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Sample records for replicons expressing gn

  1. Recombination-ready Sindbis replicon expression vectors for transgene expression

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    Olson Ken E

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sindbis viruses have been widely used as tools to study gene function in cells. Despite the utility of these systems, the construction and production of alphavirus replicons is time consuming and inefficient due to potential additional restriction sites within the insert region and lack of directionality for insert ligation. In this report, we present a system useful for producing recombinant Sindbis replicons that uses lambda phage recombination technology to rapidly and specifically construct replicon expression plasmids that contain insert regions in the desired orientation. Results Recombination of the gene of interest with the replicon plasmid resulted in nearly 100% recombinants, each of which contained a correctly orientated insert. Replicons were easily produced in cell culture and packaged into pseudo-infectious viral particles. Insect and mammalian cells infected with pseudo-infectious viral particles expressed various transgenes at high levels. Finally, inserts from persistently replicating replicon RNA were easily isolated and recombined back into entry plasmids for sequencing and subsequent analysis. Conclusion Replication-ready replicon expression plasmids make the use of alphavirus replicons fast and easy as compared to traditional replicon production methods. This system represents a significant step forward in the utility and ease of use of alphavirus replicons in the study of gene function.

  2. Melatonin Inhibits GnRH-1, GnRH-3 and GnRH Receptor Expression in the Brain of the European Sea Bass, Dicentrarchus labrax

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    José Antonio Muñoz-Cueto

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Several evidences supported the existence of melatonin effects on reproductive system in fish. In order to investigate whether melatonin is involved in the modulation of GnRH systems in the European sea bass, we have injected melatonin (0.5 µg/g body mass in male specimens. The brain mRNA transcript levels of the three GnRH forms and the five GnRH receptors present in this species were determined by real time quantitative PCR. Our findings revealed day–night variations in the brain expression of GnRH-1, GnRH-3 and several GnRH receptors (dlGnRHR-II-1c, -2a, which exhibited higher transcript levels at mid-light compared to mid-dark phase of the photocycle. Moreover, an inhibitory effect of melatonin on the nocturnal expression of GnRH-1, GnRH-3, and GnRH receptors subtypes 1c, 2a and 2b was also demonstrated. Interestingly, the inhibitory effect of melatonin affected the expression of hypophysiotrophic GnRH forms and GnRH receptors that exhibit day–night fluctuations, suggesting that exogenous melatonin reinforce physiological mechanisms already established. These interactions between melatoninergic and GnRH systems could be mediating photoperiod effects on reproductive and other rhythmic physiological events in the European sea bass.

  3. Gene expression in the muscle and central nervous system following intramuscular inoculation of encapsidated or naked poliovirus replicons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, Cheryl A.; Messinger, Jeff; Palmer, Matthew T.; Peduzzi, Jean D.; Morrow, Casey D.

    2003-01-01

    The spread of intramuscularly inoculated poliovirus to the central nervous system (CNS) has been documented in humans, monkeys, and mice transgenic for the human poliovirus receptor. Poliovirus spread is thought to be due to infection of the peripheral nerve and retrograde transport of poliovirus through the axon to the neuron cell body, where final virus uncoating occurs and translation/replication ensues. In previous studies, we have shown that polio-based vectors (replicons) can be used for gene delivery to motor neurons of the CNS. Using a replicon that encodes green fluorescent protein (GFP), we found that following intrathecal inoculation, GFP expression was confined to motorneurons of the spinal cord. To further characterize the gene expression of poliovirus in the periphery and CNS, we have intramuscularly inoculated transgenic mice with poliovirus replicons encoding GFP. Expression of GFP was demonstrated in the muscle, sciatic nerve, dorsal root ganglion, and the ventral horn motorneurons following intramuscular inoculation. There was no evidence of paralysis or behavioral abnormalities in the mice following intramuscular inoculation of the replicon encoding GFP. Injection of replicon RNA alone (naked RNA) into the muscle of transgenic mice or rats, which do not express the poliovirus receptor, also resulted in expression of GFP in the muscle, sciatic nerve, dorsal root ganglion, and ventral horn motorneurons, indicating that transport of the replicon RNA from the periphery to CNS had occurred. GFP expression was found in the muscles and sciatic nerve as early as 6 h after injection of replicons or replicon RNA, even after sciatic nerve section. Analysis at longer times postinjection revealed GFP expression similar to 6 h levels in the cut sciatic nerves and robust expression in the nerves of uncut animals. The infection and expression of GFP in the CNS following intramuscular inoculation of encapsidated replicons encoding GFP occurred in juvenile or

  4. Bean Yellow Dwarf Virus replicons for high-level transgene expression in transgenic plants and cell cultures.

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    Zhang, Xiuren; Mason, Hugh

    2006-02-05

    A novel stable transgenic plant expression system was developed using elements of the replication machinery of Bean Yellow Dwarf Virus (BeYDV). The system contains two transgenes: 1) The BeYDV replicon vector with an expression cassette flanked by cis-acting DNA elements of BeYDV, and 2) The viral replication initiator protein (Rep) controlled by an alcohol-inducible promoter. When Rep expression was triggered by treatment with ethanol, it induced release of the BeYDV replicon from stably integrated T-DNA and episomal replication to high copy number. Replicon amplification resulted in substantially increased transgene mRNA levels (up to 80-fold) and translation products (up to 10-fold) after induction of Rep expression by ethanol treatment in tobacco NT1 cells and leaves of whole potato plants. Thus, the BeYDV stable transformant replicon system is a powerful tool for plant-based production of recombinant proteins. (c) 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Development of expression vectors for Escherichia coli based on the pCR2 replicon

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    Deb J K

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent developments in metabolic engineering and the need for expanded compatibility required for co-expression studies, underscore the importance of developing new plasmid vectors with properties such as stability and compatibility. Results We utilized the pCR2 replicon of Corynebacterium renale, which harbours multiple plasmids, for constructing a range of expression vectors. Different antibiotic-resistance markers were introduced and the vectors were found to be 100% stable over a large number of generations in the absence of selection pressure. Compatibility of this plasmid was studied with different Escherichia coli plasmid replicons viz. pMB1 and p15A. It was observed that pCR2 was able to coexist with these E.coli plasmids for 60 generations in the absence of selection pressure. Soluble intracellular production was checked by expressing GFP under the lac promoter in an expression plasmid pCR2GFP. Also high level production of human IFNγ was obtained by cloning the h-IFNγ under a T7 promoter in the expression plasmid pCR2-IFNγ and using a dual plasmid heat shock system for expression. Repeated sub-culturing in the absence of selection pressure for six days did not lead to any fall in the production levels post induction, for both GFP and h-IFNγ, demonstrating that pCR2 is a useful plasmid in terms of stability and compatibility. Conclusion We have constructed a series of expression vectors based on the pCR2 replicon and demonstrated its high stability and sustained expression capacity, in the absence of selection pressure which will make it an efficient tool for metabolic engineering and co-expression studies, as well as for scale up of expression.

  6. Expression of the GnRH and GnRH receptor (GnRH-R) genes in the hypothalamus and of the GnRH-R gene in the anterior pituitary gland of anestrous and luteal phase ewes.

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    Ciechanowska, Magdalena; Lapot, Magdalena; Malewski, Tadeusz; Mateusiak, Krystyna; Misztal, Tomasz; Przekop, Franciszek

    2008-11-01

    Data exists showing that seasonal changes in the innervations of GnRH cells in the hypothalamus and functions of some neural systems affecting GnRH neurons are associated with GnRH release in ewes. Consequently, we put the question as to how the expression of GnRH gene and GnRH-R gene in the hypothalamus and GnRH-R gene in the anterior pituitary gland is reflected with LH secretion in anestrous and luteal phase ewes. Analysis of GnRH gene expression by RT-PCR in anestrous ewes indicated comparable levels of GnRH mRNA in the preoptic area, anterior and ventromedial hypothalamus. GnRH-R mRNA at different concentrations was found throughout the preoptic area, anterior and ventromedial hypothalamus, stalk/median eminence and in the anterior pituitary gland. The highest GnRH-R mRNA levels were detected in the stalk/median eminence and in the anterior pituitary gland. During the luteal phase of the estrous cycle in ewes, the levels of GnRH mRNA and GnRH-R mRNA in all structures were significantly higher than in anestrous ewes. Also LH concentrations in blood plasma of luteal phase ewes were significantly higher than those of anestrous ewes. In conclusion, results from this study suggest that low expression of the GnRH and GnRH-R genes in the hypothalamus and of the GnRH-R gene in the anterior pituitary gland, amongst others, may be responsible for a decrease in LH secretion and the anovulatory state in ewes during the long photoperiod.

  7. Reduced expression of Jak-1 and Tyk-2 proteins leads to interferon resistance in Hepatitis C virus replicon

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    Luftig Ronald

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alpha interferon in combination with ribavirin is the standard therapy for hepatitis C virus infection. Unfortunately, a significant number of patients fail to eradicate their infection with this regimen. The mechanisms of IFN-resistance are unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the contribution of host cell factors to the mechanisms of interferon resistance using replicon cell lines. Results HCV replicons with high and low activation of the IFN-promoter were cultured for a prolonged period of time in the presence of interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha2b. Stable replicon cell lines with resistant phenotype were isolated and characterized by their ability to continue viral replication in the presence of IFN-alpha. Interferon resistant cell colonies developed only in replicons having lower activation of the IFN promoter and no resistant colonies arose from replicons that exhibit higher activation of the IFN promoter. Individual cell clones were isolated and nine IFN resistant cell lines were established. HCV RNA and protein levels in these cells were not altered by IFN- alpha2b. Reduced signaling and IFN-resistant phenotype was found in all Huh-7 cell lines even after eliminating HCV, suggesting that cellular factors are involved. Resistant phenotype in the replicons is not due to lack of interferon receptor expression. All the cell lines show defect in the JAK-STAT signaling and phosphorylation of STAT 1 and STAT 2 proteins were strongly inhibited due to reduced expression of Tyk2 and Jak-1 protein. Conclusion This in vitro study provides evidence that altered expression of the Jak-Stat signaling proteins can cause IFN resistance using HCV replicon cell clones.

  8. Recombinant Kunjin virus replicon vaccines induce protective T-cell immunity against human papillomavirus 16 E7-expressing tumour

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    Herd, Karen A.; Harvey, Tracey; Khromykh, Alexander A.; Tindle, Robert W.

    2004-01-01

    The persistence of the E7 oncoprotein in transformed cells in human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated cervical cancer provides a tumour-specific antigen to which immunotherapeutic strategies may be directed. Self-replicating RNA (replicon) vaccine vectors derived from the flavivirus Kunjin (KUN) have recently been reported to induce T-cell immunity. Here, we report that inclusion of a CTL epitope of HPV16 E7 protein into a polyepitope encoded by a KUN vector induced E7-directed T-cell responses and protected mice against challenge with an E7-expressing epithelial tumour. We found replicon RNA packaged into virus-like particles to be more effective than naked replicon RNA or plasmid DNA constructed to allow replicon RNA transcription in vivo. Protective immunity was induced although the E7 CTL epitope was subdominant in the context of other CTL epitopes in the polyepitope. The results demonstrate the efficacy of the KUN replicon vector system for inducing protective immunity directed towards a virally encoded human tumour-specific antigen, and for inducing multi-epitopic CTL responses

  9. A Polyprotein-Expressing Salmonid Alphavirus Replicon Induces Modest Protection in Atlantic Salmon (Salmo Salar Against Infectious Pancreatic Necrosis

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    Azila Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vaccination is an important strategy for the control and prevention of infectious pancreatic necrosis (IPN in farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar in the post-smolt stage in sea-water. In this study, a heterologous gene expression system, based on a replicon construct of salmonid alphavirus (SAV, was used for in vitro and in vivo expression of IPN virus proteins. The large open reading frame of segment A, encoding the polyprotein NH2-pVP2-VP4-VP3-COOH, as well as pVP2, were cloned and expressed by the SAV replicon in Chinook salmon embryo cells (CHSE-214 and epithelioma papulosum cyprini (EPC cells. The replicon constructs pSAV/polyprotein (pSAV/PP and pSAV/pVP2 were used to immunize Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar by a single intramuscular injection and tested in a subsequent IPN virus (IPNV challenge trial. A low to moderate protection against IPN was observed in fish immunized with the replicon vaccine that encoded the pSAV/PP, while the pSAV/pVP2 construct was not found to induce protection.

  10. Effect of endotoxin on the expression of GnRH and GnRHR genes in the hypothalamus and anterior pituitary gland of anestrous ewes.

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    Herman, Andrzej Przemysław; Tomaszewska-Zaremba, Dorota

    2010-07-01

    An immune/inflammatory challenge can affect reproduction at the level of the hypothalamus, pituitary gland, or gonads. Nonetheless, the major impact is thought to occur within the brain or the pituitary gland. The present study was designed to examine the effect of intravenous (i.v.) lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection on the expression of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and the gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR) genes in the hypothalamic structures where GnRH neurons are located as well as in the anterior pituitary gland (AP) of anestrous ewes. We also determined the effect of LPS on luteinizing hormone (LH) release. It was found that i.v. LPS injection significantly decreased GnRH and GnRHR mRNAs levels in the preoptic area (40%, ppituitary cells to GnRH stimulation. The presence of GnRH mRNA in the median eminence, the hypothalamic structure where GnRH-ergic neurons' terminals are located, suggests that the axonal transport of GnRH mRNA may occur in these neurons. This phenomenon could play an important role in the physiology of GnRH neurons. Our data demonstrate that immune stress could be important inhibitor of this process. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Do GnRH analogues directly affect human endometrial epithelial cell gene expression?

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    Zhang, Xiaomei; Bocca, Silvina Maria; Franchi, Anahí ; Anderson, Sandra; Kaur, Mandeep; Bajic, Vladimir B.; Oehninger, Sergio Carlos

    2010-01-01

    were: (i) to study the modulatory effect of GnRH analogues by RT-PCR [in the absence and presence of E2 and P4, and cyclic adenosine monophos-phate (cAMP)] on mRNA expression of genes modulated during the window of implantation in GnRH analogues

  12. Development and evaluation of a replicon particle vaccine expressing the E2 glycoprotein of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV in cattle

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    Loy John Dustin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bovine viral diarrhea virus is one of the most significant and costly viral pathogens of cattle worldwide. Alphavirus-derived replicon particles have been shown to be safe and highly effective vaccine vectors against a variety of human and veterinary pathogens. Replicon particles are non-propagating, DIVA compatible, and can induce both humoral and cell mediated immune responses. This is the first experiment to demonstrate that Alphavirus-based replicon particles can be utilized in a standard prime/boost vaccination strategy in calves against a commercially significant bovine pathogen. Findings Replicon particles that express bovine viral diarrhea virus sub-genotype 1b E2 glycoprotein were generated and expression was confirmed in vitro using polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies specific to E2. Vaccine made from particles was generated in Vero cells and administered to BVDV free calves in a prime/boost regimen at two dosage levels. Vaccination resulted in neutralizing antibody titers that cross-neutralized both type 1 and type 2 BVD genotypes following booster vaccination. Additionally, high dose vaccine administration demonstrated some protection from clinical disease and significantly reduced the degree of leukopenia caused by viral infection. Conclusions Replicon particle vaccines administered in a prime/boost regimen expressing BVDV E2 glycoprotein can induce cross-neutralizing titers, reduce leukopenia post challenge, and mitigate clinical disease in calves. This strategy holds promise for a safe and effective vaccine to BVDV.

  13. A vaccinia virus recombinant transcribing an alphavirus replicon and expressing alphavirus structural proteins leads to packaging of alphavirus infectious single cycle particles.

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    Juana M Sánchez-Puig

    Full Text Available Poxviruses and Alphaviruses constitute two promising viral vectors that have been used extensively as expression systems, or as vehicles for vaccine purposes. Poxviruses, like vaccinia virus (VV are well-established vaccine vectors having large insertion capacity, excellent stability, and ease of administration. In turn, replicons derived from Alphaviruses like Semliki Forest virus (SFV are potent protein expression and immunization vectors but stocks are difficult to produce and maintain. In an attempt to demonstrate the use of a Poxvirus as a means for the delivery of small vaccine vectors, we have constructed and characterized VV/SFV hybrid vectors. A SFV replicon cDNA was inserted in the VV genome and placed under the control of a VV early promoter. The replicon, transcribed from the VV genome as an early transcript, was functional, and thus capable of initiating its own replication and transcription. Further, we constructed a VV recombinant additionally expressing the SFV structural proteins under the control of a vaccinia synthetic early/late promoter. Infection with this recombinant produced concurrent transcription of the replicon and expression of SFV structural proteins, and led to the generation of replicon-containing SFV particles that were released to the medium and were able to infect additional cells. This combined VV/SFV system in a single virus allows the use of VV as a SFV delivery vehicle in vivo. The combination of two vectors, and the possibility of generating in vivo single-cycle, replicon containing alphavirus particles, may open new strategies in vaccine development or in the design of oncolytic viruses.

  14. A vaccinia virus recombinant transcribing an alphavirus replicon and expressing alphavirus structural proteins leads to packaging of alphavirus infectious single cycle particles.

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    Sánchez-Puig, Juana M; Lorenzo, María M; Blasco, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Poxviruses and Alphaviruses constitute two promising viral vectors that have been used extensively as expression systems, or as vehicles for vaccine purposes. Poxviruses, like vaccinia virus (VV) are well-established vaccine vectors having large insertion capacity, excellent stability, and ease of administration. In turn, replicons derived from Alphaviruses like Semliki Forest virus (SFV) are potent protein expression and immunization vectors but stocks are difficult to produce and maintain. In an attempt to demonstrate the use of a Poxvirus as a means for the delivery of small vaccine vectors, we have constructed and characterized VV/SFV hybrid vectors. A SFV replicon cDNA was inserted in the VV genome and placed under the control of a VV early promoter. The replicon, transcribed from the VV genome as an early transcript, was functional, and thus capable of initiating its own replication and transcription. Further, we constructed a VV recombinant additionally expressing the SFV structural proteins under the control of a vaccinia synthetic early/late promoter. Infection with this recombinant produced concurrent transcription of the replicon and expression of SFV structural proteins, and led to the generation of replicon-containing SFV particles that were released to the medium and were able to infect additional cells. This combined VV/SFV system in a single virus allows the use of VV as a SFV delivery vehicle in vivo. The combination of two vectors, and the possibility of generating in vivo single-cycle, replicon containing alphavirus particles, may open new strategies in vaccine development or in the design of oncolytic viruses.

  15. Cumulus cells gene expression profiling in terms of oocyte maturity in controlled ovarian hyperstimulation using GnRH agonist or GnRH antagonist.

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    Devjak, Rok; Fon Tacer, Klementina; Juvan, Peter; Virant Klun, Irma; Rozman, Damjana; Vrtačnik Bokal, Eda

    2012-01-01

    In in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) is established by gonadotropins in combination with gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonists or antagonists, to prevent premature luteinizing hormone (LH) surge. The aim of our study was to improve the understanding of gene expression profile of cumulus cells (CC) in terms of ovarian stimulation protocol and oocyte maturity. We applied Affymetrix gene expression profiling in CC of oocytes at different maturation stages using either GnRH agonists or GnRH antagonists. Two analyses were performed: the first involved CC of immature metaphase I (MI) and mature metaphase II (MII) oocytes where 359 genes were differentially expressed, and the second involved the two GnRH analogues where no differentially expressed genes were observed at the entire transcriptome level. A further analysis of 359 differentially genes was performed, focusing on anti-Müllerian hormone receptor 2 (AMHR2), follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR), vascular endothelial growth factor C (VEGFC) and serine protease inhibitor E2 (SERPINE2). Among other differentially expressed genes we observed a marked number of new genes connected to cell adhesion and neurotransmitters such as dopamine, glycine and γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA). No differential expression in CC between the two GnRH analogues supports the findings of clinical studies where no significant difference in live birth rates between both GnRH analogues has been proven.

  16. Alphavirus Replicon DNA Vectors Expressing Ebola GP and VP40 Antigens Induce Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses in Mice

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    Shoufeng Ren

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Ebola virus (EBOV causes severe hemorrhagic fevers in humans, and no approved therapeutics or vaccine is currently available. Glycoprotein (GP is the major protective antigen of EBOV, and can generate virus-like particles (VLPs by co-expression with matrix protein (VP40. In this study, we constructed a recombinant Alphavirus Semliki Forest virus (SFV replicon vector DREP to express EBOV GP and matrix viral protein (VP40. EBOV VLPs were successfully generated and achieved budding from 293 cells after co-transfection with DREP-based GP and VP40 vectors (DREP-GP+DREP-VP40. Vaccination of BALB/c mice with DREP-GP, DREP-VP40, or DREP-GP+DREP-VP40 vectors, followed by immediate electroporation resulted in a mixed IgG subclass production, which recognized EBOV GP and/or VP40 proteins. This vaccination regimen also led to the generation of both Th1 and Th2 cellular immune responses in mice. Notably, vaccination with DREP-GP and DREP-VP40, which produces both GP and VP40 antigens, induced a significantly higher level of anti-GP IgG2a antibody and increased IFN-γ secreting CD8+ T-cell responses relative to vaccination with DREP-GP or DREP-VP40 vector alone. Our study indicates that co-expression of GP and VP40 antigens based on the SFV replicon vector generates EBOV VLPs in vitro, and vaccination with recombinant DREP vectors containing GP and VP40 antigens induces Ebola antigen-specific humoral and cellular immune responses in mice. This novel approach provides a simple and efficient vaccine platform for Ebola disease prevention.

  17. Effects of corticotropin-releasing hormone and its antagonist on the gene expression of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and GnRH receptor in the hypothalamus and anterior pituitary gland of follicular phase ewes.

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    Ciechanowska, Magdalena; Łapot, Magdalena; Malewski, Tadeusz; Mateusiak, Krystyna; Misztal, Tomasz; Przekop, Franciszek

    2011-01-01

    There is no information in the literature regarding the effect of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) on genes encoding gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and the GnRH receptor (GnRHR) in the hypothalamus or on GnRHR gene expression in the pituitary gland in vivo. Thus, the aim of the present study was to investigate, in follicular phase ewes, the effects of prolonged, intermittent infusion of small doses of CRH or its antagonist (α-helical CRH 9-41; CRH-A) into the third cerebral ventricle on GnRH mRNA and GnRHR mRNA levels in the hypothalamo-pituitary unit and on LH secretion. Stimulation or inhibition of CRH receptors significantly decreased or increased GnRH gene expression in the hypothalamus, respectively, and led to different responses in GnRHR gene expression in discrete hypothalamic areas. For example, CRH increased GnRHR gene expression in the preoptic area, but decreased it in the hypothalamus/stalk median eminence and in the anterior pituitary gland. In addition, CRH decreased LH secretion. Blockade of CRH receptors had the opposite effect on GnRHR gene expression. The results suggest that activation of CRH receptors in the hypothalamus of follicular phase ewes can modulate the biosynthesis and release of GnRH through complex changes in the expression of GnRH and GnRHR genes in the hypothalamo-anterior pituitary unit. © CSIRO 2011 Open Access

  18. Kisspeptin Activates Ankrd 26 Gene Expression in Migrating Embryonic GnRH Neurons

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    Tomoko eSoga

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Kisspeptin, a newly discovered neuropeptide regulates gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH. Kisspeptins are a large RF-amide family of peptides. The kisspeptin coded by kiss1 gene is a 145-amino acid- protein that is cleaved to C-terminal peptide kisspeptin-10. G-protein coupled receptor 54 (GPR54 has been identified as a kisspeptin receptor, and it is expressed in GnRH neurons and in a variety of cancer cells. In this study, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP labelled GnRH cells with migratory properties, which express GPR54, served as a model to study the effects of kisspeptin on cell migration. We monitored EGFP–GnRH neuronal migration in brain slide culture of embryonic day 14 transgenic rat by live cell imaging system and studied the effects of kisspeptin-10 (1nM treatment for 36h on GnRH migration. Furthermore to determine kisspeptin-induced molecular pathways related with apoptosis, and cytoskeletal changes during neuronal migration, we studied the expression levels of candidate genes in laser captured EGFP–GnRH neurons by real time PCR. We found that there was no change in the expression level of genes related to cell proliferation and apoptosis. The expression of ankyrin repeat domain-containing protein (ankrd 26 in EGFP–GnRH neurons was up-regulated by the exposure to kisspeptin. These studies suggest that ankrd26 gene plays an unidentified role in regulating neuronal movement mediated by kisspeptin-GPR54 signaling, which could be a potential pathway to suppress cell migration.

  19. Characterization and differential expression of three GnRH forms during reproductive development in cultured turbot Schophthalmus maximus

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    Zhao, Chunyan; Xu, Shihong; Feng, Chengcheng; Liu, Yifan; Yang, Yang; Wang, Yanfeng; Xiao, Yongshuang; Song, Zongcheng; Liu, Qinghua; Li, Jun

    2017-10-01

    Turbots (Schophthalmus maximus), one of the most important economic marine flatfish species, fail to undergo final spawning and spermiation naturally under artificial farming conditions. In vertebrates, reproduction is regulated by the brain-pituitary-gonadal axis (BPG-axis), and gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) is one of its key components. Therefore, to better understand the physiology of reproduction in the turbot, three of the genes encoding GnRH subtypes—sbGnRH, cGnRH-II and sGnRH—were cloned and sequenced by isolating the cDNA sequences. The localizations and patterns of expression of their mRNAs were also evaluated during seasonal gonadal development. All three mRNAs were expressed abundantly in the brain; sbGnRH and sGnRH mRNAs were also detected in the gonads and pituitary gland, and sbGnRH expression was much higher than that of sGnRH, indicating the critical role of sbGnRH in regulating the BPG-axis. Moreover, the brain expression patterns of sbGnRH and sGnRH mRNAs showed an increased trend during gonadal development, peaking in mature stages. This indicated the direct regulation of gonadal development by the GnRH system. In addition, cGnRH-II mRNA expression showed no significant variations, suggesting that cGnRH-II is not critically involved in the control of reproduction. Further, the mRNA abundances of the three GnRH forms in the breeding season were significantly higher than those in immature and post-breeding stages in all analyzed brain areas. Therefore, we propose that sbGnRH is the most important hormone for the regulation of reproduction in turbot via the BPG-axis. These results will help in better understanding the reproductive endocrine mechanisms of turbots and lay the groundwork for additional studies aimed at comparing the reproductive physiology of wild individuals with those raised under artificial conditions.

  20. Do GnRH analogues directly affect human endometrial epithelial cell gene expression?

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xiaomei

    2010-03-04

    We examined whether Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogues [leuprolide acetate (LA) and ganirelix acetate (GA)] modulate gene expression in Ishikawa cells used as surrogate for human endometrial epithelial cells in vitro. The specific aims were: (i) to study the modulatory effect of GnRH analogues by RT-PCR [in the absence and presence of E2 and P4, and cyclic adenosine monophos-phate (cAMP)] on mRNA expression of genes modulated during the window of implantation in GnRH analogues/rFSH-treated assisted reproductive technology cycles including OPTINEURIN (OPTN), CHROMATIN MODIFYING PROTEIN (CHMP1A), PROSAPOSIN (PSAP), IGFBP-5 and SORTING NEXIN 7 (SNX7), and (ii) to analyze the 5\\'-flanking regions of such genes for the presence of putative steroid-response elements [estrogen-response elements (EREs) and P4-response element (PREs)]. Ishikawa cells were cytokeratin+/vimentin2 and expressed ERa,ERb, PR and GnRH-R proteins. At 6 and 24 h, neither LA nor GA alone had an effect on gene expression. GnRH analogues alone or following E2 and/or P4 co-incubation for 24 h also had no effect on gene expression, but P4 significantly increased expression of CHMP1A.E2 + P4 treatment for 4 days, alone or followed by GA, had no effect, but E2 + P4 treatment followed by LA significantly decreased IGFBP-5 expression. The addition of 8-Br cAMP did not modify gene expression, with the exception of IGFBP-5 that was significantly increased. The GnRH analogues did not modify intracellular cAMP levels. We identified conserved EREs for OPN, CHMP1A, SNX7 and PSAP and PREs for SNX7. We conclude that GnRH analogues appear not to have major direct effects on gene expression of human endo-metrial epithelial cells in vitro. © The Author 2010. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oxfordjournals.org.

  1. Immunogenicity in pig-tailed macaques of poliovirus replicons expressing HIV-1 and SIV antigens and protection against SHIV-89.6P disease

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    Fultz, Patricia N.; Stallworth, Jackie; Porter, Donna; Novak, Miroslav; Anderson, Marie J.; Morrow, Casey D.

    2003-01-01

    In the search for an effective vaccine against the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), novel ways to deliver viral antigens are being evaluated. One such approach is the use of nonreplicating viral vectors encoding HIV and/or SIV genes that are expressed after infection of host cells. Nonreplicating poliovirus vectors, termed replicons, that expressed HIV-1/HXB2 and SIVmac239 gag and various HIV-1 env genes from different clades were tested for immunogenicity and protective efficacy against intravenous challenge of pig-tailed macaques with SHIV-89.6P. To maximize both cellular and humoral immune responses, a prime-boost regimen was used. Initially, macaques were immunized four times over 35 weeks by either the intranasal and intrarectal or the intramuscular (im) route with mixtures of poliovirus replicons expressing HIV-1 gag and multiple env genes. Immunization with replicons alone induced both serum antibodies and lymphocyte proliferative responses. After boosting with purified Env protein, neutralizing antibodies to SHIV-89.6P were induced in four of five immunized animals. In a second experiment, four macaques were immunized im three times over 27 weeks with replicons expressing the SIVmac239 gag and HIV-1/HXB2 env genes. All immunized animals were then boosted twice with purified HIV-1-89.6 rgp140-Env and SIVmac239 p55-Gag proteins. Four control animals received only the two protein inoculations. Immunized and control animals were then challenged intravenously with the pathogenic SHIV-89.6P. After challenge the animals were monitored for virus isolation from peripheral blood mononuclear cells and plasma viremia and for changes in virus-specific antibody titers. Naieve pig-tailed macaques experienced rapid loss of CD4 + T cells and died between 38 and 62 weeks after infection. In contrast, macaques immunized with replicons and proteins rapidly cleared plasma virus and did not experience sustained loss of CD4 + lymphocytes. Furthermore, two of the four macaques

  2. The novel fusion proteins, GnRH-p53 and GnRHIII-p53, expression and their anti-tumor effect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiyuan Jia

    Full Text Available p53, one of the most well studied tumor suppressor factor, is responsible to a variety of damage owing to the induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in the tumor cells. More than 50% of human tumors contain mutation or deletion of p53. Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH, as the ligand of Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRH-R, was used to deliver p53 into tumor cells. The p53 fusion proteins GnRH-p53 and GnRH iii-p53 were expressed and their targeted anti-tumor effects were determined. GnRH mediates its fusion proteins transformation into cancer cells. The intracellular delivery of p53 fusion proteins exerted the inhibition of the growth of H1299 cells in vitro and the reduction of tumor volume in vivo. Their anti-tumor effect was functioned by the apoptosis and cell cycle arrest induced by p53. Hence, the fusion protein could be a novel protein drug for anti-tumor therapy.

  3. Effects of different replicons in conjugative plasmids on transformation efficiency, plasmid stability, gene expression and n-butanol biosynthesis in Clostridium tyrobutyricum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Mingrui; Du, Yinming; Jiang, Wenyan; Chang, Wei-Lun; Yang, Shang-Tian [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). William G. Lowrie Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; Tang, I-Ching [Bioprocessing Innovative Company, Dublin, OH (United States)

    2012-01-15

    Clostridium tyrobutyricum ATCC 25755 can produce butyric acid, acetic acid, and hydrogen as the main products from various carbon sources. In this study, C. tyrobutyricum was used as a host to produce n-butanol by expressing adhE2 gene under the control of a native thiolase promoter using four different conjugative plasmids (pMTL82151, 83151, 84151, and 85151) each with a different replicon (pBP1 from C. botulinum NCTC2916, pCB102 from C. butyricum, pCD6 from Clostridium difficile, and pIM13 from Bacillus subtilis). The effects of different replicons on transformation efficiency, plasmid stability, adhE2 expression and aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase activities, and butanol production by different mutants of C. tyrobutyricum were investigated. Among the four plasmids and replicons studied, pMTL82151 with pBP1 gave the highest transformation efficiency, plasmid stability, gene expression, and butanol biosynthesis. Butanol production from various substrates, including glucose, xylose, mannose, and mannitol were then investigated with the best mutant strain harboring adhE2 in pMTL82151. A high butanol titer of 20.5 g/L with 0.33 g/g yield and 0.32 g/L h productivity was obtained with mannitol as the substrate in batch fermentation with pH controlled at {proportional_to}6.0. (orig.)

  4. Immunogenicity of a DNA-launched replicon-based canine parvovirus DNA vaccine expressing VP2 antigen in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahiya, Shyam S; Saini, Mohini; Kumar, Pankaj; Gupta, Praveen K

    2012-10-01

    A replicon-based DNA vaccine encoding VP2 gene of canine parvovirus (CPV) was developed by cloning CPV-VP2 gene into a replicon-based DNA vaccine vector (pAlpha). The characteristics of a replicon-based DNA vaccine like, self-amplification of transcripts and induction of apoptosis were analyzed in transfected mammalian cells. When the pAlpha-CPV-VP2 was injected intradermal as DNA-launched replicon-based DNA vaccine in dogs, it induced CPV-specific humoral and cell mediated immune responses. The virus neutralization antibody and lymphocyte proliferative responses were higher than conventional CPV DNA vaccine and commercial CPV vaccine. These results indicated that DNA-launched replicon-based CPV DNA vaccine was effective in inducing both CPV-specific humoral and cellular immune responses and can be considered as effective alternative to conventional CPV DNA vaccine and commercial CPV vaccine. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier India Pvt Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Cytomegalovirus replicon-based regulation of gene expression in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermine Mohr

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence for a connection between DNA replication and the expression of adjacent genes. Therefore, this study addressed the question of whether a herpesvirus origin of replication can be used to activate or increase the expression of adjacent genes. Cell lines carrying an episomal vector, in which reporter genes are linked to the murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV origin of lytic replication (oriLyt, were constructed. Reporter gene expression was silenced by a histone-deacetylase-dependent mechanism, but was resolved upon lytic infection with MCMV. Replication of the episome was observed subsequent to infection, leading to the induction of gene expression by more than 1000-fold. oriLyt-based regulation thus provided a unique opportunity for virus-induced conditional gene expression without the need for an additional induction mechanism. This principle was exploited to show effective late trans-complementation of the toxic viral protein M50 and the glycoprotein gO of MCMV. Moreover, the application of this principle for intracellular immunization against herpesvirus infection was demonstrated. The results of the present study show that viral infection specifically activated the expression of a dominant-negative transgene, which inhibited viral growth. This conditional system was operative in explant cultures of transgenic mice, but not in vivo. Several applications are discussed.

  6. Characterization of cell lines stably transfected with rubella virus replicons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzeng, Wen-Pin; Xu, Jie; Frey, Teryl K.

    2012-01-01

    Rubella virus (RUBV) replicons expressing a drug resistance gene and a gene of interest were used to select cell lines uniformly harboring the replicon. Replicons expressing GFP and a virus capsid protein GFP fusion (C-GFP) were compared. Vero or BHK cells transfected with either replicon survived drug selection and grew into a monolayer. However, survival was ∼9-fold greater following transfection with the C-GFP-replicon than with the GFP-expressing replicon and while the C-GFP-replicon cells grew similarly to non-transfected cells, the GFP-replicon cells grew slower. Neither was due to the ability of the CP to enhance RNA synthesis but survival during drug selection was correlated with the ability of CP to inhibit apoptosis. Additionally, C-GFP-replicon cells were not cured of the replicon in the absence of drug selection. Interferon-alpha suppressed replicon RNA and protein synthesis, but did not cure the cells, explaining in part the ability of RUBV to establish persistent infections.

  7. Characterization of cell lines stably transfected with rubella virus replicons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tzeng, Wen-Pin; Xu, Jie [Department of Biology, Georgia State University, P.O. Box 4010, Atlanta GA 30302-4010 (United States); Frey, Teryl K., E-mail: tfrey@gsu.edu [Department of Biology, Georgia State University, P.O. Box 4010, Atlanta GA 30302-4010 (United States)

    2012-07-20

    Rubella virus (RUBV) replicons expressing a drug resistance gene and a gene of interest were used to select cell lines uniformly harboring the replicon. Replicons expressing GFP and a virus capsid protein GFP fusion (C-GFP) were compared. Vero or BHK cells transfected with either replicon survived drug selection and grew into a monolayer. However, survival was {approx}9-fold greater following transfection with the C-GFP-replicon than with the GFP-expressing replicon and while the C-GFP-replicon cells grew similarly to non-transfected cells, the GFP-replicon cells grew slower. Neither was due to the ability of the CP to enhance RNA synthesis but survival during drug selection was correlated with the ability of CP to inhibit apoptosis. Additionally, C-GFP-replicon cells were not cured of the replicon in the absence of drug selection. Interferon-alpha suppressed replicon RNA and protein synthesis, but did not cure the cells, explaining in part the ability of RUBV to establish persistent infections.

  8. SH2 modified STAT1 induces HLA-I expression and improves IFN-γ signaling in IFN-α resistant HCV replicon cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bret Poat

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available We have developed multiple stable cell lines containing subgenomic HCV RNA that are resistant to treatment with interferon alpha (IFN-α. Characterization of these IFN-α resistant replicon cells showed defects in the phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of STAT1 and STAT2 proteins due to a defective Jak-STAT pathway.In this study, we have developed an alternative strategy to overcome interferon resistance in a cell culture model by improving intracellular STAT1 signaling. An engineered STAT1-CC molecule with double cysteine substitutions in the Src-homology 2 (SH2 domains of STAT1 (at Ala-656 and Asn-658 efficiently phosphorylates and translocates to the nucleus of IFN-resistant cells in an IFN-γ dependent manner. Transfection of a plasmid clone containing STAT1-CC significantly activated the GAS promoter compared to wild type STAT1 and STAT3. The activity of the engineered STAT1-CC is dependent upon the phosphorylation of tyrosine residue 701, since the construct with a substituted phenylalanine residue at position 701 (STAT1-CC-Y701F failed to activate GAS promoter in the replicon cells. Intracellular expression of STAT1-CC protein showed phosphorylation and nuclear translocation in the resistant cell line after IFN-γ treatment. Transient transfection of STAT1-CC plasmid clone into an interferon resistant cell line resulted in inhibition of viral replication and viral clearance in an IFN-γ dependent manner. Furthermore, the resistant replicon cells transfected with STAT1-CC constructs significantly up regulated surface HLA-1 expression when compared to the wild type and Y to F mutant controls.These results suggest that modification of the SH2 domain of the STAT1 molecule allows for improved IFN-γ signaling through increased STAT1 phosphorylation, nuclear translocation, HLA-1 surface expression, and prolonged interferon antiviral gene activation.

  9. Cre-expressing neurons in the cortical white matter of Ntsr1-Cre GN220 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundberg, Sofie C; Granseth, Björn

    2018-03-23

    Genetically modified mouse strains that express Cre-recombinase in specific neuronal sub-populations have become widely used tools for investigating neuronal function. The Ntsr1-Cre GN220 mouse expresses this enzyme in corticothalamic neurons in layer 6 of cerebral cortex. We observed that about 7% of Cre-expressing cells in the primary visual cortex are found within the white matter bordering layer 6. By using the immunohistochemical marker for layer 6 neurons, Forkhead box protein 2 (FoxP2), and fluorescently conjugated latex beads injected into the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus, we show that about half of these cells are similar to and could belong to the layer 6 corticothalamic neuron population. The other half seems to be a distinct white matter (WM) neuron sub-population that we estimate to constitute 2-4% of the total cortical Cre-expressing population. Staining for the neuronal marker Neuronal nuclei (NeuN) revealed that about 15-40% of WM neurons are Cre-expressing. Thus, the potential contribution from WM neurons needs to be considered when interpreting the results from experiments using the Ntsr1-Cre GN220 mouse for investigating corticothalamic neuronal function. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The chicken type III GnRH receptor homologue is predominantly expressed in the pituitary, and exhibits similar ligand selectivity to the type I receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Nerine T; Morgan, Kevin; Sellar, Robin; McBride, Derek; Millar, Robert P; Dunn, Ian C

    2009-01-01

    Two GnRH isoforms (cGnRH-I and GnRH-II) and two GnRH receptor subtypes (cGnRH-R-I and cGnRH-R-III) occur in chickens. Differential roles for these molecules in regulating gonadotrophin secretion or other functions are unclear. To investigate this we cloned cGnRH-R-III from a broiler chicken and compared its structure, expression and pharmacological properties with cGnRH-R-I. The broiler cGnRH-R-III cDNA was 100% identical to the sequence reported in the red jungle fowl and white leghorn breed. Pituitary cGnRH-R-III mRNA was ∼1400-fold more abundant than cGnRH-R-I mRNA. Northern analysis indicated a single cGnRH-R-III transcript. A pronounced sex and age difference existed, with higher pituitary transcript levels in sexually mature females versus juvenile females. In contrast, higher expression levels occurred in juvenile males versus sexually mature males. Functional studies in COS-7 cells indicated that cGnRH-R-III has a higher binding affinity for GnRH-II than cGnRH-I (Kd: 0·57 vs 19·8 nM) with more potent stimulation of inositol phosphate production (ED50: 0·8 vs 4·38 nM). Similar results were found for cGnRH-R-I, (Kd: 0·51 vs 10·8 nM) and (ED50: 0·7 vs 2·8 nM). The initial rate of internalisation was faster for cGnRH-R-III than cGnRH-R-I (26 vs 15·8%/min). Effects of GnRH antagonists were compared at the two receptors. Antagonist #27 distinguished between cGnRH-R-I and cGnRH-R-III (IC50: 2·3 vs 351 nM). These results suggest that cGnRH-R-III is probably the major mediator of pituitary gonadotroph function, that antagonist #27 may allow delineation of receptor subtype function in vitro and in vivo and that tissue-specific recruitment of cGnRH-R isoforms has occurred during evolution. PMID:19380456

  11. Developmental expression of the G protein-coupled receptor 54 and three GnRH mRNAs in the teleost fish cobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, J Shaik; Benninghoff, Abby D; Holt, G Joan; Khan, Izhar A

    2007-02-01

    The cDNAs of the G protein-coupled receptor 54 (GPR54) and three prepro-gonadotropin-releasing hormones, GnRH-I (seabream GnRH), GnRH-II (chicken GnRH-II), and GnRH-III (salmon GnRH) were isolated and cloned from the brain of the teleost fish cobia, Rachycentron canadum. The cobia GPR54 cDNA was 95 and 51-56% identical to those of tilapia and mammalian models respectively. The GnRH cDNA sequences of cobia showed strong identities to those of tilapia, Atlantic croaker, red drum, and the seabass and seabream species. The real-time quantitative RT-PCR methods allowed detection of all three GnRH mRNAs on the first day after hatching (DAH). The GnRH-I mRNA levels, which were the lowest among the three GnRHs, increased gradually with two distinct peaks in larvae at 3 and 4 DAH. On the other hand, GnRH-II and GnRH-III mRNAs were significantly higher in larvae at 2 and 6 DAH compared with those on the preceding days. In addition, significant peaks of all the three GnRH mRNAs were observed in the brains of 26-day-old fish. The finding of higher GnRH-I and GnRH-II mRNAs in males than females at 153 DAH may be related to early puberty observed during the first year in laboratory-reared male cobia. Moreover, this study demonstrates for the first time the expression of GPR54 mRNA during larval development in a vertebrate species. The concomitant expression patterns of GPR54 and GnRH mRNAs during different stages of larval and juvenile developments, and during early puberty in male cobia suggest a potential relationship between GPR54 and multiple GnRHs during these stages of development consistent with the role of GPR54 in controlling GnRH release in mammals. The increase in GPR54 and GnRH mRNAs observed during early puberty in cobia is consistent with a similar change reported in pubertal rats. This finding together with the localization of GPR54 mRNAs on GnRH neurons in fish and mammals suggests that the GPR54-GnRH interactions may be conserved in different vertebrate groups.

  12. Transient Expression of Lumbrokinase (PI239 in Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum Using a Geminivirus-Based Single Replicon System Dissolves Fibrin and Blood Clots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexia Dickey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lumbrokinases, a group of fibrinolytic enzymes extracted from earthworm, have been widely used to prevent and treat various cardiovascular diseases. They specifically target fibrin to effectively degrade thrombi without major side effects. Plant expression systems are becoming potential alternative expression platforms for producing pharmaceutical proteins. In this work, a lumbrokinase (PI239 was produced from a plant system. Both wild-type (WT and plant codon-optimized (OP PI239 gene sequences were synthesized and cloned into a geminivirus-based single-vector DNA replicon system. Both vectors were independently expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum leaves transiently by agroinfiltration. Overexpressed PI239 resulted in sudden tissue necrosis 3 days after infiltration. Remaining proteins were purified through His-tag affinity chromatography and analyzed with SDS-PAGE and Western blot methods. Purified PI239 successfully degraded artificial fibrin with relative activity of 13,400 U/mg when compared with commercial lumbrokinase product. In vitro tests demonstrated that plant-derived PI239 dissolved human blood clots and that the plant expression system is capable of producing functional PI239.

  13. Aberrant gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR) expression and its regulation of CYP11B2 expression and aldosterone production in adrenal aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Hattangady, Namita G; Ye, Ping; Satoh, Fumitoshi; Morimoto, Ryo; Ito-Saito, Takako; Sugawara, Akira; Ohba, Koji; Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Rainey, William E; Sasano, Hironobu

    2014-03-25

    Aberrant expression of gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR) has been reported in human adrenal tissues including aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA). However, the details of its expression and functional role in adrenals are still not clear. In this study, quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed the mean level of GnRHR mRNA was significantly higher in APAs than in human normal adrenal (NA) (P=0.004). GnRHR protein expression was detected in human NA and neoplastic adrenal tissues. In H295R cells transfected with GnRHR, treatment with GnRH resulted in a concentration-dependent increase in CYP11B2 reporter activity. Chronic activation of GnRHR with GnRH (100nM), in a cell line with doxycycline-inducible GnRHR (H295R-TR/GnRHR), increased CYP11B2 expression and aldosterone production. These agonistic effects were inhibited by blockers for the calcium signaling pathway, KN93 and calmidazolium. These results suggest GnRH, through heterotopic expression of its receptor, may be a potential regulator of CYP11B2 expression levels in some cases of APA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. GnRH neurons of young and aged female rhesus monkeys co-express GPER but are unaffected by long-term hormone replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naugle, Michelle M; Gore, Andrea C

    2014-01-01

    Menopause is caused by changes in the function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis that controls reproduction. Hypophysiotropic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons in the hypothalamus orchestrate the activity of this axis and are regulated by hormonal feedback loops. The mechanisms by which GnRH responds to the primary regulatory sex steroid hormone, estradiol (E2), are still poorly understood in the context of menopause. Our goal was to determine whether the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) is co-expressed in adult primate GnRH neurons and whether this changes with aging and/or E2 treatment. We used immunofluorescence double-labeling to characterize the co-expression of GPER in GnRH perikarya and terminals in the hypothalamus. Young and aged rhesus macaques were ovariectomized and given long-term (~2-year) hormone treatments (E2, E2 + progesterone, or vehicle) selected to mimic currently prescribed hormone replacement therapies used for the alleviation of menopausal symptoms in women. We found that about half of GnRH perikarya co-expressed GPER, while only about 12% of GnRH processes and terminals in the median eminence (ME) were double-labeled. Additionally, many GPER-labeled processes were in direct contact with GnRH neurons, often wrapped around the perikarya and processes and in close proximity in the ME. These results extend prior work by showing robust co-localization of GPER in GnRH in a clinically relevant model, and they support the possibility that GPER-mediated E2 regulation of GnRH occurs both in the soma and terminals in nonhuman primates.

  15. Chromosomal replicons of higher plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van't Hof, J.

    1987-01-01

    This brief discussion of replicons of higher plants offers a glimpse into the properties of chromosomal DNA replication. It gives evidence that the S phase of unrelated plant species is comprised of temporally ordered replicon families that increase in number with genome size. This orderly process, which assures a normal inheritance of genetic material to recipient daughter cells, is maintained at the level of replicon clusters by two mutually exclusive mechanisms, one involving the rate at which single replicons replicate their allotment of DNA, and another by means of the tempo-pause. The same two mechanisms are used by cells to alter the pattern of chromosomal DNA replication just prior to and during normal development. Both mechanisms are genetically determined and produce genetic effects when disturbed of disrupted by additional non-conforming DNAs. Further insight into how these two mechanisms operate requires more molecular information about the nature of replicons and the factors that govern when a replicon family replicates. Plant material is a rich and ideal source for this information just awaiting exploitation. 63 refs

  16. Construction of a subgenomic CV-B3 replicon expressing emerald green fluorescent protein to assess viral replication of a cardiotropic enterovirus strain in cultured human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehbe, Michel; Huguenin, Antoine; Leveque, Nicolas; Semler, Bert L; Hamze, Monzer; Andreoletti, Laurent; Bouin, Alexis

    2016-04-01

    Coxsackieviruses B (CV-B) (Picornaviridae) are a common infectious cause of acute myocarditis in children and young adults, a disease, which is a precursor to 10-20% of chronic myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) cases. The mechanisms involved in the disease progression from acute to chronic myocarditis phase and toward the DCM clinical stage are not fully understood but are influenced by both viral and host factors. Subgenomic replicons of CV-B can be used to assess viral replication mechanisms in human cardiac cells and evaluate the effects of potential antiviral drugs on viral replication activities. Our objectives were to generate a reporter replicon from a cardiotropic prototype CV-B3/28 strain and to characterize its replication properties into human cardiac primary cells. To obtain this replicon, a cDNA plasmid containing the full CV-B3/28 genome flanked by a hammerhead ribozyme sequence and an MluI restriction site was generated and used as a platform for the insertion of sequences encoding emerald green fluorescent protein (EmGFP) in place of those encoding VP3. In vitro transcribed RNA from this plasmid was transfected into HeLa cells and human primary cardiac cells and was able to produce EmGFP and VP1-containing polypeptides. Moreover, non-structural protein biological activity was assessed by the specific cleavage of eIF4G1 by viral 2A(pro). Viral RNA replication was indirectly demonstrated by inhibition assays, fluoxetine was added to cell culture and prevented the EmGFP synthesis. Our results indicated that the EmGFP CV-B3 replicon was able to replicate and translate as well as the CV-B3/28 prototype strain. Our EmGFP CV-B3 replicon will be a valuable tool to readily investigate CV-B3 replication activities in human target cell models. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Zika Virus Replicons for Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuping Xie

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The current epidemic of Zika virus (ZIKV has underscored the urgency to establish experimental systems for studying viral replication and pathogenesis, and countermeasure development. Here we report two ZIKV replicon systems: a luciferase replicon that can differentiate between viral translation and RNA synthesis; and a stable luciferase replicon carrying cell line that can be used to screen and characterize inhibitors of viral replication. The transient replicon was used to evaluate the effect of an NS5 polymerase mutation on viral RNA synthesis and to analyze a known ZIKV inhibitor. The replicon cell line was developed into a 96-well format for antiviral testing. Compare with virus infection-based assay, the replicon cell line allows antiviral screening without using infectious virus. Collectively, the replicon systems have provided critical tools for both basic and translational research.

  18. GnRH-agonist implants suppress reproductive function and affects ovarian LHR and FSHR expression in prepubertal female cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehl, N S; Srisuwatanasagul, S; Swangchan-Uthai, T; Sirivaidyapong, S; Khalid, M

    2017-01-01

    Effect of a GnRH-agonist (deslorelin) was studied on reproductive function and ovarian luteinizing hormone receptor (LHR) and follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) expression in prepubertal female cats that were either implanted with 4.7-mg deslorelin (implanted: n = 6) or not (controls: n = 18) or ovariohysterectomized at prepubertal age (prepubertal OVH: n = 6). Body weights, fecal estradiol, and sexual behavior of implanted and control cats were monitored for 48 weeks followed by collection of ovaries and uteri. Ovaries and uteri were collected from control cats at follicular, luteal, and inactive stage (n = 6/group) and from prepubertal OVH cats at prepubertal age. Ovaries and uteri were analyzed for anatomical/histological characteristics. Ovaries were also analyzed for LHR and FSHR expression. Statistical analysis showed higher (P ≤ 0.05) body weight in control than implanted cats only during 22nd to 26th weeks of the study. Estrus was observed in control cats only. Deslorelin reduced (P ≤ 0.05) ovarian weight and number of antral follicles but did not affect endometrial thickness and gland diameter. However, myometrial thickness of implanted cats was significantly lower than control cats at follicular and luteal stage. Ovarian LHR mRNA expression was lower (P ≤ 0.05) in implanted cats than control cats at follicular stage. FSHR mRNA and LHR protein expression did not differ among the three groups. FSHR protein expression was lower (P ≤ 0.05) in prepubertal OVH cats and was not affected by deslorelin. In conclusion, deslorelin suppresses reproductive function in prepubertal female cats for at least 48 weeks possibly through a change in the ovarian mRNA expression of LHR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Eel Kisspeptins: Identification, Functional Activity, and Inhibition on both Pituitary LH and GnRH Receptor Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérémy Pasquier

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The European eel (Anguilla anguilla presents a blockade of sexual maturation at a prepubertal stage due to a deficient production of gonadotropins. We previously initiated, in the eel, the investigation of the kisspeptin system, one of the major gatekeepers of puberty in mammals, and we predicted the sequence of two Kiss genes. In the present study, we cloned and sequenced Kiss1 and Kiss2 cDNAs from the eel brain. The tissue distributions of Kiss1 and Kiss2 transcripts, as investigated by quantitative real-time PCR, showed that both genes are primarily expressed in the eel brain and pituitary. The two 10-residue long sequences characteristic of kisspeptin, eel Kp1(10 and Kp2(10, as well as two longer sequences, predicted as mature peptides, eel Kp1(15 and Kp2(12, were synthesized and functionally analyzed. Using rat Kiss1 receptor-transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells, we found that the four synthesized eel peptides were able to induce [Ca2+]i responses, indicating their ability to bind mammalian KissR-1 and to activate second messenger pathways. In primary culture of eel pituitary cells, all four peptides were able to specifically and dose-dependently inhibit lhβ expression, without any effect on fshβ, confirming our previous data with heterologous kisspeptins. Furthermore, in this eel in vitro system, all four peptides inhibited the expression of the type 2 GnRH receptor (gnrh-r2. Our data revealed a dual inhibitory effect of homologous kisspeptins on both pituitary lhβ and gnrh-r2 expression in the European eel.

  20. Differentially expressed miRNAs after GnRH treatment and their potential roles in FSH regulation in porcine anterior pituitary cell.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui-Song Ye

    Full Text Available Hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH is a major regulator of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH secretion in gonadotrope cell in the anterior pituitary gland. microRNAs (miRNAs are small RNA molecules that control gene expression by imperfect binding to the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR of mRNA at the post-transcriptional level. It has been proven that miRNAs play an important role in hormone response and/or regulation. However, little is known about miRNAs in the regulation of FSH secretion. In this study, primary anterior pituitary cells were treated with 100 nM GnRH. The supernatant of pituitary cell was collected for FSH determination by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA at 3 hours and 6 hours post GnRH treatment respectively. Results revealed that GnRH significantly promoted FSH secretion at 3 h and 6 h post-treatment by 1.40-fold and 1.80-fold, respectively. FSHβ mRNA at 6 h post GnRH treatment significantly increased by 1.60-fold. At 6 hours, cells were collected for miRNA expression profile analysis using MiRCURY LNA Array and quantitative PCR (qPCR. Consequently, 21 up-regulated and 10 down-regulated miRNAs were identified, and qPCR verification of 10 randomly selected miRNAs showed a strong correlation with microarray results. Chromosome location analysis indicated that 8 miRNAs were mapped to chromosome 12 and 4 miRNAs to chromosome X. Target and pathway analysis showed that some miRNAs may be associated with GnRH regulation pathways. In addition, In-depth analysis indicated that 10 up-regulated and 3 down-regulated miRNAs probably target FSHβ mRNA 3'-UTR directly, including miR-361-3p, a highly conserved X-linked miRNA. Most importantly, functional experimental results showed that miR-361-3p was involved in FSH secretion regulation, and up-regulated miR-361-3p expression inhibited FSH secretion, while down-regulated miR-361-3p expression promoted FSH secretion in pig pituitary cell model. These differentially

  1. Parity Differences in Heat Expression of Dairy Cows Synchronized with GnRH, CIDR and PGF2α during Dry Season in Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. S. Mwaanga*, K. Choongo, H. Simukoko and C. Chama1

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to investigate parity differences in heat expression of dairy cows heat-synchronized during the dry season when feed scarcity is common. Cyclic cows (n=65 aged 2 to 10 years with parity range of 0 to 7 were selected from small-holder dairy farms around Lusaka. Cows were divided into 3 groups of nulliparous, primiparous and pluriparous. Heat-was synchronized using gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH and controlled intra-vaginal drug releasing device (CIDR. Heat detection was observed after CIDR withdraw. The study showed a significantly (P<0.05 lower number of primiparous cows (68% coming into heat compared to nulliparous (81.8% and pluriparous cows (83.3%. It was concluded that parity influences estrus expression rate in dairy cows following synchronization with GnRH, CIDR and PGF2α during the dry season in the sub-tropics.

  2. Engineering a CTL-Tailored Replicon RNA Vaccine against PRRSV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welner, Simon; Werder, Simea; Nielsen, Morten

    The development of vaccines against porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) has been hampered by the high mutation rate and the multiple immunoevasive strategies of the virus. With the overall aim of designing a broad coverage vaccine that induces an effective CTL response aga...... will be available for IVIS. This study exemplifies how bioinformatics epitope prediction, recombinant SLA molecules and RNA virus replicon design can be used to engineer a replicating non-propagating vaccine tailored to deliver conserved and immunogenic CTL epitopes....... against PRRSV, we have used a bioinformatics approach to identify common PRRSV type 2 epitopes predicted to react broadly with predominant swine MHC (SLA) alleles. All possible 9- and 10-mer peptides derived from 104 wild-type strains were analyzed in silico for their predicted binding affinity to 3...... cloned into a classical swine fever virus (CSFV)-derived replicon vector. Virus replicon particles (VRP) were rescued by transfection of a complementing cell line with replicon RNA. Polyepitope expression and subsequent proteasomal degradation was confirmed indirectly by increased FLAG-tagged protein...

  3. Alphavirus replicon DNA expressing HIV antigens is an excellent prime for boosting with recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA or with HIV gp140 protein antigen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria L Knudsen

    Full Text Available Vaccination with DNA is an attractive strategy for induction of pathogen-specific T cells and antibodies. Studies in humans have shown that DNA vaccines are safe, but their immunogenicity needs further improvement. As a step towards this goal, we have previously demonstrated that immunogenicity is increased with the use of an alphavirus DNA-launched replicon (DREP vector compared to conventional DNA vaccines. In this study, we investigated the effect of varying the dose and number of administrations of DREP when given as a prime prior to a heterologous boost with poxvirus vector (MVA and/or HIV gp140 protein formulated in glucopyranosyl lipid A (GLA-AF adjuvant. The DREP and MVA vaccine constructs encoded Env and a Gag-Pol-Nef fusion protein from HIV clade C. One to three administrations of 0.2 μg DREP induced lower HIV-specific T cell and IgG responses than the equivalent number of immunizations with 10 μg DREP. However, the two doses were equally efficient as a priming component in a heterologous prime-boost regimen. The magnitude of immune responses depended on the number of priming immunizations rather than the dose. A single low dose of DREP prior to a heterologous boost resulted in greatly increased immune responses compared to MVA or protein antigen alone, demonstrating that a mere 0.2 μg DREP was sufficient for priming immune responses. Following a DREP prime, T cell responses were expanded greatly by an MVA boost, and IgG responses were also expanded when boosted with protein antigen. When MVA and protein were administered simultaneously following multiple DREP primes, responses were slightly compromised compared to administering them sequentially. In conclusion, we have demonstrated efficient priming of HIV-specific T cell and IgG responses with a low dose of DREP, and shown that the priming effect depends on number of primes administered rather than dose.

  4. Defining global gene expression changes of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in female sGnRH-antisense transgenic common carp (Cyprinus carpio.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Xu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG axis is critical in the development and regulation of reproduction in fish. The inhibition of neuropeptide gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH expression may diminish or severely hamper gonadal development due to it being the key regulator of the axis, and then provide a model for the comprehensive study of the expression patterns of genes with respect to the fish reproductive system. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a previous study we injected 342 fertilized eggs from the common carp (Cyprinus carpio with a gene construct that expressed antisense sGnRH. Four years later, we found a total of 38 transgenic fish with abnormal or missing gonads. From this group we selected the 12 sterile females with abnormal ovaries in which we combined suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH and cDNA microarray analysis to define changes in gene expression of the HPG axis in the present study. As a result, nine, 28, and 212 genes were separately identified as being differentially expressed in hypothalamus, pituitary, and ovary, of which 87 genes were novel. The number of down- and up-regulated genes was five and four (hypothalamus, 16 and 12 (pituitary, 119 and 93 (ovary, respectively. Functional analyses showed that these genes involved in several biological processes, such as biosynthesis, organogenesis, metabolism pathways, immune systems, transport links, and apoptosis. Within these categories, significant genes for neuropeptides, gonadotropins, metabolic, oogenesis and inflammatory factors were identified. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study indicated the progressive scaling-up effect of hypothalamic sGnRH antisense on the pituitary and ovary receptors of female carp and provided comprehensive data with respect to global changes in gene expression throughout the HPG signaling pathway, contributing towards improving our understanding of the molecular mechanisms and regulative pathways in the

  5. Defining Global Gene Expression Changes of the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Gonadal Axis in Female sGnRH-Antisense Transgenic Common Carp (Cyprinus carpio)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing; Huang, Wei; Zhong, Chengrong; Luo, Daji; Li, Shuangfei; Zhu, Zuoyan; Hu, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Background The hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis is critical in the development and regulation of reproduction in fish. The inhibition of neuropeptide gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) expression may diminish or severely hamper gonadal development due to it being the key regulator of the axis, and then provide a model for the comprehensive study of the expression patterns of genes with respect to the fish reproductive system. Methodology/Principal Findings In a previous study we injected 342 fertilized eggs from the common carp (Cyprinus carpio) with a gene construct that expressed antisense sGnRH. Four years later, we found a total of 38 transgenic fish with abnormal or missing gonads. From this group we selected the 12 sterile females with abnormal ovaries in which we combined suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) and cDNA microarray analysis to define changes in gene expression of the HPG axis in the present study. As a result, nine, 28, and 212 genes were separately identified as being differentially expressed in hypothalamus, pituitary, and ovary, of which 87 genes were novel. The number of down- and up-regulated genes was five and four (hypothalamus), 16 and 12 (pituitary), 119 and 93 (ovary), respectively. Functional analyses showed that these genes involved in several biological processes, such as biosynthesis, organogenesis, metabolism pathways, immune systems, transport links, and apoptosis. Within these categories, significant genes for neuropeptides, gonadotropins, metabolic, oogenesis and inflammatory factors were identified. Conclusions/Significance This study indicated the progressive scaling-up effect of hypothalamic sGnRH antisense on the pituitary and ovary receptors of female carp and provided comprehensive data with respect to global changes in gene expression throughout the HPG signaling pathway, contributing towards improving our understanding of the molecular mechanisms and regulative pathways in the reproductive system of

  6. Characterization of a minimal pKW2124 replicon from Weissella cibaria KLC140 and its application for the construction of the Weissella expression vector pKUCm1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Hye-Jin; Park, Myeong Soo; Lee, Ju-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    A 2.1-kb plasmid was previously isolated from Weissella cibaria KLC140 in kimchi and cloned into pUC19 along with the slpA and gfp genes, resulting in an 8.6-kb pKWCSLGFP construct for use as a novel surface display vector. To reduce the size of the vector, the minimal replicon of pKW2124 was determined. The pKW2124 plasmid contains a putative origin of replication (ori), a potential ribosomal binding site (RBS), and the repA gene encoding a plasmid replication protein. To conduct the minimal replicon experiment, four different PCR products (MR1, ori+RBS+repA; MR2, RBS+repA; MR2’, repA; MR3, fragment of repA) were obtained and cloned into pUC19 (pKUCm1, pKUCm2, pKUCm2’, and pKUCm3, respectively) containing the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene. These constructed vectors were electroporated into W. confusa ATCC 10881 with different transformation efficiencies of 1.5 × 105 CFU/μg, 1.3 × 101 CFU/μg, and no transformation, respectively, suggesting that the putative ori, RBS, and repA gene are essential for optimum plasmid replication. Subsequent segregational plasmid stability testing of pKUCm1 and pKUCm2 showed that the vector pKUCm1 is highly stable up to 100 generations but pKUCm2 was completely lost after 60 generations, suggesting that the putative ori may be important for plasmid stability in the host strain. In addition, a host range test of pKUCm1 revealed that it has a broad host range spectrum including Weissella, Lactococcus, Leuconostoc, and even Lactobacillus. To verify the application of pKUCm1, the β-galactosidase gene and its promoter region from W. cibaria KSD1 were cloned in the vector, resulting in pKUGal. Expression of the β-galactosidase gene was confirmed using blue-white screening after IPTG induction. The small and stable pKUGal vector will be useful for gene transfer, expression, and manipulation in the Weissella genome and in other lactic acid bacteria. PMID:25691882

  7. Alphavirus replicon approach to promoterless analysis of IRES elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamrud, K I; Custer, M; Dudek, J M; Owens, G; Alterson, K D; Lee, J S; Groebner, J L; Smith, J F

    2007-04-10

    Here we describe a system for promoterless analysis of putative internal ribosome entry site (IRES) elements using an alphavirus (family Togaviridae) replicon vector. The system uses the alphavirus subgenomic promoter to produce transcripts that, when modified to contain a spacer region upstream of an IRES element, allow analysis of cap-independent translation of genes of interest (GOI). If the IRES element is removed, translation of the subgenomic transcript can be reduced >95% compared to the same transcript containing a functional IRES element. Alphavirus replicons, used in this manner, offer an alternative to standard dicistronic DNA vectors or in vitro translation systems currently used to analyze putative IRES elements. In addition, protein expression levels varied depending on the spacer element located upstream of each IRES. The ability to modulate the level of expression from alphavirus vectors should extend the utility of these vectors in vaccine development.

  8. Expression of feeding-related peptide receptors mRNA in GT1-7 cell line and roles of leptin and orexins in control of GnRH secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ying; Zhou, Li-bin; Liu, Shang-quan; Tang, Jing-feng; Li, Feng-yin; Li, Rong-ying; Song, Huai-dong; Chen, Ming-dao

    2005-08-01

    To investigate the expression of feeding-related peptide receptors mRNA in GT1-7 cell line and roles of leptin and orexins in the control of GnRH secretion. Receptors of bombesin3, cholecystokinin (CCK)-A, CCK-B, glucagon-like peptide (GLP)1, melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH)1, orexin1, orexin2, neuromedin-B, neuropeptide Y (NPY)1 and NPY5, neurotensin (NT)1, NT2, NT3, and leptin receptor long form mRNA in GT1-7 cells were detected by reversed transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. GT1-7 cells were treated with leptin, orexin A and orexin B at a cohort of concentrations for different lengths of time, and GnRH in medium was determined by radioimmunoassay (RIA). Receptors of bombesin 3, CCK-B, GLP1, MCH1, orexin1, neuromedin-B, NPY1, NPY5, NT1, NT3, and leptin receptor long form mRNA were expressed in GT1-7 cells, of which, receptors of GLP1, neuromedin-B, NPY1, and NT3 were highly expressed. No amplified fragments of orexin2, NT2, and CCK-A receptor cDNA were generated with GT1-7 RNA, indicating that the GT1-7 cells did not express mRNA of them. Leptin induced a significant stimulation of GnRH release, the results being most significant at 0.1 nmol/L for 15 min. In contrast to other studies in hypothalamic explants, neither orexin A nor orexin B affected basal GnRH secretion over a wide range of concentrations ranging from 1 nmol/L to 500 nmol/Lat 15, 30, and 60 min. Feeding and reproductive function are closely linked. Many orexigenic and anorexigenic signals may control feeding behavior as well as alter GnRH secretion through their receptors on GnRH neurons.

  9. GnRH-agonist implantation of prepubertal male cats affects their reproductive performance and testicular LH receptor and FSH receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehl, N S; Khalid, M; Srisuwatanasagul, S; Swangchan-Uthai, T; Sirivaidyapong, S

    2016-03-15

    This study was conducted to investigate the effect of GnRH-agonist implantation in prepubertal tomcats on sexual behavior, reproductive performance, and expression of testicular LH receptor (LHR) and FSH receptor (FSHR) and also to compare the testicular characteristics, LHR and FSHR expression between prepubertal and adult tomcats. In experiment 1, 3-month-old tomcats (n = 6/group) were either treated with or left without 4.7 mg deslorelin implants. Semen collection and evaluation were performed just before castration at 48 weeks after treatment; removed testes were analyzed for mRNA and protein expression of LHR and FSHR. We were able to collect semen from six non-treated cats, whereas in treated cats, semen was uncollectable. The results revealed that sexual behavior was absent in the implanted cats throughout the study period. Testicular volume was found to decrease from 30 weeks after treatment onward in the implanted cats compared to the controls (P score, seminiferous tubule diameter, and LHR protein expression were found lower in the implanted cats (P reproductive function without any adverse effects for at least 48 weeks in male cats. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Cre-expressing neurons in visual cortex of Ntsr1-Cre GN220 mice are corticothalamic and are depolarized by acetylcholine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundberg, Sofie Charlotte; Lindström, Sarah Helen; Sanchez, Gonzalo Manuel; Granseth, Björn

    2018-01-01

    The Ntsr1-Cre GN220 mouse expresses Cre-recombinase in corticothalamic (CT) neurons in neocortical layer 6. It is not known if the other major types of pyramidal neurons in this layer also express this enzyme. By electrophysiological recordings in slices and histological analysis of the uptake of retrogradely transported beads we show that Cre-positive neurons are CT and not corticocortical or corticoclaustral types. Furthermore, we show that Ntsr1-Cre-positive cells are immuno-positive for the nuclear transcription factor Forkhead box protein P2 (FoxP2). We conclude that Cre-expression is limited to a specific type of pyramidal neuron: CT. However, it appears as not all CT neurons are Cre-expressing; there are indications that the penetrance of the gene is about 90%. We demonstrate the utility of assigning a specific identity to individual neurons by determining that the CT neurons are potently modulated by acetylcholine acting on both nicotinic and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. These results corroborate the suggested function of these neurons in regulating the gain of thalamocortical transfer of sensory information depending on attentional demand and state of arousal. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Morphology, cell viability, karyotype, expression of surface markers and plasticity of three human primary cell line cultures before and after the cryostorage in LN2 and GN2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Pino, Alberto; Ligero, Gertrudis; López, María B; Navarro, Héctor; Carrillo, Jose A; Pantoll, Siobhan C; Díaz de la Guardia, Rafael

    2015-02-01

    Primary cell line cultures from human skin biopsies, adipose tissue and tumor tissue are valuable samples for research and therapy. In this regard, their derivation, culture, storage, transport and thawing are important steps to be studied. Towards this end, we wanted to establish the derivation, and identify the culture characteristics and the loss of viability of three human primary cell line cultures (human adult dermal fibroblasts (hADFs), human adult mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs), and primary culture of tumor cells from lung adenocarcinoma (PCTCLA)). Compared to fresh hADFs, hMSCs and PCTCLA, thawed cells stored in a cryogenic Dewar tanks with liquid nitrogen (LN2), displayed 98.20% ± 0.99, 95.40% ± 1.41 and 93.31% ± 3.83 of cell viability, respectively. Thawed cells stored in a Dry Vapor Shipper container with gas phase (GN2), for 20 days, in addition displayed 4.61% ± 2.78, 3.70% ± 4.09 and 9.13% ± 3.51 of average loss of cells viability, respectively, showing strong correlation between the loss of viability in hADFs and the number of post-freezing days in the Dry Vapor Shipper. No significant changes in morphological characteristics or in the expression of surface markers (being hADFs, hMSCs and PCTCLA characterized by positive markers CD73+; CD90+; CD105+; and negative markers CD14-; CD20-; CD34-; and CD45-; n=2) were found. Chromosome abnormalities in the karyotype were not found. In addition, under the right conditions hMSCs were differentiated into adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic lineages in vitro. In this paper, we have shown the characteristics of three human primary cell line cultures when they are stored in LN2 and GN2. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Analysis of classical swine fever virus RNA replication determinants using replicons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risager, Peter Christian; Fahnøe, Ulrik; Gullberg, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Self-replicating RNAs (replicons), with or without reporter gene sequences, derived from the genome of the Paderborn strain of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) have been produced. The full-length viral cDNA, propagated within a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC), was modified by targeted...... recombination within E. coli. RNA transcripts were produced in vitro and introduced into cells by electroporation. The translation and replication of the replicon RNAs could be followed by the accumulation of luciferase (from Renilla reniformis or Gaussia princeps) protein expression (where appropriate......), as well as by detection of the CSFV NS3 protein production within the cells. Inclusion of the viral E2 coding region within the replicon was advantageous for the replication efficiency. Production of chimeric RNAs, substituting the NS2 and NS3 coding regions (as a unit) from the Paderborn strain...

  13. Origins of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in vertebrates: identification of a novel GnRH in a basal vertebrate, the sea lamprey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanaugh, Scott I; Nozaki, Masumi; Sower, Stacia A

    2008-08-01

    We cloned a cDNA encoding a novel (GnRH), named lamprey GnRH-II, from the sea lamprey, a basal vertebrate. The deduced amino acid sequence of the newly identified lamprey GnRH-II is QHWSHGWFPG. The architecture of the precursor is similar to that reported for other GnRH precursors consisting of a signal peptide, decapeptide, a downstream processing site, and a GnRH-associated peptide; however, the gene for lamprey GnRH-II does not have introns in comparison with the gene organization for all other vertebrate GnRHs. Lamprey GnRH-II precursor transcript was widely expressed in a variety of tissues. In situ hybridization of the brain showed expression and localization of the transcript in the hypothalamus, medulla, and olfactory regions, whereas immunohistochemistry using a specific antiserum showed only GnRH-II cell bodies and processes in the preoptic nucleus/hypothalamus areas. Lamprey GnRH-II was shown to stimulate the hypothalamic-pituitary axis using in vivo and in vitro studies. Lamprey GnRH-II was also shown to activate the inositol phosphate signaling system in COS-7 cells transiently transfected with the lamprey GnRH receptor. These studies provide evidence for a novel lamprey GnRH that has a role as a third hypothalamic GnRH. In summary, the newly discovered lamprey GnRH-II offers a new paradigm of the origin of the vertebrate GnRH family. We hypothesize that due to a genome/gene duplication event, an ancestral gene gave rise to two lineages of GnRHs: the gnathostome GnRH and lamprey GnRH-II.

  14. Inhibition of protease-inhibitor resistant hepatitis C virus replicons and infectious virus by intracellular intrabodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Tanamy, Meital; Zemel, Romy; Bachmatov, Larissa; Jangra, Rohit K.; Shapira, Assaf; Villanueva, Rodrigo; Yi, MinKyung; Lemon, Stanley M.; Benhar, Itai; Tur-Kaspa, Ran

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a common cause of chronic liver disease and a serious threat to human health. The HCV NS3/4A serine protease is necessary for viral replication and innate immune evasion, and represents a well-validated target for specific antiviral therapy. We previously reported the isolation of single-chain antibodies (scFvs) that inhibit NS3/4A protease activity in vitro. Expressed intracellularly (intrabodies), these scFvs blocked NS3-mediated proliferation of NS3-transfected cells. Here we show that anti-NS3 scFvs suppress HCV RNA replication when expressed intracellularly in Huh7 hepatoma cells bearing either subgenomic or genome-length HCV RNA replicons. The expression of intrabodies directed against NS3 inhibited the autonomous amplification of HCV replicons resistant to small molecule inhibitors of the NS3/4A protease, and replicons derived from different HCV genotypes. The combination of intrabodies and interferon-α had an additive inhibitory effect on RNA replication in the replicon model. Intrabody expression also inhibited production of infectious HCV in a cell culture system. The NS3 protease activity was inhibited by the intrabodies in NS3-expressing cells. In contrast, cell-free synthesis of HCV RNA by preformed replicase complexes was not inhibited by intrabodies, suggesting that the major mode of inhibition of viral replication is inhibition of NS3/4A protease activity and subsequent suppression of viral polyprotein processing. PMID:20705106

  15. Review: Evolution of GnIH structure and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro eOsugi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Discovery of gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH in the Japanese quail in 2000 was the first to demonstrate the existence of a hypothalamic neuropeptide inhibiting gonadotropin release. We now know that GnIH regulates reproduction by inhibiting gonadotropin synthesis and release via action on the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH system and the gonadotrope in various vertebrates. GnIH peptides identified in birds and mammals have a common LPXRF-amide (X = L or Q motif at the C-terminus and inhibits pituitary gonadotropin secretion. However, the function and structure of GnIH peptides were diverse in fish. Goldfish GnIHs possessing a C-terminal LPXRF-amide motif had both stimulatory and inhibitory effects on gonadotropin synthesis or release. The C-terminal sequence of grass puffer and medaka GnIHs were MPQRF-amide. To investigate the evolutionary origin of GnIH and its ancestral structure and function, we searched for GnIH in agnathans, the most ancient lineage of vertebrates. We identified GnIH precursor gene and mature GnIH peptides with C-terminal QPQRF-amide or RPQRF-amide from the brain of sea lamprey. Lamprey GnIH fibers were in close proximity to GnRH-III neurons. Further, one of lamprey GnIHs stimulated the expression of lamprey GnRH-III peptide in the hypothalamus and gonadotropic hormone β mRNA expression in the pituitary. We further identified the ancestral form of GnIH, which had a C-terminal RPQRF-amide, and its receptors in amphioxus, the most basal chordate species. The amphioxus GnIH inhibited cAMP signaling in vitro. In sum, the original forms of GnIH may date back to the time of the emergence of early chordates. GnIH peptides may have had various C-terminal structures slightly different from LPXRF-amide in basal chordates, which had stimulatory and/or inhibitory functions on reproduction. The C-terminal LPXRF-amide structure and its inhibitory function on reproduction may be selected in later-evolved vertebrates, such as

  16. Protein expression profile of HT-29 human colon cancer cells after treatment with a cytotoxic daunorubicin-GnRH-III derivative bioconjugate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Natalie Schreier

    Full Text Available Targeted delivery of chemotherapeutic agents is a new approach for the treatment of cancer, which provides increased selectivity and decreased systemic toxicity. We have recently developed a promising drug delivery system, in which the anticancer drug daunorubicin (Dau was attached via oxime bond to a gonadotropin-releasing hormone-III (GnRH-III derivative used as a targeting moiety (Glp-His-Trp-Lys(Ac-His-Asp-Trp-Lys(Da  = Aoa-Pro-Gly-NH2; Glp = pyroglutamic acid, Ac = acetyl; Aoa = aminooxyacetyl. This bioconjugate exerted in vitro cytostatic/cytotoxic effect on human breast, prostate and colon cancer cells, as well as significant in vivo tumor growth inhibitory effect on colon carcinoma bearing mice. In our previous studies, H-Lys(Dau = Aoa-OH was identified as the smallest metabolite produced in the presence of rat liver lysosomal homogenate, which was able to bind to DNA in vitro. To get a deeper insight into the mechanism of action of the bioconjugate, changes in the protein expression profile of HT-29 human colon cancer cells after treatment with the bioconjugate or free daunorubicin were investigated by mass spectrometry-based proteomics. Our results indicate that several metabolism-related proteins, molecular chaperons and proteins involved in signaling are differently expressed after targeted chemotherapeutic treatment, leading to the conclusion that the bioconjugate exerts its cytotoxic action by interfering with multiple intracellular processes.

  17. Identification of Smad Response Elements in the Promoter of Goldfish FSHβ Gene and Evidence for Their Mediation of Activin and GnRH Stimulation of FSHβ Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man-Tat eLau

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available As an essential hormone regulating gonads in vertebrates, the biosynthesis and secretion of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH is controlled by a variety of endocrine and paracrine factors in both mammalian and non-mammalian vertebrates. Activin was initially discovered in the ovary for its specific stimulation of FSH secretion by the pituitary cells. Our earlier studies in fish have shown that activin stimulates FSHβ but suppresses LHβ expression in both the goldfish and zebrafish. Further experiments showed that the regulation of FSHβ in fish occurred at the promoter level involving Smads, in particular Smad3. To further understand the mechanisms by which activin/Smad regulates FSHβ transcription, the present study was undertaken to analyze the promoter of goldfish FSHβ gene (fshb with the aim to identify potential cis-regulatory elements responsible for activin/Smad stimulation. Both serial deletion and site-directed mutagenesis were used, and the promoter activity was tested in the LβT2 cells, a murine gonadotroph cell line. The reporter constructs of goldfish FSHβ promoter-SEAP (secreted alkaline phosphatase were co-transfected with an expression plasmid for Smads (2 or 3 followed by measurement of SEAP activity in the medium. Two putative Smad responsive elements (SRE were identified in the promoter at distal and proximal regions, respectively. The distal site contained a consensus Smad binding element (SBE; AGAC, -1675/-1672 whereas the proximal site (GACCTTGA, -212/-205 was identical to an SF-1 binding site reported in humans, which was preceded by a sequence (AACACTGA highly conserved between fish and mammals. The proximal site also seemed to be involved in mediating stimulation of FSHβ expression by gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH and its potential interaction with activin. In conclusion, we have identified two potential cis-regulatory elements in the promoter of goldfish FSHβ that are responsible for activin

  18. Functional characterization and quantitative expression analysis of two GnRH-related peptide receptors in the mosquito, Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oryan, Alireza; Wahedi, Azizia; Paluzzi, Jean-Paul V

    2018-03-04

    To cope with stressful events such as flight, organisms have evolved various regulatory mechanisms, often involving control by endocrine-derived factors. In insects, two stress-related factors include the gonadotropin-releasing hormone-related peptides adipokinetic hormone (AKH) and corazonin (CRZ). AKH is a pleiotropic hormone best known as a substrate liberator of proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates. Although a universal function has not yet been elucidated, CRZ has been shown to have roles in pigmentation, ecdysis or act as a cardiostimulatory factor. While both these neuropeptides and their respective receptors (AKHR and CRZR) have been characterized in several organisms, details on their specific roles within the disease vector, Aedes aegypti, remain largely unexplored. Here, we obtained three A. aegypti AKHR transcript variants and further identified the A. aegypti CRZR receptor. Receptor expression using a heterologous functional assay revealed that these receptors exhibit a highly specific response for their native ligands. Developmental quantitative expression analysis of CRZR revealed enrichment during the pupal and adult stages. In adults, quantitative spatial expression analysis revealed CRZR transcript in a variety of organs including head, thoracic ganglia, primary reproductive organs (ovary and testis), as well as male carcass. This suggest CRZ may play a role in ecdysis, and neuronal expression of CRZR indicates a possible role for CRZ within the nervous system. Quantitative developmental expression analysis of AKHR identified significant transcript enrichment in early adult stages. AKHR transcript was observed in the head, thoracic ganglia, accessory reproductive tissues and the carcass of adult females, while it was detected in the abdominal ganglia and enriched significantly in the carcass of adult males, which supports the known function of AKH in energy metabolism. Collectively, given the enrichment of CRZR and AKHR in the primary and

  19. Effect of GnRHa ovulation trigger dose on follicular fluid characteristics and granulosa cell gene expression profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vuong, Thi Ngoc Lan; Ho, M T; Ha, T Q

    2017-01-01

    in oocyte donors undergoing a single stimulation cycle at IVFMD, My Duc Hospital, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, from August 2014 to March 2015. A total of 165 women aged 18-35 years with body mass index 1.25 ng/mL, and antral follicle count ≥6 were randomised to three...... granulosa cells were investigated in a subset of women from each group. RESULTS: Progesterone and oestradiol levels in FF did not differ significantly by trigger doses; findings were similar for 3βHSD, LHR and INHB-A gene expression in both cumulus and mural granulosa cells. CONCLUSIONS: In women co...

  20. Construction of self-replicating subgenomic West Nile virus replicons for screening antiviral compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaraz-Estrada, Sofia L; Reichert, Erin Donohue; Padmanabhan, Radhakrishnan

    2013-01-01

    Mosquito-borne flavivirus RNA genomes encode one long open reading frame flanking 5'- and 3'-untranslated regions (5'- and 3'-UTRs) which contain cis-acting RNA elements playing important roles for viral RNA translation and replication. The viral RNA encodes a single polyprotein, which is processed into three structural proteins and seven nonstructural (NS) proteins. The regions coding for the seven NS proteins are sufficient for replication of the RNA. The sequences encoding the structural genes can be deleted except for two short regions. The first one encompasses 32 amino acid (aa) residues from the N-terminal coding sequence of capsid (C) and the second, 27 aa region from the C-terminus of envelope (E) protein. The deleted region can be substituted with a gene coding for a readily quantifiable reporter to give rise to a subgenomic reporter replicon. Replicons containing a variety of reporter genes and marker genes for construction of stable mammalian cell lines are valuable reagents for studying the effects of mutations in translation and/or replication in isolation from processes like the entry and assembly of the virus particles. Here we describe the construction of two West Nile virus (WNV) replicons by overlap extension PCR and standard recombinant DNA techniques. One has a Renilla luciferase (Rluc) reporter gene followed by an internal ribosome entry site (element) for cap-independent translation of the open reading frame encompassing the carboxy-terminal sequence of E to NS5. The second replicon has in tandem the Rluc gene, foot and mouth disease virus 2A, and neomycin phosphotransferase gene that allows establishment of a stable mammalian cell line expressing the Rluc reporter in the presence of the neomycin analog, G418. The stable replicon-expressing Vero cell line has been used for cell-based screening and determination of EC50 values for antiviral compounds that inhibited WNV replication.

  1. Effect of cortisol on gonadotropin inhibitory hormone (GnIH) in the cinnamon clownfish, Amphiprion melanopus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young Jae; Habibi, Hamid R; Kil, Gyung-Suk; Jung, Min-Min; Choi, Cheol Young

    2017-04-01

    Hypothalamic peptides, gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and gonadotropin inhibitory hormone (GnIH), play pivotal roles in the control of reproduction and gonadal maturation in fish. In the present study we tested the possibility that stress-mediated reproductive dysfunction in teleost may involve changes in GnRH and GnIH activity. We studied expression of brain GnIH, GnIH-R, seabream GnRH (sbGnRH), as well as circulating levels of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), and luteinizing hormone (LH) in the cinnamon clownfish, Amphiprion melanopus. Treatment with cortisol increased GnIH mRNA level, but reduced sbGnRH mRNA and circulating levels of LH and FSH in cinnamon clownfish. Using double immunofluorescence staining, we found expression of both GnIH and GnRH in the diencephalon region of cinnamon clownfish brain. These findings support the hypothesis that cortisol, an indicator of stress, affects reproduction, in part, by increasing GnIH in cinnamon clownfish which contributes to hypothalamic suppression of reproductive function in A. melanopus, a protandrous hermaphroditic fish. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Construction and characterization of poliovirus subgenomic replicons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, G; Racaniello, V R

    1988-05-01

    Poliovirus RNAs containing in-frame deletions within the capsid-coding region were produced by in vitro transcription of altered poliovirus type 1 cDNA by using bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase. Three RNAs were transcribed that contained deletions of 2,317 nucleotides (bases 747 to 3064), 1,781 nucleotides (bases 1,175 to 2,956), and 1,295 nucleotides (bases 1,175 to 2,470). All three subgenomic RNAs replicated after transfection into HeLa cells, demonstrating that sequences encoding the capsid polypeptides are not essential for viral RNA replication in vivo. Viral RNA containing the largest deletion (R1) replicated approximately three times better than full-length RNA produced in vitro. Northern blot (RNA blot) hybridization analysis of total cellular RNA from HeLa cells at different times after transfection with R1 demonstrated the presence of increasing amounts of the expected 5.1-kilobase subgenomic RNA. Analysis by immunoprecipitation of viral proteins induced after transfection of R1 RNA into HeLa cells revealed the presence of proteins 2Apro, 2C, and 3Dpol and its precursors, suggesting that the polyprotein cleavages are similar to those occurring in virus-infected cells. Replication of P2/Lansing virion RNA was inhibited by cotransfection with the R1 replicon, as demonstrated by hybridization analysis with a serotype-specific oligonucleotide probe. A higher level of inhibition of RNA replication was observed when P2/Lansing RNA was cotransfected into HeLa cells with truncated R1 transcripts (R1-PvuII) that were missing 395 3' nucleotides and a poly(A) tail. These internally and terminally deleted RNAs inhibited the replication of subgenomic replicons R1, R2, and R3 and caused a reduction in plaque size when cotransfected with P1/Mahoney or P2/Lansing viral RNA, suggesting that individual cells had received both RNAs. No inhibition of plaque size was observed when replicon RNAs were used that were missing 1,384 or 1,839 3' nucleotides or contained plasmid

  3. Identification of the GnRH-(1-5) Receptor and Signaling Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-22

    expression in immortalized GnRH neurons and to facilitate lordosis behavior in female rats. Interestingly, EP24.15 colocalizes with vii...expression in immortalized GnRH neurons (73) and facilitates lordosis behavior in female rats (72). Interestingly, EP24.15 is expressed along the...biologically active by facilitating lordosis behavior in ovariectomized estrogen-primed rats (72); and can increase the mRNA expression of GnRH in immortalized

  4. Fanconi Anemia a Is a Nucleocytoplasmic Shuttling Molecule Required for Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone (GnRH) Transduction of the GnRH Receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Larder, Rachel; Karali, Dimitra; Nelson, Nancy; Brown, Pamela

    2006-01-01

    GnRH binds its cognate G protein-coupled GnRH receptor (GnRHR) located on pituitary gonadotropes and drives expression of gonadotropin hormones. There are two gonadotropin hormones, comprised of a common α- and hormone-specific β-subunit, which are required for gonadal function. Recently we identified that Fanconi anemia a (Fanca), a DNA damage repair gene, is differentially expressed within the LβT2 gonadotrope cell line in response to stimulation with GnRH. FANCA is mutated in more than 60%...

  5. Establishment and mitotic stability of an extra-chromosomal mammalian replicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson Dean A

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Basic functions of the eukaryotic nucleus, like transcription and replication, are regulated in a hierarchic fashion. It is assumed that epigenetic factors influence the efficiency and precision of these processes. In order to uncouple local and long-range epigenetic features we used an extra-chromosomal replicon to study the requirements for replication and segregation and compared its behavior to that of its integrated counterpart. Results The autonomous replicon replicates in all eukaryotic cells and is stably maintained in the absence of selection but, as other extra-chromosomal replicons, its establishment is very inefficient. We now show that following establishment the vector is stably associated with nuclear compartments involved in gene expression and chromosomal domains that replicate at the onset of S-phase. While the vector stays autonomous, its association with these compartments ensures the efficiency of replication and mitotic segregation in proliferating cells. Conclusion Using this novel minimal model system we demonstrate that relevant functions of the eukaryotic nucleus are strongly influenced by higher nuclear architecture. Furthermore our findings have relevance for the rational design of episomal vectors to be used for genetic modification of cells: in order to improve such constructs with respect to efficiency elements have to be identified which ensure that such constructs reach regions of the nucleus favorable for replication and transcription.

  6. Fanconi anemia A is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling molecule required for gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) transduction of the GnRH receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larder, Rachel; Karali, Dimitra; Nelson, Nancy; Brown, Pamela

    2006-12-01

    GnRH binds its cognate G protein-coupled GnRH receptor (GnRHR) located on pituitary gonadotropes and drives expression of gonadotropin hormones. There are two gonadotropin hormones, comprised of a common alpha- and hormone-specific beta-subunit, which are required for gonadal function. Recently we identified that Fanconi anemia a (Fanca), a DNA damage repair gene, is differentially expressed within the LbetaT2 gonadotrope cell line in response to stimulation with GnRH. FANCA is mutated in more than 60% of cases of Fanconi anemia (FA), a rare genetically heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorder characterized by bone marrow failure, endocrine tissue cancer susceptibility, and infertility. Here we show that induction of FANCA protein is mediated by the GnRHR and that the protein constitutively adopts a nucleocytoplasmic intracellular distribution pattern. Using inhibitors to block nuclear import and export and a GnRHR antagonist, we demonstrated that GnRH induces nuclear accumulation of FANCA and green fluorescent protein (GFP)-FANCA before exporting back to the cytoplasm using the nuclear export receptor CRM1. Using FANCA point mutations that locate GFP-FANCA to the cytoplasm (H1110P) or functionally uncouple GFP-FANCA (Q1128E) from the wild-type nucleocytoplasmic distribution pattern, we demonstrated that wild-type FANCA was required for GnRH-induced activation of gonadotrope cell markers. Cotransfection of H1110P and Q1128E blocked GnRH activation of the alphaGsu and GnRHR but not the beta-subunit gene promoters. We conclude that nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of FANCA is required for GnRH transduction of the alphaGSU and GnRHR gene promoters and propose that FANCA functions as a GnRH-induced signal transducer.

  7. Identification and characterization of a reptilian GnRH receptor from the leopard gecko.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikemoto, T; Enomoto, M; Park, M K

    2004-02-12

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) plays a pivotal role in the regulation of reproductive functions through interactions with its specific receptor. We describe the first molecular cloning and characterization of a full-length GnRH receptor (GnRHR) from the leopard gecko Eublepharis macularius. It has a distinct genomic structure consisting of five exons and four introns, compared with all the other reported GnRHR genes. A native GnRH form, cGnRH-II, stimulated inositol phosphate (IP) production in COS-7 cells transiently transfected with the GnRHR, in a dose dependent manner. The mRNA was expressed in all the tissues and organs examined. Molecular phylogenetic analysis revealed that the cloned GnRHR belongs to the type 2/nonmammalian I GnRHR. Low-expression levels were observed from the pituitary glands of reproductively active leopard geckos, indicating the possibility that there is at least one more type of GnRHR highly expressed in the pituitary gland for the gonadotropin secretion in this reptile.

  8. Construction and characterization of poliovirus subgenomic replicons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, G.; Racaniello, V.R.

    1988-01-01

    Poliovirus RNAs containing in-frame deletions within the capsid-coding region were produced by in vitro transcription of altered poliovirus type 1 cDNA by using bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase. Three RNAs were transcribed that contained deletions of 2,317 nucleotides (bases 747 to 3,064), 1,781 nucleotides (bases 1,175 to 2,956), and 1,295 nucleotides (bases 1,175 to 2,470). All three subgenomic RNAs replicated after transfection into HeLa cells, demonstrating that sequences encoding the capsid polypeptides are not essential for viral RNA replication in vivo. Viral RNA containing the largest deletion (R1) replicated approximately three times better than full-length RNA produced in vitro. Northern blot (RNA blot) hybridization analysis of total cellular RNA from HeLa cells at different times after transfection with R1 demonstrated the presence of increasing amounts of the expected 5.1-kilobase subgenomic RNA. Analysis by immunoprecipitation of [ 35 S-labeled] viral proteins induced after transfection of R1 RNA into HeLa cells revealed the presence of proteins 2A pro , 2C, and 3D pol and its precursors, suggesting that the polyprotein cleavages are similar to those occurring in virus-infected cells. These internally and terminally deleted RNAs inhibited the replication of subgenomic replicons R1, R2, and R3 and caused a reduction in plaque size when cotransfected with P1/Mahoney or P2/Lansing viral RNA, suggesting that individual cells had received both RNAs

  9. Review: Regulatory mechanisms of gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH synthesis and release in photoperiodic animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuyoshi eTsutsui

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH is a novel hypothalamic neuropeptide that was discovered in quail as an inhibitory factor for gonadotropin release. GnIH inhibits gonadotropin synthesis and release in birds through actions on gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH neurons and gonadotropes, mediated via the GnIH receptor (GnIH-R, GPR147. Subsequently, GnIH was identified in mammals and other vertebrates. As in birds, mammalian GnIH inhibits gonadotropin secretion, indicating a conserved role for this neuropeptide in the control of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG axis across species. Identification of the regulatory mechanisms governing GnIH expression and release is important in understanding the physiological role of the GnIH system. A nocturnal hormone, melatonin, appears to act directly on GnIH neurons through its receptor to induce expression and release of GnIH in quail, a photoperiodic bird. Recently, a similar, but opposite, action of melatonin on the inhibition of expression of mammalian GnIH was shown in hamsters and sheep, photoperiodic mammals. These results in photoperiodic animals demonstrate that GnIH expression is photoperiodically modulated via a melatonin-dependent process. Recent findings indicate that GnIH may be a mediator of stress-induced reproductive disruption in birds and mammals, pointing to a broad role for this neuropeptide in assessing physiological state and modifying reproductive effort accordingly. This paper summarizes the advances made in our knowledge regarding the regulation of GnIH synthesis and release in photoperiodic birds and mammals. This paper also discusses the neuroendocrine integration of environmental signals, such as photoperiods and stress, and internal signals, such as GnIH, melatonin and glucocorticoids, to control avian and mammalian reproduction.

  10. Microarray analysis identifies a common set of cellular genes modulated by different HCV replicon clones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerosolimo Germano

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV RNA synthesis and protein expression affect cell homeostasis by modulation of gene expression. The impact of HCV replication on global cell transcription has not been fully evaluated. Thus, we analysed the expression profiles of different clones of human hepatoma-derived Huh-7 cells carrying a self-replicating HCV RNA which express all viral proteins (HCV replicon system. Results First, we compared the expression profile of HCV replicon clone 21-5 with both the Huh-7 parental cells and the 21-5 cured (21-5c cells. In these latter, the HCV RNA has been eliminated by IFN-α treatment. To confirm data, we also analyzed microarray results from both the 21-5 and two other HCV replicon clones, 22-6 and 21-7, compared to the Huh-7 cells. The study was carried out by using the Applied Biosystems (AB Human Genome Survey Microarray v1.0 which provides 31,700 probes that correspond to 27,868 human genes. Microarray analysis revealed a specific transcriptional program induced by HCV in replicon cells respect to both IFN-α-cured and Huh-7 cells. From the original datasets of differentially expressed genes, we selected by Venn diagrams a final list of 38 genes modulated by HCV in all clones. Most of the 38 genes have never been described before and showed high fold-change associated with significant p-value, strongly supporting data reliability. Classification of the 38 genes by Panther System identified functional categories that were significantly enriched in this gene set, such as histones and ribosomal proteins as well as extracellular matrix and intracellular protein traffic. The dataset also included new genes involved in lipid metabolism, extracellular matrix and cytoskeletal network, which may be critical for HCV replication and pathogenesis. Conclusion Our data provide a comprehensive analysis of alterations in gene expression induced by HCV replication and reveal modulation of new genes potentially useful

  11. Review: evolution of GnIH and related peptides structure and function in the chordates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osugi, Tomohiro; Ubuka, Takayoshi; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Discovery of gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) in the Japanese quail in 2000 was the first to demonstrate the existence of a hypothalamic neuropeptide inhibiting gonadotropin release. We now know that GnIH regulates reproduction by inhibiting gonadotropin synthesis and release via action on the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) system and the gonadotrope in various vertebrates. GnIH peptides identified in birds and mammals have a common LPXRF-amide (X = L or Q) motif at the C-terminus and inhibit pituitary gonadotropin secretion. However, the function and structure of GnIH peptides are diverse in fish. Goldfish GnIHs possessing a C-terminal LPXRF-amide motif have both stimulatory and inhibitory effects on gonadotropin synthesis or release. The C-terminal sequence of grass puffer and medaka GnIHs are MPQRF-amide. To investigate the evolutionary origin of GnIH and its ancestral structure and function, we searched for GnIH in agnathans, the most ancient lineage of vertebrates. We identified GnIH precursor gene and mature GnIH peptides with C-terminal QPQRF-amide or RPQRF-amide from the brain of sea lamprey. Lamprey GnIH fibers were in close proximity to GnRH-III neurons. Further, one of lamprey GnIHs stimulated the expression of lamprey GnRH-III peptide in the hypothalamus and gonadotropic hormone β mRNA expression in the pituitary. We further identified the ancestral form of GnIH, which had a C-terminal RPQRF-amide, and its receptors in amphioxus, the most basal chordate species. The amphioxus GnIH inhibited cAMP signaling in vitro. In sum, the original forms of GnIH may date back to the time of the emergence of early chordates. GnIH peptides may have had various C-terminal structures slightly different from LPXRF-amide in basal chordates, which had stimulatory and/or inhibitory functions on reproduction. The C-terminal LPXRF-amide structure and its inhibitory function on reproduction may be selected in later-evolved vertebrates, such as birds and mammals.

  12. A conserved non-reproductive GnRH system in chordates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takehiro G Kusakabe

    Full Text Available Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH is a neuroendocrine peptide that plays a central role in the vertebrate hypothalamo-pituitary axis. The roles of GnRH in the control of vertebrate reproductive functions have been established, while its non-reproductive function has been suggested but less well understood. Here we show that the tunicate Ciona intestinalis has in its non-reproductive larval stage a prominent GnRH system spanning the entire length of the nervous system. Tunicate GnRH receptors are phylogenetically closest to vertebrate GnRH receptors, yet functional analysis of the receptors revealed that these simple chordates have evolved a unique GnRH system with multiple ligands and receptor heterodimerization enabling complex regulation. One of the gnrh genes is conspicuously expressed in the motor ganglion and nerve cord, which are homologous structures to the hindbrain and spinal cord of vertebrates. Correspondingly, GnRH receptor genes were found to be expressed in the tail muscle and notochord of embryos, both of which are phylotypic axial structures along the nerve cord. Our findings suggest a novel non-reproductive role of GnRH in tunicates. Furthermore, we present evidence that GnRH-producing cells are present in the hindbrain and spinal cord of the medaka, Oryzias latipes, thereby suggesting the deep evolutionary origin of a non-reproductive GnRH system in chordates.

  13. Ontogenic and sexual differences in pituitary GnRH receptors and intracellular Ca2+ mobilization induced by GnRH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacau-Mengido, I M; González Iglesias, A; Lux-Lantos, V; Libertun, C; Becú-Villalobos, D

    1998-04-01

    The present experiments were designed in order to elucidate the participation of the developing hypophysis in determining the changing sensitivity of gonadotrophins to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) during ontogeny in the rat. To that end, we chose two well defined developmental ages that differ markedly in sexual and ontogenic characteristics of hypophyseal sensitivity to GnRH, 15 and 30 d. In order to study sex differences and the role of early sexual organization of the hypothalamus, experiments were carried out in males, females, and neonatally androgenized females (TP females). We evaluated (1) the characteristics of pituitary GnRH receptors, and (2) associated changes in GnRH-induced mobilization of intracellular Ca2+ (a second messenger involved in gonadotropins exocytosis). We measured binding characteristics of the GnRH analog D-Ser(TBu)6-des-Gly10-GnRH ethylamide in pituitary homogenates. We found that Kds did not vary among the different sex groups. Total number and concentration of receptors decreased in the female rat from 15-30 d of age, whereas in the male and TP female, receptors/pituitary increased, and the concentration/mg tissue did not change. Also, at 30 days of age, males presented higher content and concentration of receptors than females, and higher content than TP females. In order to evaluate if developmental and sexual differences in pituitary sensitivity to GnRH might be expressed through variations in the intracellular Ca2+ signal, we studied the mobilization of intracellular Ca2+ induced by GnRH (1 x 10(-8) to 1 x 10(-11) M) in a suspension of dispersed pituitary cells in the six groups. In cells from 15-d-old females, Ca2+ response was greater than in 30-d-old females at the doses of 10(-8) to 10(-10) M, indicating that in the infantile female rat activation of highly concentrated GnRH receptors is reflected in an increase in signal transduction mediated by Ca2+. In males and in female rats androgenized at birth, there was also

  14. Etude du rôle de l’expression du récepteur Neuropiline-1 et de l’exocytose Calcium-dépendante dans le neurone à GnRH sur le développement et la maturation du système à GnRH et la physiologie de la reproduction

    OpenAIRE

    Vanacker , Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Fertility in mammals is the result of a long development and maturation process of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. The reproductive function is orchestrated by a small population of neurons, located in preoptic area of hypothalamus in rodents, and releasing in a pulsatile manner Gonadotropin-releasing hormon (GnRH) in the portal blood vessels, where it is transported to the anterior pituitary gland. GnRH neuropeptide triggers synthesis and release of the gonadotropins LH and FSH, whi...

  15. A small population of hypothalamic neurons govern fertility: the critical role of VAX1 in GnRH neuron development and fertility maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Hanne M; Mellon, Pamela L

    2016-01-01

    Fertility depends on the correct maturation and function of approximately 800 gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons in the brain. GnRH neurons are at the apex of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis that regulates fertility. In adulthood, GnRH neurons are scattered throughout the anterior hypothalamic area and project to the median eminence, where GnRH is released into the portal vasculature to stimulate release of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) from the pituitary. LH and FSH then regulate gonadal steroidogenesis and gametogenesis. Absence of GnRH neurons or inappropriate GnRH release leads to infertility. Despite the critical role of GnRH neurons in fertility, we still have a limited understanding of the genes responsible for proper GnRH neuron development and function in adulthood. GnRH neurons originate in the olfactory placode then migrate into the brain. Homeodomain transcription factors expressed within GnRH neurons or along their migratory path are candidate genes for inherited infertility. Using a combined in vitro and in vivo approach, we have identified Ventral Anterior Homeobox 1 ( Vax1 ) as a novel homeodomain transcription factor responsible for GnRH neuron maturation and fertility. GnRH neuron counts in Vax1 knock-out embryos revealed Vax1 to be required for the presence of GnRH-expressing cells at embryonic day 17.5 (E17.5), but not at E13.5. To localize the effects of Vax1 on fertility, we generated Vax1 flox mice and crossed them with Gnrh cre mice to specifically delete Vax1 within GnRH neurons. GnRH staining in Vax1 flox/flox :GnRH cre mice show a total absence of GnRH expression in the adult. We performed lineage tracing in Vax1 flox/flox :GnRH cre :RosaLacZ mice which proved GnRH neurons to be alive, but incapable of expressing GnRH. The absence of GnRH leads to delayed puberty, hypogonadism and complete infertility in both sexes. Finally, using the immortalized model GnRH neuron cell lines, GN11 and

  16. Selective enhancement of main olfactory input to the medial amygdala by GnRH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Camille Bond; Meredith, Michael

    2010-03-04

    In male hamsters mating behavior is dependent on chemosensory input from the main olfactory and vomeronasal systems, whose central pathways contain cell bodies and fibers of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons. In sexually naive males, vomeronasal organ removal (VNX), but not main olfactory lesions, impairs mating behavior. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.)-GnRH restores mating in sexually naive VNX males and enhances medial amygdala (Me) immediate-early gene activation by chemosensory stimulation. In sexually experienced males, VNX does not impair mating and i.c.v.-GnRH suppresses Me activation. Thus, the main olfactory system is sufficient for mating in experienced-VNX males, but not in naive-VNX males. We investigated the possibility that GnRH enhances main olfactory input to the amygdala in naive-VNX males using i.c.v.-GnRH and pharmacological stimulation (bicuculline/D,L-homocysteic acid mixture) of the main olfactory bulb (MOB). In sexually naive intact males there was a robust increase of Fos protein expression in the anteroventral medial amygdala (MeAv) with MOB stimulation, but no effect of GnRH. There was no effect of stimulation or GnRH in posterodorsal medial amygdala (MePd). In naive-VNX animals, GnRH increased Fos in MeAv and MePv. Only combined MOB stimulation and i.c.v.-GnRH produced a significant increase in Fos in the dorsal (reproduction-related) portion of MeP (MePd). When the animals were sexually experienced before VNX, a condition in which GnRH does not enhance mating, i.c.v.-GnRH combined with MOB stimulation suppressed Fos expression in MePd. This suggests a more selective effect of GnRH on olfactory input in MePd than elsewhere in medial amygdala of VNX males. 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone type II (GnRH-II) agonist regulates the invasiveness of endometrial cancer cells through the GnRH-I receptor and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-dependent activation of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Hsien-Ming; Wang, Hsin-Shih; Huang, Hong-Yuan; Lai, Chyong-Huey; Lee, Chyi-Long; Soong, Yung-Kuei; Leung, Peter CK

    2013-01-01

    More than 25% of patients diagnosed with endometrial carcinoma have an invasive primary cancer accompanied by metastases. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) plays an important role in reproduction. In mammals, expression of GnRH-II is higher than GnRH-I in reproductive tissues. Here, we examined the effect of a GnRH-II agonist on the motility of endometrial cancer cells and its mechanism of action in endometrial cancer therapy. Immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry (IHC) were used to determine the expression of the GnRH-I receptor protein in human endometrial cancer. The activity of MMP-2 in the conditioned medium was determined by gelatin zymography. Cell motility was assessed by invasion and migration assay. GnRH-I receptor si-RNA was applied to knockdown GnRH-I receptor. The GnRH-I receptor was expressed in the endometrial cancer cells. The GnRH-II agonist promoted cell motility in a dose-dependent manner. The GnRH-II agonist induced the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and JNK, and the phosphorylation was abolished by ERK1/2 inhibitor (U0126) and the JNK inhibitor (SP600125). Cell motility promoted by GnRH-II agonist was suppressed in cells that were pretreated with U0126 and SP600125. Moreover, U0126 and SP600125 abolished the GnRH-II agonist-induced activation of MMP-2. The inhibition of MMP-2 with MMP-2 inhibitor (OA-Hy) suppressed the increase in cell motility in response to the GnRH-II agonist. Enhanced cell motility mediated by GnRH-II agonist was also suppressed by the knockdown of the endogenous GnRH-I receptor using siRNA. Our study indicates that GnRH-II agonist promoted cell motility of endometrial cancer cells through the GnRH-I receptor via the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and JNK, and the subsequent, MAPK-dependent activation of MMP-2. Our findings represent a new concept regarding the mechanism of GnRH-II-induced cell motility in endometrial cancer cells and suggest the possibility of exploring GnRH-II as a potential therapeutic target for the

  18. Chitosan-based DNA delivery vector targeted to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonthum, Chatwalee; Namdee, Katawut; Boonrungsiman, Suwimon; Chatdarong, Kaywalee; Saengkrit, Nattika; Sajomsang, Warayuth; Ponglowhapan, Suppawiwat; Yata, Teerapong

    2017-02-10

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate the application of modified chitosan as a potential vector for gene delivery to gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR)-expressing cells. Such design of gene carrier could be useful in particular for gene therapy for cancers related to the reproductive system, gene disorders of sexual development, and contraception and fertility control. In this study, a decapeptide GnRH was successfully conjugated to chitosan (CS) as confirmed by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H NMR) and Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR). The synthesized GnRH-conjugated chitosan (GnRH-CS) was able to condense DNA to form positively charged nanoparticles and specifically deliver plasmid DNA to targeted cells in both two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures systems. Importantly, GnRH-CS exhibited higher transfection activity compared to unmodified CS. In conclusion, GnRH-conjugated chitosan can be a promising carrier for targeted DNA delivery to GnRHR-expressing cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particle vaccine protects nonhuman primates from intramuscular and aerosol challenge with ebolavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Andrew S; Kuehne, Ana I; Barth, James F; Ortiz, Ramon A; Nichols, Donald K; Zak, Samantha E; Stonier, Spencer W; Muhammad, Majidat A; Bakken, Russell R; Prugar, Laura I; Olinger, Gene G; Groebner, Jennifer L; Lee, John S; Pratt, William D; Custer, Max; Kamrud, Kurt I; Smith, Jonathan F; Hart, Mary Kate; Dye, John M

    2013-05-01

    There are no vaccines or therapeutics currently approved for the prevention or treatment of ebolavirus infection. Previously, a replicon vaccine based on Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) demonstrated protective efficacy against Marburg virus in nonhuman primates. Here, we report the protective efficacy of Sudan virus (SUDV)- and Ebola virus (EBOV)-specific VEEV replicon particle (VRP) vaccines in nonhuman primates. VRP vaccines were developed to express the glycoprotein (GP) of either SUDV or EBOV. A single intramuscular vaccination of cynomolgus macaques with VRP expressing SUDV GP provided complete protection against intramuscular challenge with SUDV. Vaccination against SUDV and subsequent survival of SUDV challenge did not fully protect cynomolgus macaques against intramuscular EBOV back-challenge. However, a single simultaneous intramuscular vaccination with VRP expressing SUDV GP combined with VRP expressing EBOV GP did provide complete protection against intramuscular challenge with either SUDV or EBOV in cynomolgus macaques. Finally, intramuscular vaccination with VRP expressing SUDV GP completely protected cynomolgus macaques when challenged with aerosolized SUDV, although complete protection against aerosol challenge required two vaccinations with this vaccine.

  20. GnRH-agonist versus GnRH-antagonist IVF cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papanikolaou, E G; Pados, G; Grimbizis, G

    2012-01-01

    In view of the current debate concerning possible differences in efficacy between the two GnRH analogues used in IVF stimulated cycles, the current study aimed to explore whether progesterone control in the late follicular phase differs when GnRH antagonist is used as compared with GnRH agonist...

  1. Identification of Genes Enriched in GnRH Neurons by Translating Ribosome Affinity Purification and RNAseq in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Laura L; Vanacker, Charlotte; Phumsatitpong, Chayarndorn; Wagenmaker, Elizabeth R; Wang, Luhong; Olson, David P; Moenter, Suzanne M

    2018-04-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons are a nexus of fertility regulation. We used translating ribosome affinity purification coupled with RNA sequencing to examine messenger RNAs of GnRH neurons in adult intact and gonadectomized (GDX) male and female mice. GnRH neuron ribosomes were tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and GFP-labeled polysomes isolated by immunoprecipitation, producing one RNA fraction enhanced for GnRH neuron transcripts and one RNA fraction depleted. Complementary DNA libraries were created from each fraction and 50-base, paired-end sequencing done and differential expression (enhanced fraction/depleted fraction) determined with a threshold of >1.5- or <0.66-fold (false discovery rate P ≤ 0.05). A core of ∼840 genes was differentially expressed in GnRH neurons in all treatments, including enrichment for Gnrh1 (∼40-fold), and genes critical for GnRH neuron and/or gonadotrope development. In contrast, non-neuronal transcripts were not enriched or were de-enriched. Several epithelial markers were also enriched, consistent with the olfactory epithelial origins of GnRH neurons. Interestingly, many synaptic transmission pathways were de-enriched, in accordance with relatively low innervation of GnRH neurons. The most striking difference between intact and GDX mice of both sexes was a marked downregulation of genes associated with oxidative phosphorylation and upregulation of glucose transporters in GnRH neurons from GDX mice. This may suggest that GnRH neurons switch to an alternate fuel to increase adenosine triphosphate production in the absence of negative feedback when GnRH release is elevated. Knowledge of the GnRH neuron translatome and its regulation can guide functional studies and can be extended to disease states, such as polycystic ovary syndrome.

  2. Hepatitis C virus replicons: dinosaurs still in business?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woerz, I; Lohmann, V; Bartenschlager, R

    2009-01-01

    Since the molecular cloning of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) genome for the first time in 1989, there has been tremendous progress in our understanding of the multiple facets of the replication cycle of this virus. Key to this progress has been the development of systems to propagate the virus in cell culture, which turned out to be a notoriously difficult task. A major breakthrough has been the construction of subgenomic replicons that self-amplify in cultured human hepatoma cells. These RNAs recapitulate the intracellular steps of the HCV replication cycle and have been instrumental to decipher details of the RNA amplification steps including the identification of key host cell factors. However, reproduction of the complete viral replication cycle only became possible with the advent of a particular molecular HCV clone designated JFH-1 that replicates to very high levels and supports the production of infectious virus particles. The availability of this new culture system raises the question, whether the use of replicons is still justified. In this review, we will discuss the pros and cons of both systems.

  3. In silico and in situ characterization of the zebrafish (Danio rerio gnrh3 (sGnRH gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husebye Harald

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH is responsible for stimulation of gonadotropic hormone (GtH in the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis (HPG. The regulatory mechanisms responsible for brain specificity make the promoter attractive for in silico analysis and reporter gene studies in zebrafish (Danio rerio. Results We have characterized a zebrafish [Trp7, Leu8] or salmon (s GnRH variant, gnrh3. The gene includes a 1.6 Kb upstream regulatory region and displays the conserved structure of 4 exons and 3 introns, as seen in other species. An in silico defined enhancer at -976 in the zebrafish promoter, containing adjacent binding sites for Oct-1, CREB and Sp1, was predicted in 2 mammalian and 5 teleost GnRH promoters. Reporter gene studies confirmed the importance of this enhancer for cell specific expression in zebrafish. Interestingly the promoter of human GnRH-I, known as mammalian GnRH (mGnRH, was shown capable of driving cell specific reporter gene expression in transgenic zebrafish. Conclusions The characterized zebrafish Gnrh3 decapeptide exhibits complete homology to the Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar GnRH-III variant. In silico analysis of mammalian and teleost GnRH promoters revealed a conserved enhancer possessing binding sites for Oct-1, CREB and Sp1. Transgenic and transient reporter gene expression in zebrafish larvae, confirmed the importance of the in silico defined zebrafish enhancer at -976. The capability of the human GnRH-I promoter of directing cell specific reporter gene expression in zebrafish supports orthology between GnRH-I and GnRH-III.

  4. Inter-replicon Gene Flow Contributes to Transcriptional Integration in the Sinorhizobium meliloti Multipartite Genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George C. diCenzo

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Integration of newly acquired genes into existing regulatory networks is necessary for successful horizontal gene transfer (HGT. Ten percent of bacterial species contain at least two DNA replicons over 300 kilobases in size, with the secondary replicons derived predominately through HGT. The Sinorhizobium meliloti genome is split between a 3.7 Mb chromosome, a 1.7 Mb chromid consisting largely of genes acquired through ancient HGT, and a 1.4 Mb megaplasmid consisting primarily of recently acquired genes. Here, RNA-sequencing is used to examine the transcriptional consequences of massive, synthetic genome reduction produced through the removal of the megaplasmid and/or the chromid. Removal of the pSymA megaplasmid influenced the transcription of only six genes. In contrast, removal of the chromid influenced expression of ∼8% of chromosomal genes and ∼4% of megaplasmid genes. This was mediated in part by the loss of the ETR DNA region whose presence on pSymB is due to a translocation from the chromosome. No obvious functional bias among the up-regulated genes was detected, although genes with putative homologs on the chromid were enriched. Down-regulated genes were enriched in motility and sensory transduction pathways. Four transcripts were examined further, and in each case the transcriptional change could be traced to loss of specific pSymB regions. In particularly, a chromosomal transporter was induced due to deletion of bdhA likely mediated through 3-hydroxybutyrate accumulation. These data provide new insights into the evolution of the multipartite bacterial genome, and more generally into the integration of horizontally acquired genes into the transcriptome.

  5. Inter-replicon Gene Flow Contributes to Transcriptional Integration in the Sinorhizobium meliloti Multipartite Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    diCenzo, George C; Wellappili, Deelaka; Golding, G Brian; Finan, Turlough M

    2018-05-04

    Integration of newly acquired genes into existing regulatory networks is necessary for successful horizontal gene transfer (HGT). Ten percent of bacterial species contain at least two DNA replicons over 300 kilobases in size, with the secondary replicons derived predominately through HGT. The Sinorhizobium meliloti genome is split between a 3.7 Mb chromosome, a 1.7 Mb chromid consisting largely of genes acquired through ancient HGT, and a 1.4 Mb megaplasmid consisting primarily of recently acquired genes. Here, RNA-sequencing is used to examine the transcriptional consequences of massive, synthetic genome reduction produced through the removal of the megaplasmid and/or the chromid. Removal of the pSymA megaplasmid influenced the transcription of only six genes. In contrast, removal of the chromid influenced expression of ∼8% of chromosomal genes and ∼4% of megaplasmid genes. This was mediated in part by the loss of the ETR DNA region whose presence on pSymB is due to a translocation from the chromosome. No obvious functional bias among the up-regulated genes was detected, although genes with putative homologs on the chromid were enriched. Down-regulated genes were enriched in motility and sensory transduction pathways. Four transcripts were examined further, and in each case the transcriptional change could be traced to loss of specific pSymB regions. In particularly, a chromosomal transporter was induced due to deletion of bdhA likely mediated through 3-hydroxybutyrate accumulation. These data provide new insights into the evolution of the multipartite bacterial genome, and more generally into the integration of horizontally acquired genes into the transcriptome. Copyright © 2018 diCenzo, et al.

  6. Reproduction phase-related expression of GnRH-like immunoreactivity in the olfactory receptor neurons, their projections to the olfactory bulb and in the nervus terminalis in the female Indian major carp Cirrhinus mrigala (Ham.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biju, K C; Singru, Praful S; Schreibman, Martin P; Subhedar, Nishikant

    2003-10-01

    The reproductive biology of the Indian major carp Cirrhinus mrigala is tightly synchronized with the seasonal changes in the environment. While the ovaries show growth from February through June, the fish spawn in July-August to coincide with the monsoon; thereafter the fish pass into the postspawning and resting phases. We investigated the pattern of GnRH immunoreactivity in the olfactory system at regular intervals extending over a period of 35 months. Although no signal was detected in the olfactory organ of fish collected from April through February following year, distinct GnRH-like immunoreactivity appeared in the fish collected in March. Intense immunoreactivity was noticed in several olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) and their axonal fibers as they extend over the olfactory nerve, spread in the periphery of the olfactory bulb (OB), and terminate in the glomerular layer. Strong immunoreactivity was seen in some fascicles of the medial olfactory tracts extending from the OB to the telencephalon. Some neurons of the ganglion cells of nervus terminalis showed GnRH immunostaining during March; no immunoreactivity was detected at other times of the year. Plexus of GnRH immunoreactive fibers extending throughout the bulb represented a different component of the olfactory system; the fiber density showed a seasonal pattern that could be related to the status of gonadal maturity. While it was highest in the prespawning phase, significant reduction in the fiber density was noticed in the fish of spawning and the following regressive phases. Taken together the data suggest that the GnRH in the olfactory system of C. mrigala may play a major role in translation of the environmental cues and influence the downstream signals leading to the stimulation of the brain-pituitary-ovary axis.

  7. The high affinity selectin glycan ligand C2-O-sLex and mRNA transcripts of the core 2 β-1,6-N-acetylglusaminyltransferase (C2GnT1) gene are highly expressed in human colorectal adenocarcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    St Hill, Catherine A; Farooqui, Mariya; Mitcheltree, Gregory; Gulbahce, H Evin; Jessurun, Jose; Cao, Qing; Walcheck, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    The metastasis of cancer cells and leukocyte extravasation into inflamed tissues share common features. Specialized carbohydrates modified with sialyl Lewis x (sLe x ) antigens on leukocyte membranes are ligands for selectin adhesion molecules on activated vascular endothelial cells at inflammatory sites. The activity of the enzyme core 2 β1,6 N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase (C2GnT1) in leukocytes greatly increases their ability to bind to endothelial selectins. C2GnT1 is essential for the synthesis of core 2-branched O-linked carbohydrates terminated with sLe x (C2-O-sLe x ). Our goal was to determine the expression profiles of C2-O-sLe x in the malignant progression and metastasis of colorectal adenocarcinomas. The well characterized CHO-131 monoclonal antibody (mAb) specifically recognizes C2-O-sLe x present in human leukocytes and carcinoma cells. Using CHO-131 mAb, we investigated whether C2-O-sLe x was present in 113 human primary colorectal adenocarcinomas, 10 colorectal adenomas, 46 metastatic liver tumors, 28 normal colorectal tissues, and 5 normal liver tissues by immunohistochemistry. We also examined mRNA levels of the enzyme core 2 β1,6-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase (C2GnT1) in 20 well, 15 moderately, and 2 poorly differentiated colorectal adenocarcinomas, and in 5 normal colorectal tissues by using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCR). We observed high reactivity with CHO-131 mAb in approximately 70% of colorectal carcinomas and 87% of metastatic liver tumors but a lack of reactivity in colorectal adenomas and normal colonic and liver tissues. Positive reactivity with CHO-131 mAb was very prominent in neoplastic colorectal glands of well to moderately differentiated adenocarcinomas. The most intense staining with CHO-131 mAb was observed at the advancing edge of tumors with the deepest invasive components. Finally, we analyzed C2GnT1 mRNA levels in 37 colorectal adenocarcinomas and 5 normal colorectal tissues by RT

  8. Brain penetrant small molecule 18F-GnRH receptor (GnRH-R) antagonists: Synthesis and preliminary positron emission tomography imaging in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olberg, Dag E.; Bauer, Nadine; Andressen, Kjetil W.; Hjørnevik, Trine; Cumming, Paul; Levy, Finn O.; Klaveness, Jo; Haraldsen, Ira; Sutcliffe, Julie L.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor (GnRH-R) has a well-described neuroendocrine function in the anterior pituitary. However, little is known about its function in the central nervous system (CNS), where it is most abundantly expressed in hippocampus and amygdala. Since peptide ligands based upon the endogenous decapetide GnRH do not pass the blood–brain-barrier, we are seeking a high-affinity small molecule GnRH-R ligand suitable for brain imaging by positron emission tomography. We have previously reported the radiosynthesis and in vitro evaluation of two novel [ 18 F]fluorinated GnRH-R ligands belonging to the furamide class of antagonists, with molecular weight less than 500 Da. We now extend this work using palladium coupling for the synthesis of four novel radioligands, with putatively reduced polar surface area and hydrophilicity relative to the two previously described compounds, and report the uptake of these 18 F-labeled compounds in brain of living rats. Methods: We synthesized reference standards of the small molecule GnRH-R antagonists as well as mesylate precursors for 18 F-labeling. The antagonists were tested for binding affinity for both human and rat GnRH-R. Serum and blood stability in vitro and in vivo were studied. Biodistribution and PET imaging studies were performed in male rats in order to assess brain penetration in vivo. Results: A palladium coupling methodology served for the synthesis of four novel fluorinated furamide GnRH receptor antagonists with reduced heteroatomic count. Radioligand binding assays in vitro revealed subnanomolar affinity of the new fluorinated compounds for both human and rat GnRH-R. The 18 F-GnRH antagonists were synthesized from the corresponding mesylate precursors in 5–15% overall radiochemical yield. The radiolabeled compounds demonstrated good in vivo stability. PET imaging with the 18 F-radiotracers in naive rats showed good permeability into brain and rapid washout, but absence of

  9. MaGnET: Malaria Genome Exploration Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharman, Joanna L; Gerloff, Dietlind L

    2013-09-15

    The Malaria Genome Exploration Tool (MaGnET) is a software tool enabling intuitive 'exploration-style' visualization of functional genomics data relating to the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. MaGnET provides innovative integrated graphic displays for different datasets, including genomic location of genes, mRNA expression data, protein-protein interactions and more. Any selection of genes to explore made by the user is easily carried over between the different viewers for different datasets, and can be changed interactively at any point (without returning to a search). Free online use (Java Web Start) or download (Java application archive and MySQL database; requires local MySQL installation) at http://malariagenomeexplorer.org joanna.sharman@ed.ac.uk or dgerloff@ffame.org Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  10. Robust production of virus-like particles and monoclonal antibodies with geminiviral replicon vectors in lettuce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Huafang; He, Junyun; Engle, Michael; Diamond, Michael S.; Chen, Qiang

    2011-01-01

    Summary Pharmaceutical protein production in plants has been greatly promoted by the development of viral-based vectors and transient expression systems. Tobacco and related Nicotiana species are currently the most common host plants for generation of plant-made pharmaceutical proteins (PMPs). Downstream processing of target PMPs from these plants, however, is hindered by potential technical and regulatory difficulties due to the presence of high levels of phenolics and toxic alkaloids. Here, we explored the use of lettuce, which grows quickly yet produces low levels of secondary metabolites, and viral vector-based transient expression systems to develop a robust PMP production platform. Our results showed that a geminiviral replicon system based on the bean yellow dwarf virus permits high-level expression in lettuce of virus-like particles (VLP) derived from the Norwalk virus capsid protein and therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against Ebola and West Nile viruses. These vaccine and therapeutic candidates can be readily purified from lettuce leaves with scalable processing methods while fully retaining functional activity. Furthermore, this study also demonstrated the feasibility of using commercially produced lettuce for high-level PMP production. This allows our production system to have access to unlimited quantities of inexpensive plant material for large-scale production. These results establish a new production platform for biological pharmaceutical agents that is effective, safe, low-cost, and amenable to large-scale manufacturing. PMID:21883868

  11. Comparison of long GnRH agonist versus GnRH antagonist protocol in poor responders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadık Şahin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare long GnRH agonist with GnRH antagonist protocol in poor responders. Materials and Methods: Medical charts of 531 poor responder women undergoing in-vitro fertilization (IVF cycle at Zeynep Kamil Maternity and Children’s Hospital, IVF Center were retrospectively analysed. Those who received at least 300 IU/daily gonadotropin and had ≤3 oocytes retrieved were enrolled in the study. Poor responders were categorized into two groups as those who received long GnRH agonist or GnRH antagonist regimen. Results: Treatment duration and total gonadotropin dosage were significantly higher in women undergoing the long GnRH agonist regimen compared with the GnRH antagonist regimen (p<0.001 for both. Although the number of total and mature oocytes retrieved was similar between the groups, good quality embryos were found to be higher in the GnRH antagonist regimen. The day of embryo transfer and number of transferred embryos were similar in the groups. No statistically significant differences were detected in pregnancy (10.5% vs 14.1%, clinical pregnancy (7.7% vs 10.6% and early pregnancy loss rates (27.2% vs 35% between the groups. Conclusion: GnRH antagonist regimen may be preferable to long GnRH regimen as it could decrease the cost and treatment duration in poor responders.

  12. Hypersensitivity reaction with intravenous GnRH after pulsatile subcutaneous GnRH treatment in male hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism.

    OpenAIRE

    Popović, V.; Milosević, Z.; Djukanović, R.; Micić, D.; Nesović, M.; Manojlović, D.; Djordjević, P.; Mićić, J.

    1988-01-01

    Chronic pulsatile subcutaneous administration of low doses of gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH) is an effective therapy for men with hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism. Hypersensitivity reactions to GnRH are rare. We wish to report hypersensitivity reactions with intravenous GnRH after low dose subcutaneous pulsatile GnRH treatment in two men with hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism due to suprasellar disease.

  13. GnRH receptor activation competes at a low level with growth signaling in stably transfected human breast cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, Kevin; Meyer, Colette; Miller, Nicola; Sims, Andrew H; Cagnan, Ilgin; Faratian, Dana; Harrison, David J; Millar, Robert P; Langdon, Simon P

    2011-01-01

    Gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH) analogs lower estrogen levels in pre-menopausal breast cancer patients. GnRH receptor (GnRH-R) activation also directly inhibits the growth of certain cells. The applicability of GnRH anti-proliferation to breast cancer was therefore analyzed. GnRH-R expression in 298 primary breast cancer samples was measured by quantitative immunofluorescence. Levels of functional GnRH-R in breast-derived cell lines were assessed using 125 I-ligand binding and stimulation of 3 H-inositol phosphate production. Elevated levels of GnRH-R were stably expressed in cells by transfection. Effects of receptor activation on in vitro cell growth were investigated in comparison with IGF-I and EGF receptor inhibition, and correlated with intracellular signaling using western blotting. GnRH-R immunoscoring was highest in hormone receptor (triple) negative and grade 3 breast tumors. However prior to transfection, functional endogenous GnRH-R were undetectable in four commonly studied breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, ZR-75-1, T47D and MDA-MB-231). After transfection with GnRH-R, high levels of cell surface GnRH-R were detected in SVCT and MDA-MB-231 clones while low-moderate levels of GnRH-R occurred in MCF-7 clones and ZR-75-1 clones. MCF-7 sub-clones with high levels of GnRH-R were isolated following hygromycin phosphotransferase transfection. High level cell surface GnRH-R enabled induction of high levels of 3 H-inositol phosphate and modest growth-inhibition in SVCT cells. In contrast, growth of MCF-7, ZR-75-1 or MDA-MB-231 clones was unaffected by GnRH-R activation. Cell growth was inhibited by IGF-I or EGF receptor inhibitors. IGF-I receptor inhibitor lowered levels of p-ERK1/2 in MCF-7 clones. Washout of IGF-I receptor inhibitor resulted in transient hyper-elevation of p-ERK1/2, but co-addition of GnRH-R agonist did not alter the dynamics of ERK1/2 re-phosphorylation. Breast cancers exhibit a range of GnRH-R immunostaining, with higher levels of

  14. Transcriptome analysis of endometrial tissues following GnRH agonist treatment in a mouse adenomyosis model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo S

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Song Guo,1,* Xiaowei Lu,1,* Ruihuan Gu,2 Di Zhang,3 Yijuan Sun,2 Yun Feng1 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Reproductive Medicine Center, Ruijin Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 2Gynecology, Shanghai Ji Ai Genetics & In Vitro Fertilization Institute, Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Jinan Military General Hospital, Jinan, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: Adenomyosis is a common, benign gynecological condition of the female reproductive tract characterized by heavy menstrual bleeding and dysmenorrhea. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH agonists are one of the medications used in adenomyosis treatment; however, their underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Moreover, it is difficult to obtain endometrial samples from women undergoing such treatment. To overcome this, we generated an adenomyosis mouse model, which we treated with an GnRH agonist to determine its effect on pregnancy outcomes. We also analyzed endometrial gene expression following GnRH agonist treatment to determine the mechanisms that may affect pregnancy outcome in individuals with adenomyosis.Methods: Neonatal female mice were divided into a control group, an untreated adenomyosis group, and an adenomyosis group treated with a GnRH agonist (n=6 each. The pregnancy outcome was observed and compared among the groups. Then, three randomly chosen transcriptomes from endometrial tissues from day 4 of pregnancy were analyzed between the adenomyosis group and the GnRH agonist treatment group by RNA sequencing and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR.Results: The litter size was significantly smaller in the adenomyosis group than in the control group (7±0.28 vs 11±0.26; P<0.05. However, the average live litter

  15. Expression and purification of soluble and stable ectodomain of natural killer cell receptor LLT1 through high-density transfection of suspension adapted HEK293S GnTI(-) cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bláha, J.; Pachl, Petr; Novák, Petr; Vaněk, O.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 109, May (2015), s. 7-13 ISSN 1046-5928 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0003; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Grant - others:OPPK(CZ) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/24023 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:61388971 Keywords : LLT1 * HEK293S GnTI(-) * C-type lectin-like * NK cell * glycosylation * transfection Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 1.407, year: 2015

  16. Opposite Effects of Two Human ATG10 Isoforms on Replication of a HCV Sub-genomic Replicon Are Mediated via Regulating Autophagy Flux in Zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chen Li

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a host mechanism for cellular homeostatic control. Intracellular stresses are symptoms of, and responses to, dysregulation of the physiological environment of the cell. Alternative gene transcription splicing is a mechanism potentially used by a host to respond to physiological or pathological challenges. Here, we aimed to confirm opposite effects of two isoforms of the human autophagy-related protein ATG10 on an HCV subgenomic replicon in zebrafish. A liver-specific HCV subreplicon model was established and exhibited several changes in gene expression typically induced by HCV infection, including overexpression of several HCV-dependent genes (argsyn, leugpcr, rasgbd, and scaf-2, as well as overexpression of several ER stress related genes (atf4, chop, atf6, and bip. Autophagy flux was blocked in the HCV model. Our results indicated that the replication of the HCV subreplicon was suppressed via a decrease in autophagosome formation caused by the autophagy inhibitor 3MA, but enhanced via dysfunction in the lysosomal degradation caused by another autophagy inhibitor CQ. Human ATG10, a canonical isoform in autophagy, facilitated the amplification of the HCV-subgenomic replicon via promoting autophagosome formation. ATG10S, a non-canonical short isoform of the ATG10 protein, promoted autophagy flux, leading to lysosomal degradation of the HCV-subgenomic replicon. Human ATG10S may therefore inhibit HCV replication, and may be an appropriate target for future antiviral drug screening.

  17. Efficient replication of genotype 3a and 4a hepatitis C virus replicons in human hepatoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saeed, Mohsan; Scheel, Troels K H; Gottwein, Judith M

    2012-01-01

    culture adaptive mutations originally reported for genotype 1b replicons. RNA replication was confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR and detection of viral protein. Sequencing of multiple independent replicon clones revealed the presence of additional nonsynonymous mutations. Interestingly......, all potentially adaptive mutations mapped to the NS3 protein. These mutations, when introduced back into original constructs, substantially increased colony formation efficiency. To make these replicons useful for high-throughput screening and evaluation of antiviral compounds, they were modified...

  18. Antitumor agent 25-epi Ritterostatin GN1N induces endoplasmic reticulum stress and autophagy mediated cell death in melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz Ahmed, Kausar Begam; Kanduluru, Ananda Kumar; Feng, Li; Fuchs, Philip L; Huang, Peng

    2017-05-01

    Metastatic melanoma is the most aggressive of all skin cancers and is associated with poor prognosis owing to lack of effective treatments. 25-epi Ritterostatin GN1N is a novel antitumor agent with yet undefined mechanisms of action. We sought to delineate the antitumor mechanisms of 25-epi Ritterostatin GN1N in melanoma cells to determine the potential of this compound as a treatment for melanoma. Activation of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress protein glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) has been associated with increased melanoma progression, oncogenic signaling, drug resistance, and suppression of cell death. We found that 25-epi Ritterostatin GN1N induced cell death in melanoma cells at nanomolar concentrations, and this cell death was characterized by inhibition of GRP78 expression, increased expression of the ER stress marker CHOP, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and lipidation of the autophagy marker protein LC3B. Importantly, normal melanocytes exhibited limited sensitivity to 25-epi Ritterostatin GN1N. Subsequent in vivo results demonstrated that 25-epi Ritterostatin GN1N reduced melanoma growth in mouse tumor xenografts and did not affect body weight, suggesting minimal toxicity. In summary, our findings indicate that 25-epi Ritterostatin GN1N causes ER stress and massive autophagy, leading to collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential and cell death in melanoma cells, with minimal effects in normal melanocytes. Thus, 25-epi Ritterostatin GN1N is a promising anticancer agent that warrants further investigation.

  19. Multiagent vaccines vectored by Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon elicits immune responses to Marburg virus and protection against anthrax and botulinum neurotoxin in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, John S; Groebner, Jennifer L; Hadjipanayis, Angela G; Negley, Diane L; Schmaljohn, Alan L; Welkos, Susan L; Smith, Leonard A; Smith, Jonathan F

    2006-11-17

    The development of multiagent vaccines offers the advantage of eliciting protection against multiple diseases with minimal inoculations over a shorter time span. We report here the results of using formulations of individual Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) virus replicon-vectored vaccines against a bacterial disease, anthrax; a viral disease, Marburg fever; and against a toxin-mediated disease, botulism. The individual VEE replicon particles (VRP) expressed mature 83-kDa protective antigen (MAT-PA) from Bacillus anthracis, the glycoprotein (GP) from Marburg virus (MBGV), or the H(C) fragment from botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT H(C)). CBA/J mice inoculated with a mixture of VRP expressing BoNT H(C) serotype C (BoNT/C H(C)) and MAT-PA were 80% protected from a B. anthracis (Sterne strain) challenge and then 100% protected from a sequential BoNT/C challenge. Swiss mice inoculated with individual VRP or with mixtures of VRP vaccines expressing BoNT H(C) serotype A (BoNT/A H(C)), MAT-PA, and MBGV-GP produced antibody responses specific to the corresponding replicon-expressed protein. Combination of the different VRP vaccines did not diminish the antibody responses measured for Swiss mice inoculated with formulations of two or three VRP vaccines as compared to mice that received only one VRP vaccine. Swiss mice inoculated with VRP expressing BoNT/A H(C) alone or in combination with VRP expressing MAT-PA and MBGV GP, were completely protected from a BoNT/A challenge. These studies demonstrate the utility of combining individual VRP vaccines into multiagent formulations for eliciting protective immune responses to various types of diseases.

  20. Alphavirus replicon particles containing the gene for HER2/neu inhibit breast cancer growth and tumorigenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Jian-Ping; Maughan, Maureen F; Lachman, Lawrence B

    2005-01-01

    Overexpression of the HER2/neu gene in breast cancer is associated with an increased incidence of metastatic disease and with a poor prognosis. Although passive immunotherapy with the humanized monoclonal antibody trastuzumab (Herceptin) has shown some effect, a vaccine capable of inducing T-cell and humoral immunity could be more effective. Virus-like replicon particles (VRP) of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus containing the gene for HER2/neu (VRP-neu) were tested by an active immunotherapeutic approach in tumor prevention models and in a metastasis prevention model. VRP-neu prevented or significantly inhibited the growth of HER2/neu-expressing murine breast cancer cells injected either into mammary tissue or intravenously. Vaccination with VRP-neu completely prevented tumor formation in and death of MMTV-c-neu transgenic mice, and resulted in high levels of neu-specific CD8 + T lymphocytes and serum IgG. On the basis of these findings, clinical testing of this vaccine in patients with HER2/neu + breast cancer is warranted

  1. SiGN-SSM: open source parallel software for estimating gene networks with state space models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamada, Yoshinori; Yamaguchi, Rui; Imoto, Seiya; Hirose, Osamu; Yoshida, Ryo; Nagasaki, Masao; Miyano, Satoru

    2011-04-15

    SiGN-SSM is an open-source gene network estimation software able to run in parallel on PCs and massively parallel supercomputers. The software estimates a state space model (SSM), that is a statistical dynamic model suitable for analyzing short time and/or replicated time series gene expression profiles. SiGN-SSM implements a novel parameter constraint effective to stabilize the estimated models. Also, by using a supercomputer, it is able to determine the gene network structure by a statistical permutation test in a practical time. SiGN-SSM is applicable not only to analyzing temporal regulatory dependencies between genes, but also to extracting the differentially regulated genes from time series expression profiles. SiGN-SSM is distributed under GNU Affero General Public Licence (GNU AGPL) version 3 and can be downloaded at http://sign.hgc.jp/signssm/. The pre-compiled binaries for some architectures are available in addition to the source code. The pre-installed binaries are also available on the Human Genome Center supercomputer system. The online manual and the supplementary information of SiGN-SSM is available on our web site. tamada@ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp.

  2. Replicon sizes in mammalian cells as estimated by an x-ray plus bromodeoxyuridine photolysis method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapp, L.N.; Painter, R.B.

    1978-01-01

    A new method is described for estimating replicon sizes in mammalian cells. Cultures were pulse labeled with [ 3 H]thymidine ([ 3 H]TdR) and bromodeoxyuridine (BrDUrd) for up to 1 h. The lengths of the resulting labeled regions of DNA, L/sub obs/, were estimated by a technique wherein the change in molecular weight of nascent DNA strands, induced by 313 nm light, is measured by velocity sedimentation in alkaline sucrose gradients. If cells are exposed to 1,000 rads of x rays immediately before pulse labeling, initiation of replicon operation is blocked, although chain elongation proceeds almost normally. Under these conditions L/sub obs/ continues to increase only until operating replicons have completed their replication. This value for L/sub obs/ then remains constant as long as the block to initiation remains and represents an estimate for the average size of replicons operating in the cells before x irradiation. For human diploid fibroblasts and human HeLa cells this estimated average size is approximately 17 μM, whereas for Chinese hamster ovary cells, the average replicon size is about 42 μM

  3. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 are not required for GnRH neuron development and normal female reproductive axis function in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierman, Margaret E; Xu, Mei; Pierce, A; Bliesner, B; Bliss, S P; Roberson, M S

    2012-01-01

    Selective deletion of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1 and ERK2 in the pituitary gonadotrope and ovarian granulosa cells disrupts female reproductive axis function. Thus, we asked if ERK1 and ERK2 are critical for GnRH neuron ontogeny or the central control of female reproductive function. GnRH-Cre-recombinase (Cre+) expressing mice were crossed with mice with a global deletion of ERK1 and a floxed ERK2 allele (Erk1-/Erk2fl/fl) to selectively delete ERK2 in GnRH neurons. Cre-recombinase mRNA was selectively expressed in the brain of Cre+ mice. GnRH neuron number and location were determined during embryogenesis and in the adult. GnRH neuron counts at E15 did not differ between experimental and control groups (1,198 ± 65 and 1,160 ± 80 respectively, p = NS). In adults, numbers of GnRH neurons in the GnRHCre+Erk1-/Erk2- mice (741 ± 157) were similar to those in controls (756 ± 7), without alteration in their distribution across the forebrain. ERK1 and 2 deficiency did not alter the timing of vaginal opening, age at first estrus, or estrous cyclicity. Although ERK1 and 2 are components of a dominant signaling pathway in GnRH neuronal cells that modulates survival and control of GnRH gene expression, other signaling pathways compensate for their deletion in vivo to allow GnRH neuron survival and targeting and normal onset of female sexual maturation and reproductive function. In contrast to effects at the pituitary and the ovary, ERK1 and ERK2 are dispensable at the level of the GnRH neuron. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. A novel alphavirus replicon-vectored vaccine delivered by adenovirus induces sterile immunity against classical swine fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuan; Li, Hong-Yu; Tian, Da-Yong; Han, Qiu-Ying; Zhang, Xin; Li, Na; Qiu, Hua-Ji

    2011-10-26

    Low efficacy of gene-based vaccines due to inefficient gene delivery and expression has been major bottleneck of their applications. Efforts have been made to improve the efficacy, such as gene gun and electroporation, but the strategies are difficult to put into practical use. In this study, we developed and evaluated an adenovirus-delivered, alphavirus replicon-vectored vaccine (chimeric vector-based vaccine) expressing the E2 gene of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) (rAdV-SFV-E2). Rabbits immunized with rAdV-SFV-E2 developed CSFV-specific antibodies as early as 9 days and as long as 189 days and completely protected from challenge with C-strain. Pigs immunized with rAdV-SFV-E2 (n=5) developed robust humoral and cell-mediated responses to CSFV and were completely protected from subsequent lethal CSFV infection clinically and virologically. The level of immunity and protection induced by rAdV-SFV-E2 was comparable to that provided by the currently used live attenuated vaccine, C-strain. In contrast, both the conventional alphavirus replicon-vectored vaccine pSFV1CS-E2 and conventional adenovirus-vectored vaccine rAdV-E2 provided incomplete protection. The chimeric vector-based vaccine represents the first gene-based vaccine that is able to confer sterile immunity and complete protection against CSFV. The new-concept vaccination strategy may also be valuable in vaccine development against other pathogens. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The GnRH receptor and the response of gonadotrope cells to GnRH pulse frequency code. A story of an atypical adaptation of cell function relying on a lack of receptor homologous desensitization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Bleux

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain control of the reproductive system is mediated through hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH which activates specific receptors (GnRHR present at the surface of the pituitary gonadotropes to trigger secretion of the two gonadotropins LH and FSH. A unique feature of this system is the high dependence on the secretion mode of GnRH, which is basically pulsatile but undergoes considerable fluctuations in pulse frequency pattern in response to endogenous or external factors. How the physiological fluctuations of GnRH secretion that orchestrate normal reproduction are decoded by the gonadotrope cell machinery to ultimately control gonadotropin release and/or subunit gene transcription has been the subject of intensive studies during the past decades. Surprisingly, the mammalian GnRHR is unique among G protein-coupled receptor family as it lacks the carboxy-terminal tail usually involved in classical endocytotic process. Accordingly, it does not desensitize properly and internalizes very poorly. Both this atypical intrinsic property and post-receptor events may thus contribute to decode the GnRH signal. This includes the participation of a network of signaling pathways that differently respond to GnRH together with a growing amount of genes differentially sensitive to pulse frequency. Among these are two pairs of genes, the transcription factors EGR-1 and NAB, and the regulatory factors activin and follistatin, that function as intracellular autoregulatory feedback loops controlling respectively LHbeta and FSHbeta gene expression and hence, LH and FSH synthesis. Pituitary gonadotropes thus represent a unique model of cells functionally adapted to respond to a considerably fluctuating neuroendocrine stimulation, from short individual pulses to sustained GnRH as observed at the proestrus of ovarian cycle. Altogether, the data emphasize the adaptative reciprocal complementarity of hypothalamic GnRH neurones and pituitary gonadotropes to

  6. Msx1 Homeodomain Protein Represses the αGSU and GnRH Receptor Genes During Gonadotrope Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Huimin; Cherrington, Brian D.; Meadows, Jason D.; Witham, Emily A.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple homeodomain transcription factors are crucial for pituitary organogenesis and cellular differentiation. A homeodomain repressor, Msx1, is expressed from the ventral aspect of the developing anterior pituitary and implicated in gonadotrope differentiation. Here, we find that Msx1 represses transcription of lineage-specific pituitary genes such as the common α-glycoprotein subunit (αGSU) and GnRH receptor (GnRHR) promoters in the mouse gonadotrope-derived cell lines, αT3-1 and LβT2. Repression of the mouse GnRHR promoter by Msx1 is mediated through a consensus-binding motif in the downstream activin regulatory element (DARE). Truncation and mutation analyses of the human αGSU promoter map Msx1 repression to a site at −114, located at the junctional regulatory element (JRE). Dlx activators are closely related to the Msx repressors, acting through the same elements, and Dlx3 and Dlx2 act as transcriptional activators for GnRHR and αGSU, respectively. Small interfering RNA knockdown of Msx1 in αT3-1 cells increases endogenous αGSU and GnRHR mRNA expression. Msx1 gene expression reaches its maximal expression at the rostral edge at e13.5. The subsequent decline in Msx1 expression specifically coincides with the onset of expression of both αGSU and GnRHR. The expression levels of both αGSU and GnRHR in Msx1-null mice at e18.5 are higher compared with wild type, further confirming a role for Msx1 in the repression of αGSU and GnRHR. In summary, Msx1 functions as a negative regulator early in pituitary development by repressing the gonadotrope-specific αGSU and GnRHR genes, but a temporal decline in Msx1 expression alleviates this repression allowing induction of GnRHR and αGSU, thus serving to time the onset of gonadotrope-specific gene program. PMID:23371388

  7. Msx1 homeodomain protein represses the αGSU and GnRH receptor genes during gonadotrope development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Huimin; Cherrington, Brian D; Meadows, Jason D; Witham, Emily A; Mellon, Pamela L

    2013-03-01

    Multiple homeodomain transcription factors are crucial for pituitary organogenesis and cellular differentiation. A homeodomain repressor, Msx1, is expressed from the ventral aspect of the developing anterior pituitary and implicated in gonadotrope differentiation. Here, we find that Msx1 represses transcription of lineage-specific pituitary genes such as the common α-glycoprotein subunit (αGSU) and GnRH receptor (GnRHR) promoters in the mouse gonadotrope-derived cell lines, αT3-1 and LβT2. Repression of the mouse GnRHR promoter by Msx1 is mediated through a consensus-binding motif in the downstream activin regulatory element (DARE). Truncation and mutation analyses of the human αGSU promoter map Msx1 repression to a site at -114, located at the junctional regulatory element (JRE). Dlx activators are closely related to the Msx repressors, acting through the same elements, and Dlx3 and Dlx2 act as transcriptional activators for GnRHR and αGSU, respectively. Small interfering RNA knockdown of Msx1 in αT3-1 cells increases endogenous αGSU and GnRHR mRNA expression. Msx1 gene expression reaches its maximal expression at the rostral edge at e13.5. The subsequent decline in Msx1 expression specifically coincides with the onset of expression of both αGSU and GnRHR. The expression levels of both αGSU and GnRHR in Msx1-null mice at e18.5 are higher compared with wild type, further confirming a role for Msx1 in the repression of αGSU and GnRHR. In summary, Msx1 functions as a negative regulator early in pituitary development by repressing the gonadotrope-specific αGSU and GnRHR genes, but a temporal decline in Msx1 expression alleviates this repression allowing induction of GnRHR and αGSU, thus serving to time the onset of gonadotrope-specific gene program.

  8. Expression and Role of Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone 2 and Its Receptor in Mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy T. Desaulniers

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Gonadotropin-releasing hormone 1 (GnRH1 and its receptor (GnRHR1 drive mammalian reproduction via regulation of the gonadotropins. Yet, a second form of GnRH (GnRH2 and its receptor (GnRHR2 also exist in mammals. GnRH2 has been completely conserved throughout 500 million years of evolution, signifying high selection pressure and a critical biological role. However, the GnRH2 gene is absent (e.g., rat or inactivated (e.g., cow and sheep in some species but retained in others (e.g., human, horse, and pig. Likewise, many species (e.g., human, chimpanzee, cow, and sheep retain the GnRHR2 gene but lack the appropriate coding sequence to produce a full-length protein due to gene coding errors; although production of GnRHR2 in humans remains controversial. Certain mammals lack the GnRHR2 gene (e.g., mouse or most exons entirely (e.g., rat. In contrast, old world monkeys, musk shrews, and pigs maintain the coding sequence required to produce a functional GnRHR2. Like GnRHR1, GnRHR2 is a 7-transmembrane, G protein-coupled receptor that interacts with Gαq/11 to mediate cell signaling. However, GnRHR2 retains a cytoplasmic tail and is only 40% homologous to GnRHR1. A role for GnRH2 and its receptor in mammals has been elusive, likely because common laboratory models lack both the ligand and receptor. Uniquely, both GnRH2 and GnRHR2 are ubiquitously expressed; transcript levels are abundant in peripheral tissues and scarcely found in regions of the brain associated with gonadotropin secretion, suggesting a divergent role from GnRH1/GnRHR1. Indeed, GnRH2 and its receptor are not physiological modulators of gonadotropin secretion in mammals. Instead, GnRH2 and GnRHR2 coordinate the interaction between nutritional status and sexual behavior in the female brain. Within peripheral tissues, GnRH2 and its receptor are novel regulators of reproductive organs. GnRH2 and GnRHR2 directly stimulate steroidogenesis within the porcine testis. In the female, GnRH2 and

  9. GnRHR-II knockdown swine have constitutively lower serum testosterone concentrations, impaired senstitivity to GnRH analogues and reduced semen quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    The second mammalian GnRH isoform (GnRH-II) and its specific receptor (GnRHR-II) are abundantly produced within swine testes. GnRHR-II localizes to porcine Leydig cells and exogenous GnRH-II treatment robustly stimulates testosterone production in vivo, despite minimal secretion of luteinizing hormo...

  10. Vaccination with recombinant RNA replicon particles protects chickens from H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan J Halbherr

    Full Text Available Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIV of subtype H5N1 not only cause a devastating disease in domestic chickens and turkeys but also pose a continuous threat to public health. In some countries, H5N1 viruses continue to circulate and evolve into new clades and subclades. The rapid evolution of these viruses represents a problem for virus diagnosis and control. In this work, recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV vectors expressing HA of subtype H5 were generated. To comply with biosafety issues the G gene was deleted from the VSV genome. The resulting vaccine vector VSV*ΔG(HA was propagated on helper cells providing the VSV G protein in trans. Vaccination of chickens with a single intramuscular dose of 2×10⁸ infectious replicon particles without adjuvant conferred complete protection from lethal H5N1 infection. Subsequent application of the same vaccine strongly boosted the humoral immune response and completely prevented shedding of challenge virus and transmission to sentinel birds. The vaccine allowed serological differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA by employing a commercially available ELISA. Immunized chickens produced antibodies with neutralizing activity against multiple H5 viruses representing clades 1, 2.2, 2.5, and low-pathogenic avian influenza viruses (classical clade. Studies using chimeric H1/H5 hemagglutinins showed that the neutralizing activity was predominantly directed against the globular head domain. In summary, these results suggest that VSV replicon particles are safe and potent DIVA vaccines that may help to control avian influenza viruses in domestic poultry.

  11. GnRH dysregulation in polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is a manifestation of an altered neurotransmitter profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Nirja; Dawalbhakta, Mitali; Nampoothiri, Laxmipriya

    2018-04-11

    GnRH is the master molecule of reproduction that is influenced by several intrinsic and extrinsic factors such as neurotransmitters and neuropeptides. Any alteration in these regulatory loops may result in reproductive-endocrine dysfunction such as the polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). Although low dopaminergic tone has been associated with PCOS, the role of neurotransmitters in PCOS remains unknown. The present study was therefore aimed at understanding the status of GnRH regulatory neurotransmitters to decipher the neuroendocrine pathology in PCOS. PCOS was induced in rats by oral administration of letrozole (aromatase inhibitor). Following PCOS validation, animals were assessed for gonadotropin levels and their mRNA expression. Neurotrasnmitter status was evaluated by estimating their levels, their metabolism and their receptor expression in hypothalamus, pituitary, hippocampus and frontal cortex of PCOS rat model. We demonstrate that GnRH and LH inhibitory neurotransmitters - serotonin, dopamine, GABA and acetylcholine - are reduced while glutamate, a major stimulator of GnRH and LH release, is increased in the PCOS condition. Concomitant changes were observed for neurotransmitter metabolising enzymes and their receptors as well. Our results reveal that increased GnRH and LH pulsatility in PCOS condition likely result from the cumulative effect of altered GnRH stimulatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters in hypothalamic-pituitary centre. This, we hypothesise, is responsible for the depression and anxiety-like mood disorders commonly seen in PCOS women.

  12. Morphological and Physiological Interactions Between GnRH3 and Hypocretin/Orexin Neuronal Systems in Zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yali; Singh, Chanpreet; Prober, David A; Wayne, Nancy L

    2016-10-01

    GnRH neurons integrate internal and external cues to control sexual maturation and fertility. Homeostasis of energy balance and food intake correlates strongly with the status of reproduction. Neuropeptides secreted by the hypothalamus involved in modulating energy balance and feeding may play additional roles in the regulation of reproduction. Hypocretin (Hcrt) (also known as orexin) is one such peptide, primarily controlling sleep/wakefulness, food intake, and reward processing. There is a growing body of evidence indicating that Hcrt/orexin (Hcrt) modulates reproduction through interacting with the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis in mammals. To explore potential morphological and functional interactions between the GnRH and Hcrt neuronal systems, we employed a variety of experimental approaches including confocal imaging, immunohistochemistry, and electrophysiology in transgenic zebrafish, in which fluorescent proteins are genetically expressed in GnRH3 and Hcrt neurons. Our imaging data revealed close apposition and direct connection between GnRH3 and Hcrt neuronal systems in the hypothalamus during larval development through adulthood. Furthermore, the Hcrt receptor (HcrtR) is expressed in GnRH3 neurons. Electrophysiological data revealed a reversible inhibitory effect of Hcrt on GnRH3 neuron electrical activity, which was blocked by the HcrtR antagonist almorexant. In addition, Hcrt had no effect on the electrical activity of GnRH3 neurons in the HcrtR null mutant zebrafish (HcrtR -/- ). Our findings demonstrate a close anatomical and functional relationship between Hcrt and GnRH neuronal systems in zebrafish. It is the first demonstration of a link between neuronal circuits controlling sleeping/arousal/feeding and reproduction in zebrafish, an important animal model for investigating the molecular genetics of development.

  13. Genomic structure and promoter functional analysis of GnRH3 gene in large yellow croaker (Larimichthys crocea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Zhang, Jianshe; Liao, Zhi; Lv, Zhenming; Wu, Huifei; Zhu, Aiyi; Wu, Changwen

    2016-01-15

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone III (GnRH3) is considered to be a key neurohormone in fish reproduction control. In the present study, the cDNA and genomic sequences of GnRH3 were cloned and characterized from large yellow croaker Larimichthys crocea. The cDNA encoded a protein of 99 amino acids with four functional motifs. The full-length genome sequence was composed of 3797 nucleotides, including four exons and three introns. Higher identities of amino acid sequences and conserved exon-intron organizations were found between LcGnRH3 and other GnRH3 genes. In addition, some special features of the sequences were detected in partial species. For example, two specific residues (V and A) were found in the family Sciaenidae, and the unique 75-72 bp type of the open reading frame 2 and 3 existed in the family Cyprinidae. Analysis of the 2576 bp promoter fragment of LcGnRH3 showed a number of transcription factor binding sites, such as AP1, CREB, GATA-1, HSF, FOXA2, and FOXL1. Promoter functional analysis using an EGFP reporter fusion in zebrafish larvae presented positive signals in the brain, including the olfactory region, the terminal nerve ganglion, the telencephalon, and the hypothalamus. The expression pattern was generally consistent with the endogenous GnRH3 GFP-expressing transgenic zebrafish lines, but the details were different. These results indicate that the structure and function of LcGnRH3 are generally similar to the other teleost GnRH3 genes, but there exist some distinctions among them. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Biosynthesis of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and GnRH receptor (GnRHR) in hypothalamic-pituitary unit of anoestrous and cyclic ewes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciechanowska, M O; Łapot, M; Mateusiak, K; Paruszewska, E; Malewski, T; Przekop, F

    2017-02-01

    This study was performed to explain how the molecular processes governing the biosynthesis of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and GnRH receptor (GnRHR) in the hypothalamic-pituitary unit are reflected by luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion in sheep during anoestrous period and during luteal and follicular phases of the oestrous cycle. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), we analyzed the levels of GnRH and GnRHR in preoptic area (POA), anterior (AH) and ventromedial hypothalamus (VM), stalk-median eminence (SME), and GnRHR in the anterior pituitary gland (AP). Radioimmunoassay has also been used to define changes in plasma LH concentrations. The study provides evidence that the levels of GnRH in the whole hypothalamus of anoestrous ewes were lower than that in sheep during the follicular phase of the oestrous cycle (POA: p pituitary unit, as well as LH level, in the blood in anoestrous ewes were significantly lower than those detected in animals of both cyclic groups. Our data suggest that decrease in LH secretion during the long photoperiod in sheep may be due to low translational activity of genes encoding both GnRH and GnRHR.

  15. Robustness encoded across essential and accessory replicons of the ecologically versatile bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Graham C.; Finan, Turlough M.; Mengoni, Alessio; Griffitts, Joel S.

    2018-01-01

    Bacterial genome evolution is characterized by gains, losses, and rearrangements of functional genetic segments. The extent to which large-scale genomic alterations influence genotype-phenotype relationships has not been investigated in a high-throughput manner. In the symbiotic soil bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti, the genome is composed of a chromosome and two large extrachromosomal replicons (pSymA and pSymB, which together constitute 45% of the genome). Massively parallel transposon insertion sequencing (Tn-seq) was employed to evaluate the contributions of chromosomal genes to growth fitness in both the presence and absence of these extrachromosomal replicons. Ten percent of chromosomal genes from diverse functional categories are shown to genetically interact with pSymA and pSymB. These results demonstrate the pervasive robustness provided by the extrachromosomal replicons, which is further supported by constraint-based metabolic modeling. A comprehensive picture of core S. meliloti metabolism was generated through a Tn-seq-guided in silico metabolic network reconstruction, producing a core network encompassing 726 genes. This integrated approach facilitated functional assignments for previously uncharacterized genes, while also revealing that Tn-seq alone missed over a quarter of wild-type metabolism. This work highlights the many functional dependencies and epistatic relationships that may arise between bacterial replicons and across a genome, while also demonstrating how Tn-seq and metabolic modeling can be used together to yield insights not obtainable by either method alone. PMID:29672509

  16. Identification and characterization of the reptilian GnRH-II gene in the leopard gecko, Eublepharis macularius, and its evolutionary considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikemoto, Tadahiro; Park, Min Kyun

    2003-10-16

    To elucidate the molecular phylogeny and evolution of a particular peptide, one must analyze not the limited primary amino acid sequences of the low molecular weight mature polypeptide, but rather the sequences of the corresponding precursors from various species. Of all the structural variants of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), GnRH-II (chicken GnRH-II, or cGnRH-II) is remarkably conserved without any sequence substitutions among vertebrates, but its precursor sequences vary considerably. We have identified and characterized the full-length complementary DNA (cDNA) encoding the GnRH-II precursor and determined its genomic structure, consisting of four exons and three introns, in a reptilian species, the leopard gecko Eublepharis macularius. This is the first report about the GnRH-II precursor cDNA/gene from reptiles. The deduced leopard gecko prepro-GnRH-II polypeptide had the highest identities with the corresponding polypeptides of amphibians. The GnRH-II precursor mRNA was detected in more than half of the tissues and organs examined. This widespread expression is consistent with the previous findings in several species, though the roles of GnRH outside the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis remain largely unknown. Molecular phylogenetic analysis combined with sequence comparison showed that the leopard gecko is more similar to fishes and amphibians than to eutherian mammals with respect to the GnRH-II precursor sequence. These results strongly suggest that the divergence of the GnRH-II precursor sequences seen in eutherian mammals may have occurred along with amniote evolution.

  17. On the Finite Groupoid G(n

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Azadi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available ‎In this paper we study the existence of commuting regular elements‎, ‎verifying‎‎the notion left (right commuting regular elements and its properties in the‎‎groupoid $G(n$‎ . ‎Also we show that $G(n$ contains commuting regular‎‎subsemigroup and give a necessary and sufficient condition for the groupoid‎‎$G(n$ to be commuting regular‎.

  18. GnRH在性成熟高白鲑神经系统及性腺中的分布定位%An Immunocytochemical Localization of GnRH in the Nerve System and Gonad of Mature Coregonus peled

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹玉洁; 贾斌; 柳建新; 李志远; 张莉

    2011-01-01

    摘要:应用免疫组织化学方法,系统观察性成熟期高白鲑(Coregonus peled)神经系统及性腺中的促性腺激素释放激素( GnRH)的分布情况。结果表明,GnRH在大脑、小脑、中脑、脊髓、延髓中免疫阳性反应明显,且主要分布在神经元内。GnRH免疫阳性细胞在卵巢和精巢中均有分布,而且其阳性部位在卵巢主要分布于小生长期卵母细胞;在精巢中主要分布于间质细胞和精原细胞中。本文讨论了GnRH直接或间接参与高白鲑性腺发育成熟调节的可能性。%Immunocytochemical staining technique was used to study the expression of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in the nervous system and gonad of Coregonus peled. The results showed that there were GnRH immunoreactive endocrine cells in the cerebrum,cerebellum,diencephalon,medulla oblongata,and spinal cord. There were GnRH immunoreactive endocrine cells in the ovary and testis. The positive staining was observed mainly in the small growing oocyte, and in the interstitial cells and spermatogonia. The possible physiological function and morphological evidence of GnRH regulation on the development of gonad in C. Peled were discussed.

  19. Ordering the mob: Insights into replicon and MOB typing schemes from analysis of a curated dataset of publicly available plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlek, Alex; Phan, Hang; Sheppard, Anna E; Doumith, Michel; Ellington, Matthew; Peto, Tim; Crook, Derrick; Walker, A Sarah; Woodford, Neil; Anjum, Muna F; Stoesser, Nicole

    2017-05-01

    Plasmid typing can provide insights into the epidemiology and transmission of plasmid-mediated antibiotic resistance. The principal plasmid typing schemes are replicon typing and MOB typing, which utilize variation in replication loci and relaxase proteins respectively. Previous studies investigating the proportion of plasmids assigned a type by these schemes ('typeability') have yielded conflicting results; moreover, thousands of plasmid sequences have been added to NCBI in recent years, without consistent annotation to indicate which sequences represent complete plasmids. Here, a curated dataset of complete Enterobacteriaceae plasmids from NCBI was compiled, and used to assess the typeability and concordance of in silico replicon and MOB typing schemes. Concordance was assessed at hierarchical replicon type resolutions, from replicon family-level to plasmid multilocus sequence type (pMLST)-level, where available. We found that 85% and 65% of the curated plasmids could be replicon and MOB typed, respectively. Overall, plasmid size and the number of resistance genes were significant independent predictors of replicon and MOB typing success. We found some degree of non-concordance between replicon families and MOB types, which was only partly resolved when partitioning plasmids into finer-resolution groups (replicon and pMLST types). In some cases, non-concordance was attributed to ambiguous boundaries between MOBP and MOBQ types; in other cases, backbone mosaicism was considered a more plausible explanation. β-lactamase resistance genes tended not to show fidelity to a particular plasmid type, though some previously reported associations were supported. Overall, replicon and MOB typing schemes are likely to continue playing an important role in plasmid analysis, but their performance is constrained by the diverse and dynamic nature of plasmid genomes. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Towards neuroimmunotherapy for cancer: the neurotransmitters glutamate, dopamine and GnRH-II augment substantially the ability of T cells of few head and neck cancer patients to perform spontaneous migration, chemotactic migration and migration towards the autologous tumor, and also elevate markedly the expression of CD3zeta and CD3epsilon TCR-associated chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saussez, Sven; Laumbacher, Barbara; Chantrain, Gilbert; Rodriguez, Alexandra; Gu, Songhai; Wank, Rudolf; Levite, Mia

    2014-08-01

    In previous studies we found that several Neurotransmitters and Neuropeptides among them: Glutamate, Dopamine, Gonadotropin-releasing-hormone (GnRH) I and II, Somatostatin, CGRP and Neuropeptide Y, can each by itself, at low physiological concentration (~10 nM) bind its receptors in human T cells and trigger several key T cell functions. These findings showed that the nervous system, via Neurotransmitters and Neuropeptides, can 'talk' directly to the immune system, and stimulate what we coined 'Nerve-Driven Immunity': immune responses dictated by the nervous system. In various human cancers, the immune system of the patients, and their T cells in particular, are not functioning well enough against the cancer due to several reasons, among them the suppressive effects on the immune system induced by: (1) the cancer itself, (2) the chemotherapy and radiotherapy, (3) the ongoing/chronic stress, anxiety, depression and pain felt by the cancer patients. In Head and Neck Cancer (HNC), 5-year survival rate remains below 50%, primarily because of local recurrences or second primary tumors. Two-thirds of HNC patients are diagnosed at advanced clinical stage and have significantly poorer prognosis. Most HNC patients have multiple severe immunological defects especially in their T cells. A major defect in T cells of patients with HNC or other types of cancer is low CD3zeta expression that correlates with poor prognosis, decreased proliferation, apoptotic profile, abnormal cytokine secretion and poor abilities of destructing cancer cells. T cells of cancer patients are often also unable to migrate properly towards the tumor. In this study we asked if Glutamate, Dopamine or GnRH-II can augment the spontaneous migration, chemotactic migration and towards autologous HNC migration, and also increase CD3zeta and CD3epsilon expression, of peripheral T cells purified from the blood of five HNC patients. These HNC patients had either primary tumor or recurrence, and have been already

  1. Replicon-dependent differentiation of symbiosis-related genes in Sinorhizobium strains nodulating Glycine max.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hui Juan; Wang, En Tao; Zhang, Xing Xing; Li, Qin Qin; Zhang, Yan Ming; Tian, Chang Fu; Chen, Wen Xin

    2014-02-01

    In order to investigate the genetic differentiation of Sinorhizobium strains nodulating Glycine max and related microevolutionary mechanisms, three housekeeping genes (SMc00019, truA, and thrA) and 16 symbiosis-related genes on the chromosome (7 genes), pSymA (6 genes), and pSymB (3 genes) were analyzed. Five distinct species were identified among the test strains by calculating the average nucleotide identity (ANI) of SMc00019-truA-thrA: Sinorhizobium fredii, Sinorhizobium sojae, Sinorhizobium sp. I, Sinorhizobium sp. II, and Sinorhizobium sp. III. These species assignments were also supported by population genetics and phylogenetic analyses of housekeeping genes and symbiosis-related genes on the chromosome and pSymB. Different levels of genetic differentiation were observed among these species or different replicons. S. sojae was the most divergent from the other test species and was characterized by its low intraspecies diversity and limited geographic distribution. Intergenic recombination dominated the evolution of 19 genes from different replicons. Intraspecies recombination happened frequently in housekeeping genes and symbiosis-related genes on the chromosome and pSymB, whereas pSymA genes showed a clear pattern of lateral-transfer events between different species. Moreover, pSymA genes were characterized by a lower level of polymorphism and recombination than those on the chromosome and pSymB. Taken together, genes from different replicons of rhizobia might be involved in the establishment of symbiosis with legumes, but these symbiosis-related genes might have evolved differently according to their corresponding replicons.

  2. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Mediates Proliferative GN via CD74

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djudjaj, Sonja; Lue, Hongqi; Rong, Song; Papasotiriou, Marios; Klinkhammer, Barbara M.; Zok, Stephanie; Klaener, Ole; Braun, Gerald S.; Lindenmeyer, Maja T.; Cohen, Clemens D.; Bucala, Richard; Tittel, Andre P.; Kurts, Christian; Moeller, Marcus J.; Floege, Juergen; Ostendorf, Tammo

    2016-01-01

    Pathologic proliferation of mesangial and parietal epithelial cells (PECs) is a hallmark of various glomerulonephritides. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that mediates inflammation by engagement of a receptor complex involving the components CD74, CD44, CXCR2, and CXCR4. The proliferative effects of MIF may involve CD74 together with the coreceptor and PEC activation marker CD44. Herein, we analyzed the effects of local glomerular MIF/CD74/CD44 signaling in proliferative glomerulonephritides. MIF, CD74, and CD44 were upregulated in the glomeruli of patients and mice with proliferative glomerulonephritides. During disease, CD74 and CD44 were expressed de novo in PECs and colocalized in both PECs and mesangial cells. Stress stimuli induced MIF secretion from glomerular cells in vitro and in vivo, in particular from podocytes, and MIF stimulation induced proliferation of PECs and mesangial cells via CD74. In murine crescentic GN, Mif-deficient mice were almost completely protected from glomerular injury, the development of cellular crescents, and the activation and proliferation of PECs and mesangial cells, whereas wild-type mice were not. Bone marrow reconstitution studies showed that deficiency of both nonmyeloid and bone marrow–derived Mif reduced glomerular cell proliferation and injury. In contrast to wild-type mice, Cd74-deficient mice also were protected from glomerular injury and ensuing activation and proliferation of PECs and mesangial cells. Our data suggest a novel molecular mechanism and glomerular cell crosstalk by which local upregulation of MIF and its receptor complex CD74/CD44 mediate glomerular injury and pathologic proliferation in GN. PMID:26453615

  3. GnRH injection before artificial insemination (AI) alters follicle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-08-04

    Aug 4, 2009 ... releasing hormone (GnRH) injection on day 6 of the estrous cycle. The estrous cycles ... follicle at the time of GnRH injection (Silcox et al., 1993;. Twagiramungu .... Waves and their Effect on pregnancy rate in the Cow. Reprod.

  4. GnRHa trigger for final oocyte maturation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Humaidan, Peter; Alsbjerg, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    Since the introduction of the gonadotrophin-releasing hormone analogues (GnRHa) protocol, it has become possible to trigger final oocyte maturation with a bolus of GnRHa. This leads to a significant reduction or complete elimination of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome compared with human chorion...

  5. Differential roles of PKC isoforms (PKCs) in GnRH stimulation of MAPK phosphorylation in gonadotrope derived cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugami, Shany; Dobkin-Bekman, Masha; Rahamim-Ben Navi, Liat; Naor, Zvi

    2018-03-05

    The role of protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms (PKCs) in GnRH-stimulated MAPK [ERK1/2, JNK1/2 and p38) phosphorylation was examined in gonadotrope derived cells. GnRH induced a protracted activation of ERK1/2 and a slower and more transient activation of JNK1/2 and p38MAPK. Gonadotropes express conventional PKCα and PKCβII, novel PKCδ, PKCε and PKCθ, and atypical PKC-ι/λ. The use of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-PKCs constructs revealed that GnRH induced rapid translocation of PKCα and PKCβII to the plasma membrane, followed by their redistribution to the cytosol. PKCδ and PKCε localized to the cytoplasm and Golgi, followed by the rapid redistribution by GnRH of PKCδ to the perinuclear zone and of PKCε to the plasma membrane. The use of dominant negatives for PKCs and peptide inhibitors for the receptors for activated C kinase (RACKs) has revealed differential role for PKCα, PKCβII, PKCδ and PKCε in ERK1/2, JNK1/2 and p38MAPK phosphorylation in a ligand-and cell context-dependent manner. The paradoxical findings that PKCs activated by GnRH and PMA play a differential role in MAPKs phosphorylation may be explained by persistent vs. transient redistribution of selected PKCs or redistribution of a given PKC to the perinuclear zone vs. the plasma membrane. Thus, we have identified the PKCs involved in GnRH stimulated MAPKs phosphorylation in gonadotrope derived cells. Once activated, the MAPKs will mediate the transcription of the gonadotropin subunits and GnRH receptor genes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Hantavirus Gn and Gc glycoproteins self-assemble into virus-like particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuña, Rodrigo; Cifuentes-Muñoz, Nicolás; Márquez, Chantal L; Bulling, Manuela; Klingström, Jonas; Mancini, Roberta; Lozach, Pierre-Yves; Tischler, Nicole D

    2014-02-01

    How hantaviruses assemble and exit infected cells remains largely unknown. Here, we show that the expression of Andes (ANDV) and Puumala (PUUV) hantavirus Gn and Gc envelope glycoproteins lead to their self-assembly into virus-like particles (VLPs) which were released to cell supernatants. The viral nucleoprotein was not required for particle formation. Further, a Gc endodomain deletion mutant did not abrogate VLP formation. The VLPs were pleomorphic, exposed protrusions and reacted with patient sera.

  7. The terminal nerve plays a prominent role in GnRH-1 neuronal migration independent from proper olfactory and vomeronasal connections to the olfactory bulbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ed Zandro M. Taroc

    2017-10-01

    Yoshihara et al., 2005. Our data prove that correct development of the OBs and axonal connection of the olfactory/vomeronasal sensory neurons to the forebrain are not required for GnRH-1 ns migration, and suggest that the terminal nerve, which forms the GnRH-1 migratory scaffold, follows different guidance cues and differs in gene expression from olfactory/vomeronasal sensory neurons.

  8. Reproductive physiology of a humanized GnRH receptor mouse model: application in evaluation of human-specific analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tello, Javier A; Kohout, Trudy; Pineda, Rafael; Maki, Richard A; Scott Struthers, R; Millar, Robert P

    2013-07-01

    The human GnRH receptor (GNRHR1) has a specific set of properties with physiological and pharmacological influences not appropriately modeled in laboratory animals or cell-based systems. To address this deficiency, we have generated human GNRHR1 knock-in mice and described their reproductive phenotype. Measurement of pituitary GNRHR1 transcripts from homozygous human GNRHR1 knock-in (ki/ki) mice revealed a severe reduction (7- to 8-fold) compared with the mouse Gnrhr1 in wild-type mice. ¹²⁵I-GnRH binding assays on pituitary membrane fractions corroborated reduced human GNRHR1 protein expression in ki/ki mice, as occurs with transfection of human GNRHR1 in cell lines. Female homozygous knock-in mice displayed normal pubertal onset, indicating that a large reduction in GNRHR1 expression is sufficient for this process. However, ki/ki females exhibited periods of prolonged estrous and/or metestrous and reduced fertility. No impairment was found in reproductive maturity or adult fertility in male ki/ki mice. Interestingly, the serum LH response to GnRH challenge was reduced in both knock-in males and females, indicating a reduced GNRHR1 signaling capacity. Small molecules targeting human GPCRs usually have poor activities at homologous rodent receptors, thus limiting their use in preclinical development. Therefore, we tested a human-specific GnRH1 antagonist, NBI-42902, in our mouse model and demonstrated abrogation of a GnRH1-induced serum LH rise in ki/ki mice and an absence of effect in littermates expressing the wild-type murine receptor. This novel model provides the opportunity to study the human receptor in vivo and for screening the activity of human-specific GnRH analogs.

  9. GnRH agonist versus GnRH antagonist in in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer (IVF/ET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Depalo Raffaella

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Several protocols are actually available for in Vitro Fertilization and Embryo Transfer. The review summarizes the main differences and the clinic characteristics of the protocols in use with GnRH agonists and GnRH antagonists by emphasizing the major outcomes and hormonal changes associated with each protocol. The majority of randomized clinical trials clearly shows that in “in Vitro” Fertilization and Embryo Transfer, the combination of exogenous Gonadotropin plus a Gonadotropin Releasing Hormone (GnRH agonist, which is able to suppress pituitary FSH and LH secretion, is associated with increased pregnancy rate as compared with the use of gonadotropins without a GnRH agonist. Protocols with GnRH antagonists are effective in preventing a premature rise of LH and induce a shorter and more cost-effective ovarian stimulation compared to the long agonist protocol. However, a different synchronization of follicular recruitment and growth occurs with GnRH agonists than with GnRH antagonists. Future developments have to be focused on timing of the administration of GnRH antagonists, by giving a great attention to new strategies of stimulation in patients in which radio-chemotherapy cycles are needed.

  10. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of Semliki forest virus replicon-based DNA vaccines encoding goatpox virus structural proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Min; Jin Ningyi; Liu Qi; Huo Xiaowei; Li Yang; Hu Bo; Ma Haili; Zhu Zhanbo; Cong Yanzhao; Li Xiao; Jin Minglan; Zhu Guangze

    2009-01-01

    Goatpox, caused by goatpox virus (GTPV), is an acute feverish and contagious disease in goats often associated with high morbidity and high mortality. To resolve potential safety risks and vaccination side effects of existing live attenuated goatpox vaccine (AV41), two Semliki forest virus (SFV) replicon-based bicistronic expression DNA vaccines (pCSm-AAL and pCSm-BAA) which encode GTPV structural proteins corresponding to the Vaccinia virus proteins A27, L1, A33, and B5, respectively, were constructed. Then, theirs ability to induce humoral and cellular response in mice and goats, and protect goats against virulent virus challenge were evaluated. The results showed that, vaccination with pCSm-AAL and pCSm-BAA in combination could elicit strong humoral and cellular responses in mice and goats, provide partial protection against viral challenge in goats, and reduce disease symptoms. Additionally, priming vaccination with the above-mentioned DNA vaccines could significantly reduce the goats' side reactions from boosting vaccinations with current live vaccine (AV41), which include skin lesions at the inoculation site and fevers. Data obtained in this study could not only facilitate improvement of the current goatpox vaccination strategy, but also provide valuable guidance to suitable candidates for evaluation and development of orthopoxvirus vaccines.

  11. Fertility of Angus cross beef heifers after GnRH treatment on day 23 and timing of insemination in 14-day CIDR protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasimanickam, R K; Hall, J B; Whittier, W D

    2017-02-01

    This study compared artificial insemination pregnancy rate (AI-PR) between 14-day CIDR-GnRH-PGF2α-GnRH and CIDR-PGF2α-GnRH synchronization protocol with two fixed AI times (56 or 72 hr after PGF2α). On day 0, heifers (n = 1311) from nine locations assigned body condition score (BCS: 1, emaciated; 9, obese), reproductive tract score (RTS: 1, immature, acyclic; 5, mature, cyclic) and temperament score (0, calm; and 1, excited) and fitted with a controlled internal drug release (CIDR, 1.38 g of progesterone) insert for 14 days. Within herd, heifers were randomly assigned either to no-GnRH group (n = 635) or to GnRH group (n = 676), and heifers in GnRH group received 100 μg of GnRH (gonadorelin hydrochloride, IM) on day 23. All heifers received 25 mg of PGF2α (dinoprost, IM) on day 30 and oestrous detection aids at the same time. Heifers were observed for oestrus thrice daily until AI. Within GnRH groups, heifers were randomly assigned to either AI-56 or AI-72 groups. Heifers in AI-56 group (n = 667) were inseminated at 56 hr (day 32 PM), and heifers in AI-72 group (n = 644) were inseminated at 72 hr (day 33 AM) after PGF2α administration. All heifers were given 100 μg of GnRH concurrently at the time AI. Controlling for BCS (p < .05), RTS (p < .05), oestrous expression (p < .001), temperament (p < .001) and GnRH treatment by time of insemination (p < .001), the AI-PR differed between GnRH treatment [GnRH (Yes - 60.9% (412/676) vs. No - 55.1% (350/635); p < .05)] and insemination time [AI-56 - 54.6% (364/667) vs. AI-72 - 61.8% (398/644); (p < .01)] groups. The GnRH treatment by AI time interaction influenced AI-PR (GnRH56 - 61.0% (208/341); GnRH72 - 60.9% (204/335); No-GnRH56 - 47.9% (156/326); No-GnRH72 - 62.8% (194/309); p < .001). In conclusion, 14-day CIDR synchronization protocol for FTAI required inclusion of GnRH on day 23 if inseminations were to be performed at 56 hr after PGF2α in order to achieve greater AI-PR.

  12. Inhibition of replicon initiation and DNA elongation in Chinese hamster ovary cells by treatment at 45.5 degrees C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, R.S.; Dewey, W.C.

    1982-01-01

    Heat treatment of Chinese hamster ovary cells at 45.5 degrees C for 15 minutes resulted in the inhibition of both the replicon initiation and the DNA elongation processes. Analysis of the DNA made after treatment showed that for up to 30 minutes after hyperthermia, there was a significant increase (45-80% above control level) in the amount of labeled DNA less than or equal to 40S in size and having a distinct peak of 20S. Therefore, elongation of 20S molecules into larger molecules was inhibited or slowed down. These small molecules did not accumulate when recovery times were longer than 30 minutes. The DNA made after 120 and 240 minutes postheat incubation was larger than control size and indicated that, although replicon initiation was still inhibited, elongation between replicons into 120S molecules could take place. However, their subsequent elongation into parental-size molecules was inhibited. The same delay in DNA elongation seen in cells examined immediately after treatment was still observed in cells heated and allowed to recover for 30 minutes. Also, after 30 minutes of recovery, heated cells still had more newly synthesized DNA in the single-stranded fraction than did control cells, which indicates that DNA elongation within a replicon is delayed for at least 30 minutes after heating. Furthermore, at 4 hours after heating, the inhibition of elongation of clusters of replicons into parental molecules prevailed

  13. Development and characterization of a Rift Valley fever virus cell-cell fusion assay using alphavirus replicon vectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filone, Claire Marie; Heise, Mark; Doms, Robert W.; Bertolotti-Ciarlet, Andrea

    2006-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), a member of the Phlebovirus genus in the Bunyaviridae family, is transmitted by mosquitoes and infects both humans and domestic animals, particularly cattle and sheep. Since primary RVFV strains must be handled in BSL-3+ or BSL-4 facilities, a RVFV cell-cell fusion assay will facilitate the investigation of RVFV glycoprotein function under BSL-2 conditions. As for other members of the Bunyaviridae family, RVFV glycoproteins are targeted to the Golgi, where the virus buds, and are not efficiently delivered to the cell surface. However, overexpression of RVFV glycoproteins using an alphavirus replicon vector resulted in the expression of the glycoproteins on the surface of multiple cell types. Brief treatment of RVFV glycoprotein expressing cells with mildly acidic media (pH 6.2 and below) resulted in rapid and efficient syncytia formation, which we quantified by β-galactosidase α-complementation. Fusion was observed with several cell types, suggesting that the receptor(s) for RVFV is widely expressed or that this acid-dependent virus does not require a specific receptor to mediate cell-cell fusion. Fusion occurred over a broad temperature range, as expected for a virus with both mosquito and mammalian hosts. In contrast to cell fusion mediated by the VSV-G glycoprotein, RVFV glycoprotein-dependent cell fusion could be prevented by treating target cells with trypsin, indicating that one or more proteins (or protein-associated carbohydrate) on the host cell surface are needed to support membrane fusion. The cell-cell fusion assay reported here will make it possible to study the membrane fusion activity of RVFV glycoproteins in a high-throughput format and to screen small molecule inhibitors for the ability to block virus-specific membrane fusion

  14. Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Replicon Particles Can Induce Rapid Protection against Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Diaz-San Segundo, Fayna; Dias, Camila C. A.; Moraes, Mauro P.; Weiss, Marcelo; Perez-Martin, Eva; Owens, Gary; Custer, Max; Kamrud, Kurt; de los Santos, Teresa; Grubman, Marvin J.

    2013-01-01

    We have previously shown that delivery of the porcine type I interferon gene (poIFN-α/β) with a replication-defective human adenovirus vector (adenovirus 5 [Ad5]) can sterilely protect swine challenged with foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) 1 day later. However, the need of relatively high doses of Ad5 limits the applicability of such a control strategy in the livestock industry. Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEE) empty replicon particles (VRPs) can induce rapid protection of mice a...

  15. Chimeric classical swine fever (CSF)-Japanese encephalitis (JE) viral replicon as a non-transmissible vaccine candidate against CSF and JE infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhenhua; Wu, Rui; Li, Robert W; Li, Ling; Xiong, Zhongliang; Zhao, Haizhong; Guo, Deyin; Pan, Zishu

    2012-04-01

    A trans-complemented chimeric CSF-JE virus replicon was constructed using an infectious cDNA clone of the CSF virus (CSFV) Alfort/187 strain. The CSFV E2 gene was deleted, and a fragment containing the region encoding a truncated envelope protein (tE, amino acid 292-402, domain III) of JE virus (JEV) was inserted into the resultant plasmid, pA187delE2, to generate the recombinant cDNA clone pA187delE2/JEV-tE. Porcine kidney 15 (PK15) cells that constitutively express the CSFV E2p7 proteins were then transfected with in vitro-transcribed RNA from pA187delE2/JEV-tE. As a result, the chimeric CSF-JE virus replicon particle (VRP), rv187delE2/JEV-tE, was rescued. In a mouse model, immunization with the chimeric CSF-JE VRP induced strong production of JEV-specific antibody and conferred protection against a lethal JEV challenge. Pigs immunized with CSF-JE VRP displayed strong anti-CSFV and anti-JEV antibody responses and protection against CSFV and JEV challenge infections. Our evidence suggests that E2-complemented CSF-JE VRP not only has potential as a live-attenuated non-transmissible vaccine candidate against CSF and JE but also serves as a potential DIVA (Differentiating Infected from Vaccinated Animals) vaccine for CSF in pigs. Together, our data suggest that the non-transmissible chimeric VRP expressing foreign antigenic proteins may represent a promising strategy for bivalent DIVA vaccine design. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A single sample GnRHa stimulation test in the diagnosis of precocious puberty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) has been the standard test for diagnosing central precocious puberty. Because GnRH is no longer available, GnRH analogues (GnRHa) are now used. Random LH concentration, measured by the third-generation immunochemiluminometric assay, is a useful screening tool ...

  17. Regulation versus modulation in GnRH receptor function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zolman, J.C.; Theodoropoulos, T.J.

    1985-01-01

    Serum luteinizing hormone (LH) concentration after exposure to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) indicates that an instantaneous increase occurs in the rate of release of LH directly from the anterior pituitary, as measured dynamically during superfusion in vitro. On the other hand, estradiol-17 beta (E2) alone shows no such instantaneous effect on LH release rate (at least for the first four hours), in either physiologic or pharmacologic concentrations. At the same time, brief (ten to 30 minute) exposure of isolated anterior pituitary plasma membranes to physiologic concentrations of E2 significantly alters the binding of a fully biologically active 125 I-GnRH to its plasma membrane receptor protein. In order to characterize the effect of E2 on GnRH binding further, dispersed bovine anterior pituitary cells were preincubated for six hours in the presence or absence of physiologic concentrations of E2 (10(-10)M). Following preincubation in the presence of E2, the cell suspension was incubated for 30 minutes with physiologic concentrations (5 x 10(-11) - 5 x 10(-10)M) of a fully biologically active 125 I-GnRH. The treatment, at least, doubled the number of biologically important high affinity GnRH binding sites (Kd's . 7.5 x -10(-11) - 4.5 x 10(-10)M), and changed the binding capacity of some of the binding sites up to three fold, which altered the cooperativity of GnRH-receptor interaction. Thus, the interaction of E2 with GnRH at the level of GnRH receptor is mandatory for the short-term pituitary effect of E2 on LH release in vitro and in vivo

  18. Space Shuttle GN and C Development History and Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimpfer, Douglas; Hattis, Phil; Ruppert, John; Gavert, Don

    2011-01-01

    Completion of the final Space Shuttle flight marks the end of a significant era in Human Spaceflight. Developed in the 1970 s, first launched in 1981, the Space Shuttle embodies many significant engineering achievements. One of these is the development and operation of the first extensive fly-by-wire human space transportation Guidance, Navigation and Control (GN&C) System. Development of the Space Shuttle GN&C represented first time inclusions of modern techniques for electronics, software, algorithms, systems and management in a complex system. Numerous technical design trades and lessons learned continue to drive current vehicle development. For example, the Space Shuttle GN&C system incorporated redundant systems, complex algorithms and flight software rigorously verified through integrated vehicle simulations and avionics integration testing techniques. Over the past thirty years, the Shuttle GN&C continued to go through a series of upgrades to improve safety, performance and to enable the complex flight operations required for assembly of the international space station. Upgrades to the GN&C ranged from the addition of nose wheel steering to modifications that extend capabilities to control of the large flexible configurations while being docked to the Space Station. This paper provides a history of the development and evolution of the Space Shuttle GN&C system. Emphasis is placed on key architecture decisions, design trades and the lessons learned for future complex space transportation system developments. Finally, some of the interesting flight operations experience is provided to inform future developers of flight experiences.

  19. The lower expression of gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor associated with poor prognosis in gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Mingzhu; Zhu, Jing; Ling, Yang; Shi, Wenping; Zhang, Changsong; Wu, Haorong

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Expression of gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR) has been demonstrated in a number of malignancies. The aim is to investigate the expression of GnRHR and prognosis in gastric cancer. Methods and materials: GnRHR mRNA was examined in tumor and non-tumor tissues from 48 gastric cancer patients by Real-time PCR. The GnRHR protein expression was performed by immunohistochemical analysis. Results: The expression of GnRHR mRNA was higher (mean ± SD, -10.06 ± 1.28) in gastric tumor tissues than matched non-tumor tissues (mean ± SD, -12.43 ± 1.33). GnRHR mRNA expression was associated with lymph node metastasis, distant metastasis, and TNM stage. We found the decreased expression of GnRHR mRNA were significantly correlated with poor overall survival (P = 0.003). Immunocytochemical staining of GnRHR in tumor tissues showed mainly weak staining (43.48%, 10/23) and moderate staining (21.74%, 5/23) in high GnRHR mRNA patients, and mainly negative staining in low GnRHR mRNA patients. And the staining of GnRHR was not detection in tumor tissues for more than half of gastric patients (52.08%, 25/48). These results implied that the loss of GnRHR protein could be a main event in gastric cancer. Conclusion: The GnRHR expression is very low in gastric cancer, and the loss of GnRHR expression could be a poor prognostic factor, which implied that GnRHR could play an important role in the development of gastric cancer. PMID:26550267

  20. Luteal blood flow in patients undergoing GnRH agonist long protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takasaki Akihisa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Blood flow in the corpus luteum (CL is closely related to luteal function. It is unclear how luteal blood flow is regulated. Standardized ovarian-stimulation protocol with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa long protocol causes luteal phase defect because it drastically suppresses serum LH levels. Examining luteal blood flow in the patient undergoing GnRHa long protocol may be useful to know whether luteal blood flow is regulated by LH. Methods Twenty-four infertile women undergoing GnRHa long protocol were divided into 3 groups dependent on luteal supports; 9 women were given ethinylestradiol plus norgestrel (Planovar orally throughout the luteal phase (control group; 8 women were given HCG 2,000 IU on days 2 and 4 day after ovulation induction in addition to Planovar (HCG group; 7 women were given vitamin E (600 mg/day orally throughout the luteal phase in addition to Planovar (vitamin E group. Blood flow impedance was measured in each CL during the mid-luteal phase by transvaginal color-pulsed-Doppler-ultrasonography and was expressed as a CL-resistance index (CL-RI. Results Serum LH levels were remarkably suppressed in all the groups. CL-RI in the control group was more than the cutoff value (0.51, and only 2 out of 9 women had CL-RI values Conclusion Patients undergoing GnRHa long protocol had high luteal blood flow impedance with very low serum LH levels. HCG administration improved luteal blood flow impedance. This suggests that luteal blood flow is regulated by LH.

  1. Cloning and functional analysis of promoters of three GnRH genes in a cichlid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitahashi, Takashi; Sato, Hideki; Sakuma, Yasuo; Parhar, Ishwar S.

    2005-01-01

    Mechanisms regulating gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) types, a key molecule for reproductive physiology, remain unclear. In the present study, we cloned the promoters of GnRH1, GnRH2, and GnRH3 genes in the tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus; and found putative binding sites for glucocorticoid receptors, Sp1, C/EBP, GATA, and Oct-1, but not for androgen receptors in all three GnRH promoters using computer analysis. The presence of binding sites for progesterone receptors in GnRH1, estrogen receptors in GnRH1 and GnRH2, and thyroid hormone receptors in GnRH1 and GnRH3 suggests direct action of steroid hormones on GnRH types. Our observation of SOX and LINE-like sequences exclusively in GnRH1, COUP in GnRH2, and retinoid X receptors in GnRH3 suggests their role in sexual differentiation, midbrain segmentation, and visual cue integration, respectively. Thus, the characteristic binding sites for nuclear receptors and transcription factors support the notion that each GnRH type is regulated differently and has distinct physiological roles

  2. DNA replication in ultraviolet light irradiated Chinese hamster cells: the nature of replicon inhibition and post-replication repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doniger, J.

    1978-01-01

    DNA replication in ultraviolet light irradiated Chinese hamster cells was studied using techniques of DNA fiber autoradiography and alkaline sucrose sedimentation. Bidirectionally growing replicons were observed in the autoradiograms independent of the irradiation conditions. After a dose of 5 J/m 2 at 254 nm the rate of fork progression was the same as in unirradiated cells, while the rate of replication was reduced by 50%. After a dose of 10J/m 2 the rate of fork progression was reduced 40%, while the replication rate was only 25% of normal. Therefore, at low doses of ultraviolet light irradiation, the inhibition of DNA replication is due to reduction in the number of functioning replicons, while at higher doses the rate of fork progression is also slowed. Those replicons which no longer function after irradiation are blocked in fork movement rather than replicon initiation. After irradiation, pulse label was first incorporated into short nascent strands, the average size of which was approximately equal to the distance between pyrimidine dimers. Under conditions where post-replication repair occurs these short strands were eventually joined into larger pieces. Finally, the data show that slowing post-replication repair with caffeine does not slow fork movement. The results presented here support the post-replication repair model of 'gapped synthesis' and rule out a major role for 'replicative bypass'. (author)

  3. Ghrelin decreases firing activity of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH neurons in an estrous cycle and endocannabinoid signaling dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imre Farkas

    Full Text Available The orexigenic peptide, ghrelin is known to influence function of GnRH neurons, however, the direct effects of the hormone upon these neurons have not been explored, yet. The present study was undertaken to reveal expression of growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R in GnRH neurons and elucidate the mechanisms of ghrelin actions upon them. Ca(2+-imaging revealed a ghrelin-triggered increase of the Ca(2+-content in GT1-7 neurons kept in a steroid-free medium, which was abolished by GHS-R-antagonist JMV2959 (10 µM suggesting direct action of ghrelin. Estradiol (1nM eliminated the ghrelin-evoked rise of Ca(2+-content, indicating the estradiol dependency of the process. Expression of GHS-R mRNA was then confirmed in GnRH-GFP neurons of transgenic mice by single cell RT-PCR. Firing rate and burst frequency of GnRH-GFP neurons were lower in metestrous than proestrous mice. Ghrelin (40 nM-4 μM administration resulted in a decreased firing rate and burst frequency of GnRH neurons in metestrous, but not in proestrous mice. Ghrelin also decreased the firing rate of GnRH neurons in males. The ghrelin-evoked alterations of the firing parameters were prevented by JMV2959, supporting the receptor-specific actions of ghrelin on GnRH neurons. In metestrous mice, ghrelin decreased the frequency of GABAergic mPSCs in GnRH neurons. Effects of ghrelin were abolished by the cannabinoid receptor type-1 (CB1 antagonist AM251 (1µM and the intracellularly applied DAG-lipase inhibitor THL (10 µM, indicating the involvement of retrograde endocannabinoid signaling. These findings demonstrate that ghrelin exerts direct regulatory effects on GnRH neurons via GHS-R, and modulates the firing of GnRH neurons in an ovarian-cycle and endocannabinoid dependent manner.

  4. GnRH Analogues in the Prevention of Ovarian Hyperstimulation Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alama, Pilar; Bellver, Jose; Vidal, Carmen; Giles, Juan

    2013-01-01

    The GnRH analogue (agonist and antagonist GnRH) changed ovarian stimulation. On the one hand, it improved chances of pregnancy to obtain more oocytes and better embryos. This leads to an ovarian hyper-response, which can be complicated by the ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS). On the other hand, the GnRH analogue can prevent the incidence of OHSS: GnRH antagonist protocols, GnRH agonist for triggering final oocyte maturation, either together or separately, coasting, and the GnRH analogue may prove useful for avoiding OHSS in high-risk patients. We review these topics in this article. PMID:23825982

  5. Peripheral Inhibitor of AChE, Neostigmine, Prevents the Inflammatory Dependent Suppression of GnRH/LH Secretion during the Follicular Phase of the Estrous Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej P. Herman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was designed to test the hypothesis that the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE activity at the periphery by Neostigmine (0.5 mg/animal will be sufficient to prevent inflammatory dependent suppression of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH/luteinising hormone (LH secretion in ewes in the follicular phase of the estrous cycle, and this effect will be comparable with the systemic AChE inhibitor, Donepezil (2.5 mg/animal. An immune/inflammatory challenge was induced by peripheral administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 400 ng/kg. Peripheral treatment with Donepezil and Neostigmine prevented the LPS-induced decrease (P<0.05 in LHβ gene expression in the anterior pituitary gland (AP and in LH release. Moreover, Donepezil completely abolished (P<0.05 the suppressory effect of inflammation on GnRH synthesis in the preoptic area, when pretreatment with Neostigmine reduced (P<0.05 the decrease in GnRH content in this hypothalamic structure. Moreover, administration of both AChE inhibitors diminished (P<0.05 the inhibitory effect of LPS treatment on the expression of GnRH receptor in the AP. Our study shows that inflammatory dependent changes in the GnRH/LH secretion may be eliminated or reduced by AChE inhibitors suppressing inflammatory reaction only at the periphery such as Neostigmine, without the need for interfering in the central nervous system.

  6. Comparative analysis of the pituitary and ovarian GnRH systems in the leopard gecko: signaling crosstalk between multiple receptor subtypes in ovarian follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikemoto, Tadahiro; Park, Min Kyun

    2007-02-01

    GnRH regulates reproductive functions through interaction with its pituitary receptor in vertebrates. The present study demonstrated that the leopard gecko possessed two and three genes for GnRH ligands and receptors, respectively, though one of the three receptor subtypes had long been thought not to exist in reptiles. Each receptor subtype showed a distinct pharmacology. All types of ligands and receptors showed different expression patterns, and were widely expressed both inside and outside the brain. This report also shows a comparison of the pituitary and ovarian GnRH systems in the leopard gecko during and after the egg-laying season. All three receptor subtypes were expressed in both the whole pituitary and ovary; however, only one receptor subtype could be detected in the anterior pituitary gland. In situ hybridization showed spatial expression patterns of ovarian receptors, and suggested co-expression of multiple receptor subtypes in granulosa cells of larger follicles. Co-transfection of receptor subtypes showed a distinct pharmacology in COS-7 cells compared with those of single transfections. These results suggest that distinct signaling mechanisms are involved in the pituitary and ovarian GnRH systems. Seasonal and developmental variations in receptor expression in the anterior pituitary gland and ovarian follicles may contribute to the seasonal breeding of this animal.

  7. Effects of Huang Bai (Phellodendri Cortex and Three Other Herbs on GnRH and GH Levels in GT1–7 and GH3 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Haeng Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was to evaluate the effects of Huang Bai, Zhi Mu, Mai Ya, and Xia Ku Cao on hormone using the GT1–7 and GH3 cells. The GT1–7 and GH3 cell lines were incubated with DW; DMSO; and 30, 100, or 300 μg/mL of one of the four extract solutions in serum-free media for 24 hours. The MTT assay was performed to determine the cytotoxicity of the four herbs. The GT1–7 and GH3 cells were incubated in DW, estradiol (GT1–7 only, or noncytotoxic herb solutions in serum-free medium for 24 hours. A quantitative RT-PCR and western blot were performed to measure the GnRH expression in GT1–7 cells and GH expression in GH3 cells. Huang Bai, Zhi Mu, Xia Ku Cao, and Mai Ya inhibited the GnRH mRNA expression in GT1–7 cells, whereas Huang Bai enhanced GH mRNA expression in GH3 cells. Additionally, Xia Ku Cao inhibited GnRH protein expression in GT1–7 cells and Huang Bai promoted GH protein expression in GH3 cells. The findings suggest that Huang Bai can delay puberty by inhibiting GnRH synthesis in the hypothalamus while also accelerating growth by promoting GH synthesis and secretion in the pituitary.

  8. GnRH signalling pathways and GnRH-induced homologous desensitization in a gonadotrope cell line (alphaT3-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulin, B; Rich, N; Mas, J L; Kordon, C; Enjalbert, A; Drouva, S V

    1998-07-25

    Exposure of the gonadotrope cells to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) reduces their responsiveness to a new GnRH stimulation (homologous desensitization). The time frame as well as the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are yet unclear. We studied in a gonadotrope cell line (alphaT3-1) the effects of short as well as long term GnRH pretreatments on the GnRH-induced phospholipases-C (PLC), -A2 (PLA2) and -D (PLD) activities, by measuring the production of IP3, total inositol phosphates (IPs), arachidonic acid (AA) and phosphatidylethanol (PEt) respectively. We demonstrated that although rapid desensitization of GnRH-induced IP3 formation did not occur in these cells, persistent stimulation of cells with GnRH or its analogue resulted in a time-dependent attenuation of GnRH-elicited IPs formation. GnRH-induced IPs desensitization was potentiated after direct activation of PKC by the phorbol ester TPA, suggesting the involvement of distinct mechanisms in the uncoupling exerted by either GnRH or TPA on GnRH-stimulated PI hydrolysis. The levels of individual phosphoinositides remained unchanged under any desensitization condition applied. Interestingly, while the GnRH-induced PLA2 activity was rapidly desensitized (2.5 min) after GnRH pretreatments, the neuropeptide-evoked PLD activation was affected at later times, indicating an important time-dependent contribution of these enzymatic activities in the sequential events underlying the GnRH-induced homologous desensitization processes in the gonadotropes. Under GnRH desensitization conditions, TPA was still able to induce PLD activation and to further potentiate the GnRH-evoked PLD activity. AlphaT3-1 cells possess several PKC isoforms which, except PKCzeta, were differentially down-regulated by TPA (PKCalpha, betaII, delta, epsilon, eta) or GnRH (PKCbetaII, delta, epsilon, eta). In spite of the presence of PKC inhibitors or down-regulation of PKC isoforms by TPA, the desensitizing effect of the neuropeptide on

  9. Conditional Viral Tract Tracing Delineates the Projections of the Distinct Kisspeptin Neuron Populations to Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone (GnRH) Neurons in the Mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Siew Hoong; Boehm, Ulrich; Herbison, Allan E; Campbell, Rebecca E

    2015-07-01

    Kisspeptin neurons play an essential role in the regulation of fertility through direct regulation of the GnRH neurons. However, the relative contributions of the two functionally distinct kisspeptin neuron subpopulations to this critical regulation are not fully understood. Here we analyzed the specific projection patterns of kisspeptin neurons originating from either the rostral periventricular nucleus of the third ventricle (RP3V) or the arcuate nucleus (ARN) using a cell-specific, viral-mediated tract-tracing approach. We stereotaxically injected a Cre-dependent recombinant adenovirus encoding farnesylated enhanced green fluorescent protein into the ARN or RP3V of adult male and female mice expressing Cre recombinase in kisspeptin neurons. Fibers from ARN kisspeptin neurons projected widely; however, we did not find any evidence for direct contact with GnRH neuron somata or proximal dendrites in either sex. In contrast, we identified RP3V kisspeptin fibers in close contact with GnRH neuron somata and dendrites in both sexes. Fibers originating from both the RP3V and ARN were observed in close contact with distal GnRH neuron processes in the ARN and in the lateral and internal aspects of the median eminence. Furthermore, GnRH nerve terminals were found in close contact with the proximal dendrites of ARN kisspeptin neurons in the ARN, and ARN kisspeptin fibers were found contacting RP3V kisspeptin neurons in both sexes. Together these data delineate selective zones of kisspeptin neuron inputs to GnRH neurons and demonstrate complex interconnections between the distinct kisspeptin populations and GnRH neurons.

  10. Risk of severe ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome in GnRH antagonist versus GnRH agonist protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftager, M.; Bogstad, J; Bryndorf, T

    2016-01-01

    interval (CI): 0.33-0.57) compared with the traditional GnRH agonist protocol. Previous trials comparing the two protocols mainly included selected patient populations, a limited number of patients and the applied OHSS criteria differed, making direct comparisons difficult. In two recent large meta...... IV, dual-centre, open-label, RCT including 1050 women allocated to either short GnRH antagonist or long GnRH agonist protocol in a 1:1 ratio and enrolled over a 5-year period using a web-based concealed randomization code. This is a superiority study designed to detect a difference in severe OHSS...... between the two arms. None of the women had undergone previous ART treatment. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS: All infertile women referred for their first IVF/ICSI at two public fertility clinics, less than 40 years of age and with no uterine malformations were asked to participate. A total...

  11. T-Bet Enhances Regulatory T Cell Fitness and Directs Control of Th1 Responses in Crescentic GN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosko, Anna; Kluger, Malte A; Diefenhardt, Paul; Melderis, Simon; Wegscheid, Claudia; Tiegs, Gisa; Stahl, Rolf A K; Panzer, Ulf; Steinmetz, Oliver M

    2017-01-01

    Th1 cells are central pathogenic mediators of crescentic GN (cGN). Mechanisms responsible for Th1 cell downregulation, however, remain widely unknown. Recently, it was proposed that activation of the Th1-characteristic transcription factor T-bet optimizes Foxp3 + regulatory T (Treg) cells to counteract Th1-type inflammation. Because very little is known about the role of T-bet + Treg1 cells in inflammatory diseases, we studied the function of these cells in the nephrotoxic nephritis (NTN) model of cGN. The percentage of Treg1 cells progressively increased in kidneys of nephritic wild-type mice during the course of NTN, indicating their functional importance. Notably, naïve Foxp3 Cre xT-bet fl/fl mice, lacking Treg1 cells, showed spontaneous skewing toward Th1 immunity. Furthermore, absence of Treg1 cells resulted in aggravated NTN with selectively dysregulated renal and systemic Th1 responses. Detailed analyses of Treg cells from Foxp3 Cre xT-bet fl/fl mice revealed unaltered cytokine production and suppressive capacity. However, in competitive cotransfer experiments, wild-type Treg cells outcompeted T-bet-deficient Treg cells in terms of population expansion and expression levels of Foxp3, indicating that T-bet expression is crucial for general Treg fitness. Additionally, T-bet-deficient Treg cells lacked expression of the Th1-characteristic trafficking receptor CXCR3, which correlated with significant impairment of renal Treg infiltration. In summary, our data indicate a new subtype of Treg cells in cGN. These Treg1 cells are characterized by activation of the transcription factor T-bet, which enhances the overall fitness of these cells and optimizes their capacity to downregulate Th1 responses by inducing chemokine receptor CXCR3 expression. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  12. Gonadotropin Releasing Hormone (GnRH) Neuron Migration: Initiation, Maintenance and Cessation as Critical Steps to Ensure Normal Reproductive Function

    OpenAIRE

    Wierman, Margaret E.; Kiseljak-Vassiliades, Katja; Tobet, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    GnRH neurons follow a carefully orchestrated journey from their birth in the olfactory placode area. Initially, they migrate along with the vomeronasal nerve into the brain at the cribriform plate, then progress caudally to sites within the hypothalamus where they halt and send projections to the median eminence to activate pituitary gonadotropes. Many factors controlling this precise journey have been elucidated by the silencing or over expression of candidate genes in mouse models. Importan...

  13. (cGnRH-II) on plasma steroid hormone, maturation and ovulation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-12-01

    Dec 1, 2009 ... (LHRHa) and salmon gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogue (sGnRHa) in ..... Four out of six fish reached GVBD at 12 h after injection. Egg quality .... of the sbGnRH and cGnRH-II genes from the striped bass, Morone.

  14. Effects of GnRH immunization in sexually mature pony stallions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turkstra, J.A.; Meer, F.J.U.M.; Knaap, J.; Rottier, P.J.M.; Teerds, K.J.; Colenbrander, B.; Meloen, R.H.

    2005-01-01

    Immunization against gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH) was studied as an alternative for the commonly used surgical castration in stallions. Two GnRH vaccines comprising non-mineral oil adjuvants were evaluated for their potential to induce high antibody titers directed against GnRH and

  15. Differential effects of human and plant N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I (GnTI) in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henquet, M.; Heinhuis, B.; Borst, J.W.; Eigenhuijsen, J.; Schreuder, M.; Bosch, D.; van der Krol, A.R.

    2009-01-01

    In plants and animals, the first step in complex type N-glycan formation on glycoproteins is catalyzed by N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I (GnTI). We show that the cgl1-1 mutant of Arabidopsis, which lacks GnTI activity, is fully complemented by YFP-labeled plant AtGnTI, but only partially

  16. Differential effects of human and plant N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I (GnTI) in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henquet, M.G.L.; Heinhuis, B.; Borst, J.W.; Eigenhuijsen, J.; Schreuder, M.; Bosch, D.; Krol, van der A.R.

    2010-01-01

    In plants and animals, the first step in complex type N-glycan formation on glycoproteins is catalyzed by N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I (GnTI). We show that the cgl1-1 mutant of Arabidopsis, which lacks GnTI activity, is fully complemented by YFP-labeled plant AtGnTI, but only partially

  17. Accelerating NASA GN&C Flight Software Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamblyn, Scott; Henry, Joel; Rapp, John

    2010-01-01

    When the guidance, navigation, and control (GN&C) system for the Orion crew vehicle undergoes Critical Design Review (CDR), more than 90% of the flight software will already be developed - a first for NASA on a project of this scope and complexity. This achievement is due in large part to a new development approach using Model-Based Design.

  18. Construction and Cloning of Reporter-Tagged Replicon cDNA for an In Vitro Replication Study of Murine Norovirus-1 (MNV-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Muhammad Khairi; Tabana, Yasser M; Ahmed, Mowaffaq Adam; Sandai, Doblin Anak; Mohamed, Rafeezul; Ismail, Ida Shazrina; Zulkiflie, Nurulisa; Yunus, Muhammad Amir

    2017-12-01

    A norovirus maintains its viability, infectivity and virulence by its ability to replicate. However, the biological mechanisms of the process remain to be explored. In this work, the NanoLuc™ Luciferase gene was used to develop a reporter-tagged replicon system to study norovirus replication. The NanoLuc™ Luciferase reporter protein was engineered to be expressed as a fusion protein for MNV-1 minor capsid protein, VP2. The foot-and-mouth disease virus 2A (FMDV2A) sequence was inserted between the 3'end of the reporter gene and the VP2 start sequence to allow co-translational 'cleavage' of fusion proteins during intracellular transcript expression. Amplification of the fusion gene was performed using a series of standard and overlapping polymerase chain reactions. The resulting amplicon was then cloned into three readily available backbones of MNV-1 cDNA clones. Restriction enzyme analysis indicated that the NanoLucTM Luciferase gene was successfully inserted into the parental MNV-1 cDNA clone. The insertion was further confirmed by using DNA sequencing. NanoLuc™ Luciferase-tagged MNV-1 cDNA clones were successfully engineered. Such clones can be exploited to develop robust experimental assays for in vitro assessments of viral RNA replication.

  19. Self-Amplifying Replicon RNA Vaccine Delivery to Dendritic Cells by Synthetic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth C. McCullough

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DC play essential roles determining efficacy of vaccine delivery with respect to immune defence development and regulation. This renders DCs important targets for vaccine delivery, particularly RNA vaccines. While delivery of interfering RNA oligonucleotides to the appropriate intracellular sites for RNA-interference has proven successful, the methodologies are identical for RNA vaccines, which require delivery to RNA translation sites. Delivery of mRNA has benefitted from application of cationic entities; these offer value following endocytosis of RNA, when cationic or amphipathic properties can promote endocytic vesicle membrane perturbation to facilitate cytosolic translocation. The present review presents how such advances are being applied to the delivery of a new form of RNA vaccine, replicons (RepRNA carrying inserted foreign genes of interest encoding vaccine antigens. Approaches have been developed for delivery to DCs, leading to the translation of the RepRNA and encoded vaccine antigens both in vitro and in vivo. Potential mechanisms favouring efficient delivery leading to translation are discussed with respect to the DC endocytic machinery, showing the importance of cytosolic translocation from acidifying endocytic structures. The review relates the DC endocytic pathways to immune response induction, and the potential advantages for these self-replicating RNA vaccines in the near future.

  20. Computational design and characterization of a temperature-sensitive plasmid replicon for gram positive thermophiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olson Daniel G

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Temperature-sensitive (Ts plasmids are useful tools for genetic engineering, but there are currently none compatible with the gram positive, thermophilic, obligate anaerobe, Clostridium thermocellum. Traditional mutagenesis techniques yield Ts mutants at a low frequency, and therefore requires the development of high-throughput screening protocols, which are also not available for this organism. Recently there has been progress in the development of computer algorithms which can predict Ts mutations. Most plasmids currently used for genetic modification of C. thermocellum are based on the replicon of plasmid pNW33N, which replicates using the RepB replication protein. To address this problem, we set out to create a Ts plasmid by mutating the gene coding for the RepB replication protein using an algorithm designed by Varadarajan et al. (1996 for predicting Ts mutants based on the amino-acid sequence of the protein. Results A library of 34 mutant plasmids was designed, synthesized and screened, resulting in 6 mutants which exhibited a Ts phenotype. Of these 6, the one with the most temperature-sensitive phenotype (M166A was compared with the original plasmid. It exhibited lower stability at 48°C and was completely unable to replicate at 55°C. Conclusions The plasmid described in this work could be useful in future efforts to genetically engineer C. thermocellum, and the method used to generate this plasmid may be useful for others trying to make Ts plasmids.

  1. Random-start GnRH antagonist for emergency fertility preservation: a self-controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Checa MA

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Miguel A Checa,1,2 Mario Brassesco,2 Margalida Sastre,1 Manuel Gómez,2 Julio Herrero,3 Laura Marque,3 Arturo Brassesco,2 Juan José Espinós3 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Parc de Salut Mar, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 2Centro de Infertilidad y Reproducción Humana (CIRH, 3Centro de Reproducción Asistida Sagrada Familia, Clínica Sagrada Familia, Barcelona, Spain Abstract: The aim of this study is to evaluate the feasibility and safety of random-start controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH for emergency fertility preservation, regardless of the phase of the menstrual cycle. A self-controlled pilot clinical trial (NCT01385332 was performed in an acute-care teaching hospital and in two private reproductive centers in Barcelona, Spain. Eleven egg donors participated in the study. Two random-start gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH antagonist protocols were assessed in which ganirelix was initiated on either day 10 (protocol B or on day 20 (protocol C of the menstrual cycle and was continued until estradiol levels were below 60 pg/dL. These protocols were compared with a standard protocol (protocol A. The main outcome of interest was the number of metaphase 2 oocytes retrieved. Results from this study show that the number of mature oocytes retrieved was comparable across the different protocols (14.3±4.6 in the standard protocol versus 13.0±9.1 and 13.2±5.2 in protocols B and C, respectively; values expressed as mean ± standard deviation. The mean number of days needed for a GnRH antagonist to lower estradiol levels, as well as the ongoing pregnancy rates, were also similar when protocols B (stimulation in follicular phase and C (stimulation on luteal phase were compared with protocol A (standard stimulation. GnRH antagonists can be effectively used for random-start controlled ovarian hyperstimulation with an ovarian response similar to that of standard protocols, and the antagonists appear suitable for emergency

  2. The role of GABA in the regulation of GnRH neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miho eWatanabe

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH neurons form the final common pathway for the central regulation of reproduction. Gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA has long been implicated as one of the major players in the regulation of GnRH neurons. Although GABA is typically an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mature adult central nervous system, most mature GnRH neurons show the unusual characteristic of being excited by GABA. While many reports have provided much insight into the contribution of GABA to the activity of GnRH neurons, the precise physiological role of the excitatory action of GABA on GnRH neurons remains elusive. This brief review presents the current knowledge of the role of GABA signaling in GnRH neuronal activity. We also discuss the modulation of GABA signaling by neurotransmitters and neuromodulators and the functional consequence of GABAergic inputs to GnRH neurons in both the physiology and pathology of reproduction.

  3. C5a receptor (CD88) blockade protects against MPO-ANCA GN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hong; Dairaghi, Daniel J; Powers, Jay P; Ertl, Linda S; Baumgart, Trageen; Wang, Yu; Seitz, Lisa C; Penfold, Mark E T; Gan, Lin; Hu, Peiqi; Lu, Bao; Gerard, Norma P; Gerard, Craig; Schall, Thomas J; Jaen, Juan C; Falk, Ronald J; Jennette, J Charles

    2014-02-01

    Necrotizing and crescentic GN (NCGN) with a paucity of glomerular immunoglobulin deposits is associated with ANCA. The most common ANCA target antigens are myeloperoxidase (MPO) and proteinase 3. In a manner that requires activation of the alternative complement pathway, passive transfer of antibodies to mouse MPO (anti-MPO) induces a mouse model of ANCA NCGN that closely mimics human disease. Here, we confirm the importance of C5aR/CD88 in the mediation of anti-MPO-induced NCGN and report that C6 is not required. We further demonstrate that deficiency of C5a-like receptor (C5L2) has the reverse effect of C5aR/CD88 deficiency and results in more severe disease, indicating that C5aR/CD88 engagement enhances inflammation and C5L2 engagement suppresses inflammation. Oral administration of CCX168, a small molecule antagonist of human C5aR/CD88, ameliorated anti-MPO-induced NCGN in mice expressing human C5aR/CD88. These observations suggest that blockade of C5aR/CD88 might have therapeutic benefit in patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis and GN.

  4. Pharmacological and toxicological assessment of a potential GnRH vaccine in young-adult male pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turkstra, J.A.; Staay, van der F.J.; Stockhofe-Zurwieden, N.; Woelders, H.; Meloen, R.H.; Schuurman, T.

    2011-01-01

    Active immunization against gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is successfully applied to prevent boar taint in pork. In men, GnRH immunization could be an alternative to hormone therapy in patients with prostate cancer. In this study, a new GnRH vaccine formulation (a modified GnRH peptide

  5. Dynamic GnRH and hCG testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, A. Kirstine; Nordkap, Loa; Almstrup, Kristian

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) stimulation tests may be used to evaluate the pituitary and testicular capacity. Our aim was to evaluate changes in follicular-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH) and testosterone after Gn...... influence of the tests was illustrated by results from 45 patients suspected of disordered hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. METHODS: Baseline, stimulated, relative and absolute changes in serum FSH and LH were determined by ultrasensitive TRIFMA, and testosterone was determined by LC-MS/MS. RESULTS......: For the reference group, LH and FSH increased almost 400% and 40% during GnRH testing, stimulated levels varied from 4.4 to 58.8 U/L and 0.2 to 11.8 U/L and FSH decreased in nine men. Testosterone increased approximately 110% (range: 18.7-67.6 nmol/L) during hCG testing. None of the polymorphisms had any major...

  6. GnRH-Analoga und Add-back-Verfahren

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleinstein J

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available GnRH-Analoga haben eine große Bedeutung in der medikamentösen Therapie der Endometriose erlangt. Sie sind in der Lage, Endometrioseassoziierte Schmerzen zu beseitigen und sind Bestandteil der Therapie der endometriosebedingten Infertilität. Aufgrund der Chronizität der Endometriose bedarf es in vielen Fällen der Prolongation der GnRH-A-Therapie über den Zeitraum von 6 Monaten hinaus. Für diese Fälle eignet sich eine Add-back- Therapie nach dem Format von Hormonersatztherapien, um vasomotorischen Nebeneffekten und dem Knochensubstanzverlust entgegenwirken zu können. Dabei wird der Estrogenanteil niedrig dosiert eingesetzt, um innerhalb eines "therapeutischen Fensters" den Hypoestrogenismus auszugleichen, ohne das Endometriosewachstum zu fördern. Prinzipiell kann dazu das Estrogen oral, aber auch transdermal appliziert werden. Die Effektivität der Kombination aus GnRH-A plus Add-back bezüglich der Knochenprotektion konnte bereits für einen Zeitraum von bis zu 10 Jahren bestätigt werden, sodass damit eine Langzeitkonzeption für Frauen mit rezidivierender Endometriose und wiederholten operativen Eingriffen existiert. Alternativen zur klassischen Add-back mit Sexualsteroiden existieren vielfältig, aber ihr Einsatz ist durch Partialwirkungen und eigene Nebenwirkungen limitiert.

  7. High-frequency stimulation-induced peptide release synchronizes arcuate kisspeptin neurons and excites GnRH neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jian; Nestor, Casey C; Zhang, Chunguang; Padilla, Stephanie L; Palmiter, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    Kisspeptin (Kiss1) and neurokinin B (NKB) neurocircuits are essential for pubertal development and fertility. Kisspeptin neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (Kiss1ARH) co-express Kiss1, NKB, dynorphin and glutamate and are postulated to provide an episodic, excitatory drive to gonadotropin-releasing hormone 1 (GnRH) neurons, the synaptic mechanisms of which are unknown. We characterized the cellular basis for synchronized Kiss1ARH neuronal activity using optogenetics, whole-cell electrophysiology, molecular pharmacology and single cell RT-PCR in mice. High-frequency photostimulation of Kiss1ARH neurons evoked local release of excitatory (NKB) and inhibitory (dynorphin) neuropeptides, which were found to synchronize the Kiss1ARH neuronal firing. The light-evoked synchronous activity caused robust excitation of GnRH neurons by a synaptic mechanism that also involved glutamatergic input to preoptic Kiss1 neurons from Kiss1ARH neurons. We propose that Kiss1ARH neurons play a dual role of driving episodic secretion of GnRH through the differential release of peptide and amino acid neurotransmitters to coordinate reproductive function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16246.001 PMID:27549338

  8. Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Replicon Particles Can Induce Rapid Protection against Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-San Segundo, Fayna; Dias, Camila C. A.; Moraes, Mauro P.; Weiss, Marcelo; Perez-Martin, Eva; Owens, Gary; Custer, Max; Kamrud, Kurt; de los Santos, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    We have previously shown that delivery of the porcine type I interferon gene (poIFN-α/β) with a replication-defective human adenovirus vector (adenovirus 5 [Ad5]) can sterilely protect swine challenged with foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) 1 day later. However, the need of relatively high doses of Ad5 limits the applicability of such a control strategy in the livestock industry. Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEE) empty replicon particles (VRPs) can induce rapid protection of mice against either homologous or, in some cases, heterologous virus challenge. As an alternative approach to induce rapid protection against FMDV, we have examined the ability of VRPs containing either the gene for green fluorescent protein (VRP-GFP) or poIFN-α (VRP-poIFN-α) to block FMDV replication in vitro and in vivo. Pretreatment of swine or bovine cell lines with either VRP significantly inhibited subsequent infection with FMDV as early as 6 h after treatment and for at least 120 h posttreatment. Furthermore, mice pretreated with either 107 or 108 infectious units of VRP-GFP and challenged with a lethal dose of FMDV 24 h later were protected from death. Protection was induced as early as 6 h after treatment and lasted for at least 48 h and correlated with induction of an antiviral response and production of IFN-α. By 6 h after treatment several genes were upregulated, and the number of genes and the level of induction increased at 24 h. Finally, we demonstrated that the chemokine IP-10, which is induced by IFN-α and VRP-GFP, is directly involved in protection against FMDV. PMID:23468490

  9. Puberty and Pubertal Growth in GH-treated SGA Children: Effects of 2 Years of GnRHa Versus No GnRHa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Steen, Manouk; Lem, Annemieke J; van der Kaay, Danielle C M; Hokken-Koèelega, Anita C S

    2016-05-01

    Most studies on puberty in children born small for gestational age (SGA) report height and age at onset of puberty. GH-treated SGA children with an adult height (AH) expectation below -2.5 SDS at onset of puberty can benefit from an additional 2 years of GnRH analog (GnRHa) treatment. There are no data on puberty and growth after discontinuation of GnRHa treatment in GH-treated SGA children. This study aimed to investigate the effects on puberty and pubertal growth of 2 years GnRHa vs no GnRHa in GH-treated SGA children. This was a GH trial involving 76 prepubertal short SGA children (36 girls) treated with GH. Thirty-two children received additional GnRHa for 2 years. Pubertal stages were 3-monthly assessed according to Tanner. Age, bone age, and median height at pubertal onset were lower in girls and boys in the GH/GnRHa group compared with the GH group. In girls and boys treated with GH/GnRHa, pubertal duration after stop of GnRHa treatment was shorter than pubertal duration in those with GH only (40.9 vs 46.7 mo; P = .044; 50.8 vs 57.5 months; P = .006; respectively). Height gain from onset of puberty until AH, including height gain during 2 years of GnRHa treatment, was 25.4 cm in girls and 33.0 cm in boys, which was 6.6 cm more than girls and boys treated with GH only. AH was similar in children treated with GH/GnRHa compared with those with GH only. GH-treated SGA children who start puberty with an AH expectation below -2.5 SDS and are treated with 2 years of GnRHa have a shorter pubertal duration after discontinuation of GnRHa compared with pubertal duration in children treated with GH only. Height gain from onset of puberty until AH is, however, more due to adequate growth during 2 years of GnRHa treatment resulting in a similar AH as children treated with GH only.

  10. Mental distress and personality in women undergoing GnRH agonist versus GnRH antagonist protocols for assisted reproductive technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenbæk, D. S.; Toftager, M.; Hjordt, L. V.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: Do mental distress and mood fluctuations in women undergoing GnRH agonist and GnRH antagonist protocols for assisted reproductive technology (ART) differ depending on protocol and the personality trait, neuroticism? SUMMARY ANSWER: ART treatment did not induce elevated levels...... of mental distress in either GnRH antagonist or agonist protocols but neuroticism was positively associated with increased mental distress, independent of protocols. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY: ART treatment may increase mental distress by mechanisms linked to sex hormone fluctuations. General psychological...... characteristics, such as personality traits indexing negative emotionality, e.g. neuroticism, are likely to affect mental distress during ART treatment. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION: A total of 83 women undergoing their first ART cycle were consecutively randomized 1:1 to GnRH antagonist (n = 42) or GnRH agonist...

  11. GnRH-I and GnRH-II-induced calcium signaling and hormone secretion in neonatal rat gonadotrophs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Balík, Aleš; Jindřichová, Marie; Bhattacharyya, Sharmistha; Zemková, Hana

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 5 (2009), s. 709-716 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/07/0681; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110702; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : gonadotrophs * GnRH-II * melatonin Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 1.430, year: 2009

  12. The comparision of effect of microdose GnRH-a flare-up, GnRH antagonist/aromatase inhibitor letrozole and GnRH antagonist/clomiphene citrate protocols on IVF outcomes in poor responder patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan Cenksoy, Pinar; Ficicioglu, Cem; Kizilkale, Ozge; Suhha Bostanci, Mehmet; Bakacak, Murat; Yesiladali, Mert; Kaspar, Cigdem

    2014-07-01

    To compare the effects of microdose GnRH-a flare-up, GnRH antagonist/aromatase inhibitor letrozole and GnRH antagonist/clomiphene citrate protocols on IVF outcomes in poor responder patients. Of 225 patients, 83 patients were in microdose flare-up group (Group 1), 70 patients were in GnRH antagonist/letrozole group (Group 2) and 72 patients were in GnRH antagonist/clomiphene citrate group (Group 3). Demographic and endocrine characteristics, the total number of oocytes retrieved, cancellation rate and clinical pregnancy rate were collected Results: Total dosage of gonadotropins (p=0.002) and serum E2 levels on the day of hCG administration (p=0.010) were significantly higher and duration of stimulations (p=0.03) was significantly longer in group 1. The number of oocytes retrieved was significantly greater in group 1 and 2 when compare to those of group 3 (p=0,000). There was a trend towards increasing cycle cancellation rates with GnRH antagonist/clomiphene citrate and GnRH antagonist/letrozole. Our finding suggest that the results of microdose flare-up protocol are better than other two used treatment protocols, in terms of maximum estradiol levels, number of mature oocytes retrieved, and cancellation rate and it still seems to be superior the ovarian stimulation regime for the poor responder patients.

  13. Differences in replicon behavior between x-irradiation-sensitive L5178Y mouse lymphoma cells and A-T fibroblasts using DNA fiber autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ockey, C.H.

    1983-01-01

    Replicon behavior in radiosensitive Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) fibroblasts and mouse lymphoma L5178Y (LS) cells was studied by DNA fiber autoradiography. LS cells, irradiated at 13 Gy, showed a similar reduction in rate of DNA chain growth and initiation of replicons as did resistant (LR) cells. A progressive increase in the intensity of [ 3 H]TdR labeling of many replicons was observed after irradition in the LS cells, but not in LR cells. This indicated a reduced or absent endogenous dTTP supply after irradiation in the LS cells, implicating a defect in nucleoside precursor production. Irradiated normal human and A-T cells did not show this effect. After 2 Gy, the frequency of initiation of replicons into synthesis was temporarily reduced in the normal human but not in the A-T cells. After 20 Gy, the rate of DNA chain growth was preferentially reduced in the normal human cells, but an increase was observed in the A-T cells. This increased rate could be explained in terms of a normal supply of complexes involved in chain elongation being distributed over a reduced number of initiated replicon clusters in the A-T cells

  14. ParABS Systems of the Four Replicons of Burkholderia cenocepacia: New Chromosome Centromeres Confer Partition Specificity†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubarry, Nelly; Pasta, Franck; Lane, David

    2006-01-01

    Most bacterial chromosomes carry an analogue of the parABS systems that govern plasmid partition, but their role in chromosome partition is ambiguous. parABS systems might be particularly important for orderly segregation of multipartite genomes, where their role may thus be easier to evaluate. We have characterized parABS systems in Burkholderia cenocepacia, whose genome comprises three chromosomes and one low-copy-number plasmid. A single parAB locus and a set of ParB-binding (parS) centromere sites are located near the origin of each replicon. ParA and ParB of the longest chromosome are phylogenetically similar to analogues in other multichromosome and monochromosome bacteria but are distinct from those of smaller chromosomes. The latter form subgroups that correspond to the taxa of their hosts, indicating evolution from plasmids. The parS sites on the smaller chromosomes and the plasmid are similar to the “universal” parS of the main chromosome but with a sequence specific to their replicon. In an Escherichia coli plasmid stabilization test, each parAB exhibits partition activity only with the parS of its own replicon. Hence, parABS function is based on the independent partition of individual chromosomes rather than on a single communal system or network of interacting systems. Stabilization by the smaller chromosome and plasmid systems was enhanced by mutation of parS sites and a promoter internal to their parAB operons, suggesting autoregulatory mechanisms. The small chromosome ParBs were found to silence transcription, a property relevant to autoregulation. PMID:16452432

  15. Evolutionary origin and divergence of GnIH and its homologous peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi; Osugi, Tomohiro

    2009-03-01

    Probing undiscovered hypothalamic neuropeptides that play important roles in the regulation of pituitary function in vertebrates is essential for the progress of neuroendocrinology. In 2000, we discovered a novel hypothalamic dodecapeptide inhibiting gonadotropin release in quail and termed it gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH). GnIH acts on the pituitary and gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons in the hypothalamus via a novel G protein-coupled receptor for GnIH to inhibit gonadal development and maintenance by decreasing gonadotropin release and synthesis. Similar findings were observed in other avian species. Thus, GnIH is a key factor controlling avian reproduction. To give our findings a broader perspective, we also found GnIH homologous peptides in the hypothalamus of other vertebrates, such as mammals, reptiles, amphibians and teleosts. GnIH and its homologs share a common C-terminal LPXRFamide (X=L or Q) motif. A mammalian GnIH homolog also inhibited gonadotropin release in mammals like the GnIH action in birds. In contrast to higher vertebrates, hypophysiotropic activities of GnIH homologs were different in lower vertebrates. To clarify the evolutionary origin of GnIH and its homologs, we further sought to identify novel LPXRFamide peptides from the brain of sea lamprey and hagfish, two extant groups of the oldest lineage of vertebrates, Agnatha. In these agnathans, LPXRFamide peptide and its cDNA were identified only from the brain of hagfish. Based on these findings over the past decade, this paper summarizes the evolutionary origin and divergence of GnIH and its homologous peptides.

  16. Gonadotrophin-inhibitory hormone receptor expression in the chicken pituitary gland: potential influence of sexual maturation and ovarian steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddineni, S; Ocón-Grove, O M; Krzysik-Walker, S M; Hendricks, G L; Proudman, J A; Ramachandran, R

    2008-09-01

    Gonadotrophin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH), a hypothalamic RFamide, has been found to inhibit gonadotrophin secretion from the anterior pituitary gland originally in birds and, subsequently, in mammalian species. The gene encoding a transmembrane receptor for GnIH (GnIHR) was recently identified in the brain, pituitary gland and gonads of song bird, chicken and Japanese quail. The objectives of the present study are to characterise the expression of GnIHR mRNA and protein in the chicken pituitary gland, and to determine whether sexual maturation and gonadal steroids influence pituitary GnIHR mRNA abundance. GnIHR mRNA quantity was found to be significantly higher in diencephalon compared to either anterior pituitary gland or ovaries. GnIHR mRNA quantity was significantly higher in the pituitaries of sexually immature chickens relative to sexually mature chickens. Oestradiol or a combination of oestradiol and progesterone treatment caused a significant decrease in pituitary GnIHR mRNA quantity relative to vehicle controls. GnIHR-immunoreactive (ir) cells were identified in the chicken pituitary gland cephalic and caudal lobes. Furthermore, GnIHR-ir cells were found to be colocalised with luteinising hormone (LH)beta mRNA-, or follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)beta mRNA-containing cells. GnIH treatment significantly decreased LH release from anterior pituitary gland slices collected from sexually immature, but not from sexually mature chickens. Taken together, GnIHR gene expression is possibly down regulated in response to a surge in circulating oestradiol and progesterone levels as the chicken undergoes sexual maturation to allow gonadotrophin secretion. Furthermore, GnIHR protein expressed in FSHbeta or LHbeta mRNA-containing cells is likely to mediate the inhibitory effect of GnIH on LH and FSH secretion.

  17. Structures of phlebovirus glycoprotein Gn and identification of a neutralizing antibody epitope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yan; Zhu, Yaohua; Gao, Feng; Jiao, Yongjun; Oladejo, Babayemi O; Chai, Yan; Bi, Yuhai; Lu, Shan; Dong, Mengqiu; Zhang, Chang; Huang, Guangmei; Wong, Gary; Li, Na; Zhang, Yanfang; Li, Yan; Feng, Wen-Hai; Shi, Yi; Liang, Mifang; Zhang, Rongguang; Qi, Jianxun; Gao, George F

    2017-09-05

    Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV) and Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) are two arthropod-borne phleboviruses in the Bunyaviridae family, which cause severe illness in humans and animals. Glycoprotein N (Gn) is one of the envelope proteins on the virus surface and is a major antigenic component. Despite its importance for virus entry and fusion, the molecular features of the phleboviruse Gn were unknown. Here, we present the crystal structures of the Gn head domain from both SFTSV and RVFV, which display a similar compact triangular shape overall, while the three subdomains (domains I, II, and III) making up the Gn head display different arrangements. Ten cysteines in the Gn stem region are conserved among phleboviruses, four of which are responsible for Gn dimerization, as revealed in this study, and they are highly conserved for all members in Bunyaviridae Therefore, we propose an anchoring mode on the viral surface. The complex structure of the SFTSV Gn head and human neutralizing antibody MAb 4-5 reveals that helices α6 in subdomain III is the key component for neutralization. Importantly, the structure indicates that domain III is an ideal region recognized by specific neutralizing antibodies, while domain II is probably recognized by broadly neutralizing antibodies. Collectively, Gn is a desirable vaccine target, and our data provide a molecular basis for the rational design of vaccines against the diseases caused by phleboviruses and a model for bunyavirus Gn embedding on the viral surface.

  18. Zebrafish adult-derived hypothalamic neurospheres generate gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Cortés-Campos

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH is a hypothalamic decapeptide essential for fertility in vertebrates. Human male patients lacking GnRH and treated with hormone therapy can remain fertile after cessation of treatment suggesting that new GnRH neurons can be generated during adult life. We used zebrafish to investigate the neurogenic potential of the adult hypothalamus. Previously we have characterized the development of GnRH cells in the zebrafish linking genetic pathways to the differentiation of neuromodulatory and endocrine GnRH cells in specific regions of the brain. Here, we developed a new method to obtain neural progenitors from the adult hypothalamus in vitro. Using this system, we show that neurospheres derived from the adult hypothalamus can be maintained in culture and subsequently differentiate glia and neurons. Importantly, the adult derived progenitors differentiate into neurons containing GnRH and the number of cells is increased through exposure to either testosterone or GnRH, hormones used in therapeutic treatment in humans. Finally, we show in vivo that a neurogenic niche in the hypothalamus contains GnRH positive neurons. Thus, we demonstrated for the first time that neurospheres can be derived from the hypothalamus of the adult zebrafish and that these neural progenitors are capable of producing GnRH containing neurons.

  19. Hormonal changes during GnRH analogue therapy in children with central precocious puberty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, J; Juul, A; Andersson, A M

    2000-01-01

    Gonadotropin releasing hormone analogues (GnRHa) have been used for treatment of central precocious puberty (CPP) for more than 15 years. They are generally considered safe although data on potential long-term side effects are scarce. However, GnRHa therapy has profound effects on both the hypoth......Gonadotropin releasing hormone analogues (GnRHa) have been used for treatment of central precocious puberty (CPP) for more than 15 years. They are generally considered safe although data on potential long-term side effects are scarce. However, GnRHa therapy has profound effects on both...

  20. Co-delivery of antigen and IL-12 by Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles enhances antigen-specific immune responses and anti-tumor effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osada, Takuya; Berglund, Peter; Morse, Michael A.; Hubby, Bolyn; Lewis, Whitney; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Hobeika, Amy; Burnett, Bruce; Devi, Gayathri R.; Clay, Timothy M.; Smith, Jonathan; Lyerly, H. Kim

    2013-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) virus-based replicon particles (VRP) encoding tumor antigens could break tolerance in the immunomodulatory environment of advanced cancer. We hypothesized that local injection of VRP expressing Interleukin-12 (IL-12) at the site of injections of VRP-based cancer vaccines would enhance the tumor-antigen-specific T cell and antibody responses and anti-tumor efficacy. Mice were immunized with VRP encoding the human tumor-associated antigen, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) (VRP-CEA(6D)) and VRP-IL-12 was also administered at the same site or at a distant location. CEA-specific T cell and antibody responses were measured. To determine antitumor activity, mice were implanted with MC38-CEA-2 cells and immunized with VRP-CEA with and without VRP-IL-12 and tumor growth and mouse survival were measured. VRP-IL-12 greatly enhanced CEA-specific T cell and antibody responses when combined with VRP-CEA(6D) vaccination. VRP IL-12 was superior to IL-12 protein at enhancing immune responses. Vaccination with VRP-CEA(6D) plus VRP-IL-12 was superior to VRP-CEA(6D) or VRP-IL-12 alone in inducing anti-tumor activity and prolonging survival in tumor-bearing mice. Importantly, local injection of VRP-IL-12 at the VRP-CEA(6D) injection site provided more potent activation of CEA-specific immune responses than VRP-IL-12 injected at a distant site from the VRP-CEA injections. Together, this study shows that VRP-IL-12 enhances vaccination with VRP-CEA(6D) and was more effective at activating CEA-specific T cell responses when locally expressed at the vaccine site. Clinical trials evaluating the adjuvant effect of VRP-IL-12 at enhancing the immunogenicity of cancer vaccines are warranted. PMID:22488274

  1. Viral-Associated GN: Hepatitis C and HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupin, Warren L

    2017-08-07

    Viruses are capable of inducing a wide spectrum of glomerular disorders that can be categorized on the basis of the duration of active viremia: acute, subacute, or chronic. The variable responses of the adaptive immune system to each time period of viral infection results mechanistically in different histologic forms of glomerular injury. The unique presence of a chronic viremic carrier state with either hepatitis C (HCV) or HIV has led to the opportunity to study in detail various pathogenic mechanisms of viral-induced glomerular injury, including direct viral infection of renal tissue and the development of circulating immune complexes composed of viral antigens that deposit along the glomerular basement membrane. Epidemiologic data show that approximately 25%-30% of all HIV patients are coinfected with HCV and 5%-10% of all HCV patients are coinfected with HIV. This situation can often lead to a challenging differential diagnosis when glomerular disease occurs in this dual-infected population and requires the clinician to be familiar with the clinical presentation, laboratory workup, and pathophysiology behind the development of renal disease for both HCV and HIV. Both of these viruses can be categorized under the new classification of infection-associated GN as opposed to being listed as causes of postinfectious GN as has previously been applied to them. Neither of these viruses lead to renal injury after a latent period of controlled and inactive viremia. The geneses of HCV- and HIV-associated glomerular diseases share a total dependence on the presence of active viral replication to sustain renal injury so the renal disease cannot be listed under "postinfectious" GN. With the new availability of direct-acting antivirals for HCV and more effective combined antiretroviral therapy for HIV, successful remission and even regression of glomerular lesions can be achieved if initiated at an early stage. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  2. Antiviral Activity and Resistance Analysis of NS3/4A Protease Inhibitor Grazoprevir and NS5A Inhibitor Elbasvir in Hepatitis C Virus GT4 Replicons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asante-Appiah, Ernest; Curry, Stephanie; McMonagle, Patricia; Ingravallo, Paul; Chase, Robert; Nickle, David; Qiu, Ping; Howe, Anita; Lahser, Frederick C

    2017-07-01

    Although genotype 4 (GT4)-infected patients represent a minor overall percentage of the global hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected population, the high prevalence of the genotype in specific geographic regions coupled with substantial sequence diversity makes it an important genotype to study for antiviral drug discovery and development. We evaluated two direct-acting antiviral agents-grazoprevir, an HCV NS3/4A protease inhibitor, and elbasvir, an HCV NS5A inhibitor-in GT4 replicons prior to clinical studies in this genotype. Following a bioinformatics analysis of available GT4 sequences, a set of replicons bearing representative GT4 clinical isolates was generated. For grazoprevir, the 50% effective concentration (EC 50 ) against the replicon bearing the reference GT4a (ED43) NS3 protease and NS4A was 0.7 nM. The median EC 50 for grazoprevir against chimeric replicons encoding NS3/4A sequences from GT4 clinical isolates was 0.2 nM (range, 0.11 to 0.33 nM; n = 5). The difficulty in establishing replicons bearing NS3/4A resistance-associated substitutions was substantially overcome with the identification of a G162R adaptive substitution in NS3. Single NS3 substitutions D168A/V identified from de novo resistance selection studies reduced grazoprevir antiviral activity by 137- and 47-fold, respectively, in the background of the G162R replicon. For elbasvir, the EC 50 against the replicon bearing the reference full-length GT4a (ED43) NS5A gene was 0.0002 nM. The median EC 50 for elbasvir against chimeric replicons bearing clinical isolates from GT4 was 0.0007 nM (range, 0.0002 to 34 nM; n = 14). De novo resistance selection studies in GT4 demonstrated a high propensity to suppress the emergence of amino acid substitutions that confer high-potency reductions to elbasvir. Phenotypic characterization of the NS5A amino acid substitutions identified (L30F, L30S, M31V, and Y93H) indicated that they conferred 15-, 4-, 2.5-, and 7.5-fold potency losses, respectively, to elbasvir

  3. Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Regulates Expression of the DNA Damage Repair Gene, Fanconi anemia A, in Pituitary Gonadotroph Cells1

    OpenAIRE

    Larder, Rachel; Chang, Lynda; Clinton, Michael; Brown, Pamela

    2004-01-01

    Gonadal function is critically dependant on regulated secretion of the gonadotropin hormones from anterior pituitary gonadotroph cells. Gonadotropin biosynthesis and release is triggered by the binding of hypothalamic GnRH to GnRH receptor expressed on the gonadotroph cell surface. The repertoire of regulatory molecules involved in this process are still being defined. We used the mouse LβT2 gonadotroph cell line, which expresses both gonadotropin hormones, as a model to investigate GnRH regu...

  4. Efficient in planta gene targeting in tomato using geminiviral replicons and the CRISPR/Cas9 system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahan-Meir, Tal; Filler-Hayut, Shdema; Melamed-Bessudo, Cathy; Bocobza, Samuel; Czosnek, Henryk; Aharoni, Asaph; Levy, Avraham A

    2018-04-18

    Current breeding relies mostly on random mutagenesis and recombination to generate novel genetic variation. However, targeted genome editing is becoming an increasingly important tool for precise plant breeding. Using the CRISPR-Cas system combined with the bean yellow dwarf virus rolling circle replicon we optimized a method for targeted mutagenesis and gene replacement in tomato. The carotenoid isomerase (CRTISO) and phytoene synthase 1 (PSY1) genes from the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway were chosen as targets due to their easily detectable change of phenotype. We took advantage of the geminiviral replicon amplification as a mean to provide a large amount of donor template for the repair of a CRISPR-Cas-induced DNA double strand break (DSB) in the target gene, via homologous recombination. Mutagenesis experiments, performed in the Micro-Tom variety achieved precise modification of the CRTISO and PSY1 loci at an efficiency of up to 90%. In the gene targeting experiments, our target was a fast-neutron-induced crtiso allele that contained a 281bp deletion. This deletion was repaired with the wildtype sequence through homologous recombination between the CRISPR-Cas-induced DSB in the crtiso target and the amplified donor in 25% of the plants transformed. This shows that efficient gene targeting can be achieved in the absence of selection markers or reporters using a single and modular construct that is adaptable to other tomato targets and other crops. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Distribution of cytomegalovirus gN variants and associated clinical sequelae in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradowska, Edyta; Jabłońska, Agnieszka; Studzińska, Mirosława; Suski, Patrycja; Kasztelewicz, Beata; Zawilińska, Barbara; Wiśniewska-Ligier, Małgorzata; Dzierżanowska-Fangrat, Katarzyna; Woźniakowska-Gęsicka, Teresa; Czech-Kowalska, Justyna; Lipka, Bożena; Kornacka, Maria; Pawlik, Dorota; Tomasik, Tomasz; Kosz-Vnenchak, Magdalena; Leśnikowski, Zbigniew J

    2013-09-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is the most widespread cause of congenital infection. The effects of various viral strains and viral loads on the infection outcome have been under debate. To determine the distribution of gN variants in HCMV strains isolated from children with congenital or postnatal infection and to establish the relationship between the viral genotype, the viral load, and the sequelae. The study population included congenitally HCMV-infected newborns and children with postnatal or unproven congenital HCMV infection. The genotyping was performed by RFLP analysis of PCR-amplified fragments, and the viral load was measured by quantitative real-time PCR. Our results demonstrated that the HCMV genotypes gN3b, gN4b, and gN4c were prevalent in the patients examined. There were no differences in the distributions of gN genotypes in the congenitally and postnatally infected children. Multiple HCMV strains were detected in both groups of children. A significant association between the HCMV gN4 genotype and the incidence of neurological disorders was observed (p=0.045). Our results suggest that the detection of the gN2 or the gN4 genotype may be indicative of serious manifestations in children. In contrast, the gN3b and the gN1 genotypes represent less pathogenic HCMV strains. The HCMV load in urine was significantly higher in children with congenital infection compared with children with postnatal infection. No correlation was found between the viral load and the genotype. Our results suggest that the gN genotype may be a virological marker of symptomatic HCMV infection in newborns. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Developmental Regulation of Gonadotropin-releasing Hormone Gene Expression by the MSX and DLX Homeodomain Protein Families*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Givens, Marjory L.; Rave-Harel, Naama; Goonewardena, Vinodha D.; Kurotani, Reiko; Berdy, Sara E.; Swan, Christo H.; Rubenstein, John L. R.; Robert, Benoit; Mellon, Pamela L.

    2010-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is the central regulator of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, controlling sexual maturation and fertility in diverse species from fish to humans. GnRH gene expression is limited to a discrete population of neurons that migrate through the nasal region into the hypothalamus during embryonic development. The GnRH regulatory region contains four conserved homeodomain binding sites (ATTA) that are essential for basal promoter activity and cell-specific expression of the GnRH gene. MSX and DLX are members of the Antennapedia class of non-Hox homeodomain transcription factors that regulate gene expression and influence development of the craniofacial structures and anterior forebrain. Here, we report that expression patterns of the Msx and Dlx families of homeodomain transcription factors largely coincide with the migratory route of GnRH neurons and co-express with GnRH in neurons during embryonic development. In addition, MSX and DLX family members bind directly to the ATTA consensus sequences and regulate transcriptional activity of the GnRH promoter. Finally, mice lacking MSX1 or DLX1 and 2 show altered numbers of GnRH-expressing cells in regions where these factors likely function. These findings strongly support a role for MSX and DLX in contributing to spatiotemporal regulation of GnRH transcription during development. PMID:15743757

  7. Developmental regulation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone gene expression by the MSX and DLX homeodomain protein families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Givens, Marjory L; Rave-Harel, Naama; Goonewardena, Vinodha D; Kurotani, Reiko; Berdy, Sara E; Swan, Christo H; Rubenstein, John L R; Robert, Benoit; Mellon, Pamela L

    2005-05-13

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is the central regulator of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, controlling sexual maturation and fertility in diverse species from fish to humans. GnRH gene expression is limited to a discrete population of neurons that migrate through the nasal region into the hypothalamus during embryonic development. The GnRH regulatory region contains four conserved homeodomain binding sites (ATTA) that are essential for basal promoter activity and cell-specific expression of the GnRH gene. MSX and DLX are members of the Antennapedia class of non-Hox homeodomain transcription factors that regulate gene expression and influence development of the craniofacial structures and anterior forebrain. Here, we report that expression patterns of the Msx and Dlx families of homeodomain transcription factors largely coincide with the migratory route of GnRH neurons and co-express with GnRH in neurons during embryonic development. In addition, MSX and DLX family members bind directly to the ATTA consensus sequences and regulate transcriptional activity of the GnRH promoter. Finally, mice lacking MSX1 or DLX1 and 2 show altered numbers of GnRH-expressing cells in regions where these factors likely function. These findings strongly support a role for MSX and DLX in contributing to spatiotemporal regulation of GnRH transcription during development.

  8. GnRH Antagonist/Letrozole Versus Microdose GnRH Agonist Flare Protocol in Poor Responders Undergoing In Vitro Fertilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robab Davar

    2010-09-01

    Conclusion: The addition of letrozole to the GnRH antagonist for poor responders does not improve the outcome of assisted reproductive technology cycles. The MF protocol remains the most appropriate protocol in poor responders.

  9. Lactobacillus rhamnosus accelerates zebrafish backbone calcification and gonadal differentiation through effects on the GnRH and IGF systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo A Avella

    Full Text Available Endogenous microbiota play essential roles in the host's immune system, physiology, reproduction and nutrient metabolism. We hypothesized that a continuous administration of an exogenous probiotic might also influence the host's development. Thus, we treated zebrafish from birth to sexual maturation (2-months treatment with Lactobacillus rhamnosus, a probiotic species intended for human use. We monitored for the presence of L. rhamnosus during the entire treatment. Zebrafish at 6 days post fertilization (dpf exhibited elevated gene expression levels for Insulin-like growth factors -I and -II, Peroxisome proliferator activated receptors -α and -β, VDR-α and RAR-γ when compared to untreated-10 days old zebrafish. Using a gonadotropin-releasing hormone 3 GFP transgenic zebrafish (GnRH3-GFP, higher GnRH3 expression was found at 6, 8 and 10 dpf upon L. rhamnosus treatment. The same larvae exhibited earlier backbone calcification and gonad maturation. Noteworthy in the gonad development was the presence of first testes differentiation at 3 weeks post fertilization in the treated zebrafish population -which normally occurs at 8 weeks- and a dramatic sex ratio modulation (93% females, 7% males in control vs. 55% females, 45% males in the treated group. We infer that administration of L. rhamnosus stimulated the IGF system, leading to a faster backbone calcification. Moreover we hypothesize a role for administration of L. rhamnosus on GnRH3 modulation during early larval development, which in turn affects gonadal development and sex differentiation. These findings suggest a significant role of the microbiota composition on the host organism development profile and open new perspectives in the study of probiotics usage and application.

  10. Live birth in a 46-year-old woman using microdose GnRH agonist flare-up protocol combined with GnRH antagonist: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Liu, Ya-Qiong; Lu, Guang-Xiu; Gong, Fei

    2016-12-01

    Few successful pregnancies after age 45 years with low ovarian reserve have been reported. We report a 46-year-old woman with basal FSH 20.36 mIU/mL and an antral follicle count of four obtained two embryos and delivered a healthy infant with IVF using a microdose GnRH-a flare-up protocol combined with GnRH-ant.

  11. Low-dose add-back therapy during postoperative GnRH agonist treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiao-Wen Tsai

    2016-02-01

    Conclusion: Low dose add-back therapy could effectively ameliorate hypoestrogenic side effects and simultaneously maintain the therapeutic response of GnRH agonist treatment. The treatment dropout was lower compared with a regular dose. Therefore, low dose add-back therapy can be considered a treatment choice during postoperative GnRH agonist treatment.

  12. Neutrophil Extracellular Trap-Related Extracellular Histones Cause Vascular Necrosis in Severe GN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Santhosh V R; Kulkarni, Onkar P; Mulay, Shrikant R; Darisipudi, Murthy N; Romoli, Simone; Thomasova, Dana; Scherbaum, Christina R; Hohenstein, Bernd; Hugo, Christian; Müller, Susanna; Liapis, Helen; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2015-10-01

    Severe GN involves local neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation. We hypothesized a local cytotoxic effect of NET-related histone release in necrotizing GN. In vitro, histones from calf thymus or histones released by neutrophils undergoing NETosis killed glomerular endothelial cells, podocytes, and parietal epithelial cells in a dose-dependent manner. Histone-neutralizing agents such as antihistone IgG, activated protein C, or heparin prevented this effect. Histone toxicity on glomeruli ex vivo was Toll-like receptor 2/4 dependent, and lack of TLR2/4 attenuated histone-induced renal thrombotic microangiopathy and glomerular necrosis in mice. Anti-glomerular basement membrane GN involved NET formation and vascular necrosis, whereas blocking NET formation by peptidylarginine inhibition or preemptive anti-histone IgG injection significantly reduced all aspects of GN (i.e., vascular necrosis, podocyte loss, albuminuria, cytokine induction, recruitment or activation of glomerular leukocytes, and glomerular crescent formation). To evaluate histones as a therapeutic target, mice with established GN were treated with three different histone-neutralizing agents. Anti-histone IgG, recombinant activated protein C, and heparin were equally effective in abrogating severe GN, whereas combination therapy had no additive effects. Together, these results indicate that NET-related histone release during GN elicits cytotoxic and immunostimulatory effects. Furthermore, neutralizing extracellular histones is still therapeutic when initiated in established GN. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  13. Bilateral Salpingo-Oophorectomy Versus GnRH Analogue in the Adjuvant Treatment of Premenopausal Breast Cancer Patients: Cost-Effectiveness Evaluation of Breast Cancer Outcome, Ovarian Cancer Prevention and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrandina, Gabriella; Amadio, Giulia; Marcellusi, Andrea; Azzolini, Elena; Puggina, Anna; Pastorino, Roberta; Ricciardi, Walter; Scambia, Giovanni

    2017-11-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: There is no available evidence to recommend gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogue-based ovarian suppression versus bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (BSO) in the adjuvant treatment of early breast cancer, since the two approaches are considered equivalent in terms of oncologic outcome. The role of surgical ovarian ablation has been revitalized based on the advances of minimally invasive surgery, and a better understanding of clinical and molecular basis of hereditary breast/ovarian cancer syndromes. The aim of this study is to analyze the cost-effectiveness of laparoscopic BSO and GnRH analogue administration in patients aged 40-49 years with hormone-sensitive breast cancer. A probabilistic decision tree model was developed to evaluate costs and outcomes of ovarian ablation through laparoscopic BSO, or ovarian suppression through monthly injections of GnRH analogue. Results were expressed as incremental costs per quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) gained. Laparoscopic BSO strategy was associated with a lower mean total cost per patient than GnRH treatment, and considering the difference in terms of QALYs, the incremental effectiveness did not demonstrate a notable difference between the two approaches. From the National Health Service perspective, and for a time horizon of 5 years, laparoscopic BSO was the dominant option compared to GnRH treatment; laparoscopic BSO was less expensive than GnRH, €2385 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 2044, 2753] vs €7093 (95% CI = 3409, 12,105), respectively, and more effective. Surgical ovarian ablation is more cost-effective than GnRH administration in the adjuvant treatment of hormone-sensitive breast cancer patients aged 40-49 years, and the advantage of preventing ovarian cancer through laparoscopic BSO should be considered.

  14. Microdose Flare-up Gonadotropin-releasing Hormone (GnRH) Agonist Versus GnRH Antagonist Protocols in Poor Ovarian Responders Undergoing Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boza, Aysen; Cakar, Erbil; Boza, Barıs; Api, Murat; Kayatas, Semra; Sofuoglu, Kenan

    2016-01-01

    Microdose flare-up GnRH agonist and GnRH antagonist have become more popular in the management of poor ovarian responders (POR) in recent years; however, the optimal protocol for POR patients undergoing in vitro fertilization has still been a challenge. In this observational study design, two hundred forty four poor ovarian responders were retrospectively evaluated for their response to GnRH agonist protocol (group-1, n=135) or GnRH antagonist protocol (group-2, n=109). Clinical pregnancy rate was the primary end point and was compared between the groups. Student t-test, Mann Whitney U test and χ (2)-test were used to compare the groups. The pmicrodose flare-up protocol has favorable outcomes with respect to the number of oocytes retrieved and implantation rate; nevertheless, the clinical pregnancy rate was found to be similar in comparison to GnRH antagonist protocol in poor ovarian responders. GnRH antagonist protocol appears to be promising with significantly lower gonadotropin requirement and lower treatment cost in poor ovarian responders.

  15. GnRH agonist trigger for the induction of oocyte maturation in GnRH antagonist IVF cycles: a SWOT analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engmann, Lawrence; Benadiva, Claudio; Humaidan, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Gonadotrophin releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) trigger is effective in the induction of oocyte maturation and prevention of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome during IVF treatment. This trigger concept, however, results in early corpora lutea demise and consequently luteal phase dysfunction and impaired endometrial receptivity. The aim of this strenghths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats analysis was to summarize the progress made over the past 15 years to optimize ongoing pregnancy rates after GnRHa trigger. The advantages and potential drawbacks of this type of triggering are reviewed. The current approach to the management of GnRHa trigger in autologous cycles is based on the peak serum oestradiol level or follicle number and aims at a fresh embryo transfer or a segmentation approach with elective cryopreservation policy. We recommend intensive luteal support with transdermal oestradiol and intramuscular progesterone alone if peak serum oestradiol is 4000 or more pg/ml after GnRHa trigger or dual trigger with GnRHa and HCG 1000 IU if peak serum oestradiol is less than 4000 pg/mL. On the contrary, we recommend HCG 1500 IU 35 h after GnRHa trigger if there are less than 25 follicles, or freeze all oocytes or embryos if there are over 25 follicles. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Pregnancy outcome of “delayed start” GnRH antagonist protocol versus GnRH antagonist protocol in poor responders: A clinical trial study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Aflatoonian

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Management of poor-responding patients is still major challenge in assisted reproductive techniques (ART. Delayed-start GnRH antagonist protocol is recommended to these patients, but little is known in this regards. Objective: The goal of this study was assessment of delayed-start GnRH antagonist protocol in poor responders, and in vitro fertilization (IVF outcomes. Materials and Methods: This randomized clinical trial included sixty infertile women with Bologna criteria for ovarian poor responders who were candidate for IVF. In case group (n=30, delayed-start GnRH antagonist protocol administered estrogen priming followed by early follicular-phase GnRH antagonist treatment for 7 days before ovarian stimulation with gonadotropin. Control group (n=30 treated with estrogen priming antagonist protocol. Finally, endometrial thickness, the rates of oocytes maturation, , embryo formation, and pregnancy were compared between two groups. Results: Rates of implantation, chemical, clinical, and ongoing pregnancy in delayed-start cycles were higher although was not statistically significant. Endometrial thickness was significantly higher in case group. There were no statistically significant differences in the rates of oocyte maturation, embryo formation, and IVF outcomes between two groups. Conclusion: There is no significant difference between delayed-start GnRH antagonist protocol versus GnRH antagonist protocol.

  17. Characterization of pMC11, a plasmid with dual origins of replication isolated from Lactobacillus casei MCJ and construction of shuttle vectors with each replicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Zhengjun; Lin, Jinzhong; Ma, Chengjie

    2014-01-01

    . These plasmids showed distinct properties: pEL5.7 was capable of replicating in L. casei MCJΔ1 and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactic LBCH-1 but failed to do so in two other tested lactobacilli strains whereas pEL5.6 replicated in three different strains, including L. casei MCJΔ1, L. casei NJ, Lactobacillus......Many lactic acid bacteria carry different plasmids, particularly those that replicate via a theta mechanism. Here we describe Lactobacillus casei MCJ(CCTCC AB20130356), a new isolate that contains pMC11, carrying two distinct theta-type replicons. Each replicon contained an iteron in the origin...... of replication (oriV1 or oriV2) and a gene coding for the replicase (RepA_1 or RepB_1), both of which are essential for plasmid replication. Escherichia coli/Lactobacillus shuttle vectors were constructed with each replicon, yielding pEL5.7 and pEL5.6 that are based on oriV2 and oriV1 replicons, respectively...

  18. GnRH antagonist versus long agonist protocols in IVF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambalk, C B; Banga, F R; Huirne, J A

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Most reviews of IVF ovarian stimulation protocols have insufficiently accounted for various patient populations, such as ovulatory women, women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) or women with poor ovarian response, and have included studies in which the agonist or antagonist...... was not the only variable between the compared study arms. OBJECTIVE AND RATIONALE: The aim of the current study was to compare GnRH antagonist protocols versus standard long agonist protocols in couples undergoing IVF or ICSI, while accounting for various patient populations and treatment schedules. SEARCH...... in couples undergoing IVF or ICSI. The primary outcome was ongoing pregnancy rate. Secondary outcomes were: live birth rate, clinical pregnancy rate, number of oocytes retrieved and safety with regard to ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS). Separate comparisons were performed for the general IVF...

  19. Burkholderia xenovorans LB400 harbors a multi-replicon, 9.73-Mbp genome shaped for versatility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chain, Patrick S G; Denef, Vincent J; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T; Vergez, Lisa M; Agulló, Loreine; Reyes, Valeria Latorre; Hauser, Loren; Córdova, Macarena; Gómez, Luis; González, Myriam; Land, Miriam; Lao, Victoria; Larimer, Frank; LiPuma, John J; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar; Malfatti, Stephanie A; Marx, Christopher J; Parnell, J Jacob; Ramette, Alban; Richardson, Paul; Seeger, Michael; Smith, Daryl; Spilker, Theodore; Sul, Woo Jun; Tsoi, Tamara V; Ulrich, Luke E; Zhulin, Igor B; Tiedje, James M

    2006-10-17

    Burkholderia xenovorans LB400 (LB400), a well studied, effective polychlorinated biphenyl-degrader, has one of the two largest known bacterial genomes and is the first nonpathogenic Burkholderia isolate sequenced. From an evolutionary perspective, we find significant differences in functional specialization between the three replicons of LB400, as well as a more relaxed selective pressure for genes located on the two smaller vs. the largest replicon. High genomic plasticity, diversity, and specialization within the Burkholderia genus are exemplified by the conservation of only 44% of the genes between LB400 and Burkholderia cepacia complex strain 383. Even among four B. xenovorans strains, genome size varies from 7.4 to 9.73 Mbp. The latter is largely explained by our findings that >20% of the LB400 sequence was recently acquired by means of lateral gene transfer. Although a range of genetic factors associated with in vivo survival and intercellular interactions are present, these genetic factors are likely related to niche breadth rather than determinants of pathogenicity. The presence of at least eleven "central aromatic" and twenty "peripheral aromatic" pathways in LB400, among the highest in any sequenced bacterial genome, supports this hypothesis. Finally, in addition to the experimentally observed redundancy in benzoate degradation and formaldehyde oxidation pathways, the fact that 17.6% of proteins have a better LB400 paralog than an ortholog in a different genome highlights the importance of gene duplication and repeated acquirement, which, coupled with their divergence, raises questions regarding the role of paralogs and potential functional redundancies in large-genome microbes.

  20. Burkholderia xernovorans LB400 harbors a multi-replicon, 9.73-Mbp genome shaped for versatility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chain, Patrick S. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Denef, Vincent [University of California, Berkeley; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Vergez, Lisa [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Agullo, Loreine [Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Casilla 110-V; Reyes, Valeria Latorre [Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Casilla 110-V; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Cordova, Macarena [Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Casilla 110-V; Gomez, Luis [Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Casilla 110-V; Gonzalez, Myriam [Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Casilla 110-V; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Lao, Victoria [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Larimer, Frank W [ORNL; LiPuma, John J [University of Michigan; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar [Cardiff University, Wales; Malfatti, Stephanie [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Marx, Christopher J [Harvard University; Parnell, J Jacob [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Ramette, Alban [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Richardson, P M [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Seeger, Michael [Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Casilla 110-V; Smith, Daryl [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Spilker, Theodore [University of Michigan; Sul, Woo Jun [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Tsoi, Tamara V [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Zhulin, Igor B [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Tiedje, James M. [Michigan State University, East Lansing

    2006-01-01

    Burkholderia xenovorans LB400 (LB400), a well studied, effective polychlorinated biphenyl-degrader, has one of the two largest known bacterial genomes and is the first nonpathogenic Burkholderia isolate sequenced. From an evolutionary perspective, we find significant differences in functional specialization between the three replicons of LB400, as well as a more relaxed selective pressure for genes located on the two smaller vs. the largest replicon. High genomic plasticity, diversity, and specialization within the Burkholderia genus are exemplified by the conservation of only 44% of the genes between LB400 and Burkholderia cepacia complex strain 383. Even among four B. xenovorans strains, genome size varies from 7.4 to 9.73 Mbp. The latter is largely explained by our findings that >20% of the LB400 sequence was recently acquired by means of lateral gene transfer. Although a range of genetic factors associated with in vivo survival and intercellular interactions are present, these genetic factors are likely related to niche breadth rather than determinants of pathogenicity. The presence of at least eleven 'central aromatic' and twenty 'peripheral aromatic' pathways in LB400, among the highest in any sequenced bacterial genome, supports this hypothesis. Finally, in addition to the experimentally observed redundancy in benzoate degradation and formaldehyde oxidation pathways, the fact that 17.6% of proteins have a better LB400 paralog than an ortholog in a different genome highlights the importance of gene duplication and repeated acquirement, which, coupled with their divergence, raises questions regarding the role of paralogs and potential functional redundancies in large-genome microbes.

  1. Social Isolation Modulates CLOCK Protein and Beta-Catenin Expression Pattern in Gonadotropin-Inhibitory Hormone Neurons in Male Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuin Hau Teo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Postweaning social isolation reduces the amplitude of the daily variation of CLOCK protein in the brain and induces lower reproductive activity. Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH acts as an inhibitor in the reproductive system and has been linked to stress. Social isolation has been shown to lower neuronal activity of GnIH-expressing neurons in the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH. The exact mechanism by which social isolation may affect GnIH is still unclear. We investigated the impact of social isolation on regulatory cellular mechanisms in GnIH neurons. We examined via immunohistochemistry the expression of CLOCK protein at four different times throughout the day in GnIH cells tagged with enhanced fluorescent green protein (EGFP-GnIH in 9-week-old adult male rats that have been raised for 6 weeks under postweaning social isolation and compared them with group-raised control rats of the same age. We also studied the expression of β-catenin—which has been shown to be affected by circadian proteins such as Bmal1—in EGFP-GnIH neurons to determine whether it could play a role in linking CLOCK in GnIH neurons. We found that social isolation modifies the pattern of CLOCK expression in GnIH neurons in the DMH. Socially isolated rats displayed greater CLOCK expression in the dark phase, while control rats displayed increased CLOCK expression in the light phase. Furthermore, β-catenin expression pattern in GnIH cells was disrupted by social isolation. This suggests that social isolation triggers changes in CLOCK and GnIH expression, which may be associated with an increase in nuclear β-catenin during the dark phase.

  2. Social Isolation Modulates CLOCK Protein and Beta-Catenin Expression Pattern in Gonadotropin-Inhibitory Hormone Neurons in Male Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Chuin Hau; Soga, Tomoko; Parhar, Ishwar S

    2017-01-01

    Postweaning social isolation reduces the amplitude of the daily variation of CLOCK protein in the brain and induces lower reproductive activity. Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) acts as an inhibitor in the reproductive system and has been linked to stress. Social isolation has been shown to lower neuronal activity of GnIH-expressing neurons in the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH). The exact mechanism by which social isolation may affect GnIH is still unclear. We investigated the impact of social isolation on regulatory cellular mechanisms in GnIH neurons. We examined via immunohistochemistry the expression of CLOCK protein at four different times throughout the day in GnIH cells tagged with enhanced fluorescent green protein (EGFP-GnIH) in 9-week-old adult male rats that have been raised for 6 weeks under postweaning social isolation and compared them with group-raised control rats of the same age. We also studied the expression of β-catenin-which has been shown to be affected by circadian proteins such as Bmal1-in EGFP-GnIH neurons to determine whether it could play a role in linking CLOCK in GnIH neurons. We found that social isolation modifies the pattern of CLOCK expression in GnIH neurons in the DMH. Socially isolated rats displayed greater CLOCK expression in the dark phase, while control rats displayed increased CLOCK expression in the light phase. Furthermore, β-catenin expression pattern in GnIH cells was disrupted by social isolation. This suggests that social isolation triggers changes in CLOCK and GnIH expression, which may be associated with an increase in nuclear β-catenin during the dark phase.

  3. Genetics of Isolated Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism: Role of GnRH Receptor and Other Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karges Beate

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypothalamic gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH is a key player in normal puberty and sexual development and function. Genetic causes of isolated hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH have been identified during the recent years affecting the synthesis, secretion, or action of GnRH. Developmental defects of GnRH neurons and the olfactory bulb are associated with hyposmia, rarely associated with the clinical phenotypes of synkinesia, cleft palate, ear anomalies, or choanal atresia, and may be due to mutations of KAL1, FGFR1/FGF8, PROKR2/PROK2, or CHD7. Impaired GnRH secretion in normosmic patients with IHH may be caused by deficient hypothalamic GPR54/KISS1, TACR3/TAC3, and leptinR/leptin signalling or mutations within the GNRH1 gene itself. Normosmic IHH is predominantly caused by inactivating mutations in the pituitary GnRH receptor inducing GnRH resistance, while mutations of the β-subunits of LH or FSH are very rare. Inheritance of GnRH deficiency may be oligogenic, explaining variable phenotypes. Future research should identify additional genes involved in the complex network of normal and disturbed puberty and reproduction.

  4. EXPRESSION AND SELF-ASSEMBLY OF NORWALK VIRUS CAPSID PROTEIN FROM VENEZUELAN EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS VIRUS REPLICONS. (R826139)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  5. N-Glycans on the Rift Valley Fever Virus Envelope Glycoproteins Gn and Gc Redundantly Support Viral Infection via DC-SIGN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phoenix, Inaia; Nishiyama, Shoko; Lokugamage, Nandadeva; Hill, Terence E.; Huante, Matthew B.; Slack, Olga A.L.; Carpio, Victor H.; Freiberg, Alexander N.; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2016-01-01

    Rift Valley fever is a mosquito-transmitted, zoonotic disease that infects humans and ruminants. Dendritic cell specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3 (ICAM-3) grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) acts as a receptor for members of the phlebovirus genus. The Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) glycoproteins (Gn/Gc) encode five putative N-glycan sequons (asparagine (N)–any amino acid (X)–serine (S)/threonine (T)) at positions: N438 (Gn), and N794, N829, N1035, and N1077 (Gc). The N-glycosylation profile and significance in viral infection via DC-SIGN have not been elucidated. Gc N-glycosylation was first evaluated by using Gc asparagine (N) to glutamine (Q) mutants. Subsequently, we generated a series of recombinant RVFV MP-12 strain mutants, which encode N-to-Q mutations, and the infectivity of each mutant in Jurkat cells stably expressing DC-SIGN was evaluated. Results showed that Gc N794, N1035, and N1077 were N-glycosylated but N829 was not. Gc N1077 was heterogeneously N-glycosylated. RVFV Gc made two distinct N-glycoforms: “Gc-large” and “Gc-small”, and N1077 was responsible for “Gc-large” band. RVFV showed increased infection of cells expressing DC-SIGN compared to cells lacking DC-SIGN. Infection via DC-SIGN was increased in the presence of either Gn N438 or Gc N1077. Our study showed that N-glycans on the Gc and Gn surface glycoproteins redundantly support RVFV infection via DC-SIGN. PMID:27223297

  6. In vitro regulation of LH biosynthesis and release by GnRH and estradiol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramey, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    Anterior pituitaries were taken from female rats at random stages of the estrous cycle, enzymatically dispersed, and cultured for 48h in steroid-free α-modified Eagles medium followed by 24h in fresh medium +/- estradiol (E 2 ). The pituitary cells were then incubated in fresh medium containing radiolabeled precursors +/- gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH). Radioactive precursor incorporation into LH was determined by immuno-precipitation. The dose-dependent effects of E 2 (10 -11 to 10 -8 M) on 3 H-glucosamine ( 3 H-Gln) and 35 S-methionine ( 35 S-Met) incorporation into LH +/- 1 nM GnRH (4h) were investigated. GnRH (10 -9 M) and E 2 (all doses) significantly increased total 3 H-Gln LH. Moreover, E 2 at 10 -9 M and 10 -8 M significantly enhanced GnRH stimulated LH glycosylation. In contrast, addition of GnRH and/or E 2 did not significantly increase 35 S-Met incorporation into LH over a 4h period. The effects of various GnRH concentrations (10 -11 to 10 -9 M; 8h) +/- E 2 (0.05 nM) on 3 H-Gln LH and 35 S-Met LH production were also investigated. In the absence of E 2 , only 10 -9 M GnRH was effective in increasing total 3 H-Gln LH and 35 S-Met LH synthesis. However, in the presence of E 2 , all concentrations of GnRH stimulated LH synthesis with 3 H-Gln LH production responding in a dose related manner whereas 35 S-Met LH production was maximally stimulated at all doses of GnRH. In the final series of experiments, pituitary cells previously exposed to estradiol were incubated for 4 h in normal calcium or low calcium medium containing 3 H-Gln or 35 S-Met +/- GnRH. Removal of extracellular calcium completely inhibited GnRH stimulated 3 H-Gln LH and 35 S-Met LH production

  7. Microdose GnRH Agonist Flare-Up versus Ultrashort GnRH Agonist Combined with Fixed GnRH Antagonist in Poor Responders of Assisted Reproductive Techniques Cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Khani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study compares the microdose flare-up protocol to the ultrashort gonadotropinreleasinghormone (GnRH agonist flare combined with the fixed multidose GnRH antagonistprotocol in poor responders undergoing ovarian stimulation.Materials and Methods: In this randomized clinical trial, 120 women who were candidates forassisted reproductive techniques (ART and had histories of one or more failed in vitro fertilization(IVF cycles with three or fewer retrieved oocytes were prospectively randomized into two groups.Group I (60 patients received the microdose flare-up regimen and group II (60 patients receivedthe ultrashort GnRH agonist combined with fixed GnRH antagonist.Results: There were no significant differences between the groups in the number of used gonadotropinampoules (p=0.591, duration of stimulation (p=0.610, number of retrieved oocytes (p=0.802,fertilization rate (p=0.456, and the number of transferred embryos (p=0.954. The clinical pregnancyrates were statistically similar in group I (10% compared with group II (13.3%, p=0.389.Conclusion: According to our results, there is no significant difference between these protocolsfor improving the ART outcome in poor responders. Additional prospective, randomizedstudies with more patients is necessary to determine the best protocol (Registration Number:IRCT201105096420N1.

  8. Microdose GnRH Agonist Flare-Up versus Ultrashort GnRH Agonist Combined with Fixed GnRH Antagonist in Poor Responders of Assisted Reproductive Techniques Cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eftekhar, Maryam; Mohammadian, Farnaz; Yousefnejad, Fariba; Khani, Parisa

    2013-01-01

    This study compares the microdose flare-up protocol to the ultrashort gonadotropinreleasing hormone (GnRH) agonist flare combined with the fixed multidose GnRH antagonist protocol in poor responders undergoing ovarian stimulation. In this randomized clinical trial, 120 women who were candidates for assisted reproductive techniques (ART) and had histories of one or more failed in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles with three or fewer retrieved oocytes were prospectively randomized into two groups. Group I (60 patients) received the microdose flare-up regimen and group II (60 patients) received the ultrashort GnRH agonist combined with fixed GnRH antagonist. There were no significant differences between the groups in the number of used gonadotropin ampoules (p=0.591), duration of stimulation (p=0.610), number of retrieved oocytes (p=0.802), fertilization rate (p=0.456), and the number of transferred embryos (p=0.954). The clinical pregnancy rates were statistically similar in group I (10%) compared with group II (13.3%, p=0.389). According to our results, there is no significant difference between these protocols for improving the ART outcome in poor responders. Additional prospective, randomized studies with more patients is necessary to determine the best protocol (Registration Number: IRCT201105096420N1).

  9. Bakteriochlorophyllvorstufen und Pigment-Protein-Komplexe in Rhodospirillum rubrum ST3 und GN11

    OpenAIRE

    Hammel, Jörg U.

    2006-01-01

    In der vorliegenden Arbeit wurden zwei Mutanten des Alpha-Proteobakteriums Rhodospirillum rubrum untersucht, die im Bakteriochlorophyll-Biosyntheseweg unterbrochen sind, um einen Beitrag zum genaueren Verständnis der Biosynthese dieser Moleküle und der einzelnen daran beteiligten Schritte zu liefern. Von den beiden Stämmen ST3 und GN11 wurden die ins Kulturmedium ausgeschiedenen Pigmente aufgereinigt und spektroskopisch analysiert. Ebenfalls wurden sowohl von ST3, als auch von GN11 die in int...

  10. Evolution of International Space Station GN&C System Across ISS Assembly Stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Roscoe; Frank, K. D. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The Guidance Navigation and Control (GN&C) system for the International Space Station is initially implemented by the Functional Cargo Block (FGB) which was built by the Khrunichev Space Center under direct contract to Boeing. This element (Stage 1A/R) was launched on 20 November 1998 and is currently operating on-orbit. The components and capabilities of the FGB Motion Control System (MCS) are described. The next ISS element, which has GN&C functionality will be the Service Module (SM) built by Rocket Space Corporation-Energia. This module is scheduled for launch (Stage 1R) in early 2000. Following activation of the SM GN&C system, the FGB MCS is deactivated and no longer used. The components and capabilities of the SM GN&C system are described. When a Progress vehicle is attached to the ISS it can be used for reboost operations, based on commands provided by the Mission Control Center-Moscow. When a data connection is implemented between the SM and the Progress, the SM can command the Progress thrusters for attitude control and reboosts. On Stage 5A, the U.S. GN&C system will become activated when the U.S. Laboratory is de loyed and installed (launch schedule is currently TBD). The U.S. GN&C system provides non-propulsive control capabilities to support micro-gravity operations and minimize the use of propellant for attitude control, and an independent capability for determining the ISS state vector, attitude, attitude rate. and time.. The components and capabilities of the U.S. GN&C system are described and the interactions between the U.S. and Russian Segment GN&C systems are also described.

  11. Antibodies against gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in patients with diabetes mellitus is associated with lower body weight and autonomic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berntorp, Kerstin; Frid, Anders; Alm, Ragnar; Fredrikson, Gunilla Nordin; Sjöberg, Klas; Ohlsson, Bodil

    2013-08-17

    Esophageal dysmotility and gastroparesis are common secondary complications in patients with diabetes mellitus. Patients with dysmotility express antibodies against gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in serum. The aim of the present study was to scrutinize patients with diabetes mellitus with regard to the presence of GnRH antibodies, and to examine associations between antibodies and clinical findings. Thirty-nine consecutive patients with diabetes mellitus were included in the study after clinical examination and examination by esophageal manometry and gastric emptying scintigraphy. Serum was analyzed for the presence of antibodies against GnRH using an ELISA, and values are expressed as relative units (RU). Two age- and gender-matched healthy subjects per each patient served as controls. The prevalence of IgM GnRH antibodies in patients was 33% compared to 14% in controls (p = 0.027), with a higher antibody titer; 1.2 (0.6-5.0) and 0.2 (0.1-0.3) RU, respectively (p = 0.000). The expression of IgG antibodies was 15% in patients and none in controls (p = 0.000). Lower body mass index was associated with the presence of IgM antibodies (OR = 0.835, 95% CI = 0.699-0.998), and autonomic neuropathy with the presence IgG antibodies (OR = 9.000, 95% CI = 1.327-61.025). Esophageal dysmotility (69%) or gastroparesis (18%) were not associated with the presence of IgM antibodies (OR = 0.589, 95% CI = 0.143-2.424 and OR = 3.407, 95% CI = 0.633-18.350, respectively). Neither was esophageal dysmotility associated with IgG antibodies (OR = 2.500, 95% CI = 0.259-24.096). Antibodies against GnRH are more common in patients with diabetes mellitus compared with healthy controls. IgM antibodies are associated with lower body mass index and IgG antibodies are associated with autonomic neuropathy.

  12. Evaluation of GnRH analogue testing in diagnosis and management of children with pubertal disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemchand K Prasad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH stimulation test is pivotal in the assessment of children with pubertal disorders. However, lack of availability and high cost often result in the test falling into disfavor. We routinely use the GnRH analogue stimulation test as an alternative at our center. Aim: To present the data on children with endocrine disorders who underwent GnRH agonist stimulation test in pediatric endocrine clinic of a tertiary care referral hospital. Setting and Design: Pediatric endocrine clinic of a tertiary care referral hospital. Retrospective analysis of case records. Materials and Methods: The details pertaining to clinical and radiological parameters and hormonal tests were retrieved from case records of 15 children who underwent GnRH agonist stimulation test from May 2010 to April 2011. Results: Indications for testing with GnRH analogue were evaluation of delayed puberty, diagnosis of precocious puberty, assessment of hormonal suppression in treatment of precocious puberty and micropenis in two, nine, three and one cases, respectively. The results of the test and clinical and radiological parameters were in concordance. The test was also crucial in diagnosing the onset of central precocious puberty in two children with congenital adrenal hyperplasia. Conclusion: GnRH agonist test is a convenient, safe test that can be performed on an out-patient basis and can help the clinicians in the correct diagnosis and appropriate treatment of various puberty-related disorders.

  13. Neuroregulatory and neuroendocrine GnRH pathways in the hypothalamus and forebrain of the baboon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, P E; Goldsmith, P C

    1980-07-14

    The distribution of neurons containing gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in the baboon hypothalamus and forebrain was studied immunocytochemically by light and electron microscopy. GnRH was present in the perikarya, axonal and dendritic processes of immunoreactive neurons. Three populations of GnRH neurons could be distinguished. Most of the GnRH neurons which are assumed to directly influence the anterior pituitary were in the medial basal hypothalamus. Other cells that projected to the median eminence were found scattered throughout the hypothalamus. A second, larger population of neurons apparently was not involved with control of the anterior pituitary. These neurons were generally found within afferent and efferent pathways of the hypothalamus and forebrain, and may receive external information affecting reproduction. A few neurons projecting to the median eminence were also observed sending collaterals to other brain areas. Thus, in addition to their neuroendocrine role, these cells possibly have neuroregulatory functions. The inference is made that these bifunctional neurons, together with the widely observed GnRH-GnRH cellular interactions may help to synchronize ovulation and sexual behavior.

  14. Profiling and functional data on the developing olfactory/GnRH system reveal cellular and molecular pathways essential for this process and potentially relevant for the Kallmann syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia eGaraffo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available During embryonic development, immature neurons in the olfactory epithelium (OE extend axons through the nasal mesenchyme, to contact projection neurons in the olfactory bulb. Axon navigation is accompanied by migration of the GnRH+ neurons, which enter the anterior forebrain and home in the septo-hypothalamic area. This process can be interrupted at various points and lead to the onset of the Kallmann syndrome (KS, a disorder characterized by anosmia and central hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Several genes has been identified in human and mice that cause KS or a KS-like phenotype. In mice a set of transcription factors appears to be required for olfactory connectivity and GnRH neuron migration; thus we explored the transcriptional network underlying this developmental process by profiling the OE and the adjacent mesenchyme at three embryonic ages. We also profiled the OE from embryos null for Dlx5, a homeogene that causes a KS-like phenotype when deleted. We identified 20 interesting genes belonging to the following categories: 1 transmembrane adhesion/receptor, 2 axon-glia interaction, 3 scaffold/adapter for signalling, 4 synaptic proteins. We tested some of them in zebrafish embryos: the depletion of five (of six Dlx5 targets affected axonal extension and targeting, while three (of three affected GnRH neuron position and neurite organization. Thus, we confirmed the importance of cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions and identified new molecules needed for olfactory connection and GnRH neuron migration. Using available and newly generated data, we predicted/prioritized putative KS-disease genes, by building conserved co-expression networks with all known disease genes in human and mouse. The results show the overall validity of approaches based on high-throughput data and predictive bioinformatics to identify genes potentially relevant for the molecular pathogenesis of KS. A number of candidate will be discussed, that should be tested in

  15. Molecular characterization of the pSinB plasmid of the arsenite oxidizing, metallotolerant Sinorhizobium sp. M14 - insight into the heavy metal resistome of sinorhizobial extrachromosomal replicons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romaniuk, Krzysztof; Dziewit, Lukasz; Decewicz, Przemyslaw; Mielnicki, Sebastian; Radlinska, Monika; Drewniak, Lukasz

    2017-01-01

    Sinorhizobium sp. M14 is an As(III)-oxidizing, psychrotolerant strain, capable of growth in the presence of extremely high concentrations of arsenic and many other heavy metals. Metallotolerant abilities of the M14 strain depend upon the presence of two extrachromosomal replicons: pSinA (∼ 109 kb) and pSinB (∼ 300 kb). The latter was subjected to complex analysis. The performed analysis demonstrated that the plasmid pSinB is a narrow-host-range repABC-type replicon, which is fully stabilized by the phd-vapC-like toxin-antitoxin stabilizing system. In silico analysis showed that among the phenotypic gene clusters of the plasmid pSinB, eight modules are potentially involved in heavy metals resistance (HMR). These modules carry genes encoding efflux pumps, permeases, transporters and copper oxidases, which provide resistance to arsenic, cadmium, cobalt, copper, iron, mercury, nickel, silver and zinc. The functional analysis revealed that the HMR modules are active and have an effect on the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values observed for the heterological host cells. The phenotype was manifested by an increase or decrease of the MICs of heavy metals and it was strain specific. The analysis of distribution of the heavy metal resistance genes, i.e. resistome, in Sinorhizobium spp. plasmids, revealed that the HMR modules are common in these replicons. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Extensive characterization of a lentiviral-derived stable cell line expressing rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus VPg protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jie; Miao, Qiuhong; Tan, Yonggui; Guo, Huimin; Li, Chuanfeng; Chen, Zongyan; Liu, Guangqing

    2016-11-01

    Rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) is an important member of the caliciviridae family. Currently, no suitable tissue culture system is available for proliferating RHDV, which limits the study of its pathogenesis. To bypass this obstacle, we established a cell line, RK13-VPg, stably expressing the VPg gene with a lentivirus packaging system in this study. In addition, the recently constructed RHDV replicon in our laboratory provided an appropriate model for studying the pathogenesis of RHDV without in vitro RHDV propagation and culture. Using this RHDV replicon and RK13-VPg cell line, we further demonstrated that the presence of VPg protein is essential for efficient translation of an RHDV replicon. Therefore, the RK13-VPg cell line is a powerful tool for studying the replication and translation mechanisms of RHDV. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Rescue of corpus luteum function with peri-ovulatory HCG supplementation in IVF/ICSI GnRH antagonist cycles in which ovulation was triggered with a GnRH agonist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al Humaidan, Peter Samir Heskjær; Bungum, L; Bungum, M

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies found a poor clinical outcome when a GnRH agonist (GnRHa) was used to trigger ovulation in GnRH antagonist IVF/ICSI cycles. This study aimed to determine the clinical and endocrine effects as well the optimal timing of HCG supplementation. Forty-five normogonadotrophic IVF/ICSI p......RHa supplemented with 1500 IU HCG 35 h later (group 3) seems to secure a normal luteal phase and a normal clinical pregnancy outcome....

  18. The Luteal Phase after GnRHa Trigger-Understanding An Enigma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrine Leth-Moller

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The luteal phase of all stimulated in vitro fertilization/intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection (IVF/ICSI cycles is disrupted, which makes luteal phase support (LPS mandatory. The cause of the disruption is thought to be the multifollicular development achieved during ovarian stimulation which results in supraphysiological concentrations of steroids secreted by a high number of corpora lutea during the early luteal phase. This will directly inhibit luteinizing hormone (LH secretion by the pituitary via negative feedback at the level of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, leading to a luteal phase defect. With the introduction of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH antagonist protocol, it became feasible to trigger final oocyte maturation and ovulation with a single bolus of GnRH agonist (GnRHa as an alternative to human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG. GnRHa triggering presents several advantages, including the reduction in or even elimination of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome. Despite the potential advantages of GnRHa triggering, previous randomized controlled trials reported a poor clinical outcome with high rates of early pregnancy losses, despite supplementation with a standard LPS in the form of progesterone and estradiol. Following these disappointing results, several studies now report a luteal phase rescue after modifications of the LPS, resulting in a reproductive outcome comparable to that seen after hCG triggering. We herein review luteal phase differences between the natural cycle, hCG trigger and GnRHa trigger and present the most recent data on handling the luteal phase after GnRHa triggering.

  19. The synaptic cell adhesion molecule, SynCAM1, mediates astrocyte-to-astrocyte and astrocyte-to-GnRH neuron adhesiveness in the mouse hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandau, Ursula S; Mungenast, Alison E; McCarthy, Jack; Biederer, Thomas; Corfas, Gabriel; Ojeda, Sergio R

    2011-06-01

    We previously identified synaptic cell adhesion molecule 1 (SynCAM1) as a component of a genetic network involved in the hypothalamic control of female puberty. Although it is well established that SynCAM1 is a synaptic adhesion molecule, its contribution to hypothalamic function is unknown. Here we show that, in addition to the expected neuronal localization illustrated by its presence in GnRH neurons, SynCAM1 is expressed in hypothalamic astrocytes. Cell adhesion assays indicated that SynCAM is recognized by both GnRH neurons and astrocytes as an adhesive partner and promotes cell-cell adhesiveness via homophilic, extracellular domain-mediated interactions. Alternative splicing of the SynCAM1 primary mRNA transcript yields four mRNAs encoding membrane-spanning SynCAM1 isoforms. Variants 1 and 4 are predicted to be both N and O glycosylated. Hypothalamic astrocytes and GnRH-producing GT1-7 cells express mainly isoform 4 mRNA, and sequential N- and O-deglycosylation of proteins extracted from these cells yields progressively smaller SynCAM1 species, indicating that isoform 4 is the predominant SynCAM1 variant expressed in astrocytes and GT1-7 cells. Neither cell type expresses the products of two other SynCAM genes (SynCAM2 and SynCAM3), suggesting that SynCAM-mediated astrocyte-astrocyte and astrocyte-GnRH neuron adhesiveness is mostly mediated by SynCAM1 homophilic interactions. When erbB4 receptor function is disrupted in astrocytes, via transgenic expression of a dominant-negative erbB4 receptor form, SynCAM1-mediated adhesiveness is severely compromised. Conversely, SynCAM1 adhesive behavior is rapidly, but transiently, enhanced in astrocytes by ligand-dependent activation of erbB4 receptors, suggesting that erbB4-mediated events affecting SynCAM1 function contribute to regulate astrocyte adhesive communication.

  20. Inhibition of protease-inhibitor resistant hepatitis C virus replicons and infectious virus by intracellular intrabodies

    OpenAIRE

    Gal-Tanamy, Meital; Zemel, Romy; Bachmatov, Larissa; Jangra, Rohit K.; Shapira, Assaf; Villanueva, Rodrigo; Yi, MinKyung; Lemon, Stanley M.; Benhar, Itai; Tur-Kaspa, Ran

    2010-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a common cause of chronic liver disease and a serious threat to human health. The HCV NS3/4A serine protease is necessary for viral replication and innate immune evasion, and represents a well-validated target for specific antiviral therapy. We previously reported the isolation of single-chain antibodies (scFvs) that inhibit NS3/4A protease activity in vitro. Expressed intracellularly (intrabodies), these scFvs blocked NS3-mediated proliferation of NS3-tra...

  1. Transient foreign gene expression in chloroplasts of cultured tobacco cells after biolistic delivery of chloroplast vectors.

    OpenAIRE

    Daniell, H; Vivekananda, J; Nielsen, B L; Ye, G N; Tewari, K K; Sanford, J C

    1990-01-01

    Expression of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (cat) by suitable vectors in chloroplasts of cultured tobacco cells, delivered by high-velocity microprojectiles, is reported here. Several chloroplast expression vectors containing bacterial cat genes, placed under the control of either psbA promoter region from pea (pHD series) or rbcL promoter region from maize (pAC series) have been used in this study. In addition, chloroplast expression vectors containing replicon fragments from pea, tobacc...

  2. GnRH antagonist, cetrorelix, for pituitary suppression in modern, patient-friendly assisted reproductive technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tur-Kaspa, Ilan; Ezcurra, Diego

    2009-10-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogues are used routinely to prevent a premature luteinizing hormone (LH) surge in women undergoing assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatments. In contrast to GnRH agonists, antagonists produce rapid and reversible suppression of LH with no initial flare effect. To review the role of cetrorelix, the first GnRH antagonist approved for the prevention of premature LH surges during controlled ovarian stimulation in modern ART. A review of published literature on cetrorelix. Both multiple- and single-dose cetrorelix protocols were shown to be at least as effective as long GnRH agonist regimens for pituitary suppression in Phase II/III clinical trials. Furthermore, cetrorelix co-treatment resulted in similar live birth rates but a shorter duration of gonadotropin stimulation, a lower total gonadotropin dose requirement and lower incidence of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome compared with long agonist regimens. A single-dose cetrorelix protocol further decreased the number of injections required. Preliminary studies have also produced promising data on the use of cetrorelix in modified ART protocols, such as frozen embryo transfer and donor oocyte recipient cycles. Cetrorelix offers a potential therapeutic alternative to GnRH agonists during controlled ovarian stimulation and has become an integral part of modern, patient-friendly reproductive medicine.

  3. Measurements of Neuronal Soma Size and Estimated Peptide Concentrations in Addition to Cell Abundance Offer a Higher Resolution of Seasonal and Reproductive Influences of GnRH-I and GnIH in European Starlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorin, Nelson; Calisi, Rebecca M

    2015-08-01

    Hypothalamic neuropeptides involved in vertebrate reproduction, gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH-I) and gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH), can vary in the abundance of immunoreactive cells as a function of the reproductive status and nest box occupation of European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris). While using the abundance of cells as an indicator of the activity of neurohormones is informative, incorporating information on cell size (readily observed using immunohistochemistry) can offer a more detailed understanding of environmentally-mediated changes in hormonal dynamics. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the size of cells' somas and the estimated concentration of peptides in cells immunoreactive (ir) for GnRH-I and GnIH would vary throughout the breeding season and as a function of nest-box status (resident or not). In the absence of a direct assay of protein, we estimated an index of the concentration of hypothalamic peptides via the relative optical density (i.e., the difference between the mean optical density and the optical density of background staining). In support of our hypothesis, we found that GnRH-I- and GnIH-ir soma size and peptide concentration changed both in males and females throughout the breeding season. Somas were largest and estimated peptide concentration was highest mid-season when compared with earlier in the season or to the non-breeding period. For nest-box residents, GnIH-ir soma size and peptide concentration were higher during the middle of the breeding season than earlier in the breeding season, although residence in the nest box was not related to GnRH-I-ir variables. Our results confirm that previously reported changes in cell abundance mimic changes we see in GnRH-I and GnIH-ir soma size and our proxy for peptide concentration. However, investigating changes in the soma of GnRH-I-ir cells revealed a peak in size during the middle of the breeding season, a change not evident when solely examining data on the

  4. A Flexible Multidose GnRH Antagonist versus a Microdose Flare-Up GnRH Agonist Combined with a Flexible Multidose GnRH Antagonist Protocol in Poor Responders to IVF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayem İnayet Turgay Çelik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare the effectiveness of a flexible multidose gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH antagonist against the effectiveness of a microdose flare-up GnRH agonist combined with a flexible multidose GnRH antagonist protocol in poor responders to in vitro fertilization (IVF. Study Design. A retrospective study in Akdeniz University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, IVF Center, for 131 poor responders in the intracytoplasmic sperm injection-embryo transfer (ICSI-ET program between January 2006 and November 2012. The groups were compared to the patients’ characteristics, controlled ovarian stimulation (COH results, and laboratory results. Results. Combination protocol was applied to 46 patients (group 1, and a single protocol was applied to 85 patients (group 2. In group 1, the duration of the treatment was longer and the dose of FSH was higher. The cycle cancellation rate was significantly higher in group 2 (26.1% versus 38.8%. A significant difference was not observed with respect to the number and quality of oocytes and embryos or to the number of embryos transferred. There were no statistically significant differences in the hCG positivity (9.5% versus 9.4% or the clinical pregnancy rates (7.1% versus 10.6%. Conclusion. The combination protocol does not provide additional efficacy.

  5. A Flexible Multidose GnRH Antagonist versus a Microdose Flare-Up GnRH Agonist Combined with a Flexible Multidose GnRH Antagonist Protocol in Poor Responders to IVF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelik, Gayem İnayet Turgay; Sütçü, Havva Kömür; Akpak, Yaşam Kemal; Akar, Münire Erman

    2015-01-01

    To compare the effectiveness of a flexible multidose gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist against the effectiveness of a microdose flare-up GnRH agonist combined with a flexible multidose GnRH antagonist protocol in poor responders to in vitro fertilization (IVF). A retrospective study in Akdeniz University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, IVF Center, for 131 poor responders in the intracytoplasmic sperm injection-embryo transfer (ICSI-ET) program between January 2006 and November 2012. The groups were compared to the patients' characteristics, controlled ovarian stimulation (COH) results, and laboratory results. Combination protocol was applied to 46 patients (group 1), and a single protocol was applied to 85 patients (group 2). In group 1, the duration of the treatment was longer and the dose of FSH was higher. The cycle cancellation rate was significantly higher in group 2 (26.1% versus 38.8%). A significant difference was not observed with respect to the number and quality of oocytes and embryos or to the number of embryos transferred. There were no statistically significant differences in the hCG positivity (9.5% versus 9.4%) or the clinical pregnancy rates (7.1% versus 10.6%). The combination protocol does not provide additional efficacy.

  6. Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang-Xia Wang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The miR-15/107 family comprises a group of 10 paralogous microRNAs (miRNAs, sharing a 5′ AGCAGC sequence. These miRNAs have overlapping targets. In order to characterize the expression of miR-15/107 family miRNAs, we employed customized TaqMan Low-Density micro-fluid PCR-array to investigate the expression of miR-15/107 family members, and other selected miRNAs, in 11 human tissues obtained at autopsy including the cerebral cortex, frontal cortex, primary visual cortex, thalamus, heart, lung, liver, kidney, spleen, stomach and skeletal muscle. miR-103, miR-195 and miR-497 were expressed at similar levels across various tissues, whereas miR-107 is enriched in brain samples. We also examined the expression patterns of evolutionarily conserved miR-15/107 miRNAs in three distinct primary rat brain cell preparations (enriched for cortical neurons, astrocytes and microglia, respectively. In primary cultures of rat brain cells, several members of the miR-15/107 family are enriched in neurons compared to other cell types in the central nervous system (CNS. In addition to mature miRNAs, we also examined the expression of precursors (pri-miRNAs. Our data suggested a generally poor correlation between the expression of mature miRNAs and their precursors. In summary, we provide a detailed study of the tissue and cell type-specific expression profile of this highly expressed and phylogenetically conserved family of miRNA genes.

  7. [Effectiveness and safety of pulsatile GnRH pump therapy on female patients with IHH].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhaoxiang; Mao, Jiangfeng; Wu, Xueyan; Nie, Min; Huang, Bingkun; Xu, Hongli; Wang, Xi; Zheng, Junjie

    2015-11-10

    To investigate the therapeutic effect of pulsatile GnRH (gonadorelin) pump on female patients with idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH). In this retrospective study, five female IHH patients were recruited. Patients were treated with pulsatile gonadorelin (10 µg per 90 min) via a pump for at least 12 weeks. Serum gonadotropins and sex steroid levels were measured, and menses were recorded. After one-week treatment, luteinizing hormone (LH) level increased from (2.2 ± 2.0) U/L to (5.4 ± 2.5) U/L (P=0.028), follicle-stimulating hormone(FSH) level increased from (3.7 ± 2.7) U/L to(6.3 ± 1.0) U/L (P=0.162), and estradiol (E2) level increased from (58 ± 13) pmol/L to (260 ± 97) pmol/L (P=0.011). Menstrual bleeding was observed in 4 patients after starting treatment for 35-55 days and two natural pregnancies were reported. No menstrual bleeding was reported in another patient. The frequency of pulsatile GnRH had to be adjusted according to endogenous GnRH secretion during the follicular phase of normal women and regular menses were induced. Pulsatile GnRH is effective in treating female IHH. A constant frequency of pulsatile GnRH is suitable for most of IHH patients. However, for those who failed to produce regular menses, adjusting pulsatile frequency to imitate the physiological rhythm of GnRH may be an alternative option.

  8. Endocannabinoids and Endovanilloids: A Possible Balance in the Regulation of the Testicular GnRH Signalling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosanna Chianese

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Reproductive functions are regulated both at central (brain and gonadal levels. In this respect, the endocannabinoid system (eCS has a very influential role. Interestingly, the characterization of eCS has taken many advantages from the usage of animal models different from mammals. Therefore, this review is oriented to summarize the main pieces of evidence regarding eCS coming from the anuran amphibian Rana esculenta, with particular interest to the morphofunctional relationship between eCS and gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH. Furthermore, a novel role for endovanilloids in the regulation of a testicular GnRH system will be also discussed.

  9. Numerical experimentation on focusing time and neutron yield in GN1 plasma focus machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Arwinder; Lee, Sing; Saw, S.H.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we have shown how we have fitted Lee's six phase model code to analyze the current waveform of the GN1 plasma focus machine working in deuterium gas. The Lee's 6-phase model codes was later configured to work between 0.5 to 6 Torr and the results of both focusing time and neutron yield was then compared with the published experimental results. The final results indicate that Lee's code, gives realistic plasma dynamics and focus properties together with a realistic neutron yield for GN1 plasma focus, without the need of any adjustable parameters, needing only to fit the computed current trace to a measured current trace. (author)

  10. The luteal phase after GnRH-agonist triggering of ovulation: present and future perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Humaidan, Peter; Papanikolaou, E G; Kyrou, D

    2012-01-01

    In stimulated IVF/intracytoplasmic sperm injection cycles, the luteal phase is disrupted, necessitating luteal-phase supplementation. The most plausible reason behind this is the ovarian multifollicular development obtained after ovarian stimulation, resulting in supraphysiological steroid...... with a GnRH agonist instead of human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG). The first studies applying this concept, however, showed a very poor pregnancy rate, despite standard luteal-phase support with progesterone. This review discusses the reason for the poor results and the newest studies, using GnRH agonist...

  11. Feasibility of corifollitropin alfa/GnRH antagonist protocol combined with GnRH agonist triggering and freeze-all strategy in polycystic ovary syndrome patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiann-Loung Hwang

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Purpose: The long-acting corifollitropin alfa is comparable to FSH in terms of pregnancy outcomes in normal responders and poor responders. Corifollitropin alfa has never been studied in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS patients because of concerns of excessive ovarian stimulation and ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS. The purpose of the study was to evaluate if corifollitropin alfa can be used in PCOS patients. Methods: Forty PCOS patients who were going to undergo in vitro fertilization were enrolled in this study. A single injection of corifollitropin alfa was administered on cycle day 2 or day 3. From stimulation day 8 onwards, daily FSH was administered until the day of final oocyte maturation. Cetrorelix was administered from stimulation day 5 to prevent premature LH surge. Final oocyte maturation was triggered by: acetate. All embryos were cryopreserved and replaced in subsequent cycles. Results: All 40 patients were subjected to oocyte retrieval, and none developed moderate or severe ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (0%, 95% CI 0–0.088. For each patient, an average of 23.4 (±7.4; 95% CI 21.0–25.7 oocytes were retrieved and a mean of 11.7 (±6.4; 95% CI 9.6–13.8 embryos were frozen. Mean serum estradiol level on the day of GnRHa triggering was 7829.9 pg/ml (±3297; 95% CI 6775–8885. The cumulated ongoing pregnancy rate after 3 frozen-thawed embryo transfers was 75.0% (95% CI 61.6%–88.4%. Conclusion: The results suggest that corifollitropin alfa/GnRH antagonist protocol can be used in PCOS patients, in combination with GnRHa triggering and embryo cryopreservation. Keywords: Corifollitropin alfa, Cryopreservation, GnRH agonist, Polycystic ovary syndrome

  12. Influence of GnRH analogue on body mass index in girls with precocious puberty: a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heshmat Moaieri

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: Gonadotropin-releasing hormone analog (GnRHa therapy in central precocious puberty (CPP is safe for BMI and increasing of BMI is not significant, long- term follow-up study is required to elucidate whether GnRHa treatment affects adult obesity. Using growth hormone concomitantly, the effect on increasing height is significant.

  13. An oral Sindbis virus replicon-based DNA vaccine containing VP2 gene of canine parvovirus delivered by Escherichia coli elicits immune responses in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahiya, S S; Saini, M; Kumar, P; Gupta, P K

    2011-01-01

    A Sindbis virus replicon-based DNA vaccine containing VP2 gene of canine parvovirus (CPV) was delivered by Escherichia coli to elicit immune responses. The orally immunized dogs developed CPV-specific serum IgG and virus neutralizing antibody responses. The cellular immune responses analyzed using lymphocyte proliferation test and flow cytometry indicated CPV-specific sensitization of both CD3+CD4+ and CD3+CD8+ lymphocytes. This study demonstrated that the oral CPV DNA vaccine delivered by E. coli can be considered as a promising approach for vaccination of dogs against CPV.

  14. GnRH Neuron Activity and Pituitary Response in Estradiol-Induced vs Proestrous Luteinizing Hormone Surges in Female Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Marina A; Burger, Laura L; DeFazio, R Anthony; Wagenmaker, Elizabeth R; Moenter, Suzanne M

    2017-02-01

    During the female reproductive cycle, estradiol exerts negative and positive feedback at both the central level to alter gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) release and at the pituitary to affect response to GnRH. Many studies of the neurobiologic mechanisms underlying estradiol feedback have been done on ovariectomized, estradiol-replaced (OVX+E) mice. In this model, GnRH neuron activity depends on estradiol and time of day, increasing in estradiol-treated mice in the late afternoon, coincident with a daily luteinizing hormone (LH) surge. Amplitude of this surge appears lower than in proestrous mice, perhaps because other ovarian factors are not replaced. We hypothesized GnRH neuron activity is greater during the proestrous-preovulatory surge than the estradiol-induced surge. GnRH neuron activity was monitored by extracellular recordings from fluorescently tagged GnRH neurons in brain slices in the late afternoon from diestrous, proestrous, and OVX+E mice. Mean GnRH neuron firing rate was low on diestrus; firing rate was similarly increased in proestrous and OVX+E mice. Bursts of action potentials have been associated with hormone release in neuroendocrine systems. Examination of the patterning of action potentials revealed a shift toward longer burst duration in proestrous mice, whereas intervals between spikes were shorter in OVX+E mice. LH response to an early afternoon injection of GnRH was greater in proestrous than diestrous or OVX+E mice. These observations suggest the lower LH surge amplitude observed in the OVX+E model is likely not attributable to altered mean GnRH neuron activity, but because of reduced pituitary sensitivity, subtle shifts in action potential pattern, and/or excitation-secretion coupling in GnRH neurons. Copyright © 2017 by the Endocrine Society.

  15. Photoaffinity labeling of pituitary GnRH receptors: significance of the position of photolabel on the ligand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolics, K.; Szonyi, E.; Ramachandran, J.

    1988-01-01

    Photoreactive derivatives of GnRH and its analogues were prepared by incorporation of the 2-nitro-4(5)-azidophenylsulfenyl [2,4(5)-NAPS] group into amino acid residues at position 1, 3, 6, or 8 of the decapeptide sequence. The modification of Trp 3 by the 2,4-NAPS group led to a complete loss of the luteinizing hormone (LH) releasing as well as LH-release-inhibiting activity of the peptide. The [D-Lys(2,4-NAPS)] 6 analog was a very potent agonist that, after covalent attachment by photoaffinity labeling, caused prolonged LH secretion at a submaximal rate. [Orn(2,4-NAPS)] 8 -GnRH, a full agonist with a relative potency of 7% of GnRH, after photoaffinity labeling caused prolonged maximal LH release from cultured pituitary cells. In contrast, [Orn(2,5-NAPS)] 8 -GnRH, although being equipotent with the 2,4-NAPS isomer in terms of LH releasing ability, was unable to cause prolonged LH release after photoaffinity labeling. Thus, [Orn(2,4-NAPS)] 8 GnRH is very effective photolabeling ligand of the functionally significant pituitary GnRH receptor. Based on this compound, a pituitary peptidase resistant derivative, D-Phe 6 , [Orn(2,4-NAPS)] 8 -GnRH-(1-9)-ethylamide, was synthesized. This derivative showed high-affinity binding to pituitary membranes with a K/sub d/ comparable to those of other GnRH analogues. A radioiodinated form of this peptide was used for pituitary GnRH-receptor labeling. This derivative labeled 59- and 57-kDa proteins in rat and 58- and 56-kDa proteins in bovine pituitary membrane preparations, respectively. This peptide also labeled pituitary GnRH receptors in the solubilized state and therefore appears to be a suitable ligand for the isolation and further characterization of the receptor

  16. Morphological Characterization of the Action Potential Initiation Segment in GnRH Neuron Dendrites and Axons of Male Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herde, Michel K; Herbison, Allan E

    2015-11-01

    GnRH neurons are the final output neurons of the hypothalamic network controlling fertility in mammals. In the present study, we used ankyrin G immunohistochemistry and neurobiotin filling of live GnRH neurons in brain slices from GnRH-green fluorescent protein transgenic male mice to examine in detail the location of action potential initiation in GnRH neurons with somata residing at different locations in the basal forebrain. We found that the vast majority of GnRH neurons are bipolar in morphology, elaborating a thick (primary) and thinner (secondary) dendrite from opposite poles of the soma. In addition, an axon-like process arising predominantly from a proximal dendrite was observed in a subpopulation of GnRH neurons. Ankyrin G immunohistochemistry revealed the presence of a single action potential initiation zone ∼27 μm in length primarily in the secondary dendrite of GnRH neurons and located 30 to 140 μm distant from the cell soma, depending on the type of process and location of the cell body. In addition to dendrites, the GnRH neurons with cell bodies located close to hypothalamic circumventricular organs often elaborated ankyrin G-positive axon-like structures. Almost all GnRH neurons (>90%) had their action potential initiation site in a process that initially, or ultimately after a hairpin loop, was coursing in the direction of the median eminence. These studies indicate that action potentials are initiated in different dendritic and axonal compartments of the GnRH neuron in a manner that is dependent partly on the neuroanatomical location of the cell body.

  17. Highly immunogenic and fully synthetic peptide-carrier constructs targetting GnRH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beekman, N.J.C.M.; Schaaper, W.M.M.; Turkstra, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    To use peptides as synthetic vaccines, they have to be coupled to a carrier protein to make them more immunogenic. Coupling efficiency between a carrier protein and a peptide, however, is difficult to control with respect to loading density of the peptide, This makes these carrier proteins poorly...... for the induction of antibodies against GnRH and immunocastration of pigs....

  18. Empty follicle syndrome after GnRHa triggering versus hCG triggering in COS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, Juan C; Garcia-Velasco, Juan; Humaidan, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the incidence of empty follicle syndrome (EFS) in oocyte donors who had final oocyte maturation triggered with GnRHa and to compare the incidence of EFS in this group of patients with IVF patients who had final oocyte maturation with hCG....

  19. Social Crowding during Development Causes Changes in GnRH1 DNA Methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado, Sebastian G; Lenkov, Kapa; Williams, Blake; Fernald, Russell D

    2015-01-01

    Gestational and developmental cues have important consequences for long-term health, behavior and adaptation to the environment. In addition, social stressors cause plastic molecular changes in the brain that underlie unique behavioral phenotypes that also modulate fitness. In the adult African cichlid, Astatotilapia burtoni, growth and social status of males are both directly regulated by social interactions in a dynamic social environment, which causes a suite of plastic changes in circuits, cells and gene transcription in the brain. We hypothesized that a possible mechanism underlying some molecular changes might be DNA methylation, a reversible modification made to cytosine nucleotides that is known to regulate gene function. Here we asked whether changes in DNA methylation of the GnRH1 gene, the central regulator of the reproductive axis, were altered during development of A. burtoni. We measured changes in methylation state of the GnRH1 gene during normal development and following the gestational and developmental stress of social crowding. We found differential DNA methylation within developing juveniles between 14-, 28- and 42-day-old. Following gestational crowding of mouth brooding mothers, we saw differential methylation and transcription of GnRH1 in their offspring. Taken together, our data provides evidence for social control of GnRH1 developmental responses to gestational cues through DNA methylation.

  20. Molecular mechanism of action of pharmacoperone rescue of misrouted GPCR mutants: the GnRH receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janovick, Jo Ann; Patny, Akshay; Mosley, Ralph; Goulet, Mark T; Altman, Michael D; Rush, Thomas S; Cornea, Anda; Conn, P Michael

    2009-02-01

    The human GnRH receptor (hGnRHR), a G protein-coupled receptor, is a useful model for studying pharmacological chaperones (pharmacoperones), drugs that rescue misfolded and misrouted protein mutants and restore them to function. This technique forms the basis of a therapeutic approach of rescuing mutants associated with human disease and restoring them to function. The present study relies on computational modeling, followed by site-directed mutagenesis, assessment of ligand binding, effector activation, and confocal microscopy. Our results show that two different chemical classes of pharmacoperones act to stabilize hGnRHR mutants by bridging residues D(98) and K(121). This ligand-mediated bridge serves as a surrogate for a naturally occurring and highly conserved salt bridge (E(90)-K(121)) that stabilizes the relation between transmembranes 2 and 3, which is required for passage of the receptor through the cellular quality control system and to the plasma membrane. Our model was used to reveal important pharmacophoric features, and then identify a novel chemical ligand, which was able to rescue a D(98) mutant of the hGnRHR that could not be rescued as effectively by previously known pharmacoperones.

  1. Model-Based GN and C Simulation and Flight Software Development for Orion Missions beyond LEO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odegard, Ryan; Milenkovic, Zoran; Henry, Joel; Buttacoli, Michael

    2014-01-01

    For Orion missions beyond low Earth orbit (LEO), the Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GN&C) system is being developed using a model-based approach for simulation and flight software. Lessons learned from the development of GN&C algorithms and flight software for the Orion Exploration Flight Test One (EFT-1) vehicle have been applied to the development of further capabilities for Orion GN&C beyond EFT-1. Continuing the use of a Model-Based Development (MBD) approach with the Matlab®/Simulink® tool suite, the process for GN&C development and analysis has been largely improved. Furthermore, a model-based simulation environment in Simulink, rather than an external C-based simulation, greatly eases the process for development of flight algorithms. The benefits seen by employing lessons learned from EFT-1 are described, as well as the approach for implementing additional MBD techniques. Also detailed are the key enablers for improvements to the MBD process, including enhanced configuration management techniques for model-based software systems, automated code and artifact generation, and automated testing and integration.

  2. Hormonal responses to GnRH injection given at different stages of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-04-05

    Apr 5, 2010 ... In conclusion, the results presented here indicate that. GnRH given at the beginning (days 5 to 7) or at the end. (days 15 to 17) of the estrous cycle did not alter the profile of progesterone and estradiol concentration in water buffaloes as previously described in cattle (Kohram et al., 1998a, b). REFERENCES.

  3. Effects of GnRH administration on ovulation and fertility in ewes subjected to estrous synchronization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda dos Santos Cavalcanti

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to verify the effects of GnRH on ovulation and pregnancy of ewes subjected to a short-term synchronization of estrus. Santa Inês and crossbred Santa Inês/Dorper ewes received 60 mg MAP sponges during 6 days plus 300 IU eCG and 30 µg d-cloprostenol 24 h prior to sponge withdrawal (SW. Ewes were assigned to receive 0.9% NaCl solution (Tcontrol; n = 32 or 25 µg GnRH (licerelin, T GnRH; n = 34 24 hours after SW. Each group was assigned to intrauterine insemination by laparoscopy (n = 25 or to natural mating (n = 41. Artificial insemination was performed with a single dose of fresh semen. For controlled mating, females were exposed to males 12, 24, 36 and 48 hours after SW. Ten females per treatment were subjected to transrectal ultrasound examination at 12-hour intervals (SW to 60 hours after. Estrous response (100.0% vs 95.2%, interval from SW to estrus (32.9±7.4 vs 29.8±6.9 hours, estrous length (37.4±9.0 vs 31.5±10.4 hours, pregnancy rates (57.0% vs 41.0%, ovulation rate (100.0% vs 90.0%, number of ovulations/ewe (1.1±0.3 vs 1.2±0.4, maximum follicular diameter (6.4±0.7 vs 6.1±0.6 mm, interval from SW to ovulation (59.1±3.5 vs 58.4±3.5 hours did not differ between Tcontrol and T GnRH, respectively. Administration of GnRH 24 hours after SW does not improve ovulation or pregnancy rate in estrous synchronization in ewes.

  4. Evolution of ANB and SN-GoGn angles during craniofacial growth: A retrospective longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Oyonarte

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study is to describe the evolution of the ANB and SN-GoGn angles throughout development, in a longitudinal sample of Caucasian patients. Materials and Methods: Historical cephalometric records from North American individuals available at the American Association of Orthodontists Foundation Craniofacial Legacy Growth Collection website were used to carry out an exploratory longitudinal study. Lateral cephalometric radiographs of orthodontically untreated males and females were included. Individuals with three or more longitudinal cephalometric records at pre- and post-pubertal stages, with at least one postpubertal radiograph available in vertebral cervical maturation stage (cervical vertebral maturation 5 or 6, were selected. Seventy-one individuals met the inclusion criteria. ANB, SNA, SNB, and SN-GoGn angles were measured. Individuals were classified according to the latest postpubertal ANB angle available and grouped by CVM. Descriptive statistics were obtained for the cephalometric variables, and differences between genders were analyzed. Results: Forty-five individuals were classified as skeletal Class I at the end of growth, 17 as Class II, and 9 as Class III. ANB values decrease as growth occurs in every group (average ANB decrease between the stages CVM 1 and 6: Class I - 1.5°, Class II - 0.7°, and Class III - 3.1°. For SN-GoGn angle, a constant reduction was observed as skeletal maturation increased (Average SN-GoGn decrease between the stages CVM 1 and 6: Class I - 4°, Class II - 2.5°, and Class III - 4.9°. Conclusions: ANB and SN-GoGn angles decrease during growth. The magnitude varies depending on individual sagittal characteristics, Class III individuals displaying the greatest reduction, and Class II individuals the least.

  5. Characterization of 12 GnRH peptide agonists - a kinetic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nederpelt, Indira; Georgi, Victoria; Schiele, Felix; Nowak-Reppel, Katrin; Fernández-Montalván, Amaury E; IJzerman, Adriaan P; Heitman, Laura H

    2016-01-01

    Drug-target residence time is an important, yet often overlooked, parameter in drug discovery. Multiple studies have proposed an increased residence time to be beneficial for improved drug efficacy and/or longer duration of action. Currently, there are many drugs on the market targeting the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor for the treatment of hormone-dependent diseases. Surprisingly, the kinetic receptor-binding parameters of these analogues have not yet been reported. Therefore, this project focused on determining the receptor-binding kinetics of 12 GnRH peptide agonists, including many marketed drugs. A novel radioligand-binding competition association assay was developed and optimized for the human GnRH receptor with the use of a radiolabelled peptide agonist, [(125) I]-triptorelin. In addition to radioligand-binding studies, a homogeneous time-resolved FRET Tag-lite™ method was developed as an alternative assay for the same purpose. Two novel competition association assays were successfully developed and applied to determine the kinetic receptor-binding characteristics of 12 high-affinity GnRH peptide agonists. Results obtained from both methods were highly correlated. Interestingly, the binding kinetics of the peptide agonists were more divergent than their affinities with residence times ranging from 5.6 min (goserelin) to 125 min (deslorelin). Our research provides new insights by incorporating kinetic, next to equilibrium, binding parameters in current research and development that can potentially improve future drug discovery targeting the GnRH receptor. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  6. Heterologous expression, purification and characterization of human β-1,2-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase II using a silkworm-based Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus bacmid expression system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Takatsugu; Kato, Tatsuya; Park, Enoch Y

    2018-02-03

    β-1,2-N-Acetylglucosaminyltransferase II (GnTII, EC 2.4.1.143) is a Golgi-localized type II transmembrane enzyme that catalyzes the transfer of N-acetylglucosamine to the 6-arm of the trimanosyl core of N-glycans, an essential step in the conversion of oligomannose-type to complex-type N-glycans. Despite its physiological importance, there have been only a few reports on the heterologous expression and structure-function relationship of this enzyme. Here, we constructed a silkworm-based Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus bacmid expression system and expressed human GnTII (hGnTII) lacking the N-terminal cytosolic tail and transmembrane region. The recombinant hGnTII was purified from silkworm larval hemolymph in two steps by using tandem affinity purification tags, with a yield of approximately 120 μg from 10 mL hemolymph, and exhibited glycosyltransferase activity and strict substrate specificity. The enzyme was found to be N-glycosylated by the enzymatic cleavage of glycans, while hGnTII expressed in insect cells had not been reported to be glycosylated. Although insects typically produce pauci-mannosidic-type glycans, the structure of N-glycans in the recombinant hGnTII was suggested to be of the complex type, and the removal of the glycans did not affect the enzymatic activity. Copyright © 2018 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Afferent neuronal control of type-I gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH neurons in the human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik eHrabovszky

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the regulation of the human menstrual cycle represents an important ultimate challenge of reproductive neuroendocrine research. However, direct translation of information from laboratory animal experiments to the human is often complicated by strikingly different and unique reproductive strategies and central regulatory mechanisms that can be present in even closely related animal species. In all mammals studied so far, type-I gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH synthesizing neurons form the final common output way from the hypothalamus in the neuroendocrine control of the adenohypophysis. Under various physiological and pathological conditions, hormonal and metabolic signals either regulate GnRH neurons directly or act on upstream neuronal circuitries to influence the pattern of pulsatile GnRH secretion into the hypophysial portal circulation. Neuronal afferents to GnRH cells convey important metabolic-, stress-, sex steroid-, lactational- and circadian signals to the reproductive axis, among other effects. This article gives an overview of the available neuroanatomical literature that described the afferent regulation of human GnRH neurons by peptidergic, monoaminergic and amino acidergic neuronal systems. Recent studies of human genetics provided evidence that central peptidergic signaling by kisspeptins and neurokinin B play particularly important roles in puberty onset and later, in the sex steroid-dependent feedback regulation of GnRH neurons. This review article places special emphasis on the topographic distribution, sexual dimorphism, aging-dependent neuroanatomical changes and plastic connectivity to GnRH neurons of the critically important human hypothalamic kisspeptin and neurokinin B systems.

  8. Microdose flare-up vs. flexible-multidose GnRH antagonist protocols for poor responder patients who underwent ICSI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esinler, I

    2014-01-01

    To compare the performance of microdose flare-up (MF) and flexible-multidose gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist protocols in poor responder patients who underwent intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). One hundred and 12 consecutive patients (217 cycles) suspected to have poor ovarian response were enrolled. Group 1 (MF GnRH agonist group) constituted 64 patients (135 cycles) who underwent MF GnRH agonist protocol. Group 2 (flexible-multidose GnRH antagonist group) constituted 48 patients (82 cycles) who underwent flexible-multidose GnRH antagonist protocol. The duration of stimulation (d) (11.5 +/- 2.1 vs. 10.4 +/- 2.7, p or = seven blastomeres and < 10% fragmentation at day 3 (35.9% vs. 65.1%, p < 0.05) were significantly lower in Group 1 when compared to Group 2. The number of embryos transferred (2.2 +/- 1.3 vs. 2.4 +/- 0.9), the clinical pregnancy per embryo transfer (16.3% vs. 25.8%), and the implantation rate (8.6% vs. 12.2%) were comparable between groups. Although the flexible-multidose GnRH antagonist protocol produced better oocyte and embryo parameters, the clinical pregnancy rate and the implantation rates were comparable between the flexible-multidose GnRH antagonist and MF protocols in poor responder patients.

  9. EXPRESS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ancelin, C.; Le, P.; DeSaint-Quentin, S.; Villatte, N.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents EXPRESS, an expert system developed for the automation of reliability studies. The first part consists in the description of the method for static thermohydraulic systems. In this step, the authors define the knowledge representation based on the two inference engines - ALOUETTE and LCR developed by EDF. They explain all the process to construct a fault tree from a topological and functional description of the system. Numerous examples are exhibited in illustration of the method. This is followed by the lessons derived from the studies performed on some safety systems of the PALUEL nuclear plant. The development of the same approach for electric power systems is described, insisting on the difference resulting from the sequential nature of these systems. Finally, they show the main advantages identified during the studies

  10. GnRH Neurons on LSD: A Year of Rejecting Hypotheses That May Have Made Karl Popper Proud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moenter, Suzanne M

    2018-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons are critical to many aspects of fertility regulation, from producing episodic release critical to both sexes, to providing a central signal to induce the ovulatory cascade in females. This year saw progress through the rejection, and occasional support, of hypotheses in understanding how GnRH neurons contribute to these processes. This brief review provides one laboratory's view of new insights into possible roles for these cells in development, adult reproductive function, and what may go wrong with GnRH neurons in some cases of infertility. Copyright © 2018 Endocrine Society.

  11. The carboxy-terminal tail or the intracellular loop 3 is required for β-arrestin-dependent internalization of a mammalian type II GnRH receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madziva, Michael T; Mkhize, Nonhlanhla N; Flanagan, Colleen A; Katz, Arieh A

    2015-08-15

    The type II GnRH receptor (GnRH-R2) in contrast to mammalian type I GnRH receptor (GnRH-R1) has a cytosolic carboxy-terminal tail. We investigated the role of β-arrestin 1 in GnRH-R2-mediated signalling and mapped the regions in GnRH-R2 required for recruitment of β-arrestin, employing internalization assays. We show that GnRH-R2 activation of ERK is dependent on β-arrestin and protein kinase C. Appending the tail of GnRH-R2 to GnRH-R1 enabled GRK- and β-arrestin-dependent internalization of the chimaeric receptor. Surprisingly, carboxy-terminally truncated GnRH-R2 retained β-arrestin and GRK-dependent internalization, suggesting that β-arrestin interacts with additional elements of GnRH-R2. Mutating serine and threonine or basic residues of intracellular loop 3 did not abolish β-arrestin 1-dependent internalization but a receptor lacking these basic residues and the carboxy-terminus showed no β-arrestin 1-dependent internalization. Our results suggest that basic residues at the amino-terminal end of intracellular loop 3 or the carboxy-terminal tail are required for β-arrestin dependent internalization. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Differential Gene Expression in Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Neurons of Male and Metestrous Female Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vastagh, Csaba; Rodolosse, Annie; Solymosi, Norbert; Farkas, Imre; Auer, Herbert; Sárvári, Miklós; Liposits, Zsolt

    2015-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons play a pivotal role in the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary gonadal axis in a sex-specific manner. We hypothesized that the differences seen in reproductive functions of males and females are associated with a sexually dimorphic gene expression profile of GnRH neurons. We compared the transcriptome of GnRH neurons obtained from intact metestrous female and male GnRH-green fluorescent protein transgenic mice. About 1,500 individual GnRH neurons from each sex were sampled with laser capture microdissection followed by whole-transcriptome amplification for gene expression profiling. Under stringent selection criteria (fold change >1.6, adjusted p value 0.01), Affymetrix Mouse Genome 430 PM array analysis identified 543 differentially expressed genes. Sexual dimorphism was most apparent in gene clusters associated with synaptic communication, signal transduction, cell adhesion, vesicular transport and cell metabolism. To validate microarray results, 57 genes were selected, and 91% of their differential expression was confirmed by real-time PCR. Similarly, 88% of microarray results were confirmed with PCR from independent samples obtained by patch pipette harvesting and pooling of 30 GnRH neurons from each sex. We found significant differences in the expression of genes involved in vesicle priming and docking (Syt1, Cplx1), GABAergic (Gabra3, Gabrb3, Gabrg2) and glutamatergic (Gria1, Grin1, Slc17a6) neurotransmission, peptide signaling (Sstr3, Npr2, Cxcr4) and the regulation of intracellular ion homeostasis (Cacna1, Cacnb1, Cacng5, Kcnq2, Kcnc1). The striking sexual dimorphism of the GnRH neuron transcriptome we report here contributes to a better understanding of the differences in cellular mechanisms of GnRH neurons in the two sexes. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Peri-pubertal gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist treatment affects sex biased gene expression of amygdala in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuruddin, Syed; Krogenæs, Anette; Brynildsrud, Ola Brønstad; Verhaegen, Steven; Evans, Neil P; Robinson, Jane E; Haraldsen, Ira Ronit Hebold; Ropstad, Erik

    2013-12-01

    The nature of hormonal involvement in pubertal brain development has attracted wide interest. Structural changes within the brain that occur during pubertal development appear mainly in regions closely linked with emotion, motivation and cognitive functions. Using a sheep model, we have previously shown that peri-pubertal pharmacological blockade of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) receptors, results in exaggerated sex-differences in cognitive executive function and emotional control, as well as sex and hemisphere specific patterns of expression of hippocampal genes associated with synaptic plasticity and endocrine signaling. In this study, we explored effects of this treatment regime on the gene expression profile of the ovine amygdala. The study was conducted with 30 same-sex twin lambs (14 female and 16 male), half of which were treated with the GnRH agonist (GnRHa) goserelin acetate every 4th week, beginning before puberty, until approximately 50 weeks of age. Gene expression profiles of the left and right amygdala were measured using 8×15 K Agilent ovine microarrays. Differential expression of selected genes was confirmed by qRT-PCR (Quantitative real time PCR). Networking analyses and Gene Ontology (GO) Term analyses were performed with Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA), version 7.5 and DAVID (Database for Annotation, Visualization and integrated Discovery) version 6.7 software packages, respectively. GnRHa treatment was associated with significant sex- and hemisphere-specific differential patterns of gene expression. GnRHa treatment was associated with differential expression of 432 (|logFC|>0.3, adj. p value expressed as a result of GnRHa treatment in the male animals. The results indicated that GnRH may, directly and/or indirectly, be involved in the regulation of sex- and hemisphere-specific differential expression of genes in the amygdala. This finding should be considered when long-term peri-pubertal GnRHa treatment is used in children. Copyright

  14. Heterosis expression in crosses between maize populations: ear yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Ricardo Machado da

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of heterosis has been exploited extensively in maize (Zea mays L. breeding. The objective of this study was to evaluate the genetic potential of ten maize populations for ear yield following the diallel mating scheme. Six parental populations were obtained through phenotypic selection of open-pollinated ears in Rio Verde, GO, Brazil, (GO populations and four parental populations were synthesized in Piracicaba, SP, Brazil (GN populations: GO-D (DENTADO, GO- F (FLINT, GO-A (AMARELO, GO-B (BRANCO, GO-L (LONGO, GO-G (GROSSO, GN-01, GN-02, GN-03 and GN-04. Experiments were carried out in three environments: Anhembi (SP and Rio Verde (GO in 1998/99 (normal season crop and Piracicaba (SP in 1999 (off-season crop. All experiments were in completely randomized blocks with six replications. Analysis of variance grouped over environments showed high significance for heterosis and its components, although mid-parent heterosis and average heterosis were of low expression. The interaction treatments x environments was not significant. Total mid-parent heterosis effects ranged from de -4.3% to 17.3% with an average heterosis of 3.37%. Population with the highest yield (7.4 t ha-1 and with the highest effect of population (v i = 0.746 was GN-03, while the highest yielding cross was GO-B x GN-03 with 7,567 t ha-1. The highest specific heterosis effect (s ii' = 0.547 was observed in the cross GO-B x GN-03.

  15. Mean rate of DNA replication and replicon size in the shoot apex of Silence coeli-rosa. During the initial 120 minutes of the first day of floral induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ormrod, J.C.; Francis, D.

    1986-01-01

    28-day-old plants of Silence coeli-rosa were exposed, at 1700 hours, to long day (LD) conditions comprising light of low fluence rate provided by tungsten bulbs, or maintained in darkness as short day (SD) controls. All plants were exposed at 1700 hours to tritiated-(methyl- 3 H)-thymidine for 30, 45, 60, 90, or 120 minutes. Apical domes were isolated and prepared as fiber autoradiographs from which replicon size and rates of DNA replication, per single replication fork were recorded. In SD, replicon size was between 15-20 μm and exposure to LD conditions altered neither replicon size nor the pattern of deployment of replicons during S-phase relative to the SD controls. However, the mean rate of replication in LD was 8.7 μm h -1 compared with 5.2 μm h -1 in SD. Thus, exposure to LD resulted in a 1.7-fold increase in the rate of DNA replication relative to the SD controls. This rapid increase in replication rate, detectable within 30 minutes of the start of the LD is discussed in relation to changes known to occur to the cell cycle in Silene during the first day of floral induction. (Author)

  16. Haploinsufficiency of Dmxl2, encoding a synaptic protein, causes infertility associated with a loss of GnRH neurons in mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brooke Tata

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of the genetic defects causing gonadotropic deficiency has made a major contribution to elucidation of the fundamental role of Kisspeptins and Neurokinin B in puberty onset and reproduction. The absence of puberty may also reveal neurodevelopmental disorders caused by molecular defects in various cellular pathways. Investigations of these neurodevelopmental disorders may provide information about the neuronal processes controlling puberty onset and reproductive capacity. We describe here a new syndrome observed in three brothers, which involves gonadotropic axis deficiency, central hypothyroidism, peripheral demyelinating sensorimotor polyneuropathy, mental retardation, and profound hypoglycemia, progressing to nonautoimmune insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. High-throughput sequencing revealed a homozygous in-frame deletion of 15 nucleotides in DMXL2 in all three affected patients. This homozygous deletion was associated with lower DMXL2 mRNA levels in the blood lymphocytes of the patients. DMXL2 encodes the synaptic protein rabconnectin-3α, which has been identified as a putative scaffold protein for Rab3-GAP and Rab3-GEP, two regulators of the GTPase Rab3a. We found that rabconnectin-3α was expressed in exocytosis vesicles in gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH axonal extremities in the median eminence of the hypothalamus. It was also specifically expressed in cells expressing luteinizing hormone (LH and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH within the pituitary. The conditional heterozygous deletion of Dmxl2 from mouse neurons delayed puberty and resulted in very low fertility. This reproductive phenotype was associated with a lower number of GnRH neurons in the hypothalamus of adult mice. Finally, Dmxl2 knockdown in an insulin-secreting cell line showed that rabconnectin-3α controlled the constitutive and glucose-induced secretion of insulin. In conclusion, this study shows that low levels of DMXL2 expression cause a

  17. Suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis by TAK-385 (relugolix), a novel, investigational, orally active, small molecule gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist: studies in human GnRH receptor knock-in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Daisuke; Masaki, Tsuneo; Tanaka, Akira; Yoshimatsu, Mie; Akinaga, Yumiko; Asada, Mari; Sasada, Reiko; Takeyama, Michiyasu; Miwa, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Tatsuya; Kusaka, Masami

    2014-01-15

    TAK-385 (relugolix) is a novel, non-peptide, orally active gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist, which builds on previous work with non-peptide GnRH antagonist TAK-013. TAK-385 possesses higher affinity and more potent antagonistic activity for human and monkey GnRH receptors compared with TAK-013. Both TAK-385 and TAK-013 have low affinity for the rat GnRH receptor, making them difficult to evaluate in rodent models. Here we report the human GnRH receptor knock-in mouse as a humanized model to investigate pharmacological properties of these compounds on gonadal function. Twice-daily oral administration of TAK-013 (10mg/kg) for 4 weeks decreased the weights of testes and ventral prostate in male knock-in mice but not in male wild-type mice, demonstrating the validity of this model to evaluate antagonists for the human GnRH receptor. The same dose of TAK-385 also reduced the prostate weight to castrate levels in male knock-in mice. In female knock-in mice, twice-daily oral administration of TAK-385 (100mg/kg) induced constant diestrous phases within the first week, decreased the uterus weight to ovariectomized levels and downregulated GnRH receptor mRNA in the pituitary after 4 weeks. Gonadal function of TAK-385-treated knock-in mice began to recover after 5 days and almost completely recovered within 14 days after drug withdrawal in both sexes. Our findings demonstrate that TAK-385 acts as an antagonist for human GnRH receptor in vivo and daily oral administration potently, continuously and reversibly suppresses the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. TAK-385 may provide useful therapeutic interventions in hormone-dependent diseases including endometriosis, uterine fibroids and prostate cancer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The type of GnRH analogue used during controlled ovarian stimulation influences early embryo developmental kinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muñoz, Manuel; Cruz, María; Humaidan, Peter

    2013-01-01

    in the Instituto Valenciano de Infertilidad (IVI) Alicante and the Instituto Universitario-IVI Valencia, Spain, 2817 embryos deriving from 400 couples undergoing oocyte donation were analysed. After controlled ovarian stimulation and IVF/intracytoplamic sperm injection, the timing of embryonic cleavages......OBJECTIVE: To explore if the GnRH analogue used for controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) and the ovulation triggering factor (GnRH agonist+hCG triggering versus GnRH antagonist+GnRH agonist triggering) affect embryo development and kinetics. STUDY DESIGN: In a retrospective cohort study...... was assessed by a video time-lapse system. The results were analysed using Student's t test for comparison of timings (hours) and Chi-squared test for comparison of proportions. A p-value...

  19. ABRAM ET LA MAISON DE SON PÈRE (GN 11,26-32)

    OpenAIRE

    Misenga Dituanya, Marie-Anne; Abram et la maison de son père (Gn 11,26-32)

    2015-01-01

    L’élection et l’alliance sont des concepts fondamentaux dans l’Ancien Testament. Cette initiative divine commence avec Abraham par qui Dieu promet de bénir tous les clans de la terre (Gn 12,1-4; 15; 17). Cependant, on néglige souvent le point de départ d’Abraham qui n’est pas l’appel de Dieu, mais la situation de la famille de son père que Dieu demande à Abraham de quitter (Gn 11,26-32). Il est donc important d’étudier cette partie de plus près pour voir s’il est possible de préciser ce qu’es...

  20. The GnRH analogue triptorelin confers ovarian radio-protection to adult female rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camats, N.; Garcia, F.; Parrilla, J.J.; Calaf, J.; Martin-Mateo, M.; Caldes, M. Garcia

    2009-01-01

    There is a controversy regarding the effects of the analogues of the gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in radiotherapy. This has led us to study the possible radio-protection of the ovarian function of a GnRH agonist analogue (GnRHa), triptorelin, in adult, female rats (Rattus norvegicus sp.). The effects of the X-irradiation on the oocytes of ovarian primordial follicles, with and without GnRHa treatment, were compared, directly in the female rats (F 0 ) with reproductive parameters, and in the somatic cells of the resulting foetuses (F 1 ) with cytogenetical parameters. In order to do this, the ovaries and uteri from 82 females were extracted for the reproductive analysis and 236 foetuses were obtained for cytogenetical analysis. The cytogenetical study was based on the data from 22,151 metaphases analysed. The cytogenetical parameters analysed to assess the existence of chromosomal instability were the number of aberrant metaphases (2234) and the number (2854) and type of structural chromosomal aberrations, including gaps and breaks. Concerning the reproductive analysis of the ovaries and the uteri, the parameters analysed were the number of corpora lutea, implantations, implantation losses and foetuses. Triptorelin confers radio-protection of the ovaries in front of chromosomal instability, which is different, with respect to the single and fractioned dose. The cytogenetical analysis shows a general decrease in most of the parameters of the triptorelin-treated groups, with respect to their controls, and some of these differences were considered to be statistically significant. The reproductive analysis indicates that there is also radio-protection by the agonist, although minor to the cytogenetical one. Only some of the analysed parameters show a statistically significant decrease in the triptorelin-treated groups.

  1. Whole-Genome Sequence of Chlamydia abortus Strain GN6 Isolated from Aborted Yak Fetus

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Zhaocai; Cai, Jinshan; Cao, Xiaoan; Lou, Zhongzi; Chao, Yilin; Kan, Wei; Zhou, Jizhang

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The obligate intracellular Gram-negative bacterium Chlamydia abortus is one of the causative agents of abortion and fetal loss in sheep, goats, and cattle in many countries. It also affects the reproductivity of yaks (Bos grunniens). This study reports the whole-genome sequence of Chlamydia abortus strain GN6, which was isolated from aborted yak fetus in Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, China.

  2. Whole-Genome Sequence of Chlamydia abortus Strain GN6 Isolated from Aborted Yak Fetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhaocai; Cai, Jinshan; Cao, Xiaoan; Lou, Zhongzi; Chao, Yilin; Kan, Wei; Zhou, Jizhang

    2017-08-31

    The obligate intracellular Gram-negative bacterium Chlamydia abortus is one of the causative agents of abortion and fetal loss in sheep, goats, and cattle in many countries. It also affects the reproductivity of yaks ( Bos grunniens ). This study reports the whole-genome sequence of Chlamydia abortus strain GN6, which was isolated from aborted yak fetus in Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, China. Copyright © 2017 Li et al.

  3. Prenatal testosterone treatment alters LH and testosterone responsiveness to GnRH agonist in male sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SERGIO E RECABARREN

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Although evidence is accumulating that prenatal testosterone (T compromises reproductive function in the female, the effects of excess T in utero on the postnatal development of male reproductive function has not been studied. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of prenatal T excess on age-related changes in pituitary and gonadal responsiveness to GnRH in the male sheep. We used the GnRH agonist, leuprolide (10 µg/kg, as a pharmacologic challenge at 5, 10, 20 and 30 weeks of age. These time points correspond to early and late juvenile periods and the prepubertal and postpubertal periods of sexual development, respectively. LH and T were measured in blood samples collected before and after GnRH agonist administration. The area under the response curve (AUC of LH increased progressively in both controls and prenatal T-treated males from 5 to 20 weeks of age (P<0.01. The LH responses in prenatal T-treated males were lower at 20 and 30 weeks of age compared to controls (P<0.05. AUC-T increased progressively in control males from 5 through 30 weeks of age and prenatal T-treated males from 5 to 20 weeks of age. The T response in prenatal T-treated males was higher at 20 weeks compared to controls of same age but similar to controls and prenatal T-treated males at 30 weeks of age (P <0.05. Our findings suggest that prenatal T treatment advances the developmental trajectory of gonadal responsiveness to GnRH in male offspring

  4. The GnRH analogue triptorelin confers ovarian radio-protection to adult female rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camats, N. [Institut de Biotecnologia i de Biomedicina (I.B.B.), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Departament de Biologia Cel.lular, Fisiologia i Immunologia, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Garcia, F. [Institut de Biotecnologia i de Biomedicina (I.B.B.), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Parrilla, J.J. [Servicio de Ginecologia y Obstetricia, Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca, 30120 El Palmar, Murcia (Spain); Calaf, J. [Servei de Ginecologia i Obstetricia, Hospital Universitari de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, 08025 Barcelona (Spain); Martin-Mateo, M. [Departament de Pediatria, d' Obstetricia i Ginecologia i de Medicina Preventiva, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Caldes, M. Garcia, E-mail: Montserrat.Garcia.Caldes@uab.es [Institut de Biotecnologia i de Biomedicina (I.B.B.), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Departament de Biologia Cel.lular, Fisiologia i Immunologia, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain)

    2009-10-02

    There is a controversy regarding the effects of the analogues of the gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in radiotherapy. This has led us to study the possible radio-protection of the ovarian function of a GnRH agonist analogue (GnRHa), triptorelin, in adult, female rats (Rattus norvegicus sp.). The effects of the X-irradiation on the oocytes of ovarian primordial follicles, with and without GnRHa treatment, were compared, directly in the female rats (F{sub 0}) with reproductive parameters, and in the somatic cells of the resulting foetuses (F{sub 1}) with cytogenetical parameters. In order to do this, the ovaries and uteri from 82 females were extracted for the reproductive analysis and 236 foetuses were obtained for cytogenetical analysis. The cytogenetical study was based on the data from 22,151 metaphases analysed. The cytogenetical parameters analysed to assess the existence of chromosomal instability were the number of aberrant metaphases (2234) and the number (2854) and type of structural chromosomal aberrations, including gaps and breaks. Concerning the reproductive analysis of the ovaries and the uteri, the parameters analysed were the number of corpora lutea, implantations, implantation losses and foetuses. Triptorelin confers radio-protection of the ovaries in front of chromosomal instability, which is different, with respect to the single and fractioned dose. The cytogenetical analysis shows a general decrease in most of the parameters of the triptorelin-treated groups, with respect to their controls, and some of these differences were considered to be statistically significant. The reproductive analysis indicates that there is also radio-protection by the agonist, although minor to the cytogenetical one. Only some of the analysed parameters show a statistically significant decrease in the triptorelin-treated groups.

  5. Responsiveness to a Physiological Regimen of GnRH Therapy and Relation to Genotype in Women With Isolated Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Brent S.; Shaw, Natalie D.; Brown, Jenifer M.; Adams, Judith M.; Alati, Teresa; Martin, Kathryn A.; Pitteloud, Nelly; Seminara, Stephanie B.; Plummer, Lacey; Pignatelli, Duarte; Crowley, William F.; Welt, Corrine K.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Isolated hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH) is caused by defective GnRH secretion or action resulting in absent or incomplete pubertal development and infertility. Most women with IHH ovulate with physiological GnRH replacement, implicating GnRH deficiency as the etiology. However, a subset does not respond normally, suggesting the presence of defects at the pituitary or ovary. Objectives: The objective of the study was to unmask pituitary or ovarian defects in IHH women using a physiological regimen of GnRH replacement, relating these responses to genes known to cause IHH. Design, Setting, and Subjects: This study is a retrospective analysis of 37 IHH women treated with iv pulsatile GnRH (75 ng/kg per bolus). Main Outcome Measures: Serum gonadotropin and sex steroid levels were measured, and 14 genes implicated in IHH were sequenced. Results: During their first cycle of GnRH replacement, normal cycles were recreated in 60% (22 of 37) of IHH women. Thirty percent of women (12 of 37) demonstrated an attenuated gonadotropin response, indicating pituitary resistance, and 10% (3 of 37) exhibited an exaggerated FSH response, consistent with ovarian resistance. Mutations in CHD7, FGFR1, KAL1, TAC3, and TACR3 were documented in IHH women with normal cycles, whereas mutations were identified in GNRHR, PROKR2, and FGFR1 in those with pituitary resistance. Women with ovarian resistance were mutation negative. Conclusions: Although physiological replacement with GnRH recreates normal menstrual cycle dynamics in most IHH women, hypogonadotropic responses in the first week of treatment identify a subset of women with pituitary dysfunction, only some of whom have mutations in GNRHR. IHH women with hypergonadotropic responses to GnRH replacement, consistent with an additional ovarian defect, did not have mutations in genes known to cause IHH, similar to our findings in a subset of IHH men with evidence of an additional testicular defect. PMID:23341491

  6. The Effect of a GnRH Agonist Injection or Progesterone Implant at Diestrus in Cryopreserved Embryo Transferred Cows

    OpenAIRE

    KIRBAŞ, Mesut; BÜLBÜL, Bülent; KÖSE, Mehmet; DURSUN, Şükrü; ÇOLAK, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the effect of a single dose of GnRH on d 13 or progesterone implant for 7 days between d 13 and 20 on plasma progesterone levels and pregnancy rates on cryopreserved embryo transferred cows were investigated. Synchronized 48 Brown Swiss recipient cows were used as animal material. Seven days after estrus detection, cryopreserved cattle embryos were transferred into recipients and cows were assigned randomly into three groups. In GnRH group (n=16), cows were intramuscularly inje...

  7. Leptin and adiponectin levels in girls with central precocious puberty before and during GnRH agonist treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Won Yoo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available PurposeThe effects of gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa treatment on the energy metabolism in girls with central precocious puberty (CPP are controversial. We focused the changes and related factors of serum levels of leptin and adiponectin in girls with CPP before and during GnRHa treatment.MethodsThirty girls with idiopathic CPP were enrolled in the study. Their auxological data and fasting blood were collected at the baseline and after six months of GnRHa treatment.ResultsAfter treatment, height (P<0.001, weight (P<0.001, and serum leptin levels (P=0.033 were significantly increased, whereas body mass index (BMI, homeostasis model of assessment-insulin resistance, serum adiponectin levels, and adiponectin/leptin ratio exhibited no significant changes. A Pearson correlation analysis showed that height, weight, BMI, and their standard deviation scores (SDSs, but not basal LH, FSH, and estradiol, were significantly correlated with serum leptin levels before and after GnRHa treatment. After a multiple linear regression analysis, only BMI was associated with serum leptin levels. Moreover, leptin SDSs adjusted for BMI were not significantly different before and after GnRHa. The Δ leptin levels (r2=0.207, P=0.012, but not with Δ leptin SDS (r2=0.019, P=0.556, during GnRHa treatment were positively correlated with Δ BMI.ConclusionThese results suggest that GnRHa treatment in girls with CPP does not affect serum levels of leptin and adiponectin and insulin resistance. Serum leptin levels were depend on the changes in BMI during GnRHa treatment.

  8. Split-time artificial insemination in beef cattle: I-Using estrous response to determine the optimal time(s) at which to administer GnRH in beef heifers and postpartum cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, B E; Thomas, J M; Abel, J M; Poock, S E; Ellersieck, M R; Smith, M F; Patterson, D J

    2016-09-01

    Two experiments evaluated timing of GnRH administration in beef heifers and cows on the basis of estrous status during split-time artificial insemination (AI) after controlled internal drug release (CIDR) based protocols. In experiment 1, estrus was synchronized for 816 pubertal and prepubertal or peripubertal heifers using the 14-day CIDR-PGF2α (PG) protocol, and in experiment 2, estrus was synchronized for 622 lactating cows using the 7-day CO-Synch + CIDR protocol. For both experiments, estrus detection aids (Estrotect) were applied at PG, with estrus recorded at 66 and 90 hours after PG. Treatments were balanced across locations for heifers using reproductive tract score and weight; whereas for cows, treatments were assigned and balanced to treatment according to age, body condition score, and days postpartum. Timing of AI for heifers and cows was on the basis of estrus expression 66 hours after PG. Females in each treatment that exhibited estrus before 66 hours were inseminated at 66 hours, whereas AI was delayed 24 hours until 90 hours after PG for females failing to exhibit estrus before 66 hours. Females in treatment one received GnRH 66 hours after PG irrespective of estrus expression; however, in treatment 2, GnRH was administered coincident with delayed AI only to females not detected in estrus at 66 hours after PG. Among heifers, there was no effect of treatment on overall estrous response (P = 0.49) or AI pregnancy rate (P = 0.54). Pregnancy rate for heifers inseminated at 66 hours was not influenced by GnRH (P = 0.65), and there were no differences between treatments in estrous response during the 24 hours delay period (P = 0.22). Cows in treatment 2 had a greater (P = 0.04) estrous response during the 24-hour delay period resulting in a greater overall estrous response (P = 0.04), but this did not affect AI pregnancy rate at 90 hours (P = 0.51) or total AI pregnancy rate (P = 0.89). Pregnancy rate resulting from AI for

  9. Return to fertility after extended chemical castration with a GnRH antagonist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostanski, Janusz W; Jiang, Ge; Dani, Bhas A; Murty, Santos B; Qiu, Wei; Schrier, Bruce; Thanoo, B C; DeLuca, Patrick P

    2001-01-01

    Antagonistic analogues of GnRH for the treatment of prostate cancer may be used clinically in persons for whom return to fertility after such treatment is important or desirable. The purpose of this study was, therefore, to evaluate the effects of a long term treatment with orntide, a GnRH antagonist, on testosterone levels and fertility in male rats. Two groups of male rats received either 120-day orntide microspheres (8.8 mg orntide/kg/120 days) or vehicle alone (control group). Serum orntide and testosterone levels in both groups were monitored at certain intervals for 9 months from the initiation of treatment. After recovery of normal serum testosterone levels in the treated animals, each rat was housed with two proven breeder, but drug-naive, females. All mates of treated rats achieved pregnancy as rapidly as the mates of control rats although two of the control rats did not sire a litter with either female and one sired only one litter. The mean size of the litters of treated (12.3 offspring per litter) and control (10.6 offspring per litter) were similar. All offspring were grossly normal morphologically and behaviorally during the time to weaning. These results suggest that lack of fertility due to testosterone suppression is reversible after cessation of treatment with this GnRH antagonist

  10. THE USE OF GnRH ANTAGONISTS IN OVARIAN STIMULATION FOR INTRAUTERINE INSEMINATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mete Işıkoğlu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The first paper entitled intrauterine insemination (IUI was published in 1962. By time, several methods involving the technique and the ovulation induction schedules have evolved in order to improve the success rates. Although gonadotrophin releasing hormone antagonists (GnRHa is a crucial part of assisted reproductive treatments now, concerns also arouse regarding the need for the use of it in IUI cycles. These drugs may be considered in IUI programs basically in order to prevent premature LH surges and related cycle cancellations. Although administration of a GnRH antagonist almost completely abolishes premature luteinization, it does not substantially improve the pregnancy rate. The decision of using GnRH antagonists in IUI cycles should be based primarily on the local cost/benefit analysis of individual centers. It will be prudent to limit the involvement of the antagonists in ovulation induction protocols to: patients who frequently exhibit premature LH discharges and therefore either fail to complete treatment or result in unsuccessful outcome; initiated cycles intented for IUI but converted to ART; if it is not possible for logistic reasons (weekend to perform the insemination or for medical centers in which a gynecologist on call is not available and in order to decrease clinical task burden resulting from strict cycle monitoring such as serial transvaginal sonography and/or frequent urine tests.

  11. Return to fertility after extended chemical castration with a GnRH antagonist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schrier Bruce

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antagonistic analogues of GnRH for the treatment of prostate cancer may be used clinically in persons for whom return to fertility after such treatment is important or desirable. The purpose of this study was, therefore, to evaluate the effects of a long term treatment with orntide, a GnRH antagonist, on testosterone levels and fertility in male rats. Methods Two groups of male rats received either 120-day orntide microspheres (8.8 mg orntide/kg/120 days or vehicle alone (control group. Serum orntide and testosterone levels in both groups were monitored at certain intervals for 9 months from the initiation of treatment. After recovery of normal serum testosterone levels in the treated animals, each rat was housed with two proven breeder, but drug-naive, females. Results All mates of treated rats achieved pregnancy as rapidly as the mates of control rats although two of the control rats did not sire a litter with either female and one sired only one litter. The mean size of the litters of treated (12.3 offspring per litter and control (10.6 offspring per litter were similar. All offspring were grossly normal morphologically and behaviorally during the time to weaning. Conclusions These results suggest that lack of fertility due to testosterone suppression is reversible after cessation of treatment with this GnRH antagonist.

  12. GnRHa trigger and individualized luteal phase hCG support according to ovarian response to stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Humaidan, Peter; Polyzos, N P; Alsbjerg, B

    2013-01-01

    , there was a lack of blinding in the RCTs. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS: Although a non-significant result, one bolus of 1.500 IU hCG after GnRHa trigger tended to reduce the OHSS rate in patients with 15-25 follicles ≥11 mm as well as secure the ongoing pregnancy rate. In contrast, in patients at low risk......STUDY QUESTION: Does a GnRH agonist (GnRHa) trigger followed by a bolus of 1.500 IU hCG in a group of patients at risk of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) reduce the OHSS incidence compared with hCG trigger? SUMMARY ANSWER: A GnRHa trigger followed by early luteal hCG support with one bolus...... of 1.500 IU hCG appears to reduce OHSS in patients at risk of OHSS; however, in a low-risk group a second bolus of 1.500 IU hCG induced two cases of late onset OHSS. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY: A GnRHa trigger is an alternative to hCG in GnRH antagonist co-treated cycles. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION: Two...

  13. Administration of single-dose GnRH agonist in the luteal phase in ICSI cycles: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira João

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effects of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRH-a administered in the luteal phase remains controversial. This meta-analysis aimed to evaluate the effect of the administration of a single-dose of GnRH-a in the luteal phase on ICSI clinical outcomes. Methods The research strategy included the online search of databases. Only randomized studies were included. The outcomes analyzed were implantation rate, clinical pregnancy rate (CPR per transfer and ongoing pregnancy rate. The fixed effects model was used for odds ratio. In all trials, a single dose of GnRH-a was administered at day 5/6 after ICSI procedures. Results All cycles presented statistically significantly higher rates of implantation (P Conclusions These findings demonstrate that the luteal-phase single-dose GnRH-a administration can increase implantation rate in all cycles and CPR per transfer and ongoing pregnancy rate in cycles with GnRH antagonist ovarian stimulation protocol. Nevertheless, by considering the heterogeneity between the trials, it seems premature to recommend the use of GnRH-a in the luteal phase. Additional randomized controlled trials are necessary before evidence-based recommendations can be provided.

  14. A study on the reproductive endocrine mechanisms of ovulation induced by [D-Leu6,Pro9]-GnRH N-ethylamide in laying Taihe hens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Gongjin; Li Zhengkui; Yan Jianmin

    1994-01-01

    Ovulation induced by gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist [GnRH-A, (D-Leu 6 , Pro 9 ]-GnRH N-ethylamide] was used as a model for studying the endocrine mechanisms of ovulation in laying Taihe hens. The results showed that: (1) GnRH-A had a great stimulating effect on development of reproductive organs of hens, and caused weight increasing of ovary, oviduct and liver in hens, whereas there was no significant weight difference between GnRH-A and control group. Admininstration of GnRH-A seven days before the end of laying could keep normal egg production of the hens. (2) Twenty days after GnRH-A administration the two releasing peaks of plasma LH were induced in GnRH-A group, and plasma LH concentrations were higher in GnRH-A group than that in control group, whereas plasma FSH did not changed significantly compared with control group. (3) After administration of GnRH-A, plasma progesterone increased, and it was higher in GnRH-A group than that in control group out of laying cycle. On contrary, plasma estriol declined obviously 8 days after GnRH-A administration, though it elevated slightly later, it was less than that in control group. It is concluded that GnRH-A induced oviduct and ovalution development is associated with changes in plasma LH, progesterone and estriol concentration and that GnRH-A may be an useful agent for inducing development of ovalution and oviduct and improving egg production

  15. Differential co-localization with choline acetyltransferase in nervus terminalis suggests functional differences for GnRH isoforms in bonnethead sharks (Sphyrna tiburo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, John F; Meredith, Michael

    2010-12-17

    The nervus terminalis (NT) is a vertebrate cranial nerve whose function in adults is unknown. In bonnethead sharks, the nerve is anatomically independent of the olfactory system, with two major cell populations within one or more ganglia along its exposed length. Most cells are immunoreactive for either gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) or RF-amide-like peptides. To define further the cell populations and connectivity, we used double-label immunocytochemistry with antisera to different isoforms of GnRH and to choline acetyltransferase (ChAT). The labeling patterns of two GnRH antisera revealed different populations of GnRH-immunoreactive (ir) cell profiles in the NT ganglion. One antiserum labeled a large group of cells and fibers, which likely contain mammalian GnRH (GnRH-I) as described in previous studies and which were ChAT immunoreactive. The other antiserum labeled large club-like structures, which were anuclear, and a sparse number of fibers, but with no clear labeling of cell bodies in the ganglion. These club structures were choline acetyltrasferase (ChAT)-negative, and preabsorption control tests suggest they may contain chicken-GnRH-II (GnRH-II) or dogfish GnRH. The second major NT ganglion cell-type was immunoreactive for RF-amides, which regulate GnRH release in other vertebrates, and may provide an intraganglionic influence on GnRH release. The immunocytochemical and anatomical differences between the two GnRH-immunoreactive profile types indicate possible functional differences for these isoforms in the NT. The club-like structures may be sites of GnRH release into the general circulation since these structures were observed near blood vessels and resembled structures seen in the median eminence of rats. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Statistical methods for launch vehicle guidance, navigation, and control (GN&C) system design and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Michael Benjamin

    A novel trajectory and attitude control and navigation analysis tool for powered ascent is developed. The tool is capable of rapid trade-space analysis and is designed to ultimately reduce turnaround time for launch vehicle design, mission planning, and redesign work. It is streamlined to quickly determine trajectory and attitude control dispersions, propellant dispersions, orbit insertion dispersions, and navigation errors and their sensitivities to sensor errors, actuator execution uncertainties, and random disturbances. The tool is developed by applying both Monte Carlo and linear covariance analysis techniques to a closed-loop, launch vehicle guidance, navigation, and control (GN&C) system. The nonlinear dynamics and flight GN&C software models of a closed-loop, six-degree-of-freedom (6-DOF), Monte Carlo simulation are formulated and developed. The nominal reference trajectory (NRT) for the proposed lunar ascent trajectory is defined and generated. The Monte Carlo truth models and GN&C algorithms are linearized about the NRT, the linear covariance equations are formulated, and the linear covariance simulation is developed. The performance of the launch vehicle GN&C system is evaluated using both Monte Carlo and linear covariance techniques and their trajectory and attitude control dispersion, propellant dispersion, orbit insertion dispersion, and navigation error results are validated and compared. Statistical results from linear covariance analysis are generally within 10% of Monte Carlo results, and in most cases the differences are less than 5%. This is an excellent result given the many complex nonlinearities that are embedded in the ascent GN&C problem. Moreover, the real value of this tool lies in its speed, where the linear covariance simulation is 1036.62 times faster than the Monte Carlo simulation. Although the application and results presented are for a lunar, single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO), ascent vehicle, the tools, techniques, and mathematical

  17. Basal testosterone concentrations after the application of a slow-release GnRH agonist implant are associated with a loss of response to buserelin, a short-term GnRH agonist, in the tom cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goericke-Pesch, Sandra; Georgiev, Plamen; Fasulkov, Ivan; Vodenicharov, Angel; Wehrend, Axel

    2013-07-01

    Slow-release GnRH agonist implants are considered an effective, reversible alternative to surgical castration in male tom cats. Individual differences exist regarding the onset of efficacy and might be delayed in some animals. Single measurements of testosterone (T) might result in basal concentrations also in intact male cats. Consequently, GnRH stimulation tests are performed to measure T increase in intact animals and to differentiate castrated from intact male cats. In this study, five tom cats were treated with a 4.7-mg deslorelin implant and GnRH stimulation tests using buserelin were performed before treatment and at 4-week intervals afterward until Week 20. After the last test in Week 20 all animals were castrated. Four of five animals had basal T after 4 weeks and-in contrast to pretreatment-application of buserelin did not result in any further T increase. In one animal, T was low after implant insertion, but not basal; however, a GnRH stimulation test induced a slight increase of T in Week 8 and 16 only and no response in Weeks 4, 12, and 20. Testicular volume was significantly decreased and penile spines disappeared in all cats. Testicular histology showed mixed atrophy, but also fully elongated spermatids in three of five male cats making infertility questionable. Because of the loss of the stimulatory effect of short-term GnRH application (buserelin), it can be assumed that long-term GnRH agonists also act by some mechanisms of downregulation of pituitary GnRH receptors in the tom cat. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Does polycystic ovarian morphology influence the response to treatment with pulsatile GnRH in functional hypothalamic amenorrhea?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Agathe; Dewailly, Didier; Plouvier, Pauline; Catteau-Jonard, Sophie; Robin, Geoffroy

    2016-04-29

    Pulsatile GnRH therapy is the gold standard treatment for ovulation induction in women having functional hypothalamic amenorrhea (FHA). The use of pulsatile GnRH therapy in FHA patients with polycystic ovarian morphology (PCOM), called "FHA-PCOM", has been little studied in the literature and results remain contradictory. The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes of pulsatile GnRH therapy for ovulation induction between FHA and "FHA-PCOM" patients in order to search for an eventual impact of PCOM. Retrospective study from August 2002 to June 2015, including 27 patients with FHA and 40 "FHA-PCOM" patients (85 and 104 initiated cycles, respectively) treated by pulsatile GnRH therapy for induction ovulation. The two groups were similar except for markers of PCOM (follicle number per ovary, serum Anti-Müllerian Hormone level and ovarian area), which were significantly higher in patients with "FHA-PCOM". There was no significant difference between the groups concerning the ovarian response: with equivalent doses of GnRH, both groups had similar ovulation (80.8 vs 77.7 %, NS) and excessive response rates (12.5 vs 10.6 %, NS). There was no significant difference in on-going pregnancy rates (26.9 vs 20 % per initiated cycle, NS), as well as in miscarriage, multiple pregnancy or biochemical pregnancy rates. Pulsatile GnRH seems to be a successful and safe method for ovulation induction in "FHA-PCOM" patients. If results were confirmed by prospective studies, GnRH therapy could therefore become a first-line treatment for this specific population, just as it is for women with FHA without PCOM.

  19. Letrozole+ GnRH antagonist stimulation protocol in poor ovarian responders undergoing intracytoplasmic sperm injection cycles: An RCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahbod Ebrahimi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH antagonist protocol has been proposed as a potentially proper option for the patients with limited ovarian reserve. Nevertheless, there is no significant difference in terms of clinical pregnancy between the GnRH antagonist and agonist cycles. The use of aromatase inhibitors such as letrozole was suggested by some studies. Objective: The object of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of letrozole cotreatment with GnRH-antagonist protocol in ovarian stimulation of poor responder patients undergoing intracytoplasmic sperm injection. Materials and Methods: A double-blinded randomized control trial was conducted on 70 infertile women with poor ovarian response based on Bologna criteria in two groups: letrozole+GnRH-antagonist (LA group and placebo+GnRH-antagonist (PA group (n=35/each. The LA group involved at letrozole 2.5 mg daily over 5 days and recombinant human follicle stimulating hormone 225 IU/daily. The PA group received placebo over 5 days and recombinant human follicle stimulating hormone at the same starting day and dose, similar to LA group. GnRH-antagonist was introduced once one or more follicle reached ≥14 mm. The main outcome measures were the number of oocytes retrieved, fertilization rate, implantation rate, cycle cancellation rate, and clinical pregnancy rate. Results: There were no significant differences in demographic characteristics between groups. There were no significant differences between groups regarding the number of oocytes retrieved (p=0.81, number of embryos transferred (p=0.82, fertilization rate (p=0.225, implantation rate (p=0.72, total cycle cancelation rate (p=0.08, and clinical pregnancy rate (p=0.12. Conclusion: The use of letrozole in GnRH-antagonist cycles does not improve clinical outcomes in poor responder patients undergoing intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

  20. Glucosensing by GnRH Neurons: Inhibition by Androgens and Involvement of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roland, Alison V.

    2011-01-01

    GnRH neurons integrate steroidal and metabolic cues to regulate fertility centrally. Central glucoprivation reduces LH secretion, which is governed by GnRH release, suggesting GnRH neuron activity is modulated by glucose availability. Here we tested whether GnRH neurons can sense changes in extracellular glucose, and whether glucosensing is altered by the steroids dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and/or estradiol (E). Extracellular recordings were made from GnRH neurons in brain slices from ovariectomized (OVX) mice ± DHT and/or E implants. Firing rate was reduced by a switch from 4.5 to 0.2 mm glucose in cells from OVX, OVX+E, and OVX+DHT+E mice, but not OVX+DHT mice. This suggests that androgens reduce the sensitivity of GnRH neurons to changes in extracellular glucose, but E mitigates this effect. Next we investigated potential mechanisms. In the presence of the ATP-sensitive potassium channel antagonist tolbutamide, glucosensing persisted. In contrast, glucosensing was attenuated in the presence of compound C, an antagonist of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), suggesting a role for AMPK in glucosensing. The AMPK activator N1-(b-d-ribofuranosyl)-5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide (AICAR) mimicked the effect of low glucose and was less effective in cells from DHT-treated mice. The effect of DHT to diminish responses to low glucose and AICAR was abolished by blockade of fast synaptic transmission. Both AICAR and low glucose activated a current with a reversal potential near −50 mV, suggesting a nonspecific cation current. These studies indicate that glucosensing is one mechanism by which GnRH neurons sense fuel availability and point to a novel role for AMPK in the central regulation of fertility. PMID:21393446

  1. Population pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modelling of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis following treatment with GnRH analogues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tornøe, Christoffer Wenzel; Agersø, Henrik; Senderovitz, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    and the GnRH receptor blocker degarelix. Methods Fifty-eight healthy subjects received single subcutaneous or intramuscular injections of 3.75 mg of triptorelin and 170 prostate cancer patients received multiple subcutaneous doses of degarelix of between 120 and 320 mg. All subjects were pooled...... for the different dynamic responses observed after administration of both GnRH agonists and GnRH receptor blockers, suggesting that the model adequately characterizes the underlying physiology of the endocrine system....

  2. In vitro evidence of glucose-induced toxicity in GnRH secreting neurons: high glucose concentrations influence GnRH secretion, impair cell viability, and induce apoptosis in the GT1-1 neuronal cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Lubna; Chu, Hsiao-Pai; Shu, Jun; Topalli, Ilir; Santoro, Nanette; Karkanias, George

    2007-10-01

    To evaluate for direct toxic effects of high glucose concentrations on cellular physiology in GnRH secreting immortalized GT1-1 neurons. Prospective experimental design. In vitro experimental model using a cell culture system. GT1-1 cells were cultured in replicates in media with two different glucose concentrations (450 mg/dL and 100 mg/dL, respectively) for varying time intervals (24, 48, and 72 hours). Effects of glucose concentrations on GnRH secretion by the GT1-1 neurons were evaluated using a static culture model. Cell viability, cellular apoptosis, and cell cycle events in GT1-1 neurons maintained in two different glucose concentrations were assessed by flow cytometry (fluorescence-activated cell sorter) using Annexin V-PI staining. Adverse influences of high glucose concentrations on GnRH secretion and cell viability were noted in cultures maintained in high glucose concentration (450 mg/dL) culture medium for varying time intervals. A significantly higher percentage of cells maintained in high glucose concentration medium demonstrated evidence of apoptosis by a fluorescence-activated cell sorter. We provide in vitro evidence of glucose-induced cellular toxicity in GnRH secreting GT1-1 neurons. Significant alterations in GnRH secretion, reduced cell viability, and a higher percentage of apoptotic cells were observed in GT1-1 cells maintained in high (450 mg/dL) compared with low (100 mg/dL) glucose concentration culture medium.

  3. Circulating Estradiol Regulates Brain-Derived Estradiol via Actions at GnRH Receptors to Impact Memory in Ovariectomized Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Britta S; Black, Katelyn L; Daniel, Jill M

    2016-01-01

    Systemic estradiol treatment enhances hippocampus-dependent memory in ovariectomized rats. Although these enhancements are traditionally thought to be due to circulating estradiol, recent data suggest these changes are brought on by hippocampus-derived estradiol, the synthesis of which depends on gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) activity. The goal of the current work is to test the hypothesis that peripheral estradiol affects hippocampus-dependent memory through brain-derived estradiol regulated via hippocampal GnRH receptor activity. In the first experiment, intracerebroventricular infusion of letrozole, which prevents the synthesis of estradiol, blocked the ability of peripheral estradiol administration in ovariectomized rats to enhance hippocampus-dependent memory in a radial-maze task. In the second experiment, hippocampal infusion of antide, a long-lasting GnRH receptor antagonist, blocked the ability of peripheral estradiol administration in ovariectomized rats to enhance hippocampus-dependent memory. In the third experiment, hippocampal infusion of GnRH enhanced hippocampus-dependent memory, the effects of which were blocked by letrozole infusion. Results indicate that peripheral estradiol-induced enhancement of cognition is mediated by brain-derived estradiol via hippocampal GnRH receptor activity.

  4. The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) GN and C Technical Discipline Team (TDT): Its Purpose, Practices and Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennehy, Cornelius J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper will briefly define the vision, mission, and purpose of the NESC organization. The role of the GN&C TDT will then be described in detail along with an overview of how this team operates and engages in its objective engineering and safety assessments of critical NASA projects. This paper will then describe key issues and findings from several of the recent GN&C-related independent assessments and consultations performed and/or supported by the NESC GN&C TDT. Among the examples of the GN&C TDT s work that will be addressed in this paper are the following: the Space Shuttle Orbiter Repair Maneuver (ORM) assessment, the ISS CMG failure root cause assessment, the Demonstration of Autonomous Rendezvous Technologies (DART) spacecraft mishap consultation, the Phoenix Mars lander thruster-based controllability consultation, the NASA in-house Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) Smart Buyer assessment and the assessment of key engineering considerations for the Design, Development, Test & Evaluation (DDT&E) of robust and reliable GN&C systems for human-rated spacecraft.

  5. Regression of the inflammatory microenvironment of the peritoneal cavity in women with endometriosis by GnRHa treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirgianakis, K; Bersinger, N A; McKinnon, B; Kostov, P; Imboden, S; Mueller, M D

    2013-10-01

    To investigate the effect of gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogues (GnRHa) on the peritoneal fluid microenvironment in women with endometriosis. Peritoneal fluid was collected from 85 women with severe endometriosis (rAFS stage III and IV) during laparoscopic surgery during the proliferative phase. Prior to surgery clinical data were collected. The concentrations of specific markers for endometriosis in the peritoneal fluid were determined using an ELISA and a comparison between peritoneal fluid markers in women using GnRHa and no hormonal treatment was performed using a non-parametric Mann-Whitney U test. The study included peritoneal fluid from 39 patients who had been administered GnRHa (Zoladex(®)) in the three months prior to surgery and 46 from women with no hormonal treatment in this period. Concentrations of IL-8, PAPP-A, glycodelin-A and midkine were significantly reduced in the GnRHa treatment group compared to women receiving no hormonal treatment. RANTES, MCP-1, ENA-78, TNF-α, OPG, IP-10 and defensin showed no significant change between the two groups. GnRHa mediate a significant regression in the inflammatory nature of the peritoneal microenvironment in women with endometriosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Polycystic ovarian disease unmasked by pulsatile GnRH therapy in a subgroup of women with hypothalamic amenorrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattle, Verena; Bilgyicildirim, Aysen; Hadziomerovic, Dijana; Ott, Helmut W; Zervomanolakis, Ioannis; Leyendecker, Gerhard; Wildt, Ludwig

    2008-02-01

    To present the observation in six out of 120 women treated with pulsatile GnRH for ovulation induction, who developed hyperandrogenemia and polycystic ovaries during treatment. Clinical observation. Department of Gynecologic Endocrinology and Reproductive Medicine, Medical University of Innsbruck, Austria. A total of 120 women initially diagnosed as suffering from primary or secondary hypothalamic amenorrhea were treated for ovulation induction with pulsatile administration of GnRH for up to 140 days. There was no indication of the presence of polycystic ovaries or hyperandrogenemia before therapy. Pulsatile GnRH therapy using the Zyklomat pump. Ovulatory menstrual cycles. Initially, all patients responded to pulsatile GnRH administration with ovulation and corpus luteum formation. During continuation of treatment, 6 patients developed an increase in LH and LH/FSH ratio as well as a progressive rise in serum T levels resulting in hyperandrogenemia. This was accompanied by the development of polycystic ovaries and cessation of follicular maturation. We conclude from these observations that restoration of normal GnRH stimulation of the pituitary gland can result in the development of hyperandrogenemia and polycystic ovaries, suggesting a pituitary or ovarian defect underlying the pathogenesis of this disorder.

  7. Development, study and use of GN type high-speed burners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilipenko, R A; Yerinov, A Y

    1981-01-01

    The design of a tunnel high speed gas burner for thermal, tunnel, and annealing furnaces is described. The use of GN type burners and heat treating processes and annealing of articles allows one to attain high uniformity of heating, to reduce fuel consumption, and to simplify the lining. A high degree of (+ or - f/sup 0/C) heating uniformity and significant (up to 30%) fuel saving was obtained in a heat treatment furnace with a roll-out hearth at the Uralkhimmash plant.

  8. The effects of a slow release GnRH agonist implant on male rabbits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goericke-Pesch, Sandra Kathrin; Groeger, Gesa; Wehrend, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Surgical castration is done in male pet rabbits for reproduction control, to reduce inter-male aggression and to control hyper-sexuality, territory marking and aggression against humans. Alternatives to surgical castration are requested because of a relatively great anaesthetic risk in rabbits....... Long-term application of a GnRH agonist implant results in a fully reversible "hormonal" castration in male dogs, cats, boars and many other species. Therefore, the present study using New Zealand White hybrid and German Giant rabbits aimed to investigate the effects of a 4.7mg deslorelin implant...

  9. The Luteal Phase after GnRHa Trigger-Understanding An Enigma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth-Moller, Kathrine; Hammer Jagd, Sandra; Humaidan, Peter

    2014-01-01

    results in supraphysiological concentrations of steroids se- creted by a high number of corpora lutea during the early luteal phase. This will directly inhibit luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion by the pituitary via negative feedback at the level of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, leading to a luteal...... several advantages, including the reduction in or even elimination of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome. Despite the potential advantages of GnRHa trig- gering, previous randomized controlled trials reported a poor clinical outcome with high rates of early pregnancy losses, despite supplementation...

  10. C5a Receptor (CD88) Blockade Protects against MPO-ANCA GN

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Hong; Dairaghi, Daniel J.; Powers, Jay P.; Ertl, Linda S.; Baumgart, Trageen; Wang, Yu; Seitz, Lisa C.; Penfold, Mark E.T.; Gan, Lin; Hu, Peiqi; Lu, Bao; Gerard, Norma P.; Gerard, Craig; Schall, Thomas J.; Jaen, Juan C.

    2013-01-01

    Necrotizing and crescentic GN (NCGN) with a paucity of glomerular immunoglobulin deposits is associated with ANCA. The most common ANCA target antigens are myeloperoxidase (MPO) and proteinase 3. In a manner that requires activation of the alternative complement pathway, passive transfer of antibodies to mouse MPO (anti-MPO) induces a mouse model of ANCA NCGN that closely mimics human disease. Here, we confirm the importance of C5aR/CD88 in the mediation of anti-MPO–induced NCGN and report th...

  11. Expression and distribution of octopus gonadotropin-releasing hormone in the central nervous system and peripheral organs of the octopus (Octopus vulgaris) by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwakoshi-Ukena, Eiko; Ukena, Kazuyoshi; Takuwa-Kuroda, Kyoko; Kanda, Atshuhiro; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi; Minakata, Hiroyuki

    2004-09-20

    We recently purified a peptide with structural features similar to vertebrate gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) from the brain of Octopus vulgaris, cloned a cDNA encoding the precursor protein, and named it oct-GnRH. In the current study, we investigated the expression and distribution of oct-GnRH throughout the central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral organs of Octopus by in situ hybridization on the basis of the cDNA sequence and by immunohistochemistry using a specific antiserum against oct-GnRH. Oct-GnRH mRNA-expressing cell bodies were located in 10 of 19 lobes in the supraesophageal and subesophageal parts of the CNS. Several oct-GnRH-like immunoreactive fibers were seen in all the neuropils of the CNS lobes. The sites of oct-GnRH mRNA expression and the mature peptide distribution were consistent with each other as judged by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. In addition, many immunoreactive fibers were distributed in peripheral organs such as the heart, the oviduct, and the oviducal gland. Modulatory effects of oct-GnRH on the contractions of the heart and the oviduct were demonstrated. The results suggested that, in the context of reproduction, oct-GnRH is a key peptide in the subpedunculate lobe and/or posterior olfactory lobe-optic gland-gonadal axis, an octopus analogue of the hypothalamo-hypophysial-gonadal axis. It may also act as a modulatory factor in controlling higher brain functions such as feeding, memory, movement, maturation, and autonomic functions

  12. Effect of resynchronization with GnRH or progesterone (P4) intravaginal device (CIDR) on Day 23 after timed artificial insemination on cumulative pregnancy and embryonic losses in CIDR-GnRH synchronized Nili-Ravi buffaloes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, Usman; Qayyum, Arslan; Hassan, Mubbashar; Husnain, Ali; Sattar, Abdul; Ahmad, Nasim

    2017-11-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the effect of resynchronization on Day 23 with either GnRH or P4 (controlled internal drug release device containing progesterone; CIDR) on pregnancy rate, cumulative pregnancy, and embryonic and fetal losses in CIDR-GnRH synchronized Nili-Ravi buffaloes. Buffaloes (n = 181) of mixed parity, lactating, 181 ± 73 days postpartum, a body condition score (BCS) of 3.2 ± 0.5 (scale of 1-5), and 450-600 kg weight were subjected to synchronization and resynchronization. All buffaloes received CIDR on Day -9.5. In addition, GnRH was injected 36 h after CIDR removal, and timed artificial insemination (TAI) was performed 18 h later (Day 0). On Day 23, buffaloes were randomly assigned to receive one of the following treatments: 1) CON (n = 63), 2) P4 (n = 55), and 3) GnRH (n = 63) for resynchronization (2nd AI). Pregnancy rate, and embryonic and fetal losses were monitored by serial ultrasonography on Days 30, 45, 60, and 90 after synchronization (1st TAI), respectively. The pregnancy rate in GnRH-treated buffaloes remained significantly and consistently higher (P  0.05) between the OVS and CIDR groups; whereas the, cumulative pregnancy rate in GnRH + OVS buffaloes (81%) after 1st and 2 nd AI when determined on Day 64 was higher (P losses were significantly lower (P losses were fewer and did not differ (P > 0.05) due to treatments on Day 60 or 90 post 1st AI. In conclusion, 1) the pregnancy rate and cumulative pregnancy rate in GnRH-treated buffaloes were higher than in CON buffaloes on Day 64 after synchronization and resynchronization, and 2) embryonic and fetal losses were lower in GnRH-treated buffaloes than in CON buffaloes when determined from Day 31-90 post 1st TAI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Ovulation induction by pulsatile GnRH therapy in 2014: literature review and synthesis of current practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronier, H; Peigné, M; Catteau-Jonard, S; Dewailly, D; Robin, G

    2014-10-01

    The hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is an easily treatable form of female infertility. The most common cause of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is functional hypothalamic amenorrhea. The GnRH pump is a simple and effective treatment to restore fertility of patients with hypothalamic amenorrhea: cumulative pregnancy rate is estimated between 70 and 100% after 6 cycles, compared to a low rate of complications and multiple pregnancies. While only 2.8 cycles are on average required to achieve a pregnancy with a pump, this induction of ovulation stays underused in France. The objective of this paper is to propose a practical manual of pulsatile GnRH, in order to improve the accessibility of pulsatile GnRH for patients with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparison of microdose GnRH agonist protocol with GnRH antagonist / letrazole protocol in patients with poor ovarian response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiğit Çakıroğlu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare microdose GnRH agonist (MDL protocol with GnRH antagonist/letrazole (AL protocol in patients with poor ovarian response. Design: Randomised clinical trial. Setting: Kocaeli University Assisted Reproductive Centre Interventions: POR was diagnosed according to ESHRE Bologna criteria in case of presence of 2 out of 3 criteria. In the MDL group (n=27, 40µg/0.2 cc subcutaneous leuprolid acetate was given two times a day starting on the first day of menstrual cycle. On the second day of the cycle, gonadotrophin stimulation was started at 450-600 IU and/or 150 IU human menopausal gonadotrophin (hMG along with leuprolid. In the AL group (n=28, 5 mg letrazole was given for 5 days starting on the second day of the spontaneous cycle and after the 5th day of the cycle, 450-600 IU and/or 150 IU hMG was given. Main Outcome Measures: To compare the outcomes of MDL protocol with AL protocol in patients with poor ovarian response. Results: Stimulation days, total gonadotrophin dose (IU, peak E2 (pg/ml levels, and endometrial thickness were found to be statistically significantly lower in the AL group. While no cases of cycle cancellation was detected in the MDL group, statistically significantly higher rates of cycle cancellation (%35.7, p<0.001 was detected in the AL group. No statistically significant differences were detected in total oocyte numbers (3.7±2.9 vs 2.7±2.2, number of transferred embryos (1.4±0.5 vs 1.4±1.9, pregnancy rates (3/27 (%11.1 vs 2/28 (%7.1 and implantation rates (3/36 (%8.3 vs 2/22 (%9.1 in between the groups. Comment: Although AL protocol is not superior to MDL protocol in poor ovarian response patients, it may be used as an alternative protocol.

  15. Orion GN&C Fault Management System Verification: Scope And Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Denise; Weiler, David; Flanary, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    In order to ensure long-term ability to meet mission goals and to provide for the safety of the public, ground personnel, and any crew members, nearly all spacecraft include a fault management (FM) system. For a manned vehicle such as Orion, the safety of the crew is of paramount importance. The goal of the Orion Guidance, Navigation and Control (GN&C) fault management system is to detect, isolate, and respond to faults before they can result in harm to the human crew or loss of the spacecraft. Verification of fault management/fault protection capability is challenging due to the large number of possible faults in a complex spacecraft, the inherent unpredictability of faults, the complexity of interactions among the various spacecraft components, and the inability to easily quantify human reactions to failure scenarios. The Orion GN&C Fault Detection, Isolation, and Recovery (FDIR) team has developed a methodology for bounding the scope of FM system verification while ensuring sufficient coverage of the failure space and providing high confidence that the fault management system meets all safety requirements. The methodology utilizes a swarm search algorithm to identify failure cases that can result in catastrophic loss of the crew or the vehicle and rare event sequential Monte Carlo to verify safety and FDIR performance requirements.

  16. A COMPREHENSIVE PHOTOMETRIC STUDY OF THE CONTACT BINARY GN BOO WITH POSSIBLE MAGNETIC ACTIVITIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J. J.; Qian, S. B.; Zhang, J.; He, J. J.; Zhao, E. G.; Zhu, L. Y.; Liao, W. P.; Liu, L.; Zhang, Y. P.

    2015-01-01

    Multi-color photometric data of GN Boo observed from 2010 to 2013 are presented. The intrinsic variations of the light curves are remarkable, and their phenomena are probable evidence of stronger magnetic activities on the surfaces of the components. Based on all CCD times of minimum light, a secular increase superimposed on a cyclic oscillation is found. The orbital period increases at a rate of dP/dt = +1.74 × 10 −7 days yr −1 , which can be explained by mass transfer from the less massive component to the more massive one. The period and amplitude of the cyclic variation are P = 9.5632 yr and A = 0.0046 days, respectively, which correspond to the previous published results. Using the 2010 version of the W–D code, five sets of photometric solutions were derived from our new data. The results imply that the stellar spot, the degree of fill-out, and the temperature difference ΔT between the components of GN Boo are variable. It is inferred that the magnetic activities perhaps influence the outer radius of the component, causing the temperature of the component star and the level of contact to change

  17. The potential for castration of domestic animals by active immunization against GnRH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, A.; Allen, A.F.; Murphy, B.D.; Mapletoft, R.J.; Cohen, R.

    1990-01-01

    Trials have been carried out in sheep and beef cattle in attempts to induce immunity against gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH), with the objective of using immunocastration as a replacement for surgical castration. Of the protein carriers used, ovalbumin and horse albumin yielded highest responses, with keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH) being a potent substitute for both. Different adjuvants were also used. In these trials, highest titre responses were obtained using Freund's complete (FCA) or Freund's incomplete (FIA) adjuvant in cattle and sheep. Although no adjuvant was found to yield as high a response as FCA and Alhydrogel, an aluminium hydroxide adjuvant generally yielded a high response in cattle and sheep. The results from the trials in beef calves indicate that active immunization against GnRH does not affect average daily gains, total body weight gain or carcass dressing percentage. The results suggest the potential of immunocastration as a substitute for surgical castration in cattle and sheep. (author). 30 refs, 8 figs, 2 tabs

  18. Development of a Ga-68 labeled triptorelin analog for GnRH receptor imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zoghi, Masoumeh; Niazi, Ali [Islamic Azad Univ., Arak (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Chemistry; Jalilian, Amir R.; Johari-daha, Fariba; Alirezapour, Behrouz [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI) (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Radiation Application Research School; Ramezanpour, Sorour [K.N. Toosi Univ. of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Peptide Chemistry Research Center

    2016-08-01

    Optimized total synthesis, radiolabeling and quality control of [{sup 68}Ga]-DOTA-Hyd-TRP as an efficient and possible PET radiotracer for GnRH receptor imaging in various tumors is of great interest. DOTA-Hyd-TRP was synthesized using solid phase peptide synthesis followed by conjugation to DOTA using pSCN-Bn-DOTA. [{sup 68}Ga]-DOTA-Hyd-TRP was prepared using generator-based [{sup 68}Ga]GaCl{sub 3} and DOTA-Hyd-TRP under optimized conditions for time, temperature, ligand amount, gallium content and column cartridge purification followed by proper formulation. The biodistribution of the tracer in rats was studied using tissue counting up to 120 min. [{sup 68}Ga]-DOTA-Hyd-TRP was prepared at optimized conditions in 5-7 min at 95 C followed by separation using C{sub 18} cartridge (radiochemical purity ∼99 ± 0.88% ITLC, > 99% HPLC, specific activity: 300 ± 15 MBq/nM). The biodistribution of the tracer demonstrated high kidney uptake of the tracer in 10-20 min as well as significant testicular uptake consistent with reported GnRH receptor mappings. Block test studies by triptorelin pretreatment of the animals prior to tracer administration demonstrated significant specific uptake in receptor rich organs including testes and stomach.

  19. Melanin-concentrating hormone directly inhibits GnRH neurons and blocks kisspeptin activation, linking energy balance to reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Min; Dumalska, Iryna; Morozova, Elena; van den Pol, Anthony; Alreja, Meenakshi

    2009-10-06

    A link between energy balance and reproduction is critical for the survival of all species. Energy-consuming reproductive processes need to be aborted in the face of a negative energy balance, yet knowledge of the pathways mediating this link remains limited. Fasting and food restriction that inhibit fertility also upregulate the hypothalamic melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) system that promotes feeding and decreases energy expenditure; MCH knockout mice are lean and have a higher metabolism but remain fertile. MCH also modulates sleep, drug abuse behavior, and mood, and MCH receptor antagonists are currently being developed as antiobesity and antidepressant drugs. Despite the clinical implications of MCH, the direct postsynaptic effects of MCH have never been reported in CNS neurons. Using patch-clamp recordings in brain slices from multiple lines of transgenic GFP mice, we demonstrate a strong inhibitory effect of MCH on an exclusive population of septal vGluT2-GnRH neurons that is activated by the puberty-triggering and preovulatory luteinizing hormone surge-mediating peptide, kisspeptin. MCH has no effect on kisspeptin-insensitive GnRH, vGluT2, cholinergic, or GABAergic neurons located within the same nucleus. The inhibitory effects of MCH are reproducible and nondesensitizing and are mediated via a direct postsynaptic Ba(2+)-sensitive K(+) channel mechanism involving the MCHR1 receptor. MCH immunoreactive fibers are in close proximity to vGluT2-GFP and GnRH-GFP neurons. Importantly, MCH blocks the excitatory effect of kisspeptin on vGluT2-GnRH neurons. Considering the role of MCH in regulating energy balance and of GnRH and kisspeptin in triggering puberty and maintaining fertility, MCH may provide a critical link between energy balance and reproduction directly at the level of the kisspeptin-activated vGluT2-GnRH neuron.

  20. PHOTOMETRIC STUDIES OF THREE NEGLECTED SHORT-PERIOD CONTACT BINARIES GN BOOTIS, BL LEONIS, AND V1918 CYGNI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Y.-G.; Dai, H.-F.; Qian, S.-B.

    2013-01-01

    We present new photometry for three short-period contact binaries, GN Boo, BL Leo, and V1918 Cyg, observed from 2008 December to 2012 April using several small telescopes in China. Photometric models were deduced from new observations using the updated Wilson-Devinney Code. The results show that GN Boo and BL Leo are W-type contact binaries, while V1918 Cyg is an A-type one. The mass ratios and fill-out factors are q = 0.320(± 0.002) and f = 5.8(± 0.1)% for GN Boo, q = 0.476(± 0.005) and f = 21.3(± 1.1)% for BL Leo, q = 0.264(± 0.002), and f = 49.7(± 0.7)% for V1918 Cyg, respectively. From the (O – C) curves, it is discovered that the orbital periods of three binaries have varied in a complicated way, i.e., cyclic oscillation for GN Boo, long-term period decrease for BL Leo, and both for V1918 Cyg. The cyclic variations for GN Boo and V1918 Cyg may probably be attributed to the magnetic activity of the primary component or light-time effect due to the third body. Meanwhile, the secular period decreases for BL Leo and V1918 Cyg may result from mass transfer from the primary to the secondary, accompanying the mass and angular momentum loss from the central system. Finally, GN Boo, BL Leo, and V1918 Cyg will evolve into deep contact binaries. Additionally, a statistical study of 37 contact binaries with decreasing periods is given. We obtained the relations of q – f and q – dln P/dt, and preliminarily determined the mass loss rate of dln M/dt from the binary system.

  1. MDS G(N) fast differentiation between natural and artificial gamma radiation with a new class of mobile instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katzung, W.; Bottcher, J.

    2009-01-01

    A State-of-the-Art tool used for detecting and tracking artificial gamma radiation out of a helicopter or a vehicle is the MDS G(N) - Mobile Detection System. A highly sensitive scintillation detector detects a significant artificial gamma radiation on the ground even if the helicopter is travelling at high speed. The GPS-aided system visualizes the measured values on a moveable map displayed on the screen of a notebook every second. The colours of the continuously entered points do represent adjustable alarm thresholds. This way, location and intensity of an unknown radioactive source or a radioactive contamination can be determined very quickly. The NBR-technology (Natural Background Rejection) which is used here leads to expressive measurement results differentiating between artificial and natural gamma radiation. Additional He-3 detectors allow simultaneously the detection of neutrons. The NBR principle - developed by Thermo Scientific - stands out for its very short response times. Thus, artificial radiation can be detected reliably within seconds - even when the unit is operated by untrained staff. Unlike traditional analytic measuring techniques, the NBR method is able to detect artificial radiation sources hidden or strongly shielded gamma sources clearly from the natural background radiation. The measuring range from 1 nSv/h to 20 ?Sv/h and is extended to 1 Sv/h with a Geiger Mueller counting tube. The sensitivity amounts to max. 20000 cps (referred to 1 ?Sv/h for Cs-137). The NBR- technique is well-proven and tested for: tracking hidden radiation sources, even such ones with low activity or which are shielded, detection of artificial radiation portions in the range of the natural background, reliably measuring the ambient equivalent dose rate in the range of the natural background, fast detection of artificial radioactivity out of helicopters and vehicles.(author)

  2. Proteome analysis of liver cells expressing a full-length hepatitis C virus (HCV) replicon and biopsy specimens of posttransplantation liver from HCV-infected patients

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jacobs, J. M.; Diamond, D. L.; Chan, E. Y.; Gritsenko, M. A.; Qian, W.; Šťastná, Miroslava; Baas, T.; Camp II, D. G .H.; Carithers Jr., R. L.; Smith, R. D.; Katze, M. G.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 79, č. 12 (2005), s. 7558-7569 ISSN 0022-538X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : proteome analysis * hepatitis C Virus * mass spectrometry Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 5.178, year: 2005

  3. Corifollitropin alfa followed by rFSH in a GnRH antagonist protocol for poor ovarian responder patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polyzos, Nikolaos P; Devos, Michel; Humaidan, Peter

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify whether women with poor ovarian response may benefit from treatment with corifollitropin alfa in a GnRH antagonist protocol. DESIGN: Retrospective pilot study. SETTING: University-based tertiary care center. PATIENT(S): Poor ovarian responders fulfilling the Bologna criteria...... developed by European Society for Human Reproduction and Embryology Consensus Group. INTERVENTION(S): Corifollitropin alfa (150 μg) followed by 300 IU rFSH in a GnRH antagonist protocol. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Endocrinologic profile and ongoing pregnancy rates. RESULT(S): Among 43 women treated...

  4. Circadian control of kisspeptin and a gated GnRH response mediate the preovulatory luteinizing hormone surge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, Wilbur P; Jarjisian, Stephan G; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    2011-01-01

    In spontaneously ovulating rodents, the preovulatory LH surge is initiated on the day of proestrus by a timed, stimulatory signal originating from the circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The present studies explored whether kisspeptin is part of the essential neural circuit...... linking the SCN to the GnRH system to stimulate ovulation in Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus). Kisspeptin neurons exhibit an estrogen-dependent, daily pattern of cellular activity consistent with a role in the circadian control of the LH surge. The SCN targets kisspeptin neurons via vasopressinergic...... of ovulatory control with interactions among the circadian system, kisspeptin signaling, and a GnRH gating mechanism of control....

  5. GnRH agonist ovulation trigger and hCG-based, progesterone-free luteal support: a proof of concept study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kol, Shahar; Humaidan, Peter; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    in normal responder IVF patients. We here present a novel approach for luteal support after a GnRHa trigger. METHODS Normal responder patients who failed at least one previous IVF attempt, during which a conventional hCG trigger was used, were consecutively enrolled in the study. A GnRH antagonist...

  6. Changes in gonadotropin-releasing hormone and gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor gene expression after an increase in carbon monoxide concentration in the cavernous sinus of male wild boar and pig crossbread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romerowicz-Misielak, M; Tabecka-Lonczynska, A; Koziol, K; Gilun, P; Stefanczyk-Krzymowska, S; Och, W; Koziorowski, M

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies indicate that there are at least a few regulatory systems involved in photoperiodic synchronisation of reproductive activity, which starts with the retina and ends at the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) pulse generator. Recently we have shown indicated that the amount of carbon monoxide (CO) released from the eye into the ophthalmic venous blood depends on the intensity of sunlight. The aim of this study was to test whether changes in the concentration of carbon monoxide in the ophthalmic venous blood may modulate reproductive activity, as measured by changes in GnRH and GnRH receptor gene expression. The animal model used was mature male swine crossbred from wild boars and domestic sows (n = 48). We conducted in vivo experiments to determine the effect of increased CO concentrations in the cavernous sinus of the mammalian perihypophyseal vascular complex on gene expression of GnRH and GnRH receptors as well as serum luteinizing hormone (LH) levels. The experiments were performed during long photoperiod days near the summer solstice (second half of June) and short photoperiod days near the winter solstice (second half of December). These crossbred swine demonstrated a seasonally-dependent marked variation in GnRH and GnRH receptor gene expression and systemic LH levels in response to changes in CO concentration in ophthalmic venous blood. These results seem to confirm the hypothesis of humoral phototransduction as a mechanism for some of bright light's effects in animal chronobiology and the effect of CO on GnRH and GnRH receptor gene expression.

  7. Endocrine dynamics during pulsatile GnRH administration in patients with hypothalamic amenorrhea and polycystic ovarian disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossmanith, W G; Wirth, U; Benz, R; Wolf, A S

    1989-01-01

    The LH secretory patterns and ovarian endocrine responses have been determined during pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) administration for induction of ovulation in patients with hypothalamic amenorrhea (HA). However, until now these endocrine dynamics during GnRH therapy have not been thoroughly investigated in patients with polycystic ovarian disease (PCOD). Seven patients with HA and 4 patients with PCOD have therefore been studied to determine changes in LH pulsatile activity and in serum sex steroid levels in response to chronic intermittent GnRH stimulation. GnRH was administered intravenously (5-10 micrograms/90 minutes) by means of a portable infusion pump. Blood samples were obtained at 15-minute intervals for 4 hours on the day before the start of GnRH stimulation (control day) and on treatment days 5, 10 and 15. LH was determined in all samples and FSH, serum androgens and estrogens were measured in baseline samples by RIA. While 8 (62%) ovulations and 5 conceptions were observed in 13 treatment cycles in patients with HA, no ovulations were achieved during 9 treatment cycles in patients with PCOD. On the control day significantly (p less than 0.05) higher basal LH and testosterone (T) levels and significantly (p less than 0.05) lower FSH levels were found in the PCOD patients. The LH pulsatile profiles of the PCOD patients showed significantly (p less than 0.05) higher pulse amplitudes and areas under the curve (integrated responses). Pulsatile GnRH administration induced a significant (p less than 0.05) increase in LH pulse amplitudes in both HA and PCOD patients, and also increased (p less than 0.05) the integrated responses in patients with HA. During the GnRH stimulation, the LH interpulse intervals of both HA and PCOD patients were found to be similar to the frequency in which exogenous GnRH was administered. FSH levels rose continuously (p less than 0.001) during stimulation in patients with HA, but remained unchanged in patients

  8. Impact of GnRH agonist triggering and intensive luteal steroid support on live-birth rates and ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iliodromiti, Stamatina; Lan, Vuong Thi Ngoc; Tuong, Ho Manh

    2013-01-01

    Conventional luteal support packages are inadequate to facilitate a fresh transfer after GnRH agonist (GnRHa) trigger in patients at high risk of developing ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS). By providing intensive luteal-phase support with oestradiol and progesterone satisfactory implanta......Conventional luteal support packages are inadequate to facilitate a fresh transfer after GnRH agonist (GnRHa) trigger in patients at high risk of developing ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS). By providing intensive luteal-phase support with oestradiol and progesterone satisfactory...... implantation rates can be sustained. The objective of this study was to assess the live-birth rate and incidence of OHSS after GnRHa trigger and intensive luteal steroid support compared to traditional hCG trigger and conventional luteal support in OHSS high risk Asian patients....

  9. Endocrine profiles after triggering of final oocyte maturation with GnRH agonist after cotreatment with the GnRH antagonist ganirelix during ovarian hyperstimulation for in vitro fertilization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.C.J.M. Fauser (Bart); D. de Jong (Danielle); F. Olivennes; H. Wramsby; C. Tay; J. Itskovitz-Eldor; H.G. van Hooren

    2002-01-01

    textabstractIn a randomized multicenter study, the efficacies of two different GnRH agonists were compared with that of hCG for triggering final stages of oocyte maturation after ovarian hyperstimulation for in vitro fertilization. Ovarian stimulation was conducted by recombinant

  10. Impact of GnRH analogues on oocyte/embryo quality and embryo development in in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection cycles: a case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rigó János

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the clinical outcomes of ovarian stimulation with either GnRH-agonist or GnRH-antagonist analogues for in vitro fertilization (IVF being well analysed, the effect of analogues on oocyte/embryo quality and embryo development is still not known in detail. The aim of this case-control study was to compare the efficacy of a multiple-dose GnRH antagonist protocol with that of the GnRH agonist long protocol with a view to oocyte and embryo quality, embryo development and IVF treatment outcome. Methods Between October 2001 and December 2008, 100 patients were stimulated with human menopausal gonadotrophin (HMG and GnRH antagonist in their first treatment cycle for IVF or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI. One hundred combined GnRH agonist + HMG (long protocol cycles were matched to the GnRH antagonist + HMG cycles by age, BMI, baseline FSH levels and by cause of infertility. We determined the number and quality of retrieved oocytes, the rate of early-cleavage embryos, the morphology and development of embryos, as well as clinical pregnancy rates. Statistical analysis was performed using Wilcoxon's matched pairs rank sum test and McNemar's chi-square test. P Results The rate of cytoplasmic abnormalities in retrieved oocytes was significantly higher with the use of GnRH antagonist than in GnRH agonist cycles (62.1% vs. 49.9%; P Conclusion Antagonist seemed to influence favourably some parameters of early embryo development dynamics, while other morphological parameters seemed not to be altered according to GnRH analogue used for ovarian stimulation in IVF cycles.

  11. Guanylin and uroguanylin mRNA expression is increased following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, but guanylins do not play a significant role in body weight regulation and glycemic control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez-Cachon, María L; Pedersen, Søren L; Rigbolt, Kristoffer T

    2018-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether intestinal expression of guanylate cyclase activator 2A (GUCA2A) and guanylate cyclase activator 2B (GUCA2B) genes is regulated in obese humans following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), and to evaluate the corresponding guanylin (GN) and uroguanylin (UGN) peptides...... for potentially contributing to the beneficial metabolic effects of RYGB. METHODS: Enteroendocrine cells were harvested peri- and post-RYGB, and GUCA2A/GUCA2B mRNA expression was compared. GN, UGN and their prohormones (proGN, proUGN) were administered subcutaneously in normal-weight mice to evaluate effects...... on food intake. GN and UGN, as well as their prohormones, were evaluated for effects on glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in rat pancreatic islets and perfused rat pancreas. RESULTS: GUCA2A and GUCA2B mRNA expression was significantly upregulated in enteroendocrine cells after RYGB. Peripheral...

  12. Experience with the once-yearly histrelin (GnRHa subcutaneous implant in the treatment of central precocious puberty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine A Lewis

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Katherine A Lewis, Erica A EugsterDepartment of Pediatrics, Indiana University School of Medicine, Riley Hospital for Children, Indianapolis, USAAbstract: In 2007, a hydrogel histrelin implant was approved for the treatment of children with central precocious puberty (CPP. Children with CPP commonly have reduced height potential due to premature closure of the epiphyseal growth plates from exposure to sex steroids. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone analog (GnRHa treatment halts puberty and allows for improvement of adult height. A hydrogel implant delivery system utilizing the potent GnRHa, histrelin, was first developed for use in men with prostate cancer. A once yearly histrelin subcutaneous implant was subsequently developed for the treatment of children with CPP. Studies to date have demonstrated safety, tolerability, and effectiveness of this treatment option in patients treated up to 2 years. The most common adverse effects of the implant relate to implant site pain or bruising. Cost of this treatment seems comparable to somewhat higher than the commonly used GnRHa treatment option, depot leuprolide. While long term studies are needed to establish continued efficacy and safety beyond 2 years of treatment, the histrelin implant appears to be an attractive option for GnRHa treatment in patients with CPP.Keywords: central precocious puberty, histrelin, implant, gonadotropin-releasing-hormone analogs

  13. Effects of GnRHa treatment during vitellogenesis on the reproductive physiology of thermally challenged female Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelli Anderson

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Tasmanian Atlantic salmon (S. salar broodstock can experience temperatures above 20 °C, which impairs reproductive development and inhibits ovulation. The present study investigated the prolonged use of gonadotropin releasing hormone analogue (GnRHa during vitellogenesis as a means of maintaining endocrine function and promoting egg quality at elevated temperature in maiden and repeat spawning S. salar. GnRHa-treatment during vitellogenesis did not compensate for the negative effects of thermal challenge on the timing of ovulation, egg size, egg fertility or embryo survival in any fish maintained at 22 °C relative to 14 °C. The lack of effectiveness was reflected by the endocrine data, as plasma follicle stimulating hormone and luteinising hormone levels were not different between treated and untreated groups at 22 °C. Furthermore, plasma testosterone and E2 levels were unchanged in GnRHa-treated fish at 22 °C, and plasma levels were generally lower in both groups maintained at 22 °C relative to 14 °C. Transcription of vitellogenin, and zona pellucida B and C was not enhanced in GnRHa-treated fish relative to untreated fish at 22 °C, presumably due to observed suppression of plasma E2. These results indicate that thermal impairment of reproduction is likely to occur on multiple levels, and is difficult to overcome via hormonal manipulation.

  14. Recent Experiences of the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) GN and C Technical Discipline Team (TDT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennehy, Cornelius J.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC), initially formed in 2003, is an independently funded NASA Program whose dedicated team of technical experts provides objective engineering and safety assessments of critical, high risk projects. The GN&C Technical Discipline Team (TDT) is one of fifteen such discipline-focused teams within the NESC organization. The TDT membership is composed of GN&C specialists from across NASA and its partner organizations in other government agencies, industry, national laboratories, and universities. This paper will briefly define the vision, mission, and purpose of the NESC organization. The role of the GN&C TDT will then be described in detail along with an overview of how this team operates and engages in its objective engineering and safety assessments of critical NASA projects. This paper will then describe selected recent experiences, over the period 2007 to present, of the GN&C TDT in which they directly performed or supported a wide variety of NESC assessments and consultations.

  15. GnRH and prostaglandin-based synchronization protocols as alternatives to progestogen-based treatments in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekik, M; Haile, A; Abebe, A; Muluneh, D; Goshme, S; Ben Salem, I; Hilali, M El-Dine; Lassoued, N; Chanyalew, Y; Rischkowsky, B

    2016-12-01

    The study investigated, for cycling sheep, synchronizing protocols simultaneously to the standard "P" protocol using progestogens priming with intravaginal devices and gonadotropin. In November 2014, 90 adult Menz ewes were assigned to either the "P" protocol, "PGF" treatment where oestrus and ovulation were synchronized using two injections of prostaglandin 11 days apart or a "GnRH" treatment where the ewes had their oestrus and ovulation synchronized with GnRH (day 0)-prostaglandin (day 6)-GnRH (day 9) sequence. The ewes were naturally mated at the induced oestrus and the following 36 days. Plasma progesterone revealed that 92% of the ewes were ovulating before synchronization and all, except one, ovulated in response to the applied treatments. All "P" ewes exhibited oestrus during the 96-hr period after the end of the treatments in comparison with only 79.3% and 73.3% for "PGF" and "GnRH" ewes, respectively (p sheep after the rainy season when most animals are spontaneously cycling. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  16. FSH inhibits the augmentation by oestradiol of the pituitary responsiveness to GnRH in the female rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuiling, GA; Valkhof, N; Koiter, TR

    The effect of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) treatment on the pituitary response to gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) was studied in rats in various reproductive conditions. A 3-day treatment of cycling rats with FSH (Metrodin(R); 10 IU/injection) lowered the spontaneous pre-ovulatory

  17. The effect of intracerebroventricular injection of L-glutamate on the hypothalamic GnRH content in rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Qiang; He Haoming

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of intracerebroventricular injection of L-Glutamate (L-Glu) on hypothalamic gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) content in male rats. Methods: The GnRH content in the supernatant of hypothalamic homogenates was measured by RIA. Results: The mean values of hypothalamic GnRH content in rat were 1.59 +- 0.41, 0.88 +- 0.34, 0.70 +- 0.42 ng/10mg wet tissue 40 min after intracerebroventricular injection of 0.01176, 0.1176, 1.176 μg/20 μl L-Glu respectively, which were significantly lower than those in controls with saline injections (P 3 H-Glu in rat at 40 min the author found that the intake of 3 H-glu by MBH was 1069.82 +- 490.33 cpm/10 mg wet tissues, the highest value among those taken by cerebrum, cerebellum, pituitary, POA and MBH itself. Conclusion: L-Glu probably participates in the regulation of functional activity of GnRH neurons in the hypothalamus

  18. Final height in central precocious puberty after long term treatment with a slow release GnRH agonist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostdijk, W; Rikken, B; Schreuder, S; Otten, Barto; Odink, R; Rouwe, C; Jansen, M; Gerver, WJ; Waelkens, J; Drop, S

    1996-01-01

    Objective-To study the resumption of puberty and the final height achieved in children with central precocious puberty (CPP) treated with the GnRH agonist triptorelin. Patients-31 girls and five boys with CPP who were treated with triptorelin 3.75 mg intramuscularly every four weeks. Girls were

  19. Clinical Effects of a Microdose GnRH Agonist Flare Regimen Administered to Poor Responders Undergoing ART Cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aflatoonian Abbas

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The microdose GnRH agonist (GnRH-a flare protocol may have a particular value for previously poor responders in whom it has been observed to stimulate dramatic increases in serum FSH. The Purpose of this study was to determine the effects of microdose GnRH-a in poor responders. This is a clinical trial with before and after design. This study was done in Research and Clinical Center for Infertility (Shahid Sadoughi University, Yazd, Iran and Madar Hospital, Yazd, Iran. In this study, 61 poor responders volunteered for in vitro fertilization (IVF or intracytoplacmic sperm injection (ICSI. The volunteers were divided into two age groups (group A, 20 - 34; group B, 35 - 40 and received low dose oral contraceptive pills for 21 days, then 40µg of subcutaneous buserelin 2 times/day from day 3 of the cycle and human menopausal gonadotropin (hMG 3 ampoules/day from day 5. Main Outcome measures were number of follicles, oocytes and embryos, and pregnancy rate (PR. These measures were then compared with those of the previous cycle. There were significant differences in all parameters (P < 0.05. Pregnancy occurred in 3 women (5%. There was no significant difference in number of follicles, oocytes and embryo between two age groups (P > 0.05. Use of microdose GnRH-a plus HMG for controlled ovarian hyperstimulation in IVF or ICSI cycles can lead to formation of more follicles, oocyte and embryo in poor responders.

  20. Effect of duration of the GnRH agonists in the luteal phase in the outcome of assisted reproduction cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geber, Selmo; Sampaio, Marcos

    2013-06-01

    The effect of long-acting GnRHa, in the luteal phase, during ART cycles varies from one patient to another. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the effect of long-acting GnRHa in the luteal phase, in ART cycles, affects pregnancy rates according to the duration of its action in such phase. This is a retrospective study of 367 patients submitted to ovulation induction for in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection procedures that used long-acting depot GnRHa for pituitary suppression. Patients were stratified according to the period of action of the agonist in the luteal phase: group 1, ≤ 6 days; group 2, 7 to 12 days; and group 3, >12 days. The following variables were analyzed: ovarian response, age, infertility causes and pregnancy rates. Group 1 (n = 53) had a mean age of 33.8 ± 4.55 years (23-44 years) and a pregnancy rate of 45.2%. In group 2 (n = 118), mean age was 33.7 ± 4.5 years (24-44 years) and the pregnancy rate was 38.9%. In group 3 (n = 196), mean age was 33.7 ± 4.4 years (23-43 years) and the pregnancy rate was 47.4%. Regardless of the duration of depot GnRHa action in the luteal phase, no significant association with pregnancy rates was found.

  1. The Orion GN and C Data-Driven Flight Software Architecture for Automated Sequencing and Fault Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Ellis; Hart, Jeremy; Odegard, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    The Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CET) is being designed to include significantly more automation capability than either the Space Shuttle or the International Space Station (ISS). In particular, the vehicle flight software has requirements to accommodate increasingly automated missions throughout all phases of flight. A data-driven flight software architecture will provide an evolvable automation capability to sequence through Guidance, Navigation & Control (GN&C) flight software modes and configurations while maintaining the required flexibility and human control over the automation. This flexibility is a key aspect needed to address the maturation of operational concepts, to permit ground and crew operators to gain trust in the system and mitigate unpredictability in human spaceflight. To allow for mission flexibility and reconfrgurability, a data driven approach is being taken to load the mission event plan as well cis the flight software artifacts associated with the GN&C subsystem. A database of GN&C level sequencing data is presented which manages and tracks the mission specific and algorithm parameters to provide a capability to schedule GN&C events within mission segments. The flight software data schema for performing automated mission sequencing is presented with a concept of operations for interactions with ground and onboard crew members. A prototype architecture for fault identification, isolation and recovery interactions with the automation software is presented and discussed as a forward work item.

  2. Six-month gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH agonist depots provide efficacy, safety, convenience, and comfort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillips JM

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available E David Crawford, Jason M PhillipsUniversity of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO, USAAbstract: Two different 6-month GnRH agonist depot formulations approved for palliative treatment of advanced and metastatic prostate cancer in the United States – leuprolide acetate 45 mg and triptorelinpalmoate 22.5 mg – provide patients with efficacy and safety comparable to those of existing 1-, 3-, and 4-month GnRH agonist depots. However, the 6-month formulations can increase patient convenience, comfort, and compliance by reducing the number of physician visits and injections required. At the conclusion of their pivotal trials, the 6-month formulations demonstrated efficacy rates in achieving chemical castration (serum testosterone #50 ng/dL that ranged between 93% and 99%. As with existing GnRH agonist depot formulations, hot flashes represented the most common adverse event reported in trials of 6-month leuprolide acetate or triptorelin. As such, these products may prove useful not only for their labeled indication, but also as adjuncts to other treatments such as radical prostatectomy, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. We recommend further research, including head-to-head trials between the 6-month GnRH depots, to refine our understanding of these products.Keywords: prostate cancer, leuprorelin, leuprolide, triptorelin, 6-month depot, testosterone

  3. In vivo activity of native GnRHs and their analogues on ovulation in the American catfish, Clarias gariepinus (Burchell)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Szabó, T.; Radics, F.; Barth, Tomislav; Horváth, L.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 2 (2007), s. 140-146 ISSN 1355-557X R&D Projects: GA MZe QF3028; GA MZe QF3029 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : GnRH * ovulation * African catfish Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.067, year: 2007

  4. Perspectives on the co-treatment with GnRHa in female patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luminita Nicoleta Cima

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Outcomes after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT for patients with both malignant and nonmalignant diseases have improved significantly in recent years. However, the endocrine system is highly susceptible to damage by the high-dose chemotherapy and/or irradiation used in the conditioning regimen before HSCT. Ovarian failure and subsequent infertility are frequent complications that long-term HSCT survivors and their partners face with a negative impact on their QoL. Several meta-analyses of randomized clinical trials showed that gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa administration in advance of starting standard chemotherapy decreases the risk of gonadal dysfunction and infertility in cancer patients, but GnRHa use for ovarian protection in HSCT patients is not fully determined. In this review, we are discussing the potential preservation of ovarian function and fertility in pubertal girls/premenopausal women who undergo HSCT using GnRHa in parallel with conditioning chemotherapy, focusing on the current data available and making some special remarks regarding the use of GnRHa.

  5. Induction of fertile estrus in bitches using a sustained-release formulation of a GnRH agonist (leuprolide acetate).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, T; Tani, H; Gonda, M; Nakagawa, A; Ohmura, M; Mori, J; Torii, R; Tamada, H; Sawada, T

    1998-04-01

    A single subcutaneous injection of a sustained-release formulation of a potent GnRH agonist, leuprolide acetate (LA; [D-Leu6, Pro9NEt]-GnRH), was evaluated as a method of inducing fertile estrus in 12 mature anestrous and 6 prepubertal beagle bitches. The bitches were treated with microencapsulated LA (100 micrograms/kg, s.c.) at 120 or 150 d post partum, or at 1 yr of age, followed by a GnRH-analogue (fertirelin; [Pro9NEt]-GnRH, 3 micrograms/kg, i.m.) on the first day of induced estrus. Signs of estrus were seen within 10.3 +/- 0.9 d after LA administration in all bitches. The interestrous interval in 120- and 150-d post-partum bitches was shortened (P bitches. All LA treated dogs demonstrated behavioral estrus and mated. Three of 6 (50%) at 120 d post partum, 6 of 6 (100%) at 150 d post partum and 5 of 6 (83%) of prepubertal (1-yr old) bitches then became pregnant and produced a mean litter size of 4.1 +/- 0.8 pups. A normal circulating estrogen and progesterone response pattern was observed in mature anestrous bitches. A prepubertal bitch that failed to become pregnant had a similar estrogen response pattern but an insufficient progesterone profile. The results suggest that microencapsulated LA can be useful in inducing fertile estrus in the domestic dogs.

  6. Effect of reproductive methods and GnRH administration on long-term protocol in Santa Ines ewes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biehl, Marcos V; Ferraz Junior, Marcos V C; Ferreira, Evandro M; Polizel, Daniel M; Miszura, Alexandre A; Barroso, José P R; Oliveira, Gabriela B; Bertoloni, Analisa V; Pires, Alexandre V

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to determine whether reproductive performance of ewes submitted to laparoscopic timed artificial insemination (TAI) would be similar to ante meridiem (AM)/post meridiem (PM) rule and assisted natural mating (NM), and whether GnRH may enhance the pregnancy rate in TAI. In experiment I, 191 non-lactating ewes were synchronized, then TAI was performed either 48 h after progesterone (P4) removal (TAI-48 h) or 12 h after estrus detection (AM/PM); moreover, some ewes were submitted to NM (NM) as control treatment. In experiment II, 247 non-lactating ewes were allocated in five treatments, a control (no-GnRH on protocol) and four treatments arranged in a factorial design 2 × 2. The factors were time and dose of GnRH: ewes that received either 10 μg (TAI-10 μg-36 h) or 25 μg of GnRH (TAI-25 μg-36 h) 36 h after P4 removal and ewes that received either 10 μg (TAI-10 μg-48 h) or 25 μg of GnRH (TAI-25 μg-48 h) at time of insemination, 48 h after P4 removal. In experiment I, pregnancy rate in TAI-48 h was lower (P = 0.03) than AM/PM and NM. Moreover, the probability of pregnancy in TAI-48 h was higher (P = 0.06) in ewes detected in estrus early. In experiment II, the use of GnRH in TAI protocols increased (P < 0.01) pregnancy rate at synchronization, and TAI-25 μ-48 h and TAI-10 μg-36 h treatments increased (P = 0.02) pregnancy rate compered to TAI-10 μg-48 h. We conclude that TAI decreased pregnancy rate compered to NM and AM/PM, which may be improved by GnRH use in TAI to synchronize ovulation.

  7. The utility of the gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH) test in the diagnosis of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Krzysztof C; Cajdler-Łuba, Agata; Salata, Ireneusz; Bieńkiewicz, Małgorzata; Lewiński, Andrzej

    2011-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is characterised by increased frequency of hypothalamic GnRH pulses leading to a relative increase in LH synthesis by the pituitary. As GnRH stimulation can reveal a relative LH excess, we have endeavoured to assess whether GnRH test might be useful in the diagnosis of PCOS. The study involved 185 subjects: a PCOS group, n = 151, all with oligo- or amenorrhoea, aged (mean ± SD) 24.8 ± ± 5.4 years, BMI 24.5 ± 6.0 kg/m²; and regularly menstruating controls, n = 34, aged 26.6 ± 5.0 years, BMI 24.6 ± 5.5 kg/m². In 121 subjects with PCOS and in 32 controls, serum LH and FSH were measured before (0 minutes) and 30 and 60 minutes after GnRH stimulation (100 μg i.v.). Insulin resistance was assessed by HOMA and Insulin Resistance Index derived from glucose and insulin concentrations during 75 gram oral glucose tolerance test. Women with PCOS had higher testosterone (p = 0.0002), androstendione (p = 0.0021), 17OH-progesterone (p PCOS. Baseline and stimulated LH concentrations were higher in PCOS (9.09 ± 5.56 vs 4.83 ± 1.71 IU/L, 35.48 ± 31.4 vs 16.30 ± 6.68 IU/L, 33.86 ± 31.8 vs 13.45 ± 5.2 IU/L, at 0, 30 and 60 mins post GnRH, respectively, p PCOS in comparison to controls (LH0 min/FSH(₀ min) 1.59 ± 0.95 vs 0.76 ± 0.2, LH(₃₀ min) /FSH(₃₀ min) 4.07 ± 3.0 vs 1.89 ± 0.79, LH(₆₀ min)/FSH(₆₀ min) 3.56 ± 2.58 vs 1.55 ± 0.63, p 2.11 or LH(₆₀ min)/FSH(₆₀ min) > 1.72 had 78.3% and 87.5% sensitivity and 81.7% and 81.3% specificity for the diagnosis of PCOS, respectively. Women with PCOS have higher baseline and GnRH-stimulated LH concentrations. GnRH stimulation results in an increase in LH/FSH ratio in women with PCOS. Therefore we postulate that this phenomenon might be potentially useful as an additional tool in the diagnosis of PCOS.

  8. Highly differentiated, resting gn-specific memory CD8+ T cells persist years after infection by andes hantavirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Manigold

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In man, infection with South American Andes virus (ANDV causes hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS. HCPS due to ANDV is endemic in Southern Chile and much of Argentina and increasing numbers of cases are reported all over South America. A case-fatality rate of about 36% together with the absence of successful antiviral therapies urge the development of a vaccine. Although T-cell responses were shown to be critically involved in immunity to hantaviruses in mouse models, no data are available on the magnitude, specificity and longevity of ANDV-specific memory T-cell responses in patients. Using sets of overlapping peptides in IFN-gamma ELISPOT assays, we herein show in 78 Chilean convalescent patients that Gn-derived epitopes were immunodominant as compared to those from the N- and Gc-proteins. Furthermore, while the relative contribution of the N-specific response significantly declined over time, Gn-specific responses remained readily detectable ex vivo up to 13 years after the acute infection. Tetramer analysis further showed that up to 16.8% of all circulating CD3(+CD8(+ T cells were specific for the single HLA-B*3501-restricted epitope Gn(465-473 years after the acute infection. Remarkably, Gn(465-473-specific cells readily secreted IFN-gamma, granzyme B and TNF-alpha but not IL-2 upon stimulation and showed a 'revertant' CD45RA(+CD27(-CD28(-CCR7(-CD127(- effector memory phenotype, thereby resembling a phenotype seen in other latent virus infections. Most intriguingly, titers of neutralizing antibodies increased over time in 10/17 individuals months to years after the acute infection and independently of whether they were residents of endemic areas or not. Thus, our data suggest intrinsic, latent antigenic stimulation of Gn-specific T-cells. However, it remains a major task for future studies to proof this hypothesis by determination of viral antigen in convalescent patients. Furthermore, it remains to be seen whether Gn-specific T

  9. Effect of test temperature on the fatigue strength of the 12GN2MFAYu tempered steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goritskij, V.M.; Terent'ev, V.F.; Bobyleva, L.A.

    1979-01-01

    The cyclic strength, variation of dislocation structure and fractography of specimen fractures were investigated depending on testing temperature. The specimens were tested at temperatures of 20, 350, 450, 550 deg C. The increase of testing temperature, according to the experimental data obtained, is accompanied by an insignificant reduction of fatigue strength. The testing temperature in the range from 350 to 550 deg C has a weak effect on the fatigue strength of the quenched and tempered steel. A change in the dislocation structure occurs under all tested temperatures in the 12 GN2MFAYu steel during fatigue. The intensity of the rearrangement of dislocation structure increases as the testing temperature increases to 550 deg C causing a decrease of the limited life-time at increased stress amplitudes

  10. Behavior of feral horses in response to culling and GnRH immunocontraception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransom, Jason I.; Powers, Jenny G.; Garbe, Heidi M.; Oehler, Michael W.; Nett, Terry M.; Baker, Dan L.

    2014-01-01

    Wildlife management actions can alter fundamental behaviors of individuals and groups,which may directly impact their life history parameters in unforeseen ways. This is especially true for highly social animals because changes in one individual’s behavior can cascade throughout its social network. When resources to support populations of social animals are limited and populations become locally overabundant, managers are faced with the daunting challenge of decreasing population size without disrupting core behavioral processes. Increasingly, managers are turning to fertility control technologies to supplement culling in efforts to suppress population growth, but little is quantitatively known about how either of these management tools affects behavior. Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) is a small neuropeptide that performs an obligatory role in mammalian reproduction and has been formulated into the immunocontraceptive GonaCon-BTM. We investigated the influences of this vaccine on behavior of feral horses (Equus caballus) at Theodore Roosevelt National Park, North Dakota, USA, for a year preceding and a year following nonlethal culling and GnRH-vaccine treatment. We observed horses during the breeding season and found only minimal differences in time budget behaviors of free-ranging female feral horses treated with GnRH and those treated with saline. The differences observed were consistent with the metabolic demands of pregnancy and lactation. We observed similar social behaviors between treatment groups, reflecting limited reproductive behavior among control females due to high rates of pregnancy and suppressed reproductive behavior among treated females due to GnRH-inhibited ovarian activity. In the treatment year, band stallion age was the only supported factor influencing herding behavior (P < 0.001), harem-tending behavior (P < 0.001), and agonistic behavior (P = 0.02). There was no difference between the mean body condition of control females (4

  11. Long-term effects of GnRH agonists on fertility and behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goericke-Pesch, Sandra Kathrin

    2017-01-01

    ; a significant positive effect in reducing sexual behaviour and libido, hypersexuality, intermale dominance and excessive territorial urine marking has been described. Rates of improvement of the respective behaviour are comparable to those after surgical castration, making GnRH A-SRI a valuable option...... and behaviour have by now been shown to be fully reversible. Knowledge in females is more limited, and particularly, the initial induction of a possibly fertile oestrus and individual variation in duration of efficacy remain problems in bitches and queens treated for suppression of fertility. However, long......-term suppression of oestrous cycle and fertility seems to be possible with induced effects shown to be reversible including restoration of normal fertility after the end of efficacy/GNRH A-SRI removal....

  12. Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Regulates Expression of the DNA Damage Repair Gene, Fanconi anemia A, in Pituitary Gonadotroph Cells1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larder, Rachel; Chang, Lynda; Clinton, Michael; Brown, Pamela

    2007-01-01

    Gonadal function is critically dependant on regulated secretion of the gonadotropin hormones from anterior pituitary gonadotroph cells. Gonadotropin biosynthesis and release is triggered by the binding of hypothalamic GnRH to GnRH receptor expressed on the gonadotroph cell surface. The repertoire of regulatory molecules involved in this process are still being defined. We used the mouse LβT2 gonadotroph cell line, which expresses both gonadotropin hormones, as a model to investigate GnRH regulation of gene expression and differential display reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to identify and isolate hormonally induced changes. This approach identified Fanconi anemia a (Fanca), a gene implicated in DNA damage repair, as a differentially expressed transcript. Mutations in Fanca account for the majority of cases of Fanconi anemia (FA), a recessively inherited disease identified by congenital defects, bone marrow failure, infertility, and cancer susceptibility. We confirmed expression and hormonal regulation of Fanca mRNA by quantitative RT-PCR, which showed that GnRH induced a rapid, transient increase in Fanca mRNA. Fanca protein was also acutely upregulated after GnRH treatment of LβT2 cells. In addition, Fanca gene expression was confined to mature pituitary gonadotrophs and adult mouse pituitary and was not expressed in the immature αT3-1 gonadotroph cell line. Thus, this study extends the expression profile of Fanca into a highly specialized endocrine cell and demonstrates hormonal regulation of expression of the Fanca locus. We suggest that this regulatory mechanism may have a crucial role in the GnRH-response mechanism of mature gonadotrophs and perhaps the etiology of FA. PMID:15128600

  13. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone regulates expression of the DNA damage repair gene, Fanconi anemia A, in pituitary gonadotroph cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larder, Rachel; Chang, Lynda; Clinton, Michael; Brown, Pamela

    2004-09-01

    Gonadal function is critically dependant on regulated secretion of the gonadotropin hormones from anterior pituitary gonadotroph cells. Gonadotropin biosynthesis and release is triggered by the binding of hypothalamic GnRH to GnRH receptor expressed on the gonadotroph cell surface. The repertoire of regulatory molecules involved in this process are still being defined. We used the mouse L beta T2 gonadotroph cell line, which expresses both gonadotropin hormones, as a model to investigate GnRH regulation of gene expression and differential display reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to identify and isolate hormonally induced changes. This approach identified Fanconi anemia a (Fanca), a gene implicated in DNA damage repair, as a differentially expressed transcript. Mutations in Fanca account for the majority of cases of Fanconi anemia (FA), a recessively inherited disease identified by congenital defects, bone marrow failure, infertility, and cancer susceptibility. We confirmed expression and hormonal regulation of Fanca mRNA by quantitative RT-PCR, which showed that GnRH induced a rapid, transient increase in Fanca mRNA. Fanca protein was also acutely upregulated after GnRH treatment of L beta T2 cells. In addition, Fanca gene expression was confined to mature pituitary gonadotrophs and adult mouse pituitary and was not expressed in the immature alpha T3-1 gonadotroph cell line. Thus, this study extends the expression profile of Fanca into a highly specialized endocrine cell and demonstrates hormonal regulation of expression of the Fanca locus. We suggest that this regulatory mechanism may have a crucial role in the GnRH-response mechanism of mature gonadotrophs and perhaps the etiology of FA.

  14. EFFECT OF GnRH AND PHOSPHORUS IN DELAYED PUBERTAL SURTI BUFFALO HEIFERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.B. Dhamsaniya

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted on eighteen delayed pubertal Surti buffalo heifers, divided into three equal groups (6 in each to evaluate the efficacy of GnRH alone and in combination of phosphorus. The buffalo heifers in Group-I and Group-II were treated with Buserelin acetate (5 ml, IM. Buffalo heifers in Group-II also received additional injection of Toldimphos sodium (10 ml, IM at 3 day interval for 4 times, while buffalo heifers in Group-III served as control. The percentage of induced estrus was highest (83.33% in each treated groups as compared to control group (50%. The mean estrus induction intervals were significantly (P<0.05 shorter in Group-I (20.20 ± 2.18 days and Group-II (18.80 ± 2.32 days as compared to control group (30.24 ± 0.81 days. The conception rate at induced estrus was highest in Group-II (50% followed by Group-I (33.33%. The plasma progesterone levels being significantly lowest on the day of estrus (less than 0.5 ng/ml as compared to pre-treatment days in all groups. The mean total protein and triglycerides levels were differed significantly between the groups on the day of estrus and being significantly higher in Group-II as compared to Group-I and III on that day. A significantly higher level of cholesterol in both treatment groups as compared to the control group during different intervals and also being higher on the day of estrus as compared to pre-treatment days. The mean plasma glucose levels were differed nonsignificantly between and within the treatment and control groups. It is concluded that estrus can be successfully induced in delayed pubertal heifers with the use of GnRH alone and in combination with phosphorus.

  15. A comparative therapeutic management of anoestrus in buffaloes using insulin and GnRH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. D. Purkayastha

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Anoestrus is one of the most common functional disorders of the reproductive cycle in buffaloes. In spite of technical advancement, there is no single cure for the management of anoestrus. Therefore, the aim of this study was to find out the efficacy of gonadotropic releasing hormone (GnRH and metabolic hormone for the management of true anoestrus in buffaloes. Materials and Methods: The experimental animals were selected on the basis of history, gyneco-clinical examinations and progesterone estimation. Deworming was done with Fenbendazole and thereafter mineral mixture was given @ 50 g per animal per day for 10 days in all the selected buffaloes before the start of treatment. The selected buffaloes were randomly divided into four groups (n=25. In Group I, buffaloes were administered 20 μg of buserelin intramuscularly. Buffaloes of Group II were administered long-acting insulin @ 0.25 IU/Kg body weight subcutaneously for 5 consecutive days. In Group III, buffaloes were treated with a combination of insulin and buserelin in the above-mentioned doses whereas buffaloes of Group IV were kept as untreated control. Results: The higher oestrus induction (64% vs. 28% was found in Group III and differed significantly (p<0.05 as compared to control group. The conception rate (69.23% vs. 66.66% was also found higher in Group III but did not differ significantly among the treated groups. The mean time taken for the onset of oestrus was recorded significantly shorter in insulin (8.80±0.69 and GnRH (7.60±0.92 days alone and as compared to other (Group III, 14.43±0.83 and Group IV, 20.57±1.69 days groups. Conclusion: The results of this study indicated better fertility response using Insulin plus Buserelin in true anoestrus buffaloes under field conditions.

  16. GnRH mRNA levels in male three-spined sticklebacks, Gasterosteus aculeatus, under different reproductive conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yi Ta; Tseng, Yung Che; Chang, Chia-Hao; Yan, Hong Young; Hwang, Pung Pung; Borg, Bertil

    2015-02-01

    In vertebrates, reproduction is regulated by the brain-pituitary-gonad (BPG) axis, where the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is one of the key components. However, very little is known about the possible role of GnRH in the environmental and feedback control of fish reproduction. To investigate this, full-length gnrh2 (chicken GnRH II) and gnrh3 (salmon GnRH) sequences of male three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus), which are clustered with the taxa of the same GnRH type as other Euteleostei, were cloned and annotated. gnrh1 is absent in this species. The mRNA levels of gnrh2 and gnrh3 in the sticklebacks' brain were measured under breeding and post-breeding conditions as well as in castrated and sham-operated breeding fish and castrated/sham-operated fish kept under long-day (LD 16:8) and short-day (LD 8:16) conditions. Fully breeding males had considerably higher mRNA levels of gnrh2 and gnrh3 in the thalamus (Th) and in the telencephalon and preoptic area (T+POA), respectively, than post-breeding males. Sham-operated breeding males have higher gnrh3 mRNA levels than the corresponding castrated males. Moreover, higher gnrh2 mRNA levels in the Th and higher gnrh3 mRNA levels in the T+POA and hypothalamus (HypTh) were also found in long-day sham-operated males than in sham-operated fish kept under an inhibitory short day photoperiod. Nevertheless, gnrh2 and gnrh3 mRNA levels were not up-regulated in castrated males kept under long-day photoperiod, which suggests that positive feedbacks on the brain-pituitary-gonad axis are necessary for this response. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Induction of spermatogenesis and fertility in hypogonadotropic azoospermic men by intravenous pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenfeld, Z; Makler, A; Frisch, L; Brandes, J M

    1988-06-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) has only recently become a helpful tool in the medication of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH). Two azoospermic patients with HH who had previously been treated with hCG/hMG because of delayed puberty and each of whom had fathered a child after previous gonadotropin therapy were referred due to secondary failure of hCG/hMG treatment to induce spermatogenesis and fertility. A pulse study where blood was drawn every 15 minutes for LH, FSH and PRL RIAs was performed in each patient, and afterwards a bolus of i.v. GnRH was injected to assess gonadotropin responsiveness. A portable GnRH pump was connected to each patient so that it administered 5-20 micrograms of GnRH i.v. every 89 minutes. Spermatogenesis was first detected after 42 and 78 days respectively in the 2 treated HH men and 4 1/2 months from the start of treatment their wives became pregnant. No thrombophlebitis or other complications of the i.v. therapy occurred. In the case of the first patient, the semen was washed and concentrated and intra-uterine inseminations were carried out in an attempt to shorten the time needed to achieve fertility. The first pregnancy was successfully terminated at 38 weeks with the delivery of 2 heterozygotic normal male babies. The second pregnancy ended in spontaneous delivery of a healthy female. We conclude that i.v. pulsatile, intermittent GnRH administration is a safe, efficient and highly successful means of treating azoospermic men with HH.

  18. Effects of cetrorelix, a GnRH-receptor antagonist, on gonadal axis in women with functional hypothalamic amenorrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berardelli, Rita; Gianotti, Laura; Karamouzis, Ioannis; Picu, Andreea; Giordano, Roberta; D'Angelo, Valentina; Zinnà, Domenico; Lanfranco, Fabio; Ghigo, Ezio; Arvat, Emanuela

    2011-10-01

    Gonadotropin Releasing Hormone (GnRH) antagonists (GnRHa) suppress gonadotropin and sex-steroid secretion. In normal women, acute GnRHa administration induces inhibitory effect on pituitary-gonadal axis, followed by Luteinizing Hormone (LH) rebound. Functional hypothalamic amenorrhea (HA) is characterised by impaired gonadotropin secretion and hypogonadism secondary to blunted GnRH pulsatility. We studied the effects of a GnRHa, cetrorelix (CTX 3.0 mg), in six women with HA (age 30.7 ± 3.2 years; BMI 21.5 ± 1.7 kg/m(2)) and six control subjects (CS, 28.2 ± 0.6 years; 22.6 ± 0.9 kg/m(2)) on LH, Follicle-Stimulating Hormone (FSH) and oestradiol levels over 4 h (08.00-12.00 am) before, +24 h and +96 h after CTX; LH, FSH, and oestradiol were also evaluated at +6, +8, +12, +48, +72 h after CTX. CS: CTX reduced (p < 0.05) LH, FSH, and oestradiol (nadir at +12 h, +24 h, and +24 h); LH rebounded at +96 h, FSH and oestradiol recovered at +48 h and +72 h. The 4-h evaluation showed LH and FSH reduction (p < 0.05) at +24 h, with LH rebound at +96 h. HA: CTX reduced (p < 0.05) LH, FSH, and oestradiol, (nadir at +24 h, +48 h, and +48 h, recovery at +48 h, +72 h, and +96 h). The 4-h evaluation showed gonadotropin reduction (p < 0.05) 24 h after CTX, without any rebound effect. One single CTX dose still modulates gonadotropin secretion in HA. Its 'paradoxical' stimulatory effect on gonadotropins needs to be verified after prolonged administration.

  19. Superior induction of T cell responses to conserved HIV-1 regions by electroporated alphavirus replicon DNA compared to that with conventional plasmid DNA vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Maria L; Mbewe-Mvula, Alice; Rosario, Maximillian; Johansson, Daniel X; Kakoulidou, Maria; Bridgeman, Anne; Reyes-Sandoval, Arturo; Nicosia, Alfredo; Ljungberg, Karl; Hanke, Tomás; Liljeström, Peter

    2012-04-01

    Vaccination using "naked" DNA is a highly attractive strategy for induction of pathogen-specific immune responses; however, it has been only weakly immunogenic in humans. Previously, we constructed DNA-launched Semliki Forest virus replicons (DREP), which stimulate pattern recognition receptors and induce augmented immune responses. Also, in vivo electroporation was shown to enhance immune responses induced by conventional DNA vaccines. Here, we combine these two approaches and show that in vivo electroporation increases CD8(+) T cell responses induced by DREP and consequently decreases the DNA dose required to induce a response. The vaccines used in this study encode the multiclade HIV-1 T cell immunogen HIVconsv, which is currently being evaluated in clinical trials. Using intradermal delivery followed by electroporation, the DREP.HIVconsv DNA dose could be reduced to as low as 3.2 ng to elicit frequencies of HIV-1-specific CD8(+) T cells comparable to those induced by 1 μg of a conventional pTH.HIVconsv DNA vaccine, representing a 625-fold molar reduction in dose. Responses induced by both DREP.HIVconsv and pTH.HIVconsv were further increased by heterologous vaccine boosts employing modified vaccinia virus Ankara MVA.HIVconsv and attenuated chimpanzee adenovirus ChAdV63.HIVconsv. Using the same HIVconsv vaccines, the mouse observations were supported by an at least 20-fold-lower dose of DNA vaccine in rhesus macaques. These data point toward a strategy for overcoming the low immunogenicity of DNA vaccines in humans and strongly support further development of the DREP vaccine platform for clinical evaluation.

  20. Reduction of N-linked xylose and fucose by expression of rat beta1,4-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase III in tobacco BY-2 cells depends on Golgi enzyme localization domain and genetic elements used for expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karg, Saskia R; Frey, Alexander D; Kallio, Pauli T

    2010-03-01

    Plant-specific N-glycosylation, such as the introduction of core alpha1,3-fucose and beta1,2-xylose residues, is a major obstacle to the utilization of plant cell- or plant-derived recombinant therapeutic proteins. The beta1,4-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase III (GnTIII) introduces a bisecting GlcNAc residue into N-glycans, which exerts a high level of substrate mediated control over subsequent modifications, for example inhibiting mammalian core fucosylation. Based on similar findings in plants, we used Nicotianatabacum BY-2 cells to study the effects of localization and expression levels of GnTIII in the remodeling of the plant N-glycosylation pathway. The N-glycans produced by the cells expressing GnTIII were partially bisected and practically devoid of the paucimannosidic type which is typical for N-glycans produced by wildtype BY-2 suspension cultured cells. The proportion of human-compatible N-glycans devoid of fucose and xylose could be increased from an average of 4% on secreted protein from wildtype cells to as high as 59% in cells expressing chimeric GnTIII, named GnTIII(A.th.) replacing its native localization domain with the cytoplasmic tail, transmembrane, and stem region of Arabidopsis thaliana mannosidase II. The changes in N-glycosylation observed were dependent on the catalytic activity of GnTIII, as the expression of catalytically inactive GnTIII mutants did not show a significant effect on N-glycosylation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The glycomic effect of N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase III overexpression in metastatic melanoma cells. GnT-III modifies highly branched N-glycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link-Lenczowski, Paweł; Bubka, Monika; Balog, Crina I A; Koeleman, Carolien A M; Butters, Terry D; Wuhrer, Manfred; Lityńska, Anna

    2018-04-01

    N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase III (GnT-III) is known to catalyze N-glycan "bisection" and thereby modulate the formation of highly branched complex structures within the Golgi apparatus. While active, it inhibits the action of other GlcNAc transferases such as GnT-IV and GnT-V. Moreover, GnT-III is considered as an inhibitor of the metastatic potential of cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. However, the effects of GnT-III may be more diverse and depend on the cellular context. We describe the detailed glycomic analysis of the effect of GnT-III overexpression in WM266-4-GnT-III metastatic melanoma cells. We used MALDI-TOF and ESI-ion-trap-MS/MS together with HILIC-HPLC of 2-AA labeled N-glycans to study the N-glycome of membrane-attached and secreted proteins. We found that the overexpression of GnT-III in melanoma leads to the modification of a broad range of N-glycan types by the introduction of the "bisecting" GlcNAc residue with highly branched complex structures among them. The presence of these unusual complex N-glycans resulted in stronger interactions of cellular glycoproteins with the PHA-L. Based on the data presented here we conclude that elevated activity of GnT-III in cancer cells does not necessarily lead to a total abrogation of the formation of highly branched glycans. In addition, the modification of pre-existing N-glycans by the introduction of "bisecting" GlcNAc can modulate their capacity to interact with carbohydrate-binding proteins such as plant lectins. Our results suggest further studies on the biological function of "bisected" oligosaccharides in cancer cell biology and their interactions with carbohydrate-binding proteins.

  2. Efficiency of fixed-time artificial insemination using a progesterone device combined with GnRH or estradiol benzoate in Nellore heifers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinícius Antônio Pelissari Poncio

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available he use of estrogens in artificial insemination protocols for cattle is the least expensive and most efficient method currently available. However, the trend to prohibit the use of estrogens for this purpose has made it necessary to find alternatives that replace estrogens without compromising the reproductive performance of the animals. The objective of this study was to evaluate conception rates in Bos indicus beef heifers treated with a progesterone device (P4 combined with GnRH or an estradiol ester. On day 0, pubertal Nellore heifers (n = 100 received an intravaginal device containing 1 g P4 and were randomly divided into two groups. The GnRH group (n = 49 received an intramuscular injection of 100 µg GnRH, while the E2 group (n = 51 received 2 mg estradiol benzoate (EB. The P4 device was removed after 5 (GnRH group or 8 days (E2 group, followed by an injection of 125 µg of the PGF2α, analog cloprostenol. On that occasion, the E2 group received an additional injection of 300 IU eCG. Twenty-four hours later, the GnRH group received a second injection of 125 µg cloprostenol, while the E2 group received 1 mg EB. The heifers were inseminated 72 (GnRH group or 54 hours (E2 group after removal of the P4 device. At the time of insemination, the GnRH group received additionally an injection of 100 µg GnRH. Estrus was monitored during the period of cloprostenol injection until the time of artificial insemination and pregnancy was diagnosed 40 days after insemination by transrectal ultrasonography. The data were analyzed by Fisher’s exact test. The pregnancy rate was 38.8% and 31.4% in the GnRH and E2 groups, respectively (P>0.05. The ovarian condition of the heifers (estrus or anestrus tended to influence (P=0.07 pregnancy rates in the GnRH group, but not in the E2 group. At the time of artificial insemination, 33.3% of heifers in the GnRH group showed signs of estrus versus 88.2% in the E2 group (P<0.05. However, the time of estrus

  3. Nonsupplemented luteal phase characteristics after the administration of recombinant human chorionic gonadotropin, recombinant luteinizing hormone, or gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist to induce final oocyte maturation in in vitro fertilization patients after ovarian stimulation with recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone and GnRH antagonist cotreatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.S. Macklon (Nick); M.J.C. Eijkemans (René); M. Ludwig (Michael); R.E. Felberbaum; K. Diedrich; S. Bustion; E. Loumaye; B.C.J.M. Fauser (Bart); N.G.M. Beckers (Nicole)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractReplacing GnRH agonist cotreatment for the prevention of a premature rise in LH during ovarian stimulation for in vitro fertilization (IVF) by the late follicular phase administration of GnRH antagonist may render supplementation of the luteal phase redundant, because

  4. Influence of bovine LH tracer quality on levels of LH in GnRH-treated cows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madej, A.; Hallin, P.; Madej, M.; Seguin, B.; Edqvist, L.E.

    1989-01-01

    Chromatography of 125I-bovine LH (LER-1716-2 and USDA-I-1) by means of anion exchange high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) revealed two main peaks of radioactivity regardless as to whether or not the tracer was initially purified on cellulose CF11. The content of radioactivity in the first peak tended to increase as the storage time of the bLH preparation, either before or after iodination, increased. The first peak of radioactivity after HPLC fractionation either with or without cellulose adsorption consisted of material with low binding ability to bLH antiserum (6.9% +/- 0.5 and 13.0% +/- 1.0, respectively) and high binding ability to ovine LH alpha antiserum (51.0% +/- 2.7 and 35.2% +/- 3.6, respectively). The average ratio of alpha-subunit immuno-reactivity to 125I-bLH immunoreactivity in this material was 7.4 +/- 0.1 and 2.7 +/- 0.2, respectively (P less than 0.001). Peaks in 125I-bLH radioactivity and 125I-bLH immunoreactivity had different elution times. Radioimmunoassays with tracers obtained from fractions derived from the first radioactive peak after HPLC chromatography (i.e. 125I-bLH-LER-1716-2) both with and without cellulose adsorption, yielded significantly lower mean plasma LH levels in GnRH-treated cows compared with the control tracer routinely purified only on cellulose CF11 (e.g. 5.7 vs. 8.2 micrograms/; 4.6 vs. 8.2 micrograms/l). Plasma LH levels in GnRH-treated cows were significantly (P less than 0.001) lower as measured by radioimmunoassay utilizing 125I-USDA-blH-I-1 tracers than by radioimmunoassays utilizing 125I-blH-LER-1716-2 tracers (i.e. either Y = 0.17 + 0.75X or Y = 1.18 + 0.60X)

  5. Magnetoelastic plane waves in rotating media in thermoelasticity of type II (G-N model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Roychoudhuri

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A study is made of the propagation of time-harmonic plane waves in an infinite, conducting, thermoelastic solid permeated by a uniform primary external magnetic field when the entire medium is rotating with a uniform angular velocity. The thermoelasticity theory of type II (G-N model (1993 is used to study the propagation of waves. A more general dispersion equation is derived to determine the effects of rotation, thermal parameters, characteristic of the medium, and the external magnetic field. If the primary magnetic field has a transverse component, it is observed that the longitudinal and transverse motions are linked together. For low frequency (χ≪1, χ being the ratio of the wave frequency to some standard frequency ω∗, the rotation and the thermal field have no effect on the phase velocity to the first order of χ and then this corresponds to only one slow wave influenced by the electromagnetic field only. But to the second order of χ, the phase velocity, attenuation coefficient, and the specific energy loss are affected by rotation and depend on the thermal parameters cT, cT being the nondimensional thermal wave speed of G-N theory, and the thermoelastic coupling εT, the electromagnetic parameters εH, and the transverse magnetic field RH. Also for large frequency, rotation and thermal field have no effect on the phase velocity, which is independent of primary magnetic field to the first order of (1/χ (χ≫1, and the specific energy loss is a constant, independent of any field parameter. However, to the second order of (1/χ, rotation does exert influence on both the phase velocity and the attenuation factor, and the specific energy loss is affected by rotation and depends on the thermal parameters cT and εT, electromagnetic parameter εH, and the transverse magnetic field RH, whereas the specific energy loss is independent of any field parameters to the first order of (1/χ.

  6. GnRH-dependent precocious puberty manifested at the age of 14 months in a girl with 47,XXX karyotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skordis, Nicos; Ferrari, Eleana; Antoniadou, Aria; Phylactou, Leonidas A; Fanis, Pavlos; Neocleous, Vassos

    2017-07-01

    This case report describes a 47,XXX girl who presented very early, at the age of 14 months, with signs of sexual precocity (breast and pubic hair development, menarche) and was finally diagnosed with GnRH dependent precocious puberty with no evidence of underlying central nervous system pathology. Molecular testing did not identify any genetic defect in any of the genes tested (KISS1, KISS1R, DLK1 and the intronless MKRN3). Though previous studies have shown a link between karyotype 47,XXX and precocious puberty, this is the youngest patient reported so far. Treatment with GnRH analog was commenced and proved to be effective, indicating a successful suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis.

  7. Studies on the relationship between thyroid hormones, ovarian hormones, GnRH and reproductive performance of egyptian buffaloes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farghaly, H.A.M.

    1992-01-01

    this study was carried out in the experimental farm of animal production department, faculty of agriculture, cairo university. hormonal analysis were performed in the laboratories of animal physiology unit, radiobiology department, nuclear research center, atomic energy authority (radiobiol. Dept., NRC, AEA). The aim of the study was to investigate the following : 1- post-partum reproductive activity of egyptian buffaloes and the factors affecting the resumption of ovarian activity after calving , with particular reference to the patterns of thyroid hormones (T 4 and T 3 ) and progesterone hormone.2- the effectiveness of using GnRH treatment on inducing ovarian activity after calving. 3- the effect of goitrogen administration (thiouracil) on ovarian activity during post-partum and on the response of buffaloes to GnRH treatment and their reproductive patterns

  8. Transient foreign gene expression in chloroplasts of cultured tobacco cells after biolistic delivery of chloroplast vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniell, H; Vivekananda, J; Nielsen, B L; Ye, G N; Tewari, K K; Sanford, J C

    1990-01-01

    Expression of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (cat) by suitable vectors in chloroplasts of cultured tobacco cells, delivered by high-velocity microprojectiles, is reported here. Several chloroplast expression vectors containing bacterial cat genes, placed under the control of either psbA promoter region from pea (pHD series) or rbcL promoter region from maize (pAC series) have been used in this study. In addition, chloroplast expression vectors containing replicon fragments from pea, tobacco, or maize chloroplast DNA have also been tested for efficiency and duration of cat expression in chloroplasts of tobacco cells. Cultured NT1 tobacco cells collected on filter papers were bombarded with tungsten particles coated with pUC118 (negative control), 35S-CAT (nuclear expression vector), pHD312 (repliconless chloroplast expression vector), and pHD407, pACp18, and pACp19 (chloroplast expression vectors with replicon). Sonic extracts of cells bombarded with pUC118 showed no detectable cat activity in the autoradiograms. Nuclear expression of cat reached two-thirds of the maximal 48 hr after bombardment and the maximal at 72 hr. Cells bombarded with chloroplast expression vectors showed a low level of expression until 48 hr of incubation. A dramatic increase in the expression of cat was observed 24 hr after the addition of fresh medium to cultured cells in samples bombarded with pHD407; the repliconless vector pHD312 showed about 50% of this maximal activity. The expression of nuclear cat and the repliconless chloroplast vector decreased after 72 hr, but a high level of chloroplast cat expression was maintained in cells bombarded with pHD407. Organelle-specific expression of cat in appropriate compartments was checked by introducing various plasmid constructions into tobacco protoplasts by electroporation. Although the nuclear expression vector 35S-CAT showed expression of cat, no activity was observed with any chloroplast vectors.

  9. Evolution of the AKH/corazonin/ACP/GnRH receptor superfamily and their ligands in the Protostomia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauser, Frank; Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis

    2014-01-01

    In this review we trace the evolutionary connections between GnRH receptors from vertebrates and the receptors for adipokinetic hormone (AKH), AKH/corazonin-related peptide (ACP), and corazonin from arthropods. We conclude that these G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are closely related and hav......QLTFSSDWSGamide), and the penis worm Priapulus caudatus (pQIFFSKGWRGamide). This is the first report, showing that AKH signaling is widespread in molluscs....

  10. Circadian Control of the Estrogenic Circuits Regulating GnRH Secretion and the Preovulatory Luteinizing Hormone Surge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lance J Kriegsfeld

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Female reproduction requires the precise temporal organization of interacting, estradiol-sensitive neural circuits that converge to optimally drive hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal (HPG axis functioning. In mammals, the master circadian pacemaker in the suprachaismatic nucleus (SCN of the anterior hypothalamus coordinates reproductively-relevant neuroendocrine events necessary to maximize reproductive success. Likewise, in species where periods of fertility are brief, circadian oversight of reproductive function ensures that estradiol-dependent increases in sexual motivation coincide with ovulation. Across species, including humans, disruptions to circadian timing (e.g., through rotating shift work, night shift work, poor sleep hygiene lead to pronounced deficits in ovulation and fecundity. Despite the well-established roles for the circadian system in female reproductive functioning, the specific neural circuits and neurochemical mediators underlying these interactions are not fully understood. Most work to date has focused on the direct and indirect communication from the SCN to the GnRH system in control of the preovulatory LH surge. However, the same clock genes underlying circadian rhythms at the cellular level in SCN cells are also common to target cell populations of the SCN, including the GnRH neuronal network. Exploring the means by which the master clock synergizes with subordinate clocks in GnRH cells and its upstream modulatory systems represents an exciting opportunity to further understand the role of endogenous timing systems in female reproduction. Herein we provide an overview of the state of knowledge regarding interactions between the circadian timing system and estradiol-sensitive neural circuits driving GnRH secretion and the preovulatory LH surge.

  11. Prostate specific antigen in boys with precocious puberty before and during gonadal suppression by GnRH agonist treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, A; Müller, J; Skakkebaek, N E

    1997-01-01

    antigen (PSA) is a marker of the androgen-dependent prostatic epithelial cell activity and it is used in the diagnosis and surveillance of adult patients with prostatic cancer. We have measured PSA concentrations in serum from boys with precocious puberty before and during gonadal suppression with Gn......RH agonists to evaluate the effect of normal and precocious puberty on PSA levels and to study the correlation between testosterone and PSA in boys....

  12. Histamine-induced paradoxical GH response to TRH/GnRH in men and women: dependence on gonadal steroid hormones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knigge, U; Thuesen, B; Dejgaard, A

    1990-01-01

    .025), but not during the early follicular phase of the cycle (GH peak: 1.7 +/- 0.5 vs 1.6 +/- 0.3 micrograms/l). In luteal-phase women the GH response to TRH/GnRH correlated with the serum estradiol-17 beta level (GH area/E2: r = 0.98; p less than 0.005) and the serum estrone level (GH area/E1: r = 0.81; p less than 0...

  13. BPA/Lower Valley transmission project. Final environmental impact statement. Appendices A, B, D, E, G-N

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-06-01

    Bonneville Power Administration is investigating the feasibility of constructing an additional transmission line, which for the most part will be adjacent to the existing transmission line. This would require the construction or acquisition of additional access roads, used for routine and emergency maintenance and construction activities. A survey was conducted to map any occurrences of threatened, endangered and sensitivity plant species and weed species along the Swan Valley-Teton Line. This report contains Appendices A, B, D, E, G--N

  14. Progesterone treatment inhibits and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) treatment potentiates voltage-gated calcium currents in gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jianli; Moenter, Suzanne M

    2010-11-01

    GnRH neurons are central regulators of fertility, and their activity is modulated by steroid feedback. In normal females, GnRH secretion is regulated by estradiol and progesterone (P). Excess androgens present in hyperandrogenemic fertility disorders may disrupt communication of negative feedback signals from P and/or independently stimulate GnRH release. Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) are important in regulating excitability and hormone release. Estradiol alters VGCCs in a time-of-day-dependent manner. To further elucidate ovarian steroid modulation of GnRH neuron VGCCs, we studied the effects of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and P. Adult mice were ovariectomized (OVX) or OVX and treated with implants containing DHT (OVXD), estradiol (OVXE), estradiol and DHT (OVXED), estradiol and P (OVXEP), or estradiol, DHT, and P (OVXEDP). Macroscopic calcium current (I(Ca)) was recorded in the morning or afternoon 8-12 d after surgery using whole-cell voltage-clamp. I(Ca) was increased in afternoon vs. morning in GnRH neurons from OVXE mice but this increase was abolished in cells from OVXEP mice. I(Ca) in cells from OVXD mice was increased regardless of time of day; there was no additional effect in OVXED mice. P reduced N-type and DHT potentiated N- and R-type VGCCs; P blocked the DHT potentiation of N-type-mediated current. These data suggest P and DHT have opposing actions on VGCCs in GnRH neurons, but in the presence of both steroids, P dominates. VGCCs are targets of ovarian steroid feedback modulation of GnRH neuron activity and, more specifically, a potential mechanism whereby androgens could activate GnRH neuronal function.

  15. Prenatal androgenization of female mice programs an increase in firing activity of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons that is reversed by metformin treatment in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roland, Alison V; Moenter, Suzanne M

    2011-02-01

    Prenatal androgenization (PNA) of female mice with dihydrotestosterone programs reproductive dysfunction in adulthood, characterized by elevated luteinizing hormone levels, irregular estrous cycles, and central abnormalities. Here, we evaluated activity of GnRH neurons from PNA mice and the effects of in vivo treatment with metformin, an activator of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) that is commonly used to treat the fertility disorder polycystic ovary syndrome. Estrous cycles were monitored in PNA and control mice before and after metformin administration. Before metformin, cycles were longer in PNA mice and percent time in estrus lower; metformin normalized cycles in PNA mice. Extracellular recordings were used to monitor GnRH neuron firing activity in brain slices from diestrous mice. Firing rate was higher and quiescence lower in GnRH neurons from PNA mice, demonstrating increased GnRH neuron activity. Metformin treatment of PNA mice restored firing activity and LH to control levels. To assess whether AMPK activation contributed to the metformin-induced reduction in GnRH neuron activity, the AMPK antagonist compound C was acutely applied to cells. Compound C stimulated cells from metformin-treated, but not untreated, mice, suggesting that AMPK was activated in GnRH neurons, or afferent neurons, in the former group. GnRH neurons from metformin-treated mice also showed a reduced inhibitory response to low glucose. These studies indicate that PNA causes enhanced firing activity of GnRH neurons and elevated LH that are reversible by metformin, raising the possibility that central AMPK activation by metformin may play a role in its restoration of reproductive cycles in polycystic ovary syndrome.

  16. Consistent high clinical pregnancy rates and low ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome rates in high-risk patients after GnRH agonist triggering and modified luteal support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iliodromiti, Stamatina; Blockeel, Christophe; Tremellen, Kelton P

    2013-01-01

    Are clinical pregnancy rates satisfactory and the incidence of OHSS low after GnRH agonist trigger and modified intensive luteal support in patients with a high risk of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS)?......Are clinical pregnancy rates satisfactory and the incidence of OHSS low after GnRH agonist trigger and modified intensive luteal support in patients with a high risk of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS)?...

  17. Genetic variation in total number and locations of GnRH neurons identified using in situ hybridization in a wild-source population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaugars, Katherine E; Rivers, Charlotte I; Saha, Margaret S; Heideman, Paul D

    2016-02-01

    The evolution of brain function in the regulation of physiology may depend in part upon the numbers and locations of neurons. Wild populations of rodents contain natural genetic variation in the inhibition of reproduction by winter-like short photoperiod, and it has been hypothesized that this functional variation might be due in part to heritable variation in the numbers or location of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons. A naturally variable wild-source population of white-footed mice was used to develop lines artificially selected for or against mature gonads in short, winter-like photoperiods. We compared a selection line that is reproductively inhibited in short photoperiod (Responsive) to a line that is weakly inhibited by short photoperiod (Nonresponsive) for differences in counts of neurons identified using in situ hybridization for GnRH mRNA. There was no effect of photoperiod, but there were 60% more GnRH neurons in total in the Nonresponsive selection line than the Responsive selection line. The lines differed specifically in numbers of GnRH neurons in more anterior regions, whereas numbers of GnRH neurons in posterior areas were not statistically different between lines. We compare these results to those of an earlier study that used immunohistochemical labeling for GnRH neurons. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that the selection lines and natural source population contain significant genetic variation in the number and location of GnRH neurons. The variation in GnRH neurons may contribute to functional variation in fertility that occurs in short photoperiods in the laboratory and in the wild source population in winter. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Characterisation of a novel quantitative trait locus, GN4-1, for grain number and yield in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yong; Tao, Yajun; Yuan, Yuan; Zhang, Yanzhou; Miao, Jun; Zhang, Ron; Yi, Chuandeng; Gong, Zhiyun; Yang, Zefeng; Liang, Guohua

    2018-03-01

    A novel QTL for grain number, GN4-1, was identified and fine-mapped to an ~ 190-kb region on the long arm of rice chromosome 4. Rice grain yield is primarily determined by three components: number of panicles per plant, grain number per panicle and grain weight. Among these traits, grain number per panicle is the major contributor to grain yield formation and is a crucial trait for yield improvement. In this study, we identified a major quantitative trait locus (QTL) responsible for rice grain number on chromosome 4, designated GN4-1 (a QTL for Grain Number on chromosome 4), using advanced segregating populations derived from the crosses between an elite indica cultivar 'Zhonghui 8006' (ZH8006) and a japonica rice 'Wuyunjing 8' (WYJ8). GN4-1 was delimited to an ~ 190-kb region on chromosome 4. The genetic effect of GN4-1 was estimated using a pair of near-isogenic lines. The GN4-1 gene from WYJ8 promoted accumulation of cytokinins in the inflorescence and increased grain number per panicle by ~ 17%. More importantly, introduction of the WYJ8 GN4-1 gene into ZH8006 increased grain yield by ~ 14.3 and ~ 11.5% in the experimental plots in 2014 and 2015, respectively. In addition, GN4-1 promoted thickening of the culm and may enhance resistance to lodging. These results demonstrate that GN4-1 is a potentially valuable gene for improvement of yield and lodging resistance in rice breeding.

  19. A mathematical model for LH release in response to continuous and pulsatile exposure of gonadotrophs to GnRH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reed Michael C

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In a previous study, a model was developed to investigate the release of luteinizing hormone (LH from pituitary cells in response to a short pulse of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH. The model included: binding of GnRH to its receptor (R, dimerization and internalization of the hormone receptor complex, interaction with a G protein, production of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3, release of calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER, entrance of calcium into the cytosol via voltage gated membrane channels, pumping of calcium out of the cytosol via membrane and ER pumps, and release of LH. The extended model, presented in this paper, also includes the following physiologically important phenomena: desensitization of calcium channels; internalization of the dimerized receptors and recycling of some of the internalized receptors; an increase in Gq concentration near the plasma membrane in response to receptor dimerization; and basal rates of synthesis and degradation of the receptors. With suitable choices of the parameters, good agreement with a variety of experimental data of the LH release pattern in response to pulses of various durations, repetition rates, and concentrations of GnRH were obtained. The mathematical model allows us to assess the effects of internalization and desensitization on the shapes and time courses of LH response curves.

  20. The Value of Identifying and Recovering Lost GN&C Lessons Learned: Aeronautical, Spacecraft, and Launch Vehicle Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennehy, Cornelius J.; Labbe, Steve; Lebsock, Kenneth L.

    2010-01-01

    Within the broad aerospace community the importance of identifying, documenting and widely sharing lessons learned during system development, flight test, operational or research programs/projects is broadly acknowledged. Documenting and sharing lessons learned helps managers and engineers to minimize project risk and improve performance of their systems. Often significant lessons learned on a project fail to get captured even though they are well known 'tribal knowledge' amongst the project team members. The physical act of actually writing down and documenting these lessons learned for the next generation of NASA GN&C engineers fails to happen on some projects for various reasons. In this paper we will first review the importance of capturing lessons learned and then will discuss reasons why some lessons are not documented. A simple proven approach called 'Pause and Learn' will be highlighted as a proven low-impact method of organizational learning that could foster the timely capture of critical lessons learned. Lastly some examples of 'lost' GN&C lessons learned from the aeronautics, spacecraft and launch vehicle domains are briefly highlighted. In the context of this paper 'lost' refers to lessons that have not achieved broad visibility within the NASA-wide GN&C CoP because they are either undocumented, masked or poorly documented in the NASA Lessons Learned Information System (LLIS).

  1. Cryopreserved embryo transfer: adjacent or non-adjacent to failed fresh long GnRH-agonist protocol IVF cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volodarsky-Perel, Alexander; Eldar-Geva, Talia; Holzer, Hananel E G; Schonberger, Oshrat; Reichman, Orna; Gal, Michael

    2017-03-01

    The optimal time to perform cryopreserved embryo transfer (CET) after a failed oocyte retrieval-embryo transfer (OR-ET) cycle is unknown. Similar clinical pregnancy rates were recently reported in immediate and delayed CET, performed after failed fresh OR-ET, in cycles with the gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist protocol. This study compared outcomes of CET performed adjacently (<50 days, n = 67) and non-adjacently (≥50 to 120 days, n = 62) to the last OR-day of cycles with the GnRH agonist down-regulation protocol. Additional inclusion criteria were patients' age 20-38 years, the transfer of only 1-2 cryopreserved embryos, one treatment cycle per patient and artificial preparation for CET. Significantly higher implantation, clinical pregnancy and live birth rates were found in the non-adjacent group than in the adjacent group: 30.5% versus 11.3% (P = 0.001), 41.9% versus 17.9% (P = 0.003) and 32.3% versus 13.4% (P = 0.01), respectively. These results support the postponement of CET after a failed OR-ET for at least one menstrual cycle, when a preceding long GnRH-agonist protocol is used. Copyright © 2016 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Female-Specific Glucose Sensitivity of GnRH1 Neurons Leads to Sexually Dimorphic Inhibition of Reproduction in Medaka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasebe, Masaharu; Kanda, Shinji; Oka, Yoshitaka

    2016-11-01

    Close interaction exists between energy-consuming reproduction and nutritional status. However, there are differences in costs and priority for reproduction among species and even between sexes, which leads to diversification of interactions between reproduction and nutritional status. Despite such diversified interactions among species and sexes, most of the analysis of the nutritional status-dependent regulation of reproduction has been limited to an endothermic vertebrate, mammalian species of either sex. Therefore, the mechanisms underlying the diversified interactions remain elusive. In the present study, we demonstrated the effects of malnutritional status on reproduction at both organismal and cellular levels in an ectothermic vertebrate, a teleost medaka of both sexes. First, we analyzed the effects of malnutrition by fasting on gonadosomatic index, number of spawned/fertilized eggs, and courtship behavior. Fasting strongly suppressed reproduction in females but, surprisingly, not in males. Next, we analyzed the effects of fasting on firing activity of hypothalamic GnRH1 neurons, which form the final common pathway for the control of reproduction. An electrophysiological analysis showed that low glucose, which is induced by fasting, directly suppresses the firing activity of GnRH1 neurons specifically in females through intracellular ATP-sensitive potassium channels and AMP-activated protein kinase pathways. Based on the fact that such suppressions occurred only in females, we conclude that nutritional status-dependent, glucose-sensing in GnRH1 neurons may contribute to the most fitted reproductive regulation for each sex.

  3. COBALT: Development of a Platform to Flight Test Lander GN&C Technologies on Suborbital Rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, John M., III; Seubert, Carl R.; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Bergh, Chuck; Kourchians, Ara; Restrepo, Carolina I.; Villapando, Carlos Y.; O'Neal, Travis V.; Robertson, Edward A.; Pierrottet, Diego; hide

    2017-01-01

    The NASA COBALT Project (CoOperative Blending of Autonomous Landing Technologies) is developing and integrating new precision-landing Guidance, Navigation and Control (GN&C) technologies, along with developing a terrestrial fight-test platform for Technology Readiness Level (TRL) maturation. The current technologies include a third- generation Navigation Doppler Lidar (NDL) sensor for ultra-precise velocity and line- of-site (LOS) range measurements, and the Lander Vision System (LVS) that provides passive-optical Terrain Relative Navigation (TRN) estimates of map-relative position. The COBALT platform is self contained and includes the NDL and LVS sensors, blending filter, a custom compute element, power unit, and communication system. The platform incorporates a structural frame that has been designed to integrate with the payload frame onboard the new Masten Xodiac vertical take-o, vertical landing (VTVL) terrestrial rocket vehicle. Ground integration and testing is underway, and terrestrial fight testing onboard Xodiac is planned for 2017 with two flight campaigns: one open-loop and one closed-loop.

  4. Agreement between TOAST and CCS ischemic stroke classification: the NINDS SiGN study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArdle, Patrick F; Kittner, Steven J; Ay, Hakan; Brown, Robert D; Meschia, James F; Rundek, Tatjana; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; Woo, Daniel; Andsberg, Gunnar; Biffi, Alessandro; Brenner, David A; Cole, John W; Corriveau, Roderick; de Bakker, Paul I W; Delavaran, Hossein; Dichgans, Martin; Grewal, Raji P; Gwinn, Katrina; Huq, Mohammed; Jern, Christina; Jimenez-Conde, Jordi; Jood, Katarina; Kaplan, Robert C; Katschnig, Petra; Katsnelson, Michael; Labovitz, Daniel L; Lemmens, Robin; Li, Linxin; Lindgren, Arne; Markus, Hugh S; Peddareddygari, Leema R; Pedersén, Annie; Pera, Joanna; Redfors, Petra; Roquer, Jaume; Rosand, Jonathan; Rost, Natalia S; Rothwell, Peter M; Sacco, Ralph L; Sharma, Pankaj; Slowik, Agnieszka; Sudlow, Cathie; Thijs, Vincent; Tiedt, Steffen; Valenti, Raffaella; Worrall, Bradford B

    2014-10-28

    The objective of this study was to assess the level of agreement between stroke subtype classifications made using the Trial of Org 10172 Acute Stroke Treatment (TOAST) and Causative Classification of Stroke (CCS) systems. Study subjects included 13,596 adult men and women accrued from 20 US and European genetic research centers participating in the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) Stroke Genetics Network (SiGN). All cases had independently classified TOAST and CCS stroke subtypes. Kappa statistics were calculated for the 5 major ischemic stroke subtypes common to both systems. The overall agreement between TOAST and CCS was moderate (agreement rate, 70%; κ = 0.59, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.58-0.60). Agreement varied widely across study sites, ranging from 28% to 90%. Agreement on specific subtypes was highest for large-artery atherosclerosis (κ = 0.71, 95% CI 0.69-0.73) and lowest for small-artery occlusion (κ = 0.56, 95% CI 0.54-0.58). Agreement between TOAST and CCS diagnoses was moderate. Caution is warranted when comparing or combining results based on the 2 systems. Replication of study results, for example, genome-wide association studies, should utilize phenotypes determined by the same classification system, ideally applied in the same manner. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.

  5. Effects and safety of GnRH-a as a luteal support in women undertaking assisted reproductive technology procedures: follow-up results for pregnancy, delivery, and neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Weiqin; Zhuang, Yanyan; Pan, Yanping; Xia, Fei

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the effects and safety of gonadotropin releasing hormone analogue (GnRH-a) as an addition to progesterone luteal support in women who underwent in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection-embryo transfer (IVF/ICSI-ET) and achieved a clinical pregnancy. A retrospective analysis was conducted on 214 patients who underwent IVF/ICSI-ET procedures with standard long mid-luteal protocol, of which 123 received GnRH-a-free protocol and 91 received GnRH-a-added protocol. The patients' pregnancy and delivery course, and their neonates' status at birth and growth/development after birth were statistically compared. There was no significant difference between both study groups regarding embryo risks and maternal complications during early pregnancy. as well as fetal risks during the middle and late stages and neonate risks during birth, except that the twin pregnancies of the GnRH-a-added group had a considerably greater male/female ratio, and a significantly higher rate of premature delivery and low birth weight than those of the GnRH-a-free group. In addition, there was no significant difference in neonate risks within 2 years after birth between both cohorts. With precautions taken to control the number of implanted embryos and reduce the incidence of twinning pregnancy, the addition of GnRH-a to luteal support is relatively safe and effective.

  6. Sexual dimorphism of gonadotropin-releasing hormone type-III (GnRH3) neurons and hormonal sex reversal of male reproductive behavior in Mozambique tilapia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuramochi, Asami; Tsutiya, Atsuhiro; Kaneko, Toyoji; Ohtani-Kaneko, Ritsuko

    2011-10-01

    In tilapia, hormone treatment during the period of sexual differentiation can alter the phenotype of the gonads, indicating that endocrine factors can cause gonadal sex reversal. However, the endocrine mechanism underlying sex reversal of reproductive behaviors remains unsolved. In the present study, we detected sexual dimorphism of gonadotropin-releasing hormone type III (GnRH3) neurons in Mozambique tilapia Oreochromis mossambicus. Our immunohistochemical observations showed sex differences in the number of GnRH3 immunoreactive neurons in mature tilapia; males had a greater number of GnRH3 neurons in the terminal ganglion than females. Treatment with androgen (11-ketotestosterone (11-KT) or methyltestosterone), but not that with 17β-estradiol, increased the number of GnRH3 neurons in females to a level similar to that in males. Furthermore, male-specific nest-building behavior was induced in 70% of females treated with 11-KT within two weeks after the onset of the treatment. These results indicate androgen-dependent regulation of GnRH3 neurons and nest-building behavior, suggesting that GnRH3 is importantly involved in sex reversal of male-specific reproductive behavior.

  7. Split-time artificial insemination in beef cattle: III. Comparing fixed-time artificial insemination to split-time artificial insemination with delayed administration of GnRH in postpartum cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, B E; Thomas, J M; Abel, J M; Poock, S E; Ellersieck, M R; Smith, M F; Patterson, D J

    2017-09-01

    This experiment was designed to compare pregnancy rates in postpartum beef cows following split-time (STAI) or fixed-time (FTAI) artificial insemination. Estrus was synchronized for 671 cows at seven locations following administration of the 7-d CO-Synch + CIDR protocol (100 μg GnRH + CIDR insert [1.38 g progesterone] on d 0; 25 mg prostaglandin F 2α [PG] at CIDR removal on d 7). Cows were assigned to treatments that were balanced across locations based on age, body condition score, and days postpartum at the time treatments were initiated. All cows in treatment 1 (n = 333; FTAI) were inseminated at 66 h after PG and GnRH was administered concurrent with insemination regardless of estrus expression. For cows in treatment 2 (n = 338; STAI), inseminations were performed at 66 or 90 h after PG, and estrous status was recorded at these times. Cows in the STAI treatment that exhibited estrus by 66 h were inseminated at that time and did not receive GnRH, whereas AI was delayed 24 h until 90 h after PG for cows that failed to exhibit estrus by 66 h. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (100 μg) was administered concurrent with AI at 90 h only to cows failing to exhibit estrus. Estrus expression that occurred during the 24 h delay period among cows assigned to the STAI treatment increased the total proportion of cows that expressed estrus prior to insemination (1 = 60%; 2 = 86%; P cows inseminated at 66 h that exhibited estrus did not differ between treatments (1 = 58%; 2 = 58%; P = 0.93); however, pregnancy rates among non-estrous cows at 66 h were improved (1 = 35%; 2 = 51%; P = 0.01) among cows assigned to the STAI treatment when insemination was postponed by 24 h. Consequently, total AI pregnancy rate tended to be higher for cows that received STAI (1 = 49%; 2 = 56%; P = 0.06). In summary, following administration of the 7-d CO-Synch + CIDR protocol, total estrous response increased and pregnancy rates resulting from AI

  8. Inducción del desove y espermiación de anchoveta peruana Engraulis ringens (Jennyns, 1842 en cautiverio mediante la inyección de un análogo de GnRH Induction of spawning and spermiation in captive Peruvian anchovy Engraulis ringens (Jennyns using GnRH analogue injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Espinoza

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Con la finalidad de obtener desoves de ejemplares de Engraulis ringens en cautiverio para realizar pruebas experimentales con huevos y larvas; el presente trabajo evaluó el efecto de inyecciones de acetato de buserelina (un análogo de GnRH; GnRHa sobre desove y espermiación. Además, se utilizó domperidona (DOM para eliminar un posible control dopaminérgico en la liberación de gonadotropinas endógenas en esta especie. Se inyectaron intraperitonealmente ejemplares maduros con 0,005 ug GnRHa g-1 pez (GnRHa; 0,005 ug GnRHa g-1 pez + 0,01 mg DOM g-1 pez (GnRHa+DOM o solución salina a 0,9% (SS. Hubo un efecto inductor de los tratamientos con GnRHa y GnRHa+DOM sobre el desove. Los desoves ocurrieron entre 24 y 48 h post-inyección (p.i. y los porcentajes totales fueron 57,3% y 20,9% con GnRHa y GnRHa+DOM respectivamente, los cuales fueron significativamente diferentes (P , siendo el porcentaje de machos expulsantes a 0 horas p.i. significativamente diferente al control (0 %> (P con GnRHa y 75,0%> con GnRHa+DOM, entre los cuales no se encontró diferencias significativas (P > 0,05. De acuerdo a los resultados obtenidos no existiría un control dopaminérgico en esta especie, ya que hubo expulsión de gametos con o sin la aplicación de domperidona. Por el contrario, se observó significativa reducción de los porcentajes de peces expulsantes al inyectar DOM.In order to achieve spawning in captive Engraulis ringens that would result in eggs and larvae for experimental assays, the present work evaluated the effect of buserelin acétate (an analogue of GnRH; GnRHa injections on spawning and spermiation. Domperidone (DOM was also used in order to reject a possible dopaminergic control in the reléase of endogenous gonadotropins for this species. Ripe fish were mjected mtraperitoneally with 0.005 ug GnRHa g-1 fish (H, 0.005 ug GnRHa g-1 fish + 0.01 mg DOM g-1 fish (HD or saline solution at 0.9%> (SS. The GnRHa and GnRHa+DOM treatments showed an

  9. Augmentation of DHCR24 expression by hepatitis C virus infection facilitates viral replication in hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Takashi; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko; Hayashi, Masahiro; Hirata, Yuichi; Satoh, Masaaki; Tokunaga, Yuko; Tateno, Chise; Hayashi, Yukiko; Hishima, Tsunekazu; Funata, Nobuaki; Sudoh, Masayuki; Kohara, Michinori

    2011-09-01

    We characterized the role of 24-dehydrocholesterol reductase (DHCR24) in hepatitis C virus infection (HCV). DHCR24 is a cholesterol biosynthetic enzyme and cholesterol is a major component of lipid rafts, which is reported to play an important role in HCV replication. Therefore, we examined the potential of DHCR24 as a target for novel HCV therapeutic agents. We examined DHCR24 expression in human hepatocytes in both the livers of HCV-infected patients and those of chimeric mice with human hepatocytes. We targeted DHCR24 with siRNA and U18666A which is an inhibitor of both DHCR24 and cholesterol synthesis. We measured the level of HCV replication in these HCV replicon cell lines and HCV infected cells. U18666A was administrated into chimeric mice with humanized liver, and anti-viral effects were assessed. Expression of DHCR24 was induced by HCV infection in human hepatocytes in vitro, and in human hepatocytes of chimeric mouse liver. Silencing of DHCR24 by siRNA decreased HCV replication in replicon cell lines and HCV JFH-1 strain-infected cells. Treatment with U18666A suppressed HCV replication in the replicon cell lines. Moreover, to evaluate the anti-viral effect of U18666A in vivo, we administrated U18666A with or without pegylated interferon to chimeric mice and observed an inhibitory effect of U18666A on HCV infection and a synergistic effect with interferon. DHCR24 is an essential host factor which augmented its expression by HCV infection, and plays a significant role in HCV replication. DHCR24 may serve as a novel anti-HCV drug target. Copyright © 2010 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Expression and role of gonadotropin-releasing hormone 2 and its receptor in mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH1) and its receptor (GnRHR1) drive mammalian reproduction via regulation of the gonadotropins. Yet, a second form of GnRH (GnRH2) and its receptor (GnRHR2) also exist in some mammals. GnRH2 has been completely conserved throughout 500 million years of evolution, s...

  11. Participation of the endoplasmic reticulum protein chaperone thio-oxidoreductase in gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor expression at the plasma membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Lucca-Junior

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Chaperone members of the protein disulfide isomerase family can catalyze the thiol-disulfide exchange reaction with pairs of cysteines. There are 14 protein disulfide isomerase family members, but the ability to catalyze a thiol disulfide exchange reaction has not been demonstrated for all of them. Human endoplasmic reticulum protein chaperone thio-oxidoreductase (ERp18 shows partial oxidative activity as a protein disulfide isomerase. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the participation of ERp18 in gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR expression at the plasma membrane. Cos-7 cells were cultured, plated, and transfected with 25 ng (unless indicated wild-type human GnRHR (hGnRHR or mutant GnRHR (Cys14Ala and Cys200Ala and pcDNA3.1 without insert (empty vector or ERp18 cDNA (75 ng/well, pre-loaded for 18 h with 1 µCi myo-[2-3H(N]-inositol in 0.25 mL DMEM and treated for 2 h with buserelin. We observed a decrease in maximal inositol phosphate (IP production in response to buserelin in the cells co-transfected with hGnRHR, and a decrease from 20 to 75 ng of ERp18 compared with cells co-transfected with hGnRHR and empty vector. The decrease in maximal IP was proportional to the amount of ERp18 DNA over the range examined. Mutants (Cys14Ala and Cys200Ala that could not form the Cys14-Cys200 bridge essential for plasma membrane routing of the hGnRHR did not modify maximal IP production when they were co-transfected with ERp18. These results suggest that ERp18 has a reduction role on disulfide bonds in wild-type hGnRHR folding.

  12. GnRH-induced Ca2+ signaling patterns and gonadotropin secretion in pituitary gonadotrophs. Functional adaptations to both ordinary and extraordinary physiological demands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Luisa eDurán-Pastén

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary gonadotrophs are a small fraction of the anterior pituitary population, yet they synthesize gonadotropins: luteinizing (LH and follicle stimulating (FSH, essential for gametogenesis and steroidogenesis. LH is secreted via a regulated pathway while FSH release is mostly constitutive and controlled by synthesis. Although gonadotrophs fire action potentials spontaneously, the intracellular Ca2+ rises produced do not influence secretion, which is mainly driven by Gonadotropin Releasing Hormone (GnRH, a decapeptide synthesized in the hypothalamus and released in a pulsatile manner into the hypophyseal portal circulation. GnRH binding to G protein coupled receptors triggers Ca2+ mobilization from InsP3-sensitive intracellular pools, generating the global Ca2+ elevations necessary for secretion. Ca2+ signaling responses to increasing [GnRH] vary in stereotyped fashion from subthreshold to baseline spiking (oscillatory, to biphasic (spike-oscillatory or spike-plateau. This progression varies somewhat in gonadotrophs from different species and biological preparations. Both baseline spiking and biphasic GnRH-induced Ca2+ signals control LH/FSH synthesis and exocytosis. Estradiol and testosterone regulate gonadotropin secretion through feedback mechanisms, while FSH synthesis and release are influenced by activin, inhibin and follistatin. Adaptation to physiological events like the estrous cycle, involves changes in GnRH sensitivity and LH/FSH synthesis: in proestrus, estradiol feedback regulation abruptly changes from negative to positive, causing the pre-ovulatory LH surge. Similarly, when testosterone levels drop after orquiectomy the lack of negative feedback on pituitary and hypothalamus boosts both GnRH and LH secretion, gonadotrophs GnRH sensitivity increases and Ca2+ signaling patterns change. In addition, gonadotrophs proliferate and grow. These plastic changes denote a more vigorous functional adaptation in response to an extraordinary

  13. Effects of GnRH, a progesterone-releasing device, and energy balance on an oestrus synchronisation program in anoestrous dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, S K; Cockrem, J F; Parkinson, T J; Laven, R A

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this research was to study the roles of the day 0 energy balance and gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and progesterone levels on dominant follicle (DF) and corpus luteum (CL) development during the first 7 days of a gonadotrophin-prostaglandin-gonadotrophin (GPG) + progesterone (P4) program in anoestrous dairy cows. Cows (n = 81) were allocated to one of the three treatments: (1) GPG + P4 (days 0 and 9, 100 µg GnRH; day 0-7, intravaginal P4 device; day 7, 500 µg PGF 2α ); (2) GPG (as for treatment 1 but excluding the P4 device) and (3) prostaglandin + GnRH + P4 (as for treatment 1, but excluding day 0 GnRH). DF and CL size, plasma concentrations of insulin, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) were measured on days 0 and 7. The proportion of cows with a CL on day 7 was significantly different between groups (GPG: 78%, GPG+P4: 69%, PGF 2α + GnRH + P4: 42%, P = 0.02). The CL volume on day 7 was significantly associated with treatment, treatment by time postpartum and plasma concentrations of insulin, IGF-I and NEFA. In cows without a CL present on day 0 of an oestrus synchronisation program, removal of the day 0 GnRH treatment led to reduced CL development; however, no effect of adding progesterone was found. In contrast, in cows with a CL present on day 0 inclusion of a progesterone device led to a higher CL volume, but removal of the first GnRH injection had no effect. Response to the treatment was affected by plasma concentrations of insulin, IGF-I and NEFA. © 2017 Australian Veterinary Association.

  14. Modeling the Male Reproductive Endocrine Axis: Potential Role for a Delay Mechanism in the Inhibitory Action of Gonadal Steroids on GnRH Pulse Frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferasyi, Teuku R; Barrett, P Hugh R; Blache, Dominique; Martin, Graeme B

    2016-05-01

    We developed a compartmental model so we could test mechanistic concepts in the control of the male reproductive endocrine axis. Using SAAM II computer software and a bank of experimental data from male sheep, we began by modeling GnRH-LH feed-forward and LH-T feedback. A key assumption was that the primary control signal comes from a hypothetical neural network (the PULSAR) that emits a digital (pulsatile) signal of variable frequency that drives GnRH secretion in square wave-like pulses. This model produced endocrine profiles that matched experimental observations for the testis-intact animal and for changes in GnRH pulse frequency after castration and T replacement. In the second stage of the model development, we introduced a delay in the negative feedback caused by the aromatization of T to estradiol at the brain level, a concept supported by empirical observations. The simulations showed how changes in the process of aromatization could affect the response of the pulsatile signal to inhibition by steroid feedback. The sensitivity of the PULSAR to estradiol was a critical factor, but the most striking observation was the effect of time delays. With longer delays, there was a reduction in the rate of aromatization and therefore a decrease in local estradiol concentrations, and the outcome was multiple-pulse events in the secretion of GnRH/LH, reflecting experimental observations. In conclusion, our model successfully emulates the GnRH-LH-T-GnRH loop, accommodates a pivotal role for central aromatization in negative feedback, and suggests that time delays in negative feedback are an important aspect of the control of GnRH pulse frequency.

  15. Evaluation of the pituitary-gonadal response to GnRH, and adrenal status, in the leopard (Panthera pardus japonensis) and tiger (Panthera tigris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, J L; Goodrowe, K L; Simmons, L G; Armstrong, D L; Wildt, D E

    1988-01-01

    Frequent blood samples were collected to study hormonal responses to GnRH in male and female leopards and tigers. Animals were anaesthetized with ketamine-HCl and blood samples were collected every 5 min for 15 min before and 160 min after i.v. administration of GnRH (1 micrograms/kg body weight) or saline. No differences in serum cortisol concentrations were observed between sexes within species, but mean cortisol was 2-fold greater in leopards than tigers. GnRH induced a rapid rise in LH in all animals (18.3 +/- 0.9 min to peak). Net LH peak height above pretreatment levels was 3-fold greater in males than conspecific females and was also greater in tigers than leopards. Serum FSH increased after GnRH, although the magnitude of response was less than that observed for LH. Basal LH and FSH and GnRH-stimulated FSH concentrations were not influenced by sex or species. Serum testosterone increased within 30-40 min after GnRH in 3/3 leopard and 1/3 tiger males. Basal testosterone was 3-fold greater in tiger than leopard males. LH pulses (1-2 pulses/3 h) were detected in 60% of saline-treated animals, suggesting pulsatile gonadotrophin secretion; however, in males concomitant testosterone pulses were not observed. These results indicate that there are marked sex and species differences in basal and GnRH-stimulated hormonal responses between felids of the genus Panthera which may be related to differences in adrenal activity.

  16. Balancing selected medication costs with total number of daily injections: a preference analysis of GnRH-agonist and antagonist protocols by IVF patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sills E

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During in vitro fertilization (IVF, fertility patients are expected to self-administer many injections as part of this treatment. While newer medications have been developed to substantially reduce the number of these injections, such agents are typically much more expensive. Considering these differences in both cost and number of injections, this study compared patient preferences between GnRH-agonist and GnRH-antagonist based protocols in IVF. Methods Data were collected by voluntary, anonymous questionnaire at first consultation appointment. Patient opinion concerning total number of s.c. injections as a function of non-reimbursed patient cost associated with GnRH-agonist [A] and GnRH-antagonist [B] protocols in IVF was studied. Results Completed questionnaires (n = 71 revealed a mean +/− SD patient age of 34 +/− 4.1 yrs. Most (83.1% had no prior IVF experience; 2.8% reported another medical condition requiring self-administration of subcutaneous medication(s. When out-of-pocket cost for [A] and [B] were identical, preference for [B] was registered by 50.7% patients. The tendency to favor protocol [B] was weaker among patients with a health occupation. Estimated patient costs for [A] and [B] were $259.82 +/− 11.75 and $654.55 +/− 106.34, respectively (p  Conclusions This investigation found consistently higher non-reimbursed direct medication costs for GnRH-antagonist IVF vs. GnRH-agonist IVF protocols. A conditional preference to minimize downregulation (using GnRH-antagonist was noted among some, but not all, IVF patient sub-groups. Compared to IVF patients with a health occupation, the preference for GnRH-antagonist was weaker than for other patients. While reducing total number of injections by using GnRH-antagonist is a desirable goal, it appears this advantage is not perceived equally by all IVF patients and its utility is likely discounted heavily by patients when nonreimbursed medication costs

  17. Balancing selected medication costs with total number of daily injections: a preference analysis of GnRH-agonist and antagonist protocols by IVF patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sills, E Scott; Collins, Gary S; Salem, Shala A; Jones, Christopher A; Peck, Alison C; Salem, Rifaat D

    2012-08-30

    During in vitro fertilization (IVF), fertility patients are expected to self-administer many injections as part of this treatment. While newer medications have been developed to substantially reduce the number of these injections, such agents are typically much more expensive. Considering these differences in both cost and number of injections, this study compared patient preferences between GnRH-agonist and GnRH-antagonist based protocols in IVF. Data were collected by voluntary, anonymous questionnaire at first consultation appointment. Patient opinion concerning total number of s.c. injections as a function of non-reimbursed patient cost associated with GnRH-agonist [A] and GnRH-antagonist [B] protocols in IVF was studied. Completed questionnaires (n = 71) revealed a mean +/- SD patient age of 34 +/- 4.1 yrs. Most (83.1%) had no prior IVF experience; 2.8% reported another medical condition requiring self-administration of subcutaneous medication(s). When out-of-pocket cost for [A] and [B] were identical, preference for [B] was registered by 50.7% patients. The tendency to favor protocol [B] was weaker among patients with a health occupation. Estimated patient costs for [A] and [B] were $259.82 +/- 11.75 and $654.55 +/- 106.34, respectively (p cost difference increased. This investigation found consistently higher non-reimbursed direct medication costs for GnRH-antagonist IVF vs. GnRH-agonist IVF protocols. A conditional preference to minimize downregulation (using GnRH-antagonist) was noted among some, but not all, IVF patient sub-groups. Compared to IVF patients with a health occupation, the preference for GnRH-antagonist was weaker than for other patients. While reducing total number of injections by using GnRH-antagonist is a desirable goal, it appears this advantage is not perceived equally by all IVF patients and its utility is likely discounted heavily by patients when nonreimbursed medication costs reach a critical level.

  18. Predicting the effect of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogue treatment on uterine leiomyomas based on MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuno, Y.; Yamashita, Y.; Takahashi, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Kumamoto Univ. School of Medicine, Kumamoto (Japan); Katabuchi, H.; Okamura, H. [Dept. of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Kumamoto Univ. School of Medicine, Kumamoto (Japan); Kitano, Y.; Shimamura, T. [Dept. of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Amakusa Chuou General Hospital, Hondo (Japan)

    1999-11-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that the simple assessment of signal intensity on T2-weighted MR images is predictive of the effect of hormonal treatment with gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogue. Material and methods: The correlation between T2-weighted MR imaging of uterine leiomyomas and histologic findings was evaluated using 85 leiomyomas from 62 females who underwent myomectomy or hysterectomy. We also correlated the pretreatment MR images features obtained in 110 women with 143 leiomyomas with the effect of GnRH analogue treatment. The size (length x width x depth) of the leiomyoma was evaluated before and at 6 months after treatment by ultrasound. Results: The proportion of leiomyoma cell fascicles and that of extracellular matrix affected signal intensities of uterine leiomyomas on T2-weighted MR images. The amount of extracellular matrix was predominant in hypointense leiomyomas on T2-weighted images, while diffuse intermediate signal leiomyomas were predominantly composed of leiomyoma cell fascicles. Marked degenerative changes were noted in leiomyomas with heterogenous hyperintensity. The homogeneously intermediate signal intensity leiomyomas showed significant size reduction after treatment (size ratio; posttreatment volume/pretreatment volume 0.29{+-}0.11). The size ratio for the hypointense tumors was 0.82{+-}0.14, and 0.82{+-}0.18 for the heterogeneously hyperintense tumors. There was a significant difference in the response to treatment between the homogeneously intermediate signal intensity leiomyomas and the hypointense or heterogeneously hyperintense leiomyomas (both p<0.01). Conclusion: Signal intensity on T2-weighted MR images depends on the amount of leiomyoma cell fascicles and extracellular matrix. Simple assessment of the MR signal intensity is useful in predicting the effect of GnRH analogue on uterine leiomyomas. (orig.)

  19. Predicting the effect of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogue treatment on uterine leiomyomas based on MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuno, Y.; Yamashita, Y.; Takahashi, M.; Katabuchi, H.; Okamura, H.; Kitano, Y.; Shimamura, T.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that the simple assessment of signal intensity on T2-weighted MR images is predictive of the effect of hormonal treatment with gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogue. Material and methods: The correlation between T2-weighted MR imaging of uterine leiomyomas and histologic findings was evaluated using 85 leiomyomas from 62 females who underwent myomectomy or hysterectomy. We also correlated the pretreatment MR images features obtained in 110 women with 143 leiomyomas with the effect of GnRH analogue treatment. The size (length x width x depth) of the leiomyoma was evaluated before and at 6 months after treatment by ultrasound. Results: The proportion of leiomyoma cell fascicles and that of extracellular matrix affected signal intensities of uterine leiomyomas on T2-weighted MR images. The amount of extracellular matrix was predominant in hypointense leiomyomas on T2-weighted images, while diffuse intermediate signal leiomyomas were predominantly composed of leiomyoma cell fascicles. Marked degenerative changes were noted in leiomyomas with heterogenous hyperintensity. The homogeneously intermediate signal intensity leiomyomas showed significant size reduction after treatment (size ratio; posttreatment volume/pretreatment volume 0.29±0.11). The size ratio for the hypointense tumors was 0.82±0.14, and 0.82±0.18 for the heterogeneously hyperintense tumors. There was a significant difference in the response to treatment between the homogeneously intermediate signal intensity leiomyomas and the hypointense or heterogeneously hyperintense leiomyomas (both p<0.01). Conclusion: Signal intensity on T2-weighted MR images depends on the amount of leiomyoma cell fascicles and extracellular matrix. Simple assessment of the MR signal intensity is useful in predicting the effect of GnRH analogue on uterine leiomyomas. (orig.)

  20. Identification and localization of gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) orthologs in the hypothalamus of the red-eared slider turtle, Trachemys scripta elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukena, Kazuyoshi; Iwakoshi-Ukena, Eiko; Osugi, Tomohiro; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi

    2016-02-01

    Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) was discovered in 2000 as a novel hypothalamic neuropeptide that inhibited gonadotropin release in the Japanese quail. GnIH and its orthologs have a common C-terminal LPXRFamide (X=L or Q) motif, and have been identified in vertebrates from agnathans to humans, apart from reptiles. In the present study, we characterized a cDNA encoding GnIH orthologs in the brain of the red-eared slider turtle. The deduced precursor protein consisted of 205 amino-acid residues, encoding three putative peptide sequences that included the LPXRFamide motif at their C-termini. In addition, the precursor sequence was most similar to those of avian species. Immunoaffinity purification combined with mass spectrometry confirmed that three mature peptides were produced in the brain. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry showed that turtle GnIH-containing cells were restricted to the periventricular hypothalamic nucleus. Immunoreactive fibers were densely distributed in the median eminence. Thus, GnIH and related peptides may act on the pituitary to regulate pituitary hormone release in turtles as well as other vertebrates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Prostate specific antigen in boys with precocious puberty before and during gonadal suppression by GnRH agonist treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, A; Müller, J; Skakkebaek, N E

    1997-01-01

    antigen (PSA) is a marker of the androgen-dependent prostatic epithelial cell activity and it is used in the diagnosis and surveillance of adult patients with prostatic cancer. We have measured PSA concentrations in serum from boys with precocious puberty before and during gonadal suppression with Gn......In healthy boys, the pituitary-gonadal axis exhibits diurnal variation in early puberty. Serum testosterone levels are higher during the night and low or immeasurable during the day. These fluctuating levels of circulating androgens in early pubertal boys are difficult to monitor. Prostate specific...

  2. The relationship between HBV serum markers and the clinicopathological characteristics of hepatitis B virus-associated glomerulonephritis (HBV-GN in the northeastern chinese population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Lei

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To investigate the effect of HBV markers on HBV-GN. Methods The immunohistochemistry was used to detect HBsAg and HBcAg in frozen sections of renal biopsy, the changes in HBV serum markers, renal functional parameters and clinical manifestations or symptoms were observed to analyze renal damage. Results Using renal biopsy data from 329 cases, this study found that the most common pathological subtype in HBV-GN was mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis (MsPGN (24.9%, P P P P Conclusion Examination of HBV markers in serum and renal biopsy will be useful for clinicians to predict the renal damage in early stage when it is reversible in HBV-GN.

  3. Intracellular expression of IRF9 Stat fusion protein overcomes the defective Jak-Stat signaling and inhibits HCV RNA replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balart Luis A

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Interferon alpha (IFN-α binds to a cell surface receptor that activates the Jak-Stat signaling pathway. A critical component of this pathway is the translocation of interferon stimulated gene factor 3 (a complex of three proteins Stat1, Stat2 and IRF9 to the nucleus to activate antiviral genes. A stable sub-genomic replicon cell line resistant to IFN-α was developed in which the nuclear translocation of Stat1 and Stat2 proteins was prevented due to the lack of phosphorylation; whereas the nuclear translocation of IRF9 protein was not affected. In this study, we sought to overcome defective Jak-Stat signaling and to induce an antiviral state in the IFN-α resistant replicon cell line by developing a chimera IRF9 protein fused with the trans activating domain (TAD of either a Stat1 (IRF9-S1C or Stat2 (IRF9-S2C protein. We show here that intracellular expression of fusion proteins using the plasmid constructs of either IRF9-S1C or IRF9-S2C, in the IFN-α resistant cells, resulted in an increase in Interferon Stimulated Response Element (ISRE luciferase promoter activity and significantly induced HLA-1 surface expression. Moreover, we show that transient transfection of IRF9-S1C or IRF9-S2C plasmid constructs into IFN-α resistant replicon cells containing sub-genomic HCV1b and HCV2a viruses resulted in an inhibition of viral replication and viral protein expression independent of IFN-α treatment. The results of this study indicate that the recombinant fusion proteins of IRF9-S1C, IRF9-S2C alone, or in combination, have potent antiviral properties against the HCV in an IFN-α resistant cell line with a defective Jak-Stat signaling.

  4. Developmental exposure to ethinylestradiol affects reproductive physiology, the GnRH neuroendocrine network and behaviors in female mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyes eDerouiche

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available During development, environmental estrogens are able to induce an estrogen mimetic action that may interfere with endocrine and neuroendocrine systems. The present study investigated the effects on the reproductive function in female mice following developmental exposure to pharmaceutical ethinylestradiol (EE2, the most widespread and potent synthetic steroid present in aquatic environments. EE2 was administrated in drinking water at environmentally relevant (ENVIR or pharmacological (PHARMACO doses (0.1 and 1 µg/kg (body weight/day respectively, from embryonic day 10 until postnatal day 40. Our results show that both groups of EE2-exposed females had advanced vaginal opening and shorter estrus cycles, but a normal fertility rate compared to CONTROL females. The hypothalamic population of GnRH neurons was affected by EE2 exposure with a significant increase in the number of perikarya in the preoptic area of the PHARMACO group and a modification in their distribution in the ENVIR group, both associated with a marked decrease in GnRH fibers immunoreactivity in the median eminence. In EE2-exposed females, behavioral tests highlighted a disturbed maternal behavior, a higher lordosis response, a lack of discrimination between gonad-intact and castrated males in sexually experienced females, and an increased anxiety-related behavior. Altogether, these results put emphasis on the high sensitivity of sexually dimorphic behaviors and neuroendocrine circuits to disruptive effects of EDCs.

  5. Comparison of mild and microdose GnRH agonist flare protocols on IVF outcome in poor responders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimzadeh, Mohammad Ali; Mashayekhy, Mehri; Mohammadian, Farnaz; Moghaddam, Fatemeh Mansoori

    2011-05-01

    To compare the IVF outcome of clomiphene citrate/gonadotropin/antagonist (mild protocol) and microdose GnRH agonist flare protocols for poor responders undergoing in vitro fertilization. 159 poor responder patients were randomized and ovarian stimulation was performed with clomiphene citrate, gonadotropin and antagonist (group I) or microdose GnRH agonist flare (group II) protocols. Main outcome was clinical pregnancy rate and secondary outcomes were doses of gonadotropin administration and duration of stimulation. There were no significant differences in age, causes of infertility, basal FSH, BMI, duration of infertility, E(2) level on the day of hCG injection in both groups. Although the cancellation, fertilization, and clinical pregnancy rates were similar in both groups, the endometrial thickness, number of retrieved oocytes, mature oocytes and implantation rate were significantly higher in mild protocol. The doses of gonadotropin administration and duration of stimulation were significantly lower in mild protocol. We recommend mild protocol in assisted reproductive technology cycles for poor responders based on our results regarding less doses of used gonadotropin and a shorter duration of stimulation.

  6. The induction of ovulation by pulsatile administration of GnRH: an appropriate method in hypothalamic amenorrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christou, Fotini; Pitteloud, Nelly; Gomez, Fulgencio

    2017-08-01

    The induction of ovulation by the means of a pump which assures the pulsatile administration of GnRH is a well-known method that applies to women suffering from amenorrhea of hypothalamic origin. Although a simple and efficient method to establish fertility, it is underused. Twelve patients suffering from this condition, 1 Kallmann syndrome, 4 normosmic isolated hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, and 7 functional hypothalamic amenorrhea desiring pregnancy were treated. They underwent one or more cycles of pulsatile GnRH, at a frequency of 90 minutes, either by the intravenous or the subcutaneous route. An initial dose of 5 μg per pulse in the intravenous route was administered and of 15 μg per pulse in the subcutaneous route. The treatment was monitored by regular dosing of gonadotropins, estradiol and progesterone, and the development of follicles and ovulation was monitored by intra-vaginal ultrasonography. All the patients had documented ovulation, after a mean of 17 days on pump stimulation. Single ovulation occurred in 30 of 33 treatment cycles, irrespective of the route of administration. Ovulation resulted in 10 pregnancies over 7 patients (2 pregnancies in 3 of them), distributed in the 3 diagnostic categories. For comparison, a patient with PCOS treated similarly, disclosed premature LH surge without ovulation.

  7. Anti-Mullerian hormone levels do not predict response to pulsatile GnRH in women with hypothalamic amenorrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billington, Emma O; Corenblum, Bernard

    2016-09-01

    Pulsatile GnRH is used to induce ovulation in women with hypothalamic amenorrhea (HA), but tools to predict response are lacking. We assessed whether baseline AMH levels are associated with response to pulsatile GnRH in 16 women with HA. AMH levels were compared between non-responders and women who achieved follicular development or pregnancy. Median AMH for the cohort was 2.2 ng/mL. AMH levels were undetectable or low in four women, normal in nine and high in three. Follicular development was observed in 13 (81%) women (82% of cycles) and pregnancy achieved in 10 (63%) women (29% of cycles). All four women with low or undetectable AMH had follicular response and three achieved pregnancy. Of the 12 women with normal or high AMH, 10 had a follicular response and seven achieved pregnancy. Median AMH levels were comparable in those who achieved follicular development and those who did not (2.2 ng/mL versus 1.3 ng/mL, p = 0.78) and in those who became pregnant and those who did not (2.2 ng/mL versus 1.9 ng/mL, p = 0.52). In summary, low AMH does not preclude response to ovulation induction in women with HA, suggesting that ovarian potential may not be the primary determinant of AMH concentrations in this population.

  8. GN and C Subsystem Concept for Safe Precision Landing of the Proposed Lunar MARE Robotic Science Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, John M., III; Johnson, Andrew E.; Anderson, F. Scott; Condon, Gerald L.; Nguyen, Louis H.; Olansen, Jon B.; Devolites, Jennifer L.; Harris, William J.; Hines, Glenn D.; Lee, David E.; hide

    2016-01-01

    The Lunar MARE (Moon Age and Regolith Explorer) Discovery Mission concept targets delivery of a science payload to the lunar surface for sample collection and dating. The mission science is within a 100-meter radius region of smooth lunar maria terrain near Aristarchus crater. The location has several small, sharp craters and rocks that present landing hazards to the spacecraft. For successful delivery of the science payload to the surface, the vehicle Guidance, Navigation and Control (GN&C) subsystem requires safe and precise landing capability, so design infuses the NASA Autonomous precision Landing and Hazard Avoidance Technology (ALHAT) and a gimbaled, throttleable LOX/LCH4 main engine. The ALHAT system implemented for Lunar MARE is a specialization of prototype technologies in work within NASA for the past two decades, including a passive optical Terrain Relative Navigation (TRN) sensor, a Navigation Doppler Lidar (NDL) velocity and range sensor, and a Lidar-based Hazard Detection (HD) sensor. The landing descent profile is from a retrograde orbit over lighted terrain with landing near lunar dawn. The GN&C subsystem with ALHAT capabilities will deliver the science payload to the lunar surface within a 20-meter landing ellipse of the target location and at a site having greater than 99% safety probability, which minimizes risk to safe landing and delivery of the MARE science payload to the intended terrain region.

  9. Synchronisation of the follicular wave with GnRH and PGF2α analogue for a timed breeding programme in dromedary camels (Camelus dromedarius).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjunatha, B M; Al-Bulushi, Samir; Pratap, N

    2015-09-01

    This study was conducted to develop a hormone protocol that precisely synchronises follicular development for a timed breeding (TB) programme in dromedary camels. To examine the effect of GnRH treatment at four known stages of follicular development, animals were treated with GnRH when the largest follicle of the wave was 4-7, 8-11, 12-17 and 18-27 mm in diameter. Transrectal ultrasonography was carried out daily up to 20 days after treatment. A hormone protocol (FWsynch) for the synchronisation of follicular wave and TB consisting of GnRH-1 (GnRH) on Day 0, PG-1 (PGF2α) on Day 7, GnRH-2 on Day 10 and PG-2 on Day 17 was initiated at four known stages of follicular development. Ovarian structures were monitored by ultrasonography. The FWsynch protocol was initiated at random stages of follicle development and animals were bred by natural mating at a fixed time at the research facility and in field. The pregnancy was diagnosed by ultrasonography. GnRH treatment in animals with a dominant follicle (DF) of ≥ 11 mm in diameter resulted in synchronous new follicular wave emergence, whereas in animals with a DF ≤ 10 mm, the treatment did not alter the development of the existing follicular wave. The FWsynch protocol was effective in synchronising the follicular wave for TB irrespective of the stage of follicular development at the beginning of the protocol. TB using FWsynch protocol resulted in a pregnancy rate of 60.2% in a research facility and 53.6% and 45.6% in normal and infertile camels respectively under field conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. [EFECTOS NEUROENDOCRINOS DE INSULINA, IGF-I Y LEPTINA SOBRE LA SECRECIÓN DE HORMONA LIBERADORA DE GONADOTROPINAS (GnRH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Rosales-Torres

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available El balance energético del individuo determina en gran medida su eficiencia reproductiva. Bajo condiciones de balance negativo de energía, en la mayoría de los mamíferos, hay una reducción en la síntesis de hormona liberadora de gonadotropinas (GnRH, lo cual disminuye la actividad del eje hipotálamo-hipófisis-gónadas. Cuando el balance energético es revertido, el hipotálamo puede monitorear este cambio y restablecer la secreción de GnRH. La Insulina, el Factor de Crecimiento similar a la Insulina I (IGF-I y Leptina parecen ser los principales mensajeros que informan al hipotálamo sobre el estado energético del animal puesto que las concentraciones periféricas de estas hormonas en situaciones energéticas negativas o positivas, se han asociado con los cambios en la secreción de GnRH. En la presente revisión se muestra como IGF-I actúa directamente sobre neuronas secretoras de GnRH, afectando su síntesis, en tanto que insulina y leptina actúan sobre neuronas en el núcleo arcuato, las cuales hacen sinapsis con neuronas GnRH en el área preóptica medial. Sobre neuronas productoras de neuropéptido Y (NPY insulina y leptina reducen su expresión y por lo tanto el efecto negativo del NPY sobre neuronas GnRH. En cambio insulina y leptina estimulan la síntesis de péptido similar a la galanina (GLAP y propiomelanocortina (POMC. Tanto GALP como los metabolitos de POMC (hormona estimulante de melanocitos principalmente incrementan la síntesis de GnRH. Finalmente, la leptina, incrementa la expresión de kispeptina en neuronas del núcleo ARC. Kispeptina por su parte también tiene un efecto positivo sobre la síntesis y secreción de GnRH.

  11. Biphasic action of cyclic adenosine 3',5'- monophosphate in gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analog-stimulated hormone release from GH3 cells stably transfected with GnRH receptor complementary deoxyribonucleic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanislaus, D; Arora, V; Awara, W M; Conn, P M

    1996-03-01

    GH3 cells are a PRL-secreting adenoma cell line derived from pituitary lactotropes. These cells have been stably transfected with rat GnRH receptor complementary DNA to produce four cell lines: GGH(3)1', GGH(3)2', GGH(3)6', and GGH(3)12'. In response to either GnRH or Buserelin (a metabolically stable GnRH agonist), these cell lines synthesize PRL in a cAMP-dependent manner. Only GGH(3)6' cells desensitize in response to persistent treatment with 10(-7) g/ml Buserelin. GGH(3)1', GGH(3)2', and GGH(3)12' cells, however, can be made refractory to Buserelin stimulation by raising cAMP levels either by the addition of (Bu)2cAMP to the medium or by treatment with cholera toxin. In GGH(3) cells, low levels of cAMP fulfill the requirements for a second messenger, whereas higher levels appear to mediate the development of desensitization. The observation that in GGH(3)6' cells, cAMP production persists after the onset of desensitization is consistent with the view that the mechanism responsible for desensitization is distal to the production of cAMP. Moreover, the absence of any significant difference in the amount of cAMP produced per cell in GGH(3)2', GGH(3)6', or GGH(3)12' cells suggests that elevated cAMP production per cell does not explain the development of desensitization in GGH(3)6' cells. We suggest that Buserelin-stimulated PRL synthesis in GGH(3)6' cells is mediated by a different cAMP-dependent protein kinase pool(s) than that in nondesensitizing GGH(3) cells. Such a protein kinase A pool(s) may be more susceptible to degradation via cAMP-mediated mechanisms than the protein kinase pools mediating the Buserelin response in nondesensitizing GGH(3) cells. A similar mechanism has been reported in other systems.

  12. Expression of TNF-α and IL-6 cytokines in the choroid and sclera of hypercholesterolemic rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogil José de Almeida Torres

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Avaliar a expressão das citocinas inflamatórias TNF-α e IL-6 na esclera e coroide de coelhos hipercolesterolêmicos. Método: Coelhos New Zealand foram organizados em dois grupos: GN recebeu ração padrão para coelhos; GH recebeu dieta rica em colesterol a 1%. Foi realizada a dosagem sérica de colesterol total, triglicerídeos, HDL colesterol, glicemia de jejum no início do experimento e no momento da eutanásia. Ao final da 4ª semana para o GN e 8ª semana para o GH foi realizada a eutanásia dos animais. Os olhos foram submetidos à análise imuno-histoquímica com os anticorpos TNF-α e IL-6. Resultados: O GH manifestou significativo aumento do colesterol total e triglicerídeos em relação ao GN (p<0,001. Houve significativo aumento da expressão da TNF-α (p<0,001 e da IL-6 (p=0,002 na coroide e esclera dos animais do GH em relação ao GN. Conclusão: Este estudo demonstra que a dieta hipercolesterolêmica induz ao aumento da expressão das citocinas TNF-α e IL-6 na coroide e esclera de coelhos.

  13. Single and repeated GnRH agonist stimulation tests compared with basal markers of ovarian reserve in the prediction of outcome in IVF

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, D.J.; Broekmans, F.J.M.; Bancsi, L.F.J.M.M.; Looman, C.W.N.; Jong, F.H. de; Velde, E.R. te

    Purpose: To study the value of a single or repeated GnRH agonist stimulation test (GAST) in predicting outcome in IVF compared to basal ovarian reserve tests. Methods: A total of 57 women was included. In a cycle prior to the IVF treatment, on day 3, an antral follicle count (AFC) was performed

  14. Longitudinal follow-up of bone density and body composition in children with precocious or early puberty before, during and after cessation of GnRH agonist therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.M. van der Sluis (Inge); A.M. Boot (Annemieke); E.P. Krenning (Eric); S.L.S. Drop (Stenvert); S.M.P.F. de Muinck Keizer-Schrama (Sabine)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractWe studied bone mineral density (BMD), bone metabolism, and body composition in 47 children with central precocious puberty (n = 36) or early puberty (n = 11) before, during, and after cessation of GnRH agonist. Bone density and body composition were measured with dual

  15. Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Modelling of GnRH Antagonist Degarelix: A Comparison of the Non-linear Mixed-Effects Programs NONMEM and NLME

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tornøe, Christoffer Wenzel; Agersø, Henrik; Nielsen, Henrik Aalborg

    2004-01-01

    proposed by Lindstrom and Bates. The two programs were tested using clinical PK/PD data of a new gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist degarelix currently being developed for prostate cancer treatment. The pharmacokinetics of intravenous administered degarelix was analysed using a three...

  16. Peculiarities of cyclic deformation and fracture of heat-resistant steel 10GN2MFA under conditions typical for the steam generator PGV-1000 collector material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giginyak, F.F.

    1998-01-01

    In the present paper, the results are discussed concerning investigations into the regularities of deformation and fracture of steel, 10GN2MFA under conditions close to those of actual operation when used in collectors of PGV-1000-type steam generators, which are in service with WWER-1000-type reactors of nuclear power plants (NPP). (author)

  17. Gonadotrophin-Releasing Hormone (GnRH Analogues in the Treatment of Mixed Mullerian Tumours of the Uterus: Two Case Reports and Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Katesmark

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Subjects/Discussion. Two cases of clinical and radiological response of recurrent mixed Mullerian tumours following treatment with either nasal (Buserilin or intramuscular (Goserilin GnRH analogues are reported and a short review of the evidence to support this treatment option presented.

  18. Ovulation induction with pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) or gonadotropins in a case of hypothalamic amenorrhea and diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgopoulos, N A; Markou, K B; Pappas, A P; Protonatariou, A; Vagenakis, G A; Sykiotis, G P; Dimopoulos, P A; Tzingounis, V A

    2001-12-01

    Hypothalamic amenorrhea is a treatable cause of infertility. Our patient was presented with secondary amenorrhea and diabetes insipidus. Cortisol and prolactin responded normally to a combined insulin tolerance test (ITT) and thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) challenge, while thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) response to TRH was diminished, and no response of growth hormone to ITT was detected. Both luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) levels increased following gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) challenge. No response of LH to clomiphene citrate challenge was detected. Magnetic resonance imaging findings demonstrated a midline mass occupying the inferior hypothalamus, with posterior lobe not visible and thickened pituitary stalk. Ovulation induction was carried out first with combined human menopausal gonadotropins (hMG/LH/FSH) (150 IU/day) and afterwards with pulsatile GnRH (150 ng/kg/pulse). Ovulation was achieved with both pulsatile GnRH and combine gonadotropin therapy. Slightly better results were achieved with the pulsatile GnRH treatment.

  19. Comparison between pulsatile GnRH therapy and gonadotropins for ovulation induction in women with both functional hypothalamic amenorrhea and polycystic ovarian morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Agathe; Dewailly, Didier; Plouvier, Pauline; Catteau-Jonard, Sophie; Robin, Geoffroy

    2016-12-01

    Ovulation induction in patients having both functional hypothalamic amenorrhea (FHA) and polycystic ovarian morphology (PCOM) has been less studied in the literature. As results remain contradictory, no recommendations have yet been established. To compare pulsatile GnRH therapy versus gonadotropins for ovulation induction in "FHA-PCOM" patients and to determine if one treatment strikes as superior to the other. A 12-year retrospective study, comparing 55 "FHA-PCOM" patients, treated either with GnRH therapy (38 patients, 93 cycles) or with gonadotropins (17 patients, 53 cycles). Both groups were similar, defined by low serum LH and E2 levels, low BMI, excessive follicle number per ovary and/or high serum AMH level. Ovulation rates were significantly lower with gonadotropins (56.6% versus 78.6%, p = 0.005), with more cancellation and ovarian hyper-responses (14% versus 34% per initiated cycle, p < 0.005). Pregnancy rates were significantly higher with GnRH therapy, whether per initiated cycle (26.9% versus 7.6%, p = 0.005) or per patient (65.8% versus 23.5%, p = 0.007). In our study, GnRH therapy was more successful and safer than gonadotropins, for ovulation induction in "FHA-PCOM" patients. If results were confirmed by prospective studies, it could become a first-line treatment for this population, just as it is for FHA women without PCOM.

  20. Differential testosterone response to GnRH-induced LH release before and after musth in adult Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) bulls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Somgird, Chaleamchat; Sripiboon, Supaphen; Mahasawangkul, Sittidet; Boonprasert, Khajohnpat; Brown, Janine L; Stout, Tom A E; Colenbrander, Ben; Thitaram, Chatchote

    2016-01-01

    Bull elephants exhibit marked increases in testosterone secretion during musth, and studies have shown a heightened sensitivity of the testis to GnRH-stimulated testosterone production in musth compared to nonmusth males. However, activity of the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis before or soon

  1. Serum inhibin A and inhibin B in central precocious puberty before and during treatment with GnRH agonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sehested, A; Andersson, A M; Müller, J

    2000-01-01

    both gonadotropins and estradiol levels become suppressed. We therefore investigated serum levels of inhibin A and inhibin B in girls with CPP at diagnosis and during treatment in order to test the hypothesis that inhibin secretion would increase and decrease in parallel with the activation......Serum levels of the gonadal hormones inhibin A and inhibin B are undetectable or low in prepubertal girls, and rise during puberty. In girls with central precocious puberty (CPP) the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis is prematurely activated, if the girl is thereafter treated with GnRH agonists...... and suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Serum levels of inhibin A and inhibin B were significantly (p 0.0005) elevated in 42 girls at diagnosis of CPP (inhibin A: 7 pg/ml (...

  2. Evidence That Dopamine Acts via Kisspeptin to Hold GnRH Pulse Frequency in Check in Anestrous Ewes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltby, Matthew J.; Millar, Robert P.; Hileman, Stanley M.; Nestor, Casey C; Whited, Brant; Tseng, Ashlie S.; Coolen, Lique M.; Lehman, Michael N.

    2012-01-01

    Recent work has implicated stimulatory kisspeptin neurons in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) as important for seasonal changes in reproductive function in sheep, but earlier studies support a role for inhibitory A15 dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the suppression of GnRH (and LH) pulse frequency in the nonbreeding (anestrous) season. Because A15 neurons project to the ARC, we performed three experiments to test the hypothesis that A15 neurons act via ARC kisspeptin neurons to inhibit LH in anestrus: 1) we used dual immunocytochemistry to determine whether these ARC neurons contain D2 dopamine receptor (D2-R), the receptor responsible for inhibition of LH in anestrus; 2) we tested the ability of local administration of sulpiride, a D2-R antagonist, into the ARC to increase LH secretion in anestrus; and 3) we determined whether an antagonist to the kisspeptin receptor could block the increase in LH secretion induced by sulpiride in anestrus. In experiment 1, 40% of this ARC neuronal subpopulation contained D2-R in breeding season ewes, but this increased to approximately 80% in anestrus. In experiment 2, local microinjection of the two highest doses (10 and 50 nmol) of sulpiride into the ARC significantly increased LH pulse frequency to levels 3 times that seen with vehicle injections. Finally, intracerebroventricular infusion of a kisspeptin receptor antagonist completely blocked the increase in LH pulse frequency induced by systemic administration of sulpiride to anestrous ewes. These results support the hypothesis that DA acts to inhibit GnRH (and LH) secretion in anestrus by suppressing the activity of ARC kisspeptin neurons. PMID:23038740

  3. Structural Dynamic Assessment of the GN2 Piping System for NASA's New and Powerful Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNelis, Mark E.; Staab, Lucas D.; Akers, James C.; Hughes, WIlliam O.; Chang, Li, C.; Hozman, Aron D.; Henry, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) has led the design and build of the new world-class vibroacoustic test capabilities at the NASA GRC's Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio, USA from 2007-2011. SAIC-Benham has completed construction of a new reverberant acoustic test facility to support the future testing needs of NASA's space exploration program and commercial customers. The large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) is approximately 101,000 cu ft in volume and was designed to operate at a maximum empty chamber acoustic overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 163 dB. This combination of size and acoustic power is unprecedented amongst the world's known active reverberant acoustic test facilities. Initial checkout acoustic testing was performed on March 2011 by SAIC-Benham at test levels up to 161 dB OASPL. During testing, several branches of the gaseous nitrogen (GN2) piping system, which supply the fluid to the noise generating acoustic modulators, failed at their "t-junctions" connecting the 12 inch supply line to their respective 4 inch branch lines. The problem was initially detected when the oxygen sensors in the horn room indicated a lower than expected oxygen level from which was inferred GN2 leaks in the piping system. In subsequent follow up inspections, cracks were identified in the failed "t-junction" connections through non-destructive evaluation testing . Through structural dynamic modeling of the piping system, the root cause of the "t-junction" connection failures was determined. The structural dynamic assessment identified several possible corrective design improvements to the horn room piping system. The effectiveness of the chosen design repairs were subsequently evaluated in September 2011 during acoustic verification testing to 161 dB OASPL.

  4. Activation of the connective tissue growth factor (CTGF-transforming growth factor β 1 (TGF-β 1 axis in hepatitis C virus-expressing hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tirumuru Nagaraja

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The pro-fibrogenic cytokine connective tissue growth factor (CTGF plays an important role in the development and progression of fibrosis in many organ systems, including liver. However, its role in the pathogenesis of hepatitis C virus (HCV-induced liver fibrosis remains unclear. METHODS: In the present study, we assessed CTGF expression in HCV-infected hepatocytes using replicon cells containing full-length HCV genotype 1 and the infectious HCV clone JFH1 (HCV genotype 2 by real-time PCR, Western blot analysis and confocal microscopy. We evaluated transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1 as a key upstream mediator of CTGF production using neutralizing antibodies and shRNAs. We also determined the signaling molecules involved in CTGF production using various immunological techniques. RESULTS: We demonstrated an enhanced expression of CTGF in two independent models of HCV infection. We also demonstrated that HCV induced CTGF expression in a TGF-β1-dependent manner. Further dissection of the molecular mechanisms revealed that CTGF production was mediated through sequential activation of MAPkinase and Smad-dependent pathways. Finally, to determine whether CTGF regulates fibrosis, we showed that shRNA-mediated knock-down of CTGF resulted in reduced expression of fibrotic markers in HCV replicon cells. CONCLUSION: Our studies demonstrate a central role for CTGF expression in HCV-induced liver fibrosis and highlight the potential value of developing CTGF-based anti-fibrotic therapies to counter HCV-induced liver damage.

  5. Synthesis of green nano iron particles (GnIP) and their application in adsorptive removal of As(III) and As(V) from aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, Kumar Suranjit, E-mail: suranjit@gmail.com [Department of Environmental Studies, Faculty of Science, The M. S. University of Baroda, Vadodara, 390002, Gujarat (India); Gandhi, Pooja, E-mail: poojagandhi.3090@gmail.com [Department of Environmental Sciences, Ashok and Rita Patel Institute of Integrated Study and Research in Biotechnology and Allied Sciences (ARIBAS), New Vallabh Vidyanagar, Anand, Gujarat, 388121 (India); Selvaraj, Kaliaperumal, E-mail: k.selvaraj@ncl.res.in [Nano and Computational Materials Lab, Catalysis Division, National Chemical Laboratory, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Pune, 411008 (India)

    2014-10-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Colloidal GnIP synthesised using extract of Mint leaves were entrapped in chitosan beads. • GnIP loaded beads were employed for removal of As ions, showed excellent removal efficiency. • Iron and chitosan are cost effective materials hence can be a good adsorbent for removal of arsenic. - Abstract: The present study reports a new approach to synthesise nano iron particles using leaf extract of Mint (Mentha spicata L.) plant. The synthesised GnIPs were subjected to detailed adsorption studies for removal of arsenite and arsenate from aqueous solution of defined concentration. Iron nanoparticles synthesised using leaf extract showed UV–vis absorption peaks at 360 and 430 nm. TEM result showed the formation of polydispersed nanoparticles of size ranging from 20 to 45 nm. Nanoparticles were found to have core–shell structure. The planer reflection of selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and XRD analysis suggested that iron particles were crystalline and belonged to fcc (face centred cubic) type. Energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX) shows that Fe was an integral component of synthesised nanoparticles. The content of Fe in nanoparticles was found to be 40%, in addition to other elements like C (16%), O (19%) and Cl (23%). FT-IR study suggested that functional groups like -NH, -C=O, -C=N and -C=C were involved in particle formation. The removal efficiency of GnIP-chitosan composite for As(III) and As(V) was found to be 98.79 and 99.65%. Regeneration of adsorbent suggested that synthesised green GnIP may work as an effective tool for removal of arsenic from contaminated water.

  6. Synthesis of green nano iron particles (GnIP) and their application in adsorptive removal of As(III) and As(V) from aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, Kumar Suranjit; Gandhi, Pooja; Selvaraj, Kaliaperumal

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Colloidal GnIP synthesised using extract of Mint leaves were entrapped in chitosan beads. • GnIP loaded beads were employed for removal of As ions, showed excellent removal efficiency. • Iron and chitosan are cost effective materials hence can be a good adsorbent for removal of arsenic. - Abstract: The present study reports a new approach to synthesise nano iron particles using leaf extract of Mint (Mentha spicata L.) plant. The synthesised GnIPs were subjected to detailed adsorption studies for removal of arsenite and arsenate from aqueous solution of defined concentration. Iron nanoparticles synthesised using leaf extract showed UV–vis absorption peaks at 360 and 430 nm. TEM result showed the formation of polydispersed nanoparticles of size ranging from 20 to 45 nm. Nanoparticles were found to have core–shell structure. The planer reflection of selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and XRD analysis suggested that iron particles were crystalline and belonged to fcc (face centred cubic) type. Energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX) shows that Fe was an integral component of synthesised nanoparticles. The content of Fe in nanoparticles was found to be 40%, in addition to other elements like C (16%), O (19%) and Cl (23%). FT-IR study suggested that functional groups like -NH, -C=O, -C=N and -C=C were involved in particle formation. The removal efficiency of GnIP-chitosan composite for As(III) and As(V) was found to be 98.79 and 99.65%. Regeneration of adsorbent suggested that synthesised green GnIP may work as an effective tool for removal of arsenic from contaminated water

  7. Differential testosterone response to GnRH-induced LH release before and after musth in adult Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) bulls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somgird, Chaleamchat; Sripiboon, Supaphen; Mahasawangkul, Sittidet; Boonprasert, Khajohnpat; Brown, Janine L; Stout, Tom A E; Colenbrander, Ben; Thitaram, Chatchote

    2016-04-15

    Bull elephants exhibit marked increases in testosterone secretion during musth, and studies have shown a heightened sensitivity of the testis to GnRH-stimulated testosterone production in musth compared to nonmusth males. However, activity of the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis before or soon after musth has not been studied in detail. The aim of this study was to evaluate LH and testosterone responses to GnRH challenge in nine adult Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) bulls during three periods relative to musth: premusth, postmusth, and nonmusth. Bulls were administered 80 μg of a GnRH agonist, and blood was collected before and after injection to monitor serum hormone concentrations. The same bulls were injected with saline 2 weeks before each GnRH challenge and monitored using the same blood collection protocol. All bulls responded to GnRH, but not saline, with an increase in LH and testosterone during all three periods. The mean peak LH (1.76 ± 0.19 ng/mL; P elephants. Furthermore, although the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis is active throughout the year, the testis appears to be more responsive to LH in terms of testosterone production in the period leading up to musth, compared to the nonmusth and postmusth periods. This heightened sensitivity, perhaps as a result of LH receptor up-regulation, may prime the testis for maximal testosterone production, leading to the physiological and behavioral changes associated with musth. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. PCR-based plasmid typing in Enterococcus faecium strains reveals widely distributed pRE25-, pRUM-, pIP501-and pHT beta-related replicons associated with glycopeptide resistance and stabilizing toxin-antitoxin systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosvoll, T.C.S.; Pedersen, T.; Sletvold, H.

    2010-01-01

    A PCR-based typing scheme was applied to identify plasmids in an epidemiologically and geographically diverse strain collection of Enterococcus faecium (n=93). Replicon types of pRE25 (n=56), pRUM (n=41), pIP501 (n=17) and pHT beta (n=14) were observed in 83% of the strains, while pS86, pCF10, pA...

  9. A Summary of the Rendezvous, Proximity Operations, Docking, and Undocking (RPODU) Lessons Learned from the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA) Orbital Express (OE) Demonstration System Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennehy, Cornelius J.; Carpenter, James R.

    2011-01-01

    The Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GN&C) Technical Discipline Team (TDT) sponsored Dr. J. Russell Carpenter, a Navigation and Rendezvous Subject Matter Expert (SME) from NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), to provide support to the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA) Orbital Express (OE) rendezvous and docking flight test that was conducted in 2007. When that DARPA OE mission was completed, Mr. Neil Dennehy, NASA Technical Fellow for GN&C, requested Dr. Carpenter document his findings (lessons learned) and recommendations for future rendezvous missions resulting from his OE support experience. This report captures lessons specifically from anomalies that occurred during one of OE's unmated operations.

  10. Inhibition of RM-1 prostate carcinoma and eliciting robust immune responses in the mouse model by using VEGF-M2-GnRH3-hinge-MVP vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiqin; Alahdal, Murad; Ye, Jia; Jing, Liangliang; Liu, Xiaoxin; Chen, Huan; Jin, Liang; Cao, Rongyue

    2018-01-23

    GnRH and VEGF have been investigated as prostate carcinoma enhancers that support tumor spread and progression. Although both have documented roles in prostate carcinoma and many cancer types, the weak immunogenicity of these peptides has remained a major challenge for use in immunotherapy. Here, we describe a novel strategy to inhibit GnRH and VEGF production and assess the effect on the immune responses against these hormones using the RM-1 prostate cancer model. We designed a novel recombinant fusion protein which combined GnRH and VEGF as a vaccine against this tumor. The newly constructed fusion protein hVEGF121-M2-GnRH3-hinge-MVP contains the human vascular endothelial growth factor (hVEGF121) and three copies of GnRH in sequential linear alignment and T helper epitope MVP as an immunogenic vaccine. The effectiveness of the vaccine in eliciting an immune response and attenuating the prostate tumor growth was evaluated. Results showed that administration of a new vaccine effectively elicited humoral and cellular immune responses. We found that, a novel fusion protein, hVEGF121-M2-GnRH3-hinge-MVP, effectively inhibited growth of RM-1 prostate model and effectively promoted immune response. In conclusion, hVEGF121-M2-GnRH3-hinge-MVP is an effective dual mechanism tumor vaccine that limits RM-1 prostate growth. This vaccine may be a promising strategy for the treatment of hormone refractory prostate malignancies.

  11. [Expressions and roles of TGFβ/Smad signal pathway in peritoneum of endometriosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng-long; Leng, Jin-hua; Li, Meng-hui; Shi, Jing-hua; Jia, Shuang-zheng; Lang, Jing-he

    2011-11-01

    To investigate the expression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β and Smad pathway expressed in adhesion peritoneums in patients with endometriosis (EM). From Dec. 2009 to Mar. 2010, 11 patients with EM [including 3 patients treated by gonadotropin releasing hormone agonist (GnRH-a) treatment] underwent laparoscopy surgery in Peking Union Medical College Hospital. In the mean time, 9 patients with benign ovarian tumor without EM and peritoneum adhesion were chosen as control. Peritoneum from lateral peritoneal cavity, adjacent from lesion and grossly normal was obtained during surgery. Microstructure of peritoneums was observed by HE staining and Masson staining. The expression of TGF-β1, TGF-β3, Smad 3 and Smad 7 in peritoneums were measured by immunohistochemistry staining and real-time PCR. The effect of GnRH-a on expressions of these markers were also analyzed. (1) Microstructures of peritoneum: enlargement of nucleus of peritoneal mesothelial cells, thickening of connective tissue, distributive disorder of fiber, increasing numbers of fibroblast and inflammatory cells in EM were significantly different from those in control group. (2) The expression of TGF-β1 and 3 in peritoneum were 0.170 ± 0.020 and 0.110 ± 0.010 in EM group, which were significantly higher than 0.070 ± 0.010 and 0.050 ± 0.020 in control group. TGF-β1 was downregulated to 0.130 ± 0.030 and TGF-β3 was upregulated to 0.490 ± 0.090 by GnRH-a. (3) The expression of Smad 3 and 7 were 0.140 ± 0.020 and 0.110 ± 0.020 in peritoneum in EM group, which were significantly higher than 0.024 ± 0.004 and 0.014 ± 0.007 in control group. GnRH-a could upregualted the expression of smad 7 (0.040 ± 0.020), however, but no significant effect was observed on regulating Smad3 expression. The changes of microstructure and the alteration of TGF-β/Smad expression in peritoneum of endometriosis were observed. GnRH-a could regulate the expression of TGF-β and Smad.

  12. GnRH Agonist Trigger and LH Activity Luteal Phase Support versus hCG Trigger and Conventional Luteal Phase Support in Fresh Embryo Transfer IVF/ICSI Cycles—A Systematic PRISMA Review and Meta-analysis

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    Thor Haahr

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThe use of GnRH agonist (GnRHa for final oocyte maturation trigger in oocyte donation and elective frozen embryo transfer cycles is well established due to lower ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS rates as compared to hCG trigger. A recent Cochrane meta-analysis concluded that GnRHa trigger was associated with reduced live birth rates (LBRs in fresh autologous IVF cycles compared to hCG trigger. However, the evidence is not unequivocal, and recent trials have found encouraging reproductive outcomes among couples undergoing GnRHa trigger and individualized luteal LH activity support. Thus, the aim was to compare GnRHa trigger followed by luteal LH activity support with hCG trigger in IVF patients undergoing fresh embryo transfer.Material and methodsWe conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized trials published until December 14, 2016. The population was infertile patients submitted to IVF/ICSI cycles with GnRH antagonist cotreatment who underwent fresh embryo transfer. The intervention was GnRHa trigger followed by LH activity luteal phase support (LPS. The comparator was hCG trigger followed by a standard LPS. The critical outcome measures were LBR and OHSS rate. The secondary outcome measures were number of oocytes retrieved, clinical and ongoing pregnancy rates, and miscarriage rates.ResultsA total of five studies met the selection criteria comprising a total of 859 patients. The LBR was not significantly different between the GnRHa and hCG trigger groups (OR 0.84, 95% CI 0.62, 1.14. OHSS was reported in a total of 4/413 cases in the GnRHa group compared to 7/413 in the hCG group (OR 0.48, 95% CI 0.15, 1.60. We observed a slight, but non-significant increase in miscarriage rate in the GnRHa triggered group compared to the hCG group (OR 1.85; 95% CI 0.97, 3.54.ConclusionGnRHa trigger with LH activity LPS resulted in comparable LBRs compared to hCG trigger. The most recent trials reported LBRs close to unity

  13. Growth Hormone Supplementation in the Luteal Phase Before Microdose GnRH Agonist Flare Protocol for In Vitro Fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Caitlin; Seethram, Ken; Roberts, Jeffrey

    2015-09-01

    Growth hormone (GH) acts in both early and late follicular development to stimulate the proliferation and differentiation of granulosa cells and to increase the production of estradiol in animal and human ovaries. Investigators have therefore explored GH supplementation to improve outcomes in women undergoing in vitro fertilization, with the greatest interest in women with diminished ovarian reserve. Recent meta-analyses indicate that GH supplementation can be beneficial for poor responders undergoing IVF. In most studies, GH has been given concomitantly with gonadotropins during the follicular phase; this may not be optimal, since follicular recruitment begins during the preceding luteal phase. We therefore wished to examine the effect of GH supplementation in the luteal phase before controlled ovarian stimulation (COH) with a microdose GnRH agonist flare (MDF) protocol in women undergoing in vitro fertilization. We performed a retrospective matched case-control study of patients undergoing treatment at a private IVF facility between June 2012 and July 2013. Patients identified as poor responders to COH were offered adjuvant GH treatment as part of their ovarian stimulation regimen. The patients in the experimental group chose to take GH, 3.33 mg daily by subcutaneous injection for 14 days, before starting COH. All patients had an MDF stimulation protocol using 450 IU of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) daily. A total of 42 women were included in the study. There were 14 women in the experimental group (GH) and 28 controls (C) matched for age, BMI, and day 3 FSH level. There was no difference between the groups in clinical pregnancy rate (GH = 29%, C = 32%, P = 0.99), number of mature oocytes retrieved (GH = 2.5, C = 5.0, P = 0.13), cycle cancellation rate (GH = 21%, C = 14%, P = 0.88), duration of COH (GH = 10.1, C = 10.1, P = 0.93), or mean peak estradiol level (GH = 4174 pmol/L, C = 5105 pmol/L, P = 0.44). The administration of growth hormone during the

  14. Observational Study to Assess the Therapeutic Value of Four Ovarian Hyperstimulation Protocols in IVF After Pituitary Suppression with GnRH Antagonists in Normally Responding Women.

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    Ana, Monzó; Vicente, Montañana; María, Rubio José; Trinidad, García-Gimeno; Alberto, Romeu

    2011-02-22

    To compare the clinical results of four different protocols of COH for IVF-ICSI in normovulatory women, using in all cases pituitary suppression with GnRH antagonists. A single center, open label, parallel-controlled, prospective, post-authorization study under the approved conditions for use where 305 normal responders women who were candidates to COH were assigned to r-FSH +hp-hMG (n = 51, Group I), hp-hMG (n = 61, Group II), fixed-dose r-FSH (n = 118, Group III), and r-FSH with potential dose adjustment (n = 75, Group IV) to subsequently undergo IVF-ICSI. During stimulation, Group IV needed significantly more days of stimulation as compared to Group II [8.09 ± 1.25 vs. 7.62 ± 1.17; P women undergoing pituitary suppression with GnRH antagonists.

  15. Pregnancy outcome in delayed start antagonist versus microdose flare GnRH agonist protocol in poor responders undergoing IVF/ICSI: An RCT

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    Robab Davar

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Over the years, many article on different aspects of pathogenesis and management of poor ovarian responders have been published but there is no clear guideline for treating themyet. Objective: This study was designated to compare the effectiveness of a delayed start protocol with gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH antagonist and microdose flare-up GnRH agonist protocol in poor ovarian responders. Materials and Methods: This randomized clinical trial consisted of 100 poor ovarian responder women in assisted reproductive technologies cycles. They were divided randomly in delayed-start antagonist protocol (with estrogen priming followed by early follicular-phase GnRH antagonist treatment for 7 days before ovarian stimulation and microdose flare-up GnRH agonist protocol. The main outcome was clinical pregnancy rate and second outcome was the number of retrieved oocytes, mature oocytes, 2PN number, fertilization rate, and implantation rate. Results: Fertilization rate, clinical pregnancy rate, and ongoing pregnancy rates were not significantly different between the two studied protocols. Number of retrieved oocytes (5.10±3.41 vs. 3.08±2.51 with p=0.002, mature oocytes (4.32±2.69 vs. 2.34±1.80 with p=0.003, number of 2PN (3.94±1.80 vs. 2.20±1.01 with p=0.001 and implantation rate (19.40% vs. 10.30% with p=0.022 were significantly higher in delayed antagonist group. Conclusion: The delayed-start protocol can improve ovarian response in poor responders by stimulating and synchronizing follicle development

  16. Use of a GnRH antagonist in controlled ovarian hyperstimulation for assisted conception in women with polycystic ovary disease: a randomized, prospective, pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahçeci, Mustafa; Ulug, Ulun; Ben-Shlomo, Izhar; Erden, Halit Firat; Akman, Mehmet Ali

    2005-02-01

    To compare the outcome of using gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonists versus agonists in women with polycystic ovary disease (PCOD) who underwent controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) for assisted reproductive techniques (ART). A total of 129 patients with PCOD were randomly allocated to undergo COH with a GnRH antagonist (59 patients) and GnRH agonist (leuprolide acetate) (70 patients) to prevent a premature luteinizing hormone (LH) surge. Assisted fertilization following oocyte retrieval and embryo transfer was performed. None of the cycles were cancelled due to a premature LH surge. There was no significant difference between the antagonist and agonist arms in the number of gonadotropin ampules consumed per cycle. However, in the antagonist arm a shorter duration of ovarian stimulation was recorded as compared to the agonist arm. Although similar numbers of oocytes was retrieved from both groups of patients, the quality of the oocytes, as measured by metaphase 2/total oocyte ratio, was lower in the antagonist arm as compared to the agonist arm. Pregnancy rates were 57.6% and 58.5% in the antagonist and agonist arms, respectively (p > 0.05). Implantation rates were not different (34.0% and 34.6%, respectively). The frequency of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome also did not differ between the treatment groups (5% and 7.1%, respectively). The size of our study, on a specific subgroup of patients, does not allow a reliable conclusion regarding ART outcomefollowing the use of a GnRH antagonist versus agonist. Nevertheless, the protocol with the antagonist gave results that were as good as those of the protocol with the agonist in this PCOD patient population.

  17. Karyometric changes of neurons of hypothalamus and ependyma nuclei of the third cerebral ventricle of sheep following administration of Gn-RH and subsequent irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanikova, A.; Arendarcik, J.; Tokos, M.; Balun, J.; Chlebovsky, O.

    1983-01-01

    A karyometric analysis was used for the study of changes in the cell nucleus volume of the neurons of nucleus paraventricularis, nucleus arcuatus, and the ependyma of the third cerebral ventricle of sheep after the administration of Gn-RH, followed by exposure to X rays. The test animals included 12 ewes in physiological anoestrus and two rams. The trials were conducted in spring. The first group of four ewes and two rams were left as controls; in the ewes of the second group the hypothalamo-hypophysial region was irradiated with 516.5 mC/kg (200 R);in the four ewes of the third group, ovaries were directly irradiated at laparotomy with 64.4 mC/kg (250 R). The ewes of the second and third groups were treated with i.m. administration of 400 μg Gn-RH per head before irradiation. The excisions were collected and processed the tenth day from irradiation. The karyometric analysis was performed at 3000-fold magnification, 200 cells being measured in each sample. Changes in neurosecretory cells were described in the regions of nucleus paraventricularis, nucleus arcuatus and in the ependyma of the third cerebral ventricle. The results of the karyometric analysis of nucleus paraventricularis and nucleus arcuatus suggest that the administration of Gn-RH and irradiation of the hypothalamo-hypophysial region, and direct irradiation of the ovaries stimulated the studied cerebral structures. The changes observed in the ependyma of the third cerebral ventricle after the administration of Gn-RH and subsequent irradiation of the hypothalamo-hypophysial region were insignificant; it was only after direct irradiation of the ovaries that these cells were inhibited indirectly through the feedback mechanism. (author)

  18. Effects of single dose GnRH agonist as luteal support on pregnancy outcome in frozen-thawed embryo transfer cycles: an RCT

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    Robab Davar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is no doubt that luteal phase support is essential to enhance the reproductive outcome in IVF cycles. In addition to progesterone and human chorionic gonadotropin, several studies have described GnRH agonists as luteal phase support to improve implantation rate, pregnancy rate and live birth rate, whereas other studies showed dissimilar conclusions. All of these studies have been done in fresh IVF cycles. Objective: To determine whether an additional GnRH agonist administered at the time of implantation for luteal phase support in frozen-thawed embryo transfer (FET improves the embryo developmental potential. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective controlled trial study in 200 FET cycles, patients were randomized on the day of embryo transfer into group 1 (n=100 to whom a single dose of GnRH agonist (0.1 mg triptorelin was administered three days after transfer and group 2 (n=100, who did not receive agonist. Both groups received daily vaginal progesterone suppositories plus estradiol valerate 6 mg daily. Primary outcome measure was clinical pregnancy rate. Secondary outcome measures were implantation rate, chemical, ongoing pregnancy rate and abortion rate. Results: A total of 200 FET cycles were analyzed. Demographic data and embryo quality were comparable between two groups. No statistically significant difference in clinical and ongoing pregnancy rates was observed between the two groups (26% versus 21%, p=0.40 and 21% versus 17%, p=0.37, respectively. Conclusion: Administration of a subcutaneous GnRH agonist at the time of implantation does not increase clinical or ongoing pregnancy.

  19. Successful induction of oestrus, ovulation and pregnancy in adult ewes and ewe lambs out of the breeding season using a GnRH+progesterone oestrus synchronisation protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, M F; McLeod, B; Tattersfield, G; Smaill, B; Quirke, L D; Juengel, J L

    2015-04-01

    A series of experiments was designed to assess the effect of a treatment protocol (U-synch) for inducing oestrus and ovulation out of the breeding season in adult ewes and ewe lambs. The protocol consisted of a 7-day treatment with an intravaginal progesterone-releasing device (IPRD), administration of GnRH at IPRD insertion on Day 0, and equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG) and prostaglandin F2α at IPRD removal on Day 7. In Experiment 1, 50 or 100 μg GnRH were sufficient to induce ovulation at the beginning of the protocol in 3/9 and 4/9 ewes, respectively; while the resulting proportion of sheep ovulating after the treatment protocol was 88.9% and 77.8% in ewes initially treated with 50 or 100 μg GnRH, respectively. In Experiment 2, the proportion of Romney-cross ewe lambs ovulating was greater (P<0.0001) in the U-synch group (95.4%) than in the untreated Control group (3.2%). In Experiment 3, pregnancy rates of Dorset-cross sheep in the U-synch (60.7%) and Standard (12-day IPRD and eCG treatment; 56.5%) groups were greater (P=0.01) than in the untreated Control group (43.4%). The incidence of twin pregnancies was greater (P=0.005) in the U-synch group than in the Control group. A 7-day IPRD treatment including GnRH treatment at device insertion and eCG treatment at device removal induced oestrus and ovulation during the non-breeding season in a high proportion of mature ewes and ewe lambs. High pregnancy rates to natural mating, with a low rate of triplet pregnancies, were also observed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Hepatic expression of proteasome subunit alpha type-6 is upregulated during viral hepatitis and putatively regulates the expression of ISG15 ubiquitin-like modifier, a proviral host gene in hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broering, R; Trippler, M; Werner, M; Real, C I; Megger, D A; Bracht, T; Schweinsberg, V; Sitek, B; Eisenacher, M; Meyer, H E; Baba, H A; Weber, F; Hoffmann, A-C; Gerken, G; Schlaak, J F

    2016-05-01

    The interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. ISG15-regulated proteins have previously been identified that putatively affect this proviral interaction. The present observational study aimed to elucidate the relation between ISG15 and these host factors during HCV infection. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses were performed using liver samples of HCV-infected (n = 54) and uninfected (n = 10) or HBV-infected controls (n = 23). Primary human hepatocytes (PHH) were treated with Toll-like receptor ligands, interferons and kinase inhibitors. Expression of ISG15 and proteasome subunit alpha type-6 (PSMA6) was suppressed in subgenomic HCV replicon cell lines using specific siRNAs. Comparison of hepatic expression patterns revealed significantly increased signals for ISG15, IFIT1, HNRNPK and PSMA6 on the protein level as well as ISG15, IFIT1 and PSMA6 on the mRNA level in HCV-infected patients. In contrast to interferon-stimulated genes, PSMA6 expression occurred independent of HCV load and genotype. In PHH, the expression of ISG15 and PSMA6 was distinctly induced by poly(I:C), depending on IRF3 activation or PI3K/AKT signalling, respectively. Suppression of PSMA6 in HCV replicon cells led to significant induction of ISG15 expression, thus combined knock-down of both genes abrogated the antiviral effect induced by the separate suppression of ISG15. These data indicate that hepatic expression of PSMA6, which is upregulated during viral hepatitis, likely depends on TLR3 activation. PSMA6 affects the expression of immunoregulatory ISG15, a proviral factor in the pathogenesis of HCV infection. Therefore, the proteasome might be involved in the enigmatic interaction between ISG15 and HCV. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. In-vitro maturation versus IVF with GnRH antagonist for women with polycystic ovary syndrome: treatment outcome and rates of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Mausumi; Son, Weon-Young; Buckett, William; Tulandi, Togas; Holzer, Hananel

    2014-11-01

    In-vitro maturation (IVM) treatment has gained popularity for decreasing the incidence of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) by eliminating or minimizing the use of gonadotrophins in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Studies have shown that IVF with GnRH-antagonist protocol is associated with a lower incidence of OHSS. Data comparing the relative success of these two treatments is, however, lacking. Treatment outcome and rates of OHSS were compared in patients with PCOS who underwent assisted conception with either IVM or IVF with GnRH-antagonist protocol between 2006 and 2011. The number of oocytes retrieved was higher in the IVM group, whereas the number of mature oocytes, fertilization rate and number of embryos cleaved were comparable. The implantation rate was higher in the IVF group. The clinical pregnancy rates per embryo transfer were not statistically different (IVF: 45.8% versus IVM: 32.4%). The live-birth rate was higher in the IVF group (IVF: 40.7% versus IVM: 23.5%; P = 0.04). Five women developed moderate or severe OHSS in the IVF group, whereas none did in the IVM group. Both IVM and IVF with GnRH-antagonist protocol seem to be effective treatment regimens in women with PCOS, although IVM is associated with a lower risk of OHSS. Copyright © 2014 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Adult height after spontaneous pubertal growth or GnRH analog treatment in girls with early puberty: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertelloni, Silvano; Massart, Francesco; Miccoli, Mario; Baroncelli, Giampiero I

    2017-06-01

    Early puberty (EP) has been defined as the onset of puberty in the low-normal range; it may be a cause for concern regarding a possible impairment of adult height (AH). This paper meta-analysed data on AH after spontaneous growth or after gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analog treatment in girls with EP. A computerized literature search was conducted from 1980 to June 30, 2016. Only published studies in English were considered. Eight papers were selected (483 cases). In untreated girls (n = 300), predicted adult height (PAH) at start of follow-up (-0.559 SDS (95%CI -1.110 to 0.001); P = 0.050) was close to mid-parental height (MPH) (-0.557 SDS (95%CI -0.736 to -0.419); P adult height. What is New: • Untreated and GnRH analog treated girls with early puberty reached similar adult height. • Adult height was consistent with mid-parental height in both untreated and GnRH analog treated girls with early puberty.

  3. Recent Experiences of the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) Guidance Navigation and Control (GN and C) Technical Discipline Team (TDT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennehy, Cornelius J.

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) is an independently funded NASA Program whose dedicated team of technical experts provides objective engineering and safety assessments of critical, high risk projects. NESC's strength is rooted in the diverse perspectives and broad knowledge base that add value to its products, affording customers a responsive, alternate path for assessing and preventing technical problems while protecting vital human and national resources. The Guidance Navigation and Control (GN&C) Technical Discipline Team (TDT) is one of fifteen such discipline-focused teams within the NESC organization. The TDT membership is composed of GN&C specialists from across NASA and its partner organizations in other government agencies, industry, national laboratories, and universities. This paper will briefly define the vision, mission, and purpose of the NESC organization. The role of the GN&C TDT will then be described in detail along with an overview of how this team operates and engages in its objective engineering and safety assessments of critical NASA.

  4. Influence of the graphite type in the mechanical properties of graphene nanosheets and ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (GN/UHMWPE) nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, M.E. de A.; Coutinho, S.V.; Fim, F. de C.

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies the mechanical properties of graphene nanosheets and ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (GN/UHMWPE) nanocomposites. The graphene nanosheets were obtained by two methods: the first, from Graphite Micrograf HC11 after 8 hours in a ultrasound bath in 70% alcoholic solution; the second, from Graflake 9950 prepared by oxidizing with H 2 SO 4 /HNO 3 (4:1), followed by thermal expansion at 1050°C for 30 seconds and ultrasound bath for 20 hours. Both were oven dried for 24 hours at 110°C and subsequently added to the polymer in percentages of 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5% (w/w). The powders of the nanocomposites were mixed in a ball mill for 1 hour and molded by hot compression. XRD and SEM images was possible to verify that the Graflake's GN had higher delamination that the Micrograph's GN. The mechanical properties were affected in different percentages for each graphite type. (author)

  5. COBALT: A GN&C Payload for Testing ALHAT Capabilities in Closed-Loop Terrestrial Rocket Flights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, John M., III; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Hines, Glenn D.; O'Neal, Travis V.; Robertson, Edward A.; Seubert, Carl; Trawny, Nikolas

    2016-01-01

    The COBALT (CoOperative Blending of Autonomous Landing Technology) payload is being developed within NASA as a risk reduction activity to mature, integrate and test ALHAT (Autonomous precision Landing and Hazard Avoidance Technology) systems targeted for infusion into near-term robotic and future human space flight missions. The initial COBALT payload instantiation is integrating the third-generation ALHAT Navigation Doppler Lidar (NDL) sensor, for ultra high-precision velocity plus range measurements, with the passive-optical Lander Vision System (LVS) that provides Terrain Relative Navigation (TRN) global-position estimates. The COBALT payload will be integrated onboard a rocket-propulsive terrestrial testbed and will provide precise navigation estimates and guidance planning during two flight test campaigns in 2017 (one open-loop and closed- loop). The NDL is targeting performance capabilities desired for future Mars and Moon Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL). The LVS is already baselined for TRN on the Mars 2020 robotic lander mission. The COBALT platform will provide NASA with a new risk-reduction capability to test integrated EDL Guidance, Navigation and Control (GN&C) components in closed-loop flight demonstrations prior to the actual mission EDL.

  6. Comparison Pregnancy Outcomes Between Minimal Stimulation Protocol and Conventional GnRH Antagonist Protocols in Poor Ovarian Responders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamim Pilehvari

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare the pregnancy outcomes achieved by in vitro fertilization (IVF between minimal stimulation and conventional antagonist protocols in poor ovarian responders (PORs.Materials and methods: In this randomized controlled trial, 77 PORs undergoing IVF were selected and divided into two groups. First group was the minimal stimulation group (n = 42 receiving 100 mg/day clomiphene citrate on day 2of the cycle for 5 day that was followed by150IU/day human menopausal gonadotropin (hMG on day 5 of the cycle. Second group was the conventional group (n = 35 receiving at least 300 IU/daygonadotropin on day 2 of the cycle. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH antagonist protocol was applied for both groups according to flexible protocol. Number of retrieved oocytes and chemical pregnancy rate were the main outcomes.Results: There was no difference in number ofretrieved oocyte and pregnancy rate (2.79 ± 1.96 vs. 2.20 ± 1.71 and 5.6% vs. 4.1%; p > 0.05 between both groups. The gonadotropin dose used in the minimal stimulation group was lower than conventional group (1046 ± 596 vs. 2806 ± 583.Conclusion: Minimal stimulation protocol with lower gonadotropin used is likely to be considered as a patient- friendly and cost-effective substitute for PORs. 

  7. Expression of Tight Junction Protein Claudin-1 in Human Crescentic Glomerulonephritis

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    Ryo Koda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The origin of crescent forming cells in human glomerulonephritis (GN remains unknown. Some animal studies demonstrated that parietal epithelial cells of Bowman’s capsule (PECs were the main component of proliferating cells and PEC-specific tight junction protein claudin-1 was expressed in crescentic lesions. We investigated the expression of claudin-1 in human GN. Immunohistochemistry for claudin-1 was performed on 17 kidney biopsy samples with crescent formation. Colocalization of claudin-1 with intracellular tight junction protein ZO-1 was also evaluated by immunofluorescence double staining. Claudin-1 is expressed mainly at the cell to cell contact site of proliferating cells in cellular crescentic lesions in patients with these forms of human GN. Small numbers of crescent forming cells showed extrajunctional localization of claudin-1. Colocalization of claudin-1 with ZO-1 was found at cell to cell contact sites of adjacent proliferating cells. In control samples, staining of claudin-1 was positive in PECs, but not in podocytes. Our findings suggest that claudin-1 contributes to crescent formation as a component of the tight junction protein complex that includes ZO-1. Co-localization of claudin-1 with ZO-1 implies the formation of functional tight junction complexes in crescentic lesions to prevent the interstitial damage caused by penetration of filtered molecules from Bowman’s space.

  8. Differential protein expression profile in the hypothalamic GT1-7 cell line after exposure to anabolic androgenic steroids.

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    Freddyson J Martínez-Rivera

    Full Text Available The abuse of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS has been considered a major public health problem during decades. Supraphysiological doses of AAS may lead to a variety of neuroendocrine problems. Precisely, the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG axis is one of the body systems that is mainly influenced by steroidal hormones. Fluctuations of the hormonal milieu result in alterations of reproductive function, which are made through changes in hypothalamic neurons expressing gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH. In fact, previous studies have shown that AAS modulate the activity of these neurons through steroid-sensitive afferents. To increase knowledge about the cellular mechanisms induced by AAS in GnRH neurons, we performed proteomic analyses of the murine hypothalamic GT1-7 cell line after exposure to 17α-methyltestosterone (17α-meT; 1 μM. These cells represent a good model for studying regulatory processes because they exhibit the typical characteristics of GnRH neurons, and respond to compounds that modulate GnRH in vivo. Two-dimensional difference in gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE and mass spectrometry analyses identified a total of 17 different proteins that were significantly affected by supraphysiological levels of AAS. Furthermore, pathway analyses showed that modulated proteins were mainly associated to glucose metabolism, drug detoxification, stress response and cell cycle. Validation of many of these proteins, such as GSTM1, ERH, GAPDH, PEBP1 and PDIA6, were confirmed by western blotting. We further demonstrated that AAS exposure decreased expression of estrogen receptors and GnRH, while two important signaling pathway proteins p-ERK, and p-p38, were modulated. Our results suggest that steroids have the capacity to directly affect the neuroendocrine system by modulating key cellular processes for the control of reproductive function.

  9. Periodic regulation of expression of genes for kisspeptin, gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone and their receptors in the grass puffer: Implications in seasonal, daily and lunar rhythms of reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Hironori; Shahjahan, Md; Kitahashi, Takashi

    2018-04-03

    The seasonal, daily and lunar control of reproduction involves photoperiodic, circadian and lunar changes in the activity of kisspeptin, gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) and gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons. These changes are brought through complex networks of light-, time- and non-photic signal-dependent control mechanisms, which are mostly unknown at present. The grass puffer, Takifugu alboplumbeus, a semilunar spawner, provides a unique and excellent animal model to assess this question because its spawning is synchronized with seasonal, daily and lunar cycles. In the diencephalon, the genes for kisspeptin, GnIH and their receptors showed similar expression patterns with clear seasonal and daily oscillations, suggesting that they are regulated by common mechanisms involving melatonin, circadian clock and water temperature. For implications in semilunar-synchronized spawning rhythm, melatonin receptor genes showed ultradian oscillations in expression with the period of 14.0-15.4 h in the pineal gland. This unique ultradian rhythm might be driven by circatidal clock. The possible circatidal clock and circadian clock in the pineal gland may cooperate to drive circasemilunar rhythm to regulate the expression of the kisspeptin, GnIH and their receptor genes. On the other hand, high temperature (over 28 °C) conditions, under which the expression of the kisspeptin and its receptor genes is markedly suppressed, may provide an environmental signal that terminates reproduction at the end of breeding period. Taken together, the periodic regulation of the kisspeptin, GnIH and their receptor genes by melatonin, circadian clock and water temperature may be important in the precisely-timed spawning of the grass puffer. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of GnRH vaccination in wild and captive African Elephant bulls (Loxodonta africana on reproductive organs and semen quality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imke Lueders

    Full Text Available Although the African elephant (Loxodonta africana is classified as endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN, in some isolated habitats in southern Africa, contraception is of major interest due to local overpopulation. GnRH vaccination has been promoted as a non-invasive contraceptive measure for population management of overabundant wildlife. We tested the efficacy of this treatment for fertility control in elephant bulls.In total, 17 male African elephants that were treated with a GnRH vaccine were examined in two groups. In the prospective study group 1 (n = 11 bulls, ages: 8-36 years, semen quality, the testes, seminal vesicles, ampullae and prostate, which were all measured by means of transrectal ultrasound, and faecal androgen metabolite concentrations were monitored over a three-year period. Each bull in the prospective study received 5 ml of Improvac® (1000 μg GnRH conjugate intramuscularly after the first examination, followed by a booster six weeks later and thereafter every 5-7 months. In a retrospective study group (group 2, n = 6, ages: 19-33 years, one examination was performed on bulls which had been treated with GnRH vaccine for 5-11 years.In all bulls of group 1, testicular and accessory sex gland sizes decreased significantly after the third vaccination. In six males examined prior to vaccination and again after more than five vaccinations, the testis size was reduced by 57.5%. Mean testicular height and length decreased from 13.3 ± 2.6 cm x 15.2 ± 2.8 cm at the beginning to 7.6 ± 2.1 cm x 10.2 ± 1.8 cm at the end of the study. Post pubertal bulls (>9 years, n = 6 examined prior to vaccination produced ejaculates with viable spermatozoa (volume: 8-175 ml, sperm concentration: 410-4000x106/ml, total motility: 0-90%, while after 5-8 injections, only 50% of these bulls produced ejaculates with a small number of immotile spermatozoa. The ejaculates of group 2 bulls (vaccinated >8 times were

  11. Comparison of GnRh Agonist Microdose Flare Up and GnRh Antagonist/Letrozole in Treatment of Poor Responder Patients in Intra Cytoplaspic Sperm Injection: Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabati, Azar; Peivandi, Sepideh; Khalilian, Alireza; Mirzaeirad, Sina; Hashemi, Seyyed Abbas

    2015-08-06

    the prevalence of infertility is up to 10 to 15 % which 9 to 24 % of them are Poor Ovarian Responders (POR). This study was designed to compare two methods of GnRH Agonist Microdose Flareup (MF) and GnRH Antagonist/Letrozole (AL) in treatment of these patients. this randomized clinical trial study consisted of 123 patients. In the first step of treatment in both methods FSH, LH, estradiol, anderostandion, testestron in third day of menstruation period and the thickness of endometrium by Transvaginal sonography were evaluated. At the time of HCG injection the thickness of endometrium and follicles which were more than 14mm ware established and hormones were evaluated. Two weeks later serum βhCG and after 6 to 8 weeks Transvaginal sonography were applied to prove the pregnancy. there were 61 patients with mean age of 38.7±4.58 in MF group and 62 patients with mean age of 38.5±4.6 in AL group (P=0.80). At the time of hCG injection there were significant increase in the level of LH,estradiol, thickness of endometrium and follicles more than 14mm in MF patients (P<0.0001). The mean time of ovary stimulation in MF group was 10.72±1.5 and in AL was 8.45±1.2 (P<0.0001). The mean level of gonadotropin which were used was 80.6±20.1 in MF patients and 64.7±16.4 in AL group (P<0.0001). 18 % of MF group and 38.7% in AL group had no normal cycle of ovulation (OR: 2.87, 95% CI: 1.25-6.57, P=0.011). The mean numbers of oocyte and normal fetus in MF was 5.83±3.5 and 3.7±2.5 and in AL was 3±1.69 and 1.4±1.33 (P<0.0001). The number of chemical pregnancy in MF group was 10 (16.4%) and in AL was 3 (4.8%) (OR:3.85, 95%CI:1.06-14.77, P=0.037). Clinical pregnancy in 10 patients (16.4%) of MF group and 3 (4.8%)in AL was reported. OR: 3.85, 95%CI: 1.06-14.77, P=0.037). this study showed that MF method of pregnancy leads to more positive results in pregnancy based on chemical and clinical evaluation in comparison with AL and is advised for poor responder patients.

  12. GnRH antagonist versus long agonist protocols in IVF: a systematic review and meta-analysis accounting for patient type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambalk, C B; Banga, F R; Huirne, J A; Toftager, M; Pinborg, A; Homburg, R; van der Veen, F; van Wely, M

    2017-09-01

    Most reviews of IVF ovarian stimulation protocols have insufficiently accounted for various patient populations, such as ovulatory women, women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) or women with poor ovarian response, and have included studies in which the agonist or antagonist was not the only variable between the compared study arms. The aim of the current study was to compare GnRH antagonist protocols versus standard long agonist protocols in couples undergoing IVF or ICSI, while accounting for various patient populations and treatment schedules. The Cochrane Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Review Group specialized register of controlled trials and Pubmed and Embase databases were searched from inception until June 2016. Eligible trials were those that compared GnRH antagonist protocols and standard long GnRH agonist protocols in couples undergoing IVF or ICSI. The primary outcome was ongoing pregnancy rate. Secondary outcomes were: live birth rate, clinical pregnancy rate, number of oocytes retrieved and safety with regard to ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS). Separate comparisons were performed for the general IVF population, women with PCOS and women with poor ovarian response. Pre-planned subgroup analyses were performed for various antagonist treatment schedules. We included 50 studies. Of these, 34 studies reported on general IVF patients, 10 studies reported on PCOS patients and 6 studies reported on poor responders. In general IVF patients, ongoing pregnancy rate was significantly lower in the antagonist group compared with the agonist group (RR 0.89, 95% CI 0.82-0.96). In women with PCOS and in women with poor ovarian response, there was no evidence of a difference in ongoing pregnancy between the antagonist and agonist groups (RR 0.97, 95% CI 0.84-1.11 and RR 0.87, 95% CI 0.65-1.17, respectively). Subgroup analyses for various antagonist treatment schedules compared to the long protocol GnRH agonist showed a significantly lower ongoing

  13. A comparative study of diffraction of shallow-water waves by high-level IGN and GN equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, B.B. [College of Shipbuilding Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, 150001 Harbin (China); Ertekin, R.C. [Department of Ocean and Resources Engineering, University of Hawai' i, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); College of Shipbuilding Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, 150001 Harbin (China); Duan, W.Y., E-mail: duanwenyangheu@hotmail.com [College of Shipbuilding Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, 150001 Harbin (China)

    2015-02-15

    This work is on the nonlinear diffraction analysis of shallow-water waves, impinging on submerged obstacles, by two related theories, namely the classical Green–Naghdi (GN) equations and the Irrotational Green–Naghdi (IGN) equations, both sets of equations being at high levels and derived for incompressible and inviscid flows. Recently, the high-level Green–Naghdi equations have been applied to some wave transformation problems. The high-level IGN equations have also been used in the last decade to study certain wave propagation problems. However, past works on these theories used different numerical methods to solve these nonlinear and unsteady sets of differential equations and at different levels. Moreover, different physical problems have been solved in the past. Therefore, it has not been possible to understand the differences produced by these two sets of theories and their range of applicability so far. We are thus motivated to make a direct comparison of the results produced by these theories by use of the same numerical method to solve physically the same wave diffraction problems. We focus on comparing these two theories by using similar codes; only the equations used are different but other parts of the codes, such as the wave-maker, damping zone, discretion method, matrix solver, etc., are exactly the same. This way, we eliminate many potential sources of differences that could be produced by the solution of different equations. The physical problems include the presence of various submerged obstacles that can be used for example as breakwaters or to represent the continental shelf. A numerical wave tank is created by placing a wavemaker on one end and a wave absorbing beach on the other. The nonlinear and unsteady sets of differential equations are solved by the finite-difference method. The results are compared with different equations as well as with the available experimental data.

  14. Estrogen modulates potassium currents and expression of the Kv4.2 subunit in GT1-7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Imre; Varju, Patricia; Liposits, Zsolt

    2007-03-01

    The proper maintenance of reproduction requires the pulsatile secretion of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), which is ensured by synchronized periodic firing of multiple GnRH neurons. Both hormone secretion and electrophysiological properties of GnRH cells are influenced by estrogen. The impact of 17beta-estradiol treatment on the function of voltage gated A- and K-type potassium channels, known modulators of firing rate, was therefore examined in our experiments using immortalized GnRH-producing GT1-7 neurons. Whole cell patch clamp recordings showed the absence of the A-type current in GT1-7 cells cultured in estrogen-free medium and after 8h 17beta-estradiol treatment. Exposure of the cells to 17beta-estradiol for 24 and 48 h, respectively, resulted in the appearance of the A-type current. The induction of the A-type current by 17beta-estradiol was dose-related (50 pM to 15 nM range). In contrast, the K-type potassium current was apparent in the estrogen-free environment and 17beta-estradiol administration significantly decreased its amplitude. Co-administration of 17beta-estradiol and estrogen receptor blocker, Faslodex (ICI 182,780; 1 microM) abolished the occurrence of the A-type current. Real-time PCR data demonstrated that expression of the Kv4.2 subunit of the A-type channel was low at 0, 0.5, 2 and 8h, peaked at 24h and diminished at 48 h 17beta-estradiol treatment (15 nM). These data indicate that potassium channels of GT1-7 neurons are regulated by estrogen a mechanism that might contribute to modulation of firing rate and hormone secretion in GnRH neurons.

  15. A short course of metformin does not reduce OHSS in a GnRH antagonist cycle for women with PCOS undergoing IVF: a randomised placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, S L; Brewer, C; Tang, T; Picton, H M; Barth, J H; Balen, A H

    2016-12-01

    Does 'metformin' reduce the incidence of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) for women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) undergoing a GnRH antagonist assisted conception treatment cycle? A short course of metformin does not reduce the incidence of OHSS for women with PCOS undergoing a GnRH antagonist treatment cycle. Metformin does reduce the incidence of OHSS in a GnRH-agonist treatment cycle. A randomised placebo-controlled trial (RCT) using metformin or placebo. Randomisation was blinded to both patient and investigator, using a random permuted blocks method with a 50:50 allocation ratio. The study was completed over 5 years (2009-2014) with 153 randomised patients. A sample size calculation based on the incidence of OHSS was completed prospectively suggesting a minimum of 146 recruits was required for the trial with a power of 80% and a type 1 error of 0.05. All patients met the Rotterdam criteria for PCOS and were treated with a standard GnRH antagonist IVF/ICSI treatment cycle in a tertiary infertility clinic. The study medication was started prior to stimulation and continued to oocyte retrieval. Of the 153 patients, 77 received metformin and 76 placebo. There was no reduction in the incidence of moderate-severe OHSS (Placebo (PLA) 12.2%, metformin (MET) = 16%, 95% CI -0.08-0.16, P = 0.66). There was no difference in total gonadotrophin dose (PLA = 1200, MET = 1200, 95% CI -118.67-118.67, P = 0.75), oocytes retrieved (PLA = 15, MET = 14, 95% CI -2.37-4.37, P = 0.66) or fertilisation rate (PLA = 60.7%, MET = 53.3%, 95% CI -0.96-14.94, P = 0.07). However, using metformin resulted in a reduced clinical pregnancy rate (CPR) per cycle started (PLA = 48.7%, MET = 28.6%, 95% CI 0.04-0.35, P = 0.02) and live birth rate (PLA = 51.6%, MET = 27.6%, 95% CI 0.05-0.40, P = 0.02). Furthermore, when ethnicity was taken into account there was a significant reduction in pregnancy outcome for the South Asian population irrespective of metformin or

  16. Prediction of Ovarian Hyperstimulation Syndrome in Patients Treated with Corifollitropin alfa or rFSH in a GnRH Antagonist Protocol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Griesinger

    Full Text Available What is the threshold for the prediction of moderate to severe or severe ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS based on the number of growing follicles ≥ 11 mm and/or estradiol (E2 levels?The optimal threshold of follicles ≥11 mm on the day of hCG to identify those at risk was 19 for both moderate to severe OHSS and for severe OHSS. Estradiol (E2 levels were less prognostic of OHSS than the number of follicles ≥ 11 mm.In comparison to long gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH agonist protocols, the risk of severe OHSS is reduced by approximately 50% in a GnRH antagonist protocol for ovarian stimulation prior to in vitro fertilisation (IVF, while the two protocols provide equal chances of pregnancy per initiated cycle. Nevertheless, moderate to severe OHSS may still occur in GnRH antagonist protocols if human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG is administered to trigger final oocyte maturation, especially in high responder patients. Severe OHSS following hCG trigger may occur with an incidence of 1-2% in a relatively young (aged 18 to 36 years IVF population treated in a GnRH-antagonist protocol.From the Engage, Ensure and Trust trials, in total, 2,433 women who received hCG for oocyte maturation and for whom the number of follicles ≥ 11 mm and the level of E2 on the day of hCG administration were known were included in the analyses.The threshold for OHSS prediction of moderate and severe OHSS was assessed in women treated with corifollitropin alfa or daily recombinant follicle stimulation hormone (rFSH in a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH-antagonist protocol. Receiver operating characteristics curve analyses for moderate to severe OHSS and severe OHSS were performed on the combined dataset and the sensitivity and specificity for the optimal threshold of number of follicles ≥ 11 mm, E2 levels on the day of (hCG, and a combination of both, were determined.The optimal threshold of follicles ≥ 11 mm on the day of hCG to identify those at

  17. Geminivirus vectors for high-level expression of foreign proteins in plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mor, Tsafrir S; Moon, Yong-Sun; Palmer, Kenneth E; Mason, Hugh S

    2003-02-20

    Bean yellow dwarf virus (BeYDV) is a monopartite geminivirus that can infect dicotyledonous plants. We have developed a high-level expression system that utilizes elements of the replication machinery of this single-stranded DNA virus. The replication initiator protein (Rep) mediates release and replication of a replicon from a DNA construct ("LSL vector") that contains an expression cassette for a gene of interest flanked by cis-acting elements of the virus. We used tobacco NT1 cells and biolistic delivery of plasmid DNA for evaluation of replication and expression of reporter genes contained within an LSL vector. By codelivery of a GUS reporter-LSL vector and a Rep-supplying vector, we obtained up to 40-fold increase in expression levels compared to delivery of the reporter-LSL vectors alone. High-copy replication of the LSL vector was correlated with enhanced expression of GUS. Rep expression using a whole BeYDV clone, a cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter driving either genomic rep or an intron-deleted rep gene, or 35S-rep contained in the LSL vector all achieved efficient replication and enhancement of GUS expression. We anticipate that this system can be adapted for use in transgenic plants or plant cell cultures with appropriately regulated expression of Rep, with the potential to greatly increase yield of recombinant proteins. Copyright 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biotechnol Bioeng 81: 430-437, 2003.

  18. Clinical Value of Basal Serum Progesterone Prior to Initiate Ovarian Hyper-Stimulation with GnRH Antagonists: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulisi, Sonia; Reschini, Marco; Borroni, Raffaella; Paffoni, Alessio; Busnelli, Andrea; Somigliana, Edgardo

    2017-01-01

    The routine assessment of day 3 serum progesterone prior to initiation of ovarian hyper-stimulation with the use of GnRH antagonists is under debate. In this study, we evaluated the clinical utility of this policy. Retrospective cohort study of women undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) with the use of GnRH antagonists aimed at determining the frequency of cases with progesterone levels exceeding the recommended threshold of 1,660 pg/ml and at evaluating whether this assessment may be predictive of pregnancy. Serum progesterone exceeded the recommended threshold in one case (0.3%, 95% CI 0.01-1.5). The median (interquartile range) basal progesterone in women who did (n = 95) and did not (n = 217) become pregnant were 351 (234-476) and 380 (237-531) pg/ml, respectively (p = 0.28). The 90th percentile of the basal progesterone distribution in women who became pregnant was 660 pg/ml. Cases with serum progesterone exceeding this threshold in successful and unsuccessful cycles were 10 (10%) and 30 (14%), respectively (p = 0.47). The capacity of basal progesterone to predict pregnancy was evaluated using receiver operating characteristic curve (area under the curve = 0.54, 95% CI 0.47-0.61, p = 0.28). No graphically evident threshold emerged. Routine day 3 serum progesterone assessment in IVF cycles with the use of GnRH antagonists is not justified. Further evidence is warranted prior to claiming its systematic use. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Socially regulated reproductive development: analysis of GnRH-1 and kisspeptin neuronal systems in cooperatively breeding naked mole-rats (Heterocephalus glaber).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shuzhi; Holmes, Melissa M; Forger, Nancy G; Goldman, Bruce D; Lovern, Matthew B; Caraty, Alain; Kalló, Imre; Faulkes, Christopher G; Coen, Clive W

    2013-09-01

    In naked mole-rat (NMR) colonies, breeding is monopolized by the queen and her consorts. Subordinates experience gonadal development if separated from the queen. To elucidate the neuroendocrine factors underlying reproductive suppression/development in NMRs, we quantified plasma gonadal steroids and GnRH-1- and kisspeptin-immunoreactive (ir) neurons in subordinate adults and in those allowed to develop into breeders, with or without subsequent gonadectomy. In males and females, respectively, plasma testosterone and progesterone are higher in breeders than in subordinates. No such distinction occurs for plasma estradiol; its presence after gonadectomy and its positive correlation with adrenal estradiol suggest an adrenal source. Numbers of GnRH-1-ir cell bodies do not differ between gonad-intact breeders and subordinates within or between the sexes. As in phylogenetically related guinea pigs, kisspeptin-ir processes pervade the internal and external zones of the median eminence. Their distribution is consistent with actions on GnRH-1 neurons at perikaryal and/or terminal levels. In previously investigated species, numbers of kisspeptin-ir cell bodies vary from substantial to negligible according to sex and/or reproductive state. NMRs are exceptional: irrespective of sex, reproductive state, or presence of gonads, substantial numbers of kisspeptin-ir cell bodies are detected in the rostral periventricular region of the third ventricle (RP3V) and in the anterior periventricular (PVa), arcuate, and dorsomedial hypothalamic nuclei. Nevertheless, the greater number in the RP3V/PVa of female breeders compared with female subordinates or male breeders suggests that emergence from a hypogonadotrophic state in females may involve kisspeptin-related mechanisms similar to those underlying puberty or seasonal breeding in other species. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Vectors expressing chimeric Japanese encephalitis dengue 2 viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Y; Wang, S; Wang, X

    2014-01-01

    Vectors based on self-replicating RNAs (replicons) of flaviviruses are becoming powerful tool for expression of heterologous genes in mammalian cells and development of novel antiviral and anticancer vaccines. We constructed two vectors expressing chimeric viruses consisting of attenuated SA14-14-2 strain of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) in which the PrM/M-E genes were replaced fully or partially with those of dengue 2 virus (DENV-2). These vectors, named pJED2 and pJED2-1770 were transfected to BHK-21 cells and produced chimeric viruses JED2V and JED2-1770V, respectively. The chimeric viruses could be passaged in C6/36 but not BHK-21 cells. The chimeric viruses produced in C6/36 cells CPE 4-5 days after infection and RT-PCR, sequencing, immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and Western blot analysis confirmed the chimeric nature of produced viruses. The immunogenicity of chimeric viruses in mice was proved by detecting DENV-2 E protein-specific serum IgG antibodies with neutralization titer of 10. Successful preparation of infectious clones of chimeric JEV-DENV-2 viruses showed that JEV-based expression vectors are fully functional.

  1. The effect of GnRH or oestradiol injected at pro-oestrus on luteal function and follicular dynamics of the subsequent oestrous cycle in non-lactating cycling Holstein cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.V.E. Segwagwe

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Oestrous synchronization involves synchronization of ovarian follicular turnover, new wave emergence, and finally induction of ovulation. The final step can be synchronized by the parenteral administration of either GnRH or oestradiol benzoate. This study investigated corpus luteum and follicular emergence after ovulation had been induced by the administration of either GnRH or oestradiol benzoate. The injection of oestradiol benzoate may have delayed the emergence of the first follicular wave subsequent to the induced ovulation; administration of oestradiol benzoate or GnRH lowered the progesterone rise so that the maximum dioestrous concentration of progesterone on Day 9 was lower when cows were treated during pro-oestrus compared to the spontaneously ovulating controls. One implication of findings from the present study is that induction of ovulation with either oestradiol benzoate or GnRH, administered 24 or 36 h after withdrawal of the CIDR device, respectively, may lower fertility. Future studies must identify the timing of administration relative to the time of CIDR device withdrawal and the optimum concentration of oestradiol benzoate or GnRH that would not have untoward effects on the development of the corpus lutea, particularly within the first week of dioestrus.

  2. Impacto do uso de anÃlogos de GnRH sobre o tecido e metabolismo Ãsseo de pacientes endometrÃoticas

    OpenAIRE

    Danyelle Craveiro de Aquino

    2005-01-01

    Este trabalho tem por objetivo avaliar mulheres portadoras de endometriose em uso de anÃlogos de GnRH investigando o metabolismo Ãsseo e massa Ãssea atravÃs da dosagem de marcadores sÃricos e realizaÃÃo de ultra-sonometria do calcÃneo, respectivamente. Trata-se de estudo observacional transversal tipo caso â controle prospectivo. Foi desenvolvido na Maternidade-Escola Assis Chateaubriand (MEAC) â UFC. Foram avaliadas 99 mulheres, divididas em 3 grupos, sendo 32 portadoras de endometriose diag...

  3. \\"Estudo geológico-geocronológico dos terrenos granito-gnáissicos e sequências metavulcanossedimentares da Região do Betara (PR)\\"

    OpenAIRE

    Ligia Maria de Almeida Leite Ribeiro

    2006-01-01

    A Região do Betara, objeto desta pesquisa, localiza-se a nordeste da Cidade de Curitiba, entre os Municípios de Rio Branco do Sul e Campo Largo. Inclui Rochas granito-gnáissicas proto a miloníticas (Núcleo Betara) e seqüências metavulcanossedimentares de baixo a médio grau metamórfico (Formação Betara). Esses terrenos ocorrem na porção sul da Faixa Ribeira, em meio a seqüências metavulcanossedimentares da Formação Votuverava. Este trabalho teve como objetivo principal realizar estudos geológi...

  4. THE KILOPARSEC-SCALE STAR FORMATION LAW AT REDSHIFT 4: WIDESPREAD, HIGHLY EFFICIENT STAR FORMATION IN THE DUST-OBSCURED STARBURST GALAXY GN20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodge, J. A. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Riechers, D. [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, NY 14853 (United States); Decarli, R.; Walter, F. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Carilli, C. L. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 0, Socorro, NM 87801-0387 (United States); Daddi, E. [CEA, Laboratoire AIM-CNRS-Université Paris Diderot, Irfu/SAp, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Dannerbauer, H., E-mail: jhodge@nrao.edu [Universität Wien, Institut für Astrophysik, Türkenschanzstraße 17, 1180 Wien (Austria)

    2015-01-01

    We present high-resolution observations of the 880 μm (rest-frame FIR) continuum emission in the z = 4.05 submillimeter galaxy GN20 from the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer (PdBI). These data resolve the obscured star formation (SF) in this unlensed galaxy on scales of 0.''3 × 0.''2 (∼2.1 × 1.3 kpc). The observations reveal a bright (16 ± 1 mJy) dusty starburst centered on the cold molecular gas reservoir and showing a bar-like extension along the major axis. The striking anti-correlation with the Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Camera 3 imaging suggests that the copious dust surrounding the starburst heavily obscures the rest-frame UV/optical emission. A comparison with 1.2 mm PdBI continuum data reveals no evidence for variations in the dust properties across the source within the uncertainties, consistent with extended SF, and the peak star formation rate surface density (119 ± 8 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} kpc{sup –2}) implies that the SF in GN20 remains sub-Eddington on scales down to 3 kpc{sup 2}. We find that the SF efficiency (SFE) is highest in the central regions of GN20, leading to a resolved SF law with a power-law slope of Σ{sub SFR} ∼ Σ{sub H{sub 2}{sup 2.1±1.0}}, and that GN20 lies above the sequence of normal star-forming disks, implying that the dispersion in the SF law is not due solely to morphology or choice of conversion factor. These data extend previous evidence for a fixed SFE per free-fall time to include the star-forming medium on ∼kiloparsec scales in a galaxy 12 Gyr ago.

  5. Observational Study to Assess the Therapeutic Value of Four Ovarian Hyperstimulation Protocols in IVF After Pituitary Suppression with GnRH Antagonists in Normally Responding Women

    OpenAIRE

    Ana, Monzó; Vicente, Montañana; María, Rubio José; Trinidad, García-Gimeno; Alberto, Romeu

    2011-01-01

    Objective To compare the clinical results of four different protocols of COH for IVF-ICSI in normovulatory women, using in all cases pituitary suppression with GnRH antagonists. Materials/methods A single center, open label, parallel-controlled, prospective, post-authorization study under the approved conditions for use where 305 normal responders women who were candidates to COH were assigned to r-FSH + hp-hMG (n = 51, Group I), hp-hMG (n = 61, Group II), fixed-dose r-FSH (n = 118, Group III...

  6. The expression of gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor gene in ovaries and uterus cells of Iraqi and Damascus goat breed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaa kamil Abdulla

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Iraqi goats have a major economic role in production of meat, milk and leather as well as it considered a financial source for owners as reproduce twice a year, yet the Damascus goats have great importance than Iraqi goats owing to the number of twin births. The gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH and its receptors have great importance in the reproduction and eugenics. To make a comparison between the Iraqi and Damascus goats in terms of this receptor gene expression in the ovaries and uterus tissue cells, the study was performed, in which used the (∆Ct Using a Reference Gene method by quintitive -real time PCR technique. Results were found a significant difference (p<0.05, as the gene expression of (GnRH-R higher in the ovaries and uterus tissue cells in Damascus goats compared with the Iraqi goats. In conclusion; the multiple pregnancies of twins in Damascus goats may be due to an increase gene expression of (GnRH-R in the ovaries and uterus tissue

  7. Type 3 Fimbriae Encoded on Plasmids Are Expressed from a Unique Promoter without Affecting Host Motility, Facilitating an Exceptional Phenotype That Enhances Conjugal Plasmid Transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jonas Stenlokke; Riber, Leise; Kot, Witold

    2016-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT), the transmission of genetic material to a recipient that is not the progeny of the donor, is fundamental in bacterial evolution. HGT is often mediated by mobile genetic elements such as conjugative plasmids, which may be in conflict with the chromosomal elements...... of the genome because they are independent replicons that may petition their own evolutionary strategy. Here we study differences between type 3 fimbriae encoded on wild type plasmids and in chromosomes. Using known and newly characterized plasmids we show that the expression of type 3 fimbriae encoded...... on plasmids is systematically different, as MrkH, a c-di-GMP dependent transcriptional activator is not needed for strong expression of the fimbriae. MrkH is required for expression of type 3 fimbriae of the Klebsiella pneumoniae chromosome, wherefrom the fimbriae operon (mrkABCDF) of plasmids is believed...

  8. Aumento da expressão do MCP-1 coroidal e escleral em modelo experimental de hipercolesterolemia

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    Rogil José de Almeida Torres

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: O objetivo deste trabalho é demonstrar experimentalmente que a dieta rica em colesterol provoca aumento da expressão da MCP-1 na coroide e esclera. MÉTODO: Coelhos New Zealand foram organizados em dois grupos: GN (grupo dieta normal, composto por 8 coelhos (8 olhos, recebeu ração padrão para coelhos, durante 4 semanas; GH (grupo hipercolesterolêmico, composto por 13 coelhos (13 olhos, recebeu dieta rica em colesterol a 1% por 8 semanas. Foi realizada a dosagem sérica de colesterol total, triglicerídeos, HDL colesterol, glicemia de jejum no início do experimento e no momento da eutanásia. Ao final da 8ª semana para o GH e 4ª semana para o GN foi realizada a eutanásia dos animais e os olhos foram submetidos à análise imuno-histoquímica com o anticorpo anti-MCP-1. RESULTADOS: A dieta provocou significativo aumento do colesterol total e triglicerídeos do GH em relação ao GN (p<0,001. Houve significativo aumento da expressão da MCP-1 na coroide e esclera dos animais do GH em relação ao GN (p<0,001. CONCLUSÃO: Este estudo demonstrou que a dieta hipercolesterolêmica em coelhos induz ao aumento da expressão do MCP-1 na coroide e esclera.

  9. Morphological Analysis of the Axonal Projections of EGFP-Labeled Esr1-Expressing Neurons in Transgenic Female Medaka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zempo, Buntaro; Karigo, Tomomi; Kanda, Shinji; Akazome, Yasuhisa; Oka, Yoshitaka

    2018-02-01

    Some hypothalamic neurons expressing estrogen receptor α (Esr1) are thought to transmit a gonadal estrogen feedback signal to gonadotropin-releasing hormone 1 (GnRH1) neurons, which is the final common pathway for feedback regulation of reproductive functions. Moreover, estrogen-sensitive neurons are suggested to control sexual behaviors in coordination with reproduction. In mammals, hypothalamic estrogen-sensitive neurons release the peptide kisspeptin and regulate GnRH1 neurons. However, a growing body of evidence in nonmammalian species casts doubt on the regulation of GnRH1 neurons by kisspeptin neurons. As a step toward understanding how estrogen regulates neuronal circuits for reproduction and sex behavior in vertebrates in general, we generated a transgenic (Tg) medaka that expresses enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) specifically in esr1-expressing neurons (esr1 neurons) and analyzed their axonal projections. We found that esr1 neurons in the preoptic area (POA) project to the gnrh1 neurons. We also demonstrated by transcriptome and histological analyses that these esr1 neurons are glutamatergic or γ-aminobutyric acidergic (GABAergic) but not kisspeptinergic. We therefore suggest that glutamatergic and GABAergic esr1 neurons in the POA regulate gnrh1 neurons. This hypothesis is consistent with previous studies in mice that found that glutamatergic and GABAergic transmission is critical for estrogen-dependent changes in GnRH1 neuron firing. Thus, we propose that this neuronal circuit may provide an evolutionarily conserved mechanism for regulation of reproduction. In addition, we showed that telencephalic esr1 neurons project to medulla, which may control sexual behavior. Moreover, we found that some POA-esr1 neurons coexpress progesterone receptors. These neurons may form the neuronal circuits that regulate reproduction and sex behavior in response to the serum estrogen/progesterone. Copyright © 2018 Endocrine Society.

  10. Corifollitropin alfa compared to daily rFSH or HP-HMG in GnRH antagonist controlled ovarian stimulation protocol for patients undergoing assisted reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Priscila Morais Galvão; Carvalho, Bruno Ramalho de; Nakagawa, Hitomi Miura; Rassi, Thalita Reis Esselin; Barbosa, Antônio César Paes; Silva, Adelino Amaral

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to compare the outcomes of controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) with corifollitropin alfa versus daily recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone (rRFSH) or highly purified human menopausal gonadotropin (HP-HMG) in patients undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles based on gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist protocols. The primary endpoints were total number of oocytes and mature oocytes. This retrospective study looked into 132 controlled ovarian stimulation cycles from IVF or oocyte cryopreservation performed in a private human reproduction center between January 1 and December 31, 2014. Enrollment criteria: women aged 0.05). There were no significant differences in fertilization (76.9% vs. 76.8%, p=1.0), biochemical pregnancy (66.7% vs. 47.2%, p=0.1561) or embryo implantation rates (68.7% vs. 50%, p=0.2588) between the groups using corifollitropin alfa and rFSH or HMG, respectively. Corifollitropin alfa seems to be as effective as rFSH or HP-HMG when used in the first seven days of ovulation induction for patients undergoing assisted reproduction in GnRH antagonist protocols.

  11. Outpatient management of severe early OHSS by administration of GnRH antagonist in the luteal phase: an observational cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lainas George T

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Management of established severe OHSS requires prolonged hospitalization, occasionally in intensive care units, accompanied by multiple ascites punctures, correction of intravascular fluid volume and electrolyte imbalance. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether it is feasible to manage women with severe OHSS as outpatients by treating them with GnRH antagonists in the luteal phase. Methods This is a single-centre, prospective, observational, cohort study. Forty patients diagnosed with severe OHSS, five days post oocyte retrieval, were managed as outpatients after administration of GnRH antagonist (0.25 mg daily from days 5 to 8 post oocyte retrieval, combined with cryopreservation of all embryos. The primary outcome measure was the pr