ARKit is a framework which allows developers to create augmented reality apps for the iPhone and iPad. In a previous study, we had shown that it could be used to detect position in educational physics experiments and emphasized that the ability to provide position data in real-time was one of the prominent features of this newly emerging…

  17. Natural history of optical coherence tomography-detected non-flow-limiting edge dissections following drug-eluting stent implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radu, Maria D; Räber, Lorenz; Heo, Jungho

    2014-01-01

    history and clinical implications remain unclear. The objectives of the present study were to assess the morphology, healing response, and clinical outcomes of OCT-detected edge dissections using serial OCT imaging at baseline and at one year following drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation. METHODS...

  18. Effects of Kapton Sample Cell Windows on the Detection Limit of Smectite: Implications for CheMin on the Mars Science Laboratory Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achilles, C. N.; Ming, Douglas W.; Morris, R. V.; Blake, D. F.

    2012-01-01

    The CheMin instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover Curiosity is an X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) instrument capable of providing the mineralogical and chemical compositions of rocks and soils on the surface of Mars. CheMin uses a microfocus X-ray tube with a Co target, transmission geometry, and an energy-discriminating X-ray sensitive CCD to produce simultaneous 2-D XRD patterns and energy-dispersive X-ray histograms from powdered samples. CheMin has two different window materials used for sample cells -- Mylar and Kapton. Instrument details are provided elsewhere. Fe/Mg-smectite (e.g., nontronite) has been identified in Gale Crater, the MSL future landing site, by CRISM spectra. While large quantities of phyllosilicate minerals will be easily detected by CheMin, it is important to establish detection limits of such phases to understand capabilities and limitations of the instrument. A previous study indicated that the (001) peak of smectite at 15 Ang was detectable in a mixture of 1 wt.% smectite with olivine when Mylar is the window material for the sample cell. Complications arise when Kapton is the window material because Kapton itself also has a diffraction peak near 15 Ang (6.8 deg 2 Theta). This study presents results of mineral mixtures of smectite and olivine to determine smectite detection limits for Kapton sample cells. Because the intensity and position of the smectite (001) peak depends on the hydration state, we also analyzed mixtures with "hydrated" and "dehydrated"h smectite to examine the effects of hydration state on detection limits.

  19. Enhancement of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) Detection limit using a low-pressure and short-pulse laser-induced plasma process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen Zhen; Deguchi, Yoshihiro; Kuwahara, Masakazu; Yan, Jun Jie; Liu, Ji Ping

    2013-11-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technology is an appealing technique compared with many other types of elemental analysis because of the fast response, high sensitivity, real-time, and noncontact features. One of the challenging targets of LIBS is the enhancement of the detection limit. In this study, the detection limit of gas-phase LIBS analysis has been improved by controlling the pressure and laser pulse width. In order to verify this method, low-pressure gas plasma was induced using nanosecond and picosecond lasers. The method was applied to the detection of Hg. The emission intensity ratio of the Hg atom to NO (IHg/INO) was analyzed to evaluate the LIBS detection limit because the NO emission (interference signal) was formed during the plasma generation and cooling process of N2 and O2 in the air. It was demonstrated that the enhancement of IHg/INO arose by decreasing the pressure to a few kilopascals, and the IHg/INO of the picosecond breakdown was always much higher than that of the nanosecond breakdown at low buffer gas pressure. Enhancement of IHg/INO increased more than 10 times at 700 Pa using picosecond laser with 35 ps pulse width. The detection limit was enhanced to 0.03 ppm (parts per million). We also saw that the spectra from the center and edge parts of plasma showed different features. Comparing the central spectra with the edge spectra, IHg/INO of the edge spectra was higher than that of the central spectra using the picosecond laser breakdown process.

  20. Source evaluation report phase 2 investigation: Limited field investigation. Final report: United States Air Force Environmental Restoration Program, Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-10-01

    This report describes the limited field investigation work done to address issues and answer unresolved questions regarding a collection of potential contaminant sources at Eielson Air Force Base (AFB), near Fairbanks, Alaska. These sources were listed in the Eielson AFB Federal Facility Agreement supporting the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) cleanup of the base. The limited field investigation began in 1993 to resolve all remaining technical issues and provide the data and analysis required to evaluate the environmental hazard associated with these sites. The objective of the limited field investigation was to allow the remedial project managers to sort each site into one of three categories: requiring remedial investigation/feasibility study, requiring interim removal action, or requiring no further remedial action.

  1. Detection of anabolic androgenic steroid abuse in doping control using mammalian reporter gene bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houtman, Corine J; Sterk, Saskia S; van de Heijning, Monique P M; Brouwer, Abraham; Stephany, Rainer W; van der Burg, Bart; Sonneveld, Edwin

    2009-04-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are a class of steroid hormones related to the male hormone testosterone. They are frequently detected as drugs in sport doping control. Being similar to or derived from natural male hormones, AAS share the activation of the androgen receptor (AR) as common mechanism of action. The mammalian androgen responsive reporter gene assay (AR CALUX bioassay), measuring compounds interacting with the AR can be used for the analysis of AAS without the necessity of knowing their chemical structure beforehand, whereas current chemical-analytical approaches may have difficulty in detecting compounds with unknown structures, such as designer steroids. This study demonstrated that AAS prohibited in sports and potential designer AAS can be detected with this AR reporter gene assay, but that also additional steroid activities of AAS could be found using additional mammalian bioassays for other types of steroid hormones. Mixtures of AAS were found to behave additively in the AR reporter gene assay showing that it is possible to use this method for complex mixtures as are found in doping control samples, including mixtures that are a result of multi drug use. To test if mammalian reporter gene assays could be used for the detection of AAS in urine samples, background steroidal activities were measured. AAS-spiked urine samples, mimicking doping positive samples, showed significantly higher androgenic activities than unspiked samples. GC-MS analysis of endogenous androgens and AR reporter gene assay analysis of urine samples showed how a combined chemical-analytical and bioassay approach can be used to identify samples containing AAS. The results indicate that the AR reporter gene assay, in addition to chemical-analytical methods, can be a valuable tool for the analysis of AAS for doping control purposes.

  2. X-ray Bursts in Neutron Star and Black Hole Binaries from USA Data: Detections and Upper Limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tournear, Derek M

    2003-02-18

    Narayan and Heyl (2002) have developed a theoretical framework to convert suitable upper limits on type I X-ray bursts from accreting black hole candidates (BHCs) into evidence for an event horizon. However, no appropriate observational limit exists in the literature. In this paper we survey 2101.2 ks of data from the Unconventional Stellar Aspect (USA) X-ray timing experiment and 5142 ks of data from the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) experiment to obtain a formal constraint of this type. 1122 ks of neutron star data yield a population averaged mean burst rate of 1.69 x 10{sup -5} bursts s{sup -1} while 6081 ks of BHC data yield a 95% confidence level upper limit of 4.9 x 10{sup -7} bursts s{sup -1}. This is the first published limit of this type for Black Hole Candidates. Applying the theoretical framework of Narayan and Heyl (2002) we calculate regions of unstable luminosity where the neutron stars are expected to burst and the BHCs would be expected to burst if they had a surface. In this unstable luminosity region 464 ks of neutron star data yield an averaged mean burst rate of 4.1 x 10{sup -5} bursts s{sup -1} and 1512 ks of BHC data yield a 95% confidence level upper limit of 2.0 x 10{sup 6} bursts s{sup -1}, and a limit of > 10 {sigma} that BHCs do not burst with a rate similar to the rate of neutron stars in these unstable regions. This gives further evidence that BHCs do not have surfaces unless there is some new physics occurring on their surface.

  3. 40 CFR 60.3052 - What else must I report if I have a deviation from the operating limits or the emission limitations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... control device was bypassed, or if a performance test was conducted that showed a deviation from any... deviation from the operating limits or the emission limitations? 60.3052 Section 60.3052 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR...

  4. Final report on the UKAEA defect detection trials on test pieces 3 and 4. December 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lock, D.L.; Cowburn, K.J.

    1983-03-01

    The report follows ND-R-845(R) which described the scope, inspection procedures and results of the defect detection trials on test pieces 3 and 4. The work has been aimed at assessing the ability of non-destructive testing techniques, to detect and size defects near the clad/base metal interface of a flat piece and the inner radius of a PWR inlet nozzle. Following the destructive examination of the test pieces at Ispra, the true sizes of the intended defects are now known. These sizes are compared with that intended and the performance of the inspection teams reviewed. (author)

  5. Utility and limitations of Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination-Revised for detecting mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komadina, Natalie C; Terpening, Zoe; Huang, Yue; Halliday, Glenda M; Naismith, Sharon L; Lewis, Simon J G

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the utility of the Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination-Revised (ACE-R) as a screening tool for mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease (PD-MCI). PD patients underwent comprehensive neuropsychological and neurological evaluations and ACE-R assessment. The ACE-R was superior to the Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE) in detecting PD-MCI, with a cutoff score of ≤93 offering a sensitivity of 61% and a specificity of 64%. The utility of the ACE-R in detecting PD-MCI is largely influenced by the fluency sub-domain score, and has optimal discriminability when utilized in patients with lower levels of education (≤12 years of formal schooling). The ACE-R must be used cautiously as a screening tool for PD-MCI, with results being most influenced by its fluency sub-domain score and patient education levels. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Signal Detection of Imipenem Compared to Other Drugs from Korea Adverse Event Reporting System Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyounghoon; Soukavong, Mick; Kim, Jungmee; Kwon, Kyoung Eun; Jin, Xue Mei; Lee, Joongyub; Yang, Bo Ram; Park, Byung Joo

    2017-05-01

    To detect signals of adverse drug events after imipenem treatment using the Korea Institute of Drug Safety & Risk Management-Korea adverse event reporting system database (KIDS-KD). We performed data mining using KIDS-KD, which was constructed using spontaneously reported adverse event (AE) reports between December 1988 and June 2014. We detected signals calculated the proportional reporting ratio, reporting odds ratio, and information component of imipenem. We defined a signal as any AE that satisfied all three indices. The signals were compared with drug labels of nine countries. There were 807582 spontaneous AEs reports in the KIDS-KD. Among those, the number of antibiotics related AEs was 192510; 3382 reports were associated with imipenem. The most common imipenem-associated AE was the drug eruption; 353 times. We calculated the signal by comparing with all other antibiotics and drugs; 58 and 53 signals satisfied the three methods. We compared the drug labelling information of nine countries, including the USA, the UK, Japan, Italy, Switzerland, Germany, France, Canada, and South Korea, and discovered that the following signals were currently not included in drug labels: hypokalemia, cardiac arrest, cardiac failure, Parkinson's syndrome, myocardial infarction, and prostate enlargement. Hypokalemia was an additional signal compared with all other antibiotics, and the other signals were not different compared with all other antibiotics and all other drugs. We detected new signals that were not listed on the drug labels of nine countries. However, further pharmacoepidemiologic research is needed to evaluate the causality of these signals. © Copyright: Yonsei University College of Medicine 2017

  7. Recovery Efficiency, False Negative Rate, and Limit of Detection Performance of a Validated Macrofoam-Swab Sampling Method with Low Surface Concentrations of Two Bacillus anthracis Surrogates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piepel, Gregory F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hutchison, Janine R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Deatherage Kaiser, Brooke L [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Amidan, Brett G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sydor, Michael A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Barrett, Christopher A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-03-31

    The performance of a macrofoam-swab sampling method was evaluated using Bacillus anthracis Sterne (BAS) and Bacillus atrophaeus Nakamura (BG) spores applied at nine low target amounts (2-500 spores) to positive-control plates and test coupons (2 in. × 2 in.) of four surface materials (glass, stainless steel, vinyl tile, and plastic). Test results from cultured samples were used to evaluate the effects of surrogate, surface concentration, and surface material on recovery efficiency (RE), false negative rate (FNR), and limit of detection. For RE, surrogate and surface material had statistically significant effects, but concentration did not. Mean REs were the lowest for vinyl tile (50.8% with BAS, 40.2% with BG) and the highest for glass (92.8% with BAS, 71.4% with BG). FNR values ranged from 0 to 0.833 for BAS and 0 to 0.806 for BG, with values increasing as concentration decreased in the range tested (0.078 to 19.375 CFU/cm2, where CFU denotes ‘colony forming units’). Surface material also had a statistically significant effect. A FNR-concentration curve was fit for each combination of surrogate and surface material. For both surrogates, the FNR curves tended to be the lowest for glass and highest for vinyl title. The FNR curves for BG tended to be higher than for BAS at lower concentrations, especially for glass. Results using a modified Rapid Viability-Polymerase Chain Reaction (mRV-PCR) analysis method were also obtained. The mRV-PCR results and comparisons to the culture results will be discussed in a subsequent report.

  8. Recovery Efficiency, False Negative Rate, and Limit of Detection Performance of a Validated Macrofoam-Swab Sampling Method with Low Surface Concentrations of Two Bacillus anthracis Surrogates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piepel, Gregory F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hutchison, Janine R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kaiser, Brooke L. D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Amidan, Brett G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sydor, Michael A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Barrett, Christopher A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-06-16

    The performance of a macrofoam-swab sampling method was evaluated using Bacillus anthracis Sterne (BAS) and Bacillus atrophaeus Nakamura (BG) spores applied at nine low target amounts (2-500 spores) to positive-control plates and test coupons (2 in × 2 in) of four surface materials (glass, stainless steel, vinyl tile, and plastic). Test results from cultured samples were used to evaluate the effects of surrogate, surface concentration, and surface material on recovery efficiency (RE), false negative rate (FNR), and limit of detection. For RE, surrogate and surface material had statistically significant effects, but concentration did not. Mean REs were the lowest for vinyl tile (50.8% with BAS, 40.2% with BG) and the highest for glass (92.8% with BAS, 71.4% with BG). FNR values ranged from 0 to 0.833 for BAS and 0 to 0.806 for BG, with values increasing as concentration decreased in the range tested (0.078 to 19.375 CFU/cm2, where CFU denotes ‘colony forming units’). Surface material also had a statistically significant effect. A FNR-concentration curve was fit for each combination of surrogate and surface material. For both surrogates, the FNR curves tended to be the lowest for glass and highest for vinyl title. The FNR curves for BG tended to be higher than for BAS at lower concentrations, especially for glass. Results using a modified Rapid Viability-Polymerase Chain Reaction (mRV-PCR) analysis method were also obtained. The mRV-PCR results and comparisons to the culture results are discussed in a separate report.

  9. Detection limits of nuclear radiation and radioactivity measurements. Digital, non-selective measurements on untreated specimens. Draft. Nachweisgrenzen bei Kernstrahlungs- und Radioaktivitaetsmessungen. Digitale, nichtselektive Messungen ohne Probenbehandlung. Entwurf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    The standard applies to nuclear radiation measurements where the number of pulses is recorded directly, considering exclusively the statistical character of radioactive decay and pulse counting, with the measuring time being short with regard to the half-life of radionuclides, and instrument dead-times being neglectible. The standard is intended to define suitable characteristics allowing an evaluation of detection efficiency. Two criteria are explained for given error probabilities: the sensitivity limit which allows a decision to be made as to whether the pulses recorded include values contributed by the sample; the detection limit which permits an evaluation of the measuring method in terms of suitability to the measuring goals. (orig./HP).

  10. Comparison of sensitivities and detection limits between direct excitation and secondary excitation modes in energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artz, B.E.; Short, M.A.

    1976-01-01

    A comparison was made between the direct tube excitation mode and the secondary target excitation mode using a Kevex 0810 energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence system. Relative sensitivities and detection limits were determined with two system configurations. The first configuration used a standard, high power, x-ray fluorescence tube to directly excite the specimen. Several x-ray tubes, including chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten, both filtered and not filtered, were employed. The second configuration consisted of using the x-ray tube to excite a secondary target which in turn excited the specimen. Appropriate targets were compared to the direct excitation results. Relative sensitivities and detection limits were determined for K-series lines for elements from magnesium to barium contained in a low atomic number matrix and in a high atomic number matrix

  11. Characteristics of right-sided colonic neoplasia and colonoscopy barriers limiting their early detection and prognosis: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischbach, Wolfgang; Elsome, Rory; Amlani, Bharat

    2018-06-05

    Colonoscopy provides less protection from colorectal cancer in the right colon than the left. Areas covered: This review examines patient outcomes and colonoscopy success rates to identify factors that limit the protective effect of colonoscopy in the right colon. The MEDLINE and Embase databases were searched for literature from 2000 onwards, on the long-term outcomes and differences in screening practice between the right and left colon. In total, 12 systematic reviews (including nine meta-analyses) and 44 primary data records were included. Differences in patient outcomes and colonoscopy practice were identified between the right and left colon, suggesting that several factors, many of which disproportionally affect the right colon, impact lesion detection rates. Shorter withdrawal times reduce detection rates, while longer times significantly increase detection; mostly of adenomas in the right colon. Colonoscope attachments often only show a significant improvement in detection rates in the right colon, suggesting detection is more challenging due to visibility of the right colonic mucosa. Higher bowel cleansing grades significantly improve detection rates in the right colon compared to the left. Expert commentary: These findings confirm the need for continued improvement of colonoscopy effectiveness, and obligatory quality assessment, overall and especially in the right colon.

  12. Final Scientific Report, Integrated Seismic Event Detection and Location by Advanced Array Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kvaerna, T.; Gibbons. S.J.; Ringdal, F; Harris, D.B.

    2007-01-30

    In the field of nuclear explosion monitoring, it has become a priority to detect, locate, and identify seismic events down to increasingly small magnitudes. The consideration of smaller seismic events has implications for a reliable monitoring regime. Firstly, the number of events to be considered increases greatly; an exponential increase in naturally occurring seismicity is compounded by large numbers of seismic signals generated by human activity. Secondly, the signals from smaller events become more difficult to detect above the background noise and estimates of parameters required for locating the events may be subject to greater errors. Thirdly, events are likely to be observed by a far smaller number of seismic stations, and the reliability of event detection and location using a very limited set of observations needs to be quantified. For many key seismic stations, detection lists may be dominated by signals from routine industrial explosions which should be ascribed, automatically and with a high level of confidence, to known sources. This means that expensive analyst time is not spent locating routine events from repeating seismic sources and that events from unknown sources, which could be of concern in an explosion monitoring context, are more easily identified and can be examined with due care. We have obtained extensive lists of confirmed seismic events from mining and other artificial sources which have provided an excellent opportunity to assess the quality of existing fully-automatic event bulletins and to guide the development of new techniques for online seismic processing. Comparing the times and locations of confirmed events from sources in Fennoscandia and NW Russia with the corresponding time and location estimates reported in existing automatic bulletins has revealed substantial mislocation errors which preclude a confident association of detected signals with known industrial sources. The causes of the errors are well understood and are

  13. Final Scientific Report, Integrated Seismic Event Detection and Location by Advanced Array Processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kvaerna, T.; Gibbons. S.J.; Ringdal, F; Harris, D.B.

    2007-01-01

    In the field of nuclear explosion monitoring, it has become a priority to detect, locate, and identify seismic events down to increasingly small magnitudes. The consideration of smaller seismic events has implications for a reliable monitoring regime. Firstly, the number of events to be considered increases greatly; an exponential increase in naturally occurring seismicity is compounded by large numbers of seismic signals generated by human activity. Secondly, the signals from smaller events become more difficult to detect above the background noise and estimates of parameters required for locating the events may be subject to greater errors. Thirdly, events are likely to be observed by a far smaller number of seismic stations, and the reliability of event detection and location using a very limited set of observations needs to be quantified. For many key seismic stations, detection lists may be dominated by signals from routine industrial explosions which should be ascribed, automatically and with a high level of confidence, to known sources. This means that expensive analyst time is not spent locating routine events from repeating seismic sources and that events from unknown sources, which could be of concern in an explosion monitoring context, are more easily identified and can be examined with due care. We have obtained extensive lists of confirmed seismic events from mining and other artificial sources which have provided an excellent opportunity to assess the quality of existing fully-automatic event bulletins and to guide the development of new techniques for online seismic processing. Comparing the times and locations of confirmed events from sources in Fennoscandia and NW Russia with the corresponding time and location estimates reported in existing automatic bulletins has revealed substantial mislocation errors which preclude a confident association of detected signals with known industrial sources. The causes of the errors are well understood and are

  14. Improvement of detection limits in the annular 241Am radioisotope-excited X-ray fluorescence analysis for minor elements of environmental sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thai My Phe; Ngo Quang Huy; Nguyen Van Suc; Tran Van Luyen; Nguyen Van Mai; Dao Van Hoang; Trinh Thi Bich

    2003-01-01

    The improvement of limit detection to elements Pb, Sr, Zr, Nd, and Ba in mud samples is presented. Two ways for reducing background radiation are: 1/ choosing the optimum γ-ray-excited X-ray assembly such as scattering angle (θ), filter for primary beam, excited holder, collimator for fluorescent lines, etc; 2/ using the chemical separation method to remove major composition for matrix reduction. (NHA)

  15. Testing the discrimination and detection limits of WorldView-2 imagery on a challenging invasive plant target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, T. P.; Wardell-Johnson, G. W.; Pracilio, G.; Brown, C.; Corner, R.; van Klinken, R. D.

    2016-02-01

    Invasive plants pose significant threats to biodiversity and ecosystem function globally, leading to costly monitoring and management effort. While remote sensing promises cost-effective, robust and repeatable monitoring tools to support intervention, it has been largely restricted to airborne platforms that have higher spatial and spectral resolutions, but which lack the coverage and versatility of satellite-based platforms. This study tests the ability of the WorldView-2 (WV2) eight-band satellite sensor for detecting the invasive shrub mesquite (Prosopis spp.) in the north-west Pilbara region of Australia. Detectability was challenged by the target taxa being largely defoliated by a leaf-tying biological control agent (Gelechiidae: Evippe sp. #1) and the presence of other shrubs and trees. Variable importance in the projection (VIP) scores identified bands offering greatest capacity for discrimination were those covering the near-infrared, red, and red-edge wavelengths. Wavelengths between 400 nm and 630 nm (coastal blue, blue, green, yellow) were not useful for species level discrimination in this case. Classification accuracy was tested on three band sets (simulated standard multispectral, all bands, and bands with VIP scores ≥1). Overall accuracies were comparable amongst all band-sets (Kappa = 0.71-0.77). However, mesquite omission rates were unacceptably high (21.3%) when using all eight bands relative to the simulated standard multispectral band-set (9.5%) and the band-set informed by VIP scores (11.9%). An incremental cover evaluation on the latter identified most omissions to be for objects high mapping accuracy of objects >16 m2 allows application for mapping mesquite shrubs and coalesced stands, the former not previously possible, even with 3 m resolution hyperspectral imagery. WV2 imagery offers excellent portability potential for detecting other species where spectral/spatial resolution or coverage has been an impediment. New generation satellite

  16. Quantitative assessment of a data-limited recreational bonefish fishery using a time-series of fishing guides reports.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolando O Santos

    Full Text Available Recreational fisheries can be prone to severe declines, yet these fisheries, particularly catch-and-release, are often data-limited, constraining our ability to conduct stock assessments. A combination of catch and effort indices derived from fisheries-dependent data (FDD gathered from fishing logbooks could be a powerful approach to inform these data gaps. This study demonstrates the utility of using different catch metrics such as indices of abundance, species richness associated with reported catch, and the success rate of targeted trips, to assess historical shifts in the trajectory of the data-limited bonefish (Albula vulpes fishery in Florida Bay, an economically-important recreational fishery within the Caribbean Basin. We used FDD from fishing guide reports submitted to Everglades National Park to determine temporal patterns in the bonefish population over the past 35 years. These reports indicated a decline in recreational catches in Florida Bay since the late 1980s, with an accelerated decline starting in the late 1990s-early 2000s. Analyses showed an overall 42% reduction in bonefish catches. Trends in the proportion of positive trips (i.e., the probability of catching success followed the declining catch patterns, suggesting major population changes starting in 1999-2000. As bonefish catches declined, species richness in bonefish trips increased by 34%, suggesting a decrease in bonefish abundance and/or shift in fishing effort (e.g., giving-up time, changes in preferred species. Results provide additional resolution to a pattern of decline for bonefish in South Florida and highlight the value of reconstructing time-series for the development of hypotheses about the potential driving mechanisms of species decline. Further, the data-limited nature of most recreational fisheries, and the increase in a use of catch-and-release as a fisheries management strategy point to the need to develop further data integration tools to assess

  17. Applying ISO 11929:2010 Standard to detection limit calculation in least-squares based multi-nuclide gamma-ray spectrum evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanisch, G., E-mail: guenter.kanisch@hanse.net

    2017-05-21

    The concepts of ISO 11929 (2010) are applied to evaluation of radionuclide activities from more complex multi-nuclide gamma-ray spectra. From net peak areas estimated by peak fitting, activities and their standard uncertainties are calculated by weighted linear least-squares method with an additional step, where uncertainties of the design matrix elements are taken into account. A numerical treatment of the standard's uncertainty function, based on ISO 11929 Annex C.5, leads to a procedure for deriving decision threshold and detection limit values. The methods shown allow resolving interferences between radionuclide activities also in case of calculating detection limits where they can improve the latter by including more than one gamma line per radionuclide. The co'mmon single nuclide weighted mean is extended to an interference-corrected (generalized) weighted mean, which, combined with the least-squares method, allows faster detection limit calculations. In addition, a new grouped uncertainty budget was inferred, which for each radionuclide gives uncertainty budgets from seven main variables, such as net count rates, peak efficiencies, gamma emission intensities and others; grouping refers to summation over lists of peaks per radionuclide.

  18. Long range surface plasmon resonance with ultra-high penetration depth for self-referenced sensing and ultra-low detection limit using diverging beam approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isaacs, Sivan, E-mail: sivan.isaacs@gmail.com; Abdulhalim, Ibrahim [Department of Electro-Optical Engineering and TheIlse Katz Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel); NEW CREATE Programme, School of Materials Science and Engineering, 1 CREATE Way, Research Wing, #02-06/08, Singapore 138602 (Singapore)

    2015-05-11

    Using an insulator-metal-insulator structure with dielectric having refractive index (RI) larger than the analyte, long range surface plasmon (SP) resonance exhibiting ultra-high penetration depth is demonstrated for sensing applications of large bioentities at wavelengths in the visible range. Based on the diverging beam approach in Kretschmann-Raether configuration, one of the SP resonances is shown to shift in response to changes in the analyte RI while the other is fixed; thus, it can be used as a built in reference. The combination of the high sensitivity, high penetration depth and self-reference using the diverging beam approach in which a dark line is detected of the high sensitivity, high penetration depth, self-reference, and the diverging beam approach in which a dark line is detected using large number of camera pixels with a smart algorithm for sub-pixel resolution, a sensor with ultra-low detection limit is demonstrated suitable for large bioentities.

  19. Detection of pneumonia using free-text radiology reports in the BioSense system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asatryan, Armenak; Benoit, Stephen; Ma, Haobo; English, Roseanne; Elkin, Peter; Tokars, Jerome

    2011-01-01

    Near real-time disease detection using electronic data sources is a public health priority. Detecting pneumonia is particularly important because it is the manifesting disease of several bioterrorism agents as well as a complication of influenza, including avian and novel H1N1 strains. Text radiology reports are available earlier than physician diagnoses and so could be integral to rapid detection of pneumonia. We performed a pilot study to determine which keywords present in text radiology reports are most highly associated with pneumonia diagnosis. Electronic radiology text reports from 11 hospitals from February 1, 2006 through December 31, 2007 were used. We created a computerized algorithm that searched for selected keywords ("airspace disease", "consolidation", "density", "infiltrate", "opacity", and "pneumonia"), differentiated between clinical history and radiographic findings, and accounted for negations and double negations; this algorithm was tested on a sample of 350 radiology reports. We used the algorithm to study 189,246 chest radiographs, searching for the keywords and determining their association with a final International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) diagnosis of pneumonia. Performance of the search algorithm in finding keywords, and association of the keywords with a pneumonia diagnosis. In the sample of 350 radiographs, the search algorithm was highly successful in identifying the selected keywords (sensitivity 98.5%, specificity 100%). Analysis of the 189,246 radiographs showed that the keyword "pneumonia" was the strongest predictor of an ICD-9-CM diagnosis of pneumonia (adjusted odds ratio 11.8) while "density" was the weakest (adjusted odds ratio 1.5). In general, the most highly associated keyword present in the report, regardless of whether a less highly associated keyword was also present, was the best predictor of a diagnosis of pneumonia. Empirical methods may assist in finding radiology

  20. Surface modification of alignment layer by ultraviolet irradiation to dramatically improve the detection limit of liquid-crystal-based immunoassay for the cancer biomarker CA125.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Hui-Wen; Lee, Mon-Juan; Lee, Wei

    2015-05-01

    Liquid crystal (LC)-based biosensing has attracted much attention in recent years. We focus on improving the detection limit of LC-based immunoassay techniques by surface modification of the surfactant alignment layer consisting of dimethyloctadecyl[3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl]ammonium chloride (DMOAP). The cancer biomarker CA125 was detected with an array of anti-CA125 antibodies immobilized on the ultraviolet (UV)-modified DMOAP monolayer. Compared with a pristine counterpart, UV irradiation enhanced the binding affinity of the CA125 antibody and reproducibility of immunodetection in which a detection limit of 0.01 ng∕ml for the cancer biomarker CA125 was achieved. Additionally, the optical texture observed under a crossed polarized microscope was correlated with the analyte concentration. In a proof-of-concept experiment using CA125-spiked human serum as the analyte, specific binding between the CA125 antigen and the anti-CA125 antibody resulted in a distinct and concentration-dependent optical response despite the high background caused by nonspecific binding of other biomolecules in the human serum. Results from this study indicate that UVmodification of the alignment layer, as well as detection with LCs of large birefringence, contributes to the enhanced performance of the label-free LC-based immunodetection, which may be considered a promising alternative to conventional label-based methods.

  1. Final Technical Report for the Neutron Detection without Helium-3 Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ely, James H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bliss, Mary [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kouzes, Richard T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lintereur, Azaree T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Robinson, Sean M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Siciliano, Edward R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Swinhoe, Martyn T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Woodring, Mitchell L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-11-01

    This report details the results of the research and development work accomplished for the ‘Neutron Detection without Helium-3’ project conducted during the 2011-2013 fiscal years. The primary focus of the project was to investigate commercially available technologies that might be used in safeguards applications in the relatively near term. Other technologies that are being developed may be more applicable in the future, but were outside the scope of this study.

  2. Students' Reports of Severe Violence in School as a Tool for Early Detection and Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yablon, Yaacov B.

    2017-01-01

    Early detection of severe violence is a significant challenge for many schools. Three studies were conducted on samples of 6th, 8th, and 10th graders (12-16 years old). The first study, based on paired reports of teachers and students (n = 130), showed that a high percentage of both victims and perpetrators of severe violence are not identified by…

  3. Detection of Acute and Early HIV-1 Infections in an HIV Hyper-Endemic Area with Limited Resources.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simnikiwe H Mayaphi

    Full Text Available Two thirds of the world's new HIV infections are in sub-Saharan Africa. Acute HIV infection (AHI is the time of virus acquisition until the appearance of HIV antibodies. Early HIV infection, which includes AHI, is the interval between virus acquisition and establishment of viral load set-point. This study aimed to detect acute and early HIV infections in a hyper-endemic setting.This was a cross-sectional diagnostic study that enrolled individuals who had negative rapid HIV results in five clinics in South Africa. Pooled nucleic acid amplification testing (NAAT was performed, followed by individual sample testing in positive pools. NAAT-positive participants were recalled to the clinics for confirmatory testing and appropriate management. HIV antibody, p24 antigen, Western Blot and avidity tests were performed for characterization of NAAT-positive samples.The study enrolled 6910 individuals with negative rapid HIV results. Median age was 27 years (interquartile range {IQR}: 23-31. NAAT was positive in 55 samples, resulting in 0.8% newly diagnosed HIV-infected individuals (95% confidence interval {CI}: 0.6-1.0. The negative predictive value for rapid HIV testing was 99.2% (95% CI: 99.0-99.4. Characterization of NAAT-positive samples revealed that 0.04% (95% CI: 0.000-0.001 had AHI, 0.3% (95% CI: 0.1-0.4 had early HIV infection, and 0.5% (95% CI: 0.5-0.7 had chronic HIV infection. Forty-seven (86% of NAAT-positive participants returned for follow-up at a median of 4 weeks (IQR: 2-8. Follow-up rapid tests were positive in 96% of these participants.NAAT demonstrated that a substantial number of HIV-infected individuals are misdiagnosed at South African points-of-care. Follow-up rapid tests done within a 4 week interval detected early and chronic HIV infections initially missed by rapid HIV testing. This may be a practical and affordable strategy for earlier detection of these infections in resource-constrained settings. Newer molecular tests that can

  4. Sensitive detection of a small parathyroid adenoma using fluorocholine PET/CT: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padinhare-Keloth, Thanseer N. T. K.; Bhadada, Sanjay K.; Sood, Ashwani; Kumar, Rajender; Behera, Arunanshu; Radotra, Bishan D.; Mittal, Bhagwant R. [PGIMER, Chandigarh (India)

    2017-06-15

    Primary hyperparathyroidism is caused by parathyroid adenoma in the majority of cases and diagnosis is usually made biochemically. Pre-surgical localization of parathyroid adenoma is essential to limit the extent of surgery and avoid missing them at ectopic sites. Anatomical and functional imaging are used for the localization, but may fail to identify the small and ectopic parathyroid adenoma. We present a case of small sized ectopic parathyroid adenoma at unusual location detected by F-18 fluorocholine (FCH) PET/CT, where other imaging modalities failed. The post-operative histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of ectopic parathyroid adenoma.

  5. A discussion on the merits and limitations of using drive-by monitoring to detect localised damage in a bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hester, David; González, Arturo

    2017-06-01

    Given the large number of bridges that currently have no instrumentation, there are obvious advantages in monitoring the condition of a bridge by analysing the response of a vehicle crossing it. As a result, the last two decades have seen a rise in the research attempting to solve the problem of identifying damage in a bridge from vehicle measurements. This paper examines the theoretical feasibility and practical limitations of a drive-by system in identifying damage associated to localised stiffness losses. First, the nature of the damage feature that is sought within the vehicle response needs to be characterized. For this purpose, the total vehicle response is considered to be made of 'static' and 'dynamic' components, and where the bridge has experienced a localised loss in stiffness, an additional 'damage' component. Understanding the nature of this 'damage' component is crucial to have an informed discussion on how damage can be identified and localised. Leveraging this new understanding, the authors propose a wavelet-based drive-by algorithm. By comparing the effect of the 'damage' component to other key effects defining the measurements such as 'vehicle speed', the 'road profile' and 'noise' on a wavelet contour plot, it is possible to establish if there is a frequency range where drive-by can be successful. The algorithm uses then specific frequency bands to improve the sensitivity to damage with respect to limitations imposed by Vehicle-Bridge vibrations. Recommendations on the selection of the mother wavelet and frequency band are provided. Finally, the paper discusses the impact of noise and road profile on the ability of the approach to identify damage and how periodic measurements can be effective at monitoring localised stiffness changes.

  6. Mobile phone imaging and cloud-based analysis for standardized malaria detection and reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherr, Thomas F.; Gupta, Sparsh; Wright, David W.; Haselton, Frederick R.

    2016-06-01

    Rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) have been widely deployed in low-resource settings. These tests are typically read by visual inspection, and accurate record keeping and data aggregation remains a substantial challenge. A successful malaria elimination campaign will require new strategies that maximize the sensitivity of RDTs, reduce user error, and integrate results reporting tools. In this report, an unmodified mobile phone was used to photograph RDTs, which were subsequently uploaded into a globally accessible database, REDCap, and then analyzed three ways: with an automated image processing program, visual inspection, and a commercial lateral flow reader. The mobile phone image processing detected 20.6 malaria parasites/microliter of blood, compared to the commercial lateral flow reader which detected 64.4 parasites/microliter. Experienced observers visually identified positive malaria cases at 12.5 parasites/microliter, but encountered reporting errors and false negatives. Visual interpretation by inexperienced users resulted in only an 80.2% true negative rate, with substantial disagreement in the lower parasitemia range. We have demonstrated that combining a globally accessible database, such as REDCap, with mobile phone based imaging of RDTs provides objective, secure, automated, data collection and result reporting. This simple combination of existing technologies would appear to be an attractive tool for malaria elimination campaigns.

  7. Limitations of Using IL-17A and IFN-γ-Induced Protein 10 to Detect Bovine Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Ting; Gao, Xintao; Yang, Hongjun; Li, Pingjun; Liang, Qianqian; Hou, Shaohua; Sui, Xiukun; Guo, Xiaoyu; Yuan, Weifeng; Zhu, Hongfei; Ding, Jiabo; Jia, Hong

    2018-01-01

    Bovine tuberculosis (bTB) is primarily caused by infection with Mycobacterium bovis, which belongs to the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. The airborne route is considered the most common for transmission of M. bovis, and more than 15% of cattle with bTB shed the Mycobacterium, which can be detect by nested PCR to amplify mycobacterial mpb70 from a nasal swab from a cow. To screen for cytokines fostering early and accurate detection of bTB, peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from naturally M. bovis-infected, experimentally M. bovis 68002-infected, and uninfected cattle, then these cells were stimulated by PPD-B, CFP-10-ESAT-6 (CE), or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) for 6 h. The levels of interferon gamma (IFN-γ), IFN-γ-induced protein 10 (IP-10), IL-6, IL-12, IL-17A, and tumor necrosis factor alpha mRNA were measured using real-time PCR. To explore the cytokines associated with different periods of M. bovis infection, cattle were divided into three groups: PCR-positive, PCR-negative, and uninfected using the tuberculin skin test, CFP-10/ESAT-6/TB10.4 protein cocktail-based skin test, IFN-γ release assay (IGRA), CFP-10/ESAT-6 (CE)-based IGRA, and nested PCR. The expression of IP-10, IL-17A, and IFN-γ proteins induced by PPD-B, CE, or PBS was detected by ELISA. The results showed that levels of PPD-B-stimulated IL-17A and IP-10 (mRNA and protein), and CE-induced IP-10 (mRNA and protein) were significantly higher in cattle naturally or experimentally infected with M. bovis than in those that were uninfected. The levels of PPD-B- or CE-induced IL-17A and IP-10 (protein) could be used to differentiate M. bovis-infected calves from uninfected ones for 6 to 30 weeks post-infection, whereas PPD-B- and CE-induced IP-10 and IL-17A mRNA expression could be used to differentiate M. bovis-infected calves from uninfected ones between 6 and 58 weeks post-infection. However, CE-induced IL-17A (protein) was not a reliable indicator of M. bovis infection

  8. Evaluation of a manual DNA extraction protocol and an isothermal amplification assay for detecting HIV-1 DNA from dried blood spots for use in resource-limited settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Jeanne A; Ibe, Christine O; Moore, Miranda S; Host, Christel; Simon, Gary L

    2012-05-01

    In resource-limited settings (RLS) dried blood spots (DBS) are collected on infants and transported through provincial laboratories to a central facility where HIV-1 DNA PCR testing is performed using specialized equipment. Implementing a simpler approach not requiring such equipment or skilled personnel could allow the more numerous provincial laboratories to offer testing, improving turn-around-time to identify and treat infected infants sooner. Assess performances of a manual DNA extraction method and helicase-dependent amplification (HDA) assay for detecting HIV-1 DNA from DBS. 60 HIV-1 infected adults were enrolled, blood samples taken and DBS made. DBS extracts were assessed for DNA concentration and beta globin amplification using PCR and melt-curve analysis. These same extracts were then tested for HIV-1 DNA using HDA and compared to results generated by PCR and pyrosequencing. Finally, HDA limit of detection (LOD) studies were performed using DBS extracts prepared with known numbers of 8E5 cells. The manual extraction protocol consistently yielded high concentrations of amplifiable DNA from DBS. LOD assessment demonstrated HDA detected ∼470 copies/ml of HIV-1 DNA extracts in 4/4 replicates. No statistical difference was found using the McNemar's test when comparing HDA to PCR for detecting HIV-1 DNA from DBS. Using just a magnet, heat block and pipettes, the manual extraction protocol and HDA assay detected HIV-1 DNA from DBS at levels that would be useful for early infant diagnosis. Next steps will include assessing HDA for non-B HIV-1 subtypes recognition and comparison to Roche HIV-1 DNA v1.5 PCR assay. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Use and limitations of radiolabelled anti-CEA antibodies and their fragments for photoscanning detection of human colorectal carcinomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mach, J P; Forni, M; Ritschard, J; Buchegger, F; Carrel, S; Widgren, S; Donath, A; Alberto, P [Lausanne Univ. (Switzerland)

    1980-08-01

    Fifty-three patients with histologically proven carcinoma were injected with highly purified (/sup 131/I)-labelled goat antibodies or fragments of antibodies against carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Each patient was tested by external photoscanning 4, 24, 36, 48h after injection. In 22 patients (16 of 38 injected with intact antibodies, 5 of 13 with F(ab')/sub 2/ fragments and 1 of 2 with Fab' fragments), an increased concentration of /sup 131/I radioactivity corresponding to the previously known tumor location was detected by photoscanning 36-48 h after injection. Blood pool and secreted radioactivity was determined in all patients by injecting 15 min after scanning, (sup(99m)Tc)-labeled normal serum albumin and free sup(99m)TcO/sub 4//sup -/. The computerized subtraction of sup(99m)Tc from /sup 131/I radioactivity enhanced the definition of tumor localization in the 22 positive patients. However, in spite of the computerized subtraction, interpretation of the scans remained doubtful for 12 patients and was entirely negative for 19 additional patients.

  10. Preliminary minimum detectable limit measurements in 208-L drums for selected actinide isotopes in mock-waste matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camp, D.C.; Wang, Tzu-Fang; Martz, H.E.

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary minimum detectable levels (MDLS) of selected actinide isotopes have been determined in full-scale, 55-gallon drums filled with a range of mock-waste materials from combustibles (0.14 g/CM 3 ) to sand (1.7 g/CM 3 ). Measurements were recorded from 100 to 10,000 seconds with selected actinide sources located in these drums at an edge position, on the center axis of a drum and midway between these two positions. Measurements were also made with a 166 Ho source to evaluate the attenuation of these mock-matrix materials as a function of energy. By knowing where the source activity is located within a drum, our preliminary results show that a simply collimated 90% HPGE detector can differentiate between TRU (>100 nCi/g) and LLW amounts of 239 Pu in only 100s of measurement time and with sufficient accuracy in both low and medium density, low Z materials. Other actinides measured so far include 235 U, 241 Am, and 244 Cm. These measurements begin to establish the probable MDLs achievable in the nondestructive assays of real waste drums when using active and passive CT. How future measurements may differ from these preliminary measurements is also discussed

  11. Limit of detection of a fiber optics gyroscope using a super luminescent radiation source; Limite de deteccion de un giroscopio de fibra optica usando una fuente de radiacion superluminiscente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandoval R, G.E. [Laboratorio de Optica Aplicada, Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnologico, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-186, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Nikolaev, V.A. [Departamento de Optica y Radiofisica Cuantica, Universidad Estatal de Telecomunicaciones de San Petersburgo, M.A. Bonch-Bruyevich, Kanal Moika 61, Saint Petersburg 191186, (Russian Federation)

    2003-07-01

    The main objective of this work is to establish the dependence of characteristics of the fiber optics gyroscope (FOG) with respect to the parameters of the super luminescent emission source based on doped optical fiber with rare earth elements (Super luminescent Fiber Source, SFS), argument the pumping rate election of the SFS to obtain characteristics limits of the FOG sensibility. By using this type of emission source in the FOG is recommend to use the rate when the direction of the pumping signal coincide with the super luminescent signal. The most results are the proposition and argumentation of the SFS election as emission source to be use in the FOG of the phase type. Such a decision allow to increase the characteristics of the FOG sensibility in comparison with the use of luminescent source of semiconductors emission which are extensively used in the present time. The use of emission source of the SFS type allow to come closer to the threshold of the obtained sensibility limit (detection limit) which is determined with the shot noise. (Author)

  12. Congenital Left Circumflex Coronary Artery Atresia Detected by 64-Slice Computed Tomography: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Yuan Liu

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available A variety of coronary artery disorders, including intramyocardial coronary segments and coronary artery anomalies, can result in sudden cardiac death, especially in young adults. The detection of structural coronary artery abnormalities is important in the management of patients at risk of sudden cardiac death. Coronary artery anomalies occur in about 1% of the population. Congenital absence of left circumflex coronary artery (LCX is a very rare vascular anomaly, and few cases have been reported in the literature, with a frequency of only 0.003% in all patients who underwent coronary angiography. Although coronary catheterization is the gold standard for the evaluation of coronary arterial patency disease, noninvasive computed tomography (CT is considered the diagnostic method of choice for the detection and evaluation of coronary artery anomaly. Herein, we report the case of a 17-year-old girl who presented with exertional dyspnea and chest pain and who was studied at our emergency department with the final diagnosis of LCX atresia detected by 64-slice CT. She may be the first case of congenital LCX atresia proved by multislice CT.

  13. The phantom menace. Determination of the true Method Detection Limit (MDL) for background levels of PCDDs, PCDFs, and cPCBs in human serum by high-resolution mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, W.; Welch, S.; DiPietro, E.; Cash, T.; McClure, C.; Needham, L.; Patterson, D. [CDC/ATSDR, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2004-09-15

    The recent worldwide decline in background serum levels of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, furans, and coplanar biphenyls (PCDDs/PCDFs/cPCBs) is unquestionably an important finding. However, as serum levels continue to diminish, our analytical methods for measuring these toxicants will continue to be ''pushed to their limit''. In a previous article, we investigated some of the variables that influence the quantification of ''ultra-trace'' (fg/g) concentrations of PCDDs/PCDFs and cPCBs in human serum. In this report, we continue to explore parameters that can affect the determination of the ''true'' detection limit of our method (MDL), using both analytical standards and matrix-based samples.

  14. Study of boron detection limit using the in-air PIGE set-up at LAMFI-USP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moro, M. V.; Silva, T. F.; Trindade, G. F.; Added, N.; Tabacniks, M. H. [Institute of Physics, University of São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-11-11

    The quantification of small amounts of boron in materials is of extreme importance in different areas of materials science. Boron is an important contaminant and also a silicon dopant in the semiconductor industry. Boron is also extensively used in nuclear power plants, either for neutron shielding or for safety control and boron is an essential nutrient for life, either vegetable or animal. The production of silicon solar cells, by refining metallurgical-grade silicon (MG-Si) requires the control and reduction of several silicon contaminants to very low concentration levels. Boron is one of the contaminants of solar-grade silicon (SG-Si) that must be controlled and quantified at sub-ppm levels. In the metallurgical purification, boron quantification is usually made by Inductive Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry, (ICP-MS) but the results need to be verified by an independent analytical method. In this work we present the results of the analysis of silicon samples by Particle Induced Gamma-Ray Emission (PIGE) aiming the quantification of low concentrations of boron. PIGE analysis was carried out using the in-air external beam line of the Laboratory for Materials Analysis with Ion Beams (LAMFI-USP) by the {sup 10}B(p,αγ({sup 7}Be nuclear reaction, and measuring the 429 keV γ-ray. The in-air PIGE measurements at LAMFI have a quantification limit of the order of 10{sup 16} at/cm{sup 2}.

  15. Study of boron detection limit using the in-air PIGE set-up at LAMFI-USP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, M. V.; Silva, T. F.; Trindade, G. F.; Added, N.; Tabacniks, M. H.

    2014-11-01

    The quantification of small amounts of boron in materials is of extreme importance in different areas of materials science. Boron is an important contaminant and also a silicon dopant in the semiconductor industry. Boron is also extensively used in nuclear power plants, either for neutron shielding or for safety control and boron is an essential nutrient for life, either vegetable or animal. The production of silicon solar cells, by refining metallurgical-grade silicon (MG-Si) requires the control and reduction of several silicon contaminants to very low concentration levels. Boron is one of the contaminants of solar-grade silicon (SG-Si) that must be controlled and quantified at sub-ppm levels. In the metallurgical purification, boron quantification is usually made by Inductive Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry, (ICP-MS) but the results need to be verified by an independent analytical method. In this work we present the results of the analysis of silicon samples by Particle Induced Gamma-Ray Emission (PIGE) aiming the quantification of low concentrations of boron. PIGE analysis was carried out using the in-air external beam line of the Laboratory for Materials Analysis with Ion Beans (LAMFI-USP) by the 10B ( p ,αγ(7Be nuclear reaction, and measuring the 429 keV γ-ray. The in-air PIGE measurements at LAMFI have a quantification limit of the order of 1016 at/cm2.

  16. Study of boron detection limit using the in-air PIGE set-up at LAMFI-USP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moro, M. V.; Silva, T. F.; Trindade, G. F.; Added, N.; Tabacniks, M. H.

    2014-01-01

    The quantification of small amounts of boron in materials is of extreme importance in different areas of materials science. Boron is an important contaminant and also a silicon dopant in the semiconductor industry. Boron is also extensively used in nuclear power plants, either for neutron shielding or for safety control and boron is an essential nutrient for life, either vegetable or animal. The production of silicon solar cells, by refining metallurgical-grade silicon (MG-Si) requires the control and reduction of several silicon contaminants to very low concentration levels. Boron is one of the contaminants of solar-grade silicon (SG-Si) that must be controlled and quantified at sub-ppm levels. In the metallurgical purification, boron quantification is usually made by Inductive Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry, (ICP-MS) but the results need to be verified by an independent analytical method. In this work we present the results of the analysis of silicon samples by Particle Induced Gamma-Ray Emission (PIGE) aiming the quantification of low concentrations of boron. PIGE analysis was carried out using the in-air external beam line of the Laboratory for Materials Analysis with Ion Beams (LAMFI-USP) by the 10 B(p,αγ( 7 Be nuclear reaction, and measuring the 429 keV γ-ray. The in-air PIGE measurements at LAMFI have a quantification limit of the order of 10 16 at/cm 2

  17. Predicament in detection and reporting of extended spectrum beta lactamase production in routine antibiotic susceptibility testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butt, T.; Butt, E.; Raza, S.

    2017-01-01

    This descriptive and cross-sectional study was planned to determine the dilemma of inadvertent detection of extended spectrum beta lactamase (ESBL) production in Enterobacteriaceaewhen using inhibition zone size of antibiotic disks of Cefotaxime or Aztreonam in routine antibiotic susceptibility testing as recommended by Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). Screening and double disk tests were adopted as per CLSI. Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 was used as control strain. Among total specimens of 5346, there were 348 isolates of Escherichia coli(n=235), Klebsiella pneumonia (n=92), Klebsiella oxytoca(n=3) or Proteus mirabilus(n=18). The screening method recommended by CLSI significantly falsely detected ESBL production in 79 (32.3%) isolates (p<0.0001). ESBL detection is important as its frequency is high and treatment of the infection varies with the presence and absence of ESBL. To avoid false reporting, proper phenotypic detection of ESBL confirmatory method-like double-disk synergy test, should be used routinely. (author)

  18. Combined diversity and improved energy detection in cooperative spectrum sensing with faded reporting channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivas Nallagonda

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we evaluate the performance of cooperative spectrum sensing (CSS where each cognitive radio (CR employs an improved energy detector (IED with multiple antennas and uses selection combining (SC for detecting the primary user (PU in noisy and faded sensing (S channels. We derive an expression for the probability of false alarm and expressions for probability of missed detection in non-faded (AWGN and Rayleigh faded sensing environments in terms of cumulative distribution function (CDF. Each CR transmits its decision about PU via noisy and faded reporting (R channel to fusion center (FC. In this paper we assume that S-channels are noisy and Rayleigh faded while several cases of fading are considered for R-channels such as: (i Hoyt (or Nakagami-q, (ii Rayleigh, (iii Rician (or Nakagami-n, and (iv Weibull. A Binary Symmetric channel (BSC with a fixed error probability (r in the R-channel is also considered. The impact of fading in R-channel, S-channel and several network parameters such as IED parameter, normalized detection threshold, number of CRs, and number of antennas on missed detection and total error probability is assessed. The effects of Hoyt, Rician, and Weibull fading parameters on overall performance of IED-CSS are also highlighted.

  19. Polysplenia Syndrome Detected after Chest Symptoms in Two Adult Patients: Case Report and Review of Literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yılmaz, Güliz; Akpınar, Süha H.; Alıcıoğlu, Banu

    2014-01-01

    Polisplenia syndrome (PSS) is a rare subtype of heterotaxy syndrome and means ambiguous location of the major thoracic and abdominal organs with vascular anomalies and multiple spleens. We reported on the findings of computed tomography (CT) of PSS in adults, detected incidentally. Two woman underwent a CT examination of the thorax for different thoracic pathologies. There were common abnormalities such as hyparterial bronchi and absence of middle lobe fissure on CTscans suggesting heterotaxy syndrome. Therefore, the abdominal CTs were performed to detect the accompanying abdominal anomalies. Our two cases defined as PSS were diagnosed with multiple spleens in the normal location in the abdomen. The left-dominant liver and short pancreas with agenesis of the pancreatic tail and lateral part of the body were detected on CT scan. In the first case, the vascular abnormalities were as follows: variant entrance of the main portal vein into the liver and atypically located superior mesenteric vein (SMV) joining with t