WorldWideScience

Sample records for repetitive diving decompression

  1. Decompression sickness following breath-hold diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schipke, J D; Gams, E; Kallweit, Oliver

    2006-01-01

    Despite convincing evidence of a relationship between breath-hold diving and decompression sickness (DCS), the causal connection is only slowly being accepted. Only the more recent textbooks have acknowledged the risks of repetitive breath-hold diving. We compare four groups of breath-hold divers: (1) Japanese and Korean amas and other divers from the Pacific area, (2) instructors at naval training facilities, (3) spear fishers, and (4) free-dive athletes. While the number of amas is likely decreasing, and Scandinavian Navy training facilities recorded only a few accidents, the number of spear fishers suffering accidents is on the rise, in particular during championships or using scooters. Finally, national and international associations (e.g., International Association of Free Drives [IAFD] or Association Internationale pour Le Developpment De L'Apnee [AIDA]) promote free-diving championships including deep diving categories such as constant weight, variable weight, and no limit. A number of free-diving athletes, training for or participating in competitions, are increasingly accident prone as the world record is presently set at a depth of 171 m. This review presents data found after searching Medline and ISI Web of Science and using appropriate Internet search engines (e.g., Google). We report some 90 cases in which DCS occurred after repetitive breath-hold dives. Even today, the risk of suffering from DCS after repetitive breath-hold diving is often not acknowledged. We strongly suggest that breath-hold divers and their advisors and physicians be made aware of the possibility of DCS and of the appropriate therapeutic measures to be taken when DCS is suspected. Because the risk of suffering from DCS increases depending on depth, bottom time, rate of ascent, and duration of surface intervals, some approaches to assess the risks are presented. Regrettably, none of these approaches is widely accepted. We propose therefore the development of easily manageable

  2. Influence of repeated daily diving on decompression stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanchi, J; Ljubkovic, M; Denoble, P J; Dujic, Z; Ranapurwala, S; Pollock, N W

    2014-06-01

    Acclimatization (an adaptive change in response to repeated environmental exposure) to diving could reduce decompression stress. A decrease in post-dive circulating venous gas emboli (VGE or bubbles) would represent positive acclimatization. The purpose of this study was to determine whether four days of daily diving alter post-dive bubble grades. 16 male divers performed identical no-decompression air dives on 4 consecutive days to 18 meters of sea water for 47 min bottom times. VGE monitoring was performed with transthoracic echocardiography every 20 min for 120 min post-dive. Completion of identical daily dives resulted in progressively decreasing odds (or logit risk) of having relatively higher grade bubbles on consecutive days. The odds on Day 4 were half that of Day 1 (OR 0.50, 95% CI: 0.34, 0.73). The odds ratio for a >III bubble grade on Day 4 was 0.37 (95% CI: 0.20, 0.70) when compared to Day 1. The current study indicates that repetitive daily diving may reduce bubble formation, representing a positive (protective) acclimatization to diving. Further work is required to evaluate the impact of additional days of diving and multiple dive days and to determine if the effect is sufficient to alter the absolute risk of decompression sickness.

  3. Recreational technical diving part 2: decompression from deep technical dives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doolette, David J; Mitchell, Simon J

    2013-06-01

    Technical divers perform deep, mixed-gas 'bounce' dives, which are inherently inefficient because even a short duration at the target depth results in lengthy decompression. Technical divers use decompression schedules generated from modified versions of decompression algorithms originally developed for other types of diving. Many modifications ostensibly produce shorter and/or safer decompression, but have generally been driven by anecdote. Scientific evidence relevant to many of these modifications exists, but is often difficult to locate. This review assembles and examines scientific evidence relevant to technical diving decompression practice. There is a widespread belief that bubble algorithms, which redistribute decompression in favour of deeper decompression stops, are more efficient than traditional, shallow-stop, gas-content algorithms, but recent laboratory data support the opposite view. It seems unlikely that switches from helium- to nitrogen-based breathing gases during ascent will accelerate decompression from typical technical bounce dives. However, there is evidence for a higher prevalence of neurological decompression sickness (DCS) after dives conducted breathing only helium-oxygen than those with nitrogen-oxygen. There is also weak evidence suggesting less neurological DCS occurs if helium-oxygen breathing gas is switched to air during decompression than if no switch is made. On the other hand, helium-to-nitrogen breathing gas switches are implicated in the development of inner-ear DCS arising during decompression. Inner-ear DCS is difficult to predict, but strategies to minimize the risk include adequate initial decompression, delaying helium-to-nitrogen switches until relatively shallow, and the use of the maximum safe fraction of inspired oxygen during decompression.

  4. Venous gas embolism after an open-water air dive and identical repetitive dive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellart, N A M; Sterk, W

    2012-01-01

    Decompression tables indicate that a repetitive dive to the same depth as a first dive should be shortened to obtain the same probability of occurrence of decompression sickness (pDCS). Repetition protocols are based on small numbers, a reason for re-examination. Since venous gas embolism (VGE) and pDCS are related, one would expect a higher bubble grade (BG) of VGE after the repetitive dive without reducing bottom time. BGs were determined in 28 divers after a first and an identical repetitive air dive of 40 minutes to 20 meters of sea water. Doppler BG scores were transformed to log number of bubbles/cm2 (logB) to allow numerical analysis. With a previously published model (Model2), pDCS was calculated for the first dive and for both dives together. From pDCS, theoretical logBs were estimated with a pDCS-to-logB model constructed from literature data. However, pDCS the second dive was provided using conditional probability. This was achieved in Model2 and indirectly via tissue saturations. The combination of both models shows a significant increase of logB after the second dive, whereas the measurements showed an unexpected lower logB. These differences between measurements and model expectations are significant (p-values < 0.01). A reason for this discrepancy is uncertain. The most likely speculation would be that the divers, who were relatively old, did not perform physical activity for some days before the first dive. Our data suggest that, wisely, the first dive after a period of no exercise should be performed conservatively, particularly for older divers.

  5. Portable Sensor for Detecting Microbubbles in Real Time to Prevent Decompression Sickness for Safe Diving During Subaquatic Navy Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-17

    Contains Proprietary information Final Report: Portable Sensor for Detecting Microbubbles in Real Time to Prevent Decompression Sickness for Safe Diving ...Portable Sensor for Detecting Microbubbles in Real Time to Prevent Decompression Sickness for Safe Diving During Subaquatic Navy Activities Report Title The...Portable Sensor for Detecting Microbubbles in Real Time to Prevent Decompression Sickness for Safe Diving During Subaquatic Navy Activities Final

  6. Deadly diving? Physiological and behavioural management of decompression stress in diving mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, S. K.; Fahlman, A.; Moore, M. J.; Aguilar de Soto, N.; Bernaldo de Quirós, Y.; Brubakk, A. O.; Costa, D. P.; Costidis, A. M.; Dennison, S.; Falke, K. J.; Fernandez, A.; Ferrigno, M.; Fitz-Clarke, J. R.; Garner, M. M.; Houser, D. S.; Jepson, P. D.; Ketten, D. R.; Kvadsheim, P. H.; Madsen, P. T.; Pollock, N. W.; Rotstein, D. S.; Rowles, T. K.; Simmons, S. E.; Van Bonn, W.; Weathersby, P. K.; Weise, M. J.; Williams, T. M.; Tyack, P. L.

    2012-01-01

    Decompression sickness (DCS; ‘the bends’) is a disease associated with gas uptake at pressure. The basic pathology and cause are relatively well known to human divers. Breath-hold diving marine mammals were thought to be relatively immune to DCS owing to multiple anatomical, physiological and behavioural adaptations that reduce nitrogen gas (N2) loading during dives. However, recent observations have shown that gas bubbles may form and tissue injury may occur in marine mammals under certain circumstances. Gas kinetic models based on measured time-depth profiles further suggest the potential occurrence of high blood and tissue N2 tensions. We review evidence for gas-bubble incidence in marine mammal tissues and discuss the theory behind gas loading and bubble formation. We suggest that diving mammals vary their physiological responses according to multiple stressors, and that the perspective on marine mammal diving physiology should change from simply minimizing N2 loading to management of the N2 load. This suggests several avenues for further study, ranging from the effects of gas bubbles at molecular, cellular and organ function levels, to comparative studies relating the presence/absence of gas bubbles to diving behaviour. Technological advances in imaging and remote instrumentation are likely to advance this field in coming years. PMID:22189402

  7. Deadly diving? Physiological and behavioural management of decompression stress in diving mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, S K; Fahlman, A; Moore, M J; de Soto, N Aguilar; de Quirós, Y Bernaldo; Brubakk, A O; Costa, D P; Costidis, A M; Dennison, S; Falke, K J; Fernandez, A; Ferrigno, M; Fitz-Clarke, J R; Garner, M M; Houser, D S; Jepson, P D; Ketten, D R; Kvadsheim, P H; Madsen, P T; Pollock, N W; Rotstein, D S; Rowles, T K; Simmons, S E; Van Bonn, W; Weathersby, P K; Weise, M J; Williams, T M; Tyack, P L

    2012-03-22

    Decompression sickness (DCS; 'the bends') is a disease associated with gas uptake at pressure. The basic pathology and cause are relatively well known to human divers. Breath-hold diving marine mammals were thought to be relatively immune to DCS owing to multiple anatomical, physiological and behavioural adaptations that reduce nitrogen gas (N(2)) loading during dives. However, recent observations have shown that gas bubbles may form and tissue injury may occur in marine mammals under certain circumstances. Gas kinetic models based on measured time-depth profiles further suggest the potential occurrence of high blood and tissue N(2) tensions. We review evidence for gas-bubble incidence in marine mammal tissues and discuss the theory behind gas loading and bubble formation. We suggest that diving mammals vary their physiological responses according to multiple stressors, and that the perspective on marine mammal diving physiology should change from simply minimizing N(2) loading to management of the N(2) load. This suggests several avenues for further study, ranging from the effects of gas bubbles at molecular, cellular and organ function levels, to comparative studies relating the presence/absence of gas bubbles to diving behaviour. Technological advances in imaging and remote instrumentation are likely to advance this field in coming years.

  8. Decompression sickness among Moroami diving fishermen in Jakarta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chichi Wahab

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia is an archipelago with many traditional divers, however research on decompression sickness (DCS has not yet elaborated. The aim of the study was to identify the prevalence of DCS and factors related to it. The study was conducted on October-November 2007 among fisherman moroami divers in Seribu Island Jakarta. Anamnesis and physical examination was taken before and three times after diving. Subject was diagnosed as having DCS if experienced one of these symptom or sign: myalgia, muscle pain, skin rash, ankle weakness, bowel movement & bladder dysfunction, visual disturbances, headache, vertigo, dyspnoe, chest pain, convulsion, unconsciousness, nausea and vomiting. Among 123 potential divers, five were having upper respiratory infection, so only 117 divers participated in this study. Final model analysis showed that regulator, valsava when having ear pain, ascending speed to surface, and lack of training were risk factors to obtain DCS. Divers whose ascending speed more than 9 m per minutes had two times risk to get DCS [adjusted ratio = 2.2; 95% confidence interval (CI= 1.11 – 3.56]. Having DCS before diving, increased risk 20% (RRa = 1.20; 95% CI = 0.86-1.68; P=0,285. Beside knowledge to use regulator correctly and valsava, fisherman Moroami divers need to be trained to ascend speed to sea level surface less than 9 m per minute. (Med J Indones 2008; 17: 197-202Keywords: decompression sickness, ascending speed, regulator, valsava

  9. A comparative evaluation of two decompression procedures for technical diving using inflammatory responses: compartmental versus ratio deco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spisni, Enzo; Marabotti, Claudio; De Fazio, Luigia; Valerii, Maria Chiara; Cavazza, Elena; Brambilla, Stefano; Hoxha, Klarida; L'Abbate, Antonio; Longobardi, Pasquale

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare two decompression procedures commonly adopted by technical divers: the ZH-L16 algorithm modified by 30/85 gradient factors (compartmental decompression model, CDM) versus the 'ratio decompression strategy' (RDS). The comparison was based on an analysis of changes in diver circulating inflammatory profiles caused by decompression from a single dive. Fifty-one technical divers performed a single trimix dive to 50 metres' sea water (msw) for 25 minutes followed by enriched air (EAN50) and oxygen decompression. Twenty-three divers decompressed according to a CDM schedule and 28 divers decompressed according to a RDS schedule. Peripheral blood for detection of inflammatory markers was collected before and 90 min after diving. Venous gas emboli were measured 30 min after diving using 2D echocardiography. Matched groups of 23 recreational divers (dive to 30 msw; 25 min) and 25 swimmers were also enrolled as control groups to assess the effects of decompression from a standard air dive or of exercise alone on the inflammatory profile. Echocardiography at the single 30 min observation post dive showed no significant differences between the two decompression procedures. Divers adopting the RDS showed a worsening of post-dive inflammatory profile compared to the CDM group, with significant increases in circulating chemokines CCL2 (P = 0.001) and CCL5 (P = 0.006) levels. There was no increase in chemokines following the CDM decompression. The air scuba group also showed a statistically significant increase in CCL2 (P strategy did not confer any benefit in terms of bubbles but showed the disadvantage of increased decompression-associated secretion of inflammatory chemokines involved in the development of vascular damage.

  10. Decompression illness secondary to occupational diving: recommended management based current legistation and practice in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozali, A; Khairuddin, H; Sherina, M S; Zin, B Mohd; Sulaiman, A

    2008-06-01

    Occupational divers are exposed to hazards which contribute to the risk of developing decompression illnesses (DCI). DCI consists of Type I decompression sickness (DCS), Type II DCS and arterial gas embolism (AGE), developed from formation of bubbles in the tissues or circulation as a result of inadequate elimination of inert gas (nitrogen) after a dive. In Malaysia, DCI is one of the significant contributions to mortality and permanent residual morbidity in diving accidents. This is a case of a diver who suffered from Type II DCS with neurological complications due to an occupational diving activity. This article mentions the clinical management of the case and makes several recommendations based on current legislations and practise implemented in Malaysia in order to educate medical and health practitioners on the current management of DCI from the occupational perspective. By following these recommendations, hopefully diving accidents mainly DCI and its sequalae among occupational divers can be minimized and prevented, while divers who become injured receive the proper compensation for their disabilities.

  11. Redistribution of Decompression Stop Time from Shallow to Deep Stops Increases Incidence of Decompression Sickness in Air Decompression Dives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-22

    with trans-thoracic cardiac 2-D echo imaging (Siemens Medical Solutions® Acuson Cypress Portable Colorflow Ultrasound System) at 30 minutes and...and DiveDayID 31 on 20060301) were aborted during the descent, due to divers being unable to equalize sinus or middle ear gas spaces with ambient

  12. Pre-dive Whole-Body Vibration Better Reduces Decompression-Induced Vascular Gas Emboli than Oxygenation or a Combination of Both

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestra, Costantino; Theunissen, Sigrid; Papadopoulou, Virginie; Le Mener, Cedric; Germonpré, Peter; Guerrero, François; Lafère, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Since non-provocative dive profiles are no guarantor of protection against decompression sickness, novel means including pre-dive “preconditioning” interventions, are proposed for its prevention. This study investigated and compared the effect of pre-dive oxygenation, pre-dive whole body vibration or a combination of both on post-dive bubble formation. Methods: Six healthy volunteers performed 6 no-decompression dives each, to a depth of 33 mfw for 20 min (3 control dives without preconditioning and 1 of each preconditioning protocol) with a minimum interval of 1 week between each dive. Post-dive bubbles were counted in the precordium by two-dimensional echocardiography, 30 and 90 min after the dive, with and without knee flexing. Each diver served as his own control. Results: Vascular gas emboli (VGE) were systematically observed before and after knee flexing at each post-dive measurement. Compared to the control dives, we observed a decrease in VGE count of 23.8 ± 7.4% after oxygen breathing (p < 0.05), 84.1 ± 5.6% after vibration (p < 0.001), and 55.1 ± 9.6% after vibration combined with oxygen (p < 0.001). The difference between all preconditioning methods was statistically significant. Conclusions: The precise mechanism that induces the decrease in post-dive VGE and thus makes the diver more resistant to decompression stress is still not known. However, it seems that a pre-dive mechanical reduction of existing gas nuclei might best explain the beneficial effects of this strategy. The apparent non-synergic effect of oxygen and vibration has probably to be understood because of different mechanisms involved. PMID:27965591

  13. Nanobubbles Form at Active Hydrophobic Spots on the Luminal Aspect of Blood Vessels: Consequences for Decompression Illness in Diving and Possible Implications for Autoimmune Disease—An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Arieli

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Decompression illness (DCI occurs following a reduction in ambient pressure. Decompression bubbles can expand and develop only from pre-existing gas micronuclei. The different hypotheses hitherto proposed regarding the nucleation and stabilization of gas micronuclei have never been validated. It is known that nanobubbles form spontaneously when a smooth hydrophobic surface is submerged in water containing dissolved gas. These nanobubbles may be the long sought-after gas micronuclei underlying decompression bubbles and DCI. We exposed hydrophobic and hydrophilic silicon wafers under water to hyperbaric pressure. After decompression, bubbles appeared on the hydrophobic but not the hydrophilic wafers. In a further series of experiments, we placed large ovine blood vessels in a cooled high pressure chamber at 1,000 kPa for about 20 h. Bubbles evolved at definite spots in all the types of blood vessels. These bubble-producing spots stained positive for lipids, and were henceforth termed “active hydrophobic spots” (AHS. The lung surfactant dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC, was found both in the plasma of the sheep and at the AHS. Bubbles detached from the blood vessel in pulsatile flow after reaching a mean diameter of ~1.0 mm. Bubble expansion was bi-phasic—a slow initiation phase which peaked 45 min after decompression, followed by fast diffusion-controlled growth. Many features of decompression from diving correlate with this finding of AHS on the blood vessels. (1 Variability between bubblers and non-bubblers. (2 An age-related effect and adaptation. (3 The increased risk of DCI on a second dive. (4 Symptoms of neurologic decompression sickness. (5 Preconditioning before a dive. (6 A bi-phasic mechanism of bubble expansion. (7 Increased bubble formation with depth. (8 Endothelial injury. (9 The presence of endothelial microparticles. Finally, constant contact between nanobubbles and plasma may result in distortion of proteins and their

  14. Statistically-Based Decompression Tables. 6. Repeat Dives on Oxyen/ Nitrogen Mixes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-10-01

    Parameter Mc-!s: Combinations of Data from Different Categories model 2 model 3 (2 Tissue (1 Tissue Mgno-exponential); Bi-exponential); Ptb - 0 Pthr ...Dive model 2 model 3 (2 Tissue (1 Tissue Mono-exponential); Bi-exponential); Pthr " 0 Pt.h * 0

  15. Estimated Tissue and Blood N(2) Levels and Risk of Decompression Sickness in Deep-, Intermediate-, and Shallow-Diving Toothed Whales during Exposure to Naval Sonar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvadsheim, P H; Miller, P J O; Tyack, P L; Sivle, L D; Lam, F P A; Fahlman, A

    2012-01-01

    Naval sonar has been accused of causing whale stranding by a mechanism which increases formation of tissue N(2) gas bubbles. Increased tissue and blood N(2) levels, and thereby increased risk of decompression sickness (DCS), is thought to result from changes in behavior or physiological responses during diving. Previous theoretical studies have used hypothetical sonar-induced changes in both behavior and physiology to model blood and tissue N(2) tension [Formula: see text], but this is the first attempt to estimate the changes during actual behavioral responses to sonar. We used an existing mathematical model to estimate blood and tissue N(2) tension [Formula: see text] from dive data recorded from sperm, killer, long-finned pilot, Blainville's beaked, and Cuvier's beaked whales before and during exposure to Low- (1-2 kHz) and Mid- (2-7 kHz) frequency active sonar. Our objectives were: (1) to determine if differences in dive behavior affects risk of bubble formation, and if (2) behavioral- or (3) physiological responses to sonar are plausible risk factors. Our results suggest that all species have natural high N(2) levels, with deep diving generally resulting in higher end-dive [Formula: see text] as compared with shallow diving. Sonar exposure caused some changes in dive behavior in both killer whales, pilot whales and beaked whales, but this did not lead to any increased risk of DCS. However, in three of eight exposure session with sperm whales, the animal changed to shallower diving, and in all these cases this seem to result in an increased risk of DCS, although risk was still within the normal risk range of this species. When a hypothetical removal of the normal dive response (bradycardia and peripheral vasoconstriction), was added to the behavioral response during model simulations, this led to an increased variance in the estimated end-dive N(2) levels, but no consistent change of risk. In conclusion, we cannot rule out the possibility that a combination

  16. DECOMPRESSION FROM He-N2-O2 (TRIMIX) BOUNCE DIVES IS NOT MORE EFFICIENT THAN FROM He-O2 (HELIOX) BOUNCE DIVES

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-28

    for moderately deep bounce dives may have the advantage of reducing nitrogen narcosis and work of breathing compared to breathing nitrox, but result...more complex gas mixing and reduced operational depth because of nitrogen narcosis and increased work of breathing. The principal potential...Experimental Diving Unit who made these experiments possible. 1 INTRODUCTION Nitrogen and oxygena (nitrox) breathing mixtures are impractical for deep

  17. Diving In Extreme Environments:: The Scientific Diving Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Lang, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    The scope of extreme-environment diving defined within this work encompasses diving modes outside of the generally accepted no-decompression, open-circuit, compressed-air diving limits on selfcontained underwater breathing apparatus (scuba) in temperate or warmer waters. Extreme-environment diving is scientifically and politically interesting. The scientific diving operational safety and medical framework is the cornerstone from which diving takes place in the scientific community. From this ...

  18. Parameter estimation of the copernicus decompression model with venous gas emboli in human divers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutvik, Christian R; Dunford, Richard G; Dujic, Zeljko; Brubakk, Alf O

    2010-07-01

    Decompression Sickness (DCS) may occur when divers decompress from a hyperbaric environment. To prevent this, decompression procedures are used to get safely back to the surface. The models whose procedures are calculated from, are traditionally validated using clinical symptoms as an endpoint. However, DCS is an uncommon phenomenon and the wide variation in individual response to decompression stress is poorly understood. And generally, using clinical examination alone for validation is disadvantageous from a modeling perspective. Currently, the only objective and quantitative measure of decompression stress is Venous Gas Emboli (VGE), measured by either ultrasonic imaging or Doppler. VGE has been shown to be statistically correlated with DCS, and is now widely used in science to evaluate decompression stress from a dive. Until recently no mathematical model has existed to predict VGE from a dive, which motivated the development of the Copernicus model. The present article compiles a selection experimental dives and field data containing computer recorded depth profiles associated with ultrasound measurements of VGE. It describes a parameter estimation problem to fit the model with these data. A total of 185 square bounce dives from DCIEM, Canada, 188 recreational dives with a mix of single, repetitive and multi-day exposures from DAN USA and 84 experimentally designed decompression dives from Split Croatia were used, giving a total of 457 dives. Five selected parameters in the Copernicus bubble model were assigned for estimation and a non-linear optimization problem was formalized with a weighted least square cost function. A bias factor to the DCIEM chamber dives was also included. A Quasi-Newton algorithm (BFGS) from the TOMLAB numerical package solved the problem which was proved to be convex. With the parameter set presented in this article, Copernicus can be implemented in any programming language to estimate VGE from an air dive.

  19. Diving medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bove, Alfred A

    2014-06-15

    Exposure to the undersea environment has unique effects on normal physiology and can result in unique disorders that require an understanding of the effects of pressure and inert gas supersaturation on organ function and knowledge of the appropriate therapies, which can include recompression in a hyperbaric chamber. The effects of Boyle's law result in changes in volume of gas-containing spaces when exposed to the increased pressure underwater. These effects can cause middle ear and sinus injury and lung barotrauma due to lung overexpansion during ascent from depth. Disorders related to diving have unique presentations, and an understanding of the high-pressure environment is needed to properly diagnose and manage these disorders. Breathing compressed air underwater results in increased dissolved inert gas in tissues and organs. On ascent after a diving exposure, the dissolved gas can achieve a supersaturated state and can form gas bubbles in blood and tissues, with resulting tissue and organ damage. Decompression sickness can involve the musculoskeletal system, skin, inner ear, brain, and spinal cord, with characteristic signs and symptoms. Usual therapy is recompression in a hyperbaric chamber following well-established protocols. Many recreational diving candidates seek medical clearance for diving, and healthcare providers must be knowledgeable of the environmental exposure and its effects on physiologic function to properly assess individuals for fitness to dive. This review provides a basis for understanding the diving environment and its accompanying disorders and provides a basis for assessment of fitness for diving.

  20. [Neurological decompression illness in a Japanese breath-held diver: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Ryu; Arakawa, Shuji; Furuta, Yoshihiko; Kanazawa, Yuka; Kamouchi, Masahiro; Kitazono, Takanari

    2012-01-01

    We report a Japanese breath-hold diver (Ama) who presented neurological disorders after diving. He repeated diving into 25-30 meters depth in the sea for 6 hours. After diving, he felt dizziness and unsteady gait. Neurological examination showed left quadrant hemianopia, bilateral limb ataxia and ataxic gait. Head CT revealed gas bubbles in the left parietal lobe. In CT scan on 3 days after onset, gas bubbles disappeared and low density areas were observed in the bilateral parietal lobes. Brain imaging (DWI, T(2)WI and FLAIR) demonstrated high intensity in the parieto-occipital lobes. Neither pulmonary barotrauma nor intracardiac shunt was detected. He was diagnosed as having neurological decompression illness and therefore underwent hyperbaric oxygen therapy. The pathogenesis of this case was considered to be microbubbles induced by decompression. The present case suggests that repetitive rapid surfacing from the deep sea causes neurological decompression illness even in the breath-hold diver.

  1. [Lungs et diving].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Héritier, F; Avanzi, P; Nicod, L

    2014-11-19

    Whilst underwater, the body is submitted to significant variations of the surrounding pressure according to the depth. These conditions modify the hemodynamic and the ventilatory mechanics considerably. Some repercussions, like pulmonary barotrauma, are related to simple physical phenomena. Others, like decompression sickness, are due to more com- plex processes. Breath-hold diving disrupts haematosis and can be complicated by alveolar haemorrhage and loss of consciousness. Acute pulmonary oedema during scuba-diving, breath-hold diving and swimming has been reported more recently. In case of pulmonary disorders scuba-diving is contraindicated most of the time. It is therefore highly recommended to seek medical advice to prevent problems.

  2. 模拟高海拔氦氧常规潜水减压方案的计算和验证%Calculation and verification of the simulated high altitude heliox conventional diving decompression schedule

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚健; 方以群; 张延猛; 周述尧; 石中瑗

    2012-01-01

    Objective To calculate the decompression schedule for the simulated high altitude heliox conventional dive,by using the ratio of high altitude air pressure and sea level air pressure to simulate heliox conventional dive at high altitude,and then to verify the safety of the decompression schedule.Methods Data at various depths in the heliox conventional diving schedule were revised by using the ratio of high altitude air pressure and sea level air pressure as an adjusting factor.Then,4 decompression schedules were developed for the high altitude heliox conventional diving.Four male healthy divers were exposed to 3000,4000 and 5200 m above sea level in the high-low pressure chamber and carried out simulated 30 m/60 min and 50m/60min heliox conventional dives.During the process of decompression,pre-cordial Doppler ultrasonic bubble detections and recordings inside the chamber were made every other decompression stage,and when the divers returned to ambient pressure at high altitudes.Results Static and dynamic Doppler bubble detection indicated that there were neither bubbles in the blood stream nor symptoms and signs of decompression sickness.Conclusions The diving decompression schedules developed through our research are safe and practically feasible.%目的 运用高海拔气压值与海平面气压值之比,计算高海拔氦氧常规潜水的减压方案,并在高低压舱内模拟高海拔氦氧常规潜水验证减压方案的安全性.方法 用高海拔气压值与海平面气压值的比率作为校正因子,对氦氧常规潜水减压表中各有关深度值进行修正后确定4个高海拔氦氧常规潜水减压方案.4名健康男性潜水员在高低压舱内分别暴露于海拔3000、4000和5200 m,进行了模拟30 m/60 min和50 m/60 min的氦氧常规潜水,减压过程中每隔1个停留站深度及返回高海拔压力时对潜水员进行舱内心前区多普勒超声气泡检测及录音.结果 静态、动态多普勒超声气泡检测均未

  3. Extreme diving of beaked whales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyack, Peter L; Johnson, Mark; Soto, Natacha Aguilar; Sturlese, Albert; Madsen, Peter T

    2006-11-01

    Sound-and-orientation recording tags (DTAGs) were used to study 10 beaked whales of two poorly known species, Ziphius cavirostris (Zc) and Mesoplodon densirostris (Md). Acoustic behaviour in the deep foraging dives performed by both species (Zc: 28 dives by seven individuals; Md: 16 dives by three individuals) shows that they hunt by echolocation in deep water between 222 and 1885 m, attempting to capture about 30 prey/dive. This food source is so deep that the average foraging dives were deeper (Zc: 1070 m; Md: 835 m) and longer (Zc: 58 min; Md: 47 min) than reported for any other air-breathing species. A series of shallower dives, containing no indications of foraging, followed most deep foraging dives. The average interval between deep foraging dives was 63 min for Zc and 92 min for Md. This long an interval may be required for beaked whales to recover from an oxygen debt accrued in the deep foraging dives, which last about twice the estimated aerobic dive limit. Recent reports of gas emboli in beaked whales stranded during naval sonar exercises have led to the hypothesis that their deep-diving may make them especially vulnerable to decompression. Using current models of breath-hold diving, we infer that their natural diving behaviour is inconsistent with known problems of acute nitrogen supersaturation and embolism. If the assumptions of these models are correct for beaked whales, then possible decompression problems are more likely to result from an abnormal behavioural response to sonar.

  4. Statistical correlations and risk analyses techniques for a diving dual phase bubble model and data bank using massively parallel supercomputers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wienke, B R; O'Leary, T R

    2008-05-01

    Linking model and data, we detail the LANL diving reduced gradient bubble model (RGBM), dynamical principles, and correlation with data in the LANL Data Bank. Table, profile, and meter risks are obtained from likelihood analysis and quoted for air, nitrox, helitrox no-decompression time limits, repetitive dive tables, and selected mixed gas and repetitive profiles. Application analyses include the EXPLORER decompression meter algorithm, NAUI tables, University of Wisconsin Seafood Diver tables, comparative NAUI, PADI, Oceanic NDLs and repetitive dives, comparative nitrogen and helium mixed gas risks, USS Perry deep rebreather (RB) exploration dive,world record open circuit (OC) dive, and Woodville Karst Plain Project (WKPP) extreme cave exploration profiles. The algorithm has seen extensive and utilitarian application in mixed gas diving, both in recreational and technical sectors, and forms the bases forreleased tables and decompression meters used by scientific, commercial, and research divers. The LANL Data Bank is described, and the methods used to deduce risk are detailed. Risk functions for dissolved gas and bubbles are summarized. Parameters that can be used to estimate profile risk are tallied. To fit data, a modified Levenberg-Marquardt routine is employed with L2 error norm. Appendices sketch the numerical methods, and list reports from field testing for (real) mixed gas diving. A Monte Carlo-like sampling scheme for fast numerical analysis of the data is also detailed, as a coupled variance reduction technique and additional check on the canonical approach to estimating diving risk. The method suggests alternatives to the canonical approach. This work represents a first time correlation effort linking a dynamical bubble model with deep stop data. Supercomputing resources are requisite to connect model and data in application.

  5. Pre-dive normobaric oxygen reduces bubble formation in scuba divers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castagna, Olivier; Gempp, Emmanuel; Blatteau, Jean-Eric

    2009-05-01

    Oxygen pre-breathing is routinely employed as a protective measure to reduce the incidence of altitude decompression sickness in aviators and astronauts, but the effectiveness of normobaric oxygen before hyperbaric exposure has not been well explored. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of 30-min normobaric oxygen (O(2)) breathing before diving upon bubble formation in recreational divers. Twenty-one subjects (13 men and 8 women, mean age (SD) 33 +/- 8 years) performed random repetitive open-sea dives (surface interval of 100 min) to 30 msw for 30 min with a 6-min stop at 3 msw under four experimental protocols: "air-air" (control), "O(2)-O(2)", "O(2)-air" and "air-O(2)" where "O(2)" corresponds to a dive with oxygen pre-breathing and "air" a dive without oxygen administration. Post-dive venous gas emboli were examined by means of a precordial Doppler ultrasound. The results showed decreased bubble scores in all dives where preoxygenation had taken place (p < 0.01). Oxygen pre-breathing before each dive ("O(2)-O(2)" condition) resulted in the highest reduction in bubble scores measured after the second dive compared to the control condition (-66%, p < 0.05). The "O(2)-air" and "air-O(2) "conditions produced fewer circulating bubbles after the second dive than "air-air" condition (-47.3% and -52.2%, respectively, p < 0.05) but less bubbles were detected in "air-O(2) "condition compared to "O(2)-air" (p < 0.05). Our findings provide evidence that normobaric oxygen pre-breathing decreases venous gas emboli formation with a prolonged protective effect over time. This procedure could therefore be beneficial for multi-day repetitive diving.

  6. Microparticle production, neutrophil activation, and intravascular bubbles following open-water SCUBA diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, Stephen R; Milovanova, Tatyana N; Bogush, Marina; Bhopale, Veena M; Yang, Ming; Bushmann, Kim; Pollock, Neal W; Ljubkovic, Marko; Denoble, Petar; Dujic, Zeljko

    2012-04-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate annexin V-positive microparticles (MPs) and neutrophil activation in humans following decompression from open-water SCUBA diving with the hypothesis that changes are related to intravascular bubble formation. Sixteen male volunteer divers followed a uniform profile of four daily SCUBA dives to 18 m of sea water for 47 min. Blood was obtained prior to and at 80 min following the first and fourth dives to evaluate the impact of repetitive diving, and intravascular bubbles were quantified by trans-thoracic echocardiography carried out at 20-min intervals for 2 h after each dive. MPs increased by 3.4-fold after each dive, neutrophil activation occurred as assessed by surface expression of myeloperoxidase and the CD18 component of β(2)-integrins, and there was an increased presence of the platelet-derived CD41 protein on the neutrophil surface indicating interactions with platelet membranes. Intravascular bubbles were detected in all divers. Surprisingly, significant inverse correlations were found among postdiving bubble scores and MPs, most consistently at 80 min or more after the dive on the fourth day. There were significant positive correlations between MPs and platelet-neutrophil interactions after the first dive and between platelet-neutrophil interactions and neutrophil activation documented as an elevation in β(2)-integrin expression after the fourth dive. We conclude that MPs- and neutrophil-related events in humans are consistent with findings in an animal decompression model. Whether there are causal relationships among bubbles, MPs, platelet-neutrophil interactions, and neutrophil activation remains obscure and requires additional study.

  7. Neurology and diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, E Wayne; Moon, Richard E

    2014-01-01

    Diving exposes a person to the combined effects of increased ambient pressure and immersion. The reduction in pressure when surfacing can precipitate decompression sickness (DCS), caused by bubble formation within tissues due to inert gas supersaturation. Arterial gas embolism (AGE) can also occur due to pulmonary barotrauma as a result of breath holding during ascent or gas trapping due to disease, causing lung hyperexpansion, rupture and direct entry of alveolar gas into the blood. Bubble disease due to either DCS or AGE is collectively known as decompression illness. Tissue and intravascular bubbles can induce a cascade of events resulting in CNS injury. Manifestations of decompression illness can vary in severity, from mild (paresthesias, joint pains, fatigue) to severe (vertigo, hearing loss, paraplegia, quadriplegia). Particularly as these conditions are uncommon, early recognition is essential to provide appropriate management, consisting of first aid oxygen, targeted fluid resuscitation and hyperbaric oxygen, which is the definitive treatment. Less common neurologic conditions that do not require hyperbaric oxygen include rupture of a labyrinthine window due to inadequate equalization of middle ear pressure during descent, which can precipitate vertigo and hearing loss. Sinus and middle ear overpressurization during ascent can compress the trigeminal and facial nerves respectively, causing temporary facial hypesthesia and lower motor neuron facial weakness. Some conditions preclude safe diving, such as seizure disorders, since a convulsion underwater is likely to be fatal. Preventive measures to reduce neurologic complications of diving include exclusion of individuals with specific medical conditions and safe diving procedures, particularly related to descent and ascent.

  8. Diving at altitude: from definition to practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egi, S Murat; Pieri, Massimo; Marroni, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Diving above sea level has different motivations for recreational, military, commercial and scientific activities. Despite the apparently wide practice of inland diving, there are three major discrepancies about diving at altitude: threshold elevation that requires changes in sea level procedures; upper altitude limit of the applicability of these modifications; and independent validation of altitude adaptation methods of decompression algorithms. The first problem is solved by converting the normal fluctuation in barometric pressure to an altitude equivalent. Based on the barometric variations recorded from a meteorological center, it is possible to suggest 600 meters as a threshold for classifying a dive as an "altitude" dive. The second problem is solved by proposing the threshold altitude of aviation (2,400 meters) to classify "high" altitude dives. The DAN (Divers Alert Network) Europe diving database (DB) is analyzed to solve the third problem. The database consists of 65,050 dives collected from different dive computers. A total of 1,467 dives were found to be classified as altitude dives. However, by checking the elevation according to the logged geographical coordinates, 1,284 dives were disqualified because the altitude setting had been used as a conservative setting by the dive computer despite the fact that the dive was made at sea level. Furthermore, according to the description put forward in this manuscript, 72 dives were disqualified because the surface level elevation is lower than 600 meters. The number of field data (111 dives) is still very low to use for the validation of any particular method of altitude adaptation concerning decompression algorithms.

  9. Dive Data Management System and Database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardiner, J.

    1998-05-01

    In 1994 the International Marine Contractors Association (IMCA, formerly AODC), the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) and the United Kingdom Offshore Operators Association (UKOOA) entered into a tri-partite Agreement to create a Dive Data Recording and Management System for offshore dives in the air range on the United Kingdom Continental Shelf (UKCS). The two companies of this system were: automatic Dive Data Recording Systems (DDRS) on dive support vessels, to log depth/time and other dive parameters; and a central Dive Data Management System (DDMS) to collate and analyse these data in an industry-wide database. This report summarises the progress of the project over the first two years of operation. It presents the data obtained in the period 1 January 1995 to 31 December 1996, in the form of industry-wide Standard Reports. It comments on the significance of the data, and it records the experience of the participants in implementing and maintaining the offshore Dive Data Recording Systems and the onshore central Dive Data Management System. A key success of the project has been to provide the air-range Diving Supervisor with an accurate, real-time display of the depth and time of every dive. This has enabled the dive and the associated decompression to be managed more effectively by the Supervisor. In the event of an incident, the recorded data are also available to the Dive/Safety Manager, who now has more complete information on which to assess the possible causes of the incident. (author)

  10. Shallow Water Diving - The NASA Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Daniel; Kelsey-Seybold

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews some of the problems and solutions that personnel have experienced during sessions in the Neutral Bu0yancy Lab (NBL). It reviews the standard dive that occurs at the NBL, Boyles and Henry's laws as they relate to the effects of diving. It then reviews in depth some of the major adverse physiologic events that happen during a diving session: Ear and Sinus Barotrauma, Decompression Sickness, (DCS), Pulmonary Barotrauma (i.e., Arterial Gas Embolism (AGE). Mediastinal Emphysema, Subcutaneous Emphysema, and Pneumothorax) Oxygen Toxicity and Hypothermia. It includes information about the pulmonary function in NBL divers. Also included is recommendations about flying after diving.

  11. [Otorhinolaryngologic aspects of diving sports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strutz, J

    1993-08-01

    ENT disorders are the most common of all medical problems of diving. This review summarizes the specific conditions and ENT diseases in Scuba diving. During compression failure to equalize the pressure of air-filled cavities surrounded by bone deprives the middle ear or sinuses of aeration. Middle ear barotrauma is the most common barotrauma encountered in divers while sinus barotrauma and especially inner ear barotrauma (with rupture of the round or oval window) are less common. Decompression sickness in primarily the result of inert gas bubbles; deafness and vertigo may result if the inner ear is involved. The ENT examination necessary for assessment of diving fitness focuses on the middle and inner ear as well as the nose, sinuses and larynx. A list of ENT contra-indications is presented that mandate temporary or permanent disqualification from diving.

  12. Neurological complications of underwater diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosińska, Justyna; Łukasik, Maria; Kozubski, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    The diver's nervous system is extremely sensitive to high ambient pressure, which is the sum of atmospheric and hydrostatic pressure. Neurological complications associated with diving are a difficult diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. They occur in both commercial and recreational diving and are connected with increasing interest in the sport of diving. Hence it is very important to know the possible complications associated with this kind of sport. Complications of the nervous system may result from decompression sickness, pulmonary barotrauma associated with cerebral arterial air embolism (AGE), otic and sinus barotrauma, high pressure neurological syndrome (HPNS) and undesirable effect of gases used for breathing. The purpose of this review is to discuss the range of neurological symptoms that can occur during diving accidents and also the role of patent foramen ovale (PFO) and internal carotid artery (ICA) dissection in pathogenesis of stroke in divers.

  13. Oral and maxillofacial aspects of diving medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Matthew T

    2004-02-01

    Sport diving has witnessed explosive growth in the past decade, as 8.5 million people are certified in the United States alone. Even though scuba diving is a relatively safe sport, there are serious risks that all divers must consider. Beyond the better-known sequelae such as decompression sickness, middle ear dysfunction, and potential central nervous system effects, scuba diving also carries inherent risk to the maxillofacial region. Atypical facial pain, temporomandibular joint dysfunction, sinus barotraumas, and barodontalgia have all been reported by dentists and physicians treating military, commercial, and sport divers. Additionally, clinicians must address anatomic concerns for would-be divers, including cleft lip and palate, edentulism, or patients with pre-existing temporomandibular dysfunction, midfacial trauma, or craniomaxillofacial surgery. Health care professionals should have a thorough understanding of the implications of scuba diving for consultation and recommendation regarding diving fitness and the treatment of adverse effects of scuba diving to the maxillofacial region.

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Breath-Hold Divers with Cerebral Decompression Sickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryu Matsuo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of cerebral decompression sickness (DCS is still unclear. We report 2 cases of breath-hold divers with cerebral DCS in whom magnetic resonance imaging (MRI demonstrated distinctive characteristics. One case presented right hemiparesthesia, diplopia, and gait disturbance after breath-hold diving into the sea at a depth of 20 m. Brain MRI with fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR sequence revealed multiple hyperintense lesions in the right frontal lobe, bilateral thalamus, pons, and right cerebellar hemisphere. The second case presented visual and gait disturbance after repetitive breath-hold diving into the sea. FLAIR imaging showed hyperintense areas in the bilateral occipito-parietal lobes. In both cases, diffusion-weighted imaging and apparent diffusion coefficient mapping revealed hyperintense areas in the lesions identified by FLAIR. Moreover, follow-up MRI showed attenuation of the FLAIR signal abnormalities. These findings are suggestive of transient hyperpermeability in the microvasculature as a possible cause of cerebral DCS.

  15. Recreational technical diving part 1: an introduction to technical diving methods and activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Simon J; Doolette, David J

    2013-06-01

    Technical divers use gases other than air and advanced equipment configurations to conduct dives that are deeper and/or longer than typical recreational air dives. The use of oxygen-nitrogen (nitrox) mixes with oxygen fractions higher than air results in longer no-decompression limits for shallow diving, and faster decompression from deeper dives. For depths beyond the air-diving range, technical divers mix helium, a light non-narcotic gas, with nitrogen and oxygen to produce 'trimix'. These blends are tailored to the depth of intended use with a fraction of oxygen calculated to produce an inspired oxygen partial pressure unlikely to cause cerebral oxygen toxicity and a nitrogen fraction calculated to produce a tolerable degree of nitrogen narcosis. A typical deep technical dive will involve the use of trimix at the target depth with changes to gases containing more oxygen and less inert gas during the decompression. Open-circuit scuba may be used to carry and utilise such gases, but this is very wasteful of expensive helium. There is increasing use of closed-circuit 'rebreather' devices. These recycle expired gas and potentially limit gas consumption to a small amount of inert gas to maintain the volume of the breathing circuit during descent and the amount of oxygen metabolised by the diver. This paper reviews the basic approach to planning and execution of dives using these methods to better inform physicians of the physical demands and risks.

  16. Diving birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clanet, Christophe; Masson, Lucien; McKinley, Gareth; Cohen, Robert; Ecole polytechnique Collaboration; MIT Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Many seabirds (gannets, pelicans, gulls, albatrosses) dive into water at high speeds (25 m/s) in order to capture underwater preys. Diving depths of 20 body lengths are reported in the literature. This value is much larger than the one achieved by men, which is of the order of 5. We study this difference by comparing the impact of slender vs bluff bodies. We show that, contrary to bluff bodies, the penetration depth of slender bodies presents a maximum value for a specific impact velocity that we connect to the velocity of diving birds.

  17. The research progress of diving medicine in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-qun FANG; Xiao-chen BAO; Ci LI; Miao MENG; Heng-rong YUAN; Jun MA; Yan WANG

    2012-01-01

    Diving medicine is one of the branches of military medicine,and plays an important role in naval development.This review introduces the progress of researches on undersea and hyperbaric physiology and medicine in the past few years in China.The article describes our research achievement in conventional diving and its medical support,researches on saturation diving and its medical support,submarine escape and its medical support,effects of hyperbaric environments and fast buoyancy ascent on immunological and cardiological functions.Diving disorders (including decompression sickness and oxygen toxicity) are also introduced.

  18. A forensic diving medicine examination of a highly publicised scuba diving fatality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, Carl

    2012-12-01

    A high-profile diving death occurred in 2003 at the site of the wreck of the SS Yongala off the Queensland coast. The victim's buddy, her husband, was accused of her murder and found guilty of manslaughter in an Australian court. A detailed analysis of all the evidence concerning this fatality suggests alternative medical reasons for her death. The value of decompression computers in determining the diving details and of CT scans in clarifying autopsy findings is demonstrated. The victim was medically, physically and psychologically unfit to undertake the fatal dive. She was inexperienced and inadequately supervised. She was over-weighted and exposed for the first time to difficult currents. The analysis of the dive demonstrates how important it is to consider the interaction of all factors and to not make deductions from individual items of information. It also highlights the importance of early liaison between expert divers, technicians, diving clinicians and pathologists, if inappropriate conclusions are to be avoided.

  19. Diving and pregnancy: what do we really know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conger, Jacqueline; Magann, Everett F

    2014-09-01

    Exercise during pregnancy has been advocated by many professional organizations to promote fetal heath and maternal well-being. Those same professional organizations do not recommend diving during pregnancy because of the potential adverse outcomes that have been observed in the animal model. In nonpregnant women, diving becomes problematic at depth as the ambient pressure increases and more gases become dissolved in the bloodstream. This can result in oxygen toxicity and nitrogen narcosis. Too rapid an ascent from depth can cause nitrogen emboli that can lodge in joints and tissue, resulting in decompression sickness, known as "the bends." The best animal model to study the effects of diving on pregnancy is the sheep model. Bubbling has been observed in both ewes and their fetuses, with bubbles more common in the ewes. Repeated decompressions done improperly can lead to fetal death. Information on pregnancy outcomes in humans is more limited, with inconsistent data on diving and birth defects, spontaneous abortions, and stillbirth. Even in the face of overall increased resistance in the maternal or fetal placental circulations, the total placental blood flow is usually maintained, preventing adverse outcomes. It appears that the safest choice during pregnancy is to avoid diving; however, if the woman dove when she did not know she was pregnant, there is usually a normal outcome. If a women insists on diving during pregnancy, she should go to a depth of only 60 ft, and duration of her dive should be half that recommended by Navy dive table times.

  20. Changes of cortisol and immunoglobulins in the saliva of naval divers during decompression of the 330 m saturation dive in the open sea%海上330 m饱和潜水减压期间潜水员唾液皮质醇与免疫球蛋白的变化趋势

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘晓波; 吴岩印; 孙擎; 唐艳超

    2016-01-01

    Objective To observe the change pattern of cortisol,IgA,IgG and IgMin the saliva of the naval divers during decompression of the 330 m saturation dive in the open sea,and also to explore the practicability of monitoring the stress level of divers under hyperbaric pressure by using the saliva indicators,so as to provide scientific evidence for the screening of stress-related indicators under hyperbaric environment. Methods During decompression of the 330 m saturation dive,saliva samples of the divers were collected at set time.The cortisol level was detected by using radioimmunoassay and IgA,IgG and IgM levels were monitored by using enzyme -linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA ).Results As compared with the baseline data [Cortisol:(117.0 ±35.4)μg/L],all the parameters including cortisol,IgA,IgG and IgM concentrations decreased at day 2 (at the initial decompression phase),and at day 8 (at the medium decompression stage)IgA concentration also decreased(129.5 ±114.8)μg/L].However,salivary cortisol concentration at other time points was higher than the baseline data,and salivary cortisol concentration at day 12 (207.7 ±85.9)μg/L] approached the significant level (t=3.014,P=0.057),and on day 13 [(208.1 ±15.4)μg/L]it reached significant level (t =8.424,P =0.014 ).Nevertheless,the levels of IgA,IgG and IgM failed to reach significant levels.Results indicated that the two salivary indicators were positively correlated.It was shown from the graph that various indicators decreased at the initial decompression stage at the early stage,and their levels remained relatively stable at medium decompression stage,while these levels increased slightly at the late stage of decompression.Conclusions Under hyperbaric environment,salivary cortisol could be used as a stress indicator and could provide scientific evidence for the intervention of stress during saturation diving.%目的:评估军事潜水员海上330 m饱和潜水实潜作业减压过程中唾液中皮质醇、IgA

  1. Diving behavior and fishing performance: the case of lobster artisanal fishermen of the Yucatan coast, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huchim-Lara, Oswaldo; Salas, Silvia; Chin, Walter; Montero, Jorge; Fraga, Julia

    2015-01-01

    An average of 209 cases of decompression sickness (DCS) have been reported every year among artisanal fishermen. divers of the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. DCS is a major problem among fishermen divers worldwide. This paper explores how diving behavior and fishing techniques among fishermen relate to the probability of experiencing DCS (Pdcs). Fieldwork was conducted in two communities during the 2012-2013 fishing season. Fishermen were classified into three groups (two per group) according to their fishing performance and followed during their journeys. Dive profiles were recorded using Sensus Ultra dive recorders (Reefet Inc.). Surveys were used to record fishing yields from cooperative and individual fishermen along with fishing techniques and dive behavior. 120 dives were recorded. Fishermen averaged three dives/day, with an average depth of 47 ± 2 feet of sea water (fsw) and an average total bottom time (TBT) of 95 ± 11 minutes. 24% of dives exceeded the 2008 U.S. Navy no-decompression limit. The average ascent rate was 20 fsw/minute, and 5% of those exceeded 40 fsw/minute. Inadequate decompression was observed in all fishermen. Fishermen are diving outside the safety limits of both military and recreational standards. Fishing techniques and dive behavior were important factors in Pdcs. Fishermen were reluctant to seek treatment, and symptoms were relieved with analgesics.

  2. Exhaled nitric oxide concentration and decompression-induced bubble formation: An index of decompression severity in humans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontier, J-M; Buzzacott, P; Nastorg, J; Dinh-Xuan, A T; Lambrechts, K

    2014-05-30

    Previous studies have highlighted a decreased exhaled nitric oxide concentration (FE NO) in divers after hyperbaric exposure in a dry chamber or following a wet dive. The underlying mechanisms of this decrease remain however unknown. The aim of this study was to quantify the separate effects of submersion, hyperbaric hyperoxia exposure and decompression-induced bubble formation on FE NO after a wet dive. Healthy experienced divers (n=31) were assigned to either (i) a group making a scuba-air dive (Air dive), (ii) a group with a shallow oxygen dive protocol (Oxygen dive) or (iii) a group making a deep dive breathing a trimix gas mixture (deep-dive). Bubble signals were graded with the KISS score. Before and after each dive FE NO values were measured using a hand-held electrochemical analyzer. There was no change in post-dive values of FE NO values (expressed in ppb=parts per billion) in the Air dive group (15.1 ± 3.6 ppb vs. 14.3 ± 4.7 ppb, n=9, p=0.32). There was a significant decrease in post-dive values of FE NO in the Oxygen dive group (15.6 ± 6 ppb vs. 11.7 ± 4.7 ppb, n=9, p=0.009). There was an even more pronounced decrease in the deep dive group (16.4 ± 6.6 ppb vs. 9.4 ± 3.5 ppb, n=13, p0 (n=13) and percentage decrease in post-dive FE NO values (r=-0.53, p=0.03). Submersion and hyperbaric hyperoxia exposure cannot account entirely for these results suggesting the possibility that, in combination, one effect magnifies the other. A main finding of the present study is a significant relationship between reduction in exhaled NO concentration and dive-induced bubble formation. We postulate that exhaled NO concentration could be a useful index of decompression severity in healthy human divers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of in-water oxygen prebreathing at different depths on decompression-induced bubble formation and platelet activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosco, Gerardo; Yang, Zhong-jin; Di Tano, Guglielmo; Camporesi, Enrico M; Faralli, Fabio; Savini, Fabio; Landolfi, Angelo; Doria, Christian; Fanò, Giorgio

    2010-05-01

    Effect of in-water oxygen prebreathing at different depths on decompression-induced bubble formation and platelet activation in scuba divers was evaluated. Six volunteers participated in four diving protocols, with 2 wk of recovery between dives. On dive 1, before diving, all divers breathed normally for 20 min at the surface of the sea (Air). On dive 2, before diving, all divers breathed 100% oxygen for 20 min at the surface of the sea [normobaric oxygenation (NBO)]. On dive 3, before diving, all divers breathed 100% O2 for 20 min at 6 m of seawater [msw; hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO) 1.6 atmospheres absolute (ATA)]. On dive 4, before diving, all divers breathed 100% O2 for 20 min at 12 msw (HBO 2.2 ATA). Then they dove to 30 msw (4 ATA) for 20 min breathing air from scuba. After each dive, blood samples were collected as soon as the divers surfaced. Bubbles were measured at 20 and 50 min after decompression and converted to bubble count estimate (BCE) and numeric bubble grade (NBG). BCE and NBG were significantly lower in NBO than in Air [0.142+/-0.034 vs. 0.191+/-0.066 (Pbubbles and platelet activation and, therefore, may be beneficial in reducing the development of decompression sickness.

  4. Polar Diving

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    3 July 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows layers exposed by erosion in a trough within the north polar residual cap of Mars, diving beneath a younger covering of polar materials. The layers have, since the Mariner 9 mission in 1972, been interpreted to be composed of a combination of dust and ice in unknown proportions. In this scene, a layer of solid carbon dioxide, which was deposited during the previous autumn and winter, blankets the trough as well as the adjacent terrain. Throughout northern spring, the carbon dioxide will be removed; by summer, the layers will be frost-free. Location near: 81.4oN, 352.2oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Spring

  5. Blood Oxygen Conservation in Diving Sea Lions: How Low Does Oxygen Really Go

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    diving physiology and the avoidance of decompression sickness in a marine mammal. Such a model is essential to better understand the potential role of...decompression sickness in the etiology of the stranding of beaked whales after exposure to naval sonar as well as to evaluate the value and accuracy...risk of decompression sickness and for the accuracy of the many numerical models of nitrogen uptake and distribution. None of the models incorporate

  6. On diver thermal status and susceptibility to decompression sickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerth, Wayne A

    2015-09-01

    In a recent Letter to the Editor, Clarke, et al, indicated that divers who deliberately chill themselves on a dive to reduce risk of decompression sickness (DCS) may be misinterpreting our 2007 Navy Experimental Diving Unit (NEDU) report. Indeed, we did not advocate that divers should risk hypothermia on bottom to reduce risk of DCS, nor do we dispute the authors' overall admonition to avoid diving cold unnecessarily. However, Clarke, et al, imply more generally that results of our study are not applicable to recreational or technical divers because the dives we tested were atypical of dives undertaken by such divers. We wish to clarify that our study does have implications for recreational and technical divers, implications that should not be ignored. The dives we tested were not intended to be typical of dives undertaken in any actual operational context. Instead, we chose to expose divers to temperatures at the extremes of their thermal tolerance in order to ensure that effects of diver thermal status on DCS susceptibility would be found if such effects existed. Our initial test dive profile provided appreciable time both on bottom and during decompression to allow any differential thermal effects during these two dive phases to manifest, while affording a baseline risk of DCS that could be altered by thermal effects without exposing subjects to inordinately high risks of DCS. Our results strongly indicate that the optimal diver thermal conditions for mitigation of DCS risk or minimization of decompression time entail remaining cool during gas uptake phases of a dive and warm during off-gassing phases. While the dose-response characteristics of our observed thermal effects are almost certainly non-linear in both exposure temperature and duration, it is only reasonable to presume that the effects vary monotonically with these factors. We have no reason to presume that such responses and effects under less extreme conditions would be in directions opposite to

  7. European EVA decompression sickness risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Lorenz; Wenzel, Jürgen; Skoog, A. I.; Luck, S.; Svensson, Bengt

    For the first manned flight of Hermes there will be a capability of performing EVA. The European EVA Space Suit will be an anthropomorphic system with an internal pressure of 500 hPa of pure oxygen. The pressure reduction from the Hermes cabin pressure of 1013 hPa will induce a risk for Decompression Sickness (DCS) for the EVA crewmember if no adequate protective procedures are implemented. Specific decompression procedures have to be developed. From a critical review of the literature and by using knowledge gained from research conducted in the past in the fields of diving and aerospace medicine safe protective procedures are proposed for the European EVA scenario. An R factor of 1.2 and a tissue half-time ( t1/2) of 360 minutes in a single-tissue model have been identified as appropriate operational values. On the basis of an acceptable risk level of approximately 1%, oxygen prebreathing times are proposed for (a) direct pressure reduction from 1013 hPa to a suit pressure of 500 hPa, and (b) staged decompression using a 700 hPa intermediate stage in the spacecraft cabin. In addition, factors which influence individual susceptibility to DCS are identified. Recommendations are also given in the areas of crew selection and medical monitoring requirements together with therapeutic measures that can be implemented in the Hermes scenario. A method for demonstration of the validity of proposed risks and procedures is proposed.

  8. 29 CFR 1910.423 - Post-dive procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Post-dive procedures. 1910.423 Section 1910.423 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... onset); and (ii) Description and results of treatment. (e) Decompression procedure assessment. The...

  9. Microbubbles are detected prior to larger bubbles following decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, J G; Wilbur, J C; Moodie, K L; Kane, S A; Knaus, D A; Phillips, S D; Beach, T L; Fellows, A M; Magari, P J; Buckey, J C

    2014-04-01

    Using dual-frequency ultrasound (DFU), microbubbles (multiple sites, 2) appear in the presence and absence of bmdVGE, and 3) occur before bmdVGE. This supports the hypothesis that microbubbles precede larger VGE bubbles. Microbubble presence may be an early marker of decompression stress. Since DFU is a low-power ultrasonic method, it may be useful for operational diving applications.

  10. CERN Scuba Diving Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Club Subaquatique du CERN

    2017-01-01

    Interested in scuba diving? Fancy a fun trial dive? Like every year, the CERN Scuba Diving Club is organizing two free trial dive sessions. Where? Varembé Swimming Pool, Avenue Giuseppe Motta 46, 1202 Genève When? 25th October and 1st November at 19:15 (one session per participant) Price? Trial dives are FREE! Swimming pool entrance 5,40 CHF. What to bring? Swimwear, towel, shower necessities and a padlock – diving equipment will be provided by the CSC. For more information and to subscribe, follow the link below: http://cern.ch/csc-baptemes-2017 Looking forward to meeting you!

  11. Effect of oxygen breathing and perfluorocarbon emulsion treatment on air bubbles in adipose tissue during decompression sickness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Randsoe, T; Hyldegaard, O

    2009-01-01

    Decompression sickness (DCS) after air diving has been treated with success by means of combined normobaric oxygen breathing and intravascular perfluorocarbon (PFC) emulsions causing increased survival rate and faster bubble clearance from the intravascular compartment. The beneficial PFC effect...

  12. Fatal diving accidents in western Norway 1983-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramnefjell, M P; Morild, I; Mørk, S J; Lilleng, P K

    2012-11-30

    Despite efforts to reduce their number, fatal diving accidents still occur. The circumstances and post-mortem findings in 40 fatal diving accidents in western Norway from 1983 through 2007 were investigated. Diving experience, medical history and toxicology reports were retrieved. The material consisted of recreational divers, professional saturation divers and professional divers without experience with saturation. In 33 cases the diving equipment was examined as part of the forensic investigation. In 27 cases defects in the diving equipment were found. For six divers such defects were responsible for the fatal accidents. Eighteen divers died on the surface or less than 10 m below surface. Five divers reached below 100 msw, and two of them died at this depth. The fatalities were not season-dependent. However, wave-height and strength of currents were influential factors in some cases. Twelve divers were diving alone. Twenty divers had one buddy, 9 of these divers were alone at the time of death. The cause of death was drowning in 31 out of 40 divers; one of them had a high blood-ethanol concentration, in two other divers ethanol was found in the urine, indicating previous ethanol consumption. Nine divers died from sudden decompression, pulmonary barotraumas, underwater trauma and natural causes. The study shows that most of the fatal diving accidents could be avoided if adequate diving safety procedures had been followed.

  13. Travelers' Health: Scuba Diving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2 - Environmental Hazards Chapter 2 - Medical Tourism Scuba Diving Daniel A. Nord Published estimates report anywhere from ... may include an electrocardiogram and exercise treadmill test. DIVING DISORDERS Barotrauma Ear and sinus Ear barotrauma is ...

  14. A critical review of physiological bubble formation in hyperbaric decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulou, Virginie; Eckersley, Robert J; Balestra, Costantino; Karapantsios, Thodoris D; Tang, Meng-Xing

    2013-05-01

    Bubbles are known to form in the body after scuba dives, even those done well within the decompression model limits. These can sometimes trigger decompression sickness and the dive protocols should therefore aim to limit bubble formation and growth from hyperbaric decompression. Understanding these processes physiologically has been a challenge for decades and there are a number of questions still unanswered. The physics and historical background of this field of study is presented and the latest studies and current developments reviewed. Heterogeneous nucleation is shown to remain the prime candidate for bubble formation in this context. The two main theories to account for micronuclei stability are then to consider hydrophobicity of surfaces or tissue elasticity, both of which could also explain some physiological observations. Finally the modeling relevance of the bubble formation process is discussed, together with that of bubble growth as well as multiple bubble behavior.

  15. The probability and severity of decompression sickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howle, Laurens E; Weber, Paul W; Hada, Ethan A; Vann, Richard D; Denoble, Petar J

    2017-01-01

    Decompression sickness (DCS), which is caused by inert gas bubbles in tissues, is an injury of concern for scuba divers, compressed air workers, astronauts, and aviators. Case reports for 3322 air and N2-O2 dives, resulting in 190 DCS events, were retrospectively analyzed and the outcomes were scored as (1) serious neurological, (2) cardiopulmonary, (3) mild neurological, (4) pain, (5) lymphatic or skin, and (6) constitutional or nonspecific manifestations. Following standard U.S. Navy medical definitions, the data were grouped into mild-Type I (manifestations 4-6)-and serious-Type II (manifestations 1-3). Additionally, we considered an alternative grouping of mild-Type A (manifestations 3-6)-and serious-Type B (manifestations 1 and 2). The current U.S. Navy guidance allows for a 2% probability of mild DCS and a 0.1% probability of serious DCS. We developed a hierarchical trinomial (3-state) probabilistic DCS model that simultaneously predicts the probability of mild and serious DCS given a dive exposure. Both the Type I/II and Type A/B discriminations of mild and serious DCS resulted in a highly significant (p probability of 'mild' DCS resulted in a longer allowable bottom time for the same 2% limit. However, for the 0.1% serious DCS limit, we found a vastly decreased allowable bottom dive time for all dive depths. If the Type A/B scoring was assigned to outcome severity, the no decompression limits (NDL) for air dives were still controlled by the acceptable serious DCS risk limit rather than the acceptable mild DCS risk limit. However, in this case, longer NDL limits were allowed than with the Type I/II scoring. The trinomial model mild and serious probabilities agree reasonably well with the current air NDL only with the Type A/B scoring and when 0.2% risk of serious DCS is allowed.

  16. Endothelial function and cardiovascular stress markers after a single dive in aging rats (ApoE knockout rats)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berenji Ardestani, Simin; Pedersen, Michael

    Diving exposes body to a variety of stressors during the dive itself, and gas bubbles that develop during the decompression (ascent) phase. The compressed gas breath augments partial pressure of oxygen (PO2) causing the oxygen concentration of the blood to increase above normal (hyperoxia) likely...

  17. Diving injuries to the inner ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, J C

    1977-01-01

    Most of the previous literature concerning otologic problems in compressed gas environments has emphasized middle ear barotrauma. With recent increases in commercial, military, and sport diving to deeper depths, inner ear disturbances during these exposures have been noted more frequently. Studies of inner ear physiology and pathology during diving indicate that the causes and treatment of these problems differ depending upon the phase and type of diving. Humans exposed to simulated depths of up to 305 meters without barotrauma or decompression sickness develop transient, conductive hearing losses with no audiometric evidence of cochlear dysfunction. Transient vertigo and nystagmus during diving have been noted with caloric stimulation, resulting from the unequal entry of cold water into the external auditory canals, and with asymmetric middle ear pressure equilibration during ascent and descent (alternobaric vertigo). Equilibrium disturbances noted with nitrogen narcosis, oxygen toxicity, hypercarbia, or hypoxia appear primarily related to the effects of these conditions upon the central nervous system and not to specific vestibular end-organ dysfunction. Compression of humans in helium-oxygen at depths greater than 152.4 meters results in transient symptoms of tremor, dizziness, and nausea plus decrements in postural equilibrium and psychomotor performance, the high pressure nervous syndrome. Vestibular function studies during these conditions indicate that these problems are due to central dysfunction and not to vestibular end-organ dysfunction. Persistent inner ear injuries have been noted during several phases of diving: 1) Such injuries during compression (inner ear barotrauma) have been related to round window ruptures occurring with straining, or a Valsalva's maneuver during inadequate middle ear pressure equilibration. Divers who develop cochlear and/or vestibular symptoms during shallow diving in which decompression sickness is unlikely or during

  18. Enriched Air Nitrox Breathing Reduces Venous Gas Bubbles after Simulated SCUBA Diving: A Double-Blind Cross-Over Randomized Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Souday

    Full Text Available To test the hypothesis whether enriched air nitrox (EAN breathing during simulated diving reduces decompression stress when compared to compressed air breathing as assessed by intravascular bubble formation after decompression.Human volunteers underwent a first simulated dive breathing compressed air to include subjects prone to post-decompression venous gas bubbling. Twelve subjects prone to bubbling underwent a double-blind, randomized, cross-over trial including one simulated dive breathing compressed air, and one dive breathing EAN (36% O2 in a hyperbaric chamber, with identical diving profiles (28 msw for 55 minutes. Intravascular bubble formation was assessed after decompression using pulmonary artery pulsed Doppler.Twelve subjects showing high bubble production were included for the cross-over trial, and all completed the experimental protocol. In the randomized protocol, EAN significantly reduced the bubble score at all time points (cumulative bubble scores: 1 [0-3.5] vs. 8 [4.5-10]; P < 0.001. Three decompression incidents, all presenting as cutaneous itching, occurred in the air versus zero in the EAN group (P = 0.217. Weak correlations were observed between bubble scores and age or body mass index, respectively.EAN breathing markedly reduces venous gas bubble emboli after decompression in volunteers selected for susceptibility for intravascular bubble formation. When using similar diving profiles and avoiding oxygen toxicity limits, EAN increases safety of diving as compared to compressed air breathing.ISRCTN 31681480.

  19. Risk of Neurological Insult in Competitive Deep Breath-Hold Diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetzlaff, Kay; Schöppenthau, Holger; Schipke, Jochen D

    2017-02-01

    It has been widely believed that tissue nitrogen uptake from the lungs during breath-hold diving would be insufficient to cause decompression stress in humans. With competitive free diving, however, diving depths have been ever increasing over the past decades. A case is presented of a competitive free-diving athlete who suffered stroke-like symptoms after surfacing from his last dive of a series of 3 deep breath-hold dives. A literature and Web search was performed to screen for similar cases of subjects with serious neurological symptoms after deep breath-hold dives. A previously healthy 31-y-old athlete experienced right-sided motor weakness and difficulty speaking immediately after surfacing from a breathhold dive to a depth of 100 m. He had performed 2 preceding breath-hold dives to that depth with surface intervals of only 15 min. The presentation of symptoms and neuroimaging findings supported a clinical diagnosis of stroke. Three more cases of neurological insults were retrieved by literature and Web search; in all cases the athletes presented with stroke-like symptoms after single breath-hold dives of depths exceeding 100 m. Two of these cases only had a short delay to recompression treatment and completely recovered from the insult. This report highlights the possibility of neurological insult, eg, stroke, due to cerebral arterial gas embolism as a consequence of decompression stress after deep breath-hold dives. Thus, stroke as a clinical presentation of cerebral arterial gas embolism should be considered another risk of extreme breath-hold diving.

  20. Decompression sickness ('the bends') in sea turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Párraga, D; Crespo-Picazo, J L; de Quirós, Y Bernaldo; Cervera, V; Martí-Bonmati, L; Díaz-Delgado, J; Arbelo, M; Moore, M J; Jepson, P D; Fernández, Antonio

    2014-10-16

    Decompression sickness (DCS), as clinically diagnosed by reversal of symptoms with recompression, has never been reported in aquatic breath-hold diving vertebrates despite the occurrence of tissue gas tensions sufficient for bubble formation and injury in terrestrial animals. Similarly to diving mammals, sea turtles manage gas exchange and decompression through anatomical, physiological, and behavioral adaptations. In the former group, DCS-like lesions have been observed on necropsies following behavioral disturbance such as high-powered acoustic sources (e.g. active sonar) and in bycaught animals. In sea turtles, in spite of abundant literature on diving physiology and bycatch interference, this is the first report of DCS-like symptoms and lesions. We diagnosed a clinico-pathological condition consistent with DCS in 29 gas-embolized loggerhead sea turtles Caretta caretta from a sample of 67. Fifty-nine were recovered alive and 8 had recently died following bycatch in trawls and gillnets of local fisheries from the east coast of Spain. Gas embolization and distribution in vital organs were evaluated through conventional radiography, computed tomography, and ultrasound. Additionally, positive response following repressurization was clinically observed in 2 live affected turtles. Gas embolism was also observed postmortem in carcasses and tissues as described in cetaceans and human divers. Compositional gas analysis of intravascular bubbles was consistent with DCS. Definitive diagnosis of DCS in sea turtles opens a new era for research in sea turtle diving physiology, conservation, and bycatch impact mitigation, as well as for comparative studies in other air-breathing marine vertebrates and human divers.

  1. Sports-related lung injury during breath-hold diving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Mijacika

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The number of people practising recreational breath-hold diving is constantly growing, thereby increasing the need for knowledge of the acute and chronic effects such a sport could have on the health of participants. Breath-hold diving is potentially dangerous, mainly because of associated extreme environmental factors such as increased hydrostatic pressure, hypoxia, hypercapnia, hypothermia and strenuous exercise. In this article we focus on the effects of breath-hold diving on pulmonary function. Respiratory symptoms have been reported in almost 25% of breath-hold divers after repetitive diving sessions. Acutely, repetitive breath-hold diving may result in increased transpulmonary capillary pressure, leading to noncardiogenic oedema and/or alveolar haemorrhage. Furthermore, during a breath-hold dive, the chest and lungs are compressed by the increasing pressure of water. Rapid changes in lung air volume during descent or ascent can result in a lung injury known as pulmonary barotrauma. Factors that may influence individual susceptibility to breath-hold diving-induced lung injury range from underlying pulmonary or cardiac dysfunction to genetic predisposition. According to the available data, breath-holding does not result in chronic lung injury. However, studies of large populations of breath-hold divers are necessary to firmly exclude long-term lung damage.

  2. Sports-related lung injury during breath-hold diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijacika, Tanja; Dujic, Zeljko

    2016-12-01

    The number of people practising recreational breath-hold diving is constantly growing, thereby increasing the need for knowledge of the acute and chronic effects such a sport could have on the health of participants. Breath-hold diving is potentially dangerous, mainly because of associated extreme environmental factors such as increased hydrostatic pressure, hypoxia, hypercapnia, hypothermia and strenuous exercise.In this article we focus on the effects of breath-hold diving on pulmonary function. Respiratory symptoms have been reported in almost 25% of breath-hold divers after repetitive diving sessions. Acutely, repetitive breath-hold diving may result in increased transpulmonary capillary pressure, leading to noncardiogenic oedema and/or alveolar haemorrhage. Furthermore, during a breath-hold dive, the chest and lungs are compressed by the increasing pressure of water. Rapid changes in lung air volume during descent or ascent can result in a lung injury known as pulmonary barotrauma. Factors that may influence individual susceptibility to breath-hold diving-induced lung injury range from underlying pulmonary or cardiac dysfunction to genetic predisposition.According to the available data, breath-holding does not result in chronic lung injury. However, studies of large populations of breath-hold divers are necessary to firmly exclude long-term lung damage.

  3. Seal Lungs Collapse during Free Diving: Evidence from Arterial Nitrogen Tensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falke, Konrad J.; Hill, Roger D.; Qvist, Jesper; Schneider, Robert C.; Guppy, Michael; Liggins, Graham C.; Hochachka, Peter W.; Elliott, Richard E.; Zapol, Warren M.

    1985-08-01

    Arterial blood nitrogen tensions of free-diving Weddell seals (Leptonychotes weddelli) were measured by attaching a microprocessor-controlled blood pump and drawing samples at depth to determine how these marine mammals dive to great depths and ascend rapidly without developing decompression sickness. Forty-seven samples of arterial blood were obtained from four Weddell seals during free dives lasting up to 23 minutes to depths of 230 meters beneath the sea ice of McMurdo Sound, Antarctica. Peak arterial blood nitrogen tensions of between 2000 and 2500 millimeters of mercury were recorded at depths of 40 to 80 meters during descent, indicating that the seal's lung collapses by 25 to 50 meters. Then arterial blood nitrogen tensions slowly decreased to about 1500 millimeters of mercury at the surface. In a single dive, alveolar collapse and redistribution of blood nitrogen allow the seal to avoid nitrogen narcosis and decompression sickness.

  4. Diving under a microscope--a new simple and versatile in vitro diving device for fluorescence and confocal microscopy allowing the controls of hydrostatic pressure, gas pressures, and kinetics of gas saturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiong; Belhomme, Marc; Guerrero, François; Mazur, Aleksandra; Lambrechts, Kate; Theron, Michaël

    2013-06-01

    How underwater diving effects the function of the arterial wall and the activities of endothelial cells is the focus of recent studies on decompression sickness. Here we describe an in vitro diving system constructed to achieve real-time monitoring of cell activity during simulated dives under fluorescent microscopy and confocal microscopy. A 1-mL chamber with sapphire windows on both sides and located on the stage of an inverted microscope was built to allow in vitro diving simulation of isolated cells or arteries in which activities during diving are monitored in real-time via fluorescent microscopy and confocal microscopy. Speed of compression and decompression can range from 20 to 2000 kPa/min, allowing systemic pressure to range up to 6500 kPa. Diving temperature is controlled at 37°C. During air dive simulation oxygen partial pressure is optically monitored. Perfusion speed can range from 0.05 to 10 mL/min. The system can support physiological viability of in vitro samples for real-time monitoring of cellular activity during diving. It allows regulations of pressure, speeds of compression and decompression, temperature, gas saturation, and perfusion speed. It will be a valuable tool for hyperbaric research.

  5. Diving accidents treated at a military hospital-based recompression chamber facility in Peninsular Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozali, A; Khairuddin, H; Sherina, M S; Halim, M Abd; Zin, B Mohd; Sulaiman, A

    2008-06-01

    This paper describes the pattern of diving accidents treated in a military hospital-based recompression chamber facility in Peninsular Malaysia. A retrospective study was carried out to utilize secondary data from the respective hospital medical records from 1st January 1996 to 31st December 2004. A total of 179 cases categorized as diving accidents received treatment with an average of 20 cases per year. Out of 179 cases, 96.3% (n = 173) received recompression treatment. Majority were males (93.3%), civilians (87.2%) and non-Malaysian citizens (59.2%). Commercial diving activities contributed the highest percentage of diving accidents (48.0%), followed by recreational (39.2%) and military (12.8%). Diving accidents due to commercial diving (n = 86) were mainly contributed by underwater logging activities (87.2%). The most common cases sustained were decompression illness (DCI) (96.1%). Underwater logging and recreational diving activities which contribute to a significant number of diving accidents must be closely monitored. Notification, centralised data registration, medical surveillance as well as legislations related to diving activities in Malaysia are essential to ensure adequate monitoring of diving accidents in the future.

  6. Exercise and nitric oxide prevent bubble formation: a novel approach to the prevention of decompression sickness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisløff, Ulrik; Richardson, Russell S; Brubakk, Alf O

    2004-03-16

    Nitrogen dissolves in the blood during dives, but comes out of solution if divers return to normal pressure too rapidly. Nitrogen bubbles cause a range of effects from skin rashes to seizures, coma and death. It is believed that these bubbles form from bubble precursors (gas nuclei). Recently we have shown that a single bout of exercise 20 h, but not 48 h, before a simulated dive prevents bubble formation and protects rats from severe decompression sickness (DCS) and death. Furthermore, we demonstrated that administration of N(omega)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, a non-selective inhibitor of NO synthase (NOS), turns a dive from safe to unsafe in sedentary but not exercised rats. Therefore based upon previous data an attractive hypothesis is that it may be possible to use either exercise or NO-releasing agents before a dive to inhibit bubble formation and thus protect against DCS. Consequently, the aims of the present study were to determine whether protection against bubble formation in 'diving' rats was provided by (1) chronic and acute administration of a NO-releasing agent and (2) exercise less than 20 h prior to the dive. NO given for 5 days and then 20 h prior to a dive to 700 kPa lasting 45 min breathing air significantly reduced bubble formation and prevented death. The same effect was seen if NO was given only 30 min before the dive. Exercise 20 h before a dive suppressed bubble formation and prevented death, with no effect at any other time (48, 10, 5 and 0.5 h prior to the dive). Pre-dive activities have not been considered to influence the growth of bubbles and thus the risk of serious DCS. The present novel findings of a protective effect against bubble formation and death by appropriately timed exercise and an NO-releasing agent may form the basis of a new approach to preventing serious decompression sickness.

  7. Energy cost and optimisation in breath-hold diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trassinelli, M

    2016-05-07

    diminished by reducing the volume of gas-filled body parts in divers close to neutral buoyancy. This provides a possible additional explanation for the observed exhalation of air before diving in phocid seals to minimise dive energy cost. Until now the only explanation for this phenomenon has been a reduction in the risk of decompression sickness.

  8. High altitude dives from 7000 to 14,200 feet in the Himalayas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahni, T K; John, M J; Dhall, A; Chatterjee, A K

    1991-07-01

    Indian Navy divers carried out no-decompression dives at altitudes of 7000 to 14,200 ft (2134-4328 m) in the Nilgiris and Himalayas from May to July 1988. Seventy-eight dives on air and 22 dives on oxygen were carried out at various altitudes. The final dives were at Lake Pangong Tso (4328 m) in Ladakh, Himalayas, to a maximum of 140 feet of sea water (fsw) [42.6 meters of sea water (msw)] equivalent ocean depth in minimum water temperature of 2 degrees C. Oxygen diving at 14,200 ft (4328 m) was not successful. Aspects considered were altitude adaptation, diminished air pressure diving, hypothermia, and remote area survival. Depths at altitude were converted to depths at sea level and were applied to the Royal Navy air tables. Altitude-related manifestations, hypoxia, hypothermia, suspected oxygen toxicity, and equipment failure were observed. It is concluded that stress is due to effects of altitude and cold on man and equipment, as well as changes in diving procedures when diving at high altitudes. Equivalent air depths when applied to Royal Navy tables could be considered a safe method for diving at altitudes.

  9. Diving pattern and work schedule of construction well divers in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, K L; Lee, H C; Huang, G B; Lin, T F; Niu, K C; Liou, S H; Lin, Y C

    1998-01-01

    Construction well divers in Taiwan reportedly suffer a high prevalence of dysbaric osteonecrosis. We studied five divers working at the same construction site. We recorded their diving methods, diving depths, bottom times, work patterns, water temperatures, and heart rates. We also monitored gas bubbles in the subclavian vein in selected dives. A crude but effective hot-water system protected divers against hypothermia and allowed them to work in 24 degrees-27 degrees C water. Divers worked approximately 6.6 h a day and progressed approximately 3.0 m a day while excavating an average of 148 buckets of sand and rock each weighing 49.5 kg. The divers sustained a heart rate increase of 49%. Sixty percent of their equivalent single dive bottom times exceeded the U.S. Navy's no-decompression limits. Two cases of venous bubbles were detected, and one of these divers showed symptoms of decompression sickness. The prolonged bottom time and lack of a decompression schedule probably contributed to a risk of decompression sickness and dysbaric osteonecrosis.

  10. Effect of nitric oxide on spinal evoked potentials and survival rate in rats with decompression sickness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Randsøe, Thomas; Meehan, Claire Francesca; Broholm, Helle

    2015-01-01

    evaluated by means of spinal evoked potentials (SEPs). Anesthetized rats were decompressed from a 1-h hyperbaric air dive at 506.6 kPa (40 m of seawater) for 3 min and 17 s, and spinal cord conduction was studied by measurements of SEPs. Histological samples of the spinal cord were analyzed for lesions...

  11. Diving fatality investigations: recent changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, Carl; Caruso, James

    2014-06-01

    Modifications to the investigation procedures in diving fatalities have been incorporated into the data acquisition by diving accident investigators. The most germane proposal for investigators assessing diving fatalities is to delay the drawing of conclusions until all relevant diving information is known. This includes: the accumulation and integration of the pathological data; the access to dive computer information; re-enactments of diving incidents; post-mortem CT scans and the interpretation of intravascular and tissue gas detected. These are all discussed, with reference to the established literature and recent publications.

  12. Allometric scaling of decompression sickness risk in terrestrial mammals; cardiac output explains risk of decompression sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahlman, Andreas

    2017-02-01

    A probabilistic model was used to predict decompression sickness (DCS) outcome in pig (70 and 20 kg), hamster (100 g), rat (220 g) and mouse (20 g) following air saturation dives. The data set included 179 pig, 200 hamster, 360 rat, and 224 mouse exposures to saturation pressures ranging from 1.9–15.2 ATA and with varying decompression rates (0.9–156 ATA • min‑1). Single exponential kinetics described the tissue partial pressures (Ptiss) of N2: Ptiss =  ∫(Pamb – Ptiss) • τ‑1 dt, where Pamb is ambient N2 pressure and τ is a time constant. The probability of DCS [P(DCS)] was predicted from the risk function: P(DCS) = 1‑e‑r, where r = ∫(PtissN2 ‑ Thr ‑ Pamb) • Pamb–1 dt, and Thr is a threshold parameter. An equation that scaled τ with body mass included a constant (c) and an allometric scaling parameter (n), and the best model included n, Thr, and two c. The final model provided accurate predictions for 58 out of 61 dive profiles for pig, hamster, rat, and mouse. Thus, body mass helped improve the prediction of DCS risk in four mammalian species over a body mass range covering 3 orders of magnitude.

  13. 46 CFR 197.430 - SCUBA diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false SCUBA diving. 197.430 Section 197.430 Shipping COAST... GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Specific Diving Mode Procedures § 197.430 SCUBA diving. The diving supervisor shall insure that— (a) SCUBA diving is not conducted— (1) Outside the...

  14. 46 CFR 197.460 - Diving equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Diving equipment. 197.460 Section 197.460 Shipping COAST... GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Periodic Tests and Inspections of Diving Equipment § 197.460 Diving equipment. The diving supervisor shall insure that the diving equipment designated for...

  15. Endoscopic Intermetatarsal Ligament Decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-12-01

    Morton neuroma is an entrapment of the intermetatarsal nerve by the deep intermetatarsal ligament. It is usually treated conservatively. Surgery is considered if there is recalcitrant pain that is resistant to conservative treatment. The surgical options include resection of the neuroma or decompression of the involved nerve. Decompression of the nerve by release of the intermetatarsal ligament can be performed by either an open or minimally invasive approach. We describe 2-portal endoscopic decompression of the intermetatarsal nerve. The ligament is released by a retrograde knife through the toe-web portal under arthroscopic guidance through the plantar portal.

  16. Diving Medicine: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Paroxysmal Supraventricular Tachycardia(PSVT) Patent Foramen Ovale (PFO) Raynaud's Syndrome or Phenomenon Vasovagal and Carotid Sinus Syncopes DAN ... Implants and Diving Loss of Sight After HBO Treatment Macular Degeneration DAN discusses diving with this leading ...

  17. Decompressive craniotomy or craniectomy?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-09-22

    Sep 22, 2012 ... Materials and Methods: Review of all cases of bony decompression done at the Memfys .... ICH=Intracerebral hemorrhage, ASDH=Acute subdural hematoma, EDH=Extradural .... ischaemic strokes: Swiss recommendations.

  18. How man-made interference might cause gas bubble emboli in deep diving whales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas eFahlman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent cetacean mass strandings in close temporal and spatial association with sonar activity has raised the concern that anthropogenic sound may harm breath-hold diving marine mammals. Necropsy results of the stranded whales have shown evidence of bubbles in the tissues, similar to those in human divers suffering from decompression sickness (DCS. It has been proposed that changes in behavior or physiological responses during diving could increase tissue and blood N2 levels, thereby increasing DCS risk. Dive data recorded from sperm, killer, long-finned pilot, Blainville’s beaked and Cuvier’s beaked whales before and during exposure to low- (1-2 kHz and mid- (2-7 kHz frequency active sonar were used to estimate the changes in blood and tissue N2 tension (PN2. Our objectives were to determine if differences in 1 dive behavior or 2 physiological responses to sonar are plausible risk factors for bubble formation. The theoretical estimates indicate that all species may experience high N2 levels. However, unexpectedly, deep diving generally result in higher end-dive PN2 as compared with shallow diving. In this focused review we focus on three possible explanations: 1 We revisit an old hypothesis that CO2, because of its much higher diffusivity, form bubble precursors that continue to grow in N2 supersaturated tissues. Such a mechanism would be less dependent on the alveolar collapse depth but affected by elevated levels of CO2 following a burst of activity during sonar exposure. 2 During deep dives, a greater duration of time might be spent at depths where gas exchange continues as compared with shallow dives. The resulting elevated levels of N2 in deep diving whales might also make them more susceptible to anthropogenic disturbances. 3 Extended duration of dives even at depths beyond where the alveoli collapse could result in slow continuous accumulation of N2 in the adipose tissues that eventually becomes a liability.

  19. Endoscopic Intermetatarsal Ligament Decompression

    OpenAIRE

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-01-01

    Morton neuroma is an entrapment of the intermetatarsal nerve by the deep intermetatarsal ligament. It is usually treated conservatively. Surgery is considered if there is recalcitrant pain that is resistant to conservative treatment. The surgical options include resection of the neuroma or decompression of the involved nerve. Decompression of the nerve by release of the intermetatarsal ligament can be performed by either an open or minimally invasive approach. We describe 2-portal endoscopic ...

  20. Statistically Based Decompression Tables. II. Equal Risk Air Diving Decompression Schedules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-03-01

    Pamb PtisA by monoexponential, time constant = TA r4B = AB ( Ptis B - Pamb - PTHR ) / Pamb PtisB by monoexponential, time constant = TB 5 parameters: AA...TA, AB, TB, PTHR [31 2 ***% *.. .. t . .- .- -’ ." .J i.. - . * " -. i- , * * *.. .- .- V . . , ,.., ., W. ..%. The sense of PTHR is an absolutely

  1. Persistence of critical flicker fusion frequency impairment after a 33 mfw SCUBA dive: evidence of prolonged nitrogen narcosis?

    OpenAIRE

    Balestra, Costantino; Lafère, Pierre; Germonpré, Peter

    2012-01-01

    One of the possible risks incurred while diving is inert gas narcosis (IGN), yet its mechanism of action remains a matter of controversy. Although providing insights in the basic mechanisms of IGN, research has been primarily limited to animal studies. A human study, in real diving conditions, was needed. Twenty volunteers within strict biometrical criteria (male, age 30-40 years, BMI 20-23, non smoker) were selected. They performed a no-decompression dive to a depth of 33 mfw for 20 min and ...

  2. Protective effects of fluoxetine on decompression sickness in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Eric Blatteau

    Full Text Available Massive bubble formation after diving can lead to decompression sickness (DCS that can result in central nervous system disorders or even death. Bubbles alter the vascular endothelium and activate blood cells and inflammatory pathways, leading to a systemic pathophysiological process that promotes ischemic damage. Fluoxetine, a well-known antidepressant, is recognized as having anti-inflammatory properties at the systemic level, as well as in the setting of cerebral ischemia. We report a beneficial clinical effect associated with fluoxetine in experimental DCS. 91 mice were subjected to a simulated dive at 90 msw for 45 min before rapid decompression. The experimental group received 50 mg/kg of fluoxetine 18 hours before hyperbaric exposure (n = 46 while controls were not treated (n = 45. Clinical assessment took place over a period of 30 min after surfacing. At the end, blood samples were collected for blood cells counts and cytokine IL-6 detection. There were significantly fewer manifestations of DCS in the fluoxetine group than in the controls (43.5% versus 75.5%, respectively; p = 0.004. Survivors showed a better and significant neurological recovery with fluoxetine. Platelets and red cells were significantly decreased after decompression in controls but not in the treated mice. Fluoxetine reduced circulating IL-6, a relevant marker of systemic inflammation in DCS. We concluded that fluoxetine decreased the incidence of DCS and improved motor recovery, by limiting inflammation processes.

  3. Diving Into History

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Three divers have made history at the 13th FINA World Championships held in Rome on July 17-August 2. Guo Jingjing, the Chinese diving queen who clinched the gold in the women’s 3-meter springboard on July 21, became the first

  4. ASSESSMENT OF PLUME DIVING

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation presents an assessment of plume diving. Observations included: vertical plume delineation at East Patchogue, NY showed BTEX and MTBE plumes sinking on either side of a gravel pit; Lake Druid TCE plume sank beneath unlined drainage ditch; and aquifer recharge/dis...

  5. Toppling Techniques in Diving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Barry D.

    1977-01-01

    This paper demonstrates that in a toppling dive (1) a 1:1 ratio exists between the rotational speed of the diver immediately before and after the take-off and (2) the take-off angle as defined by Page is approximately 50 percent. (Author)

  6. Early genetic responses in rat vascular tissue after simulated diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eftedal, Ingrid; Jørgensen, Arve; Røsbjørgen, Ragnhild; Flatberg, Arnar; Brubakk, Alf O

    2012-12-18

    Diving causes a transient reduction of vascular function, but the mechanisms behind this are largely unknown. The aim of this study was therefore to analyze genetic reactions that may be involved in acute changes of vascular function in divers. Rats were exposed to 709 kPa of hyperbaric air (149 kPa Po(2)) for 50 min followed by postdive monitoring of vascular bubble formation and full genome microarray analysis of the aorta from diving rats (n = 8) and unexposed controls (n = 9). Upregulation of 23 genes was observed 1 h after simulated diving. The differential gene expression was characteristic of cellular responses to oxidative stress, with functions of upregulated genes including activation and fine-tuning of stress-responsive transcription, cytokine/cytokine receptor signaling, molecular chaperoning, and coagulation. By qRT-PCR, we verified increased transcription of neuron-derived orphan receptor-1 (Nr4a3), plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (Serpine1), cytokine TWEAK receptor FN14 (Tnfrsf12a), transcription factor class E basic helix-loop-helix protein 40 (Bhlhe40), and adrenomedullin (Adm). Hypoxia-inducible transcription factor HIF1 subunit HIF1-α was stabilized in the aorta 1 h after diving, and after 4 h there was a fivefold increase in total protein levels of the procoagulant plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI1) in blood plasma from diving rats. The study did not have sufficient power for individual assessment of effects of hyperoxia and decompression-induced bubbles on postdive gene expression. However, differential gene expression in rats without venous bubbles was similar to that of all the diving rats, indicating that elevated Po(2) instigated the observed genetic reactions.

  7. Could beaked whales get the bends? Effect of diving behaviour and physiology on modelled gas exchange for three species: Ziphius cavirostris, Mesoplodon densirostris and Hyperoodon ampullatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, Sascha K; Baird, Robin W; Fahlman, Andreas

    2009-07-31

    A mathematical model, based on current knowledge of gas exchange and physiology of marine mammals, was used to predict blood and tissue tension N2 (P(N2)) using field data from three beaked whale species: northern bottlenose whales, Cuvier's beaked whales, and Blainville's beaked whales. The objective was to determine if physiology (body mass, diving lung volume, dive response) or dive behaviour (dive depth and duration, changes in ascent rate, diel behaviour) would lead to differences in P(N2) levels and thereby decompression sickness (DCS) risk between species. Diving lung volume and extent of the dive response had a large effect on end-dive P(N2). The dive profile had a larger influence on end-dive P(N2) than body mass differences between species. Despite diel changes in dive behaviour, P(N2) levels showed no consistent trend. Model output suggested that all three species live with tissue P(N2) levels that would cause a significant proportion of DCS cases in terrestrial mammals. Cuvier's beaked whale diving behaviour appears to put them at higher risk than the other species, which may explain their prevalence in strandings after the use of mid-frequency sonar.

  8. Abdominal Decompression in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Chiaka Ejike

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS increases the risk for mortality in critically ill children. It occurs in association with a wide variety of medical and surgical diagnoses. Management of ACS involves recognizing the development of intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH by intra-abdominal pressure (IAP monitoring, treating the underlying cause, and preventing progression to ACS by lowering IAP. When ACS is already present, supporting dysfunctional organs and decreasing IAP to prevent new organ involvement become an additional focus of therapy. Medical management strategies to achieve these goals should be employed but when medical management fails, timely abdominal decompression is essential to reduce the risk of mortality. A literature review was performed to understand the role and outcomes of abdominal decompression among children with ACS. Abdominal decompression appears to have a positive effect on patient survival. However, prospective randomized studies are needed to fully understand the indications and impact of these therapies on survival in children.

  9. Whole-Earth Decompression Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Herndon, J M

    2005-01-01

    The principles of Whole-Earth Decompression Dynamics are disclosed leading to a new way to interpret whole-Earth dynamics. Whole-Earth Decompression Dynamics incorporates elements of and unifies the two seemingly divergent dominant theories of continential displacement, plate tectonics theory and Earth expansion theory. Whole-Earth decompression is the consequence of Earth formation from within a Jupiter-like protoplanet with subsequent loss of gases and ices and concomitant rebounding. The initial whole-Earth decompression is expected to result in a global system of major primary decompression cracks appearing in the rigid crust which persist as the basalt feeders for the global, mid-oceanic ridge system. As the Earth subsequently decompresses, the area of the Earth's surface increases by the formation of secondary decompression cracks, often located near the continental margins, presently identified as oceanic trenches. These secondary decompression cracks are subsequently in-filled with basalt, extruded fr...

  10. Acute ischemic colitis during scuba diving:Report of a unique case

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Konstantinos Goumas; Androniki Poulou; Ioannis Tyrmpas; Dimitrios Dandakis; Stavros Bartzokis; Magdalini Tsamouri; Kalipso Barbati; Dimitrios Soutos

    2008-01-01

    The presentation of clinical symptoms due to decompression during diving,varies significantly,as mainly minor disturbances for the gastrointestinal tract in particular have been reported.The following case debates whether diving can cause severe symptoms from the gastrointestinal system.We describe a clinical case of ischemic colitis presented in a 27-year-old male,who manifested abdominal pain while in the process of scuba diving 20 meters undersea,followed by bloody diarrhoea as soon as he ascended to sea level.Taking into account his past medical history,the thorough,impeccable clinical and laboratory examinations and presence of no other factors predisposing to ischemia of the colon,we assume that a possible relationship between diving conditions and the pathogenesis of ischemic colitis may exist.This unusual case might represent a hematologic manifestation of decompression sickness,due to increased coagulability and/or transient air emboli,occurring during a routine scuba diving ascent to sea level.

  11. Doppler bubble detection and decompression sickness: a prospective clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayne, C G; Hunt, W S; Johanson, D C; Flynn, E T; Weathersby, P K

    1985-09-01

    Decompression sickness in human beings exposed to high ambient pressure is thought to follow from gas bubble formation and growth in the body during return to low pressure. Detection of Doppler-shifted ultrasonic reflections in major blood vessels has been promoted as a noninvasive and sensitive indicator of the imminence of decompression sickness. We have conducted a double-blind, prospective clinical trial of Doppler ultrasonic bubble detection in simulated diving using 83 men, of whom 8 were stricken and treated for the clinical disease. Diagnosis based only on the Doppler signals had no correlation with clinical diagnosis. Bubble scores were only slightly higher in the stricken group. The Doppler technique does not appear to be of diagnostic value in the absence of other clinical information.

  12. Blood platelet-derived microparticles release and bubble formation after an open-sea air dive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontier, Jean-Michel; Gempp, Emmanuel; Ignatescu, Mihaela

    2012-10-01

    Bubble-induced platelet aggregation offers an index for evaluating decompression severity in humans and in a rat model of decompression sickness. Endothelial cells, blood platelets, or leukocytes shed microparticles (MP) upon activation and during cell apoptosis. The aim was to study blood platelet MP (PMP) release and bubble formation after a scuba-air dive in field conditions. Healthy, experienced divers were assigned to 1 experimental group (n = 10) with an open-sea air dive to 30 msw for 30 min and 1 control group (n = 5) during head-out water immersion for the same period. Bubble grades were monitored with a pulsed doppler according to Kissman Integrated Severity Score (KISS). Blood samples for platelet count (PC) and PMP (annexin V and CD41) were taken 1 h before and after exposure in both groups. The result showed a decrease in post-dive PC compared with pre-dive values in experimental group with no significant change in the control group. We observed a significant increase in PMP values after the dive while no change was revealed in the control group. There was a significant positive correlation between the PMP values after the dive and the KISS bubble score. The present study highlighted a relationship between the post-dive decrease in PC, platelet MP release, and bubble formation. Release of platelet MPs could reflect bubble-induced platelet aggregation and could play a key role in alteration of the coagulation. Further studies must investigate endothelial and leukocyte MP release in the same field conditions.

  13. Correlation between Patent Foramen Ovale, Cerebral “Lesions” and Neuropsychometric Testing in Experienced Sports Divers: Does Diving Damage the Brain?

    OpenAIRE

    Balestra, Costantino; Germonpré, Peter

    2016-01-01

    SCUBA diving exposes divers to decompression sickness (DCS). There has been considerable debate whether divers with a Patent Foramen Ovale of the heart have a higher risk of DCS because of the possible right-to-left shunt of venous decompression bubbles into the arterial circulation. Symptomatic neurological DCS has been shown to cause permanent damage to brain and spinal cord tissue; it has been suggested that divers with PFO may be at higher risk of developing subclinical brain lesions beca...

  14. Diving down the reefs? Intensive diving tourism threatens the reefs of the northern Red Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasler-Sheetal, Harald; Ott, Jörg A.

    2008-01-01

    Intensive recreational SCUBA diving threatens coral reef ecosystems. The reefs at Dahab, South Sinai, Egypt, are among the world’s most dived (>30,000dives y−1). We compared frequently dived sites to sites with no or little diving. Benthic communities and condition of corals were examined by the ...

  15. Mental abilities and performance efficacy under a simulated 480 meters helium-oxygen saturation diving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    gonglin ehou

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Stress in extreme environment severely disrupts human physiology and mental abilities. The present study investigated the cognition and performance efficacy of four divers during a simulated 480 meters helium-oxygen saturation diving. We analyzed the spatial memory, 2D/3D mental rotation functioning, grip strength, and hand-eye coordination ability in four divers during the 0 – 480 meters compression and decompression processes of the simulated diving. The results showed that except for its mild decrease on grip strength, the high atmosphere pressure condition significantly impaired the hand-eye coordination (especially at 300 meters, the reaction time and correct rate of mental rotation, as well as the spatial memory (especially as 410 meters, showing high individual variability. We conclude that the human cognition and performance efficacy are significantly affected during deep water saturation diving.

  16. 29 CFR 1910.424 - SCUBA diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false SCUBA diving. 1910.424 Section 1910.424 Labor Regulations... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Commercial Diving Operations Specific Operations Procedures § 1910.424 SCUBA diving. (a) General. Employers engaged in SCUBA diving shall comply with the...

  17. 43 CFR 15.8 - Skin diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Skin diving. 15.8 Section 15.8 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior KEY LARGO CORAL REEF PRESERVE § 15.8 Skin diving. Diving with camera, or diving for observation and pleasure is permitted and encouraged within...

  18. Whole-Earth Decompression Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Herndon, J. Marvin

    2005-01-01

    The principles of Whole-Earth Decompression Dynamics are disclosed leading to a new way to interpret whole-Earth dynamics. Whole-Earth Decompression Dynamics incorporates elements of and unifies the two seemingly divergent dominant theories of continential displacement, plate tectonics theory and Earth expansion theory. Whole-Earth decompression is the consequence of Earth formation from within a Jupiter-like protoplanet with subsequent loss of gases and ices and concomitant rebounding. The i...

  19. Gender and Decompression Sickness: A Critical Review and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The author addressed the following questions: are women at greater risk of decompression sickness and venous gas emboli at certain times in their reproductive cycle, is risk modified by the use of birth control pills (BCP), and is there a difference in overall risk between men and women under the same decompression dose? The summary considers information from the few abstracts and reports that were available. Except for the observation of more Type II DCS in women, particularly in women who fly after diving, there was no compelling evidence of a difference in DCS risk between men and women SCUBA divers. Many women that presented with DCS symptoms seemed to be in or near menses, with statistically fewer cases reported as time increased from menses. There was no compelling evidence that the use of BCP in SCUBA divers increases the risk of DCS. There were insufficient data about VGE from SCUBA diving to make any conclusion about the incidence of VGE and gender. In contrast, there were ample data about VGE from research in altitude chambers. Women produced less VGE and less Grade IV VGE compared to men under the same decompression dose, certainly when resting oxygen prebreathe (PB) was performed prior to ascent to altitude. Dual-cycle ergometry exercise during PB tends to reduce the differences in VGE between men and women. There was no compelling evidence that the risk of altitude DCS was different between men and women. However, a large number of DCS cases were associated with menses, and the use of BCP did seem to put women at a slightly greater risk than those that did not use BCP. There were substantial observations that women comprised a larger number of difficult cases that required complicated medical management.

  20. Bubbles, microparticles, and neutrophil activation: changes with exercise level and breathing gas during open-water SCUBA diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, Stephen R; Milovanova, Tatyana N; Bogush, Marina; Yang, Ming; Bhopale, Veena M; Pollock, Neal W; Ljubkovic, Marko; Denoble, Petar; Madden, Dennis; Lozo, Mislav; Dujic, Zeljko

    2013-05-15

    The study goal was to evaluate responses in humans following decompression from open-water SCUBA diving with the hypothesis that exertion underwater and use of a breathing mixture containing more oxygen and less nitrogen (enriched air nitrox) would alter annexin V-positive microparticle (MP) production and size changes and neutrophil activation, as well as their relationships to intravascular bubble formation. Twenty-four divers followed a uniform dive profile to 18 m of sea water breathing air or 22.5 m breathing 32% oxygen/68% nitrogen for 47 min, either swimming with moderately heavy exertion underwater or remaining stationary at depth. Blood was obtained pre- and at 15 and 120 min postdive. Intravascular bubbles were quantified by transthoracic echocardiography postdive at 20-min intervals for 2 h. There were no significant differences in maximum bubble scores among the dives. MP number increased 2.7-fold, on average, within 15 min after each dive; only the air-exertion dive resulted in a significant further increase to 5-fold over baseline at 2 h postdive. Neutrophil activation occurred after all dives. For the enriched air nitrox stationary at depth dive, but not for other conditions, the numbers of postdive annexin V-positive particles above 1 μm in diameter were correlated with intravascular bubble scores (correlation coefficients ∼0.9, P bubbles, MPs, platelet-neutrophil interactions, and neutrophil activation appear to exist, but more study is required to improve confidence in the associations.

  1. Stroke rates and diving air volumes of emperor penguins: implications for dive performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Katsufumi; Shiomi, Kozue; Marshall, Greg; Kooyman, Gerald L; Ponganis, Paul J

    2011-09-01

    Emperor penguins (Aptenodytes forsteri), both at sea and at an experimental dive hole, often have minimal surface periods even after performance of dives far beyond their measured 5.6 min aerobic dive limit (ADL: dive duration associated with the onset of post-dive blood lactate accumulation). Accelerometer-based data loggers were attached to emperor penguins diving in these two different situations to further evaluate the capacity of these birds to perform such dives without any apparent prolonged recovery periods. Minimum surface intervals for dives as long as 10 min were less than 1 min at both sites. Stroke rates for dives at sea were significantly greater than those for dives at the isolated dive hole. Calculated diving air volumes at sea were variable, increased with maximum depth of dive to a depth of 250 m, and decreased for deeper dives. It is hypothesized that lower air volumes for the deepest dives are the result of exhalation of air underwater. Mean maximal air volumes for deep dives at sea were approximately 83% greater than those during shallow (emperor penguins, (b) stroke rate at sea is greater than at the isolated dive hole and, therefore, a reduction in muscle stroke rate does not extend the duration of aerobic metabolism during dives at sea, and (c) a larger diving air volume facilitates performance of deep dives by increasing the total body O(2) store to 68 ml O(2) kg(-1). Although increased O(2) storage and cardiovascular adjustments presumably optimize aerobic metabolism during dives, enhanced anaerobic capacity and hypoxemic tolerance are also essential for longer dives. This was exemplified by a 27.6 min dive, after which the bird required 6 min before it stood up from a prone position, another 20 min before it began to walk, and 8.4 h before it dived again.

  2. Diving and Environmental Simulation Team

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Diving and Environmental Simulation Team focuses on ways to optimize the performance and safety of Navy divers. Our goal is to increase mission effectiveness by...

  3. Diving Medicine: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sinus Congestion Surfers Ear (Exotoses) Surfers Ear (Exotoses) Tinnitus (Ringing) TMJ (Temporal-Mandibular Joint Syndrome) Tympanic Membrane ... Implants Face Lift Liposuction Rhinoplasty Psychological Diving and Depression Medications Respiratory Breathing Discomfort Immersion Pulmonary Edema Mechanism ...

  4. CO and CO2 analysis in the diving gas of the fishermen of the Yucatan Peninsula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Walter; Huchim, Oswaldo; Wegrzyn, Grace H; Sprau, Susan E; Salas, Silvia; Markovitz, Gerald H

    2015-01-01

    It is reported that more than 75% of 400 artisanal fisherman divers working off the Yucatan Peninsula experience decompression sickness (DCS) each year, making DCS an epidemic in this region. These divers use primitive hookah diving support systems (HDSS). Breathing air is supplied from inadequately filtered and poorly maintained gasoline-powered air compressors. We hypothesized that air supplies could be contaminated. Air contamination could produce symptoms consistent with some presentations of DCS. This could confound and falsely elevate the true incidence of DCS. A cross-sectional study was undertaken in a fishing community. Ten fishermen from a single cohort participated. Fishermen were instructed not to drain volume tanks following their last dive of the day before their diving air was sampled. Dräger carbon monoxide (CO) 5/a-P and carbon dioxide (CO2) 100/a Short-term Tubes were used to measure 1.0 liters (L) of gas through a Visi-Float flow meter at 0.2 L/minute. Average CO value was 42 ppm (8-150 ppm). Average CO2 was 663 ppm (600-800). Measurements exceeded recommended diving norms for CO of 20 ppm. CO2 exceeded one diving organization recommendation of 500 ppm. Separation of engine exhaust from compressor intake could decrease CO values in HDSS to acceptable standards thus eliminating one possible confounder from this DCS epidemic.

  5. Endurance exercise immediately before sea diving reduces bubble formation in scuba divers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castagna, Olivier; Brisswalter, Jeanick; Vallee, Nicolas; Blatteau, Jean-Eric

    2011-06-01

    Previous studies have observed that a single bout of exercise can reduce the formation of circulating bubbles on decompression but, according to different authors, several hours delay were considered necessary between the end of exercise and the beginning of the dive. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of a single bout of exercise taken immediately before a dive on bubble formation. 24 trained divers performed open-sea dives to 30 msw depth for 30 min followed by a 3 min stop at 3 msw, under two conditions: (1) a control dive without exercise before (No-Ex), (2) an experimental condition in which subjects performed an exercise before diving (Ex). In the Ex condition, divers began running on a treadmill for 45 min at a speed corresponding to their own ventilatory threshold 1 h before immersion. Body weight, total body fluid volume, core temperature, and volume of consumed water were measured. Circulating bubbles were graded according to the Spencer scale using a precordial Doppler every 30 min for 90 min after surfacing. A single sub-maximal exercise performed immediately before immersion significantly reduces bubble grades (p bubble formation.

  6. 46 CFR 197.432 - Surface-supplied air diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Surface-supplied air diving. 197.432 Section 197.432... STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Specific Diving Mode Procedures § 197.432 Surface-supplied air diving. The diving supervisor shall insure that— (a) Surface-supplied air diving is...

  7. Diving seabirds: the stability of a diving elastic beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Brian; Croson, Matthew; Jung, Sunghwan

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we examine the buckling stability of a beam attached to a cone plunge diving into a bath of water, which is inspired by diving birds. This beam-cone system initially experiences an impact force before the cone is completely submerged, followed by a hydrodynamic drag force. Using high speed imaging techniques, it was observed that the soft elastic beam exhibits either buckling (unstable) or non-buckling (stable) behaviors upon impact and submergence. Large cone angles, long beams, and high impact velocities likely cause buckling in the beam. By varying geometric factors of the beam-cone system and changing the impact velocity, a transition from non-buckling to buckling is characterized through physical experiments and is verified by an analytical model. This study elucidates under which conditions diving birds may possibly get injured.

  8. Physiotherapy after subacromial decompression surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, David Høyrup; Falla, Deborah; Frost, Poul

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the development and details of a standardised physiotherapy exercise intervention designed to address pain and disability in patients with difficulty returning to usual activities after arthroscopic decompression surgery for subacromial impingement syndrome. To develop...

  9. Persistence of critical flicker fusion frequency impairment after a 33 mfw SCUBA dive: evidence of prolonged nitrogen narcosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestra, C; Lafère, P; Germonpré, P

    2012-12-01

    One of the possible risks incurred while diving is inert gas narcosis (IGN), yet its mechanism of action remains a matter of controversy. Although providing insights in the basic mechanisms of IGN, research has been primarily limited to animal studies. A human study, in real diving conditions, was needed. Twenty volunteers within strict biometrical criteria (male, age 30-40 years, BMI 20-23, non smoker) were selected. They performed a no-decompression dive to a depth of 33 mfw for 20 min and were assessed by the means of critical flicker fusion frequency (CFFF) measurement before the dive, during the dive upon arriving at the bottom, 5 min before the ascent, and 30 min after surfacing. After this late measurement, divers breathed oxygen for 15 min and were assessed a final time. Compared to the pre-dive value the mean value of each measurement was significantly different (p nitrogen supersaturation), 124.4 ± 10.8 versus 124.2 ± 3.9 %. This simple study suggests that IGN (at least partially) depends on gas-protein interactions and that the cerebral impairment persists for at least 30 min after surfacing. This could be an important consideration in situations where precise and accurate judgment or actions are essential.

  10. Scuba diving activates vascular antioxidant system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sureda, A; Batle, J M; Ferrer, M D; Mestre-Alfaro, A; Tur, J A; Pons, A

    2012-07-01

    The aim was to study the effects of scuba diving immersion on plasma antioxidant defenses, nitric oxide production, endothelin-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor levels. 9 male divers performed an immersion at 50 m depth for a total time of 35 min. Blood samples were obtained before diving at rest, immediately after diving, and 3 h after the diving session. Leukocyte counts, plasma 8oxoHG, malondialdehyde and nitrite levels significantly increased after recovery. Activities of lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, catalase and superoxide significantly increased immediately after diving and these activities remained high after recovery. Plasma myeloperoxidase activity and protein levels and extracellular superoxide dismutase protein levels increased after 3 h. Endothelin-1 concentration significantly decreased after diving and after recovery. Vascular endothelial growth factor concentration significantly increased after diving when compared to pre-diving values, returning to initial values after recovery. Scuba diving at great depth activated the plasma antioxidant system against the oxidative stress induced by elevated pO₂ oxygen associated with hyperbaria. The decrease in endothelin-1 levels and the increase in nitric oxide synthesis could be factors that contribute to post-diving vasodilation. Diving increases vascular endothelial growth factor plasma levels which can contribute to the stimulation of tissue resistance to diving-derived oxidative damage.

  11. 33 CFR 146.40 - Diving casualties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Diving casualties. 146.40 Section 146.40 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES OPERATIONS OCS Facilities § 146.40 Diving casualties. Diving related...

  12. 29 CFR 1926.1084 - SCUBA diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false SCUBA diving. 1926.1084 Section 1926.1084 Labor Regulations...) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Diving Specific Operations Procedures § 1926.1084 SCUBA diving. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are identical to...

  13. The potential role of perfluorocarbon emulsions in decompression illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiess, Bruce D

    2010-03-01

    Decompression illness (DCI) is an occasional occurrence in sport, professional, and military diving as well as a potential catastrophe in high-altitude flight, space exploration, mining, and caisson bridge construction. DCI theoretically could be a success-limiting problem in escape from a disabled submarine (DISSUB). Perfluorocarbon emulsions (PFCs) have previously been investigated as 'blood substitutes' with one approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of myocardial ischaemia. PFCs possess enhanced (as compared to plasma) respiratory gas solubility characteristics, including oxygen, nitrogen and carbon dioxide. This review examines approximately 30 years of research regarding the utilization of PFCs in gas embolism as well as experimental DCI. To date, no humans have been treated with PFCs for DCI.

  14. Ondine's curse after posterior fossa decompression: report of one case

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Lun-shan; XU Min-hui

    2001-01-01

    A case of Ondine's curse after posterior fossa decompression was reported. A 33-year-old woman was admitted complaining 2 years of dizziness and progressive worsening of gait disturbances, and 1year of repetitively ictal nausea. The diagnosis of Arnold-Chiari malformations was established. Results: The patient underwent suboccipital craniectomy and C1-3 laminectomy. In addition to this decompression measure, a fascial graft was sutured between the edges of the dural incision. Postoperatively, the patient lost automatic control of her respiration during sleep and became hypercapnic and hypoxemic. Assisted ventilation was initiated. Conclusion: Ondine's curse is possibly due to insensitivity of central chemoreceptors to carbon dioxide resulting in defective control of minute ventilation.Propofol is not recommended in cases of Ondine's curse, and assisted ventilation until the restoration of automatic control of respiration can be of value. Oxygen inspiration alone is rather harmful than beneficial.

  15. The physiology and pathophysiology of human breath-hold diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindholm, Peter; Lundgren, Claes E G

    2009-01-01

    This is a brief overview of physiological reactions, limitations, and pathophysiological mechanisms associated with human breath-hold diving. Breath-hold duration and ability to withstand compression at depth are the two main challenges that have been overcome to an amazing degree as evidenced by the current world records in breath-hold duration at 10:12 min and depth of 214 m. The quest for even further performance enhancements continues among competitive breath-hold divers, even if absolute physiological limits are being approached as indicated by findings of pulmonary edema and alveolar hemorrhage postdive. However, a remarkable, and so far poorly understood, variation in individual disposition for such problems exists. Mortality connected with breath-hold diving is primarily concentrated to less well-trained recreational divers and competitive spearfishermen who fall victim to hypoxia. Particularly vulnerable are probably also individuals with preexisting cardiac problems and possibly, essentially healthy divers who may have suffered severe alternobaric vertigo as a complication to inadequate pressure equilibration of the middle ears. The specific topics discussed include the diving response and its expression by the cardiovascular system, which exhibits hypertension, bradycardia, oxygen conservation, arrhythmias, and contraction of the spleen. The respiratory system is challenged by compression of the lungs with barotrauma of descent, intrapulmonary hemorrhage, edema, and the effects of glossopharyngeal insufflation and exsufflation. Various mechanisms associated with hypoxia and loss of consciousness are discussed, including hyperventilation, ascent blackout, fasting, and excessive postexercise O(2) consumption. The potential for high nitrogen pressure in the lungs to cause decompression sickness and N(2) narcosis is also illuminated.

  16. Return of the Diving Queen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    AFTER winning two gold medals atthe 1996 Atlanta Olympic,theDiving Queen’Fu Mingxia quit her sportscareer and became a student at QinghuaUniversity,one of the best universities inChina.Recently,due to the less than idealstandard of the younger divers,sheresumed her training under the guidance

  17. Physiological Monitoring in Diving Mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Physiological Monitoring in Diving Mammals Andreas...825-2025 email: andreas.fahlman@tamucc.edu Peter L. Tyack School of Biology Sea Mammal Research Unit Scottish Oceans Institute...OBJECTIVES This project is separated into three aims: Aim 1: Develop a new generation of tags/data logger for marine mammals that will

  18. Diving down the reefs? Intensive diving tourism threatens the reefs of the northern Red Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasler, Harald; Ott, Jörg A

    2008-10-01

    Intensive recreational SCUBA diving threatens coral reef ecosystems. The reefs at Dahab, South Sinai, Egypt, are among the world's most dived (>30,000 dives y(-1)). We compared frequently dived sites to sites with no or little diving. Benthic communities and condition of corals were examined by the point intercept sampling method in the reef crest zone (3m) and reef slope zone (12 m). Additionally, the abundance of corallivorous and herbivorous fish was estimated based on the visual census method. Sediments traps recorded the sedimentation rates caused by SCUBA divers. Zones subject to intensive SCUBA diving showed a significantly higher number of broken and damaged corals and significantly lower coral cover. Reef crest coral communities were significantly more affected than those of the reef slope: 95% of the broken colonies were branching ones. No effect of diving on the abundance of corallivorous and herbivorous fish was evident. At heavily used dive sites, diver-related sedimentation rates significantly decreased with increasing distance from the entrance, indicating poor buoyancy regulation at the initial phase of the dive. The results show a high negative impact of current SCUBA diving intensities on coral communities and coral condition. Corallivorous and herbivorous fishes are apparently not yet affected, but are endangered if coral cover decline continues. Reducing the number of dives per year, ecologically sustainable dive plans for individual sites, and reinforcing the environmental education of both dive guides and recreational divers are essential to conserve the ecological and the aesthetic qualities of these dive sites.

  19. 46 CFR 197.210 - Designation of diving supervisor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Designation of diving supervisor. 197.210 Section 197... HEALTH STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations General § 197.210 Designation of diving supervisor. The name of the diving supervisor for each commercial diving operation shall be— (a)...

  20. Diving Star—Guo Jingjing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    SINCE she won the gold medal for thethree meters springboard dive at the ThirteenthAsian Games, Guo Jingjing has become anoutstanding star within China’s sporting circle.People take her as a leading figure after thelikes of Fu Mingxia and Tan Shuping, andplace great expectations on her. As soon as shefinishes a competition. reporters pursue her foranswers to their questions. A cheeky figure,her reply is often a non-committal,"I don’tknow".

  1. Decompressive craniectomy with lattice duraplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, P; Tseng, M; Mendelow, A D

    2004-02-01

    A method of opening dura for decompressive craniectomies is described. Numerous cuts intersecting in a lattice pattern allow the dura to expand in a gradual and controlled manner minimising the chances of cortical laceration or venous kinking on the craniectomy edge.

  2. Microvascular decompression for trigeminal neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sade, Burak; Lee, Joung H

    2014-10-01

    The microvascular decompression procedure has proven to be a safe and effective option in the surgical management of neurovascular compression syndromes in general and trigeminal neuralgia in particular. This article aims to serve as an overview of the decision-making process, application of the surgical technique, and clinical outcome pertaining to this procedure.

  3. High diving metabolism results in a short aerobic dive limit for Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlinsky, Carling D; Rosen, David A S; Trites, Andrew W

    2013-07-01

    The diving capacity of marine mammals is typically defined by the aerobic dive limit (ADL) which, in lieu of direct measurements, can be calculated (cADL) from total body oxygen stores (TBO) and diving metabolic rate (DMR). To estimate cADL, we measured blood oxygen stores, and combined this with diving oxygen consumption rates (VO2) recorded from 4 trained Steller sea lions diving in the open ocean to depths of 10 or 40 m. We also examined the effect of diving exercise on O2 stores by comparing blood O2 stores of our diving animals to non-diving individuals at an aquarium. Mass-specific blood volume of the non-diving individuals was higher in the winter than in summer, but there was no overall difference in blood O2 stores between the diving and non-diving groups. Estimated TBO (35.9 ml O2 kg(-1)) was slightly lower than previously reported for Steller sea lions and other Otariids. Calculated ADL was 3.0 min (based on an average DMR of 2.24 L O2 min(-1)) and was significantly shorter than the average 4.4 min dives our study animals performed when making single long dives-but was similar to the times recorded during diving bouts (a series of 4 dives followed by a recovery period on the surface), as well as the dive times of wild animals. Our study is the first to estimate cADL based on direct measures of VO2 and blood oxygen stores for an Otariid and indicates they have a much shorter ADL than previously thought.

  4. Rabbit lung injury induced by explosive decompression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To study the mechanism of rabbit lunginjury caused by explosive decompression. Methods: A total of 42 rabbits and 10 rats were served as the experimental animals. A slow recompressiondecompression test and an explosive decompression test were applied to the animals, respectively. And the effects of the given tests on the animals were discussed. Results: The slow recompression-decompression did not cause an obvious lung injury, but the explosive decompression did cause lung injuries in different degrees. The greater the decompression range was, the shorter the decompression duration was, and the heavier the lung injuries were. Conclusions: Explosive decompression can cause a similar lung injury as shock wave does. The primary mechanical causes of the lung injury might be a tensile strain or stress in the alveolar wall and the pulmonary surface's impacts on the inside wall of the chest.

  5. What triggers the aerobic dive limit? Patterns of muscle oxygen depletion during dives of emperor penguins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Cassondra L; Meir, Jessica U; Ponganis, Paul J

    2011-06-01

    The physiological basis of the aerobic dive limit (ADL), the dive duration associated with the onset of post-dive blood lactate elevation, is hypothesized to be depletion of the muscle oxygen (O(2)) store. A dual wavelength near-infrared spectrophotometer was developed and used to measure myoglobin (Mb) O(2) saturation levels in the locomotory muscle during dives of emperor penguins (Aptenodytes forsteri). Two distinct patterns of muscle O(2) depletion were observed. Type A dives had a monotonic decline, and, in dives near the ADL, the muscle O(2) store was almost completely depleted. This pattern of Mb desaturation was consistent with lack of muscle blood flow and supports the hypothesis that the onset of post-dive blood lactate accumulation is secondary to muscle O(2) depletion during dives. The mean type A Mb desaturation rate allowed for calculation of a mean muscle O(2) consumption of 12.4 ml O(2) kg(-1) muscle min(-1), based on a Mb concentration of 6.4 g 100 g(-1) muscle. Type B desaturation patterns demonstrated a more gradual decline, often reaching a mid-dive plateau in Mb desaturation. This mid-dive plateau suggests maintenance of some muscle perfusion during these dives. At the end of type B dives, Mb desaturation rate increased and, in dives beyond the ADL, Mb saturation often reached near 0%. Thus, although different physiological strategies may be used during emperor penguin diving, both Mb desaturation patterns support the hypothesis that the onset of post-dive lactate accumulation is secondary to muscle O(2) store depletion.

  6. Diving down the reefs? Intensive diving tourism threatens the reefs of the northern Red Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasler-Sheetal, Harald; Ott, Jörg A.

    2008-01-01

    Intensive recreational SCUBA diving threatens coral reef ecosystems. The reefs at Dahab, South Sinai, Egypt, are among the world’s most dived (>30,000dives y−1). We compared frequently dived sites to sites with no or little diving. Benthic communities and condition of corals were examined...... to intensive SCUBA diving showed a significantly higher number of broken and damaged corals and significantly lower coral cover. Reef crest coral communities were significantly more affected than those of the reef slope: 95% of the broken colonies were branching ones. No effect of diving on the abundance...... by the point intercept sampling method in the reef crest zone (3 m) and reef slope zone (12 m). Additionally, the abundance of corallivorous and herbivorous fish was estimated based on the visual census method. Sediments traps recorded the sedimentation rates caused by SCUBA divers. Zones subject...

  7. Introduction to Scuba Diving. Diver Education Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somers, Lee H.

    Scuba diving is often referred to as a "recreational sport." However, the term "sport" sometimes implies erroneous connotations and limits understanding. Scuba diving can be an avocation or a vocation. It is a pastime, a pursuit, or even a lifestyle, that can be as limited or extensive as one makes it. A persons level of commitment, degree of…

  8. Teaching Persons with Disabilities to SCUBA Diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, Louis W.

    This booklet is designed to sensitize and inform the scuba diving instructor on appropriate attitudes and successful methods for teaching scuba diving to persons with physical disability. It addresses misconceptions about people with disabilities and the importance of effective two-way communication and mutual respect between instructors and…

  9. Deep-diving sea lions exhibit extreme bradycardia in long-duration dives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Birgitte I; Ponganis, Paul J

    2014-05-01

    Heart rate and peripheral blood flow distribution are the primary determinants of the rate and pattern of oxygen store utilisation and ultimately breath-hold duration in marine endotherms. Despite this, little is known about how otariids (sea lions and fur seals) regulate heart rate (fH) while diving. We investigated dive fH in five adult female California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) during foraging trips by instrumenting them with digital electrocardiogram (ECG) loggers and time depth recorders. In all dives, dive fH (number of beats/duration; 50±9 beats min(-1)) decreased compared with surface rates (113±5 beats min(-1)), with all dives exhibiting an instantaneous fH below resting (100 m) consisted of: (1) an initial rapid decline in fH resulting in the lowest instantaneous fH of the dive at the end of descent, often below 10 beats min(-1) in dives longer than 6 min in duration; (2) a slight increase in fH to ~10-40 beats min(-1) during the bottom portion of the dive; and (3) a gradual increase in fH during ascent with a rapid increase prior to surfacing. Thus, fH regulation in deep-diving sea lions is not simply a progressive bradycardia. Extreme bradycardia and the presumed associated reductions in pulmonary and peripheral blood flow during late descent of deep dives should (a) contribute to preservation of the lung oxygen store, (b) increase dependence of muscle on the myoglobin-bound oxygen store, (c) conserve the blood oxygen store and (d) help limit the absorption of nitrogen at depth. This fH profile during deep dives of sea lions may be characteristic of deep-diving marine endotherms that dive on inspiration as similar fH profiles have been recently documented in the emperor penguin, another deep diver that dives on inspiration.

  10. The death of buddy diving?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, P David

    2011-12-01

    Dear Editor, By focussing on the details of the Watson case, I believe Bryan Walpole has missed the thrust of my earlier letter. I agree this was a complex case, which is why I deliberately avoided the murky specifics in order to consider the 'big-picture' ramifications of the judgement. My concerns relate to the potential consequences of the unintended interplay between unrelated developments in the medical and legal arenas. Taken together, I believe these developments threaten the very institution of buddy diving. I have been unable to verify Dr Walpole's claim that the statute under which Mr Watson was convicted has not been used previously in a criminal trial. I must, however, refute his assertion that this legislation is some sort of idiosyncratic historical hangover or legal curiosity unique to Queensland. Although the original legislation pre-dates Australian federation, this statute has survived intact through 110 years of reviews and amendments to the Queensland Criminal Code. The application of this 19th century law to the Watson case now provides a direct, post-federation, 21st century relevance. Nor is Queensland alone in having such a statute on its books. Section 151 of the Criminal Code Act in Dr Walpole's home state of Tasmania states "When a person undertakes to do any act, the omission to do which is or may be dangerous to human life or health, it is his duty to do that act." Similar statutes can also be found in the legislation of other Australian states and as far afield as New Zealand and Canada. The phrasing of the relevant sections is, in many cases, almost identical to Queensland's, reflecting the common judicial heritage of these places. Even if this ruling's reach extended no further than the Queensland border its ramifications would be immense. Tourism statistics reveal that over 1.2 million visitors perform nearly 3.5 million dives/snorkels in Queensland each year. An estimated 93% of international divers visiting Australia stopover in

  11. Conditioning Bottlenose Dolphins (Tursiops Truncatus Gilli) for Voluntary Diving Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-12-31

    heartrate (EKG) to validate "voluntary" nature of dive EXAMINE ACTIVE DIVING CONDITIONS (open Ocean Mewwmenr) dive profiles using TDR respiration... heartrate electrodes Open Ocean Experiments ’wear instrument package (TDR) perform voluntary dive up to 200 meters readily present tail flukes for

  12. 46 CFR 197.320 - Diving ladder and stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Diving ladder and stage. 197.320 Section 197.320... STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Equipment § 197.320 Diving ladder and stage. (a) Each diving ladder must— (1) Be capable of supporting the weight of at least two divers; (2) Extend...

  13. 29 CFR 1910.426 - Mixed-gas diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mixed-gas diving. 1910.426 Section 1910.426 Labor... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Commercial Diving Operations Specific Operations Procedures § 1910.426 Mixed-gas diving. (a) General. Employers engaged in mixed-gas diving shall comply with the...

  14. 46 CFR 197.404 - Responsibilities of the diving supervisor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Responsibilities of the diving supervisor. 197.404... SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Operations § 197.404 Responsibilities of the diving supervisor. (a) The diving supervisor shall— (1) Be fully cognizant of...

  15. Minimal Invasive Decompression for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Popov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lumbar spinal stenosis is a common condition in elderly patients and may lead to progressive back and leg pain, muscular weakness, sensory disturbance, and/or problems with ambulation. Multiple studies suggest that surgical decompression is an effective therapy for patients with symptomatic lumbar stenosis. Although traditional lumbar decompression is a time-honored procedure, minimally invasive procedures are now available which can achieve the goals of decompression with less bleeding, smaller incisions, and quicker patient recovery. This paper will review the technique of performing ipsilateral and bilateral decompressions using a tubular retractor system and microscope.

  16. Field Evaluation of Topside Decompression Monitor (TDM) During Ships Husbandary Diving at SWRMC-NI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-31

    SWRMC–NI barge tied next to the USS NIMITZ. Two 650 ft sensor cables were married into the first 300 ft of Red and Green divers’ umbilicals by being... Cochran Undersea Technologies DR200 data loggers (each of which was changed every three to four weeks) — one for each diver’s umbilical. 5 RESULTS

  17. Statistically Based Decompression Tables 5: Haldane-Vann Models for Air Diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-02-01

    91.450 no thresh A 3.IE-3 (1.1E-3) R2. 1-tissue, T - 122 (50) -90.891 thresh A = 16E-2 (2.4E-2) PTHR - 11.9 (7.1)(fsw) T, TI, etc. are in units of...T = 739 (469) -27.076 no thresh A = 3.3E-3 (0.7E-3) R2. 1-tissue, T = 329 (38) -21.680 thresh A - .113 (.091) PTHR - 15.2 (1.5)(fsw) T, Ti, etc. are...tissue, T - 318 (156) -119.202 thresh A - 4.35E-3 (3.6E-3) PTHR - 1.23 (4.95)(fsw) T, Ti, etc. are in units of minutes, the other parameters are

  18. Statistically Based Decompression Tables. I. Analysis of Standard Air Dives: 1950-1970.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-03-01

    Weathersby, Homer, and Flynn (1984). The next model adds a threshold parameter, PTHR , that allows the possibility of a supersaturation that can be sustained...indefinitely without the risk of DCS: Model 2: r2 = A ( Ptis - Pamb - PTHR ) / Pamb Ptis by monoexponential; time constant T [61 3 parameters: A, T... PTHR PTHR is a constant parameter independent of depth. Again, only positive values of the numerator will be allowed in the integration of Eqn. 4. Model

  19. Risk of Central Nervous System Decompression Sickness in Air Diving to No-Stop Limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    the surface at 30 fsw/minute. Water temperature was 55 OF and while on bottom patient pedaled a cycle ergometer set at 50 watts. He denied any other...Exercise on bottom was moderate (50 Watts C-2 cycling at 60 rpm on underwater ergometer ). Subject was immersed for the compression to 130 fsw and...t (2) Substituting Equation 2 into Equation 1 and rearranging gives: -I -I -21 -21 PI" =P +P ·e’ -P ·e’ -P ·e’ +PI, ·e’ (3)I,IT aT aT_I aT aT_I

  20. Graphics processing unit-assisted lossless decompression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughry, Thomas A.

    2016-04-12

    Systems and methods for decompressing compressed data that has been compressed by way of a lossless compression algorithm are described herein. In a general embodiment, a graphics processing unit (GPU) is programmed to receive compressed data packets and decompress such packets in parallel. The compressed data packets are compressed representations of an image, and the lossless compression algorithm is a Rice compression algorithm.

  1. Graphics processing unit-assisted lossless decompression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loughry, Thomas A.

    2016-04-12

    Systems and methods for decompressing compressed data that has been compressed by way of a lossless compression algorithm are described herein. In a general embodiment, a graphics processing unit (GPU) is programmed to receive compressed data packets and decompress such packets in parallel. The compressed data packets are compressed representations of an image, and the lossless compression algorithm is a Rice compression algorithm.

  2. Recreational Diving Impacts on Coral Reefs and the Adoption of Environmentally Responsible Practices within the SCUBA Diving Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Ronan C.; Harvey, Chloe V.; Harvey, James J.; Kavanagh, Alan P.; McDonald, Meaghan; Stein-Rostaing, Vivienne R.; Turner, John R.

    2016-07-01

    Recreational diving on coral reefs is an activity that has experienced rapidly growing levels of popularity and participation. Despite providing economic activity for many developing coastal communities, the potential role of dive impacts in contributing to coral reef damage is a concern at heavily dived locations. Management measures to address this issue increasingly include the introduction of programmes designed to encourage environmentally responsible practices within the dive industry. We examined diver behaviour at several important coral reef dive locations within the Philippines and assessed how diver characteristics and dive operator compliance with an environmentally responsible diving programme, known as the Green Fins approach, affected reef contacts. The role of dive supervision was assessed by recording dive guide interventions underwater, and how this was affected by dive group size. Of the 100 recreational divers followed, 88 % made contact with the reef at least once per dive, with a mean (±SE) contact rate of 0.12 ± 0.01 per min. We found evidence that the ability of dive guides to intervene and correct diver behaviour in the event of a reef contact decreases with larger diver group sizes. Divers from operators with high levels of compliance with the Green Fins programme exhibited significantly lower reef contact rates than those from dive operators with low levels of compliance. The successful implementation of environmentally responsible diving programmes, which focus on influencing dive industry operations, can contribute to the management of human impacts on coral reefs.

  3. Pressureless Orbital Decompression for Myopic Proptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajak, Saul N; McGovern, Richard A; Selva, Dinesh

    2017-01-01

    Orbital decompression surgery increases the orbital volume. It has rarely been used for proptosis of the large highly myopic globe. However, external decompression surgery carries significant risks because of the large thin-walled globe. The authors report the first use of endoscopic medial wall orbital decompression surgery in this setting to obviate the risk of globe pressure.Endoscopic medial wall decompression brought about a 4 mm reduction of proptosis, correction of exotropia and elimination of retrobulbar ache providing good symmetry with the fellow eye.Endoscopic medial wall orbital decompression can be very effective for correcting the proptosis of high myopia and minimizes the risk of damage to the very large, thin-walled globe.

  4. Impacts of Artificial Reefs and Diving Tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Jakšić

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Coral reefs are currently endangered throughout the world. One of the main activities responsible for this is scuba-diving. Scuba-diving on coral reefs was not problematic in the begging, but due to popularization of the new sport, more and more tourists desired to participate in the activity. Mass tourism, direct contact of the tourists with the coral reefs and unprofessional behavior underwater has a negative effect on the coral reefs. The conflict between nature preservation and economy benefits related to scuba-diving tourism resulted in the creation of artificial reefs, used both to promote marine life and as tourists attractions, thereby taking the pressure off the natural coral reefs. Ships, vehicles and other large structures can be found on the coastal sea floor in North America, Australia, Japan and Europe. The concept of artificial reefs as a scuba-diving attraction was developed in Florida. The main goal was to promote aquaculture, with the popularization of scuba-diving attractions being a secondary effect. The aim of this paper is to determine the effects of artificial reefs on scuba-diving tourism, while taking into account the questionnaire carried out among 18 divers

  5. Fluoxetine protection in decompression sickness in mice is enhanced by blocking TREK-1 potassium channel with the spadin antidepressant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas eVallée

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In mice, disseminated coagulation, inflammation and ischemia induce neurological damages that can lead to the death. These symptoms result from circulating bubbles generated by a pathogenic decompression. An acute fluoxetine treatment or the presence of the TREK-1 potassium channel increased the survival rate when mice are subjected to an experimental dive/decompression protocol. This is a paradox because fluoxetine is a blocker of TREK-1 channels. First, we studied the effects of an acute dose of fluoxetine (50mg/kg in wild-type (WT and TREK-1 deficient mice (Knockout homozygous KO and heterozygous HET. Then, we combined the same fluoxetine treatment with a five-day treatment by spadin, in order to specifically block TREK-1 activity (KO-like mice. KO and KO-like mice could be regarded as antidepressed models.167 mice (45 WTcont 46 WTflux 30 HETflux and 46 KOflux constituting the flux-pool and 113 supplementary mice (27 KO-like 24 WTflux2 24 KO-likeflux 21 WTcont2 17 WTno dive constituting the spad-pool were included in this study. Only 7% of KO-TREK-1 treated with fluoxetine (KOflux and 4% of mice treated with both spadin and fluoxetine (KO-likeflux died from decompression sickness (DCS symptoms. These values are much lower than those of WT control (62% or KO-like mice (41%. After the decompression protocol, mice showed a significant consumption of their circulating platelets and leukocytes.Spadin antidepressed mice were more likely to declare DCS. Nevertheless, which had both blocked TREK-1 channel and were treated with fluoxetine were better protected against DCS. We conclude that the protective effect of such an acute dose of fluoxetine is enhanced when TREK-1 is inhibited. We confirmed that antidepressed models may have worse DCS outcomes, but a concomitant fluoxetine treatment not only decreases DCS severity but increases the survival rate.

  6. libpolycomp: Compression/decompression library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasi, Maurizio

    2016-04-01

    Libpolycomp compresses and decompresses one-dimensional streams of numbers by means of several algorithms. It is well-suited for time-ordered data acquired by astronomical instruments or simulations. One of the algorithms, called "polynomial compression", combines two widely-used ideas (namely, polynomial approximation and filtering of Fourier series) to achieve substantial compression ratios for datasets characterized by smoothness and lack of noise. Notable examples are the ephemerides of astronomical objects and the pointing information of astronomical telescopes. Other algorithms implemented in this C library are well known and already widely used, e.g., RLE, quantization, deflate (via libz) and Burrows-Wheeler transform (via libbzip2). Libpolycomp can compress the timelines acquired by the Planck/LFI instrument with an overall compression ratio of ~9, while other widely known programs (gzip, bzip2) reach compression ratios less than 1.5.

  7. Training rats to voluntarily dive underwater: investigations of the mammalian diving response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCulloch, Paul F

    2014-11-12

    Underwater submergence produces autonomic changes that are observed in virtually all diving animals. This reflexly-induced response consists of apnea, a parasympathetically-induced bradycardia and a sympathetically-induced alteration of vascular resistance that maintains blood flow to the heart, brain and exercising muscles. While many of the metabolic and cardiorespiratory aspects of the diving response have been studied in marine animals, investigations of the central integrative aspects of this brainstem reflex have been relatively lacking. Because the physiology and neuroanatomy of the rat are well characterized, the rat can be used to help ascertain the central pathways of the mammalian diving response. Detailed instructions are provided on how to train rats to swim and voluntarily dive underwater through a 5 m long Plexiglas maze. Considerations regarding tank design and procedure room requirements are also given. The behavioral training is conducted in such a way as to reduce the stressfulness that could otherwise be associated with forced underwater submergence, thus minimizing activation of central stress pathways. The training procedures are not technically difficult, but they can be time-consuming. Since behavioral training of animals can only provide a model to be used with other experimental techniques, examples of how voluntarily diving rats have been used in conjunction with other physiological and neuroanatomical research techniques, and how the basic training procedures may need to be modified to accommodate these techniques, are also provided. These experiments show that voluntarily diving rats exhibit the same cardiorespiratory changes typically seen in other diving animals. The ease with which rats can be trained to voluntarily dive underwater, and the already available data from rats collected in other neurophysiological studies, makes voluntarily diving rats a good behavioral model to be used in studies investigating the central aspects of the

  8. Could some aviation deep vein thrombosis be a form of decompression sickness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzacott, Peter; Mollerlokken, Andreas

    2016-10-01

    Aviation deep vein thrombosis is a challenge poorly understood in modern aviation. The aim of the present project was to determine if cabin decompression might favor formation of vascular bubbles in commercial air travelers. Thirty commercial flights were taken. Cabin pressure was noted at take-off and at every minute following, until the pressure stabilized. These time-pressure profiles were imported into the statistics program R and analyzed using the package SCUBA. Greatest pressure differentials between tissues and cabin pressures were estimated for 20, 40, 60, 80 and 120 min half-time compartments. Time to decompress ranged from 11 to 47 min. The greatest drop in cabin pressure was from 1022 to 776 mBar, equivalent to a saturated diver ascending from 2.46 msw depth. Mean pressure drop in flights >2 h duration was 193 mBar, while mean pressure drop in flights <2 h was 165 mBar. The greatest drop in pressure over 1 min was 28 mBar. Over 30 commercial flights it was found that the drop in cabin pressure was commensurate with that found to cause bubbles in man. Both the US Navy and the Royal Navy mandate far slower decompression from states of saturation, being 1.7 and 1.9 mBar/min respectively. The median overall rate of decompression found in this study was 8.5 mBar/min, five times the rate prescribed for USN saturation divers. The tissues associated with hypobaric bubble formation are likely slower than those associated with bounce diving, with 60 min a potentially useful index.

  9. Repetitive maladaptive behavior: beyond repetition compulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowins, Brad

    2010-09-01

    Maladaptive behavior that repeats, typically known as repetition compulsion, is one of the primary reasons that people seek psychotherapy. However, even with psychotherapeutic advances it continues to be extremely difficult to treat. Despite wishes and efforts to the contrary repetition compulsion does not actually achieve mastery, as evidenced by the problem rarely resolving without therapeutic intervention, and the difficulty involved in producing treatment gains. A new framework is proposed, whereby such behavior is divided into behavior of non-traumatic origin and traumatic origin with some overlap occurring. Repetitive maladaptive behavior of non-traumatic origin arises from an evolutionary-based process whereby patterns of behavior frequently displayed by caregivers and compatible with a child's temperament are acquired and repeated. It has a familiarity and ego-syntonic aspect that strongly motivates the person to retain the behavior. Repetitive maladaptive behavior of traumatic origin is characterized by defensive dissociation of the cognitive and emotional components of trauma, making it very difficult for the person to integrate the experience. The strong resistance of repetitive maladaptive behavior to change is based on the influence of both types on personality, and also factors specific to each. Psychotherapy, although very challenging at the best of times, can achieve the mastery wished and strived for, with the aid of several suggestions provided.

  10. Doppler recordings after diving to depth of 30 meters at high altitude of 4,919 meters (16,138 feet) during the Tilicho Lake Expedition 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kot, J; Sicko, Z; Zyszkowski, M; Brajta, M

    2014-01-01

    When going to high altitude (higher than 2,400 meters above mean sea level [about 8,200 feet]), human physiology is strongly affected by changes in atmospheric conditions, including decreased ambient pressure and hypobaric hypoxia, which can lead to severe hypoxemia, brain and/or pulmonary edema, negative changes in body and blood composition, as well as disturbances in regional microcirculation. When adding other factors, such as dehydration, physical exercise and exposure to low temperature, it is likely that nitrogen desaturation after diving at such environmental conditions is far from optimal, There are only single reports on diving at high alti-tudes. In 2007 a Polish team of climbers and divers participated in the Tilicho Lake and Peak Expedition to the Himalaya Mountains in Nepal. During this expedition, four divers conducted six dives in the Tilicho Lake at altitude of 4,919 meters above mean sea level equivalent (16,138 feet) to a maximum depth of 15 meters of fresh water (mfw) (equivalent to 28 mfw at sea level by the Cross Correction method) and 30 mfw (equivalent to 57 mfw at sea level "by Cross correction). Decompression debt was calculated using Cross Correction with some additional safety add-ons. Precordial Doppler recordings were taken every 15 minutes until 90 minutes after surfacing. No signs or symptoms of decompression sickness were observed after diving but in one diver, very high bubble grade Doppler signals were recorded. It can be concluded that diving at high altitude should be accompanied by additional safety precautions as well as taking into account personal sensitivity for such conditions.

  11. [Multinodular diving goiters: 100 cases in Morocco].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajdine, Med Tariq; Lamrani, Mohamed; Serhane, Khalid; Achour, Abdessamad; Benariba, Farid; Daali, Mustapha

    2005-01-01

    To assess 100 cases of multinodular diving goiters, the authors review the literature to compare the epidemiology, clinical pictures, additional required work-up, treatments, complications, and sequelae. Records of 100 cases of multinodular diving goiters were collected in the surgical department of the Military Hospital of Marrakesh in Morocco from 1991 through 2004. They accounted for 6% of all goiters. The sex ratio was clearly female, and the mean age 50 years. The clinical symptoms of diving goiters involves mainly signs of compression, with dyspnea seen in 50% of cases. Thyroid dysfunction was found in only 25% of our patients. A diagnosis of diving goiter must be suspected when there are signs of mediastinal compression and a palpable cervical goiter, as seen in all our patients. The diagnosis can often be confirmed with thoracic radiography and thyroid scintigraphy. Treatment is mainly surgical and depends on disease course. Cervicotomy was performed in 97% of our patients and was sufficient to extract even most voluminous goiters and those deepest in the mediastinum. Immediate operative results were satisfactory. More long-term results were also generally satisfactory, except for 4 cases of recurrent paralysis and 5 cases of hypoparathyroidism. Both have been reported by several authors. Surgical management of multinodular diving goiters is necessary. In general, cervicotomy is sufficient, and the results generally satisfactory, except some complications and neoplasms.

  12. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Perceptions of FKNMS Dive Operators

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A total of 69 dive operators in the Florida Keys, representing 77.5% of the region's operator population, provided information on their use of dive and snorkel sites...

  13. Summer diving behavior of male walruses in Bristol Bay, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay, C.V.; Farley, Sean D.; Garner, G.W.

    2001-01-01

    Pacific walruses (Odobenus rosmarus divergens) make trips from ice or land haul-out sites to forage for benthic prey. We describe dive and trip characteristics from time-depth-recorder data collected over a one-month period during summer from four male Pacific walruses in Bristol Bay, Alaska. Dives were classified into four types. Shallow (4 m), short (2.7 min), square-shaped dives accounted for 11% of trip time, and many were probably associated with traveling. Shallow (2 m) and very short (0.5 min) dives composed only 1% of trip time. Deep (41 m), long (7.2 min), square-shaped dives accounted for 46% of trip time and were undoubtedly associated with benthic foraging. V-shaped dives ranged widely in depth, were of moderate duration (4.7 min), and composed 3% of trip time. These dives may have been associated with navigation or exploration of the seafloor for potential prey habitat. Surface intervals between dives were similar among dive types, and generally lasted 1-2 min. Total foraging time was strongly correlated with trip duration and there was no apparent diel pattern of diving in any dive type among animals. We found no correlation between dive duration and postdive surface interval within dive types, suggesting that diving occurred within aerobic dive limits. Trip duration varied considerably within and among walruses (0.3-9.4 d), and there was evidence that some of the very short trips were unrelated to foraging. Overall, walruses were in the water for 76.6% of the time, of which 60.3% was spent diving.

  14. 29 CFR 1910.422 - Procedures during dive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Procedures during dive. (a) General. The employer shall comply with the following requirements which are... appropriate any breathing gas changes, shall be maintained for each diver during the dive including... reserve breathing gas or the dive-location reserve breathing gas. ...

  15. 46 CFR 197.334 - Open diving bells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Open diving bells. 197.334 Section 197.334 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Equipment § 197.334 Open diving bells. Each open...

  16. 29 CFR 1910.425 - Surface-supplied air diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Surface-supplied air diving. 1910.425 Section 1910.425..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Commercial Diving Operations Specific Operations Procedures § 1910.425 Surface-supplied air diving. (a) General. Employers engaged in surface-supplied...

  17. 29 CFR 1926.1085 - Surface-supplied air diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Surface-supplied air diving. 1926.1085 Section 1926.1085..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Diving Specific Operations Procedures § 1926.1085 Surface-supplied air diving. Note: The requirements applicable to construction...

  18. 29 CFR 1926.1086 - Mixed-gas diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mixed-gas diving. 1926.1086 Section 1926.1086 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Diving Specific Operations Procedures § 1926.1086 Mixed-gas diving. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section...

  19. 46 CFR 56.50-110 - Diving support systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Diving support systems. 56.50-110 Section 56.50-110... APPURTENANCES Design Requirements Pertaining to Specific Systems § 56.50-110 Diving support systems. (a) In addition to the requirements of this part, piping for diving installations which is permanently...

  20. Effects of scuba diving on vascular repair mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culic, Vedrana Cikes; Van Craenenbroeck, Emeline; Muzinic, Nikolina Rezic; Ljubkovic, Marko; Marinovic, Jasna; Conraads, Viviane; Dujic, Zeljko

    2014-01-01

    A single air dive causes transient endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and circulating angiogenic cells (CAC) contribute synergistically to endothelial repair. In this study (1) the acute effects of diving on EPC numbers and CAC migration and (2) the influence of the gas mixture (air/nitrox-36) was investigated. Ten divers performed two dives to 18 meters on Day (D) 1 and D3, using air. After 15 days, dives were repeated with nitrox-36. Blood sampling took place before and immediately after diving. Circulating EPCs were quantified by flow cytometry, CAC migration of culture was assessed on D7. When diving on air, a trend for reduced EPC numbers is observed post-dive, which is persistent on D1 and D3. CAC migration tends to improve acutely following diving. These effects are more pronounced with nitrox-36 dives. Diving acutely affects EPC numbers and CAC function, and to a larger extent when diving with nitrox-36. The diving-induced oxidative stress may influence recruitment or survival of EPC. The functional improvement of CAC could be a compensatory mechanism to maintain endothelial homeostasis.

  1. 29 CFR 1915.6 - Commerical diving operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Commerical diving operations. 1915.6 Section 1915.6 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Commerical diving operations. Commerical diving operations shall be subject to subpart T of part...

  2. O2 store management in diving emperor penguins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponganis, P J; Stockard, T K; Meir, J U; Williams, C L; Ponganis, K V; Howard, R

    2009-01-01

    In order to further define O(2) store utilization during dives and understand the physiological basis of the aerobic dive limit (ADL, dive duration associated with the onset of post-dive blood lactate accumulation), emperor penguins (Aptenodytes forsteri) were equipped with either a blood partial pressure of oxygen (P(O(2))) recorder or a blood sampler while they were diving at an isolated dive hole in the sea ice of McMurdo Sound, Antarctica. Arterial P(O(2)) profiles (57 dives) revealed that (a) pre-dive P(O(2)) was greater than that at rest, (b) P(O(2)) transiently increased during descent and (c) post-dive P(O(2)) reached that at rest in 1.92+/-1.89 min (N=53). Venous P(O(2)) profiles (130 dives) revealed that (a) pre-dive venous P(O(2)) was greater than that at rest prior to 61% of dives, (b) in 90% of dives venous P(O(2)) transiently increased with a mean maximum P(O(2)) of 53+/-18 mmHg and a mean increase in P(O(2)) of 11+/-12 mmHg, (c) in 78% of dives, this peak venous P(O(2)) occurred within the first 3 min, and (d) post-dive venous P(O(2)) reached that at rest within 2.23+/-2.64 min (N=84). Arterial and venous P(O(2)) values in blood samples collected 1-3 min into dives were greater than or near to the respective values at rest. Blood lactate concentration was less than 2 mmol l(-1) as far as 10.5 min into dives, well beyond the known ADL of 5.6 min. Mean arterial and venous P(N(2)) of samples collected at 20-37 m depth were 2.5 times those at the surface, both being 2.1+/-0.7 atmospheres absolute (ATA; N=3 each), and were not significantly different. These findings are consistent with the maintenance of gas exchange during dives (elevated arterial and venous P(O(2)) and P(N(2)) during dives), muscle ischemia during dives (elevated venous P(O(2)), lack of lactate washout into blood during dives), and arterio-venous shunting of blood both during the surface period (venous P(O(2)) greater than that at rest) and during dives (arterialized venous P(O(2

  3. Grammatical Change through Repetition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arevart, Supot

    1989-01-01

    The effect of repetition on grammatical change in an unrehearsed talk is examined based on a case study of a single learner. It was found that repetition allows for accuracy monitoring in that errors committed in repeated contexts undergo correction. Implications for teaching are discussed. (23 references) (LB)

  4. The Negative Repetition Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Neil W.; Peterson, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental property of human memory is that repetition enhances memory. Peterson and Mulligan (2012) recently documented a surprising "negative repetition effect," in which participants who studied a list of cue-target pairs twice recalled fewer targets than a group who studied the pairs only once. Words within a pair rhymed, and…

  5. Roles of repetitive sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, G.I.

    1991-12-31

    The DNA of higher eukaryotes contains many repetitive sequences. The study of repetitive sequences is important, not only because many have important biological function, but also because they provide information on genome organization, evolution and dynamics. In this paper, I will first discuss some generic effects that repetitive sequences will have upon genome dynamics and evolution. In particular, it will be shown that repetitive sequences foster recombination among, and turnover of, the elements of a genome. I will then consider some examples of repetitive sequences, notably minisatellite sequences and telomere sequences as examples of tandem repeats, without and with respectively known function, and Alu sequences as an example of interspersed repeats. Some other examples will also be considered in less detail.

  6. Roles of repetitive sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, G.I.

    1991-12-31

    The DNA of higher eukaryotes contains many repetitive sequences. The study of repetitive sequences is important, not only because many have important biological function, but also because they provide information on genome organization, evolution and dynamics. In this paper, I will first discuss some generic effects that repetitive sequences will have upon genome dynamics and evolution. In particular, it will be shown that repetitive sequences foster recombination among, and turnover of, the elements of a genome. I will then consider some examples of repetitive sequences, notably minisatellite sequences and telomere sequences as examples of tandem repeats, without and with respectively known function, and Alu sequences as an example of interspersed repeats. Some other examples will also be considered in less detail.

  7. Managing scientific diving operations in a remote location: the Canadian high Arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayer, Martin D J; Küpper, Frithjof C; van West, Pieter; Wilson, Colin M; Brown, Hugh; Azzopardi, Elaine

    2013-12-01

    Global climate change is expected to alter the Arctic bioregion markedly in coming decades. As a result, monitoring of the expected and actual changes has assumed high scientific significance. Many marine science objectives are best supported with the use of scientific diving techniques. Some important keystone environments are located in extremely remote locations where land-based expeditions offer high flexibility and cost-effectiveness over ship-based operations. However, the extreme remoteness of some of these locations, coupled with complex and unreliable land, sea and air communications, means that there is rarely quick access (diving medical intervention or recompression. In 2009, a land based expedition to the north end of Baffin Island was undertaken with the specific aim of establishing an inventory of the diversity of seaweeds and their pathogens that was broadly representative of a high Arctic marine environment. This account highlights some of the logistical considerations taken on that expedition; specifically it outlines the non-recompression treatment pathway that would have been adopted in the event of a diver suffering decompression illness.

  8. Effect of metabolic gases and water vapor, perfluorocarbon emulsions, and nitric oxide on tissue bubbles during decompression sickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randsøe, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    In aviation and diving, fast decrease in ambient pressure, such as during accidental loss of cabin pressure or when a diver decompresses too fast to sea level, may cause nitrogen (N2) bubble formation in blood and tissue resulting in decompression sickness (DCS). Conventional treatment of DCS is oxygen (O2) breathing combined with recompression.  However, bubble kinetic models suggest, that metabolic gases, i.e. O2 and carbon dioxide (CO2), and water vapor contribute significantly to DCS bubble volume and growth at hypobaric altitude exposures. Further, perfluorocarbon emulsions (PFC) and nitric oxide (NO) donors have, on an experimental basis, demonstrated therapeutic properties both as treatment and prophylactic intervention against DCS. The effect was ascribed to solubility of respiratory gases in PFC, plausible NO elicited nuclei demise and/or N2 washout through enhanced blood flow rate. Accordingly, by means of monitoring injected bubbles in exposed adipose tissue or measurements of spinal evoked potentials (SEPs) in anaesthetized rats, the aim of this study was to: 1) evaluate the contribution of metabolic gases and water vapor to bubble volume at different barometrical altitude exposures, 2) clarify the O2 contribution and N2 solubility from bubbles during administration of PFC at normo- and hypobaric conditions and, 3) test the effect of different NO donors on SEPs during DCS upon a hyperbaric air dive and, to study the influence of  NO on tissue bubbles at high altitude exposures. The results support the bubble kinetic models and indicate that metabolic gases and water vapor contribute significantly to bubble volume at 25 kPa (~10,376 m above sea level) and constitute a threshold for bubble stabilization or decay at the interval of 47-36 kPa (~6,036 and ~7,920 m above sea level). The effect of the metabolic gases and water vapor seemed to compromise the therapeutic properties of both PFC and NO at altitude, while PFC significantly increased bubble

  9. U S Navy Diving Manual. Volume 2. Mixed-Gas Diving. Revision 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    APPENDIX A- MK 12 MIXED-GAS DIVING OUTFIT D.3 D-5 MK 6 MOO 0 MXD-GAS SCUBA A-1 Diving Equipment Preparation D-5 Ps,-O4X ’ IpIP W Popmom Mixed-Gas Supply... Ocean Simulation Facility at Panama City, Fl. bell; and to 300 feet using helium-oxygen breathing gas mixtures as the breathing me- dium with the

  10. Decompression induced bubble dynamics on ex vivo fat and muscle tissue surfaces with a new experimental set up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulou, Virginie; Evgenidis, Sotiris; Eckersley, Robert J; Mesimeris, Thodoris; Balestra, Costantino; Kostoglou, Margaritis; Tang, Meng-Xing; Karapantsios, Thodoris D

    2015-05-01

    Vascular gas bubbles are routinely observed after scuba dives using ultrasound imaging, however the precise formation mechanism and site of these bubbles are still debated and growth from decompression in vivo has not been extensively studied, due in part to imaging difficulties. An experimental set-up was developed for optical recording of bubble growth and density on tissue surface area during hyperbaric decompression. Muscle and fat tissues (rabbits, ex vivo) were covered with nitrogen saturated distilled water and decompression experiments performed, from 3 to 0bar, at a rate of 1bar/min. Pictures were automatically acquired every 5s from the start of the decompression for 1h with a resolution of 1.75μm. A custom MatLab analysis code implementing a circular Hough transform was written and shown to be able to track bubble growth sequences including bubble center, radius, contact line and contact angles over time. Bubble density, nucleation threshold and detachment size, as well as coalescence behavior, were shown significantly different for muscle and fat tissues surfaces, whereas growth rates after a critical size were governed by diffusion as expected. Heterogeneous nucleation was observed from preferential sites on the tissue substrate, where the bubbles grow, detach and new bubbles form in turn. No new nucleation sites were observed after the first 10min post decompression start so bubble density did not vary after this point in the experiment. In addition, a competition for dissolved gas between adjacent multiple bubbles was demonstrated in increased delay times as well as slower growth rates for non-isolated bubbles.

  11. The assessment and management of inner ear barotrauma in divers and recommendations for returning to diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Elizabeth J; Smart, David R

    2014-12-01

    Inner ear barotrauma (IEBt) constitutes a spectrum of pressure-related pathology in the inner ear, with antecedent middle ear barotrauma (MEBt) common. IEBt includes perilymph fistula, intralabyrinthine membrane tear, inner ear haemorrhage and other rarer pathologies. Following a literature search, the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of IEBt in divers and best-practice recommendations for returning to diving were reviewed. Sixty-nine papers/texts were identified and 54 accessed. Twenty-five case series (majority surgical) provided guidance on diagnostic pathways; nine solely reported divers. IEBt in divers may be difficult to distinguish from inner ear decompression sickness (IEDCS), and requires dive-risk stratification and careful interrogation regarding diving-related ear events, clinical assessment, pure tone audiometry, a fistula test and electronystagmography (ENG). Once diagnosed, conservative management is the recommended first line therapy for IEBt. Recompression does not appear to cause harm if the diagnosis (IEBt vs IEDCS) is doubtful (limited case data). Exploratory surgery is indicated for severe or persisting vestibular symptoms or hearing loss, deterioration of symptoms, or lack of improvement over 10 days indicating significant pathology. Steroids are used, but without high-level evidence. It may be possible for divers to return to subaquatic activity after stakeholder risk acceptance and informed consent, provided: (1) sensorineural hearing loss is stable and not severe; (2) there is no vestibular involvement (via ENG); (3) high-resolution computed tomography has excluded anatomical predilection to IEBt and (4) education on equalising techniques is provided. There is a need for a prospective data registry and controlled trials to better evaluate diagnostic and treatment algorithms.

  12. Repetition and Translation Shifts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Zupan

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Repetition manifests itself in different ways and at different levels of the text. The first basic type of repetition involves complete recurrences; in which a particular textual feature repeats in its entirety. The second type involves partial recurrences; in which the second repetition of the same textual feature includes certain modifications to the first occurrence. In the article; repetitive patterns in Edgar Allan Poe’s short story “The Fall of the House of Usher” and its Slovene translation; “Konec Usherjeve hiše”; are compared. The author examines different kinds of repetitive patterns. Repetitions are compared at both the micro- and macrostructural levels. As detailed analyses have shown; considerable microstructural translation shifts occur in certain types of repetitive patterns. Since these are not only occasional; sporadic phenomena; but are of a relatively high frequency; they reduce the translated text’s potential for achieving some of the gothic effects. The macrostructural textual property particularly affected by these shifts is the narrator’s experience as described by the narrative; which suffers a reduction in intensity.

  13. Heart rate regulation and extreme bradycardia in diving emperor penguins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meir, Jessica U; Stockard, Torre K; Williams, Cassondra L; Ponganis, Katherine V; Ponganis, Paul J

    2008-04-01

    To investigate the diving heart rate (f(H)) response of the emperor penguin (Aptenodytes forsteri), the consummate avian diver, birds diving at an isolated dive hole in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica were outfitted with digital electrocardiogram recorders, two-axis accelerometers and time depth recorders (TDRs). In contrast to any other freely diving bird, a true bradycardia (f(H) significantly emperor penguins. Maximum instantaneous surface interval f(H) in this study is the highest ever recorded for emperor penguins (256 beats min(-1)), equivalent to f(H) at V(O(2)) max., presumably facilitating oxygen loading and post-dive metabolism. The classic Scholander-Irving dive response in these emperor penguins contrasts with the absence of true bradycardia in diving ducks, cormorants, and other penguin species.

  14. Fishery and Dive Tourism Enhancement in Kenya

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    benefit from enhanced dive tourism was estimated as US$75,000—$ 1 74.000 annually and there .... used, based on personal communications and ..... The median values of the Likert scale in response to each question for each stakeholder ...

  15. 46 CFR 197.410 - Dive procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... SCUBA divers shall maintain their own profiles; (5) A two-way voice communication system is used between...); and (ii) The bell (when provided) and the dive location; (6) A two-way communication system is...) The physical condition of the diver is checked by— (A) Visual observation; and (B) Questioning...

  16. Effect of Diving and Diving Hoods on the Bacterial Flora of the External Ear Canal and Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-05-01

    NAVAL MEDICAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE BETHESDA, MARYLAND 82-22 EFFECT OF DIVING AND DIVING HOODS ON THE BACTERIAL FLORA OF THE EXTERNAL EAR CANAL AND SKIN...Subtitle) 5. TYPE OF REPeRT & PERIOD COVERED EFFECT OF DIVING AND DIVING HOODS ON THE BACTERIAL - PROGRESS FLORA OF THE EXTERNAL EAR CANAL AND SKIN MEDICAL...bacterial flora of the external ear canals and posterior auricular skin surface was investigated’in a group of 26 divers after 25 dry-suit dives in harbor

  17. Estimating the risk of a scuba diving fatality in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippmann, John; Stevenson, Christopher; McD Taylor, David; Williams, Jo

    2016-12-01

    There are few data available on which to estimate the risk of death for Australian divers. This report estimates the risk of a scuba diving fatality for Australian residents, international tourists diving in Queensland, and clients of a large Victorian dive operator. Numerators for the estimates were obtained from the Divers Alert Network Asia-Pacific dive fatality database. Denominators were derived from three sources: Participation in Exercise, Recreation and Sport Surveys, 2001-2010 (Australian resident diving activity data); Tourism Research Australia surveys of international visitors to Queensland 2006-2014 and a dive operator in Victoria 2007-2014. Annual fatality rates (AFR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated using an exact binomial test. Estimated AFRs were: 0.48 (0.37-0.59) deaths per 100,000 dives, or 8.73 (6.85-10.96) deaths per 100,000 divers for Australian residents; 0.12 (0.05-0.25) deaths per 100,000 dives, or 0.46 (0.20-0.91) deaths per 100,000 divers for international visitors to Queensland; and 1.64 (0.20-5.93) deaths per 100,000 dives for the dive operator in Victoria. On a per diver basis, Australian residents are estimated to be almost twenty times more likely to die whilst scuba diving than are international visitors to Queensland, or to lower than fourfold on a per dive basis. On a per dive basis, divers in Victoria are fourteen times more likely to die than are Queensland international tourists. Although some of the estimates are based on potentially unreliable denominator data extrapolated from surveys, the diving fatality rates in Australia appear to vary by State, being considerably lower in Queensland than in Victoria. These estimates are similar to or lower than comparable overseas estimates, although reliability of all such measurements varies with study size and accuracy of the data available.

  18. Trialogue: Preparation, Repetition and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberg, Antoinette; And Others

    1996-01-01

    This paper interrogates both curriculum theory and the limits and potentials of textual forms. A set of overlapping discourses (a trialogue) focuses on inquiring into the roles of obsession and repetition in creating deeply interpretive locations for understanding. (SM)

  19. Decompressive craniectomy in herpes simplex encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed Jasim Abdul Jalal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial hypertension is a common cause of morbidity in herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE. HSE is the most common form of acute viral encephalitis. Hereby we report a case of HSE in which decompressive craniectomy was performed to treat refractory intracranial hypertension. A 32-year-old male presented with headache, vomiting, fever, and focal seizures involving the right upper limb. Cerebrospinal fluid-meningoencephalitic profile was positive for herpes simplex. Magnetic resonance image of the brain showed swollen and edematous right temporal lobe with increased signal in gray matter and subcortical white matter with loss of gray, white differentiation in T2-weighted sequences. Decompressive craniectomy was performed in view of refractory intracranial hypertension. Decompressive surgery for HSE with refractory hypertension can positively affect patient survival, with good outcomes in terms of cognitive functions.

  20. Decompressive laparotomy for abdominal compartment syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, E.; Malbrain, M.; Nesbitt, I.; Cohen, J.; Kaloiani, V.; Ivatury, R.; Mone, M.; Debergh, D.; Björck, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The effect of decompressive laparotomy on outcomes in patients with abdominal compartment syndrome has been poorly investigated. The aim of this prospective cohort study was to describe the effect of decompressive laparotomy for abdominal compartment syndrome on organ function and outcomes. Methods This was a prospective cohort study in adult patients who underwent decompressive laparotomy for abdominal compartment syndrome. The primary endpoints were 28‐day and 1‐year all‐cause mortality. Changes in intra‐abdominal pressure (IAP) and organ function, and laparotomy‐related morbidity were secondary endpoints. Results Thirty‐three patients were included in the study (20 men). Twenty‐seven patients were surgical admissions treated for abdominal conditions. The median (i.q.r.) Acute Physiology And Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score was 26 (20–32). Median IAP was 23 (21–27) mmHg before decompressive laparotomy, decreasing to 12 (9–15), 13 (8–17), 12 (9–15) and 12 (9–14) mmHg after 2, 6, 24 and 72 h. Decompressive laparotomy significantly improved oxygenation and urinary output. Survivors showed improvement in organ function scores, but non‐survivors did not. Fourteen complications related to the procedure developed in eight of the 33 patients. The abdomen could be closed primarily in 18 patients. The overall 28‐day mortality rate was 36 per cent (12 of 33), which increased to 55 per cent (18 patients) at 1 year. Non‐survivors were no different from survivors, except that they tended to be older and on mechanical ventilation. Conclusion Decompressive laparotomy reduced IAP and had an immediate effect on organ function. It should be considered in patients with abdominal compartment syndrome. PMID:26891380

  1. Portal Decompression Using the Inferior Mesenteric Vein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Gorini

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available We report five patients with variceal hemorrhage, in three cases secondary to diffuse thrombosis of the portal, superior mesenteric and splenic veins. Mesenteric angiography demonstrated patency of the inferior mesenteric vein (IMV in each, and successful portal decompression by anastomosis of the IMV to the left renal vein (n=4 or the inferior vena cava (n=1 was accomplished. Bleeding was permanently controlled: four patients have survived from one to eight years post-operatively. Because shunt procedures utilizing the IMV are technically straightforward, subtotally decompress the portal system and avoid the right upper quadrant, they may be advantageous in certain clinical settings.

  2. 46 CFR 197.434 - Surface-supplied mixed-gas diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Surface-supplied mixed-gas diving. 197.434 Section 197... HEALTH STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Specific Diving Mode Procedures § 197.434 Surface-supplied mixed-gas diving. The diving supervisor shall insure that— (a) When...

  3. The diving behavior of blue and fin whales: is dive duration shorter than expected based on oxygen stores?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croll, D A; Acevedo-Gutiérrez, A; Tershy, B R; Urbán-Ramírez, J

    2001-07-01

    Many diving seabirds and marine mammals have been found to regularly exceed their theoretical aerobic dive limit (TADL). No animals have been found to dive for durations that are consistently shorter than their TADL. We attached time-depth recorders to 7 blue whales and 15 fin whales (family Balaenopteridae). The diving behavior of both species was similar, and we distinguished between foraging and traveling dives. Foraging dives in both species were deeper, longer in duration and distinguished by a series of vertical excursions where lunge feeding presumably occurred. Foraging blue whales lunged 2.4 (+/-1.13) times per dive, with a maximum of six times and average vertical excursion of 30.2 (+/-10.04) m. Foraging fin whales lunged 1.7 (+/-0.88) times per dive, with a maximum of eight times and average vertical excursion of 21.2 (+/-4.35) m. The maximum rate of ascent of lunges was higher than the maximum rate of descent in both species, indicating that feeding lunges occurred on ascent. Foraging dives were deeper and longer than non-feeding dives in both species. On average, blue whales dived to 140.0 (+/-46.01) m and 7.8 (+/-1.89) min when foraging, and 67.6 (+/-51.46) m and 4.9 (+/-2.53) min when not foraging. Fin whales dived to 97.9 (+/-32.59) m and 6.3 (+/-1.53) min when foraging and to 59.3 (+/-29.67) m and 4.2 (+/-1.67) min when not foraging. The longest dives recorded for both species, 14.7 min for blue whales and 16.9 min for fin whales, were considerably shorter than the TADL of 31.2 and 28.6 min, respectively. An allometric comparison of seven families diving to an average depth of 80-150 m showed a significant relationship between body mass and dive duration once Balaenopteridae whales, with a mean dive duration of 6.8 min, were excluded from the analysis. Thus, the short dive durations of blue whales and fin whales cannot be explained by the shallow distribution of their prey. We propose instead that short duration diving in large whales results from

  4. The silent witness: using dive computer records in diving fatality investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayer, Martin D J; Azzopardi, Elaine

    2014-09-01

    Downloaded data from diving computers can offer invaluable insights into diving incidents resulting in fatalities. Such data form an essential part of subsequent investigations or in legal actions related to the diving incident. It is often tempting to accept the information being displayed from a computer download without question. However, there is a large variability between the makes and models of dive computer in how the data are recorded, stored and re-displayed and caution must be employed in the interpretation of the evidence. In reporting on downloaded data, investigators should be fully aware of the limitations in the data retrieved. They should also know exactly how to interpret parameters such as: the accuracy of the dive profile; the effects of different mode settings; the precision of displayed water temperatures; the potential for misrepresenting breathing rates where there are data from integrated monitoring systems, and be able to challenge some forms of displayed information either through re-modelling based on the pressure/time profiles or by testing the computers in standardised conditions.

  5. Diving dentistry: a review of the dental implications of scuba diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadik, Y; Drucker, S

    2011-09-01

    In light of the overwhelming popularity of self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (SCUBA) diving, general dental practitioners should be prepared to address complications arising as a result of diving and to provide patients with accurate information. The aim of this article was to introduce the concepts of diving medicine and dentistry to the dentist, and to supply the dental practitioner with some diagnostic tools as well as treatment guidelines. The literature was reviewed to address diving barotrauma (pressure-induced injury related to an air space) to the head, face and oral regions, as well as scuba mouthpiece-related oral conditions. The relevant conditions for dentists who treat divers include diving-associated headache (migraine, tension-type headache), barosinusitis and barotitis-media (sinus and middle ear barotrauma, respectively), neuropathy, trigeminal (CN V) or facial (CN VII) nerve baroparesis (pressure-induced palsy), dental barotrauma (barometric-related tooth injury), barodontalgia (barometric-related dental pain), mouthpiece-associated herpes infection, pharyngeal gag reflex and temporomandibular joint disorder (dysfunction). For each condition, a theoretical description is followed by practical recommendations for the dental practitioner for the prevention and management of the condition.

  6. Nucleosynthesis in decompressing neutron star matter

    CERN Document Server

    Jaikumar, P; Otsuki, K; Ouyed, R; Jaikumar, Prashanth; Meyer, Bradley S.; Otsuki, Kaori; Ouyed, Rachid

    2006-01-01

    We explore heavy-element nucleosynthesis by rapid neutron capture (r-process) in the decompressing ejecta from the surface of a neutron star. The decompression is triggered by a violent phase transition to strange quark matter (quark-nova scenario). The presence of neutron-rich large Z nuclei (40,95)<(Z,A)<(70,177), the large neutron-to-seed ratio, and the low electron fraction Ye ~ 0.03 in the decompressing ejecta present favorable conditions for the r-process. We perform network calculations that are adapted to the quark-nova conditions, and which mimic usual (n-\\gamma) equilibrium r-process calculations during the initially cold decompression phase. They match to dynamical r-process calculations at densities below neutron drip (4x10^11 g/cc). We present results for the final element abundance distribution with and without heating from nuclear reactions, and compare to the solar abundance pattern of r-process elements. We highlight the distinguishing features of quark-novae by contrasting it with conv...

  7. Complications of cranioplasty after decompressive craniectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maša Glišović

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cranioplasty is a surgical repair of a defect or deformity of a skull with the use of autologous bone or synthetic materials.[4] It usually follows decompressive craniectomy, which is a commonly practiced neurosurgical intervention in patients with raised intracranial pressure unresponsive to other forms of treatment.[1] There are many conditions that may lead to intracranial hypertension, and the goal is to avoid brain necrosis caused by compartment pressure syndrome.[2] Consequently, the extensive use of decompressive craniectomy directly results in more cranioplasties, which sometimes present with unwanted complications.[5] Generally, the occurence of cranioplasty complications is between 16% and 34%.[3] Because of the many indications for craniectomy based on clinical data that speak in its favour, if will probably remain a relatively common neurosurgical intervention also in the future. The frequency of decompressive craniectomy and consequently of cranioplasty requires awareness of the many potential postoperative complications and understanding of its evolution. This article is a review of pathophysiological mechanisms after decompressive craniectomy and cranioplasty, of its complications and factors that potentially contribute to their occurence.

  8. A Pottery Electric Kiln Using Decompression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naoe, Nobuyuki; Yamada, Hirofumi; Nakayama, Tetsuo; Nakayama, Minoru; Minamide, Akiyuki; Takemata, Kazuya

    This paper presents a novel type electric kiln which fires the pottery using the decompression. The electric kiln is suitable for the environment and the energy saving as the pottery furnace. This paper described the baking principle and the baking characteristic of the novel type electric kiln.

  9. [Ethmoidal mucocele after transpalpebral bony orbital decompression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gire, J; Facon, F; Guigou, S; Fauquier, S; Malet, T

    2012-10-01

    We report a case of a late ethmoidal mucocele occurring after transpalpebral bony orbital decompression. A 39-year-old man presented with a recurrence of a right-sided proptosis without signs of orbital inflammation. The patient had undergone bilateral transpalpebral bony orbital decompression for dysthyroid orbitopathy 2 years prior. Orbital CT scan showed a large mucocele in the supero-lateral right ethmoidal sinus with lateral extension to the medial rectus. The patient was therefore referred to an ear, nose and throat (ENT) surgeon, who performed an anterior ethmoidectomy with marsupialization and drainage of the mucocele via an endoscopic approach. A complete postoperative resolution of proptosis was observed without recurrence of the mucocele to date, approximately 6 months postoperative. Sinus complications occurring after orbital decompression may include sinusitis, hematoma, imploding antrum syndrome and mucoceles. Recurrent proptosis secondary to an ethmoidal mucocele is a rare event after bony orbital decompression surgery, with only two cases reported in the international literature. Management requires ophthalmologic diagnosis and collaboration between the ophthalmologist and otorhinolaryngologist. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Decompression Sickness Risk Versus Time and Altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-11-01

    M, Wiegman J, Pilmanis exposure at 22,500 ft (Fig. 1-2) should raise AA. Prebreathe enhancement with concern since that level of decompression is...Andrew A. P11manis in a research phyniologist 2. Fischer MO, Wiegman JF, McLean SA, Olson Andrew A. ihi ish resiarch poycioo SRM. Evaluation of four

  11. Spontaneous extracranial decompression of epidural hematoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neely, John C. [Marshall University School of Medicine, Huntington, WV (United States); Jones, Blaise V. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Crone, Kerry R. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Division of Neurosurgery, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2008-03-15

    Epidural hematoma (EDH) is a common sequela of head trauma in children. An increasing number are managed nonsurgically, with close clinical and imaging observation. We report the case of a traumatic EDH that spontaneously decompressed into the subgaleal space, demonstrated on serial CT scans that showed resolution of the EDH and concurrent enlargement of the subgaleal hematoma. (orig.)

  12. Carbon dioxide absorbents for rebreather diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennefather, John

    2016-09-01

    Firstly I would like to thank SPUMS members for making me a Life Member of SPUMS; I was surprised and greatly honoured by the award. I also want to confirm and expand on the findings on carbon dioxide absorbents reported by David Harvey et al. For about 35 years, I was the main player in deciding which absorbent went into Australian Navy and Army diving sets. On several occasions, suppliers of absorbents to the anaesthesia market tried to supply the Australian military market. On no occasion did they provide absorbent that came close to the minimum absorbent capacity required, generally being 30-40% less efficient than diving-grade absorbents. Because I regard lives as being more important than any likely dollar saving, the best absorbent was always selected unless two suppliers provided samples with the same absorbent capacity. On almost every occasion, there was a clear winner and cost was never considered. I suggest the same argument for the best absorbent should be used by members and their friends who dive using rebreather sets. I make this point because of my findings on a set that was brought to me after the death of its owner. The absorbent was not the type or grain size recommended by the manufacturer of the set and did not resemble any of the diving grade absorbents I knew of. I suspected by its appearance that it was anaesthetic grade absorbent. When I tested the set, the absorbent system failed very quickly so it is likely that carbon dioxide toxicity contributed to his death. The death was not the subject of an inquest and I have no knowledge of how the man obtained the absorbent. Possibly there was someone from an operating theatre staff who unintentionally caused their friend's death by supplying him with 'borrowed absorbent'. I make this point as I would like to discourage members from making a similar error.

  13. Fabrication of a custom diving mouthpiece using a thermoforming material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Ryosuke; Ueno, Toshiaki; Ohyama, Takashi

    2004-10-01

    Scuba divers may suffer from temporomandibular joint dysfunction and related problems associated with the use of commercially available diving mouthpieces. Several authors have recommended that custom diving mouthpieces be fabricated for relieving the symptoms of diver's mouth syndrome. The lost wax technique is commonly used for this purpose but may be time-consuming and is technically complicated. This article describes a simplified technique using thermoforming material for fabricating a custom diving mouthpiece.

  14. CAS Technology Propels China's DeepDiving Submersible

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    @@ The manned diving submersible Jiaolong, named after a water dragon from Chinese mythology, has held a worldwide spotlight since its triumph in a 5,188m test dive in international waters of the Pacific Ocean the last summer.During its voyage from July 1 to August 18, 2011, Jiaolong successfully performed five dives, among which four exceeded 5,000 meters in depth, touching a maximal depth of 5,188 meters below sea level.

  15. 29 CFR Appendix C to Subpart T to... - Alternative Conditions Under § 1910.401(a)(3) for Recreational Diving Instructors and Diving...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Recreational Diving Instructors and Diving Guides (Mandatory) C Appendix C to Subpart T to Part 1910 Labor... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Commercial Diving Operations Pt. 1910, Subpt. T, App. C Appendix C to Subpart T to Part 1910—Alternative Conditions Under § 1910.401(a)(3) for Recreational Diving...

  16. Diving costs as a component of daily energy budgets of aquatic birds and mammals : Generalizing the inclusion of dive-recovery costs demonstrated in tufted ducks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deLeeuw, JJ

    1996-01-01

    Metabolic studies on freely diving birds and mammals are reviewed and allometric relations of diving costs are presented. A distinction can be made between three different types of diving costs: (1) metabolic rate during submergence, relevant in estimating aerobic dive limits, (2) average metabolic

  17. Diving costs as a component of daily energy budgets of aquatic birds and mammals : Generalizing the inclusion of dive-recovery costs demonstrated in tufted ducks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deLeeuw, JJ

    1996-01-01

    Metabolic studies on freely diving birds and mammals are reviewed and allometric relations of diving costs are presented. A distinction can be made between three different types of diving costs: (1) metabolic rate during submergence, relevant in estimating aerobic dive limits, (2) average metabolic

  18. Pictorial essay: Role of ultrasound in failed carpal tunnel decompression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Botchu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available USG has been used for the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome. Scarring and incomplete decompression are the main causes for persistence or recurrence of symptoms. We performed a retrospective study to assess the role of ultrasound in failed carpal tunnel decompression. Of 422 USG studies of the wrist performed at our center over the last 5 years, 14 were for failed carpal tunnel decompression. Scarring was noted in three patients, incomplete decompression in two patients, synovitis in one patient, and an anomalous muscle belly in one patient. No abnormality was detected in seven patients. We present a pictorial review of USG findings in failed carpal tunnel decompression.

  19. Gait switches in deep-diving beaked whales: biomechanical strategies for long-duration dives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín López, Lucía Martina; Miller, Patrick J O; Aguilar de Soto, Natacha; Johnson, Mark

    2015-05-01

    Diving animals modulate their swimming gaits to promote locomotor efficiency and so enable longer, more productive dives. Beaked whales perform extremely long and deep foraging dives that probably exceed aerobic capacities for some species. Here, we use biomechanical data from suction-cup tags attached to three species of beaked whales (Mesoplodon densirostris, N=10; Ziphius cavirostris, N=9; and Hyperoodon ampullatus, N=2) to characterize their swimming gaits. In addition to continuous stroking and stroke-and-glide gaits described for other diving mammals, all whales produced occasional fluke-strokes with distinctly larger dorso-ventral acceleration, which we termed 'type-B' strokes. These high-power strokes occurred almost exclusively during deep dive ascents as part of a novel mixed gait. To quantify body rotations and specific acceleration generated during strokes we adapted a kinematic method combining data from two sensors in the tag. Body rotations estimated with high-rate magnetometer data were subtracted from accelerometer data to estimate the resulting surge and heave accelerations. Using this method, we show that stroke duration, rotation angle and acceleration were bi-modal for these species, with B-strokes having 76% of the duration, 52% larger body rotation and four times more surge than normal strokes. The additional acceleration of B-strokes did not lead to faster ascents, but rather enabled brief glides, which may improve the overall efficiency of this gait. Their occurrence towards the end of long dives leads us to propose that B-strokes may recruit fast-twitch fibres that comprise ∼80% of swimming muscles in Blainville's beaked whales, thus prolonging foraging time at depth.

  20. [Scuba diving in children: Physiology, risks and recommendations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilveti, R; Osona, B; Peña, J A; Moreno, L; Asensio, O

    2015-12-01

    The increase in recreational scuba diving in recent years, including children, involves risks and the possibility of accidents. While legislation, conditions and risks of scuba diving are well documented in adults, scientific evidence in scuba diving by children and adolescents is sparse and isolated. Furthermore, existing guidelines and recommendations for adults cannot be transferred directly to children. These circumstances have led to the Group on Techniques of the Spanish Society of Pediatric Pulmonology (SENP) to perform a literature search to review and update the knowledge about scuba diving in children. Physiological adaptations of the body are examined during the dive, as well as the anatomical and physiological characteristics of children that should be taken into account in scuba diving. The most common types of accidents and its causes, as well as the risks of scuba diving practice in children with previous diseases are discussed, along with details of the medical and psychological requirements for scuba diving to be considered in the assessment of child and adolescent. A list of recommendations for scuba diving with compressed air in children is presented by a group of experts. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of recreational diving on Patagonian rocky reefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Gonzalo; Márquez, Federico; Marzinelli, Ezequiel M; Mendez, María M; Bigatti, Gregorio

    2015-03-01

    Tourism has grown considerably in the last decades, promoting activities such as recreational SCUBA diving that may affect marine benthic communities. In Puerto Madryn, Patagonia Argentina, sub-aquatic tourism areas (STA) receive about 7,000 divers per year. Diving is concentrated on a few small rocky reefs and 50% of the dives occur in summer. In this work, we evaluated the effect of recreational diving activities on benthic communities and determined whether diving causes a press (long-term) or a pulse (short-term) response. We quantified the percentage cover of benthic organisms and compared benthic assemblage structure and composition between two sites with contrasting usage by divers, 'highly disturbed' and 'moderately disturbed' sites, and two 'control' sites with similar physical characteristics but no diving activity, twice before and after the diving peak in summer. We found differences in benthic assemblage structure (identity and relative abundance of taxa) and composition (identity only) among diving sites and controls. These differences were consistent before and after the peak of diving in summer, suggesting that recreational diving may produce a press impact on overall benthic assemblage structure and composition in these STA. At the moderately disturbed site, however, covers of specific taxa, such as some key habitat-forming or highly abundant species, usually differed from those in controls only immediately after summer, after which they begun to resemble controls, suggesting a pulse impact. Thus, STA in Golfo Nuevo seem to respond differently to disturbances of diving depending on the usage of the sites. This information is necessary to develop sound management strategies in order to preserve local biodiversity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Novel porcine repetitive elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nonneman Dan J

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Repetitive elements comprise ~45% of mammalian genomes and are increasingly known to impact genomic function by contributing to the genomic architecture, by direct regulation of gene expression and by affecting genomic size, diversity and evolution. The ubiquity and increasingly understood importance of repetitive elements contribute to the need to identify and annotate them. We set out to identify previously uncharacterized repetitive DNA in the porcine genome. Once found, we characterized the prevalence of these repeats in other mammals. Results We discovered 27 repetitive elements in 220 BACs covering 1% of the porcine genome (Comparative Vertebrate Sequencing Initiative; CVSI. These repeats varied in length from 55 to 1059 nucleotides. To estimate copy numbers, we went to an independent source of data, the BAC-end sequences (Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, covering approximately 15% of the porcine genome. Copy numbers in BAC-ends were less than one hundred for 6 repeat elements, between 100 and 1000 for 16 and between 1,000 and 10,000 for 5. Several of the repeat elements were found in the bovine genome and we have identified two with orthologous sites, indicating that these elements were present in their common ancestor. None of the repeat elements were found in primate, rodent or dog genomes. We were unable to identify any of the replication machinery common to active transposable elements in these newly identified repeats. Conclusion The presence of both orthologous and non-orthologous sites indicates that some sites existed prior to speciation and some were generated later. The identification of low to moderate copy number repetitive DNA that is specific to artiodactyls will be critical in the assembly of livestock genomes and studies of comparative genomics.

  3. Decompression from He-N2-O2 (TRIMIX) Bounce Dives Is Not More Efficient Than From He-O2 (HELIOX) Bounce Dives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-28

    bubbles grow if the animal breathes air. Qualitatively similar results are observed in adipose tissue, where nitrogen permeability might exceed that of...or in Skeletal Muscle in Sheep," Journal of Applied Physiology, Vol. 118 (2015), pp. 586-594. 41. R. H. Strauss and T. D. Kunkle, "Isobaric Bubble...typical and common for this diver Vague abdominal or chest pain, not related to trauma or barotrauma Vague symptoms of any kind not responding to

  4. [Diving: barometric pressure and neurochemical mechanisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostain, Jean-Claude; Balon, Norbert

    2006-01-01

    The studies of Paul Bert, presented in his book "La Pression Barométrique" in 1878, were at the origin of the modern hyperbaric physiology. Indeed his research demonstrated the effects of oxygen at high pressure, that compression effects must be dissociated from decompression effects, and that neurological troubles and death of divers during or after decompression were due to the fast rate of decompression. However, it is only in 1935 that the work of Behnke et al. attributed the complaints reported at 3 bars and above in compressed air or nitrogen-oxygen mixture to the increase in partial pressure of nitrogen which induces nitrogen narcosis. Little is known about the origins and mechanisms of this narcosis. The traditional view was that anaesthesia or narcosis occurred when the volume of a hydrophobic membrane site was caused to expand beyond a critical amount by the absorption of molecules of a narcotic gas. The observation of the pressure reversal effect during general anaesthesia has long supported this lipid theory. However, recently, protein theories have met with increasing recognition since results with gaseous anaesthetics have been interpreted as evidence for a direct gas-protein interaction. The question is to know whether inert gases, that disrupt dopamine and GABA neurotransmissions and probably glutamatergic neurotransmission, act by binding to neurotransmitter protein receptors.

  5. Pressure Physiology: Studies of Acute and Chronic Exposures to Increased Pressures of Oxygen and Inert Gases in Diving, Decompression and Therapy of Decompression and Isobaric Gas Lesion Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-12-31

    Oxygen Exposures. Completion of Design for Human Studies of CNS, Pulmon - ary, and Cardiac Oxygen Tolerance Extension at 2.5 and 3.0 ATA. (Based on prior...intoxication at that pressure. Of all pulmon - ary function-indices that are known to be affected by oxygen to date, repeated post-exposure measurements of

  6. Treatment of hemimasticatory spasm with microvascular decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong-Nan; Dou, Ning-Ning; Zhou, Qiu-Meng; Jiao, Wei; Zhu, Jin; Zhong, Jun; Li, Shi-Ting

    2013-01-01

    Hemimasticatory spasm is a rare disorder characterized by paroxysmal involuntary contraction of the jaw-closing muscles. As the ideology and pathogenesis of the disease are still unclear, there has been no treatment that could give rise to a good outcome so far. Herein, we tried to use surgical management to cure the disease. Six patients with the disease were included in this study. These patients underwent microvascular decompression of the motor fibers of the trigeminal root. After the operation, all faces of the patients felt relaxed at varied degrees, except for 1 patient. Our study showed that microvascular decompression of the trigeminal nerve could lead to a better outcome. However, a control study with a large sample is needed before this technique is widely used.

  7. Optic Nerve Decompression for Orbitofrontal Fibrous Dysplasia

    OpenAIRE

    Abe, Takumi; Sato, Kaneshige; Otsuka, Takaharu; Kawamura, Noriyoshi; Shimazu, Motohiko; Izumiyama, Hitoshi; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi

    2002-01-01

    Orbitofrontal fibrous dysplasia often involves the bony orbit and the optic canal. Although fibrous dysplasia reportedly produces compression of the optic nerve leading to visual distrubances, optic nerve decompression in patients without clinical signs of optic neuropathy is still controversial. We describe two patients with orbitofrontal fibrous dysplasia without signs of visual disturbance and one patient with McCune-Albright syndrome and progressive visual impairment. Optic nerve decompre...

  8. Emergency percutaneous needle decompression for tension pneumoperitoneum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Körner Markus

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tension pneumoperitoneum as a complication of iatrogenic bowel perforation during endoscopy is a dramatic condition in which intraperitoneal air under pressure causes hemodynamic and ventilatory compromise. Like tension pneumothorax, urgent intervention is required. Immediate surgical decompression though is not always possible due to the limitations of the preclinical management and sometimes to capacity constraints of medical staff and equipment in the clinic. Methods This is a retrospective analysis of cases of pneumoperitoneum and tension pneumoperitoneum due to iatrogenic bowel perforation. All patients admitted to our surgical department between January 2005 and October 2010 were included. Tension pneumoperitoneum was diagnosed in those patients presenting signs of hemodynamic and ventilatory compromise in addition to abdominal distension. Results Between January 2005 and October 2010 eleven patients with iatrogenic bowel perforation were admitted to our surgical department. The mean time between perforation and admission was 36 ± 14 hrs (range 30 min - 130 hrs, between ER admission and begin of the operation 3 hrs and 15 min ± 47 min (range 60 min - 9 hrs. Three out of eleven patients had clinical signs of tension pneumoperitoneum. In those patients emergency percutaneous needle decompression was performed with a 16G venous catheter. This improved significantly the patients' condition (stabilization of vital signs, reducing jugular vein congestion, bridging the time to the start of the operation. Conclusions Hemodynamical and respiratory compromise in addition to abdominal distension shortly after endoscopy are strongly suggestive of tension pneumoperitoneum due to iatrogenic bowel perforation. This is a rare but life threatening condition and it can be managed in a preclinical and clinical setting with emergency percutaneous needle decompression like tension pneumothorax. Emergency percutaneous decompression is no

  9. Danish diving-related fatalities 1999-2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinkel, Julie; Bak, Peter; Hyldegaard, Ole

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The purpose was to explore causative tendencies among diving fatalities to prevent similar injuries in the future. METHODS: We report 33 fatal diving injuries that occurred among Danish divers during the period 1999-2012 in Scandinavian waters. The study was performed as a retrospective over...

  10. 50 CFR 640.22 - Gear and diving restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gear and diving restrictions. 640.22 Section 640.22 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND... ATLANTIC Management Measures § 640.22 Gear and diving restrictions. (a) Prohibited gear and methods. (1)...

  11. Recent modifications to the investigation of diving related deaths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, Carl; Caruso, James

    2014-03-01

    The investigation of deaths that involve diving using a compressed breathing gas (SCUBA diving) is a specialized area of forensic pathology. Diving related deaths occur more frequently in certain jurisdictions, but any medical examiner or coroner's office may be faced with performing this type of investigation. In order to arrive at the correct conclusion regarding the cause and manner of death, forensic pathologists and investigators need to have a basic understanding of diving physiology, and should also utilize more recently developed technology and ancillary techniques. In the majority of diving related deaths, the cause of death is drowning, but this more often represents a final common pathway due to a water environment. The chain of events leading to the death is just as important to elucidate if similar deaths are to be minimized in the future. Re-enactment of accident scenarios, interrogation of dive computers, postmortem radiographic imaging, and slight alterations in autopsy technique may allow some of these diving related deaths to the better characterized. The amount and location of gas present in the body at the time of autopsy may be very meaningful or may simply represent a postmortem artifact. Medical examiners, coroners, and forensic investigators should consider employing select ancillary techniques to more thoroughly investigate the factors contributing a death associated with SCUBA diving.

  12. Swimming & Diving: Special Olympics Sports Skills Instructional Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph P. Kennedy, Jr. Foundation, Washington, DC.

    One of five parts of the Special Olympics' Sports Skills Instructional Program, the booklet addresses ways to teach swimming and diving to mentally retarded students. Short term objectives of the program encompass warmup, basic swimming and diving skills, safety, and good sportsmanship. The long term goal focuses on acquisition of basic skills,…

  13. Scuba Diving and Kinesiology: Development of an Academic Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Christopher R.; Walter, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The use of scuba diving as a recreational activity within traditional university instructional programs has been well established. Departments focusing on kinesiology, physical education, or exercise science have often provided scuba diving lessons as part of their activity-based course offerings. However, few departments have developed an…

  14. Scuba Diving and Kinesiology: Development of an Academic Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Christopher R.; Walter, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The use of scuba diving as a recreational activity within traditional university instructional programs has been well established. Departments focusing on kinesiology, physical education, or exercise science have often provided scuba diving lessons as part of their activity-based course offerings. However, few departments have developed an…

  15. Optic nerve decompression for orbitofrontal fibrous dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Takumi; Sato, Kaneshige; Otsuka, Takaharu; Kawamura, Noriyoshi; Shimazu, Motohiko; Izumiyama, Hitoshi; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi

    2002-08-01

    Orbitofrontal fibrous dysplasia often involves the bony orbit and the optic canal. Although fibrous dysplasia reportedly produces compression of the optic nerve leading to visual distrubances, optic nerve decompression in patients without clinical signs of optic neuropathy is still controversial. We describe two patients with orbitofrontal fibrous dysplasia without signs of visual disturbance and one patient with McCune-Albright syndrome and progressive visual impairment. Optic nerve decompression was performed prophylactically for two patients and therapeutically for one patient through the transcranial extradural route. Dystopias and craniofacial deformities induced by fibrous dysplasia also were corrected. The micropressure suction-irrigation system was especially effective for decreasing heat transfer and thereby preventing thermal injury of the optic nerve. The orbitofrontal area was reconstructed from cranial bone, iliac bone, and ribs. Postoperative follow-up revealed no disturbances in visual function and no evidence of cerebrospinal fluid leakage. These findings suggest that optic nerve decompression may be effective in preventing visual disturbances with minimal risk of other neurological sequelae. Subsequent orbital reconstruction yielded satisfactory cosmetic results.

  16. Novel locomotor muscle design in extreme deep-diving whales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velten, B P; Dillaman, R M; Kinsey, S T; McLellan, W A; Pabst, D A

    2013-05-15

    Most marine mammals are hypothesized to routinely dive within their aerobic dive limit (ADL). Mammals that regularly perform deep, long-duration dives have locomotor muscles with elevated myoglobin concentrations that are composed of predominantly large, slow-twitch (Type I) fibers with low mitochondrial volume densities (V(mt)). These features contribute to extending ADL by increasing oxygen stores and decreasing metabolic rate. Recent tagging studies, however, have challenged the view that two groups of extreme deep-diving cetaceans dive within their ADLs. Beaked whales (including Ziphius cavirostris and Mesoplodon densirostris) routinely perform the deepest and longest average dives of any air-breathing vertebrate, and short-finned pilot whales (Globicephala macrorhynchus) perform high-speed sprints at depth. We investigated the locomotor muscle morphology and estimated total body oxygen stores of several species within these two groups of cetaceans to determine whether they (1) shared muscle design features with other deep divers and (2) performed dives within their calculated ADLs. Muscle of both cetaceans displayed high myoglobin concentrations and large fibers, as predicted, but novel fiber profiles for diving mammals. Beaked whales possessed a sprinter's fiber-type profile, composed of ~80% fast-twitch (Type II) fibers with low V(mt). Approximately one-third of the muscle fibers of short-finned pilot whales were slow-twitch, oxidative, glycolytic fibers, a rare fiber type for any mammal. The muscle morphology of beaked whales likely decreases the energetic cost of diving, while that of short-finned pilot whales supports high activity events. Calculated ADLs indicate that, at low metabolic rates, both beaked and short-finned pilot whales carry sufficient onboard oxygen to aerobically support their dives.

  17. Can dive cycle models predict patterns of foraging behaviour? Diving by common eiders in an Arctic polynya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heath, J.P.; Gilchrist, H.G.; Ydenberg, R.C.

    2007-01-01

    There has been wide empirical and theoretical interest in how diving animals allocate time between obtaining oxygen at the surface and foraging at depth. Assuming diminishing returns in oxygen gain at the surface, classic diving models predict that time on the surface should increase, while time spe

  18. Biosonar, diving and movements of two tagged white-beaked dolphin in Icelandic waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Marianne H.; Akamatsu, Tomonari; Teilmann, Jonas;

    2013-01-01

    registered 162 dives. The dolphin dove to a maximum depth of 45 m, which is about the depth of the bay in which the dolphin was swimming. Two basic types of dives were identified; U-shaped and V-shaped dives. The dolphin used more time in U-shaped dives, more clicks and sonar signals with shorter click...

  19. Early diving behaviour in juvenile penguins: improvement or selection processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orgeret, Florian; Weimerskirch, Henri; Bost, Charles-André

    2016-08-01

    The early life stage of long-lived species is critical to the viability of population, but is poorly understood. Longitudinal studies are needed to test whether juveniles are less efficient foragers than adults as has been hypothesized. We measured changes in the diving behaviour of 17 one-year-old king penguins Aptenodytes patagonicus at Crozet Islands (subantartic archipelago) during their first months at sea, using miniaturized tags that transmitted diving activity in real time. We also equipped five non-breeder adults with the same tags for comparison. The data on foraging performance revealed two groups of juveniles. The first group made shallower and shorter dives that may be indicative of early mortality while the second group progressively increased their diving depths and durations, and survived the first months at sea. This surviving group of juveniles required the same recovery durations as adults, but typically performed shallower and shorter dives. There is thereby a relationship between improved diving behaviour and survival in young penguins. This long period of improving diving performance in the juvenile life stage is potentially a critical period for the survival of deep avian divers and may have implications for their ability to adapt to environmental change. © 2016 The Authors.

  20. Early diving behaviour in juvenile penguins: improvement or selection processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weimerskirch, Henri; Bost, Charles-André

    2016-01-01

    The early life stage of long-lived species is critical to the viability of population, but is poorly understood. Longitudinal studies are needed to test whether juveniles are less efficient foragers than adults as has been hypothesized. We measured changes in the diving behaviour of 17 one-year-old king penguins Aptenodytes patagonicus at Crozet Islands (subantartic archipelago) during their first months at sea, using miniaturized tags that transmitted diving activity in real time. We also equipped five non-breeder adults with the same tags for comparison. The data on foraging performance revealed two groups of juveniles. The first group made shallower and shorter dives that may be indicative of early mortality while the second group progressively increased their diving depths and durations, and survived the first months at sea. This surviving group of juveniles required the same recovery durations as adults, but typically performed shallower and shorter dives. There is thereby a relationship between improved diving behaviour and survival in young penguins. This long period of improving diving performance in the juvenile life stage is potentially a critical period for the survival of deep avian divers and may have implications for their ability to adapt to environmental change. PMID:27484650

  1. Sympathetic nerve activity and simulated diving in healthy humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsuzzaman, Abu; Ackerman, Michael J; Kuniyoshi, Fatima Sert; Accurso, Valentina; Davison, Diane; Amin, Raouf S; Somers, Virend K

    2014-04-01

    The goal of our study was to develop a simple and practical method for simulating diving in humans using facial cold exposure and apnea stimuli to measure neural and circulatory responses during the stimulated diving reflex. We hypothesized that responses to simultaneous facial cold exposure and apnea (simulated diving) would be synergistic, exceeding the sum of responses to individual stimuli. We studied 56 volunteers (24 female and 32 male), average age of 39 years. All subjects were healthy, free of cardiovascular and other diseases, and on no medications. Although muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), blood pressure, and vascular resistance increased markedly during both early and late phases of simulated diving, significant reductions in heart rate were observed only during the late phase. Total MSNA during simulated diving was greater than combined MSNA responses to the individual stimuli. We found that simulated diving is a powerful stimulus to sympathetic nerve traffic with significant bradycardia evident in the late phase of diving and eliciting synergistic sympathetic and parasympathetic responses. Our data provide insight into autonomic triggers that could help explain catastrophic cardiovascular events that may occur during asphyxia or swimming, such as in patients with obstructive sleep apnea or congenital long QT syndrome.

  2. MIMICRY, DIFFERENCE AND REPETITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Mendes de Souza

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses Homi K. Bhabha’s concept of mimicry in a broader context, other than that of cultural studies and post-colonial studies, bringing together other concepts, such as that of Gilles Deleuze in Difference and repetition, among other texts, and other names, such as Silviano Santiago, Jorge Luís Borges, Franz Kafka and Giorgio Agamben. As a partial conclusion, the article intends to oppose Bhabha’s freudian-marxist view to Five propositions on Psychoanalysis (1973, Gilles Deleuze’s text about Psychoanalysis published right after his book The Anti-Oedipus.

  3. Diving response in rats: role of the subthalamic vasodilator area.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene Golanov

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Diving response is a powerful integrative response targeted toward survival of the hypoxic/anoxic conditions. Being present in all animals and humans it allows to survive adverse conditions like diving. Earlier we discovered that forehead stimulation affords neuroprotective effect decreasing infarction volume triggered by permanent occlusion of the middle cerebral artery in rats. We hypothesized that cold stimulation of the forehead induces diving response in rats, which, in turn, exerts neuroprotection. We compared autonomic (AP, HR, CBF and EEG responses to the known diving response-triggering stimulus, ammonia stimulation of the nasal mucosa, cold stimulation of the forehead, and cold stimulation of the glabrous skin of the tail base in anesthetized rats. Responses in AP, HR, CBF and EEG to cold stimulation of the forehead and ammonia vapors instillation into the nasal cavity were comparable and differed significantly from responses to the cold stimulation of the tail base. Excitotoxic lesion of the subthalamic vasodilator area, which is known to participate in CBF regulation and to afford neuroprotection upon excitation, failed to affect autonomic components of the diving response evoked by forehead cold stimulation or nasal mucosa ammonia stimulation. We conclude that cold stimulation of the forehead triggers physiological response comparable to the response evoked by ammonia vapor instillation into the nasal cavity, which considered as stimulus triggering protective diving response. These observations may explain the neuroprotective effect of the forehead stimulation. Data demonstrate that subthalamic vasodilator area does not directly participate in the autonomic adjustments accompanying diving response, however, it is involved in diving-evoked modulation of EEG. We suggest that forehead stimulation can be employed as a stimulus capable of triggering oxygen-conserving diving response and can be used for neuroprotective therapy.

  4. Advances in microvascular decompression for hemifacial spasm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiqiang Cui; Zhipei Ling

    2015-01-01

    Primary hemifacial spasm (HFS) is a disorder that causes frequent involuntary contractions in the muscles on one side of the face, due to a blood vessel compressing the nerve at its root exit zone (REZ) from the brainstem. Numerous prospective and retrospective case series have confirmed the efficacy of microvascular decompression (MVD) of the facial nerve in patients with HFS. However, while MVD is effective, there are still significant postoperative complications. In this paper, recent technological advances related to MVD (such as lateral spread response, brainstem auditory evokes potential, three dimensional time of flight magnetic resonance angiography, intraoperative neuroendoscopy) are reviewed for the purposes of improving MVD treatment efficacy and reducing postoperative complications.

  5. Thirty-five Day Fluoxetine Treatment Limits Sensory-Motor Deficit and Biochemical Disorders in a Rat Model of Decompression Sickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Cosnard

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available According to the OECD statistical base for 2014, anti-depressants will, on average, be distributed at a rate of 62 daily doses per 1,000 inhabitants for the 25 countries surveyed (Health at a glance: Europe 2014; OECD Health Statistics; World Health Organization and OECD Health Statistics, 2014. Divers must be concerned. On another hand, divers are potentially exposed to decompression sickness including coagulation inflammation and ischemia, which can result in neurological lesions or even death. The purpose of this study is to assess whether chronic treatment with anti-depressants may represent a contraindication to the practice of an at-risk activity, such as, scuba diving, or even presents a benefit by attenuating the severity of the symptoms. We study for the first time the effect of a 35-day fluoxetine treatment (20 mg/kg on the occurrence of decompression sickness in laboratory rats (n = 79. Following exposure to the hazardous protocol, there is a significant correlation between the type of treatment and the clinical status of the rats in favor of a better clinical prognosis for the rats treated with fluoxetine with a significantly higher number of No DCS status and a lower number of Severe DCS status in the Flux, compared to Controls. The treatment modifies the rat performances both significantly and favorably during the physical and behavioral tests, just like their biological and biochemical constants. After decompression, rats under treatment display lower sensory-motor deficit and lowers biochemical disorders. From a biological point of view, we conclude fluoxetine should not be seen as a contraindication for diving on the basis of anticipated increased physiological risk.

  6. 77 FR 74193 - Request for Information on Edel-Kindwall Caisson Tables for Preventing Decompression Illness in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-13

    ... environmental pressure (decompression). The release of nitrogen bubbles into blood or tissues can result in... environmental ambient pressure (decompressed) in decompression areas. Decompression tables generally utilize...). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: High pressure tunneling operations are used for some underground infrastructure...

  7. Orbital subperiosteal hematoma from scuba diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberry, Clark; Angelidis, Matthew; Devita, Diane

    2010-09-01

    Only a few cases of nontraumatic orbital subperiosteal hematoma due to scuba diving have been reported, and this is the first of such cases that underwent surgical intervention. This injury results from negative pressure within the face mask, suctioning orbital tissues into the mask after incomplete equilibration of pressure on descent. Valsalva maneuver is a second mechanism implicated in the etiology of this injury. Recognition of this injury is of the utmost importance because vision loss is a possible complication if there is compression of the optic nerve or increased intraocular pressure. In many cases of nontraumatic orbital hematoma, conservative management is adequate; however, this case was an exception due to worsening exam findings. Divers may be able to prevent this injury by frequent and gentle equilibration of mask pressure on descent.

  8. A New Measure of Decompression Sickness in the Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Buzzacott

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we assessed the reliability of a tilting-board grip score as a measure of decompression sickness in rats. In experiments using a hyperbaric compression/decompression protocol, rats were observed for signs of decompression sickness and their grip strength measured on a tilting particle board hinged to a metal frame. Angles at which rats lost grip were converted to gravitational vectors. Decreased mean grip scores following decompression were fitted to a logistic regression model with strain, age, and weight. Decrease in grip score was significantly associated with observed decompression sickness (P=0.0036. The log odds ratio for decompression sickness = 1.40 (decrease in grip score. In rats with no decrease in mean grip score there was a 50% probability of decompression sickness (pDCS. This increased steadily with decreases in mean grip score. A decrease of 0.3 had a 60% pDCS, a decrease of 0.6 had a 70% pDCS, and a decrease of 2.1 had a 95% pDCS. The tilting board grip score is a reliable measure of the probability of decompression sickness.

  9. [Osteoplastic decompressive craniotomy--indication and surgical technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mracek, J; Choc, M; Mracek, Z

    2010-02-01

    Decompressive craniotomy is usually carried out using decompressive craniectomy (osteoclastic decompressive craniotomy) when the bone flap is removed. In situations when the level of expansion does not call for decomopressive craniectomy, we do not remove the bone flap and we perform osteoplastic decompressive craniotomy. The indication is based on assessment and cross correlation of the following parameters: intracranial pressure,midline shift and the number of pathologies on CT, actual influence of antiedematous therapy, expected cerebral oedema progression and especially according to the size of the dural defect after duratomy. In the course of osteoplastic decompressive craniotomy, decompression is secured by the elevation of the unfixed bone flap during cerebral tissue expansion. After the oedema regression, the elevated bone flap spontaneously drops to its original position and is reattached. The danger of bone plate depression is eliminated with the use of a bevel bone cut using a Gigli saw. Osteoplastic decompressive craniotomy is an effective method of treating brain oedema when the degree of expansion does not require decompressive craniectomy.

  10. Collagen levels are normalized after decompression of experimentally obstructed colon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehn, Martin; Ågren, Sven Per Magnus; Syk, I

    2011-01-01

    Our aim was to define the dynamics in collagen concentrations in the large bowel wall following decompression of experimental obstruction.......Our aim was to define the dynamics in collagen concentrations in the large bowel wall following decompression of experimental obstruction....

  11. Different effect of l-NAME treatment on susceptibility to decompression sickness in male and female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, Aleksandra; Buzzacott, Peter; Lambrechts, Kate; Wang, Qiong; Belhomme, Marc; Theron, Michael; Popov, Georgi; Distefano, Giovanni; Guerrero, Francois

    2014-11-01

    Vascular bubble formation results from supersaturation during inadequate decompression contributes to endothelial injuries, which form the basis for the development of decompression sickness (DCS). Risk factors for DCS include increased age, weight-fat mass, decreased maximal oxygen uptake, chronic diseases, dehydration, and nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. Production of NO is often affected by diving and its expression-activity varies between the genders. Little is known about the influence of sex on the risk of DCS. To study this relationship we used an animal model of Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) to induce decreased NO production. Male and female rats with diverse ages and weights were divided into 2 groups: treated with l-NAME (in tap water; 0.05 mg·mL(-1) for 7 days) and a control group. To control the distribution of nitrogen among tissues, 2 different compression-decompression protocols were used. Results showed that l-NAME was significantly associated with increased DCS in female rats (p = 0.039) only. Weight was significant for both sexes (p = 0.01). The protocol with the highest estimated tissue pressures in the slower compartments was 2.6 times more likely to produce DCS than the protocol with the highest estimated tissue pressures in faster compartments. The outcome of this study had significantly different susceptibility to DCS after l-NAME treatment between the sexes, while l-NAME per se had no effect on the likelihood of DCS. The analysis also showed that for the appearance of DCS, the most significant factors were type of protocol and weight.

  12. Repetition in Waiting for Godot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李想; 魏妍

    2015-01-01

    Waiting for Godot is one of the most famous plays written by Samuel Barclay Beckett, and also is the founding work of“Theatre of the Absurd”. In the drama, repetitive phenomena shed light on the whole construction considerably. All the charac-ters were helpless and unthinking. Their dialogues were simple, nonsense and repetitive. Two scenes were cyclical. Repetition was used subtly in order to express the theme of the play, showing mental crisis after depravation of WWII.

  13. Dives from missions of the NOAA ship Okeanos Explorer.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Dataset shows dives made by a Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) or an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) from the NOAA ship Okeanos Explorer during expeditions from...

  14. B-type natriuretic peptide secretion following scuba diving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Passino, Claudio; Franzino, Enrico; Giannoni, Alberto;

    2011-01-01

    To examine the neurohormonal effects of a scuba dive, focusing on the acute changes in the plasma concentrations of the different peptide fragments from the B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) precursor....

  15. Spinal cord decompression sickness: a comparison of recompression therapies in an animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, J J; Hallenbeck, J M; Leitch, D R

    1986-06-01

    Somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) were used in an animal model to measure spinal cord electrophysiological function. Animals were submitted to a dive profile resulting in spinal cord decompression sickness (DCS). The animals were treated after a delay allowing the lesion to consolidate. Serial measurements of SEP documented the onset, duration, and outcome of treatment. Physiological data were recorded throughout each experiment. Group A (n = 10) was recompressed to 60 fsw (feet of sea water) breathing 100% oxygen (2.8 ATA) and Group B (n = 8) was treated at 66 fsw breathing 66% oxygen (2.0 ATA). No differences were found between groups in the severity, surface interval before treatment, or the maximum effect of treatment. The maximum effect of treatment was seen by 25 min of treatment. Animals were regrouped into responders and nonresponders. The latter displayed a more rapid onset, a more severe insult, and more adverse physiological effects than the responders. The possibility of a different etiology was considered together with the failure to differentiate between the treatment groups. It was concluded that treatment B was safer but the problems of introducing a new therapeutic table outweighed the safety advantage.

  16. [Lipid peroxidation and antioxidative system in imitation diving].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrakhovich, E A; Vdovin, A V; Biziukin, A V; Pavlov, B N; Smolin, V V; Meshkov, D O

    1998-01-01

    Plasma lipid oxidation (LPO) and antioxidative system were examined in test divers who made imitation diving in the pressure chamber to the depth of 250 meters. Imitation diving showed higher iron levels, followed by a rise in the concentration of primary LPO products. There were no increases in the levels of secondary LPO products probably due to the fact that the ceruloplasmin-transferrin system released active iron from the reaction and that peroxy radicals were inactivated by SH groups.

  17. Nitrogen narcosis and alcohol consumption--a scuba diving fatality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalodimitrakis, E; Patsalis, A

    1987-07-01

    Nitrogen narcosis can cause death among experienced scuba divers. Nitrogen under pressure affects the brain by acting as an anesthetic agent. Furthermore, the consumption of ethanol along with diving will cause the symptoms of nitrogen narcosis to occur at depths less than 30 m. Our case deals with an experienced diver who drank alcoholic beverages before diving and developed symptoms of nitrogen narcosis at a shallow depth. These two conditions contributed to his death by drowning.

  18. [Evaluation of diving stress implication of analysis of work loads].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mano, Y

    1987-05-01

    An investigation was conducted on the actual diving conditions of 2,996 divers in Japan except those engaged in fishery. Results of analysis made on the diving profiles and actual working conditions showed that some of their jobs required heavy load and that the burden was excessively large. Little study has been made for the proper evaluation of diving stress or work loads, but it has been assumed from these limited studies that the load is not so heavy. The load has been generally estimated to be about 1.8l/min STPD of oxygen consumption (VO2) during 40 l/min STPD of expiratory gas volume/min (VE). In our examination of their actual diving work, their work load was far greater than our expectation. It was in practice not only difficult to obtain the actual VO2 but also very difficult to determine their actual fatigue. Instead of these, it is necessary to establish an adequate index for evaluating diving work load. Studies have been made in our laboratory since 1981 and regression equations have been finally obtained, by which load during diving work can be determined using heart rate as index. Seven healthy males were chosen as subjects of the present study having a mean age of 34.4 yr and a mean diving history of 7.3 yr. First, performance time was acquired in each subject by bicycle ergometer exercise and the maximalen oxygen consumption (VO2-max) was obtained. In the second step, VO2-max was obtained by using the regulator apparatus for breathing during SCUBA diving. This value was 86.1% of the first step. The third step was made in a swimming pool.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. THE INFLUENCE OF AUTONOMOUS DIVING ON SENSES AND MENTAL PROCESSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan Krivokapić

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Diving is classified within a group of sports accompanied with an increased risk, yet it is a sport of full biological significance. Diving implies change of immediate human environment. Water, as the natural ambient for diving issues specific demands to the organism, which in turn influence decrease in psychophysical abilities when underwater, and in some instances, immediately after emerging from it. The most important factors influencing decrease in psychophysical abilities are: immersion, increased ambient pressure, characteristics of diving equipment and atmosphere separation. The senses and the mental processes of the diver are significantly altered during the autonomous diving. Loss of self-weight perception and pressure put on joints cause disorders in function of kinesthetic senses and vestibular apparatus, which in turn becomes reflected on proprioception. Coldness of water, especially at grater depths, induces decline in pain sensation as well as in aptness and mobility of fingers. Sight remains normal, but the image received is slightly changed due to refraction of light on boundary surfaces. Visual field is narrowed down to fit the limited diving mask field of view. At the same time, diffusion of light and color absorption brings about the loss of both ability to perceive things and contrasts when at depths .Objects tend to appear bigger and closer underwater. Hearing is changed owing to the fact that the sound is not carried through the air but through the water, yet the speed of transmission causes only slight difference of left and right ear stimulation. Mental processes, informationassessment, creation of clear mental images of the actual moment, abstract thinking, decision making, etc. are not effective and precise. This state can be partly ascribed to the above mentioned problems with senses, partly to the greater influence of emotional as opposed to rational, but also to the narcotic effect of nitrogen that is produced while

  20. Function of head-bobbing behavior in diving little grebes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunji, Megu; Fujita, Masaki; Higuchi, Hiroyoshi

    2013-08-01

    Most birds show a characteristic head movement that consists of head stabilization and quick displacement. In this movement, which is analogous to saccadic eye movement in mammals, head stabilization plays an important role in stabilizing the retinal image. This head movement, called "head bobbing", is particularly pronounced during walking. Previous studies focusing on anatomical and behavioral features have pointed out that visual information is also important for diving birds, indicating its significance in the head movements of diving birds. In the present study, the kinematic and behavioral features of head bobbing in diving little grebes were described by motion analysis to identify the head movement in diving birds. The results showed that head-bobbing stroke (HBS) consisted of a thrust phase and a hold phase as is typical for head bobbing during walking birds. This suggests that HBS is related to visual stabilization under water. In HBS, grebes tended to dive with longer stroke length and smaller stroke frequency than in non-bobbing stroke. This suggests that the behavior, which is related to vision, affects the kinematic stroke parameters. This clarification of underwater head movement will help in our understanding not only of vision, but also of the kinematic strategy of diving birds.

  1. Should children be SCUBA diving?: Cerebral arterial gas embolism in a swimming pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Valerie; Adkinson, Cheryl; Bowen, Mariya; Ortega, Henry

    2012-04-01

    Cerebral arterial gas embolism (CAGE) is a well-known serious complication of self-contained breathing apparatus (SCUBA) diving. Most serious complications of SCUBA diving occur in adults because most of SCUBA divers are adults. However, young age is an independent risk factor for injury in SCUBA diving and shallow-water SCUBA diving is the riskiest environment for CAGE. We present a case of a 10-year-old boy who developed CAGE while taking SCUBA diving lessons in a university swimming pool. This case illustrates the potential danger of SCUBA diving for children who lack understanding of the physics of diving as well as the often unappreciated risk of shallow-water SCUBA diving. Our intent is to educate providers of primary care to children, so that they may appropriately advise parents about SCUBA diving, and to educate providers of emergency care to children, so that they will recognize this uncommon but serious emergency condition.

  2. Regional heterothermy and conservation of core temperature in emperor penguins diving under sea ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponganis, P J; Van Dam, R P; Levenson, D H; Knower, T; Ponganis, K V; Marshall, G

    2003-07-01

    Temperatures were recorded at several body sites in emperor penguins (Aptenodytes forsteri) diving at an isolated dive hole in order to document temperature profiles during diving and to evaluate the role of hypothermia in this well-studied model of penguin diving physiology. Grand mean temperatures (+/-S.E.) in central body sites during dives were: stomach: 37.1+/-0.2 degrees C (n=101 dives in five birds), pectoral muscle: 37.8+/-0.1 degrees C (n=71 dives in three birds) and axillary/brachial veins: 37.9+/-0.1 degrees C (n=97 dives in three birds). Mean diving temperature and duration correlated negatively at only one site in one bird (femoral vein, r=-0.59, Pemperors. Although prey ingestion can result in cooling in the stomach, these findings and the lack of negative correlations between internal temperatures and diving duration do not support a role for hypothermia-induced metabolic suppression of the abdominal organs as a mechanism of extension of aerobic dive time in emperor penguins diving at the isolated dive hole. Such high temperatures within the body and the observed decreases in limb, anterior abdomen, subcutaneous and sub-feather temperatures are consistent with preservation of core temperature and cooling of an outer body shell secondary to peripheral vasoconstriction, decreased insulation of the feather layer, and conductive/convective heat loss to the water environment during the diving of these emperor penguins.

  3. Microneurolysis and decompression of long thoracic nerve injury are effective in reversing scapular winging: Long-term results in 50 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyons Andrew B

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long thoracic nerve injury leading to scapular winging is common, often caused by closed trauma through compression, stretching, traction, direct extrinsic force, penetrating injury, or neuritides such as Parsonage-Turner syndrome. We undertook the largest series of long thoracic nerve decompression and neurolysis yet reported to demonstrate the usefulness of long thoracic nerve decompression. Methods Winging was bilateral in 3 of the 47 patients (26 male, 21 female, yielding a total of 50 procedures. The mean age of the patients was 33.4 years, ranging from 24–57. Causation included heavy weight-lifting (31 patients, repetitive throwing (5 patients, deep massage (2 patients, repetitive overhead movement (1 patient, direct trauma (1 patient, motor bike accident (1 patient, and idiopathic causes (9 patients. Decompression and microneurolysis of the long thoracic nerve were performed in the supraclavicular space. Follow-up (average of 25.7 months consisted of physical examination and phone conversations. The degree of winging was measured by the operating surgeon (RKN. Patients also answered questions covering 11 quality-of-life facets spanning four domains of the World Health Organization Quality of Life questionnaire. Results Thoracic nerve decompression and neurolysis improved scapular winging in 49 (98% of the 50 cases, producing "good" or "excellent" results in 46 cases (92%. At least some improvement occurred in 98% of cases that were less than 10 years old. Pain reduction through surgery was good or excellent in 43 (86% cases. Shoulder instability affected 21 patients preoperatively and persisted in 5 of these patients after surgery, even in the 5 patients with persistent instability who experienced some relief from the winging itself. Conclusion Surgical decompression and neurolysis of the long thoracic nerve significantly improve scapular winging in appropriate patients, for whom these techniques should be considered

  4. Nitrogen Solubility in Adipose Tissues of Diving Animals: Implications for Human Divers and for Modeling Diving Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    in different locations, and even though manunalian and avian body core temperature is regulated to between 37-40 °C, the peripheral regions of the...adipose at different temperatures , because diving animals and humans may experience a range of water temperatures when diving to different depths or... body will experience temperatures along a gradient between core and ambient. Coupled with new knowledge of solubility in adipose tissue was the need

  5. A Navy Diving Supervisor’s Guide to the Nontechnical Skills Required for Safe and Productive Diving Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-01

    from other high-risk industries (e.g., aviation, nuclear power production, offshore oil production) relevant to Navy dive teams. Furthermore, real...the helmet and was almost out of air. He tried to climb up the umbilical ; however, his attempts were futile. The Diving Supervisor heard gurgling over...most effective offshore oil production supervisors use interpersonal skills more often than less effective supervisors do. When less effective

  6. Understanding maximal repetitions in strings

    CERN Document Server

    Crochemore, Maxime

    2008-01-01

    The cornerstone of any algorithm computing all repetitions in a string of length n in O(n) time is the fact that the number of runs (or maximal repetitions) is O(n). We give a simple proof of this result. As a consequence of our approach, the stronger result concerning the linearity of the sum of exponents of all runs follows easily.

  7. Bubble dynamics in perfused tissue undergoing decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisel, S; Nir, A; Kerem, D

    1981-02-01

    A mathematical model describing bubble dynamics in a perfused tissue undergoing decompression is presented, taking into account physical expansion and inward diffusion from surrounding supersaturated tissue as growth promoting factors and tissue gas elimination by perfusion, tissue elasticity, surface tension and inherent unsaturation as resolving driving forces. The expected behavior after a step reduction of pressure of a bubble initially existing in the tissue, displaying both growth and resolution has been demonstrated. A strong perfusion-dependence of bubble resolution time at low perfusion rates is apparent. The model can account for various exposure pressures and saturation fractions of any inert gas-tissue combination for which a set of physical and physiological parameters is available.

  8. Outcome of endoscopic decompression of retrocalcaneal bursitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vamsi Kondreddi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Posterior heel pain due to retrocalcaneal bursitis, is a disabling condition that responds well to the conventional methods of treatment. Patients who do not respond to conservative treatment may require surgical intervention. This study evaluates the outcome of endoscopic decompression of retrocalcaneal bursitis, with resection of posterosuperior eminence of the calcaneum. Materials and Methods: This present study included 25 heels from 23 consecutive patients with posterior heel pain, who did not respond to conservative treatment and underwent endoscopic decompression of the retrocalcaneal bursae and excision of bony spurs. The functional outcome was evaluated by comparing the pre and postoperative American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS scores. The Maryland ankle and foot score was used postoperatively to assess the patient′s satisfaction at the one-year followup. Results: The University of Maryland scores of 25 heels were categorized as the nonparametric categories, and it was observed that 16 patients had an excellent outcome, six good, three fair and there were no poor results. The AOFAS scores averaged 57.92 ± 6.224 points preoperatively and 89.08 ± 5.267 points postoperatively (P < 0.001, at an average followup of 16.4 months. The 12 heels having noninsertional tendinosis on ultrasound had low AOFAS scores compared to 13 heels having retrocalcaneal bursitis alone. At one year followup, correlation for preoperative ultrasound assessment of tendoachilles degeneration versus postoperative Maryland score (Spearman correlation had shown a strong negative correlation. Conclusion: Endoscopic calcaneal resection is highly effective in patients with mild or no degeneration and yields cosmetically better results with fewer complications. Patients with degenerative changes in Achilles tendon had poorer outcomes in terms of subjective satisfaction.

  9. Perceptual Repetition Blindness Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochhaus, Larry; Johnston, James C.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The phenomenon of repetition blindness (RB) may reveal a new limitation on human perceptual processing. Recently, however, researchers have attributed RB to post-perceptual processes such as memory retrieval and/or reporting biases. The standard rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) paradigm used in most RB studies is, indeed, open to such objections. Here we investigate RB using a "single-frame" paradigm introduced by Johnston and Hale (1984) in which memory demands are minimal. Subjects made only a single judgement about whether one masked target word was the same or different than a post-target probe. Confidence ratings permitted use of signal detection methods to assess sensitivity and bias effects. In the critical condition for RB a precue of the post-target word was provided prior to the target stimulus (identity precue), so that the required judgement amounted to whether the target did or did not repeat the precue word. In control treatments, the precue was either an unrelated word or a dummy.

  10. Diving with microparticles in acoustic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Marin, Alvaro; Barnkob, Rune; Augustsson, Per; Muller, Peter; Bruus, Henrik; Laurell, Thomas; Kaehler, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Sound can move particles. A good example of this phenomenon is the Chladni plate, in which an acoustic wave is induced in a metallic plate and particles migrate to the nodes of the acoustic wave. For several years, acoustophoresis has been used to manipulate microparticles in microscopic scales. In this fluid dynamics video, submitted to the 30th Annual Gallery of Fluid Motion, we show the basic mechanism of the technique and a simple way of visualize it. Since acoustophoretic phenomena is essentially a three-dimensional effect, we employ a simple technique to visualize the particles in 3D. The technique is called Astigmatism Particle Tracking Velocimetry and it consists in the use of cylindrical lenses to induce a deformation in the particle shape, which will be then correlated with its distance from the observer. With this method we are able to dive with the particles and observe in detail particle motion that would otherwise be missed. The technique not only permits visualization but also precise quantitat...

  11. Air sac PO2 and oxygen depletion during dives of emperor penguins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knower Stockard, T; Heil, J; Meir, J U; Sato, K; Ponganis, K V; Ponganis, P J

    2005-08-01

    In order to determine the rate and magnitude of respiratory O2 depletion during dives of emperor penguins (Aptenodytes forsteri), air sac O2 partial pressure (PO2) was recorded in 73 dives of four birds at an isolated dive hole. These results were evaluated with respect to hypoxic tolerance, the aerobic dive limit (ADL; dive duration beyond which there is post-dive lactate accumulation) and previously measured field metabolic rates (FMRs). 55% of dives were greater in duration than the previously measured 5.6-min ADL. PO2 and depth profiles revealed compression hyperoxia and gradual O2 depletion during dives. 42% of final PO2s during the dives (recorded during the last 15 s of ascent) were emperors. In dives of durations greater than the ADL, the calculated end-of-dive air sac O2 fraction was <4%. The respiratory O2 store depletion rate of an entire dive, based on the change in O2 fraction during a dive and previously measured diving respiratory volume, ranged from 1 to 5 ml O2 kg(-1) min(-1) and decreased exponentially with diving duration. The mean value, 2.1+/-0.8 ml O2 kg(-1) min(-1), was (1) 19-42% of previously measured respiratory O(2) depletion rates during forced submersions and simulated dives, (2) approximately one-third of the predicted total body resting metabolic rate and (3) approximately 10% of the measured FMR. These findings are consistent with a low total body metabolic rate during the dive.

  12. Some new cave diving exploration results from Croatian karst area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garasic, Davor; Garasic, Mladen

    2017-04-01

    In the recent years, several international cave diving expeditions took place in the Dinaric karst of Croatia. The objectives were conducting a new research of previously known karstic springs and also exploring new ones. The deepest karst cave in Croatia filled with water is Crveno jezero (lake) near Imotski town, with water depth of 281 meters and total cave depth of 528 meters. Volume of water in this cave is about 16 millions m3. Diving expeditions were held in 1997 and 1998.The deepest karst spring in the Dinaric karst of Croatia is Vrelo of Una River (with max discharge about 100 m3/s), where divers measured depth of -248 meters. Explorations were made in 2007 and 2016. Sinac spring in Pla\\vsko Polje has been dived to the depth of -203 meters. Cave diving was done in 1984, 1999, 2003, 2007 - 2016. Furthermore, very popular springs of the river Kupa (-155 m) in Gorski Kotar (explored since1995 till 2015), river Gacka (-105 in depth, 1150m in length) in Lika, explored from 1992 to 2016, river Cetina (-110 m in depth, 1300 m in length), cave diving explored from 2000 to 2016 in the Dalmatinska Zagora, Rumin Veliki spring (- 150 m in depth) in the Sinjska Krajina (explored and dived in 2006 and 2010), than rivers Krnjeza and Krupa in Ravni kotari with diving depths of over 100 meters (in 2004 and 2005) and so on. Along the Adriatic coast in Croatia there are many deep and long submarine springs (vrulje), ie. caves under seawater springs. called - vruljas for example Vrulja Zecica with over 900 meters ine length and Vrulja Modrič with completely flooded cave channels that extend over 2300 meters in length. Cave diving was conducted from 2010 to 2016. Vrulja Dubci is also worth mentioning (dived and explored in 2000), 161 meters deep and so on. Tectonic activity plays a dominant role in the creation and function of these caves. Geological, hydrogeological and lithostratigraphic conditions are also very important in speleogenesis of these caves in Croatian karst

  13. Fatty Acid use in Diving Mammals: More than Merely Fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J Trumble

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Diving mammals, are under extreme pressure to conserve oxygen as well as produce adequate energy through aerobic pathways during breath-hold diving. Typically a major source of energy, lipids participate in structural and regulatory roles and have an important influence on the physiological functions of an organism. At the stochiometric level, the metabolism of PUFAs (polyunsaturated fatty acids utilizes less oxygen than metabolizing either MUFAs (monounsaturated fatty acids or SFAs (saturated fatty acids and yields fewer ATP per same length fatty acid. However, there is evidence that indicates the cellular metabolic rate is directly correlated to the lipid composition of the membranes such that the greater the PUFA concentration in the membranes the greater the metabolic rate. These findings appear to be incompatible with diving mammals that ingest and metabolize high levels of unsaturated fatty acids while relying on stored oxygen. Growing evidence from birds to mammals including recent evidence in Weddell seals also indicates that at the whole animal level the utilization of PUFAs to fuel their metabolism actually conserves oxygen. In this paper, we make an initial attempt to ascertain the beneficial adaptations or limitations of lipids constituents and potential trade-offs in diving mammals. We discuss how changes in Antarctic climate are predicted to have numerous different environmental effects; such potential shifts in the availability of certain prey species or even changes in the lipid composition (increased SFA of numerous fish species with increasing water temperatures and how this may impact the diving ability of Weddell seals.

  14. OSTEOLOGICAL KEY CHARACTERS OF THE PERUVIAN DIVING PETREL PELECANOIDES GARNOTII (PROCELLARIIFORMES, PELECANOIDIDAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stucchi, Marcelo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Comparative measurements and photographs of the skeleton of Peruvian diving petrel Pelecanoides garnotii (Lesson, 1828 are presented as a field guide for identification. Also, the skeleton's locomotory functionality in relation to flight and diving are discussed.

  15. Clinical outcome following micro-vascular decompression for trigeminal neuralgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godugu Bhaskar Rao

    2015-07-01

    Conclusion: Micro-vascular decompression is safe and effective in producing good pain relief over a long term in patients with Trigeminal neuralgias refractive to medical treatment. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(7.000: 1741-1744

  16. Endoscopic Decompression, Detorsion, and Reduction of Sigmoid Volvulus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shou-jiang Tang

    2014-04-01

    Conclusions: Sigmoid volvulus is a medical emergency and diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion. Emergent EDDR and decompression tube placement should be utilized as a first line treatment for patients with uncomplicated sigmoid volvulus.

  17. A Biomedical Assessment of a One-Atmosphere Diving System: JIM-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-01

    diving dress ................................. A7 Fig. 9. Galeazzi diving suit ................................. A8 Fig. 10. Peress’s diving system, the...joints, one in each shoulder and two in each leg. Around the time that Neufeldt and Kuhnke were developing their system, an Italian developer Galeazzi ...produced an atmospheric diving system (Davis, 1969). A photograph in Davis’s book shows a 1930’s Galeazzi suit that is virtually identical to a recent

  18. Dive Tourism and Local Communities: Active Participation or Subject to Impacts?Case Studies from Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Daldeniz, Bilge; Hampton, Mark P.

    2013-01-01

    Dive tourism impacts were examined in three Malaysian islands: Perhentian(backpackers), Redang (package tourism) and Mabul (upmarket dive tourism). Qualitative local participation approaches were applied to investigate whether host communities were merely reactive to dive tourism’s impacts. Dive tourism affected many aspects of community life. Besides physical/environmental impacts (new infrastructure), research found varied economic impacts including employment/business opportunities and dif...

  19. Comparative histology of muscle in free ranging cetaceans: shallow versus deep diving species

    OpenAIRE

    Sierra, E.; Fernández, A.; Espinosa de los Monteros, A; Díaz-Delgado, J.; Bernaldo de Quirós, Y.; N. García-Álvarez; Arbelo, M.; Herráez, P.

    2015-01-01

    Different marine mammal species exhibit a wide range of diving behaviour based on their breath-hold diving capabilities. They are classically categorized as long duration, deep-diving and short duration, shallow-diving species. These abilities are likely to be related to the muscle characteristics of each species. Despite the increasing number of publications on muscle profile in different cetacean species, very little information is currently available concerning the characteristics of other...

  20. Perceived diving impacts and managment implications at a popular South African reef

    OpenAIRE

    Lucrezi, Serena; Saayman, Melville; Van der Merwe, Peet

    2013-01-01

    Coral reefs are threatened by impacts such as from scuba diving, and ongoing research is required to assess diving impacts, diver behavior and environmental knowledge. This study investigated perceived diving impacts, reef condition and norms among scuba divers at Sodwana Bay (South Africa). Divers viewed contact with coral as damaging, and perceived environmental degradation at dive sites. However, most divers saw activities such as photography as causing little or no damage to reefs. One me...

  1. Dive and Explore: An Interactive Web Visualization that Simulates Making an ROV Dive to an Active Submarine Volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, C.; Chadwick, W. W.

    2004-12-01

    Several years ago we created an exciting and engaging multimedia exhibit for the Hatfield Marine Science Center that lets visitors simulate making a dive to the seafloor with the remotely operated vehicle (ROV) named ROPOS. The exhibit immerses the user in an interactive experience that is naturally fun but also educational. The public display is located at the Hatfield Marine Science Visitor Center in Newport, Oregon. We are now completing a revision to the project that will make this engaging virtual exploration accessible to a much larger audience. With minor modifications we will be able to put the exhibit onto the world wide web so that any person with internet access can view and learn about exciting volcanic and hydrothermal activity at Axial Seamount on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The modifications address some cosmetic and logistic ISSUES confronted in the museum environment, but will mainly involve compressing video clips so they can be delivered more efficiently over the internet. The web version, like the museum version, will allow users to choose from 1 of 3 different dives sites in the caldera of Axial Volcano. The dives are based on real seafloor settings at Axial seamount, an active submarine volcano on the Juan de Fuca Ridge (NE Pacific) that is also the location of a seafloor observatory called NeMO. Once a dive is chosen, then the user watches ROPOS being deployed and then arrives into a 3-D computer-generated seafloor environment that is based on the real world but is easier to visualize and navigate. Once on the bottom, the user is placed within a 360 degree panorama and can look in all directions by manipulating the computer mouse. By clicking on markers embedded in the scene, the user can then either move to other panorama locations via movies that travel through the 3-D virtual environment, or they can play video clips from actual ROPOS dives specifically related to that scene. Audio accompanying the video clips informs the user where they are

  2. Decompression to altitude: assumptions, experimental evidence, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Philip P; Butler, Bruce D

    2009-02-01

    Although differences exist, hypobaric and hyperbaric exposures share common physiological, biochemical, and clinical features, and their comparison may provide further insight into the mechanisms of decompression stress. Although altitude decompression illness (DCI) has been experienced by high-altitude Air Force pilots and is common in ground-based experiments simulating decompression profiles of extravehicular activities (EVAs) or astronauts' space walks, no case has been reported during actual EVAs in the non-weight-bearing microgravity environment of orbital space missions. We are uncertain whether gravity influences decompression outcomes via nitrogen tissue washout or via alterations related to skeletal muscle activity. However, robust experimental evidence demonstrated the role of skeletal muscle exercise, activities, and/or movement in bubble formation and DCI occurrence. Dualism of effects of exercise, positive or negative, on bubble formation and DCI is a striking feature in hypobaric exposure. Therefore, the discussion and the structure of this review are centered on those highlighted unresolved topics about the relationship between muscle activity, decompression, and microgravity. This article also provides, in the context of altitude decompression, an overview of the role of denitrogenation, metabolic gases, gas micronuclei, stabilization of bubbles, biochemical pathways activated by bubbles, nitric oxide, oxygen, anthropometric or physiological variables, Doppler-detectable bubbles, and potential arterialization of bubbles. These findings and uncertainties will produce further physiological challenges to solve in order to line up for the programmed human return to the Moon, the preparation for human exploration of Mars, and the EVAs implementation in a non-zero gravity environment.

  3. The Risk of Noise-Induced Hearing Loss During Simulated Dives in Canadian Forces Hyperbaric Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    The risk of noise-induced hearing loss during simulated dives in Canadian Forces hyperbaric facilities Sharon M...2012-084 October 2012 The risk of noise-induced hearing loss during simulated dives in Canadian Forces hyperbaric ...transferred into the dive chamber of a hyperbaric facility. The mechanism is audible and sufficiently high in level in adjacent areas to warrant the

  4. 29 CFR Appendix B to Subpart T to... - Guidelines for Scientific Diving

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Guidelines for Scientific Diving B Appendix B to Subpart T... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Commercial Diving Operations Pt. 1910, Subpt. T, App. B Appendix B to Subpart T to Part 1910—Guidelines for Scientific Diving...

  5. 33 CFR 150.825 - Reporting a diving-related casualty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reporting a diving-related casualty. 150.825 Section 150.825 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Reporting a diving-related casualty. Deaths and injuries related to diving within the safety zone of...

  6. 29 CFR Appendix B to Subpart Y of... - Guidelines for Scientific Diving

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Guidelines for Scientific Diving B Appendix B to Subpart Y... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Diving Pt. 1926, Subpt. Y, App. B Appendix B to Subpart Y of Part 1926—Guidelines for Scientific Diving Note:...

  7. Hidden Markov models reveal complexity in the diving behaviour of short-finned pilot whales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, Nicola J; Isojunno, Saana; Sadykova, Dina; Bowers, Matthew; Nowacek, Douglas P; Read, Andrew J

    2017-03-31

    Diving behaviour of short-finned pilot whales is often described by two states; deep foraging and shallow, non-foraging dives. However, this simple classification system ignores much of the variation that occurs during subsurface periods. We used multi-state hidden Markov models (HMM) to characterize states of diving behaviour and the transitions between states in short-finned pilot whales. We used three parameters (number of buzzes, maximum dive depth and duration) measured in 259 dives by digital acoustic recording tags (DTAGs) deployed on 20 individual whales off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, USA. The HMM identified a four-state model as the best descriptor of diving behaviour. The state-dependent distributions for the diving parameters showed variation between states, indicative of different diving behaviours. Transition probabilities were considerably higher for state persistence than state switching, indicating that dive types occurred in bouts. Our results indicate that subsurface behaviour in short-finned pilot whales is more complex than a simple dichotomy of deep and shallow diving states, and labelling all subsurface behaviour as deep dives or shallow dives discounts a significant amount of important variation. We discuss potential drivers of these patterns, including variation in foraging success, prey availability and selection, bathymetry, physiological constraints and socially mediated behaviour.

  8. Hidden Markov models reveal complexity in the diving behaviour of short-finned pilot whales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, Nicola J.; Isojunno, Saana; Sadykova, Dina; Bowers, Matthew; Nowacek, Douglas P.; Read, Andrew J.

    2017-01-01

    Diving behaviour of short-finned pilot whales is often described by two states; deep foraging and shallow, non-foraging dives. However, this simple classification system ignores much of the variation that occurs during subsurface periods. We used multi-state hidden Markov models (HMM) to characterize states of diving behaviour and the transitions between states in short-finned pilot whales. We used three parameters (number of buzzes, maximum dive depth and duration) measured in 259 dives by digital acoustic recording tags (DTAGs) deployed on 20 individual whales off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, USA. The HMM identified a four-state model as the best descriptor of diving behaviour. The state-dependent distributions for the diving parameters showed variation between states, indicative of different diving behaviours. Transition probabilities were considerably higher for state persistence than state switching, indicating that dive types occurred in bouts. Our results indicate that subsurface behaviour in short-finned pilot whales is more complex than a simple dichotomy of deep and shallow diving states, and labelling all subsurface behaviour as deep dives or shallow dives discounts a significant amount of important variation. We discuss potential drivers of these patterns, including variation in foraging success, prey availability and selection, bathymetry, physiological constraints and socially mediated behaviour. PMID:28361954

  9. Surgical options in ICH including decompressive craniectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Patrick; Gregson, Barbara A; Vindlacheruvu, Raghu R; Mendelow, A David

    2007-10-15

    Intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) accounts for 15 to 20% of strokes. The condition carries a higher morbidity and mortality than occlusive stroke. Despite considerable research effort, no therapeutic modality either medical or surgical has emerged with clear evidence of benefit other than in rare aneurysmal cases. Intracerebral haemorrhages can be divided into those that arise from pre-existing macroscopic vascular lesions - so called "ictohaemorrhagic lesions", and those that do not; the latter being the commoner. Most of the research that has been done on the benefits of surgery has been in this latter group. Trial data available to date precludes a major benefit from surgical evacuation in a large proportion of cases however there are hypotheses of benefit still under investigation, specifically superficial lobar ICH treated by open surgical evacuation, deeper ICH treated with minimally invasive surgical techniques, and decompressive craniectomy. When an ICH arises from an ictohaemorrhagic lesion, therapy has two goals: to treat the effects of the acute haemorrhage and to prevent a recurrence. Three modalities are available for treating lesions to prevent recurrence: stereotactic radiosurgery, endovascular embolisation, and open surgical resection. As with ICH without an underlying lesion there is no evidence to support surgical removal of the haemorrhage in most cases. An important exception is ICHs arising from intracranial aneurysms where there is good evidence to support evacuation of the haematoma as well as repair of the aneurysm.

  10. Arthroscopic Decompression for a Giant Meniscal Cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohishi, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Daisuke; Matsuyama, Yukihiro

    2016-01-01

    The authors report the case of a giant medial meniscal cyst in an osteoarthritic knee of an 82-year-old woman that was successfully treated with only arthroscopic cyst decompression. The patient noticed a painful mass on the medial side of the right knee that had been gradually growing for 5 years. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an encapsulated large medial cystic mass measuring 80×65×40 mm that was adjacent to the medial meniscus. An accompanying horizontal tear was also detected in the middle and posterior segments of the meniscus. The medial meniscus was resected up to the capsular attachment to create bidirectional flow between the joint and the cyst with arthroscopic surgery. Magnetic resonance imaging performed 14 months postoperatively showed that the cyst had completely disappeared, and no recurrence was observed during a 2-year follow-up period. An excellent result could be obtained by performing limited meniscectomy to create a channel leading to the meniscal cyst, even though the cyst was large. Among previously reported cases of meniscal cysts, this case is the largest to be treated arthroscopically without open excision.

  11. Techniques for Diving Deeper Than 1,500 Feet,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-03-01

    imposed at 250 m, due to a throat infection in one subject. In this dive there were only very minor ill-effects at 43 bar, in contrast to Dive 8, where...B.B., J.L. Parmentier, P.B. Bennett. Pressure reversal of ketamine anesthesia. Undersea Biomed. Res. 5(Suppl. 1), 49-50, 1978. Spyropoulos, C.S. The...must have asked yourselves as I did if there is anything sore to say on this occasion. Well, for one thing, by virtue of my role as a Chairman and

  12. Simulation of Dive Motion of a Deep Manned Submersible

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MALing; CUIWei-cheng

    2004-01-01

    In order to predict the dive motion of a deep manned submersible currently developed in China,a three-degree-of-freedom dynamic model is developed to simulate its dive motion restricted in the vertical plane. Being the nonlinear function of attack angle, the hydrodynamic forces acting upon the submersible are determined by a towing tank test.Based on these experimental values,the hydrodynamic forces are identified by a general regression neural network (GRNN) over a wide range of attack angles.Results of numerical examples are presented in this paper to explain practical applications of the method.

  13. Seabird diving behaviour reveals the functional significance of shelf-sea fronts as foraging hotspots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, S L; Miller, P I; Embling, C B; Scales, K L; Bicknell, A W J; Hosegood, P J; Morgan, G; Ingram, S N; Votier, S C

    2016-09-01

    Oceanic fronts are key habitats for a diverse range of marine predators, yet how they influence fine-scale foraging behaviour is poorly understood. Here, we investigated the dive behaviour of northern gannets Morus bassanus in relation to shelf-sea fronts. We GPS (global positioning system) tracked 53 breeding birds and examined the relationship between 1901 foraging dives (from time-depth recorders) and thermal fronts (identified via Earth Observation composite front mapping) in the Celtic Sea, Northeast Atlantic. We (i) used a habitat-use availability analysis to determine whether gannets preferentially dived at fronts, and (ii) compared dive characteristics in relation to fronts to investigate the functional significance of these oceanographic features. We found that relationships between gannet dive probabilities and fronts varied by frontal metric and sex. While both sexes were more likely to dive in the presence of seasonally persistent fronts, links to more ephemeral features were less clear. Here, males were positively correlated with distance to front and cross-front gradient strength, with the reverse for females. Both sexes performed two dive strategies: shallow V-shaped plunge dives with little or no active swim phase (92% of dives) and deeper U-shaped dives with an active pursuit phase of at least 3 s (8% of dives). When foraging around fronts, gannets were half as likely to engage in U-shaped dives compared with V-shaped dives, independent of sex. Moreover, V-shaped dive durations were significantly shortened around fronts. These behavioural responses support the assertion that fronts are important foraging habitats for marine predators, and suggest a possible mechanistic link between the two in terms of dive behaviour. This research also emphasizes the importance of cross-disciplinary research when attempting to understand marine ecosystems.

  14. Seabird diving behaviour reveals the functional significance of shelf-sea fronts as foraging hotspots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, S. L.; Miller, P. I.; Embling, C. B.; Scales, K. L.; Bicknell, A. W. J.; Hosegood, P. J.; Morgan, G.; Ingram, S. N.; Votier, S. C.

    2016-09-01

    Oceanic fronts are key habitats for a diverse range of marine predators, yet how they influence fine-scale foraging behaviour is poorly understood. Here, we investigated the dive behaviour of northern gannets Morus bassanus in relation to shelf-sea fronts. We GPS (global positioning system) tracked 53 breeding birds and examined the relationship between 1901 foraging dives (from time-depth recorders) and thermal fronts (identified via Earth Observation composite front mapping) in the Celtic Sea, Northeast Atlantic. We (i) used a habitat-use availability analysis to determine whether gannets preferentially dived at fronts, and (ii) compared dive characteristics in relation to fronts to investigate the functional significance of these oceanographic features. We found that relationships between gannet dive probabilities and fronts varied by frontal metric and sex. While both sexes were more likely to dive in the presence of seasonally persistent fronts, links to more ephemeral features were less clear. Here, males were positively correlated with distance to front and cross-front gradient strength, with the reverse for females. Both sexes performed two dive strategies: shallow V-shaped plunge dives with little or no active swim phase (92% of dives) and deeper U-shaped dives with an active pursuit phase of at least 3 s (8% of dives). When foraging around fronts, gannets were half as likely to engage in U-shaped dives compared with V-shaped dives, independent of sex. Moreover, V-shaped dive durations were significantly shortened around fronts. These behavioural responses support the assertion that fronts are important foraging habitats for marine predators, and suggest a possible mechanistic link between the two in terms of dive behaviour. This research also emphasizes the importance of cross-disciplinary research when attempting to understand marine ecosystems.

  15. Repetition in English Political Public Speaking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李红梅

    2010-01-01

    Repetition is frequently used in English political public speaking to make it easy to be remembered and powerful to move the feelings of the public. This paper is intended to analyze the functions of repetition and different levels of repetition to highlight the significance of repetition in English political public speaking and the ability of using it in practice.

  16. Perceptions amongst Tasmanian recreational scuba divers of the value of a diving medical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baines, Carol

    2013-12-01

    An online survey was offered to recreational divers in Tasmania to ascertain if they have an understanding of how pressure affects their health and if they considered an annual dive medical necessary. A total of 98 recreational divers completed the survey, five of these had never had a dive medical while 74 felt that if they passed their dive medical they do not have any potential illness. Sixty five saw the dive medical as a comprehensive health check. This project provided an insight to Tasmanian recreational divers' understanding of and attitude towards the value of a dive medical.

  17. EXPERIENCE OF SURGICAL TREATMENT OF INJURIES OF MIDDLE AND LOWER CERVICAL SPINE WHILE DIVING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. P. Ardashev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective - to analyze the long-term results of surgical treatment of patients with injuries of middle- and lower cervical spine in diving. Materials and methods. An analysis of surgical treatment of 27 patients and assessment of the long-term results of 20 patients in a period of 6 months to 6 years were performed with analysis of clinical, neurological, radiographic data and mortality. Results. Mostly the C5 vertebra was damaged - in 17 patients (63%. Compression fractures of vertebral bodies met in 6 (22%, compression-comminuted fractures - in 16 (59% patients, dislocations - in 5 (19%. All patients had neurological disorders. All observations noted rigid stabilization of the spine with an implant made of porous nickel-titanium, the presence of bone-metal block at the level of the damaged vertebral body Mortality in the postoperative period was 26%. In the long-term period the initial neurological symptoms were observed in 7 (30% patients, 13 (48% patients had marked regression of neurological symptoms. Full functional maladjustment was observed in 6 patients with no motor function below the damaged segment, originally belonging to groups A and B on the classification of H.L. Frankel. Moderate and mild degree of functional adaptation disorders were present in 5 and 4 patients respectively. In the remaining patients we did not reveal a functional maladjustment. Range of motion in the cervical spine in all patients was considered as good. Conclusions. Anterior decompressive-stabilizing surgeries on the spine with an implant made of porous nickel-titanium and metal plate CSLP allows reliably stabilization of the injured spine and the rehabilitation of this severe category of patients.

  18. Delayed recompression for decompression sickness: retrospective analysis.

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    Amir Hadanny

    Full Text Available Most cases of decompression sickness (DCS occur soon after surfacing, with 98% within 24 hours. Recompression using hyperbaric chamber should be administrated as soon as feasible in order to decrease bubble size and avoid further tissue injury. Unfortunately, there may be a significant time delay from surfacing to recompression. The time beyond which hyperbaric treatment is non effective is unclear. The aims of the study were first to evaluate the effect of delayed hyperbaric treatment, initiated more than 48 h after surfacing for DCS and second, to evaluate the different treatment protocols.From January 2000 to February 2014, 76 divers had delayed hyperbaric treatment (≥48 h for DCS in the Sagol center for Hyperbaric medicine and Research, Assaf-Harofeh Medical Center, Israel. Data were collected from their medical records and compared to data of 128 patients treated earlier than 48 h after surfacing at the same hyperbaric institute.There was no significant difference, as to any of the baseline characteristics, between the delayed and early treatment groups. With respect to treatment results, at the delayed treatment divers, complete recovery was achieved in 76% of the divers, partial recovery in 17.1% and no improvement in 6.6%. Similar results were achieved when treatment started early, where 78% of the divers had complete recovery, 15.6% partial recovery and 6.2% no recovery. Delayed hyperbaric treatment using US Navy Table 6 protocol trended toward a better clinical outcome yet not statistically significant (OR=2.786, CI95%[0.896-8.66], p=0.07 compared to standard hyperbaric oxygen therapy of 90 minutes at 2 ATA, irrespective of the symptoms severity at presentation.Late recompression for DCS, 48 hours or more after surfacing, has clinical value and when applied can achieve complete recovery in 76% of the divers. It seems that the preferred hyperbaric treatment protocol should be based on US Navy Table 6.

  19. Aerobic dive limit. What is it and is it always used appropriately?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Patrick J

    2006-09-01

    The original definition of aerobic dive limit (ADL) was the dive duration after which there is an increase in post-dive concentration of lactate in the blood of Weddell seals freely diving in the field. The only other species in which such measurements have been made is the emperor penguin. For all other species, aerobic dive limit has been calculated (cADL) by dividing usable oxygen stores with an estimation of the rate of oxygen consumption during diving. Unfortunately, cADL is often referred to as the aerobic dive limit, implying that it is equivalent to that determined from the measurement of post-dive blood lactate concentration. However, this is not so, as at cADL all of the usable oxygen would have been consumed, whereas Weddell seals and emperor penguins can dive for at least 2-3 times longer than their ADL. Thus, at ADL, there is still some usable oxygen remaining in the stores. It is suggested that to avoid continued confusion between these two terms, the former is called diving lactate threshold (DLT), as it is somewhat analogous to the lactate threshold in exercising terrestrial vertebrates. Possible explanations of how some species routinely dive beyond their cADL are also discussed.

  20. Diving bradycardia of elderly Korean women divers, haenyeo, in cold seawater: a field report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joo-Young; Lee, Hyo-Hyun; Kim, Siyeon; Jang, Young-Joon; Baek, Yoon-Jeong; Kang, Kwon-Yong

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present field study was to explore diving patterns and heart rate of elderly Korean women divers (haenyeo) while breath-hold diving in cold seawater. We hypothesized that the decreasing rate in heart rate of elderly haenyeos during breath-hold diving was greater and total diving time was shorter than those of young haenyeos from previous studies. Nine haenyeos participated in a field study [68 ± 10 yr in age, ranged from 56 to 83 yr] at a seawater temperature of 10 to 13 °C. Average total diving time including surface swimming time between dives was 253 ± 73 min (155-341 min). Total frequency of dives was 97 ± 28 times and they dived 23 ± 8 times per hour. All haenyeos showed diving bradycardia with a decreased rate of 20 ± 8% at the bottom time (101 ± 20 bpm) when compared to surface swimming time (125 ± 16 bpm) in the sea. Older haenyeos among the nine elderly haenyeos had shorter diving time, less diving frequencies, and lower heart rate at work (p<0.05). These reductions imply that haenyeos voluntarily adjust their workload along with advancing age and diminished cardiovascular functions.

  1. When pressure sinks performance: Evidence from diving competitions

    OpenAIRE

    Eleni Garbi; Christos Genakos; Mario Pagliero

    2015-01-01

    Tournaments are designed to enhance participants’ effort and productivity. However, ranking near the top may increase psychological pressure and reduce performance. We empirically study the impact of interim rank on performance using data from international diving tournaments. We find that competitors systematically underperform when ranked closer to the top, despite higher incentives to perform well.

  2. 29 CFR 1910.410 - Qualifications of dive team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... employee's experience or training, except that limited additional tasks may be assigned to an employee... experience or training necessary to perform assigned tasks in a safe and healthful manner. (2) Each dive team member shall have experience or training in the following: (i) The use of tools, equipment and...

  3. A Measurement of "g" Using Alexander's Diving Bell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroga, M.; Martinez, S.; Otranto, S.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a very simple exercise using an inverted test tube pushed straight down into a column of water to determine the free-fall acceleration "g". The exercise employs the ideal gas law and only involves the measurement of the displacement of the bottom of the "diving bell" and the water level inside the tube with respect to the…

  4. Performing CPR on a commercial diver inside the diving bell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sourabh Bhutani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available CPR in a diving bell is difficult. It is taught by diving companies and training institutes but has not been subjected to the tenets of evidence based medicine. The diving bell lacks space as well as a flat hard surface to lay the patient on and therefore conventional methods of administering CPR are not possible. The diver is hung from a pulley tied to the diver's harness, and the bell flooded with water to reduce pooling of blood. Airway is established using a cervical collar to hyperextend the neck and inserting an appropriate oropharyngeal airway. Cardiac compressions are administered by the bellman using his head or the knee while holding the patient with his arms from behind. The bell can be recovered to surface only when spontaneous breathing and circulation have started. Diving bell offers a unique environment for management of unconscious casualties. Even though the method is at variance with the conventional method of administering CPR, it is the only method possible inside the bell. It is important that the method be scrutinized and refined so as to be more effective and efficacious inside the bell.

  5. Physical gills in diving insects and spiders: theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, Roger S; Matthews, Philip G D

    2013-01-15

    Insects and spiders rely on gas-filled airways for respiration in air. However, some diving species take a tiny air-store bubble from the surface that acts as a primary O(2) source and also as a physical gill to obtain dissolved O(2) from the water. After a long history of modelling, recent work with O(2)-sensitive optodes has tested the models and extended our understanding of physical gill function. Models predict that compressible gas gills can extend dives up to more than eightfold, but this is never reached, because the animals surface long before the bubble is exhausted. Incompressible gas gills are theoretically permanent. However, neither compressible nor incompressible gas gills can support even resting metabolic rate unless the animal is very small, has a low metabolic rate or ventilates the bubble's surface, because the volume of gas required to produce an adequate surface area is too large to permit diving. Diving-bell spiders appear to be the only large aquatic arthropods that can have gas gill surface areas large enough to supply resting metabolic demands in stagnant, oxygenated water, because they suspend a large bubble in a submerged web.

  6. Varianish: Jamming with Pattern Repetition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jort Band

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In music, patterns and pattern repetition are often regarded as a machine-like task, indeed often delegated to drum Machines and sequencers. Nevertheless, human players add subtle differences and variations to repeated patterns that are musically interesting and often unique. Especially when looking at minimal music, pattern repetitions create hypnotic effects and the human mind blends out the actual pattern to focus on variation and tiny differences over time. Varianish is a musical instrument that aims at turning this phenomenon into a new musical experience for musician and audience: Musical pattern repetitions are found in live music and Varianish generates additional (musical output accordingly that adds substantially to the overall musical expression. Apart from the theory behind the pattern finding and matching and the conceptual design, a demonstrator implementation of Varianish is presented and evaluated.

  7. A review of spinal cord injury decompression in experimental animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vafa Rahimi-Movaghar

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI is major permanent sequelae of trauma with high burden and low frequency. In the setting of SCI is there any correlation between the timing of surgical decompression and sensory-motor improvement.Material and Methods: A literature review was performed using PUBMED from 1966 to 25th January 2010. Cross referencing of discovered articles was also reviewed.Results: The results of animal studies have shown that aside from the kind of procedure and species, when compression is less severe and of shorter duration, the neurological and histopathological recovery is significantly good. One meta-analysis, nine prospective studies, and one randomized clinical trial were identified. Conclusion: There are presently no standards regarding the role and timing of decompression in acute SCI. As a practice guideline, early surgery in less than 24 hours can be done safely in patients with acute SCI and urgent decompression is a reasonable practice option. Traction is the most practical method of achieving urgent decompression after cervical SCI. There are class III data to support a recommendation for urgent decompression in any patient with incomplete SCI with or without neurologic deterioration, with or without bilateral irreducible facet dislocations. There is emerging evidence that surgery within 24 hours may reduce both the length of intensive care unit stay and incidence of medical complications

  8. Complications induced by decompressive craniectomies after traumatic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨学军; 洪国良; 苏少波; 杨树源

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To find out the optimal approach to decompress externally the severe injured brain and to avoid possible complications caused by external decompression.Methods: 68 patients who underwent external decompression after traumatic brain injury were admitted into Tianjin Medical University General Hospital for cranioplasty from 1995 to 2001. Complications were retrospectively investigated and analyzed in all patients. The findings were compared between the patients who accepted the decompressive craniectomy in our hospital and in local hospitals. Χ2-test was employed for statistical analysis and complication evaluation. Results: Large craniectomy definitely caused some side effects to patients. Among various complications, several of them showed significantly high incidence (P0.05) between the two groups including dilation or/and migration of lateral ventricle underlying the cranial defect, skin flap concavity, encephalomalacia of the decompressive area, seizure and infection.Conclusions: To reduce the incidence of iatrogenic side effects, surgical craniectomy should be performed according to the strict indication and standard and any abuse should be avoided.

  9. REPETITIVE CLUSTER-TILTED ALGEBRAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Shunhua; Zhang Yuehui

    2012-01-01

    Let H be a finite-dimensional hereditary algebra over an algebraically closed field k and CFm be the repetitive cluster category of H with m ≥ 1.We investigate the properties of cluster tilting objects in CFm and the structure of repetitive clustertilted algebras.Moreover,we generalize Theorem 4.2 in [12](Buan A,Marsh R,Reiten I.Cluster-tilted algebra,Trans.Amer.Math.Soc.,359(1)(2007),323-332.) to the situation of CFm,and prove that the tilting graph KCFm of CFm is connected.

  10. Diving-flight aerodynamics of a peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Ponitz

    Full Text Available This study investigates the aerodynamics of the falcon Falco peregrinus while diving. During a dive peregrines can reach velocities of more than 320 km h⁻¹. Unfortunately, in freely roaming falcons, these high velocities prohibit a precise determination of flight parameters such as velocity and acceleration as well as body shape and wing contour. Therefore, individual F. peregrinus were trained to dive in front of a vertical dam with a height of 60 m. The presence of a well-defined background allowed us to reconstruct the flight path and the body shape of the falcon during certain flight phases. Flight trajectories were obtained with a stereo high-speed camera system. In addition, body images of the falcon were taken from two perspectives with a high-resolution digital camera. The dam allowed us to match the high-resolution images obtained from the digital camera with the corresponding images taken with the high-speed cameras. Using these data we built a life-size model of F. peregrinus and used it to measure the drag and lift forces in a wind-tunnel. We compared these forces acting on the model with the data obtained from the 3-D flight path trajectory of the diving F. peregrinus. Visualizations of the flow in the wind-tunnel uncovered details of the flow structure around the falcon's body, which suggests local regions with separation of flow. High-resolution pictures of the diving peregrine indicate that feathers pop-up in the equivalent regions, where flow separation in the model falcon occurred.

  11. EPO modulation in a 14-days undersea scuba dive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revelli, L; Vagnoni, S; D'Amore, A; Di Stasio, E; Lombardi, C P; Storti, G; Proietti, R; Balestra, C; Ricerca, B M

    2013-10-01

    Erythropoiesis is affected during deep saturation dives. The mechanism should be related to a downregulation of serum Erythropoietin (s-EPO) concentration or to a toxic effect of the hyperbaric hyperoxia. We evaluated s-EPO and other haematological parameters in 6 scuba divers before, during and after a 14-days guinness saturation dive (8-10 m). Athletes were breathing air at 1.8-2 ATA, under the control of a team of physicians. Serum parameters were measured before diving (T0) and: 7 days (T1), 14 days (T2) after the beginning of the dive and 2 h (T3) and 24 h (T4) after resurfacing. Hgb, and many other haematological parameters did not change whereas Ht, s-EPO, the ratio between s-EPO predicted and that observed and reticulocytes (absolute, percent) declined progressively from T0 to T3. At T4 a significant rise in s-EPO was observed. Hgb did not vary but erythropoiesis seemed to be affected as s-EPO and reticulocyte counts showed. All these changes were statistically significant. The experiment, conducted in realistic conditions of dive length, oxygen concentration and pressure, allows us to formulate some hypotheses about the role of prolonged hyperbarism on erythropoiesis. The s-EPO rise, 24 h after resurfacing, is clearly documented and related to the "Normobaric Oxygen Paradox". This evidence suggests interesting hypotheses for new clinical applications such as modulation of s-EPO production and Hgb content triggered by appropriate O₂ administration in pre-surgical patients or in some anemic disease.

  12. Recursive filtering for zero offset correction of diving depth time series with GNU R package diveMove.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastián P Luque

    Full Text Available Zero offset correction of diving depth measured by time-depth recorders is required to remove artifacts arising from temporal changes in accuracy of pressure transducers. Currently used methods for this procedure are in the proprietary software domain, where researchers cannot study it in sufficient detail, so they have little or no control over how their data were changed. GNU R package diveMove implements a procedure in the Free Software domain that consists of recursively smoothing and filtering the input time series using moving quantiles. This paper describes, demonstrates, and evaluates the proposed method by using a "perfect" data set, which is subsequently corrupted to provide input for the proposed procedure. The method is evaluated by comparing the corrected time series to the original, uncorrupted, data set from an Antarctic fur seal (Arctocephalus gazella Peters, 1875. The Root Mean Square Error of the corrected data set, relative to the "perfect" data set, was nearly identical to the magnitude of noise introduced into the latter. The method, thus, provides a flexible, reliable, and efficient mechanism to perform zero offset correction for analyses of diving behaviour. We illustrate applications of the method to data sets from four species with large differences in diving behaviour, measured using different sampling protocols and instrument characteristics.

  13. Connectivity-Based Segmentation for GPU-Accelerated Mesh Decompression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie-Yi Zhao; Min Tang; Ruo-Feng Tong

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel algorithm to partition large 3D meshes for GPU-accelerated decompression.Our formulation focuses on minimizing the replicated vertices between patches,and balancing the numbers of faces of patches for efficient parallel computing.First we generate a topology model of the original mesh and remove vertex positions.Then we assign the centers of patches using geodesic farthest point sampling and cluster the faces according to the geodesic distance to the centers.After the segmentation we swap boundary faces to fix jagged boundaries and store the boundary vertices for whole-mesh preservation.The decompression of each patch runs on a thread of GPU,and we evaluate its performance on various large benchmarks.In practice,the GPU-based decompression algorithm runs more than 48x faster on NVIDIA GeForce GTX 580 GPU compared with that on the CPU using single core.

  14. Decompressive Craniectomy Following Brain Injury: Factors Important to Patient Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eghwrudjakpor PO

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Decompressive craniectomy is often performed as an empirical lifesaving measure to protect the injured brain from the damaging effects of propagating oedema and intracranial hypertension. However, there are no clearly defined indications or specified guidelines for patient selection for the procedure. Aims: To evaluate outcome determinants and factors important in patientselection for the procedure. Methods: We reviewed the literature on decompressive craniectomy, including single case reports and reported case series, to identify factors affecting outcome followingthe procedure, as well as its pitfalls and associated complications. Results: Glasgow coma score of 8 and above, age less than 50 years and early intervention were found to be among the most significantdeterminants of prognosis. Conclusion: Improving patient selection for decompressive craniectomy may be expected to further improve the outcome following the procedure in severely brain injured patients.

  15. Repetitive elements in parasitic protozoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clayton Christine

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A recent paper published in BMC Genomics suggests that retrotransposition may be active in the human gut parasite Entamoeba histolytica. This adds to our knowledge of the various types of repetitive elements in parasitic protists and the potential influence of such elements on pathogenicity. See research article http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2164/11/321

  16. Decompression surgery for spinal metastases: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakar, Dara; Tanenbaum, Joseph E; Phan, Kevin; Alentado, Vincent J; Steinmetz, Michael P; Benzel, Edward C; Mroz, Thomas E

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to systematically review the literature on reported outcomes following decompression surgery for spinal metastases. METHODS The authors conducted MEDLINE, Scopus, and Web of Science database searches for studies reporting clinical outcomes and complications associated with decompression surgery for metastatic spinal tumors. Both retrospective and prospective studies were included. After meeting inclusion criteria, articles were categorized based on the following reported outcomes: survival, ambulation, surgical technique, neurological function, primary tumor histology, and miscellaneous outcomes. RESULTS Of the 4148 articles retrieved from databases, 36 met inclusion criteria. Of those included, 8 were prospective studies and 28 were retrospective studies. The year of publication ranged from 1992 to 2015. Study size ranged from 21 to 711 patients. Three studies found that good preoperative Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS ≥ 80%) was a significant predictor of survival. No study reported a significant effect of time-to-surgery following the onset of spinal cord compression symptoms on survival. Three studies reported improvement in neurological function following surgery. The most commonly cited complication was wound infection or dehiscence (22 studies). Eight studies reported that preoperative ambulatory or preoperative motor status was a significant predictor of postoperative ambulatory status. A wide variety of surgical techniques were reported: posterior decompression and stabilization, posterior decompression without stabilization, and posterior decompression with total or subtotal tumor resection. Although a wide range of functional scales were used to assess neurological outcomes, four studies used the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale to assess neurological function. Four studies reported the effects of radiation therapy and local disease control for spinal metastases. Two studies reported that

  17. Muscle energy stores and stroke rates of emperor penguins: implications for muscle metabolism and dive performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Cassondra L; Sato, Katsufumi; Shiomi, Kozue; Ponganis, Paul J

    2012-01-01

    In diving birds and mammals, bradycardia and peripheral vasoconstriction potentially isolate muscle from the circulation. During complete ischemia, ATP production is dependent on the size of the myoglobin oxygen (O(2)) store and the concentrations of phosphocreatine (PCr) and glycogen (Gly). Therefore, we measured PCr and Gly concentrations in the primary underwater locomotory muscle of emperor penguin and modeled the depletion of muscle O(2) and those energy stores under conditions of complete ischemia and a previously determined muscle metabolic rate. We also analyzed stroke rate to assess muscle workload variation during dives and evaluate potential limitations on the model. Measured PCr and Gly concentrations, 20.8 and 54.6 mmol kg(-1), respectively, were similar to published values for nondiving animals. The model demonstrated that PCr and Gly provide a large anaerobic energy store, even for dives longer than 20 min. Stroke rate varied throughout the dive profile, indicating muscle workload was not constant during dives as was assumed in the model. The stroke rate during the first 30 s of dives increased with increased dive depth. In extremely long dives, lower overall stroke rates were observed. Although O(2) consumption and energy store depletion may vary during dives, the model demonstrated that PCr and Gly, even at concentrations typical of terrestrial birds and mammals, are a significant anaerobic energy store and can play an important role in the emperor penguin's ability to perform long dives.

  18. Investigating annual diving behaviour by hooded seals (Cystophora cristata within the Northwest Atlantic Ocean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie M Andersen

    Full Text Available With the exception of relatively brief periods when they reproduce and moult, hooded seals, Cystophora cristata, spend most of the year in the open ocean where they undergo feeding migrations to either recover or prepare for the next fasting period. Valuable insights into habitat use and diving behaviour during these periods have been obtained by attaching Satellite Relay Data Loggers (SRDLs to 51 Northwest (NW Atlantic hooded seals (33 females and 18 males during ice-bound fasting periods (2004-2008. Using General Additive Models (GAMs we describe habitat use in terms of First Passage Time (FPT and analyse how bathymetry, seasonality and FPT influence the hooded seals' diving behaviour described by maximum dive depth, dive duration and surface duration. Adult NW Atlantic hooded seals exhibit a change in diving activity in areas where they spend >20 h by increasing maximum dive depth, dive duration and surface duration, indicating a restricted search behaviour. We found that male and female hooded seals are spatially segregated and that diving behaviour varies between sexes in relation to habitat properties and seasonality. Migration periods are described by increased dive duration for both sexes with a peak in May, October and January. Males demonstrated an increase in dive depth and dive duration towards May (post-breeding/pre-moult and August-October (post-moult/pre-breeding but did not show any pronounced increase in surface duration. Females dived deepest and had the highest surface duration between December and January (post-moult/pre-breeding. Our results suggest that the smaller females may have a greater need to recover from dives than that of the larger males. Horizontal segregation could have evolved as a result of a resource partitioning strategy to avoid sexual competition or that the energy requirements of males and females are different due to different energy expenditure during fasting periods.

  19. Nutritional Assessment During a 14-d Saturation Dive: the NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operation V Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. M.; Davis-Street, J. E.; Fesperman, J. V.; Smith, M. D.; Rice, B. L.; Zwart, S. R.

    2006-01-01

    Ground-based analogs of spaceflight are an important means of studying physiological and nutritional changes associated with space travel, particularly since exploration missions are anticipated, and flight research opportunities are limited. A clinical nutritional assessment of the NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operation V (NEEMO) crew (4 M, 2 F) was conducted before, during, and after the 14-d saturation dive. Blood and urine samples were collected before (D-12 and D-1), during (MD 7 and MD 12), and after (R + 0 and R + 7) the dive. The foods were typical of the spaceflight food system. A number of physiological changes were reported both during the dive and post dive that are also commonly observed during spaceflight. Serum hemoglobin and hematocrit were decreased (P less than 0.05) post dive. Serum ferritin and ceruloplasmin significantly increased during the dive, while transferring receptors tended to go down during the dive and were significantly decreased by the last day (R + 0). Along with significant hematological changes, there was also evidence for increased oxidative damage and stress during the dive. 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine was elevated (P less than 0.05) during the dive, while glutathione peroxidase and superoxide disrnutase activities were decreased (P less than 0.05) during the dive. Serum C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration also tended to increase during the dive, suggesting the presence of a stress-induced inflammatory response, Decreased leptin during the dive (P less than 0.05) may also be related to the increased stress. Similar to what is observed during spaceflight, subjects had decreased energy intake and weight loss during the dive. Together, these similarities to spaceflight provide a model to further define the physiological effects of spaceflight and investigate potential countermeasures.

  20. Repetition suppression and repetition priming are processing outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wig, Gagan S

    2012-01-01

    Abstract There is considerable evidence that repetition suppression (RS) is a cortical signature of previous exposure to the environment. In many instances RS in specific brain regions is accompanied by improvements in specific behavioral measures; both observations are outcomes of repeated processing. In understanding the mechanism by which brain changes give rise to behavioral changes, it is important to consider what aspect of the environment a given brain area or set of areas processes, and how this might be expressed behaviorally.

  1. Cohesive Function of Lexical Repetition in Text

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张莉; 卢沛沛

    2013-01-01

    Lexical repetition is the most direct form of lexical cohesion,which is the central device for making texts hang together. Although repetition is the most direct way to emphasize,it performs the cohesive effect more apparently.

  2. Decompressive Craniectomy and Traumatic Brain Injury: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvis-Miranda, Hernando; Castellar-Leones, Sandra Milena; Moscote-Salazar, Luis Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Intracranial hypertension is the largest cause of death in young patients with severe traumatic brain injury. Decompressive craniectomy is part of the second level measures for the management of increased intracranial pressure refractory to medical management as moderate hypothermia and barbiturate coma. The literature lack of concepts is their indications. We present a review on the state of the art. PMID:27162826

  3. Nerve conduction studies after decompression in painful diabetic polyneuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Macare van Maurik, JFM; Franssen, Hessel; Millin, Daniel W.; Peters, Edgar J G; Kon, Moshe

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the influence of nerve decompression at potential entrapment sites in the lower extremity in painful diabetic polyneuropathy on nerve conduction study variables. Methods: Forty-two patients with painful diabetic polyneuropathy were included in this prospective randomized cont

  4. Repeat microvascular decompression for recurrent idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Nicolaas A.; van Dijk, J. Marc C.; Immenga, Steven; Wagemakers, Michiel; Metzemaekers, Jan D. M.

    2014-01-01

    Object. Microvascular decompression (MVD) is considered the method of choice to treat idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia (TN) refractory to medical treatment. However, repeat MVD for recurrent TN is not well established. In this paper, the authors describe a large case series in which patients underwen

  5. Treatment of atypical trigeminal neuralgia with microvascular decompression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai Jian

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To explore the methods for achieving pain relief in patients with atypical trigeminal neuralgia (TN using microvascular decompression (MVD. Study Design and Settings: Retrospective study of 26 patients treated during the years 2000 to 2004. Materials and Methods: Twenty-six patients in whom vascular compression of the trigeminal nerve was identified by high definition magnetic resonance tomographic angiography (MRTA were treated with MVD for atypical TN in our department. Clinical presentations, surgical findings and clinical outcomes were analyzed retrospectively. Results: In this study, single trigeminal division was involved in only 2 patients (8% and two or three divisions in the other 24 patients (92%. Of prime importance is the fact that in 46.2% of the patients, several conflicting vessels were found in association. Location of the conflicts around the circumference of the trigeminal root was supero-medial to the root in 53.5%, supero-lateral in 30.8% and inferior in 15.7%. MVD for atypical TN resulted in complete pain relief in 50% of the patients with complete decompression, partial pain relief in 30.8% and poor pain relief or pain recurrence in 19.2% of the patients without complete decompression postoperatively. Conclusions: Complete decompression of the entire trigeminal root plays an important role in achieving pain relief in patients with atypical TN with MVD.

  6. Repeat microvascular decompression for recurrent idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Nicolaas A.; van Dijk, J. Marc C.; Immenga, Steven; Wagemakers, Michiel; Metzemaekers, Jan D. M.

    2014-01-01

    Object. Microvascular decompression (MVD) is considered the method of choice to treat idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia (TN) refractory to medical treatment. However, repeat MVD for recurrent TN is not well established. In this paper, the authors describe a large case series in which patients

  7. Studies on the Mechanism and Prevention of Decompression Sickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-07-12

    1968 - February 28, 1982 b i TABLE OF CONTENTS Page PREFACE ------------------------------------------------------- III INTRODUCTION...Table of Contents (continued) Pg Dysbaric Osteonecrosis: Etiological and Pathogenetic Concepts-- 123 Dysbaric Osteonecrosis in Mice...des lesions vasculaires doies aux bUlles. Ccs observations peuvent contribuer At l’Ouci- dation de la pathog~nie de la maladie de decompression, ct

  8. Autosub6000: A Deep Diving Long Range AUV

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stephen McPhail

    2009-01-01

    With an ultimate range up to 1000 kin, a maximum operating depth of 6000 m, and a generous payload capacity, Autosub6000 is well placed to become one of the world's most capable deep diving Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs).Recently, Autosub6000 successfully completed its first deep water engineering trials, and in September 2008, fitted with a muitibeam sonar, will carry out its fLrst science missions. This paper will describe how we are tackling the design issues that specifically affect a deep diving AUV which must be capable of operating with true autonomy, independently of the mother ship,namely: carrying adequate energy for long endurance and range, coping with varying buoyancy, and maintaining accurate navigation throughout missions lasting up to several days. Results from the recent engineering trails are presented, and future missions and development plans are discussed.

  9. A Review of SCUBA Diving Impacts and Implication for Coral Reefs Conservation and Tourism Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainal Abidin Siti Zulaiha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dive tourism has become important in term of magnitude and significantly contributes to regional economies. Nevertheless, in the absence of proper controls and enforcement, unplanned tourism growth has caused environmental degradation which undermines the long-term sustainability of the tourism industry. The purpose of this paper is to explore factors that contribute to the SCUBA diving impacts on coral and fish communities. This paper explains the causes of a certain event, validating the problem of impacts, defining the core issues and identifies possible causes leading to an effect. The phenomenon of diving impacts on coral reefs is a result of intensive use of dive site over the long-term. The divers can reduce their impacts towards coral reefs through responsible diving behaviors. The causes of cumulative diver’s contacts are more complicated than it seems. In response, this paper proposes the best mitigation strategies that need to be considered for future dive tourism management.

  10. Comparative histology of muscle in free ranging cetaceans: shallow versus deep diving species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, E; Fernández, A; Espinosa de los Monteros, A; Díaz-Delgado, J; Bernaldo de Quirós, Y; García-Álvarez, N; Arbelo, M; Herráez, P

    2015-10-30

    Different marine mammal species exhibit a wide range of diving behaviour based on their breath-hold diving capabilities. They are classically categorized as long duration, deep-diving and short duration, shallow-diving species. These abilities are likely to be related to the muscle characteristics of each species. Despite the increasing number of publications on muscle profile in different cetacean species, very little information is currently available concerning the characteristics of other muscle components in these species. In this study, we examined skeletal muscle fiber type, fiber size (cross sectional area and lesser diameter), intramuscular substrates, and perimysium-related structures, by retrospective study in 146 stranded cetaceans involving 15 different species. Additionally, we investigated diving profile-specific histological features. Our results suggest that deep diving species have higher amount of intramyocyte lipid droplets, and evidence higher percentage of intramuscular adipose tissue, and larger fibre sizes in this group of animals.

  11. Biosonar, dive, and foraging activity of satellite tracked harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linnenschmidt, Meike; Teilmann, Jonas; Akamatsu, Tomonari

    2013-01-01

    rates and higher dive activity at night. A female traveling in open waters showed no diel rhythm, but its sonar activity was three times higher compared to the males’. Considerable individual differences in dive and echolocation activity could have been influenced by biological and physical factors......This study presents bioacoustic recordings in combination with movements and diving behavior of three free-ranging harbor porpoises (a female and two males) in Danish waters. Each porpoise was equipped with an acoustic data logger (A-tag), a time-depth-recorder, a VHF radio transmitter......, and a satellite transmitter. The units were programmed to release after 24 or 72 h. Possible foraging occurred mostly near the surface or at the bottom of a dive. The porpoises showed individual diversity in biosonar activity (50,000 clicks per hour) and in dive frequency (6–179 dives per hour). We...

  12. Comparative histology of muscle in free ranging cetaceans: shallow versus deep diving species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, E.; Fernández, A.; Espinosa de los Monteros, A.; Díaz-Delgado, J.; Bernaldo de Quirós, Y.; García-Álvarez, N.; Arbelo, M.; Herráez, P.

    2015-01-01

    Different marine mammal species exhibit a wide range of diving behaviour based on their breath-hold diving capabilities. They are classically categorized as long duration, deep-diving and short duration, shallow-diving species. These abilities are likely to be related to the muscle characteristics of each species. Despite the increasing number of publications on muscle profile in different cetacean species, very little information is currently available concerning the characteristics of other muscle components in these species. In this study, we examined skeletal muscle fiber type, fiber size (cross sectional area and lesser diameter), intramuscular substrates, and perimysium-related structures, by retrospective study in 146 stranded cetaceans involving 15 different species. Additionally, we investigated diving profile-specific histological features. Our results suggest that deep diving species have higher amount of intramyocyte lipid droplets, and evidence higher percentage of intramuscular adipose tissue, and larger fibre sizes in this group of animals. PMID:26514564

  13. CARDIOVASCULAR RESPONSES OF DIVING AND NONDIVING MAMMALS TO APNEA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    anesthetized nutria and cats. In the nutria , arterial blood pressure was maintained an average of 182 seconds after profound bradycardia developed despite a...bradycardia was observed. The increase in peripheral resistance during apnea in cats was less than 20% of that found in nutria . Evidence of cardiac...failure was found before bradycardia in the cat, but not in the nutria . It was concluded cardiovascular responses reported for diving mammals could be

  14. Energetic cost of foraging in free-diving emperor penguins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, K A; Kooyman, G L; Ponganis, P J

    2001-01-01

    Hypothesizing that emperor penguins (Aptenodytes forsteri) would have higher daily energy expenditures when foraging for their food than when being hand-fed and that the increased expenditure could represent their foraging cost, we measured field metabolic rates (FMR; using doubly labeled water) over 4-d periods when 10 penguins either foraged under sea ice or were not allowed to dive but were fed fish by hand. Surprisingly, penguins did not have higher rates of energy expenditure when they dove and captured their own food than when they did not forage but were given food. Analysis of time-activity and energy budgets indicated that FMR was about 1.7 x BMR (basal metabolic rate) during the 12 h d(-1) that penguins were lying on sea ice. During the remaining 12 h d(-1), which we termed their "foraging period" of the day, the birds were alert and active (standing, preening, walking, and either free diving or being hand-fed), and their FMR was about 4.1 x BMR. This is the lowest cost of foraging estimated to date among the eight penguin species studied. The calculated aerobic diving limit (ADL(C)), determined with the foraging period metabolic rate of 4.1 x BMR and known O(2) stores, was only 2.6 min, which is far less than the 6-min ADL previously measured with postdive lactate analyses in emperors diving under similar conditions. This indicates that calculating ADL(C) from an at-sea or foraging-period metabolic rate in penguins is not appropriate. The relatively low foraging cost for emperor penguins contributes to their relatively low total daily FMR (2.9 x BMR). The allometric relationship for FMR in eight penguin species, including the smallest and largest living representatives, is kJ d(-1)=1,185 kg(0.705).

  15. Parasympathetic preganglionic cardiac motoneurons labeled after voluntary diving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Michael ePanneton

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A dramatic bradycardia is induced by underwater submersion in vertebrates. The location of parasympathetic preganglionic cardiac motor neurons driving this aspect of the diving response was investigated using cFos immunohistochemistry combined with retrograde transport of cholera toxin subunit B (CTB to double-label neurons. After pericardial injections of CTB, trained rats voluntarily dove underwater, and their heart rates dropped immediately to 95±2bpm, an 80% reduction. After immunohistochemical processing, the vast majority of CTB labeled neurons were located in the reticular formation from the rostral cervical spinal cord to the facial motor nucleus, confirming previous studies. Labeled neurons caudal to the rostral ventrolateral medulla were usually spindle-shaped aligned along an oblique line running from the dorsal vagal nucleus to the ventrolateral reticular formation, while those more rostrally were multipolar with extended dendrites. Nine percent of retrogradely-labeled neurons were positive for both cFos and CTB after diving and 74% of these were found rostral to the obex. CTB also was transported transganglionically in primary afferent fibers, resulting in large granular deposits in dorsolateral, ventrolateral, and commissural subnuclei of the nucleus tractus solitarii and finer deposits in lamina I and IV-V of the trigeminocervical complex. The overlap of parasympathetic preganglionic cardiac motor neurons activated by diving with those activated by baro- and chemoreceptors in the rostral ventrolateral medulla is discussed. Thus the profound bradycardia seen with underwater submersion reinforces the notion that the mammalian diving response is the most powerful autonomic reflex known.

  16. Beaked Whale Group Deep Dive Behavior from Passive Acoustic Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Beaked Whale Group Deep Dive Behavior from Passive...Research Organisation P.O. Box AB-20714 Marsh Harbour Abaco, Bahamas phone: (242) 366-4155 fax: (242) 366-4155 email: dclaridge...N000141512649 LONG-TERM GOALS While a significant body of knowledge regarding individual beaked whale behavior at depth has been established in the

  17. Beaked Whale Group Deep Dive Behavior from Passive Acoustic Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Beaked Whale Group Deep Dive Behavior from Passive...described explicitly, beaked whales are one of the cetacean taxa more sensitive to use of Navy sonar (Moretti et al., 2014; Tyack et al., 2011). Despite...their vulnerability, Blainville’s beaked whale , Mesoplodon densirostris (Md), are routinely detected year-round on the AUTEC range, coincident with

  18. Incremental Knowledge Base Construction Using DeepDive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jaeho; Wu, Sen; Wang, Feiran; De Sa, Christopher; Zhang, Ce; Ré, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Populating a database with unstructured information is a long-standing problem in industry and research that encompasses problems of extraction, cleaning, and integration. Recent names used for this problem include dealing with dark data and knowledge base construction (KBC). In this work, we describe DeepDive, a system that combines database and machine learning ideas to help develop KBC systems, and we present techniques to make the KBC process more efficient. We observe that the KBC process is iterative, and we develop techniques to incrementally produce inference results for KBC systems. We propose two methods for incremental inference, based respectively on sampling and variational techniques. We also study the tradeoff space of these methods and develop a simple rule-based optimizer. DeepDive includes all of these contributions, and we evaluate Deep-Dive on five KBC systems, showing that it can speed up KBC inference tasks by up to two orders of magnitude with negligible impact on quality. PMID:27144081

  19. A comparison of auditory brainstem responses across diving bird species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowell, Sara E.; Berlin, Alicia; Carr, Catherine E; Olsen, Glenn H.; Therrien, Ronald E; Yannuzzi, Sally E; Ketten, Darlene R

    2015-01-01

    There is little biological data available for diving birds because many live in hard-to-study, remote habitats. Only one species of diving bird, the black-footed penguin (Spheniscus demersus), has been studied in respect to auditory capabilities (Wever et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 63:676–680, 1969). We, therefore, measured in-air auditory threshold in ten species of diving birds, using the auditory brainstem response (ABR). The average audiogram obtained for each species followed the U-shape typical of birds and many other animals. All species tested shared a common region of the greatest sensitivity, from 1000 to 3000 Hz, although audiograms differed significantly across species. Thresholds of all duck species tested were more similar to each other than to the two non-duck species tested. The red-throated loon (Gavia stellata) and northern gannet (Morus bassanus) exhibited the highest thresholds while the lowest thresholds belonged to the duck species, specifically the lesser scaup (Aythya affinis) and ruddy duck (Oxyura jamaicensis). Vocalization parameters were also measured for each species, and showed that with the exception of the common eider (Somateria mollisima), the peak frequency, i.e., frequency at the greatest intensity, of all species' vocalizations measured here fell between 1000 and 3000 Hz, matching the bandwidth of the most sensitive hearing range.

  20. Surgical decompression for lumbar stenosis in pediatric achondroplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baca, Kirsten E; Abdullah, Madeel A; Ting, Beverlie L; Schkrohowsky, Joshua G; Hoernschemeyer, Daniel G; Carson, Benjamin S; Ain, Michael C

    2010-01-01

    Spinal stenosis is a common complication of achondroplasia. To our knowledge, no study has evaluated a greater than 2-year outcome after surgical intervention for spinal stenosis in such children or compared decompression with and without instrumentation in relation to revision surgery. Our purpose was to assess the efficacy of lumbar decompression and instrumentation for symptomatic stenosis in children with achondroplasia. We retrospectively reviewed our institution's database to identify children (achondroplasia undergoing initial spinal decompression for lumbar stenosis from 1995 through 2003. We identified 18 such patients and reviewed their medical records for demographic data, presenting signs and symptoms, and treatment and outcome data. Mean follow-up was 72.0+/-27.6 months. We determined each patient's symptom score (SS) based on presence of leg weakness, numbness, or pain; abnormal reflexes; incontinence; and walking intolerance (unable to walk > or =5 blocks). Each finding was scored 1 point (6 points maximum). Nine patients requiring revision surgery were assigned a revision postoperative SS. All patients were contacted at the end of data collection and assigned a final follow-up SS. Baseline SS values were compared with postoperative, revision postoperative, and final follow-up scores using a paired t test (alpha=0.05). The mean preoperative and final SS values were significantly different: 4.0+/-0.9 (most common symptoms, leg weakness and incontinence) and 1.6+/-1.7 (most common symptom, leg weakness), respectively. Nine patients underwent decompression with instrumentation initially; 9 did not; 7 of the latter required instrumentation during revision; and 2 of the former also required revision. Those without initial instrumentation were 3.5 times more likely (odds ratio=12.3) to require revision. Surgical decompression with instrumentation significantly reduced the symptoms of lumbar stenosis and the likelihood of revision surgery in children with

  1. Beneath the surface : towards improved management of the scuba diving tourism system in Tofo, Mozambique

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Natural resource management is essential in areas where livelihoods depend on them. Scuba diving tourism has become one of the fastest growing markets for special interest tourism in the world. Coral degradation and species disappearance poses a great risk for livelihoods in areas where SCUBA diving tourism is the main economic driver. Praia do Tofo emerged as a diving destination thanks to the year round presence of captivating marine mega fauna species: manta rays and whale sharks. Concerns...

  2. High-affinity hemoglobin and blood oxygen saturation in diving emperor penguins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meir, Jessica U; Ponganis, Paul J

    2009-10-01

    The emperor penguin (Aptenodytes forsteri) thrives in the Antarctic underwater environment, diving to depths greater than 500 m and for durations longer than 23 min. To examine mechanisms underlying the exceptional diving ability of this species and further describe blood oxygen (O2) transport and depletion while diving, we characterized the O2-hemoglobin (Hb) dissociation curve of the emperor penguin in whole blood. This allowed us to (1) investigate the biochemical adaptation of Hb in this species, and (2) address blood O2 depletion during diving, by applying the dissociation curve to previously collected partial pressure of O2 (PO2) profiles to estimate in vivo Hb saturation (SO2) changes during dives. This investigation revealed enhanced Hb-O2 affinity (P50=28 mmHg, pH 7.5) in the emperor penguin, similar to high-altitude birds and other penguin species. This allows for increased O2 at low blood PO2 levels during diving and more complete depletion of the respiratory O2 store. SO2 profiles during diving demonstrated that arterial SO2 levels are maintained near 100% throughout much of the dive, not decreasing significantly until the final ascent phase. End-of-dive venous SO2 values were widely distributed and optimization of the venous blood O2 store resulted from arterialization and near complete depletion of venous blood O2 during longer dives. The estimated contribution of the blood O2 store to diving metabolic rate was low and highly variable. This pattern is due, in part, to the influx of O2 from the lungs into the blood during diving, and variable rates of tissue O2 uptake.

  3. Converting chemical energy into electricity through a functionally cooperating device with diving-surfacing cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Mengmeng; Cheng, Mengjiao; Ju, Guannan; Zhang, Yajun; Shi, Feng

    2014-11-05

    A smart device that can dive or surface in aqueous medium has been developed by combining a pH-responsive surface with acid-responsive magnesium. The diving-surfacing cycles can be used to convert chemical energy into electricity. During the diving-surfacing motion, the smart device cuts magnetic flux lines and produces a current, demonstrating that motional energy can be realized by consuming chemical energy of magnesium, thus producing electricity.

  4. Endoscopic decompression for chronic compartment syndrome of the forearm in motocross racers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jans, Christophe; Peersman, Geert; Peersman, Benjamin; Van Den Langenbergh, Tom; Valk, Jody; Richart, Tom

    2015-09-01

    Sporting activities that involve repetitive stress to muscle compartments can elicit chronic exertional compartment syndrome. Its occurrence in the lower leg muscle compartments is most common, but other locations are less well known and the pathophysiology is not completely understood. In motocross racers, chronic exertional compartment syndrome can occur in the muscles of the lower arm. Currently, the only accepted treatment of correctly diagnosed chronic exertional compartment syndrome is surgical release of the fascia, which successfully relieves pain and allows patients to return to full activity. Open decompression is considered as the gold standard of treatment. This clinical paper describes our new endoscopic technique and investigates the functional outcome after surgery. We report on a series of 154 chronic exertional compartment syndromes afflicted motocross racers treated with an endoscopic release of the lower arm muscles. An MRI scan before and after strenuous exercise of the hand flexors (repetitive grip until exhaustion for 15 min) was performed to confirm the clinical diagnosis of chronic exertional compartment syndrome. Symptom severity before and after surgery was assessed using a visual analogue scale. Preoperative symptom severity scores were 1.1 ± 0.3 before exercise and 7.4 ± 1.5 after exercise. Post-operatively, these were 1.0 ± 0.2 and 1.7 ± 0.9. The pre- versus post-operative symptom scores after exercise were significantly different (p motocross racers diagnosed with chronic exertional compartment syndrome is a valuable treatment option, with mild post-operative pain and fast recovery.

  5. Deep-diving by narwhals Monodon monoceros: differences in foraging behavior between wintering areas?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laidre, K. L.; Heide-Jørgensen, M. P.; Dietz, R.

    2003-01-01

    -depth recorders (SLTDRs) were used to examine differences in narwhal Monodon monoceros diving behavior and habitat selection among 3 sub-populations in Canada and West Greenland (n = 16 individuals). The number of dives to different depths and time allocation within the water column was investigated in 3 seasons...... between summer and winter. Clear differences were observed between 2 wintering grounds. Whales occupying one wintering ground spent most of their time diving to between 200 and 400 m (25 dives per day, SE 3), confirmed by both depth and temperature recording tags. In contrast, narwhals in a separate...

  6. 36 CFR 3.18 - May I snorkel or underwater dive in park waters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... waters? (a) Snorkeling and underwater diving is allowed in park waters, subject to closures or... flag. (e) If State laws or regulations exist concerning snorkeling activities, those provisions...

  7. Functional properties of myoglobins from five whale species with different diving capacities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helbo, Signe; Fago, Angela

    2012-10-01

    Whales show an exceptionally wide range of diving capabilities and many express high amounts of the O(2) carrier protein myoglobin (Mb) in their muscle tissues, which increases their aerobic diving capacity. Although previous studies have mainly focused on the muscle Mb concentration and O(2) carrying capacity as markers of diving behavior in whales, it still remains unexplored whether whale Mbs differ in their O(2) affinities and nitrite reductase and peroxidase enzymatic activities, all functions that could contribute to differences in diving capacities. In this study, we have measured the functional properties of purified Mbs from five toothed whales and two baleen whales and have examined their correlation with average dive duration. Results showed that some variation in functional properties exists among whale Mbs, with toothed whale Mbs having higher O(2) affinities and nitrite reductase activities (similar to those of horse Mb) compared with baleen whale Mbs. However, these differences did not correlate with average dive duration. Instead, a significant correlation was found between whale Mb concentration and average duration and depth of dives, and between O(2) affinity and nitrite reductase activity when including horse Mb. Despite the fact that the functional properties showed little species-specific differences in vitro, they may still contribute to enhancing diving capacity as a result of the increased muscle Mb concentration found in extreme divers. In conclusion, Mb concentration rather than specific functional reactivities may support whale diving performance.

  8. Epilepsy, scuba diving and risk assessment. Near misses and the need for ongoing vigilance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, David; Lippmann, John

    2013-03-01

    There is ongoing debate about the safety of scuba diving for individuals with a history of epilepsy. An in-water seizure is highly likely to be fatal. Recommendations for fitness to dive vary with some regarding epilepsy as an absolute contraindication to diving (South Pacific Underwater Medicine Society) and others permitting diving under strict criteria (United Kingdom Sport Diving Medical Committee) with diving to be postponed for a period of three to five years without seizures. Long-term follow up of people with epilepsy shows that at least one-third will have a recurrence and that the risk remains elevated for many years. We present three cases where individuals with a history of epilepsy (or likely epilepsy) almost fell through the cracks of health risk assessment, two with near-fatal consequences. These cases inform the on-going debate about fitness to dive for those with current or past epilepsy, and highlight the importance of education for doctors, dive professionals and divers about the risks associated with epilepsy and diving.

  9. Safe Inner Ear Gas Tensions for Switch from Helium to Air Breathing During Decompression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    interviewed, guided using a brief questionnaire including questions regarding vision or hearing changes. Sixty minutes after the divers reached the air...ear squeeze and could not complete the descent. In two cases, the un-afflicted divers were able to continue, but in three cases the dive was aborted ...for the afflicted and un-afflicted divers. Overall, 14 man-dives were aborted , none of which are included in the 104 man-dives completed. 6

  10. Changes in dive behaviour during naval sonar exposure in killer whales, long-finned pilot whales and sperm whales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lise Doksæter Sivle

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic underwater sound in the environment might potentially affect the behavior of marine mammals enough to have an impact on their reproduction and survival. Diving behavior of 5 killer whales (Orcinus orca, 7 long-finned pilot whales (Globicephala melas and 4 sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus were studied during controlled exposures to naval sonar (LFAS: 1-2 kHz and MFAS: 6-7 kHz during three field seasons (2006-2009. Diving behavior was monitored before, during and after sonar exposure using an archival tag placed on the animal with suction cups. The tag recorded the animal’s vertical movement, and additional data on horizontal movement and vocalizations were used to determine behavioral modes. Killer whales that were conducting deep dives at sonar onset changed abruptly to shallow diving during LFAS, while killer whales conducting deep dives at the onset of MFAS did not alter dive mode. When in shallow diving mode at sonar onset, killer whales did not change their diving behavior. Pilot and sperm whales performed normal deep dives during MFAS exposure. During LFAS exposures, long-finned pilot whales mostly performed fewer deep dives and some sperm whales performed shallower and shorter dives. Acoustic recording data presented previously indicates that deep diving is associated with feeding. Therefore, the observed changes in dive behavior of the three species could potentially reduce the foraging efficiency of the affected animals.

  11. Biomechanical evaluation of an interfacet joint decompression and stabilization system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leasure, Jeremi M; Buckley, Jenni

    2014-07-01

    A majority of the middle-aged population exhibit cervical spondylosis that may require decompression and fusion of the affected level. Minimally invasive cervical fusion is an attractive option for decreasing operative time, morbidity, and mortality rates. A novel interfacet joint spacer (DTRAX facet screw system, Providence Medical) promises minimally invasive deployment resulting in decompression of the neuroforamen and interfacet fusion. The present study investigates the effectiveness of the device in minimizing intervertebral motion to promote fusion, decompression of the nerve root during bending activity, and performance of the implant to adhere to anatomy during repeated bending loads. We observed flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation resonant overshoot mode (ROM) in cadaver models of c-spine treated with the interfacet joint spacer (FJ spacer) as stand-alone and supplementing anterior plating. The FJ spacer was deployed bilaterally at single levels. Specimens were placed at the limit of ROM in flexion, extension, axial bending, and lateral bending. 3D images of the foramen were taken and postprocessed to quantify changes in foraminal area. Stand-alone spacer specimens were subjected to 30,000 cycles at 2 Hz of nonsimultaneous flexion-extension and lateral bending under compressive load and X-ray imaged at regular cycle intervals for quantitative measurements of device loosening. The stand-alone FJ spacer increased specimen stiffness in all directions except extension. 86% of all deployments resulted in some level of foraminal distraction. The rate of effective distraction was maintained in flexed, extended, and axially rotated postures. Two specimens demonstrated no detectable implant loosening (<0.25 mm). Three showed unilateral subclinical loosening (0.4 mm maximum), and one had subclinical loosening bilaterally (0.5 mm maximum). Results of our study are comparable to previous investigations into the stiffness of other stand

  12. Does recreational scuba diving have clinically significant effect on routine haematological parameters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perovic, Antonija; Nikolac, Nora; Braticevic, Marina Njire; Milcic, Ana; Sobocanec, Sandra; Balog, Tihomir; Dabelic, Sanja; Dumic, Jerka

    2017-06-15

    Scuba diving represents a combination of exercise and changes in environmental conditions. This study aimed to evaluate changes in haematological parameters after recreational scuba diving in order to identify clinically significant changes. The study included males, 17 recreational divers, median age (range) 41 (30-52) years. Blood samples were taken before diving, immediately after diving to 30 meters for 30 minutes, 3 hours and 6 hours after diving. Complete blood counts were analyzed on the Cell Dyn Ruby haematology analyzer. Statistical significance between successive measurements was tested using Friedman test. The difference between the two measurements was judged against desirable bias (DSB) derived from biological variation and calculated reference change values (RCV). The difference higher than RCV was considered clinically significant. A statistically significant increase and difference judging against DSB was observed: for neutrophils immediately, 3 and 6 hours after diving (18%, 34% and 36%, respectively), for white blood cells (WBCs) 3 and 6 hours after diving (20% and 25%, respectively), for lymphocytes (20%) and monocytes (23%) 6 hours after diving. A statistically significant decrease and difference judging against DSB was found: immediately after diving for monocytes (- 15%), 3 and 6 hours after diving for red blood cells (RBCs) (- 2.6% and -2.9%, respectively), haemoglobin (- 2.1% and - 2.8%, respectively) and haematocrit (- 2.4% and - 3.2%, respectively). A clinically significant change was not found for any of the test parameters when compared to RCV. Observed statistically significant changes after recreational scuba diving; WBCs, neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes increase and RBCs, haemoglobin, haematocrit decrease, probably will not affect clinical decision.

  13. Circuit considerations for repetitive railguns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honih, E.M.

    1986-01-01

    Railgun electromagnetic launchers have significant military and scientific potential. They provide direct conversion of electrical energy to projectile kinetic energy, and they offer the hope of achieving projectile velocities greatly exceeding the limits of conventional guns. With over 10 km/sec already demonstrated, railguns are attracting attention for tactical and strategic weapons systems and for scientific equation-of-state research. The full utilization of railguns will require significant improvements in every aspect of system design - projectile, barrel, and power source - to achieve operation on a large scale. This paper will review fundamental aspects of railguns, with emphasis on circuit considerations and repetitive operation.

  14. 75 FR 81224 - Availability of Recreational Diving, Oil and Gas Operations and Commercial Fishing Seats for the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Availability of Recreational Diving, Oil and Gas Operations... National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council: Recreational Diving, Oil and Gas Operations and...

  15. 76 FR 67480 - Standard on Commercial Diving Operations; Extension of the Office of Management and Budget's (OMB...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Standard on Commercial Diving Operations; Extension of the Office of Management and Budget's (OMB) Approval of Information Collection (Paperwork) Requirements AGENCY... requirements specified in the Commercial Diving Operations Standard (29 CFR part 1910, subpart T)....

  16. Inner-ear decompression sickness: 'hubble-bubble' without brain trouble?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremolizzo, Lucio; Malpieri, Massimo; Ferrarese, Carlo; Appollonio, Ildebrando

    2015-06-01

    Inner-ear decompression sickness (DCS) is an incompletely understood and increasingly recognized condition in compressed-air divers. Previous reports show a high association of inner-ear DCS with persistent foramen ovale (PFO), suggesting that a moderate-to-severe right-to-left shunt might represent a major predisposing factor, and more properly defining it as an event from arterial gas embolism (AGE). However, other conditions characterized by bubbles entering the arterial circulation, such as open-chamber cardiac surgery, do not produce inner-ear involvement, while sometimes damaging the brain extensively. Moreover, in other sites, such as the spinal cord, the prevailing mechanism for DCS is not AGE, but more likely local bubble formation with subsequent compression of venules and capillaries. Thus, AGE might be, more properly, a predisposing condition, neither sufficient, nor possibly even strictly necessary for inner-ear DCS. A 'two-hit hypothesis' has been proposed, implying a locally selective vulnerability of the inner ear to AGE. Modelled kinetics for gas removal are slower in the inner ear compared to the brain, leading to a supersaturated environment which allows bubbles to grow until they eventually obstruct the labyrinthine artery. Since this artery is relatively small, there is a low probability for a bubble to enter it; this might explain the disproportion between the high prevalence of PFO in the general population (25-30%) and the very low incidence of inner-ear DCS in compressed-air diving (approximately 0.005%). Furthermore, given that the labyrinthine artery usually originates either from the anterior inferior cerebellar artery, or directly from the basilar artery, shunting bubbles will more frequently swarm through the entire brain. In this case, however, the brain's much faster gas removal kinetics might allow for them to be reabsorbed without damaging brain tissue. In line with this scenario is the low probability (approx. 15%) of inner

  17. Acute obstructive hydrocephalus complicating decompression surgery of the craniovertebral junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohya, Junichi; Chikuda, Hirotaka; Nakatomi, Hirofumi; Sakamoto, Ryuji; Saito, Nobuhito; Tanaka, Sakae

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive hydrocephalus has been described as a rare complication following foramen magnum decompression for Chiari malformation. However, there are few reports of obstructive hydrocephalus after spinal surgery for other pathologies of the craniovertebral junction (CVJ). The authors herein report a 52-year-old female with achondroplasia presenting with an 8-month history of myelopathy due to spinal cord compression at CVJ. She underwent resection of the C1 posterior arch and part of the edge of the occipital bone. A computed tomography (CT) scan obtained 1-week after the surgery revealed bilateral infratentorial fluid collection. The patient was first managed conservatively; however, on the 17th day, her consciousness level showed sudden deterioration. Emergency CT demonstrated marked hydrocephalus due to obstruction of the cerebral aqueduct. Acute obstructive hydrocephalus can occur late after decompression surgery at the CVJ, and thus should be included in the differential diagnosis of a deteriorating mental status. PMID:27366268

  18. A New Basis of Geoscience: Whole-Earth Decompression Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Herndon, J Marvin

    2013-01-01

    Neither plate tectonics nor Earth expansion theory is sufficient to provide a basis for understanding geoscience. Each theory is incomplete and possesses problematic elements, but both have served as stepping stones to a more fundamental and inclusive geoscience theory that I call Whole-Earth Decompression Dynamics (WEDD). WEDD begins with and is the consequence of our planet's early formation as a Jupiter-like gas giant and permits deduction of:(1) Earth's internal composition, structure, and highly-reduced oxidation state; (2) Core formation without whole-planet melting; (3) Powerful new internal energy sources - proto-planetary energy of compression and georeactor nuclear fission energy; (4) Georeactor geomagnetic field generation; (5) Mechanism for heat emplacement at the base of the crust resulting in the crustal geothermal gradient; (6) Decompression driven geodynamics that accounts for the myriad of observations attributed to plate tectonics without requiring physically-impossible mantle convection, an...

  19. The distal radial decompression osteotomy for ulnar impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krimmer, Hermann; Unglaub, Frank; Langer, Martin F; Spies, Christian K

    2016-01-01

    The decompression of the distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) is performed by ulnar translation of the radial shaft proximal to the sigmoid notch, i.e. detensioning of the distal part of the interosseous membrane (DIOM) while containment of the DRUJ is achieved by closed wedge osteotomy of the radius. The osteotomy shortens the radius which entails detensioning of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC). Facilitating the modified Henry approach to the distal palmar radius a radial based wedge osteotomy is applied. The proximal osteotomy is proximal to the ulnar head and distal osteotomy is proximal to the sigmoid notch to prevent iatrogenic impingement. Ulnar translation of the radial shaft is performed to loosen the DIOM. The closed wedge osteotomy reduces radial inclination which will foster containment of the DRUJ. Distal radial decompression osteotomy of the DRUJ preserves DRUJ function while relieving painful impingement. Further surgical interventions are not compromised in case of failure.

  20. Bayesian approach to decompression sickness model parameter estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howle, L E; Weber, P W; Nichols, J M

    2017-03-01

    We examine both maximum likelihood and Bayesian approaches for estimating probabilistic decompression sickness model parameters. Maximum likelihood estimation treats parameters as fixed values and determines the best estimate through repeated trials, whereas the Bayesian approach treats parameters as random variables and determines the parameter probability distributions. We would ultimately like to know the probability that a parameter lies in a certain range rather than simply make statements about the repeatability of our estimator. Although both represent powerful methods of inference, for models with complex or multi-peaked likelihoods, maximum likelihood parameter estimates can prove more difficult to interpret than the estimates of the parameter distributions provided by the Bayesian approach. For models of decompression sickness, we show that while these two estimation methods are complementary, the credible intervals generated by the Bayesian approach are more naturally suited to quantifying uncertainty in the model parameters.

  1. Diving of great shearwaters (Puffinus gravis in cold and warm water regions of the South Atlantic Ocean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A Ronconi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Among the most widespread seabirds in the world, shearwaters of the genus Puffinus are also some of the deepest diving members of the Procellariiformes. Maximum diving depths are known for several Puffinus species, but dive depths or diving behaviour have never been recorded for great shearwaters (P. gravis, the largest member of this genus. This study reports the first high sampling rate (2 s of depth and diving behaviour for Puffinus shearwaters. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Time-depth recorders (TDRs were deployed on two female great shearwaters nesting on Inaccessible Island in the South Atlantic Ocean, recording 10 consecutive days of diving activity. Remote sensing imagery and movement patterns of 8 males tracked by satellite telemetry over the same period were used to identify probable foraging areas used by TDR-equipped females. The deepest and longest dive was to 18.9 m and lasted 40 s, but most (>50% dives were <2 m deep. Diving was most frequent near dawn and dusk, with <0.5% of dives occurring at night. The two individuals foraged in contrasting oceanographic conditions, one in cold (8 to 10°C water of the Sub-Antarctic Front, likely 1000 km south of the breeding colony, and the other in warmer (10 to 16°C water of the Sub-tropical Frontal Zone, at the same latitude as the colony, possibly on the Patagonian Shelf, 4000 km away. The cold water bird spent fewer days commuting, conducted four times as many dives as the warm water bird, dived deeper on average, and had a greater proportion of bottom time during dives. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: General patterns of diving activity were consistent with those of other shearwaters foraging in cold and warm water habitats. Great shearwaters are likely adapted to forage in a wide range of oceanographic conditions, foraging mostly with shallow dives but capable of deep diving.

  2. Nerve Decompression and Restless Legs Syndrome: A Retrospective Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James C. Anderson

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionRestless legs syndrome (RLS is a prevalent sleep disorder affecting quality of life and is often comorbid with other neurological diseases, including peripheral neuropathy. The mechanisms related to RLS symptoms remain unclear, and treatment options are often aimed at symptom relief rather than etiology. RLS may present in distinct phenotypes often described as “primary” vs. “secondary” RLS. Secondary RLS is often associated with peripheral neuropathy. Nerve decompression surgery of the common and superficial fibular nerves is used to treat peripheral neuropathy. Anecdotally, surgeons sometimes report improved RLS symptoms following nerve decompression for peripheral neuropathy. The purpose of this retrospective analysis was to quantify the change in symptoms commonly associated with RLS using visual analog scales (VAS.MethodsForty-two patients completed VAS scales (0–10 for pain, burning, numbness, tingling, weakness, balance, tightness, aching, pulling, cramping, twitchy/jumpy, uneasy, creepy/crawly, and throbbing, both before and 15 weeks after surgical decompression.ResultsSubjects reported significant improvement among all VAS categories, except for “pulling” (P = 0.14. The change in VAS following surgery was negatively correlated with the pre-surgery VAS for both the summed VAS (r = −0.58, P < 0.001 and the individual VAS scores (all P < 0.01, such that patients who reported the worst symptoms before surgery exhibited relatively greater reductions in symptoms after surgery.ConclusionThis is the first study to suggest improvement in RLS symptoms following surgical decompression of the common and superficial fibular nerves. Further investigation is needed to quantify improvement using RLS-specific metrics and sleep quality assessments.

  3. On-the-Fly Decompression and Rendering of Multiresolution Terrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindstrom, P; Cohen, J D

    2009-04-02

    We present a streaming geometry compression codec for multiresolution, uniformly-gridded, triangular terrain patches that supports very fast decompression. Our method is based on linear prediction and residual coding for lossless compression of the full-resolution data. As simplified patches on coarser levels in the hierarchy already incur some data loss, we optionally allow further quantization for more lossy compression. The quantization levels are adaptive on a per-patch basis, while still permitting seamless, adaptive tessellations of the terrain. Our geometry compression on such a hierarchy achieves compression ratios of 3:1 to 12:1. Our scheme is not only suitable for fast decompression on the CPU, but also for parallel decoding on the GPU with peak throughput over 2 billion triangles per second. Each terrain patch is independently decompressed on the fly from a variable-rate bitstream by a GPU geometry program with no branches or conditionals. Thus we can store the geometry compressed on the GPU, reducing storage and bandwidth requirements throughout the system. In our rendering approach, only compressed bitstreams and the decoded height values in the view-dependent 'cut' are explicitly stored on the GPU. Normal vectors are computed in a streaming fashion, and remaining geometry and texture coordinates, as well as mesh connectivity, are shared and re-used for all patches. We demonstrate and evaluate our algorithms on a small prototype system in which all compressed geometry fits in the GPU memory and decompression occurs on the fly every rendering frame without any cache maintenance.

  4. Trial of Decompressive Craniectomy for Traumatic Intracranial Hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Hutchinson, Peter J.; Kolias, Angelos G.; Timofeev, Ivan S.; Elizabeth A. Corteen; Czosnyka, Marek; Timothy, Jake; Anderson, Ian; Bulters, Diederik O.; Belli, Antonio; Eynon, C. Andrew; Wadley, John; Mendelow, A David; Mitchell, Patrick M; Wilson, Mark H; Critchley, Giles

    2016-01-01

    This is the author accepted manuscript. The final version is available from the Massachusetts Medical Society via http://dx.doi.org/10.1056/NEJMoa1605215 BACKGROUND The effect of decompressive craniectomy on clinical outcomes in patients with refractory traumatic intracranial hypertension remains unclear. METHODS From 2004 through 2014, we randomly assigned 408 patients, 10 to 65 years of age, with traumatic brain injury and refractory elevated intracranial pressure (>25 mm Hg) to und...

  5. Recomputation of U. S. Navy Standard Air Decompression Tables,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-31

    Contr-act #NOOQ(4-81-G-0216 with funds provided by the Naval Vedical Research and Development Comrmand. January 31, 1982 Appzavod fol Tru"-Ilc DL~trbuban...realistic mathematical models for computation and analysis of decompression profiles. Such models utilize computational methods which provide tables...vast majority of instances. Further, the absence of any mathematical model which could generate such tables required a scientific investigation

  6. Architecture for hardware compression/decompression of large images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akil, Mohamed; Perroton, Laurent; Gailhard, Stephane; Denoulet, Julien; Bartier, Frederic

    2001-04-01

    In this article, we present a popular loseless compression/decompression algorithm, GZIP, and the study to implement it on a FPGA based architecture. The algorithm is loseless, and applied to 'bi-level' images of large size. It insures a minimum compression rate for the images we are considering. The proposed architecture for the compressor is based ona hash table and the decompressor is based on a parallel decoder of the Huffman codes.

  7. Interspinous Process Decompression: Expanding Treatment Options for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierce D. Nunley

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Interspinous process decompression is a minimally invasive implantation procedure employing a stand-alone interspinous spacer that functions as an extension blocker to prevent compression of neural elements without direct surgical removal of tissue adjacent to the nerves. The Superion® spacer is the only FDA approved stand-alone device available in the US. It is also the only spacer approved by the CMS to be implanted in an ambulatory surgery center. We computed the within-group effect sizes from the Superion IDE trial and compared them to results extrapolated from two randomized trials of decompressive laminectomy. For the ODI, effect sizes were all very large (>1.0 for Superion and laminectomy at 2, 3, and 4 years. For ZCQ, the 2-year Superion symptom severity (1.26 and physical function (1.29 domains were very large; laminectomy effect sizes were very large (1.07 for symptom severity and large for physical function (0.80. Current projections indicate a marked increase in the number of patients with spinal stenosis. Consequently, there remains a keen interest in minimally invasive treatment options that delay or obviate the need for invasive surgical procedures, such as decompressive laminectomy or fusion. Stand-alone interspinous spacers may fill a currently unmet treatment gap in the continuum of care and help to reduce the burden of this chronic degenerative condition on the health care system.

  8. Rapid decompression and desorption induced energetic failure in coal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shugang Wang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, laboratory experiments are conducted to investigate the rapid decompression and desorption induced energetic failure in coal using a shock tube apparatus. Coal specimens are recovered from Colorado at a depth of 610 m. The coal specimens are saturated with the strong sorbing gas CO2 for a certain period and then the rupture disc is suddenly broken on top of the shock tube to generate a shock wave propagating upwards and a rarefaction wave propagating downwards through the specimen. This rapid decompression and desorption has the potential to cause energetic fragmentation in coal. Three types of behaviors in coal after rapid decompression are found, i.e. degassing without fragmentation, horizontal fragmentation, and vertical fragmentation. We speculate that the characteristics of fracture network (e.g. aperture, spacing, orientation and stiffness and gas desorption play a role in this dynamic event as coal can be considered as a dual porosity, dual permeability, dual stiffness sorbing medium. This study has important implications in understanding energetic failure process in underground coal mines such as coal gas outbursts.

  9. Decompression of the facial nerve in cases of hemifacial spasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten Kettel

    1954-12-01

    Full Text Available Among 11 patients a complete cure was obtained in one case, a fair result in 4 cases, while in 6 cases the effect of the operation has only been temporary and full recurrence has taken place. Even if decompression has thus resulted in a few recoveries and improvements, the results in the majority of cases have been disappointing. Everything points to hemifacial spasm being due to a disorder of the lower motor neuron. Intracranial lesions in the vicinity of the facial nerve are known to have resulted in irritation and spasm. It may be perfectly true that the majority of cases of hemifacial spasm are due to a lesion, the nature of which may vary, in the Fallopian canal near the stylomastoid foramen, not least the postparalytic following Bell's palsy. But the disappointing results of decompression seems to indicate that at the time of operation irreparable damage to the nerve has in the majority of cases been already done. Consequently I gave up decompression in cases of hemifacial spasm some years ago. Good results from injections of alcohol into the nerve have been reported13 but I prefer selective sections of the branches to the muscles involved as described by German and Greenwood8.

  10. Outcomes following surgical decompression for dysthyroid orbitopathy (Graves' disease).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Samuel C; White, Paul S

    2010-02-01

    Graves' disease is a multiorgan autoimmune disease of complex pathophysiology that primarily affects the thyroid gland and orbit. The ophthalmic manifestations of Graves' disease may vary from mild proptosis which causes minimal cosmetic embarrassment to subluxation of the globe, exposure keratitis, corneal abrasion and even blindness. This article focuses on outcomes following orbital decompression. Surgical techniques have evolved with improved understanding of sinonasal anatomy and being technology-driven with the use of the fiberoptic endoscope and image guidance. The most common surgical outcome reported in the literature is reduction in proptosis, followed by visual acuity and intraocular pressure. Quality-of-life assessments are not routinely measured. There are a myriad of surgical techniques currently in practice which underscores the fact that no single technique is clearly superior to another. Endoscopic decompression results in a mean reduction of 3.50 mm and is associated with a low complication rate. Nevertheless, the literature suggests that the best techniques are likely to be multiwall approaches such as combined medial and lateral wall decompression. Management of dysthyroid ophthalmopathy is clearly multidisciplinary. Future studies should consider a minimum data set for reporting outcome measures which should include a quality of life tool.

  11. Adjacent level spondylodiscitis after anterior cervical decompression and fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saumyajit Basu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative spondylodiscitis after anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF is rare, but the same occurring at adjacent levels without disturbing the operated level is very rare. We report a case, with 5 year followup, who underwent ACDF from C5 to C7 for cervical spondylotic myelopathy. He showed neurological improvement after surgery but developed discharging sinus after 2 weeks, which healed with antibiotics. He improved on his preoperative symptoms well for the first 2 months. He started developing progressive neck pain and myelopathy after 3 months and investigations revealed spondylodiscitis at C3 and C4 with erosion, collapse, and kyphosis, without any evidence of implant failure or graft rejection at the operated level. He underwent reexploration and implant removal at the operated level (there was good fusion from C5 to C7 followed by debridement/decompression at C3, C4 along with iliac crest bone grafting and stabilization with plate and screws after maximum correction of kyphosis. The biopsy specimen grew Pseudomonas aeruginosa and appropriate sensitive antibiotics (gentamycin and ciprofloxacin were given for 6 weeks. He was under regular followup for 5 years his myelopathy resolved completely and he is back to work. Complete decompression of the cord and fusion from C2 to C7 was demonstrable on postoperative imaging studies without any evidence of implant loosening or C1/C2 instability at the last followup.

  12. Competitive Swimming and Diving. Official Rules, Officating. August 1983-August 1984. NAGWS Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance, Reston, VA. National Association for Girls and Women in Sport.

    Arranged in three sections, this pamphlet details the rules, officiating techniques, and official records for girls' and womens' competitive swimming and diving. Section 1 lists members of the national rules committee, major rule changes for 1983-84, and official rules for swimming and diving competition. Section 2 contains officiating tips,…

  13. Ascent exhalations of Antarctic fur seals: a behavioural adaptation for breath-hold diving?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, Sascha K; Miller, Patrick J O; Johnson, Mark P; Cox, Oliver P; Boyd, Ian L

    2005-02-22

    Novel observations collected from video, acoustic and conductivity sensors showed that Antarctic fur seals consistently exhale during the last 50-85% of ascent from all dives (10-160 m, n > 8000 dives from 50 seals). The depth of initial bubble emission was best predicted by maximum dive depth, suggesting an underlying physical mechanism. Bubble sound intensity recorded from one seal followed predictions of a simple model based on venting expanding lung air with decreasing pressure. Comparison of air release between dives, together with lack of variation in intensity of thrusting movement during initial descent regardless of ultimate dive depth, suggested that inhaled diving lung volume was constant for all dives. The thrusting intensity in the final phase of ascent was greater for dives in which ascent exhalation began at a greater depth, suggesting an energetic cost to this behaviour, probably as a result of loss of buoyancy from reduced lung volume. These results suggest that fur seals descend with full lung air stores, and thus face the physiological consequences of pressure at depth. We suggest that these regular and predictable ascent exhalations could function to reduce the potential for a precipitous drop in blood oxygen that would result in shallow-water blackout.

  14. 75 FR 14493 - Safety Zone; Dive Platform, Pago Pago Harbor, American Samoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-26

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Dive Platform, Pago Pago Harbor, American...; Dive Platform, Pago Pago Harbor, American Samoa in the Federal Register (75 FR 5907). We received no... Pago Pago Inner Harbor, in an estimated 160 feet of water, approximately 350-feet from the fuel...

  15. 75 FR 5907 - Safety Zone; Dive Platform, Pago Pago Harbor, American Samoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-05

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Dive Platform, Pago Pago Harbor, American... a temporary safety zone around a dive platform vessel in Pago Pago Harbor, American Samoa, while... Purpose On October 7, 1949 the 4,130-ton gasoline tanker CHEHALIS sank in Pago Pago Inner Harbor, in...

  16. The potential for dive tourism led entrepreneurial marine protected areas in Curacao

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, de J.; Bush, S.R.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the successful establishment of marine protected areas in the Netherlands Antilles, such as Saba and Bonaire, government-led protection of the reefs surrounding Curacao has repeatedly failed. In the absence of effective state regulation, dive operations have taken de facto control over dive

  17. Using Stimulation of the Diving Reflex in Humans to Teach Integrative Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choate, Julia K.; Denton, Kate M.; Evans, Roger G.; Hodgson, Yvonne

    2014-01-01

    During underwater submersion, the body responds by conserving O[subscript 2] and prioritizing blood flow to the brain and heart. These physiological adjustments, which involve the nervous, cardiovascular, and respiratory systems, are known as the diving response and provide an ideal example of integrative physiology. The diving reflex can be…

  18. Safety Practices for Commercial Diving. Module SH-43. Safety and Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This student module on safety practices for commercial diving is one of 50 modules concerned with job safety and health. This module provides a brief orientation to safety considerations for commercial diving. Following the introduction, nine objectives (each keyed to a page in the text) the student is expected to accomplish are listed (e.g., Name…

  19. Scientific Diving Training Course. Red Sea & Gulf of Aden Programme (PERSGA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arab Organization for Education and Science, Cairo (Egypt).

    This document presents the scientific diving training course organized by the Arab League Educational, Cultural and Scientific Organization (ALECSO) for the Program for Environmental Studies, Red Sea and Gulf of Aden (PERSGA). This course of six weeks duration aims to produce a person who is capable of carrying out scientific diving tasks in the…

  20. Body cooling and its energetic implications for feeding and diving of tufted ducks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Leeuw, JJ; Butler, PJ; Woakes, AJ; Zegwaard, F

    1998-01-01

    Wintering in a temperate climate with low water temperatures is energetically expensive for diving ducks. The energy costs associated with body cooling due to diving and ingesting large amounts of cold food were measured in tufted ducks (Aythya fuligula) feeding on zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorph

  1. Effects of diving and oxygen on autonomic nervous system and cerebral blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winklewski, Pawel J; Kot, Jacek; Frydrychowski, Andrzej F; Nuckowska, Magdalena K; Tkachenko, Yurii

    2013-09-01

    Recreational scuba diving is a popular leisure activity with the number of divers reaching several millions worldwide. Scuba diving represents a huge challenge for integrative physiology. In mammalian evolution, physiological reflexes developed to deal with lack of oxygen, rather than with an excess, which makes adaptations to scuba diving more difficult to describe and understand than those associated with breath-hold diving. The underwater environment significantly limits the use of equipment to register the organism's functions, so, in most instances, scientific theories are built on experiments that model real diving to some extent, like hyperbaric exposures, dive reflexes or water immersion. The aim of this review is to summarise the current knowledge related to the influence exerted by physiological conditions specific to diving on the autonomic nervous system and cerebral blood flow. The main factors regulating cerebral blood flow during scuba diving are discussed as follows: 1) increased oxygen partial pressure; 2) immersion-related trigemino-cardiac reflexes and 3) exposure to cold, exercise and stress. Also discussed are the potential mechanisms associated with immersion pulmonary oedema.

  2. The diving mouthpiece and the conditions of the temporomandibular joints. Preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walczyńska – Dragon Karolina

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of research on the effects of a long-term exposure to non-physiological location of anatomical elements of the masticatory organ in the course of diving. The said exposure is connected with the utilisation of various types of diving mouthpieces.

  3. Jeff's Reef Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 607 Narrative 2001 - Videotape and Visual Observations from Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These are data from one of fourteen 2001 submersible "Clelia" dives. Narratives including habitat descriptions and estimates of megafaunal species abundance were...

  4. Sebastian Pinnacles, Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 619 Narrative 2001 - Videotape and Visual Observations from Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are from one of fourteen 2001 submersible "Clelia" dives. Narratives including habitat descriptions and estimates of megafaunal species abundance were...

  5. Jeff's Reef, Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 606 Narrative 2001 - Videotape and Visual Observations from Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These are data from one of fourteen 2001 submersible "Clelia" dives. Narratives including habitat descriptions and estimates of megafaunal species abundance were...

  6. Eau Gallie, Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 608 Narrative 2001 - Videotape and Visual Observations from Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are from one of fourteen 2001 submersible "Clelia" dives. Narratives including habitat descriptions and estimates of megafaunal species abundance were...

  7. Chapman's Reef, Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 620 Narrative 2001 - Videotape and Visual Observations from Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are from one of fourteen 2001 submersible "Clelia" dives. Narratives including habitat descriptions and estimates of megafaunal species abundance were...

  8. Sebastian Pinnacles, Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 614 Narrative 2001 - Videotape and Visual Observations from Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are from one of fourteen 2001 submersible "Clelia" dives. Narratives including habitat descriptions and estimates of megafaunal species abundance were...

  9. Sebastian Pinnacles, Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 618 Narrative 2001 - Videotape and Visual Observations from Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are from one of fourteen 2001 submersible "Clelia" dives. Narratives including habitat descriptions and estimates of megafaunal species abundance were...

  10. Chapman's Reef, Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 621 Narrative 2001 - Videotape and Visual Observations from Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are from one of fourteen 2001 submersible "Clelia" dives. Narratives including habitat descriptions and estimates of megafaunal species abundance were...

  11. Cocoa Beach, Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 617 Narrative 2001 - Videotape and Visual Observations from Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are from one of from fourteen 2001 submersible "Clelia" dives. Narratives including habitat descriptions and estimates of megafaunal species abundance...

  12. Eau Gallie, Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 609 Narrative 2001 - Videotape and Visual Observations from Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are from one of fourteen 2001 submersible "Clelia" dives. Narratives including habitat descriptions and estimates of megafaunal species abundance were...

  13. Cape Canaveral, Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 616 Narrative 2001 - Videotape and Visual Observations from Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These are data from one of fourteen 2001 submersible "Clelia" dives. Narratives including habitat descriptions and estimates of megafaunal species abundance were...

  14. Sebastian Pinnacles, Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 615 Narrative 2001 - Videotape and Visual Observations from Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are from one of fourteen 2001 submersible "Clelia" dives. Narratives including habitat descriptions and estimates of megafaunal species abundance were...

  15. PNW cetacean muscle biochemistry - Muscle Myoglobin Content and Acid Buffering Capacity of Cetaceans from the Pacific Northwest to Assess Dive Capacity and the Development of Diving Capabilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This project assesses the development of two important skeletal muscle adaptations for diving (enhanced myoglobin content and acid buffering capacities) in a range...

  16. Changes in dive behavior during naval sonar exposure in killer whales, long-finned pilot whales, and sperm whales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivle, L D; Kvadsheim, P H; Fahlman, A; Lam, F P A; Tyack, P L; Miller, P J O

    2012-01-01

    Anthropogenic underwater sound in the environment might potentially affect the behavior of marine mammals enough to have an impact on their reproduction and survival. Diving behavior of four killer whales (Orcinus orca), seven long-finned pilot whales (Globicephala melas), and four sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus) was studied during controlled exposures to naval sonar [low frequency active sonar (LFAS): 1-2 kHz and mid frequency active sonar (MFAS): 6-7 kHz] during three field seasons (2006-2009). Diving behavior was monitored before, during and after sonar exposure using an archival tag placed on the animal with suction cups. The tag recorded the animal's vertical movement, and additional data on horizontal movement and vocalizations were used to determine behavioral modes. Killer whales that were conducting deep dives at sonar onset changed abruptly to shallow diving (ShD) during LFAS, while killer whales conducting deep dives at the onset of MFAS did not alter dive mode. When in ShD mode at sonar onset, killer whales did not change their diving behavior. Pilot and sperm whales performed normal deep dives (NDD) during MFAS exposure. During LFAS exposures, long-finned pilot whales mostly performed fewer deep dives and some sperm whales performed shallower and shorter dives. Acoustic recording data presented previously indicates that deep diving (DD) is associated with feeding. Therefore, the observed changes in dive behavior of the three species could potentially reduce the foraging efficiency of the affected animals.

  17. On the adiabatic theorem when eigenvalues dive into the continuum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornean, Decebal Horia; Jensen, Arne; Knörr, Hans Konrad

    For a Wigner-Weisskopf model of an atom consisting of a quantum dot coupled to an energy reservoir described by a three-dimensional Laplacian we study the survival probability of a bound state when the dot energy varies smoothly and adiabatically in time. The initial state corresponds to a discre...... eigenvalue which dives into the continuous spectrum and re-emerges from it as the dot energy is varied in time and finally returns to its initial value. Our main result is that for a large class of couplings, the survival probability of this bound state vanishes in the adiabatic limit....

  18. Dynamics of ultralight aircraft: Dive recovery of hang gliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R. T.

    1977-01-01

    Longitudinal control of a hang glider by weight shift is not always adequate for recovery from a vertical dive. According to Lanchester's phugoid theory, recovery from rest to horizontal flight ought to be possible within a distance equal to three times the height of fall needed to acquire level flight velocity. A hang glider, having a wing loading of 5 kg sq m and capable of developing a lift coefficient of 1.0, should recover to horizontal flight within a vertical distance of about 12 m. The minimum recovery distance can be closely approached if the glider is equipped with a small all-moveable tail surface having sufficient upward deflection.

  19. Diving experience and emotional factors related to the psychomotor effects of nitrogen narcosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biersner, R J; Hall, D A; Linaweaver, P G; Neuman, T S

    1978-08-01

    Simple and complex psychomotor performance were tested among 21 Navy divers under normal conditions and during nitrogen narcosis in simulated dives to 170 ft of sea water. Complex psychomotor performance was impaired significantly during narcosis, while simple psychomotor performance remained essentially normal. Differences between baseline scores for complex psychomotor performance (pre- and post-dive combined) and scores obtained from the two combined testing sessions administered during narcosis were correlated with official Navy records of diving experience and self-reported moods. None of the diving experience measures was associated significantly with these difference scores. The moods of Fatigue and Happiness were, however, correlated significantly with impairment. These results indicate that, although previous experience with nitrogen narcosis and diving tasks do not mediate the performance effects of nitrogen narcosis, the complex psychomotor effects nitrogen narcosis are related to emotional traits.

  20. Digital repetitive control under varying frequency conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos Fuentes, Germán Andrés

    2012-01-01

    The tracking/rejection of periodic signals constitutes a wide field of research in the control theory and applications area and Repetitive Control has proven to be an efficient way to face this topic; however, in some applications the period of the signal to be tracked/rejected changes in time or is uncertain, which causes and important performance degradation in the standard repetitive controller. This thesis presents some contributions to the open topic of repetitive control workin...

  1. Costoclavicular venous decompression in patients with threatened arteriovenous hemodialysis access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Carolyn; Dugan, Michelle; Gillespie, David; Doyle, Adam; Illig, Karl

    2011-07-01

    Autologous arteriovenous fistulas are frequently threatened by central venous obstruction. Although this is frequently ascribed to indwelling catheters and neointimal venous remodeling, we believe that extrinsic compression of the subclavian vein as it passes through the costoclavicular junction (CCJ) may play a significant role in a subset of dialysis patients. We reviewed our experience with CCJ decompression for arteriovenous fistula dysfunction at our institution. Decompression followed principles for venous thoracic outlet syndrome: bony decompression with thorough venolysis, followed by central venography through the fistula and endoluminal treatment, if necessary. Patients underwent transaxillary first rib resection, or claviculectomy in the supine position in cases when reconstruction was anticipated. In all cases, the minimum exposure included 360° mobilization of the subclavian vein with resection of surrounding cicatrix to the jugular/innominate junction. A total of 10 patients requiring decompression between November 2008 and February 2010 were included. All had severe arm swelling, four had dialysis dysfunction (postcannulation bleeding or maturation failure), two had severe arm pain, and one had a pseudoaneurysm. All patients had subclavian vein stenosis at the CCJ by venography or intravascular ultrasound. The majority of patients had balloon dilation (mean: 2.3 attempts) without success. Six patients underwent transaxillary first rib resection and four had medial claviculectomy. No patients required surgical venous reconstruction. In all, 80% of fistulas remained functionally patent, and all but one patient (who underwent ligation) had complete relief of upper arm edema. Median hospital length of stay was 2 days and mean follow-up was 7 months (range, 1-13). There was no mortality or significant morbidity. Five patients later required central venoplasty (four subclavian, mean: 1.8 attempts and one innominate) and three had stents placed (two

  2. Diving Related Changes in the Blood Oxygen Stores of Rehabilitating Harbor Seal Pups (Phoca vitulina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Amber; Ono, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    Harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) pups begin diving within hours of birth, stimulating the development of the blood oxygen (O2) stores necessary to sustain underwater aerobic metabolism. Since harbor seals experience a brief nursing period, the early-life development of these blood O2 stores is necessary for successful post-weaning foraging. If mothers and pups become prematurely separated, the pup may be transported to a wildlife rehabilitation center for care. Previous studies suggest that the shallow pools and lack of diving in rehabilitation facilities may lead to under-developed blood O2 stores, but diving behavior during rehabilitation has not been investigated. This study aimed to simultaneously study the diving behaviors and blood O2 store development of rehabilitating harbor seal pups. Standard hematology measurements (Hct, Hb, RBC, MCV, MCH, MCHC) were taken to investigate O2 storage capacity and pups were equipped with time-depth recorders to investigate natural diving behavior while in rehabilitation. Linear mixed models of the data indicate that all measured blood parameters changed with age; however, when compared to literature values for wild harbor seal pups, rehabilitating pups have smaller red blood cells (RBCs) that can store less hemoglobin (Hb) and subsequently, less O2, potentially limiting their diving capabilities. Wild pups completed longer dives at younger ages (maximum reported dives were observed (maximum during rehabilitation: 13.6 min at 89 days of age). Further, this study suggests that there may be a positive relationship between RBC size and the frequency of long duration dives. Thus, rehabilitating harbor seal pups should be encouraged to make frequent, long duration dives to prepare themselves for post-release foraging.

  3. Intraoperative Computed Tomography for Cervicomedullary Decompression of Foramen Magnum Stenosis in Achondroplasia: Two Case Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arishima, Hidetaka; Tsunetoshi, Kenzo; Kodera, Toshiaki; Kitai, Ryuhei; Takeuchi, Hiroaki; Kikuta, Ken-ichiro

    2013-01-01

    The authors report two cases of cervicomedullary decompression of foramen magnum (FM) stenosis in children with achondroplasia using intraoperative computed tomography (iCT). A 14-month-old girl with myelopathy and retarded motor development, and a 10-year-old girl who had already undergone incomplete FM decompression was presented with myelopathy. Both patients underwent decompressive sub-occipitalcraniectomy and C1 laminectomy without duraplasty using iCT. It clearly showed the extent of FM decompression during surgery, which finally enabled sufficient decompression. After the operation, their myelopathy improved. We think that iCT can provide useful information and guidance for sufficient decompression for FM stenosis in children with achondroplasia. PMID:24140778

  4. [Repetition and fear of dying].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, B D

    1995-03-01

    In this paper a revision is made of the qualifications of Repetition (R) in Freuds work, i.e. its being at the service of the Pleasure Principle and, beyond it, the binding of free energy due to trauma. Freud intends to explain with this last concept the "fort-da" and the traumatic dreams (obsessively reiterated self-reproaches may be added to them). The main thesis of this work is that R. is not only a defense against the recollection of the ominous past (as in the metaphorical deaths of abandonment and desertion) but also a way of maintaining life and identify fighting against the inescapable omninous future (known but yet experienced), i.e. our own death. Some forms of R. like habits, identificatory behaviors and sometimes even magic, are geared to serve the life instinct. A literary illustration shows this desperate fight.

  5. Pressure rig for repetitive casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Peter (Inventor); Hutto, William R. (Inventor); Philips, Albert R. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The invention is a pressure rig for repetitive casting of metal. The pressure rig performs like a piston for feeding molten metal into a mold. Pressure is applied to an expandable rubber diaphragm which expands like a balloon to force the metal into the mold. A ceramic cavity which holds molten metal is lined with blanket-type insulating material, necessitating only a relining for subsequent use and eliminating the lengthy cavity preparation inherent in previous rigs. In addition, the expandable rubber diaphragm is protected by the insulating material thereby decreasing its vulnerability to heat damage. As a result of the improved design the life expectancy of the pressure rig contemplated by the present invention is more than doubled. Moreover, the improved heat protection has allowed the casting of brass and other alloys with higher melting temperatures than possible in the conventional pressure rigs.

  6. Technical advances in minimally invasive surgery: direct decompression for lumbar spinal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauryssen, Carl

    2010-12-15

    Literature review, technique overview, prospective and retrospective data analysis. To review current minimally invasive surgery (MIS) methods of decompression for lumbar spinal stenosis and present a decompression technique using a flexible microblade shaver system. Several MIS decompression techniques for stenosis have been developed to minimize damage to soft tissues and reduce the amount of posterior element resection. Decompression using linearly configured instruments may not be able to adequately address stenosis in the neural foramen. A flexible microblade shaver system is able to traverse the foramen, removing bone and ligament, using a ventral to dorsal approach, rather than medial to lateral. This enables it to effectively decompress the lateral recess and neural foramen while sparing posterior structures. Brief literature review of current MIS decompression techniques is presented. MIS decompression using a flexible microblade shaver system is described with 1 year outcomes from a small pilot study and a retrospective chart review at 2 centers. A small postmarket pilot study (n = 9) with 1 year results showed positive patient outcomes using Visual Analog Scale (decrease by 73%), Oswestry Disability Index(50% improvement), Zurich Claudication Questionnaire physical function and symptom severity (improved by 72% and 31%, respectively), and Short-Form 36 (SF-36) Physical Component Score (36% improvement). Sixty-seven patients from a retrospective chart review at 2 centers had an average of 2 levels per patient decompressed using a flexible microblade shaver system. No patient has returned for additional surgery and there have been no cases of neurologic impairment. Current decompression techniques may result in inadequate decompression of the neural foramen or excessive resection of the facet joint. MIS decompression using a flexible microblade shaver system represents a way to perform an effective, facet-preserving decompression for patients with lumbar

  7. Compressible gas gills of diving insects: measurements and models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Philip G D; Seymour, Roger S

    2010-05-01

    Many diving insects collect a bubble of air from the surface to supply their oxygen requirements while submerged. It has been theorised that these air bubbles may also act as compressible gas gills, as the low oxygen partial pressure P(O(2))within the bubble caused by the insect's respiration creates a gradient capable of driving the diffusion of oxygen from the water into the bubble. Under these conditions nitrogen diffuses in the opposite direction, resulting in a situation where the volume of the bubble is continually shrinking while oxygen is obtained. This study measures changes in volume and P(O(2)) within the gas gills held by a tethered water bug, Agraptocorixa eurynome. Both gill volume and P(O(2)) drop rapidly at the beginning of a dive, but eventually the P(O(2)) reaches an apparently stable level while volume continually declines at a slower rate. Active ventilation of the gill is crucial to maintaining oxygen uptake. These measurements are used to calculate oxygen flux into the gas gill and the oxygen consumption rate V(O(2)) of the bug. The effectiveness of a gas gill as a respiratory organ is also demonstrated by determining the critical P(O(2)) of the water bug and comparing this with measured gas gill P(O(2)) and calculated V(O(2)) .

  8. The effect of O2 and CO2 on the dive behavior and heart rate of lesser scaup ducks (Aythya affinis): quantification of the critical PaO2 that initiates a diving bradycardia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Kim A; Milsom, William K; Jones, David R

    2004-12-15

    Lesser scaup ducks were trained to dive for short and long durations following exposure to various gas concentrations to determine the influence of oxygen (O2) and carbon dioxide (CO2) on diving behavior and heart rate. Compared with normoxia, hyperoxia (50% O2) significantly increased the duration of long dives, whereas severe hypoxia (9% O2) significantly decreased the duration of both short and long dives. Hypercapnia (5% CO2) had no effect on dive duration. Surface intervals were not significantly altered by the oxygen treatments, but significantly increased following CO2 exposure. Heart rate during diving was unaffected by hyperoxia and hypercapnia, but gradually declined in long dives after severe hypoxia. Thus, our results suggest that during the majority of dives, O2 and CO2 levels in lesser scaup ducks are managed through changes in diving behavior without any major cardiovascular adjustments, but below a threshold PaO2, a bradycardia is evoked to conserve the remaining oxygen for hypoxia sensitive tissues. A model of oxygen store utilization during voluntary diving was developed to estimate the critical PaO2 below which bradycardia is initiated (approximately 26 mmHg) and predicted that this critical PaO2 would be reached 19s into a dive after exposure to severe hypoxia, which corresponded exactly with the time of initiation of bradycardia in the severe hypoxia trials.

  9. Body fat does not affect venous bubble formation after air dives of moderate severity: theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellart, Nico A M; van Rees Vellinga, Tjeerd P; van Hulst, Rob A

    2013-03-01

    For over a century, studies on body fat (BF) in decompression sickness and venous gas embolism of divers have been inconsistent. A major problem is that age, BF, and maximal oxygen consumption (Vo2max) show high multicollinearity. Using the Bühlmann model with eight parallel compartments, preceded by a blood compartment in series, nitrogen tensions and loads were calculated with a 40 min/3.1 bar (absolute) profile. Compared with Haldanian models, the new model showed a substantial delay in N2 uptake and (especially) release. One hour after surfacing, an increase of 14-28% in BF resulted in a whole body increase of the N2 load of 51%, but in only 15% in the blood compartment. This would result in an increase in the bubble grade of only 0.01 Kisman-Masurel (KM) units at the scale near KM = I-. This outcome was tested indirectly by a dry dive simulation (air breathing) with 53 male divers with a small range in age and Vo2max to suppress multicollinearity. BF was determined with the four-skinfold method. Precordial Doppler bubble grades determined at 40, 80, 120, and 160 min after surfacing were used to calculate the Kisman Integrated Severity Score and were also transformed to the logarithm of the number of bubbles/cm(2) (logB). The highest of the four scores yielded logB = -1.78, equivalent to KM = I-. All statistical outcomes of partial correlations with BF were nonsignificant. These results support the model outcomes. Although this and our previous study suggest that BF does not influence venous gas embolism (Schellart NAM, van Rees Vellinga TP, van Dijk FH, Sterk W. Aviat Space Environ Med 83: 951-957, 2012), more studies with different profiles under various conditions are needed to establish whether BF remains (together with age and Vo2max) a basic physical characteristic or will become less important for the medical examination and for risk assessment.

  10. Financial incentives for lumbar surgery: a critical analysis of physician reimbursement for decompression and fusion procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whang, Peter G; Lim, Moe R; Sasso, Rick C; Skelton, Alta; Brown, Zoe B; Greg Anderson, David; Albert, Todd J; Hilibrand, Alan S; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2008-08-01

    Retrospective case-control study/economic analysis. To determine the treatment times required for isolated lumbar decompressions and for combined decompression and instrumented fusion procedures to compare the relative reimbursements for each type of operation as a function of time expenditure by the surgeon. Under current Medicare fee schedules, the payment for a fusion procedure is higher than of an isolated decompression. It has been recently suggested in the lay press that the greater reimbursement for a lumbar arthrodesis may inappropriately influence the manner in which surgeons elect to treat lumbar degenerative conditions, resulting in what they believe to be a substantial number of unnecessary spinal fusions. A consecutive series of 50 single-level decompression cases performed by single surgeon were retrospectively analyzed and compared with an equivalent cohort of subjects who underwent single-level decompression and instrumented posterolateral fusion with autogenous iliac crest bone grafting. The operative reports, office charts, and billing records were reviewed to determine the total clinical time invested by the surgeon and the Medicare reimbursement for each surgery. Relative to the corresponding values of the decompression group, combined decompression and fusion procedures were associated with a longer mean surgical time (134.6 min vs. 47.3 min, Pundue financial incentive to recommend a combined decompression and instrumented fusion procedure over an isolated decompression to patients with symptomatic lumbar degeneration, especially when considering the greater time, effort, and risk characteristic of this more complex operation.

  11. Frequency of decompression illness among recent and extinct mammals and "reptiles": a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsen, Agnete Weinreich

    2017-08-01

    The frequency of decompression illness was high among the extinct marine "reptiles" and very low among the marine mammals. Signs of decompression illness are still found among turtles but whales and seals are unaffected. In humans, the risk of decompression illness is five times increased in individuals with Patent Foramen Ovale; this condition allows blood shunting from the venous circuit to the systemic circuit. This right-left shunt is characteristic of the "reptile" heart, and it is suggested that this could contribute to the high frequency of decompression illness in the extinct reptiles.

  12. Dive and Explore: An Interactive Exhibit That Simulates Making an ROV Dive to a Submarine Volcano, Hatfield Marine Science Visitor Center, Newport, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, C.; Chadwick, W. W.; Hanshumaker, W.; Osis, V.; Hamilton, C.

    2002-12-01

    We have created a new interactive exhibit in which the user can sit down and simulate that they are making a dive to the seafloor with the remotely operated vehicle (ROV) named ROPOS. The exhibit immerses the user in an interactive experience that is naturally fun but also educational. This new public display is located at the Hatfield Marine Science Visitor Center in Newport, Oregon. The exhibit is designed to look like the real ROPOS control console and includes three video monitors, a PC, a DVD player, an overhead speaker, graphic panels, buttons, lights, dials, and a seat in front of a joystick. The dives are based on real seafloor settings at Axial seamount, an active submarine volcano on the Juan de Fuca Ridge (NE Pacific) that is also the location of a seafloor observatory called NeMO. The user can choose between 1 of 3 different dives sites in the caldera of Axial Volcano. Once a dive is chosen, then the user watches ROPOS being deployed and then arrives into a 3-D computer-generated seafloor environment that is based on the real world but is easier to visualize and navigate. Once on the bottom, the user is placed within a 360 degree panorama and can look in all directions by manipulating the joystick. By clicking on markers embedded in the scene, the user can then either move to other panorama locations via movies that travel through the 3-D virtual environment, or they can play video clips from actual ROPOS dives specifically related to that scene. Audio accompanying the video clips informs the user where they are going or what they are looking at. After the user is finished exploring the dive site they end the dive by leaving the bottom and watching the ROV being recovered onto the ship at the surface. The user can then choose a different dive or make the same dive again. Within the three simulated dives there are a total of 6 arrival and departure movies, 7 seafloor panoramas, 12 travel movies, and 23 ROPOS video clips. The exhibit software was created

  13. Nutritional status changes in humans during a 14-day saturation dive: the NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations V project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Scott M.; Davis-Street, Janis E.; Fesperman, J. Vernell; Smith, Myra D.; Rice, Barbara L.; Zwart, Sara R.

    2004-01-01

    Ground-based analogs of spaceflight are an important means of studying physiologic and nutritional changes associated with space travel, and the NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations V (NEEMO) is such an analog. To determine whether saturation diving has nutrition-related effects similar to those of spaceflight, we conducted a clinical nutritional assessment of the NEEMO crew (4 men, 2 women) before, during, and after their 14-d saturation dive. Blood and urine samples were collected before, during, and after the dive. The foods consumed by the crew were typical of the spaceflight food system. A number of physiologic changes were observed, during and after the dive, that are also commonly observed during spaceflight. Hemoglobin and hematocrit were lower (P < 0.05) after the dive. Transferrin receptors were significantly lower immediately after the dive. Serum ferritin increased significantly during the dive. There was also evidence indicating that oxidative damage and stress increased during the dive. Glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase decreased during and after the dive (P < 0.05). Decreased leptin during the dive (P < 0.05) may have been related to the increased stress. Subjects had decreased energy intake and weight loss during the dive, similar to what is observed during spaceflight. Together, these similarities to spaceflight provide a model to use in further defining the physiologic effects of spaceflight and investigating potential countermeasures.

  14. Comparing repetition-based melody segmentation models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodríguez López, M.E.; de Haas, Bas; Volk, Anja

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on a comparative study of computational melody segmentation models based on repetition detection. For the comparison we implemented five repetition-based segmentation models, and subsequently evaluated their capacity to automatically find melodic phrase boundaries in a corpus of 2

  15. Task Repetition and Second Language Speech Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Craig; Kormos, Judit; Minn, Danny

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between the repetition of oral monologue tasks and immediate gains in L2 fluency. It considers the effect of aural-oral task repetition on speech rate, frequency of clause-final and midclause filled pauses, and overt self-repairs across different task types and proficiency levels and relates these findings to…

  16. Repetitions: A Cross-Cultural Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Kumiko

    1995-01-01

    This study investigated how repetition is used in conversation among native speakers of British English, native speakers of Japanese, and Japanese speakers of English. Five interactional functions of repetition (interruption-orientated, solidarity, silence-avoidance, hesitation, and reformulation) were identified, as well as the cultural factors…

  17. Diving reflex: can the time course of heart rate reduction be quantified?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caspers, C; Cleveland, S; Schipke, J D

    2011-02-01

    In this meta-analysis of diving bradycardia in humans, we sought to quantify any heart rate (HR) reduction using a relatively simple mathematical function. Using the terms "diving reflex,"diving bradycardia,"diving response,"diving plus heart rate," databases were searched. Data from the studies were fitted using HR=c+aexp(-(t-t(0))/τ), where c is the final HR, a is the HR decrease, τ is the time constant of HR decay, and t(0) is the time delay. Of 890 studies, 220 were given closer scrutiny. Only eight of these provided data obtained under comparable conditions. Apneic facial immersion decreased HR with τ=10.4 s and in air alone it was less pronounced and slower (τ=16.2 s). The exponential function fitted the time course of HR decrease closely (r(2)>0.93). The fit was less adequate for apneic-exercising volunteers. During apnea both with and without face immersion, HR decreases along a monoexponential function with a characteristic time constant. HR decrease during exercise with and without face immersion could not readily be described with a simple function: the parasympathetic reaction was partially offset by some sympathetic activity. Thus, we succeeded in quantifying the early time course of diving bradycardia. It is concluded that the diving reflex is useful to diagnose the integrity of efferent cardiovascular autonomic pathways. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  18. Abdominally implanted transmitters with percutaneous antennas affect the dive performance of Common Eiders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Abby N.; Latty, Christopher J.; Hollmén, Tuula E.; Petersen, Margaret R.; Andrews, Russel D.

    2010-01-01

    Implanted transmitters have become an important tool for studying the ecology of sea ducks, but their effects remain largely undocumented. To address this, we assessed how abdominally implanted transmitters with percutaneous antennas affect the vertical dive speeds, stroke frequencies, bottom time, and dive duration of captive Common Eiders (Somateria mollissima). To establish baselines, we recorded video of six birds diving 4.9 m prior to surgery, implanted them with 38- to 47-g platform transmitter terminals, and then recorded their diving for 3.5 months after surgery to determine effects. Descent speeds were 16–25% slower and ascent speeds were 17–44% slower after surgery, and both remained below baseline at the end of the study. Dive durations were longer than baseline until day 22. On most days between 15 and 107 days after surgery, foot-stroke frequencies of birds foraging on the bottom were slower. Foot- and wing-stroke frequencies during descent and bottom time did not differ across the time series. If birds that rely on benthic invertebrates for sustenance dive slower and stay submerged longer after being implanted with a satellite transmitter, their foraging energetics may be affected. Researchers considering use of implanted transmitters with percutaneous antennas should be mindful of these effects and the possibility of concomitant alterations in diving behavior, foraging success, and migratory behavior compared to those of unmarked conspecifics.

  19. Children’s Understanding of No Diving Warning Signs: Implications for Preventing Childhood Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara A. Morrongiello

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The current study examined children’s understanding of No Diving warning signs. Normally-developing 7 to 10 year olds were asked questions to assess their understanding of text, images, and main messages on No Diving warning signs. These structured interviews were audio recorded and responses were later coded. Results revealed that children understood the behavior advised against (diving, why it is prohibited (can hit head on the bottom, and what can happen (serious injury including hospitalization. They understood that breaking your neck results in limitations in mobility and can occur from diving, but they did not anticipate that such an injury is likely to occur. There were no gender and few age differences, but diving experience was associated with children significantly downplaying their risk of injury. The findings suggest that having No Diving warning signs explicitly mention a broken neck, may serve to remind children of this potential consequence at the time of decision making. Active adult supervision is particularly important for children who have prior positive diving experiences.

  20. Exercise at depth alters bradycardia and incidence of cardiac anomalies in deep-diving marine mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Terrie M; Fuiman, Lee A; Kendall, Traci; Berry, Patrick; Richter, Beau; Noren, Shawn R; Thometz, Nicole; Shattock, Michael J; Farrell, Edward; Stamper, Andy M; Davis, Randall W

    2015-01-16

    Unlike their terrestrial ancestors, marine mammals routinely confront extreme physiological and physical challenges while breath-holding and pursuing prey at depth. To determine how cetaceans and pinnipeds accomplish deep-sea chases, we deployed animal-borne instruments that recorded high-resolution electrocardiograms, behaviour and flipper accelerations of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) and Weddell seals (Leptonychotes weddellii) diving from the surface to >200 m. Here we report that both exercise and depth alter the bradycardia associated with the dive response, with the greatest impacts at depths inducing lung collapse. Unexpectedly, cardiac arrhythmias occurred in >73% of deep, aerobic dives, which we attribute to the interplay between sympathetic and parasympathetic drivers for exercise and diving, respectively. Such marked cardiac variability alters the common view of a stereotypic 'dive reflex' in diving mammals. It also suggests the persistence of ancestral terrestrial traits in cardiac function that may help explain the unique sensitivity of some deep-diving marine mammals to anthropogenic disturbances.

  1. Recreational scuba diving: negative or positive effects of oxidative and cardiovascular stress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perovic, Antonija; Unic, Adriana; Dumic, Jerka

    2014-01-01

    Environmental conditions and increased physical activity during scuba diving are followed by increased production of free radicals and disturbed redox balance. Redox balance disorder is associated with damage of cellular components, changes of cellular signaling pathways and alterations of gene expression. Oxidative stress leads to increased expression of sirtuins (SIRTs), molecules which play an important role in the antioxidant defense, due to their sensitivity to the changes in the redox status and their ability to regulate redox homeostasis. These facts make SIRTs interesting to be considered as molecules affected by scuba diving and in that sense, as potential biomarkers of oxidative status or possible drug targets in reduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation. In addition, SIRTs effects through currently known targets make them intriguing molecules which can act positively on health in general and whose expression can be induced by scuba diving.A demanding physical activity, as well as other circumstances present in scuba diving, has the greatest load on the cardiovascular function (CV). The mechanisms of CV response during scuba diving are still unclear, but diving-induced oxidative stress and the increase in SIRTs expression could be an important factor in CV adaptation. This review summarizes current knowledge on scuba diving-induced oxidative and CV stress and describes the important roles of SIRTs in the (patho)physiological processes caused by the redox balance disorder.

  2. 12-lead Holter monitoring in diving and water sports: a preliminary investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosco, Gerardo; De Marzi, Elena; Michieli, Pierantonio; Omar, Hesham R; Camporesi, Enrico M; Padulo, Johnny; Paoli, Antonio; Mangar, Devanand; Schiavon, Maurizio

    2014-12-01

    To demonstrate the utility of 12-lead Holter monitoring underwater. A Holter monitor, recording a 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) underwater, was applied to 16 pre-trained volunteer scuba divers (13 males and three females). Dive computers were synchronized with the Holter recorder to correlate the ECG tracings with diving events. Our main objective was to demonstrate the utility of recording over a period of time a good quality 12-lead ECG underwater. The ECGs were analyzed for heart rate (HR), arrhythmias, conduction abnormalities and ischaemic events in relation to various stages of diving as follows: baseline, pre diving, diving, and post diving. The ECG tracings were of good quality with minimal artefacts. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) demonstrated a significant difference in HR during the various diving stages (P Holter monitoring underwater can produce good quality tracings. Further studies are necessary to assess its usefulness in divers at risk for or with known coronary artery disease, and its comparison with other forms of cardiac stress tests.

  3. Digital repetitive control under varying frequency conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Ramos, Germán A; Olm, Josep M

    2013-01-01

    The tracking/rejection of periodic signals constitutes a wide field of research in the control theory and applications area. Repetitive Control has proven to be an efficient way to face this topic. However, in some applications the frequency of the reference/disturbance signal is time-varying or uncertain. This causes an important performance degradation in the standard Repetitive Control scheme. This book presents some solutions to apply Repetitive Control in varying frequency conditions without loosing steady-state performance. It also includes a complete theoretical development and experimental results in two representative systems. The presented solutions are organized in two complementary branches: varying sampling period Repetitive Control and High Order Repetitive Control. The first approach allows dealing with large range frequency variations while the second allows dealing with small range frequency variations. The book also presents applications of the described techniques to a Roto-magnet plant and...

  4. Enteral nutrition with simultaneous gastric decompression in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentilello, L M; Cortes, V; Castro, M; Byers, P M

    1993-03-01

    Early enteral nutrition is an important adjunct in the care of critically ill patients. A double-lumen gastrostomy tube with a duodenal extension has been reported to enable early enteral feeding with simultaneous gastroduodenal decompression. We tested the ability of this device to achieve these goals in critically ill patients. Noncomparative, descriptive case series. Surgical intensive care unit in a university hospital. Fifteen consecutive critically ill patients, who, at the time of laparotomy, were assessed likely to need long-term nutritional support and gastric decompression, underwent tube placement. Mean age was 47 +/- 21 yrs. Mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE II) and Therapeutic Intervention Scores were 15 +/- 7.3 (SD) and 29 +/- 10.2, respectively, and the mean Injury Severity Score of 11 trauma patients in the group was 27 +/- 7.4. Correct tube positioning was verified by radiograph or endoscopy. Caloric and protein requirements, nutritional parameters, and problems encountered with the device were recorded. The correlation between the volume of feeding port input and suction port output was noted, and this correlation was considered significant if r2 was > or = .5. Only three (20%) of 15 patients reached full enteral nutritional support via the enteral route. None of these patients achieved this level of nutritional support within the first postoperative week. In 67% of the patients, large quantities of enteral feeding solution appeared in the gastroduodenal suction port effluent. When feeding port input was plotted against effluent volume, a correlation coefficient of > .71 (r2 = > or = .5) was found in 40% of the patients. Other complications included: a) excessive gastroduodenal drainage requiring fluid/electrolyte replacement in eight (53.3%) patients; and b) skin ulceration at the tube entrance site in seven (46.7%) patients. These data do not support the use of this device for early enteral feeding and simultaneous

  5. Intra-Operative Vertebroplasty Combined with Posterior Cord Decompression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegretti, Luca; Mavilio, Nicola; Fiaschi, Pietro; Bragazzi, Roberto; Pacetti, Mattia; Castelletti, Lara; Saitta, Laura; Castellan, Lucio

    2014-01-01

    Summary Percutaneous vertebroplasty (VP) is a minimally invasive technique for the treatment of vertebral pathology providing early vertebral stabilization and pain relief. In cases of vertebral pathology complicated by spinal cord compression with associated neurological deficits, VP alone cannot be performed free of risks. We describe a combined approach in which decompressive laminectomy and intra-operative vertebroplasty (IVP) are performed during a single session. Among the 252 VP performed in our centre in the past three years, 12 patients (12 vertebral levels) with different pathologies (six symptomatic haemangiomas, two metastatic fractures, four osteoporotic fractures) were treated with an open procedure combined with surgery. All cases were treated with decompressive laminectomy and IVP (mono/bipeduncular or median-posterior trans-somatic access). Five patients with symptomatic haemangiomas were treated with endovascular embolization prior to the combined approach. A visual analogue scale (VAS) was applied to assess pain intensity before and after surgery. The neurological deficits were evaluated with an ASIA impairment scale. In all cases benefit from pain and neurological deficits was observed. The mean VAS score decreased from 7.8 to 2.5 after surgery. The ASIA score improved in all cases (five cases from D to E and five cases from C to D). No clinical complications were observed. In one case a CT scan performed after the procedure showed a foraminal accumulation of PMMA, but the patient referred no symptoms. IVP can be successfully applied in different pathologies affecting the vertebrae. In our limited series this approach proved safe and efficient to provide decompression of spinal cord and dural sac and vertebral body stabilization in a single session. PMID:25363261

  6. SLAP repair with arthroscopic decompression of spinoglenoid cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashiguchi Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A spinoglenoid cyst with suprascapular nerve disorders is highly associated with superior labrum anterior posterior (SLAP lesion. Conservative or surgical treatment is applied to relieve pain and neurological symptoms. The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical outcomes of patients treated by arthroscopic surgery for SLAP lesion with a spinoglenoid cyst. Methods: The subjects of this study were six patients with SLAP lesion with a spinoglenoid cyst who underwent arthroscopic surgery. There was one female and five males with a mean age of 48.5 years. SLAP lesion was found in all the patients at arthroscopy. A small tear of the rotator cuff was found in the two patients. The SLAP lesion was repaired using suture anchors, and the rotator cuff tears were repaired by suture-bridge fixation. The spinoglenoid cyst was decompressed through the torn labrum in three patients, and through the released superior to posterior portion of the capsule in the other three patients. Results: All patients showed excellent improvement in pain and muscle strength at the final follow-up examination. The mean Constant score was improved from 60.5 points preoperatively to 97.2 points postoperatively. The mean visual analog scale (VAS score decreased from 4.5 on the day of the surgery to 2.5 within one week postoperatively. Postoperative MRI showed disappearance or reduction of the spinoglenoid cyst in four and two patients, respectively. There were no complications from the surgical intervention and in the postoperative period. Discussion: The patients treated by decompression through the released capsule obtained pain relief at an early period after the surgery. Arthroscopic treatment for a spinoglenoid cyst can provide a satisfactory clinical outcome. Arthroscopic decompression of a spinoglenoid cyst through the released capsule is recommended for a safe and reliable procedure for patients with suprascapular nerve disorders.

  7. Dive characteristics can predict foraging success in Australian fur seals (Arctocephalus pusillus doriferus as validated by animal-borne video

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth L. Volpov

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Dive characteristics and dive shape are often used to infer foraging success in pinnipeds. However, these inferences have not been directly validated in the field with video, and it remains unclear if this method can be applied to benthic foraging animals. This study assessed the ability of dive characteristics from time-depth recorders (TDR to predict attempted prey capture events (APC that were directly observed on animal-borne video in Australian fur seals (Arctocephalus pusillus doriferus, n=11. The most parsimonious model predicting the probability of a dive with ≥1 APC on video included only descent rate as a predictor variable. The majority (94% of the 389 total APC were successful, and the majority of the dives (68% contained at least one successful APC. The best model predicting these successful dives included descent rate as a predictor. Comparisons of the TDR model predictions to video yielded a maximum accuracy of 77.5% in classifying dives as either APC or non-APC or 77.1% in classifying dives as successful verses unsuccessful. Foraging intensity, measured as either total APC per dive or total successful APC per dive, was best predicted by bottom duration and ascent rate. The accuracy in predicting total APC per dive varied based on the number of APC per dive with maximum accuracy occurring at 1 APC for both total (54% and only successful APC (52%. Results from this study linking verified foraging dives to dive characteristics potentially opens the door to decades of historical TDR datasets across several otariid species.

  8. Craniofacial surgery and optic canal decompression in adult fibrous dysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahapatra A

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A 29-year-old female had a 3-year history of bony swelling over the right frontal area. For 3 months she noticed proptosis of her right eye. Investigations revealed fibrous dysplasia involving the right half of the frontal bone and the right greater and lesser wings of the sphenoid bone. Visual evoked potentials (VEP showed delayed latencies on the involved side. A craniofacial surgery with optic canal decompression was performed. Follow-up after 2 years revealed normalization of VEP.

  9. Strategies for Using Repetition as a Powerful Teaching Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saville, Kirt

    2011-01-01

    Brain research indicates that repetition is of vital importance in the learning process. Repetition is an especially useful tool in the area of music education. The success of repetition can be enhanced by accurate and timely feedback. From "simple repetition" to "repetition with the addition or subtraction of degrees of freedom," there are many…

  10. Strategies for Using Repetition as a Powerful Teaching Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saville, Kirt

    2011-01-01

    Brain research indicates that repetition is of vital importance in the learning process. Repetition is an especially useful tool in the area of music education. The success of repetition can be enhanced by accurate and timely feedback. From "simple repetition" to "repetition with the addition or subtraction of degrees of freedom," there are many…

  11. Technique of ICP monitored stepwise intracranial decompression effectively reduces postoperative complications of severe bifrontal contusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan eSun

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Bifrontal contusion is a common clinical brain injury. In the early stage, it is often mild, but it progresses rapidly and frequently worsens suddenly. This condition can become life threatening and therefore requires surgery. Conventional decompression craniectomy is the commonly used treatment method. In this study, the effect of ICP monitored stepwise intracranial decompression surgery on the prognosis of patients with acute severe bifrontal contusion was investigated. Method A total of 136 patients with severe bifrontal contusion combined with deteriorated intracranial hypertension admitted from March 2001 to March 2014 in our hospital were selected and randomly divided into two groups, i.e., a conventional decompression group and an intracranial pressure (ICP monitored stepwise intracranial decompression group (68 patients each, to conduct a retrospective study. The incidence rates of acute intraoperative encephalocele, delayed hematomas, and postoperative cerebral infarctions and the Glasgow outcome scores (GOSs 6 months after the surgery were compared between the two groups.Results (1 The incidence rates of acute encephalocele and contralateral delayed epidural hematoma in the stepwise decompression surgery group were significantly lower than those in the conventional decompression group; the differences were statistically significant (P < 0.05; (2 6 months after the surgery, the incidence of vegetative state and mortality in the stepwise decompression group were significantly lower than those in the conventional decompression group (P < 0.05; the rate of favorable prognosis in the stepwise decompression group was also significantly higher than that in the conventional decompression group (P < 0.05.Conclusions The ICP monitored stepwise intracranial decompression technique reduced the perioperative complications of traumatic brain injury through the gradual release of intracranial pressure and was beneficial to the prognosis of

  12. Repetition priming from moving faces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lander, Karen; Bruce, Vicki

    2004-06-01

    Recent experiments have suggested that seeing a familiar face move provides additional dynamic information to the viewer, useful in the recognition of identity. In four experiments, repetition priming was used to investigate whether dynamic information is intrinsic to the underlying face representations. The results suggest that a moving image primes more effectively than a static image, even when the same static image is shown in the prime and the test phases (Experiment 1). Furthermore, when moving images are presented in the test phase (Experiment 2), there is an advantage for moving prime images. The most priming advantage is found with naturally moving faces, rather than with those shown in slow motion (Experiment 3). Finally, showing the same moving sequence at prime and test produced more priming than that found when different moving sequences were shown (Experiment 4). The results suggest that dynamic information is intrinsic to the face representations and that there is an advantage to viewing the same moving sequence at prime and test.

  13. DIVE: a graph-based visual-analytics framework for big data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rysavy, Steven J; Bromley, Dennis; Daggett, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    The need for data-centric scientific tools is growing; domains such as biology, chemistry, and physics are increasingly adopting computational approaches. So, scientists must deal with the challenges of big data. To address these challenges, researchers built a visual-analytics platform named DIVE (Data Intensive Visualization Engine). DIVE is a data-agnostic, ontologically expressive software framework that can stream large datasets at interactive speeds. In particular, DIVE makes novel contributions to structured-data-model manipulation and high-throughput streaming of large, structured datasets.

  14. Returning on empty: extreme blood O2 depletion underlies dive capacity of emperor penguins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponganis, P J; Stockard, T K; Meir, J U; Williams, C L; Ponganis, K V; van Dam, R P; Howard, R

    2007-12-01

    Blood gas analyses from emperor penguins (Aptenodytes forsteri) at rest, and intravascular P(O(2)) profiles from free-diving birds were obtained in order to examine hypoxemic tolerance and utilization of the blood O(2) store during dives. Analysis of blood samples from penguins at rest revealed arterial P(O(2))s and O(2) contents of 68+/-7 mmHg (1 mmHg= 133.3 Pa) and 22.5+/-1.3 ml O(2) dl(-1) (N=3) and venous values of 41+/-10 mmHg and 17.4+/-2.9 ml O(2) dl(-1) (N=9). Corresponding arterial and venous Hb saturations for a hemoglobin (Hb) concentration of 18 g dl(-1) were >91% and 70%, respectively. Analysis of P(O(2)) profiles obtained from birds equipped with intravascular P(O(2)) electrodes and backpack recorders during dives revealed that (1) the decline of the final blood P(O(2)) of a dive in relation to dive duration was variable, (2) final venous P(O(2)) values spanned a 40-mmHg range at the previously measured aerobic dive limit (ADL; dive duration associated with onset of post-dive blood lactate accumulation), (3) final arterial, venous and previously measured air sac P(O(2)) values were indistinguishable in longer dives, and (4) final venous P(O(2)) values of longer dives were as low as 1-6 mmHg during dives. Although blood O(2) is not depleted at the ADL, nearly complete depletion of the blood O(2) store occurs in longer dives. This extreme hypoxemic tolerance, which would be catastrophic in many birds and mammals, necessitates biochemical and molecular adaptations, including a shift in the O(2)-Hb dissociation curve of the emperor penguin in comparison to those of most birds. A relatively higher-affinity Hb is consistent with blood P(O(2)) values and O(2) contents of penguins at rest.

  15. Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and recreational scuba diving in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Rebecca

    2016-09-01

    Dive medicine bodies worldwide recognise that, with comprehensive screening and careful management, people with insulin-dependent diabetes (IDDM) can dive safely. Despite this, people with IDDM in Australia are generally denied access to dive training, an out-dated status quo that is not acceptable to the Australian diabetes community. This paper reflects upon the important advocacy work that has been done to progress this issue, and what is still required to open up access and bring Australia into line with more flexible and supportive international standards.

  16. Semantic and Structural Analysis of TV Diving Programs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei Wang; Jin-Tao Li; Yong-Dong Zhang; Shou-Xun Lin

    2004-01-01

    Automatic content analysis of sports videos is a valuable and challenging task. Motivated by analogies between a class of sports videos and languages, the authors propose a novel approach for sports video analysis based on compiler principles. It integrates both semantic analysis and syntactic analysis to automatically create an index and a table of contents for a sports video. Each shot of the video sequence is first annotated and indexed with semantic labels through detection of events using domain knowledge. A grammar-based parser is then constructed to identify the tree structure of the video content based on the labels. Meanwhile, the grammar can be used to detect and recover errors during the analysis. As a case study, a sports video parsing system is presented in the particular domain of diving. Experimental results indicate the proposed approach is effective.

  17. Path analysis of self-efficacy and diving performance revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feltz, Deborah L; Chow, Graig M; Hepler, Teri J

    2008-06-01

    The Feltz (1982) path analysis of the relationship between diving efficacy and performance showed that, over trials, past performance was a stronger predictor than self-efficacy of performance. Bandura (1997) criticized the study as statistically "overcontrolling" for past performance by using raw past performance scores along with self-efficacy as predictors of performance. He suggests residualizing past performance by regressing the raw scores on self-efficacy and entering them into the model to remove prior contributions of self-efficacy imbedded in past performance scores. To resolve this controversy, we reanalyzed the Feltz data using three statistical models: raw past performance, residual past performance, and a method that residualizes past performance and self-efficacy. Results revealed that self-efficacy was a stronger predictor of performance in both residualized models than in the raw past performance model. Furthermore, the influence of past performance on future performance was weaker when the residualized methods were conducted.

  18. Creació del portal International Diving Center

    OpenAIRE

    Fatsini Font, Albert

    2011-01-01

    Catala: L'objectiu d aquest projecte consisteix en desenvolupar el portal web del centre d immersió International Diving Center i documentar-ne tot el procés de creació. El portal en qüestió ha de ser dinàmic, autogestionable i fàcil d usar. També ha de permetre la reserva d immersions on-line, donant la possibilitat als usuaris de pagar amb la seva targeta de crèdit. També he afegit un objectiu secundari, desenvolupar tot el projecte usant només software lliure. En el projecte es contemplarà...

  19. A case of deep burns, while diving The Lusitania.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Curran, John N

    2010-07-01

    We present the first documented case of severe burns, sustained by a diver as a result of auto-ignition of air-activated heat packs at high partial pressure of oxygen and high ambient pressure. Our patient was diving the shipwreck of The Lusitania off the south coast of Ireland. This is a significant wreck, lying 90 metres down on the seabed. Torpedoed by a German U-boat in 1915, its loss prompted American involvement in WW1. Several unlikely events combined in this case to bring about serious and life threatening injuries. Herein we discuss the case and explore some of the physical and chemical processes that lead to these injuries.

  20. Active diver thermal protection requirements for cold water diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippitt, M W; Nuckols, M L

    1983-07-01

    An analysis of the supplemental heating requirements for military divers, both surface-tended and free-swimming, is presented. Specific categories of diver heat loss, including respiratory losses and suit convective losses, are characterized over a range of water temperatures, depths, and breathing gas mixtures. The need for a 1-kW diver heater is identified to accommodate deep dives where the limitation of a surface-supplied hot water source and a long hot water umbilical pose an unacceptable burden. A 0.5-kW heater is shown to be satisfactory to extend the performance of existing closed circuit-breathing apparatuses for shallow water operations in water temperatures as low as 40 degrees F. Substantial benefits in heat savings are shown through the use of passive regenerative breath heaters and alternative suit inflation gases for drysuit use.

  1. Virtual Diving in the Underwater Archaeological Site of Cala Minnola

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, F.; Lagudi, A.; Barbieri, L.; Muzzupappa, M.; Mangeruga, M.; Pupo, F.; Cozza, M.; Cozza, A.; Ritacco, G.; Peluso, R.; Tusa, S.

    2017-02-01

    The paper presents the application of the technologies and methods defined in the VISAS project for the case study of the underwater archaeological site of Cala Minnola located in the island of Levanzo, in the archipelago of the Aegadian Islands (Sicily, Italy). The VISAS project (http://visas-project.eu) aims to improve the responsible and sustainable exploitation of the Underwater Cultural Heritage by means the development of new methods and technologies including an innovative virtual tour of the submerged archaeological sites. In particular, the paper describes the 3D reconstruction of the underwater archaeological site of Cala Minnola and focus on the development of the virtual scene for its visualization and exploitation. The virtual dive of the underwater archaeological site allows users to live a recreational and educational experience by receiving historical, archaeological and biological information about the submerged exhibits, the flora and fauna of the place.

  2. Passive acoustic detection of deep-diving beaked whales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimmer, W.M.X.; Harwood, J.; Tyack, P.L.

    2008-01-01

    Beaked whales can remain submerged for an hour or more and are difficult to sight when they come to the surface to breathe. Passive acoustic detection (PAD) not only complements traditional visual-based methods for detecting these species but also can be more effective because beaked whales produce...... clicks regularly to echolocate on prey during deep foraging dives. The effectiveness of PAD for beaked whales depends not only on the acoustic behavior and output of the animals but also on environmental conditions and the quality of the passive sonar implemented. A primary constraint on the range...... at which beaked whale clicks can be detected involves their high frequencies, which attenuate rapidly, resulting in limited ranges of detection, especially in adverse environmental conditions. Given current knowledge of source parameters and in good conditions, for example, with a wind speed of 2  m...

  3. The Adventures of the Diving-Bell Spider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevenin, Raphaele; Dupeux, Guillaume; Piroird, Keyvan; Clanet, Christophe; Quere, David; Interfaces; Co. Team

    2012-11-01

    The Argyroneta Aquatica is a unique spider that has every features of a usual terrestrial spider, but constantly lives under water. To however still be able to breath oxygen, it builds an underwater bell of air (hence its other name ``the diving-bell spider''): using its superhydrophobic abdomen, it pulls an air bubble at the surface by leaving the latter very rapidly. It then enters the bell formed under aquatic plants or under its under-water web, and leaves it more slowly so as to entrain the least air possible. We study these dynamics that take place at the air/water interfaces. We reduce the spider to two beads, one for the hydrophobic abdomen, one for the hydrophilic head, and measure and model the air entrainment according to the size and surface properties of the abdomen and to the velocity of motion.

  4. Precision markedly attenuates repetitive lift capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Brooke R; Holland, Laura; McGhee, Deirdre; Sampson, John A; Bell, Alison; Stapley, Paul J; Groeller, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of precision on time to task failure in a repetitive whole-body manual handling task. Twelve participants were required to repetitively lift a box weighing 65% of their single repetition maximum to shoulder height using either precise or unconstrained box placement. Muscle activity, forces exerted at the ground, 2D body kinematics, box acceleration and psychophysical measures of performance were recorded until task failure was reached. With precision, time to task failure for repetitive lifting was reduced by 72%, whereas the duration taken to complete a single lift and anterior deltoid muscle activation increased by 39% and 25%, respectively. Yet, no significant difference was observed in ratings of perceived exertion or heart rate at task failure. In conclusion, our results suggest that when accuracy is a characteristic of a repetitive manual handling task, physical work capacity will decline markedly. The capacity to lift repetitively to shoulder height was reduced by 72% when increased accuracy was required to place a box upon a shelf. Lifting strategy and muscle activity were also modified, confirming practitioners should take into consideration movement precision when evaluating the demands of repetitive manual handling tasks.

  5. Cortical blindness following posterior lumbar decompression and fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Nitin; Hansberry, David R; Goldstein, Ira M

    2014-01-01

    Perioperative vision loss following non-ocular surgery is a well-documented phenomenon. In particular, perioperative vision loss has been frequently cited following spinal surgery. Although the rate of vision compromise in spinal surgery is relatively low, the consequences can be quite severe and devastating for the patient. We report a 60-year-old woman who initially presented with back and left leg pain as well as paraparesis. Imaging studies of the lumbar spine showed bony erosion consistent with tumor infiltration of the L3 and L4 spinal segments. Laminectomy at the L2-L4 levels for decompression of the intraspinal tumor was performed. Pathology of the resected bone was consistent with metastatic adenocarincoma. Postoperatively, the patient suffered severe anemia and bilateral infarctions of the posterior cerebral arteries and occipital lobes resulting in vision compromise. Although a definitive pathogenesis remains unknown, preoperative cardiovascular issues and intraoperative hemodynamic instabilities have typically been implicated as high risk factors. High risk factors for this novel clinical presentation of visual compromise following posterior lumbar laminectomy with decompression for an intraspinal tumor are reported.

  6. A metastable liquid melted from a crystalline solid under decompression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chuanlong; Smith, Jesse S.; Sinogeikin, Stanislav V.; Kono, Yoshio; Park, Changyong; Kenney-Benson, Curtis; Shen, Guoyin

    2017-01-01

    A metastable liquid may exist under supercooling, sustaining the liquid below the melting point such as supercooled water and silicon. It may also exist as a transient state in solid–solid transitions, as demonstrated in recent studies of colloidal particles and glass-forming metallic systems. One important question is whether a crystalline solid may directly melt into a sustainable metastable liquid. By thermal heating, a crystalline solid will always melt into a liquid above the melting point. Here we report that a high-pressure crystalline phase of bismuth can melt into a metastable liquid below the melting line through a decompression process. The decompression-induced metastable liquid can be maintained for hours in static conditions, and transform to crystalline phases when external perturbations, such as heating and cooling, are applied. It occurs in the pressure–temperature region similar to where the supercooled liquid Bi is observed. Akin to supercooled liquid, the pressure-induced metastable liquid may be more ubiquitous than we thought. PMID:28112152

  7. A very high speed lossless compression/decompression chip set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venbrux, Jack; Liu, Norley; Liu, Kathy; Vincent, Peter; Merrell, Randy

    1991-01-01

    A chip is described that will perform lossless compression and decompression using the Rice Algorithm. The chip set is designed to compress and decompress source data in real time for many applications. The encoder is designed to code at 20 M samples/second at MIL specifications. That corresponds to 280 Mbits/second at maximum quantization or approximately 500 Mbits/second under nominal conditions. The decoder is designed to decode at 10 M samples/second at industrial specifications. A wide range of quantization levels is allowed (4...14 bits) and both nearest neighbor prediction and external prediction are supported. When the pre and post processors are bypassed, the chip set performs high speed entropy coding and decoding. This frees the chip set from being tied to one modeling technique or specific application. Both the encoder and decoder are being fabricated in a 1.0 micron CMOS process that has been tested to survive 1 megarad of total radiation dosage. The CMOS chips are small, only 5 mm on a side, and both are estimated to consume less than 1/4 of a Watt of power while operating at maximum frequency.

  8. The mechanics of decompressive craniectomy: Bulging in idealized geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weickenmeier, Johannes; Kuhl, Ellen; Goriely, Alain

    2016-11-01

    In extreme cases of traumatic brain injury or a stroke, the resulting uncontrollable swelling of the brain may lead to a harmful increase of the intracranial pressure. As a common measure for immediate release of pressure on the brain, part of the skull is surgically removed allowing for the brain to bulge outwards, a procedure known as a decompressive craniectomy. During this excessive brain swelling, the affected tissue typically undergoes large deformations resulting in a complex three-dimensional mechanical loading state with several important implications on optimal treatment strategies and outcome. Here, as a first step towards a better understanding of the mechanics of a decompressive craniectomy, we consider simple models for the bulging of elastic solids under geometric constraints representative of the surgical intervention. In small deformations and simple geometries, the exact solution of this problem is derived from the theory of contact mechanics. The analysis of these solutions reveals a number of interesting generic features relevant for the mechanics of craniectomy.

  9. Decompression syndrome (Caisson disease in an Indian diver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phatak Uday

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute decompression syndrome (Caisson′s disease is an acute neurological emergency in divers. It is caused due to release of nitrogen gas bubbles that impinge the blood vessels of the spinal cord and brain and result in severe neurodeficit. There are very few case reports in Indian literature. There are multiple factors in the pathogenesis of Acute decompression syndrome (Caisson′s disease such as health problems in divers (respiratory problems or congenital heart diseases like atrial septal defect, patent ductus arteriosus etc, speed of ascent from the depth and habits like smoking that render divers susceptible for such neurological emergency. Usually, immediate diagnosis of such a condition with MRI is not possible in hospitals in the Coastal border. Even though, MRI is performed, it has very low specificity and sensitivity. Facilities like hyperbaric oxygen treatment are virtually non-existent in these hospitals. Therefore, proper education of the divers and appropriate preventive measures in professional or recreational divers is recommended.

  10. Recurrent subdural hygromas after foramen magnum decompression for Chiari Type I malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Erlick A C; Steele, Louise F; Magdum, Shailendra A

    2014-06-01

    A paediatric case of foramen magnum decompression for Chiari Type I malformation complicated by recurrent subdural hygromas (SH) and raised intracranial pressure without ventriculomegaly is described. SH pathogenesis is discussed, with consideration given to arachnoid fenestration. We summarise possibilities for treatment and avoidance of this unusual consequence of foramen magnum decompression.

  11. Ulnar nerve strain at the elbow in patients with cubital tunnel syndrome: effect of simple decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochi, K; Horiuchi, Y; Nakamura, T; Sato, K; Arino, H; Koyanagi, T

    2013-06-01

    Simple decompression of the ulnar nerve at the elbow has not been shown to reduce nerve strain in cadavers. In this study, ulnar nerve strain at the elbow was measured intraoperatively in 11 patients with cubital tunnel syndrome, before and after simple decompression. Statistical analysis was performed using a paired Student's t-test. Mean ulnar nerve strain before and after simple decompression was 30.5% (range 9% to 69%) and 5.5% (range -2% to 11%), respectively; this difference was statistically significant (p ulnar nerve strain in all patients by an average of 24.5%. Our results suggest that the pathophysiology of cubital tunnel syndrome may be multifactorial, being neither a simple compression neuropathy nor a simple traction neuropathy, and simple decompression may be a favourable surgical procedure for cubital tunnel syndrome in terms of decompression and reduction of strain in the ulnar nerve.

  12. EX1504L4 Dive03 Ancillary Data Collection including reports, kmls, spreadsheets, images and data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of ancillary data files generated through a scripting process following an ROV dive on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L4: Campaign to Address...

  13. EX1504L4 Dive07 Ancillary Data Collection including reports, kmls, spreadsheets, images and data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of ancillary data files generated through a scripting process following an ROV dive on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L4: Campaign to Address...

  14. Submersible Data (Dive Trackpoints) for Investigating the Charleston Bump 2003 - Office of Ocean Exploration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data and information collected by the submersible Johnson Sea-Link II along its track during fourteen dives of the 2003 "Investigating the Charleston Bump"...

  15. Non-Dive Activities for Operation Deep Scope 2005 - Office of Ocean Exploration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Information about non-dive activities were recorded into the Cruise Information Management System (CIMS) by the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration's data manager...

  16. EX1504L2 Dive12 Ancillary Data Collection including reports, kmls, spreadsheets, images and data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of ancillary data files generated through a scripting process following an ROV dive on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L2: Campaign to Address...

  17. Submersible Data (Dive Waypoints) for Life on the Edge 2005 - Office of Ocean Exploration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data and information collected by the submersible Johnson Sea-Link I at waypoints along its track during nineteen dives of the 2005 "Life on the Edge" expedition...

  18. Submersible Data (Dive Trackpoints) for Life on the Edge 2005 - Office of Ocean Exploration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data and information collected by the submersible Johnson Sea-Link I along its track during nineteen dives of the 2005 "Life on the Edge" expedition sponsored by the...

  19. Submersible Data (Dive Trackpoints) for Life on the Edge 2004 - Office of Ocean Exploration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data and information collected by the submersible Johnson Sea-Link I along its track during twenty-five dives of the 2004 "Life on the Edge" expedition sponsored by...

  20. Submersible Data (Dive Trackpoints) for Bioluminescence 2009 - Office of Ocean Exploration and Research

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data and information collected by the Johnson Sea Link II during sixteen dives of the "Bioluminescence 2009" expedition sponsored by the National Oceanic and...

  1. Submersible Data (Dive Waypoints) for Bioluminescence 2009 - Office of Ocean Exploration and Research

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data and information collected by the submersible Johnson Sea-Link II at waypoints along its track during seventeen dives of the 2009 "Bioluminescence" expedition...

  2. Dive Activities for Bioluminescence 2009 - Office of Ocean Exploration and Research

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Information about dive activities were recorded by personnel during the "Bioluminescence 2009" expedition, July 20 through 31, 2009. Additional information was...

  3. EX1504L2 Dive11 Ancillary Data Collection including reports, kmls, spreadsheets, images and data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of ancillary data files generated through a scripting process following an ROV dive on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L2: Campaign to Address...

  4. EX1504L2 Dive18 Ancillary Data Collection including reports, kmls, spreadsheets, images and data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of ancillary data files generated through a scripting process following an ROV dive on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L2: Campaign to Address...

  5. EX1504L3 Dive03 Ancillary Data Collection including reports, kmls, spreadsheets, images and data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of ancillary data files generated through a scripting process following an ROV dive on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L3: CAPSTONE Leg III:...

  6. Dive Activities for Expedition to the Deep Slope 2007 - Office of Ocean Exploration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Information about dive activities were recorded by personnel during the "Expedition to the Deep Slope 2007" expedition, June 4 through July 6, 2007. Additional...

  7. Dive Activities for Expedition to the Deep Slope 2006 - Office of Ocean Exploration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Information about dive activities were recorded by personnel during the "Expedition to the Deep Slope 2006" expedition, May 7 through June 2, 2006. Additional...

  8. Satellite-linked locational, mapping, and diving of sea turtles in pelagic and coastal benthic habitats

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Satellite telemetry determines migratory pathways to the foraging and nesting areas, degree of fixation on a foraging area, diving behaviors during the migrations,...

  9. Submersible Data (Dive Waypoints) for Operation Deep Scope 2007 - Office of Ocean Exploration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data and information collected by the submersible Johnson Sea-Link II at waypoints along its track during nineteen dives of the 2007 "Operation Deep Scope"...

  10. Submersible Data (Dive Trackpoints) for Lophelia II 2008 - Office of Ocean Exploration and Research

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data and information collected by the Remotely Operated Vehicle SeaEye Falcon along its track during four dives of the "Lophelia II 2008" expedition sponsored by the...

  11. Submersible Data (Dive Trackpoints) for Operation Deep Scope 2005 - Office of Ocean Exploration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data and information collected by the submersible Johnson Sea-Link I along its track during thirteen dives of the 2005 "Operation Deep Scope" expedition sponsored by...

  12. EX1504L3 Dive06 Ancillary Data Collection including reports, kmls, spreadsheets, images and data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of ancillary data files generated through a scripting process following an ROV dive on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L3: CAPSTONE Leg III:...

  13. Submersible Data (Dive Waypoints) for Investigating the Charleston Bump 2003 - Office of Ocean Exploration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data and information collected by the submersible Johnson Sea-Link II at waypoints along its track during fourteen dives of the 2003 "Investigating the Charleston...

  14. EX1504L4 Dive06 Ancillary Data Collection including reports, kmls, spreadsheets, images and data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of ancillary data files generated through a scripting process following an ROV dive on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L4: Campaign to Address...

  15. EX1504L2 Dive09 Ancillary Data Collection including reports, kmls, spreadsheets, images and data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of ancillary data files generated through a scripting process following an ROV dive on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L2: Campaign to Address...

  16. EX1504L2 Dive04 Ancillary Data Collection including reports, kmls, spreadsheets, images and data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of ancillary data files generated through a scripting process following an ROV dive on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L2: Campaign to Address...

  17. EX1504L3 Dive07 Ancillary Data Collection including reports, kmls, spreadsheets, images and data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of ancillary data files generated through a scripting process following an ROV dive on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L3: CAPSTONE Leg III:...

  18. EX1504L2 Dive10 Ancillary Data Collection including reports, kmls, spreadsheets, images and data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of ancillary data files generated through a scripting process following an ROV dive on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L2: Campaign to Address...

  19. EX1504L2 Dive16 Ancillary Data Collection including reports, kmls, spreadsheets, images and data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of ancillary data files generated through a scripting process following an ROV dive on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L2: Campaign to Address...

  20. EX1504L2 Dive15 Ancillary Data Collection including reports, kmls, spreadsheets, images and data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of ancillary data files generated through a scripting process following an ROV dive on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L2: Campaign to Address...

  1. EX1504L4 Dive11 Ancillary Data Collection including reports, kmls, spreadsheets, images and data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of ancillary data files generated through a scripting process following an ROV dive on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L4: Campaign to Address...

  2. EX1504L3 Dive04 Ancillary Data Collection including reports, kmls, spreadsheets, images and data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of ancillary data files generated through a scripting process following an ROV dive on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L3: CAPSTONE Leg III:...

  3. EX1504L3 Dive02 Ancillary Data Collection including reports, kmls, spreadsheets, images and data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of ancillary data files generated through a scripting process following an ROV dive on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L3: CAPSTONE Leg III:...

  4. EX1504L4 Dive01 Ancillary Data Collection including reports, kmls, spreadsheets, images and data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of ancillary data files generated through a scripting process following an ROV dive on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L4: Campaign to Address...

  5. EX1504L4 Dive10 Ancillary Data Collection including reports, kmls, spreadsheets, images and data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of ancillary data files generated through a scripting process following an ROV dive on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L4: Campaign to Address...

  6. EX1504L4 Dive02 Ancillary Data Collection including reports, kmls, spreadsheets, images and data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of ancillary data files generated through a scripting process following an ROV dive on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L4: Campaign to Address...

  7. EX1504L2 Dive02 Ancillary Data Collection including reports, kmls, spreadsheets, images and data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of ancillary data files generated through a scripting process following an ROV dive on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L2: Campaign to Address...

  8. EX1504L3 Dive05 Ancillary Data Collection including reports, kmls, spreadsheets, images and data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of ancillary data files generated through a scripting process following an ROV dive on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L3: CAPSTONE Leg III:...

  9. EX1504L2 Dive01 Ancillary Data Collection including reports, kmls, spreadsheets, images and data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of ancillary data files generated through a scripting process following an ROV dive on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L2: Campaign to Address...

  10. EX1504L2 Dive06 Ancillary Data Collection including reports, kmls, spreadsheets, images and data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of ancillary data files generated through a scripting process following an ROV dive on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L2: Campaign to Address...

  11. EX1504L2 Dive03 Ancillary Data Collection including reports, kmls, spreadsheets, images and data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of ancillary data files generated through a scripting process following an ROV dive on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L2: Campaign to Address...

  12. EX1504L2 Dive13 Ancillary Data Collection including reports, kmls, spreadsheets, images and data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of ancillary data files generated through a scripting process following an ROV dive on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L2: Campaign to Address...

  13. EX1504L2 Dive05 Ancillary Data Collection including reports, kmls, spreadsheets, images and data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of ancillary data files generated through a scripting process following an ROV dive on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L2: Campaign to Address...

  14. EX1504L4 Dive13 Ancillary Data Collection including reports, kmls, spreadsheets, images and data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of ancillary data files generated through a scripting process following an ROV dive on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L4: Campaign to Address...

  15. EX1504L2 Dive08 Ancillary Data Collection including reports, kmls, spreadsheets, images and data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of ancillary data files generated through a scripting process following an ROV dive on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L2: Campaign to Address...

  16. Non-Dive Activities for Investigating the Charleston Bump 2003 - Office of Ocean Exploration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Information about non-dive activities were recorded into the Cruise Information Management System (CIMS) by the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration's data manager...

  17. Non-Dive Activities for Life on the Edge 2004 - Office of Ocean Exploration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Information about non-dive activities were recorded into the Cruise Information Management System (CIMS) by the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration's data manager...

  18. Non-Dive Activities for Life on the Edge 2005 - Office of Ocean Exploration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Information about non-dive activities were recorded into the Cruise Information Management System (CIMS) by the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration's data manager...

  19. Bermuda Deep Water Caves 2011: Dives of Discovery between 20110607 and 20110627

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — During the three week NOAA Ocean Exploration project, Bermuda Deep Water Caves 2011: Dives of Discovery, our four member deep team, aided by numerous assistants,...

  20. EX1504L2 Dive17 Ancillary Data Collection including reports, kmls, spreadsheets, images and data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of ancillary data files generated through a scripting process following an ROV dive on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L2: Campaign to Address...

  1. EX1504L4 Dive12 Ancillary Data Collection including reports, kmls, spreadsheets, images and data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of ancillary data files generated through a scripting process following an ROV dive on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L4: Campaign to Address...

  2. EX1504L4 Dive04 Ancillary Data Collection including reports, kmls, spreadsheets, images and data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of ancillary data files generated through a scripting process following an ROV dive on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L4: Campaign to Address...

  3. EX1504L4 Dive09 Ancillary Data Collection including reports, kmls, spreadsheets, images and data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of ancillary data files generated through a scripting process following an ROV dive on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L4: Campaign to Address...

  4. EX1504L2 Dive07 Ancillary Data Collection including reports, kmls, spreadsheets, images and data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of ancillary data files generated through a scripting process following an ROV dive on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L2: Campaign to Address...

  5. EX1504L4 Dive05 Ancillary Data Collection including reports, kmls, spreadsheets, images and data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of ancillary data files generated through a scripting process following an ROV dive on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L4: Campaign to Address...

  6. EX1504L4 Dive08 Ancillary Data Collection including reports, kmls, spreadsheets, images and data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of ancillary data files generated through a scripting process following an ROV dive on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L4: Campaign to Address...

  7. EX1504L2 Dive14 Ancillary Data Collection including reports, kmls, spreadsheets, images and data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of ancillary data files generated through a scripting process following an ROV dive on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L2: Campaign to Address...

  8. Winter and spring diving behavior of bowhead whales relative to prey

    KAUST Repository

    Heide-Jørgensen, Mads

    2013-10-23

    Background Little is known about bowhead whale (Balaena mysticetus) foraging behavior and what concentrations of prey are required to balance the energetic trade-offs of feeding. We used satellite telemetry, archival depth recorders, and water column echo sounding data to study bowhead whale diving behavior relative to prey depth and concentration in Disko Bay, West Greenland. Results Between March and May 2008 to 2011, nine bowhead whales were tagged in Disko Bay, West Greenland with instruments that collected data on location and diving over a period of 1 to 33 days. The frequency of U-dives (presumed to be foraging dives) was low during winter months but more than doubled in spring concurrent with a decrease in diving depth. The mean speed of the horizontal bottom phase of the U-dives was 0.9 ms-1 and on average, whales spent 37% of their time at the bottom phase of the dive. In March, bowhead whales presumably fed on copepods (Calanus spp.) close to the seabed (between 100 and 400 m). In April and May, after the copepods ascended to shallower depths, bowhead whales also dove to shallower depths (approximately 30 m) more often. However, echo sounding surveys in the vicinity of feeding whales in early May indicated that patches of copepods could still be found close to the seabed. Conclusions There was a marked change in diving behavior from winter through spring and this was likely in response to the changes in sea ice conditions, primary production and potential copepod abundance in the upper part of the water column. Depth and duration of dives changed significantly during this period; however, other dive parameters (for example the proportion of time spent feeding on the bottom of U-dives) remained fairly constant indicating a constant feeding effort. Bowhead whales target copepods at or close to the seabed in winter months in Disko Bay and continue feeding on copepods when they migrate to the surface. However, bowhead whales leave West Greenland before peak

  9. DIVE: A Graph-based Visual Analytics Framework for Big Data

    OpenAIRE

    Rysavy, Steven J.; Bromley, Dennis; Daggett, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    The need for data-centric scientific tools is growing; domains like biology, chemistry, and physics are increasingly adopting computational approaches. As a result, scientists must now deal with the challenges of big data. To address these challenges, we built a visual analytics platform named DIVE: Data Intensive Visualization Engine. DIVE is a data-agnostic, ontologically-expressive software framework capable of streaming large datasets at interactive speeds. Here we present the technical d...

  10. Pulmonary Function in a Diving Population Aged Over 40 Years Old: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-08-01

    1992. Universidad de Murcia. Br.J.Ind.Med. 1987; 44:467-469. 14. MELERO MORENO C. Enfermedad 3. CALI-CORLEO R. Special medical pulmonar obstructiva...habilidades en patologia infecciosa Medical assessment of fitness to dive. Ewell. respiratoria. Sociedad espafiola de medicina Biomedical Seminars...diving experience to pulmonary function REQUENA JM. CARRERAS CASTELLET among U.S. Navy Divers.Undersea JM. Enfermedad pulmonar obstructiva Bimedical

  11. The development of an intermediate‐duration tag to characterize the diving behavior of large whales

    OpenAIRE

    Mate, Bruce R.; Irvine, Ladd M.; Daniel M Palacios

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The development of high‐resolution archival tag technologies has revolutionized our understanding of diving behavior in marine taxa such as sharks, turtles, and seals during their wide‐ranging movements. However, similar applications for large whales have lagged behind due to the difficulty of keeping tags on the animals for extended periods of time. Here, we present a novel configuration of a transdermally attached biologging device called the Advanced Dive Behavior (ADB) tag. The A...

  12. Right Whale Diving and Foraging Behavior in the Southwestern Gulf of Maine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    by a video plankton recorder is shown as the color background (cool colors indicate low copepod abundance, warm colors indicate high abundance...archival tags, video plankton recorder). In 2005-2007, we conducted research on the diving and foraging behavior of North Atlantic right whales in the...locations. Upon resurfacing after each long dive, the whale’s exact resurfacing position is recorded by the tagging boat using a global positioning

  13. Can foraging ecology drive the evolution of body size in a diving endotherm?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothée R Cook

    Full Text Available Within a single animal species, different morphs can allow for differential exploitation of foraging niches between populations, while sexual size dimorphism can provide each sex with access to different resources. Despite being potentially important agents of evolution, resource polymorphisms, and the way they operate in wild populations, remain poorly understood. In this study, we examine how trophic factors can select for different body sizes between populations and sexes in a diving endotherm. Dive depth and duration are positively related to body size in diving birds and mammals, a relationship explained by a lower mass-specific metabolic rate and greater oxygen stores in larger individuals. Based on this allometry, we predict that selection for exploiting resources situated at different depths can drive the evolution of body size in species of diving endotherms at the population and sexual level. To test this prediction, we studied the foraging ecology of Blue-eyed Shags, a group of cormorants with male-biased sexual size dimorphism from across the Southern Ocean. We found that mean body mass and relative difference in body mass between sexes varied by up to 77% and 107% between neighbouring colonies, respectively. Birds from colonies with larger individuals dived deeper than birds from colonies with smaller individuals, when accounting for sex. In parallel, males dived further offshore and deeper than females and the sexual difference in dive depth reflected the level of sexual size dimorphism at each colony. We argue that body size in this group of birds is under intense selection for diving to depths of profitable benthic prey patches and that, locally, sexual niche divergence selection can exaggerate the sexual size dimorphism of Blue-eyed Shags initially set up by sexual selection. Our findings suggest that trophic resources can select for important geographic micro-variability in body size between populations and sexes.

  14. The Integration of a Smart Stage into Current Dive Ships of the Navy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    conditions. The majority of dives are in navigable waters inshore and offshore . Occasionally, divers may be involved in HAZMAT and nuclear diving...operate the stage on compressed air or umbilical support. The ship’s crew is there to help maintain these systems and operate them while the divers are in...Additional lighting Have increased lighting in the workspace in order to work more efficiently and safely tool storage system will umbilical support on

  15. Repetitive Bibliographical Information in Relational Databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Terrence A.

    1988-01-01

    Proposes a solution to the problem of loading repetitive bibliographic information in a microcomputer-based relational database management system. The alternative design described is based on a representational redundancy design and normalization theory. (12 references) (Author/CLB)

  16. Computer-Related Repetitive Stress Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on the shoulder Epicondylitis: elbow soreness often called "tennis elbow" Ganglion cyst: swelling or lump in the wrist ... Bones, Muscles, and Joints Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Medial Epicondylitis Repetitive Stress Injuries Contact Us Print Resources Send ...

  17. Digital repetitive control under varying frequency conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos Fuentes, Germán Andrés

    2012-01-01

    Premi extraordinari doctorat curs 2011-2012, àmbit d’Enginyeria Industrial The tracking/rejection of periodic signals constitutes a wide field of research in the control theory and applications area and Repetitive Control has proven to be an efficient way to face this topic; however, in some applications the period of the signal to be tracked/rejected changes in time or is uncertain, which causes and important performance degradation in the standard repetitive controller. This the...

  18. Ecological carrying capacity assessment of diving site: A case study of Mabul Island, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li-Ye; Chung, Shan-Shan; Qiu, Jian-Wen

    2016-12-01

    Despite considered a non-consumptive use of the marine environment, diving-related activities can cause damages to coral reefs. It is imminent to assess the maximum numbers of divers that can be accommodated by a diving site before it is subject to irreversible deterioration. This study aimed to assess the ecological carrying capacity of a diving site in Mabul Island, Malaysia. Photo-quadrat line transect method was used in the benthic survey. The ecological carrying capacity was assessed based on the relationship between the number of divers and the proportion of diver damaged hard corals in Mabul Island. The results indicated that the proportion of diver damaged hard corals occurred exponentially with increasing use. The ecological carrying capacity of Mabul Island is 15,600-16,800 divers per diving site per year at current levels of diver education and training with a quarterly threshold of 3900-4200 per site. Our calculation shows that management intervention (e.g. limiting diving) is justified at 8-14% of hard coral damage. In addition, the use of coral reef dominated diving sites should be managed according to their sensitivity to diver damage and the depth of the reefs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Using stimulation of the diving reflex in humans to teach integrative physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choate, Julia K; Denton, Kate M; Evans, Roger G; Hodgson, Yvonne

    2014-12-01

    During underwater submersion, the body responds by conserving O2 and prioritizing blood flow to the brain and heart. These physiological adjustments, which involve the nervous, cardiovascular, and respiratory systems, are known as the diving response and provide an ideal example of integrative physiology. The diving reflex can be stimulated in the practical laboratory setting using breath holding and facial immersion in water. Our undergraduate physiology students complete a laboratory class in which they investigate the effects of stimulating the diving reflex on cardiovascular variables, which are recorded and calculated with a Finapres finger cuff. These variables include heart rate, cardiac output, stroke volume, total peripheral resistance, and arterial pressures (mean, diastolic, and systolic). Components of the diving reflex are stimulated by 1) facial immersion in cold water (15°C), 2) breathing with a snorkel in cold water (15°C), 3) facial immersion in warm water (30°C), and 4) breath holding in air. Statistical analysis of the data generated for each of these four maneuvers allows the students to consider the factors that contribute to the diving response, such as the temperature of the water and the location of the sensory receptors that initiate the response. In addition to providing specific details about the equipment, protocols, and learning outcomes, this report describes how we assess this practical exercise and summarizes some common student misunderstandings of the essential physiological concepts underlying the diving response.

  20. Coming up for air: thermal dependence of dive behaviours and metabolism in sea snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udyawer, Vinay; Simpfendorfer, Colin A; Heupel, Michelle R; Clark, Timothy D

    2016-11-01

    Cutaneous gas exchange allows some air-breathing diving ectotherms to supplement their pulmonary oxygen uptake, which may allow prolongation of dives and an increased capacity to withstand anthropogenic and natural threatening processes that increase submergence times. However, little is known of the interplay between metabolism, bimodal oxygen uptake and activity levels across thermal environments in diving ectotherms. Here, we show in two species of sea snake (spine-bellied sea snake, Hydrophis curtus; and elegant sea snake, Hydrophis elegans) that increasing temperature elevates surfacing rate, increases total oxygen consumption and decreases dive duration. The majority of dives observed in both species remained within estimated maximal aerobic limits. While cutaneous gas exchange accounted for a substantial proportion of total oxygen consumption (up to 23%), unexpectedly it was independent of water temperature and activity levels, suggesting a diffusion-limited mechanism. Our findings demonstrate that rising water temperature and a limited capability to up-regulate cutaneous oxygen uptake may compromise the proficiency with which sea snakes perform prolonged dives. This may hinder their capacity to withstand ongoing anthropogenic activities like trawl fishing, and increase their susceptibility to surface predation as their natural environments continue to warm.