WorldWideScience

Sample records for replacement tooth initiation

  1. Replacing a Missing Tooth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vessels in the tooth pulps are rather large. Drilling down these teeth for crowns may expose the ... porcelain replacement tooth is held in place by metal extensions cemented to the backs of the adjacent ...

  2. Autogenous tooth transplantation for replacing a lost tooth: case reports

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Ji-Youn; Chang, Hoon-Sang; Hwang,Yun-Chan; Hwang, In-Nam; Oh, Won-Mann; LEE, Bin-Na

    2013-01-01

    The autogenous tooth transplantation is an alternative treatment replacing a missing tooth when a suitable donor tooth is available. It is also a successful treatment option to save significant amount of time and cost comparing implants or conventional prosthetics. These cases, which required single tooth extraction due to deep caries and severe periodontal disease, could have good results by transplanting non-functional but sound donor tooth to the extraction site.

  3. Biology of tooth replacement in amniotes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John A Whitlock; Joy M Richman

    2013-01-01

    Tooth replacement is a common trait to most vertebrates, including mammals. Mammals, however, have lost the capacity for continuous tooth renewal seen in most other vertebrates, and typically have only 1–2 generations of teeth. Here, we review the mechanisms of tooth replacement in reptiles and mammals, and discuss in detail the current and historical theories on control of timing and pattern of tooth replacement and development.

  4. Autogenous tooth transplantation: an alternative to replace extracted tooth

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    David B. Kamadjaja

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The gold standard treatment to replace missing tooth is dental implants, however, in certain cases, such as in young patients its placement is contraindicated. Autogenous tooth transplantation, which has been widely done in Scandinavian countries for many years, may become a good alternative to overcome this problem. Purpose: This article attempted to provide information about the indication, treatment planning, surgical technique and the successful result of autogenous tooth transplantation. Case: A fifteen year old male patient presented with large caries and periapical disease of his lower left first molar, which was partially erupted and the roots was not fully formed in radiograph. Case management: Autogenous tooth transplantation procedure was performed consisting of extraction of #36, odontectomy of #38 followed by its implantation to socket #36 and fixation of the transplanted tooth to the adjacent teeth. Post operative evaluation was done on regular basis within 18 months period. There was no complaint, the tooth was clinically stable and no evidence of periodontal problem. Serial radiographs showed healing of alveolar bone and periodontal tissue, and the complete root formation was evident by 18 months post operatively. Conclusion: Autogenous tooth transplantation is a potential alternative to replace extracted tooth. Provided that the case be properly planned and operation carefully performed, successful result of this treatment can be achieved.

  5. Autogenous Transplantation for Replacing a Hopeless Tooth

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    Zakershahrak, Mehrsa; Moshari, Amirabbas; Vatanpour, Mehdi; Khalilak, Zohreh; Jalali Ara, Afsoon

    2017-01-01

    Autogenous tooth transplantation (ATT) is a simple and reasonable choice for replacing the missing teeth when a proper donor tooth is available. This report presents a case of successful ATT of a maxillary right third molar for replacement of mandibular right second molar with a concomitant endodontic-periodontal disease. The mandibular second molar was believed to be hopeless due to a severe damage to coronal tooth structure, inappropriate root canal treatment and apical radiolucency. After extraction of mandibular second molar and maxillary third molar (the donor), the tooth was re-implanted into the extracted socket of second molar site. Root canal therapy was then performed. After 3 years, clinical and radiographic examinations revealed satisfying results, with no signs and symptoms. The patient is asymptomatic and the transplanted tooth is still functional with no signs of marginal periodontal pathosis. Radiographies showed bone regeneration in the site of previous extensive periapical lesion, normal periodontal ligament with no signs of root resorption. PMID:28179939

  6. Functional tooth regenerative therapy: tooth tissue regeneration and whole-tooth replacement.

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    Oshima, Masamitsu; Tsuji, Takashi

    2014-07-01

    Oral and general health is compromised by irreversible dental problems, including dental caries, periodontal disease and tooth injury. Regenerative therapy for tooth tissue repair and whole-tooth replacement is currently considered a novel therapeutic concept with the potential for the full recovery of tooth function. Several types of stem cells and cell-activating cytokines have been identified in oral tissues. These cells are thought to be candidate cell sources for tooth tissue regenerative therapies because they have the ability to differentiate into tooth tissues in vitro and in vivo. Whole-tooth replacement therapy is regarded as an important model for the development of an organ regenerative concept. A novel three-dimensional cell-manipulation method, designated the organ germ method, has been developed to recapitulate organogenesis. This method involves compartmentalisation of epithelial and mesenchymal cells at a high cell density to mimic multicellular assembly conditions and epithelial-mesenchymal interactions. A bioengineered tooth germ can generate a structurally correct tooth in vitro and erupt successfully with the correct tooth structure when transplanted into the oral cavity. We have ectopically generated a bioengineered tooth unit composed of a mature tooth, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone, and that tooth unit was successfully engrafted into an adult jawbone through bone integration. Such bioengineered teeth were able to perform normal physiological tooth functions, such as developing a masticatory potential in response to mechanical stress and a perceptive potential for noxious stimuli. In this review, we describe recent findings and technologies underpinning tooth regenerative therapy.

  7. Evolution of high tooth replacement rates in sauropod dinosaurs.

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    Michael D D'Emic

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tooth replacement rate can be calculated in extinct animals by counting incremental lines of deposition in tooth dentin. Calculating this rate in several taxa allows for the study of the evolution of tooth replacement rate. Sauropod dinosaurs, the largest terrestrial animals that ever evolved, exhibited a diversity of tooth sizes and shapes, but little is known about their tooth replacement rates. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We present tooth replacement rate, formation time, crown volume, total dentition volume, and enamel thickness for two coexisting but distantly related and morphologically disparate sauropod dinosaurs Camarasaurus and Diplodocus. Individual tooth formation time was determined by counting daily incremental lines in dentin. Tooth replacement rate is calculated as the difference between the number of days recorded in successive replacement teeth. Each tooth family in Camarasaurus has a maximum of three replacement teeth, whereas each Diplodocus tooth family has up to five. Tooth formation times are about 1.7 times longer in Camarasaurus than in Diplodocus (315 vs. 185 days. Average tooth replacement rate in Camarasaurus is about one tooth every 62 days versus about one tooth every 35 days in Diplodocus. Despite slower tooth replacement rates in Camarasaurus, the volumetric rate of Camarasaurus tooth replacement is 10 times faster than in Diplodocus because of its substantially greater tooth volumes. A novel method to estimate replacement rate was developed and applied to several other sauropodomorphs that we were not able to thin section. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Differences in tooth replacement rate among sauropodomorphs likely reflect disparate feeding strategies and/or food choices, which would have facilitated the coexistence of these gigantic herbivores in one ecosystem. Early neosauropods are characterized by high tooth replacement rates (despite their large tooth size, and derived titanosaurs and

  8. Complex patterns of tooth replacement revealed in the fruit bat (Eidolon helvum).

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    Popa, Elena M; Anthwal, Neal; Tucker, Abigail S

    2016-12-01

    How teeth are replaced during normal growth and development has long been an important question for comparative and developmental anatomy. Non-standard model animals have become increasingly popular in this field due to the fact that the canonical model laboratory mammal, the mouse, develops only one generation of teeth (monophyodonty), whereas the majority of mammals possess two generations of teeth (diphyodonty). Here we used the straw-coloured fruit bat (Eidolon helvum), an Old World megabat, which has two generations of teeth, in order to observe the development and replacement of tooth germs from initiation up to mineralization stages. Our morphological study uses 3D reconstruction of histological sections to uncover differing arrangements of the first and second-generation tooth germs during the process of tooth replacement. We show that both tooth germ generations develop as part of the dental lamina, with the first generation detaching from the lamina, leaving the free edge to give rise to a second generation. This separation was particularly marked at the third premolar locus, where the primary and replacement teeth become positioned side by side, unconnected by a lamina. The position of the replacement tooth, with respect to the primary tooth, varied within the mouth, with replacements forming posterior to or directly lingual to the primary tooth. Development of replacement teeth was arrested at some tooth positions and this appeared to be linked to the timing of tooth initiation and the subsequent rate of development. This study adds an additional species to the growing body of non-model species used in the study of tooth replacement, and offers a new insight into the development of the diphyodont condition. © 2016 Anatomical Society.

  9. DENTAL IMPLANTS: AS AN ALTERNATIVE FOR TOOTH REPLACEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Banerjee Nandini; Singh Sushma

    2013-01-01

    A dental implant is an artificial tooth that replaces a tooth that has been taken out. Implants are natural-looking, can provide support for dentures and do not affect the teeth bordering them. They are as stable as your real teeth and protect you from the loss of jawbone, which occurs when you lose teeth. Endosseous dental implants have revolutionized the fields of implants and periodontics. During the last decade, a great deal of information has been generated concerning the effectiveness a...

  10. Beta-Catenin and Plakoglobin Expression during Zebrafish Tooth Development and Replacement.

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    Barbara Verstraeten

    Full Text Available We analyzed the protein distribution of two cadherin-associated molecules, plakoglobin and β-catenin, during the different stages of tooth development and tooth replacement in zebrafish. Plakoglobin was detected at the plasma membrane already at the onset of tooth development in the epithelial cells of the tooth. This pattern remained unaltered during further tooth development. The mesenchymal cells only showed plakoglobin from cytodifferentiation onwards. Plakoglobin 1a morpholino-injected embryos showed normal tooth development with proper initiation and differentiation. Although plakoglobin is clearly present during normal odontogenesis, the loss of plakoglobin 1a does not influence tooth development. β-catenin was found at the cell borders of all cells of the successional lamina but also in the nuclei of surrounding mesenchymal cells. Only membranous, not nuclear, β-catenin, was found during morphogenesis stage. However, during cytodifferentiation stage, both nuclear and membrane-bound β-catenin was detected in the layers of the enamel organ as well as in the differentiating odontoblasts. Nuclear β-catenin is an indication of an activated Wnt pathway, therefore suggesting a possible role for Wnt signalling during zebrafish tooth development and replacement.

  11. Beta-Catenin and Plakoglobin Expression during Zebrafish Tooth Development and Replacement.

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    Verstraeten, Barbara; van Hengel, Jolanda; Huysseune, Ann

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed the protein distribution of two cadherin-associated molecules, plakoglobin and β-catenin, during the different stages of tooth development and tooth replacement in zebrafish. Plakoglobin was detected at the plasma membrane already at the onset of tooth development in the epithelial cells of the tooth. This pattern remained unaltered during further tooth development. The mesenchymal cells only showed plakoglobin from cytodifferentiation onwards. Plakoglobin 1a morpholino-injected embryos showed normal tooth development with proper initiation and differentiation. Although plakoglobin is clearly present during normal odontogenesis, the loss of plakoglobin 1a does not influence tooth development. β-catenin was found at the cell borders of all cells of the successional lamina but also in the nuclei of surrounding mesenchymal cells. Only membranous, not nuclear, β-catenin, was found during morphogenesis stage. However, during cytodifferentiation stage, both nuclear and membrane-bound β-catenin was detected in the layers of the enamel organ as well as in the differentiating odontoblasts. Nuclear β-catenin is an indication of an activated Wnt pathway, therefore suggesting a possible role for Wnt signalling during zebrafish tooth development and replacement.

  12. Autocrine and paracrine Shh signaling are necessary for tooth morphogenesis, but not tooth replacement in snakes and lizards (Squamata).

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    Handrigan, Gregory R; Richman, Joy M

    2010-01-01

    Here we study the role of Shh signaling in tooth morphogenesis and successional tooth initiation in snakes and lizards (Squamata). By characterizing the expression of Shh pathway receptor Ptc1 in the developing dentitions of three species (Eublepharis macularius, Python regius, and Pogona vitticeps) and by performing gain- and loss-of-function experiments, we demonstrate that Shh signaling is active in the squamate tooth bud and is required for its normal morphogenesis. Shh apparently mediates tooth morphogenesis by separate paracrine- and autocrine-mediated functions. According to this model, paracrine Shh signaling induces cell proliferation in the cervical loop, outer enamel epithelium, and dental papilla. Autocrine signaling within the stellate reticulum instead appears to regulate cell survival. By treating squamate dental explants with Hh antagonist cyclopamine, we induced tooth phenotypes that closely resemble the morphological and differentiation defects of vestigial, first-generation teeth in the bearded dragon P. vitticeps. Our finding that these vestigial teeth are deficient in epithelial Shh signaling further corroborates that Shh is needed for the normal development of teeth in snakes and lizards. Finally, in this study, we definitively refute a role for Shh signaling in successional dental lamina formation and conclude that other pathways regulate tooth replacement in squamates.

  13. Functional tooth regeneration using a bioengineered tooth unit as a mature organ replacement regenerative therapy.

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    Oshima, Masamitsu; Mizuno, Mitsumasa; Imamura, Aya; Ogawa, Miho; Yasukawa, Masato; Yamazaki, Hiromichi; Morita, Ritsuko; Ikeda, Etsuko; Nakao, Kazuhisa; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko; Kasugai, Shohei; Saito, Masahiro; Tsuji, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Donor organ transplantation is currently an essential therapeutic approach to the replacement of a dysfunctional organ as a result of disease, injury or aging in vivo. Recent progress in the area of regenerative therapy has the potential to lead to bioengineered mature organ replacement in the future. In this proof of concept study, we here report a further development in this regard in which a bioengineered tooth unit comprising mature tooth, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone, was successfully transplanted into a properly-sized bony hole in the alveolar bone through bone integration by recipient bone remodeling in a murine transplantation model system. The bioengineered tooth unit restored enough the alveolar bone in a vertical direction into an extensive bone defect of murine lower jaw. Engrafted bioengineered tooth displayed physiological tooth functions such as mastication, periodontal ligament function for bone remodeling and responsiveness to noxious stimulations. This study thus represents a substantial advance and demonstrates the real potential for bioengineered mature organ replacement as a next generation regenerative therapy.

  14. DENTAL IMPLANTS: AS AN ALTERNATIVE FOR TOOTH REPLACEMENT

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    Banerjee Nandini

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A dental implant is an artificial tooth that replaces a tooth that has been taken out. Implants are natural-looking, can provide support for dentures and do not affect the teeth bordering them. They are as stable as your real teeth and protect you from the loss of jawbone, which occurs when you lose teeth. Endosseous dental implants have revolutionized the fields of implants and periodontics. During the last decade, a great deal of information has been generated concerning the effectiveness and predictability of endosseous implants. Implant placement is a viable option in the treatment of partial and full edentulism and has become an integral facet of periodontal therapy. The available implants are remarkably successful. This review discusses the different aspects of dental implant including its advantages over the contemporary removable implants, its procedure in detail and the financial outlook of the same. The review also has a small consideration on minidental implant.

  15. Single-tooth replacement: factors affecting different prosthetic treatment modalities

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    Al-Quran Firas A

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The choice between several treatment options for replacing a single missing tooth is influenced by clinical, dentist- and patient-immanent factors. This study aimed to determine the patient factors that would affect the treatment decision to replace a single missing tooth and to assess the satisfaction with several options. Method 200 volunteers involved (121 females and 79 males divided into four groups, Group A: consisted of patients with conventional fixed partial dentures or patients with resin bonded fixed partial dentures. Group B: consisted of patients who received removable partial dentures while Group C: consisted of patients who received a single implant supported crown, and a control group D: consisted of patients who received no treatment. Data were collected using a questionnaire. Results The highest percentage of males within groups (58% was within the removable prostheses category. The majority of the subjects in the study reported that the main reason for replacing a missing tooth was for esthetic and function. Most important factor affecting the choice between treatment modalities was damaging the neighboring teeth. Pain, post operative sensitivity and dental phobia were important factors in choosing the prosthesis type and affected the control group patients not to have any treatment. The highest satisfaction percentage among groups studied was recorded for dental implants then FPD groups, while the least percentage were in both the control and RPD groups, for all aspects of function, esthetic and speech efficiency. Conclusions The final choice between FPD, RPD and implant depended on several factors which affected the decision making; among these is cost and patients' awareness of the different treatment options.

  16. Economic evaluation of single-tooth replacement: dental implant versus fixed partial denture.

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    Kim, Younhee; Park, Joo-Yeon; Park, Sun-Young; Oh, Sung-Hee; Jung, YeaJi; Kim, Ji-Min; Yoo, Soo-Yeon; Kim, Seong-Kyun

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed the cost-effectiveness from a societal perspective of a dental implant compared with a three-unit tooth-supported fixed partial denture (FPD) for the replacement of a single tooth in 2010. A decision tree was developed to estimate cost-effectiveness over a 10-year period. The survival rates of single-tooth implants and FPDs were extracted from a meta-analysis of single-arm studies. Medical costs included initial treatment costs, maintenance costs, and costs to treat complications. Patient surveys were used to obtain the costs of the initial single-tooth implant or FPD. Maintenance costs and costs to treat complications were based on surveys of seven clinical experts at dental clinics or hospitals. Transportation costs were calculated based on the number of visits for implant or FPD treatment. Patient time costs were estimated using the number of visits and time required, hourly wage, and employment rate. Future costs were discounted by 5% to convert to present values. The results of a 10-year period model showed that a single dental implant cost US $261 (clinic) to $342 (hospital) more than an FPD and had an average survival rate that was 10.4% higher. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was $2,514 in a clinic and $3,290 in a hospital for a prosthesis in situ for 10 years. The sensitivity analysis showed that initial treatment costs and survival rate influenced the cost-effectiveness. If the cost of an implant were reduced to 80% of the current cost, the implant would become the dominant intervention. Although the level of evidence for effectiveness is low, and some aspects of single-tooth implants or FPDs, such as satisfaction, were not considered, this study will help patients requiring single-tooth replacement to choose the best treatment option.

  17. Tooth regeneration: implications for the use of bioengineered organs in first-wave organ replacement.

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    Nakahara, Taka; Ide, Yoshiaki

    2007-08-01

    Experiments with animal models have shown that the tooth crown structure can be regenerated using tissue engineering techniques that combine tooth bud cells and biodegradable materials, or by using embryonic tissue and adult stem cells. Moreover, tooth roots and periodontal tissues have been reconstructed by grafting dental stem cells, which leads to the recovery of tooth function, suggesting that tooth regeneration will become possible in humans in the near future. The present article reviews current research on tooth regeneration, discusses a model of tooth replacement that could be used clinically, and proposes a new tooth regeneration approach that overcomes the difficulties associated with the tooth replacement model. Tooth regeneration is an important stepping stone in the establishment of engineered organ transplantation, which is one of the ultimate goals of regenerative therapies.

  18. An Innovative Rigid Tray Technique for Replacement and Reattachment of the Anterior Composite Tooth Pontic

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    Saied Mostafa Moazzami

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Replacement and reattachment of a newly detached composite tooth pontic is sometimes justified because of shape, color, function and patient satisfaction. The aim of this case report is to describe a new method using Rigid Tray Technique for exact replacement and reattachment of acceptable detached composite tooth pontic

  19. Wnt signaling during tooth replacement in zebrafish (Danio rerio: pitfalls and perspectives

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    Ann eHuysseune

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The canonical (β-catenin dependent Wnt signaling pathway has emerged as a likely candidate for regulating tooth replacement in continuously renewing dentitions. So far, the involvement of canonical Wnt signaling has been experimentally demonstrated predominantly in amniotes. These studies tend to show stimulation of tooth formation by activation of the Wnt pathway, and inhibition of tooth formation when blocking the pathway. Here, we report a strong and dynamic expression of the soluble Wnt inhibitor dickkopf1 (dkk1 in developing zebrafish (Danio rerio tooth germs, suggesting an active repression of Wnt signaling during morphogenesis and cytodifferentiation of a tooth, and derepression of Wnt signaling during start of replacement tooth formation. To further analyse the role of Wnt signaling, we used different gain-of-function approaches. These yielded disjunct results, yet none of them indicating enhanced tooth replacement. Thus, masterblind (mbl mutants, defective in axin1, mimic overexpression of Wnt, but display a normally patterned dentition in which teeth are replaced at the appropriate times and positions. Activating the pathway with LiCl had variable outcomes, either resulting in the absence, or the delayed formation, of first-generation teeth, or yielding a regular dentition with normal replacement, but no supernumerary teeth or accelerated tooth replacement.The failure so far to influence tooth replacement in the zebrafish by perturbing Wnt signaling is discussed in the light of (i potential technical pitfalls related to dose- or time-dependency, (ii the complexity of the canonical Wnt pathway, and (iii species-specific differences in the nature and activity of pathway components. Finally, we emphasize the importance of in-depth knowledge of the wild-type pattern for reliable interpretations. It is hoped that our analysis can be inspiring to critically assess and elucidate the role of Wnt signaling in tooth development in polyphyodonts.

  20. Tooth replacement and putative odontogenic stem cell niches in pharyngeal dentition of medaka (Oryzias latipes).

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    Abduweli, Dawud; Baba, Otto; Tabata, Makoto J; Higuchi, Kazunori; Mitani, Hiroshi; Takano, Yoshiro

    2014-04-01

    The small-sized teleost fish medaka, Oryzias latipes, has as many as 1000 pharyngeal teeth undergoing continuous replacement. In this study, we sought to identify the tooth-forming units and determine its replacement cycles, and further localize odontogenic stem cell niches in the pharyngeal dentition of medaka to gain insights into the mechanisms whereby continuous tooth replacement is maintained. Three-dimensional reconstruction of pharyngeal epithelium and sequential fluorochrome labeling of pharyngeal bones and teeth indicated that the individual functional teeth and their successional teeth were organized in families, each comprising up to five generations of teeth and successional tooth germs, and that the replacement cycle of functional teeth was approximately 4 weeks. BrdU label/chase experiments confirmed the existence of clusters of label-retaining epithelial cells at the posterior end of each tooth family where the expression of pluripotency marker Sox2 was confirmed by in situ hybridization. Label-retaining cells were also identified in the mesoderm immediately adjacent to the posterior end of each tooth family. These data suggest the importance of existence of slow-cycling dental epithelial cells and Sox2 expressions at the posterior end of each tooth family to maintain continuous tooth formation and replacement in the pharyngeal dentition of medaka.

  1. Tooth replacement of tigerfish Hydrocynus vittatus from the Kruger National Park

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    C.L. Gagiano

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence of tooth replacement was observed in 14 tigerfish which had been caught during the period 1991 - 1993 in the Olifants and Letaba rivers in the Kruger National Park. Replacement of teeth is a quick process (3-5 days and first replacement of adult coni- cal dentition takes place at six to seven months post hatch, at a body length of 100 mm (FL. Swollen gums are evident prior to tooth replacement and newly erupted teeth are loosely embedded in the gums. Tooth replacement occurs in both the upper and lower jaws simultaneously. It was observed in the laboratory that the feeding behaviour was affected when adult conical dentition was replaced in @ 287 mm (FL specimens.

  2. An evolutionary view on tooth development and replacement in wild Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.).

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    Huysseune, A; Witten, P E

    2008-01-01

    To gain an insight into the evolution of tooth replacement mechanisms, we studied the development of first-generation and replacement teeth on the dentary of wild Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.), a protacanthopterygian teleost, using serially sectioned heads of early posthatching stages as well as adults. First-generation teeth develop within the oral epithelium. The anlage of the replacement tooth is first seen as a placode-like thickening of the outer dental epithelium of the predecessor, at its lingual and caudal side. Ongoing development of the replacement tooth germ is characterized by the elaboration of a population of epithelial cells, termed here the middle dental epithelium, apposed to the inner dental epithelium on the lingual side of the tooth germ. Before the formation of the new successor, a single-layered outer dental epithelium segregates from the middle dental epithelium. The dental organs of the predecessor and the successor remain broadly interconnected. The absence of a discrete successional dental lamina in salmon stands in sharp contrast to what is observed in other teleosts, even those that share with salmon the extraosseous formation of replacement teeth. The mode of tooth replacement in Atlantic salmon displays several characters similar to those observed in the shark Squalus acanthias. To interpret similarities in tooth replacement between Atlantic salmon and chondrichthyans as a case of convergence, or to see them as a result of a heterochronic shift, requires knowledge on the replacement process in more basal actinopterygian lineages. The possibility that the middle dental epithelium functionally substitutes for a successional lamina, and could be a source of stem cells, whose descendants subsequently contribute to the placode of the new replacement tooth, needs to be explored.

  3. A short report on tooth replacement in an older suburban population in Nigeria.

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    Ibiyemi, Olushola; Lawal, Folake B

    2017-09-20

    To determine: the knowledge of the participants about removable dentures, importance of tooth replacement; prevalence of tooth loss and denture use; and factors associated with its non-use among an elderly population in Nigeria. Tooth loss without replacement can impact negatively on the quality of life of the elders, thus making use of denture a basic requirement for those with partial or complete edentulous arches in developed countries. It is, however, not known if this is the case among elders in suburban Nigeria. A cross-section of 392 consenting elderly participants aged ≥65 years residing at Idikan, Ibadan, Nigeria, were interviewed on their biodata, knowledge of removable denture and importance of tooth replacement, history of use of denture and reasons for non-use where applicable. Oral examinations for the presence of missing teeth and denture were conducted by an examiner. Data were analysed with SPSS and P value set at ˂.05. The mean age of the participants was 73 (SD = 9.2) years. About 39% of the participants believed that it was important to replace missing teeth, 56.0% had poor knowledge about tooth replacement options, and 47.7% had at least a missing tooth. Only 7.1% of those with missing teeth had them replaced and all were using removable acrylic partial dentures. Financial constraint was the main reason for non-replacement of missing teeth (80.1%). Age, gender, occupation before retirement, income, level of education and presence of physical impairment were associated with non-use of denture (P ˂ .05). Many elderly individuals had poor knowledge about removable dentures and the importance of tooth replacement. About half of the participants had full complement of teeth and only 7.1% of those with tooth loss reported denture wear. Major reasons for non-use of dentures were due to economic reasons. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Association. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. A multidisciplinary esthetic approach to single-tooth replacement and diastema closure.

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    Lyssova, Valentina; Estafan, Denise; Cunnigham, Ralph P

    2008-05-01

    Anterior tooth replacement has always posed an esthetic challenge for dentists. A multidisciplinary approach makes it possible to provide patients with esthetics and function. Treatment planning should involve other specialists when clinicians are faced with the additional esthetic concerns of the patient (such as anterior spatial anomalies and esthetically unpleasant existing restorations). Metal-ceramic fixed partial dentures have been used to allow the replacement of missing teeth for many years, providing both strength and esthetics. Several other options also are available, including implant placement. Dental implants in the esthetic zone are well-documented in the literature; numerous controlled clinical trials have shown overall implant survival and success rates. This article illustrates a step-by-step analysis and treatment option for a single-tooth replacement and maxillary anterior spatial dilemma using Captek crowns.

  5. Autotransplantation of a Supernumerary Tooth to Replace a Misaligned Incisor with Abnormal Dimensions and Morphology: 2-Year Follow-Up

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    R. Ebru Tirali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Autotransplantation is a viable treatment option to restore esthetics and function impaired by abnormally shaped teeth when a suitable donors tooth is available. This paper describes the autotransplantation and 2-year follow-up of a supernumerary maxillary incisor as a replacement to a misaligned maxillary incisor with abnormal crown morphology and size. The supernumerary incisor was immediately autotransplanted into the extraction site of the large incisor and was stabilized with a bonded semirigid splint for 2 weeks. Fixed orthodontic therapy was initiated 3 months after autotransplantation. Ideal alignment of the incisors was accomplished after 6 months along with radiographic evidence of apical closure and osseous/periodontal regeneration. In autogenous tooth transplantation, a successful clinical outcome can be achieved if the cases are selected and treated properly.

  6. Single Tooth Replacement Using InCeram Resin Bonded Fixed Partial Denture: A Clinical Report.

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    Elnaz Moslehifard

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This clinical report describes a treatment option for replacement of a missing mandibular anterior tooth using InCeram resin bonded fixed partial denture (RBFPD. The conventional approach for replacing mandibular incisors dictates the placement of either a conventional porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM bridge, Maryland bridge, or fiber-reinforced composite veneer bridge and several appearance-related disadvantages have been reported in the use of a prosthesis that incorporates a metal substructure. The InCeram bridge is a minimally invasive restoration and eliminates undesirable incisal graying frequently observed in metal RBFPDs. This method was successfully clinically applied to overcome shortcomings of other approaches that may require a minimal invasive technique to preserve lasting sound tooth structure.

  7. Dental implant as an option for tooth replacement: The awareness of patients at a tertiary hospital in a developing country

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    Olaide Shakeerah Gbadebo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: A survey was set out to evaluate the knowledge of patients about tooth replacement as a whole, and assess their awareness of implant-retained prosthesis as an option of tooth replacement. Materials and Methods: Information on sociodemographic characteristics, knowledge about implant-retained tooth as an option for missing tooth replacement, cost implication, source of information and knowledge about other options of tooth replacement were obtained from patients attending the dental clinics of the University College Hospital, Ibadan, using structured self-administered questionnaires. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 20. Result: A total of 220 patients aged 18-84 years with a mean age of 37.6 (±16.5 years participated in the study, with a male to female ratio of 1:1.1. The majority (92.5% knew that missing teeth can be replaced, while a significantly lower proportion (28.9% knew about dental implants as an option (P < 0.01. Dentists were the major source of information on dental implants (68%. Only 21 (36.8% of those who had heard about dental implant had knowledge about the cost (P < 0.000. Conclusion: A low level of awareness about dental implant as tooth replacement option exist in this environment, although most of the study participants were aware that missing teeth can be replaced.

  8. A comparison of tooth retention and replacement across 15 countries in the over-50s.

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    Stock, Christian; Jürges, Hendrik; Shen, Jing; Bozorgmehr, Kayvan; Listl, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    Oral diseases are still among the most common chronic diseases globally with substantial detrimental impact especially on elderly people's health and well-being. However, limited evidence exists on international variation in the oral health status of the older population. We aimed to examine international variation in tooth loss and tooth replacement in the general population aged between 50 and 90 years. A cross-sectional analysis of data from the fifth wave of the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) was conducted. The data cover 14 European countries (Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, France, Germany, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, and Switzerland) and Israel, and they were collected during the year 2013. Age-specific percentages of the population having all natural teeth, the age-specific numbers of natural (and artificial) teeth, and the age-specific percentages of full, partial, or no replacement of missing teeth were assessed with stratification by country. It was further evaluated to which extent proposed oral health goals concerning tooth loss at higher ages had been achieved. In total, 62,763 individuals were included in the study. Age-standardized mean numbers of natural teeth exhibited substantial variation, ranging from 14.3 (Estonia) to 24.5 (Sweden). The oral health goal of retaining at least 20 teeth at age 80 years was achieved by 25% of the population or less in most countries. A target concerning edentulism (≤15% in population aged 65-74 years) was reached in Sweden, Switzerland, Denmark, France, and Germany. Tooth replacement practices varied especially for a number of up to five missing teeth which were more likely to be replaced in Austria, Germany, Luxembourg, and Switzerland than in Israel, Denmark, Estonia, Spain, and Sweden. This study suggests that the age-specific number of natural teeth and the practice of tooth replacement in the over 50s differ substantially among

  9. Unique method of tooth replacement in durophagous placodont marine reptiles, with new data on the dentition of Chinese taxa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neenan, James M; Li, Chun; Rieppel, Olivier; Bernardini, Federico; Tuniz, Claudio; Muscio, Giuseppe; Scheyer, Torsten M

    2014-05-01

    The placodonts of the Triassic period (~252-201 mya) represent one of the earliest and most extreme specialisations to a durophagous diet of any known reptile group. Exceptionally enlarged crushing tooth plates on the maxilla, dentary and palatine cooperated to form functional crushing areas in the buccal cavity. However, the extreme size of these teeth, combined with the unusual way they occluded, constrained how replacement occurred. Using an extensive micro-computed tomographic dataset of 11 specimens that span all geographic regions and placodont morphotypes, tooth replacement patterns were investigated. In addition, the previously undescribed dental morphologies and formulae of Chinese taxa are described for the first time and incorporated into the analysis. Placodonts have a unique tooth replacement pattern and results follow a phylogenetic trend. The plesiomorphic Placodus species show many replacement teeth at various stages of growth, with little or no discernible pattern. On the other hand, the more derived cyamodontoids tend to have fewer replacement teeth growing at any one time, replacing teeth unilaterally and/or in functional units, thus maintaining at least one functional crushing area at all times. The highly derived placochelyids have fewer teeth and, as a result, only have one or two replacement teeth in the upper jaw. This supports previous suggestions that these taxa had an alternative diet to other placodonts. Importantly, all specimens show at least one replacement tooth growing at the most posterior palatine tooth plates, indicating increased wear at this point and thus the most efficient functional crushing area.

  10. Endodontic therapy or single tooth implant? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torabinejad, Mahmoud; Lozada, Jaime; Puterman, Israel; White, Shane N

    2008-06-01

    Should a tooth with pulpal involvement be saved through endodontic therapy, or extracted and replaced with a single tooth implant? Within the limitations of the existing literature, this systematic review of treatment outcomes found that initial endodontic treatment had a high long-term survival rate, equivalent to replacement of a missing tooth with an implant-supported restoration. Single tooth implants should be considered as the first treatment option for patients requiring extraction and tooth replacement.

  11. A 5-year prospective study of single-tooth replacements supported by the Astra Tech implant: a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotfredsen, Klaus

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Implant-supported single-tooth replacements are an increasingly used method to replace teeth, especially in young patients. Therefore, long-term validation of different treatment modalities with different implant systems is of great importance. PURPOSE: The aim of the present study wa...

  12. A 5-year prospective study of single-tooth replacements supported by the Astra Tech implant: a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotfredsen, Klaus

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Implant-supported single-tooth replacements are an increasingly used method to replace teeth, especially in young patients. Therefore, long-term validation of different treatment modalities with different implant systems is of great importance. PURPOSE: The aim of the present study...

  13. Outcome of bonded vs all-ceramic and metal- ceramic fixed prostheses for single tooth replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    The conventional treatment of a single missing tooth is most frequently based on the provision of a fixed dental prosthesis (FDPs). A variety of designs and restorative materials are available which have an impact on the treatment outcome. Consequently, it was the aim of this review to compare resin-bonded, all-ceramic and metal-ceramic FDPs based on existing evidence. An electronic literature search using "metal-ceramic" AND "fixed dental prosthesis" AND "clinical, all-ceramic" AND "fixed dental prosthesis" AND "clinical, resin-bonded" AND "fixed dental prosthesis" AND "clinical, fiber reinforced composite" AND "clinical, monolithic" AND "zirconia" AND "clinical" was conducted and supplemented by the manual searching of bibliographies from articles already included. A total of 258 relevant articles were identified. Metal-ceramic FDPs still show the highest survival rates of all tooth-supported restorations. Depending on the ceramic system used, all-ceramic restorations may reach comparable survival rates while the technical complications, i.e. chipping fractures of veneering materials in particular, are more frequent. Resin-bonded FDPs can be seen as long-term provisional restorations with the survival rate being higher in anterior locations and when a cantilever design is applied. Inlay-retained FDPs and the use of fiber-reinforced composites overall results in a compromised long-term prognosis. Recently advocated monolithic zirconia restorations bear the risk of low temperature degradation. Several variables affect treatment planning for a given patient situation, with survival and success rates of different restorative options representing only one factor. The broad variety of designs and materials available for conventional tooth-supported restorations should still be considered as a viable treatment option for single tooth replacement.

  14. SERDP-ESTCP Depot Cd/Chromate Replacement Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-18

    ESTCP SERDP Environmental Technology Development Process Office of the Deputy Under Secretary of Defense - Installations and Environment 4...SERDP-ESTCP Depot Cd/ Chromate Replacement Initiative Robin Nissan Weapons Systems and Platforms Program Manager ASETSDefense 18 November 2014...NOV 2014 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE SERDP-ESTCP Depot Cd/ Chromate Replacement Initiative 5a

  15. Tooth replacement related to number of natural teeth in a dentate adult population in Bulgaria: a cross-sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damyanov, N.D.; Witter, D.J.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study aimed to explore the relationships among tooth replacement, number of present natural teeth, and sociodemographic and behavioral factors in an adult population in Bulgaria. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Quota sampling was used to recruit 2,531 dentate subjects aged 20 years and over fro

  16. Single-tooth replacement by osseointegrated Astra Tech dental implants: a 2-year report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, U; Gotfredsen, K; Olsson, C

    1998-01-01

    This study presents the outcome of single-tooth restorations supported by Astra Tech single-tooth implants followed for 2 years. Forty-seven implants were placed in the same number of patients. Forty-three patients attended the second recall visit, and none of the evaluated implants have been...

  17. Telemedicine consulting in the patient preparation and planning of prosthetic tooth replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mladenović, Dragan; Tosić, Goran; Zivković, Dusan; Djindjić, Natasa; Mladenović, Lidija; Mladenović, Sanja; Marković, Ivana

    2013-09-01

    In the management of edentulous spaces, there is a permanent need of a dentist-prosthetician in charge to consult other specialists. Modern telemedicine, based on powerful computer and telecomunication systems, offers an adequate answer to these challenges, being able to transfer and obtain clinical data and consultation information over large distances. Using smartphone or a computer, the teleconsultant acces the system, downloads and review the data and photographs and gave suggestions. The system then enables direct, real time contact with the consultant, chat, or directs them to contact each other by phone. We presented telemedicine consulting in the patient preparation and planning of prosthetic tooth replacement in 3 cases with different teleconsultation requirements: the first case for prosthetic rehabilitation of his upper teeth, the second one for prosthetic management of his partial edentulousness and "a growth on his gums" in the vestibular region of the frontal teeth and the third one for prosthetic management of total edentulousness of her upper jaw. We used the system of telemedicine in dentistry, established at the Faculty of Medicine in Kosovska Mitrovica. The operation was based on the computer application system XPA3 Online, computer networking and mobile smartphone network. All consultations were succefull with no need for further procedures in regional center. The use of a mobile smartphone has brought about the mobility and availability of teleconsultant specialists in an extent never seen before. Prostheticians are thus able to offer better service to their patients and improve the quality of management of partially or totally edentulous patients, especially in rural areas.

  18. Telemedicine consulting in the patient preparation and planning of prosthetic tooth replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladenović Dragan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In the management of edentulous spaces, there is a permanent need of a dentist-prosthetician in charge to consult other specialists. Modern telemedicine, based on powerful computer and telecomunication systems, offers an adequate answer to these challenges, being able to transfer and obtain clinical data and consultation information over large distances. Using smartphone or a computer, the teleconsultant acces the system, downloads and review the data and photographs and gave suggestions. The system then enables direct, real time contact with the consultant, chat, or directs them to contact each other by phone. Case report. We presented telemedicine consulting in the patient preparation and planning of prosthetic tooth replacement in 3 cases with different teleconsultation requirements: the first case for prosthetic rehabilitation of his upper teeth, the second one for prosthetic management of his partial edentulousness and “a growth on his gums” in the vestibular region of the frontal teeth and the third one for prosthetic management of total edentulousness of her upper jaw. We used the system of telemedicine in dentistry, established at the Faculty of Medicine in Kosovska Mitrovica. The operation was based on the computer application system XPA3 Online, computer networking and mobile smartphone network. All consultations were succefull with no need for further procedures in regional center. Conclusion. The use of a mobile smartphone has brought about the mobility and availability of teleconsultant specialists in an extent never seen before. Prostheticians are thus able to offer better service to their patients and improve the quality of management of partially or totally edentulous patients, especially in rural areas.

  19. Aesthetic Alternative Using Composite Resin to Replace a Missing Tooth. A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuritza Hernández Núñez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Patients who experience dental trauma resulting in permanent tooth loss are often prosthetically rehabilitated through any of its variants. However, it is uncommon to rehabilitate a patient using composite resin when a tooth is lost. The case of a patient who had lost a maxillary central incisor years ago and its space had been occupied by the lateral incisor is presented. The missing tooth was built up through the enlargement of the lateral incisor using the layering technique or stratification with Brilliant New Line resin. This paper aims at demonstrating a more economical and simpler alternative for restoring the aesthetics of a patient with unfavorable prognosis.

  20. The endodontically involved tooth: treat, or extract, and replace?%牙髓病患牙:治疗,拔除,种植?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Roger J.Smales

    2010-01-01

    @@ Introduction In recent years there has been increasing discussion and controversy regarding endodontic therapy and restoration versus tooth extraction and replacement with an osseointegrated dental implant-supported single crown[1-10].

  1. Residual ridge dimensions at edentulous maxillary first molar sites and periodontal bone loss among two ethnic cohorts seeking tooth replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Aneesha; Hao, Jia; Mattheos, Nikos; Chau, Anson; Shirke, Prashant; Lang, Niklaus P

    2014-12-01

    To study residual ridge dimensions at edentulous first molar sites in relation to periodontal bone loss among cohorts of partially edentulous Asian Indian and Hong Kong Chinese subjects seeking tooth replacement. A total of 628 edentulous maxillary first molar sites were analyzed on Cone Beam Computed Tomography scans of 225 Asian Indian (I) and 232 Hong Kong Chinese (C) partially edentulous adults seeking tooth replacement. Age, ethnicity, gender, total tooth loss, the presence or absence of adjacent teeth, categories of periodontal status defined according to radiographic alveolar bone loss (P0: periodontal health, P1: incipient to moderate disease, P2: severe periodontal disease) and sinus membrane abnormalities were noted. Alveolar ridge height (RH), widths at 1 and 3 mm from crest (RW1; RW3), and relative position of the bone crest (RR) were measured. Prevalence of P2 status was most frequent in both cohorts(C: 50.4% I: 49.2%). P2 had lowest ridge heights; 13.1% C P2 and 14%I P2 had RH Sinus membrane abnormalities were most frequent in P2. Periodontal status and sinus membrane abnormality increased the odds of RH sinus membrane thickening affected available bone height in the subsinus region, while the presence of adjacent teeth- and age-affected residual ridge width. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Bio-Root and Implant-Based Restoration as a Tooth Replacement Alternative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Z H; Hu, L; Liu, G L; Wei, F L; Liu, Y; Liu, Z H; Fan, Z P; Zhang, C M; Wang, J S; Wang, S L

    2016-06-01

    We previously reported that dental stem cell-mediated bioengineered tooth root (bio-root) regeneration could restore tooth loss in a miniature pig model. As a potential new method for tooth restoration, it is essential to compare this method with the widely used commercial dental implant-based method of tooth restoration. Tooth loss models were created by extracting mandibular incisors from miniature pigs. Allogeneic periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) and dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) were isolated and cultured. A PDLSC sheet was prepared by adding 20.0 µg/mL vitamin C to the culture medium; in addition, a hydroxyapatite tricalcium phosphate (HA/TCP)/DPSC graft was fabricated and cultured in a 3-dimensional culture system. A total of 46 bio-root implantations and 9 dental implants were inserted, and crown restorations were performed 6 mo after implantation. Histological, radiological, biomechanical, and elemental analyses were used to evaluate and compare tissue-engineered bio-roots and dental implants to the natural tooth roots. After 6 mo, both computed tomography scans and histological examinations showed that root-like structures and dentin-like tissues had formed. Three months after crown restoration, clinical assessments revealed that tooth function was equivalent in the regenerated bio-root and the dental implant. Biomechanical testing showed that the bio-roots were similar to natural tooth roots in compressive strength, modulus of elasticity, and torsional force; however, these properties were significantly higher in the dental implants. Elemental analysis revealed a higher similarity in elemental composition between bio-roots and natural tooth roots than between bio-roots and dental implants. However, the dental implant success rate was 100% (9 of 9) and the bio-root success rate was only 22% (10 of 46). Taken together, we showed that an allogeneic HA/TCP/DPSC/PDLSC sheet could successfully build a bio-root with structure and function similar to

  3. Successful Reconstruction of Tooth Germ with Cell Lines Requires Coordinated Gene Expressions from the Initiation Stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Tomooka

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Tooth morphogenesis is carried out by a series of reciprocal interactions between the epithelium and mesenchyme in embryonic germs. Previously clonal dental epithelial cell (epithelium of molar tooth germ (emtg lines were established from an embryonic germ. They were odontogenic when combined with a dental mesenchymal tissue, although the odontogenesis was quantitatively imperfect. To improve the microenvironment in the germs, freshly isolated dental epithelial cells were mixed with cells of lines, and germs were reconstructed in various combinations. The results demonstrated that successful tooth construction depends on the mixing ratio, the age of dental epithelial cells and the combination with cell lines. Analyses of gene expression in these germs suggest that some signal(s from dental epithelial cells makes emtg cells competent to communicate with mesenchymal cells and the epithelial and mesenchymal compartments are able to progress  odontogenesis from the initiation stage.

  4. Randomized controlled trial to evaluate tooth stain reduction with nicotine replacement gum during a smoking cessation program

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Whelton, Helen

    2012-06-13

    AbstractBackgroundIn addition to its general and periodontal health effects smoking causes tooth staining. Smoking cessation support interventions with an added stain removal or tooth whitening effect may increase motivation to quit smoking. Oral health professionals are well placed to provide smoking cessation advice and support to patients. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of Nicorette® Freshmint Gum used in a smoking cessation programme administered in a dental setting, on extrinsic stain and tooth shade among smokers.MethodsAn evaluator-blinded, randomized, 12-week parallel-group controlled trial was conducted among 200 daily smokers motivated to quit smoking. Participants were randomised to use either the Nicorette® Freshmint Gum or Nicorette® Microtab (tablet). Tooth staining and shade were rated using the modified Lobene Stain Index and the Vita® Shade Guide at baseline, weeks 2, 6 and 12. To maintain consistency with other whitening studies, the primary end-point was the mean change in stain index between baseline and week 6. Secondary variables included changes in stain measurements and tooth shade at the other time points the number of gums or tablets used per day and throughout the trial period; and the number of cigarettes smoked per day. Treatments were compared using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), using treatment and nicotine dependence as factors and the corresponding baseline measurement as a covariate. Each comparison (modified intention-to-treat) was tested at the 0.05 level, two-sided. Within-treatment changes from baseline were compared using a paired t-test.ResultsAt week 6, the gum-group experienced a reduction in mean stain scores whilst the tablet-group experienced an increase with mean changes of -0.14 and +0.12 respectively, (p = 0.005, ANCOVA). The change in mean tooth shade scores was statistically significantly greater in the gum-group than in the tablet group at 2 (p = 0.015), 6 (p = 0

  5. Functional tooth restoration by next-generation bio-hybrid implant as a bio-hybrid artificial organ replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Masamitsu; Inoue, Kaoru; Nakajima, Kei; Tachikawa, Tetsuhiko; Yamazaki, Hiromichi; Isobe, Tomohide; Sugawara, Ayaka; Ogawa, Miho; Tanaka, Chie; Saito, Masahiro; Kasugai, Shohei; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko; Inoue, Takashi; Tezuka, Katsunari; Kuboki, Takuo; Yamaguchi, Akira; Tsuji, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Bio-hybrid artificial organs are an attractive concept to restore organ function through precise biological cooperation with surrounding tissues in vivo. However, in bio-hybrid artificial organs, an artificial organ with fibrous connective tissues, including muscles, tendons and ligaments, has not been developed. Here, we have enveloped with embryonic dental follicle tissue around a HA-coated dental implant, and transplanted into the lower first molar region of a murine tooth-loss model. We successfully developed a novel fibrous connected tooth implant using a HA-coated dental implant and dental follicle stem cells as a bio-hybrid organ. This bio-hybrid implant restored physiological functions, including bone remodelling, regeneration of severe bone-defect and responsiveness to noxious stimuli, through regeneration with periodontal tissues, such as periodontal ligament and cementum. Thus, this study represents the potential for a next-generation bio-hybrid implant for tooth loss as a future bio-hybrid artificial organ replacement therapy.

  6. A rotated palatal flap ridge preservation technique to enhance restorative and hard and soft tissue esthetics for tooth replacement in the anterior maxilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitter, Robert N

    2010-04-01

    Hard and soft tissue alveolar ridge deformities occur following the extraction of teeth, creating functional and esthetic tooth replacement challenges, especially in the maxillary anterior smile zone. A surgical technique using a rotated palatal flap for ridge preservation is discussed that, whether combined with conventional fixed dentures or implant treatment for tooth replacement, provides the possibility for greatly improved esthetics. This technique, used in combination with or in preparation for implant treatment, allows for preservation of the alveolar bone height and width for improved implant size and placement options. In addition, preservation and enhancement of the soft tissue at the extraction site provides for soft tissue contours adjacent to the definitive restoration that vary little from those of the original natural tooth. Combined with conventional fixed dentures, use of this technique creates a template of the labial and interproximal sulcus of the extracted tooth, allowing for the molding of an ovate pontic replacement tooth. This results in vastly improved restorative emergence profiles with minimal or no change in the height of the labial gingival margin and the form and height of the interproximal papillae with adjacent teeth.

  7. Influence of tooth dimension on the initial mobility based on plaster casts and X-ray images : A numerical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Martin; Dirk, Cornelius; Reimann, Susanne; Keilig, Ludger; Konermann, Anna; Jäger, Andreas; Bourauel, Christoph

    2017-07-01

    The goal was to determine the influence of different geometric parameters of the tooth on the initial tooth mobility and the position of the center of resistance employing numerical models based on scaled X-ray images and plaster casts. The dimensions of tooth 21 were measured in 21 patients, using radiographs and dental casts. Length and mesiodistal width of the tooth were obtained from the X-ray image and the orovestibular diameter from the plaster cast. Finite element models were generated. Cortical and cancellous bone and the periodontal ligament were simulated to create realistic models. Root length (11-17 mm), mesiodistal width (6-10 mm) and orovestibular thickness (7-9 mm) were varied in 1-mm steps to generate 105 models. In the simulation, each model was loaded with a force of 10 N in vestibulopalatinal direction and with a torque of 10 Nmm to determine tooth displacements and center of resistance. Initial tooth displacement and thus mobility increased with decreasing total root surface. The shortest, slimmest and thinnest tooth showed a total deflection of 0.14 mm at the incisal edge, while the longest, widest and thickest tooth showed a total deflection of 0.10 mm. Changes in mesiodistal width had the greatest influence on initial tooth mobility and changes in orovestibular thickness the least. The teeth's center of resistance was positioned between 37 and 43% of the root length measured from the cervical margin of the alveolar bone. The center of resistance of the longest dental root investigated was located around 6% more cervically compared to the one of the shortest dental root. The influence of root width and thickness on the position of the center of resistance was significantly lower than root length. Geometric parameters significantly impact initial tooth mobility and position of the center of resistance. Thus, tooth dimensions should be considered in orthodontic treatment planning. Dental radiographs represent a sufficient validation tool

  8. Digital reconstruction of the mandible of an adult Lesothosaurus diagnosticus with insight into the tooth replacement process and diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoll, Fabien; Bordy, Emese M.; de Kock, Michiel O.; Redelstorff, Ragna

    2017-01-01

    Fragmentary caudal ends of the left and right mandible assigned to Lesothosaurus diagnosticus, an early ornithischian, was recently discovered in the continental red bed succession of the upper Elliot Formation (Lower Jurassic) at Likhoele Mountain (Mafeteng District) in Lesotho. Using micro-CT scanning, this mandible could be digitally reconstructed in 3D. The replacement teeth within the better preserved (left) dentary were visualised. The computed tomography dataset suggests asynchronous tooth replacement in an individual identified as an adult on the basis of bone histology. Clear evidence for systematic wear facets created by attrition is lacking. The two most heavily worn teeth are only apically truncated. Our observations of this specimen as well as others do not support the high level of dental wear expected from the semi-arid palaeoenvironment in which Lesothosaurus diagnosticus lived. Accordingly, a facultative omnivorous lifestyle, where seasonality determined the availability, quality, and abundance of food is suggested. This would have allowed for adaptability to episodes of increased environmental stress. PMID:28265518

  9. Common developmental pathways link tooth shape to regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Gareth J; Bloomquist, Ryan F; Streelman, J Todd

    2013-05-15

    In many non-mammalian vertebrates, adult dentitions result from cyclical rounds of tooth regeneration wherein simple unicuspid teeth are replaced by more complex forms. Therefore and by contrast to mammalian models, the numerical majority of vertebrate teeth develop shape during the process of replacement. Here, we exploit the dental diversity of Lake Malawi cichlid fishes to ask how vertebrates generally replace their dentition and in turn how this process acts to influence resulting tooth morphologies. First, we used immunohistochemistry to chart organogenesis of continually replacing cichlid teeth and discovered an epithelial down-growth that initiates the replacement cycle via a labial proliferation bias. Next, we identified sets of co-expressed genes from common pathways active during de novo, lifelong tooth replacement and tooth morphogenesis. Of note, we found two distinct epithelial cell populations, expressing markers of dental competence and cell potency, which may be responsible for tooth regeneration. Related gene sets were simultaneously active in putative signaling centers associated with the differentiation of replacement teeth with complex shapes. Finally, we manipulated targeted pathways (BMP, FGF, Hh, Notch, Wnt/β-catenin) in vivo with small molecules and demonstrated dose-dependent effects on both tooth replacement and tooth shape. Our data suggest that the processes of tooth regeneration and tooth shape morphogenesis are integrated via a common set of molecular signals. This linkage has subsequently been lost or decoupled in mammalian dentitions where complex tooth shapes develop in first generation dentitions that lack the capacity for lifelong replacement. Our dissection of the molecular mechanics of vertebrate tooth replacement coupled to complex shape pinpoints aspects of odontogenesis that might be re-evolved in the lab to solve problems in regenerative dentistry.

  10. Common developmental pathways link tooth shape to regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Gareth J.; Bloomquist, Ryan F.; Streelman, J. Todd

    2013-01-01

    In many non-mammalian vertebrates, adult dentitions result from cyclical rounds of tooth regeneration wherein simple unicuspid teeth are replaced by more complex forms. Therefore and by contrast to mammalian models, the numerical majority of vertebrate teeth develop shape during the process of replacement. Here, we exploit the dental diversity of Lake Malawi cichlid fishes to ask how vertebrates generally replace their dentition and in turn how this process acts to influence resulting tooth morphologies. First, we used immunohistochemistry to chart organogenesis of continually replacing cichlid teeth and discovered an epithelial down-growth that initiates the replacement cycle via a labial proliferation bias. Next, we identified sets of co-expressed genes from common pathways active during de novo, lifelong tooth replacement and tooth morphogenesis. Of note, we found two distinct epithelial cell populations, expressing markers of dental competence and cell potency, which may be responsible for tooth regeneration. Related gene sets were simultaneously active in putative signaling centers associated with the differentiation of replacement teeth with complex shapes. Finally, we manipulated targeted pathways (BMP, FGF, Hh, Notch, Wnt/β-catenin) in vivo with small molecules and demonstrated dose-dependent effects on both tooth replacement and tooth shape. Our data suggest that the processes of tooth regeneration and tooth shape morphogenesis are integrated via a common set of molecular signals. This linkage has subsequently been lost or decoupled in mammalian dentitions where complex tooth shapes develop in first generation dentitions that lack the capacity for lifelong replacement. Our dissection of the molecular mechanics of vertebrate tooth replacement coupled to complex shape pinpoints aspects of odontogenesis that might be re-evolved in the lab to solve problems in regenerative dentistry. PMID:23422830

  11. Analysis of epithelial-mesenchymal interactions in the initial morphogenesis of the mammalian tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dassule, H R; McMahon, A P

    1998-10-15

    Epithelial-mesenchymal interactions govern the development of epidermal organs such as teeth. During the early stages of tooth development, a local ectodermal thickening which expresses several signaling molecules appears. It is believed that these in turn signal to the underlying mesenchyme triggering mesenchymal condensation and tooth development. For example, epithelially expressed Bmp4 induces Msx1 and Lef1 as well as itself in the underlying mesenchyme. In this paper we have investigated the role of four epithelial signaling molecules, Bmp2, Shh, Wnt10a, and Wnt10b, in the early inductive cascades that govern tooth development. We show that all four genes are specifically expressed in the epithelium between E11.0 and E12.0 when tooth morphogenesis is first apparent. Although Shh, Bmp2, and Wnt10b have similar, if not identical, expression patterns, each signal has a distinct molecular action on the jaw mesenchyme. Whereas Shh and Wnt10b can induce general Hedgehog and Wnt targets, Ptc and Gli for Shh and Lef1 for Wnt10b, only Bmp2 is able to induce tooth-specific expression of Msx1. Thus, there are distinct targets for all three pathways. Interestingly, both Bmp and Wnt signaling activate Lef1, making it a candidate for integrating the two distinct signaling pathways. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  12. Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Radhakrishnan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The fishmeal replaced with Spirulina platensis, Chlorella vulgaris and Azolla pinnata and the formulated diet fed to Macrobrachium rosenbergii postlarvae to assess the enhancement ability of non-enzymatic antioxidants (vitamin C and E, enzymatic antioxidants (superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase (CAT and lipid peroxidation (LPx were analysed. In the present study, the S. platensis, C. vulgaris and A. pinnata inclusion diet fed groups had significant (P < 0.05 improvement in the levels of vitamins C and E in the hepatopancreas and muscle tissue. Among all the diets, the replacement materials in 50% incorporated feed fed groups showed better performance when compared with the control group in non-enzymatic antioxidant activity. The 50% fishmeal replacement (best performance diet fed groups taken for enzymatic antioxidant study, in SOD, CAT and LPx showed no significant increases when compared with the control group. Hence, the present results revealed that the formulated feed enhanced the vitamins C and E, the result of decreased level of enzymatic antioxidants (SOD, CAT and LPx revealed that these feeds are non-toxic and do not produce any stress to postlarvae. These ingredients can be used as an alternative protein source for sustainable Macrobrachium culture.

  13. 牙仙女%The Tooth Fairy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李世荣

    2009-01-01

    @@ The American children’s ritual of hiding a lost tooth under a pillow stems from an old German tradition of placing a lost tooth in a mouse or rat hole SO that when a new tooth grew in,it would possess the strong dental qualities of a rodent’S tooth.In America the “tooth rat”was replaced by the“tooth fairy”,who would compensate the child with money for surrendering a tooth to her.

  14. Levels of matrix metalloproteinase-7 and osteopontin in human gingival crevicular fluid during initial tooth movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhaval Oswal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: During orthodontic treatment, the early response of periodontal tissues to mechanical stress involves several metabolic changes that allow tooth movement. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate osteopontin (OPN and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-7 in the gingival crevicular fluid (GCF of human teeth exposed to orthodontic force. Materials and Methods: GCF samples were obtained from 15 healthy orthodontic patients (age, 12-22 years. In each patient, the left maxillary canine having the fixed orthodontic appliance was used as the test tooth, and its antagonist, with no appliance, was the control. Orthodontic force, 75 g was applied using a 16 × 22 beta titanium closing loop. The GCF sampling on the disto-buccal aspects of experimental and control tooth was performed at specific time interval with sterilized absorbent paper point. Processing was carried out with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to detect OPN and MMP-7 levels. Results: The peak level of OPN was seen after 1 h application of orthodontic force which was 1280.36 pg/ml ± 185.02. The peak level of MMP-7 was seen at 0 h which was 598.3 pg/ml ± 107.5. The levels of OPN after 1 h increased to 1280.36 pg/ml ± 185.02, and they decreased at 24 h to 1012.86 pg/ml ± 168.47 (P = 0.001. The levels of MMP-7 after 1 h decreased to 478 pg/ml ± 99.7 which increased at 24 h to 526.9 pg/ml ± 99.2. Conclusions: Orthodontic forces affect both OPN and MMP-7 protein levels on the compression side in a time-dependent fashion.

  15. Socket seal surgery: Clinical uses in implant dentistry and guided bone regeneration procedures for single tooth replacement in the esthetic zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negri, Bruno; Zuhr, Otto; Fickl, Stefan; Ciurana, Xavier Rodríguez; Navarro Martínez, José Manuel; Blanco, Víctor Méndez

    2016-02-01

    Restoring failing anterior teeth with a dental implant is considered a complex treatment even with thorough biologic knowledge of the situation. The goal is to produce a result in which the labial soft tissues and the papillae remain stable over time. Treatment of the fresh extraction socket in the alveolar ridge presents a challenge in everyday clinical practice. Regardless of the subsequent treatment, maintenance of the ridge contour will frequently facilitate all further therapeutic steps. Socket seal surgery and socket preservation in combination with immediate, early, or delayed implant placement can be valuable procedures for single tooth replacement. However, their potential as ridge preservation techniques in these different situations still needs to be demonstrated. The use of these procedures is illustrated in three consecutive cases.

  16. Non-Metallic Biomaterials for Tooth Repair and Replacement. By Pekka Vallittu, Woodhead Publishing, 2013; 406 pages. Price £145.00/US$245.00/€175.00 ISBN 978-0-85709-244-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Kun Lin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available 1. Discusses the properties of enamel and dentin and their role in adhesive dental restoration;2. Chapters also examine the wear properties of dental ceramics, glasses and bioactive glass ceramics for tooth repair and replacement;3. Dental composites and antibacterial restorative materials are also considered;4. Provides a concise overview of non-metallic biomaterials for dental clinicians, materials scientists and academic researchers alike.As the demand for healthy, attractive teeth increases, the methods and materials employed in restorative dentistry have become progressively more advanced. Non-metallic biomaterials for tooth repair and replacement focuses on the use of biomaterials for a range of applications in tooth repair and, in particular, dental restoration.

  17. Associations of race and ethnicity with anemia management among patients initiating renal replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbord, Steven D; Fried, Linda F; Mor, Maria K; Resnick, Abby L; Kimmel, Paul L; Palevsky, Paul M; Fine, Michael J

    2007-11-01

    Many patients initiate renal replacement therapy with suboptimal anemia management. The factors contributing to this remain largely unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the associations of race and ethnicity with anemia care prior to the initiation of renal replacement therapy. Using data from the medical evidence form filed for patients who initiated renal replacement therapy between 1995-2003, we assessed racial and ethnic differences in pre-end-stage renal disease hematocrit levels, the use of erythropoiesis stimulation agents (ESAs), the proportion of patients with hematocrit levels > or = 33% and the proportion of patients with hematocrit levels or = 33% (OR = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.77-0.79) or to receive ESA if the hematocrit was or = 33% (OR = 0.91, 95% CI: 0.89-0.93) or to receive ESA if the hematocrit was < 33% (OR = 0.85, 95% CI: 0.83-0.87) than non-Hispanic whites. These disparities persisted over the eight-year study period. African-American race and Hispanic ethnicity are associated with suboptimal pre-end-stage renal disease anemia management. Efforts to improve anemia care should incorporate targeted interventions to decrease these disparities.

  18. Impact of total knee replacement practice: cost effectiveness analysis of data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferket, Bart S; Feldman, Zachary; Zhou, Jing; Oei, Edwin H; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M A; Mazumdar, Madhu

    2017-03-28

    Objectives To evaluate the impact of total knee replacement on quality of life in people with knee osteoarthritis and to estimate associated differences in lifetime costs and quality adjusted life years (QALYs) according to use by level of symptoms.Design Marginal structural modeling and cost effectiveness analysis based on lifetime predictions for total knee replacement and death from population based cohort data.Setting Data from two studies-Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI) and the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study (MOST)-within the US health system.Participants 4498 participants with or at high risk for knee osteoarthritis aged 45-79 from the OAI with no previous knee replacement (confirmed by baseline radiography) followed up for nine years. Validation cohort comprised 2907 patients from MOST with two year follow-up.Intervention Scenarios ranging from current practice, defined as total knee replacement practice as performed in the OAI (with procedural rates estimated by a prediction model), to practice limited to patients with severe symptoms to no surgery.Main outcome measures Generic (SF-12) and osteoarthritis specific quality of life measured over 96 months, model based QALYs, costs, and incremental cost effectiveness ratios over a lifetime horizon.Results In the OAI, total knee replacement showed improvements in quality of life with small absolute changes when averaged across levels of confounding variables: 1.70 (95% uncertainty interval 0.26 to 3.57) for SF-12 physical component summary (PCS); -10.69 (-13.39 to -8.01) for Western Ontario and McMaster Universities arthritis index (WOMAC); and 9.16 (6.35 to 12.49) for knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS) quality of life subscale. These improvements became larger with decreasing functional status at baseline. Provision of total knee replacement to patients with SF-12 PCS scores osteoarthritis from the MOST cohort and were robust against various scenarios including increased rates of total

  19. Tooth Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that knocked out a tooth?YesNoDo you have pain that is specific to one tooth?YesNoHave you broken or chipped a tooth, or ... room. The tooth may be saved.Start OverDiagnosisYour pain may be from a FRACTURED, CRACKED or LOOSE TOOTH.Self CareSave any pieces of the tooth, wrap ...

  20. Recommendations for initiation and cessation of enzyme replacement therapy in patients with Fabry disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biegstraaten, Marieke; Arngrímsson, Reynir; Barbey, Frederic;

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Fabry disease (FD) is a lysosomal storage disorder resulting in progressive nervous system, kidney and heart disease. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) may halt or attenuate disease progression. Since administration is burdensome and expensive, appropriate use is mandatory. We aimed...... to define European consensus recommendations for the initiation and cessation of ERT in patients with FD. METHODS: A Delphi procedure was conducted with an online survey (n = 28) and a meeting (n = 15). Patient organization representatives were present at the meeting to give their views. Recommendations...

  1. Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs prior to chronic renal replacement therapy initiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosbøl, Emil L; Kamper, Anne-Lise; Køber, Lars;

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may be associated with severe renal complications, including acute renal failure, reduced glomerular filtration rate and interstitial nephritis. Caution against NSAIDs is therefore recommended in advanced chronic kidney disease. In this study......, we examined NSAID use, aetiology and comorbidity among a national cohort of patients before the initiation of chronic renal replacement therapy (RRT). METHODS: Patients initiated on chronic RRT in the period 1997-2006 were identified in the Danish National Registry on Regular Dialysis...... and Transplantation, including etiological diagnosis. The use of NSAID before the start of RRT was studied by linkage to the National Prescription Register and comorbidity by linkage to the National Patient Registry. RESULTS: A total of 6663 patients were included in the study, and 2407 patients (36.1%) were...

  2. Impacted tooth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is not causing any problems. Over-the-counter pain relievers may help if the impacted tooth causes discomfort. Warm saltwater (one-half teaspoon or ... tooth (or partially emerged tooth) and you have pain in the gums or other symptoms. Alternative Names ... tooth; Dental impaction; Unerupted tooth References ...

  3. Initial tooth movement under extraoral force and considerations for controlled molar movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, N; Jost-Brinkmann, P G; Yamada, Y

    1995-01-01

    Initial movement of the maxillary first molars under the application of straight-pull, cervical-pull, and high-pull headgear was measured in human subjects. Facebow deflection can influence molar movement as the relationship of the force vector to the molar's center of resistance changes with an increase of force. The present study proposes using headgear with a combination of variable-pull headcap and short outer bow. A variable-pull headcap allows a great range in force direction. The direction of the headgear force system can be accurately determined using a short outer bow.

  4. Initial catch-up growth in children with hypothyroidism on thyroxine replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajitha D

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is a paucity of observational data from India on initial catch up growth in hypothyroid children started on thyroxine replacement therapy. Methods: We retrospectively studied 44 children and adolescents (32 girls with a diagnosis of primary hypothyroidism i.e., (thyrotropin > 15 µIU/mL and thyroxine < 55ng/mL. All were started on treatment with oral thyroxine. The dose was adjusted to maintain thyrotropin between 0.5-5 µIU/mL. Height was measured at baseline and at each follow-up visit and height standard deviation scores (HtSDS were calculated. We studied the therapeutic benefit of thyroxine replacement therapy on growth in the initial couple of years of treatment. Results: Dose of thyroxine required to restore euthyroidism was 4.1±2.5 µg/kg body weight. The dose fell from 9.7±2.4 µg/kg body weight in infants to 3.0±1.5 µg/kg body weight in adolescence (p<0.001. Likewise, the dose per unit body surface area also fell consistently from 207 ± 70.3 µg/m2 in infants to only 89.3±17.9 µg/m2 in adolescents (p<0.001. The initial HtSDS was 2.0±1.5 and this improved by 0.4 to final value of 1.6±1.3 (p < 0.001 after an average follow up of 14.1±2.5 months. The mean catch-up growth velocity, weighted for the duration of follow-up was 7.7 cm/year. Conclusions: The HtSDS deficit because of hypothyroidism is partially regained in the first few years after treatment.

  5. Tooth extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007630.htm Tooth extraction To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A tooth extraction is a procedure to remove a tooth from ...

  6. Phase transformations in a human tooth tissue at the initial stage of caries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Seredin

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to study phase transformations in solid tissues of the human teeth during the development of fissure caries by Raman and fluorescence microspectroscopy. The study of the areas with fissure caries confirmed the assumption of the formation of a weak interaction between phosphate apatite enamel and organic acids (products of microorganisms. The experimental results obtained with by Raman microspectroscopy showed the formation of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate - CaHPO4-2H2O in the area of mural demineralization of carious fissure. A comparative analysis of structural and spectroscopic data for the intact and carious enamel shows that emergence of a more soluble phase - carbonate-substituted hydroxyapatite - is typical for the initial stage of caries. It is shown that microareas of dental hard tissues in the carious fissure due to an emerging misorientation of apatite crystals have a higher fluorescence yield than the area of the intact enamel. These areas can be easily detected even prior to a deep demineralization (white spot stage for the case of irreversibly changed organomineral complex and intensive removal of the mineral component.

  7. Feasibility of Early-Initiated Progressive Resistance Training after Total Hip Replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Lone Ramer; Mechlenburg, Inger; Petersen, Annemette Krintel

    Background: Muscle atrophy, reduced hip muscle strength and function are documented within the first weeks after Total Hip Replacement (THR). Purpose / Aim of Study: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of early-initiated progressive resistance training (PRT) after THR...... extension, mean (sd): 28.9 (8.5), 36.3 (7.5), 39.4 (8.4), kg, p=0.02. Hip flexion, mean (sd): 32.4 (9.7), 43.8 (11.5), 53.6 (12.9), kg, p=0.001. Isometric strength in Nm/kg: Preoperative, 4 weeks postoperative, p- value (diff): Hip abduction, mean (sd): 0.86 (0.28), 0.85 (0.16) Nm/kg, p=0.94. Hip flexion......, mean (sd): 0.98 (0.26), 1.03 (0.29) Nm/kg, p=0.52. Conclusions: It seems feasible to commence PRT within the first week after THR, as hip pain remained the same or decreased, while the training load increased progressively. The included patients reached their preoperative hip-strength levels after 4...

  8. Evolution and developmental diversity of tooth regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Abigail S; Fraser, Gareth J

    2014-01-01

    This review considers the diversity observed during both the development and evolution of tooth replacement throughout the vertebrates in a phylogenetic framework from basal extant chondrichthyan fish and more derived teleost fish to mammals. We illustrate the conservation of the tooth regeneration process among vertebrate clades, where tooth regeneration refers to multiple tooth successors formed de novo for each tooth position in the jaws from a common set of retained dental progenitor cells. We discuss the conserved genetic mechanisms that might be modified to promote morphological diversity in replacement dentitions. We review current research and recent progress in this field during the last decade that have promoted our understanding of tooth diversity in an evolutionary developmental context, and show how tooth replacement and dental regeneration have impacted the evolution of the tooth-jaw module in vertebrates.

  9. Initiating heavy-atom-based phasing by multi-dimensional molecular replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bjørn Panyella; Gourdon, Pontus; Liu, Xiangyu;

    2016-01-01

    -dimensional search to test a wide spectrum of molecular-replacement parameters, such as different data sets and search models with different conformations. Results are scored by the ability to identify heavy-atom positions from anomalous difference Fourier maps. The strategy was successfully applied...... the identification of weak but correct molecular-replacement solutions with maximum contrast to prime experimental phasing efforts....

  10. A comparison of early versus late initiation of renal replacement therapy in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Our aim was to investigate the impact of early versus late initiation of renal replacement therapy (RRT) on clinical outcomes in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury (AKI). Methods: Systematic review and meta-analysis were used in this study. PUBMED, EMBASE, SCOPUS, Web...

  11. Tooth anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002214.htm Tooth anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, ... upper jawbone is called the maxilla. Images Tooth anatomy References Lingen MW. Head and neck. In: Kumar ...

  12. Practical whole-tooth restoration utilizing autologous bioengineered tooth germ transplantation in a postnatal canine model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Mitsuaki; Oshima, Masamitsu; Ogawa, Miho; Sonoyama, Wataru; Hara, Emilio Satoshi; Oida, Yasutaka; Shinkawa, Shigehiko; Nakajima, Ryu; Mine, Atsushi; Hayano, Satoru; Fukumoto, Satoshi; Kasugai, Shohei; Yamaguchi, Akira; Tsuji, Takashi; Kuboki, Takuo

    2017-01-01

    Whole-organ regeneration has great potential for the replacement of dysfunctional organs through the reconstruction of a fully functional bioengineered organ using three-dimensional cell manipulation in vitro. Recently, many basic studies of whole-tooth replacement using three-dimensional cell manipulation have been conducted in a mouse model. Further evidence of the practical application to human medicine is required to demonstrate tooth restoration by reconstructing bioengineered tooth germ using a postnatal large-animal model. Herein, we demonstrate functional tooth restoration through the autologous transplantation of bioengineered tooth germ in a postnatal canine model. The bioengineered tooth, which was reconstructed using permanent tooth germ cells, erupted into the jawbone after autologous transplantation and achieved physiological function equivalent to that of a natural tooth. This study represents a substantial advancement in whole-organ replacement therapy through the transplantation of bioengineered organ germ as a practical model for future clinical regenerative medicine. PMID:28300208

  13. Perception of discomfort during initial orthodontic tooth alignment using a self-ligating or conventional bracket system: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Paul; Sherriff, Martyn; Dibiase, Andrew T; Cobourne, Martyn T

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the degree of discomfort experienced during the period of initial orthodontic tooth movement using Damon3 self-ligating and Synthesis conventional ligating pre-adjusted bracket systems. Sixty-two subjects were recruited from two centres (32 males and 30 females; mean age 16 years, 3 months) with lower incisor irregularity between 5 and 12 mm and a prescribed extraction pattern, including lower first premolar teeth. These subjects were randomly allocated for treatment with either bracket system. Fully ligated Damon3 0.014-inch Cu NiTi archwires were used for initial alignment in both groups. Following archwire insertion, the subjects were given a prepared discomfort diary to complete over the first week, recording discomfort by means of a 100 mm visual analogue scale at 4 hours, 24 hours, 3 days, and 1 week. The subjects also noted any self-prescribed analgesics that were taken during the period of observation. Data were analysed using repeated measures analysis of variance. There were no statistically significant differences in perceived discomfort levels between the two appliances; discomfort did not differ at the first time point and did not develop differently across subsequent measurement times. Overall, this investigation found no evidence to suggest that Damon3 self-ligating brackets are associated with less discomfort than conventional pre-adjusted brackets during initial tooth alignment, regardless of age or gender.

  14. Initiating Heavy-atom Based Phasing by Multi-Dimensional Molecular Replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bjørn Panyella; Gourdon, Pontus Emanuel; Liu, Xiangyu

    2014-01-01

    approaches, which however may fail when only poorly diffracting derivative crystals are available, as often the case for e.g. membrane proteins. Here we present an approach for heavy atom site identification based on a Molecular Replacement Parameter Matrix (MRPM) search. It involves an n-dimensional search......To obtain an electron-density map from a macromolecular crystal the phase-problem needs to be solved, which often involves the use of heavy-atom derivative crystals and concomitantly the determination of the heavy atom substructure. This is customarily done by direct methods or Patterson-based...... to test a wide spectrum of molecular replacement parameters, such as clusters of different conformations. The result is scored by the ability to identify heavy-atom positions, from anomalous difference Fourier maps, that allow meaningful phases to be determined. The strategy was successfully applied...

  15. Initiating heavy-atom-based phasing by multi-dimensional molecular replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Bjørn Panyella; Gourdon, Pontus; Liu, Xiangyu; Karlsen, Jesper Lykkegaard; Nissen, Poul

    2016-03-01

    To obtain an electron-density map from a macromolecular crystal the phase problem needs to be solved, which often involves the use of heavy-atom derivative crystals and concomitant heavy-atom substructure determination. This is typically performed by dual-space methods, direct methods or Patterson-based approaches, which however may fail when only poorly diffracting derivative crystals are available. This is often the case for, for example, membrane proteins. Here, an approach for heavy-atom site identification based on a molecular-replacement parameter matrix (MRPM) is presented. It involves an n-dimensional search to test a wide spectrum of molecular-replacement parameters, such as different data sets and search models with different conformations. Results are scored by the ability to identify heavy-atom positions from anomalous difference Fourier maps. The strategy was successfully applied in the determination of a membrane-protein structure, the copper-transporting P-type ATPase CopA, when other methods had failed to determine the heavy-atom substructure. MRPM is well suited to proteins undergoing large conformational changes where multiple search models should be considered, and it enables the identification of weak but correct molecular-replacement solutions with maximum contrast to prime experimental phasing efforts.

  16. A New Replacement for the Deep Diving Submersible ALVIN: Initial Project Update and Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R.; Tivey, M. A.; Walden, B.; Detrick, R. S.

    2004-12-01

    In August 2004, the National Science Foundation (NSF) funded the first phase of a 4-year project proposed by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) to build a replacement submersible for the present human occupied vehicle (HOV) ALVIN operated by WHOI as part of the National Deep Submergence Facility. The design of the replacement HOV is the result of almost 10 years of deliberations among the scientific community and several studies including a recent 2004 National Research Council report on the "Future Needs of Deep Submergence Science". The over-riding design philosophy was to enhance capabilities and not to detract from the present ALVIN capabilities that have made it one of the premier research tools in oceanography. The replacement submersible will have a nominal depth capability of 6500 meters allowing access to over 99% of the world's ocean floor. The submersible is planned to have a sphere diameter of 2.1 m providing 27 cu. ft. of additional internal volume over the present ALVIN. A key improvement will be the viewport design with five viewports for a total 245 degree viewing area and with the forward three viewports having overlapping fields of view. This will provide an unprecedented view of the seafloor. The central pilot viewport is 7" in diameter with two forward 6" observer viewports and two lateral 5" observer viewports. The replacement vehicle will continue to operate with 1 pilot and 2 scientists inside the sphere. In order for the submersible to reach the greater depths will require increased descent and ascent rates. The new vehicle will operate with a variable water ballast system that can provide trim angles of up to +/-25 degrees to use on descent and ascent and will also enable the vehicle to stop in midwater to conduct experiments and sampling. Important design constraints are imposed by the capacity of the present ALVIN mother ship, Atlantis and the A-frame launch system. Due to these restrictions the replacement HOV will weigh 44

  17. Extent of tooth decay in the mouth and increased need for replacement of dental restorations: the New England Children's Amalgam Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trachtenberg, Felicia; Maserejian, Nancy Nairi; Tavares, Mary; Soncini, Jennifer Ann; Hayes, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between baseline caries experience and the restoration replacement rate in children. The 5-year New England Children's Amalgam Trial recruited 534 6- to 10-year-old children with 2 or more carious posterior teeth. The association between decoy and longevity of restorations was assessed. Restorations with no follow-up (N = 391) were excluded from analysis. The average follow-up was 3.0 +/- 1.6 years in 489 children. Restorations with follow-up (N = 3,604) were placed in mouths with a median of 15 dfs/DFS and 8 dft/DFT. The need for replacement increased significantly (P or = 14 dfs/DFS needed replacement, compared to 9% for 2 to 5 dfs/DFS. Comparing dft/DFT after 5 years of follow-up, there was a 23% replacement rate for > or = 12 dft/DFT compared to 10% for 2 to 3 dft/DFT. Decoy in the mouth had a greater association with the need for replacement due to new caries compared to replacement due to recurrent caries. Children with more decoy at the time of restoration placement were at higher risk for replacement of restorations.

  18. Tooth development in a scincid lizard, Chalcides viridanus (Squamata), with particular attention to enamel formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Sidney; Davit-Béal, Tiphaine; Allizard, Françoise; Sire, Jean-Yves

    2005-01-01

    Comparative analysis of tooth development in the main vertebrate lineages is needed to determine the various evolutionary routes leading to current dentition in living vertebrates. We have used light, scanning and transmission electron microscopy to study tooth morphology and the main stages of tooth development in the scincid lizard, Chalcides viridanus, viz., from late embryos to 6-year-old specimens of a laboratory-bred colony, and from early initiation stages to complete differentiation and attachment, including resorption and enamel formation. In C. viridanus, all teeth of a jaw have a similar morphology but tooth shape, size and orientation change during ontogeny, with a constant number of tooth positions. Tooth morphology changes from a simple smooth cone in the late embryo to the typical adult aspect of two cusps and several ridges via successive tooth replacement at every position. First-generation teeth are initiated by interaction between the oral epithelium and subjacent mesenchyme. The dental lamina of these teeth directly branches from the basal layer of the oral epithelium. On replacement-tooth initiation, the dental lamina spreads from the enamel organ of the previous tooth. The epithelial cell population, at the dental lamina extremity and near the bone support surface, proliferates and differentiates into the enamel organ, the inner (IDE) and outer dental epithelium being separated by stellate reticulum. IDE differentiates into ameloblasts, which produce enamel matrix components. In the region facing differentiating IDE, mesenchymal cells differentiate into dental papilla and give rise to odontoblasts, which first deposit a layer of predentin matrix. The first elements of the enamel matrix are then synthesised by ameloblasts. Matrix mineralisation starts in the upper region of the tooth (dentin then enamel). Enamel maturation begins once the enamel matrix layer is complete. Concomitantly, dental matrices are deposited towards the base of the

  19. [Management of patients with end-stage renal disease prior to initiation of renal replacement therapy in 2013 in France].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuppin, Philippe; Cuerq, Anne; Torre, Sylvie; Couchoud, Cécile; Fagot-Campagna, Anne

    2017-04-01

    This study evaluated the management of patients with end-stage renal disease prior to initiation of renal replacement therapy. Among the 51 million national health insurance general scheme beneficiaries (77% of the population), persons 18 years and older, starting dialysis or undergoing preemptive renal transplantation in 2013, were included in this study. Data were derived from the French national health insurance system (SNIIRAM). In this population of 6674 patients (median age: 68 years), 88% initiated renal replacement therapy by haemodialysis, 8% by peritoneal dialysis, and 4% by renal transplantation. During the year preceding initiation of dialysis, 76% of patients had been hospitalised with at least one diagnostic code for renal disease in 83% of cases, 16% had not received any reimbursements for serum creatinine assay and 32% had not seen a nephrologist; 87% were taking at least one antihypertensive drug (60% were taking at least a renin-angiotensin system inhibitor) and 30% were taking a combination of 4 or more classes of antihypertensive drugs. For patients initiating haemodialysis in a haemodialysis centre, 39% had undergone a procedure related to arteriovenous fistula and 10% had been admitted to an intensive care unit. This study, based on the available reimbursement data, shows that, despite frequent use of the health care system by this population, there is still room for improvement of screening and management of patients with end-stage renal disease and preparation for renal replacement therapy. Copyright © 2016 Association Société de néphrologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Decellularized Tooth Bud Scaffolds for Tooth Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W; Vazquez, B; Oreadi, D; Yelick, P C

    2017-01-01

    Whole tooth regeneration approaches currently are limited by our inability to bioengineer full-sized, living replacement teeth. Recently, decellularized organ scaffolds have shown promise for applications in regenerative medicine by providing a natural extracellular matrix environment that promotes cell attachment and tissue-specific differentiation leading to full-sized organ regeneration. We hypothesize that decellularized tooth buds (dTBs) created from unerupted porcine tooth buds (TBs) can be used to guide reseeded dental cell differentiation to form whole bioengineered teeth, thereby providing a potential off-the-shelf scaffold for whole tooth regeneration. Porcine TBs were harvested from discarded 6-mo-old pig jaws, and decellularized by successive sodium dodecyl sulfate/Triton-X cycles. Four types of replicate implants were used in this study: 1) acellular dTBs; 2) recellularized dTBs seeded with porcine dental epithelial cells, human dental pulp cells, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (recell-dTBs); 3) dTBs seeded with bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 (dTB-BMPs); and 4) freshly isolated nondecellularized natural TBs (nTBs). Replicate samples were implanted into the mandibles of host Yucatan mini-pigs and grown for 3 or 6 mo. Harvested mandibles with implanted TB constructs were fixed in formalin, decalcified, embedded in paraffin, sectioned, and analyzed via histological methods. Micro-computed tomography (CT) analysis was performed on harvested 6-mo samples prior to decalcification. All harvested constructs exhibited a high degree of cellularity. Significant production of organized dentin and enamel-like tissues was observed in dTB-recell and nTB implants, but not in dTB or dTB-BMP implants. Micro-CT analyses of 6-mo implants showed the formation of organized, bioengineered teeth of comparable size to natural teeth. To our knowledge, these results are the first to describe the potential use of dTBs for functional whole tooth regeneration.

  1. Placement of replace select Ti-Unite-coated type implants using a combination of immediate and submerge techniques after tooth extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coen Pramono D

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The high success rate of immediate implant placement both in the anterior and posterior regions were reported by many authors, therefore applying this techniques can be considered as a safe surgical procedure and minimizing the dental office visit for patient satisfaction. This paper reports the outcome of immediate placement of implants following extraction of anterior maxillary teeth. Combination technique of immediate and submerge implant placements including bone grafting procedure were used. Four implants with TiUnite surface type were placed immediately in two patients with the short-term result indicated that this technique may serve as a simple and safe procedure for immediate implant placement. It was concluded that immediate implant placement technique combined with TiUnite implant surface was successful in treating region directly after tooth extraction therefore this technique can be use as an alternative surgical method for dental implant rehabilitation.

  2. Ozone-initiated terpene reaction products in five European offices: Replacement of a floor cleaning agent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nørgaard, A.W.; Kofoed-Sørensen, V.; Mandin, C.; Ventura, G.; Mabilia, R.; Perreca, E.; Cattaneo, A.; Spinazzè, A.; Mihucz, V.G.; Szigeti, T.; De Kluizenaar, Y.; Cornelissen, H.J.M.; Trantallidi, M.; Carrer, P.; Sakellaris, I.; Bartzis, J.; Wolkoff, P.

    2014-01-01

    Cleaning agents often emit terpenes that react rapidly with ozone. These ozone-initiated reactions, which occur in the gas-phase and on surfaces, produce a host of gaseous and particulate oxygenated compounds with possible adverse health effects in the eyes and airways. Within the European Union (EU

  3. Assessment of left ventricular function after mitral valvular replacement using multidetector row computed tomography: initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Hun [Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Joo Nam [Chosun University, College of Medicine, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Sang Wan [Miraero21 Hospital, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Sang Il [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-04-15

    To assess the usefulness of cardiac MDCT for the evaluation of cardiac function and morphology of mitral valve replacement (MVR) with or without subvalvular preservation. Sixteen patients with (n = 10) or without (n = 6) subvalvular sparing and control subjects (n = 6) were evaluated using 16-slice MDCT (Sensation 16, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany). Images of MDCT were reconstructed for the evaluation of cardiac morphology and ventricular function. Patients were compared with respect to variables such as ejection fraction (EF), end-diastolic volume (EDV), and-systolic volume (ESV), and the diastolic-systolic left ventricular area ratio on a short-axis view at apical, mid-ventricular, and basal levels. The average values for cardiac function variables for control subjects and after MVR (with subvalvular preservation versus without subvalvular preservation) were, respectively, 54 {+-} 8%, 54 {+-} 7% and 44 {+-} 6%, for EF; 91 {+-} 28 ml, 108 {+-} 35 ml and 99 {+-} 33 ml for EDV; 43 {+-} 19 ml, 52 {+-} 24 ml and, 56 {+-} 21 ml for ESV. The area ratio was 2.56, 2.75, 2.09 at the apex; 2.20, 2.17, 1.56 at the mid-ventricular level; 1.90, 1.87, 1.76 at the basal level, respectively. Mid ventricular contraction for patients following subvalvular resection was significantly decreased ({rho} < 0.05). MDCT is a useful diagnostic modality for functional and morphologic evaluation of MVR.

  4. Estimating ages of white-tailed deer: Age and sex patterns of error using tooth wear-and-replacement and consistency of cementum annuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Michael D.; Storm, Daniel J.; Rolley, Robert E.; Beissel, Thomas; Richards, Bryan J.; Van Deelen, Timothy R.

    2014-01-01

    The age structure of harvested animals provides the basis for many demographic analyses. Ages of harvested white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) and other ungulates often are estimated by evaluating replacement and wear patterns of teeth, which is subjective and error-prone. Few previous studies however, examined age- and sex-specific error rates. Counting cementum annuli of incisors is an alternative, more accurate method of estimating age, but factors that influence consistency of cementum annuli counts are poorly known. We estimated age of 1,261 adult (≥1.5 yr old) white-tailed deer harvested in Wisconsin and Illinois (USA; 2005–2008) using both wear-and-replacement and cementum annuli. We compared cementum annuli with wear-and-replacement estimates to assess misclassification rates by sex and age. Wear-and-replacement for estimating ages of white-tailed deer resulted in substantial misclassification compared with cementum annuli. Age classes of females were consistently underestimated, while those of males were underestimated for younger age classes but overestimated for older age classes. Misclassification resulted in an impression of a younger age-structure than actually was the case. Additionally, we obtained paired age-estimates from cementum annuli for 295 deer. Consistency of paired cementum annuli age-estimates decreased with age, was lower in females than males, and decreased as age estimates became less certain. Our results indicated that errors in the wear-and-replacement techniques are substantial and could impact demographic analyses that use age-structure information. 

  5. Tooth abscess

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tissue swelling within the tooth. This causes a toothache . The toothache may stop if pressure is relieved. But the ... tissue. Symptoms The main symptom is a severe toothache. The pain is continuous. It does not stop. ...

  6. Test Tube Tooth: The Next Big Thing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, Mohammed; Yadav, Harsh; Sureka, Rakshit; Garg, Aarti

    2016-01-01

    Unlike some vertebrates and fishes, humans do not have the capacity for tooth regeneration after the loss of permanent teeth. Although artificial replacement with removable dentures, fixed prosthesis and implants is possible through advances in the field of prosthetic dentistry, it would be ideal to recreate a third set of natural teeth to replace lost dentition. For many years now, researchers in the field of tissue engineering have been trying to bioengineer dental tissues as well as whole teeth. In order to attain a whole tooth through dental engineering, that has the same or nearly same biological, mechanical and physical properties of a natural tooth, it’s necessary to deal with all the cells and tissues which are concerned with the formation, maintenance and repair of the tooth. In this article we review the steps involved in odontogenesis or organogenesis of a tooth and progress in the bioengineering of a whole tooth. PMID:27504430

  7. Hydration of Biodentine, Theracal LC, and a prototype tricalcium silicate-based dentin replacement material after pulp capping in entire tooth cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, Josette; Laurent, Patrick; About, Imad

    2014-11-01

    The calcium-releasing ability of pulp-capping materials induces pulp tissue regeneration. Tricalcium silicate-based materials produce calcium hydroxide as a by-product of hydration. Assessment of hydration and calcium ion leaching is usually performed on samples that have been aged in physiological solution for a predetermined period of time. The hydration and activity of the materials in vivo may not be similar to those displayed in vitro because of insufficient fluid available in contact with dentin. The aim of this research was the assessment of hydration of Biodentine, Theracal LC, and a prototype radiopacified tricalcium silicate-based material after pulp capping and to compare it with direct hydration in an aqueous solution. The extent of hydration of Biodentine, Theracal LC, and a prototype radiopacified tricalcium silicate-based material with a similar composition to Biodentine but not incorporating the additives was assessed by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy of polished specimens after being allowed to hydrate in Hank's balanced salt solution for 14 days. The extent of hydration was compared with material hydration when used as direct pulp capping materials by using a tooth culture model. Material activity was also assessed by x-ray diffraction analysis to investigate the deposition of calcium hydroxide by the materials, and calcium ion leaching in Hank's balanced salt solution was assessed by ion chromatography. Biodentine and the prototype tricalcium silicate cement hydrated and reaction by-products were deposited in the cement matrix both after pulp capping and when incubated in an aqueous solution. Calcium hydroxide was formed, and calcium ions were leached in solution. Theracal LC hydration was incomplete because of the limited moisture diffusion within the material. Thus, no calcium hydroxide was produced, and a lower calcium ion leaching was recorded. Theracal LC had a heterogeneous structure with large unhydrated

  8. Influence of tooth profile on the noncircular gear tooth contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristescu, A.; Andrei, L.; Cristescu, B.

    2017-02-01

    With noncircular gears, the continuous modification of the tooth meshing, in terms of variation of the tooth profiles and the line of action position and inclination, makes difficult the implementation of a general standard procedure for the analysis of the noncircular gears tooth contact. In this paper, the authors present a graphical approach that enables the tooth contact static pattern to be produced and evaluated in case of a noncircular gear with complex geometry of the pitch curve. The study is virtually developed, in AutoCAD environment, by animating and investigating the gear solid models in mesh. The tooth static contact analysis enables the path of contact area and distribution to be evaluated in correlation with the following variable initial data: gear pitch curve geometry, tooth profile geometry, as a consequence of different generating procedures, and the gear pressure angle. It was found out that the noncircular gear tooth contact could be improved by choosing different procedures for the tooth flank generation in concave and convex zones and by increasing the gear pressure angle.

  9. Replacement of missing anterior tooth using screw retained implant prosthesis in the esthetic zone: a case report with 3 years of follow up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Manawar; Dhanasekar, B; Aparna, I N; Naim, Hina

    2014-09-01

    As more and more dental practitioners are focusing on implant-supported fixed restorations, some clinicians favor the use of cement retained restorations while others consider screw-retained prosthesis to be the best choice. As both types of prostheses have certain advantages and disadvantages, clinicians should be aware of the limitations of each type. Screw-retained implant restorations have an advantage of predictable retention, retrievability and lack of potentially retained sub-gingival cement. However, a few disadvantages exist such as precise placement of the implant for optimal and esthetic location of the screw access hole and obtaining passive fit. On the other hand, cement retained restorations eliminates unaesthetic screw access holes; have passive fit of castings; reduce stress to splinted implants because of minor misfit of the framework; reduced complexity of lab procedures; enhanced esthetics; reduced cost factors and non disrupted morphology of the occlusal table. This case report presents the replacement of missing left central incisor using screw-retained implant prosthesis due to palatal trajectory of the implant placement and inadequate abutment height for retention of cement retained prosthesis.

  10. Early Clinical Outcome of Mitral Valve Replacement Using a Newly Designed Stentless Mitral Valve for Failure of Initial Mitral Valve Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Hidefumi; Kasegawa, Hitoshi; Kin, Hajime; Takanashi, Shuichiro

    2016-12-21

    Here we report the early outcome of mitral valve replacement using a newly designed stentless mitral valve for failure of initial mitral valve repair. Mitral valve plasty (MVP) for mitral regurgitation is currently a standard technique performed worldwide. However, whether mitral valve repair should be performed for patients with advanced leaflet damage or complicated pathology remains controversial. Mitral valve replacement might be feasible for patients who have undergone failed initial MVP; however, it is not an optimal treatment because of poor valve durability and the need for anticoagulative therapy. We report two cases of successful mitral valve replacement using a newly designed stentless mitral valve made of fresh autologous pericardium, which may have a potential benefit over mitral valve repair or mitral valve replacement with a mechanical or bioprosthetic valve.

  11. Tooth wear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tušek Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tooth wear is the loss of dental hard tissue that was not caused by decay and represents a common clinical problem of modern man. In the etiology of dental hard tissue lesions there are three dominant mechanisms that may act synergistically or separately:friction (friction, which is caused by abrasion of exogenous, or attrition of endogenous origin, chemical dissolution of dental hard tissues caused by erosion, occlusal stress created by compression and flexion and tension that leads to tooth abfraction and microfracture. Wear of tooth surfaces due to the presence of microscopic imperfections of tooth surfaces is clinically manifested as sanding veneers. Tribology, as an interdisciplinary study of the mechanisms of friction, wear and lubrication at the ultrastructural level, has defined a universal model according to which the etiopathogenesis of tooth wear is caused by the following factors: health and diseases of the digestive tract, oral hygiene, eating habits, poor oral habits, bruxism, temporomandibular disorders and iatrogenic factors. Attrition and dental erosion are much more common in children with special needs (Down syndrome. Erosion of teeth usually results from diseases of the digestive tract that lead to gastroesophageal reflux (GER of gastric juice (HCl. There are two basic approaches to the assessment of the degree of wear and dental erosion. Depending on the type of wear (erosion, attrition, abfraction, the amount of calcium that was realised during the erosive attack could be determined qualitatively and quantitatively, or changes in optical properties and hardness of enamel could be recorded, too. Abrasion of teeth (abrasio dentium is the loss of dental hard tissue caused by friction between the teeth and exogenous foreign substance. It is most commonly provoked by prosthetic dentures and bad habits, while its effect depends on the size of abrasive particles and their amount, abrasive particle hardness and hardness of tooth

  12. Cutting blade dentitions in squaliform sharks form by modification of inherited alternate tooth ordering patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Charlie; Johanson, Zerina; Smith, Moya Meredith

    2016-11-01

    The squaliform sharks represent one of the most speciose shark clades. Many adult squaliforms have blade-like teeth, either on both jaws or restricted to the lower jaw, forming a continuous, serrated blade along the jaw margin. These teeth are replaced as a single unit and successor teeth lack the alternate arrangement present in other elasmobranchs. Micro-CT scans of embryos of squaliforms and a related outgroup (Pristiophoridae) revealed that the squaliform dentition pattern represents a highly modified version of tooth replacement seen in other clades. Teeth of Squalus embryos are arranged in an alternate pattern, with successive tooth rows containing additional teeth added proximally. Asynchronous timing of tooth production along the jaw and tooth loss prior to birth cause teeth to align in oblique sets containing teeth from subsequent rows; these become parallel to the jaw margin during ontogeny, so that adult Squalus has functional tooth rows comprising obliquely stacked teeth of consecutive developmental rows. In more strongly heterodont squaliforms, initial embryonic lower teeth develop into the oblique functional sets seen in adult Squalus, with no requirement to form, and subsequently lose, teeth arranged in an initial alternate pattern.

  13. Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Tooth Engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Peng; Ling Ye; Xue-dong Zhou

    2009-01-01

    Tooth loss compromises human oral health. Although several prosthetic methods, such as artificial denture and dental implants, are clinical therapies to tooth loss problems, they are thought to have safety and usage time issues. Recently, tooth tissue engineering has attracted more and more attention. Stem cell based tissue engineering is thought to be a promising way to replace the missing tooth. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent stem cells which can differentiate into a variety of cell types. The potential MSCs for tooth regeneration mainly include stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs), adult dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), stem cells from the apical part of the papilla (SCAPs), stem cells from the dental follicle (DFSCs), periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) and bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). This review outlines the recent progress in the mesenchymal stem cells used in tooth regeneration.

  14. [Tooth regeneration--dream to reality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Song-Ling; Wang, Xue-Jiu

    2008-04-01

    Tooth or dentition missing compromises human health physically and psychiatrically. Although several prosthesis methods are used to restore tooth loss, these restorations are still non-biological methods. It is a dream for human being to regenerate a real tooth for hundreds years. There are two ways to regenerate the tooth. One is application of conventional tissue engineering techniques including seed cells and scaffold. The other is regeneration tooth using dental epithelium and dental mesenchymal cells based on the knowledge of tooth initiation and development. Marked progress has been achieved in these two ways, while there is still a long way to go. Recently a new concept has been proposed for regeneration of a biological tooth root based on tooth-related stem cells and tissue engineering technique. A biological tooth root has been regenerated in swine. It may be a valuable method for restoration of tooth loss before successful whole tooth regeneration. A latest research showed that a subpopulation in bone marrow cells can give rise to ameloblast-like cells when mixed with embryonic epithelium and reassociation with integrated mesenchyme, which may provide a new seed cell source for tooth regeneration.

  15. Whole Tooth Regeneration as a Future Dental Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Masamitsu; Tsuji, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Dental problems caused by dental caries, periodontal disease and tooth injury compromise the oral and general health issues. Current advances for the development of regenerative therapy have been influenced by our understanding of embryonic development, stem cell biology, and tissue engineering technology. Tooth regenerative therapy for tooth tissue repair and whole tooth replacement is currently expected a novel therapeutic concept with the full recovery of tooth physiological functions. Dental stem cells and cell-activating cytokines are thought to be candidate approach for tooth tissue regeneration because they have the potential to differentiate into tooth tissues in vitro and in vivo. Whole tooth replacement therapy is considered to be an attractive concept for next generation regenerative therapy as a form of bioengineered organ replacement. For realization of whole tooth regeneration, we have developed a novel three-dimensional cell manipulation method designated the "organ germ method". This method involves compartmentalisation of epithelial and mesenchymal cells at a high cell density to mimic multicellular assembly conditions and epithelial-mesenchymal interactions in organogenesis. The bioengineered tooth germ generates a structurally correct tooth in vitro, and erupted successfully with correct tooth structure when transplanted into the oral cavity. We have ectopically generated a bioengineered tooth unit composed of a mature tooth, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone, and that tooth unit was engrafted into an adult jawbone through bone integration. Bioengineered teeth were also able to perform physiological tooth functions such as mastication, periodontal ligament function and response to noxious stimuli. In this review, we describe recent findings and technologies underpinning whole tooth regenerative therapy.

  16. Time of Initiating Enzyme Replacement Therapy Affects Immune Abnormalities and Disease Severity in Patients with Gaucher Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioanou, Chidima; Plassmeyer, Matthew; Ryherd, Mark; Kozhaya, Lina; Austin, Lauren; Abidoglu, Cem; Unutmaz, Derya; Alpan, Oral; Goker-Alpan, Ozlem

    2016-01-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) patients often present with abnormalities in immune response that may be the result of alterations in cellular and/or humoral immunity. However, how the treatment and clinical features of patients impact the perturbation of their immunological status remains unclear. To address this, we assessed the immune profile of 26 GD patients who were part of an enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) study. Patients were evaluated clinically for onset of GD symptoms, duration of therapy and validated outcome measures for ERT. According to DS3 disease severity scoring system criteria, they were assigned to have mild, moderate or severe GD. Flow cytometry based immunophenotyping was performed to analyze subsets of T, B, NK, NKT and dendritic cells. GD patients showed multiple types of immune abnormalities associated to T and B lymphocytes with respect to their subpopulations as well as memory and activation markers. Skewing of CD4 and CD8 T cell numbers resulting in lower CD4/CD8 ratio and an increase in overall T cell activation were observed. A decrease in the overall B cells and an increase in NK and NKT cells were noted in the GD patients compared to controls. These immune alterations do not correlate with GD clinical type or level of biomarkers. However, subjects with persistent immune alterations, especially in B cells and DCs correlate with longer delay in initiation of ERT (ΔTX). Thus, while ERT may reverse some of these immune abnormalities, the immune cell alterations become persistent if therapy is further delayed. These findings have important implications in understanding the immune disruptions before and after treatment of GD patients. PMID:27942037

  17. Initiation time of renal replacement therapy on patients with acute kidney injury: A systematic review and meta-analysis of 8179 participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Caixia; Lv, Lin-Sheng; Huang, Hui; Guan, Jianqiang; Ye, Zengchun; Li, Shaomin; Wang, Yanni; Lou, Tanqi; Liu, Xun

    2017-01-01

    The early initiation of renal replacement therapy has been recommended for patients with acute renal failure by some studies, but its effects on mortality and renal recovery are unknown. We conducted an updated meta-analysis to provide quantitative evaluations of the association between the early initiation of renal replacement therapy and mortality for patients with acute kidney injury. After applying inclusion/exclusion criteria, 51 studies, including 10 randomized controlled trials, with a total of 8179 patients were analyzed. Analysis of the included trials showed that patients receiving early renal replacement therapy had a 25% reduction in all-cause mortality compared to those receiving late renal replacement therapy (risk ratio [RR] 0.75, 95% CI [0.69, 0.82]). We also noted a 30% increase in renal recovery (RR 1.30, 95% CI [1.07, 1.56]), a reduction in hospitalization of 5.84 days (mean difference [MD], 95% CI [-10.27, -1.41]) and a reduction in the duration of mechanical ventilation of 2.33 days (MD, 95% CI [-3.40, -1.26]) in patients assigned to early renal replacement therapy. The early initiation of renal replacement therapy was associated with a decreased risk of all-cause mortality compared with the late initiation of RRT in patients with acute kidney injury. These findings should be interpreted with caution given the heterogeneity between studies. Further studies are needed to identify the causes of mortality and to assess whether mortality differs by dialysis dose.

  18. Dental Caries (Tooth Decay)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find Data by Topic > Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Main Content Dental caries (tooth decay) remains the most prevalent chronic ... important source of information on oral health and dental care in the United States since the early ...

  19. Seal Out Tooth Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Decay (Caries) > Seal Out Tooth Decay Seal Out Tooth Decay Main Content What are dental sealants? How are ... fix decayed teeth. Back to Top What causes tooth decay? Germs in the mouth use the sugar in ...

  20. Comparison of radiographic joint space width and magnetic resonance imaging for prediction of knee replacement: A longitudinal case-control study from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckstein, Felix; Wirth, Wolfgang; Cotofana, Sebastian [Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg and Nuremberg Austria and Chondrometrics GmbH, Institute of Anatomy, Ainring (Germany); Boudreau, Robert [University of Pittsburgh, Department of Epidemiology, Graduate School of Public Health, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Wang, Zhijie; Hannon, Michael J. [University of Pittsburgh and Pittsburgh VAHS, Division of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Duryea, Jeff [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Guermazi, Ali [Boston University School of Medicine and Boston Imaging Core Lab (BICL), LLC, Boston, MA (United States); Roemer, Frank [Boston University School of Medicine and Boston Imaging Core Lab (BICL), LLC, Boston, MA (United States); University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Radiology, Erlangen (Germany); Nevitt, Michael [OAI Coordinating Ctr., UCSF, San Francisco, CA (United States); John, Markus R. [Novartis Pharma AG, Basel (Switzerland); Ladel, Christoph [Merck KGaA, Darmstadt (Germany); Sharma, Leena [Northwestern University, Department of Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Hunter, David J. [University Sydney, Royal North Shore Hospital and Institute of Bone and Joint Research, Kolling Institute, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Kwoh, C.K. [University of Arizona, Division of Rheumatology and the University of Arizona Arthritis Center, Tucson, AZ (United States); Collaboration: OAI Investigators

    2016-06-15

    To evaluate whether change in fixed-location measures of radiographic joint space width (JSW) and cartilage thickness by MRI predict knee replacement. Knees replaced between 36 and 60 months' follow-up in the Osteoarthritis Initiative were each matched with one control by age, sex and radiographic status. Radiographic JSW was determined from fixed flexion radiographs and subregional femorotibial cartilage thickness from 3 T MRI. Changes between the annual visit before replacement (T{sub 0}) and 2 years before T{sub 0} (T{sub -2}) were compared using conditional logistic regression. One hundred and nineteen knees from 102 participants (55.5 % women; age 64.2 ± 8.7 [mean ± SD] years) were studied. Fixed-location JSW change at 22.5 % from medial to lateral differed more between replaced and control knees (case-control [cc] OR = 1.57; 95 % CI: 1.23-2.01) than minimum medial JSW change (ccOR = 1.38; 95 % CI: 1.11-1.71). Medial femorotibial cartilage loss displayed discrimination similar to minimum JSW, and central tibial cartilage loss similar to fixed-location JSW. Location-independent thinning and thickening scores were elevated prior to knee replacement. Discrimination of structural progression between knee pre-placement cases versus controls was stronger for fixed-location than minimum radiographic JSW. MRI displayed similar discrimination to radiography and suggested greater simultaneous cartilage thickening and loss prior to knee replacement. (orig.)

  1. Predictive value of semi-quantitative MRI-based scoring systems for future knee replacement: data from the osteoarthritis initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hafezi-Nejad, Nima; Eng, John; Demehri, Shadpour [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Musculoskeletal Radiology, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Zikria, Bashir [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Baltimore, MD (United States); Carrino, John A. [Hospital for Special Surgery, Department of Radiology and Imaging, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-11-15

    To evaluate, in a confirmatory fashion, whether baseline and change from baseline to 24-month follow-up in cartilage damage, bone marrow lesions and meniscal damage are predictors of knee replacement (KR) in subjects with a high risk of osteoarthritis (OA), independent of the level of physical activity, symptom severity and radiographic abnormalities. Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative's (OAI) baseline and 24-month follow-up knee MRIs of 115 patients (age range: 45-78 years; 48 % female; BMI: 20.9-48.7) were analyzed. Cartilage, bone marrow and menisci were semi-quantitatively scored according to the Whole-Organ Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score (WORMS) and Boston-Leeds Osteoarthritis Knee Score (BLOKS) systems in all compartments. Baseline and 24-month interval changes in structural tissue damage assessed by BLOKS and WORMS were used as predictors of KR independent of clinical and radiographic parameters using Cox hazard analysis. Adjustments were performed for age, gender, BMI and physical activity (Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly: PASE), Western Ontario and McMaster Questionnaire (WOMAC) total score and radiographic Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) score. BLOKS and WORMS baseline cartilage scores were predictors of KR independent of the PASE, WOMAC and KL score. One score increase in the average baseline BLOKS full-thickness cartilage defect score was associated with a [hazard ratio (95 % CI)] 13.55 (3.61-50.89) times greater risk of KR independent of the PASE, WOMAC and KL score. Net reclassification improvements (NRIs) of the additional evaluation of 24-month follow-up MRI scores and assessment of changes were not significant for prediction of KR (NRI range: - 7.23 - 24.8 %). The BLOKS cartilage score for full-thickness cartilage defects had the highest hazard for KR. Follow-up MRI changes in structural tissue damage, detected by BLOKS and WORMS cartilage, bone marrow or meniscus scores (up to 24 months) had no significant predictive value in addition

  2. OMERACT/OARSI initiative to define states of severity and indication for joint replacement in hip and knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gossec, Laure; Hawker, Gillian; Davis, Aileen M

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Time to theoretical indication of joint replacement surgery has been proposed as a primary outcome for potential structure-modifying interventions for osteoarthritis (OA). The objectives of this OMERACT/OARSI Working Group were to identify pain, physical function, and structure states ...

  3. The effect of timing of the first kidney transplantation on survival in children initiating renal replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Anneke; Stel, Vianda S; Geskus, Ronald B;

    2012-01-01

    Controversy exists concerning the timing of the first kidney transplantation for children who need to start renal replacement therapy (RRT). Our aim was to estimate the effect of timing of the first transplantation on patient survival in children, for the first time also taking into account...

  4. Conversions from anatomic shoulder replacements to reverse total shoulder arthroplasty: do the indications for initial surgery influence the clinical outcome after revision surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holschen, Malte; Franetzki, Bastian; Witt, Kai-Axel; Liem, Dennis; Steinbeck, Jörn

    2017-02-01

    The most frequent indications for anatomic shoulder replacement are glenohumeral osteoarthritis and fractures of the humeral head. If anatomic shoulder prostheses fail, reverse total shoulder arthroplasty is often the only remaining treatment option. This study evaluates the influence of indications for primary shoulder arthroplasty on the clinical outcome after conversion to reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. From 2010 to 2012, 44 failed shoulder arthroplasties were converted to reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. Forty-four patients were available for follow-up after a mean of 24 months (14-36 months). Twenty-three of them had received an initial shoulder replacement because of osteoarthritis, while the remaining 21 patients had been treated for a fracture of the humeral head. At follow-up, patients were assessed with X-rays, constant-, and ASES scores. The total number of observed complications was higher in patients revised because of failed fracture arthroplasty (24 vs. 9%). Patients initially treated for osteoarthritis achieved a higher ASES score (71 vs. 59 points; p = 0.048). The normalized constant score was not different between the two observed groups (osteoarthritis 73% vs. fracture 67%: p = 0.45). Complications occurred more often in patients who had initially suffered from a fracture of the humeral head (fracture 23.8% vs. osteoarthritis 8.7%). Scapular notching was more frequent after initial fracture arthroplasty (33 vs. 14%). Indications for initial shoulder replacement have an influence on the clinical outcome after conversion to reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. Patients initially treated for a fracture of the humeral head have a lower subjective outcome and a higher complication rate in comparison with patients initially treated for osteoarthritis. IV (Retrospective study).

  5. Tooth engineering: searching for dental mesenchymal cells sources.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laetitia eKeller

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The implantation of cultured re-associations between embryonic dental mesenchymal cells and epithelial cells from mouse molars at ED14 allowed making full teeth with crown, root, periodontal ligament fibers and bone. Although representing valuable tools to set up methodologies embryonic cells are not easily available. This work thus aimed to replace the embryonic cells by dental mesenchymal cell lines or cultured expanded embryonic cells, and to test their ability to mediate tooth development in vitro when re-associated with a competent dental epithelium. Histology, immunostaining and RT-PCR allowed getting complementary sets of results. Two different immortalized cell lines from ED18 dental mesenchyme failed in mediating tooth formation. The potentialities of embryonic dental mesenchymal cells decreased from ED14 to ED16 and were lost at ED18. This is likely related to a change in the mesenchymal cell phenotype and/or populations during development. Attempts to cultivate ED14 or ED16 embryonic dental mesenchymal cells prior to re-association led to the loss of their ability to support tooth development. This was accompanied by a down-regulation of Fgf3 transcription. Supplementation of the culture medium with FGF2 allowed restoring Fgf3 expression, but not the ability of mesenchymal cells to engage in tooth formation. Altogether, these observations suggest that a competent cell population exists in the dental mesenchyme at ED14, progressively decreases during development, and cannot as such be maintained in vitro. This study evidenced the need for specific conditions to maintain the ability of dental mesenchymal cells to initiate whole tooth formation, when re-associated with an odontogenic epithelium. Efforts to improve the culture conditions will have to be combined with attempts to characterize the competent cells within the dental mesenchyme.

  6. Initial non-opioid based anesthesia in a parturient having severe aortic stenosis undergoing cesarean section with aortic valve replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subrata Podder

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy in presence of severe aortic stenosis (AS causes worsening of symptoms needing further intervention. In the advanced stages of pregnancy, some patients may even require aortic valve replacement (AVR and cesarean delivery in the same sitting. Opioid based general anesthesia for combined lower segment cesarean section (LSCS with AVR has been described. However, the use of opioid may lead to fetal morbidity and need of respiratory support for the baby. We describe successful anesthetic management for LSCS with AVR in a >33 week gravida with severe AS and congestive heart failure. We avoided opioids till delivery of the baby AVR; the delivered neonate showed a normal APGAR score.

  7. Transaortic aortic valve replacement using the Edwards Sapien-XT Valve and the Medtronic CoreValve: initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spargias, Konstantinos; Bouboulis, Nikolaos; Halapas, Antonios; Chrissoheris, Michael; Skardoutsos, Spyridon; Nikolaou, Joulia; Tsolakis, Apostolos; Mourmouris, Christos; Pattakos, Stratis

    2014-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is now an established treatment for certain patients with severe aortic valve stenosis (AS). However, as the number of patients screened for TAVR increases, many are found to have absolutely no option for peripheral artery access. Transaortic valve replacement (TAoVR) has been proposed as a new alternative route in patients deemed unsuitable for conventional approaches. We present our first series of TAoVR cases using the Edwards Sapien-XT and the Medtronic CoreValve prostheses. Twenty-five (25) symptomatic patients (mean age 78 ± 8 years, mean logistic EuroSCORE I 25 ± 11%) with severe AS underwent TAoVR using the Sapien-XT valve (10 patients) or the CoreValve (15 patients). The mean fluoroscopy time was 15.6 ± 4.2 minutes, the mean time in the intensive care unit was 1.9 ± 1.0 days, and the mean hospital stay was 6.4 ± 1.6 days. The mean effective aortic valve area increased (from 0.68 ± 0.15 cm(2) to 1.82 ± 0.34 cm(2), pMedtronic CoreValve prosthesis demonstrated that it could be performed safely, resulting in substantial acute echocardiographic and early clinical improvement.

  8. Immediate Esthetic Rehabilitation of Periodontally Compromised Anterior Tooth Using Natural Tooth as Pontic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Pavan Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For patients who require removal of anterior teeth and their replacement various treatment modalities are available. With advancement in technology and availability of glass/polyethylene fibres, use of natural tooth as pontic with fibre reinforced composite restorations offers the promising results. The present case report describes management of periodontally compromised mandibular anterior tooth using natural tooth pontic with fibre reinforcement. A 1-year follow-up showed that the bridge was intact with good esthetics and no problem was reported.

  9. Cavities/Tooth Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavities/tooth decay Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Cavities are permanently damaged areas in the hard surface of your teeth ... into tiny openings or holes. Cavities, also called tooth decay or caries, are caused by a combination of ...

  10. Application of model of incremental haemodialysis, based on residual renal function, at the initiation of renal replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José L. Merino

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Incremental HD treatment, with twice-weekly HD, may be an alternative in selected patients. This approach can largely preserve residual renal function at least for the first year. Although this pattern probably is not applicable to all patients starting RRT, it can and should be an initial alternative to consider.

  11. Intracranial supernumerary tooth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjoeberg, S.; Loerinc, P.

    1984-12-01

    Case report of an accidentally diagnosed supernumerary tooth in the superior orbital fissure. Computed tomography (CT) contributed with a more precise localization of the tooth being situated between the orbit and the brain. CT also showed that there was no cyst or other pathological process around the supernumerary tooth, which is plausible and frequently reported in the literature.

  12. Tooth sensitivity and whitening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Edward J

    2005-09-01

    This article presents a review of the basic concepts of tooth sensitivity and how those concepts apply to cervical dentin hypersensitivity and the sensitivity frequently associated with tooth whitening. The etiology and treatment of cervical dentin hypersensitivity are described. The clinical presentation, incidence, and predisposing factors for sensitivity associated with tooth whitening also are discussed.

  13. Improvement in Total Joint Replacement Quality Metrics: Year One Versus Year Three of the Bundled Payments for Care Improvement Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dundon, John M; Bosco, Joseph; Slover, James; Yu, Stephen; Sayeed, Yousuf; Iorio, Richard

    2016-12-07

    In January 2013, a large, tertiary, urban academic medical center began participation in the Bundled Payments for Care Improvement (BPCI) initiative for total joint arthroplasty, a program implemented by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) in 2011. Medicare Severity-Diagnosis Related Groups (MS-DRGs) 469 and 470 were included. We participated in BPCI Model 2, by which an episode of care includes the inpatient and all post-acute care costs through 90 days following discharge. The goal for this initiative is to improve patient care and quality through a patient-centered approach with increased care coordination supported through payment innovation. Length of stay (LOS), readmissions, discharge disposition, and cost per episode of care were analyzed for year 3 compared with year 1 of the initiative. Multiple programs were implemented after the first year to improve performance metrics: a surgeon-directed preoperative risk-factor optimization program, enhanced care coordination and home services, a change in venous thromboembolic disease (VTED) prophylaxis to a risk-stratified protocol, infection-prevention measures, a continued emphasis on discharge to home rather than to an inpatient facility, and a quality-dependent gain-sharing program among surgeons. There were 721 Medicare primary total joint arthroplasty patients in year 1 and 785 in year 3; their data were compared. The average hospital LOS decreased from 3.58 to 2.96 days. The rate of discharge to an inpatient facility decreased from 44% to 28%. The 30-day all-cause readmission rate decreased from 7% to 5%; the 60-day all-cause readmission rate decreased from 11% to 6%; and the 90-day all-cause readmission rate decreased from 13% to 8%. The average 90-day cost per episode decreased by 20%. Mid-term results from the implementation of Medicare BPCI Model 2 for primary total joint arthroplasty demonstrated decreased LOS, decreased discharges to inpatient facilities, decreased readmissions, and

  14. Parameters affecting tooth loss during periodontal maintenance in a Greek population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsami, Alexandra; Pepelassi, Eudoxie; Kodovazenitis, George; Komboli, Mado

    2009-09-01

    Investigators have evaluated predictive parameters of tooth loss during the maintenance phase (MP). The authors conducted a retrospective study to evaluate the rate of tooth loss and to explore the parameters that affect tooth loss during MP in a Greek population. A periodontist administered periodontal treatment and maintenance care to 280 participants with severe periodontitis for a mean period +/- standard deviation of 10.84 +/- 2.13 years. The periodontist recorded the following parameters for each participant: oral hygiene index level, simplified gingival index level, clinical attachment level, probing depth measurements, initial tooth prognosis, smoking status, tooth loss during active periodontal treatment and MP, and compliance with suggested maintenance visits. The authors found that total tooth loss during active treatment (n = 1,427) was greater than during MP (n = 918) and was associated with the initial tooth prognosis, tooth type group, participants' compliance with suggested maintenance visits, smoking status and acceptability of the quality of tooth restorations. Most of the teeth extracted during maintenance had an initial guarded prognosis (n = 612). Participants whose compliance was erratic had a greater risk of undergoing tooth extraction than did participants whose compliance was complete. Participants' initial tooth prognosis, tooth type, compliance with suggested maintenance visits and smoking status affected tooth loss during MP. Initial guarded prognosis and erratic compliance increased the risk of undergoing tooth extraction during maintenance. Determining predictive parameters for disease progression and tooth loss provides critical information to clinicians so that they can develop and implement rational treatment planning.

  15. Using multidetector-row CT in neonates with complex congenital heart disease to replace diagnostic cardiac catheterization for anatomical investigation: initial experiences in technical and clinical feasibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tain; Tsai, I.C.; Chen, Min-Chi [Taichung Veterans General Hospital, 407 Department of Radiology, Taichung (Taiwan); Medical College of Chung Shan Medical University, Faculty of Medicine, Taichung (Taiwan); National Yang Ming University School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Taipei (Taiwan); Fu, Yun-Ching; Jan, Sheng-Lin [Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Taichung (Taiwan); National Yang-Ming University, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Taipei (Taiwan); Wang, Chung-Chi; Chang, Yen [Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Section of Cardiovascular Surgery, Department of Surgery, Taichung (Taiwan)

    2006-12-15

    Echocardiography is the first-line modality for the investigation of neonatal congenital heart disease. Diagnostic cardiac catheterization, which has a small but recognized risk, is usually performed if echocardiography fails to provide a confident evaluation of the lesions. To verify the technical and clinical feasibilities of replacing diagnostic cardiac catheterization with multidetector-row CT (MDCT) in neonatal complex congenital heart disease. Over a 1-year period we prospectively enrolled all neonates with complex congenital heart disease referred for diagnostic cardiac catheterization after initial assessment by echocardiography. MDCT was performed using a 40-detector-row CT scanner with dual syringe injection. A multidisciplinary congenital heart disease team evaluated the MDCT images and decided if further diagnostic cardiac catheterization was necessary. The accuracy of MDCT in detecting separate cardiovascular anomalies and bolus geometry of contrast enhancement were calculated. A total of 14 neonates were included in the study. No further diagnostic cardiac catheterization was needed in any neonate. The accuracy of MDCT in diagnosing separate cardiovascular anomalies was 98% (53/54) with only one atrial septal defect missed in a patient with coarctation syndrome. The average cardiovascular enhancement in evaluated chambers was 471 HU. No obvious beam-hardening artefact was observed. The technical and clinical feasibility of MDCT in complex congenital heart disease in neonates is confirmed. After initial assessment with echocardiography, MDCT could probably replace diagnostic cardiac catheterization for further anatomical clarification in neonates. (orig.)

  16. Thyroid function in children with growth hormone (GH deficiency during the initial phase of GH replacement therapy - clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smyczynska Joanna

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Normal thyroid hormone secretion or appropriate L-thyroxine (L-T4 substitution is necessary for the optimal effect of the growth hormone (GH administration on growth rate. The decrease of free thyroxine (FT4 levels at recombinant human GH (rhGH therapy onset has been reported in several studies. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of rhGH administration on thyrotropin (TSH and FT4 serum concentrations in children with GH deficiency (GHD during the 1st year of therapy, as well as to assess potential indications to thyroid hormone supplementation in them. Patients and methods The analysis involved data of 75 children (59 boys, 16 girls with disorders of GH secretion (GHD, neurosecretory dysfunction - NSD and partial GH inactivity (inactGH, who were treated with rhGH for - at least - one year. In all the children, body height and height velocity (HV were assessed before and after 1 year of therapy, while TSH, FT4, IGF-I and IGFBP-3 before treatment and after 3-6 months and 1 year of treatment. In the patients, who revealed hypothyroidism (HypoT, an appropriate L-T4 substitution was introduced immediately. The incidence of HypoT, occurring during the initial phase of rhGH therapy, was assessed, as well as its influence on the therapy effectiveness. Results Before rhGH substitution, there were no significant differences in either auxological indices or TSH and FT4 secretion, or IGF-I concentration and its bioavailability among the groups of patients. During the initial 3-6 months of rhGH administration, a significant decrease of FT4 serum concentration, together with a significant increase of IGF-I SDS and IGF-I/IGFBP-3 molar ratio was observed in all the studied groups. In 17 children, HypoT was diagnosed and L-T4 substitution was administered. Despite similar IGF-I secretion increase, the improvement of HV presented significantly lower in children with HypoT than in those who remained euthyroid all the time

  17. Tissue Interactions Regulating Tooth Development and Renewal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balic, Anamaria; Thesleff, Irma

    2015-01-01

    Reciprocal interactions between epithelial and mesenchymal tissues play a fundamental role in the morphogenesis of teeth and regulate all aspects of tooth development. Extensive studies on mouse tooth development over the past 25 years have uncovered the molecular details of the signaling networks mediating these interactions (reviewed by Jussila & Thesleff, 2012; Lan, Jia, & Jiang, 2014). Five conserved signaling pathways, namely, the Wnt, BMP, FGF, Shh, and Eda, are involved in the mediation of the successive reciprocal epithelial-mesenchymal cross talk which follows the general principle of morphogenetic interactions (Davidson, 1993). The pathways regulate the expression of transcription factors which confer the identity of dental epithelium and mesenchyme. The signals and transcription factors are integrated in complex signaling networks whose fine-tuning allows the generation of the variation in tooth morphologies. In this review, we describe the principles and molecular mechanisms of the epithelial-mesenchymal interactions regulating successive stages of tooth formation: (i) the initiation of tooth development, with special reference to the shift of tooth-forming potential from epithelium to mesenchyme; (ii) the morphogenesis of the tooth crown, focusing on the roles of epithelial signaling centers; (iii) the differentiation of odontoblasts and ameloblasts, which produce dentin and enamel, respectively; and (iv) the maintenance of dental stem cells, which support the continuous growth of teeth. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Nasal tooth: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Si Hyun; Kim, Ji Hye; Hwang, Hee Young; Yang, Dal Mo; Kim, Hyung Sik; Park, Chol Heui [Gachon Medical School, Inchon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-12-01

    Ectopic tooth is not uncommon and usually occurs in the palate and maxillary sinus. We report a case of ectopic tooth located in the nasal cavity, a rare site. The mass depicted by CT was highly attenuated, and central lucency was observed.

  19. To Tell the Tooth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... To Tell the Tooth Print and Take a Quiz + Watch Videos Dudley and Friends Sesame Street + For Preteens Healthy Habits Nutrition Be a Dentist + For Educators Career Resources Presentations and Resources Smile Smarts Dental Health Curriculum MouthHealthy Kids > Games and Quizzes > To Tell the Tooth To Tell ...

  20. Exceptionally prolonged tooth formation in elasmosaurid plesiosaurians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kear, Benjamin P.; Larsson, Dennis; Lindgren, Johan; Kundrát, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Elasmosaurid plesiosaurians were globally prolific marine reptiles that dominated the Mesozoic seas for over 70 million years. Their iconic body-plan incorporated an exceedingly long neck and small skull equipped with prominent intermeshing ‘fangs’. How this bizarre dental apparatus was employed in feeding is uncertain, but fossilized gut contents indicate a diverse diet of small pelagic vertebrates, cephalopods and epifaunal benthos. Here we report the first plesiosaurian tooth formation rates as a mechanism for servicing the functional dentition. Multiple dentine thin sections were taken through isolated elasmosaurid teeth from the Upper Cretaceous of Sweden. These specimens revealed an average of 950 daily incremental lines of von Ebner, and infer a remarkably protracted tooth formation cycle of about 2–3 years–other polyphyodont amniotes normally take ~1–2 years to form their teeth. Such delayed odontogenesis might reflect differences in crown length and function within an originally uneven tooth array. Indeed, slower replacement periodicity has been found to distinguish larger caniniform teeth in macrophagous pliosaurid plesiosaurians. However, the archetypal sauropterygian dental replacement system likely also imposed constraints via segregation of the developing tooth germs within discrete bony crypts; these partly resorbed to allow maturation of the replacement teeth within the primary alveoli after displacement of the functional crowns. Prolonged dental formation has otherwise been linked to tooth robustness and adaption for vigorous food processing. Conversely, elasmosaurids possessed narrow crowns with an elongate profile that denotes structural fragility. Their apparent predilection for easily subdued prey could thus have minimized this potential for damage, and was perhaps coupled with selective feeding strategies that ecologically optimized elasmosaurids towards more delicate middle trophic level aquatic predation. PMID:28241059

  1. Tooth reorientation affects tooth function during prey processing and tooth ontogeny in the lesser electric ray, Narcine brasiliensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Mason N; Ramsay, Jason B; Schaefer, Justin T

    2008-01-01

    The dental anatomy of elasmobranch fishes (sharks, rays and relatives) creates a functional system that is more dynamic than that of mammalian dentition. Continuous dental replacement (where new teeth are moved rostrally to replace older ones) and indirect fibrous attachment of the dentition to the jaw allow teeth to reorient relative to the jaw over both long- and short-term scales, respectively. In this study, we examine the processing behavior and dental anatomy of the lesser electric ray Narcine brasiliensis (Olfers, 1831) to illustrate that the freedom of movement of elasmobranch dentition allows a functional flexibility that can be important for complex prey processing behaviors. From static manipulations of dissected jaws and observations of feeding events in live animals, we show that the teeth rotate during jaw protrusion, resulting in a secondary grasping mechanism that likely serves to hold prey while the buccal cavity is flushed free of sediment. The function of teeth is not always readily apparent from morphology; in addition to short-term reorientation, the long-term dental reorientation during replacement allows a given tooth to serve multiple functions during tooth ontogeny. Unlike teeth inside the mouth, the cusps of external teeth (on the portion of the tooth pad that extends past the occlusal plane) lay flat, such that the labial faces act as a functional battering surface, protecting the jaws during prey excavation.

  2. Tooth whitening today.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrett, David C

    2002-11-01

    Methods to improve the esthetics of the dentition by tooth whitening are of interest to dentists, their patients and the public. In the past 20 years, research on bleaching and other methods of removing tooth discolorations has dramatically increased. Dentist-supervised and over-the-counter products now are available to solve a variety of tooth discoloration problems without restorative intervention. The indications for appropriate use of tooth-whitening methods and products are dependent on correct diagnosis of the discoloration. Tooth-whitening methods include the use of peroxide bleaching agents to remove internal discolorations or abrasive products to remove external stains. Peroxide bleaching procedures are completed by the dentist in single or multiple appointments, or by the patient over a period of weeks to months using custom trays loaded with a bleaching agent. Both methods are safe and effective when supervised by the dentist. Microabrasion is indicated for the removal of isolated discolorations that often are associated with fluorosis. Whitening toothpastes remove surface stains only through the polishing effect of the abrasives they contain. Tooth whitening is a form of dental treatment and should be completed as part of a comprehensive treatment plan developed by a dentist after an oral examination. When used appropriately, tooth-whitening methods are safe and effective.

  3. The development and validation of a multivariable model to predict whether patients referred for total knee replacement are suitable surgical candidates at the time of initial consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchill, Laura; Malian, Samuel J; Chesworth, Bert M; Bryant, Dianne; MacDonald, Steven J; Marsh, Jacquelyn D; Giffin, J Robert

    2016-12-01

    In previous studies, 50%-70% of patients referred to orthopedic surgeons for total knee replacement (TKR) were not surgical candidates at the time of initial assessment. The purpose of our study was to identify and cross-validate patient self-reported predictors of suitability for TKR and to determine the clinical utility of a predictive model to guide the timing and appropriateness of referral to a surgeon. We assessed pre-consultation patient data as well as the surgeon's findings and post-consultation recommendations. We used multivariate logistic regression to detect self-reported items that could identify suitable surgical candidates. Patients' willingness to undergo surgery, higher rating of pain, greater physical function, previous intra-articular injections and patient age were the factors predictive of patients being offered and electing to undergo TKR. The application of the model developed in our study would effectively reduce the proportion of nonsurgical referrals by 25%, while identifying the vast majority of surgical candidates (> 90%). Using patient-reported information, we can correctly predict the outcome of specialist consultation for TKR in 70% of cases. To reduce long waits for first consultation with a surgeon, it may be possible to use these items to educate and guide referring clinicians and patients to understand when specialist consultation is the next step in managing the patient with severe osteoarthritis of the knee.

  4. Gingival Papillae Contour after Implant-supported Single-Tooth Replacements%单枚后牙种植修复体龈乳头形态及其变化的临床分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王国世; 李韶伟; 蔡露

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To observe the gingival papillae contour and its variation after posterior single-tooth implantsupported restoration. Methods: 20 single-tooth implant-supported restorations which were followed-up for more than 3 months were retrospectively evaluated. Data related with the height of gingival papillae, the papilla index score (PIS),and questionnaire of the patient's satisfaction were obtained. Analysis of data were performed with SAS 9.13 software. P< 0.01 was considered high significant. Results: 19 implants showed osseointegration. In the 35 observed gingival papillae, the mesial and distal papillae index score was at levels 3 in 11, at levels 2 in 19, at levels 1 in 5.Questionnaire of the patient' s satisfaction degree was 89.47%. The heights of gingival papillae measured immediately after restoration, at the end of 1-month and 3-month respectively revealed significant differences (P<0.01). Conclusion: The heights of gingival papillae supported by a single implant restoration grows to the top at the end of three months when final crown prosthesos were done.%目的:通过分析单枚后牙种植修复体龈乳头形态及变化,探讨其与种植修复体牙龈美学有关的相关因素.方法:选择20枚后牙种植修复体,通过修复后不同时期的临床检查、根尖片、研究模型、患者满意度调查等方法.得到种植修复体龈乳头高度、牙龈乳头指数(papilla index score,PIS)和患者满意度数据,并进行统计分析.结果:随访到的19枚种植体均形成良好的骨结合,所观察的35个龈乳头中,根据Jemt的PIS分级,11个龈乳头为Ⅲ级,19个龈乳头为Ⅱ级,5个龈乳头为I级.龈乳头高度在修复完成后即刻、修复后1个月、修复后3个月的3次测量中逐次增大.使用SAS 9.13软件进行统计分析,其差异有高度统计学意义(P<0.01).在患者满意度问卷调查中.满意率达89.47%.结论:单枚后牙种植修复体的龈乳头高度在冠修复完成后的3

  5. Ankle replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankle arthroplasty - total; Total ankle arthroplasty; Endoprosthetic ankle replacement; Ankle surgery ... You may not be able to have a total ankle replacement if you have had ankle joint infections in ...

  6. Knee Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knee replacement is surgery for people with severe knee damage. Knee replacement can relieve pain and allow you to ... Your doctor may recommend it if you have knee pain and medicine and other treatments are not ...

  7. Overview of Tooth Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Abbreviations Weights & Measures ENGLISH View Professional English Deutsch Japanese Espaniol Find information on medical topics, symptoms, drugs, ... Abnormal tooth enamel may be due to a diet containing insufficient vitamin D, as in rickets . Abnormal ...

  8. Tooth in oropharynx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Nagarajappa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of ectopic teeth has increased. In many cases, the etiology of ectopic teeth cannot be identified. Ectopic tooth in deciduous dentition period is very rare and information is limited about its causes and characteristics. The conditions commonly associated with an increased prevalence of ectopic teeth include cleft lip and palate, cleidocranial dysplasia, and Gardner syndrome. The diagnosis is made by the clinical and radiological examinations. The indication for extraction in ectopic teeth cases is in general determined by the presence of symptomatology, or by the need for preventing future complications. We present a case of an ectopic maxillary tooth in a 4 year-old boy. In addition, this report also addresses a young patient with a tooth in the oropharynx with the objective of non traumatic etiology, and such a clinical presentation is extremely rare. The authors believe the case presented here is the first documented case of an ectopic supernumerary tooth seen in the oropharynx.

  9. Tooth in oropharynx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajappa, D; Manjunatha, Bs

    2011-09-01

    The incidence of ectopic teeth has increased. In many cases, the etiology of ectopic teeth cannot be identified. Ectopic tooth in deciduous dentition period is very rare and information is limited about its causes and characteristics. The conditions commonly associated with an increased prevalence of ectopic teeth include cleft lip and palate, cleidocranial dysplasia, and Gardner syndrome. The diagnosis is made by the clinical and radiological examinations. The indication for extraction in ectopic teeth cases is in general determined by the presence of symptomatology, or by the need for preventing future complications. We present a case of an ectopic maxillary tooth in a 4 year-old boy. In addition, this report also addresses a young patient with a tooth in the oropharynx with the objective of non traumatic etiology, and such a clinical presentation is extremely rare. The authors believe the case presented here is the first documented case of an ectopic supernumerary tooth seen in the oropharynx.

  10. Developing a biomimetic tooth bud model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Elizabeth E; Zhang, Weibo; Schiele, Nathan R; Khademhosseini, Ali; Kuo, Catherine K; Yelick, Pamela C

    2017-01-08

    A long-term goal is to bioengineer, fully functional, living teeth for regenerative medicine and dentistry applications. Biologically based replacement teeth would avoid insufficiencies of the currently used dental implants. Using natural tooth development as a guide, a model was fabricated using post-natal porcine dental epithelial (pDE), porcine dental mesenchymal (pDM) progenitor cells, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) encapsulated within gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) hydrogels. Previous publications have shown that post-natal DE and DM cells seeded onto synthetic scaffolds exhibited mineralized tooth crowns composed of dentin and enamel. However, these tooth structures were small and formed within the pores of the scaffolds. The present study shows that dental cell-encapsulated GelMA constructs can support mineralized dental tissue formation of predictable size and shape. Individually encapsulated pDE or pDM cell GelMA constructs were analysed to identify formulas that supported pDE and pDM cell attachment, spreading, metabolic activity, and neo-vasculature formation with co-seeded endothelial cells (HUVECs). GelMa constructs consisting of pDE-HUVECS in 3% GelMA and pDM-HUVECs within 5% GelMA supported dental cell differentiation and vascular mineralized dental tissue formation in vivo. These studies are the first to demonstrate the use of GelMA hydrogels to support the formation of post-natal dental progenitor cell-derived mineralized and functionally vascularized tissues of specified size and shape. These results introduce a novel three-dimensional biomimetic tooth bud model for eventual bioengineered tooth replacement teeth in humans. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Long term use of analgesics and risk of osteoarthritis progressions and knee replacement: propensity score matched cohort analysis of data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafezi-Nejad, N; Guermazi, A; Roemer, F W; Eng, J; Zikria, B; Demehri, S

    2016-04-01

    To determine the association between the long-term use of analgesics and progression of osteoarthritis (OA) as evidenced by up to 3-years follow-up worsening of radiographic Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) grade and incidence of knee replacement (KR). Using nearest neighbor matching of the propensity scores with caliper in the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI) cohort, 173 index (Analgesic +) and 173 referent (Analgesic -) subjects were included. Analgesic + and - subjects had analgesics in all and none of their visits, respectively. Analgesic + and - subjects were balanced in their demographics, baseline, first, second and third year body mass index (BMI), Western Ontario and McMaster (WOMAC) total score, Physical and Mental health summary scales (SF-12), Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly (PASE) and Charleston Comorbidity Scale. Analgesic + and - subjects were also matched for baseline radiographic KL grade. Interval increase in the KL grade and incidence of KR were defined as the outcome. Included subjects had average 6.5 years of follow-up. By the third year, 44 subjects had an interval increase in the KL grade; 29 in Analgesic + and 15 among Analgesic - subjects (P = 0.024). By the eighth-year, 41 subjects had their first KR; 29 in Analgesic + and 12 among Analgesic - subjects (P = 0.005). Hazard Ratio (HR) of OA progression and KR for Analgesic + subjects was 1.91 (1.02-3.57) and 2.57 (1.31-5.04), respectively. Long-term use of analgesics may be associated with radiographic progression of knee OA and increased risk of future KR. Copyright © 2015 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Sonic hedgehog expression during early tooth development in Suncus murinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyado, Mami; Ogi, Hidenao; Yamada, Gen; Kitoh, Junzo; Jogahara, Takamichi; Oda, Sen-Ichi; Sato, Iwao; Miyado, Kenji; Sunohara, Masataka

    2007-11-16

    Tooth development is a highly organized process characterized by reciprocal interactions between epithelium and mesenchyme. However, the expression patterns and functions of molecules involved in mouse tooth development are unclear from the viewpoint of explaining human dental malformations and anomalies. Here, we show the expression of sonic hedgehog (Shh), a potent initiator of morphogenesis, during the early stages of tooth development in Suncus murinus. Initially, symmetrical, elongated expression of suncus Shh (sShh) was observed in the thin layer of dental epithelial cells along the mesial-distal axis of both jaws. As the dental epithelium continued to develop, sShh was strictly restricted to the predicted leading parts of the growing, invaginating epithelium corresponding to tooth primordia and enamel knots. We propose that some aspects of Shh function in tooth development are widely conserved in mammalian phylogeny.

  13. Autogenous wisdom tooth transplantation: A case series with 6-9 months follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Nimcenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tooth transplantation can be considered a valid and predictable treatment option for rehabilitating young patients with permanent teeth loss. This study presents several cases of successful autogenous tooth transplantation with a 6-9 months follow-up. Tooth auto-transplantation can be considered a reasonable option for replacing missing teeth when a donor tooth is available. The auto-transplantation of a right mandibular third molar with compromised function and esthetics to replace the residual roots resulting from coronal destruction due to extensive carious lesion of the second molar in the same quadrant as shown in the presented cases can result a viable treatment alternative especially in a young patient that cannot undergo dental implant therapy. Transplantation of mature third molar seems to be a promising method for replacing a lost permanent molar tooth and restoring esthetics and function. This clinical procedure showed excellent functional and esthetical long-term results in the analyzed cases.

  14. Autogenous wisdom tooth transplantation: A case series with 6-9 months follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimčenko, Tatjana; Omerca, Gražvydas; Bramanti, Ennio; Cervino, Gabriele; Laino, Luigi; Cicciù, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Tooth transplantation can be considered a valid and predictable treatment option for rehabilitating young patients with permanent teeth loss. This study presents several cases of successful autogenous tooth transplantation with a 6-9 months follow-up. Tooth auto-transplantation can be considered a reasonable option for replacing missing teeth when a donor tooth is available. The auto-transplantation of a right mandibular third molar with compromised function and esthetics to replace the residual roots resulting from coronal destruction due to extensive carious lesion of the second molar in the same quadrant as shown in the presented cases can result a viable treatment alternative especially in a young patient that cannot undergo dental implant therapy. Transplantation of mature third molar seems to be a promising method for replacing a lost permanent molar tooth and restoring esthetics and function. This clinical procedure showed excellent functional and esthetical long-term results in the analyzed cases. PMID:25540668

  15. Morphological and Functional Parameters in Patients with Tooth Wear before and after Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Sierpinska, Teresa; Kuc, Joanna; Golebiewska, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Advanced tooth wear often results in lost vertical dimension and impacts facial aesthetics. Complex restorative treatment can replace the lost tooth structure and improve functional occlusal and facial skeleton parameters. Purpose: The aim of the study is to assess changes in the morphological and functional occlusal parameters of the facial skeleton after prosthetic rehabilitation that increased lost occlusal vertical dimension. Material and Methodology: 50 patients with advanced tooth wear ...

  16. Evaluation of scaffold materials for tooth tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohara, Takayuki; Itaya, Toshimitsu; Usami, Kazutada; Ando, Yusuke; Sakurai, Hiroya; Honda, Masaki J; Ueda, Minoru; Kagami, Hideaki

    2010-09-01

    Recently, the possibility of tooth tissue engineering has been reported. Although there are a number of available materials, information about scaffolds for tooth tissue engineering is still limited. To improve the manageability of tooth tissue engineering, the effect of scaffolds on in vivo tooth regeneration was evaluated. Collagen and fibrin were selected for this study based on the biocompatibility to dental papilla-derived cells and the results were compared with those of polyglycolic acid (PGA) fiber and beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP) porous block, which are commonly used for tooth, dentin and bone tissue engineering. Isolated porcine tooth germ-derived cells were seeded onto one of those scaffolds and transplanted to the back of nude mice. Tooth bud-like structures were observed more frequently in collagen and fibrin gels than on PGA or beta-TCP, while the amount of hard tissue formation was less. The results showed that collagen and fibrin gel support the initial regeneration process of tooth buds possibly due to their ability to support the growth of epithelial and mesenchymal cells. On the other hand, maturation of tooth buds was difficult in fibrin and collagen gels, which may require other factors.

  17. OARSI/OMERACT initiative to define states of severity and indication for joint replacement in hip and knee osteoarthritis. An OMERACT 10 Special Interest Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gossec, Laure; Paternotte, Simon; Bingham, Clifton O;

    2011-01-01

    To define pain and physical function cutpoints that would, coupled with structural severity, define a surrogate measure of "need for joint replacement surgery," for use as an outcome measure for potential structure-modifying interventions for osteoarthritis (OA)....

  18. The Molecular Circuit Regulating Tooth Development in Crocodilians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, S; Abdelhamid, A; Khan, M K; Elkarargy, A; Widelitz, R B; Chuong, C M; Wu, P

    2016-12-01

    Alligators have robust regenerative potential for tooth renewal. In contrast, extant mammals can either renew their teeth once (diphyodont dentition, as found in humans) or not at all (monophyodont dentition, present in mice). Previously, the authors used multiple mitotic labeling to map putative stem cells in alligator dental laminae, which contain quiescent odontogenic progenitors. The authors demonstrated that alligator tooth cycle initiation is related to β-catenin/Wnt pathway activity in the dental lamina bulge. However, the molecular circuitry underlying the developmental progression of polyphyodont teeth remains elusive. Here, the authors used transcriptomic analyses to examine the additional molecular pathways related to the process of alligator tooth development. The authors collected juvenile alligator dental laminae at different developmental stages and performed RNA-seq. This data shows that Wnt, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), and fibroblast growth factor (FGF) pathways are activated at the transition from pre-initiation stage (bud) to initiation stage (cap). Intriguingly, the activation of Wnt ligands, receptors and co-activators accompanies the inactivation of Wnt antagonists. In addition, the authors identified the molecular circuitry at different stages of tooth development. The authors conclude that multiple pathways are associated with specific stages of tooth development in the alligator. This data shows that Wnt pathway activation may play the most important role in the initiation of tooth development. This result may offer insight into ways to modulate the genetic controls involved in mammalian tooth renewal. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2016.

  19. Replacement of missing teeth in a southern region of Vietnam--a descriptive dental laboratory study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chau, T.N.; Witter, D.J.; Kreulen, C.M.; Creugers, N.H.J.; Tu, H.H.

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To explore whether tooth replacement in a southern region of Vietnam is in line with the primary health care approach, aiming at health services for all people at affordable costs. METHODS: Tooth replacement was investigated by means of prostheses as delivered by four dental laboratories of whi

  20. Biomaterial selection for tooth regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhenglin; Nie, Hemin; Wang, Shuang; Lee, Chang Hun; Li, Ang; Fu, Susan Y; Zhou, Hong; Chen, Lili; Mao, Jeremy J

    2011-10-01

    Biomaterials are native or synthetic polymers that act as carriers for drug delivery or scaffolds for tissue regeneration. When implanted in vivo, biomaterials should be nontoxic and exert intended functions. For tooth regeneration, biomaterials have primarily served as a scaffold for (1) transplanted stem cells and/or (2) recruitment of endogenous stem cells. This article critically synthesizes our knowledge of biomaterial use in tooth regeneration, including the selection of native and/or synthetic polymers, three-dimensional scaffold fabrication, stem cell transplantation, and stem cell homing. A tooth is a complex biological organ. Tooth loss represents the most common organ failure. Tooth regeneration encompasses not only regrowth of an entire tooth as an organ, but also biological restoration of individual components of the tooth including enamel, dentin, cementum, or dental pulp. Regeneration of tooth root represents perhaps more near-term opportunities than the regeneration of the whole tooth. In the adult, a tooth owes its biological vitality, arguably more, to the root than the crown. Biomaterials are indispensible for the regeneration of tooth root, tooth crown, dental pulp, or an entire tooth.

  1. Varanoid Tooth Eruption and Implantation Modes in a Late Cretaceous Mosasaur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min eLiu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Erupting teeth are some of the oldest witnesses of developmental processes in the vertebrate fossil record and provide an important resource for vertebrate cladistics. Here we have examined a mosasaur jaw fragment from central Texas using ultrathin ground section histology and 3D tomographic imaging to assess features critical for the cladistic placement of mosasaurs among varanoids versus snakes: (i the orientation of replacement teeth compared to the major tooth axis, (ii the occurrence of resorption pits, and (iii the mode of tooth implantation/attachment to the tooth bearing element. The replacement tooth studied here developed in an inclined position slightly distal of the deciduous parent tooth, similar to another varanoid squamate, the Gila monster Heloderma suspectum. Ground sections and tomographs also demonstrated that the replacement tooth attachment apparatus was entirely intact and that there was no evidence of mechanical deformation. Sections and tomographs further illustrated that the replacement tooth was located within a bony crypt and the inclination of the crypt matched the inclination of the replacement tooth. These preparations also revealed the presence of a resorption pit within the boundaries of the deciduous tooth that surrounded the developing replacement tooth. This finding suggests that developing mosasaur teeth developed within the walls of resorption pits similar to varanoid tooth germs and unlike developing snake teeth which are surrounded by fibrous connective tissue integuments. Finally, mosasaurs featured pseudo-thecodont tooth implantation with teeth anchored within a socket of mineralized tissue by means of a mineralized periodontal ligament. Together, these data indicate that the moderate inclination of the erupting mosasaur tooth studied here is neither a result of postmortem displacement nor a character representative of snakes, but rather a shared character between Mosasaurs and other varanoids such as

  2. Patient-related predictors of implant failure after primary total hip replacement in the initial, short- and long-terms. A nationwide Danish follow-up study including 36,984 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, S.P.; Sørensen, H.T.; Lucht, Ulf

    2006-01-01

    We examined the association between patient-related factors and the risk of initial, short- and long-term implant failure after primary total hip replacement. We used data from the Danish Hip Arthroplasty Registry between 1 January 1995 and 31 December 2002, which gave us a total of 36 984 patients....... Separate analyses were carried out for three follow-up periods: 0 to 30 days, 31 days to six months (short term), and six months to 8.6 years after primary total hip replacement (long term). The outcome measure was defined as time to failure, which included re-operation with open surgery for any reason...

  3. Tooth regeneration: Current status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dadu Shifali

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Regeneration of a functional tooth has the potential to be a promising therapeutic strategy. Experiments have shown that with the use of principles of bioengineering along with adult stem cells, scaffold material, and signaling molecules, tooth regeneration is possible. Research work is in progress on creating a viable bioroot with all its support. A new culture needs to be created that can possibly provide all the nutrients to the stem cells. With the ongoing research, tissue engineering is likely to revolutionize dental health and well-being of people by regenerating teeth over the next decade.

  4. Tooth regeneration: current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadu, Shifali S

    2009-01-01

    Regeneration of a functional tooth has the potential to be a promising therapeutic strategy. Experiments have shown that with the use of principles of bioengineering along with adult stem cells, scaffold material, and signaling molecules, tooth regeneration is possible. Research work is in progress on creating a viable bioroot with all its support. A new culture needs to be created that can possibly provide all the nutrients to the stem cells. With the ongoing research, tissue engineering is likely to revolutionize dental health and well-being of people by regenerating teeth over the next decade.

  5. Directed Replacement

    CERN Document Server

    Karttunen, L

    1996-01-01

    This paper introduces to the finite-state calculus a family of directed replace operators. In contrast to the simple replace expression, UPPER -> LOWER, defined in Karttunen (ACL-95), the new directed version, UPPER @-> LOWER, yields an unambiguous transducer if the lower language consists of a single string. It transduces the input string from left to right, making only the longest possible replacement at each point. A new type of replacement expression, UPPER @-> PREFIX ... SUFFIX, yields a transducer that inserts text around strings that are instances of UPPER. The symbol ... denotes the matching part of the input which itself remains unchanged. PREFIX and SUFFIX are regular expressions describing the insertions. Expressions of the type UPPER @-> PREFIX ... SUFFIX may be used to compose a deterministic parser for a ``local grammar'' in the sense of Gross (1989). Other useful applications of directed replacement include tokenization and filtering of text streams.

  6. Immediate natural tooth pontic: A viable yet temporary prosthetic solution: A patient reported outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhir Bhandari

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: The concept of immediate pontic placement is surely a viable treatment option and promises an excellent transient esthetic solution for a lost tooth as well as enables good preparation of the extraction site for future prosthetic replacement.

  7. Atypical Odontalgia (Phantom Tooth Pain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Odontalgia Atypical odontalgia, also known as atypical facial pain, phantom tooth pain, or neuropathic orofacial pain, is characterized by chronic pain in a tooth or teeth, or in a site where teeth ...

  8. Tooth development in Ambystoma mexicanum: phosphatase activities, calcium accumulation and cell proliferation in the tooth-forming tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wistuba, Joachim; Ehmcke, Jens; Clemen, Günter

    2003-06-01

    Prerequisites of tooth formation, cell proliferation in the tooth-forming tissues, calcium accumulation and the enzymatic activities of alkaline (ALP) and acid phosphatases (ACP) were investigated by immunohistochemical and histochemical methods in various developmental stages of the Mexican Axolotl, Ambystoma mexicanum. During the growth of replacement teeth, the tooth-forming tissues continually recruit cells from the surrounding regions. The basal layer of the oral epithelium, the dental lamina and sometimes even the outer enamel epithelium provide cells for the differentiated inner enamel epithelium, in which the active ameloblasts are localized. The differentiating odontoblasts are derived from proliferating cells situated basally to the replacement teeth in the mesenchymal tissue. When differentiation has started and the cells have become functional, proliferative activity can no longer be observed. Calcium is accumulated close to the site of mineralization in the inner enamel epithelium and in the odontoblasts as it is in mammals, elasmobranchii and teleostei. The activities of ACP and ALP related to the mineralization of the replacement teeth are separated spatially and not sequentially as they are in mammals. However, the results indicate a similar function of these enzymatic components in relation to tooth formation and maturation of mineral deposition. Most of the substantial processes related to tooth formation reported from other vertebrates occur in a manner similar to that in Ambystoma mexicanum, but there also seem to be basic mechanisms present that are realised in a unique way in this urodele.

  9. Roles of Bmp4 during tooth morphogenesis and sequential tooth formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Shihai; Zhou, Jing; Gao, Yang; Baek, Jin-A; Martin, James F.; Lan, Yu; Jiang, Rulang

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that Bmp4 is a key Msx1-dependent mesenchymal odontogenic signal for driving tooth morphogenesis through the bud-to-cap transition. Whereas all tooth germs were arrested at the bud stage in Msx1–/– mice, we show that depleting functional Bmp4 mRNAs in the tooth mesenchyme, through neural crest-specific gene inactivation in Bmp4f/f;Wnt1Cre mice, caused mandibular molar developmental arrest at the bud stage but allowed maxillary molars and incisors to develop to mineralized teeth. We found that expression of Osr2, which encodes a zinc finger protein that antagonizes Msx1-mediated activation of odontogenic mesenchyme, was significantly upregulated in the molar tooth mesenchyme in Bmp4f/f;Wnt1Cre embryos. Msx1 heterozygosity enhanced maxillary molar developmental defects whereas Osr2 heterozygosity partially rescued mandibular first molar morphogenesis in Bmp4f/f;Wnt1Cre mice. Moreover, in contrast to complete lack of supernumerary tooth initiation in Msx1–/–Osr2–/– mice, Osr2–/–Bmp4f/f;Wnt1Cre compound mutant mice exhibited formation and subsequent arrest of supernumerary tooth germs that correlated with downregulation of Msx1 expression in the tooth mesenchyme. In addition, we found that the Wnt inhibitors Dkk2 and Wif1 were much more abundantly expressed in the mandibular than maxillary molar mesenchyme in wild-type embryos and that Dkk2 expression was significantly upregulated in the molar mesenchyme in Bmp4f/f;Wnt1Cre embryos, which correlated with the dramatic differences in maxillary and mandibular molar phenotypes in Bmp4f/f;Wnt1Cre mice. Together, these data indicate that Bmp4 signaling suppresses tooth developmental inhibitors in the tooth mesenchyme, including Dkk2 and Osr2, and synergizes with Msx1 to activate mesenchymal odontogenic potential for tooth morphogenesis and sequential tooth formation. PMID:23250216

  10. Incidence of Complications During Initial Experience with Revision of the Agility and Agility LP Total Ankle Replacement Systems: A Single Surgeon's Learning Curve Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roukis, Thomas S; Simonson, Devin C

    2015-10-01

    As the frequency in which foot and ankle surgeons are performing primary total ankle replacement (TAR) continues to build, revision TAR will likely become more commonplace, creating a need for an established benchmark by which to evaluate the safety of revision TAR as determined by the incidence of complications. Currently, no published data exist on the incidence of intraoperative and early postoperative complications during revision of the Agility or Agility LP Total Ankle Replacement Systems during the surgeon learning curve period; therefore, the authors sought to determine this incidence during the senior author's learning curve period.

  11. The Rachitic Tooth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nociti, Francisco H.; Somerman, Martha J.

    2014-01-01

    Teeth are mineralized organs composed of three unique hard tissues, enamel, dentin, and cementum, and supported by the surrounding alveolar bone. Although odontogenesis differs from osteogenesis in several respects, tooth mineralization is susceptible to similar developmental failures as bone. Here we discuss conditions fitting under the umbrella of rickets, which traditionally referred to skeletal disease associated with vitamin D deficiency but has been more recently expanded to include newly identified factors involved in endocrine regulation of vitamin D, phosphate, and calcium, including phosphate-regulating endopeptidase homolog, X-linked, fibroblast growth factor 23, and dentin matrix protein 1. Systemic mineral metabolism intersects with local regulation of mineralization, and factors including tissue nonspecific alkaline phosphatase are necessary for proper mineralization, where rickets can result from loss of activity of tissue nonspecific alkaline phosphatase. Individuals suffering from rickets often bear the additional burden of a defective dentition, and transgenic mouse models have aided in understanding the nature and mechanisms involved in tooth defects, which may or may not parallel rachitic bone defects. This report reviews dental effects of the range of rachitic disorders, including discussion of etiologies of hereditary forms of rickets, a survey of resulting bone and tooth mineralization disorders, and a discussion of mechanisms, known and hypothesized, involved in the observed dental pathologies. Descriptions of human pathology are augmented by analysis of transgenic mouse models, and new interpretations are brought to bear on questions of how teeth are affected under conditions of rickets. In short, the rachitic tooth will be revealed. PMID:23939820

  12. Pneumomediastinum after Tooth Extraction

    OpenAIRE

    Ilhan Ocakcioglu; Serhat Koyuncu; Mustafa Kupeli; Oguzhan Bol

    2016-01-01

    Pneumomediastinum is defined as the presence of air in mediastinum. Pneumomediastinum can sometimes occur after surgery. Pneumomediastinum seen after dental procedures is rare. We presented the case of subcutaneous emphysema developed in the neck and upper chest after tooth extraction and discussed the possible mechanisms of pneumomediastinum.

  13. A 10-Year Prospective Study of Single Tooth Implants Placed in the Anterior Maxilla

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotfredsen, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    in this study. Ten implants were placed with an early placement protocol, that is, 4 weeks after tooth extraction, whereas the other 10 implants were placed with a conventional delayed placement protocol, for example, 12 weeks after tooth extraction. At the baseline and at the annual re-examinations, pain from......Purpose: The aim of the study was to evaluate the biological and technical outcomes of early and delayed placed single tooth implants after 10 years of follow-up. Materials and Methods: Twenty consecutive patients who needed a single tooth replacement in the anterior maxilla were included...

  14. 3D Simulation Modeling of the Tooth Wear Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ning; Hu, Jian; Liu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Severe tooth wear is the most common non-caries dental disease, and it can seriously affect oral health. Studying the tooth wear process is time-consuming and difficult, and technological tools are frequently lacking. This paper presents a novel method of digital simulation modeling that represents a new way to study tooth wear. First, a feature extraction algorithm is used to obtain anatomical feature points of the tooth without attrition. Second, after the alignment of non-attrition areas, the initial homogeneous surface is generated by means of the RBF (Radial Basic Function) implicit surface and then deformed to the final homogeneous by the contraction and bounding algorithm. Finally, the method of bilinear interpolation based on Laplacian coordinates between tooth with attrition and without attrition is used to inversely reconstruct the sequence of changes of the 3D tooth morphology during gradual tooth wear process. This method can also be used to generate a process simulation of nonlinear tooth wear by means of fitting an attrition curve to the statistical data of attrition index in a certain region. The effectiveness and efficiency of the attrition simulation algorithm are verified through experimental simulation.

  15. 3D Simulation Modeling of the Tooth Wear Process.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Dai

    Full Text Available Severe tooth wear is the most common non-caries dental disease, and it can seriously affect oral health. Studying the tooth wear process is time-consuming and difficult, and technological tools are frequently lacking. This paper presents a novel method of digital simulation modeling that represents a new way to study tooth wear. First, a feature extraction algorithm is used to obtain anatomical feature points of the tooth without attrition. Second, after the alignment of non-attrition areas, the initial homogeneous surface is generated by means of the RBF (Radial Basic Function implicit surface and then deformed to the final homogeneous by the contraction and bounding algorithm. Finally, the method of bilinear interpolation based on Laplacian coordinates between tooth with attrition and without attrition is used to inversely reconstruct the sequence of changes of the 3D tooth morphology during gradual tooth wear process. This method can also be used to generate a process simulation of nonlinear tooth wear by means of fitting an attrition curve to the statistical data of attrition index in a certain region. The effectiveness and efficiency of the attrition simulation algorithm are verified through experimental simulation.

  16. Knee Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... need knee replacement surgery usually have problems walking, climbing stairs, and getting in and out of chairs. Some ... a total living space on one floor since climbing stairs can be difficult. Install safety bars or a ...

  17. Replacing penalties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitaly Stepashin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available УДК 343.24The subject. The article deals with the problem of the use of "substitute" penalties.The purpose of the article is to identify criminal and legal criteria for: selecting the replacement punishment; proportionality replacement leave punishment to others (the formalization of replacement; actually increasing the punishment (worsening of legal situation of the convicted.Methodology.The author uses the method of analysis and synthesis, formal legal method.Results. Replacing the punishment more severe as a result of malicious evasion from serving accused designated penalty requires the optimization of the following areas: 1 the selection of a substitute punishment; 2 replacement of proportionality is serving a sentence other (formalization of replacement; 3 ensuring the actual toughening penalties (deterioration of the legal status of the convict. It is important that the first two requirements pro-vide savings of repression in the implementation of the replacement of one form of punishment to others.Replacement of punishment on their own do not have any specifics. However, it is necessary to compare them with the contents of the punishment, which the convict from serving maliciously evaded. First, substitute the punishment should assume a more significant range of restrictions and deprivation of certain rights of the convict. Second, the perfor-mance characteristics of order substitute the punishment should assume guarantee imple-mentation of the new measures.With regard to replacing all forms of punishment are set significant limitations in the application that, in some cases, eliminates the possibility of replacement of the sentence, from serving where there has been willful evasion, a stricter measure of state coercion. It is important in the context of the topic and the possibility of a sentence of imprisonment as a substitute punishment in cases where the original purpose of the strict measures excluded. It is noteworthy that the

  18. Single-tooth replacement in the anterior arch with a cantilevered IPS e.max press fixed-partial dentures for aged patients: 6 years follow-up%e.Max全瓷贴面单端翼板桥在老年患者前牙弓单颗牙缺失中的6年应用效果评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙强; 王冠超; 何天鹏; 李婧

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To evaluated the clinical outcomes of cantilevered veneer-retained fixed partial dentures (VRFPDs) fabricated with IPS e.max Press for single-tooth replacement in the anterior arch for the aged patients.Methods:A total of 13 patients were treated with VRFPDs,including 4 cases in the maxilla and 9 in the mandible.The patients were evaluated at baseline and annually from October 2005 to Sep 2012 for the integrity of the VRFPDs,proximal contacts,occulsal relationships,pulp vitality,and tooth mobility.The degree of satisfaction was indicated with a visual analog scale.Results:During a mean observation time of 60.5 months,13 VRFPDs on vital abutment teeth did not exhibit postoperative sensitivity or secondary caries.No fractures or chipping of the restorations occurred within the course of the evaluation.No patient complained of food impaction.One cantilevered pontic needed adjustment on the incisal edge due to premature contacts after the 3-year recall examination.Conclusion:Cantilevered IPS e.max Press VRFPDs should be considered as minimally invasive,single-tooth restorative strategy in the anterior arch for the aged patients.Longer observation periods are necessary before this type of restorative design can be recommended as a general conservative procedure.%目的:通过e.Max单端全瓷翼板桥修复老年患者单颗前牙缺失,并对其中短期临床应用效果进行评价,为其临床应用提供参考依据.方法:选择于2005年10月-2012年9月之间就诊于中日友好医院口腔医学中心.共入组13人,其中男性8人,平均62.2岁;女性5人,平均64.3岁.恢复上颌侧切牙3例,上颌第一前磨牙1例;恢复下颌中切牙5例,下颌侧切牙4例;应用Variolink Ⅱ作为树脂粘接剂,常规进行粘接.针对修复体的完整性、邻接关系、咬合关系和基牙牙髓活力以及患者的满意度进行每年一次的随访.结果:平均观察期为60.5个月,所有修复体无1例表现术后敏感和继发龋,

  19. Odontogenic differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells for tooth regeneration: necessity, possibility, and strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Wei; Wu, Ling; Lin, Yunfeng; Liu, Lei; Tang, Wei; Tian, Weidong

    2008-01-01

    Tooth regeneration using tissue engineering concepts is a promising biological approach to solving problems of tooth loss in elderly patients. The seeding cells, however, for tooth regeneration such as odontoblasts from dental germ, stem cells from dental pulp and deciduous teeth, and ectomesenchymal cells from the first branchial arch are difficult, even impossible to harvest in clinic. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells have odontogenic capacity, but their differentiation abilities significantly decrease with the increasing age of the donors. Therefore, the cells mentioned above are not practical in the clinical application of tooth regeneration in the old. Adipose derived stem cells have many clinical advantages over bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, and their differentiation potential can be maintained with aging. Here we propose the hypothesis that adipose derived stem cells could be induced into odontogenic lineage and might be used as suitable seeding cells for tooth regeneration to replace the lost tooth of elderly patients.

  20. Saw-tooth cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karatza Ageliki A

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present an unusual case of cardiomyopathy in a two month old male infant with a grade-I systolic murmur. Echocardiographic examination disclosed left ventricular (LV, dysplasia with saw-tooth like inwards myocardial projections extending from the lateral walls towards the LV cavity. There was mild LV systolic dysfunction with apical hypokinesia. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance demonstrated in detail these cross bridging muscular projections originating from the inferior interventricular septum and lateral LV wall, along with areas of hypokinesis at the LV septum and apex in a noncoronary distribution, without any late gadolinium enhancement. We have termed this condition saw-tooth cardiomyopathy because of the very characteristic appearance.

  1. Tooth in oropharynx

    OpenAIRE

    Nagarajappa, D; B S Manjunatha

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of ectopic teeth has increased. In many cases, the etiology of ectopic teeth cannot be identified. Ectopic tooth in deciduous dentition period is very rare and information is limited about its causes and characteristics. The conditions commonly associated with an increased prevalence of ectopic teeth include cleft lip and palate, cleidocranial dysplasia, and Gardner syndrome. The diagnosis is made by the clinical and radiological examinations. The indication for extraction in ec...

  2. Solving tooth sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Michael B

    2010-01-01

    Solving tooth sensitivity requires both you and the patients to be resilient and to understand that if one approach doesn't work, you can try another one that is non-invasive or, at worst, minimally invasive. Much like the clinician who posted the original question, I strongly believe that it is our responsibility to convince patients that jumping to a radical solution could be totally unnecessary--and expensive-- and still might not solve the problem.

  3. Esophageal replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunisaki, Shaun M; Coran, Arnold G

    2017-04-01

    This article focuses on esophageal replacement as a surgical option for pediatric patients with end-stage esophageal disease. While it is obvious that the patient׳s own esophagus is the best esophagus, persisting with attempts to retain a native esophagus with no function and at all costs are futile and usually detrimental to the overall well-being of the child. In such cases, the esophagus should be abandoned, and the appropriate esophageal replacement is chosen for definitive reconstruction. We review the various types of conduits used for esophageal replacement and discuss the unique advantages and disadvantages that are relevant for clinical decision-making. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Decoronation for the management of an ankylosed young permanent tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapir, Shabtai; Shapira, Joseph

    2008-02-01

    Replacement resorption rate is a variable process, and is dependent on age, basal metabolic rate, extra-alveolar time, treatment prior to replantation, amount of root dentin, severity of trauma, and extent of periodontal ligament necrosis. In patients 7-16 years old a tooth is lost 3-7 years after the onset of root resorption. The complications that may develop as a consequence of ankylosis of a permanent incisor in children are due to the inevitable early loss of the traumatized tooth and local arrest of alveolar bone development. An ankylosed tooth should be removed before the changes become so pronounced that they compromise future prosthetic treatment. The treatment options may involve: interceptive regenerative treatment, early extraction of the ankylosed tooth, orthodontic space closure, intentional replantation, extraction of the ankylosed tooth followed with immediate ridge augmentation/preservation, auto-transplantation, single tooth dento-osseous osteotomy, and decoronation. The purpose of this article was to review the considerations involved in the decision-making concerning the use of the decoronation technique for the treatment of a permanent incisor diagnosed as ankylosed.

  5. Successful autotransplantation of a mature mesiodens to replace a traumatized maxillary central incisor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharmani, U; Rajput, A; Kamal, C; Talwar, S; Verma, M

    2015-06-01

    This case describes the successful transplantation of a mature mesiodens tooth to replace a traumatized maxillary central incisor. A 17-year-old male attended 1 week after a traumatic injury to his left maxillary central incisor (tooth 21). Radiographs revealed a horizontal root fracture and a poor prognosis. The tooth was atraumatically removed and replaced with a mesiodens lying in the same region. After stabilization, root canal treatment was performed and aesthetics were restored with a tooth coloured restoration. A 2-year follow-up revealed the tooth had good aesthetics and function. A supernumerary nonfunctional tooth such as a mesiodens can be successfully used to replace a missing permanent tooth by autotransplantation. Autotransplantation has a high success rate if case selection is good, appropriate surgery is carried out and excellent hygiene is maintained. Autotransplantation should be considered as one of the most biologic techniques for replacing a missing tooth with minimal cost. Autotransplantation can be carried out even after complete root formation in the donor tooth. © 2014 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Molar tooth sign − looking beyond the obvious

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasreen Mahomed

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The molar tooth sign was initially identified in Joubert syndrome, named after Marie Joubert who first described it in 1968 as a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterised by the neuroradiological hallmark of the molar tooth sign caused by cerebellar vermian hypoplasia. Subsequently, it emerged that the molar tooth sign encompasses many syndromes that are now grouped together and termed Joubert syndrome and related disorders (JSRDs. Knowledge of the newer classification system and the subtypes is important and helps to direct and interpret imaging studies based on clinical signs so as to avoid delay in diagnosis of the hepatic oculorenal and renal subtypes of JSRDs in patients in whom the molar tooth sign is identified on brain MRI.

  7. Nonlinear Simulation of the Tooth Enamel Spectrum for EPR Dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirillov, V. A.; Dubovsky, S. V.

    2016-07-01

    Software was developed where initial EPR spectra of tooth enamel were deconvoluted based on nonlinear simulation, line shapes and signal amplitudes in the model initial spectrum were calculated, the regression coefficient was evaluated, and individual spectra were summed. Software validation demonstrated that doses calculated using it agreed excellently with the applied radiation doses and the doses reconstructed by the method of additive doses.

  8. Stem cell-based biological tooth repair and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volponi, Ana Angelova; Pang, Yvonne; Sharpe, Paul T

    2010-12-01

    Teeth exhibit limited repair in response to damage, and dental pulp stem cells probably provide a source of cells to replace those damaged and to facilitate repair. Stem cells in other parts of the tooth, such as the periodontal ligament and growing roots, play more dynamic roles in tooth function and development. Dental stem cells can be obtained with ease, making them an attractive source of autologous stem cells for use in restoring vital pulp tissue removed because of infection, in regeneration of periodontal ligament lost in periodontal disease, and for generation of complete or partial tooth structures to form biological implants. As dental stem cells share properties with mesenchymal stem cells, there is also considerable interest in their wider potential to treat disorders involving mesenchymal (or indeed non-mesenchymal) cell derivatives, such as in Parkinson's disease.

  9. Two stage gear tooth dynamics program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Linda S.

    1989-01-01

    The epicyclic gear dynamics program was expanded to add the option of evaluating the tooth pair dynamics for two epicyclic gear stages with peripheral components. This was a practical extension to the program as multiple gear stages are often used for speed reduction, space, weight, and/or auxiliary units. The option was developed for either stage to be a basic planetary, star, single external-external mesh, or single external-internal mesh. The two stage system allows for modeling of the peripherals with an input mass and shaft, an output mass and shaft, and a connecting shaft. Execution of the initial test case indicated an instability in the solution with the tooth paid loads growing to excessive magnitudes. A procedure to trace the instability is recommended as well as a method of reducing the program's computation time by reducing the number of boundary condition iterations.

  10. Comparison of Clinical Trajectories before Initiation of Renal Replacement Therapy between Diabetic Nephropathy and Nephrosclerosis on the KDIGO Guidelines Heat Map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Masanori; Okada, Kazuyoshi; Maruyama, Noriaki; Takashima, Hiroyuki; Oikawa, Osamu; Soma, Masayoshi

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated differences between the clinical trajectories of diabetic nephropathy and nephrosclerosis using the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) heat map and the clinical characteristics between the two diseases at RRT initiation. This single-center, retrospective study enrolled 100 patients whose estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was ≥45 mL/min/1.73 m(2) at their first visit and who were initiated on RRT. Fifty consecutive patients were assigned to each of the diabetic nephropathy and nephrosclerosis groups. All data for simultaneously measured eGFR and urinary albumin to creatinine ratio (UACR) were collected from first visit to RRT initiation and were plotted on the KDIGO heat map. Diabetic nephropathy was characterized by higher blood pressure and UACR and lower age, eGFR, and serum albumin levels compared with nephrosclerosis at RRT initiation. The vast majority of patients with diabetic nephropathy and eGFR diabetic nephropathy group than that in the nephrosclerosis group. The clinical trajectories of diabetic nephropathy and nephrosclerosis differed markedly on the KDIGO heat map.

  11. High- Versus Low-Gradient Severe Aortic Stenosis: Demographics, Clinical Outcomes, and Effects of the Initial Aortic Valve Replacement Strategy on Long-Term Prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Tomohiko; Morimoto, Takeshi; Shiomi, Hiroki; Ando, Kenji; Kanamori, Norio; Murata, Koichiro; Kitai, Takeshi; Kawase, Yuichi; Izumi, Chisato; Miyake, Makoto; Mitsuoka, Hirokazu; Kato, Masashi; Hirano, Yutaka; Matsuda, Shintaro; Inada, Tsukasa; Nagao, Kazuya; Murakami, Tomoyuki; Takeuchi, Yasuyo; Yamane, Keiichiro; Toyofuku, Mamoru; Ishii, Mitsuru; Minamino-Muta, Eri; Kato, Takao; Inoko, Moriaki; Ikeda, Tomoyuki; Komasa, Akihiro; Ishii, Katsuhisa; Hotta, Kozo; Higashitani, Nobuya; Kato, Yoshihiro; Inuzuka, Yasutaka; Maeda, Chiyo; Jinnai, Toshikazu; Morikami, Yuko; Saito, Naritatsu; Minatoya, Kenji; Kimura, Takeshi

    2017-05-01

    There is considerable debate on the management of patients with low-gradient severe aortic stenosis (LG-AS), defined as aortic valve area strategy: n=977, and conservative strategy: n=1120) with high-gradient severe aortic stenosis (HG-AS) and 1712 patients (initial AVR strategy: n=219, and conservative strategy: n=1493) with LG-AS. AVR was more frequently performed in HG-AS patients than in LG-AS patients (60% versus 28%) during the entire follow-up. In the comparison between the initial AVR and conservative groups, the propensity score-matched cohorts were developed in both HG-AS (n=887 for each group) and LG-AS (n=218 for each group) strata. The initial AVR strategy when compared with the conservative strategy was associated with markedly lower risk for a composite of aortic valve-related death or heart failure hospitalization in both HG-AS and LG-AS strata (hazard ratio, 0.30; 95% confidence interval, 0.25-0.37; Pstrategy was associated with a better outcome than the conservative strategy (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.37; 95% confidence interval, 0.23-0.59; Pstrategy was associated with better outcomes than the conservative strategy in both HG-AS and LG-AS patients, although AVR was less frequently performed in LG-AS patients than in HG-AS patients. The favorable effect of initial AVR strategy was also seen in patients with LG-AS with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction. URL: http://www.umin.ac.jp/ctr/index.htm. Unique identifier: UMIN000012140. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. The junctional epithelium originates from the odontogenic epithelium of an erupted tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima-Himuro, Sara; Oshima, Masamitsu; Yamamoto, Gou; Ogawa, Miho; Furuya, Madoka; Tanaka, Junichi; Nishii, Kousuke; Mishima, Kenji; Tachikawa, Tetsuhiko; Tsuji, Takashi; Yamamoto, Matsuo

    2014-05-02

    The junctional epithelium (JE) is an epithelial component that is directly attached to the tooth surface and has a protective function against periodontal diseases. In this study, we determined the origin of the JE using a bioengineered tooth technique. We transplanted the bioengineered tooth germ into the alveolar bone with an epithelial component that expressed green fluorescence protein. The reduced enamel epithelium from the bioengineered tooth fused with the oral epithelium, and the JE was apparently formed around the bioengineered tooth 50 days after transplantation. Importantly, the JE exhibited green fluorescence for at least 140 days after transplantation, suggesting that the JE was not replaced by oral epithelium. Therefore, our results demonstrated that the origin of the JE was the odontogenic epithelium, and odontogenic epithelium-derived JE was maintained for a relatively long period.

  13. Tooth loss caused by displaced elastic during simple preprosthetic orthodontic treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dianiskova, Simona; Calzolari, Chiara; Migliorati, Marco; Silvestrini-Biavati, Armando; Isola, Gaetano; Savoldi, Fabio; Dalessandri, Domenico; Paganelli, Corrado

    2016-01-01

    The use of elastics to close a diastema or correct tooth malpositions can create unintended consequences if not properly controlled. The American Association of Orthodontists recently issued a consumer alert, warning of “a substantial risk for irreparable damage” from a new trend called “do-it-yourself” orthodontics, consisting of patients autonomously using elastics to correct tooth position. The elastics can work their way below the gums and around the roots of the teeth, causing damage to the periodontium and even resulting in tooth loss. The cost of implants to replace these teeth would well exceed the cost of proper orthodontic care. This damage could also occur in a dental office, when a general dentist tries to perform a simplified orthodontic correction of a minor tooth malposition. The present case report describes a case of tooth loss caused by a displaced intraoral elastic, which occurred during a simple preprosthetic orthodontic treatment. PMID:27672645

  14. Partial tooth gear bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A partial gear bearing including an upper half, comprising peak partial teeth, and a lower, or bottom, half, comprising valley partial teeth. The upper half also has an integrated roller section between each of the peak partial teeth with a radius equal to the gear pitch radius of the radially outwardly extending peak partial teeth. Conversely, the lower half has an integrated roller section between each of the valley half teeth with a radius also equal to the gear pitch radius of the peak partial teeth. The valley partial teeth extend radially inwardly from its roller section. The peak and valley partial teeth are exactly out of phase with each other, as are the roller sections of the upper and lower halves. Essentially, the end roller bearing of the typical gear bearing has been integrated into the normal gear tooth pattern.

  15. Abiotic tooth enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Bongjun; Sain, Trisha; Lacevic, Naida; Bukharina, Daria; Cha, Sang-Ho; Waas, Anthony M.; Arruda, Ellen M.; Kotov, Nicholas A.

    2017-03-01

    Tooth enamel comprises parallel microscale and nanoscale ceramic columns or prisms interlaced with a soft protein matrix. This structural motif is unusually consistent across all species from all geological eras. Such invariability—especially when juxtaposed with the diversity of other tissues—suggests the existence of a functional basis. Here we performed ex vivo replication of enamel-inspired columnar nanocomposites by sequential growth of zinc oxide nanowire carpets followed by layer-by-layer deposition of a polymeric matrix around these. We show that the mechanical properties of these nanocomposites, including hardness, are comparable to those of enamel despite the nanocomposites having a smaller hard-phase content. Our abiotic enamels have viscoelastic figures of merit (VFOM) and weight-adjusted VFOM that are similar to, or higher than, those of natural tooth enamels—we achieve values that exceed the traditional materials limits of 0.6 and 0.8, respectively. VFOM values describe resistance to vibrational damage, and our columnar composites demonstrate that light-weight materials of unusually high resistance to structural damage from shocks, environmental vibrations and oscillatory stress can be made using biomimetic design. The previously inaccessible combinations of high stiffness, damping and light weight that we achieve in these layer-by-layer composites are attributed to efficient energy dissipation in the interfacial portion of the organic phase. The in vivo contribution of this interfacial portion to macroscale deformations along the tooth’s normal is maximized when the architecture is columnar, suggesting an evolutionary advantage of the columnar motif in the enamel of living species. We expect our findings to apply to all columnar composites and to lead to the development of high-performance load-bearing materials.

  16. Tooth tissue engineering: optimal dental stem cell harvest based on tooth development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duailibi, Monica Talarico; Duailibi, Silvio Eduardo; Duailibi Neto, Eduardo Felippe; Negreiros, Renata Matalon; Jorge, Waldyr Antonio; Ferreira, Lydia Masako; Vacanti, Joseph Phillip; Yelick, Pamela Crotty

    2011-07-01

    Our long-term objective is to devise reliable methods to generate biological replacement teeth exhibiting the physical properties and functions of naturally formed human teeth. Previously, we demonstrated the successful use of tissue engineering approaches to generate small, bioengineered tooth crowns from harvested pig and rat postnatal dental stem cells (DSCs). To facilitate characterizations of human DSCs, we have developed a novel radiographic staging system to accurately correlate human third molar tooth developmental stage with anticipated harvested DSC yield. Our results demonstrated that DSC yields were higher in less developed teeth (Stages 1 and 2), and lower in more developed teeth (Stages 3, 4, and 5). The greatest cell yields and colony-forming units (CFUs) capability was obtained from Stages 1 and 2 tooth dental pulp. We conclude that radiographic developmental staging can be used to accurately assess the utility of harvested human teeth for future dental tissue engineering applications. © 2011, Copyright the Authors. Artificial Organs © 2011, International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Iatrogenic traumatic brain injury during tooth extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troxel, Mark

    2015-01-01

    An 8 yr old spayed female Yorkshire terrier was referred for evaluation of progressive neurological signs after a routine dental prophylaxis with tooth extractions. The patient was circling to the left and blind in the right eye with right hemiparesis. Neurolocalization was to the left forebrain. MRI revealed a linear tract extending from the caudal oropharynx, through the left retrobulbar space and frontal lobe, into the left parietal lobe. A small skull fracture was identified in the frontal bone through which the linear tract passed. Those findings were consistent with iatrogenic trauma from slippage of a dental elevator during extraction of tooth 210. The dog was treated empirically with clindamycin. The patient regained most of its normal neurological function within the first 4 mo after the initial injury. Although still not normal, the dog has a good quality of life. Traumatic brain injury is a rarely reported complication of extraction. Care must be taken while performing dental cleaning and tooth extraction, especially of the maxillary premolar and molar teeth to avoid iatrogenic damage to surrounding structures.

  18. On acceleration of Krylov-subspace-based Newton and Arnoldi iterations for incompressible CFD: replacing time steppers and generation of initial guess

    CERN Document Server

    Gelfgat, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    We propose two techniques aimed at improving the convergence rate of steady state and eigenvalue solvers preconditioned by the inverse Stokes operator and realized via time-stepping. First, we suggest a generalization of the Stokes operator so that the resulting preconditioner operator depends on several parameters and whose action preserves zero divergence and boundary conditions. The parameters can be tuned for each problem to speed up the convergence of a Krylov-subspace-based linear algebra solver. This operator can be inverted by the Uzawa-like algorithm, and does not need a time-stepping. Second, we propose to generate an initial guess of steady flow, leading eigenvalue and eigenvector using orthogonal projection on divergence-free basis satisfying all boundary conditions. The approach, including the two proposed techniques, is illustrated on the solution of the linear stability problem for laterally heated square and cubic cavities.

  19. Dental-derived Stem Cells and whole Tooth Regeneration: an Overview

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    The need for new dental tissue-replacement therapies is evident in recent reports which reveal startling statistics regarding the high incidence of tooth decay and tooth loss. Recent advances in the identification and characterization of dental stem cells, and in dental tissue-engineering strategies, suggest that bioengineering approaches may successfully be used to regenerate dental tissues and whole teeth. Interest in dental tissue-regeneration applications continues to increase as clinical...

  20. Natural Tooth Pontic: An Instant Esthetic Option for Periodontally Compromised Teeth—A Case Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Rishi; Narayan, Ipshita; Gowda, Triveni Mavinakote; Mehta, D. S.

    2016-01-01

    Sudden tooth loss in the esthetic zone of the maxillary or mandibular anterior region can be due to trauma, periodontal disease, or endodontic failure. The treatment options for replacing the missing tooth can vary between removable prosthesis, tooth-supported prosthesis, and implant-supported prosthesis. Irrespective of the final treatment, the first line of management would be to provisionally restore the patient's esthetic appearance at the earliest, while functionally stabilizing the compromised arch. Using the patient's own natural tooth as a pontic offers the benefits of being the right size, shape, and color and provides exact repositioning in its original intraoral three-dimensional position. Additionally, using the patient's platelet concentrate (platelet rich fibrin) facilitates early wound healing and preservation of alveolar ridge shape following tooth extraction. The abutment teeth can also be preserved with minimal or no preparation, thus keeping the technique reversible, and can be completed at the chair side thereby avoiding laboratory costs. This helps the patient better tolerate the effect of tooth loss psychologically. The article describes a successful, immediate, and viable technique for rehabilitation of three different patients requiring replacement of a single periodontally compromised tooth in an esthetic region. PMID:27994892

  1. Hedgehog signaling is required at multiple stages of zebrafish tooth development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stock David W

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The accessibility of the developing zebrafish pharyngeal dentition makes it an advantageous system in which to study many aspects of tooth development from early initiation to late morphogenesis. In mammals, hedgehog signaling is known to be essential for multiple stages of odontogenesis; however, potential roles for the pathway during initiation of tooth development or in later morphogenesis are incompletely understood. Results We have identified mRNA expression of the hedgehog ligands shha and the receptors ptc1 and ptc2 during zebrafish pharyngeal tooth development. We looked for, but did not detect, tooth germ expression of the other known zebrafish hedgehog ligands shhb, dhh, ihha, or ihhb, suggesting that as in mammals, only Shh participates in zebrafish tooth development. Supporting this idea, we found that morphological and gene expression evidence of tooth initiation is eliminated in shha mutant embryos, and that morpholino antisense oligonucleotide knockdown of shha, but not shhb, function prevents mature tooth formation. Hedgehog pathway inhibition with the antagonist compound cyclopamine affected tooth formation at each stage in which we applied it: arresting development at early stages and disrupting mature tooth morphology when applied later. These results suggest that hedgehog signaling is required continuously during odontogenesis. In contrast, over-expression of shha had no effect on the developing dentition, possibly because shha is normally extensively expressed in the zebrafish pharyngeal region. Conclusion We have identified previously unknown requirements for hedgehog signaling for early tooth initiation and later morphogenesis. The similarity of our results with data from mouse and other vertebrates suggests that despite gene duplication and changes in the location of where teeth form, the roles of hedgehog signaling in tooth development have been largely conserved during evolution.

  2. Hedgehog signaling is required at multiple stages of zebrafish tooth development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, William R; Yoo, James J; Stock, David W

    2010-11-30

    The accessibility of the developing zebrafish pharyngeal dentition makes it an advantageous system in which to study many aspects of tooth development from early initiation to late morphogenesis. In mammals, hedgehog signaling is known to be essential for multiple stages of odontogenesis; however, potential roles for the pathway during initiation of tooth development or in later morphogenesis are incompletely understood. We have identified mRNA expression of the hedgehog ligands shha and the receptors ptc1 and ptc2 during zebrafish pharyngeal tooth development. We looked for, but did not detect, tooth germ expression of the other known zebrafish hedgehog ligands shhb, dhh, ihha, or ihhb, suggesting that as in mammals, only Shh participates in zebrafish tooth development. Supporting this idea, we found that morphological and gene expression evidence of tooth initiation is eliminated in shha mutant embryos, and that morpholino antisense oligonucleotide knockdown of shha, but not shhb, function prevents mature tooth formation. Hedgehog pathway inhibition with the antagonist compound cyclopamine affected tooth formation at each stage in which we applied it: arresting development at early stages and disrupting mature tooth morphology when applied later. These results suggest that hedgehog signaling is required continuously during odontogenesis. In contrast, over-expression of shha had no effect on the developing dentition, possibly because shha is normally extensively expressed in the zebrafish pharyngeal region. We have identified previously unknown requirements for hedgehog signaling for early tooth initiation and later morphogenesis. The similarity of our results with data from mouse and other vertebrates suggests that despite gene duplication and changes in the location of where teeth form, the roles of hedgehog signaling in tooth development have been largely conserved during evolution.

  3. Hedgehog signaling is required at multiple stages of zebrafish tooth development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background The accessibility of the developing zebrafish pharyngeal dentition makes it an advantageous system in which to study many aspects of tooth development from early initiation to late morphogenesis. In mammals, hedgehog signaling is known to be essential for multiple stages of odontogenesis; however, potential roles for the pathway during initiation of tooth development or in later morphogenesis are incompletely understood. Results We have identified mRNA expression of the hedgehog ligands shha and the receptors ptc1 and ptc2 during zebrafish pharyngeal tooth development. We looked for, but did not detect, tooth germ expression of the other known zebrafish hedgehog ligands shhb, dhh, ihha, or ihhb, suggesting that as in mammals, only Shh participates in zebrafish tooth development. Supporting this idea, we found that morphological and gene expression evidence of tooth initiation is eliminated in shha mutant embryos, and that morpholino antisense oligonucleotide knockdown of shha, but not shhb, function prevents mature tooth formation. Hedgehog pathway inhibition with the antagonist compound cyclopamine affected tooth formation at each stage in which we applied it: arresting development at early stages and disrupting mature tooth morphology when applied later. These results suggest that hedgehog signaling is required continuously during odontogenesis. In contrast, over-expression of shha had no effect on the developing dentition, possibly because shha is normally extensively expressed in the zebrafish pharyngeal region. Conclusion We have identified previously unknown requirements for hedgehog signaling for early tooth initiation and later morphogenesis. The similarity of our results with data from mouse and other vertebrates suggests that despite gene duplication and changes in the location of where teeth form, the roles of hedgehog signaling in tooth development have been largely conserved during evolution. PMID:21118524

  4. [Estrogen replacement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søgaard, A J; Berntsen, G K; Magnus, J H; Tollan, A

    1998-02-10

    Recent research on long-term postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy (HRT) indicates a positive effect on both total mortality and morbidity. This has raised the question of widespread preventive long-term use of HRT. Possible side-effects and ideological issues related to preventive HRT have led to debate and uncertainty among health professionals, in the media, and in the population at large. In order to evaluate the level of knowledge about and attitudes towards HRT, a randomly selected group of 737 Norwegian women aged 16-79 was interviewed by the Central Bureau of Statistics. One in three women had received information about HRT in the last two years, mainly through weekly magazines and physicians. The proportion who answered the questions on knowledge correctly varied from 36% to 47%. Those who had been given information by a physician possessed accurate knowledge, had more positive attitudes towards HRT and were more willing to use HRT than women who had reviewed information through other channels. Women with a higher level of education were better informed and more knowledgeable than others, but were nevertheless more reluctant to use HRT than those who were less educated. The limited number of women who actually receive information on HRT, the low level of knowledge and the ambivalent attitudes toward HRT are a major challenge to the public health service.

  5. Managing congenitally missing lateral incisors. Part II: tooth-supported restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinzer, Greggory A; Kokich, Vincent O

    2005-01-01

    Three treatment options exist for the replacement of congenitally missing lateral incisors: canine substitution, a tooth-supported restoration, or a single-tooth implant. Selecting the appropriate treatment option depends on the malocclusion, the anterior relationship, specific space requirements, and the condition of the adjacent teeth. The ideal treatment is the most conservative alternative that satisfies individual esthetic and functional requirements. This article closely examines the three options when replacing a missing lateral incisor with a tooth-supported restoration. These options are a resin-bonded fixed partial denture, a cantilevered fixed partial denture, and a conventional full-coverage fixed partial denture. The specific criteria that must be evaluated for each option is addressed to illustrate the importance of interdisciplinary treatment planning to achieve optimal esthetics and long-term predictability. This article is the second of a three-part series discussing the three treatment alternatives for replacing congenitally missing lateral incisors.

  6. [Application of micro-power system in the surgery of tooth extraction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaijin, Hu; Yongfeng, Li

    2015-02-01

    Tooth extraction is a common operation in oral surgery. Traditional-extraction instruments, such as bone chisel, elevator, and bone hammer, lead to not only severe trauma but also unnecessary complications, and patients easily become nervous and apprehensive if tooth extraction is performed using these violent instruments. In recent years, with the develop- ment of minimally invasive concept and technology, various micro-power instruments have been used for tooth extraction. This innovative technology can reduce the iatrogenic trauma and complications of tooth extraction. Additionally, this technology can greatly decrease the patient's physical and mental pressure. The new equipment compensates for the deficiency of traditional tooth extraction equipment and facilitates the gradual replacement of the latter. Diverse micro-power systems have distinct strengths and weaknesses, so some auxiliary instruments are still needed during tooth extraction. This paper focuses on the various micro-power systems for tooth extraction and tries to compare the advantages and disadvantages of these systems. Selection and usage of auxiliary equipment are also introduced. Thus, this paper provides reference for the proper application of the micro-power systems in tooth extraction.

  7. Treatment of a horizontal root-fractured tooth with decoronation procedure: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selen Esin Yoldaş

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Early loss of permanent anterior teeth due to trauma can cause esthetic and functional problems for young patients. In such cases, replacement of the missing tooth with traditional approaches is possible; however such approaches will reduce the chance of the patient to receive an esthetic and consistent treatment in the future. CASE REPORT: A 12-year-old male patient referred to our clinic with a history of trauma. Complicated crown fracture in tooth no.11 and horizontal root fracture in tooth no. 21 was detected. Following root canal treatment, tooth no. 11 was restored with a fiber post and a strip crown. To avoid alveolar bone loss due to early tooth extraction, decoronation procedure, an alternative approach, was applied to tooth no. 21. This procedure consisted of leaving the root fragment inside the alveolar socket following the removal of the crown. For the rehabilitation of the missing crown, a partial removable prosthesis was implemented. The patient was recalled in 6., 12. and 18. months. Within the follow-up period, no reduction in the alveolar bone level was seen. No sign of infection was evident. The remaining root fragment kept on resorbing. Tooth no. 11 remained symptom-free as well. The patient is still being followed. CONCLUSION: Decoronation is essentially a treatment choice for preventing alveolar bone loss in ankylosed teeth considered for extraction. In this case report, decoronation was shown to be a suitable alternative also for a fractured, non-ankylosed tooth.

  8. Biomaterial Selection for Tooth Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Biomaterials are native or synthetic polymers that act as carriers for drug delivery or scaffolds for tissue regeneration. When implanted in vivo, biomaterials should be nontoxic and exert intended functions. For tooth regeneration, biomaterials have primarily served as a scaffold for (1) transplanted stem cells and/or (2) recruitment of endogenous stem cells. This article critically synthesizes our knowledge of biomaterial use in tooth regeneration, including the selection of native and/or s...

  9. Dental patterning in the earliest sharks: Implications for tooth evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisey, John G; Turner, Susan; Naylor, Gavin J P; Miller, Randall F

    2014-05-01

    Doliodus problematicus is the oldest known fossil shark-like fish with an almost intact dentition (Emsian, Lower Devonian, c. 397Ma). We provide a detailed description of the teeth and dentition in D. problematicus, based on tomographic analysis of NBMG 10127 (New Brunswick Museum, Canada). Comparisons with modern shark dentitions suggest that Doliodus was a ram-feeding predator with a dentition adapted to seizing and disabling prey. Doliodus provides several clues about the early evolution of the "shark-like" dentition in chondrichthyans and also raises new questions about the evolution of oral teeth in jawed vertebrates. As in modern sharks, teeth in Doliodus were replaced in a linguo-labial sequence within tooth families at fixed positions along the jaws (12-14 tooth families per jaw quadrant in NBMG 10127). Doliodus teeth were replaced much more slowly than in modern sharks. Nevertheless, its tooth formation was apparently as highly organized as in modern elasmobranchs, in which future tooth positions are indicated by synchronized expression of shh at fixed loci within the dental epithelium. Comparable dental arrays are absent in osteichthyans, placoderms, and many "acanthodians"; a "shark-like" dentition, therefore, may be a synapomorphy of chondrichthyans and gnathostomes such as Ptomacanthus. The upper anterior teeth in Doliodus were not attached to the palatoquadrates, but were instead supported by the ethmoid region of the prechordal basicranium, as in some other Paleozoic taxa (e.g., Triodus, Ptomacanthus). This suggests that the chondrichthyan dental lamina was originally associated with prechordal basicranial cartilage as well as jaw cartilage, and that the modern elasmobranch condition (in which the oral dentition is confined to the jaws) is phylogenetically advanced. Thus, oral tooth development in modern elasmobranchs does not provide a complete developmental model for chondrichthyans or gnathostomes.

  10. Pulpal regeneration following allogenic tooth transplantation into mouse maxilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unno, Hideki; Suzuki, Hironobu; Nakakura-Ohshima, Kuniko; Jung, Han-Sung; Ohshima, Hayato

    2009-04-01

    Autogenic tooth transplantation is now a common procedure in dentistry for replacing a missing tooth. However, there are many difficulties in clinical application of allogenic tooth transplantation because of immunological rejection. This study aims to clarify pulpal regeneration following allogenic tooth transplantation into the mouse maxilla by immunohistochemistry for 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and nestin, and by the histochemistry for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP). The upper right first molar (M1) of 2-week-old mice was extracted and allografted in the original socket in both the littermate and non-littermate after the extraction of M1. Tooth transplantation weakened the nestin-positive reactions in the pulp tissue that had shown immunoreactivity for nestin before operation. On postoperative Days 5-7, tertiary dentin formation commenced next to the preexisting dentin where nestin-positive odontoblast-like cells were arranged in all cases of the littermate group until Day 14, except for one case showing immunological rejection in the pulp chamber. In the non-littermate group, bone-like tissue formation occurred in the pulp chamber in addition to tertiary dentin formation until Day 14. The rate of tertiary dentin was 38%, and the rate of the mixed form of dentin and bone-like tissue formation was 23% (the remainder was immunological rejection). Interestingly, the periodontal tissue recovered even in the case of immunological rejection in which the pulp chamber was replaced by sparse connective tissue. These results suggest that the selection of littermate or non-littermate is decisive for the survival of odontoblast-lineage cells and that the immunological rejection does not influence the periodontal regeneration.

  11. The 3′ Untranslated Region of the Andes Hantavirus Small mRNA Functionally Replaces the Poly(A) Tail and Stimulates Cap-Dependent Translation Initiation from the Viral mRNA ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera-Otarola, Jorge; Soto-Rifo, Ricardo; Ricci, Emiliano P.; Ohlmann, Théophile; Darlix, Jean-Luc; López-Lastra, Marcelo

    2010-01-01

    In the process of translation of eukaryotic mRNAs, the 5′ cap and the 3′ poly(A) tail interact synergistically to stimulate protein synthesis. Unlike its cellular counterparts, the small mRNA (SmRNA) of Andes hantavirus (ANDV), a member of the Bunyaviridae, lacks a 3′ poly(A) tail. Here we report that the 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR) of the ANDV SmRNA functionally replaces a poly(A) tail and synergistically stimulates cap-dependent translation initiation from the viral mRNA. Stimulation of translation by the 3′UTR of the ANDV SmRNA was found to be independent of viral proteins and of host poly(A)-binding protein. PMID:20660206

  12. [A tooth or an implant--literature based decision making].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar On, H; Sharon, E; Lipovezky-Adler, M; Haramaty, O; Smidt, A

    2014-07-01

    The common use of dental implants in the daily practice led to a profound change in the available treatment strategies. The option of replacing a diagnosed doubtful tooth with an implant has become widely accepted and often used. The prognosis systems in use today are based on the three major disciplines: endodontics, periodontics and prosthodontics. Combining these three may impair and bias the decision making process and increase the tendency to base it on subjective clinical experience and personal preference. Reading and reviewing the relevant literature gives no clear tool for use. Root canal treatment is considered a highly predictable treatment procedure and a treated tooth is affected mainly by the quality and type of the fabricated restoration and the risk of caries. Periodontal treatment followed by a suitable maintenance regimen will likely allow long term tooth survival. When comparing the success rates of natural teeth rehabilitation versus implant supported restorations, it appears that with implants an additional treatment is demanded along the years. This coincides with the fact that to date there is no consensus regarding the extent of perimplantitis and perimucositis that is to be expected around a restored implant. In addition, a peri implant tissue problem or a failure of a dental implant may prove to be more challenging than a failure of a tooth. It is important to remember that a dental implant is made to substitute a missing tooth and it is a treatment modality with known and clear indications for rehabilitation of an edentulous space. The aim of this paper is to review and discuss the various aspects of whether to maintain a compromised or a doubtful tooth or to prefer a treatment modality using dental implants. In conclusion it is advised here, to incorporate the discussed issues in the decision making process towards the most suitable treatment plan.

  13. Transplantation of premolars as an approach for replacing avulsed teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Schwartz, Ole; Kofoed, Thomas; Daugaard-Jensen, Jette

    2009-01-01

    Autotransplantation of premolars to the anterior region subsequent to tooth loss represent a unique treatment method that has a number of advantages in comparison with other tooth substitution methods. A tooth transplant has a bone inducing capacity implying that lost labial bone is regenerated. Secondly the tooth precipitates growth of the alveolar procces and allows treatment to be performed at an early age (10-12 years) where the trauma incidence is at its maximum. Finally transplanted teeth can be moved orthodontically. These characteristics make implant solutions appealing in a number of situations. The procedure consist in selecting a premolar in a optimal root development stage which is approximately three fourths root formation where optimal pulp and periodontal ligament healing can be achieved in more than 90 percent of the cases. The tooth is later after slight crown remodeling restored with composite or a porcelain laminate. Four recent long-term studies have shown survival rates between 90-98 percent and a single long term study (33 years) showed a survival rate of 90 percent, a survival rate not surpassed by any other type of tooth replacement (fixed or removable prostetics, implants). In conclusion premolar transplantation should be considered in cases of early loss of a permanent tooth.

  14. Analysis of split tooth as an unstudied reason for tooth extraction

    OpenAIRE

    Osaghae, Ifueko Patience; Azodo, Clement Chinedu

    2014-01-01

    Background Split tooth is an unstudied reason for tooth extraction. The purpose of this study was to determine and analyze split tooth as a reason for extraction in a dental clinic in Benin City. Methods The prospective study was carried out on 669 patients having tooth extraction between May, 2005 and December, 2012. Over the period of the study, diagnosis and tooth extraction were done by three dentists of more five years practice experience. The indications for tooth extraction were noted ...

  15. Fusion following failed total ankle replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wünschel, Markus; Leichtle, Ulf G; Leichtle, Carmen I; Walter, Christian; Mittag, Falk; Arlt, Eva; Suckel, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    Although mid- to long-term results after total ankle replacement have improved because of available second- and third-generation devices, failure of total ankle replacement is still more common compared with total hip replacement and total knee replacement. The portfolio of available total ankle replacement revision component options is small. Furthermore, the bone stock of the tibiotalar region is scarce making it difficult and in some situations impossible to perform revision total ankle replacement. In these cases tibiotalar and tibiotalocalcaneal fusions are valuable options. This article describes which surgical procedures should be performed depending on the initial situation and gives detailed advice on surgical technique, postoperative care, and clinical results.

  16. Tooth wear patterns in the deciduous dentition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, John J; Yonezu, Takuro; Bishara, Samir E

    2002-12-01

    Tooth wear is common in the deciduous dentition. A recent study suggests that tooth wear in the deciduous dentition is related to subsequent tooth wear in adults, so that early identification of factors related to tooth wear could be of long-term benefit. The purposes of this study were to describe patterns of tooth wear in the deciduous dentition and to relate tooth wear to occlusal characteristics and longitudinal dietary patterns. Data were collected as part of a longitudinal study of a cohort of children recruited at birth from Iowa hospitals. Stone casts were obtained in the deciduous dentition stage, and 355 children, 4 to 5 years old, met the selection criteria. Tooth wear was categorized for each tooth as none, mild, moderate, or severe, and related to occlusal characteristics and longitudinal data on fruit juice and soft drink consumption. All children exhibited some tooth wear on at least 1 tooth, and nearly 16% of them had at least 1 tooth with severe wear. Tooth wear was generally more severe in the maxillary arch and the anterior teeth. Severe tooth wear on the molars was significantly related to posterior crossbites, but severe tooth wear on the incisors was related to Class III canine relationships. There were no statistically significant relationships between tooth wear and soft drink or fruit juice consumption. Based on our results, we concluded that mild tooth wear is universal in the deciduous dentition, but only a few occlusal factors are related to severe tooth wear. Tooth wear was not related to any dietary patterns we investigated.

  17. Predictors of tooth loss during long-term periodontal maintenance: a systematic review of observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambrone, Leandro; Chambrone, Daniela; Lima, Luiz A; Chambrone, Luiz A

    2010-07-01

    To systematically assess the factors influencing tooth loss during long-term periodontal maintenance (PM). CENTRAL, MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched up to and including September 2009. Studies limited to patients with periodontitis who underwent periodontal therapy and followed a maintenance care programme for the at least 5 years were eligible for inclusion in this review. Studies were considered for inclusion if they reported data on tooth loss during PM. The search strategy identified 527 potentially eligible articles, of which 13 retrospective case series were included in this review. The risk of bias assessment evaluated by the Newcastle-Ottawa scale showed that eight studies were considered of medium methodological quality and five of low methodological quality. Of 41,404 teeth present after active periodontal treatment, 3919 were lost during PM. The percentages of tooth loss due to periodontal reasons and of patients who did not experience tooth loss varied from 1.5% to 9.8% and 36.0% to 88.5%. Studies' individual outcomes showed that different patient-related factors (i.e. age and smoking) and tooth-related factors (tooth type and location, and the initial tooth prognosis) were associated with tooth loss during PM. The considerable heterogeneity found among studies did not allow definitive conclusions. Age, smoking and initial tooth prognosis were found to be associated with tooth loss during PM. Overall, patients must be instructed to follow periodic PM and quit smoking (smokers). Prospective cohort studies are required to confirm the possible predictors of tooth loss due to periodontal reasons. The allocation of patients into subgroups according to the type of periodontitis and smoking frequency will allow more accurate evaluations.

  18. Hedgehog signaling is required at multiple stages of zebrafish tooth development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    William R Jackman; James J Yoo; David W Stock

    2010-01-01

      Abstract Background: The accessibility of the developing zebrafish pharyngeal dentition makes it an advantageous system in which to study many aspects of tooth development from early initiation to late morphogenesis...

  19. Multidisciplinary Treatment Options of Tooth Avulsion Considering Different Therapy Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostka, Eckehard; Meissner, Simon; Finke, Christian H; Mandirola, Manlio; Preissner, Saskia

    2014-01-01

    Background: Avulsion of permanent front teeth is a rare accident, mostly affecting children between seven and nine years of age. Replanted and splinted, these teeth often develop inflammation, severe resorption or ankylosis affecting alveolar bone development and have to be extracted sooner or later. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate different therapy concepts to create a structured concept for the treatment of avulsions. Results: Based on existing therapy concepts, a concept for different initial conditions (dry time, age, growth, tooth, hard and soft tissues) was developed and is presented here. Conclusion: A great deal of research has been performed during recent years and guidelines for the management of avulsions have been published. With the help of this literature it is possible to identify the best treatment procedure for each tooth. Clinical Relevance: The prognosis of avulsed teeth can be improved by considering evidence-based therapy concepts. Resorption, ankylosis and tooth loss could be minimized. PMID:25352922

  20. The effect of light-activation sources on tooth bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusai Baroudi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vital bleaching is one of the most requested cosmetic dental procedures asked by patients who seek a more pleasing smile. This procedure consists of carbamide or hydrogen peroxide gel applications that can be applied in-office or by the patient (at-home/overnight bleaching system. Some in-office treatments utilise whitening light with the objective of speeding up the whitening process. The objective of this article is to review and summarise the current literature with regard to the effect of light-activation sources on in-office tooth bleaching. A literature search was conducted using Medline, accessed via the National Library of Medicine Pub Med from 2003 to 2013 searching for articles relating to effectiveness of light activation sources on in-office tooth bleaching. This study found conflicting evidence on whether light truly improve tooth whitening. Other factors such as, type of stain, initial tooth colour and subject age which can influence tooth bleaching outcome were discussed. Conclusions: The use of light activator sources with in-office bleaching treatment of vital teeth did not increase the efficacy of bleaching or accelerate the bleaching.

  1. Energy harvesting from mastication forces via a smart tooth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bani-Hani, Muath; Karami, M. Amin

    2016-04-01

    The batteries of the current pacing devices are relatively large and occupy over 60 percent of the size of pulse generators. Therefore, they cannot be placed in the subtle areas of human body. In this paper, the mastication force and the resulting tooth pressure are converted to electricity. The pressure energy can be converted to electricity by using the piezoelectric effect. The tooth crown is used as a power autonomous pulse generator. We refer to this envisioned pulse generator as the smart tooth. The smart tooth is in the form of a dental implant. A piezoelectric vibration energy harvester is designed and modeled for this purpose. The Piezoelectric based energy harvesters investigated and analyzed in this paper initially includes a single degree of freedom piezoelectric based stack energy harvester which utilizes a harvesting circuit employing the case of a purely resistive circuit. The next step is utilizing and investigating a bimorph piezoelectric beam which is integrated/embedded in the smart tooth implant. Mastication process causes the bimorph beam to buckle or return to unbuckled condition. The transitions results in vibration of the piezoelectric beam and thus generate energy. The power estimated by the two mechanisms is in the order of hundreds of microwatts. Both scenarios of the energy harvesters are analytically modeled. The exact analytical solution of the piezoelectric beam energy harvester with Euler-Bernoulli beam assumptions is presented. The electro-mechanical coupling and the geometric nonlinearities have been included in the model for the piezoelectric beam.

  2. Fibroblast growth factor signaling in mammalian tooth development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun-Ying; Prochazka, Jan; Goodwin, Alice F; Klein, Ophir D

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we discuss the central role of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling in mammalian tooth development. The FGF family consists of 22 members, most of which bind to four different receptor tyrosine kinases, which in turn signal through a cascade of intracellular proteins. This signaling regulates a number of cellular processes, including proliferation, differentiation, cell adhesion and cell mobility. FGF signaling first becomes important in the presumptive dental epithelium at the initiation stage of tooth development, and subsequently, it controls the invagination of the dental epithelium into the underlying mesenchyme. Later, FGFs are critical in tooth shape formation and differentiation of ameloblasts and odontoblasts, as well as in the development and homeostasis of the stem cell niche that fuels the continuously growing mouse incisor. In addition, FGF signaling is critical in human teeth, as mutations in genes encoding FGF ligands or receptors result in several congenital syndromes characterized by alterations in tooth number, morphology or enamel structure. The parallel roles of FGF signaling in mouse and human tooth development demonstrate the conserved importance of FGF signaling in mammalian odontogenesis.

  3. A comparative examination of odontogenic gene expression in both toothed and toothless amniotes

    OpenAIRE

    Alexis J. Lainoff; Moustakas-Verho, Jacqueline E.; Hu, Diane; Kallonen, Aki; Marcucio, Ralph S.; Hlusko, Leslea J

    2015-01-01

    A well-known tenet of murine tooth development is that BMP4 and FGF8 antagonistically initiate odontogenesis, but whether this tenet is conserved across amniotes is largely unexplored. Moreover, changes in BMP4-signaling have previously been implicated in evolutionary tooth loss in Aves. Here we demonstrate that Bmp4, Msx1, and Msx2 expression is limited proximally in the red-eared slider turtle (Trachemys scripta) mandible at stages equivalent to those at which odontogenesis is initiated in ...

  4. A comparative examination of odontogenic gene expression in both toothed and toothless amniotes

    OpenAIRE

    Lainoff, Alexis J.; Moustakas-Verho, Jacqueline E.; Hu, Diane; Kallonen, Aki; Marcucio, Ralph S.; Hlusko, Leslea J.

    2015-01-01

    A well-known tenet of murine tooth development is that BMP4 and FGF8 antagonistically initiate odontogenesis, but whether this tenet is conserved across amniotes is largely unexplored. Moreover, changes in BMP4-signaling have previously been implicated in evolutionary tooth loss in Aves. Here we demonstrate that Bmp4, Msx1, and Msx2 expression is limited proximally in the red-eared slider turtle (Trachemys scripta) mandible at stages equivalent to those at which odontogenesis is initiated in ...

  5. Tooth polishing: The current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawai, Madhuri Alankar; Bhardwaj, Ashu; Jafri, Zeba; Sultan, Nishat; Daing, Anika

    2015-01-01

    Healthy teeth and gums make a person feel confident and fit. As people go about their daily routines and with different eating and drinking habits, the tooth enamel turns yellowish or gets stained. Polishing traditionally has been associated with the prophylaxis procedure in most dental practices, which patients know and expect. However, with overzealous use of polishing procedure, there is wearing of the superficial tooth structure. This would lead to more accumulation of local deposits. Also, it takes a long time for the formation of the fluoride-rich layer of the tooth again. Hence, now-a-days, polishing is not advised as a part of routine oral prophylaxis procedure but is done selectively based on the patients' need. The article here, gives an insight on the different aspects of the polishing process along with the different methods and agents used for the same.

  6. Tooth polishing: The current status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhuri Alankar Sawai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Healthy teeth and gums make a person feel confident and fit. As people go about their daily routines and with different eating and drinking habits, the tooth enamel turns yellowish or gets stained. Polishing traditionally has been associated with the prophylaxis procedure in most dental practices, which patients know and expect. However, with overzealous use of polishing procedure, there is wearing of the superficial tooth structure. This would lead to more accumulation of local deposits. Also, it takes a long time for the formation of the fluoride-rich layer of the tooth again. Hence, now-a-days, polishing is not advised as a part of routine oral prophylaxis procedure but is done selectively based on the patients′ need. The article here, gives an insight on the different aspects of the polishing process along with the different methods and agents used for the same.

  7. Primary culprit for tooth loss!!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sailavanya Nuvvula

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: In order to facilitate planning for dental health services and to progress strategies to continue the reduction in tooth loss, it is important to identify the factors that result in such loss. therefore the aim of the study is to investigate the major cause for tooth extraction. Objective: to examine whether the major reason for tooth extraction is dental caries or periodontal disease. Materials and Methods: The study is carried out among the dental practitioners in our district. A questionnaire containing 10 items was distributed to the dental practitioners, which included age, gender, no of teeth indicated for extraction, the reason for extraction, and the periodontal parameters that are involved with the extracted tooth and were requested to complete the form on every extraction they were to undertake. the study form was collected at the end of the study period and data was subjected to statistical analysis. Results: A total of 502 patients were enrolled during the study period, and a total of 1055 teeth were extracted for several reasons. we found that 51.14%extractions are due to dental caries in case of 20-30years age groups, which is more when compared to tooth loss due to periodontal diseases in this age group. whereas in case of >40years of age group periodontal diseases account for 54.11%, and dental caries accounts for only 29.11%. Showing more teeth were lost due to periodontal disease. Conclusion: therefore we concluded that, caries is the dominant reason for extraction in patients with 20–30 years of age while periodontal disease accounts for the majority of tooth extraction in patients older than 40 years.

  8. Epithelial topography for repetitive tooth formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Gaete

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available During the formation of repetitive ectodermally derived organs such as mammary glands, lateral line and teeth, the tissue primordium iteratively initiates new structures. In the case of successional molar development, new teeth appear sequentially in the posterior region of the jaw from Sox2+ cells in association with the posterior aspect of a pre-existing tooth. The sequence of molar development is well known, however, the epithelial topography involved in the formation of a new tooth is unclear. Here, we have examined the morphology of the molar dental epithelium and its development at different stages in the mouse in vivo and in molar explants. Using regional lineage tracing we show that within the posterior tail of the first molar the primordium for the second and third molar are organized in a row, with the tail remaining in connection with the surface, where a furrow is observed. The morphology and Sox2 expression of the tail retains characteristics reminiscent of the earlier stages of tooth development, such that position along the A-P axes of the tail correlates with different temporal stages. Sox9, a stem/progenitor cell marker in other organs, is expressed mainly in the suprabasal epithelium complementary with Sox2 expression. This Sox2 and Sox9 expressing molar tail contains actively proliferating cells with mitosis following an apico-basal direction. Snail2, a transcription factor implicated in cell migration, is expressed at high levels in the tip of the molar tail while E-cadherin and laminin are decreased. In conclusion, our studies propose a model in which the epithelium of the molar tail can grow by posterior movement of epithelial cells followed by infolding and stratification involving a population of Sox2+/Sox9+ cells.

  9. On gear tooth stiffness evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Niels Leergaard; Jørgensen, Martin Felix

    2014-01-01

    The estimation of gear stiffness is important for determining the load distribution between the gear teeth when two sets of teeth are in contact. Two factors have a major influence on the stiffness; firstly the boundary condition through the gear rim size included in the stiffness calculation...... and secondly the size of the contact. In the FE calculation the true gear tooth root profile is applied. The meshing stiffnesses of gears are highly non-linear, it is however found that the stiffness of an individual tooth can be expressed in a linear form assuming that the contact width is constant. © 2014...

  10. A SINGLE VISIT IMMEDIATE TEMPORIZATION WITH NATURAL TOOTH PONTIC FOR PERIODONTALLY INVOLVED ANTERIOR TEETH : ANESTHETIC AND INNOVATIVE APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilofer Sultan Sheikh, Neelima S. Rajhans, Preeti Mundhe, Gabriela Jude Fernandez, Nilkanth Mhaske, Nikesh Moolya, Sudeep HM

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim and Objectives: Sudden loss of anterior tooth is a dreadful situation. It can be as a result of trauma, endodontic failure or periodontal disease which is a true aesthetic emergency for a patient. Along with the patient, the dentist also emphasizes on saving an anterior tooth for the primary reason of aesthetics. If the tooth crown is intact, is not grossly decayed, broken down or discoloured, it can be used as a natural tooth pontic in designing an interim prosthesis. Case: A chair side technique for replacing the missing tooth using the patient’s own natural tooth as a pontic in the three dimensional original position using a fibre reinforced composite resin splint thus restoring the aesthetics and relieving the apprehension of the patient, as described in this case report. Conclusion: The concept of Natural tooth pontic placement is a simple, economical, minimal intervention, viable and an easy to handle treatment option and promises an excellent transient aesthetic solution for a lost tooth as well as require minimal or no tooth preparation, thus is a reversible technique and avoids the laboratory cost.

  11. Orthodontic Tooth Movement: A Historic Prospective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Leslie A

    2016-01-01

    The earliest report on orthodontic tooth movement in the English literature was published in 1911. Oppenheim carried out studies on baboons to determine what histologic changes occurred during tooth movement. Reitan and many others carried out research into the nature of tooth movement. The pressure-tension model of tooth movement developed from these studies, whereby the two sides of the tooth responded to forces as if in isolation. A second theory, proposed by Stuteville in 1938, was the hydraulic theory of tooth movement. In this theory, fluid from the vasculature, lymphatic system and intercellular spaces responds to the forces of tooth movement, damping the force and limiting movement. Bien and Baumrind expanded on this theory with their own studies in the 1960s. It is clear that both the pressure-tension and fluid flow concepts have merit, but considerable work needs to be done to ascertain the details so that tooth movement can be managed and controlled.

  12. Tooth Retained Implant: No More an Oxymoron

    OpenAIRE

    Divya Bhat

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Periodontally af-fected teeth are treated in one of the two ways. (1) Tooth retention after periodontal surgery, in which the degree of regeneration achieved is unpredictable. (2) Tooth extrac-tion and implant placement. Implants have an osseointegrated surface which does not provide adequate shock absorption. Regeneration can be achieved by resecting the crown of the affected tooth and submerging the root. This technique has not had a clinical application so far as the tooth be...

  13. MICROWAVE PROPAGATION IN TOOTH AND DENTAL DEFECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Papezova

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION:The most common method of conventional dental diagnosisinvolves X-rays, such as Radio Tomography (RT or Computer Tomography (CT. Such methods are used for diagnosing pores in dental material that can lead to premature failure of dental material. Diagnosis by X-ray provides an objective analysis. However, repeated radiation from X-rays can cause biological damage to human tissues. From this point of view, there is a significant need to progress to quantitative non-invasive and non-destructive testing (NDT methods to measure dental material and improve treatment options. This article focuses on applying microwave technology to characterize teeth and teeth replacements. Knowledge of microwave propagation in biomaterial with no defects, using a defined microwave frequency range, and subsequently comparing the result with defective material could provide a means of dental diagnosis without the risk of radiation for the patient, i.e. without X-ray. OBJECTIVES: The primary objective of this study was to examine microwave technology in the field of dental medical diagnosis as a new NDT method. METHODS: The basic concept of applying microwave technology to characterize teeth in dental diagnosis was examined using a basic algorithm designed in the MATLAB programming language. Tests used dielectric properties of tooth and tooth decay and propagated electromagnetic (EM waves to show different characteristics of chosen materials.RESULTS: The analyses of frequency dependent reflection and transmission coefficients of the chosen material, specificallyteeth, atfrequency range 0 GHz to 30 GHz, computed differences between healthy and defective dental material.CONCLUSION: Thus, this could be used in providing a dental diagnosis without exposing patients to radiation, i.e. without X-ray. The next stage will involve creating a complete model of a jaw with teeth, and designing a sensor for crack detection for comparisons using this basic algorithm.

  14. Multiphoton microscopy imaging of developing tooth germs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Yu Pan

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: In this study, a novel multiphoton microscopy database of images from developing tooth germs in mice was set up. We confirmed that multiphoton laser microscopy is a powerful tool for investigating the development of tooth germ and is worthy for further application in the study of tooth regeneration.

  15. 21 CFR 872.3920 - Porcelain tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Porcelain tooth. 872.3920 Section 872.3920 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3920 Porcelain tooth. (a) Identification. A porcelain tooth is a prefabricated device made of porcelain powder for clinical use (§ 872.6660) intended for...

  16. Mechanism of human tooth eruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Inger

    2014-01-01

    discussed in the introduction. Human studies, mainly clinical and radiological, have focused on normal eruption and gender differences. Why a tooth begins eruption and what enables it to move eruptively and later to end these eruptive movements is not known. Pathological eruption courses contribute...

  17. Erosive Potential of Cola and Orange Fruit Juice on Tooth Colored ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    is defined as an irreversible loss of dental hard tissue by a chemical process ... replacement of lost tooth structure is usually desired to restore esthetics and .... Specimens were finished and polished with Sof‑Lex disks. (3M, St. Paul, MN, USA) ...

  18. Comparison of Leaf Plastochron Index and Allometric Analyses of Tooth Development in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groot; Meicenheimer

    2000-03-01

    Two methods of analyses were used to investigate tooth development in serrate (se) mutant and wild-type Columbia-1 (Col-1) Arabidopsis thaliana leaves. There were almost twice as many teeth with deeper sinuses and two orders of toothing on the margins of serrate compared with Columbia-1 leaves. The main objective of this study was to test three hypotheses relative to the source of polymorphism in tooth development: (i) Teeth share similar growth rates and initial sizes, but the deeper teeth are initiated earlier in leaf development. (ii) Teeth share similar timing of initiation and growth rates, but the deeper teeth have a larger initial size. (iii) Teeth share similar timing of initiation and initial sizes, but the deeper teeth have a faster growth rate. Leaf plastochron index (LPI) was used as the time variable for leaf development. Results showed teeth in se were initiated at -27 LPI, 15 plastochrons earlier than those of Col-1. Serrate leaf expansion was biphasic, with the early phase expanding at half the relative plastochron rate of the later phase, which equaled the constant relative expansion rate of Col-1 leaves. Allometric analyses of tooth development obscured the interactions between time of tooth and leaf initiation and the early phase of leaf expansion characteristic of serrate leaves and teeth. Timing of developmental events that allometric analysis obscured can be readily detected with the LPI as a developmental index.

  19. COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY OF TOOTH RESORPTION IN CATS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Linda G; Wilkinson, Thomas E; White, Tammy L; Farnsworth, Raelynn K; Potter, Kathleen A

    2016-09-01

    Tooth resorption is the most common dental disease in cats and can be a source of oral pain. The current clinical gold standard for diagnosis includes a combination of oral exam and dental radiography, however early lesions are not always detected. Computed tomography (CT) of the skull, including the dental arches, is a commonly performed diagnostic procedure, however the appearance of tooth resorption on CT and the diagnostic ability of CT to detect tooth resorption have not been evaluated. The purpose of this prospective, descriptive, diagnostic accuracy study was to characterize the CT appearance of tooth resorption in a sample of affected cats and to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of CT for tooth resorption compared to the clinical gold standard of oral exam and intraoral dental radiography. Twenty-eight cat cadaver specimens were recruited for inclusion. Each specimen was evaluated using oral exam, intraoral dental radiography, and computed tomography (four different slice thicknesses). Each tooth was evaluated for the presence or absence of tooth resorption. Teeth with lesions and a subset of normal teeth were evaluated with histopathology. On CT, tooth resorption appeared as irregularly marginated hypoattenuating defects in the mineral attenuating tooth components, most commonly involving the root or cementoenamel junction. Sensitivity for CT detection of tooth resorption was fair to poor (42.2-57.7%) and specificity was good to excellent (92.8-96.3%). Findings from this study indicated that CT has high specificity but low sensitivity for detection of tooth resorption in cats.

  20. Fluoridation and tooth wear in Irish adults.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burke, F M

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of tooth wear in adults in Ireland and its relationship with water fluoridation. The National Survey of Adult Oral Health was conducted in 2000\\/2001. Tooth wear was determined using a partial mouth examination assessing the upper and lower anterior teeth. A total of 2456 subjects were examined. In this survey, increasing levels and severity of tooth wear were associated with ageing. Men were more affected by tooth wear and were more likely to be affected by severe tooth wear than women. It was found that age, and gender were significant predictors of tooth wear (P < 0.01). Overall, there was no significant relationship between fluoridation and tooth wear in this study.

  1. [Tooth injury in anaesthesiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão Ribeiro de Sousa, José Miguel; de Barros Mourão, Joana Irene

    2015-01-01

    Dental injury is the most common complication of general anaesthesia and has significant physical, economic and forensic consequences. The aim of this study is to review on the characteristics of dental injury associated with anaesthesiology and existing methods of prevention. In this review, the time of anaesthesia in which the dental injury occurs, the affected teeth, the most frequent type of injury, established risk factors, prevention strategies, protection devices and medico-legal implications inherent to its occurrence are approached. Before initiating any medical procedure that requires the use of classic laryngoscopy, a thorough and detailed pre-aesthetic evaluation of the dental status of the patient is imperative, in order to identify teeth at risk, analyze the presence of factors associated with difficult intubation and outline a prevention strategy that is tailored to the risk of dental injury of each patient. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  2. Tooth injury in anaesthesiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa, José Miguel Brandão Ribeiro; Mourão, Joana Irene de Barros

    2015-01-01

    Dental injury is the most common complication of general anaesthesia and has significant physical, economic and forensic consequences. The aim of this study is to review on the characteristics of dental injury associated with anaesthesiology and existing methods of prevention. In this review, the time of anaesthesia in which the dental injury occurs, the affected teeth, the most frequent type of injury, established risk factors, prevention strategies, protection devices and medico-legal implications inherent to its occurrence are approached. Before initiating any medical procedure that requires the use of classic laryngoscopy, a thorough and detailed pre-aesthetic evaluation of the dental status of the patient is imperative, in order to identify teeth at risk, analyze the presence of factors associated with difficult intubation and outline a prevention strategy that is tailored to the risk of dental injury of each patient. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  3. Tooth injury in anaesthesiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Miguel Brandão Ribeiro de Sousa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Dental injury is the most common complication of general anaesthesia and has significant physical, economic and forensic consequences. The aim of this study is to review on the characteristics of dental injury associated with anaesthesiology and existing methods of prevention. CONTENTS: In this review, the time of anaesthesia in which the dental injury occurs, the affected teeth, the most frequent type of injury, established risk factors, prevention strategies, protection devices and medico-legal implications inherent to its occurrence are approached. CONCLUSIONS: Before initiating any medical procedure that requires the use of classic laryngoscopy, a thorough and detailed pre-aesthetic evaluation of the dental status of the patient is imperative, in order to identify teeth at risk, analyze the presence of factors associated with difficult intubation and outline a prevention strategy that is tailored to the risk of dental injury of each patient.

  4. Tooth sensitivity: mechanisms and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowitz, K

    1993-08-01

    Tooth sensitivity is a common complaint encountered in clinical practice. Exposed superficial dentin is free of nerve endings, yet sensitive. Experimental evidence indicates that stimuli, such as probing the dentin surface and air blasts, induce fluid movements in the dentinal tubules and these fluid movements, in turn, activate the intradental nerves. The condition of the dentin surface is critically important in allowing this process. In addition, the internal environment of the pulp may influence nerve excitability. Therapies for tooth sensitivity include both agents that obstruct the dentinal tubules and agents that can decrease the excitability of the intradental nerves. The exact treatment used depends on the etiology of the individual's problem and the extent of dentinal tissue damage.

  5. Towards tooth friendly soft drinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolahi, Jafar; Fazilati, Mohamad; Kadivar, Mahdi

    2009-10-01

    Most soft drinks contain high concentration of simple carbohydrates and have a pH of 3 or even lower. Therefore, they are harmful for tooth structure. A tooth friendly soft drink (T.F.S.D) should have the following characteristics and elements; fluoride (approximately 1 ppm), casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (2%), xylitol (4-6g/serving), tea polyphenols (2-4 mg/ml), cranberry extract (250 mg/ml of the flavonoids quercetin and myricetin), sugar free, pH close to 5.5 and super oxygenation (240,000 ppm) vs. carbonation. T.F.S.D can be packaged in a container which gaseous oxygen is dissolved in a liquid in the form of bubbles. However, looking at opportunities for so-called sophisticated soft drinks, T.F.S.D will be an example for a functional and health oriented soft drink.

  6. Supernumerary Jawbone Tooth: Clinical Case

    OpenAIRE

    Rivas Gutiérrez, Jesús; Carlos Sánchez, María Dolores

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: supernumerary teeth are dental development anomalies, alsoknown as hyperdontia or extra teeth. Their prevalence ranges between 0.3% and 3.8%.Their morphology may be normal or dismorphic and are associated to the etiology ofocclusal alterations. It is important to make an early diagnostic through a radiographicalstudy. Case presentation:this article presents a clinical case of a supernumerary tooth thatcaused rotation and crowding of the anterior bottom teeth, which was addressed...

  7. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Reilly, Mary M

    2011-03-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is the commonest inherited neuromuscular disorder affecting at least 1 in 2,500. Over the last two decades, there have been rapid advances in understanding the molecular basis for many forms of CMT with more than 30 causative genes now described. This has made obtaining an accurate genetic diagnosis possible but at times challenging for clinicians. This review aims to provide a simple, pragmatic approach to diagnosing CMT from a clinician\\'s perspective.

  8. Optical spectroscopy and tooth decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, P.; De, T.; Singh, R.

    2005-11-01

    Optical spectroscopy in the ultraviolet, visible and mid-infrared spectral regions has been used to discriminate between healthy and diseased teeth of patients in the age range 15-75 years. Spectral scans of absorbance versus wavenumber and fluorescence intensity versus wavelength have been recorded and investigated for caries and periodontal disease. Such optical diagnostics can prove very useful in the early detection and treatment of tooth decay.

  9. [Changes in the microvascular pattern of the periodontal ligament in an experimental tooth extrusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, K

    1989-08-01

    Forty eight adult cats were employed to investigate the serial changes of vascular patterns of the periodontal ligament on tooth extrusion. The right upper canines have been successively extruded (initial load 40 gr) with a open coil spring. The experimental periods were set on 1, 2, 3, 4 and 6 weeks respectively. On each experimental period, the microvascular casts of the periodontal ligament and alveolar bone around the experimental tooth were prepared for the scanning electron microscopy, utilizing the acrylic plastic injection method (Taniguchi and Ohta, et al. 1952 and 1955). And the serial sections of the surrounding tissues of the experimental tooth were made. In order to elucidate the mode of the tooth movement, the load of applied force and the distance of extrusion were measured. Results obtained were as follows: 1. The experimental tooth was extruded rapidly during first two weeks. The speed reduced gradually afterwards. 2. The new vascularization was seen around the apex first, then widely spread in the periodontal ligament. And the remarkable trabecula-shaped bone formation were observed around the venous networks of the root apex after two week period. 3. The tissue reactions after the tooth extrusion delayed in comparison with the movement of the tooth. 4. Although the tissue reactions of the root apex of the extruded tooth were originally similar to the one in the transverse tooth movement, slight differences were found in timing of the tissue change and shape of the capillary network. The findings of the tissue change showed that the light force was indicated in extrusion of the tooth. And the range of action of the force applied should be limited in orthodontic clinic.

  10. Novel management of avulsed tooth by pulpal and periodontal regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, Dexton Antony; Shivashankar, Vasundara Yayathi; Maroli, Ramesh Kumar; Vidyanath, Surendran

    2013-12-01

    The avulsion of anterior teeth of young children is a tragic occurrence and often presents an unparalleled challenge for the dentist. Reimplantation is the state-of-the-art treatment but may incur several complications, particularly with inappropriate posttraumatic management. In this article we report the emergency and rehabilitation treatment of an avulsed maxillary anterior tooth by using platelet-rich fibrin. The osteoconductive and osteoinductive properties of platelet-rich fibrin were used to stimulate pulpal and periodontal regeneration. During follow-up, no clinical signs and symptoms were present. After the initial 6 months, no further bone loss and attachment loss were observed. The tooth remained functional and was aesthetically acceptable. When a tooth is avulsed, attachment damage and pulp necrosis occur. Viable periodontal ligament cells are often left on most of the root surface. If the periodontal ligament that is left attached to the root surface does not dry out, the consequences of tooth avulsion are usually minimal. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Hair keratin mutations in tooth enamel increase dental decay risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duverger, Olivier; Ohara, Takahiro; Shaffer, John R; Donahue, Danielle; Zerfas, Patricia; Dullnig, Andrew; Crecelius, Christopher; Beniash, Elia; Marazita, Mary L; Morasso, Maria I

    2014-12-01

    Tooth enamel is the hardest substance in the human body and has a unique combination of hardness and fracture toughness that protects teeth from dental caries, the most common chronic disease worldwide. In addition to a high mineral content, tooth enamel comprises organic material that is important for mechanical performance and influences the initiation and progression of caries; however, the protein composition of tooth enamel has not been fully characterized. Here, we determined that epithelial hair keratins, which are crucial for maintaining the integrity of the sheaths that support the hair shaft, are expressed in the enamel organ and are essential organic components of mature enamel. Using genetic and intraoral examination data from 386 children and 706 adults, we found that individuals harboring known hair disorder-associated polymorphisms in the gene encoding keratin 75 (KRT75), KRT75(A161T) and KRT75(E337K), are prone to increased dental caries. Analysis of teeth from individuals carrying the KRT75(A161T) variant revealed an altered enamel structure and a marked reduction of enamel hardness, suggesting that a functional keratin network is required for the mechanical stability of tooth enamel. Taken together, our results identify a genetic locus that influences enamel structure and establish a connection between hair disorders and susceptibility to dental caries.

  12. [Assessment of traumatic tooth injuries in the emergency room].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risheim, Helge

    2006-04-27

    Many patients with facial injuries are first seen by doctors in the emergency room. Injuries affecting teeth and alveolar process are common in children; approximately half of all children have sustained such an injury before adulthood. Dentoalveolar trauma does not pose a significant morbid risk for the trauma patient. However, failure to recognise or obtain appropriate consultation can result in premature tooth or alveolar bone loss, resulting in problematic prosthetic rehabilitation. Emergency room doctors should know the initial treatment guidelines for traumatic dental injuries to provide optimal treatment before the patient can seen by a dentist. An avulsed tooth should be replanted immediately, or kept moist until it can be replanted. Prognosis is related to storage media and the length of the extra-alveolar period. Teeth replanted within 5 minutes have the best prognosis. If the primary consultation is by phone the patient, or the parent, should be informed to replant the avulsed tooth. If this is not feasible the tooth should be stored in milk, saliva (oral cavity) or physiologic saline until replanted. Primary teeth are not replanted.

  13. Epithelial histogenesis during tooth development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesot, H; Brook, A H

    2009-12-01

    This paper reviews the current understanding of the progressive changes mediating dental epithelial histogenesis as a basis for future collaborative studies. Tooth development involves morphogenesis, epithelial histogenesis and cell differentiation. The consecutive morphological stages of lamina, bud, cap and bell are also characterized by changes in epithelial histogenesis. Differential cell proliferation rates, apoptosis, and alterations in adhesion and shape lead to the positioning of groups of cells with different functions. During tooth histo-morphogenesis changes occur in basement membrane composition, expression of signalling molecules and the localization of cell surface components. Cell positional identity may be related to cell history. Another important parameter is cell plasticity. Independently of signalling molecules, which play a major role in inducing or modulating specific steps, cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions regulate the plasticity/rigidity of particular domains of the enamel organ. This involves specifying in space the differential growth and influences the progressive tooth morphogenesis by shaping the epithelial-mesenchymal junction. Deposition of a mineralized matrix determines the final shape of the crown. All data reviewed in this paper were investigated in the mouse.

  14. Tooth brushing for oral prophylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruaki Hayasaki, DDS, PhD

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Control of plaque and debris is essential for the prevention of inflammatory periodontal diseases and dental caries, because plaque is the primary etiological factor in the introduction and development of both of these infection-oriented diseases. Plaque removal with a toothbrush is the most frequently used method of oral hygiene. Powered toothbrushes were developed beginning in the 1960s and are now widely used in developed countries. The bristles of a toothbrush should be able to reach and clean efficiently most areas of the mouth, and recently the design of both manual and powered toothbrushes has focused on the ability to reach and clean interproximal tooth surfaces. An individual's tooth brushing behavior, including force, duration, motivation and motion, are also critical to tooth brushing efficacy. Dental floss and the type of toothpaste play additional important roles as auxiliary tools for oral prophylaxis. Dental professionals should help their care-receivers’ meet the requirements of oral hygiene to maintain their QOL. This article reviews these topics.

  15. Structure, attachment, replacement and growth of teeth in bluefish, Pomatomus saltatrix (Linnaeus, 1776), a teleost with deeply socketed teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemis, William E; Giuliano, Anne; McGuire, Betty

    2005-01-01

    Tooth replacement poses many questions about development, pattern formation, tooth attachment mechanisms, functional morphology and the evolution of vertebrate dentitions. Although most vertebrate species have polyphyodont dentitions, detailed knowledge of tooth structure and replacement is poor for most groups, particularly actinopterygians. We examined the oral dentition of the bluefish, Pomatomus saltatrix, a pelagic and coastal marine predator, using a sample of 50 individuals. The oral teeth are located on the dentary and premaxillary bones, and we scored each tooth locus in the dentary and premaxillary bones using a four-part functional classification: absent (A), incoming (I), functional (F=fully ankylosed) or eroding (E). The homodont oral teeth of Pomatomus are sharp, deeply socketed and firmly ankylosed to the bone of attachment. Replacement is intraosseus and occurs in alternate tooth loci with long waves of replacement passing from rear to front. The much higher percentage of functional as opposed to eroding teeth suggests that replacement rates are low but that individual teeth are quickly lost once erosion begins. Tooth number increases ontogenetically, ranging from 15-31 dentary teeth and 15-39 premaxillary teeth in the sample studied. Teeth increase in size with every replacement cycle. Remodeling of the attachment bone occurs continuously to accommodate growth. New tooth germs originate from a discontinuous dental lamina and migrate from the lingual (dentary) or labial (premaxillary) epithelium through pores in the bone of attachment into the resorption spaces beneath the existing teeth. Pomatomus shares unique aspects of tooth replacement with barracudas and other scombroids and this supports the interpretation that Pomatomus is more closely related to scombroids than to carangoids.

  16. Homogenization in strength and durability analysis of reinforced tooth filling

    OpenAIRE

    Mikhailov, SE; Orlik, J

    2002-01-01

    An asymptotic homogenization procedure is employed to obtain effective elastic properties of the composite tooth filling, a homogenized macro– stress field and a first approximation to the micro-stress field, from properties of the components and applied macro–loads. Using the approximate micro–stress field, a non–local initial strength and fatigue durability macro–conditions for the composite filling material is expressed in terms of the homogenized macro–stresses. An illustrative example wi...

  17. Impact of Masked Replacement of Sugar-Sweetened with Sugar-Free Beverages on Body Weight Increases with Initial BMI: Secondary Analysis of Data from an 18 Month Double-Blind Trial in Children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martijn B Katan

    Full Text Available Substituting sugar-free for sugar-sweetened beverages reduces weight gain. This effect may be more pronounced in children with a high body mass index (BMI because their sensing of kilocalories might be compromised. We investigated the impact of sugar-free versus sugary drinks separately in children with a higher and a lower initial BMI z score, and predicted caloric intakes and degree of compensation in the two groups.This is a secondary, explorative analysis of our double-blind randomized controlled trial (RCT which showed that replacement of one 250-mL sugary drink per day by a sugar-free drink for 18 months significantly reduced weight gain. In the 477 children who completed the trial, mean initial weights were close to the Dutch average. Only 16% were overweight and 3% obese. Weight changes were expressed as BMI z-score, i.e. as standard deviations of the BMI distribution per age and sex group. We designated the 239 children with an initial BMI z-score below the median as 'lower BMI' and the 238 children above the median as 'higher BMI'. The difference in caloric intake from experimental beverages between treatments was 86 kcal/day both in the lower and in the higher BMI group. We used a multiple linear regression and the coefficient of the interaction term (initial BMI group times treatment, indicated whether children with a lower BMI responded differently from children with a higher BMI. Statistical significance was defined as p ≤ 0.05. Relative to the sugar sweetened beverage, consumption of the sugar-free beverage for 18 months reduced the BMI z-score by 0.05 SD units within the lower BMI group and by 0.21 SD within the higher BMI group. Body weight gain was reduced by 0.62 kg in the lower BMI group and by 1.53 kg in the higher BMI group. Thus the treatment reduced the BMI z-score by 0.16 SD units more in the higher BMI group than in the lower BMI group (p = 0.04; 95% CI -0.31 to -0.01. The impact of the intervention on body weight

  18. Impact of Masked Replacement of Sugar-Sweetened with Sugar-Free Beverages on Body Weight Increases with Initial BMI: Secondary Analysis of Data from an 18 Month Double-Blind Trial in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katan, Martijn B; de Ruyter, Janne C; Kuijper, Lothar D J; Chow, Carson C; Hall, Kevin D; Olthof, Margreet R

    2016-01-01

    Substituting sugar-free for sugar-sweetened beverages reduces weight gain. This effect may be more pronounced in children with a high body mass index (BMI) because their sensing of kilocalories might be compromised. We investigated the impact of sugar-free versus sugary drinks separately in children with a higher and a lower initial BMI z score, and predicted caloric intakes and degree of compensation in the two groups. This is a secondary, explorative analysis of our double-blind randomized controlled trial (RCT) which showed that replacement of one 250-mL sugary drink per day by a sugar-free drink for 18 months significantly reduced weight gain. In the 477 children who completed the trial, mean initial weights were close to the Dutch average. Only 16% were overweight and 3% obese. Weight changes were expressed as BMI z-score, i.e. as standard deviations of the BMI distribution per age and sex group. We designated the 239 children with an initial BMI z-score below the median as 'lower BMI' and the 238 children above the median as 'higher BMI'. The difference in caloric intake from experimental beverages between treatments was 86 kcal/day both in the lower and in the higher BMI group. We used a multiple linear regression and the coefficient of the interaction term (initial BMI group times treatment), indicated whether children with a lower BMI responded differently from children with a higher BMI. Statistical significance was defined as p ≤ 0.05. Relative to the sugar sweetened beverage, consumption of the sugar-free beverage for 18 months reduced the BMI z-score by 0.05 SD units within the lower BMI group and by 0.21 SD within the higher BMI group. Body weight gain was reduced by 0.62 kg in the lower BMI group and by 1.53 kg in the higher BMI group. Thus the treatment reduced the BMI z-score by 0.16 SD units more in the higher BMI group than in the lower BMI group (p = 0.04; 95% CI -0.31 to -0.01). The impact of the intervention on body weight gain differed by 0

  19. Shoulder Joint Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Shoulder Replacement Options Shoulder replacement surgery is highly technical. It should be performed by a surgical team ... area and will meet a doctor from the anesthesia department. You, your anesthesiologist, and your surgeon will ...

  20. Partial knee replacement - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100225.htm Partial knee replacement - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Knee Replacement A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited ...

  1. Tooth erosion caused by chewing aspirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Edward G; Sarlani, Eleni; Kaplan, Sarit

    2004-07-01

    Although the effects of aspirin on the oral mucosa are well-documented, there is little documentation of the effects of aspirin-chewing on the enamel and dentin. The authors present two cases of patients with damage to their tooth enamel and dentin. Both patients had similiar symptoms, but had not been told that chewing aspirin could harm tooth structure. The authors identify clinical signs and symptoms and discuss ways to prevent erosion. The common factor in these cases is that aspirin was the only possible cause of the tooth erosion. Dentists should be aware of the effects of aspirin-chewing on tooth structure and advise their patients accordingly.

  2. Cracked tooth syndrome: Overview of literature

    OpenAIRE

    Hasan, Shamimul; Singh, Kuldeep; Salati, Naseer

    2015-01-01

    Pain is defined as an “unpleasant sensory and emotional feeling which is associated with actual or potential injury of tissue or expressed in terms of such injury.” Tooth pain usually refers to pain around the teeth or jaws mainly as a result of a dental condition. Mostly, toothaches are caused by a carious cavity, a broken tooth, an exposed tooth root or gum disease. The toothache may sometimes be the result of radiating pain from structures in the vicinity of tooth and jaws (cardiac pain, e...

  3. Proteoglycans and orthodontic tooth movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddington, R J; Embery, G

    2001-12-01

    Proteoglycans represent an important and diverse family of extracellular matrix components within the connective tissues of the periodontium. This review focuses on the function and metabolism of the various proteoglycans in periodontal tissues, such as alveolar bone and periodontal ligament, and considers their potential fate in response to an orthodontic force. Such considerations provide an important background in evaluating the potential for proteoglycan metabolites, alongside other connective tissue metabolites, as biomarkers for assessing the deep-seated metabolic changes and as a diagnostic tool in monitoring orthodontic tooth movement.

  4. Esthesioneuroblastoma presenting as tooth pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvathi Devi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Esthesioneuroblastoma, also called olfactory neuroblastoma, is a rare malignant tumor originating in the olfactory epithelium in the upper nasal cavity with intracranial extension and may also be associated with secondary sinus diseases. Esthesioneuroblastoma has been observed to cause death by distant metastasis or by invasion through the cribriform plate and secondary meningitis. It usually produces nasal obstruction, epistaxis and less commonly anosmia, headache and pain. We report a case of esthesioneuroblastoma in a 50-year-old female who reported with tooth pain as a presenting symptom.

  5. Esthesioneuroblastoma presenting as tooth pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Parvathi; Bhavle, Radhika; Aggarwal, Avanti; Walia, Cherry

    2014-09-01

    Esthesioneuroblastoma, also called olfactory neuroblastoma, is a rare malignant tumor originating in the olfactory epithelium in the upper nasal cavity with intracranial extension and may also be associated with secondary sinus diseases. Esthesioneuroblastoma has been observed to cause death by distant metastasis or by invasion through the cribriform plate and secondary meningitis. It usually produces nasal obstruction, epistaxis and less commonly anosmia, headache and pain. We report a case of esthesioneuroblastoma in a 50-year-old female who reported with tooth pain as a presenting symptom.

  6. Stem cell sources for tooth regeneration: current status and future prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keishi eOtsu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells are capable of renewing themselves through cell division and have the remarkable ability to differentiate into many different types of cells. They therefore have the potential to become a central tool in regenerative medicine. During the last decade, advances in tissue engineering and stem cell-based tooth regeneration have provided realistic and attractive means of replacing lost or damaged teeth. Investigation of embryonic and adult (tissue stem cells as potential cell sources for tooth regeneration has led to many promising results. However, technical and ethical issues have hindered the availability of these cells for clinical application. The recent discovery of induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells has provided the possibility to revolutionize the field of regenerative medicine (dentistry by offering the option of autologous transplantation. In this article, we review the current progress in the field of stem cell-based tooth regeneration and discuss the possibility of using iPS cells for this purpose.

  7. Future dentistry: cell therapy meets tooth and periodontal repair and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catón, Javier; Bostanci, Nagihan; Remboutsika, Eumorphia; De Bari, Cosimo; Mitsiadis, Thimios A

    2011-05-01

    Cell-based tissue repair of the tooth and - tooth-supporting - periodontal ligament (PDL) is a new attractive approach that complements traditional restorative or surgical techniques for replacement of injured or pathologically damaged tissues. In such therapeutic approaches, stem cells and/or progenitor cells are manipulated in vitro and administered to patients as living and dynamic biological agents. In this review, we discuss the clonogenic potential of human dental and periodontal tissues such as the dental pulp and the PDL and their potential for tooth and periodontal repair and/or regeneration. We propose novel therapeutic approaches using stem cells or progenitor cells, which are targeted to regenerate the lost dental or periodontal tissue.

  8. Stem cell sources for tooth regeneration: current status and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsu, Keishi; Kumakami-Sakano, Mika; Fujiwara, Naoki; Kikuchi, Kazuko; Keller, Laetitia; Lesot, Hervé; Harada, Hidemitsu

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells are capable of renewing themselves through cell division and have the remarkable ability to differentiate into many different types of cells. They therefore have the potential to become a central tool in regenerative medicine. During the last decade, advances in tissue engineering and stem cell-based tooth regeneration have provided realistic and attractive means of replacing lost or damaged teeth. Investigation of embryonic and adult (tissue) stem cells as potential cell sources for tooth regeneration has led to many promising results. However, technical and ethical issues have hindered the availability of these cells for clinical application. The recent discovery of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells has provided the possibility to revolutionize the field of regenerative medicine (dentistry) by offering the option of autologous transplantation. In this article, we review the current progress in the field of stem cell-based tooth regeneration and discuss the possibility of using iPS cells for this purpose.

  9. Post-Odontoma autotransplantation of an impacted tooth: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robindro Singh, Waikhom; Aheibam, Kirankumar; Nameirakpam, Anthopia

    2015-01-01

    After years of relegation by dental implants, autotransplantation has recently become more popular because of a better understanding of its science. The prognosis of autotransplantation primarily depends upon the presence of an intact alveolar bone at the transplant site and the regeneration of a functional periodontal ligament of the transplant. Replacement of an unsalvaged or a missing tooth by a natural tooth with normal periodontium within a short duration of treatment is the ultimate challenge of autotransplantation. Meanwhile, Platelet Rich Fibrin (PRF) is popular as a biomaterial which helps in the regeneration of bone and periodontal tissues. To improve the prognosis, and also shorten the treatment time in a rare case of autotransplantation of an impacted tooth in a post-odontoma site, we did a two-stage surgical procedure aided by synthetic bone granules (Biograft) and PRF. The clinical and radiological findings at 6 months follow-up showed good result and promise.

  10. Pediatric tooth extractions under sedoanalgesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arpaci, Ayse Hande; Isik, Berrin

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The present study aims to evaluate intravenous ketamine and inhalation sedation in children, their unwanted side-effects and surgeon satisfaction. Methods: In this study, data of 922 children aged between 1-18 who underwent tooth extraction under sedoanalgesia in our department between September 2015-January 2016 were gathered and anesthesia approaches, unwanted side effects and surgical satisfaction was investigated. Postoperative recovery emergence agitation or delirium was evaluated with Watcha Behavior Scale (WBS). Results: Patients were grouped and compared according to acceptance of intravenous line placement (Group-1) or not (Group- 2). Group 1 received intravenous ketamine anesthesia (n=822), Group 2 received inhalation anesthesia with sevoflurane (n=100). Number of patients, age, weight and gender was significantly different in two groups. When side effects were investigated nausea was observed in 30 patients (3.6%), skin rashes were observed in 26 patients (3.2%) in Group-1 while skin rashes were observed in one patient (1%) in Group 2. 95% of surgeons reported intravenous anesthesia, 18% of surgeons reported inhalation anesthesia to be the anesthesia of choice. Emergence of postoperative recovery agitation (WBS≥3) was observed more frequent in Group 2 (p<0.05) than Group 1. Conclusion: Ketamine, which has analgesic, hypnotic and amnestic effects and which does not alter pharyngeal and laryngeal reflexes thus minimizes aspiration possibility, is a safe and effective anesthetic agent for tooth extractions of the pediatric population under sedoanalgesia. PMID:27882039

  11. Replacement of hopeless retained primary teeth by immediate dental implants: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Rafael R; Macedo, Guilherme O; Muglia, Valdir A; Souza, Sérgio L S; Novaes, Arthur B; Taba, Mário

    2009-01-01

    Hopeless retained primary teeth without permanent successors represent a restorative challenge for clinicians, along with esthetic and functional problems for patients. While various treatment approaches for congenitally missing teeth have been proposed, the replacement of a missing tooth with a dental implant offers specific advantages, such as preservation of the alveolar crest and elimination of the need to restore the adjacent teeth, over other options for tooth replacement. The aim of this article was to illustrate the surgical and prosthetic treatment with implants of a patient with primary teeth without permanent successors.

  12. Herbal extracts and symbiotic mixture replacing antibiotics in piglets at the initial phase Extratos herbais e mistura simbiótica em substituição aos antibióticos para suínos na fase inicial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Gilberto Zangeronimo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the use of vegetable extract based addictives associated or not to symbiotics as an alternative for antibiotic as growth promoters for piglets at initial phase. It was used 125 pigs of commercial genetic line with initial weight of 7.4 ± 1.1 kg, weaned at 20 days of age, during 50 days. The experimental design used was randomized blocks (initial weight, with five treatments and five replicates with five animals per experimental unit. The experimental diets were a basal diet, without additive, and other four diets, one diet containing antibiotic (colistin + zinc oxide; diet with 0.3% of a symbiotic mixture; diet with 0.3% of a symbiotic mixture plus 0.05% of herbal mix (plant extracts and microencapsulated essential oils; and another diet with 0.3% of symbiotic mixture plus 0.1% of herbal mixture. It was observed that the use of the symbiotic mixture associated to 0.05% of herbal mixture showed positive results, similar to the ones obtained with diets containing antibiotics for the final weight, average weight gain, average daily feed intake and pH of stomach and diarrhea incidence. The use of symbiotics promoted smaller vilous:depth crypt ratio, except when associated to 0.1% of herbal mixture, which was similar to the diet without addictives. There was no differences in the feed conversion, coliform and lactobacillus count in the jejune and in the cecum and in the pH of cecum. The use of herbal mixture associated to symbiotic is a viable alternative for replacing the use of antibiotics as growth promoters for piglets in the initial phase. However, the concentration of the herbal mixture is an important factor to be considered.O objetivo neste trabalho foi avaliar o uso de aditivos à base de extratos vegetais associados ou não ao uso de simbióticos como alternativa aos antibióticos como promotores de crescimento para suínos na fase inicial. Foram utilizados 125 leitões de genética comercial, com

  13. Addressing Tooth Decay in Head Start Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlden, Adam P.; Hill, Lawrence F.; Alles-White, Monica L.; Cottrell, Randall R.

    2012-01-01

    Tooth decay is the most prevalent chronic disease of childhood. Oral health education and dental services are crucial to reducing the number of children afflicted with dental cavities. Due to limited access to preventative care, Head Start children are particularly vulnerable to tooth decay. This article outlines practical implications of a…

  14. Side effects of external tooth bleaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruzell, E.M.; Pallesen, Ulla; Thoresen, N.R.

    2013-01-01

    General practices and university clinics during the years 2007‑2009 in Scandinavia. Subjects Patients with tooth bleaching as part of the treatment plan. Results The prevalence of experienced tooth sensitivity at first follow-up was independent of bleaching procedure (at-home = 50.3% [n = 143]; in...

  15. Addressing Tooth Decay in Head Start Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlden, Adam P.; Hill, Lawrence F.; Alles-White, Monica L.; Cottrell, Randall R.

    2012-01-01

    Tooth decay is the most prevalent chronic disease of childhood. Oral health education and dental services are crucial to reducing the number of children afflicted with dental cavities. Due to limited access to preventative care, Head Start children are particularly vulnerable to tooth decay. This article outlines practical implications of a…

  16. Biologically Based Restorative Management of Tooth Wear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin G. D. Kelleher

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence and severity of tooth wear is increasing in industrialised nations. Yet, there is no high-level evidence to support or refute any therapeutic intervention. In the absence of such evidence, many currently prevailing management strategies for tooth wear may be failing in their duty of care to first and foremost improve the oral health of patients with this disease. This paper promotes biologically sound approaches to the management of tooth wear on the basis of current best evidence of the aetiology and clinical features of this disease. The relative risks and benefits of the varying approaches to managing tooth wear are discussed with reference to long-term follow-up studies. Using reference to ethical standards such as “The Daughter Test”, this paper presents case reports of patients with moderate-to-severe levels of tooth wear managed in line with these biologically sound principles.

  17. Signaling Pathways Critical for Tooth Root Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J; Feng, J Q

    2017-10-01

    Tooth is made of an enamel-covered crown and a cementum-covered root. Studies on crown dentin formation have been a major focus in tooth development for several decades. Interestingly, the population prevalence for genetic short root anomaly (SRA) with no apparent defects in crown is close to 1.3%. Furthermore, people with SRA itself are predisposed to root resorption during orthodontic treatment. The discovery of the unique role of Nfic (nuclear factor I C; a transcriptional factor) in controlling root but not crown dentin formation points to a new concept: tooth crown and root have different control mechanisms. Further genetic mechanism studies have identified more key molecules (including Osterix, β-catenin, and sonic hedgehog) that play a critical role in root formation. Extensive studies have also revealed the critical role of Hertwig's epithelial root sheath in tooth root formation. In addition, Wnt10a has recently been found to be linked to multirooted tooth furcation formation. These exciting findings not only fill the critical gaps in our understanding about tooth root formation but will aid future research regarding the identifying factors controlling tooth root size and the generation of a whole "bio-tooth" for therapeutic purposes. This review starts with human SRA and mainly focuses on recent progress on the roles of NFIC-dependent and NFIC-independent signaling pathways in tooth root formation. Finally, this review includes a list of the various Cre transgenic mouse lines used to achieve tooth root formation-related gene deletion or overexpression, as well as strengths and limitations of each line.

  18. Review of molar tooth structure research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Wei Kuang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available For more than a century, molar tooth structure (MTS has been studied. The study developed in three stages. During the first stage (before 1980, researchers described three basic morphologies of MTS, mainly from the Belt Supergroup in North America, and they provided several hypotheses for the origin of MTS. During the second stage (1980–1999, the frequent discoveries of MTS on all continents resulted in many detailed descriptions of their shape and in several hypotheses concerning the origin of MTS. Notably, hypotheses of MTS’s origin such as seismic activity and biological activity were developed. Since 2000, research has progressed into a new stage (the third stage. This is due to discoveries of MTS in the Meso–Neoproterozoic of China and elsewhere, and the ongoing debate on the seismic or biological origin is replaced by a hypothesis that involves gas expansion and chemically-controlled carbonate precipitation (both of them possibly affected by biological activities. This latter idea has gradually been commonly recognized as the mainstream theory. Despite continued disagreements, researchers now agree that microsparry calcite played a controlling role regarding the development and the global distribution of MTS in time and space during the Proterozoic, the morphological diversity, and the impact on the sedimentary environment. The present contribution analyses the three major hypotheses regarding the origin of MTS; it also discusses the shortcomings of the hypotheses regarding a seismic or biologic origin, and it details the modern hypothesis that links formation of cracks to the precipitation of sparry calcite. It is deduced that important questions dealing with the Precambrian can be answered, among other aspects regarding the depositional palaeogeography and stratigraphic correlations.

  19. A Case of Simultaneous Ectopic Tooth Extraction and Removal of Migrated Dental Implant from Maxillary Sinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, Yoshitaka; Norizuki, Yoshie; Yajima, Yasutomo

    2015-01-01

    When a dental implant migrates to the maxillary sinus it should be extracted immediately as it may cause sinusitis or further migrate to one of the other paranasal sinuses. Although usually detected due to symptoms such as nasal obstruction, nasal discharge, and nasal bleeding, an ectopic tooth in the maxillary sinus can sometimes be revealed incidentally on radiographic examination. Here, we report a case of simultaneous extraction of a dental implant that had migrated to the maxillary sinus and removal of an ectopic tooth that had arisen in the same location. The patient was a 73-year-old man who had received the implant to replace the first left maxillary molar at a local dental office. The implant had subsequently migrated to the left maxillary sinus and the patient was referred to us for its removal. On locating the implant on a CT scan at our hospital, an ectopic tooth was also observed at the base of the maxillary sinus. With patient consent, the decision was made to remove the ectopic tooth and extract the implant simultaneously. Excision of the lateral wall of the maxillary sinus allowed easy extraction of the implant. The ectopic tooth was removed by slightly expanding a fenestration in the sinus wall. Ectopic teeth in the maxillary sinus are sometimes put on follow-up if asymptomatic. Removal should be considered, however, if there is a risk of it becoming infected due to implantation-induced inflammation.

  20. Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells: A New Therapeutic Option for Tooth Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuanwei; Yu, Yongchun; Chen, Lin; Ye, Lanfeng; Cui, Junhui; Sun, Quan; Li, Kaide; Li, Zhiyong; Liu, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Tooth regeneration is considered to be an optimistic approach to replace current treatments for tooth loss. It is important to determine the most suitable seed cells for tooth regeneration. Recently, human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) have been regarded as a promising candidate for tissue regeneration. However, it has not been reported whether hUCMSCs can be employed in tooth regeneration. Here, we report that hUCMSCs can be induced into odontoblast-like cells in vitro and in vivo. Induced hUCMSCs expressed dentin-related proteins including dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and dentin matrix protein-1 (DMP-1), and their gene expression levels were similar to those in native pulp tissue cells. Moreover, DSP- and DMP-1-positive calcifications were observed after implantation of hUCMSCs in vivo. These findings reveal that hUCMSCs have an odontogenic differentiation potency to differentiate to odontoblast-like cells with characteristic deposition of dentin-like matrix in vivo. This study clearly demonstrates hUCMSCs as an alternative therapeutic cell source for tooth regeneration.

  1. Effects of carbonated soft drink consumption on orthodontic tooth movements in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Agha Aghili

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this animal study was to evaluate the possible effects of Carbonated Soft Drink consumption on the rate of orthodontic tooth movement in rats.Thirty-six adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into two experimental groups and one control group. In the experimental groups (A&B, the water in the dietary regimen was replaced with soft drinks (Fanta® in group A and Cola® in group B two weeks before placement of orthodontic appliances. Then 5-mm nickel-titanium closed-coil springs were placed between the maxillary right first molars and first incisors under general anesthesia. This regimen continued for two weeks more and animals drank soft drink ad libitum. At the end of the experimental period, the rats were sacrificed, and interproximal tooth movements were measured.The mean amounts of tooth movement were 0.19mm in group A, 0.22mm in group B and 0.37mm in group C. Statistical analysis with analysis of variance (ANOVA test showed significant differences between all groups. The least movement occurred in group A that had received Fanta® drink.CSDs consumption decreases the rate of orthodontic tooth movement. The role of soft drinks in decreasing tooth movement might be related to its effects on bone metabolism.

  2. Aeronautical Information System Replacement -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — Aeronautical Information System Replacement is a web-enabled, automation means for the collection and distribution of Service B messages, weather information, flight...

  3. Decoronation of an ankylosed tooth for preservation of alveolar bone prior to implant placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippi, A; Pohl, Y; von Arx, T

    2001-04-01

    A 12-year-old patient sustained avulsions of both permanent maxillary central incisors. Subsequently, both teeth developed replacement resorption. The left incisor was extracted alio loco. The right incisor was treated by decoronation (removal of crown and pulp, but preservation of the root substance). Comparison of both sites demonstrated complete preservation of the height and width of the alveolar bone at the decoronation site, whereas the tooth extraction site showed considerable bone loss. In addition, some vertical bone apposition was found on top of the decoronated root. Decoronation is a simple and safe surgical procedure for preservation of alveolar bone prior to implant placement. It must be considered as a treatment option for teeth affected by replacement resorption if tooth transplantation is not feasible.

  4. Tooth crown heights, tooth wear, sexual dimorphism and jaw growth in hominoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, M C; Beynon, A D

    1991-01-01

    The aim of this review is to bring together data that link tooth morphology with tooth function and tooth growth: We aim to show how the microanatomy of hominoid teeth is providing evidence about rates of tooth growth that are likely to be a consequence of both masticatory strategy and social behaviour. First, we present data about incisor and molar tooth wear in wild short chimpanzees that demonstrate how crown heights are likely to be related to relative tooth use in a broad sense. Following this we review recent studies that describe the microanatomy of hominoid tooth enamel and show how these studies are providing evidence about tooth crown formation times in hominoids, as well as improving estimates for the age at death of certain juvenile fossil hominids. Next, we outline what is known about the mechanisms of tooth growth in the sexually dimorphic canine teeth of chimpanzees and compare these patterns of growth with tooth growth patterns in the canines of three fossil hominids from Laetoli, Tanzania. Finally, we discuss how selection pressures that operate to increase or reduce the size of anterior teeth interact with jaw size. We argue that the space available to grow developing teeth in the mandibles of juvenile hominoids is determined by the growth patterns of the mandibles, which in turn reflect masticatory strategy. The consequences of selection pressure to grow large or small anterior teeth are likely to be reflected in the times at which these teeth are able to emerge into occlusion.

  5. Primary Cilia Integrate Hedgehog and Wnt Signaling during Tooth Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, B.; Chen, S.; Cheng, D.; Jing, W.; Helms, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Many ciliopathies have clinical features that include tooth malformations but how these defects come about is not clear. Here we show that genetic deletion of the motor protein Kif3a in dental mesenchyme results in an arrest in odontogenesis. Incisors are completely missing, and molars are enlarged in Wnt1Cre+Kif3afl/fl embryos. Although amelogenesis and dentinogenesis initiate in the molar tooth bud, both processes terminate prematurely. We demonstrate that loss of Kif3a in dental mesenchyme results in loss of Hedgehog signaling and gain of Wnt signaling in this same tissue. The defective dental mesenchyme then aberrantly signals to the dental epithelia, which prompts an up-regulation in the Hedgehog and Wnt responses in the epithelia and leads to multiple attempts at invagination and an expanded enamel organ. Thus, the primary cilium integrates Hedgehog and Wnt signaling between dental epithelia and mesenchyme, and this cilia-dependent integration is required for proper tooth development. PMID:24659776

  6. Primary cilia integrate hedgehog and Wnt signaling during tooth development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, B; Chen, S; Cheng, D; Jing, W; Helms, J A

    2014-05-01

    Many ciliopathies have clinical features that include tooth malformations but how these defects come about is not clear. Here we show that genetic deletion of the motor protein Kif3a in dental mesenchyme results in an arrest in odontogenesis. Incisors are completely missing, and molars are enlarged in Wnt1(Cre+)Kif3a(fl/fl) embryos. Although amelogenesis and dentinogenesis initiate in the molar tooth bud, both processes terminate prematurely. We demonstrate that loss of Kif3a in dental mesenchyme results in loss of Hedgehog signaling and gain of Wnt signaling in this same tissue. The defective dental mesenchyme then aberrantly signals to the dental epithelia, which prompts an up-regulation in the Hedgehog and Wnt responses in the epithelia and leads to multiple attempts at invagination and an expanded enamel organ. Thus, the primary cilium integrates Hedgehog and Wnt signaling between dental epithelia and mesenchyme, and this cilia-dependent integration is required for proper tooth development.

  7. Tooth Retained Implant: No More an Oxymoron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Bhat

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Periodontally af-fected teeth are treated in one of the two ways. (1 Tooth retention after periodontal surgery, in which the degree of regeneration achieved is unpredictable. (2 Tooth extrac-tion and implant placement. Implants have an osseointegrated surface which does not provide adequate shock absorption. Regeneration can be achieved by resecting the crown of the affected tooth and submerging the root. This technique has not had a clinical application so far as the tooth becomes difficult to restore. Placing an implant within the root can make the retained root restorable. At the same time, as the implant is placed within the root surface it achieves a periodontal integration which dampens occlusal forces better than osseointegration. Therefore, such a “tooth retained implant” may serve as an additional treatment option with significant benefits over tooth retention and implant placement alone. The hypothesis: Implants placed within retained roots have shown cementum deposition and attachment of periodontal ligament fibers over their surface. This periodontal attachment may be able to dam-pen forces better than in an osseointegrated implant. Moreover, since an implant is being placed, the crown of the tooth can be resected and submerged. This prevents epithelial migration, allows for the periodontal ligament cells to populate the wound and favors regeneration.Evaluation of the hypothesis: The technique of placing implants within cavities prepared in the root and then submerging them are simple for any practitioner placing implants routinely.

  8. Spectroscopic investigations of carious tooth decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thareja, R K; Sharma, A K; Shukla, Shobha

    2008-11-01

    We report on the elemental composition of healthy and infected part of human tooth using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). We have used prominent constituent transitions in laser-excited tooth to diagnose the state of the tooth. A nanosecond laser pulse (355nm, 5ns) was used as an ablating pulse and the sodium (3s2S-3p2P) at 588.99 and (3s2S-3p2P) at 589.99nm, strontium (5s21S-1s5P) at 460.55nm, and calcium (3d3D-4f 3F0) at 452.55nm transitions for spectroscopic analysis. The spectroscopic observations in conjunction with discriminate analysis showed that calcium attached to the hydroxyapatite structure of the tooth was affected severely at the infected part of the tooth. The position-time plots generated from two-dimensional (2D) images conclusively showed a decrease in calcium concentration in the infected region of the irradiated tooth. Using the technique, we could distinguish between the healthy and carious parts of the tooth with significant accuracy.

  9. Radiation Source Replacement Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Moran, Traci L.; Bond, Leonard J.

    2010-12-01

    This report summarizes a Radiation Source Replacement Workshop in Houston Texas on October 27-28, 2010, which provided a forum for industry and researchers to exchange information and to discuss the issues relating to replacement of AmBe, and potentially other isotope sources used in well logging.

  10. Tooth-bone morphogenesis during postnatal stages of mouse first molar development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lungová, Vlasta; Radlanski, Ralf J; Tucker, Abigail S; Renz, Herbert; Míšek, Ivan; Matalová, Eva

    2011-06-01

    The first mouse molar (M1) is the most common model for odontogenesis, with research particularly focused on prenatal development. However, the functional dentition forms postnatally, when the histogenesis and morphogenesis of the tooth is completed, the roots form and the tooth physically anchors into the jaw. In this work, M1 was studied from birth to eruption, assessing morphogenesis, proliferation and apoptosis, and correlating these with remodeling of the surrounding bony tissue. The M1 completed crown formation between postnatal (P) days 0-2, and the development of the tooth root was initiated at P4. From P2 until P12, cell proliferation in the dental epithelium reduced and shifted downward to the apical region of the forming root. In contrast, proliferation was maintained or increased in the mesenchymal cells of the dental follicle. At later stages, before tooth eruption (P20), cell proliferation suddenly ceased. This withdrawal from the cell cycle correlated with tooth mineralization and mesenchymal differentiation. Apoptosis was observed during all stages of M1 postnatal morphogenesis, playing a role in the removal of cells such as osteoblasts in the mandibular region and working together with osteoclasts to remodel the bone around the developing tooth. At more advanced developmental stages, apoptotic cells and bodies accumulated in the cell layers above the tooth cusps, in the path of eruption. Three-dimensional reconstruction of the developing postnatal tooth and bone indicates that the alveolar crypts form by resorption underneath the primordia, whereas the ridges form by active bone growth between the teeth and roots to form a functional complex. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Anatomy © 2011 Anatomical Society of Great Britain and Ireland.

  11. Effect of repeated immersion solution cycles on the color stability of denture tooth acrylic resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Maurício Batista da Silva

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Chemical solutions have been widely used for disinfection of dentures, but their effect on color stability of denture tooth acrylic resins after repeated procedures is still unclear. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate whether repeated cycles of chemical disinfectants affected the color stability of two denture tooth acrylic resins. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Sixty disc-shaped specimens (40 mm x 3 mm were fabricated from two different brands (Artiplus and Trilux of denture tooth acrylic resin. The specimens from each brand (n=30 were randomly divided into 6 groups (n=5 and immersed in the following solutions: distilled water (control group and 5 disinfecting solutions (1% sodium hypochlorite, 2% sodium hypochlorite, 5.25% sodium hypochlorite, 2% glutaraldehyde, and 4% chlorhexidine gluconate. Tooth color measurements were made by spectrophotometry. Before disinfection, the initial color of each tooth was recorded. Further color measurements were determined after subjecting the specimens to 7, 21, 30, 45, 60, and 90 immersion cycles in each tested solution. Color differences (ΔE* were determined using the CIE L*a*b* color system. Data were analyzed using two-way repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA followed by Tukey tests. The significance level was set at 5%. RESULTS: There were statistically significant differences in ΔE* among the 5 disinfectants and water during the 90 cycles of immersion for both denture tooth acrylic resins. Distilled water promoted the greatest color change in both denture tooth acrylic resins, nevertheless none of tested disinfectants promoted ΔE* values higher than 1.0 on these acrylic materials during the 90 cycles of disinfection. CONCLUSIONS: Repeated immersion cycles in disinfecting solutions alter ΔE* values, however these values do not compromise the color of the tested denture tooth acrylic resins because they are imperceptible to the human eye.

  12. Tooth-bone morphogenesis during postnatal stages of mouse first molar development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lungová, Vlasta; Radlanski, Ralf J; Tucker, Abigail S; Renz, Herbert; Míšek, Ivan; Matalová, Eva

    2011-01-01

    The first mouse molar (M1) is the most common model for odontogenesis, with research particularly focused on prenatal development. However, the functional dentition forms postnatally, when the histogenesis and morphogenesis of the tooth is completed, the roots form and the tooth physically anchors into the jaw. In this work, M1 was studied from birth to eruption, assessing morphogenesis, proliferation and apoptosis, and correlating these with remodeling of the surrounding bony tissue. The M1 completed crown formation between postnatal (P) days 0–2, and the development of the tooth root was initiated at P4. From P2 until P12, cell proliferation in the dental epithelium reduced and shifted downward to the apical region of the forming root. In contrast, proliferation was maintained or increased in the mesenchymal cells of the dental follicle. At later stages, before tooth eruption (P20), cell proliferation suddenly ceased. This withdrawal from the cell cycle correlated with tooth mineralization and mesenchymal differentiation. Apoptosis was observed during all stages of M1 postnatal morphogenesis, playing a role in the removal of cells such as osteoblasts in the mandibular region and working together with osteoclasts to remodel the bone around the developing tooth. At more advanced developmental stages, apoptotic cells and bodies accumulated in the cell layers above the tooth cusps, in the path of eruption. Three-dimensional reconstruction of the developing postnatal tooth and bone indicates that the alveolar crypts form by resorption underneath the primordia, whereas the ridges form by active bone growth between the teeth and roots to form a functional complex. PMID:21418206

  13. TOOTH CONTACT ANALYSIS OF CONICAL INVOLUTE GEARS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The mathematical model of conical involute gears is developed based on the theory of gearing and the generating mechanism. Tooth contact analysis (TCA) is performed to examine the meshing and bearing contact of the conical involute gear pairs with intersected and crossed axes. In addition, the principal directions and curvatures of the gear surfaces are investigated and the contact ellipses of the mating tooth surfaces are also studied. Finally, the numerical illustrative examples are provided to demonstrate the computational results, test gears are made for tooth-bearing tests, and the conclusion is verified that the theory has the applicability.

  14. Regenerative Applications Using Tooth Derived Stem Cells in Other Than Tooth Regeneration: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yun-Jong; Cha, Seunghee; Park, Young-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Tooth derived stem cells or dental stem cells are categorized according to the location from which they are isolated and represent a promising source of cells for regenerative medicine. Originally, as one kind of mesenchymal stem cells, they are considered an alternative of bone marrow stromal cells. They share many commonalties but maintain differences. Considering their original function in development and the homeostasis of tooth structures, many applications of these cells in dentistry have aimed at tooth structure regeneration; however, the application in other than tooth structures has been attempted extensively. The availability from discarded or removed teeth can be an innate benefit as a source of autologous cells. Their origin from the neural crest results in exploitation of neurological and numerous other applications. This review briefly highlights current and future perspectives of the regenerative applications of tooth derived stem cells in areas beyond tooth regeneration.

  15. Tooth resorption in cats: contribution of vitamin D and inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, H.E.

    2010-01-01

    Tooth resorption in cats Tooth resorption affecting several teeth is a painful disease with a prevalence of up to 75% in household cats and is often accompanied by periodontitis. Tooth resorption is caused by an increased number and activity of tooth-resorbing odontoclasts, cells that share function

  16. Percutaneous tricuspid valve replacement in childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Emmel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Percutaneous replacement of the tricuspid valve with a bovine jugular venous valve (melody valve was successfully undertaken in a 9-year-old boy. The patient had a previous history of bacterial endocarditis of the native tricuspid valve in infancy. Initially, a pericardial patch valve was created, followed by surgical replacement of the valve using a biological tissue valve at 4 years of age. Progressive stenosis and regurgitation of the biological valve, with severe venous congestion and resulting hepatic dysfunction prompted percutaneous valve replacement.

  17. 经股动脉球囊扩张式主动脉瓣置换术的初步经验%Aortic valve replacement via transfemoral balloon dilation: an initial experience

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆清声; 景在平; 洪毅; 吴宏; 王志农; 李卫萍; 张勇学; 李南; 马宇; 秦永文

    2011-01-01

    Objective To discuss the feasibility of treating patients with severe aortic valve stenosis by aortic valve replacement via transfemoral balloon dilation. Methods Three patients with severe aortic valve stenosis, who could not tolerate traditional open surgery, were chosen to receive aortic valve replacement via transfemoral balloon dilation. Results All the three operations were successfully done by transfemoral approach, including one assisted by transapical puncture. The aortic valve function of patients was improved, and there was no related complication or death. Conclusion Aortic valve replacement via transfemoral balloon dilation can be used for treatment of Chinese patients with severe aortic valve stenosis; but which demands more detailed preoperative preparation, evaluation, and surgical manipulation.%目的 探讨经股动脉球囊扩张式主动脉瓣置换术治疗严重主动脉瓣狭窄患者的可行性.方法 选取3例严重主动脉瓣钙化狭窄的患者,术前评估无法耐受传统开放手术,行经股动脉球扩式主动脉瓣置换术.结果 3例均经股动脉完成,其中1例经心尖穿刺辅助完成.3例手术全部成功,术后患者主动脉瓣功能显著改善,无并发症,无死亡.结论 经股动脉球扩式主动脉瓣置换术可用于国人严重主动脉瓣狭窄患者,但在术前准备与评估、术中操作等方面提出了更高的要求.

  18. Impacted supernumerary tooth in coronoid process: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Won Se; Lee, Je Ho; Park, Hyok; Jung, Ho Gul; Kim, Kee Deog [Yonsei University College of Dentistry, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    Impaction of tooth is a situation in which an unerupted tooth is wedged against another tooth or teeth or otherwise located so that it cannot erupt normally. The supernumerary tooth is also called as hyperdontia and defined as the condition of having additional tooth to the regular number of teeth. The most common supernumerary tooth is a mesiodens, which is a mal-formed, peg-like tooth that occurs between the maxillary incisors. The supernumerary tooth is commonly impacted but they are frequently impacted on maxilla. Ectopic impaction of supernumerary tooth on mandibular condyle, coronoid process, ascending ramus, and pterygomandibular space is very rare condition. In this case, we report a case of impacted supernumerary tooth on mandibular sigmoid notch without definite pathologic change.

  19. Critical appraisal. In-office tooth whitening: pulpal effects and tooth sensitivity issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, So Ran; Swift, Edward J

    2014-01-01

    In-office bleaching is an effective method for whitening teeth.Tooth sensitivity associated with in-office whitening is reversible and may range from mild to considerable. The incidence and severity of tooth sensitivity can be reduced by pretreatment with a desensitizer such as potassium nitrate. Histologic studies and clinical studies on long-term pulpal effects are lacking to definitively support the safety of in-office tooth whitening. Future studies on the etiology of tooth sensitivity related to whitening might greatly improve the means of preventing and managing this side effect.

  20. The tooth, the whole tooth and nothing but the tooth: tooth shape and ontogenetic shift dynamics in the white shark Carcharodon carcharias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, G C A; Stürup, M; Rizzuto, S; van Wyk, J H; Edwards, D; Dolan, R W; Wintner, S P; Towner, A V; Hughes, W O H

    2017-10-01

    Results from this study of the white shark Carcharodon carcharias include measurements obtained using a novel photographic method that reveal significant differences between the sexes in the relationship between tooth cuspidity and shark total length, and a novel ontogenetic change in male tooth shape. Males exhibit broader upper first teeth and increased distal inclination of upper third teeth with increasing length, while females do not present a consistent morphological change. Substantial individual variation, with implications for pace of life syndrome, was present in males and tooth polymorphism was suggested in females. Sexual differences and individual variation may play major roles in ontogenetic changes in tooth morphology in C. carcharias, with potential implications for their foraging biology. Such individual and sexual differences should be included in studies of ontogenetic shift dynamics in other species and systems. © 2017 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  1. Materials science: Lessons from tooth enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, Horacio D.; Soler-Crespo, Rafael

    2017-03-01

    A remarkable composite material has been made that mimics the structure of tooth enamel. This achievement opens up the exploration of new composite materials and of computational methods that reliably predict their properties. See Letter p.95

  2. Genetics And Tooth Anomalies - An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aswathy Brahmanandan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tooth development like the development of all epithelial appendages is regulated by inductive tissue interactions between epithelium and mesenchyme. Numerous genes interact, either act in conjunction or antagonize each other in odontogenesis. A number of different mesenchymal molecules and their receptors act as mediators in epithelial mesenchymal interactions. Several genes linked with early tooth positioning and developments belong to signaling pathways and have morphogenesis regulatory functions in morphogenesis of other organs. Their mutations often show pleiotropic effects beyond dental morphogenesis. In contrast, certain genes involved in enamel and dentin structures are highly specific for tooth. Mutations in these genes have been identified as causes of Amelogenesis Imperfecta (AI, Dentinogenesis Imperfecta (DI, Dentin Dysplasia (DD and anomalies in tooth number. This article focuses on genetic basis of inherited non-syndromic teeth disorders.

  3. Charcot-Marie-Tooth and Related Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of France, and Howard Henry Tooth of the United Kingdom. Although most people have never heard of CMT, ... CMT provided by patients and families. (See http://neurology.med. wayne.edu/neurogenetics/na_database. php.) MDA ...

  4. Life of a Tooth: A Visual Timeline

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Dentist Your Family's Oral Health About the AGD Dental care and oral health information you need from ... Child First See a Dentist? The History of Dental Advances Check Menstrual Calendar for Tooth Extraction Temporomandibular ...

  5. [Biological basis of orthodontic tooth movement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltha, J C; van Leeuwen, E J

    2000-04-01

    The effect of orthodontic therapy is dependent of the biological possibilities and limitations of the dento-alveolar complex. Biomechanical effects determine the first phase of tooth movement. In the second phase hyalinisation occurs in almost all cases. Elimination of the hyalinised tissue is associated with undermining bone resorption. Next, 'real' tooth movement starts. At the pressure side the normal structure of the periodontal ligament is destroyed and so is the tooth attachment. At the tension side deposition of trabecular bone is found and the tooth attachment remains. The regulation of these processes is still not completely understood, but cytokines and growth factors play an important role. The biological system does not react according to a simple dose-response relation and large individual differences in susceptibility of the system exist.

  6. Determination of tooth clearances at trochoidal pump

    OpenAIRE

    Ivanović, Lozica T.; Erić, Milan D.; Stojanović, Blaža Ž.; id_orcid 0000-0003-4790-2856; Ilić, Andreja B.

    2011-01-01

    The paper describes the development of a mathematical model of trochoidal gearing with clearances. Gearing of a trochoidal pump's gear set with an outer gear having one gear tooth more than an inner gear is analyzed. The inner gear tooth profile is described by peritrochoidal equidistance and the outer gear profile by a circular arc. Upon the basic principles of ideal profile generation, a mathematical model of gearing with clearances is developed. Using an analytical model, the calculation o...

  7. Computer simulation of gear tooth manufacturing processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavriplis, Dimitri; Huston, Ronald L.

    1990-01-01

    The use of computer graphics to simulate gear tooth manufacturing procedures is discussed. An analytical basis for the simulation is established for spur gears. The simulation itself, however, is developed not only for spur gears, but for straight bevel gears as well. The applications of the developed procedure extend from the development of finite element models of heretofore intractable geometrical forms, to exploring the fabrication of nonstandard tooth forms.

  8. Tooth enamel and enameloid in actinopterygian fish

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    I.SASAGAWA; M.ISHIYAMA; H.YOKOSUKA; M.MIKAMI; T.UCHIDA

    2009-01-01

    The morphological features of tooth enamel and enameloid in actinopterygian fish are reviewed to provide basic data concerning the biomineralization of teeth in lower vertebrates. Enameloid, which covers the tooth surface, is a unique well-mineralized tissue and usually has the same functions as mammalian tooth enamel. However, the development of enameloi is different from that of the enamel produced by dental epithelial cells. Enameloid is made by a combination of odontoblasts and dental epithelial cells. An organic matrix that contains collagen is provided by odontoblasts, and then dental epithelial cells dissolve the degenerate matrix and suooly inorganic ions during advanced crystal growth in enameloid. It is likely that enameloid is a good model for studying the growth of well-mineralized hard tissues in vertebrates. Some actinopterygian fish possess a collar enamel layer that is situated at the surface of the tooth shaft, indicating that the origin of tooth enamel is found in fish. Collar enamel is thought to be a precursor of mammalian enamel, although it is thin and not well mineralized in comparison with enameloid. In Lepisosteus and Polypterus, both of which are living actinopterygians,both enameloid and enamel are found in the same tooth. Therefore, they ace suitable materials for examining the developmental processes of enameloid and enamel and the relationship among them.

  9. Cracked tooth syndrome: Overview of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Shamimul; Singh, Kuldeep; Salati, Naseer

    2015-01-01

    Pain is defined as an "unpleasant sensory and emotional feeling which is associated with actual or potential injury of tissue or expressed in terms of such injury." Tooth pain usually refers to pain around the teeth or jaws mainly as a result of a dental condition. Mostly, toothaches are caused by a carious cavity, a broken tooth, an exposed tooth root or gum disease. The toothache may sometimes be the result of radiating pain from structures in the vicinity of tooth and jaws (cardiac pain, ear, nose, throat pain, and sinusitis). Therefore, evaluation by both dentists and physicians are sometimes necessary to diagnose medical illnesses causing "toothache." Cracked tooth syndrome is a major diagnostic challenge in clinical practice. Accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment are complicated due to lack of awareness of this condition and its bizarre clinical features. Early diagnosis has been linked with successful restorative management and good prognosis. This article provides a detailed literature on the causes, classification, signs and symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment planning of cracked tooth syndrome.

  10. Frictional Effects on Gear Tooth Contact Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper concentrates on the investigations regarding the situations of frictional shear stress of gear teeth and the relevant frictional effects on bending stresses and transmission error in gear meshing. Sliding friction is one of the major reasons causing gear failure and vibration; the adequate consideration of frictional effects is essential for understanding gear contact behavior accurately. An analysis of tooth frictional effect on gear performance in spur gear is presented using finite element method. Nonlinear finite element model for gear tooth contact with rolling/sliding is then developed. The contact zones for multiple tooth pairs are identified and the associated integration situation is derived. The illustrated bending stress and transmission error results with static and dynamic boundary conditions indicate the significant effects due to the sliding friction between the surfaces of contacted gear teeth, and the friction effect can not be ignored. To understand the particular static and dynamic frictional effects on gear tooth contact analysis, some significant phenomena of gained results will also be discussed. The potentially significant contribution of tooth frictional shear stress is presented, particularly in the case of gear tooth contact analysis with both static and dynamic boundary conditions.

  11. Design of face-hobbed spiral bevel gears with reduced maximum tooth contact pressure and transmission errors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vilmos Simon

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to define optimal tooth modifications,introduced by appropriately chosen head-cutter geometry and machine tool setting,to simultaneously minimize tooth contact pressure and angular displacement error of the driven gear (transmission error) of face-hobbed spiral bevel gears.As a result of these modifications,the gear pair becomes mismatched,and a point contact replaces the theoretical line contact.In the applied loaded tooth contact analysis it is assumed that the point contact under load is spreading over a surface along the whole or part of the “potential” contact line.A computer program was developed to implement the formulation provided above.By using this program the influence of tooth modifications introduced by the variation in machine tool settings and in head cutter data on load and pressure distributions,transmission errors,and fillet stresses is investigated and discussed.The correlation between the ease-off obtained by pinion tooth modifications and the corresponding tooth contact pressure distribution is investigated and the obtained results are presented.

  12. Hormone Replacement Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... before and during menopause, the levels of female hormones can go up and down. This can cause ... hot flashes and vaginal dryness. Some women take hormone replacement therapy (HRT), also called menopausal hormone therapy, ...

  13. Knee joint replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of your kneecap. Your kneecap is called the patella. The replacement part is usually made from a ... long. Then your surgeon will: Move your kneecap (patella) out of the way, then cut the ends ...

  14. Knee joint replacement - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100088.htm Knee joint replacement - series—Normal anatomy To use the ... to slide 4 out of 4 Overview The knee is a complex joint. It contains the distal ...

  15. Product Platform Replacements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sköld, Martin; Karlsson, Christer

    2012-01-01

    Purpose – It is argued in this article that too little is known about product platforms and how to deal with them from a manager's point of view. Specifically, little information exists regarding when old established platforms are replaced by new generations in R&D and production environments...... originality and value is achieved by focusing on product platform replacements believed to represent a growing management challenge....

  16. Preventing Tooth Decay: A Guide for Implementing Self-Applied Fluoride in Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Inst. of Dental Research (NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    This guidebook was developed to assist citizens in initiating programs to prevent tooth decay in young children through the use of fluoridation. It contains outlines for determining the needs of the school and community for fluoride in drinking water, and presents the various steps and activities that are necessary for developing and implementing…

  17. Preventing Tooth Decay: A Guide for Implementing Self-Applied Fluoride in Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Inst. of Dental Research (NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    This guidebook was developed to assist citizens in initiating programs to prevent tooth decay in young children through the use of fluoridation. It contains outlines for determining the needs of the school and community for fluoride in drinking water, and presents the various steps and activities that are necessary for developing and implementing…

  18. Laser ultrasonic techniques for assessment of tooth structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blodgett, David W.; Baldwin, Kevin C.

    2000-06-01

    Dental health care and research workers require a means of imaging the structures within teeth in vivo. For example, there is a need to image the margins of a restoration for the detection of poor bonding or voids between the restorative material and the dentin. With conventional x-ray techniques, it is difficult to detect cracks and to visualize interfaces between hard media. This due to the x-ray providing only a 2 dimensional projection of the internal structure (i.e. a silhouette). In addition, a high resolution imaging modality is needed to detect tooth decay in its early stages. If decay can be detected early enough, the process can be monitored and interventional procedures, such as fluoride washes and controlled diet, can be initiated which can help the tooth to re-mineralize itself. Currently employed x-ray imaging is incapable of detecting decay at a stage early enough to avoid invasive cavity preparation followed by a restoration with a synthetic material. Other clinical applications include the visualization of periodontal defects, the localization of intraosseous lesions, and determining the degree of osseointegration between a dental implant and the surrounding bone. A means of assessing the internal structure of the tooth based upon use of high frequency, highly localized ultrasound (acoustic waves) generated by a laser pulse is discussed. Optical interferometric detection of ultrasound provides a complementary technique with a very small detection footprint. Initial results using laser-based ultrasound for assessment of dental structures are presented. Discussion will center on the adaptability of this technique to clinical applications.

  19. CHARCOT-MARIE-TOOTH DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea Leonardis

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT disease is a common inherited disorder of the peripheral nervous system. In our paper, different types of CMT are described with their typical clinical pictures, electrophysiological signs and molecular genetic studies. CMT is classified as demyelinative and axonal type and distal motor neuronopathy.Conclusions. CMT can be of autosomal dominant, recessive and X-linked inheritance. The most frequent form of CMT is the result of the dominantly inherited duplication of chromosome 17p11.2 and is marked as CMT1A. The same group involves also rare patients with point mutation in the peripheral myelin protein-22 gene. CMT1B is associated with point mutations in protein zero gene. CMT1C is linked to chromosome 16p13.1–12.3. Patients with point mutations in early growth response 2 gene (EGR2 are included in group CMT1D. The disease can be also inhereted X-linked (CMTX with the mutations in connexin-32 gene. In autosomal recessive inherited demyelinating polyneuropathies (CMT4, mutations are found in the myotubularin-related protein-2 (CMT4B, N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (CMT4D, EGR2 (CMT4E, and in the periaksin (CMT4F genes. In axonal inherited neuropathy, mutations are found in KIF1beta (CMT2A and in light neurofilament (CMT2E genes, other forms map to different chromosomal loci (CMT2B, CMT2D, CMT2F. Some suggestions for the diagnostic procedures of patients with CMT are given.

  20. Educating My Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarter, Jill

    , in partnership with the dedicated teachers out there, I think I can help promote the critical thinking skills and scientific literacy of the next generation of voters. Hopefully, I can also help train my replacement to be a better scientist, capable of seizing all the opportunities generated by advances in technology and our improved understanding of the universe to craft search strategies with greater probability of success than those I have initiated.

  1. Increased expression of TRPV1 in the trigeminal ganglion is involved in orofacial pain during experimental tooth movement in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Hu; Gao, YuNan; Zhang, Caidi; Zhou, Hong

    2015-02-01

    To investigate whether transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) is involved in pain induced by experimental tooth movement, experiments were performed in male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 200-250 g. Directed face-grooming behavior was used to evaluate nocifensive behavior in rats during experimental tooth movement. The distribution of TRPV1 in the trigeminal ganglion (TG) was evaluated by immunohistochemistry, and its expression was detected by western blotting at several time points following the application of various magnitudes of force during tooth movement. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that TRPV1 was expressed in TG, and its expression was increased after experimental tooth movement. Western blot results also showed that experimental tooth movement led to a statistically significant increase in expression of TRPV1 protein in TG. Meanwhile, the time spent on directed face-grooming peaked on day 1 and thereafter showed a gradual decrease. In addition, both the change in TRPV1 expression in the TG and directed face-grooming behavior were modulated in a force-dependent manner and in concert with initial orthodontic pain responses. Our results reveal that TRPV1 expression is modulated by experimental tooth movement and is involved in tooth-movement pain. © 2014 Eur J Oral Sci.

  2. Malformations of the tooth root in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Ulrich eLuder

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The most common root malformations in humans arise from either developmental disorders of the root alone or disorders of radicular development as part of a general tooth dysplasia. The aim of this review is to relate the characteristics of these root malformations to potentially disrupted processes involved in radicular morphogenesis. Radicular morphogenesis proceeds under the control of Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS which determines the number, length, and shape of the root, induces the formation of radicular dentin, and participates in the development of root cementum. Formation of HERS at the transition from crown to root development appears to be very insensitive to adverse effects, with the result that rootless teeth are extremely rare. In contrast, shortened roots as a consequence of impaired or prematurely halted apical growth of HERS constitute the most prevalent radicular dysplasia which occurs due to trauma and unknown reasons as well as in association with dentin disorders. While odontoblast differentiation inevitably stops when growth of HERS is arrested, it seems to be unaffected even in cases of severe dentin dysplasias such as regional odontodysplasia and dentin dysplasia type I. As a result radicular dentin formation is at least initiated and progresses for a limited time. The only condition affecting cementogenesis is hypophosphatasia which disrupts the formation of acellular cementum through an inhibition of mineralization. A process particularly susceptible to adverse effects appears to be the formation of the furcation in multirooted teeth. Impairment or disruption of this process entails taurodontism, single-rooted posterior teeth, and misshapen furcations. Thus even though many characteristics of human root malformations can be related to disorders of specific processes involved in radicular morphogenesis, precise inferences as to the pathogenesis of these dysplasias are hampered by the still limited knowledge on

  3. Tooth by tooth survival analysis of dental health in girls with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajavaara, P; Vainionpää, L; Rättyä, J; Knip, M; Pakarinen, A; Isojärvi, J; Larmas, M

    2003-06-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse, tooth by tooth, the timing of caries attacks leading to dental restoration in girls with epilepsy. The series comprised 60 girls with epilepsy, 8-18 years old, treated in the Departments of Paediatrics or Neurology of the Oulu University Hospital. A group of healthy age matched girls served as control. A tooth by tooth survival analysis of the time between tooth eruption and caries attacks to a stage leading to the restorations of the permanent teeth was conducted retrospectively using data from the dental health records with annual examinations. The rate of dental restorations placed due to caries was constantly higher in the girls with epilepsy than in their controls. The difference was significant between the first molars (p=epilepsy, the antiepileptic medication in particular, might increase the risk of caries.

  4. Tooth regeneration from newly established cell lines from a molar tooth germ epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komine, Akihiko; Suenaga, Momoko; Nakao, Kazuhisa; Tsuji, Takashi; Tomooka, Yasuhiro

    2007-04-13

    In order to investigate tooth development, several cell lines of the dental epithelium and ectomesenchyme have been established. However, no attempt has been reported to regenerate teeth with cell lines. Here, we have established several clonal cell lines of the dental epithelium from a p53-deficient fetal mouse. They expressed specific markers of the dental epithelium such as ameloblastin and amelogenin. A new method has been developed to bioengineer tooth germs with dental epithelial and mesenchymal cells. Reconstructed tooth germs with cell lines and fetal mesenchymal cells were implanted under kidney capsule. The germs regenerated teeth with well-calcified structures as seen in natural tooth. Germs without the cell lines developed bone. This is the first success to regenerate teeth with dental epithelial cell lines. They are useful models in vitro for investigation of mechanisms in morphogenesis and of cell lineage in differentiation, and for clinical application for tooth regeneration.

  5. In vitro assessment of tooth color alteration by two different types of endodontic irrigants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koursoumis, Anastasios Dimitrios; Kerezoudis, Nikolaos P; Kakaboura, Afrodite

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess in vitro the tooth color alterations associated with two commonly used endodontic irrigants, the chlorhexidine gluconate (CHX) and the sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) up to 15 days post-treatment. Additionally, the possible influence of endodontic access preparation on tooth color was investigated. Thirty intact human anterior teeth were used. Black adhesive tape with a 4 mm diameter window was used to standardize the enamel surface intended for color analysis. After the access cavity, preparation and the initial root canal negotiation with stainless steel hand files, the root canal shaping was completed with rotary nickel-titanium files. The teeth were divided into three groups (n = 10). Conventional syringe irrigation was performed with one irrigant for each group. The enamel surfaces were colorimetrically evaluated before access cavity, after cavity preparation and at 1, 3, 7 and 15 days post-treatment. The CIE color parameters (L*, a*, b*) were recorded and averaged for each material and the corresponding color differences (ΔE) were calculated and statistically analyzed. The most significant factor in tooth color alteration, during the endodontic treatment, was the access preparation. CHX and NaOCl caused tooth color changes comparable with the saline. CHX and NaOCl did not increase the tooth color changes relative to the values induced by the access preparation. The two endodontic irrigants were not able to induce tooth color alteration to a greater extent than the access preparation. Chlorhexidine and NaOCl cannot be considered as discoloring endodontic materials. The most contributing factor in tooth color alteration during endodontic treatment in the anterior teeth is access preparation.

  6. [CCL2/CCR2 signaling activation contributes to tooth movement pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhi; Luo, Wei; Fu, Runqing; Tan, Yu; Yuan, Lingjun; Fang, Bing

    2014-08-01

    To test the hypothesis that the CCL2/CCR2 signaling pathway plays an important role in pain induced by experimental tooth movement. Male Sprague- Dawley rats weighing between 200 and 300 g were used in this study. Expression of CCL2/CCR2 in the trigeminal ganglion (TG) was determined by Western blotting 0 h, 4 h, 1 d, 3 d, 5 d, 7 d after tooth movement. Localization of the CCL2 was revealed by immunohistochemistry. Changes in body weight, nocifensive behaviors, and the effects of CCL2/CCR2 antagonists on these changes in pain behaviors were evaluated. Exogenous CCL2 was injected into periodontal tissues and added to TG neurons in culture and the resulting c-fos expression and pain responses were detected. In addition, the expression and cellular localization of CCL2 in the medullary dorsal horn (MDH) was determined by immunohistochemistry 3 d and 14 d after tooth movement. Experimental tooth movement led to a statistically significant increase in CCL2/CCR2 expression at the protein level from day 3 to 7 after application of force initiating tooth movement.When compared with control group (1.000 ± 0.000), CCL2 increased to (2.620 ± 0.128), (3.300 ± 0.197) and (1.740 ± 1.290) at day 3, 5 and 7 respectively, which were statistically significant (P tooth movement and involved in the development of tooth movement pain, and thus palyed an important role in orthodontic pain mechanism.

  7. Effect of Low-Level Laser Therapy on Orthodontic Tooth Movement: A Clinical Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalaie, Kazem; Hamedi, Roya; Kharazifard, Mohammad Javad; Mahdian, Mina; Bayat, Mehrdad

    2015-04-01

    One major drawback of orthodontic treatment is its long duration due to slow tooth movement and the pain at the onset of treatment following application of forces. There is controversy regarding the efficacy of laser for decreasing the treatment time and pain of orthodontic treatment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of low level diode laser on the rate of orthodontic tooth movement and the associated pain. In this double blind randomized controlled clinical trial, 12 orthodontic patients referring to Shahid Beheshti School of Dentistry for first premolar extraction were randomly selected and allocated to gallium aluminum-arsenide laser (GA-AL-AS diode laser, 880 nm, 100 mW, 5 j/cm(2), 8 points, 80 seconds, continuous mode) or control group. The patients initially underwent leveling and alignment using the sectional system. Force (150 gr) was applied to each canine tooth via sectional closing loops. The loops were activated every month. The rate of tooth movement and pain were monitored over the treatment period and recorded on days 1, 3, 7, 30, 33, 37, 60, 63 and 67. Two-way ANOVA was used for comparison of groups. There was no significant difference in terms of tooth movement and pain scores between the irradiated and non-irradiated sides at any time point (P>0.05). Although laser enhanced orthodontic tooth movement in the upper jaw, we failed to provide solid evidence to support the efficacy of laser for expediting tooth movement or reducing the associated pain.

  8. Tooth tissue engineering: tooth decellularization for natural scaffold

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa Iwamoto, Luciana Aparecida; Duailibi, Monica Talarico; Iwamoto, Gerson Yoshinobu; Juliano, Yara; Duailibi, Michel Silvio; Ossamu Tanaka, Francisco André; Duailibi, Silvio Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Tissue engineering is a multidisciplinary science that aims to produce replacement organs and biological substitutes. One of the techniques involves decellularizing a biological organ without altering its structure. One challenge is how to demonstrate which method would be better for this process. Methodology: Fifty premolar teeth were divided into five groups: G1 (control): solution of 10% formaldehyde; G2: phosphate buffer saline (PBS), 28 g of tetrasodium ethylenediaminetetraacetic (EDTA), sodium hypochlorite 2.5% (SH); G3: PBS, EDTA and 40v hydrogen peroxide (HP); G4: PBS, EDTA, SH, enzymatic detergent (ED); and G5: PBS, EDTA, HP, ED. Each group was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray, measured weights and color and received statistical analysis. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that G5 was the most appropriate method to obtain a natural scaffold. PMID:28031968

  9. The tooth, the whole tooth: an unusual fight bite with an unnoticed embedded tooth in the hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayan, Roshan; Awad, Guirgis

    2015-05-02

    A 19-year-old man presented to the plastic surgeons with a wound between his fourth and fifth metacarpophalangeal joints, with associated hand swelling and pain. He admitted to accidentally striking his brother in the mouth the previous evening. His brother reportedly made a hasty exit, and the patient dismissed the wound to his hand until waking up the next morning with swelling, pain and ascending lymphangitis. Radiographs revealed the unusual extent of his 'fight bite' injury with an entire human tooth embedded in his hand. Removal of the tooth and aggressive debridement was performed in theatre. Establishing an accurate account of events in these injuries can be difficult, with the orientation of the tooth in the soft tissues being more consistent with an uppercut than the reported jab. The patient made a good recovery following elevation, intravenous antibiotics, rigorous surgical debridement and postoperative hand therapy. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  10. Total ankle replacement. Design evolution and results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Heuvel, Alexander; Van Bouwel, Saskia; Dereymaeker, Greta

    2010-04-01

    The ankle joint has unique anatomical, biomechanical and cartilaginous structural characteristics that allow the joint to withstand the very high mechanical stresses and strains over years. Any minor changes to any of these features predispose the joint to osteoarthritis. Total ankle replacement (TAR) is evolving as an alternative to ankle arthrodesis for the treatment of end-stage ankle osteoarthritis. Initial implant designs from the early 1970s had unacceptably high failure and complication rates. As a result many orthopaedic surgeons have restricted the use of TAR in favour of ankle arthrodesis. Long term follow-up studies following ankle arthrodesis show risks of developing adjacent joint osteoarthritis. Therefore research towards a successful ankle replacement continues. Newer designs and longer-term outcome studies have renewed the interest in ankle joint replacement. We present an overview of the evolution, results and current concepts of total ankle replacement.

  11. Pain experience after simple tooth extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khateeb, Taiseer Hussain; Alnahar, Amir

    2008-05-01

    To assess pain experience after simple uncomplicated tooth extraction and to see if there is a need to prescribe analgesic drugs after such a procedure. A random sample of patients presenting for tooth extraction at the Maxillofacial Unit, Jordan University of Science and Technology was included. A baseline assessment of previously experienced general and dental pains using numeric scales was done. Subsequently, tooth extractions were done and telephone interviews were made during evenings for a week. Pain intensity was assessed on a numeric scale, and use of analgesic drugs and pain quality were recorded. At the evening of extraction 81.8% of patients had pain. Female gender predominance in pain reporting was statistically significant on postextraction days 3 and 5. Chronically inflamed teeth caused the highest mean pain intensity scores and nonsmokers showed significantly higher mean pain intensity scores compared with smokers. Mild pain was experienced by most patients (38.6%) on the evening of extraction. It was found that 55.3% of participants (largely females) used analgesic drugs on the evening of extraction, and 6.8% of participants still used analgesic drugs on day 7 postextraction. There was a significant correlation between mean pain intensity score and previous dental injection pain. Patients, notably females, experienced pain of varying intensity after simple uncomplicated tooth extraction maximally at the evening of extraction; and greater than 50% of the patients used analgesic drugs. We recommend offering regular analgesic drugs during the first week after tooth extraction.

  12. Detecting Tooth Damage in Geared Drive Trains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachtsheim, Philip R.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes a method that was developed to detect gear tooth damage that does not require a priori knowledge of the frequency characteristic of the fault. The basic idea of the method is that a few damaged teeth will cause transient load fluctuations unlike the normal tooth load fluctuations. The method attempts to measure the energy in the lower side bands of the modulated signal caused by the transient load fluctuations. The method monitors the energy in the frequency interval which excludes the frequency of the lowest dominant normal tooth load fluctuation and all frequencies above it. The method reacted significantly to the tooth fracture damage results documented in the Lewis data sets which were obtained from tests of the OH-58A transmission and tests of high contact ratio spiral bevel gears. The method detected gear tooth fractures in all four of the high contact ratio spiral bevel gear runs. Published results indicate other detection methods were only able to detect faults for three out of four runs.

  13. Controlled Deposition of HAp Mimicking Tooth Enamel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Chemical compositions and microsturcture of mature human tooth enamel were investigated by XRD , FTIR and SEM to further understand the characteristics of tooth enamel. In order to obtain apatite crystals chemically and structurally similar to those in tooth enamel, biomimetic way was employed. Selfassembled monolyers terminated with-SO3 H groups were used as deposition substrates and 1.5 SBF ( the concentrations of Ca2+ and PO43- ions 1.5 times than those in simulated body fluid ) with and without 5 ppm F- were used as soaking medium. The XRD and FTIR results showed that both the deposited fluoride-substituted hydroxyapatite( F-HAp ) crystals in 1.5 SBF with F- and hydroxyapatite ( HAp ) crystals in 1.5 SBF were carbonate-containing, mimicking human tooth enamel in chemical compositions. The SEM photos showed that needle-like F-HAp crystals bad large aspect ratios and grew in bundles, which were similar to the crystals in human tooth enamel.The results provide available information on dental restoration.

  14. The evolution of dinosaur tooth enamel microstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Sunny H

    2011-02-01

    The evolution of tooth enamel microstructure in both extinct and extant mammalian groups has been extensively documented, but is poorly known in reptiles, including dinosaurs. Previous intensive sampling of dinosaur tooth enamel microstructure revealed that: (1) the three-dimensional arrangement of enamel types and features within a tooth-the schmelzmuster-is most useful in diagnosing dinosaur clades at or around the family level; (2) enamel microstructure complexity is correlated with tooth morphology complexity and not necessarily with phylogenetic position; and (3) there is a large amount of homoplasy within Theropoda but much less within Ornithischia. In this study, the examination of the enamel microstructure of 28 additional dinosaur taxa fills in taxonomic gaps of previous studies and reinforces the aforementioned conclusions. Additionally, these new specimens reveal that within clades such as Sauropodomorpha, Neotheropoda, and Euornithopoda, the more basal taxa have simpler enamel that is a precursor to the more complex enamel of more derived taxa and that schmelzmusters evolve in a stepwise fashion. In the particularly well-sampled clade of Euornithopoda, correlations between the evolution of dental and enamel characters could be drawn. The ancestral schmelzmuster for Genasauria remains ambiguous due to the dearth of basal ornithischian teeth available for study. These new specimens provide new insights into the evolution of tooth enamel microstructure in dinosaurs, emphasizing the importance of thorough sampling within broadly inclusive clades, especially among their more basal members.

  15. Transient thermal and stress analysis of maxillary second premolar tooth using an exact three-dimensional model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashemipour Maryam

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim : In this paper, the temperature and stress distributions in an exact 3D-model of a restored maxillary second premolar tooth are obtained with finite element approach. Objective : The carious teeth need to restore with appropriate restorative materials. There are too many restorative materials which can be used instead of tooth structures; since tooth structures are being replaced, the restorative materials should be similar to original structure as could as possible . Materials and Methods : In the present study, a Mesial Occlusal Distal (MOD type of restoration is chosen and applied to a sound tooth model. Four cases of restoration are investigated: two cases in which base are used under restorative materials and two cases in which base is deleted. The restorative materials are amalgam and composite and glass-inomer is used as a base material. Modeling is done in the solid works ambient by means of an exact measuring of a typical human tooth dimensions. Tooth behavior under thermal load due to consuming hot liquids is analyzed by means of a three dimensional finite element method using ANSYS software. The highest values of tensile and compressive stresses are compared with tensile and compressive strength of the tooth and restorative materials and the value of shear stress on the tooth and restoration junctions is compared with the bond strength. Also, sound tooth under the same thermal load is analyzed and the results are compared with those obtained for restored models. Results : Temperature and stress distributions in the tooth are calculated for each case, with a special consideration in the vicinity of pulp and restoration region. Numerical results show that in two cases with amalgam, using the base material (Glass-ionomer under the restorative material causes to decrease the maximum temperature in the restorative teeth . In the stress analysis, it is seen that the principal stress has its maximum values in composite restorations

  16. Discrimination of tooth layers and dental restorative materials using cutting sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakeri, Vahid; Arzanpour, Siamak; Chehroudi, Babak

    2015-03-01

    Dental restoration begins with removing carries and affected tissues with air-turbine rotary cutting handpieces, and later restoring the lost tissues with appropriate restorative materials to retain the functionality. Most restoration materials eventually fail as they age and need to be replaced. One of the difficulties in replacing failing restorations is discerning the boundary of restorative materials, which causes inadvertent removal of healthy tooth layers. Developing an objective and sensor-based method is a promising approach to monitor dental restorative operations and to prevent excessive tooth losses. This paper has analyzed cutting sounds of an air-turbine handpiece to discriminate between tooth layers and two commonly used restorative materials, amalgam and composite. Support vector machines were employed for classification, and the averaged short-time Fourier transform coefficients were selected as the features. The classifier performance was evaluated from different aspects such as the number of features, feature scaling methods, classification schemes, and utilized kernels. The total classification accuracies were 89% and 92% for cases included composite and amalgam materials, respectively. The obtained results indicated the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  17. Plakophilin-1, a Novel Wnt Signaling Regulator, Is Critical for Tooth Development and Ameloblast Differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanako Miyazaki

    Full Text Available Tooth morphogenesis is initiated by reciprocal interactions between the ectoderm and neural crest-derived mesenchyme, and the Wnt signaling pathway is involved in this process. We found that Plakophilin (PKP1, which is associated with diseases such as ectodermal dysplasia/skin fragility syndrome, was highly expressed in teeth and skin, and was upregulated during tooth development. We hypothesized that PKP1 regulates Wnt signaling via its armadillo repeat domain in a manner similar to β-catenin. To determine its role in tooth development, we performed Pkp1 knockdown experiments using ex vivo organ cultures and cell cultures. Loss of Pkp1 reduced the size of tooth germs and inhibited dental epithelial cell proliferation, which was stimulated by Wnt3a. Furthermore, transfected PKP1-emerald green fluorescent protein was translocated from the plasma membrane to the nucleus upon stimulation with Wnt3a and LiCl, which required the PKP1 N terminus (amino acids 161 to 270. Localization of PKP1, which is known as an adhesion-related desmosome component, shifted to the plasma membrane during ameloblast differentiation. In addition, Pkp1 knockdown disrupted the localization of Zona occludens 1 in tight junctions and inhibited ameloblast differentiation; the two proteins were shown to directly interact by immunoprecipitation. These results implicate the participation of PKP1 in early tooth morphogenesis as an effector of canonical Wnt signaling that controls ameloblast differentiation via regulation of the cell adhesion complex.

  18. Tooth loss during maintenance following periodontal treatment in a periodontal practice in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fardal, Øystein; Johannessen, Anne C; Linden, Gerard J

    2004-07-01

    Periodontal therapy coupled with careful maintenance has been shown to be effective in maintaining periodontal health; however, a small number of teeth are still lost because of progressive periodontitis. To investigate factors associated with tooth loss due to periodontal reasons during maintenance following periodontal treatment in patients in a Norwegian specialist periodontal practice. The study also examined how initial prognosis related to actual outcome as measured by periodontal tooth loss. Hundred consecutive patients (68 females, 32 males) who had comprehensive periodontal treatment and attended for 9.8 (SD: 0.7), range: 9-11 years of maintenance care, were studied. All teeth classified as being lost due to periodontal disease over the period were identified. Only 36 (1.5%) of the 2436 teeth present at baseline were subsequently lost due to periodontal disease. There were 26 patients who lost at least one tooth. Logistic regression analysis showed that tooth loss was significantly related to male gender (p=0.049; adjusted odds ratio: 2.8; confidence interval (c.i.): 1.0-8.1), older age, i.e.>60 years (p=0.012; adjusted odds ratio: 4.0; c.i.: 1.3-12.0) and smoking (p=0.019; adjusted odds ratio: 4.2; c.i.: 1.4-13.8). The majority 27 (75%) of the teeth lost due to periodontal disease had been assigned an uncertain, poor or hopeless initial prognosis; however, nine teeth (25%) lost had been assigned a good prognosis at baseline. The prognosis for 202 teeth was judged to have worsened over the period of the study. Compliance with maintenance following periodontal treatment was associated with very low levels of tooth loss in a referral practice in rural Norway. Male gender, older age (>60 years) and smoking were predictors of tooth loss due to progressive periodontitis.

  19. PKA regulatory subunit expression in tooth development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa, Sílvia Ferreira; Kawasaki, Katsushige; Kawasaki, Maiko; Volponi, Ana Angelova; Gomez, Ricardo Santiago; Gomes, Carolina Cavaliéri; Sharpe, Paul T; Ohazama, Atsushi

    2014-05-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) plays critical roles in many biological processes including cell proliferation, cell differentiation, cellular metabolism and gene regulation. Mutation in PKA regulatory subunit, PRKAR1A has previously been identified in odontogenic myxomas, but it is unclear whether PKA is involved in tooth development. The aim of the present study was to assess the expression of alpha isoforms of PKA regulatory subunit (Prkar1a and Prkar2a) in mouse and human odontogenesis by in situ hybridization. PRKAR1A and PRKAR2A mRNA transcription was further confirmed in a human deciduous germ by qRT-PCR. Mouse Prkar1a and human PRKAR2A exhibited a dynamic spatio-temporal expression in tooth development, whereas neither human PRKAR1A nor mouse Prkar2a showed their expression in odontogenesis. These isoforms thus showed different expression pattern between human and mouse tooth germs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of drugs on orthodontic tooth movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Sarah Aulia Amrullah

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontic tooth movement is basically a biological response to mechanical forces given to the teeth in orthodontic treatment, which involving the periodontal tissue and alveolar bone, resulting in the release of numerous substances from the dental tissues and surrounding structure. Remodeling changes in periodontal tissues are considered to be essential in effecting orthodontic tooth movement which is the base of orthodontic correction. Molecules produced in various diseased tissues or drugs and nutrients consumed regularly by patients, can influence mechanically stressed periodontal tissue through the circulation and interact with target cell combination of which may be inhibitory, additive or synergize. Medications might have an important influence on the rate of tooth movement, and information on their consumption is essential to adequately discuss treatment planning with patients. Therefore it is imperative to the practitioners being in medical profession, must pay close attention to the drug consumption history of every patient before and during the course of treatment.

  1. Signaling networks regulating tooth organogenesis and regeneration, and the specification of dental mesenchymal and epithelial cell lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jussila, Maria; Thesleff, Irma

    2012-04-01

    Teeth develop as ectodermal appendages from epithelial and mesenchymal tissues. Tooth organogenesis is regulated by an intricate network of cell-cell signaling during all steps of development. The dental hard tissues, dentin, enamel, and cementum, are formed by unique cell types whose differentiation is intimately linked with morphogenesis. During evolution the capacity for tooth replacement has been reduced in mammals, whereas teeth have acquired more complex shapes. Mammalian teeth contain stem cells but they may not provide a source for bioengineering of human teeth. Therefore it is likely that nondental cells will have to be reprogrammed for the purpose of clinical tooth regeneration. Obviously this will require understanding of the mechanisms of normal development. The signaling networks mediating the epithelial-mesenchymal interactions during morphogenesis are well characterized but the molecular signatures of the odontogenic tissues remain to be uncovered.

  2. Robotic mitral valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senay, Sahin; Gullu, Ahmet Umit; Kocyigit, Muharrem; Degirmencioglu, Aleks; Karabulut, Hasan; Alhan, Cem

    2014-01-01

    Robotic surgical techniques allow surgeons to perform mitral valve surgery. This procedure has gained acceptance, particularly for mitral valve repair in degenerative mitral disease. However, mitral repair may not always be possible, especially in severely calcified mitral valve of rheumatic origin. This study demonstrates the basic concepts and technique of robotic mitral valve replacement for valve pathologies that are not suitable for repair.

  3. Replacing America's Job Bank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollman, Jim

    2009-01-01

    The Job Central National Labor Exchange (www.jobcentral.com) has become the effective replacement for America's Job Bank with state workforce agencies and, increasingly, with community colleges throughout the country. The American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) has formed a partnership with Job Central to promote its use throughout the…

  4. Replacing America's Job Bank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollman, Jim

    2009-01-01

    The Job Central National Labor Exchange (www.jobcentral.com) has become the effective replacement for America's Job Bank with state workforce agencies and, increasingly, with community colleges throughout the country. The American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) has formed a partnership with Job Central to promote its use throughout the…

  5. Maxillary tooth displacement in the infratemporal fossa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshanghias, Korosh; Peisker, Andre; Zieron, Jörg Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Wisdom tooth operations are sometimes accompanied by complications. This case report shows complications during upper jaw third molar removal. Expectable problems during oral surgery should be planned to be solved in advance. Displacement of the third molar during oral surgeries as a considerable complication is rarely discussed scientifically. A good design of flap, adequate power for extraction, and clear view on the surgical field are crucial. Three-dimensional radiographic diagnostics in terms of cone beam computed tomography is helpful after tooth displacement into the infratemporal fossa.

  6. Maxillary tooth displacement in the infratemporal fossa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korosh Roshanghias

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Wisdom tooth operations are sometimes accompanied by complications. This case report shows complications during upper jaw third molar removal. Expectable problems during oral surgery should be planned to be solved in advance. Displacement of the third molar during oral surgeries as a considerable complication is rarely discussed scientifically. A good design of flap, adequate power for extraction, and clear view on the surgical field are crucial. Three-dimensional radiographic diagnostics in terms of cone beam computed tomography is helpful after tooth displacement into the infratemporal fossa.

  7. Ectopic tooth in maxillary sinus: Case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanojam, Shandilya; Halli, Rajshekhar; Hebbale, Manjula; Bhardwaj, Smita

    2013-01-01

    Ectopic eruption of a tooth within the dentate region of the jaws is often noticed in clinical practice and is well documented in the literature. But the ectopic eruption into the non dentate region is rare and scantly documented. The maxillary sinus is one such a non dentate region, apart from nasal septum, mandibular condyle, coronoid process and the palate, to accommodate such ectopic eruptions of teeth. Due to its rarity and lack of consensus over its management, the incidence deserves to be added to the literature and discussed. Early surgical intervention for removal of ectopic tooth along with enucleation of the associated cyst, if any, is the treatment of choice.

  8. [Ectopic molar tooth in the maxillary sinus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altun, Hüseyin; Teker, Ayşenur Meriç; Ceran, Murat; Gedikli, Orhan

    2007-01-01

    The development of intranasal ectopic teeth is rare. Although they are more commonly seen in the palate and maxillary sinus, they can also be found in the mandibular condyle, coronoid process, and nasal cavity. A 30-year-old male patient presented with a complaint of headache. Computed tomography of the paranasal sinuses showed a bony mass in the right maxillary sinus wall, 1 cm in size. He did not have any history of maxillofacial trauma or operation. The mass was removed via a Caldwell-Luc procedure. It looked like a tooth. Histopathologic diagnosis was made as ectopic molar tooth. The patient was asymptomatic two weeks after the operation.

  9. Nasomaxillary hypoplasia with a congenitally missing tooth treated with LeFort II osteotomy, autotransplantation, and nickel-titanium alloy wire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Takayoshi; Ikemoto, Shigehiro; Ono, Takashi

    2015-09-01

    In some skeletal Class III adult patients with nasomaxillary hypoplasia, the LeFort I osteotomy provides insufficient correction. This case report describes a 20-year-old woman with a combination of nasomaxillary hypoplasia and a protrusive mandible with a congenitally missing mandibular second premolar. We performed a LeFort II osteotomy for maxillary advancement. Autotransplantation of a tooth was also performed; the donor tooth was used to replace the missing permanent tooth. To increase the chance of success, we applied light continuous force with an improved superelastic nickel-titanium alloy wire technique before extraction and after transplantation. The patient's profile and malocclusion were corrected, and the autotransplanted tooth functioned well. The postero-occlusal relationships were improved, and ideal overbite and overjet relationships were achieved. The methods used in this case represent a remarkable treatment. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. 3D analysis of craniofacial growth and tooth eruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreiborg, Sven

    The 9th International Congress on Cleft Palate and Related Craniofacial Anomalies, 3D analysis, craniofacial growth, tooth eruption......The 9th International Congress on Cleft Palate and Related Craniofacial Anomalies, 3D analysis, craniofacial growth, tooth eruption...

  11. Seal Out Tooth Decay: A Fact Sheet for Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Seal Out Tooth Decay A Fact Sheet for Parents What are dental ... important reason for getting sealants is to avoid tooth decay. • Fluoride in toothpaste and in drinking water protects ...

  12. 21 CFR 872.3200 - Resin tooth bonding agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... A resin tooth bonding agent is a device material, such as methylmethacrylate, intended to be painted on the interior of a prepared cavity of a tooth to improve retention of a restoration, such as...

  13. Comparison of the effect of thermal stresses on tooth-colored posts, cores and tooth structures by finite element analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levent Nalbant

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aims of this study were to analyze the influence of cold heat flow in all ceramic crown material, composite core, zirconium and glass fiber reinforced composite post materials, resin based luting cement and root dentin; and to compare these two tooth-colored post systems about their temperature and thermal stress distributions.
    Materials and Methods: A 3-dimesional finite element model of maxillary left canine tooth was constructed. All ceramic crown, composite core, tooth dentin, post and bone were modeled. In the first part of this study, initial body temperature was assumed to be 36.5°C and the outer temperature was reduced to 0°C for 5 secs. In the second part, the thermal stress was calculated as a result of temperature change. For the analysis, 7 nodes of the finite element model were selected and heat flow, temperature and thermal stres on these nodes were evaluated.
    Results: Mean temperature value was 15.75 °C for GFRC post model and 15.47 °C for Zr post model. The maximum von Mises stress was obtained at the node C in both post systems. In general, thermal stress was observed on the cervical part of all-ceramic crown and there was an interface between root dentin-composite core and post material. The temperature gradient of the GFRC post was smaller than that of the zirconia post.
    Conclusions: Within the limitation of this study, zirconia posts produced greater stress than GFRC posts. Temperature changes had more effect on the post-cement interface and cervical areas than on the other areas.

  14. Hyaluronan in human deciduous tooth germs in the bell stage. Histochemistry and immunohistochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiessen, Martin Ebbe; Garbarsch, Charly; Olsen, Birgitte Engelbrecht

    1997-01-01

    Anatomy, development, glycosaminoglycans, hyaluronan, tooth germs, histochemistry, immunocytochemistry......Anatomy, development, glycosaminoglycans, hyaluronan, tooth germs, histochemistry, immunocytochemistry...

  15. Functional Properties of Tooth Pulp Neurons Responding to Thermal Stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Ahn, D.K.; Doutova, E.A.; McNaughton, K.; Light, A.R.; Närhi, M.; Maixner, W.

    2012-01-01

    The response properties of tooth pulp neurons that respond to noxious thermal stimulation of the dental pulp have been not well-studied. The present study was designed to characterize the response properties of tooth pulp neurons to noxious thermal stimulation of the dental pulp. Experiments were conducted on 25 male ferrets, and heat stimulation was applied by a computer-controlled thermode. Only 15% of tooth pulp neurons (n = 39) responded to noxious thermal stimulation of the teeth. Tooth ...

  16. A panorama of tooth wear during the medieval period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esclassan, Rémi; Hadjouis, Djillali; Donat, Richard; Passarrius, Olivier; Maret, Delphine; Vaysse, Frédéric; Crubézy, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Tooth wear is a natural phenomenon and a universal occurrence that has existed from the origin of humankind and depends on the way of life, especially diet. Tooth wear was very serious in ancient populations up to the medieval period. The aim of this paper is to present a global view of tooth wear in medieval times in Europe through different parameters: scoring systems, quantity and direction of wear, gender, differences between maxilla and mandible, relations with diet, caries, tooth malpositions and age.

  17. A prospective study of Astra single tooth implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, R M; Smith, B J; Palmer, P J; Floyd, P D

    1997-06-01

    A new design of single tooth implant (AstraTech, Molndal Sweden) featuring a microthreaded conical neck and TiO blast surface was evaluated clinically and radiographically after 2 years in function. Fifteen patients (age range 16 to 48) with missing maxillary anterior teeth (6 central incisors, 8 laterals, 1 bicuspid) had 4, 13 mm and 11, 15 mm implants placed under local anaesthesia and left for a period of 6 months before exposure and abutment connection/crown fabrication. All patients were seen at 4 to 6 monthly intervals for hygienist maintenance. Radiographs using Rinn holders and a long cone technique were taken at the crown insertion and after 1 year (14 subjects) and 2 years (12 subjects). All implants were successfully integrated at stage 2, and no implants have been lost. The internal conical seal design of the abutment/implant interface facilitated connection and there were no cases of abutment screw loosening. No soft tissue problems were observed, and the gingival morphology/health was well maintained. One crown was recemented after 18 months in function, and 1 crown was replaced because of a fracture to the porcelain incisal edge. At crown insertion, the mean bone level was 0.46 to 0.48 mm apical to the top of the implant and there were no statistically significant changes in the bone level over the 2 years of the study. In conclusion, the single tooth Astra implants were highly successful and bone changes within the first 2 years of function were comparable with other systems reporting high long-term success rates.

  18. Implant-supported single-tooth restorations. A 12-year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donati, Mauro; Ekestubbe, Annika; Lindhe, Jan; Wennström, Jan L

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate prospectively the 12-year outcome of implant-supported single-tooth restorations. Originally 45 self-tapping Astra Tech TiOblast(®) ST-implants were installed by a two-stage protocol in 40 subjects requiring single-tooth prosthetic replacement for a missing tooth. Clinical and radiologic examinations were performed at completion of the prosthetic treatment 4-7 months after implant installation surgery and after 5 and 12 years in function. At 12 years 31 patients and 35 implants were available for evaluation. The overall failure rate after 12 years was 10.3% on the subject level and 9.1% on the implant level. The mean bone loss amounted to 0.67 mm (SD 2.20) on a subject level and 0.47 mm (1.72) on an implant level. Three subjects (10%) and three implants (8.6%) were diagnosed with peri-implantitis. Five subjects had experienced technical complications; three incidences of loosening of the abutment retention screw during the first 5 years and two minor porcelain fracture of the crown (two patients) between 5- and 12-years of follow-up. The findings reported in this 12-year prospective case series suggest that the use of the Astra Tech dental implants may be a valid treatment alternative for single-tooth replacement prostheses. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Dental histology of Coelophysis bauri and the evolution of tooth attachment tissues in early dinosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Raymond K M; LeBlanc, Aaron R H; Berman, David S; Reisz, Robert R

    2016-07-01

    Studies of dinosaur teeth have focused primarily on external crown morphology and thus, use shed or in situ tooth crowns, and are limited to the enamel and dentine dental tissues. As a result, the full suites of periodontal tissues that attach teeth to the jaws remain poorly documented, particularly in early dinosaurs. These tissues are an integral part of the tooth and thus essential to a more complete understanding of dental anatomy, development, and evolution in dinosaurs. To identify the tooth attachment tissues in early dinosaurs, histological thin sections were prepared from the maxilla and dentary of a partial skull of the early theropod Coelophysis bauri from the Upper Triassic (Rhaetian- 209-201 Ma) Whitaker Quarry, New Mexico, USA. As one of the phylogenetically and geologically oldest dinosaurs, it is an ideal candidate for examining dental tissues near the base of the dinosaurian clade. The teeth of C. bauri exhibited a fibrous tooth attachment in which the teeth possessed five tissues: enamel, dentine, cementum, periodontal ligament (PDL), and alveolar bone. Our findings, coupled with those of more recent studies of ornithischian teeth, indicate that a tripartite periodontium, similar to that of crocodilians and mammals, is the plesiomorphic condition for dinosaurs. The occurrence of a tripartite periodontium in dinosaurs adds to the growing consensus that the presence of these tissues is the plesiomorphic condition for the major amniote clades. Furthermore, this study establishes the relative timing of tissue development and growth directions of periodontal tissues and provides the first comparative framework for future studies of dinosaur periodontal development, tooth replacement, and histology. J. Morphol. 277:916-924, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Expression analysis of candidate genes regulating successional tooth formation in the human embryo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan eOlley

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Human dental development is characterized by formation of the primary teeth, which are subsequently replaced by the secondary dentition. The secondary dentition consists of incisors, canines and premolars derived from the successional dental lamina of the corresponding primary tooth germs; and molar teeth, which develop as a continuation of the dental lamina. Currently, very little is known about the molecular regulation of human successional tooth formation. Here, we have investigated expression of three candidate regulators for human successional tooth formation; the Fibroblast Growth Factor-antagonist SPROUTY2, the Hedgehog co-receptor GAS1 and the RUNT-related transcription factor RUNX2. At around 8 weeks of development, only SPROUTY2 showed strong expression in both epithelium and mesenchyme of the early bud. During the cap stage between 12-14 weeks, SPROUTY2 predominated in the dental papilla and inner enamel epithelium of the developing tooth. No specific expression was seen in the successional dental lamina. GAS1 was expressed in the dental papilla and follicle, and associated with mesenchyme adjacent to the primary dental lamina during the late cap stage. In addition, GAS1 transcripts were identifiable in mesenchyme adjacent to the successional lamina, particularly in the developing primary first molar. For RUNX2, expression predominated in the dental papilla and follicle. Localized expression was seen in mesenchyme adjacent to the primary dental lamina at the late cap stage; but surprisingly, not in the early successional lamina at these stages. These findings confirm that SPROUTY2, GAS1 and RUNX2 are all expressed during early human tooth development. The domains of GAS1 and RUNX2 are consistent with a role influencing function of the primary dental lamina but only GAS1 transcripts were identifiable in the successional lamina at these early stages of development.

  1. In vitro differentiation and attachment of human embryonic stem cells on periodontal tooth root surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inanç, Bülend; Elçin, A Eser; Elçin, Y Murat

    2009-11-01

    Periodontal tissue engineering based on cell replacement therapies is a promising field for improved regeneration of tooth supporting structures lost as a result of destructive periodontal diseases. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) could become adequate cell source for tissue engineering because of their unlimited proliferative potential and ability to differentiate to all somatic cell types. The aim of this study was to analyze the differentiation capacity of hESCs toward periodontal compartment cells and their relationship with tooth root surfaces in vitro. Periodontal ligament fibroblastic cell (PDLF) cultures were established and characterized; hESCs (HUES-9 line) were expanded in undifferentiated state and characterized for pluripotency morphologically and immunohistochemically. Extracted tooth root slices (RS) of 300 microm thickness, prepared with both periodontal and endodontic instrumentation, were used. Three different experimental groups were established: (i) undifferentiated hESC colonies cultured on and around the RS; (ii) undifferentiated hESC colonies cultured on and around RS with PDLF coculture, and (iii) undifferentiated hESC colonies cultured on and around RS with PDLF coculture in osteoinductive medium for 3 weeks. The fibrogenic and osteogenic marker expression was assessed with immunohistochemistry; histological staining and scanning electron microscopy were utilized to determine the relationship between differentiating hESCs and mineralized tooth root structures. Results demonstrate that hESC differentiation is influenced by tooth structures, PDLFs, and osteogenic medium, resulting with increased propensity toward mesenchymal lineage commitment, and formation of soft-hard tissue relationship in close contact areas. The proposed experimental system may facilitate further understanding in development of periodontal structures and contribute to realization of hESCs as a cell source in periodontal tissue engineering applications.

  2. The Importance of Tooth Decay Prevention in Children under Three

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milgrom, Peter; Huebner, Colleen; Chi, Donald

    2010-01-01

    Tooth decay and tooth loss was once the norm but public health interventions have led to major improvements for most people. Nevertheless, not all children have benefited. Dental disease in young children is unacceptably high. Tooth decay is preventable. Early childhood educators are often the first to notice the problem. Professional…

  3. The Importance of Tooth Decay Prevention in Children under Three

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milgrom, Peter; Huebner, Colleen; Chi, Donald

    2010-01-01

    Tooth decay and tooth loss was once the norm but public health interventions have led to major improvements for most people. Nevertheless, not all children have benefited. Dental disease in young children is unacceptably high. Tooth decay is preventable. Early childhood educators are often the first to notice the problem. Professional…

  4. Tooth-marked small theropod bone: an extremely rare trace

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Aase Roland

    2001-01-01

    Tooth-marked dinosaur bones provide insight into feeding behaviours and biting strategies of theropod dinosaurs. The majority of theropod tooth marks reported to date have been found on herbivorous dinosaur bones, although some tyrannosaurid bones with tooth marks have also been reported. In 1988...

  5. 21 CFR 872.3690 - Tooth shade resin material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3690 Tooth shade resin material. (a) Identification. Tooth shade resin material is a device composed of materials such as bisphenol-A glycidyl... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tooth shade resin material. 872.3690 Section...

  6. Microfluidics co-culture systems for studying tooth innervation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierfrancesco ePagella

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Innervation plays a key role in the development and homeostasis of organs and tissues of the orofacial complex. Among these structures, teeth are peculiar organs as they are not innervated until later stages of development. Furthermore, the implication of neurons in tooth initiation, morphogenesis and differentiation is still controversial. Co-cultures constitute a valuable method to investigate and manipulate the interactions of nerve fibres with their target organs in a controlled and isolated environment. Conventional co-cultures between neurons and their target tissues have already been performed, but these cultures do not offer optimal conditions that are closely mimicking the in vivo situation. Indeed, specific cell populations require different culture media in order to preserve their physiological properties. In this study we evaluate the usefulness of a microfluidics system for co-culturing mouse trigeminal ganglia and developing teeth. This device allows the application of specific media for the appropriate development of both neuronal and dental tissues. The results show that mouse trigeminal ganglia and teeth survive for long culture periods in this microfluidics system, and that teeth maintain the attractive or repulsive effect on trigeminal neurites that has been observed in vivo. Neurites are repealed when co-cultured with embryonic tooth germs, while postnatal teeth exert an attractive effect to trigeminal ganglia-derived neurons.In conclusion, microfluidics system devices provide a valuable tool for studying the behaviour of neurons during the development of orofacial tissues and organs, faithfully imitating the in vivo situation.

  7. Acoustic emission analysis of tooth-composite interfacial debonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, N Y; Ferracane, J L; Lee, I B

    2013-01-01

    This study detected tooth-composite interfacial debonding during composite restoration by means of acoustic emission (AE) analysis and investigated the effects of composite properties and adhesives on AE characteristics. The polymerization shrinkage, peak shrinkage rate, flexural modulus, and shrinkage stress of a methacrylate-based universal hybrid, a flowable, and a silorane-based composite were measured. Class I cavities on 49 extracted premolars were restored with 1 of the 3 composites and 1 of the following adhesives: 2 etch-and-rinse adhesives, 2 self-etch adhesives, and an adhesive for the silorane-based composite. AE analysis was done for 2,000 sec during light-curing. The silorane-based composite exhibited the lowest shrinkage (rate), the longest time to peak shrinkage rate, the lowest shrinkage stress, and the fewest AE events. AE events were detected immediately after the beginning of light-curing in most composite-adhesive combinations, but not until 40 sec after light-curing began for the silorane-based composite. AE events were concentrated at the initial stage of curing in self-etch adhesives compared with etch-and-rinse adhesives. Reducing the shrinkage (rate) of composites resulted in reduced shrinkage stress and less debonding, as evidenced by fewer AE events. AE is an effective technique for monitoring, in real time, the debonding kinetics at the tooth-composite interface.

  8. An inductive signalling network regulates mammalian tooth morphogenesis with implications for tooth regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z; Yu, M; Tian, W

    2013-10-01

    Sequential and reciprocal epithelial-mesenchymal interactions, essential throughout such aspects of tooth morphogenesis as patterning, size and number of teeth, involves a well-ordered series of inductive and permissive signals that exert global control over cell proliferation, differentiation and organogenesis. In particular, growth factors, transcription factors and their corresponding receptors, as well as other soluble morphogens, make up a regulatory network at the molecular level that synergistically or antagonistically controls intra-/inter-cellular signal transduction during odontogenesis. This review summarizes recent advances in the study of crucial signalling pathways, for example of BMPs, Wnt, Notch, Shh and FGF, with emphasis on the potential integrated signalling network responsible for tooth formation. Our work probes into the complexity of these inductive signalling pathways to promote the understanding of tooth regeneration. Additionally, our study provides further insights into therapeutic strategies for various dental abnormalities in patterning and number, such as tooth agenesis and supernumerary teeth.

  9. Storing tooth segments for optimal esthetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuzuner, T.; Turgut, S.; Özen, B.; Kılınç, H.; Bagis, B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: A fractured whole crown segment can be reattached to its remnant; crowns from extracted teeth may be used as pontics in splinting techniques. We aimed to evaluate the effect of different storage solutions on tooth segment optical properties after different durations. Study design: Sixty c

  10. Life of a Tooth: A Visual Timeline

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Bomberman atari oyunlarý bakugan oyunlarý geta poker friv Home InfoBites Find an AGD Dentist Your Family's Oral ... words mean. The Life of a Tooth games Home | InfoBites | Find a Dentist | Your Family's Oral Health | ...

  11. Age effect on orthodontic tooth movement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ren, Yijin

    2003-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the effect of age on the efficiency of orthodontic tooth movement based on critical literature reviews, studies on a standardized orthodontic animal model and a non-invasive clinical investigation. A systematic review was performed on the optimum force for ort

  12. Bleaching of the discolored traumatized tooth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jon E.; Kopperud, Siemen E.; Pallesen, Ulla

    2017-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the treatment of discolored traumatized teeth, most of them being non-vital and subsequently, endodontically treated. Tooth bleaching based upon hydrogen peroxide as the active agent, applied directly or produced in a chemical reaction from sodium perborate or carbamide...

  13. Early Onset Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The clinical signs and genetic analysis of early-onset Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT in a 2-year-old boy and members of his family are reported from the Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, and Sophia Children’s Hospital, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

  14. Life of a Tooth: A Visual Timeline

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Jaw Pain? Check Your Posture! Learn what those dental words mean. The Life of a Tooth games Home | InfoBites | Find a Dentist | Your Family's Oral Health | Newsroom | RSS About AGD | Contact AGD | Site Map | ... | Terms and Conditions © 1996-2017 Academy of General Dentistry. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Restoration of the endodontically treated posterior tooth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Polesel

    2014-06-01

    Results and conclusions: Direct adhesive restorations, indirect bonded restorations and traditional full crown are three therapeutic options for the single posterior endodontically treated teeth. The amount of remaining sound tooth structure is the most significant factor influencing the therapeutic approach. The clinician's operative skill is a determining aspect for long-term success of adhesive inlays.

  16. psychosocial aspect of anterior tooth discoloration among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tooth colour7 and 28% of adults in the UK were dissatisfied with the ... often results in loss of self-esteem and damage to physical and ... childhood and adolescence can have a significant effect on psychosocial ... the school authorities. Written ...

  17. Tooth loss: Are the patients prepared?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    this has on their lives. ... (12.9%) cases, depression in 11 (6.4%), feeling of losing body part in 24 (14%), feeling of aging in 4 (2.3%), .... and the quality of life of the individuals following tooth ... However, in the elderly, periodontal diseases are.

  18. Life of a Tooth: A Visual Timeline

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... friv Home InfoBites Find an AGD Dentist Your Family's Oral Health About the AGD Dental care and ... Tooth games Home | InfoBites | Find a Dentist | Your Family's Oral Health | Newsroom | RSS About AGD | Contact AGD | ...

  19. Computed tomography to quantify tooth abrasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofmehl, Lukas; Schulz, Georg; Deyhle, Hans; Filippi, Andreas; Hotz, Gerhard; Berndt-Dagassan, Dorothea; Kramis, Simon; Beckmann, Felix; Müller, Bert

    2010-09-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography, also termed digital volume tomography, has become a standard technique in dentistry, allowing for fast 3D jaw imaging including denture at moderate spatial resolution. More detailed X-ray images of restricted volumes for post-mortem studies in dental anthropology are obtained by means of micro computed tomography. The present study evaluates the impact of the pipe smoking wear on teeth morphology comparing the abraded tooth with its contra-lateral counterpart. A set of 60 teeth, loose or anchored in the jaw, from 12 dentitions have been analyzed. After the two contra-lateral teeth were scanned, one dataset has been mirrored before the two datasets were registered using affine and rigid registration algorithms. Rigid registration provides three translational and three rotational parameters to maximize the overlap of two rigid bodies. For the affine registration, three scaling factors are incorporated. Within the present investigation, affine and rigid registrations yield comparable values. The restriction to the six parameters of the rigid registration is not a limitation. The differences in size and shape between the tooth and its contra-lateral counterpart generally exhibit only a few percent in the non-abraded volume, validating that the contralateral tooth is a reasonable approximation to quantify, for example, the volume loss as the result of long-term clay pipe smoking. Therefore, this approach allows quantifying the impact of the pipe abrasion on the internal tooth morphology including root canal, dentin, and enamel volumes.

  20. Life of a Tooth: A Visual Timeline

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... friv Home InfoBites Find an AGD Dentist Your Family's Oral Health About the AGD Dental care and ... Tooth games Home | InfoBites | Find a Dentist | Your Family's Oral Health | Newsroom | RSS About AGD | Contact AGD | ...

  1. Development of a behavior model of pain induced by experimental tooth movement in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhi; Luo, Wei; Hou, Jingqiu; Zhao, Zhihe; Jian, Fan; Wamalwa, Peter; Lai, Wenli; Wang, Jing; Wang, Yan; Liao, Zhenyu

    2009-08-01

    The mechanism of orthodontic pain and discomfort is poorly understood partly because of the limited number of animal behavioral models for pain assessment. This study aimed to develop a behavioral model for assessment of tooth-movement pain in rats using directed face-grooming activity. Male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 200-300 g were used. They were videotaped on days 1, 3, 5, 7, and 14 after experimental tooth movement and their directed face-grooming behavior was evaluated. In addition, we also evaluated behavioral responses to the application of a progressively higher magnitude force and to multiple applications of an equal magnitude force. Finally, the effects of peripherally and systemically administered morphine and of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, MK-801, on the behavioral responses were evaluated. The results indicated that time spent on directed face-grooming activity increased dramatically after initiating experimental tooth movement. The change concurred with the initial orthodontic pain response. This behavioral change was reproducible and was related to force magnitude. Application of both systemic and peripheral morphine and MK-801 could exert an analgesic effect on this pain model. These results suggest that directed face-grooming behavior can be a reliable measure for tooth-movement pain in rats, which could be widely used in investigating the orthodontic pain mechanism.

  2. Regenerative Applications Using Tooth Derived Stem Cells in Other Than Tooth Regeneration: A Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Tooth derived stem cells or dental stem cells are categorized according to the location from which they are isolated and represent a promising source of cells for regenerative medicine. Originally, as one kind of mesenchymal stem cells, they are considered an alternative of bone marrow stromal cells. They share many commonalties but maintain differences. Considering their original function in development and the homeostasis of tooth structures, many applications of these cells in dentistry ha...

  3. Ulnar head replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Timothy J; van Schoonhoven, Joerg

    2007-03-01

    Recent years have seen an increasing awareness of the anatomical and biomechanical significance of the distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ). With this has come a more critical approach to surgical management of DRUJ disorders and a realization that all forms of "excision arthroplasty" can only restore forearm rotation at the expense of forearm stability. This, in turn, has led to renewed interest in prosthetic replacement of the ulnar head, a procedure that had previously fallen into disrepute because of material failures with early implants, in particular, the Swanson silicone ulnar head replacement. In response to these early failures, a new prosthesis was developed in the early 1990s, using materials designed to withstand the loads across the DRUJ associated with normal functional use of the upper limb. Released onto the market in 1995 (Herbert ulnar head prosthesis), clinical experience during the last 10 years has shown that this prosthesis is able to restore forearm function after ulnar head excision and that the materials (ceramic head and noncemented titanium stem), even with normal use of the limb, are showing no signs of failure in the medium to long term. As experience with the use of an ulnar head prosthesis grows, so does its acceptance as a viable and attractive alternative to more traditional operations, such as the Darrach and Sauve-Kapandji procedures. This article discusses the current indications and contraindications for ulnar head replacement and details the surgical procedure, rehabilitation, and likely outcomes.

  4. Implant-supported single-tooth restorations: a 5-year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wennström, Jan L; Ekestubbe, Annika; Gröndahl, Kerstin; Karlsson, Stig; Lindhe, Jan

    2005-06-01

    Comparatively few studies are available reporting at least 5 years of follow-up data of implant-supported single-tooth replacements. To evaluate prospectively the 5-year outcome of implant-supported single-tooth prosthetic restorations. Forty subjects (mean age 41 years), 23 males and 17 females, who required single-tooth prosthetic replacement for a missing tooth were recruited. A total of 45 self-tapping implants (Astra Tech ST-implants)--40 in the maxilla and five in the mandible--were installed in a two-stage procedure. Abutment connection was performed 3-6 months after implant installation. Clinical and radiographic examinations were performed at the completion of the prosthetic treatment and once a year during a 5-year follow-up period. The analysis of peri-implant bone level alteration was performed on subject and implant levels and by the use of analysis of variance and binary logistic regression. Three patients were lost during the 5 years of follow-up. One implant was lost after 2.5 years in function and another four implants could not be accounted for at the 5-year follow-up examination. The overall failure rate at 5 years was 2.6% (subject level) and 2.3% (implant level). The mean loss of marginal bone at the implants during the first year in function was 0.06 mm (SD 0.67) on the subject level and 0.02 mm (0.65) on the implant level. During the subsequent 4 years the annual change in peri-implant bone level amounted to -0.02 mm (0.22) on both subject and implant levels. Thus, the mean total bone level change over the 5-year interval was -0.14 mm (1.04) on subject level and -0.11 mm (1.00) on the implant level of analysis (p>0.05). The frequency of implants with a 5-year bone loss of > or =1 mm was 13%. Approximately 50% of the implants demonstrated no bone loss. The present clinical trial on single-tooth replacements with the Astra Tech implant system demonstrated that the bone loss during the first year of function as well as annually thereafter was

  5. Analysis of the soluble human tooth proteome and its ability to induce dentin/tooth regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, So Young; Lee, Hyo Jung; Choi, Young Ae; Kim, Kyung Min; Baek, Sang Heum; Park, Hyo Sang; Kim, Jae-Young; Ahn, Jung-Mo; Cho, Je-Yeol; Cho, Dong-Woo; Shin, Hong-In; Park, Eui Kyun

    2011-01-01

    While the soluble proteins of human teeth consist of various extracellular matrix and bioactive proteins, they have not yet been characterized fully. Moreover, the role they play in tooth regeneration is not clear. Analysis of the soluble proteins in human teeth by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed 147 different ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid-soluble tooth proteins (ESTPs). Of these, 29 had not been shown previously to be present in human teeth. To determine their effect on the in vitro responses of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), DPSCs were cultured in ESTP-coated culture plates and three-dimensional scaffolds. The ESTPs significantly enhanced DPSC odontoblast differentiation and mineralization in vitro, but had only partial effect on bone marrow stem cells or adipose tissue stem cells. To test the effect of ESTPs on in vivo dentin and tooth formation, mouse embryonic tooth-forming primordia and xenogenic murine apical bud epithelium/human DPSC composites were treated with ESTPs before implantation under the renal capsule of ICR mice. ESTP treatment promoted the formation of morphologically normal teeth by the tooth-forming primordium regions and enhanced the development of a regular and large dentin structure by the composites. These observations suggest that human ESTPs contain dentinogenic proteins and can promote dentin and tooth formation.

  6. Is tooth wear in the primary dentition predictive of tooth wear in the permanent dentition? Report from a longitudinal study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harding, M A

    2010-03-01

    To determine the prevalence of tooth wear in the permanent dentition of a sample of 12-year-old school children and establish whether an association exists between tooth wear recorded now and tooth wear recorded in their primary dentition at age five.

  7. Replacement of Missing Anterior Teeth in a Patient with Chronic Mouth Breathing and Tongue Thrusting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satheesh B. Haralur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The loss of anterior teeth has serious functional, esthetic disabilities, in addition to compromising the patients' quality of life. Various etiologies can be attributed to the anterior tooth loss, including trauma, caries, and periodontal diseases. The chronic mouth breathing due to nasal adenoids is known to enhance the gingival and periodontal diseases. The dental literature proves the association of nasal breathing, tongue thrusting, and anterior open bite. Arch shape and tooth position are primarily determined by the equilibrium of the forces from tongue and perioral musculature. Increased force from tongue musculature in the tongue thrusting patient leads to flaring of anterior teeth, making them susceptible for periodontal and traumatic tooth loss. Replacement of the anterior teeth in this patient will also help in restoration of anterior guidance, which is critical for the health of temporomandibular joint, posterior teeth, and musculature.

  8. Replacement of missing anterior teeth in a patient with chronic mouth breathing and tongue thrusting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haralur, Satheesh B; Al-Qahtani, Ali Saad

    2013-01-01

    The loss of anterior teeth has serious functional, esthetic disabilities, in addition to compromising the patients' quality of life. Various etiologies can be attributed to the anterior tooth loss, including trauma, caries, and periodontal diseases. The chronic mouth breathing due to nasal adenoids is known to enhance the gingival and periodontal diseases. The dental literature proves the association of nasal breathing, tongue thrusting, and anterior open bite. Arch shape and tooth position are primarily determined by the equilibrium of the forces from tongue and perioral musculature. Increased force from tongue musculature in the tongue thrusting patient leads to flaring of anterior teeth, making them susceptible for periodontal and traumatic tooth loss. Replacement of the anterior teeth in this patient will also help in restoration of anterior guidance, which is critical for the health of temporomandibular joint, posterior teeth, and musculature.

  9. [A new method for combined auto-alloplastic tooth reimplantation with a parallel A1203-ceramic root].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschner, H; Bolz, U; Enomoto, S; Hüttemann, R W; Meinel, W; Sturm, J

    1978-09-01

    The operative procedure for partially replacing the root with A12O3 ceramic represents a good possibility for preserving teeth in which the pulpa is devitalized. The method used in connection with the well known autoplastic reimplantation not only presents an alternative to the traditional apicoectomy but also provides additional stabilization of the tooth by lengthing the root with cocotostabile and biocompatible A1203 ceramic. The method was tested in humans and monkeys. Argumentation was based on histological examination via light microscopy.

  10. Prevention of dental anomalies in children by prosthetics defects hard tooth tissues and dentitions: the need to possibilities

    OpenAIRE

    Suetenkov D.Ye.; Pudovkina Е.А.; Venatovskaya N.V.; Proshin A.G.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the possibility of restore the function and anatomy of the tooth and replacement of defects of dentition by prosthesis in children under the removable bite as a method of prevention of dentoalveolar anomalies. Identified the need for prosthetic treatment of children and the willingness of dentists as primary health care professional to address the problems identified. A clinical analysis of complex treatment of defects in the teeth with fixed restorations

  11. Prevention of dental anomalies in children by prosthetics defects hard tooth tissues and dentitions: the need to possibilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suetenkov D.Ye.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the possibility of restore the function and anatomy of the tooth and replacement of defects of dentition by prosthesis in children under the removable bite as a method of prevention of dentoalveolar anomalies. Identified the need for prosthetic treatment of children and the willingness of dentists as primary health care professional to address the problems identified. A clinical analysis of complex treatment of defects in the teeth with fixed restorations

  12. A TOOTH TATTOO WITH A PURPOSE: AN INNOVATIVE APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neetu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Skin is not the only place that can be decorated with a tattoo. You can decorate your tooth with amazing tattoos. Tooth tattoos and tooth jewels have become one of the hottest fashion trends , and a very popular arrival in cosmetic dentistry. But won’t it be a boon if it had some preventive or medicinal v alue. Yes tooth tattoos can act as indicators of once illness. These tiny electronic sensors can diagnose illnesses by 'tasting' your breath. This paper is an insight into how a tooth tattoos can pick up early warning signs of sickness or infection by bact eria in people's breath.

  13. Tooth regeneration: challenges and opportunities for biomedical material research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Chang; Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2006-03-01

    Tooth regeneration presents many challenges to researchers in the fields of biology, medicine and material science. This review considers the opportunities for biomedical material research to contribute to this multidisciplinary endeavor. We present short summaries and an overview on the collective knowledge of tooth developmental biology, advances in stem-cell research, and progress in the understanding of the tooth biomineralization principles as they provide the foundation for developing strategies for reparative and regenerative medicine. We emphasize that various biomaterials developed via biomimetic strategies have great potential for tooth tissue engineering and regeneration applications. The current practices in tooth tissue engineering approaches and applications of biomimetic carriers or scaffolds are also discussed.

  14. Stages and transitions in the development of tooth brushing skills in children of Mexican immigrant families: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benadof, Dafna; Polk, Deborah; Documet, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Compared with white children, the oral health of Latino children in the United States is much worse. One factor contributing to oral health is tooth brushing. Few studies have addressed the formation of the tooth brushing habit in children, and only one of them studied a Latino population. The purpose of this study is to explore the development of the tooth brushing habit in children of Mexican immigrant families and develop hypothesis based on its results. This is an exploratory qualitative study, with a case study design based on 20 in-depth interviews. Participants were Mexican immigrant mothers living in Pittsburgh and Philadelphia, PA. Participants had at least one child six-years-old or younger. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using qualitative analysis procedures. Four stages were identified in the tooth brushing learning process: initiation and entirely dependent tooth brushing, assisted tooth brushing, road to tooth brushing independence, and independent tooth brushing. Two factors influenced parents' teaching approaches: parents' perceptions of their child's achievement of physical, cognitive, and motor developmental milestones and parents' knowledge about oral hygiene. We identified four distinct stages and found evidence to hypothesize that transitions from one stage to the next are triggered not by the age of the child but by parents' knowledge about oral hygiene and their perceptions of their child's achievement of physical, cognitive, and motor developmental milestones. Future quantitative research studies should be conducted to test this hypothesis in larger groups of Latinos as well as other ethnic groups. © 2015 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  15. 'Split posterior tooth': conservative clinical re-attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Sathish; Chacko, Lisa Neelathil

    2014-07-30

    Trauma is the prime causative factor for fracture of teeth/dentition. Many procedural management options are followed successfully in relation to the anterior teeth. However, most posterior cases where the tooth is fractured have only limited options to pursue to save the tooth. Fractured teeth, whether they are vital/non-vital, are predominantly managed with surgical options. This paper discusses a conservative approach to reattaching a split posterior tooth. A split tooth situation is mostly an absolute indication for extraction, but the clinician may go in for extensive surgical procedures if he/she wishes to save it. The reattachment of the tooth can be successfully done and it can be put to function. This paper discusses how a split posterior tooth can be treated successfully, although depending on multiple factors. A full crown cemented after successful reattachment and root canal therapy would provide sufficient support in order for the tooth to heal.

  16. Multilobed mesiodens: a supernumerary tooth with unusual morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Bhavna; Patel, Jalark; Swadas, Milan; Mallikarjuna, Rachappa

    2013-02-06

    An 8-year-old boy came with a chief complaint of an abnormally shaped tooth situated in upper front teeth region. On examination a supernumerary tooth with multiple lobes was present palatally to the maxillary right permanent central incisor. The morphology of the tooth crown was found to be unusual due to the presence of five lobes in the crown portion. Because of the supernumerary tooth, the permanent right central incisor was displaced labially. Radiographic examination showed a completely formed supernumerary tooth with dilacerated root. On the basis of clinical and radiographic examination, the supernumerary tooth was diagnosed as multilobed mesiodens. Since patient expressed dissatisfaction with the presence of supernumerary tooth, it was decided to extract this mesiodens followed by orthodontic treatment for alignment of labially placed maxillary right permanent central incisor.

  17. Aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kapetanakis, Emmanouil I; Athanasiou, Thanos; Mestres, Carlos A

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS OF THE STUDY: Prompted by anecdotal evidence and observations by surgeons, an investigation was undertaken into the potential differences in implanted aortic valve prosthesis sizes, during aortic valve replacement (AVR) procedures, between northern and southern European...... countries. METHODS: A multi-institutional, non-randomized, retrospective analysis was conducted among 2,932 patients who underwent AVR surgery at seven tertiary cardiac surgery centers throughout Europe. Demographic and perioperative variables including valve size and type, body surface area (BSA) and early...

  18. Total ankle joint replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Ankle arthritis results in a stiff and painful ankle and can be a major cause of disability. For people with end-stage ankle arthritis, arthrodesis (ankle fusion) is effective at reducing pain in the shorter term, but results in a fixed joint, and over time the loss of mobility places stress on other joints in the foot that may lead to arthritis, pain and dysfunction. Another option is to perform a total ankle joint replacement, with the aim of giving the patient a mobile and pain-free ankle. In this article we review the efficacy of this procedure, including how it compares to ankle arthrodesis, and consider the indications and complications.

  19. The Optimum Replacement of Weapon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiao; ZHANG Jin-chun

    2002-01-01

    The theory of LCC (Life Cycle Cost) is applied in this paper. The relation between the economic life of weapon and the optimum replacement is analyzed. The method to define the optimum replacement time of weapon is discussed.

  20. A Comparison of Equivalent Doses of Lidocaine and Articaine in Maxillary Posterior Tooth Extractions: Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher C. Friedl

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Local anaesthesia is the standard of care during dental extractions. With the advent of newer local anesthetic agents, it is often difficult for the clinician to decide which agent would be most efficacious in a given clinical scenario. This study assessed the efficacy of equal-milligram doses of lidocaine and articaine in achieving surgical anaesthesia of maxillary posterior teeth diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis. Material and Methods: This case-series evaluated a total of 41 patients diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis in a maxillary posterior tooth. Patients randomly received an infiltration of either 3.6 mL (72 mg 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine or 1.8 mL (72 mg 4% articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine in the buccal fold and palatal soft tissue adjacent to the tooth. After 10 minutes, initial anaesthesia of the tooth was assessed by introducing a sterile 27-gauge needle into the gingival tissue adjacent to the tooth, followed by relief of the gingival cuff. Successful treatment was considered to have occurred when the tooth was extracted with no reported pain. Data was analyzed with the Fisher’s exact test, unpaired t-test and normality test. Results: Twenty-one patients received lidocaine and 20 received articaine. Forty of the 41 patients achieved initial anaesthesia 10 minutes after injection: 21 after lidocaine and 19 after articaine (P = 0.488. Pain-free extraction was accomplished in 33 patients: 19 after lidocaine and 14 after articaine buccal and palatal infiltrations (P = 0.226. Conclusions: There was no significant difference in efficacy between equivalent doses of lidocaine and articaine in the anaesthesia of maxillary posterior teeth with irreversible pulpitis.

  1. Power Plant Replacement Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, Gary

    2010-09-30

    This report represents the final report for the Eastern Illinois University power plant replacement study. It contains all related documentation from consideration of possible solutions to the final recommended option. Included are the economic justifications associated with the chosen solution along with application for environmental permitting for the selected project for construction. This final report will summarize the results of execution of an EPC (energy performance contract) investment grade audit (IGA) which lead to an energy services agreement (ESA). The project includes scope of work to design and install energy conservation measures which are guaranteed by the contractor to be self‐funding over its twenty year contract duration. The cost recovery is derived from systems performance improvements leading to energy savings. The prime focus of this EPC effort is to provide a replacement solution for Eastern Illinois University’s aging and failing circa 1925 central steam production plant. Twenty‐three ECMs were considered viable whose net impact will provide sufficient savings to successfully support the overall project objectives.

  2. Total disc replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vital, J-M; Boissière, L

    2014-02-01

    Total disc replacement (TDR) (partial disc replacement will not be described) has been used in the lumbar spine since the 1980s, and more recently in the cervical spine. Although the biomechanical concepts are the same and both are inserted through an anterior approach, lumbar TDR is conventionally indicated for chronic low back pain, whereas cervical TDR is used for soft discal hernia resulting in cervicobrachial neuralgia. The insertion technique must be rigorous, with precise centering in the disc space, taking account of vascular anatomy, which is more complex in the lumbar region, particularly proximally to L5-S1. All of the numerous studies, including prospective randomized comparative trials, have demonstrated non-inferiority to fusion, or even short-term superiority regarding speed of improvement. The main implant-related complication is bridging heterotopic ossification with resulting loss of range of motion and increased rates of adjacent segment degeneration, although with an incidence lower than after arthrodesis. A sufficiently long follow-up, which has not yet been reached, will be necessary to establish definitively an advantage for TDR, particularly in the cervical spine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. REPLACEMENT OF FRENCH CARDS

    CERN Multimedia

    HR/SOC

    2001-01-01

    The French Ministry of Foreign Affairs has informed the Organization that it is shortly to replace all diplomatic cards, special cards and employment permits ('attestations de fonctions') now held by members of the personnel and their families. Between 2 July and 31 December 2001, these cards are to be replaced by secure, computerized equivalents. The old cards may continue to be used until 31 December 2001. For the purposes of the handover, members of the personnel must go personally to the cards office (33/1-015), in order to fill in a 'fiche individuelle' form, taking the following documents for themselves and members of their families already in possession of a French card : A recent identity photograph in 4.5 cm x 3.5 cm format. The French card in their possession. An A4 photocopy of the same French card, certified by the cards office as being a true copy. Those members of the personnel whose cards (and/or cards belonging to members of their families) are shortly due to expire, or have recently done...

  4. REPLACEMENT OF FRENCH CARDS

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division; Cards.Service@cern.ch

    2001-01-01

    The French Ministry of Foreign Affairs is currently replacing all diplomatic cards, special cards and employment permits («attestations de fonctions») held by members of the personnel and their families. These cards are replaced by secure, computerized equivalents. The old cards may no longer be used after 31 December 2001. For the purposes of the handover, members of the personnel must go personally to the cards office (33/1-015) between 8h30 and 12h30, in order to fill in a «fiche individuelle» form, taking the following documents for themselves and members of their families already in possession of a French card : A recent identity photograph in 4.5 cm x 3.5 cm format, the French card in their possession, an A4 photocopy of the same French card, certified by the cards office as being a true copy. Those members of the personnel whose cards (and/or cards belonging to members of their families) are shortly due to expire, or have recently done so, are also requested...

  5. REPLACEMENT OF FRENCH CARDS

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2001-01-01

    The French Ministry of Foreign Affairs has informed the Organization that it is shortly to replace all diplomatic cards, special cards and employment permits ('attestations de fonctions') now held by members of the personnel and their families. Between 2 July and 31 December 2001, these cards are to be replaced by secure, computerized equivalents. The old cards may continue to be used until 31 December 2001. For the purposes of the handover, members of the personnel are asked to go to the cards office (33/1-015), taking the following documents for themselves and members of their families already in possession of a French card : A recent identity photograph in 4.5 cm x 3.5 cm format, The French card in their possession, an A4 photocopy of the same French card, certified by the cards office as being a true copy. Those members of the personnel whose cards (and/or cards belonging to members of their families) are shortly due to expire, or have recently done so, are also requested to take these items to the c...

  6. REPLACEMENT OF FRENCH CARDS

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2001-01-01

    The French Ministry of Foreign Affairs has informed the Organization that it is shortly to replace all diplomatic cards, special cards and employment permits ('attestations de fonctions') now held by members of the personnel and their families. Between 2 July and 31 December 2001, these cards are to be replaced by secure, computerized equivalents. A 'personnel office' stamped photocopy of the old cards may continue to be used until 31 December 2001. For the purposes of the handover, members of the personnel must go personally to the cards office (33/1-015), between 8:30 and 12:30, in order to fill a 'fiche individuelle' form (in black ink only), which has to be personally signed by themselves and another separately signed by members of their family, taking the following documents for themselves and members of their families already in possession of a French card : A recent identity photograph in 4.5 cm x 3.5 cm format (signed on the back) The French card in their possession an A4 photocopy of the same Fre...

  7. Power Plant Replacement Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, Gary

    2010-09-30

    This report represents the final report for the Eastern Illinois University power plant replacement study. It contains all related documentation from consideration of possible solutions to the final recommended option. Included are the economic justifications associated with the chosen solution along with application for environmental permitting for the selected project for construction. This final report will summarize the results of execution of an EPC (energy performance contract) investment grade audit (IGA) which lead to an energy services agreement (ESA). The project includes scope of work to design and install energy conservation measures which are guaranteed by the contractor to be self-funding over its twenty year contract duration. The cost recovery is derived from systems performance improvements leading to energy savings. The prime focus of this EPC effort is to provide a replacement solution for Eastern Illinois University's aging and failing circa 1925 central steam production plant. Twenty-three ECMs were considered viable whose net impact will provide sufficient savings to successfully support the overall project objectives.

  8. Faster Replacement Paths

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Virginia Vassilevska

    2010-01-01

    The replacement paths problem for directed graphs is to find for given nodes s and t and every edge e on the shortest path between them, the shortest path between s and t which avoids e. For unweighted directed graphs on n vertices, the best known algorithm runtime was \\tilde{O}(n^{2.5}) by Roditty and Zwick. For graphs with integer weights in {-M,...,M}, Weimann and Yuster recently showed that one can use fast matrix multiplication and solve the problem in O(Mn^{2.584}) time, a runtime which would be O(Mn^{2.33}) if the exponent \\omega of matrix multiplication is 2. We improve both of these algorithms. Our new algorithm also relies on fast matrix multiplication and runs in O(M n^{\\omega} polylog(n)) time if \\omega>2 and O(n^{2+\\eps}) for any \\eps>0 if \\omega=2. Our result shows that, at least for small integer weights, the replacement paths problem in directed graphs may be easier than the related all pairs shortest paths problem in directed graphs, as the current best runtime for the latter is \\Omega(n^{2.5...

  9. Power Plant Replacement Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, Gary

    2010-09-30

    This report represents the final report for the Eastern Illinois University power plant replacement study. It contains all related documentation from consideration of possible solutions to the final recommended option. Included are the economic justifications associated with the chosen solution along with application for environmental permitting for the selected project for construction. This final report will summarize the results of execution of an EPC (energy performance contract) investment grade audit (IGA) which lead to an energy services agreement (ESA). The project includes scope of work to design and install energy conservation measures which are guaranteed by the contractor to be self-funding over its twenty year contract duration. The cost recovery is derived from systems performance improvements leading to energy savings. The prime focus of this EPC effort is to provide a replacement solution for Eastern Illinois University’s aging and failing circa 1925 central steam production plant. Twenty-three ECMs were considered viable whose net impact will provide sufficient savings to successfully support the overall project objectives.

  10. Squalicorax Chips a Tooth: A Consequence of Feeding-Related Behavior from the Lowermost Navesink Formation (Late Cretaceous: Campanian-Maastrichtian of Monmouth County, New Jersey, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A. Chamberlain

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Chipped and broken functional teeth are common in modern sharks with serrated tooth shape. Tooth damage consists of splintering, cracking, and flaking near the cusp apex where the enameloid is broken and exposes the osteodentine and orthodentine. Such damage is generally viewed as the result of forces applied during feeding as the cusp apex impacts the skeletal anatomy of prey. Damage seen in serrated functional teeth from sharks Squalicorax kaupi [1] and Squalicorax pristodontus [1] from the late Cretaceous lowermost Navesink Formation of New Jersey resembles that occurring in modern sharks and suggests similar feeding behavior. Tumbling experiments using serrated modern and fossil functional shark teeth, including those of Squalicorax, show that teeth are polished, not cracked or broken, by post-mortem abrasion in lowermost Navesink sediment. This provides further evidence that chipped and broken Squalicorax teeth are feeding-related and not taphonomic in origin. Evolution of rapid tooth replacement in large sharks such as Squalicorax ensured maximum functionality after feeding-related tooth damage occurred. Serrated teeth and rapid tooth replacement in the large sharks of the Mesozoic and Cenozoic afforded them competitive advantages that helped them to achieve their place as apex predators in today’s ocean.

  11. New method of control of tooth whitening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelov, I.; Mantareva, V.; Gisbrecht, A.; Valkanov, S.; Uzunov, Tz.

    2010-10-01

    New methods of control of tooth bleaching stages through simultaneous measurements of a reflected light and a fluorescence signal are proposed. It is shown that the bleaching process leads to significant changes in the intensity of a scattered signal and also in the shape and intensity of the fluorescence spectra. Experimental data illustrate that the bleaching process causes essential changes in the teeth discoloration in short time as 8-10 min from the beginning of the application procedure. The continuation of the treatment is not necessary moreover the probability of the enamel destroy increases considerably. The proposed optical back control of tooth surface is a base for development of a practical set up to control the duration of the bleaching procedure.

  12. Distribution of amelotin in mouse tooth development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yuguang; Wang, Wanchun; Sun, Yan; Zhang, Juanjuan; Li, Dongliang; Wei, Yahong; Han, Tingting

    2010-01-01

    Amelotin is expressed and secreted by ameloblasts in tooth development, but amelotin distribution during enamel development is not clear. In this report, we first investigated amelotin expression in developing teeth by immunohistochemistry. Amelotin was detected in the enamel matrix at the secretion and maturation stages of enamel development. Amelotin was also observed at Tomes' processes on the apical ends of secretory ameloblasts. We then compared amelotin gene expression with those of amelogenin, enamelin, and ameloblastin in the mandibles of postnatal mice by RT-PCR. The expression of amelotin was detected as early as in postnatal day 0 mandibles and amelotin was coexpressed with amelogenin, ameloblastin, and enamelin during tooth development. These data strongly suggest that amelotin is an enamel matrix protein expressed at the secretion and maturation stages of enamel development. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Tooth in Ethmoid Sinus: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayebe Kazemei

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Ectopic eruption of teeth occurs in a variety of locations.Commonly seen in palate and maxillary sinus, they have alsobeen reported in nasal cavity, orbit, mandibular condyle,coronoid process, and facial skin.Here, we report a rare case of recurrent sinusitis caused byectopic tooth in right ethmoid sinus and successful endoscopicremoval of it. The symptoms of the patient disappeared aftersurgery. Such case has not been yet reported in the Englishliterature.Ectopic tooth is an uncommon cause of sinusitis. It shouldbe considered in patients presenting with recurrent sinusitis unresponsiveto medical treatment. Computed tomography of thesinuses is the modality of choice for diagnosis. Endoscopic sinussurgery is the best method for management of such cases.

  14. Expression of Sox genes in tooth development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Katsushige; Kawasaki, Maiko; Watanabe, Momoko; Idrus, Erik; Nagai, Takahiro; Oommen, Shelly; Maeda, Takeyasu; Hagiwara, Nobuko; Que, Jianwen; Sharpe, Paul T; Ohazama, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Members of the Sox gene family play roles in many biological processes including organogenesis. We carried out comparative in situ hybridization analysis of seventeen sox genes (Sox1-14, 17, 18, 21) during murine odontogenesis from the epithelial thickening to the cytodifferentiation stages. Localized expression of five Sox genes (Sox6, 9, 13, 14 and 21) was observed in tooth bud epithelium. Sox13 showed restricted expression in the primary enamel knots. At the early bell stage, three Sox genes (Sox8, 11, 17 and 21) were expressed in pre-ameloblasts, whereas two others (Sox5 and 18) showed expression in odontoblasts. Sox genes thus showed a dynamic spatio-temporal expression during tooth development.

  15. Interdisciplinary management of single-tooth implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spear, F M; Mathews, D M; Kokich, V G

    1997-03-01

    Orthodontists treat many patients who are missing maxillary lateral incisors and/or mandibular second premolars. In the past, if the canines could not be substituted for lateral incisors, conventional full-coverage bridges were the common restoration. Recently, resin-bonded Maryland bridges became a popular substitute for conventional bridges to avoid crowns on the nonrestored abutments. However, resin-bonded bridges have a poor long-term prognosis for retention, lasting on average about 10 years. Since implants were introduced into dentistry by Swedish researchers in the mid-1980s, they have become a promising substitute for conventional or resin-bonded bridges. However, to successfully place and restore single-tooth implants in young orthodontic patients several questions must be answered. This article will discuss the many interdisciplinary issues that are involved in placing and restoring single-tooth implants in orthodontic patients.

  16. Esthetics and vertical tooth position: orthodontic possibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokich, V G

    1997-12-01

    Throughout the 1990s, esthetic dentistry has become a prominent part of the treatment protocol of most dentists. Patients have become more conscious of the benefits of a beautiful smile and are willing to invest time and money to improve the appearance of their teeth. Many of these patients can be treated with routine restorative procedures (crowns, composites, laminates) to achieve the desired results. However, some patients have problems with tooth position that create significant discrepancies in gingival levels which can compromise the esthetic result of restorative dentistry. Prerestorative orthodontic therapy can often resolve these tooth position problems and enhance the esthetic restoration. This article describes the indication, methods, and results achieved when orthodontics preceded restorative dentistry in the treatment of various esthetic challenges.

  17. Non-surgical management of tooth hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Danielle; Levin, Liran

    2016-10-01

    Tooth sensitivity is a common complaint of patients in dental practices. Studies have demonstrated dentinal hypersensitivity to affect 10-30% of the population. There are various potential causes of tooth sensitivity and a variety of available treatment options. This narrative review will discuss the possible aetiology of this condition, as well as the treatment modalities available. A tailor-made treatment plan that starts with the most non-invasive treatment options and escalates only when those options have proven insufficient in alleviating symptoms should be provided for each patient. Only after all non- and less-invasive methods have failed to reduce the symptoms should more invasive treatment options, such as root-coverage, be considered.

  18. Expression of Sox genes in tooth development

    Science.gov (United States)

    KAWASAKI, KATSUSHIGE; KAWASAKI, MAIKO; WATANABE, MOMOKO; IDRUS, ERIK; NAGAI, TAKAHIRO; OOMMEN, SHELLY; MAEDA, TAKEYASU; HAGIWARA, NOBUKO; QUE, JIANWEN; SHARPE, PAUL T.; OHAZAMA, ATSUSHI

    2017-01-01

    Members of the Sox gene family play roles in many biological processes including organogenesis. We carried out comparative in situ hybridization analysis of seventeen sox genes (Sox1-14, 17, 18, 21) during murine odontogenesis from the epithelial thickening to the cytodifferentiation stages. Localized expression of five Sox genes (Sox6, 9, 13, 14 and 21) was observed in tooth bud epithelium. Sox13 showed restricted expression in the primary enamel knots. At the early bell stage, three Sox genes (Sox8, 11, 17 and 21) were expressed in pre-ameloblasts, whereas two others (Sox5 and 18) showed expression in odontoblasts. Sox genes thus showed a dynamic spatio-temporal expression during tooth development. PMID:26864488

  19. "Drink beer regularly - it's good for you (and us)": selling Tooth's Beer in a depressed market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Robert

    2007-01-01

    This study examines the unique publicity activities devised by the Tooth's brewery in Sydney during the Great Depression and the 1930s. Unlike many advertisers, the brewery did not turn its back on advertising or marketing. Recognising the importance of publicity, the brewery developed innovative advertising and marketing initiatives in an attempt to arrest its declining sales. Such strategies included the development of co-operative advertising campaigns, the creation of advertisements directly targeting female consumers, and the renovation of pubs owned by the brewery. However, the significance of these initiatives extends beyond the immediate economic concerns. They were also celebration of modernity. By locating Tooth's advertising, marketing, and public relations activities within the broader social, cultural, and political context, this study provides a revealing insight into the way in which such campaigns simultaneously informed and reflected the Australian experience of modernity during the 1930s.

  20. Frictional Effects on Gear Tooth Contact Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng Li; Ken Mao

    2013-01-01

    The present paper concentrates on the investigations regarding the situations of frictional shear stress of gear teeth and the relevant frictional effects on bending stresses and transmission error in gear meshing. Sliding friction is one of the major reasons causing gear failure and vibration; the adequate consideration of frictional effects is essential for understanding gear contact behavior accurately. An analysis of tooth frictional effect on gear performance in spur gear is presented us...

  1. Bivalent histone modifications during tooth development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Wei Zheng; Bin-Peng Zhang; Ruo-Shi Xu; Xin Xu; Ling Ye; Xue-Dong Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Histone methylation is one of the most widely studied post-transcriptional modifications. It is thought to be an important epigenetic event that is closely associated with cell fate determination and differentiation. To explore the spatiotemporal expression of histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) and histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3) epigenetic marks and methylation or demethylation transferases in tooth organ development, we measured the expression of SET7, EZH2, KDM5B and JMJD3 via immunohistochemistry and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis in the first molar of BALB/c mice embryos at E13.5, E15.5, E17.5, P0 and P3, respectively. We also measured the expression of H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 with immunofluorescence staining. During murine tooth germ development, methylation or demethylation transferases were expressed in a spatial–temporal manner. The bivalent modification characterized by H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 can be found during the tooth germ development, as shown by immunofluorescence. The expression of SET7, EZH2 as methylation transferases and KDM5B and JMJD3 as demethylation transferases indicated accordingly with the expression of H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 respectively to some extent. The bivalent histone may play a critical role in tooth organ development via the regulation of cell differentiation.

  2. Risk factors for developing tooth sensitivity and gingival irritation associated with nightguard vital bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, R H; Haywood, V B; Phillips, C

    1997-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine risk factors in the development of tooth sensitivity and gingival irritation associated with the nightguard vital bleaching technique. The potential risk factors evaluated (sex, age, reported allergy, whitening solution, number of times the solution was changed daily [its usage pattern], and dental arch) were collected from the daily log form turned in by each of the 64 participants after completion of the 6-week lightening process. Also evaluated for each participant, from color slides, were tooth characteristics such as gingival recession, defective restorations, abfraction lesions, enamel-cementum abrasion, etc, and reported side effects. The generalized Mantel-Haenszel statistic was used to assess the association between the potential risk factors and the development of tooth sensitivity and/or gingival irritation. No statistical relationship existed between age, sex, allergy, tooth characteristics, or the dental arch lightened and the development of side effects. Initially, a statistically significant association existed between side effects and the whitening solution used. However, when the analysis was controlled for usage pattern, this relationship disappeared. Patients who changed the whitening solution more than once a day reported statistically significantly more side effects than did those who did not change the whitening solution during their usage time.

  3. Effect of atorvastatin on orthodontic tooth movement in male wistar rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Hossein MirHashemi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Statins are used as cholesterol-lowering drugs by many patients and have been recently shown to affect bone metabolism. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of atorvastatinon on orthodontic tooth movement (OTM in rats.Thirty-six adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups of 12 samples each. Group A, served as control with no medication while groups B and C received a daily gavage of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC as vehicle and atorvastatin (5 mg/kg as test substance, respectively. In all three groups, 6mm nickel-titanium closed-coil springs were ligated between the maxillary incisors and first left molars to deliver an initial force of 60g. Tooth movement was measured following sacrifice, 21 days after appliance insertion. Root resorption, PDL width and osteoclast number were histologically evaluated and compared between the groups.The mean amount of tooth movement was 0.62 mm in group A, 0.59 mm in group B and 0.38 mm in group C. OTM reduction following administration of atorvastatin was statistically significant (p0.05.According to the results obtained in the current study, atorvastatin appears to reduce tooth movement in rats; however its effect on osteoclasts, especially osteoclastic function, requires further investigation.

  4. Expression of HMGB1 during tooth development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugars, R; Karlström, E; Christersson, C; Olsson, M-L; Wendel, M; Fried, K

    2007-03-01

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a nuclear and cytosolic protein that can act as a transcription factor, a growth factor, or a cytokine. To elucidate a possible role for HMGB1 in tooth development, we have studied the expression of HMGB1 and its receptor RAGE (receptor for advanced glycation end-products) during the late fetal and early postnatal period of rat by using light- and electron-microscopic immunohistochemistry. Low HMGB1 protein expression was observed during fetal and newborn stages of tooth development. However, from postnatal day 5 (P5) onward, a marked increase occurred in the levels of the protein in most dental cell types. Expression was particularly high in ameloblasts and odontoblasts at regions of ongoing mineralization. Although most HMGB1 immunoreactivity was confined to cell nuclei, it was also present in odontoblast cytoplasm. At P5, ameloblasts and odontoblasts also showed RAGE immunoreactivity, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction demonstrated both HMGB1 and RAGE mRNA in human dental pulp cells in vitro. Immunoblots performed on extracts from bovine dentin demonstrated a principal band at approximately 27 kDa, indicating that HMGB1 participates in tooth mineralization. The expression of both ligand and receptor suggests an autocrine/paracrine HMGB1 signalling axis in odontoblasts.

  5. Influence of musical instruments on tooth positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, E

    1981-08-01

    A 2-year longitudinal investigation was conducted at five New York City junior high schools on 11- to 13-year-old children starting instrumental music education to determine what tooth movement, if any, resulted from the playing of certain musical instruments. Questionnaires, interviews, oral examinations, and dental casts were used at the start of instrumental study, after one year, and then after a second year. Statistically significant anterior tooth movements occurred in an overwhelming majority of the instrumentalists, while negligible movements were recorded for the controls over this period. As a result of this study, certain recommendations can be made by dentists when they are asked to suggest instruments which are dentally suited for children. In most cases they can suggest more than one instrument which would be of benefit dentally to the individual child, especially in the increase or reduction of overjet and overbite. The playing of the correct musical instrument can serve as an adjunct to the dentist or orthodontist in trying to accomplish certain tooth movements.

  6. Tooth reattachment: An immediate esthetic restorative procedure for crown root fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenu G Singla

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Crown root fractures in the maxillary anterior region represent an intriguing challenge for clinicians. An interdisciplinary approach based on exposing fractured margins and the definitive prosthetic rehabilitation represent the standard modality of treatment for these conditions to restore the appropriate biologic dimension and esthetics. However, if the margins of the fragment and the tooth show perfect juxtaposition with no interfragmentary space and immediate esthetic replacement is needed, reattachment of the fractured segment using adhesives may be indicated. The aim of this case report is to describe the treatment of a crown root fracture at CEJ of an endodontically treated tooth having porcelain fused to metal crown by means of metal post placement and reattactment of the fragment using Glass ionomer cement with follow up of one year. Conclusion: Reattachment of a tooth fragment is a viable technique that restores function and aesthetics with a very conservative approach in a single visit and can be considered when treating patients with crown/root fractures of the anterior teeth.

  7. Contribution of donor and host mesenchyme to the transplanted tooth germs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaki, T; Saito, K; Ida-Yonemochi, H; Nakagawa, E; Kenmotsu, S; Ohshima, H

    2015-01-01

    Autologous tooth germ transplantation of immature teeth is an alternative method of tooth replacement that could be used instead of dental implants in younger patients. However, it is paramount that the dental pulp remain vital and that root formation continue in the transplanted location. The goal of this study is to characterize the healing of allogenic tooth grafts in an animal model using GFP-labeled donor or host postnatal mice. In addition, the putative stem cells were labeled before transplantation with a pulse-chase paradigm. Transplanted molars formed cusps and roots and erupted into occlusion by 2 wk postoperatively. Host label-retaining cells (LRCs) were maintained in the center of pulp tissue associating with blood vessels. Dual labeling showed that a proportion of LRCs were incorporated into the odontoblast layer. Host cells, including putative dendritic cells and the endothelium, also immigrated into the pulp tissue but did not contribute to the odontoblast layer. Therefore, LRCs or putative mesenchymal stem cells are retained in the transplanted pulps. Hertwig's epithelial root sheath remains vital, and epithelial LRCs are present in the donor cervical loops. Thus, the dynamic donor-host interaction occurred in the developing transplant, suggesting that these changes affect the characteristics of the dental pulp.

  8. Octacalcium phosphate (OCP) collagen composites enhance bone healing in a dog tooth extraction socket model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iibuchi, S; Matsui, K; Kawai, T; Sasaki, K; Suzuki, O; Kamakura, S; Echigo, S

    2010-02-01

    The authors have reported that a scaffold constructed of synthetic octacalcium phosphate (OCP) and porcine atelocollagen sponge (OCP/Col) enhanced bone regeneration more than sintered beta-tricalcium phosphate collagen composite or sintered hydroxyapatite collagen composite with a rat calvarial defect model. To aim for clinical application, the present study investigated whether OCP/Col would enhance bone healing in a dog tooth extraction socket model. Six adult, male, beagle dogs were used. The tooth extraction socket model was made by extracting bilateral third maxillary incisors and the subsequent removal of buccal bone. Disks of OCP/Col were implanted into one side of the model and the other side was untreated. The specimens were fixed 1 or 3 months after implantation. In radiographic analysis, the OCP/Col-treated group showed a wider range of radiopacity than the untreated control. Histologically, the OCP/Col-treated group showed more abundant newly formed bone than untreated control, and the implanted OCP was gradually resorbed. In morphometrical analysis, enlargement of the buccal alveolus in the OCP/Col group was significantly greater than in the untreated control. This study showed that implanted OCP/Col would be replaced by newly formed bone and OCP/Col implantation would enhance bone healing in a tooth socket model.

  9. ESR dosimetry using eggshells and tooth enamel for accidental dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oka, Toshihide; Yamanaka, Chihiro; Ikeya, Motoji [Department of Earth and Space Science, Faculty of Science, Osaka Univ., Toyonaka, Osaka (Japan)

    1997-07-01

    The CO{sub 2}{sup -} signal of eggshells showed a good dose linearity and was appropriate in the wide dose range from 1 to 10 kGy, while ESR signal of CO{sub 2}{sup -} in sea and fresh water shells were saturated at a dose od below 10 kGy. The minimum detectable dose and G-value of CO{sub 2}{sup -} in eggshells were estimated 0.3 Gy and 0.28, respectively. The lifetime of CO{sub 2}{sup -} in eggshells could not be determined exactly because of overlapping organic signals, however it is still sufficiently long for practical use as ESR dosimeter materials. Various bird`s or reptile`s eggshells would be available as natural retrospective ESR dosimeter materials after nuclear accidents. Eggshells will be useful for the food irradiation dosimetry in the dose range of about a few kGy. Tooth enamel is one of the most useful dosimeter materials in public at a accident because of its high sensitivity. ESR dosimetry will replace TLD in near future if the cost of an ESR reader is further reduced . (author)

  10. Toleration, Synthesis or Replacement?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holtermann, Jakob v. H.; Madsen, Mikael Rask

    2016-01-01

    to have considerable problems keeping a clear focus on the key question: What are the implications of this empirical turn in terms of philosophy of legal science, of the social understanding of IL, and, not least, of the place of doctrinal scholarship after the alleged Wende? What is needed, we argue......, in order to answer is not yet another partisan suggestion, but rather an attempt at making intelligible both the oppositions and the possibilities of synthesis between normative and empirical approaches to law. Based on our assessment and rational reconstruction of current arguments and positions, we...... therefore outline a taxonomy consisting of the following three basic, ideal-types in terms of the epistemological understanding of the interface of law and empirical studies: toleration, synthesis and replacement. This tripartite model proves useful with a view to teasing out and better articulating...

  11. Current concepts in total femoral replacement

    OpenAIRE

    Ramanathan, Deepak; Siqueira, Marcelo BP; Klika, Alison K.; Higuera, Carlos A.; Barsoum, Wael K.; Joyce, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Total femoral replacement (TFR) is a salvage arthroplasty procedure used as an alternative to lower limb amputation. Since its initial description in the mid-20th century, this procedure has been used in a variety of oncologic and non-oncologic indications. The most compelling advantage of TFR is the achievement of immediate fixation which permits early mobilization. It is anticipated that TFR will be increasingly performed as the rate of revision arthroplasty rises worldwide. The existing li...

  12. 2H Stable Isotope Analysis of Tooth Enamel: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holobinko, Anastasia; Kemp, Helen; Meier-Augenstein, Wolfram; Prowse, Tracy; Ford, Susan

    2010-05-01

    Stable isotope analysis of biogenic tissues such as tooth enamel and bone mineral has become a well recognized and increasingly important method for determining provenance of human remains, and has been used successfully in bioarchaeological studies as well as forensic investigations (Lee-Thorp, 2008; Meier-Augenstein and Fraser, 2008). Particularly, 18O and 2H stable isotopes are well established proxies as environmental indicators of climate (temperature) and source water and are therefore considered as indicators of geographic life trajectories of animals and humans (Hobson et al., 2004; Schwarcz and Walker, 2006). While methodology for 2H analysis of human hair, fingernails, and bone collagen is currently used to determine geographic origin and identify possible migration patterns, studies involving the analysis of 2H in tooth enamel appear to be nonexistent in the scientific literature. The apparent lack of research in this area is believed to have two main reasons. (1) Compared to the mineral calcium hydroxylapatite Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2, in tooth enamel forming bio-apatite carbonate ions replace some of the hydroxyl ions at a rate of one CO32 replacing two OH, yet published figures for the degree of substitution vary (Wopenka and Pasteris, 2005). (2) Most probably due to the aforementioned no published protocols exist for sample preparation and analytical method to obtain δ2H-values from the hydroxyl fraction of tooth enamel. This dilemma has been addressed through a pilot study to establish feasibility of 2H stable isotope analysis of ground tooth enamel by continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) coupled on-line to a high-temperature conversion elemental analyzer (TC/EA). An array of archaeological and modern teeth has been analyzed under different experimental conditions, and results from this pilot study are being presented. References: Lee-Thorp, J.A. (2008) Archaeometry, 50, 925-950 Meier-Augenstein, W. and Fraser, I. (2008) Science & Justice

  13. Do meal replacement drinks have a role in diabetes management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditschuneit, Herwig H

    2006-01-01

    The poor effectiveness of conventional dietary treatment for weight loss and weight maintenance in patients with type-2 diabetes may be improved by a meal replacement strategy that provides a strong structured meal plan with reasonable opportunity for dietary variety. Typical meal replacement programs fix the intake of one or two meals per day with a calorie-controlled, nutritionally balanced commercial formulation, and allow prudent additional meals and snacks. In obese subjects, diets with meal replacements have proven to be more efficient than conventional diets. Patients on the meal replacement regimen lost 7.3 and 8.4% of initial body weight after 12 weeks and 4 years, respectively, whereas the patients on the conventional diet had lost 1.4% and 3.2% of initial body weight after 12 weeks and 4 years, respectively. The meal replacement plan has also proven to be effective in patients with type-2 diabetes. After 6 and 12 months, patients in the meal replacement group achieved on average a weight loss of 5.24 and 4.35% of their initial body weight, respectively. In contrast, after 6 and 12 months, patients on the individualized diet plan achieved on average a weight loss of 2.85 and 2.36% of their initial body weight, respectively. Meal replacements offer a promising strategy for treating obese patients with type-2 diabetes.

  14. Inhibition of apoptosis in early tooth development alters tooth shape and size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J-Y; Cha, Y-G; Cho, S-W; Kim, E-J; Lee, M-J; Lee, J-M; Cai, J; Ohshima, H; Jung, H-S

    2006-06-01

    Apoptosis plays important roles in various stages of organogenesis. In this study, we hypothesized that apoptosis would play an important role in tooth morphogenesis. We examined the role of apoptosis in early tooth development by using a caspase inhibitor, z-VAD-fmk, concomitant with in vitro organ culture and tooth germ transplantation into the kidney capsule. Inhibition of apoptosis at the early cap stage did not disrupt the cell proliferation level when compared with controls. However, the macroscopic morphology of mice molar teeth exhibited dramatic alterations after the inhibition of apoptosis. Crown height was reduced, and mesiodistal diameter was increased in a concentration-dependent manner with z-VAD-fmk treatment. Overall, apoptosis in the enamel knot would be necessary for the proper formation of molar teeth, including appropriate shape and size.

  15. [Study on the appropriate parameters of automatic full crown tooth preparation for dental tooth preparation robot].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, F S; Wang, Y; Zhang, Y P; Sun, Y C; Wang, D X; Lyu, P J

    2017-05-09

    Objective: To further study the most suitable parameters for automatic full crown preparation using oral clinical micro robot. Its purpose is to improve the quality of automated tooth preparing for the system and to lay the foundation for clinical application. Methods: Twenty selected artificial resin teeth were used as sample teeth. The micro robot automatic tooth preparation system was used in dental clinic to control the picosecond laser beam to complete two dimensional cutting on the resin tooth sample according to the motion planning path. Using the laser scanning measuring microscope, each layer of cutting depth values was obtained and the average value was calculated. The monolayer cutting depth was determined. The three-dimensional (3D) data of the target resin teeth was obtained using internal scanner, and the CAD data of full-crown tooth preparation was designed by CAD self-develged software. According to the depth of the single layer, 11 complete resin teeth in phantom head were automatically prepared by the robot controlling the laser focused spot in accordance with the layer-cutting way. And the accuracy of resin tooth preparation was evaluated with the software. Using the same method, monolayer cutting depth parameter for cutting dental hard tissue was obtained. Then 15 extracted mandibular and maxillary first molars went through automatic full crown tooth preparation. And the 3D data of tooth preparations were obtained with intra oral scanner. The software was used to evaluate the accuracy of tooth preparation. Results: The results indicated that the single cutting depth of cutting resin teeth and in vitro teeth by picosecond laser were (60.0±2.6) and (45.0±3.6) μm, respectively. Using the tooth preparation robot, 11 artificial resin teeth and 15 complete natural teeth were automatically prepared, and the average time were (13.0±0.7), (17.0±1.8) min respectively. Through software evaluation, the average preparation depth of the occlusal surface

  16. Influence of tooth profile modification on spur gear dynamic tooth strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, Fred B.; Townsend, Dennis P.

    1995-06-01

    This paper presents results of dynamic strain gage measurements performed on the NASA gear-noise rig. The experiments were part of a joint research program between NASA and the U.S. Army Research Laboratory to advance the technology of rotorcraft transmissions. Tests were performed on six sets of low contact ratio spur gears with different tooth profile modifications. Results presented include static and dynamic measurements of gear tooth strain taken over a matrix of operating conditions. The results demonstrate that a well-designed tooth profile modification can significantly reduce dynamic loads in spur gears, especially for gears which operate at high speed and under high torque. The two parabolic modifications tested were not as effective as linear modifications, possibly because the modification zone was too long.

  17. Correlation of natural tooth colour with aging in the Spanish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Polo, Cristina; Gómez Polo, Miguel; Montero, Javier; Martínez Vazquez De Parga, Juan Antonio; Celemin Viñuela, Alicia

    2015-10-01

    To analyse natural tooth colour in the Spanish population according to the colour coordinates lightness (L*), chroma (C*), hue (h*), red-green axis (a*) and yellow-blue axis (b*) in order to quantify the correlation and changes of tooth colour with age and sex. Natural tooth colour was measured in a sample of 1,361 Spanish participants of both sexes distributed within an age range of 16 to 89 years. The Easyshade Compact spectrophotometer was used and the CIELAB and CIELCh systems were followed. Pearson's bivariate correlations between age and colour coordinates were highly significant for L* (r=-0.674, P≤0.001), h* (r=-0.468, P≤0.001) and C* (r=0.417, P≤0.001). The correlation between age and colour coordinates was stronger for men than for women, for all colour coordinates. The results showed that C*, b* and a* increased by 0.60, 0.56 and 0.26 units/year on average, respectively, whereas L* and h* decreased progressively with age (by 0.60 units/year, on average), and colour differences increased in a systematic way as the gap between the ages being compared grew wider. The strongest correlation was found between age and L*, then between age and h* (both inverse relationships) and then between age and a*, C* and b* (direct relationships). In addition, a similar degree of change in the colour coordinates L*, C* and h* (of 0.60 units/year on average) was observed for natural tooth colour. Knowledge of the chromatic range of natural teeth may help to choose colour for the replacement of missing elements. © 2015 FDI World Dental Federation.

  18. Endogenous and Exogenous Substances Influencing the Orthodontic Tooth Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mine Geçgelen Cesur

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontic tooth movement occurs as a result of prolonged application of controlled mechanical forces. Recent studies have focused on the effects of systemic or local applications of medications and the intake of dietary supplements as well as the mechanical forces. Factors affecting the orthodontic tooth movement are parathyroid hormone, thyroid hormones, estrogen, vitamin D3, eicosanoids, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, paracetamol, corticosteroids, bisphosphonates, cholesterol drugs, anticonvulsants, oral contraceptives, alcohol and nicotine use, nitric oxide, and fluoride. These medications have an important effect on the rate of tooth movement and treatment time. NSAIDs decrease tooth movement, but paracetamol has no effect. Parathyroid and thyroxin hormones increase tooth movement. Bisphosphonates have a strong inhibitory effect. Vitamin D3 stimulates tooth movement and dietary calcium seems to reduce it. It is important to discuss with patients about the consumption of these substances during orthodontic treatment.

  19. IBA analysis of a possible therapeutic ancient tooth inlay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, E.; Pineda, J. C.; Zavala, E. P.; Murillo, G.; Chavez, R.; Lazcurain, R.; Espinosa, Ma. L.; Villanueva, O.

    1998-03-01

    Five pre-Columbian human teeth from the same skeleton found during excavation in an ancient ceremonial center in Mexico, have been analyzed by two conventional Ion Beam Analysis (IBA) techniques: PIXE and 4He RBS. The anthropologists have estimated that the skeleton is about 2000 years old. X-ray radiography studies of one of these teeth have revealed that they contain an inlay in the tooth crown. The IBA methods have been used to study the inlay materials and also the tooth enamel. The IBA studies show that the tooth inlay materials have almost the same atomic composition as the tooth enamel. These results suggest that the tooth inlay were made for therapeutic purposes, using healthy tooth grains as inlay materials which were glued into the prepared teeth to fill it up.

  20. Clinical and community risk models of incident tooth loss in postmenopausal women from the Buffalo Osteo Perio Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bole, Christopher; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Hovey, Kathleen M; Genco, Robert J; Hausmann, Ernest

    2010-12-01

      While risk factors for tooth loss in adults have been identified, limited studies describing factors associated with incident tooth loss in postmenopausal women exist. This study assessed both clinical and non-clinical risk factors for incident tooth loss. Postmenopausal women (N = 1341) were recruited between 1997 and 2000 from 1847 eligible Observational Study participants of the Buffalo, NY center of the Women's Health Initiative who had complete dental examinations to assess alveolar bone height, soft tissue attachment and general oral health, and completed questionnaires concerning demographics, general health, lifestyle and oral health (72.6% participation rate). Five years later (2002-2005), 1021 women (76.1%) repeated these examinations and questionnaires. Incident tooth loss was determined by oral examination. After an average 5.1 years of follow-up (SD, 0.38), a total of 323 teeth were lost in 293 women, resulting in 28.7% of women with incident loss of at least one tooth. In multivariable models, diabetes history, gum disease history, smoking, previous tooth loss, BMI and plaque index, baseline clinical measures including alveolar crestal height (ACH) (OR = 1.22 per mm loss, 95% CI 1.11, 1.35), clinical attachment loss (CAL) (OR = 1.13 per mm loss, 95% CI 1.05, 1.23), and pocket depth (PD) (OR = 1.26 per mm loss, 95% CI 1.13, 1.41) were significant risk factors of incident tooth loss. In a community model that included no clinical measures, diabetes history (OR = 2.45, 95% CI 1.26, 4.77), prior gum disease (OR = 1.97, 95% CI 1.43, 2.70), ever smoking (OR = 1.42, 95% CI 1.06, 1.89), number of teeth lost at baseline (OR = 1.05 per tooth, 95% CI 1.02, 1.08), and BMI (OR = 1.15 per 5 km/m(2) increase, 95% CI 1.01, 1.33) were associated with an increased risk of incident tooth loss. Clinical and questionnaire-based models were found to provide similar risk estimates for incident tooth loss in postmenopausal women. These models identified high

  1. A theropod tooth from the Late Triassic of southern Africa

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sanghamitra Ray; Anusuya Chinsamy

    2002-06-01

    An isolated, large recurved and finely serrated tooth found associated with the prosauropod Euskelosaurus from the Late Triassic part of the Elliot Formation is described here. It is compared to the Triassic thecodonts and carnivorous dinosaurs and its possible affinity is discussed. The tooth possibly belongs to a basal theropod and shows some features similar to the allosauroids. This tooth is of significance, as dinosaur remains except for some footprints and trackways, are poorly known in the Late Triassic horizons of southern Africa.

  2. Sonosurgery for atraumatic tooth extraction: a clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitriou, Dimitrios E V; Geminiani, Alessandro; Zahavi, Thomas; Ercoli, Carlo

    2012-12-01

    The preservation of an intact labial plate during tooth extraction is a critical determinant of whether an immediate implant can be placed and is also an important predictor of the esthetic result. The purpose of this clinical report was to present a method for atraumatic tooth extraction by using an air-driven sonic instrument with specially designed inserts. This surgical technique provides the clinician with an efficient method for atraumatic tooth extraction and preservation of an intact labial plate.

  3. Modular Permanent Magnet Machines with Alternate Teeth Having Tooth Tips

    OpenAIRE

    Li, G. J.; Zhu, Z.Q.; Foster, M. P.; Stone, D. A.; Zhan, H.L.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents single layer modular permanent magnet machines with either wound or unwound teeth with tooth tips. The structures with wound teeth having tooth tips are suitable for modular machines with slot number higher than pole number to compensate for the drop in winding factor due to the flux gaps in alternate stator teeth, accordingly to maintain or even to increase their average torques. However, the structures with unwound teeth having tooth tips are suitable for modular machine...

  4. The genetics of Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease: current trends and future implications for diagnosis and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoyle JC

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available J Chad Hoyle,1 Michael C Isfort,1 Jennifer Roggenbuck,1,2 W David Arnold1,3,4 1Department of Neurology, Division of Neuromuscular Disorders, 2Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Human Genetics, 3Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 4Department of Neuroscience, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH, USA Abstract: Charcot–Marie–Tooth (CMT disease is the most common hereditary polyneuropathy and is classically associated with an insidious onset of distal predominant motor and sensory loss, muscle wasting, and pes cavus. Other forms of hereditary neuropathy, including sensory predominant or motor predominant forms, are sometimes included in the general classification of CMT, but for the purpose of this review, we will focus primarily on the forms associated with both sensory and motor deficits. CMT has a great deal of genetic heterogeneity, leading to diagnostic considerations that are still rapidly evolving for this disorder. Clinical features, inheritance pattern, gene mutation frequencies, and electrodiagnostic features all are helpful in formulating targeted testing algorithms in practical clinical settings, but these still have shortcomings. Next-generation sequencing (NGS, combined with multigene testing panels, is increasing the sensitivity and efficiency of genetic testing and is quickly overtaking targeted testing strategies. Currently, multigene panel testing and NGS can be considered first-line in many circumstances, although obtaining initial targeted testing for the PMP22 duplication in CMT patients with demyelinating conduction velocities is still a reasonable strategy. As technology improves and cost continues to fall, targeted testing will be completely replaced by multigene NGS panels that can detect the full spectrum of CMT mutations. Nevertheless, clinical acumen is still necessary given the variants of uncertain significance encountered with NGS. Despite the current limitations

  5. Esthetic Reconstruction of Diastema with Adhesive Tooth-Colored Restorations and Hyaluronic Acid Fillers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supawadee Naorungroj

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This report presents a comprehensive esthetic treatment with adhesive tooth-colored restorations in a combination with hyaluronic acid (HA fillers of diastema in an orthodontic patient with relapse. Case Report. A 36-year-old female patient consulted about 1.5–2 mm midline diastema after an orthodontic relapse of replacing missing central incisors with lateral incisors and dark-colored gingival tissue as a result of a metal post and core with porcelain fused to a metal (PFM crown at the left lateral incisor. Restorative treatments included replacing the PFM with all-ceramic material and placing a ceramic veneer on the right lateral incisor. To close the space, crown forms of both lateral incisors were altered. A direct resin composite was then used to reform right and left canines to a more ideal lateral incisor shape. An HA fillers injection was used to fill the remaining open gingival embrasure. Eighteen months after treatment, the interdental papilla remained stable and the patient was satisfied with the result. Conclusion. Esthetic reconstruction of diastema and open gingival embrasure in this case can be accomplished without orthodontic retreatment. Tooth-colored restorations and HA filler injection appear as a promising modality to address this patient’s esthetic concern.

  6. [Preserving the natural tooth versus extraction and implant placement: making a rational clinical decision].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsesis, I; Nemkowsky, C E; Tamse, E; Rosen, E

    2010-01-01

    Modern dental practice offers a wide variety of treatment alternatives and modalities. With the wider scale of treatment options, new dilemmas emerged. A common dilemma is the decision whether to preserve the natural tooth by endodontic treatment, or to extract the tooth and replace it with a single dental implant. The clinician needs to remember that the basic goal of dental implants is to replace missing teeth, and not present teeth. Prosthodontic, periodontal, and esthetic considerations should be integrated in the treatment planning process. Long-term prognosis, the capabilities offered by the modern endodontic treatment, the alternatives in case of treatment failure, post treatment quality of life and patient's preferences should all be recognized and incorporated in the dentist decision making. An important factor is the communication between the prosthodontist and the endodontist before and during the treatment in order to avoid possible risks or treatment failure. The integration of these factors would assist the clinician to achieve a rational treatment plan for the benefit of the patient.

  7. Epithelial Label-Retaining Cells Are Absent during Tooth Cycling in Salmo salar and Polypterus senegalus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Vandenplas

    Full Text Available The Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar and African bichir (Polypterus senegalus are both actinopterygian fish species that continuously replace their teeth without the involvement of a successional dental lamina. Instead, they share the presence of a middle dental epithelium: an epithelial tier enclosed by inner and outer dental epithelium. It has been hypothesized that this tier could functionally substitute for a successional dental lamina and might be a potential niche to house epithelial stem cells involved in tooth cycling. Therefore, in this study we performed a BrdU pulse chase experiment on both species to (1 determine the localization and extent of proliferating cells in the dental epithelial layers, (2 describe cell dynamics and (3 investigate if label-retaining cells are present, suggestive for the putative presence of stem cells. Cells proliferate in the middle dental epithelium, outer dental epithelium and cervical loop at the lingual side of the dental organ to form a new tooth germ. Using long chase times, both in S. salar (eight weeks and P. senegalus (eight weeks and twelve weeks, we could not reveal the presence of label-retaining cells in the dental organ. Immunostaining of P. senegalus dental organs for the transcription factor Sox2, often used as a stem cell marker, labelled cells in the zone of outer dental epithelium which grades into the oral epithelium (ODE transition zone and the inner dental epithelium of a successor only. The location of Sox2 distribution does not provide evidence for epithelial stem cells in the dental organ and, more specifically, in the middle dental epithelium. Comparison of S. salar and P. senegalus reveals shared traits in tooth cycling and thus advances our understanding of the developmental mechanism that ensures lifelong replacement.

  8. The influence of teriparatide in induced tooth movement: A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza-Silva, Bianca-Núbia; Rodrigues, José-Lucas-Sani-de Alcântara; Moreira, Jefferson-Chaves; Matos, Felipe-de Souza; Cesar, Carla-Patrícia-Hernandez-Alves-Ribeiro; Repeke, Carlos-Eduardo-Palanch

    2016-01-01

    Background Teriparatide is a synthetic drug similar than PTH (parathyroid hormone), which is currently used as long-term treatment option for patients with bone chronic diseases, as osteoporosis; and this drug can interfere in a positive way in orthodontic movement. Objectives: The medical literature was assessed in the present systematic review in order to determine the level of scientific evidence supporting the influence of teriparatide in induced tooth movement. Material and Methods The PRISMA Checklist was followed in this systematic review. Four electronic databases (PubMed; Scopus; ScienceDirect; OpenGrey) were searched without implementing restrictions of year, status, and language of publications. The inclusion criteria consisted of selecting only experimental studies comparing the influence of teriparatide in tooth movement of male Wistar rats. The exclusion criteria consisted of experiments with female rats or other experimental animals, and animals with pathologic conditions. The eligible studies were evaluated based on methodological quality. Two trained examiners performed all the research steps. Results The initial sample comprised 700 studies, which was reduced to 664 after the exclusion of duplicates (n=36). Three articles were selected for the final qualitative analysis. The local administration of parathyroid hormone (PTH) 1-34 or PTH 1-84 revealed major effectiveness when compared with control groups and systematic administration. Additionally, the dilution of PTH 1-34 within methyl cellulose (MC) gel increased the time range for drug release, enabling to reduce the drug concentration without decreasing the effectiveness of tooth movement. Conclusions Teriparatide demonstrated potential acceleration of tooth movement in Wistar rats depending on the drug concentration; drug administration; and time for drug release. Key words:Teriparatide, tooth movement, parathyroid hormone, orthodontics. PMID:27957280

  9. Development and evolution of dentition pattern and tooth order in the skates and rays (batoidea; chondrichthyes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlie J Underwood

    Full Text Available Shark and ray (elasmobranch dentitions are well known for their multiple generations of teeth, with isolated teeth being common in the fossil record. However, how the diverse dentitions characteristic of elasmobranchs form is still poorly understood. Data on the development and maintenance of the dental patterning in this major vertebrate group will allow comparisons to other morphologically diverse taxa, including the bony fishes, in order to identify shared pattern characters for the vertebrate dentition as a whole. Data is especially lacking from the Batoidea (skates and rays, hence our objective is to compile data on embryonic and adult batoid tooth development contributing to ordering of the dentition, from cleared and stained specimens and micro-CT scans, with 3D rendered models. We selected species (adult and embryonic spanning phylogenetically significant batoid clades, such that our observations may raise questions about relationships within the batoids, particularly with respect to current molecular-based analyses. We include developmental data from embryos of recent model organisms Leucoraja erinacea and Raja clavata to evaluate the earliest establishment of the dentition. Characters of the batoid dentition investigated include alternate addition of teeth as offset successional tooth rows (versus single separate files, presence of a symphyseal initiator region (symphyseal tooth present, or absent, but with two parasymphyseal teeth and a restriction to tooth addition along each jaw reducing the number of tooth families, relative to addition of successor teeth within each family. Our ultimate aim is to understand the shared characters of the batoids, and whether or not these dental characters are shared more broadly within elasmobranchs, by comparing these to dentitions in shark outgroups. These developmental morphological analyses will provide a solid basis to better understand dental evolution in these important vertebrate groups as

  10. Development and evolution of dentition pattern and tooth order in the skates and rays (batoidea; chondrichthyes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Charlie J; Johanson, Zerina; Welten, Monique; Metscher, Brian; Rasch, Liam J; Fraser, Gareth J; Smith, Moya Meredith

    2015-01-01

    Shark and ray (elasmobranch) dentitions are well known for their multiple generations of teeth, with isolated teeth being common in the fossil record. However, how the diverse dentitions characteristic of elasmobranchs form is still poorly understood. Data on the development and maintenance of the dental patterning in this major vertebrate group will allow comparisons to other morphologically diverse taxa, including the bony fishes, in order to identify shared pattern characters for the vertebrate dentition as a whole. Data is especially lacking from the Batoidea (skates and rays), hence our objective is to compile data on embryonic and adult batoid tooth development contributing to ordering of the dentition, from cleared and stained specimens and micro-CT scans, with 3D rendered models. We selected species (adult and embryonic) spanning phylogenetically significant batoid clades, such that our observations may raise questions about relationships within the batoids, particularly with respect to current molecular-based analyses. We include developmental data from embryos of recent model organisms Leucoraja erinacea and Raja clavata to evaluate the earliest establishment of the dentition. Characters of the batoid dentition investigated include alternate addition of teeth as offset successional tooth rows (versus single separate files), presence of a symphyseal initiator region (symphyseal tooth present, or absent, but with two parasymphyseal teeth) and a restriction to tooth addition along each jaw reducing the number of tooth families, relative to addition of successor teeth within each family. Our ultimate aim is to understand the shared characters of the batoids, and whether or not these dental characters are shared more broadly within elasmobranchs, by comparing these to dentitions in shark outgroups. These developmental morphological analyses will provide a solid basis to better understand dental evolution in these important vertebrate groups as well as the

  11. Repair or replacement of amalgam restorations: decisions at a USA and a UK dental school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setcos, James C; Khosravi, Reza; Wilson, Nairn H F; Shen, Chiayi; Yang, Mark; Mjör, Ivar A

    2004-01-01

    Whereas replacement of failed restorations is the major treatment for adults in dental practice, repair is an important alternative with the potential to save tooth structure and increase the longevity of restorations at a lower cost. This in vitro study recorded the choices of treatment for the same set of teeth with defective Class II amalgam restorations by students and faculty at two dental schools (University of Manchester, UK and University of Florida, USA). Treatment options (monitor, refurbish, repair and replace) and reason(s) for the choice of treatment for 24 marked amalgam restorations were selected. Overall, participants more frequently chose replacement of restorations; whereas, repair was the least favored option. The reasons cited the most to replace restorations were secondary caries including unsightly appearance, partially lost restoration and tooth fracture; for repair, the major reasons included loss of part of the restoration and marginal ditching; and for refurbishment, the major reasons included poor anatomic form and marginal ditching. There was a significant difference between the students and faculties at the two sites in their choice of treatment (p<0.0001; Chi-square test). The treatment decision to "monitor" the restorations was more frequent for the Manchester site than the Florida site. Conversely, the combined treatment decisions to "refurbish, repair and replace" were more frequently chosen in Florida than in Manchester.

  12. A comparative examination of odontogenic gene expression in both toothed and toothless amniotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lainoff, Alexis J.; Moustakas-Verho, Jacqueline E.; Hu, Diane; Kallonen, Aki; Marcucio, Ralph S.; Hlusko, Leslea J.

    2015-01-01

    A well-known tenet of murine tooth development is that BMP4 and FGF8 antagonistically initiate odontogenesis, but whether this tenet is conserved across amniotes is largely unexplored. Moreover, changes in BMP4-signaling have previously been implicated in evolutionary tooth loss in Aves. Here we demonstrate that Bmp4, Msx1, and Msx2 expression is limited proximally in the red-eared slider turtle (Trachemys scripta) mandible at stages equivalent to those at which odontogenesis is initiated in mice, a similar finding to previously reported results in chicks. To address whether the limited domains in the turtle and the chicken indicate an evolutionary molecular parallelism, or whether the domains simply constitute an ancestral phenotype, we assessed gene expression in a toothed reptile (the American alligator, Alligator mississippiensis) and a toothed non-placental mammal (the gray short-tailed opossum, Monodelphis domestica). We demonstrate that the Bmp4 domain is limited proximally in M. domestica and that the Fgf8 domain is limited distally in A. mississippiensis just preceding odontogenesis. Additionally, we show that Msx1 and Msx2 expression patterns in these species differ from those found in mice. Our data suggest that a limited Bmp4 domain does not necessarily correlate with edentulism, and reveal that the initiation of odontogenesis in non-murine amniotes is more complex than previously imagined. Our data also suggest a partially conserved odontogenic program in T. scripta, as indicated by conserved Pitx2, Pax9, and Barx1 expression patterns and by the presence of a Shh-expressing palatal epithelium, which we hypothesize may represent potential dental rudiments based on the Testudinata fossil record. PMID:25678399

  13. A comparative examination of odontogenic gene expression in both toothed and toothless amniotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lainoff, Alexis J; Moustakas-Verho, Jacqueline E; Hu, Diane; Kallonen, Aki; Marcucio, Ralph S; Hlusko, Leslea J

    2015-05-01

    A well-known tenet of murine tooth development is that BMP4 and FGF8 antagonistically initiate odontogenesis, but whether this tenet is conserved across amniotes is largely unexplored. Moreover, changes in BMP4-signaling have previously been implicated in evolutionary tooth loss in Aves. Here we demonstrate that Bmp4, Msx1, and Msx2 expression is limited proximally in the red-eared slider turtle (Trachemys scripta) mandible at stages equivalent to those at which odontogenesis is initiated in mice, a similar finding to previously reported results in chicks. To address whether the limited domains in the turtle and the chicken indicate an evolutionary molecular parallelism, or whether the domains simply constitute an ancestral phenotype, we assessed gene expression in a toothed reptile (the American alligator, Alligator mississippiensis) and a toothed non-placental mammal (the gray short-tailed opossum, Monodelphis domestica). We demonstrate that the Bmp4 domain is limited proximally in M. domestica and that the Fgf8 domain is limited distally in A. mississippiensis just preceding odontogenesis. Additionally, we show that Msx1 and Msx2 expression patterns in these species differ from those found in mice. Our data suggest that a limited Bmp4 domain does not necessarily correlate with edentulism, and reveal that the initiation of odontogenesis in non-murine amniotes is more complex than previously imagined. Our data also suggest a partially conserved odontogenic program in T. scripta, as indicated by conserved Pitx2, Pax9, and Barx1 expression patterns and by the presence of a Shh-expressing palatal epithelium, which we hypothesize may represent potential dental rudiments based on the Testudinata fossil record. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. The effect of low-level laser therapy on tooth movement during canine distalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Üretürk, Sevin Erol; Saraç, Müyesser; Fıratlı, Sönmez; Can, Şule Batu; Güven, Yegane; Fıratlı, Erhan

    2017-05-01

    The aim of the study is to determine the effects of low level laser therapy on tooth movement during canine distalization by evaluating IL-1β, TGF-β1 levels in gingival crevicular fluid. Maxillary first premolars of the 15 Angle Class II division I patients (12-19 years old) were extracted. Right maxillary canines were distalized by standard protocol as control group whereas the left maxillary canines distalized by laser application. A gallium-aluminum-arsenide diode laser with an output power of 20 mW was applied as five doses from the buccal and the palatal side on the day 0, and the 3rd, 7th, 14th, 21th 30th, 33st, 37th, 60th, 63th, and 67th days. Gingival crevicular fluid samples were obtained with filtration paper at the initial, 7th, 14th, and 21th days, and the IL-1ß and TGF-ß1 cytokine levels were analyzed. Orthodontic models and periodontal indices were taken initially and on the days 30th, 60th, and 90th of canine distalization period. Tooth movement was assessed by scanning models (3Shape). The amount of tooth movement in the laser group was 40% more than the control group. First day IL-1ß levels were statistically higher than initial and 21st day levels (P= 0.003, P = 0.012). The rise in IL-1ß levels caused the negative correlations between 7th day IL-1β and 21st day TGF-β1 levels describes the tissue effects of laser application. Periodontal indices showed no sign of gingival inflammation during canine distalization period. As conclusion, laser does accelerate tooth movement and could shorten the whole treatment duration.

  15. Comparison between normal and special chain-drive toothing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolipski, M.

    1985-12-01

    A comparison of these two types of tooth arrangements on chain drives with round-link chains comes out clearly in favour of the special toothing. The article describes the advantages of this type of toothing. A proposal is made to use the special tooth arrangement in the construction of drive pocket wheels. Such a move would prevent the disastrous effects of links becoming jammed in the pockets during running-in and would consequently improve the service life of both chain and drive sprocket.

  16. Patient Discomfort Following Single-Tooth Implant Placement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spin-Neto, Rubens; Pontes, Ana Emília Farias; Wenzel, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Aims: Evaluate postoperative discomfort (pain, bleeding and swelling) in single-tooth implant patients submitted to immediate or conventional tooth restoration together with assessment of treatment time. Methods: Twenty-four patients who received single-tooth maxillary dental implants were randomly...... assigned to an IR (Immediate Restoration) or CR (Conventional Restoration) group. In IR, an implant was inserted and a provisional tooth crown was delivered within the same session, while in CR it was delivered three months after implantation. Pain (first three days), bleeding (first day) and swelling...

  17. Iron replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Coskun, Mehmet; Weiss, Günter

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Approximately, one-third of the world's population suffers from anemia, and at least half of these cases are because of iron deficiency. With the introduction of new intravenous iron preparations over the last decade, uncertainty has arisen when these compounds should be admini...... treatment, when to follow-up for relapse, which dosage and type of therapy should be recommended or not recommended, and if some patients should not be treated....... be administered and under which circumstances oral therapy is still an appropriate and effective treatment. RECENT FINDINGS: Numerous guidelines are available, but none go into detail about therapeutic start and end points or how iron-deficiency anemia should be best treated depending on the underlying cause...... of iron deficiency or in regard to concomitant underlying or additional diseases. SUMMARY: The study points to major issues to be considered in revisions of future guidelines for the true optimal iron replacement therapy, including how to assess the need for treatment, when to start and when to stop...

  18. In vitro tooth whitening effect of two medicated chewing gums compared to a whitening gum and saliva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saroea Geoffrey

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extrinsic staining of teeth may result from the deposition of a variety of pigments into or onto the tooth surface, which originate mainly from diet or from tobacco use. More recently, clinical studies have demonstrated the efficacy of some chewing gums in removing extrinsic tooth staining. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of two nicotine medicated chewing gums (A and B on stain removal in an in vitro experiment, when compared with a confectionary whitening chewing gum (C and human saliva (D. Methods Bovine incisors were stained by alternating air exposure and immersion in a broth containing natural pigments such as coffee, tea and oral microorganisms for 10 days. Stained enamel samples were exposed to saliva alone or to the test chewing gums under conditions simulating human mastication. The coloration change of the enamel samples was measured using a spectrophotometer. Measurements were obtained for each specimen (average of three absorbances using the L*a*b scale: lightness (L*, red-green (a and yellow-blue (b. Results Medicated chewing gums (A and B removed a greater amount of visible extrinsic stain, while the confectionary chewing gum with a whitening claim (C had a milder whitening effect as evaluated by quantitative and qualitative assessment. Conclusion The tested Nicotine Replacement Therapy (NRT chewing gums were more effective in the removal of the extrinsic tooth stain. This visible improvement in tooth whitening appearance could strengthen the smokers' motivation to quit smoking.

  19. Gene expression profiling during murine tooth development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A dos Santos silva Landin

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to describe the expression of genes, including ameloblastin (Ambn, amelogenin X chromosome (Amelx and enamelin (Enam during early (pre-secretory tooth development. The expression of these genes has predominantly been studied at post-secretory stages. Deoxyoligonucleotide microarrays were used to study gene expression during development of the murine first molar tooth germ at 24h intervals, starting at the eleventh embryonic day (E11.5 and up to the seventh day after birth (P7. The profile search function of Spotfire software was used to select genes with similar expression profile as the enamel genes (Ambn, Amelx and Enam. Microarray results where validated using real-time Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction (real-time RT-PCR, and translated proteins identified by Western blotting. In situ localisation of the Ambn, Amelx and Enam mRNAs were monitored from E12.5 to E17.5 using deoxyoligonucleotide probes. Bioinformatics analysis was used to associate biological functions with differentially (p ≤0.05 expressed (DE genes.Microarray results showed a total of 4362 genes including Ambn, Amelx and Enam to be significant differentially expressed throughout the time-course. The expression of the three enamel genes was low at pre-natal stages (E11.5-P0 increasing after birth (P1-P7. Profile search lead to isolation of 87 genes with significantly similar expression to the three enamel proteins. The mRNAs expressed in dental epithelium and epithelium derived cells. Although expression of Ambn, Amelx and Enam were lower during early tooth development compared to secretory stages enamel proteins were detectable by Western blotting. Bioinformatic analysis associated the 87 genes with multiple biological functions. Around thirty-five genes were associated with fifteen transcription factors.

  20. Restoration of the Severely Decayed Tooth Using Crown Lengthening with Simultaneous Tooth-Preparation

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    This clinical case describes a treatment approach that combines, in a single appointment, a crown lengthening procedure and the final crown preparation for the restoration of a severely decayed tooth. This approach allows for a more accurate placement of the crown margin in relation to the bone crest while reducing treatment time.

  1. Restoration of the severely decayed tooth using crown lengthening with simultaneous tooth-preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jun-Beom

    2010-04-01

    This clinical case describes a treatment approach that combines, in a single appointment, a crown lengthening procedure and the final crown preparation for the restoration of a severely decayed tooth. This approach allows for a more accurate placement of the crown margin in relation to the bone crest while reducing treatment time.

  2. Fate of HERS during Tooth Root Development

    OpenAIRE

    HUANG, XIAOFENG; BRINGAS, PABLO; Slavkin, Harold C.; Chai, Yang

    2009-01-01

    Tooth root development begins after the completion of crown formation in mammals. Previous studies have shown that Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS) plays an important role in root development, but the fate of HERS has remained unknown. In order to investigate the morphological fate and analyze the dynamic movement of HERS cells in vivo, we generated K14-Cre;R26R mice. HERS cells are detectable on the surface of the root throughout root formation and do not disappear. Most of the HERS c...

  3. Pediatric Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jani-Acsadi, Agnes; Ounpuu, Sylvia; Pierz, Kristan; Acsadi, Gyula

    2015-06-01

    Heritable diseases of the peripheral nerves (Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease [CMT]) affect the motor units and sensory nerves, and they are among the most prevalent genetic conditions in the pediatric patient population. The typical clinical presentation includes distal muscle weakness and atrophy, but the severity and progression are largely variable. Improvements in supportive treatment have led to better preservation of patients' motor functions. More than 80 genes have been associated with CMT. These genetic discoveries, along with the developments of cellular and transgenic disease models, have allowed clinicians to better understand the disease mechanisms, which should lead to more specific treatments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Tooth Germ-Like Construct Transplantation for Whole-Tooth Regeneration: An In Vivo Study in the Miniature Pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai-Chiang; Kitamura, Yutaka; Wu, Chang-Chin; Chang, Hao-Hueng; Ling, Thai-Yen; Kuo, Tzong-Fu

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of whole-tooth regeneration using a tooth germ-like construct. Dental pulp from upper incisors, canines, premolars, and molars were extracted from sexually mature miniature pigs. Pulp tissues were cultured and expanded in vitro to obtain dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), and cells were differentiated into odontoblasts and osteoblasts. Epithelial cells were isolated from gingival epithelium. The epithelial cells, odontoblasts, and osteoblasts were seeded onto the surface, upper, and lower layers, respectively, of a bioactive scaffold. The lower first and second molar tooth germs were removed bilaterally and the layered cell/scaffold constructs were transplanted to the mandibular alveolar socket of a pig. At 13.5 months postimplantation, seven of eight pigs developed two teeth with crown, root, and pulp structures. Enamel-like tissues, dentin, cementum, odontoblasts, and periodontal tissues were found upon histological inspection. The regenerated tooth expressed dentin matrix protein-1 and osteopontin. All pigs had regenerated molar teeth regardless of the original tooth used to procure the DPSCs. Pigs that had tooth germs removed or who received empty scaffolds did not develop teeth. Although periodontal ligaments were generated, ankylosis was found in some animals. This study revealed that implantation of a tooth germ-like structure generated a complete tooth with a high success rate. The implant location may influence the morphology of the regenerated tooth.

  5. Tooth development in a model reptile: functional and null generation teeth in the gecko Paroedura picta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahradnicek, Oldrich; Horacek, Ivan; Tucker, Abigail S

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes tooth development in a basal squamate, Paroedura picta. Due to its reproductive strategy, mode of development and position within the reptiles, this gecko represents an excellent model organism for the study of reptile development. Here we document the dental pattern and development of non-functional (null generation) and functional generations of teeth during embryonic development. Tooth development is followed from initiation to cytodifferentiation and ankylosis, as the tooth germs develop from bud, through cap to bell stages. The fate of the single generation of non-functional (null generation) teeth is shown to be variable, with some teeth being expelled from the oral cavity, while others are incorporated into the functional bone and teeth, or are absorbed. Fate appears to depend on the initiation site within the oral cavity, with the first null generation teeth forming before formation of the dental lamina. We show evidence for a stratum intermedium layer in the enamel epithelium of functional teeth and show that the bicuspid shape of the teeth is created by asymmetrical deposition of enamel, and not by folding of the inner dental epithelium as observed in mammals. PMID:22780101

  6. Using your shoulder after replacement surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joint replacement surgery - using your shoulder; Shoulder replacement surgery - after ... You have had shoulder replacement surgery to replace the bones of your shoulder joint with artificial parts. The parts include a stem made of metal and a ...

  7. Variables affecting tooth survival and changes in probing depth: a long-term follow-up of periodontitis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saminsky, Michael; Halperin-Sternfeld, Michal; Machtei, Eli E; Horwitz, Jacob

    2015-06-01

    To retrospectively assess tooth-survival rate and its association with patient and oral variables in periodontal office patients, followed up to 18 years. Patients in a private periodontal office whose files included initial examination (T0 ), reevaluation (TRe ) and ≥ 10 years after T0 (TF ) chartings, and received periodontal therapy and supportive periodontal therapy (SPT) after TRe were included. General health, plaque scores (PI), probing depth (PPD), bleeding on probing (BOP) at six points/tooth, tooth extractions, and SPT visits were extracted from patient files at T0 , TRe , and TF . Descriptive statistics and Cox regression analysis were performed. Fifty patients (mean 26 ± 4 teeth/patient, 1301 teeth) fulfilled inclusion criteria. About 20 and 129 teeth respectively were extracted before/after TRe , 96 of them for periodontal causes. PPD>7 mm at TRe (HR = 17.7, 95%CI 8.6, 36.6), age above 60 years (HR = 3.3, 95%CI 1.5, 7.2), multi-rooted teeth (HR = 1.9, 95%CI 1.2, 3.1) and SPTHR = 1.8, 95%CI 1.1, 2.9), were the best prognostic factors for tooth loss during follow-up. (p < 0.05, Cox regression analysis). A continuous, statistically significant reduction was observed in mean PPD among teeth that survived follow-up [4.3 ± 1.8 mm, 3.5 ± 1.4 mm, 3.2 ± 1.3 mm, at T0 , TRe , TF , respectively. (p < 0.001, Repeated-measures test)]. Regular SPT was associated with low tooth-loss rates and continuous reductions in probing depth. PPD after initial therapy, age above 60, multi-rooted teeth and infrequent SPT were strong negative prognostic factors for long-term tooth survival among periodontal patients. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Fatigue of tooth-colored restoratives in aqueous environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Yoshiko; Takeshige, Fumio; Hayashi, Mikako; Ebisu, Shigeyuki

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the interaction between mechanical and chemical fatigue in resin composites and dental ceramics, and the effects thereof on fatigue resistance of tooth-colored restoratives. To this end, the fatigue fracture resistance of restoratives under dry and aqueous conditions were analyzed by a dynamic fatigue crack propagation test using beam-shaped specimens with a precrack. Fatigue crack propagation characteristics were expressed by the correlation between fatigue crack growth rate (da/dN) and stress intensity factor range (deltaK). In addition, fatigue crack growth threshold (deltaKth) was calculated. Following the fatigue test, a fractographic examination was performed using scanning electron microscopy. Fatigue crack initiation was retarded in resin composites under aqueous condition, but dental ceramics were susceptible to slow crack growth after crack initiation. SEM images of the fatigue facture surfaces reflected inorganic and organic filler particles of different sizes in composites and the bonding at crystal-glass interface in ceramics. It was concluded that water exerted different effects on the fatigue resistance of composites and ceramics.

  9. Study on stress intensity factors for crack on involute spur gear tooth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Cai

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Investigating the stress intensity factors has a great importance to predict the fatigue damage for the involute spur gears. The aim of this article is to reveal the variation laws of stress intensity factors for crack on the involute spur gear tooth. For this purpose, a three-dimensional finite element model for calculating the stress intensity factors of the involute spur gear containing a surface crack is established using the finite element code ABAQUS. Based on the established three-dimensional finite element model, the influences of several parameters, such as torque, friction coefficient, crack depth, crack initial location, and crack size, on mode I, mode II, and mode III stress intensity factors are investigated numerically. The results of the study provide valuable guidelines for enhanced understanding of stress intensity factors for the crack on the involute spur gear tooth.

  10. Histochemical demonstration of activity of acid phosphatase and beta-glucuronidase in bovine incisor tooth germs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, S; Salling, E; Moe, D

    1983-01-01

    Activity of acid phosphatase and beta-glucuronidase was shown in bovine preodontoblasts and preameloblasts prior to the onset of secretion. In the preameloblasts the rather weak reaction consisted of small discrete granules dispersed in the cytoplasm apical, lateral, and proximal to the nucleus....... After initiation of enamel formation, a change in localization and intensity of the colored reaction product was observed in the ameloblasts. The activity appeared stronger and was restricted to a narrow zone just apical to the nucleus. It is proposed that the acid hydrolases in the tooth forming cells...... are located to the Golgi complex. The differences in activity of acid hydrolases between bone and tooth forming cells are expounded....

  11. Natural history of periodontitis: Disease progression and tooth loss over 40 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramseier, C A; Ånerud, Å; Dulac, M; Lulic, M; Cullinan, M P; Seymour, G J; Faddy, M J; Büergin, W; Schätzle, M; Lang, N P

    2017-07-22

    To assess long-term attachment and periodontitis-related tooth loss (PTL) in untreated periodontal disease over 40 years. Data originated from the natural history of periodontitis study in Sri Lankan tea labourers first examined in 1970. In 2010, 75 subjects (15.6%) of the original cohort were re-examined. PTL over 40 years varied between 0 and 28 teeth (mean 13.1). Four subjects presented with no PTL while 12 were edentulous. Logistic regression revealed attachment loss as a statistically significant covariate for PTL (pcalculus were associated with disease initiation and that calculus, plaque and gingivitis were associated with loss of attachment and progression to advanced disease. Mean attachment loss calculus removal, plaque control and the control of gingivitis are essential in preventing disease progression, further loss of attachment and ultimately tooth loss. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Massive clot formation after tooth extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Hunasgi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral surgical procedures mainly tooth extraction can be related with an extended hemorrhage owed to the nature of the process resulting in an "open wound." The attempt of this paper is to present a case of massive postoperative clot formation after tooth extraction and highlight on the oral complications of surgical procedures. A 32-year-old male patient reported to the Dental Clinic for evaluation and extraction of grossly decayed 46. Clinical evaluation of 46 revealed root stumps. Extraction of the root stumps was performed, and it was uneventful. Hemostasis was achieved and postsurgical instructions were specified to the patient. The patient reported to the clinic, the very subsequent morning with a criticism of bleeding at the extraction site. On clinical examination, bleeding was noted from the socket in relation to 46. To control bleeding, oral hemostatic drugs Revici - E (Ethamsylate 500 mg was prescribed and bleeding was stopped in 2 h. However, a massive clot was formed at the extraction site. Further, this clot resolved on its own in 1-week time. Despite the fact that dental extraction is considered to be a minor surgical procedure, some cases may present with life-threatening complications including hemorrhage. Vigilant and significant history taking, physical and dental examinations prior to dental procedures are a must to avoid intraoperative and postoperative complications.

  13. Hierarchical structure and biomineralization in cricket tooth

    CERN Document Server

    Xing, Xueqing; Cai, Quan; Mo, Guang; Du, Rong; Chen, Zhongjun; Wu, Zhonghua

    2012-01-01

    Cricket is a truculent insect with stiff and sharp teeth as a fighting weapon. The structure and possible biomineralization of the cricket teeth are always interested. Synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction and small angle X-ray scattering techniques were used to probe the element distribution, possible crystalline structures and size distribution of scatterers in cricket teeth. Scanning electron microscope was used to observe the nanoscaled structure. The results demonstrate that Zn is the main heavy element in cricket teeth. The surface of the cricket teeth has a crystalline compound like ZnFe2(AsO4)2(OH)2(H2O)4. While, the interior of the teeth has a crystalline compound like ZnCl2, which is from the biomineralization. The ZnCl2-like biomineral forms nanoscaled microfibrils and their axial direction points at the top of tooth cusp. The microfibrils aggregate random into intermediate filaments, forming a hierarchical structure. A sketch map of the cricket tooth cusp was proposed and a d...

  14. Inadvertent tooth movement with fixed lingual retainers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaughnessy, Timothy G; Proffit, William R; Samara, Said A

    2016-02-01

    Fixed retainers are effective in maintaining the alignment of the anterior teeth more than 90% of the time, but they can produce inadvertent tooth movement that in the most severe instances requires orthodontic retreatment managed with a periodontist. This is different from relapse into crowding when a fixed retainer is lost. These problems arise when the retainer breaks but remains bonded to some or all teeth, or when an intact retainer is distorted by function or was not passive when bonded. In both instances, torque of the affected teeth is the predominant outcome. A fixed retainer made with dead soft wire is the least likely to create torque problems but is the most likely to break. Highly flexible twist wires bonded to all the teeth appear to be the most likely to produce inadvertent tooth movement, but this also can occur with stiffer wires bonded only to the canines. Orthodontists, general dentists, and patients should be aware of possible problems with fixed retainers, especially those with all teeth bonded, because the patient might not notice partial debonding. Regular observations of patients wearing fixed retainers by orthodontists in the short term and family dentists in the long term are needed.

  15. [Ascending aorta replacement late after aortic valve replacement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Yasunari; Ito, Toshiaki; Maekawa, Atsuo; Sawaki, Sadanari; Fujii, Genyo; Hoshino, Satoshi; Tokoro, Masayoshi; Yanagisawa, Junji

    2013-07-01

    Replacement of the asceding aorta is indicated in patients undergoing aortic valve replacement( AVR), if the diameter of the ascending aorta is greater than 5.0 cm. If the diameter of the asceding aorta is from 4.0 to 5.0 cm, it was arguable whether replacement of the ascending aorta should be performed. Nine patients who underwent reoperative ascending aorta replacement after AVR were reviewed retrospectively. Reoperation on the asending aorta replacement was performed 11.8±7.2 years (range 1y5m~23y3m) after AVR. Mean patient age was 69.9±6.3 (range 60~81). In 2 cases, reoperations were performed early year after AVR. Although ascending aorta was dilated at the 1st operation, replacement wasn't performed for the age and minimally invasive cardiac surgery (MICS). In 3 cases, reoperations were performed more than 10 years later. On these cases, ascending aorta aneurysm and dissection occurred with no pain and were pointed out by computed tomography(CT) or ultrasonic cardiogram(UCG). We think that patients with dilatation of the ascending aorta should undergo AVR and aorta replacement at the 1st operation regardness of age. It is important that patients who underwent AVR should undergo a regular checkup on the ascending aorta.

  16. Anomalies of tooth formation in hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lexner, Michala O; Bardow, Allan; Hertz, Jens Michael;

    2007-01-01

    is the first to elaborate on anomalies of tooth formation found in a group of hemizygous males and heterozygous females with known ED1 mutations. These tooth anomalies may be used as dental biomarkers for heterozygous females, enabling an earlier diagnosis, and therefore, better treatment and genetic...

  17. Patterns of tooth agenesis in patients with orofacial clefts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermus, Ruurd R.; van Wijk, Arjen J.; Tan, Stephan P. K.; Kramer, Gem J. C.; Ongkosuwito, Edwin M.

    2013-01-01

    Orofacial clefts are a common oral disorder associated with tooth agenesis. As information on the simultaneous absence of teeth can be an aid in treatment planning, a large sample of orofacial cleft patients was examined. The sample consisted of 910 patients with cleft lip and palate. Tooth agenesis

  18. Severe tooth wear: European consensus statement on management guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loomans, Bas AC; Opdam, Niek JM; Attin, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports a European expert consensus statement on guidelines for the management of severe tooth wear. It focuses on the definition of physiological versus pathological tooth wear and recommends diagnosis, monitoring and counseling to define the activity of the wear. Restorative...

  19. [Tooth regeneration in the guinea pig (Cavia porcellus)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, F; Artis, J P; Lanot, R

    1977-01-01

    The first inferior molar has been extracted, a part of its being reimplanted or not. A new molar of normal form regenerated, apparently from the apex of the tooth germ, in all cases in which the alveolus was left free or implanted with a tooth freagment deprived of pulpa.

  20. Two-Dimensional Identification of Fetal Tooth Germs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabra, Mariana; Vaz, Paula; Valente, Francisco; Braga, Ana; Felino, António

    2017-03-01

      To demonstrate the efficiency and applicability of two-dimensional ultrasonography in the identification of tooth germs and in the assessment of potential pathology.   Observational, descriptive, cross-sectional study.   Prenatal Diagnosis Unit of Centro Hospitalar de Vila Nova de Gaia / Espinho-Empresa Pública in Portugal.   A total of 157 white pregnant women (median age, 32 years; range, 14 to 47 years) undergoing routine ultrasound exams.   Description of the fetal tooth germs, as visualized by two-dimensional ultrasonography, including results from prior fetal biometry and detailed screening for malformations.   In the first trimester group, ultrasonography identified 10 tooth germs in the maxilla and 10 tooth germs in the mandible in all fetuses except for one who presented eight maxillary tooth germs. This case was associated with a chromosomal abnormality (trisomy 13) with a bilateral cleft palate. In the second and third trimesters group, ultrasonography identified a larger range of tooth germs: 81.2% of fetuses showed 10 tooth germs in the maxilla and 85.0% of fetuses had 10 tooth germs in the mandible. Hypodontia was more prevalent in the maxilla than in the mandible, which led us to use qualitative two-dimensional ultrasonography to analyze the possible association between hypodontia and other variables such as fetal pathology, markers, head, nuchal, face, and spine.   We recommend using this method as the first exam to evaluate fetal morphology and also to help establish accurate diagnosis of abnormalities in pregnancy.

  1. [Tooth decay and its complication prognosis in smokers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orekhova, L Iu; Osipova, M V

    2014-01-01

    The study focuses on complicated and non-complicated tooth decay course and prognosis in smokers. Oral status, prevention and treatment effectiveness was assessed in 330 non-smokers and 345 smoking patients. The results allowed concluding with guidelines for tooth decay prevention and treatment in smokers.

  2. The Prevalence of Tooth Wear in the Dutch Adult Population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wetselaar, Peter; Vermaire, Jan H; Visscher, Corine M; Lobbezoo, Frank; Schuller, Annemarie A

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the prevalence of tooth wear in different age groups of the Dutch adult population and to determine this tooth wear distribution by gender, socioeconomic class, and type of teeth. Results were compared with the outcomes of a previous study in a comparable population. As pa

  3. Association between Severity of Tooth Wear and Dentinal Hypersensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Ayer

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Tooth wear (attrition, abrasion, erosion, and abfraction is perceived globally as ever increasing problem. Several outcome of the tooth wear are hypersensitivity, esthetic problems, functional impairment, annoyance to the patient, and fracture of the tooth. Among these, the measurable and more commonly reported outcome is hypersensitivity to stimuli. Although dentin hypersensitivity is a common clinical condition and is generally reported by the patient after experiencing a sharp, short pain caused by one of the several different external stimuli, it is often inadequately understood. None of the scientific literature available till date attempted to establish the relationship between tooth wear and dentin hypersensitivity which could be a key factor in monitoring those patients.  The aim of the study was to estimate the association between severity of teeth wear and sensitivity in the patients with reported dentinal hypersensitivity.Materials & Methods: Fifty patients with dentin hypersensitivity were investigated for tooth wear. Tooth wear measured using exact tooth wear index and level of sensitivity to stimuli was recorded using a numerical rating scale. Results: Enamel wear at cervical region of teeth showed a positive correlation (p=.010, similarly, dentin wear at cervical region of teeth showed positive correlation and significant association (p<.001 with dentinal hypersensitivity.Conclusion: The observation supports a significant association between severities of tooth surface wear and dentinal hypersensitivity.

  4. Peroxide dental bleaching via laser microchannels and tooth color measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altshuler, Gregory; Belikov, Andrey; Skrypnik, Alexei; Feldchtein, Felix; Pushkareva, Alexandra; Shatilova, Ksenia; Cernavin, Igor; Tuchin, Valery

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to use microchannels drilled by an Er:YAG laser into a human tooth through the enamel into the dentin for direct injection of hydrogen peroxide (HP) to produce a minimally invasive, rapid, tooth bleaching effect. The experiments were conducted in vitro. Five microchannels with a diameter of ˜200 μm and a depth of ˜2 mm were drilled through the palatal side of a human tooth crown using the microbeam of an Er:YAG-laser with a wavelength of 2.94 μm. After injection of an aqueous solution of 31%-HP through the microchannels, the tooth color was evaluated using a VITA shade guide and International Commission on Illumination L*ab color parameters. A tooth model used for the evaluation of the distribution of HP concentration was created and the amount of HP which can be injected into tooth dentin to bleach it safely was estimated. Injection of 1.5±0.1 mm3 of 31%-HP into the tooth led to noticeable bleaching within 3 h and significant improvement of tooth color within 24 h.

  5. Crowned spur gears - Methods for generation and tooth contact analysis. I - Basic concepts, generation of the pinion tooth surface by a plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvin, F. L.; Handschuh, R. F.; Zhang, J.

    1988-01-01

    A topology of crowned spur pinion tooth surface that reduces the level of transmission errors due to misalignment is proposed. The geometry of the deviated pinion tooth surface and regular gear tooth surface, along with tooth contact analysis is discussed. Generation of the deviated pinion tooth surface by a plane whose motion is controlled by a five-degree-of-freedom system is proposed. Numerical results are included and indicate that transmission errors remain low as the gears are misaligned.

  6. The genetics of Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease: current trends and future implications for diagnosis and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyle, J Chad; Isfort, Michael C; Roggenbuck, Jennifer; Arnold, W David

    2015-01-01

    Charcot–Marie–Tooth (CMT) disease is the most common hereditary polyneuropathy and is classically associated with an insidious onset of distal predominant motor and sensory loss, muscle wasting, and pes cavus. Other forms of hereditary neuropathy, including sensory predominant or motor predominant forms, are sometimes included in the general classification of CMT, but for the purpose of this review, we will focus primarily on the forms associated with both sensory and motor deficits. CMT has a great deal of genetic heterogeneity, leading to diagnostic considerations that are still rapidly evolving for this disorder. Clinical features, inheritance pattern, gene mutation frequencies, and electrodiagnostic features all are helpful in formulating targeted testing algorithms in practical clinical settings, but these still have shortcomings. Next-generation sequencing (NGS), combined with multigene testing panels, is increasing the sensitivity and efficiency of genetic testing and is quickly overtaking targeted testing strategies. Currently, multigene panel testing and NGS can be considered first-line in many circumstances, although obtaining initial targeted testing for the PMP22 duplication in CMT patients with demyelinating conduction velocities is still a reasonable strategy. As technology improves and cost continues to fall, targeted testing will be completely replaced by multigene NGS panels that can detect the full spectrum of CMT mutations. Nevertheless, clinical acumen is still necessary given the variants of uncertain significance encountered with NGS. Despite the current limitations, the genetic diagnosis of CMT is critical for accurate prognostication, genetic counseling, and in the future, specific targeted therapies. Although whole exome and whole genome sequencing strategies have the power to further elucidate the genetics of CMT, continued technological advances are needed. PMID:26527893

  7. Comparing the three color pounehh tooth paste with the conventional one in preventing the formation of the microbial plaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebadifar A.

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: Plaque control has always been important in preventive dentistry. Various methods and materials have been introduced for this purpose. Recently a three-colored tooth paste has been introduced which claims to prevent plaque formation. The aim of this study was to compare three-colored pouneh tooth paste containing triclosan with the conventional one in preventing plaque formation. "nMaterials and Methods: This was a randomized double blind cross over clinical trial which was carried out on 40 dental students of Tehran azad university in 2005. Before beginning the trial, the index of plaque was evaluated, registered and reduced to null. The subjects were randomly divided into two groups, the case group (three color tooth paste and the control group (conventional tooth paste. The participants were asked to apply the specified tooth paste with an oral B Advantage Artica toothbrush for two weeks. After two weeks, the amount of plaque was re-registered and again reduced to null. The type of tooth paste was changed among two groups and the plaque was registered for the third time at the end of two weeks. Then the patients and assessors were not aware of the type of tooth paste in the tubes (double blind. McNamar and ManWhitney test were used. "nResults: From the 40 subjects, 4 cases were omitted due to the different reasons. The amount of initial plaque index was 88.3 12.1 which was reduced to 78.2 16.9 in the control and 74.1 19.3 in the case group. The difference between primary plaque and secondary plaque (after applying tooth paste was significant in both case and control groups, however there was not any significant difference between two groups. "nConclusion: Based on the results of this study, there was not any significant difference between conventional and three-colored tooth paste in reducing the plaque index.

  8. An Analysis of the Symptomatic Domains Most Relevant to Charcot Marie Tooth Neuropathy (CMT) Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-09

    Charcot Marie Tooth Disease (CMT); Hereditary Sensory and Motor Neuropathy; Nerve Compression Syndromes; Tooth Diseases; Congenital Abnormalities; Genetic Diseases, Inborn; Heredodegenerative Disorders, Nervous System

  9. Drinking coffee may help accelerate orthodontic tooth movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianru Yi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Developing new methods to enhance orthodontic tooth movement and shorten the duration of treatment has always been desired. However, to date, no therapies have been widely used in clinics. Recent studies and feedback information from patients have shown that drinking coffee may accelerate orthodontic tooth movement. The Hypothesis: Drinking coffee, as a daily habit of many people, can be an effective accelerator of tooth movement with little side effect for caffeine can break the calcium balance in bone tissue and directly inhibit the development of osteoblasts, leading to temporary decreased bone mineral density and consequently inducing faster orthodontic tooth movement. Evaluation of the Hypothesis: Much effort has been made to explore therapies to shorten orthodontic treatment period with limited success. Daily coffee consumption may be a promising approach to enhance orthodontic tooth movement for its reversible effect on bone mineral density and calcium balance.

  10. Reattachment of complicated tooth fracture: An alternative approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nujella B. P. Surya Kumari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Trauma to the anterior teeth is relatively a common occurrence. There are several treatment modalities for such condition, one of which is reattachment of fractured fragment itself. Reattachment of fractured fragment provides immediate treatment with better esthetics, restoration of function, and is a faster and less complicated procedure. Reattachment of tooth fragment should be the first choice and is a viable alternative to conventional approaches because of simplicity, natural esthetics, and conservation of tooth structure. Patient cooperation and understanding of the limitations of the treatment is of utmost importance for good prognosis.The present case report describes management of a complicated fracture of maxillary right central incisor treated endodontically, followed by reattachment of the same fragment. Reattachment of fractured tooth fragments offers a viable restorative alternative, immediately restores tooth function for the clinician because it restores tooth function and esthetics with the use of a very conservative and cost-effective approach.

  11. Application of spontaneously immortalized odontoblast cells in tooth regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arany, Szilvia; Kawagoe, Masami; Sugiyama, Toshihiro

    2009-03-27

    Here, we report on the first attempt to bioengineer tooth using a spontaneously immortalized mesenchymal cell line. To assess the odontogenic potential of this cell line, odontoblast-lineage cells (OLC) were re-associated with competent dental epithelium isolated from E14.5 mice. A novel three-dimensional organ germ culture method was applied to nurture the constructs in vitro. Additionally, recombinants were transplanted under the kidney capsule in host animals for 2 weeks. Transplants developed into tooth tissues in one-third of the cases. OLC-derived GFP-positive cells could be identified in mineralizing tooth germs by immunohistochemistry. OLCs were capable of intercellular and cell-matrix communication, thus they eventually differentiated into functional odontoblasts. In summary, we managed to utilize OLCs for dental mesenchyme substitution in tooth regeneration experiments. Therefore, our spontaneously transformed cell line proved its potential for future complex, tooth developmental and bioengineering studies.

  12. Total joint replacement preadmission programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messer, B

    1998-01-01

    Patients begin to formulate their expectations of the postoperative hospitalization during the preadmission program. The challenge is to better understand the factors patients consider when formulating judgments about the quality of preadmission education. For example, it may be that perceptions of the preadmission program are influenced by what patients believe about their postoperative pain and functional abilities. Specific attention needs to be given both preoperatively and postoperatively to instructing patients on realistic expectations for recovery. One other method of measuring patient outcomes is with the Health Status Profile (SF-36) (Response Healthcare Information Management, 1995). The SF-36 approach emphasizes the outcome of medical care as the patient sees it, in addition to a clinical evaluation of successful health care. This form is currently initiated in the physician's office and returned for scanning at the preadmission class. The patient then completes another SF-36 at 6 months and every year thereafter to compare measurable outcomes. Patients intending to have elective total joint replacements experience anxiety and require much support and education. An effective preadmission program is a major investment in a patient's recovery, as well as a unique marketing tool to customers. Preadmission programs can be viewed as an opportunity to enhance customer satisfaction. Preadmission clinics are an excellent means for nurses to improve the quality of patient care through patient education. the overall goal of preadmission testing programs is to ensure patient preparedness while increasing quality health care and overall customer satisfaction. To enhance program effectiveness, health care providers must lead collaborative efforts to improve the efficiency of systems.

  13. The Business of Bundling: Joining Forces on Joint Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaldy, Joanne

    2016-03-01

    A mandated bundled-payment program for joint replacement is in place in several regions across the country, and practitioners such as pharmacists are still sorting out their roles in this federal initiative. To get involved, pharmacists need to establish connections with area hospitals and physician groups to promote and document their ability to manage medications, reduce and eliminate medication-related problems and rehospitalizations, and work with patients to maximize adherence and improve communication for those undergoing hip and knee replacement.

  14. Ultrastructure of basement membranes in developing shark tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, T; Inoue, S

    2003-01-01

    Based on studies of the tooth of largely mammalian species, the dental basement membranes are shown to be specialized for various roles significant in the development and maintenance of the tooth. Comparative studies with the nonmammalian tooth will facilitate further clarification of the mechanisms of mammalian tooth formation. In this study, basement membranes of the shark tooth in successive developmental stages was ultrastructurally examined for elucidation of their roles in odontogenesis. Teeth of a shark, Cephaloscyllium umbratile, were processed for thin section electron microscopy. Throughout the developmental stages the lamina densa of the basement membrane was made up of a fine network of "cords," irregular anastomosing strands known to be the major component of mammalian basement membranes. In the presecretory stage of the shark tooth, dental papilla cells were immobilized for their differentiation into odontoblasts by means of the binding of their processes to numerous narrow extensions of the lamina densa of the inner dental epithelium. In the secretory stage, a number of cords of the widened lamina densa were extended towards and bound to tubular vesicles of the forming enameloid. During the mineralization stage, fragments of the degrading enameloid matrix appeared to be moving through the lamina densa to the epithelial cells for processing. In the maturation stage, half of the lamina densa facing the enameloid was mineralized forming an advancing edge of mineralization of the enameloid. It provided strong binding and smooth transition of organic to mineral phase which may allow transportation of substances across the phases for enameloid maturation in a way similar to that reported in the mammalian tooth. These observations indicate that basement membranes of the developing shark tooth, as those in the mammalian tooth, play various roles, including anchoring, firm binding, and possible mediation of the transport of substances that are known to be

  15. Cortical representation of experimental tooth pain in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantsch, H H F; Kemppainen, P; Ringler, R; Handwerker, H O; Forster, C

    2005-12-05

    Cortical processing of electrically induced pain from the tooth pulp was studied in healthy volunteers with fMRI. In a first experiment, cortical representation of tooth pain was compared with that of painful mechanical stimulation to the hand. The contralateral S1 cortex was activated during painful mechanical stimulation of the hand, whereas tooth pain lead to bilateral activation of S1. The S2 and insular region were bilaterally activated by both stimuli. In S2, the center of gravity of the activation during painful mechanical stimulation was more medial/posterior compared to tooth pain. In the insular region, tooth pain induced a stronger activation of the anterior and medial parts. The posterior part of the anterior cingulate gyrus was more strongly activated by painful stimulation of the hand. Differential activations were also found in motor and frontal areas including the orbital frontal cortex where tooth pain lead to greater activations. In a second experiment, we compared the effect of weak with strong tooth pain. A significantly greater activation by more painful tooth stimuli was found in most of those areas in which tooth pain had induced more activation than hand pain. In the medial frontal and right superior frontal gyri, we found an inverse relationship between pain intensity and BOLD contrast. We concluded that tooth pain activates a cortical network which is in several respects different from that activated by painful mechanical stimulation of the hand, not only in the somatotopically organized somatosensory areas but also in parts of the 'medial' pain projection system.

  16. The tooth, the whole tooth, and nothing but the tooth: Can dental pain ever be the sole presenting symptom of a myocardial infarction? A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Jalali, N; Vilke, GM; Korenevsky, M; Castillo, EM; Wilson, MP

    2014-01-01

    Background Pain symptoms related to cardiac ischemia can vary greatly from patient to patient. However, should emergency physicians consider the possibility of myocardial infarction in patients who present solely with dental pain? Objective This is a systematic review of the literature investigating the incidence of jaw, tooth, or facial pain as the sole symptom of cardiac ischemia. Methods Studies investigating jaw, tooth, or facial pain of cardiac origin were identified using the PubMed dat...

  17. Development and microstructure of tooth histotypes in the blue shark, Prionace glauca (Carcharhiniformes: Carcharhinidae) and the great white shark, Carcharodon carcharias (Lamniformes: Lamnidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, Joshua K; Riccio, Mark L; Bemis, William E

    2015-07-01

    Elasmobranchs exhibit two distinct arrangements of mineralized tissues in the teeth that are known as orthodont and osteodont histotypes. Traditionally, it has been said that orthodont teeth maintain a pulp cavity throughout tooth development whereas osteodont teeth are filled with osteodentine and lack a pulp cavity when fully developed. We used light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and high-resolution micro-computed tomography to compare the structure and development of elasmobranch teeth representing the two histotypes. As an example of the orthodont histotype, we studied teeth of the blue shark, Prionace glauca (Carcharhiniformes: Carcharhinidae). For the osteodont histotype, we studied teeth of the great white shark, Carcharodon carcharias (Lamniformes: Lamnidae). We document similarities and differences in tooth development and the microstructure of tissues in these two species and review the history of definitions and interpretations of elasmobranch tooth histotypes. We discuss a possible correlation between tooth histotype and tooth replacement and review the history of histotype differentiation in sharks. We find that contrary to a long held misconception, there is no orthodentine in the osteodont teeth of C. carcharias. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Electrocatalysts Prepared by Galvanic Replacement

    OpenAIRE

    Athanasios Papaderakis; Ioanna Mintsouli; Jenia Georgieva; Sotiris Sotiropoulos

    2017-01-01

    Galvanic replacement is the spontaneous replacement of surface layers of a metal, M, by a more noble metal, Mnoble, when the former is treated with a solution containing the latter in ionic form, according to the general replacement reaction: nM + mMnoblen+ → nMm+ + mMnoble. The reaction is driven by the difference in the equilibrium potential of the two metal/metal ion redox couples and, to avoid parasitic cathodic processes such as oxygen reduction and (in some cases) hydrogen evolution too...

  19. Diagnosis of Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Banchs

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT disease or hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN is a genetically heterogeneous group of conditions that affect the peripheral nervous system. The disease is characterized by degeneration or abnormal development of peripheral nerves and exhibits a range of patterns of genetic transmission. In the majority of cases, CMT first appears in infancy, and its manifestations include clumsiness of gait, predominantly distal muscular atrophy of the limbs, and deformity of the feet in the form of foot drop. It can be classified according to the pattern of transmission (autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, or X linked, according to electrophysiological findings (demyelinating or axonal, or according to the causative mutant gene. The classification of CMT is complex and undergoes constant revision as new genes and mutations are discovered. In this paper, we review the most efficient diagnostic algorithms for the molecular diagnosis of CMT, which are based on clinical and electrophysiological data.

  20. Update on Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzkó, Ágnes; Shy, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) disease encompasses a genetically heterogeneous group of inherited neuropathies, also known as hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies. CMT results from mutations in more than 40 genes expressed in Schwann cells and neurons causing overlapping phenotypes. The classic CMT phenotype reflects length-dependent axonal degeneration characterized by distal sensory loss and weakness, deep tendon reflex abnormalities, and skeletal deformities. Recent articles have provided insight into the molecular pathogenesis of CMT, which, for the first time, suggest potential therapeutic targets. Although there are currently no effective medications for CMT, multiple clinical trials are ongoing or being planned. This review will focus on the underlying pathomechanisms and diagnostic approaches of CMT and discuss the emerging therapeutic strategies. PMID:21080241

  1. Restoring gingival harmony around single tooth implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reikie, D F

    1995-07-01

    One of the biggest challenges to restoring a single tooth implant in the esthetic zone of the mouth is the creation of harmonious gingival contour around the restoration. Soft- or hard-tissue deficiencies of the edentulous space are the most common obstacles to achieving gingival symmetry around the proposed restoration. Numerous gingival and osseous grafting and regeneration techniques are available but may complicate treatment by increasing the number of surgical procedures and sites necessary. This article describes a technique for treating mild-to-moderate ridge defects without the required additional surgical procedures or a surgical donor site. Soft-tissue overcontouring is provided around the healing abutment by modification of the surgical flap at second-stage implant surgery. Subsequent gingivoplasty allows establishment of anatomic gingival architecture that surrounds the single implant prosthesis.

  2. Unusual intraosseous transmigration of impacted tooth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Santosh; Urala, Arun Srinivas; Kamath, Abhay Taranath; Jayaswal, Priyanka; Valiathan, Ashima [Manipal College of Dental Sciences, Manipal (India)

    2012-03-15

    Transmigration of an impacted tooth through the symphyseal suture is a rare and special developmental anomaly of unknown etiology that is unique to the mandibular canine. Maxillary canine transmigration is even rarer. Transmigrated canines are particularly significant due to the aesthetic and functional importance. A maxillary lateral incisor crossing the mid-palatal suture has never been reported in the literature. The aim of this report is to present the first case of simultaneous transmigration of a lateral incisor and canine in the maxilla. The paper also reports four unusual cases of unilateral canine transmigration in the maxilla and mandible and successful eruption of one of the transmigrated mandibular canines following orthodontic traction. Etiology of transmigration and its clinical considerations are also discussed.

  3. EPR tooth dosimetry of SNTS area inhabitants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sholom, Sergey [Scientific Center for Radiation Medicine, Melnikova str., 53, Kiev (Ukraine); Desrosiers, Marc [Ionizing Radiation Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Bouville, Andre; Luckyanov, Nicholas [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, 6120 Executive Boulevard, Bethesda, MD (United States); Chumak, Vadim [Scientific Center for Radiation Medicine, Melnikova str., 53, Kiev (Ukraine); Simon, Steven L. [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, 6120 Executive Boulevard, Bethesda, MD (United States)], E-mail: ssimon@mail.nih.gov

    2007-07-15

    The determination of external dose to teeth of inhabitants of settlements near the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site (SNTS) was conducted using the EPR dosimetry technique to assess radiation doses associated with exposure to radioactive fallout from the test site. In this study, tooth doses have been reconstructed for 103 persons with all studied teeth having been formed before the first nuclear test in 1949. Doses above those received from natural background radiation, termed 'accident doses', were found to lie in the range from zero to approximately 2 Gy, with one exception, a dose for one person from Semipalatinsk city was approximately 9 Gy. The variability of reconstructed doses within each of the settlements demonstrated heterogeneity of the deposited fallout as well as variations in lifestyle. The village mean external gamma doses for residents of nine settlements were in the range from a few tens of mGy to approximately 100 mGy.

  4. Tooth mobility changes subsequent to root fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Christensen, Søren Steno Ahrensburg; Tsilingaridis, Georgios

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze tooth mobility changes in root-fractured permanent teeth and relate this to type of interfragment healing (hard tissue healing (HT), interfragment healing with periodontal ligament (PDL) and nonhealing with interposition of granulation tissue (GT) because...... of pulp necrosis in the coronal fragment. Furthermore, the effect of age, location of the fracture on the root, and observation period on mobility values was analyzed. Mobility values were measured for 44 of 95 previous reported root-fractured permanent incisors. Mobility changes were measured...... after 3 months and 1 year, and a normalization of mobility value was usually found after 5 and 10 years. In 17 cases of PDL healing, generally a higher mobility was found in comparison with root fractures healing with hard tissue, and a consistent decrease in mobility value was found in the course...

  5. Endodontic Treatment of an Anomalous Anterior Tooth with the Aid of a 3-dimensional Printed Physical Tooth Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Chanhee; Kim, Changhwan; Cho, Seungryong; Baek, Seung Hoon; Kim, Gyutae; Kim, Sahng G; Kim, Sun-Young

    2015-06-01

    Endodontic treatment of tooth formation anomalies is a challenge to clinicians and as such requires a complete understanding of the aberrant root canal anatomy followed by careful root canal disinfection and obturation. Here, we report the use of a 3-dimensional (3D) printed physical tooth model including internal root canal structures for the endodontic treatment of a challenging tooth anomaly. A 12-year-old boy was referred for endodontic treatment of tooth #8. The tooth showed class II mobility with swelling and a sinus tract in the buccal mucosa and periapical radiolucency. The tooth presented a very narrow structure between the crown and root by distal concavity and a severely dilacerated root. Moreover, a perforation site with bleeding and another ditching site were identified around the cervical area in the access cavity. A translucent physical tooth model carrying the information on internal root canal structures was built through a 3-step process: data acquisition by cone-beam computed tomographic scanning, virtual modeling by image processing, and manufacturing by 3D printing. A custom-made guide jig was then fabricated to achieve a safe and precise working path to the root canal. Endodontic procedures including access cavity preparation were performed using the physical tooth model and the guide jig. At the 7-month follow-up, the endodontically treated tooth showed complete periapical healing with no clinical signs and symptoms. This case report describes a novel method of endodontic treatment of an anomalous maxillary central incisor with the aid of a physical tooth model and a custom-made guide jig via 3D printing technique.

  6. Effect of adsorption time on the adhesion strength between salivary pellicle and human tooth enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y F; Zheng, J; Zheng, L; Zhou, Z R

    2015-02-01

    Salivary pellicle is a biofilm that is formed by the selective adsorption of salivary proteins. Almost all the functions of the salivary pellicle (lubricating properties, anti-caries properties, etc.) are closely associated with its adhesion strength to tooth surface. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of adsorption time on the adhesion strength between salivary pellicle and human tooth enamel, aiming to understand what act as the determinant of the interfacial adhesion. In this study, human tooth enamel samples were immersed in human whole saliva in vitro to obtain a salivary pellicle on the surface of enamel. Immersion treatments lasting up to 1, 3, 10 and 60 min were conducted, respectively. Nano-scratch tests were conducted on the surface of enamel after different adsorption times. The wettability of enamel surface was measured through water contact angle. Results showed that the shear energy between salivary pellicle and enamel surface increased exponentially with the adsorption time. The adhesion force between salivary pellicle and bare enamel surface was more than twice that between salivary pellicle and salivary pellicle. It was found that both the wettability and zeta potential of enamel increased obviously after 1 min saliva-adsorption treatment, and then they almost kept stable as the adsorption time further increased. In summary, the adhesion strength between initial salivary pellicle and enamel surface was much higher than that between initial salivary pellicle and outer salivary pellicle. It seemed that electrostatic interaction contributed to the adhesion between the initial salivary pellicle and enamel surface, but not to the adhesion between the initial and outer salivary pellicle. The results would be helpful to extend the understanding of the adhesion mechanism of salivary pellicle and then to develop new artificial saliva and dental restorative materials. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foghsgaard, Signe; Schmidt, Thomas Andersen; Kjaergard, Henrik K

    2009-01-01

    In this descriptive prospective study, we evaluate the outcomes of surgery in 98 patients who were scheduled to undergo minimally invasive aortic valve replacement. These patients were compared with a group of 50 patients who underwent scheduled aortic valve replacement through a full sternotomy....... The 30-day mortality rate for the 98 patients was zero, although 14 of the 98 mini-sternotomies had to be converted to complete sternotomies intraoperatively due to technical problems. Such conversion doubled the operative time over that of the planned full sternotomies. In the group of patients whose...... is an excellent operation in selected patients, but its true advantages over conventional aortic valve replacement (other than a smaller scar) await evaluation by means of randomized clinical trial. The "extended mini-aortic valve replacement" operation, on the other hand, is a risky procedure that should...

  8. Spatiotemporal expression of caveolin-1 and EMMPRIN during mouse tooth development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lu; Li, Lingyun; Wang, Ding; Li, Shu; Chen, Zhi; An, Zhengwen

    2016-06-01

    Caveolin-1 is a scaffolding protein involved in the formation of cholesterol-rich caveolae lipid rafts within the plasma membrane and is capable of collecting signaling molecules into the caveolae and regulating their activity, including extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN). However, detailed expression patterns of caveolin-1 and EMMPRIN in the developing dental germ are largely unknown. The present study investigated the expression patterns of caveolin-1 and EMMPRIN in the developing mouse tooth germ by immunohistochemistry and real-time polymerase chain reaction. At the bud stage, caveolin-1 expression was initiated in the epithelium bud and mesenchymal cells, while EMMPRIN was weakly expressed at this stage. At the cap stage, caveolin-1 protein was located in the lingual part of the tooth germ; however, EMMPRIN protein was located in the labial part. From the bell stage to 2 days postnatal, caveolin-1 expression was detected in the ameloblasts and cervical loop area; with EMMPRIN expression in the ameloblasts and odontoblasts. Real-time polymerase chain reaction results showed that both caveolin-1 and EMMPRIN mRNA levels increased gradually with progression of developmental stages, and peaked at day two postnatal. The current finding suggests that both caveolin-1 and EMMPRIN take part in mouse tooth development, especially in the differentiation and organization of odontogenic tissues.

  9. Bmp 2 and bmp 7 induce odonto- and osteogenesis of human tooth germ stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taşlı, P Neslihan; Aydın, Safa; Yalvaç, Mehmet Emir; Sahin, Fikrettin

    2014-03-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) initiate, promote, and maintain odontogenesis and osteogenesis. In this study, we studied the effect of bone morphogenic protein 2 (BMP 2) and bone morphogenic protein 7 (BMP 7) as differentiation inducers in tooth and bone regeneration. We compared the effect of BMP 2 and BMP 7 on odontogenic and osteogenic differentiation of human tooth germ stem cells (hTGSCs). Third molar-derived hTGSCs were characterized with mesenchymal stem cell surface markers by flow cytometry. BMP 2 and BMP 7 were transfected into hTGSCs and the cells were seeded onto six-well plates. One day after the transfection, hTGSCs were treated with odontogenic and osteogenic mediums for 14 days. For confirmation of odontogenic and osteogenic differentiation, mRNA levels of BMP2, BMP 7, collagen type 1 (COL1A), osteocalsin (OCN), and dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) genes were measured by quantitative real-time PCR. In addition to this, immunocytochemistry was performed by odontogenic and osteogenic antibodies and mineralization obtained by von Kossa staining. Our results showed that the BMP 2 and BMP 7 both promoted odontogenic and osteogenic differentiation of hTGSCs. Data indicated that BMP 2 treatment and BMP 7 treatment induce odontogenic differentiation without affecting each other, whereas they induce osteogenic differentiation by triggering expression of each other. These findings provide a feasible tool for tooth and bone tissue engineering.

  10. Three-dimensional Micro-culture System for Tooth Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchler-Bopp, S; Bécavin, T; Kökten, T; Weickert, J L; Keller, L; Lesot, H; Deveaux, E; Benkirane-Jessel, N

    2016-06-01

    The arrangement of cells within a tissue plays an essential role in organogenesis, including tooth development. Progress is being made to regenerate teeth by reassociating dissociated embryonic dental cells and implanting them in vivo. In the present study, we tested the hanging drop method to study mixed epithelial-mesenchymal cell reorganization in a liquid instead of semisolid medium to see whether it could lead to tooth histogenesis and organogenesis. This method allowed the control of the proportion and number of cells to be used, and the forming microtissues showed homogeneous size. The liquid environment favored cell migrations as compared with collagen gels. Three protocols were compared. The one that sequentially combined the hanging drop and semisolid medium cultures prior to in vivo implantation gave the best results. Indeed, after implantation, teeth developed, showing a well-formed crown, mineralization of dentin and enamel, and the initiation of root formation. Vascularization and the cellular heterogeneity in the mesenchyme were similar to what was observed in developing molars. Finally, after coimplantation with a trigeminal ganglion, the dental mesenchyme, including the odontoblast layer, became innervated. The real advantage of this technique is the small number of cells required to make a tooth. This experimental model can be employed to study the development, physiology, metabolism, or toxicology in forming teeth and test other cell sources. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2016.

  11. Digital modeling technology for full dental crown tooth preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ning; Zhong, Yicheng; Liu, Hao; Yuan, Fusong; Sun, Yuchun

    2016-04-01

    A dental defect is one of the most common oral diseases, and it often requires a full crown restoration. In this clinical operation, the dentist must manually prepare the affected tooth for the full crown so that it has a convergence angle between 4° and 10°, no undercuts, and uniform and even shoulder widths and depths using a high speed diamond bur in the patient׳s mouth within one hour, which is a difficult task that requires visual-manual operation. The quality of the tooth preparation has an important effect on the success rate of the subsequent prosthodontic treatment. This study involved research into digital modeling technology for full dental crown tooth preparation. First, the margin line of the tooth preparation was designed using a semi-automatic interactive process. Second, the inserting direction was automatically computed. Then, the characteristic parameters and the constraints on the tooth preparation were defined for the model. Next, the shoulder and axial surface of the tooth preparation were formed using parametric modeling. Finally, the implicit surface of a radial basis function was used to construct the tooth preparation׳s occlusal surface. The experimental results verified that the method of digital modeling for full crown preparation proposed in this study can quickly and accurately implement personalized designs of various parameters, such as the shoulder width and the convergence angle; it provides a digital design tool for full crown preparation.

  12. BMP4 signaling mediates Zeb family in developing mouse tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jeong-Oh; Kim, Eun-Jung; Cho, Kyoung-Won; Nakagawa, Eizo; Kwon, Hyuk-Jae; Cho, Sung-Won; Jung, Han-Sung

    2012-06-01

    Tooth morphogenesis is regulated by sequential and reciprocal interaction between oral epithelium and neural-crest-derived ectomesenchyme. The interaction is controlled by various signal molecules such as bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), Hedgehog, fibroblast growth factor (FGF), and Wnt. Zeb family is known as a transcription factor, which is essential for neural development and neural-crest-derived tissues, whereas the role of the Zeb family in tooth development remains unclear. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the expression profiles of Zeb1 and Zeb2 during craniofacial development focusing on mesenchyme of palate, hair follicle, and tooth germ from E12.5 to E16.5. In addition, we examined the interaction between Zeb family and BMP4 during tooth development. Both Zeb1 and Zeb2 were expressed at mesenchyme of the palate, hair follicle, and tooth germ throughout the stages. In the case of tooth germ at the cap stage, the expression of Zeb1 and Zeb2 was lost in epithelium-separated dental mesenchyme. However, the expression of Zeb1 and Zeb2 in the dental mesenchyme was recovered by Bmp4 signaling via BMP4-soaked bead and tissue recombination. Our results suggest that Zeb1 and Zeb2, which were mediated by BMP4, play an important role in neural-crest-derived craniofacial organ morphogenesis, such as tooth development.

  13. Expression of aquaporin isoforms during human and mouse tooth development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felszeghy, S; Módis, L; Németh, P; Nagy, G; Zelles, T; Agre, P; Laurikkala, J; Fejerskov, O; Thesleff, I; Nielsen, S

    2004-04-01

    Previously, we described the development of hyaluronan (HA) deposition in human tooth germ tissues that are consistent with water transport in different stages of tooth development. The aquaporins (AQP) constitute a family of membrane water channels that are expressed in many organs. However, there are no data available about the expression pattern of aquaporin water channels in dental structures. In the present study we have characterised the expression of six different aquaporin isoforms (AQP1-5, AQP-9) in developing human and mouse tooth germs by immunohistochemistry using isoform specific antibodies. In the "bell stage" AQP1 was expressed in endothelial cells of small vessels whereas no other structures of the tooth primordial were labeled. AQP2, AQP3 and AQP9 immunoreactivity was not observed in tooth germs, whereas strong AQP4 and AQP5 expression was observed in dental lamina, inner enamel epithelium, stratum intermedium, stellate reticulum and the outer enamel epithelium. Oral epithelium also exhibited AQP4 and AQP5 immunolabeling. During development of the matrices of the dental hard tissues AQP4 and AQP5 immunostaining was observed in the odontoblasts and their processes, as well as in the secretory ameloblast and their apical processes. Immunolabeling controls were negative. In conclusion, AQP4 and AQP5 are expressed in tooth germ tissues in early development in cells that previously have been shown to express HA and/or CD44, indicating that AQP water channels may play a role for ECM hydration during tooth development.

  14. Tooth contact versus clenching: oral parafunctions and facial pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaros, Alan G; Williams, Karen

    2012-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that estimates of time spent in tooth contact are significantly greater than estimates of time spent clenching, and to test the hypothesis that tooth contact is greater in pain patients, particularly those reporting facial or head pain, than those with pain elsewhere in the body. An anonymous, voluntary, confidential questionnaire was administered to 235 patients seeking care at a general medical clinic. The questionnaire assessed demographic variables, presence and location of pain, and percentage of time spent in tooth contact and in clenching. Analysis of variance was used to examine differences among groups of patients; logistic regression was used to identify significant predictors of pain. All patients reported that the percentage of time spent in tooth contact was significantly greater than the time spent clenching. The same pattern of results emerged for those with and without head pain, and those with and without any chronic pain problem. Both tooth contact and clenching were significantly associated with head pain. Results from the logistic regressions provide convergent validity on the importance of oral parafunctions, specifically tooth contact and clenching, to facial/head pain. For assessment of oral parafunctional behaviors, inquiries that utilize clear behavioral referents (tooth contact versus clenching) are likely to result in more accurate estimates than behaviors with unclear definitions.

  15. Safety issues of tooth whitening using peroxide-based materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y; Greenwall, L

    2013-07-01

    In-office tooth whitening using hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) has been practised in dentistry without significant safety concerns for more than a century. While few disputes exist regarding the efficacy of peroxide-based at-home whitening since its first introduction in 1989, its safety has been the cause of controversy and concern. This article reviews and discusses safety issues of tooth whitening using peroxide-based materials, including biological properties and toxicology of H₂O₂, use of chlorine dioxide, safety studies on tooth whitening, and clinical considerations of its use. Data accumulated during the last two decades demonstrate that, when used properly, peroxide-based tooth whitening is safe and effective. The most commonly seen side effects are tooth sensitivity and gingival irritation, which are usually mild to moderate and transient. So far there is no evidence of significant health risks associated with tooth whitening; however, potential adverse effects can occur with inappropriate application, abuse, or the use of inappropriate whitening products. With the knowledge on peroxide-based whitening materials and the recognition of potential adverse effects associated with the procedure, dental professionals are able to formulate an effective and safe tooth whitening regimen for individual patients to achieve maximal benefits while minimising potential risks.

  16. Frequency-domain assessment of gear-tooth bending-fatigue damage-progression using the average-log-ratio, ALR, algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, William D.; Hines, Jason A.

    2014-04-01

    Frequency-domain (rotational-harmonic) behavior of the average-log-ratio, ALR, gear-damage detection algorithm [MSSP 24 (2010) 2807-2823] [18] is utilized to explain behavior caused by tooth-bending-fatigue damage progression. For spur and helical gears, the strongest bending-fatigue damage contributions are typically found in the rotational-harmonic region below the tooth-meshing fundamental harmonic, where ALR increases almost monotonically with increasing damage. However, when the combined elastic/plastic deformation of a damaged tooth or teeth exceeds tooth tip/root/end relief magnitude, at tooth-contact initiation and/or termination, the lowest-order transmission-error discontinuity is changed from slope discontinuity to step discontinuity, resulting in transmission-error high-frequency (rotational-harmonic n) behavior changing from proportional to 1/n2 to proportional to 1/n, therefore indicating progression to severe damage. Decomposition of the ALR damage-detection metric into rotational-harmonic frequency bands using accelerometer recordings from a notched-tooth spiral-bevel gear test illustrates the above-described behavior, thereby showing increasing stages of damage progression prior to complete gear failure.

  17. Unsuspected functional disparity in Devonian fishes revealed by tooth morphometrics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauchey, Samuel; Girard, Catherine; Adnet, Sylvain; Renaud, Sabrina

    2014-09-01

    The shape of features involved in key biological functions, such as teeth in nutrition, can provide insights into ecological processes even in ancient time, by linking the occupation of the morphological space (disparity) to the occupation of the ecological space. Investigating disparity in radiating groups may provide insights into the ecological diversification underlying evolution of morphological diversity. Actinopterygian fishes initiated their radiation in the Devonian, a period characterized by the diversification of marine ecosystem. Although a former morpho-functional analysis of jaw shape concluded to conservative and poorly diversified morphologies in this early part of their history, fish tooth disparity evidenced here an unsuspected diversity of possible functional significance in the pivotal period of the Late Devonian (Famennian). All teeth being caniniforms, some were stocky and robust, in agreement with expectations for active generalist predators. More surprisingly, elongated teeth also occurred at the beginning of Famennian. Their needle-like shape challenges morpho-functional interpretations by making them fragile in response to bending or torsion. The occurrence of both types of fish teeth during the beginning of the Famennian points to a discrete but real increase in disparity, thus testifying a first burst of feeding specialization despite overall conservative jaw morphology. The disappearance of these needle-like teeth in the Late Famennian might have been related to a relay in dental diversity with abundant co-occurring groups, namely conodonts and chondrichthyans (sharks).

  18. Stem Cells in Tooth Development, Growth, Repair, and Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tian; Volponi, Ana Angelova; Babb, Rebecca; An, Zhengwen; Sharpe, Paul T

    2015-01-01

    Human teeth contain stem cells in all their mesenchymal-derived tissues, which include the pulp, periodontal ligament, and developing roots, in addition to the support tissues such as the alveolar bone. The precise roles of these cells remain poorly understood and most likely involve tissue repair mechanisms but their relative ease of harvesting makes teeth a valuable potential source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for therapeutic use. These dental MSC populations all appear to have the same developmental origins, being derived from cranial neural crest cells, a population of embryonic stem cells with multipotential properties. In rodents, the incisor teeth grow continuously throughout life, a feature that requires populations of continuously active mesenchymal and epithelial stem cells. The discrete locations of these stem cells in the incisor have rendered them amenable for study and much is being learnt about the general properties of these stem cells for the incisor as a model system. The incisor MSCs appear to be a heterogeneous population consisting of cells from different neural crest-derived tissues. The epithelial stem cells can be traced directly back in development to a Sox10(+) population present at the time of tooth initiation. In this review, we describe the basic biology of dental stem cells, their functions, and potential clinical uses.

  19. Deciduous tooth growth in an ancient Greek infant cemetery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Charles; Hillson, Simon

    2009-01-01

    The Kylindra cemetery on Astypalaia in the Dodecanese, in use 750 BC to 1st century AD, contains a unique skeletal collection. Over 2,400 infant inhumations, each buried in its own clay pot, have been uncovered so far. The skeletal material from each burial is embedded within a ball of accreted earth and since 2001, some 850 infant remains have been recovered and conserved. Most of these died perinatally, but some were very premature babies and some appear to have survived for several months after birth. A study to estimate ages at death of 277 teeth from 107 infants, using microstructural growth markers, is currently underway. One immediate objective is to help resolve the enigma of why such an unusually large number of infants were interred on such a remote Aegean island. Longer term objectives are to reconstruct the sequences of development of the different deciduous tooth types, providing new standards of growth for long bones, the skull and the dentition. This paper presents an interim report on the findings from the histological study, which has analysed 68 teeth from 36 individuals so far. Five of the 36 infants survived birth, three dying within the first 3 weeks of life and the other two surviving for about 3 months. Average appositional growth rates were found to be 3.6 microm/day, and initial mineralisation was found to be well below the figures in Sunderland and coworkers' study in 1987. Copyright (c) 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Multiple essential MT1-MMP functions in tooth root formation, dentinogenesis, and tooth eruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, H; Snider, T N; Wimer, H F; Yamada, S S; Yang, T; Holmbeck, K; Foster, B L

    2016-01-01

    Membrane-type matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MT1-MMP) is a transmembrane zinc-endopeptidase that breaks down extracellular matrix components, including several collagens, during tissue development and physiological remodeling. MT1-MMP-deficient mice (MT1-MMP(-/-)) feature severe defects in connective tissues, such as impaired growth, osteopenia, fibrosis, and conspicuous loss of molar tooth eruption and root formation. In order to define the functions of MT1-MMP during root formation and tooth eruption, we analyzed the development of teeth and surrounding tissues in the absence of MT1-MMP. In situ hybridization showed that MT1-MMP was widely expressed in cells associated with teeth and surrounding connective tissues during development. Multiple defects in dentoalveolar tissues were associated with loss of MT1-MMP. Root formation was inhibited by defective structure and function of Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS). However, no defect was found in creation of the eruption pathway, suggesting that tooth eruption was hampered by lack of alveolar bone modeling/remodeling coincident with reduced periodontal ligament (PDL) formation and integration with the alveolar bone. Additionally, we identified a significant defect in dentin formation and mineralization associated with the loss of MT1-MMP. To segregate these multiple defects and trace their cellular origin, conditional ablation of MT1-MMP was performed in epithelia and mesenchyme. Mice featuring selective loss of MT1-MMP activity in the epithelium were indistinguishable from wild type mice, and importantly, featured a normal HERS structure and molar eruption. In contrast, selective knock-out of MT1-MMP in Osterix-expressing mesenchymal cells, including osteoblasts and odontoblasts, recapitulated major defects from the global knock-out including altered HERS structure, short roots, defective dentin formation and mineralization, and reduced alveolar bone formation, although molars were able to erupt. These data