WorldWideScience

Sample records for replaceable unit memory

  1. ISS EPS Orbital Replacement Unit Block Diagrams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Gregory V.

    2001-01-01

    The attached documents are being provided to Switching Power Magazine for information purposes. This magazine is writing a feature article on the International Space Station Electrical Power System, focusing on the switching power processors. These units include the DC-DC Converter Unit (DDCU), the Bi-directional Charge/Discharge Unit (BCDU), and the Sequential Shunt Unit (SSU). These diagrams are high-level schematics/block diagrams depicting the overall functionality of each unit.

  2. Unit Replacement System Analysis I (URSA I).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    action creates a void in CONUS of one unit. A new unit is formed in CONUS to fill this void . The forming of a new unit is 3-5 -,.. - ..-- o. . CAA-SR-82...compares the observed average regimental strengths with the respective authorizations. Note the E-1 to E-4 and E-5 overfill and the E-6 to E-8 underfill ...When the data is adjusted to compensate for grade substitution flexibility (see Figure 6-26), the E-6 to E-8 underfill is corrected, but the

  3. Optimization criteria for the design of orbital replacement units (ORUs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Manfred W.

    A reduction of life cycle costs of spacecraft or Space Station elements can be achieved by a modular build up which allows an in orbit replacement, maintenance, and service of functional units named Orbital Replacement Units (ORUs). The criteria for an optimal design for an ORU is presented. Requirements involving the user spacecraft configuration, the servicing vehicle, the handling by astronauts and remote manipulator system are considered.

  4. 78 FR 26102 - Notice of Termination of Environmental Impact Statement for the Friedman Memorial Replacement...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-03

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Notice of Termination of Environmental Impact Statement for the Friedman... to terminate the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Friedman Memorial Replacement Airport... for a replacement airport for Friedman Memorial Airport, Hailey, ID. The FAA proceeded with the...

  5. Quasi-cyclic unit memory convolutional codes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Jørn; Paaske, Erik; Ballan, Mark

    1990-01-01

    Unit memory convolutional codes with generator matrices, which are composed of circulant submatrices, are introduced. This structure facilitates the analysis of efficient search for good codes. Equivalences among such codes and some of the basic structural properties are discussed. In particular...

  6. Correcting false memories: Errors must be noticed and replaced.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullet, Hillary G; Marsh, Elizabeth J

    2016-04-01

    Memory can be unreliable. For example, after reading The new baby stayed awake all night, people often misremember that the new baby cried all night (Brewer, 1977); similarly, after hearing bed, rest, and tired, people often falsely remember that sleep was on the list (Roediger & McDermott, 1995). In general, such false memories are difficult to correct, persisting despite warnings and additional study opportunities. We argue that errors must first be detected to be corrected; consistent with this argument, two experiments showed that false memories were nearly eliminated when conditions facilitated comparisons between participants' errors and corrective feedback (e.g., immediate trial-by-trial feedback that allowed direct comparisons between their responses and the correct information). However, knowledge that they had made an error was insufficient; unless the feedback message also contained the correct answer, the rate of false memories remained relatively constant. On the one hand, there is nothing special about correcting false memories: simply labeling an error as "wrong" is also insufficient for correcting other memory errors, including misremembered facts or mistranslations. However, unlike these other types of errors--which often benefit from the spacing afforded by delayed feedback--false memories require a special consideration: Learners may fail to notice their errors unless the correction conditions specifically highlight them.

  7. An energy-efficient memory unit for clustered microarchitectures

    OpenAIRE

    Bieschewski, Stefan; Parcerisa Bundó, Joan Manuel; González Colás, Antonio María

    2016-01-01

    Whereas clustered microarchitectures themselves have been extensively studied, the memory units for these clustered microarchitectures have received relatively little attention. This article discusses some of the inherent challenges of clustered memory units and shows how these can be overcome. Clustered memory pipelines work well with the late allocation of load/store queue entries and physically unordered queues. Yet this approach has characteristic problems such as queue overflows and allo...

  8. Is parenteral phosphate replacement in the intensive care unit safe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Banwari; Walecka, Agnieszka; Shaw, Steve; Davenport, Andrew

    2014-02-01

    Hypophosphatemia is well recognized in the intensive care setting, associated with refeeding and continuous forms of renal replacement therapy (CCRT). However, it is unclear as to when and how to administer intravenous phosphate supplementation in the general intensive care setting. There have been recent concerns regarding phosphate administration and development of acute kidney injury. We therefore audited our practice of parenteral phosphate administration. We prospectively audited parenteral phosphate administration (20 mmol) in 58 adult patients in a general intensive care unit in a University tertiary referral center. Fifty-eight patients were audited; mean age 57.2 ± 2.0 years, 70.7% male. The median duration of the infusion was 310 min (228-417), and 50% of the patients were on CRRT. 63.8% of patients were hypophosphatemic (phosphate infusion, and serum phosphate increased from 0.79 ± 0.02 to 1.07 ± 0.03 mmol/L, P 1.45 mmol/L). There was no correlation between the change in serum phosphate and the pre-infusion phosphate. Although there were no significant changes in serum urea, creatinine or other electrolytes, arterial ionized calcium fell from 1.15 ± 0.01 to 1.13 ± 0.01 mmol/L, P phosphate did not appear to adversely affect renal function and corrected hypophosphatemia in 67.7% of cases, we found that around 33% of patients who were given parenteral phosphate were not hypophosphatemic, and that the fall in ionized calcium raises the possibility of the formation of calcium-phosphate complexes and potential for soft tissue calcium deposition.

  9. The effect of hormone replacement therapy on mood and everyday memory in younger mid-life women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Christine; Pachana, Nancy A; Bristow, Virginia

    2006-11-01

    Research on the effect of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) on both mood and memory indicates that oestrogen may enhance verbal memory in younger mid-aged women. This study examined the effect of HRT on everyday memory, while accounting for mood changes, in women between ages 40 and 60. A within-subjects comparison of 17 women, showed that mood, everyday memory, working memory, and delayed verbal memory improved after 3 months of HRT use. The improvement in memory was not mediated by mood, but changes in mood were moderated by exercise habits. The results suggest that verbal memory in particular may be enhanced by HRT in this age group, and everyday memory is an important construct to consider in future research.

  10. Hypophosphatemia on the intensive care unit: individualized phosphate replacement based on serum levels and distribution volume.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bech, A.; Blans, M.; Raaijmakers, M.; Mulkens, C.; Telting, D.; Boer, H. de

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypophosphatemia occurs in about 25% of patients admitted to the intensive care unit. To date, a safe and validated phosphate replacement protocol is not available. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate an individualized phosphate replacement regimen. DESIGN: Fifty consecutive intensive care unit patie

  11. Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Radhakrishnan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The fishmeal replaced with Spirulina platensis, Chlorella vulgaris and Azolla pinnata and the formulated diet fed to Macrobrachium rosenbergii postlarvae to assess the enhancement ability of non-enzymatic antioxidants (vitamin C and E, enzymatic antioxidants (superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase (CAT and lipid peroxidation (LPx were analysed. In the present study, the S. platensis, C. vulgaris and A. pinnata inclusion diet fed groups had significant (P < 0.05 improvement in the levels of vitamins C and E in the hepatopancreas and muscle tissue. Among all the diets, the replacement materials in 50% incorporated feed fed groups showed better performance when compared with the control group in non-enzymatic antioxidant activity. The 50% fishmeal replacement (best performance diet fed groups taken for enzymatic antioxidant study, in SOD, CAT and LPx showed no significant increases when compared with the control group. Hence, the present results revealed that the formulated feed enhanced the vitamins C and E, the result of decreased level of enzymatic antioxidants (SOD, CAT and LPx revealed that these feeds are non-toxic and do not produce any stress to postlarvae. These ingredients can be used as an alternative protein source for sustainable Macrobrachium culture.

  12. Formal verification of a set of memory management units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, E. Thomas; Levitt, K.; Cohen, Gerald C.

    1992-01-01

    This document describes the verification of a set of memory management units (MMU). The verification effort demonstrates the use of hierarchical decomposition and abstract theories. The MMUs can be organized into a complexity hierarchy. Each new level in the hierarchy adds a few significant features or modifications to the lower level MMU. The units described include: (1) a page check translation look-aside module (TLM); (2) a page check TLM with supervisor line; (3) a base bounds MMU; (4) a virtual address translation MMU; and (5) a virtual address translation MMU with memory resident segment table.

  13. Renal replacement therapy in the intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chacko Jose

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute renal failure is a frequent complication in critically ill patients that carries with it considerable morbidity and mortality. The management of renal failure in patients with multi-organ failure is different from that of renal failure that presents as a single organ failure. Intermittent haemodialysis, done in the conventional manner may not be tolerated by most critically ill patients. Continuous renal replacement therapy is physiologically superior; however, there is lack of strong evidence to prove a clinical benefit. Hybrid therapies that combine the benefits of intermittent haemodialysis and continuous therapies have emerged in the past few years. These are simpler to carry out, provide more flexibility and may be cost effective and need to be studied in a systematic manner.

  14. Replacement Capability Options for the United States Space Shuttle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    first designed for reuse ” (NASA, 2000). 1. United States Space Shuttle Program (1981–2011) The first operational Space Shuttle was Columbia (OV-102...Week article on China’s future plans for their Long March Launch vehicles, “China is developing three basic rocket modules, with diameters of 2.25... wastewater , which will burn up with the spacecraft when it re-enters the Earth’s atmosphere. The Cargo Module can hold 1,000 to 1,700 kilograms (2,205

  15. Estradiol replacement enhances fear memory formation, impairs extinction and reduces COMT expression levels in the hippocampus of ovariectomized female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Carmel M; Liu, Dan; Ade, Catherine; Schrader, Laura A

    2015-02-01

    Females experience depression, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and anxiety disorders at approximately twice the rate of males, but the mechanisms underlying this difference remain undefined. The effect of sex hormones on neural substrates presents a possible mechanism. We investigated the effect of ovariectomy at two ages, before puberty and in adulthood, and 17β-estradiol (E2) replacement administered chronically in drinking water on anxiety level, fear memory formation, and extinction. Based on previous studies, we hypothesized that estradiol replacement would impair fear memory formation and enhance extinction rate. Females, age 4 weeks and 10 weeks, were divided randomly into 4 groups; sham surgery, OVX, OVX+low E2 (200nM), and OVX+high E2 (1000nM). Chronic treatment with high levels of E2 significantly increased anxiety levels measured in the elevated plus maze. In both age groups, high levels of E2 significantly increased contextual fear memory but had no effect on cued fear memory. In addition, high E2 decreased the rate of extinction in both ages. Finally, catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) is important for regulation of catecholamine levels, which play a role in fear memory formation and extinction. COMT expression in the hippocampus was significantly reduced by high E2 replacement, implying increased catecholamine levels in the hippocampus of high E2 mice. These results suggest that estradiol enhanced fear memory formation, and inhibited fear memory extinction, possibly stabilizing the fear memory in female mice. This study has implications for a neurobiological mechanism for PTSD and anxiety disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of dehydroepiandrosterone replacement in elderly men on event-related potentials, memory, and well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, O T; Naumann, E; Hellhammer, D H; Kirschbaum, C

    1998-09-01

    In humans, concentrations of the adrenal steroid hormone dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its sulfate ester (DHEAS) decline with age. Results from studies in rodents have suggested that DHEA administration can improve memory performance as well as neuronal plasticity. However, a first study from our laboratory could not demonstrate beneficial effects of DHEA substitution on cognitive performance and well-being in elderly subjects. To further evaluate whether DHEA replacement has effects on the central nervous system, an experiment using event-related potentials (ERPs) was conducted. In this placebo-controlled crossover study, 17 elderly men (mean age, 71.1 +/- 1.7 yr; range 59-81 yr) took placebo or DHEA (50 mg/day) for 2 weeks (double blind). After each treatment period subjects participated in an auditory oddball paradigm with three oddball blocks. In the first two blocks subjects had to count the rare tone silently, whereas, in the third block they had to press a button. In addition, memory tests assessing visual, spatial, and semantic memory as well as questionnaires on psychological and physical well-being were presented. Baseline DHEAS levels were lower compared with young adults. After 2-week DHEA replacement, DHEAS levels rose 5-fold to levels observed in young men. DHEA substitution modulated the P3 component of the ERPs, which reflects information updating in short-term memory. P3 amplitude was increased after DHEA administration, and only selectively in the second oddball block. DHEA did not influence P3 latency. Moreover, DHEA did not enhance memory or mood. A 2-week DHEA replacement in elderly men results in changes in electrophysiological indices of central nervous system stimulus processing if the task is performed repeatedly. However, these effects do not appear to be strong enough to improve memory or mood.

  17. Demographic screening for MRSA may compromise the effectiveness of ring fencing on a joint replacement unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, H-M A; Izon, C; Maley, M W

    2012-11-01

    Ring fencing of joint replacement (JR) units has been reported to reduce infections and is recommended by health authorities in Australia and the UK. It has not been determined whether a demographic risk assessment is adequate to prevent the admission of patients colonized with meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) to ring-fenced units. As such, 250 admissions to the JR unit of a suburban Sydney hospital were screened, and MRSA colonization was identified in 2.8% of patients complying with the demographic risk assessment. Demographic risk assessment is not an adequate substitute for physical MRSA screening, and undermines the effectiveness of ring-fencing procedures.

  18. Efficient Decoding of Partial Unit Memory Codes of Arbitrary Rate

    CERN Document Server

    Wachter-Zeh, Antonia; Bossert, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Partial Unit Memory (PUM) codes are a special class of convolutional codes, which are often constructed by means of block codes. Decoding of PUM codes may take advantage of existing decoders for the block code. The Dettmar--Sorger algorithm is an efficient decoding algorithm for PUM codes, but allows only low code rates. The same restriction holds for several known PUM code constructions. In this paper, an arbitrary-rate construction, the analysis of its distance parameters and a generalized decoding algorithm for PUM codes of arbitrary rate are provided. The correctness of the algorithm is proven and it is shown that its complexity is cubic in the length.

  19. International Space Station (ISS) Orbital Replaceable Unit (ORU) Wet Storage Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, Michael D.; Rotter, Henry A.; Lee, Jason; Packham, Nigel; Brady, Timothy K.; Kelly, Robert; Ott, C. Mark

    2014-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Program requested the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) to evaluate the risks posed by the practice of long-term wet storage of ISS Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) regeneration system orbital replacement units (ORUs). The ISS ECLS regeneration system removes water from urine and humidity condensate and converts it into potable water and oxygen. A total of 29 ORUs are in the ECLS system, each designed to be replaced by the ISS crew when necessary. The NESC assembled a team to review the ISS ECLS regeneration system and evaluate the potential for biofouling and corrosion. This document contains the outcome of the evaluation.

  20. Comparison of discharge silver concentrations from electrolytic plating and metallic replacement silver recovery units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Martin; Siegel, Julie M

    2003-04-01

    Silver-based photographic X-ray film is made of solid crystals of silver chloride or silver bromide suspended in a gelatin and then coated on a film. During the X-ray developing process, the image is processed and the nonimage areas containing solid silver chloride or silver bromide crystals are removed in a solution called the fixer. There may be local environmental regulations that regulate the amount of silver discharged from a facility. To meet these regulations, many facilities have added silver recovery units to their processes. Two different types of recovery processes are in use in a large hospital and three clinics under study. All of the units were claimed by their respective manufacturers to be able to recover silver down to concentrations of 5 mg/L. This concentration would ensure that the building that houses each unit would meet the local county limit of 0.5 mg/L silver for total building silver discharge. The hypothesis for this research is that one system, newer and more expensive, consisting of so-called electrolytic plating units (EPUs) (which are followed by so-called metallic replacement units [MRUs] as a backup), will have better silver recovery than MRUs alone. A total of six units were sampled, three EPUs (in combination with MRUs) and three MRUs. The units were sampled once or twice a day for 10 days for a total of 17 samples from each. The samples then were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy, and an analysis of variance was performed on the results. The range for the electrolytic plating unit/metallic replacement unit combinations was 0.20-99.9 mg/L (mean of 35.15 mg/L; median of 33.8 mg/L). The range for the MRUs alone was 7.2-1112 mg/L (mean of 565.5 mg/L; median of 720 mg/L). Many individual results exceeded 5 mg/L, such that extensive dilution would be required to ensure the building effluent did not exceed 0.5 mg/L. It is suggested that the metallic replacement units be changed to EPUs (with metallic replacement backup

  1. Developing conjugated polymers with high electron affinity by replacing a C-C unit with a B←N unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Chuandong; Ding, Zicheng; Zhang, Zijian; Xie, Zhiyuan; Liu, Jun; Wang, Lixiang

    2015-03-16

    The key parameters of conjugated polymers are lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) and highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) energy levels. Few approaches can simultaneously lower LUMO and HOMO energy levels of conjugated polymers to a large extent (>0.5 eV). Disclosed herein is a novel strategy to decrease both LUMO and HOMO energy levels of conjugated polymers by about 0.6 eV through replacement of a C-C unit by a B←N unit. The replacement makes the resulting polymer transform from an electron donor into an electron acceptor, and is proven by fluorescence quenching experiments and the photovoltaic response. This work not only provides an effective approach to tune the LUMO/HOMO energy levels of conjugated polymers, but also uses organic boron chemistry as a new toolbox to develop conjugated polymers with high electron affinity for polymer optoelectronic devices.

  2. Improving associative memory in older adults with unitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Fahad N; Fernandes, Myra; Hockley, William E

    2015-01-01

    We examined if unitization inherent preexperimentally could reduce the associative deficit in older adults. In Experiment 1, younger and older adults studied compound word (CW; e.g., store keeper) and noncompound word (NCW; e.g., needle birth) pairs. We found a reduction in the age-related associative deficit such that older but not younger adults showed a discrimination advantage for CW relative to NCW pairs on a yes-no associative recognition test. These results suggest that CW compared to NCW word pairs provide schematic support that older adults can use to improve their memory. In Experiment 2, reducing study time in younger adults decreased associative recognition performance, but did not produce a discrimination advantage for CW pairs. In Experiment 3, both older and younger adults showed a discrimination advantage for CW pairs on a two-alternative forced-choice recognition test, which encourages greater use of familiarity. These results suggest that test format influenced young adults' use of familiarity during associative recognition of unitized pairs, and that older adults rely more on familiarity than recollection for associative recognition. Unitization of preexperimental associations, as in CW pairs, can alleviate age-related associative deficits.

  3. On (Partial) Unit Memory Codes Based on Gabidulin Codes

    CERN Document Server

    Wachter, Antonia; Bossert, Martin; Zyablov, Victor

    2011-01-01

    (Partial) Unit Memory ((P)UM) codes provide a powerful possibility to construct convolutional codes based on block codes in order to achieve a high decoding performance. In this contribution, a construction based on Gabidulin codes is considered. This construction requires a modified rank metric, the so-called sum rank metric. For the sum rank metric, the free rank distance, the extended row rank distance and its slope are defined analogous to the extended row distance in Hamming metric. Upper bounds for the free rank distance and the slope of (P)UM codes in the sum rank metric are derived and an explicit construction of (P)UM codes based on Gabidulin codes is given, achieving the upper bound for the free rank distance.

  4. Lessons learned from reheater replacements TVA Gallatin Fossil Plant units 1 and 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, P.S.; Stangarone, R.J. [Tennessee Valley Authority, Chattanooga, TN (United States)

    1996-07-01

    Gallatin Units 1 and 2 have experienced a long history of problems in the reheat front inlet platens and front outlet pendants. Cracks were discovered at lug welds on the reheat inlet platen assemblies after six years of operation. During the next ten years cracking at lugs continued to be a problem in both the inlet platen and front outlet assemblies. Solutions included changing tube material and spacing, and redesigning lugs. None of the solutions were successful. In 1980, a fuel switch to washed coal was made to reduce boiler slagging. Within two years of the fuel change, liquid phase corrosion began to attack the tubes. The corrosion became severe and elements were replaced at seven year intervals. During this time, EPRI sought utilities with boilers experiencing liquid phase corrosion to test new corrosion resistant materials. Gallatin Unit 2 was selected as one of the test units. Probes containing a number of different alloys were inserted into the furnace and subjected to the corrosion attacks. After a five year study, HR3C was selected as the alloy from which to build a complete set of elements for further testing. Reheat assemblies were manufactured from HR3C and installed in Unit 2 and Unit 1 Shortly after Unit 1 returned to service, swages between the front pendant and inlet platen elements failed by brittle fracture due to the cold swaging operation used in fabrication. Cracks were discovered after two years of operation at the tube to lug welds and the new elements were experiencing the same liquid phase corrosion as in the past. The attempt to resolve the liquid phase corrosion problem in Gallatin Units 1 and 2 pendant reheater revealed that past replacements did not address the root cause of the problems. HR3C is a relatively brittle material and manufacturers used traditional methods to design and fabricate the elements. Inadequate fabrication and erection procedures have led to several in-service problems not associated with liquid phase corrosion.

  5. A Two-Unit Cold Standby Repairable System with One Replaceable Repair Facility and Delay Repair:Some Reliability Problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Ying-yuan; TANG Ying-hui

    2004-01-01

    This paper considers a two-unit same cold standby repairable system with a replaceable repair facility and delay repair .The failure time of unit is assumed to follow exponential distribution , and the repair time and delay time of failed unit are assumed to follow arbitrary distributions , whereas the failure and replacement time distributions of the repair facility are exponential and arbitrary . By using the Markov renewal process theory, some primary reliability quantities of the system are obtained.

  6. Functional tooth regeneration using a bioengineered tooth unit as a mature organ replacement regenerative therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Masamitsu; Mizuno, Mitsumasa; Imamura, Aya; Ogawa, Miho; Yasukawa, Masato; Yamazaki, Hiromichi; Morita, Ritsuko; Ikeda, Etsuko; Nakao, Kazuhisa; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko; Kasugai, Shohei; Saito, Masahiro; Tsuji, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Donor organ transplantation is currently an essential therapeutic approach to the replacement of a dysfunctional organ as a result of disease, injury or aging in vivo. Recent progress in the area of regenerative therapy has the potential to lead to bioengineered mature organ replacement in the future. In this proof of concept study, we here report a further development in this regard in which a bioengineered tooth unit comprising mature tooth, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone, was successfully transplanted into a properly-sized bony hole in the alveolar bone through bone integration by recipient bone remodeling in a murine transplantation model system. The bioengineered tooth unit restored enough the alveolar bone in a vertical direction into an extensive bone defect of murine lower jaw. Engrafted bioengineered tooth displayed physiological tooth functions such as mastication, periodontal ligament function for bone remodeling and responsiveness to noxious stimulations. This study thus represents a substantial advance and demonstrates the real potential for bioengineered mature organ replacement as a next generation regenerative therapy.

  7. Degradation of Beta-Cloth Covering for a Battery Orbital Replacement Unit in Low Earth Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, James R.; Baldwin, Sammantha; Folz, Angela D.; Waters, Deborah L.; Loos, Alyssa

    2016-01-01

    Samples from the B-cloth cover for a battery orbit replaceable unit from the International Space Station were characterized using optical and electron microscopy, UV-vis-NIR spectrophotometry, and x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy. Results showed that in areas where the fabric was exposed to solar radiation the absorptance increased by as much as 20 percent, and the peak difference was in the ultraviolet, indicating that the increased absorptance may have been due to radiation. The emissivity of the material over a temperature range of 300 - 700 K was essentially unchanged.

  8. Degradation of Beta Cloth Covering for a Battery Orbital Replacement Unit in Low Earth Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, James R.; Waters, Deborah L.; Baldwin, Sammantha; Folz, Angela D.; Loos, Alyssa

    2016-01-01

    Samples from the beta cloth cover for a battery orbit replaceable unit from the International Space Station (ISS) were characterized using optical and electron microscopy, UV-vis-NIR spectrophotometry, and x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy. Results showed that in areas where the fabric was exposed to solar radiation the absorptance increased by as much as 20 percent, and the peak difference was in the ultraviolet, indicating that the increased absorptance may have been due to radiation. The emissivity of the material over a temperature range of 300 to 700 K was essentially unchanged.

  9. Opposing effects of DHEA replacement in elderly subjects on declarative memory and attention after exposure to a laboratory stressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, O T; Kudielka, B M; Hellhammer, D H; Hellhammer, J; Kirschbaum, C

    1998-08-01

    Aging is accompanied by a continuous decline of the adrenal steroid hormone DHEA and its ester DHEAS. Results from studies in rodents have demonstrated that DHEA(S) administration can enhance memory in several test paradigms. However studies from this laboratory did not find positive effects of DHEA treatment on cognitive performance in young and elderly humans. With respect to a possible mechanism of DHEA activity, effects on several neurotransmitter receptors as well as a possible antiglucocorticoid action are discussed. For high levels of glucocorticoids, a disruptive effect on hippocampal mediated memory is documented in rodents and humans. Therefore it was speculated that, if an antiglucocorticoid action of DHEA would underlie the observed beneficial effects of DHEA on memory, these effects might only be detectable if subjects are stressed (and therefore have high cortisol levels). To test this hypothesis 75 elderly women and men participated in a placebo controlled experiment. Subjects took DHEA (50 mg/day) or placebo for 2 weeks (double blind). Thereafter they participated in a standardized psychosocial laboratory stressor (Trier Social Stress Test; TSST). Before and after stress exposure subjects completed two declarative memory tests (visual-verbal and spatial) as well as one attention test. In addition recall of visual material learned before stress was assessed after stress. Baseline DHEAS levels were significantly lower compared with young adults. DHEA replacement increased DHEAS levels into ranges found in young subjects. DHEA-substituted subjects showed a trend towards a larger cortisol stress response. In the visual memory test subjects under DHEA recalled less items after stress which they had learned before stress. In the attention test however subjects under DHEA performed better than subjects from the placebo group after stress. No interaction between stress and DHEA was found for the spatial memory task. The effects of DHEA substitution on

  10. The Modelling Of Basing Holes Machining Of Automatically Replaceable Cubical Units For Reconfigurable Manufacturing Systems With Low-Waste Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrovskij, N. M.; Levashkin, D. G.; Bobrovskij, I. N.; Melnikov, P. A.; Lukyanov, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    Article is devoted the decision of basing holes machining accuracy problems of automatically replaceable cubical units (carriers) for reconfigurable manufacturing systems with low-waste production (RMS). Results of automatically replaceable units basing holes machining modeling on the basis of the dimensional chains analysis are presented. Influence of machining parameters processing on accuracy spacings on centers between basing apertures is shown. The mathematical model of carriers basing holes machining accuracy is offered.

  11. Proposal for loadable and erasable optical memory unit based on dual active microring optical integrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yunhong; Zhang, Xiaobei; Zhang, Xinliang; Huang, Dexiu

    2008-11-01

    A novel approach for loadable and erasable optical memory unit based on dual microring optical integrators is proposed and studied. The optical integrator, which can generate an optical step function for data storing, is synthesized using active media for loss compensation and a tunable phase shifter for data reading at any time. The input data into the memory is return-to-zero (RZ) signal, and the output data read from the memory is also RZ format with a narrower pulse width. An optical digital register based on the proposed optical memory unit is also investigated and simulated, which shows the potential for large scale data storage and serial-to-parallel data conversion. A great number of such memory units can be densely integrated on a photonic circuit for future large scale data storage and buffer.

  12. Load carrying capacity of RCC beams by replacing steel reinforcement bars with shape memory alloy bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajoria, Kamal M.; Kaduskar, Shreya S.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper the structural behavior of reinforced concrete (RC) beams with smart rebars under two point loading system has been numerically studied, using Finite Element Method. The material used in this study is Super-elastic Shape Memory Alloys (SE SMAs) which contains nickel and titanium. In this study, different quantities of steel and SMA rebars have been used for reinforcement and the behavior of these models under two point bending loading system is studied. A comparison of load carrying capacity for the model between steel reinforced concrete beam and the beam reinforced with S.M.A and steel are performed. The results show that RC beams reinforced with combination of shape memory alloy and steel show better performance.

  13. Options Studied for Managing Space Station Solar Array Electrical Hazards for Sequential Shunt Unit Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delleur, Ann M.; Kerslake, Thomas W.; Levy, Robert K.

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. solar array strings on the International Space Station are connected to a sequential shunt unit (SSU). The job of the SSU is to shunt, or short, the excess current from the solar array, such that just enough current is provided downstream to maintain the 160-V bus voltage while meeting the power load demand and recharging the batteries. Should an SSU fail on-orbit, it would be removed and replaced with the on-orbit spare during an astronaut space walk or extravehicular activity (EVA) (see the photograph). However, removing an SSU during an orbit Sun period with input solar array power connectors fully energized could result in substantial hardware damage and/or safety risk to the EVA astronaut. The open-circuit voltage of cold solar-array strings can exceed 320 V, and warm solar-array strings could feed a short circuit with a total current level exceeding 240 A.

  14. Transfer Function Bounds for Partial-unit-memory Convolutional Codes Based on Reduced State Diagram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, P. J.

    1984-01-01

    The performance of a coding system consisting of a convolutional encoder and a Viterbi decoder is analytically found by the well-known transfer function bounding technique. For the partial-unit-memory byte-oriented convolutional encoder with m sub 0 binary memory cells and (k sub 0 m sub 0) inputs, a state diagram of 2(K) (sub 0) was for the transfer function bound. A reduced state diagram of (2 (m sub 0) +1) is used for easy evaluation of transfer function bounds for partial-unit-memory codes.

  15. [Drugs dosing in intensive care unit during continuous renal replacement therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourquin, Vincent; Ponte, Belén; Saudan, Patrick; Martin, Pierre-Yves

    2009-11-01

    Drug dosing in the intensive care unit can be challenging. Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication of sepsis and a part of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) is increasingly used as dialysis therapy in this critically ill population. Available data demonstrate that sepsis, AKI and different modalities of CRRT can profoundly change drugs pharmacokinetic. The severity of these changes depends on molecules characteristics (volume of distribution, plasma protein binding, molecular weight, plasma half-life, plasma clearance), patient itself (volemia, residual renal function, tissue perfusion, hepatic dysfunction) and modality of CRRT (diffusion, convection, adsorption). There are no available recommendations to adapt drug dosing in a given critically ill patient with a given modality of CRRT. It is necessary to fully understand the different methods of CRRT and drug pharmacokinetic to prescribe the appropriate dose and to avoid under or potentially toxic overdosing. Monitoring the plasma level of drug - when available - can establish a relation between the blood concentration and its effect; thus, facilitating drug dosing.

  16. Vibration isolation for launch of a space station orbital replacement unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maly, Joseph R.; Pendleton, Scott C.; James, George H., III; Mimovich, Mark

    2004-07-01

    Delivery of Orbital Replacement Units (ORUs) to the International Space Station (ISS) and other on-orbit destinations is an important component of the space program. ORUs are integrated on orbit with space assets to maintain and upgrade functionality. For ORUs comprised of sensitive equipment, the dynamic launch environment drives design and testing requirements, and high frequency random vibrations are generally the cause for failure. Vibration isolation can mitigate the structure-borne vibration environment during launch, and hardware has been developed that can provide a reduced environment for current and future launch environments. Random vibration testing of one ORU to equivalent Space Shuttle launch levels revealed that its qualification and acceptance requirements were exceeded. An isolation system was designed to mitigate the structure-borne launch vibration environment. To protect this ORU, the random vibration levels at 50 Hz must be attenuated by a factor of two and those at higher frequencies even more. Design load factors for Shuttle launch are high, so a metallic load path is needed to maintain strength margins. Isolation system design was performed using a finite element model of the ORU on its carrier with representative disturbance inputs. Iterations on the model led to an optimized design based on flight-proven SoftRide MultiFlex isolators. Component testing has been performed on prototype isolators to validate analytical predictions.

  17. Emotional consequences of intensive care unit delirium and delusional memories after intensive care unit admission : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nouwen, Marinus J.; Klijn, Francina A. M.; van den Broek, Brigitte T. A.; Slooter, Arjen J. C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to review literature exploring the emotional consequences of delirium and delusional memories in intensive care unit patients. Methods: A systematic review was performed using PubMed, Embase, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and PsychINFO.

  18. Trends in Testosterone Replacement Therapy Use from 2003 to 2013 among Reproductive-Age Men in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Pravin Kumar; Boulet, Sheree L; Mehta, Akanksha; Hotaling, James; Eisenberg, Michael L; Honig, Stanton C; Warner, Lee; Kissin, Dmitry M; Nangia, Ajay K; Ross, Lawrence S

    2017-04-01

    Although testosterone replacement therapy use in the United States has increased dramatically in the last decade, to our knowledge trends in testosterone replacement therapy use among reproductive-age men have not been investigated. We assessed changes in testosterone replacement therapy use and practice patterns among 18 to 45-year-old American men from 2003 to 2013 and compared them to older men. This is a retrospective, cross-sectional analysis of men 18 to 45 and 56 to 64 years old who were enrolled in the Truven Health MarketScan® Commercial Claims Databases throughout each given calendar year from 2003 to 2013, including 5,094,868 men in 2013. Trends in the yearly rates of testosterone replacement therapy use were calculated using Poisson regression. Among testosterone replacement therapy users, the Cochran-Armitage test was used to assess temporal trends in age, formulation type, semen analysis and serum testosterone level testing during the 12 months preceding the documented use of testosterone replacement therapy. Between 2003 and 2013, there was a fourfold increase in the rate of testosterone use among 18 to 45-year-old men from 29.2/10,000 person-years to 118.1/10,000 person-years (p testosterone replacement therapy users, topical gel formulations were initially most used. Injection use then doubled between 2009 and 2012 (23.5% and 46.2%, respectively) and surpassed topical gel use in 2013. In men 56 to 64 years old there was a statistically significant threefold increase in testosterone replacement therapy use (p testosterone replacement therapy use increased fourfold in men 18 to 45 years old compared to threefold in older men. This younger age group should be a focus for future studies due to effects on fertility and unknown long-term sequelae. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Scalable unit commitment by memory-bounded ant colony optimization with A{sup *} local search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saber, Ahmed Yousuf; Alshareef, Abdulaziz Mohammed [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80204, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia)

    2008-07-15

    Ant colony optimization (ACO) is successfully applied in optimization problems. Performance of the basic ACO for small problems with moderate dimension and searching space is satisfactory. As the searching space grows exponentially in the large-scale unit commitment problem, the basic ACO is not applicable for the vast size of pheromone matrix of ACO in practical time and physical computer-memory limit. However, memory-bounded methods prune the least-promising nodes to fit the system in computer memory. Therefore, the authors propose memory-bounded ant colony optimization (MACO) in this paper for the scalable (no restriction for system size) unit commitment problem. This MACO intelligently solves the limitation of computer memory, and does not permit the system to grow beyond a bound on memory. In the memory-bounded ACO implementation, A{sup *} heuristic is introduced to increase local searching ability and probabilistic nearest neighbor method is applied to estimate pheromone intensity for the forgotten value. Finally, the benchmark data sets and existing methods are used to show the effectiveness of the proposed method. (author)

  20. Impact of the economic downturn on total joint replacement demand in the United States: updated projections to 2021.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, Steven M; Ong, Kevin L; Lau, Edmund; Bozic, Kevin J

    2014-04-16

    Few studies have explored the role of the National Health Expenditure and macroeconomics on the utilization of total joint replacement. The economic downturn has raised questions about the sustainability of growth for total joint replacement in the future. Previous projections of total joint replacement demand in the United States were based on data up to 2003 using a statistical methodology that neglected macroeconomic factors, such as the National Health Expenditure. Data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (1993 to 2010) were used with United States Census and National Health Expenditure data to quantify historical trends in total joint replacement rates, including the two economic downturns in the 2000s. Primary and revision hip and knee arthroplasty were identified using codes from the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification. Projections in total joint replacement were estimated using a regression model incorporating the growth in population and rate of arthroplasties from 1993 to 2010 as a function of age, sex, race, and census region using the National Health Expenditure as the independent variable. The regression model was used in conjunction with government projections of National Health Expenditure from 2011 to 2021 to estimate future arthroplasty rates in subpopulations of the United States and to derive national estimates. The growth trend for the incidence of joint arthroplasty, for the overall United States population as well as for the United States workforce, was insensitive to economic downturns. From 2009 to 2010, the total number of procedures increased by 6.0% for primary total hip arthroplasty, 6.1% for primary total knee arthroplasty, 10.8% for revision total hip arthroplasty, and 13.5% for revision total knee arthroplasty. The National Health Expenditure model projections for primary hip replacement in 2020 were higher than a previously projected model, whereas the current model estimates for total

  1. Scandinavia and the replacement of in vivo toxicity tests: Some personal reflections. The 2015 Bjorn Ekwall Memorial Award Lecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balls, Michael

    2015-12-01

    A personal, and therefore unavoidably biased, review is given, of the significance of the contributions made by selected Scandinavian individuals, organisations and events, to the development of in vitro toxicology procedures as potential replacements for toxicity tests in laboratory animals. In addition to their wider significance, these contributions had a profound effect on whatever contributions I have been able to make, myself. Nevertheless, while there has been much progress in the last 35 years or so, and many lessons have been learned, there is still much to be done, especially as animal tests remain entrenched as the preferred methods which set the gold standards and make regulators feel comfortable. Many of the clues to dealing with the questions and concerns which plague hazard prediction and risk assessment have long been available, but they have been ignored, largely for reasons which have little to do with the science of toxicology and the need to maintain the highest scientific standards. I have little doubt that Björn Ekwall, whose memory I feel privileged to honour, would have agreed with that last statement.

  2. Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it has to decide what is worth remembering. Memory is the process of storing and then remembering this information. There are different types of memory. Short-term memory stores information for a few ...

  3. Folk music style modelling by recurrent neural networks with long short term memory units

    OpenAIRE

    Sturm, Bob; Santos, João Felipe; Korshunova, Iryna

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate two generative models created by training a recurrent neural network (RNN) with three hidden layers of long short-term memory (LSTM) units. This extends past work in numerous directions, including training deeper models with nearly 24,000 high-level transcriptions of folk tunes. We discuss our on-going work.

  4. Potential nutritional and economic effects of replacing juice with fruit in the diets of children in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsivais, Pablo; Rehm, Colin D

    2012-05-01

    To estimate the nutritional and economic effects of substituting whole fruit for juice in the diets of children in the United States. Secondary analyses using the 2001-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and a national food prices database. Energy intakes, nutrient intakes, and diet costs were estimated before and after fruit juices were completely replaced with fruit in 3 models that emphasized fruits that were fresh, inexpensive, and widely consumed and in a fourth model that partially replaced juice with fruit, capping juice at recommended levels. A nationwide, representative sample of children in the United States. A total of 7023 children aged 3 to 18 years. Systematic complete or partial replacement of juice with fruit. Difference in energy intakes, nutrient intakes, and diet costs between observed and modeled diets. For children who consumed juice, replacement of all juice servings with fresh, whole fruit led to a projected reduction in dietary energy of 233 kJ/d (-2.6% difference [95% CI, -5.1% to -0.1%]), an increase in fiber of 4.3 g/d (31.1% difference [95% CI, 26.4%-35.9%]), and an increase in diet cost of $0.54/d (13.3% difference [95% CI, 8.8%-17.8%]). Substitution of juice with fresh fruit has the potential to reduce energy intake and improve the adequacy of fiber intake in children's diets. This would likely increase costs for schools, childcare providers, and families. These cost effects could be minimized by selecting processed fruits, but fewer nutritional gains would be achieved.

  5. Mean field model for synchronization of coupled two-state units and the effect of memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escaff, D.; Lindenberg, K.

    2014-01-01

    A prototypical model for a mean field second order transition is presented, which is based on an ensemble of coupled two-states units. This system is used as a basic model to study the effect of memory. To wit, we distinguish two types of memories: weak and strong, depending on the feasibility of linearizing the generalized mean field master equation. For weak memory we find static solutions that behave much like those of the memoryless (Markovian) system. The latter exhibits a pitchfork bifurcation as the control parameter is increased, with two stable and one unstable solution. The former exhibits an imperfect pitchfork bifurcation to states with the same behaviors. In both cases, the stability of the static solutions is analyzed via the usual linearization around the equilibrium solution. For strong memories we again find an imperfect pitchfork bifurcation, with two stable and one unstable branch. However, it is no longer possible to analyze these behaviors via the usual linearization, which is local in time, because a strong memory requires knowledge of the system for its entire past. Finally, we are pleased to dedicate this publication to Helmut Brand on the occasion of his 60th birthday.

  6. Unit Manning System: Human Dimensions Field Evaluation of the COHORT company Replacement Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-04-18

    tha: their superiors make such an attempt. Whether we speak of "unit cohesion" (Henderson, 1985; Johns, 1984), "unit morale" (Gal, 1986), "combat...differences. Generally speaking , mean differences on the five point scales must now be in the .4 to .5 range instead of the .2 to .3 range in order to...Marlowe, et al., 1985). Training in basic skiils , along with the maintenance of barracks standards and physical readiness, were all areas where COHORT

  7. The articular surface replacement implant recall: a United Kingdom district hospital experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitwell, George S; Shine, Ashokan; Young, Steve K

    2012-01-01

    We present our experience of the articular surface replacement (ASR) hip and the implant recall process. One hundred and twenty-one ASR components were implanted (21 resurfacing hip arthroplasty (RHA) and 100 ASR/XL modular total hip replacements). At the time of the implant recall in August 2010 there were 111 surviving hips (92%) with a mean follow-up of 44 months. Nine hips had been revised and one had been listed for revision surgery. Ninety-two percent of surviving implants were reviewed in the recall clinics, and blood metal ion levels or ultrasound scans were indicated in 38 hips (34%). Immediately after the recall process seven hips (6 ASR/XL and 1 RHA) were listed for revision and a further 9 were kept under close surveillance. One year after completion of the recall process 23 hips (19 ASR/XL and 4 RHA's) had been revised. A diagnosis of adverse reaction to metal debris (ARMD) was made at surgery in all but two hips. Our current revision rate for ASR RHA is 19% (mean follow-up 62 months, range 29-80) and for the ASR/XL is 19% (mean follow-up 53 months, range 10-80). The 5-year cumulative survival rates with revision for any reason for the ASR/XL, was 80.8% (95% confidence interval 72.0 - 89.5). Given experience elsewhere we expect this rate may increase significantly with time.

  8. Summarization on Page Replacement Algorithms for Flash Memory Storages%面向Flash存储的页面置换算法综述

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱浩; 戴华东; 颜跃进

    2011-01-01

    传统的页面置换算法是针对磁盘组成的存储系统来设计和优化的,而Flash存储设备和磁盘相比有很多新的特性如读、写和擦除操作的I/O开销不对称,因此需要重新设计面向Flash存储的页面置换算法.最近这些算法的研究是个热点,可以把它们分为两类:面向Flash存储的普适性页面置换算法和专门性页面置换算法.普适性页面置换算法的思想是尽量避免置换脏页以减少二级存储设备中的写回操作,如CFLRU,LRU-WSR和APRA,它们只关注操作不对称特性,在各种Flash存储系统中都能保持较高性能.针对Flash存储的特殊应用环境,人们提出了专门性页面置换算法.这些置换算法不仅考虑了Flash存储的特性而且是针对应用的特定信息如写连续,压缩分区等等来设计的,这一类算法包括FAB,CRAW-C等等.好的算法会在保持高命中率和减少置换开销之间寻找平衡,最大程度提高存储设备的整体I/O性能.%All the time the traditional page replacement algorithms have been designed in various ways on the assumption that the storage system consists of magnetic disks. Unfortunately, Flash memory storages for example SSDs are very different from magnetic disks in the characteristic of asymmetric write/read operation and overwriting before erase. Hence, algorithms for Flash memory need to be redesigned and optimized. Researching on these algorithms has been a hot topic recently, and they can be classified into two groups: the generic page replacement algorithms and the specific page replacement algorithms for Flash memory. The proposed generic page replacement algorithms such as CFLRU, LRU-WSR and APRA for Flash memory aim to reduce write count avoid of evicting dirty page. They only focus on the asymmetric character of Flash memory. Some special algorithms, for example FAB and CRAW-C, have also been put forward. These algorithms are designed'by exploiting the characteristics of Flash

  9. Testosterone replacement therapy outcomes among opioid users: the Testim Registry in the United States (TRiUS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blick, Gary; Khera, Mohit; Bhattacharya, Rajib K; Nguyen, Dat; Kushner, Harvey; Miner, Martin M

    2012-05-01

    Among patients with hypogonadism-associated comorbidities, opioid users have the highest incidence of hypogonadism. Data from the Testim Registry in the United States were analyzed to determine the efficacy of testosterone replacement therapy in opioid users vs nonusers. Prospective, 12-month observational cohort registry. Hypogonadal men (N = 849) prescribed Testim (but not necessarily testosterone replacement) for the first time. Testim 1% testosterone gel (5-10 g/day). Total and free testosterone, sex hormone-binding globulin, prostate-specific antigen, sexual function, mood/depression, and anthropometric data were assessed. Changes from baseline were analyzed using repeated measures mixed-effects analysis of variance; multiple linear regressions of changes in testosterone levels with sexual function, mood, and opioid use were computed. 90/849 patients (10.6%) reported opioid use at baseline; 75/90 (83%) used opioids for ≥ 30 days prior to baseline. Baseline total testosterone and prostate-specific antigen were not statistically different between opioid users and nonusers; there was a trend for higher sex hormone-binding globulin (P = 0.08) and lower free testosterone (P = 0.05) in opioid users. After 1 month, both opioid users and nonusers had significant (P testosterone, which continued through 12 months. Sexual function and mood improved significantly in both opioid users and nonusers over 12 months, and significantly correlated with change in total testosterone. Testosterone replacement therapy increased serum testosterone in hypogonadal opioid users and nonusers alike. The data suggest that with testosterone replacement, hypogonadal opioid users might be expected to have similar improvements in sexual function and mood as opioid nonusers. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Strange and scary memories of the intensive care unit: a qualitative, longitudinal study inspired by Ricoeur's interpretation theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenningsen, Helle; Egerod, Ingrid; Dreyer, Pia

    2016-01-01

    Method of the Intensive Care Unit for delirium in intensive care unit, and after discharge, memories of delusions were described by 114 of 325 patients in face-to-face (after two weeks) and telephone interviews (after two and six months) using the Intensive Care Unit Memory Tool. Results. Four themes...... emerged: the ever-present family, dynamic spaces, surviving challenges and constant motion. Memories of delusions were a vivid mix of fact and fiction, demonstrating dynamic shifts in time, place and motion, but not dependent on the presence of delirium assessed by Confusion Assessment Method...... delusions and delirium after an intensive care unit stay. Relevance to clinical practice. Understanding patients’ memories of delusions is beneficial to nurses caring for patients that are anxious, upset or agitated. It opens a window to the world of the patient who is unable to communicate due...

  11. Evaluating the quality of patient leaflets about renal replacement therapy across UK renal units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterbottom, Anna; Conner, Mark; Mooney, Andrew; Bekker, Hilary L

    2007-08-01

    Enhancing patient participation is a priority for renal services. Good quality information is fundamental to facilitate patient involvement, but in other health contexts it has been found to be sub-optimal. This research aims to audit the provision of patient information by renal units and charities and to assess the quality of written information about dialysis treatment options. All UK renal units were sent a questionnaire about the patient information they provided. Renal units and charities that provided dialysis leaflets were asked to forward copies. Leaflet quality and content were assessed by a coding frame informed by information and decision aid checklists. Out of 105, 67 completed questionnaires were returned. Services provide patients with large amounts of information in several media (leaflets, meetings with nurses and patients, videos); computers were not used frequently. Out of 47, 32 units forwarded leaflets about dialysis, and 31 different leaflets. Most leaflets were difficult to understand and rarely included risk information or treatment limitations. No leaflets included techniques to assist patient involvement or decision-making; their primary goal was to inform. These data suggest an unsystematic pattern of information provision across the UK. Vast resources have been spent on providing information to patients that is difficult to comprehend and incomplete. Research needs to identify which resources are effective in meeting patient needs and at what point in their illness. A centralized system to guide renal services in the design and development of information resources may help meet the differing goals of education, choice facilitation and preparation for self-management.

  12. ERP Subsequent Memory Effects Differ between Inter-Item and Unitization Encoding Tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamp, Siri-Maria; Bader, Regine; Mecklinger, Axel

    2017-01-01

    The "subsequent memory paradigm" is an analysis tool to identify brain activity elicited during episodic encoding that is associated with successful subsequent retrieval. Two commonly observed event-related potential "subsequent memory effects" (SMEs) are the parietal SME in the P300 time window and the frontal slow wave SME, but to date a clear characterization of the circumstances under which each SME is observed is missing. To test the hypothesis that the parietal SME occurs when aspects of an experience are unitized into a single item representation, while inter-item associative encoding is reflected in the frontal slow wave effect, participants were assigned to one of two conditions that emphasized one of the encoding types under otherwise matched study phases of a recognition memory experiment. Word pairs were presented either in the context of a definition that allowed to combine the word pairs into a new concept (unitization or item encoding) or together with a sentence frame (inter-item encoding). Performance on the recognition test did not differ between the groups. The parietal SME was only found in the definition group, supporting the idea that this SME occurs when the components of an association are integrated in a unitized item representation. An early prefrontal negativity also exhibited an SME only in this group, suggesting that the formation of novel units occurs through interactions of multiple brain areas. The frontal slow wave SME was pronounced in both groups and may thus reflect processes generally involved in encoding of associations. Our results provide evidence for a partial dissociation of the eliciting conditions of the two types of SMEs and therefore provide a tool for future studies to characterize the different types of episodic encoding.

  13. ERP Subsequent Memory Effects Differ between Inter-Item and Unitization Encoding Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamp, Siri-Maria; Bader, Regine; Mecklinger, Axel

    2017-01-01

    The “subsequent memory paradigm” is an analysis tool to identify brain activity elicited during episodic encoding that is associated with successful subsequent retrieval. Two commonly observed event-related potential “subsequent memory effects” (SMEs) are the parietal SME in the P300 time window and the frontal slow wave SME, but to date a clear characterization of the circumstances under which each SME is observed is missing. To test the hypothesis that the parietal SME occurs when aspects of an experience are unitized into a single item representation, while inter-item associative encoding is reflected in the frontal slow wave effect, participants were assigned to one of two conditions that emphasized one of the encoding types under otherwise matched study phases of a recognition memory experiment. Word pairs were presented either in the context of a definition that allowed to combine the word pairs into a new concept (unitization or item encoding) or together with a sentence frame (inter-item encoding). Performance on the recognition test did not differ between the groups. The parietal SME was only found in the definition group, supporting the idea that this SME occurs when the components of an association are integrated in a unitized item representation. An early prefrontal negativity also exhibited an SME only in this group, suggesting that the formation of novel units occurs through interactions of multiple brain areas. The frontal slow wave SME was pronounced in both groups and may thus reflect processes generally involved in encoding of associations. Our results provide evidence for a partial dissociation of the eliciting conditions of the two types of SMEs and therefore provide a tool for future studies to characterize the different types of episodic encoding. PMID:28194105

  14. Chemical mode in secondary circuit of the Dukovany NPP units after TG condensers replacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopriva, M.; Shejbal, J.; Petrecky, I. [Dukovany NPP (Czech Republic)

    2002-07-01

    The increase of the pH of SG feedwater on the 1. unit of Dukovany NPP led to enhancement of chemical mode of secondary circuit, what was identified in particular by the following: Reduction of concentration of iron in SG feedwater, Reduction of concentration of Sodium and Sulfates in SG blowdown water. This reduction is caused by shutdown of CPS thus by elimination of release of Na ions and SO{sub 4} from wrong operated ion-exchangers and their subsequent regeneration (part of cation exchanger in Na form and part of anion exchanger in SO{sub 4} form). Reduction of the WANO SG chemical index to the minimum theoretical value. It will be necessary to change criteria characterizing this index or to introduce our own modified index. In relation to CPS shutdown the costs for operating chemicals and for demineralized flushing water were reduced. (authors)

  15. Replacement of the Faces subtest by Visual Reproductions within Wechsler Memory Scale-Third Edition (WMS-III) visual memory indexes: implications for discrepancy analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Keith A; Tulsky, David S

    2004-06-01

    Within discrepancy analysis differences between scores are examined for abnormality. Although larger differences are generally associated with rising impairment probabilities, the relationship between discrepancy size and abnormality varies across score pairs in relation to the correlation between the contrasted scores in normal subjects. Examinee ability level also affects the size of discrepancies observed normally. Wechsler Memory Scale-Third Edition (WMS-III) visual index scores correlate only modestly with other Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III) and WMS-III index scores; consequently, differences between these scores and others have to be very large before they become unusual, especially for subjects of higher intelligence. The substitution of the Faces subtest by Visual Reproductions within visual memory indexes formed by the combination of WMS-III visual subtests (creating immediate recall, delayed recall, and combined immediate and delayed index scores) results in higher correlation coefficients, and a decline in the discrepancy size required to surpass base rate thresholds for probable impairment. This gain appears not to occur at the cost of a diminished sensitivity to diverse pathologies. New WMS-III discrepancy base rate data are supplied to complement those currently available to clinicians.

  16. Strange and scary memories of the intensive care unit: a qualitative, longitudinal study inspired by Ricoeur's interpretation theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenningsen, Helle; Egerod, Ingrid; Dreyer, Pia

    2016-01-01

    delusions and delirium after an intensive care unit stay. Relevance to clinical practice: Understanding patients’ memories of delusions is beneficial to nurses caring for patients that are anxious, upset or agitated. It opens a window to the world of the patient who is unable to communicate due...... to intubation and general weakness. We recommend the provision of nurse-led intensive care unit follow-up enabling patients to describe and discuss their intensive care unit experiences.......Aims and objectives: To describe the content of former intensive care unit patients’ memories of delusions. Background: Intensive care unit patients often have strange and frightening experiences during the critical stage of illness. Earlier studies have provided small-sample in-depth descriptions...

  17. [Aluminium in chronic renal replacement therapy patients undergoing haemodialysis in two renal units in Bogotá].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas, Omayda; Segura, Omar; Puentes, William; Sanabria, Mauricio; Nava, Gerardo; Torrenegra, Rubén

    2010-08-01

    Determining aluminium concentrations in the serum of patients undergoing chronic renal replacement therapy with haemodialysis and concentration in distribution network water and dialysis in two renal units in Bogotá. This was a descriptive study of 63 haemodialysed patients and 20 healthy subjects. Aluminium concentration was determined in water and serum using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with deuterium lamp background corrector. Average aluminium concentration was 26.5 µg/L in patients (ranging from 11.2 to 49.2 µg/L; 8.03 standard deviation) and 8.05 µg/L in healthy individuals (ranging from undetectable to 17.2 µg/L; 4.31 standard deviation). Aluminium concentration in dialysis water and distribution network water was below 2 µg/L and 200 µg/L, respectively. Aluminium concentration in water and serum in this study was below international standard values, thereby indicating appropriate treatment. Additionally, aluminium concentration in pre-HD and post-HD sera was below that reported previously. Aluminium hydroxide uptake increases aluminium concentration in serum. Personal situation regarding age, gender, civil and work status were not risk factors determining aluminium concentrations in serum.

  18. Single Nanometric Memory Unit Based On a Protein-Nanoparticle Hybrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medalsy, Izhar; Heyman, Arnon; Shoseyov, Oded; Porath, Danny

    2009-03-01

    Proteins as an isolating template and nanoparticle (NP) as an electric storage component can form a single addressable unit cell isolated from the conductive surface and adjacent NPs. This setup gives rise to a wide range of nanoelectronic applications. Here we demonstrate, by Conductive AFM, a single nanometric memory unit using individual protein-NP hybrids. SP1 is a boiling-stable ring-shaped protein, 11 nm in diameter. Mutants of SP1 were synthesized allowing its selective attachment to gold surface and the formation of 2D arrays using methods such as phospholipids trough and Langmuir Blodgett. The SP1 inner pore was connected to Si NP forming a chargeable entity embedded in an isolating unit over a conductive surface. Each NP holds three charging states: natural, positive and negative. The charging life times are 10 min in ambient and days in vacuum. Using this setup, and the relative long charging time, we were able to apply a read and write operations on individual 5nm Si NP embedded in a stable protein.

  19. IPULOC - Exploring Dynamic Program Locality with the Instruction Processing Unit for Filling Memory Gap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄震春; 李三立

    2002-01-01

    Memory gap has become an essential factor influencing the peak performance of high-speed CPU-based systems. To fill this gap, enlarging cache capacity has been a traditional method based on static program locality principle. However, the order of instructions stored in I-Cache before being sent to Data Processing Unit (DPU) is a kind of useful information that has not ever been utilized before. So an architecture containing an Instruction Processing Unit (IPU) in parallel with the ordinary DPU is proposed. The IPU can prefetch,analyze and preprocess a large amount of instructions otherwise lying in the I-Cache untouched.It is more efficient than the conventional prefetch buffer that can only store several instructions for previewing. By IPU, Load Instructions can be preprocessed while the DPU is executing on data simultaneously. It is termed as "Instruction Processing Unit with LOokahead Cache"(IPULOC for short) in which the idea of dynamic program locality is presented. This paper describes the principle of IPULOC and illustrates the quantitative parameters for evaluation.Tools for simulating the IPULOC have been developed. The simulation result shows that it can improve program locality during program execution, and hence can improve the cache hit ratio correspondingly without further enlarging the on-chip cache that occupies a large portion of chip area.

  20. Stiefel Manifold and TCQ based on Unit Memory Coding for MIMO System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijey Thayananthan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The Multi Input and Multi Output (MIMO systems have been analyzed with a number of quantization techniques. In this short communication, few problems like performance and accuracy are investigated through a quantization technique based on Stiefel Manifold (SM. In order to improve these problems, suitable Trellis Coded Quantization (TCQ based on Unit Memory (UM coding is studied and applied to SM of MIMO components as a novel approach. Anticipated results are the bit error performance which is an overall improvement of feedback connected between transmitter and receiver of MIMO. As a conclusion, this research not only reduces the quantization problems on SM but also improve the performance and accuracy of limited-rate feedback used in MIMO system.

  1. Impact of pharmacist antimicrobial dosing adjustments in septic patients on continuous renal replacement therapy in an intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Sai-Ping; Zhu, Zheng-Yi; Ma, Kui-Fen; Zheng, Xia; Lu, Xiao-Yang

    2013-12-01

    Correct dosing of antimicrobial drugs in septic patients receiving continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) is complex. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of dosing adjustments performed by pharmacists on the length of intensive care unit (ICU) stay, ICU cost, and antimicrobial adverse drug events (ADEs). A single-center, 2-phase (pre-/post-intervention) study was performed in an ICU of a university-affiliated hospital. Septic patients receiving CRRT in the post-intervention phase received a specialized antimicrobial dosing service from critical care pharmacists, whereas patients in the pre-intervention phase received routine medical care without involving pharmacists. The 2 phases were compared to evaluate the outcomes of pharmacist interventions. Pharmacists made 183 antimicrobial dosing adjustment recommendations for septic patients receiving CRRT. Changes in CRRT-related variables (116, 63.4%) were the most common risk factors for dosing errors, and β-lactams (101, 55.2%) were the antimicrobials most commonly associated with dosing errors. Dosing adjustments were related to a reduced length of ICU stay from 10.7 ± 11.1 days to 7.7 ± 8.3 days (p = 0.037) in the intervention group, and to cost savings of $3525 (13,463 ± 12,045 vs. 9938 ± 8811, p = 0.038) per septic patient receiving CRRT in the ICU. Suspected antimicrobial adverse drug events in the intervention group were significantly fewer than in the pre-intervention group (19 events vs. 8 events, p = 0.048). The involvement of pharmacists in antimicrobial dosing adjustments in septic patients receiving CRRT is associated with a reduced length of ICU stay, lower ICU costs, and fewer ADEs. Hospitals may consider employing clinical pharmacists in ICUs.

  2. [Diagnosis of psychocognitive complaints or disorders after de novo consultation in a university hospital specialized memory unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas-Antérion, C; Richard-Mornas, A

    2013-02-01

    Psychiatric diagnoses are frequent in memory units, but most neurologists do not feel comfortable about making the diagnosis of psychopathologic cognitive complaint or disorder. The full diagnosis usually requires careful history taking and a neuropsychological examination followed by a clear joint explanation to the patient. There are no good validated clinical signs to distinguish organic memory complaints from psychological disorders, but a nonorganic pattern, as seen in somatic conversion disorder, can be suggestive of a "cognitivoform" disorder. Cognitive doubt is a frequent symptom of anxiety. Bradypsychia is a frequent symptom of depression. We report 50 patients attending their first neurological memory consultation in university hospital for whom a de novo diagnosis of psychopathologic disorder was established on the basis of the clinical setting, observation, examination and neuropsychological tests. These psychopathologic disorders accounted for 40.3% of first-consultation diagnoses. In 76% of cases, the neuropsychological examination was normal. Nine subjects had mild cognitive impairment, concerning executive functions in six and several domains in three. Simulation with atypical neuropsychological pattern was distinguished in three patients. The diagnoses were:psychosis (n=9), traumatic stress (n=5), depression (n=7), anxiety or obsession/compulsion (n=13), hypochondria and "cognitivoform" disorders (n=13). In this study, few patients consulted with a known psychiatric diagnosis. Psychiatric co-morbidity was common. In the memory unit, listening carefully to ascertain the psychic, somatic and social situation of each individual patient appears to be as important as evaluating cognition. The neurologist can rule out organic disorders or an exaggeration of somatic symptoms and determine the precise etiology in order to build a rationale for treatment. The neurologist can also avert an overconsumption of complementary explorations. In conclusion, this

  3. Α2 GABAA receptor sub-units in the ventral hippocampus and α5 GABAA receptor sub-units in the dorsal hippocampus mediate anxiety and fear memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEown, K; Treit, D

    2013-11-12

    Temporary neuronal inactivation of the ventral hippocampus with the GABAA agonist muscimol suppresses unconditioned fear behavior (anxiety) but inactivation of the dorsal hippocampus does not. On the other hand, inactivating the dorsal hippocampus disrupts fear memory, while inactivating the ventral hippocampus does not. Here we investigate the roles of hippocampal GABAA receptor sub-units in mediating these anxiolytic and amnesic effects of GABAA receptor agonists. We microinfused TPA023 (α2 agonist) or TB-21007 (inverse α5 agonist) into the dorsal or ventral hippocampus prior to testing rats in two animal models of anxiety: the elevated plus-maze and shock-probe burying test. Twenty-four hours later rats were re-tested in the shock-probe chamber with a non-electrified probe to assess their memory of the initial shock-probe experience (i.e., fear memory). We found that TPA023 was anxiolytic in the plus-maze and shock-probe burying tests when microinfused into the ventral hippocampus. However, TPA023 did not affect anxiety-related behavior when infused into the dorsal hippocampus. Conversely, we found that the α5 sub-unit inverse agonist TB-21007 impaired rats' memory of the initial shock-probe experience when infused into the dorsal hippocampus, but not when infused into the ventral hippocampus. This double dissociation suggests that α2 GABAA receptor sub-units in the ventral hippocampus mediate unconditioned fear or anxiety, while α5 GABAA receptor sub-units in the dorsal hippocampus mediate conditioned fear memory.

  4. Testosterone replacement therapy in older male subjective memory complainers: double-blind randomized crossover placebo-controlled clinical trial of physiological assessment and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asih, Prita R; Wahjoepramono, Eka J; Aniwiyanti, Vilia; Wijaya, Linda K; de Ruyck, Karl; Taddei, Kevin; Fuller, Stephanie J; Sohrabi, Hamid; Dhaliwal, Satvinder S; Verdile, Giuseppe; Carruthers, Malcolm; Martins, Ralph N

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) has been investigated in older men as a preventative treatment against Alzheimer's disease and dementia. However, previous studies have been contradictory. We assessed TRT physiological effects in 44 older men (aged 61 ± 7.7 years) with subjective memory complaints using a double blind, randomized, crossover, placebo-controlled study. Participants were randomized into 2 groups, one group received transdermal testosterone (50 mg) daily for 24 weeks, followed by a 4 week wash-out period, then 24 weeks of placebo; the other group received the reverse treatment. Blood evaluation revealed significant increases in total testosterone, free (calculated) testosterone, dihydrotestosterone, and a decrease in luteinizing hormone levels (p<0.001) following TRT. Although there were significant increases in red blood cell counts, hemoglobin and prostate specific antigen levels following TRT, they remained within normal ranges. No significant differences in plasma amyloid beta, estradiol, sex hormone binding globulin, insulin levels, body fat percentage, or body mass index were detected. This is the first carefully controlled study that has investigated the influence of TRT in Indonesian men on blood biomarkers linked to dementia risk. Our study suggests TRT is safe and well-tolerated in this Indonesian cohort, yet longitudinal studies with larger cohorts are needed to assess TRT further, and to establish whether TRT reduces dementia risk.

  5. Use of testosterone replacement therapy in the United States and its effect on subsequent prostate cancer outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Alan L; Hu, Jim C

    2013-08-01

    To assess utilization trends and determine the effect of testosterone replacement therapy on outcomes in men who subsequently developed prostate cancer. We used linked Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare data to identify 149,354 men diagnosed with prostate cancer from 1992 to 2007. Of those, 2,237 men (1.5%) underwent testosterone replacement therapy before their prostate cancer diagnosis. Propensity scoring methods were used to assess cancer-specific outcomes of testosterone replacement vs no replacement therapy. Testosterone replacement was associated with older age at cancer diagnosis, nonwhite race, and higher comorbidity (P testosterone vs testosterone before the prostate cancer diagnosis was associated with higher grade (34% vs 30%, P therapy after initial treatment. Through our observational study design, we show that testosterone use was low throughout the study period. Testosterone use was not associated with aggressive prostate cancer and did not affect overall or disease-specific mortality. Although our findings support growing evidence that testosterone replacement is safe with respect to prostate cancer, confirmatory prospective studies are needed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Trends in Vascular Complications in High-Risk Patients Following Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Tomo; Akintoye, Emmanuel; Telila, Tesfaye; Briasoulis, Alexandros; Takagi, Hisato; Grines, Cindy L; Afonso, Luis

    2017-02-10

    Vascular complications (VC) following transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) are associated with worse outcomes. The trend of VC incidence in patients considered high risk is unclear. We sought to assess the trend of VC after TAVR in patients at high risk. We investigated the VC trend in female, diabetes mellitus, and peripheral vascular disease (PVD) patients. Patients who underwent TAVR from 2011 to 2014 in the United States were identified using the International Classification of Diseases-Ninth Revision code 35.05 from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database. Frequency of any VC (per 100 transcatheter aortic valve implantation procedure or hospital discharges) for each year from 2011 to 2014 was assessed for the overall population as well as within each category of high-risk cohorts. The overall VC rate was 6.0% (2,044/33,790). Patients who had VC were more likely to be female and had higher rates of PVD at baseline. The annual rate of VC in the overall population from 2011 to 2014 was 4.6%, 9.4%, 6.8%, and 4.4%, respectively. There was a significant increase in VC rate from 2011 to 2012 (p = 0.03), whereas there was a significant decrease in VC rate from 2012 to 2014 (p <0.001). The rate of VC between 2011 and 2014 was similar (p = 0.82). The rate of VC did not increase in any of the high-risk groups from 2011 to 2012. However, the rate of VC from 2012 to 2014 decreased significantly in all the high-risk groups. The VC rate was similar for groups between 2011 and 2014. The overall VC rate among TAVR patients initially increased from 2011 to 2012 but decreased thereafter. Similar trend in VC rate was found among high-risk patients except that the initial increase in rates from 2011 to 2012 did not reach statistical significance. Whether further reduction in VC with improvement in devices and operator/center experience for both overall and high-risk groups in TAVR occurs will require continuous longitudinal monitoring.

  7. Long-Term Survival of Dialysis Patients with Bacterial Endocarditis Undergoing Valvular Replacement Surgery in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leither, Maxwell D.; Shroff, Gautam R.; Ding, Shu; Gilbertson, David T.; Herzog, Charles A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Bacterial endocarditis in dialysis patients is associated with high mortality rates. The literature is limited regarding long-term outcomes of valvular replacement surgery and choice of prosthesis in dialysis patients with bacterial endocarditis. Methods and Results Dialysis patients hospitalized for bacterial endocarditis, 2004-2007, were studied retrospectively using data from the US Renal Data System. Long-term survival of patients undergoing valve replacement surgery with tissue or non-tissue valves was compared using the Kaplan-Meier method. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to identify independent predictors of mortality in patients undergoing valvular replacement surgery. During the study period, 11,156 dialysis patients were hospitalized for bacterial endocarditis and 1267 (11.4%) underwent valvular replacement surgery (tissue valve 44.3%, non-tissue valve 55.7%). In the valve replacement cohort, 60% were men, 50% white, 54% aged 45-64 years, and 36% diabetic. Estimated survival with tissue and non-tissue valves, respectively, at 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 years was 59% and 60%, 48% and 50%, 35% and 37%, and 25% and 30% (log rank P = 0.42). Staphylococcus was the predominant organism (66% of identified organisms). Independent predictors of mortality in patients undergoing valve replacement surgery included older age, diabetes as cause of end-stage renal disease, surgery during index hospitalization, staphylococcus as the causative organism, and dysrhythmias as a comorbid condition. Conclusions Valve replacement surgery is appropriate for well-selected dialysis patients with bacterial endocarditis, but is associated with high mortality rates. Survival does not differ with tissue or non-tissue prosthesis. PMID:23785002

  8. Multidisciplinary Simulation Acceleration using Multiple Shared-Memory Graphical Processing Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemal, Jonathan Yashar

    For purposes of optimizing and analyzing turbomachinery and other designs, the unsteady Favre-averaged flow-field differential equations for an ideal compressible gas can be solved in conjunction with the heat conduction equation. We solve all equations using the finite-volume multiple-grid numerical technique, with the dual time-step scheme used for unsteady simulations. Our numerical solver code targets CUDA-capable Graphical Processing Units (GPUs) produced by NVIDIA. Making use of MPI, our solver can run across networked compute notes, where each MPI process can use either a GPU or a Central Processing Unit (CPU) core for primary solver calculations. We use NVIDIA Tesla C2050/C2070 GPUs based on the Fermi architecture, and compare our resulting performance against Intel Zeon X5690 CPUs. Solver routines converted to CUDA typically run about 10 times faster on a GPU for sufficiently dense computational grids. We used a conjugate cylinder computational grid and ran a turbulent steady flow simulation using 4 increasingly dense computational grids. Our densest computational grid is divided into 13 blocks each containing 1033x1033 grid points, for a total of 13.87 million grid points or 1.07 million grid points per domain block. To obtain overall speedups, we compare the execution time of the solver's iteration loop, including all resource intensive GPU-related memory copies. Comparing the performance of 8 GPUs to that of 8 CPUs, we obtain an overall speedup of about 6.0 when using our densest computational grid. This amounts to an 8-GPU simulation running about 39.5 times faster than running than a single-CPU simulation.

  9. Steering quantum-memory-assisted entropic uncertainty under unital and nonunital noises via filtering operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ai-Jun; Shi, Jia-Dong; Wang, Dong; Ye, Liu

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we investigate the dynamic features of the entropic uncertainty for two incompatible measurements under local unital and nonunital channels. Herein, we choose Pauli operators σ _x and σ _z as a pair of observables of interest measuring on particle A, and the uncertainty can be predicted when particle A is entangled with quantum memory B. We explore the dynamics of the uncertainty for the measurement under local unitary (phase-damping) and nonunitary (amplitude-damping) channels, respectively. Remarkably, we derive the entropic uncertainty relation under three different kinds of measurements of Pauli-observable pair under various realistic noisy environments; it has been found that the entropic uncertainty has the same tendency of its evolution during the AD and PD channel when we choose σ _x and σ _y measurement. Besides, we find out that the entropic uncertainty will have an optimal value if one chooses σ _x and σ _z as the measurement incompatibility, comparing with others. Furthermore, in order to reduce the entropic uncertainty in noisy environment, we propose an effective strategy to steer the amount by means of implementing a filtering operation on the particle under the two types of channels, respectively. It turns out that this operation can greatly reduce the entropic uncertainty by modulation of the operation strength. Thus, our investigations might offer an insight into the dynamics and steering of the entropic uncertainty in an open system.

  10. Hippocampal signatures of episodic memory: Evidence from single-unit recording studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy L Griffin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available What hippocampal neural firing patterns signal memory and, more importantly, how is this memory code used by associated structures to translate a memory into a decision or action? Candidate hippocampal activity patterns will be discussed including (1 trajectory-specific firing of place cells with place fields on an overlapping segment of two (or more distinct trajectories (2 prospective firing of hippocampal neurons that signal an upcoming event or action, and (3 place cell remapping to changes in environment and task. To date, there has not compelling evidence for any of these activity patterns being the neural substrate of episodic memory. New findings suggest that learning and memory processes are emergent properties of interregional interactions and not localized within any one discrete brain region. Therefore, the next step in understanding how remapping and trajectory coding participate in memory coding may be to investigate how these activity patterns relate to activity in anatomically-connected structures such as the prefrontal cortex.

  11. Working Memory Units Are All in Your Head: Factors That Influence Whether Features or Objects Are the Favored Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergauwe, Evie; Cowan, Nelson

    2015-01-01

    We compared two contrasting hypotheses of how multifeatured objects are stored in visual working memory (vWM); as integrated objects or as independent features. A new procedure was devised to examine vWM representations of several concurrently held objects and their features and our main measure was reaction time (RT), allowing an examination of…

  12. Understanding the continuous renal replacement therapy circuit for acute renal failure support: a quality issue in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Martin; Baldwin, Ian

    2010-01-01

    Delivery of renal replacement therapy is now a core competency of intensive care nursing. The safe and effective delivery of this form of therapy is a quality issue for intensive care, requiring an understanding of the principles underlying therapy and the functioning of machines used. Continuous hemofiltration, first described in 1977, used a system where blood flowed from arterial to venous cannulas through a small-volume, low-resistance, and high-flux filter. Monitoring of these early systems was limited, and without a machine interface, less nursing expertise was required. Current continuous renal replacement therapy machines offer user-friendly interfaces, cassette-style circuits, and comprehensive circuit diagnostics and monitoring. Although these machines conceal complexity behind a user-friendly interface, it remains important that nurses have sufficient knowledge for their use and the ability to compare and contrast circuit setups and functions for optimal and efficient treatment.

  13. Effectiveness of an intervention to facilitate prompt referral to memory clinics in the United Kingdom: Cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gill Livingston

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Most people with dementia do not receive timely diagnosis, preventing them from making informed plans about their future and accessing services. Many countries have a policy to increase timely diagnosis, but trials aimed at changing general practitioner (GP practice have been unsuccessful. We aimed to assess whether a GP's personal letter, with an evidence-based leaflet about overcoming barriers to accessing help for memory problems-aimed at empowering patients and families-increases timely dementia diagnosis and patient presentation to general practice.Multicentre, cluster-randomised controlled trial with raters masked to an online computer-generated randomisation system assessing 1 y outcome. We recruited 22 general practices (August 2013-September 2014 and 13 corresponding secondary care memory services in London, Hertfordshire, and Essex, United Kingdom. Eligible patients were aged ≥70 y, without a known diagnosis of dementia, living in their own homes. There were 6,387 such patients in 11 intervention practices and 8,171 in the control practices. The primary outcome was cognitive severity on Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE. Main secondary outcomes were proportion of patients consulting their GP with suspected memory disorders and proportion of those referred to memory clinics. There was no between-group difference in cognitive severity at diagnosis (99 intervention, mean MMSE = 22.04, 95% confidence intervals (CIs = 20.95 to 23.13; 124 control, mean MMSE = 22.59, 95% CI = 21.58 to 23.6; p = 0.48. GP consultations with patients with suspected memory disorders increased in intervention versus control group (odds ratio = 1.41; 95% CI = 1.28, 1.54. There was no between-group difference in the proportions of patients referred to memory clinics (166, 2.5%; 220, 2.7%; p = .077 respectively. The study was limited as we do not know whether the additional patients presenting to GPs had objective as well as subjective memory problems and

  14. Improving the Estimates of International Space Station (ISS) Induced K-Factor Failure Rates for On-Orbit Replacement Unit (ORU) Supportability Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Leif F.; Harrington, Sean P.; Omeke, Ojei, II; Schwaab, Douglas G.

    2009-01-01

    This is a case study on revised estimates of induced failure for International Space Station (ISS) on-orbit replacement units (ORUs). We devise a heuristic to leverage operational experience data by aggregating ORU, associated function (vehicle sub -system), and vehicle effective' k-factors using actual failure experience. With this input, we determine a significant failure threshold and minimize the difference between the actual and predicted failure rates. We conclude with a discussion on both qualitative and quantitative improvements the heuristic methods and potential benefits to ISS supportability engineering analysis.

  15. Chronic exposure to chlorpyrifos triggered body weight increase and memory impairment depending on human apoE polymorphisms in a targeted replacement mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peris-Sampedro, Fiona; Basaure, Pia; Reverte, Ingrid; Cabré, Maria; Domingo, José L; Colomina, Maria Teresa

    2015-05-15

    Despite restrictions on their use, humans are still constantly exposed to organophosphates (OPs). A huge number of studies have ratified the neurotoxic effects of chlorpyrifos (CPF) and suggested its association with neurodegenerative diseases, but data are still scarce. Human apolipoprotein E (apoE) plays an important role in lipid transport and distribution. In humans, the apoE4 isoform has been linked to an increased risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). ApoE3 is the most prevalent isoform worldwide, and has been often established as the healthful one. The current study, performed in targeted replacement (TR) adult male mice, aimed to inquire whether genetic variations of the human apoE respond differently to a chronic dietary challenge with CPF. At four/five months of age, mice carrying apoE2, apoE3 or apoE4 were pair-fed a diet supplemented with CPF at 0 or 2mg/kg body weight/day for 13weeks. Cholinergic signs were monitored daily and body weight changes weekly. In the last week of treatment, learning and memory were assessed in a Barnes maze task. Dietary CPF challenge increased body weight only in apoE3 mice. Differences in the acquisition and retention of the Barnes maze were attributed to apoE genetic differences. Our results showed that apoE4 mice performed worse than apoE2 and apoE3 carriers in the acquisition period of the spatial task, and that apoE2 mice had poorer retention than the other two genotypes. On the other hand, CPF increased the search velocity of apoE2 subjects during the acquisition period. Retention was impaired only in CPF-exposed apoE3 mice. These results underline that gene×environment interactions need to be taken into account in epidemiological studies. Given that apoE3, the most common polymorphism in humans, has proved to be the most sensitive to CPF, the potential implications for human health merit serious thought.

  16. Low-power and Low-cost Design of Survival Memory Unit for 1000Base-T Gigabit Ethernet Transceiver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Types of hybrid architectures survivor memory unit (SMU) is presented,which are applicable to IEEE 802.3 ab 1000 Base-T Gigabit Ethernet (GbE) transceiver. Area, power and decoder latency were taken into account and most efficient architectures were compared to optimize area/power tradeoff in different kinds of applications. Suitable SMU architectures are given out respectively in area-restrict, power-restrict and latency-restrict designs. A power-efficient architecture was selected in our GbE project. It provides 48% improvement in area and 71% amelioration in power, compared to classical register exchange architecture (REA) SMU.

  17. Ankle replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankle arthroplasty - total; Total ankle arthroplasty; Endoprosthetic ankle replacement; Ankle surgery ... You may not be able to have a total ankle replacement if you have had ankle joint infections in ...

  18. Knee Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knee replacement is surgery for people with severe knee damage. Knee replacement can relieve pain and allow you to ... Your doctor may recommend it if you have knee pain and medicine and other treatments are not ...

  19. Using unitization as encoding strategy in associative recognition memory : behavioral, fMRI, and ERP evidence

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Recognition memory is thought to depend on two processes. Whereas familiarity refers to a simple feeling of knowing a stimulus, recollection enables us to remember associative information such as the place of a particular episode in which the stimulus has occurred. Accordingly, recollection, which relies on the integrity of the hippocampus, is generally required to remember arbitrary associations. In contrast, a familiarity signal, presumably arising in the perirhinal cortex, is sufficient to...

  20. Non-volatile memories

    CERN Document Server

    Lacaze, Pierre-Camille

    2014-01-01

    Written for scientists, researchers, and engineers, Non-volatile Memories describes the recent research and implementations in relation to the design of a new generation of non-volatile electronic memories. The objective is to replace existing memories (DRAM, SRAM, EEPROM, Flash, etc.) with a universal memory model likely to reach better performances than the current types of memory: extremely high commutation speeds, high implantation densities and retention time of information of about ten years.

  1. Eugenics and education: Implications of ideology, memory, and history for education in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winfield, Ann Gibson

    Eugenics has been variously described "as an ideal, as a doctrine, as a science (applied human genetics), as a set of practices (ranging from birth control to euthanasia), and as a social movement" (Paul 1998 p. 95). "Race Suicide" (Roosevelt 1905) and the ensuing national phobia regarding the "children of worm eaten stock" (Bobbitt 1909) prefaced an era of eugenic ideology whose influence on education has been largely ignored until recently. Using the concept of collective memory, I examine the eugenics movement, its progressive context, and its influence on the aims, policy and practice of education. Specifically, this study examines the ideology of eugenics as a specific category and set of distinctions, and the role of collective memory in providing the mechanism whereby eugenic ideology may shape and fashion interpretation and action in current educational practice. The formation of education as a distinct academic discipline, the eugenics movement, and the Progressive era coalesced during the first decades of the twentieth century to form what has turned out to be a lasting alliance. This alliance has had a profound impact on public perception of the role of schools, how students are classified and sorted, degrees and definitions of intelligence, attitudes and beliefs surrounding multiculturalism and a host of heretofore unexplored ramifications. My research is primarily historical and theoretical and uses those material and media cultural artifacts generated by the eugenics movement to explore the relationship between eugenic ideology and the institution of education.

  2. Safety Management of a Clinical Process Using Failure Mode and Effect Analysis: Continuous Renal Replacement Therapies in Intensive Care Unit Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Izquierdo-Riera, Jose Angel; Molano-Alvarez, Esteban; Saez-de la Fuente, Ignacio; Maynar-Moliner, Javier; Marín-Mateos, Helena; Chacón-Alves, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    The failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) may improve the safety of the continuous renal replacement therapies (CRRT) in the intensive care unit. We use this tool in three phases: 1) Retrospective observational study. 2) A process FMEA, with implementation of the improvement measures identified. 3) Cohort study after FMEA. We included 54 patients in the pre-FMEA group and 72 patients in the post-FMEA group. Comparing the risks frequencies per patient in both groups, we got less cases of under 24 hours of filter survival time in the post-FMEA group (31 patients 57.4% vs. 21 patients 29.6%; p < 0.05); less patients suffered circuit coagulation with inability to return the blood to the patient (25 patients [46.3%] vs. 16 patients [22.2%]; p < 0.05); 54 patients (100%) versus 5 (6.94%) did not get phosphorus levels monitoring (p < 0.05); in 14 patients (25.9%) versus 0 (0%), the CRRT prescription did not appear on medical orders. As a measure of improvement, we adopt a dynamic dosage management. After the process FMEA, there were several improvements in the management of intensive care unit patients receiving CRRT, and we consider it a useful tool for improving the safety of critically ill patients.

  3. Directed Replacement

    CERN Document Server

    Karttunen, L

    1996-01-01

    This paper introduces to the finite-state calculus a family of directed replace operators. In contrast to the simple replace expression, UPPER -> LOWER, defined in Karttunen (ACL-95), the new directed version, UPPER @-> LOWER, yields an unambiguous transducer if the lower language consists of a single string. It transduces the input string from left to right, making only the longest possible replacement at each point. A new type of replacement expression, UPPER @-> PREFIX ... SUFFIX, yields a transducer that inserts text around strings that are instances of UPPER. The symbol ... denotes the matching part of the input which itself remains unchanged. PREFIX and SUFFIX are regular expressions describing the insertions. Expressions of the type UPPER @-> PREFIX ... SUFFIX may be used to compose a deterministic parser for a ``local grammar'' in the sense of Gross (1989). Other useful applications of directed replacement include tokenization and filtering of text streams.

  4. Concatenated coding systems employing a unit-memory convolutional code and a byte-oriented decoding algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, L.-N.

    1977-01-01

    Concatenated coding systems utilizing a convolutional code as the inner code and a Reed-Solomon code as the outer code are considered. In order to obtain very reliable communications over a very noisy channel with relatively modest coding complexity, it is proposed to concatenate a byte-oriented unit-memory convolutional code with an RS outer code whose symbol size is one byte. It is further proposed to utilize a real-time minimal-byte-error probability decoding algorithm, together with feedback from the outer decoder, in the decoder for the inner convolutional code. The performance of the proposed concatenated coding system is studied, and the improvement over conventional concatenated systems due to each additional feature is isolated.

  5. Unitization and Temporality in Associative Memory: Evidence from Modulation of Context Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibon, Roni; Vakil, Eli; Goldstein, Abraham; Levy, Daniel A.

    2012-01-01

    It has been proposed that the formation of episodic associations between stimuli may involve different processes when memoranda are from the same or different perceptual domains, and when stimuli are experienced concurrently or sequentially. Such differences are postulated to determine the degree of unitization of memoranda, and are asserted to…

  6. A Cross-Cultural Examination of the Positivity Effect in Memory: United States vs. China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Christie; Lin, Ziyong

    2012-01-01

    Many studies conducted in the United States (U.S.) have documented a positivity effect in aging--a tendency for older adults to remember more positive than negative information in comparison to young adults. Despite this cognitive emotional benefit, U.S. adults still hold a more negative view of aging compared to adults in Asia. We hypothesized…

  7. Censoring History: Citizenship and Memory in Japan, Germany, and the United States. Asia and the Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Laura, Ed.; Selden, Mark, Ed.

    This collection of essays focuses on textbook treatments of World War II in Japan, Germany, and the United States and gives readers a new perspective on the creation of national identities and international misunderstandings. Essays in the collection are: (1) "The Lessons of War, Global Power, and Social Change" (Laura Hein; Mark Selden); (2) "The…

  8. Censoring History: Citizenship and Memory in Japan, Germany, and the United States. Asia and the Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Laura, Ed.; Selden, Mark, Ed.

    This collection of essays focuses on textbook treatments of World War II in Japan, Germany, and the United States and gives readers a new perspective on the creation of national identities and international misunderstandings. Essays in the collection are: (1) "The Lessons of War, Global Power, and Social Change" (Laura Hein; Mark…

  9. Knee Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... need knee replacement surgery usually have problems walking, climbing stairs, and getting in and out of chairs. Some ... a total living space on one floor since climbing stairs can be difficult. Install safety bars or a ...

  10. Replacing penalties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitaly Stepashin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available УДК 343.24The subject. The article deals with the problem of the use of "substitute" penalties.The purpose of the article is to identify criminal and legal criteria for: selecting the replacement punishment; proportionality replacement leave punishment to others (the formalization of replacement; actually increasing the punishment (worsening of legal situation of the convicted.Methodology.The author uses the method of analysis and synthesis, formal legal method.Results. Replacing the punishment more severe as a result of malicious evasion from serving accused designated penalty requires the optimization of the following areas: 1 the selection of a substitute punishment; 2 replacement of proportionality is serving a sentence other (formalization of replacement; 3 ensuring the actual toughening penalties (deterioration of the legal status of the convict. It is important that the first two requirements pro-vide savings of repression in the implementation of the replacement of one form of punishment to others.Replacement of punishment on their own do not have any specifics. However, it is necessary to compare them with the contents of the punishment, which the convict from serving maliciously evaded. First, substitute the punishment should assume a more significant range of restrictions and deprivation of certain rights of the convict. Second, the perfor-mance characteristics of order substitute the punishment should assume guarantee imple-mentation of the new measures.With regard to replacing all forms of punishment are set significant limitations in the application that, in some cases, eliminates the possibility of replacement of the sentence, from serving where there has been willful evasion, a stricter measure of state coercion. It is important in the context of the topic and the possibility of a sentence of imprisonment as a substitute punishment in cases where the original purpose of the strict measures excluded. It is noteworthy that the

  11. Subcutaneous Immunoglobulin-G Replacement Therapy with Preparations Currently Available in the United States for Intravenous or Intramuscular Use: Reasons and Regimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chouksey Akhilesh

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract For patients who require replacement therapy for primary immunodeficiency, subcutaneous infusions of immunoglobulin G (IgG may be preferable to intravenous infusions for several reasons. However, at present, there is no preparation marketed for use by this route in North America. In this article, we describe the reasons patients have selected this route of therapy and the range of treatment regimens used. Approximately 20% of our patients have chosen the subcutaneous route, mainly because of adverse effects from intravenous (IV infusions or difficulties with venous access. Unit dose regimens using whole bottles of currently available 16% intramuscular preparations or sucrose-containing lyophilized preparations intended for IV use but reconstituted to 15% IgG for subcutaneous administration were individually tailored to each patient. In most cases, self-infusions or home infusions were administered once or twice a week, most commonly requiring two subcutaneous sites and 2 to 3 hours per infusion. On average, patients took 0.18 mL of IgG per kilogram of body weight per site per hour. There were no systemic adverse effects. In patients for whom comparative data were available, trough serum IgG levels were higher with subcutaneous therapy than with IV therapy.

  12. Group Algebras Whose Involutory Units Commute (Dedicated to the memory of Professor I.I. Khripta)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Victor Bovdi; Michael Dokuchaev

    2002-01-01

    Let K be a field of characteristic 2 and G a non-abelian locally finite 2-group. Let V(KG) be the group of units with augmentation 1 in the group algebra KG. An explicit list of groups is given, and it is proved that all involutions in V(KG) commute with each other if and only if G is isomorphic to one of the groups on this list. In particular, this property depends only on G and does not depend on K.

  13. Esophageal replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunisaki, Shaun M; Coran, Arnold G

    2017-04-01

    This article focuses on esophageal replacement as a surgical option for pediatric patients with end-stage esophageal disease. While it is obvious that the patient׳s own esophagus is the best esophagus, persisting with attempts to retain a native esophagus with no function and at all costs are futile and usually detrimental to the overall well-being of the child. In such cases, the esophagus should be abandoned, and the appropriate esophageal replacement is chosen for definitive reconstruction. We review the various types of conduits used for esophageal replacement and discuss the unique advantages and disadvantages that are relevant for clinical decision-making. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Intermittent versus continuous renal replacement therapy for acute kidney injury patients admitted to the intensive care unit: results of a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lins, Robert L; Elseviers, Monique M; Van der Niepen, Patricia; Hoste, Eric; Malbrain, Manu L; Damas, Pierre; Devriendt, Jacques

    2009-02-01

    There is uncertainty on the effect of different dialysis modalities for the treatment of patients with acute kidney injury (AKI), admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). This controlled clinical trial performed in the framework of the multicentre SHARF 4 study (Stuivenberg Hospital Acute Renal Failure) aimed to investigate the outcome in patients with AKI, stratified according to severity of disease and randomized to different treatment options. This was a multicentre prospective randomized controlled trial with stratification according to severity of disease expressed by the SHARF score. ICU patients were eligible for inclusion when serum creatinine was >2 mg/dL, and RRT was initiated. The selected patients were randomized to intermittent (IRRT) or continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). A total of 316 AKI patients were randomly assigned to IRRT (n = 144) or CRRT (n = 172). The mean age was 66 (range 18-96); 59% were male. Intention-to-treat analysis revealed a mortality of 62.5% in IRRT compared to 58.1% in CRRT (P = 0.430). No difference between IRRT and CRRT could be observed in the duration of ICU stay or hospital stay. In survivors, renal recovery at hospital discharge was comparable between both groups. Multivariate analysis, including the SHARF score, APACHE II and SOFA scores for correction of disease severity, showed no difference in mortality between both treatment modalities. This result was confirmed in pre-specified subgroup analysis (elderly, patients with sepsis, heart failure, ventilation) and after exclusion of possible confounders (early mortality, delayed ICU admission). Modality of RRT, either CRRT or IRRT, had no impact on the outcome in ICU patients with AKI. Both modalities need to be considered as complementary in the treatment of AKI (Clinical Trial: SHARF 4, NCT00322933, http://ClinicalTrials.gov).

  15. A simple device unit consisting of all NiO storage and switch elements for multilevel terabit nonvolatile random access memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Ahn, Seung-Eon; Lee, Chang Bum; Kim, Chang-Jung; Jeon, Sanghun; Chung, U-In; Yoo, In-Kyeong; Park, Gyeong-Su; Han, Seungwu; Hwang, In Rok; Park, Bae-Ho

    2011-11-01

    Present charge-based silicon memories are unlikely to reach terabit densities because of scaling limits. As the feature size of memory shrinks to just tens of nanometers, there is insufficient volume available to store charge. Also, process temperatures higher than 800 °C make silicon incompatible with three-dimensional (3D) stacking structures. Here we present a device unit consisting of all NiO storage and switch elements for multilevel terabit nonvolatile random access memory using resistance switching. It is demonstrated that NiO films are scalable to around 30 nm and compatible with multilevel cell technology. The device unit can be a building block for 3D stacking structure because of its simple structure and constituent, high performance, and process temperature lower than 300 °C. Memory resistance switching of NiO storage element is accompanied by an increase in density of grain boundary while threshold resistance switching of NiO switch element is controlled by current flowing through NiO film.

  16. 17β-estradiol replacement in young, adult and middle-aged female ovariectomized rats promotes improvement of spatial reference memory and an antidepressant effect and alters monoamines and BDNF levels in memory- and depression-related brain areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Agata; Delattre, Ana Márcia; Pereira, Sofia I R; Carolino, Ruither G; Szawka, Raphael E; Anselmo-Franci, Janete A; Zanata, Sílvio M; Ferraz, Anete C

    2012-02-01

    Clinical and experimental evidence suggest that estrogens have a major impact on cognition, presenting neurotrophic and neuroprotective actions in regions involved in such function. In opposite, some studies indicate that certain hormone therapy regimens may provoke detrimental effects over female cognitive and neurological function. Therefore, we decided to investigate how estrogen treatment would influence cognition and depression in different ages. For that matter, this study assessed the effects of chronic 17β-estradiol treatment over cognition and depressive-like behaviors of young (3 months old), adult (7 months old) and middle-aged (12 months old) reproductive female Wistar rats. These functions were also correlated with alterations in the serotonergic system, as well as hippocampal BDNF. 17β-Estradiol treatment did not influence animals' locomotor activity and exploratory behavior, but it was able to improve the performance of adult and middle-aged rats in the Morris water maze, the latter being more responsive to the treatment. Young and adult rats displayed decreased immobility time in the forced swimming test, suggesting an effect of 17β-estradiol also over such depressive-like behavior. This same test revealed increased swimming behavior, triggered by serotonergic pathway, in adult rats. Neurochemical evaluations indicated that 17β-estradiol treatment was able to increase serotonin turnover rate in the hippocampus of adult rats. Interestingly, estrogen treatment increased BDNF levels from animals of all ages. These findings support the notion that the beneficial effects of 17β-estradiol over spatial reference memory and depressive-like behavior are evident only when hormone therapy occurs at early ages and early stages of hormonal decline. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Acceptance test for 900 MWe PWR unit replacement steam generators; Essai de reception des generateurs de vapeur de remplacement des tranches REP 900

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gourguechon, B.

    1993-12-31

    During the first half of 1994, the Gravelines 1 steam generators will be replaced (SG replacement procedure). The new SG`s differ from the former components notably by the alloy used for the tube bundle, in this case, the high chromium content Inconel 690. So, from this standpoint, they are to be considered as PWR 900 replacement SG first models and their thermal efficiency has consequently to be assessed. This will provide an opportunity of ensuring that the performance of the components delivered is in compliance with requirements and of making the necessary provisions if significant deviations are observed. The EFMT branch, which has been in charge of the instrumentation and acceptance of the different SG first models since the first PWR plants were commissioned, will be responsible for the acceptance tests and the ultimate validation of a performance assessment procedure applicable to the future replacement steam generators. The methods and tests proposed for SG expert appraisal are based on consideration of the importance of primary measurement quality for satisfactory SG assessment and of the new test facilities with which the 900 and 1 300 PWR plants are gradually being equipped. These facilities provide an on-site computer environment for tests compatible with the tools (PATTERN, etc.) used at EFMT and in other departments. This test is the first of this kind performed by EFMT and the test facility of a nuclear power plant. (author). 6 figs.

  18. Unit Cell Analysis of the Superelastic Behavior of Open-Cell Tetrakaidecahedral Shape Memory Alloy Foam under Quasi-Static Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Maîtrejean

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular solid materials and, more specifically, foams are increasingly common in many industrial applications due to their attractive characteristics. The tetrakaidecahedral foam microstructure, which can be observed in many types of foams, is studied in the present work in association with shape memory alloys (SMA material. SMA foams are of particular interest as they associate both the shape memory effect and the superelasticity with the characteristics of foam. A Unit Cell Finite Element Method approach is used, an approach that allows accurate predicting of the macroscale response of the foam with a highly reduced numerical effort. The tetrakaidecahedral foam’s responses, both in the elastic and in the superelastic stages, are then extracted and compared with results from the literature. The tetrakaidecahedral geometry is found to be of particular interest when associated with SMA as it takes more advantage of the superelastic property of the material than foams with randomly distributed porosity.

  19. [Estrogen replacement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søgaard, A J; Berntsen, G K; Magnus, J H; Tollan, A

    1998-02-10

    Recent research on long-term postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy (HRT) indicates a positive effect on both total mortality and morbidity. This has raised the question of widespread preventive long-term use of HRT. Possible side-effects and ideological issues related to preventive HRT have led to debate and uncertainty among health professionals, in the media, and in the population at large. In order to evaluate the level of knowledge about and attitudes towards HRT, a randomly selected group of 737 Norwegian women aged 16-79 was interviewed by the Central Bureau of Statistics. One in three women had received information about HRT in the last two years, mainly through weekly magazines and physicians. The proportion who answered the questions on knowledge correctly varied from 36% to 47%. Those who had been given information by a physician possessed accurate knowledge, had more positive attitudes towards HRT and were more willing to use HRT than women who had reviewed information through other channels. Women with a higher level of education were better informed and more knowledgeable than others, but were nevertheless more reluctant to use HRT than those who were less educated. The limited number of women who actually receive information on HRT, the low level of knowledge and the ambivalent attitudes toward HRT are a major challenge to the public health service.

  20. The future of memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinella, M.

    In the not too distant future, the traditional memory and storage hierarchy of may be replaced by a single Storage Class Memory (SCM) device integrated on or near the logic processor. Traditional magnetic hard drives, NAND flash, DRAM, and higher level caches (L2 and up) will be replaced with a single high performance memory device. The Storage Class Memory paradigm will require high speed ( 1012), nonvolatility (retention > 10 years), and low switching energies (Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) has recently evaluated several potential candidates SCM technologies, including Resistive (or Redox) RAM, Spin Torque Transfer RAM (STT-MRAM), and phase change memory (PCM). All of these devices show potential well beyond that of current flash technologies and research efforts are underway to improve the endurance, write speeds, and scalabilities to be on-par with DRAM. This progress has interesting implications for space electronics: each of these emerging device technologies show excellent resistance to the types of radiation typically found in space applications. Commercially developed, high density storage class memory-based systems may include a memory that is physically radiation hard, and suitable for space applications without major shielding efforts. This paper reviews the Storage Class Memory concept, emerging memory devices, and possible applicability to radiation hardened electronics for space.

  1. Placement of replace select Ti-Unite-coated type implants using a combination of immediate and submerge techniques after tooth extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coen Pramono D

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The high success rate of immediate implant placement both in the anterior and posterior regions were reported by many authors, therefore applying this techniques can be considered as a safe surgical procedure and minimizing the dental office visit for patient satisfaction. This paper reports the outcome of immediate placement of implants following extraction of anterior maxillary teeth. Combination technique of immediate and submerge implant placements including bone grafting procedure were used. Four implants with TiUnite surface type were placed immediately in two patients with the short-term result indicated that this technique may serve as a simple and safe procedure for immediate implant placement. It was concluded that immediate implant placement technique combined with TiUnite implant surface was successful in treating region directly after tooth extraction therefore this technique can be use as an alternative surgical method for dental implant rehabilitation.

  2. Bion's Notes on memory and desire--its initial clinical reception in the United States: a note on archival material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguayo, Joseph

    2014-10-01

    While Bion's 1967 memory and desire paper reflected a crucial episode in his clinical thinking during his epistemological period, it was also central to his evolution as a Kleinian psychoanalyst who worked with seriously disturbed adult patients. The author explicates and contextualizes these claims with a new archival document, the Los Angeles Seminars delivered by Bion in April 1967, and the full-length version of Notes on memory and desire. Bion here instigated a radical departure from years of theory-laden work when he made his clinical work and ideas accessible to a new audience of American Freudian analysts. While this new group was keenly interested to hear about Bion's clinical technique with both borderline and psychotic patients, there were varied reactions to Bion's ideas on the technical implications of the analyst's abandonment of memory and desire. Both the Los Angeles Seminars and Notes elicited responses ranging from bewilderment, admiration to skepticism amongst his audience of listeners and readers. These materials also however allow for a more complete and systematic presentation of important ideas about analytic technique - and while his ideas in this domain have been long valued and known by many psychoanalysts, this contribution stresses the crucial aspect of the reception of his ideas about technique in a particular American context. American analysts gained a much more explicit idea of how Bion worked analytically, how he listened, formulated interpretations and factored in the analyst's listening receptivity in the here-and-now. The author concludes with a consideration of the importance of Bion's American reception in 1967.

  3. Early discharge and home intervention reduces unit costs after total hip replacement: results of a cost analysis in a randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigurdsson, Eyjolfur; Siggeirsdottir, Kristin; Jonsson, Halldor; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Matthiasson, Thorolfur; Jonsson, Brynjolfur Y

    2008-09-01

    Total hip replacement (THR) is a common and costly procedure. The number of THR is expected to increase over the coming years. Two pathways of postoperative treatment were compared in a randomized study. Fifty patients from two hospitals were randomized into a study group (SG) of 27 patients receiving preoperative and postoperative education programs, as well as home visits from an outpatient team. A control group (CG) of 23 patients received "conventional" rehabilitation augmented by a stay at a rehabilitation center if needed. All costs for the two groups both in hospitals and after discharge were collected and analyzed. On average total costs for the SG were $8,550 and $11,952 for the CG, a 28% cost reduction. Total inpatient costs were $5,225 for the SG and $6,515 for the CG. In a regression analysis the group difference is statistically significant. Adjusting for changes in the Oxford Hip Score gives effective costs (C/E). The ratio of the SGs C/E to the CGs is 0.60. That is a cost-effectiveness gain of 40%. A shorter hospital stay augmented with better preoperative education and home treatment appears to be more effective and costs less than the traditional in hospital pathway of treatment.

  4. OPTIMUM ORDERING POLICY FOR PREVENTIVE AGE REPLACEMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Young T.PARK; Jing SUN

    2009-01-01

    Most of the spare ordering policies treated up to now have assumed that preventive and corrective replacement costs are equal, which implies in essential that there is no significant need for preventive replacement. This paper presents an ordering policy for preventive age replacement with minimal repair. Introducing the replacement, repair, inventory holding and shortage costs, the expected cost rate is derived. A procedure to determine jointly the ordering time for a spare and the preventive replacement time for the operating unit so as to minimize the expected cost rate is proposed. To explain the ordering policy and the optimization procedure, a numerical example is also included.

  5. A Geothermal Energy Supported Gas-steam Cogeneration Unit as a Possible Replacement for the Old Part of a Municipal CHP Plant (TEKO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Böszörményi

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The need for more intensive utilization of local renewable energy sources is indisputable. Under the current economic circumstances their competitiveness in comparison with fossil fuels is rather low, if we do not take into account environmental considerations. Integrating geothermal sources into combined heat and power production in a municipal CHP plant would be an excellent solution to this problem. This concept could lead to an innovative type of power plant - a gas-steam cycle based, geothermal energy supported cogeneration unit.

  6. The effects of unitization on the contribution of familiarity and recollection processes to associative recognition memory: evidence from event-related potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhiwei; Li, Juan; Xiao, Fengqiu; Broster, Lucas S; Jiang, Yang; Xi, Mingjing

    2015-03-01

    Familiarity and recollection are two independent cognitive processes involved in recognition memory. It is traditionally believed that both familiarity and recollection can support item recognition, whereas only recollection can support associative recognition. Here, using a standard associative recognition task, we examined whether associative retrieval of unitized associations involved differential patterns of familiarity and recollection processes relative to non-unitized associations. The extent of engagement of familiarity and recollection processes during associative retrieval was estimated by using event-related potentials (ERPs). Twenty participants studied compound words and unrelated word pairs during encoding. Subsequently, they were asked to decide whether a presented word pair was intact, rearranged, or a new pair while electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded. ERP results showed that compound words evoked a significant early frontal old/new effect (associated with familiarity) between ERPs to intact and rearranged word pairs, whereas this effect disappeared for the unrelated word pairs. In addition, the left parietal old/new effect (associated with recollection) between ERPs to intact and rearranged word pairs was greater for compounds than for unrelated word pairs. These findings suggest that unitization enhances the contribution of both familiarity and recollection processes to associative recognition.

  7. Time-Predictable Virtual Memory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puffitsch, Wolfgang; Schoeberl, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Virtual memory is an important feature of modern computer architectures. For hard real-time systems, memory protection is a particularly interesting feature of virtual memory. However, current memory management units are not designed for time-predictability and therefore cannot be used...... in such systems. This paper investigates the requirements on virtual memory from the perspective of hard real-time systems and presents the design of a time-predictable memory management unit. Our evaluation shows that the proposed design can be implemented efficiently. The design allows address translation...... and address range checking in constant time of two clock cycles on a cache miss. This constant time is in strong contrast to the possible cost of a miss in a translation look-aside buffer in traditional virtual memory organizations. Compared to a platform without a memory management unit, these two additional...

  8. Replacement of HA-MRSA by CA-MRSA infections at an academic medical center in the midwestern United States, 2004-5 to 2008.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Z David

    Full Text Available We noted anecdotally that infections designated as health care-associated (HA- MRSA by epidemiologic criteria seemed to be decreasing in incidence at the University of Chicago Medical Center (UCMC after 2004. We compared MRSA patients seen at any site of clinical care at UCMC and the isolates that caused their infections in 2004-5 (n = 545 with those in 2008 (n = 135. The percent of patients with MRSA infections cultured > 2 days after hospital admission decreased from 19.5% in 2004-5 to 7.4% in 2008 (p = 0.001. The percent in 2004-5 compared with 2008 who had a hospitalization (49.1% to 26.7%, p = 0.001 or surgery (43.0% to 14.1%, p<0.001 in the previous year decreased. In 2008 a greater percent of patients was seen in the emergency department (23.1% vs. 39.3% and a smaller percent both in intensive care units (15.6% vs. 6.7% and in other inpatient units (40.7% vs. 32.6% (p<0.001. The percent of patients with CA-MRSA infections by the CDC epidemiologic criteria increased from 36.5% in 2004-5 to 62.2% in 2008 (p<0.001. The percent of MRSA isolates sharing genetic characteristics of USA100 decreased from 27.9% (152/545 to 12.6% (17/135, while the percent with CA-MRSA (USA300 characteristics increased from 53.2% (290/545 to 66.7% (90/135. The percent of infections that were invasive did not change significantly. Our data suggest that HA-MRSA infections, both by epidemiologic and microbiologic criteria, relative to CA-MRSA, decreased between 2004-5 and 2008 at UCMC.

  9. CMV and the art of memory maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klenerman, Paul; Dunbar, P Rod

    2008-10-17

    The CD8(+) T cell responses to CMV gradually increase in magnitude over time-so-called memory "inflation." In this issue of Immunity, Snyder et al. (2008) examine the dynamics of memory inflation and demonstrate continuous turnover of inflating T cells, drawing on both memory cells and naive cells to replace them.

  10. Replacing the Transfusion of 1–2 Units of Blood with Plasma Expanders that Increase Oxygen Delivery Capacity: Evidence from Experimental Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy G. Tsai

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available At least a third of the blood supply in the world is used to transfuse 1–2 units of packed red blood cells for each intervention and most clinical trials of blood substitutes have been carried out at this level of oxygen carrying capacity (OCC restoration. However, the increase of oxygenation achieved is marginal or none at all for molecular hemoglobin (Hb products, due to their lingering vasoactivity. This has provided the impetus for the development of “oxygen therapeutics” using Hb-based molecules that have high oxygen affinity and target delivery of oxygen to anoxic areas. However it is still unclear how these oxygen carriers counteract or mitigate the functional effects of anemia due to obstruction, vasoconstriction and under-perfusion. Indeed, they are administered as a low dosage/low volume therapeutic Hb (subsequently further diluted in the circulatory pool and hence induce extremely small OCC changes. Hyperviscous plasma expanders provide an alternative to oxygen therapeutics by increasing the oxygen delivery capacity (ODC; in anemia they induce supra-perfusion and increase tissue perfusion (flow by as much as 50%. Polyethylene glycol conjugate albumin (PEG-Alb accomplishes this by enhancing the shear thinning behavior of diluted blood, which increases microvascular endothelial shear stress, causes vasodilation and lowering peripheral vascular resistance thus facilitating cardiac function. Induction of supra-perfusion takes advantage of the fact that ODC is the product of OCC and blood flow and hence can be maintained by increasing either or both. Animal studies suggest that this approach may save a considerable fraction of the blood supply. It has an additional benefit of enhancing tissue clearance of toxic metabolites.

  11. Women Up, Men Down: The Clinical Impact of Replacing the Framingham Risk Score with the Reynolds Risk Score in the United States Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tattersall, Matthew C.; Gangnon, Ronald E.; Karmali, Kunal N.; Keevil, Jon G.

    2012-01-01

    Background The Reynolds Risk Score (RRS) is one alternative to the Framingham Risk Score (FRS) for cardiovascular risk assessment. The Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) integrated the FRS a decade ago, but with the anticipated release of ATP IV, it remains uncertain how and which risk models will be integrated into the recommendations. We sought to define the effects in the United States population of a transition from the FRS to the RRS for cardiovascular risk assessment. Methods Using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, we assessed FRS and RRS in 2,502 subjects representing approximately 53.6 Million (M) men (ages 50–79) and women (ages 45–79), without cardiovascular disease or diabetes. We calculated the proportion reclassified by RRS and the subset whose LDL-C goal achievement changed. Results Compared to FRS, the RRS assigns a higher risk category to 13.9% of women and 9.1% of men while assigning a lower risk to 35.7% of men and 2% of women. Overall, 4.7% of women and 1.1% of men fail to meet newly intensified LDL-C goals using the RRS. Conversely, 10.5% of men and 0.6% of women now meet LDL-C goal using RRS when they had not by FRS. Conclusion In the U.S. population the RRS assigns a new risk category for one in six women and four of nine men. In general, women increase while men decrease risk. In conclusion, adopting the RRS for the 53.6 million eligible U.S. adults would result in intensification of clinical management in 1.6 M additional women and 2.10 M fewer men. PMID:22984495

  12. Women up, men down: the clinical impact of replacing the Framingham Risk Score with the Reynolds Risk Score in the United States population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew C Tattersall

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Reynolds Risk Score (RRS is one alternative to the Framingham Risk Score (FRS for cardiovascular risk assessment. The Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III integrated the FRS a decade ago, but with the anticipated release of ATP IV, it remains uncertain how and which risk models will be integrated into the recommendations. We sought to define the effects in the United States population of a transition from the FRS to the RRS for cardiovascular risk assessment. METHODS: Using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, we assessed FRS and RRS in 2,502 subjects representing approximately 53.6 Million (M men (ages 50-79 and women (ages 45-79, without cardiovascular disease or diabetes. We calculated the proportion reclassified by RRS and the subset whose LDL-C goal achievement changed. RESULTS: Compared to FRS, the RRS assigns a higher risk category to 13.9% of women and 9.1% of men while assigning a lower risk to 35.7% of men and 2% of women. Overall, 4.7% of women and 1.1% of men fail to meet newly intensified LDL-C goals using the RRS. Conversely, 10.5% of men and 0.6% of women now meet LDL-C goal using RRS when they had not by FRS. CONCLUSION: In the U.S. population the RRS assigns a new risk category for one in six women and four of nine men. In general, women increase while men decrease risk. In conclusion, adopting the RRS for the 53.6 million eligible U.S. adults would result in intensification of clinical management in 1.6 M additional women and 2.10 M fewer men.

  13. Focused ion beam and field-emission microscopy of metallic filaments in memory devices based on thin films of an ambipolar organic compound consisting of oxadiazole, carbazole, and fluorene units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Christopher; Bowen, Leon; Lee, Myung Won; Fisher, Alison L.; Linton, Katherine E.; Bryce, Martin R.; Petty, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the mechanism of operation of organic thin film resistive memory architectures based on an ambipolar compound consisting of oxadiazole, carbazole, and fluorene units. Cross-sections of the devices have been imaged by electron microscopy both before and after applying a voltage. The micrographs reveal the growth of filaments, with diameters of 50 nm–100 nm, on the metal cathode. We suggest that these are formed by the drift of aluminium ions from the anode and are responsible for the observed switching and negative differential resistance phenomena in the memory devices.

  14. Shoulder Joint Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Shoulder Replacement Options Shoulder replacement surgery is highly technical. It should be performed by a surgical team ... area and will meet a doctor from the anesthesia department. You, your anesthesiologist, and your surgeon will ...

  15. Partial knee replacement - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100225.htm Partial knee replacement - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Knee Replacement A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited ...

  16. Completely positive maps with memory

    CERN Document Server

    Daffer, S; Cresser, J D; McIver, J K; Daffer, Sonja; Wodkiewicz, Krzysztof; Cresser, James D.; Iver, John K. Mc

    2003-01-01

    The prevailing description for dissipative quantum dynamics is given by the Lindblad form of a Markovian master equation, used under the assumption that memory effects are negligible. However, in certain physical situations, the master equation is essentially of a non-Markovian nature. This paper examines master equations that possess a memory kernel, leading to a replacement of white noise by colored noise. The conditions under which this leads to a completely positive, trace-preserving map are discussed for an exponential memory kernel. A physical model that possesses such an exponential memory kernel is presented. This model contains a classical, fluctuating environment based on random telegraph signal stochastic variables.

  17. Memory Matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Emergency Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Memory Matters KidsHealth > For Kids > Memory Matters A A ... of your complex and multitalented brain. What Is Memory? When an event happens, when you learn something, ...

  18. MEMORY MODULATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roozendaal, Benno; McGaugh, James L.

    2011-01-01

    Our memories are not all created equally strong: Some experiences are well remembered while others are remembered poorly, if at all. Research on memory modulation investigates the neurobiological processes and systems that contribute to such differences in the strength of our memories. Extensive evidence from both animal and human research indicates that emotionally significant experiences activate hormonal and brain systems that regulate the consolidation of newly acquired memories. These effects are integrated through noradrenergic activation of the basolateral amygdala which regulates memory consolidation via interactions with many other brain regions involved in consolidating memories of recent experiences. Modulatory systems not only influence neurobiological processes underlying the consolidation of new information, but also affect other mnemonic processes, including memory extinction, memory recall and working memory. In contrast to their enhancing effects on consolidation, adrenal stress hormones impair memory retrieval and working memory. Such effects, as with memory consolidation, require noradrenergic activation of the basolateral amygdala and interactions with other brain regions. PMID:22122145

  19. Exploring memory hierarchy design with emerging memory technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Guangyu

    2014-01-01

    This book equips readers with tools for computer architecture of high performance, low power, and high reliability memory hierarchy in computer systems based on emerging memory technologies, such as STTRAM, PCM, FBDRAM, etc.  The techniques described offer advantages of high density, near-zero static power, and immunity to soft errors, which have the potential of overcoming the “memory wall.”  The authors discuss memory design from various perspectives: emerging memory technologies are employed in the memory hierarchy with novel architecture modification;  hybrid memory structure is introduced to leverage advantages from multiple memory technologies; an analytical model named “Moguls” is introduced to explore quantitatively the optimization design of a memory hierarchy; finally, the vulnerability of the CMPs to radiation-based soft errors is improved by replacing different levels of on-chip memory with STT-RAMs.   ·         Provides a holistic study of using emerging memory technologies i...

  20. Flash-Aware Page Replacement Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangxia Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the limited main memory resource of consumer electronics equipped with NAND flash memory as storage device, an efficient page replacement algorithm called FAPRA is proposed for NAND flash memory in the light of its inherent characteristics. FAPRA introduces an efficient victim page selection scheme taking into account the benefit-to-cost ratio for evicting each victim page candidate and the combined recency and frequency value, as well as the erase count of the block to which each page belongs. Since the dirty victim page often contains clean data that exist in both the main memory and the NAND flash memory based storage device, FAPRA only writes the dirty data within the victim page back to the NAND flash memory based storage device in order to reduce the redundant write operations. We conduct a series of trace-driven simulations and experimental results show that our proposed FAPRA algorithm outperforms the state-of-the-art algorithms in terms of page hit ratio, the number of write operations, runtime, and the degree of wear leveling.

  1. Schemas and memory consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Dorothy; Langston, Rosamund F; Kakeyama, Masaki; Bethus, Ingrid; Spooner, Patrick A; Wood, Emma R; Witter, Menno P; Morris, Richard G M

    2007-04-01

    Memory encoding occurs rapidly, but the consolidation of memory in the neocortex has long been held to be a more gradual process. We now report, however, that systems consolidation can occur extremely quickly if an associative "schema" into which new information is incorporated has previously been created. In experiments using a hippocampal-dependent paired-associate task for rats, the memory of flavor-place associations became persistent over time as a putative neocortical schema gradually developed. New traces, trained for only one trial, then became assimilated and rapidly hippocampal-independent. Schemas also played a causal role in the creation of lasting associative memory representations during one-trial learning. The concept of neocortical schemas may unite psychological accounts of knowledge structures with neurobiological theories of systems memory consolidation.

  2. Aeronautical Information System Replacement -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — Aeronautical Information System Replacement is a web-enabled, automation means for the collection and distribution of Service B messages, weather information, flight...

  3. Research and Implementation of Software Transactional Memory Based on Graphics Processor Unite%基于图形处理器的STM研究与实现

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁飞; 胡大裟; 蒲亦非

    2013-01-01

    The development of multi-core processor and GPGPU ( general purpose computing on graphics processors) creates a demand for ease of parallelization. STM ( Software transactional memory ) provides a good choice to simplify the development of concurrent code by allowing the programmer to mark sections of code to be executed atomically. To simplify the relatively complex of parallel programming on GPU ( Graphics Processing Unit) , synchronization problems of GPU programming are analyzed. Based on the comprehensive consideration of significant factors of STM and characteristics of CUDA ( Compute Unified Device Architecture) , the introduction of STM in GPU programming environment is proposed and the test results show that speedup ratio sustains well by comparison with computing on CPU.%  多核处理器和基于图形处理器通用计算( GPGPU)的发展,提出了简化并行编程的需求,而软件事务存储( STM)通过标记代码段并保证其执行的原子性为简化并行编程提供了很好的选择。为降低图形处理器( GPU)并行编程的复杂性,在分析GPU编程中存在的同步问题,结合统一计算设备架构( CUDA)的特点以及影响STM重要因素的基础上,提出在编程环境中引入STM模型的编程方法,测试结果表明相对基于CPU的计算依然具有良好的加速比。

  4. Living Memorials: Understanding the Social Meanings of Community-Based Memorials to September 11, 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erika S. Svendsen; Lindsay K. Campbell

    2010-01-01

    Living memorials are landscaped spaces created by people to memorialize individuals, places, and events. Hundreds of stewardship groups across the United States of America created living memorials in response to the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. This study sought to understand how stewards value, use, and talk about their living, community-based memorials....

  5. Radiation Source Replacement Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Moran, Traci L.; Bond, Leonard J.

    2010-12-01

    This report summarizes a Radiation Source Replacement Workshop in Houston Texas on October 27-28, 2010, which provided a forum for industry and researchers to exchange information and to discuss the issues relating to replacement of AmBe, and potentially other isotope sources used in well logging.

  6. Il turismo della memoria e i luoghi dell’Unità d’Italia / Tourism, memory and the places of the unification of Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnani, Elisa

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The Unification of Italy may be celebrated with modern forms of pilgrimage in the places where the Unification was built, places of the collective cultural heritage of our country, connected to the recovery of memory of this past event. In this paper we will analyse the existing literature on the issues of memory and tourism and on the role of tourism in shaping the collective memory and the national identity of a population and we will discuss how the celebrations for the 150th anniversary of the unification of Italy are promoting the cultural heritage, both material and immaterial, it has produced.

  7. Overview of emerging nonvolatile memory technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meena, Jagan Singh; Sze, Simon Min; Chand, Umesh; Tseng, Tseung-Yuen

    2014-01-01

    Nonvolatile memory technologies in Si-based electronics date back to the 1990s. Ferroelectric field-effect transistor (FeFET) was one of the most promising devices replacing the conventional Flash memory facing physical scaling limitations at those times. A variant of charge storage memory referred to as Flash memory is widely used in consumer electronic products such as cell phones and music players while NAND Flash-based solid-state disks (SSDs) are increasingly displacing hard disk drives as the primary storage device in laptops, desktops, and even data centers. The integration limit of Flash memories is approaching, and many new types of memory to replace conventional Flash memories have been proposed. Emerging memory technologies promise new memories to store more data at less cost than the expensive-to-build silicon chips used by popular consumer gadgets including digital cameras, cell phones and portable music players. They are being investigated and lead to the future as potential alternatives to existing memories in future computing systems. Emerging nonvolatile memory technologies such as magnetic random-access memory (MRAM), spin-transfer torque random-access memory (STT-RAM), ferroelectric random-access memory (FeRAM), phase-change memory (PCM), and resistive random-access memory (RRAM) combine the speed of static random-access memory (SRAM), the density of dynamic random-access memory (DRAM), and the nonvolatility of Flash memory and so become very attractive as another possibility for future memory hierarchies. Many other new classes of emerging memory technologies such as transparent and plastic, three-dimensional (3-D), and quantum dot memory technologies have also gained tremendous popularity in recent years. Subsequently, not an exaggeration to say that computer memory could soon earn the ultimate commercial validation for commercial scale-up and production the cheap plastic knockoff. Therefore, this review is devoted to the rapidly developing new

  8. Replacing a Missing Tooth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vessels in the tooth pulps are rather large. Drilling down these teeth for crowns may expose the ... porcelain replacement tooth is held in place by metal extensions cemented to the backs of the adjacent ...

  9. Hormone Replacement Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... before and during menopause, the levels of female hormones can go up and down. This can cause ... hot flashes and vaginal dryness. Some women take hormone replacement therapy (HRT), also called menopausal hormone therapy, ...

  10. Knee joint replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of your kneecap. Your kneecap is called the patella. The replacement part is usually made from a ... long. Then your surgeon will: Move your kneecap (patella) out of the way, then cut the ends ...

  11. Knee joint replacement - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100088.htm Knee joint replacement - series—Normal anatomy To use the ... to slide 4 out of 4 Overview The knee is a complex joint. It contains the distal ...

  12. Product Platform Replacements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sköld, Martin; Karlsson, Christer

    2012-01-01

    Purpose – It is argued in this article that too little is known about product platforms and how to deal with them from a manager's point of view. Specifically, little information exists regarding when old established platforms are replaced by new generations in R&D and production environments...... originality and value is achieved by focusing on product platform replacements believed to represent a growing management challenge....

  13. Memory mechanisms supporting syntactic comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Gloria

    2013-01-01

    Efforts to characterize the memory system that supports sentence comprehension have historically drawn extensively on short-term memory as a source of mechanisms that might apply to sentences. The focus of these efforts has changed significantly in the past decade. As a result of changes in models of short-term working memory (ST-WM) and developments in models of sentence comprehension, the effort to relate entire components of an ST-WM system, such as those in the model developed by Baddeley (Nature Reviews Neuroscience 4: 829–839, 2003) to sentence comprehension has largely been replaced by an effort to relate more specific mechanisms found in modern models of ST-WM to memory processes that support one aspect of sentence comprehension—the assignment of syntactic structure (parsing) and its use in determining sentence meaning (interpretation) during sentence comprehension. In this article, we present the historical background to recent studies of the memory mechanisms that support parsing and interpretation and review recent research into this relation. We argue that the results of this research do not converge on a set of mechanisms derived from ST-WM that apply to parsing and interpretation. We argue that the memory mechanisms supporting parsing and interpretation have features that characterize another memory system that has been postulated to account for skilled performance—long-term working memory. We propose a model of the relation of different aspects of parsing and interpretation to ST-WM and long-term working memory. PMID:23319178

  14. Memory Modulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roozendaal, Benno; McGaugh, James L.

    2011-01-01

    Our memories are not all created equally strong: Some experiences are well remembered while others are remembered poorly, if at all. Research on memory modulation investigates the neurobiological processes and systems that contribute to such differences in the strength of our memories. Extensive evi

  15. Memory Matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the brain that actually make memories harder to recall. previous continue Signs of a Memory Problem A person might — or might not — be ... A doctor will test the person's ability to recall events, names, or places by ... . If the person has memory loss from a head injury, the doctor will ...

  16. [From memories about war].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivak, B A

    2010-04-01

    The article presents publication of memories of a military physician Spivak B.A., finished the First Kiev medical institute in 1941. The author held rank: from August 1941--chief of sanitary service of a separated battalion, April 1942-June 1945--chief of operation-bandaging unit of 246 SMSB SD. After war served in military treatment institutes on ranks of surgical profile, finished the military service in the rank of chief of surgical unit of Kovel garrison hospital in 1964.

  17. Computational unit for non-contact photonic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochetov, Alexander V.; Skrylev, Pavel A.

    2005-06-01

    Requirements to the unified computational unit for non-contact photonic system have been formulated. Estimation of central processing unit performance and required memory size are calculated. Specialized microcontroller optimal to use as central processing unit has been selected. Memory chip types are determinated for system. The computational unit consists of central processing unit based on selected microcontroller, NVRAM memory, receiving circuit, SDRAM memory, control and power circuits. It functions, as performing unit that calculates required parameters ofrail track.

  18. Arc Length Coding by Interference of Theta Frequency Oscillations May Underlie Context-Dependent Hippocampal Unit Data and Episodic Memory Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasselmo, Michael E.

    2007-01-01

    Many memory models focus on encoding of sequences by excitatory recurrent synapses in region CA3 of the hippocampus. However, data and modeling suggest an alternate mechanism for encoding of sequences in which interference between theta frequency oscillations encodes the position within a sequence based on spatial arc length or time. Arc length…

  19. Memory protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denning, Peter J.

    1988-01-01

    Accidental overwriting of files or of memory regions belonging to other programs, browsing of personal files by superusers, Trojan horses, and viruses are examples of breakdowns in workstations and personal computers that would be significantly reduced by memory protection. Memory protection is the capability of an operating system and supporting hardware to delimit segments of memory, to control whether segments can be read from or written into, and to confine accesses of a program to its segments alone. The absence of memory protection in many operating systems today is the result of a bias toward a narrow definition of performance as maximum instruction-execution rate. A broader definition, including the time to get the job done, makes clear that cost of recovery from memory interference errors reduces expected performance. The mechanisms of memory protection are well understood, powerful, efficient, and elegant. They add to performance in the broad sense without reducing instruction execution rate.

  20. Robotic mitral valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senay, Sahin; Gullu, Ahmet Umit; Kocyigit, Muharrem; Degirmencioglu, Aleks; Karabulut, Hasan; Alhan, Cem

    2014-01-01

    Robotic surgical techniques allow surgeons to perform mitral valve surgery. This procedure has gained acceptance, particularly for mitral valve repair in degenerative mitral disease. However, mitral repair may not always be possible, especially in severely calcified mitral valve of rheumatic origin. This study demonstrates the basic concepts and technique of robotic mitral valve replacement for valve pathologies that are not suitable for repair.

  1. Replacing America's Job Bank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollman, Jim

    2009-01-01

    The Job Central National Labor Exchange (www.jobcentral.com) has become the effective replacement for America's Job Bank with state workforce agencies and, increasingly, with community colleges throughout the country. The American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) has formed a partnership with Job Central to promote its use throughout the…

  2. Replacing America's Job Bank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollman, Jim

    2009-01-01

    The Job Central National Labor Exchange (www.jobcentral.com) has become the effective replacement for America's Job Bank with state workforce agencies and, increasingly, with community colleges throughout the country. The American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) has formed a partnership with Job Central to promote its use throughout the…

  3. Distributed trace using central performance counter memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satterfield, David L.; Sexton, James C.

    2013-01-22

    A plurality of processing cores, are central storage unit having at least memory connected in a daisy chain manner, forming a daisy chain ring layout on an integrated chip. At least one of the plurality of processing cores places trace data on the daisy chain connection for transmitting the trace data to the central storage unit, and the central storage unit detects the trace data and stores the trace data in the memory co-located in with the central storage unit.

  4. Memory design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanderup, Sisse

    Mind and Matter - Nordik 2009 Conference for Art Historians Design Matters Contributed Memory design BACKGROUND My research concerns the use of memory categories in the designs by the companies Alessi and Georg Jensen. When Alessi's designers create their products, they are usually inspired...... by cultural forms, often specifically by the concept of memory in philosophy, sociology and psychology, while Danish design traditionally has been focusing on form and function with frequent references to the forms of nature. Alessi's motivation for investigating the concept of memory is that it adds...... a cultural dimension to the design objects, enabling the objects to make an identity-forming impact. Whether or not the concept of memory plays a significant role in Danish design has not yet been elucidated fully. TERMINOLOGY The concept of "memory design" refers to the idea that design carries...

  5. Disputed Memory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The world wars, genocides and extremist ideologies of the 20th century are remembered very differently across Central, Eastern and Southeastern Europe, resulting sometimes in fierce memory disputes. This book investigates the complexity and contention of the layers of memory of the troubled 20th...... century in the region. Written by an international group of scholars from a diversity of disciplines, the chapters approach memory disputes in methodologically innovative ways, studying representations and negotiations of disputed pasts in different media, including monuments, museum exhibitions......, individual and political discourse and electronic social media. Analyzing memory disputes in various local, national and transnational contexts, the chapters demonstrate the political power and social impact of painful and disputed memories. The book brings new insights into current memory disputes...

  6. Main Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Boncz, Peter; Liu, Lei; Özsu, Tamer, M.

    2008-01-01

    Primary storage, presently known as main memory, is the largest memory directly accessible to the CPU in the prevalent Von Neumann model and stores both data and instructions (program code). The CPU continuously reads instructions stored there and executes them. It is also called Random Access Memory (RAM), to indicate that load/store instructions can access data at any location at the same cost, is usually implemented using DRAM chips, which are connected to the CPU and other peripherals (di...

  7. The effects of estradiol replacement therapy on novel-object recognition and extinction of conditioned fear memory in ovariectomized rats%雌二醇替代治疗对去卵巢大鼠新事物探索和恐惧记忆消退的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    楼忠泽; 陈俊丰; 金博弘; 张宜生

    2012-01-01

    目的 观察雌二醇替代治疗对去卵巢大鼠新事物探索和恐惧记忆消退等认知功能的影响.方法 60只成年雌性大鼠(> 90d,250 ~ 300g)双侧卵巢切除手术后,根据不同剂量和给药时间通过皮下注射进行雌二醇替代治疗,手术后第2天治疗组分为低剂量治疗组(OVX+ LD,0.1 mg· kg-1)、中剂量治疗组(OVX+ MD,0.3 mg·kg-1)、高剂量治疗组(OVX+ HD,0.9 mg·kg-1),手术后不同时间分为2周后中剂量治疗组(MD+2W)和4周后中剂量治疗组(MD+4W)以及手术组(OVX)和假手术组(SH).给药维持1月后用新事物探索和恐惧记忆消退的方法进行认知功能的测定.结果 (1) OVX组[(5.83±4.5)s]新事物探索能力较SH组[(27.14±6.6)s]明显降低,差异有统计学意义(P<0.01);雌二醇替代治疗(除HD组)呈一定剂量和时间效应提升大鼠新事物探索能力,且MD[(27.86±2.6)s]组较OVX组有统计学差异(P<0.05);LD组、MD+2W组较OVX组新事物探索能力有所提升,但差异并无统计学意义(P>0.05).(2) OVX组[(21.67±2.0)%]其恐惧度较SH组[(56.81±4.6)%]明显降低,差异有统计学意义(P<0.01);LD组、MD组和MD+2W组较OVX组均可显著提升大鼠恐惧度(P<0.01),但HD组对恐惧记忆的能力减弱,MD+4W组较OVX组无明显变化(P>0.05).(3)OVX组较SH组其恐惧记忆消退速度明显下降(P<0.01);雌二醇替代治疗(除MD+ 4W组)均可一定程度的提升大鼠恐惧消退的速度(P<0.01).结论 雌二醇能改善情绪和抑制性学习记忆,并提示早期给予雌激素治疗改善认知功能更好.%Objective To investigate the effects of estradiol replacement therapy on novel-object recognition and extinction of conditioned fear memory in ovariectomized (OVX) rats.Methods Sixty sexually mature (>90 days) female SD rats weighing 250g-300g were used as subjects.The rats were randomly divided into 7groups as following:OVX with low dose of estradiol replacement (OVX + LD,0.1 mg · kg-1

  8. Advanced image memory architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercillo, Richard; McNeill, Kevin M.

    1994-05-01

    A workstation for radiographic images, known as the Arizona Viewing Console (AVC), was developed at the University of Arizona Health Sciences Center in the Department of Radiology. This workstation has been in use as a research tool to aid us in investigating how a radiologist interacts with a workstation, to determine which image processing features are required to aid the radiologist, to develop user interfaces and to support psychophysical and clinical studies. Results from these studies have show a need to increase the current image memory's available storage in order to accommodate high resolution images. The current triple-ported image memory can be allocated to store any number of images up to a combined total of 4 million pixels. Over the past couple of years, higher resolution images have become easier to generate with the advent of laser digitizers and computed radiology systems. As part of our research, a larger 32 million pixel image memory for AVC has been designed to replace the existing image memory.

  9. Ulnar head replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Timothy J; van Schoonhoven, Joerg

    2007-03-01

    Recent years have seen an increasing awareness of the anatomical and biomechanical significance of the distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ). With this has come a more critical approach to surgical management of DRUJ disorders and a realization that all forms of "excision arthroplasty" can only restore forearm rotation at the expense of forearm stability. This, in turn, has led to renewed interest in prosthetic replacement of the ulnar head, a procedure that had previously fallen into disrepute because of material failures with early implants, in particular, the Swanson silicone ulnar head replacement. In response to these early failures, a new prosthesis was developed in the early 1990s, using materials designed to withstand the loads across the DRUJ associated with normal functional use of the upper limb. Released onto the market in 1995 (Herbert ulnar head prosthesis), clinical experience during the last 10 years has shown that this prosthesis is able to restore forearm function after ulnar head excision and that the materials (ceramic head and noncemented titanium stem), even with normal use of the limb, are showing no signs of failure in the medium to long term. As experience with the use of an ulnar head prosthesis grows, so does its acceptance as a viable and attractive alternative to more traditional operations, such as the Darrach and Sauve-Kapandji procedures. This article discusses the current indications and contraindications for ulnar head replacement and details the surgical procedure, rehabilitation, and likely outcomes.

  10. Improving Memory Error Handling Using Linux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlton, Michael Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Blanchard, Sean P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Debardeleben, Nathan A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-07-25

    As supercomputers continue to get faster and more powerful in the future, they will also have more nodes. If nothing is done, then the amount of memory in supercomputer clusters will soon grow large enough that memory failures will be unmanageable to deal with by manually replacing memory DIMMs. "Improving Memory Error Handling Using Linux" is a process oriented method to solve this problem by using the Linux kernel to disable (offline) faulty memory pages containing bad addresses, preventing them from being used again by a process. The process of offlining memory pages simplifies error handling and results in reducing both hardware and manpower costs required to run Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) clusters. This process will be necessary for the future of supercomputing to allow the development of exascale computers. It will not be feasible without memory error handling to manually replace the number of DIMMs that will fail daily on a machine consisting of 32-128 petabytes of memory. Testing reveals the process of offlining memory pages works and is relatively simple to use. As more and more testing is conducted, the entire process will be automated within the high-performance computing (HPC) monitoring software, Zenoss, at LANL.

  11. The attorney/client privilege: a fond memory of things past an analysis of the privilege following United States v. Anderson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustokoff, M M; Swichar, J L; Herzfeld, C R

    2000-01-01

    Mr. Mustokoff, Mr. Swichar, and Ms. Herzfeld address the rudiments of the attorney/client privilege, its crime-fraud exception, corporate compliance programs, the United States government's quest for voluntary disclosure, and how those principles have been affected by United States v. Anderson.

  12. Generation-based memory synchronization in a multiprocessor system with weakly consistent memory accesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmacht, Martin

    2014-09-09

    In a multiprocessor system, a central memory synchronization module coordinates memory synchronization requests responsive to memory access requests in flight, a generation counter, and a reclaim pointer. The central module communicates via point-to-point communication. The module includes a global OR reduce tree for each memory access requesting device, for detecting memory access requests in flight. An interface unit is implemented associated with each processor requesting synchronization. The interface unit includes multiple generation completion detectors. The generation count and reclaim pointer do not pass one another.

  13. Generation-based memory synchronization in a multiprocessor system with weakly consistent memory accesses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohmacht, Martin

    2017-08-15

    In a multiprocessor system, a central memory synchronization module coordinates memory synchronization requests responsive to memory access requests in flight, a generation counter, and a reclaim pointer. The central module communicates via point-to-point communication. The module includes a global OR reduce tree for each memory access requesting device, for detecting memory access requests in flight. An interface unit is implemented associated with each processor requesting synchronization. The interface unit includes multiple generation completion detectors. The generation count and reclaim pointer do not pass one another.

  14. Resistively heated shape memory polymer device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marion, III, John E.; Bearinger, Jane P.; Wilson, Thomas S.; Maitland, Duncan J.

    2017-09-05

    A resistively heated shape memory polymer device is made by providing a rod, sheet or substrate that includes a resistive medium. The rod, sheet or substrate is coated with a first shape memory polymer providing a coated intermediate unit. The coated intermediate unit is in turn coated with a conductive material providing a second intermediate unit. The second coated intermediate unit is in turn coated with an outer shape memory polymer. The rod, sheet or substrate is exposed and an electrical lead is attached to the rod, sheet or substrate. The conductive material is exposed and an electrical lead is attached to the conductive material.

  15. Resistively heated shape memory polymer device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, III, John E.; Bearinger, Jane P.; Wilson, Thomas S.; Maitland, Duncan J.

    2016-10-25

    A resistively heated shape memory polymer device is made by providing a rod, sheet or substrate that includes a resistive medium. The rod, sheet or substrate is coated with a first shape memory polymer providing a coated intermediate unit. The coated intermediate unit is in turn coated with a conductive material providing a second intermediate unit. The second coated intermediate unit is in turn coated with an outer shape memory polymer. The rod, sheet or substrate is exposed and an electrical lead is attached to the rod, sheet or substrate. The conductive material is exposed and an electrical lead is attached to the conductive material.

  16. Flavor Memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mojet, Jos; Köster, Ep

    2016-01-01

    Odor, taste, texture, temperature, and pain all contribute to the perception and memory of food flavor. Flavor memory is also strongly linked to the situational aspects of previous encounters with the flavor, but does not depend on the precise recollection of its sensory features as in vision and

  17. Memory integration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sweegers, C.C.G.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to characterize the neural mechanisms underlying memory integration. In chapter 2, we studied the neural underpinnings of regularity extraction across hippocampus-dependent episodic memories. We found higher connectivity between the hippocampus and the mPFC for the

  18. Shared Memories?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wæhrens, Anne

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyses how the memory of the Holocaust has been addressed in the European Parliament from 1989 to 2009. I identify two major changes that occurred in the 1990s and after the 2004 enlargement of the European Union respectively. In the 1990s the war in Bosnia and the question of restit......This paper analyses how the memory of the Holocaust has been addressed in the European Parliament from 1989 to 2009. I identify two major changes that occurred in the 1990s and after the 2004 enlargement of the European Union respectively. In the 1990s the war in Bosnia and the question...... of restitution universalised the memory of the Holocaust and made it present. The 2004 enlargement brought the memory of Soviet Communism into the Union and made it a central task to construct a community of memory that includes both the memory of the Holocaust and of Soviet Communism. The analysis also...... identifies what seems to be a political memory split between Left and Right; and it shows that the time might not be ripe for a shared European memory....

  19. Collaging Memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallach, Michele

    2011-01-01

    Even middle school students can have memories of their childhoods, of an earlier time. The art of Romare Bearden and the writings of Paul Auster can be used to introduce ideas about time and memory to students and inspire works of their own. Bearden is an exceptional role model for young artists, not only because of his astounding art, but also…

  20. Main Memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A. Boncz (Peter); L. Liu (Lei); M. Tamer Özsu

    2008-01-01

    htmlabstractPrimary storage, presently known as main memory, is the largest memory directly accessible to the CPU in the prevalent Von Neumann model and stores both data and instructions (program code). The CPU continuously reads instructions stored there and executes them. It is also called Random

  1. Memory conformity affects inaccurate memories more than accurate memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Daniel B; Villalba, Daniella K

    2012-01-01

    After controlling for initial confidence, inaccurate memories were shown to be more easily distorted than accurate memories. In two experiments groups of participants viewed 50 stimuli and were then presented with these stimuli plus 50 fillers. During this test phase participants reported their confidence that each stimulus was originally shown. This was followed by computer-generated responses from a bogus participant. After being exposed to this response participants again rated the confidence of their memory. The computer-generated responses systematically distorted participants' responses. Memory distortion depended on initial memory confidence, with uncertain memories being more malleable than confident memories. This effect was moderated by whether the participant's memory was initially accurate or inaccurate. Inaccurate memories were more malleable than accurate memories. The data were consistent with a model describing two types of memory (i.e., recollective and non-recollective memories), which differ in how susceptible these memories are to memory distortion.

  2. Towards a Phenomenology of Memory and Forgetting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Dessingué

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Differences and trends in the discourse of memory in France have been consistent since the publication by Henri Bergson of Matter and Memory in 1896. In History, Memory and Forgetting published in 2000, Ricœur’s approach goes further than Bergson, Durkheim and Halbwachs. The memory issue in Ricœur is closely linked to a “hermeneutics of the self” that he already introduced in Oneself as Another in 1990. It seems that the traditional paradigm between individual and collective memory has been replaced by the affirmation of the dialogical nature of memory related to the dialogical nature of being a self and an other. 

  3. [Acute renal replacement therapy in pediatrics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillot, T; Ozanne, B; Bétrémieux, P; Tirel, O; Ecoffey, C

    2013-12-01

    In pediatric intensive care unit, the available modalities of acute renal replacement therapy include intermittent hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis and continuous renal replacement therapies. No prospective studies have evaluated to date the effect of dialysis modality on the outcomes of children. The decision about dialysis modality should therefore be based on local expertise, resources available, and the patient's clinical status. Poor hemodynamic tolerance of intermittent hemodialysis is a common problem in critically ill patients. Moreover, many pediatric intensive care units are not equipped with dedicated water circuit. Peritoneal dialysis, a simple and inexpensive alternative, is the most widely available form of acute renal replacement therapy. However, its efficacy may be limited in critically ill patients. The use of continuous renal replacement therapy permits usually to reach a greater estimated dialysis dose, a better control of fluid balance, and additionally, to provide adequate nutrition. Copyright © 2013 Société française d’anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kapetanakis, Emmanouil I; Athanasiou, Thanos; Mestres, Carlos A

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS OF THE STUDY: Prompted by anecdotal evidence and observations by surgeons, an investigation was undertaken into the potential differences in implanted aortic valve prosthesis sizes, during aortic valve replacement (AVR) procedures, between northern and southern European...... countries. METHODS: A multi-institutional, non-randomized, retrospective analysis was conducted among 2,932 patients who underwent AVR surgery at seven tertiary cardiac surgery centers throughout Europe. Demographic and perioperative variables including valve size and type, body surface area (BSA) and early...

  5. Total ankle joint replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Ankle arthritis results in a stiff and painful ankle and can be a major cause of disability. For people with end-stage ankle arthritis, arthrodesis (ankle fusion) is effective at reducing pain in the shorter term, but results in a fixed joint, and over time the loss of mobility places stress on other joints in the foot that may lead to arthritis, pain and dysfunction. Another option is to perform a total ankle joint replacement, with the aim of giving the patient a mobile and pain-free ankle. In this article we review the efficacy of this procedure, including how it compares to ankle arthrodesis, and consider the indications and complications.

  6. The Optimum Replacement of Weapon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiao; ZHANG Jin-chun

    2002-01-01

    The theory of LCC (Life Cycle Cost) is applied in this paper. The relation between the economic life of weapon and the optimum replacement is analyzed. The method to define the optimum replacement time of weapon is discussed.

  7. Performing an allreduce operation using shared memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Charles J [Rochester, MN; Dozsa, Gabor [Ardsley, NY; Ratterman, Joseph D [Rochester, MN; Smith, Brian E [Rochester, MN

    2012-04-17

    Methods, apparatus, and products are disclosed for performing an allreduce operation using shared memory that include: receiving, by at least one of a plurality of processing cores on a compute node, an instruction to perform an allreduce operation; establishing, by the core that received the instruction, a job status object for specifying a plurality of shared memory allreduce work units, the plurality of shared memory allreduce work units together performing the allreduce operation on the compute node; determining, by an available core on the compute node, a next shared memory allreduce work unit in the job status object; and performing, by that available core on the compute node, that next shared memory allreduce work unit.

  8. Retention Benefit Based Intelligent Cache Replacement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李凌达; 陆俊林; 程旭

    2014-01-01

    The performance loss resulting from different cache misses is variable in modern systems for two reasons: 1) memory access latency is not uniform, and 2) the latency toleration ability of processor cores varies across different misses. Compared with parallel misses and store misses, isolated fetch and load misses are more costly. The variation of cache miss penalty suggests that the cache replacement policy should take it into account. To that end, first, we propose the notion of retention benefit. Retention benefits can evaluate not only the increment of processor stall cycles on cache misses, but also the reduction of processor stall cycles due to cache hits. Then, we propose Retention Benefit Based Replacement (RBR) which aims to maximize the aggregate retention benefits of blocks reserved in the cache. RBR keeps track of the total retention benefit for each block in the cache, and it preferentially evicts the block with the minimum total retention benefit on replacement. The evaluation shows that RBR can improve cache performance significantly in both single-core and multi-core environment while requiring a low storage overhead. It also outperforms other state-of-the-art techniques.

  9. The utility of trans-catheter aortic valve replacement after commercialization: does the European experience provide a glimpse into the future use of this technology in the United States?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linke, Axel; Walther, Thomas; Schuler, Gerhard

    2010-03-01

    Treatment of aortic stenosis remains challenging in older individuals, as their perioperative mortality for open heart surgery is increased due to comorbidities. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation using the CoreValve ReValving System (Medtronic, Minneapolis, USA) and the Edwards SAPIEN transcatheter heart valve (THV; Edwards Lifescience, Irvine, California, USA) represents an alternative to conventional valve replacement in elderly patients that have a high risk for conventional surgery. This article summarizes the evidence-base from recent clinical trials. The early results of these landmark studies suggest that transcatheter aortic valve implantation with either one of the prosthesis is feasible, safe, improves hemodynamics and, therefore, might be an alternative to conventional aortic valve replacement in very high-risk patients. However, all of the available transcatheter heart valves have certain disadvantages, limiting their use in daily clinical practice. The process of decision making, which valve to use and which access route to choose is illustrated in this article through clinical case scenarios. Additionally, the lessons learned thus far from the European perspective and the potential impact on the future use in the US are discussed. Despite of the progress in this field, we are still lacking an optimal transcatheter heart valve. Once it is available, we can take the plunge to compare transcatheter valve implantation with convention surgery in severe aortic stenosis!

  10. Power Plant Replacement Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, Gary

    2010-09-30

    This report represents the final report for the Eastern Illinois University power plant replacement study. It contains all related documentation from consideration of possible solutions to the final recommended option. Included are the economic justifications associated with the chosen solution along with application for environmental permitting for the selected project for construction. This final report will summarize the results of execution of an EPC (energy performance contract) investment grade audit (IGA) which lead to an energy services agreement (ESA). The project includes scope of work to design and install energy conservation measures which are guaranteed by the contractor to be self‐funding over its twenty year contract duration. The cost recovery is derived from systems performance improvements leading to energy savings. The prime focus of this EPC effort is to provide a replacement solution for Eastern Illinois University’s aging and failing circa 1925 central steam production plant. Twenty‐three ECMs were considered viable whose net impact will provide sufficient savings to successfully support the overall project objectives.

  11. Total disc replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vital, J-M; Boissière, L

    2014-02-01

    Total disc replacement (TDR) (partial disc replacement will not be described) has been used in the lumbar spine since the 1980s, and more recently in the cervical spine. Although the biomechanical concepts are the same and both are inserted through an anterior approach, lumbar TDR is conventionally indicated for chronic low back pain, whereas cervical TDR is used for soft discal hernia resulting in cervicobrachial neuralgia. The insertion technique must be rigorous, with precise centering in the disc space, taking account of vascular anatomy, which is more complex in the lumbar region, particularly proximally to L5-S1. All of the numerous studies, including prospective randomized comparative trials, have demonstrated non-inferiority to fusion, or even short-term superiority regarding speed of improvement. The main implant-related complication is bridging heterotopic ossification with resulting loss of range of motion and increased rates of adjacent segment degeneration, although with an incidence lower than after arthrodesis. A sufficiently long follow-up, which has not yet been reached, will be necessary to establish definitively an advantage for TDR, particularly in the cervical spine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. REPLACEMENT OF FRENCH CARDS

    CERN Multimedia

    HR/SOC

    2001-01-01

    The French Ministry of Foreign Affairs has informed the Organization that it is shortly to replace all diplomatic cards, special cards and employment permits ('attestations de fonctions') now held by members of the personnel and their families. Between 2 July and 31 December 2001, these cards are to be replaced by secure, computerized equivalents. The old cards may continue to be used until 31 December 2001. For the purposes of the handover, members of the personnel must go personally to the cards office (33/1-015), in order to fill in a 'fiche individuelle' form, taking the following documents for themselves and members of their families already in possession of a French card : A recent identity photograph in 4.5 cm x 3.5 cm format. The French card in their possession. An A4 photocopy of the same French card, certified by the cards office as being a true copy. Those members of the personnel whose cards (and/or cards belonging to members of their families) are shortly due to expire, or have recently done...

  13. REPLACEMENT OF FRENCH CARDS

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division; Cards.Service@cern.ch

    2001-01-01

    The French Ministry of Foreign Affairs is currently replacing all diplomatic cards, special cards and employment permits («attestations de fonctions») held by members of the personnel and their families. These cards are replaced by secure, computerized equivalents. The old cards may no longer be used after 31 December 2001. For the purposes of the handover, members of the personnel must go personally to the cards office (33/1-015) between 8h30 and 12h30, in order to fill in a «fiche individuelle» form, taking the following documents for themselves and members of their families already in possession of a French card : A recent identity photograph in 4.5 cm x 3.5 cm format, the French card in their possession, an A4 photocopy of the same French card, certified by the cards office as being a true copy. Those members of the personnel whose cards (and/or cards belonging to members of their families) are shortly due to expire, or have recently done so, are also requested...

  14. REPLACEMENT OF FRENCH CARDS

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2001-01-01

    The French Ministry of Foreign Affairs has informed the Organization that it is shortly to replace all diplomatic cards, special cards and employment permits ('attestations de fonctions') now held by members of the personnel and their families. Between 2 July and 31 December 2001, these cards are to be replaced by secure, computerized equivalents. The old cards may continue to be used until 31 December 2001. For the purposes of the handover, members of the personnel are asked to go to the cards office (33/1-015), taking the following documents for themselves and members of their families already in possession of a French card : A recent identity photograph in 4.5 cm x 3.5 cm format, The French card in their possession, an A4 photocopy of the same French card, certified by the cards office as being a true copy. Those members of the personnel whose cards (and/or cards belonging to members of their families) are shortly due to expire, or have recently done so, are also requested to take these items to the c...

  15. REPLACEMENT OF FRENCH CARDS

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2001-01-01

    The French Ministry of Foreign Affairs has informed the Organization that it is shortly to replace all diplomatic cards, special cards and employment permits ('attestations de fonctions') now held by members of the personnel and their families. Between 2 July and 31 December 2001, these cards are to be replaced by secure, computerized equivalents. A 'personnel office' stamped photocopy of the old cards may continue to be used until 31 December 2001. For the purposes of the handover, members of the personnel must go personally to the cards office (33/1-015), between 8:30 and 12:30, in order to fill a 'fiche individuelle' form (in black ink only), which has to be personally signed by themselves and another separately signed by members of their family, taking the following documents for themselves and members of their families already in possession of a French card : A recent identity photograph in 4.5 cm x 3.5 cm format (signed on the back) The French card in their possession an A4 photocopy of the same Fre...

  16. Power Plant Replacement Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, Gary

    2010-09-30

    This report represents the final report for the Eastern Illinois University power plant replacement study. It contains all related documentation from consideration of possible solutions to the final recommended option. Included are the economic justifications associated with the chosen solution along with application for environmental permitting for the selected project for construction. This final report will summarize the results of execution of an EPC (energy performance contract) investment grade audit (IGA) which lead to an energy services agreement (ESA). The project includes scope of work to design and install energy conservation measures which are guaranteed by the contractor to be self-funding over its twenty year contract duration. The cost recovery is derived from systems performance improvements leading to energy savings. The prime focus of this EPC effort is to provide a replacement solution for Eastern Illinois University's aging and failing circa 1925 central steam production plant. Twenty-three ECMs were considered viable whose net impact will provide sufficient savings to successfully support the overall project objectives.

  17. Faster Replacement Paths

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Virginia Vassilevska

    2010-01-01

    The replacement paths problem for directed graphs is to find for given nodes s and t and every edge e on the shortest path between them, the shortest path between s and t which avoids e. For unweighted directed graphs on n vertices, the best known algorithm runtime was \\tilde{O}(n^{2.5}) by Roditty and Zwick. For graphs with integer weights in {-M,...,M}, Weimann and Yuster recently showed that one can use fast matrix multiplication and solve the problem in O(Mn^{2.584}) time, a runtime which would be O(Mn^{2.33}) if the exponent \\omega of matrix multiplication is 2. We improve both of these algorithms. Our new algorithm also relies on fast matrix multiplication and runs in O(M n^{\\omega} polylog(n)) time if \\omega>2 and O(n^{2+\\eps}) for any \\eps>0 if \\omega=2. Our result shows that, at least for small integer weights, the replacement paths problem in directed graphs may be easier than the related all pairs shortest paths problem in directed graphs, as the current best runtime for the latter is \\Omega(n^{2.5...

  18. Power Plant Replacement Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, Gary

    2010-09-30

    This report represents the final report for the Eastern Illinois University power plant replacement study. It contains all related documentation from consideration of possible solutions to the final recommended option. Included are the economic justifications associated with the chosen solution along with application for environmental permitting for the selected project for construction. This final report will summarize the results of execution of an EPC (energy performance contract) investment grade audit (IGA) which lead to an energy services agreement (ESA). The project includes scope of work to design and install energy conservation measures which are guaranteed by the contractor to be self-funding over its twenty year contract duration. The cost recovery is derived from systems performance improvements leading to energy savings. The prime focus of this EPC effort is to provide a replacement solution for Eastern Illinois University’s aging and failing circa 1925 central steam production plant. Twenty-three ECMs were considered viable whose net impact will provide sufficient savings to successfully support the overall project objectives.

  19. Conditional load and store in a shared memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumrich, Matthias A; Ohmacht, Martin

    2015-02-03

    A method, system and computer program product for implementing load-reserve and store-conditional instructions in a multi-processor computing system. The computing system includes a multitude of processor units and a shared memory cache, and each of the processor units has access to the memory cache. In one embodiment, the method comprises providing the memory cache with a series of reservation registers, and storing in these registers addresses reserved in the memory cache for the processor units as a result of issuing load-reserve requests. In this embodiment, when one of the processor units makes a request to store data in the memory cache using a store-conditional request, the reservation registers are checked to determine if an address in the memory cache is reserved for that processor unit. If an address in the memory cache is reserved for that processor, the data are stored at this address.

  20. Turbine casing bolts; a life assessment and bolt replacement strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulloch, J.H. [ESB, Power Generation, Dublin (Ireland)

    1998-12-31

    The present presentation describes a detailed study concerning the life assessment and replacement strategy of large turbine casing bolts in a 120 MW steam raising unit. After 122000 hours service, circa 1991/92, the Cr-Mo-V steel casing bolts, involving a total of 184 bolts, from two identical 120 MW units, termed Units 1 and 2, were examined to establish the extent of Reverse Temper Embrittlement, RTE, and creep damage suffered during service. The bolt replacement plans for the two units were as follows; Unit 1 bolts were completely replaced with new bolts while Unit 2 embrittled bolts were withdrawn from service and replaced with Non- Embrittled bolts from Unit 1; basically Unit 2 bolts were made up from a mixture of Unit 1 and 2 Non- Embrittled bolts which had been in service for 122000 hours. Remnant life assessments, concerning both embrittlement and creep damage aspects, were earned out on this series of easing bolts at service times 122000, 150000 and 200000 hours. These assessments involved the use of general embrittlement and creep damage laws which were empirically derived and concerned such parameters as microstructural grain size, bulk phosphorus content and accumulated service strain. (orig.) 7 refs.

  1. Novelty processing and memory formation in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schomaker, J; Berendse, H W; Foncke, E M J; van der Werf, Y D; van den Heuvel, O A; Theeuwes, J; Meeter, M

    BACKGROUND: Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by a degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic cells, resulting in dopamine depletion. This depletion is counteracted through dopamine replacement therapy (DRT). Dopamine has been suggested to affect novelty processing and memory, which suggests

  2. Memory loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    A person with memory loss needs a lot of support. It helps to show the person familiar objects, music, or and photos or play familiar music. Write down when the person should take any medicine or do other ...

  3. Toleration, Synthesis or Replacement?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holtermann, Jakob v. H.; Madsen, Mikael Rask

    2016-01-01

    to have considerable problems keeping a clear focus on the key question: What are the implications of this empirical turn in terms of philosophy of legal science, of the social understanding of IL, and, not least, of the place of doctrinal scholarship after the alleged Wende? What is needed, we argue......, in order to answer is not yet another partisan suggestion, but rather an attempt at making intelligible both the oppositions and the possibilities of synthesis between normative and empirical approaches to law. Based on our assessment and rational reconstruction of current arguments and positions, we...... therefore outline a taxonomy consisting of the following three basic, ideal-types in terms of the epistemological understanding of the interface of law and empirical studies: toleration, synthesis and replacement. This tripartite model proves useful with a view to teasing out and better articulating...

  4. Memory clinics

    OpenAIRE

    Jolley, D; Benbow, S M; Grizzell, M

    2006-01-01

    Memory clinics were first described in the 1980s. They have become accepted worldwide as useful vehicles for improving practice in the identification, investigation, and treatment of memory disorders, including dementia. They are provided in various settings, the setting determining clientele and practice. All aim to facilitate referral from GPs, other specialists, or by self referral, in the early stages of impairment, and to avoid the stigma associated with psychiatric services. They bring ...

  5. Natural variation in learning and memory dynamics studied by artificial selection on learning rate in parasitic wasps.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Berg, M.; Duivenvoorde, L.; Wang, G.; Tribuhl, S.; Bukovinszky, T.; Vet, L.E.M.; Dicke, M.; Smid, H.M.

    2011-01-01

    Animals form memory types that differ in duration and stability. The initial anaesthesia-sensitive memory (ASM) can be replaced by anaesthesia-resistant memory (ARM), and/or by protein synthesis-dependent, long-term memory (LTM). We previously showed that two closely related parasitic wasp species

  6. Dimensionless Units in the SI

    CERN Document Server

    Mohr, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    The International System of Units (SI) is supposed to be coherent. That is, when a combination of units is replaced by an equivalent unit, there is no additional numerical factor. Here we consider dimensionless units as defined in the SI, {\\it e.g.} angular units like radians or steradians and counting units like radioactive decays or molecules. We show that an incoherence may arise when different units of this type are replaced by a single dimensionless unit, the unit "one", and suggest how to properly include such units into the SI in order to remove the incoherence. In particular, we argue that the radian is the appropriate coherent unit for angles and that hertz is not a coherent unit in the SI. We also discuss how including angular and counting units affects the fundamental constants.

  7. Worst-Case Memory Consumption Analysis for SCJ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jeppe Lunde; Todberg, Mikkel; Dalsgaard, Andreas Engelbredt

    2013-01-01

    Safety-Critical Java is designed to be used for safety-critical and hard real-time systems. To ensure predictable behaviour garbage collection has been replaced by a scope based memory model. This model currently requires bounds on memory usage of scopes to be specified by developers. These bounds...

  8. Worst-Case Memory Consumption Analysis for SCJ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jeppe Lunde; Todberg, Mikkel; Dalsgaard, Andreas Engelbredt

    2013-01-01

    Safety-Critical Java is designed to be used for safety-critical and hard real-time systems. To ensure predictable behaviour garbage collection has been replaced by a scope based memory model. This model currently requires bounds on memory usage of scopes to be specified by developers. These bounds...

  9. Iron replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Coskun, Mehmet; Weiss, Günter

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Approximately, one-third of the world's population suffers from anemia, and at least half of these cases are because of iron deficiency. With the introduction of new intravenous iron preparations over the last decade, uncertainty has arisen when these compounds should be admini...... treatment, when to follow-up for relapse, which dosage and type of therapy should be recommended or not recommended, and if some patients should not be treated....... be administered and under which circumstances oral therapy is still an appropriate and effective treatment. RECENT FINDINGS: Numerous guidelines are available, but none go into detail about therapeutic start and end points or how iron-deficiency anemia should be best treated depending on the underlying cause...... of iron deficiency or in regard to concomitant underlying or additional diseases. SUMMARY: The study points to major issues to be considered in revisions of future guidelines for the true optimal iron replacement therapy, including how to assess the need for treatment, when to start and when to stop...

  10. Memory consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, Larry R; Genzel, Lisa; Wixted, John T; Morris, Richard G

    2015-08-03

    Conscious memory for a new experience is initially dependent on information stored in both the hippocampus and neocortex. Systems consolidation is the process by which the hippocampus guides the reorganization of the information stored in the neocortex such that it eventually becomes independent of the hippocampus. Early evidence for systems consolidation was provided by studies of retrograde amnesia, which found that damage to the hippocampus-impaired memories formed in the recent past, but typically spared memories formed in the more remote past. Systems consolidation has been found to occur for both episodic and semantic memories and for both spatial and nonspatial memories, although empirical inconsistencies and theoretical disagreements remain about these issues. Recent work has begun to characterize the neural mechanisms that underlie the dialogue between the hippocampus and neocortex (e.g., "neural replay," which occurs during sharp wave ripple activity). New work has also identified variables, such as the amount of preexisting knowledge, that affect the rate of consolidation. The increasing use of molecular genetic tools (e.g., optogenetics) can be expected to further improve understanding of the neural mechanisms underlying consolidation. Copyright © 2015 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  11. Is external memory memory? Biological memory and extended mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelian, Kourken

    2012-09-01

    Clark and Chalmers (1998) claim that an external resource satisfying the following criteria counts as a memory: (1) the agent has constant access to the resource; (2) the information in the resource is directly available; (3) retrieved information is automatically endorsed; (4) information is stored as a consequence of past endorsement. Research on forgetting and metamemory shows that most of these criteria are not satisfied by biological memory, so they are inadequate. More psychologically realistic criteria generate a similar classification of standard putative external memories, but the criteria still do not capture the function of memory. An adequate account of memory function, compatible with its evolution and its roles in prospection and imagination, suggests that external memory performs a function not performed by biological memory systems. External memory is thus not memory. This has implications for: extended mind theorizing, ecological validity of memory research, the causal theory of memory.

  12. Architectural Leakage Power Minimization of Scratchpad memories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Paraneetharan,

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Partitioning a memory into multiple blocks that can be independently accessed is a widely used technique to reduce its dynamic power. For embedded systems, its benefits can be even pushed further by properly matching the partition to the memory access patterns. When leakage energy comes into play, however, idle memory blocks must be put into a proper low-leakage sleep state to actually save energy when not accessed. In this case, the matching becomes an instance of the power management problem, because moving to and from this sleep state requires additional energy. An effective solution to the problem of the leakage-aware partitioning of a memory into disjoint sub blocks, in particular, target scratchpad memories, which are commonly used in some embedded systems as a replacement for caches. By this approach, it is able to provide an optimal solution to the leakage-aware partitioning problem.

  13. The Memory Mosaic Project and Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Cynthia Duquette

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a unit-length project involving students in the analysis of how public memory is shaped by multiple factors and functions persuasively to influence one's understanding of historical events. This project was designed for an upper-division undergraduate course in Rhetoric and Public Memory, but could be adapted for use in…

  14. Proficient Pair of Replacement Algorithms on L1 and L2 Cache for Merge Sort

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Richa

    2010-01-01

    Memory hierarchy is used to compete the processors speed. Cache memory is the fast memory which is used to conduit the speed difference of memory and processor. The access patterns of Level 1 cache (L1) and Level 2 cache (L2) are different, when CPU not gets the desired data in L1 then it accesses L2. Thus the replacement algorithm which works efficiently on L1 may not be as efficient on L2. Similarly various applications such as Matrix Multiplication, Web, Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) etc will have varying access pattern. Thus same replacement algorithm for all types of application may not be efficient. This paper works for getting an efficient pair of replacement algorithm on L1 and L2 for the algorithm Merge Sort. With the memory reference string of Merge Sort, we have analyzed the behavior of various existing replacement algorithms on L1. The existing replacement algorithms which are taken into consideration are: Least Recently Used (LRU), Least Frequently Used (LFU) and First In First Out (FIFO). After A...

  15. 可重构幸存路径管理Viterbi译码器的研究与设计%Study and Implementation of a Reconfigurable Survivor Path Memory Unit for Viterbi Decoder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张维津; 张科峰

    2011-01-01

    根据现代通信系统对自适应性和低功耗的要求,设计了一种自适应的Viterbi译码器,通过设计可重构的幸存路径存储管理单元(SMU),译码器可以根据不同调制方式自适应地选择回溯深度,并通过简化分支度量运算,降低了Viterbi算法中分支度量单元(BMU)和加-比-选单元(ACSU)的复杂度.经FPGA仿真结果表明,该算法性能满足自适应要求,且占用硬件资源低,可降低功耗14%左右,可用于含多速率多调制方式的移动通信系统.%An adaptive Viterbi decoder is designed in this paper, based on the demand of adaptive and low power consumption in modern communication systems. The Viterbi decoder can change trace depth automatically by the design of a reconfigurable survivor path memory unit. In this paper we also simplify the branch metric arithmetic, so as to decrease the complexity of the branch metric unit and the add-compare-select unit. According to the simulation result, this design has a small area and has satisfied the demand of adaption, the power consumption can be decreased by 14%. The Viterbi decoder supposed in this paper can be used in communication systems which have kinds of modulation modes.

  16. Memory training in depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becker, E.S.; Vanderhasselt, M.A.; Vrijsen, J.N.

    2015-01-01

    Memory biases, that is, general memory impairments as well as specific mood-congruent memory biases, are important vulnerability factors in depression. Recently, computerized memory trainings have been developed to target these biases, reducing rumination and lightening depressive symptoms. This

  17. Memory Hierarchy Sensitive Graph Layout

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, Amitabha

    2012-01-01

    Mining large graphs for information is becoming an increasingly important workload due to the plethora of graph structured data becoming available. An aspect of graph algorithms that has hitherto not received much interest is the effect of memory hierarchy on accesses. A typical system today has multiple levels in the memory hierarchy with differing units of locality; ranging across cache lines, TLB entries and DRAM pages. We postulate that it is possible to allocate graph structured data in main memory in a way as to improve the spatial locality of the data. Previous approaches to improving cache locality have focused only on a single unit of locality, either the cache line or virtual memory page. On the other hand cache oblivious algorithms can optimise layout for all levels of the memory hierarchy but unfortunately need to be specially designed for individual data structures. In this paper we explore hierarchical blocking as a technique for closing this gap. We require as input a specification of the units...

  18. Using your shoulder after replacement surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joint replacement surgery - using your shoulder; Shoulder replacement surgery - after ... You have had shoulder replacement surgery to replace the bones of your shoulder joint with artificial parts. The parts include a stem made of metal and a ...

  19. Inspection-replacement policy of system under predictive maintenance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Bao-you; FANG You-tong; WEI Jin-xiang; WANG Yong-liang

    2007-01-01

    In general, every system is in one of the three states: normal, abnormal, or failure state. When the system is diagnosed as abnormal state, it needs predictive maintenance. If the system fails, an identical new one will replace it. The predictive maintenance cannot make the system "as good as new". Under these assumptions, the reliability index and the inspection-replacement policy of a system were studied. The explicit expression of the reliability index and the average income rate (i.e., the long-runaverage income per unit time) are derived by using probability analysis and vector Markov process method. The criterion of feasibility for the optimal inspection-replacement policy under the maximum average income rate is obtained. The numerical example shows the optimal inspection-replacement policy can raise the average income rate when the optimal inspection-replacement policy is feasible.

  20. The road we travelled: discovery, choreography, and significance of brain replaceable neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nottebohm, Fernando

    2004-06-01

    Neurons are constantly added to the telencephalon of songbirds. In the high vocal center (HVC), where this has been studied, new neurons replace older ones that died. Peaks in replacement are seasonal and affect some neuronal classes but not others. Peaks in replacement coincide with peaks in information acquisition. The new neurons are produced by division of cells in the wall of the lateral ventricle. Where studied closely, the neuronal stem cells proved to be radial glia. Life expectancy of the new neurons ranges from weeks to months. New neuron survival is regulated by vacancies, hormones, and activity. The immediate agent of new neuron survival is, in some cases, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). The effect of BDNF is maximal 14-20 days after the cells are born, when they are establishing their connections. These observations are now being extended to other vertebrates and may apply, to varying degrees, to all of them. The function of neuronal replacement in healthy adult brain remains unclear. If synaptic number and efficacy sufficed as mechanisms for long-term memory storage and could be adjusted again and again to incorporate new memories, then neuronal replacement would seem unnecessary. Since it occurs, it seems reasonable to suppose that replacement serves to maintain learning potential in a way that could not be done just by synaptic change. Long-term memories may be encoded by long-term changes in gene expression akin to a last step in cell differentiation. If so, neuronal replacement may be the adult brain's way of striking a balance between limited memory space and the need to acquire new memories. The testing of this hypothesis remains in the future. This chapter tells how neuronal replacement was discovered in the adult songbird brain.

  1. Low Memory Low Complexity Image Compression Using HSSPIHT Encoder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.L.Vasundhara

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Due to the large requirement for memory and the high complexity of computation, JPEG2000 cannot be used in many conditions especially in the memory constraint equipment. The line-based W avelet transform was proposed and accepted because lower memory is required without affecting the result of W avelet transform, In this paper, the improved lifting schem e is introduced to perform W avelet transform to replace Mallat method that is used in the original line-based wavelet transform. In this a three-adder unit is adopted to realize lifting scheme. It can perform wavelet transform with less computation and reduce memory than Mallat algorithm. The corresponding HS_SPIHT coding is designed here so that the proposed algorithm is more suitable for equipment. W e proposed a highly scale image compression scheme based on the Set Partitioning in Hierarchical Trees (SPIHT algorithm. Our algorithm, called Highly Scalable SPIHT (HS_SPIHT, supports High Compression efficiency, spatial and SNR scalability and provides l bit stream that can be easily adapted to give bandwidth and resolution requirements by a simple transcoder (parse. The HS_SPIHT algorithm adds the spatial scalability feature without sacrificing the S NR embeddedness property as found in the original SPIHT bit stream. Highly scalable image compression scheme based on the SPIHT algorithm the proposed algorithm used, highly scalable SPIHT (HS_SPIHT Algorithm, adds the spatial scalability feature to the SPIHT algorithm through the introduction of multiple resolution dependent lists and a resolution-dependent sorting pass. SPIHT keeps the import features of the original SPIHT algorithm such as compression efficiency, full SNR Scalability and low complexity.

  2. Educating My Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarter, Jill

    , in partnership with the dedicated teachers out there, I think I can help promote the critical thinking skills and scientific literacy of the next generation of voters. Hopefully, I can also help train my replacement to be a better scientist, capable of seizing all the opportunities generated by advances in technology and our improved understanding of the universe to craft search strategies with greater probability of success than those I have initiated.

  3. Retracing Memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, David L.

    2005-01-01

    There are plenty of paths to poetry but few are as accessible as retracing ones own memories. When students are asked to write about something they remember, they are given them the gift of choosing from events that are important enough to recall. They remember because what happened was funny or scary or embarrassing or heartbreaking or silly.…

  4. Memory consolidation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takashima, A.; Bakker, I.

    2016-01-01

    In order to make use of novel experiences and knowledge to guide our future behavior, we must keep large amounts of information accessible for retrieval. The memory system that stores this information needs to be flexible in order to rapidly incorporate incoming information, but also requires that

  5. Broadcast Memories

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈淑娴

    1995-01-01

    At the root of all memory is a communication among neurons,millions of neurons, passing signals to one another like the transistors in a computer. Transistors have to be linked by wires in order to communicate—but neurons,it now seems, are different. According to a recent study dnne at Stanford, neu-

  6. Concrete Memories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiegand, Frauke Katharina

    2015-01-01

    This article traces the presence of Atlantikwall bunkers in amateur holiday snapshots and discusses the ambiguous role of the bunker site in visual cultural memory. Departing from my family’s private photo collection from twenty years of vacationing at the Danish West coast, the different mundane...

  7. [Ascending aorta replacement late after aortic valve replacement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Yasunari; Ito, Toshiaki; Maekawa, Atsuo; Sawaki, Sadanari; Fujii, Genyo; Hoshino, Satoshi; Tokoro, Masayoshi; Yanagisawa, Junji

    2013-07-01

    Replacement of the asceding aorta is indicated in patients undergoing aortic valve replacement( AVR), if the diameter of the ascending aorta is greater than 5.0 cm. If the diameter of the asceding aorta is from 4.0 to 5.0 cm, it was arguable whether replacement of the ascending aorta should be performed. Nine patients who underwent reoperative ascending aorta replacement after AVR were reviewed retrospectively. Reoperation on the asending aorta replacement was performed 11.8±7.2 years (range 1y5m~23y3m) after AVR. Mean patient age was 69.9±6.3 (range 60~81). In 2 cases, reoperations were performed early year after AVR. Although ascending aorta was dilated at the 1st operation, replacement wasn't performed for the age and minimally invasive cardiac surgery (MICS). In 3 cases, reoperations were performed more than 10 years later. On these cases, ascending aorta aneurysm and dissection occurred with no pain and were pointed out by computed tomography(CT) or ultrasonic cardiogram(UCG). We think that patients with dilatation of the ascending aorta should undergo AVR and aorta replacement at the 1st operation regardness of age. It is important that patients who underwent AVR should undergo a regular checkup on the ascending aorta.

  8. Common Kibra alleles are associated with human memory performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papassotiropoulos, Andreas; Stephan, Dietrich A; Huentelman, Matthew J; Hoerndli, Frederic J; Craig, David W; Pearson, John V; Huynh, Kim-Dung; Brunner, Fabienne; Corneveaux, Jason; Osborne, David; Wollmer, M Axel; Aerni, Amanda; Coluccia, Daniel; Hänggi, Jürgen; Mondadori, Christian R A; Buchmann, Andreas; Reiman, Eric M; Caselli, Richard J; Henke, Katharina; de Quervain, Dominique J-F

    2006-10-20

    Human memory is a polygenic trait. We performed a genome-wide screen to identify memory-related gene variants. A genomic locus encoding the brain protein KIBRA was significantly associated with memory performance in three independent, cognitively normal cohorts from Switzerland and the United States. Gene expression studies showed that KIBRA was expressed in memory-related brain structures. Functional magnetic resonance imaging detected KIBRA allele-dependent differences in hippocampal activations during memory retrieval. Evidence from these experiments suggests a role for KIBRA in human memory.

  9. Episodic memory--from brain to mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferbinteanu, Janina; Kennedy, Pamela J; Shapiro, Matthew L

    2006-01-01

    Neuronal mechanisms of episodic memory, the conscious recollection of autobiographical events, are largely unknown because electrophysiological studies in humans are conducted only in exceptional circumstances. Unit recording studies in animals are thus crucial for understanding the neurophysiological substrate that enables people to remember their individual past. Two features of episodic memory--autonoetic consciousness, the self-aware ability to "travel through time", and one-trial learning, the acquisition of information in one occurrence of the event--raise important questions about the validity of animal models and the ability of unit recording studies to capture essential aspects of memory for episodes. We argue that autonoetic experience is a feature of human consciousness rather than an obligatory aspect of memory for episodes, and that episodic memory is reconstructive and thus its key features can be modeled in animal behavioral tasks that do not involve either autonoetic consciousness or one-trial learning. We propose that the most powerful strategy for investigating neurophysiological mechanisms of episodic memory entails recording unit activity in brain areas homologous to those required for episodic memory in humans (e.g., hippocampus and prefrontal cortex) as animals perform tasks with explicitly defined episodic-like aspects. Within this framework, empirical data suggest that the basic structure of episodic memory is a temporally extended representation that distinguishes the beginning from the end of an event. Future research is needed to fully understand how neural encodings of context, sequences of items/events, and goals are integrated within mnemonic representations of autobiographical events.

  10. Morphological associative memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, G X; Sussner, P; Diza-de-Leon, J L

    1998-01-01

    The theory of artificial neural networks has been successfully applied to a wide variety of pattern recognition problems. In this theory, the first step in computing the next state of a neuron or in performing the next layer neural network computation involves the linear operation of multiplying neural values by their synaptic strengths and adding the results. A nonlinear activation function usually follows the linear operation in order to provide for nonlinearity of the network and set the next state of the neuron. In this paper we introduce a novel class of artificial neural networks, called morphological neural networks, in which the operations of multiplication and addition are replaced by addition and maximum (or minimum), respectively. By taking the maximum (or minimum) of sums instead of the sum of products, morphological network computation is nonlinear before possible application of a nonlinear activation function. As a consequence, the properties of morphological neural networks are drastically different than those of traditional neural network models. The main emphasis of the research presented here is on morphological associative memories. We examine the computing and storage capabilities of morphological associative memories and discuss differences between morphological models and traditional semilinear models such as the Hopfield net.

  11. Optical Bidirectional Associative Memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosko, Bart; Guest, Clark

    1987-06-01

    Four optical implementations of bidirectional associative memories (BAMs) are presented. BAMs are heteroassociative content addressable memories (CAMs). A BAM stores the m binary associations (A1, B1), ..., (Am, Bm) , where A is a point in the Boolean n-cube and B is a point in the Boolean p-cube. A is a neural network of n bivalent or continuous neurons ai; B is a network of p bivalent or continuous neurons bi. The fixed synaptic connections between the A and B networks are represented by some n-by-p real matrix M. Bidirectionality, forward and backward information flow, in neural nets produces two-way associative search for the nearest stored pair (Ai, Bi) to an input key. Every matrix is a bidirectionally stable hetero-associative CAM for boh bivalent and continuous networks. This generalizes the well-known unidirectional stability for autoassociative networks with square symmetric M. When the BAM neurons are activated, the network quickly evolves to a stable state of two-pattern reverberation, or pseudo-adaptive resonance. The stable reverberation corresponds to a system energy local minimum. Heteroassociative pairs (Ai, Bi) are encoded in a BAM M by summing bipolar correlation matrices, M = X1T Y1 + ... + XmT Ym , where Xi (Yi) is the bipolar version of Ai (Bi), with -1s replacing Os. the BAM storage capacity for reliable recall is roughly m reflection hologram, and a transmission hologram.

  12. Electrocatalysts Prepared by Galvanic Replacement

    OpenAIRE

    Athanasios Papaderakis; Ioanna Mintsouli; Jenia Georgieva; Sotiris Sotiropoulos

    2017-01-01

    Galvanic replacement is the spontaneous replacement of surface layers of a metal, M, by a more noble metal, Mnoble, when the former is treated with a solution containing the latter in ionic form, according to the general replacement reaction: nM + mMnoblen+ → nMm+ + mMnoble. The reaction is driven by the difference in the equilibrium potential of the two metal/metal ion redox couples and, to avoid parasitic cathodic processes such as oxygen reduction and (in some cases) hydrogen evolution too...

  13. [Will memory be lost with menopause--can an ageing woman be protected from memory disorder?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remes, Anne; Tanila, Heikki; Hallikainen, Merja

    2015-01-01

    Approximately two out of three persons affected with Alzheimer's disease are women. Estrogen is known to have positive effects on the levels of brain-derived mediators and circulation. Along with menopause, decreasing female sex hormone levels have been assumed to promote the development of memory disorders. It is possible that timing of the start of hormone replacement therapy exactly to the menopause could provide the best benefit in respect of memory and information processing. Prevention and treatment of risk factors of cardiovascular diseases along with regular exercise and a healthy diet are more important than hormone therapy in the prevention of memory disorders.

  14. Holographic Memories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramanujam, P.S.; Holme, NCR; Berg, RH

    1999-01-01

    A Two-dimensional holographic memory for archival storage is described. Assuming a coherent transfer function, an A4 page can be stored at high resolution in an area of 1 mm(2). Recently developed side-chain liquid crystalline azobenzene polyesters are found to be suitable media for holographic...... storage. They exhibit high resolution, high diffraction efficiency, have long storage life, are fully erasable and are mechanically stable....

  15. Transactional Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Grahn, Håkan

    2010-01-01

    Current and future processor generations are based on multicore architectures where the performance increase comes from an increasing number of cores on a chip. In order to utilize the performance potential of multicore architectures the programs also need to be parallel, but writing parallel programs is a non-trivial task. Transactional memory tries to ease parallel program development by providing atomic and isolated execution of code sequences, enabling software composability and protected...

  16. Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foghsgaard, Signe; Schmidt, Thomas Andersen; Kjaergard, Henrik K

    2009-01-01

    In this descriptive prospective study, we evaluate the outcomes of surgery in 98 patients who were scheduled to undergo minimally invasive aortic valve replacement. These patients were compared with a group of 50 patients who underwent scheduled aortic valve replacement through a full sternotomy....... The 30-day mortality rate for the 98 patients was zero, although 14 of the 98 mini-sternotomies had to be converted to complete sternotomies intraoperatively due to technical problems. Such conversion doubled the operative time over that of the planned full sternotomies. In the group of patients whose...... is an excellent operation in selected patients, but its true advantages over conventional aortic valve replacement (other than a smaller scar) await evaluation by means of randomized clinical trial. The "extended mini-aortic valve replacement" operation, on the other hand, is a risky procedure that should...

  17. Embedded Memory Hierarchy Exploration Based on Magnetic Random Access Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Vitório Cargnini

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Static random access memory (SRAM is the most commonly employed semiconductor in the design of on-chip processor memory. However, it is unlikely that the SRAM technology will have a cell size that will continue to scale below 45 nm, due to the leakage current that is caused by the quantum tunneling effect. Magnetic random access memory (MRAM is a candidate technology to replace SRAM, assuming appropriate dimensioning given an operating threshold voltage. The write current of spin transfer torque (STT-MRAM is a known limitation; however, this has been recently mitigated by leveraging perpendicular magnetic tunneling junctions. In this article, we present a comprehensive comparison of spin transfer torque-MRAM (STT-MRAM and SRAM cache set banks. The non-volatility of STT-MRAM allows the definition of new instant on/off policies and leakage current optimizations. Through our experiments, we demonstrate that STT-MRAM is a candidate for the memory hierarchy of embedded systems, due to the higher densities and reduced leakage of MRAM.We demonstrate that adopting STT-MRAM in L1 and L2 caches mitigates the impact of higher write latencies and increased current draw due to the use of MRAM. With the correct system-on-chip (SoC design, we believe that STT-MRAM is a viable alternative to SRAM, which minimizes leakage current and the total power consumed by the SoC.

  18. The Importance of Unitization for Familiarity-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Colleen M.; Yonelinas, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    It is often assumed that recollection is necessary to support memory for novel associations, whereas familiarity supports memory for single items. However, the levels of unitization framework assumes that familiarity can support associative memory under conditions in which the components of an association are unitized (i.e., treated as a single…

  19. PERFORMANCE OF PRIVATE CACHE REPLACEMENT POLICIES FOR MULTICORE PROCESSORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Lentz

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Multicore processors have become ubiquitous, both in general-purpose and special-purpose applications. With the number of transistors in a chip continuing to increase, the number of cores in a processor is also expected to increase. Cache replacement policy is an important design parameter of a cache hierarchy. As most of the processor designs have become multicore, there is a need to study cache replacement policies for multi-core systems. Previous studies have focused on the shared levels of the multicore cache hierarchy. In this study, we focus on the top level of the hierarchy, which bears the brunt of the memory requests emanating from each processor core. We measure the miss rates of various cache replacement policies, as the number of cores is steadily increased from 1 to 16. The study was done by modifying the publicly available SESC simulator, which models in detail a multicore processor with a multilevel cache hierarchy. Our experimental results show that for the private L1 caches, the LRU (Least Recently Used replacement policy outperforms all of the other replacement policies. This is in contrast to what was observed in previous studies for the shared L2 cache. The results presented in this paper are useful for hardware designers to optimize their cache designs or the program codes.

  20. [Neural correlates of memory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Toshikatsu

    2013-01-01

    Memory can be divided into several types, although all of them involve three successive processes: encoding, storage, and retrieval. In terms of the duration of retention, neurologists classify memory into immediate, recent, and remote memories, whereas psychologists classify memory into short-term and long-term memories. In terms of the content, episodic, semantic, and procedural memories are considered to be different types of memory. Furthermore, researchers on memory have proposed relatively new concepts of memory, i.e., working memory and prospective memory. This article first provides explanations for these several types of memory. Next, neuropsychological characteristics of amnesic syndrome are briefly outlined. Finally, how several different types of memory are affected (or preserved) in patients with amnesic syndrome is described.

  1. Radiological assessment of steam generator repair and replacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkhurst, M.A.; Rathbun, L.A.; Murphy, D.W.

    1983-12-01

    Previous analyses of the radiological impact of removing and replacing corroded steam generators have been updated based on experience at Surry Units 1 and 2 and Turkey Point Units 3 and 4. The sleeving repairs of degraded tubes at San Onofre Unit 1, Point Beach Unit 2, and R.E. Ginna are also analyzed. Actual occupational doses incurred during application of the various technologies used in repairs have been included, along with radioactive waste quantities and constituents. Considerable progress has been made in improving radiation protection and reducing worker dose by the development of remotely controlled equipment and the implementation of dose reduction strategies that have been successful in previous repair operations.

  2. Durable fear memories require PSD-95

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Paul J.; Pinard, Courtney R.; Camp, Marguerite C.; Feyder, Michael; Sah, Anupam; Bergstrom, Hadley; Graybeal, Carolyn; Liu, Yan; Schlüter, Oliver; Grant, Seth G.N.; Singewald, Nicolas; Xu, Weifeng; Holmes, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic fear memories are highly durable but also dynamic, undergoing repeated reactivation and rehearsal over time. While overly persistent fear memories underlie anxiety disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder, the key neural and molecular mechanisms underlying fear memory durability remain unclear. Post-synaptic density 95 (PSD-95) is a synaptic protein regulating glutamate receptor anchoring, synaptic stability and certain types of memory. Employing a loss-of-function mutant mouse lacking the guanylate kinase domain of PSD-95 (PSD-95GK), we analyzed the contribution of PSD-95 to fear memory formation and retrieval, and sought to identify the neural basis of PSD-95-mediated memory maintenance using ex vivo immediate-early gene mapping, in vivo neuronal recordings and viral-mediated knockdown approaches. We show that PSD-95 is dispensable for the formation and expression of recent fear memories, but essential for the formation of precise and flexible fear memories and for the maintenance of memories at remote time points. The failure of PSD-95GK mice to retrieve remote cued fear memories was associated with hypoactivation of the infralimbic cortex (IL) (not anterior cingulate (ACC) or prelimbic cortex), reduced IL single-unit firing and bursting, and attenuated IL gamma and theta oscillations. Adeno-associated PSD-95 virus-mediated knockdown in the IL, not ACC, was sufficient to impair recent fear extinction and remote fear memory, and remodel IL dendritic spines. Collectively, these data identify PSD-95 in the IL as a critical mechanism supporting the durability of fear memories over time. These preclinical findings have implications for developing novel approaches to treating trauma-based anxiety disorders that target the weakening of overly persistent fear memories. PMID:25510511

  3. Durable fear memories require PSD-95.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, P J; Pinard, C R; Camp, M C; Feyder, M; Sah, A; Bergstrom, H C; Graybeal, C; Liu, Y; Schlüter, O M; Grant, S G; Singewald, N; Xu, W; Holmes, A

    2015-07-01

    Traumatic fear memories are highly durable but also dynamic, undergoing repeated reactivation and rehearsal over time. Although overly persistent fear memories underlie anxiety disorders, such as posttraumatic stress disorder, the key neural and molecular mechanisms underlying fear memory durability remain unclear. Postsynaptic density 95 (PSD-95) is a synaptic protein regulating glutamate receptor anchoring, synaptic stability and certain types of memory. Using a loss-of-function mutant mouse lacking the guanylate kinase domain of PSD-95 (PSD-95(GK)), we analyzed the contribution of PSD-95 to fear memory formation and retrieval, and sought to identify the neural basis of PSD-95-mediated memory maintenance using ex vivo immediate-early gene mapping, in vivo neuronal recordings and viral-mediated knockdown (KD) approaches. We show that PSD-95 is dispensable for the formation and expression of recent fear memories, but essential for the formation of precise and flexible fear memories and for the maintenance of memories at remote time points. The failure of PSD-95(GK) mice to retrieve remote cued fear memory was associated with hypoactivation of the infralimbic (IL) cortex (but not the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) or prelimbic cortex), reduced IL single-unit firing and bursting, and attenuated IL gamma and theta oscillations. Adeno-associated virus-mediated PSD-95 KD in the IL, but not the ACC, was sufficient to impair recent fear extinction and remote fear memory, and remodel IL dendritic spines. Collectively, these data identify PSD-95 in the IL as a critical mechanism supporting the durability of fear memories over time. These preclinical findings have implications for developing novel approaches to treating trauma-based anxiety disorders that target the weakening of overly persistent fear memories.

  4. A Computationally Efficient P-LRU based Optimal Cache Heap Object Replacement Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burhan Ul Islam Khan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent advancement in the field of distributed computing depicts a need of developing highly associative and less expensive cache memories for the state-of-art processors i.e., Intel Core i6, i7, etc. Hence, various conventional studies introduced cache replacement policies which are one of the prominent key factors to determine the effectiveness of a cache memory. Most of the conventional cache replacement algorithms are found to be as not so efficient on memory management and complexity analysis. Therefore, a significant and thorough analysis is required to suggest a new optimal solution for optimizing the state-of-the-art cache replacement issues. The proposed study aims to conceptualize a theoretical model for optimal cache heap object replacement. The proposed model incorporates Tree based and MRU (Most Recently Used pseudo-LRU (Least Recently Used mechanism and configures it with JVM’s garbage collector to replace the old referenced objects from the heap cache lines. The performance analysis of the proposed system illustrates that it outperforms the conventional state of art replacement policies with much lower cost and complexity. It also depicts that the percentage of hits on cache heap is relatively higher than the conventional technologies.

  5. Transactional Memory

    CERN Document Server

    Harris, Tim; Rajwar, Ravi

    2010-01-01

    The advent of multicore processors has renewed interest in the idea of incorporating transactions into the programming model used to write parallel programs.This approach, known as transactional memory, offers an alternative, and hopefully better, way to coordinate concurrent threads. The ACI(atomicity, consistency, isolation) properties of transactions provide a foundation to ensure that concurrent reads and writes of shared data do not produce inconsistent or incorrect results. At a higher level, a computation wrapped in a transaction executes atomically - either it completes successfullyand

  6. Salto Talaris fixed-bearing total ankle replacement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rush, Shannon M; Todd, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    The Salto Talaris total ankle replacement is an anatomically designed fixed bearing prosthesis available in the United States based on the successful design of the mobile-bearing Salto prosthesis available outside the United States. The original mobile-bearing design was modified and the mobile-bearing was transferred to the precision instrumentation at the trial phase evaluation. Instrumentation and technique allow the surgeon to determine the functional joint axis before final implantation. The Salto Talaris total ankle replacement design blends minimal bone resection and optimizes surface area, cortical contact, and ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene conformity. The authors present an overview of the Salto Talaris total ankle replacement surgical technique and pearls for successful application.

  7. Knee Replacement: What you can Expect

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... improves function lessen with each additional surgery. Artificial knees can wear out Another risk of knee replacement ... replacement surgery to last about two hours. After knee replacement surgery After surgery, you're wheeled to ...

  8. Memory effects in turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinze, J. O.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental investigations of the wake flow of a hemisphere and cylinder show that such memory effects can be substantial and have a significant influence on momentum transport. Memory effects are described in terms of suitable memory functions.

  9. Homologous gene replacement in Physarum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burland, T.G. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Pallotta, D. [Laval Univ., Quebec (Canada)

    1995-01-01

    The protist Physarum polycephalum is useful for analysis of several aspects of cellular and developmental biology. To expand the opportunities for experimental analysis of this organism, we have developed a method for gene replacement. We transformed Physarum amoebae with plasmid DNA carrying a mutant allele, ardD{Delta}1, of the ardD actin gene; ardD{Delta}1 mutates the critical carboxy-terminal region of the gene product. Because ardD is not expressed in the amoeba, replacement of ardD{sup +} with ardD{Delta}1 should not be lethal for this cell type. Transformants were obtained only when linear plasmid DNA was used. Most transformants carried one copy of ardD{Delta}1 in addition to ardD{sup +}, but in two (5%), ardD{sup +} was replaced by a single copy of ardD{Delta}1. This is the first example of homologous gene replacement in Physarum. ardD{Delta}1 was stably maintained in the genome through growth, development and meiosis. We found no effect of ardD{Delta}l on viability, growth, or development of any of the various cell types of Physarum. Thus, the carboxy-terminal region of the ardD product appears not to perform a unique essential role in growth or development. Nevertheless, this method for homologous gene replacement can be applied to analyze the function of any cloned gene. 38 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  10. STRUKTUR DAN PROSES MEMORI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Bhinnety

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes structures and processes of human memory system according to the modal model. Sensory memory is described as the first system to store information from outside world. Short‐term memory, or now called working memory, represents a system characterized by limited ability in storing as well as retrieving information. Long‐term memory on the hand stores information larger in amount and longer than short‐term memory

  11. Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station recirc pipe dose rates with zinc injection and condenser replacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiCello, D.C.; Odell, A.D.; Jackson, T.J. [PECO Energy Co., Delta, PA (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station (PBAPS) is located near the town of Delta, Pennsylvania, on the west bank of the Susquehanna River. It is situated approximately 20 miles south of Lancaster, Pennsylvania. The site contains two boiling water reactors of General Electric design and each rated at 3,293 megawatts thermal. The units are BWR 4s and went commercial in 1977. There is also a decommissioned high temperature gas-cooled reactor on site, Unit 1. PBAPS Unit 2 recirc pipe was replaced in 1985 and Unit 3 recirc pipes replaced in 1988 with 326 NGSS. The Unit 2 replacement pipe was electropolished, and the Unit 3 pipe was electropolished and passivated. The Unit 2 brass condenser was replaced with a Titanium condenser in the first quarter of 1991, and the Unit 3 condenser was replaced in the fourth quarter of 1991. The admiralty brass condensers were the source of natural zinc in both units. Zinc injection was initiated in Unit 2 in May 1991, and in Unit 3 in May 1992. Contact dose rate measurements were made in standard locations on the 28-inch recirc suction and discharge lines to determine the effectiveness of zinc injection and to monitor radiation build-up in the pipe. Additionally, HPGe gamma scans were performed to determine the isotopic composition of the oxide layer inside the pipe. In particular, the specific ({mu}Ci/cm{sup 2}) of Co-60 and Zn-65 were analyzed.

  12. Cobra Probes Containing Replaceable Thermocouples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, John; Redding, Adam

    2007-01-01

    A modification of the basic design of cobra probes provides for relatively easy replacement of broken thermocouples. Cobra probes are standard tube-type pressure probes that may also contain thermocouples and that are routinely used in wind tunnels and aeronautical hardware. They are so named because in side views, they resemble a cobra poised to attack. Heretofore, there has been no easy way to replace a broken thermocouple in a cobra probe: instead, it has been necessary to break the probe apart and then rebuild it, typically at a cost between $2,000 and $4,000 (2004 prices). The modified design makes it possible to replace the thermocouple, in minimal time and at relatively low cost, by inserting new thermocouple wire in a tube.

  13. Memory, collective memory, orality and the gospels

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Test

    2011-06-07

    Jun 7, 2011 ... with collective memory theory in the works of Halbwachs, Connerton, Gillis, Fentress and. Wickham, Olick, Schwartz ..... critical importance of cultural memory for (re)constructing history. ...... Frankfurt am Main. Baddeley, A.D. ...

  14. Registry data trends of total ankle replacement use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roukis, Thomas S; Prissel, Mark A

    2013-01-01

    Joint arthroplasty registry data are meaningful when evaluating the outcomes of total joint replacement, because they provide unbiased objective information regarding survivorship and incidence of use. Critical evaluation of the registry data information will benefit the surgeon, patient, and industry. However, the implementation and acceptance of registry data for total ankle replacement has lagged behind that of hip and knee implant arthroplasty. Currently, several countries have national joint arthroplasty registries, with only some procuring information for total ankle replacement. We performed an electronic search to identify publications and worldwide registry databanks with pertinent information specific to total ankle replacement to determine the type of prostheses used and usage trends over time. We identified worldwide registry data from 33 countries, with details pertinent to total ankle replacement identified in only 6 countries. The obtained information was arbitrarily stratified into 3 distinct periods: 2000 to 2006, 2007 to 2010, and 2011. Within these study periods, the data from 13 total ankle replacement systems involving 3,980 ankles were identified. The vast majority (97%) of the reported ankle replacements were 3-component, mobile-bearing, uncemented prostheses. Three usage trends were identified: initial robust embracement followed by abrupt disuse, minimal use, and initial embracement followed by sustained growth in implantation. Before the widespread acceptance of new total ankle replacements, the United States should scrutinize and learn from the international registry data and develop its own national joint registry that would include total ankle replacement. Caution against the adoption of newly released prostheses, especially those without readily available revision components, is recommended.

  15. Renal replacement therapy in ICU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Deepa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosing and managing critically ill patients with renal dysfunction is a part of the daily routine of an intensivist. Acute kidney insufficiency substantially contributes to the morbidity and mortality of critically ill patients. Renal replacement therapy (RRT not only does play a significant role in the treatment of patients with renal failure, acute as well as chronic, but also has spread its domains to the treatment of many other disease conditions such as myaesthenia gravis, septic shock and acute on chronic liver failure. This article briefly outlines the role of renal replacement therapy in ICU.

  16. Prioritization methodology for chemical replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Ben; Cruit, Wendy; Schutzenhofer, Scott

    1995-01-01

    This methodology serves to define a system for effective prioritization of efforts required to develop replacement technologies mandated by imposed and forecast legislation. The methodology used is a semi quantitative approach derived from quality function deployment techniques (QFD Matrix). QFD is a conceptual map that provides a method of transforming customer wants and needs into quantitative engineering terms. This methodology aims to weight the full environmental, cost, safety, reliability, and programmatic implications of replacement technology development to allow appropriate identification of viable candidates and programmatic alternatives.

  17. Wafer Replacement Cluster Tool (Presentation);

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branz, H. M.

    2008-04-01

    This presentation on wafer replacement cluster tool discusses: (1) Platform for advanced R and D toward SAI 2015 cost goal--crystal silicon PV at area costs closer to amorphous Si PV, it's 15% efficiency, inexpensive substrate, and moderate temperature processing (<800 C); (2) Why silicon?--industrial and knowledge base, abundant and environmentally benign, market acceptance, and good efficiency; and (3) Why replace wafers?--expensive, high embedded energy content, and uses 50-100 times more silicon than needed.

  18. Experimental Results on Statistical Approaches to Page Replacement Policies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LEUNG,VITUS J.; IRANI,SANDY

    2000-12-08

    This paper investigates the questions of what statistical information about a memory request sequence is useful to have in making page replacement decisions: Our starting point is the Markov Request Model for page request sequences. Although the utility of modeling page request sequences by the Markov model has been recently put into doubt, we find that two previously suggested algorithms (Maximum Hitting Time and Dominating Distribution) which are based on the Markov model work well on the trace data used in this study. Interestingly, both of these algorithms perform equally well despite the fact that the theoretical results for these two algorithms differ dramatically. We then develop succinct characteristics of memory access patterns in an attempt to approximate the simpler of the two algorithms. Finally, we investigate how to collect these characteristics in an online manner in order to have a purely online algorithm.

  19. Load beam unit replaceable inserts for dry coal extrusion pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Timothy; Brady, John D.

    2012-11-13

    A track assembly for a particulate material extrusion pump according to an exemplary aspect of the present disclosure includes a link assembly with a roller bearing. An insert mounted to a load beam located such that the roller bearing contacts the insert.

  20. Switzerland Replaces United States at Top of Competitiveness Rankings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    On Sep. 8,2009,Switzerland tops the overall ranking in The Global Competitiveness Report 2009-2010, released by the World Economic Forum ahead of its Annual Meeting of the New Champions 2009 in Dalian.

  1. Microstore: the Stanford analog memory unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, J.T.; Chae, S.I.; Shapiro, S.; Larsen, R.S.

    1984-11-01

    An NMOS device has been developed which provides high speed analog signal storage and readout for time expansion of transient signals. This device takes advantage of HMOS-1 VLSI technology to implement an array of 256 storage cells. Sequential samples of an input waveform can be taken every 5 ns while providing an effective sampling aperture time of less than 1 ns. The design signal-to-noise ratio is 1 part in 2000. Digital control circuitry is provided on the chip for controlling the read-in and read-out processes. A reference circuit is incorporated in the chip for first order compensation of leakage drifts, sampling pedestals, and temperature effects.

  2. Review of Emerging New Solid-State Non-Volatile Memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisaki, Yoshihisa

    2013-04-01

    The integration limit of flash memories is approaching, and many new types of memory to replace conventional flash memories have been proposed. Unlike flash memories, new nonvolatile memories do not require storage of electric charges. The possibility of phase-change random-access memories (PCRAMs) or resistive-change RAMs (ReRAMs) replacing ultrahigh-density NAND flash memories has been investigated; however, many issues remain to be overcome, making the replacement difficult. Nonetheless, ferroelectric RAMs (FeRAMs) and magnetoresistive RAMs (MRAMs) are gradually penetrating into fields where the shortcomings of flash memories, such as high operating voltage, slow rewriting speed, and limited number of rewrites, make their use inconvenient. For instance, FeRAMs are widely used in ICs that require low power consumption such as smart cards and wireless tags. MRAMs are used in many kinds of controllers in industrial equipment that require high speed and unlimited rewrite operations. For successful application of new non-volatile semiconductor memories, such memories must be practically utilized in new fields in which flash memories are not applicable, and their technologies must be further developed.

  3. Memory Stacking in Hierarchical Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westö, Johan; May, Patrick J C; Tiitinen, Hannu

    2016-02-01

    Robust representations of sounds with a complex spectrotemporal structure are thought to emerge in hierarchically organized auditory cortex, but the computational advantage of this hierarchy remains unknown. Here, we used computational models to study how such hierarchical structures affect temporal binding in neural networks. We equipped individual units in different types of feedforward networks with local memory mechanisms storing recent inputs and observed how this affected the ability of the networks to process stimuli context dependently. Our findings illustrate that these local memories stack up in hierarchical structures and hence allow network units to exhibit selectivity to spectral sequences longer than the time spans of the local memories. We also illustrate that short-term synaptic plasticity is a potential local memory mechanism within the auditory cortex, and we show that it can bring robustness to context dependence against variation in the temporal rate of stimuli, while introducing nonlinearities to response profiles that are not well captured by standard linear spectrotemporal receptive field models. The results therefore indicate that short-term synaptic plasticity might provide hierarchically structured auditory cortex with computational capabilities important for robust representations of spectrotemporal patterns.

  4. Optical memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Samuel S; Zhang, Yanfeng

    2013-07-02

    Optical memory comprising: a semiconductor wire, a first electrode, a second electrode, a light source, a means for producing a first voltage at the first electrode, a means for producing a second voltage at the second electrode, and a means for determining the presence of an electrical voltage across the first electrode and the second electrode exceeding a predefined voltage. The first voltage, preferably less than 0 volts, different from said second voltage. The semiconductor wire is optically transparent and has a bandgap less than the energy produced by the light source. The light source is optically connected to the semiconductor wire. The first electrode and the second electrode are electrically insulated from each other and said semiconductor wire.

  5. Double emulsions as fat replacers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oppermann, Anika

    2017-01-01

    The use of double (w1/o/w2) emulsions, in which part of the oil is replaced by small water droplets, is a promising strategy to reduce oil content in food products. For successful applications, (1) significant levels of fat reduction (i.e. significant amounts of water inside the oil droplets) have

  6. Replacement policies for dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Relund

    In a recent paper a hierarchical Markov decision processes (MDP) with finite state and action space was formulated for the dairy cow replacement problem with stage lengths of 1 d. Bayesian updating was used to predict the performance of each cow in the herd and economic decisions were based...

  7. Electrocatalysts Prepared by Galvanic Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasios Papaderakis

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Galvanic replacement is the spontaneous replacement of surface layers of a metal, M, by a more noble metal, Mnoble, when the former is treated with a solution containing the latter in ionic form, according to the general replacement reaction: nM + mMnoblen+ → nMm+ + mMnoble. The reaction is driven by the difference in the equilibrium potential of the two metal/metal ion redox couples and, to avoid parasitic cathodic processes such as oxygen reduction and (in some cases hydrogen evolution too, both oxygen levels and the pH must be optimized. The resulting bimetallic material can in principle have a Mnoble-rich shell and M-rich core (denoted as Mnoble(M leading to a possible decrease in noble metal loading and the modification of its properties by the underlying metal M. This paper reviews a number of bimetallic or ternary electrocatalytic materials prepared by galvanic replacement for fuel cell, electrolysis and electrosynthesis reactions. These include oxygen reduction, methanol, formic acid and ethanol oxidation, hydrogen evolution and oxidation, oxygen evolution, borohydride oxidation, and halide reduction. Methods for depositing the precursor metal M on the support material (electrodeposition, electroless deposition, photodeposition as well as the various options for the support are also reviewed.

  8. An Overview of Non-Volatile Flip-Flops Based on Emerging Memory Technologies An Overview of Non-Volatile Flip-Flops Based on Emerging Memory Technologies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. M. Portal; C. Chappert; W.-S. Zhao; M. Bocquet; M. Moreau; H. Aziza; D. Deleruyelle; Y. Zhang; W. Kang; J.-O. Klein; Y.-G. Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Low power consumption is a major issue in nowadays electronics systems. This trend is pushed by the development of data center related to cloud services and soon to the Internet of Things (IoT) deployment. Memories are one of the major contributors to power consumption. However, the development of emerging memory technologies paves the way to low-power design, through the partial replacement of the dynamic random access memory (DRAM) with the non-volatile stand-alone memory in servers or with the embedded or distributed emerging non-volatile memory in IoT objects. In the latter case, non-volatile flip-flops (NVFFs) seem a promising candidate to replace the retention latch. Indeed, IoT objects present long sleep time and NVFFs offer to save data in registers with zero power when the application is idle. This paper gives an overview of NVFF architecture flavors for various emerging memory technologies.

  9. Single Parameter Model for Free Recall And the Nature of Partially Filled Working Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Tarnow, Dr Eugen

    2009-01-01

    I present a single parameter model of free recall and fit the one parameter, the probability per time unit of an item in working memory entering the next memory store (similar to Atkinson and Shiffrin, 1968), to the original Murdock (1962) data. Working memory is modeled as having space for a maximum of 4 items (Cowan, 2001). The first four probability values convey precise information about how items in the partially filled working memory enter the next memory store. In particular, one ...

  10. Bonding over Dentin Replacement Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meraji, Naghmeh; Camilleri, Josette

    2017-08-01

    Dentin replacement materials are necessary in large cavities to protect the pulp and reduce the bulk of filling material. These materials are layered with a composite resin restorative material. Microleakage caused by poor bonding of composite resin to underlying dentin replacement material will result in pulp damage. The aim of this study was to characterize the interface between dentin replacement materials and composite resin and to measure the shear bond strength after dynamic aging. Biodentine (Septodont, Saint Maur-des-Fosses, France), Theracal LC (Bisco, Schaumburg, IL), and Fuji IX (GC, Tokyo, Japan) were used as dentin replacement materials. They were then overlaid with a total-etch and bonding agent or a self-etch primer and composite resin or a glass ionomer cement. All combinations were thermocycled for 3000 cycles. The interface was characterized using scanning electron microscopy and elemental mapping. Furthermore, the shear bond strength was assessed. The Biodentine surface was modified by etching. The Theracal LC and Fuji IX microstructure was unchanged upon the application of acid etch. The Biodentine and glass ionomer interface showed an evident wide open space, and glass particles from the glass ionomer adhered to the Biodentine surface. Elemental migration was shown with aluminum, barium, fluorine, and ytterbium present in Biodentine from the overlying composite resin. Calcium was more stable. The bond strength between Theracal LC and composite using a total-etch technique followed by self-etch primer achieved the best bond strength values. Biodentine exhibited the weakest bond with complete failure of bonding shown after demolding and thermocycling. Dynamic aging is necessary to have clinically valid data. Bonding composite resin to water-based dentin replacement materials is still challenging, and further alternatives for restoration of teeth using such materials need to be developed. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists

  11. Postoperative Autologous Reinfusion in Total Knee Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Crescibene

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgeries for total knee replacement (TKR are increasing and in this context there is a need to develop new protocols for management and use of blood transfusion therapy. Autologous blood reduces the need for allogeneic blood transfusion and the aim of the present study was to verify the safety and the clinical efficacy. An observational retrospective study has been conducted on 124 patients, undergoing cemented total knee prosthesis replacement. Observed population was stratified into two groups: the first group received reinfusion of autologous blood collected in the postoperative surgery and the second group did not receive autologous blood reinfusion. Analysis of data shows that patients undergoing autologous blood reinfusion received less homologous blood bags (10.6% versus 30%; p=0.08 and reduced days of hospitalization (7.88 ± 0.7 days versus 8.96 ± 2.47 days for the control group; p=0.03. Microbiological tests were negative in all postoperatively salvaged and reinfused units. Our results emphasize the effectiveness of this procedure and have the characteristics of simplicity, low cost (€97.53 versus €103.79; p<0.01, and easy reproducibility. Use of autologous drainage system postoperatively is a procedure that allows reducing transfusion of homologous blood bags in patients undergoing TKR.

  12. Memory and Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈园

    1996-01-01

    Of all the myths that surround memory, the most damaging is that it is agift. That is quite untrue. Memory is a skill; and like any skill its performancedepends on application, on practice, and on regular training. Everyone poten-tially has a first-class memory; and everyone can train their memory, and there-

  13. Memory, microprocessor, and ASIC

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Wai-Kai

    2003-01-01

    System Timing. ROM/PROM/EPROM. SRAM. Embedded Memory. Flash Memories. Dynamic Random Access Memory. Low-Power Memory Circuits. Timing and Signal Integrity Analysis. Microprocessor Design Verification. Microprocessor Layout Method. Architecture. ASIC Design. Logic Synthesis for Field Programmable Gate Array (EPGA) Technology. Testability Concepts and DFT. ATPG and BIST. CAD Tools for BIST/DFT and Delay Faults.

  14. Unit 03 - Introduction to Computers

    OpenAIRE

    Unit 74, CC in GIS; National Center for Geographic Information and Analysis

    1990-01-01

    This unit provides a brief introduction to computer hardware and software. It discusses binary notation, the ASCII coding system and hardware components including the central processing unit (CPU), memory, peripherals and storage media. Software including operating systems, word processors database packages, spreadsheets and statistical packages are briefly described.

  15. High-Capacity Quantum Associative Memories

    OpenAIRE

    Diamantini, M. Cristina; Trugenberger, Carlo A.

    2015-01-01

    We review our models of quantum associative memories that represent the "quantization" of fully coupled neural networks like the Hopfield model. The idea is to replace the classical irreversible attractor dynamics driven by an Ising model with pattern-dependent weights by the reversible rotation of an input quantum state onto an output quantum state consisting of a linear superposition with probability amplitudes peaked on the stored pattern closest to the input in Hamming distance, resulting...

  16. Event Segmentation Ability Uniquely Predicts Event Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, Jesse Q.; Zacks, Jeffrey M.; Hambrick, David Z.; Zacks, Rose T.; Kurby, Christopher A.; Bailey, Heather R.; Eisenberg, Michelle L.; Beck, Taylor M.

    2013-01-01

    Memory for everyday events plays a central role in tasks of daily living, autobiographical memory, and planning. Event memory depends in part on segmenting ongoing activity into meaningful units. This study examined the relationship between event segmentation and memory in a lifespan sample to answer the following question: Is the ability to segment activity into meaningful events a unique predictor of subsequent memory, or is the relationship between event perception and memory accounted for by general cognitive abilities? Two hundred and eight adults ranging from 20 to 79 years old segmented movies of everyday events and attempted to remember the events afterwards. They also completed psychometric ability tests and tests measuring script knowledge for everyday events. Event segmentation and script knowledge both explained unique variance in event memory above and beyond the psychometric measures, and did so as strongly in older as in younger adults. These results suggest that event segmentation is a basic cognitive mechanism, important for memory across the lifespan. PMID:23942350

  17. Urbanization, Ikization, and Replacement Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yanguang

    2015-01-01

    The phenomenon of Iks was first found by anthropologists and biologists, but it is actually a problem of human geography. However, it has not yet drawn extensive attention of geographers. In this paper, a hypothesis of ikization is presented that sudden and violent change of geographical environments results in dismantling of traditional culture, which then result in collective depravity of a nationality. By quantitative analysis and mathematical modeling, the causality between urbanization and ikization is discussed, and the theory of replacement dynamics is employed to interpret the process of ikization. Urbanization is in essence a nonlinear process of population replacement. Urbanization may result in ikization because that the migration of population from rural regions to urban regions always give rise to abrupt changes of geographical environments and traditional culture. It is necessary to protect the geographical environment against disruption, and to inherit and develop traditional culture in order t...

  18. [MINIMALLY INVASIVE AORTIC VALVE REPLACEMENT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabata, Minoru

    2016-03-01

    Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement (MIAVR) is defined as aortic valve replacement avoiding full sternotomy. Common approaches include a partial sternotomy right thoracotomy, and a parasternal approach. MIAVR has been shown to have advantages over conventional AVR such as shorter length of stay and smaller amount of blood transfusion and better cosmesis. However, it is also known to have disadvantages such as longer cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic cross-clamp times and potential complications related to peripheral cannulation. Appropriate patient selection is very important. Since the procedure is more complex than conventional AVR, more intensive teamwork in the operating room is essential. Additionally, a team approach during postoperative management is critical to maximize the benefits of MIAVR.

  19. Morphological bidirectional associative memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, G X.; Diaz-de-Leon, J L.; Sussner, P

    1999-07-01

    The theory of artificial neural networks has been successfully applied to a wide variety of pattern recognition problems. In this theory, the first step in computing the next state of a neuron or in performing the next layer neural network computation involves the linear operation of multiplying neural values by their synaptic strengths and adding the results. Thresholding usually follows the linear operation in order to provide for nonlinearity of the network. In this paper we discuss a novel class of artificial neural networks, called morphological neural networks, in which the operations of multiplication and addition are replaced by addition and maximum (or minimum), respectively. By taking the maximum (or minimum) of sums instead of the sum of products, morphological network computation is nonlinear before thresholding. As a consequence, the properties of morphological neural networks are drastically different from those of traditional neural network models. The main emphasis of the research presented here is on morphological bidirectional associative memories (MBAMs). In particular, we establish a mathematical theory for MBAMs and provide conditions that guarantee perfect bidirectional recall for corrupted patterns. Some examples that illustrate performance differences between the morphological model and the traditional semilinear model are also given.

  20. Verbal memory and menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Pauline M

    2015-11-01

    Midlife women frequently report memory problems during the menopausal transition. Recent studies validate those complaints by showing significant correlations between memory complaints and performance on validated memory tasks. Longitudinal studies demonstrate modest declines in verbal memory during the menopausal transition and a likely rebound during the postmenopausal stage. Clinical studies that examine changes in memory following hormonal withdrawal and add-back hormone therapy (HT) demonstrate that estradiol plays a critical role in memory. Although memory changes are frequently attributed to menopausal symptoms, studies show that the memory problems occur during the transition even after controlling for menopausal symptoms. It is well established that self-reported vasomotor symptoms (VMS) are unrelated to objective memory performance. However, emerging evidence suggests that objectively measured VMS significantly correlate with memory performance, brain activity during rest, and white matter hyperintensities. This evidence raises important questions about whether VMS and VMS treatments might affect memory during the menopausal transition. Unfortunately, there are no clinical trials to inform our understanding of how HT affects both memory and objectively measured VMS in women in whom HT is indicated for treatment of moderate to severe VMS. In clinical practice, it is helpful to normalize memory complaints, to note that evidence suggests that memory problems are temporary, and to counsel women with significant VMS that memory might improve with treatment.

  1. Mitochondrial Replacement: Ethics And Identity

    OpenAIRE

    Wrigley, Anthony; Wilkinson, Stephen; Appleby, John B

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial replacement techniques (MRTs) have the potential to allow prospective parents who are at risk of passing on debilitating or even life-threatening mitochondrial disorders to have healthy children to whom they are genetically related. Ethical concerns have however been raised about these techniques. This article focuses on one aspect of the ethical debate, the question of whether there is any moral difference between the two types of MRT proposed: Pronuclear Transfer (PNT) and Mat...

  2. Salam Memorial

    CERN Document Server

    Rubbia, Carlo

    1997-01-01

    by T.W.B. KIBBLE / Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London. Recollections of Abdus Salam at Imperial College I shall give a personal account of Professor Salam's life and work from the perspective of a colleague at Imperial College, concentrating particularly but not exclusively on the period leading up to the discovery of the electro-weak theory. If necessary I could perhaps give more detail, but only once I have given more thought to what ground I shall cover. by Sheldon Lee GLASHOW / Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA. Memories of Abdus Salam. My interactions with Abdus Salam, weak as they have been, extended over five decades. I regret that we never once collaborated in print or by correspondence. I visited Abdus only twice in London and twice again in Trieste, and met him at the occasional conference or summer school. Our face-to-face encounters could be counted on one's fingers and toes, but we became the best of friends. Others will discuss Abdus as an inspiring teacher, as a great scientist,...

  3. From Pink Memory to Red Classics --Triple Replacement in Youth Song%由“粉色”记忆到“红色经典”——试论《青春之歌》叙事话语的三重置换

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田承良

    2012-01-01

    The Song of Youth by Yang Mo has successfully created triple displacements: discourse from a Pettybourgeois intellectual to a revolutionist; topics from love to politics; personal memories to collective memories. This has shaped the red classic texts in the 50s and 60s in the 20th century.%杨沫的《青春之歌》成功地进行了三重置换,即小资产阶级知识分子向一个革命者的话语转换,爱情话语向政治话语的转换,个人记忆向集体记忆的转换。从而形成二十世纪五、六十年代的红色经典文本。

  4. Replacing magnets at the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    LHC, LSI2, Point 4

    2013-01-01

    CERN engineers have been working through the night this week to move the final replacement dipole magnets into position on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Though there are several still to go, the teams expect to have completed the task by the end of this month. Dipole magnets bend the paths of particles as they travel around the circular accelerator. Of the LHC's 1232 dipoles – each 15 metres long and weighing 35 tonnes – 15 are being replaced as part of the long shutdown of CERN's accelerator complex. These 15 magnets suffered wear and tear during the LHC's first 4-year run. Three quadrupole-magnet assemblies – which help to focus particles into a tight beam – have also been replaced. Moving such heavy magnets requires specially adapted cranes and trailers both above and below ground. There are several access points on the LHC. Some, such as the 100-metre vertical access shaft down to the ALICE experiment, are equipped with lifts to allow technical personnel and visitors down to the caverns. Other ...

  5. Results of Austin Moore replacement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jadhav A

    1996-04-01

    Full Text Available Forty cases of Austin Moore Replacement done for transcervical fractures of the femur in patients were reviewed after a period of 12 to 48 months postoperatively (mean 26 mth. 30 cases (75% had mild to severe pain of non-infective origin, starting as early as 6 months postoperatively. This was irrespective of the make, size or position (varus/valgus of the prosthesis. Though the Aufranc and Sweet clinical scoring was satisfactory in 65% cases, radiological evidence of complications like sinking, protrusion, etc. were seen in majority of the cases. Calcar resorption was seen in 34 cases (85% as early as 4 months postoperatively. Results of THR and bipolar replacement done for transcervical fractures in recent literature show 85% pain-free cases at 5 years. We feel that Austin Moore Replacement should be reserved for patients more than 65 years of age and those who are less active or debilitated because of other factors, because of increased acetabular wear with time in the younger individual. This is corroborated by unsatisfactory results in patients less than 65 years of age (p < 0.05.

  6. The caudal septum replacement graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foda, Hossam M T

    2008-01-01

    To describe a technique for reconstructing the lost tip support in cases involving caudal septal and premaxillary deficiencies. The study included 120 patients with aesthetic and functional nasal problems resulting from the loss of caudal septal and premaxillary support. An external rhinoplasty approach was performed to reconstruct the lost support using a cartilaginous caudal septum replacement graft and premaxillary augmentation with Mersilene mesh. The majority of cases (75%) involved revisions in patients who had previously undergone 1 or more nasal surgical procedures. A caudal septum replacement graft was combined with premaxillary augmentation in 93 patients (77.5%). The mean follow-up period was 3 years (range, 1-12 years). The technique succeeded in correcting the external nasal deformities in all patients and resulted in a significant improvement in breathing in 74 patients (86%) with preoperative nasal obstruction. There were no cases of infection, displacement, or extrusion. The caudal septum replacement graft proved to be very effective in restoring the lost tip support in patients with caudal septal deficiency. Combining the graft with premaxillary augmentation using Mersilene mesh helped increase support and stability over long-term follow-up.

  7. Introduction to magnetic random-access memory

    CERN Document Server

    Dieny, Bernard; Lee, Kyung-Jin

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic random-access memory (MRAM) is poised to replace traditional computer memory based on complementary metal-oxide semiconductors (CMOS). MRAM will surpass all other types of memory devices in terms of nonvolatility, low energy dissipation, fast switching speed, radiation hardness, and durability. Although toggle-MRAM is currently a commercial product, it is clear that future developments in MRAM will be based on spin-transfer torque, which makes use of electrons’ spin angular momentum instead of their charge. MRAM will require an amalgamation of magnetics and microelectronics technologies. However, researchers and developers in magnetics and in microelectronics attend different technical conferences, publish in different journals, use different tools, and have different backgrounds in condensed-matter physics, electrical engineering, and materials science. This book is an introduction to MRAM for microelectronics engineers written by specialists in magnetic mat rials and devices. It presents the bas...

  8. Organizational memory: from expectations memory to procedural memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ebbers, J.J.; Wijnberg, N.M.

    2009-01-01

    Organizational memory is not just the stock of knowledge about how to do things, but also of expectations of organizational members vis-à-vis each other and the organization as a whole. The central argument of this paper is that this second type of organizational memory -organizational expectations

  9. Organizational memory: from expectations memory to procedural memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ebbers, J.J.; Wijnberg, N.M.

    2009-01-01

    Organizational memory is not just the stock of knowledge about how to do things, but also of expectations of organizational members vis-à-vis each other and the organization as a whole. The central argument of this paper is that this second type of organizational memory -organizational expectations

  10. Exploring history and memory through autobiographical memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivor Goodson

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The article reviews the role of autobiographical memory as a site of narrative construction. Far from being a place of liberal retrospective recall it is a site of active recapitulation and reconstruction. The article provides examples of how history and memory are intermingled. It also draws in the author’s autobiographical vignettes to explore the underpinning desires for historical reconstruction in autobiographical memory work

  11. Quantum memory for entangled two-mode squeezed states

    CERN Document Server

    Jensen, K; Krauter, H; Fernholz, T; Nielsen, B M; Serafini, A; Owari, M; Plenio, M B; Wolf, M M; Polzik, E S

    2010-01-01

    A quantum memory for light is a key element for the realization of future quantum information networks. Requirements for a good quantum memory are (i) versatility (allowing a wide range of inputs) and (ii) true quantum coherence (preserving quantum information). Here we demonstrate such a quantum memory for states possessing Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) entanglement. These multi-photon states are two-mode squeezed by 6.0 dB with a variable orientation of squeezing and displaced by a few vacuum units. This range encompasses typical input alphabets for a continuous variable quantum information protocol. The memory consists of two cells, one for each mode, filled with cesium atoms at room temperature with a memory time of about 1msec. The preservation of quantum coherence is rigorously proven by showing that the experimental memory fidelity 0.52(2) significantly exceeds the benchmark of 0.45 for the best possible classical memory for a range of displacements.

  12. Ferroelectric memories: A possible answer to the hardened nonvolatile question

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messenger, G.C.; Coppage, F.N.

    1988-12-01

    Ferroelectric memory cells have been fabricated using a process compatible with semiconductor VLSI (Very Large-Scale Integration) manufacturing techniques which are basically nonvolatile and radiation hard. The memory can be made NDRO (Nondestructive Readout) for strategic systems using several techniques; the most practical is probably a rapid read/restore in combination with EDAC software. This memory can replace plated wire and will have substantial advantages in cost, weight, size, power and speed. It provides a practical cost-competitive solution to the need for nonvolatile RAM in all hardened tactical, avionic, and space systems.

  13. Fusion following failed total ankle replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wünschel, Markus; Leichtle, Ulf G; Leichtle, Carmen I; Walter, Christian; Mittag, Falk; Arlt, Eva; Suckel, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    Although mid- to long-term results after total ankle replacement have improved because of available second- and third-generation devices, failure of total ankle replacement is still more common compared with total hip replacement and total knee replacement. The portfolio of available total ankle replacement revision component options is small. Furthermore, the bone stock of the tibiotalar region is scarce making it difficult and in some situations impossible to perform revision total ankle replacement. In these cases tibiotalar and tibiotalocalcaneal fusions are valuable options. This article describes which surgical procedures should be performed depending on the initial situation and gives detailed advice on surgical technique, postoperative care, and clinical results.

  14. Memory Without Parties or Parties Without Memory?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Mario Solís Delgadillo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the role of political parties in Argentina, Chile and Guatemala in relation to the implementation of public policies of memory after the return to democracy in each of these countries. To do this, we discuss the concept of memory and the problems of memorial obsession. We consider the uses and abuses of memory that human rights organizations manifest on the subject, and examine the work of the parties about the level of adaptation that allows claims of human rights movement to become matters of public policy.

  15. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: Comprehensive Review and Present Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misenheimer, Jacob A.; Ramaraj, Radhakrishnan

    2017-01-01

    Aortic stenosis is the most common valvular heart disease in the developed world. About 7% of the population over age 65 years suffers from degenerative aortic stenosis. The prognosis of patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis is dismal without valve replacement. Even though the American College of Cardiology recommends aortic valve replacement to treat this condition as a class I recommendation, approximately one third of these patients over the age of 75 years are not referred for surgery. Typically, this is from concern about prohibitive surgical risk associated with patient frailty, comorbidities, age, and severe left ventricular dysfunction. The advent in France of transcatheter aortic valve replacement has raised the hope in the United States for an alternative, less invasive treatment for aortic stenosis. Two recent trials—the Placement of AoRTic TraNscathetER Valve Trial Edwards SAPIEN Transcatheter Heart Valve (Partner) and the CoreValve US Pivotal—have established transcatheter aortic valve replacement as the preferred approach in patients who are at high or prohibitive surgical risk. The more recently published Partner 2 trial has shown the feasibility of transcatheter aortic valve replacement in intermediate-surgical-risk patients as well. With a profile that promises easier use and better valve performance and delivery, newer-generation valves have shown their potential for further improvement in safety profile and overall outcomes. We review the history and status of this topic. PMID:28265210

  16. Radiology of total hip replacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffiths, H.J.; Lovelock, J.E.; McCollister Evarts, C.; Geyer, D.

    1984-06-01

    The radiology of total hip replacement (THR) and its complications is reviewed in conjunction with a long-term follow-up study on 402 patients with 501 prostheses. The indications, contraindications, biomechanics, and operative management of these patients is discussed. Clinical complications such as deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and hemorrhage are mentioned. Postoperative infections including granulomatous pseudotumors, dislocations and fractures, true loosening of the prosthesis, and heterotopic bone formation (HBF) are discussed and illustrated. The importance of differentiating the lucent line from true loosening is stressed. Mechanical and other clinical complications which are largely ignored by radiologists are also discussed. The uses of arthrography and bone scanning are included.

  17. [Proximal and total femur replacement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennekamp, P H; Wirtz, D C; Dürr, H R

    2012-07-01

    Reconstruction of segmental bone defects of the proximal femur following wide tumor resection or revision arthroplasty. Aggressive benign or primary malignant bone tumors of the proximal femur; destructive metastases; massive segmental bone defects of the proximal femur; periprosthetic fractures. Local infection; very short life expectancy (acetabular bone stock. Anterolateral approach. Exposure and detachment of the iliopsoas and gluteus medius muscle from the proximal femur with a sufficient safety margin to the bone; distal transsection of the vastus lateralis/intermedius and rectus femoris muscle according to the extraosseous tumor extension; distal femur osteotomy al least 3 cm beyond the farthest point of tumor extension; in case of total femur replacement, additional lateral arthrotomy of the knee with resection of the ligaments and menisci; reaming of the medullary canal after securing the shaft with a Verbrugge clamp; trial assembly and reduction followed by the definitive implantation of the prosthesis with adjustment of the femoral neck anteversion in 5° increments; soft tissue reconstruction and fixation to an attachment tube covering the prosthesis; in case of total femur replacement, the preparation of the tibia is followed by the coupling of the tibial and femoral components. Infection prophylaxis, 20 kg partial weight bearing, continuous passive motion. A total of 20  patients with proximal femur replacement and 2 patients with total femur replacement implanted between June 2007 and December 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. Three patients had primary malignant bone tumors, while 19 patients underwent resection for metastatic disease. The mean age at surgery was 62.0 ± 18.1 years (18-82 years). Fifteen patients with a mean follow-up of 20.3 ± 17.2 months (4-51 months) were studied. Among the 22 cases, periprosthetic infection occurred in 3 patients (13.6%), dislocation in 2 patients (9.1%). Evaluation of the functional

  18. Design and Simulation of a Quaternary Memory Cell based on a Physical Memristor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nannarelli, Alberto; Taylor, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Memristors were theorized more than fifty years ago, but only recently physical devices with memristor’s behavior have been fabricated and shipped. In this work, we experiment on one of these physical memristors by designing a memristorbased memory cell, implementing the cell, and testing it. Our...... experiments demonstrate that the memristor technology is not yet mature for practical applications, but, nevertheless, when production will provide reliable and dependable devices, memristorbased memory systems may replace CMOS memories with some advantages....

  19. The German Replacement Army (Ersatzheer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1944-04-01

    Wkr. XIII), 52 (Wkr. X), and 66 (Wkr. XII) the last digit of th ~ number has been found to indicate the Wehrkreis of each unit. Most of the units...regular courses for officer candidates are held: (a) Fahnenjunker-Lehrgang I at Wiinsdorf (Wkr. III), probably now at th ~ School for Panzer Troops I in...Heerweiler tiber Bingen (Wkr. XII), and Wischau near Brunn (Wkr. B.u.M.). (c) Panzerfahrschulen (Tank Driver Schools).-Have been re- ported at Gelnhausen

  20. The power of living things: Living memorials as therapeutic landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heather L. McMillen; Lindsay K. Campbell; Erika S. Svendsen

    2017-01-01

    In response to the events of 11 September 2001 (9/11), many communities came together to create living memorials. Many living memorials were established near the crash sites, but others were created across the United States from urban to rural areas, with designs ranging from entire forests to single trees. They were created by surviving family members, supporters of...

  1. FPGA Based Intelligent Co-operative Processor in Memory Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, Zaki; Sotudeh, Reza; Hussain, Dil Muhammad Akbar

    2011-01-01

    In a continuing effort to improve computer system performance, Processor-In-Memory (PIM) architecture has emerged as an alternative solution. PIM architecture incorporates computational units and control logic directly on the memory to provide immediate access to the data. To exploit the potentia...

  2. Long Memory, Fractional Integration, and Cross-Sectional Aggregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haldrup, Niels; Vera-Valdés, Eduardo

    It is commonly argued that observed long memory in time series variables can result from cross-sectional aggregation of dynamic heterogeneous micro units. For instance, Granger (1980) demonstrated that aggregation of AR(1) processes with a Beta distributed AR coefficient can exhibit long memory...

  3. FPGA Based Intelligent Co-operative Processor in Memory Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, Zaki; Sotudeh, Reza; Hussain, Dil Muhammad Akbar

    2011-01-01

    In a continuing effort to improve computer system performance, Processor-In-Memory (PIM) architecture has emerged as an alternative solution. PIM architecture incorporates computational units and control logic directly on the memory to provide immediate access to the data. To exploit the potential...

  4. Development of a tire-replacement handler for large scaled dump trucks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimauchi, H. [Aomi Lime Stone Mine, Denkikakgaku-kogyo co. Ltd., Niigata (Japan); Ujihira, M. [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). School of Engineering

    2005-07-01

    Tire replacement for large-scale mine haulage trucks is expensive and poses a burden to mine operators that intend to reduce costs. This study examined a method to move the central axis of a large scale tire to an optional height while remaining horizontal with the ground. The motion of a tire replacement handler system was analyzed both theoretically and experimentally. A tire handler unit attached to a bulldozer was then developed and tire replacement tests were conducted. The study showed that the optional height of the axis of a large diameter tire that has to be replaced can be adjusted smoothly. The rolling test for a large scale tire using a pair of 7 inch diameter steel pipes showed that the total time of front tire replacement was 282-303 minutes. The newly developed and simple tire handler unit was shown to have a broad range of applications and was cost effective. 4 refs., 3 tabs., 8 figs.

  5. Neonatal varicella pneumonia, surfactant replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mousa Ahmadpour-kacho

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chickenpox is a very contagious viral disease that caused by varicella-zoster virus, which appears in the first week of life secondary to transplacental transmission of infection from the affected mother. When mother catches the disease five days before and up to two days after the delivery, the chance of varicella in neonate in first week of life is 17%. A generalized papulovesicular lesion is the most common clinical feature. Respiratory involvement may lead to giant cell pneumonia and respiratory failure. The mortality rate is up to 30% in the case of no treatment, often due to pneumonia. Treatment includes hospitalization, isolation and administration of intravenous acyclovir. The aim of this case report is to introduce the exogenous surfactant replacement therapy after intubation and mechanical ventilation for respiratory failure in neonatal chickenpox pneumonia and respiratory distress. Case Presentation: A seven-day-old neonate boy was admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Amirkola Children’s Hospital, Babol, north of Iran, with generalized papulovesicular lesions and respiratory distress. His mother has had a history of Varicella 4 days before delivery. He was isolated and given supportive care, intravenous acyclovir and antibiotics. On the second day, he was intubated and connected to mechanical ventilator due to severe pneumonia and respiratory failure. Because of sever pulmonary involvement evidenced by Chest X-Ray and high ventilators set-up requirement, intratracheal surfactant was administered in two doses separated by 12 hours. He was discharged after 14 days without any complication with good general condition. Conclusion: Exogenous surfactant replacement therapy can be useful as an adjunctive therapy for the treatment of respiratory failure due to neonatal chickenpox.

  6. B Plant process piping replacement feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howden, G.F.

    1996-02-07

    Reports on the feasibility of replacing existing embedded process piping with new more corrosion resistant piping between cells and between cells and a hot pipe trench of a Hanford Site style canyon facility. Provides concepts for replacement piping installation, and use of robotics to replace the use of the canyon crane as the primary means of performing/supporting facility modifications (eg, cell lining, pipe replacement, equipment reinstallation) and operational maintenenace.

  7. REMINDER REPLACEMENT OF FRENCH CARDS

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division; Cards.Service@cern.ch

    2001-01-01

    The French Ministry of Foreign Affairs is currently replacing all diplomatic cards, special cards and employment permits («attestations de fonctions») held by members of the personnel and their families. These cards are replaced by secure, computerized equivalents. The old cards may no longer be used after 31 December 2001. For the purposes of the handover, members of the personnel must go personally to the cards office (33/1-015) between 8h30 and 12h30, in order to fill in a «fiche individuelle» form, taking the following documents for themselves and members of their families already in possession of a French card : A recent identity photograph in 4.5 cm x 3.5 cm format, the French card in their possession, an A4 photocopy of the same French card, certified by the cards office as being a true copy. Those members of the personnel whose cards (and/or cards belonging to members of their families) are shortly due to expire, or have recently done so, are also requested...

  8. Total hip replacement in dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyls, Inge R A E; Rietveld, A B M Boni; Ourila, Tiia; Emerton, Mark E; Bird, H A

    2013-04-01

    A case report of a professional contemporary dancer who successfully returned to the stage after bilateral total hip replacements (THR) for osteoarthritis is presented, together with her own commentary and a retrospective cohort study of total hip replacements in dancers. In the presented cohort, there were no post-operative dislocations or infections, the original pain had been relieved, rehabilitation was objectively normal and all resumed their dance (teaching) activities. Nevertheless, they were disappointed about the prolonged rehabilitation. Due to their high demands as professional dancers, post-operative expectations were too optimistic in view of the usual quick and favourable results of THR in the older and less physically active, general population. In all dancers with unilateral osteoarthritis, the left hip was involved, which may reflect the tendency to use the left leg as standing leg and be suggestive that strenuous physical activity may lead to osteoarthritis. Better rehabilitation guidelines are needed for dancer patients undergoing THR, especially drawing their attention to realistic post-operative expectations.

  9. Medications for Memory Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by state Home > Alzheimer's Disease > Treatments > Medications for Memory Overview What Is Dementia? What Is Alzheimer's? Younger/ ... Interactive Tour Risk Factors Diagnosis Treatments Medications for Memory Treatments for Behavior For Sleep Changes Alternative Treatments ...

  10. Tracing Cultural Memory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiegand, Frauke Katharina

    We encounter, relate to and make use of our past and that of others in multifarious and increasingly mobile ways. Tourism is one of the main paths for encountering sites of memory. This thesis examines tourists’ creative appropriations of sites of memory – the objects and future memories inspired...... by their encounters – to address a question that thirty years of ground - breaking research into memory has not yet sufficiently answered: What can we learn about the dynamics of cultural memory by examining mundane accounts of touristic encounters with sites of memory? From Blaavand Beach in Western Denmark...... to Soweto’s Regina Mundi Church, this thesis analyses tourists’ snapshots at sites of memory and outlines their tracing activity in cultural memory. It draws on central concepts of actor - network theory and visual culture studies for a cross - disciplinary methodology to comprehend the collective...

  11. Coping with Memory Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Coping With Memory Loss Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... a health professional. back to top What Causes Memory Loss? Anything that affects cognition—the process of ...

  12. Music, memory and emotion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jäncke, Lutz

    2008-01-01

    Because emotions enhance memory processes and music evokes strong emotions, music could be involved in forming memories, either about pieces of music or about episodes and information associated with particular music...

  13. Memory and Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memory and Aging Losing keys, misplacing a wallet, or forgetting someone’s name are common experiences. But for people nearing or over age 65, such memory lapses can be frightening. They wonder if they ...

  14. The episodicity of verbal reports of personally significant autobiographical memories: vividness correlates with narrative text quality more than with detailedness or memory specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habermas, Tilmann; Diel, Verena

    2013-01-01

    How can we tell from a memory report whether a memory is episodic or not? Vividness is required by many definitions, whereas detailedness, memory specificity, and narrative text type are competing definitions of episodicity used in research. We explored their correlations with vividness in personally significant autobiographical memories to provide evidence to support their relative claim to define episodic memories. In addition, we explored differences between different memory types and text types as well as between memories with different valences. We asked a lifespan sample (N = 168) of 8-, 12-, 16-, 20-, 40-, and 65-year-olds of both genders (N = 27, 29, 27, 27, 28, 30) to provide brief oral life narratives. These were segmented into thematic memory units. Detailedness of person, place, and time did not correlate with each other or either vividness, memory specificity, or narrative text type. Narrative text type, in contrast, correlated both with vividness and memory specificity, suggesting narrative text type as a good criterion of episodicity. Emotionality turned out to be an even better predictor of vividness. Also, differences between narrative, chronicle, and argument text types and between specific versus more extended and atemporal memories were explored as well as differences between positive, negative, ambivalent, neutral, contamination, and redemption memory reports. It is concluded that temporal sequentiality is a central characteristic of episodic autobiographical memories. Furthermore, it is suggested that the textual quality of memory reports should be taken more seriously, and that evaluation and interpretation are inherent aspects of personally significant memories.

  15. Room-temperature antiferromagnetic memory resistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, X; Fina, I; Frontera, C; Liu, Jian; Wadley, P; He, Q; Paull, R J; Clarkson, J D; Kudrnovský, J; Turek, I; Kuneš, J; Yi, D; Chu, J-H; Nelson, C T; You, L; Arenholz, E; Salahuddin, S; Fontcuberta, J; Jungwirth, T; Ramesh, R

    2014-04-01

    The bistability of ordered spin states in ferromagnets provides the basis for magnetic memory functionality. The latest generation of magnetic random access memories rely on an efficient approach in which magnetic fields are replaced by electrical means for writing and reading the information in ferromagnets. This concept may eventually reduce the sensitivity of ferromagnets to magnetic field perturbations to being a weakness for data retention and the ferromagnetic stray fields to an obstacle for high-density memory integration. Here we report a room-temperature bistable antiferromagnetic (AFM) memory that produces negligible stray fields and is insensitive to strong magnetic fields. We use a resistor made of a FeRh AFM, which orders ferromagnetically roughly 100 K above room temperature, and therefore allows us to set different collective directions for the Fe moments by applied magnetic field. On cooling to room temperature, AFM order sets in with the direction of the AFM moments predetermined by the field and moment direction in the high-temperature ferromagnetic state. For electrical reading, we use an AFM analogue of the anisotropic magnetoresistance. Our microscopic theory modelling confirms that this archetypical spintronic effect, discovered more than 150 years ago in ferromagnets, is also present in AFMs. Our work demonstrates the feasibility of fabricating room-temperature spintronic memories with AFMs, which in turn expands the base of available magnetic materials for devices with properties that cannot be achieved with ferromagnets.

  16. Feed water distribution pipe replacement at Loviisa NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savolainen, S.; Elsing, B. [Imatran Voima Loviisa NPP (Finland)

    1995-12-31

    Imatran Voima Oy operates two WWER-440 reactors. Unit 1 has been operating since 1977 and unit 2 since 1981. First damages of feed water distribution (FWD) pipe were observed in 1989. The FWD-pipe T-connection had suffered from severe erosion corrosion damages. Similar damages have been been found also in other WWER-440 type NPPs. In 1989 the nozzles of the steam generator YB11 were inspected. No signs of the damages or signs of erosion were detected. The first damaged nozzles were found in 1992 in steam generators of both units. In 1992 it was started studying different possibilities to either repair or replace the damaged FWD-pipes. Due to the difficult conditions for repairing the damaged nozzles it was decided to study different FWD-pipe constructions. In 1991 two new feedwater distributors had been implemented at Dukovany NPP designed by Vitckovice company. Additionally OKB Gidropress had presented their design for new collector. In spring 1994 all the six steam generators of Rovno NPP unit 1 were replaced with FWD-pipes designed by OKB Gidropress. After the implementation an experimental program with the new systems was carried out. Due to the successful experiments at Rovno NPP Unit 1 it was decided to implement `Gidropress solution` during 1994 refueling outage into the steam generator YB52 at Loviisa 2. The object of this paper is to discuss the new FWD-pipe and its effects on the plant safety during normal and accident conditions. (orig.).

  17. Saving Malta's music memory

    OpenAIRE

    Sant, Toni

    2013-01-01

    Maltese music is being lost. Along with it Malta loses its culture, way of life, and memories. Dr Toni Sant is trying to change this trend through the Malta Music Memory Project (M3P) http://www.um.edu.mt/think/saving-maltas-music-memory-2/

  18. Music, memory and emotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäncke, Lutz

    2008-08-08

    Because emotions enhance memory processes and music evokes strong emotions, music could be involved in forming memories, either about pieces of music or about episodes and information associated with particular music. A recent study in BMC Neuroscience has given new insights into the role of emotion in musical memory.

  19. War Memories and the Refusal of Male Dominance in Shakir's "Oh, Lebanon"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Momani, Hassan Ali Abdullah

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the role of the war memories in the construction of the female gender identity in Evelyin Shakir's "Oh, Lebanon," in which the female protagonist refuses to belong to her Arab identity when she lives in the United States because of the brutal war memories she witnesses in Lebanon. Such memories make the…

  20. 75 FR 44283 - In the Matter of Certain Dynamic Random Access Memory Semiconductors and Products Containing Same...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Dynamic Random Access Memory Semiconductors and Products Containing Same... within the United States after importation of certain dynamic random access memory semiconductors...

  1. Using DMA for copying performance counter data to memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gara, Alan; Salapura, Valentina; Wisniewski, Robert W

    2013-12-31

    A device for copying performance counter data includes hardware path that connects a direct memory access (DMA) unit to a plurality of hardware performance counters and a memory device. Software prepares an injection packet for the DMA unit to perform copying, while the software can perform other tasks. In one aspect, the software that prepares the injection packet runs on a processing core other than the core that gathers the hardware performance data.

  2. 右美托咪定联合心理干预对神经阻滞下单侧全膝关节置换术患者心理应激反应的影响%Influence on mental stress reaction of dexmedetomidine uniting psycholog-ical intervention of the patients with unilateral total knee replacement un-der nerve block

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周强

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the influence on mental stress reaction of dexmedetomidine uniting psychological in-tervention of the patients with unilateral total knee replacement under nerve block. Methods 60 patients with one sided total knee replacement under nerve block from October 2014 to march 2015 in our hospital were choosed,they were di-vided into study group (30 cases) and control group (30 cases) by random number table method,the two groups were all given psychological intervention,Study group was given dexmedetomidine,control group was given 0.9% saline solution. Before and after operation,the difference of HR、MAP、serum cortisol, ATII between two groups was compared respec-tively.At the same time,the mental condition between two groups were compared using S-AI,HAD,AVAT. Results Be-fore operation,the score of S-AI,HAD,AVAT,and HR、MAP、serum cortisol、ATII between two groups was no statistical differenc(P>0.05).After operation,HR、MAP、serum cortisol、ATII of study group was[(80±5) mm Hg、(80±8)/min、(308±116)nmol/L、(15±5)ng/L] lower than [(86±6)mm Hg、(84±9)/min、(356±136)nmol/L、(21±7)ng/L] in control group respec-tively,with statistical difference(P0.05);术后,研究组MAP、HR、血清皮质醇、ATⅡ分别为(80±5)mm Hg、(80±8)/min、(308±116) nmol/L、(15±5) ng/L,低于对照组的(86±6)mm Hg、(84±9)/min、(356±136)nmol/L、(21±7)ng/L,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);术后研究组S-AI、HAD、AVAT评分分别为(9±4)、(9±3)、(53±5)分,低于对照组的(12±5)、(12±4)、(60±5)分,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论右美托咪定联合心理干预能减少腰丛与坐骨神经联合阻滞下行单侧全膝关节置换术患者的心理应激反应,明显减轻患者心理压力,保障血流动力学平稳。

  3. ORO. The physical developer replacement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Michael A; James, Tim

    2009-12-01

    In the process of fingerprint development Physical Developer has been largely the method of choice on porous surfaces after coming into contact with wet environments. It is only recently that a new technique has been identified which could replace this standard technique. This study aims to build on previous research and expand knowledge regarding the technique. The study built on previous research and compared Physical Developer to Oil Red O, testing both on four paper types, while being placed in three different water types and an accelerant for various amounts of time. Marks were placed with both heavily 'loaded' sebaceous fingers and 'normal' un-washed fingers. Results show that Oil Red O consistently produced clearer more detailed marks from the 'loaded' fingers, but neither technique proved to work better on the 'normal' marks. Neither technique developed any prints from the accelerant.

  4. Optimal randomized scheduling by replacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saias, I.

    1996-05-01

    In the replacement scheduling problem, a system is composed of n processors drawn from a pool of p. The processors can become faulty while in operation and faulty processors never recover. A report is issued whenever a fault occurs. This report states only the existence of a fault but does not indicate its location. Based on this report, the scheduler can reconfigure the system and choose another set of n processors. The system operates satisfactorily as long as, upon report of a fault, the scheduler chooses n non-faulty processors. We provide a randomized protocol maximizing the expected number of faults the system can sustain before the occurrence of a crash. The optimality of the protocol is established by considering a closely related dual optimization problem. The game-theoretic technical difficulties that we solve in this paper are very general and encountered whenever proving the optimality of a randomized algorithm in parallel and distributed computation.

  5. Controversies in hormone replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Baziad

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Deficiency of estrogen hormone will result in either long-term or short-term health problems which may reduce the quality of life. There are numerous methods by which the quality of female life can be achieved. Since the problems occuring are due to the deficiency of estrogen hormone, the appropriate method to tackle the problem is by administration of estrogen hormone. The administration of hormone replacement therapy (HRT with estrogen may eliminate climacteric complaints, prevent osteoporosis, coronary heart disease, dementia, and colon cancer. Although HRT has a great deal of advantage, its use is still low and may result in controversies. These controversies are due to fact that both doctor and patient still hold on to the old, outmoded views which are not supported by numerous studies. Currently, the use of HRT is not only based on experience, or temporary observation, but more on evidence based medicine. (Med J Indones 2001; 10: 182-6Keywords: controversies, HRT

  6. Replacement reactor to revolutionise magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Atkins, G

    2002-01-01

    Electric motors, hearing aids and magnetic resonance imaging are only some of the applications that will benefit from the first advances in magnets in a quarter of a century. Magnets achieve their characteristics when electrons align themselves to produce a unified magnetic field. Neutrons can probe these magnetic structures. The focus is not just on making more powerful magnets, but also identifying the characteristics that make magnets cheaper and easier for industry to manufacture. Staff from the ANSTO's Neutron Scattering Group have already performed a number of studies on the properties of magnets using using HIFAR, but the Replacement Research Reactor that will produce cold neutrons would allow scientists to investigate the atomic properties of materials with large molecules. A suite of equipment will enable studies at different temperatures, pressures and magnetic fields

  7. Renal replacement therapy in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noordzij, Marlies; Kramer, Anneke; Abad Diez, José M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This article provides a summary of the 2011 ERA-EDTA Registry Annual Report (available at www.era-edta-reg.org). METHODS: Data on renal replacement therapy (RRT) for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) from national and regional renal registries in 30 countries in Europe and bordering the .......6-47.0], and on dialysis 39.3% (95% CI 39.2-39.4). The unadjusted 5-year patient survival after the first renal transplantation performed between 2002 and 2006 was 86.7% (95% CI 86.2-87.2) for kidneys from deceased donors and 94.3% (95% CI 93.6-95.0) for kidneys from living donors....

  8. Leptin replacement improves cognitive development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto J Paz-Filho

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leptin changes brain structure, neuron excitability and synaptic plasticity. It also regulates the development and function of feeding circuits. However, the effects of leptin on neurocognitive development are unknown. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of leptin on neurocognitive development. METHODOLOGY: A 5-year-old boy with a nonconservative missense leptin gene mutation (Cys-to-Thr in codon 105 was treated with recombinant methionyl human leptin (r-metHuLeptin at physiologic replacement doses of 0.03 mg/kg/day. Cognitive development was assessed using the Differential Ability Scales (DAS, a measure of general verbal and nonverbal functioning; and selected subtests from the NEPSY, a measure of neuropsychological functioning in children. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Prior to treatment, the patient was morbidly obese, hypertensive, dyslipidemic, and hyperinsulinemic. Baseline neurocognitive tests revealed slower than expected rates of development (developmental age lower than chronological age in a majority of the areas assessed. After two years, substantial increases in the rates of development in most neurocognitive domains were apparent, with some skills at or exceeding expectations based on chronological age. We also observed marked weight loss and resolution of hypertension, dyslipidemia and hyperinsulinemia. CONCLUSIONS: We concluded that replacement with r-metHuLeptin is associated with weight loss and changes in rates of development in many neurocognitive domains, which lends support to the hypothesis that, in addition to its role in metabolism, leptin may have a cognitive enhancing role in the developing central nervous system. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00659828.

  9. Valve replacement in pediatric patients:a single center experience

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Jian-hua; GUO Hong-wei; ZHANG Gong; WU Shu-ming; SONG Guang-min; SUN Wen-yu

    2011-01-01

    Background Reconstructive surgery is the primary goal in pediatric patients with valve disease.However,in cases with irreparable valve lesions,valve replacement is the only option.This study aimed to retrospectively analyze the clinical experience of heart valve prosthesis replacement in children.Methods Between January 1990 and July 2009,35 pediatric patients (16 boys,19 girls) underwent mechanical valve replacement in Shandong University Qilu Hospital.The ages ranged from 2.5 to 14 years (mean,(8.8±3.8) years) and body weight varied from 11 to 37 kg (mean,(22.1±5.2) kg).Mechanical valve replacement was performed because of congenital heart disease in 23 patients,rheumatic disease in ten patients and infective endocarditis in two patients.St.Jude bileaflet mechanical valves were implanted in all the 35 patients including mitral valve replacement (MVR) in 18,aortic valve replacement (AVR) in 12,tricuspid valve replacement (TVR) in two,AVR and MVR in two and MVR and TVR in one.The size of the prostheses ranged between 19 and 27 mm.All patients received long-term anticoagulation treatment with sodium warfarin,aiming to maintain an international normalized ratio between 1.5 to 2.0.Follow-up was performed in all the patients with a total follow-up of 119.4 patient-years.Results The operative mortality was 8.57% (3/35).One patient,who underwent cardiac debridement and AVR,died 2 hours after being admitted to the intensive care unit because of severe low cardiac output syndrome and ventricular fibrillation.Two patients died of cardiogenic shock and renal failure during initial hospitalization after the operation.One patient who received replacement of a tricuspid valve developed complete heart block requiring temporary pacing and recovered sinus rhythm 4 days later.Thirty-two patients survived and their cardiac function was in New York Heart Association (NYHA) class Ⅰ to class Ⅱ when discharged.Late events included hemorrhage and endocarditis.Two patients required

  10. Memory: Organization and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenbaum, Howard

    2017-01-01

    A major goal of memory research is to understand how cognitive processes in memory are supported at the level of brain systems and network representations. Especially promising in this direction are new findings in humans and animals that converge in indicating a key role for the hippocampus in the systematic organization of memories. New findings also indicate that the prefrontal cortex may play an equally important role in the active control of memory organization during both encoding and retrieval. Observations about the dialog between the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex provide new insights into the operation of the larger brain system that serves memory. PMID:27687117

  11. The hip and knee replacement operation: an extensive life event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Birgitta Åkesdotter; Ekman, Sirkka-Liisa; Ponzer, Sari; Heikkilä, Kristiina

    2010-12-01

    A total hip replacement and a total knee replacement have shown to effectively reduce pain and disability in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip and knee joint despite associated risks. Even though the intervention primarily concerns older people with additional health problems, the patients stand on their feet the day after the operation and are discharged a few days later. Previous research indicates that reflections about life are related to the operation. The aim of this study was to illuminate the meaning of reflections related to hip and knee replacement surgery. A phenomenological hermeneutical approach with a longitudinal design was chosen in order to study the participants' experiences of the hip and knee replacement intervention across the entire perioperative period. Four themes emerged from the structural analysis; choosing the challenge, past memories connect to the current situation, moving from happiness to ordinary everyday life and moving from despair towards reluctant acceptance of unexpected bad conditions for everyday life. There was inner negotiations about having surgery or not, and existential anxiety that reminded people that life cannot be taken for granted. Our findings indicate the operation was seen as an extensive life event including reflections about life and death and about hope and fear. Previous bad experiences of care seemed to influence the way patients dealt with fear and hope. Fear had to be overcome by inner negotiations about undergoing surgery or not. Relief was expressed about surviving the actual operation, but soon after fears arose about how to manage on the actual road to recovery. Hope for a good life grew either stronger or weaker, depending on the progress following the operation. The outcome eventually generated a transition from happiness to ordinary everyday life, or a transition from despair towards reluctant acceptance of unfulfilled expectations. © 2010 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences

  12. Memory dynamics under stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaedflieg, Conny W E M; Schwabe, Lars

    2017-06-19

    Stressful events have a major impact on memory. They modulate memory formation in a time-dependent manner, closely linked to the temporal profile of action of major stress mediators, in particular catecholamines and glucocorticoids. Shortly after stressor onset, rapidly acting catecholamines and fast, non-genomic glucocorticoid actions direct cognitive resources to the processing and consolidation of the ongoing threat. In parallel, control of memory is biased towards rather rigid systems, promoting habitual forms of memory allowing efficient processing under stress, at the expense of "cognitive" systems supporting memory flexibility and specificity. In this review, we discuss the implications of this shift in the balance of multiple memory systems for the dynamics of the memory trace. Specifically, stress appears to hinder the incorporation of contextual details into the memory trace, to impede the integration of new information into existing knowledge structures, to impair the flexible generalisation across past experiences, and to hamper the modification of memories in light of new information. Delayed, genomic glucocorticoid actions might reverse the control of memory, thus restoring homeostasis and "cognitive" control of memory again.

  13. Immunological memory is associative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D.J.; Forrest, S. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Computer Science; Perelson, A.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to show that immunological memory is an associative and robust memory that belongs to the class of sparse distributed memories. This class of memories derives its associative and robust nature by sparsely sampling the input space and distributing the data among many independent agents. Other members of this class include a model of the cerebellar cortex and Sparse Distributed Memory (SDM). First we present a simplified account of the immune response and immunological memory. Next we present SDM, and then we show the correlations between immunological memory and SDM. Finally, we show how associative recall in the immune response can be both beneficial and detrimental to the fitness of an individual.

  14. Flexible kernel memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowicki, Dimitri; Siegelmann, Hava

    2010-06-11

    This paper introduces a new model of associative memory, capable of both binary and continuous-valued inputs. Based on kernel theory, the memory model is on one hand a generalization of Radial Basis Function networks and, on the other, is in feature space, analogous to a Hopfield network. Attractors can be added, deleted, and updated on-line simply, without harming existing memories, and the number of attractors is independent of input dimension. Input vectors do not have to adhere to a fixed or bounded dimensionality; they can increase and decrease it without relearning previous memories. A memory consolidation process enables the network to generalize concepts and form clusters of input data, which outperforms many unsupervised clustering techniques; this process is demonstrated on handwritten digits from MNIST. Another process, reminiscent of memory reconsolidation is introduced, in which existing memories are refreshed and tuned with new inputs; this process is demonstrated on series of morphed faces.

  15. Flexible kernel memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitri Nowicki

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a new model of associative memory, capable of both binary and continuous-valued inputs. Based on kernel theory, the memory model is on one hand a generalization of Radial Basis Function networks and, on the other, is in feature space, analogous to a Hopfield network. Attractors can be added, deleted, and updated on-line simply, without harming existing memories, and the number of attractors is independent of input dimension. Input vectors do not have to adhere to a fixed or bounded dimensionality; they can increase and decrease it without relearning previous memories. A memory consolidation process enables the network to generalize concepts and form clusters of input data, which outperforms many unsupervised clustering techniques; this process is demonstrated on handwritten digits from MNIST. Another process, reminiscent of memory reconsolidation is introduced, in which existing memories are refreshed and tuned with new inputs; this process is demonstrated on series of morphed faces.

  16. NAND flash memory technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Aritome, Seiichi

    2016-01-01

    This book discusses basic and advanced NAND flash memory technologies, including the principle of NAND flash, memory cell technologies, multi-bits cell technologies, scaling challenges of memory cell, reliability, and 3-dimensional cell as the future technology. Chapter 1 describes the background and early history of NAND flash. The basic device structures and operations are described in Chapter 2. Next, the author discusses the memory cell technologies focused on scaling in Chapter 3, and introduces the advanced operations for multi-level cells in Chapter 4. The physical limitations for scaling are examined in Chapter 5, and Chapter 6 describes the reliability of NAND flash memory. Chapter 7 examines 3-dimensional (3D) NAND flash memory cells and discusses the pros and cons in structure, process, operations, scalability, and performance. In Chapter 8, challenges of 3D NAND flash memory are dis ussed. Finally, in Chapter 9, the author summarizes and describes the prospect of technologies and market for the fu...

  17. Generating memory with vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellino, Flora; Galli, Grazia; Del Giudice, Giuseppe; Rappuoli, Rino

    2009-08-01

    The goal of vaccination is to induce long-lasting protective immune memory. Although most vaccines induce good memory responses, the type of memory induced by different vaccines may be considerably different. In addition, memory responses to the same vaccine may be influenced by age, environmental and genetic factors. Results emerging from detailed and integrated profiling of immune-responses to natural infection or vaccination suggest that the type and duration of immune memory are largely determined by the magnitude and complexity of innate immune signals that imprint the acquired immune primary responses. Here we summarize results obtained from analyzing human immune memory responses to different types of vaccines. We will also discuss how extending clinical investigation to events occurring early after vaccination can help identify early predictive markers of protective memory and thus contribute to faster development of better and safer vaccines.

  18. A ten-year follow-up of a study of memory for the attack of September 11, 2001: Flashbulb memories and memories for flashbulb events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirst, William; Phelps, Elizabeth A; Meksin, Robert; Vaidya, Chandan J; Johnson, Marcia K; Mitchell, Karen J; Buckner, Randy L; Budson, Andrew E; Gabrieli, John D E; Lustig, Cindy; Mather, Mara; Ochsner, Kevin N; Schacter, Daniel; Simons, Jon S; Lyle, Keith B; Cuc, Alexandru F; Olsson, Andreas

    2015-06-01

    Within a week of the attack of September 11, 2001, a consortium of researchers from across the United States distributed a survey asking about the circumstances in which respondents learned of the attack (their flashbulb memories) and the facts about the attack itself (their event memories). Follow-up surveys were distributed 11, 25, and 119 months after the attack. The study, therefore, examines retention of flashbulb memories and event memories at a substantially longer retention interval than any previous study using a test-retest methodology, allowing for the study of such memories over the long term. There was rapid forgetting of both flashbulb and event memories within the first year, but the forgetting curves leveled off after that, not significantly changing even after a 10-year delay. Despite the initial rapid forgetting, confidence remained high throughout the 10-year period. Five putative factors affecting flashbulb memory consistency and event memory accuracy were examined: (a) attention to media, (b) the amount of discussion, (c) residency, (d) personal loss and/or inconvenience, and (e) emotional intensity. After 10 years, none of these factors predicted flashbulb memory consistency; media attention and ensuing conversation predicted event memory accuracy. Inconsistent flashbulb memories were more likely to be repeated rather than corrected over the 10-year period; inaccurate event memories, however, were more likely to be corrected. The findings suggest that even traumatic memories and those implicated in a community's collective identity may be inconsistent over time and these inconsistencies can persist without the corrective force of external influences. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. [Renal replacement therapy for refractory heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenger, V; Remppis, A B

    2012-07-01

    After broad cardiological and nephrological evaluation and consideration of optimal conservative options according to national and international guidelines, renal replacement therapy might be helpful in patients with refractory heart failure even if they are not dialysis-dependent. This is even more important as renal failure is a strong predictor for mortality in patients with severe congestive heart failure (CHF) and CHF is one of the fastest growing morbidities in western countries. Although peritoneal dialysis (PD) is frequently used in patients with CHF its role remains unclear. Acute chronic volume overload in refractory CHF is still an unresolved clinical problem. In patients with acute heart and renal failure with need of management in an intensive care unit, extracorporeal ultrafiltration or a dialysis modality should be preferred. In patients with chronic refractory CHF, volume overload and renal failure, peritoneal dialysis should be the therapy of choice. Due to the limited data available, treatment and outcome parameters should be recorded in the registry of the German Society of Nephrology (http://www.herz-niere.de).

  20. A Register Allocation Algorithm in the Presence of Scalar Replacement for Fine-Grain Configurable Architectures

    CERN Document Server

    Baradaran, Nastaran

    2011-01-01

    The aggressive application of scalar replacement to array references substantially reduces the number of memory operations at the expense of a possibly very large number of registers. In this paper we describe a register allocation algorithm that assigns registers to scalar replaced array references along the critical paths of a computation, in many cases exploiting the opportunity for concurrent memory accesses. Experimental results, for a set of image/signal processing code kernels, reveal that the proposed algorithm leads to a substantial reduction of the number of execution cycles for the corresponding hardware implementation on a contemporary Field-Programmable-Gate-Array (FPGA) when compared to other greedy allocation algorithms, in some cases, using even fewer number of registers.

  1. Replacing paper with digital recording.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Kawa

    2015-01-01

    Addressing the needs to achieve the highest standards at multidisciplinary team meetings at the Stroke Unit of Broomfield Hospital, an electronic version is applied instead of the traditional paper model. This is to ensure that patients within the unit are receiving appropriate care and their progress is monitored throughout their entire journey. This also enables the stroke team to retrieve old information anywhere in the hospital, electronically, from previous documentations to compare progress of rehabilitation. The electronic model also helps when assessing readmission or those who attend the stroke clinics to clarify new onset changes from residual weakness. The tool kit estimates Barthel Index score for activities of daily living and Rivermead Mobility Index for physical capacity assessment weekly as the team attending the meetings. The goals from all disciplines, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, speech and language therapists, and nurses are clearly documented along with patient cognition, emotion, and perception. This initiative commenced in late April 2013 and the first clinical outcome assessments performed at the beginning of September 2013, enabling the stroke team to assess rehabilitation activities and achievements. Front-line staff expressed satisfaction with the initiative model, which successfully managed to monitor and analyze the rehabilitation activities within the stroke unit.

  2. Psychophysiology of prospective memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothen, Nicolas; Meier, Beat

    2014-01-01

    Prospective memory involves the self-initiated retrieval of an intention upon an appropriate retrieval cue. Cue identification can be considered as an orienting reaction and may thus trigger a psychophysiological response. Here we present two experiments in which skin conductance responses (SCRs) elicited by prospective memory cues were compared to SCRs elicited by aversive stimuli to test whether a single prospective memory cue triggers a similar SCR as an aversive stimulus. In Experiment 2 we also assessed whether cue specificity had a differential influence on prospective memory performance and on SCRs. We found that detecting a single prospective memory cue is as likely to elicit a SCR as an aversive stimulus. Missed prospective memory cues also elicited SCRs. On a behavioural level, specific intentions led to better prospective memory performance. However, on a psychophysiological level specificity had no influence. More generally, the results indicate reliable SCRs for prospective memory cues and point to psychophysiological measures as valuable approach, which offers a new way to study one-off prospective memory tasks. Moreover, the findings are consistent with a theory that posits multiple prospective memory retrieval stages.

  3. Gene replacement in Penicillium roqueforti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goarin, Anne; Silar, Philippe; Malagnac, Fabienne

    2015-05-01

    Most cheese-making filamentous fungi lack suitable molecular tools to improve their biotechnology potential. Penicillium roqueforti, a species of high industrial importance, would benefit from functional data yielded by molecular genetic approaches. This work provides the first example of gene replacement by homologous recombination in P. roqueforti, demonstrating that knockout experiments can be performed in this fungus. To do so, we improved the existing transformation method to integrate transgenes into P. roqueforti genome. In the meantime, we cloned the PrNiaD gene, which encodes a NADPH-dependent nitrate reductase that reduces nitrate to nitrite. Then, we performed a deletion of the PrNiaD gene from P. roqueforti strain AGO. The ΔPrNiaD mutant strain is more resistant to chlorate-containing medium than the wild-type strain, but did not grow on nitrate-containing medium. Because genomic data are now available, we believe that generating selective deletions of candidate genes will be a key step to open the way for a comprehensive exploration of gene function in P. roqueforti.

  4. VNR CMS Pixel detector replacement

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    Joel Butler, spokesperson of the CMS collaboration explains how a team from many different partner institutes installed a new detector in CMS. This detector is the silicon pixel detector and they’ve been working on it for about five years, to replace one of our existing detectors. This detectors measures particles closer to the beam than any of the other components of this huge detector behind me. It gives us the most precise picture of tracks as they come out of the collisions and expand and travel through the detector. This particular device has twice as many pixels, 120 million, as opposed to about 68 million in the old detector and it can take data faster and pump it out to the analysis more quickly. 00’53’’ Images of the descent, insertion and installation of first piece of the Pixel detector on Tue Feb 28. Images of the descent, insertion and installation of second piece of the Pixel and the two cylinders being joined.

  5. Orthogonal Matching Pursuit with Replacement

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, Prateek; Dhillon, Inderjit S

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the problem of compressed sensing where the goal is to recover almost all the sparse vectors using a small number of fixed linear measurements. For this problem, we propose a novel partial hard-thresholding operator that leads to a general family of iterative algorithms. While one extreme of the family yields well known hard thresholding algorithms like ITI (Iterative Thresholding with Inversion) and HTP (Hard Thresholding Pursuit), the other end of the spectrum leads to a novel algorithm that we call Orthogonal Matching Pursuit with Replacement (OMPR). OMPR, like the classic greedy algorithm OMP, adds exactly one coordinate to the support at each iteration, based on the correlation with the current residual. However, unlike OMP, OMPR also removes one coordinate from the support. This simple change allows us to prove that OMPR has the best known guarantees for sparse recovery in terms of the Restricted Isometry Property (a condition on the measurement matrix). In contrast, OMP is kn...

  6. Visual Image Sensor Organ Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maluf, David A.

    2014-01-01

    This innovation is a system that augments human vision through a technique called "Sensing Super-position" using a Visual Instrument Sensory Organ Replacement (VISOR) device. The VISOR device translates visual and other sensors (i.e., thermal) into sounds to enable very difficult sensing tasks. Three-dimensional spatial brightness and multi-spectral maps of a sensed image are processed using real-time image processing techniques (e.g. histogram normalization) and transformed into a two-dimensional map of an audio signal as a function of frequency and time. Because the human hearing system is capable of learning to process and interpret extremely complicated and rapidly changing auditory patterns, the translation of images into sounds reduces the risk of accidentally filtering out important clues. The VISOR device was developed to augment the current state-of-the-art head-mounted (helmet) display systems. It provides the ability to sense beyond the human visible light range, to increase human sensing resolution, to use wider angle visual perception, and to improve the ability to sense distances. It also allows compensation for movement by the human or changes in the scene being viewed.

  7. [Animal experiment, can we replace?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combrisson, H

    2017-09-01

    Animal experiment is a subject of controversies. Some people, defenders of animals, think that it is not acceptable to use for scientific purposes at the risk of making them suffer or assert that the results obtained with animals are not transposable in the human beings. Others, in particular researchers in biology or medicine, think that the animal models are essential for the biomedical search. This confrontation of the opinions bases largely on an evolution of the place of animals in our society. The regulations authorize the use of animals for scientific purposes but oblige to make it under restrictive conditions. The application of 3Rs - replacement, reduction, and refinement - expressed in 1959 by Russel and Burch is an ethical guide to improve the welfare of animals in research. The alternative methods do not allow, in the present state of the knowledge, to answer all the scientific questions in biology and medicine research. They are, most of the time, complementary methods of the in vivo methods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Intensive care delirium - effect on memories and health-related quality of life - a follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenningsen, Helle; Tønnesen, Else K; Videbech, Poul

    2013-01-01

    delirium, memories and health-related quality needs further investigation. DESIGN: We used an observational multicentre design with telephone interviews. METHODS: Adult intensive care unit patients (n = 360) were consecutively recruited and interviewed using the intensive care unit-Memory Tool one week...... nondelirious patients up to six months postintensive care unit discharge. Delirium, memories and intensive care unit diaries with follow-up did not affect health-related quality of life and healthcare dependency. Memories of delusions might have an impact on patients assessed as nondelirious. CONCLUSIONS: More......AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To investigate the effects of delirium in the intensive care unit on health-related quality of life, healthcare dependency and memory after discharge and to explore the association between health-related quality of life and memories, patient diaries and intensive care unit...

  9. Biology of tooth replacement in amniotes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John A Whitlock; Joy M Richman

    2013-01-01

    Tooth replacement is a common trait to most vertebrates, including mammals. Mammals, however, have lost the capacity for continuous tooth renewal seen in most other vertebrates, and typically have only 1–2 generations of teeth. Here, we review the mechanisms of tooth replacement in reptiles and mammals, and discuss in detail the current and historical theories on control of timing and pattern of tooth replacement and development.

  10. Surfactant replacement therapy--economic impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pejaver, R K; al Hifzi, I; Aldussari, S

    2001-06-01

    Surfactant replacement is an effective treatment for neonatal respiratory distress syndrome. (RDS). As widespread use of surfactant is becoming a reality, it is important to assess the economic implications of this new form of therapy. A comparison study was carried out at the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) of Northwest Armed Forces Hospital, Saudi Arabia. Among 75 infants who received surfactant for RDS and similar number who were managed during time period just before the surfactant was available, but by set criteria would have made them eligible for surfactant. All other management modalities except surfactant were the same for all these babies. Based on the intensity of monitoring and nursing care required by the baby, the level of care was divided as: Level IIIA, IIIB, Level II, Level I. The cost per day per bed for each level was calculated, taking into account the use of hospital immovable equipment, personal salaries of nursing, medical, ancillary staff, overheads and maintenance, depreciation and replacement costs. Medications used, procedures done, TPN, oxygen, were all added to individual patient's total expenditure. 75 infants in the Surfactant group had 62 survivors. They spent a total of 4300 days in hospital. (av 69.35) Out of which 970 d (av 15.65 per patient) were ventilated days. There were 56 survivors in the non-surfactant group of 75. They had spent a total of 5023 days in the hospital (av 89.69/patient) out of which 1490 were ventilated days (av 26.60 d). Including the cost of surfactant (two doses), cost of hospital stay for each infant taking the average figures of stay would be SR 118, 009.75 per surfactant treated baby and SR 164, 070.70 per non-surfactant treated baby. The difference of 46,061 SR is 39.03% more in non-surfactant group. One Saudi rial = 8 Rs (approx at the time study was carried out.) Medical care cost varies from place to place. However, it is definitely cost-effective where surfactant is concerned. Quality adjusted

  11. Human learning and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M K; Hasher, L

    1987-01-01

    There have been several notable recent trends in the area of learning and memory. Problems with the episodic/semantic distinction have become more apparent, and new efforts have been made (exemplar models, distributed-memory models) to represent general knowledge without assuming a separate semantic system. Less emphasis is being placed on stable, prestored prototypes and more emphasis on a flexible memory system that provides the basis for a multitude of categories or frames of reference, derived on the spot as tasks demand. There is increasing acceptance of the idea that mental models are constructed and stored in memory in addition to, rather than instead of, memorial representations that are more closely tied to perceptions. This gives rise to questions concerning the conditions that permit inferences to be drawn and mental models to be constructed, and to questions concerning the similarities and differences in the nature of the representations in memory of perceived and generated information and in their functions. There has also been a swing from interest in deliberate strategies to interest in automatic, unconscious (even mechanistic!) processes, reflecting an appreciation that certain situations (e.g. recognition, frequency judgements, savings in indirect tasks, aspects of skill acquisition, etc) seem not to depend much on the products of strategic, effortful or reflective processes. There is a lively interest in relations among memory measures and attempts to characterize memory representations and/or processes that could give rise to dissociations among measures. Whether the pattern of results reflects the operation of functional subsystems of memory and, if so, what the "modules" are is far from clear. This issue has been fueled by work with amnesics and has contributed to a revival of interaction between researchers studying learning and memory in humans and those studying learning and memory in animals. Thus, neuroscience rivals computer science as a

  12. Memories and prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder in intensive care units Memórias e prevalência de transtorno de estresse pós-traumático em uma unidade de terapia intensiva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Bender Rovatti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study evaluated the prevalence of PTSD indicators in patients who had to be hospitalized in ICU six months after being discharged and examined the relationship between PTSD and mnemonic memories. Participants were 41 adult patients with different diseases who answered questionnaires about PTSD, memory and clinical information. It was identified that 24.4% of the sample presented PTSD symptoms. These patients presented more affective memories than those without PTSD (t=2.29, pO estudo avaliou a prevalência de indicadores de TEPT em pacientes que foram internados em UTI seis meses após a alta hospitalar, e examinou a relação entre TEPT e recordações mnêmincas. Participaram 41 pacientes adultos com diferentes doenças, que responderam a questionários sobre TEPT, memórias e informações clínicas. Identificou-se que 24,4% da amostra possuía indicadores de TEPT. Estes pacientes apresentaram mais memórias afetivas que os pacientes sem TEPT (t=2,29, p<0,05. As memórias afetivas correlacionaram-se com o TEPT total (r=0,408, p<0,01 e com suas dimensões revivência (r=0,443, p<0,01 e excitabilidade (r=0,403, p<0,01. A análise de regressão hierárquica mostrou que o sexo (mulher (β=0,44, p<0,01 e a presença de memórias afetivas (β=0,46, p<0,01 foram preditoras de TEPT, explicando 38,2% da sua variância.

  13. Memory in astrocytes: a hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caudle Robert M

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent work has indicated an increasingly complex role for astrocytes in the central nervous system. Astrocytes are now known to exchange information with neurons at synaptic junctions and to alter the information processing capabilities of the neurons. As an extension of this trend a hypothesis was proposed that astrocytes function to store information. To explore this idea the ion channels in biological membranes were compared to models known as cellular automata. These comparisons were made to test the hypothesis that ion channels in the membranes of astrocytes form a dynamic information storage device. Results Two dimensional cellular automata were found to behave similarly to ion channels in a membrane when they function at the boundary between order and chaos. The length of time information is stored in this class of cellular automata is exponentially related to the number of units. Therefore the length of time biological ion channels store information was plotted versus the estimated number of ion channels in the tissue. This analysis indicates that there is an exponential relationship between memory and the number of ion channels. Extrapolation of this relationship to the estimated number of ion channels in the astrocytes of a human brain indicates that memory can be stored in this system for an entire life span. Interestingly, this information is not affixed to any physical structure, but is stored as an organization of the activity of the ion channels. Further analysis of two dimensional cellular automata also demonstrates that these systems have both associative and temporal memory capabilities. Conclusion It is concluded that astrocytes may serve as a dynamic information sink for neurons. The memory in the astrocytes is stored by organizing the activity of ion channels and is not associated with a physical location such as a synapse. In order for this form of memory to be of significant duration it is necessary

  14. Quantum Associative Memory

    CERN Document Server

    Ventura, D; Ventura, Dan; Martinez, Tony

    1998-01-01

    This paper combines quantum computation with classical neural network theory to produce a quantum computational learning algorithm. Quantum computation uses microscopic quantum level effects to perform computational tasks and has produced results that in some cases are exponentially faster than their classical counterparts. The unique characteristics of quantum theory may also be used to create a quantum associative memory with a capacity exponential in the number of neurons. This paper combines two quantum computational algorithms to produce such a quantum associative memory. The result is an exponential increase in the capacity of the memory when compared to traditional associative memories such as the Hopfield network. The paper covers necessary high-level quantum mechanical and quantum computational ideas and introduces a quantum associative memory. Theoretical analysis proves the utility of the memory, and it is noted that a small version should be physically realizable in the near future.

  15. Time for memory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murakami, Kyoko

    2012-01-01

    This article is a continuous dialogue on memory triggered by Brockmeier’s (2010) article. I drift away from the conventionalization of the archive as a spatial metaphor for memory in order to consider the greater possibility of “time” for conceptualizing memory. The concept of time is central...... in terms of autobiographical memory. The second category of time is discussed, drawing on Augustine and Bergson amongst others. Bergson’s notion of duration has been considered as a promising concept for a better understanding of autobiographical memory. Psychological phenomena such as autobiographical...... memory should embrace not only spatial dimension, but also a temporal dimension, in which a constant flow of irreversible time, where multiplicity, momentarily, dynamic stability and becoming and emergence of novelty can be observed....

  16. Regulatory T cell memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, Michael D.; Way, Sing Sing; Abbas, Abul K.

    2016-01-01

    Memory for antigen is a defining feature of adaptive immunity. Antigen-specific lymphocyte populations show an increase in number and function after antigen encounter and more rapidly re-expand upon subsequent antigen exposure. Studies of immune memory have primarily focused on effector B cells and T cells with microbial specificity, using prime challenge models of infection. However, recent work has also identified persistently expanded populations of antigen-specific regulatory T cells that protect against aberrant immune responses. In this Review, we consider the parallels between memory effector T cells and memory regulatory T cells, along with the functional implications of regulatory memory in autoimmunity, antimicrobial host defence and maternal fetal tolerance. In addition, we discuss emerging evidence for regulatory T cell memory in humans and key unanswered questions in this rapidly evolving field. PMID:26688349

  17. Shape memory polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Thomas S.; Bearinger, Jane P.

    2017-08-29

    New shape memory polymer compositions, methods for synthesizing new shape memory polymers, and apparatus comprising an actuator and a shape memory polymer wherein the shape memory polymer comprises at least a portion of the actuator. A shape memory polymer comprising a polymer composition which physically forms a network structure wherein the polymer composition has shape-memory behavior and can be formed into a permanent primary shape, re-formed into a stable secondary shape, and controllably actuated to recover the permanent primary shape. Polymers have optimal aliphatic network structures due to minimization of dangling chains by using monomers that are symmetrical and that have matching amine and hydroxl groups providing polymers and polymer foams with clarity, tight (narrow temperature range) single transitions, and high shape recovery and recovery force that are especially useful for implanting in the human body.

  18. Shape memory polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Thomas S.; Bearinger, Jane P.

    2015-06-09

    New shape memory polymer compositions, methods for synthesizing new shape memory polymers, and apparatus comprising an actuator and a shape memory polymer wherein the shape memory polymer comprises at least a portion of the actuator. A shape memory polymer comprising a polymer composition which physically forms a network structure wherein the polymer composition has shape-memory behavior and can be formed into a permanent primary shape, re-formed into a stable secondary shape, and controllably actuated to recover the permanent primary shape. Polymers have optimal aliphatic network structures due to minimization of dangling chains by using monomers that are symmetrical and that have matching amine and hydroxyl groups providing polymers and polymer foams with clarity, tight (narrow temperature range) single transitions, and high shape recovery and recovery force that are especially useful for implanting in the human body.

  19. Impedance-matched cavity quantum memory

    CERN Document Server

    Afzelius, Mikael

    2010-01-01

    We consider an atomic frequency comb based quantum memory inside an asymmetric optical cavity. In this configuration it is possible to absorb the input light completely in a system with an effective optical depth of one, provided that the absorption per cavity round trip exactly matches the transmission of the coupling mirror ("impedance matching"). We show that the impedance matching results in a readout efficiency only limited by irreversible atomic dephasing, whose effect can be made very small in systems with large inhomogeneous broadening. Our proposal opens up an attractive route towards quantum memories with close to unit efficiency.

  20. Magnetic Random Access Memory; Integrated Passive Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-02

    for an inductor designed to  operate at 10 MHz, a reasonable value for  switching  power converters. The  ferrite  cladding  works optimally when applied to...elements: a magnetic latch , and a magnetic shadow memory to serve as a backup to volatile electronic memory. Integrated Passive Electronic Components...greater inductance per unit area, and a 150% increase in Q, by using ferrite cladding contain and shape electromagnetic fields. 15. SUBJECT TERMS

  1. Aortic valve replacement in octogenarians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dark John H

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and Aims As our population ages and life expectancy increases the number of people aged over 80 and more referred for cardiac surgery is growing. This study sought to identify the outcome of aortic valve replacement (AVR in octogenarians. Methods 68 patients aged 80 years or more underwent AVR at the Freeman Hospital, between April 2001 and April 2004. A retrospective review of the notes and outcomes from the patients' GP and the NHS strategic tracking service was performed. 54% (37 underwent isolated AVR whilst 46% (31 underwent combined AVR and CABG. Results Follow up was 100% complete. The mean age was 83.1 ± s.d. 2.9 years, a mean gradient of 83 ± s.d. 31 mmHg and mean AVA of 0.56 cm2. The mean additive EuroSCORE was 8.6 ± s.d. 1.2, the logistic EuroSCORE mean 12.0 ± s.d. 5.9. In hospital 30 day mortality was 13 %. Survival was 80% at 1 year and 78% at 2 years. Median follow up was for 712 days. Stepwise logistic regression identified chronic obstructive airways disease as an independent predictor of mortality (p Conclusion Our study demonstrates that the operative mortality for AVR in the over eighties is good, whilst the mid to long term outcome is excellent There is a very low attrition rate with those undergoing the procedure living as long than their age matched population. This study confirms AVR is a safe, acceptable treatment for octogenarians with excellent mid term outcomes.

  2. Menopause and hormone replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Baziad

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The global population in the 21st century has reached 6.2 billion people, by the year 2025 it is to be around 8.3-8.5 billion, and will increase further. Elderly people are expected to grow rapidly than other groups. The fastest increase in the elderly population will take place in Asia. Life expectancy is increasing steadily throughout developed and developing countries. For many  menopausal women, increased life expectancy will accompanied by many health problems. The consequences of estrogen deficiency are the menopausal symptoms. The treatment of menopause related complaints and diseases became an  important socioeconomic and medical issue. Long term symptoms, such as the increase in osteoporosis fractures, cardio and cerebrovascular disesses and dementia, created a large financial burden on individuals and society. All these health problems can be lreated or prevented by hormone replacement therapy (HRT. Natural HRT is usually prefened. Synthetic  estrogen in oral contraceptives (oc are not recommended for HRT. Many contra-indications for oc, but now it is widely usedfor HRT. The main reasons for discontinuing HRT are unwanted bleeding, fear of cancer, and negative side effects. Until now there are sill debates about the rebrtonship between HRT and the incidence of breast cancer. Many data showed that there were no clear relationship between the use of HRT and breast cancer. ThereÎore, nwny experts advocate the use of HRTfrom the first sign of climacteric complaints until death. (Med J Indones 2001;10: 242-51Keywords: estrogen deficiency, climacteric phases, tibolone.

  3. Total joint replacement preadmission programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messer, B

    1998-01-01

    Patients begin to formulate their expectations of the postoperative hospitalization during the preadmission program. The challenge is to better understand the factors patients consider when formulating judgments about the quality of preadmission education. For example, it may be that perceptions of the preadmission program are influenced by what patients believe about their postoperative pain and functional abilities. Specific attention needs to be given both preoperatively and postoperatively to instructing patients on realistic expectations for recovery. One other method of measuring patient outcomes is with the Health Status Profile (SF-36) (Response Healthcare Information Management, 1995). The SF-36 approach emphasizes the outcome of medical care as the patient sees it, in addition to a clinical evaluation of successful health care. This form is currently initiated in the physician's office and returned for scanning at the preadmission class. The patient then completes another SF-36 at 6 months and every year thereafter to compare measurable outcomes. Patients intending to have elective total joint replacements experience anxiety and require much support and education. An effective preadmission program is a major investment in a patient's recovery, as well as a unique marketing tool to customers. Preadmission programs can be viewed as an opportunity to enhance customer satisfaction. Preadmission clinics are an excellent means for nurses to improve the quality of patient care through patient education. the overall goal of preadmission testing programs is to ensure patient preparedness while increasing quality health care and overall customer satisfaction. To enhance program effectiveness, health care providers must lead collaborative efforts to improve the efficiency of systems.

  4. Random Access Memory Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-02-01

    extreme temperatures. True nonvolatility is offered by the NVRAM or shadow RAM. In the NVRAM , a volatile NMOS static RAM memory cell is merged with the...or reapplied, and no longer require special power sources. The size of the nine-device memory cell required for the NVRAM has limited its capacity to...4K. While 8K NVRAMs are expected in 1985, the 30 . . .’o .-. . high cost of these devices will hamper further development for larger capacity memories

  5. Ginseng and Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Shergill, Amandeep

    1998-01-01

    For thousands of years, Chinese medicine has used the herb ginseng as a memory tonic with the belief that ginseng can improve learning and memory, especially in aging humans. Recent studies have sought to validate this claim. Experiments done on rats have shown that ginsenosides, the saponins of ginseng, can partially prevent scopolamine-induced memory deficits in rats. Ginsenosides are thought to increase choline uptake in the central cholinergic nervous system, which plays important roles i...

  6. Music, memory and emotion

    OpenAIRE

    Jäncke, Lutz

    2008-01-01

    Because emotions enhance memory processes and music evokes strong emotions, music could be involved in forming memories, either about pieces of music or about episodes and information associated with particular music. A recent study in BMC Neuroscience has given new insights into the role of emotion in musical memory. Music has a prominent role in the everyday life of many people. Whether it is for recreation, distraction or mood enhancement, a lot of people listen to music from early in t...

  7. The Cosmological Memory Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Tolish, Alexander; Wald, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    The "memory effect" is the permanent change in the relative separation of test particles resulting from the passage of gravitational radiation. We investigate the memory effect for a general, spatially flat FLRW cosmology by considering the radiation associated with emission events involving particle-like sources. We find that if the resulting perturbation is decomposed into scalar, vector, and tensor parts, only the tensor part contributes to memory. Furthermore, the tensor contribution to m...

  8. Emotion and Autobiographical Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuray Sarp

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Self and mind are constituted with the cumulative effects of significant life events. This description is regarded as a given explicitly or implicitly in vari-ous theories of personality. Such an acknowledgment inevitably brings together these theories on two basic concepts. The first one is the emotions that give meaning to experiences and the second one is the memory which is related to the storage of these experiences. The part of the memory which is responsible for the storage and retrieval of life events is the autobiographical memory. Besides the development of personality, emotions and autobiographical memory are important in the development of and maintenance of psychopathology. Therefore, these two concepts have both longitudinal and cross-sectional functions in understanding human beings. In case of psychopathology, understanding emotions and autobiographical memory developmentally, aids in understanding the internal susceptibility factors. In addition, understanding how these two structures work and influence each other in an acute event would help to understand the etiological mechanisms of mental disorders. In the literature, theories that include both of these structures and that have clinical implications, are inconclusive. Theories on memory generally focus on cognitive and semantic structures while neglecting emotions, whereas theories on emotions generally neglect memory and its organization. There are only a few theories that cover both of these two concepts. In the present article, these theories that include both emotions and autobiographical memory in the same framework (i.e. Self Memory System, Associative Network Theory, Structural and Contextual theories and Affect Regulation Theory were discussed to see the full picture. Taken together, these theories seem to have the potential to suggest data-driven models in understanding and explaining symptoms such as flashbacks, dissociation, amnesia, over general memory seen in

  9. Memories of art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirstein, William

    2013-04-01

    Although the art-historical context of a work of art is important to our appreciation of it, it is our knowledge of that history that plays causal roles in producing the experience itself. This knowledge is in the form of memories, both semantic memories about the historical circumstances, but also episodic memories concerning our personal connections with an artwork. We also create representations of minds in order to understand the emotions that artworks express.

  10. Phase change memory

    CERN Document Server

    Qureshi, Moinuddin K

    2011-01-01

    As conventional memory technologies such as DRAM and Flash run into scaling challenges, architects and system designers are forced to look at alternative technologies for building future computer systems. This synthesis lecture begins by listing the requirements for a next generation memory technology and briefly surveys the landscape of novel non-volatile memories. Among these, Phase Change Memory (PCM) is emerging as a leading contender, and the authors discuss the material, device, and circuit advances underlying this exciting technology. The lecture then describes architectural solutions t

  11. Memories Persist in Silence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Patricia Arenas Grisales

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This article exposes the hypothesis that memory artifacts, created to commemorate the victims of armed conflict in Colombia, are an expression of the underground memories and a way of political action in the midst of war. We analyze three cases of creations of memory artifacts in Medellín, Colombia, as forms of suffering, perceiving and resisting the power of armed groups in Medellín. The silence, inherent in these objects, should not be treated as an absence of language, but as another form of expression of memory. Silence is a tactic used to overcome losses and reset everyday life in contexts of protracted violence.

  12. Temporomandibular joint reconstruction with total alloplastic joint replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R H B

    2011-03-01

    This paper is a preliminary paper which presents the early findings of an ongoing prospective trial on the use of the TMJ Concepts and Biomet Lorenz total joint replacement systems for the reconstruction of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Total alloplastic replacement of the TMJ has become a viable option for many people who suffer from TMJ disease where surgical reconstruction is indicated. Degenerative joint diseases such as osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, TMJ ankylosis, malunited condylar fractures and tumours can be successfully treated using this technique. There are a number of TMJ prostheses available. Two of the joint replacement products, which have been found to be most reliable and have FDA approval in the United States, are the TMJ Concepts system and the Biomet Lorenz system, and for this reason they are being investigated in this study. This study presents the findings of seven patients with a total of 12 joint replacements using either the TMJ Concepts system or the Biomet Lorenz joint system. Two patients (3 joints) had the TMJ Concepts system and five patients (9 joints) had the Biomet Lorenz system. Although still early, the results were generally pleasing, with the longest replacement having been in position for three years and the most recent six months. The average postoperative mouth opening was 29.7 mm (range 25-35 mm) with an average pain score of 1.7 (range 0-3, minimum score of 0 and maximum 10). Complications were minimal and related to sensory disturbance to the lip in one patient and joint dislocation in two patients.

  13. [Extracorporeal renal replacement therapies in acute renal failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, R M; Barenbrock, M; Teschner, M; Bahner, U

    2000-05-15

    The most serious forms of acute renal failure (ARF) are nowadays encountered in the intensive care unit (ICU), where up to 25% of new patients are reported to develop ARF. Lethality rates may reach 50 to 90% when the ARF is part of a multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. A multitude of extracorporeal procedures have been introduced into intensive care medicine. Applied with adequate skills and experience, most of these techniques will suffice to replace excretory renal function. However, because of low efficacy arterio-venous procedures (CAVH and CAVHD) have been abandoned for the veno-venous, pump-driven techniques (CVVH and CVVHD). Up to now, there is no consensus whether continuous or intermittent renal replacement therapy is more advantageous. In many cases, oliguric patients with circulatory instability will be treated by CVVH, even though there is no prospective study to show that in terms of outcome continuous treatment is superior to intermittent hemodialysis. It is equally conceivable to treat such patients with daily, prolonged (intermittent) hemodialysis. Apparently, the dose of replacement therapy, be it continuous filtration (36 to 48 l/24 h) or intermittent hemodialysis (daily 3 to 4 h) with a target BUN of less than 50 mg/dl, is more important than the modality of treatment. Moreover, there is good evidence that the use of biocompatible membranes (no complement- or leukocyte activation) is preferable and that with high-volume hemofiltration bicarbonate-containing replacement fluids should be used. However, despite all the technical advances, we firmly believe that the skills and the experience of those physicians and nurses who actually perform renal replacement therapy in the ICU are more important than the modality of treatment applied.

  14. Treatment of delayed rupture of the left ventricle after mitral valve replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomes Walter J.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Rupture of the left ventricle following mitral valve replacement is a catastrophic complication with deadly consequences. We report here the case of a 75-year-old man who underwent elective mitral valve replacement for severe mitral regurgitation. Delayed type 1 rupture of the left ventricle developed 3 hours postoperatively in the intensive care unit. A salvaging maneuver was used, which gained time, allowing reoperation and successful intraventricular repair.

  15. A Study on Associative Neural Memories

    OpenAIRE

    B.D.C.N.Prasad; P. E. S. N. Krishna Prasad; Sagar Yeruva; P Sita Rama Murty

    2011-01-01

    Memory plays a major role in Artificial Neural Networks. Without memory, Neural Network can not be learned itself. One of the primary concepts of memory in neural networks is Associative neural memories. A survey has been made on associative neural memories such as Simple associative memories (SAM), Dynamic associative memories (DAM), Bidirectional Associative memories (BAM), Hopfield memories, Context Sensitive Auto-associative memories (CSAM) and so on. These memories can be applied in vari...

  16. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mylotte, Darren; Osnabrugge, Ruben L J; Windecker, Stephan;

    2013-01-01

    The authors sought to examine the adoption of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in Western Europe and investigate factors that may influence the heterogeneous use of this therapy.......The authors sought to examine the adoption of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in Western Europe and investigate factors that may influence the heterogeneous use of this therapy....

  17. [Memory disorders in schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danion, J M; Peretti, S; Gras-Vincendon, A; Singer, L

    1992-01-01

    The current interest in memory disorders in schizophrenia results from the way perceptions of schizophrenia--whose organic origin is becoming increasingly evident--and memory--according to which there exist not one, but several memories--have developed. Memory disorders in the schizophrenic cannot be considered in isolation from knowledge accumulated in other areas of the cognitive and neuro-sciences; a more detailed understanding of these disorders requires a comparison of the different cognitive approaches, both with each other and with the neurobiological and clinical approaches, so that they can be integrated. Despite numerous methodological and conceptual difficulties, it now appears to have been established that the schizophrenic's memory deficit should be seen in the context of a wider cognitive deficit, that the memory tasks are not all disturbed and that the memory deficit cannot be identified with one specific form of memory. Thus, iconic formation, short-term memory in the traditionally accepted sense and implicit memory are hardly, if at all, affected; in contrast, the early processing of information, working memory and explicit memory are disturbed, probably to the extent that they require the implementation of strategies to organise the information to be memorized. Finally, in certain tasks, such as those evaluating latent inhibition or negative priming, schizophrenics perform better than normal subjects, suggesting that schizophrenics' cognitive deficit is localised. This profile of memory disorders is compatible with a dysfunction predominating in the frontal and temporo-hippocampal regions. Neuroleptics and anticholinergics have opposite effects on cognitive and mnesic performance, which is improved by the former and aggravated by the latter. The influence of clinical symptoms, positive or negative, institutionalisation of patients and chronic tardive dyskinesia is unclear. Among the theoretical proposals put forward to account for the observed

  18. [Repeated measurement of memory with valenced test items: verbal memory, working memory and autobiographic memory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuffel, A; Terfehr, K; Uhlmann, C; Schreiner, J; Löwe, B; Spitzer, C; Wingenfeld, K

    2013-07-01

    A large number of questions in clinical and/or experimental neuropsychology require the multiple repetition of memory tests at relatively short intervals. Studies on the impact of the associated exercise and interference effects on the validity of the test results are rare. Moreover, hardly any neuropsychological instruments exist to date to record the memory performance with several parallel versions in which the emotional valence of the test material is also taken into consideration. The aim of the present study was to test whether a working memory test (WST, a digit-span task with neutral or negative distraction stimuli) devised by our workgroup can be used with repeated measurements. This question was also examined in parallel versions of a wordlist learning paradigm and an autobiographical memory test (AMT). Both tests contained stimuli with neutral, positive and negative valence. Twenty-four participants completed the memory testing including the working memory test and three versions of a wordlist and the AMT at intervals of a week apiece (measuring points 1. - 3.). The results reveal consistent performances across the three measuring points in the working and autobiographical memory test. The valence of the stimulus material did not influence the memory performance. In the delayed recall of the wordlist an improvement in memory performance over time was seen. The tests on working memory presented and the parallel versions for the declarative and autobiographical memory constitute informal economic instruments within the scope of the measurement repeatability designs. While the WST and AMT are appropriate for study designs with repeated measurements at relatively short intervals, longer intervals might seem more favourable for the use of wordlist learning paradigms. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. A Working Memory System With Distributed Executive Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandierendonck, André

    2016-01-01

    Working memory consists of domain-specific storage facilities and domain-general executive control processes. In some working memory theories, these control processes are accounted for via a homunculus, the central executive. In the present article, the author defends a mechanistic view of executive control by adopting the position that executive control is situated in the context of goal-directed behavior to maintain and protect the goal and to select an action to attain the goal. On the basis of findings in task switching and dual tasking, he proposes an adapted multicomponent working memory model in which the central executive is replaced by three interacting components: an executive memory that maintains the task set, a collection of acquired procedural rules, and an engine that executes the procedural rules that match the ensemble of working memory contents. The strongest among the rules that match the ensemble of working memory contents is applied, resulting in changes of the working memory contents or in motor actions. According to this model, goals are attained when the route to the goals is known or can be searched when the route is unknown (problem solving). Empirical evidence for this proposal and new predictions are discussed.

  20. Signal processing unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boswell, J.

    1983-01-01

    The architecture of the signal processing unit (SPU) comprises an ROM connected to a program bus, and an input-output bus connected to a data bus and register through a pipeline multiplier accumulator (pmac) and a pipeline arithmetic logic unit (palu), each associated with a random access memory (ram1,2). The system pulse frequency is from 20 mhz. The pmac is further detailed, and has a capability of 20 mega operations per second. There is also a block diagram for the palu, showing interconnections between the register block (rbl), separator for bus (bs), register (reg), shifter (sh) and combination unit. The first and second rams have formats 64*16 and 32*32 bits, respectively. Further data are a 5-v power supply and 2.5 micron n-channel silicon gate mos technology with about 50000 transistors.

  1. Working memory and fluid intelligence

    OpenAIRE

    Engel de Abreu, Pascale; Gathercole; Conway, A.

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigates how working memory and fluid intelligence are related in young children and which aspect of working memory span tasks– short-term storage or controlled attention - might drive the relationship. A sample of 119 children were followed from kindergarten to 2nd grade and completed assessments of working memory, short-term memory, and fluid intelligence. The data showed that working memory, verbal short-term memory, and fluid intelligence were highly related but sepa...

  2. Replacing lactose from calf milk replacers : effects on digestion and post-absorptive metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilbert, M.S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary PhD thesis Myrthe S. Gilbert Replacing lactose from calf milk replacers – Effects on digestion and post-absorptive metabolism Veal calves are fed milk replacer (MR) and solid feed. The largest part of the energy provided to veal calves originates from

  3. Aortic valve replacement with the Nicks annulus enlargement procedure 12 years after mitral valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazama, S; Kurata, A; Yamashita, Y

    1999-10-01

    An aortic valve replacement was successfully performed employing the Nicks annulus enlargement procedure in a case of aortic valve stenosis with small annulus 12 years after mitral valve replacement. Previous mitral valve replacement does not preclude feasibility of the Nicks procedure.

  4. Human memory search

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davelaar, E.J.; Raaijmakers, J.G.W.; Hills, T.T.; Robbins, T.W.; Todd, P.M.

    2012-01-01

    The importance of understanding human memory search is hard to exaggerate: we build and live our lives based on what whe remember. This chapter explores the characteristics of memory search, with special emphasis on the use of retrieval cues. We introduce the dependent measures that are obtained

  5. Human Memory: The Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Michael E.

    2010-01-01

    The human mind has two types of memory: short-term and long-term. In all types of learning, it is best to use that structure rather than to fight against it. One way to do that is to ensure that learners can fit new information into patterns that can be stored in and more easily retrieved from long-term memory.

  6. Bipolar spectral associative memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, R G

    2001-01-01

    Nonlinear spectral associative memories are proposed as quantized frequency domain formulations of nonlinear, recurrent associative memories in which volatile network attractors are instantiated by attractor waves. In contrast to conventional associative memories, attractors encoded in the frequency domain by convolution may be viewed as volatile online inputs, rather than nonvolatile, off-line parameters. Spectral memories hold several advantages over conventional associative memories, including decoder/attractor separability and linear scalability, which make them especially well suited for digital communications. Bit patterns may be transmitted over a noisy channel in a spectral attractor and recovered at the receiver by recurrent, spectral decoding. Massive nonlocal connectivity is realized virtually, maintaining high symbol-to-bit ratios while scaling linearly with pattern dimension. For n-bit patterns, autoassociative memories achieve the highest noise immunity, whereas heteroassociative memories offer the added flexibility of achieving various code rates, or degrees of extrinsic redundancy. Due to linear scalability, high noise immunity and use of conventional building blocks, spectral associative memories hold much promise for achieving robust communication systems. Simulations are provided showing bit error rates for various degrees of decoding time, computational oversampling, and signal-to-noise ratio.

  7. Tracing Cultural Memory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiegand, Frauke Katharina

    to Soweto’s Regina Mundi Church, this thesis analyses tourists’ snapshots at sites of memory and outlines their tracing activity in cultural memory. It draws on central concepts of actor - network theory and visual culture studies for a cross - disciplinary methodology to comprehend the collective...

  8. [Learning and memory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombroso, Paul

    2004-09-01

    Memory is broadly divided into declarative and nondeclarative forms of memory. The hippocampus is required for the formation of declarative memories, while a number of other brain regions including the striatum, amygdala and nucleus accumbens are involved in the formation of nondeclarative memories. The formation of all memories require morphological changes of synapses: new ones must be formed or old ones strengthened. These changes are thought to reflect the underlying cellular basis for persistent memories. Considerable advances have occurred over the last decade in our understanding of the molecular bases of how these memories are formed. A key regulator of synaptic plasticity is a signaling pathway that includes the mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase. As this pathway is required for normal memory and learning, it is not surprising that mutations in members of this pathway lead to disruptions in learning. Neurofibromatosis, Coffin-Lowry syndrome and Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome are three examples of developmental disorders that have mutations in key components of the MAP kinase signaling pathway.

  9. Memories of Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidwell, Amy M.; Walls, Richard T.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to explore college students' autobiographical memories of physical education (PE). Questionnaires were distributed to students enrolled in undergraduate Introduction to PE and Introduction to Communications courses. The 261 participants wrote about memories of PE. These students recalled events from Grades…

  10. A Space for Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charman, Karen

    2015-01-01

    In this article I examine the possibilities of reparation in an era of privatisation and de-industrialisation. I examine the effect of a recent project Sunshine Memory Space, a space, designed to evoke memories of a de-industrialised urban Melbourne suburb Sunshine. This project offered the opportunity for the effects of industrial change to be…

  11. Human Memory: The Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Michael E.

    2010-01-01

    The human mind has two types of memory: short-term and long-term. In all types of learning, it is best to use that structure rather than to fight against it. One way to do that is to ensure that learners can fit new information into patterns that can be stored in and more easily retrieved from long-term memory.

  12. LSTM with Working Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Pulver, Andrew; Lyu, Siwei

    2016-01-01

    LSTM is arguably the most successful RNN architecture for many tasks that involve sequential information. In the past few years there have been several proposed improvements to LSTM. We propose an improvement to LSTM which allows communication between memory cells in different blocks and allows an LSTM layer to carry out internal computation within its memory.

  13. Predicting Reasoning from Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heit, Evan; Hayes, Brett K.

    2011-01-01

    In an effort to assess the relations between reasoning and memory, in 8 experiments, the authors examined how well responses on an inductive reasoning task are predicted from responses on a recognition memory task for the same picture stimuli. Across several experimental manipulations, such as varying study time, presentation frequency, and the…

  14. An Exceptional Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Ian M. L.

    1977-01-01

    An account is given of the exceptional memory of the late Professor A. C. Aitken who was also a distinguished mathematician and mental calculator. Compared with Shereshevskii, another man with exceptional memory, he shows the scholar's reliance on conceptual mapping rather than the mnemonist's reliance on perceptual chaining. (Editor)

  15. Visual Memory at Birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Alan; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Explored new-born babys' capacity for forming visual memories. Used an habituation procedure that accommodated individual differences by allowing each infant to control the time course of habituation trials. Found significant novelty preference, providing strong evidence that recognition memory can be reliably demonstrated from birth. (Author/JAC)

  16. Human Learning and Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, David A.

    2012-01-01

    This innovative textbook is the first to integrate learning and memory, behaviour, and cognition. It focuses on fascinating human research in both memory and learning (while also bringing in important animal studies) and brings the reader up to date with the latest developments in the subject. Students are encouraged to think critically: key…

  17. Animal models of source memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crystal, Jonathon D

    2016-01-01

    Source memory is the aspect of episodic memory that encodes the origin (i.e., source) of information acquired in the past. Episodic memory (i.e., our memories for unique personal past events) typically involves source memory because those memories focus on the origin of previous events. Source memory is at work when, for example, someone tells a favorite joke to a person while avoiding retelling the joke to the friend who originally shared the joke. Importantly, source memory permits differentiation of one episodic memory from another because source memory includes features that were present when the different memories were formed. This article reviews recent efforts to develop an animal model of source memory using rats. Experiments are reviewed which suggest that source memory is dissociated from other forms of memory. The review highlights strengths and weaknesses of a number of animal models of episodic memory. Animal models of source memory may be used to probe the biological bases of memory. Moreover, these models can be combined with genetic models of Alzheimer's disease to evaluate pharmacotherapies that ultimately have the potential to improve memory.

  18. Mathematical aspects of molecular replacement. II. Geometry of motion spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirikjian, Gregory S; Yan, Yan

    2012-03-01

    Molecular replacement (MR) is a well established computational method for phasing in macromolecular crystallography. In MR searches, spaces of motions are explored for determining the appropriate placement of rigid models of macromolecules in crystallographic asymmetric units. In the first paper of this series, it was shown that this space of motions, when endowed with an appropriate composition operator, forms an algebraic structure called a quasigroup. In this second paper, the geometric properties of these MR search spaces are explored and analyzed. This analysis includes the local differential geometry, global geometry and symmetry properties of these spaces.

  19. Memory: Pandora's hippocampus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrieli, John D E

    2004-01-01

    Greater knowledge of the human brain has enabled us to begin devising therapies to rescue or modify memory for the afflicted, such as Alzheimer's patients or post-traumatic stress disorder victims. This same knowledge could also allow us to alter how normal, healthy memory operates; we may become able to enhance memory and learning through biological intervention. But the brain consists of complex, interactive networks, and unintended consequences could easily occur. Moreover, memory is woven into our individuality. Altering our memory processes therefore risks altering us fundamentally. We may not be able to resist opening this neuroscientific Pandora's Box, John Gabrieli writes, but we must proceed with all the wisdom we can muster.

  20. Making memories matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul E. Gold

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews some of the neuroendocrine bases by which emotional events regulate brain mechanisms of learning and memory. In laboratory rodents, there is extensive evidence that epinephrine influences memory processing through an inverted-U relationship, at which moderate levels enhance and high levels impair memory. These effects are, in large part, mediated by increases in blood glucose levels subsequent to epinephrine release, which then provide support for the brain processes engaged by learning and memory. These brain processes include augmentation of neurotransmitter release and of energy metabolism, the latter apparently including a key role for astrocytic glycogen. In addition to up- and down-regulation of learning and memory in general, physiological concomitants of emotion and arousal can also switch the neural system that controls learning at a particular time, at once improving some attributes of learning and impairing others in a manner that results in a change in the strategy used to solve a problem.

  1. Cosmological memory effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolish, Alexander; Wald, Robert M.

    2016-08-01

    The "memory effect" is the permanent change in the relative separation of test particles resulting from the passage of gravitational radiation. We investigate the memory effect for a general, spatially flat Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) cosmology by considering the radiation associated with emission events involving particle-like sources. We find that if the resulting perturbation is decomposed into scalar, vector, and tensor parts, only the tensor part contributes to memory. Furthermore, the tensor contribution to memory depends only on the cosmological scale factor at the source and observation events, not on the detailed expansion history of the universe. In particular, for sources at the same luminosity distance, the memory effect in a spatially flat FLRW spacetime is enhanced over the Minkowski case by a factor of (1 +z ).

  2. The Cosmological Memory Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Tolish, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The "memory effect" is the permanent change in the relative separation of test particles resulting from the passage of gravitational radiation. We investigate the memory effect for a general, spatially flat FLRW cosmology by considering the radiation associated with emission events involving particle-like sources. We find that if the resulting perturbation is decomposed into scalar, vector, and tensor parts, only the tensor part contributes to memory. Furthermore, the tensor contribution to memory depends only on the cosmological scale factor at the source and observation events, not on the detailed expansion history of the universe. In particular, for sources at the same luminosity distance, the memory effect in a spatially flat FLRW spacetime is enhanced over the Minkowski case by a factor of $(1 + z)$.

  3. Innate Memory T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jameson, Stephen C.; Lee, You Jeong; Hogquist, Kristin A.

    2015-01-01

    Memory T cells are usually considered to be a feature of a successful immune response against a foreign antigen, and such cells can mediate potent immunity. However, in mice, alternative pathways have been described, through which naïve T cells can acquire the characteristics and functions of memory T cells without encountering specific foreign antigen or the typical signals required for conventional T cell differentiation. Such cells reflect a response to the internal rather the external environment, and hence such cells are called innate memory T cells. In this review, we describe how innate memory subsets were identified, the signals that induce their generation and their functional properties and potential role in the normal immune response. The existence of innate memory T cells in mice raises questions about whether parallel populations exist in humans, and we discuss the evidence for such populations during human T cell development and differentiation. PMID:25727290

  4. Russell on Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Baldwin

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Russell famously propounded scepticism about memory in The Analysis of Mind (1921. As he there acknowledged, one way to counter this sceptical position is to hold that memory involves direct acquaintance with past, and this is in fact a thesis Russell had advanced in The Problems of Philosophy (1911. Indeed he had there used the case of memory to develop a sophisticated falibilist, non-sceptical, epistemology. By 1921, however, Russell had rejected the early conception of memory as incompatible with the neutral monism he now affirmed. In its place he argued that memory involves a distinctive type of belief whose content is given by imagery. Russell's language here is off-putting but without much distortion his later position can be interpreted as an early formulation of a functionalist theory of mind based on a causal theory of mental representation. Thus interpreted it provides the basis for a different response to Russell's sceptical thesis.

  5. Serotonin transporter and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses, Alfredo; Perez-Garcia, Georgina; Ponce-Lopez, Teresa; Tellez, Ruth; Castillo, Carlos

    2011-09-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) has been associated to diverse functions and diseases, though seldom to memory. Therefore, we made an attempt to summarize and discuss the available publications implicating the involvement of the SERT in memory, amnesia and anti-amnesic effects. Evidence indicates that Alzheimer's disease and drugs of abuse like d-methamphetamine (METH) and (+/-)3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, "ecstasy") have been associated to decrements in the SERT expression and memory deficits. Several reports have indicated that memory formation and amnesia affected the SERT expression. The SERT expression seems to be a reliable neural marker related to memory mechanisms, its alterations and potential treatment. The pharmacological, neural and molecular mechanisms associated to these changes are of great importance for investigation.

  6. Emergence of collective memories

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Sungmin; Holme, Petter

    2010-01-01

    We understand the dynamics of the world around us as by associating pairs of events, where one event has some influence on the other. These pairs of events can be aggregated into a web of memories representing our understanding of an episode of history. The events and the associations between them need not be directly experienced-they can also be acquired by communication. In this paper we take a network approach to study the dynamics of memories of history. First we investigate the network structure of a data set consisting of reported events by several individuals and how associations connect them. We focus our measurement on degree distributions, degree correlations, cycles (which represent inconsistencies as they would break the time ordering) and community structure. We proceed to model effects of communication using an agent-based model. We investigate the conditions for the memory webs of different individuals to converge to collective memories, how groups where the individuals have similar memories (b...

  7. Conflict and memory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagoner, Brady; Brescó, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    This introduction to the special issue on conflict and memory aims to underscore the importance of memory (whether individual and collective) in relation to intergroup conflicts. We argue that the way in which societies reconstruct and bring the past into the present—especially, the historical past......—is crucial when it comes to the study of intergroup conflict dynamics. In this regard, we also highlight the growing importance of memory studies within the area of social sciences as well as the multiple ways of approaching memory. Drawing from this wide theoretical framework, we introduce the articles...... of this issue, eight articles that tackle the role of memory in different conflicts, whether currently under way, in progress of being resolved, in postwar settings, or in contexts conflicts expected to happen do not arise....

  8. Piezopotential-Programmed Multilevel Nonvolatile Memory As Triggered by Mechanical Stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qijun; Ho, Dong Hae; Choi, Yongsuk; Pan, Caofeng; Kim, Do Hwan; Wang, Zhong Lin; Cho, Jeong Ho

    2016-12-27

    We report the development of a piezopotential-programmed nonvolatile memory array using a combination of ion gel-gated field-effect transistors (FETs) and piezoelectric nanogenerators (NGs). Piezopotentials produced from the NGs under external strains were able to replace the gate voltage inputs associated with the programming/erasing operation of the memory, which reduced the power consumption compared with conventional memory devices. Multilevel data storage in the memory device could be achieved by varying the external bending strain applied to the piezoelectric NGs. The resulting devices exhibited good memory performance, including a large programming/erasing current ratio that exceeded 10(3), multilevel data storage of 2 bits (over 4 levels), performance stability over 100 cycles, and stable data retention over 3000 s. The piezopotential-programmed multilevel nonvolatile memory device described here is important for applications in data-storable electronic skin and advanced human-robot interface operations.

  9. Emerging non-volatile memories

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, Seungbum; Wouters, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    This book is an introduction to the fundamentals of emerging non-volatile memories and provides an overview of future trends in the field. Readers will find coverage of seven important memory technologies, including Ferroelectric Random Access Memory (FeRAM), Ferromagnetic RAM (FMRAM), Multiferroic RAM (MFRAM), Phase-Change Memories (PCM), Oxide-based Resistive RAM (RRAM), Probe Storage, and Polymer Memories. Chapters are structured to reflect diffusions and clashes between different topics. Emerging Non-Volatile Memories is an ideal book for graduate students, faculty, and professionals working in the area of non-volatile memory. This book also: Covers key memory technologies, including Ferroelectric Random Access Memory (FeRAM), Ferromagnetic RAM (FMRAM), and Multiferroic RAM (MFRAM), among others. Provides an overview of non-volatile memory fundamentals. Broadens readers' understanding of future trends in non-volatile memories.

  10. Conceptual Design Plan SM-43 Replacement Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    University of California, Los Alamos National Laboratory, SCC Project Office

    2000-11-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory Conceptual Design Plan for the SM-43 Replacement Project outlines plans for replacing the SM-43 Administration Building. Topics include the reasons that replacement is considered a necessity; the roles of the various project sponsors; and descriptions of the proposed site and facilities. Also covered in this proposal is preliminary information on the project schedule, cost estimates, acquisition strategy, risk assessment, NEPA strategy, safety strategy, and safeguards and security. Spreadsheets provide further detail on space requirements, project schedules, and cost estimates.

  11. Percutaneous tricuspid valve replacement in childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Emmel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Percutaneous replacement of the tricuspid valve with a bovine jugular venous valve (melody valve was successfully undertaken in a 9-year-old boy. The patient had a previous history of bacterial endocarditis of the native tricuspid valve in infancy. Initially, a pericardial patch valve was created, followed by surgical replacement of the valve using a biological tissue valve at 4 years of age. Progressive stenosis and regurgitation of the biological valve, with severe venous congestion and resulting hepatic dysfunction prompted percutaneous valve replacement.

  12. Clonal Strategy Algorithm Based on the Immune Memory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruo-Chen Liu; Li-Cheng Jiao; Hai-Feng Du

    2005-01-01

    Based on the clonal selection theory and immune memory mechanism in the natural immune system, a novel artificial immune system algorithm, Clonal Strategy Algorithm based on the Immune Memory (CSAIM), is proposed in this paper. The algorithm realizes the evolution of antibody population and the evolution of memory unit at the same time, and by using clonal selection operator, the global optimal computation can be combined with the local searching. According to antibody-antibody (Ab-Ab) affinity and antibody-antigen (Ab-Ag) affinity, the algorithm can allot adaptively the scales of memory unit and antibody population. It is proved theoretically that CSAIM is convergent with probability 1. And with the computer simulations of eight benchmark functions and one instance of traveling salesman problem (TSP), it is shown that CSAIM has strong abilities in having high convergence speed, enhancing the diversity of the population and avoiding the premature convergence to some extent.

  13. Performance of defect-tolerant set-associative cache memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenzel, J. F.

    1991-01-01

    The increased use of on-chip cache memories has led researchers to investigate their performance in the presence of manufacturing defects. Several techniques for yield improvement are discussed and results are presented which indicate that set-associativity may be used to provide defect tolerance as well as improve the cache performance. Tradeoffs between several cache organizations and replacement strategies are investigated and it is shown that token-based replacement may be a suitable alternative to the widely-used LRU strategy.

  14. Renal Replacement Therapy [version 1; referees: 4 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaccaria Ricci

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last few years, due to medical and surgical evolution, patients with increasingly severe diseases causing multiorgan dysfunction are frequently admitted to intensive care units. Therapeutic options, when organ failure occurs, are frequently nonspecific and mostly directed towards supporting vital function. In these scenarios, the kidneys are almost always involved and, therefore, renal replacement therapies have become a common routine practice in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury. Recent technological improvement has led to the production of safe, versatile and efficient dialysis machines. In addition, emerging evidence may allow better individualization of treatment with tailored prescription depending on the patients’ clinical picture (e.g. sepsis, fluid overload, pediatric. The aim of the present review is to give a general overview of current practice in renal replacement therapies for critically ill patients. The main clinical aspects, including dose prescription, modality of dialysis delivery, anticoagulation strategies and timing will be addressed. In addition, some technical issues on physical principles governing blood purification, filters characteristics, and vascular access, will be covered. Finally, a section on current standard nomenclature of renal replacement therapy is devoted to clarify the “Tower of Babel” of critical care nephrology.

  15. Acceleration-induced nonlocality: kinetic memory versus dynamic memory

    OpenAIRE

    Chicone, C.; Mashhoon, B.

    2001-01-01

    The characteristics of the memory of accelerated motion in Minkowski spacetime are discussed within the framework of the nonlocal theory of accelerated observers. Two types of memory are distinguished: kinetic and dynamic. We show that only kinetic memory is acceptable, since dynamic memory leads to divergences for nonuniform accelerated motion.

  16. Aging Memories: Differential Decay of Episodic Memory Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talamini, Lucia M.; Gorree, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Some memories about events can persist for decades, even a lifetime. However, recent memories incorporate rich sensory information, including knowledge on the spatial and temporal ordering of event features, while old memories typically lack this "filmic" quality. We suggest that this apparent change in the nature of memories may reflect a…

  17. Associative working memory and subsequent episodic memory in Alzheimer's disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geldorp, B. van; Konings, E.P.; Tilborg, I.A. Van; Kessels, R.P.C.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies indicate deficits in associative working memory in patients with medial-temporal lobe amnesia. However, it is unclear whether these deficits reflect working memory processing or are due to hippocampally mediated long-term memory impairment. We investigated associative working memory

  18. Associative working memory and subsequent episodic memory in Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geldorp, B. van; Konings, E.P.C.; Tilborg, I.A.D.A. van; Kessels, R.P.C.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies indicate deficits in associative working memory in patients with medial-temporal lobe amnesia. However, it is unclear whether these deficits reflect working memory processing or are due to hippocampally mediated long-term memory impairment. We investigated associative working memory

  19. The role of additive neurogenesis and synaptic plasticity in a hippocampal memory model with grid-cell like input.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter A Appleby

    Full Text Available Recently, we presented a study of adult neurogenesis in a simplified hippocampal memory model. The network was required to encode and decode memory patterns despite changing input statistics. We showed that additive neurogenesis was a more effective adaptation strategy compared to neuronal turnover and conventional synaptic plasticity as it allowed the network to respond to changes in the input statistics while preserving representations of earlier environments. Here we extend our model to include realistic, spatially driven input firing patterns in the form of grid cells in the entorhinal cortex. We compare network performance across a sequence of spatial environments using three distinct adaptation strategies: conventional synaptic plasticity, where the network is of fixed size but the connectivity is plastic; neuronal turnover, where the network is of fixed size but units in the network may die and be replaced; and additive neurogenesis, where the network starts out with fewer initial units but grows over time. We confirm that additive neurogenesis is a superior adaptation strategy when using realistic, spatially structured input patterns. We then show that a more biologically plausible neurogenesis rule that incorporates cell death and enhanced plasticity of new granule cells has an overall performance significantly better than any one of the three individual strategies operating alone. This adaptation rule can be tailored to maximise performance of the network when operating as either a short- or long-term memory store. We also examine the time course of adult neurogenesis over the lifetime of an animal raised under different hypothetical rearing conditions. These growth profiles have several distinct features that form a theoretical prediction that could be tested experimentally. Finally, we show that place cells can emerge and refine in a realistic manner in our model as a direct result of the sparsification performed by the dentate gyrus

  20. Recurrent correlation associative memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiueh, T D; Goodman, R M

    1991-01-01

    A model for a class of high-capacity associative memories is presented. Since they are based on two-layer recurrent neural networks and their operations depend on the correlation measure, these associative memories are called recurrent correlation associative memories (RCAMs). The RCAMs are shown to be asymptotically stable in both synchronous and asynchronous (sequential) update modes as long as their weighting functions are continuous and monotone nondecreasing. In particular, a high-capacity RCAM named the exponential correlation associative memory (ECAM) is proposed. The asymptotic storage capacity of the ECAM scales exponentially with the length of memory patterns, and it meets the ultimate upper bound for the capacity of associative memories. The asymptotic storage capacity of the ECAM with limited dynamic range in its exponentiation nodes is found to be proportional to that dynamic range. Design and fabrication of a 3-mm CMOS ECAM chip is reported. The prototype chip can store 32 24-bit memory patterns, and its speed is higher than one associative recall operation every 3 mus. An application of the ECAM chip to vector quantization is also described.

  1. Trials and Tribulations with VH Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenzhao eMeng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available VH replacement is a type of antibody gene rearrangement in which an upstream heavy chain variable gene segment (VH invades a pre-existing rearrangement (VDJ. In this Hypothesis and Theory article, we begin by reviewing the mechanism of VH replacement, its developmental timing and its potential biological consequences. Then we explore the hypothesis that specific sequence motifs called footprints reflect VH replacement vs. other processes. We provide a compilation of footprint sequences from different regions of the antibody heavy chain, include data from the literature and from a high throughput sequencing experiment to evaluate the significance of footprint sequences. We conclude by discussing the difficulties of attributing footprints to VH replacement.

  2. Gyrator-type circuits replace ungrounded inductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deboo, G. J.

    1968-01-01

    Gyrator circuits using only transistors, capacitors, and resistors which can replace both grounded and ungrounded inductors have been developed to permit complete microminiaturization of circuitry by integration of the components.

  3. Total ankle replacement. Design evolution and results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Heuvel, Alexander; Van Bouwel, Saskia; Dereymaeker, Greta

    2010-04-01

    The ankle joint has unique anatomical, biomechanical and cartilaginous structural characteristics that allow the joint to withstand the very high mechanical stresses and strains over years. Any minor changes to any of these features predispose the joint to osteoarthritis. Total ankle replacement (TAR) is evolving as an alternative to ankle arthrodesis for the treatment of end-stage ankle osteoarthritis. Initial implant designs from the early 1970s had unacceptably high failure and complication rates. As a result many orthopaedic surgeons have restricted the use of TAR in favour of ankle arthrodesis. Long term follow-up studies following ankle arthrodesis show risks of developing adjacent joint osteoarthritis. Therefore research towards a successful ankle replacement continues. Newer designs and longer-term outcome studies have renewed the interest in ankle joint replacement. We present an overview of the evolution, results and current concepts of total ankle replacement.

  4. Minimally Invasive Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Watch a Broward Health surgeon perform a minimally invasive Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR) Click Here to view the BroadcastMed, Inc. Privacy Policy and Legal Notice © 2017 BroadcastMed, Inc. ...

  5. Total ankle replacement - surgical treatment and rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prusinowska, Agnieszka; Krogulec, Zbigniew; Turski, Piotr; Przepiórski, Emil; Małdyk, Paweł; Księżopolska-Orłowska, Krystyna

    2015-01-01

    Functions of the ankle joint are closely connected with the gait and ability to maintain an upright position. Degenerative lesions of the joint directly contribute to postural disorders and greatly restrict propulsion of the foot, thus leading to abnormal gait. Development of total ankle replacement is connected with the use of the method as an efficient treatment of joint injuries and continuation of achievements in hip and knee surgery. The total ankle replacement technique was introduced as an alternative to arthrodesis, i.e. surgical fixation, which made it possible to preserve joint mobility and to improve gait. Total ankle replacement is indicated in post-traumatic degenerative joint disease and joint destruction secondary to rheumatoid arthritis. In this paper, total ankle replacement and various types of currently used endoprostheses are discussed. The authors also describe principles of early postoperative rehabilitation as well as rehabilitation in the outpatient setting.

  6. 47 CFR 13.17 - Replacement license.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMERCIAL RADIO OPERATORS General § 13.17 Replacement... Operator License, Marine Radio Operator Permit, First Class Radiotelegraph Operator's Certificate, Second... Radio Operator's License, Restricted GMDSS Radio Operator License, GMDSS Radio Maintainer's License,...

  7. Renal replacement therapy for acute renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, E; Bouchard, J; Mehta, R L

    2009-09-01

    Renal replacement therapy became a common clinical tool to treat patients with severe acute kidney injury (AKI) since the 1960s. During this time dialytic options have expanded considerably; biocompatible membranes, bicarbonate dialysate and dialysis machines with volumetric ultrafiltration control have improved the treatment for acute kidney injury. Along with advances in methods of intermittent hemodialysis, continuous renal replacement therapies have gained widespread acceptance in the treatment of dialysis-requiring AKI. However, many of the fundamental aspects of the renal replacement treatment such as indication, timing of dialytic intervention, and choice of dialysis modality are still controversial and may influence AKI patient's outcomes. This review outlines current concepts in the use of dialysis techniques for AKI and suggests an approach for selecting the optimal method of renal replacement therapy.

  8. Minimally Invasive Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Watch a Broward Health surgeon perform a minimally invasive Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR) Click Here to view the BroadcastMed, Inc. Privacy Policy and Legal Notice © 2017 BroadcastMed, Inc. ...

  9. SYNERGISTIC WOOD PRESERVATIVES FOR REPLACEMENT OF CCA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this project was to evaluate the potential synergistic combinations of environmentally-safe biocides as wood preservatives. These wood preservatives could be potential replacements for the heavy-metal based CCA.Didecyldimethylammonium chloride [DDAC] was...

  10. Bone Marrow Transplantation (BMT) and Gene Replacement ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bone Marrow Transplantation (BMT) and Gene Replacement Therapy (GRT) In Sickle Cell Anemia. ... manifesting clinical disease, while the heterozygoste(AS) are clinically ... medicine, we argue here the case for Bone marrow transplantation

  11. European Union of Memories?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wæhrens, Anne

    After a very brief introduction to history and memory in Europe after 1989, as seen by Aleida Assmann, I will give a short introduction to the EP and to their adoption of resolutions and declarations. Then I will define some concepts central to my study before I proceed to the analysis. Finally I...... these changes have come about. Moreover, I show that there seems to be a political memory split between Left and Right and I suggest that the time might not be ripe for a shared European memory....

  12. Extended associative memories

    OpenAIRE

    J.H Sossa Azuela; R. Barrón Fernández

    2007-01-01

    The #945; #946; associative memories recently developed in Ref 10 have proven to be powerful tools for memorizing and recalling patterns when they appear distorted by noise. However they are only useful in the binary case. In this paper we show that it is possible to extend these memories now to the gray-level case. To get the desired extension, we take the original operators #945; and #946;, foundation of the #945; #946; memories, and propose a more general family of operators. We find t...

  13. Maximum Likelihood Associative Memories

    OpenAIRE

    Gripon, Vincent; Rabbat, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Associative memories are structures that store data in such a way that it can later be retrieved given only a part of its content -- a sort-of error/erasure-resilience property. They are used in applications ranging from caches and memory management in CPUs to database engines. In this work we study associative memories built on the maximum likelihood principle. We derive minimum residual error rates when the data stored comes from a uniform binary source. Second, we determine the minimum amo...

  14. History, Memory and Film

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bondebjerg, Ib

    In this paper I discuss history and memory from a theoretical and philosophical point of view and the non-fiction and fiction aspects of historical representation. I use Edgar Reitz’ monumental work Heimat 1-3 (and his recent film Die Andere Heimat) as examples of very different transformative...... historical narratives. In terms of narrative construction and aesthetic form the Heimat-project challenges the dominant forms of historical fiction. By combining personal memory, everyday life and collective memory and a more indirect way of representing factual history Reitz wants to transform our look...

  15. New gravitational memories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasterski, Sabrina; Strominger, Andrew; Zhiboedov, Alexander [Center for the Fundamental Laws of Nature, Harvard University,Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2016-12-14

    The conventional gravitational memory effect is a relative displacement in the position of two detectors induced by radiative energy flux. We find a new type of gravitational ‘spin memory’ in which beams on clockwise and counterclockwise orbits acquire a relative delay induced by radiative angular momentum flux. It has recently been shown that the displacement memory formula is a Fourier transform in time of Weinberg’s soft graviton theorem. Here we see that the spin memory formula is a Fourier transform in time of the recently-discovered subleading soft graviton theorem.

  16. Infective endocarditis following percutaneous pulmonary valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheung, Gary; Vejlstrup, Niels; Ihlemann, Nikolaj;

    2013-01-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) following percutaneous pulmonary valve replacement (PPVR) with the Melody valve is rarely reported. Furthermore, there are challenges in this diagnosis; especially echocardiographic evidence of vegetation within the prosthesis may be difficult.......Infective endocarditis (IE) following percutaneous pulmonary valve replacement (PPVR) with the Melody valve is rarely reported. Furthermore, there are challenges in this diagnosis; especially echocardiographic evidence of vegetation within the prosthesis may be difficult....

  17. Memory-based logic synthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Sasao, Tsutomu

    2011-01-01

    This book describes the synthesis of logic functions using memories. It is useful to design field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) that contain both small-scale memories, called look-up tables (LUTs), and medium-scale memories, called embedded memories. This is a valuable reference for both FPGA system designers and CAD tool developers, concerned with logic synthesis for FPGAs.

  18. Context memory in Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El Haj, M.; Kessels, R.P.C.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by a gradual loss of memory. Specifically, context aspects of memory are impaired in AD. Our review sheds light on the neurocognitive mechanisms of this memory component that forms the core of episodic memory function.

  19. Reduced False Memory after Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenn, Kimberly M.; Gallo, David A.; Margoliash, Daniel; Roediger, Henry L., III; Nusbaum, Howard C.

    2009-01-01

    Several studies have shown that sleep contributes to the successful maintenance of previously encoded information. This research has focused exclusively on memory for studied events, as opposed to false memories. Here we report three experiments showing that sleep reduces false memories in the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) memory illusion. False…

  20. Context memory in Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El Haj, M.; Kessels, R.P.C.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by a gradual loss of memory. Specifically, context aspects of memory are impaired in AD. Our review sheds light on the neurocognitive mechanisms of this memory component that forms the core of episodic memory function.

  1. [Replacement of tracheo-esophageal Provox prosthesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biacabe, B; Laccourreye, O; Ménard, M; Hans, S; Brasnu, D

    2000-02-01

    To compare anesthesic techniques used between 1992 and 1997 at Laënnec Hospital for replacement by tracheo-esophageal Provox prosthesis: local and general anesthesia. Theoretical financial cost for replacement was estimated according to anaesthetic techniques. Provox in situ lifetime was calculated in 58 patients who underwent 115 and 49 replacements under general and local anaesthesia respectively. Age, sex, surgical and radiotherapy backgrounds, complications and anaesthetic techniques were studied as potential factors correlated with Provox in situ lifetime. Theoretical financial cost for replacement was estimated according to anaesthetic techniques. In 1992, 12% of Provox prosthesis were inserted under local anaesthesia and 54% in 1997. Provox in situ lifetime was either not influenced by anaesthetic techniques or other factors under analysis. The theoretical financial cost was estimated at 14, 341 FFrs and 6,048 FFrs for replacement under general and local anaesthesia respectively. Due to increased control of health care costs, we advocated local anaesthesia for Provox prosthesis replacement if control endoscopy is not required.

  2. Strategic vehicle fleet management - the replacement problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Redmer

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fleets constitute the most important production means in transportation. Their appropriate management is crucial for all companies having transportation duties. The paper is the third one of a series of three papers that the author dedicates to the strategic vehicle fleet management topic. Material and methods: The paper discusses ways of building replacement strategies for companies' fleets of vehicles. It means deciding for how long to exploit particular vehicles in a fleet (the fleet replacement problem - FR. The essence of this problem lies in the minimization of vehicle / fleet exploitation costs by balancing ownership and utilization costs and taking into account budget limitations. In the paper an original mathematical model (an optimization method allowing for the FR analysis is proposed. Results: An application of the proposed optimization method in a real-life decision situation (the case study within the Polish environment and the obtained solution are presented. The solution shows that there exist optimal exploitation periods of particular vehicles in a fleet. However, combination of them gives a replacement plan for an entire fleet violating budget constraints. But it is possible to adjust individual age to replacement of particular vehicles to fulfill budget constraints without losing economical optimality of a developed replacement plan for an entire fleet. Conclusions: The paper is the last one of a series of three papers that the author dedicated to the strategic vehicle fleet management topic including the following managerial decision problems: MAKE-or-BUY, sizing / composition and replacement.

  3. Cardiac crossroads: deciding between mechanical or bioprosthetic heart valve replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maggie N Tillquist

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Maggie N Tillquist1, Thomas M Maddox21School of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, Denver, CO, USA; 2VA Eastern Colorado Health Care System, and Department of Medicine (Cardiology, University of Colorado Denver, Denver, CO, USAAbstract: Nearly 15 million people in the United States suffer from either aortic or mitral valvular disease. For patients with severe and symptomatic valvular heart disease, valve replacement surgery improves morbidity and mortality outcomes. In 2009, 90,000 valve replacement surgeries were performed in the United States. This review evaluates the advantages and disadvantages of mechanical and bioprosthetic prosthetic heart valves as well as the factors for consideration in deciding the appropriate valve type for an individual patient. Although many caveats exist, the general recommendation is for patients younger than 60 to 65 years to receive mechanical valves due to the valve's longer durability and for patients older than 60 to 65 years to receive a bioprosthetic valve to avoid complications with anticoagulants. Situations that warrant special consideration include patient co-morbidities, the need for anticoagulation, and the potential for pregnancy. Once these characteristics have been considered, patients' values, anxieties, and expectations for their lifestyle and quality of life should be incorporated into final valve selection. Decision aids can be useful in integrating preferences in the valve decision. Finally, future directions in valve technology, anticoagulation, and medical decision-making are discussed.Keywords: prosthetic heart valves, patient preference, valve type, anticoagulant, structural valve deterioration 

  4. Effect of Cu Content on Atomic Positions of Ti50Ni50−xCux Shape Memory Alloys Based on Density Functional Theory Calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liangliang Gou

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The study of crystal structures in shape memory alloys is of fundamental importance for understanding the shape memory effect. In order to investigate the mechanism of how Cu content affects martensite crystal structures of TiNiCu alloys, the present research examines the atomic displacement of Ti50Ni50−xCux (x = 0, 5, 12.5, 15, 18.75, 20, 25 shape memory alloys using density functional theory (DFT. By the introduction of Cu atoms into TiNi martensite crystal to replace Ni, the displacements of Ti and Ni/Cu atoms along the x-axis are obvious, but they are minimal along the y- and z-axes. It is found that along the x-axis, the two Ti atoms in the unit cell move in opposite directions, and the same occurred with the two Ni/Cu atoms. With increasing Cu content, the distance between the two Ni/Cu atoms increases while the Ti atoms draw closer along the x-axis, leading to a rotation of the (100 plane, which is responsible for the decrease in the monoclinic angle. It is also found that the displacements of both Ti atoms and Ni/Cu atoms along the x-axis are progressive, which results in a gradual change of monoclinic angle and a transition to B19 martensite crystal structure.

  5. Role of the hippocampus in memory formation: restorative encoding memory integration neural device as a cognitive neural prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Theodore; Song, Dong; Chan, Rosa; Shin, Dae; Marmarelis, Vasilis; Hampson, Robert; Sweatt, Andrew; Heck, Christi; Liu, Charles; Wills, Jack; Lacoss, Jeff; Granacki, John; Gerhardt, Greg; Deadwyler, Sam

    2012-01-01

    Remind, which stands for "restorative encoding memory integration neural device," is a Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA)-sponsored program to construct the first-ever cognitive prosthesis to replace lost memory function and enhance the existing memory capacity in animals and, ultimately, in humans. Reaching this goal involves understanding something fundamental about the brain that has not been understood previously: how the brain internally codes memories. In developing a hippocampal prosthesis for the rat, we have been able to demonstrate a multiple-input, multiple- output (MIMO) nonlinear model that predicts in real time the spatiotemporal codes for specific memories required for correct performance on a standard learning/memory task, i.e., delayed-nonmatch-to-sample (DNMS) memory. The MIMO model has been tested successfully in a number of contexts; most notably, in animals with a pharmacologically disabled hippocampus, we were able to reinstate long-term memories necessary for correct DNMS behavior by substituting a MIMO model-predicted code, delivered by electrical stimulation to the hippocampus through an array of electrodes, resulting in spatiotemporal hippocampal activity that is normally generated endogenously. We also have shown that delivering the same model-predicted code to electrode-implanted control animals with a normally functioning hippocampus substantially enhances animals memory capacity above control levels. These results in rodents have formed the basis for extending the MIMO model to nonhuman primates; this is now underway as the last step of the REMIND program before developing a MIMO-based cognitive prosthesis for humans.

  6. Evolution of working memory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peter Carruthers

    2013-01-01

    Working memory (WM) is fundamental to many aspects of human life, including learning, speech and text comprehension, prospection and future planning, and explicit "system 2" forms of reasoning, as well as overlapping...

  7. Conglomerate memory and cosmopolitanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susannah Ryan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Under what conditions do countries and cultures considered radically different find a basis for allegiance and kinship? What part does memory play in this process? This article responds to these questions in two ways: 1 Through Emmanuel Levinas and Hannah Arendt, I propose that when an other appears in empathetic discourses that both honor difference and cite shared human experiences, seemingly irreconcilable people can develop a sense of mutual responsibility and 2 Conglomerate memory, memories that fuse together others through common pains, contributes to such an appearance. To illustrate this point, I turn to Congolese voices as they are articulated in online American discourses; although currently, authors of online texts typically rely on traditional narrative forms that position Central Africa as incommensurate to Western civilizations, the Internet's worldwide accessibility and intertextual capacities render it a place primed for developing international collectives by connecting memories while maintaining difference.

  8. The Rational Memory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1903-01-01

    FEW could read this useful little book of 115 pages without benefit. The author does not claim originality, but has selected the principles and facts of recognised importance from other works on memory...

  9. Modelling Immunological Memory

    CERN Document Server

    Garret, Simon; Walker, Joanne; Wilson, William; Aickelin, Uwe

    2010-01-01

    Accurate immunological models offer the possibility of performing highthroughput experiments in silico that can predict, or at least suggest, in vivo phenomena. In this chapter, we compare various models of immunological memory. We first validate an experimental immunological simulator, developed by the authors, by simulating several theories of immunological memory with known results. We then use the same system to evaluate the predicted effects of a theory of immunological memory. The resulting model has not been explored before in artificial immune systems research, and we compare the simulated in silico output with in vivo measurements. Although the theory appears valid, we suggest that there are a common set of reasons why immunological memory models are a useful support tool; not conclusive in themselves.

  10. Islamic Myths and Memories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    and globalization and to the study of the place of the mass media in the contemporary Islamic resurgence. It explores the annulment of spatial and temporal distance by globalization and by the communications revolution underlying it, and how this has affected the cherished myths and memories of the Muslim community......Islamic myths and collective memory are very much alive in today’s localized struggles for identity, and are deployed in the ongoing construction of worldwide cultural networks. This book brings the theoretical perspectives of myth-making and collective memory to the study of Islam....... It shows how contemporary Islamic thinkers and movements respond to the challenges of globalization by preserving, reviving, reshaping, or transforming myths and memories....

  11. Serriform Strip Crosstie Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    edge effect of the margin serrations upon magnetization, a form of shape anisotropy, inherently defines memory cell boundaries in the domain walls, thereby giving the crossties and Bloch lines preferred locations and allowing the use of a simplified propagation

  12. Memory mass storage

    CERN Document Server

    Campardo, Giovanni; Iaculo, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    Covering all the fundamental storage technologies such as semiconductor, magnetic, optical and uncommon, this volume details their core characteristics. In addition, it includes an overview of the 'biological memory' of the human brain and its organization.

  13. Just a Memory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    While Beijing accelerates its modernization drive,it needs to retain its city culture before the ancient parts of the capital are only seen in photographs and live on only in the memories of residents

  14. Magnetic vortex racetrack memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Liwei D.; Jin, Yongmei M.

    2017-02-01

    We report a new type of racetrack memory based on current-controlled movement of magnetic vortices in magnetic nanowires with rectangular cross-section and weak perpendicular anisotropy. Data are stored through the core polarity of vortices and each vortex carries a data bit. Besides high density, non-volatility, fast data access, and low power as offered by domain wall racetrack memory, magnetic vortex racetrack memory has additional advantages of no need for constrictions to define data bits, changeable information density, adjustable current magnitude for data propagation, and versatile means of ultrafast vortex core switching. By using micromagnetic simulations, current-controlled motion of magnetic vortices in cobalt nanowire is demonstrated for racetrack memory applications.

  15. Multiresonator quantum memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moiseev, S. A.; Gubaidullin, F. F.; Kirillov, R. S.; Latypov, R. R.; Perminov, N. S.; Petrovnin, K. V.; Sherstyukov, O. N.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we present universal broadband multiresonator quantum memory based on the spatial-frequency combs of the microresonators coupled with a common waveguide. We find a Bragg-type impedance matching condition for the coupling of the microresonators with a waveguide field that provides an efficient broadband quantum storage. The analytical solution obtained for the microresonator fields enables sustainable parametric control of all the memory characteristics. We also construct an experimental prototype of the studied quantum memory in the microwave spectral range that demonstrates basic properties of the microwave microresonators, their coupling with a common waveguide, and independent control of the microresonator frequencies. Experimentally observed narrow lines of the microresonators confirm the possibility of multiresonator quantum memory implementation.

  16. Memory Circuit Fault Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Douglas J.; McClure, Tucker

    2013-01-01

    Spacecraft are known to experience significant memory part-related failures and problems, both pre- and postlaunch. These memory parts include both static and dynamic memories (SRAM and DRAM). These failures manifest themselves in a variety of ways, such as pattern-sensitive failures, timingsensitive failures, etc. Because of the mission critical nature memory devices play in spacecraft architecture and operation, understanding their failure modes is vital to successful mission operation. To support this need, a generic simulation tool that can model different data patterns in conjunction with variable write and read conditions was developed. This tool is a mathematical and graphical way to embed pattern, electrical, and physical information to perform what-if analysis as part of a root cause failure analysis effort.

  17. Auditory short-term memory in the primate auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Brian H; Mishkin, Mortimer

    2016-06-01

    Sounds are fleeting, and assembling the sequence of inputs at the ear into a coherent percept requires auditory memory across various time scales. Auditory short-term memory comprises at least two components: an active ׳working memory' bolstered by rehearsal, and a sensory trace that may be passively retained. Working memory relies on representations recalled from long-term memory, and their rehearsal may require phonological mechanisms unique to humans. The sensory component, passive short-term memory (pSTM), is tractable to study in nonhuman primates, whose brain architecture and behavioral repertoire are comparable to our own. This review discusses recent advances in the behavioral and neurophysiological study of auditory memory with a focus on single-unit recordings from macaque monkeys performing delayed-match-to-sample (DMS) tasks. Monkeys appear to employ pSTM to solve these tasks, as evidenced by the impact of interfering stimuli on memory performance. In several regards, pSTM in monkeys resembles pitch memory in humans, and may engage similar neural mechanisms. Neural correlates of DMS performance have been observed throughout the auditory and prefrontal cortex, defining a network of areas supporting auditory STM with parallels to that supporting visual STM. These correlates include persistent neural firing, or a suppression of firing, during the delay period of the memory task, as well as suppression or (less commonly) enhancement of sensory responses when a sound is repeated as a ׳match' stimulus. Auditory STM is supported by a distributed temporo-frontal network in which sensitivity to stimulus history is an intrinsic feature of auditory processing. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Auditory working memory.

  18. Memory training with senior citizens

    OpenAIRE

    CHOVANCOVÁ, Lenka

    2014-01-01

    This is a theoretical work. It deals with the topics of senior citizens and the aging process in an abbreviated conception, periodization of old age, and active life of seniors. It describes forms of social work with seniors in medical facilities, home environments and communities, and in old people's homes. Further, it describes memory: its definition, types of memory, memory loss, reasons why people forget, work with memory and advice on memory improvement from the medical point of view. Th...

  19. Solution processed silver sulfide thin films for filament memory applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Shong

    Filament Memories based on resistive switching have been attracting attention in recent years as a potential replacement for flash memory in CMOS technology and as a potential candidate memory for low-cost, large-area electronics. These memories operate at low voltages with fast switching speeds. These devices are based on ionic conduction through an electrolyte layer and differ fundamentally in operation from conventional flash memory, which is based on the field effect transistor. To facilitate development of this technology, effects of film structure on ionic and electronic conducting properties and the filament formation processes must be studied. In this work, silver sulfide, a mixed ionic-electronic conductor, is used as a model material for studying the solution processing of filament memories, and to study the impact of film structure on conducting and switching properties. Three different solution processing methods are investigated for depositing silver sulfide: sulfidation of elemental silver films, and sintering of two types of silver sulfide nanoparticles. Effects of nanoparticle sintering conditions on electrolyte structured and mixed conducting properties are investigated by a combination of X-ray diffraction, electrical impedance spectroscopy and thermo-gravimetric analysis. Impact of forming voltage and time on filament morphology is examined to provide an overall view of the impact of electrical and material parameters on device operation.

  20. Memory, Conviviality and Coexistence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duru, Deniz Neriman

    2016-01-01

    The article explores the narratives and memories of past diversity and current practices of conviviality to investigate how class, lifestyle and tastes affect the daily interactions between people belonging to different ethno-religious backgrounds. This chapter critiques ‘coexistence’ as a concep......’ emphasize the fragmentation of people into ethnic and religious groups as a consequence of the homogenization process in the post-Ottoman Turkish context, bitter sweet memories of conviviality create a sense of belonging to Burgaz....

  1. Computational principles of memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Rishidev; Fiete, Ila

    2016-03-01

    The ability to store and later use information is essential for a variety of adaptive behaviors, including integration, learning, generalization, prediction and inference. In this Review, we survey theoretical principles that can allow the brain to construct persistent states for memory. We identify requirements that a memory system must satisfy and analyze existing models and hypothesized biological substrates in light of these requirements. We also highlight open questions, theoretical puzzles and problems shared with computer science and information theory.

  2. Photonic crystal optical memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, A. Wirth; Sombra, A. S. B.

    2011-06-01

    After several decades pushing the technology and the development of the world, the electronics is giving space for technologies that use light. We propose and analyze an optical memory embedded in a nonlinear photonic crystal (PhC), whose system of writing and reading data is controlled by an external command signal. This optical memory is based on optical directional couplers connected to a shared optical ring. Such a device can work over the C-Band of ITU (International Telecommunication Union).

  3. Epigenetic memory in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Mayumi; Paszkowski, Jerzy

    2014-09-17

    Epigenetics refers to heritable changes in patterns of gene expression that occur without alterations in DNA sequence. The epigenetic mechanisms involve covalent modifications of DNA and histones, which affect transcriptional activity of chromatin. Since chromatin states can be propagated through mitotic and meiotic divisions, epigenetic mechanisms are thought to provide heritable 'cellular memory'. Here, we review selected examples of epigenetic memory in plants and briefly discuss underlying mechanisms.

  4. Tunable and Memory Metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-02

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2015-0402 TUNABLE AND MEMORY METAMATERIALS Dimitri Basov UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SAN DIEGO Final Report 12/02/2015 DISTRIBUTION A...DATES COVERED (From - To) 15-08-2010 to 14-08-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE TUNABLE AND MEMORY METAMATERIALS 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER FA9550...common limitations of infrared metamaterials in order to achieve low electromagnetic losses and broad tunability of the electromagnetic response. One

  5. Regulatory T cell memory

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenblum, Md; Way, SS; Abbas, AK

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Nature Publishing Group, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited. All Rights Reserved. Memory for antigen is a defining feature of adaptive immunity. Antigen-specific lymphocyte populations show an increase in number and function after antigen encounter and more rapidly re-expand upon subsequent antigen exposure. Studies of immune memory have primarily focused on effector B cells and T cells with microbial specificity, using prime–challenge models of infection. However, recent work ...

  6. Music and memory

    OpenAIRE

    Haefliger, Anna Berenika

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: Music and its different forms of use seem to benefit people in a number of ways. Research has suggested that extensive musical practice and musical listening enhances mental functioning in healthy adults and patients with neurodegenerative disease. Yet, the findings presented have not yet examined the effects both musical training and stimuli enhancement have on episodic memory recognition. 20 musicians and 20 non-musicians took part in an episodic memory task which evaluated m...

  7. Cognitive Memory Network

    CERN Document Server

    James, Alex Pappachen; 10.1049/el.2010.0279

    2012-01-01

    A resistive memory network that has no crossover wiring is proposed to overcome the hardware limitations to size and functional complexity that is associated with conventional analogue neural networks. The proposed memory network is based on simple network cells that are arranged in a hierarchical modular architecture. Cognitive functionality of this network is demonstrated by an example of character recognition. The network is trained by an evolutionary process to completely recognise characters deformed by random noise, rotation, scaling and shifting

  8. Kirchnerist construction of memory

    OpenAIRE

    Bermúdez, Nicolás

    2015-01-01

    The effects on the construction of collective memory caused by the arrival of the kirchnerism to the political field have been extensively studied. That construction suffered transformations with the change of president, which have been less studied. Therefore, the objective of this paper is to present an analysis about the discursive construction of memory during Cristina Fernández de Kirchner first government. This research is part of the discourse studies, and more precisely it is part of ...

  9. Collective Memories in Wikipedia

    OpenAIRE

    Ferron, Michela

    2012-01-01

    Collective memories are precious resources for the society, because they contribute to strengthening the emotional bonding between community members, maintaining groups cohesion, and directing future behavior. Understanding the formation of the collective memories of emotional upheavals is important to a better comprehension of people's reactions and of the consequences on their psychological health. Previous studies investigated the effects of single traumatizing events, but few of them app...

  10. Memory, collective memory, orality and the gospels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis C. Duling

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This article first explores individual memory as understood from the time of the ancient Greeks and Romans to modern-day neurology and psychology. The perspective is correlated with collective memory theory in the works of Halbwachs, Connerton, Gillis, Fentress and Wickham, Olick, Schwartz, Jan and Alida Assmann and Kirk and Thatcher. The relevance of ‘orality’ is highlighted in Kelber’s works, as well as in oral poetry performance by illiterate Yugoslavian bards, as discussed in studies by Parry, Lord and Havelock. Kelber’s challenge of Bultmann’s theory of oral tradition in the gospels is also covered. The article concludes with observations and reflections, opting for a position of moderate−to−strong constructionism.

  11. Nuclear facilities: repair and replacement technologies; Installations nucleaires: technologies de reparation et de remplacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    The oldest operating reactors are more than 35 years old and are now facing major maintenance operations. The first replacement of a pressurizer took place in autumn 2005 at the St-Lucie plant (Usa) while steam generators have been currently replaced since 1983. Nuclear industry has to adapt to this new market by proposing innovative technological solutions in the reactor maintenance field. This document gathers the 9 papers presented at the conference. The main improvements concern repair works on internal components of PWR-type reactors, the replacement of major components of the primary coolant circuit and surface treatments to limit the propagation of damages. The first paper shows that adequate design and feedback experience are good assets to manage the ageing of a nuclear unit. Another paper shows that a new repair method of a relief valve can avoid its replacement. (A.C.)

  12. Learning and memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. J. Ryke

    1989-03-01

    Full Text Available Under various circumstances and in different species the outward expression of learning varies considerably, and this has led to the classification of different categories of learning. Just as there is no generally agreed on definition of learning, there is no one system of classification. Types of learning commonly recognized are: Habituation, sensitization, classical conditioning, operant conditioning, trial and error, taste aversion, latent learning, cultural learning, imprinting, insight learning, learning-set learning and instinct. The term memory must include at least two separate processes. It must involve, on the one hand, that of learning something and on the other, at some later date, recalling that thing. What lies between the learning and (he remembering must be some permanent record — a memory trace — within the brain. Memory exists in at least two forms: memory for very recent events (short-term which is relatively labile and easily disruptable; and long-term memory, which is much more stable. Not everything that gets into short-term memory becomes fixed in the long-term store; a filtering mechanism selects things that might be important and discards the rest.

  13. Shape memory materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Compared with piezoelectric ceramics and magnetostrictive materials, the shape memory materials possess larger recoverable strain and recovery stress but slower response to external field. It is expected that the magneto-shape memory materials may develop considerable strain as well as rapid and precise shape control. Pseudoelasticity and shape memory effect (SME) resulted from martensitic transformation and its reverse transformation in shape memory materials were generally described. The requirements of appearing the shape memory effect in materials and the criteria for thermoelastic martensitic transformation were given. Some aspects concerning characteristics of martensitic transformation, and factors affecting SME in Ni-Ti, Cu-Zn-Al and Fe-Mn-Si based alloys as well as ZrO2 containing ceramics were briefly reviewed. Thermodynamic calculation of Ms temperature as function of grain size and parent ordering in Cu-Zn-Al was presented. The works on prediction of Ms in Fe-Mn-Si based alloys and in ZrO2-CeO2 were mentioned. Magnetic shape memory materials were briefly introduced.

  14. Immune memory in invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milutinović, Barbara; Kurtz, Joachim

    2016-08-01

    Evidence for innate immune memory (or 'priming') in invertebrates has been accumulating over the last years. We here provide an in-depth review of the current state of evidence for immune memory in invertebrates, and in particular take a phylogenetic viewpoint. Invertebrates are a very heterogeneous group of animals and accordingly, evidence for the phenomenon of immune memory as well as the hypothesized molecular underpinnings differ largely for the diverse invertebrate taxa. The majority of research currently focuses on Arthropods, while evidence from many other groups of invertebrates is fragmentary or even lacking. We here concentrate on immune memory that is induced by pathogenic challenges, but also extent our view to a non-pathogenic context, i.e. allograft rejection, which can also show forms of memory and can inform us about general principles of specific self-nonself recognition. We discuss definitions of immune memory and a number of relevant aspects such as the type of antigens used, the route of exposure, and the kinetics of reactions following priming. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [Memory and epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, Sophie

    2010-01-01

    Medial temporal lobe epilepsy is a chronic neurological disease that begins in the early age and that is associated with frequent and disturbing memory deficits. Repeated seizures will lead to the formation of an epileptogenic network that may interfere with physiological neuronal networks and thus with normal brain function: by direct activation or indirectly by deactivation during a seizure, see for example the dreamy state or the ''déja vécu'' phenomenon during temporal seizures; by ictal or post-ictal inhibition, see for example ictal or post-ictal amnesia; by a repetitive and chronic modulation leading to a reorganization of the physiological neuronal networks. The study of these interactions between epileptic and physiological neural networks must lead to better explore the patient's memory and predict memory worsening before temporal lobe surgery and to better understand the reorganization of memory networks in chronic epilepsy. The goal is double: (1) improve the prediction of post-operative memory worsening and guide rehabilitation in epileptic clinical practice; (2) improve the pathophysiological knowledge about memory processes. © Société de Biologie, 2010.

  16. Memory effects in turbulent transport

    CERN Document Server

    Hubbard, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    In mean-field theory of magnetic fields or passive scalars, for example, turbulent transport is usually assumed to be proportional to the corresponding mean fields and their spatial derivatives. However, this is an approximation that is valid only if the mean fields vary slowly in time. Examples are presented where turbulent transport possesses memory, i.e. it depends crucially on the past history of the mean fields at earlier times. Such effects are captured by replacing turbulent transport coefficients with time integral kernels, resulting in transport coefficients that depend effectively on the frequency or the growth rate of the mean fields themselves. In this paper we perform numerical experiments to find the characteristic timescale of this effect as well as simple analytical models of the integral kernels in the case of passive scalar concentrations and kinetic dynamos. The integral kernels can then be used to find self-consistent growth or decay rates of the mean fields. In mean-field dynamos the grow...

  17. Music evokes vivid autobiographical memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfi, Amy M; Karlan, Brett; Tranel, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    Music is strongly intertwined with memories-for example, hearing a song from the past can transport you back in time, triggering the sights, sounds, and feelings of a specific event. This association between music and vivid autobiographical memory is intuitively apparent, but the idea that music is intimately tied with memories, seemingly more so than other potent memory cues (e.g., familiar faces), has not been empirically tested. Here, we compared memories evoked by music to those evoked by famous faces, predicting that music-evoked autobiographical memories (MEAMs) would be more vivid. Participants listened to 30 songs, viewed 30 faces, and reported on memories that were evoked. Memories were transcribed and coded for vividness as in Levine, B., Svoboda, E., Hay, J. F., Winocur, G., & Moscovitch, M. [2002. Aging and autobiographical memory: Dissociating episodic from semantic retrieval. Psychology and Aging, 17, 677-689]. In support of our hypothesis, MEAMs were more vivid than autobiographical memories evoked by faces. MEAMs contained a greater proportion of internal details and a greater number of perceptual details, while face-evoked memories contained a greater number of external details. Additionally, we identified sex differences in memory vividness: for both stimulus categories, women retrieved more vivid memories than men. The results show that music not only effectively evokes autobiographical memories, but that these memories are more vivid than those evoked by famous faces.

  18. Dynamic Torque Calibration Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agronin, Michael L.; Marchetto, Carl A.

    1989-01-01

    Proposed dynamic torque calibration unit (DTCU) measures torque in rotary actuator components such as motors, bearings, gear trains, and flex couplings. Unique because designed specifically for testing components under low rates. Measures torque in device under test during controlled steady rotation or oscillation. Rotor oriented vertically, supported by upper angular-contact bearing and lower radial-contact bearing that floats axially to prevent thermal expansion from loading bearings. High-load capacity air bearing available to replace ball bearings when higher load capacity or reduction in rate noise required.

  19. Verification of Embedded Memory Systems using Efficient Memory Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Ganai, Malay K; Ashar, Pranav

    2011-01-01

    We describe verification techniques for embedded memory systems using efficient memory modeling (EMM), without explicitly modeling each memory bit. We extend our previously proposed approach of EMM in Bounded Model Checking (BMC) for a single read/write port single memory system, to more commonly occurring systems with multiple memories, having multiple read and write ports. More importantly, we augment such EMM to providing correctness proofs, in addition to finding real bugs as before. The novelties of our verification approach are in a) combining EMM with proof-based abstraction that preserves the correctness of a property up to a certain analysis depth of SAT-based BMC, and b) modeling arbitrary initial memory state precisely and thereby, providing inductive proofs using SAT-based BMC for embedded memory systems. Similar to the previous approach, we construct a verification model by eliminating memory arrays, but retaining the memory interface signals with their control logic and adding constraints on tho...

  20. The Scandinavian Total Ankle Replacement and the ideal biomechanical requirements of ankle replacements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robati, Shibby; Salih, Alan; Ghosh, Koushik; Vinayakam, Parthiban

    2016-03-01

    The complex anatomy of the articular bone surfaces, ligaments, tendon attachments and muscles makes the ankle joint difficult to replicate in prosthetic replacements. Ever since the early 1970s, which saw the dawn of the first total ankle replacements, there have been numerous other attempts at replicating the joint, often with poor clinical outcomes. The anatomy of the ankle is discussed, followed by evidence of the normal ankle biomechanics and the ideal requirements of an ankle replacement. We focus on the Scandinavian Total Ankle Replacement and evaluate whether these requirements have been met.

  1. Serum and urine cystatin C are poor biomarkers for acute kidney injury and renal replacement therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Royakkers, A.A.N.M.; Korevaar, J.C.; van Suijlen, J.D.E.; Hofstra, L.S.; Kuiper, M.A.; Spronk, P.E.; Schultz, M.J.; Bouman, C.S.C.

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate whether cystatin C in serum (sCyC) and urine (uCyC) can predict early acute kidney injury (AKI) in a mixed heterogeneous intensive care unit (ICU), and also whether these biomarkers can predict the need for renal replacement therapy (RRT). Multicenter prospective observational cohort stu

  2. Serum and urine cystatin C are poor biomarkers for acute kidney injury and renal replacement therapy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Royakkers, A.A.N.M.; Korevaar, J.C.; Suijlen, J.D.E. van; Hofstra, L.S.; Kuiper, M.A.; Spronk, P.E.; Schultz, M.J.; Bouman, C.S.C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose : To evaluate whether cystatin C in serum (sCyC) and urine (uCyC) can predict early acute kidney injury (AKI) in a mixed heterogeneous intensive care unit (ICU), and also whether these biomarkers can predict the need for renal replacement therapy (RRT). Methods: Multicenter prospective obser

  3. Serum and urine cystatin C are poor biomarkers for acute kidney injury and renal replacement therapy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Royakkers, A.A.N.M.; Korevaar, J.C.; Suijlen, J.D.E. van; Hofstra, L.S.; Kuiper, M.A.; Spronk, P.E.; Schultz, M.J.; Bouman, C.S.C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose : To evaluate whether cystatin C in serum (sCyC) and urine (uCyC) can predict early acute kidney injury (AKI) in a mixed heterogeneous intensive care unit (ICU), and also whether these biomarkers can predict the need for renal replacement therapy (RRT). Methods: Multicenter prospective obser

  4. Serum and urine cystatin C are poor biomarkers for acute kidney injury and renal replacement therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Royakkers, A.A.N.M.; Korevaar, J.C.; van Suijlen, J.D.E.; Hofstra, L.S.; Kuiper, M.A.; Spronk, P.E.; Schultz, M.J.; Bouman, C.S.C.

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate whether cystatin C in serum (sCyC) and urine (uCyC) can predict early acute kidney injury (AKI) in a mixed heterogeneous intensive care unit (ICU), and also whether these biomarkers can predict the need for renal replacement therapy (RRT). Multicenter prospective observational cohort stu

  5. Aortic Valve Replacement: Treatment by Sternotomy versus Minimally Invasive Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Tosoni Rodrigues Ferreira

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To compare the results of aortic valve replacement with access by sternotomy or minimally invasive approach. Methods: Retrospective analysis of medical records of 37 patients undergoing aortic valve replacement by sternotomy or minimally invasive approach, with emphasis on the comparison of time of cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic clamping, volume of surgical bleeding, time of mechanical ventilation, need for blood transfusion, incidence of atrial fibrillation, length of stay in intensive care unit, time of hospital discharge, short-term mortality and presence of surgical wound infection. Results: Sternotomy was used in 22 patients and minimally invasive surgery in 15 patients. The minimally invasive approach had significantly higher time values of cardiopulmonary bypass (114.3±23.9 versus 86.7±19.8min.; P=0.003, aortic clamping (87.4±19.2 versus 61.4±12.9 min.; P<0.001 and mechanical ventilation (287.3±138.9 versus 153.9±118.6 min.; P=0.003. No difference was found in outcomes surgical bleeding volume, need for blood transfusion, incidence of atrial fibrillation, length of stay in intensive care unit and time of hospital discharge. No cases of short-term mortality or surgical wound infection were documented. Conclusion: The less invasive approach presented with longer times of cardiopulmonary bypass, aortic clamping and mechanical ventilation than sternotomy, however without prejudice to the length of stay in intensive care unit, time of hospital discharge and morbidity.

  6. Memory engram storage and retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonegawa, Susumu; Pignatelli, Michele; Roy, Dheeraj S; Ryan, Tomás J

    2015-12-01

    A great deal of experimental investment is directed towards questions regarding the mechanisms of memory storage. Such studies have traditionally been restricted to investigation of the anatomical structures, physiological processes, and molecular pathways necessary for the capacity of memory storage, and have avoided the question of how individual memories are stored in the brain. Memory engram technology allows the labeling and subsequent manipulation of components of specific memory engrams in particular brain regions, and it has been established that cell ensembles labeled by this method are both sufficient and necessary for memory recall. Recent research has employed this technology to probe fundamental questions of memory consolidation, differentiating between mechanisms of memory retrieval from the true neurobiology of memory storage.

  7. Cholinesterase inhibitors and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepeu, Giancarlo; Giovannini, Maria Grazia

    2010-09-06

    A consensus exists that cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEIs) are efficacious for mild to moderate Alzheimer's Disease (AD). Unfortunately, the number of non-responders is large and the therapeutic effect is usually short-lasting. In experimental animals, ChEIs exert three main actions: inhibit cholinesterase (ChE), increase extracellular levels of brain acetylcholine (ACh), improve cognitive processes, particularly when disrupted in models of AD. In this overview we shall deal with the cognitive processes that are improved by ChEI treatment because they depend on the integrity of brain cholinergic pathways and their activation. The role of cholinergic system in cognition can be investigated using different approaches. Microdialysis experiments demonstrate the involvement of the cholinergic system in attention, working, spatial and explicit memory, information encoding, sensory-motor gating, skill learning. No involvement in long-term memory has yet been demonstrated. Conversely, memory consolidation is facilitated by low cholinergic activity. Experiments on healthy human subjects, notwithstanding caveats concerning age, dose, and different memory tests, confirm the findings of animal experiments and demonstrate that stimulation of the cholinergic system facilitates attention, stimulus detection, perceptual processing and information encoding. It is not clear whether information retrieval may be improved but memory consolidation is reduced by cholinergic activation. ChEI effects in AD patients have been extensively investigated using rating scales that assess cognitive and behavioural responses. Few attempts have been made to identify which scale items respond better to ChEIs and therefore, presumably, depend on the activity of the cholinergic system. Improvement in attention and executive functions, communication, expressive language and mood stability have been reported. Memory consolidation and retrieval may be impaired by high ACh levels. Therefore, considering

  8. Testosterone replacement therapy and prostate health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polackwich, A Scott; Ostrowski, Kevin A; Hedges, Jason C

    2012-12-01

    There is an emerging evolution in the understanding of the relationship between the prostate and testosterone. It has long been generally believed that with testosterone replacement therapy (TRT), increasing serum testosterone levels led to prostatic growth and worsening of voiding dysfunction and associated complications. A new theory, the Saturation Model of Testosterone and its effect on the Prostate has gained attention. This theory suggests that the prostate's response to increasing levels of serum testosterone reaches a limit beyond which there is minimal effect. This model predicts that testosterone replacement therapy occurs above this saturation point, and replacing testosterone to eugonadal levels should not worsen prostate related benign disease. We evaluated the recent published data, with an emphasis on clinical studies done within the last 3 years, for the effects of testosterone supplementation on benign prostatic disease.

  9. Postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy--clinical implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, S H; Rosenberg, J; Bostofte, E

    1994-01-01

    in the urogenital tract. Women at risk of osteoporosis will benefit from hormone replacement therapy. The treatment should start as soon after menopause as possible and it is possible that it should be maintained for life. The treatment may be supplemented with extra calcium intake, vitamin D, and maybe calcitonin....... Physical activity should be promoted, and cigarette smoking reduced if possible. Women at risk of cardiovascular disease will also benefit from hormone replacement therapy. There is overwhelming evidence that hormone therapy will protect against both coronary heart disease and stroke...... suggest that every woman showing any signs of hormone deprivation should be treated with hormone replacement therapy. This includes women with subjective or objective vaso-motor symptoms, genito-urinary symptoms, women at risk of osteoporosis (fast bone losers), and women at risk of cardiovascular...

  10. Double Valve Replacement for Lupus Valvulitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraris, Victor A.; Hawksley, Vaughn C.; Rabinowitz, Max; Coyne, Carolyn M.; Sullivan, Thomas J.; Sprague, Merle S.

    1990-01-01

    Hemodynamically significant lupus valvulitis, requiring valve replacement, is rare: 21 cases have been reported so far in the literature, and only 2 of these have involved double valve replacement. We describe an additional case of double valve replacement in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus. The histopathologic and clinical features of this case suggest that valvular involvement resulted from both acute and chronic disease processes. Medical success in the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus, especially that achieved through prolonged or high-dose steroid therapy, may cause chronic valvular disease to become a more common surgical problem. A review of the literature supports this contention. (Texas Heart Institute Journal 1990;17:56-60) Images PMID:15227191

  11. Renal function after elective total hip replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perregaard, Helene; Damholt, Mette B; Solgaard, Søren

    2016-01-01

    and the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in an elective population of orthopedic patients undergoing primary total hip replacement, hypothesizing that chronic kidney disease predisposes to AKI. Patients and methods - This was a single-center, population-based, retrospective, registry-based cohort study...... involving all primary elective total hip replacements performed from January 2003 through December 2012. Patient demographics and creatinine values were registered. We evaluated the presence of CKD and AKI according to the international guidelines for kidney disease (KDIGO Acute Kidney Injury Workgroup 2013...... ). Results - 3,416 patients were included (2,064 females (60%)). AKI (according to KDIGO criteria) was seen in 75 patients (2.2%, 95% CI: 1.7-2.7) in the course of primary total hip replacement. Of these, 26 had pre-existing CKD of class 3-5. Pre-existing CKD of class 3-5, indicating moderately to severely...

  12. OPTIMAL MAINTENANCE AND REPLACEMENT OF EXTRACTION MACHINERY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suresh P.SETHI; Hong-Mo YEH; Rong ZHANG; Andrew K.S.JARDINE

    2008-01-01

    This paper considers a problem of optimal preventive maintenance and replacement schedule ofequipment devoted to extracting resources from known deposits. Typical examples are oil drills, mine shovels, etc. At most one replacement of the existing machinery by a new one is allowed. The problem is formulated as an optimal control problem subject to the state constraint that the remaining deposit at any given time is nonnegative. We show that the optimal preventive maintenance, production rates, and the replacement and salvage times of the existing machinery and the new one, if required, can be obtained by solving sequentially a series of free-end-point optimal control problems. Moreover, an algorithm based on this result is developed and used to solve two illustrative examples.

  13. Dead pixel replacement in LWIR microgrid polarimeters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratliff, Bradley M; Tyo, J Scott; Boger, James K; Black, Wiley T; Bowers, David L; Fetrow, Matthew P

    2007-06-11

    LWIR imaging arrays are often affected by nonresponsive pixels, or "dead pixels." These dead pixels can severely degrade the quality of imagery and often have to be replaced before subsequent image processing and display of the imagery data. For LWIR arrays that are integrated with arrays of micropolarizers, the problem of dead pixels is amplified. Conventional dead pixel replacement (DPR) strategies cannot be employed since neighboring pixels are of different polarizations. In this paper we present two DPR schemes. The first is a modified nearest-neighbor replacement method. The second is a method based on redundancy in the polarization measurements.We find that the redundancy-based DPR scheme provides an order-of-magnitude better performance for typical LWIR polarimetric data.

  14. Hip or knee replacement - after - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... replacement Hip pain Knee joint replacement Knee pain Osteoarthritis ... Ma, MD, Assistant Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, San Francisco, ...

  15. Hip or knee replacement - before - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... replacement Hip pain Knee joint replacement Knee pain Osteoarthritis ... Ma, MD, Assistant Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, San Francisco, ...

  16. Antigen-Encoding Bone Marrow Terminates Islet-Directed Memory CD8+ T-Cell Responses to Alleviate Islet Transplant Rejection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coleman, Miranda; Jessup, Claire F.; Bridge, Jennifer A.

    2016-01-01

    antigen directed to dendritic cells, under mild, immune-preserving conditions, inactivates established memory CD8+ T-cell populations and generates a long-lived, antigen-specific tolerogenic environment. Consequently, CD8+ memory T cell–mediated targeting of islet-expressed antigens is prevented and islet......Islet-specific memory T cells arise early in type 1 diabetes (T1D), persist for long periods, perpetuate disease, and are rapidly reactivated by islet transplantation. As memory T cells are poorly controlled by “conventional” therapies, memory T cell–mediated attack is a substantial challenge...... in islet transplantation, and this will extend to application of personalized approaches using stem cell–derived replacement β-cells. New approaches are required to limit memory autoimmune attack of transplanted islets or replacement β-cells. Here, we show that transfer of bone marrow encoding cognate...

  17. Embodied Memory: Unconscious Smiling Modulates Emotional Evaluation of Episodic Memories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu eArminjon

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Since Damasio introduced the somatic markers hypothesis in 1991, it has spread through the psychological community, where it is now commonly acknowledged that somatic states are a factor in producing the qualitative dimension of our experiences. Present actions are emotionally guided by those somatic states that were previously activated in similar experiences. In this model, somatic markers serve as a kind of embodied memory.Here we test whether the manipulation of somatic markers can modulate the emotional evaluation of negative memories. Because facial feedback has been shown to be a powerful means of modifying emotional judgements, we used it to manipulate somatic markers. Participants first read a sad story in order to induce a negative emotional memory and then were asked to rate their emotions and memory about the text. Twenty-four hours later, the same participants were asked to assume a predetermined facial feedback (smiling while reactivating their memory of the sad story. The participants were once again asked to fill in emotional and memory questionnaires about the text. Our results showed that participants who had smiled during memory reactivation later rated the text less negatively than control participants. However, the contraction of the zygomaticus muscles during memory reactivation did not have any impact on episodic memory scores. This suggests that manipulating somatic states modified emotional memory without affecting episodic memory. Thus, modulating memories through bodily states might pave the way to studying memory as an embodied function and help shape new kinds of psychotherapeutic interventions.

  18. Embodied memory: unconscious smiling modulates emotional evaluation of episodic memories

    KAUST Repository

    Arminjon, Mathieu

    2015-05-26

    Since Damasio introduced the somatic markers hypothesis in Damasio (1994), it has spread through the psychological community, where it is now commonly acknowledged that somatic states are a factor in producing the qualitative dimension of our experiences. Present actions are emotionally guided by those somatic states that were previously activated in similar experiences. In this model, somatic markers serve as a kind of embodied memory. Here, we test whether the manipulation of somatic markers can modulate the emotional evaluation of negative memories. Because facial feedback has been shown to be a powerful means of modifying emotional judgements, we used it to manipulate somatic markers. Participants first read a sad story in order to induce a negative emotional memory and then were asked to rate their emotions and memory about the text. Twenty-four hours later, the same participants were asked to assume a predetermined facial feedback (smiling) while reactivating their memory of the sad story. The participants were once again asked to fill in emotional and memory questionnaires about the text. Our results showed that participants who had smiled during memory reactivation later rated the text less negatively than control participants. However, the contraction of the zygomaticus muscles during memory reactivation did not have any impact on episodic memory scores. This suggests that manipulating somatic states modified emotional memory without affecting episodic memory. Thus, modulating memories through bodily states might pave the way to studying memory as an embodied function and help shape new kinds of psychotherapeutic interventions.

  19. The echocardiography of replacement heart valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    This is a practical description of how replacement valves are assessed using echocardiography. Normal transthoracic appearances including normal variants are described. The problem of differentiating normal function, patient–prosthesis mismatch and pathological obstruction in aortic replacement valves with high gradients is discussed. Obstruction and abnormal regurgitation is described for valves in the aortic, mitral and right-sided positions and when to use echocardiography in suspected infective endocarditis. The roles of transoesophageal and stress echocardiography are described and finally when other imaging techniques may be useful. PMID:27600454

  20. Upgrade or replace?: The effect of the EPBD on the choice between improvement or replacement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomsen, A.F.; Van der Flier, C.L.

    2010-01-01

    What is better: improvement or replacement by new construction? The choice between life cycle extension and replacement of existing buildings is at itself a vital but very difficult decision, involving a wide range of different aspects and affecting several contrary and often conflicting interests.

  1. Performance Evaluation of the Random Replacement Policy for Networks of Caches

    CERN Document Server

    Gallo, Massimo; Muscariello, Luca; Simonian, Alain; Tanguy, Christian

    2012-01-01

    The overall performance of content distribution networks as well as recently proposed information-centric networks rely on both memory and bandwidth capacities. In this framework, the hit ratio is the key performance indicator which captures the bandwidth / memory tradeo? for a given global performance.This paper focuses on the estimation of the hit ratio in a network of caches that employ the Random replacement policy. Assuming that requests are independent and identically distributed, general expressions of miss probabilities for a single Random cache are provided as well as exact results for specif?c popularity distributions. Moreover, for any Zipf popularity distribution with exponent ? > 1, we obtain asymptotic equivalents for the miss probability in the case of large cache size. We extend the analysis to networks of Random caches, when the topology is either a line or a homogeneous tree. In that case, approximations for miss probabilities across the network are derived by assuming that miss events at an...

  2. MEMORY IMPROVING FOODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akula Annapurna

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Learning is a lifelong process of transforming information and experience into knowledge, skills, behaviorand attitudes. Memory is the ability of the brain to store, retain and subsequently to recall information received fromthe world. Cognition can be defined as organization of information. It includes acquiring information (perception,selecting (attention, representing (understanding and retaining (memory information and using it to guidebehavior (reasoning and coordination of motor outputs.There are so many conditions associated with memory and cognitive impairment which include Aging,Alzheimer’s disease, Stroke, Stress, Head injuries, Seizures, Benzodiazepines, Brain tumors, Depression, Temporallobe defects and Schizophrenia etc.Choline rich foods can enhance memory and learning and may be useful in improving cognitive abilities. Theseinclude sea foods, liver, egg yolk, soysbeans, broccoli, ash gourd. Coloured fruits and vegetables are good source ofantioxidants which improve concentration. It is advised to decrease the consumption of foods rich in transfats likehydrogenated oils, fried foods, beef, pork, mutton and ice creams and pastries. Such foods increase the deposition offats in the neurons and impair cognition. Tea, cocoa and turmeric are reported to have good nootropic activity i.e.improving memory and learning. Apart from the foods, one should keep the brain active to maintain its cognitivefunction well.

  3. Oligocrystalline shape memory alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueland, Stian M.; Chen, Ying; Schuh, Christopher A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2012-05-23

    Copper-based shape memory alloys (SMAs) exhibit excellent shape memory properties in single crystalline form. However, when they are polycrystalline, their shape memory properties are severely compromised by brittle fracture arising from transformation strain incompatibility at grain boundaries and triple junctions. Oligocrystalline shape memory alloys (oSMAs) are microstructurally designed SMA structures in which the total surface area exceeds the total grain boundary area, and triple junctions can even be completely absent. Here it is shown how an oligocrystalline structure provides a means of achieving single crystal-like SMA properties without being limited by constraints of single crystal processing. Additionally, the formation of oSMAs typically involves the reduction of the size scale of specimens, and sample size effects begin to emerge. Recent findings on a size effect on the martensitic transformation in oSMAs are compared and a new regime of heat transfer associated with the transformation heat evolution in these alloys is discussed. New results on unassisted two-way shape memory and the effect of loading rate in oSMAs are also reported. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. A balanced memory network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasser Roudi

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available A fundamental problem in neuroscience is understanding how working memory--the ability to store information at intermediate timescales, like tens of seconds--is implemented in realistic neuronal networks. The most likely candidate mechanism is the attractor network, and a great deal of effort has gone toward investigating it theoretically. Yet, despite almost a quarter century of intense work, attractor networks are not fully understood. In particular, there are still two unanswered questions. First, how is it that attractor networks exhibit irregular firing, as is observed experimentally during working memory tasks? And second, how many memories can be stored under biologically realistic conditions? Here we answer both questions by studying an attractor neural network in which inhibition and excitation balance each other. Using mean-field analysis, we derive a three-variable description of attractor networks. From this description it follows that irregular firing can exist only if the number of neurons involved in a memory is large. The same mean-field analysis also shows that the number of memories that can be stored in a network scales with the number of excitatory connections, a result that has been suggested for simple models but never shown for realistic ones. Both of these predictions are verified using simulations with large networks of spiking neurons.

  5. Nanoporous silicon oxide memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gunuk; Yang, Yang; Lee, Jae-Hwang; Abramova, Vera; Fei, Huilong; Ruan, Gedeng; Thomas, Edwin L; Tour, James M

    2014-08-13

    Oxide-based two-terminal resistive random access memory (RRAM) is considered one of the most promising candidates for next-generation nonvolatile memory. We introduce here a new RRAM memory structure employing a nanoporous (NP) silicon oxide (SiOx) material which enables unipolar switching through its internal vertical nanogap. Through the control of the stochastic filament formation at low voltage, the NP SiOx memory exhibited an extremely low electroforming voltage (∼ 1.6 V) and outstanding performance metrics. These include multibit storage ability (up to 9-bits), a high ON-OFF ratio (up to 10(7) A), a long high-temperature lifetime (≥ 10(4) s at 100 °C), excellent cycling endurance (≥ 10(5)), sub-50 ns switching speeds, and low power consumption (∼ 6 × 10(-5) W/bit). Also provided is the room temperature processability for versatile fabrication without any compliance current being needed during electroforming or switching operations. Taken together, these metrics in NP SiOx RRAM provide a route toward easily accessed nonvolatile memory applications.

  6. Memory Loss: 7 Tips to Improve Your Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... re not alone. Everyone forgets things occasionally. Still, memory loss is nothing to take lightly. Although there are no guarantees when it comes to preventing memory loss or dementia, certain activities might help. Consider ...

  7. Psychometric Properties of the Working Memory Rating Scale for Spanish-Speaking English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman-Orth, Danielle; Grimm, Ryan; Gerber, Michael; Orosco, Michael; Swanson, H. Lee; Lussier, Cathy

    2015-01-01

    The Working Memory Rating Scale (WMRS) was designed as a behavioral rating tool to assist teachers in identifying students at risk of working memory difficulties. The instrument was originally normed on 417 monolingual English-speaking children from the United Kingdom. The purpose of this study was to test the reliability and validity of the WMRS…

  8. 75 FR 26877 - Peace Officers Memorial Day and Police Week, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-12

    ... of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-fourth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2010... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8518 of May 7, 2010 Peace Officers Memorial Day and Police Week, 2010 By the... Officers Memorial Day'' and the week in which it falls as ``Police Week.'' NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK...

  9. Psychometric Properties of the Working Memory Rating Scale for Spanish-Speaking English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman-Orth, Danielle; Grimm, Ryan; Gerber, Michael; Orosco, Michael; Swanson, H. Lee; Lussier, Cathy

    2015-01-01

    The Working Memory Rating Scale (WMRS) was designed as a behavioral rating tool to assist teachers in identifying students at risk of working memory difficulties. The instrument was originally normed on 417 monolingual English-speaking children from the United Kingdom. The purpose of this study was to test the reliability and validity of the WMRS…

  10. Negative affect impairs associative memory but not item memory.

    OpenAIRE

    Bisby, J. A.; Burgess, N.

    2014-01-01

    The formation of associations between items and their context has been proposed to rely on mechanisms distinct from those supporting memory for a single item. Although emotional experiences can profoundly affect memory, our understanding of how it interacts with different aspects of memory remains unclear. We performed three experiments to examine the effects of emotion on memory for items and their associations. By presenting neutral and negative items with background contexts, Experiment 1 ...

  11. Special Operations Commemoration: Monuments, Memory & Memorialization Practices of Elite Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Although controversial at the time the precedent set for repatriation remains U.S. policy today.27 For example, Private Thomas Enright , Private Merle...organization. The first ceremony was held in 1987 and was presided over by the Deputy Director Robert M. Gates. The Memorial Ceremony has evolved over...memorial ceremonies timelessly capture the essence of any memorialization or commemorative practice. At the inaugural Memorial Ceremony in 1987 Robert

  12. Matter and memory

    CERN Document Server

    Bergson, Henri

    1991-01-01

    Since the end of the last century," Walter Benjamin wrote, "philosophy has made a series of attempts to lay hold of the 'true' experience as opposed to the kind that manifests itself in the standardized, denatured life of the civilized masses. It is customary to classify these efforts under the heading of a philosophy of life. Towering above this literature is Henri Bergson's early monumental work, Matter and Memory."Along with Husserl's Ideas and Heidegger's Being and Time, Bergson's work represents one of the great twentieth-century investigations into perception and memory, movement and time, matter and mind. Arguably Bergson's most significant book, Matter and Memory is essential to an understanding of his philosophy and its legacy.This new edition includes an annotated bibliography prepared by Bruno Paradis.Henri Bergson (1859-1941) was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1927. His works include Time and Free Will, An Introduction to Metaphysics, Creative Evolution, and The Creative Mind.

  13. Emotion and autobiographical memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Alisha C.; Kensinger, Elizabeth A.

    2010-03-01

    Autobiographical memory encompasses our recollections of specific, personal events. In this article, we review the interactions between emotion and autobiographical memory, focusing on two broad ways in which these interactions occur. First, the emotional content of an experience can influence the way in which the event is remembered. Second, emotions and emotional goals experienced at the time of autobiographical retrieval can influence the information recalled. We discuss the behavioral manifestations of each of these types of interactions and describe the neural mechanisms that may support those interactions. We discuss how findings from the clinical literature (e.g., regarding depression) and the social psychology literature (e.g., on emotion regulation) might inform future investigations of the interplay between the emotions experienced at the time of retrieval and the memories recalled, and we present ideas for future research in this domain.

  14. Mediated Cultural Memories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølunde, Lisbeth; Bjerregaard, Mette

    2013-01-01

    (A revised, full paper will be published in the journal Mediekultur, spring 2014) This paper explores two examples of narratives representing memories of acts of mass violence: Gzim Rewind (Sweden, 2011, director Knutte Wester) about 1990’s Kosovo, and The Act of Killing (Denmark, 2012, director...... perspectives of semiosis (meaning-making) in relation to the films as redefining genres and what sorts of meanings different audiences create about the films. Acts of mass violence, including murder on civilians, genocide, and wars, can be seen as seeds for memories of the involved persons and following...... generations. Acts of mass violence also construct a sort of looking glass of culturally dominant memories that are mediated through stories: retold as oral stories through generations, as myths or sagas, or remediated in contemporary documentary or fiction films. In these processes of retelling acts...

  15. Albert Einstein memorial lectures

    CERN Document Server

    Mechoulam, Raphael; The Israel Academy for Sciences and Humanities

    2012-01-01

    This volume consists of a selection of the Albert Einstein Memorial Lectures presented annually at the Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities. Delivered by eminent scientists and scholars, including Nobel laureates, they cover a broad spectrum of subjects in physics, chemistry, life science, mathematics, historiography and social issues. This distinguished memorial lecture series was inaugurated by the Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities following an international symposium held in Jerusalem in March 1979 to commemorate the centenary of Albert Einstein's birth. Considering that Einstein's interests, activities and influence were not restricted to theoretical physics but spanned broad fields affecting society and the welfare of humankind, it was felt that these memorial lectures should be addressed to scientists, scholars and erudite laypersons rather than to physicists alone.

  16. External-Memory Multimaps

    CERN Document Server

    Angelino, Elaine; Mitzenmacher, Michael; Thaler, Justin

    2011-01-01

    Many data structures support dictionaries, also known as maps or associative arrays, which store and manage a set of key-value pairs. A \\emph{multimap} is generalization that allows multiple values to be associated with the same key. For example, the inverted file data structure that is used prevalently in the infrastructure supporting search engines is a type of multimap, where words are used as keys and document pointers are used as values. We study the multimap abstract data type and how it can be implemented efficiently online in external memory frameworks, with constant expected I/O performance. The key technique used to achieve our results is a combination of cuckoo hashing using buckets that hold multiple items with a multiqueue implementation to cope with varying numbers of values per key. Our external-memory results are for the standard two-level memory model.

  17. When Memories are Mediated

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølunde, Lisbeth; Bjerregaard, Mette

    2013-01-01

    that are mediated through stories: told and retold as oral stories through generations, as myths or sagas, or remediated as contemporary documentary film accounts or more fictional film accounts. In these processes of retelling acts of violence, transformations of meanings across time, cultural, social......Acts of mass violence, including murder on civilians, genocide, oppression and wars, can mobilize memories of the involved persons and following generations in a certain historical situation. Acts of mass violence can also create a sort of looking glass of culturally dominant memories...... makes meaning about past events. In the discussion, we consider how mediated memories affect audiences, and the potential of achieving development of present political and cultural understandings of past acts of violence....

  18. When Memories are Mediated

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølunde, Lisbeth; Bjerregaard, Mette

    2013-01-01

    and political contexts and media platforms take place and become contexts for audience reception. This paper explores two examples of narratives that construct memories of acts of mass violence: “Gzim Rewind” (Sweden, 2011, director Knutte Wester) about 1990’s Kosovo, and “The Act of Killing” (Denmark, 2012......Acts of mass violence, including murder on civilians, genocide, oppression and wars, can mobilize memories of the involved persons and following generations in a certain historical situation. Acts of mass violence can also create a sort of looking glass of culturally dominant memories...... that are mediated through stories: told and retold as oral stories through generations, as myths or sagas, or remediated as contemporary documentary film accounts or more fictional film accounts. In these processes of retelling acts of violence, transformations of meanings across time, cultural, social...

  19. Networks with Memory

    CERN Document Server

    Rosvall, Martin; Lancichinetti, Andrea; West, Jevin D; Lambiotte, Renaud

    2013-01-01

    It is a paradigm to capture the spread of information and disease with random flow on networks. However, this conventional approach ignores an important feature of the dynamics: where flow moves to depends on where it comes from. That is, memory matters. We analyze multi-step pathways from different systems and show that ignoring memory has profound consequences for community detection and ranking as well as for epidemic spreading. Specifically, memoryless dynamics on networks understate the effect of communities and exaggerate the effect of highly connected nodes. Including memory reveals actual travel patterns in air traffic, ranking that favors specialized journals in scientific communication, and diseases that spread more slowly and persist longer in hospitals.

  20. Shape-memory polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Behl

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Shape-memory polymers are an emerging class of active polymers that have dual-shape capability. They can change their shape in a predefined way from shape A to shape B when exposed to an appropriate stimulus. While shape B is given by the initial processing step, shape A is determined by applying a process called programming. We review fundamental aspects of the molecular design of suitable polymer architectures, tailored programming and recovery processes, and the quantification of the shape-memory effect. Shape-memory research was initially founded on the thermally induced dual-shape effect. This concept has been extended to other stimuli by either indirect thermal actuation or direct actuation by addressing stimuli-sensitive groups on the molecular level. Finally, polymers are introduced that can be multifunctional. Besides their dual-shape capability, these active materials are biofunctional or biodegradable. Potential applications for such materials as active medical devices are highlighted.