WorldWideScience

Sample records for repetitively pulsed laser

  1. Interaction of Repetitively Pulsed High Energy Laser Radiation With Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugenschmidt, Manfred

    1986-10-01

    The paper is concerned with laser target interaction processes involving new methods of improving the overall energy balance. As expected theoretically, this can be achieved with high repetition rate pulsed lasers even for initially highly reflecting materials, such as metals. Experiments were performed by using a pulsed CO2 laser at mean powers up to 2 kW and repetition rates up to 100 Hz. The rates of temperature rise of aluminium for example were thereby increased by lore than a factor of 3 as compared to cw-radiation of comparable power density. Similar improvements were found for the overall absorptivities that were increased by this method by more than an order of magnitude.

  2. Investigation of Fe:ZnSe laser in pulsed and repetitively pulsed regimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velikanov, S D; Zaretskiy, N A; Zotov, E A; Maneshkin, A A; Chuvatkin, R S; Yutkin, I M [Russian Federal Nuclear Center ' All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics' , Sarov, Nizhnii Novgorod region (Russian Federation); Kozlovsky, V I; Korostelin, Yu V; Krokhin, O N; Podmar' kov, Yu P; Savinova, S A; Skasyrsky, Ya K; Frolov, M P [P N Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-01-31

    The characteristics of a Fe:ZnSe laser pumped by a single-pulse free-running Er : YAG laser and a repetitively pulsed HF laser are presented. An output energy of 4.9 J is achieved in the case of liquid-nitrogen cooling of the Fe{sup 2+}:ZnSe active laser element longitudinally pumped by an Er:YAG laser with a pulse duration of 1 ms and an energy up to 15 J. The laser efficiency with respect to the absorbed energy is 47%. The output pulse energy at room temperature is 53 mJ. The decrease in the output energy is explained by a strong temperature dependence of the upper laser level lifetime and by pulsed heating of the active element. The temperature dependence of the upper laser level lifetime is used to determine the pump parameters needed to achieve high pulse energies at room temperature. Stable repetitively-pulsed operation of the Fe{sup 2+}:ZnSe laser at room temperature with an average power of 2.4 W and a maximum pulse energy of 14 mJ is achieved upon pumping by a 1-s train of 100-ns HF laser pulses with a repetition rate of 200 Hz. (lasers)

  3. Investigation of Fe:ZnSe laser in pulsed and repetitively pulsed regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velikanov, S. D.; Zaretskiy, N. A.; Zotov, E. A.; Kozlovsky, V. I.; Korostelin, Yu V.; Krokhin, O. N.; Maneshkin, A. A.; Podmar'kov, Yu P.; Savinova, S. A.; Skasyrsky, Ya K.; Frolov, M. P.; Chuvatkin, R. S.; Yutkin, I. M.

    2015-01-01

    The characteristics of a Fe:ZnSe laser pumped by a single-pulse free-running Er : YAG laser and a repetitively pulsed HF laser are presented. An output energy of 4.9 J is achieved in the case of liquid-nitrogen cooling of the Fe2+:ZnSe active laser element longitudinally pumped by an Er:YAG laser with a pulse duration of 1 ms and an energy up to 15 J. The laser efficiency with respect to the absorbed energy is 47%. The output pulse energy at room temperature is 53 mJ. The decrease in the output energy is explained by a strong temperature dependence of the upper laser level lifetime and by pulsed heating of the active element. The temperature dependence of the upper laser level lifetime is used to determine the pump parameters needed to achieve high pulse energies at room temperature. Stable repetitively-pulsed operation of the Fe2+:ZnSe laser at room temperature with an average power of 2.4 W and a maximum pulse energy of 14 mJ is achieved upon pumping by a 1-s train of 100-ns HF laser pulses with a repetition rate of 200 Hz.

  4. Repetitively Pulsed Electric Laser Acoustic Studies. Volume 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-09-01

    INGARD ET AL. SEP 83 UNCLASSIFIED APHAL-IR-83-2858-VOL-1 F336i5 86-C 2848 F/ 0/ 8, EEEmohEEEomhiE EohEEmhohEEEEE mhhhmmomhhlm...TR-83-2058, Vol 9, 0 REPETITIVELY PULSED ELECTRIC LASER ACOUSTIC STUDIES Volume I K. U. INGARD , CHARLES F. MCMILLAN uDEPARTMENT OF AERONAUTICS AND...CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(s) K.U. Ingard and Charles F. McMillan F33615.80-C-2040 9. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT

  5. Optically pumped terahertz lasers with high pulse repetition frequency: theory and design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yude Sun; Shiyou Fu; Jing Wang; Zhenghe Sun; Yanchao Zhang; Zhaoshuo Tian; Qi Wang

    2009-01-01

    Optically pumped terahertz (THz) lasers with high pulse repetition frequency are designed. Such a laser includes two parts: the optically pumping laser and the THz laser. The structures of the laser are described and analyzed. The rate equations for the pulsed THz laser are given. The kinetic process and laser pulse waveform for this kind of laser are numerically calculated based on the theory of rate equations. The theoretical results give a helpful guide to the research of such lasers.

  6. Coupling coefficient for TEA CO2 laser propulsion with variable pulse repetition rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yijun Zheng; Rongqing Tan; Donglei Wang; Guang Zheng; Changjun Ke; Kuohai Zhang; Chongyi Wan; Jin Wu

    2006-01-01

    @@ Because pulse repetition rate affected directly the momentum coupling coefficient of transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) CO2 laser propulsion, a double pulse trigger, controlling high voltage switch of laser excitation circuit, was designed. The pulse interval ranged between 5 and 100 ms. The momentum coupling coefficient for air-breathing mode laser propulsion was studied experimentally. It was found that the momentum coupling coefficient decreased with the pulse repetition rate increasing.

  7. Power neodymium-glass amplifier of a repetitively pulsed laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinogradov, Aleksandr V; Gaganov, V E; Garanin, Sergey G; Zhidkov, N V; Krotov, V A; Martynenko, S P; Pozdnyakov, E V; Solomatin, I I [Russian Federal Nuclear Center ' All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics' , Sarov, Nizhnii Novgorod region (Russian Federation)

    2011-11-30

    A neodymium-glass diode-pumped amplifier with a zigzag laser beam propagation through the active medium was elaborated; the amplifier is intended for operation in a repetitively pulsed laser. An amplifier unit with an aperture of 20 Multiplication-Sign 25 mm and a {approx}40-cm long active medium was put to a test. The energy of pump radiation amounts to 140 J at a wavelength of 806 nm for a pump duration of 550 {mu}s. The energy parameters of the amplifier were experimentally determined: the small-signal gain per pass {approx}3.2, the linear gain {approx}0.031 cm{sup -1} with a nonuniformity of its distribution over the aperture within 15%, the stored energy of 0.16 - 0.21 J cm{sup -3}. The wavefront distortions in the zigzag laser-beam propagation through the active element of the amplifier did not exceed 0.4{lambda} ({lambda} = 0.63 {mu}m is the probing radiation wavelength).

  8. Longitudinally excited CO2 laser with short laser pulse operating at high repetition rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianhui; Uno, Kazuyuki; Akitsu, Tetsuya; Jitsuno, Takahisa

    2016-11-01

    A short-pulse longitudinally excited CO2 laser operating at a high repetition rate was developed. The discharge tube was made of a 45 cm-long or 60 cm-long dielectric tube with an inner diameter of 16 mm and two metallic electrodes at the ends of the tube. The optical cavity was formed by a ZnSe output coupler with a reflectivity of 85% and a high-reflection mirror. Mixed gas (CO2:N2:He = 1:1:2) was flowed into the discharge tube. A high voltage of about 33 kV with a rise time of about 200 ns was applied to the discharge tube. At a repetition rate of 300 Hz and a gas pressure of 3.4 kPa, the 45 cm-long discharge tube produced a short laser pulse with a laser pulse energy of 17.5 mJ, a spike pulse energy of 0.2 mJ, a spike width of 153 ns, and a pulse tail length of 90 μs. The output power was 5.3 W. The laser pulse waveform did not depend on the repetition rate, but the laser beam profile did. At a low repetition rate of less than 50 Hz, the laser beam had a doughnut-like shape. However, at a high repetition rate of more than 150 Hz, the discharge concentrated at the center of the discharge tube, and the intensity at the center of the laser beam was higher. The laser beam profile depended on the distribution of the discharge. An output power of 7.0 W was achieved by using the 60 cm-long tube.

  9. Programmable Control of the Pulse Repetition Rate in the Multiwave Strontium Vapor Laser System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soldatov Anatoly

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present work was the development of laser systems for ablation of biological tissues with a programmable control over the lasing pulse repetition rate in a wide range. A two-stage laser system consisting of a master oscillator and a power amplifier based on strontium vapor laser has been developed. The operation of the laser system in a single-pulse mode operation, multipulse mode operation, and with a pulse repetition rate up to 20 kHz has been technically implemented. The possibility of a bone tissue ablation with no visible thermal damage is shown.

  10. Hydrodynamic size distribution of gold nanoparticles controlled by repetition rate during pulsed laser ablation in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menéndez-Manjón, Ana; Barcikowski, Stephan

    2011-02-01

    Most investigations on the laser generation and fragmentation of nanoparticles focus on Feret particle size, although the hydrodynamic size of nanoparticles is of great importance, for example in biotechnology for diffusion in living cells, or in engineering, for a tuned rheology of suspensions. In this sense, the formation and fragmentation of gold colloidal nanoparticles using femtosecond laser ablation at variable pulse repetition rates (100-5000 Hz) in deionized water were investigated through their plasmon resonance and hydrodynamic diameter, measured by Dynamic Light Scattering. The increment of the repetition rate does not influence the ablation efficiency, but produces a decrease of the hydrodynamic diameter and blue-shift of the plasmon resonance of the generated gold nanoparticles. Fragmentation, induced by inter-pulse irradiation of the colloids was measured online, showing to be more effective low repetition rates. The pulse repetition rate is shown to be an appropriate laser parameter for hydrodynamic size control of nanoparticles without further influence on the production efficiency.

  11. Spectrum analysis of all parameter noises in repetition-rate laser pulse train

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junhua Tang; Yuncai Wang

    2006-01-01

    @@ The theoretical investigation of all parameter noises in repetition-rate laser pulse train was presented. The expression of power spectrum of laser pulse trains with all parameter noises was derived, and the power spectra of pulse trains with different noise parameters were numerically simulated. By comparing the power spectra with and without pulse-width jitter, we noted that pulse-width jitter could not be neglected compared with amplitude noise and timing jitter and contributed a great amount of noise into the power spectrum under the condition that the product of pulse width and angular frequency was larger than 1.

  12. Real-time energy measurement of high repetition rate ultrashort laser pulses using pulse integration and FPGA processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qi-Jie; Yang, Dong-Xu; Wang, Jian; Feng, Yi; Zhang, Hong-Fei; Chen, Teng-Yun

    2016-11-01

    Real-time energy measurement using pulse integration method for high repetition rate ultrashort laser pulses based on FPGA (Field-Programmable Gate Array) and high-speed pipeline ADC (Analog-to-Digital Convertor) is introduced in this paper. There are two parts contained in this method: pulse integration and real-time data processing. The pulse integration circuit will convert the pulse to the step type signals which are linear to the laser pulse energy. Through the real-time data processing part, the amplitude of the step signals will be obtained by ADC sampling and conducting calculation in real time in FPGA. The test result shows that the method with good linearity (4.770%) and without pulse measurement missing is suitable for ultrashort laser pulses with high repetition rate up to 100 MHz.

  13. Real-time energy measurement of high repetition rate ultrashort laser pulses using pulse integration and FPGA processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qi-jie; Yang, Dong-xu; Wang, Jian; Feng, Yi; Zhang, Hong-fei; Chen, Teng-yun

    2016-11-01

    Real-time energy measurement using pulse integration method for high repetition rate ultrashort laser pulses based on FPGA (Field-Programmable Gate Array) and high-speed pipeline ADC (Analog-to-Digital Convertor) is introduced in this paper. There are two parts contained in this method: pulse integration and real-time data processing. The pulse integration circuit will convert the pulse to the step type signals which are linear to the laser pulse energy. Through the real-time data processing part, the amplitude of the step signals will be obtained by ADC sampling and conducting calculation in real time in FPGA. The test result shows that the method with good linearity (4.770%) and without pulse measurement missing is suitable for ultrashort laser pulses with high repetition rate up to 100 MHz.

  14. Neodymium glass laser with a pulse energy of 220 J and a pulse repetition rate of 0.02 Hz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzmin, A A; Kulagin, O V; Khazanov, Efim A; Shaykin, A A [Institute of Applied Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhnii Novgorod (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-31

    A compact neodymium glass laser with a pulse energy of 220 J and a record-high pulse repetition rate of 0.02 Hz (pulse duration 30 ns) is developed. Thermally induced phase distortions are compensated using wave phase conjugation. The integral depolarisation of radiation is decreased to 0.4% by using linear compensation schemes. The second harmonic of laser radiation can be used for pumping Ti : sapphire multipetawatt complexes. (letters)

  15. Temporal dynamics of high repetition rate pulsed single longitudinal mode dye laser

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G Sridhar; V S Rawar; S Singh; L M Gantayet

    2013-08-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies of temporal dynamics of grazing incidence grating (GIG) cavity, single-mode dye laser pumped by high repetition rate copper vapour laser (CVL) are presented. Spectral chirp of the dye laser as they evolve in the cavity due to transient phase dynamics of the amplifier gain medium is studied. Effect of grating efficiency, focal spot size, pump power and other cavity parameters on the temporal behaviour of narrow band dye laser such as build-up time, pulse shape and pulse width is studied using the four level dye laser rate equation and photon evolution equation. These results are compared with experimental observations of GIG single-mode dye laser cavity. The effect of pulse stretching of CVL pump pulse on the temporal dynamics of the dye laser is studied.

  16. Generation of picosecond laser pulses at 1030 nm with gigahertz range continuously tunable repetition rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubourg, Adrien; Lhermite, Jérôme; Hocquet, Steve; Cormier, Eric; Santarelli, Giorgio

    2015-12-01

    We report on a watt range laser system generating picosecond pulses using electro-optical modulation of a 1030 nm single frequency low noise laser diode. Its repetition rate is continuously tunable between 11 and 18 GHz. Over this range, output spectra and pulse characteristics are measured and compared with a numerical simulation. Finally, amplitude and residual phase noise measurements of the source are also presented.

  17. High repetition rate, compact micro-pulse all-solid-state laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yutong Feng; Junqing Meng; Weibiao Chen

    2007-01-01

    A high repetition rate, compact micro-pulse all-solid-state laser is designed. The diffusion bonded crystal of YAG, Nd:YAG, and Cr4+:YAG is taken as a monolithic cavity. The optimized initial transmission,output coupling, and pumping size of Cr4+:YAG are calculated. The experimental results show that the laser satisfies the requirement of a spaceborne laser range finder.

  18. Development of a compact and reliable repetitively pulsed Xe Cl (308 nm) excimer laser

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N S Benerji; N Varshnay; J K Mittal

    2013-02-01

    Development and operation characteristics of a repetitively pulsed UV spark pre-ionized XeCl(Xenon Chloride) excimer laser is described. The laser uses discharge pumped C–C charge transfer excitation. A compact gas circulation loop was adopted to achieve high repetition rate operation. The laser generates optical pulses of energy 150 mJ at 150 Hz reliably. The electrical to optical conversion efficiency obtained is 1%. The laser pulse duration is ∼8 nS (FWHM). The single fill gas lifetime have been found to be 2 × 106 shots for 20% reduction of energy without any halogen injection. The system is compact and reliable.

  19. Dual-Comb Coherent Raman Spectroscopy with Lasers of 1-GHz Pulse Repetition Frequency

    CERN Document Server

    Mohler, Kathrin J; Yan, Ming; Hänsch, Theodor W; Picqué, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    We extend the technique of multiplex coherent Raman spectroscopy with two femtosecond mode-locked lasers to oscillators of a pulse repetition frequency of 1 GHz. We demonstrate spectra of liquids, which span 1100 cm$^{-1}$ of Raman shifts. At a resolution of 6 cm$^{-1}$, their measurement time may be as short as 5 microseconds for a refresh rate of 2 kHz. The waiting period between acquisitions is improved ten-fold compared to previous experiments with two lasers of 100-MHz repetition frequencies.

  20. High repetition rate tunable femtosecond pulses and broadband amplification from fiber laser pumped parametric amplifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, T V; Schmidt, O; Bruchmann, C; Limpert, J; Aguergaray, C; Cormier, E; Tünnermann, A

    2006-05-29

    We report on the generation of high energy femtosecond pulses at 1 MHz repetition rate from a fiber laser pumped optical parametric amplifier (OPA). Nonlinear bandwidth enhancement in fibers provides the intrinsically synchronized signal for the parametric amplifier. We demonstrate large tunability extending from 700 nm to 1500 nm of femtosecond pulses with pulse energies as high as 1.2 muJ when the OPA is seeded by a supercontinuum generated in a photonic crystal fiber. Broadband amplification over more than 85 nm is achieved at a fixed wavelength. Subsequent compression in a prism sequence resulted in 46 fs pulses. With an average power of 0.5 W these pulses have a peak-power above 10 MW. In particular, the average power and pulse energy scalability of both involved concepts, the fiber laser and the parametric amplifier, will enable easy up-scaling to higher powers.

  1. Laser-induced retinal damage threshold for repetitive-pulse exposure to 100-microsecs pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-07

    and is inde pendent of the pulse repetition frequency (PRF). When the injury mechanism is thermal denaturation, the pulses do interact , with the peak...energy incident on the cornea that passes through the pupil of the eye. TIE is expressed in this paper as the energy per pulse in the pulse train. 3...given in the guidelines as the corneal irradiance (J∕cm2), was multi plied by the area of a 7 mm pupil to give the allowable TIE. CP is a multiplicative

  2. Adjustable high-repetition-rate pulse trains in a passively-mode-locked fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si Fodil, Rachid; Amrani, Foued; Yang, Changxi; Kellou, Abdelhamid; Grelu, Ph.

    2016-07-01

    We experimentally investigate multipulse regimes obtained within a passively-mode-locked fiber laser that includes a Mach-Zehnder (MZ) interferometer. By adjusting the time delay imbalance of the MZ, ultrashort pulse trains at multi-GHz repetition rates are generated. We compare the observed dynamics with high-harmonic mode locking, and show that the multi-GHz pulse trains display an inherent instability, which has been overlooked. By using a recirculation loop containing the MZ, we demonstrate a significant improvement of the pulse train stability.

  3. High Repetition Rate Pulsed 2-Micron Laser Transmitter for Coherent CO2 DIAL Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Uprendra N.; Bai, Yingxin; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Petzar, Paul J.; Trieu, Bo C.; Lee, Hyung

    2009-01-01

    A high repetition rate, highly efficient, Q-switched 2-micron laser system as the transmitter of a coherent differential absorption lidar for CO2 measurement has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center. Such a laser transmitter is a master-slave laser system. The master laser operates in a single frequency, either on-line or off-line of a selected CO2 absorption line. The slave laser is a Q-switched ring-cavity Ho:YLF laser which is pumped by a Tm:fiber laser. The repetition rate can be adjusted from a few hundred Hz to 10 kHz. The injection seeding success rate is from 99.4% to 99.95%. For 1 kHz operation, the output pulse energy is 5.5mJ with the pulse length of approximately 50 ns. The optical-to-optical efficiency is 39% when the pump power is 14.5W. The measured standard deviation of the laser frequency jitter is about 3 MHz.

  4. Applications of ions produced by low intensity repetitive laser pulses for implantation into semiconductor materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wołowski, J.; Badziak, J.; Czarnecka, A.; Parys, P.; Pisarek, M.; Rosinski, M.; Turan, R.; Yerci, S.

    This work reports experiment concerning specific applications of implantation of laser-produced ions for production of semiconductor nanocrystals. The investigation was carried out in the IPPLM within the EC STREP `SEMINANO' project. A repetitive pulse laser system of parameters: energy up to 0.8 J in a 3.5 ns-pulse, wavelength of 1.06 μ m, repetition rate of up to 10 Hz, has been employed in these investigations. The characterisation of laser-produced ions was performed with the use of `time-of-flight' ion diagnostics simultaneously with other diagnostic methods in dependence on laser pulse parameters, illumination geometry and target material. The properties of laser-implanted and modified SiO2 layers on sample surface were characterised with the use of different methods (XPS + ASD, Raman spectroscopy, PL spectroscopy) at the Middle East Technological University in Ankara and at the Warsaw University of Technology. The production of the Ge nanocrystallites has been demonstrated for annealed samples prepared in different experimental conditions.

  5. Electra: durable repetitively pulsed angularly multiplexed KrF laser system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolford, Matthew F.; Myers, Matthew C.; Giuliani, John L.; Sethian, John D.; Burns, Patrick M.; Hegeler, Frank; Jaynes, Reginald

    2008-02-01

    Electra is a repetitively pulsed, electron beam pumped Krypton Fluoride (KrF) laser at the Naval Research Laboratory that is developing the technologies that can meet the Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) requirements for durability, efficiency, and cost. The technologies developed on Electra should be directly scalable to a full size fusion power plant beam line. As in a full size fusion power plant beam line, Electra is a multistage laser amplifier system which, consists of a commercial discharge laser (LPX 305i, Lambda Physik), 175 keV electron beam pumped (40 ns flat-top) preamplifier, and 530 keV (100 ns flat-top) main amplifier. Angular multiplexing is used in the optical layout to provide pulse length control and to maximize laser extraction from the amplifiers. Single shot yield of 452 J has been extracted from the initial shots of the Electra laser system using a relatively low energy preamplifier laser beam. In rep-rate burst of 5 Hz for durations of one second a total energy of 1.585 kJ (average 317 J/pulse) has been attained. Total energy of 2.5 kJ has been attained over a two second period. For comparison, the main amplifier of Electra in oscillator mode has demonstrated at 2.5 Hz rep-rate average laser yield of 270 J over a 2 hour period.

  6. Recent developments in high-resolution optical diagnostics of repetitively pulsed laser-target effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugenschmidt, Manfred; Althaus, Marion

    1995-05-01

    High energy densities, as required both in research and in industry, are achieved by the use of lasers. Extremely highpower densities are obtained in the pulsed mode with short microsecond(s) -, ns-, or even ultrashort ps- to fs- pulses. The interaction of such powerful laser pulses with any type of solid state, liquid or gaseous materials is then causing rapidly developing, nonstationary, optically nonlinear processes. Experimental investigations of these effects are therefore requiring special measuring techniques with high spatial and temporal resolution. Optical and optronical methods have proven to be particularly useful. Methods based on laser diagnostics, including high speed photography, cinematography, speckle techniques, holography, videography, infrared techniques or arbitrary combinations of these, are therefore considered to be important tools in these laser effect studies. The investigations reported in the present paper are referring to carbon dioxide-laser effects in intensity ranges which are useful for many industrial applications, such as for example in the field of material processing. Basic interest is actually in pulsed, plasma sustained laser target interaction phenomena which occur above critical threshold power densities, specific for each type of material. Surface induced, highly ionized absorption waves are then determining the energy transfer from the coherent laser radiation field towards the targets. The experiments at ISL were aimed at investigating plasma parameters and their influence on the energy transfer rates, by fast optical, electrical and optronical techniques, such as mentioned above. The results to be discussed refer to target effects, basically observed on optically transparent materials, subject to high average power pulsed carbon dioxide-laser radiation, with repetition rates of several tens to hundred pps at multi-MW/cm2 to GW/cm2 peak power densities and average power densities in the multi-kW/cm2-range.

  7. A Real-Time Terahertz Time-Domain Polarization Analyzer with 80-MHz Repetition-Rate Femtosecond Laser Pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takehiro Tachizaki

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a real-time terahertz time-domain polarization analyzer by using 80-MHz repetition-rate femtosecond laser pulses. Our technique is based on the spinning electro-optic sensor method, which we recently proposed and demonstrated by using a regenerative amplifier laser system; here we improve the detection scheme in order to be able to use it with a femtosecond laser oscillator with laser pulses of a much higher repetition rate. This improvement brings great advantages for realizing broadband, compact and stable real-time terahertz time-domain polarization measurement systems for scientific and industrial applications.

  8. A real-time terahertz time-domain polarization analyzer with 80-MHz repetition-rate femtosecond laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Shinichi; Yasumatsu, Naoya; Oguchi, Kenichi; Takeda, Masatoshi; Suzuki, Takeshi; Tachizaki, Takehiro

    2013-03-11

    We have developed a real-time terahertz time-domain polarization analyzer by using 80-MHz repetition-rate femtosecond laser pulses. Our technique is based on the spinning electro-optic sensor method, which we recently proposed and demonstrated by using a regenerative amplifier laser system; here we improve the detection scheme in order to be able to use it with a femtosecond laser oscillator with laser pulses of a much higher repetition rate. This improvement brings great advantages for realizing broadband, compact and stable real-time terahertz time-domain polarization measurement systems for scientific and industrial applications.

  9. Threshold determinations for selective retinal pigment epithelium damage with repetitive pulsed microsecond laser systems in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Framme, Carsten; Schuele, Georg; Roider, Johann; Kracht, Dietmar; Birngruber, Reginald; Brinkmann, Ralf

    2002-01-01

    In both clinical and animal studies, it has been shown that repetitive short laser pulses can cause selective retinal pigment epithelium damage (RPE) with sparing of photoreceptors. Our purpose was to determine the ophthalmoscopic and angiographic damage thresholds as a function of pulse durations by using different pulsed laser systems to optimize treatment modalities. Chinchilla-breed rabbits were narcotized and placed in a special holding system. Laser lesions were applied using a commercial laser slit lamp, contact lens, and irradiation with a frequency-doubled Nd:YLF laser (wave-length: 527 nm; repetition rate: 500 Hz; number of pulses: 100; pulse duration: 5 micros, 1.7 micros, 200 ns) and an argon-ion laser (514 nm, 500 Hz, 100 pulses, 5 micros and 200 ms). In all eyes, spots with different energies were placed into the regio macularis with a diameter of 102 microm (tophat profile). After treatment, fundus photography and fluorescein angiography were performed and radiant exposure for ED50 damage determined. Speckle measurements at the fiber tips were performed to determine intensity peaks in the beam profile. Using the Nd:YLF laser system, the ophthalmoscopic ED50 threshold energies were 25.4 microJ (5 micros), 32 microJ (1.7 micros), and 30 microJ (200 ns). The angiographic ED50 thresholds were 13.4 microJ (5 micros), 9.2 microJ (1.7 micros), and 6.7 microJ (200 ns). With the argon laser, the angiographic threshold for 5 micros pulses was 5.5 microJ. The ophthalmoscopic threshold could not be determined because of a lack of power; however, it was > 12 microJ. For 200 ms, the ED50 radiant exposures were 20.4 mW ophthalmoscopically and 19.2 mW angiographically. Speckle factors were found to be 1.225 for the Nd:YLF and 3.180 for the argon laser. Thus, the maximal ED50 -threshold radiant exposures for the Nd:YLF were calculated to be 362 mJ/cM2 (5 micros), 478 mJ/cm2 (1.7 micros), and 438 mJ/cm2 (200 ns) ophthalmoscopically. Angiographically, the thresholds

  10. 486nm blue laser operating at 500 kHz pulse repetition frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creeden, Daniel; Blanchard, Jon; Pretorius, Herman; Limongelli, Julia; Setzler, Scott D.

    2016-03-01

    Compact, high power blue light in the 470-490nm region is difficult to generate due to the lack of laser sources which are easily convertible (through parametric processes) to those wavelengths. By using a pulsed Tm-doped fiber laser as a pump source for a 2-stage second harmonic generation (SHG) scheme, we have generated ~2W of 486.5nm light at 500kHz pulse repetition frequency (PRF). To our knowledge, this is the highest PRF and output power achieved in the blue region based on a frequency converted, monolithic fiber laser. This pump laser is a pulsed Tm-doped fiber laser/amplifier which generates 12.8W of 1946nm power at 500kHz PRF with diffraction-limited output from a purely single-mode fiber. The output from this laser is converted to 973nm through second harmonic generation (SHG). The 973nm is then converted to 486.5nm via another SHG stage. This architecture operates with very low peak power, which can be challenging from a nonlinear conversion standpoint. However, the low peak power enables the use of a single-mode monolithic fiber amplifier without undergoing nonlinear effects in the fiber. This also eliminates the need for novel fiber designs, large-mode area fiber, or free-space coupling to rod-type amplifiers, improving reliability and robustness of the laser source. Higher power and conversion efficiency are possible through the addition of Tm-doped fiber amplification stages as well as optimization of the nonlinear conversion process and nonlinear materials. In this paper, we discuss the laser layout, results, and challenges with generating blue light using a low peak power approach.

  11. Analysis of Thermal Effects in Laser Rod Pumped by Repetitively Pulsed Laser Diode Array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Qin; LI Xin-zhong; WU Ri-na; WANG Xi-jun

    2007-01-01

    Based on some assumptions, the numerical model of thermal distribution in solid state laser crystal pumped by pulsed laser diode is set up due to the pumped intensity distribution. Taking into account the property of YAG materials that varies with temperature, the transient temperature distribution of the laser crystal is calculated using finite element method on condition that K is a constant and a function of temperature. Then, the influence of the pumping parameters on the thermal effect in laser crystal is also discussed. This study is helpful to optimize the design of the diode side pumped solid state lasers.

  12. Characterization of MHz pulse repetition rate femtosecond laser-irradiated gold-coated silicon surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatakrishnan Krishnan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this study, MHz pulse repetition rate femtosecond laser-irradiated gold-coated silicon surfaces under ambient condition were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS. The radiation fluence used was 0.5 J/cm2 at a pulse repetition rate of 25 MHz with 1 ms interaction time. SEM analysis of the irradiated surfaces showed self-assembled intermingled weblike nanofibrous structure in and around the laser-irradiated spots. Further TEM investigation on this nanostructure revealed that the nanofibrous structure is formed due to aggregation of Au-Si/Si nanoparticles. The XRD peaks at 32.2°, 39.7°, and 62.5° were identified as (200, (211, and (321 reflections, respectively, corresponding to gold silicide. In addition, the observed chemical shift of Au 4f and Si 2p lines in XPS spectrum of the irradiated surface illustrated the presence of gold silicide at the irradiated surface. The generation of Si/Au-Si alloy fibrous nanoparticles aggregate is explained by the nucleation and subsequent condensation of vapor in the plasma plume during irradiation and expulsion of molten material due to high plasma pressure.

  13. A repetitively pulsed xenon chloride excimer laser with all ferrite magnetic cores (AFMC) based all solid state exciter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benerji, N. S.; Varshnay, N. K.; Ghodke, D. V.; Singh, A.

    2016-10-01

    Performance of repetitively pulsed xenon chloride excimer laser (λ~308 nm) with solid state pulser consisting of magnetic pulse compression circuit (MPC) using all ferrite magnetic cores (AFMC) is reported. Laser system suitable for 100 Hz operation with inbuilt pre-ionizer, compact gas circulation and cooling has been developed and presented. In this configuration, high voltage pulses of ~8 μs duration are compressed to ~100 ns by magnetic pulse compression circuit with overall compression factor of ~80. Pulse energy of ~18 J stored in the primary capacitor is transferred to the laser head with an efficiency of ~85% compared to ~70% that is normally achieved in such configurations using annealed met-glass core. This is a significant improvement of about 21%. Maximum output laser pulse energy of ~100 mJ was achieved at repetition rate of 100 Hz with a typical pulse to pulse energy stability of ±5% and laser pulse energy of 150 mJ was generated at low rep-rate of ~40 Hz. This exciter uses a low current and low voltage solid state switch (SCR) that replaces high voltage and high current switch i. e, thyratron completely. The use of solid state exciter in turn reduces electromagnetic interference (EMI) effects particularly in excimer lasers where high EMI is present due to high di/dt. The laser is focused on a thin copper sheet for generation of micro-hole and the SEM image of the generated micro hole shows the energy stability of the laser at high repetition rate operation. Nearly homogeneous, regular and well developed xenon chloride (XeCl) laser beam spot was achieved using the laser.

  14. Optical breakdown and filamentation of femtosecond laser pulses propagating in air at a kHz repetition rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Duan Zuo-Liang; Chen Jian-Ping; Li Ru-Xin; Lin Li-Huang; Xu Zhi-Zhan

    2004-01-01

    We report the experiments on the optical breakdown and filamentation of femtosecond laser pulses propagating in air at a kHz repetition rate and with several hundreds micro-joule-energy. A 10m-long filament and its breakup and merging at the nonlinear focal region produced by modulational instability of femtosecond laser pulses in air are observed. A simple model based on the nonlinear Schrodinger equation coupled with multiphoton ionization law is presented to explain the several experimental results.

  15. NEO-LISP: Deflecting near-Earth objects using high average power, repetitively pulsed lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, C. R.; Michaelis, M. M.

    Several kinds of Near-Earth objects exist for which one would like to cause modest orbit perturbations, but which are inaccessible to normal means of interception because of their number, distance or the lack of early warning. For these objects, LISP (Laser Impulse Space Propulsion) is an appropriate technique for rapidly applying the required mechanical impulse from a ground-based station. In order of increasing laser energy required, examples are: (1) repositioning specially prepared geosynchronous satellites for an enhanced lifetime; (2) causing selected items of space junk to re-enter and burn up in the atmosphere on a computed trajectory; and (3) safely deflecting Earth-directed comet nuclei and earth-crossing asteroids (ECA's) a few tens of meters in size (the most hazardous size). They will discuss each of these problems in turn and show that each application is best matched by its own matrix of LISP laser pulse width, pulse repetition rate, wavelength and average power. The latter ranges from 100W to 3GW for the cases considered. They will also discuss means of achieving the active beam phase error correction during passage through the atmosphere and very large exit pupil in the optical system which are required in each of these cases.

  16. Mode-locked Yb-doped fiber laser emitting broadband pulses at ultra-low repetition rates

    CERN Document Server

    Bowen, Patrick; Provo, Richard; Harvey, John D; Broderick, Neil G R

    2016-01-01

    We report on an environmentally stable, Yb-doped, all-normal dispersion, mode-locked fibre laser that is capable of creating broadband pulses with ultra-low repetition rates. Specifically, through careful positioning of fibre sections in an all-PM-fibre cavity mode-locked with a nonlinear amplifying loop mirror, we achieve stable pulse trains with repetition rates as low as 506 kHz. The pulses have several nanojules of energy and are compressible down to ultrashort (< 500 fs) durations.

  17. Repetitively pulsed Fe: ZnSe laser with an average output power of 20 W at room temperature of the polycrystalline active element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velikanov, S. D.; Gavrishchuk, E. M.; Zaretsky, N. A.; Zakhryapa, A. V.; Ikonnikov, V. B.; Kazantsev, S. Yu.; Kononov, I. G.; Maneshkin, A. A.; Mashkovskii, D. A.; Saltykov, E. V.; Firsov, K. N.; Chuvatkin, R. S.; Yutkin, I. M.

    2017-05-01

    The energy and spectral-temporal characteristics of a Fe : ZnSe laser operating in pulsed and repetitively pulsed regimes are studied at room temperature of the polycrystalline active element. The crystal was pumped by a nonchain electric-discharge HF laser. The energy of the Fe : ZnSe laser in a single-pulse regime was 1.67 J at the slope efficiency with respect to the absorbed and incident energy of ∼43% and ∼27%, respectively. In a repetitively pulsed regime with a pulse repetition rate of 20 Hz and an efficiency with respect to the absorbed power of ∼40%, the average laser power was ∼20 W with an individual pulse energy of ∼1 J. The possibility of increasing the average power of the repetitively pulsed Fe : ZnSe laser at room temperature is discussed.

  18. Generation of a Sub-10 fs Laser Pulse by a Ring Oscillator with a High Repetition Rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Qing; ZHAO Yan-Ying; WEI Zhi-Yi

    2009-01-01

    @@ A compact femtoescond Ti:sapphire ring oscillator composed of chirped mirrors is designed. By accurately optimizing the intra-cavity dispersion and the mode locking range of the ring configuration, we generate laser pulses as short as 7.7 fs with a repetition rate as high as 745 MHz. The spectrum spans from 660nm to 940nm and the average output power is 480row under the cw pump laser of 7.5 W.

  19. Excitation and relaxation of metastable atomic states in an active medium of a repetitively pulsed copper vapour laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bokhan, P A; Zakrevskii, D E; Lavrukhin, M A [A.V. Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Lyabin, N A; Chursin, A D [Research and production corporation ' Istok' , Fryazino, Moscow region (Russian Federation)

    2016-02-28

    The influence of a pre-pulse population of copper atom metastable states and their sub-population at a current pulse edge on the copper vapour laser pulse energy is studied under optimal temperature conditions. Experiments have been performed with active elements of a commercial laser having an internal diameter of a discharge channel of 14 and 20 mm. It is found that at a pulse repetition frequency of 12 – 14 kHz, corresponding to a maximal output power, the reduction of the energy due to a residual population of metastable states is by an order of magnitude less than due to their sub-population at a current pulse edge. The modelling based on the experimental results obtained has shown that in the case of an active element with an internal diameter of 14 mm, a decrease in the pulse leading edge from ∼25 ns to 0.6 ns does not reduce the laser pulse energy up to the repetition frequency of ∼50 kHz at an average output power of 70 W m{sup -1} and efficiency of ∼11%. (lasers)

  20. High-power, highly stable KrF laser with a 4-kHz pulse repetition rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisov, V. M.; El'tsov, A. V.; Khristoforov, O. B.

    2015-08-01

    An electric-discharge KrF laser (248 nm) with an average output power of 300 W is developed and studied. A number of new design features are related to the use of a laser chamber based on an Al2O3 ceramic tube. A high power and pulse repetition rate are achieved by using a volume discharge with lateral preionisation by the UV radiation of a creeping discharge in the form of a homogeneous plasma sheet on the surface of a plane sapphire plate. Various generators for pumping the laser are studied. The maximum laser efficiency is 3.1%, the maximum laser energy is 160 mJ pulse-1, and the pulse duration at half maximum is 7.5 ns. In the case of long-term operation at a pulse repetition rate of 4 kHz and an output power of 300 W, high stability of laser output energy (σ <= 0.7%) is achieved using an all-solid-state pump system.

  1. Investigation on repetition rate and pulse duration influences on ablation efficiency of metals using a high average power Yb-doped ultrafast laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopez J.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafast lasers provide an outstanding processing quality but their main drawback is the low removal rate per pulse compared to longer pulses. This limitation could be overcome by increasing both average power and repetition rate. In this paper, we report on the influence of high repetition rate and pulse duration on both ablation efficiency and processing quality on metals. All trials have been performed with a single tunable ultrafast laser (350 fs to 10ps.

  2. Wakefield-acceleration of relativistic electrons with few-cycle laser pulses at kHz-repetition-rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenot, Diego; Gustas, Dominykas; Vernier, Aline; Boehle, Frederik; Beaurepaire, Benoit; Lopez-Martens, Rodrigo; Faure, Jerome; Appli Team

    2016-10-01

    The generation of relativistic electron beams using laser wakefield acceleration has become a standard technique, providing low emittance electron bunches with femtosecond durations. However, this technique usually requires multi-ten-terawatt lasers and is thus limited to low repetition-rate (typically 10 Hz or less). We have recently demonstrated the generation of few MeV electrons using 2.5-mJ, 4-fs, 1-kHz repetition-rate laser pulses, focused to relativistic intensity onto a gas jet with electron density 1020 cm-3. We have investigated the influence of the pulse duration, the gas density. We demonstrated that an electron beam with a charge in the range of 10-fC/shot, with a divergence of 20-mrad and a peaked spectrum with energies between 2 and 4 MeV can be generated at kHz repetition-rate. These results confirm the possibility of using few-cycle laser pulses with very low energy for exciting wakefields in the bubble regime and for trapping electrons, as predicted by PIC simulations. This kHz electron source is ideally suited for performing electron diffraction experiments with very high temporal resolution. Our results also open the way to other applications, such as the generation of a kHz ultrafast X-ray source. ERC femtoelec.

  3. Mechanisms of high-regularity periodic structuring of silicon surface by sub-MHz repetition rate ultrashort laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnilitskyi, Iaroslav; Gruzdev, Vitaly; Bulgakova, Nadezhda M.; Mocek, Tomáš; Orazi, Leonardo

    2016-10-01

    Silicon is one of the most abundant materials which is used in many areas of modern research and technology. A variety of those applications require surface nanopatterning with minimum structure defects. However, the high-quality nanostructuring of large areas of silicon surface at industrially acceptable speed is still a challenge. Here, we report a rapid formation of highly regular laser-induced periodic surface structures (HR-LIPSS) in the regime of strong ablation by infrared femtosecond laser pulses at sub-MHz repetition rate. Parameters of the laser-surface interactions and obtained experimental results suggest an important role of electrostatically assisted bond softening in initiating the HR-LIPSS formation.

  4. Enhanced performance of a repetitively pulsed 130 mJ KrF laser with improved pre-ionization parameters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N S Benerji; A Singh; N Varshnay; Bijendra Singh

    2014-01-01

    Studies related to the effect of pre-ionizer on laser output energy of a repetitively pulsed KrF laser are presented. The dependence of laser output energy, spectral width and beam spot homogeneity on pre-ionization parameters, namely its current and voltage rise time are reported here. Here, effectiveness of pre-ionization is optimized by improving pre-ionization current and rise time of the pump pulse of the automatic UV pre-ionizer KrF laser. It is observed that by increasing pre-ionization current from 6 kA to 10.6 kA, the output energy increases by about 30% (from 100 to 130 mJ). It is also observed that the emission spectral width reduces by almost 60% by increasing the pre-ionization current. Regular homogeneous and well-developed beam spot (nearly Hat-Top profile) was achieved under these optimized conditions.

  5. Repetitively pulsed electric laser acoustic studies. Volume 1. Final technical report, Jun 80-Jun 83

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingard, K.U.; McMillan, C.F.

    1983-09-01

    This report summarizes a study of the acoustical characteristics of a closed loop duct system for pulsed lasers with emphasis on acoustic suppression technology. Several topics are considered involving wave propagation reflection and attenuation in a shock tube, in which pulse waves are generated, simulating those in a pulsed laser system. A detailed analysis of the design of parallel-baffle attenuators for suppression of acoustic waves is given, allowing for the contributions of the reflection transmitted and reverberant contributions to the sound pressure field in the optical cavity.

  6. High Repetition-Rate Wakefield Electron Source Generated by Few-millijoule, 30 femtosecond Laser Pulses on a Density Downramp

    CERN Document Server

    He, Z -H; Easter, J H; Krushelnick, K; Nees, J A; Thomas, A G R

    2012-01-01

    We report on an experimental demonstration of laser wakefield electron acceleration using a sub-TW power laser by tightly focusing 30-fs laser pulses with only 8 mJ pulse energy on a 100 \\mu m scale gas target. The experiments are carried out at an unprecedented 0.5 kHz repetition rate, allowing "real time" optimization of accelerator parameters. Well-collimated and stable electron beams with a quasi-monoenergetic peak in excess of 100 keV are measured. Particle-in-cell simulations show excellent agreement with the experimental results and suggest an acceleration mechanism based on electron trapping on the density downramp, due to the time varying phase velocity of the plasma waves.

  7. Effect of laser annealing using high repetition rate pulsed laser on optical properties of phosphorus-ion-implanted ZnO nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimogaki, Tetsuya; Ofuji, Taihei; Tetsuyama, Norihiro; Okazaki, Kota; Higashihata, Mitsuhiro; Nakamura, Daisuke; Ikenoue, Hiroshi; Asano, Tanemasa; Okada, Tatsuo

    2014-02-01

    The effect of high repetition rate pulsed laser annealing with a KrF excimer laser on the optical properties of phosphorus-ion-implanted zinc oxide nanorods has been investigated. The recovery levels of phosphorus-ion-implanted zinc oxide nanorods have been measured by photoluminescence spectra and cathode luminescence images. Cathode luminescence disappeared over 300 nm below the surface due to the damage caused by ion implantation with an acceleration voltage of 25 kV. When the annealing was performed at a low repetition rate of the KrF excimer laser, cathode luminescence was recovered only in a shallow area below the surface. The depth of the annealed area was increased along with the repetition rate of the annealing laser. By optimizing the annealing conditions such as the repetition rate, the irradiation fluence and so on, we have succeeded in annealing the whole damaged area of over 300 nm in depth and in observing cathode luminescence. Thus, the effectiveness of high repetition rate pulsed laser annealing on phosphorus-ion-implanted zinc oxide nanorods was demonstrated.

  8. Effect of pulse repetition rate and number of pulses in the analysis of polypropylene and high density polyethylene by nanosecond infrared laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leme, Flavio O. [Laboratorio de Quimica Analitica ' Henrique Bergamin Filho' , Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Centenario 303, 13416-000 Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Godoi, Quienly [Laboratorio de Quimica Analitica ' Henrique Bergamin Filho' , Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Centenario 303, 13416-000 Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, Rod. Washington Luis, km 235, 13565-905 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Kiyataka, Paulo H.M. [Centro de Tecnologia de Embalagens, Instituto de Tecnologia de Alimentos, Av. Brasil 2880, 13070-178 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Santos, Dario [Departamento de Ciencias Exatas e da Terra, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, Rua Prof. Artur Riedel 275, 09972-270 Diadema, SP (Brazil); Agnelli, Jose A.M. [Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, Rod. Washington Luis, km 235, 13565-905 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); and others

    2012-02-01

    Pulse repetition rates and the number of laser pulses are among the most important parameters that do affect the analysis of solid materials by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, and the knowledge of their effects is of fundamental importance for suggesting analytical strategies when dealing with laser ablation processes of polymers. In this contribution, the influence of these parameters in the ablated mass and in the features of craters was evaluated in polypropylene and high density polyethylene plates containing pigment-based PbCrO{sub 4}. Surface characterization and craters profile were carried out by perfilometry and scanning electron microscopy. Area, volume and profile of craters were obtained using Taylor Map software. A laser induced breakdown spectroscopy system consisted of a Q-Switched Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm, 5 ns) and an Echelle spectrometer equipped with ICCD detector were used. The evaluated operating conditions consisted of 10, 25 and 50 laser pulses at 1, 5 and 10 Hz, 250 mJ/pulse (85 J cm{sup -2}), 2 {mu}s delay time and 6 {mu}s integration time gate. Differences in the topographical features among craters of both polymers were observed. The decrease in the repetition rate resulted in irregular craters and formation of edges, especially in polypropylene sample. The differences in the topographical features and ablated masses were attributed to the influence of the degree of crystallinity, crystalline melting temperature and glass transition temperature in the ablation process of the high density polyethylene and polypropylene. It was also observed that the intensities of chromium and lead emission signals obtained at 10 Hz were two times higher than at 5 Hz by keeping the number of laser pulses constant.

  9. Large area crystallization of amorphous Si with overlapping high repetition rate laser pulses

    KAUST Repository

    Ryu, Sang-Gil

    2012-09-01

    This paper presents a pulsed laser crystallization technique, enabling large area crystallization of amorphous Si to produce grains having well-defined size and orientation. The method is developed by first determining the parameters influencing crystallization induced by single laser pulses of circular cross-sectional profile. In a second step, crystallization by overlapping round spots is examined. The experiments reveal three zones characterized by distinctly different crystallized morphologies following the laser irradiation. One of these zones corresponds to the regime of lateral crystal growth, wherein grains are driven towards the center of the spot by the radial temperature gradient. These findings are then applied to processing via line beam profiles that facilitate large area crystallization upon rapid translation of the specimen. Crystallization of extended areas hinges on the determination of the crystal growth length for a single spot. The pitch between successive pulses is then set on the basis of this information. It is shown that the pulse energy has only a weak effect on the crystal growth length. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  10. Drilling and cutting of thin metal plates in water with radiation of a repetitively pulsed Nd : YAG laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glova, A. F.; Lysikov, A. Yu

    2011-10-01

    The conditions of drilling and cutting of 0.15-mm-thick titanium and stainless steel plates in water with the radiation of a repetitively pulsed Nd : YAG laser having the mean power up to 30 W are studied experimentally in the absence of water and gas jets. Dependences of the maximal cutting speed in water on the radiation power are obtained, the cutting efficiency is determined, and the comparison with the conditions of drilling and cutting of plates in air is carried out.

  11. Actual laser removal of black soiling crust from siliceous sandstone by high pulse repetition rate equipment: effects on surface morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iglesias-Campos, M. A.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This research project studies the role of pulse repetition rate in laser removal of black soiling crust from siliceous sandstone, and specifically, how laser fluence correlates with high pulse repetition rates in cleaning practice. The aim is to define practical cleaning processes and determine simple techniques for evaluation based on end-users’ perspective (restorers. Spot and surface tests were made using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser system with a wide range of pulse repetition rates (5–200 Hz, systematically analysed and compared by macrophotography, portable microscope, stereomicroscope with 3D visualizing and area roughness measurements, SEM imaging and spectrophotometry. The results allow the conclusion that for operation under high pulse repetition rates the average of total energy applied per spot on a treated surface should be attendant upon fluence values in order to provide a systematic and accurate description of an actual laser cleaning intervention.En este trabajo se estudia el papel de la frecuencia de repetición en la limpieza láser de costras de contaminación sobre una arenisca silícea, y concretamente, como se relaciona fluencia y frecuencias elevadas en una limpieza real. Se pretende definir un procedimiento práctico de limpieza y determinar técnicas sencillas de evaluación desde el punto de vista de los usuarios finales (restauradores. Para el estudio se realizaron diferentes ensayos en spot y en superficie mediante un equipo Q-switched Nd:YAG con un amplio rango de frecuencias (5–200 Hz, que se analizaron y compararon sistemáticamente mediante macrofotografía, microscopio portátil, estereomicroscopio con visualización 3D y mediciones de rugosidad en área, imágenes SEM y espectrofotometría. Los resultados permiten proponer que, al trabajar con altas frecuencias, la media de la energía total depositada por spot en la superficie debería acompañar los valores de fluencia para describir y comprender mejor una

  12. Electra: Repetitively Pulsed Angularly Multiplexed KrF Laser System Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolford, Matthew; Myers, Matthew; Giuliani, John; Sethian, John; Burns, Patrick; Hegeler, Frank; Jaynes, Reginald

    2008-11-01

    As in a full size fusion power plant beam line, Electra is a multistage laser amplifier system. The multistage amplifier system consists of a commercial discharge laser and two doubled sided electron beam pumped amplifiers. Angular multiplexing is used in the optical layout to provide pulse length control and to maximize laser extraction from the amplifiers. Two angularly multiplexed beams have extracted 30 J of KrF laser light with an aperture 8 x 10 cm^2, which is sufficient to extract over 500 J from the main amplifier and models agree. The main amplifier of Electra in oscillator mode has demonstrated single shot and rep-rate laser energies exceeding 700 J with 100 ns pulsewidth at 248 nm with an aperture 29 x 29 cm^2. Continuous operation of the KrF electron beam pumped oscillator has lasted for more than 2.5 hours without failure at 1 Hz and 2.5 Hz. The measured intensity and pulse energy for durations greater than thousand shots are consistent at measurable rep-rates of 1 Hz, 2.5 Hz and 5 Hz.

  13. 10  GHz pulse repetition rate Er:Yb:glass laser modelocked with quantum dot semiconductor saturable absorber mirror.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resan, B; Kurmulis, S; Zhang, Z Y; Oehler, A E H; Markovic, V; Mangold, M; Südmeyer, T; Keller, U; Hogg, R A; Weingarten, K J

    2016-05-10

    Semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM) modelocked high pulse repetition rate (≥10  GHz) diode-pumped solid-state lasers are proven as an enabling technology for high data rate coherent communication systems owing to their low noise and high pulse-to-pulse optical phase-coherence. Compared to quantum well, quantum dot (QD)-based SESAMs offer potential advantages to such laser systems in terms of reduced saturation fluence, broader bandwidth, and wavelength flexibility. Here, we describe the first 10 GHz pulse repetition rate QD-SESAM modelocked laser at 1.55 μm, exhibiting 2 ps pulse width from an Er-doped glass oscillator (ERGO). The 10 GHz ERGO laser is modelocked with InAs/GaAs QD-SESAM with saturation fluence as low as 9  μJ/cm2.

  14. Characteristics of the evolution of a plasma generated by radiation from CW and repetitively pulsed CO2 lasers in different gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanevskii, M. F.; Stepanova, M. A.

    1990-06-01

    The interaction between high-power CW and repetitively pulsed CO2 laser radiation and a low-threshold optical-breakdown plasma near a metal surface is investigated. The characteristics of the breakdown plasma are examined as functions of the experimental conditions. A qualitative analysis of the results obtained was performed using a simple one-dimensional model for laser combustion waves.

  15. Laser ablation efficiency during the production of Ag nanoparticles in ethanol at a low pulse repetition rate (1-10 Hz)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valverde-Alva, M. A.; García-Fernández, T.; Esparza-Alegría, E.; Villagrán-Muniz, M.; Sánchez-Aké, C.; Castañeda-Guzmán, R.; de la Mora, M. B.; Márquez-Herrera, C. E.; Sánchez Llamazares, J. L.

    2016-10-01

    We studied the effect of the repetition rate of laser pulses (RRLP) in the range from 1-10 Hz in the production of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) by laser ablation in ethanol. Laser pulses with a duration of 7 ns, a wavelength of 1064 nm and an energy of 60 mJ were used to ablate a 99.99% pure silver target immersed in 10 ml of ethanol. Transmittance analysis and atomic absorption spectroscopy were used to study the silver concentration in the colloidal solutions. The ablation process was studied by measuring the transmission of the laser pulses through the colloid. It is shown that for a fixed number of laser pulses (NLP) the ablation efficiency, in terms of the ablated silver mass per laser pulse, increases with the RRLP. This result contradicts what had previously been established in the literature.

  16. Relativistic electron beams driven by single-cycle laser pulses at kHz repetition rate (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faure, Jérôme; Guénot, Diego; Gustas, Dominykas; Vernier, Aline; Beaurepaire, Benoît; Böhle, Frederik; López-Martens, Rodrigo; Lifschitz, Agustin

    2017-05-01

    Laser-plasma accelerators are usually driven by 100-TW class laser systems with rather low repetition rates. However, recent years have seen the emergence of laser-plasma accelerators operating with kHz lasers and energies lower than 10 mJ. The high repetition-rate is particularly interesting for applications requiring high stability and high signal-to-noise ratio but lower energy electrons. For example, our group recently demonstrated that kHz laser-driven electron beams could be used to capture ultrafast structural dynamics in Silicon nano-membranes via electron diffraction with picosecond resolution. In these first experiments, electrons were injected in the density gradients located at the plasma exit, resulting in rather low energies in the 100 keV range. The electrons being nonrelativistic, the bunch duration quickly becomes picosecond long. Relativistic energies are required to mitigate space charge effects and maintain femtosecond bunches. In this paper, we will show very recent results where electrons are accelerated in laser-driven wakefields to relativistic energies, reaching up to 5 MeV at kHz repetition rate. The electron energy was increased by nearly two orders of magnitude by using single-cycle laser pulses of 3.5 fs, with only 2.5 mJ of energy. Using such short pulses of light allowed us to resonantly excite high amplitude and nonlinear plasma waves at high plasma density, ne=1.5-2×1020 cm-3, in a regime close to the blow-out regime. Electrons had a peaked distribution around 5 MeV, with a relative energy spread of 30 %. Charges in the 100's fC/shot and up to pC/shot where measured depending on plasma density. The electron beam was fairly collimated, 20 mrad divergence at Full Width Half Maximum. The results show remarkable stability of the beam parameters in terms of beam pointing and electron distribution. 3D PIC simulations reproduce the results very well and indicate that electrons are injected by the ionization of Nitrogen atoms, N5+ to N6

  17. Low-timing-jitter, stretched-pulse passively mode-locked fiber laser with tunable repetition rate and high operation stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuanshan; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guofu; Zhao, Wei; Bai, Jing

    2010-09-01

    We design a low-timing-jitter, repetition-rate-tunable, stretched-pulse passively mode-locked fiber laser by using a nonlinear amplifying loop mirror (NALM), a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM), and a tunable optical delay line in the laser configuration. Low-timing-jitter optical pulses are stably produced when a SESAM and a 0.16 m dispersion compensation fiber are employed in the laser cavity. By inserting a tunable optical delay line between NALM and SESAM, the variable repetition-rate operation of a self-starting, passively mode-locked fiber laser is successfully demonstrated over a range from 49.65 to 50.47 MHz. The experimental results show that the newly designed fiber laser can maintain the mode locking at the pumping power of 160 mW to stably generate periodic optical pulses with width less than 170 fs and timing jitter lower than 75 fs in the 1.55 µm wavelength region, when the fundamental repetition rate of the laser is continuously tuned between 49.65 and 50.47 MHz. Moreover, this fiber laser has a feature of turn-key operation with high repeatability of its fundamental repetition rate in practice.

  18. Investigation of the lasing characteristics of a barium vapor laser with pulse repetition frequencies up to 320 kHz for navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldatov, A. N.; Polunin, Yu. P.

    2015-11-01

    Results of experimental investigations into the characteristics of a laser on self-terminating transitions of the barium atom with λ = 1499 nm are presented for high pulse repetition frequencies (PRF). The frequency-energy characteristics are investigated in the self-heating mode of laser operation. Record values of PRF for the barium vapor laser, equal to ~320 kHz, have been attained.

  19. Wavelength dependence of repetitive-pulse laser-induced damage threshold in beta-BaB2O4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouta, H

    1999-01-20

    The dependence on wavelength of repetitive-pulse (10 Hz, 8-10 ns) laser-induced damage on beta barium metaborate (BBO) has been investigated. The thresholds of dielectric breakdown in bulk crystal have been found to be 0.3 GW/cm(2) at 266 nm, 0.9 GW/cm(2) at 355 nm, 2.3 GW/cm(2) at 532 nm, and 4.5 GW/cm(2) at 1064 nm. Results indicate two-photon absorption at 266 and 355 nm, which helps to produce an avalanche effect that causes breakdown at each of the four wavelengths tested. Neither the BBO refractive indices nor the absorption spectrum change until breakdown occurs.

  20. A high pulse repetition frequency ultrasound system for the ex vivo measurement of mechanical properties of crystalline lenses with laser-induced microbubbles interrogated by acoustic radiation force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sangpil; Aglyamov, Salavat; Karpiouk, Andrei; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2012-08-07

    A high pulse repetition frequency ultrasound system for an ex vivo measurement of mechanical properties of an animal crystalline lens was developed and validated. We measured the bulk displacement of laser-induced microbubbles created at different positions within the lens using nanosecond laser pulses. An impulsive acoustic radiation force was applied to the microbubble, and spatio-temporal measurements of the microbubble displacement were assessed using a custom-made high pulse repetition frequency ultrasound system consisting of two 25 MHz focused ultrasound transducers. One of these transducers was used to emit a train of ultrasound pulses and another transducer was used to receive the ultrasound echoes reflected from the microbubble. The developed system was operating at 1 MHz pulse repetition frequency. Based on the measured motion of the microbubble, Young's moduli of surrounding tissue were reconstructed and the values were compared with those measured using the indentation test. Measured values of Young's moduli of four bovine lenses ranged from 2.6 ± 0.1 to 26 ± 1.4 kPa, and there was good agreement between the two methods. Therefore, our studies, utilizing the high pulse repetition frequency ultrasound system, suggest that the developed approach can be used to assess the mechanical properties of ex vivo crystalline lenses. Furthermore, the potential of the presented approach for in vivo measurements is discussed.

  1. Laser generation of XeCl exciplex molecules in a longitudinal repetitively pulsed discharge in a Xe – CsCl mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boichenko, A M [A M Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Klenovskii, M S [National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-31

    By using the previously developed kinetic model, we have carried out simulations to study the possibility of laser generation of XeCl exciplex molecules in the working medium based on a mixture of Xe with CsCl vapours, excited by a longitudinal repetitively pulsed discharge. The formation mechanism of exciplex molecules in this mixture is fundamentally different from the formation mechanisms in the traditional mixtures of exciplex lasers. The conditions that make the laser generation possible are discussed. For these conditions, with allowance for available specific experimental conditions of the repetitively pulsed discharge excitation, we have obtained the calculated dependences of the power and efficiency of generation on the reflectivity of mirrors in a laser cavity. (active media)

  2. Single-pulse picking at kHz repetition rates using a Ge plasma switch at the free-electron laser FELBE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, J; Winnerl, S; Seidel, W; Bauer, C; Gensch, M; Schneider, H; Helm, M

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrate a system for picking of mid-infrared and terahertz (THz) radiation pulses from the free-electron laser (FEL) FELBE operating at a repetition rate of 13 MHz. Single pulses are reflected by a dense electron-hole plasma in a Ge slab that is photoexcited by amplified near-infrared (NIR) laser systems operating at repetition rates of 1 kHz and 100 kHz, respectively. The peak intensity of picked pulses is up to 400 times larger than the peak intensity of residual pulses. The required NIR fluence for picking pulses at wavelengths in the range from 5 μm to 30 μm is discussed. In addition, we show that the reflectivity of the plasma decays on a time scale from 100 ps to 1 ns dependent on the wavelengths of the FEL and the NIR laser. The plasma switch enables experiments with the FEL that require high peak power but lower average power. Furthermore, the system is well suited to investigate processes with decay times in the μs to ms regime, i.e., much longer than the 77 ns long pulse repetition period of FELBE.

  3. Gigahertz repetition rate, sub-femtosecond timing jitter optical pulse train directly generated from a mode-locked Yb:KYW laser

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Heewon; Shin, Junho; Kim, Chur; Choi, Sun Young; Kim, Guang-Hoon; Rotermund, Fabian; Kim, Jungwon

    2014-01-01

    We show that a 1.13-GHz repetition rate optical pulse train with 0.70 fs high-frequency timing jitter (integration bandwidth of 17.5 kHz - 10 MHz, where the measurement instrument-limited noise floor contributes 0.41 fs in 10 MHz bandwidth) can be directly generated from a free-running, single-mode diode-pumped Yb:KYW laser mode-locked by single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)-coated mirrors. To our knowledge, this is the lowest timing jitter optical pulse train with the GHz repetition rate ever measured. If this pulse train is used for direct sampling of 565-MHz signals (Nyquist frequency of the pulse train), the demonstrated jitter level corresponds to the projected effective-number-of-bit (ENOB) of 17.8, which is much higher than the thermal noise limit of 50-ohm load resistance (~14 bits).

  4. Tunable GHz pulse repetition rate operation in high-power TEM(00)-mode Nd:YLF lasers at 1047 nm and 1053 nm with self mode locking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Y J; Tzeng, Y S; Tang, C Y; Huang, Y P; Chen, Y F

    2012-07-30

    We report on a high-power diode-pumped self-mode-locked Nd:YLF laser with the pulse repetition rate up to several GHz. A novel tactic is developed to efficiently select the output polarization state for achieving the stable TEM(00)-mode self-mode-locked operations at 1053 nm and 1047 nm, respectively. At an incident pump power of 6.93 W and a pulse repetition rate of 2.717 GHz, output powers as high as 2.15 W and 1.35 W are generated for the σ- and π-polarization, respectively. We experimentally find that decreasing the separation between the gain medium and the input mirror not only brings in the pulse shortening thanks to the enhanced effect of the spatial hole burning, but also effectively introduces the effect of the spectral filtering to lead the Nd:YLF laser to be in a second harmonic mode-locked status. Consequently, pulse durations as short as 8 ps and 8.5 ps are obtained at 1053 nm and 1047 nm with a pulse repetition rate of 5.434 GHz.

  5. Formation of the active medium in high-power repetitively pulsed gas lasers pumped by an electron-beam-controlled discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulaev, V. D.; Lysenko, S. L.

    2015-07-01

    A high-power repetitively pulsed e-beam-controlled discharge CO2 laser is simulated numerically; the simulation results are compared with experimental data. Optimal sizes and design of electrodes and configuration of the external magnetic field are found, which allow one to introduce no less than 90% electric pump energy into a specified volume of the active medium, including the active volume of a laser with an aperture of 110 × 110 cm. The results obtained can also be used to design other types of highpower gas lasers.

  6. Broadband directional couplers fabricated in bulk glass with high repetition rate femtosecond laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Jen; Eaton, Shane M; Zhang, Haibin; Herman, Peter R

    2008-07-21

    A femtosecond fiber laser was applied to fabricate broadband directional couplers inside bulk glass for general power splitting application in the 1250 to 1650-nm wavelength telecom spectrum. The broadband response was optimized over the 400-nm bandwidth by tailoring the coupling strength and the waveguide interaction length to balance the differing wavelength dependence of the straight interaction and bent transition regions. High spatial finesse of the femtosecond-laser writing technique enabled close placement (approxiamtely 6 microm) of adjacent waveguides that underpinned the wavelength-flattened broadband response at any coupling ratio in the 0% to 100% range. The spectral responses were well-represented by coupled mode theory, permitting simple design and implementation of broadband couplers for bulk 3D optical circuit integration.

  7. Effect of power density and pulse repetition on laser shock peening of Ti-6Al-4V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, P.R.; Shepard, M.J.; Prevey, P.S. III; Clauer, A.H.

    2000-02-01

    Laser shock peening (LSP) was applied to Ti-6Al-4V (wt.%) simulated airfoil specimens using a Nd:Glass laser. Laser shock peening processing parameters examined in the present study included power density (5.5, 7, and 9 GW/cm{sup 2}) and number of laser pulses per spot (one and three pulses/spot). The LSP's Ti-6Al-4V samples were examined using x-ray diffraction techniques to determine the residual stress distribution and percent cold work as a function of depth. It was found that the residual stress state and percent of cold work were relatively independent of LSP power density. However, the number of laser pulses per spot had a significant effect on both residual stress and percent of cold work for a given power density level. In addition, there was a strong correlation between the magnitude of residual compressive stresses generated and the percent cold work measured.

  8. Effects of conical nozzle configuration on impulse coupling coefficient in repetitively-pulsed laser propulsion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Zheng-rui; HONG Yan-ji; WEN Ming

    2009-01-01

    A dimensionless factor was introduced to deduce the analytic expression of impulse coupling coefficient for conical nozzles in the case of spherical symmetry, and a high precision impact pendulum system was used to measure impulse coupling coefficients of 15 conical nozzles with different cone angles and lengths. The expression was corrected according to experi-mental values. The results indicate that: 1) impulse coupling coefficient increases firstly and then decreases with augment of dimensionless length when cone angle is fixed;2) impulse coupling coefficient decreases monotonously with augment of cone angle when dimensionless length is fixed;3) it is of great importance for improving impulse coupling coefficient to increase the rate of laser energy deposition.

  9. Generation of low-timing-jitter femtosecond pulse trains with 2 GHz repetition rate via external repetition rate multiplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Sickler, Jason W; Fendel, Peter; Ippen, Erich P; Kärtner, Franz X; Wilken, Tobias; Holzwarth, Ronald; Hänsch, Theodor W

    2008-05-01

    Generation of low-timing-jitter 150 fs pulse trains at 1560 nm with 2 GHz repetition rate is demonstrated by locking a 200 MHz fundamental polarization additive-pulse mode-locked erbium fiber laser to high-finesse external Fabry-Perot cavities. The timing jitter and relative intensity noise of the repetition-rate multiplied pulse train are investigated.

  10. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Calculation of mass transfer in the remote cutting of metals by radiation of a high-power repetitively pulsed CO2 laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladush, G. G.; Rodionov, N. B.

    2002-01-01

    The mechanism of remote cutting of steel plates by radiation of a high-power repetitively pulsed CO2 laser is theoretically studied. The models of melt removal by the gravity force and the recoil pressure of material vapour are proposed and the sufficient conditions for the initiation of cutting are determined. A numerical model of a thermally thin plate was employed to describe the cutting for large focal spots.

  11. Gas-dynamic perturbations in an electric-discharge repetitively pulsed DF laser and the role of He in their suppression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evdokimov, P A; Sokolov, D V [Russian Federal Nuclear Center ' All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics' , Sarov, Nizhnii Novgorod region (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-30

    The gas-dynamic perturbations in a repetitively pulsed DF laser are studied using a Michelson interferometer. Based on the analysis of experimental data obtained in two experimental sets (working medium without buffer gas and with up to 90% of He), it is concluded that such phenomena as isentropic expansion of a thermal plug, gas heating by shock waves and resonance acoustic waves do not considerably decrease the upper limit of the pulse repetition rate below a value determined by the time of the thermal plug flush out of the discharge gap. It is suggested that this decrease for a DF laser with the SF{sub 6} – D{sub 2} working mixture is caused by the development of overheat instability due to an increased energy deposition into the near-electrode regions and to the formation of electrode shock waves. Addition of He to the active media of the DF laser changes the discharge structure and improves its homogeneity over the discharge gape cross section, thus eliminating the reason for the development of this instability. A signification dilution of the active medium of a DF laser with helium up to the atmospheric pressure allowed us to achieve the limiting discharge initiation frequencies with the active medium replacement ratio K ∼ 1. (active media)

  12. Gain-switched laser diode seeded Yb-doped fiber amplifier delivering 11-ps pulses at repetition rates up to 40-MHz

    CERN Document Server

    Ryser, Manuel; Pilz, Soenke; Burn, Andreas; Romano, Valerio

    2014-01-01

    Here, we demonstrate all-fiber direct amplification of 11 picosecond pulses from a gain-switched laser diode at 1063nm. The diode was driven at a repetition rate of 40MHz and delivered 13$\\mu$W of fiber-coupled average output power. For the low output pulse energy of 0.33pJ we have designed a multi-stage core pumped preamplifier based on single clad Yb-doped fibers in order to keep the contribution of undesired amplified spontaneous emission as low as possible and to minimize temporal and spectral broadening. After the preamplifier we reduced the 40MHz repetition rate to 1MHz using a fiber coupled pulse-picker. The final amplification was done with a cladding pumped Yb-doped large mode area fiber and a subsequent Yb-doped rod-type fiber. With our setup we achieved amplification of 72dBs to an output pulse energy of 5.7$\\mu$J, pulse duration of 11ps and peak power of >0.6MW.

  13. Ballistic phonon and thermal radiation transport across a minute vacuum gap in between aluminum and silicon thin films: Effect of laser repetitive pulses on transport characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilbas, B.S., E-mail: bsyilbas@kfupm.edu.sa; Ali, H.

    2016-08-15

    Short-pulse laser heating of aluminum and silicon thin films pair with presence of a minute vacuum gap in between them is considered and energy transfer across the thin films pair is predicted. The frequency dependent Boltzmann equation is used to predict the phonon intensity distribution along the films pair for three cycles of the repetitive short-pulse laser irradiation on the aluminum film surface. Since the gap size considered is within the Casimir limit, thermal radiation and ballistic phonon contributions to energy transfer across the vacuum gap is incorporated. The laser irradiated field is formulated in line with the Lambert's Beer law and it is considered as the volumetric source in the governing equations of energy transport. In order to assess the phonon intensity distribution in the films pair, equivalent equilibrium temperature is introduced. It is demonstrated that thermal separation of electron and lattice sub-systems in the aluminum film, due to the short-pulse laser irradiation, takes place and electron temperature remains high in the aluminum film while equivalent equilibrium temperature for phonons decays sharply in the close region of the aluminum film interface. This behavior is attributed to the phonon boundary scattering at the interface and the ballistic phonon transfer to the silicon film across the vacuum gap. Energy transfer due to the ballistic phonon contribution is significantly higher than that of the thermal radiation across the vacuum gap.

  14. Laser-induced backside wet etching of silica glass with ns-pulsed DPSS UV laser at the repetition rate of 40 kHz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niino, Hiroyuki; Kawaguchi, Yoshizo; Sato, Tadatake; Narazaki, Aiko; Gumpenberger, Thomas; Kurosaki, Ryozo [Photonics Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba Central 5, Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan)

    2007-04-15

    Surface micro-structuring of silica glass plates was performed by using laser- induced backside wet etching (LIBWE) upon irradiation with a single-mode laser beam from a diode-pumped solid-state (DPSS) UV laser with 40 kHz repetition rate at 266 nm. We have succeeded in a well-defined micro-pattern formation without debris and microcrack generation around the etched area on the basis of a galvanometer scanning system for the laser beam. Bubble dynamics after liquid ablation was monitored by impulse pressure detection with a fast- response piezoelectric pressure gauge.

  15. Phase-matched high-order harmonics by interaction of Ar atoms with high-repetition-rate low-energy femtosecond laser pulses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Xinhua; ZENG Zhinan; LI Ruxin; CHEN Shu; LU Haihe; YIN Dingjun; XU Zhizhan

    2004-01-01

    Phase-matched high-order harmonic generation in Ar gas-filled cell was investigated experimentally. We obtained phase-matched 27th order harmonic driven by a commercially available solid-state femtosecond laser system at 0.55 m J/pulse energy level and 1 kHz repetition rate. To our knowledge, this is the lowest driving laser energy used to obtain phase-matched 27th order harmonic in a static gas cell. High-order harmonic generation at different gas density was studied systematically. Spectral blueshift and broadening of high harmonics under different pressure were analyzed. We found that the source size and spatial distribution of high-order harmonics are quite different under the phase-matching condition from those of the phase-mismatching case.

  16. 50-GHz repetition-rate, 280-fs pulse generation at 100-mW average power from a mode-locked laser diode externally compressed in a pedestal-free pulse compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Kohichi R.; Sato, Kenji

    2002-07-01

    280-fs pedestal-free pulses are generated at average output powers exceeding 100 mW at a repetition rate of 50 GHz by compression of the output of a mode-locked laser diode (MLLD) by use of a pedestal-free pulse compressor (PFPC). The MLLD consists of a monolithically integrated chirped distributed Bragg reflector, a gain section, and an electroabsorption modulator. The PFPC is composed of a dispersion-flattened dispersion-decreasing fiber and a dispersion-flattened dispersion-imbalanced nonlinear optical loop mirror. Frequency modulation for linewidth broadening is used to overcome the power limitation imposed by stimulated Brillouin scattering.

  17. High repetition rate femtosecond dye amplifier using a laser diode pumped neodymium:YAG laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zysset, B.; LaGasse, M.J.; Fujimoto, J.G.; Kafka, J.D.

    1989-02-06

    A high repetition rate femtosecond dye amplifier is demonstrated using a laser diode pumped Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. Amplification of wavelength tunable 300 fs pulses from a synchronously mode-locked rhodamine dye laser is achieved with a saturated gain of 70 and a small gain of 200 at a repetition rate of 800 Hz. Maximum pulse energies of 40 nJ are obtained, and pulse compression to as short as 30 fs is demonstrated.

  18. High repetition rate femtosecond dye amplifier using a laser diode pumped neodymium:YAG laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zysset, B.; LaGasse, M. J.; Fujimoto, J. G.; Kafka, J. D.

    1989-02-01

    A high repetition rate femtosecond dye amplifier is demonstrated using a laser diode pumped Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. Amplification of wavelength tunable 300 fs pulses from a synchronously mode-locked rhodamine dye laser is achieved with a saturated gain of 70 and a small gain of 200 at a repetition rate of 800 Hz. Maximum pulse energies of 40 nJ are obtained, and pulse compression to as short as 30 fs is demonstrated.

  19. Welding of glasses in optical and partial-optical contact via focal position adjustment of femtosecond-laser pulses at moderately high repetition rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hua; Duan, Ji'an

    2017-07-01

    We used 1030-nm femtosecond-laser pulses focused above/at/below the interface of two fused-silica glass substrates in optical and partial-optical contact to successfully weld them at a moderately high repetition rate of 600 kHz. Variation in the laser focal position for these two gap-distance regimes (optical and partial-optical contact) yields different bonding strengths (BSs) and machining mechanisms. The maximum bonding strength (58.2 MPa) can be achieved for a gap distance ≤λ /4 for optical-contact welding when laser focused below the interface, and the corresponding height of the welding seam was 23 μm. In addition, our results demonstrated that the "filamentation welding technique" is critical to the femtosecond-laser direct welding of glasses. Furthermore, line welding is significantly easier to realize when the femtosecond laser focuses at the interface in partial-optical-contact welding applications due to the combined effects of filamentation welding and ablation.

  20. Pulsed inductive HF laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razhev, A M; Kargapol' tsev, E S [Institute of Laser Physics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Churkin, D S; Demchuk, S V [Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-03-31

    We report the results of experimentally investigated dependences of temporal, spectral and spatial characteristics of an inductive HF-laser generation on the pump conditions. Gas mixtures H{sub 2} – F{sub 2}(NF{sub 3} or SF6{sub 6}) and He(Ne) – H{sub 2} – F{sub 2}(NF{sub 3} or SF{sub 6}) were used as active media. The FWHM pulse duration reached 0.42 μs. This value corresponded to a pulsed power of 45 kW. For the first time, the emission spectrum of an inductive HF laser was investigated, which consisted of seven groups of bands with centres around the wavelengths of 2732, 2736, 2739, 2835, 2837, 2893 and 2913 nm. The cross section profile of the laser beam was a ring with a diameter of about 20 mm and width of about 5 mm. Parameters of laser operation in the repetitively pulsed regime were sufficiently stable. The amplitude instability of light pulses was no greater than 5% – 6%. (lasers)

  1. 电激励重复频率非链式HF激光器%Electrically initiated repetitive-pulsed non-chain HF lasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    易爱平; 刘晶儒; 唐影; 黄珂; 黄欣; 于力; 马连英

    2011-01-01

    采用电子束和气体放电两种激励方式开展重复频率非链式HF激光研究.基于全固态脉冲功率源SPG200建立了重复频率HF实验装置,探索了产生重频大面积均匀电子束的技术途径,利用法拉第筒对进入激光气室的电子束的轴向均匀性进行了诊断,开展了激光器输出特性研究和重频实验调试,在C2 H6:SF6=0.035,总气压为35 kPa时,激光器输出能量最大约为4.8 mJ,并实现了最高30 Hz的HF激光稳定输出.采用峰化电容及紫外自动预电离技术设计研制了放电激励重频HF激光器,研究了SF6气体放电特性和重频运行稳定性.研究发现SF6气体放电具有典型的辉光放电、电压维持和电弧放电三阶段特征.在充电电压为28 kV,总气压为12 kPa,C2H6含量为8%时,放电激励HF激光器最大脉冲能量约 600 mJ,比能量输出达到8.5J/1,激光器的电光转换效率约为2.5%.该激光器在1-50 Hz实现了重频输出,首脉冲能量>500 mJ,在10 Hz时稳定输出能量约为200 mJ,%The repetitive-pulsed non-chain HF lasers initiated by e-beams and fast discharges were studied respectively. The e-beam initiated HF laser characterized by an all-solid-state generator was developed. A large area repetitive uniform e-beam was obtained and the Faraday cup was used to diagnose the uniformity of e-beam into the laser gas cell. The output characteristics of the laser were studied and the maximal energy of 4.8 mJ was obtained with gas mixture C2 H6: SF6 =0.035. The e-beam initiated HF laser could operate at the repetition rate of 30 Hz. The discharge initiated non-chain HF laser was designed by using the technologies of peaking capacitor and UV pre-ionizing. The discharge characteristics and stability of SF6 gas in repetition mode were studied. The results show that the discharge includes main discharge (volume discharge) and arc discharge, between which the voltage maintains and no evident discharge is visible. The maximal output

  2. Medium Repetition Rate TEA Laser For Industrial Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Bruno

    1987-09-01

    The design and performance of an inexpensive compact repetitively pulsed TEA CO2 laser is described. The device uses a modified corona preionization technique and a fast transverse gas flow to achieve high repetition rates. An output energy of 500 mJ per pulse and an out-put power of 6.2W at 40Hz have been obtained. Due to the small energy needed for preionization, the efficiency of the device is high, whereas the gas dissociation is low when compared with commercial laser systems. This results in the relatively small fresh laser gas exchange of 20 ltr h-1 for long term operation.

  3. Three-dimensional polymer nanostructures for applications in cell biology generated by high-repetition rate sub-15 fs near-infrared laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licht, Martin; Straub, Martin; König, Karsten; Afshar, Maziar; Feili, Dara; Seidel, Helmut

    2011-03-01

    In recent years two-photon photopolymerization has emerged as a novel and extremely powerful technique of three-dimensional nanostructure formation. Complex-shaped structures can be generated using appropriate beam steering or nanopositioning systems. Here, we report on the fabrication of three-dimensional arrangements made of biocompatible polymer material, which can be used as templates for cell growth. Using three-dimensional cell cages as cell culture substrates is advantageous, as cells may develop in a more natural environment as compared to conventional planar growth methods. The two-photon fabrication experiments were carried out on a commercial microscope setup. Sub-15 fs pulsed Ti:Sapphire laser light (centre wavelength 800 nm, bandwidth 120 nm, repetition rate 85 MHz) was focused into the polymer material by a high-numerical aperture oil immersion objective. Due to the high peak intensities picojoule pulse energies in the focal spot are sufficient to polymerize the material at sub-100 nm structural element dimensions. Therefore, cell cages of sophisticated architecture can be constructed involving very fine features which take into account the specific needs of various types of cells. Ultimately, our research aims at three-dimensional assemblies of photopolymerized structural elements involving sub-100 nm features, which provide cell culture substrates far superior to those currently existing.

  4. Micro pulse laser radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinhirne, James D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An eye safe, compact, solid state lidar for profiling atmospheric cloud and aerosol scattering is disclosed. The transmitter of the micro pulse lidar is a diode pumped micro-J pulse energy, high repetition rate Nd:YLF laser. Eye safety is obtained through beam expansion. The receiver employs a photon counting solid state Geiger mode avalanche photodiode detector. Data acquisition is by a single card multichannel scaler. Daytime background induced quantum noise is controlled by a narrow receiver field-of-view and a narrow bandwidth temperature controlled interference filter. Dynamic range of the signal is limited to optical geometric signal compression. Signal simulations and initial atmospheric measurements indicate that micropulse lider systems are capable of detecting and profiling all significant cloud and aerosol scattering through the troposphere and into the stratosphere. The intended applications are scientific studies and environmental monitoring which require full time, unattended measurements of the cloud and aerosol height structure.

  5. 新型高重复频率脉冲CO2激光器%Novel high repetition-rate pulse CO2 laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑义军; 刁伟伦; 谭荣清; 王东雷; 张阔海; 黄文武; 刘世明; 李能文; 孙科; 卢远添

    2013-01-01

    A novel transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) CO2 laser with high repetition- rate was reported. The size of laser is 300 mmí300 mmí300 mm. The discharge volume is 12í103 mm3, the length of cavity is 310 mm. The ultraviolet preionization makes the discharge even and stable, the output energy can be as high as 15 mJ under the circumstance of free oscillation, and the full width at half maximum of the light pulse is 70 ns. To acquire the high wind velocity, a turbocharger was used in the system of the fast- gas flow cycle. When the pressure in the cavity is 100 kPa, the wind speed is 100 m/s, and the repetition rate of the TEA CO2 laser is up to 1.5 kHz. On the basis of preliminary experiment, the system of the grating tuning line selection can be applied to the high repetition- rate pulse laser to abtain the output of grating line selection accurately and fast.%报道了一种新型高重复频率的脉冲CO2激光器。该型激光器结构紧凑,激光器外型尺寸为300 mm×300 mm×300 mm,工作气体放电增益体积为12×103 mm3,谐振腔的长度为310 mm。为了获得大体积均匀稳定的气体放电,激光器采用了紫外电晕预电离方式。在激光器自由运转时,单脉冲激光的输出能量达到15 mJ ,输出脉冲的半高全宽为70 ns。激光器采用紧凑型高速涡轮增压风机,在一个大气压的条件下,气流循环速度超过100 m/s,激光脉冲重复频率为1.5 kHz,采用大体积强迫冷却和气体主动置换技术,可以获得较长时间激光稳定输出。在已有的实验基础上,采用光栅调谐,可快速准确地实现高重复频率脉冲CO2激光器的谱线选支输出。

  6. High-repetition-rate XeCl waveguide laser without gas flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, C.P.; Gordon C. III; Moutoulas, C.; Feldman, B.J.

    1987-03-01

    Operation of a microwave discharge XeCl laser at pulse-repetition rates extending to 8 kHz without flow of the laser gas is reported. Present limits on pulse-repetition rate appear to be imposed by thermally induced refractive-index gradients.

  7. High-repetition-rate femtosecond dye amplifier using a laser-diode-pumped neodymium:YAG laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zysset, B.; LaGasse, M.J.; Fujimoto, J.G.; Kafka, J.D.

    1989-02-06

    A high-repetition-rate femotosecond dye amplifier is demonstrated using a laser-diode-pumped Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. Amplification of wavelength-tunable 300-fs pulses from a synchronously mode-locked rhodamine dye laser is achieved with a saturated gain of 70 and a small gain of 200 at a repetition rate of 800 Hz. Maximum pulse energies of 40 nJ are obtained, and pulse compression to as short as 30 fs is demonstrated.

  8. Pulsed pumped Yb-doped fiber amplifier at low repetition rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Changgeng Ye; Ping Yan; Mali Gong; Ming Lei

    2005-01-01

    A pulsed pumped Yb-doped double-clad fiber (DCF) master-oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) at low repetition rate is reported. Seeded by a passive Q-switched Nd:YAG microchip laser, the fiber amplifier can generate 167-kW peak-power and 0.83-ns duration pulses at 200-Hz repetition rate. Because of the pulsed pump approach, the amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) and the spurious lasing between pulses are well avoided, and the repetition rate can be set freely from single-shot to 1 kHz. Peak power scaling limitations that arise from the fiber facet damage are discussed.

  9. Femtosecond and picosecond laser drilling of metals at high repetition rates and average powers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancona, A; Döring, S; Jauregui, C; Röser, F; Limpert, J; Nolte, S; Tünnermann, A

    2009-11-01

    The influence of pulse duration on the laser drilling of metals at repetition rates of up to 1 MHz and average powers of up to 70 W has been experimentally investigated using an ytterbium-doped-fiber chirped-pulse amplification system with pulses from 800 fs to 19 ps. At a few hundred kilohertz particle shielding causes an increase in the number of pulses for breakthrough, depending on the pulse energy and duration. At higher repetition rates, the heat accumulation effect overbalances particle shielding, but significant melt ejection affects the hole quality. Using femtosecond pulses, heat accumulation starts at higher repetition rates, and the ablation efficiency is higher compared with picosecond pulses.

  10. Picosecond Pulse Laser Microstructuring of silicon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵明; 尹钢; 朱京涛; 赵利

    2003-01-01

    We report the experimental results of picosecond pulse laser microstructuring (pulse duration 35ps, wavelength 1.06μm, repetition rate 10Hz) of silicon using the direct focusing technique. Arrays of sharp conical spikes located below the initial surface have been formed by cumulative picosecond pulsed laser irradiation of silicon in SF6. Irradiation of silicon surface in air, N2, or vacuum creates ripple-like patterns, but does not create the sharp conical spikes.

  11. A Q-Swicthed All-Solid-State Single-Longitudinal-Mode Laser with Adjustable Pulse-Width and High Repetition Rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Jun; XU Shi-Zhong; HOU Xia; WEI Hui; CHEN Wei-Biao

    2006-01-01

    A single-longitudinal-mode (SLM) laser-diode pumped Nd: YAG laser with adjustable pulse width is developed by using the techniques of pre-lasing and changing polarization of birefingent crystal. The Q-switching voltage is triggered by the peak of the pre-lasing pulse to achieve the higher stability of output pulse energy. The output energy of more than 1mJ is obtained with output energy stability of 3% (rms) at 100 Hz. The pulsewidth can be adjusted from 30ns to 300ns by changing the Q-switching voltage. The probability of putting out single-longitudinal-mode pulses is almost 100%. The laser can be run over four hours continually without mode hopping.

  12. Relationships of skin depths and temperatures when varying pulse repetition frequencies from 2.0-μm laser light incident on pig skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaaf, David; Johnson, Thomas

    2010-07-01

    Human perception of 2.0-μm infrared laser irradiation has become significant in such disparate fields as law enforcement, neuroscience, and pain research. Several recent studies have found damage thresholds for single-pulse and continuous wave irradiations at this wavelength. However, the only publication using multiple-pulse irradiations was investigating the cornea rather than skin. Literature has claimed that the 2.0-μm light characteristic thermal diffusion time was as long as 300-ms. Irradiating the skin with 2.0-μm lasers to produce sensation should follow published recommendations to use pulses on the order of 10 to 100 ms, which approach the theoretical thermal diffusion time. Therefore, investigation of the heating of skin for a variety of laser pulse combinations was undertaken. Temperatures of ex vivo pig skin were measured at the surface and at three depths from pulse sequences of six different duty factors. Differences were found in temperature rise per unit exposure that did not follow a linear relation to duty factor. The differences can be explained by significant heat conduction during the pulses. Therefore, the common heat modeling assumption of thermal confinement during a pulse may need to be experimentally verified if the pulse approaches the theoretical thermal confinement time.

  13. Diagnosis of high-repetition-rate pulse laser with pyroelectric detector%基于热释电探测器的重频脉冲激光诊断

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张磊; 邵碧波; 杨鹏翎; 王振宝; 闫燕

    2011-01-01

    Based on the working principles of a pyroelectric detector, the transient response of the detector to the pulse laser is researched. The model of pyroelectric detector is built, and the response in practical application is simulated according to the parameters of materials and structures. Signal process circuits which are suitable for a high-repetition-rate pulse laser are designed. Finally', a number of the repetition frequency laser radiation experiments on the pyroelectric detector are carried out. The experiments on frequency response and pulse width of the detector are completed, and the feasibility of applying the pyroelectric detector to the energy measurement of the high-repetition-rate and narrow pulse laser is verified.%摘以热释电探测器的工作原理为基础,研究了热释电探测器对重频脉冲激光的瞬态响应特性,建立了热释电探测器对单脉冲激光辐照响应的工作模型,分析了影响探测器频率特性的主要因素。根据材料和结构参数模拟计算了实际应用中的响应模型。设计了信号检测电路并对其进行计算仿事。完成了探测器的频率响应、脉宽响应等实验测量,验证了热释电探测器用于高重频、窄脉冲激光能量测量的可行性。

  14. Repetition rate tunable ultra-short optical pulse generation based on electrical pattern generator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Fu; Hongming Zhang; Meng Yan; Minyu Yao

    2009-01-01

    @@ An actively mode-locked laser with tunable repetition rate is proposed and experimentally demonstrated based on a programmable electrical pattern generator.By changing the repetition rate of the electrical patterns applied on the in-cavity modulator, the repetition rate of the output optical pulse sequences changes accordingly while the pulse width of the optical pulse train remains almost constant.In other words, the output ultra-short pulse train has a tunable duty cycle.In a proof-of-principle experiment, optical pulses with repetition rates of 10, 5, 2.5 and 1.25 GHz are obtained by adjusting the electrical pattern applied on the in-cavity modulator while their pulse widths remain almost unchanged.

  15. Breakdown behavior of electronics at variable pulse repetition rates

    OpenAIRE

    Korte, S.; H. Garbe

    2006-01-01

    The breakdown behavior of electronics exposed to single transient electromagnetic pulses is subject of investigations for several years. State-of-the-art pulse generators additionally provide the possibility to generate pulse sequences with variable pulse repetition rate. In this article the influence of this repetition rate variation on the breakdown behavior of electronic systems is described. For this purpose microcontroller systems are examined during line-led exposure to pulses with repe...

  16. On the repetitive operation of a self-switched transversely excited atmosphere CO2 laser

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pallavi Raote; Gautam Patil; J Padma Nilaya; D J Biswas

    2010-11-01

    The repetition rate capability of self-switched transversely excited atmosphere (TEA) CO2 laser was studied for different gas flow configurations. For an optimized gas flow configuration, repetitive operation was achieved at a much smaller gas replenishment factor between two successive pulses when compared with repetitive systems energized by conventional pulsers.

  17. Temporal synchronization of GHz repetition rate electron and laser pulses for the optimization of a compact inverse-Compton scattering x-ray source

    CERN Document Server

    Hadmack, Michael R; Madey, John M J; Kowalczyk, Jeremy M D

    2014-01-01

    The operation of an inverse-Compton scattering source of x-rays or gamma-rays requires the precision alignment and synchronization of highly focused electron bunches and laser pulses at the collision point. The arrival times of electron and laser pulses must be synchronized with picosecond precision. We have developed an RF synchronization technique that reduces the initial timing uncertainty from 350 ps to less than 2 ps, greatly reducing the parameter space to be optimized while commissioning the x-ray source. We describe the technique and present measurements of its performance.

  18. Repetitively pulsed TEA CO{sub 2} laser and its application for second harmonic generation in ZnGeP{sub 2} crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koval' chuk, L V; Grezev, A N; Niz' ev, V G; Yakunin, V P [Institute on Laser and Information Technologies, Russian Academy of Sciences, Shatura, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Mezhevov, V S [Kaluga Laser Innovation and Technology Centre, Obninsk, Kaluga region (Russian Federation); Goryachkin, D A [Russian State Scientific Center for Robotics and Technical Cybernetics, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Sergeev, V V; Kalintsev, A G [Open Joint Stock Company S.I.Vavilov State Optical Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-31

    Experimental results are presented on the development of a radiation source emitting at a wavelength of 4.775 μm with a pulse energy up to 50 mJ and an average power up to several watts in short pulse trains. A TEA CO{sub 2} laser and a nonlinear converter based on a ZnGeP{sub 2} crystal, which are specially designed for these experiments, are described. The main limitations of nonlinear conversion and possible ways to overcome these limitations are considered. (lasers)

  19. Repetition rate continuously tunable 10-GHz picosecond mode-locked fiber ring laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Wan; Ziyu Wang

    2006-01-01

    A couple of simple-structure phase modulators were used in active mode-locked fiber laser to implement repetition rate continuous tuning. The laser produces pulse as short as 5.7 ps whose repetition rate tuning can cover the spacing of the adjoining order mode-locking frequencies.

  20. Properties of water surface discharge at different pulse repetition rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruma,; Yoshihara, K. [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Hosseini, S. H. R., E-mail: hosseini@kumamoto-u.ac.jp; Sakugawa, T.; Akiyama, H. [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Institute of Pulsed Power Science, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Akiyama, M. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan); Lukeš, P. [Institute of Plasma Physics, AS CR, Prague, Prague 18200 (Czech Republic)

    2014-09-28

    The properties of water surface discharge plasma for variety of pulse repetition rates are investigated. A magnetic pulse compression (MPC) pulsed power modulator able to deliver pulse repetition rates up to 1000 Hz, with 0.5 J per pulse energy output at 25 kV, was used as the pulsed power source. Positive pulse with a point-to-plane electrode configuration was used for the experiments. The concentration and production yield of hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) were quantitatively measured and orange II organic dye was treated, to evaluate the chemical properties of the discharge reactor. Experimental results show that the physical and chemical properties of water surface discharge are not influenced by pulse repetition rate, very different from those observed for under water discharge. The production yield of H₂O₂ and degradation rate per pulse of the dye did not significantly vary at different pulse repetition rates under a constant discharge mode on water surface. In addition, the solution temperature, pH, and conductivity for both water surface and underwater discharge reactors were measured to compare their plasma properties for different pulse repetition rates. The results confirm that surface discharge can be employed at high pulse repetition rates as a reliable and advantageous method for industrial and environmental decontamination applications.

  1. Ultrashort Laser Pulse Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Diels, Jean-Claude

    2006-01-01

    Ultrashort Laser Pulse Phenomena, 2e serves as an introduction to the phenomena of ultra short laser pulses and describes how this technology can be used to examine problems in areas such as electromagnetism, optics, and quantum mechanics. Ultrashort Laser Pulse Phenomena combines theoretical backgrounds and experimental techniques and will serve as a manual on designing and constructing femtosecond (""faster than electronics"") systems or experiments from scratch. Beyond the simple optical system, the various sources of ultrashort pulses are presented, again with emphasis on the basic

  2. Experiment on damage in K9 glass due to repetition rate pulsed CO2 laser radiation%重频脉冲CO2激光损伤K9玻璃的实验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王玺; 卞进田; 李华; 聂劲松; 孙晓泉; 尹学忠; 雷鹏

    2013-01-01

      对脉冲CO2激光在不同重频模式下损伤K9玻璃进行了实验研究。采用输出能量为10 J,脉宽为90 ns,重复频率在100 Hz至300 Hz之间连续可调的脉冲CO2激光器,对K9玻璃样品进行了激光损伤实验,观察到两次不同重频条件下样品的损伤形貌。实验结果表明,重频越高,对样品的损伤程度就越严重;应力损伤成为K9玻璃激光损伤的最主要的原因,在重频强激光的辐照下,K9玻璃表面出现强烈的等离子体闪光,伴随明显的熔融气化破坏,并形成等离子体爆轰波。爆轰波对玻璃材料产生了严重的力学冲击作用,这种应力作用足以对K9玻璃造成毁灭性破坏。运用有限元分析对激光辐照K9玻璃的温度与应力分布进行仿真,其计算结果与实验基本吻合。%  In this paper, the experiment on damage in K9 glass induced by pulsed CO2 laser under different repetition rates was carried out, which had a pulse width of 90 ns. The laser pulse energy was 10 J and the repetition rate was kept within the range of 100 Hz to 300 Hz. The damage morphologies of two kind repetition rates after laser irradiation were characterized. The experimental results indicate that the effect of laser irradiation on samples can be affected considerably by the change of laser repetition rate, and the intensity of damage morphology on the sample increases with the laser repetition rate, and the damage in K9 glass induced by pulsed CO2 laser is dominated by stress. As a result, the plasma detonation wave induced by laser occured, the material was broken result from the melting and evaporation of K9 glass. It is shown that the plasma detonation wave affected stress damage considerably, and this mechanical effect almost destroyed K9 glass sample. A numerical simulation was performed to calculate temperature and stress distributions in K9 glass sample irradiated by pulsed CO2 laser using finite element method. The model

  3. Generation of laser pulse trains for tests of multi-pulse laser wakefield acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalloo, R. J.; Corner, L.; Arran, C.; Cowley, J.; Cheung, G.; Thornton, C.; Walczak, R.; Hooker, S. M.

    2016-09-01

    In multi-pulse laser wakefield acceleration (MP-LWFA) a plasma wave is driven by a train of low-energy laser pulses separated by the plasma period, an approach which offers a route to driving plasma accelerators with high efficiency and at high pulse repetition rates using emerging technologies such as fibre and thin-disk lasers. Whilst these laser technologies are in development, proof-of-principle tests of MP-LWFA require a pulse train to be generated from a single, high-energy ultrafast pulse. Here we demonstrate the generation of trains of up to 7 pulses with pulse separations in the range 150-170 fs from single 40 fs pulses produced by a Ti:sapphire laser.

  4. Generation of laser pulse trains for tests of multi-pulse laser wakefield acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shalloo, R.J., E-mail: robert.shalloo@physics.ox.ac.uk; Corner, L.; Arran, C.; Cowley, J.; Cheung, G.; Thornton, C.; Walczak, R.; Hooker, S.M.

    2016-09-01

    In multi-pulse laser wakefield acceleration (MP-LWFA) a plasma wave is driven by a train of low-energy laser pulses separated by the plasma period, an approach which offers a route to driving plasma accelerators with high efficiency and at high pulse repetition rates using emerging technologies such as fibre and thin-disk lasers. Whilst these laser technologies are in development, proof-of-principle tests of MP-LWFA require a pulse train to be generated from a single, high-energy ultrafast pulse. Here we demonstrate the generation of trains of up to 7 pulses with pulse separations in the range 150–170 fs from single 40 fs pulses produced by a Ti:sapphire laser.

  5. Frequency and amplitude characteristics of a high-repetition-rate hybrid TEA-CO/sub 2/ laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lachambre, J.L.; Lavigne, P.; Verreault, M.; Otis, G.

    1978-02-01

    The envelope and frequency characteristics of the output pulse of a high-repetition-rate hybrid TEA-CO/sub 2/ laser are presented. Both the intrapulse and interpulse laser frequency stability are experimentally determined at repetition rates up to 300 Hz. The recovery of the CW laser signal following the generation of the TEA laser pulse is analyzed theoretically and experimentally. Short term reproducibilities of + or - 2 MHz are observed at a pulse repetition rate of 300 Hz with initial chirp rates of about 1.5 MHz/microsec. Improvements and limits on power and repetition rate are discussed.

  6. Spectroscopic Investigation of a Repetitively-Pulsed Nanosecond Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Benjamin T.

    This work reports on an investigation of a repetitively-pulsed nanosecond discharge (RPND) in helium over a range of 0.3-16.0 Torr. The discharge was studied experimentally via laser-absorption spectroscopy and opticals emission spectroscopy measurements. In concert with the experimental campaign, a global model of a helium plasma was developed with the aid of particle-in-cell simulations. The global model was then used to predict the population kinetics and emissions of the RPND. Synthesis of the results provided new data and insights on the development of the RPND. Among the results were direct measurements of the triplet metastable states during the excitation period. This period was found to be unexpectedly long at low pressures (less than or equal to 1.0 Torr), suggesting an excess in high-energy electrons as compared to an equilibrium distribution. Other phenomena such as a prominent return stroke and additional energy deposition by reflections in the transmission line were also identified. Estimates of the electric field and electron temperatures were obtained for several conditions. Furthermore, several optical methods for electron temperature measurement were evaluated for application to the discharge. Based on the global model simulations, the coronal model was found to apply to the line ratio of the 33S-23Po and 31S-2 1Po transitions, however further work is needed to ascertain its applicability to experimental discharges. These results provide new insight on the development of the repetitively-pulsed nanosecond discharge. Specifically, they reveal new information about the excited state dynamics within the discharge, the non-equilibrium nature of its electrons, and several avenues for future studies. This study extends the present understanding of repetitively-pulsed discharges, and advances the knowledge of energy coupling between electric fields and plasmas.

  7. Excimer Laser Pulse Compress With Pulse Feedback

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>To attain a shorter laser pulse, a compressing technique called pulse feedback was developed from the saturation gain switch applied to the amplification in a discharge pumping excimer laser cavity. It can

  8. Nanofabrication with pulsed lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabashin, Av; Delaporte, Ph; Pereira, A; Grojo, D; Torres, R; Sarnet, Th; Sentis, M

    2010-02-24

    An overview of pulsed laser-assisted methods for nanofabrication, which are currently developed in our Institute (LP3), is presented. The methods compass a variety of possibilities for material nanostructuring offered by laser-matter interactions and imply either the nanostructuring of the laser-illuminated surface itself, as in cases of direct laser ablation or laser plasma-assisted treatment of semiconductors to form light-absorbing and light-emitting nano-architectures, as well as periodic nanoarrays, or laser-assisted production of nanoclusters and their controlled growth in gaseous or liquid medium to form nanostructured films or colloidal nanoparticles. Nanomaterials synthesized by laser-assisted methods have a variety of unique properties, not reproducible by any other route, and are of importance for photovoltaics, optoelectronics, biological sensing, imaging and therapeutics.

  9. Pulse power for lasers II; Proceedings of the Meeting, Los Angeles, CA, Jan. 19, 20, 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkes, Tom R.; McDuff, Glen

    Various papers on pulse power for lasers are presented. Individual topics addressed include: preionization techniques for discharge lasers, X-ray preionization technology for high-pressure gas-discharge lasers, weight and volume scaling of pulse power for laser systems, method for rapidly terminating the current pulses applied to recombination lasers, high dV/dt spiker pulse generation using magnetic pulse sharpening techniques, multigap thyratrons for future laser applications, high-power thyratron-type switch for laser applications, model for the optically triggered pseudospark thyratron using local field and beam-bulk methods, capacitors for repetitively pulsed laser, fast pulse transformers in laser pulse power circuits, pulsed power topologies for laser applications, pulse power for the CHIRP XeCl laser, line type pulser for gas laser pumping, engineering aspects of long-pulse CO2 lasers using plasma discharge electrodes, high-pressure pulsed radial glow discharge CO2 laser.

  10. High repetition rate passively Q-switched fiber and microchip lasers for optical resolution photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wei; Utkin, Ilya; Ranasinghesagara, Janaka; Pan, Lei; Godwal, Yogesh; Kerr, Shaun; Zemp, Roger J.; Fedosejevs, Robert

    2010-02-01

    Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy is a novel imaging technology for visualizing optically-absorbing superficial structures in vivo with lateral spatial resolution determined by optical focusing rather than acoustic detection. Since scanning of the illumination spot is required, the imaging speed is limited by the scanning speed and the laser pulse repetition rate. Unfortunately, lasers with high-repetition rate and suitable pulse durations and energies are difficult to find. We are developing compact laser sources for this application. Passively Q-switched fiber and microchip lasers with pulse repetition rates up to 300 kHz are demonstrated. Using a diode-pumped microchip laser fiber-coupled to a large mode-area Yb-doped fiber amplifier we obtained 60μJ 1-ns pulses at the frequency-doubled 532-nm wavelength. The pulse-repetition rate was determined by the power of the microchip laser pump source at 808nm and may exceed 10 kHz. Additionally, a passively Q-switched fiber laser utilizing a Yb-doped double-cladding fiber and an external saturable absorber has shown to produce 250ns pulses at repetition rates of 100-300 KHz. A photoacoustic probe enabling flexible scanning of the focused output of these lasers consisted of a 45-degree glass prism in an optical index-matching fluid. Photoacoustic signals exiting the sample are deflected by the prism to an ultrasound transducer. Phantom studies with a 7.5-micron carbon fiber demonstrate the ability to image with optical rather than acoustic resolution. We believe that the high pulse-repetition rates and the potentially compact and fiber-coupled nature of these lasers will prove important for clinical imaging applications where realtime imaging performance is essential.

  11. Power Enhancement Cavity for Burst-Mode Laser Pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yun [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel optical cavity scheme and locking method that can realize the power enhancement of picosecond UV laser pulses operating at a burst mode with arbitrary burst (macropulse) lengths and repetition rates.

  12. A High Power and High Repetition Rate Modelocked Ti-Sapphire Laser for Photoinjectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Hansknecht; M. Poelker

    2001-07-01

    A high power cw mode-locked Ti-sapphire laser has been constructed to drive the Jefferson Lab polarized photoinjector and provide > 500 mW average power with 50 ps pulsewidths at 499 MHz or 1497 MHz pulse repetition rates. This laser allows efficient, high current synchronous photoinjection for extended periods of time before intrusive steps must be taken to restore the quantum efficiency of the strained layer GaAs photocathode. The use of this laser has greatly enhanced the maximum high polarization beam current capability and operating lifetime of the Jefferson Lab photoinjector compared with previous performance using diode laser systems. A novel modelocking technique provides a simple means to phase-lock the optical pulse train of the laser to the accelerator and allows for operation at higher pulse repetition rates to {approx} 3 GHz without modification of the laser cavity. The laser design and characteristics are described below.

  13. Nanofabrication with Pulsed Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabashin AV

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An overview of pulsed laser-assisted methods for nanofabrication, which are currently developed in our Institute (LP3, is presented. The methods compass a variety of possibilities for material nanostructuring offered by laser–matter interactions and imply either the nanostructuring of the laser-illuminated surface itself, as in cases of direct laser ablation or laser plasma-assisted treatment of semiconductors to form light-absorbing and light-emitting nano-architectures, as well as periodic nanoarrays, or laser-assisted production of nanoclusters and their controlled growth in gaseous or liquid medium to form nanostructured films or colloidal nanoparticles. Nanomaterials synthesized by laser-assisted methods have a variety of unique properties, not reproducible by any other route, and are of importance for photovoltaics, optoelectronics, biological sensing, imaging and therapeutics.

  14. Repetitively Pulsed Backward-Wave Oscillator Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-03-31

    and the FE phase by applying a’ Y pulsed electric field , Fig. 1. Sawyer-Tower circuit for displaying (4) partial reversal of P. inside the P-E...at temper- a pulsed electric field to switch the material atures up to the Curie temperature. Tests on into the PE or APE phase. With this combina- a

  15. 纳秒紫外重复脉冲激光烧蚀单晶硅的热力学过程研究%Investigation of thermodynamic progress of silicon ablated by nanosecond uv repetitive pulse laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    包凌东; 韩敬华; 段涛; 孙年春; 高翔; 冯国英; 杨李茗; 牛瑞华; 刘全喜

    2012-01-01

    采用波长为355nm的纳秒紫外重复脉冲激光对单晶硅片进行了盲孔加工实验,观测了随脉冲增加激光烧蚀硅片的外观形貌和盲孔孔深、孔径的变化规律,并对紫外激光辐照硅片的热力学过程进行了分析.研究结果表明:紫外激光加工硅盲孔是基于热、力效应共同作用的结果,热效应会使得硅材料熔化、气化甚至发生电离产生激光等离子体,为材料的去除提供条件;激光等离子体冲击波以及高温气态物向外膨胀会对熔化材料产生压力致使其向外喷射,为重复脉冲的进一步烧蚀提供了条件;力效应主要沿着激光传输的方向,垂直于硅表面,使得去除部位主要集中在孔的深度方向,达到较高的孔径比,实验观察孔径比可达8:1;此外,激光等离子体的产生也阻止了激光对靶面的作用,加之随孔深的增加激光发生散焦,使得烧蚀深度有一定的限制,实验观察烧蚀脉冲个数在前100个时加工效率较高.%The blind holes processing experiment is conducted on the silicon under the radiation of a 355 nm nanosecond UV repetitive pulse laser. With the increase of the laser pulse number, the variations of the silicon morphology, the depth and aperture of the blind holes are observed, and the thermodynamic process of UV laser irradiating silicon is analyzed. The results show that the formation of the blind silicon hole in the laser ablation process is due to the interaction between thermal effect and force effect. Thermal effect results in fusion, vaporization and even producing laser plasma by ionization in silicon, which is essential to the removal of the material. The molten material is compressed by the plasma shock wave and the expansion of the high-temperature gaseous material,and then ejection outward, which will benefit the further ablation; the force propagates along the laser transmission direction,perpendicular to the silicon

  16. Effects of picosecond laser repetition rate on ablation of Cr12MoV cold work mold steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Baoye; Deng, Leimin; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Fei; Duan, Jun; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, the effects of pulse repetition rate on ablation efficiency and quality of Cr12MoV cold work mold steel have been studied using a picosecond (ps) pulse Nd:YVO4 laser system at λ= 1064 nm. The experimental results of area ablation on target surface reveal that laser repetition rate plays a significant role in controlling ablation efficiency and quality. Increasing the laser repetition rate, while keeping a constant mean power improves the ablation efficiency and quality. For each laser mean power, there is an optimal repetition rate to achieve a higher laser ablation efficiency with low surface roughness. A high ablation efficiency of 42.29, 44.11 and 47.52 μm3/mJ, with surface roughness of 0.476, 0.463 and 0.706 μm could be achieved at laser repetition rate of 10 MHz, for laser mean power of 15, 17 and 19 W, respectively. Scanning electron microcopy images revels that the surface morphology evolves from rough with numerous craters, to flat without pores when we increased the laser repetition rate. The effects of laser repetition rate on the heat accumulation, plasma shield and ablation threshold were analyzed by numerical simulation, spectral analysis and multi-laser shot, respectively. The synergetic effects of laser repetition rate on laser ablation rate and machining quality were analyzed and discussed systemically in this paper.

  17. 人眼安全高重频窄脉宽单模全光纤激光器特性研究%Characteristics of eye-safe high repetition frequency narrow pulse width single mode all fiber laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张鑫; 刘源; 贺岩; 杨燕; 侯霞; 陈卫标

    2015-01-01

    介绍了基于主振荡功率放大结构的人眼安全全光纤激光器。首先对比了电光调制及直接调制产生的种子激光在百kHz重复频率、纳秒级脉冲宽度的激光放大器中优缺点,综合系统需求选择直接调制方式;之后对窄脉冲单模放大中出现的脉冲分裂现象进行了研究,选用10μm纤芯的双包层铒镱共掺光纤,仅通过两级放大即获得了1550 nm,重复频率为200 kHz,脉冲宽度为4.07 ns,峰值功率为1.02 kW的单模激光输出。具有结构紧凑、稳定可靠的特点,可用于三维视频激光雷达。%An eye-safe, all fiber, single mode, fiber laser based on master oscillator power amplifier configuration was presented. The advantages and disadvantages were compared between using a directly modulated diode laser and an electro-optical modulated continuous-wave diode as seed laser in sub-Mega Hertz, nanosecond fiber amplifier. The main restriction of power scaling in nanosecond fiber laser was pulse split. 10μm core double cladding erbium ytterbium co-doped fiber was employed as gain fiber of power amplifier. The directly modulated seed laser was then amplified by only two stage amplifiers. Finally, a peak power of 1.02 kW with 4.07 ns pulse duration at 200 kHz pulse repetition frequency with single-mode output was obtained and it is applicable in three dimensional video imaging lidar system.

  18. Effect of the pulse repetition rate on fiber-assisted tissue ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyun Wook

    2016-07-01

    The effect of the pulse repetition rate on ablation performance was evaluated ex vivo at various fiber sweeping speeds for an effective 532-nm laser prostatectomy. Three pulse repetition rates (7.5, 15, and 30 kHz) at 100 W were delivered to bovine liver tissue at three sweeping speeds (2, 4, and 6 mm/s) to achieve bulky tissue removal. Ablation performance was quantitatively compared in terms of the ablation volume and the coagulation thickness. The lowest pulse repetition rate of 7.5 kHz attained the highest ablation volume (101.5 ± 12.0 mm3) and the thinnest coagulation (0.7 ± 0.1 mm) along with superficial carbonization. The highest pulse repetition rate of 30 kHz was associated with the least tissue removal (65.8 ± 5.0 mm3) and the deepest thermal denaturation (1.1 ± 0.2 mm). Quantitative evaluations of laser parameters can be instrumental in facilitating ablation efficiency and maintaining hemostatic coagulation during treatment of large-sized benign prostate hyperplasia.

  19. Passively Mode-Locked Fiber Laser with a Sub-Megahertz Repetition Rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jiong; JIA Dong-Fang; WU Yong-Chao; WANG Chang-Le; WANG Zhao-Ying; YANG Tian-Xin

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate an ultra-long cavity by which an all-fiber erbium-doped fiber laser is passively mode-locked by nonlinear polarization rotation.The length of the resonant cavity amounts to 466m,which can be achieved by incorporating a 420m highly nonlinear fiber.The laser generates stable mode-locked pulses with a 444 kHz fundamental repetition rate.A near transform-limited subpicosecond pulse is obtained without any dispersion compensation.The maximum average power of the output pulses is 5.16 mW,which corresponds to a per-pulse energy of 11.62nJ.A low-repetition-rate optical pulse train is required for many applications such as micromachining,biomedical diagnostics and lidar systems.[1-3] However,the repetition rate of conventional fiber lasers is normally tens of MHz.Pulse pickers such as Pockels cells or acousto-optic modulators are always used to lower the repetition rate,however,reduction in this way introduces significant energy losses,impairs the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and increases complexity.Because the pulse repetition rate of a modelocked laser is inversely proportional to its resonator length,longer cavities lead to lower pulse repetition rates and,consequently,to higher pulse energy at the same average power of radiation.%We demonstrate an ultra-long cavity by which an all-fiber erbium-doped fiber laser is passively mode-locked by nonlinear polarization rotation. The length of the resonant cavity amounts to 466 m, which can be achieved by incorporating a 420 m highly nonlinear fiber. The laser generates stable mode-locked pulses with a 444 kHz fundamental repetition rate. A near transform-limited subpicosecond pulse is obtained without any dispersion compensation. The maximum average power of the output pulses is 5.16mW, which corresponds to a per-pulse energy of 11.62 nJ.

  20. Pulsed laser illumination of photovoltaic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yater, Jane A.; Lowe, Roland A.; Jenkins, Phillip P.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1995-01-01

    In future space missions, free electron lasers (FEL) may be used to illuminate photovoltaic receivers to provide remote power. Both the radio-frequency (RF) and induction FEL produce pulsed rather than continuous output. In this work we investigate cell response to pulsed laser light which simulates the RF FEL format. The results indicate that if the pulse repetition is high, cell efficiencies are only slightly reduced compared to constant illumination at the same wavelength. The frequency response of the cells is weak, with both voltage and current outputs essentially dc in nature. Comparison with previous experiments indicates that the RF FEL pulse format yields more efficient photovoltaic conversion than does an induction FEL format.

  1. Study of filamentation with a high power high repetition rate ps laser at 1.03 µm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houard, A; Jukna, V; Point, G; André, Y-B; Klingebiel, S; Schultze, M; Michel, K; Metzger, T; Mysyrowicz, A

    2016-04-01

    We study the propagation of intense, high repetition rate laser pulses of picosecond duration at 1.03 µm central wavelength through air. Evidence of filamentation is obtained from measurements of the beam profile as a function of distance, from photoemission imaging and from spatially resolved sonometric recordings. Good agreement is found with numerical simulations. Simulations reveal an important self shortening of the pulse duration, suggesting that laser pulses with few optical cycles could be obtained via double filamentation. An important lowering of the voltage required to induce guided electric discharges between charged electrodes is measured at high laser pulse repetition rate.

  2. Laser radiation frequency conversion in carbon- and cluster-containing plasma plumes under conditions of single and two-color pumping by pulses with a 10-Hz repetition rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganeev, R. A.

    2013-07-01

    This work reviews a series of investigations of different plasma plumes using single- and two-color laser systems that emit femtosecond pulses with a 10-Hz repetition rate. Results of investigation of the resonant enhancement of harmonics in tin plasma with the use of two types of pumps are analyzed, and it is shown that the tuning of the wavelengths of harmonics to ion-resonance levels plays an important role in increasing the conversion efficiency to high-order harmonics of the radiation to be converted. Investigations of different carbon-containing plasma media (carbon nanotubes, graphite, carbon aerogel, etc.) exhibit attractive properties of the nonlinear medium of this type for efficient generation of high-order harmonics. The results of the first experiments on the use of nanoparticles produced directly in the course of laser ablation of metals for increasing the efficiency of harmonics generated in this cluster-containing medium are analyzed. It is shown that new approaches realized in these investigations give hope that the nonlinear optical response of plasma media in the far-ultraviolet range can be further increased.

  3. A contactless microwave-based diagnostic tool for high repetition rate laser systems

    CERN Document Server

    Braggio, C

    2014-01-01

    We report on a novel electro-optic device for the diagnostics of high repetition rate laser systems. It is composed of a microwave receiver and of a second order nonlinear crystal, whose irradiation with a train of short laser pulses produces a time-dependent polarization in the crystal itself as a consequence of optical rectification. This process gives rise to the emission of microwave radiation that is detected by a receiver and is analyzed to infer the repetition rate and intensity of the pulses. We believe that this new method may overcome some of the limitations of photodetection techniques.

  4. Selective laser melting of copper using ultrashort laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaden, Lisa; Matthäus, Gabor; Ullsperger, Tobias; Engelhardt, Hannes; Rettenmayr, Markus; Tünnermann, Andreas; Nolte, Stefan

    2017-09-01

    Within the field of laser-assisted additive manufacturing, the application of ultrashort pulse lasers for selective laser melting came into focus recently. In contrast to conventional lasers, these systems provide extremely high peak power at ultrashort interaction times and offer the potential to control the thermal impact at the vicinity of the processed region by tailoring the pulse repetition rate. Consequently, materials with extremely high melting points such as tungsten or special composites such as AlSi40 can be processed. In this paper, we present the selective laser melting of copper using 500 fs laser pulses at MHz repetition rates emitted at a center wavelength of about 1030 nm. To identify an appropriate processing window, a detailed parameter study was performed. We demonstrate the fabrication of bulk copper parts as well as the realization of thin-wall structures featuring thicknesses below 100 {μ }m. With respect to the extraordinary high thermal conductivity of copper which in general prevents the additive manufacturing of elements with micrometer resolution, this work demonstrates the potential for sophisticated copper products that can be applied in a wide field of applications extending from microelectronics functionality to complex cooling structures.

  5. The Effects of Single Pulse and Repetitive (Cumulative) Neodymium and Frequency-Doubled Neodymium Laser Irradiations on Prior Light- and Dark-Adapted Monkey Retinas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-12-01

    is no blink reflex. These lasers are being used increasingly in diverse ways. It is a dangerous laser for eye damage, classed as a high risk (Class...weight) and Xylazine (Rompun) (1 mg/kg body weight). The anaesthetized animal was placed on an incontinent pad on the holder, taped into position, and

  6. High-repetition-rate picosecond pump laser based on a Yb:YAG disk amplifier for optical parametric amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Thomas; Schwarz, Alexander; Teisset, Catherine Yuriko; Sutter, Dirk; Killi, Alexander; Kienberger, Reinhard; Krausz, Ferenc

    2009-07-15

    We report an optically synchronized picosecond pump laser for optical parametric amplifiers based on an Yb:YAG thin-disk amplifier. At 3 kHz repetition rate, pulse energies of 25 mJ with 1.6 ps pulse duration were achieved with an rms fluctuation in pulse energy of pumped regenerative amplifier.

  7. Double pulse laser wakefield accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Changbum [Department of Physics, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: chbkim@postech.ac.kr; Kim, Jin-Cheol B. [Department of Physics, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kukhee [National Fusion Reserch Center, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Ko, In Soo [Department of Physics, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Suk, Hyyong [Center for Advanced Accelerators, Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Changwon 641-120 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-10-22

    Two-dimensional simulation studies are performed for modified laser wakefield acceleration. After one laser pulse, another identical laser pulse is sent to the plasma to amplify the wake wave resonantly. The simulation results show that the number of injected electrons is bigger than that of the single pulse case and the beam energy is higher as well. In addition, increase of the transverse amplitude is noticed in the wake wave after the second laser pulse. This shows that the transverse motion of the wake wave enhances the wave breaking for strong injection and acceleration of electron beams.

  8. Near- infrared, mode-locked waveguide lasers with multi-GHz repetition rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, A.; Lagatsky, A. A.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhou, K. J.; Wang, Q.; Hogg, R. A.; Pradeesh, K.; Rafailov, E. U.; Resan, B.; Oehler, A. E. H.; Weingarten, K. J.; Sibbett, W.; Brown, C. T. A.; Shepherd, D. P.

    2014-02-01

    In this work, we discuss mode-locking results obtained with low-loss, ion-exchanged waveguide lasers. With Yb3+-doped phosphate glass waveguide lasers, a repetition rate of up to 15.2 GHz was achieved at a wavelength of 1047 nm with an average power of 27 mW and pulse duration of 811 fs. The gap between the waveguide and the SESAM introduced negative group velocity dispersion via the Gires Tournois Interferometer (GTI) effect which allowed the soliton mode-locking of the device. A novel quantum dot SESAM was used to mode-lock Er3+, Yb3+-doped phosphate glass waveguide lasers around 1500 nm. Picosecond pulses were achieved at a maximum repetition rate of 6.8 GHz and an average output power of 30 mW. The repetition rate was tuned by more than 1 MHz by varying the pump power.

  9. Multi-gigahertz repetition rate ultrafast waveguide lasers mode-locked with graphene saturable absorbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obraztsov, P. A.; Okhrimchuk, A. G.; Rybin, M. G.; Obraztsova, E. D.; Garnov, S. V.

    2016-08-01

    We report the development of an approach to build compact waveguide lasers that operate in the stable fundamental mode-locking regime with multigigahertz repetition rates. The approach is based on the use of depressed cladding multi- or single-mode waveguides fabricated directly in the active laser crystal using the femtosecond laser inscription method and a graphene saturable absorber. Using this approach we achieve the stable self-starting mode-locking operation of a diode-pumped waveguide Nd:YAG laser that delivers picosecond pulses at a repetition rate of up to 11.5 GHz with an average power of 12 mW at a central wavelength of 1064 nm. The saturable absorbers are formed through the chemical vapor deposition of single-layer graphene on the output coupler mirror or directly on the end facet of the laser crystal. The stable self-starting mode-locking operation is achieved by controlling the group delay dispersion in the laser cavity with an intracavity interferometer. The method developed for the creation of compact ultrashort pulse laser generators with gigahertz repetition rates can be extended further and applied for the development of compact high-repetition rate lasers that operate at a wide range of IR wavelengths.

  10. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulator with controllable pulse parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterchev, Angel V.; Murphy, David L.; Lisanby, Sarah H.

    2011-06-01

    The characteristics of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) pulses influence the physiological effect of TMS. However, available TMS devices allow very limited adjustment of the pulse parameters. We describe a novel TMS device that uses a circuit topology incorporating two energy storage capacitors and two insulated-gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) modules to generate near-rectangular electric field pulses with adjustable number, polarity, duration, and amplitude of the pulse phases. This controllable pulse parameter TMS (cTMS) device can induce electric field pulses with phase widths of 10-310 µs and positive/negative phase amplitude ratio of 1-56. Compared to conventional monophasic and biphasic TMS, cTMS reduces energy dissipation up to 82% and 57% and decreases coil heating up to 33% and 41%, respectively. We demonstrate repetitive TMS trains of 3000 pulses at frequencies up to 50 Hz with electric field pulse amplitude and width variability less than the measurement resolution (1.7% and 1%, respectively). Offering flexible pulse parameter adjustment and reduced power consumption and coil heating, cTMS enhances existing TMS paradigms, enables novel research applications and could lead to clinical applications with potentially enhanced potency.

  11. Scheme for independently stabilizing the repetition rate and optical frequency of a laser using a regenerative mode-locking technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Masataka; Yoshida, Masato

    2008-05-15

    We have succeeded in achieving independent control of the repetition rate and optical frequency of a pulse laser by employing a regenerative mode-locking technique. By adopting a voltage-controlled microwave phase shifter or an optical delay line in a regenerative feedback loop we can control the repetition rate of the laser without directly disturbing the optical frequencies. We experimentally show how this independent control can be realized by employing a 40 GHz harmonically and regeneratively mode-locked fiber laser.

  12. 3.7 GHz repetition rate operated narrow-bandwidth picosecond pulsed Yb fiber amplifier with an all-fiber multiplier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, K. H.; Wen, R. H.; Guo, Y.

    2016-04-01

    A high power picosecond pulsed Yb fiber amplifier with a pulse repetition rate of 3.7 GHz is experimentally demonstrated. The seed is a gain switched distributed Bragg reflection (DBR) structured laser diode (LD) with a pulse duration of 130 ps and a repetition rate of 460 MHz. The pulse repetition rate is increased to 3.7 GHz by introducing an all-fiber multiplier, which is composed of four 2  ×  2 structured fiber couplers. The multiplied pulse train is amplified to 81 W through two stage Yb fiber amplifiers.

  13. High voltage high repetition rate pulse using Marx topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakki, A.; Kashapov, N.

    2015-06-01

    The paper describes Marx topology using MOSFET transistors. Marx circuit with 10 stages has been done, to obtain pulses about 5.5KV amplitude, and the width of the pulses was about 30μsec with a high repetition rate (PPS > 100), Vdc = 535VDC is the input voltage for supplying the Marx circuit. Two Ferrite ring core transformers were used to control the MOSFET transistors of the Marx circuit (the first transformer to control the charging MOSFET transistors, the second transformer to control the discharging MOSFET transistors).

  14. Ultraviolet excimer laser ablation: the effect of wavelength and repetition rate on in vivo guinea pig skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morelli, J.; Kibbi, A.G.; Farinelli, W.; Boll, J.; Tan, O.T.

    1987-06-01

    Multiple dermatologic conditions that are currently treated with traditional cold-knife surgery are amenable to laser therapy. The ideal surgical treatment would be precise and total removal of abnormal tissue with maximal sparing of remaining structures. The ultraviolet (UV) excimer laser is capable of such precise tissue removal due to the penetration depth of 193 nm and 248 nm irradiation of 1 micron per pulse. This type of ablative tissue removal requires a high repetition rate for efficient lesional destruction. Excimer laser radiation at 193 nm is capable of high repetition rates, which are necessary while 248 nm radiation causes increasing nonspecific thermal injury as the laser repetition rate is increased.

  15. High Repetition Rate and Frequency Stabilized Ho:YLF Laser for CO2 Differential Absorption Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yingxin; Yu, Jirong; Petros, M.; Petzar, Pau; Trieu, Bo; Lee, Hyung; Singh, U.

    2009-01-01

    High repetition rate operation of an injection seeded Ho:YLF laser has been demonstrated. For 1 kHz operation, the output pulse energy reaches 5.8mJ and the optical-to-optical efficiency is 39% when the pump power is 14.5W.

  16. Ceramic dentures manufactured with ultrashort laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werelius, Kristian; Weigl, Paul

    2004-06-01

    Conventional manufacturing of individual ceramic dental prosthesis implies a handmade metallic framework, which is then veneered with ceramic layers. In order to manufacture all-ceramic dental prosthesis a CAD/CAM system is necessary due to the three dimensional shaping of high strength ceramics. Most CAD/CAM systems presently grind blocks of ceramic after the construction process in order to create the prosthesis. Using high-strength ceramics, such as Hot Isostatic Pressed (HIP)-zirconia, this is limited to copings. Anatomically shaped fixed dentures have a sculptured surface with small details, which can't be created by existing grinding tools. This procedure is also time consuming and subject to significant loss in mechanical strength and thus reduced survival rate once inserted. Ultra-short laser pulses offer a possibility in machining highly complex sculptured surfaces out of high-strength ceramic with negligible damage to the surface and bulk of the ceramic. In order to determine efficiency, quality and damage, several laser ablation parameters such as pulse duration, pulse energy and ablation strategies were studied. The maximum ablation rate was found using 400 fs at high pulse energies. High pulse energies such as 200μJ were used with low damage in mechanical strength compared to grinding. Due to the limitation of available laser systems in pulse repetition rates and power, the use of special ablation strategies provide a possibility to manufacture fully ceramic dental prosthesis efficiently.

  17. Ultra-short pulsed ytterbium-doped fiber laser and amplifier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guanglei Ding; Xin Zhao; Yishan Wang; Wei Zhao; Guofu Chen

    2006-01-01

    @@ This paper investigates a high power all fiber ultrashort pulse laser system. This system consists of a modelocking laser oscillator, a multi-stage amplifier, a pulse selector, and a paired grating pulse compressor.With pulse energy of 12 μJ at repetition rate of 30 kHz, the laser at center wavelength of 1.05 μm was obtained. Pulse width of 525 fs was achieved after the grating pair compressor.

  18. Laser system using ultra-short laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantus, Marcos; Lozovoy, Vadim V.; Comstock, Matthew

    2009-10-27

    A laser system using ultrashort laser pulses is provided. In another aspect of the present invention, the system includes a laser, pulse shaper and detection device. A further aspect of the present invention employs a femtosecond laser and binary pulse shaping (BPS). Still another aspect of the present invention uses a laser beam pulse, a pulse shaper and a SHG crystal.

  19. High-power pulsed lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzrichter, J.F.

    1980-04-02

    The ideas that led to the successful construction and operation of large multibeam fusion lasers at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory are reviewed. These lasers are based on the use of Nd:glass laser materials. However, most of the concepts are applicable to any laser being designed for fusion experimentation. This report is a summary of lectures given by the author at the 20th Scottish University Summer School in Physics, on Laser Plasma Interaction. This report includes basic concepts of the laser plasma system, a discussion of lasers that are useful for short-pulse, high-power operation, laser design constraints, optical diagnostics, and system organization.

  20. A high repetition rate passively Q-switched microchip laser for controllable transverse laser modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jun; Bai, Sheng-Chuang; Liu, Sheng-Hui; Ueda, Ken-Ichi; Kaminskii, Alexander A.

    2016-05-01

    A Cr4+:YAG passively Q-switched Nd:YVO4 microchip laser for versatile controllable transverse laser modes has been demonstrated by adjusting the position of the Nd:YVO4 crystal along the tilted pump beam direction. The pump beam diameter-dependent asymmetric saturated inversion population inside the Nd:YVO4 crystal governs the oscillation of various Laguerre-Gaussian, Ince-Gaussian and Hermite-Gaussian modes. Controllable transverse laser modes with repetition rates over 25 kHz and up to 183 kHz, depending on the position of the Nd:YVO4 crystal, have been achieved. The controllable transverse laser beams with a nanosecond pulse width and peak power over hundreds of watts have been obtained for potential applications in optical trapping and quantum computation.

  1. Single Longitudinal Mode, High Repetition Rate, Q-switched Ho:YLF Laser for Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yingxin; Yu, Jirong; Petzar, Paul; Petros, M.; Chen, Songsheng; Trieu, Bo; Lee, Nyung; Singh, U.

    2009-01-01

    Ho:YLF/LuLiF lasers have specific applications for remote sensing such as wind-speed measurement and carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration measurement in the atmosphere because the operating wavelength (around 2 m) is located in the eye-safe range and can be tuned to the characteristic lines of CO2 absorption and there is strong backward scattering signal from aerosol (Mie scattering). Experimentally, a diode pumped Ho:Tm:YLF laser has been successfully used as the transmitter of coherent differential absorption lidar for the measurement of with a repetition rate of 5 Hz and pulse energy of 75 mJ [1]. For highly precise CO2 measurements with coherent detection technique, a laser with high repetition rate is required to averaging out the speckle effect [2]. In addition, laser efficiency is critically important for the air/space borne lidar applications, because of the limited power supply. A diode pumped Ho:Tm:YLF laser is difficult to efficiently operate in high repetition rate due to the large heat loading and up-conversion. However, a Tm:fiber laser pumped Ho:YLF laser with low heat loading can be operated at high repetition rates efficiently [3]. No matter whether wind-speed or carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration measurement is the goal, a Ho:YLF/LuLiF laser as the transmitter should operate in a single longitudinal mode. Injection seeding is a valid technique for a Q-switched laser to obtain single longitudinal mode operation. In this paper, we will report the new results for a single longitudinal mode, high repetition rate, Q-switched Ho:YLF laser. In order to avoid spectral hole burning and make injection seeding easier, a four mirror ring cavity is designed for single longitudinal mode, high repetition rate Q-switched Ho:YLF laser. The ramp-fire technique is chosen for injection seeding.

  2. Optical pulses, lasers, measuring techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Früngel, Frank B A

    1965-01-01

    High Speed Pulse Technology: Volume II: Optical Pulses - Lasers - Measuring Techniques focuses on the theoretical and engineering problems that result from the capacitor discharge technique.This book is organized into three main topics: light flash production from a capacitive energy storage; signal transmission and ranging systems by capacitor discharges and lasers; and impulse measuring technique. This text specifically discusses the air spark under atmospheric conditions, industrial equipment for laser flashing, and claims for light transmitting system. The application of light impulse sign

  3. Correction of refraction index based on adjacent pulse repetition interval lengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Dong; Aketagawa, Masato

    2014-11-01

    Correction of refraction index is important for length measurement. The two-color method has been widely used for correction. The wavelengths of lasers have been used as a ruler of that. Based on the analogy between the wavelength and the adjacent pulse repetition interval length (APRIL), in this paper we investigate the possibility of two-color method based on adjacent pulse repetition interval lengths. Since the wavelength-based two-color method can eliminate the inhomogeneous disturbance of effects caused by the phase refractive index, therefore the APRIL-based two-color method can eliminate the air turbulence of errors induced by the group refractive index. Our analysis will contribute to high-precision length measurement.

  4. Switchable repetition rate bound solitons passively mode-locked fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuqin; Yao, Yong

    2016-11-01

    We present a kind of a switchable repetition rate mode-locked of bound-state solitons in a fiber laser based on Bi2Se3 saturable absorber (SA). In the fiber laser, two forms of the bound-state optical spectrum with central wavelength of 1532 nm are observed. The fiber laser is operate at the abnormal group velocity dispersion and the bound state pulses are equally distributed to the temporal domain. The fundamental cavity repetition-rate is 1.11 MHz with a pulse duration of 2.27 ps. The output average power and the pulse peak energy are 1.53 mW and 607 W respectively, which the pump power is 267 mW. The different repetition-rates are also achieved by changing the pump power or adjusting the angle of polarization controller. In the experiment, the repetition-rate is switched from 1.11 MHz to 41.32 MHz (37th-order, the highest repetition-rate).

  5. High repetition ration solid state switched CO2 TEA laser employed in industrial ultrasonic testing of aircraft parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bergmann, Hubertus; Morkel, Francois; Stehmann, Timo

    2015-02-01

    Laser Ultrasonic Testing (UT) is an important technique for the non-destructive inspection of composite parts in the aerospace industry. In laser UT a high power, short pulse probe laser is scanned across the material surface, generating ultrasound waves which can be detected by a second low power laser system and are used to draw a defect map of the part. We report on the design and testing of a transversely excited atmospheric pressure (TEA) CO2 laser system specifically optimised for laser UT. The laser is excited by a novel solid-state switched pulsing system and utilises either spark or corona preionisation. It provides short output pulses of less than 100 ns at repetition rates of up to 1 kHz, optimised for efficient ultrasonic wave generation. The system has been designed for highly reliable operation under industrial conditions and a long term test with total pulse counts in excess of 5 billion laser pulses is reported.

  6. Pulse power for lasers; Proceedings of the Meeting, Los Angeles, CA, Jan. 13, 14, 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkes, Tommy R.

    Papers are presented on high energy lasers which use advanced thyratron switches; pulsed power for repetitively pulsed high power discharge lasers; Nova pulse power design and operation; the power oscillator circuit modeling and redesign of the particle beam fusion accelerator II switch trigger laser; and a compact, efficient, solid-state flashlamp modulator. Topics discussed include the effects of laser discharge impedance on circuit designs; pulsed power for high power electron-beam pumped lasers; a pulse forming network of low inductance and large energy storage density; an integrated high efficiency switched mode laser power supply; and a parallel thyratron pulser with magnetic sharpening for large NgBr lasers. Consideration is given to the gating of thyristors; high repetition rate pseudospark switches for laser applications; the use of the molecular photoelectron-detachment and photodissociation process to switch electron conduction current; electron beam and optical control of bulk semiconductor switches; and scaling pulse generators for lasers.

  7. High power parallel ultrashort pulse laser processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillner, Arnold; Gretzki, Patrick; Büsing, Lasse

    2016-03-01

    The class of ultra-short-pulse (USP) laser sources are used, whenever high precession and high quality material processing is demanded. These laser sources deliver pulse duration in the range of ps to fs and are characterized with high peak intensities leading to a direct vaporization of the material with a minimum thermal damage. With the availability of industrial laser source with an average power of up to 1000W, the main challenge consist of the effective energy distribution and disposition. Using lasers with high repetition rates in the MHz region can cause thermal issues like overheating, melt production and low ablation quality. In this paper, we will discuss different approaches for multibeam processing for utilization of high pulse energies. The combination of diffractive optics and conventional galvometer scanner can be used for high throughput laser ablation, but are limited in the optical qualities. We will show which applications can benefit from this hybrid optic and which improvements in productivity are expected. In addition, the optical limitations of the system will be compiled, in order to evaluate the suitability of this approach for any given application.

  8. 1  J, 0.5  kHz repetition rate picosecond laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgarten, Cory; Pedicone, Michael; Bravo, Herman; Wang, Hanchen; Yin, Liang; Menoni, Carmen S; Rocca, Jorge J; Reagan, Brendan A

    2016-07-15

    We report the demonstration of a diode-pumped chirped pulse amplification Yb:YAG laser that produces λ=1.03  μm pulses of up to 1.5 J energy compressible to sub-5 ps duration at a repetition rate of 500 Hz (750 W average power). Amplification to high energy takes place in cryogenically cooled Yb:YAG active mirrors designed for kilowatt average power laser operation. This compact laser system will enable new advances in high-average-power ultrashort-pulse lasers and high-repetition-rate tabletop soft x-ray lasers. As a first application, the laser was used to pump a 400 Hz λ=18.9  nm laser.

  9. Powerful 170-attosecond XUV pulses generated with few-cycle laser pulses and broadband multilayer optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultze, M [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermannstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Goulielmakis, E [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermannstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Uiberacker, M [Department fuer Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Am Coulombwall 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Hofstetter, M [Department fuer Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Am Coulombwall 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Kim, J [Laser Science Laboratory, Department of Physics, POSTECH, Pohang, Kyungbuk 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, D [Laser Science Laboratory, Department of Physics, POSTECH, Pohang, Kyungbuk 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Krausz, F [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermannstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Kleineberg, U [Department fuer Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Am Coulombwall 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2007-07-15

    Single 170-as extreme ultraviolet (XUV) pulses delivering more than 10{sup 6} photons/pulse at {approx}100 eV at a repetition rate of 3 kHz are produced by ionizing neon with waveform-controlled sub-5 fs near-infrared (NIR) laser pulses and spectrally filtering the emerging near-cutoff high-harmonic continuum with a broadband, chirped multilayer molybdenum-silicon (Mo/Si) mirror.

  10. Pulse-Width Jitter Measurement for Laser Diode Pulses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Jun-Hua; WANG Yun-Cai

    2006-01-01

    @@ Theoretical analysis and experimental measurement of pulse-width jitter of diode laser pulses are presented. The expression of pulse power spectra with all amplitude jitter, timing jitter and pulse-width jitter is deduced.

  11. Measurements with the fast repetitive multi-pulse Edge Thomson Scattering system on TEXTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uzgel, Evren; Pospieszczyk, Albrecht; Unterberg, Bernhard [IEF-Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Kantor, Mikhail [Ioffe Institute, RAS, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation); Meiden, Hennie van der; Jaspers, Roger [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

    2008-07-01

    A fast repetitive multi-pulse Edge Thomson Scattering system is in operation since March 2006 and provides a sophisticated tool for the study of transport processes in the edge region of the tokamak TEXTOR. The specially designed viewing optics enables the study of the dynamics of fast plasma phenomena with high spatial resolution at the plasma edge. Various measurements under different plasma conditions were performed where the influence of resonant magnetic perturbations generated by the Dynamic Ergodic Divertor on fast electron transport in the edge region was a point of emphasis. The electron density and temperature profiles obtained are compared with other edge diagnostics based on different measuring principles. The system utilizes a ruby laser delivering bursts of 15 pulses each with a pulse energy of about 15 J. The TEXTOR plasma itself is inside the laser cavity where the double-pass system allows high laser energies of each laser pulse through the plasma. The edge system (170 mm) has 98 spatial channels of 1.7 mm each. The lower detection limit of the edge system for T{sub e} is observed to be 30 eV.

  12. Measurements with the fast repetitive multi-pulse Edge Thomson scattering system on TEXTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uzgel, Evren; Pospieszczyk, Albrecht; Unterberg, Bernhard [Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Kantor, Mikhail; Kouprienko, Denis [Ioffe Institute, RAS, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation); Meiden, Hennie van der; Oyevaar, Theo; Jaspers, Roger [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

    2007-07-01

    A fast repetitive multi-pulse Edge Thomson Scattering system is in operation since March 2006 and provides a sophisticated tool for the study of transport processes in the edge region of the tokamak TEXTOR. The specially designed viewing optics enables the study of the dynamics of fast plasma phenomena with high spatial resolution at the plasma edge. Various measurements under different plasma conditions were performed where the influence of resonant magnetic perturbations generated by the Dynamic Ergodic Divertor on fast electron transport in the edge region was a point of emphasis. The electron density and temperature profiles obtained will be compared with other edge diagnostics based on different measuring principles. The system utilizes a ruby laser delivering bursts of 15 pulses each with a pulse energy of about 15 J. The TEXTOR plasma itself is inside the laser cavity where the double-pass system allows high laser energies of each laser pulse through the plasma. The new edge system (170 mm) has 98 spatial channels of 1.7 mm each. The lower detection limit of the edge system for T{sub e} is observed to be 30 eV.

  13. Ultrafast, high repetition rate, ultraviolet, fiber based laser source: application towards Yb+ fast quantum-logic

    CERN Document Server

    Hussain, Mahmood Irtiza; Bentley, Christopher D B; Taylor, Richard L; Carvalho, Andre R R; Hope, Joseph J; Streed, Erik W; Lobino, Mirko; Kielpinski, David

    2016-01-01

    Trapped ions are one of the most promising approaches for the realization of a universal quantum computer. Faster quantum logic gates could dramatically improve the performance of trapped-ion quantum computers, and require the development of suitable high repetition rate pulsed lasers. Here we report on a robust frequency upconverted fiber laser based source, able to deliver 2.5 ps ultraviolet (UV) pulses at a stabilized repetition rate of 300.00000 MHz with an average power of 190 mW. The laser wavelength is resonant with the strong transition in Ytterbium (Yb+) at 369.53 nm and its repetition rate can be scaled up using high harmonic mode locking. We show that our source can produce arbitrary pulse patterns using a programmable pulse pattern generator and fast modulating components. Finally, simulations demonstrate that our laser is capable of performing resonant, temperature-insensitive, two-qubit quantum logic gates on trapped Yb$^+$ ions faster than the trap period and with fidelity above 99%.

  14. High-repetition rate industrial TEA CO2 laser with average output power of 1.5 kW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Chongyi; Liu, Shiming; Zhou, Jinwen; Qi, Jilan; Yang, Xiaola; Wu, Jin; Tan, Rongqing; Wang, Lichun; Mei, Qichu

    1995-03-01

    High power high repetition rate TEA CO2 laser has potential importance in material processing such as shock hardening, glazing, drilling, welding, and cutting for high damage threshold materials, as well as in chemical reaction and isotope separation. This paper describes a transverse-flow closed-cycle UV-preionized TEA CO2 laser with peak pulse power of 20 MW, maximum average power of 1.5 KW at repetition rate of 300 HZ. The laser has compact constructure of gas flow circulation system using tangential fans. With addition of small amounts of H2 and CO to the normal CO2-N2-He gas mixture, one filling sealed operating lifetime is up to millions of pulses. A novel spark gap switch has been developed for very high repetition rate laser discharge in the condition of high pulse power.

  15. Route to 100 TW Ti: Sapphire laser at repetitive mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teng Hao

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrated a 100 TW-class femtosecond Ti: sapphire laser running at repetition rate of 0.1 Hz by adding a stage amplifier in the 20 TW/10 Hz laser facility (XL-II. Pumping the new stage amplifier with the 25 J green Nd:glass laser, we successfully upgraded the laser energy to 3.4 J with duration of 29 fs, corresponding to a peak power of 117 TW.

  16. Generation of low jitter and discrete tunable dual-wavelength optical pulses at arbitrary repetition rates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ming-jiang; WANG Yun-cai

    2006-01-01

    A novel and simple method to generate low timing jitter and discrete tunable dual-wavelength optical pulses at arbitrary repetition rates is demonstrated in this paper.Two multiple quantum wells distributed feedback laser diodes,were used as the external seeding sources to inject the external photons into a gain-switched Fabry-Perot laser diode.The output wavelengths can be tuned discretely to coincide with any two lasing modes in the gain spectra range of the Fabry-Perot Laser diode,and the output side mode suppression ratio was better than 25 dB.Moreover,the timing jitter of optical pulses was reduced from 1.89 ps to 0.83 ps.It was empirically found that the lowest timing jitter operation occurred when the injected light wavelength is 0.2-0.3 nm shorter than the locked mode of the Fabry-Perot laser diode.To our knowledge,this is the first report of using two DFB laser diodes as a seeding source to reduce pulses jitter and select lasing dual-wavelength simultaneously.

  17. Experimental and theoretical study of the laser micro-machining of glass using high-repetition-rate ultrafast laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yashkir, Yuri; Liu, Qiang

    2006-04-01

    We present a systematic study of the ultrafast laser micro-machining of glass using a Ti:Spp laser with moderate pulse energy (<5 μJ) at a high repetition rate (50 kHz). Optimal conditions were identified for high resolution surface laser etching, and via drilling. Several practical applications were developed: glass templates for micro fluid diffraction devices, phase gratings for excimer laser projection techniques, micro fluid vertical channel-connectors, etc. It is demonstrated that the interaction of ultrafast laser pulses with glass combines several different processes (direct ablation, explosive material ejection, and thermal material modification). A dynamic numerical model was developed for this process. It was successfully used for modelling of laser micro-machining with arbitrary 3D translations of the target.

  18. [INVITED] Laser welding of glasses at high repetition rates - Fundamentals and prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Sören; Zimmermann, Felix; Tünnermann, Andreas; Nolte, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    We report on the welding of various glasses with ultrashort laser pulses. Femtosecond laser pulses at repetition rates in the MHz range are focused at the interface between two substrates, resulting in multiphoton absorption and heat accumulation from successive pulses. This leads to local melting and subsequent resolidification which can be used to weld the glasses. The fundamental interaction process was studied using an in-situ micro Raman setup to measure the laser induced temperature distribution and its temporal decay. The induced network changes were analyzed by Raman spectrocopy identifying an increase of three and four membered silicon rings within the laser irradiated area. In order to determine the stability of the laser welded samples a three point bending test was used. Thereby, we identified that the maximal achievable breaking strength is limited by laser induced stress surrounding the modified material. To minimize the amount of stress bursts of laser pulses or an post processing annealing step can be applied. Besides fused silica, we welded borosilicate glasses and glasses with a low thermal expansion coefficient. Even the welding of different glass combinations is possible demonstrating the versatility of ultrashort pulse induced laser welding.

  19. 1.32 μm Nd3+∶YAG Pulse Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhaoying; WU Xing

    2002-01-01

    Using specially coated mirrors, an output energy of 0.97 J at 1.32 μm from a Nd3+∶YAG pulse laser is obtained with pumping energy of 66 J. The repetition rate is 1 pulse/sec and the slope efficiency is 1.7%. The repetition rate can be changed from 1 pulse/sec to 10 pulses/sec.

  20. Optimization of the output power of a pulsed gas laser by using magnetic pulse compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louhibi, D.; Ghobrini, Mourad; Bourai, K.

    1999-12-01

    In pulsed gas lasers, the excitation of the active medium is produced through the discharge of a storage capacitor. Performances of these lasers were essentially linked to the type of switch used and also to its mode of operation. Thyratrons are the most common switches. Nevertheless, their technological limitations do not allow a high repetition rate, necessary for optimization of the output power of this type of laser. These limitations can be surpassed by combining the thyratron to a one stage of a magnetic pulse compression circuit. The mpc driver can improve the laser excitation pulse rise time and increase the repetition rate, increasing the laser output power of pulsed gas laser such as; nitrogen, excimer and copper vapor lasers. We have proposed in this paper a new configuration of magnetic pulse compression, the magnetic switch is place in our case in the charge circuit, and while in the typical utilization of magnetic pulse compression, it is placed in the discharge circuit. In this paper, we are more particularly interested in the design and the modeling of a saturate inductance that represents the magnetic switch in the proposed configuration of a thyratron - mpc circuit combination.

  1. Synchronization and Coherent Combining of Two Pulsed Fiber Ring Lasers Based on Direct Phase Modulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiao-Lin; ZHOU Pu; MA Hao-Tong; CHEN Zi-Lun; LI Xiao; XU Xiao-Jun; LIU Ze-Jin

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate a scalable architecture for coherent combining of pulsed fiber ring lasers based on mutual injection and direct phase modulation. By direct phase modulation in the common arm of two ring lasers, synchronous pulsed lasers can be generated and coherent combining of the two synchronous lasers is obtained. Two pulsed fiber ring lasers are coherently combined with 0.55 μJ pulse energy and 10μs pulse duration at a repetition rate of 27.5 kHz. Experimental results show that the two fiber ring lasers are phase locked with an invariable phase difference of π and have good temporal synchronization and spatial coherence. The combining efficiency of the two pulsed fiber laser reaches 90% and the fringe contrast is larger than 40%. Neither active phase control nor polarization control is used in our experiment and this method can be extended to combine more beams and higher repetition rate scaling up to higher power.

  2. Acousto-optic pulse picking scheme with carrier-frequency-to-pulse-repetition-rate synchronization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Oliver; Saule, Tobias; Plötner, Marco; Lücking, Fabian; Eidam, Tino; Hoffmann, Armin; Klenke, Arno; Hädrich, Steffen; Limpert, Jens; Holzberger, Simon; Schreiber, Thomas; Eberhardt, Ramona; Pupeza, Ioachim; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2015-07-27

    We introduce and experimentally validate a pulse picking technique based on a travelling-wave-type acousto-optic modulator (AOM) having the AOM carrier frequency synchronized to the repetition rate of the original pulse train. As a consequence, the phase noise characteristic of the original pulse train is largely preserved, rendering this technique suitable for applications requiring carrier-envelope phase stabilization. In a proof-of-principle experiment, the 1030-nm spectral part of an 74-MHz, carrier-envelope phase stable Ti:sapphire oscillator is amplified and reduced in pulse repetition frequency by a factor of two, maintaining an unprecedentedly low carrier-envelope phase noise spectral density of below 68 mrad. Furthermore, a comparative analysis reveals that the pulse-picking-induced additional amplitude noise is minimized, when the AOM is operated under synchronicity. The proposed scheme is particularly suitable when the down-picked repetition rate is still in the multi-MHz-range, where Pockels cells cannot be applied due to piezoelectric ringing.

  3. Femtosecond laser pulse train interaction with dielectric materials

    CERN Document Server

    Caulier, O Dematteo; Chimier, B; Skupin, S; Bourgeade, A; Léger, C Javaux; Kling, R; Hönninger, C; Lopez, J; Tikhonchuk, V; Duchateau, G

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the interaction of trains of femtosecond microjoule laser pulses with dielectric materials by means of a multi-scale model. Our theoretical predictions are directly confronted with experimental observations in soda-lime glass. We show that due to the low heat conductivity, a significant fraction of the laser energy can be accumulated in the absorption region. Depending on the pulse repetition rate, the material can be heated to high temperatures even though the single pulse energy is too low to induce a significant material modification. Regions heated above the glass transition temperature in our simulations correspond very well to zones of permanent material modifications observed in the experiments.

  4. Laser ablation of borosilicate glass with high power shaped UV nanosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Witzendorff, Philipp; Bordin, Andrea; Suttmann, Oliver; Patel, Rajesh S.; Bovatsek, James; Overmeyer, Ludger

    2016-03-01

    The application of thin borosilicate glass as interposer material requires methods for separation and drilling of this material. Laser processing with short and ultra-short laser pulses have proven to enable high quality cuts by either direct ablation or internal glass modification and cleavage. A recently developed high power UV nanosecond laser source allows for pulse shaping of individual laser pulses. Thus, the pulse duration, pulse bursts and the repetition rate can be set individually at a maximum output power of up to 60 W. This opens a completely new process window, which could not be entered with conventional Q-switched pulsed laser sources. In this study, the novel pulsed UV laser system was used to study the laser ablation process on 400 μm thin borosilicate glass at different pulse durations ranging from 2 - 10 ns and a pulse burst with two 10 ns laser pulses with a separation of 10 ns. Single line scan experiments were performed to correlate the process parameters and the laser pulse shape with the ablation depth and cutting edge chipping. Increasing the pulse duration within the single pulse experiments from 2 ns to longer pulse durations led to a moderate increase in ablation depth and a significant increase in chipping. The highest material removal was achieved with the 2x10 ns pulse burst. Experimental data also suggest that chipping could be reduced, while maintaining a high ablation depth by selecting an adequate pulse overlap. We also demonstrate that real-time combination of different pulse patterns during drilling a thin borosilicate glass produced holes with low overall chipping at a high throughput rate.

  5. VUV SOURCE FROM PULSED-LASER GENERATED PLASMA

    OpenAIRE

    Laporte, P.; Damany, N.; Damany, H.

    1987-01-01

    We describe a pulsed vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) source consisting of a plasma created by focusing a NdYAG laser beam into rare gases under moderate pressure, and we report on spectral and time properties of that source. Main features are : continuum emission in a large spectral range, with only few lines superimposed, good time characteristics of the pulses, stability, cleanliness, and relatively high repetition rate (20 Hz).

  6. Simple filtered repetitively pulsed vacuum arc plasma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekh, Yu.; Zhirkov, I. S.; Delplancke-Ogletree, M. P.

    2010-02-01

    A very simple design of cathodic filtered vacuum arc plasma source is proposed. The source without filter has only four components and none of them require precise machining. The source operates in a repetitively pulsed regime, and for laboratory experiments it can be used without water cooling. Despite the simple construction, the source provides high ion current at the filter outlet reaching 2.5% of 400 A arc current, revealing stable operation in a wide pressure range from high vacuum to oxygen pressure up to more than 10-2 mbar. There is no need in complicated power supply system for this plasma source, only one power supply can be used to ignite the arc, to provide the current for the arc itself, to generate the magnetic field in the filter, and provide its positive electric biasing without any additional high power resistance.

  7. Effect of Repetition Rate on Femtosecond Laser-Induced Homogenous Microstructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanchari Biswas

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We report on the effect of repetition rate on the formation and surface texture of the laser induced homogenous microstructures. Different microstructures were micromachined on copper (Cu and titanium (Ti using femtosecond pulses at 1 and 10 kHz. We studied the effect of the repetition rate on structure formation by comparing the threshold accumulated pulse ( F Σ p u l s e values and the effect on the surface texture through lacunarity analysis. Machining both metals at low F Σ p u l s e resulted in microstructures with higher lacunarity at 10 kHz compared to 1 kHz. On increasing F Σ p u l s e , the microstructures showed higher lacunarity at 1 kHz. The effect of the repetition rate on the threshold F Σ p u l s e values were, however, considerably different on the two metals. With an increase in repetition rate, we observed a decrease in the threshold F Σ p u l s e on Cu, while on Ti we observed an increase. These differences were successfully allied to the respective material characteristics and the resulting melt dynamics. While machining Ti at 10 kHz, the melt layer induced by one laser pulse persists until the next pulse arrives, acting as a dielectric for the subsequent pulse, thereby increasing F Σ p u l s e . However, on Cu, the melt layer quickly resolidifies and no such dielectric like phase is observed. Our study contributes to the current knowledge on the effect of the repetition rate as an irradiation parameter.

  8. Effect of Repetition Rate on Femtosecond Laser-Induced Homogenous Microstructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Sanchari; Karthikeyan, Adya; Kietzig, Anne-Marie

    2016-12-19

    We report on the effect of repetition rate on the formation and surface texture of the laser induced homogenous microstructures. Different microstructures were micromachined on copper (Cu) and titanium (Ti) using femtosecond pulses at 1 and 10 kHz. We studied the effect of the repetition rate on structure formation by comparing the threshold accumulated pulse ( F Σ p u l s e ) values and the effect on the surface texture through lacunarity analysis. Machining both metals at low F Σ p u l s e resulted in microstructures with higher lacunarity at 10 kHz compared to 1 kHz. On increasing F Σ p u l s e , the microstructures showed higher lacunarity at 1 kHz. The effect of the repetition rate on the threshold F Σ p u l s e values were, however, considerably different on the two metals. With an increase in repetition rate, we observed a decrease in the threshold F Σ p u l s e on Cu, while on Ti we observed an increase. These differences were successfully allied to the respective material characteristics and the resulting melt dynamics. While machining Ti at 10 kHz, the melt layer induced by one laser pulse persists until the next pulse arrives, acting as a dielectric for the subsequent pulse, thereby increasing F Σ p u l s e . However, on Cu, the melt layer quickly resolidifies and no such dielectric like phase is observed. Our study contributes to the current knowledge on the effect of the repetition rate as an irradiation parameter.

  9. Ramsey-comb spectroscopy with intense ultrashort laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Morgenweg, Jonas; Eikema, Kjeld S E

    2014-01-01

    Optical frequency combs based on mode-locked lasers have revolutionised the field of metrology and precision spectroscopy by providing precisely calibrated optical frequencies and coherent pulse trains. Amplification of the pulsed output from these lasers is very desirable, as nonlinear processes can then be employed to cover a much wider range of transitions and wavelengths for ultra-high precision, direct frequency comb spectroscopy. Therefore full repetition rate laser amplifiers and enhancement resonators have been employed to produce up to microjoule-level pulse energies. Here we show that the full frequency comb accuracy and resolution can be obtained by using only two frequency comb pulses amplified to the millijoule pulse energy level, orders of magnitude more energetic than what has previously been possible. The novel properties of this approach, such as cancellation of optical light-shift effects, is demonstrated on weak two-photon transitions in atomic rubidium and caesium, thereby improving the fr...

  10. Dynamics of dissipative solitons in a high repetition rate normal-dispersion erbium-doped fiber laser

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Yiyang; Zhao, Luming; Sun, Qizhen; Wu, Zhichao; Xu, Zhilin; Fu, Songnian; Liu, Deming

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of dissipative solitons (DSs) are explored in a high repetition rate normal-dispersion erbium-doped fiber laser for the first time. Despite of the high fundamental repetition rate of 129 MHz and thus the low pulse energy, a DS train with a dechirped pulse width of 418 fs, period-doubling of single and dual DSs, as well as 258 MHz 2nd-order harmonic mode-locking of DSs can be observed in the fiber laser with increasing pump power and appropriate settings. A transmitted semiconductor saturable absorber and a wavelength division multiplexer/isolator/tap hybrid module are employed to simplify the laser configuration, thus not only increasing the repetition rate, but also enhancing the stability and robustness of the fiber laser due to the commercial availability of all the components.

  11. Effects of pulse-to-pulse residual species on discharges in repetitively pulsed discharges through packed bed reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruszelnicki, Juliusz; Engeling, Kenneth W.; Foster, John E.; Kushner, Mark J.

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) sustained in packed bed reactors (PBRs) are being investigated for conversion of toxic and waste gases, and CO2 removal. These discharges are repetitively pulsed having varying flow rates and internal geometries, which results in species from the prior pulse still being in the discharge zone at the time the following discharge pulse occurs. A non-negligible residual plasma density remains, which effectively acts as preionization. This residual charge changes the discharge properties of subsequent pulses, and may impact important PBR properties such as chemical selectivity. Similarly, the residual neutral reactive species produced during earlier pulses will impact the reaction rates on subsequent pulses. We report on results of a computational investigation of a 2D PBR using the plasma hydrodynamics simulator nonPDPSIM. Results will be discussed for air flowing though an array of dielectric rods at atmospheric pressure. The effects of inter-pulse residual species on PBR discharges will be quantified. Means of controlling the presence of residual species in the reactor through gas flow rate, pulse repetition, pulse width and geometry will be described. Comparisons will be made to experiments. Work supported by US DOE Office of Fusion Energy Science and the National Science Foundation.

  12. Diode-Pumped Nanosecond Pulsed Laser with Pulse-Transmission-Mode Q-Switch

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Fei; HUO Yu-Jing; HE Shu-Fang; FENG Li-Chun

    2001-01-01

    Q-switched pulses at 1.064μm with a peak power of 5.02kW and a pulse width of2.8ns were obtained which were pumped by a 1 W laser diode on the Nd:YVO4 microchip at the 1 kHz repetition rate. These values were achieved by combining the techniques of aconsto-optic Q-switching and electro-optic pulse-transmission-mode Q-switching. The temporal characteristics of the pulses were analysed numerically. The experimental results are shown to be in good agreement with theoretical predictions.

  13. Compact X-ray Source using a High Repetition Rate Laser and Copper Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Graves, W S; Brown, P; Carbajo, S; Dolgashev, V; Hong, K -H; Ihloff, E; Khaykovich, B; Lin, H; Murari, K; Nanni, E A; Resta, G; Tantawi, S; Zapata, L E; Kärtner, F X; Moncton, D E

    2014-01-01

    A design for a compact x-ray light source (CXLS) with flux and brilliance orders of magnitude beyond existing laboratory scale sources is presented. The source is based on inverse Compton scattering of a high brightness electron bunch on a picosecond laser pulse. The accelerator is a novel high-efficiency standing-wave linac and RF photoinjector powered by a single ultrastable RF transmitter at x-band RF frequency. The high efficiency permits operation at repetition rates up to 1 kHz, which is further boosted to 100 kHz by operating with trains of 100 bunches of 100 pC charge, each separated by 5 ns. The 100 kHz repetition rate is orders of magnitude beyond existing high brightness copper linacs. The entire accelerator is approximately 1 meter long and produces hard x-rays tunable over a wide range of photon energies. The colliding laser is a Yb:YAG solid-state amplifier producing 1030 nm, 100 mJ pulses at the same 1 kHz repetition rate as the accelerator. The laser pulse is frequency-doubled and stored for m...

  14. Micromotion feature extraction of radar target using tracking pulses with adaptive pulse repetition frequency adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yijun; Zhang, Qun; Ma, Changzheng; Luo, Ying; Yeo, Tat Soon

    2014-01-01

    In multifunction phased array radar systems, different activities (e.g., tracking, searching, imaging, feature extraction, recognition, etc.) would need to be performed simultaneously. To relieve the conflict of the radar resource distribution, a micromotion feature extraction method using tracking pulses with adaptive pulse repetition frequencies (PRFs) is proposed in this paper. In this method, the idea of a varying PRF is utilized to solve the frequency-domain aliasing problem of the micro-Doppler signal. With appropriate atom set construction, the micromotion feature can be extracted and the image of the target can be obtained based on the Orthogonal Matching Pursuit algorithm. In our algorithm, the micromotion feature of a radar target is extracted from the tracking pulses and the quality of the constructed image is fed back into the radar system to adaptively adjust the PRF of the tracking pulses. Finally, simulation results illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  15. Robust Short-Pulse, High-Peak-Power Laser Transmitter for Optical Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Malcolm W.

    2009-01-01

    We report on a pulsed fiber based master oscillator power amplifier laser at 1550 nm to support moderate data rates with high peak powers in a compact package suitable for interplanetary optical communications. To accommodate pulse position modulation, the polarization maintaining laser transmitter generates pulses from 0.1 to 1 ns with variable duty cycle over a pulse repetition frequency range of 10 to 100 MHz.

  16. Q-switched pulse laser generation from double-cladding Nd:YAG ceramics waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yang; Luan, Qingfang; Liu, Fengqin; Chen, Feng; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier Rodríguez

    2013-08-12

    This work reports on the Q-switched pulsed laser generation from double-cladding Nd:YAG ceramic waveguides. Double-cladding waveguides with different combination of diameters were inscribed into a sample of Nd:YAG ceramic. With an additional semiconductor saturable absorber, stable pulsed laser emission at the wavelength of 1064 nm was achieved with pulses of 21 ns temporal duration and ~14 μJ pulse energy at a repetition rate of 3.65 MHz.

  17. Copper bromide vapour laser with an output pulse duration of up to 320 ns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubarev, F A; Fedorov, K V; Evtushenko, G S [National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Fedorov, V F; Shiyanov, D V [V.E. Zuev Institute of Atmospheric Optics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-31

    We report the development of a copper bromide vapour laser with an output pulse duration of up to 320 ns. To lengthen the pulse, the discharge current was limited using a compound switch comprising a pulsed hydrogen thyratron and a tacitron. This technique permits limiting the excitation of the working levels at the initial stage of the discharge development to lengthen the inversion lifetime. The longest duration of a laser pulse was reached in tubes 25 and 50 mm in diameter for a pulse repetition rate of 2 – 4 kHz. (lasers and laser beams)

  18. Hybrid mode-locking in pulsed ytterbium fiber laser with carbon nanotube saturable absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khudyakov, Dmitry V.; Borodkin, Andrey A.; Lobach, Anatoly S.; Vartapetov, Sergey K.

    2015-10-01

    Ultrafast pulse generation in all-normal dispersion Yb-doped fiber laser on 1.04 μm have been reported. Stable self-starting pulse generation in output of the ring fiber laser have been investigated where nonlinear polarization rotation interacted with contribution from the single walled carbon nanotube saturable absorber. Laser pulses with 0.7 nJ pulse energy and 1.7 ps pulse width at 35.6 MHz repetition rate were achieved. The output pulse could be externally compressed to width of 180 fs by pair of gratings.

  19. Picosecond optical pulse generation at gigahertz rates by direct modulation of a semiconductor laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auyeung, J.

    1981-01-01

    We report the generation of picosecond pulses by the direct modulation of a buried heterostructure GaAlAs diode laser. Pulse width of 28 ps is achieved at a repetition frequency of 2.5 GHz. Pulse width dependence on the experimental parameters is described.

  20. HIGH REPETITION RATE MICROCHIP ER3+,YB3+:YAL3(BO34 DIODE-PUMPED LASER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. N. Gorbachenya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diode-pumped passively Q-switched microchip Er,Yb:YAl3(BO34 laser for range-finding has been demonstrated. By using a Co2+:MgAl2O4 as a saturable absorber TEM00–mode Q-switched average output power of 315 mW was demonstrated at 1522 nm with pulse duration of 5 ns and pulse energy of 5,25 μJ at a repetition rate of 60 kHz.

  1. Laser-diode pumped self-mode-locked praseodymium visible lasers with multi-gigahertz repetition rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuxia; Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Di Lieto, Alberto; Tonelli, Mauro; Wang, Jiyang

    2016-06-15

    We demonstrate efficient laser-diode pumped multi-gigahertz (GHz) self-mode-locked praseodymium (Pr3+) visible lasers with broadband spectra from green to deep red for the first time to our knowledge. With a Pr3+-doped GdLiF4 crystal, stable self-mode-locked visible pulsed lasers at the wavelengths of 522 nm, 607 nm, 639 nm, and 720 nm have been obtained with the repetition rates of 2.8 GHz, 3.1 GHz, 3.1 GHz, and 3.0 GHz, respectively. The maximum output power was 612 mW with the slope efficiency of 46.9% at 639 nm. The mode-locking mechanism was theoretically analyzed. The stable second-harmonic mode-locking with doubled repetition frequency was also realized based on the Fabry-Perot effect formed in the laser cavity. In addition, we find that the polarization directions were turned with lasing wavelengths. This work may provide a new way for generating efficient ultrafast pulses with high- and changeable-repetition rates in the visible range.

  2. High-Power Laser Pulse Recirculation for Inverse Compton Scattering-Produced Gamma-Rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jovanovic, I; Shverdin, M; Gibson, D; Brown, C

    2007-04-17

    Inverse Compton scattering of high-power laser pulses on relativistic electron bunches represents an attractive method for high-brightness, quasi-monoenergetic {gamma}-ray production. The efficiency of {gamma}-ray generation via inverse Compton scattering is severely constrained by the small Thomson scattering cross section. Furthermore, repetition rates of high-energy short-pulse lasers are poorly matched with those available from electron accelerators, resulting in low repetition rates for generated {gamma}-rays. Laser recirculation has been proposed as a method to address those limitations, but has been limited to only small pulse energies and peak powers. Here we propose and experimentally demonstrate an alternative method for laser pulse recirculation that is uniquely capable of recirculating short pulses with energies exceeding 1 J. Inverse Compton scattering of recirculated Joule-level laser pulses has a potential to produce unprecedented peak and average {gamma}-ray brightness in the next generation of sources.

  3. Coherent polarization locking: an approach to mitigating optical damage in a pulsed Ho:YAG laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, L H; Chua, C F; Phua, P B

    2013-04-01

    Intracavity optical damage is mitigated in a pulsed Ho:YAG laser cavity using the coherent polarization locking (CPL) technique. By splitting the available pump power into two individual Ho:YAG laser rods, we passively coherently locked two orthogonal polarization lasers with 9.13 mJ output pulse energies and 14 ns pulsewidths, and operating at 800 Hz repetition rate. A conventional Ho:YAG laser cavity with the same pump and cavity configuration results in severe optical damage when operating at <2 kHz repetition rate, thus limiting the output pulse energies to <5 mJ. We also demonstrated, to the best of our knowledge, the first pulsed operation within the entire CPL Ho:YAG laser cavity by Q-switching in one of the polarization arms, producing nanosecond pulses with no sign of pulse instability.

  4. Pulsed Raman fiber laser and multispectral imaging in three dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Joachim F.; Busck, Jens; Heiselberg, Henning

    2006-01-01

    Raman scattering in single-mode optical fibers is exploited to generate multispectral light from a green nanolaser with high pulse repetition rate. Each pulse triggers a picosecond camera and measures the distance by time-of-flight in each of the 0.5 Mpixels. Three-dimensional images are then con......Raman scattering in single-mode optical fibers is exploited to generate multispectral light from a green nanolaser with high pulse repetition rate. Each pulse triggers a picosecond camera and measures the distance by time-of-flight in each of the 0.5 Mpixels. Three-dimensional images...... are then constructed with submillimeter accuracy for all visible colors. The generation of a series of Stokes peaks by Raman scattering in a Si fiber is discussed in detail and the laser radar technique is demonstrated. The data recording takes only a few seconds, and the high accuracy 3D color imaging works at ranges...

  5. High-repetition rate relativistic electron beam generation from intense laser solid interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batson, Thomas; Nees, John; Hou, Bixue; Thomas, A. G. R.; Krushelnick, Karl

    2015-05-01

    Relativistic electron beams have applications spanning materials science, medicine, and home- land security. Recent advances in short pulse laser technology have enabled the production of very high focused intensities at kHz rep rates. Consequently this has led to the generation of high ux sources of relativistic electrons- which is a necessary characteristic of these laser plasma sources for any potential application. In our experiments, through the generation of a plasma with the lambda cubed laser system at the University of Michigan (a 5 × 1018W=cm2, 500 Hz, Ti:Sapphire laser), we have measured electrons ejected from the surface of fused silica nd Cu targets having energies in excess of an MeV. The spectrum of these electrons was measured with respect to incident laser angle, prepulse timing, and focusing conditions. While taken at a high repetition rate, the pulse energy of the lambda cubed system was consistently on the order of 10 mJ. In order to predict scaling of the electron energy with laser pulse energy, simulations are underway which compare the spectrum generated with the lambda cubed system to the predicted spectrum generated on the petawatt scale HERCULES laser system at the University of Michigan.

  6. Broadly wavelength- and pulse width-tunable high-repetition rate light pulses from soliton self-frequency shifting photonic crystal fiber integrated with a frequency doubling crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanin, Aleksandr A; Fedotov, Andrei B; Zheltikov, Aleksei M

    2012-09-01

    Soliton self-frequency shift (SSFS) in a photonic crystal fiber (PCF) pumped by a long-cavity mode-locked Cr:forsterite laser is integrated with second harmonic generation (SHG) in a nonlinear crystal to generate ultrashort light pulses tunable within the range of wavelengths from 680 to 1800 nm at a repetition rate of 20 MHz. The pulse width of the second harmonic output is tuned from 70 to 600 fs by varying the thickness of the nonlinear crystal, beam-focusing geometry, and the wavelength of the soliton PCF output. Wavelength-tunable pulses generated through a combination of SSFS and SHG are ideally suited for coherent Raman microspectroscopy at high repetition rates, as verified by experiments on synthetic diamond and polystyrene films.

  7. Fast- and ultra-fast laser pulse induced reactions between carbon dioxide and methane

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kotze, FJ

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available (Mira oscillator) emits pulses of approximately 120 fs at a repetition rate of 76 MHz. This laser is optically pumped by a Verdi pump laser, a 5 W Nd:YVO4 continuous laser. 2.3. Experimental set-up Figure 1 illustrates the experimental setup. A gas...

  8. Ultrafast high-repetition imaging of fuel sprays using picosecond fiber laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purwar, Harsh; Wang, Hongjie; Tang, Mincheng; Idlahcen, Saïd; Rozé, Claude; Blaisot, Jean-Bernard; Godin, Thomas; Hideur, Ammar

    2015-12-28

    Modern diesel injectors operate at very high injection pressures of about 2000 bar resulting in injection velocities as high as 700 m/s near the nozzle outlet. In order to better predict the behavior of the atomization process at such high pressures, high-resolution spray images at high repetition rates must be recorded. However, due to extremely high velocity in the near-nozzle region, high-speed cameras fail to avoid blurring of the structures in the spray images due to their exposure time. Ultrafast imaging featuring ultra-short laser pulses to freeze the motion of the spray appears as an well suited solution to overcome this limitation. However, most commercial high-energy ultrafast sources are limited to a few kHz repetition rates. In the present work, we report the development of a custom-designed picosecond fiber laser generating ∼ 20 ps pulses with an average power of 2.5 W at a repetition rate of 8.2 MHz, suitable for high-speed imaging of high-pressure fuel jets. This fiber source has been proof tested by obtaining backlight images of diesel sprays issued from a single-orifice injector at an injection pressure of 300 bar. We observed a consequent improvement in terms of image resolution compared to standard white-light illumination. In addition, the compactness and stability against perturbations of our fiber laser system makes it particularly suitable for harsh experimental conditions.

  9. Optimization of graffiti removal on natural stone by means of high repetition rate UV laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorucci, M. P.; López, A. J.; Ramil, A.; Pozo, S.; Rivas, T.

    2013-08-01

    The use of laser for graffiti removal is a promising alternative to conventional cleaning methods, though irradiation parameters must be carefully selected in order to achieve the effective cleaning without damaging the substrate, especially when referring to natural stone. From a practical point of view, once a safe working window is selected, it is necessary to determine the irradiation conditions to remove large paint areas, with minimal time consumption. The aim of this paper is to present a systematic procedure to select the optimum parameters for graffiti removal by means of the 3rd harmonic of a high repetition rate nanosecond Nd:YVO4 laser. Ablation thresholds of four spray paint colors were determined and the effect of pulse repetition frequency, beam diameter and line scan separation was analyzed, obtaining a set of values which optimize the ablation process.

  10. Optimization of graffiti removal on natural stone by means of high repetition rate UV laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiorucci, M.P., E-mail: m.p.fiorucci@udc.es [Centro de Investigacións Tecnolóxicas, Universidade da Coruña, 15403 Ferrol (Spain); Dpto. Enxeñaría dos Recursos Naturais e Medio Ambiente, E.T.S.E. Minas, Universidade de Vigo, 36200 Vigo (Spain); López, A.J., E-mail: ana.xesus.lopez@udc.es [Centro de Investigacións Tecnolóxicas, Universidade da Coruña, 15403 Ferrol (Spain); Ramil, A., E-mail: alberto.ramil@udc.es [Centro de Investigacións Tecnolóxicas, Universidade da Coruña, 15403 Ferrol (Spain); Pozo, S., E-mail: ipozo@uvigo.es [Dpto. Enxeñaría dos Recursos Naturais e Medio Ambiente, E.T.S.E. Minas, Universidade de Vigo, 36200 Vigo (Spain); Rivas, T., E-mail: trivas@uvigo.es [Dpto. Enxeñaría dos Recursos Naturais e Medio Ambiente, E.T.S.E. Minas, Universidade de Vigo, 36200 Vigo (Spain)

    2013-08-01

    The use of laser for graffiti removal is a promising alternative to conventional cleaning methods, though irradiation parameters must be carefully selected in order to achieve the effective cleaning without damaging the substrate, especially when referring to natural stone. From a practical point of view, once a safe working window is selected, it is necessary to determine the irradiation conditions to remove large paint areas, with minimal time consumption. The aim of this paper is to present a systematic procedure to select the optimum parameters for graffiti removal by means of the 3rd harmonic of a high repetition rate nanosecond Nd:YVO{sub 4} laser. Ablation thresholds of four spray paint colors were determined and the effect of pulse repetition frequency, beam diameter and line scan separation was analyzed, obtaining a set of values which optimize the ablation process.

  11. Monolithic all-fiber repetition-rate tunable gain-switched single-frequency Yb-doped fiber laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yubin; Zhang, Qian; Qi, Shuxian; Feng, Xian; Wang, Pu

    2016-12-12

    We report a monolithic gain-switched single-frequency Yb-doped fiber laser with widely tunable repetition rate. The single-frequency laser operation is realized by using an Yb-doped distributed Bragg reflection (DBR) fiber cavity, which is pumped by a commercial-available laser diode (LD) at 974 nm. The LD is electronically modulated by the driving current and the diode output contains both continuous wave (CW) and pulsed components. The CW component is set just below the threshold of the single-frequency fiber laser for reducing the requirement of the pump pulse energy. Above the threshold, the gain-switched oscillation is trigged by the pulsed component of the diode. Single-frequency pulsed laser output is achieved at 1.063 μm with a pulse duration of ~150 ns and a linewidth of 14 MHz. The repetition rate of the laser output can be tuned between 10 kHz and 400 kHz by tuning the electronic trigger signal. This kind of lasers shows potential for the applications in the area of coherent LIDAR etc.

  12. One laser pulse generates two photoacoustic signals

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Fei; Feng, Xiaohua; Bai, Linyi; Zhang, Ruochong; Liu, Siyu; Ding, Ran; Kishor, Rahul; Zhao, Yanli; Zheng, Yuanjin

    2016-01-01

    Photoacoustic sensing and imaging techniques have been studied widely to explore optical absorption contrast based on nanosecond laser illumination. In this paper, we report a long laser pulse induced dual photoacoustic (LDPA) nonlinear effect, which originates from unsatisfied stress and thermal confinements. Being different from conventional short laser pulse illumination, the proposed method utilizes a long square-profile laser pulse to induce dual photoacoustic signals. Without satisfying...

  13. Ultrashort-pulse laser calligraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Weijia; Kazansky, Peter G. [Optoelectronics Research Centre, University of Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Shimotsuma, Yasuhiko; Sakakura, Masaaki; Miura, Kiyotaka; Hirao, Kazuyuki [Department of Material Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan)

    2008-10-27

    Control of structural modifications inside silica glass by changing the front tilt of an ultrashort pulse is demonstrated, achieving a calligraphic style of laser writing. The phenomena of anisotropic bubble formation at the boundary of an irradiated region and modification transition from microscopic bubbles formation to self-assembled form birefringence are observed, and the physical mechanisms are discussed. The results provide the comprehensive evidence that the light beam with centrosymmetric intensity distribution can produce noncentrosymmetric material modifications.

  14. Ultrashort-pulse laser calligraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weijia; Kazansky, Peter G.; Shimotsuma, Yasuhiko; Sakakura, Masaaki; Miura, Kiyotaka; Hirao, Kazuyuki

    2008-10-01

    Control of structural modifications inside silica glass by changing the front tilt of an ultrashort pulse is demonstrated, achieving a calligraphic style of laser writing. The phenomena of anisotropic bubble formation at the boundary of an irradiated region and modification transition from microscopic bubbles formation to self-assembled form birefringence are observed, and the physical mechanisms are discussed. The results provide the comprehensive evidence that the light beam with centrosymmetric intensity distribution can produce noncentrosymmetric material modifications.

  15. Non-chain pulsed DF laser with an average power of the order of 100 W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Qikun; Xie, Jijiang; Wang, Chunrui; Shao, Chunlei; Shao, Mingzhen; Chen, Fei; Guo, Jin

    2016-07-01

    The design and performance of a closed-cycle repetitively pulsed DF laser are described. The Fitch circuit and thyratron switch are introduced to realize self-sustained volume discharge in SF6-D2 mixtures. The influences of gas parameters and charging voltage on output characteristics of non-chain pulsed DF laser are experimentally investigated. In order to improve the laser power stability over a long period of working time, zeolites with different apertures are used to scrub out the de-excitation particles produced in electric discharge. An average output power of the order of 100 W was obtained at an operating repetition rate of 50 Hz, with amplitude difference in laser pulses <8 %. And under the action of micropore alkaline zeolites, the average power fell by 20 % after the laser continuing working 100 s at repetition frequency of 50 Hz.

  16. Vibration measurement based on the optical cross-correlation technique with femtosecond pulsed laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jibo; Wu, Tengfei; Zhao, Chunbo; Li, Shuyi

    2016-10-01

    Two vibration measurement methods with femtosecond pulsed laser based on the optical cross-correlation technique are presented independently in this paper. The balanced optical cross-correlation technique can reflect the time jitter between the reference pluses and measurement pluses by detecting second harmonic signals using type II phase-matched nonlinear crystal and balanced amplified photo-detectors. In the first method, with the purpose of attaining the vibration displacement, the time difference of the reference pulses relative to the measurement pluses can be measured using single femtosecond pulsed laser. In the second method, there are a couple of femtosecond pulsed lasers with high pulse repetition frequency. Vibration displacement associated with cavity length can be calculated by means of precisely measuring the pulse repetition frequency. The results show that the range of measurement attains ±150μm for a 500fs pulse. These methods will be suited for vibration displacement measurement, including laboratory use, field testing and industrial application.

  17. Progress in time transfer by laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Yang, Fu-Min

    2004-03-01

    Time transfer by laser pulses is based on the propagation of light pulses between satellite and ground clocks or between remote clocks on earth. It will realize the synchronization of these clocks with high accuracy and stability. Several experiments of the time transfer by laser pulses had been successfully carried out in some countries. These experiments validate the feasibility of the synchronization of clocks by laser pulses. The paper describes the results of these experiments. The time comparison by laser pulses between atomic clocks on aircraft and ground ones in the United States, and the LASSO and T2L2 projects in France are introduced in detail.

  18. Ultrashort Laser Pulses in Biology and Medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, Markus; Zinth, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Sources of ultrashort laser pulses are nowadays commercially available and have entered many areas of research and development. This book gives an overview of biological and medical applications of these laser pulses. The briefness of these laser pulses permits the tracing of the fastest processes in photo-active bio-systems, which is one focus of the book. The other focus is applications that rely on the high peak intensity of ultrashort laser pulses. Examples covered span non-linear imaging techniques, optical tomography, and laser surgery.

  19. Influence of laser pulse frequency on the microstructure of aluminum nitride thin films synthesized by pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonova, K.; Duta, L.; Szekeres, A.; Stan, G. E.; Mihailescu, I. N.; Anastasescu, M.; Stroescu, H.; Gartner, M.

    2017-02-01

    Aluminum Nitride (AlN) thin films were synthesized on Si (100) wafers at 450 °C by pulsed laser deposition. A polycrystalline AlN target was multipulsed irradiated in a nitrogen ambient, at different laser pulse repetition rate. Grazing Incidence X-Ray Diffraction and Atomic Force Microscopy analyses evidenced nanocrystallites with a hexagonal lattice in the amorphous AlN matrix. The thickness and optical constants of the layers were determined by infrared spectroscopic ellipsometry. The optical properties were studied by Fourier Transform Infrared reflectance spectroscopy in polarised oblique incidence radiation. Berreman effect was observed around the longitudinal phonon modes of the crystalline AlN component. Angular dependence of the A1LO mode frequency was analysed and connected to the orientation of the particles' optical axis to the substrate surface normal. The role of the laser pulse frequency on the layers' properties is discussed on this basis.

  20. Synchronization of Sub-Picosecond Electron and Laser Pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenzweig, J.B.; Le Sage G.P.

    2000-08-15

    Sub-picosecond laser-electron synchronization is required to take full advantage of the experimental possibilities arising from the marriage of modern high intensity lasers and high brightness electron beams in the same laboratory. Two particular scenarios stand out in this regard, injection of ultra-short electron pulses in short wavelength laser-driven plasma accelerators, and Compton scattering of laser photons from short electron pulses. Both of these applications demand synchronization, which is subpicosecond, with tens of femtosecond synchronization implied for next-generation experiments. Typically, an RF electron accelerator is synchronized to a short pulse laser system by detecting the repetition signal of a laser oscillator, adjusted to an exact subharmonic of the linac RF frequency, and multiplying or phase locking this signal to produce the master RF clock. Pulse-to-pulse jitter characteristic of self-mode-locked laser oscillators represents a direct contribution to the ultimate timing jitter between a high intensity laser focus and electron beam at the interaction point, or a photocathode drive laser in an RF photoinjector. This timing jitter problem has been addressed most seriously in the context of the RF photoinjector, where the electron beam properties are sensitive functions of relative timing jitter. The timing jitter achieved in synchronized photocathode drive laser systems is near, or slightly below one picosecond. The ultimate time of arrival jitter of the beam at the photoinjector exit is typically a bit smaller than the photocathode drive-laser jitter due to velocity compression effects in the first RF cell of the gun. This tendency of the timing of the electron beam arrival at a given spatial point to lock to the RF lock is strongly reinforced by use of magnetic compression.

  1. Pulsed laser deposition: metal versus oxide ablation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doeswijk, L.M.; Rijnders, G.; Blank, D.H.A.

    2004-01-01

    We present experimental results of pulsed laser interaction with metal (Ni, Fe, Nb) and oxide (TiO2, SrTiO3, BaTiO3) targets. The influence of the laser fluence and the number of laser pulses on the resulting target morphology are discussed. Although different responses for metal and oxide targets t

  2. High repetition rate Q-switched radially polarized laser with a graphene-based output coupler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Lifei; Jin, Chenjie; Qi, Mei; Chen, Xiaoming; Ren, Zhaoyu, E-mail: zhengxl@nwu.edu.cn, E-mail: rzy@nwu.edu.cn [National Key Laboratory of Photoelectric Technology and Functional Materials (Culture Base), and Institute of Photonics and Photon-Technology, Northwest University, Xi' an 710069 (China); Zheng, Xinliang, E-mail: zhengxl@nwu.edu.cn, E-mail: rzy@nwu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Northwest University, Xi' an 710069 (China); Bai, Jintao [National Key Laboratory of Photoelectric Technology and Functional Materials (Culture Base), and Institute of Photonics and Photon-Technology, Northwest University, Xi' an 710069 (China); Department of Physics, Northwest University, Xi' an 710069 (China); Sun, Zhipei [Department of Micro- and Nanosciences, Aalto University, P.O. Box 13500, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland)

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate a Q-switched radially polarized all-solid-state laser by transferring a graphene film directly onto an output coupler. The laser generates Q-switched radially polarized beam (QRPB) with a pulse width of 192 ns and 2.7 W average output power. The corresponding single pulse energy is up to 16.2 μJ with a high repetition rate of 167 kHz. The M{sup 2} factor and the polarization purity are ∼2.1 and 96%, respectively. Our QRPB source is a simple and low-cost source for a variety of applications, such as industrial material processing, optical trapping, and microscopy.

  3. Stabilization of a premixed methane-air flame with a high repetition nanosecond laser-induced plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yang; Li, Xiaohui; An, Xiaokang; Yu, Xin; Fan, Rongwei; Chen, Deying; Sun, Rui

    2017-07-01

    Laser-induced plasma ignition has been applied in various combustion systems, however, work on flame stabilization with repetitive laser-induced plasma (LIP) is rather limited. In this paper, stabilization of a premixed methane-air flame with a high repetition nanosecond LIP is reported. The plasma energy coupling and the temporal evolution of the flame kernels generated by the LIPs are investigated with different laser repetition rates, i.e., 1 Hz, 100 Hz and 250 Hz, respectively. The plasma energy coupling is not affected in the air flow and in the premixed methane-air flow with the applied laser repetition rates. Continuous combustion flame stabilization has been achieved with LIPs of 100 Hz and 250 Hz, in terms of catch-up and merging of the consecutive flame kernels. The flame kernel formed by the last LIP does not affect the evolution of the newly formed flame kernel by the next LIP. The catch-up distance, defined as the distance from the LIP initiation site to the flame kernel catch-up position, is estimated for different laser repetition rates based on the temporal evolution of the flame kernels. A higher laser repetition rate will lead to a shorter catch-up distance which is beneficial for flame stabilization. The up limit for the laser repetition rate to realize effective flame stabilization is determined from the critical inter-pulse delay defined from the onset of the LIP to the return of the initially contraflow propagating lower front to the LIP initiation site. The up limit is 377 Hz under the flow conditions of this work (equivalence ratio of 1, flow speed of 2 m/s, and Reynolds number of 1316).

  4. Surface damage characteristics of CFC and tungsten with repetitive ELM-like pulsed plasma irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Y.; Nishijima, D.; Nakatsuka, M.; Ando, K.; Higashi, T.; Ueno, Y.; Ishihara, M.; Shoda, K.; Nagata, M.; Kawai, T.; Ueda, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Doerner, R. P.

    2011-08-01

    Surface damage of carbon fiber composite (CFC) and tungsten (W) due to repetitive ELM-like pulsed plasma irradiation has been investigated by using a magnetized coaxial plasma gun. CX2002U CFC and stress-relieved W samples were exposed to repetitive pulsed deuterium plasmas with duration of ˜0.5 ms, incident ion energy of ˜30 eV, and surface absorbed energy density of ˜0.3-0.7 MJ/m2. Bright spots on a CFC surface during pulsed plasma exposures were clearly observed with a high-speed camera, indicating a local surface heating. No melting of a W surface was observed under a single plasma pulse exposure at energy density of ˜0.7 MJ/m2, although cracks were formed. Cracking of the W surface grew with repetitive pulsed plasma exposures. Subsequently, the surface melted due to localized heat absorption.

  5. Subthreshold pair production in short laser pulses

    OpenAIRE

    Nousch, T.; Seipt, D.; Kampfer, B.; Titov, A. I.

    2012-01-01

    The $e^+e^-$ pair production by a probe photon traversing a linearly polarized laser pulse is treated as generalized nonlinear Breit-Wheeler process. For short laser pulses with very few oscillations of the electromagnetic field we find below the perturbative weak-field threshold $\\sqrt{s} = 2m$ a similar enhancement of the pair production rate as for circular polarization. The strong subthreshold enhancement is traced back to the finite bandwidth of the laser pulse. A folding model is develo...

  6. Statistical analysis of laser driven protons using a high-repetition-rate tape drive target system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Noaman-ul-Haq

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available One of the challenges for laser-driven proton beams for many potential applications is their stability and reproducibility. We investigate the stability of the laser driven proton beams through statistical analysis of the data obtained by employing a high repetition rate tape driven target system. The characterization of the target system shows the positioning of the target within ∼15  μm in the focal plane of an off-axis parabola, with less than a micron variation in surface flatness. By employing this stable target system, we study the stability of the proton beams driven by ultrashort and intense laser pulses. Protons with maximum energies of ∼6±0.3  MeV were accelerated for a large number of laser shots taken at a rate of 0.2 Hz with a stability of less than 5% variations in cutoff energy. The development of high repetition rate target system may provide a platform to understand the dynamics of laser driven proton beams at the rate required for future applications.

  7. Ultrafast, high repetition rate, ultraviolet, fiber-laser-based source: application towards Yb+ fast quantum-logic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Mahmood Irtiza; Petrasiunas, Matthew Joseph; Bentley, Christopher D B; Taylor, Richard L; Carvalho, André R R; Hope, Joseph J; Streed, Erik W; Lobino, Mirko; Kielpinski, David

    2016-07-25

    Trapped ions are one of the most promising approaches for the realization of a universal quantum computer. Faster quantum logic gates could dramatically improve the performance of trapped-ion quantum computers, and require the development of suitable high repetition rate pulsed lasers. Here we report on a robust frequency upconverted fiber laser based source, able to deliver 2.5 ps ultraviolet (UV) pulses at a stabilized repetition rate of 300.00000 MHz with an average power of 190 mW. The laser wavelength is resonant with the strong transition in Ytterbium (Yb+) at 369.53 nm and its repetition rate can be scaled up using high harmonic mode locking. We show that our source can produce arbitrary pulse patterns using a programmable pulse pattern generator and fast modulating components. Finally, simulations demonstrate that our laser is capable of performing resonant, temperature-insensitive, two-qubit quantum logic gates on trapped Yb+ ions faster than the trap period and with fidelity above 99%.

  8. 500 MW peak power degenerated optical parametric amplifier delivering 52 fs pulses at 97 kHz repetition rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothhardt, J; Hädrich, S; Röser, F; Limpert, J; Tünnermann, A

    2008-06-09

    We present a high peak power degenerated parametric amplifier operating at 1030 nm and 97 kHz repetition rate. Pulses of a state-of-the art fiber chirped-pulse amplification (FCPA) system with 840 fs pulse duration and 410 microJ pulse energy are used as pump and seed source for a two stage optical parametric amplifier. Additional spectral broadening of the seed signal in a photonic crystal fiber creates enough bandwidth for ultrashort pulse generation. Subsequent amplification of the broadband seed signal in two 1 mm BBO crystals results in 41 microJ output pulse energy. Compression in a SF 11 prism compressor yields 37 microJ pulses as short as 52 fs. Thus, pulse shortening of more than one order of magnitude is achieved. Further scaling in terms of average power and pulse energy seems possible and will be discussed, since both concepts involved, the fiber laser and the parametric amplifier have the reputation to be immune against thermo-optical effects.

  9. Laser sources for polarized electron beams in cw and pulsed accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Hatziefremidis, A; Fraser, D; Avramopoulos, H

    1999-01-01

    We report the characterization of a high power, high repetition rate, mode-locked laser system to be used in continuous wave and pulsed electron accelerators for the generation of polarized electron beams. The system comprises of an external cavity diode laser and a harmonically mode-locked Ti:Sapphire oscillator and it can provide up to 3.4 W average power, with a corresponding pulse energy exceeding 1 nJ at 2856 MHz repetition rate. The system is tunable between 770-785 and 815-835 nm with two sets of diodes for the external cavity diode laser. (author)

  10. Ion Acceleration by Short Chirped Laser Pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Xing Li

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Direct laser acceleration of ions by short frequency chirped laser pulses is investigated theoretically. We demonstrate that intense beams of ions with a kinetic energy broadening of about 1% can be generated. The chirping of the laser pulse allows the particles to gain kinetic energies of hundreds of MeVs, which is required for hadron cancer therapy, from pulses of energies in the order of 100 J. It is shown that few-cycle chirped pulses can accelerate ions more efficiently than long ones, i.e., higher ion kinetic energies are reached with the same amount of total electromagnetic pulse energy.

  11. Ion Acceleration by Short Chirped Laser Pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jian-Xing; Keitel, Christoph H; Harman, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    Direct laser acceleration of ions by short frequency-chirped laser pulses is investigated theoretically. We demonstrate that intense beams of ions with a kinetic energy broadening of about 1 % can be generated. The chirping of the laser pulse allows the particles to gain kinetic energies of hundreds of MeVs, which is required for hadron cancer therapy, from pulses of energies of the order of 100 J. It is shown that few-cycle chirped pulses can accelerate ions more efficiently than long ones, i.e. higher ion kinetic energies are reached with the same amount of total electromagnetic pulse energy.

  12. Generation of 7-fs laser pulse directly from a compact Ti:sapphire laser with chirped mirrors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A compact femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser resonator consisting of three chirped mirrors and one output coupler was designed. By accurately balancing the intra- cavity dispersions between Ti:sapphire crystal, air and chirped mirrors, we directly generated the laser pulse shorter than 7 fs at the average power of 340 mW with 3.1 W pump. The repetition rate of the laser oscillator is 173 MHz at the centre wavelength of 791 nm, and the ultrabroaden spectrum covers from 600 nm to 1000 nm. To the best of our knowledge, this is the simplest laser resonator capable of generating sub-10 fs laser pulse.

  13. Generation of 7-fs laser pulse directly from a compact Ti:sapphire laser with chirped mirrors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO YanYing; WANG Peng; ZHANG Wei; TIAN JinRong; WEI ZhiYi

    2007-01-01

    A compact femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser resonator consisting of three chirped mirrors and one output coupler was designed. By accurately balancing the intracavity dispersions between Ti:sapphire crystal, air and chirped mirrors, we directly generated the laser pulse shorter than 7 fs at the average power of 340 mW with 3.1 W pump. The repetition rate of the laser oscillator is 173 MHz at the centre wavelength of 791 nm, and the ultrabroaden spectrum covers from 600 nm to 1000 nm. To the best of our knowledge, this is the simplest laser resonator capable of generating sub-10 fs laser pulse.

  14. Interaction of pulsed CO2 laser radiation with optical materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Ruediger; Hugenschmidt, Manfred; Geiss, L.; Stechele, E.

    1995-03-01

    Pulsed high power CO2-laser irradiation can cause damage to optical materials. Some results obtained at ISL with a repetitively pulsed CO2-laser with pulse energies up to 24 J are presented in this paper. In production facilities with CO2-lasers, optics transmitting in the visible spectral range like glass or PMMA are used as protection windows against scattered light. These materials have small skin depths for electromagnetic waves at 10,6 micrometers , typically in the order of some micrometers , so the interaction takes place in thin surface layers. Under high power laser radiation the transparency of the optics is lowered. On the other hand infrared transmitting optics like KCl or ZnSe show a low intrinsic absorption for CO2-laser radiation. Theoretical estimations matching with the experimental observations showed, however, that strong heating occurs, if a thin layer of inhomogeneities, typically some micrometers thick, is included in the surrounding material with slightly higher absorption than the surrounding lowless material. Under these assumptions the thermally induced stress inside the materials can explain the experimentally observed mechanical damage. Besides these thermal damage effects mechanical momenta are transferred by pulsed laser radiation to the optics. Experimental results as obtained by a ballistic pendulum are reported.

  15. Laser Thomson scattering in a pulsed atmospheric arc discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommers, Bradley; Adams, Steven

    2015-09-01

    Laser scattering measurements, including Rayleigh, Raman, and Thomson scattering have been performed on an atmospheric pulsed arc discharge. Such laser scattering techniques offer a non-invasive diagnostic to measure gas temperature, electron temperature, and electron density in atmospheric plasma sources, particularly those with feature sizes approaching 1 mm. The pulsed discharge is ignited in a pin to pin electrode geometry using a 6 kV pulse with 10 ns duration. The electrodes are housed in a glass vacuum chamber filled with argon gas. The laser signal is produced by a Nd:Yag laser supply, repetitively pulsed at 10 Hz and frequency quadrupled to operate at 266 nm. The scattered laser signal is imaged onto a triple grating spectrometer, which is used to suppress the Rayleigh scatter signal in order to measure the low amplitude Thomson and Raman signals. Preliminary results include measurements of electron temperature and electron density in the plasma column taken during the evolution of the discharge. The laser system is also used to measure the Rayleigh scattering signal, which provides space and time resolved measurements of gas temperature in the arc discharge.

  16. Laser Energy Monitor for Double-Pulsed 2-Micrometer IPDA Lidar Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Petros, Mulugeta; Remus, Ruben; Yu, Jirong; Singh, Upendra N.

    2014-01-01

    Integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar is a remote sensing technique for monitoring different atmospheric species. The technique relies on wavelength differentiation between strong and weak absorbing features normalized to the transmitted energy. 2-micron double-pulsed IPDA lidar is best suited for atmospheric carbon dioxide measurements. In such case, the transmitter produces two successive laser pulses separated by short interval (200 microseconds), with low repetition rate (10Hz). Conventional laser energy monitors, based on thermal detectors, are suitable for low repetition rate single pulse lasers. Due to the short pulse interval in double-pulsed lasers, thermal energy monitors underestimate the total transmitted energy. This leads to measurement biases and errors in double-pulsed IPDA technique. The design and calibration of a 2-micron double-pulse laser energy monitor is presented. The design is based on a high-speed, extended range InGaAs pin quantum detectors suitable for separating the two pulse events. Pulse integration is applied for converting the detected pulse power into energy. Results are compared to a photo-electro-magnetic (PEM) detector for impulse response verification. Calibration included comparing the three detection technologies in single-pulsed mode, then comparing the pin and PEM detectors in double-pulsed mode. Energy monitor linearity will be addressed.

  17. Influence of the reactive atmosphere on the formation of nanoparticles in the plasma plume induced by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation of metallic targets at atmospheric pressure and high repetition rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girault, M.; Le Garrec, J.-L.; Mitchell, J. B. A.; Jouvard, J.-M.; Carvou, E.; Menneveux, J.; Yu, J.; Ouf, F.-X.; Carles, S.; Potin, V.; Pillon, G.; Bourgeois, S.; Perez, J.; Marco de Lucas, M. C.; Lavisse, L.

    2016-06-01

    The influence of a reactive atmosphere on the formation of nanoparticles (NPs) in the plasma plume generated by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation of metal targets (Ti, Al, Ag) was probed in situ using Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS). Air and different O2-N2 gas mixtures were used as reactive gas within atmospheric pressure. SAXS results showed the formation of NPs in the plasma-plume with a mean radius varying in the 2-5 nm range. A decrease of the NPs size with increasing the O2 percentage in the O2-N2 gas mixture was also showed. Ex situ observations by transmission electron microscopy and structural characterizations by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy were also performed for powders collected in experiments done using air as ambient gas. The stability of the different metal oxides is discussed as being a key parameter influencing the formation of NPs in the plasma-plume.

  18. A frequency-doubled, pulsed laser system for rubidium manipulation

    CERN Document Server

    Dingjan, J; Beugnon, J; Jones, M P A; Bergamini, S; Messin, G; Browaeys, A; Grangier, P

    2005-01-01

    We have constructed a pulsed laser system for the manipulation of cold Rb atoms. The system combines optical telecommunications components and frequency doubling to generate light at 780 nm. Using a fast, fibre-coupled intensity modulator, output from a continuous laser diode is sliced into pulses with a length between 1.3 and 6.1 ns and a repetition frequency of 5 MHz. These pulses are amplified using an erbium-doped fibre amplifier, and frequency-doubled in a periodically poled lithium niobate crystal, yielding a peak power up to 12 W. Using the resulting light at 780 nm, we demonstrate Rabi oscillations on the F = 2 F=3-transition of a single 87Rb atom.

  19. Analysis of picosecond pulsed laser melted graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbeck, J.; Braunstein, G.; Speck, J.; Dresselhaus, M.S.; Huang, C.Y.; Malvezzi, A.M.; Bloembergen, N.

    1986-01-01

    A Raman microprobe and high resolution TEM have been used to analyze the resolidified region of liquid carbon generated by picosecond pulse laser radiation. From the relative intensities of the zone center Raman-allowed mode for graphite at 1582 cm/sup -1/ and the disorder-induced mode at 1360 cm/sup -1/, the average graphite crystallite size in the resolidified region is determined as a function of position. By comparison with Rutherford backscattering spectra and Raman spectra from nonosecond pulsed laser melting experiments, the disorder depth for picosecond pulsed laser melted graphite is determined as a function of irradiating energy density. Comparisons of TEM micrographs for nanosecond and picosecond pulsed laser melting experiments show that the structure of the laser disordered regions in graphite are similar and exhibit similar behavior with increasing laser pulse fluence.

  20. Analysis of Picosecond Pulsed Laser Melted Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbeck, J.; Braunstein, G.; Speck, J.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Huang, C. Y.; Malvezzi, A. M.; Bloembergen, N.

    1986-12-01

    A Raman microprobe and high resolution TEM have been used to analyze the resolidified region of liquid carbon generated by picosecond pulse laser radiation. From the relative intensities of the zone center Raman-allowed mode for graphite at 1582 cm{sup -1} and the disorder-induced mode at 1360 cm{sup -1}, the average graphite crystallite size in the resolidified region is determined as a function of position. By comparison with Rutherford backscattering spectra and Raman spectra from nanosecond pulsed laser melting experiments, the disorder depth for picosecond pulsed laser melted graphite is determined as a function of irradiating energy density. Comparisons of TEM micrographs for nanosecond and picosecond pulsed laser melting experiments show that the structure of the laser disordered regions in graphite are similar and exhibit similar behavior with increasing laser pulse fluence.

  1. Pulse bundles and passive harmonic mode-locked pulses in Tm-doped fiber laser based on nonlinear polarization rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiong; Zhou, Pu; Wang, Xiaolin; Xiao, Hu; Liu, Zejin

    2014-03-10

    We demonstrate the nanosecond-level pulses in Tm-doped fiber laser generated by passively harmonic mode-locking. Nonlinear polarization rotation performed by two polarization controllers (PCs) is employed to induce the self-starting harmonic mode-locking. The fundamental repetition rate of the laser is 448.8 kHz, decided by the length of the cavity. Bundles of pulses with up to 17 uniform subpulses are generated due to the split of pulse when the pump power increases and the PCs are adjusted. Continuous harmonic mode-locked pulse trains are obtained with 1st to 6th and even more than 15th order when the positions of the PCs are properly fixed and the pump power is scaled up. The widths of all the uniform individual pulses are mostly 3-5 ns, and pulse with width of 304 ns at fundamental repetition rate can also be generated by adjusting the PCs. Hysteresis phenomenon of the passively harmonic mode-locked pulses' repetition frequency versus pump power is observed. The rather wide 3dB spectral bandwidth of the pulse train (25 nm) indicates that they may resemble noise-like pulses.

  2. Influence of the reactive atmosphere on the formation of nanoparticles in the plasma plume induced by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation of metallic targets at atmospheric pressure and high repetition rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girault, M. [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303 CNRS-Univ. Bourgogne Franche-Comté, 9 Av. A. Savary, BP 47 870, F-21078 Dijon Cedex (France); Le Garrec, J.-L.; Mitchell, J.B.A. [Institut de Physique de Rennes, UMR 6251 CNRS-Université de Rennes 1, 35042 Rennes Cedex (France); Jouvard, J.-M. [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303 CNRS-Univ. Bourgogne Franche-Comté, 9 Av. A. Savary, BP 47 870, F-21078 Dijon Cedex (France); Carvou, E. [Institut de Physique de Rennes, UMR 6251 CNRS-Université de Rennes 1, 35042 Rennes Cedex (France); Menneveux, J.; Yu, J. [Institut Lumière Matière, UMR5306 Université Lyon 1-CNRS, Université de Lyon, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Ouf, F.-X. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sureté Nucléaire IRSN/PSN-RES/SCA/LPMA BP 68, 91192 Gif-Sur-Yvette (France); Carles, S. [Institut de Physique de Rennes, UMR 6251 CNRS-Université de Rennes 1, 35042 Rennes Cedex (France); Potin, V.; Pillon, G.; Bourgeois, S. [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303 CNRS-Univ. Bourgogne Franche-Comté, 9 Av. A. Savary, BP 47 870, F-21078 Dijon Cedex (France); Perez, J. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, F-91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Marco de Lucas, M.C., E-mail: delucas@u-bourgogne.fr [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303 CNRS-Univ. Bourgogne Franche-Comté, 9 Av. A. Savary, BP 47 870, F-21078 Dijon Cedex (France); and others

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • NPs formed in a plasma-plume during laser irradiation of metals (Al, Ti, Ag) were studied. • In situ SAXS and ex situ TEM, XRD and Raman spectra were measured. • NPs size decreased when increasing the O{sub 2} fraction in a controlled O{sub 2}+N{sub 2} atmosphere. • The oxidation of metal NPs in the plasma restricts the increase of the size of the NPs. - Abstract: The influence of a reactive atmosphere on the formation of nanoparticles (NPs) in the plasma plume generated by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation of metal targets (Ti, Al, Ag) was probed in situ using Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS). Air and different O{sub 2}–N{sub 2} gas mixtures were used as reactive gas within atmospheric pressure. SAXS results showed the formation of NPs in the plasma-plume with a mean radius varying in the 2–5 nm range. A decrease of the NPs size with increasing the O{sub 2} percentage in the O{sub 2}–N{sub 2} gas mixture was also showed. Ex situ observations by transmission electron microscopy and structural characterizations by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy were also performed for powders collected in experiments done using air as ambient gas. The stability of the different metal oxides is discussed as being a key parameter influencing the formation of NPs in the plasma-plume.

  3. Pulsed laser excitation of phosphate stabilised silver nanoparticles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jyotirmayee Mohanty; Dipak K Palit; Laxminarayan V Shastri; Avinash V Sapre

    2000-02-01

    Laser flash photolysis studies were carried out on two types of silver nanoparticles prepared by -radiolysis of Ag+ solutions in the presence of polyphosphate as the stabiliser. Type I silver nanoparticles displayed a surface plasmon band at 390 nm. Type II silver nanoparticles showed a 390 nm surface plasmon band with a shoulder at 550 nm. On photoexcitation in the surface plasmon band region, using 35 picosecond laser pulses at 355 nm and 532 nm, the type II solutions showed transient bleaching and absorption signals in the 450-900 nm region, which did not decay appreciably up to 5 nanoseconds. These transient changes were found to get annealed in the interval where 5 ns < < 100 ns. Extended photolysis of the nanoparticle solutions with repetitive laser pulses resulted in a decrease in the values of the average particle size which were measured by employing the dynamic light scattering technique.

  4. Optimizing drive parameters of a nanosecond, repetitively pulsed microdischarge high power 121.6 nm source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, J.; Fierro, A.; Trienekens, D.; Dickens, J.; Neuber, A.

    2015-02-01

    Utilizing nanosecond high voltage pulses to drive microdischarges (MDs) at repetition rates in the vicinity of 1 MHz previously enabled increased time-averaged power deposition, peak vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) power yield, as well as time-averaged VUV power yield. Here, various pulse widths (30-250 ns), and pulse repetition rates (100 kHz-5 MHz) are utilized, and the resulting VUV yield is reported. It was observed that the use of a 50 ns pulse width, at a repetition rate of 100 kHz, provided 62 W peak VUV power and 310 mW time-averaged VUV power, with a time-averaged VUV generation efficiency of ˜1.1%. Optimization of the driving parameters resulted in 1-2 orders of magnitude increase in peak and time-averaged power when compared to low power, dc-driven MDs.

  5. High Efficiency Pulse Acetone Liquid Raman Laser Using DCM Fluorescent Dye as the Enhancement Medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Andrew Yuk-Sun; YANG Jing-Guo; CHAN Mau-Hing

    2006-01-01

    Pumped by a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser, 10-Hz repetition rate, 320-mJ pump energy, and 5.1-ns pulse width, a liquid Raman laser using acetone as the Raman shifting medium has been established. The residual pump laser pulse and the generated Stokes pulse are directed to a DCM dye cell for energy enhancement of the Stokes pulse. The Raman laser system is capable to produce a laser pulse at wavelength 630 nm, with single pulse energy of 120 mJ, peak power of 70 MW and an average power of 1200 mW. The energy conversion efficiency is 37.5%, or equivalently a quantum efficiency of 44.5%.

  6. Graphene based widely-tunable and singly-polarized pulse generation with random fiber lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Yao, B C; Wang, Z N; Wu, Y; Zhou, J H; Wu, H; Fan, M Q; Cao, X L; Zhang, W L; Chen, Y F; Li, Y R; Churkin, D; Turitsyn, S; Wong, C W

    2015-01-01

    Pulse generation often requires a stabilized cavity and its corresponding mode structure for initial phase-locking. Contrastingly, modeless cavity-free random lasers provide new possibilities for high quantum efficiency lasing that could potentially be widely tunable spectrally and temporally. Pulse generation in random lasers, however, has remained elusive since the discovery of modeless gain lasing. Here we report coherent pulse generation with modeless random lasers based on the unique polarization selectivity and broadband saturable absorption of monolayer graphene. Simultaneous temporal compression of cavity-free pulses are observed with such a polarization modulation, along with a broadly-tunable pulsewidth across two orders of magnitude down to 900 ps, a broadly-tunable repetition rate across three orders of magnitude up to 3 MHz, and a singly-polarized pulse train at 41 dB extinction ratio, about an order of magnitude larger than conventional pulsed fiber lasers. Moreover, our graphene-based pulse for...

  7. Extending ultra-short pulse laser texturing over large area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mincuzzi, G., E-mail: girolamo.mincuzzi@alphanov.com; Gemini, L.; Faucon, M.; Kling, R.

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • We carried out metal surface texturing (Ripples, micro grooves, Spikes) using a high power, high repetition rate, industrial, Ultra-short pulses laser. • Extremely Fast processing is shown (Laser Scan speed as high as 90 m/s) with a polygon scanner head. • Stainless steel surface blackening with Ultra-short pulses laser has been obtained with unprecedented scanspeed. • Full SEM surface characterization was carried out for all the different structures obtained. • Reflectance measurements were carried out to characterize surface reflectance. - Abstract: Surface texturing by Ultra-Short Pulses Laser (UPL) for industrial applications passes through the use of both fast beam scanning systems and high repetition rate, high average power P, UPL. Nevertheless unwanted thermal effects are expected when P exceeds some tens of W. An interesting strategy for a reliable heat management would consists in texturing with a low fluence values (slightly higher than the ablation threshold) and utilising a Polygon Scanner Heads delivering laser pulses with unrepeated speed. Here we show for the first time that with relatively low fluence it is possible over stainless steel, to obtain surface texturing by utilising a 2 MHz femtosecond laser jointly with a polygonal scanner head in a relatively low fluence regime (0.11 J cm{sup −2}). Different surface textures (Ripples, micro grooves and spikes) can be obtained varying the scan speed from 90 m s{sup −1} to 25 m s{sup −1}. In particular, spikes formation process has been shown and optimised at 25 m s{sup −1} and a full morphology characterization by SEM has been carried out. Reflectance measurements with integrating sphere are presented to compare reference surface with high scan rate textures. In the best case we show a black surface with reflectance value < 5%.

  8. Study on damage of K9 glass under 248nm ultraviolet pulsed laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xi; Fang, Xiaodong

    2015-04-01

    The damage of K9 glass under 248nm ultraviolet pulsed laser irradiation was studied. The laser pulse energy was kept within the range of 60mJ to 160mJ, and the repetition rate was adjusted within the range of 1Hz to 40Hz. The damage morphologies of single-pulse and multi-pulse laser irradiation were characterized by optical microscope, and the damage mechanism was discussed. The experimental results indicated that the damage of K9 glass irradiated by 248nm ultraviolet laser mainly followed the thermal-mechanical coupling mechanism and the damage threshold of K9 glass was 2.8J/cm2. The intensity of damage area increased gradually with the increase of the laser pulse number. It was shown that accumulation effect of laser induced damage to K9 glass was obvious.

  9. Ultrafast pulse generation in a mode-locked Erbium chip waveguide laser

    CERN Document Server

    Khurmi, Champak; Zhang, Wen Qi; V., Shahraam Afshar; Chen, George; Genest, Jérôme; Monro, Tanya M; Lancaster, David G

    2016-01-01

    We report mode-locked ~1550 nm output of transform-limited ~180 fs pulses from a large mode-area (diameter ~ 50 {\\mu}m) guided-wave erbium fluorozirconate glass laser. The passively mode-locked oscillator generates pulses with 25 nm bandwidth at 156 MHz repetition rate and peak-power of 260 W. Scalability to higher repetition rate is demonstrated by transform-limited 410 fs pulse output at 1.3 GHz. To understand the origins of the broad spectral output, the laser cavity is simulated by using a numerical solution to the Ginzburg-Landau equation. This paper reports the widest bandwidth and shortest pulses achieved from an ultra-fast laser inscribed waveguide laser.

  10. Ti : sapphire laser synchronised with femtosecond Yb pump laser via nonlinear pulse coupling in Ti : sapphire active medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didenko, N. V.; Konyashchenko, A. V.; Konyashchenko, D. A.; Kostryukov, P. V.; Kuritsyn, I. I.; Lutsenko, A. P.; Mavritskiy, A. O.

    2017-02-01

    A laser system utilising the method of synchronous pumping of a Ti : sapphire laser by a high-power femtosecond Yb3+-doped laser is described. The pulse repetition rate of the Ti : sapphire laser is successfully locked to the repetition rate of the Yb laser for more than 6 hours without the use of any additional electronics. The measured timing jitter is shown to be less than 1 fs. A simple qualitative model addressing the synchronisation mechanism utilising the cross-phase modulation of oscillation and pump pulses within a Ti : sapphire active medium is proposed. Output parameters of the Ti : sapphire laser as functions of its cavity length are discussed in terms of this model.

  11. Ultrashort pulse laser technology laser sources and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Schrempel, Frank; Dausinger, Friedrich

    2016-01-01

    Ultrashort laser pulses with durations in the femtosecond range up to a few picoseconds provide a unique method for precise materials processing or medical applications. Paired with the recent developments in ultrashort pulse lasers, this technology is finding its way into various application fields. The book gives a comprehensive overview of the principles and applications of ultrashort pulse lasers, especially applied to medicine and production technology. Recent advances in laser technology are discussed in detail. This covers the development of reliable and cheap low power laser sources as well as high average power ultrashort pulse lasers for large scale manufacturing. The fundamentals of laser-matter-interaction as well as processing strategies and the required system technology are discussed for these laser sources with respect to precise materials processing. Finally, different applications within medicine, measurement technology or materials processing are highlighted.

  12. Subthreshold pair production in short laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Nousch, T; Kampfer, B; Titov, A I

    2012-01-01

    The $e^+e^-$ pair production by a probe photon traversing a linearly polarized laser pulse is treated as generalized nonlinear Breit-Wheeler process. For short laser pulses with very few oscillations of the electromagnetic field we find below the perturbative weak-field threshold $\\sqrt{s} = 2m$ a similar enhancement of the pair production rate as for circular polarization. The strong subthreshold enhancement is traced back to the finite bandwidth of the laser pulse. A folding model is developed which accounts for the interplay of the frequency spectrum and the intensity distribution in the course of the pulse.

  13. Experimental study of polarity dependence in repetitive nanosecond-pulse breakdown

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao Tao; Sun Guang-Sheng; Yan Ping; Wang Jue; Yuan Wei-Qun; Zhang Shi-Chang

    2007-01-01

    Pulsed breakdown of dry air at ambient pressure has been investigated in the point-plane geometry,using repetitive nanosecond pulses with 10 ns risetime,20-30 as duration,and up to 100 kV amplitude.A major concern in this paper is to study the dependence of breakdown strength on the point-electrode polarity.Applied voltage,breakdown current and repetitive stressing time are measured under the experimental conditions of some variables including pulse voltage peak,gap spacing and repetition rate.The results show that increasing the E-field strength can decrease breakdown time lag,repetitive stressing time and the number of applied pulses as expected.However,compared with the traditional polarity dependence it is weakened and not significant in the repetitive nanosecond-pulse breakdown.The ambiguous polaxity dependence in the experimental study is involved with an accumulation effect of residual charges and metastable states.Moreover,it is suggested that the reactions associated with the detachment of negative ions and impact deactivation of metastable specms could provide a source of primary initiating electrons for breakdown.

  14. Repetitively pulsed UV radiation source based on a run-away electron preionised diffuse discharge in nitrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baksht, E Kh; Burachenko, A G; Lomaev, M I; Panchenko, A N; Tarasenko, V F [Institute of High Current Electronics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-04-30

    An extended repetitively pulsed source of spontaneous UV radiation is fabricated, which may also be used for producing laser radiation. Voltage pulses with an incident wave amplitude of up to 30 kV, a half-amplitude duration of ∼4 ns and a rise time of ∼2.5 ns are applied to a gap with a nonuniform electric field. For an excitation region length of 35 cm and a nitrogen pressure of 30 – 760 Torr, a diffusive discharge up to a pulse repetition rate of 2 kHz is produced without using an additional system for gap preionisation. An investigation is made of the plasma of the run-away electron preionised diffuse discharge. Using a CCD camera it is found that the dense diffused plasma fills the gap in a time shorter than 1 ns. X-ray radiation is recorded from behind the foil anode throughout the pressure range under study; a supershort avalanche electron beam is recorded by the collector electrode at pressures below 100 Torr. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  15. One laser pulse generates two photoacoustic signals

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Fei; Zheng, Yuanjin

    2016-01-01

    Photoacoustic sensing and imaging techniques have been studied widely to explore optical absorption contrast based on nanosecond laser illumination. In this paper, we report a long laser pulse induced dual photoacoustic (LDPA) nonlinear effect, which originates from unsatisfied stress and thermal confinements. Being different from conventional short laser pulse illumination, the proposed method utilizes a long square-profile laser pulse to induce dual photoacoustic signals. Without satisfying the stress confinement, the dual photoacoustic signals are generated following the positive and negative edges of the long laser pulse. More interestingly, the first expansion-induced photoacoustic signal exhibits positive waveform due to the initial sharp rising of temperature. On the contrary, the second contraction-induced photoacoustic signal exhibits exactly negative waveform due to the falling of temperature, as well as pulse-width-dependent, signal amplitude which is caused by the concurrent heat accumulation and ...

  16. Femtosecond laser ablation: Experimental study of the repetition rate influence on inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, Jhanis J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Fernandez, Alberto [Centro de Fisicoquimica. Escuela de Quimica, Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela); Oropeza, Dayana; Mao Xianglei [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Russo, Richard E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)], E-mail: RERusso@lbl.gov

    2008-02-15

    This paper demonstrates the feasibility of performing bulk chemical analysis based on laser ablation for good lateral resolution with only nominal mass ablated per pulse. The influence of repetition rate (1-1000 Hz) and scan speed (1-200 {mu}m/s) using a low energy (30 {mu}J) and a small spot size ({approx} 10 {mu}m) UV-femtosecond laser beam was evaluated for chemical analysis of silica glass samples, based on laser ablation sampling and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Accuracy to approximately 14% and precision of 6% relative standard deviation (RSD) were measured.

  17. Characterization of polymer thin films obtained by pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palla-Papavlu, A.; Dinca, V.; Ion, V.; Moldovan, A.; Mitu, B.; Luculescu, C.; Dinescu, M.

    2011-04-01

    The development of laser techniques for the deposition of polymer and biomaterial thin films on solid surfaces in a controlled manner has attracted great attention during the last few years. Here we report the deposition of thin polymer films, namely Polyepichlorhydrin by pulsed laser deposition. Polyepichlorhydrin polymer was deposited on flat substrate (i.e. silicon) using an NdYAG laser (266 nm, 5 ns pulse duration and 10 Hz repetition rate). The obtained thin films have been characterized by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry. It was found that for laser fluences up to 1.5 J/cm 2 the chemical structure of the deposited polyepichlorhydrin polymer thin layers resembles to the native polymer, whilst by increasing the laser fluence above 1.5 J/cm 2 the polyepichlorohydrin films present deviations from the bulk polymer. Morphological investigations (atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy) reveal continuous polyepichlorhydrin thin films for a relatively narrow range of fluences (1-1.5 J/cm 2). The wavelength dependence of the refractive index and extinction coefficient was determined by ellipsometry studies which lead to new insights about the material. The obtained results indicate that pulsed laser deposition method is potentially useful for the fabrication of polymer thin films to be used in applications including electronics, microsensor or bioengineering industries.

  18. Phase-stable, multi-µJ femtosecond pulses from a repetition-rate tunable Ti:Sa-oscillator-seeded Yb-fiber amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saule, T.; Holzberger, S.; De Vries, O.; Plötner, M.; Limpert, J.; Tünnermann, A.; Pupeza, I.

    2017-01-01

    We present a high-power, MHz-repetition-rate, phase-stable femtosecond laser system based on a phase-stabilized Ti:Sa oscillator and a multi-stage Yb-fiber chirped-pulse power amplifier. A 10-nm band around 1030 nm is split from the 7-fs oscillator output and serves as the seed for subsequent amplification by 54 dB to 80 W of average power. The µJ-level output is spectrally broadened in a solid-core fiber and compressed to 30 fs with chirped mirrors. A pulse picker prior to power amplification allows for decreasing the repetition rate from 74 MHz by a factor of up to 4 without affecting the pulse parameters. To compensate for phase jitter added by the amplifier to the feed-forward phase-stabilized seeding pulses, a self-referencing feed-back loop is implemented at the system output. An integrated out-of-loop phase noise of less than 100 mrad was measured in the band from 0.4 Hz to 400 kHz, which to the best of our knowledge corresponds to the highest phase stability ever demonstrated for high-power, multi-MHz-repetition-rate ultrafast lasers. This system will enable experiments in attosecond physics at unprecedented repetition rates, it offers ideal prerequisites for the generation and field-resolved electro-optical sampling of high-power, broadband infrared pulses, and it is suitable for phase-stable white light generation.

  19. Temporal laser pulse manipulation using multiple optical ring-cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet (Inventor); Kojima, Jun (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An optical pulse stretcher and a mathematical algorithm for the detailed calculation of its design and performance is disclosed. The optical pulse stretcher has a plurality of optical cavities, having multiple optical reflectors such that an optical path length in each of the optical cavities is different. The optical pulse stretcher also has a plurality of beam splitters, each of which intercepts a portion of an input optical beam and diverts the portion into one of the plurality of optical cavities. The input optical beam is stretched and a power of an output beam is reduced after passing through the optical pulse stretcher and the placement of the plurality of optical cavities and beam splitters is optimized through a model that takes into account optical beam divergence and alignment in the pluralities of the optical cavities. The optical pulse stretcher system can also function as a high-repetition-rate (MHz) laser pulse generator, making it suitable for use as a stroboscopic light source for high speed ballistic projectile imaging studies, or it can be used for high speed flow diagnostics using a laser light sheet with digital particle imaging velocimetry. The optical pulse stretcher system can also be implemented using fiber optic components to realize a rugged and compact optical system that is alignment free and easy to use.

  20. TEMPORAL CHARACTERIZATION OF LASER PULSES FROM JIGUANG-I LASER FACILITY WITH A COMPACT DUAL FUNCTION AUTOCORRELATOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏江帆; 魏志义; 邱阳; 吕铁铮; 腾浩; 王兆华; 张杰

    2001-01-01

    An optical pulse autocorrelator for rapid and slow scanning is described in this paper. Using an audio loudspeaker on one arm, an interferometric rapid-scanning signal of the output from a high-repetition laser oscillator is obtained.However, by adjusting the positions of the mirrors and using a step-motor on another arm, the intensity autocorrelation function of the output from a low-repetition laser amplifier can be easily measured. Using all-reflecting optics and an adequate nonlinear crystal, the whole instrument is very compact and has been used to measure sub-20 fs light pulses in both configurations with excellent agreement. In the slow-scanning configuration, a pulse train as long as 500ps has been determined. Using this autocorrelator, the home-made JIGUANG-I CPA laser facility was characterized for its pulse duration evolution.

  1. A highly efficient and compact long pulse Nd:YAG rod laser with 540 J of pulse energy for welding application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choubey, Ambar; Vishwakarma, S C; Misra, Pushkar; Jain, R K; Agrawal, D K; Arya, R; Upadhyaya, B N; Oak, S M

    2013-07-01

    We have developed an efficient and high average power flash lamp pumped long pulse Nd:YAG laser capable of generating 1 kW of average output power with maximum 540 J of single pulse energy and 20 kW of peak power. The laser pulse duration can be varied from 1 to 40 ms and repetition rate from 1 to 100 Hz. A compact and robust laser pump chamber and resonator was designed to achieve this high average and peak power. It was found that this laser system provides highest single pulse energy as compared to other long pulsed Nd:YAG laser systems of similar rating. A slope efficiency of 5.4% has been achieved, which is on higher side for typical lamp pumped solid-state lasers. This system will be highly useful in laser welding of materials such as aluminium and titanium. We have achieved 4 mm deep penetration welding of these metals under optimized conditions of output power, pulse energy, and pulse duration. The laser resonator was optimized to provide stable operation from single shot to 100 Hz of repetition rate. The beam quality factor was measured to be M(2) ~ 91 and pulse-to-pulse stability of ±3% for the multimode operation. The laser beam was efficiently coupled through an optical fiber of 600 μm core diameter and 0.22 numerical aperture with power transmission of 90%.

  2. A highly efficient and compact long pulse Nd:YAG rod laser with 540 J of pulse energy for welding application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choubey, Ambar; Vishwakarma, S. C.; Misra, Pushkar; Jain, R. K.; Agrawal, D. K.; Arya, R.; Upadhyaya, B. N.; Oak, S. M.

    2013-07-01

    We have developed an efficient and high average power flash lamp pumped long pulse Nd:YAG laser capable of generating 1 kW of average output power with maximum 540 J of single pulse energy and 20 kW of peak power. The laser pulse duration can be varied from 1 to 40 ms and repetition rate from 1 to 100 Hz. A compact and robust laser pump chamber and resonator was designed to achieve this high average and peak power. It was found that this laser system provides highest single pulse energy as compared to other long pulsed Nd:YAG laser systems of similar rating. A slope efficiency of 5.4% has been achieved, which is on higher side for typical lamp pumped solid-state lasers. This system will be highly useful in laser welding of materials such as aluminium and titanium. We have achieved 4 mm deep penetration welding of these metals under optimized conditions of output power, pulse energy, and pulse duration. The laser resonator was optimized to provide stable operation from single shot to 100 Hz of repetition rate. The beam quality factor was measured to be M2 ˜ 91 and pulse-to-pulse stability of ±3% for the multimode operation. The laser beam was efficiently coupled through an optical fiber of 600 μm core diameter and 0.22 numerical aperture with power transmission of 90%.

  3. A simple sub-nanosecond ultraviolet light pulse generator with high repetition rate and peak power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binh, P H; Trong, V D; Renucci, P; Marie, X

    2013-08-01

    We present a simple ultraviolet sub-nanosecond pulse generator using commercial ultraviolet light-emitting diodes with peak emission wavelengths of 290 nm, 318 nm, 338 nm, and 405 nm. The generator is based on step recovery diode, short-circuited transmission line, and current-shaping circuit. The narrowest pulses achieved have 630 ps full width at half maximum at repetition rate of 80 MHz. Optical pulse power in the range of several hundreds of microwatts depends on the applied bias voltage. The bias voltage dependences of the output optical pulse width and peak power are analysed and discussed. Compared to commercial UV sub-nanosecond generators, the proposed generator can produce much higher pulse repetition rate and peak power.

  4. KAPTURE-2. A picosecond sampling system for individual THz pulses with high repetition rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, A.-S.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a novel data acquisition system for continuous sampling of ultra-short pulses generated by terahertz (THz) detectors. Karlsruhe Pulse Taking Ultra-fast Readout Electronics (KAPTURE) is able to digitize pulse shapes with a sampling time down to 3 ps and pulse repetition rates up to 500 MHz. KAPTURE has been integrated as a permanent diagnostic device at ANKA and is used for investigating the emitted coherent synchrotron radiation in the THz range. A second version of KAPTURE has been developed to improve the performance and flexibility. The new version offers a better sampling accuracy for a pulse repetition rate up to 2 GHz. The higher data rate produced by the sampling system is processed in real-time by a heterogeneous FPGA and GPU architecture operating up to 6.5 GB/s continuously. Results in accelerator physics will be reported and the new design of KAPTURE be discussed.

  5. A Repetitive Nanosecond Pulse Source for Generation of Large Volume Streamer Discharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAO Fengbo; ZHANG Qiaogen; GAO Bo; WANG Hu; LI Zhou

    2008-01-01

    Using a unipolar pulse with the rise time and the pulse duration in the order of microsecond as the primary pulse,a nanosecond pulse with the repetitive frequency of several kilohertz is generated by a spark gap switch.By varying both the inter-pulse duration and the pulse frequency,the voltage recovery rate of the spark gap switch is investigated at different working conditions such as the gas pressure,the gas composition as well as the bias voltage.The results reveal that either increase in gas pressure or addition of SF6 to the air can increase the voltage recovery rate.The effect of gas composition on the voltage recovery rate is discussed based on the transferring and distribution of the residual space charges.The repetitive nanosecond pulse source is also applied to the generation of large volume,and the discharge currents are measured to investigate the effect of pulse repetition rate on the large volume streamer discharge.

  6. A long-pulse repetitive operation magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yu-Wei; Zhong, Hui-Huang; Zhang, Jian-De; Shu, Ting; Liu, Jin Liang

    2014-05-01

    The improved magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator (MILO) is a gigawatt-class L-band high power microwave tube. It has allowed us to generate 3.1 GW pulse of 40 ns duration in the single-pulse operation and 500 MW pulse of 25 ns duration in the repetition rate operation. However, because of the severe impedance mismatch, the power conversion efficiency is only about 4% in the repetition rate operation. In order to eliminate the impedance mismatch and obtain repetitive long-pulse high-power microwave (HPM), a series of experiments are carried out and the recent progress is presented in this paper. In the single-pulse operation, when the diode voltage is 466 kV and current is 41.6 kA, the radiated microwave power is above 2.2 GW, the pulse duration is above 102 ns, the microwave frequency is about 1.74 GHz, and the power conversion efficiency is about 11.5%. In the repetition rate operation, under the condition of the diode voltage about 400 kV, beam current about 38 kA, the radiated microwave power is about 1.0 GW, the pulse duration is about 85 ns. Moreover, the radiated microwave power and the pulse duration decline little by little when the shot numbers increase gradually. The experimental results show that the impedance matching is a vital factor for HPM systems and one of the major technical challenges is to improve the cathode for the repetition rate operation MILO.

  7. A vacuum-sealed, gigawatt-class, repetitively pulsed high-power microwave source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xun, Tao; Fan, Yu-wei; Yang, Han-wu; Zhang, Zi-cheng; Chen, Dong-qun; Zhang, Jian-de

    2017-06-01

    A compact L-band sealed-tube magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator (MILO) has been developed that does not require bulky external vacuum pump for repetitive operations. This device with a ceramic insulated vacuum interface, a carbon fiber array cathode, and non-evaporable getters has a base vacuum pressure in the low 10-6 Pa range. A dynamic 3-D Monte-Carlo model for the molecular flow movement and collision was setup for the MILO chamber. The pulse desorption, gas evolution, and pressure distribution were exactly simulated. In the 5 Hz repetition rate experiments, using a 600 kV diode voltage and 48 kA beam current, the average radiated microwave power for 25 shots is about 3.4 GW in 45 ns pulse duration. The maximum equilibrium pressure is below 4.0 × 10-2 Pa, and no pulse shortening limitations are observed during the repetitive test in the sealed-tube condition.

  8. Octave-spanning spectrum of femtosecond Yb:fiber ring laser at 528 MHz repetition rate in microstructured tellurite fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guizhong; Jiang, Tongxiao; Li, Chen; Yang, Hongyu; Wang, Aimin; Zhang, Zhigang

    2013-02-25

    The octave-spanning spectrum was generated in a tellurite glass based microstructured fiber pumped by a 528 MHz repetition rate Yb:fiber ring laser without amplification. The laser achieved 40% output optical-to-optical efficiency with the output power of 410 mW. By adjusting the grating pair in the cavity, this oscillator can work at different cavity dispersion regimes with the shortest dechirped pulse width of 46 fs. The output pulses were then launched into a high-nonlinearity tellurite fiber, which has the zero-dispersion wavelength at ~1 μm. The high nonlinearity coefficient (1348 km⁻¹W⁻¹) and the matched zero-dispersion wavelength with pump laser enable the octave-spanning supercontinuum generated from 750 nm to 1700 nm with the coupled pulse energy above 10 pJ.

  9. Short pulse laser systems for biomedical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Mitra, Kunal

    2017-01-01

    This book presents practical information on the clinical applications of short pulse laser systems and the techniques for optimizing these applications in a manner that will be relevant to a broad audience, including engineering and medical students as well as researchers, clinicians, and technicians. Short pulse laser systems are useful for both subsurface tissue imaging and laser induced thermal therapy (LITT), which hold great promise in cancer diagnostics and treatment. Such laser systems may be used alone or in combination with optically active nanoparticles specifically administered to the tissues of interest for enhanced contrast in imaging and precise heating during LITT. Mathematical and computational models of short pulse laser-tissue interactions that consider the transient radiative transport equation coupled with a bio-heat equation considering the initial transients of laser heating were developed to analyze the laser-tissue interaction during imaging and therapy. Experiments were first performe...

  10. Pulsed pumping of semiconductor disk lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempler, Nils; Hopkins, John-Mark; Kemp, Alan J; Schulz, Nico; Rattunde, Marcel; Wagner, Joachim; Dawson, Martin D; Burns, David

    2007-03-19

    Efficient operation of semiconductor disk lasers is demonstrated using uncooled and inexpensive 905nm high-power pulsed semiconductor pump lasers. Laser emission, with a peak power of 1.7W, is obtained from a 2.3mum semiconductor disk laser. This is seven times the power achieved under continuous pumping. Analysis of the time-dependent spectral characteristics of the laser demonstrate that significant device heating occurs over the 100-200ns duration of the pumping pulse - finite element modelling of the thermal processes is undertaken in support of these data. Spectral narrowing to below 0.8nm is obtained by using an intra-cavity birefringent filter.

  11. Research of application of high-repetition-rate green laser in underwater imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jie-fei; Luo, Tao; Sun, Li-ying; Ding, Chi-zhu; Xia, Min; Yang, Ke-cheng

    2013-09-01

    It is commonly known that absorption and scattering are the main causes of reducing performance of imaging system, especially imaging distance and resolution. Generally, various techniques are applied to decrease the effect of scattering, such as synchronous scanning and range-gated technique. Continuous-laser imaging technique meets requirements of imaging objects in the large field of view in real time, but imaging distance is less than 2 attenuation lengths in natural water. High-repetition-rate green laser, called quasi-continuous wave (QCW) green laser, is a better light source for underwater imaging. It has 1 kHz-100 kHz modulated rate, and its single pulse peak power is KW magnitude, which can be applied to range-gated imaging as Canadian LUCIE system. In addition, its polarization property is excellent for underwater polarization imaging. Therefore, it has enormous potential to underwater imaging. In order to realize its performance in underwater imaging system, we setup a separated underwater staring imaging system. For this system, a theoretic model is built by the lidar equation and optic transmission theory, and the system is evaluated by modulation transfer function (MTF). The effects of laser and receiver's parameters for the system are analyzed. Then the comparative experiments are conducted in turbid water in laboratory. The results indicate that high pulse energy improves imaging distance. Aperture and polarization could reduce the effect of scattering effectively in staring system. The result shows that this underwater system performs better by choosing suitable parameters of source and receiver.

  12. Ultra-short pulsed millimeter-wave laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Thomas

    2000-10-01

    High peak power pulses of 1.22-mm wavelength radiation have recently been obtained from a novel cavity-dumped far-infrared optically-pumped laser^1. Smooth reproducible pulses with the following characteristics have been routinely obtained: peak power=25-kW, pulsewidth (FWHM)=5-ns, repetition rate=10 pps. (This compares favorably to typical far-infrared, cavity-dumped output - 11-kW, 30-ns, 1 pps - available from the University of California - Santa Barbara Free Electron Laser). The pumping laser is a grating-tuned, hybrid TEA CO2 laser providing 1J / pulse at the 9P32 transition. The far-infrared gain medium is isotopic (C^13) methyl flouride. Experiments are underway for using the novel source to resonantly excite coherent pulses of 250-GHz longitudinal acoustic phonons in silicon doping superlattices. ^1 Thomas E. Wilson, "Modeling the high-speed switching of far-infrared radiation by photoionization in a semiconductor", Phys. Rev. B 59 (20), 12996 (1999).

  13. High Power Picosecond Laser Pulse Recirculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shverdin, M Y; Jovanovic, I; Semenov, V A; Betts, S M; Brown, C; Gibson, D J; Shuttlesworth, R M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; Barty, C P

    2010-04-12

    We demonstrate a nonlinear crystal-based short pulse recirculation cavity for trapping the second harmonic of an incident high power laser pulse. This scheme aims to increase the efficiency and flux of Compton-scattering based light sources. We demonstrate up to 36x average power enhancement of frequency doubled sub-millijoule picosecond pulses, and 17x average power enhancement of 177 mJ, 10 ps, 10 Hz pulses.

  14. High-power picosecond laser pulse recirculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shverdin, M Y; Jovanovic, I; Semenov, V A; Betts, S M; Brown, C; Gibson, D J; Shuttlesworth, R M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; Barty, C P J

    2010-07-01

    We demonstrate a nonlinear crystal-based short pulse recirculation cavity for trapping the second harmonic of an incident high-power laser pulse. This scheme aims to increase the efficiency and flux of Compton-scattering-based light sources. We demonstrate up to 40x average power enhancement of frequency-doubled submillijoule picosecond pulses, and 17x average power enhancement of 177 mJ, 10 ps, 10 Hz pulses.

  15. High-q microring resonator with narrow free spectral range for pulse repetition rate multiplication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pu, Minhao; Ji, Hua; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate a silicon-on-insulator microring resonator with a free-spectral-range of 0.32 nm, an extinction ratio of 27 dB, and a quality factor of ~140900 at 1550 nm that is used for pulse repetition-rate multiplication from 10 to 40 GHz.......We demonstrate a silicon-on-insulator microring resonator with a free-spectral-range of 0.32 nm, an extinction ratio of 27 dB, and a quality factor of ~140900 at 1550 nm that is used for pulse repetition-rate multiplication from 10 to 40 GHz....

  16. Improved repetition rate mixed isotope CO{sub 2} TEA laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohn, D. B., E-mail: dbctechnology@earthlink.net [DBC Technology Corp., 4221 Mesa St, Torrance, California 90505 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    A compact CO{sub 2} TEA laser has been developed for remote chemical detection that operates at a repetition rate of 250 Hz. It emits 700 mJ/pulse at 10.6 μm in a multimode beam with the {sup 12}C{sup 16}O{sub 2} isotope. With mixed {sup 12}C{sup 16}O{sub 2} plus {sup 13}C{sup 16}O{sub 2} isotopes it emits multiple lines in both isotope manifolds to improve detection of a broad range of chemicals. In particular, output pulse energies are 110 mJ/pulse at 9.77 μm, 250 mJ/pulse at 10 μm, and 550 mJ/pulse at 11.15 μm, useful for detection of the chemical agents Sarin, Tabun, and VX. Related work shows capability for long term sealed operation with a catalyst and an agile tuner at a wavelength shift rate of 200 Hz.

  17. Effective shortening of picosecond pulses emitted by a YAG:Nd/sup 3 +/ laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dianov, E.M.; Karasik, A.Y.; Mamyshev, P.V.; Onishchukov, G.I.; Prokhorov, A.M.; Stel' makh, M.F.; Fomichev, A.A.

    1984-06-01

    A 15-fold reduction in the duration of YAG:Nd/sup 3 +/ laser pulses was achieved under conditions of active mode locking and Q switching at a pulse repetition frequency approx.1 kHz. Phase self-modulation in a single-mode quartz fiber waveguide of length 10 m resulted in broadening of the laser emission spectrum right up to approx.10 cm/sup -1/ at the waveguide exit. The pulses were then shortened in a system with a diffraction grating. The pulse duration was measured by a correlation system in which the second harmonic was generated.

  18. Propagating Characteristics of Pulsed Laser in Rain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Guo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand the performance of laser ranging system under the rain weather condition, we need to know the propagating characteristics of laser pulse in rain. In this paper, the absorption and attenuation coefficients were calculated based on the scattering theories in discrete stochastic media, and the propagating characteristics of laser pulse in rain were simulated and analyzed using Monte-Carlo method. Some simulation results were verified by experiments, and the simulation results are well matched with the experimental data, with the maximal deviation not less than 7.5%. The results indicated that the propagating laser beam would be attenuated and distorted due to the scattering and absorption of raindrops, and the energy attenuation and pulse shape distortion strongly depended on the laser pulse widths.

  19. Laser sclerostomy by pulsed-dye laser and goniolens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latina, M.A.; Dobrogowski, M.; March, W.F.; Birngruber, R. (Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston (USA))

    1990-12-01

    We describe an ab-interno laser sclerostomy procedure using the method termed dye-enhanced ablation with a slit-lamp delivery system and special goniolens such that only the laser light beam penetrates the anterior chamber. The procedure uses a microsecond-pulsed-dye laser emitting at 666 nm and iontophoresis of methylene blue dye (absorption of 668 nm) into the sclera at the limbus to enhance the absorption of the laser light. We compared the number of pulses needed to perforate excised human sclera at pulse durations of 1.5, 20, and 300 microseconds. Pulse durations of 1.5 and 20 microseconds required 20 pulses or fewer to perforate excised human sclera with pulse energies of 75 to 100 mJ. The ab-interno laser sclerostomy procedure was performed in 54 eyes of Dutch-belted rabbits with pulse durations of 1.5 or 20 microseconds and a 100- or 200-microns incident spot diameter delivered using a CGF goniolens. Full-thickness fistulas were successfully created at both pulse durations in approximately 80% of eyes treated. A range of three to 25 pulses was required to perforate sclera with slightly fewer pulses and lower pulse energies at 1.5 microseconds compared with 20 microseconds. There were no significant complications from the procedure. This technique could permit filtration surgery to be performed on an outpatient basis.

  20. Compact KGd(WO4)2 picosecond pulse-train synchronously pumped broadband Raman laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiao Qiang; Long, Ming Liang; Meng, Chen

    2016-08-20

    We demonstrate an efficient approach to realizing an extra-cavity, synchronously pumped, stimulated Raman cascaded process under low repetition frequency (1 kHz) pump conditions. We also construct a compact KGd(WO4)2 (KGW) crystal picosecond Raman laser that has been configured as the developed method. A pulse-train green laser pumped the corresponding 70 mm long KGW crystal Raman cavity. The pulse train contains six pulses, about 800 ps separated, for every millisecond; thus, it can realize synchronous pumping between pump pulse and the pumped Raman cavity. The investigated system produced a collinear Raman laser output that includes six laser lines covering the 532 to 800 nm spectra. This is the first report on an all-solid-state, high-average-power picosecond collinear multi-wavelength (more than three laser components) laser to our knowledge. This method has never been reported on before in the synchronously pumped stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) realm.

  1. Plasma wakefield excitation by incoherent laser pulses: a path towards high-average power laser-plasma accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Benedetti, C; Esarey, E; Leemans, W P

    2014-01-01

    In a laser plasma accelerator (LPA), a short and intense laser pulse propagating in a plasma drives a wakefield (a plasma wave with a relativistic phase velocity) that can sustain extremely large electric fields, enabling compact accelerating structures. Potential LPA applications include compact radiation sources and high energy linear colliders. We propose and study plasma wave excitation by an incoherent combination of a large number of low energy laser pulses (i.e., without constraining the pulse phases). We show that, in spite of the incoherent nature of electromagnetic fields within the volume occupied by the pulses, the excited wakefield is regular and its amplitude is comparable or equal to that obtained using a single, coherent pulse with the same energy. These results provide a path to the next generation of LPA-based applications, where incoherently combined multiple pulses may enable high repetition rate, high average power LPAs.

  2. Eye-safe,single-frequency pulsed all-fiber laser for Doppler wind lidar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Liu; Jiqiao Liu; Weibiao Chen

    2011-01-01

    @@ A single-frequency pulsed erbium-doped fiber(EDF)laser with master-oscillator Dower-amplifier comiguration at t bass nm is developed.A short-cavity,erbium-doped phosphate class fiber laser is utilized as a seeaer laser wntn a unewidtn of b khz and power of 40 mW.The seeder laser is modulated to be a pulse laser with a repetition rate of 10 kHz and pulse duration of 500 ns.The amplifier consists of two pre-amplifiers and one main amplifier.The detailed characteristics of the spectrum and linewidth of the amplifiers are presented.A pulse energy of 116 pJ and a linewidth of 1.1 MHz are obtained.This laser can be a candidate transmitter for an all-fiber Doppler wind lidar in the boundarv laver.%A single-frequency pulsed erbium-doped fiber (EDF) laser with master-oscillator power-amplifier configuration at 1533 nm is developed. A short-cavity, erbium-doped phosphate glass fiber laser is utilized as a seeder laser with a linewidth of 5 kHz and power of 40 mW. The seeder laser is modulated to be a pulse laser with a repetition rate of 10 kHz and pulse duration of 500 ns. The amplifier consists of two pre-amplifiers and one main amplifier. The detailed characteristics of the spectrum and linewidth of the amplifiers are presented. A pulse energy of 116 μJ and a linewidth of 1.1 MHz are obtained. This laser can be a candidate transmitter for an all-fiber Doppler wind lidar in the boundary layer.

  3. Effects of high-repetition-rate femtosecond laser micromachining on the physical and chemical properties of polylactide (PLA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Wei; Luo, Yiming; Yu, Jian; Liu, Bowen; Hu, Minglie; Chai, Lu; Wang, Chingyue

    2015-10-19

    The effects of femtosecond laser ablation, with 115 fs pulses at 1040 nm wavelength and 57 MHz repetition-rate, on the physical and chemical properties of polylactide (PLA) were studied in air and in water. The surface of the PLA sample ablated by high-repetition-rate femtosecond laser was analysed using field emission scanning electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, raman spectroscopy, as well as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Compared with the experiments in the air at ambient temperature, melting resolidification was negligible for the experiments conducted under water. Neither in air nor under water did oxidation and crystallization process take place in the laser ablated surface. In addition, the intensity of some oxygen related peaks increased for water experiments, probably due to the hydrolysis. Meantime, the chemical shift to higher energies appeared in C1s XPS spectrum of laser processing in water. Interestingly, a large amount of defects were observed after laser processing in air, while no significant change was shown under water experiments. This indicates that thermal and mechanical effects by high-repetition-rate femtosecond laser ablation in water are quite limited, which could be even ignored.

  4. Theoretical and Experimental studies on CH{sub 3}OH THz Laser Pumped by Pulse Carbon Dioxide Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fei Fei; Wang Jing; Tian Zhaoshuo; Zhang Yanchao; Fu Shiyou; Wang Qi, E-mail: tianzhaoshuo@126.com [Information Optoelectronics Research Institute, Harbin Institute of Technology at Weihai, Sandong, Weihai, 264209 (China)

    2011-02-01

    In this paper, according to the molecular structure and vibration mode of micro-asymmetric gyroscope CH{sub 3}OH molecule, dynamic process of optically pumped Terahertz laser is analyzed theoretically. The rate equation models based on three level systems are given according to the theory of typical laser rate equation. The output THz pulsed laser waveform is obtained by solving the rate equation model. An all-metal Terahertz laser pumped by RF waveguide carbon dioxide laser is designed with CH{sub 3}OH as its working gas. The pulsed Terahertz laser output is obtained. The waveform and repetition frequency of the optically pumped laser are measured in the experiments. The Terahertz laser designed does not need water cooling system. It also has the advantages of simple structure and small size.

  5. Pulsed Laser Cladding of Ni Based Powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascu, A.; Stanciu, E. M.; Croitoru, C.; Roata, I. C.; Tierean, M. H.

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to optimize the operational parameters and quality of one step Metco Inconel 718 atomized powder laser cladded tracks, deposited on AISI 316 stainless steel substrate by means of a 1064 nm high power pulsed laser, together with a Precitec cladding head manipulated by a CLOOS 7 axes robot. The optimization of parameters and cladding quality has been assessed through Taguchi interaction matrix and graphical output. The study demonstrates that very good cladded layers with low dilution and increased mechanical proprieties could be fabricated using low laser energy density by involving a pulsed laser.

  6. Measurement of pulse lengthening with pulse energy increase in picosecond Nd:YAG laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cutolo, A.; Zeni, L.; Berardi, V.; Bruzzese, R.; Solimeno, S.; Spinelli, N.

    1989-03-15

    Taking advantage of a new technique, we have monitored the relative variations of time duration and mode size as a function of the pulse energy for 30-ps-long Nd:YAG laser pulses. In particular, by carrying out a statistical analysis, we have observed that the pulse time duration is an increasing function of the pulse energy, according to the theoretical modeling of passively mode-locked lasers. The measurements can be easily extended to the femtosecond regime.

  7. Amplification of femtosecond pulses in Ti:Al2O3 using an injection-seeded laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagasse, M. J.; Schoenlein, R. W.; Fujimoto, J. G.; Schulz, P. A.

    1989-12-01

    A 440-fsec, 0.1-pJ pulse from a dye laser is injected into a high-repetition-rate Ti:Al2O3 laser pumped by a copper-vapor laser to study the amplification and pulse broadening of femtosecond pulses in Ti:Al2O3. Gains of 2 x 10 to the 7th are achieved with output pulse durations of 1.1 psec. After recompression with a grating pair to compensate dispersion broadening, pulses as short as 275 fsec are obtained.

  8. Repetitively pulsed UV radiation source based on a run-away electron preionised diffuse discharge in nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baksht, E. Kh; Burachenko, A. G.; Lomaev, M. I.; Panchenko, A. N.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2015-04-01

    An extended repetitively pulsed source of spontaneous UV radiation is fabricated, which may also be used for producing laser radiation. Voltage pulses with an incident wave amplitude of up to 30 kV, a half-amplitude duration of ~4 ns and a rise time of ~2.5 ns are applied to a gap with a nonuniform electric field. For an excitation region length of 35 cm and a nitrogen pressure of 30 - 760 Torr, a diffusive discharge up to a pulse repetition rate of 2 kHz is produced without using an additional system for gap preionisation. An investigation is made of the plasma of the run-away electron preionised diffuse discharge. Using a CCD camera it is found that the dense diffused plasma fills the gap in a time shorter than 1 ns. X-ray radiation is recorded from behind the foil anode throughout the pressure range under study; a supershort avalanche electron beam is recorded by the collector electrode at pressures below 100 Torr.

  9. Evolution Strategies for Laser Pulse Compression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monmarché, Nicolas; Fanciulli, Riccardo; Willmes, Lars; Talbi, El-Ghazali; Savolainen, Janne; Collet, Pierre; Schoenauer, Marc; van der Walle, P.; Lutton, Evelyne; Back, Thomas; Herek, Jennifer Lynn

    2008-01-01

    This study describes first steps taken to bring evolutionary optimization technology from computer simulations to real world experimentation in physics laboratories. The approach taken considers a well understood Laser Pulse Compression problem accessible both to simulation and laboratory experiment

  10. Molecular wakes for ultrashort laser pulses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The molecular wake-assisted interaction between two collinear femotosecond laser pulses is investigated in air,which leads to the generation of a controllable 1.8 mJ super-continuum pulse with an elongated self-guided channel due to the cross-phase modulation of the impulsively aligned diatomic molecules in air. For two parallel launched femtosecond laser pulses with a certain spatial separation,controllable attraction and repulsion of the pulses are observed due to the counter-balance among molecular wakes,Kerr and plasma effects,where the molecular wakes show a longer interaction distance than the others to control the propagation of the intense ultrashort laser pulses.

  11. Temporal synchronization and spectral combining of pulses from fiber lasers Q-switched by independent MEMS micro-mirrors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabert, Marc; Desfarges-Berthelemot, Agnès; Kermène, Vincent; Crunteanu, Aurelian

    2012-09-24

    We present what we believe to be the first demonstration of spectral combining of multiple fiber lasers Q-switched by independent micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS). By correlating the actuation of the individual MEMS devices, the associated Q-switched lasers can be operated in either synchronous or asynchronous modes in such a way that their overall combined output may result in high energy emission pulses or in laser emission with higher pulse repetition rate. In a proof-of-principle experiment, we demonstrate the combination of four individual Q-switched lasers (each of them operating at 20 kHz repetition rate) leading to a final laser system generating pulses with a repetition rate of 80 kHz.

  12. Laser surface modification of titanium substrate for pulsed laser deposition of highly adherent hydroxyapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh, P; Muraleedharan, C V; Komath, Manoj; Varma, Harikrishna

    2011-07-01

    Biomedical implant devices made out of titanium and its alloys are benefited by a modified surface or a bioactive coating to enhance bone bonding ability and to function effectively in vivo for the intended period of time. In this respect hydroxyapatite coating developed through pulsed laser deposition is a promising approach. Since the success of the bioactive ceramic coated implant depends mainly on the substrate-coating strength; an attempt has been made to produce micro patterned surface structure on titanium substrate for adherent hydroxyapatite coating. A pulsed Nd-YAG laser beam (355 nm) with 10 Hz repetition rate was used for surface treatment of titanium as well as hydroxyapatite deposition. The unfocussed laser beam was used to modify the substrate surface with 500-18,000 laser pulses while keeping the polished substrate in water. Hydroxyapatite deposition was done in a vacuum deposition chamber at 400 °C with the focused laser beam under 1 × 10⁻³ mbar oxygen pressure. Deposits were analyzed to understand the physico-chemical, morphological and mechanical characteristics. The obtained substrate and coating surface morphology indicates that laser treatment method can provide controlled micro-topography. Scratch test analysis and microindentation hardness values of coating on laser treated substrate indicate higher mechanical adhesion with respect to coatings on untreated substrates.

  13. Plasma Sheet Actuator Driven by Repetitive Nanosecond Pulses with a Negative DC Component

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋慧敏; 张乔根; 李应红; 贾敏; 吴云; 梁华

    2012-01-01

    A type of electrical discharge called sliding discharge was developed to generate plasma aerodynamic actuation for flow control. A three-electrode plasma sheet actuator driven by repetitive nanosecond pulses with a negative DC component was used to generate sliding discharge, which can be called nanosecond-pulse sliding discharge. The phenomenology and behaviour of the plasma sheet actuator were investigated experimentally. Discharge morphology shows that the formation of nanosecond-pulse sliding discharge is dependent on the peak value of the repetitive nanosecond pulses and negative DC component applied on the plasma sheet actuator. Compared to dielectric barrier discharge (DBD), the extension of plasma in nanosecond-pulse sliding discharge is quasi-diffusive, stable, longer and more intensive. Test results of particle image velocimetry demonstrate that the negative DC component applied to a third electrode could significantly modify the topology of the flow induced by nanosecond-pulse DBD. Body force induced by the nanosecond-pulse sliding discharge can be approximately in the order of mN. Both the maximum velocity and the body force induced by sliding discharge increase significantly as compared to single DBD. Therefore, nanosecond-pulse sliding discharge is a preferable plasma aerodynamic actuation generation mode, which is very promising in the field of aerodynamics.

  14. Pulsed lasers in dentistry: sense or nonsense?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koort, Hans J.; Frentzen, Matthias

    1991-05-01

    The great interest in the field of laser applications in dentistry provokes the question, if all these new techniques may really fulfill advantages, which are expected after initial in-vitro studies. Whereas laser surgery of soft oral tissues has been developed to a standard method, laser treatment of dental hard tissues and the bone are attended with many unsolved problems. Different laser types, especially pulsed lasers in a wide spectrum of wavelengths have been proofed for dental use. Today neither the excimer lasers, emitting in the far uv-range from 193 to 351 nm, nor the mid-infrared lasers like Nd:YAG (1,064 μm), Ho:YAG (2,1 μm) and Er:YAG (2,96 μm) or the C02-laser (10,6 μm) show mechanism of interaction more carefully and faster than a preparation of teeth with diamond drillers. The laser type with the most precise and considerate treatment effects in the moment is the short pulsed (15 ns) ArF-excimer laser with a wavelength of 193 nm. However this laser type has not yet the effectivity of mechanical instruments and it needs a mirror system to deliver the radiation. Histological results point out, that this laser shows no significant pathological alterations in the adjacent tissues. Another interesting excimer laser, filled with XeCI and emitting at a wavelength of 308 nm has the advantage to be good to deliver through quartz fibers. A little more thermal influence is to be seen according to the longer wavelength. Yet the energy density, necessary to cut dental hard tissues will not be reached with the laser systems available now. Both the pulsed Er:YAG- (2,94 μm, pulse duration 250 s) and the Ho:YAG -laser (2,1 μm, pulse duration 250 μs) have an effective coupling of the laser energy to hydrogeneous tissues, but they do not work sufficient on healthy enamel and dentine. The influence to adjacent healthy tissue is not tolerable, especially in regard of the thermal damage dentine and pulp tissues. Moreover, like the 193 nm ArF-excimer laser

  15. High on/off ratio ns laser pulses for a triggered single-photon source

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, Gang; He, Jun; Wang, Junmin

    2016-01-01

    852nm nano-second laser pulse chain with a high on/off ratio is generated via chopping a continuous-wave laser beam by using of a Mach-Zehnder-type electro-optic intensity modulator (MZ-EOIM). Detailed analysis and dependence of the on/off ratio on the splitting ratio, the co-splitting ratio, and the arms loss of MZ-EIOM are presented. By optimizing the polarization of incident laser beam and stabilizing MZ-EOIM temperature, the static on/off ratio of 12600:1 is achieved. Also the dynamic on/off ratios versus the pulse repetition rate and the pulse duty cycle are measured and discussed. This high on/off ratio ns pulsed laser system has served as the excitation pulse source for a triggered single-photon source based on trapped single cesium atom, which reveals a representative anti-bunching.

  16. Dynamic properties of a pulse-pumped fiber laser with a short, high-gain cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chaolin; Guo, Junhong; Wei, Pu; Wan, Hongdan; Xu, Ji; Wang, Jin

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate a pulsed high-gain all-fiber laser without intracavity modulators, where a short and heavily Erbium-doped fiber is used as the gain medium in a ring cavity. By pulsed-pumping this short high gain cavity and tuning an intracavity variable optical coupler, the laser generates optical pulses with a pulse-width of μs at a repetition rate in the order of kHz down to one-shot operation. Furthermore, dynamic properties of this laser are investigated theoretically based on a traveling-wave-model, in which an adaptive-discrete-grid-finite-difference-method is applied. The simulation results validate the experimental results. The demonstrated pulsed laser is compact, flexible and cost-effective, which will have great potential for applications in all-optical sensing and communication systems.

  17. Evolution of laser pulse shape in a parabolic plasma channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, M.; Gupta, D. N.; Suk, H.

    2017-01-01

    During high-intensity laser propagation in a plasma, the group velocity of a laser pulse is subjected to change with the laser intensity due to alteration in refractive index associated with the variation of the nonlinear plasma density. The pulse front sharpened while the back of the pulse broadened due to difference in the group velocity at different parts of the laser pulse. Thus the distortion in the shape of the laser pulse is expected. We present 2D particle-in-cell simulations demonstrating the controlling the shape distortion of a Gaussian laser pulse using a parabolic plasma channel. We show the results of the intensity distribution of laser pulse in a plasma with and without a plasma channel. It has been observed that the plasma channel helps in controlling the laser pulse shape distortion. The understanding of evolution of laser pulse shape may be crucial while applying the parabolic plasma channel for guiding the laser pulse in plasma based accelerators.

  18. Efficient intracavity frequency doubling of a high-repetition-rate diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, F; Poirier, P

    1994-10-01

    Efficient operation of a pulsed, high-repetition-rate diode-pumped and intracavity frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser is reported. A 3-mm-diameter laser rod was side-pumped with a 5-bar stack of high-duty-cycle 1-cm diodearrays. The average Q-switched power at 1.06microum was 3.8 W at 1.33 kH(z), and more than 4 W at 0.532 ,microm wasobtained through intracavity frequency doubling with LiB(3)O(5).

  19. Electron diffraction using ultrafast electron bunches from a laser-wakefield accelerator at kHz repetition rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Z.-H.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Beaurepaire, B.; Nees, J. A.; Hou, B.; Malka, V.; Krushelnick, K.; Faure, J.

    2013-02-01

    We show that electron bunches in the 50-100 keV range can be produced from a laser wakefield accelerator using 10 mJ, 35 fs laser pulses operating at 0.5 kHz. It is shown that using a solenoid magnetic lens, the electron bunch distribution can be shaped. The resulting transverse and longitudinal coherence is suitable for producing diffraction images from a polycrystalline 10 nm aluminum foil. The high repetition rate, the stability of the electron source, and the fact that its uncorrelated bunch duration is below 100 fs make this approach promising for the development of sub-100 fs ultrafast electron diffraction experiments.

  20. Development of a 16 kHz repetition rate, 110 W average power copper HyBrID laser

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Biswal; P K Agrawal; G K Mishra; S V Nakhe; S K Dixit; J K Mittal

    2010-11-01

    This paper presents the design and performance analysis of an indigenously developed 110 W average output power copper HyBrID laser operating at 16 kHz pulse repetition rate. The laser active medium was confined within a fused silica tube of ∼ 6 cm diameter and ∼ 200 cm active length. An in-house developed high-power (∼ 10 kW) solid-state pulser was used as the electrical excitation source. A simple estimation of deposited electrical power, at the laser head, was carried out and based on it, the laser tube efficiency was found to be 2.9% at 70 W and 2.2% at 110 W laser power levels.

  1. Development of a 1 J short pulse tunable TEA CO2 laser with high energy stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manoj; Reghu, T.; Biswas, A. K.; Bhargav, Pankaj; Pakhare, J. S.; Kumar, Shailesh; Verma, Abrat; Mandloi, Vagesh; Kukreja, L. M.

    2014-12-01

    The design, development and operational characteristics of a 1 J, repetitively pulsed, line tunable TEA CO2 laser producing nearly tail free short pulses (~170 ns) suitable for laser isotope separation is discussed. Tail free short laser pulses were generated by employing a nitrogen lean gaseous active medium. Use of an indigenously developed stable pulsed power supply, uniform and intense UV spark pre-ionization and optimum gas purging with catalytic regeneration to control the deleterious oxygen accumulation helps generate laser pulses with high energy stability. Integration of a sensitive arc detection system allows long term arc-free operation of the laser and protects it from catastrophic failure. Laser pulses in more than 90 lines in 10.6 μm and 9.6 μm bands of CO2 laser spectrum with energy about 1 J in as many as 50 lines could be generated with a typical efficiency of about 4%. A typical pulse to pulse energy stability of ±1.4% was obtained during one hour of continuous operation of the TEA CO2 laser at 75 Hz.

  2. High-throughput machining using high average power ultrashort pulse lasers and ultrafast polygon scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schille, Joerg; Schneider, Lutz; Streek, André; Kloetzer, Sascha; Loeschner, Udo

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, high-throughput ultrashort pulse laser machining is investigated on various industrial grade metals (Aluminium, Copper, Stainless steel) and Al2O3 ceramic at unprecedented processing speeds. This is achieved by using a high pulse repetition frequency picosecond laser with maximum average output power of 270 W in conjunction with a unique, in-house developed two-axis polygon scanner. Initially, different concepts of polygon scanners are engineered and tested to find out the optimal architecture for ultrafast and precision laser beam scanning. Remarkable 1,000 m/s scan speed is achieved on the substrate, and thanks to the resulting low pulse overlap, thermal accumulation and plasma absorption effects are avoided at up to 20 MHz pulse repetition frequencies. In order to identify optimum processing conditions for efficient high-average power laser machining, the depths of cavities produced under varied parameter settings are analyzed and, from the results obtained, the characteristic removal values are specified. The maximum removal rate is achieved as high as 27.8 mm3/min for Aluminium, 21.4 mm3/min for Copper, 15.3 mm3/min for Stainless steel and 129.1 mm3/min for Al2O3 when full available laser power is irradiated at optimum pulse repetition frequency.

  3. Drop Shaping by Laser-Pulse Impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, A.L.; Bouwhuis, W.; Visser, C.W.; Lhuissier, H.E.; Sun, C.; Snoeijer, J.H.; Villermaux, E.; Lohse, D.; Gelderblom, H.

    2015-01-01

    We show how the deposition of laser energy induces propulsion and strong deformation of an absorbing liquid body. Combining high speed with stroboscopic imaging, we observe that a millimeter-sized dyed water drop hit by a millijoule nanosecond laser pulse propels forward at several meters per second

  4. Pulsed laser deposition of niobium nitride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farha, Ashraf Hassan, E-mail: ahass006@odu.edu; Elsayed-Ali, Hani E., E-mail: helsayed@odu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529 (United States); Applied Research Center, Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Ain Shams University, Cairo 11566 (Egypt); Ufuktepe, Yüksel, E-mail: ufuk@cu.edu.tr [Department of Physics, University of Cukurova, 01330 Adana (Turkey); Myneni, Ganapati, E-mail: rao@jlab.org [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia 23606 (United States)

    2015-12-04

    Niobium nitride (NbN{sub x}) films were grown on Nb and Si(100) substrates using pulsed laser deposition. NbN{sub x} films were deposited on Nb substrates using PLD with a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (λ = 1064 nm, ∼40 ns pulse width, and 10 Hz repetition rate) at different laser fluences, nitrogen background pressures and deposition substrate temperatures. When all the fabrication parameters are fixed, except for the laser fluence, the surface roughness, nitrogen content, and grain size increase with increasing laser fluence. Increasing nitrogen background pressure leads to a change in the phase structure of the NbN{sub x} films from mixed β-Nb{sub 2}N and cubic δ-NbN phases to single hexagonal β-Nb{sub 2}N. The substrate temperature affects the preferred orientation of the crystal structure. The structural and electronic, properties of NbN{sub x} deposited on Si(100) were also investigated. The NbN{sub x} films exhibited a cubic δ-NbN with a strong (111) orientation. A correlation between surface morphology, electronic, and superconducting properties was found. The observations establish guidelines for adjusting the deposition parameters to achieve the desired NbN{sub x} film morphology and phase.

  5. All-solid-state repetitive semiconductor opening switch-based short pulse generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Zhenjie; Hao, Qingsong; Hu, Long; Su, Jiancang; Liu, Guozhi

    2009-09-01

    The operating characteristics of a semiconductor opening switch (SOS) are determined by its pumping circuit parameters. SOS is still able to cut off the current when pumping current duration falls to the order of tens of nanoseconds and a short pulse forms simultaneously in the output load. An all-solid-state repetitive SOS-based short pulse generator (SPG100) with a three-level magnetic pulse compression unit was successfully constructed. The generator adopts magnetic pulse compression unit with metallic glass and ferrite cores, which compresses a 600 V, 10 mus primary pulse into short pulse with forward pumping current of 825 A, 60 ns and reverse pumping current of 1.3 kA, 30 ns. The current is sent to SOS in which the reverse pumping current is interrupted. The generator is capable of providing a pulse with the voltage of 120 kV and duration of 5-6 ns while output load being 125 Omega. The highest repetition rate is up to 1 kHz.

  6. Laser pulse shaping for high gradient accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, F.; Anania, M. P.; Bellaveglia, M.; Bisesto, F.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Curcio, A.; Galletti, M.; Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M.; Gatti, G.; Moreno, M.; Petrarca, M.; Pompili, R.; Vaccarezza, C.

    2016-09-01

    In many high gradient accelerator schemes, i.e. with plasma or dielectric wakefield induced by particles, many electron pulses are required to drive the acceleration of one of them. Those electron bunches, that generally should have very short duration and low emittance, can be generated in photoinjectors driven by a train of laser pulses coming inside the same RF bucket. We present the system used to shape and characterize the laser pulses used in multibunch operations at Sparc_lab. Our system gives us control over the main parameter useful to produce a train of up to five high brightness bunches with tailored intensity and time distribution.

  7. Laser pulse shaping for high gradient accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villa, F., E-mail: fabio.villa@lnf.infn.it [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, via E. Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Anania, M.P.; Bellaveglia, M. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, via E. Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Bisesto, F. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, via E. Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Università La Sapienza di Roma, Via A. Scarpa 14, Rome (Italy); Chiadroni, E. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, via E. Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Cianchi, A. [INFN-Roma Tor Vergata and Università di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); Curcio, A.; Galletti, M.; Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M.; Gatti, G. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, via E. Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Moreno, M.; Petrarca, M. [Università La Sapienza di Roma, Via A. Scarpa 14, Rome (Italy); Pompili, R.; Vaccarezza, C. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, via E. Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy)

    2016-09-01

    In many high gradient accelerator schemes, i.e. with plasma or dielectric wakefield induced by particles, many electron pulses are required to drive the acceleration of one of them. Those electron bunches, that generally should have very short duration and low emittance, can be generated in photoinjectors driven by a train of laser pulses coming inside the same RF bucket. We present the system used to shape and characterize the laser pulses used in multibunch operations at Sparc-lab. Our system gives us control over the main parameter useful to produce a train of up to five high brightness bunches with tailored intensity and time distribution.

  8. Production and Characterization of High Repetition Rate Terahertz Radiation in Femtosecond-Laser-Induced Air Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    20 3.1 Verdi -Pumped Femtosecond Laser System...current which then produces the observed THz pulse [9]. 20 III. EQUIPMENT 3.1 VERDI -PUMPED FEMTOSECOND LASER SYSTEM The laser used in...this research is a Coherent fs pulsed laser system as shown schematically in figure 4. The 18 W Verdi beam pumps the 76 MHz MIRA, which produces 50

  9. Performance characteristics of an excimer laser (XeCl) with single-stage magnetic pulse compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varshnay, N. K.; Singh, A.; Benerji, N. S.

    2017-02-01

    Performance characteristics of an excimer laser (XeCl) with single-stage magnetic pulse compression suitable for material processing applications are presented here. The laser incorporates in-built compact gas circulation and gas cooling to ensure fresh gas mixture between the electrodes for repetitive operation. A magnetically coupled tangential blower is used for gas circulation inside the laser chamber for repetitive operation. The exciter consists of C-C energy transfer circuit and thyratron is used as a high-voltage main switch with single-stage magnetic pulse compression (MPC) between thyratron and the laser electrodes. Low inductance of the laser head and uniform and intense pre-ionization are the main features of the electric circuit used in the laser. A 250 ns rise time voltage pulse was compressed to 100 ns duration with a single-stage magnetic pulse compressor using Ni-Zn ferrite cores. The laser can generate about 150 mJ at ˜100 Hz rep-rate reliably from a discharge volume of 100 cm 3. 2D spatial laser beam profile generated is presented here. The profile shows that the laser beam is completely filled with flat-top which is suitable for material processing applications. The SEM image of the microhole generated on copper target is presented here.

  10. Performance characteristics of an excimer laser (XeCl) with single-stage magnetic pulse compression

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N K VARSHNAY; A A SINGH; N S BENERJI

    2017-02-01

    Performance characteristics of an excimer laser (XeCl) with single-stage magnetic pulse compression suitable for material processing applications are presented here. The laser incorporates in-built compact gas circulation and gas cooling to ensure fresh gas mixture between the electrodes for repetitive operation. A magnetically coupled tangential blower is used for gas circulation inside the laser chamber for repetitive operation. The exciter consists of C–C energy transfer circuit and thyratron is used as a high-voltage main switch with singlestage magnetic pulse compression (MPC) between thyratron and the laser electrodes. Low inductance of the laser head and uniform and intense pre-ionization are the main features of the electric circuit used in the laser. A 250 ns rise time voltage pulse was compressed to 100 ns duration with a single-stage magnetic pulse compressor using Ni–Zn ferrite cores. The laser can generate about 150 mJ at ∼100 Hz rep-rate reliably from a discharge volumeof 100 cm$^3$. 2D spatial laser beam profile generated is presented here. The profile shows that the laser beam is completely filled with flat-top which is suitable for material processing applications. The SEM image of the microhole generated on copper target is presented here.

  11. Synchronization and coherent combining of two pulsed fiber lasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate a scalable architecture for coherent combining of pulsed fiber lasers.A new method for generating synchronous pulsed fiber lasers by direct phase modulation is proposed and investigated.It is shown that phase modulated mutually coupled laser array can be a steady synchronous pulsed fiber laser source.The synchronous pulsed fiber lasers are coherently combined with an invariable phase difference of π in adjacent lasers.Neither active phase control nor polarization control is taken in our experiment.

  12. X-ray generation by the interaction of laser pulses of GW and high repetition rate, with solid targets of Al, Cu, Cd and Au; Generacion de rayos X por interaccion de pulsos laser de GW y alta tasa de repeticion, con blancos solidos de Al, Cu, Cd, Au

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonseca Cuenca, C.; Rodriguez Entem, D.; Mendez Valverde, C.; Roso Franco, L.; Fernandez Gonzalez, F.

    2011-07-01

    In the present study we characterized the Bremsstrahlung radiation and X-ray emission associated with the radiation emitted during the interaction of laser pulses incident on solid targets of different material and discusses the radiation risk generated by the nature of this interaction.

  13. Fast phosphor picosecond streak tube for ultrafast laser diagnostics in repetitive mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ageeva, N. V.; Gornostaev, P. B.; Ivanova, S. R.; Kulechenkova, T. P.; Levina, G. P.; Lozovoi, V. I.; Makushina, V. A.; Schelev, M. Ya; Shashkov, E. V.; Scaballanovich, T. A.; Smirnov, A. V.; Vereschagin, A. K.; Vereschagin, K. A.; Vorobiev, N. S.

    2015-08-01

    The well-established PIF-01/S1/P43 picosecond streak tube, designed 30 years ago and still manufactured at the A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute, was modified by replacing its traditional P43 phosphor screen with a P47 one having approximately three orders of magnitude shorter decay time. The experimental measurements of this decay time were provided by PIF-01/S1/P47 image tube photocathode irradiation either with a single or a train of 8 ps laser pulses separated by 8 ns from each other at a 1.08 μm wavelength. The results of our preliminary measurements of P47-BH phosphor (manufactured by Phosphor Technology Ltd) indicate the possibility of employing the PIF-01/S1/P47 streak tube for synchrotron diagnostics at a units megahertz repetition rate without the negative influence of ‘ghost images’ from the previous streak records.

  14. Graphene-based Q-switched pulsed fiber laser in a linear configuration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y. K. Yap; Richard M. De La Rue; C. H. Pua; S. W. Harun; H. Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    A pulsed laser system is realized with graphene employed as a Q-switch.The graphene is exfoliated from its solution using an optical deposition and the optical tweezer effect.A fiber ferrule that already has the graphene deposited on it is inserted into an erbium-ytterbium laser (EYL) system with linear cavity configuration.We successfully demonstrate a pulsed EYL with a pulse duration of approximately 5.9 μs and a repetition rate of 20.0 kHz.

  15. High speed laser drilling of metals using a high repetition rate, high average power ultrafast fiber CPA system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancona, A; Röser, F; Rademaker, K; Limpert, J; Nolte, S; Tünnermann, A

    2008-06-09

    We present an experimental study on the drilling of metal targets with ultrashort laser pulses at high repetition rates (from 50 kHz up to 975 kHz) and high average powers (up to 68 Watts), using an ytterbium-doped fiber CPA system. The number of pulses to drill through steel and copper sheets with thicknesses up to 1 mm have been measured as a function of the repetition rate and the pulse energy. Two distinctive effects, influencing the drilling efficiency at high repetition rates, have been experimentally found and studied: particle shielding and heat accumulation. While the shielding of subsequent pulses due to the ejected particles leads to a reduced ablation efficiency, this effect is counteracted by heat accumulation. The experimental data are in good qualitative agreement with simulations of the heat accumulation effect and previous studies on the particle emission. However, for materials with a high thermal conductivity as copper, both effects are negligible for the investigated processing parameters. Therefore, the full power of the fiber CPA system can be exploited, which allows to trepan high-quality holes in 0.5mm-thick copper samples with breakthrough times as low as 75 ms.

  16. Temporal Shaping of High Peak Power Pulse Trains from a Burst-Mode Laser System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Körner

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown in the past that pulsed laser systems operating in the so-called “burst mode” are a beneficial approach to generate high peak power laser pulses at high repetition rates suitable for various applications. So far, most high-energy burst-mode laser systems put great effort into generating a homogeneous energy distribution across the burst duration, e.g., by shaping the pump pulse. In this work, we present a new shaping technique, which is able to produce arbitrary energy distributions within the burst by pre-shaping the seed pulse burst with a Pockels cell. Furthermore, this technique allows for the precompensation of any static modulations across the burst, which may be introduced during the subsequent amplification process. Therefore, a pulse burst with a uniform energy distribution can also be generated. The method is tested with an ultra-short pulse burst mode laser amplifier system producing bursts of a 1 ms duration with a pulse repetition rate of 1 MHz and a maximum output power of 800 W during the burst. Furthermore, a method to predict the influence of the amplifier on a non-uniformly shaped burst is presented and successfully tested to produce a pre-defined pulse shape after amplification.

  17. Long-pulse, single-frequency 1064 nm laser and frequency doubling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiafei Xu; Gang Xie; Yanhua Lu; Lei Zhang; Min Wan

    2015-01-01

    An all-solid-state single-frequency 1064 nm laser with a 100 μs pulse width, 500 Hz repetition rate and 700 m J single pulse energy is designed using seed injection and a three-stage master oscillator power amplifier(MOPA) construction.Using this as a basis, research on long-pulse laser frequency doubling is carried out. By designing and optimizing the lithium triborate(LBO) crystal, the theoretically calculated maximum conversion efficiency ηmax reaches 68% at M2=1, while ηminis 33% at M2=3. Generation of 212 m J pulses of green light with a repetition rate as high as500 Hz is obtained from a fundamental energy of 700 m J. The experimental conversion efficiency reaches 31% and the power stability is better than±1%.

  18. Passively mode-locked stretched-pulse erbium-doped fiber ring laser with a regenerative feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Vincent; Lamonde, Martin; Babin, Francois; Piche, Michel

    2003-02-01

    A polarization additive pulse mode-locked stretched-pulse erbium-doped fiber ring laser with a regenerative feedback producing near transform-limited femtosecond pulses is reported. The regenerative feedback makes use of an intensity modulator driven at twice the fundamental repetition rate of the passively mode-locked fiber laser. The laser is self-starting for a limited range of pump power. The de-chirped pulses have a duration of 90 fs (FWHM) and a pulse time-bandwidth product of 0.44. The pulse energy amounts to 0.3 nJ. Pulses with nearly twice that energy could be obtained, though without self-starting capability. The laser RF power spectrum measurement yields an amplitude noise as low as 0.15% (rms) and a pulse timing jitter of 150 fs (rms). In addition, RF spectra show no relaxation oscillation in the self-starting regime.

  19. Structure of picosecond pulses of a Q-switched and mode-locked diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donin, V I; Yakovin, D V; Gribanov, A V [Institute of Automation and Electrometry, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-31

    The pulse duration of a diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser, in which Q-switching with mode-locking (QML regime) is achieved using a spherical mirror and a travelling-wave acousto-optic modulator, is directly measured with a streak camera. It is found that the picosecond pulses can have a non-single-pulse structure, which is explained by excitation of several competing transverse modes in the Q-switching regime with a pulse repetition rate of 1 kHz. In the case of cw mode-locking (without Q-switching), a new (auto-QML) regime is observed, in which the pulse train repetition rate is determined by the frequency of the relaxation oscillations of the laser field while the train contains single picosecond pulses. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  20. A low timing jitter picosecond microchip laser pumped by pulsed LD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sha; Wang, Yan-biao; Feng, Guoying; Zhou, Shou-huan

    2016-07-01

    SESAM passively Q-switched microchip laser is a very promising instrument to replace mode locked lasers to obtain picosecond pulses. The biggest drawback of a passively Q-switched microchip laser is its un-avoided large timing jitter, especially when the pump intensity is low, i.e. at low laser repetition rate range. In order to obtain a low timing jitter passively Q-switched picosecond microchip laser in the whole laser repetition rate range, a 1000 kHz pulsed narrow bandwidth Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) stablized laser diode was used as the pump source. By tuning the pump intensity, we could control the output laser frequency. In this way, we achieved a very low timing jitter passively Q-switched picosecond laser at 2.13 mW, 111.1 kHz. The relative timing jitter was only 0.0315%, which was around 100 times smaller compared with a cw LD pumped microchip working at hundred kilohertz repetition rate frequency range.

  1. A K-alpha x-ray source using high energy and high repetition rate laser system for phase contrast imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Serbanescu, Cristina; Fourmaux, Sylvain; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Kincaid, Russell; Krol, Andrzej

    2009-01-01

    K-alpha x-ray sources from laser produced plasmas provide completely new possibilities for x-ray phase-contrast imaging applications. By tightly focusing intense femtosecond laser pulses onto a solid target K-alpha x-ray pulses are generated through the interaction of energetic electrons created in the plasma with the bulk target. In this paper, we present a continuous and efficient Mo K-alpha x-ray source produced by a femtosecond laser system operating at 100 Hz repetition rate with maximum...

  2. A compact picosecond pulsed laser source using a fully integrated CMOS driver circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuting; Li, Yuhua; Yadid-Pecht, Orly

    2016-03-01

    Picosecond pulsed laser source have applications in areas such as optical communications, biomedical imaging and supercontinuum generation. Direct modulation of a laser diode with ultrashort current pulses offers a compact and efficient approach to generate picosecond laser pulses. A fully integrated complementary metaloxide- semiconductor (CMOS) driver circuit is designed and applied to operate a 4 GHz distributed feedback laser (DFB). The CMOS driver circuit combines sub-circuits including a voltage-controlled ring oscillator, a voltagecontrolled delay line, an exclusive-or (XOR) circuit and a current source circuit. Ultrashort current pulses are generated by the XOR circuit when the delayed square wave is XOR'ed with the original square wave from the on-chip oscillator. Circuit post-layout simulation shows that output current pulses injected into an equivalent circuit load of the laser have a pulse full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 200 ps, a peak current of 80 mA and a repetition rate of 5.8 MHz. This driver circuit is designed in a 0.13 μm CMOS process and taped out on a 0.3 mm2 chip area. This CMOS chip is packaged and interconnected with the laser diode on a printed circuit board (PCB). The optical output waveform from the laser source is captured by a 5 GHz bandwidth photodiode and an 8 GHz bandwidth oscilloscope. Measured results show that the proposed laser source can output light pulses with a pulse FWHM of 151 ps, a peak power of 6.4 mW (55 mA laser peak forward current) and a repetition rate of 5.3 MHz.

  3. Ultra-short pulse laser proton acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeil, Karl; Kraft, Stephan; Bussmann, Michael; Cowan, Thomas; Kluge, Thomas; Metzkes, Josefine; Richter, Tom; Schramm, Ulrich [Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    We present a systematic investigation of ultra-short pulse laser acceleration of protons yielding unprecedented maximum proton energies of 17 MeV using the Ti:Sapphire lased high power laser of 100 TW Draco at the Research Centre Dresden-Rossendorf. For plain few micron thick foil targets a linear scaling of the maximum proton energy with laser power is observed and attributed to the short acceleration period close to the target rear surface. Although excellent laser pulse contrast was available slight deformations of the target rear were found to lead to a predictable shift of the direction of the energetic proton emission away from target normal towards the laser direction. The change of the emission characteristics are compared to analytical modelling and 2D PIC simulations.

  4. Efficient optical trapping of CdTe quantum dots by femtosecond laser pulses

    KAUST Repository

    Chiang, Weiyi

    2014-12-11

    The development in optical trapping and manipulation has been showing rapid progress, most of it is in the small particle sizes in nanometer scales, substituting the conventional continuous-wave lasers with high-repetition-rate ultrashort laser pulse train and nonlinear optical effects. Here, we evaluate two-photon absorption in optical trapping of 2.7 nm-sized CdTe quantum dots (QDs) with high-repetition-rate femtosecond pulse train by probing laser intensity dependence of both Rayleigh scattering image and the two-photon-induced luminescence spectrum of the optically trapped QDs. The Rayleigh scattering imaging indicates that the two-photon absorption (TPA) process enhances trapping ability of the QDs. Similarly, a nonlinear increase of the two-photon-induced luminescence with the incident laser intensity fairly indicates the existence of the TPA process.

  5. Ultra Stable, Industrial Green Tailored Pulse Fiber Laser with Diffraction-limited Beam Quality for Advanced Micromachining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deladurantaye, P; Roy, V; Desbiens, L; Drolet, M; Taillon, Y; Galarneau, P, E-mail: pascal.deladurantaye@ino.ca [INO, 2740 rue Einstein, Quebec City, QC, G1P 4S4 (Canada)

    2011-02-01

    We report on a novel pulsed fiber laser platform providing pulse shaping agility at high repetition rates and at a wavelength of 532 nm. The oscillator is based on the direct modulation of a seed laser diode followed by a chain of fiber amplifiers. Advanced Large Mode Area (LMA) fiber designs as well as proprietary techniques to mitigate non-linear effects enable output energy per pulse up to 100 {mu}J at 1064 nm with diffraction-limited beam quality and narrow line widths suitable for efficient frequency conversion. Ultra stable pulses with tailored pulse shapes were demonstrated in the green region of the spectrum at repetition rates higher than 200 kHz. Pulse durations between 2.5 ns and 640 ns are available, as well as pulse to pulse dynamic shape selection at repetition rates up to 1 MHz. The pulse energy stability at 532 nm is better than {+-} 1.5%, 3{sigma}, over 10 000 pulses. Excellent beam characteristics were obtained. The M{sup 2} parameter is lower than 1.05, the beam waist astigmatism and beam waist asymmetry are below 10% and below 8% respectively, with high stability over time. We foresee that the small spot size, high repetition rate and pulse tailoring capability of this platform will provide advantages to practitioners who are developing novel, advanced processes in many industrially important applications.

  6. Generation of microwave radiation by nonlinear interaction of a high-power, high-repetition rate, 1064-nm laser in KTP crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Borghesani, A F; Carugno, G

    2013-01-01

    We report measurements of microwave (RF) generation in the centimeter band accomplished by irradiating a nonlinear KTiOPO$_4$ (KTP) crystal with a home-made, infrared laser at $1064\\,$nm as a result of optical rectification (OR). The laser delivers pulse trains of duration up to $1\\,\\mu$s. Each train consists of several high-intensity pulses at an adjustable repetition rate of approximately $ 4.6\\,$GHz. The duration of the generated RF pulses is determined by that of the pulse trains. We have investigated both microwave- and second harmonic (SHG) generation as a function of the laser intensity and of the orientation of the laser polarization with respect to the crystallographic axes of KTP.

  7. Sub-50-fs pulse generation from thulium-doped ZBLAN fiber laser oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Yutaka; Fuji, Takao

    2014-05-19

    An ultrafast, passively mode-locked fiber laser oscillator has been realized using thulium-doped ZBLAN fibers. Very low dispersion of ZBLAN glass fibers enabled generation of pulses with broad spectra extending from 1730 nm to 2050 nm. Pulses are obtained with the average power of 13 mW at the repetition rate of 67.5 MHz when the pump power is 140 mW. The output pulses are compressed with a pair of SF10 prisms and their durations are measured with SHG FROG, from which we obtained the pulse duration as short as 45 fs.

  8. Optimization of native fluorescence detection of proteins using a pulsed nano laser excitation source

    OpenAIRE

    Heywood, Matthew S.; Farnsworth, Paul B.

    2010-01-01

    We present a mathematical description of the S/N ratio in a fluorescence-based protein detector for capillary electrophoresis that uses a pulsed UV laser at 266 nm as an excitation source. The model accounts for photobleaching, detector volume, laser repetition rate, and analyte flow rate. We have experimentally characterized such a system, and present a comparison of the experimental data with the predictions of the model. Using the model, the system was optimized for test analytes tryptopha...

  9. The impacts of magnetic field on repetitive nanosecond pulsed dielectric barrier discharge in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yidi; Qi, Haicheng; Fan, Zhihui; Yan, Huijie; Ren, ChunSheng

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, the impacts of the parallel magnetic field on the repetitive nanosecond pulsed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) are experimentally investigated by optical and electrical measurements. The DBD is generated between two parallel-plate electrodes in the ambient air with the stationary magnetic field on the order of 1 T. The experimental results show that additional microdischarge channels are generated and the photocurrent intensity of the plasma is increased by the magnetic field. The microdischarge channels develop along the magnetic field lines and the diffuse background emission of the discharge is stronger in the DBD with the magnetic field. As the pulse repetition frequency decreases from 1200 Hz to 100 Hz, only the photocurrent intensity of the third discharge that occurred at about 500 ns is noticeably increased by the additional magnetic field. It is believed that the enhancement of the memory effect and the confinement of the magnetic field on electrons are the main reasons.

  10. Sub-picosecond Graphene-based Harmonically Mode-Locked Fiber Laser With Repetition Rates up to 2.22 GHz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abramski K.M.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Passive harmonic-mode locking (PHML of erbium-doped fiber laser with multilayer graphene is presented. The laser could operate at several harmonics (from 2nd to 21st of the fundamental repetition frequency of the ring resonator (106 MHz. The highest achieved repetition rate was 2.22 GHz (which corresponds to the 21st harmonic with 900 fs pulse duration and 50 dB of the supermode noise suppression. The saturable absorber was formed by multilayer graphene, mechanically exfoliated from pure graphite block through Scotch-tape and deposited on the fiber ferrule.

  11. Femtosecond laser bone ablation with a high repetition rate fiber laser source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Luke J; Alt, Clemens; Turcotte, Raphaël; Masek, Marissa; Liu, Tzu-Ming; Côté, Daniel C; Xu, Chris; Intini, Giuseppe; Lin, Charles P

    2015-01-01

    Femtosecond laser pulses can be used to perform very precise cutting of material, including biological samples from subcellular organelles to large areas of bone, through plasma-mediated ablation. The use of a kilohertz regenerative amplifier is usually needed to obtain the pulse energy required for ablation. This work investigates a 5 megahertz compact fiber laser for near-video rate imaging and ablation in bone. After optimization of ablation efficiency and reduction in autofluorescence, the system is demonstrated for the in vivo study of bone regeneration. Image-guided creation of a bone defect and longitudinal evaluation of cellular injury response in the defect provides insight into the bone regeneration process.

  12. Pulse laser head with monolithic thermally bonded microchip operating at 1.5 μm wavelength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Młyńczak, Jarosław; Kopczyński, Krzysztof; Belghachem, Nabil; Kisielewski, Jarosław; Stepień, Ryszard; Wychowaniec, Marek; Galas, Jacek; Litwin, Dariusz; CzyŻewski, Adam

    2016-12-01

    On the basis of thermally bonded Er,Yb:glass/Co:MALO microchip a laser head pumped by fiber coupled laser diode was designed. The performance of the laser head were investigated and the main output parameters were determined. The energy over 40 μJ in 3.8 ns pulse with repetition rate of 0.735 kHz was achieved. The laser head characterized by such parameters can successfully be used in tele-detection applications.

  13. Spectral-temporal encoding and decoding of the femtosecond pulses sequences with a THz repetition rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tcypkin, A. N.; Putilin, S. E.

    2017-01-01

    Experimental and numerical modeling techniques demonstrated the possibilities of the spectral-time encoding and decoding for time division multiplexing sequence of femtosecond subpulses with a repetition rate of up to 6.4 THz. The sequence was formed as a result of the interference of two phase-modulated pulses. We report the limits of the application of the developed method of controlling formed sequence at the spectral-temporal coding.

  14. The role of molecular vibration in nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges and in DBDs in hydrogen plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colonna, G.; D'Ammando, G.; Pietanza, L. D.

    2016-10-01

    A self-consistent state-to-state model of pure hydrogen has been used to investigate the development of nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges and dielectric barrier discharges, the latter coupling the kinetic model with an equation for the circuit, thus mimicking an insulated electrode with an external capacitance. Vibrationally excited states play a fundamental role, affecting the degrees of dissociation and ionization, as well as internal and free-electron distributions.

  15. Drop shaping by laser-pulse impact

    CERN Document Server

    Klein, Alexander L; Visser, Claas Willem; Lhuissier, Henri; Sun, Chao; Snoeijer, Jacco H; Villermaux, Emmanuel; Lohse, Detlef; Gelderblom, Hanneke

    2015-01-01

    We study the hydrodynamic response of a falling drop hit by a laser pulse. Combining high-speed with stroboscopic imaging we report that a millimeter-sized dyed water drop hit by a milli-Joule nanosecond laser-pulse deforms and propels forward at several meters per second, until it eventually fragments. We show that the drop motion results from the recoil momentum imparted at the drop surface by water vaporization. We measure the propulsion speed and the time-deformation law of the drop, complemented by boundary integral simulations. We explain the drop propulsion and shaping in terms of the laser pulse energy and drop surface tension. These findings are crucial for the generation of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light in lithography machines.

  16. High speed, high strength microwelding of Si/glass using ps-laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Isamu; Okamoto, Yasuhiro; Hansen, Assi; Vihinen, Joma; Amberla, Tiina; Kangastupa, Jarno

    2015-02-09

    A novel microwelding procedure to join Si-to-glass using ps-laser pulses with high repetition rates is presented. The procedure provides weld joint with mechanical strength as high as 85 MPa and 45 MPa in sample pairs of Si/aluminosilicate (Si/SW-Y) and Si/borosilicate (Si/Borofloat 33), respectively, which are higher than anodic bonding, at high spatial resolution (< 20 µm) and very high throughput without pre- and post-heating. Laser-matter interaction analysis indicates that excellent weld joint of Si/glass is obtained by avoiding violent evaporation of Si substrate using ps-laser pulses. Laser welded Si/glass samples can be singulated along the weld lines by standard blade dicer without defects, demonstrating welding by ps-laser pulses is applicable to wafer-level packaging.

  17. 1-MW peak power, 574-kHz repetition rate picosecond pulses at 515 nm from a frequency-doubled fiber amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Feng; Wang, Ziwei; Wang, Zhaokun; Bai, Yang; Li, Qiurui; Zhou, Jun

    2016-11-01

    1-MW peak power picosecond, 574-kHz repetition rate green laser at 515-nm is generated from a frequency-doubled fiber amplifier. 12-ps pulses with 13.9-μJ energy at 515 nm are achieved with a noncritically phase-matched lithium triborate (LBO) crystal through second harmonic generation of a 1030 nm infrared source. The infrared source employs ultra-large-mode-area rod-type photonic crystal fiber (Rod-PCF) for direct picosecond amplification and delivers 20-W 11.6-ps 2.97-MW pulse train with near-diffraction-limited beam quality (M2 = 1.01).

  18. High power double-scale pulses from a gain-guided double-clad fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haitao; Gao, Gan; Li, Qinghua; Gong, Mali

    2017-03-01

    Generation of high power double-scale pulses from a gain-guided double-clad fiber laser is experimentally demonstrated. By employing the Yb-doped 10/130 double-clad fiber as the gain medium, the laser realizes an output power of 5.1 W and pulse energy of 0.175 µJ at repetition rate of 29.14 MHz. To the best of our knowledge, this average output power is the highest among the reported double-scale pulse oscillators. The autocorrelation trace of pulses contains the short (98 fs) and long (29.5 ps) components, and the spectral bandwidth of the pulse is 27.3 nm. Such double-scale pulses are well suited for seeding the high power MOPA (master oscillator power amplifier) systems, nonlinear frequency conversion and optical coherence tomography.

  19. Extraction of pulse repetition intervals from sperm whale click trains for ocean acoustic data mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaugg, Serge; van der Schaar, Mike; Houégnigan, Ludwig; André, Michel

    2013-02-01

    The analysis of acoustic data from the ocean is a valuable tool to study free ranging cetaceans and anthropogenic noise. Due to the typically large volume of acquired data, there is a demand for automated analysis techniques. Many cetaceans produce acoustic pulses (echolocation clicks) with a pulse repetition interval (PRI) remaining nearly constant over several pulses. Analyzing these pulse trains is challenging because they are often interleaved. This article presents an algorithm that estimates a pulse's PRI with respect to neighboring pulses. It includes a deinterleaving step that operates via a spectral dissimilarity metric. The sperm whale (SW) produces trains with PRIs between 0.5 and 2 s. As a validation, the algorithm was used for the PRI-based identification of SW click trains with data from the NEMO-ONDE observatory that contained other pulsed sounds, mainly from ship propellers. Separation of files containing SW clicks with a medium and high signal to noise ratio from files containing other pulsed sounds gave an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve value of 0.96. This study demonstrates that PRI can be used for the automated identification of SW clicks and that deinterleaving via spectral dissimilarity contributes to algorithm performance.

  20. High Repetition-Rate Neutron Generation by Several-mJ, 35 fs pulses interacting with Free-Flowing D2O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hah, Jungmoo; Petrov, George; Nees, John; He, Zhaohan; Hammig, Mark; Krushelnick, Karl; Thomas, Alexander

    2016-10-01

    Recent advance in ultra-high power laser technology allows a development of laser-based neutron sources. Here we demonstrate heavy-water based neutron source. Using several-mJ energy pulses from a high-repetition rate (½kHz), ultrashort (35 fs) pulsed laser interacting with a 10 μm diameter stream of free-flowing heavy water (D2O), we get a 2.45 MeV neutron flux of 105/s. In the intentionally generated pre-plasma, laser pulse energy is efficiently absorbed, and energetic deuterons are generated. As a convertor, the bulk heavy water stream target and the large volume of low density D2O vapor near the target are collided with accelerated deuterons, generating neutron through d(d,n)3He reactions. As laser pulse energy increased from 6mJ to 12mJ, the neutron flux increased. From the 2D particle-in-cell simulation, comparable neutron fluxes are shown at the similar laser characteristics to the experiment. Also, simulation shows forward and backward moving deuterons, which are main distributing ions impinging upon D2O stream and vapor, respectively. This material is based upon work supported by the Air Force Office of Scien- tific Research under Award Numbers FA9550-12-1-0310 (Young Investigator Program) and FA9550-14-1-0282.

  1. Highly efficient, versatile, self-Q-switched, high-repetition-rate microchip laser generating Ince–Gaussian modes for optical trapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jun Dong; Yu He; Xiao Zhou; Shengchuang Bai [Department of Electronics Engineering, School of Information Science and Engineering, Xiamen, 361005 (China)

    2016-03-31

    Lasers operating in the Ince-Gaussian (IG) mode have potential applications for optical manipulation of microparticles and formation of optical vortices, as well as for optical trapping and optical tweezers. Versatile, self-Q-switched, high-peak-power, high-repetition-rate Cr, Nd:YAG microchip lasers operating in the IG mode are implemented under tilted, tightly focused laser-diode pumping. An average output power of over 2 W is obtained at an absorbed pump power of 6.4 W. The highest optical-to-optical efficiency of 33.2% is achieved at an absorbed pump power of 3.9 W. Laser pulses with a pulse energy of 7.5 μJ, pulse width of 3.5 ns and peak power of over 2 kW are obtained. A repetition rate up to 335 kHz is reached at an absorbed pump power of 5.8 W. Highly efficient, versatile, IG-mode lasers with a high repetition rate and a high peak power ensure a better flexibility in particle manipulation and optical trapping. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  2. Extraction of enhanced, ultrashort laser pulses from a passive 10-MHz stack-and-dump cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitkopf, Sven; Wunderlich, Stefano; Eidam, Tino; Shestaev, Evgeny; Holzberger, Simon; Gottschall, Thomas; Carstens, Henning; Tünnermann, Andreas; Pupeza, Ioachim; Limpert, Jens

    2016-12-01

    Periodic dumping of ultrashort laser pulses from a passive multi-MHz repetition-rate enhancement cavity is a promising route towards multi-kHz repetition-rate pulses with Joule-level energies at an unparalleled average power. Here, we demonstrate this so-called stack-and-dump scheme with a 30-m-long cavity. Using an acousto-optic modulator, we extract pulses of 0.16 mJ at 30-kHz repetition rate, corresponding to 65 stacked input pulses, representing an improvement in three orders of magnitude over previously extracted pulse energies. The ten times longer cavity affords three essential benefits over former approaches. First, the time between subsequent pulses is increased to 100 ns, relaxing the requirements on the switch. Second, it allows for the stacking of strongly stretched pulses (here from 800 fs to 1.5 ns), thus mitigating nonlinear effects in the cavity optics. Third, the choice of a long cavity offers increased design flexibility with regard to thermal robustness, which will be crucial for future power scaling. The herein presented results constitute a necessary step towards stack-and-dump systems providing access to unprecedented laser parameter regimes.

  3. High Energy Single Frequency Fiber Laser at Low Repetition Rate Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR phase II project proposes a single frequency high energy fiber laser system operating at low repetition rate of 10 Hz to 1 kHz for coherent Lidar systems...

  4. Novel Method of Unambiguous Moving Target Detection in Pulse-Doppler Radar with Random Pulse Repetition Interval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Zhen

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Blind zones and ambiguities in range and velocity measurement are two important issues in traditional pulse-Doppler radar. By generating random deviations with respect to a mean Pulse Repetition Interval (PRI, this paper proposes a novel algorithm of Moving Target Detection (MTD based on the Compressed Sensing (CS theory, in which the random deviations of the PRIare converted to the Restricted Isometry Property (RIP of the observing matrix. The ambiguities of range and velocity are eliminated by designing the signal parameters. The simulation results demonstrate that this scheme has high performance of detection, and there is no ambiguity and blind zones as well. It can also shorten the coherent processing interval compared to traditional staggered PRI mode because only one pulse train is needed instead of several trains.

  5. Numerical simulation of interactions between pulsed laser and soild targets in an ambient gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterkin, , Jr.

    1998-10-01

    When a GW/cm^2 repetitively pulsed laser strikes a solid target that is immersed in a gas at 1 atm, numerous interesting plasma phenomena are observed. To help us understand these observations, we perform time-dependent numerical simulations of the propagation and partial absorption via inverse bremsstrahlung of a pulsed CO2 laser beam through He and N, and the interaction with a solid copper target aligned at various angles with respect to the incident laser beam. For this numerical study, we use the general-purpose 2 1/2-dimensional finite-volume MHD code uc(mach2.) The early portion of the laser pulses is deposited into the solid target and produces a jet of target material that is almost aligned with the target normal. Most of the subsequent laser energy is deposited into the ambient gas at the critical surface. For a repetitive pulsed laser, we observe a series of laser supported detonation (LSD) waves each of which originates at the instantaneous location of the critical surface. The space- and time-dependent electron number density defines this surface. For the numerical code to reproduce accurately the relevant physics, the overall energy budget must be computed accurately. The solid ejecta interacts with the LSD waves in a complex fashion, allowing the spontaneous generation of a magnetic field via the grad(P) term of a generalized Ohm's law. We illustrate the dynamics with graphical results from uc(mach2) simulations.

  6. Ionization of Atoms by Intense Laser Pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Froehlich, Juerg; Schlein, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    The process of ionization of a hydrogen atom by a short infrared laser pulse is studied in the regime of very large pulse intensity, in the dipole approximation. Let $A$ denote the integral of the electric field of the pulse over time at the location of the atomic nucleus. It is shown that, in the limit where $|A| \\to \\infty$, the ionization probability approaches unity and the electron is ejected into a cone opening in the direction of $-A$ and of arbitrarily small opening angle. Asymptotics of various physical quantities in $|A|^{-1}$ is studied carefully. Our results are in qualitative agreement with experimental data reported in \\cite{1,2}.

  7. Nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges in air at atmospheric pressure—the spark regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, David Z.; Lacoste, Deanna A.; Laux, Christophe O.

    2010-12-01

    Nanosecond repetitively pulsed (NRP) spark discharges have been studied in atmospheric pressure air preheated to 1000 K. Measurements of spark initiation and stability, plasma dynamics, gas temperature and current-voltage characteristics of the spark regime are presented. Using 10 ns pulses applied repetitively at 30 kHz, we find that 2-400 pulses are required to initiate the spark, depending on the applied voltage. Furthermore, about 30-50 pulses are required for the spark discharge to reach steady state, following initiation. Based on space- and time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy, the spark discharge in steady state is found to ignite homogeneously in the discharge gap, without evidence of an initial streamer. Using measured emission from the N2 (C-B) 0-0 band, it is found that the gas temperature rises by several thousand Kelvin in the span of about 30 ns following the application of the high-voltage pulse. Current-voltage measurements show that up to 20-40 A of conduction current is generated, which corresponds to an electron number density of up to 1015 cm-3 towards the end of the high-voltage pulse. The discharge dynamics, gas temperature and electron number density are consistent with a streamer-less spark that develops homogeneously through avalanche ionization in volume. This occurs because the pre-ionization electron number density of about 1011 cm-3 produced by the high frequency train of pulses is above the critical density for streamer-less discharge development, which is shown to be about 108 cm-3.

  8. Non-contact thrust stand calibration method for repetitively pulsed electric thrusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Andrea R; Toftul, Alexandra; Polzin, Kurt A; Pearson, J Boise

    2012-02-01

    A thrust stand calibration technique for use in testing repetitively pulsed electric thrusters for in-space propulsion has been developed and tested using a modified hanging pendulum thrust stand. In the implementation of this technique, current pulses are applied to a solenoid to produce a pulsed magnetic field that acts against a permanent magnet mounted to the thrust stand pendulum arm. The force on the magnet is applied in this non-contact manner, with the entire pulsed force transferred to the pendulum arm through a piezoelectric force transducer to provide a time-accurate force measurement. Modeling of the pendulum arm dynamics reveals that after an initial transient in thrust stand motion the quasi-steady average deflection of the thrust stand arm away from the unforced or "zero" position can be related to the average applied force through a simple linear Hooke's law relationship. Modeling demonstrates that this technique is universally applicable except when the pulsing period is increased to the point where it approaches the period of natural thrust stand motion. Calibration data were obtained using a modified hanging pendulum thrust stand previously used for steady-state thrust measurements. Data were obtained for varying impulse bit at constant pulse frequency and for varying pulse frequency. The two data sets exhibit excellent quantitative agreement with each other. The overall error on the linear regression fit used to determine the calibration coefficient was roughly 1%.

  9. Investigation of ultrashort-pulsed laser on dental hard tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchizono, Takeyuki; Awazu, Kunio; Igarashi, Akihiro; Kato, Junji; Hirai, Yoshito

    2007-02-01

    Ultrashort-pulsed laser (USPL) can ablate various materials with precious less thermal effect. In laser dentistry, to solve the problem that were the generation of crack and carbonized layer by irradiating with conventional laser such as Er:YAG and CO II laser, USPL has been studied to ablate dental hard tissues by several researchers. We investigated the effectiveness of ablation on dental hard tissues by USPL. In this study, Ti:sapphire laser as USPL was used. The laser parameter had the pulse duration of 130 fsec, 800nm wavelength, 1KHz of repetition rate and the average power density of 90~360W/cm2. Bovine root dentin plates and crown enamel plates were irradiated with USPL at 1mm/sec using moving stage. The irradiated samples were analyzed by SEM, EDX, FTIR and roughness meter. In all irradiated samples, the cavity margin and wall were sharp and steep, extremely. In irradiated dentin samples, the surface showed the opened dentin tubules and no smear layer. The Ca/P ratio by EDX measurement and the optical spectrum by FTIR measurement had no change on comparison irradiated samples and non-irradiated samples. These results confirmed that USPL could ablate dental hard tissue, precisely and non-thermally. In addition, the ablation depths of samples were 10μm, 20μm, and 60μm at 90 W/cm2, 180 W/cm2, and 360 W/cm2, approximately. Therefore, ablation depth by USPL depends on the average power density. USPL has the possibility that can control the precision and non-thermal ablation with depth direction by adjusting the irradiated average power density.

  10. DFB diode seeded low repetition rate fiber laser system operating in burst mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šajn, M.; Petelin, J.; Agrež, V.; Vidmar, M.; Petkovšek, R.

    2017-02-01

    A distributed feedback (DFB) diode, gain switched to produce pulses from 60 ps at high peak power of over 0.5 W, is used in burst mode to seed a fiber amplifier chain. High seed power, spectral filtering between amplifier stages and pulsed pumping are used to mitigate amplified spontaneous emission (ASE). The effect of pulse pumping synchronized with the seed on the ASE is explored for the power amplifier at low repetition. Different input and output energies at different burst repetition rates are examined and up to 85% reduction in ASE is achieved compared to continuous pumping. Finally, a numerical model is used to predict further reduction of ASE.

  11. Lasers and Intense Pulsed Light Hidradenitis Suppurativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunte, Ditte M; Lapins, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Lasers and intense pulsed light (IPL) treatment are useful for the treatment of hidradenitis suppurativa (HS). Carbon dioxide lasers are used for cutting or vaporization of the affected area. It is a effective therapy for the management of severe and recalcitrant HS with persistent sinus tract and scarring, and can be performed under local anesthesia. HS has a follicular pathogenesis. Lasers and IPL targeting the hair have been found useful in treating HS by reducing the numbers of hairs in areas with HS. The methods have few side effects, but the studies are preliminary and need to be repeated.

  12. Modulated Pulsed Laser Sources for Imaging Lidars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-01

    manufactured by QPC. This C-mount device has a monolithic semiconductor amplifier allowing the package to output up to 1.5 Watts at 1064 nm with linewidths ɘ.1...pulsed driver based on the avalanche transistor circuit being used for gain switching, a 1064 nm DFB laser manufactured by QPC and a DBR -style laser...available now that may provide the needed power. An example of such a laser is the QPC C-mount monolithic oscillator/amplifier which can output 1.5

  13. Internal modification of glass by ultrashort laser pulse and its application to microwelding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Isamu; Cvecek, Kristian; Okamoto, Yasuhiro; Schmidt, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Internal modification process of glass by ultrashort laser pulse (USLP) and its applications to microwelding of glass are presented. A simulation model is developed, which can determine intensity distribution of absorbed laser energy, nonlinear absorptivity and temperature distribution at different pulse repetition rates and pulse energies in internal modification of bulk glass with fs- and ps-laser pulses from experimental modified structure. The formation process of the dual-structured internal modification is clarified, which consists of a teardrop-shaped inner structure and an elliptical outer structure, corresponding to the laser-absorbing region and heat-affected molten region, respectively. Nonlinear absorptivity at high pulse repetition rates increases due to the increase in the thermally excited free electron density for avalanche ionization. USLP enables crack-free welding of glass because the shrinkage stress is suppressed by producing embedded molten pool by nonlinear absorption process, in contrast to conventional continuous wave laser welding where cracks cannot be avoided due to shrinkage stress produced in cooling process. Microwelding techniques of glass by USLP have been developed to join glass/glass and Si/glass using optically contacted sample pairs. The strength of the weld joint as high as that of base material is obtained without pre- and post-heating in glass/glass welding. In Si/glass welding, excellent joint performances competitive with anodic bonding in terms of joint strength and process throughput have been attained.

  14. Transitions between corona, glow, and spark regimes of nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges in air at atmospheric pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Pai, David,; Lacoste, Deanna,; Laux, C.

    2010-01-01

    International audience; In atmospheric pressure air preheated from 300 to 1000 K, the nanosecond repetitively pulsed (NRP) method has been used to generate corona, glow, and spark discharges. Experiments have been performed to determine the parameter space (applied voltage, pulse repetition frequency, ambient gas temperature, and interelectrode gap distance) of each discharge regime. In particular, the experimental conditions necessary for the glow regime of NRP discharges have been determine...

  15. Electron photodetachment by short laser pulse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golovinski, P. A.; Drobyshev, A. A.

    2012-01-01

    Expressions are derived for calculations of the total probabilities and electron spectra for the photodetachment of electrons from negative ions with filled valence s shells by ultrashort laser pulses. Particular calculations have been performed for two negative ions (H- and Li-) and titanium-sapphi

  16. Electron photodetachment by short laser pulse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golovinski, P. A.; Drobyshev, A. A.

    2012-01-01

    Expressions are derived for calculations of the total probabilities and electron spectra for the photodetachment of electrons from negative ions with filled valence s shells by ultrashort laser pulses. Particular calculations have been performed for two negative ions (H- and Li-) and titanium-sapphi

  17. Ultrashort Pulse (USP) Laser-Matter Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-05

    unlimited 2D electron wavepacket quantum simulation Source: Luis Plaja, U Salamanca 31 Direct Frequency Comb Spectroscopy in the Extreme...intensity short pulse laser interacting with structured targets yields an enhancement in the number and energy of hot electron. • Monte Carlo

  18. Pulsed laser deposition: Prospects for commercial deposition of epitaxial films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muenchausen, R.E.

    1999-03-01

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) is a physical vapor deposition (PVD) technique for the deposition of thin films. The vapor source is induced by the flash evaporation that occurs when a laser pulse of sufficient intensity (about 100 MW/cm{sup 2}) is absorbed by a target. In this paper the author briefly defines pulsed laser deposition, current applications, research directed at gaining a better understanding of the pulsed laser deposition process, and suggests some future directions to enable commercial applications.

  19. Effect of paraelectrode processes on contraction of space charge in periodic-pulse lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arytyunyan, R. V.; Baranov, V. Yu.; Borisov, V. M.; Vinokhodov, A. Yu.; Kiryukhin, Yu. B.

    1986-05-01

    A characteristic feature of periodic-pulse electric-discharge CO2-lasers and excimer lasers is contraction of the space charge as the pulse repetition rate increases. The emission energy per pulse decreases as a consequence, with the average laser power first ceasing to increase linearly beyond a certain corner repetition rate and then decreasing beyond a certain critical repetition rate. A study of this phenomenon was made, for the purpose of separating the effect of paracathode processes from the effect of gas dynamics and then evaluating the effect of the former alone. Paraelectrode perturbations were simulated by focusing the radiation from the an XeCl-laser on the cathode surface in an atmosphere of nonabsorbing gases. Laser pulses of up to approximately 0.5 J energy and of approximately 50 ns duration were focused within a spot of 1 mm(2) area on a cathode inside a discharge chamber, with the power density of incident radiation regulated by means of an attenuator. A space charge within a volume of 2.5x4.5x9 cm(3) was generated between this specially shaped cathode and a mesh anode with an approximately 50% optical transmission coefficient. The space charge in helium and in neon was photographed, and the time lag of a discharge pulse behind a contracting laser pulse was measured as a function of the laser pulse energy for these two gases, as well as for a He+C12 gas mixture. The general trend was found to be the same in each case, the time lag increasing with increasing energy first at a slower rate up to a critical energy level and then faster. It has been established that plasma does not build up on the cathode before the laser pulse energy reaches 30 mJ (for a 3 mm(2) surface area), while plasma glow begins as the laser pulse energy reaches 150 mJ. A contracted channel begins to form within the laser-cathode interaction space, with an attendant fast increase of the time lag owing to evaporation of the cathode metal.

  20. Highly efficient, versatile, self-Q-switched, high-repetition-rate microchip laser generating Ince-Gaussian modes for optical trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jun; He, Yu; Zhou, Xiao; Bai, Shengchuang

    2016-03-01

    Lasers operating in the Ince-Gaussian (IG) mode have potential applications for optical manipulation of microparticles and formation of optical vortices, as well as for optical trapping and optical tweezers. Versatile, self-Q-switched, high-peak-power, high-repetition-rate Cr, Nd:YAG microchip lasers operating in the IG mode are implemented under tilted, tightly focused laser-diode pumping. An average output power of over 2 W is obtained at an absorbed pump power of 6.4 W. The highest optical-to-optical efficiency of 33.2% is achieved at an absorbed pump power of 3.9 W. Laser pulses with a pulse energy of 7.5 μJ, pulse width of 3.5 ns and peak power of over 2 kW are obtained. A repetition rate up to 335 kHz is reached at an absorbed pump power of 5.8 W. Highly efficient, versatile, IG-mode lasers with a high repetition rate and a high peak power ensure a better flexibility in particle manipulation and optical trapping.

  1. Picosecond pulse generation in a hybrid Q-switched laser source by using a microelectromechanical mirror.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couderc, Vincent; Crunteanu, Aurelian; Fabert, Marc; Doutre, Florent; El Bassri, Farid; Pagnoux, Dominique; Jalocha, Alain

    2012-02-27

    We present a novel Q-switched laser source using a micro-optical-electromechanical mirror (MOEM) designed for short pulse emission. It is based on a hybrid configuration including a passively Q-switched microchip laser coupled to a fiber cavity closed by a cantilever type MOEM acting as an active modulator. This specially designed mirror with a single reflecting gold membrane is switched by low bias voltage ~50 V (peak to peak). This device emits pulses at tunable repetition rates up to 1.6 kHz, with ~564 ps duration and 3.4 kW peak power, which constitutes the shortest pulse duration ever reported with MOEMs based pulsed lasers.

  2. Ionization-injected electron acceleration with sub-terawatt laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feder, Linus; Goers, Andy; Hine, George; Miao, Bo; Salehi, Fatholah; Woodbury, Daniel; Milchberg, Howard

    2016-10-01

    The vast majority of laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) experiments use drive lasers with peak powers >10 TW and repetition rates from 10 Hz to less than once an hour. However, it was recently demonstrated that by using a thin, high density gas target, LWFA can be driven by laser pulses well below a TW and with high repetition rates. We present experiments and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of the effect of doping the high density gas jet with higher Z molecules (here nitrogen). Our earlier experiments with low-Z gas relied on self-injection of electrons into the accelerating wake through wave-breaking. In ionization injection, the relativistically self-focused laser pulse ionizes the inner shell of the dopant inside the plasma wake. High energy electrons are then trapped by the wakefield in the earliest potential buckets, which overlap with the laser pulse. PIC simulations show acceleration of these electrons by LWFA and directly by the laser pulse, with the direct contribution significantly increasing the electron energy beyond the LWFA contribution alone. Additionally, ionization injection can be controlled to prevent dephasing of the electron beam, resulting in a narrower energy spectrum and lower spatial divergence. This research is supported by the Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation.

  3. Time-resolved studies at PETRA III with a highly repetitive synchronized laser system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlie, Mortiz

    2013-09-15

    Atomic and molecular processes can nowadays be directly followed in the time domain. This is a core technique for a better understanding of the involved fundamental physics, thus auguring new applications in the future as well. Usually the so-called pump-probe technique making use of two synchronized ultrashort light pulses is utilized to obtain this time-resolved data. In this work, the development and characterization of a synchronization system enabling such pump-probe studies at the storage ring PETRA III in combination with an external, then synchronized fs-laser system is described. The synchronization is based on an extended PLL approach with three interconnected feedback loops allowing to monitor short-time losses of the lock and thus prevent them. This way, the jitter between the laser PHAROS and the PETRA III reference signal is reduced to {sigma} <5 ps. Thus the system allows to conduct experiments at a repetition rate of 130 kHz with a temporal resolution limited only by the X-ray pulse length. A major emphasis in the fundamental introductory chapters is an intuitive explanation of the basic principles of phase locked loops and the different aspects of phase noise to allow a deeper understanding of the synchronization. Furthermore, first pump-probe experiments conducted at different beamlines at PETRA III are presented, demonstrating the usability of the laser system in a scientific environment as well. In first characterizing experiments the pulse duration of PETRA III X-ray pulses has been measured to be 90 ps FWHM. In particular, there have been time resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments on Gaq3 and Znq2 conducted at beamline P11. First results show dynamics of the electronic excitation on the timescale of a few hundred pico seconds up to a few nano seconds and provide a basic understanding for further research on those molecules. For Gaq3 this data is analyzed in detail and compared with visible fluorescence measurements suggesting at

  4. Spatially modulated laser pulses for printing electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auyeung, Raymond C Y; Kim, Heungsoo; Mathews, Scott; Piqué, Alberto

    2015-11-01

    The use of a digital micromirror device (DMD) in laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) is reviewed. Combining this technique with high-viscosity donor ink (silver nanopaste) results in laser-printed features that are highly congruent in shape and size to the incident laser beam spatial profile. The DMD empowers LIFT to become a highly parallel, rapidly reconfigurable direct-write technology. By adapting half-toning techniques to the DMD bitmap image, the laser transfer threshold fluence for 10 μm features can be reduced using an edge-enhanced beam profile. The integration of LIFT with this beam-shaping technique allows the printing of complex large-area patterns with a single laser pulse.

  5. Schlieren Imaging and Pulsed Detonation Engine Testing of Ignition by a Nanosecond Repetitively Pulsed Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-16

    effect of the plasma is to produce active species, which quench to produce O atoms and release heat. The O atoms go on to initiate the fuel oxidation ...strong effect on ignition time for mixtures with MIE larger than the individual pulse energy. Stoichiometric ethylene –air has an MIE of 0.096 mJ... ethylene is so fast with just a single pulse, the effect of additional pulses is not noticeable on the time scale of the present experiments. In addition

  6. Dynamics of laser-induced electroconvection pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giebink, N C; Johnson, E R; Saucedo, S R; Miles, E W; Vardanyan, K K; Spiegel, D R; Allen, C C

    2004-06-01

    We first report that, for planar nematic 4-methoxy-benzilidene-4-butylaniline (MBBA), the electroconvection threshold voltage has a nonmonotonic temperature dependence, with a well-defined minimum, and a slope of about -0.12 V/degrees C near room temperature at 70 Hz. Motivated by this observation, we have designed an experiment in which a weak continuous-wave absorbed laser beam with a diameter comparable to the pattern wavelength generates a locally supercritical region, or pulse, in dye-doped MBBA. Working 10-20 % below the laser-free threshold voltage, we observe a steady-state pulse shaped as an ellipse with the semimajor axis oriented parallel to the nematic director, with a typical size of several wavelengths. The pulse is robust, persisting even when spatially extended rolls develop in the surrounding region, and displays rolls that counterpropagate along the director at frequencies of tenths of Hz, with the rolls on the left (right) side of the ellipse moving to the right (left). Systematic measurements of the sample-voltage dependence of the pulse amplitude, spatial extent, and frequency show a saturation or decrease when the control parameter (evaluated at the center of the pulse) approaches approximately 0.3. We propose that the model for these pulses should be based on the theory of control-parameter ramps, supplemented with new terms to account for the advection of heat away from the pulse when the surrounding state becomes linearly unstable. The advection creates a negative feedback between the pulse size and the efficiency of heat transport, which we argue is responsible for the attenuation of the pulse at larger control-parameter values.

  7. Generation of 170-fs Laser Pulses at 1053 nm by a Passively Mode-Locked Yb:YAG Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Bin-Bin; WEI Zhi-Yi; LI De-Hua; TENG Hao; Bourdet G. L

    2009-01-01

    A novel method is developed to obtain 1.05μm laser operation with a Yb:YAG laser. By using a Yb:YAG crystal with proper length and doping concentration, a femtosecond Yb: YAG laser is realized at the central wavelength of 1053nm. The measured pulse duration and spectral bandwidth (FWHM) are 17ors and 7nm; the repetition rate is 80 MHz. Under a power pump of 2 W, an average mode-locking power of 180mW is achieved.

  8. Group velocity and pulse lengthening of mismatched laser pulses in plasma channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, Carl; Benedetti, Carlo; Esarey, Eric; van Tilborg, Jeroen; Leemans, Wim

    2011-07-07

    Analytic solutions are presented to the non-paraxial wave equation describing an ultra-short, low-power, laser pulse propagating in aplasma channel. Expressions for the laser pulse centroid motion and laser group velocity are derived, valid for matched and mismatchedpropagation in a parabolic plasma channel, as well as in vacuum, for an arbitrary Laguerre-Gaussian laser mode. The group velocity of amismatched laser pulse, for which the laser spot size is strongly oscillating, is found to be independent of propagation distance andsignificantly less than that of a matched pulse. Laser pulse lengthening of a mismatched pulse owing to laser mode slippage isexamined and found to dominate over that due to dispersive pulse spreading for sufficiently long pulses. Analytic results are shown tobe in excellent agreement with numerical solutions of the full Maxwell equations coupled to the plasma response. Implications for plasmachannel diagnostics are discussed.

  9. Phase Noise Comparision of Short Pulse Laser Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Zhang; S. V. Benson; J. Hansknecht; D. Hardy; G. Neil; Michelle D. Shinn

    2006-12-01

    This paper describes the phase noise measurement on several different mode-locked laser systems that have completely different gain media and configurations including a multi-kW free-electron laser. We will focus on the state of the art short pulse lasers, especially the drive lasers for photocathode injectors. A comparison between the phase noise of the drive laser pulses, electron bunches and FEL pulses will also be presented.

  10. Theoretical analysis of pulse modulation of semiconductor lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Baoxi; Zhan Yushu; Guo Siji

    1987-05-01

    Rate equations of Gaussian shape pulse modulated semiconductor lasers are solved by Runge--Kutta method, and the results are analyzed. The formulae for calculating the delay time, pulse width of laser pulse and maximum bit-rate of Gaussian shape pulse modulation are derived. The experimental results of modulation pattern effects are given.

  11. Period Doubling in a Fabry-Perot Laser Diode Subject to Optical Pulse Injection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yue-Peng; WANG Yun-Cai; ZHANG Ming-Jiang; AN Yi; WANG Ji-Long

    2007-01-01

    Experimental study and numerical simulations of the period doubling of injected optical pulses in Fabry-Perot laser diodes are presented. In our experiments, the period doubling is achieved within a wide input frequency range and the period doubling of the injected optical pulses with 6.32 GHz repetition rate is investigated in detail. The obtained experimental results indicate that period doubling occurs at an appropriate injected optical power level when the bias current of the Fabry-Perot laser diode is located in lower ranges. Moreover, the experimental observed features have been numerically demonstrated by using a coupled rate-equation model. Numerical simulations are consistent with the experimental results.

  12. Double nanosecond pulses generation in ytterbium fiber laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veiko, V. P.; Samokhvalov, A. A., E-mail: samokhvalov.itmo@gmail.com; Yakovlev, E. B.; Zhitenev, I. Yu.; Kliushin, A. N. [Saint-Petersburg State University of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics, Kronverksky Pr. 49, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation); Lednev, V. N. [Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Vavilov Str., 38, Moscow (Russian Federation); National University of Science and Technology MISiS, Leninskyave., 4, Moscow (Russian Federation); Pershin, S. M. [Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Vavilov Str., 38, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-15

    Double pulse generation mode for nanosecond ytterbium fiber laser was developed. Two sequential 60-200 ns laser pulses with variable delay between them were generated by acousto-optic modulator opening with continuous diode pumping. A custom radio frequency generator was developed to produce two sequential “opening” radio pulses with a delay of 0.2–1 μs. It was demonstrated that double pulse generation did not decrease the average laser power while providing the control over the laser pulse power profile. Surprisingly, a greater peak power in the double pulse mode was observed for the second laser pulse. Laser crater studies and plasma emission measurements revealed an improved efficiency of laser ablation in the double pulse mode.

  13. Safety and efficacy of low fluence, high repetition rate versus high fluence, low repetition rate 810-nm diode laser for axillary hair removal in Chinese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenhai; Liu, Chengyi; Chen, Zhou; Cai, Lin; Zhou, Cheng; Xu, Qianxi; Li, Houmin; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2016-11-01

    High-fluence diode lasers with contact cooling have emerged as the gold standard to remove unwanted hair. Lowering the energy should result in less pain and could theoretically affect the efficacy of the therapy. To compare the safety and efficacy of a low fluence high repetition rate 810-nm diode laser to those of a high fluence, low repetition rate diode laser for permanent axillary hair removal in Chinese women. Ninety-two Chinese women received four axillae laser hair removal treatments at 4-week intervals using the low fluence, high repetition rate 810-nm diode laser in super hair removal (SHR) mode on one side and the high fluence, low repetition rate diode laser in hair removal (HR) mode on the other side. Hair counts were done at each follow-up visit and 6-month follow-up after the final laser treatment using a "Hi Quality Hair Analysis Program System"; the immediate pain score after each treatment session was recorded by a visual analog scale. The overall median reduction of hair was 90.2% with the 810-nm diode laser in SHR mode and 87% with the same laser in HR mode at 6-month follow-up. The median pain scores in SHR mode and in HR mode were 2.75 and 6.75, respectively. Low fluence, high repetition rate diode laser can efficiently remove unwanted hair but also significantly improve tolerability and reduce adverse events during the course of treatment.

  14. Study on the optical limiting properties of the mixed liquid of carbon black suspensions and green tea solution by multi-pulse laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Niu Yan-Xiong; Yang Hai-Lin; Zhang Peng; Shen Xue-Ju; Jiang Nan; Chen Yan; Tang Fang

    2008-01-01

    The optical limiting properties of the mixed liquid of carbon black suspensions(CBS)and green tea solution were studied by using an 8 ns laser pulse at 532nm.The optical limiting effects of the CBS and mixed liquid have been compared between 5 and 10 Hz repetition frequencies with nanosecond laser pulse.The experimental results indicate that the optical limiting threshold of the sample with the incidence laser at 10 Hz repetition frequency is lower than at 5 Hz repetition frequency.The possible reasons for the influence of the repetition frequency on the samples are discussed.And by observing the optical radiant distributions when the laser pulse passing through different samples,a possible mechanism for the observed effects is suggested.At the same time,the result shows that the optical limiting of CBS is the dominant factor to optical limiting ofthe mixed liquid.

  15. CLASSICAL AREAS OF PHENOMENOLOGY: Study on the optical limiting properties of the mixed liquid of carbon black suspensions and green tea solution by multi-pulse laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu Yan-, Xiong; Yang, Hai-Lin; Zhang, Peng; Shen, Xue-Ju; Jiang, Nan; Chen, Yan; Tang, Fang

    2008-09-01

    The optical limiting properties of the mixed liquid of carbon black suspensions (CBS) and green tea solution were studied by using an 8 ns laser pulse at 532 nm. The optical limiting effects of the CBS and mixed liquid have been compared between 5 and 10 Hz repetition frequencies with nanosecond laser pulse. The experimental results indicate that the optical limiting threshold of the sample with the incidence laser at 10 Hz repetition frequency is lower than at 5 Hz repetition frequency. The possible reasons for the influence of the repetition frequency on the samples are discussed. And by observing the optical radiant distributions when the laser pulse passing through different samples, a possible mechanism for the observed effects is suggested. At the same time, the result shows that the optical limiting of CBS is the dominant factor to optical limiting of the mixed liquid.

  16. Short-pulsed diode lasers as an excitation source for time-resolved fluorescence applications and confocal laser scanning microscopy in PDT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, Matthias; Meier, Thomas H.; El-Tayeb, Tarek A. A.; Kemkemer, Ralf; Steiner, Rudolf W.; Rueck, Angelika C.

    2001-11-01

    This article describes a setup for subcellular time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence lifetime measurements using a confocal laser scanning microscope in combination with a short pulsed diode laser for fluorescence excitation and specimen illumination. The diode laser emits pulses at 398 nm wavelength with 70 ps full width at half maximum (FWHM) duration. The diode laser can be run at a pulse repetition rate of 40 MHz down to single shot mode. For time resolved spectroscopy a spectrometer setup consisting of an Czerny Turner spectrometer and a MCP-gated and -intensified CCD camera was used. Subcellular fluorescence lifetime measurements were achieved using a time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) module instead of the spectrometer setup. The capability of the short pulsed diode laser for fluorescence imaging, fluorescence lifetime measurements and time-resolved spectroscopy in combination with laser scanning microscopy is demonstrated by fluorescence analysis of several photosensitizers on a single cell level.

  17. Pulsed Power for Solid-State Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gagnon, W; Albrecht, G; Trenholme, J; Newton, M

    2007-04-19

    Beginning in the early 1970s, a number of research and development efforts were undertaken at U.S. National Laboratories with a goal of developing high power lasers whose characteristics were suitable for investigating the feasibility of laser-driven fusion. A number of different laser systems were developed and tested at ever larger scale in pursuit of the optimum driver for laser fusion experiments. Each of these systems had associated with it a unique pulsed power option. A considerable amount of original and innovative engineering was carried out in support of these options. Ultimately, the Solid-state Laser approach was selected as the optimum driver for the application. Following this, the Laser Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the University of Rochester undertook aggressive efforts directed at developing the technology. In particular, at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, a series of laser systems beginning with the Cyclops laser and culminating in the present with the National Ignition Facility were developed and tested. As a result, a large amount of design information for solid-state laser pulsed power systems has been documented. Some of it is in the form of published papers, but most of it is buried in internal memoranda, engineering reports and LLNL annual reports. One of the goals of this book is to gather this information into a single useable format, such that it is easily accessed and understood by other engineers and physicists for use with future designs. It can also serve as a primer, which when seriously studied, makes the subsequent reading of original work and follow-up references considerably easier. While this book deals only with the solid-state laser pulsed power systems, in the bibliography we have included a representative cross section of papers and references from much of the very fine work carried out at other institutions in support of different laser approaches. Finally, in recent years, there has

  18. Picosecond to femtosecond pulses from high power self mode-locked ytterbium rod-type fiber laser

    OpenAIRE

    Deslandes, Pierre; Perrin, Mathias; Saby, Julien; Sangla, Damien; Salin, François; Freysz, Eric

    2013-01-01

    International audience; We have designed an ytterbium rod-type fiber laser oscillator with tunable pulse duration. This system that delivers more than 10 W of average power is self mode-locked. It yields femtosecond to picosecond laser pulses at a repetition rate of 74 MHz. The pulse duration is adjusted by changing the spectral width of a band pass filter that is inserted in the laser cavity. Using volume Bragg gratings of 0.9 nm and 0.07 nm spectrum bandwidth, this oscillator delivers nearl...

  19. Pulsed ytterbium-doped fibre laser with a combined modulator based on single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khudyakov, D V; Borodkin, A A; Vartapetov, S K [Physics Instrumentation Center, A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Troitsk, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Lobach, A S [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-30

    This paper describes an all-normal-dispersion pulsed ytterbium-doped fibre ring laser mode-locked by a nonlinear combined modulator based on single-wall carbon nanotubes. We have demonstrated 1.7-ps pulse generation at 1.04 μm with a repetition rate of 35.6 MHz. At the laser output, the pulses were compressed to 180 fs. We have examined an intracavity nonlinear modulator which utilises nonlinear polarisation ellipse rotation in conjunction with a saturable absorber in the form of a polymer-matrix composite film containing single-wall carbon nanotubes. (lasers)

  20. The effects of laser repetition rate on femtosecond laser ablation of dry bone: a thermal and LIBS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Ruby K; Smith, Zachary J; Lee, Changwon; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to understand the effect of varying laser repetition rate on thermal energy accumulation and dissipation as well as femtosecond Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (fsLIBS) signals, which may help create the framework for clinical translation of femtosecond lasers for surgical procedures. We study the effect of repetition rates on ablation widths, sample temperature, and LIBS signal of bone. SEM images were acquired to quantify the morphology of the ablated volume and fsLIBS was performed to characterize changes in signal intensity and background. We also report for the first time experimentally measured temperature distributions of bone irradiated with femtosecond lasers at repetition rates below and above carbonization conditions. While high repetition rates would allow for faster cutting, heat accumulation exceeds heat dissipation and results in carbonization of the sample. At repetition rates where carbonization occurs, the sample temperature increases to a level that is well above the threshold for irreversible cellular damage. These results highlight the importance of the need for careful selection of the repetition rate for a femtosecond laser surgery procedure to minimize the extent of thermal damage to surrounding tissues and prevent misclassification of tissue by fsLIBS analysis.

  1. Equal-Amplitude Optical Pulse Generation from a Rational Harmonic Mode-Locked Fibre Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Xin-Huan; YUAN Shu-Zhong; LI Yao; LIU Yan-Ge; KAI Gui-Yun; DONG Xiao-Yi

    2004-01-01

    A simple technique for the generation of equal-amplitude high repetition rate pulses from a rational harmonic mode-locked fibre ring laser is demonstrated. The principle is based on the combination of the nonlinear characteristics of the modulator and the effect of rational harmonic mode-locking. The two sources act on each other and the integrated effect eventually leads to the pulse amplitude-equalization. We obtain amplitude-equalized short pulses up to the fifth-order rational harmonic mode-locking with an optimum bias level and modulation depth of the modulator, which demonstrates the efficiency of this method.

  2. Synchronized and timing-stabilized pulse generation from a gain-switched laser diode for stimulated Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, Kyoya; Fang, Yi-Cheng; Yokoyama, Hiroyuki; Ozeki, Yasuyuki

    2016-03-01

    We present a picosecond laser source based on a gain-switched laser diode (GS-LD) that can be applied to stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy. A 1.06-μm GS-LD was used to generate 14-ps pulses at a repetition rate of 38 MHz. The GS-LD was driven by 200-ps electrical pulses, which were triggered through a toggle flip-flop (T-FF). As a result, the GS-LD pulses were subharmonically synchronized to Ti:sapphire laser (TSL) pulses at a repetition rate of 76 MHz. We investigated the timing jitter of GS-LD pulses and found it to be less than 2.5 ps. We also show that the trigger delay can be less sensitive to the optical power of TSL pulses by controlling the threshold voltage of the T-FF. As a result, GS-LD pulses sufficiently overlapped with TSL pulses even when we scanned the wavelength of the TSL pulses. We demonstrate the SRS imaging of HeLa cells with GS-LD pulses and TSL pulses, proving that GS-LD is readily applicable to SRS microscopy as a compact and stable pulse source.

  3. PRR performance of Cu- and CuBr-vapor lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, V. F.; Evtushenko, Gennadiy S.; Klimkin, Vladimir M.; Polunin, Yu. P.; Soldatov, Anatoly N.; Sukhanov, Viktor B.

    1998-06-01

    Results obtained from comparative analysis of the pulse repetition rate performance of Cu- and CuBr-vapor lasers operated at high pump pulse repetitions (approximately 100 kHz) are reported. For a CuBr laser with a 8 mm diameter discharge tube the laser pulse repetition rate as high as 270 kHz was realized.

  4. High-repetition-rate compact excimer laser: UV light source for metrology, inspection, direct writing, and material testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Heinz P.; Pflanz, Tobias; Goertler, Andreas; Schillinger, Helmut

    2003-06-01

    The discharge pumped excimer laser is a gas laser providing ultra violet (UV) radiation with well defined spectral, temporal and spatial properties. The fast development of excimer lasers in recent years has succeeded in designing very compact, table-top and turn-key systems delivering up to 20 W of radiation at 248 nm, 10 W at 193 nm and 2 W at 157 nm with repetition rates up to 2000 Hz (1, 5). Due to their short emission wavelength and compactness they are continuously replacing other light sources, like lamps and ion lasers, in applications as metrology, inspection, direct writing and material testing. Spatial and temporal beam properties of compact excimer lasers are very suitable to be utilized as illumination source in these applications. The compact excimer laser is combining the advantages of both, lamp and laser sources. It displays low temporal and spatial coherence, but has a narrow spectral emission range of a few hundred pm. The beam area is approximately 1/2 cm2, the divergence is in the order of 1 mrad. Variation of beam position and beam direction are negligible for most illumination applications. Compact excimer lasers are easy to integrate in measurement and inspection systems. Typically their footprint area is 0.25 m2. The power consumption is less than 1 kW, enabling single phase electrical supply and air cooling. State-of-the-art compact excimer lasers are compliant to all relevant SEMI regulations. The laser optics exceeds the life time of the laser tube, thus no optics cleaning and exchange is necessary in a whole life time of a laser tube of a few billion pulses (6).

  5. Laser-Material Interaction of Powerful Ultrashort Laser Pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komashko, A

    2003-01-06

    Laser-material interaction of powerful (up to a terawatt) ultrashort (several picoseconds or shorter) laser pulses and laser-induced effects were investigated theoretically in this dissertation. Since the ultrashort laser pulse (USLP) duration time is much smaller than the characteristic time of the hydrodynamic expansion and thermal diffusion, the interaction occurs at a solid-like material density with most of the light energy absorbed in a thin surface layer. Powerful USLP creates hot, high-pressure plasma, which is quickly ejected without significant energy diffusion into the bulk of the material, Thus collateral damage is reduced. These and other features make USLPs attractive for a variety of applications. The purpose of this dissertation was development of the physical models and numerical tools for improvement of our understanding of the process and as an aid in optimization of the USLP applications. The study is concentrated on two types of materials - simple metals (materials like aluminum or copper) and wide-bandgap dielectrics (fused silica, water). First, key physical phenomena of the ultrashort light interaction with metals and the models needed to describe it are presented. Then, employing one-dimensional plasma hydrodynamics code enhanced with models for laser energy deposition and material properties at low and moderate temperatures, light absorption was self-consistently simulated as a function of laser wavelength, pulse energy and length, angle of incidence and polarization. Next, material response on time scales much longer than the pulse duration was studied using the hydrocode and analytical models. These studies include examination of evolution of the pressure pulses, effects of the shock waves, material ablation and removal and three-dimensional dynamics of the ablation plume. Investigation of the interaction with wide-bandgap dielectrics was stimulated by the experimental studies of the USLP surface ablation of water (water is a model of

  6. DESIGN NOTE: A video synchronization unit for capture of pulsed laser parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oak, S. M.; Navathe, C. P.

    1996-04-01

    An electronic circuit called a video synchronization unit (VSU) is developed to synchronize TV grade CCTV cameras, CCTV monitors and video frame grabbers for the capture of pulsed laser parameters. The VSU accepts a video signal from the camera and generates triggers for the laser and frame grabber at required times. It also generates a trigger at any pre-set horizontal line in the video signal, so that the intensity profile of the selected line can be viewed on an oscilloscope. The unit can drive a laser or be driven by the laser either in single-shot or in repetitive mode of operation. With the help of this unit, a video system is built for the capture of pulsed laser beam profiles and fluorescence traces of a picosecond autocorrelator. It is an inexpensive and more readily available alternative to commercial asynchronous video systems.

  7. Laser-driven hydrothermal process studied with excimer laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariella, Raymond; Rubenchik, Alexander; Fong, Erika; Norton, Mary; Hollingsworth, William; Clarkson, James; Johnsen, Howard; Osborn, David L.

    2017-08-01

    Previously, we discovered [Mariella et al., J. Appl. Phys. 114, 014904 (2013)] that modest-fluence/modest-intensity 351-nm laser pulses, with insufficient fluence/intensity to ablate rock, mineral, or concrete samples via surface vaporization, still removed the surface material from water-submerged target samples with confinement of the removed material, and then dispersed at least some of the removed material into the water as a long-lived suspension of nanoparticles. We called this new process, which appears to include the generation of larger colorless particles, "laser-driven hydrothermal processing" (LDHP) [Mariella et al., J. Appl. Phys. 114, 014904 (2013)]. We, now, report that we have studied this process using 248-nm and 193-nm laser light on submerged concrete, quartzite, and obsidian, and, even though light at these wavelengths is more strongly absorbed than at 351 nm, we found that the overall efficiency of LDHP, in terms of the mass of the target removed per Joule of laser-pulse energy, is lower with 248-nm and 193-nm laser pulses than with 351-nm laser pulses. Given that stronger absorption creates higher peak surface temperatures for comparable laser fluence and intensity, it was surprising to observe reduced efficiencies for material removal. We also measured the nascent particle-size distributions that LDHP creates in the submerging water and found that they do not display the long tail towards larger particle sizes that we had observed when there had been a multi-week delay between experiments and the date of measuring the size distributions. This is consistent with transient dissolution of the solid surface, followed by diffusion-limited kinetics of nucleation and growth of particles from the resulting thin layer of supersaturated solution at the sample surface.

  8. Matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation processing of triacetate-pullulan polysaccharide thin films for drug delivery systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristescu, R. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor, P.O. Box MG-36, RO-077125, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania) and Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of Czech Republic, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)]. E-mail: rodica.cristescu@inflpr.ro; Dorcioman, G. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor, P.O. Box MG-36, RO-077125, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Ristoscu, C. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor, P.O. Box MG-36, RO-077125, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Axente, E. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor, P.O. Box MG-36, RO-077125, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Grigorescu, S. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor, P.O. Box MG-36, RO-077125, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Moldovan, A. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor, P.O. Box MG-36, RO-077125, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Mihailescu, I.N. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor, P.O. Box MG-36, RO-077125, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Kocourek, T. [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of Czech Republic, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Jelinek, M. [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of Czech Republic, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Albulescu, M. [National Institute for Chemical-Pharmaceutical R and D, 112 Vitan, 74373 Bucharest 3 (Romania); Buruiana, T. [Petru Poni Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Iasi 6600 (Romania); Mihaiescu, D. [University of Agriculture Sciences and Veterinary Medicine, 59 Marasti, Bucharest (Romania); Stamatin, I. [University of Bucharest, Faculty of Physics, P.O. Box MG-38, 3 Nano-SAE Research Center, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Chrisey, D.B. [US Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5345 (United States)

    2006-04-30

    We report the first successful deposition of triacetate-pullulan polysaccharide thin films by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation. We used a KrF* excimer laser source ({lambda} = 248 nm, {tau} {approx} 20 ns) operated at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. We demonstrated by FTIR that our thin films are composed of triacetate-pullulan maintaining its chemical structure and functionality. The dependence on incident laser fluence of the induced surface morphology is analysed.

  9. Power scaling of supercontinuum seeded megahertz-repetition rate optical parametric chirped pulse amplifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, R; Stephanides, A; Prandolini, M J; Gronloh, B; Jungbluth, B; Mans, T; Tavella, F

    2014-03-15

    Optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifiers with high average power are possible with novel high-power Yb:YAG amplifiers with kW-level output powers. We demonstrate a compact wavelength-tunable sub-30-fs amplifier with 11.4 W average power with 20.7% pump-to-signal conversion efficiency. For parametric amplification, a beta-barium borate crystal is pumped by a 140 W, 1 ps Yb:YAG InnoSlab amplifier at 3.25 MHz repetition rate. The broadband seed is generated via supercontinuum generation in a YAG crystal.

  10. Theoretical investigation on nonlinear optical effects in laser trapping of dielectric nanoparticles with ultrafast pulsed excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Anita; De, Arijit K

    2016-09-19

    The use of low-power high-repetition-rate ultrafast pulsed excitation in stable optical trapping of dielectric nanoparticles has been demonstrated in the recent past; the high peak power of each pulse leads to instantaneous trapping of a nanoparticle with fast inertial response and the high repetition-rate ensures repetitive trapping by successive pulses However, with such high peak power pulsed excitation under a tight focusing condition, nonlinear optical effects on trapping efficiency also become significant and cannot be ignored. Thus, in addition to the above mentioned repetitive instantaneous trapping, trapping efficiency under pulsed excitation is also influenced by the optical Kerr effect, which we theoretically investigate here. Using dipole approximation we show that with an increase in laser power the radial component of the trapping potential becomes progressively more stable but the axial component is dramatically modulated due to increased Kerr nonlinearity. We justify that the relevant parameter to quantify the trapping efficiency is not the absolute depth of the highly asymmetric axial trapping potential but the height of the potential barrier along the beam propagation direction. We also discuss the optimal excitation parameters leading to the most stable dipole trap. Our results show excellent agreement with previous experiments.

  11. Process optimization in high-average-power ultrashort pulse laser microfabrication: how laser process parameters influence efficiency, throughput and quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schille, Joerg; Schneider, Lutz; Loeschner, Udo

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, laser processing of technical grade stainless steel and copper using high-average-power ultrashort pulse lasers is studied in order to gain deeper insight into material removal for microfabrication. A high-pulse repetition frequency picosecond and femtosecond laser is used in conjunction with high-performance galvanometer scanners and an in-house developed two-axis polygon scanner system. By varying the processing parameters such as wavelength, pulse length, fluence and repetition rate, cavities of standardized geometry are fabricated and analyzed. From the depths of the cavities produced, the ablation rate and removal efficiency are estimated. In addition, the quality of the cavities is evaluated by means of scanning electron microscope micrographs or rather surface roughness measurements. From the results obtained, the influence of the machining parameters on material removal and machining quality is discussed. In addition, it is shown that both material removal rate and quality increase by using femtosecond compared to picosecond laser pulses. On stainless steel, a maximum throughput of 6.81 mm3/min is achieved with 32 W femtosecond laser powers; if using 187 W picosecond laser powers, the maximum is 15.04 mm3/min, respectively. On copper, the maximum throughputs are 6.1 mm3/min and 21.4 mm3/min, obtained with 32 W femtosecond and 187 W picosecond laser powers. The findings indicate that ultrashort pulses in the mid-fluence regime yield most efficient material removal. In conclusion, from the results of this analysis, a range of optimum processing parameters are derived feasible to enhance machining efficiency, throughput and quality in high-rate micromachining. The work carried out here clearly opens the way to significant industrial applications.

  12. High speed sampling circuit design for pulse laser ranging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Rui-hai; Gao, Xuan-yi; Zhang, Yan-mei; Li, Huan; Guo, Hai-chao; Guo, Xiao-kang; He, Shi-jie

    2016-10-01

    In recent years, with the rapid development of digital chip, high speed sampling rate analog to digital conversion chip can be used to sample narrow laser pulse echo. Moreover, high speed processor is widely applied to achieve digital laser echo signal processing algorithm. The development of digital chip greatly improved the laser ranging detection accuracy. High speed sampling and processing circuit used in the laser ranging detection system has gradually been a research hotspot. In this paper, a pulse laser echo data logging and digital signal processing circuit system is studied based on the high speed sampling. This circuit consists of two parts: the pulse laser echo data processing circuit and the data transmission circuit. The pulse laser echo data processing circuit includes a laser diode, a laser detector and a high sample rate data logging circuit. The data transmission circuit receives the processed data from the pulse laser echo data processing circuit. The sample data is transmitted to the computer through USB2.0 interface. Finally, a PC interface is designed using C# language, in which the sampling laser pulse echo signal is demonstrated and the processed laser pulse is plotted. Finally, the laser ranging experiment is carried out to test the pulse laser echo data logging and digital signal processing circuit system. The experiment result demonstrates that the laser ranging hardware system achieved high speed data logging, high speed processing and high speed sampling data transmission.

  13. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the drilling of alumina ceramic using Nd:YAG pulsed laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanon, M. M.; Akman, E.; Genc Oztoprak, B.; Gunes, M.; Taha, Z. A.; Hajim, K. I.; Kacar, E.; Gundogdu, O.; Demir, A.

    2012-06-01

    Alumina ceramics have found wide range of applications from semiconductors, communication technologies, medical devices, automotive to aerospace industries. Processing of alumina ceramics is rather difficult due to its high degree of brittleness, hardness, low thermal diffusivity and conductivity. Rapid improvements in laser technologies in recent years make the laser among the most convenient processing tools for difficult-to-machine materials such as hardened metals, ceramics and composites. This is particularly evident as lasers have become an inexpensive and controllable alternative to conventional hole drilling methods. This paper reports theoretical and experimental results of drilling the alumina ceramic with thicknesses of 5 mm and 10.5 mm using milisecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser. Effects of the laser peak power, pulse duration, repetition rate and focal plane position have been determined using optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) images taken from cross-sections of the drilled alumina ceramic samples. In addition to dimensional analysis of the samples, microstructural investigations have also been examined. It has been observed that, the depth of the crater can be controlled as a function of the peak power and the pulse duration for a single laser pulse application without any defect. Crater depth can be increased by increasing the number of laser pulses with some defects. In addition to experimental work, conditions have been simulated using ANYS FLUENT package providing results, which are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  14. Picosecond pulsed laser ablation and micromachining of 4H-SiC wafers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molian, Pal, E-mail: molian@iastate.edu [Laboratory for Lasers, MEMS and Nanotechnology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iowa State University, 301 Black, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Pecholt, Ben; Gupta, Saurabh [Laboratory for Lasers, MEMS and Nanotechnology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iowa State University, 301 Black, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

    2009-02-01

    Ultra-short pulsed laser ablation and micromachining of n-type, 4H-SiC wafer was performed using a 1552 nm wavelength, 2 ps pulse, 5 {mu}J pulse energy erbium-doped fiber laser with an objective of rapid etching of diaphragms for pressure sensors. Ablation rate, studied as a function of energy fluence, reached a maximum of 20 nm per pulse at 10 mJ/cm{sup 2}, which is much higher than that achievable by the femtosecond laser for the equivalent energy fluence. Ablation threshold was determined as 2 mJ/cm{sup 2}. Scanning electron microscope images supported the Coulomb explosion (CE) mechanism by revealing very fine particulates, smooth surfaces and absence of thermal effects including melt layer formation. It is hypothesized that defect-activated absorption and multiphoton absorption mechanisms gave rise to a charge density in the surface layers required for CE and enabled material expulsion in the form of nanoparticles. Trenches and holes micromachined by the picosecond laser exhibited clean and smooth edges and non-thermal ablation mode for pulse repetition rates less than 250 kHz. However carbonaceous material and recast layer were noted in the machined region when the pulse repetition rate was increased 500 kHz that could be attributed to the interaction between air plasma and micro/nanoparticles. A comparison with femtosecond pulsed lasers shows the promise that picosecond lasers are more efficient and cost effective tools for creating sensor diaphragms and via holes in 4H-SiC.

  15. Laser absorption via QED cascades in counter propagating laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Grismayer, Thomas; Martins, Joana L; Fonseca, Ricardo A; Silva, Luis O

    2015-01-01

    A model for laser light absorption in electron-positron plasmas self-consistently created via QED cascades is described. The laser energy is mainly absorbed due to hard photon emission via nonlinear Compton scattering. The degree of absorption depends on the laser intensity and the pulse duration. The QED cascades are studied with multi-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations complemented by a QED module and a macro-particle merging algorithm that allows to handle the exponential growth of the number of particles. Results range from moderate-intensity regimes ($\\sim$ 10 PW) where the laser absorption is negligible, to extreme intensities (> 100 PW) where the degree of absorption reaches 80%. Our study demonstrates good agreement between the analytical model and simulations. The expected properties of the hard photon emission and the generated pair-plasma are investigated, and the experimental signatures for near-future laser facilities are discussed.

  16. [Retinal photocoagulation with a pulsed, frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser (532 nm)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roider, J; Schiller, M; el Hifnawi, E S; Birngruber, R

    1994-12-01

    The small difference in wavelength between an argon laser (514 nm) and a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser (532 nm), together with the advantage of the solid-state technology, makes the Nd:YAG laser likely to play a major role in retinal photocoagulation in the near future. For technical reasons all frequency-doubled Nd:YAG lasers work in a quasi-continuous mode, emitting a burst of highly repetitive short laser pulses during the exposure time desired. We investigated the side effects due to high peak irradiances of those short laser pulse trains (Crystal Focus Nd:YAG laser, Emerald; pulse duration 1-10 microseconds, repetition rate 13 KHz) in rabbits in comparison with a standard argon laser system (Zeiss, Visulas, Argon II). The energy necessary for blanching the retina was similar in both cases. As opposed to the argon laser system, subretinal bubbles were regularly visible ophthalmoscopically with the Nd:YAG system, when average powers as high as 200 mW were used. The ED50 power for bubble formation is about 2-3 times above the ED50 power for blanching. Thermal calculations show that this bubble formation effect is likely to be related to the peak power of the short pulses. The hemorrhage threshold is similar in both systems. However, light microscopically there is no difference between the two laser systems. Panretinal photocoagulation (300-500 microns, 100-200 ms) in patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy produced such bubbles about once per 1000 lesions.

  17. Adaptive optics for ultra short pulsed lasers in UHV environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deneuville, Francois; Ropert, Laurent; Sauvageot, Paul; Theis, Sébastien

    2015-02-01

    ISP SYSTEM has developed an electro-mechanical deformable mirror compatible with Ultra High Vacuum environment, suitable for ultra short pulsed lasers. The design of the MD-AME deformable mirror is based on force application on numerous locations. μ-AME actuators are driven by stepper motors, and their patented special design allows controlling the force with a very high accuracy. Materials and assembly method have been adapted to UHV constraints and the performances were evaluated on a first application for a beam with a diameter of 250mm. A Strehl ratio above 0.9 was reached for this application. Optical aberrations up to Zernike order 5 can be corrected with a very low residual error as for standard MD-AME mirror. Amplitude can reach up to several hundreds of μm for low order corrections. Hysteresis is lower than 0.1% and linearity better than 99%. Contrary to piezo-electric actuators, the μ-AME actuators avoid print-through effects and they permit to keep the mirror shape stable even unpowered, providing a high resistance to electro-magnetic pulses. The deformable mirror design allows changing easily an actuator or even the membrane if needed, in order to improve the facility availability. They are designed for circular, square or elliptical aperture from 30mm up to 500mm or more, with incidence angle from 0° to 45°. They can be equipped with passive or active cooling for high power lasers with high repetition rate.

  18. A CW calibrated laser pulse energy meter for the range 1 pJ to 100 mJ

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, M. G.; Leonhardt, R.; Livigni, D.; Lehman, J. H.

    2014-06-01

    We describe the use of a silicon photodiode trap detector and digital storage oscilloscope as an absolute laser pulse energy meter, capable of repetition rates of 85 Hz and 5% uncertainty (k = 2). The maximum repetition rate is limited by the decay time of the output pulse of the detector. The technique relies on a straightforward oscilloscope-based integration of the voltage pulse generated by the photodiode trap detector. We highlight the versatility of the technique by comparing it at 1064 nm with our high and low-level calorimeter based pulse energy scales, to which our calibration services are traceable. The good agreement of the results, along with comprehensive uncertainty analysis, validates the approach we have taken. We have demonstrated a basis for establishing laser pulse energy measurement using continuous wave (CW) sources and standard detectors.

  19. A Study on Efficiency Improvement and Optimization of Operating Characteristics of Pulsed Co{sub 2} Laser System using 3 Electrode-type and Ring Blower

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D. W.; Chung, H. J.; Park, S. J.; Lee, Y. S.; Lee, D. H.; Kim, H. J.; Cho, J. S. [Pusan National University (Korea)

    2000-07-01

    In this paper, it is purpose to develop a pulsed CO{sub 2} laser with stable output at pulse repetition rate range of 2 khz. We used a IGBT as a switching device. The laser cavity was fabricated as an axial and water cooled type. It was used a ring blower to increase a cooling effect. The laser performance characteristics as parameters, such as pulse repetition rate, gas pressure have been investigated. The experiment was done under 3 electrode-type instead of 2 electrode-type. To achieve 3 electrode-type, we used two pulse-transformers which is operated parallel. As a result, the maximum output was about 28 W at the total pressure of 20 Torr(the gas mixture CO{sub 2}:N{sub 2}:He=1:9:15 and the pulse repetition rate of 1300 Hz). (author). 7 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Vector similariton erbium-doped all-fiber laser generating sub-100-fs nJ pulses at 100 MHz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, Michel; Piché, Michel

    2016-02-08

    Erbium-doped mode-locked fiber lasers with repetition rates comparable to those of solid-state lasers and generating nJ pulses are required for many applications. Our goal was to design a fiber laser that would meet such requirements, that could be built at relatively low cost and that would be reliable and robust. We thus developed a high-fundamental-repetition-rate erbium-doped all-fiber laser operating in the amplifier similariton regime. Experimental characterization shows that this laser, which is mode-locked by nonlinear polarization evolution, emits 76-fs pulses with an energy of 1.17 nJ at a repetition rate of 100 MHz. Numerical simulations support the interpretation of self-similar evolution of the pulse in the gain fiber. More specifically we introduce the concept of vector similariton in fiber lasers. The coupled x- and y- polarization components of such a pulse have a pulse profile with a linear chirp and their combined power profile evolves self-similarly when the nonlinear asymptotic regime is reached in the gain fiber.

  1. Hierarchical classification of dynamically varying radar pulse repetition interval modulation patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauppi, Jukka-Pekka; Martikainen, Kalle; Ruotsalainen, Ulla

    2010-12-01

    The central purpose of passive signal intercept receivers is to perform automatic categorization of unknown radar signals. Currently, there is an urgent need to develop intelligent classification algorithms for these devices due to emerging complexity of radar waveforms. Especially multifunction radars (MFRs) capable of performing several simultaneous tasks by utilizing complex, dynamically varying scheduled waveforms are a major challenge for automatic pattern classification systems. To assist recognition of complex radar emissions in modern intercept receivers, we have developed a novel method to recognize dynamically varying pulse repetition interval (PRI) modulation patterns emitted by MFRs. We use robust feature extraction and classifier design techniques to assist recognition in unpredictable real-world signal environments. We classify received pulse trains hierarchically which allows unambiguous detection of the subpatterns using a sliding window. Accuracy, robustness and reliability of the technique are demonstrated with extensive simulations using both static and dynamically varying PRI modulation patterns. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Pulsed Green Laser for Time Resolved Raman Spectroscopy Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I effort will demonstrate the feasibility of developing a fully packaged, efficient, short pulse, high repetition rate frequency doubled micro-chip...

  3. Interaction of femtosecond laser pulses with metal photocathode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Yun-Quan; Zhang Jie; Liang Wen-Xi

    2005-01-01

    The features of interaction of femtosecond laser pulses with photocathode are studied theoretically in this paper.The surface temperature of the metal cathode film while femtosecond laser pulses irradiation is studied with twotemperature model. With a simple photoelectric model we obtain the optimum metal film thickness for the backilluminated photocathode. The generated ultrashort photocurrent pulses are strongly dependent on the temperature of the electron gas and the lattice during the femtosecond laser pulse irradiation on the photocathode.

  4. Non-Contact Thrust Stand Calibration Method for Repetitively-Pulsed Electric Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Andrea R.; Toftul, Alexandra; Polzin, Kurt A.; Pearson, J. Boise

    2011-01-01

    A thrust stand calibration technique for use in testing repetitively-pulsed electric thrusters for in-space propulsion has been developed and tested using a modified hanging pendulum thrust stand. In the implementation of this technique, current pulses are applied to a solenoidal coil to produce a pulsed magnetic field that acts against the magnetic field produced by a permanent magnet mounted to the thrust stand pendulum arm. The force on the magnet is applied in this non-contact manner, with the entire pulsed force transferred to the pendulum arm through a piezoelectric force transducer to provide a time-accurate force measurement. Modeling of the pendulum arm dynamics reveals that after an initial transient in thrust stand motion the quasisteady average deflection of the thrust stand arm away from the unforced or zero position can be related to the average applied force through a simple linear Hooke s law relationship. Modeling demonstrates that this technique is universally applicable except when the pulsing period is increased to the point where it approaches the period of natural thrust stand motion. Calibration data were obtained using a modified hanging pendulum thrust stand previously used for steady-state thrust measurements. Data were obtained for varying impulse bit at constant pulse frequency and for varying pulse frequency. The two data sets exhibit excellent quantitative agreement with each other as the constant relating average deflection and average thrust match within the errors on the linear regression curve fit of the data. Quantitatively, the error on the calibration coefficient is roughly 1% of the coefficient value.

  5. Plasma generated during underwater pulsed laser processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Jacek; Chrzanowska, Justyna; Moscicki, Tomasz; Radziejewska, Joanna; Stobinski, Leszek; Szymanski, Zygmunt

    2017-09-01

    The plasma induced during underwater pulsed laser ablation of graphite is studied both experimentally and theoretically. The results of the experiment show that the maximum plasma temperature of 25000 K is reached 20 ns from the beginning of the laser pulse and decreases to 6500 K after 1000 ns. The observed OH absorption band shows that the plasma plume is surrounded by the thin layer of dissociated water vapour at a temperature around 5500 K. The hydrodynamic model applied shows similar maximum plasma temperature at delay times between 14 ns and 30 ns. The calculations show also that already at 14th ns, the plasma electron density reaches 0.97·1027 m-3, which is the critical density for 1064 nm radiation. At the same time the plasma pressure is 2 GPa, which is consisted with earlier measurements of the peak pressure exerted on a target in similar conditions.

  6. Laser Pulse Heating of Spherical Metal Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribelsky, Michael I.; Miroshnichenko, Andrey E.; Kivshar, Yuri S.; Luk'Yanchuk, Boris S.; Khokhlov, Alexei R.

    2011-10-01

    We consider the general problem of laser pulse heating of spherical metal particles with the sizes ranging from nanometers to millimeters. We employ the exact Mie solution of the diffraction problem and solve the heat-transfer equation to determine the maximum temperature rise at the particle surface as a function of optical and thermometric parameters of the problem. Primary attention is paid to the case when the thermal diffusivity of the particle is much larger than that of the environment, as it is in the case of metal particles in fluids. We show that, in this case, for any given duration of the laser pulse, the maximum temperature rise as a function of the particle size reaches a maximum at a certain finite size of the particle. We suggest simple approximate analytical expressions for this dependence, which cover the entire parameter range of the problem and agree well with direct numerical simulations.

  7. Theoretical Studies of the Output Pulse with Variation of the Pumping Pulse for RF Excited CO2 Pulsed Waveguide Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A Rauf; ZHOU Wei; XIN Jian-guo

    2006-01-01

    The behavior of a RF-excited waveguide CO2 laser in the pulse regime is studied theoretically. The output pulse evolution is studied by applying three types of pulses namely the square, sine and the triangular ones as the excitation pulses. The frequency dependence behavior of the output pulse is also presented.

  8. The influence of the repetition rate on the nanosecond pulsed pin-to-pin microdischarges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bang-Dou; Takashima, Keisuke; Zhu, Xi-Ming; Pu, Yi-Kang

    2014-10-01

    The effect of repetition rate on a nanosecond atmospheric pressure discharge is investigated. The discharge is generated between two pins in a mixture of Ne and Ar. The voltage, current, power waveforms and the temporally and spatially resolved electron density and an ‘effective’ electron temperature are measured, with a pulse interval between 1.5 and 200 µs. It is found that not only does the repetition rate have a strong influence on the breakdown voltage and the peak discharge power, but it can also affect the rise rate of the volume averaged electron density and its peak value. Temporally and spatially resolved measurement of the electron density and the effective electron temperature show that the spatial distributions of both quantities are also influenced by the repetition rate. In the initial discharge period of all cases, the sharp rise of the electron density correlates with the drastic drop of the effective electron temperature. It is suggested that the residual charges have a strong impact on the axial distribution of the electric field and energetic electrons between the electrodes during the breakdown period, as illustrated by a simple sheath model.

  9. Matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation of chemoselective polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palla-Papavlu, Alexandra; Dinca, Valentina; Dinescu, Maria; di Pietrantonio, Fabio; Cannatà, Domenico; Benetti, Massimiliano; Verona, Enrico

    2011-11-01

    In this work, matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation was applied to achieve gentle deposition of polymer thin films onto surface acoustic wave resonators. Polyepichlorhydrin, polyisobutylene and polyethylenimine were deposited both onto rigid substrates e.g. Si wafers as well as surface acoustic wave devices using a Nd-YAG laser (266 nm, 355 nm, 10 Hz repetition rate). Morphological investigations (atomic force microscopy and optical microscopy) reveal continuous deposited polymer thin films, and in the case of polyethylenimine a very low surface roughness of 1.2 nm (measured on a 40×40 μm2 area). It was found that only for a narrow range of laser fluences (i.e. 0.1-0.3 J/cm2 in the case of polyisobutylene) the chemical structure of the deposited polymer thin layers resembles to the native polymer. In addition, in the case of polyisobutylene it was shown that the irradiation at 355-nm wavelength produces deviations in the chemical structure of the deposited polymer, as compared to its bulk structure. Following the morphological and structural characterization, only a set of well established conditions was used for polymer deposition on the sensor structures. The surface acoustic wave resonators have been tested using the Network Analyzer before and after polymer deposition. The polymer coated surface acoustic wave resonator responses have been measured upon exposure to various concentrations of dimethylmethylphosphonate analyte. All sensors coated with different polymer layers (polyethylenimine, polyisobutylene, and polyepichlorhydrin) show a clear response to the dimethylmethylphosphonate vapor. The strongest signal is obtained for polyisobutylene, followed by polyethylenimine and polyepichlorhydrin. The results obtained indicate that matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation is potentially useful for the fabrication of polymer thin films to be used in applications including microsensor industry.

  10. Pulsed laser noise analysis and pump-probe signal detection with a data acquisition card.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werley, Christopher A; Teo, Stephanie M; Nelson, Keith A

    2011-12-01

    A photodiode and data acquisition card whose sampling clock is synchronized to the repetition rate of a laser are used to measure the energy of each laser pulse. Simple analysis of the data yields the noise spectrum from very low frequencies up to half the repetition rate and quantifies the pulse energy distribution. When two photodiodes for balanced detection are used in combination with an optical modulator, the technique is capable of detecting very weak pump-probe signals (ΔI/I(0) ~ 10(-5) at 1 kHz), with a sensitivity that is competitive with a lock-in amplifier. Detection with the data acquisition card is versatile and offers many advantages including full quantification of noise during each stage of signal processing, arbitrary digital filtering in silico after data collection is complete, direct readout of percent signal modulation, and easy adaptation for fast scanning of delay between pump and probe.

  11. Aging Characteristics on Epoxy Resin Surface Under Repetitive Microsecond Pulses in Air at Atmospheric Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Qing; Liu, Xiong; Zhang, Cheng; Wang, Ruixue; Rao, Zhangquan; Shao, Tao

    2016-03-01

    Research on aging characteristics of epoxy resin (EP) under repetitive microsecond pulses is important for the design of insulating materials in high power apparatus. It is because that very fast transient overvoltage always occurs in a power system, which causes flashover and is one of the main factors causing aging effects of EP materials. Therefore, it is essential to obtain a better understanding of the aging effect on an EP surface resulting from flashover. In this work, aging effects on an EP surface were investigated by surface flashover discharge under repetitive microsecond pulses in atmospheric pressure. The investigations of parameters such as the surface micro-morphology and chemical composition of the insulation material under different degrees of aging were conducted with the aid of measurement methods such as atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Results showed that with the accumulation of aging energy on the material surface, the particles formed on the material surface increased both in number and size, leading to the growth of surface roughness and a reduction in the water contact angle; the surface also became more absorbent. Furthermore, in the aging process, the molecular chains of EP on the surface were broken, resulting in oxidation and carbonisation. supported by the Natural Science Foundation of Hebei Province (No. E2015502081), National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51222701, 51307060), and the National Basic Research Program of China (No. 2014CB239505-3)

  12. Nanosecond Repetitively Pulsed Discharges in Air at Atmospheric Pressure -- Experiment and Theory of Regime Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, David; Lacoste, Deanna; Laux, Christophe

    2009-10-01

    In atmospheric pressure air preheated from 300 to 1000 K, the Nanosecond Repetitively Pulsed (NRP) method has been used to generate corona, glow, and spark discharges. Experiments have been performed to determine the parameter space (applied voltage, pulse repetition frequency, ambient gas temperature, and inter-electrode gap distance) of each discharge regime. Notably, there is a minimum gap distance for the existence of the glow regime that increases with decreasing gas temperature. A theory is developed to describe the Corona-to-Glow (C-G) and Glow-to-Spark (G-S) transitions for NRP discharges. The C-G transition is shown to depend on the Avalanche-to-Streamer Transition (AST) as well as the electric field strength in the positive column. The G-S transition is due to the thermal ionization instability. The minimum gap distance for the existence of the glow regime can be understood by considering that the applied voltage of the AST must be lower than that of the thermal ionization instability. This is a previously unknown criterion for generating glow discharges, as it does not correspond to the Paschen minimum or to the Meek-Raether criterion.

  13. An Improved Clutter Suppression Method for Weather Radars Using Multiple Pulse Repetition Time Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingjie Yu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the implementation of an improved clutter suppression method for the multiple pulse repetition time (PRT technique based on simulated radar data. The suppression method is constructed using maximum likelihood methodology in time domain and is called parametric time domain method (PTDM. The procedure relies on the assumption that precipitation and clutter signal spectra follow a Gaussian functional form. The multiple interleaved pulse repetition frequencies (PRFs that are used in this work are set to four PRFs (952, 833, 667, and 513 Hz. Based on radar simulation, it is shown that the new method can provide accurate retrieval of Doppler velocity even in the case of strong clutter contamination. The obtained velocity is nearly unbiased for all the range of Nyquist velocity interval. Also, the performance of the method is illustrated on simulated radar data for plan position indicator (PPI scan. Compared with staggered 2-PRT transmission schemes with PTDM, the proposed method presents better estimation accuracy under certain clutter situations.

  14. Mid-infrared pulsed fiber lasers operating at 3μm region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yong; Li, Jianfeng; Yu, Luohong; Zhang, Zhiyao; Li, Heping; Zhou, Xiaojun

    2014-11-01

    Mid-infrared pulsed fiber laser with centered wavelength from 2 to 5 μm have attracted substantial attention owing to their potential applications in defence, laser microsurgery, material processing, nonlinear frequency conversion, etc. We demonstrated our recent achievements at 3 μm pulsed fiber lasers by utilizing Q-switching method. Firstly, a cascaded dual wavelength actively Q-switched Ho3+-doped ZBLAN fiber was reported by inserting an external electrically driven acoustic-optical modulator (AOM) into the cavity. The 3.0 μm and 2.07 μm pulse trains were achieved with a μs level time delay corresponding to the pulse energy of 29 μJ and 7 μJ, pulse duration of 380 ns and 260 ns, respectively. The narrower pulse width in this case compared to that in passively Q-switched fiber lasers can be attributed to the much higher modulation depth of AOM. Using a reversely designed semiconductor saturable mirror (SESAM) as the saturable absorber (SA), we presented a passively Q-switched Ho3+-doped ZBLAN fiber laser operating at ~2971 nm, the obtained maximum pulse energy of 6.65 μJ only limited by the maximum pump power was also the highest level from passively Q-switched fiber lasers at this wavelength range, and corresponding pulse repetition rate and duration were 47.6 kHz and 1.68 μs, respectively. Then using a Fe2+: ZnSe crystal with an initial transmission of 69 % as the SA, a passively Q-switched Ho3+-doped ZBLAN fiber laser operating at 2970.3 nm was also achieved. The obtained pulse duration and repetition rate were 1.92 μs and 62.74 kHz, respectively with an output power of 266 mW and a pulse energy of 4.24 μJ. The further performance improvements were possible because they were just limited by the maximum pump power. To sum up, the above achievements would be beneficial for further development of mid-infrared pulsed fiber lasers.

  15. PULSAR: A High-Repetition-Rate, High-Power, CE Phase-Locked Laser for the J.R. Macdonald Laboratory at Kansas State University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Itzhak, Itzik (Itzhak) [J.R. Macdonald Laboratory, Physics Department, Kansas State University; Carnes, Kevin D. [J.R. Macdonald Laboratory, Physics Department, Kansas State University; Cocke, C. Lew [J.R. Macdonald Laboratory, Physics Department, Kansas State University; Fehrenbach, Charles W. [J.R. Macdonald Laboratory, Physics Department, Kansas State University; Kumarappan, Vinod [PULSAR: A High-Repetition-Rate, High-Power, CE Phase-Locked Laser for the J.R. Macdonald Laboratory at Kansas State University; Rudenko, Artem [J.R. Macdonald Laboratory, Physics Department, Kansas State University; Trallero, Carlos [J.R. Macdonald Laboratory, Physics Department, Kansas State University

    2014-05-09

    This instrumentation grant funded the development and installation of a state-of-the-art laser system to be used for the DOE funded research at the J.R. Macdonald Laboratory at Kansas State University. Specifically, we purchased a laser based on the KMLABs Red-Dragon design, which has a high repetition rate of 10-20 kHz crucial for multi-parameter coincidence measurements conducted in our lab. This laser system is carrier-envelope phase (CEP) locked and provides pulses as short as 21 fs directly from the amplifier (see details below). In addition, we have developed a pulse compression setup that provides sub 5 fs pulses and a CEP tagging capability that allows for long measurements of CEP dependent processes.

  16. Selective Ablation of thin Nickel-chromium-alloy Films Using Ultrashort Pulsed Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabst, Linda; Ebert, Robby; Exner, Horst

    The selective ablation of 100nm thin Nickel-Chromium-alloy films on glass substrate was investigated using femtosecond laser pulses (λ=1030nm, τp=170 fs, Ep,max=7μJ). The influence of the processing parameters such as fluence, pulse number and pulse repetition rate on the ablation process was examined. Single and multiple pulses ablation thresholds of the Nickel-Chromium-alloy film were determined and the incubation coefficient calculated. Optical and electron microscopy were employed to characterize the patterned area. As a result, different irradiation morphologies were observed, dependent from the processing parameters. A processing window for film side ablation of the Nickel-Chromium-alloy film without damaging the underlying glass substrate was found, however, the edge of the ablation craters were covered with laser induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS).

  17. Pulsed laser deposition of metal films and nanoparticles in vacuum using subnanosecond laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganeev, R A; Chakravarty, U; Naik, P A; Srivastava, H; Mukherjee, C; Tiwari, M K; Nandedkar, R V; Gupta, P D

    2007-03-10

    A study of silver, chromium, stainless-steel, and indium thin films prepared by subnanosecond laser deposition in vacuum is reported. We compare the laser ablation in vacuum at the weak- and tight-focusing conditions of a Ti:sapphire laser beam and analyze the nanoparticles synthesized in the latter case using absorption spectroscopy, x-ray fluorescence, atomic force microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Our results show that the nanoparticle formation can be accomplished using long laser pulses under tight-focusing conditions.

  18. Picosecond pulse measurements using the active laser medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardin, James P.; Lawandy, N. M.

    1990-01-01

    A simple method for measuring the pulse lengths of synchronously pumped dye lasers which does not require the use of an external nonlinear medium, such as a doubling crystal or two-photon fluorescence cell, to autocorrelate the pulses is discussed. The technique involves feeding the laser pulses back into the dye jet, thus correlating the output pulses with the intracavity pulses to obtain pulse length signatures in the resulting time-averaged laser power. Experimental measurements were performed using a rhodamine 6G dye laser pumped by a mode-locked frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser. The results agree well with numerical computations, and the method proves effective in determining lengths of picosecond laser pulses.

  19. Heavy ion acceleration using femtosecond laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Petrov, G M; Thomas, A G R; Krushelnick, K; Beg, F N

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical study of heavy ion acceleration from ultrathin (<200 nm) gold foils irradiated by a short pulse laser is presented. Using two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations the time history of the laser bullet is examined in order to get insight into the laser energy deposition and ion acceleration process. For laser pulses with intensity , duration 32 fs, focal spot size 5 mkm and energy 27 Joules the calculated reflection, transmission and coupling coefficients from a 20 nm foil are 80 %, 5 % and 15 %, respectively. The conversion efficiency into gold ions is 8 %. Two highly collimated counter-propagating ion beams have been identified. The forward accelerated gold ions have average and maximum charge-to-mass ratio of 0.25 and 0.3, respectively, maximum normalized energy 25 MeV/nucleon and flux . Analytical model was used to determine a range of foil thicknesses suitable for acceleration of gold ions in the Radiation Pressure Acceleration regime and the onset of the Target Normal Sheath Acceleratio...

  20. Technology and engineering aspects of high power pulsed single longitudinal mode dye lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawat, V. S.; Mukherjee, Jaya; Gantayet, L. M.

    2015-09-01

    Tunable single mode pulsed dye lasers are capable of generating optical radiations in the visible range having very small bandwidths (transform limited), high average power (a few kW) at a high pulse repetition rate (a few tens of kHz), small beam divergence and relatively higher efficiencies. These dye lasers are generally utilized laser dyes dissolved in solvents such as water, heavy water, ethanol, methanol, etc. to provide a rapidly flowing gain medium. The dye laser is a versatile tool, which can lase either in the continuous wave (CW) or in the pulsed mode with pulse duration as small as a few tens of femtoseconds. In this review, we have examined the several cavity designs, various types of gain mediums and numerous types of dye cell geometries for obtaining the single longitudinal mode pulsed dye laser. Different types of cavity configuration, such as very short cavity, short cavity with frequency selective element and relatively longer cavity with multiple frequency selective elements were reviewed. These single mode lasers have been pumped by all kinds of pumping sources such as flash lamps, Excimer, Nitrogen, Ruby, Nd:YAG, Copper Bromide and Copper Vapor Lasers. The single mode dye lasers are either pumped transversely or longitudinally to the resonator axis. The pulse repletion rate of these pump lasers were ranging from a few Hz to a few tens of kHz. Physics technology and engineering aspects of tuning mechanism, mode hop free scanning and dye cell designs are also presented in this review. Tuning of a single mode dye laser with a resolution of a few MHz per step is a technologically challenging task, which is discussed here.

  1. Pulsed laser deposition of rare earth compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Stone, L A

    2001-01-01

    Magnetostrictive thin films have been deposited using various techniques such as sputtering and evaporation but the use of laser deposition has been limited. This research presents the results from pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of TbFe sub 2 , DyFe sub 2 and Terfenol-D thin films using an infra red Transversely Excited Atmospheric (TEA) CO sub 2 laser at lambda approx 10.6 mu m and an ultra violet Argon-Fluoride (ArF) excimer laser at lambda approx 193 nm. Results have showed that the TEA CO sub 2 laser under the range of conditions studied is not suitable for the production of magnetostrictive films. The problems experienced are a mixture of mostly fracture debris at low fluences (F approx 20 Jcm sup - sup 2) and melt droplets at high fluences (F approx 60 Jcm sup - sup 2). In all cases the destruction of the target is a major problem, with the Terfenol-D targets being the worst affected. Thin films produced were all iron rich. The use of an excimer laser has proved more successful in providing stoichiometri...

  2. Pulsed Nd-YAG laser in endodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragot-Roy, Brigitte; Severin, Claude; Maquin, Michel

    1994-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish an operative method in endodontics. The effect of a pulsed Nd:YAG laser on root canal dentin has been examined with a scanning electron microscope. Our first experimentation was to observe the impacts carried out perpendicularly to root canal surface with a 200 micrometers fiber optic in the presence of dye. Secondarily, the optical fiber was used as an endodontic instrument with black dye. The irradiation was performed after root canal preparation (15/100 file or 40/100 file) or directly into the canal. Adverse effects are observed. The results show that laser irradiation on root canal dentin surfaces induces a nonhomogeneous modified dentin layer, melted and resolidified dentin closed partially dentinal tubules. The removal of debris is not efficient enough. The laser treatment seems to be indicated only for endodontic and periapical spaces sterilization after conventional root canal preparation.

  3. Coherent Dark States of Rubidium 87 in a Buffer Gas using Pulsed Laser Light

    CERN Document Server

    Brattke, S; Hartmann, W D

    1998-01-01

    The coherent dark resonance between the hyperfine levels F=1, m=0 and F=2, m=0 of the rubidium ground state has been observed experimentally with the light of a pulsed mode-locked diode laser operating at the D1 transition frequency. The resonance occurs whenever the pulse repetition frequency matches an integer fraction of the rubidium 87 ground state hyperfine splitting of 6.8 GHz. Spectra have been taken by varying the pulse repetition frequency. Using cells with argon as a buffer gas a linewidth as narrow as 149 Hz was obtained. The rubidium ground state decoherence cross section 1.1*10^(-18) cm^2 for collisions with xenon atoms has been measured for the first time with this method using a pure isotope rubidium vapor cell and xenon as a buffer gas.

  4. Active mode locking at 50 GHz repetition frequency by half-frequency modulation of monolithic semiconductor lasers integrated with electroabsorption modulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kenji; Kotaka, Isamu; Kondo, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Mitsuo

    1996-10-01

    Active mode locking achieved at a 50 GHz repetition frequency by modulation at half (25 GHz) the cavity resonance frequency using a monolithic mode-locked InGaAsP laser integrated with an electroabsorption modulator is described. A pulse width of around 3 ps and a high suppression ratio of more than 33 dB of the intensity modulation at the driving frequency are obtained.

  5. Numerical simulation of copper ablation by ultrashort laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Ding, PengJi; Li, YuHong

    2011-01-01

    Using a modified self-consistent one-dimensional hydrodynamic lagrangian fluid code, laser ablation of solid copper by ultrashort laser pulses in vacuum was simulated to study fundamental mechanisms and to provide a guide for drilling periodic microholes or microgratings on the metal surface. The simulated laser ablation threshold is a approximate constancy in femtosecond regime and increases as the square root of pulse duration in picosecond regime. The ablation depth as a function of pulse duration shows four different regimes and a minimum for a pulse duration of ~ 12ps for various laser fluences. The influence of laser-induced plasma shielding on ablation depth is also studied.

  6. Twin-Pulse Soliton Operation of a Fiber Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    W.; S.; Man; H.; Y.; Tam

    2003-01-01

    We report on the experimental observation of a novel type of twin-pulse soliton in a passively mode-locked fiber ring laser. Twin-pulse soliton interaction in the laser cavity are also experimentally investigated and compared with those of the single pulse soliton.

  7. Interaction mechanisms of cavitation bubbles induced by spatially and temporally separated fs-laser pulses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Tinne

    Full Text Available The emerging use of femtosecond lasers with high repetition rates in the MHz regime together with limited scan speed implies possible mutual optical and dynamical interaction effects of the individual cutting spots. In order to get more insight into the dynamics a time-resolved photographic analysis of the interaction of cavitation bubbles is presented. Particularly, we investigated the influence of fs-laser pulses and their resulting bubble dynamics with various spatial as well as temporal separations. Different time courses of characteristic interaction effects between the cavitation bubbles were observed depending on pulse energy and spatio-temporal pulse separation. These ranged from merely no interaction to the phenomena of strong water jet formation. Afterwards, the mechanisms are discussed regarding their impact on the medical application of effective tissue cutting lateral to the laser beam direction with best possible axial precision: the mechanical forces of photodisruption as well as the occurring water jet should have low axial extend and a preferably lateral priority. Furthermore, the overall efficiency of energy conversion into controlled mechanical impact should be maximized compared to the transmitted pulse energy and unwanted long range mechanical side effects, e.g. shock waves, axial jet components. In conclusion, these experimental results are of great importance for the prospective optimization of the ophthalmic surgical process with high-repetition rate fs-lasers.

  8. Interaction mechanisms of cavitation bubbles induced by spatially and temporally separated fs-laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinne, Nadine; Kaune, Brigitte; Krüger, Alexander; Ripken, Tammo

    2014-01-01

    The emerging use of femtosecond lasers with high repetition rates in the MHz regime together with limited scan speed implies possible mutual optical and dynamical interaction effects of the individual cutting spots. In order to get more insight into the dynamics a time-resolved photographic analysis of the interaction of cavitation bubbles is presented. Particularly, we investigated the influence of fs-laser pulses and their resulting bubble dynamics with various spatial as well as temporal separations. Different time courses of characteristic interaction effects between the cavitation bubbles were observed depending on pulse energy and spatio-temporal pulse separation. These ranged from merely no interaction to the phenomena of strong water jet formation. Afterwards, the mechanisms are discussed regarding their impact on the medical application of effective tissue cutting lateral to the laser beam direction with best possible axial precision: the mechanical forces of photodisruption as well as the occurring water jet should have low axial extend and a preferably lateral priority. Furthermore, the overall efficiency of energy conversion into controlled mechanical impact should be maximized compared to the transmitted pulse energy and unwanted long range mechanical side effects, e.g. shock waves, axial jet components. In conclusion, these experimental results are of great importance for the prospective optimization of the ophthalmic surgical process with high-repetition rate fs-lasers.

  9. Drilling of Copper Using a Dual-Pulse Femtosecond Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Wei Cheng

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The drilling of copper using a dual-pulse femtosecond laser with wavelength of 800 nm, pulse duration of 120 fs and a variable pulse separation time (0.1–150 ps is investigated theoretically. A one-dimensional two-temperature model with temperature-dependent material properties is considered, including dynamic optical properties and the thermal-physical properties. Rapid phase change and phase explosion models are incorporated to simulate the material ablation process. Numerical results show that under the same total laser fluence of 4 J/cm2, a dual-pulse femtosecond laser with a pulse separation time of 30–150 ps can increase the ablation depth, compared to the single pulse. The optimum pulse separation time is 85 ps. It is also demonstrated that a dual pulse with a suitable pulse separation time for different laser fluences can enhance the ablation rate by about 1.6 times.

  10. Low-loss waveguides fabricated in BK7 glass by high repetition rate femtosecond fiber laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Shane M; Ng, Mi Li; Bonse, Jörn; Mermillod-Blondin, Alexandre; Zhang, Haibin; Rosenfeld, Arkadi; Herman, Peter R

    2008-04-20

    For the first time femtosecond-laser writing has inscribed low-loss optical waveguides in Schott BK7 glass, a commercially important type of borosilicate widely used in optical applications. The use of a variable repetition rate laser enabled the identification of a narrow processing window at 1 MHz repetition rate with optimal waveguides exhibiting propagation losses of 0.3 dB/cm and efficient mode matching to standard optical fibers at a 1550 nm wavelength. The waveguides were characterized by complementary phase contrast and optical transmission microscopy, identifying a micrometer-sized guiding region within a larger complex structure of both positive and negative refractive index variations.

  11. Wavelength stabilisation during current pulsing of tapered laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Bjarlin

    2009-01-01

    The use of external feedback to stabilise the frequency of a tapered laser during current pulsing is reported. Using this technique more than 20 W of peak power in 60 ns pulses from the tapered laser is obtained and owing to the external feedback, the laser is tunable in the 778-808 nm range....... The spectral width of the tapered laser is significantly narrowed compared to the freely running laser....

  12. Drop deformation by laser-pulse impact

    CERN Document Server

    Gelderblom, Hanneke; Klein, Alexander L; Bouwhuis, Wilco; Lohse, Detlef; Villermaux, Emmanuel; Snoeijer, Jacco H

    2015-01-01

    A free-falling absorbing liquid drop hit by a nanosecond laser-pulse experiences a strong recoil-pressure kick. As a consequence, the drop propels forward and deforms into a thin sheet which eventually fragments. We study how the drop deformation depends on the pulse shape and drop properties. We first derive the velocity field inside the drop on the timescale of the pressure pulse, when the drop is still spherical. This yields the kinetic-energy partition inside the drop, which precisely measures the deformation rate with respect to the propulsion rate, before surface tension comes into play. On the timescale where surface tension is important the drop has evolved into a thin sheet. Its expansion dynamics is described with a slender-slope model, which uses the impulsive energy-partition as an initial condition. Completed with boundary integral simulations, this two-stage model explains the entire drop dynamics and its dependance on the pulse shape: for a given propulsion, a tightly focused pulse results in a...

  13. High-energy ultra-short pulse thin-disk lasers: new developments and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Knut; Klingebiel, Sandro; Schultze, Marcel; Tesseit, Catherine Y.; Bessing, Robert; Häfner, Matthias; Prinz, Stefan; Sutter, Dirk; Metzger, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    We report on the latest developments at TRUMPF Scientific Lasers in the field of ultra-short pulse lasers with highest output energies and powers. All systems are based on the mature and industrialized thin-disk technology of TRUMPF. Thin Yb:YAG disks provide a reliable and efficient solution for power and energy scaling to Joule- and kW-class picosecond laser systems. Due to its efficient one dimensional heat removal, the thin-disk exhibits low distortions and thermal lensing even when pumped under extremely high pump power densities of 10kW/cm². Currently TRUMPF Scientific Lasers develops regenerative amplifiers with highest average powers, optical parametric amplifiers and synchronization schemes. The first few-ps kHz multi-mJ thin-disk regenerative amplifier based on the TRUMPF thindisk technology was developed at the LMU Munich in 20081. Since the average power and energy have continuously been increased, reaching more than 300W (10kHz repetition rate) and 200mJ (1kHz repetition rate) at pulse durations below 2ps. First experiments have shown that the current thin-disk technology supports ultra-short pulse laser solutions >1kW of average power. Based on few-picosecond thin-disk regenerative amplifiers few-cycle optical parametric chirped pulse amplifiers (OPCPA) can be realized. These systems have proven to be the only method for scaling few-cycle pulses to the multi-mJ energy level. OPA based few-cycle systems will allow for many applications such as attosecond spectroscopy, THz spectroscopy and imaging, laser wake field acceleration, table-top few-fs accelerators and laser-driven coherent X-ray undulator sources. Furthermore, high-energy picosecond sources can directly be used for a variety of applications such as X-ray generation or in atmospheric research.

  14. Characterization of ethylcellulose and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose thin films deposited by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palla-Papavlu, A.; Rusen, L.; Dinca, V.; Filipescu, M.; Lippert, T.; Dinescu, M.

    2014-05-01

    In this study is reported the deposition of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) and ethylcellulose (EC) by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE). Both HPMC and EC were deposited on silicon substrates using a Nd:YAG laser (266 nm, 5 ns laser pulse and 10 Hz repetition rate) and then characterized by atomic force microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. It was found that for laser fluences up to 450 mJ/cm2 the structure of the deposited HPMC and EC polymer in the thin film resembles to the bulk. Morphological investigations reveal island features on the surface of the EC thin films, and pores onto the HPMC polymer films. The obtained results indicate that MAPLE may be an alternative technique for the fabrication of new systems with desired drug release profile.

  15. Characterization of ethylcellulose and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose thin films deposited by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palla-Papavlu, A., E-mail: apalla@nipne.ro [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, PO Box MG-36, Magurele, RO-077125 Bucharest (Romania); Rusen, L.; Dinca, V.; Filipescu, M. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, PO Box MG-36, Magurele, RO-077125 Bucharest (Romania); Lippert, T. [Paul Scherrer Institut, General Energy Research Department, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Dinescu, M. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, PO Box MG-36, Magurele, RO-077125 Bucharest (Romania)

    2014-05-01

    In this study is reported the deposition of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) and ethylcellulose (EC) by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE). Both HPMC and EC were deposited on silicon substrates using a Nd:YAG laser (266 nm, 5 ns laser pulse and 10 Hz repetition rate) and then characterized by atomic force microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. It was found that for laser fluences up to 450 mJ/cm{sup 2} the structure of the deposited HPMC and EC polymer in the thin film resembles to the bulk. Morphological investigations reveal island features on the surface of the EC thin films, and pores onto the HPMC polymer films. The obtained results indicate that MAPLE may be an alternative technique for the fabrication of new systems with desired drug release profile.

  16. Active cooling of pulse compression diffraction gratings for high energy, high average power ultrafast lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessi, David A; Rosso, Paul A; Nguyen, Hoang T; Aasen, Michael D; Britten, Jerald A; Haefner, Constantin

    2016-12-26

    Laser energy absorption and subsequent heat removal from diffraction gratings in chirped pulse compressors poses a significant challenge in high repetition rate, high peak power laser development. In order to understand the average power limitations, we have modeled the time-resolved thermo-mechanical properties of current and advanced diffraction gratings. We have also developed and demonstrated a technique of actively cooling Petawatt scale, gold compressor gratings to operate at 600W of average power - a 15x increase over the highest average power petawatt laser currently in operation. Combining this technique with low absorption multilayer dielectric gratings developed in our group would enable pulse compressors for petawatt peak power lasers operating at average powers well above 40kW.

  17. Theory of Self-pulsing in Photonic Crystal Fano Lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thorsten Svend; Yu, Yi; Mørk, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    Laser self-pulsing was a phenomenon exclusive to macroscopic lasers until recently, where self-starting laser pulsation in a microscopic photonic crystal Fano laser was reported. In this paper a theoretical model is developed to describe the Fano laser, including descriptions of the highly......-dispersive Fano mirror, the laser frequency and the threshold gain. The model is based upon a combination of conventional laser rate equations and coupled-mode theory. The dynamical model is used to demonstrate how the laser has two regimes of operation, continuous-wave output and self-pulsing, and these regimes...

  18. Design concept and performance considerations for fast high power semiconductor switching for high repetition rate and high power excimer laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Tatsumi; Kakizaki, Kouji; Takagi, Shigeyuki; Satoh, Saburoh; Shinohe, Takashi; Ohashi, Hiromichi; Endo, Fumihiko; Okamura, Katsuya; Ishii, Akira; Teranishi, Tsuneharu; Yasuoka, Koichi

    1997-07-01

    A semiconductor switching power supply has been developed, in which a novel structure semiconductor device, metal-oxide-semiconductor assisted gate-triggered thyristor (MAGT) was incorporated with a single stage magnetic pulse compression circuit (MPC). The MAGT was specially designed to directly replace thyratrons in a power supply for a high repetition rate laser. Compared with conventional high power semiconductor switching devices, it was designed to enable a fast switching, retaining a high blocking voltage and to extremely reduce the transient turn-on power losses, enduring a higher peak current. A maximum peak current density of 32 kA/cm2 and a current density risetime rate di/dt of 142 kA/(cm2×μs) were obtained at the chip area with an applied anode voltage of 1.5 kV. A MAGT switching unit connecting 32 MAGTs in series was capable of switching on more than 25 kV-300 A at a repetition rate of 5 kHz, which, coupled with the MPC, was equivalent to the capability of a high power thyratron. A high repetition rate and high power XeCl excimer laser was excited by the power supply. The results confirmed the stable laser operation of a repetition rate of up to 5 kHz, the world record to our knowledge. An average output power of 0.56 kW was obtained at 5 kHz where the shortage of the total discharge current was subjoined by a conventional power supply with seven parallel switching thyratrons, simultaneously working, for the MAGT power supply could not switch a greater current than that switched by one thyratron. It was confirmed by those excitations that the MAGT unit with the MPC could replace a high power commercial thyratron directly for excimer lasers. The switching stability was significantly superior to that of the thyratron in a high repetition rate region, judging from the discharge current wave forms. It should be possible for the MAGT unit, in the future, to directly switch the discharge current within a rise time of 0.1 μs with a magnetic assist.

  19. Repetition frequency scaling of an all-polarization maintaining erbium-doped mode-locked fiber laser based on carbon nanotubes saturable absorber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sotor, J., E-mail: jaroslaw.sotor@pwr.edu.pl; Sobon, G.; Abramski, K. M. [Laser and Fiber Electronics Group, Wroclaw University of Technology, Wybrzeze Wyspianskiego 27, 50-370 Wroclaw (Poland); Jagiello, J.; Lipinska, L. [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, Wolczynska 133, 01-919 Warsaw (Poland)

    2015-04-07

    We demonstrate an all-polarization maintaining (PM), mode-locked erbium (Er)-doped fiber laser based on a carbon nanotubes (CNT) saturable absorber (SA). The laser resonator was maximally simplified by using only one passive hybrid component and a pair of fiber connectors with deposited CNTs. The repetition frequency (F{sub rep}) of such a cost-effective and self-starting mode-locked laser was scaled from 54.3 MHz to 358.6 MHz. The highest F{sub rep} was obtained when the total cavity length was shortened to 57 cm. The laser allows ultrashort pulse generation with the duration ranging from 240 fs to 550 fs. Because the laser components were based on PM fibers the laser was immune to the external perturbations and generated laniary polarized light with the degree of polarization (DOP) of 98.7%.

  20. Repetition frequency scaling of an all-polarization maintaining erbium-doped mode-locked fiber laser based on carbon nanotubes saturable absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotor, J.; Sobon, G.; Jagiello, J.; Lipinska, L.; Abramski, K. M.

    2015-04-01

    We demonstrate an all-polarization maintaining (PM), mode-locked erbium (Er)-doped fiber laser based on a carbon nanotubes (CNT) saturable absorber (SA). The laser resonator was maximally simplified by using only one passive hybrid component and a pair of fiber connectors with deposited CNTs. The repetition frequency (Frep) of such a cost-effective and self-starting mode-locked laser was scaled from 54.3 MHz to 358.6 MHz. The highest Frep was obtained when the total cavity length was shortened to 57 cm. The laser allows ultrashort pulse generation with the duration ranging from 240 fs to 550 fs. Because the laser components were based on PM fibers the laser was immune to the external perturbations and generated laniary polarized light with the degree of polarization (DOP) of 98.7%.

  1. Amplification of Short Pulse High Power UV Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    At recent year, with the development of CPA and other amplification technology, laser intensity achieves great increase and laser power can be high to PW(105) now, this ultrashort pulse lasers offer scientists a route to investigate laser-matter interaction in an absolute new regime.So far the researches on ultrashort pulse laser-matter interaction concentrated on infrared regime, yet ultraviolet laser has the advantage in intense field physics and ICF researches for its short wavelength and less nonlinear effects. KrF excimer is the best medium in UV ultrashort pulse amplification for its small saturation energy and high contrast ratio accessible.

  2. The Electron Trajectory in a Relativistic Femtosecond Laser Pulse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Feng; Yu Wei; Lu Peixiang; Xu Han; Shen Baifei; Li Ruxin; Xu Zhizhan

    2005-01-01

    In this report, we start from Lagrange equation and analyze theoretically the electron dynamics in electromagnetic field. By solving the relativistic government equations of electron,the trajectories of an electron in plane laser pulse, focused laser pulse have been given for different initial conditions. The electron trajectory is determined by its initial momentum, the amplitude,spot size and polarization of the laser pulse. The optimum initial momentum of the electron for LSS (laser synchrotron source) is obtained. Linear polarized laser is more advantaged than circular polarized laser for generating harmonic radiation.

  3. Genetic algorithm based optimization of pulse profile for MOPA based high power fiber lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiawei; Tang, Ming; Shi, Jun; Fu, Songnian; Li, Lihua; Liu, Ying; Cheng, Xueping; Liu, Jian; Shum, Ping

    2015-03-01

    Although the Master Oscillator Power-Amplifier (MOPA) based fiber laser has received much attention for laser marking process due to its large tunabilty of pulse duration (from 10ns to 1ms), repetition rate (100Hz to 500kHz), high peak power and extraordinary heat dissipating capability, the output pulse deformation due to the saturation effect of fiber amplifier is detrimental for many applications. We proposed and demonstrated that, by utilizing Genetic algorithm (GA) based optimization technique, the input pulse profile from the master oscillator (current-driven laser diode) could be conveniently optimized to achieve targeted output pulse shape according to real parameters' constraints. In this work, an Yb-doped high power fiber amplifier is considered and a 200ns square shaped pulse profile is the optimization target. Since the input pulse with longer leading edge and shorter trailing edge can compensate the saturation effect, linear, quadratic and cubic polynomial functions are used to describe the input pulse with limited number of unknowns(<5). Coefficients of the polynomial functions are the optimization objects. With reasonable cost and hardware limitations, the cubic input pulse with 4 coefficients is found to be the best as the output amplified pulse can achieve excellent flatness within the square shape. Considering the bandwidth constraint of practical electronics, we examined high-frequency component cut-off effect of input pulses and found that the optimized cubic input pulses with 300MHz bandwidth is still quite acceptable to satisfy the requirement for the amplified output pulse and it is feasible to establish such a pulse generator in real applications.

  4. Quasi-flat-top frequency-doubled Nd:glass laser for pumping of high-power Ti:sapphire amplifiers at a 0.1 Hz repetition rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanovsky, Victor; Kalinchenko, Galina; Rousseau, Pascal; Chvykov, Vladimir; Mourou, Gerard; Krushelnick, Karl

    2008-04-20

    A Nd:glass laser based on a novel design delivers up to 120 J energy pulses with a quasi-flat-top spatial profile at a 0.1 Hz repetition rate. The laser output is frequency-doubled with 50% efficiency and used to pump Ti:sapphire amplifiers. The developed design is perspective for use in the currently contemplated next step in ultra-high-intensity laser development.

  5. Pulse shape control in a dual cavity laser: numerical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yashkir, Yuri

    2006-04-01

    We present a numerical model of the laser system for generating a special shape of the pulse: a steep peak at the beginning followed by a long pulse tail. Laser pulses of this nature are required for various applications (laser material processing, optical breakdown spectroscopy, etc.). The laser system consists of two "overlapped" cavities with different round-trip times. The laser crystal, the Q-switching element, the back mirror, and the output coupler are shared. A shorter pulse is generated in a short cavity. A small fraction of this pulse is injected into the long cavity as a seed. It triggers generation of the longer pulse. The output emission from this hybrid laser produces a required pulse shape. Parameters of the laser pulse (ratios of durations and energies of short- and long- pulse components) can be controlled through cavity length and the output coupler reflection. Modelling of the laser system is based on a set of coupled rate equations for dynamic variables of the system: the inverse population in an active laser media and photon densities in coupled cavities. Numerical experiments were provided with typical parameters of a Nd:YAG laser to study the system behaviour for different combinations of parameters.

  6. Pulsed ytterbium-doped fibre laser with a combined modulator based on single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khudyakov, D. V.; Borodkin, A. A.; Lobach, A. S.; Vartapetov, S. K.

    2015-09-01

    This paper describes an all-normal-dispersion pulsed ytterbium-doped fibre ring laser mode-locked by a nonlinear combined modulator based on single-wall carbon nanotubes. We have demonstrated 1.7-ps pulse generation at 1.04 μm with a repetition rate of 35.6 MHz. At the laser output, the pulses were compressed to 180 fs. We have examined an intracavity nonlinear modulator which utilises nonlinear polarisation ellipse rotation in conjunction with a saturable absorber in the form of a polymer-matrix composite film containing single-wall carbon nanotubes.

  7. Laser ranging by time-of-flight measurement of femtosecond light pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Jin

    2014-04-01

    Time-of-flight (TOF) measurement of femtosecond light pulses was investigated for laser ranging of long distances with sub-micrometer precision in the air. The bandwidth limitation of the photo-detection electronics used in timing femtosecond pulses was overcome by adopting a type-II nonlinear second-harmonic crystal that permits producing the balanced optical cross-correlation signal between two overlapped light pulses. This method offered a sub-femtosecond timing resolution in determining the temporal offset between two pulses through lock-in control of the pulse repetition rate with reference to the atomic clock. The exceptional ranging capability was verified by measuring various distances from 1.5 m to 700 m. This method is found suited for terrestrial land surveying and space missions of formation-flying satellites.

  8. High precision laser ranging by time-of-flight measurement of femtosecond pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joohyung; Lee, Keunwoo; Lee, Sanghyun; Kim, Seung-Woo; Kim, Young-Jin

    2012-06-01

    Time-of-flight (TOF) measurement of femtosecond light pulses was investigated for laser ranging of long distances with sub-micrometer precision in the air. The bandwidth limitation of the photo-detection electronics used in timing femtosecond pulses was overcome by adopting a type-II nonlinear second-harmonic crystal that permits the production of a balanced optical cross-correlation signal between two overlapping light pulses. This method offered a sub-femtosecond timing resolution in determining the temporal offset between two pulses through lock-in control of the pulse repetition rate with reference to the atomic clock. The exceptional ranging capability was verified by measuring various distances of 1.5, 60 and 700 m. This method is found well suited for future space missions based on formation-flying satellites as well as large-scale industrial applications for land surveying, aircraft manufacturing and shipbuilding.

  9. Compressed 6 ps pulse in nonlinear amplification of a Q-switched microchip laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Ruxin; Liu, Zuosheng; Niu, Fuzeng; Wang, Aimin; Taira, Takunori; Zhang, Zhigang

    2017-02-01

    We present a passively Q-switched Nd:YVO4 crystal microchip laser with a 6 ps pulse width, which is based on SPM-induced spectral broadening and pulse compression. The passive Q-switching is obtained by a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror. The laser’s seed source centered at 1064 nm pulses with a duration of 80 ps, at a repetition rate of 600 kHz corresponding to an average output power of 10 mW. After amplification and compression, the pulses were compressed to 6 ps with a maximum pulse energy of 0.5 µJ.

  10. Propagation of λ3 Laser Pulses in Underdense Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhidkov, Alexei; Nemoto, Koshichi; Nayuki, Takuya; Oishi, Yuji; Fujii, Takashi

    2008-06-01

    We study the interaction of λ3 laser pulses with underdense plasma by means of real geometry particle-in-cell simulation. Underdense plasma irradiated by even low energy λ3 laser pulses can be an efficient source of multi-MeV electrons, ˜50 nC/J. The electron acceleration driven by low energy λ3 and λ2 laser pulses is monitored by means of fully relativistic 3D particle-in- cell simulation. Strong transverse wave-breaking in the vicinity of the laser focus is found to give rise to an immense electron charge injected to the acceleration phase of laser wake field. While the acceleration by λ2 pulses runs in usual way, strong blowout regime is found for λ3 pulses. Details of laser pulse self-guiding are discussed.

  11. Features of gallstone and kidney stone fragmentation by IR-pulsed Nd:YAG laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batishche, Sergei A.

    1995-05-01

    It is shown that infra-red ((lambda) equals 1064 nm) long pulse (approximately 100 microsecond(s) ) radiation of YAG:Nd laser, operating in free generation regime, effectively fragments gallstones, urinary calculus and kidney stones. The features of the mechanism of this process are investigated. Laser lithotripsy is nowadays a method widely used for fragmentation of gallstones, urinary calculus and kidney stones. Flashlamp pumped dye lasers of microsecond duration are most often used for such purposes. Nevertheless, there are some reports on lithotripsies with nanosecond duration laser pulses (for example, Q-switched YAG:Nd laser). The mechanism of the laser fragmentation of such stones was supposed to be the next. The laser powerful radiation, delivered through the optical fiber, is absorbed by the material of the stone. As a result of such highly localized energy absorption, dense plasma is formed, which expands. Such plasma and vapor, liquid confined, forms a cavitation bubble. This bubble grows, reaches its most dimension and then collapses on itself in some hundreds of micro seconds. Shock waves generated during the growth and the collapse of these bubbles are the origin of fragmentation of the stone. It is necessary to say that there are rather confined data on the hundreds microsecond laser pulse fragmentation especially what concerns the usage of infra-red (IR) YAG:Nd lasers with long laser pulses. Clearing this problem would result in better understanding of the fragmentation mechanism and it could favor development of simple and more reliable laser systems for lithotripsy. In this work we report about investigation of features of an effective fragmentation of gallstones, urinary calculus and kidney stones under exposure of IR ((lambda) equals 1064 nm) radiation of repetitive YAG:Nd laser working in free generation regime.

  12. APPLICATION OF PULSE-PERIODICAL MODE FOR IMPROVEMENT OF LASER TREATMENT EFFICIENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Apollonov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the paper is to estimate an application of pulse-periodical mode for improvement of laser treatment efficiency. Laser technologies have been widely used in the processes of material treatment with the purpose to provide them the required surface properties and also for high accuracy cutting of sheet materials. Application of complex treatment is of great interest and especially when it is used for worn-out surfaces with formation of a coating by gas-flame laying of powder mixture of specific composition and subsequent laser fusion.Increase of laser unit capacity is very important task for higher efficiency of laser technology application in mechanical engineering. Nowadays technological processes using lasers with high average power (more than 100 W have been applying only sources that are working in two modes, namely: continuous and pulse- periodical (P-P with pulse repetition rate from some units to several hundred hertz and pulse duration within dozens to hundreds of microseconds and even within milliseconds. On the other hand, in some cases shielding effect of plasma cloud formed during laser alloying, cladding or welding reduces the efficiency of laser treatment up to 50 % depending on plasma composition and laser beam length. High frequency P-P laser systems with high average power working in mode of Q-factor modulation allow to realize principally other mechanism of irradiation interaction with materials that is an ablation. In this case it is possible to provide local energy release both in space and time.The performed analysis has revealed that P-P mode of laser operation for a majority of treatment processes is much better and more efficient from energetic point of view in comparison with the continuous mode. On the basis of the developments it is possible to make a conclusion that there is a possibility to create laser systems working in high frequency P-P mode with high average power above hundreds watt.

  13. Pulsed laser propulsion performance of 11-cm parabolic bell engines within the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrabo, Leik N.; Libeau, M. A.; Meloney, E. D.; Bracken, R. L.; Knowles, T. B.

    2004-09-01

    The paper presents pulsed laser propulsion performance data for three 11-cm diameter aluminum parabolic (or "bell-shaped") engines, tested with the 10-kW PLVTS pulsed CO2 laser at White Sands Missile Range, NM. The single-pulse and multiple-pulse tests were conducted on two campaigns, Sept. 2000 and Sept. 2001, using a ballistic pendulum apparatus. The results from two different sets of PLVTS resonator optics were gathered (both 2X and 3X magnification). Assuming the vertex is set at the parabola's focus (i.e., and viewing outward towards the 11-cm exit plane), the bell engines had three different total included angles of 60, 87.2, and 120 degrees. As expected, the impulse and coupling coefficient performance of the 60 deg. bell generally exceeded that of the 87.2 deg. engine, which in turn outperformed the 120 deg. bell. The maximum single-pulse coupling coefficients varied from 275 to 375 N-sec/MJ. Multiple-pulse engine performance data was also gathered with the same ballistic pendulum in the first campaign. A sequence of from 2 to 8 pulses was transmitted into each bell at a pulse repetition frequency of 25 HZ -- all delivered within the first 1/8th cycle of the pendulum's swing. In general, only small variations in the coupling coefficient were observed throughout the string of pulses.

  14. Optodynamic analysis of pulsed-laser processing with a Nd:YAG laser

    OpenAIRE

    Strgar, Simon; Možina, Janez

    2015-01-01

    Laser drilling and laser marking of metals with a pulsed Nd:YAG laser are discussed. Some characteristics of pulsed-laser processing and the possibilities of process optodynamic analysis are presented for the laser-drilling of aluminium. The optodynamic analysis is based on observation of generated shock waves, which propagate in the material as well as in the surrounding air during laser processing. For the detection of laser-induced shock waves in the air and for measurements of their chara...

  15. Design of nanosecond pulse laser micromachining system based on PMAC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingyan; Fu, Xing; Xu, Linyan; Lin, Qian; Gu, Shuang

    2012-10-01

    Pulse laser micromachining technology, as a branch of laser processing technology, has been widely used in MEMS device processing, aviation, instruments fabrication, circuit board design etc.. In this paper, a novel nanosecond pulse laser micromachining system is presented, which consists of nanosecond pulse LASER, optical path mechanical structure, transmission system, motion control system. Nanosecond pulse UV laser, with 355 nm wavelength and 40ns pulse width, is chosen as the light source. Optical path mechanical structure is designed to get ideal result of laser focusing. Motion control system, combining PMAC card with the PC software, can control the 3-D motion platform and complete microstructure processing. By CCD monitoring system, researchers can get real-time detection on the effect of laser beam focusing and processing process.

  16. Features of femtosecond laser pulses interaction with laser nanoceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestryakov, E. V.; Petrov, V. V.; Trunov, V. I.; Kirpichnikov, A. V.; Merzliakov, M. A.; Laptev, A. V.

    2007-06-01

    In this work we have performed the experimental researches of features for the generation of supercontinuum in laser materials with identical chemical composition: Yb:YAG crystal and Yb:YAG laser nanoceramics. Dependence of width of supercontinuum spectrum in 515-1100 nm spectral range on femtosecond radiation intensity was investigated. At laser intensity ~1.2•10 14 W/cm2 the short-wave wing of a spectrum for nanoceramics has greater intensity and more flat shape in comparison with crystal. Experiments were made at lens focusing of the Ti:Sapphire femtosecond laser system radiation with energy up to 0.5 mJ in explored sample that was inside of integrating optical sphere. Also we investigated the interaction of femtosecond laser pulses and the generation of supercontinuum in Nd:Y IIO 3 nanoceramics. The maximum value of laser intensity in experiments was restricted by optical breakdown on target output surface, i.e. was below threshold of ablation of sample substance.

  17. A narrow-band wavelength-tunable laser system delivering high-energy 300 ps pulses in the near-infrared

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandi, F.; Velchev, I.; Neshev, D.; Hogervorst, W.; Ubachs, W.M.G.

    2003-01-01

    We report on the operation of a novel laser system delivering high-energy pulses in the near-infrared region. The pulses are nearly Fourier-transform limited (time-bandwidth product of 0.48), providing narrow-band radiation (similar to1.5 GHz), with an energy of 225 mJ and 10 Hz repetition rate. The

  18. Short optical pulse generated by integrated MQW DBR laser/EA-modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Young-Kai; Tanbun-Ek, Tawee; Logan, Ralph A.; Tate, A. R.; Sergent, A. M.; Wecht, K. W.; Sciortino, Paul F., Jr.; Raybon, Gregory; Froberg, Nan M.; Johnson, Anthony M.

    1994-05-01

    We report on the generation of short optical pulses by utilizing the non-linear absorption characteristics of a multiple quantum well (MQW) electro-absorption modulator, which is monolithically integrated with a MQW wavelength-tunable distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) laser on a single chip. Optical pulses as short as 39 ps and 15 ps have been generated at a repetition rate of 3 GHz and 10 GHz, respectively, with a broad tuning range of 5.4 nm near 1554 nm lasing wavelength.

  19. Generation of the numerator=2 rational harmonic mode-locked pulses in fiber ring lasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pinghe Wang(汪平河); Li Zhan(詹黎); Qinghao Ye(叶庆好); Yuxing Xia(夏宇兴)

    2004-01-01

    In conventional rational harmonic mode-locking, optical pulse trains with the repetition rate of(pn + 1)fc are generated when the modulation frequency of the in-cavity modulator is set at fm=(n + 1/p)fc, where n and p are both integers, fc is the fundamental cavity frequency. In this paper, we report that rational harmonic mode locking phenomenon takes place in the fiber lasers when the modulation frequency is set at fm =(n + 2/p)fc. The pulse generations are experimentally demonstrated when the numerator of the rational corresponds to 2 in 5th and 7th order rational harmonic mode-locking.

  20. Repetitive short-pulse light mainly inactivates photosystem I in sunflower leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sejima, Takehiro; Takagi, Daisuke; Fukayama, Hiroshi; Makino, Amane; Miyake, Chikahiro

    2014-06-01

    Under field conditions, the leaves of plants are exposed to fluctuating light, as observed in sunfleck. The duration and frequency of sunfleck, which is caused by the canopy being blown by the wind, are in the ranges from 0.2 to 50 s, and from 0.004 to 1 Hz, respectively. Furthermore, >60% of the sunfleck duration ranges from 0.2 to 0.8 s. In the present research, we analyzed the effects of repetitive illumination by short-pulse (SP) light of sunflower leaves on the photosynthetic electron flow. The duration of SP light was set in the range from 10 to 300 ms. We found that repetitive illumination with SP light did not induce the oxidation of P700 in PSI, and mainly inactivated PSI. Increases in the intensity, duration and frequency of SP light enhanced PSI photoinhibition. PSI photoinhibition required the presence of O2. The inactivation of PSI suppressed the net CO2 assimilation. On the other hand, the increase in the oxidized state of P700 suppressed PSI inactivation. That is, PSI with a reduced reaction center would produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) by SP light, leading to PSI photodamage. This mechanism probably explains the PSI photodamage induced by constant light. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Development of a picosecond CO2 laser system for a high-repetition γ-source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polyanskiy, M.N.; Pogorelsky, I.V.; Yakimenko, V.E.; Platonenko, V.T.

    2009-04-17

    The concept of a high-repetition-rate, high-average power {gamma}-source is based on Compton backscattering from the relativistic electron beam inside a picosecond CO{sub 2} laser cavity. Proof-of-principle experiments combined with computer simulations allow evaluating the promise of this approach for novel applications in science and technology.

  2. Femtosecond laser ablation of Au film around single pulse threshold

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaochang Ni; Ching-Yue Wang; Yinzhong Wu; Li Yang; Wei Jia; Lu Chai

    2006-01-01

    @@ Ablation process of 1-kHz femtosecond lasers (pulse duration of 148 fs, wavelength of 775 nm) of Au film on silica substrates is studied. The thresholds for single and multi pulses can be obtained directly from the relation between the squared diameter D2 of the ablated craters and the laser fluence φo. From the plot of the accumulated laser fluence Nφth(N) and the number of laser pulses N, incubation coefficient of Au film is obtained to be 0.765. Some experimental data obtained around the single pulse threshold are in good agreement with the theoretical calculation.

  3. Generation, shaping, compression, characterization and application of intense ultrashort laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Z

    2001-01-01

    Recently, the development of intense ultrashort laser pulses has attracted much interest because of their significant applications in many fields of science and technology. This thesis contributes to the generation, shaping, compression, characterization and application of intense ultrashort laser pulses as follows: 1. Laser pulses of 17.5-fs with a peak power of 0.1-TW at 1-kHz repetition rate have been generated by a compact single-stage ten-pass Ti:sapphire amplifier system with a high-order-dispersion-mirror compensator and a spectral shaping for the first time. The experimental results are in reasonable agreement with numerical calculations. 2. The first experimental study on arbitrary shaping of intense ultrashort pulses has been conducted in a kHz amplifier system capable of generating 27 fs pulses by using an acousto-optic programmable dispersive filter (AOPDF). 17-fs transform-limited pulses have been achieved and arbitrary shaping of these 17-fs pulses has been demonstrated both in the temporal and ...

  4. Improved pulse laser ranging algorithm based on high speed sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xuan-yi; Qian, Rui-hai; Zhang, Yan-mei; Li, Huan; Guo, Hai-chao; He, Shi-jie; Guo, Xiao-kang

    2016-10-01

    Narrow pulse laser ranging achieves long-range target detection using laser pulse with low divergent beams. Pulse laser ranging is widely used in military, industrial, civil, engineering and transportation field. In this paper, an improved narrow pulse laser ranging algorithm is studied based on the high speed sampling. Firstly, theoretical simulation models have been built and analyzed including the laser emission and pulse laser ranging algorithm. An improved pulse ranging algorithm is developed. This new algorithm combines the matched filter algorithm and the constant fraction discrimination (CFD) algorithm. After the algorithm simulation, a laser ranging hardware system is set up to implement the improved algorithm. The laser ranging hardware system includes a laser diode, a laser detector and a high sample rate data logging circuit. Subsequently, using Verilog HDL language, the improved algorithm is implemented in the FPGA chip based on fusion of the matched filter algorithm and the CFD algorithm. Finally, the laser ranging experiment is carried out to test the improved algorithm ranging performance comparing to the matched filter algorithm and the CFD algorithm using the laser ranging hardware system. The test analysis result demonstrates that the laser ranging hardware system realized the high speed processing and high speed sampling data transmission. The algorithm analysis result presents that the improved algorithm achieves 0.3m distance ranging precision. The improved algorithm analysis result meets the expected effect, which is consistent with the theoretical simulation.

  5. Pulsed laser deposition of nanostructured Ag films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donnelly, Tony [School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Doggett, Brendan [School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Lunney, James G. [School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)]. E-mail: jlunney@tcd.ie

    2006-04-30

    Ultra-thin (0.5-5 nm) films of Ag have been prepared by pulsed laser deposition in vacuum using a 26 ns KrF excimer laser at 1 J cm{sup -2}. The deposition was controlled using a Langmuir ion probe and a quartz crystal thickness monitor. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the films are not continuous, but are structured on nanometer size scales. Optical absorption spectra showed the expected surface plasmon resonance feature, which shifted to longer wavelength and increased in strength as the equivalent film thickness was increased. It is shown that Maxwell Garnett effective medium theory can be used to calculate the main features of optical absorption spectra.

  6. Laser Pulsing in Linear Compton Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Krafft, Geoffrey; Deitrick, Kirsten; Terzic, Balsa; Kelmar, R; Hodges, Todd; Melnitchouk, W; Delayen, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Previous work on calculating energy spectra from Compton scattering events has either neglected considering the pulsed structure of the incident laser beam, or has calculated these effects in an approximate way subject to criticism. In this paper, this problem has been reconsidered within a linear plane wave model for the incident laser beam. By performing the proper Lorentz transformation of the Klein-Nishina scattering cross section, a spectrum calculation can be created which allows the electron beam energy spread and emittance effects on the spectrum to be accurately calculated, essentially by summing over the emission of each individual electron. Such an approach has the obvious advantage that it is easily integrated with a particle distribution generated by particle tracking, allowing precise calculations of spectra for realistic particle distributions in collision. The method is used to predict the energy spectrum of radiation passing through an aperture for the proposed Old Dominion University inverse...

  7. A spectroscopic approach to monitor the cut processing in pulsed laser osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henn, Konrad; Gubaidullin, Gail G; Bongartz, Jens; Wahrburg, Jürgen; Roth, Hubert; Kunkel, Martin

    2013-01-01

    During laser osteotomy surgery, plasma arises at the place of ablation. It was the aim of this study to explore whether a spectroscopic analysis of this plasma would allow identification of the type of tissue that was affected by the laser. In an experimental setup (Rofin SCx10, CO(2) Slab Laser, wavelength 10.6 μm, pulse duration 80 μs, pulse repetition rate 200 Hz, max. output in cw-mode 100 W), the plasma spectra evoked by a pulsed laser, cutting 1-day postmortem pig and cow bones, were recorded. Spectra were compared to the reference spectrum of bone via correlation analysis. Our measurements show a clear differentiation between the plasma spectra when cutting either a bone or a soft tissue. The spectral changes could be detected from one to the next spectrum within 200 ms. Continuous surveillance of plasma spectra allows us to differentiate whether bone or soft tissue is hit by the last laser pulse. With this information, it may be possible to stop the laser when cutting undesired soft tissue and to design an automatic control of the ablation process.

  8. Picosecond pulses from wavelength-swept continuous-wave Fourier domain mode-locked lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eigenwillig, Christoph M; Wieser, Wolfgang; Todor, Sebastian; Biedermann, Benjamin R; Klein, Thomas; Jirauschek, Christian; Huber, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Ultrafast lasers have a crucial function in many fields of science; however, up to now, high-energy pulses directly from compact, efficient and low-power semiconductor lasers are not available. Therefore, we introduce a new approach based on temporal compression of the continuous-wave, wavelength-swept output of Fourier domain mode-locked lasers, where a narrowband optical filter is tuned synchronously to the round-trip time of light in a kilometre-long laser cavity. So far, these rapidly swept lasers enabled orders-of-magnitude speed increase in optical coherence tomography. Here we report on the generation of ~60-70 ps pulses at 390 kHz repetition rate. As energy is stored optically in the long-fibre delay line and not as population inversion in the laser-gain medium, high-energy pulses can now be generated directly from a low-power, compact semiconductor-based oscillator. Our theory predicts subpicosecond pulses with this new technique in the future.

  9. Sub-wavelength surface structuring on stainless steel by femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Litao; Hu, Jinping; Lin, Haipeng; Xing, Hualu

    2014-12-01

    In this research, the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on the stainless steel surface by femtosecond laser pulses was investigated under static irradiation and line-scanning experiment. In the experiment, we used a commercial amplified Ti:sapphire laser system that generated 164 fs laser pulses with a maximum pulse energy (Ep) of 1 mJ at a 1 kHz repetition rate and with a central wavelength λ = 780 nm. To obtain a fine periodic ordering of surface nanostructures, the laser beam, through a 0.2 mm pinhole aperture positioned near the 5× objective lens, was focused onto the sample. The samples were mounted on an XYZ-translation stage and irradiated in static and line-scanning experiment. The morphology of the induced periodic structure was examined by scanning electron microscopy. The surface profile was measured by atomic force microscopy. High-spatial-frequency LIPSS (HSFL) with a period of 255 +/- 21 nm were obtained over the entire ablated area. HSFL were found to form on low-spatial-frequency LIPSS (LSFL). From our results we elucidated the relationship between the formation of LSFL and HSFL to obtain an enhanced understanding of the mechanism of HSFL formation by femtosecond laser pulses. A large number of applications have been proposed, such as improvement of the optical properties of the surface, new cutting tool development and hard diamond. More applications could be found as the spatial period of HSFL on different materials comes into sub-100 nm.

  10. Photoacoustic imaging using lock-in amplification and pulsed fiber lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wei; Hajireza, Parsin; Zemp, Roger

    2016-03-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is a non-invasive, non-ionizing imaging technology with high optical contrast between blood and tissue, and with high sensitivity of hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation due to different optical absorption spectra resulting from different oxygenation of hemoglobin. Most PA imaging systems implement a nanosecond pulsed laser source as excitation source to induce PA signal, and rely on broadband amplifiers to record time-domain PA signals [1-6]. Some groups, however, have reported using modulated continuous-wave lasers as an excitation source for frequency-domain imaging [7-9]. Frequency-domain imaging offers the potential of lock-in amplification which has sensitivities as low as nV even in noise orders of magnitude higher than the signal. However, although modulated CW sources works for low cost and compact PA imaging, it does not satisfy thermal and stress confinement conditions required for optimal PA signal strength. Here, we investigate a PA methodology using pulsed fiber lasers as excitation laser source combined with lock-in amplification technology. For comparison, we also studied time-domain PA methodology. Phantom studies show that signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) obtained with frequency domain PA imaging is significantly more sensitive than that obtained using time-domain PA imaging when the laser pulse repetition rate (PRR) matches the bandwidth of ultrasound transducer. Therefore, high sensitive PA imaging technology using pulsed fiber laser sources with lock-in amplification may potentially greatly extend the depth of PA imaging.

  11. Long pulse chemical laser. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardon, R.L.; Breidenthal, R.E.; Buonadonna, V.R. [and others] [Boeing Aerospace Co., Seattle, WA (United States)

    1989-02-01

    This report covers the technical effort through February, 1989. This effort was directed towards the technology associated with the development of a large scale, long pulse DF-CO{sub 2} chemical laser. Optics damage studies performed under Task 1 assessed damage thresholds for diamond-turned salt windows. Task 2 is a multi-faceted task involving the use of PHOCL-50 for laser gain measurements, LTI experiments, and detector testing by LANL personnel. To support these latter tests, PHOCL-50 was upgraded with Boeing funding to incorporate a full aperture outcoupler that increased its energy output by over a factor of 3, to a full kilojoule. The PHOCL-50 carbon block calorimeter was also recalibrated and compared with the LANL Scientech meter. Cloud clearing studies under Task 3 initially concentrated on delivering a Boeing built Cloud Simulation Facility to LANL, and currently involves design of a Cold Cloud Simulation Facility. A Boeing IRAD funded theoretical study on cold cloud clearing revealed that ice clouds may be easier to clear then warm clouds. Task 4 involves the theoretical and experimental study of flow system design as related to laser beam quality. Present efforts on this task are concentrating on temperature gradients induced by the gas filling process. General support for the LPCL field effort is listed under Task 5, with heavy emphasis on assuring reliable operation of the Boeing built Large Slide Valve and other device related tests. The modification of the PHOCL-50 system for testing long pulse DF (4{mu}m only) chemical laser operation is being done under Task 6.

  12. Tunable Yb-doped fiber laser based on a FBG array and a theta ring resonator ensuring a constant repetition rate (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiess, Tobias; Becker, Martin; Rothhardt, Manfred; Bartelt, Hartmut; Jäger, Matthias L.

    2017-03-01

    Fiber lasers provide the perfect basis to develop broadly tunable lasers with high efficiency, excellent beam quality and user-friendly operation as they are increasingly demanded by applications in biophotonics and spectroscopy. Recently, a novel tuning scheme has been presented using fiber Bragg grating (FBG) arrays as fiber-integrated spectral filters containing many standard FBGs with different feedback wavelengths. Based on the discrete spectral sampling, these reflective filters uniquely enable tailored tuning ranges and broad bandwidths to be implemented into fiber lasers. Even though the first implementation of FBG arrays in pulsed tunable lasers based on a sigma ring resonators works with good emission properties, the laser wavelength is tuned by a changing repetition rate, which causes problems with applications in synchronized environments. In this work, we present a modified resonator scheme to maintain a constant repetition rate over the tuning range and still benefit from the advantages of FBG arrays as filters. With a theta ring cavity and two counter propagating filter passes, the distributed feedback of the FBG array is compensated resulting in a constant pulse round trip time for each filter wavelength. Together with an adapted gating scheme controlling the emission wavelength with a modulator, the tuning principle has been realized based on a Ytterbium-doped fiber laser. We present first experimental results demonstrating a tuning range of 25nm, high signal contrast and pulse durations of about 10ns. With the prospect of tailored tuning ranges, this pulsed fiber-integrated laser may be the basis to tackle challenging applications in spectroscopy.

  13. Picosecond to femtosecond pulses from high power self mode-locked ytterbium rod-type fiber laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deslandes, Pierre; Perrin, Mathias; Saby, Julien; Sangla, Damien; Salin, François; Freysz, Eric

    2013-05-06

    We have designed an ytterbium rod-type fiber laser oscillator with tunable pulse duration. This system that delivers more than 10 W of average power is self mode-locked. It yields femtosecond to picosecond laser pulses at a repetition rate of 74 MHz. The pulse duration is adjusted by changing the spectral width of a band pass filter that is inserted in the laser cavity. Using volume Bragg gratings of 0.9 nm and 0.07 nm spectrum bandwidth, this oscillator delivers nearly Fourier limited 2.8 ps and 18.5 ps pulses, respectively. With a 4 nm interference filter, one obtains picosecond pulses that have been externally dechirped down to 130 fs.

  14. Improvement of Polytetrafluoroethylene Surface Energy by Repetitive Pulse Non-Thermal Plasma Treatment in Atmospheric Air%Improvement of Polytetrafluoroethylene Surface Energy by Repetitive Pulse Non-Thermal Plasma Treatment in Atmospheric Air

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨国清; 张冠军; 张文元

    2011-01-01

    Improvement of polytetrafluoroethylene surface energy by non-thermal plasma treatment is presented, using a nanosecond-positive-edge repetitive pulsed dielectric barrier discharge generator in atmospheric air. The electrical parameters including discharging power, peak and density of micro-discharge current were calculated, and the electron energy was estimated. Surface treatment experiments of polytetrafluoroethylene films were conducted for both different applied voltages and different treating durations. Results show that the surface energy of polytetrafluoroethylene film could be improved to 40 mJ/m2 or more by plasma treatment. Surface roughness measurement and surface X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis indicate that there are chemical etching and implantation of polar oxygen groups in the sample surface treating process, resulting in the improvement of the sample surface energy. Compared with an AC source of 50 Hz, the dielectric barrier discharges generated by a repetitive pulsed source could provide higher peak power, lower mean power, larger micro-discharge current density and higher electron energy. Therefore, with the same applied peak voltage and treating duration, the improvement of polytetrafluoroethylene surface energy using repetitive pulsed plasma is more effective, and the plasma treatment process based on repetitive pulsed dielectric barrier discharges in air is thus feasible and applicable.

  15. 25 years of pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Michael; Ramachandra Rao, M. S.

    2014-01-01

    It is our pleasure to introduce this special issue appearing on the occasion of the 25th anniversary of pulsed laser deposition (PLD), which is today one of the most versatile growth techniques for oxide thin films and nanostructures. Ever since its invention, PLD has revolutionized the research on advanced functional oxides due to its ability to yield high-quality thin films, multilayers and heterostructures of a variety of multi-element material systems with rather simple technical means. We appreciate that the use of lasers to deposit films via ablation (now termed PLD) has been known since the 1960s after the invention of the first ruby laser. However, in the first two decades, PLD was something of a 'sleeping beauty' with only a few publications per year, as shown below. This state of hibernation ended abruptly with the advent of high T c superconductor research when scientists needed to grow high-quality thin films of multi-component high T c oxide systems. When most of the conventional growth techniques failed, the invention of PLD by T (Venky) Venkatesan clearly demonstrated that the newly discovered high-T c superconductor, YBa2Cu3O7-δ , could be stoichiometrically deposited as a high-quality nm-thin film with PLD [1]. As a remarkable highlight of this special issue, Venkatesan gives us his very personal reminiscence on these particularly innovative years of PLD beginning in 1986 [2]. After Venky's first paper [1], the importance of this invention was realized worldwide and the number of publications on PLD increased exponentially, as shown in figure 1. Figure 1. Figure 1. Published items per year with title or topic PLD. Data from Thomson Reuters Web of Knowledge in September 2013. After publication of Venky's famous paper in 1987 [1], the story of PLD's success began with a sudden jump in the number of publications, about 25 years ago. A first PLD textbook covering its basic understanding was soon published, in 1994, by Chrisey and Hubler [3]. Within a

  16. Precise ablation of dental hard tissues with ultra-short pulsed lasers. Preliminary exploratory investigation on adequate laser parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello-Silva, Marina Stella; Wehner, Martin; Eduardo, Carlos de Paula; Lampert, Friedrich; Poprawe, Reinhart; Hermans, Martin; Esteves-Oliveira, Marcella

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the possibility of introducing ultra-short pulsed lasers (USPL) in restorative dentistry by maintaining the well-known benefits of lasers for caries removal, but also overcoming disadvantages, such as thermal damage of irradiated substrate. USPL ablation of dental hard tissues was investigated in two phases. Phase 1--different wavelengths (355, 532, 1,045, and 1,064 nm), pulse durations (picoseconds and femtoseconds) and irradiation parameters (scanning speed, output power, and pulse repetition rate) were assessed for enamel and dentin. Ablation rate was determined, and the temperature increase measured in real time. Phase 2--the most favorable laser parameters were evaluated to correlate temperature increase to ablation rate and ablation efficiency. The influence of cooling methods (air, air-water spray) on ablation process was further analyzed. All parameters tested provided precise and selective tissue ablation. For all lasers, faster scanning speeds resulted in better interaction and reduced temperature increase. The most adequate results were observed for the 1064-nm ps-laser and the 1045-nm fs-laser. Forced cooling caused moderate changes in temperature increase, but reduced ablation, being considered unnecessary during irradiation with USPL. For dentin, the correlation between temperature increase and ablation efficiency was satisfactory for both pulse durations, while for enamel, the best correlation was observed for fs-laser, independently of the power used. USPL may be suitable for cavity preparation in dentin and enamel, since effective ablation and low temperature increase were observed. If adequate laser parameters are selected, this technique seems to be promising for promoting the laser-assisted, minimally invasive approach.

  17. PHASE NOISE COMPARISON OF SHORT PULSE LASER SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukui Zhang; Stephen Benson; John Hansknecht; David Hardy; George Neil; Michelle D. Shinn

    2006-08-27

    This paper describes phase noise measurements of several different laser systems that have completely different gain media and configurations including a multi-kW free-electron laser. We will focus on state-of-the-art short pulse lasers, especially drive lasers for photocathode injectors. Phase noise comparison of the FEL drive laser, electron beam and FEL laser output also will be presented.

  18. Laser and intense pulsed light hair removal technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haedersdal, M; Beerwerth, F; Nash, J F

    2011-01-01

    Light-based hair removal (LHR) is one of the fastest growing, nonsurgical aesthetic cosmetic procedures in the United States and Europe. A variety of light sources including lasers, e.g. alexandrite laser (755 nm), pulsed diode lasers (800, 810 nm), Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) and broad-spectrum intense...

  19. Generation of Intense THz Pulsed Lasers Pumped Strongly by CO2 Pulsed Lasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Chun-Chao; CHENG Zu-Hai

    2009-01-01

    A theoretical method dealing with two intense laser fields interacting with a three-level molecular system is proposed.A discussion is presented on the properties of the solutions for time-independent and time-dependent absorption coefficients and gain coemcient on resonance for strong laser fields,based on analytic evaluation of the rate equations for a homogeneously broadened,three-level molecular system.The pump intensity range can be estimated according to the analytic expression of pump saturation intensity.The effects of pulse width,gas pressure and path length on the energy absorbed from pump light are studied theoretically.The results can be applied to the analysis of pulsed,optically pumped terahertz lasers.

  20. Experimental Study on Mechanical Characteristics of Coupling Pulsed Laser to Solid Targets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林丽云; 王声波; 吴鸿兴; 郭大浩; 戴宇生; 夏小平; 郭磊; 罗志成

    2003-01-01

    A set of experiments were designed to research on the mechanical characteristics of laser driving lightcraft,and the minimum laser power density needed to drive the lightcraft (weight 1.010 kg) is measured to be 71.986 ×109 W. cm-2 during the confined laser ablation of targets in vacuum. A set of parameters are discovered important to improve the propulsion efficiency, such as the restraint layers on the targets (the K9 glass is the optimal), and larger laser power density. In view of the impracticality of the confined ablation, we propose the applications of those target materials that cannot only produce powerful plasma propulsion but also can be used in repetitively pulsed laser.

  1. An Experimental Study of Ultrashort Pulsed Ytterbium-Doped Fibre Laser and Amplifier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Ling-Zhen; XIONG Hong-Jun; CHEN Guo-Fu; WANG Yi-Shan; ZHAO Wei; CHENG Zhao

    2004-01-01

    @@ We report the generation of ultrashort pulses in ytterbium-doped fibre oscillator emitting around 1.05μm at a repetition rate of 17.6MHz. A diode laser with single silica fibre at 976nm pumps the ytterbium fibre laser, the aH-fibre picosecond pulsed oscillator has excellent stability and compact size, and freedom from misalignment. After amplifying, pulse energy of 3.4 nj and an average power of 60 mW are obtained. The compression is obtained with a grating pair out of the cavity. The compressor produces 307fs with the peak power 5.47kW. A practical fibre-based source with good performance is thus demonstrated.

  2. Analysis on the damage threshold of MgO:LiNbO3 crystals under multiple femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zhuolin; Meng, Qinglong; Zhang, Bin

    2016-10-01

    An improved theoretical model of the interaction between multiple femtosecond laser pulses and MgO:LiNbO3 crystals with different doping concentrations has been established based on the classical two-temperature model. The evolutions of electron and lattice temperature with the duration, the repetition frequency and the numbers of multiple femtosecond laser pulses in MgO:LiNbO3 crystals have been simulated numerically by the Crank-Nicholson implicit finite-difference method. Furthermore, the variations of the damage threshold of MgO:LiNbO3 crystals with the parameters of multiple femtosecond laser pulses at different doping concentrations, as well as the influence of doping concentration on damage threshold have also been analyzed. The results show that, the damage threshold of MgO:LiNbO3 crystals increases with the increasing of the duration of the femtosecond laser pulse. The damage threshold of MgO:LiNbO3 crystals first decreases with the increasing of the numbers and the pulse repetition frequency of the laser pulses and then tends to be a constant. The damage threshold of a small amount of MgO-doped LiNbO3 crystals is higher than that of undoped LiNbO3 crystals. Consequently, the resist damage capability of LiNbO3 crystals can be enhanced by doping appropriate MgO in many practical applications.

  3. Low Timing Jitter and Tunable Dual- Wavelength Picosecond Pulse Genera from a Fabry-Pérot Laser Diode with External Injection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Yi-Biao; WANG Yun-Cai; ZHANG Ming-Jiang; LIANG Wei

    2007-01-01

    A novel scheme to generate tunable dual-wavelength optical pulses with low timing jitter at arbitrary repetition rates is proposed and demonstrated experimentally. The pulses are generated from a gain-switched Fabry-Perot laser diode with two external cw beams for injection seeding simultaneously. The cw light is generated by two independent distributed feedback laser diodes, and their wavelengths can be tuned independently by two temperature controllers. The dual-wavelength pulses with the pulse width of 57 ps, the timing jitter of 340 fs, are obtained. The sidemode-suppression ratio of the output pulses is better than 23 dB over a 10-nm wavelength tuning range.

  4. Characterization of Ag and Au nanoparticles created by nanosecond pulsed laser ablation in double distilled water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolov, A.S., E-mail: anastas_nikolov@abv.bg [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Tzarigradsko shousse 72, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); Nedyalkov, N.N.; Nikov, R.G.; Atanasov, P.A. [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Tzarigradsko shousse 72, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); Alexandrov, M.T. [Institute of Experimental Pathology and Parasitology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, G. Bonchev Street, bl. 25, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria)

    2011-04-01

    Pulsed laser ablation of Ag and Au targets, immersed in double-distilled water is used to synthesize metallic nanoparticles (NPs). The targets are irradiated for 20 min by laser pulses at different wavelengths-the fundamental and the second harmonic (SHG) ({lambda} = 1064 and 532 nm, respectively) of a Nd:YAG laser system. The ablation process is performed at a repetition rate of 10 Hz and with pulse duration of 15 ns. Two boundary values of the laser fluence for each wavelength under the experimental conditions chosen were used-it varied from several J/cm{sup 2} to tens of J/cm{sup 2}. Only as-prepared samples were measured not later than two hours after fabrication. The NPs shape and size distribution were evaluated from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images. The suspensions obtained were investigated by optical transmission spectroscopy in the near UV and in the visible region in order to get information about these parameters. Spherical shape of the NPs at the low laser fluence and appearance of aggregation and building of nanowires at the SHG and high laser fluence was seen. Dependence of the mean particle size at the SHG on the laser fluence was established. Comments on the results obtained have been also presented.

  5. Subpicosecond pulse generation from an all solid-state laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keen, S. J.; Ferguson, A. I.

    1989-11-01

    An all-solid-state (holosteric) laser source which produces subpicosecond pulses at 1.4 microns is described. The system consists of a diode laser pumped Nd:YAG laser which is frequency-modulated (FM) mode-locked and Q-switched at 1.32 microns. In continuous wave operation the laser produces pulses of 19 ps while simultaneous Q-switching and mode-locking result in 30 ps pulses being contained in a Q-switched envelope of energy 2.1 microJ. The output of the laser, when passed through a 1 km single-mode optical fiber, produces a spectrally broad Raman signal with its peak at 1.4 microns and the overall conversion efficiency at 12 percent. The pulse duration at 1.4 microns has been measured to be 280 fs. This is the first time that subpicosecond light pulses have been generated by an all-solid-state laser system.

  6. Pulsed laser deposition of pepsin thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kecskemeti, G. [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged, Dom ter 9 (Hungary)]. E-mail: kega@physx.u-szeged.hu; Kresz, N. [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged, Dom ter 9 (Hungary); Smausz, T. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences and University of Szeged, Research Group on Laser Physics, H-6720 Szeged, Dom ter 9 (Hungary); Hopp, B. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences and University of Szeged, Research Group on Laser Physics, H-6720 Szeged, Dom ter 9 (Hungary); Nogradi, A. [Department of Ophthalmology, University of Szeged, H-6720, Szeged, Koranyi fasor 10-11 (Hungary)

    2005-07-15

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of organic and biological thin films has been extensively studied due to its importance in medical applications among others. Our investigations and results on PLD of a digestion catalyzing enzyme, pepsin, are presented. Targets pressed from pepsin powder were ablated with pulses of an ArF excimer laser ({lambda} = 193 nm, FWHM = 30 ns), the applied fluence was varied between 0.24 and 5.1 J/cm{sup 2}. The pressure in the PLD chamber was 2.7 x 10{sup -3} Pa. The thin layers were deposited onto glass and KBr substrates. Our IR spectroscopic measurements proved that the chemical composition of deposited thin films is similar to that of the target material deposited at 0.5 and 1.3 J/cm{sup 2}. The protein digesting capacity of the transferred pepsin was tested by adapting a modified 'protein cube' method. Dissolution of the ovalbumin sections proved that the deposited layers consisted of catalytically active pepsin.

  7. Nanosecond pulsed laser texturing of optical diffusers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqurashi, Tawfiq; Sabouri, Aydin; Yetisen, Ali K.; Butt, Haider

    2017-02-01

    High-quality optical glass diffusers have applications in aerospace, displays, imaging systems, medical devices, and optical sensors. The development of rapid and accurate fabrication techniques is highly desirable for their production. Here, a micropatterning method for the fast fabrication of optical diffusers by means of nanosecond pulsed laser ablation is demonstrated (λ=1064 nm, power=7.02, 9.36 and 11.7 W and scanning speed=200 and 800 mm s-1). The experiments were carried out by point-to-point texturing of a glass surface in spiral shape. The laser machining parameters, the number of pulses and their power had significant effect on surface features. The optical characteristics of the diffusers were characterized at different scattering angles. The features of the microscale structures influenced average roughness from 0.8 μm to 1.97 μm. The glass diffusers scattered light at angles up to 20° and their transmission efficiency were measured up to ˜97% across the visible spectrum. The produced optical devices diffuse light less but do so with less scattering and energy losses as compared to opal diffusing glass. The presented fabrication method can be applied to any other transparent material to create optical diffusers. It is anticipated that the optical diffusers presented in this work will have applications in the production of LED spotlights and imaging devices.

  8. Microstructuring of silicon with femtosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freund, Waldemar; Richters, Jan P.; Voss, Tobias; Gutowski, Juergen [Institute of Solid State Physics, Semiconductor Optics Group, University of Bremen (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Silicon structured with ultrashort laser pulses which is called ''black silicon'' due to its dark appearance has been a field of intense studies in recent years. It exhibits a nearly uniform absorptivity beyond 90% in the whole visible to near-infrared spectral region. Therefore, it is a promising material for applications in solar cells and photo diodes. In this talk a brief introduction of microstructuring of silicon with ultrashort laser pulses will be given. Structuring is carried out in a sulfurhexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) atmosphere, which simultaneously allows doping of the silicon with sulfur far above the solubility limit. The structuring leads to a specific quasiperiodic surface morphology at which incident light is reflected multiple times. Thus light absorption in the silicon is considerably enhanced. The extremely high doping with sulfur results in the formation of a distinct defect band which is the origin of high absorptance in the near infrared. Furthermore, sulfur acts as a donor in silicon. Hence, microstructuring of p-doped silicon in SF{sub 6} atmosphere leads to the formation of a p-n{sup +} junction. This is an important step towards the fabrication of efficient solar cells and photo diodes with increased infrared sensitivity on base of easy-to-produce black silicon.

  9. Generation of Low Jitter Laser Diode Pulse With External Pulse Injection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Yuncai; Olaf Reimann; Dieter Huhse; Dieter Bimberg

    2003-01-01

    One gain-switched laser diode(LD) was used as external injection seeding source, to reduce the timing jitter of another gain-switched LD, This technique can generate low jitter, frequency-free and wavelength tunable laser pulse.

  10. Nanograting formation on metals in air with interfering femtosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazaki, Kenzo, E-mail: k-miyazaki@iae.kyoto-u.ac.jp, E-mail: kmiyazaki@wind.ocn.ne.jp [Laser Science Research Section, Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Center for Collaborative Research and Community Cooperation, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki 889-2192 (Japan); Miyaji, Godai, E-mail: gmiyaji@cc.tuat.ac.jp [Laser Science Research Section, Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Inoue, Toshishige [Laser Science Research Section, Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2015-08-17

    It is demonstrated that a homogeneous nanograting having the groove period much smaller than the laser wavelength (∼800 nm) can be fabricated on metals in air through ablation induced by interfering femtosecond laser pulses (100 fs at a repetition rate of 10 Hz). Morphological changes on stainless steel and Ti surfaces, observed with an increase in superimposed shots of the laser pulses at a low fluence, have shown that the nanograting is developed through bonding structure change at the interference fringes, plasmonic near-field ablation to create parallel grooves on the fringe, and subsequent excitation of surface plasmon polaritons to regulate the groove intervals at 1/3 or 1/4 of the fringe period over the whole irradiated area. Calculation for a model target having a thin oxide layer on the metal substrate reproduces well the observed groove periods and explains the mechanism for the nanograting formation.

  11. Group velocity locked vector dissipative solitons in a high repetition rate fiber laser

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Yiyang; Li, Lei; Sun, Qizhen; Wu, Zhichao; Xu, Zhilin; Fu, Songnian; Zhao, Luming

    2016-01-01

    Vectorial nature of dissipative solitons (DSs) with high repetition rates is studied for the first time in a normal-dispersion fiber laser. Despite the fact that the formed DSs are strongly chirped and the repetition rate is greater than 100 MHz, polarization locked and polarization rotating group velocity locked vector DSs can be formed under 129.3 MHz fundamental mode-locking and 258.6 MHz harmonic mode-locking of the fiber laser, respectively. The two orthogonally polarized components of these vector DSs possess distinctly different central wavelengths and travel together at the same group velocity in the laser cavity, resulting in a gradual spectral edge and small steps on the optical spectra, which can be considered as an auxiliary indicator of the group velocity locked vector DSs.

  12. End-pumped all solid-state high repetition rate Tm, Ho:LuLF laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shijiang Shu; Ting Yu; Junyan Hou; Rongtao Liu; Minjie Huang; Weibiao Chen

    2011-01-01

    @@ The characteristics of diode end-pumped Tm,Ho:LuLiF for continuous wave (CW) running and high pulse repetition frequency (PRF) Q-switched operation are illustrated. In the CW mode, 950-mW output power with a slope efficiency of 24% is obtained. In the Q-switched mode, output energy of 78 μJ under 10 kHz with a slope efficiency of 23% is achieved. The pulse stability, pulse width as a function of pump intensity, and spectral characteristics are also analyzed.%The characteristics of diode end-pumped Tm,Ho:LuLiF for continuous wave (CW) running and high pulse repetition frequency (PRF) Q-switched operation are illustrated. In the CW mode, 950-mW output power with a slope efficiency of 24% is obtained. In the Q-switched mode, output energy of 78μJ under 10 kHz with a slope efficiency of 23% is achieved. The pulse stability, pulse width as a function of pump intensity, and spectral characteristics are also analyzed.

  13. A new pulsed laser deposition technique: scanning multi-component pulsed laser deposition method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, D; de la Fuente, G F; Jansen, M

    2012-04-01

    The scanning multi-component pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method realizes uniform depositions of desired coatings by a modified pulsed laser deposition process, preferably with a femto-second laser-system. Multi-component coatings (single or multilayered) are thus deposited onto substrates via laser induced ablation of segmented targets. This is achieved via horizontal line-scanning of a focused laser beam over a uniformly moving target's surface. This process allows to deposit the desired composition of the coating simultaneously, starting from the different segments of the target and adjusting the scan line as a function of target geometry. The sequence and thickness of multilayers can easily be adjusted by target architecture and motion, enabling inter/intra layer concentration gradients and thus functional gradient coatings. This new, simple PLD method enables the achievement of uniform, large-area coatings. Case studies were performed with segmented targets containing aluminum, titanium, and niobium. Under the laser irradiation conditions applied, all three metals were uniformly ablated. The elemental composition within the rough coatings obtained was fixed by the scanned area to Ti-Al-Nb = 1:1:1. Crystalline aluminum, titanium, and niobium were found to coexist side by side at room temperature within the substrate, without alloy formation up to 600 °C.

  14. Analysis on the characteristics of pulsed laser proximity fuze's echo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun; Chen, Huimin

    2011-06-01

    With the rapid development of semiconductor technology and laser technology, a kind of proximity fuze named pulsed laser proximity fuze has been applied. Compared with other fuzes, pulsed laser proximity fuze has high ranging precision and strong resistance to artificial active interference. It is an important development tendency of proximity fuze. The paper analyze the characteristic of target echo of laser signal, and then make theoretical analysis and calculation on the laser signal transmission in the smog. Firstly, use the pulse width of 10ns semiconductor laser fuze to do typical targets experiment, to get the echo information of target distance is 5m; then to do smog interference experiment, by comparing the pulse width amplitude and backscattering signal amplitude of laser fuze in simulation and experiment, analyzing the effect of anti-clutter, providing the evidence for the subsequent of circuit of signal amplification and processing.

  15. Pulsed laser ablation of solids basics, theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Stafe, Mihai; Puscas, Niculae N

    2014-01-01

    The book introduces ‘the state of the art' of pulsed laser ablation and its applications. It is based on recent theoretical and experimental studies. The book reaches from the basics to advanced topics of pulsed laser ablation. Theoretical and experimental fundamental phenomena involved in pulsed laser ablation are discussed with respect to material properties, laser wavelength, fluence and intensity regime of the light absorbed linearly or non-linearly in the target material. The energy absorbed by the electrons leads to atom/molecule excitation, ionization and/or direct chemical bond breaking and is also transferred to the lattice leading to material heating and phase transitions. Experimental  non-invasive optical methods for analyzing these phenomena in real time are described. Theoretical models for pulsed laser ablation and phase transitions induced by laser beams and laser-vapour/plasma interaction during the plume expansion above the target are also presented. Calculations of the ablation speed and...

  16. Raman study of TiO2 coatings modified by UV pulsed laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belka, Radosław; Keczkowska, Justyna; Sek, Piotr

    2016-12-01

    The TiO2 coatings were prepared by simple sol-gel method and modified by UV pulsed laser. TiO2, also know as titania, is a ceramic compound, existing in numerous polymorphic forms, mainly as tetragonal rutile and anatase, and rhomboidal brookite. Rutile is the most stable form of titanium dioxide, whereas anatase is a metastable form, created in lower temperatures than rutile. Anatase is marked with higher specific surface area, porosity and a higher number of surface hydroxyl groups as compared to rutile. The unique optical and electronic properties of TiO2 results in its use as semiconductors dielectric mirrors, sunscreen and UV-blocking pigments and especially as photocatalyst. In this paper, the tetraisopropoxide was used as Ti precursor according to sol-gel method. An organic base was applied during sol preparation. Prepared gel was coated on glass substrates and calcined in low temperature to obtain amorphous phase of titania. Prepared coatings were modified by UV picosecond pulse laser with different pulse repetition rate and pulse power. Physical modification of the coatings using laser pulses was intended in order change the phase content of the produced material. Raman spectroscopy (RS) method was applied to studies of modified coatings as it is one of the basic analytical techniques, supporting the identification of compounds and obtaining information about the structure. Especially, RS is a useful method for distinguishing the anatase and rutile phases. In these studies, anatase to rutile transformation was observed, depending on laser parameters.

  17. Copper bromide vapor brightness amplifiers with 100 kHz pulse repetition frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigub, M. V.; Evtushenko, G. S.; Torgaev, S. N.; Shiyanov, D. V.; Evtushenko, T. G.

    2016-10-01

    The paper presents a laser monitor with 10 μs time-resolution based on a high-frequency copper bromide vapor brightness amplifier. A sync circuit has been designed for single-pulse imaging. The analysis of amplifying characteristics of the active elements and active optical system (laser monitor) parameters allowed to determine the optimal concentration of HBr at which the images can be obtained with minimum distortions. For the active element operating at high frequencies (more than 50 kHz) as a brightness amplifier, the concentration of HBr must be lower than that needed for obtaining the maximum output power. The limiting brightness temperature of the background radiation which does not affect the image quality is determined. The potential feasibility of using a proposed brightness amplifier for visualizing processes blocked from viewing by the background radiation with the brightness temperature up to 8000 K is demonstrated.

  18. High Power Widely Tunable Narrow Linewidth All-Solid-State Pulsed Titanium-Doped Sapphire Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Xin; LI Xue; SHENG Quan; SHI Chun-Peng; YIN Su-Jia; LI Bin; YU Xuan-Yi; WEN Wu-Qi; YAO Jian-Quan

    2011-01-01

    We report a widely tunable, narrow linewidth, pulsed Ti:sapphire laser pumped by an all-solid-state Q-switched intra-cavity frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser. By using four dense Bint glass prisms as intra-cavity dispersive elements, the output wavelength can be continuously tuned over 675-970 nm and the spectral linewidth is shortened to 0.5nm. The maximum output power of 6.65 W at 780 nm is obtained under 23.4 Wpump power with repetition rate of 5.5 kHz; corresponding to an conversion efficiency of 28.4%. Due to the gain-switching characteristics of the Ti:sapphire laser, the output pulse duration is as short as 17.6ns.%@@ We report a widely tunable,narrow linewidth,pulsed Th:sapphire laser pumped by an all-solid-state Q-switched intra-cavity frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser.By using four dense flint glass prisms as intra-cavity dispersive elements,the output wavelength can be continuously tuned over 675-970nm and the spectral linewidth is shortened to 0.5 nm.The maximum output power of 6.65 W at 780 run is obtained under 23.4 W pump power with repetition rate of 5.5 kHz,corresponding to an conversion efficiency of 28.4%.Due to the gain-switching characteristics of the Ti:sapphire laser,the output pulse duration is as short as 17.6ns.

  19. Tissue effects of Ho:YAG laser with varying fluences and pulse widths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vari, Sandor G.; van der Veen, Maurits J.; Pergadia, Vani R.; Shi, Wei-Qiang; Duffy, J. T.; Weiss, Andrew B.; Fishbein, Michael C.; Grundfest, Warren S.

    1994-02-01

    We investigated the effect of varying fluence and pulse width on the ablation rate and consequent thermal damage of the Ho:YAG (2.130 micrometers ) laser. The rate of ablation on fresh bovine knee joint tissues, fibrous cartilage, hyaline cartilage, and bone in saline was determined after varying the fluence (160 - 640 J/cm2) and pulse width (150, 250, 450 microsecond(s) ec, FWHM) at a repetition rate of 2 Hz. A 400/440 micrometers fiber was used. The ablation rate increased linearly with the fluence. In fibrocartilage, different pulse durations generated significant changes in the ablation rates, but showed minor effects on hyaline cartilage and bone. The heat of ablation for all three tissue types decreased after lengthening the pulse.

  20. Texturing of titanium (Ti6Al4V) medical implant surfaces with MHz-repetition-rate femtosecond and picosecond Yb-doped fiber lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdoğan, Mutlu; Öktem, Bülent; Kalaycıoğlu, Hamit; Yavaş, Seydi; Mukhopadhyay, Pranab K; Eken, Koray; Ozgören, Kıvanç; Aykaç, Yaşar; Tazebay, Uygar H; Ilday, F Ömer

    2011-05-23

    We propose and demonstrate the use of short pulsed fiber lasers in surface texturing using MHz-repetition-rate, microjoule- and sub-microjoule-energy pulses. Texturing of titanium-based (Ti6Al4V) dental implant surfaces is achieved using femtosecond, picosecond and (for comparison) nanosecond pulses with the aim of controlling attachment of human cells onto the surface. Femtosecond and picosecond pulses yield similar results in the creation of micron-scale textures with greatly reduced or no thermal heat effects, whereas nanosecond pulses result in strong thermal effects. Various surface textures are created with excellent uniformity and repeatability on a desired portion of the surface. The effects of the surface texturing on the attachment and proliferation of cells are characterized under cell culture conditions. Our data indicate that picosecond-pulsed laser modification can be utilized effectively in low-cost laser surface engineering of medical implants, where different areas on the surface can be made cell-attachment friendly or hostile through the use of different patterns.

  1. 100μJ-level single frequency linearly-polarized nanosecond pulsed laser at 775 nm (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wei; Fang, Qiang; Fan, Jingli; Cui, Xuelong; Zhang, Zhuo; Li, Jinhui; Zhou, Guoqing

    2017-02-01

    We report a single frequency, linearly polarized, near diffraction-limited, pulsed laser source at 775 nm by frequency doubling a single frequency nanosecond pulsed all fiber based master oscillator-power amplifier, seeded by a fiber coupled semiconductor DFB laser diode at 1550 nm. The laser diode was driven by a pulsed laser driver to generate 5 ns laser pulses at 260 Hz repetition rate with 50 pJ pulse energy. The pulse energy was boosted to 200 μJ using two stages of core-pumped fiber amplifiers and two stages of cladding-pumped fiber amplifiers. The multi-stage synchronous pulse pumping technique was adopted in the four stages of fiber amplifiers to mitigate the ASE. The frequency doubling is implemented in a single pass configuration using a periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) crystal. The crystal is 3 mm long, 1.4 mm wide, 1 mm thick, with a 19.36 μm domain period chosen for quasi-phase matching at 33°C. It was AR coated at both 1550 nm and 775 nm. The maximum pulse energy of 97 μJ was achieved when 189 μJ fundamental laser was launched. The corresponding conversion efficiency is about 51.3%. The pulse duration was measured to be 4.8 ns. So the peak power of the generated 775 nm laser pulses reached 20 kW. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a 100 μJ-level, tens of kilowatts-peak-power-level single frequency linearly polarized 775 nm laser based on the frequency doubling of the fiber lasers.

  2. Narrow band tuning with small long pulse excimer lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sze, R.C.; Kurnit, N.; Watkins, D.; Bigio, I.

    1985-12-01

    We discuss frequency narrowing and tuning with simple dispersion elements with small long-pulse excimer lasers. The improved performance over short-pulse lasers is discussed and attributed to the increased number of round trips. A physical model of the dynamics of line narrowing is presented.

  3. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis of solids using a long-pulse (150 ns) Q-switched Nd:YAG laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Karen Y; Cremers, David A; Foster, Leeann E; Davies, Mathew P; Harris, Ronny D

    2005-09-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) measurements are typically carried out using pulses (50 mJ) from a flashlamp-pumped electro-optically Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (EO-laser) or excimer laser. Here we report LIBS analyses of solids using an acousto-optically Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (AO-laser) producing 150 ns pulses of lower energy (10 mJ) at repetition rates up to 6 kHz. The high repetition rate allows increased spatial or depth sampling over a given time period compared to the EO-laser. Results of AO-laser based LIBS analysis of (1) steels, (2) soils, and (3) surface stains and dusts are described. Detection limits for Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, and Si in steel ranged from 0.11 to 0.24% using a commercial polychromator-based detection system with limits 4--30 times lower achieved using a laboratory-based detection system. The minimum detectable masses of Ba, Cr, Mn, and Sr on a metal surface were estimated with 1.2 pg/shot achieved for Sr. Detection limits for Ba and Sr in soil were 296 and 52 ppm, respectively. The temperatures, spectra, and emission decay curves from plasmas generated by the AO- and EO-lasers are compared and some characteristics of particles ablated by the AO-laser are described.

  4. High-repetition-rate quasi-CW side-pumped mJ eye-safe laser with a monolithic KTP crystal for intracavity optical parametric oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, C Y; Chen, Y C; Huang, Y P; Huang, Y J; Su, K W; Chen, Y F

    2014-04-01

    We demonstrate a high-repetition-rate millijoule passively Q-switched eye-safe Nd:YVO(4) laser pumped by a quasi-CW diode stack. A theoretical analysis has been explored for the design criteria of generating TEM(n,0) mode in the diode-stack directly side-pumping configuration. We successfully generate TEM(n,0) modes at 1064 nm by adjusting the gain medium with respected to the laser axis. We further observe the spatial cleaning ability for generating an nearly TEM(0,0) mode output at 1573 nm with a monolithic OPO cavity. At the repetition rate up to 200 Hz, the output pulse energy reaches 1.21 mJ with the threshold pump energy of 17.9 mJ.

  5. Clutter discrimination algorithm simulation in pulse laser radar imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan-mei; Li, Huan; Guo, Hai-chao; Su, Xuan; Zhu, Fule

    2015-10-01

    Pulse laser radar imaging performance is greatly influenced by different kinds of clutter. Various algorithms are developed to mitigate clutter. However, estimating performance of a new algorithm is difficult. Here, a simulation model for estimating clutter discrimination algorithms is presented. This model consists of laser pulse emission, clutter jamming, laser pulse reception and target image producing. Additionally, a hardware platform is set up gathering clutter data reflected by ground and trees. The data logging is as clutter jamming input in the simulation model. The hardware platform includes a laser diode, a laser detector and a high sample rate data logging circuit. The laser diode transmits short laser pulses (40ns FWHM) at 12.5 kilohertz pulse rate and at 905nm wavelength. An analog-to-digital converter chip integrated in the sample circuit works at 250 mega samples per second. The simulation model and the hardware platform contribute to a clutter discrimination algorithm simulation system. Using this system, after analyzing clutter data logging, a new compound pulse detection algorithm is developed. This new algorithm combines matched filter algorithm and constant fraction discrimination (CFD) algorithm. Firstly, laser echo pulse signal is processed by matched filter algorithm. After the first step, CFD algorithm comes next. Finally, clutter jamming from ground and trees is discriminated and target image is produced. Laser radar images are simulated using CFD algorithm, matched filter algorithm and the new algorithm respectively. Simulation result demonstrates that the new algorithm achieves the best target imaging effect of mitigating clutter reflected by ground and trees.

  6. Spectral compression of single-photon-level laser pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanhua; Xiang, Tong; Nie, Yiyou; Sang, Minghuang; Chen, Xianfeng

    2017-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate that the bandwidth of single photons laser pulse is compressed by a factor of 58 in a periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) waveguide chip. A positively chirped single photons laser pulse and a negatively chirped classical laser pulse are employed to produce a narrowband single photon pulse with new frequency through sum-frequency generation. In our experiment, the frequency and bandwidth of single photons at 1550 nm are simultaneously converted. Our results mark a critical step towards the realization of coherent photonic interface between quantum communication at 1550 nm and quantum memory in the near-visible window. PMID:28240245

  7. Pair production in short laser pulses near threshold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nousch, T. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, POB 510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); TU Dresden, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Seipt, D., E-mail: d.seipt@hzdr.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, POB 510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); TU Dresden, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Kaempfer, B. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, POB 510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); TU Dresden, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Titov, A.I. [Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, JINR, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation)

    2012-08-29

    The e{sup +}e{sup -} pair production by a probe photon traversing a linearly polarized laser pulse is treated as generalized nonlinear Breit-Wheeler process. For short laser pulses with very few oscillations of the electromagnetic field we find below the perturbative weak-field threshold {radical}(s)=2m a similar enhancement of the pair production rate as for circular polarization. The strong enhancement below the weak-field threshold is traced back to the finite bandwidth of the laser pulse. A folding model is developed which accounts for the interplay of the frequency spectrum and the intensity distribution in the course of the pulse.

  8. Pair production in short laser pulses near threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nousch, T.; Seipt, D.; Kämpfer, B.; Titov, A. I.

    2012-08-01

    The e+e- pair production by a probe photon traversing a linearly polarized laser pulse is treated as generalized nonlinear Breit-Wheeler process. For short laser pulses with very few oscillations of the electromagnetic field we find below the perturbative weak-field threshold √{ s} = 2 m a similar enhancement of the pair production rate as for circular polarization. The strong enhancement below the weak-field threshold is traced back to the finite bandwidth of the laser pulse. A folding model is developed which accounts for the interplay of the frequency spectrum and the intensity distribution in the course of the pulse.

  9. Plasma wakefields driven by an incoherent combination of laser pulses: a path towards high-average power laser-plasma accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benedetti, C.; Schroeder, C.B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    2014-05-01

    he wakefield generated in a plasma by incoherently combining a large number of low energy laser pulses (i.e.,without constraining the pulse phases) is studied analytically and by means of fully-self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations. The structure of the wakefield has been characterized and its amplitude compared with the amplitude of the wake generated by a single (coherent) laser pulse. We show that, in spite of the incoherent nature of the wakefield within the volume occupied by the laser pulses, behind this region the structure of the wakefield can be regular with an amplitude comparable or equal to that obtained from a single pulse with the same energy. Wake generation requires that the incoherent structure in the laser energy density produced by the combined pulses exists on a time scale short compared to the plasma period. Incoherent combination of multiple laser pulses may enable a technologically simpler path to high-repetition rate, high-average power laser-plasma accelerators and associated applications.

  10. Dark pulse generation in fiber lasers incorporating carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H H; Chow, K K

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate the generation of dark pulses from carbon nanotube (CNT) incorporated erbium-doped fiber ring lasers with net anomalous dispersion. A side-polished fiber coated with CNT layer by optically-driven deposition method is embedded into the laser in order to enhance the birefringence and nonlinearity of the laser cavity. The dual-wavelength domain-wall dark pulses are obtained from the developed CNT-incorporated fiber laser at a relatively low pump threshold of 50.6 mW. Dark pulses repeated at the fifth-order harmonic of the fundamental cavity frequency are observed by adjusting the intra-cavity polarization state.

  11. Single-grating laser pulse stretcher and compressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, M; Lai, S T; Swinger, C

    1994-10-20

    Stretching and compressing of laser pulses is demonstrated with a single-grating apparatus. A laser pulse of 110 fs is stretched to 250 ps and then recompressed to 115 fs. The apparatus exploits a two-level structure: one level for stretching and the other for compressing. This single-grating configuration shows significant simplification in structure and alignment over existing multiple-grating systems. Such a stretcher-compressor is particularly suitable for use with chirped-pulse amplification in which laser wavelength tuning is desirable. Only one rotational adjustment is rquired to restore the alignment of the entire stretcher and compressor when the laser wavelength is changed.

  12. Full 3D modelling of pulse propagation enables efficient nonlinear frequency conversion with low energy laser pulses in a single-element tripler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardaś, Tomasz M.; Nejbauer, Michał; Wnuk, Paweł; Resan, Bojan; Radzewicz, Czesław; Wasylczyk, Piotr

    2017-01-01

    Although new optical materials continue to open up access to more and more wavelength bands where femtosecond laser pulses can be generated, light frequency conversion techniques are still indispensable in filling the gaps on the ultrafast spectral scale. With high repetition rate, low pulse energy laser sources (oscillators) tight focusing is necessary for a robust wave mixing and the efficiency of broadband nonlinear conversion is limited by diffraction as well as spatial and temporal walk-off. Here we demonstrate a miniature third harmonic generator (tripler) with conversion efficiency exceeding 30%, producing 246 fs UV pulses via cascaded second order processes within a single laser beam focus. Designing this highly efficient and ultra compact frequency converter was made possible by full 3-dimentional modelling of propagation of tightly focused, broadband light fields in nonlinear and birefringent media. PMID:28225007

  13. Full 3D modelling of pulse propagation enables efficient nonlinear frequency conversion with low energy laser pulses in a single-element tripler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardaś, Tomasz M; Nejbauer, Michał; Wnuk, Paweł; Resan, Bojan; Radzewicz, Czesław; Wasylczyk, Piotr

    2017-02-22

    Although new optical materials continue to open up access to more and more wavelength bands where femtosecond laser pulses can be generated, light frequency conversion techniques are still indispensable in filling the gaps on the ultrafast spectral scale. With high repetition rate, low pulse energy laser sources (oscillators) tight focusing is necessary for a robust wave mixing and the efficiency of broadband nonlinear conversion is limited by diffraction as well as spatial and temporal walk-off. Here we demonstrate a miniature third harmonic generator (tripler) with conversion efficiency exceeding 30%, producing 246 fs UV pulses via cascaded second order processes within a single laser beam focus. Designing this highly efficient and ultra compact frequency converter was made possible by full 3-dimentional modelling of propagation of tightly focused, broadband light fields in nonlinear and birefringent media.

  14. Modeling of time evolution of power and temperature in single-pulse and multi-pulses diode-pumped alkali vapor lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Binglin; Huang, Jinghua; Xu, Xingqi; Xia, Chunsheng; Pan, Bailiang

    2017-06-12

    A physical model combining rate, power propagation, and transient heat conduction equations for diode-pumped alkali vapor lasers (DPAL) is applied to a pulsed Rb-CH4 DPAL, which agrees well with the time evolution of laser power and temperature measured by K absorption spectroscopy. The output feature and temperature rise of a multi-pulse DPAL are also calculated in the time domain, showing that if we energize the pump light when the temperature rise decays to 1/2, rather than 1/e of its maximum, we can increase the duty cycle and obtain more output energy. The repetition rate of >100Hz is high enough to achieve QCW (quasi-continuous-wave) laser pulses.

  15. Automated measurement of the EUREKA EU213 excimer laser pulse-forming line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boardman, Allan D.; Hodgson, Elizabeth M.; Spence, A. J.; Wilkins, M.; Wu, Jian; Ashton, J. A.

    1990-08-01

    This paper describes part of the EUREKA Eurolaser project EU213, to build an excimer laser. The emphasis is on control and monitoring systems. The performance of a test-bed laser built at Salford will be described. In the design discussed, two voltage components are generated separately and combined at the laser head to form a pumping pulse. A "magnetic switch" is used to isolate the two parts of the transmission line'. A theoretical analysis of the sustainer section of the line has been carried out and compared with measurements made using a dummy load in place of the laser head. A control system is discussed that is being developed to monitor the shape of each laser pulse at a high repetition rate. The control system is designed to protect the laser from damage. The construction of various conventional probes, and the progress towards various fibre probes will be reported with emphasis on measuring fast current pulses on the various parts of the line.

  16. Programmable picosecond pulse packets for micromachining with multiwatt UV fiber lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekel, Theodore; Foster, David H.; Crist, Jordan

    2009-02-01

    Nanosecond class lasers have been the mainstay of optical machining for decades, delivering pulses with high fluences (>1 J/cm2) that cause many material sets to undergo thermally-induced phase changes to cause removal of matter. While in many cases their delivery of sheer laser power has proved useful, nanosecond lasers have fallen short of addressing current micromachining requirements with respect to decreased feature sizes and more complex substrates. One main issue is the laser pulse width endures throughout the ablation process, depositing energy is deposited into plasma formation and local material heating. Plasma shielding takes place when the laser pulse energy contributes to plasma formation to a greater extent than direct material ablation processes. The result is a crude "plasma cutter" of the substrate, leaving a telltale trail of localized dross and droplet deposition. Nanosecond lasers of sufficient process speeds are typically Q-switched with repetition rates less than 200 kHz. As a result, the scribed lines are made of a sequence of "blast events" that result in a variety of undesired consequences and a limited process speed.

  17. Generation And Measurement Of High Contrast Ultrashort Intense Laser Pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Konoplev, O A

    2000-01-01

    In this thesis, the generation and measurement of high contrast, intense, ultrashort pulses have been studied. Various factors affecting the contrast and pulse shape of ultrashort light pulses from a chirped pulse amplification (CPA) laser system are identified. The level of contrast resulting from influence of these factors is estimated. Methods for improving and controlling the pulse shape and increasing the contrast are discussed. Ultrahigh contrast, 1-ps pulses were generated from a CPA system with no temporal structure up to eleven orders of magnitude. This is eight orders of magnitude higher contrast than the original pulse. This contrast boost was achieved using two techniques. One is the optical pulse cleaning based on the nonlinear birefringence of the chirping fiber and applied to the pulses before amplification. The other is the fast saturable absorber. The fast saturable absorber was placed after amplification and compression of the pulse. The measurements of high-contrast, ultrashort pulse with h...

  18. Nanosecond pulsed laser welding of high carbon steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascari, Alessandro; Fortunato, Alessandro

    2014-03-01

    The present paper deals with the possibility to exploit low-cost, near infra-red, nanosecond pulsed laser sources in welding of high carbon content thin sheets. The exploitation of these very common sources allows to achieve sound weld beads with a good depth-to-width ratio and very small heat affected zones when the proper process parameters are involved. In particular the role of pulse frequency, pulse duration, peak power and welding speed on the characteristics of the weld beads is studied and the advantage of the application of short-pulse laser sources over traditional long-pulse or continuous wave one is assessed.

  19. Short pulse diode-pumped Tm:YAG slab laser electro-optically Q-switched by RbTiOPO4 crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Lin; Liu, Pian; Huang, Haitao; Liu, Xuan; Shen, Deyuan

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, a laser diode end pumped RbTiOPO4 (RTP) electro-optically Q-switched Tm:YAG slab laser was demonstrated. Stable Q-switched pulse with the shortest pulse width of 58 ns and an average output power of 7.5 W were realized at the repetition rate of 1 KHz, corresponding to the slope efficiency of 21.7%.

  20. Chirp of monolithic colliding pulse mode-locked diode lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofmann, M.; Bischoff, S.; Franck, Thorkild

    1997-01-01

    Spectrally resolved streak camera measurements of picosecond pulses emitted by hybridly colliding pulse mode-locked (CPM) laser diodes are presented in this letter. Depending on the modulation frequency both blue-chirped (upchirped) and red-chirped (downchirped) pulses can be observed. The two...... different regimes and the transition between them are characterized experimentally and the behavior is explained on the basis of our model for the CPM laser dynamics. (C) 1997 American Institute of Physics....