WorldWideScience

Sample records for replacement pilot training

  1. Flight Hour Reductions in Fleet Replacement Pilot Training through Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smode, Alfred F.

    A project was undertaken to integrate the 2F87F operational flight trainer into the program for training replacement patrol plane pilots. The objectives were to determine the potential of the simulator as a substitute environment for learning aircraft tasks and to effectively utilize the simulator in pilot training. The students involved in the…

  2. Motivational Engineering for Pilot Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzberg, Frederick I.; And Others

    The study was an investigation of student pilot motivation for, and toward, the Air Training Command's undergraduate pilot training (UPT) program. The motivation hygiene approach was used to identify the motivational factors operating in the UPT program systematically. This approach has been used extensively in industry and with success in a…

  3. Aircraft Simulators and Pilot Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caro, Paul W.

    Flight simulators are built as realistically as possible, presumably to enhance their training value. Yet, their training value is determined by the way they are used. Traditionally, simulators have been less important for training than have aircraft, but they are currently emerging as primary pilot training vehicles. This new emphasis is an…

  4. Pilot selection and training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmreich, Robert L.

    1982-01-01

    Personality and situational factors relevant to individual and group performance in highly demanding environments, such as those faced by astronauts or by jet transport crew, are discussed. It is emphasized that although technical competence and proficiency in pilot selection are prerequisites for safety, operating a modern jet transport is a group endeavor that requires the effective coordination of the entire crew. A self-report test battery for measuring positive and negative personality traits of pilot candidates, termed the Personal Characteristics Inventory, is described.

  5. Aggression Replacement Training and Childhood Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amendola, A. Mark; Oliver, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    Aggression Replacement Training (ART) was developed by the late Arnold Goldstein of Syracuse University to teach positive alternatives to children and youth with emotional and behavioral problems (Glick & Gibbs, 2011; Goldstein, Glick, & Gibbs, 1998). ART provides cognitive, affective, and behavioral interventions to build competence in…

  6. Consistency of Pilot Trainee Cognitive Ability, Personality, and Training Performance in Undergraduate Pilot Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-09

    4343. Table A-16. Differences by Year for the NEO-PI-R Extraversion Score: T-38 Training Year 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004...AFRL-RH-WP-TR-2013-0081 CONSISTENCY OF PILOT TRAINEE COGNITIVE ABILITY, PERSONALITY, AND TRAINING PERFORMANCE IN UNDERGRADUATE PILOT... TRAINING Mark S. Teachout University of the Incarnate Word San Antonio, TX Malcolm James Ree Erica L. Barto Operational Technologies

  7. A.R.T. – Aggression Replacement Training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harbo, Lotte Junker; Domben, Eskil

    2015-01-01

    Artiklen indeholder en kort introduktion, eksemplificeret ved case, af det manualbaserede program til behandling af udadreagerende unge Aggression Replacement Training.......Artiklen indeholder en kort introduktion, eksemplificeret ved case, af det manualbaserede program til behandling af udadreagerende unge Aggression Replacement Training....

  8. Realistic Radio Communications in Pilot Simulator Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burki-Cohen, Judith; Kendra, Andrew J.; Kanki, Barbara G.; Lee, Alfred T.

    2000-01-01

    Simulators used for total training and evaluation of airline pilots must satisfy stringent criteria in order to assure their adequacy for training and checking maneuvers. Air traffic control and company radio communications simulation, however, may still be left to role-play by the already taxed instructor/evaluators in spite of their central importance in every aspect of the flight environment. The underlying premise of this research is that providing a realistic radio communications environment would increase safety by enhancing pilot training and evaluation. This report summarizes the first-year efforts of assessing the requirement and feasibility of simulating radio communications automatically. A review of the training and crew resource/task management literature showed both practical and theoretical support for the need for realistic radio communications simulation. A survey of 29 instructor/evaluators from 14 airlines revealed that radio communications are mainly role-played by the instructor/evaluators. This increases instructor/evaluators' own workload while unrealistically lowering pilot communications load compared to actual operations, with a concomitant loss in training/evaluation effectiveness. A technology review searching for an automated means of providing radio communications to and from aircraft with minimal human effort showed that while promising, the technology is still immature. Further research and the need for establishing a proof-of-concept are also discussed.

  9. Lunar Landing Training vehicle piloted by Neil Armstrong during training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1969-01-01

    A Lunar Landing Training Vehicle, piloted by Astronaut Neil Armstrong, goes through a checkout flight at Ellington Air Force Base on June 16, 1969. The total duration of the lunar simulation flight was five minutes and 59 seconds. Maximum altitude attained was about 300 feet.

  10. The effectiveness of airline pilot training for abnormal events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casner, Stephen M; Geven, Richard W; Williams, Kent T

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of airline pilot training for abnormal in-flight events. Numerous accident reports describe situations in which pilots responded to abnormal events in ways that were different from what they had practiced many times before. One explanation for these missteps is that training and testing for these skills have become a highly predictable routine for pilots who arrive to the training environment well aware of what to expect. Under these circumstances, pilots get plentiful practice in responding to abnormal events but may get little practice in recognizing them and deciding which responses to offer. We presented 18 airline pilots with three abnormal events that are required during periodic training and testing. Pilots were presented with each event under the familiar circumstances used during training and also under less predictable circumstances as they might occur during flight. When presented in the routine ways seen during training, pilots gave appropriate responses and showed little variability. However, when the abnormal events were presented unexpectedly, pilots' responses were less appropriate and showed great variability from pilot to pilot. The results suggest that the training and testing practices used in airline training may result in rote-memorized skills that are specific to the training situation and that offer modest generalizability to other situations. We recommend a more complete treatment of abnormal events that allows pilots to practice recognizing the event and choosing and recalling the appropriate response. The results will aid the improvement of existing airline training practices.

  11. Aggression Replacement Training: Putting Theory and Research to Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollin, Clive R.

    2003-01-01

    There are many problems posed by aggressive youth, the harm to victims and the loss of young people into the criminal justice system and penal confinement. Aggression Replacement Training (ART) was developed by Arnold Goldstein and his colleagues as a means of working with aggressive young people to help them learn new, prosocial ways of behaving.…

  12. T-4G Methodology: Undergraduate Pilot Training T-37 Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Robert R.; And Others

    The report's brief introduction describes the application of T-4G methodology to the T-37 instrument phase of undergraduate pilot training. The methodology is characterized by instruction in trainers, proficiency advancement, a highly structured syllabus, the training manager concept, early exposure to instrument training, and hands-on training.…

  13. Measuring Pilot Proficiency on an Instrument Training Maneuver

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-08-01

    featmr• of the Advanced Simulator for Pilot Training ( ASPT ) could be suc- cess tuj ly used to facilitate the development and validation of a recording...for the instrument training maneuver Vertical S-A in which the unique record/playback features of the Advanced Simulator for Pilot Training ( ASPT ) were...the ASPT revealed several format and observe--workload problems that needed correction. SFollowing revision, the booklet (Appendix A) was given a

  14. Can Competency-Based Training Fly?: An Overview of Key Issues for "Ab Initio" Pilot Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franks, Peter; Hay, Stephen; Mavin, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Competency-based training (CBT) for pilots was formally introduced in 1999 by the Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) for training leading to the issue of aeroplane private and commercial pilot licences. This initiative followed the Australian government's introduction of CBT policy for vocational and workplace training in the late 1980's.…

  15. Flight Simulator Platform Motion and Air Transport Pilot Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Alfred T.; Bussolari, Steven R.

    1989-01-01

    The influence of flight simulator platform motion on pilot training and performance was examined In two studies utilizing a B-727-200 aircraft simulator. The simulator, located at Ames Research Center, Is certified by the FAA for upgrade and transition training in air carrier operations. Subjective ratings and objective performance of experienced B-727 pilots did not reveal any reliable effects of wide variations In platform motion de- sign. Motion platform variations did, however, affect the acquisition of control skill by pilots with no prior heavy aircraft flying experience. The effect was limited to pitch attitude control inputs during the early phase of landing training. Implications for the definition of platform motion requirements in air transport pilot training are discussed.

  16. The Training of Military Pilots: Men, Machines, and Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-06-01

    program. Beyond its purely technical function, UPT has become both a cultural rite of passage and the institutional portal through which most Air Force...decades, becoming for many of its graduates a cultural rite of passage . This approach to pilot training, however, represented a departure from the...maneuvering, surface attack training, and, the Navy’s rite of passage , carrier landing qualification. Air Force fighter pilots receive all of their

  17. Models of Pilot Behavior and Their Use to Evaluate the State of Pilot Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirgl, Miroslav; Jalovecky, Rudolf; Bradac, Zdenek

    2016-07-01

    This article discusses the possibilities of obtaining new information related to human behavior, namely the changes or progressive development of pilots' abilities during training. The main assumption is that a pilot's ability can be evaluated based on a corresponding behavioral model whose parameters are estimated using mathematical identification procedures. The mean values of the identified parameters are obtained via statistical methods. These parameters are then monitored and their changes evaluated. In this context, the paper introduces and examines relevant mathematical models of human (pilot) behavior, the pilot-aircraft interaction, and an example of the mathematical analysis.

  18. Flight physiology training experiences and perspectives: survey of 117 pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrão, Luís; Zorro, Sara; Silva, Jorge; Castelo-Branco, Miguel; Ribeiro, João

    2013-06-01

    Human factors and awareness of flight physiology play a crucial role in flight safety. Even so, international legislation is vague relative to training requirements in hypoxia and altitude physiology. Based on a previously developed survey, an adapted questionnaire was formulated and released online for Portuguese pilots. Specific questions regarding the need for pilot attention monitoring systems were added to the original survey. There were 117 pilots, 2 of whom were women, who completed the survey. Most of the pilots had a light aviation license and flew in unpressurized cabins at a maximum ceiling of 10,000 ft (3048 m). The majority of the respondents never experienced hypoxic symptoms. In general, most of the individuals agreed with the importance of an introductory hypoxia course without altitude chamber training (ACT) for all pilot populations, and with a pilot monitoring system in order to increase flight safety. Generally, most of the pilots felt that hypoxia education and training for unpressurized aircraft is not extensive enough. However, almost all the respondents were willing to use a flight physiology monitoring system in order to improve flight safety.

  19. Community reintegration following a total joint replacement: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stergiou-Kita, Mary; Grigorovich, Alisa

    2014-06-01

    To examine community reintegration following a hip or knee total joint replacement (TJR) from the perspective of rehabilitation clients. A phenomenological frame of reference guided the present study. Ten participants who received inpatient rehabilitation completed semi-structured qualitative interviews to explore their experiences with reintegrating back into their chosen communities and the meanings that they ascribed to their reintegration. Interview data were analysed using thematic analysis. Demographic data, and information regarding participants' living situation and supports were extracted from existing databases and used to characterize the sample. Participants revealed that reintegration after a TJR encompassed two key elements of meaning: i) engagement in meaningful activities; and ii) satisfaction levels. Additionally, the following five factors were identified as facilitators or barriers to community reintegration following a TJR: i) ongoing preparation and education; ii) confounding health issues; iii) driving and transportation; iv) personal facilitators; v) access to supports from professionals, family and friends, and community programmes. The present study highlights the significance of engaging in meaningful activities and being satisfied in one's level of engagement to achieving a sense of community reintegration following a TJR. This suggests that reintegration post-TJR has broader meanings than just improvements in functional abilities. Practitioners are encouraged to inquire about patients' meaningful activities, support their preparedness throughout the rehabilitation process, to identify confounding health issues that may limit reintegration, consider patients' fears and anxieties and establish supports to enhance their feelings of self-efficacy and abilities to cope following a TJR. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. T-4G Simulator and T-4 Ground Training Devices in USAF Undergraduate Pilot Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Robert R.; Smith, James F.

    The objective of the project was to investigate the utility of using an A/F37A-T4G T-37 flight simulator within the context of Air Force undergraduate pilot training. Twenty-one subjects, selected from three undergraduate pilot training classes, were given contact flight training in a TP4G/EPT simulator before going to T-37 aircraft for further…

  1. Consumer Perceptions About Pilot Training: An Emotional Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosser, Timothy G.

    Civilian pilot training has followed a traditional path for several decades. With a potential pilot shortage approaching, ICAO proposed a new paradigm in pilot training methodology called the Multi-Crew Pilot License. This new methodology puts a pilot in the cockpit of an airliner with significantly less flight time experience than the traditional methodology. The purpose of this study was to determine to what extent gender, country of origin and pilot training methodology effect an aviation consumer's willingness to fly. Additionally, this study attempted to determine what emotions mediate a consumer's decision. This study surveyed participants from India and the United States to measure their willingness to fly using the Willingness to Fly Scale shown to be valid and reliable by Rice et al. (2015). The scale uses a five point Likert-type scale. In order to determine the mediating emotions, Ekman and Friesen's (1979) universal emotions, which are happiness, surprise, fear, disgust, anger, and sadness were used. Data were analyzed using SPSS. Descriptive statistics are provided for respondent's age and willingness to fly values. An ANOVA was conducted to test the first four hypotheses and Hayes (2004, 2008) bootstrapping process was used for the mediation analysis. Results indicated a significant main effect for training, F(1,972) = 227.76, p . .001, etap 2 = 0.190, country of origin, F(1, 972) = 28.86, p emotions anger, fear, happiness, and surprise mediated the relationship between training and country of origin, and training. The findings of this study are important to designers of MPL training programs and airline marketers.

  2. Telemetry System Utilization for Stress Monitoring of Pilots During Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luboš Socha

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Air transport development brings an increased focus on the safety of piloting. The safety conditions can be assessed by mental workload. Psychic discomfort or excessive stress on pilots can negatively influence the course of flights. Therefore it appears convenient to monitor such parameters, which represent the mental wellbeing, or discomfort of a pilot. Since physiological measurements can provide a good information about mental workload or stress, this work primarily focuses on the observation of the change in heart rate, as it is an indicator of stress during the training of pilots, using the designed modular telemetry system. Another aim of this study is to evaluate the influence of a change in the avionic data visualization. This can have an unfavorable effect on the piloting of an airplane. This work, based on the evaluation of heart rate shows, that the switch from analog visualization to glass cockpit creates increased levels of stress in pilots, which was proved for all examined subjects except one. Significant level of correlation in the heart beat rate change in subjects in the course of training was also discovered.

  3. Fidelity of Simulation for Pilot Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-12-01

    virtualI measurement hous* FI4A Flight Simulator 1-Sigma V 35K Asmly Csae ig’ 4 "lCoonn""’ Calligraphi 46~i I-wiodow folded,. iie efrac S F95 (4 units...Film (photographic) d) Shadowgraph Presentation to the pilot for a) and b) is normally by CRT, with the information written calligraphi - cally or

  4. Piloted Flight Simulator Developed for Icing Effects Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratvasky, Thomas P.

    2005-01-01

    In an effort to expand pilot training methods to avoid icing-related accidents, the NASA Glenn Research Center and Bihrle Applied Research Inc. have developed the Ice Contamination Effects Flight Training Device (ICEFTD). ICEFTD simulates the flight characteristics of the NASA Twin Otter Icing Research Aircraft in a no-ice baseline and in two ice configurations simulating ice-protection-system failures. Key features of the training device are the force feedback in the yoke, the instrument panel and out-the-window graphics, the instructor s workstation, and the portability of the unit.

  5. Undergraduate Pilot Training: Instructor Pilot Behavior and Student Stress and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-01

    to those reported for power-on-stall and spin recovery units flown by students in the Advanced Simulator for Pilot Training ( ASPT ) (Krahenbuhl, Marett...in the ASPT (Krahenbuhl et al., 1978, 1979). The instructor behavior data were collapsed across trials in order to calculate mean rates for each

  6. Innovative Debrief Solutions for Mission Training & Simulation: Making fighter pilot training more effective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, L.R.M.A.; Cornelisse, E.; Schavemaker-Piva, O.

    2006-01-01

    To enhance and improve the quality of mission training and simulation for fighter pilots, TNO and the Royal Netherlands Air Force (RNLAF) investigate various innovative debrief concepts. In this paper we will describe our work on Innovative Debrief Solutions for Mission Training through Distributed

  7. Flight Screening Program Effects on Attrition in Undergraduate Pilot Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-08-01

    AFHRL-TP-86-59rttC p - -FLIGHT SCRELNING PROGRAM EFFECTS ONAIR FORCE ATTRITION IN UNDERGRADUATE PILOT TRAINING H U Peter Stoker David R. Hunter So...SCREENING PROGRAM EFFECTS ON ATTRITION IN UNOERGRADUATE PILOT TRAININS Peter Stoker David R. Hunter Jeffrey E. Kantor John C. Quebe, MaJor, USAF...Attrition (Cals With sc700€1h r Test crsNall) . . .. .*,., *. 1 1. 26 A-36 Predictien of T-3? Phase Pass Oyreall Attrition Results by FW brades far

  8. Sex education training: a Pro Familia pilot project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-07-01

    A Pro Familia (Saarbrucken) project has established a pilot sex education project to teach youth leaders happy sexual relationships, how relationships are formed and influenced, and the physiological and biological realities surrounding those relationships. The training is intended for two groups. Personnel involved in out-of-school activities will be trained in 5-10 sessions of 2-3 hours each. The basic course highlights the participants' attitudes towards sexuality, sex education, and conflicts arising in youth work. 6 months later a further course follows in which practical experiences are exchanged. Training in the field is also provided for personnel of youth clubs, centres. Personal attitudes are discussed and a discussion group, led by Pro Familia personnel, are formed. Future workers in out-of-school activities need further training. A 2 term course at the Technical High School for social workers and extra courses in sociology, psychology, and teacher training, are being considered.

  9. AFHRL/FT [Air Force Human Resources Laboratory/Flight Training] Capabilities in Undergraduate Pilot Training Simulation Research: Executive Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheny, W. G.; And Others

    The document presents a summary description of the Air Force Human Resource Laboratory's Flying Training Division (AFHRL/FT) research capabilities for undergraduate pilot training. One of the research devices investigated is the Advanced Simulator for Undergraduate Pilot Training (ASUPT). The equipment includes the ASUPT, the instrumented T-37…

  10. 14 CFR 91.1097 - Pilot and flight attendant crewmember training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pilot and flight attendant crewmember... RULES Fractional Ownership Operations Program Management § 91.1097 Pilot and flight attendant crewmember training programs. (a) Each program manager must establish and maintain an approved pilot training...

  11. 14 CFR 91.1101 - Pilots: Initial, transition, and upgrade ground training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pilots: Initial, transition, and upgrade... RULES Fractional Ownership Operations Program Management § 91.1101 Pilots: Initial, transition, and upgrade ground training. Initial, transition, and upgrade ground training for pilots must include...

  12. A Bibliographic Database for the History of Pilot Training Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Estudio psicofisiolôgico de la profesiôn de piloto aviador. Revista de Psicologia i Pedagogia, 2, 54-79. Describes test content, scoring...generali e ricerche sperimentali sulla selezione dei piloti di aviazione. Rivista di Psicologia , 25, 180-194. Gemelli, A. (1929). Ricerche sulla...Revista de Psicologia del Trabajo y de las Organizaciones, 20(2), 249-261. Morin, D. P. (1997). Training Air Service Pursuit Pilots in World War I

  13. Alternative System Designs for Navy Undergraduate Pilot Training, Post 1975.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-06-01

    abilities and predicting future attrites. F0. (PAGE TIDD NOV GS473 Unclassified S/N 0102-0144500 Securit ’ Clasification S - .. - ,-. , Unclassified...University Bulletin, Series 58, No. 7-5. January 1958 (cited in Jolley 1964). Woodruff, R. R. Use of the T- 4G Simulator in the T-37 UPT Syllabus AFHRL-TRM-26...Texas. Woodruff, R. R. and Smith, J. F. T- 4G Simulator and T-4 Ground Training Devices in USAF Undergraduate Pilot Training. AFHRL-TR-74-78. November

  14. Effect of Playful Balancing Training - A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henrik Hautop; Jessen, Jari Due

    2013-01-01

    We used the modular playware in the form of modular interactive tiles for playful training of community-dwelling elderly with balancing problem. During short-term play on the modular interactive tiles, the elderly were playing physical, interactive games that were challenging their dynamic balance......, agility, endurance, and sensor-motoric reaction. A population of 12 elderly (average age: 79) with balancing problems (DGI average score: 18.7) was randomly assigned to control group or tiles training group, and tested before and after intervention. The tiles training group had statistical significant...... increase in balancing performance (DGI score: 21.3) after short-term playful training with the modular interactive tiles, whereas the control group remained with a score indicating balancing problems and risk of falling (DGI score: 16.6). The small pilot randomized controlled trial suggests...

  15. SoCIAL - training cognition in schizophrenia: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Davide; Mucci, Armida; Piegari, Giuseppe; D'Alise, Valentina; Mazza, Annapaola; Galderisi, Silvana

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to assess the efficacy of a new social cognition (SC) remediation intervention, the Social Cognition Individualized Activities Lab (SoCIAL), for subjects with schizophrenia. The training includes a module for emotion recognition and one for theory of mind. A comparison with a validated cognitive remediation intervention, the Social Skills And Neurocognitive Individualized Training (SSANIT), was conducted to verify the efficacy of the SoCIAL in improving SC. Ten stabilized patients with schizophrenia accepted to participate. Five patients were randomized to SoCIAL and five to SSANIT. The SoCIAL intervention includes individual sessions of neurocognitive individualized training (NIT) and group sessions of SC training. SSANIT includes individual sessions of NIT and group sessions of social skills individualized training. The interventions were matched for the overall treatment duration (20 weeks) and for the frequency of the sessions (two times a week, one for SoCIAL or social skills individualized training and one for NIT, with a duration of 80 minutes for each session). Results showed a significant treatment effect (effect size: Cohen's d 0.32) on the primary outcome; in fact, only the SoCIAL intervention improved theory of mind. Patients receiving the SoCIAL intervention also showed an improvement of avolition. These preliminary findings support further development of the SoCIAL and suggest that cognitive remediation should include an SC module.

  16. External validity of individual differences in multiple cue probability learning: The case of pilot training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Matton

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Individuals differ in their ability to deal with unpredictable environments. Could impaired performances on learning an unpredictable cue-criteria relationship in a laboratory task be associated with impaired learning of complex skills in a natural setting? We focused on a multiple-cue probability learning (MCPL laboratory task and on the natural setting of pilot training. We used data from three selection sessions and from the three corresponding selected pilot student classes of a national airline pilot selection and training system. First, applicants took an MCPL task at the selection stage (N=556; N=701; N=412. Then, pilot trainees selected from the applicant pools (N=44; N=60; N=28 followed the training for 2.5 to 3 yrs. Differences in final MCPL performance were associated with pilot training difficulties. Indeed, poor MCPL performers experienced almost twice as many pilot training difficulties as better MCPL performers (44.0% and 25.0%, respectively.

  17. The relationship between academic performanceand pilot performance in a collegiate flight training environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Carolyn A.

    While flight time has commonly been used as a measure of a pilot's skill level, little research has been performed to determine what factors are linked to predicting a pilot's performance, particularly in a training environment. If a dependable link was found, prediction of how well an individual would do in flight training would be possible. Time, money and resources could be focused on individuals who are more likely to succeed in pilot training. Therefore, this study was designed to determine if a relationship between GPA and pilot performance exists, in order to determine if academic performance can serve as a predictor of pilot performance in a training environment. The use of historical records from Middle Tennessee State University's Aerospace Department, which included GPA information and flight training records information, was used evaluate this relationship. Results of the study indicate a statistically significant modest correlation between academic performance and pilot performance between some of the variable pairings.

  18. Effects of Reiki on Pain, Anxiety, and Blood Pressure in Patients Undergoing Knee Replacement: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Ann Linda; Vitale, Anne; Brownell, Elise; Kryak, Elizabeth; Rand, William

    This blinded, controlled pilot study investigated the effects of Reiki on 46 patients undergoing knee replacement surgery. Of the 3 groups, Reiki, Sham Reiki, and Standard of Care, only the Reiki group showed significant reductions in pain, blood pressure, respiration rate, and state anxiety, which provides evidence for a full-scale clinical study.

  19. Ultra Low-Dose Naloxone and Tramadol/Acetaminophen in Elderly Patients Undergoing Joint Replacement Surgery: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngozi N Imasogie

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: A pilot study was conducted to assess whether both the rationale and feasibility exist for future randomized clinical trials to evaluate the combined use of naloxone infusion and tramadol/acetaminophen as opioid-sparing drugs in elderly patients undergoing lower extremity joint replacement surgery.

  20. Aggression Replacement Training for Violent Young Men in a Forensic Psychiatric Outpatient Clinic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hornsveld, R.H.; Kraaimaat, F.W.; Muris, P.; Zwets, A.J.; Kanters, T.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of Aggression Replacement Training (ART) were explored in a group of Dutch violent young men aged 16 to 21 years, who were obliged by the court to follow a treatment program in a forensic psychiatric outpatient clinic. To evaluate the training, patients completed a set of self-report que

  1. Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Radhakrishnan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The fishmeal replaced with Spirulina platensis, Chlorella vulgaris and Azolla pinnata and the formulated diet fed to Macrobrachium rosenbergii postlarvae to assess the enhancement ability of non-enzymatic antioxidants (vitamin C and E, enzymatic antioxidants (superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase (CAT and lipid peroxidation (LPx were analysed. In the present study, the S. platensis, C. vulgaris and A. pinnata inclusion diet fed groups had significant (P < 0.05 improvement in the levels of vitamins C and E in the hepatopancreas and muscle tissue. Among all the diets, the replacement materials in 50% incorporated feed fed groups showed better performance when compared with the control group in non-enzymatic antioxidant activity. The 50% fishmeal replacement (best performance diet fed groups taken for enzymatic antioxidant study, in SOD, CAT and LPx showed no significant increases when compared with the control group. Hence, the present results revealed that the formulated feed enhanced the vitamins C and E, the result of decreased level of enzymatic antioxidants (SOD, CAT and LPx revealed that these feeds are non-toxic and do not produce any stress to postlarvae. These ingredients can be used as an alternative protein source for sustainable Macrobrachium culture.

  2. Mission X: Train Like an Astronaut Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Charles W.; Olivotto, C.; Boese, A.; Spiero, F.; Galoforo, G.; Niihori, M.

    2011-01-01

    Mission X: Train Like an Astronaut is an international educational challenge focusing on fitness and nutrition as we encourage students to "train like an astronaut." Teams of students (aged 8-12) learn principles of healthy eating and exercise, compete for points by finishing training modules, and get excited about their future as "fit explorers." The 18 core exercises (targeting strength, endurance, coordination, balance, spatial awareness, and more) involve the same types of skills that astronauts learn in their training and use in spaceflight. This first-of-its-kind cooperative outreach program has allowed 14 space agencies and various partner institutions to work together to address quality health/fitness education, challenge students to be more physically active, increase awareness of the importance of lifelong health and fitness, teach students how fitness plays a vital role in human performance for exploration, and inspire and motivate students to pursue careers in STEM fields. The project was initiated in 2009 in response to a request by the International Space Life Sciences Working Group. USA, Netherlands, Italy, France, Germany, Austria, Colombia, Spain, and United Kingdom hosted teams for the pilot this past spring, and Japan held a modified version of the challenge. Several more agencies provided input into the preparations. Competing on 131 teams, more than 3700 students from 40 cities worldwide participated in the first round of Mission X. OUTCOMES AND BEST PRACTICES Members of the Mission X core team will highlight the outcomes of this international educational outreach pilot project, show video highlights of the challenge, provide the working group s initial assessment of the project and discuss the future potential of the effort. The team will also discuss ideas and best practices for international partnership in education outreach efforts from various agency perspectives and experiences

  3. Fundamental Study of Evaluation at Berthing Training for Pilot Trainees Using a Ship Maneuvering Simulator

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kazuki Inoue; Tadatsugi Okazaki; Koji Murai; Yuji Hayashi

    2013-01-01

    Use of the ship maneuvering simulator (SMS) is at the core of pilot trainees education and training, so it is desirable to have an evaluation method that can be completed shortly after each berthing training session...

  4. Flight Crew Training: Multi-Crew Pilot License Training versus Traditional Training and Its Relationship with Job Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushing, Thomas S.

    2013-01-01

    In 2006, the International Civil Aviation Organization promulgated requirements for a Multi-Crew Pilot License for First Officers, in which the candidate attends approximately two years of ground school and trains as part of a two-person crew in a simulator of a Boeing 737 or an Airbus 320 airliner. In the traditional method, a candidate qualifies…

  5. Bicycle Trains, Cycling, and Physical Activity: A Pilot Cluster RCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Jason A; Haaland, Wren; Jacobs, Maya; Abbey-Lambertz, Mark; Miller, Josh; Salls, Deb; Todd, Winifred; Madding, Rachel; Ellis, Katherine; Kerr, Jacqueline

    2017-10-01

    Increasing children's cycling to school and physical activity are national health goals. The objective was to conduct an RCT of a bicycle train program to assess impact on students' school travel mode and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Pilot cluster RCT with randomization at the school level and N=54 participants. Fourth-fifth graders from four public schools serving low-income families in Seattle, WA in 2014 with analyses in 2015-2016. All participants were provided and fitted with bicycles, safety equipment (helmets, locks, and lights), and a 2- to 3-hour bicycle safety course. The intervention was a bicycle train offered daily (i.e., students volunteered to cycle with study staff to and from school). Time 1 assessments occurred prior to randomization. Time 2 assessments occurred after 3-5 weeks of the intervention (i.e., during Weeks 4-6 of the intervention period). The primary outcome was the percentage of daily commutes to school by cycling measured by validated survey. MVPA, measured by accelerometry and GPS units and processed by machine learning algorithms, was a secondary outcome. For two separate adjusted repeated measures linear mixed effects models in which students (N=54) were nested within schools (N=4), intervention participants had: (1) an absolute increase in mean percentage of daily commutes by cycling of 44.9%, (95% CI=26.8, 63.0) and (2) an increase in mean MVPA of 21.6 minutes/day, (95% CI=8.7, 34.6) from Time 1 to Time 2 compared with controls. A pilot bicycle train intervention increased cycling to school and daily MVPA in the short term among diverse, inner-city elementary school students. The bicycle train intervention appears promising and warrants further experimental trials among large, diverse samples with longer follow-up. This study is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT02006186. Copyright © 2017 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Consistency of the Relations of Cognitive Ability and Personality Traits to Pilot Training Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-22

    training completion (pass/fail). Two higher-order personality domains, Neuroticism (r = -.15) and Extraversion (r = .13), and one lower-order facet of...Consistency of the Relations of Cognitive Ability and Personality Traits to Pilot Training Performance 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...examined in large samples of US Air Force pilot trainees. Criterion data were collected between 1995 and 2008 from four training bases across three

  7. Ultra Low-Dose Naloxone and Tramadol/Acetaminophen in Elderly Patients Undergoing Joint Replacement Surgery: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Imasogie, Ngozi N; Sudha Singh; Watson, James T.; Debbie Hurley; Patricia Morley-Forster

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A pilot study was conducted to assess whether both the rationale and feasibility exist for future randomized clinical trials to evaluate the combined use of naloxone infusion and tramadol/acetaminophen as opioid-sparing drugs in elderly patients undergoing lower extremity joint replacement surgery.DESIGN: Ten patients 70 years of age or older undergoing either total knee (n=7) or total hip (n=3) arthroplasty were treated prospectively. Each patient received two tablets of tramadol/...

  8. Replacing Trains with Coaches: Implications for Social Inclusion in Rural New South Wales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Gray

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available With the future of New South Wales (NSW regional train services under question, concern has been expressed that replacement of trains with coaches will diminish levels of mobility and raise social exclusion for some people. Provision has been made on coaches for people considered to be disabled, but without recognition of the needs of people who do not fit either able or disabled categorisation. All train services offer better accessibility and therefore mobility to all people. The issue of regional train service cessation and replacement raises questions regarding the reliability of existing Australian studies about train service replacement, the degree to which health and illness are affected, as well as the potential for the exacerbation of existing social exclusion. An examination of the literature and some historical investigation undertaken by the authors highlights these limitations amid the ableism/disablism dualism in existing research and rural transport policy. The paper further suggests that the absence of Australian evidence of mobility loss should not be taken to indicate the reality of regional mobility and social inclusion. Instead the paper argues that further independent mobility loss and social exclusion may occur if coaches are further substituted for regional train services. Keywords: Public transport, disability, rural Australia, regional Australia, social inclusion, social policy, transport history

  9. Pre-quitting nicotine replacement therapy: Findings from a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wallace-Bell Mark

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Using nicotine replacement therapy (NRT while still smoking in the lead up to quitting could enhance success at quitting, one of the most cost-effective means of improving health, but little is known about its acceptability and tolerability. Aim To test the acceptability and tolerability of using NRT while smoking for two weeks before quitting, to inform a randomised controlled trial of pre-quitting NRT versus usual NRT-based quitting practice. Methods Prospective pragmatic uncontrolled clinic-based pilot study in which 14 adult smokers recruited from a smoking cessation clinic were prescribed nicotine patches or gum with follow up for two weeks. Data were collected on participants' concerns about smoking while using NRT, importance of quitting, urges to smoke, smoking behaviour, previous NRT use and the length of the pre-quitting period. Urine tests were collected weekly for cotinine, and participants recorded smoking activity and noted experiences and changes in their health in diaries. Results Only 21% of 14 participants expressed concerns about using NRT while smoking. All of the nine followed up used it as recommended, 56% of these reporting no unpleasant symptoms. Median urine cotinine levels declined over the two weeks. Urges to smoke averaged 1.8 on a 4-point scale. All participants decreased the number of cigarettes per day. Diary records showed wide variation in smoking and NRT use, with an increased sense of control and determination to quit. Conclusion Smokers using pre-quitting NRT over two weeks appeared to titrate nicotine levels and symptoms of toxicity were uncommon and of low intensity.

  10. [The impact of continuous renal replacement therapy training on nursing competence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voltzenlogel, Sabine

    2015-06-01

    Specific training adapted to the needs of caregivers in intensive care enables professional competence and quality of care to be developed in continuous renal replacement therapy. In addition, it contributes to reducing the stress felt by caregivers and the costs of this technique. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. A novel, online social cognitive training program for young adults with schizophrenia: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mor Nahum

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: This study provides an initial proof of concept for online social cognition training in schizophrenia. This form of training demonstrated feasibility and resulted in within-subject gains in social functioning and motivation. This pilot study represents a first step towards validating this training approach; randomized controlled trials, now underway, are designed to confirm and extend these findings.

  12. STS-44 Atlantis, OV-104, Pilot Henricks in FB-SMS training at JSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    STS-44 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, Pilot Terence T. Henricks, seated at the pilots station on the forward flight deck, reviews checklists before a flight simulation in the Fixed Base (FB) Shuttle Mission Simulator (SMS) located in JSC's Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5. Surrounding Henricks are the seat back, the overhead panels, forward panels, and forward windows.

  13. A pilot course for training-in-context in statistics and research methods

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A pilot course for training-in-context in statistics and research methods: Radiation oncology. ... roles of emotional engagement and social networking in facilitating effective ... Participants reported an increased understanding of the principles of ...

  14. STS-93 Pilot Ashby takes part in emergency egress training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    STS-93 Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby pauses for the photographer before climbing into an M-113 armored personnel carrier at the launch pad to take part in emergency egress training. In preparation for their mission, the STS-93 crew are participating in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities that also include a launch-day dress rehearsal culminating with a simulated main engine cut-off. Others in the crew are Commander Eileen M. Collins and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.), and Michel Tognini of France, who represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as a mission commander. The primary mission of STS-93 is the release of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to obtain unprecedented X-ray images of exotic environments in space to help understand the structure and evolution of the universe. Chandra is expected to provide unique and crucial information on the nature of objects ranging from comets in our solar system to quasars at the edge of the observable universe. Since X-rays are absorbed by the Earth's atmosphere, space-based observatories are necessary to study these phenomena and allow scientists to analyze some of the greatest mysteries of the universe. The targeted launch date for STS-93 is no earlier than July 20 at 12:36 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39B.

  15. The ELIXIR-EXCELERATE Train-the-Trainer pilot programme: empower researchers to deliver high-quality training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Sarah L; Palagi, Patricia M; Fernandes, Pedro L; Koperlainen, Eija; Dimec, Jure; Marek, Diana; Larcombe, Lee; Rustici, Gabriella; Attwood, Teresa K; Via, Allegra

    2017-01-01

    One of the main goals of the ELIXIR-EXCELERATE project from the European Union's Horizon 2020 programme is to support a pan-European training programme to increase bioinformatics capacity and competency across ELIXIR Nodes. To this end, a Train-the-Trainer (TtT) programme has been developed by the TtT subtask of EXCELERATE's Training Platform, to try to expose bioinformatics instructors to aspects of pedagogy and evidence-based learning principles, to help them better design, develop and deliver high-quality training in future. As a first step towards such a programme, an ELIXIR-EXCELERATE TtT (EE-TtT) pilot was developed, drawing on existing 'instructor training' models, using input both from experienced instructors and from experts in bioinformatics, the cognitive sciences and educational psychology. This manuscript describes the process of defining the pilot programme, illustrates its goals, structure and contents, and discusses its outcomes. From Jan 2016 to Jan 2017, we carried out seven pilot EE-TtT courses (training more than sixty new instructors), collaboratively drafted the training materials, and started establishing a network of trainers and instructors within the ELIXIR community. The EE-TtT pilot represents an essential step towards the development of a sustainable and scalable ELIXIR TtT programme. Indeed, the lessons learned from the pilot, the experience gained, the materials developed, and the analysis of the feedback collected throughout the seven pilot courses have both positioned us to consolidate the programme in the coming years, and contributed to the development of an enthusiastic and expanding ELIXIR community of instructors and trainers.

  16. Gaining Through Training: Pilot Proficiency in Modern Combat Aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    part of the European conflict. The military budget was small and aviation received a relatively small 25 percentage. Airmen received low wages ...re-installed, only pilots with two years of experience or more would fly, and pilots would fly only routes with a forecasted minimum ceiling of

  17. Optimization of initial training military pilots in Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В.В. Шмаков

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available  Began to attain adequacy of estimation of cost of primary preparation of pilots possible as a result of development in the Kharkov university of Aircraft of method which gave possibility to analyses the degree of influence on the cost of preparation of pilots of every constituent and define ways from optimization of preparation.

  18. STS-35 Pilot Gardner shoots picture during water egress training at JSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    STS-35 Pilot Guy S. Gardner shoots picture using a 35mm camera during water egress training conducted in the Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29 at JSC. Gardner is wearing a launch and entry suit and a life jacket.

  19. STS-37 Pilot Kenneth D. Cameron during egress training in JSC's WETF Bldg 29

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    STS-37 Pilot Kenneth D. Cameron, wearing launch and entry suit (LES), discusses simulated emergency egress training on the pool side of JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29. Cameron will be dropped into a simulated ocean, the WETF's 25-ft pool, into which a parachute landing might be made.

  20. STS-31 Pilot Bolden with beverages on the FB-SMS middeck during JSC training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    STS-31 Pilot Charles F. Bolden holds three beverage containers while in front of the galley on the middeck of the fixed based (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS) during a training simulation at JSC's Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5. From the middeck, Bolden, wearing lightweight headset, simulates a communications link with ground controllers and fellow crewmembers.

  1. 14 CFR 135.345 - Pilots: Initial, transition, and upgrade ground training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Training § 135.345 Pilots: Initial, transition, and upgrade ground training... airplanes during ground icing conditions, (i.e., any time conditions are such that frost, ice, or snow may... responsibilities; (C) Communications; (D) Airplane surface contamination (i.e., adherence of frost, ice, or...

  2. Peer-Directed, Brief Mindfulness Training with Adolescents: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Samuel J.; Jennings, Jerry L.

    2013-01-01

    This pilot study studied the impact of brief mindfulness meditation training with adolescents. Whereas adult mindfulness training programs typically entail weekly 2.5 hour sessions over an eight week period, this program delivered four 50-minute sessions within a three week period. Each session was comprised of two mindfulness exercises delivered…

  3. A pilot study of a practice management training module for medical residents

    OpenAIRE

    Berkenbosch,Lizanne; Arno M. M. Muijtjens; Zimmermann, Luc J. I.; Heyligers, Ide C.; Scherpbier, Albert J. J. A.; Busari, Jamiu O

    2014-01-01

    Background In 2005 a competency based curriculum was introduced in the Dutch postgraduate medical training programs. While the manager’s role is one of the seven key competencies, there is still no formal management course in most postgraduate curricula. Based on a needs assessment we conducted, several themes were identified as important for a possible management training program. We present the results of the pilot training we performed to investigate two of these themes. Methods The topics...

  4. The "Plane" Truth about DoD Undergraduate Helicopter Pilot Training Consolidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    the DOD’s Trainer Aircraft Masterplan ( Masterplan ) which was a planning document for the procurement of Navy and Air Force training aircraft...procurement strategy outlined in the Masterplan . The purpose of the DoDIG Audit Report was to determine whether the programs contained in the... Masterplan would enhance the quality and adequacy of Navy and Air Force pilots, overcome existing and anticipated training deficiencies, improve training

  5. Depression training in nursing homes: lessons learned from a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Marianne; Stolder, Mary Ellen; Jaggers, Benjamin; Liu, Megan Fang; Haedtke, Chris

    2013-02-01

    Late-life depression is common among nursing home residents, but often is not addressed by nurses. Using a self-directed CD-based depression training program, this pilot study used mixed methods to assess feasibility issues, determine nurse perceptions of training, and evaluate depression-related outcomes among residents in usual care and training conditions. Of 58 nurses enrolled, 24 completed the training and gave it high ratings. Outcomes for 50 residents include statistically significant reductions in depression severity over time (p Depression training is an important vehicle to improve depression recognition and daily nursing care, but diverse factors must be addressed to assure optimal outcomes.

  6. Manpower Projections, Recruitment Needs and Training Requirements for Commercial Airline Pilots in the United States 1968-1979.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Robert Marchand

    This study evaluated the reported airline pilot shortage in relation to certified air carriers; recruitment needs for qualified applicants; training requirements as recommended by air carriers, airline captains, and flight officers; and airline pilot supply and demand during 1968-79. A literature review on foreign and domestic pilot shortages was…

  7. Pharmacokinetics of cefetaxime in ICU-patients treated with continuous renal replacement : A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valk-Swinkels, C.G.H.; Rijpstra, T.A.; Van Der Meer, B.J.M.; Touw, D.J.; van't Veer, N.E.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Data on the optimal dosage of cefotaxime (CTX) in patients receiving continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) is sparse and equivocal [1]. We conducted a trial investigating the concentrations of CTX in general ICU and post-cardiac surgery ICU patients who were treated with CRRT bec

  8. Replacement of moist ingredients in the feed training of carnivorous fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lúcia Salaro

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The study evaluated the replacement of bovine heart by gelatin in the feed training of carnivorous fish, using giant trahira (Hoplias lacerdae as an experimental model. A completely randomized design with four treatments and five repetitions was employed. The treatments were composed of wet ingredients beef heart (control, gelatin diluted in water, gelatin diluted in beef heart broth, and gelatin diluted in water mixed with fish meal. The fish (3.22±0.03 cm and 0.57±0.01 g were conditioned to accept industrialized diets by the technique of gradual feed ingredients transition in the diet. Gains in weight and length, efficiency of feed training, specific growth rate, cannibalism, mortality and survival rates were evaluated. There was significant difference in weight and length gains and specific growth rate, whereby the use of bovine heart gave the best results. Greater efficiency of feed training was observed for fish fed diets containing beef heart and gelatin diluted in water mixed with fish meal. The high survival rates and the absence of significant differences among treatments for rates of cannibalism, mortality and survival indicate the feasibility of using gelatin as a moist ingredient in the feed training of carnivorous fish.

  9. Guidelines for Simulator-Based Marine Pilot Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-03-01

    Naccara, USCG 16. Ahatrac This report contains inf’ormiation relatino to the proper use of a shjphandling/ship bridge simulator by marine pilots for...inadequate for evolutions that require reader should also contact the follow- astern motion. ing organizations for their latest publications on this

  10. Association of hormonal responses and performance of student pilots during acceleration training on the human centrifuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, D.; Rohleder, N.; Welsch, H.

    2005-08-01

    Prediction of student pilots' +Gz tolerance by stress hormone levels would be a useful tool in aviation medicine. The aim of the present study was to analyze the relationship between neuroendocrine parameters with performance during acceleration training on the human centrifuge (HC).We investigated 21 student pilots during self-controlled acceleration training on the HC. Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), cortisol, epinephrine, and norepinephrine were measured after individual training sessions and at rest. Performance was defined by several characteristics including maximum tolerated acceleration. ACTH and cortisol, were significantly higher 20 minutes after acceleration training compared to the resting condition. Subjects tolerated a maximal acceleration of +6.69 Gz. HPA hormone levels and responses were associated with maximum tolerated acceleration +Gz. These findings support the expectation that acceleration- induced increases in stress hormones may enable the organism to tolerate a higher acceleration and could therefore be used as predictors for acceleration tolerance.

  11. Identifying training deficiencies in military pilots by applying the human factors analysis and classification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen-Chin; Harris, Don

    2013-01-01

    Without accurate analysis, it is difficult to identify training needs and develop the content of training programs required for preventing aviation accidents. The human factors analysis and classification system (HFACS) is based on Reason's system-wide model of human error. In this study, 523 accidents from the Republic of China Air Force were analyzed in which 1762 human errors were categorized. The results of the analysis showed that errors of judgment and poor decision-making were commonly reported amongst pilots. As a result, it was concluded that there was a need for military pilots to be trained specifically in making decisions in tactical environments. However, application of HFACS also allowed the identification of systemic training deficiencies within the organization further contributing to the accidents observed.

  12. Training Significantly Improves Fetoscopy Performance: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mietzsch, Stefan; Boettcher, Johannes; Yang, Sisi; Chantereau, Pierre; Romero, Philip; Bergholz, Robert; Reinshagen, Konrad; Boettcher, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Background Implementation of complex fetoscopic procedures that included intracorporeal suturing has been limited due to technical difficulties that might be surmounted with adequate training. Evaluating the impact of laparoscopic or fetoscopic training on fetoscopic performance was the aim of this study. Methods To evaluate fetoscopic performance after either laparoscopic or fetoscopic training, subjects were asked to perform four surgeon's square knots fetoscopically prior and post 2 hours of hands-on training. All subjects were medical students and novice in laparoscopic and fetoscopic interventions. Total time, knot stability (evaluated via tensiometer), suture accuracy, knot quality, and fetoscopic performance were assessed. Results Forty-six subjects were included in the study; after simple randomization, 24 were trained fetoscopically and 22 laparoscopically. Both groups had comparable baseline characteristics and improved after training significantly regarding all aspects assessed in this study. Subjects who trained fetoscopically were superior in terms of suturing and knot-tying performance. Conclusion Training significantly improves fetoscopic performance and may indeed be the keystone for future complex fetoscopic interventions. It seems advisable to train rather fetoscopically than laparoscopically resulting in higher suture and knot-tying quality. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Fluid intellingence and spatial reasoning as predictors of pilot training performance in the South African Air Force (SAAF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François de Kock

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Pilot selection is a form of high-stakes selection due to the massive costs of training, high trainee ability requirements and costly repercussions of poor selection decisions. This criterion-related validation study investigated the predictive ability of fluid intelligence and spatial reasoning in predicting three criteria of pilot training performance, using an accumulated sample of South African Air Force pilots (N = 108. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses with training grade achieved as criterion were performed for each of the phases of training, namely practical flight training, ground school training, and officers’ formative training. Multiple correlations of 0.35 (p < 0.01, 0.20 (p > 0.05 and 0.23 (p > 0.05 were obtained for flight, ground school and formative training results, respectively. Spatial ability had incremental validity over fluid intelligence for predicting flight training performance.

  14. Advanced Simulator for Pilot Training: Effects of Collimation on Accommodation and Vergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-09-01

    Training ( ASPT ), used for training R&D by AFHRL, employs seven collimated display windows to provide a virtual image covering a 300 degree horizontal by...with relatively low luminance and contrast. One potential solution to the limited lumirance and contrast of the ASPT display system is simply to remove...while viewing ASPT imagery through a ILIOS. Measurements were made while the observer viewed a dynamic computer-generated scene representing the pilot’s

  15. Simulation Modeling of Advanced Pilot Training: The Effects of a New Aircraft Family of Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Vendor 4 Figure 2. Advanced Pilot Training The shaded portion of Figure 2 depicts T-38s utilized by the Air Education and Training Command...requirements and resource availability on student throughput. The model runs each scenario fifty times to generate the appropriate data in analysis...parameters in this study can be determined with 10 or 20 replications, however MTBM requires fifty replications to gain accuracy within ±.1 maintenance

  16. Economies of Scale in Air Force Undergraduate Pilot Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    LSH Chesis Feedback), Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio 4S433. . Did this research contribute to a current Air Force project? a. Yes b. No 2. Do you believe... coefficient relating GRADS to COST. The second model tested was a quadratic relationship between average cost and graduate pilots, COST = A + B(GRADS) + C... coefficient of GRADSSQ. In this model, the independent variables were entered into the equation in a stepwise manner. In other words, the computer program

  17. Interactive BIM-Enabled Safety Training Piloted in Construction Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clevenger, Caroline; Lopez del Puerto, Carla; Glick, Scott

    2015-01-01

    This paper documents and assesses the development of a construction safety training module featuring interactive, BIM-enabled, 3D visualizations to test if such a tool can enhance safety training related to scaffolds. This research documents the technical challenges and the lessons learned through the development and administration of a prototype…

  18. Executive function training in children with SLI: A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vugs, B.A.M.; Knoors, H.E.T.; Cuperus, J.M.; Hendriks, M.P.H.; Verhoeven, L.T.W.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a computer-based executive function (EF) training in children with specific language impairment (SLI). Ten children with SLI, ages 8 to 12 years, completed a 25-session training of visuospatial working memory, inhibition and cognitive

  19. Executive Function Training in Children with SLI: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vugs, Brigitte; Knoors, Harry; Cuperus, Juliane; Hendriks, Marc; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a computer-based executive function (EF) training in children with specific language impairment (SLI). Ten children with SLI, ages 8 to 12 years, completed a 25-session training of visuospatial working memory, inhibition and cognitive flexibility over a 6-week period. Treatment outcome was…

  20. Pilot Evaluation of a Home Visit Parent Training Program in Disadvantaged Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Cynthia; Tsang, Sandra; Heung, Kitty

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The study reported the pilot evaluation of the Healthy Start Home Visit Program for disadvantaged Chinese parents with preschool children, delivered by trained parent assistants. Home visiting was used to make services more accessible to disadvantaged families. Method: The participants included 21 parent-child dyads. Outcome measures…

  1. Exergames for unsupervised balance training at home : A pilot study in healthy older adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Diest, Mike; Stegenga, Jan; Wörtche, Heinrich J.; Verkerke, G. J.; Postema, Klaas; Lamoth, Claude

    Exercise videogames (exergames) are gaining popularity as tools for improving balance ability in older adults, yet few exergames are suitable for home-based use. The purpose of the current pilot study was to examine the effects of a 6-week unsupervised home-based exergaming training program on

  2. Exergames for unsupervised balance training at home: A pilot study in healthy older adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Diest, Mike; Stegenga, Jan; Wörtche, Heinrich J.; Verkerke, Gijsbertus; Postema, Klaas; Lamoth, Claude

    2016-01-01

    Exercise videogames (exergames) are gaining popularity as tools for improving balance ability in older adults, yet few exergames are suitable for home-based use. The purpose of the current pilot study was to examine the effects of a 6-week unsupervised home-based exergaming training program on balan

  3. Personality: Its Use in Selecting Candidates for US Air Force Undergraduate Pilot Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-02-01

    Aviation Psychology, 1987. Fitschen, Maj Charles K. Cost Impact: Should Improved Screening Methods Be Implemented in the Undergraduate Pilot Training...Brooks AFB, Tex.: Air Force Systems Command, 1988. Spence, Janet T., Robert L. Helmreich, and Carole K. Holahan . "Negative and Positive Components of

  4. Pilot Study of the Pharmacokinetics of Cefotaxime in Critically Ill Patients with Acute Kidney Injury Treated with Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koedijk, Joost B.; Valk-Swinkels, Corinne G. H.; Rijpstra, Tom A.; Touw, Daan J.; Mulder, Paul G. H.; Van Der Voort, Peter H. J.; Van 't Veer, Nils E.; Van Der Meer, Nardo J. M.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the pharmacokinetics of cefotaxime (CTX) in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) when treated with continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) in the intensive care unit (ICU). This single-center prospective observational pilot study was

  5. Disaster Response Team FAST Skills Training with a Portable Ultrasound Simulator Compared to Traditional Training: Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paddock, Michael T.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pre-hospital focused assessment with sonography in trauma (FAST has been effectively used to improve patient care in multiple mass casualty events throughout the world. Although requisite FAST knowledge may now be learned remotely by disaster response team members, traditional live instructor and model hands-on FAST skills training remains logistically challenging. The objective of this pilot study was to compare the effectiveness of a novel portable ultrasound (US simulator with traditional FAST skills training for a deployed mixed provider disaster response team. Methods: We randomized participants into one of three training groups stratified by provider role: Group A. Traditional Skills Training, Group B. US Simulator Skills Training, and Group C. Traditional Skills Training Plus US Simulator Skills Training. After skills training, we measured participants’ FAST image acquisition and interpretation skills using a standardized direct observation tool (SDOT with healthy models and review of FAST patient images. Pre- and post-course US and FAST knowledge were also assessed using a previously validated multiple-choice evaluation. We used the ANOVA procedure to determine the statistical significance of differences between the means of each group’s skills scores. Paired sample t-tests were used to determine the statistical significance of pre- and post-course mean knowledge scores within groups. Results: We enrolled 36 participants, 12 randomized to each training group. Randomization resulted in similar distribution of participants between training groups with respect to provider role, age, sex, and prior US training. For the FAST SDOT image acquisition and interpretation mean skills scores, there was no statistically significant difference between training groups. For US and FAST mean knowledge scores, there was a statistically significant improvement between pre- and post-course scores within each group, but again there was not

  6. Food allergy training event for restaurant staff; a pilot evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    A previous cross-sectional survey highlighted that restaurant staff in Brighton had gaps in their knowledge of food allergy, which could lead to the provision of unsafe meals to food-allergic customers. A food allergy training event was developed by a multi-disciplinary team (health service researcher, clinician, teacher and patient group representative) to equip restaurant staff with the knowledge and skills necessary to safely serve food-allergic customers. This evaluation summarises the training event’s impact on participants’ knowledge of food allergy and their satisfaction with the event. No attendee had previously attended any formal training on food allergy. The percentage of participants who answered all true-false questions correctly increased from 82% before the training event to 91% afterwards. The percentage of participants who were able to name at least three common allergens increased from 9% to 64%. Both quantitative and qualitative feedback was positive. Restaurant staff require a good understanding of food allergy to ensure that food-allergic customers are kept safe, and their restaurants operate within the law. This food allergy training event improved participants’ absolute knowledge of food allergy, and attendees changed practice. Recommendations are made which could improve the impact and uptake of future food allergy training events. PMID:25225607

  7. Effects of resistance training and estrogen replacement on adipose tissue inflammation in ovariectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Maria Fernanda Cury; Ferreira, Fabiano Candido; Silva-Magosso, Natália Santanielo; Barbosa, Marina Rodrigues; Souza, Markus Vinicius Campos; Domingos, Mateus Moraes; Canevazzi, Gustavo Henrique Rigo; Stotzer, Uliana Sbeguen; Peviani, Sabrina Messa; de Lira, Fábio Santos; Selistre de Araújo, Heloísa Sobreiro; Perez, Sérgio Eduardo de Andrade

    2017-06-01

    Estrogen deficiency is directly related to central obesity and low-grade inflammation. Hormonal replacement and exercise training are both able to decrease fat accumulation and inflammation in postmenopausal women. However, the efficiency of resistance training (RT) and estrogen replacement (ER) in minimizing adiposity and inflammation in the visceral adipose tissue (VAT) of ovariectomized (OVX) rats has not yet been elucidated. In this study, Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into the following 6 groups: sham-operated sedentary (Sham-Sed), OVX-Sed, Sham-RT, OVX-RT, OVX-Sed-ER, and OVX-RT-ER groups. ER was performed by implanting silastic capsules containing 17β-estradiol. For RT, the animals were required to climb a 1.1-m vertical ladder with conical flasks containing weights attached to their tails for 12 weeks. Histological analyses were used to evaluate morphological changes. Gene expression levels were determined by quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, and protein concentrations were determined using Multiplex/Luminex assays. Ovariectomy increased the body mass (BM), adipocyte area, and inflammation in the VAT, the latter of which was indicated by reduced interleukin-10 (48%) and increased tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α concentration (∼3%). RT efficiently decreased BM, adipocyte area, and inflammation in the OVX groups. The combination of RT and ER decreased BM (19%) and the TNF-α concentration (18%) and increased the gene and protein expression levels of adiponectin (173% and 18%). These results indicate that RT and the combination of RT and ER are efficient strategies for reducing the BM and improving the inflammatory status of OVX rats.

  8. Collecting Biomarkers Using Trained Interviewers. Lessons Learned from a Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie L. McFall

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the design and outcomes of a pilot study for the UK Household Longitudinal Study (UKHLS, Understanding Society, to develop and test the feasibility of collection of biomarkers by trained non-clinical interviewers. Feasibility tests performance of procedures, that they are technically satisfactory and reasonable in relation to alternatives. The dimensions reported are recruitment and training of interviewers, completeness, acceptability and time required for data collection, and quality of the biological samples. Some comparisons are made with measures conducted by nurses in wave 2 of the UK Household Longitudinal Study, Understanding Society. Biomeasures included anthropometrics, blood pressure, grip strength and the collection of saliva and dried blood spots. We implemented measurement protocols, introduced training and certification of interviewers, who then collected data from 92 participants. The study produced information about duration of collection, participation and quality of blood and saliva samples. The pilot study informs the design decisions about the biosocial component of Understanding Society

  9. Cognitive training changes hippocampal function in mild cognitive impairment: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Allyson C; Sugiura, Lisa; Kramer, Joel H; Whitfield-Gabrieli, Susan; Gabrieli, John D

    2011-01-01

    A randomized pilot experiment examined the neural substrates of response to cognitive training in participants with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Participants performed exercises previously demonstrated to improve verbal memory and an active control group performed other computer activities. An auditory-verbal fMRI task was conducted before and after the two-month training program. Verbal memory scores improved significantly and left hippocampal activation increased significantly in the experimental group (gains in 5 of 6 participants) relative to the control group (reductions in all 6 participants). Results suggest that the hippocampus in MCI may retain sufficient neuroplasticity to benefit from cognitive training.

  10. Feasibility of Early-Initiated Progressive Resistance Training after Total Hip Replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Lone Ramer; Mechlenburg, Inger; Petersen, Annemette Krintel

    Background: Muscle atrophy, reduced hip muscle strength and function are documented within the first weeks after Total Hip Replacement (THR). Purpose / Aim of Study: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of early-initiated progressive resistance training (PRT) after THR...... extension, mean (sd): 28.9 (8.5), 36.3 (7.5), 39.4 (8.4), kg, p=0.02. Hip flexion, mean (sd): 32.4 (9.7), 43.8 (11.5), 53.6 (12.9), kg, p=0.001. Isometric strength in Nm/kg: Preoperative, 4 weeks postoperative, p- value (diff): Hip abduction, mean (sd): 0.86 (0.28), 0.85 (0.16) Nm/kg, p=0.94. Hip flexion......, mean (sd): 0.98 (0.26), 1.03 (0.29) Nm/kg, p=0.52. Conclusions: It seems feasible to commence PRT within the first week after THR, as hip pain remained the same or decreased, while the training load increased progressively. The included patients reached their preoperative hip-strength levels after 4...

  11. Exercise training as treatment of neck pain among fighter pilots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murray, Mike; Lange, Britt; Andersen, Christoffer Højnicke

    ) seldom, trained but stopped, 6) no participation at all. Maximal Voluntary Isometric Contraction (MVC) and Rate of Force Development (RFD) for cervical flexion and extension were measured by strain-gauge transducers. Results Prevalence of neck pain was significantly reduced in ET from baseline (mean ± SD...... 58% participated more that once a week (scale 1+2). Compliance according to the questionnaire correlated with registrations in the training diary (r = -0.745, P = MVC measures for cervical flexion and extension at baseline in ET were 183.6 N ± 47.1 and 286.5 N ± 48.0, and in REF 160.7 N...

  12. Cognitive Effectiveness of CF18 Instructor Pilots during Routine Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-02-01

    FASTTM). Sur la foi des données de sommeil et de vigilance, le programme prédit l’efficacité cognitive. Résultats. L’analyse FASTTM a prédit une...cognitive les plus faibles prévus (pendant la période de service de ces pilotes) avaient été causée par un sommeil insuffisant la nuit précédant les...World Safari. L’efficacité cognitive est déterminée par l’entrée de données quotidiennes sur le sommeil dans un programme de modélisation récemment

  13. A Pilot Study of Auditory Integration Training in Autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimland, Bernard; Edelson, Stephen M.

    1995-01-01

    The effectiveness of Auditory Integration Training (AIT) in 8 autistic individuals (ages 4-21) was evaluated using repeated multiple criteria assessment over a 3-month period. Compared to matched controls, subjects' scores improved on the Aberrant Behavior Checklist and Fisher's Auditory Problems Checklist. AIT did not decrease sound sensitivity.…

  14. A pilot study of iPad-assisted cognitive training for schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Jin; Zhang, Jiangtao; Guo, Zhongwei; Lu, Weihong; Cai, Jun; Shi, Zhongying; Zhang, Chen

    2014-06-01

    In this pilot study, we aimed to examine whether iPad-assisted cognitive training could be beneficial in ameliorating some of the cognitive impairment that accompany schizophrenia. Totally, 20 first-episode schizophrenia patients were randomly assigned to an experiment group (with cognitive training) or to a control group (without cognitive training). The N-back task was assessed at baseline and after intervention, to see what effects iPad-assisted training might have (week 4). The experimental group exhibited significant improvement in the accuracy rate at 2-back, and reaction time at 0, 1 and 2-back tasks. These findings suggest that iPad- or other technically-assisted cognitive training may potentially be a valid strategy for pursuing cognitive rehabilitation among those with schizophrenia.

  15. Gait Training in Chronic Stroke Using Walk-Even Feedback Device: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Krishnan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Asymmetrical gait and a reduction in weight bearing on the affected side are a common finding in chronic stroke survivors. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine the effectiveness of a shoe insole device that we developed, called Walk-Even, in correcting asymmetric gait in chronic stroke survivors. Six individuals with chronic (>6 months stroke underwent 8 weeks of intervention with 2 sessions/week, each consisting of 20 minutes of gait training and 20 minutes of lower-extremity strength training. The 2 control participants underwent conventional gait training, while 4 participants underwent gait training using the Walk-Even. Following intervention, all the participants improved on most of the gait measures: peak pressure of the foot, time of transfer of weight from heel-to-forefoot, center of pressure (COP trajectory, COP velocity, asymmetry ratio of stance, mean-force-heel, mean-force-metatarsals, Timed “Up and Go,” and Activities-specific Balance Scale. The improvement was more pronounced in the 4 participants that underwent training with Walk-Even compared to the control participants. This pilot study suggests that a combination of strength and gait training with real-time feedback may reduce temporal asymmetry and enhance weight-bearing on the affected side in chronic stroke survivors. A large randomized controlled study is needed to confirm its efficacy.

  16. Umanned Aerial Systems: Actions Needed to Improve DOD Pilot Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    of Defense’s (DOD) UAS portfolio has grown over the years to rival traditional manned systems, and, as of July 2013, DOD had acquired over 10,000...Congressional Committees The size, sophistication, and cost of the Department of Defense’s (DOD) unmanned aerial systems (UAS)1 portfolio has grown to...the questionnaire to each of the service’s headquarters, training commands, and operational commands. To include diverse UAS unit perspectives , we

  17. Evaluation of the Advanced Situational Awareness Training Pilot Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    sights , sounds , and smells. Atmospherics is taught as a means of detecting pre-event indicators by establishing a baseline for events that occur within...hides in plain sight among the civilian population. The Advanced Situational Awareness Training (ASAT) program proposes teaching Soldiers to use... sounds , smells, and other “atmospherics” taught as valuable observation tools in ASAT. In spite of the handicaps introduced by the nature of the video

  18. Prospective assessment of stereoscopic visual status and USAF pilot training attrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Q C; Lezotte, D C

    1993-01-01

    The role of stereopsis (i.e., the use of binocular cues for depth perception) in military aviation is undetermined. Pilots possessing adequate near stereopsis but having deficient distant stereopsis are thought to have microtropias. Historical reviews of microtropia and research concerning the role of depth perception in military aviation are described. A historical prospective study of student pilots entering U.S. Air Force Undergraduate Pilot Training (UPT) from Oct 1990 through Sep 1991 (FY 90-91) compares UPT attrition rates according to their preselection stereoscopic status (microtropia vs. normal). Univariate and multiple logistic regression analyses do not show significant differences in attrition rates between the two groups, implying that distant stereopsis is not critical to successful completion of UPT. The U.S. Air Force decided in Oct 91 to eliminate near stereoscopic vision screening while retaining distant stereoacuity testing as a criterion for candidates to qualify medically for UPT. Valid rationale for this decision includes simplified and uniform administration of stereoacuity testing, minimizing spurious results, the continued validity of stereopsis testing as a cross-check of other areas of visual function, the uncertain role of stereopsis in critical areas of flight operations, and the large applicant pool competing for a limited number of pilot training positions.

  19. Intensive gait training in toddlers with cerebral palsy: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Herskind

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Reduced muscle growth may be involved in the development of contractures in children with cerebral palsy (CP. Here, we report data from a pilot study of intensive gait training in CP toddlers. Methods: Five children with CP aged 8-30 months performed activity-based gait training for one hour/day, five days/week for three consecutive months. Included children were diagnosed with spastic CP, had a Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS score of I–II, and were not epileptic. All children wore pedometers during training. Before and after the training period, kinematic and qualitative gait analysis, clinical and objective evaluation of spasticity, Gross Motor Function Measure-66 (GMFM-66, and ultrasound of the affected medial gastrocnemius (MG muscle were performed. Two children were also tested before and after three months of receiving only standard care (SC. Results: On average 1410 steps/session were logged during 63 days of training. More steps were achieved at home than at a central facility. During training, MG muscle volume increased significantly, while it decreased for SC children. Gait improved qualitatively in all children, and GMFM-66 score improved in four of the five children. Similar improvements were seen among the SC children. Two children had pathologically increased muscle stiffness prior to training, which was reduced during training. Reflex stiffness was unchanged in all five children. Conclusions: This pilot study suggests that intensive gait training may increase muscle volume, improve walking skills and reduce passive muscle stiffness in toddlers with CP.

  20. Utilization of simple and double control subsonic aircraft for advanced combat training of the military pilots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan STEFANESCU

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of subsonic single control aircraft and especially of double–control ones, instead of supersonic combat aircraft in the military pilot training programs in the operational units, has be-come a necessity due to the economic and financial world-wide crisis which began during the 70’s-80’s, with the advent of the oil crisis, affecting many countries, which have their own Military Air Forces.

  1. STS-26 Pilot Covey, wearing launch and entry suit, trains in JSC mockup area

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Pilot Richard O. Covey, wearing the orange launch and entry suit (LES) and launch and entry helmet (LEH), pauses during a training exercise in JSC Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A crew compartment trainer (CCT). LES, a partial pressure suit to be worn during launch and entry phases of the space shuttle flight, was evaluated and checked out.

  2. STS-35 Pilot Gardner during fire fighting exercises at JSC fire training pit

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    STS-35 Pilot Guy S. Gardner extinguishes a small blaze during a fire handling training session for crewmembers at JSC Fire Training Pit across from the Gilruth Center Bldg 207. Wearing a navy blue flight suit, Gardner approaches fire while operating a fire extinguisher as Commander Vance D. Brand (far right) and Payload Specialist Samuel T. Durrance look on. The crew was briefed on types of potential blazes and the correct means of controlling each type. STS-35 will mark the first seven-member crew staffing since the Challenger accident of January 1986.

  3. STS-35 Pilot Gardner and MS Hoffman during egress training at JSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    STS-35 Pilot Guy S. Gardner (standing) and Mission Specialist (MS) Jeffrey A. Hoffman prepare for egress training at JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9A. Gardner and Hoffman, wearing orange launch and entry suits (LESs), adjust their parachute harnesses as they listen to instructions before training begins. The astronaut crewmembers and payload specialists for the scheduled May flight were specifically learning proper measures to take in the event of an emergency on the launch pad necessitating emergency evacuation of the orbiter.

  4. A Pilot Study of Training and Compensation Interventions for Mild Cognitive Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Konsztowicz

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: This pilot clinical trial sought to estimate the feasibility and efficacy of two interventions aimed at improving memory performance in geriatric clinic patients with mild cognitive impairment. Methods: Fifteen participants were randomized to either a memory training group or a memory compensation group. Results: Recruitment rates were low, whereas adherence and retention rates were acceptable. The memory training group improved in self-reported memory abilities and satisfaction with memory. The memory compensation group improved on one objective memory test but showed no consistent changes on any other outcomes. Conclusion: Effect size estimates will inform the design of larger clinical trials.

  5. A pilot randomized study of skills training for African American cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Cindy; Rust, Connie; Choi, Sam

    2014-01-01

    This study tested the efficacy of a psychosocial group intervention for African American breast cancer survivors based on the Cancer Survival Toolbox with the specific aim of decreasing distress and improving aspects of psychosocial functioning and quality of life. This pilot study utilized a randomized, repeated measures, experimental design. The study sample (N = 71) consisted of an intervention group (n = 23) of cancer survival skills training for 6 weeks and a control group (n = 48). The study could not confirm that cancer skills training in a psychoeducational group setting had a positive effect on decreasing stress or improving aspects of psychosocial functioning and quality of life.

  6. A pilot study examining garment severance damage caused by a trained sharp-weapon user

    OpenAIRE

    Cowper, E J; Mahoney, P F; Godhania, K; Carr, D. J.; Harrison, K.

    2016-01-01

    The pilot study summarized in this paper aimed to raise awareness of a gap that exists in the forensic textile science literature about damage caused to clothing by trained sharp-weapon users. A male trained in the Filipino martial arts discipline of Eskrima performed attack techniques on a physical model of a male torso covered with a 97% cotton/3% elastane knitted T-shirt, that is, a garment commonly worn by males. Fabric severance appearance created by three different, but commonly availab...

  7. Efficacy of Aggression Replacement Training among Children from North-West Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Koposov

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to assess whether the Aggression Replacement Training (ART programme is effective in increasing social skills and decreasing problem behaviour. The sample consisted of 232 children (mean age 10.9 yrs, SD = 2.32, their parents and teachers. The study had a quasi-experimental design with intervention and control groups. Children were recruited from six schools and four social institutions from four regions in North-West Russia from 2010 to 2013. Social skills and externalizing behaviour were assessed with the Social Skills Rating Scale and analyzed by repeated measures ANOVA (GLM. In a pre and post-test assessment, the 30-hour ART programme was associated with a significant increase in social skills when assessed by children’s self-reports. The most reliable effects of the intervention were demonstrated in the two age groups of 6-9 and 10-14 years old. When both pre and post-test were assessed by parents and teachers, children from both the intervention and control groups demonstrated more social skills and less problem behaviour. Overall results point to a significant improvement of social skills among children from the intervention groups, but an improvement in social skills and reduction of problem behaviour have also been indicated among children from the control group. Findings are discussed in view to possible diffusion of treatment from children participating in an intervention to children from control groups.

  8. Ultra low-dose naloxone and tramadol/acetaminophen in elderly patients undergoing joint replacement surgery: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imasogie, Ngozi N; Singh, Sudha; Watson, James T; Hurley, Debbie; Morley-Forster, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    A pilot study was conducted to assess whether both the rationale and feasibility exist for future randomized clinical trials to evaluate the combined use of naloxone infusion and tramadol/acetaminophen as opioid-sparing drugs in elderly patients undergoing lower extremity joint replacement surgery. Ten patients 70 years of age or older undergoing either total knee (n=7) or total hip (n=3) arthroplasty were treated prospectively. Each patient received two tablets of tramadol/acetaminophen (Tramacet; Janssen-Ortho Inc, Canada) preoperatively and every 6 h postoperatively, as well as a naloxone infusion started preoperatively at 0.25 microg/kg/h and continued up to 48 h postoperatively. In addition, standard intraoperative care was provided with 0.2 mg of intrathecal morphine, 1.4 mL of 0.75% bupivacaine, and an intra-articular infiltration of 100 mL of 0.3% ropivacaine and 30 mg of ketorolac, as well as standard postoperative morphine via patient-controlled analgesia orders and celecoxib 200 mg twice daily for five days. Compared with seven historical controls, also 70 years of age or older, who had undergone either a total knee (n=4) or total hip (n=3) arthroplasty, postoperative opioid use was reduced by 80%. Except for transient nausea and vomiting in 40% and 20% of patients, respectively, the 10 patients on tramadol/acetaminophen and naloxone tolerated the new regimen without difficulty. Consequently, a randomized, double-blinded clinical trial comparing standard therapy versus standard therapy plus these two drugs seems warranted. In such a trial, it would require approximately 20 subjects per treatment arm to detect a 80% decrease in morphine use.

  9. Effect of Exercise Training and Testosterone Replacement on Skeletal Muscle Wasting in Patients With Heart Failure With Testosterone Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Marcelo R; Sayegh, Ana L C; Bacurau, Aline V N; Arap, Marco A; Brum, Patrícia C; Pereira, Rosa M R; Takayama, Liliam; Barretto, Antônio C P; Negrão, Carlos E; Alves, Maria Janieire de Nazaré Nunes

    2016-05-01

    To examine whether combined testosterone replacement and exercise training (ET) therapies would potentiate the beneficial effects of isolated therapies on neurovascular control and muscle wasting in patients with heart failure (HF) with testosterone deficiency. From January 10, 2010, through July 25, 2013, 39 male patients with HF, New York Heart Association functional class III, total testosterone level less than 249 ng/dL (to convert to nmol/L, multiply by .03467), and free testosterone level less than 131 pmol/L were randomized to training (4-month cycloergometer training), testosterone (intramuscular injection of testosterone undecylate for 4 months), and training + testosterone groups. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity was measured using microneurography, forearm blood flow using plethysmography, body composition using dual X-ray absorptiometry, and functional capacity using cardiopulmonary test. Skeletal muscle biopsy was performed in the vastus lateralis. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity decreased in ET groups (training, Ptestosterone, Ptestosterone group (P=.89). Forearm blood flow was similar in all groups. Lean mass increased in ET groups (training, Ptestosterone, Ptestosterone group (Ptestosterone group as compared with the isolated testosterone group. Our findings provide evidence for a superior effect of combined ET and testosterone replacement therapies on muscle sympathetic nerve activity, muscle wasting, and functional capacity in patients with HF with testosterone deficiency. Copyright © 2016 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Fundamental Study of Evaluation at Berthing Training for Pilot Trainees Using a Ship Maneuvering Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuki Inoue

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Use of the ship maneuvering simulator (SMS is at the core of pilot trainees education and training, so it is desirable to have an evaluation method that can be completed shortly after each berthing training session. There are basically two methods of docking maneuvering that pilot trainees learn: one in which the ship enters from outside the port and is berthed directly at the target quay, and a second method in which the vessel carries out a turn in front of the target quay before berthing. The authors suggested an evaluation index in a previous study concerning the first docking method. In the present study, the authors propose an evaluation method for the case of berthing the vessel using the turning maneuver. Since the index obtained by this method offers a single numerical benchmark, it is an easy–to-understand result of the training exercise. The authors carried out experiments using a SMS and confirmed that the proposed evaluation method is effective and helpful to improve the effectiveness of SMS training.

  11. An Educational Intervention to Train Professional Nurses in Promoting Patient Engagement: A Pilot Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barello, Serena; Graffigna, Guendalina; Pitacco, Giuliana; Mislej, Maila; Cortale, Maurizio; Provenzi, Livio

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Growing evidence recognizes that patients who are motivated to take an active role in their care can experience a range of health benefits and reduced healthcare costs. Nurses play a critical role in the effort to make patients fully engaged in their disease management. Trainings devoted to increase nurses' skills and knowledge to assess and promote patient engagement are today a medical education priority. To address this goal, we developed a program of nurse education training in patient engagement strategies (NET-PES). This paper presents pilot feasibility study and preliminary participants outcomes for NET-PES. Methods: This is a pilot feasibility study of a 2-session program on patient engagement designed to improve professional nurses' ability to engage chronic patients in their medical journey; the training mainly focused on passing patient engagement assessment skills to clinicians as a crucial mean to improve care experience. A pre-post pilot evaluation of NET-PES included 46 nurses working with chronic conditions. A course specific competence test has been developed and validated to measure patient engagement skills. The design included self-report questionnaire completed before and after the training for evaluation purposes. Participants met in a large group for didactic presentations and then they were split into small groups in which they used role-play and case discussion to reflect upon the value of patient engagement measurement in relation to difficult cases from own practice. Results: Forty-six nurses participated in the training program. The satisfaction questionnaire showed that the program met the educational objectives and was considered to be useful and relevant by the participants. Results demonstrated changes on clinicians' attitudes and skills in promoting engagement. Moreover, practitioners demonstrated increases on confidence regarding their ability to support their patients' engagement in the care process. Conclusions

  12. Effects of a pilot training program on veterinary students' pain knowledge, attitude, and assessment skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mich, Patrice M; Hellyer, Peter W; Kogan, Lori; Schoenfeld-Tacher, Regina

    2010-01-01

    The prevention and management of pain is fundamental to the practice of both human and veterinary medicine. The recognition and treatment of pain represents an important indicator of the quality of care delivered in human hospitals and veterinary hospitals. Yet, both human and veterinary health care professionals have cited inadequate knowledge as a significant barrier to effective pain management. The aims of this pilot study were twofold: (1) to gauge veterinary medical students' current attitudes regarding their training in pain management and (2) to assess the impact of training and practice on the use of a canine acute pain assessment teaching tool. Participants, third-year professional veterinary medical students, completed a 16-item survey questionnaire before a 30-minute training session on pain assessment using the teaching tool and completed it again after training and a one-week practice period. Questions related to canine pain, assessment of canine pain, pain management education in the professional veterinary curriculum, and an example case presentation (video) were included in the survey. The analysis of survey results indicated that professional veterinary medicine students find value in didactic and clinical training in canine pain assessment. Additionally, use of the canine acute pain teaching tool in conjunction with a training program improved students' knowledge and skill in assessment while pointing out the importance of further training. Differences with regard to gender and tracking were found and warrant further exploration.

  13. Mindfulness training for loneliness among Chinese college students: A pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Na; Fan, Fu-Min; Huang, Si-Yuan; Rodriguez, Marcus A

    2016-10-05

    Loneliness has been found to predict a wide range of physical and mental health problems. It is suggested that China's One-Child Policy places young Chinese people at a particularly high risk for loneliness. Although loneliness is most prevalent in late adolescence and early adulthood, interventions have primarily targeted children or older adults with limited success. The current study examines a pilot randomized controlled trial of a mindfulness training program among Chinese college students. Participants with elevated loneliness (N = 50, ages 17-25) were randomized into either an 8-week mindfulness training or a control group. Self-reported measures of loneliness and mindfulness were administered at baseline and posttest. The training group also completed a program evaluation form and a 3-month follow-up assessment. Results provided preliminary evidence indicating that the intervention was feasible and effective at reducing loneliness among Chinese college students. Limitations and future directions were discussed.

  14. Cognitive effects of mindfulness training: Results of a pilot study based on a theory driven approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena Wimmer

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The present paper reports a pilot study which tested cognitive effects of mindfulness practice in a theory-driven approach. Thirty-four fifth graders received either a mindfulness training which was based on the mindfulness-based stress reduction approach (experimental group, a concentration training (active control group or no treatment (passive control group. Based on the operational definition of mindfulness by Bishop et al. (2004, effects on sustained attention, cognitive flexibility, cognitive inhibition and data-driven as opposed to schema-based information processing were predicted. These abilities were assessed in a pre-post design by means of a vigilance test, a reversible figures test, the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, a Stroop test, a visual search task, and a recognition task of prototypical faces. Results suggest that the mindfulness training specifically improved cognitive inhibition and data-driven information processing.

  15. Implementing school health promotion in Austria: experiences from a pilot training course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaschberger, Edith; Nitsch, Martina; Waldherr, Karin

    2012-05-01

    A pilot training course on school health promotion in Austria focused on supporting teachers and school heads during the implementation of the health-promoting school (HPS) concept. The participants talked about their experiences during the implementation phase in focus groups held in a feedback seminar at the end of the training course. The focus groups were analyzed by using an inductive approach. A coding method for thematic analysis was applied. Compatibility of the training course with the school setting was examined and supporting and hindering structures and processes pertaining to the schools and the training course are described. The results can be displayed in a model showing connections between the themes. Internal and external collaboration structures were identified as central aspects in the implementation phase. Particularly collaboration within the faculty is shown to be of importance when implementing the HPS approach. Voluntary cooperation especially of teachers, which is often connected with work in their spare time, is another aspect influencing the sustainability and therefore also the compatibility of the training course with the school setting. For future designs of teacher training courses in health promotion, the aspects of collaboration, teamwork, and collective commitment have to be taken into consideration.

  16. Live tissue versus simulation training for emergency procedures: Is simulation ready to replace live tissue?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Stephen L; Bukoski, Alex; Kerby, Jeffrey D; Llerena, Luis; Armstrong, John H; Strayhorn, Catherine

    2016-10-01

    Training of emergency procedures is challenging and application is not routine in all health care settings. The debate over simulation as an alternative to live tissue training continues with legislation before Congress to banish live tissue training in the Department of Defense. Little evidence exists to objectify best practice. We sought to evaluate live tissue and simulation-based training practices in 12 life-saving emergency procedures. In the study, 742 subjects were randomized to live tissue or simulation-training. Assessments of self-efficacy, cognitive knowledge, and psychomotor performance were completed pre- and post-training. Affective response to training was assessed through electrodermal activity. Subject matter experts gap analysis of live tissue versus simulation completed the data set. Subjects demonstrated pre- to post-training gains in self-efficacy, cognitive knowledge, psychomotor performance, and affective response regardless of training modality (P training modality in the overall group. Risk estimates on the least pretest performance subgroup favored simulation in 7 procedures. Affective response was greatest in live tissue training (P superior. Wholesale abandonment of live tissue training is not warranted. We maintain that combined live tissue and simulation-based training add value and should be continued. Congressional mandates may accelerate simulation development and improve performance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A Usability and Learnability Case Study of Glass Flight Deck Interfaces and Pilot Interactions through Scenario-based Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cino, Thomas J., II

    In the aviation industry, digitally produced and presented flight, navigation, and aircraft information is commonly referred to as glass flight decks. Glass flight decks are driven by computer-based subsystems and have long been a part of military and commercial aviation sectors. Over the past 15 years, the General Aviation (GA) sector of the aviation industry has become a recent beneficiary of the rapid advancement of computer-based glass flight deck (GFD) systems. While providing the GA pilot considerable enhancements in the quality of information about the status and operations of the aircraft, training pilots on the use of glass flight decks is often delivered with traditional methods (e.g. textbooks, PowerPoint presentations, user manuals, and limited computer-based training modules). These training methods have been reported as less than desirable in learning to use the glass flight deck interface. Difficulties in achieving a complete understanding of functional and operational characteristics of the GFD systems, acquiring a full understanding of the interrelationships of the varied subsystems, and handling the wealth of flight information provided have been reported. Documented pilot concerns of poor user experience and satisfaction, and problems with the learning the complex and sophisticated interface of the GFD are additional issues with current pilot training approaches. A case study was executed to explore ways to improve training using GFD systems at a Midwestern aviation university. The researcher investigated if variations in instructional systems design and training methods for learning glass flight deck technology would affect the perceptions and attitudes of pilots of the learnability (an attribute of usability) of the glass flight deck interface. Specifically, this study investigated the effectiveness of scenario-based training (SBT) methods to potentially improve pilot knowledge and understanding of a GFD system, and overall pilot user

  18. Enhancing Cognitive Training Through Aerobic Exercise After a First Schizophrenia Episode: Theoretical Conception and Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuechterlein, Keith H; Ventura, Joseph; McEwen, Sarah C; Gretchen-Doorly, Denise; Vinogradov, Sophia; Subotnik, Kenneth L

    2016-07-01

    Cognitive training (CT) and aerobic exercise have separately shown promise for improving cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. Aerobic exercise releases brain-derived neurotrophic factor, which promotes synaptic plasticity and neurogenesis. Thus, aerobic exercise provides a neurotrophic platform for neuroplasticity-based CT. The combination of aerobic exercise and CT may yield more robust effects than CT alone, particularly in the initial course of schizophrenia. In a pilot study, 7 patients with a recent onset of schizophrenia were assigned to Cognitive Training & Exercise (CT&E) and 9 to CT alone for a 10-week period. Posit Science programs were used for CT. Neurocognitive training focused on tuning neural circuits related to perceptual processing and verbal learning and memory. Social cognitive training used the same learning principles with social and affective stimuli. Both groups participated in these training sessions 2d/wk, 2h/d. The CT&E group also participated in an aerobic conditioning program for 30 minutes at our clinic 2d/wk and at home 2d/wk. The effect size for improvement in the MATRICS Consensus Cognitive Battery Overall Composite score for CT&E patients relative to CT patients was large. Functional outcome, particularly independent living skills, also tended to improve more in the CT&E than in the CT group. Muscular endurance, cardiovascular fitness, and diastolic blood pressure also showed relative improvement in the CT&E compared to the CT group. These encouraging pilot study findings support the promise of combining CT and aerobic exercise to improve the early course of schizophrenia.

  19. Micro-expression recognition training in medical students: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laidlaw Anita

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients provide emotional cues during consultations which may be verbal or non-verbal. Many studies focus on patient verbal cues as predictors of physicians' ability to recognize and address patient needs but this project focused on non-verbal cues in the form of facial micro-expressions. This pilot study investigated first year medical students' (n = 75 identified as being either good or poor communicators abilities to detect emotional micro-expressions before and after training using the Micro Expression Training Tool (METT http://www.mettonline.com. Methods The sample consisted of 24 first year medical students, 9 were from the lowest performance quartile in a communication skills OSCE (Objective Structured Clinical Exam station and 15 were from the highest performance quartile. These students completed the METT individually, recording pre- and post-assessment scores. Students were also invited to provide their views on the training. Results No difference in pre-assessment scores was found between the lowest and highest quartile groups (P = 0.797. After training, students in the high quartile showed significant improvement in the recognition of facial micro-expressions (P = 0.014. The lowest quartile students showed no improvement (P = 0.799. Conclusion In conclusion, this pilot study showed there was no difference between the ability of medical undergraduate students assessed as being good communicators and those assessed as poor communicators to identify facial micro-expressions. But, the study did highlight that those students demonstrating good general clinical communication benefited from the training aspect of the METT, whereas low performing students did not gain. Why this should be the case is not clear and further investigation should be carried out to determine why lowest quartile students did not benefit.

  20. A pilot study assessing emotional intelligence training and communication skills with 3rd year medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Ian; Leadbetter, Peter; Curran, Andrew; O'Sullivan, Helen

    2009-09-01

    To investigate whether emotional intelligence (EI) developmental training workshops can lead to increases with the Bar-On Emotional Quotient (EQ-i) total scores. A pilot study with a quasi-randomised controlled design was employed with self-report assessments conducted at baseline and post-intervention following a 7-month training programme. Medical students based at a UK-based medical school participated in the study, and 36 volunteer students were recruited to the control group with 50 students randomly assigned to receive the intervention. A total of 34 (68%) students in the intervention group attended the first intervention training workshop, 17 (34%) attended the majority of the monthly development sessions and completed the post-intervention assessment. In the control group only one participant did not complete the follow-up assessment. The intervention group had significantly higher EQ-i change from baseline mean scores than the control group. The intervention group mean scores had increased across time, whilst the control group mean scores slightly decreased. The EI developmental training workshops had a positive effect on the medical students in the intervention group. Further research is warranted to determine whether EI can be a useful measure in medical training, and the concept and measurement of EI requires further development.

  1. The ELIXIR-EXCELERATE Train-the-Trainer pilot programme: empower researchers to deliver high-quality training [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah L Morgan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the main goals of the ELIXIR-EXCELERATE project from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 programme is to support a pan-European training programme to increase bioinformatics capacity and competency across ELIXIR Nodes. To this end, a Train-the-Trainer (TtT programme has been developed by the TtT subtask of EXCELERATE’s Training Platform, to try to expose bioinformatics instructors to aspects of pedagogy and evidence-based learning principles, to help them better design, develop and deliver high-quality training in future. As a first step towards such a programme, an ELIXIR-EXCELERATE TtT (EE-TtT pilot was developed, drawing on existing ‘instructor training’ models, using input both from experienced instructors and from experts in bioinformatics, the cognitive sciences and educational psychology. This manuscript describes the process of defining the pilot programme, illustrates its goals, structure and contents, and discusses its outcomes. From Jan 2016 to Jan 2017, we carried out seven pilot EE-TtT courses (training more than sixty new instructors, collaboratively drafted the training materials, and started establishing a network of trainers and instructors within the ELIXIR community. The EE-TtT pilot represents an essential step towards the development of a sustainable and scalable ELIXIR TtT programme. Indeed, the lessons learned from the pilot, the experience gained, the materials developed, and the analysis of the feedback collected throughout the seven pilot courses have both positioned us to consolidate the programme in the coming years, and contributed to the development of an enthusiastic and expanding ELIXIR community of instructors and trainers.

  2. Coach training can improve the self-efficacy of neonatal nurses. A pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ammentorp, Jette; Kofoed, Poul-Erik

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In this pilot study we have investigated the impact of coach training offered to neonatal nurses on their assessment of their ability to meet the needs of the mothers and fathers. METHODS: The effect of a 3-day coaching training offered to neonatal nurses was investigated...... in an intervention study evaluating the nurses' self-efficacy before and after the course. RESULTS: A total of 39/44 (89%) and 31/40 (78%) neonatal nurses answered the questionnaire before and after the course. The self-efficacy scores increased up to 14.8% and for all but 1 question, the increase was statistically...... that increasingly is being requested. This should be confirmed in a bigger study....

  3. Self-administered physical exercise training as treatment of neck pain among military helicopter pilots and crew

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murray, Mike; Lange, Britt; Nørnberg, Bo Riebeling

    Introduction: Flight related neck pain is frequent among helicopter pilots and crew and affect individual health, operational capacity and flight safety. Exercise training has proven effective in reducing neck pain within other job professions. The aim of this study was to investigate if an exerc......Introduction: Flight related neck pain is frequent among helicopter pilots and crew and affect individual health, operational capacity and flight safety. Exercise training has proven effective in reducing neck pain within other job professions. The aim of this study was to investigate...... if an exercise intervention might reduce neck pain among helicopter pilots and crew. Methods: A total of 31 helicopter pilots and 38 crew members were randomized to an exercise-training-group ETG (n=35) or a reference-group REF (n=34). ETG received 20 weeks of strength, endurance and coordination training...... targeting the deep and superficial neck muscles. Training was self-administered due to irregular work schedules. REF received no training. Primary outcome: Intensity of neck pain the previous 3 months (self-reported on a 0-10 numeric box scale) and pressure-pain threshold (PPT) in the trapezius m. (TRA...

  4. Restructuring of advanced instruction and training programs in order to increase the number of flight hours for military pilots. Part II

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ioan STEFANESCU

    2011-01-01

    Converting the DC school jet aircraft into SC advanced training aircraft - and use them for the combat training of military pilots from the operational units, has become a necessity due to the budget...

  5. Effectiveness of a perceptual - proprioceptive training with virtual visual feedback in healthy subjects: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Vando

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: the aim of this pilot study was to evaluate whether proprioceptive-motor training using the Wii Balance Board (WBB might improve postural sway in healthy subjects.Methods: twenty-five healthy subjects were trained for six weeks (two sessions per week with 5 “video games”: Wii Fit Plus (WFP program. Before and after training: Basic Balance, Single-leg Balance, Agility, Stability and Motion (lower limb: right-left and both leg were measured using the Wii Balance Board.Results: the Wilcoxon Test showed improvements at the end of the training program compared to the baseline conditions. Basic Balance increased during the WFP (33.33% and was associated with a 19.92% decrease in center of pressure (COP lenght. The Single-leg Balance results incremented after the WFP (left 29.09% vs. right 47.92% and accompanied by a decrement in COP (left 28.71% vs. right 30.45%. The values for the Agility test increased both in WFP and COP (28.57% and 58.57%, respectively. The Stability test scores increased in the WFP (66.67% along with a consequent decrease in COP (10.53%. Finally, the Motion test values increased in the WFP (73.17%, whilst COP for this test decreased (12.02%. These results indicate that 6 weeks of virtual training produced a good adaptability. Younger participants (<20 years demonstrated to be more responsive to dynamic stimulation with respect to those >20 years.Conclusions: significant improvements in all participants were observed, indicating that virtual training can influence posture and balance in healthy people. Because of its characteristics of low cost and easy availability, a portable system for balance training for everyone offers the possibility to more readily measure motor skill and to gauge improvement.

  6. A Methodology for Estimating the Full Cost of Replacing Trained Air Force Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    training time by the average salary for the skill level 3. This is the average value of time lost to training each month. Step 141 Multiply the monthly...NUMBER OF MONTHS TO UPGRADE 7.9 9 MONTHLY VALUE OF TIME LOST TO TRAINING 573.62 743.08 TOTAL VALUE OF TIME LOST 4531.60 6687.72 OJT SUPERVISION/ADMIN

  7. A 5-year prospective study of single-tooth replacements supported by the Astra Tech implant: a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotfredsen, Klaus

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Implant-supported single-tooth replacements are an increasingly used method to replace teeth, especially in young patients. Therefore, long-term validation of different treatment modalities with different implant systems is of great importance. PURPOSE: The aim of the present study wa...

  8. A 5-year prospective study of single-tooth replacements supported by the Astra Tech implant: a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotfredsen, Klaus

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Implant-supported single-tooth replacements are an increasingly used method to replace teeth, especially in young patients. Therefore, long-term validation of different treatment modalities with different implant systems is of great importance. PURPOSE: The aim of the present study...

  9. Pilot Candidate Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-01

    pilot selection system and to best support up-front track selection for SUPT? Assumptions The USAF Trainer Masterplan does not include a plan to...replace the T-41 with a new flight screening aircraft. In addition, the Masterplan states that candidates will be track selected prior to entry into primary...training. (3:10) While the Masterplan is not a static document and aircraft procurement plans and/or the timing of track selection are subject to

  10. Cognitive Training for Schizophrenia in Developing Countries: A Pilot Trial in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia M. M. Pontes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive deficits in schizophrenia can massively impact functionality and quality of life, furthering the importance of cognitive training. Despite the development of the field in Europe and in the United States, no programmes have been developed and tested in developing countries. Different cultural backgrounds, budget restrictions, and other difficulties may render treatment packages created in high income countries difficult for adoption by developing nations. We performed a pilot double-blind, randomized, controlled trial in order to investigate the efficacy and feasibility of an attention and memory training programme specially created in a developing nation. The intervention used simple, widely available materials, required minimal infrastructure, and was conducted in groups. The sample included seventeen stable Brazilians with schizophrenia. Sessions were conducted weekly during five months. The cognitive training group showed significant improvements in inhibitory control and set-shifting over time. Both groups showed improvements in symptoms, processing speed, selective attention, executive function, and long-term visual memory. Improvements were found in the control group in long-term verbal memory and concentration. Our findings reinforce the idea that cognitive training in schizophrenia can be constructed using simple resources and infrastructure, facilitating its adoption by developing countries, and it may improve cognition.

  11. The Influence of Dynamic Orthosis Training on Upper Extremity Function after Stroke: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Cappato de Araújo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to assess the use of a dynamic orthosis on upper extremity function in chronic stroke patients. A case series approach was utilized, with provision of a training program (3x/week, 50 minutes/session for 8 weeks and employment of a dynamic orthosis. Six volunteers with persistent hemiparesis due to a single, unilateral stroke performed task-oriented movements with the aid of a dynamic orthosis. Tests were administered before and after training. Functional capacity was assessed using the TEMPA (Test d'Évaluation des Membres Supérieurs de Personnes Âgées test. The Wilcoxon test was used for pre-training and post-training comparisons of TEMPA scores. The volunteers showed significant improvement of upper extremity function in the performance of a bilateral task (p = 0.01 and three unilateral tasks (p = 0.04. This pilot study suggests that the dynamic orthosis associated with the performance of functional tasks can have positive outcomes regarding the improvement of functional capacity of upper extremity.

  12. Teacher-Child Interaction Training: A Pilot Study With Random Assignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Melanie A; Adelstein, Jonathan S; Miller, Samantha P; Areizaga, Margaret J; Gold, Dylann C; Sanchez, Amanda L; Rothschild, Sara A; Hirsch, Emily; Gudiño, Omar G

    2015-07-01

    Teacher-Child Interaction Training (TCIT), adapted from Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT), is a classroom-based program designed to provide teachers with behavior management skills that foster positive teacher-student relationships and to improve student behavior by creating a more constructive classroom environment. The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate TCIT in more classrooms than previously reported in the literature, with older children than previously reported, using random assignment of classrooms to TCIT or to a no-TCIT control condition and conducting all but two sessions within the classroom to enhance feasibility. Participants included 11 kindergarten and first grade classroom teachers and their 118 students from three urban, public schools in Manhattan, with five classrooms randomly assigned to receive TCIT and six to the no-TCIT control condition. Observations of teacher skill acquisition were conducted before, during, and after TCIT for all 11 teachers, and teacher reports of student behavior were obtained at these same time points. Teacher satisfaction with TCIT was assessed following training. Results suggested that after receiving TCIT, teachers increased rates of positive attention to students' appropriate behavior, decreased rates of negative attention to misbehavior, reported significantly less distress related to student disruptive behavior, and reported high satisfaction with the training program. Our study supports the growing evidence-base suggesting that TCIT is a promising approach for training teachers in positive behavior management strategies and for improving student disruptive behavior in the classroom.

  13. Pilot Study: The Use of Electroencephalogram to Measure Attentiveness towards Short Training Videos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Alton Nussbaum

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Universities, schools, and training centers are seeking to improve their computer-based [3] and distance learning classes through the addition of short training videos, often referred to as podcasts [4]. As distance learning and computer based training become more popular, it is of great interest to measure if students are attentive to recorded lessons and short training videos. The proposed research presents a novel approach to this issue. Signal processing of electroencephalogram (EEG has proven useful in measuring attentiveness in a variety of applications such as vehicle operation and listening to sonar [5] [6] [7] [8] [9] [10] [11] [12] [13] [14] [15]. Additionally, studies have shown that EEG data can be correlated to the ability of participants to remember television commercials days after they have seen them [16]. Electrical engineering presents a possible solution with recent advances in the use of biometric signal analysis for the detection of affective (emotional response [17] [18] [19] [20] [21] [22] [23] [24] [25] [26] [27]. Despite the wealth of literature on the use of EEG to determine attentiveness in a variety of applications, the use of EEG for the detection of attentiveness towards short training videos has not been studied, nor is there a great deal of consistency with regard to specific methods that would imply a single method for this new application. Indeed, there is great variety in EEG signal processing and machine learning methods described in the literature cited above and in other literature [28] [29] [30] [31] [32] [33] [34]. This paper presents a novel method which uses EEG as an input to an automated system that measures a participant’s attentiveness while watching a short training video. This paper provides the results of a pilot study, including a structured comparison of signal processing and machine learning methods to find optimal solutions which can be extended to other applications.

  14. SoCIAL – training cognition in schizophrenia: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palumbo D

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Davide Palumbo,* Armida Mucci,* Giuseppe Piegari, Valentina D’Alise, Annapaola Mazza, Silvana Galderisi Department of Psychiatry, University of Campania Luigi Vanvitelli, Naples, Italy *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The purpose of this pilot study was to assess the efficacy of a new social cognition (SC remediation intervention, the Social Cognition Individualized Activities Lab (SoCIAL, for subjects with schizophrenia. The training includes a module for emotion recognition and one for theory of mind. A comparison with a validated cognitive remediation intervention, the Social Skills And Neurocognitive Individualized Training (SSANIT, was conducted to verify the efficacy of the SoCIAL in improving SC. Ten stabilized patients with schizophrenia accepted to participate. Five patients were randomized to SoCIAL and five to SSANIT. The SoCIAL intervention includes individual sessions of neurocognitive individualized training (NIT and group sessions of SC training. SSANIT includes individual sessions of NIT and group sessions of social skills individualized training. The interventions were matched for the overall treatment duration (20 weeks and for the frequency of the sessions (two times a week, one for SoCIAL or social skills individualized training and one for NIT, with a duration of 80 minutes for each session. Results showed a significant treatment effect (effect size: Cohen’s d 0.32 on the primary outcome; in fact, only the SoCIAL intervention improved theory of mind. Patients receiving the SoCIAL intervention also showed an improvement of avolition. These preliminary findings support further development of the SoCIAL and suggest that cognitive remediation should include an SC module. Keywords: cognitive remediation, psychiatric rehabilitation, negative symptoms, avolition, MATRICS consensus cognitive battery, MCCB

  15. Effect of pre-operative neuromuscular training on functional outcome after total knee replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huber, Erika O; de Bie, Rob A; Roos, Ewa M.

    2013-01-01

    Total Knee Replacement (TKR) is the standard treatment for patients with severe knee osteoarthritis (OA). Significant improvement in pain and function are seen after TKR and approximately 80% of patients are very satisfied with the outcome. Functional status prior to TKR is a major predictor of o...

  16. Model for Team Training Using the Advanced Trauma Operative Management Course: Pilot Study Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, R Serene; Lehner, Kathryn A; Armstrong, Randy; Gardiner, Stuart K; Karmy-Jones, Riyad C; Izenberg, Seth D; Long, William B; Wackym, P Ashley

    2015-01-01

    Education and training of surgeons has traditionally focused on the development of individual knowledge, technical skills, and decision making. Team training with the surgeon's operating room staff has not been prioritized in existing educational paradigms, particularly in trauma surgery. We aimed to determine whether a pilot curriculum for surgical technicians and nurses, based on the American College of Surgeons' Advanced Trauma Operative Management (ATOM) course, would improve staff knowledge if conducted in a team-training environment. Between December 2012 and December 2014, 22 surgical technicians and nurses participated in a curriculum complementary to the ATOM course, consisting of 8 individual 8-hour training sessions designed by and conducted at our institution. Didactic and practical sessions included educational content, hands-on instruction, and alternating role play during 5 system-specific injury scenarios in a simulated operating room environment. A pre- and postcourse examination was administered to participants to assess for improvements in team members' didactic knowledge. Course participants displayed a significant improvement in didactic knowledge after working in a team setting with trauma surgeons during the ATOM course, with a 9-point improvement on the postcourse examination (83%-92%, p = 0.0008). Most participants (90.5%) completing postcourse surveys reported being "highly satisfied" with course content and quality after working in our simulated team-training setting. Team training is critical to improving the knowledge base of surgical technicians and nurses in the trauma operative setting. Improved communication, efficiency, appropriate equipment use, and staff awareness are the desired outcomes when shifting the paradigm from individual to surgical team training so that improved patient outcomes, decreased risk, and cost savings can be achieved. Determine whether a pilot curriculum for surgical technicians and nurses, based on the

  17. Training text chunkers on a silver standard corpus: can silver replace gold?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ning; van Mulligen, Erik M; Kors, Jan A

    2012-01-30

    To train chunkers in recognizing noun phrases and verb phrases in biomedical text, an annotated corpus is required. The creation of gold standard corpora (GSCs), however, is expensive and time-consuming. GSCs therefore tend to be small and to focus on specific subdomains, which limits their usefulness. We investigated the use of a silver standard corpus (SSC) that is automatically generated by combining the outputs of multiple chunking systems. We explored two use scenarios: one in which chunkers are trained on an SSC in a new domain for which a GSC is not available, and one in which chunkers are trained on an available, although small GSC but supplemented with an SSC. We have tested the two scenarios using three chunkers, Lingpipe, OpenNLP, and Yamcha, and two different corpora, GENIA and PennBioIE. For the first scenario, we showed that the systems trained for noun-phrase recognition on the SSC in one domain performed 2.7-3.1 percentage points better in terms of F-score than the systems trained on the GSC in another domain, and only 0.2-0.8 percentage points less than when they were trained on a GSC in the same domain as the SSC. When the outputs of the chunkers were combined, the combined system showed little improvement when using the SSC. For the second scenario, the systems trained on a GSC supplemented with an SSC performed considerably better than systems that were trained on the GSC alone, especially when the GSC was small. For example, training the chunkers on a GSC consisting of only 10 abstracts but supplemented with an SSC yielded similar performance as training them on a GSC of 100-250 abstracts. The combined system even performed better than any of the individual chunkers trained on a GSC of 500 abstracts. We conclude that an SSC can be a viable alternative for or a supplement to a GSC when training chunkers in a biomedical domain. A combined system only shows improvement if the SSC is used to supplement a GSC. Whether the approach is applicable to

  18. Training text chunkers on a silver standard corpus: can silver replace gold?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Ning

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To train chunkers in recognizing noun phrases and verb phrases in biomedical text, an annotated corpus is required. The creation of gold standard corpora (GSCs, however, is expensive and time-consuming. GSCs therefore tend to be small and to focus on specific subdomains, which limits their usefulness. We investigated the use of a silver standard corpus (SSC that is automatically generated by combining the outputs of multiple chunking systems. We explored two use scenarios: one in which chunkers are trained on an SSC in a new domain for which a GSC is not available, and one in which chunkers are trained on an available, although small GSC but supplemented with an SSC. Results We have tested the two scenarios using three chunkers, Lingpipe, OpenNLP, and Yamcha, and two different corpora, GENIA and PennBioIE. For the first scenario, we showed that the systems trained for noun-phrase recognition on the SSC in one domain performed 2.7-3.1 percentage points better in terms of F-score than the systems trained on the GSC in another domain, and only 0.2-0.8 percentage points less than when they were trained on a GSC in the same domain as the SSC. When the outputs of the chunkers were combined, the combined system showed little improvement when using the SSC. For the second scenario, the systems trained on a GSC supplemented with an SSC performed considerably better than systems that were trained on the GSC alone, especially when the GSC was small. For example, training the chunkers on a GSC consisting of only 10 abstracts but supplemented with an SSC yielded similar performance as training them on a GSC of 100-250 abstracts. The combined system even performed better than any of the individual chunkers trained on a GSC of 500 abstracts. Conclusions We conclude that an SSC can be a viable alternative for or a supplement to a GSC when training chunkers in a biomedical domain. A combined system only shows improvement if the SSC is used to

  19. Catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation after an unsuccessful surgical ablation and biological prosthetic mitral valve replacement: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey E. Mamchur

    2014-08-01

    Conclusion: Catheter ablation is an effective method for AF treatment following an ineffective surgical RF ablation procedure and biological prosthetic MV replacement. The use of bioprosthetic MVs allows for performing safe catheter ablation without subsequent prosthetic dysfunction.

  20. Self-administered physical exercise training as treatment of neck and shoulder pain among military helicopter pilots and crew

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murray, Mike; Lange, Britt; Nørnberg, Bo Riebeling

    2017-01-01

    -one pilots and thirty-eight crew-members were randomized to either an exercise-training-group (n = 35) or a reference-group (n = 34). The exercise-training-group received 20-weeks of specific neck/shoulder training. The reference-group received no training. PRIMARY OUTCOME: Intensity of neck pain previous 3......-months (scale 0-10). SECONDARY OUTCOMES: additional neck/shoulder pain intensity variables and pressure-pain-threshold in the trapezius muscle (TRA) and upper-neck-extensor muscles (UNE). Regular training adherence was defined as ≥1 training session a week. Statistical analyses performed were intention......-to-treat and per-protocol. Students t-test was performed (p training...

  1. Exergames for unsupervised balance training at home: A pilot study in healthy older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Diest, M; Stegenga, J; Wörtche, H J; Verkerke, G J; Postema, K; Lamoth, C J C

    2016-02-01

    Exercise videogames (exergames) are gaining popularity as tools for improving balance ability in older adults, yet few exergames are suitable for home-based use. The purpose of the current pilot study was to examine the effects of a 6-week unsupervised home-based exergaming training program on balance performance. Ten community dwelling healthy older adults (age: 75.9 ± 7.2 years) played a newly developed ice skating exergame for six weeks at home. In the game, the speed and direction of a virtual ice skater on a frozen canal were controlled using lateral weight shifts, which were captured using Kinect. Sway characteristics during quiet standing in eyes open (EO), eyes closed (EC) and dual task (DT) conditions were assessed in time and frequency domain before, and after two, four and six weeks of training. Balance was also evaluated using the narrow ridge balance test (NRBT). Multilevel modeling was applied to examine changes in balance ability. Participants played 631 (± 124)min over the intervention period and no subjects dropped out. Balance in terms of sway characteristics improved on average by 17.4% (EO) and 23.3% (EC) after six weeks of training (ptraining programs.

  2. Music therapy as specific and complementary training for adults after cochlear implantation: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutter, E; Argstatter, H; Grapp, M; Plinkert, P K

    2015-09-01

    Although cochlear implant (CI) users achieve good speech comprehension, they experience difficulty perceiving music and prosody in speech. As the provision of music training in rehabilitation is limited, a novel concept of music therapy for rehabilitation of adult CI users was developed and evaluated in this pilot study. Twelve unilaterally implanted, postlingually deafened CI users attended ten sessions of individualized and standardized training. The training started about 6 weeks after the initial activation of the speech processor. Before and after therapy, psychological and musical tests were applied in order to evaluate the effects of music therapy. CI users completed the musical tests in two conditions: bilateral (CI + contralateral, unimplanted ear) and unilateral (CI only). After therapy, improvements were observed in the subjective sound quality (Hearing Implant Sound Quality Index) and the global score on the self-concept questionnaire (Multidimensional Self-Concept Scales) as well as in the musical subtests for melody recognition and for timbre identification in the unilateral condition. Discussion Preliminary results suggest improvements in subjective hearing and music perception, with an additional increase in global self-concept and enhanced daily listening capacities. The novel concept of individualized music therapy seems to provide an effective treatment option in the rehabilitation of adult CI users. Further investigations are necessary to evaluate effects in the area of prosody perception and to separate therapy effects from general learning effects in CI rehabilitation.

  3. A competency based selection procedure for Dutch postgraduate GP training: a pilot study on validity and reliability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, M.I.; Tromp, F.; Zuithoff, N.P.; Pieters, R.H.; Damoiseaux, R.A.; Kuyvenhoven, M.M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Historically, semi-structured interviews (SSI) have been the core of the Dutch selection for postgraduate general practice (GP) training. This paper describes a pilot study on a newly designed competency-based selection procedure that assesses whether candidates have the compete

  4. A competency based selection procedure for Dutch postgraduate GP training: a pilot study on validity and reliability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, M.I.; Tromp, F.; Zuithoff, N.P.; Pieters, R.H.; Damoiseaux, R.A.; Kuyvenhoven, M.M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Historically, semi-structured interviews (SSI) have been the core of the Dutch selection for postgraduate general practice (GP) training. This paper describes a pilot study on a newly designed competency-based selection procedure that assesses whether candidates have the

  5. Promoting Healthy Transition to College through Mindfulness Training with First-Year College Students: Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvoráková, Kamila; Kishida, Moé; Li, Jacinda; Elavsky, Steriani; Broderick, Patricia C.; Agrusti, Mark R.; Greenberg, Mark T.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Given the importance of developmental transitions on young adults' lives and the high rates of mental health issues among U.S. college students, first-year college students can be particularly vulnerable to stress and adversity. This pilot study evaluated the effectiveness and feasibility of mindfulness training aiming to promote…

  6. The Relationship between Self-Appraisal, Professional Training, and Diversity Awareness among Forensic Psychology Students: A Pilot Formative Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Donald S., Jr.; Chandler, Michele D.; Clark, Quelanda C.

    2009-01-01

    Currently, there is a growing need for formal training in forensic psychology. This pilot study examines the relational-behavior model (RBM) as a method of intrinsic motivational instruction, perceived academic competence, and program competency among a sample of forensic psychology students. In theory, the RBM suggests that self-appraisal,…

  7. STS-26 Pilot Covey during egress training at JSC's MAIL full fuselage trainer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Pilot Richard O. Covey, wearing a launch and entry suit (LES) and launch and entry helmet (LEH), slides to safety using the new crew escape system (CES) inflated slide during an emergency egress training exercise in JSC's Shuttle Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9A. Technicians stand on either side of the slide ready to help Covey to his feet once he reaches the bottom. The CES pole extends out the open side hatch of the Full Fuselage Trainer (FFT). During Crew Station Review (CSR) #3, the crew donned the new (navy blue) partial pressure suits (LESs) and checked out CES slide and other CES configurations to evaluate crew equipment and procedures related to emergency egress methods and proposed crew escape options.

  8. Training text chunkers on a silver standard corpus: Can silver replace gold?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Kang (Ning); E.M. van Mulligen (Erik); J.A. Kors (Jan)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: To train chunkers in recognizing noun phrases and verb phrases in biomedical text, an annotated corpus is required. The creation of gold standard corpora (GSCs), however, is expensive and time-consuming. GSCs therefore tend to be small and to focus on specific subdomains,

  9. Transcranial direct current stimulation modulates neuronal activity and learning in pilot training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaehoon eChoe

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Skill acquisition requires distributed learning both within (online and across (offline days to consolidate experiences into newly learned abilities. In particular, piloting an aircraft requires skills developed from extensive training and practice. Here, we tested the hypothesis that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS can modulate neuronal function to improve skill learning and performance during flight simulator training of aircraft landing procedures. Thirty-two right-handed participants consented to participate in four consecutive daily sessions of flight simulation training and received sham or anodal high-definition-tDCS to the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC or left motor cortex (M1 in a randomized, double-blind experiment. Continuous electroencephalography (EEG and functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS were collected during flight simulation, n-back working memory, and resting-state assessments. tDCS of the right DLPFC increased midline-frontal theta-band activity in flight and n-back working memory training, confirming tDCS-related modulation of brain processes involved in executive function. This modulation corresponded to a significantly different online and offline learning rates for working memory accuracy and decreased inter-subject behavioral variability in flight and n-back tasks in the DLPFC stimulation group. Additionally, tDCS of left M1 increased parietal alpha power during flight tasks and tDCS to the right DLPFC increased midline frontal theta-band power during n-back and flight tasks. These results demonstrate a modulation of group variance in skill acquisition through an increasing in learned skill consistency in cognitive and real-world tasks with tDCS. Further, tDCS performance improvements corresponded to changes in electrophysiological and blood-oxygenation activity of the DLPFC and motor cortices, providing a stronger link between modulated neuronal function and behavior.

  10. Effects of multiple training modalities in patients with Alzheimer’s disease: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Shu-Yu; Hsu, Chia-Ling; Huang, Shu-Wan; Ma, Tzu-Chiao; Hsieh, Wen-Chien; Yang, Yuan-Han

    2016-01-01

    Objective This pilot study investigated the effects of multiple training modalities on cognition, neuropsychiatric symptoms, caregivers’ burden, and quality of life in patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Patients and methods This intervention study was conducted in 24 patients with AD aged ≥65 years with a Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) score of 0.5–1. The patients were assigned to receive multiple training modalities (1 hour for each training: Tai Chi, calligraphy, and drawing) over a 6-week period in either the experimental group (n=14) or the comparison group (n=10). A series of neuropsychological tests – namely the Traditional Chinese version Mini-Mental Status Examination, Cognitive Assessment Screening Instrument (CASI), Neuropsychiatric Inventory and the Neuropsychiatric Inventory Caregiver Distress Scale, and the Clinical Dementia Rating Sum of Boxes scale – were conducted at the baseline and after the intervention. The World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF (WHOQOL-BREF) and Zarit Caregiver Burden Scale were used to assess the quality of life and caregivers’ burden, respectively. Independent sample t-test and paired sample t-test were used to analyze the data. Results After the intervention, the experimental group reported higher scores in the orientation domain of CASI (P=0.007) and in the psychiatry domain of WHOQOL-BREF (P=0.042) compared with the comparison group. Caregivers’ distress was significantly decreased in the experimental group (P=0.035) but not in the comparison group (P=0.430). Conclusion The multiple training modalities improved scores in the orientation domain of CASI and psychiatry domain of WHOQOL-BREF in patients with AD. Moreover, the intervention reduced caregivers’ distress. PMID:27843319

  11. Effects of multiple training modalities in patients with Alzheimer's disease: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Shu-Yu; Hsu, Chia-Ling; Huang, Shu-Wan; Ma, Tzu-Chiao; Hsieh, Wen-Chien; Yang, Yuan-Han

    2016-01-01

    This pilot study investigated the effects of multiple training modalities on cognition, neuropsychiatric symptoms, caregivers' burden, and quality of life in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). This intervention study was conducted in 24 patients with AD aged ≥65 years with a Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) score of 0.5-1. The patients were assigned to receive multiple training modalities (1 hour for each training: Tai Chi, calligraphy, and drawing) over a 6-week period in either the experimental group (n=14) or the comparison group (n=10). A series of neuropsychological tests - namely the Traditional Chinese version Mini-Mental Status Examination, Cognitive Assessment Screening Instrument (CASI), Neuropsychiatric Inventory and the Neuropsychiatric Inventory Caregiver Distress Scale, and the Clinical Dementia Rating Sum of Boxes scale - were conducted at the baseline and after the intervention. The World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF (WHOQOL-BREF) and Zarit Caregiver Burden Scale were used to assess the quality of life and caregivers' burden, respectively. Independent sample t-test and paired sample t-test were used to analyze the data. After the intervention, the experimental group reported higher scores in the orientation domain of CASI (P=0.007) and in the psychiatry domain of WHOQOL-BREF (P=0.042) compared with the comparison group. Caregivers' distress was significantly decreased in the experimental group (P=0.035) but not in the comparison group (P=0.430). The multiple training modalities improved scores in the orientation domain of CASI and psychiatry domain of WHOQOL-BREF in patients with AD. Moreover, the intervention reduced caregivers' distress.

  12. Pharmacokinetics of cefotaxime in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury treated with continuous renal replacement therapy : a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koedijk, Joost B; Valk-Swinkels, Corinne G H; Rijpstra, Tom A; Touw, Daan J; Mulder, Paul G H; van der Voort, Peter H J; Van't Veer, Nils E; van der Meer, Nardo J M

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The objective of this study is to describe the pharmacokinetics of cefotaxime (CTX) in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) when treated with continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). MATERIALS AND METHODS: This single-center prospe

  13. Protective effect of creatine supplementation and estrogen replacement on cardiac reserve function and antioxidant reservation against oxidative stress in exercise-trained ovariectomized hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakpongsiri, Kedsara; Sawangkoon, Suwanakiet

    2008-05-01

    The combined effect of creatine (Cr) or estrogen (E(2)) with exercise training on cardiac reserve function and antioxidant reservation against oxidative stress were investigated in ovariectomized female Golden Syrian hamsters. One hundred animals were divided into nonexercise and exercise-trained groups, in which each group was separated into the control and 4 treatments of Cr depletion (Cr-), Cr supplementation (Cr+), E(2) replacement (E(2)), and Cr supplementation combined with E(2) replacement (Cr+E (2)). In the exercise-trained group, wheel-running exercise (10 minutes a day, 5 days a week) was imposed for 9 weeks. After the animals were sacrificed, several indicators of cardiac function, specifically the corrected QT interval, left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP), and maximum rate of rise (dP/dt(max)) against a hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) stress test were measured in isolated hearts using the Langendorff apparatus. Markers of oxidative stress, in other words, reduced glutathione (GSH), oxidized glutathione (GSSG), and an antioxidant enzyme, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were determined. Exercise-trained animals could restore cardiac reserve function and antioxidant levels against oxidative damage (Pexercise training showed highly protected cardiac reserve function against oxidative stress compared to Cr+, E(2) , and Cr+E(2) without exercise (Pexercise training (Pestrogen replacement and creatine supplementation plus estrogen replacement when combined with exercise training show significant protective effects for cardiac reserve function and antioxidant reservation against oxidative stress in estrogen-deficient hamsters.

  14. Basic ultrasound training can replace chest radiography for safe tube thoracostomy removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavingia, Kedar S; Soult, Michael C; Collins, Jay N; Novosel, Timothy J; Weireter, Leonard J; Britt, L D

    2014-08-01

    An ultrasound (US) examination can be easily and rapidly performed at the bedside to aide in clinical decisions. Previously we demonstrated that US was safe and as effective as a chest x-ray (CXR) for removal of tube thoracostomy (TT) when performed by experienced sonographers. This study sought to examine if US was as safe and accurate for the evaluation of pneumothorax (PTX) associated with TT removal after basic US training. Patients included had TT managed by the surgical team between October 2012 and May 2013. Bedside US was performed by a variety of members of the trauma team before and after removal. All residents received, at minimum, a 1-hour formal training class in the use of ultrasound. Data were collected from the electronic medical records. We evaluated 61 TTs in 61 patients during the study period. Exclusion of 12 tubes occurred secondary to having incomplete imaging, charting, or death before having TT removed. Of the 49 remaining TT, all were managed with US imaging. Average age of the patients was 40 years and 30 (61%) were male. TT was placed for PTX in 37 (76%), hemothorax in seven (14%), hemopneumothorax in four (8%), or a pleural effusion in one (2%). Two post pull PTXs were correctly identified by residents using US. This was confirmed on CXR with appropriate changes made. US was able to successfully predict the safe TT removal and patient discharge at all residency levels after receiving a basic US training program.

  15. Improving therapist psychological flexibility while training acceptance and commitment therapy: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luoma, Jason B; Vilardaga, Jennifer Plumb

    2013-01-01

    Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) training often includes experiential elements aimed at improving therapist psychological flexibility, yet the effects of ACT training on therapist psychological flexibility have yet to be evaluated. This pilot study examines the effects of experiential phone consultation as an adjunct to a standard continuing education workshop on psychological flexibility and burnout among therapists learning ACT. In this study, counselors taking a 2-day ACT workshop were randomly assigned to either six 30-min phone consultation sessions (n = 10) or no additional contact (n = 10). The results show that those in the consultation condition reported higher psychological flexibility at the 3-month follow-up compared to the workshop-only condition. Improvements in ACT knowledge, overall burnout, and personal accomplishment were found in both groups, independent of whether they received phone consultation, and this increase was maintained over time. In conclusion, ACT phone consultation contributed to counselor psychological flexibility above the workshop alone and appears to be feasible as a means to improve counselor psychological flexibility.

  16. Cissus quadrangularis reduces joint pain in exercise-trained men: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomer, Richard J; Farney, Tyler M; McCarthy, Cameron G; Lee, Sang-Rok

    2013-09-01

    Strenuous, high-volume exercise is often associated with inflammation and joint pain. Cissus quadrangularis (CQ) has been reported to have anti-inflammatory activity. The purpose of our study was to determine the therapeutic effects of CQ supplementation in healthy, exercise-trained men with joint-specific pain. Twenty-nine men between the ages of 20 and 46 years, who reportedly experienced chronic joint pain as a result of strenuous exercise, participated in our pilot study. All men received CQ 3200 mg daily for 8 weeks. Before and after the 8-week intervention period, subjects completed a questionnaire to determine their degree of joint pain (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Index of Osteoarthritis [WOMAC]). Clinical measures (eg, heart rate, blood pressure, blood biomarkers) were also collected for each subject pre- (baseline) and post-intervention. Subject ratings for multiple variables within the WOMAC Index improved (decreased) significantly (P exercise-trained men. Additional study is needed to extend these findings, including comparison with a placebo-controlled cohort, and possibly, examining effects of CQ use in women and older adult subjects.

  17. Short cognitive behavioral therapy and cognitive training for adults with ADHD - a randomized controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virta, Maarit; Salakari, Anita; Antila, Mervi; Chydenius, Esa; Partinen, Markku; Kaski, Markus; Vataja, Risto; Kalska, Hely; Iivanainen, Matti

    2010-09-07

    In clinical practice, a growing need exists for effective non-pharmacological treatments of adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Here, we present the results of a pilot study of 10 adults with ADHD participating in short-term individual cognitive- behavioral therapy (CBT), 9 adults participating in cognitive training (CT), and 10 controls. Self-report questionnaires, independent evaluations, and computerized neurocognitive testing were collected before and after the treatments to evaluate change. There were distinctive pre-hypotheses regarding the treatments, and therefore the statistical comparisons were conducted in pairs: CBT vs control, CT vs control, and CBT vs CT. In a combined ADHD symptom score based on self-reports, 6 participants in CBT, 2 in CT and 2 controls improved. Using independent evaluations, improvement was found in 7 of the CBT participants, 2 of CT participants and 3 controls. There was no treatment-related improvement in cognitive performance. Thus, in the CBT group, some encouraging improvement was seen, although not as clearly as in previous research with longer interventions. In the CT group, there was improvement in the trained tasks but no generalization of the improvement to the tasks of the neurocognitive testing, the self- report questionnaires, or the independent evaluations. These preliminary results warrant further studies with more participants and with more elaborate cognitive testing.

  18. Association between eye dominance and training for rifle marksmanship: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, L F; Classe, J G; Hester, M; Harris, K

    1996-02-01

    This pilot study was performed to determine the effect, if any, exerted by crossed dominance (contralateral hand and eye dominance) on the ability of novice riflemen to learn how to accurately shoot a rifle. Sighting dominance was used to determine the dominant eye. Hand dominance was determined by the arm used to shoulder the rifle in the shooting position. Subjects were 308 military recruits at the Fort Benning Army Base in Columbus, Georgia, who had undergone basic training in rifle marksmanship. Qualification scores obtained at the base rifle range were used to measure the subjects' ability to learn marksmanship skills. The subjects with right-hand/right-eye and left-hand/left-eye (uncrossed) dominance had qualification scores that were significantly higher (p = .009) than the subjects with right hand/left-eye and left-hand/right-eye (crossed) dominance. A significantly higher percentage of subjects with uncrossed dominance achieved rifle qualification (86.1 percent) than subjects with crossed dominance (56.5 percent) (p = .000). The learning of rifle marksmanship is influenced by eye dominance. Individuals who shoot right handed and are left-eye dominant or who shoot left handed and are right-eye dominant do not learn marksmanship skills as readily as individuals who have matched eye and hand dominance. Since crossed hand and eye dominance can be easily determined, it should be possible to identify cross dominant individuals and provide them with special training so that they can perform at a higher level of skill.

  19. High Spinal Anesthesia Enhances Anti-Inflammatory Responses in Patients Undergoing Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery and Aortic Valve Replacement: Randomized Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Trevor W R; Kowalski, Stephen; Falk, Kelsey; Maguire, Doug; Freed, Darren H; HayGlass, Kent T

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac surgery induces many physiologic changes including major inflammatory and sympathetic nervous system responses. Here, we conducted a single-centre pilot study to generate hypotheses on the potential immune impact of adding high spinal anaesthesia to general anaesthesia during cardiac surgery in adults. We hypothesized that this strategy, previously shown to blunt the sympathetic response and improve pain management, could reduce the undesirable systemic inflammatory responses caused by cardiac surgery. This prospective randomized unblinded pilot study was conducted on 14 patients undergoing cardiac surgery for coronary artery bypass grafting and/or aortic valve replacement secondary to severe aortic stenosis. The primary outcome measures examined longitudinally were serum pro-inflammatory (IL-6, IL-1b, CCL2), anti-inflammatory (IL-10, TNF-RII, IL-1Ra), acute phase protein (CRP, PTX3) and cardiovascular risk (sST2) biomarkers. The kinetics of pro- and anti-inflammatory biomarker was determined following surgery. All pro-inflammatory and acute phase reactant biomarker responses induced by surgical stress were indistinguishable in intensity and duration between control groups and those who also received high spinal anaesthesia. Conversely, IL-10 levels were markedly elevated in both intensity and duration in the group receiving high spinal anesthesia (p = 0.005). This hypothesis generating pilot study suggests that high spinal anesthesia can alter the net inflammatory response that results from cardiac surgery. In appropriately selected populations, this may add incremental benefit by dampening the net systemic inflammatory response during the week following surgery. Larger population studies, powered to assess immune, physiologic and clinical outcomes in both acute and longer term settings, will be required to better assess potential benefits of incorporating high spinal anesthesia. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00348920.

  20. The Effect of Modified "Aggression Replacement Training" Program on Self-efficacy of Adolescents with Insulin-dependent Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Reza Mazlom

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Self-efficacy is a crucial factor in controlling adolescents with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM. Subsequently the negative behavioral reactions such as aggression adversely affect on self-efficacy. Therefore, interventions are essential to reduce the aggression and to improve the self- efficacy in these patients. Aim: To determine the efficacy of the modified "aggression replacement training" program on self-efficacy of adolescents with insulin-dependent diabetes. Methods: In this clinical trial, 70 adult subjects with IDDM who were referred to Parsian Diabetes clinic of Mashhad in 2014 were divided into two groups of intervention and control. The intervention program, including three aspects including: anger control training, social skills training and moral reasoning training was performed in five sessions, each 1.5-2 hours. A five-day interval was between the sessions and each group consisted of 8-10 individuals. The self-management standard questionnaire of “insulin-dependent diabetes management self-efficacy scale (IDMSE” was filled before the intervention and two months afterwards. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 11.5 with paired and Independent t-tests. Results: In this study, 38.5 and 61.5 percent of the subjects were boys and girls, respectively with total mean age of 15.9±2. The self-efficacy of the subjects before the intervention was not significantly different within the groups (p=0/57. Nevertheless in post-intervention assessment, the self-efficacy of the Intervention group significantly increased (49.0±11.1 compared to the control group (33.7±5.5 (p

  1. 14 CFR 91.1093 - Initial and transition training and checking: Check pilots (aircraft), check pilots (simulator).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... OPERATING RULES GENERAL OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES Fractional Ownership Operations Program Management § 91... preceding 24 months, that person satisfactorily conducts a proficiency or competency check under the..., and emergency procedures to ensure competence to conduct the pilot flight checks required by...

  2. The effect of action observation training on knee joint function and gait ability in total knee replacement patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seong Doo; Song, Hyun Seung; Kim, Jin Young

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate that effect of action observation training (AOT) on knee joint function and balance in total knee replacement (TKR) patients. The subjects consisted of eighteen post-TKR patients. All participants underwent conventional physical therapy. In addition, patients in the AOT group (n= 9) were asked to observe video clips showing daily actions and to imitate them afterward. Patients in the control group (n= 9) were asked to execute the same actions as patients in the AOT group. Outcome measures Western Ontario and Mc-Master Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) included pain, stiffness, function and Timed Up and Go (TUG) test. After intervention, patients in the AOT group score better than patients in the control group. After TUG test, patients in the AOT group and control group were no significant difference between two groups. In addition to conventional physical therapy, AOT is effective in the rehabilitation of post-TKR patients. Action observation training is considered conducive to improving knee functions and ameliorating pain and stiffness, of patients who underwent TKR.

  3. Effect of early progressive resistance training compared with home-based exercise after total hip replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Lone Ramer; Mechlenburg, Inger; Søballe, Kjeld

    /week). The IG trained with loads of 10 repetition maximum from week 1 to 10 after THR. Before surgery and after the intervention, performance was evaluated by leg extension power (primary outcome), isometric strength (hip abduction + flexion), sit-to-stand test (STS), stair test and 20 meter walking speed....... Results 62 patients completed the trial (31 in each group). Leg extension power improved significantly in both groups with no between-group difference: IG (baseline-follow up): 0.28 [0.1;0.3] Watt/kg, CG: 0.26 [0.0;0.5] Watt/kg, p=0.91. 20-m walk performance improved more in IG (2.98 [1.8;4.2] sec) than...... in CG (1.58 [0.8;2.4] sec) (p=0.05). No significant differences were found in stair test; yet, borderline significance (p=0.06-0.09) favoured IG in STS and isometric strength. Conclusion 7 days/week of home-based exercise was just as effective as 5 days/week of home-based exercise plus 2 days...

  4. Preliminary efficacy and feasibility of embedding high intensity interval training into the school day: A pilot randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Costigan, S.A.; Eather, N.; Plotnikoff, R.C.; Taaffe, D R; E. Pollock; S.G. Kennedy; Lubans, D. R.

    2015-01-01

    Current physical activity and fitness levels among adolescents are low, increasing the risk of chronic disease. Although the efficacy of high intensity interval training (HIIT) for improving metabolic health is now well established, it is not known if this type of activity can be effective to improve adolescent health. The primary aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness and feasibility of embedding HIIT into the school day. A 3-arm pilot randomized controlled trial was conducted in o...

  5. Personality Test Scores that Distinguish U.S. Air Force Remotely Piloted Aircraft Drone Pilot Training Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-18

    stress and adaptability) and positive social interpersonal style (i.e., group warmth ) [17-22]. A more lengthy study that included the input of over...manned aircraft pilots who were either medically disqualified from flying manned aircraft and reassigned to fly RPAs due to physical or psychological...excitement, and general expressions of warmth , gregariousness, assertiveness, and optimism 3. Openness – flexibility with thinking and behaving

  6. Feasibility and acceptance of biofeedback-assisted mental training in an Austrian elementary school: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crevenna, Richard; Krammer, Christine; Keilani, Mohammad

    2016-04-01

    This pilot study aimed to investigate feasibility, acceptance, and effects of biofeedback-assisted mental training in a population of fifteen 10-year-old pupils in an Austrian elementary school. Participants were instructed in relaxation techniques by using biofeedback. Before intervention, after 6 weeks with active mental training and with regular instructions by the teacher, and after a further time period of 6 weeks without instructions, attention and concentration improved. The results indicate feasibility, good acceptance, and beneficial effects of biofeedback-assisted mental techniques in Austrian elementary school pupils.

  7. Competency-based evaluation tools for integrative medicine training in family medicine residency: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneider Craig

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As more integrative medicine educational content is integrated into conventional family medicine teaching, the need for effective evaluation strategies grows. Through the Integrative Family Medicine program, a six site pilot program of a four year residency training model combining integrative medicine and family medicine training, we have developed and tested a set of competency-based evaluation tools to assess residents' skills in integrative medicine history-taking and treatment planning. This paper presents the results from the implementation of direct observation and treatment plan evaluation tools, as well as the results of two Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs developed for the program. Methods The direct observation (DO and treatment plan (TP evaluation tools developed for the IFM program were implemented by faculty at each of the six sites during the PGY-4 year (n = 11 on DO and n = 8 on TP. The OSCE I was implemented first in 2005 (n = 6, revised and then implemented with a second class of IFM participants in 2006 (n = 7. OSCE II was implemented in fall 2005 with only one class of IFM participants (n = 6. Data from the initial implementation of these tools are described using descriptive statistics. Results Results from the implementation of these tools at the IFM sites suggest that we need more emphasis in our curriculum on incorporating spirituality into history-taking and treatment planning, and more training for IFM residents on effective assessment of readiness for change and strategies for delivering integrative medicine treatment recommendations. Focusing our OSCE assessment more narrowly on integrative medicine history-taking skills was much more effective in delineating strengths and weaknesses in our residents' performance than using the OSCE for both integrative and more basic communication competencies. Conclusion As these tools are refined further they will be of value both in improving

  8. Robot-assisted gait training in multiple sclerosis: a pilot randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, S; Aschbacher, B; Manoglou, D; Gamper, E; Kool, J; Kesselring, J

    2008-03-01

    To evaluate feasibility and perform an explanatory analysis of the efficacy of robot-assisted gait training (RAGT) in MS patients with severe walking disabilities (Expanded Disability Status Scale [EDSS] 6.0-7.5) in a pilot trial. Prospective, randomized, controlled clinical trial comparing RAGT with conventional walking training (CWT) in a group of stable MS patients (n = 35) during an inpatient rehabilitation stay, 15 sessions over three weeks. All patients participated additionally in a multimodal rehabilitation program. The primary outcome measure was walking velocity and secondary measures were 6-min-walking distance, stride length and knee-extensor strength. All tests were performed by an external blinded assessor at baseline after three weeks and at follow-up after six months. Additionally, Extended Barthel Index (EBI) at entry and discharge was assessed (not blinded), and acceptance/convenience of RAGT rated by patients (Visual Analogue Scale [VAS]) was recorded. Nineteen patients were randomly allocated to RAGT and 16 patients to CWT. Groups were comparable at baseline. There were 5 drop-outs (2 related directly to treatment) in the RAGT group and 1 in the CWT group, leaving 14 RAGT patients and 15 CWT patients for final analysis. Acceptance and convenience of RAGT as rated by patients were high. Effect sizes were moderate to large, although not significant, for walking velocity (0.700, 95% CI -0.089 to 1.489), walking distance (0.401, 95% CI - 0.370 to 1.172) and knee-extensor strength (right: 1.105, 95% CI 0.278 to 1.932, left 0.650, 95% CI -0.135 to 1.436) favouring RAGT. Prepost within-group analysis revealed an increase of walking velocity, walking distance and knee-extensor strength in the RAGT group, whereas in CWT group only walking velocity was improved. In both groups outcome values returned to baseline at follow-up after six months (n = 23). Robot-assisted gait training is feasible and may be an effective therapeutic option in MS patients with

  9. Self-compassion training for binge eating disorder: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Allison C; Carter, Jacqueline C

    2015-09-01

    The present pilot study sought to compare a compassion-focused therapy (CFT)-based self-help intervention for binge eating disorder (BED) to a behaviourally based intervention. Forty-one individuals with BED were randomly assigned to 3 weeks of food planning plus self-compassion exercises; food planning plus behavioural strategies; or a wait-list control condition. Participants completed weekly measures of binge eating and self-compassion; pre- and post-intervention measures of eating disorder pathology and depressive symptoms; and a baseline measure assessing fear of self-compassion. Results showed that: (1) perceived credibility, expectancy, and compliance did not differ between the two interventions; (2) both interventions reduced weekly binge days more than the control condition; (3) the self-compassion intervention reduced global eating disorder pathology, eating concerns, and weight concerns more than the other conditions; (4) the self-compassion intervention increased self-compassion more than the other conditions; and (5) participants low in fear of self-compassion derived significantly more benefits from the self-compassion intervention than those high in fear of self-compassion. Findings offer preliminary support for the usefulness of CFT-based interventions for BED sufferers. Results also suggest that for individuals to benefit from self-compassion training, assessing and lowering fear of self-compassion will be crucial. Individuals with BED perceive self-compassion training self-help interventions, derived from CFT, to be as credible and as likely to help as behaviourally based interventions. The cultivation of self-compassion may be an effective approach for reducing binge eating, and eating, and weight concerns in individuals with BED. Teaching individuals with BED CFT-based self-help exercises may increase their self-compassion levels over a short period of time. It may be important for clinicians to assess and target clients' fear of self

  10. Multidimensional Aptitude Battery-Second Edition Intelligence Testing of Remotely Piloted Aircraft Training Candidates Compared with Manned Airframe Training Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    schizophrenia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder , and autism spectrum disorders ) and not on very high functioning populations such as aviators...pilots and to the development of a U.S. Air Force (USAF) RPA pilot career field. Effective recruitment into this new career field is critical to...high levels of intelligence, dexterity, visual-spatial abilities, memory, attention /concentration, psychomotor reaction time, as well as speed and

  11. Effect of aerobic training and resistance training on circulating irisin level and their association with change of body composition in overweight/obese adults: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H-J; Lee, H-J; So, B; Son, J S; Yoon, D; Song, W

    2016-06-20

    The novel myokine irisin has been reported as a therapeutic target for metabolic disease. The objective of this study is to reveal the effects of aerobic training (AT) and resistance training (RT) on circulating irisin levels and their associations with change of body composition in overweight/obese adults. Twenty eight overweight/obese adults (BMI>23 kg/m(2)) were included in this study and compared before and after 8 weeks of exercise program (60 min/day, 5 times in a week). The subjects, in both aerobic and resistance training, showed significant improvement in anthropometric parameters and exercise capacities including maximal oxygen uptake and muscle strength. Interestingly, the circulating irisin was significantly increased in resistance training group (p=0.002) but not in aerobic training (p=0.426) compared to control group. In addition, we found the positive correlation between change of the circulating irisin and muscle mass (r=0.432, p=0.022) and the negative correlation between change of the circulating irisin and fat mass (r=-0.407, p=0.031). In the present pilot study, we found that circulating irisin level was increased by 8 weeks of resistance training in overweight/obese adults, suggesting that resistance training could be the efficient exercise type in overweight/obese considering positive change of body composition concomitant with increase of irisin levels.

  12. Effect of Above Real Time Training and Post Flight Feedback in Training of Novice Pilots in a PC-Based Flight Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M. Javed; Rossi, Marcia; Heath, Bruce E.; Ali, Syed firasat; Crane, Peter; Knighten, Tremaine; Culpepper, Christi

    2003-01-01

    The use of Post-Flight Feedback (PFFB) and Above Real-Time Training (ARTT) while training novice pilots to perform a coordinated level turn on a PC-based flight simulator was investigated. One group trained at 1.5 ARTT followed by an equal number of flights at 2.0 ARTT; the second group experienced Real Time Training (RTT). The total number of flights for both groups was equal. Each group was further subdivided into two groups one of which was provided PFFB while the other was not. Then, all participants experienced two challenging evaluation missions in real time. Performance was assessed by comparing root-mean-square error in bank-angle and altitude. Participants in the 1.512.0 ARTT No-PFFB sequence did not show improvement in performance across training sessions. An ANOVA on performance in evaluation flights found that the PFFB groups performed significantly better than those with No-PFFB. Also, the RTT groups performed significantly better than the ARTT groups. Data from two additional groups trained under a 2.011.5 ARTT PFFB and No-PFFB regimes were collected and combined with data from the previously Trainers, Real-time simulation, Personal studied groups and reanalyzed to study the computers, Man-in-the-loop simulation influence of sequence. An ANOVA on test trials found no significant effects between groups. Under training situations involving ARTT we recommend that appropriate PFFB be provided.

  13. Comparison of Balance, Proprioception and Skeletal Muscle Mass in Total Hip Replacement Patients With and Without Fracture: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether there was a difference in balance, proprioception, and skeletal muscle mass among patients who undergo hip fracture surgery relative to and elective total hip replacement (THR). Methods Thirty-one THR patients were enrolled. The patients were categorized into two groups: fracture group (n=15) and non-fracture group (n=16). Berg Balance Scale (BBS) was used to balance the proprioception of the hip joint while a joint position sense (JPS) test was used to evaluate it. Skeletal muscle mass was measured by bioelectrical impedance analysis and expressed as a skeletal muscle mass index (SMI). Quality of life (QOL) was also assessed using a 36-item short form health survey (SF-36). All tests were assessed at 3 months after the surgery. An independent t-test was used to compare the fracture group and non-fracture group. Spearman correlation was used to identify the correlation of each variable. Results In an independent t-test, the BBS score of patients undergoing elective surgery was higher than the BBS score of patients undergoing hip fracture surgery. There was a significant correlation between the BBS and JPS score after a THR. SMI also correlated with the score of BBS. Conclusion It seems that THR patients undergoing surgery for a hip fracture might have more trouble balancing than elective THR patients. Therefore THR patients undergoing hip fracture surgery might need more care during rehabilitation. PMID:28119837

  14. The Relationship of a Pilot's Educational Background, Aeronautical Experience and Recency of Experience to Performance In Initial Training at a Regional Airline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shane, Nancy R.

    The purpose of this study was to determine how a pilot's educational background, aeronautical experience and recency of experience relate to their performance during initial training at a regional airline. Results show that variables in pilots' educational background, aeronautical experience and recency of experience do predict performance in training. The most significant predictors include years since graduation from college, multi-engine time, total time and whether or not a pilot had military flying experience. Due to the pilot shortage, the pilots entering regional airline training classes since August 2013 have varied backgrounds, aeronautical experience and recency of experience. As explained by Edward Thorndike's law of exercise and the law of recency, pilots who are actively using their aeronautical knowledge and exercising their flying skills should exhibit strong performance in those areas and pilots who have not been actively using their aeronautical knowledge and exercising their flying skills should exhibit degraded performance in those areas. Through correlation, chi-square and multiple regression analysis, this study tests this theory as it relates to performance in initial training at a regional airline.

  15. Effects of multiple training modalities in patients with Alzheimer’s disease: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai SY

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Shu-Yu Tai,1–4 Chia-Ling Hsu,5 Shu-Wan Huang,5 Tzu-Chiao Ma,6,7 Wen-Chien Hsieh,8,9 Yuan-Han Yang5,7,10,11 1Department of Family Medicine, Kaohsiung Municipal Ta-Tung Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, 2Department of Family Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, 3Department of Family Medicine, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, 4Research Center for Environmental Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, 5Department of Neurology, Kaohsiung Municipal Ta-Tung Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, 6Graduate Institute of Oral Health Sciences, Kaohsiung Medical University, 7Mentality Protection Center, Fo Guang Shan Compassion Foundation, 8Department of Social Work, Kaohsiung Municipal Ta-Tung Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, 9Department of Sociology and Social Work, Kaohsiung Medical University, 10Department of Neurology, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, 11Department of and Master’s Program in Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung City, Taiwan Objective: This pilot study investigated the effects of multiple training modalities on cognition, neuropsychiatric symptoms, caregivers’ burden, and quality of life in patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD.Patients and methods: This intervention study was conducted in 24 patients with AD aged ≥65 years with a Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR score of 0.5–1. The patients were assigned to receive multiple training modalities (1 hour for each training: Tai Chi, calligraphy, and drawing over a 6-week period in either the experimental group (n=14 or the comparison group (n=10. A series of neuropsychological tests – namely the Traditional Chinese version Mini-Mental Status Examination, Cognitive Assessment Screening Instrument (CASI, Neuropsychiatric Inventory and the Neuropsychiatric Inventory Caregiver Distress Scale, and the Clinical Dementia

  16. Fixed-altitude stair-climbing test replacing the conventional symptom-limited test. A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoa, Nuria M; Rodríguez, María; Gómez, M Teresa; Jiménez, Marcelo F; Varela, Gonzalo

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether a patient's maximum capacity is comparable in 2 different stair-climbing tests, allowing the simplest to be used in clinical practice. Prospective, observational study of repeated measures on 33 consecutive patients scheduled for lung resection. Stair-climbing tests were: the standard test (climb to 27 m) and the alternative fixed-altitude test (climb to 12 m). In both cases, heart rate and oxygen saturation were monitored before and after the test. The power output of stair-climbing for each test (Watt1 for the standard and Watt2 for the fixed-altitude test) was calculated using the following equation: Power (watt)=weight (kg)*9.8*height (m)/time (sec). Concordance between tests was evaluated using a regression model and the residuals were plotted against Watt1. Finally, power output values were analyzed using a Bland-Altman plot. Twenty-one male and 12 female patients (mean age 63.2±11.2) completed both tests. Only 12 patients finished the standard test, while all finished the fixed-altitude test. Mean power output values were Watt1: 184.1±65 and Watt2: 214.5±75.1. The coefficient of determination (R(2)) in the linear regression was 0.67. No fixed bias was detected after plotting the residuals. The Bland-Altman plot showed that 32 out of 33 values were within 2 standard deviations of the differences between methods. The results of this study show a reasonable level of concordance between both stair-climbing tests. The standard test can be replaced by the fixed-altitude test up to 12 m. Copyright © 2014 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. [Postgraduate training for specialists in psychiatry and psychotherapy. Problem-based learning - evaluation of a pilot project].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rufer, M; Schnyder, U; Schirlo, C; Wengle, H; Gerke, W

    2011-05-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) emphasizes the student's individual needs, their ability to solve complex clinical problems, and a professional attitude that facilitates communication among colleagues. Thus, PBL appears to provide a perfectly suitable didactic format for postgraduate training of medical specialties. To date, it is only rarely used in this area though. In a pilot project, we implemented PBL into the curriculum of postgraduate training in psychiatry and psychotherapy, and evaluated the program over a period of 12 months, using structured questionnaires. A total of 41 PBL courses were held, with 447 residents participating. Participants as well as tutors assessed 19 of 21 aspects as good or very good (5-point Likert scale, mean value >4). Overall, PBL was rated as highly suitable for advanced training (participants: 4.5±0.8; tutors: 5.0±0.2). The results of this pilot project suggest that PBL might be a useful element of multifaceted advanced training programs, strengthening their practical component and the applicability of knowledge in the daily clinical routine.

  18. Changes in Mobility and Muscle Function of Children with Cerebral Palsy after Gait Training: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegarty, Amy K; Kurz, Max J; Stuberg, Wayne; Silverman, Anne K

    2016-10-01

    The goal of this pilot study was to characterize the effects of gait training on the capacity of muscles to produce body accelerations and relate these changes to mobility improvements seen in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Five children (14 years ± 3 y; GMFCS I-II) with spastic diplegic CP participated in a 6-week gait training program. Changes in 10-m fast-as-possible walking speed and 6-minute walking endurance were used to assess changes in mobility. In addition, musculoskeletal modeling was used to determine the potential of lower-limb muscles to accelerate the body's center of mass vertically and forward during stance. The mobility changes after the training were mixed, with some children demonstrating vast improvements, while others appeared to be minimal. However, the musculoskeletal results revealed unique responses for each child. The most common changes occurred in the capacity for the hip and knee extensors to produce body support and the hip flexors to produce body propulsion. These results cannot yet be generalized to the broad population of children with CP, but demonstrate that therapy protocols may be enhanced by modeling analyses. The pilot study results provide motivation for gait training emphasizing upright leg posture, mediolateral balance, and ankle push-off.

  19. Who would benefit from memory training? A pilot study examining the ceiling effect of concurrent cognitive stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwok TCY

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Timothy CY Kwok1,2, Wai Wang Chau1, Kenneth SL Yuen1,3, Anita YM Wong4, Jessie CY Li1, Rebecca YY Shiu4, Florence KY Ho11Jockey Club Centre for Positive Ageing, Hong Kong; 2Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong; 3Laboratory of Neuropsychology, Department of Psychology, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong; 4The Hong Kong Chinese Women's Club Madam Wong Chan Sook Ying Memorial Care and Attention Home for the Aged, Hong KongAbstract: Diverse effects of memory training were observed in the literature. One possible factor is the amount of concurrent cognitive training received during the training program. In this pilot study, we recruited 24 elderly adults with or without concurrent cognitive stimulations to attend a memory-training program. Findings suggested that elderly people without concurrent cognitive stimulation could benefit from a memory-training program in the form of improved initiation and memory functioning. Self-rated quality of life measure also showed improvements alongside the cognitive benefits. Elderly people with regular concurrent cognitive stimulation, on the other hand, seemed to plateau in their level of performance and did not show any significant change. Our preliminary findings suggested nonlinear concurrent cognitive stimulation in the elderly.Keywords: memory training, cognitive training, dementia, Chinese, elderly 

  20. Effects of first aid training in the kindergarten - a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myklebust Anne G

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Children can be the only persons present in an emergency situation. Aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of a first aid course for 4-5-year-old kindergarten children given by a first aid instructor and kindergarten teachers. Methods A mixed methods approach using both quantitative and qualitative methods was used to investigate the effects of teaching first aid in the kindergarten in the present study. 10 kindergarten children at the age of 4-5 years were included in a pilot-study, 5 girls and 5 boys. Three of them were four years and seven were five years old. Two months after completion of the first aid course children were tested in a scenario where the children had to provide first aid to an unconscious victim after a cycle accident. The next seven months the children were followed by participant observation. Results The findings suggest that 4-5-year-old children are able to learn and apply basic first aid. Tested two months after course completion 70% of the children assessed consciousness correctly and knew the correct emergency telephone number; 60% showed correct assessment of breathing and 40% of the participants accomplished the other tasks (giving correct emergency call information, knowledge of correct recovery position, correct airway management correctly. Many of the children showed their capabilities to do so in a first aid scenario although some participants showed fear of failure in the test scenario. In an informal group testing most of these children could perform first aid measures, too. Teaching first aid also lead to more active helping behaviour and increased empathy in the children. Conclusion Kindergarten children aged 4-5 years can learn basic fist aid. First aid training should start in the kindergarten.

  1. A Preliminary Investigation into Cognitive Aptitudes Predictive of Overall MQ-1 Predator Pilot Qualification Training Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-06

    other qualitative studies postulating on the cognitive aptitudes critical to the performance of military RPA pilots flying large- sized aircraft at...b Bailey M. Predator pilot and sensor operator selection test batteries . United Kingdom: Cranwell Royal Air...Multidimensional Aptitude Battery II (MAB-II) assesses general intelligence with five distinct verbal intelligence subscales, five distinct performance 4

  2. A Pilot Investigation Comparing Instructional Packages for MTS Training: "Manual Alone" vs. "Manual-Plus-Computer-Aided Personalized System of Instruction"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Marileide; Goyos, Celso; Pear, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Matching-to-sample (MTS) training consists of presenting a stimulus as a sample followed by stimuli called comparisons from which a subject makes a choice. This study presents results of a pilot investigation comparing two packages for teaching university students to conduct MTS training. Two groups--control and experimental--with 2 participants…

  3. Effect of position feedback during task-oriented upper-limb training after stroke: Five-case pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit I. Molier, MSc

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Feedback is an important element in motor learning during rehabilitation therapy following stroke. The objective of this pilot study was to better understand the effect of position feedback during task-oriented reach training of the upper limb in people with chronic stroke. Five subjects participated in the training for 30 minutes three times a week for 6 weeks. During training, subjects performed reaching movements over a predefined path. When deviation from this path occurred, shoulder and elbow joints received position feedback using restraining forces. We recorded the amount of position feedback used by each subject. During pre- and posttraining assessments, we collected data from clinical scales, isometric strength, and workspace of the arm. All subjects showed improvement on one or several kinematic variables during a circular motion task after training. One subject showed improvement on all clinical scales. Subjects required position feedback between 7.4% and 14.7% of training time. Although augmented feedback use was limited, kinematic outcome measures and movement performance during training increased in all subjects, which was comparable with other studies. Emphasis on movement errors at the moment they occur may possibly stimulate motor learning when movement tasks with sufficiently high levels of difficulty are applied.

  4. Specific exercise training for reducing neck and shoulder pain among military helicopter pilots and crew members

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murray, Mike; Lange, Britt; Nørnberg, Bo Riebeling

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Flight-related neck/shoulder pain is frequent among military helicopter pilots and crew members. With a lifetime prevalence of 81 % for pilots and 84 % for crew members, the prevalence of neck pain is considered high compared to the general population. The aim of this study was to inv......BACKGROUND: Flight-related neck/shoulder pain is frequent among military helicopter pilots and crew members. With a lifetime prevalence of 81 % for pilots and 84 % for crew members, the prevalence of neck pain is considered high compared to the general population. The aim of this study...... was to investigate whether a specifically tailored exercise intervention would reduce the prevalence and incidence rate of neck/shoulder pain among helicopter pilots and crew members. METHOD: This study used a prospective, parallel group, single blinded, randomized controlled design. Participants were military...... helicopter pilots and crew members recruited from the Royal Danish Air Force. Inclusion criteria were: 1) employed within the Royal Danish Air Force as a helicopter pilot or onboard crew member (technician, systems-operator, tactical helicopter observer and/or navigator), 2) maintaining operational flight...

  5. Effects of interactive visual feedback training on post-stroke pusher syndrome: a pilot randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yea-Ru; Chen, Yi-Hua; Chang, Heng-Chih; Chan, Rai-Chi; Wei, Shun-Hwa; Wang, Ray-Yau

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the effects of a computer-generated interactive visual feedback training program on the recovery from pusher syndrome in stroke patients. Assessor-blinded, pilot randomized controlled study. A total of 12 stroke patients with pusher syndrome were randomly assigned to either the experimental group (N = 7, computer-generated interactive visual feedback training) or control group (N = 5, mirror visual feedback training). The scale for contraversive pushing for severity of pusher syndrome, the Berg Balance Scale for balance performance, and the Fugl-Meyer assessment scale for motor control were the outcome measures. Patients were assessed pre- and posttraining. A comparison of pre- and posttraining assessment results revealed that both training programs led to the following significant changes: decreased severity of pusher syndrome scores (decreases of 4.0 ± 1.1 and 1.4 ± 1.0 in the experimental and control groups, respectively); improved balance scores (increases of 14.7 ± 4.3 and 7.2 ± 1.6 in the experimental and control groups, respectively); and higher scores for lower extremity motor control (increases of 8.4 ± 2.2 and 5.6 ± 3.3 in the experimental and control groups, respectively). Furthermore, the computer-generated interactive visual feedback training program produced significantly better outcomes in the improvement of pusher syndrome (p visual feedback training program. Although both training programs were beneficial, the computer-generated interactive visual feedback training program more effectively aided recovery from pusher syndrome compared with mirror visual feedback training. © The Author(s) 2014.

  6. Training symmetry of weight distribution after stroke: a randomized controlled pilot study comparing task-related reach, Bobath and feedback training approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudie, M H; Winzeler-Mercay, U; Radwan, S; Lee, L

    2002-09-01

    To determine (1) the most effective of three treatment approaches to retrain seated weight distribution long-term after stroke and (2) whether improvements could be generalized to weight distribution in standing. Inpatient rehabilitation unit. Forty asymmetrical acute stroke subjects were randomly allocated to one of four groups in this pilot study. Changes in weight distribution were compared between the 10 subjects of each of three treatment groups (task-specific reach, Bobath, or Balance Performance Monitor [BPM] feedback training) and a no specific treatment control group. One week of measurement only was followed by two weeks of daily training sessions with the treatment to which the subject was randomly allocated. Measurements were performed using the BPM daily before treatment sessions, two weeks after cessation of treatment and 12 weeks post study. Weight distribution was calculated in terms of mean balance (percentage of total body weight) or the mean of 300 balance points over a 30-s data run. In the short term, the Bobath approach was the most effective treatment for retraining sitting symmetry after stroke (p = 0.004). Training with the BPM and no training were also significant (p = 0.038 and p = 0.035 respectively) and task-specific reach training failed to reach significance (p = 0.26). At 12 weeks post study 83% of the BPM training group, 38% of the task-specific reach group, 29% of the Bobath group and 0% of the untrained group were found to be distributing their weight to both sides. Some generalization of symmetry training in sitting to standing was noted in the BPM training group which appeared to persist long term. Results should be treated with caution due to the small group sizes. However, these preliminary findings suggest that it might be possible to restore postural symmetry in sitting in the early stages of rehabilitation with therapy that focuses on creating an awareness of body position.

  7. Going straight to the source: A pilot study of bereaved parent-facilitated communication training for pediatric subspecialty fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snaman, Jennifer M; Kaye, Erica C; Cunningham, Melody J; Sykes, April; Levine, Deena R; Mahoney, Daniel; Baker, Justin N

    2017-01-01

    Medical trainees consistently report suboptimal instruction and poor self-confidence in communication skills. Despite this deficit, few established training programs provide comprehensive, pediatric-specific communication education, particularly in the provision of "bad news." To our knowledge, no programs currently use bereaved parent educators to facilitate communication training for pediatric subspecialty trainees. The authors designed and implemented a pilot communication training seminar in which bereaved parent educators and faculty facilitators led small groups in interactive, role-play scenarios. Surveys incorporating a retrospective preprogram assessment item to account for response-shift bias were used to assess short- and long-term changes in trainee comfort with delivering "bad news." Fifteen pediatric fellowship trainees participated in the communication seminar; complete data were available for 12 participants. After accounting for response-shift bias, participants reported significant improvement in overall preparedness, breaking bad news to a patient and family, and including the adolescent or young adult patient in conversations. Additionally, participants reported a significant improvement in their ability to address a patient and family's need for information, emotional suffering at the end of life (EOL), if and when a patient should be included in the conversation, and EOL care decisions. The participant's self-perceived improvement in comfort and preparedness persisted over time. Communication training for pediatric subspecialty trainees using bereaved parent educators is feasible and effective. Both medical trainee and bereaved parent participants benefited from involvement in this pilot study. Further iterations of this training will be modified to assess objective measures of improvement in trainees' communication skills. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Effects of High Intensity Interval Training and Strength Training on Metabolic, Cardiovascular and Hormonal Outcomes in Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A Pilot Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Almenning

    Full Text Available Polycystic ovary syndrome is a common endocrinopathy in reproductive-age women, and associates with insulin resistance. Exercise is advocated in this disorder, but little knowledge exists on the optimal exercise regimes. We assessed the effects of high intensity interval training and strength training on metabolic, cardiovascular, and hormonal outcomes in women with polycystic ovary syndrome.Three-arm parallel randomized controlled trial. Thirty-one women with polycystic ovary syndrome (age 27.2 ± 5.5 years; body mass index 26.7 ± 6.0 kg/m2 were randomly assigned to high intensity interval training, strength training, or a control group. The exercise groups exercised three times weekly for 10 weeks.The main outcome measure was change in homeostatic assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR. HOMA-IR improved significantly only after high intensity interval training, by -0.83 (95% confidence interval [CI], -1.45, -0.20, equal to 17%, with between-group difference (p = 0.014. After high intensity interval training, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol increased by 0.2 (95% CI, 0.02, 0.5 mmol/L, with between group difference (p = 0.04. Endothelial function, measured as flow-mediated dilatation of the brachial artery, increased significantly after high intensity interval training, by 2.0 (95% CI, 0.1, 4.0 %, between-group difference (p = 0.08. Fat percentage decreased significantly after both exercise regimes, without changes in body weight. After strength training, anti-Müllarian hormone was significantly reduced, by -14.8 (95% CI, -21.2, -8.4 pmol/L, between-group difference (p = 0.04. There were no significant changes in high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, adiponectin or leptin in any group.High intensity interval training for ten weeks improved insulin resistance, without weight loss, in women with polycystic ovary syndrome. Body composition improved significantly after both strength training and high intensity interval training. This pilot

  9. Correlations between visual test results and flying performance on the advanced simulator for pilot training (ASPT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruk, R; Regan, D; Beverley, K I; Longridge, T

    1981-08-01

    Looking for visual differences in pilots to account for differences in flying performance, we tested five groups of subjects: Air Force primary student jet pilots, graduating (T38 aircraft) students, Air Force pilot instructors, and two control groups made up of experienced nonpilot aircrew and nonflying civilians. This interim report compares 13 different visual test results with low-visibility landing performance on the Air Force Human Resources Laboratory ASPT simulator. Performance was assessed by the number of crashes and by the distance of the aircraft from the runway threshold at the time of the first visual flight correction. Our main finding was that, for student pilots, landing performance correlated with tracking performance for a target that changed size (as if moving in depth) and also with tracking performance for a target that moved sideways. On the other hand, landing performance correlated comparatively weakly with psychophysical thresholds for motion and contrast. For student pilots, several of the visual tests gave results that correlated with flying grades in T37 and T38 jet aircraft. Tracking tests clearly distinguished between the nonflying group and all the flying groups. On the other hand, visual threshold tests did not distinguish between nonflying and flying groups except for grating contrast, which distinguished between the nonflying group and the pilot instructors. The sideways-motion tracking task was sensitive enough to distinguish between the various flying groups.

  10. Treadmill-based locomotor training with leg weights to enhance functional ambulation in people with chronic stroke: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Tania; Luttmann, Kathryn; Houldin, Adina; Chan, Catherine

    2009-09-01

    Novel locomotor training strategies for individuals with disorders of the central nervous system have been associated with improved locomotor function. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of treadmill-based locomotor training combined with leg weights on functional ambulation in individuals with chronic stroke. We assessed functional ambulation and muscle activity in ambulatory individuals with chronic stroke. We used a pre/posttest design. Six individuals with chronic stroke who were community ambulators were recruited. Participants underwent a 30-minute treadmill-based locomotor training sessions three times per week for four to 12 weeks. The training program involved treadmill walking for 30 minutes with partial body weight support as needed. Leg weights, equivalent to 5% of body weight, were affixed around the paretic leg. Outcome measures consisted of the 10-m walk test, the modified Emory Functional Ambulation Profile, and temporal gait parameters. Improvements were observed in functional ambulation measures, particularly the stairs subscore of the modified Emory Functional Ambulation Profile. Participants also exhibited an increase in the proportion of time the paretic leg spent in swing. No significant improvements were observed in the 10-m walk test. This pilot study demonstrates that the combination of leg weights and treadmill training is a feasible approach, that is well tolerated by participants. This approach may have the potential to improve some aspects of functional ambulation and the performance of activities requiring hip and knee flexion.

  11. Feasibility of training nurses in motivational interviewing to improve patient experience in mental health inpatient rehabilitation: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunyan, M; Crowley, J; Smedley, N; Mutti, M-F; Cashen, A; Thompson, T; Foster, J

    2017-05-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: Recently, concerns have been raised about how well United Kingdom National Health Service nurses care for their patients and their level of compassion. Motivational interviewing (MI) is an established approach to helping people make positive behaviour changes, through directive, person-centred counselling within a collaborative relationship between clinician and recipient. Based on evidence that MI may influence nursing practice positively, an investigation into the feasibility of training nurses on mental health inpatient rehabilitation wards ('rehabilitation') in MI to improve patient experience was reported. WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: This pilot study demonstrates that training rehabilitation nurses in MI is feasible and provides preliminary evidence suggesting that a larger study to examine efficacy is warranted, including a calculation of sample size required to draw robust statistical conclusions. Nurses evaluated the training as highly relevant to their work. Patients responded well to interviews and focus groups with support from experts-by-experience; they were generally fairly satisfied with the rehabilitation ward and slight improvements in their experience were found following MI training for nurses but not at 6-month follow-up. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: Rehabilitation nurses may face conflicting demands between ensuring patients with severe difficulties meet their basic needs and working with them to develop greater independence. Qualitative findings question whether nurse-patient interactions are fully valued as nursing interventions in inpatient rehabilitation. Learning MI might be a useful way of helping nurses think in detail about their interactions with patients and how to improve communications with their patients. The principles of MI should be incorporated into pre-registration training. Introduction There is limited research addressing the experiences of patients in inpatient

  12. Effects of comprehensive rehabilitation training in combination with multi-mode analgesia on body function recovery after tumor-type knee replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junjuan; Wang, Yahan; Yang, Guangyu; Liu, Jing; Wang, Junjie

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the significance of comprehensive rehabilitation training combined with multimodal analgesia (MMA) for the early knee function recovery of patients with knee bone tumor who underwent prosthesis replacement operation. Methods: Sixty patients with knee bone tumor who underwent prosthesis replacement operation were selected and randomly divided into two groups according to rehabilitation training and postoperative analgesic methods, namely, observation group and control group, 30 cases in each group. The control group was treated with symptomatic treatment (drugs were given based on pain before and after surgery) and continuous passive motion (CPM) functional training, while the observation group was treated with comprehensive rehabilitation training combined with MMA. The compliance of patients in the two groups was compared and the first-time off-bed activity time was recorded. Recovery conditions of wounds were observed, and recovery conditions of limb functions after operations were evaluated. Results: The compliance of patients in the observation group was significantly higher than that in the control group, and the difference was statistically significant (Pknee (HSS) score and evaluation result of range of motion (ROM) of knees of the observation group were both better than those of the control group in different periods after operation, and the differences were statistically significant (Prehabilitation training combined with MMA can improve the compliance of patients and help patients off bed earlier, and remarkably promote the early recovery of knee functions; hence it deserves to be promoted clinically. PMID:27882029

  13. Error Detection-Based Model to Assess Educational Outcomes in Crisis Resource Management Training: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhabel, Sarah; Kay-Rivest, Emily; Nhan, Carol; Bank, Ilana; Nugus, Peter; Fisher, Rachel; Nguyen, Lily Hp

    2017-06-01

    Otolaryngology-head and neck surgery (OTL-HNS) residents face a variety of difficult, high-stress situations, which may occur early in their training. Since these events occur infrequently, simulation-based learning has become an important part of residents' training and is already well established in fields such as anesthesia and emergency medicine. In the domain of OTL-HNS, it is gradually gaining in popularity. Crisis Resource Management (CRM), a program adapted from the aviation industry, aims to improve outcomes of crisis situations by attempting to mitigate human errors. Some examples of CRM principles include cultivating situational awareness; promoting proper use of available resources; and improving rapid decision making, particularly in high-acuity, low-frequency clinical situations. Our pilot project sought to integrate CRM principles into an airway simulation course for OTL-HNS residents, but most important, it evaluated whether learning objectives were met, through use of a novel error identification model.

  14. Eye Movement Training and Suggested Gaze Strategies in Tunnel Vision - A Randomized and Controlled Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Iliya V; Mackeben, Manfred; Vollmer, Annika; Martus, Peter; Nguyen, Nhung X; Trauzettel-Klosinski, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Degenerative retinal diseases, especially retinitis pigmentosa (RP), lead to severe peripheral visual field loss (tunnel vision), which impairs mobility. The lack of peripheral information leads to fewer horizontal eye movements and, thus, diminished scanning in RP patients in a natural environment walking task. This randomized controlled study aimed to improve mobility and the dynamic visual field by applying a compensatory Exploratory Saccadic Training (EST). Oculomotor responses during walking and avoiding obstacles in a controlled environment were studied before and after saccade or reading training in 25 RP patients. Eye movements were recorded using a mobile infrared eye tracker (Tobii glasses) that measured a range of spatial and temporal variables. Patients were randomly assigned to two training conditions: Saccade (experimental) and reading (control) training. All subjects who first performed reading training underwent experimental training later (waiting list control group). To assess the effect of training on subjects, we measured performance in the training task and the following outcome variables related to daily life: Response Time (RT) during exploratory saccade training, Percent Preferred Walking Speed (PPWS), the number of collisions with obstacles, eye position variability, fixation duration, and the total number of fixations including the ones in the subjects' blind area of the visual field. In the saccade training group, RTs on average decreased, while the PPWS significantly increased. The improvement persisted, as tested 6 weeks after the end of the training. On average, the eye movement range of RP patients before and after training was similar to that of healthy observers. In both, the experimental and reading training groups, we found many fixations outside the subjects' seeing visual field before and after training. The average fixation duration was significantly shorter after the training, but only in the experimental training condition

  15. A pilot study of biomechanical assessment before and after an integrative training program for adolescents with juvenile fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Susan T; Thomas, Staci; DiCesare, Christopher; Pfeiffer, Megan; Sil, Soumitri; Ting, Tracy V; Williams, Sara E; Myer, Gregory D; Kashikar-Zuck, Susmita

    2016-07-22

    Adolescents with juvenile fibromyalgia (JFM) tend to be very sedentary and avoid participation in physical activity. A prior study suggested that JFM patients show altered biomechanics compared to healthy adolescents which may make them more prone to pain/injury during exercise. A new intervention combining well established cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) techniques with specialized neuromuscular exercise -Fibromyalgia Integrative Training for Teens (FIT Teens) was developed and shown to be promising in improving functioning in adolescents with JFM. In contrast to traditional exercise programs such as aerobic or resistance training, neuromuscular training is a tailored approach which targets gait, posture, balance and movement mechanics which form the foundation for safe exercise participation with reduced risk for injury or pain (and hence more tolerable by JFM patients). The aim of this pilot feasibility study was to establish whether objective biomechanical assessment including sophisticated 3-D motion analysis would be useful in measuring improvements in strength, balance, gait, and functional performance after participation in the 8-week FIT Teens program. Eleven female participants with JFM (ages 12-18 years) completed pre- and post-treatment assessments of biomechanics, including walking gait analysis, lower extremity strength assessment, functional performance, and dynamic postural stability. Descriptive data indicated that mechanics of walking gait and functional performance appeared to improve after treatment. Hip abduction strength and dynamic postural control also demonstrated improvements bilaterally. Overall, the results of this pilot study offer initial evidence for the utility of biomechanical assessment to objectively demonstrate observable changes in biomechanical performance after an integrated training intervention for youth with JFM. If replicated in larger controlled studies, findings would suggest that through the FIT Teens intervention

  16. Fundamental movement skills training to promote physical activity in children with and without disability:A pilot study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Catherine M. Capio; Cindy H.P. Sit; Kathlynne F. Egui; Bruce Abernethy; Richard S.W. Masters

    2015-01-01

    Background: A positive association between fundamental movement skills (FMS) and physical activity (PA) has been shown in previous research of children with and without disability. This pilot study explored a causal mechanism for such relationship, and hypothesized that when FMS proficiency is improved, enhanced PA uptake will be found in children with and without disability. It was further hypothesized that improving FMS proficiency will have a greater impact on children with disability than those without disability. Methods:Participants include typically developing (TD) children without disability and children with cerebral palsy (CP), who were allocated to FMS training groups (CP-FMS n=12, TD-FMS n=13) and control groups (CP-C n=12, TD-C n=13). Training groups practiced five FMS (run, jump, kick, throw, catch) in weekly 45-min sessions for 4 weeks. Control groups had their regular physiotherapy (CP) or physical education (TD) sessions. FMS were evaluated using process-and product-oriented measures, and PA was measured using accelerometers, before and after training. Results:It was verified that training groups gained improvements in FMS while control groups did not. No significant changes in weekday PA were found. Increased weekend moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was found in the CP-FMS group, while decreased weekend sedentary time was found in the CP-FMS and TD-FMS groups. The percentages of participants who exceeded the minimum detectable change (MDC90) in MVPA and sedentary time were larger in children with CP than in children without disability. Conclusion:The findings suggest that improved FMS proficiency could potentially contribute to heightened PA and decreased sedentary time during weekends for children. Such effect of improved FMS proficiency on PA appears to be greater in those with physical disability than in those without disability. It is recommended that the findings of this pilot study should be further examined in future research.

  17. The Armeo Spring as training tool to improve upper limb functionality in multiple sclerosis: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerkhofs Lore

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few research in multiple sclerosis (MS has focused on physical rehabilitation of upper limb dysfunction, though the latter strongly influences independent performance of activities of daily living. Upper limb rehabilitation technology could hold promise for complementing traditional MS therapy. Consequently, this pilot study aimed to examine the feasibility of an 8-week mechanical-assisted training program for improving upper limb muscle strength and functional capacity in MS patients with evident paresis. Methods A case series was applied, with provision of a training program (3×/week, 30 minutes/session, supplementary on the customary maintaining care, by employing a gravity-supporting exoskeleton apparatus (Armeo Spring. Ten high-level disability MS patients (Expanded Disability Status Scale 7.0-8.5 actively performed task-oriented movements in a virtual real-life-like learning environment with the affected upper limb. Tests were administered before and after training, and at 2-month follow-up. Muscle strength was determined through the Motricity Index and Jamar hand-held dynamometer. Functional capacity was assessed using the TEMPA, Action Research Arm Test (ARAT and 9-Hole Peg Test (9HPT. Results Muscle strength did not change significantly. Significant gains were particularly found in functional capacity tests. After training completion, TEMPA scores improved (p = 0.02, while a trend towards significance was found for the 9HPT (p = 0.05. At follow-up, the TEMPA as well as ARAT showed greater improvement relative to baseline than after the 8-week intervention period (p = 0.01, p = 0.02 respectively. Conclusions The results of present pilot study suggest that upper limb functionality of high-level disability MS patients can be positively influenced by means of a technology-enhanced physical rehabilitation program.

  18. Making the links between domestic violence and child safeguarding: an evidence-based pilot training for general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szilassy, Eszter; Drinkwater, Jess; Hester, Marianne; Larkins, Cath; Stanley, Nicky; Turner, William; Feder, Gene

    2016-10-14

    We describe the development of an evidence-based training intervention on domestic violence and child safeguarding for general practice teams. We aimed - in the context of a pilot study - to improve knowledge, skills, attitudes and self-efficacy of general practice clinicians caring for families affected by domestic violence. Our evidence sources included: a systematic review of training interventions aiming to improve professional responses to children affected by domestic violence; content mapping of relevant current training in England; qualitative assessment of general practice professionals' responses to domestic violence in families; and a two-stage consensus process with a multi-professional stakeholder group. Data were collected between January and December 2013. This paper reports key research findings and their implications for practice and policy; describes how the research findings informed the training development and outlines the principal features of the training intervention. We found lack of cohesion and co-ordination in the approach to domestic violence and child safeguarding. General practice clinicians have insufficient understanding of multi-agency work, a limited competence in gauging thresholds for child protection referral to children's services and little understanding of outcomes for children. While prioritising children's safety, they are more inclined to engage directly with abusive parents than with affected children. Our research reveals uncertainty and confusion surrounding the recording of domestic violence cases in families' medical records. These findings informed the design of the RESPONDS training, which was developed in 2014 to encourage general practice clinicians to overcome barriers and engage more extensively with adults experiencing abuse, as well as responding directly to the needs of children. We conclude that general practice clinicians need more support in managing the complexity of this area of practice. We need to

  19. Action observation training for functional activities after stroke: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung-Hee; Lee, Byoung-Hee

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effects of action observation training and motor imagery training on recovery from chronic stroke. Thirty patients who were more than six months post stroke participated in this study and were randomly allocated to three groups. The action observation training group practiced additional action observation training for five 30-minute sessions over a four-week period. The motor imagery training group practiced additional motor imagery training for five 30-minute sessions over a four-week period. The following clinical measures were used for assessment of dynamic balance and gait abilities: Timed Up and Go Test, Functional Reaching Test, Walking Ability Questionnaire, and Functional Ambulation Category. Spatiotemporal gait parameters were also collected using a GAITRite system. Compared with the physical training group, the action observation training group showed significant improvement in the Timed Up and Go test, gait speed, cadence, and single limb support of the affected side. No significant differences in any of the outcome measures were observed between the action observation training group and the motor imagery training group. Action observation training and motor imagery training results in improvement of dynamic balance and gait ability. These results suggest the feasibility and suitability of action observation training for patients with chronic stroke.

  20. Development of a disaster preparedness curriculum for medical students: a pilot study of incorporating local events into training opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Katherine A; Bachmann, Daniel J; Greer, Marek; Way, David P; Kman, Nicholas E

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary disasters, like the outbreak of Ebola in West Africa, have piqued the interest of medical students in disaster preparedness. The topic is also a requirement of undergraduate medical education.(1) Yet current literature suggests that disaster preparedness education is lacking. Our objective was to pilot a curriculum to augment medical students' disaster preparedness education by marshalling local resources to provide practical hands-on experiences. This pilot curriculum consisted of lectures; simulations; asynchronous learning materials; a large-scale, regional disaster exercise; and preparation for and participation in a real-time mass gathering. Outcomes were measured by student performance on written tests and evaluations of each activity. Academic Health Center with associated medical school. Fifty-two medical students participated in at least one of the six activities during this voluntary pilot program. Premedical students and residents (n=57) participated in some activities. Forty-one medical students took either the pretest or the post-test over the curriculum. Only eight students took both. A paired t test comparing pretest to post-test scores using imputed missing data (t=-11.72, df=40, p≤0.001) was consistent with an analysis using only complete data (t=-2.35, df=7, p=0.05), implying that student scores improved significantly over time. Evaluations indicated a student preference for hands-on over didactic or independent learning activities. This pilot curriculum was designed to capitalize on practical hands-on training opportunities for our medical students, including participation in a disaster exercise and a mass-gathering event. These opportunities provided effective and engaging disaster preparedness education.

  1. An ET-CURE Pilot Project Supporting Undergraduate Training in Cancer Research, Emerging Technology, and Health Disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Danyell S.; Fang, Bin; Dalton, William S.; Meade, Cathy; Koomen, John M.

    2012-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute’s Center to Reduce Cancer Health Disparities has created pilot training opportunities under the “Continuing Umbrella of Research Experiences” (CURE) program that focus on emerging technologies (ET). In this pilot project, an eighteen month cancer biology research internship was reinforced with: instruction in an emerging technology (proteomics), a transition from the undergraduate laboratory to a research setting, education in cancer health disparities, and community outreach activities. A major goal was to provide underrepresented undergraduates with hands-on research experiences that are rarely encountered at the undergraduate level, including mentoring, research presentations, and participation in local and national meetings. These opportunities provided education and career development for the undergraduates, and they have given each student the opportunity to transition from learning to sharing their knowledge and from being mentored to mentoring others. Here, we present the concepts, curriculum, infrastructure, and challenges for this training program along with evaluations by both the students and their mentors. PMID:22528637

  2. A pilot study on feasibility, acceptance and effectiveness of metacognitive-oriented social skills training in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inchausti, Felix; García-Poveda, Nancy V; Ballesteros-Prados, Alejandro; Fonseca-Pedrero, Eduardo; Ortuño-Sierra, Javier; Sánchez-Reales, Sergio; Prado-Abril, Javier; Aldaz-Armendáriz, José Antonio; Mole, Joe

    2017-06-12

    In preparation for a randomized controlled trial, a pilot study was conducted to investigate the feasibility, acceptability and effectiveness of a psychotherapy group based on metacognitive-oriented social skills training (MOSST). Twelve outpatients with schizophrenia were offered 16 group-sessions of MOSST. Effect sizes were calculated for changes from baseline to treatment end for both psychosocial functioning and metacognitive abilities measured by the Personal and Social Performance Scale (PSP) and the Metacognition Assessment Scale-Abbreviated (MAS-A) respectively. Ten patients finished the full treatment protocol and nonsignificant moderate effect sizes were obtained on PSP and MAS-A scores. To date, this is the first study in Spain to suggest that outpatients with schizophrenia will accept metacognitive therapy for social skills training and evidence improvements in psychosocial functioning and metacognition. Despite limitations inherent in a pilot study, including a small sample size and the absence of a control group, sufficient evidence of effectiveness was found to warrant further investigation. ISRCTN10917911 . Retrospectively registered 30 November 2016.

  3. TEACCH-based group social skills training for children with high-functioning autism: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Kayoko; Takahashi, Yoshimitsu; Ando, Masahiko; Anme, Tokie; Ishizaki, Tatsuro; Yamaguchi, Hinako; Nakayama, Takeo

    2013-10-01

    Although social skills training programs for people with high-functioning autism (HFA) are widely practiced, the standardization of curricula, the examination of clinical effectiveness, and the evaluation of the feasibility of future trials have yet to be done in Asian countries. To compensate for this problem, a Japanese pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT) of the Treatment and Education of Autistic and Related Communication Handicapped Children (TEACCH)-based group social skills training for children with HFA and their mothers was conducted. Eleven children with HFA, aged 5-6 years, and their mothers were randomly assigned to the TEACCH program (n=5) or a waiting-list control group (n=6). The program involved comprehensive group intervention and featured weekly 2-hour sessions, totaling 20 sessions over six months. The adaptive behaviors and social reciprocity of the children, parenting stress, and parent-child interactions were assessed using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ), Parenting Stress Index (PSI), Beck depression inventory-II (BDI-II), and Interaction Rating Scale (IRS). Through this pilot trial, the intervention and evaluation of the program has been shaped. There were no dropouts from the program and the mothers' satisfaction was high. The outcome measurements improved more in the program group than in the control group, with moderate effect sizes (SDQ, 0.71; PSI, 0.58; BDI-II, 0.40; and IRS, 0.69). This pilot trial also implied that this program is more beneficial for high IQ children and mothers with low stress than for those who are not. We have standardized the TEACCH program, confirmed the feasibility of a future trial, and successfully estimated the positive effect size. These findings will contribute to a larger trial in the future and to forthcoming systematic reviews with meta-analyses. UMIN000004560.

  4. Improving psychosexual knowledge in adolescents with autism spectrum disorder : pilot of the tackling teenage training program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, Linda P; van der Vegt, Esther J M; Visser, Kirsten; Tick, Nouchka; Boudesteijn, Frieda; Verhulst, Frank C; Maras, Athanasios; Greaves-Lord, Kirstin

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that psychosexual functioning in adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is hampered and emphasize the need for a specialized training program tailored to their needs. Therefore, an individual training program was developed; the Tackling Teenage Training (TTT) pro

  5. IAC-11.E1-7.-A1.8.5 The Mission X: Train Like an Astronaut pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Charles W.

    2012-12-01

    Mission X: Train Like an Astronaut is an international educational challenge focusing on fitness and nutrition as we encourage students to "train like an astronaut." Teams of students (aged 8-12) learn principles of healthy eating and exercise, compete for points by finishing training modules, and get excited about their future as "fit explorers." The 18 core exercises (targeting strength, endurance, coordination, balance, spatial awareness, and more) involve the same types of skills that astronauts learn in their training and use in spaceflight. This first-of-its-kind cooperative outreach program has allowed 11 space agencies and various partner institutions to work together to address quality health/fitness education, challenge students to be more physically active, increase awareness of the importance of lifelong health and fitness, teach students how fitness plays a vital role in human performance for exploration, and to inspire and motivate students to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields. The project was initiated in 2009 in response to a request by the International Space Life Sciences Working Group. USA, Netherlands, Italy, France, Germany, Austria, Colombia, Spain, Belgium, Czech Republic and United Kingdom hosted teams for the pilot in the spring of 2010, and Japan held a modified version of the challenge. Several more agencies provided input into the preparations. Competing in 137 teams, more than 4000 students from over 40 cities worldwide participated in the first round of Mission X.

  6. A Small Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial Comparing Mobile and Traditional Pain Coping Skills Training Protocols for Cancer Patients with Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara J. Somers

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Psychosocial pain management interventions are efficacious for cancer pain but are underutilized. Recent advances in mobile health (mHealth technologies provide new opportunities to decrease barriers to access psychosocial pain management interventions. The objective of this study was to gain information about the accessibility and efficacy of mobile pain coping skills training (mPCST intervention delivered to cancer patients with pain compared to traditional in-person pain coping skills training intervention. This study randomly assigned participants (N=30 to receive either mobile health pain coping skills training intervention delivered via Skype or traditional pain coping skills training delivered face-to-face (PCST-trad. This pilot trial suggests that mPCST is feasible, presents low burden to patients, may lead to high patient engagement, and appears to be acceptable to patients. Cancer patients with pain in the mPCST group reported decreases in pain severity and physical symptoms as well as increases in self-efficacy for pain management that were comparable to changes in the PCST-trad group (p’s < 0.05. These findings suggest that mPCST, which is a highly accessible intervention, may provide benefits similar to an in-person intervention and shows promise for being feasible, acceptable, and engaging to cancer patients with pain.

  7. Midwifery students receiving the newborn at birth: A pilot study of the impact of structured training in neonatal resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Angela; Sweet, Linda

    2015-09-01

    The experience of midwifery students in receiving the newborn at birth, before and after structured training in neonatal resuscitation: A pilot study. The practice of receiving the newborn, including neonatal resuscitation is an essential component of midwifery. Anecdotal evidence suggests preparation for the task is ad hoc within midwifery curricula, leading to student's anxiety. This paper reports impacts of neonatal resuscitation training upon levels of knowledge, preparedness, and anxiety for midwifery students receiving the newborn. Midwifery students participated in an online questionnaire before and after neonatal resuscitation training. The responses collected were subjected to descriptive analysis. Of 10 students invited, 6 completed the pre and post course questionnaires. Knowledge of the responsibility in receiving the newborn and instigation of resuscitation increased after attending the course. Steps to prepare to receive the newborn and clinical signs for initial assessment remained static. Students felt more prepared to receive the newborn after the course but did not improve in their preparation to initiate resuscitation. Anxiety levels remained static. Structured neonatal resuscitation training and strategies to ensure application of skills learnt should be embedded into midwifery curricula. Midwifery students' experience in receiving the newborn and neonatal resuscitation is worthy of further study.

  8. Shuttle-run sprint training in hypoxia for youth elite soccer players: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatterer, Hannes; Philippe, Marc; Menz, Verena; Mosbach, Florian; Faulhaber, Martin; Burtscher, Martin

    2014-12-01

    The purposes of the present study were to investigate if a) shuttle-run sprint training performed in a normobaric hypoxia chamber of limited size (4.75x2.25m) is feasible, in terms of producing the same absolute training load, when compared to training in normoxia, and b) if such training improves the repeated sprint ability (RSA) and the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery (YYIR) test outcome in young elite soccer players. Players of an elite soccer training Centre (age: 15.3 ± 0.5 years, height: 1.73 ± 0.07 m, body mass: 62.6 ± 6.6 kg) were randomly assigned to a hypoxia or a normoxia training group. Within a 5-week period, players, who were not informed about the hypoxia intervention, performed at least 7 sessions of identical shuttle-run sprint training either in a normal training room (FiO2 = 20.95%) or in a hypoxic chamber (FiO2 = 14.8%; approximately 3300m), both equipped with the same floor. Each training session comprised 3 series of 5x10s back and forth sprints (4.5m) performed at maximal intensity. Recovery time between repetitions was 20s and between series 5min. Before and after the training period the RSA (6 x 40m shuttle sprint with 20 s rest between shuttles) and the YYIR test were performed. The size of the chamber did not restrict the training intensity of the sprint training (both groups performed approximately 8 shuttles during 10s). Training in hypoxia resulted in a lower fatigue slope which indicates better running speed maintenance during the RSA test (p = 0.024). YYIR performance increased over time (p = 0.045) without differences between groups (p > 0.05). This study showed that training intensity of the shuttle-run sprint training was not restricted in a hypoxic chamber of limited size which indicates that such training is feasible. Furthermore, hypoxia compared to normoxia training reduced the fatigue slope during the RSA test in youth soccer players. Key PointsShuttle-run sprint training is feasible in hypoxic chambers of limited size (i

  9. A crossover pilot study evaluating the functional outcomes of two different types of robotic movement training in chronic stroke survivors using the arm exoskeleton BONES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milot, Marie-Hélène; Spencer, Steven J; Chan, Vicky; Allington, James P; Klein, Julius; Chou, Cathy; Bobrow, James E; Cramer, Steven C; Reinkensmeyer, David J

    2013-12-19

    To date, the limited degrees of freedom (DOF) of most robotic training devices hinders them from providing functional training following stroke. We developed a 6-DOF exoskeleton ("BONES") that allows movement of the upper limb to assist in rehabilitation. The objectives of this pilot study were to evaluate the impact of training with BONES on function of the affected upper limb, and to assess whether multijoint functional robotic training would translate into greater gains in arm function than single joint robotic training also conducted with BONES. Twenty subjects with mild to moderate chronic stroke participated in this crossover study. Each subject experienced multijoint functional training and single joint training three sessions per week, for four weeks, with the order of presentation randomized. The primary outcome measure was the change in Box and Block Test (BBT). The secondary outcome measures were the changes in Fugl-Meyer Arm Motor Scale (FMA), Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT), Motor Activity Log (MAL), and quantitative measures of strength and speed of reaching. These measures were assessed at baseline, after each training period, and at a 3-month follow-up evaluation session. Training with the robotic exoskeleton resulted in significant improvements in the BBT, FMA, WMFT, MAL, shoulder and elbow strength, and reaching speed (p functional and single joint robotic training programs. However, for the BBT, WMFT and MAL, inequality of carryover effects were noted; subsequent analysis on the change in score between the baseline and first period of training again revealed no difference in the gains obtained between the types of training. Training with the 6 DOF arm exoskeleton improved motor function after chronic stroke, challenging the idea that robotic therapy is only useful for impairment reduction. The pilot results presented here also suggest that multijoint functional robotic training is not decisively superior to single joint robotic training. This

  10. Targeting clinician concerns about exposure therapy: A pilot study comparing standard vs. enhanced training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Nicholas R; Kemp, Joshua J; Blakey, Shannon M; Meyer, Johanna M; Deacon, Brett J

    2016-10-01

    Owing to concerns about the safety and tolerability of exposure therapy, many clinicians deliver the treatment in an overly cautious manner, which may limit its effectiveness. Although didactic training in exposure reduces clinician concerns about the treatment to a moderate extent, improved training strategies are needed to minimize these concerns and improve exposure delivery. The present study compared the effectiveness of a standard (i.e., didactic) exposure therapy training model to an "enhanced" training paradigm encompassing strategies derived from social-cognitive theory on attitude change. Clinicians (N = 49) were assigned to one of the two training approaches. Relative to standard training, clinicians who received enhanced training showed: (a) significantly greater reductions in concerns about exposure from pre- to post-training, and (b) superior self-reported delivery of the treatment. Reduction in concerns during training mediated the effects of training condition on clinicians' self-reported exposure delivery. These findings underscore the importance of addressing clinician concerns about exposure therapy in training contexts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. ORTHO-LBNP: A new apparatus for assessing autocontrol mechanisms of the heart-vessel system in pilots undergoing training in conditions of ischemic hypoxia and orthostatic stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truszczynski, Olaf; Skibniewski, Franciszek; Dziuda, Lukasz; Gacek, Adam; Krej, Mariusz; Sobotnicki, Aleksander; Rajchel, Jan; Bylinka, Marek; Burek, Michal

    The authors present a new system for examining the behaviour of the human body and cerebral circulation in conditions of ischemic hypoxia and orthostatic stress that can cause orthostatic hypotension. Ischemic hypoxia affects mainly pilots of highly manoeuvrable aircraft, where long-lasting G forces not seldom reach 6-8 +Gz and can exceed the gravitational acceleration by ten times or more. Additionally, pilots are subjected to orthostatic hypotension in which abnormally low blood pressure is caused by pressure adjustment disorder and decreased stroke volume when changing body position rapidly. For several decades, these effects have been deeply investigated using human centrifuges or lower body negative pressure (LBNP) chambers. The latter method involves significantly less financial resources to carry out experiments and training, whereas the effects exerted on pilots, and the results of the training can be comparable. A group of researchers from the Military Institute of Aviation Medicine, Warszawa, Poland, and the Institute of Medical Technology and Equipment ITAM, Zabrze, Poland, are developing the innovative ORTHO-LBNP device based on the cradle principle and the LBNP method. The system will be implemented in a modern programme for training cadets of the Polish Air Force Academy, Dęblin, Poland. Together with other equipment such as a high-G centrifuge, pressure chambers, flight and spatial disorientation simulators as well as gymnastic training equipment for pilots (GTEP), the ORTHO-LBNP apparatus will be an element of the selection system of candidates for aviation. It is expected that the experimental studies will result in developing new indicators providing an objective assessment, whether examined persons possess the traits necessary for performing tasks related to the job of a pilot. It is highly probable that those indicators can be incorporated into routine checks for pilots, which in turn, can lead to improving the safety of flight operations and

  12. Reiki training for caregivers of hospitalized pediatric patients: a pilot program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Anjana; Dolan-Oves, Rebecca; Dimmers, Martha A; Towle, Cara B; Doorenbos, Ardith Z

    2013-02-01

    To explore the feasibility of a Reiki therapy-training program for the caregivers of pediatric medical or oncology inpatients, at a large pediatric hospital, a series of Reiki training classes were offered by a Reiki Master. At completion of the training, an interview was conducted to elicit participant's feedback regarding the effectiveness and feasibility of the training program. Seventeen of the 18 families agreed to participate. Most families (65%) attended three Reiki training sessions, reporting that Reiki benefitted their child by improving their comfort (76%), providing relaxation (88%), and pain relief (41%). All caregivers identified becoming an active participant in their child's care as a major gain from participation in the Reiki training. A hospital-based Reiki training program for caregivers of hospitalized pediatric patients is feasible and can positively impact patients and their families. More rigorous research regarding the benefits of Reiki in the pediatric population is needed.

  13. Robotic resistance treadmill training improves locomotor function in human spinal cord injury: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ming; Landry, Jill M; Schmit, Brian D; Hornby, T George; Yen, Sheng-Che

    2012-05-01

    To determine whether cable-driven robotic resistance treadmill training can improve locomotor function in humans with incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI). Repeated assessment of the same patients with crossover design. Research units of rehabilitation hospitals in Chicago. Patients with chronic incomplete SCI (N=10) were recruited to participate in this study. Subjects were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups. One group received 4 weeks of assistance training followed by 4 weeks of resistance training, while the other group received 4 weeks of resistance training followed by 4 weeks of assistance training. Locomotor training was provided by using a cable-driven robotic locomotor training system, which is highly backdrivable and compliant, allowing patients the freedom to voluntarily move their legs in a natural gait pattern during body weight supported treadmill training (BWSTT), while providing controlled assistance/resistance forces to the leg during the swing phase of gait. Primary outcome measures were evaluated for each participant before training and after 4 and 8 weeks of training. Primary measures were self-selected and fast overground walking velocity and 6-minute walking distance. Secondary measures included clinical assessments of balance, muscle tone, and strength. A significant improvement in walking speed and balance in humans with SCI was observed after robotic treadmill training using the cable-driven robotic locomotor trainer. There was no significant difference in walking functional gains after resistance versus assistance training, although resistance training was more effective for higher functioning patients. Cable-driven robotic resistance training may be used as an adjunct to BWSTT for improving overground walking function in humans with incomplete SCI, particularly for those patients with relatively high function. Copyright © 2012 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Dynamic training devices in CRM training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawver, J.

    1984-01-01

    Pilot training effectiveness and flying safety of a seasonal tour flight company are described. The change from single pilot to two pilot operated twin otters is examined. The use of the ATC 810 training device, its possibilities and training capacity is outlined. Problem areas which may arise, emergency system and pilot/passenger interaction are analyzed.

  15. Personality: Its Use in Selecting Canditates for US Air Force Undergraduate Pilot Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-08-01

    Symposium on Aiation Psychology, 1987. Fitschen, Maj Charles K. Cost Impact: Should Improved Screening Methods Be Implemented in the Undergraduate Pilot...AFHRL-TR-87-62. Brooks AFB, Tex.: Air Force Systems Command, 1988. Spence, Janet T., Robert L. Helmreich, and Carole K. Holahan . "Negative and Positive

  16. Group 13 1990 ASCAN Ochoa talks to NASA staff pilot during T-38A training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Astronaut candidate (ASCAN) Ellen Ochoa reviews T-38A flight procedures with a NASA staff pilot while standing on an Ellington Field runway. Later, Ochoa, along with classmates from the Group 13 1990 Astronaut class, took a T-38A familiarization flight. Ellington Field is located near JSC.

  17. Developing a health and human rights training program for french speaking Africa: lessons learned, from needs assessment to a pilot program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freigburghaus Franziska

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The importance of human rights education has widely been recognized as one of the strategies for their protection and promotion of health. Yet training programs have not always taken into account neither local needs, nor public health relevance, nor pedagogical efficacy. The objectives of our study were to assess, in a participative way, educational needs in the field of health and human rights among potential trainees in six French-speaking African countries and to test the feasibility of a training program through a pilot test. Ultimately the project aims to implement a health and human rights training program most appropriate to the African context. Methods Needs assessment was done according to four approaches: Revue of available data on health and human rights in the targeted countries; Country visits by one of the authors meeting key institutions; Focus group discussions with key-informants in each country; A questionnaire-based study targeting health professionals and human rights activists. Pilot training program: an interactive e-learning pilot program was developed integrating training needs expressed by partner institutions and potential trainees. Results Needs assessment showed high public health and human rights challenges that the target countries have to face. It also showed precise demands of partner institutions in regard to a health and human rights training program. It further allowed defining training objectives and core competencies useful to potential employers and future students as well as specific training contents. A pilot program allowed testing the motivation of students, the feasibility of an interactive educational approach and identifying potential difficulties. Conclusion In combining various approaches our study was able to show that training needs concentrate around tools allowing the identification of basic human rights violations in the health system, the analysis of their causes and

  18. A pilot training programme for health and social care professionals providing oncological and palliative care to lesbian, gay and bisexual patients in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Reygan, Finn C G

    2012-05-09

    OBJECTIVE: The international literature points to the specific cancer risks and palliative care needs of lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) populations. However, with the exception of a programme in the USA, there is a lack of training internationally for health and social care professionals providing oncological and palliative care to LGB patients. In Ireland, a training project funded by the Irish Cancer Society, the Irish Hospice Foundation and the Health Service Executive developed a training pilot programme for health and social care professionals providing oncological and palliative care to LGB patients. METHODS: Over 200 (N = 201) oncology and palliative care staff participated in 17 brief, 50-min trainings in pilot sites. Evaluation of the training included self-report questionnaires at the end of each training and an evaluation interview with one participant from each of the four sites. RESULTS: The majority of participants reported that they would recommend the training to their colleagues, were interested in further training in the area and found the training useful for their practice. They also reported becoming more familiar with LGB-related language and terminology, became more knowledgeable of LGB health issues and reported becoming more confident in providing care to LGB patients. CONCLUSIONS: Recommendations are that the training be made available across the health services in Ireland and included in postgraduate courses for trainee health and social care professionals. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Eye Movement Training and Suggested Gaze Strategies in Tunnel Vision - A Randomized and Controlled Pilot Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iliya V Ivanov

    Full Text Available Degenerative retinal diseases, especially retinitis pigmentosa (RP, lead to severe peripheral visual field loss (tunnel vision, which impairs mobility. The lack of peripheral information leads to fewer horizontal eye movements and, thus, diminished scanning in RP patients in a natural environment walking task. This randomized controlled study aimed to improve mobility and the dynamic visual field by applying a compensatory Exploratory Saccadic Training (EST.Oculomotor responses during walking and avoiding obstacles in a controlled environment were studied before and after saccade or reading training in 25 RP patients. Eye movements were recorded using a mobile infrared eye tracker (Tobii glasses that measured a range of spatial and temporal variables. Patients were randomly assigned to two training conditions: Saccade (experimental and reading (control training. All subjects who first performed reading training underwent experimental training later (waiting list control group. To assess the effect of training on subjects, we measured performance in the training task and the following outcome variables related to daily life: Response Time (RT during exploratory saccade training, Percent Preferred Walking Speed (PPWS, the number of collisions with obstacles, eye position variability, fixation duration, and the total number of fixations including the ones in the subjects' blind area of the visual field.In the saccade training group, RTs on average decreased, while the PPWS significantly increased. The improvement persisted, as tested 6 weeks after the end of the training. On average, the eye movement range of RP patients before and after training was similar to that of healthy observers. In both, the experimental and reading training groups, we found many fixations outside the subjects' seeing visual field before and after training. The average fixation duration was significantly shorter after the training, but only in the experimental training

  20. Shuttle-Run Sprint Training in Hypoxia for Youth Elite Soccer Players: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes Gatterer

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purposes of the present study were to investigate if a shuttle-run sprint training performed in a normobaric hypoxia chamber of limited size (4.75x2.25m is feasible, in terms of producing the same absolute training load, when compared to training in normoxia, and b if such training improves the repeated sprint ability (RSA and the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery (YYIR test outcome in young elite soccer players. Players of an elite soccer training Centre (age: 15.3 ± 0.5 years, height: 1.73 ± 0.07 m, body mass: 62.6 ± 6.6 kg were randomly assigned to a hypoxia or a normoxia training group. Within a 5-week period, players, who were not informed about the hypoxia intervention, performed at least 7 sessions of identical shuttle-run sprint training either in a normal training room (FiO2 = 20.95% or in a hypoxic chamber (FiO2 = 14.8%; approximately 3300m, both equipped with the same floor. Each training session comprised 3 series of 5x10s back and forth sprints (4.5m performed at maximal intensity. Recovery time between repetitions was 20s and between series 5min. Before and after the training period the RSA (6 x 40m shuttle sprint with 20 s rest between shuttles and the YYIR test were performed. The size of the chamber did not restrict the training intensity of the sprint training (both groups performed approximately 8 shuttles during 10s. Training in hypoxia resulted in a lower fatigue slope which indicates better running speed maintenance during the RSA test (p = 0.024. YYIR performance increased over time (p = 0.045 without differences between groups (p > 0.05. This study showed that training intensity of the shuttle-run sprint training was not restricted in a hypoxic chamber of limited size which indicates that such training is feasible. Furthermore, hypoxia compared to normoxia training reduced the fatigue slope during the RSA test in youth soccer players.

  1. Restructuring of advanced instruction and training programs in order to increase the number of flight hours for military pilots. Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan STEFANESCU

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Converting the DC school jet aircraft into SC advanced training aircraft - and use them for the combat training of military pilots from the operational units, has become a necessity due to the budget cuts for Air Force, with direct implications on reducing the number of hours of flight assigned to operating personnel for preparing and training.The purpose of adopting such a program is to reduce the number of flight hours allocated annually for preparing and training in advanced stages of instruction, for every pilot, by more intensive use of this type of aircraft, which has the advantage of lower flight hour costs as compared to a supersonic combat plane.

  2. Functional rehabilitation training following hip replacement%人工髋关节置换后的功能康复训练

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶新平

    2011-01-01

    背景:人工髋关节置换后的功能康复训练可改善假体功能,促进患者恢复体力,增强肌力,增大关节活动度,恢复日常生活协调性.目的:总结人工髋关节置换后功能康复训练的研究进展.方法:以"人工髋关节,置换,功能康复;artificial hip joints,Replacement,Sports rehabilitation"为关键词,应用计算机检索1997/2011 PubMed数据库、中国期刊网、万方数据库、Springer Link数据库和Science Direct数据库,有关人工髋关节置换后的功能康复训练的文章.结果与结论:人工髋关节置换可及时有效地缓解疼痛,重建髋关节功能,改善患者日常生活能力,提高生活质量.人工髋关节置换围手术期进行科学合理的功能康复训练指导,遵循个体化、循序渐进和全面训练的原则,训练程序根据具体情况、合并症及对疾病的耐受性和功能恢复的期望值而制定,活动量由小到大、时间由短到长、频率由少到多的详细训练计划,进行肌力训练才能使患者达到康复快、关节功能恢复效果好、并发症少的目的.提示早期功能康复训练对人工髋关节置换后患者功能恢复具有重要的意义,早期的康复训练可改善患者疼痛程度、行走功能,增强关节活动度功能;后期的功能康复训练能有效地预防肢体被迫制动而引起的肌张力降低和肌萎缩.%BACKGROUND: Functional training following hip replacement can improve prosthesis function, patient rehabilitation, enhancemuscle power, enlarge joint range of motion and restore concordant of daily life.OBJECTIVE: To summarize advances in functional rehabilitation training following artificial hip replacement.METHODS: A computer-based online search of PubMed, CNKI, Wanfang Springer Link and Science Direct was performed forrelated articles published between 1997 and 2011 with key words “artificial hip joints, Replacement, Sports rehabilitation”.RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Artificial hip

  3. Training referential communicative skills to individuals with autism spectrum disorder: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivar-Parra, José-Sixto; De-La-Iglesia-Gutiérrez, Myriam; Forns, Maria

    2011-12-01

    The present study reports the effects of referential communication training in individuals formally diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Participants were 20 children with ASD (M age = 14.3 yr., SD = 4.2; 6 girls, 14 boys) in the role of speakers and 20 control children, who acted as listeners. They were all enrolled in mainstream compulsory education. Inclusion/exclusion criteria were defined according to the clinical diagnosis of ASD, the presence or absence of additional or associated disability, previous training in referential communication, and any drug treatment. Speakers were randomly assigned to one of two groups (trained vs untrained). Linguistic age, cognitive level and autistic symptoms were analyzed, respectively, with the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT), the Wechsler Intelligence Scale (WISC-R or WAIS-III), and the Autistic Behavior Checklist (ABC). Communicative abilities were analyzed through two indexes related to message complexity and self-regulation. The trained group was trained in referential communication tasks (task analysis, role taking, and task evaluation), while the untrained group took part in a communicative game but without any specific communicative training. The results showed that the complexity of emitted messages had improved statistically significantly in the trained group as an effect of training. Ecological referential communication is shown to be an appropriate paradigm for studying the communicative process and its products and could be used to develop and implement a training program focused on those skills in which individuals with ASD are most deficient.

  4. Sustained attention training reduces spatial bias in Parkinson's disease: a pilot case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGutis, Joseph; Grosso, Mallory; VanVleet, Thomas; Esterman, Michael; Pistorino, Laura; Cronin-Golomb, Alice

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) commonly demonstrate lateralized spatial biases, which affect daily functioning. Those with PD with initial motor symptoms on the left body side (LPD) have reduced leftward attention, whereas PD with initial motor symptoms on the right side (RPD) may display reduced rightward attention. We investigated whether a sustained attention training program could help reduce these spatial biases. Four non-demented individuals with PD (2 LPD, 2 RPD) performed a visual search task before and after 1 month of computer training. Before training, all participants showed a significant spatial bias and after training, all participants' spatial bias was eliminated.

  5. Pilot activities to create effective training materials on inclusive value chains : Effective training materials on inclusive value chains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guijt, W.J.; Blomne Sopov, M.; Reuver, R.

    2013-01-01

    This report describes efforts to develop training materials to stimulate adoption of more inclusive ways of doing business. The target audiences are private companies, collaborating organisations and business students. The report includes links to two videos on coffee in Kenya and soy-based products

  6. Development and pilot testing of an online case-based approach to shared decision making skills training for clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volk, Robert J; Shokar, Navkiran K; Leal, Viola B; Bulik, Robert J; Linder, Suzanne K; Mullen, Patricia Dolan; Wexler, Richard M; Shokar, Gurjeet S

    2014-11-01

    Although research suggests that patients prefer a shared decision making (SDM) experience when making healthcare decisions, clinicians do not routinely implement SDM into their practice and training programs are needed. Using a novel case-based strategy, we developed and pilot tested an online educational program to promote shared decision making (SDM) by primary care clinicians. A three-phased approach was used: 1) development of a conceptual model of the SDM process; 2) development of an online teaching case utilizing the Design A Case (DAC) authoring template, a well-tested process used to create peer-reviewed web-based clinical cases across all levels of healthcare training; and 3) pilot testing of the case. Participants were clinician members affiliated with several primary care research networks across the United States who answered an invitation email. The case used prostate cancer screening as the clinical context and was delivered online. Post-intervention ratings of clinicians' general knowledge of SDM, knowledge of specific SDM steps, confidence in and intention to perform SDM steps were also collected online. Seventy-nine clinicians initially volunteered to participate in the study, of which 49 completed the case and provided evaluations. Forty-three clinicians (87.8%) reported the case met all the learning objectives, and 47 (95.9%) indicated the case was relevant for other equipoise decisions. Thirty-one clinicians (63.3%) accessed supplementary information via links provided in the case. After viewing the case, knowledge of SDM was high (over 90% correctly identified the steps in a SDM process). Determining a patient's preferred role in making the decision (62.5% very confident) and exploring a patient's values (65.3% very confident) about the decisions were areas where clinician confidence was lowest. More than 70% of the clinicians intended to perform SDM in the future. A comprehensive model of the SDM process was used to design a case

  7. A Pilot Study to Test the Efficacy of Psychologically Based Physical Therapy Training for Treating Deployed U.S. Sailors and Marines with Musculoskeletal Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-2-0146 TITLE: A Pilot Study to Test the Efficacy of Psychologically Based Physical Therapy Training for Treating...Study to Test the Efficacy of Psychologically Based Physical Therapy Training for Treating Deployed U.S. Sailors and Marines with Musculoskeletal...deployment in support of combat operations on a carrier. This includes testing the feasibility of the implementation and documenting psychological risk

  8. Toepasbaarheid en effectiviteit van mindfulnesstraining bij volwassenen met AD(H)D; een open pilotonderzoek [Feasibility and effectiveness of mindfulness training in adults with ADHD: A pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Hepark, S.; Kan, C C; Speckens, A.E.M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a developmental disorder that often continues into adulthood. Stimulant medication is the common treatment for ADHD. However, there is a need for psychosocial interventions in addition to medication. AIM: To conduct a pilot study which examines the feasibility and effectiveness of mindfulness training for adults with ADHD. METHOD: Eleven adults with ADHD participated in a mindfulness training scheme lasting 10 weeks. ADHD symptoms...

  9. Development of training-related health care software by a team of clinical educators: their experience, from conception to piloting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ap Dafydd D

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Derfel ap Dafydd,1 Ruth Williamson,2 Philip Blunt,3 Dominic M Blunt4 1Department of Radiology, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London, 2Imaging Department, Royal Bornemouth Hospital, Bornemouth, 3Savernake IT Ltd, Marlborough, 4Imaging Department, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London, UK Abstract: The difficulties of producing useful, bespoke, and affordable information technology systems for large health care organizations are well publicized, following several high-profile endeavors in the UK. This article describes the experience of a small group of clinical radiologists and their collaborators in producing an information technology system – from conception to piloting. This system, called Trainee Tracker, enables automated target date recalculation of trainee milestones, depending on their work patterns and other individual circumstances. It utilizes an automated email alert system to notify the educational supervisors and trainees of approaching and elapsed target dates, in order to identify trainees in difficulty early and address their training needs accordingly. The challenges and advantages, both common to and contrasting with larger-scale projects, are also considered. The benefits of the development team’s “agile” approach to software development and the lessons learned will be of interest to medical educators, particularly those with expertise in e-portfolios and other training-related software. Keywords: training, appraisal, ARCP, Annual Review of Clinical Progression, portfolio, trainer

  10. Hybrid gait training with an overground robot for people with incomplete spinal cord injury: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio J del-Ama

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Locomotor training has proved to provide beneficial effect in terms of mobility in incomplete paraplegic patients. Neuroprosthetic technology can contribute to increase the efficacy of a training paradigm in the promotion of a locomotor pattern. Robotic exoskeletons can be used to manage the unavoidable loss of performance of artificially-driven muscles. Hybrid exoskeletons blend complementary robotic and neuro-prosthetic technologies. The aim of this pilot study was to determine the effects of hybrid gait training in three case studies with persons with incomplete spinal cord injury in terms of locomotion performance during assisted gait, patient-robot adaptations, impact on ambulation and assessment of lower limb muscle strength and spasticity. Participants with incomplete Spinal Cord Injury (SCI received interventions with a hybrid bilateral exoskeleton for 4 days. Assessment of gait function revealed that patients improved the 6 minutes and 10 meters walking tests after the intervention, and further improvements were observed one week after the intervention. Muscle examination revealed improvements in knee and hip sagittal muscle balance scores and decreased score in ankle extensor balance. It is concluded that improvements in biomechanical function of the knee joint after the tested overground hybrid gait trainer are coherent with improvements in gait performance.

  11. Compensatory cognitive training for people with first-episode schizophrenia: results from a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendella, Paul D; Burton, Cynthia Z; Tasca, Giorgio A; Roy, Paul; St Louis, Lea; Twamley, Elizabeth W

    2015-03-01

    Cognitive training or remediation now has multiple studies and meta-analyses supporting its efficacy in improving cognition and functioning in people with schizophrenia. However, relatively little is known about cognitive training outcomes in early psychosis. We conducted a pilot randomized controlled trial of Compensatory Cognitive Training (CCT) compared to Treatment as Usual (TAU) in 27 participants with first-episode psychosis who had received treatment for psychosis for less than six months. Assessments of cognition (MATRICS Consensus Cognitive Battery; MCCB) and functional capacity (UCSD Performance-Based Skills Assessment-Brief; UPSA-B) were administered at baseline and following the 12-week treatment. The CCT condition, compared to TAU, was associated with significant improvements on the MCCB composite score, as well as MCCB subtests measuring processing speed (Trail Making) and social cognition (Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test), with large effects on these three outcome measures. There were no significant CCT-associated effects on the UPSA-B or on positive, negative, or depressive symptoms. CCT treatment of cognitive impairments in first-episode schizophrenia is feasible and can result in large effect size improvements in global cognition, processing speed, and social cognition.

  12. STS-56 Commander Cameron and Pilot Oswald at CCT hatch during JSC training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    STS-56 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Commander Kenneth Cameron (right) and Pilot Stephen S. Oswald, wearing launch and entry suits (LESs), stand at the side hatch of the crew compartment trainer (CCT), a shuttle mockup, prior to entering the mockup. Once inside the CCT, they will don their launch and entry helmets (LEHs) and participate in emergency egress (bailout) procedures. The CCT is located in JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9NE.

  13. Flight simulator requirements for airline transport pilot training - An evaluation of motion system design alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, A. T.; Bussolari, S. R.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of motion platform systems on pilot behavior is considered with emphasis placed on civil aviation applications. A dynamic model for human spatial orientation based on the physiological structure and function of the human vestibular system is presented. Motion platform alternatives were evaluated on the basis of the following motion platform conditions: motion with six degrees-of-freedom required for Phase II simulators and two limited motion conditions. Consideration was given to engine flameout, airwork, and approach and landing scenarios.

  14. Commissioning Source and Personality Differences in U.S. Air Force Pilot Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-24

    officership. USAFA cadets are selected by Academy faculty and staff who take into account academic [e.g., grade point average ( GPA )], physical, and... Predictors of Pilot Performance : A Meta- Analysis,” International Journal of Aviation Psychology, 6(1), 1996, pp. 1-20. 13. Campbell JS, Castaneda...Human Performance Wing School of Aerospace Medicine Aeromedical Research Department 2510 Fifth St. Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433-7913

  15. Consistency of the Relations of Cognitive Ability and Personality Traits to Pilot Training Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-22

    human personality. The domains are Neuroticism (sometimes called emotional stability), Extraversion, Openness, Agreeableness, and Conscientiousness . 250...Agreeableness, and Conscientiousness . In one of the earliest reported studies of the use of personality tests for flying personnel, Sells (1955) showed...assigned to fly airlift/tankers versus those assigned to fly fighters for the NEO PI–R domains of Agreeableness and Conscientiousness . Fighter pilots had

  16. Evaluating and Training Substance Abuse Counselors: A Pilot Study Assessing Standardized Patients as Authentic Clients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fussell, Holly E.; Lewy, Colleen S.; McFarland, Bentson H.

    2009-01-01

    Clinician training and supervision are needed to transfer evidence-based practices to community-based treatment organizations. Standardized patients (SPs) are used for clinician training and evaluating. However, to be effective for substance abuse counselors, SPs must realistically portray substance abuse treatment clients. The current study…

  17. Effectiveness of an Emotion Regulation Group Training for Adolescents-a Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuppert, H. Marieke; Giesen-Bloo, Josephine; van Gemert, Tonny G.; Wiersema, Herman M.; Minderaa, Ruud B.; Emmelkamp, Paul M. G.; Nauta, Maaike H.

    2009-01-01

    Emotion Regulation Training (ERT) was developed for adolescents with symptoms of borderline personality disorder (BPD) and emotion dysregulation. ERT is an adaptation of the Systems Training for Emotional Predictability and Problem Solving (STEPPS) programme. This paper describes the background of t

  18. Web-Based Simulation in Psychiatry Residency Training: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorrindo, Tristan; Baer, Lee; Sanders, Kathy M.; Birnbaum, Robert J.; Fromson, John A.; Sutton-Skinner, Kelly M.; Romeo, Sarah A.; Beresin, Eugene V.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Medical specialties, including surgery, obstetrics, anesthesia, critical care, and trauma, have adopted simulation technology for measuring clinical competency as a routine part of their residency training programs; yet, simulation technologies have rarely been adapted or used for psychiatry training. Objective: The authors describe…

  19. EFFECTIVENESS OF A NEW BALANCE TRAINING PROGRAM ON ROCKER BOARD IN SITTING IN STROKE SUBJECTS A PILOT STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandesh Rayamajhi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stroke has been considered to be the most common cause of neurological disability with very high prevalence rate. The recovery of independence following stroke is a complex process requiring the reacquisition of many skills. Since controlling the body’s position in space is essential part of functional skills, restoration of balance is a critical part of the recovery of ability after stroke. Most of the work done regarding balance training in stroke subjects has focused on task-oriented activities and training under varied sensory input and found them to be effective. Studies have also compared the effect of stable and unstable surfaces on balance in stroke subjects and found that balance training on unstable surfaces is more effective in improving static and dynamic balance. There has not been any study till date investigating the effectiveness of balance training program on rocker board which is specific for stroke subjects who have difficulty in standing. Since balance training on rocker board in sitting has proved to be effective in improving balance in subjects with spinal cord injury who have difficulty in standing, there is a need to find out if similar balance training program on rocker board in sitting is also effective for improving balance of stroke subjects. Method: A Pilot study was performed on 10 stroke subjects selected through purposive sampling. Subjects were divided into two groups by randomization as control (CG and experimental group (EG. EG received balance training on a rocker board along with conventional physiotherapy program. The CG received only conventional physiotherapy program. Results: Post-intervention Berg balance scale score of EG and the CG was statistically significant (p < 0.05 in both the groups as compared to pre-treatment depicted through Wilcoxon signed rank analysis within the groups. Greater improvement was observed in the EG compared to the CG post-treatment, analysed through Mann

  20. Outcomes of an Acceptance and Commitment Therapy-Based Skills Training Group for Students with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Quasi-Experimental Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahnke, Johan; Lundgren, Tobias; Hursti, Timo; Hirvikoski, Tatja

    2014-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder is characterized by social impairments and behavioural inflexibility. In this pilot study, the feasibility and outcomes of a 6-week acceptance and commitment therapy-based skills training group were evaluated in a special school setting using a quasi-experimental design (acceptance and commitment therapy/school classes as…

  1. Trauma Non-Technical Training (TNT-2): the development, piloting and multilevel assessment of a simulation-based, interprofessional curriculum for team-based trauma resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doumouras, Aristithes G; Keshet, Itay; Nathens, Avery B; Ahmed, Najma; Hicks, Christopher M

    2014-10-01

    Medical error is common during trauma resuscitations. Most errors are nontechnical, stemming from ineffective team leadership, nonstandardized communication among team members, lack of global situational awareness, poor use of resources and inappropriate triage and prioritization. We developed an interprofessional, simulation-based trauma team training curriculum for Canadian surgical trainees. Here we discuss its piloting and evaluation.

  2. Outcomes of an Acceptance and Commitment Therapy-Based Skills Training Group for Students with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Quasi-Experimental Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahnke, Johan; Lundgren, Tobias; Hursti, Timo; Hirvikoski, Tatja

    2014-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder is characterized by social impairments and behavioural inflexibility. In this pilot study, the feasibility and outcomes of a 6-week acceptance and commitment therapy-based skills training group were evaluated in a special school setting using a quasi-experimental design (acceptance and commitment therapy/school classes as…

  3. F-35 Embedded Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    from the pilot vehicle interface ( PVI ), which enables weapon and expendable countermeasures employment simulations. From TRAIN mode the pilot can...Scenario Debrief Data Aircraft Data Transfer Device ET Scenarios controlled via TRAIN Mode PVI TRAIN Mode Infrastructure JSF OMS VT Scenario...TRAIN mode from the pilot vehicle interface ( PVI ), which enables weapon and expendable countermeasures employment simulations. From TRAIN mode the

  4. Mindfulness training and stress reactivity in substance abuse: results from a randomized, controlled stage I pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Judson A; Sinha, Rajita; Chen, Justin A; Michalsen, Ravenna N; Babuscio, Theresa A; Nich, Charla; Grier, Aleesha; Bergquist, Keri L; Reis, Deidre L; Potenza, Marc N; Carroll, Kathleen M; Rounsaville, Bruce J

    2009-01-01

    Stress is important in substance use disorders (SUDs). Mindfulness training (MT) has shown promise for stress-related maladies. No studies have compared MT to empirically validated treatments for SUDs. The goals of this study were to assess MT compared to cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in substance use and treatment acceptability, and specificity of MT compared to CBT in targeting stress reactivity. Thirty-six individuals with alcohol and/or cocaine use disorders were randomly assigned to receive group MT or CBT in an outpatient setting. Drug use was assessed weekly. After treatment, responses to personalized stress provocation were measured. Fourteen individuals completed treatment. There were no differences in treatment satisfaction or drug use between groups. The laboratory paradigm suggested reduced psychological and physiological indices of stress during provocation in MT compared to CBT. This pilot study provides evidence of the feasibility of MT in treating SUDs and suggests that MT may be efficacious in targeting stress.

  5. FY 2008 Next Generation Safeguards Initiative International Safeguards Education and Training Pilot Progerams Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreicer, M; Anzelon, G; Essner, J; Dougan, A; Doyle, J; Boyer, B; Hypes, P; Sokova, E; Wehling, F

    2008-10-17

    Key component of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) launched by the National Nuclear Security Administration is the development of human capital to meet present and future challenges to the safeguards regime. An effective university-level education in safeguards and related disciplines is an essential element in a layered strategy to rebuild the safeguards human resource capacity. Two pilot programs at university level, involving 44 students, were initiated and implemented in spring-summer 2008 and linked to hands-on internships at LANL or LLNL. During the internships, students worked on specific safeguards-related projects with a designated Laboratory Mentor to provide broader exposure to nuclear materials management and information analytical techniques. The Safeguards and Nuclear Material Management pilot program was a collaboration between the Texas A&M University (TAMU), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). It included a 16-lecture course held during a summer internship program. The instructors for the course were from LANL together with TAMU faculty and LLNL experts. The LANL-based course was shared with the students spending their internship at LLNL via video conference. A week-long table-top (or hands-on) exercise on was also conducted at LANL. The student population was a mix of 28 students from a 12 universities participating in a variety of summer internship programs held at LANL and LLNL. A large portion of the students were TAMU students participating in the NGSI pilot. The International Nuclear Safeguards Policy and Information Analysis pilot program was implemented at the Monterey Institute for International Studies (MIIS) in cooperation with LLNL. It included a two-week intensive course consisting of 20 lectures and two exercises. MIIS, LLNL, and speakers from other U.S. national laboratories (LANL, BNL) delivered lectures for the audience of 16 students. The majority of students were

  6. Effectiveness of training community-based rehabilitation workers on multiple disabilities: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Samuel V Raj

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Community-based rehabilitation (CBR as a developmental strategy addresses the needs of people with disabilities and their family. CBR personals at remote rural play an important role in early detection and prevention of disabilities. The identification with proper guidance can help to overcome the scarcity in early detection. An effective training for rehabilitation workers should contain training program emphasis on multiple disabilities. Aims: The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of training CBR personal with relation to knowledge on multiple disabilities. Settings and Design: An experimental design of 12 month's intervention confined to Chamarajanagar district. Subjects and Methods: A total of 20 subjects of trained CBR personals with the age group of 20–45 years were included in this study. The initial baseline evaluation was performed with a pretest questionnaire to assess their knowledge. The training with practical exposure on multiple disabilities was carried out at an interval of 3 months. The posttest at 12 months was analyzed. Statistical Analysis Used: SPSS version 16 for Windows was used for analysis. The results were statistically analyzed using paired test, Chi-square test, and ANOVA for between and within the groups. Results: The results showed significance on effectiveness of training. There was an improvement in outcome measures reflecting on identification and management of disabilities. Conclusions: The knowledge regarding early identification of disabilities plays an important role. Implementation of training methods on a regular interval and as a part in continuing education plays an important source for better outcome.

  7. Controlling memory impairment in elderly adults using virtual reality memory training: a randomized controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Optale, Gabriele; Urgesi, Cosimo; Busato, Valentina; Marin, Silvia; Piron, Lamberto; Priftis, Konstantinos; Gamberini, Luciano; Capodieci, Salvatore; Bordin, Adalberto

    2010-05-01

    Memory decline is a prevalent aspect of aging but may also be the first sign of cognitive pathology. Virtual reality (VR) using immersion and interaction may provide new approaches to the treatment of memory deficits in elderly individuals. The authors implemented a VR training intervention to try to lessen cognitive decline and improve memory functions. The authors randomly assigned 36 elderly residents of a rest care facility (median age 80 years) who were impaired on the Verbal Story Recall Test either to the experimental group (EG) or the control group (CG). The EG underwent 6 months of VR memory training (VRMT) that involved auditory stimulation and VR experiences in path finding. The initial training phase lasted 3 months (3 auditory and 3 VR sessions every 2 weeks), and there was a booster training phase during the following 3 months (1 auditory and 1 VR session per week). The CG underwent equivalent face-to-face training sessions using music therapy. Both groups participated in social and creative and assisted-mobility activities. Neuropsychological and functional evaluations were performed at baseline, after the initial training phase, and after the booster training phase. The EG showed significant improvements in memory tests, especially in long-term recall with an effect size of 0.7 and in several other aspects of cognition. In contrast, the CG showed progressive decline. The authors suggest that VRMT may improve memory function in elderly adults by enhancing focused attention.

  8. A pilot study of surgical training using a virtual robotic surgery simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tergas, Ana I; Sheth, Sangini B; Green, Isabel C; Giuntoli, Robert L; Winder, Abigail D; Fader, Amanda N

    2013-01-01

    Our objectives were to compare the utility of learning a suturing task on the virtual reality da Vinci Skills Simulator versus the da Vinci Surgical System dry laboratory platform and to assess user satisfaction among novice robotic surgeons. Medical trainees were enrolled prospectively; one group trained on the virtual reality simulator, and the other group trained on the da Vinci dry laboratory platform. Trainees received pretesting and post-testing on the dry laboratory platform. Participants then completed an anonymous online user experience and satisfaction survey. We enrolled 20 participants. Mean pretest completion times did not significantly differ between the 2 groups. Training with either platform was associated with a similar decrease in mean time to completion (simulator platform group, 64.9 seconds [P = .04]; dry laboratory platform group, 63.9 seconds [P virtual reality platform. The majority found the training "definitely useful" in improving robotic surgical skills (mean, 4.6) and would attend future training sessions (mean, 4.5). Training on the virtual reality robotic simulator or the dry laboratory robotic surgery platform resulted in significant improvements in time to completion and economy of motion for novice robotic surgeons. Although there was a perception that both simulators improved performance, there was a preference for the virtual reality simulator. Benefits unique to the simulator platform include autonomy of use, computerized performance feedback, and ease of setup. These features may facilitate more efficient and sophisticated simulation training above that of the conventional dry laboratory platform, without loss of efficacy.

  9. Treadmill training improves overground walking economy in Parkinson's disease: a randomized, controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Del-Olmo, Miguel Angel; Sanchez, Jose Andres; Bello, Olalla; Lopez-Alonso, Virginia; Márquez, Gonzalo; Morenilla, Luis; Castro, Xabier; Giraldez, Manolo; Santos-García, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Gait disturbances are one of the principal and most incapacitating symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). In addition, walking economy is impaired in PD patients and could contribute to excess fatigue in this population. An important number of studies have shown that treadmill training can improve kinematic parameters in PD patients. However, the effects of treadmill and overground walking on the walking economy remain unknown. The goal of this study was to explore the walking economy changes in response to a treadmill and an overground training program, as well as the differences in the walking economy during treadmill and overground walking. Twenty-two mild PD patients were randomly assigned to a treadmill or overground training group. The training program consisted of 5 weeks (3 sessions/week). We evaluated the energy expenditure of overground walking, before and after each of the training programs. The energy expenditure of treadmill walking (before the program) was also evaluated. The treadmill, but not the overground training program, lead to an improvement in the walking economy (the rate of oxygen consumed per distance during overground walking at a preferred speed) in PD patients. In addition, walking on a treadmill required more energy expenditure compared with overground walking at the same speed. This study provides evidence that in mild PD patients, treadmill training is more beneficial compared with that of walking overground, leading to a greater improvement in the walking economy. This finding is of clinical importance for the therapeutic administration of exercise in PD.

  10. Working Memory Training in Patients with Chronic Schizophrenia: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Hubacher

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. There is evidence that patients with schizophrenia suffer from decline in working memory performance with consequences for psychosocial outcome. Objective. To evaluate the efficacy of a computerized working memory training program (BrainStim in patients with chronic schizophrenia. Methods. Twenty-nine inpatients with chronic schizophrenia were assigned to either the intervention group receiving working memory training (N=15 or the control group without intervention (N=14. Training was performed four times a week for 45 minutes during four weeks under neuropsychological supervision. At baseline and followup all participants underwent neuropsychological testing. Results. Pre-post comparisons of neuropsychological measures showed improvements in visual and verbal working memories and visual short-term memory with small and large effect sizes in the intervention group. In contrast, the control group showed decreased performance in verbal working memory and only slight changes in visual working memory and visual and verbal short-term memories after 4 weeks. Analyses of training profiles during application of BrainStim revealed increased performance over the 4-week training period. Conclusions. The applied training tool BrainStim improved working memory and short-term memory in patients with chronic schizophrenia. The present study implies that chronic schizophrenic patients can benefit from computerized cognitive remediation training of working memory in a clinical setting.

  11. Problem-solving skills training for parents of children with chronic pain: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palermo, Tonya M; Law, Emily F; Bromberg, Maggie; Fales, Jessica; Eccleston, Christopher; Wilson, Anna C

    2016-06-01

    This pilot randomized controlled trial aimed to determine the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy of parental problem-solving skills training (PSST) compared with treatment as usual on improving parental mental health symptoms, physical health and well-being, and parenting behaviors. Effects of parent PSST on child outcomes (pain, emotional, and physical functioning) were also examined. Participants included 61 parents of children aged 10 to 17 years with chronic pain randomized to PSST (n = 31) or treatment as usual (n = 30) groups. Parents receiving PSST participated in 4 to 6 individual sessions of training in problem-solving skills. Outcomes were assessed at pretreatment, immediately after treatment, and at a 3-month follow-up. Feasibility was determined by therapy session attendance, therapist ratings, and parent treatment acceptability ratings. Feasibility of PSST delivery in this population was demonstrated by high compliance with therapy attendance, excellent retention, high therapist ratings of treatment engagement, and high parent ratings of treatment acceptability. PSST was associated with posttreatment improvements in parental depression (d = -0.68), general mental health (d = 0.64), and pain catastrophizing (d = -0.48), as well as in child depression (d = -0.49), child general anxiety (d = -0.56), and child pain-specific anxiety (d = -0.82). Several effects were maintained at the 3-month follow-up. Findings demonstrate that PSST is feasible and acceptable to parents of youths with chronic pain. Treatment outcome analyses show promising but mixed patterns of effects of PSST on parent and child mental health outcomes. Further rigorous trials of PSST are needed to extend these pilot results.

  12. A competency based selection procedure for Dutch postgraduate GP training: a pilot study on validity and reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, Margit I; Tromp, Fred; Zuithoff, Nicolaas P A; Pieters, Ron H M; Damoiseaux, Roger A M J; Kuyvenhoven, Marijke M

    2014-12-01

    Abstract Background: Historically, semi-structured interviews (SSI) have been the core of the Dutch selection for postgraduate general practice (GP) training. This paper describes a pilot study on a newly designed competency-based selection procedure that assesses whether candidates have the competencies that are required to complete GP training. The objective was to explore reliability and validity aspects of the instruments developed. The new selection procedure comprising the National GP Knowledge Test (LHK), a situational judgement tests (SJT), a patterned behaviour descriptive interview (PBDI) and a simulated encounter (SIM) was piloted alongside the current procedure. Forty-seven candidates volunteered in both procedures. Admission decision was based on the results of the current procedure. Study participants did hardly differ from the other candidates. The mean scores of the candidates on the LHK and SJT were 21.9 % (SD 8.7) and 83.8% (SD 3.1), respectively. The mean self-reported competency scores (PBDI) were higher than the observed competencies (SIM): 3.7(SD 0.5) and 2.9(SD 0.6), respectively. Content-related competencies showed low correlations with one another when measured with different instruments, whereas more diverse competencies measured by a single instrument showed strong to moderate correlations. Moreover, a moderate correlation between LHK and SJT was found. The internal consistencies (intraclass correlation, ICC) of LHK and SJT were poor while the ICC of PBDI and SIM showed acceptable levels of reliability. Findings on content validity and reliability of these new instruments are promising to realize a competency based procedure. Further development of the instruments and research on predictive validity should be pursued.

  13. Endurance Exercise Training in Young Adults with Barth Syndrome: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cade, W Todd; Reeds, Dominic N; Peterson, Linda R; Bohnert, Kathryn L; Tinius, Rachel A; Benni, Paul B; Byrne, Barry J; Taylor, Carolyn L

    2017-01-01

    Barth syndrome (BTHS) is a rare X-linked disorder that is characterized by mitochondrial abnormalities, cardio-skeletal myopathy, exercise intolerance, and premature mortality. The effect on endurance exercise training on exercise tolerance, cardio-skeletal function, and quality of life in BTHS is unknown. Four young adults (23 ± 5 years, n = 4) with BTHS participated in a 12-week, supervised, individualized endurance exercise training program. Exercise training was performed on a cycle ergometer for 30-45' three times per week at a moderate intensity level. Exercise tolerance was measured by graded exercise testing and peak oxygen consumption, heart function via two-dimensional and M-mode echocardiography, skeletal muscle function by near-infrared spectroscopy, and quality of life through the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure questionnaire. There were no adverse events during exercise testing or training for any participant. Peak oxygen consumption modestly (~5%) improved in three or four participants. Mean quality of life questions regarding dyspnea and side effects from medications significantly improved following exercise training. Mean resting heart function or skeletal muscle oxygen extraction during exercise did not improve after exercise training. Endurance exercise training is safe and appears to modestly improve peak exercise tolerance and certain measures of quality of life in young adults with BTHS. However, compared to improvements resulting from endurance exercise training seen in other non-BTHS mitochondrial myopathies and heart failure, these improvements appear blunted. Further research into the most beneficial mode, intensity and frequency of exercise training in BTHS is warranted.

  14. Preparing residents in training to become health-care leaders: a pilot project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurrera, Ronald J; Dismukes, Rodney; Edwards, Matthew; Feroze, Usama; Nakshabandi, Firas; Tanaka, Gen; Tang, Michael

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study is to describe a successful and exportable training module that addresses Next Accreditation System (NAS) behavioral milestones for leadership competencies. A novel leadership training module, which required the creation of original business plans by teams of residents, was incorporated into a psychiatry PGY-2 training curriculum. In the creation and presentation of their business plans, the residents demonstrated competencies in the NAS functional domains of interpersonal and communication skills, professionalism, practice-based learning and improvement, and systems-based practice. Residents who responded with feedback after completing the course were very positive about their experience. The leadership training module described here allowed residents to acquire and demonstrate many of the competencies specified in leadership-oriented NAS milestones. The module did not require additional funding or a formal rotation or "track," is scalable to accommodate any number of residents and can be modified based on available local teaching resources.

  15. Task-specific ankle robotics gait training after stroke: a randomized pilot study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Forrester, Larry W; Roy, Anindo; Hafer-Macko, Charlene; Krebs, Hermano I; Macko, Richard F

    2016-01-01

    An unsettled question in the use of robotics for post-stroke gait rehabilitation is whether task-specific locomotor training is more effective than targeting individual joint impairments to improve walking function...

  16. A STUDY OF THE IMPACT OF EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE TRAINING IN PHYSIOTHERAPY INTERNS A PILOT STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishakha Patil

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Physiotherapy is a branch of medicine where development of a good rapport between patient and therapist coupled with presence of a caring attitude and emotional understanding of patients would facilitate faster recovery. This study assessed the effect of Emotional Intelligence (EI training in physiotherapy interns to help them understand their patients better and enhance their self awareness while patient’s perceived change in care was examined. Methods: 8 physiotherapy interns completed an EI scale at the start and end of the study. A scale assessing change in Consultation and Relational Empathy (CARE was administered to patients prior to and after the EI training. A retrospective pre and post questionnaire was helped assess change in personal attitude and awareness for the interns. All interns were trained using 6 modules on EI via lectures, case vignettes and discussions. Results: Statistically significant differences in scores were noted on the EI scale, retrospective pre and post questionnaire and the CARE questionnaire (p< 0.05. A correlation done between the retro-post questionnaire and post training CARE scale scores revealed a positive correlation between patient perception of better care and enhanced self awareness in interns (r = 0.88847, p = 0.00318. Conclusion: EI training helped improving patient care and self awareness in physiotherapy interns leading to better care being perceived by patients. This study demonstrates the educational value of EI training emphasizing the need for the regular inclusion of EI training in physiotherapy training curriculums. Further studies to validate these findings are warranted.

  17. Task-specific ankle robotics gait training after stroke: a randomized pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Forrester, Larry W.; Roy, Anindo; Hafer-Macko, Charlene; Krebs, Hermano I.; Macko, Richard F.

    2016-01-01

    Background An unsettled question in the use of robotics for post-stroke gait rehabilitation is whether task-specific locomotor training is more effective than targeting individual joint impairments to improve walking function. The paretic ankle is implicated in gait instability and fall risk, but is difficult to therapeutically isolate and refractory to recovery. We hypothesize that in chronic stroke, treadmill-integrated ankle robotics training is more effective to improve gait function than...

  18. Neuropsychological benefits of a narrative cognitive training program for people living with dementia: A pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Federico Batini; Giulia Toti; Marco Bartolucci

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many areas in the cortex are active during reading of narrative material, and these activations in the brain produce significant changes in connectivity. Following previous results showing cognitive benefits in memory domains of a narrative training program in nursing home patients living with dementia, the aim of the present study was to perform a more in depth investigation of the effects of this training on memory domains and other cognitive areas. Methods: An experimental group ...

  19. Sex-related effects in strength training during adolescence: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehlbauer, Thomas; Gollhofer, Albert; Granacher, Urs

    2012-12-01

    The objective was to investigate the effects of high-velocity strength training on isometric strength of the leg extensors and jump height in female and male adolescents. Twenty-eight students (13 boys, 15 girls) ages 16 to 17 years participated in this study and were assigned to either a strength training group or a control group. Strength training was conducted over 8 weeks (2 times per week). Pre- and post-training tests included the measurements of maximal isometric force and rate of force development of the leg extensors as well as countermovement jump height. Both girls (effect size = 1.37) and boys (effect size = 0.61) showed significant improvements in jump height. However, significant increases in maximal isometric force (effect size = 1.85) and rate of force development (effect size = 2.23) were found only in girls. In female and male adolescents, high-velocity strength training is an effective training regimen that produced improvements in countermovement jump height in both sexes but higher gains in maximal isometric force and rate of force development in girls.

  20. Students' Perceptions on an Interprofessional Ward Round Training – A Qualitative Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikendei, C.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ward rounds are an essential activity for interprofessional teams in hospital settings and represent complex tasks requiring not only medical knowledge but also communication skills, clinical technical skills, patient management skills and team-work skills. The present study aimed to analyse final year students’, nurses’ as well as physiotherapists’ views on a simulation-based interprofessional ward round training.Methods: In two successive passes a total number of 29 final year students, nursing students and physiotherapy students (16 in the first run, 13 in the second volunteered to participate in two standardized patient ward round scenarios: (1 patient with myocardial infarction, and (2 patient with poorly controlled diabetes. Views on the interprofessional ward round training were assessed using focus groups.Results: Focus group based feedback contained two main categories (A ward round training benefits and (B difficulties. Positive aspects enfolded course preparation, setting of the training, the involvement of the participants during training and the positive learning atmosphere. Difficulties were seen in the flawed atmosphere and realization of ward rounds in the daily clinical setting with respect to inter-professional aspects, and course benefit for the different professional groups.Conclusion: The presented inter-professional ward round training represents a well received and valuable model of interprofessional learning. Further research should assess its effectiveness, processes of interprofessional interplay and transfer into clinical practice.

  1. Photographed Rapid HIV Test Results Pilot Novel Quality Assessment and Training Schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Yu-Ho C.; Ong, Joanna; Walker, Sandy; Kumalawati, July; Gartinah, Tintin; McPhee, Dale A.; Dax, Elizabeth M.

    2011-01-01

    HIV rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) are now used widely in non-laboratory settings by non-laboratory-trained operators. Quality assurance programmes are essential in ensuring the quality of HIV RDT outcomes. However, there is no cost-effective means of supplying the many operators of RDTs with suitable quality assurance schemes. Therefore, it was examined whether photograph-based RDT results could be used and correctly interpreted in the non-laboratory setting. Further it was investigated if a single training session improved the interpretation skills of RDT operators. The photographs were interpreted, a 10-minute tutorial given and then a second interpretation session was held. It was established that the results could be read with accuracy. The participants (n = 75) with a range of skills interpreted results (>80% concordance with reference results) from a panel of 10 samples (three negative and seven positive) using four RDTs. Differences in accuracy of interpretation before and after the tutorial were marked in some cases. Training was more effective for improving the accurate interpretation of more complex results, e.g. results with faint test lines or for multiple test lines, and especially for improving interpretation skills of inexperienced participants. It was demonstrated that interpretation of RDTs was improved using photographed results allied to a 10-minute training session. It is anticipated that this method could be used for training but also for quality assessment of RDT operators without access to conventional quality assurance or training schemes requiring wet samples. PMID:21483842

  2. Six weeks of core stability training improves landing kinetics among female capoeira athletes: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Simone; Cohen, Daniel; Hayes, Lawrence

    2015-03-29

    Core stability training (CST) has increased in popularity among athletes and the general fitness population despite limited evidence CST programmes alone lead to improved athletic performance. In female athletes, neuromuscular training combining balance training and trunk and hip/pelvis dominant CST is suggested to reduce injury risk, and specifically peak vertical ground reaction forces (vGRF) in a drop jump landing task. However, the isolated effect of trunk dominant core stability training on vGRF during landing in female athletes had not been evaluated. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate landing kinetics during a drop jump test following a CST intervention in female capoeira athletes. After giving their informed written consent, sixteen female capoeira athletes (mean ± SD age, stature, and body mass of 27.3 ± 3.7 years, 165.0 ± 4.0 cm, and 59.7 ± 6.3 kg, respectively) volunteered to participate in the training program which consisted of static and dynamic CST sessions, three times per week for six weeks. The repeated measures T-test revealed participants significantly reduced relative vGRF from pre- to post-intervention for the first (3.40 ± 0.78 vs. 2.85 ± 0.52 N·NBW-1, respectively [pcore stability training improves landing kinetics without improving jump height, and may reduce lower extremity injury risk in female athletes.

  3. Relationship between burnout and communication skill training among Japanese hospital nurses: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Takashi; Mizoue, Tetsuya; Kubota, Shinya; Mishima, Norio; Nagata, Shoji

    2003-05-01

    We investigated the relationship between burnout and communication skill training among Japanese hospital nurses to improve the mental health of human service workers. The subjects were forty-five registered nurses referred to a self-expression skill intervention program by their section superiors, with each superior choosing from two to five nurses. The hospital was located in the Kyushu area and staffed by about four hundred nurses. The subjects were divided into an intervention group (19 nurses) and a reference group (26 nurses). The intervention group received the communication skill training in July and August, 2001. The communication skill training was carried out in accordance with the assertiveness training (AsT) precepts of Anne Dickson. In June, 2001, we delivered a set of questionnaires including age, gender, working years, a burnout scale, and a communication skill check-list as a baseline survey. The baseline questionnaires were returned at the end of June, 2001. In January, 2002, we delivered the same questionnaire again to the two groups and collected them at the end of the month. Excluding the only male and insufficient answers, twenty-six nurses (58%) returned complete answers in the initial and subsequent surveys. We found that the personal accomplishment and the two communication skills such as "accepting valid criticisms" and "negotiation" of the intervention group had improved significantly five months after the training as compared with that of the reference. Our results implied that communication skill training might have a favorable effect on burnout among Japanese hospital nurses.

  4. Cognitive training of self-initiation of semantic encoding strategies in schizophrenia: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimond, Synthia; Lepage, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Available cognitive remediation interventions have a significant but relatively small to moderate impact on episodic memory in schizophrenia. The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and feasibility of a brief novel episodic memory training targeting the self-initiation of semantic encoding strategies. To select patients with such deficits, 28 participants with schizophrenia performed our Semantic Encoding Memory Task (SEMT) that provides a measure of self-initiated semantic encoding strategies. This task identified a deficit in 13 participants who were then offered two 60-minute training sessions one week apart. After the training, patients performed an alternate version of the SEMT. The CVLT-II (a standardised measure of semantic encoding strategies) and the BVMT-R (a control spatial memory task) were used to quantify memory pre- and post-training. After the training, participants were significantly better at self-initiating semantic encoding strategies in the SEMT (p = .004) and in the CVLT-II (p = .002). No significant differences were found in the BVMT-R. The current study demonstrates that a brief and specific training in memory strategies can help patients to improve a deficient memory process in schizophrenia. Future studies will need to test this intervention further using a randomised controlled trial, and to explore its functional impact.

  5. National Spill Control School. A pilot program in environmental training. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberholtzer, G.R.; Acuff, J.T.

    1980-01-01

    Increased environmental awareness and the amended Federal Water Pollution Control Act of 1972 required an increased level of expertise by the American Public in the field of oil spill prevention and control. The National Spill Control School was created at Corpus Christi State University to help meet this need. Drawing on the talents of a nationwide sample of experts in this field, the project team created a unique management oriented course. A review of the origination and experiences of two years of classes of this pilot program is provided in this report.

  6. Comparison of strength training, aerobic training, and additional physical therapy as supplementary treatments for Parkinson's disease: pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Alessandro; Barbirato, Dannyel; Araujo, Narahyana; Martins, Jose Vicente; Cavalcanti, Jose Luiz Sá; Santos, Tony Meireles; Coutinho, Evandro S; Laks, Jerson; Deslandes, Andrea C

    2015-01-01

    Physical rehabilitation is commonly used in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) to improve their health and alleviate the symptoms. We compared the effects of three programs, strength training (ST), aerobic training (AT), and physiotherapy, on motor symptoms, functional capacity, and electroencephalographic (EEG) activity in PD patients. Twenty-two patients were recruited and randomized into three groups: AT (70% of maximum heart rate), ST (80% of one repetition maximum), and physiotherapy (in groups). Subjects participated in their respective interventions twice a week for 12 weeks. The assessments included measures of disease symptoms (Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale [UPDRS]), functional capacity (Senior Fitness Test), and EEG before and after 12 weeks of intervention. The PD motor symptoms (UPDRS-III) in the group of patients who performed ST and AT improved by 27.5% (effect size [ES]=1.25, confidence interval [CI]=-0.11, 2.25) and 35% (ES=1.34, CI=-0.16, 2.58), respectively, in contrast to the physiotherapy group, which showed a 2.9% improvement (ES=0.07, CI=-0.85, 0.99). Furthermore, the functional capacity of all three groups improved after the intervention. The mean frequency of the EEG analysis mainly showed the effect of the interventions on the groups (F=11.50, P=0.0001). ST and AT in patients with PD are associated with improved outcomes in disease symptoms and functional capacity.

  7. Task-specific ankle robotics gait training after stroke: a randomized pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Larry W; Roy, Anindo; Hafer-Macko, Charlene; Krebs, Hermano I; Macko, Richard F

    2016-06-02

    An unsettled question in the use of robotics for post-stroke gait rehabilitation is whether task-specific locomotor training is more effective than targeting individual joint impairments to improve walking function. The paretic ankle is implicated in gait instability and fall risk, but is difficult to therapeutically isolate and refractory to recovery. We hypothesize that in chronic stroke, treadmill-integrated ankle robotics training is more effective to improve gait function than robotics focused on paretic ankle impairments. Participants with chronic hemiparetic gait were randomized to either six weeks of treadmill-integrated ankle robotics (n = 14) or dose-matched seated ankle robotics (n = 12) videogame training. Selected gait measures were collected at baseline, post-training, and six-week retention. Friedman, and Wilcoxon Sign Rank and Fisher's exact tests evaluated within and between group differences across time, respectively. Six weeks post-training, treadmill robotics proved more effective than seated robotics to increase walking velocity, paretic single support, paretic push-off impulse, and active dorsiflexion range of motion. Treadmill robotics durably improved gait dorsiflexion swing angle leading 6/7 initially requiring ankle braces to self-discarded them, while their unassisted paretic heel-first contacts increased from 44 % to 99.6 %, versus no change in assistive device usage (0/9) following seated robotics. Treadmill-integrated, but not seated ankle robotics training, durably improves gait biomechanics, reversing foot drop, restoring walking propulsion, and establishing safer foot landing in chronic stroke that may reduce reliance on assistive devices. These findings support a task-specific approach integrating adaptive ankle robotics with locomotor training to optimize mobility recovery. NCT01337960. https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01337960?term=NCT01337960&rank=1.

  8. Pilot Evaluation of a Communication Skills Training Program for Psychiatry Residents Using Standardized Patient Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditton-Phare, Philippa; Sandhu, Harsimrat; Kelly, Brian; Kissane, David; Loughland, Carmel

    2016-10-01

    Mental health clinicians can experience difficulties communicating diagnostic information to patients and their families/carers, especially about distressing psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. There is evidence for the effectiveness of communication skills training (CST) for improving diagnostic discussions, particularly in specialties such as oncology, but only limited evidence exists about CST for psychiatry. This study evaluated a CST program specifically developed for psychiatry residents called ComPsych that focuses on conveying diagnostic and prognostic information about schizophrenia. The ComPsych program consists of an introductory lecture, module booklets for trainees, and exemplary skills videos, followed by small group role-plays with simulated patients (SPs) led by a trained facilitator. A standardized patient assessment (SPA) was digitally recorded pre- and post-training with a SP using a standardized scenario in a time-limited (15 min) period. Recorded SPAs were independently rated using a validated coding system (ComSkil) to identify frequency of skills used in five skills categories (agenda setting, checking, questioning, information organization, and empathic communication). Thirty trainees (15 males and 15 females; median age = 32) undertaking their vocational specialty training in psychiatry participated in ComPsych training and pre- and post-ComPsych SPAs. Skills increased post-training for agenda setting (d = -0.82), while questioning skills (d = 0.56) decreased. There were no significant differences in any other skills grouping, although checking, information organization, and empathic communication skills tended to increase post-training. A dose effect was observed for agenda setting, with trainees who attended more CST sessions outperforming those attending fewer. Findings support the generalization and translation of ComPsych CST to psychiatry.

  9. Training residents in problem-solving treatment of depression: a pilot feasibility and impact study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegel, Mark T; Dietrich, Allen J; Seville, Janette L; Jordan, Caren B

    2004-03-01

    Primary care patients with depression may prefer or require a non-pharmacological treatment such as counseling. We investigated the feasibility of teaching family medicine residents an evidence-based brief counseling intervention for depression (Problem-solving Treatment of Depression for Primary Care [PST-PC]). Eleven residents over 3 consecutive years were provided a brief training program in PST-PC. Residents were evaluated for skill acquisition, changes in self efficacy, intentions to improve their care for depression, and post-residency integration of PST-PC into their daily practice. Trainees met established criteria for competency to administer PST-PC. They improved to moderate-to-high levels of self efficacy for treating depression, including for their counseling skills, and in their intentions to improve their depression management. At up to 3 years post residency, 90% indicated they were using PST-PC, often in a modified form, and also for illnesses other than depression. They indicated they would recommend the training to new residents. The PST-PC training program evaluated in this study is feasible in residency training and appears to influence practice post residency. These findings warrant continued investigation of this training program with a larger sample of residents and evaluation of outcomes with depressed patients treated with PST-PC in real-world practice settings.

  10. Evaluation of a Pilot Project to Introduce Simulation-Based Team Training to Pediatric Surgery Trauma Room Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Lehner

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Several studies in pediatric trauma care have demonstrated substantial deficits in both prehospital and emergency department management. Methods. In February 2015 the PAEDSIM collaborative conducted a one and a half day interdisciplinary, simulation based team-training course in a simulated pediatric emergency department. 14 physicians from the medical fields of pediatric surgery, pediatric intensive care and emergency medicine, and anesthesia participated, as well as four pediatric nurses. After a theoretical introduction and familiarization with the simulator, course attendees alternately participated in six simulation scenarios and debriefings. Each scenario incorporated elements of pediatric trauma management as well as Crew Resource Management (CRM educational objectives. Participants completed anonymous pre- and postcourse questionnaires and rated the course itself as well as their own medical qualification and knowledge of CRM. Results. Participants found the course very realistic and selected scenarios highly relevant to their daily work. They reported a feeling of improved medical and nontechnical skills as well as no uncomfortable feeling during scenarios or debriefings. Conclusion. To our knowledge this pilot-project represents the first successful implementation of a simulation-based team-training course focused on pediatric trauma care in German-speaking countries with good acceptance.

  11. Short cognitive behavioral therapy and cognitive training for adults with ADHD – a randomized controlled pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virta, Maarit; Salakari, Anita; Antila, Mervi; Chydenius, Esa; Partinen, Markku; Kaski, Markus; Vataja, Risto; Kalska, Hely; Iivanainen, Matti

    2010-01-01

    In clinical practice, a growing need exists for effective non-pharmacological treatments of adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Here, we present the results of a pilot study of 10 adults with ADHD participating in short-term individual cognitive- behavioral therapy (CBT), 9 adults participating in cognitive training (CT), and 10 controls. Self-report questionnaires, independent evaluations, and computerized neurocognitive testing were collected before and after the treatments to evaluate change. There were distinctive pre-hypotheses regarding the treatments, and therefore the statistical comparisons were conducted in pairs: CBT vs control, CT vs control, and CBT vs CT. In a combined ADHD symptom score based on self-reports, 6 participants in CBT, 2 in CT and 2 controls improved. Using independent evaluations, improvement was found in 7 of the CBT participants, 2 of CT participants and 3 controls. There was no treatment-related improvement in cognitive performance. Thus, in the CBT group, some encouraging improvement was seen, although not as clearly as in previous research with longer interventions. In the CT group, there was improvement in the trained tasks but no generalization of the improvement to the tasks of the neurocognitive testing, the self- report questionnaires, or the independent evaluations. These preliminary results warrant further studies with more participants and with more elaborate cognitive testing. PMID:20856608

  12. Preoperative ambulatory inspiratory muscle training in patients undergoing esophagectomy. A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrelli, Taciana Freitas; de Carvalho Ramos, Marisa; Guglielminetti, Rachel; Silva, Alex Augusto; Crema, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    A major decline in pulmonary function is observed on the first day after upper abdominal surgery. This decline can reduce vital and inspiratory capacity and can culminate in restrictive lung diseases that cause atelectasis, reduced diaphragm movement, and respiratory insufficiency. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of preoperative ambulatory respiratory muscle training in patients undergoing esophagectomy. The sample consisted of 20 adult patients (14 men [70%] and 6 women [30%]) with a diagnosis of advanced chagasic megaesophagus. A significant increase in maximum inspiratory pressure was observed after inspiratory muscle training when compared with baseline values (from -55.059 ± 18.359 to -76.286 ± 16.786). Preoperative ambulatory inspiratory muscle training was effective in increasing respiratory muscle strength in patients undergoing esophagectomy and contributed to the prevention of postoperative complications.

  13. Effect of Resistance Training on Hematological Blood Markers in Older Men and Women: A Pilot Study

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    Florian Bobeuf

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the effects of resistance training on hematological blood markers in older individuals. Twenty-nine men and women participated to this study. Subjects were randomized in 2 groups: (1 control (n=13 and (2 resistance training (n=16. At baseline and after the intervention, subjects were submitted to a blood sample to determine their hematological profile (red blood cells, hemoglobin, hematocrit, platelets, leukocytes, neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, red cell distribution width. At baseline, no difference was observed between groups. Moreover, we found no significant difference after the intervention on any of these markers. A 6-month resistance program in healthy older individuals seems to have no beneficial nor deleterious effects on hematological blood parameters. However, resistance training was well tolerated and should be recommended for other health purposes. Further studies are needed to confirm these results in a large population.

  14. Comparison of strength training, aerobic training, and additional physical therapy as supplementary treatments for Parkinson’s disease: pilot study

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    Carvalho A

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Alessandro Carvalho,1,2 Dannyel Barbirato,1 Narahyana Araujo,1 Jose Vicente Martins,3 Jose Luiz Sá Cavalcanti,3 Tony Meireles Santos,4 Evandro S Coutinho,5 Jerson Laks,1,2 Andrea C Deslandes1 1Centro de Doença de Alzheimer e Outros Transtornos da Velhice, Instituto de Psiquiatria, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; 2Centro de Estudo de Pesquisa do Envelhecimento, Instituto Vital Brazil, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; 3Instituto de Neurologia Deolindo Couto, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; 4Departamento de Educação Física da Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Pernambuco, Brazil; 5Departamento de Epidemiologia e Métodos Quantitativos em Saúde. Escola Nacional de Saúde Pública-FIOCRUZ, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Introduction: Physical rehabilitation is commonly used in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD to improve their health and alleviate the symptoms. Objective: We compared the effects of three programs, strength training (ST, aerobic training (AT, and physiotherapy, on motor symptoms, functional capacity, and electroencephalographic (EEG activity in PD patients. Methods: Twenty-two patients were recruited and randomized into three groups: AT (70% of maximum heart rate, ST (80% of one repetition maximum, and physiotherapy (in groups. Subjects participated in their respective interventions twice a week for 12 weeks. The assessments included measures of disease symptoms (Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale [UPDRS], functional capacity (Senior Fitness Test, and EEG before and after 12 weeks of intervention. Results: The PD motor symptoms (UPDRS-III in the group of patients who performed ST and AT improved by 27.5% (effect size [ES]=1.25, confidence interval [CI]=-0.11, 2.25 and 35% (ES=1.34, CI=-0.16, 2.58, respectively, in contrast to the physiotherapy group, which showed a 2.9% improvement (ES=0.07, CI=-0.85, 0.99. Furthermore, the functional capacity of all three groups

  15. Systematic Braiding of Two Evidence-Based Parent Training Programs: Qualitative Results from the Pilot Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guastaferro, Kate; Miller, Katy; Shanley Chatham, Jenelle R.; Whitaker, Daniel J.; McGilly, Kate; Lutzker, John R.

    2017-01-01

    An effective approach in early intervention for children and families, including child maltreatment prevention, is home-based services. Though several evidence-based programs exist, they are often grouped together, despite having different foci. This paper describes an ongoing cluster randomized trial systematically braiding two evidence-based home-based models, SafeCare® and Parents as Teachers (PAT)®, to better meet the needs of families at-risk. We describe the methodology for braiding model implementation and curriculum, specifically focusing on how structured qualitative feedback from pilot families and providers was used to create the braided curriculum and implementation. Systematic braiding of two models at the implementation and curriculum levels is a mechanism that has the potential to meet the more comprehensive needs of families at-risk for maltreatment. PMID:27870760

  16. Increase in Teachers' Knowledge about ADHD after a Week-Long Training Program: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Ehsan Ullah; Hussein, Sajida Abdul

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: ADHD affects 3% to 5% of school-age children. Clinical and community based epidemiological studies in Pakistan have shown a high prevalence of ADHD among school going children. A thorough review of literature shows that no studies of teachers' training programs regarding ADHD have been published in Pakistani research literature. The…

  17. A Pilot Study of Parent Training in Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Disruptive Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearss, Karen; Johnson, Cynthia; Handen, Benjamin; Smith, Tristram; Scahill, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    Guidance on effective interventions for disruptive behavior in young children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) is limited. We present feasibility and initial efficacy data on a structured parent training program for 16 children (ages 3-6) with ASD and disruptive behavior. The 6-month intervention included 11 Core and up to 2 Optional…

  18. Neuropsychological benefits of a narrative cognitive training program for people living with dementia: A pilot study

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    Federico Batini

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Many areas in the cortex are active during reading of narrative material, and these activations in the brain produce significant changes in connectivity. Following previous results showing cognitive benefits in memory domains of a narrative training program in nursing home patients living with dementia, the aim of the present study was to perform a more in depth investigation of the effects of this training on memory domains and other cognitive areas. Methods: An experimental group of eight patients underwent auditory narrative training of 60 hours. At the beginning and end of the training, subjects were tested with a neuropsychological battery to quantify any improvements in individual performance. Results: The results showed a statistically significant improvement in the list learning task (immediate memory and list learning recognition for single tasks, and a statistically significant improvement in overall cognitive area scores for immediate and delayed memory. Conclusion: Results replicate and expand our previous findings, indicating that this type of intervention can increase performance on memory-related tests.

  19. Smart Glasses in Nursing Training - Redundant Gadget or Precious Tool? A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschollek, Michael; Barthel, Christoph; Behrends, Marianne; Schmeer, Regina; Meyenburg-Altwarg, Iris; Becker, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Heavy workloads in nursing care and high employee turnover call for efficient methods to support on-the-job training. Within the Witra Care project - aiming to develop mobile technologies to support knowledge transfer between experienced and inexperienced nurses - the objective was to investigate the feasibility and perceived usefulness of advanced smart glasses for an exemplary, specific activity in nursing training - preparation of a surgical instrument table in an operating room. Four trainee nurses performed different tasks using speech-command operated smart glasses within an operating room setting and were asked for their expectations towards this technology, their experiences and perceptions. All tasks could be achieved by the trainee nurses, and the overall perception was that the technology is supportive and helpful. Our results indicate interest in new wearable technologies for supporting training in nursing care. Limitations include small sample size, selection bias and several technical issues such as speech recognition accuracy or short battery lifetime. More research is necessary to evaluate the usefulness and usability of advanced wearable devices for supporting knowledge transfer and training in nursing care.

  20. The Relationship between Athletic Training Student Critical Thinking Skills and Clinical Instructor Supervision: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabay, Michele R.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to 1) assess the critical thinking skill level of the athletic training student at onset and end of the clinical education experience 2) to examine the influence of the students' critical thinking skills and the CIs' supervision responses to the changes in the students' critical thinking skills and 3) to compare the…

  1. Effect of core strength and endurance training on performance in college students: randomized pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Jim F; Murphy, Jeff C; Bonney, John R; Thich, Jacob L

    2013-07-01

    Core training continues to be emphasized with the proposed intent of improving athletic performance. The purpose of this investigation was to discover if core isometric endurance exercises were superior to core isotonic strengthening exercises and if either influenced specific endurance, strength, and performance measures. Ten untrained students were randomly assigned to core isometric endurance (n = 5) and core isotonic strength training (n = 5). Each performed three exercises, two times per week for six weeks. A repeated measures ANOVA was used to compare the measurements for the dependent variables and significance by bonferroni post-hoc testing. The training protocols were compared using a 2 × 3 mixed model ANOVA. Improvement in trunk flexor and extensor endurance (p strength (p strength group. Improvement in trunk flexor and right lateral endurance (p strength in the squat (p < 0.05) were found with the endurance group. Neither training protocol claimed superiority and both were ineffective in improving performance. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Testing a Resilience Training Program in Police Recruits: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramey, Sandra L; Perkhounkova, Yelena; Hein, Maria; Bohr, Nicole L; Anderson, Amanda A

    2017-07-01

    Stress from multiple sources is inherent in law enforcement. However, it is possible to modify responses to stress with resilience training that includes teaching techniques to modify emotional and physical responses to stress, interface with mental health professionals, and practice sessions to improve self-regulation of responses to stress including coherence, a measure of heart rate variability. A gap exists in the research, however, regarding evaluation of the duration of effects after the initial resilience training. Subjects included ( N = 34) recruits enrolled in summer 2015 at the Milwaukee Police Academy. An experimental design was used to compare recruits who received resilience training to recruits in the control group. No statistically significant differences between the groups were found for self-reported measures of stress and resilience. For the treatment group ( n = 17), change in coherence was significant ( p Organizational Quality Assessment Emotional Buoyancy subscale correlated significantly with the number of practice sessions ( r = .63, p = .01) and marginally with change in coherence ( r = .47, p = .07). Results confirm several significant effects of resilience training with recruits.

  3. Pilot Study of a School-Based Parent Training Program for Preschoolers with ASD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingersoll, Brooke R; Wainer, Allison L

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the feasibility and preliminary effectiveness of a parenting training program designed for early intervention and early childhood special education (EI/ESCE) programs serving students with autistic spectrum disorders. Thirteen teachers representing three intermediate school districts implemented the intervention with 27…

  4. A Pilot Study Involving the Effect of Two Different Complex Training Protocols on Lower Body Power

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    Smith Chad E.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Complex training (CT involves the coupling of two exercises ostensibly to enhance the effect of the second exercise. Typically, the first exercise is a strength exercise and the second exercise is a power exercise involving similar muscles. In most cases, CT is designed to enhance power. The purpose of this study was twofold. First, this study was designed to determine if lower body power could be enhanced using complex training protocols. Second, this study investigated whether the inclusion of a power exercise instead of a strength exercise as the first exercise in CT would produce differences in lower body power. Methods. Thirty-six recreationally-trained men and women aged 20 to 29 years attending a college physical education course were randomly assigned to one of three groups: squat and countermovement squat jumps (SSJ, kettlebell swings and countermovement squat jumps (KSJ, and a control (CON. Training involving CT lasted 6 weeks. All participants were pre- and posttested for vertical jump performance in order to assess lower body power. Results. Vertical jump scores improved for all groups (p < 0.01. The results also indicated that there were no statistically significant differences between group scores across time (p = 0.215. The statistical power for this analysis was low (0.312, most likely due to the small sample size. However, the results did reveal a trend suggesting that the training improvements were greater for both the SSJ and KSJ groups compared with the CON (by 171% and 107%, respectively although significance was not reached. Conclusions. Due to the observed trend, a replication of this study with a greater number of participants over a longer period of time is warranted.

  5. A randomized controlled pilot study of a brief web-based mindfulness training

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    Glück Tobias M

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mindfulness has been shown to be effective in treating various medical and mental problems. Especially its incorporation in cognitive-behavioural interventions has improved long-term outcomes of those treatments. It has also been shown, that brief mindfulness-based trainings are effective in reducing distress. There have been few web-based interventions incorporating mindfulness techniques in their manual and it remains unclear whether a brief web-based mindfulness intervention is feasible. Methods Out of 50 adults (different distress levels; exclusion criteria: Results 26 participants of the treatment group completed post-measures. Most measures under ITT-analysis revealed no significant improvement for the treatment group, but trends with medium effect sizes for PSQ (d = 0.46 and PANASneg (d = 0.50 and a small, non-significant effect for FMI (d = 0.29. Per-protocol analyses for persons who participated over 50% of the time revealed significant treatment effects for PSQ (d = 0.72 and PANASneg (d = 0.77. Comparing higher distressed participants with lower distressed participants, highly distressed participants seemed to profit more of the training in terms of distress reduction (GSI, d = 0.85. Real change (RCI occurred for PSQ in the treatment condition (OR = 9. Results also suggest that participants continued to benefit from the training at 3MFU. Conclusion This study of a brief web-based mindfulness training indicates that mindfulness can be taught online and may improve distress, perceived stress and negative affect for regular users. Although there were no significant improvements, but trends, for most measures under ITT, feasibility of such a program was demonstrated and also that persons continued to use techniques of the training in daily life. Trial Registration German Clinical Trials Register (DRKS: DRKS00003209

  6. Cognitive rehabilitation training in patients with brain tumor-related epilepsy and cognitive deficits: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maschio, Marta; Dinapoli, Loredana; Fabi, Alessandra; Giannarelli, Diana; Cantelmi, Tonino

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this pilot observational study was to evaluate effect of cognitive rehabilitation training (RehabTr) on cognitive performances in patients with brain tumor-related epilepsy (BTRE) and cognitive disturbances. Medical inclusion criteria: patients (M/F) ≥ 18 years ≤ 75 with symptomatic seizures due to primary brain tumors or brain metastases in stable treatment with antiepileptic drugs; previous surgical resection or biopsy; >70 Karnofsky Performance Status; stable oncological disease. Eligible patients recruited from 100 consecutive patients with BTRE at first visit to our Center from 2011 to 2012. All recruited patients were administered battery of neuropsychological tests exploring various cognitive domains. Patients considered to have a neuropsychological deficit were those with at least one test score for a given domain indicative of impairment. Thirty patients out of 100 showed cognitive deficits, and were offered participation in RehabTr, of which 16 accepted (5 low grade glioma, 4 high grade glioma, 2 glioblastoma, 2 meningioma and 3 metastases) and 14 declined for various reasons. The RehabTr consisted of one weekly individual session of 1 h, for a total of 10 weeks, carried out by a trained psychologist. The functions trained were: memory, attention, visuo-spatial functions, language and reasoning by means of Training NeuroPsicologico (TNP(®)) software. To evaluate the effect of the RehabTr, the same battery of tests was administered directly after cognitive rehabilitation (T1), and at six-month follow-up (T2). Statistical analysis with Student T test for paired data showed that short-term verbal memory, episodic memory, fluency and long term visuo-spatial memory improved immediately after the T1 and remained stable at T2. At final follow-up all patients showed an improvement in at least one domain that had been lower than normal at baseline. Our results demonstrated a positive effect of rehabilitative training at different times, and, for

  7. Mechanical massage and mental training programmes affect employees' anxiety, stress susceptibility and detachment-a randomised explorative pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Jasmin; Handlin, Linda; Harlén, Mikael; Lindmark, Ulrika; Ekström, Anette

    2015-09-02

    eight (p=0.049) and also in the control group between the second and third data collection (p=0.014). The massage and mental training group showed a significant decrease in "Stress Susceptibility" between week four and week eight (p=0.022). The pause group showed a significant increase in the subscale "Detachment" (p=0.044). There were no significant differences between the five study groups for any of the traits studied. However, when looking at each individual group separately, positive effects in their levels of "Anxiety", "Stress Susceptibility" and "Detachment" could be seen. Although the results from this pilot study indicate some positive effects, mechanical chair massage and mental training programmes used in order to increase employee's ability to recover, needs to be evaluated further as tools to increase the employees ability to recover. ACTRN12615000020583 , Date of registration: 15/01/2015.

  8. A pilot study of rhythm and timing training as a supplement to occupational therapy in stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Valerie; Dunn, Leah; Dunning, Kari; Page, Stephen J

    2011-01-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of disability. A need exists for an effective intervention to enhance upper extremity (UE) motor abilities and activities of daily living (ADL) performance. The objectives of this pilot study were to (1) determine the feasibility of adding Interactive Metronome (IM) to an occupational therapy (OT) program; and (2) determine changes in UE impairments, function, quality of life, and perceived physical performance ability and satisfaction using a combined IM + OT regimen compared with OT alone for adults with chronic stroke. This pilot study (n=10) used a 2-group (OT or IM+OT) pretest-posttest design. The intervention involved 60 minutes of IM + OT or OT alone, 3 days a week for 10 weeks. Outcome measures included the UE Fugl-Meyer (impairment), the Arm Motor Ability Test (function), the Box and Block Test (function), Stroke Impact Scale (quality of life), and the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (perceived performance ability and satisfaction). It was feasible to add IM to OT. The IM+OT group demonstrated decreased impairment and increased quality of life. However, the OT-alone group demonstrated greater gains in function, perceived physical performance ability, and satisfaction. These findings suggest that rhythm and timing training using the IM is a feasible intervention to consider as part of therapy treatment. However, IM may fit best for prefunctional treatment, as it seemed to primarily decrease impairment. It may also serve as a supplement before or after treatment in order to maximize rehabilitation potential. Clinical implications and suggestions for future studies are provided.

  9. Six Weeks of Core Stability Training Improves Landing Kinetics Among Female Capoeira Athletes: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Simone; Cohen, Daniel; Hayes, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Core stability training (CST) has increased in popularity among athletes and the general fitness population despite limited evidence CST programmes alone lead to improved athletic performance. In female athletes, neuromuscular training combining balance training and trunk and hip/pelvis dominant CST is suggested to reduce injury risk, and specifically peak vertical ground reaction forces (vGRF) in a drop jump landing task. However, the isolated effect of trunk dominant core stability training on vGRF during landing in female athletes had not been evaluated. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate landing kinetics during a drop jump test following a CST intervention in female capoeira athletes. After giving their informed written consent, sixteen female capoeira athletes (mean ± SD age, stature, and body mass of 27.3 ± 3.7 years, 165.0 ± 4.0 cm, and 59.7 ± 6.3 kg, respectively) volunteered to participate in the training program which consisted of static and dynamic CST sessions, three times per week for six weeks. The repeated measures T-test revealed participants significantly reduced relative vGRF from pre- to post-intervention for the first (3.40 ± 0.78 vs. 2.85 ± 0.52 N·NBW-1, respectively [p<0.05, effect size = 0.60]), and second landing phase (5.09 ± 1.17 vs. 3.02 ± 0.41 N·NBW-1, respectively [p<0.001, effect size = 0.87]). The average loading rate was reduced from pre- to post-intervention during the second landing phase (30.96 ± 18.84 vs. 12.06 ± 9.83 N·NBW·s-1, respectively [p<0.01, effect size = 0.68]). The peak loading rate was reduced from pre- to post-intervention during the first (220.26 ± 111.51 vs. 120.27 ± 64.57 N·NBW·s-1 respectively [p<0.01, effect size = 0.64]), and second (99.52 ± 54.98 vs. 44.71 ± 30.34 N·NBW·s-1 respectively [p<0.01, effect size = 0.70]) landing phase. Body weight, average loading rate during the first landing phase, and jump height were not significantly different between week 0 and week 6

  10. Effect of endurance versus resistance training on quadriceps muscle dysfunction in COPD: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iepsen UW

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Ulrik Winning Iepsen,1 Gregers Druedal Wibe Munch,1 Mette Rugbjerg,1 Anders Rasmussen Rinnov,1 Morten Zacho,1 Stefan Peter Mortensen,1,2 Niels H Secher,3 Thomas Ringbaek,4 Bente Klarlund Pedersen,1 Ylva Hellsten,5 Peter Lange,1,4,6 Pia Thaning1,4 1The Centre of Inflammation and Metabolism and the Centre for Physical Activity Research, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Denmark, 2Department of Cardiovascular and Renal Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, 3Department of Anesthesiology, University of Copenhagen, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, 4Department of Respiratory Medicine, University Hospital Hvidovre, Hvidovre, 5Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, University of Copenhagen, 6Department of Public Health, Section of Social Medicine, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark Introduction: Exercise is an important countermeasure to limb muscle dysfunction in COPD. The two major training modalities in COPD rehabilitation, endurance training (ET and resistance training (RT, may both be efficient in improving muscle strength, exercise capacity, and health-related quality of life, but the effects on quadriceps muscle characteristics have not been thoroughly described.Methods: Thirty COPD patients (forced expiratory volume in 1 second: 56% of predicted, standard deviation [SD] 14 were randomized to 8 weeks of ET or RT. Vastus lateralis muscle biopsies were obtained before and after the training intervention to assess muscle morphology and metabolic and angiogenic factors. Symptom burden, exercise capacity (6-minute walking and cycle ergometer tests, and vascular function were also assessed.Results: Both training modalities improved symptom burden and exercise capacity with no difference between the two groups. The mean (SD proportion of glycolytic type IIa muscle fibers was reduced after ET (from 48% [SD 11] to 42% [SD 10], P<0.05, whereas there was no significant change in muscle fiber distribution with RT. There was

  11. Respiratory motor training and neuromuscular plasticity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovechkin, Alexander V; Sayenko, Dimitry G; Ovechkina, Elena N; Aslan, Sevda C; Pitts, Teresa; Folz, Rodney J

    2016-07-15

    The objective of this study was to examine the feasibility of a full-scale investigation of the neurophysiological mechanisms of COPD-induced respiratory neuromuscular control deficits. Characterization of respiratory single- and multi-muscle activation patterns using surface electromyography (sEMG) were assessed along with functional measures at baseline and following 21±2 (mean±SD) sessions of respiratory motor training (RMT) performed during a one-month period in four patients with GOLD stage II or III COPD. Pre-training, the individuals with COPD showed significantly increased (prespiratory muscle activity and disorganized multi-muscle activation patterns in association with lowered spirometrical measures and decreased fast- and slow-twitch fiber activity as compared to healthy controls (N=4). Following RMT, functional and respiratory sEMG activation outcomes during quite breathing and forced expiratory efforts were improved suggesting that functional improvements, induced by task-specific RMT, are evidence respiratory neuromuscular networks re-organization.

  12. PILOT STUDY REGARDING THE IMPLEMENT OF INNOVATIVE EQUIPMENT IN FORCE TRAINING

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    Hagiu Bogdan Alexandru

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to evaluate the perception over the innovative systems of barbell- extensor (concentric and exocentric and helcometers bar with extensor system, focused on development and recovery of mass and muscular force. Subjects tested were males (N=10, aged between 19 to 32 (average 21.54 years, executing a training program with innovative equipments, of individually intensity. After 24 hours, they filled a questioner of 8 items (open and closed questions. The results proved that new equipment exhibits advantages related to the isolation efficiency of exercises, but the training programs must be constructed taking into consideration that joints are more stressed than in case of classical devices. Still, the pressure on spinal column is lower when using innovative devises.

  13. Cortical and subcortical processing of short duration speech stimuli in trained rock musicians: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Prawin; Anil, Sam Publius; Grover, Vibhu; Sanju, Himanshu Kumar; Sinha, Sachchidanand

    2017-02-01

    Most trained musicians are actively involved in rigorous practice from several years to achieve a high level of proficiency. Therefore, musicians are best group to research changes or modification in brain structures and functions across several information processing systems. This study aimed to investigate cortical and subcortical processing of short duration speech stimuli in trained rock musicians and non-musicians. Two groups of participant (experimental and control groups) in the age range of 18-25 years were selected for the study. Experimental group includes 15 rock musicians who had minimum professional training of 5 years of rock music, and each member had to be a regular performer of rock music for at least 15 h a week. Further age-matched 15 participants who were not having any formal training of any music served as non-musicians, in the control group. The speech-evoked ABR (S-ABR) and speech-evoked ALLR (S-LLR) with short duration speech 'synthetic /da/' was elicited in both groups. Different measures were analyzed for S-ABR and S-LLR. For S-ABR, MANOVA revealed significant main effect of groups on latencies of wave V, wave A, and amplitude of wave V/A slope. Similarly, Kruskal-Wallis test showed significantly higher F 0 amplitude in rock musicians compared with non-musicians. For S-LLR, MANOVA showed statistically significant differences observed for latencies of wave P2 and N2 and amplitude measures of P2-N2 amplitude. This study indicated better neural processing of short duration speech stimuli at subcortical as well as cortical level among rock musicians when compared with non-musicians.

  14. A STUDY OF THE IMPACT OF EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE TRAINING IN PHYSIOTHERAPY INTERNS A PILOT STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    Vishakha Patil; Rajashree Naik; Avinash De Sousa

    2016-01-01

    Background: Physiotherapy is a branch of medicine where development of a good rapport between patient and therapist coupled with presence of a caring attitude and emotional understanding of patients would facilitate faster recovery. This study assessed the effect of Emotional Intelligence (EI) training in physiotherapy interns to help them understand their patients better and enhance their self awareness while patient’s perceived change in care was examined. Methods: 8 physiotherapy ...

  15. The Effectiveness and Applicability of Compensatory Cognitive Training for Japanese Patients with Schizophrenia: A Pilot Study

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    Sadao Otsuka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although cognitive remediation or training for schizophrenia has been developed, few studies on the subject have focused on Japanese patients. The aim of the present study was to examine the effectiveness and applicability of compensatory cognitive training (CCT in Japanese patients with schizophrenia. Twenty-six participants diagnosed with schizophrenia were assigned to either the CCT plus treatment as usual group (n=13 or the treatment as usual alone group (n=13. CCT is a 12-session, manualized, group-based training that coaches compensatory strategies in four cognitive domains (prospective memory, attention, verbal memory, and executive functions. Cognitive, functional, and clinical symptom measures were implemented at baseline, after treatment, and at 3-month follow-up. Mixed design analyses of variance with group and time for each measure demonstrated that effects of CCT on verbal memory, processing speed, and social functioning at postintervention were significant, and the effects on processing speed were maintained at follow-up. Our study suggests that CCT has beneficial effects on cognitive performance, improving functional outcomes in Japanese patients with schizophrenia. Additionally, the high degrees of attendance rates and level of satisfaction rated by the CCT participants ensure the applicability of this methodology to this population.

  16. Mind-Body Skills Training to Improve Distress Tolerance in Medical Students: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, Kristen M; Luberto, Christina M; O'Bryan, Emily M; Mysinger, Erica; Cotton, Sian

    2016-01-01

    Medical students face rigorous and stressful work environments, resulting in high rates of psychological distress. However, there has been a dearth of empirical work aimed at modifying risk factors for psychopathology among this at-risk group. Distress tolerance, defined as the ability to withstand emotional distress, is one factor that may be important in promoting psychological well-being in medical students. Thus, the aim of the current mixed-methods study was (a) to describe changes in facets of distress tolerance (i.e., emotional tolerance, absorption, appraisal, regulation) for medical students who completed a mind-body skills training group, and a no-intervention control group of students; (b) to examine the relationship between changes in psychological variables and changes in distress tolerance; and (c) to report students' perceptions of the mind-body group, with an emphasis on how the group may have affected personal and professional functioning due to improvements in distress tolerance. The mind-body program was an 11-week, 2-hour skills training group that focused on introducing, practicing, and processing mind-body skills such as biofeedback, guided imagery, relaxation, several forms of meditation (e.g., mindfulness), breathing exercises, and autogenic training. Participants were 52 first- and second-year medical students (62.7% female, Mage = 23.45, SD = 1.51) who participated in a mind-body group or a no-intervention control group and completed self-report measures before and after the 11-week period. Students in the mind-body group showed a modest improvement in all distress tolerance subscales over time (ΔM = .42-.53, p = .01-.03, d = .44-.53), whereas the control group showed less consistent changes across most subscales (ΔM = .11-.42, p = .10-.65, d = .01-.42). Students in the mind-body group qualitatively reported an improved ability to tolerate affective distress. Overall, improvements in psychological symptoms were associated with

  17. Exercise Training in Treatment and Rehabilitation of Hip Osteoarthritis: A 12-Week Pilot Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsti Uusi-Rasi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Osteoarthritis (OA of the hip is one of the major causes of pain and disability in the older population. Although exercise is an effective treatment for knee OA, there is lack of evidence regarding hip OA. The aim of this trial was to test the safety and feasibility of a specifically designed exercise program in relieving hip pain and improving function in hip OA participants and to evaluate various methods to measure changes in their physical functioning. Materials and Methods. 13 women aged ≥ 65 years with hip OA were recruited in this 12-week pilot study. Results. Pain declined significantly over 30% from baseline, and joint function and health-related quality of life improved slightly. Objective assessment of physical functioning showed statistically significant improvement in the maximal isometric leg extensor strength by 20% and in the hip extension range of motion by 30%. Conclusions. The exercise program was found to be safe and feasible. The present evidence indicates that the exercise program is effective in the short term. However, adequate powered RCTs are needed to determine effects of long-term exercise therapy on pain and progression of hip OA.

  18. Exercise Training in Treatment and Rehabilitation of Hip Osteoarthritis: A 12-Week Pilot Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uusi-Rasi, Kirsti; Patil, Radhika; Karinkanta, Saija; Tokola, Kari; Kannus, Pekka; Sievänen, Harri

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip is one of the major causes of pain and disability in the older population. Although exercise is an effective treatment for knee OA, there is lack of evidence regarding hip OA. The aim of this trial was to test the safety and feasibility of a specifically designed exercise program in relieving hip pain and improving function in hip OA participants and to evaluate various methods to measure changes in their physical functioning. Materials and Methods. 13 women aged ≥ 65 years with hip OA were recruited in this 12-week pilot study. Results. Pain declined significantly over 30% from baseline, and joint function and health-related quality of life improved slightly. Objective assessment of physical functioning showed statistically significant improvement in the maximal isometric leg extensor strength by 20% and in the hip extension range of motion by 30%. Conclusions. The exercise program was found to be safe and feasible. The present evidence indicates that the exercise program is effective in the short term. However, adequate powered RCTs are needed to determine effects of long-term exercise therapy on pain and progression of hip OA.

  19. Group Singing as a Therapy during Diabetes Training--A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groener, J B; Neus, I; Kopf, S; Hartmann, M; Schanz, J; Kliemank, E; Wetekam, B; Kihm, L; Fleming, T; Herzog, W; Nawroth, P P

    2015-11-01

    Comprehensive diabetes treatment has been shown to reduce quality of life in diabetic patients. However, there is evidence to suggest that group singing can have positive effects on quality of life in various clinical settings. In this randomized controlled pilot study, the effect of singing as a therapy to reduce stress and improve quality of life was investigated in insulin-dependent diabetic patients, undergoing a lifestyle intervention program. Patients from the singing group felt less discontented following treatment. This effect, however, was lost after 3 months. No effect on serum cortisol and plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels could be seen when comparing the singing group with the control group, although reduced levels of ACTH and cortisol 3 days after treatment could be found and were still present after 3 months within the group of patients who undertook singing as a therapy. Singing led to an increase in bodyweight, which interestingly had no effect on glucose control or methylglyoxal levels. Therefore, singing during a lifestyle intervention program for insulin-dependent diabetic patients had a short lasting and weak effect on patients' mood without affecting glucose control, but no significant effect on stress related hormones. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. An Experimental Study of the Effect of Out-of-the-Window Cues on Training Novice Pilots on a Flight Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M. Javed; Rossi, Marcia; Heath, Bruce; Ali, Syed F.; Ward, Marcus

    2006-01-01

    The effects of out-of-the-window cues on learning a straight-in landing approach and a level 360deg turn by novice pilots on a flight simulator have been investigated. The treatments consisted of training with and without visual cues as well as density of visual cues. The performance of the participants was then evaluated through similar but more challenging tasks. It was observed that the participants in the landing study who trained with visual cues performed poorly than those who trained without the cues. However the performance of those who trained with a faded-cues sequence performed slightly better than those who trained without visual cues. In the level turn study it was observed that those who trained with the visual cues performed better than those who trained without visual cues. The study also showed that those participants who trained with a lower density of cues performed better than those who trained with a higher density of visual cues.

  1. The Health Benefits and Challenges of Exercise Training in Persons Living with Schizophrenia: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna J. Lang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: In addition to the hallmark cognitive and functional impairments mounting evidence indicates that schizophrenia is also associated with an increased risk for the development of secondary complications, in particular cardio-metabolic disease. This is thought to be the result of various factors including physical inactivity and the metabolic side effects of psychotropic medications. Therefore, non-pharmacological approaches to improving brain health, physical health, and overall well-being have been promoted increasingly. Methods: We report on the health-related physical fitness (body composition, blood pressure, heart rate, and aerobic fitness and lipid profile of persons living with schizophrenia and effective means to address the challenges of exercise training in this population. Results: There was a markedly increased risk for cardio-metabolic disease in 13 persons living with schizophrenia (Age = 31 ± 7 years including low aerobic fitness (76% ± 34% of predicted, reduced HDL (60% of cohort, elevated resting heart rate (80% of cohort, hypertension (40% of cohort, overweight and obesity (69% of cohort, and abdominal obesity (54% of cohort. Individualized exercise prescription (3 times/week was well tolerated, with no incidence of adverse exercise-related events. The exercise adherence rate was 81% ± 21% (Range 48%–100%, and 69% of the participants were able to complete the entire exercise training program. Exercise training resulted in clinically important changes in physical activity, aerobic fitness, exercise tolerance, blood pressure, and body composition. Conclusion: Persons living with schizophrenia appear to be at an increased risk for cardio-metabolic disease. An individualized exercise program has shown early promise for the treatment of schizophrenia and the various cognitive, functional, and physiological impairments that ultimately affect health and well-being.

  2. Impact of Ramadan intermittent fasting on cognitive function in trained cyclists: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Chamari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed selected measures of cognitive function in trained cyclists who observed daylight fasting during Ramadan. Eleven cyclists volunteered to participate (age: 21.6±4.8 years, VO 2 max: 57.7±5.6 ml • kg-1 • min-1 and were followed for 2 months. Cognitive function (Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB, Reaction Time index (RTI and Rapid Visual Information Processing (RVP tests and sleep architecture (ambulatory EEG were assessed: before Ramadan (BR, in the 1st week (RA1 and 4th week of Ramadan (RA4, and 2 weeks post-Ramadan (PR. Both cognitive tests were performed twice per day: before and after Ramadan at 8-10 a.m. and 4-6 p.m., and during Ramadan at 4-6 p.m. and 0-2 a.m., respectively. Training load (TL by the rating of perceived exertion (RPE method and wellness (Hooper index were measured daily. If the TL increased over the study period, this variable was stable during Ramadan. The perceived fatigue and delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS increased at RA4. Sleep patterns and architecture showed clear disturbances, with significant increases in the number of awakenings and light sleep durations during Ramadan (RA1 and RA4, together with decreased durations of deep and REM sleep stages at PR. RTI (simple and multiple reaction index reaction and movement times did not vary over the study period. The RVP test showed reduced false alarms during Ramadan, suggesting reduced impulsivity. Overall accuracy significantly increased at RA1, RA4 and PR compared to baseline. At RA4, the accuracy was higher at 0-2 a.m. compared to 4-6 p.m. Despite the observed disturbances in sleep architecture, Ramadan fasting did not negatively impact the cognitive performance of trained cyclists from the Middle East.

  3. A pilot study of effects of cardiopulmonary resuscitation training on participants' self-concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, T R; Byrd, E K

    1983-10-01

    The administration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was taught to a group of 12 adults. The Tennessee Self-concept Scale Form-C and the Fundamental Interpersonal Relations Orientation-Behavior Scale (FIRO-B) were administered before and after their training. A control group of 12 was administered both scales twice with one day between administrations. Analysis indicated both groups showed significant differences between the pre- and posttest administrations on expressed affection on the FIRO-B. However, participants in a brief CPR course did not score significantly differently from a control group on these measures, as expected.

  4. Virtual Patients in continuing medical education and residency training: a pilot project for acceptance analysis in the framework of a residency revision course in pediatrics

    OpenAIRE

    Lehmann, Ronny; Hanebeck, Benjamin; Oberle, Stephan; Simon, Anke; Choukair, Daniela; Tönshoff, Burkhard; Huwendiek, Sören

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Virtual patients (VPs) are a one-of-a-kind e-learning resource, fostering clinical reasoning skills through clinical case examples. The combination with face-to-face teaching is important for their successful integration, which is referred to as "blended learning". So far little is known about the use of VPs in the field of continuing medical education and residency training. The pilot study presented here inquired the application of VPs in the framework of a pediatric residency revisio...

  5. Short cognitive behavioral therapy and cognitive training for adults with ADHD – a randomized controlled pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarit Virta

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Maarit Virta1,2, Anita Salakari1, Mervi Antila1, Esa Chydenius1, Markku Partinen1, Markus Kaski1, Risto Vataja3, Hely Kalska2, Matti Iivanainen11Rinnekoti Research Centre, Espoo, Finland; 2Department of Psychology, University of Helsinki, Finland; 3Kellokoski Hospital, Kellokoski, FinlandAbstract: In clinical practice, a growing need exists for effective non-pharmacological ­treatments of adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. Here, we present the results of a pilot study of 10 adults with ADHD participating in short-term individual ­cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT, 9 adults participating in cognitive training (CT, and 10 controls. Self-report ­questionnaires, independent evaluations, and computerized neurocognitive testing were ­collected before and after the treatments to evaluate change. There were distinctive pre-hypotheses regarding the treatments, and therefore the statistical comparisons were conducted in pairs: CBT vs control, CT vs control, and CBT vs CT. In a combined ADHD symptom score based on self-reports, 6 participants in CBT, 2 in CT and 2 controls improved. Using independent evaluations, improvement was found in 7 of the CBT participants, 2 of CT ­participants and 3 controls. There was no treatment-related improvement in cognitive performance. Thus, in the CBT group, some encouraging improvement was seen, although not as clearly as in ­previous research with longer interventions. In the CT group, there was improvement in the trained tasks but no generalization of the improvement to the tasks of the neurocognitive testing, the ­self-report questionnaires, or the independent evaluations. These preliminary results warrant further studies with more participants and with more elaborate cognitive testing.Keywords: CBT, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, cognitive testing, non-­pharmacological treatments

  6. Psychotherapy of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in adults--a pilot study using a structured skills training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesslinger, Bernd; Tebartz van Elst, Ludger; Nyberg, Elisabeth; Dykierek, Petra; Richter, Harald; Berner, Michael; Ebert, Dieter

    2002-08-01

    In clinical practice many adult patients with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) ask for an additional psychotherapeutic intervention besides the medical therapy. In this paper we present a structured skill training program particularly tailored for adult patients with ADHD. The program is based on the principles of cognitive-behavioral treatment for borderline personality disorder developed by M. Linehan. It was modified to suit the special needs of adult patients with ADHD. In this exploratory pilot study we tested this program in a group setting. The following elements were presented: neurobiology of ADHD, mindfulness, chaos and control, behavior analysis, emotion regulation, depression, medication in ADHD, impulse control, stress management, dependency, ADHD in relationship and self respect. In an open study design patients were assessed clinically using psychometric scales (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Checklist according to DSM-IV, 16 items of the SCL-90-R, Beck-Depression Inventory, visual analogue scale) prior to and following group therapy. This treatment resulted in positive outcomes in that patients improved on all psychometric scales.

  7. A pilot study on the effect of cognitive training on BDNF serum levels in individuals with Parkinson’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelucci, Francesco; Peppe, Antonella; Carlesimo, Giovanni A.; Serafini, Francesca; Zabberoni, Silvia; Barban, Francesco; Shofany, Jacob; Caltagirone, Carlo; Costa, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients, besides motor dysfunctions, may also display mild cognitive deficits (MCI) which increase with disease progression. The neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a role in the survival of dopaminergic neurons and in the regulation of synaptic connectivity. Moreover, the brain and peripheral level of this protein may be significantly reduced in PD patients. These data suggest that a cognitive rehabilitation protocol aimed at restoring cognitive deficits in PD patients may also involve changes in this neurotrophin. Thus, in this pilot study we evaluated the effect of a cognitive rehabilitation protocol focused on the training of executive functioning and measured BDNF serum levels in a group of PD patients with mild cognitive impairment, as compared to the effect of a placebo treatment (n = 7/8 group). The results showed that PD patients undergoing the cognitive rehabilitation, besides improving their cognitive performance as measured with the Zoo Map Test, also displayed increased serum BDNF levels as compared to the placebo group. These findings suggest that BDNF serum levels may represent a biomarker of the effects of cognitive rehabilitation in PD patients affected by MCI. However, the functional significance of this increase in PD as well as other neuropathological conditions remains to be determined. PMID:25852518

  8. Blood Glucose Prediction Using Artificial Neural Networks Trained with the AIDA Diabetes Simulator: A Proof-of-Concept Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin Robertson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a major, and increasing, global problem. However, it has been shown that, through good management of blood glucose levels (BGLs, the associated and costly complications can be reduced significantly. In this pilot study, Elman recurrent artificial neural networks (ANNs were used to make BGL predictions based on a history of BGLs, meal intake, and insulin injections. Twenty-eight datasets (from a single case scenario were compiled from the freeware mathematical diabetes simulator, AIDA. It was found that the most accurate predictions were made during the nocturnal period of the 24 hour daily cycle. The accuracy of the nocturnal predictions was measured as the root mean square error over five test days (RMSE5 day not used during ANN training. For BGL predictions of up to 1 hour a RMSE5 day of (±SD 0.15±0.04 mmol/L was observed. For BGL predictions up to 10 hours, a RMSE5  day of (±SD 0.14±0.16 mmol/L was observed. Future research will investigate a wider range of AIDA case scenarios, real-patient data, and data relating to other factors influencing BGLs. ANN paradigms based on real-time recurrent learning will also be explored to accommodate dynamic physiology in diabetes.

  9. Combined transcranial direct current stimulation and robot-assisted arm training in subacute stroke patients: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, S; Werner, C; Schonhardt, E M; Bardeleben, A; Jenrich, W; Kirker, S G B

    2007-01-01

    Preliminary reports suggest that central stimulation may enhance the effect of conventional physical therapies after stroke. This pilot study examines the safety and methodology of using transcranial direct stimulation (tDCS) with robot-assisted arm training (AT), to inform planning a larger randomised controlled trial. Ten patients, after an ischaemic stroke 4-8 weeks before study onset, no history of epilepsy, participated. Eight had a cortical lesion and 2 had subcortical lesions: all had severe arm paresis and, co-incidentally, 5 had severe aphasia. Over six weeks, they received thirty 20 min-sessions of AT. During the first 7 minutes, 1.5mA of tDCS was applied, with the anode over the lesioned hemisphere and the cathode above the contralateral orbit. Arm and language impairment were assessed with the Fugl-Meyer motor score (FM, full range 0-66) and the Aachener Aphasie Test. No major side effects occurred. Arm function of three patients (two with a subcortical lesion) improved significantly, with FM scores increasing from 6 to 28, 10 to 49 and 11 to 48. In the remaining seven patients, all with cortical lesions, arm function changed little, FM scores did not increase more than 5 points. Unexpectedly, aphasia improved in 4 patients. These procedures are safe, and easy to use in a clinical setting. In future studies, patients should be stratified by degree of arm weakness and lesion site, also the unexpected aphasia improvement warrants following-up.

  10. Exercise training as treatment of neck pain among military helicopter pilots and crew members

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murray, Mike; Lange, Britt; Nørnberg, Bo Riebeling

    ) and Pressure-Pain-Threshold (PPT) in the trapezius m. and upper neck extensors. Secondary outcome: Maximal-Voluntary-Contraction (MVC) for cervical flexion/extension and shoulder-elevation. Results: Neck-pain for ETG was (mean±SD) 1.9±1.7 at baseline and 1.8±2.1 at follow-up, and correspondingly for REF 2.......4±2.0 and 1.7±1.7. Preliminary intention-to-treat analysis, revealed no significant effect on change in pain or PPT between groups. Further analysis, controlling for training frequency, intensity and volume are pending. Baseline MVC for ETG cervical flexion/extension was 184.4±59.8N and 247.2±63.8N...

  11. A pilot study of an emotional intelligence training intervention for a paediatric team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamberger, Ellen; Genizi, Jacob; Kerem, Nogah; Reuven-Lalung, Ayalla; Dolev, Niva; Srugo, Isaac; Rofe, Amnon

    2017-02-01

    Emotional intelligence (EI) is the individual's ability to perceive, understand and manage emotion and to understand and relate effectively to others. We examined the degree to which EI training may be associated with a change in EI among different medical personnel and patient satisfaction. The EI of 17 physicians and 10 nurses in paediatric ward was prospectively evaluated with Bar-On's EI at baseline and after 18 months. 11 physicians who did not undergo the intervention served as controls. The intervention consisted of a training programme comprising group discussions, simulations and case studies. Pre-emotional quotient inventory (EQ-i) and post-EQ-i scores and patient satisfaction surveys of nurse and physicians pre-intervention and post-intervention were analysed. The mean overall EI score of the study sample rose from 99.0±9.6 (both plus and minus mathematical operations standing for SD) at baseline to 105.4±10 (p<0.000) after 18 months, with the most robust increase (nearly 6%; p<0.003) manifested among physicians. In contrast, the control group's EI scores did not change over this period. Within the intervention group, physicians displayed a statistically significant increase in three of the five EI dimensions, compared with only one of the five EI dimensions for nurses. Patient satisfaction scores relating to physician care rose from 4.4 pre-intervention to 4.7 post-intervention (p=0.03). An EI intervention led to an overall increase in EI scores, with a significant improvement in patient satisfaction. These findings suggest important potential benefits for both staff and their patients. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  12. Modular Ankle Robotics Training in Early Sub-Acute Stroke: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Larry W.; Roy, Anindo; Krywonis, Amanda; Kehs, Glenn; Krebs, Hermano Igo; Macko, Richard F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Modular lower extremity (LE) robotics may offer a valuable avenue for restoring neuromotor control after hemiparetic stroke. Prior studies show that visually-guided and visually-evoked practice with an ankle robot (anklebot) improves paretic ankle motor control that translates into improved overground walking. Objective Assess the feasibility and efficacy of daily anklebot training during early sub-acute hospitalization post-stroke. Methods Thirty-four inpatients from a stroke unit were randomly assigned to anklebot (N=18) or passive manual stretching (N=16) treatments. All suffered a first stroke with residual hemiparesis (ankle manual muscle test grade 1/5 to 4/5), and at least trace muscle activation in plantar- or dorsiflexion. Anklebot training employed an “assist-as-needed” approach during > 200 volitional targeted paretic ankle movements, with difficulty adjusted to active range of motion and success rate. Stretching included >200 daily mobilizations in these same ranges. All sessions lasted 1 hour and assessments were not blinded. Results Both groups walked faster at discharge, however the robot group improved more in percent change of temporal symmetry (p=0.032) and also of step length symmetry (p=0.038), with longer nonparetic step lengths in the robot (133%) vs. stretching (31%) groups. Paretic ankle control improved in the robot group, with increased peak (p≤ 0.001) and mean (p≤ 0.01) angular speeds, and increased movement smoothness (p≤ 0.01). There were no adverse events. Conclusion Though limited by small sample size and restricted entry criteria, our findings suggest that modular lower extremity robotics during early sub-acute hospitalization is well tolerated and improves ankle motor control and gait patterning. PMID:24515923

  13. Modular ankle robotics training in early subacute stroke: a randomized controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Larry W; Roy, Anindo; Krywonis, Amanda; Kehs, Glenn; Krebs, Hermano Igo; Macko, Richard F

    2014-09-01

    BACKGROUND. Modular lower extremity robotics may offer a valuable avenue for restoring neuromotor control after hemiparetic stroke. Prior studies show that visually guided and visually evoked practice with an ankle robot (anklebot) improves paretic ankle motor control that translates into improved overground walking. To assess the feasibility and efficacy of daily anklebot training during early subacute hospitalization poststroke. Thirty-four inpatients from a stroke unit were randomly assigned to anklebot (n = 18) or passive manual stretching (n = 16) treatments. All suffered a first stroke with residual hemiparesis (ankle manual muscle test grade 1/5 to 4/5), and at least trace muscle activation in plantar- or dorsiflexion. Anklebot training employed an "assist-as-needed" approach during >200 volitional targeted paretic ankle movements, with difficulty adjusted to active range of motion and success rate. Stretching included >200 daily mobilizations in these same ranges. All sessions lasted 1 hour and assessments were not blinded. Both groups walked faster at discharge; however, the robot group improved more in percentage change of temporal symmetry (P = .032) and also of step length symmetry (P = .038), with longer nonparetic step lengths in the robot (133%) versus stretching (31%) groups. Paretic ankle control improved in the robot group, with increased peak (P ≤ .001) and mean (P ≤ .01) angular speeds, and increased movement smoothness (P ≤ .01). There were no adverse events. Though limited by small sample size and restricted entry criteria, our findings suggest that modular lower extremity robotics during early subacute hospitalization is well tolerated and improves ankle motor control and gait patterning. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Development of Activity-Related Muscle Fatigue during Robot-Mediated Upper Limb Rehabilitation Training in Persons with Multiple Sclerosis: A Pilot Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Renny Octavia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Robot-assisted rehabilitation facilitates high-intensity training of the impaired upper limb in neurological rehabilitation. It has been clinically observed that persons with Multiple Sclerosis (MS have difficulties in sustaining the training intensity during a session due to the development of activity-related muscle fatigue. An experimental observational pilot study was conducted to examine whether or not the muscle fatigue develops in MS patients during one session of robot-assisted training within a virtual learning environment. Six MS patients with upper limb impairment (motricity index ranging from 50 to 91/100 and six healthy persons completed five training bouts of three minutes each performing lifting tasks, while EMG signals of anterior deltoid and lower trapezius muscles were measured and their subjective perceptions on muscle fatigue were registered. Decreased performance and higher subjective fatigue perception were present in the MS group. Increased mean EMG amplitudes and subjective perception levels on muscle fatigue were observed in both groups. Muscle fatigue development during 15′ training has been demonstrated in the arm of MS patients, which influences the sustainability of training intensity in MS patients. To optimize the training performance, adaptivity based on the detection of MS patient’s muscle fatigue could be provided by means of training program adjustment.

  15. Locomotor training through a 3D cable-driven robotic system for walking function in children with cerebral palsy: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ming; Kim, Janis; Arora, Pooja; Gaebler-Spira, Deborah J; Zhang, Yunhui

    2014-01-01

    Locomotor training using treadmill has been shown to elicit significant improvements in locomotor ability for some children with cerebral palsy (CP), the functional gains are relatively small and it requires greater involvement from a physical therapist. Current robotic gait training systems are effective in reducing the strenuous work of a physical therapist during locomotor training, but are less effective in improving locomotor function in some children with CP due to the limitations of the systems. Thus, a 3D cable-driven robotic gait training system was developed and tested in five children with CP through a 6 week of long-term gait training. Results indicated that both overground walking speed and 6 minute walking distance improved after robot assisted treadmill training through the cable-driven robotic system, and partially retained at 8 weeks after the end of training. Results from this pilot study indicated that it seems feasible to conduct locomotor training in children with CP through the 3D cable-driven robotic system.

  16. Ankle replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankle arthroplasty - total; Total ankle arthroplasty; Endoprosthetic ankle replacement; Ankle surgery ... You may not be able to have a total ankle replacement if you have had ankle joint infections in ...

  17. Knee Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knee replacement is surgery for people with severe knee damage. Knee replacement can relieve pain and allow you to ... Your doctor may recommend it if you have knee pain and medicine and other treatments are not ...

  18. Effects of One-Week Tongue-Task Training on Sleep Apnea Severity: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Rousseau

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of one-week tongue-task training (TTT on sleep apnea severity in sleep apnea subjects. Ten patients with sleep apnea (seven men, mean [± SD] age 52±8 years; mean apnea-hypopnea [AHI] index 20.9±5.3 events/h underwent 1 h TTT in the authors’ laboratory on seven consecutive days. A complete or limited recording and tongue maximal protruding force were assessed before and after one-week TTT. One-week TTT was associated with a global AHI decrease (pre-TTT: 20.9±5.3 events/h; post-TTT: 16.1±5.1 events/h; P<0.001 and AHI decrease during rapid eye movement sleep (pre-TTT: 32.2±18.4 events/h; post-TTT: 16.7±6.6 events/h; P=0.03, while protruding force remained unchanged. The authors consider these results to be potentially clinically relevant and worthy of further investigation in a large randomized trial.

  19. Cognitive and Neural Effects of Vision-Based Speed of Processing Training in Older Adults with Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Feng; Heffner, Kathi L.; Ren, Ping; Tivarus, Madalina E.; Brasch, Judith; Chen, Ding-Geng; Mapstone, Mark; Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Tadin, Duje

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives Vision-based speed of processing (VSOP) training is a promising cognitive intervention for older adults. However, it is unknown whether VSOP training can affect cognitive processing in individuals at high risk for dementia. Here, we examined cognitive and neural effects of VSOP training in older adults with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) and contrasted those effects with an active control (mental leisure activities; MLA). Design A randomized single-blinded controlled pilot trial. Setting An academic medical center. Participants Twenty-one participants with aMCI. Intervention A 6-week computerized VSOP training. Measurements Multiple cognitive processing measures, instrumental activities of daily living (IADL), and two key resting state neural networks regulating cognitive processing: central executive network (CEN) and default mode network (DMN). Results We found that, compared to MLA control, VSOP training led to significant improvements in trained (processing speed and attention: F1,19 = 6.61, Partial η2 = 0.26, p = .019) and untrained cognitive domains (working memory: F1,19 = 7.33, Partial η2 = 0.28, p = .014; IADL: F1,19 = 5.16, Partial η2 = 0.21, p = .035), and protective maintenance in DMN (F1, 9 = 14.63, Partial η2 = 0.62, p = .004). Additionally, VSOP training, but not MLA, resulted in a significant improvement in CEN connectivity (Z = −2.37, p = .018). Conclusion We identified both target and transfer effects of VSOP training and revealed links between VSOP training and two key neural networks associated with aMCI. These findings highlight the potential of VSOP training to slow cognitive decline in aMCI. Further delineation of mechanisms underlying VSOP-induced plasticity is necessary to understand in what populations and conditions such training may be most effective. PMID:27321608

  20. Aerobic or Resistance Training and Pulse Wave Velocity in Kidney Transplant Recipients: A 12-Week Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial (the Exercise in Renal Transplant [ExeRT] Trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Sharlene A; Koufaki, Pelagia; Mercer, Thomas H; Rush, Robert; O'Connor, Ellen; Tuffnell, Rachel; Lindup, Herolin; Haggis, Lynda; Dew, Tracy; Abdulnassir, Lyndsey; Nugent, Eilish; Goldsmith, David; Macdougall, Iain C

    2015-10-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death in kidney transplant recipients. This pilot study examined the potential effect of aerobic training or resistance training on vascular health and indexes of cardiovascular risk in kidney transplant recipients. Single-blind, randomized, controlled, parallel trial. 60 participants (mean age, 54 years; 34 men) were randomly assigned to aerobic training (n=20), resistance training (n=20), or usual care (n=20). Participants were included if they had a kidney transplant within 12 months prior to baseline assessment. Patients were excluded if they had unstable medical conditions or had recently started regular exercise. Aerobic training and resistance training were delivered 3 days per week for a 12-week period. The usual-care group received standard care. Pulse wave velocity, peak oxygen uptake (Vo2peak), sit-to-stand 60, isometric quadriceps force, and inflammatory biomarkers were assessed at 0 and 12 weeks. The anticipated 60 participants were recruited within 12 months. 46 participants completed the study (aerobic training, n=13; resistance training, n=13; and usual care, n=20), resulting in a 23% attrition rate. Analyses of covariance, adjusted for baseline values, age, and dialysis vintage pretransplantation, revealed significant mean differences between aerobic training and usual care in pulse wave velocity of -2.2±0.4 (95% CI, -3.1 to -1.3) m/s (PPilot study, small sample size, no measure of endothelial function. Both aerobic training and resistance training interventions appear to be feasible and clinically beneficial in this patient population. Copyright © 2015 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Training of executive functions in healthy elderly: Results of a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaís Bento Lima-Silva

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Executive functions (EF refer to the cognitive skills necessary to formulate a goal, plan, execute plans effectively, and to perform self-monitoring and self-correction. Several aspects of EF change during the normal aging process. Objectives: To train skills associated with executive functions in the elderly and to detect possible impact on objective EF tests and self-reports of functional status. Methods: A cross-sectional study involving an intervention and pre and post testing was carried out. Study participants included 26 seniors assigned to an experimental group (EG and given six sessions of cognitive intervention, and 17 seniors assigned to a control group (CG who completed pre and post testing only. All participants were enrolled in an Open University for the Third Age. The following tests were used to measure outcome: the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE, the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS, the Story subtest of the Rivermead Behavioral Memory Test (RBMT (versions A and B, semantic verbal fluency fruit category, and verbal fluency with phonological constraints (FAS, WAIS-III Digit Span, Clock Drawing Test (CDT, Trail Making Part A and the Pfeffer Functional Assessment Questionnaire (PFAQ. Delta scores were calculated (post-test score minus pretest score to assess the impact of the intervention. Results: In the post test, the CG showed significant improvement on the RBMT Story recall and Digit Span but a decline in verbal fluency. The EG remained stable in terms of pre and post test scores. Conclusions: The intervention did not enhance performance on the EF tests. It is noteworthy that the EG received only a small number of sessions which may not have been sufficient to generate improvement. Alternatively, the lack of group differences observed could be associated to participation in other workshops offered at the university.

  2. Improving the Teaching Skills of Residents in a Surgical Training Program: Results of the Pilot Year of a Curricular Initiative in an Ophthalmology Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, Yewlin E; Newman, Lori R; Loewenstein, John I; Kloek, Carolyn E

    2015-01-01

    To design and implement a teaching skills curriculum that addressed the needs of an ophthalmology residency training program, to assess the effect of the curriculum, and to present important lessons learned. A teaching skills curriculum was designed for the Harvard Medical School (HMS) Residency Training Program in Ophthalmology. Results of a needs assessment survey were used to guide curriculum objectives. Overall, 3 teaching workshops were conducted between October 2012 and March 2013 that addressed areas of need, including procedural teaching. A postcurriculum survey was used to assess the effect of the curriculum. Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, a tertiary care institution in Boston, MA. Overall, 24 residents in the HMS Residency Training Program in Ophthalmology were included. The needs assessment survey demonstrated that although most residents anticipated that teaching would be important in their future career, only one-third had prior formal training in teaching. All residents reported they found the teaching workshops to be either very or extremely useful. All residents reported they would like further training in teaching, with most residents requesting additional training in best procedural teaching practices for future sessions. The pilot year of the resident-as-teacher curriculum for the HMS Residency Training Program in Ophthalmology demonstrated a need for this curriculum and was perceived as beneficial by the residents, who reported increased comfort in their teaching skills after attending the workshops. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Preliminary efficacy and feasibility of embedding high intensity interval training into the school day: A pilot randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costigan, S.A.; Eather, N.; Plotnikoff, R.C.; Taaffe, D.R.; Pollock, E.; Kennedy, S.G.; Lubans, D.R.

    2015-01-01

    Current physical activity and fitness levels among adolescents are low, increasing the risk of chronic disease. Although the efficacy of high intensity interval training (HIIT) for improving metabolic health is now well established, it is not known if this type of activity can be effective to improve adolescent health. The primary aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness and feasibility of embedding HIIT into the school day. A 3-arm pilot randomized controlled trial was conducted in one secondary school in Newcastle, Australia. Participants (n = 65; mean age = 15.8(0.6) years) were randomized into one of three conditions: aerobic exercise program (AEP) (n = 21), resistance and aerobic exercise program (RAP) (n = 22) and control (n = 22). The 8-week intervention consisted of three HIIT sessions per week (8–10 min/session), delivered during physical education (PE) lessons or at lunchtime. Assessments were conducted at baseline and post-intervention to detect changes in cardiorespiratory fitness (multi-stage shuttle-run), muscular fitness (push-up, standing long jump tests), body composition (Body Mass Index (BMI), BMI-z scores, waist circumference) and physical activity motivation (questionnaire), by researchers blinded to treatment allocation. Intervention effects for outcomes were examined using linear mixed models, and Cohen's d effect sizes were reported. Participants in the AEP and RAP groups had moderate intervention effects for waist circumference (p = 0.024), BMI-z (p = 0.037) and BMI (not significant) in comparison to the control group. A small intervention effect was also evident for cardiorespiratory fitness in the RAP group. PMID:26844177

  4. Preliminary efficacy and feasibility of embedding high intensity interval training into the school day: A pilot randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. Costigan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Current physical activity and fitness levels among adolescents are low, increasing the risk of chronic disease. Although the efficacy of high intensity interval training (HIIT for improving metabolic health is now well established, it is not known if this type of activity can be effective to improve adolescent health. The primary aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness and feasibility of embedding HIIT into the school day. A 3-arm pilot randomized controlled trial was conducted in one secondary school in Newcastle, Australia. Participants (n = 65; mean age = 15.8(0.6 years were randomized into one of three conditions: aerobic exercise program (AEP (n = 21, resistance and aerobic exercise program (RAP (n = 22 and control (n = 22. The 8-week intervention consisted of three HIIT sessions per week (8–10 min/session, delivered during physical education (PE lessons or at lunchtime. Assessments were conducted at baseline and post-intervention to detect changes in cardiorespiratory fitness (multi-stage shuttle-run, muscular fitness (push-up, standing long jump tests, body composition (Body Mass Index (BMI, BMI-z scores, waist circumference and physical activity motivation (questionnaire, by researchers blinded to treatment allocation. Intervention effects for outcomes were examined using linear mixed models, and Cohen's d effect sizes were reported. Participants in the AEP and RAP groups had moderate intervention effects for waist circumference (p = 0.024, BMI-z (p = 0.037 and BMI (not significant in comparison to the control group. A small intervention effect was also evident for cardiorespiratory fitness in the RAP group.

  5. Preliminary efficacy and feasibility of embedding high intensity interval training into the school day: A pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costigan, S A; Eather, N; Plotnikoff, R C; Taaffe, D R; Pollock, E; Kennedy, S G; Lubans, D R

    2015-01-01

    Current physical activity and fitness levels among adolescents are low, increasing the risk of chronic disease. Although the efficacy of high intensity interval training (HIIT) for improving metabolic health is now well established, it is not known if this type of activity can be effective to improve adolescent health. The primary aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness and feasibility of embedding HIIT into the school day. A 3-arm pilot randomized controlled trial was conducted in one secondary school in Newcastle, Australia. Participants (n = 65; mean age = 15.8(0.6) years) were randomized into one of three conditions: aerobic exercise program (AEP) (n = 21), resistance and aerobic exercise program (RAP) (n = 22) and control (n = 22). The 8-week intervention consisted of three HIIT sessions per week (8-10 min/session), delivered during physical education (PE) lessons or at lunchtime. Assessments were conducted at baseline and post-intervention to detect changes in cardiorespiratory fitness (multi-stage shuttle-run), muscular fitness (push-up, standing long jump tests), body composition (Body Mass Index (BMI), BMI-z scores, waist circumference) and physical activity motivation (questionnaire), by researchers blinded to treatment allocation. Intervention effects for outcomes were examined using linear mixed models, and Cohen's d effect sizes were reported. Participants in the AEP and RAP groups had moderate intervention effects for waist circumference (p = 0.024), BMI-z (p = 0.037) and BMI (not significant) in comparison to the control group. A small intervention effect was also evident for cardiorespiratory fitness in the RAP group.

  6. Professional Pilots Meteorology Training Standards Conference Held in Colorado Springs, Colorado on 13-14 April 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-07-01

    precalculus level, which is already a requirement for many college majors. Often the pilot can satisfy the four hours of elective credit required for the minor...with precalculus mathematics courses. Pilots who have taken precalculus mathematics often take four hours of MTR 421, Forecasting Laboratory, to

  7. Evaluation of the effectiveness of postgraduate general medicine training by objective structured clinical examination---pilot study and reflection on the experiences of Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jer-Chia; Liu, Keh-Min; Lee, Kun-Tai; Yen, Jo-Chu; Yen, Jeng-Hsien; Liu, Ching-Kuan; Lai, Chung-Sheng

    2008-12-01

    Objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) is an effective assessment method to evaluate medical students' clinical competencies performance. Postgraduate year 1 (PGY1) residents have been initiated in a general medicine training program in Taiwan since 2003. However, little is known about the learning effectiveness of trainees from this program. This pilot study aimed to evaluate the clinical core competencies of PGY1 residents using OSCE, and to reflect on the strengths and weaknesses of this pilot assessment project. OSCE was conducted for five PGY1 examinees (4 men, 1 woman) with five stations covering core themes, including history taking, physical examination, clinical procedure of airway intubation, clinical reasoning, and communication skills for informing bad news. Itemized checklists and five-point Likert scale global ratings were used for evaluating performance. The results showed that the performance of our PGY1 residents on history taking was significantly better after about 2 months of postgraduate training on general internal medicine. Self-evaluation on performance by examinees revealed significantly lower global ratings on post-course OSCE (4.14 +/- 0.80 vs. 3.68 +/- 0.66; p OSCEs showed consistently favorable responses on the purposes, content, process, and environment of this assessment (4.0 +/- 0.17 vs. 4.0 +/- 0.12, nonsignificant). However, a survey of the examinees completed at pre- and post-course OSCEs showed relatively unfavorable responses to the same aspects, and to tutors and SPs (4.1 +/- 0.09 vs. 3.7 +/- 0.18; p clinical reasoning performance, communication skills (giving bad news) and self-confidence were unsatisfactory. In conclusion, this pilot study has demonstrated that OSCE is a rational and feasible assessment method for evaluating the effectiveness of our PGY general medicine training program. The quantitative data and qualitative information provide a foundation to improve the quality of the program design and evaluation

  8. Diminished disease progression rate in a chronic kidney disease population following the replacement of dietary water source with quality drinking water: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriwardhana, Edirisinghe Arachchige Ranga Iroshanie Edirisinghe; Perera, Ponnamperuma Aratchige Jayasumana; Sivakanesan, Ramiah; Abeysekara, Tilak; Nugegoda, Danaseela Bandara; Weerakoon, Kosala; Siriwardhana, Dunusingha Asitha Surandika

    2017-03-29

    Environmental toxin/s is alleged to be the contributory factor for the chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology (CKDu) in Sri Lanka. The potential of drinking water as a medium for the nephrotoxic agents in the affected subjects has been comprehensively discoursed in the recent past. The present study was aimed to assess the effect of replacing the habitual drinking water on the kidney function of CKDu patients residing in the North Central Province of Sri Lanka: METHODS: An interventional study was carried out to assess the disease progression rate of a CKDu population whose habitual drinking water was replaced by bottled spring water certified by Sri Lanka Standard (SLS) for a period of 18 month along with a population of CKDu patients who continued with their usual drinking water. Kidney function of subjects in both groups were monitored in terms of blood pressure, serum creatinine, serum calcium, serum phosphorus, hemoglobin, estimated glomerular filtration rate and urinary protein at 6 months intervals during the intervention and follow up periods. Diminished disease progression rate was observed in CKDu patients in the intervention group when compared with the non- intervention group based on serum creatinine, Hb, estimated glomerular filtration rate and urinary protein levels. Extensive interventional studies are required to generalize effect of drinking water on CKDu population. The habitual drinking water is likely to be a contributory factor towards the progression of the disease. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Building Potential for Pilot Expertise: Can Understanding How People Think and Make Decisions Improve the Ability of Military Flight Training to Create Potential Pilot Expertise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-24

    the video a girl in a full body gorilla suit walked into the middle of the scene, stopped in the middle of the players, faced the camera, thumped her...chest, and then walked off after spending nine seconds on the screen. Roughly half of the observers never saw the gorilla . The invisible gorilla ...of the invisible gorilla is expertise. Experienced basketball players are much more likely to Tempest – Building Potential for Pilot Expertise B

  10. 飞行人员生物反馈放松训练效果评价%The evaluation of pilots' biofeedback relaxation training effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘军; 王煜蕙; 杜长伟; 刘玉华; 赵春华; 王开辉; 冯琦

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of pilots' biofeedback training in aviation psychological training. Methods After practicing pilots by four kinds of relaxation training ( progressive muscle relaxation, breath adjusting relaxation, intention relaxation and music relaxation) , the scores of heart rate, pressure and PNN50 were statistical analyzed. Results Three physiological inde-xes were changed during earlier stage, medium stage and later stage and the difference had statistical significance ( P < 0.05 or P < 0.01), but were not found significant different among four methods ( P < 0. 01). Compared with the older group and the oldest group, the difference of heart rate scores changes in younger group before, during and after training had statistical significance ( P < 0.01). Conclusion The biofeedback relaxation training was effective in pilots. There was no statistical significance in difference of training effects between different methods and results. The training effects of different age groups were different, and scores of younger group were higher than others.%目的 评价航空心理训练中对飞行人员实施生物反馈放松训练的效果.方法 分别采用渐进性肌肉放松、呼吸调整放松、意向放松和音乐放松等四种方法 进行反馈训练,对训练中心率、压力指数和PNN50生理指标进行统计分析.结果 训练前、中和后期各生理指标变化的差异有统计学意义(P<0.05或P<0.01);四种训练方法 之间生理指标变化无差异(P>0.05);低年龄组心率变化在训练前和训练中、训练后与中间和高年龄组比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.01).结论 飞行人员生物反馈放松训练效果明显,不同放松方法 的训练效果比较差异无统计学意义;不同年龄组训练效果差异有统计学意义,低年龄组训练效果好于中间和高年龄组.

  11. Cognitive and Neural Effects of Vision-Based Speed-of-Processing Training in Older Adults with Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Feng; Heffner, Kathi L; Ren, Ping; Tivarus, Madalina E; Brasch, Judith; Chen, Ding-Geng; Mapstone, Mark; Porsteinsson, Anton P; Tadin, Duje

    2016-06-01

    To examine the cognitive and neural effects of vision-based speed-of-processing (VSOP) training in older adults with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) and contrast those effects with an active control (mental leisure activities (MLA)). Randomized single-blind controlled pilot trial. Academic medical center. Individuals with aMCI (N = 21). Six-week computerized VSOP training. Multiple cognitive processing measures, instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs), and two resting state neural networks regulating cognitive processing: central executive network (CEN) and default mode network (DMN). VSOP training led to significantly greater improvements in trained (processing speed and attention: F1,19  = 6.61, partial η(2)  = 0.26, P = .02) and untrained (working memory: F1,19  = 7.33, partial η(2)  = 0.28, P = .01; IADLs: F1,19  = 5.16, partial η(2)  = 0.21, P = .03) cognitive domains than MLA and protective maintenance in DMN (F1, 9  = 14.63, partial η(2)  = 0.62, P = .004). VSOP training, but not MLA, resulted in a significant improvement in CEN connectivity (Z = -2.37, P = .02). Target and transfer effects of VSOP training were identified, and links between VSOP training and two neural networks associated with aMCI were found. These findings highlight the potential of VSOP training to slow cognitive decline in individuals with aMCI. Further delineation of mechanisms underlying VSOP-induced plasticity is necessary to understand in which populations and under what conditions such training may be most effective. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  12. Leptin replacement improves postprandial glycemia and insulin sensitivity in human immunodeficiency virus-infected lipoatrophic men treated with pioglitazone: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magkos, Faidon; Brennan, Aoife; Sweeney, Laura; Kang, Eun Seok; Doweiko, John; Karchmer, Adolf W; Mantzoros, Christos S

    2011-07-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)-induced lipoatrophy is characterized by hypoleptinemia and insulin resistance. Evidence suggests that pioglitazone and recombinant methionyl human leptin (metreleptin) administration has beneficial effects in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected lipoatrophic patients. This proof-of-concept study aimed at evaluating whether the combination of metreleptin and pioglitazone has favorable effects, above and beyond pioglitazone alone, on both metabolic outcomes and peripheral lipoatrophy in HIV-infected patients on HAART. Nine HIV-positive men with at least 6 months of HAART exposure, clinical evidence of lipoatrophy, and low leptin concentrations (≤4 ng/mL) were placed on pioglitazone treatment (30 mg/d per os) and were randomized to receive either metreleptin (0.04 mg/kg subcutaneously once daily; n = 5) or placebo (n = 4) for 3 months in a double-blinded fashion. Compared with placebo, metreleptin reduced fasting serum insulin concentration, increased adiponectin concentration, reduced the homeostasis model assessment index of insulin resistance, and attenuated postprandial glycemia in response to a mixed meal (all P ≤ .02), but did not affect trunk and peripheral fat mass. HIV control was not affected, and no major adverse effects were observed. Metreleptin administration in HIV-positive, leptin-deficient patients with lipoatrophy treated with pioglitazone improves postprandial glycemia and insulin sensitivity. Results from this pilot study should be confirmed in larger clinical trials.

  13. Implementing and managing self-management skills training within primary care organisations: a national survey of the expert patients programme within its pilot phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogers Anne

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A key element of the United Kingdom (UK health policy reform in relation to chronic disease management is the introduction of a national programme seeking to promote self-care from within the National Health Service (NHS. The mainstay of the Expert Patients Programme (EPP is a six-week training course that provides the opportunity for anyone with a long-term condition to develop new skills to manage their condition better on a day-to-day basis. The course forms part of the NHS self-care support programme, is administered by Primary Care Trusts (PCTs and delivered by people who have personal experience of living with a long-term condition. The NHS' official Expert Patients Programme website presently states that, "Pilot EPP courses began at 26 NHS PCT sites across England in May 2002, and by May 2004 approximately 300 PCTs had either actively implemented pilot courses or had committed to joining. The majority of PCTs are now coming to the end of the pilot phase, with many implementing plans to make EPP sustainable for the long-term." The NHS website heralds the pilot "a success." A national, postal survey of PCT EPP Leads was undertaken in order to examine both the evolvement of EPP during its pilot stage and future plans for the programme. A questionnaire was sent out to the 299 PCTs known to have committed to the EPP pilot, and an excellent 100% response rate was obtained over a 3-month period (April-July 2005. One marker of success of the Expert Patients Programme implementation is the actual running of courses by the Primary Care Trusts. This paper explores the extent to which the implementation of the pilot can indeed be viewed as a "success," primarily in terms of the number of courses run, and considers the extent to which PCTs have carried out all that they were committed to do. Findings suggest that the more time an EPP Lead dedicates to the Programme, the more likely it is that EPP has run successfully in the past, and the more

  14. Directed Replacement

    CERN Document Server

    Karttunen, L

    1996-01-01

    This paper introduces to the finite-state calculus a family of directed replace operators. In contrast to the simple replace expression, UPPER -> LOWER, defined in Karttunen (ACL-95), the new directed version, UPPER @-> LOWER, yields an unambiguous transducer if the lower language consists of a single string. It transduces the input string from left to right, making only the longest possible replacement at each point. A new type of replacement expression, UPPER @-> PREFIX ... SUFFIX, yields a transducer that inserts text around strings that are instances of UPPER. The symbol ... denotes the matching part of the input which itself remains unchanged. PREFIX and SUFFIX are regular expressions describing the insertions. Expressions of the type UPPER @-> PREFIX ... SUFFIX may be used to compose a deterministic parser for a ``local grammar'' in the sense of Gross (1989). Other useful applications of directed replacement include tokenization and filtering of text streams.

  15. Whole-body vibration training improves balance control and sit-to-stand performance among middle-aged and older adults: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Ming-Chen; Wu, Long-Shan; Lee, Sangwoo; Wang, Chien-Chun; Lee, Po-Fu; Tseng, Ching-Yu; Ho, Chien-Chang

    2017-01-01

    Aging is associated with decreased balance, which increases falling risk. The objective of the current study was to determine the feasibility and effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) training on knee extensor muscle power, limits of stability, and sit-to-stand performance among community-dwelling middle-aged and older adults in the United States. A randomized pilot study with participant blinding was conducted. Feasibility outcomes included recruitment and compliance rate. Twenty-nine community-dwelling older adults were randomly assigned to perform body-weight exercises with either an individualized vibration frequency and amplitude, a fixed vibration frequency and amplitude, or no vibration. Isokinetic knee extensor power, limits of stability, and sit-to-stand tests were conducted before beginning the exercises (baseline) and after 8 weeks of training. With a favorable recruitment rate (58%) and compliance rates (attrition 9%; adherence 85%), the intervention was deemed feasible. The limits of stability endpoint excursion score for the individualized frequency-amplitude group was increased by 8.8 (12.9%; P = 0.025) after training, and that group's maximum excursion score was increased by 9.2 (11.5%; P = 0.006) after training. The average weight transfer time score was significantly decreased by 0.2 s in the fixed group. The participants in the individualized group demonstrated a significant increase (3.2%) in weight rising index score after 8 weeks of WBV training. WBV training is feasible for use with elderly people, and this study achieved good recruitment and compliance. The present paper suggests that 8 weeks of WBV training improves limits of stability and sit-to-stand performance. Future studies must determine whether WBV training improves other factors that affect posture control. This study was registered at the Texas Woman's University Institutional Review Board [TWU IRB 17632] on the 3rd of November 2014.

  16. The efficacy of {sup 99m}Tc-ciprofloxacin (infecton) imaging in suspected prosthetic infection following total knee replacement arthroplasty (pilot study)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Ho; Choi, Tae Hyun; Kim, Nam Bum [Gachon Medical School, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    The aims of this study were 1) to increase the labelling efficiency of {sup 99m}Tc-ciprofloxacin (infecton) and 2) to determine the value of infecton imaging in demonstrating infection following total knee replacement arthroplasty (TKRA). Five patients (4 female, 1 male: mean age 52.8{+-}13.5 years, both TKRA in 3 pt) with suspected prosthetic infective conditions were included. In order to increase labelling efficiency, infection was labelled with stannous tartrate instead of previousely used formamidine sulfinic acid (FSA). Immediate perfusion, 5min blood pool, 1hr, 4hr and 24hr delayed images were perfomed. All images were blindly interpreted by two independent observers with visual findings being classified according to a four-grade scale(0.1.2.3). Images graded 0 and 1, and also those regions which showed faintly increase or unchanged uptake grade on late images as compared with early images, were classified as negative; grades 2 and 3 were classified as positive. The diagnosis was confirmed by intraoperative microbiological / histological findings or by the presence of gross purulence. Labelling efficiency increased up to over 98% with formation of radiocolloid less than 1%. All of four pt with prosthetic infection showed positive infecton images but one pt with sterile loosening of prosthesis showed negative infection images. The easy availability as well as new labelling technique make infecton imaging the better option for the detection of prosthetic orthopedic infection.

  17. Pilot study of pre-maxilla replacement and bone graft in a patient with lip and palate clefts: transforaminal relationship between upper canines and bone graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Luis Carlini

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to assess patients subjected to replacement surgery of the pre maxilla with bone graft, having as donor area the iliac crest and chin, and the relation with upper canines erupted in grafted areas. Materials and Methods: 54 records were evaluated from cleft patients that were under treatment at CAIF - Center of Attention to Clefts in Curitiba, PR, Brazil, both sexes, with unilateral and bilateral lip and palate clefts. Patients younger than fourteen years old, both sexes, that lost the surgical segment or did not continue the treatment at same welcoming institution, were excluded.  The surgical segment average was 5.72 years. Results: Using both descriptive and chi-square statistics, we observed a statistically significant distinction regarding the eruption of upper canines in the region of secondary bone grafts when using iliac crest and chin grafts, which 62.8% of the sample that was treated with chin grafts happened to have an eruption of upper canines, and 37.2% were successful with iliac crest grafts (value-p 0.028. Conclusions: It is necessary to carry out a study with a larger sample size and where the samples are paired in order to confirm the superiority the iliac crest donor area as the gold standard for this surgical procedure.

  18. Effects of recombinant growth hormone (GH) replacement and psychomotor and cognitive stimulation in the neurodevelopment of GH-deficient (GHD) children with cerebral palsy: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devesa, Jesús; Alonso, Begoña; Casteleiro, Nerea; Couto, Paula; Castañón, Beatriz; Zas, Eva; Reimunde, Pedro

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is the main cause of physical disability in childhood and is an important health issue that has a strong socioeconomic impact. There is no effective treatment for CP and therapeutic approaches report only partial benefits for affected people. In this study we assessed the effects of growth hormone (GH) treatment combined with psychomotor and cognitive stimulation in the neurodevelopment of children with CP and GH deficiency (GHD). The study was carried out in 11 patients (7 boys and 4 girls; 4.12 ± 1.31 years) with GHD and CP who were treated with recombinant GH (rGH) and psychomotor and cognitive stimulation during 2 months. Battelle Developmental Inventory Screening Test (BDIST) was performed 2 months before commencing GH treatment, just before commencing GH administration, and after 2 months of combined treatment involving GH and cognitive stimulation. Psychomotor and cognitive status did not change during the period in which only cognitive stimulation was performed; however, significant improvements in personal and social skills, adaptive behavior, gross motor skills and total psychomotor abilities, receptive and total communication, cognitive skills and in the total score of the test (P < 0.01), and in fine motor skills and expressive communication (P < 0.02) were observed after the combined treatment period. Therefore, GH replacement together with psychomotor and cognitive stimulation seem to be useful for the appropriate neurodevelopment of children with GHD and CP.

  19. A pilot study examining the impact of exercise training on skeletal muscle genes related to the TLR signaling pathway in older adults following hip fracture recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Alec I; Briggs, Robert A; Barrows, Katherine M; Nelson, Daniel S; Kwon, Oh Sung; Hopkins, Paul N; Higgins, Thomas F; Marcus, Robin L; Drummond, Micah J

    2017-01-01

    Older adults after hip fracture surgery experience progressive muscle atrophy and weakness, limiting full recovery. Further understanding of the molecular mechanisms in muscle with adaptation to exercise training in this vulnerable population is necessary. Therefore, we conducted a pilot study to investigate the skeletal muscle inflammatory and ceramide biosynthesis gene expression levels associated with the toll-like receptor (TLR) pathway before (Pre) and following a 3-mo multicomponent exercise training program in older adults (3M, 4F; 78.4 ± 13.3 yr; 25.5 ± 2.3 kg/m(2)) ~4 mo after repair from hip fracture (HipFx). Vastus lateralis biopsies from the surgical limb were obtained before (Pre) and after training. Molecular end points and muscle function data were also compared with matched nonexercise healthy controls (CON). As a follow-up analysis, we evaluated specific sphingolipid pools in HipFx and CON muscle. Following training, quadriceps cross-sectional area, strength, and 6-min walk (6MW) increased in the surgical limb (P exercise training alters skeletal muscle inflammation and ceramide metabolism associated with TLR signaling in older adults recovering from hip fracture surgery and may be related to improvements in muscle function recovery.

  20. Where there is no obstetrician--increasing capacity for emergency obstetric care in rural India: an evaluation of a pilot program to train general doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Cherrie Lynn; Maine, Deborah; McCloskey, Lois; Feeley, Frank G; Sanghvi, Harshad

    2009-12-01

    Maternal mortality continues to be high in rural India. Chief among the reasons for this is a severe shortage of obstetricians to perform cesarean delivery and other skills required for emergency obstetric care (EmOC). In 2006, the Government of India and the Federation of Obstetric and Gynecological Societies of India (FOGSI) with technical assistance from Jhpiego, instituted a nationwide, 16-week comprehensive EmOC (CEmOC) training program for general medical officers (MOs). This program is based on an earlier pilot project (2004-2006). To evaluate the pilot project, and identify lessons learned to inform the nationwide scale-up. The lead author (CE) visited trainees and their facilities to evaluate the project. Eight data collection tools were created, which included interviews with informants (program/government staff, regional/international experts, trainees and trainers), facility observation, and facility-based data collection of births and maternal/newborn deaths during the study period. More trainees performed each of the basic EmOC skills after the training than before. After training, 10 of 15 facilities to which trainees returned could provide all signal functions for basic EmOC whereas only 2 could do so before. For comprehensive EmOC, 2 facilities with obstetricians were providing all functions before and 2 were doing so after, even though the specialists had left those facilities and services were being provided by CEmOC trainees. Barriers to providing, or continuing to provide, EmOC for some trainees included insufficient training for cesarean delivery, lack of anesthetists, equipment and infrastructure (operating theater, blood services, forceps/vacuum, manual vacuum aspiration syringes). Although MOs can be trained to provide CEmOC (including cesarean delivery), without proper selection of facilities and trainees, adequate training, and support, this strategy will not substantially improve the availability of comprehensive EmOC in India. To

  1. Pre- and post-training evaluation of dental efficacy and activation measures in carers of adults with disabilities in South Australia - a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Archana; Keuskamp, Dominic; Brennan, David

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to train carers to provide oral care for adults with disabilities and to evaluate the training programme. Forty-one carers of 103 care recipients from three disability organisations in South Australia were trained in providing oral care for adults with disabilities (April 2013-April 2014). The training included an oral presentation and practical session by a special needs dentist on completing oral health assessments (OHA), developing oral healthcare plans, providing oral hygiene care and assessing the need for dental referral. Continued support was provided via home visits by dental hygienists for the first 2 months and a dentist visit at 3 months. At 6 months, agreement on OHAs between the dentist and trained carers was assessed. Pre- and post-training questionnaires (at 6 months) collected information on dental behaviours of carers and psychosocial factors: carer activation measure-knowledge (CAM-Knowledge), carer activation measure-skills (CAM-Skills), carer activation measure-confidence (CAM-Confidence) and carer dental efficacy (CDE) items (carer diligence, self-efficacy and priority). Post-training (among 16 retained carers), there were significant increases in the mean scores of CAM-Knowledge and CAM-Confidence, but not for CAM-Skills (paired-samples t-tests, α = 0.05). Per cent agreement of CDE items varied little between questionnaires. Carer-dentist agreement on OHAs was generally high with kappa values ranging from 0.63 for the assessment of gums to 1.0 for the assessment of tongue, roof of mouth, denture and dental pain. Further, carers were able to assess the need for referral of their care recipients' oral health similar to the dentist. These findings suggest that with combined theoretical and practical training and continued support, non-dental professionals like carers can improve their knowledge and confidence in providing oral care for adults with disabilities. However, the findings of this pilot study need

  2. Long-term pulse wave velocity outcomes with aerobic and resistance training in kidney transplant recipients - A pilot randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Ellen M; Koufaki, Pelagia; Mercer, Thomas H; Lindup, Herolin; Nugent, Eilish; Goldsmith, David; Macdougall, Iain C; Greenwood, Sharlene A

    2017-01-01

    This pilot study examined long-term pulse wave velocity (PWV) and peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) outcomes following a 12-week moderate-intensity aerobic or resistance training programme in kidney transplant recipients. Single-blind, bi-centre randomised controlled parallel trial. 42 out of 60 participants completed a 9-month follow-up assessment (Aerobic training = 12, Resistance training = 10 and usual care = 20). Participants completed 12 weeks of twice-weekly supervised aerobic or resistance training. Following the 12-week exercise intervention, participants were transitioned to self-managed community exercise activity using motivational interviewing techniques. Usual care participants received usual encouragement for physical activity during routine clinical appointments in the transplant clinic. PWV, VO2peak, blood pressure and body weight were assessed at 12 weeks and 12 months, and compared to baseline. ANCOVA analysis, covarying for baseline values, age, and length of time on dialysis pre-transplantation, revealed a significant mean between-group difference in PWV of -1.30 m/sec (95%CI -2.44 to -0.17, p = 0.03) between resistance training and usual care groups. When comparing the aerobic training and usual care groups at 9-month follow-up, there was a mean difference of -1.05 m/sec (95%CI -2.11 to 0.017, p = 0.05). A significant mean between-group difference in relative VO2peak values of 2.2 ml/kg/min (95% CI 0.37 to 4.03, p = 0.02) when comparing aerobic training with usual care was revealed. There was no significant between group differences in body weight or blood pressure. There were no significant adverse effects associated with the interventions. Significant between-group differences in 9-month follow-up PWV existed when comparing resistance exercise intervention with usual care. A long-term between-group difference in VO2peak was only evident when comparing aerobic intervention with usual care. This pilot study, with a small sample size, did not aim to

  3. Educating My Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarter, Jill

    , in partnership with the dedicated teachers out there, I think I can help promote the critical thinking skills and scientific literacy of the next generation of voters. Hopefully, I can also help train my replacement to be a better scientist, capable of seizing all the opportunities generated by advances in technology and our improved understanding of the universe to craft search strategies with greater probability of success than those I have initiated.

  4. Academic and Workplace-related Visual Stresses Induce Detectable Deterioration Of Performance, Measured By Basketball Trajectories and Astigmatism Impacting Athletes Or Students In Military Pilot Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mc Leod, Roger D.

    2004-03-01

    Separate military establishments across the globe can confirm that a high percentage of their prospective pilots-in-training are no longer visually fit to continue the flight training portion of their programs once their academic coursework is completed. I maintain that the visual stress induced by those intensive protocols can damage the visual feedback mechanism of any healthy and dynamic system beyond its usual and ordinary ability to self-correct minor visual loss of acuity. This deficiency seems to be detectable among collegiate and university athletes by direct observation of the height of the trajectory arc of a basketball's flight. As a particular athlete becomes increasingly stressed by academic constraints requiring long periods of concentrated reading under highly static angular convergence of the eyes, along with unfavorable illumination and viewing conditions, eyesight does deteriorate. I maintain that induced astigmatism is a primary culprit because of the evidence of that basketball's trajectory! See the next papers!

  5. Ribbed人工关节全髋置换后的康复训练与护理%Rehabilitation training and nursing of patients with hip joint replacement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈研; 张强; 王蔚; 马毳; 郭路娇

    2010-01-01

    Objective To explore the importance of I rehabilitation training and nursing of patients with hip joint replacement. Methods The samples were 104 patients who received the post-surgery guides on rehabilitation and were followed up by3, 6 and 12 months postoperative. The effects were assessed. Results Harris score was 34.7 at preoperation and 92.8 at postoperation. Excellent was 81.3% , good was 10. 1% , fair was 4.4% and poor was 3. 3%. Except one acetabular shell was loosen, there were no problems with other prosthesis. Conclusions Rehabilitation after surgery is very important in total hip replacement, it can accelerate recovery and improve patient' s quality of life.%目的 探讨系统的康复训练特别是术后院外康复训练的重要性.方法 对104例全髋关节单侧置换患者进行术后康复指导.术后3个月、6个月以及1年分别对患者功能康复情况进行随访,评估康复效果.结果 104例患者Harris评分术前平均34.7分,术后平均92.8分.其中优秀81.3%,良好10.1%,一般4.4%,差3.3%.除1例髋臼松动导致翻修外,影像学检查均无异常.结论 对髋关节置换术后患者进行系统的康复训练特别是院外功能康复训练与护理指导,有利于髋关节早日恢复良好状态,提高患者生活质量.

  6. Effects of recombinant growth hormone (GH replacement and psychomotor and cognitive stimulation in the neurodevelopment of GH-deficient (GHD children with cerebral palsy: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devesa J

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Jesús Devesa1,2, Begoña Alonso1, Nerea Casteleiro1, Paula Couto1, Beatriz Castañón1, Eva Zas1, Pedro Reimunde1,21Medical Center “Proyecto Foltra”, Cacheiras (Teo, A Coruña, Spain; 2Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, University of Santiago de Compostela, SpainAbstract: Cerebral palsy (CP is the main cause of physical disability in childhood and is an important health issue that has a strong socioeconomic impact. There is no effective treatment for CP and therapeutic approaches report only partial benefits for affected people. In this study we assessed the effects of growth hormone (GH treatment combined with psychomotor and cognitive stimulation in the neurodevelopment of children with CP and GH deficiency (GHD. The study was carried out in 11 patients (7 boys and 4 girls; 4.12 ± 1.31 years with GHD and CP who were treated with recombinant GH (rGH and psychomotor and cognitive stimulation during 2 months. Battelle Developmental Inventory Screening Test (BDIST was performed 2 months before commencing GH treatment, just before commencing GH administration, and after 2 months of combined treatment involving GH and cognitive stimulation. Psychomotor and cognitive status did not change during the period in which only cognitive stimulation was performed; however, significant improvements in personal and social skills, adaptive behavior, gross motor skills and total psychomotor abilities, receptive and total communication, cognitive skills and in the total score of the test (P < 0.01, and in fine motor skills and expressive communication (P < 0.02 were observed after the combined treatment period. Therefore, GH replacement together with psychomotor and cognitive stimulation seem to be useful for the appropriate neurodevelopment of children with GHD and CP.Keywords: growth hormone, cerebral palsy, cognitive functions, Battelle’s test, neurodevelopment

  7. Knee Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... need knee replacement surgery usually have problems walking, climbing stairs, and getting in and out of chairs. Some ... a total living space on one floor since climbing stairs can be difficult. Install safety bars or a ...

  8. 高职教育以赛带训人才培养模式分析与探讨%Analysis and Discussion on Talents' Cultivation Mode of Replacing Training with Competition for Higher Vocational Education

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄忠东; 刘畅; 尹结

    2012-01-01

    抚顺职业技术学院积极参加省级和国家级职业技能竞赛,以技能竞赛带动高职教育改革,根据行业岗位技能需求制定竞赛计划,健全实施机制,将项目化教学与技能大赛项目紧密衔接,将训练项目与企业项目相融合,逐渐形成了以竞赛带动实训、以实训带动就业的办学理念,积极探索出"以赛带训"人才培养新模式。并在此阐明了"以赛带训"模式的形成及内涵,并对其做了进一步的分析与探讨。%Fushun Vocational Technology Institute actively participates in provincial and national vocational skills competition,driving reform of higher vocational education by replacing training with competition.According to the requirement of industry post skills to make competition plan and perfect implementing mechanism,it can link project teaching with skilled competition project closely,combining training project with enterprise project to form the running concept of driving practical training with competition and driving employment with practical training gradually.It can actively explore the new mode of talents' training by replacing training by competition.It clarifies the formation and connotation of the mode of replacing training with competition,and makes further analysis and discussion.

  9. Replacing penalties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitaly Stepashin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available УДК 343.24The subject. The article deals with the problem of the use of "substitute" penalties.The purpose of the article is to identify criminal and legal criteria for: selecting the replacement punishment; proportionality replacement leave punishment to others (the formalization of replacement; actually increasing the punishment (worsening of legal situation of the convicted.Methodology.The author uses the method of analysis and synthesis, formal legal method.Results. Replacing the punishment more severe as a result of malicious evasion from serving accused designated penalty requires the optimization of the following areas: 1 the selection of a substitute punishment; 2 replacement of proportionality is serving a sentence other (formalization of replacement; 3 ensuring the actual toughening penalties (deterioration of the legal status of the convict. It is important that the first two requirements pro-vide savings of repression in the implementation of the replacement of one form of punishment to others.Replacement of punishment on their own do not have any specifics. However, it is necessary to compare them with the contents of the punishment, which the convict from serving maliciously evaded. First, substitute the punishment should assume a more significant range of restrictions and deprivation of certain rights of the convict. Second, the perfor-mance characteristics of order substitute the punishment should assume guarantee imple-mentation of the new measures.With regard to replacing all forms of punishment are set significant limitations in the application that, in some cases, eliminates the possibility of replacement of the sentence, from serving where there has been willful evasion, a stricter measure of state coercion. It is important in the context of the topic and the possibility of a sentence of imprisonment as a substitute punishment in cases where the original purpose of the strict measures excluded. It is noteworthy that the

  10. The feasibility and effectiveness of high-intensity boxing training versus moderate-intensity brisk walking in adults with abdominal obesity: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheema, Birinder S; Davies, Timothy B; Stewart, Matthew; Papalia, Shona; Atlantis, Evan

    2015-01-01

    High-intensity interval training (HIIT) performed on exercise cycle or treadmill is considered safe and often more beneficial for fat loss and cardiometabolic health than moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT). The aim of this pilot study was to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of a 12-week boxing training (HIIT) intervention compared with an equivalent dose of brisk walking (MICT) in obese adults. Men and women with abdominal obesity and body mass index >25 kg/m(2) were randomized to either a boxing group or a brisk walking (control) group for 12 weeks. Each group engaged in 4 training sessions per week, equated for total physical activity. Feasibility outcomes included recruitment rates, assessment of training intensities, adherence and adverse events. Effectiveness was assessed pre and post intervention via pertinent obesity-, cardiovascular-, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) outcomes. Nineteen individuals expressed an interest and 63% (n = 12) consented. Recruitment was slower than anticipated (1.3 participants/week). The boxing group trained at a significantly higher intensity each week versus the brisk walking group (p boxing group experienced an adverse event; both continued to exercise with modifications to the exercise program. No other adverse events were noted. The boxing group attended more sessions (79% vs. 55%) and had a lower attrition rate (n = 0 vs. n = 2) than the walking group. Analysis of covariance revealed that the boxing group significantly improved body fat percentage (p = 0.047), systolic blood pressure (p = 0.026), augmentation index (AIx; p Boxing training (HIIT) in adults with abdominal obesity is feasible and may elicit a better therapeutic effect on obesity, cardiovascular, and HRQoL outcomes than an equivalent dose of brisk walking (MICT). Robustly designed randomized controlled trials are required to confirm these findings and inform clinical guidelines and practice for obesity

  11. Training and administration of epinephrine auto-injectors for anaphylaxis treatment in US schools: results from the EpiPen4Schools® pilot survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hogue SL

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Susan L Hogue,1 Diana Goss,1 Kelly Hollis,1 Suyapa Silvia,2 Martha V White3 1Health Solutions, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC, 2Education and Workforce Development, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC, 3Institute for Asthma and Allergy, Wheaton, MD, USA Background: Anaphylaxis is a serious, potentially life-threatening condition. Adequate preparation for anaphylaxis management is imperative for school personnel. This descriptive pilot study assessed preparedness of US schools to manage anaphylactic reactions. Methods: An exploratory, cross-sectional, web-based, pilot survey assessed the occurrence and characteristics of anaphylactic events, as well as training provided to school personnel for the recognition and treatment of anaphylaxis. Eligible US schools were participants in the EpiPen4Schools® program during the 2013–2014 school year. EpiPen4Schools provides EpiPen® (epinephrine injection Auto-Injectors and training materials to qualifying US schools. Survey data were parsed by US Census Bureau region and state and were evaluated using descriptive statistics. Results: Schools from all 50 states and the District of Columbia participated in the survey (N=6,019. Among schools that provided information on anaphylactic events, 11% (607/5,683 reported the occurrence of one or more events, with significant variability in incidence across census regions and among states. A total of 5,613 schools provided information regarding which staff members were trained to recognize the signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis. Thirty-six percent of schools (2,022/5,613 indicated that only the school nurse and select staff were trained in anaphylaxis recognition. The proportion of schools in which most or all school staff received such training differed by region/state (range, 13%–100%. A total of 5,578 schools provided information on which staff were permitted to administer epinephrine. The majority of schools (54%; 3

  12. The turnover tax burden of pilot entities during the period of replacing the business tax with a value-added tax%“营改增”试点企业流转税税负研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑婕

    2014-01-01

    “营改增”是中国“十二五”时期税制改革的重要举措。在对增值税纳税人实行分类管理的模式下,通过对影响试点企业流转税税负变化的因素进行分析,可以发现企业通过合理选择纳税人身份、分别核算不同税率业务收入和转变经营模式等措施,能有效降低企业流转税税负,并在此过程中调整企业发展战略,实现核心竞争力的提升。%The replacement of business tax with a value-added tax (VAT) is the most important part of tax reform in the Twelfth Five-Year Plan period. Based on the analysis of factors that would effect the tax burden of pilot entities, it can be found that under the management mode of classification of VAT payers, the measures such as reasonably choosing the status of tax payers, accounting for revenues with different tax rates separately and changing operation modes could reduce the tax burden, adjust the development strategy and improve the core competitiveness of entities.

  13. A Pilot Investigation into the Efficacy of a Signing Training Strategy for Staff Working with Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, Darren D.; Jolliffe, Jane

    2009-01-01

    To contribute to increasing the quality and quantity of communication between staff and adults with intellectual disabilities, training was undertaken to enhance the awareness and knowledge of signing as a method of communication. Multidisciplinary team members, residential and day centre staff were trained to use 20 core signs. Training methods…

  14. Evaluation of self-care skills training and solution-focused counselling for health professionals in psychiatric medicine: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mache, Stefanie; Bernburg, Monika; Baresi, Lisa; Groneberg, David A

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to implement and to evaluate a self-care skills training with solution-focused counselling to support psychiatrists in handling their daily work challenges. A total of 72 psychiatrists working in a psychiatric clinic were randomised in a single-blind trial to either an intervention group or a control group. Outcomes were measured at baseline and at the end of the training (follow-up 1: after 3 months; follow-up 2: after 6 months). A validated questionnaire including the Perceived Stress Questionnaire, the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire, Brief Resilient Coping Scale, Self-Efficacy Scale and the Quality of Relationship Inventory was used. Psychiatrists in the intervention group reached a significant reduction in perceived job stress (p = 0.01, d = 0.05), improvements in job satisfaction (p = 0.02, d = 0.04), resilience (p = 0.02, d = 0.04) and self-efficacy (p = 0.04, d = 0.02) from baseline to all follow-ups with no comparable results seen in the control group. Psychiatrists stated an improved quality of physician-patient relationship (e.g. support, conflict management; p stress, job satisfaction, individual protective skills and quality of relationship to patients. This training is suitable to implement as a group training program for psychiatrists.

  15. A pilot evaluation of an educational program that offers visualizations of cervical spine injuries: medical students' self-efficacy increases by training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedman, Leif; Fahlstedt, Madelen; Schlickum, Marcus; Möller, Hans; von Holst, Hans; Felländer-Tsai, Li

    2014-01-01

    In this pilot study, a new method for visualization through imaging and simulation (VIS-Ed) for teaching diagnosis and treatment of cervical spine trauma was formatively evaluated. The aims were to examine if medical students' self-efficacy would change by training using VIS-Ed, and if so these changes were related to how they evaluated the session, and the user interface (UI) of this program. Using a one-group, pre-post course test design 43 Swedish medical students (4th year, 17 males, 26 females) practiced in groups of three participants. Overall the practice and the UI were considered as positive experiences. They judged VIS-Ed as a good interactive scenario-based educational tool. All students' self-efficacy increased significantly by training (p < 0.001). Spearman's rank correlation tests revealed that increased self-efficacy was only associated with: how the session was compared to as expected (p < 0.007). Students' self-efficacy increased significantly by training, but replication studies should determine if this training effect is gender-related.

  16. Effects of treadmill training on cognitive and motor features of patients with mild to moderate Parkinson’s disease: a pilot, single-blind, randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picelli, Alessandro; Varalta, Valentina; Melotti, Camilla; Zatezalo, Vanja; Fonte, Cristina; Amato, Stefania; Saltuari, Leopold; Santamato, Andrea; Fiore, Pietro; Smania, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Summary The aim of this pilot randomized controlled trial was to evaluate the effects of treadmill training on cognitive and motor performance in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD). Seventeen persons with mild to moderate PD were enrolled. Nine patients were allocated to the Intervention group and received twelve 45-minute sessions of treadmill training: one session a day, three days a week, for four consecutive weeks. Eight patients were allocated to the Control group; these patients did not undergo physical training but were required to have regular social interactions, following a specific lifestyle program. All the patients were evaluated at baseline and one month later. The primary outcome measures were the Frontal Assessment Battery-Italian version (FAB-it) and the 6-minute walking test (6MWT). At the one-month evaluation significant differences were found between the groups in their performance on the FAB-it (p=0.005) and the 6MWT (p=0.018). Our findings support the hypothesis that treadmill training might effectively improve cognitive and motor features in patients with PD. PMID:27027891

  17. 75 FR 56857 - Pilot, Flight Instructor, and Pilot School Certification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-17

    ... Administration 14 CFR Part 141 RIN 2120-AI86 Pilot, Flight Instructor, and Pilot School Certification AGENCY... Register on August 21, 2009. That final rule revised the training, qualification, certification, and... Certification and Training Branch, AFS-810, General Aviation and Commercial Division, Flight Standards...

  18. Core stability exercise is as effective as task-oriented motor training in improving motor proficiency in children with developmental coordination disorder: a randomized controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Mei K; Chan, Wai M; Lee, Lin; Chen, Tracy Mk; Chau, Rosanna Mw; Pang, Marco Yc

    2014-10-01

    To compare the effectiveness of a core stability program with a task-oriented motor training program in improving motor proficiency in children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD). Randomized controlled pilot trial. Outpatient unit in a hospital. Twenty-two children diagnosed with DCD aged 6-9 years were randomly allocated to the core stability program or the task-oriented motor program. Both groups underwent their respective face-to-face training session once per week for eight consecutive weeks. They were also instructed to carry out home exercises on a daily basis during the intervention period. Short Form of the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency (Second Edition) and Sensory Organization Test at pre- and post-intervention. Intention-to-treat analysis revealed no significant between-group difference in the change of motor proficiency standard score (P=0.717), and composite equilibrium score derived from the Sensory Organization Test (P=0.100). Further analysis showed significant improvement in motor proficiency in both the core stability (mean change (SD)=6.3(5.4); p=0.008) and task-oriented training groups (mean change(SD)=5.1(4.0); P=0.007). The composite equilibrium score was significantly increased in the task-oriented training group (mean change (SD)=6.0(5.5); P=0.009), but not in the core stability group (mean change(SD) =0.0(9.6); P=0.812). In the task-oriented training group, compliance with the home program was positively correlated with change in motor proficiency (ρ=0.680, P=0.030) and composite equilibrium score (ρ=0.638, P=0.047). The core stability exercise program is as effective as task-oriented training in improving motor proficiency among children with DCD. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. Training and administration of epinephrine auto-injectors for anaphylaxis treatment in US schools: results from the EpiPen4Schools® pilot survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogue, Susan L; Goss, Diana; Hollis, Kelly; Silvia, Suyapa; White, Martha V

    2016-01-01

    Background Anaphylaxis is a serious, potentially life-threatening condition. Adequate preparation for anaphylaxis management is imperative for school personnel. This descriptive pilot study assessed preparedness of US schools to manage anaphylactic reactions. Methods An exploratory, cross-sectional, web-based, pilot survey assessed the occurrence and characteristics of anaphylactic events, as well as training provided to school personnel for the recognition and treatment of anaphylaxis. Eligible US schools were participants in the EpiPen4Schools® program during the 2013–2014 school year. EpiPen4Schools provides EpiPen® (epinephrine injection) Auto-Injectors and training materials to qualifying US schools. Survey data were parsed by US Census Bureau region and state and were evaluated using descriptive statistics. Results Schools from all 50 states and the District of Columbia participated in the survey (N=6,019). Among schools that provided information on anaphylactic events, 11% (607/5,683) reported the occurrence of one or more events, with significant variability in incidence across census regions and among states. A total of 5,613 schools provided information regarding which staff members were trained to recognize the signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis. Thirty-six percent of schools (2,022/5,613) indicated that only the school nurse and select staff were trained in anaphylaxis recognition. The proportion of schools in which most or all school staff received such training differed by region/state (range, 13%–100%). A total of 5,578 schools provided information on which staff were permitted to administer epinephrine. The majority of schools (54%; 3,024/5,578) permitted only the school nurse and select staff to administer epinephrine, although percentages varied by region/state (range, 4%–100%). Conclusion Schools differed substantially in their preparedness to manage anaphylaxis, with significant disparities in staff training and permission to treat. Given

  20. Esophageal replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunisaki, Shaun M; Coran, Arnold G

    2017-04-01

    This article focuses on esophageal replacement as a surgical option for pediatric patients with end-stage esophageal disease. While it is obvious that the patient׳s own esophagus is the best esophagus, persisting with attempts to retain a native esophagus with no function and at all costs are futile and usually detrimental to the overall well-being of the child. In such cases, the esophagus should be abandoned, and the appropriate esophageal replacement is chosen for definitive reconstruction. We review the various types of conduits used for esophageal replacement and discuss the unique advantages and disadvantages that are relevant for clinical decision-making. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Montana Cook Fresh Workshop Pilot: A K-12 School Nutrition Professional Training to Incorporate Whole Foods in School Meals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Lacy; Shanks, Carmen Byker; Roth, Aubree; Bark, Katie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: To meet new school meal guidelines, create meals that appeal to students, and promote positive food choices and health status among students, school nutrition programs are increasingly moving towards scratch cooking. This pilot research aimed to evaluate the outcomes of the Montana Cook Fresh Workshop, a culinary skills class…

  2. Montana Cook Fresh Workshop Pilot: A K-12 School Nutrition Professional Training to Incorporate Whole Foods in School Meals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Lacy; Shanks, Carmen Byker; Roth, Aubree; Bark, Katie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: To meet new school meal guidelines, create meals that appeal to students, and promote positive food choices and health status among students, school nutrition programs are increasingly moving towards scratch cooking. This pilot research aimed to evaluate the outcomes of the Montana Cook Fresh Workshop, a culinary skills class…

  3. Fundamental movement skills training to promote physical activity in children with and without disability: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine M. Capio

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: The findings suggest that improved FMS proficiency could potentially contribute to heightened PA and decreased sedentary time during weekends for children. Such effect of improved FMS proficiency on PA appears to be greater in those with physical disability than in those without disability. It is recommended that the findings of this pilot study should be further examined in future research.

  4. Feasibility of a combined aerobic and strength training program and its effects on cognitive and physical function in institutionalized dementia patients. A pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willem J R Bossers

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: We examined the feasibility of a combined aerobic and strength training program in institutionalized dementia patients and studied the effects on cognitive and physical function. METHODS: Thirty-three patients with dementia, recruited from one nursing home, participated in this non-randomized pilot study (25 women; age = 85.2±4.9 years; Mini Mental State Examination = 16.8±4.0. In phase 1 of the study, seventeen patients in the Exercise group (EG received a combined aerobic and strength training program for six weeks, five times per week, 30 minutes per session, in an individually supervised format and successfully concluded the pre and posttests. In phase 2 of the study, sixteen patients in the Social group (SG received social visits at the same frequency, duration, and format and successfully concluded the pre and posttests. RESULTS: Indices of feasibility showed that the recruitment and adherence rate, respectively were 46.2% and 86.3%. All EG patients completed the exercise program according to protocol without adverse events. After the six-week program, no significant differences on cognitive function tests were found between the EG and SG. There was a moderate effect size in favor for the EG for the Visual Memory Span Forward; a visual attention test. There were significant differences between groups in favor for the EG with moderate to large effects for the physical tests Walking Speed (p = .003, Six-Minute Walk Test (p = .031, and isometric quadriceps strength (p = .012. CONCLUSIONS: The present pilot study showed that it is feasible to conduct a combined aerobic and strength training program in institutionalized patients with dementia. The selective cognitive visual attention improvements and more robust changes in motor function in favor of EG vs. SG could serve as a basis for large randomized clinical trials. TRIAL REGISTRATION: trialregister.nl 1230.

  5. Reduction in pulmonary complications in high risk patients undergoing surgery for total hip replacement under general anesthesia by preoperative intensive inspiratory muscle training:A randomized controlled clinical trial

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bingqiang Ma; Hongguang Bao

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of preoperative inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on the incidence of atelectasis in patients at high risk of postoperative pulmonary complications scheduled for elective total hip replacement surgery under general anesthesia. Methods: Thirty two high-risk paticnts undergoing elective total hip replacement surgery under general anesthesia were chosen from Nanjing Medical University, Affiliated Nanjing First Hospital. In this single-blind randomized controlled clinical trial, patients were randomly assigned to receive preoperative inspiratory muscle training or conventional treatment (CT). The major effectiveness outcome variables were atelectasis and duration of postoperative hospitalization. Results: Both groups were comparable prior to surgery. Seven patients in the CT group and 3 in the IMT group developed atelectasis (P = 0.25). Median duration of postoperative hospitalization was 13 days (range, 10~17 days) in the IMT group versus 16 days (range, 11~23 days) in the CT group (Mann-Whitney U statistics, Z =-2.22, P = 0.03). Mean postoperative inspiratory pressure was 5% higher in the IMT group. Conclusion: Preoperative intensive inspiratory muscle training appears to reduce the incidence of atelectasis and duration of postoperative hospitalization in patients at high risk of developing postoperative pulmonary complications who were scheduled for elective total hip replacement surgery under general anesthesia.

  6. Innovation of School-enterprise Cooperation in Vocational Education: Replacement Full-time Training%职业教育校企合作模式创新——置换脱产培训

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙泽平; 田书芹

    2011-01-01

    Based on the influential factors in enterprise participating in vocational education, the construction of the replacement full-time training mode is the driving force for the development of school-enterprise cooperation and the link to maintain healthy operation of school-enterprise cooperation. Replacement full-time training aims to meet the interests demands of vocational schools and establish a " school-enterprise win-win" operation mechanism with their own advantages and characteristics to provide effective service for enterprises. The implementation of replacement full-time training mode demands a rational and scientific effective mechanism.%基于企业参与职业教育的影响因素研究,构建科学合理的置换脱产培训模式是推动校企合作发展的动力和维系校企合作良性运转的纽带.置换脱产培训模式,旨在使职业院校能有的放矢地适应企业利益诉求,凭借自身优势与特色为企业提供有效服务,建立“校企双赢”的运行机制.置换脱产培训模式的实施必须有一套理性化和科学化的有效机制.

  7. Effect of multi-sensory balance training for unsteady elderly people: pilot study of the "Reykjavik model".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristinsdottir, Ella Kolbrun; Baldursdottir, Bergthora

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate effects of combined mechano- and proprioceptive, vestibular and fall-prevention training on postural control, functional ability, confidence in activities of daily living (ADL) and frequency of falls among unsteady elderly people. Subjects were 37 elderly outpatients attending physiotherapy because of instability. Treatment consisted of 18 multisensory balance training sessions. RESULTS from Sensory Organization Test, Five-Times-Sit-to-Stand Test, 30-m normal and fast walk with a turn, Ascending-Descending 11 steps and Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale were compared before and after training. Information was gathered about number of falls 1 year prior to training, during training period and for 6 months after completion of training. Significant improvement was observed in all measured parameters (p elderly people.

  8. Effects of dual-task training on balance and executive functions in Parkinson's disease: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Ângela; Rocha, Nuno; Santos, Rubim; Tavares, João Manuel R S

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the efficacy of cognitive-motor dual-task training compared with single-task training on balance and executive functions in individuals with Parkinson's disease. Fifteen subjects, aged between 39 and 75 years old, were randomly assigned to the dual-task training group (n = 8) and single-task training group (n = 7). The training was run twice a week for 6 weeks. The single-task group received balance training and the dual-task group performed cognitive tasks simultaneously with the balance training. There were no significant differences between the two groups at baseline. After the intervention, the results for mediolateral sway with eyes closed were significantly better for the dual-task group and anteroposterior sway with eyes closed was significantly better for the single-task group. The results suggest superior outcomes for the dual-task training compared to the single-task training for static postural control, except in anteroposterior sway with eyes closed.

  9. A pilot randomised controlled trial to assess the utility of an e‐learning package that trains users in adverse drug reaction causality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkham, Jamie J.; Bellis, Jennifer R.; Peak, Matthew; Smyth, Rosalind L.; Williamson, Paula R.; Pirmohamed, Munir

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objectives Causality assessment of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) by healthcare professionals is often informal which can lead to inconsistencies in practice. The Liverpool Causality Assessment Tool (LCAT) offers a systematic approach. An interactive, web‐based, e‐learning package, the Liverpool ADR Causality Assessment e‐learning Package (LACAeP), was designed to improve causality assessment using the LCAT. This study aimed to (1) get feedback on usability and usefulness on the LACAeP, identify areas for improvement and development, and generate data on effect size to inform a larger scale study; and (2) test the usability and usefulness of the LCAT. Methods A pilot, single‐blind, parallel‐group, randomised controlled trial hosted by the University of Liverpool was undertaken. Participants were paediatric medical trainees at specialty training level 1+ within the Mersey and North‐West England Deaneries. Participants were randomised (1 : 1) access to the LACAeP or no training. The primary efficacy outcome was score by correct classification, predefined by a multidisciplinary panel of experts. Following participation, feedback on both the LCAT and the LACAeP was obtained, via a built in survey, from participants. Key findings Of 57 randomised, 35 completed the study. Feedback was mainly positive although areas for improvement were identified. Seventy‐four per cent of participants found the LCAT easy to use and 78% found the LACAeP training useful. Sixty‐one per cent would be unlikely to recommend the training. Scores ranged from 4 to 13 out of 20. The LACAeP increased scores by 1.3, but this was not significant. Conclusions Improving the LACAeP before testing it in an appropriately powered trial, informed by the differences observed, is required. Rigorous evaluation will enable a quality resource that will be of value in healthcare professional training. PMID:26032626

  10. Effectiveness of a workplace training programme in improving social, communication and emotional skills for adults with autism and intellectual disability in Hong Kong--a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Karen P Y; Wong, Denys; Chung, Anthony C Y; Kwok, Natalie; Lam, Madeleine K Y; Yuen, Cheri M C; Arblaster, Karen; Kwan, Aldous C S

    2013-12-01

    This pilot study explored the effectiveness of workplace training programme that aimed to enhance the work-related behaviours in individuals with autism and intellectual disabilities. Fourteen participants with autism and mild to moderate intellectual disability (mean age = 24.6 years) were recruited. The workplace training programme included practices in work context and group educational sessions. A pre-test-post-test design was used with the Work Personality Profile, the Scale of Independent Behaviour Revised and the Observational Emotional Inventory Revised to evaluate the targeted behaviours. Improvement in social and communication skills specific to the workplace was achieved. For emotional control, participants became less confused and had a better self-concept. However, improvement in other general emotional behaviours, such as impulse control, was limited. The results indicated that a structured workplace training programme aimed at improving social, communication and emotional behaviours can be helpful for people with autism and intellectual disability. Further study with a larger sample size and a control group is recommended. The development of specific programme to cater for the emotional control needs at workplace for people with autism is also suggested.

  11. Effect of Training Exercise on Urinary Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor Levels and Cognitive Performances in Overweight and Obese Subjects: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Angelo; Buratta, Livia; Pippi, Roberto; Aiello, Cristina; Ranucci, Claudia; Reginato, Elisa; Santangelo, Valerio; DeFeo, Pierpaolo; Mazzeschi, Claudia

    2016-11-21

    Exercise-mediated, brain-derived neurotrophic factor induction benefits health and cognitive functions. The multifaceted interplay between physical activity, urinary brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels and cognitive functioning has been largely neglected in previous literature. In this pilot study, two bouts of training exercise (65% and 70% of heart rate reserve) influenced urinary brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels and cognitive performances in 12 overweight and obese participants. Percent heart rate reserve, expenditure energy, brain-derived neurotrophic factor urinary levels and cognitive performances were measured before and after the exercise. No significant variations in energy expenditure were observed, while differences of heart rate reserve between two groups were maintained. Both bouts of training exercise induced a similar reduction in urinary brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels. Only visuo-spatial working memory capacity at 65% of heart rate reserve showed a significant increase. These findings indicate a consistent effect of training exercise on urinary brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels and cognitive factors in overweight and obese participants.

  12. Training in basic Internet skills for special target groups in non-formal educational settings – conclusions from three pilot projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Berger

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available With the progress of Digital Inclusion, it becomes important to address marginalised groups that face specific barriers in being part of the information society. From 2009 to 2011 within the framework of the nation-wide Initiative Internet erfahren, funded by the German Federal Ministry of Economics, Stiftung Digitale Chancen has accompanied three pilot projects and researched the hindrances and motivations of specific target groups including young migrants from Russia, women in the low-wage sector and disabled elderly people, regarding their use of information and communication technology and related skills. This article describes the teaching methodologies in the training provided in non-formal education settings, exposes the different evaluation methods and sums up the results. A special focus in the discussion is given to the role of the teacher and the relationship between teacher and students as there turned out to be similarities in all three target groups. Understanding the balance between the training and abilities and preferences of the learners will facilitate the further development of training appropriate to those who are still digitally excluded.

  13. Psychiatry in the Deep South: A Pilot Study of Integrated Training for Psychiatry Residents and Seminary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuck, Craig; Campbell, Nioaka; Bragg, John; Moran, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The authors describe an interdisciplinary training experience developed for psychiatry residents and seminary students that assessed each group's beliefs and attitudes toward the other's profession. The training was designed to enhance awareness, positive attitudes, and interaction between the disciplines. Methods: From 2005 to 2008,…

  14. Spatial Disorientation Training – Demonstration and Avoidance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bles, W.

    2008-01-01

    Acclimatization ; Aerospace medicine ; Attitude indicators ; Aviation accidents ; Flight maneuvers ; Flight simulators ; Human factors engineering ; Orientation ; Perception ; Physiological effects ; Pilot training ; Pilots (personnel) ; Responses ; Reviews ; Situational awareness ; Spatial disorien

  15. Cardiorespiratory Effects of One-Legged High-Intensity Interval Training in Normoxia and Hypoxia: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menz, Verena; Semsch, Mona; Mosbach, Florian; Burtscher, Martin

    2016-06-01

    A higher-than-average maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max), is closely associated with decreased morbidity and mortality and improved quality of life and acts as a marker of cardiorespiratory fitness. Although there is no consensus about an optimal training method to enhance VO2max, nevertheless training of small muscle groups and repeated exposure to hypoxia seem to be promising approaches. Therefore, this study was aimed at gaining innovative insights into the effects of small muscle group training in normoxia and hypoxia. Thirteen healthy participants were randomly assigned to the hypoxic (HG, n = 7) or normoxic (NG, n = 6) training group. Both groups completed nine high-intensity interval training sessions in 3 wks. The NG performed the training in normoxia (FiO2: 0.21; ~ 600 m) and the HG in hypoxia (FiO2: 0.126; ~ 4500 m). Each session consisted of 4 x 4 min one-legged cycling at 90% of maximal heart rate separated by 4 min recovery periods. Before and after the intervention period, VO2max and peak power output (Wmax) and responses to submaximal cycling (100 and 150 watts) were assessed in a laboratory cycling test. Peak power output significantly improved within both groups (9.6 ± 4.8% and 12.6 ± 8.9% for HG and NG, respectively) with no significant interaction (p = 0.277). However, VO2max only significantly increased after training in hypoxia from 45.4 ± 10.1 to 50.0 ± 9.8 ml/min/kg (10.8 ± 6.0%; p = 0.002) with no significant interaction (p = 0.146). The maximal O2-pulse improved within the HG and demonstrated a significant interaction (p = 0.040). One-legged cycling training significantly improved VO2max and peak power output. Training under hypoxic conditions may generate greater effects on VO2max than a similar training in normoxia and is considered as a promising training method for improving cardiorespiratory fitness. Key pointsNine sessions of one-legged high-intensity interval training significantly improved physical fitness.One-legged hypoxic

  16. The Reform of Teaching Content and Teaching Method for Replacing Training with Competition%以赛带训的教学内容和教学方法改革

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑红

    2012-01-01

    Combined with the training objective of higher vocational education,this paper makes the exploration of theory and practice on the mode of replacing training with competition form the following aspects,including the revision of professional teaching standard,the construction of curriculum system,the reform of teaching method,the perfect of practical training condition and the increase of teachers' professional skills.This paper discusses the thought of the reform of teaching content and teaching method in higher vocational teaching under the mode of replacing training with competition,and summarizes the experience accumulated in practice.%结合高职教育培养目标,分别从专业教学标准修订、课程体系建设、教学方法改革、实训条件完善、教师专业技能提高等方面对以赛带训教学模式进行了理论与实践探索。理清了以赛带训教学模式下高职教学中教学内容和教学方法改革的思路,并总结了实践中积累的经验。

  17. A pilot survey of the U.S. medical waste industry to determine training needs for safely handling highly infectious waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Aurora B; Hoboy, Selin; Germain, Anne; Miller, Hal; Thompson, Richard; Herstein, Jocelyn J; Jelden, Katelyn C; Beam, Elizabeth L; Gibbs, Shawn G; Lowe, John J

    2017-09-25

    The recent Ebola outbreak led to the development of Ebola virus disease (EVD) best practices in clinical settings. However, after the care of EVD patients, proper medical waste management and disposal was identified as a crucial component to containing the virus. Category A waste-contaminated with EVD and other highly infectious pathogens-is strictly regulated by governmental agencies, and led to only several facilities willing to accept the waste. A pilot survey was administered to determine if U.S. medical waste facilities are prepared to handle or transport category A waste, and to determine waste workers' current extent of training to handle highly infectious waste. Sixty-eight percent of survey respondents indicated they had not determined if their facility would accept category A waste. Of those that had acquired a special permit, 67% had yet to modify their permit since the EVD outbreak. This pilot survey underscores gaps in the medical waste industry to handle and respond to category A waste. Furthermore, this study affirms reports a limited number of processing facilities are capable or willing to accept category A waste. Developing the proper management of infectious disease materials is essential to close the gaps identified so that states and governmental entities can act accordingly based on the regulations and guidance developed, and to ensure public safety. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Validation of an immersive virtual reality system for training near and far space neglect in individuals with stroke: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Kazuhiro; Muroi, Daisuke; Ohira, Masahiro; Iwata, Hiroyasu

    2017-07-12

    Unilateral spatial neglect (USN) is defined as impaired ability to attend and see on one side, and when present, it interferes seriously with daily life. These symptoms can exist for near and far spaces combined or independently, and it is important to provide effective intervention for near and far space neglect. The purpose of this pilot study was to propose an immersive virtual reality (VR) rehabilitation program using a head-mounted display that is able to train both near and far space neglect, and to validate the immediate effect of the VR program in both near and far space neglect. Ten USN patients underwent the VR program with a pre-post design and no control. In the virtual environment, we developed visual searching and reaching tasks using an immersive VR system. Behavioral inattention test (BIT) scores obtained pre- and immediate post-VR program were compared. BIT scores obtained pre- and post-VR program revealed that far space neglect but not near space neglect improved promptly after the VR program. This effect for far space neglect was observed in the cancelation task, but not in the line bisection task. Positive effects of the immersive VR program for far space neglect are suggested by the results of the present pilot study. However, further studies with rigorous designs are needed to validate its clinical effectiveness.

  19. Improving social functioning and challenging behaviors in adolescents with ASD and significant ID: A randomized pilot feasibility trial of reciprocal imitation training in a residential setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingersoll, Brooke; Berger, Natalie; Carlsen, Danielle; Hamlin, Theresa

    2016-08-11

    There is a lack of effective social interventions for youths with ASD and co-morbid intellectual disability (ID). A previous single-case design study indicated that reciprocal imitation training (RIT) may improve social interaction and challenging behavior in this population. The current pilot study examined the feasibility of conducting an RCT to investigate the effectiveness of RIT for improving social functioning and challenging behaviors in 20 adolescents with ASD and severe ID in a residential program. The assessment protocol was feasible. RIT was well-tolerated by the adolescents and implemented with fidelity by teaching staff. Preliminary findings indicate that treatment had moderate to large effects on social functioning and challenging behavior, with mixed findings for imitation skills. A larger RCT of RIT for this population is feasible and warranted.

  20. A Study on the Potential Cost Savings Associated with Implementing Airline Pilot Training Curricula into the Future P-8 MMA Fleet Replacement Squadron

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    winglets : 35.81m Length: 38.56m Height: 12.83m Fuselage length: 38.02m Tailplane: 14.35m Maximum taxi weight: 83,778kg Maximum fuel...Costs-Navy-Maintenance - This element reports the composite pay of Navy personnel assigned as maintenance personnel. 3. Org. FRS-MilPers Costs...Navy-Other - This element reports the composite pay of Navy personnel assigned to perform duties other than those assigned for mission and maintenance

  1. Pilot Study: The Role of Predeployment Ethics Training, Professional Ethics, and Religious Values on Naval Physicians' Ethical Decision Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaidry, Alicia D; Hoehner, Paul J

    2016-08-01

    Military physicians serving overseas in cross-cultural settings face the challenge of meeting patients' needs and adhering to their personal and professional ethics while abiding by military obligations and duties. Predeployment ethics training for Naval physicians continues to be received in many forms, if received at all, and has largely not addressed their specific roles as medical providers in the military. This study explores the perceived effectiveness of predeployment ethics training received by Naval physicians. Additionally, it considers the contribution of different types of ethics training, religious values, and the professional ethics on Naval physicians' perceived ability to effectively manage ethically challenging scenarios while on deployment. A total of 49 Naval physicians participated in an online survey. 16.3% reported not receiving any form of ethics training before deployment. Of those that reported receiving ethics training before deployment, 92.7% found the ethics training received was helpful in some way while on deployment. While a medical school course was most contributory overall to their ability to handle ethically difficult situations while on deployment (70.7%), what most Naval physicians felt would help them better handle these types of situations would be a mandatory military training/military course (63.2%) or personal mentorship (57.9%). Reprint & Copyright © 2016 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  2. A pilot randomised controlled trial of a periodised resistance training and protein supplementation intervention in prostate cancer survivors on androgen deprivation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiwata, Jacqueline L; Dorff, Tanya B; Todd Schroeder, E; Salem, George J; Lane, Christianne J; Rice, Judd C; Gross, Mitchell E; Dieli-Conwright, Christina M

    2017-07-10

    Prostate cancer survivors (PCS) receiving androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) experience deleterious side effects such as unfavourable changes in cardiometabolic factors that lead to sarcopenic obesity and metabolic syndrome (MetS). While loss of lean body mass (LBM) compromises muscular strength and quality of life, MetS increases the risk of cardiovascular disease and may influence cancer recurrence. Exercise can improve LBM and strength, and may serve as an alternative to the pharmacological management of MetS in PCS on ADT. Prior exercise interventions in PCS on ADT have been effective at enhancing strength, but only marginally effective at enhancing body composition and ameliorating cardiometabolic risk factors. This pilot trial aims to improve on existing interventions by employing periodised resistance training (RT) to counter sarcopenic obesity in PCS on ADT. Secondary aims compare intervention effects on cardiometabolic, physical function, quality of life and molecular skeletal muscle changes. An exploratory aim examines if protein supplementation (PS) in combination with RT elicits greater changes in these outcomes. A 2×2 experimental design is used in 32 PCS on ADT across a 12-week intervention period. Participants are randomised to resistance training and protein supplementation (RTPS), RT, PS or control. RT and RTPS groups perform supervised RT three times per week for 12 weeks, while PS and RTPS groups receive 50 g whey protein per day. This pilot intervention applies a multilayered approach to ameliorate detrimental cardiometabolic effects of ADT while investigating molecular mechanisms underlying skeletal muscle changes in PCS. This trial was approved by the University of Southern California Institutional Review Board (HS-13-00315). Results from this trial will be communicated in peer-reviewed publications and scientific presentations. NCT01909440; Pre-results. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the

  3. Relationship between structural brainstem and brain plasticity and lower-limb training in spinal cord injury: a longitudinal pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eVilliger

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Rehabilitative training has shown to improve significantly motor outcomes and functional walking capacity in patients with incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI. However, whether performance improvements during rehabilitation relate to brain plasticity or whether it is based on functional adaptation of movement strategies remain uncertain. This study assessed training improvement-induced structural brain plasticity in chronic iSCI patients using longitudinal MRI.We used tensor-based morphometry (TBM to analyze longitudinal brain volume changes associated with intensive virtual reality (VR-augmented lower limb training in nine traumatic iSCI patients. The MRI data was acquired before and after a 4-week training period (16-20 training sessions. Before training, voxel-based morphometry (VBM and voxel-based cortical thickness (VBCT assessed baseline morphometric differences in nine iSCI patients compared to 14 healthy controls. The intense VR-augmented training of limb control improved significantly balance, walking speed, ambulation, and muscle strength in patients. Retention of clinical improvements was confirmed by the 3-4 months follow-up. In patients relative to controls, reductions in VBM of white matter volume within the brainstem and cerebellum and VBCT showed cortical thinning in the primary motor cortex. Over time, TBM revealed significant improvement-induced increases in the left middle temporal and occipital gyrus, left temporal pole and fusiform gyrus, both hippocampi, cerebellum, corpus callosum, and brainstem in iSCI patients. This study demonstrates structural plasticity at the cortical and brainstem level as a consequence of VR-augmented training in iSCI patients. These structural changes may serve as neuroimaging biomarkers of VR-augmented lower limb neurorehabilitation in addition to performance measures to detect improvements in rehabilitative training.

  4. Problem-solving skills training for mothers of children recently diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder: A pilot feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Cathina T; Fairclough, Diane L; Noll, Robert B

    2016-01-01

    Problem-solving skills training is an intervention designed to teach coping skills that has shown to decrease negative affectivity (depressive symptoms, negative mood, and post-traumatic stress symptoms) in mothers of children with cancer. The objective of this study was to see whether mothers of children recently diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder would be receptive to receiving problem-solving skills training (feasibility trial). Participants were recruited from a local outpatient developmental clinic that is part of a university department of pediatrics. Participants were to receive eight 1-h sessions of problem-solving skills training and were asked to complete assessments prior to beginning problem-solving skills training (T1), immediately after intervention (T2), and 3 months after T2 (T3). Outcome measures assessed problem-solving skills and negative affectivity (i.e. distress). In total, 30 mothers were approached and 24 agreed to participate (80.0%). Of them, 17 mothers completed problem-solving skills training (retention rate: 70.8%). Mothers of children with autism spectrum disorder who completed problem-solving skills training had significant decreases in negative affectivity and increases in problem-solving skills. A comparison to mothers of children with cancer shows that mothers of children with autism spectrum disorder displayed similar levels of depressive symptoms but less negative mood and fewer symptoms of post-traumatic stress. Data suggest that problem-solving skills training may be an effective way to alleviate distress in mothers of children recently diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. Data also suggest that mothers of children with autism spectrum disorder were moderately receptive to receiving problem-solving skills training. Implications are that problem-solving skills training may be beneficial to parents of children with autism spectrum disorder; modifications to improve retention rates are suggested.

  5. The Effect of Psychological Training on Pilots of High Performance Fighter%高性能战斗机飞行员心理训练效果

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万憬; 白海霞; 杨蕾; 潘玉唤; 徐珀; 林连香

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of psychotherapy training on mental health ,self-harmony and interpersonal trust of pi-lots of high performance fighter .Methods A total of 146 pilots of high performance fighter were randomly assigned to the training group with 84 pilots and the control group with 62 pilots.The former received psychotherapy training for 5 times.The SCL-90 scale,trust scale and self-harmony scale were used to examine and analyze the differences between two groups before and after the training .Results After the psychotherapy training ,the scores of 7 factors of the training group which included total score of SCL -90 scale(t=-3.7103,-2.073;P<0.05),number of positive items(t=-3.7103,-24.512;P<0.01),interpersonal sensitivity(t=-2.2678,-1.994;P<0.05),depres-sion(t=-2.0771,-2.348;P<0.05),anxiety(t=-2.297,-2.096;P<0.05),hostility(t=-2.7548,-2.138;P<0.05)and other(t=-2.349,-3.427;P<0.05)were significantly decreased compared to former situation and the control group ,and compulsion(t=-2.3751, P<0.05),paranoia(t=-3.4932,P<0.01),psychotic diseases(t=-2.0766,P<0.05)were significantly decreased compared to former situation.The total score of interpersonal trust of the trained (t=3.4970,P<0.01)was significantly increased compared to former situa-tion and the control group(t=2.5031,P<0.01),while the total score of self-harmony(t=-3.0697,P<0.01)was significantly de-creased(t=-2.3324,P<0.05).Conclusion By psychotherapy training for pilots of high performance fighter ,their mental health,inter-personal trust and self-harmony are significantly improved and better than those of the untrained .%目的:探讨心理训练对高性能战斗机飞行员心理健康状况、自我和谐程度及人际信任的影响。方法将高性能战斗机飞行员随机分为训练组(84名)和对照组(62名),训练组接受为期5次的心理训练。比较训练前后两组的SCL-90量表、信任量表和自我和谐量表的差异。

  6. 14 CFR 61.87 - Solo requirements for student pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... balloon or an airship requiring more than one pilot flight crewmember. (b) Aeronautical knowledge. A... for pre-solo flight training in an airship. A student pilot who is receiving training for an airship...

  7. Virtual Patients in continuing medical education and residency training: a pilot project for acceptance analysis in the framework of a residency revision course in pediatrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehmann, Ronny

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Virtual patients (VPs are a one-of-a-kind e-learning resource, fostering clinical reasoning skills through clinical case examples. The combination with face-to-face teaching is important for their successful integration, which is referred to as “blended learning”. So far little is known about the use of VPs in the field of continuing medical education and residency training. The pilot study presented here inquired the application of VPs in the framework of a pediatric residency revision course. Methods: Around 200 participants of a pediatric nephology lecture (‘nephrotic and nephritic syndrome in children’ were offered two VPs as a wrap-up session at the revision course of the German Society for Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine (DGKJ 2009 in Heidelberg, Germany. Using a web-based survey form, different aspects were evaluated concerning the learning experiences with VPs, the combination with the lecture, and the use of VPs for residency training in general.Results: N=40 evaluable survey forms were returned (approximately 21%. The return rate was impaired by a technical problem with the local Wi-Fi firewall. The participants perceived the work-up of the VPs as a worthwhile learning experience, with proper preparation for diagnosing and treating real patients with similar complaints. Case presentations, interactivity, and locally and timely independent repetitive practices were, in particular, pointed out. On being asked about the use of VPs in general for residency training, there was a distinct demand for more such offers. Conclusion: VPs may reasonably complement existing learning activities in residency training.

  8. The effect of gym training on multiple outcomes in Parkinson's disease: a pilot randomised waiting-list controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poliakoff, Ellen; Galpin, Adam J; McDonald, Kathryn; Kellett, Mark; Dick, Jeremy P R; Hayes, Sue; Wearden, Alison J

    2013-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence for the benefits of exercise in Parkinson's disease (PD), but less is known about group exercise interventions. We evaluated the effect of gym-training programme on people with PD. Thirty-two adults with mild to moderate PD, not currently exercising formally, were randomised to an immediate 20-week biweekly gym training programme at a local leisure complex, or a 10-week programme starting 10 weeks later. Assessments at baseline (T1), 10 weeks (T2) and 20 weeks (T3) included reaction time, motor performance (UPDRS), quality of life and illness perceptions. Experiences of the programme were assessed via questionnaire and a focus group. Overall UPDRS motor function score did not change over time. However, gym training was associated with significant improvements in reaction times and some timed tests in the immediate training group (T1-T2). The delayed group showed similar improvements following gym training (T2-T3). Participants reported enjoyment, obtaining social benefits, and increased confidence. However, the questionnaire measures did not show improvements in subjective health ratings or illness perceptions. Although benefits were not apparent in the questionnaire measures or overall UPDRS scores, our findings suggest that a 10-week gym training programme in a community setting can provide some benefits for people with PD.

  9. 77 FR 61721 - Pilot, Flight Instructor, and Pilot School Certification; Technical Amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-11

    ... Administration 14 CFR Part 61 RIN 2120-AI86 Pilot, Flight Instructor, and Pilot School Certification; Technical... training, qualification, certification, and operating requirements for pilots, flight instructors, ground instructors, and pilot schools. A portion of the codified text was inadvertently deleted and this document...

  10. A Web-Based Training Program Using Cognitive Behavioral Therapy to Alleviate Psychological Distress Among Employees: Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, Miyuki; Kimura, Risa; Sasaki, Norio; Somemura, Hironori; Ito, Yukio; Okanoya, June; Yamamoto, Megumi; Nakamura, Saki; Tanaka, Katsutoshi

    2014-01-01

    Background A number of psychoeducational programs based on cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) to alleviate psychological distress have been developed for implementation in clinical settings. However, while these programs are considered critical components of stress management education in a workplace setting, they are required to be brief and simple to implement, which can hinder development. Objective The intent of the study was to examine the effects of a brief training program based on CBT in alleviating psychological distress among employees and facilitating self-evaluation of stress management skills, including improving the ability to recognize dysfunctional thinking patterns, transform dysfunctional thoughts to functional ones, cope with stress, and solve problems. Methods Of the 187 employees at an information technology company in Tokyo, Japan, 168 consented to participate in our non-blinded randomized controlled study. The training group received CBT group education by a qualified CBT expert and 1 month of follow-up Web-based CBT homework. The effects of this educational program on the psychological distress and stress management skills of employees were examined immediately after completion of training and then again after 6 months. Results Although the training group did exhibit lower mean scores on the Kessler-6 (K6) scale for psychological distress after 6 months, the difference from the control group was not significant. However, the ability of training group participants to recognize dysfunctional thinking was significantly improved both immediately after training completion and after 6 months. While the ability of participants to cope with stress was not significantly improved immediately after training, improvement was noted after 6 months in the training group. No notable improvements were observed in the ability of participants to transform thoughts from dysfunctional to functional or in problem-solving skills. A sub-analysis of participants who

  11. System Performance, Error Rates, and Training Time for Recent FAA Academy Nonradar Graduates, Community Persons, and Handicapped Persons on the Radar Training Facility Pilot Position,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-05-01

    acceptable limits. Feedback gives this knowledge. Negative reinforcement may have some useful purpose in training. On the other hand, it is doubtful that...it can serve usefully as the only means of shaping behavior. If negative reinforcement is used, it should be used in conjunction with opportunities

  12. e-Motional Training®: Pilot study on a novel online training program on social cognition for patients with schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Vázquez-Campo

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion: ET® enables self-training in SC and online follow-up by the therapist, thereby covering the lack of online intervention instruments validated for patients with SC deficits. Our preliminary results demonstrate the feasibility of ET® and its possible efficacy in improving emotion recognition, ToM and AS.

  13. High-intensity interval training vs. moderate-intensity continuous exercise training in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angadi, Siddhartha S; Mookadam, Farouk; Lee, Chong D; Tucker, Wesley J; Haykowsky, Mark J; Gaesser, Glenn A

    2015-09-15

    Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Exercise training is an established adjuvant therapy in heart failure; however, the effects of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) in HFpEF are unknown. We compared the effects of HIIT vs. moderate-intensity aerobic continuous training (MI-ACT) on peak oxygen uptake (V̇o₂peak), left ventricular diastolic dysfunction, and endothelial function in patients with HFpEF. Nineteen patients with HFpEF (age 70 ± 8.3 yr) were randomized to either HIIT (4 × 4 min at 85-90% peak heart rate, with 3 min active recovery) or MI-ACT (30 min at 70% peak heart rate). Fifteen patients completed exercise training (HIIT: n = 9; MI-ACT: n = 6). Patients trained 3 days/wk for 4 wk. Before and after training patients underwent a treadmill test for V̇o₂peak determination, 2D-echocardiography for assessment of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction, and brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) for assessment of endothelial function. HIIT improved V̇o₂peak (pre = 19.2 ± 5.2 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1); post = 21.0 ± 5.2 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1); P = 0.04) and left ventricular diastolic dysfunction grade (pre = 2.1 ± 0.3; post = 1.3 ± 0.7; P = 0.02), but FMD was unchanged (pre = 6.9 ± 3.7%; post = 7.0 ± 4.2%). No changes were observed following MI-ACT. A trend for reduced left atrial volume index was observed following HIIT compared with MI-ACT (-3.3 ± 6.6 vs. +5.8 ± 10.7 ml/m(2); P = 0.06). In HFpEF patients 4 wk of HIIT significantly improved V̇o₂peak and left ventricular diastolic dysfunction. HIIT may provide a more robust stimulus than MI-ACT for early exercise training adaptations in HFpEF. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  14. A brain-computer interface based cognitive training system for healthy elderly: a randomized control pilot study for usability and preliminary efficacy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tih-Shih Lee

    Full Text Available Cognitive decline in aging is a pressing issue associated with significant healthcare costs and deterioration in quality of life. Previously, we reported the successful use of a novel brain-computer interface (BCI training system in improving symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Here, we examine the feasibility of the BCI system with a new game that incorporates memory training in improving memory and attention in a pilot sample of healthy elderly. This study investigates the safety, usability and acceptability of our BCI system to elderly, and obtains an efficacy estimate to warrant a phase III trial. Thirty-one healthy elderly were randomized into intervention (n = 15 and waitlist control arms (n = 16. Intervention consisted of an 8-week training comprising 24 half-hour sessions. A usability and acceptability questionnaire was administered at the end of training. Safety was investigated by querying users about adverse events after every session. Efficacy of the system was measured by the change of total score from the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS before and after training. Feedback on the usability and acceptability questionnaire was positive. No adverse events were reported for all participants across all sessions. Though the median difference in the RBANS change scores between arms was not statistically significant, an effect size of 0.6SD was obtained, which reflects potential clinical utility according to Simon's randomized phase II trial design. Pooled data from both arms also showed that the median change in total scores pre and post-training was statistically significant (Mdn = 4.0; p<0.001. Specifically, there were significant improvements in immediate memory (p = 0.038, visuospatial/constructional (p = 0.014, attention (p = 0.039, and delayed memory (p<0.001 scores. Our BCI-based system shows promise in improving memory and attention in healthy

  15. A Mixed Methods Small Pilot Study to Describe the Effects of Upper Limb Training Using a Virtual Reality Gaming System in People with Chronic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel C. Stockley

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This small pilot study aimed to examine the feasibility of an upper limb rehabilitation system (the YouGrabber in a community rehabilitation centre, qualitatively explore participant experiences, and describe changes after using it. Methods and Material. Chronic stroke participants attending a community rehabilitation centre in the UK were randomised to either a YouGrabber or a gym group and completed 18 training sessions over 12 weeks. The motor activity log, box and block, and fatigue severity score were administered by a blinded assessor before and after the intervention. Semistructured interviews were used to ascertain participants’ views about using the YouGrabber. Results. Twelve participants (6 females with chronic stroke were recruited. All adhered to the intervention. There were no adverse events, dropouts, or withdrawal. There were no significant differences between the YouGrabber and gym groups although there were significant within group improvements on the motor activity log (median change: 0.59, range: 0.2–1.25; p<0.05 within the YouGrabber group. Participants reported that the YouGrabber was motivational but they expressed frustration with technical challenges. Conclusions. The YouGrabber appeared practical and may improve upper limb activities in people several months after stroke. Future work could examine cognition, cost effectiveness, and different training intensities.

  16. Conceptualization and Pilot Testing of a Core Competency-Based Training Workshop in Suicide Risk Assessment and Management: Notes From the Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Robert J; Bryson, Claire N; Eichorst, Morgam K; Keyes, Lee N; Ridge, Brittany E

    2017-03-01

    As professional psychology training programs and continuing education have moved toward competency based approaches, it has become equally important to develop uniform, evidence-based approaches for suicide risk assessment and management. The present article presents a workshop curriculum based on established core competencies in suicide risk assessment and management. Drawing on theories suicide risk formation, the workshop features an integration of didactic, process, and experiential components. We present pilot data from 2 small group workshops (n = 17): 1 from a clinical psychology doctoral program and 1 from a university counseling center. Workshop participation yielded increases in (a) the ability to recognize appropriate clinician responses to suicidal client statements, (b) self-perceptions of general capacity to interface with suicidal patients and mastery of the 10 core competencies, (c) factual knowledge concerning suicide risk assessment and management, and (d) the self-rated ability to assess and manage a suicidal patient. We discuss statistical and generalizability limitations as well as implications for future modification, implementation, and provision of this training method. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. A Mixed Methods Small Pilot Study to Describe the Effects of Upper Limb Training Using a Virtual Reality Gaming System in People with Chronic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Deborah A.; Smith, Phil; Moss, Sylvia; Allsop, Lizzie; Edge, Wendy

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. This small pilot study aimed to examine the feasibility of an upper limb rehabilitation system (the YouGrabber) in a community rehabilitation centre, qualitatively explore participant experiences, and describe changes after using it. Methods and Material. Chronic stroke participants attending a community rehabilitation centre in the UK were randomised to either a YouGrabber or a gym group and completed 18 training sessions over 12 weeks. The motor activity log, box and block, and fatigue severity score were administered by a blinded assessor before and after the intervention. Semistructured interviews were used to ascertain participants' views about using the YouGrabber. Results. Twelve participants (6 females) with chronic stroke were recruited. All adhered to the intervention. There were no adverse events, dropouts, or withdrawal. There were no significant differences between the YouGrabber and gym groups although there were significant within group improvements on the motor activity log (median change: 0.59, range: 0.2–1.25; p cognition, cost effectiveness, and different training intensities. PMID:28197341

  18. Introduction of Syphilis Point-of-Care Tests, from Pilot Study to National Programme Implementation in Zambia: A Qualitative Study of Healthcare Workers’ Perspectives on Testing, Training and Quality Assurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansbro, Éimhín M.; Gill, Michelle M.; Reynolds, Joanna; Shelley, Katharine D.; Strasser, Susan; Sripipatana, Tabitha; Ncube, Alexander Tshaka; Tembo Mumba, Grace; Terris-Prestholt, Fern; Peeling, Rosanna W.; Mabey, David

    2015-01-01

    Syphilis affects 1.4 million pregnant women globally each year. Maternal syphilis causes congenital syphilis in over half of affected pregnancies, leading to early foetal loss, pregnancy complications, stillbirth and neonatal death. Syphilis is under-diagnosed in pregnant women. Point-of-care rapid syphilis tests (RST) allow for same-day treatment and address logistical barriers to testing encountered with standard Rapid Plasma Reagin testing. Recent literature emphasises successful introduction of new health technologies requires healthcare worker (HCW) acceptance, effective training, quality monitoring and robust health systems. Following a successful pilot, the Zambian Ministry of Health (MoH) adopted RST into policy, integrating them into prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV clinics in four underserved Zambian districts. We compare HCW experiences, including challenges encountered in scaling up from a highly supported NGO-led pilot to a large-scale MoH-led national programme. Questionnaires were administered through structured interviews of 16 HCWs in two pilot districts and 24 HCWs in two different rollout districts. Supplementary data were gathered via stakeholder interviews, clinic registers and supervisory visits. Using a conceptual framework adapted from health technology literature, we explored RST acceptance and usability. Quantitative data were analysed using descriptive statistics. Key themes in qualitative data were explored using template analysis. Overall, HCWs accepted RST as learnable, suitable, effective tools to improve antenatal services, which were usable in diverse clinical settings. Changes in training, supervision and quality monitoring models between pilot and rollout may have influenced rollout HCW acceptance and compromised testing quality. While quality monitoring was integrated into national policy and training, implementation was limited during rollout despite financial support and mentorship. We illustrate that new

  19. Introduction of Syphilis Point-of-Care Tests, from Pilot Study to National Programme Implementation in Zambia: A Qualitative Study of Healthcare Workers' Perspectives on Testing, Training and Quality Assurance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Éimhín M Ansbro

    Full Text Available Syphilis affects 1.4 million pregnant women globally each year. Maternal syphilis causes congenital syphilis in over half of affected pregnancies, leading to early foetal loss, pregnancy complications, stillbirth and neonatal death. Syphilis is under-diagnosed in pregnant women. Point-of-care rapid syphilis tests (RST allow for same-day treatment and address logistical barriers to testing encountered with standard Rapid Plasma Reagin testing. Recent literature emphasises successful introduction of new health technologies requires healthcare worker (HCW acceptance, effective training, quality monitoring and robust health systems. Following a successful pilot, the Zambian Ministry of Health (MoH adopted RST into policy, integrating them into prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV clinics in four underserved Zambian districts. We compare HCW experiences, including challenges encountered in scaling up from a highly supported NGO-led pilot to a large-scale MoH-led national programme. Questionnaires were administered through structured interviews of 16 HCWs in two pilot districts and 24 HCWs in two different rollout districts. Supplementary data were gathered via stakeholder interviews, clinic registers and supervisory visits. Using a conceptual framework adapted from health technology literature, we explored RST acceptance and usability. Quantitative data were analysed using descriptive statistics. Key themes in qualitative data were explored using template analysis. Overall, HCWs accepted RST as learnable, suitable, effective tools to improve antenatal services, which were usable in diverse clinical settings. Changes in training, supervision and quality monitoring models between pilot and rollout may have influenced rollout HCW acceptance and compromised testing quality. While quality monitoring was integrated into national policy and training, implementation was limited during rollout despite financial support and mentorship. We

  20. 战斗机飞行员颈肌强度训练效果%EFFECT OF NECK MUSCLE STRENGTH TRAINING IN FIGHTER PILOTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏凌; 陈琼; 李交杰; 季思菊

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of neck muscle strength training, so as to provide the basis for studying the measures for improving neck muscle strength and reducing neck injuries in fighter pilots. Methods Twenty-four fighter pilots, performed neck muscle strength training by CME-1 neck muscle trainer three times one week for 3 weeks. Isometric mode training was performed at the 1st,3rd,4th,6th,7th,9th time; and variable velocity, and resistance (WR) mode at the 2nd,5th,8th time.Resutls The mean of peak neck muscle strength in the front flexion,back extension, left lateral flexion, right lateral flexion direction after training 2 weeks was 38.9%, 48.9,66.6%, 55.8% more respectively than before training;and after training 3 weeks,49.0% ,60.1% ,79.9% ,71.9% more respectively than before training(P <0.01) .The mean of peak impulse after training 2 weeks was 39.6% ,49.6% ,69.7% ,52.7% higher respectively; and after training 3 weeks 51.2%, 59.9%, 82.5%, 65.7% higher respectively than before training( P < 0. 01). Conclusions CME-1 neck muscle trainer is safe and effective for improving neck muscle strength of fighter pilots.%目的 评价颈肌强度训练提高战斗机飞行员颈肌力量的效果,为寻求减少飞行员颈部损伤发生、提高战斗力的措施提供依据.方法 应用CME-1型飞行员颈肌训练器对24名战斗机飞行员进行每周3次、连续3周共9次的颈肌强度训练(第1、3、4、6、7、9次为等长训练模式,第2、5、8次为可变阻力和可变速度训练模式),记录每次等长训练前、后、左、右肌群的峰值肌力均值、峰值总冲量均值,对训练前、训练2周(第6次)、训练3周(第9次)数值进行统计分析.结果 训练2周,24名战斗机飞行员的前、后、左、右各肌群峰值肌力均值较训练前分别增加了38.9%、48.9%、66.6%、55.8%;训练3周较训练前分别增加49.0%、60.1%、79.9%、71.9%,差异均有显著性(P<0.01).训练2周后,24名

  1. Problem-Solving Skills Training for Mothers of Children Recently Diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Pilot Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Cathina T.; Fairclough, Diane L.; Noll, Robert B.

    2016-01-01

    Problem-solving skills training is an intervention designed to teach coping skills that has shown to decrease negative affectivity (depressive symptoms, negative mood, and post-traumatic stress symptoms) in mothers of children with cancer. The objective of this study was to see whether mothers of children recently diagnosed with autism spectrum…

  2. Parent Training with High-Risk Immigrant Chinese Families: A Pilot Group Randomized Trial Yielding Practice-Based Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Anna S.; Fung, Joey J.; Ho, Lorinda Y.; Liu, Lisa L.; Gudino, Omar G.

    2011-01-01

    We studied the efficacy and implementation outcomes of a culturally responsive parent training (PT) program. Fifty-four Chinese American parents participated in a wait-list controlled group randomized trial (32 immediate treatment, 22 delayed treatment) of a 14-week intervention designed to address the needs of high-risk immigrant families.…

  3. The Experience of Training Pilots over the Age of 40 Transitioning to Technologically Advanced Aircraft: A Grounded Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolmos, John A.

    2017-01-01

    Older adults face many challenges in the workplace, one being the advancement of technologies both in hardware and software development. The purpose of the study was to understand the learned experiences of older adults integrating advanced technologies into their critical decision-making work experience because of training. Literature claimed a…

  4. Evaluating Mind Fitness Training and Its Potential Effects on Surgical Residents' Well-Being : A Mixed Methods Pilot Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lases, S. S.; Lombarts, M. J. M. H.; Slootweg, Irene A.; Arah, Onyebuchi A.; Pierik, E. G. J. M.; Heineman, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Background Residents' well-being is essential for both the individual physician and the quality of patient care they deliver. Therefore, it is important to maintain or possibly enhance residents' well-being. We investigated (i) the influence of mind fitness training (MFT) on quality of care-related

  5. Effect of Aerobic Training on Cognitive Function and Arterial Stiffness in Sedentary Young Adults: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Asamoah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study measured cognitive and vascular responses to aerobic training in sedentary young adults. Ten adults (6 women, 4 men; 18–29 years were randomly assigned to an experimental or no-treatment control group. The experimental group engaged in a 6-week intervention, performed on exercise cycle and treadmill, 3x/week, 50 min/session; intensity was increased over time. Outcome measures included arterial stiffness (augmentation index, AIx, and pulse pressure, cardiorespiratory fitness (, and cognitive function (attention, processing speed, working memory, episodic memory, and executive function. Participants randomized to aerobic training improved processing speed versus control (, ES = 0.55. However, no group × time effects were noted in other domains of cognitive function. AIx was reduced by approximately 16% from before to after intervention in the experimental group; however, the improvement was not statistically significant versus control (, ES = 0.22. Pulse pressure did not change between groups over time (, ES = 0.0. increased by approximately 10% in the experimental group; however, the change was not significant between groups over time (, ES = 0.27. Vascular and cognitive adaptations to aerobic training may move in parallel. Robust trials simultaneously investigating a broad spectrum of aerobic training interventions and vascular and cognitive outcomes are warranted.

  6. Does body shadow improve the efficacy of virtual reality-based training with BTS NIRVANA?: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Margherita; De Luca, Rosaria; Naro, Antonino; Sciarrone, Francesca; Aragona, Bianca; Silvestri, Giuseppe; Manuli, Alfredo; Bramanti, Alessia; Casella, Carmela; Bramanti, Placido; Calabrò, Rocco Salvatore

    2017-09-01

    Aim of the present study was to evaluate whether the presence of body shadows during virtual reality (VR) training with BTS NIRVANA (BTs-N) may lead to a better functional recovery. We enrolled 20 poststroke rehabilitation inpatients, who underwent a neurocognitive-rehabilitative training consisting of 24 sessions (3 times a week for 8 weeks) of BTs-N. All the patients were randomized into 2 groups: semi-immersive virtual training with (S-IVTS group) or without (S-IVT group) body shadows. Each participant was evaluated before (T0) and immediately (T1) after the end of the training (Trial Registration Number: NCT03095560). The S-IVTS group showed a greater improvement in visuo-constructive skills and sustained attention, as compared with the S-IVT group. The other measures showed nonsignificant within-group and between-group differences. Our results showed that body shadow may represent a high-priority class of stimuli that act by "pushing" attention toward the body itself. Further studies are needed to clarify the role of body shadow in promoting the internal representation construction and thus self-recognition.

  7. Virtual reality (VR)-based community living skills training for people with acquired brain injury: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Ben C B; Man, David W K

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to test the usability and effectiveness of a newly-developed virtual reality (VR)-based community living skills training program for people with acquired brain injury (ABI). A small-sample, pre- and post-quasi experimental design was adopted to initially study the efficacy of the VR-based training program. Its usability was also investigated through interviewing subjects. Outcomes were documented in terms of subjects' skills acquisition, self-efficacy in applying the learnt skills and the transfer ratio of the learnt skills to the real environment. Global cognitive ability and the functional independence level were also assessed. Four subjects with ABI (one traumatic brain injury and three stroke subjects) were successfully recruited and received 10 sessions of VR-based community living skills training. All four subjects showed improvement in skills acquisition and memory performance, while three out of four also showed improvement in self-efficacy and demonstrated transfer of skills to the real environment. Usability was initially supported. Preliminary results suggested positive changes in ABI subjects. The proposed virtual reality (VR) community living skills training software will be further investigated in a randomized controlled trial.

  8. Training- and pilot station Churwalden: Small-scale high-pressure power plant. Lehr- und Demonstrationskraftwerk Churwalden: Hochdruckkraftwerk im Taschenformat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foppa, C. (Nordostschweizerische Kraftwerke AG, Baden (Switzerland))

    1991-03-20

    The training and demonstration hydroelectric power plant at Churwalden, the only one of its kind, has been operated since October 1990. It is integrated in the local power supply grid; visitors are given illustrative insight into the process of hydroelectric power generation, which accounts for 60% of Switzerland's power supply. (orig.).

  9. Effects of respiratory muscle endurance training on wheelchair racing performance in athletes with paraplegia: a pilot study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mueller, G.; Perret, C.; Hopman, M.T.E.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Respiratory muscle endurance training (RMET) has been shown to improve both respiratory muscle and cycling exercise endurance in able-bodied subjects. Since effects of RMET on upper extremity exercise performance have not yet been investigated, we evaluated the effects of RMET on 10-km ti

  10. Problem-Solving Skills Training for Mothers of Children Recently Diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Pilot Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Cathina T.; Fairclough, Diane L.; Noll, Robert B.

    2016-01-01

    Problem-solving skills training is an intervention designed to teach coping skills that has shown to decrease negative affectivity (depressive symptoms, negative mood, and post-traumatic stress symptoms) in mothers of children with cancer. The objective of this study was to see whether mothers of children recently diagnosed with autism spectrum…

  11. Effects of presurgical exercise training on quality of life in patients undergoing lung resection for suspected malignancy: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peddle, Carolyn J; Jones, Lee W; Eves, Neil D; Reiman, Tony; Sellar, Christopher M; Winton, Timothy; Courneya, Kerry S

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the effects of presurgical exercise training on quality of life (QOL) in patients with malignant lung lesions. Using a single-group prospective design, patients were enrolled in supervised aerobic exercise training for the duration of surgical wait time (mean 59.7 days). Participants completed assessments of cardiorespiratory fitness (peak oxygen consumption) and QOL using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung scales, including the trial outcome index (TOI) and the lung cancer subscale (LCS) at baseline, immediately presurgery, and postsurgery (mean, 57 days). 9 participants provided complete data. Repeated-measures analysis indicated a significant effect for time on TOI (P = .006) and LCS (P = .009). Paired analysis revealed that QOL was unchanged after exercise training (ie, baseline to presurgery), but there were significant and clinically meaningful declines from presurgery to postsurgery in the LCS (-3.6, P = .021) and TOI (-8.3, P = .018). Change in peak oxygen consumption from presurgery to postsurgery was significantly associated with change in the LCS (r = 0.70, P = .036) and TOI (r = 0.70, P = .035). Exercise training did not improve QOL from baseline to presurgery. Significant declines in QOL after surgery seem to be related to declines in cardiorespiratory fitness. A randomized controlled trial is needed to further investigate these relationships.

  12. A Communication Training Programme for Residential Staff Working with Adults with Challenging Behaviour: Pilot Data on Intervention Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smidt, Andy; Balandin, Susan; Reed, Vicki; Sigafoos, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    Background: Challenging behaviour often serves a communicative function. It therefore stands to reason that the residential staff working in developmental disability services require training to foster appropriate communicative interactions with adults with challenging behaviour. Method: Eighteen members of staff working in three residential…

  13. Continuous One-Arm Kettlebell Swing Training on Physiological Parameters in US Air Force Personnel: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Molly; O'Hara, Reginald; Caldwell, Lydia; Ordway, Jason; Bryant, Darryn

    The primary aim of this study was to investigate the effects of continuous one-arm kettlebell (KB) swing training on various US Air Force physical fitness testing components. Thirty trained male (n = 15) and female (n = 15) US Air Force (USAF) personnel volunteered and were sequentially assigned to one of three groups based on 1.5-mile run time: (1) KB one-arm swing training, (2) KB one-arm swing training plus highintensity running (KB + run), and (3) traditional USAF physical training (PT) according to Air Force Instruction 36-2905. The following measurements were made before and after 10 weeks of training: 1.5-mile run, 1-minute maximal push-ups, 1-minute maximal situps, maximal grip strength, pro agility, vertical jump, 40-yard dash, bodyweight, and percent body fat. Subjects attended three supervised exercise sessions per week for 10 weeks. During each exercise session, all groups performed a 10-minute dynamic warm-up followed by either (1) 10 minutes of continuous KB swings, (2) 10 minutes of continuous kettlebell swings plus 10 minutes of high-intensity running, or (3) 20 minutes of moderate intensity running plus push-ups and sit-ups. Average and peak heart rate were recorded for each subject after all sessions. Paired t tests were conducted to detect changes from pretesting to posttesting within each group and analysis of variance was used to compare between-group variability (ρ ≤ .05). Twenty subjects completed the study. There were no statistically significant changes in 1.5-mile run time between or within groups. The 40- yard dash significantly improved within the KB swing (ρ ≤ .05) and KB + run group (ρ ≤ .05); however, there were no significant differences in the traditional PT group (ρ ≤ .05) or between groups. Maximal push-ups significantly improved in the KB + run group (ρ ≤ .05) and trends toward significant improvements in maximal push-ups were found in both the KB (ρ = .057) and traditional PT (ρ = .067) groups. This study

  14. Effects of inspiratory muscle training on exercise capacity and spontaneous physical activity in elderly subjects: a randomized controlled pilot trial

    OpenAIRE

    Aznar Laín, Susana; Webster, A. L., Mrs.; Cañete, Silvia; San Juan, Alejandro F.; López Mojares, Luis Miguel; Pérez Ruiz, Margarita; Lucía Mulas, Alejandro; Chicharro García, Luis Miguel

    2007-01-01

    Inspiratory muscle training (IMT) has been shown to improve exercise capacity in diseased populations. We chose to examine the effects of eight weeks of IMT on exercise capacity and spontaneous physical activity in elderly individuals. Eighteen moderately active elderly subjects (68.1 +/- 6.8 years [mean +/- SD]; range 58 - 78 years) were randomly assigned to either an experimental group (n = 9) or a control group (n = 9) in a double-blind manner. All subjects underwent inspiratory muscle tes...

  15. How could robotic training and botolinum toxin be combined in chronic post stroke upper limb spasticity? A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennati, G V; Da Re, C; Messineo, I; Bonaiuti, D

    2015-08-01

    Spasticity has a role of primary importance in functional motor recovery of upper limb after a stroke. The widespread intervention is the botulinum toxin neurolysis, however robotic training could have a role as useful addition to this conventional therapy. The aim of this study was to verify how the combination of a short robotic training and chemical neurolysis reduces spasticity and improves function in chronic post-stroke patients. Prospective single blind randomized controlled clinical trial. Post-stroke outpatients. Fifteen chronic post-stroke outpatients with severe upper limb spastic paresis. Two experimental groups underwent ten sessions of robotic training, alone (Group A) or with Botulinum toxin neurolysis (Group B). Evaluation of motor function with Fugl Meyer Upper Limb Assessment Scale (FMA) and Box & Block Test (B&B), disability with Functional Indipendence Measure (FIM), spasticity with Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS), and the Quality of Life (Euro-Qol) and muscular recruitment pattern with dynamic surface electromyography were carried out before and after the interventions. Both groups showed improvement in FMA (Group A 8.25 and Group B 5.29). Higher improvement in B&B was detected in the group A (2.62 versus 0,14 in Group B). MAS was improved more in the Group B (-0,86 versus -0,14 in Group A). In both groups, sEMG showed a reduction of co-contractions and an increase of agonist muscles recruitment during the reaching movement and the robotic exercises. The demonstrated improvement in motor function and in muscular activation pattern suggests how a short robotic training could be effective in chronic post-stroke spasticity of upper limb and in less severe spasticity the only robotic treatment could be effective. With the limits of small sample, the results showed some equivalence between these two approaches with respect to motor recovery and spasticity reduction suggesting that the cost effectiveness of each treatment may have an important role in

  16. Effect of inspiratory muscle training on respiratory capacity and walking ability with subacute stroke patients: a randomized controlled pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kyeong-Man; Bang, Dae-Hyouk

    2017-02-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effects of inspiratory muscle training on respiratory capacity and walking ability in subacute stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were randomly assigned to an experimental group (n=6) or a control group (n=6). Patients in the experimental group received inspiratory muscle training for 30 minutes (six sets of five-minutes) and traditional physical therapy once a day, five days a week, for four weeks. The control group received aerobic exercise for 30 minutes and traditional physical therapy for 30 minutes a day, five days a week, for four weeks. [Results] After the intervention, both groups showed significant improvements in the forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second, 10-meter walking test, and six-minute walking test over the baseline results. There were significant between-group differences for the forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second, and six-minute walking test. No statistically significant differences were observed for measures of saturation pulse oximetry oxygen and 10-meter walking test between the groups. [Conclusion] These findings gave some indications that inspiratory muscle training may benefit in patients with subacute stroke, and it is feasible to be included in rehabilitation program with this population.

  17. Evaluation of a Communication Skills Training Program for Companion-Animal Veterinarians: A Pilot Study Using RIAS Coding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, Michelle; Fitzgerald, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Effective veterinarian communication skills training and the related key outcomes provided the impetus for this study. We implemented a pre-experimental pre-test/post-test single-group design with a sample of 13 veterinarians and their 71 clients to evaluate the effects of a 6.5-hour communication skills intervention for veterinarians. Consultations were audiotaped and analyzed with the Roter Interaction Analysis System (RIAS). Clients completed the Consultation and Relational Care Measure, a global satisfaction scale, a Parent Medical Interview Satisfaction Scale, and the Adherence Intent measure. Veterinarians completed a communication confidence measure and a workshop satisfaction scale. Contrary to expectation, neither veterinarian communication skills nor their confidence improved post-training. Despite client satisfaction and perceptions of veterinarians' relational communication skills not increasing, clients nevertheless reported an increased intent to adhere to veterinarian recommendations. This result is important because client adherence is critical to managing and enhancing the health and well-being of animals. The results of the study suggest that while the workshop was highly regarded, either the duration of the training or practice opportunities were insufficient or a booster session was required to increase veterinarian confidence and integration of new skills. Future research should utilize a randomized control study design to investigate the appropriate intervention with which to achieve change in veterinarian communication skills. Such change could translate to more effective interactions in veterinarians' daily lives.

  18. Beneficial effects of fenugreek glycoside supplementation in male subjects during resistance training:A randomized controlled pilot study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sachin Wankhede; Vishwaraman Mohan; Prasad Thakurdesai

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of the glycoside fraction of fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum) seeds (Fenu-FG) on physiologi-cal parameters related to muscle anabolism, androgenic hormones, and body fat in healthy male subjects during an 8-week resistance training program using a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled design. Methods: Sixty healthy male subjects were randomized to ingest capsules of Fenu-FG (1 capsule of 300 mg, twice per day) or the matching placebo at a 1:1 ratio. The subjects participated in a supervised 4-day per week resistance-training program for 8 weeks. The outcome measurements were recorded at recruitment (baseline) and at the end of the treatment (8 weeks). The efficacy outcome included serum testosterone (total and free) levels, muscle strength and repetitions to failure, metabolic markers for anabolic activity (serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen), and % body fat. The standard safety measurements such as adverse events monitoring, vital signs, hematology, biochemistry, and urinalysis were performed. Results: Fenu-FG supplementation demonstrated significant anabolic and androgenic activity as compared with the placebo. Fenu-FG treated subjects showed significant improvements in body fat without a reduction in muscle strength or repetitions to failure. The Fenu-FG supplemen-tation was found to be safe and well-tolerated. Conclusion: Fenu-FG supplementation showed beneficial effects in male subjects during resistance training without any clinical side effects.

  19. Can aerobic treadmill training reduce the effort of walking and fatigue in people with multiple sclerosis: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, M A; Dawes, H; van den Berg, M; Wade, D T; Burridge, J; Izadi, H

    2007-01-01

    Impaired mobility in multiple sclerosis (MS) is associated with high-energy costs and effort when walking, gait abnormalities, poor endurance and fatigue. This repeated measures trial with blinded assessments investigated the effect of treadmill walking at an aerobic training intensity in 16 adults with MS. The intervention consisted of 12 sessions of up to 30 minutes treadmill training (TT), at 55-85% of age-predicted maximum heart rate. The primary outcome measure was walking effort, measured by oxygen consumption (mL/kg per metre), during treadmill walking at comfortable walking speed (CWS). Associated changes in gait parameters using the 'Gait-Rite' mat, 10-m time and 2-minute distance, and Fatigue Severity Scale were examined. Following training, oxygen consumption decreased at rest (P = 0.008), CWS increased (P = 0.002), and 10-m times (P = 0.032) and walking endurance (P = 0.020) increased. At increased CWS, oxygen consumption decreased (P = 0.020), with a decreased time spent in stance in the weaker leg (P = 0.034), and a greater stride distance with the stronger leg (P = 0.044). Reported fatigue levels remained the same. Aerobic TT presents the opportunity to alter a motor skill and reduce the effort of walking, whilst addressing cardiovascular de-conditioning, thereby, potentially reducing effort and fatigue for some people with MS.

  20. [Estrogen replacement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søgaard, A J; Berntsen, G K; Magnus, J H; Tollan, A

    1998-02-10

    Recent research on long-term postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy (HRT) indicates a positive effect on both total mortality and morbidity. This has raised the question of widespread preventive long-term use of HRT. Possible side-effects and ideological issues related to preventive HRT have led to debate and uncertainty among health professionals, in the media, and in the population at large. In order to evaluate the level of knowledge about and attitudes towards HRT, a randomly selected group of 737 Norwegian women aged 16-79 was interviewed by the Central Bureau of Statistics. One in three women had received information about HRT in the last two years, mainly through weekly magazines and physicians. The proportion who answered the questions on knowledge correctly varied from 36% to 47%. Those who had been given information by a physician possessed accurate knowledge, had more positive attitudes towards HRT and were more willing to use HRT than women who had reviewed information through other channels. Women with a higher level of education were better informed and more knowledgeable than others, but were nevertheless more reluctant to use HRT than those who were less educated. The limited number of women who actually receive information on HRT, the low level of knowledge and the ambivalent attitudes toward HRT are a major challenge to the public health service.

  1. Pilot study to determine the feasibility of training Army National Guard medics to perform focused cardiac ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backlund, Brandon H; Bonnett, Carl J; Faragher, Jeffrey P; Haukoos, Jason S; Kendall, John L

    2010-01-01

    To assess the ability of Army National Guard combat medics to perform a limited bedside echocardiography (BE) to determine cardiac activity after a brief training module. Twelve Army National Guard health care specialists trained to the level of emergency medical technician-basic (EMT-B) underwent an educational session consisting of a 5-minute lecture on BE followed by hands-on practical training. After the training session, each medic performed BEs, in either the subxiphoid (SX) or parasternal (PS) location at his or her discretion, on four healthy volunteers. The time required to complete the BE and the anatomic location of the examination (SX vs. PS) was documented. A 3-second video clip representing the best image was recorded for each BE. These clips were subsequently reviewed independently by two of the investigators with experience performing and interpreting BE; each BE was graded on a six-point scale designed for the study, the Cardiac Ultrasound Structural Assessment Scale (CUSAS). A score of 3 or greater was considered to be adequate to assess for the presence of cardiac activity. Where there was disagreement on the CUSAS score, the reviewers viewed the clip together and agreed on a consensus CUSAS score. We calculated the median time to completion and interquartile range (IQR) for each BE, the median CUSAS scores and IQR for examinations performed in the SX and PS locations, and kappa for agreement between the two reviewers on the CUSAS. A total of 48 BEs were recorded and reviewed. Thirty-seven of 48 (77%) were obtained in the SX location, and 11 of 48 (23%) were obtained in the PS location. Forty-four of 48 (92%) were scored as a 3 or higher on the CUSAS. Median time to completion of a BE was 5.5 seconds (IQR: 3.7-10.9 seconds). The median CUSAS score in the SX location was 4 (IQR: 4-5), and the median CUSAS score in the PS location was 4 (IQR: 4-4). Weighted kappa for the CUSAS was 0.6. With minimal training, the vast majority of the medics in our

  2. Behavioral parent training to address sleep disturbances in young children with autism spectrum disorder: a pilot trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Cynthia R.; Turner, Kylan S.; Foldes, Emily; Brooks, Maria M.; Kronk, Rebecca; Wiggs, Luci

    2013-01-01

    Objectives A large percentage of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have bedtime and sleep disturbances. However, the treatment of these disturbances has been understudied. The purpose of our study was to develop a manualized behavioral parent training (BPT) program for parents of young children with ASD and sleep disturbances and to test the feasibility, fidelity, and initial efficacy of the treatment in a small randomized controlled trial (RCT). Participants and methods Parents of a sample of 40 young children diagnosed with ASD with an average age of 3.5 years were enrolled in our study. Participants were randomized to either the BPT program group or a comparison group who were given nonsleep-related parent education. Each was individually administered a 5-session program delivered over the 8-week study. Outcome measures of feasibility, fidelity, and efficacy were collected at weeks 4 and 8 after the baseline time point. Children’s sleep was assessed by parent report and objectively by actigraphy. Results Of the 20 participants in each group, data were available for 15 participants randomized to BPT and 18 participants randomized to the comparison condition. Results supported the feasibility of the manualized parent training program and the comparison program. Treatment fidelity was high for both groups. The BPT program group significantly improved more than the comparison group based on the primary sleep outcome of parent report. There were no objective changes in sleep detected by actigraphy. Conclusions Our study is one of few RCTs of a BPT program to specifically target sleep disturbances in a well-characterized sample of young children with ASD and to demonstrate the feasibility of the approach. Initial efficacy favored the BPT program over the comparison group and suggested that this manualized parent training approach is worthy of further examination of the efficacy within a larger RCT. PMID:23993773

  3. Effects of inspiratory muscle training on exercise capacity and spontaneous physical activity in elderly subjects: a randomized controlled pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aznar-Lain, S; Webster, A L; Cañete, S; San Juan, A F; López Mojares, L M; Pérez, M; Lucia, A; Chicharro, J L

    2007-12-01

    Inspiratory muscle training (IMT) has been shown to improve exercise capacity in diseased populations. We chose to examine the effects of eight weeks of IMT on exercise capacity and spontaneous physical activity in elderly individuals. Eighteen moderately active elderly subjects (68.1 +/- 6.8 years [mean +/- SD]; range 58 - 78 years) were randomly assigned to either an experimental group (n = 9) or a control group (n = 9) in a double-blind manner. All subjects underwent inspiratory muscle testing, treadmill exercise testing and a four-day measurement period of spontaneous physical activity (using accelerometry) both pre- and post-intervention. The experimental group underwent eight weeks of incremental IMT using a pressure threshold device, while the control group underwent sham training using identical devices. After IMT training, inspiratory muscle strength (mean + 21.5 cm H (2)O; 95 % CI: 9.3, 33.7; p = 0.002), V.O (2peak) (+ 2.8 ml x min (-1) x kg (-1); 95 % CI: 0.5, 5.2; p = 0.022), time to exhaustion during a fixed workload treadmill test (+ 7.1 min; 95 % CI: 1.8, 2.4; p = 0.013) and time engaged in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (+ 59 min; 95 % CI: 15, 78; p = 0.008) improved. Except for a decline in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, no significant changes were seen in the control group. Therefore, IMT may be a useful technique for positively influencing exercise capacity and physical activity in elderly individuals.

  4. Wearable Sensor-Based Biofeedback Training for Balance and Gait in Parkinson Disease: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpinella, Ilaria; Cattaneo, Davide; Bonora, Gianluca; Bowman, Thomas; Martina, Laura; Montesano, Angelo; Ferrarin, Maurizio

    2017-04-01

    To analyze the feasibility and efficacy of a novel system (Gamepad [GAMing Experience in PArkinson's Disease]) for biofeedback rehabilitation of balance and gait in Parkinson disease (PD). Randomized controlled trial. Clinical rehabilitation gym. Subjects with PD (N=42) were randomized into experimental and physiotherapy without biofeedback groups. Both groups underwent 20 sessions of training for balance and gait. The experimental group performed tailored functional tasks using Gamepad. The system, based on wearable inertial sensors, provided users with real-time visual and acoustic feedback about their movement during the exercises. The physiotherapy group underwent individually structured physiotherapy without feedback. Assessments were performed by a blinded examiner preintervention, postintervention, and at 1-month follow-up. Primary outcomes were the Berg Balance Scale (BBS) and 10-m walk test (10MWT). Secondary outcomes included instrumental stabilometric indexes and the Tele-healthcare Satisfaction Questionnaire. Gamepad was well accepted by participants. Statistically significant between-group differences in BBS scores suggested better balance performances of the experimental group compared with the physiotherapy without biofeedback group both posttraining (experimental group-physiotherapy without biofeedback group: mean, 2.3±3.4 points; P=.047) and at follow-up (experimental group-physiotherapy without biofeedback group: mean, 2.7±3.3 points; P=.018). Posttraining stabilometric indexes showed that mediolateral body sway during upright stance was significantly reduced in the experimental group compared with the physiotherapy without biofeedback group (experimental group-physiotherapy without biofeedback group: -1.6±1.5mm; P=.003). No significant between-group differences were found in the other outcomes. Gamepad-based training was feasible and superior to physiotherapy without feedback in improving BBS performance and retaining it for 1 month. After

  5. A randomized controlled pilot study of home-based step training in older people using videogame technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Schoene

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Stepping impairments are associated with physical and cognitive decline in older adults and increased fall risk. Exercise interventions can reduce fall risk, but adherence is often low. A new exergame involving step training may provide an enjoyable exercise alternative for preventing falls in older people. PURPOSE: To assess the feasibility and safety of unsupervised, home-based step pad training and determine the effectiveness of this intervention on stepping performance and associated fall risk in older people. DESIGN: Single-blinded two-arm randomized controlled trial comparing step pad training with control (no-intervention. SETTING/PARTICIPANTS: Thirty-seven older adults residing in independent-living units of a retirement village in Sydney, Australia. INTERVENTION: Intervention group (IG participants were provided with a computerized step pad system connected to their TVs and played a step game as often as they liked (with a recommended dose of 2-3 sessions per week for 15-20 minutes each for eight weeks. In addition, IG participants were asked to complete a choice stepping reaction time (CSRT task once each week. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: CSRT, the Physiological Profile Assessment (PPA, neuropsychological and functional mobility measures were assessed at baseline and eight week follow-up. RESULTS: Thirty-two participants completed the study (86.5%. IG participants played a median 2.75 sessions/week and no adverse events were reported. Compared to the control group, the IG significantly improved their CSRT (F31,1 = 18.203, p<.001, PPA composite scores (F31,1 = 12.706, p = 0.001, as well as the postural sway (F31,1 = 4.226, p = 0.049 and contrast sensitivity (F31,1 = 4.415, p = 0.044 PPA sub-component scores. In addition, the IG improved significantly in their dual-task ability as assessed by a timed up and go test/verbal fluency task (F31,1 = 4.226, p = 0.049. CONCLUSIONS: Step pad training can

  6. A pilot randomized controlled trial using EEG-based brain–computer interface training for a Chinese-speaking group of healthy elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee TS

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tih-Shih Lee,1 Shin Yi Quek,1 Siau Juinn Alexa Goh,1 Rachel Phillips,2 Cuntai Guan,3 Yin Bun Cheung,4 Lei Feng,5 Chuan Chu Wang,3 Zheng Yang Chin,3 Haihong Zhang,3 Jimmy Lee,6 Tze Pin Ng,5 K Ranga Rama Krishnan1 1Department of Neuroscience and Behavioral Disorders, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, Singapore; 2Singapore Clinical Research Institute, Singapore; 3Institute for Infocomm Research, Agency for Science, Technology and Research, Singapore; 4Centre for Quantitative Medicine, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, Singapore; 5Department of Psychological Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore; 6Department of General Psychiatry/Department of Research, Institute of Mental Health, Singapore Background: There is growing evidence that cognitive training (CT can improve the cognitive functioning of the elderly. CT may be influenced by cultural and linguistic factors, but research examining CT programs has mostly been conducted on Western populations. We have developed an innovative electroencephalography (EEG-based brain–computer interface (BCI CT program that has shown preliminary efficacy in improving cognition in 32 healthy English-speaking elderly adults in Singapore. In this second pilot trial, we examine the acceptability, safety, and preliminary efficacy of our BCI CT program in healthy Chinese-speaking Singaporean elderly.Methods: Thirty-nine elderly participants were randomized into intervention (n=21 and waitlist control (n=18 arms. Intervention consisted of 24 half-hour sessions with our BCI-based CT training system to be completed in 8 weeks; the control arm received the same intervention after an initial 8-week waiting period. At the end of the training, a usability and acceptability questionnaire was administered. Efficacy was measured using the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS, which was translated and culturally adapted for the Chinese-speaking local population. Users were asked

  7. Pilot implementation of training modules of the EMERALD program in Brazil; Implementacao piloto de modulos de treinamento do programa EMERALD no Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Paulo R.; Yoshimura, Elisabeth M.; Okuno, Emico; Nersissian, Denise Y. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Intituto de Fisica. Departamento de Energia Nuclear; Tabakov, Slavik [Dept. Medical Engineering and Physics, King' s College, London (United Kingdom); Terini, Ricardo A., E-mail: pcosta@if.usp.br [Pontificia Universidade Catolica de Sao Paulo (PUCSP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Fisica

    2014-04-15

    A research cooperation program was established between the Institute of Physics of the University of Sao Paulo and the King's College of London to conduct the translation to Portuguese language, adaptation and update of the X-Ray Diagnostic Radiology training module of the Emerald Program (www.emerald2.eu/cd/Emerald2/). The Emerald Program teaching material in X-Ray Diagnostic Radiology is divided in ten topics covering the basics of Diagnostic Radiology, Quality Control and Radiation Protection. The referred work, besides the translation of the texts into Portuguese, comprised the review of the previously produced material. During the review process, it was decided to update some of the training tasks and add more information related to current topics, such as digital X-ray imaging modalities, multislice computed tomography and tomosynthesis. These new additions will also be available in English. The translated or written texts have been submitted to a cross-reviewing process by the co-authors in order to standardize the language. Moreover, national radiological protection recommendations were included to assist the users of the teaching material with the Brazilian rules of radiation safety and quality control in X-ray medical applications. Part of the material was submitted to a validation and also to a practical assessment process by means of a critical analysis by experts in Medical Physics education during a workshop held in Sao Paulo in March 2014. Finally, a pilot implementation has been organized in order to do the last adjustments before making the material available to other users in Portuguese language. Further assessment and feedback procedures were planned in both London and Sao Paulo, aiming to evaluate and disseminate the final product. (author)

  8. Mind/body techniques for physiological and psychological stress reduction: stress management via Tai Chi training - a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esch, Tobias; Duckstein, Jorg; Welke, Justus; Braun, Vittoria

    2007-11-01

    Stress can affect health. There is a growing need for the evaluation and application of professional stress management options, i.e, stress reduction. Mind/body medicine serves this goal, e.g, by integrating self-care techniques into medicine and health care. Tai Chi (TC) can be classified as such a mind/body technique, potentially reducing stress and affecting physical as well as mental health parameters, which, however, has to be examined further. We conducted a prospective, longitudinal pilot study over 18 weeks for the evaluation of subjective and objective clinical effects of a Yang style TC intervention in young adults (beginners) by measuring physiological (blood pressure, heart rate, saliva cortisol) and psychological (SF-36, perceived stress, significant events) parameters, i.e, direct or indirect indicators of stress and stress reduction, in a non-randomised/-controlled, yet non-selected cohort (n=21) by pre-to-post comparison and in follow-up. SF-36 values were also compared with the age-adjusted norm population, serving as an external control. Additionally, we measured diurnal cortisol profiles in a cross-sectional sub-study (n=2+2, pre-to-post), providing an internal random control sub-sample. Only nine participants completed all measurements. Even so, we found significant (pstress reduction. A significant decrease in perceived mental stress (post) proved even highly significant (pstress perception declined to a much lesser degree. Significant improvements were also detected for the SF-36 dimensions general health perception, social functioning, vitality, and mental health/psychological well-being. Thus, the summarized mental health measures all clearly improved, pointing towards a predominantly psychological impact of TC. Subjective health increased, stress decreased (objectively and subjectively) during TC practice. Future studies should confirm this observation by rigorous methodology and by further combining physical and psychological measurements

  9. Gait training with Hybrid Assistive Limb enhances the gait functions in subacute stroke patients: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Kenichi; Mizukami, Masafumi; Kawamoto, Hiroaki; Sano, Ayumu; Koseki, Kazunori; Sano, Kumiko; Asakawa, Yasutsugu; Kohno, Yutaka; Nakai, Kei; Gosho, Masahiko; Tsurushima, Hideo

    2017-01-01

    The robotic Hybrid Assistive Limb (HAL) provides motion according to the wearer's voluntary activity. HAL training effects on walking speed and capacity have not been clarified in subacute stroke. To determine improvement in walking ability by HAL and the most effective improvement measure for use in future large-scale trials. Sixteen first-ever hemiplegic stroke patients completed at least 20 sessions over 5 weeks. Per session, the experimental group received no more than 20 min of gait training with HAL (HT) and 40 min of conventional physiotherapy, whereas the control group received at least 60 min of conventional physiotherapy. Primary outcome was maximum walking speed (MWS). The change in MWS from baseline at week 5 was 11.6±10.6 m/min (HAL group) and 2.2±4.1 m/min (control group) (adjusted mean difference = 9.24 m/min, 95% confidence interval 0.48-18.01, P = 0.040). In HAL subjects there were significant increases in Self-selected walking speed (SWS; a secondary outcome) and in step length (a secondary outcome) at MWS and SWS compared with controls. HT improved walking speed in hemiplegic sub-acute stroke patients. In future, randomized controlled trials are needed to confirm the utility of HT.

  10. Self-administered physical exercise training as treatment of neck pain among military helicopter pilots and crew

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murray, Mike; Lange, Britt; Nørnberg, Bo Riebeling

    ) and upper neck extensors (UNE). Secondary outcome: Maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) for cervical extension/flexion and shoulder elevation. Training compliance was self-reported and categorized as regular if performed ≥ 1 times a week. Results: Neck pain at baseline was 1.9±1.7 (mean±SD) in ETG and 2......), was 2.2±0.6 at baseline and 1.3±1.3 at follow-up, but not significantly different from REF. MVC for cervical extension/flexion was in ETG 248±64/184±60 N at baseline and 261±56/194±63 N at follow-up, and correspondingly for REF 241±60/174±52 N and 226±58/175±43 N. MVC for cervical extension...... was significantly improved in ETG compared to REF (p=0.016). Discussion: Specific neck training significantly increased MVC in UNE in ETG. Also, PPT decreased significantly in left TRA in ETG and in REF in both TRA and UNE. No significant difference was observed between groups for self-reported neck pain. This may...

  11. 温泉游泳训练对飞行员心肺功能影响的研究%Effects of swimming training in thermal spring on pilots' cardiac and pulmonary function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王忠波; 姚博; 程书洋

    2012-01-01

    Objective To observe the effects of swimming training in thermal spring on pilots' cardiorespiratory function index. Methods Twenty four healthy male pilots in active service were selected as subjects. They were arranged to perform a twenty-days swimming training program. The changes of their cardiorespiratory function index before and after training were collected. Results After twenty days swimming training in thermal water, pilots' stroke volume ( SV) and ejection fraction ( EF) significantly increased (P<0.01) , heart rate (HR) decreased significantly (P<0.01) compared with pre-training. In addition, their forced vital capacity (FVC) , maximum voluntary ventilation ( MVV) , peak expiratory flow (PEF) , inspired vital capacity (IVC) and slow vital capacity ( VC) all increased remarkably (P <0. 01) after training. Conclusion Swimming training in thermal spring can improve pilots' cardiac function and vital capacity. However, the training has little effect on improving the small airway function.%目的 探讨温泉自然因子和游泳训练对飞行员心肺功能指标的影响.方法 24名现役飞行员连续20 d室内温泉游泳训练,并采集训练前后心肺功能指标.结果 游泳训练20 d后飞行员每搏输出量(SV)和射血分数(EF)均显著增加(P<0.01),心率(HR)显著降低(P<0.01).用力肺活量(FVC)、最大自然换气量(MVV)、呼出峰值流量(PEF)、慢吸气肺活量(IVC)、慢呼出肺活量(VC)均有显著增加(P<0.01).结论 温泉游泳锻炼可提高心功能及肺活量,但对小气道功能的改变不明显.

  12. Comparison of Muscle Onset Activation Sequences between a Golf or Tennis Swing and Common Training Exercises Using Surface Electromyography: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M. Vasudevan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The purpose of this pilot study is to use surface electromyography to determine an individual athlete’s typical muscle onset activation sequence when performing a golf or tennis forward swing and to use the method to assess to what degree the sequence is reproduced with common conditioning exercises and a machine designed for this purpose. Methods. Data for 18 healthy male subjects were collected for 15 muscles of the trunk and lower extremities. Data were filtered and processed to determine the average onset of muscle activation for each motion. A Spearman correlation estimated congruence of activation order between the swing and each exercise. Correlations of each group were pooled with 95% confidence intervals using a random effects meta-analytic strategy. Results. The averaged sequences differed among each athlete tested, but pooled correlations demonstrated a positive association between each exercise and the participants’ natural muscle onset activation sequence. Conclusion. The selected training exercises and Turning Point™ device all partially reproduced our athletes’ averaged muscle onset activation sequences for both sports. The results support consideration of a larger, adequately powered study using this method to quantify to what degree each of the selected exercises is appropriate for use in both golf and tennis.

  13. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - An International Center of Excellence for ''Training in and Demonstration of Waste Disposal Technologies''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, Mark L.; Eriksson, Leif G.

    2003-02-25

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site, which is managed and operated by the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (USDOE) Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and located in the State of New Mexico, presently hosts an underground research laboratory (URL) and the world's first certified and operating deep geological repository for safe disposition of long-lived radioactive materials (LLRMs). Both the URL and the repository are situated approximately 650 meters (m) below the ground surface in a 250-million-year-old, 600-m-thick, undisturbed, bedded salt formation, and they have been in operation since 1982 and 1999, respectively. Founded on long-standing CBFO collaborations with international and national radioactive waste management organizations, since 2001, WIPP serves as the Center of Excellence in Rock Salt for the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA's) International Network of Centers on ''Training in and Demonstration of Waste Disposal Technologies in Underground Research Facilities'' (the IAEA Network). The primary objective for the IAEA Network is to foster collaborative projects among IAEA Member States that: supplement national efforts and promote public confidence in waste disposal schemes; contribute to the resolution of key technical issues; and encourage the transfer and preservation of knowledge and technologies.

  14. Early physical training and psycho-educational intervention for patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. The SheppHeart randomized 2 × 2 factorial clinical pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Højskov, Ida E; Moons, Philip; Hansen, Niels V; Greve, Helle; Olsen, Dorte Bæk; Cour, Søren La; Glud, Christian; Winkel, Per; Lindschou, Jane; Egerod, Ingrid; Christensen, Anne Vinggaard; Berg, Selina Kikkenborg

    2016-10-01

    Patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery often experience a range of problems and symptoms such as immobility, pain and insufficient sleep. Results from trials investigating testing in-hospital physical exercise or psychological intervention have been promising. However, no randomized clinical trials have tested a comprehensive rehabilitation programme consisting of both physical exercise and psycho-education in the early rehabilitation phase. The aims of the present SheppHeart pilot randomized clinical trial were to evaluate the feasibility of patient recruitment, patient acceptance of the intervention, safety and tolerability of the intervention. Sixty patients admitted for coronary artery bypass graft were randomized 1:1:1:1 to: 1) physical exercise plus usual care, or 2) psycho-educational intervention plus usual care, or 3) physical exercise and psycho-educational plus usual care, or 4) usual care alone during a four week period after surgery. The acceptability of trial participation was 67% during the three month recruitment period. In the physical exercise groups, patients complied with 59% of the total expected training sessions during hospitalization. Nine patients (30%) complied with >75% and nine patients (30%) complied with 50% of the planned exercise sessions. Eleven patients (42%) participated in ⩾75% of the four consultations and six patients (23%) participated in 50% of the psycho-educational programme. Comprehensive phase one rehabilitation combining physical exercise and psycho-education in coronary artery bypass graft patients shows reasonably high inclusion, feasibility and safety. © The European Society of Cardiology 2015.

  15. An analytical drilling force model and GPU-accelerated haptics-based simulation framework of the pilot drilling procedure for micro-implants surgery training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Fei; Lu, Wen Feng; Wong, Yoke San; Foong, Kelvin Weng Chiong

    2012-12-01

    The placement of micro-implants is a common but relatively new surgical procedure in clinical dentistry. This paper presents a haptics-based simulation framework for the pilot drilling of micro-implants surgery to train orthodontists to successfully perform this essential procedure by tactile sensation, without damaging tooth roots. A voxel-based approach was employed to model the inhomogeneous oral tissues. A preprocessing pipeline was designed to reduce imaging noise, smooth segmentation results and construct an anatomically correct oral model from patient-specific data. In order to provide a physically based haptic feedback, an analytical drilling force model based on metal cutting principles was developed and adapted for the voxel-based approach. To improve the real-time response, the parallel computing power of Graphics Processing Units is exploited through extra efforts for data structure design, algorithms parallelization, and graphic memory utilization. A prototype system has been developed based on the proposed framework. Preliminary results show that, by using this framework, proper drilling force can be rendered at different tissue layers with reduced cycle time, while the visual display has also been enhanced.

  16. Comparison of Muscle Onset Activation Sequences between a Golf or Tennis Swing and Common Training Exercises Using Surface Electromyography: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, John M; Logan, Andrew; Shultz, Rebecca; Koval, Jeffrey J; Roh, Eugene Y; Fredericson, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The purpose of this pilot study is to use surface electromyography to determine an individual athlete's typical muscle onset activation sequence when performing a golf or tennis forward swing and to use the method to assess to what degree the sequence is reproduced with common conditioning exercises and a machine designed for this purpose. Methods. Data for 18 healthy male subjects were collected for 15 muscles of the trunk and lower extremities. Data were filtered and processed to determine the average onset of muscle activation for each motion. A Spearman correlation estimated congruence of activation order between the swing and each exercise. Correlations of each group were pooled with 95% confidence intervals using a random effects meta-analytic strategy. Results. The averaged sequences differed among each athlete tested, but pooled correlations demonstrated a positive association between each exercise and the participants' natural muscle onset activation sequence. Conclusion. The selected training exercises and Turning Point™ device all partially reproduced our athletes' averaged muscle onset activation sequences for both sports. The results support consideration of a larger, adequately powered study using this method to quantify to what degree each of the selected exercises is appropriate for use in both golf and tennis.

  17. Structured exercise training programme versus hypocaloric hyperproteic diet in obese polycystic ovary syndrome patients with anovulatory infertility: a 24-week pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomba, S; Giallauria, F; Falbo, A; Russo, T; Oppedisano, R; Tolino, A; Colao, A; Vigorito, C; Zullo, F; Orio, F

    2008-03-01

    Lifestyle modifications are successfully employed to treat obese and overweight women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). The aims of the current pilot study were (i) to compare the efficacy on reproductive functions of a structured exercise training (SET) programme with a diet programme in obese PCOS patients and (ii) to study their clinical, hormonal and metabolic effects to elucidate potentially different mechanisms of action. Forty obese PCOS patients with anovulatory infertility underwent a SET programme (SET group, n = 20) and a hypocaloric hyperproteic diet (diet group, n = 20). Clinical, hormonal and metabolic data were assessed at baseline, and at 12- and 24-week follow-ups. Primary endpoint was cumulative pregnancy rate. The two groups had similar demographic, anthropometric and biochemical parameters. After intervention, a significant improvement in menstrual cycles and fertility was noted in both groups, with no differences between groups. The frequency of menses and the ovulation rate were significantly (P diet group but the increased cumulative pregnancy rate was not significant. Body weight, body mass index, waist circumference, insulin resistance indexes and serum levels of sex hormone-binding globulin, androstenedione and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate changed significantly (P diet interventions improve fertility in obese PCOS patients with anovulatory infertility. We hypothesize that in both interventions an improvement in insulin sensitivity is the pivotal factor involved in the restoration of ovarian function but potentially acting through different mechanisms.

  18. 军机飞行员颈肌强度及训练效果研究%Research on neck muscular strength in military pilots and the effects of muscle strength training

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈琼; 沈思云; 夏凌; 李交杰; 陈小萍; 陈晓健; 徐建华

    2012-01-01

    目的 研究军机飞行员颈部各肌群的强度并探讨颈肌训练的方法和效果.方法 采用CME-1飞行员颈肌训练器对50例军机飞行员(运输机组、直升机组、歼强机组、轰炸机组和初教机组各10例)进行为期3周共9次颈部各肌群(前、后、左、右)的强度训练,第1、3、4、6、7和9次为等长训练模式,第2、5和8次为可变阻力和可变速度训练模式,记录第1次训练即颈肌训练前各机种以及第1(T1组)、3(T3组)、6(T6组)和9(T9组)次训练的前、后、左、右各肌群的平均颈肌强度、平均10 s最大冲量.结果 ①训练前运输机组向前、后肌群平均颈肌强度和平均10 s最大冲量值低于其他组(P<0.05);②第3、6和9次训练各肌群的平均颈肌强度、平均10 s最大冲量的均值较第1次均有显著提高(P<0.05);训练3周各肌群的平均颈肌强度均值的相对增长率分别为47.4%、42.6%、65.2%和55.5%,平均10s最大冲量均值的相对增长率分别为51.6%、41.8%、63.3%和53.9%.结论 运输机飞行员前屈和后伸肌群强度较低;CME-1飞行员颈肌训练器能有效提高军机飞行员的颈肌强度.%Objective To evaluate the strength of neck muscles of military pilots and the effects of the strength training. Methods Fifty military pilots from 5 groups, I. E. Transporter pilots group, helicopter pilots group,fighter and attacker pilots group,bomber pilots group and primary trainer pilots group, 10 in each group, received strength training in neck muscles, all together 9 times in 3 weeks. The training was carried out by CME-1 Neck Muscle Training Machine. Among the 9-time training,the 1st,3rd,4th,6th,7th and 9th were isometric exercises,the 2nd,5th and 8th were changeable velocity and resistant ( CVR) exercises. The mean of peak muscle strength and the mean of peak impulse in 10 seconds of the extension, flexion, left and right lateral bending directions of the neck muscles were

  19. Nonclinical core competencies and effects of interprofessional teamwork in disaster and emergency response training and practice: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peller, Jennifer; Schwartz, Brian; Kitto, Simon

    2013-08-01

    To define and delineate the nontechnical core competencies required for disaster response, Disaster Medical Assistance Team (DMAT) members were interviewed regarding their perspectives and experiences in disaster management. Also explored was the relationship between nontechnical competencies and interprofessional collaboration. In-depth interviews were conducted with 10 Canadian DMAT members to explore how they viewed nontechnical core competencies and how their experiences influenced their perceptions toward interprofessonalism in disaster response. Data were examined using thematic analysis. Nontechnical core competencies were categorized under austere skills, interpersonal skills, and cognitive skills. Research participants defined interprofessionalism and discussed the importance of specific nontechnical core competencies to interprofessional collaboration. The findings of this study established a connection between nontechnical core competencies and interprofessional collaboration in DMAT activities. It also provided preliminary insights into the importance of context in developing an evidence base for competency training in disaster response and management. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2013;0:1-8).

  20. Electromyographic biofeedback training for reducing muscle pain and tension on masseter and temporal muscles: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criado, Laura; de La Fuente, Antonio; Heredia, Margarita; Montero, Javier; Albaladejo, Alberto; Criado, José-María

    2016-12-01

    Due to the absence of agreement about an effective unified treatment for temporomandibular disorders, non-invasive therapies such as EMG-biofeedback generate a greater interest. Furthermore, most studies to the present show methodological deficiencies that must be solved in the future, which makes important to emphasize this line of studies. Fourteen patients were selected for this case series study, and replied to a questionnaire concerning awareness of bruxism, painful muscles, and muscle tension. They also practiced an intraoral exploration (occlusal analysis and mandibular dynamics), and an extraoral exploration of the head and neck muscles and the temporomandibular joint. Before each session, patients responded to a questionnaire about the subjective perceived improvement. In each session, a period of three minutes of pre-biofeedback EMG activity of right masseter and temporal muscles was registered, then patients performed 30 iterations of visual EMG-biofeedback training and finally, a period of three minutes of post-EMG activity was also registered for those muscles. Patients performed four sessions. A decrease in painful symptoms was found for all patients since the first session. EMG activity decreases (pmuscles during the biofeedback training stage, in the four sessions. It is also observed a decrease (pmuscle at the post-biofeedback stage, in the second and third sessions. There is likewise a decrease in EMG post-biofeedback activity of the temporal muscle (pmuscles during the session. This decrease persists during the post-biofeedback period since the second session. Also there is a decrease in painful symptoms for all patients. Key words:Muscle tension, muscle pain, EMG-biofeedback, masseter muscle, temporal muscle.

  1. How to fulfill residents' training needs and public service missions in outpatient general internal medicine? An observational pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junod Perron, Noelle; Humair, Jean-Paul; Gaspoz, Jean-Michel

    2012-07-12

    QUESTION UNDER STUDY/PRINCIPLES: Ambulatory care is a mandatory component of post-graduate training in general internal medicine. Academic outpatient clinics face challenges in training residents in terms of exposure to sufficient patient case-mix, diversity of clinical activities and continuity of care while fulfilling their mission to provide care to vulnerable populations. We report the development and evaluation of a new postgraduate curriculum in ambulatory care in Geneva, Switzerland, designed to overcome such challenges. The content of learning activities was adapted to core competencies and learning objectives. In the new 2-year curriculum, residents had their working week divided into 2½ days of continuity clinic over two years, and 2½ days of 6 to 12 months rotations (e.g., walk-in clinics). Team work was consolidated through the creation of subunits including an attending physician, 1-2 senior residents during one year and 6- to 8 residents, who met in bi-monthly meetings with other health professionals. In both local and national surveys, residents and senior residents expressed an overall global satisfaction with the new curriculum. Nursing and administrative staff were less satisfied, because of reduced residents' time in each unit. Interprofessional meetings were highly appreciated for both patient care and team building. Management of residents' absences became more complex. The new curriculum met its goals in gaining residents' satisfaction and in reinforcing interprofessional collaboration although management of human resources became more complex. It also gave insights into challenges to be addressed when disseminating a new curriculum, such as strong leadership, educational expertise and management skills and tools.

  2. A randomized pilot study of MOtiVation and Enhancement (MOVE) Training for negative symptoms in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velligan, Dawn I; Roberts, David; Mintz, Jim; Maples, Natalie; Li, Xueying; Medellin, Elisa; Brown, Matt

    2015-07-01

    Among individuals with schizophrenia, those who have persistent and clinically significant negative symptoms (PNS) have the poorest functional outcomes and quality of life. The NIMH-MATRICS Consensus Statement indicated that these symptoms represent an unmet therapeutic need for large numbers of individuals with schizophrenia. No psychosocial treatment model addresses the entire constellation of PNS. 51 patients with PNS were randomized into one of two groups for a period of 9 months: 1) MOtiVation and Enhancement (MOVE) or 2) treatment as usual. MOVE is a home based, manual-driven, multi-modal treatment that employs a number of cognitive and behavioral principles to address the broad range of factors contributing to PNS and their functional consequences. The components of MOVE include: Environmental supports to prompt initiation and persistence, in-vivo skills training to ameliorate deficits and encourage interaction, cognitive behavioral techniques to address self-defeating attitudes, in-vivo training in emotional processing to address affective blunting and problems in identifying emotions, and specific techniques to address the deficits in anticipatory pleasure. Patients were assessed at baseline and each 3 months with multiple measures of negative symptoms. Repeated measures analyses of variance for mixed models indicated significant Group by Time effects for the Negative Symptom Assessment (NSA; p<.02) and the Clinical Assessment Interview for Negative Symptoms (CAINS; p<.04). Group differences were not significant until 9 months of treatment and were not significant for the Brief Negative Symptom Scale (BNSS). Further investigation of a comprehensive treatment for PNS, such as MOVE, is warranted. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. NEUROLOGIC MUSIC THERAPY TRAINING FOR MOBILITY AND STABILITY REHABILITATION WITH PARKINSON’S DISEASE – A PILOT STUDY.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna A. Bukowska

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic Parkinson’s Disease (PD is a progressive condition with gait disturbance and balance disorder as the main symptoms. Previous research studies focused on the application of Rhythmic Auditory Stimulation (RAS in PD gait rehabilitation. The key hypothesis of this pilot study, however, assumes the major role of the combination of all three Neurologic Music Therapy (NMT sensorimotor techniques in improving spatio-temporal gait parameters, and postural stability in the course of PD. The 55 PD-diagnosed subjects invited to the study were divided into two groups: 30 in the experimental and 25 in the control group. Inclusion criteria included Hoehn & Yahr stage 2 or 3, the ability to walk independently without any aid and stable pharmacological treatment for the duration of the experiment. In order to evaluate the efficacy of the chosen therapy procedure the following measures were applied: Optoelectrical 3D Movement Analysis System BTS Smart for gait, and Computerized Dynamic Posturography CQ Stab for stability and balance . All measures were conducted both before and after the therapy cycle. The subjects from the experimental group attended music therapy sessions 4 times a week for 4 weeks. Therapeutic Instrumental Music Performance (TIMP, Pattern Sensory Enhancement (PSE and Rhythmic Auditory Stimulation (RAS were used in every 45-minute session for practicing daily life activities, balance, pre-gait and gait pattern. Percussion instruments, the metronome and rhythmic music were the basis for each session. The subjects from the control group were asked to stay active and perform daily life activities between the measures. The research showed that the combination of the three NMT sensorimotor techniques can be used to improve gait and other rhythmical activities in PD rehabilitation.The results demonstrated significant improvement in the majority of the spatiotemporal gait parameters in the experimental group in comparison to the control

  4. 短程心率变异性评估疗养飞行员生物反馈训练效果的研究%Short-range Assessment of Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback Training Effect Infirmary Pilot Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王洪芳; 田建全; 胡乃鉴

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the short-range assessment of heart rate variability biofeedback training effect infirmary pilot,and provide the basis for aviation psychological training.Methods:Using multi-parameter analyzer biofeedback training for pilots and short-range detection of heart rate variabil-ity.Results:Short HRV comparison showed,SDNN,RMSSD,HF and TP were increased after training( t=2.33~8.46,P<0.01);HR,LF,LF /HF were lower after training(t=4.13~20.54,P<0.01).Con-clusion:Biofeedback training can improve the functional activity of the autonomic nervous pilots situation effectively assess performance short convalescence HRV biofeedback training pilots effect.%目的:探讨短程心率变异性评估疗养飞行员生物反馈训练效果,为航空心理训练提供依据。方法:采用多参数生物反馈仪对飞行员进行训练及短程心率变异性检测。结果:短程心率变异性比较结果显示, SDNN、RMSSD、HF和TP均是训练后升高,有非常显著统计学意义(t=2.33~8.46,P<0.01);HR、LF、LF/HF均是训练后降低,有非常显著统计学意义(t=4.13~20.54,P<0.01)。结论:生物反馈训练能改善飞行员自主神经功能活性状况,短程心率变异性能有效评估疗养飞行员生物反馈训练的效果。

  5. Interns' knowledge of clinical pharmacology and therapeutics after undergraduate and on-going internship training in Nigeria: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshikoya, Kazeem A; Senbanjo, Idowu O; Amole, Olufemi O

    2009-01-01

    Background A sound knowledge of pathophysiology of a disease and clinical pharmacology and therapeutics (CPT) of a drug is required for safe and rational prescribing. The aim of this study was therefore to assess how adequately the undergraduate CPT teaching had prepared interns in Nigeria for safe and rational prescribing and retrospectively, to know how they wanted the undergraduate curriculum to be modified so as to improve appropriate prescribing. The effect of internship training on the prescribing ability of the interns was also sought. Methods A total of 100 interns were randomly selected from the Lagos State University Teaching Hospital (LASUTH), Ikeja; Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH), Idiaraba; General Hospital Lagos (GHL); the EKO Hospital, Ikeja; and Havana Specialist Hospital, Surulere. A structured questionnaire was the instrument of study. The questionnaire sought information about the demographics of the interns, their undergraduate CPT teaching, experience of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and drug interactions since starting work, confidence in drug usage and, in retrospect; any perceived deficiencies in their undergraduate CPT teaching. Results The response rate was 81%. All the respondents graduated from universities in Nigeria. The ability of the interns to prescribe rationally (66, 81.4%) and safely (47, 58%) was provided by undergraduate CPT teaching. Forty two (51.8%) respondents had problems with prescription writing. The interns would likely prescribe antibiotics (71, 87.6%), nonsteroidal analgesics (66, 81.4%), diuretics (55, 67.9%), sedatives (52, 62.9%), and insulin and oral hypoglycaemics (43, 53%) with confidence and unsupervised. The higher the numbers of clinical rotations done, the more confident were the respondents to prescribe unsupervised (χ2 = 19.98, P < 0.001). Similarly, respondents who had rotated through the four major clinical rotations and at least a special posting (χ2 = 11.57, P < 0.001) or four major

  6. The feasibility of progressive resistance training in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizza, Lisa; Smith, Caroline A; Swaraj, Soji; Agho, Kingsley; Cheema, Birinder S

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of executing a randomized controlled trial of progressive resistance training (PRT) in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Women with PCOS were randomized to an experimental (PRT) group or a no-exercise (usual care) control group. The PRT group was prescribed two supervised and two unsupervised (home-based) training sessions per week for 12 weeks. Feasibility outcomes included recruitment and attrition, adherence, adverse events, and completion of assessments. Secondary outcomes, collected pre and post intervention, included a range of pertinent physiological, functional and psychological measures. Fifteen participants were randomised into the PRT group (n = 8) or control group (n = 7); five women (n = 2 in PRT group and n = 3 in control group) withdrew from the study. The most successful recruitment sources were Facebook (40 %) and online advertisement (27 %), while least successful methods were referrals by clinicians, colleagues and flyers. In the PRT group, attendance to supervised sessions was higher (95 %; standard deviation ±6 %) compared to unsupervised sessions (51 %; standard deviation ±28 %). No adverse events were attributed to PRT. Change in menstrual cycle status was not significantly different between groups over time (p = 0.503). However, the PRT group significantly increased body weight (p = 0.01), BMI (p = 0.04), lean mass (p = 0.01), fat-free mass (p = 0.005) and lower body strength (p = 0.03), while reducing waist circumference (p = 0.03) and HbA1c (p = 0.033) versus the control group. The PRT group also significantly improved across several domains of disease-specific and general health-related quality of life, depression, anxiety and exercise self-efficacy. A randomized controlled trial of PRT in PCOS would be feasible, and this mode of exercise may elicit a therapeutic effect on clinically important outcomes in this cohort. The success of a large

  7. Interns' knowledge of clinical pharmacology and therapeutics after undergraduate and on-going internship training in Nigeria: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senbanjo Idowu O

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A sound knowledge of pathophysiology of a disease and clinical pharmacology and therapeutics (CPT of a drug is required for safe and rational prescribing. The aim of this study was therefore to assess how adequately the undergraduate CPT teaching had prepared interns in Nigeria for safe and rational prescribing and retrospectively, to know how they wanted the undergraduate curriculum to be modified so as to improve appropriate prescribing. The effect of internship training on the prescribing ability of the interns was also sought. Methods A total of 100 interns were randomly selected from the Lagos State University Teaching Hospital (LASUTH, Ikeja; Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH, Idiaraba; General Hospital Lagos (GHL; the EKO Hospital, Ikeja; and Havana Specialist Hospital, Surulere. A structured questionnaire was the instrument of study. The questionnaire sought information about the demographics of the interns, their undergraduate CPT teaching, experience of adverse drug reactions (ADRs and drug interactions since starting work, confidence in drug usage and, in retrospect; any perceived deficiencies in their undergraduate CPT teaching. Results The response rate was 81%. All the respondents graduated from universities in Nigeria. The ability of the interns to prescribe rationally (66, 81.4% and safely (47, 58% was provided by undergraduate CPT teaching. Forty two (51.8% respondents had problems with prescription writing. The interns would likely prescribe antibiotics (71, 87.6%, nonsteroidal analgesics (66, 81.4%, diuretics (55, 67.9%, sedatives (52, 62.9%, and insulin and oral hypoglycaemics (43, 53% with confidence and unsupervised. The higher the numbers of clinical rotations done, the more confident were the respondents to prescribe unsupervised (χ2 = 19.98, P 2 = 11.57, P 2 = 11.25, P Conclusion Undergraduate CPT teaching in Nigeria appears to be deficient. Principles of rational prescribing, drug dose

  8. The Effect of Maximal Strength Training on Strength, Walking, and Balance in People with Multiple Sclerosis: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herb I. Karpatkin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There is little literature examining the use of maximal strength training (MST in people with multiple sclerosis (pwMS. This pretest-posttest study examined the effects of a MST program on strength, walking, balance, and fatigue in a sample of pwMS. Seven pwMS (median EDSS 3.0, IQR 1.5 participated in a MST program twice weekly for eight weeks. Strength was assessed with 1-repetition maximum (1RM on each leg. Walking and balance were measured with the 6-Minute Walk Test (6MWT and Berg Balance Scale (BBS, respectively. Fatigue was measured during each week of the program with the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS. The program was well tolerated, with an attendance rate of 96.4%. Participants had significant improvements in right leg 1RM (t6=-6.032, P=0.001, left leg 1RM (t(6=-5.388, P=0.002, 6MWT distance (t(6=-2.572,P=0.042, and BBS score (Z=-2.371, P=0.018 after the MST intervention. There was no significant change in FSS scores (F(1,3.312=2.411, P=0.092. Participants in the MST program experienced improved balance and walking without an increase in fatigue. This MST program may be utilized by rehabilitation clinicians to improve lower extremity strength, balance, and mobility in pwMS.

  9. Non-invasive brain stimulation and robot-assisted gait training after incomplete spinal cord injury: A randomized pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raithatha, Ravi; Carrico, Cheryl; Powell, Elizabeth Salmon; Westgate, Philip M; Chelette Ii, Kenneth C; Lee, Kara; Dunsmore, Laura; Salles, Sara; Sawaki, Lumy

    2016-01-01

    Locomotor training with a robot-assisted gait orthosis (LT-RGO) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) are interventions that can significantly enhance motor performance after spinal cord injury (SCI). No studies have investigated whether combining these interventions enhances lower extremity motor function following SCI. Determine whether active tDCS paired with LT-RGO improves lower extremity motor function more than a sham condition, in subjects with motor incomplete SCI. Fifteen adults with SCI received 36 sessions of either active (n = 9) or sham (n = 6) tDCS (20 minutes) preceding LT-RGO (1 hour). Outcome measures included manual muscle testing (MMT; primary outcome measure); 6-Minute Walk Test (6MinWT); 10-Meter Walk Test (10MWT); Timed Up and Go Test (TUG); Berg Balance Scale (BBS); and Spinal Cord Independence Measure-III (SCIM-III). MMT showed significant improvements after active tDCS, with the most pronounced improvement in the right lower extremity. 10MWT, 6MinWT, and BBS showed improvement for both groups. TUG and SCIM-III showed improvement only for the sham tDCS group. Pairing tDCS with LT-RGO can improve lower extremity motor function more than LT-RGO alone. Future research with a larger sample size is recommended to determine longer-term effects on motor function and activities of daily living.

  10. The Effect of Maximal Strength Training on Strength, Walking, and Balance in People with Multiple Sclerosis: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Sarah; Park, David; Wright, Charles; Zervas, Michael

    2016-01-01

    There is little literature examining the use of maximal strength training (MST) in people with multiple sclerosis (pwMS). This pretest-posttest study examined the effects of a MST program on strength, walking, balance, and fatigue in a sample of pwMS. Seven pwMS (median EDSS 3.0, IQR 1.5) participated in a MST program twice weekly for eight weeks. Strength was assessed with 1-repetition maximum (1RM) on each leg. Walking and balance were measured with the 6-Minute Walk Test (6MWT) and Berg Balance Scale (BBS), respectively. Fatigue was measured during each week of the program with the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS). The program was well tolerated, with an attendance rate of 96.4%. Participants had significant improvements in right leg 1RM (t(6) = −6.032, P = 0.001), left leg 1RM (t(6) = −5.388, P = 0.002), 6MWT distance (t(6) = −2.572, P = 0.042), and BBS score (Z = −2.371, P = 0.018) after the MST intervention. There was no significant change in FSS scores (F(1, 3.312) = 2.411, P = 0.092). Participants in the MST program experienced improved balance and walking without an increase in fatigue. This MST program may be utilized by rehabilitation clinicians to improve lower extremity strength, balance, and mobility in pwMS. PMID:28116161

  11. Effects of treadmill exercise training on liver fat accumulation and estrogen receptor alpha expression in intact and ovariectomized rats with or without estrogen replacement treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Like; Wang, Yijing; Duan, Yushuang; Bu, Shumin

    2010-07-01

    To explore the mechanism(s) of exercise training on ovariectomized (OVX)-induced liver lipid disorder, we observed effects of treadmill training on liver fat accumulation and ER alpha expression in intact and ovariectomized rats. Sixty female rats were randomly assigned to six groups: Sham sedentary (S-S), Sham exercised (S-EX), ovariectomized sedentary (O-S), ovariectomized exercised (O-EX), ovariectomized injected subcutaneously with 17beta-estradiol (E(2)) (O-E(2)), and ovariectomized treated with E(2) and exercise (O-E(2)-EX). Twelve weeks after intervention, OVX resulted in significantly higher body weight gain, intra-abdominal fat mass, serum levels of total cholesterol (TC), and liver triacylglycerol (TAG) concentrations and ER alpha expression than S-S group, while the relative uterus and liver mass, serum levels of E(2), TAG, and the ratio of high density lipoprotein (HDL) to TC were markedly lower in O-S group. All of these changes were decreased in O-S rats after treatment with E(2) alone with the exception of serum TC and HDL-C levels and liver ER alpha expression. Exercise alone significantly reversed the effect of OVX on serum E(2), the ratio of HDL-C to TC and the liver and intra-abdominal fat accumulation in OVX rats. The addition of E(2) to exercise induced the same uterus and lipid profile as E(2) alone. Moreover, an additive effect of exercise and E(2) was observed on liver ER alpha expression in Sham or OVX rats. In conclusion, treadmill training alone could prevent liver fat accumulation in OVX rats and the regulation of exercise on liver ER alpha expression in both OVX and Sham rats needs the presence of physical estrogen levels.

  12. A New App for At-Home Cognitive Training: Description and Pilot Testing on Patients with Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacchino, Andrea; Pedullà, Ludovico; Bonzano, Laura; Vassallo, Claudio; Battaglia, Mario Alberto; Mancardi, Gianluigi; Bove, Marco; Brichetto, Giampaolo

    2015-08-31

    Cognitive impairment is common in people with neurological diseases and severely affects their social and professional life. It has been shown that intensive and personalized cognitive rehabilitation (CR), based on working memory exercises, leads to improved cognitive status of healthy and cognitive-impaired subjects. New technologies would help to promote accessible, at-home, and self-managed CR interventions. The aim of this paper is to describe the design of Cognitive Training Kit (COGNI-TRAcK), an app for mobile devices, to self-administer an at-home, intensive, and personalized CR intervention based on working memory exercises, and test its disposability-to-use (usability, motivation to use, compliance to treatment) on cognitive-impaired patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). COGNI-TRAcK includes user-friendly interfaces for personal data input and management and for CR intervention configurations. Inner routines automatically implement adaptive working load algorithms and allow data processing and analysis. A dedicated team developed COGNI-TRAcK with C# programming language, by using the platform Xamarin Studio 4.0.10 for Android (API level 15 and following). Three exercises based on working memory are now available. To assess the disposability-to-use of the system, patients with MS were selected as likely users due to the young age of disease onset. Cognitive-impaired patients with MS (N=16) with a mean age of 49.06 years (SD 9.10) and a mean score of 3.75 (SD 1.92) on the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) were submitted to an 8-week at-home intervention administered by the app. The intervention consisted of 5 daily scheduled 30-minute sessions per week. Disposability-to-use of COGNI-TRAcK was investigated by means of a questionnaire administered to patients at the end of the training. The adherence to the treatment was 84% (33.4/40). Of the patients with MS, 94% (15/16) understood the instructions given, 100% (16/16) felt independent to use COGNI

  13. A Pilot Study of a Mobile Health Pain Coping Skills Training Protocol for Patients With Persistent Cancer Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somers, Tamara J; Abernethy, Amy P; Edmond, Sara N; Kelleher, Sarah A; Wren, Anava A; Samsa, Greg P; Keefe, Francis J

    2015-10-01

    Pain coping skills training (PCST) interventions have shown efficacy for reducing pain and providing other benefits in patients with cancer. However, their reach is often limited because of a variety of barriers (e.g., travel, physical burden, cost, time). This study examined the feasibility and acceptability of a brief PCST intervention delivered to patients in their homes using mobile health (mHealth) technology. Pre-to-post intervention changes in pain, physical functioning, physical symptoms, psychological distress, self-efficacy for pain management, and pain catastrophizing also were examined. Patients with a diagnosis of breast, lung, prostate, or colorectal cancer who reported persistent pain (N = 25) participated in a four-session intervention delivered using mHealth technology (videoconferencing on a tablet computer). Participants completed measures of pain, physical functioning, physical symptoms, psychological distress, self-efficacy for pain management, and pain catastrophizing. We also assessed patient satisfaction. Participants completed an average of 3.36 (SD = 1.11) of the four intervention sessions for an overall session completion rate of 84%. Participants reported that the program was of excellent quality and met their needs. Significant preintervention to postintervention differences were found in pain, physical symptoms, psychological distress, and pain catastrophizing. The use of mHealth technology is a feasible and acceptable option for delivery of PCST for patients with cancer. This delivery mode is likely to dramatically increase intervention access for cancer patients with pain compared to traditional in-person delivery. Preliminary data also suggest that the program is likely to produce pretreatment to post-treatment decreases in pain and other important outcomes. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of Video Weather Training Products, Web-Based Preflight Weather Briefing, and Local Versus Non-Local Pilots on General Aviation Pilot Weather Knowledge and Flight Behavior, Phase 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    Weather Knowledge and Flight Behavior, Phase 3 DOT/FAA/AM-10/17 Office of Aerospace Medicine Washington, DC 20591 OK-11-0024-JAH Federal Aviation...Vs. Non-Local Pilots on General Aviation Pilot Weather Knowledge and Flight Behavior, Phase 3 6. Performing Organization Code 7. Author(s...behavior in Phase 2; (2) Whole-group (N=50) weather knowledge test scores were significantly lower (19%, p<.001) than average FAA certification exam

  15. 基于主成分分析法的飞行员培养质量评价研究%Study on Evaluating the Quality of Training Pilots Based on the Principal Component Analysis Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱志航; 阎雷

    2012-01-01

    基于中国民航飞行员需求旺盛,培养评价指标单一和方法不够科学的现状,借助南京航空航天大学的飞行员招生和培养完整的数据,本文将主成分分析方法引用到飞行员培养质量评价研究之中.基于多元统计方法定量评价的思想,本文介绍了主成分分析法的原理,并应用该方法对飞行员培养质量进行了综合评价.结果表明,该评价方法是科学有效的,其中的主要影响因子可以帮助飞行院校解决飞行员培养过程的主要问题,从而有助于为我国民航运输业培养高素质的、优秀的飞行人员.%Based on the current fact that the great demand of pilots in Chinese civil aviation is prospective while the evaluation system is single and its corresponding method is also not scientific enough, principal component analysis method will be applied into evaluating the training quality of pilot students using the complete data on the recruitment and training of pilot students from Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics. The idea of quantitative evaluation of multi-element statistical method is established in the paper, the principle of principal component analysis is also introduced, and then this method is applied to comprehensively evaluating the training of pilot students. It is shown that these evaluation methods are scientific and effective, and the main affecting factors from those can help flight schools to solve the main problem during the training, and develop the high qualitative and excellent pilots for Chinese civil aviation transportation.

  16. Comparison of embedded and added motor imagery training in patients after stroke: study protocol of a randomised controlled pilot trial using a mixed methods approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrews Brian

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two different approaches have been adopted when applying motor imagery (MI to stroke patients. MI can be conducted either added to conventional physiotherapy or integrated within therapy sessions. The proposed study aims to compare the efficacy of embedded MI to an added MI intervention. Evidence from pilot studies reported in the literature suggests that both approaches can improve performance of a complex motor skill involving whole body movements, however, it remains to be demonstrated, which is the more effective one. Methods/Design A single blinded, randomised controlled trial (RCT with a pre-post intervention design will be carried out. The study design includes two experimental groups and a control group (CG. Both experimental groups (EG1, EG2 will receive physical practice of a clinical relevant motor task ('Going down, laying on the floor, and getting up again' over a two week intervention period: EG1 with embedded MI training, EG2 with MI training added after physiotherapy. The CG will receive standard physiotherapy intervention and an additional control intervention not related to MI. The primary study outcome is the time difference to perform the task from pre to post-intervention. Secondary outcomes include level of help needed, stages of motor task completion, degree of motor impairment, balance ability, fear of falling measure, motivation score, and motor imagery ability score. Four data collection points are proposed: twice during baseline phase, once following the intervention period, and once after a two week follow up. A nested qualitative part should add an important insight into patients' experience and attitudes towards MI. Semi-structured interviews of six to ten patients, who participate in the RCT, will be conducted to investigate patients' previous experience with MI and their expectations towards the MI intervention in the study. Patients will be interviewed prior and after the intervention period

  17. 高性能战斗机飞行员前庭习服训练效果观察%Effects of vestibular acclimatization training on high-performance fighter pilots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄炜; 季思菊; 李交杰; 张刚林

    2010-01-01

    目的 通过前庭习服训练,提高高性能战斗机飞行员前庭稳定性,以降低空晕病的发生.方法 应用VTS-0型电动转椅对45例前庭稳定性评定等级为D、E级的高性能战斗机飞行员进行每天1次,持续2周的前庭习服训练,记录训练前后前庭稳定性评定中的Coriolis加速度耐受值及训练耐受时间.结果 训练后,45例高性能战斗机飞行员的前庭稳定性较训练前有不同程度提高,均达到C级以上,Coriolis加速度耐受值和训练耐受时间明显提高,且有统计学意义(t=14.55、12.66,P<0.01).结论 前庭习服训练对提高高性能战斗机飞行员的前庭稳定性效果明显.%Objective To explore the effects of vestibular accliratization training of highperformance fighter pilots for improving their vestibular stability and reducing airsickness. Methods Forty-five high-performance fighter pilots, who were graded as D and E in vestibular stability evaluation, performed vestibular acclimatization training by VTS-0 rotational chair once a day for 2weeks. In vestibular stability evaluation, tolerated Coriolis acceleration value and endurable duration of rotation were compared between the states before and after training.Results All 45 pilots'vestibular stability was variously improved and reached or exceeded grade C by training. Tolerated Coriolis acceleration value and endurable duration were significantly increased (t=14.55, 12.66, P<0.01).Conclusions Vestibular acclimatization training shows significant effects on improving the vestibular stability of high-performance fighter pilots.

  18. 术前康复训练在髋关节置换术临床路径中的应用%Effects of Clinical Pathway Plus Preoperative Rehabilitation Training on Rehabilitation in Patients After Total Hip Replacement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡保红; 彭珍; 李国琼; 李书华; 黄琴

    2016-01-01

    Objective To study the effects of clinical pathway plus preoperative rehabilitation training on rehabilitation in patients after total hip replacement( THR ). Methods 42 patients who received THR following clinical pathway were divided into test group( n=21 )and control group( n=21 ). Patients in the test group were received instruction of preoperative rehabilitation training and training methods for limb functional rehabilitation besides fulfilled routing clinical pathway before operation. Patients in the control group only fulfilled routing clinical pathway. Procedure of rehabilitation training is not different in the two groups. The satisfaction of patients,compliance of rehabilitation training,length of stay,complication were compared between two groups. Results The satisfaction of patients and compliance of rehabilitation training in the test group are significantly higher than that in the control group( P<0 . 05;P<0 . 05 ),and the length of stay in hospital is inversely( P<0 . 05 ). Conclusion Preoperative rehabilitation training can improve compliance of rehabilitation training and the satisfaction of patients and decrease the length of stay in hospital.%目的:研究将术前康复训练引入临床路径中对全髋关节置换术后康复效果的影响。方法选择行全髋关节置换术实施临床路径的患者42例,随机分为试验组和对照组各21例,试验组术前除完成临床路径的常规检查、治疗、护理内容外,还增加术前康复训练指导如肌肉力量训练、关节脱位的预防等并使患者掌握肢体功能康复训练方法,对照组术前只完成临床路径的常规内容,2组术后的康复训练程序完全一致。比较术后患者满意度、术后康复训练的依从性、住院天数、并发症的发生。结果试验组术后满意度、康复训练依从性高于对照组(均P<0.05);试验组住院天数少于对照组(P<0.05),结论术前开展康复训练指导提

  19. The Use of Archived Research Data in the Training of Qualitative Research Methods—Concept and Evaluation of a Pilot Model for Learning that is Closely Linked to Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britta Stiefel

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Digital archiving of qualitative research data together with the progress made in software-based data analysis provides the opportunity to re-use data for a training scheme that is closely related to research in the qualitative social sciences. Archived data can be used as material for demonstration and analysis and can thus facilitate a deeper insight into qualitative research methodology. The use of the concept of "blended learning" linking face-to-face teaching with elements of e-learning can be of advantage for the training of methods that is closely related to research. It ensures both professional tutoring by a teacher and independent research work by the students. The article presents the concept and the evaluation results of a training and learning model the Life-Course-Archive of the Graduate School of Social Sciences (GSSS at the University of Bremen developed for the use of archived interview data in the training of qualitative research methods. The pilot model with its focus on the approach for the analysis of problem-centered interviews is geared to the concept of blended learning. Testing and evaluation took place within a pilot course of the project mobileCampus carried out in the psychology department at the University of Bremen. The training and learning model for learning that is closely linked to research of the Life-Course-Archive is put up for discussion within the FQS Debate on "Teaching and Learning Qualitative Research Methods in the Social Sciences" (http://www.qualitative-research.net/fqs-texte/a5b6c7/07-3-15-d.htm. In addition, the article itself is to serve as a contribution to this discussion. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0703152

  20. Optimization of Daily Flight Training Schedules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    training syllabus . 14. SUBJECT TERMS Scheduling, optimization, flight training, Advance Strike Training, pilot 15. NUMBER OF...SKEDSOs that can help them increase throughput of students in the advanced strike training syllabus . vi THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK vii...instructor pilots with student naval aviators to achieve syllabus events. The schedule is built manually each day by squadron scheduling officers (SKEDSOs

  1. Pilots 2.0: DIRAC pilots for all the skies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagni, F.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; McNab, A.; Luzzi, C.

    2015-12-01

    In the last few years, new types of computing infrastructures, such as IAAS (Infrastructure as a Service) and IAAC (Infrastructure as a Client), gained popularity. New resources may come as part of pledged resources, while others are opportunistic. Most of these new infrastructures are based on virtualization techniques. Meanwhile, some concepts, such as distributed queues, lost appeal, while still supporting a vast amount of resources. Virtual Organizations are therefore facing heterogeneity of the available resources and the use of an Interware software like DIRAC to hide the diversity of underlying resources has become essential. The DIRAC WMS is based on the concept of pilot jobs that was introduced back in 2004. A pilot is what creates the possibility to run jobs on a worker node. Within DIRAC, we developed a new generation of pilot jobs, that we dubbed Pilots 2.0. Pilots 2.0 are not tied to a specific infrastructure; rather they are generic, fully configurable and extendible pilots. A Pilot 2.0 can be sent, as a script to be run, or it can be fetched from a remote location. A pilot 2.0 can run on every computing resource, e.g.: on CREAM Computing elements, on DIRAC Computing elements, on Virtual Machines as part of the contextualization script, or IAAC resources, provided that these machines are properly configured, hiding all the details of the Worker Nodes (WNs) infrastructure. Pilots 2.0 can be generated server and client side. Pilots 2.0 are the “pilots to fly in all the skies”, aiming at easy use of computing power, in whatever form it is presented. Another aim is the unification and simplification of the monitoring infrastructure for all kinds of computing resources, by using pilots as a network of distributed sensors coordinated by a central resource monitoring system. Pilots 2.0 have been developed using the command pattern. VOs using DIRAC can tune pilots 2.0 as they need, and extend or replace each and every pilot command in an easy way. In this

  2. The SISTA pilot project: understanding the training and technical assistance needs of community-based organizations implementing HIV prevention interventions for African American women--implications for a capacity building strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Taleria R; Brown, Mari; King, Winifred; Prather, Cynthia; Cazaubon, Janine; Mack, Justin; Russell, Brandi

    2007-01-01

    The disproportionate rates of HIV/AIDS among African American women in the U.S. signify the ongoing need for targeted HIV prevention interventions. Additionally, building the capacity of service providers to sustain prevention efforts is a major concern. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) conducted a pilot project to disseminate the Sisters Informing Sisters about Topics on AIDS (SISTA), an HIV prevention intervention designed for African American women. The project was to inform the diffusion process and examine the training and technical assistance needs of participating community-based organizations. Results demonstrated a need for extensive pre-planning and skills-building prior to implementation.

  3. Increasing Performance of Professional Soccer Players and Elite Track and Field Athletes with Peak Performance Training and Biofeedback: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Rijken, Noortje H.; Soer, Remko; de Maar, Ewold; Prins, Hilco; Teeuw, Wouter B.; Peuscher, Jan; Oosterveld, Frits G. J.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the effects of an intervention consisting of mental coaching combined with either electro encephalogram (EEG) alpha power feedback or heart rate variability (HRV) feedback on HRV, EEG outcomes and self-reported factors related to stress, performance, recovery and sleep quality in elite athletes. A prospective pilot study was performed with two distinct cohorts. Soccer players were provided with four sessions of mental coaching combined with daily...

  4. Low-cost training technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, A. T.

    1984-01-01

    The differences between flight training technology and flight simulation technology are highlighted. Examples of training technologies are provided, including the Navy's training system and the interactive cockpit training device. Training problems that might arise in the near future are discussed. These challenges follow from the increased amount and variety of information that a pilot must have access to in the cockpit.

  5. Effects of Video Weather Training Products, Web-Based Preflight Weather Briefing, and Local Versus Non-Local Pilots on General Aviation Pilot Weather Knowledge and Flight Behavior. Phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    younger pilots might have been merely “ gaming the system,” treating the flight more like a game than a real flight. It is difficult to say. As an...words, long dwell times do not necessarily mean a page is chock full of information. It can be, but it also can mean that the information on that

  6. Pilot Decision-Making Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-05-01

    Government Incu no reoponsbiy or any obligation wtsnoever. The fa tha the Governmert may have formuated or in any way supplied the said drawings seciicatons...Antidote: Good Judgment: 57 Situation 11 On final approach at night, you fly into patches of ground fog which severely limits visibility. Your altitude

  7. Centrifuge-induced neck and back pain in F-16 pilots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Britt; Nielsen, René Tyranski; Skejø, Pernille Bro

    2013-01-01

    Early in their careers, as an important part of their training to become fighter pilots, pilots undergo centrifuge training in order to learn effective anti-G straining maneuvers (AGSM) and to test their G tolerance. The exposure of pilots, especially early in their careers, to training that coul...

  8. Methodology of Pilot Performance Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Kalavsky

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the development of the methodology of measuring pilot performance under real flight conditions. It provides the basic information on a research project realized to obtain new information regarding training and education of pilots. The introduction is focused on the analytical part of the project and the outputs in terms of the current state of the art. Detailed view is cast on the issue of measuring pilot performance under specific conditions of the cockpit or the flight simulator. The article is zooming in on the two selected and developed methods of pilot performance in terms of the defined indicators evaluated, conditions of compliance for conducting research and procedures of the methodology of pilot performance measurements.

  9. 军事飞行员心理训练效果的实证研究%Empirical Research on Strategies and Effects of Psychological Training Concerning Military Pilot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘娟; 宋华淼; 邵峰; 彭文华; 董文; 张宜爽; 杨柳

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨两种不同的心理训练方法对飞行员缓解急性应激的效果,并对两种方法的有效性进行比较,为我军心理健康促进工作提供参考。方法:本研究选取116名飞行员参加本项研究,先通过“四任务测验”诱发应激,然后将飞行员随机分成漂浮舱训练组和腹式呼吸训练组,训练时间均为10分钟,分析两种心理训练方法对飞行员缓解应激情绪的影响。采用情绪的生理指标皮肤电作为心理训练效果的评价指标。结果:应用SPSS 16.0中一般线性模型( General linear model ,GLM)的Repeated measures和multivariate过程对心理训练重复测量数据进行重复测量方差分析和多元方差分析,并进行不同时间点和不同组的两两比较。漂浮舱训练时,飞行员的皮肤电在静息、应激和漂浮舱训练3种状态均有显著差异(F=184.479,P<0.05);腹式呼吸训练时,应激状态与静息和腹式呼吸训练间有显著差异,而静息和腹式呼吸训练两个状态间未见显著差异。结论:漂浮舱训练能有效缓解飞行员的急性应激,而腹式呼吸训练后的放松效果不明显。%Objective:To explore and compare the effect of two difficult psychological training prac-tices and the result assessment on acute stress relieving for military pilots ,and offer reference for Chinese troops'psychology health promoting in peacetime and wartime .Methods:This research selected 116 mili-tary pilots for two methods of psychological training ,58 pilots for floating capsule training and the other 58 pilots for abdominal breathing exercises .Study used physical index of galvanic skin response ( GSR) as the evaluation index .Results:Using repeated measures and multivariate analysis of variance process of the general linear model in SPSS and giving comparison among different groups and different measure time pairwise .The results showed that floating capsule

  10. Cognitive training-induced short-term functional and long-term structural plastic change is related to gains in global cognition in healthy older adults: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit eLampit

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Computerized cognitive training (CCT is a safe and inexpensive intervention to enhance cognitive performance in the elderly. However, the neural underpinning of CCT-induced effects and the timecourse by which such neural changes occur are unknown. Here, we report on results from a pilot study of healthy older adults who underwent three 1-hour weekly sessions of either multidomain CCT program (n = 7 or an active control intervention (n = 5 over 12 weeks. Multimodal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scans and cognitive assessments were performed at baseline and after 9 and 36 hours of training. Voxel-based structural analysis revealed a significant Group × Time interaction in the right postcentral gyrus indicating increased gray matter density in the CCT group compared to active control at both follow-ups. Across the entire sample, there were significant positive correlations between changes in the postcentral gyrus and change in global cognition after 36 hours of training. A post-hoc vertex-based analysis found a significant between-group difference in rate of thickness change between baseline and post-training in the left fusiform gyrus, as well as a large cluster in the right parietal lobe covering the supramarginal and postcentral gyri. Resting-state functional connectivity between the posterior cingulate and the superior frontal gyrus, and between the right hippocampus and the superior temporal gyrus significantly differed between the two groups after 9 hours of training and correlated with cognitive change post-training. No significant interactions were found for any of the spectroscopy and diffusion tensor imaging data. Though preliminary, our results suggest that functional change may precede structural and cognitive change, and that about one-half of the structural change occurs within the first nine hours of training. Future studies are required to determine the role of these brain changes in the mechanisms underlying CCT

  11. Cognitive training-induced short-term functional and long-term structural plastic change is related to gains in global cognition in healthy older adults: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampit, Amit; Hallock, Harry; Suo, Chao; Naismith, Sharon L.; Valenzuela, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Computerized cognitive training (CCT) is a safe and inexpensive intervention to enhance cognitive performance in the elderly. However, the neural underpinning of CCT-induced effects and the timecourse by which such neural changes occur are unknown. Here, we report on results from a pilot study of healthy older adults who underwent three 1-h weekly sessions of either multidomain CCT program (n = 7) or an active control intervention (n = 5) over 12 weeks. Multimodal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans and cognitive assessments were performed at baseline and after 9 and 36 h of training. Voxel-based structural analysis revealed a significant Group × Time interaction in the right post-central gyrus indicating increased gray matter density in the CCT group compared to active control at both follow-ups. Across the entire sample, there were significant positive correlations between changes in the post-central gyrus and change in global cognition after 36 h of training. A post-hoc vertex-based analysis found a significant between-group difference in rate of thickness change between baseline and post-training in the left fusiform gyrus, as well as a large cluster in the right parietal lobe covering the supramarginal and post-central gyri. Resting-state functional connectivity between the posterior cingulate and the superior frontal gyrus, and between the right hippocampus and the superior temporal gyrus significantly differed between the two groups after 9 h of training and correlated with cognitive change post-training. No significant interactions were found for any of the spectroscopy and diffusion tensor imaging data. Though preliminary, our results suggest that functional change may precede structural and cognitive change, and that about one-half of the structural change occurs within the first 9 h of training. Future studies are required to determine the role of these brain changes in the mechanisms underlying CCT-induced cognitive effects. PMID:25805989

  12. Cognitive training-induced short-term functional and long-term structural plastic change is related to gains in global cognition in healthy older adults: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampit, Amit; Hallock, Harry; Suo, Chao; Naismith, Sharon L; Valenzuela, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Computerized cognitive training (CCT) is a safe and inexpensive intervention to enhance cognitive performance in the elderly. However, the neural underpinning of CCT-induced effects and the timecourse by which such neural changes occur are unknown. Here, we report on results from a pilot study of healthy older adults who underwent three 1-h weekly sessions of either multidomain CCT program (n = 7) or an active control intervention (n = 5) over 12 weeks. Multimodal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans and cognitive assessments were performed at baseline and after 9 and 36 h of training. Voxel-based structural analysis revealed a significant Group × Time interaction in the right post-central gyrus indicating increased gray matter density in the CCT group compared to active control at both follow-ups. Across the entire sample, there were significant positive correlations between changes in the post-central gyrus and change in global cognition after 36 h of training. A post-hoc vertex-based analysis found a significant between-group difference in rate of thickness change between baseline and post-training in the left fusiform gyrus, as well as a large cluster in the right parietal lobe covering the supramarginal and post-central gyri. Resting-state functional connectivity between the posterior cingulate and the superior frontal gyrus, and between the right hippocampus and the superior temporal gyrus significantly differed between the two groups after 9 h of training and correlated with cognitive change post-training. No significant interactions were found for any of the spectroscopy and diffusion tensor imaging data. Though preliminary, our results suggest that functional change may precede structural and cognitive change, and that about one-half of the structural change occurs within the first 9 h of training. Future studies are required to determine the role of these brain changes in the mechanisms underlying CCT-induced cognitive effects.

  13. 运动处方在住院飞行员体能训练中的应用%Application of Exercise Prescription in Physical Training of Hospitalized Pilots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王学娟; 郑军; 徐蜀宣; 程军

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of exercise prescription in physical training of hospitalized pilots. Methods The exercise was prescribed according to hospitalized pilots' age,conditions of health, function and usual training to determine exercise intensity,time and frequency. The exercise course consisted of 3 stages preparation stage,exercise stage and relaxation stage for rate at rest,heart rate after squatting for 20 times,body weight and abdomen circumference. Improvement in 1 index was evaluated as common,2as better and 3 as significant. The sum of better and significant was as effective. Results In exercise effectiveness of 62 hospitalized pilots,27(43. 6%) were significant, 10(16. \\%) were better and 25(40. 3%) were common. The total effective rate was 59. 68%. Exercise times showed significant effect on exercise effectiveness(P0. 05). After exercise,all hospitalized pilots felt better. Of 37 persons with therapeutic effects, the changes in heart rate were much more common, while the changes in body weight and abdomen circumference were less. Conclusion Exercise prescription can guide hospitalized pilots to conduct physical training on objective,plan and science under medical supervision. It has important significance in pilots to keep their physical fitness during hospitalization and to adapt flying training quickly after discharge.%目的 探讨运动处方在住院飞行员体能训练中的作用.方法 根据住院飞行员的健康水平、功能状况、平时锻炼情况及年龄制定运动处方,确定运动强度、运动时间及运动频率.实施过程分三个阶段进行,即准备阶段、运动实施阶段和整理放松阶段.以主观感觉、平静心率、下蹲20次后心率、体重及腹围为评价指标,其中1项有改善为一般,2项有改善为较好,3项及以上有改善为显著.有效为较好与显著例数之和.结果 62例住院飞行员中运动效果显著27例(43.55%)、较好10例(16.13%)、一般25例(40

  14. 等速肌力训练对全膝关节置换术后髌骨轨迹异常的影响%A clinical evaluation of isokinetic training for correcting patellar tracking after total knee replacement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张颖; 袁红; 曹建刚; 李益平; 王勇军; 杜金刚

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨股四头肌不同角度等速肌力训练对全膝关节置换术后髌骨轨迹异常者的影响.方法 入选全膝关节置换术患者52例,共66个膝关节,其中男9例10膝,女43例56膝,平均年龄58.3岁.按接诊顺序分为3组,即0~30°组、30~60°组和60~90°组进行股四头肌训练,每组22个膝关节.采用德国lsomed 2000型等速肌力训练系统对各组(膝关节屈曲范围分别为0~30°、30~60°及60~90°)进行3个月的股四头肌向心性收缩训练,测试速度为30°/s.治疗前、后拍摄膝关节负重正侧位及屈膝45°轴位片,测量髌骨指数、外侧髌骨角及髌骨协调角;记录每个膝关节的峰力矩、总功率及平均功率;治疗前、后采用美国特种外科医院(HSS)膝关节功能评分评定膝关节功能.结果 0~30°组治疗前、后的髌骨指数、外侧髌骨角及髌骨协调角比较,差异有统计学意义(P<0.01),30~60°组及60~90°组治疗前、后相关指标差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);治疗后,各组峰力矩、总功率及平均功率均较治疗前增大(P<0.05).治疗前后反映髌骨轨迹的指标,即髌骨指数、外侧髌骨角及髌骨协调角差值均与0~30°组股四头肌肌力指标,即峰力矩、总功率及平均功率的差值呈正相关(P<0.05),但与30~60°组及60~90°组的各项肌力指标差值无相关性(P>0.05).治疗后0~30°组HSS评分与治疗前比较,差异有统计学意义,而30~60°组及60~90°组治疗前、后HSS评分差异无统计学意义.结论 膝关节屈曲范围0~30°的股四头肌等速训练可有效改善全膝关节置换术后髌骨轨迹异常,提高膝关节功能.%Objective To evaluate the effects of isokinetic quadriceps training with different ranges of motion for improving mal-patellar tracking after total knee replacement (TKR). Methods Isokinetic quadriceps training was administered to 52 TKR cases, involving 66 knee joints with poor patellar

  15. Shoulder Joint Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Shoulder Replacement Options Shoulder replacement surgery is highly technical. It should be performed by a surgical team ... area and will meet a doctor from the anesthesia department. You, your anesthesiologist, and your surgeon will ...

  16. Partial knee replacement - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100225.htm Partial knee replacement - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Knee Replacement A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited ...

  17. Pilot implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Bansler, Jørgen P.; Havn, Erling C.;

    2012-01-01

    implementation and provide three empirical illustrations of our model. We conclude that pilot implementation has much merit as an ISD technique when system performance is contingent on context. But we also warn developers that, despite their seductive conceptual simplicity, pilot implementations can be difficult...

  18. A pilot cluster randomised controlled trial of a support and training intervention to improve the mental health of secondary school teachers and students - the WISE (Wellbeing in Secondary Education) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidger, Judi; Stone, Tracey; Tilling, Kate; Brockman, Rowan; Campbell, Rona; Ford, Tamsin; Hollingworth, William; King, Michael; Araya, Ricardo; Gunnell, David

    2016-10-06

    Secondary school teachers are at heightened risk of psychological distress, which can lead to poor work performance, poor quality teacher-student relationships and mental illness. A pilot cluster randomised controlled trial (RCT) - the WISE study - evaluated the feasibility of a full-scale RCT of an intervention to support school staff's own mental health, and train them in supporting student mental health. Six schools were randomised to an intervention or control group. In the intervention schools i) 8-9 staff received Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) training and became staff peer supporters, and ii) youth MHFA training was offered to the wider staff body. Control schools continued with usual practice. We used thematic qualitative data analysis and regression modelling to ascertain the feasibility, acceptability and potential usefulness of the intervention. Thirteen training observations, 14 staff focus groups and 6 staff interviews were completed, and 438 staff (43.5 %) and 1,862 (56.3 %) students (years 8 and 9) completed questionnaires at baseline and one year later. MHFA training was considered relevant for schools, and trainees gained in knowledge, confidence in helping others, and awareness regarding their own mental health. Suggestions for reducing the length of the training and focusing on helping strategies were made. A peer support service was established in all intervention schools and was perceived to be helpful in supporting individuals in difficulty - for example through listening, and signposting to other services - and raising the profile of mental health at a whole school level. Barriers to use included lack of knowledge about the service, concerns about confidentiality and a preference for accessing support from pre-existing networks. The WISE intervention is feasible and acceptable to schools. Results support the development of a full-scale cluster RCT, if steps are taken to improve response rates and implement the suggested improvements to the

  19. Pilot Implementations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manikas, Maria Ie

    tensions and negotiations are fundamental characteristics of pilot implementations. Based on the analysis of a project that is pilot implementing an electronic pre-hospital patient record for emergency medical services in Danish health care, I investigate other perceptions of pilot implementations....... The analysis is conducted by means of a theoretical framework that centres on the concept infrastructure. With infrastructure I understand the relation between organised practice and the information systems supporting this practice. Thus, infrastructure is not a thing but a relational and situated concept...... understanding of pilot implementations as enacted interventions into existing infrastructures. Moreover, being embedded in the day-to-day organisation of work pilot implementations intervenes in the conventions of practice making the taken for granted visible. This allows project participants to attend...

  20. Pilot implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Bansler, Jørgen P.; Havn, Erling C.

    2012-01-01

    A recurrent problem in information-systems development (ISD) is that many design shortcomings are not detected during development, but first after the system has been delivered and implemented in its intended environment. Pilot implementations appear to promise a way to extend prototyping from...... the laboratory to the field, thereby allowing users to experience a system design under realistic conditions and developers to get feedback from realistic use while the design is still malleable. We characterize pilot implementation, contrast it with prototyping, propose a iveelement model of pilot...... implementation and provide three empirical illustrations of our model. We conclude that pilot implementation has much merit as an ISD technique when system performance is contingent on context. But we also warn developers that, despite their seductive conceptual simplicity, pilot implementations can be difficult...

  1. Pilot implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Bansler, Jørgen P.; Havn, Erling C.

    2012-01-01

    A recurrent problem in information-systems development (ISD) is that many design shortcomings are not detected during development, but first after the system has been delivered and implemented in its intended environment. Pilot implementations appear to promise a way to extend prototyping from...... the laboratory to the field, thereby allowing users to experience a system design under realistic conditions and developers to get feedback from realistic use while the design is still malleable. We characterize pilot implementation, contrast it with prototyping, propose a five-element model of pilot...... implementation, and provide three empirical illustrations of our model. We conclude that pilot implementation has much merit as an ISD technique when system performance is contingent on context. But we also warn developers that, despite their seductive conceptual simplicity, pilot implementations can...

  2. Increasing Performance of Professional Soccer Players and Elite Track and Field Athletes with Peak Performance Training and Biofeedback : A Pilot Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijken, Noortje H.; Soer, Remko; de Maar, Ewold; Prins, Hilco; Teeuw, Wouter B.; Peuscher, Jan; Oosterveld, Frits G. J.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the effects of an intervention consisting of mental coaching combined with either electro encephalogram (EEG) alpha power feedback or heart rate variability (HRV) feedback on HRV, EEG outcomes and self-reported factors related to stress, performance, re

  3. Staying in the Here-and-Now: A Pilot Study on the Use of Dialectical Behaviour Therapy Group Skills Training for Forensic Clients with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakdalan, J. A.; Shaw, J.; Collier, V.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Dialectic behaviour therapy (DBT) has been widely used with individuals diagnosed with borderline personality disorder who exhibit severe emotional and behavioural dysregulation. There is a paucity of research in assessing the effectiveness of DBT with forensic clients with intellectual disability (ID). Methods: This pilot study aims…

  4. A Pilot Study Assessing the Feasibility of a Facial Emotion Training Paradigm for School-Age Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo-Ponsaran, Nicole M.; Evans-Smith, Bernadette; Johnson, Jason K.; McKown, Clark

    2014-01-01

    Many children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) demonstrate facial emotion recognition and expression impairments. These impairments may contribute to social disability and may put children with ASDs at risk for developing further mental health problems. In this pilot study, we examined the use of a coach- and computer-assisted facial emotion…

  5. Toepasbaarheid en effectiviteit van mindfulnesstraining bij volwassenen met AD(H)D; een open pilotonderzoek [Feasibility and effectiveness of mindfulness training in adults with ADHD: A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hepark, S.; Kan, C.C.; Speckens, A.E.M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a developmental disorder that often continues into adulthood. Stimulant medication is the common treatment for ADHD. However, there is a need for psychosocial interventions in addition to medication. AIM: To conduct a pilot study which e

  6. Pilot experience online training in radiological protection for residents in SESCAM; Experiencia piloto de formacion on line en proteccion radiologica para residentes en el SESCAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gil Agudo, A.; Carrascosa Fernandez, C.B.; Lopez de Castro, F.; Gregori Enguix, A.; Torres Donaire, J.; Arjona Gutierrez, J.; Zapata Jimenez, J. C.

    2013-07-01

    Described the design and evaluation of a computer tool to form online at Radiation protection to all residents of SESCAM, using the SESCAM e Learning platform. To do this done, as well as several courses in previous years, the first pilot course online for residents of the Hospital between the months of December 2012 and January 2013. (Author)

  7. Increasing Performance of Professional Soccer Players and Elite Track and Field Athletes with Peak Performance Training and Biofeedback : A Pilot Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijken, Noortje H.; Soer, Remko; de Maar, Ewold; Prins, Hilco; Teeuw, Wouter B.; Peuscher, Jan; Oosterveld, Frits G. J.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the effects of an intervention consisting of mental coaching combined with either electro encephalogram (EEG) alpha power feedback or heart rate variability (HRV) feedback on HRV, EEG outcomes and self-reported factors related to stress, performance,

  8. Can the Air Force and Airlines Collaborate for Mutual Benefit An Exploration of Pilot and Maintenance Workforce Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    and Airlines Hiring Averages .......... 16   Figure 10. Combined Initial Flight Screening/Specialized Undergraduate Pilot Training (SUPT...Management TWCF Transportation Working Capital Fund UA United Airlines x UPT undergraduate pilot training USERRA Uniformed Services Employment and...experienced pilots directly into major airline flight operations. Also, while many military pilots historically have affiliated with a reserve component

  9. 14 CFR 61.133 - Commercial pilot privileges and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... with a commercial pilot certificate with a lighter-than-air category rating may— (i) For an airship—(A) Give flight and ground training in an airship for the issuance of a certificate or rating; (B) Give an endorsement for a pilot certificate with an airship rating; (C) Endorse a student pilot certificate or logbook...

  10. Transfer Effects to a Multimodal Dual-Task after Working Memory Training and Associated Neural Correlates in Older Adults – A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinzel, Stephan; Rimpel, Jérôme; Stelzel, Christine; Rapp, Michael A.

    2017-01-01

    Working memory (WM) performance declines with age. However, several studies have shown that WM training may lead to performance increases not only in the trained task, but also in untrained cognitive transfer tasks. It has been suggested that transfer effects occur if training task and transfer task share specific processing components that are supposedly processed in the same brain areas. In the current study, we investigated whether single-task WM training and training-related alterations in neural activity might support performance in a dual-task setting, thus assessing transfer effects to higher-order control processes in the context of dual-task coordination. A sample of older adults (age 60–72) was assigned to either a training or control group. The training group participated in 12 sessions of an adaptive n-back training. At pre and post-measurement, a multimodal dual-task was performed in all participants to assess transfer effects. This task consisted of two simultaneous delayed match to sample WM tasks using two different stimulus modalities (visual and auditory) that were performed either in isolation (single-task) or in conjunction (dual-task). A subgroup also participated in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during the performance of the n-back task before and after training. While no transfer to single-task performance was found, dual-task costs in both the visual modality (p < 0.05) and the auditory modality (p < 0.05) decreased at post-measurement in the training but not in the control group. In the fMRI subgroup of the training participants, neural activity changes in left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) during one-back predicted post-training auditory dual-task costs, while neural activity changes in right DLPFC during three-back predicted visual dual-task costs. Results might indicate an improvement in central executive processing that could facilitate both WM and dual-task coordination. PMID:28286477

  11. 歼击机飞行员高原驻训前后血清生化指标观察%Serum biochemical changes in fighter pilots before and after plateau training

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛皓晨; 朱晓全; 薛红; 李卫东; 徐成轩

    2015-01-01

    目的 评价高原缺氧环境对歼击机飞行员肝功能、肾功能、心肌酶谱、血糖、尿酸和血脂等血清生化指标的影响,为高原航空卫生保障提供依据. 方法 使用全自动生化分析仪,对高原驻训前后35例歼击机飞行员的血清生化指标进行配对t检验. 结果 进驻高原后飞行员空腹血清门冬氨酸氨基转换酶、白蛋白、尿素氮虽有下降(t=2.042、10.329、2.275,P<0.05或P<0.01),但均在正常值范围;直接胆红素、肌酐、β2微球蛋白、乳酸脱氢酶、肌酸激酶和总胆固醇虽明显高于进驻前(t=3.792~12.454,P<0.01),但基本位于正常值范围或上限;尿酸明显高于进驻前且高于正常值(t=4.373,P<0.01);丙氨酸氨基转换酶、总胆红素、总蛋白、胱抑素C、血糖和甘油三酯水平变化无统计学意义. 结论 高原环境可影响歼击机飞行员部分肝功能、肾功能、心肌酶谱、血糖、尿酸及血脂代谢功能.应采取有效措施积极预防.%Objective To evaluate the influence of plateau hypoxia environment on the parameters of liver,renal,cardiac and metabolic functions of fighter pilots,and provide the basis for the high altitude aeromedical service.Methods Serum biochemical indices were examined and compared among 35 fighter pilots before and after 3-month high altitude training by automatic biochemistry analyzer and the results were analyzed by paired t-test.Results Compared with those before plateau training,pilots' fasting serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST),albumin (ALB),blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels after plateau training were decreased slightly or significantly (t=2.042,10.329,2.275,P<0.05 or <0.01),but were still in the normal range.Direct bilirubin (DBIL),creatinine (Cr),Beta2-microglobuline (β2-MG),lactate dehydrogenase (LDH),creatinine kinase (CK),total cholesterol (TC) were significantly higher than those before the training (t=3.792-12.454,P<0.01),but were basically in the

  12. Effects of Different Types of Cognitive Training on Cognitive Function, Brain Structure, and Driving Safety in Senior Daily Drivers: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki Nozawa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Increasing proportion of the elderly in the driving population raises the importance of assuring their safety. We explored the effects of three different types of cognitive training on the cognitive function, brain structure, and driving safety of the elderly. Methods. Thirty-seven healthy elderly daily drivers were randomly assigned to one of three training groups: Group V trained in a vehicle with a newly developed onboard cognitive training program, Group P trained with a similar program but on a personal computer, and Group C trained to solve a crossword puzzle. Before and after the 8-week training period, they underwent neuropsychological tests, structural brain magnetic resonance imaging, and driving safety tests. Results. For cognitive function, only Group V showed significant improvements in processing speed and working memory. For driving safety, Group V showed significant improvements both in the driving aptitude test and in the on-road evaluations. Group P showed no significant improvements in either test, and Group C showed significant improvements in the driving aptitude but not in the on-road evaluations. Conclusion. The results support the effectiveness of the onboard training program in enhancing the elderly’s abilities to drive safely and the potential advantages of a multimodal training approach.

  13. Pilot implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Bansler, Jørgen P.; Havn, Erling C.

    2012-01-01

    A recurrent problem in information-systems development (ISD) is that many design shortcomings are not detected during development, but first after the system has been delivered and implemented in its intended environment. Pilot implementations appear to promise a way to extend prototyping from...... the laboratory to the field, thereby allowing users to experience a system design under realistic conditions and developers to get feedback from realistic use while the design is still malleable. We characterize pilot implementation, contrast it with prototyping, propose a five-element model of pilot...

  14. The ExStroke Pilot Trial: rationale, design, and baseline data of a randomized multicenter trial comparing physical training versus usual care after an ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, L.H.; Gluud, C.; Truelsen, T.

    2008-01-01

    of increasing stroke patients' level of physical activity and secondarily to associate the level of physical activity to the risk of recurrent stroke, myocardial infarction, and all-cause mortality in the two groups. We describe the rationale, design, and baseline data of the ExStroke Pilot Trial. METHODS......INTRODUCTION: A high level of physical activity is associated with a decreased risk of first stroke and physical activity modifies recognized stroke risk factors and is recommended for stroke survivors. Available research shows that stroke patients can increase their level of physical performance...... over a short period. When the intervention period is over, physical performance often declines towards baseline level. Currently, there is no evidence on the association between physical activity and the risk of recurrent stroke. The ExStroke Pilot Trial is a randomized clinical trial with the aim...

  15. Training in basic Internet skills for special target groups in non-formal educational settings – conclusions from three pilot projects

    OpenAIRE

    Berger, Andrea; Croll, Jutta

    2012-01-01

    With the progress of Digital Inclusion, it becomes important to address marginalised groups that face specific barriers in being part of the information society. From 2009 to 2011 within the framework of the nation-wide Initiative Internet erfahren, funded by the German Federal Ministry of Economics, Stiftung Digitale Chancen has accompanied three pilot projects and researched the hindrances and motivations of specific target groups including young migrants from Russia, women in the low-wage ...

  16. Effects of Exercise Training under Hyperbaric Oxygen on Oxidative Stress Markers and Endurance Performance in Young Soccer Players: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Burgos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of three weeks of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2 training on oxidative stress markers and endurance performance in young soccer players. Participants (18.6±1.6 years were randomized into hyperbaric-hyperoxic (HH training (n=6 and normobaric normoxic (NN training (n=6 groups. Immediately before and after the 5th, 10th, and 15th training sessions, plasma oxidative stress markers (lipid hydroperoxides and uric acid, plasma antioxidant capacity (6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid [TROLOX], arterial blood gases, acid-base balance, bases excess (BE, and blood lactate analyses were performed. Before and after intervention, maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max and peak power output (PPO were determined. Neither HH nor NN experienced significant changes on oxidative stress markers or antioxidant capacity during intervention. VO2max and PPO were improved (moderate effect size after HH training. The results suggest that HBO2 endurance training does not increase oxidative stress markers and improves endurance performance in young soccer players. Our findings warrant future investigation to corroborate that HBO2 endurance training could be a potential training approach for highly competitive young soccer players.

  17. Effects of Exercise Training under Hyperbaric Oxygen on Oxidative Stress Markers and Endurance Performance in Young Soccer Players: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henríquez-Olguín, Carlos; Andrade, David Cristóbal; Ramírez-Campillo, Rodrigo; White, Allan; Cerda-Kohler, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of three weeks of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) training on oxidative stress markers and endurance performance in young soccer players. Participants (18.6 ± 1.6 years) were randomized into hyperbaric-hyperoxic (HH) training (n = 6) and normobaric normoxic (NN) training (n = 6) groups. Immediately before and after the 5th, 10th, and 15th training sessions, plasma oxidative stress markers (lipid hydroperoxides and uric acid), plasma antioxidant capacity (6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid [TROLOX]), arterial blood gases, acid-base balance, bases excess (BE), and blood lactate analyses were performed. Before and after intervention, maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) and peak power output (PPO) were determined. Neither HH nor NN experienced significant changes on oxidative stress markers or antioxidant capacity during intervention. VO2max and PPO were improved (moderate effect size) after HH training. The results suggest that HBO2 endurance training does not increase oxidative stress markers and improves endurance performance in young soccer players. Our findings warrant future investigation to corroborate that HBO2 endurance training could be a potential training approach for highly competitive young soccer players. PMID:28083148

  18. Differences Training for the Glass Cockpit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, Earl L.; Shafto, Michael G. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    This study followed two groups of pilots from a major US air carrier as they went through a transition to advanced technology aircraft. Specifically, these were pilots were no previous automation experience undergoing Differences training from the 737-100/200 aircraft to the 737-300/500 aircraft. Each were given a different curriculum and data were collected on the efficacy of each training model and the pilots' attitudes toward automation. Results of the analyses performed and guidelines for training are included.

  19. Comparison of the Effect of Lateral and Backward Walking Training on Walking Function in Patients with Poststroke Hemiplegia: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang-Yong; Lee, Jung-Sun; Kim, Hyeong-Dong

    2017-02-01

    The purposes of the present study were to compare the effects of backward and lateral walking training and to identify whether additional backward or lateral walking training would be more effective in increasing the walking function of poststroke patients. Fifty-one subjects with hemiplegic stroke were randomly allocated to 3 groups, each containing 17 subjects: the control group, the backward walking training group, and the lateral walking training group. The walking abilities of each group were assessed using a 10-m walk test and the GAITRite system for spatiotemporal gait. The results show that there were significantly greater posttest increases in gait velocity (F = -12.09, P = 0.02) and stride length (F = -11.50, P = 0.02), decreases in the values of the 10-m walk test (F = -7.10, P = 0.03) (P training group compared with those in the other 2 groups. These findings demonstrate that asymmetric gait patterns in poststroke patients could be improved by receiving additional lateral walking training therapy rather than backward walking training. Complete the self-assessment activity and evaluation online at http://www.physiatry.org/JournalCME CME OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this article, the reader should be able to: (1) understand the potential benefits of backward walking (BW) and lateral walking (LW) training on improving muscle strength and gait; (2) appreciate the potential value of backward and lateral walking gait training in the treatment of hemiplegic stroke patients; and (3) appropriately incorporate backward and lateral walking gait training into the treatment plan of hemiplegic stroke patients. Advanced ACCREDITATION: The Association of Academic Physiatrists is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.The Association of Academic Physiatrists designates this activity for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should only claim credit

  20. Application and analysis of EEG Biofeedback training among high performance ifghter pilots%脑电反馈训练在高性能战机飞行员中的应用与分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王军; 万憬; 汪东军; 李洁; 薛霞; 朱国芬; 刘启明

    2016-01-01

    ObjectiveTo explore the degree of relaxation, concentration and harmony of high performance fighter pilots using EEG Biofeedback training in order to help them better regulate their concentration and relaxation and achieve harmony.Methods107 high performance fighter pilots w