WorldWideScience

Sample records for repeated search array

  1. Visual Scan Adaptation During Repeated Visual Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    locating the target, such as fixation durations and the number of fixations to find the target (Hidalgo- Sotelo , Oliva, & Torralba, 2005). Adaptations...6, doi:10.1167/ 3.1.6. [PubMed] [Article] Hidalgo- Sotelo , B., Oliva, A., & Torralba, A. (2005). Human learning of contextual priors for object search

  2. ArraySearch: A Web-Based Genomic Search Engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Tyler J; Ge, Steven X

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in microarray technologies have resulted in a flood of genomics data. This large body of accumulated data could be used as a knowledge base to help researchers interpret new experimental data. ArraySearch finds statistical correlations between newly observed gene expression profiles and the huge source of well-characterized expression signatures deposited in the public domain. A search query of a list of genes will return experiments on which the genes are significantly up- or downregulated collectively. Searches can also be conducted using gene expression signatures from new experiments. This resource will empower biological researchers with a statistical method to explore expression data from their own research by comparing it with expression signatures from a large public archive.

  3. Positions priming in briefly presented search arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asgeirsson, Arni Gunnar; Kristjánsson, Árni; Kyllingsbæk, Søren;

    2011-01-01

    Repetition priming in visual search has been a topic of extensive research since Maljkovic & Nakayama [1994, Memory & Cognition, 22, 657-672] presented the first detailed studies of such effects. Their results showed large reductions in reaction times when target color was repeated on consecutive...... pop-out search trials. Such repetition effects have since been generalized to a multitude of target attributes. Priming has primarily been investigated using self-terminating visual search paradigms, comparing differences in response times. Response accuracy has predominantly served as a control...... variable. Here we present results from experiments where position priming is demonstrated in paradigms involving temporally limited exposures to singleton targets. Position priming of response accuracy was observed in an eye-movement-controlled spatial judgment task and in partial report tasks where...

  4. RepeatsDB 2.0: improved annotation, classification, search and visualization of repeat protein structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paladin, Lisanna; Hirsh, Layla; Piovesan, Damiano; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A.; Kajava, Andrey V.; Tosatto, Silvio C.E.

    2017-01-01

    RepeatsDB 2.0 (URL: http://repeatsdb.bio.unipd.it/) is an update of the database of annotated tandem repeat protein structures. Repeat proteins are a widespread class of non-globular proteins carrying heterogeneous functions involved in several diseases. Here we provide a new version of RepeatsDB with an improved classification schema including high quality annotations for ∼5400 protein structures. RepeatsDB 2.0 features information on start and end positions for the repeat regions and units for all entries. The extensive growth of repeat unit characterization was possible by applying the novel ReUPred annotation method over the entire Protein Data Bank, with data quality is guaranteed by an extensive manual validation for >60% of the entries. The updated web interface includes a new search engine for complex queries and a fully re-designed entry page for a better overview of structural data. It is now possible to compare unit positions, together with secondary structure, fold information and Pfam domains. Moreover, a new classification level has been introduced on top of the existing scheme as an independent layer for sequence similarity relationships at 40%, 60% and 90% identity. PMID:27899671

  5. Efficient searching and sorting applications using an associative array processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, W.; Quinn, M. J.

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe a method of searching and sorting data by using some of the unique capabilities of an associative array processor. To understand the application, the associative array processor is described in detail. In particular, the content addressable memory and flip network are discussed because these two unique elements give the associative array processor the power to rapidly sort and search. A simple alphanumeric sorting example is explained in hardware and software terms. The hardware used to explain the application is the STARAN (Goodyear Aerospace Corporation) associative array processor. The software used is the APPLE (Array Processor Programming Language) programming language. Some applications of the array processor are discussed. This summary tries to differentiate between the techniques of the sequential machine and the associative array processor.

  6. Search for Gravitational-Wave Bursts from Soft Gamma Repeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G.; Amin, R.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arain, M. A.; Araya, M.; Armandula, H.; Armor, P.; Aso, Y.; Aston, S.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Ballmer, S.; Bantilan, H.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, C.; Barker, D.; Barr, B.; Barriga, P.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bastarrika, M.; Bayer, K.; Betzwieser, J.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Biswas, R.; Black, E.; Blackburn, K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bogue, L.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Brinkmann, M.; Brooks, A.; Brown, D. A.; Brunet, G.; Bullington, A.; Buonanno, A.; Burmeister, O.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Camp, J. B.; Cannizzo, J.; Cannon, K.; Cao, J.; Cardenas, L.; Casebolt, T.; Castaldi, G.; Cepeda, C.; Chalkley, E.; Charlton, P.; Chatterji, S.; Chelkowski, S.; Chen, Y.; Christensen, N.; Clark, D.; Clark, J.; Cokelaer, T.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T.; Coyne, D.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cutler, R. M.; Dalrymple, J.; Danzmann, K.; Davies, G.; Debra, D.; Degallaix, J.; Degree, M.; Dergachev, V.; Desai, S.; Desalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M.; Dickson, J.; Dietz, A.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doomes, E. E.; Drever, R. W. P.; Duke, I.; Dumas, J.-C.; Dupuis, R. J.; Dwyer, J. G.; Echols, C.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Espinoza, E.; Etzel, T.; Evans, T.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, Y.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Finn, L. S.; Flasch, K.; Fotopoulos, N.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fyffe, M.; Garofoli, J.; Gholami, I.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Goda, K.; Goetz, E.; Goggin, L.; González, G.; Gossler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Gray, M.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Grimaldi, F.; Grosso, R.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guenther, M.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hage, B.; Hallam, J. M.; Hammer, D.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G.; Harstad, E.; Hayama, K.; Hayler, T.; Heefner, J.; Heng, I. S.; Hennessy, M.; Heptonstall, A.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hirose, E.; Hoak, D.; Hosken, D.; Hough, J.; Huttner, S. H.; Ingram, D.; Ito, M.; Ivanov, A.; Johnson, B.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, G.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kamat, S.; Kanner, J.; Kasprzyk, D.; Katsavounidis, E.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Khalili, F. Ya.; Khan, R.; Khazanov, E.; Kim, C.; King, P.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Kopparapu, R. K.; Kozak, D.; Kozhevatov, I.; Krishnan, B.; Kwee, P.; Lam, P. K.; Landry, M.; Lang, M. M.; Lantz, B.; Lazzarini, A.; Lei, M.; Leindecker, N.; Leonhardt, V.; Leonor, I.; Libbrecht, K.; Lin, H.; Lindquist, P.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lodhia, D.; Lormand, M.; Lu, P.; Lubiński, M.; Lucianetti, A.; Lück, H.; Machenschalk, B.; Macinnis, M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Mandic, V.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A.; Markowitz, J.; Maros, E.; Martin, I.; Martin, R. M.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Matzner, R.; Mavalvala, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McHugh, M.; McIntyre, G.; McIvor, G.; McKechan, D.; McKenzie, K.; Meier, T.; Melissinos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C. J.; Meyers, D.; Miller, J.; Minelli, J.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Miyakawa, O.; Moe, B.; Mohanty, S.; Moreno, G.; Mossavi, K.; Mowlowry, C.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukhopadhyay, H.; Müller-Ebhardt, H.; Munch, J.; Murray, P.; Myers, E.; Myers, J.; Nash, T.; Nelson, J.; Newton, G.; Nishizawa, A.; Numata, K.; O'Dell, J.; Ogin, G.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Papa, M. A.; Parameshwaraiah, V.; Patel, P.; Pedraza, M.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Petrie, T.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H. J.; Plissi, M. V.; Postiglione, F.; Principe, M.; Prix, R.; Quetschke, V.; Raab, F.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Rainer, N.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramsunder, M.; Rehbein, H.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Rivera, B.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinson, C.; Robinson, E. L.; Roddy, S.; Rodriguez, A.; Rogan, A. M.; Rollins, J.; Romano, J. D.; Romie, J.; Route, R.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruet, L.; Russell, P.; Ryan, K.; Sakata, S.; Samidi, M.; de La Jordana, L. Sancho; Sandberg, V.; Sannibale, V.; Saraf, S.; Sarin, P.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Sato, S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Savov, P.; Schediwy, S. W.; Schilling, R.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, S. M.; Searle, A. C.; Sears, B.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sibley, A.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Sinha, S.; Sintes, A. M.

    2008-11-01

    We present a LIGO search for short-duration gravitational waves (GWs) associated with soft gamma ray repeater (SGR) bursts. This is the first search sensitive to neutron star f modes, usually considered the most efficient GW emitting modes. We find no evidence of GWs associated with any SGR burst in a sample consisting of the 27 Dec. 2004 giant flare from SGR 1806-20 and 190 lesser events from SGR 1806-20 and SGR 1900+14. The unprecedented sensitivity of the detectors allows us to set the most stringent limits on transient GW amplitudes published to date. We find upper limit estimates on the model-dependent isotropic GW emission energies (at a nominal distance of 10 kpc) between 3×1045 and 9×1052 erg depending on waveform type, detector antenna factors and noise characteristics at the time of the burst. These upper limits are within the theoretically predicted range of some SGR models.

  7. Elliptical Antenna Array Synthesis Using Backtracking Search Optimisation Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerim Guney

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The design of the elliptical antenna arrays is relatively new research area in the antenna array community. Backtracking search optimisation algorithm (BSA is employed for the synthesis of elliptical antenna arrays having different number of array elements. For this aim, BSA is used to calculate the optimum angular position and amplitude values of the array elements. BSA is a population-based iterative evolutionary algorithm. The remarkable properties of BSA are that it has a good optimisation performance, simple implementation structure, and few control parameters. The results of BSA are compared with those of self-adaptive differential evolution algorithm, firefly algorithm, biogeography based optimisation algorithm, and genetic algorithm. The results show that BSA can reach better solutions than the compared optimisation algorithms. Iterative performances of BSA are also compared with those of bacterial foraging algorithm and differential search algorithm.

  8. Search for gravitational-wave bursts from soft gamma repeaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B; Abbott, R; Adhikari, R; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allen, G; Amin, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arain, M A; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Armor, P; Aso, Y; Aston, S; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Ballmer, S; Bantilan, H; Barish, B C; Barker, C; Barker, D; Barr, B; Barriga, P; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bastarrika, M; Bayer, K; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Biswas, R; Black, E; Blackburn, K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Bodiya, T P; Bogue, L; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Brinkmann, M; Brooks, A; Brown, D A; Brunet, G; Bullington, A; Buonanno, A; Burmeister, O; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Camp, J B; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Cao, J; Cardenas, L; Casebolt, T; Castaldi, G; Cepeda, C; Chalkley, E; Charlton, P; Chatterji, S; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Christensen, N; Clark, D; Clark, J; Cokelaer, T; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T; Coyne, D; Creighton, J D E; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cutler, R M; Dalrymple, J; Danzmann, K; Davies, G; Debra, D; Degallaix, J; Degree, M; Dergachev, V; Desai, S; Desalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M; Dickson, J; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doomes, E E; Drever, R W P; Duke, I; Dumas, J-C; Dupuis, R J; Dwyer, J G; Echols, C; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Espinoza, E; Etzel, T; Evans, T; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Finn, L S; Flasch, K; Fotopoulos, N; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fyffe, M; Garofoli, J; Gholami, I; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Goda, K; Goetz, E; Goggin, L; González, G; Gossler, S; Gouaty, R; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Gray, M; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Grimaldi, F; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guenther, M; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hage, B; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G; Harstad, E; Hayama, K; Hayler, T; Heefner, J; Heng, I S; Hennessy, M; Heptonstall, A; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hirose, E; Hoak, D; Hosken, D; Hough, J; Huttner, S H; Ingram, D; Ito, M; Ivanov, A; Johnson, B; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kamat, S; Kanner, J; Kasprzyk, D; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalili, F Ya; Khan, R; Khazanov, E; Kim, C; King, P; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Kopparapu, R K; Kozak, D; Kozhevatov, I; Krishnan, B; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lang, M M; Lantz, B; Lazzarini, A; Lei, M; Leindecker, N; Leonhardt, V; Leonor, I; Libbrecht, K; Lin, H; Lindquist, P; Lockerbie, N A; Lodhia, D; Lormand, M; Lu, P; Lubinski, M; Lucianetti, A; Lück, H; Machenschalk, B; Macinnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Mandic, V; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Markosyan, A; Markowitz, J; Maros, E; Martin, I; Martin, R M; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Matzner, R; Mavalvala, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McHugh, M; McIntyre, G; McIvor, G; McKechan, D; McKenzie, K; Meier, T; Melissinos, A; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C J; Meyers, D; Miller, J; Minelli, J; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Moe, B; Mohanty, S; Moreno, G; Mossavi, K; Mowlowry, C; Mueller, G; Mukherjee, S; Mukhopadhyay, H; Müller-Ebhardt, H; Munch, J; Murray, P; Myers, E; Myers, J; Nash, T; Nelson, J; Newton, G; Nishizawa, A; Numata, K; O'Dell, J; Ogin, G; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pan, Y; Pankow, C; Papa, M A; Parameshwaraiah, V; Patel, P; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Perreca, A; Petrie, T; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Pletsch, H J; Plissi, M V; Postiglione, F; Principe, M; Prix, R; Quetschke, V; Raab, F; Rabeling, D S; Radkins, H; Rainer, N; Rakhmanov, M; Ramsunder, M; Rehbein, H; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rivera, B; Robertson, N A; Robinson, C; Robinson, E L; Roddy, S; Rodriguez, A; Rogan, A M; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J; Route, R; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruet, L; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Sakata, S; Samidi, M; de la Jordana, L Sancho; Sandberg, V; Sannibale, V; Saraf, S; Sarin, P; Sathyaprakash, B S; Sato, S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Savov, P; Schediwy, S W; Schilling, R; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, S M; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Seifert, F; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sibley, A; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Sinha, S; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Slutsky, J; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Smith, N D; Somiya, K; Sorazu, B; Stein, L C; Stochino, A; Stone, R; Strain, K A; Strom, D M; Stuver, A; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, K-X; Sung, M; Sutton, P J; Takahashi, H; Tanner, D B; Taylor, R; Taylor, R; Thacker, J; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thüring, A; Tokmakov, K V; Torres, C; Torrie, C; Traylor, G; Trias, M; Tyler, W; Ugolini, D; Ulmen, J; Urbanek, K; Vahlbruch, H; Van Den Broeck, C; van der Sluys, M; Vass, S; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Veitch, J; Veitch, P

    2008-11-21

    We present a LIGO search for short-duration gravitational waves (GWs) associated with soft gamma ray repeater (SGR) bursts. This is the first search sensitive to neutron star f modes, usually considered the most efficient GW emitting modes. We find no evidence of GWs associated with any SGR burst in a sample consisting of the 27 Dec. 2004 giant flare from SGR 1806-20 and 190 lesser events from SGR 1806-20 and SGR 1900+14. The unprecedented sensitivity of the detectors allows us to set the most stringent limits on transient GW amplitudes published to date. We find upper limit estimates on the model-dependent isotropic GW emission energies (at a nominal distance of 10 kpc) between 3x10;{45} and 9x10;{52} erg depending on waveform type, detector antenna factors and noise characteristics at the time of the burst. These upper limits are within the theoretically predicted range of some SGR models.

  9. Review of tandem repeat search tools: a systematic approach to evaluating algorithmic performance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lim, Kian Guan; Kwoh, Chee Keong; Hsu, Li Yang; Wirawan, Adrianto

    2013-01-01

    .... Over the last 10-15 years, numerous tools have been developed for searching tandem repeats, but differences in the search algorithms adopted and difficulties with parameter settings have confounded...

  10. Hypomethylation is restricted to the D4Z4 repeat array in phenotypic FSHD.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greef, J.C. de; Wohlgemuth, M.; Chan, O.A.; Hansson, K.B.; Smeets, D.F.C.M.; Frants, R.R.; Weemaes, C.M.R.; Padberg, G.W.A.M.; Maarel, S.M. van der

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) show a contraction of the D4Z4 repeat array in the subtelomere of chromosome 4q. This D4Z4 contraction is associated with significant allele-specific hypomethylation of the repeat. Hypomethylation of D4Z4 is also observed in pat

  11. Cuckoo search optimization for linear antenna arrays synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Haffane

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A recently developed metaheuristic optimization algorithm, the Cuckoo search algorithm, is used in this paper for the synthesis of symmetric uniformly spaced linear microstrip antennas array. Cuckoo search is based on the breeding strategy of Cuckoos augmented by a Levy flight behaviour found in the foraging habits of other species. This metaheuristic is tested on amplitude only pattern synthesis and amplitude and phase pattern synthesis. In both case, the objective, is to determinate the optimal excitations element that produce a synthesized radiation pattern within given bounds specified by a pattern mask.

  12. Expression, tandem repeat copy number variation and stability of four macrosatellite arrays in the human genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chadwick Brian P

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Macrosatellites are some of the largest variable number tandem repeats in the human genome, but what role these unusual sequences perform is unknown. Their importance to human health is clearly demonstrated by the 4q35 macrosatellite D4Z4 that is associated with the onset of the muscle degenerative disease facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy. Nevertheless, many other macrosatellite arrays in the human genome remain poorly characterized. Results Here we describe the organization, tandem repeat copy number variation, transmission stability and expression of four macrosatellite arrays in the human genome: the TAF11-Like array located on chromosomes 5p15.1, the SST1 arrays on 4q28.3 and 19q13.12, the PRR20 array located on chromosome 13q21.1, and the ZAV array at 9q32. All are polymorphic macrosatellite arrays that at least for TAF11-Like and SST1 show evidence of meiotic instability. With the exception of the SST1 array that is ubiquitously expressed, all are expressed at high levels in the testis and to a lesser extent in the brain. Conclusions Our results extend the number of characterized macrosatellite arrays in the human genome and provide the foundation for formulation of hypotheses to begin assessing their functional role in the human genome.

  13. Versatile directional searches for gravitational waves with Pulsar Timing Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madison, D. R.; Zhu, X.-J.; Hobbs, G.; Coles, W.; Shannon, R. M.; Wang, J. B.; Tiburzi, C.; Manchester, R. N.; Bailes, M.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Dai, S.; Dempsey, J.; Keith, M.; Kerr, M.; Lasky, P.; Levin, Y.; Osłowski, S.; Ravi, V.; Reardon, D.; Rosado, P.; Spiewak, R.; van Straten, W.; Toomey, L.; Wen, L.; You, X.

    2016-02-01

    By regularly monitoring the most stable millisecond pulsars over many years, pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) are positioned to detect and study correlations in the timing behaviour of those pulsars. Gravitational waves (GWs) from supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs) are an exciting potentially detectable source of such correlations. We describe a straightforward technique by which a PTA can be `phased-up' to form time series of the two polarization modes of GWs coming from a particular direction of the sky. Our technique requires no assumptions regarding the time-domain behaviour of a GW signal. This method has already been used to place stringent bounds on GWs from individual SMBHBs in circular orbits. Here, we describe the methodology and demonstrate the versatility of the technique in searches for a wide variety of GW signals including bursts with unmodelled waveforms. Using the first six years of data from the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array, we conduct an all-sky search for a detectable excess of GW power from any direction. For the lines of sight to several nearby massive galaxy clusters, we carry out a more detailed search for GW bursts with memory, which are distinct signatures of SMBHB mergers. In all cases, we find that the data are consistent with noise.

  14. Search for Millisecond Pulsars for the Pulsar Timing Array project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milia, S.

    2012-03-01

    Pulsars are rapidly rotating highly magnetised neutron stars (i.e. ultra dense stars, where about one solar mass is concentrated in a sphere with a radius of ~ 10 km), which irradiate radio beams in a fashion similar to a lighthouse. As a consequence, whenever the beams cut our line of sight we perceive a radio pulses, one (or two) per pulsar rotation, with a frequency up to hundred of times a second. Owing to their compact nature, rapid spin and high inertia, pulsars are in general fairly stable rotators, hence the Times of Arrival (TOAs) of the pulses at a radio telescope can be used as the ticks of a clock. This holds true in particular for the sub­class of the millisecond pulsars (MSPs), having a spin period smaller than the conventional limit of 30 ms, whose very rapid rotation and relatively older age provide better rotational stability than the ordinary pulsars. Indeed, some MSPs rotate so regularly that they can rival the best atomic clocks on Earth over timespan of few months or years.This feature allows us to use MSPs as tools in a cosmic laboratory, by exploiting a procedure called timing, which consists in the repeated and regular measurement of the TOAs from a pulsar and then in the search for trends in the series of the TOAs over various timespans, from fraction of seconds to decades.For example the study of pulsars in binary systems has already provided the most stringent tests to date of General Relativity in strong gravitational fields and has unambiguously showed the occurrence of the emission of gravitational waves from a binary system comprising two massive bodies in a close orbit. In last decades a new exciting perspective has been opened, i.e. to use pulsars also for a direct detection of the so far elusive gravitational waves and thereby applying the pulsar timing for cosmological studies. In fact, the gravitational waves (GWs) going across our Galaxy pass over all the Galactic pulsars and the Earth, perturbing the space­time at the

  15. Versatile Directional Searches for Gravitational Waves with Pulsar Timing Arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Madison, D R; Hobbs, G; Coles, W; Shannon, R M; Wang, J; Tiburzi, C; Manchester, R N; Bailes, M; Bhat, N D R; Burke-Spolaor, S; Dai, S; Dempsey, J; Keith, M; Kerr, M; Lasky, P; Levin, Y; Oslowski, S; Ravi, V; Reardon, D; Rosado, P; Spiewak, R; van Straten, W; Toomey, L; Wen, L; You, X

    2015-01-01

    By regularly monitoring the most stable millisecond pulsars over many years, pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) are positioned to detect and study correlations in the timing behaviour of those pulsars. Gravitational waves (GWs) from supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs) are an exciting potentially detectable source of such correlations. We describe a straight-forward technique by which a PTA can be "phased-up" to form time series of the two polarisation modes of GWs coming from a particular direction of the sky. Our technique requires no assumptions regarding the time-domain behaviour of a GW signal. This method has already been used to place stringent bounds on GWs from individual SMBHBs in circular orbits. Here, we describe the methodology and demonstrate the versatility of the technique in searches for a wide variety of GW signals including bursts with unmodeled waveforms. Using the first six years of data from the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array, we conduct an all-sky search for a detectable excess of GW power fr...

  16. Local and long-range stability in tandemly arrayed tetratricopeptide repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Main, Ewan R G; Stott, Katherine; Jackson, Sophie E; Regan, Lynne

    2005-04-19

    The tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) is a 34-aa alpha-helical motif that occurs in tandem arrays in a variety of different proteins. In natural proteins, the number of TPR motifs ranges from 3 to 16 or more. These arrays function as molecular scaffolds and frequently mediate protein-protein interactions. We have shown that correctly folded TPR domain proteins, exhibiting the typical helix-turn-helix fold, can be designed by arraying tandem repeats of an idealized TPR consensus motif. To date, three designed proteins, CTPR1, CTPR2, and CTPR3 (consensus TPR number of repeats) have been characterized. Their high-resolution crystal structures show that the designed proteins indeed adopt the typical TPR fold, which is specified by the correct positioning of key residues. Here, we present a study of the thermodynamic properties and folding kinetics of this set of designed proteins. Chemical denaturation, monitored by CD and fluorescence, was used to assess the folding and global stability of each protein. NMR-detected amide proton exchange was used to investigate the stability of each construct at a residue-specific level. The results of these studies reveal a stable core, which defines the intrinsic stability of an individual TPR motif. The results also show the relationship between the number of tandem repeats and the overall stability and folding of the protein.

  17. Searching for Extraterrestrial Intelligence with the Square Kilometre Array

    CERN Document Server

    Siemion, Andrew P V; Cheng-Jin, Jin; Chennamangalam, Jayanth; Cordes, James; DeBoer, David R; Falcke, Heino; Garrett, Mike; Garrington, Simon; Gurvits, Leonid; Hoare, Melvin; Korpela, Eric J; Lazio, Joseph; Messerschmitt, David; Morrison, Ian S; O'Brien, Tim; Paragi, Zsolt; Penny, Alan; Spitler, Laura; Tarter, Jill; Werthimer, Dan

    2014-01-01

    The vast collecting area of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), harnessed by sensitive receivers, flexible digital electronics and increased computational capacity, could permit the most sensitive and exhaustive search for technologically-produced radio emission from advanced extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) ever performed. For example, SKA1-MID will be capable of detecting a source roughly analogous to terrestrial high-power radars (e.g. air route surveillance or ballistic missile warning radars, EIRP (EIRP = equivalent isotropic radiated power, ~10^17 erg sec^-1) at 10 pc in less than 15 minutes, and with a modest four beam SETI observing system could, in one minute, search every star in the primary beam out to ~100 pc for radio emission comparable to that emitted by the Arecibo Planetary Radar (EIRP ~2 x 10^20 erg sec^-1). The flexibility of the signal detection systems used for SETI searches with the SKA will allow new algorithms to be employed that will provide sensitivity to a much wider variety of si...

  18. Pulsar Timing Array Based Search for Supermassive Black Hole Binaries in the Square Kilometer Array Era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Mohanty, Soumya D

    2017-04-14

    The advent of next generation radio telescope facilities, such as the Square Kilometer Array (SKA), will usher in an era where a pulsar timing array (PTA) based search for gravitational waves (GWs) will be able to use hundreds of well timed millisecond pulsars rather than the few dozens in existing PTAs. A realistic assessment of the performance of such an extremely large PTA must take into account the data analysis challenge posed by an exponential increase in the parameter space volume due to the large number of so-called pulsar phase parameters. We address this problem and present such an assessment for isolated supermassive black hole binary (SMBHB) searches using a SKA era PTA containing 10^{3} pulsars. We find that an all-sky search will be able to confidently detect nonevolving sources with a redshifted chirp mass of 10^{10}  M_{⊙} out to a redshift of about 28 (corresponding to a rest-frame chirp mass of 3.4×10^{8}  M_{⊙}). We discuss the important implications that the large distance reach of a SKA era PTA has on GW observations from optically identified SMBHB candidates. If no SMBHB detections occur, a highly unlikely scenario in the light of our results, the sky-averaged upper limit on strain amplitude will be improved by about 3 orders of magnitude over existing limits.

  19. Assembling the Streptococcus thermophilus clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) array for multiplex DNA targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lijun; Xu, Kun; Liu, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Cunfang; Xin, Ying; Zhang, Zhiying

    2015-06-01

    In addition to the advantages of scalable, affordable, and easy to engineer, the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein (Cas) technology is superior for multiplex targeting, which is laborious and inconvenient when achieved by cloning multiple gRNA expressing cassettes. Here, we report a simple CRISPR array assembling method which will facilitate multiplex targeting usage. First, the Streptococcus thermophilus CRISPR3/Cas locus was cloned. Second, different CRISPR arrays were assembled with different crRNA spacers. Transformation assays using different Escherichia coli strains demonstrated efficient plasmid DNA targeting, and we achieved targeting efficiency up to 95% with an assembled CRISPR array with three crRNA spacers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Typing dinucleotide repeat loci using microplate array diagonal gel electrophoresis: proof of principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Santiago; Chen, Xiao-He; Day, Ian N M

    2004-04-01

    Polymorphic dinucleotide repeat loci ('microsatellite markers') are found in varying abundance throughout the genomes of most organisms. They have been extensively used for genetic studies, but conventional techniques used for their genotyping require sophisticated equipment. Microplate array diagonal gel electrophoresis (MADGE) has previously been extended to economical high-throughput genotyping of trinucleotide and tetranucleotide microsatellite amplicons. However, the capability of this technique to resolve the alleles of dinucleotide repeat loci has not been explored previously. Here we show that a modified microsatellite-MADGE approach can provide sufficient resolution for dinucleotide repeat typing. This enables economical and convenient set up for analysis of single markers in many samples in parallel, suitable, for example, for population association studies.

  1. Analysis of oligonucleotide array experiments with repeated measures using mixed models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Getchell Thomas V

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two or more factor mixed factorial experiments are becoming increasingly common in microarray data analysis. In this case study, the two factors are presence (Patients with Alzheimer's disease or absence (Control of the disease, and brain regions including olfactory bulb (OB or cerebellum (CER. In the design considered in this manuscript, OB and CER are repeated measurements from the same subject and, hence, are correlated. It is critical to identify sources of variability in the analysis of oligonucleotide array experiments with repeated measures and correlations among data points have to be considered. In addition, multiple testing problems are more complicated in experiments with multi-level treatments or treatment combinations. Results In this study we adopted a linear mixed model to analyze oligonucleotide array experiments with repeated measures. We first construct a generalized F test to select differentially expressed genes. The Benjamini and Hochberg (BH procedure of controlling false discovery rate (FDR at 5% was applied to the P values of the generalized F test. For those genes with significant generalized F test, we then categorize them based on whether the interaction terms were significant or not at the α-level (αnew = 0.0033 determined by the FDR procedure. Since simple effects may be examined for the genes with significant interaction effect, we adopt the protected Fisher's least significant difference test (LSD procedure at the level of αnew to control the family-wise error rate (FWER for each gene examined. Conclusions A linear mixed model is appropriate for analysis of oligonucleotide array experiments with repeated measures. We constructed a generalized F test to select differentially expressed genes, and then applied a specific sequence of tests to identify factorial effects. This sequence of tests applied was designed to control for gene based FWER.

  2. Analysis of oligonucleotide array experiments with repeated measures using mixed models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Wood, Constance L; Getchell, Thomas V; Getchell, Marilyn L; Stromberg, Arnold J

    2004-12-30

    Two or more factor mixed factorial experiments are becoming increasingly common in microarray data analysis. In this case study, the two factors are presence (Patients with Alzheimer's disease) or absence (Control) of the disease, and brain regions including olfactory bulb (OB) or cerebellum (CER). In the design considered in this manuscript, OB and CER are repeated measurements from the same subject and, hence, are correlated. It is critical to identify sources of variability in the analysis of oligonucleotide array experiments with repeated measures and correlations among data points have to be considered. In addition, multiple testing problems are more complicated in experiments with multi-level treatments or treatment combinations. In this study we adopted a linear mixed model to analyze oligonucleotide array experiments with repeated measures. We first construct a generalized F test to select differentially expressed genes. The Benjamini and Hochberg (BH) procedure of controlling false discovery rate (FDR) at 5% was applied to the P values of the generalized F test. For those genes with significant generalized F test, we then categorize them based on whether the interaction terms were significant or not at the alpha-level (alphanew = 0.0033) determined by the FDR procedure. Since simple effects may be examined for the genes with significant interaction effect, we adopt the protected Fisher's least significant difference test (LSD) procedure at the level of alphanew to control the family-wise error rate (FWER) for each gene examined. A linear mixed model is appropriate for analysis of oligonucleotide array experiments with repeated measures. We constructed a generalized F test to select differentially expressed genes, and then applied a specific sequence of tests to identify factorial effects. This sequence of tests applied was designed to control for gene based FWER.

  3. Neural responses to target features outside a search array are enhanced during conjunction but not unique-feature search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, David R; Dux, Paul E; Travis, Susan L; Mattingley, Jason B

    2014-02-26

    The visual world is typically too complex to permit full apprehension of its content from a single fixation. Humans therefore use visual search to direct attention and eye movements to locations or objects of interest in cluttered scenes. Psychophysical investigations have revealed that observers can select target elements from within an array of distractors on the basis of their spatial location or simple features, such as color. It remains unclear, however, how stimuli that lie outside the current search array are represented in the visual system. To investigate this, we recorded continuous neural activity using EEG while participants searched a foveal array of colored targets and distractors, and ignored irrelevant objects in the periphery. Search targets were defined either by a unique feature within the array or by a conjunction of features. Objects outside the array could match the target or distractor color within the array, or otherwise possessed a baseline (neutral) color present only in the periphery. The search array and irrelevant peripheral objects flickered at unique rates and thus evoked distinct frequency-tagged neural oscillations. During conjunction but not unique-feature search, target-colored objects outside the array evoked enhanced activity relative to distractor-colored and neutral objects. The results suggest that feature-based selection applies to stimuli at ignored peripheral locations, but only when central targets compete with distractors within the array. Distractor-colored and neutral objects evoked equivalent oscillatory responses, suggesting that feature-based selection at ignored locations during visual search arises exclusively from enhancement rather than suppression of neural activity.

  4. Cuckoo Search Algorithm Based on Repeat-Cycle Asymptotic Self-Learning and Self-Evolving Disturbance for Function Optimization

    OpenAIRE

    Jie-sheng Wang; Shu-xia Li; Jiang-di Song

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve convergence velocity and optimization accuracy of the cuckoo search (CS) algorithm for solving the function optimization problems, a new improved cuckoo search algorithm based on the repeat-cycle asymptotic self-learning and self-evolving disturbance (RC-SSCS) is proposed. A disturbance operation is added into the algorithm by constructing a disturbance factor to make a more careful and thorough search near the bird’s nests location. In order to select a reasonable repeat-...

  5. Discovering Maximal Frequent Itemset using Association Array and Depth First Search Procedure with Effective Pruning Mechanisms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    K Sumathi; S Kannan; K Nagarajan

    2013-01-01

    .... In this paper, an efficient method for discovering the maximal frequent itemsets is proposed. This method employs Association array technique and depth first search technique to mine Maximal Frequent Itemset...

  6. Isolation Improvement of a Microstrip Patch Array Antenna for WCDMA Indoor Repeater Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongmin Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the isolation improvement techniques of a microstrip patch array antenna for the indoor wideband code division multiple access (WCDMA repeater applications. One approach is to construct the single-feed switchable feed network structure with an MS/NRI coupled-line coupler in order to reduce the mutual coupling level between antennas. Another approach is to insert the soft surface unit cells near the edges of the microstrip patch elements in order to reduce backward radiation waves. In order to further improve the isolation level, the server antenna and donor antenna are installedinorthogonal direction. The fabricated antenna exhibits a gain over 7 dBi and higher isolation level between server and donor antennas below −70 dB at WCDMA band.

  7. Repeating Pulsed Magnet System for Axion-like Particle Searches and Vacuum Birefringence Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Yamazaki, T; Namba, T; Asai, S; Kobayashi, T; Matsuo, A; Kindo, K; Nojiri, H

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a repeating pulsed magnet system which generates magnetic fields of about 10 T in a direction transverse to an incident beam over a length of 0.8 m with a repetition rate of 0.2 Hz. Its repetition rate is by two orders of magnitude higher than usual pulsed magnets. It is composed of four low resistance racetrack coils and a 30 kJ transportable capacitor bank as a power supply. The system aims at axion-like particle searches with a pulsed light source and vacuum birefringence measurements. We report on the details of the system and its performances.

  8. Repeating pulsed magnet system for axion-like particle searches and vacuum birefringence experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, T.; Inada, T.; Namba, T.; Asai, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Matsuo, A.; Kindo, K.; Nojiri, H.

    2016-10-01

    We have developed a repeating pulsed magnet system which generates magnetic fields of about 10 T in a direction transverse to an incident beam over a length of 0.8 m with a repetition rate of 0.2 Hz. Its repetition rate is by two orders of magnitude higher than usual pulsed magnets. It is composed of four low resistance racetrack coils and a 30 kJ transportable capacitor bank as a power supply. The system aims at axion-like particle searches with a pulsed light source and vacuum birefringence measurements. We report on the details of the system and its performances.

  9. Search for soft gamma repeaters in the SMM/HXRBS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouveliotou, C.; Norris, J. P.; Wood, K. S.; Cline, T. L.; Dennis, B. R.; Desal, U. D.; Orwig, L. E.

    1992-01-01

    The triggered fast memory of the hard X-ray burst spectrometer (HXRBS) on board the SMM is used to describe the results of a search for short transients resembling soft gamma repeater (SGR) bursts. Memory data for a total of about 4000 burst triggers, out of which only a very few could be considered as valid SGR candidate events, are analyzed. The search methodology is outlined, the HXRBS exposure and sensitivity to SGR bursts are calculated, and the criteria which constrain the number of candidate events are described. An upper limit is given for the SGR source number density. This limit, combined with results from other relevant observations and the assumption of a neutron star origin, are applied to obtain a constraint on SGR-active lifetimes.

  10. Novel cued search strategy based on information gain for phased array radar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Jianbin; Hu Weidong; Xiao Hui; Yu Wenxian

    2008-01-01

    A search strategy based on the maximal information gain principle is presented for the cued search of phased array radars. First, the method for the determination of the cued search region, arrangement of beam positions, and the calculation of the prior probability distribution of each beam position is discussed. And then,two search algorithms based on information gain are proposed using Shannon entropy and Kullback-Leibler entropy,respectively. With the proposed strategy, the information gain of each beam position is predicted before the radar detection, and the observation is made in the beam position with the maximal information gain. Compared with the conventional method of sequential search and confirm search, simulation results show that the proposed search strategy can distinctly improve the search performance and save radar time resources with the same given detection probability.

  11. Gold nanoisland arrays by repeated deposition and post-deposition annealing for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xin; Li, Hao

    2013-09-06

    Gold nanoisland arrays with well controlled growth were achieved by repeated sputtering deposition and post-deposition annealing processes. When each deposition was set at 5 nm (nominal thickness based on gold mass), the single deposition and annealing process (single process) yielded gold nanoisland arrays with an average diameter of ~16 nm based on top view scanning electron microscopy (SEM). When the deposition and annealing process was repeated two more times (triple process), top view SEM showed the nanoisland arrays grew to ~38 nm in average diameter. The surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) measurement indicated that triple processed nanoisland arrays led to the highest SERS enhancement, suggesting the necessity of pursuing nanoislands with larger sizes. The gold nanoisland arrays after the triple process were further sputtered with a final layer of gold thin film at different nominal thicknesses. An optimal nominal thickness for SERS was determined experimentally at ~40 nm, as a result of the competition between the positive and negative effects of the final gold deposition. Last, the uniformity of the optimized SERS substrate was investigated on a 5 cm x 5 cm platform. SERS measurements demonstrated a relative standard deviation of ~7% in terms of spectral variation over the entire substrate, rendering the process in the present study a promising fabrication approach for large-scale production of SERS substrates.

  12. Fabrication of an array-like freeform molding tool for UV-replication using a step and repeat process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunkel, J.; Wippermann, F.; Brückner, A.; Reimann, A.; Bräuer, A.

    2013-05-01

    Artificial compound eye cameras are a prominent approach of next generation wafer level cameras for consumer electronics due to their lower z-height compared to conventional single aperture objectives. In order to address low cost and high volume markets, their fabrication is based on a wafer level UV-replication process. The image quality of compound eye cameras can be increased significantly by the use of refractive freeform arrays (RFFA) instead of conventional microlens arrays. Therefore, we present the fabrication of a RFFA wafer level molding tool by a step and repeat process for the first time. The surface qualities of the fabricated structures were characterized with a white light interferometer.

  13. Pulsar Acceleration Searches on the GPU for the Square Kilometre Array

    CERN Document Server

    Dimoudi, Sofia

    2015-01-01

    Pulsar acceleration searches are methods for recovering signals from radio telescopes, that may otherwise be lost due to the effect of orbital acceleration in binary systems. The vast amount of data that will be produced by next generation instruments such as the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) necessitates real-time acceleration searches, which in turn requires the use of HPC platforms. We present our implementation of the Fourier Domain Acceleration Search (FDAS) algorithm on Graphics Processor Units (GPUs) in the context of the SKA, as part of the Astro-Accelerate real-time data processing library, currently under development at the Oxford e-Research Centre (OeRC), University of Oxford.

  14. Cuckoo Search Algorithm Based on Repeat-Cycle Asymptotic Self-Learning and Self-Evolving Disturbance for Function Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie-sheng; Li, Shu-xia; Song, Jiang-di

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve convergence velocity and optimization accuracy of the cuckoo search (CS) algorithm for solving the function optimization problems, a new improved cuckoo search algorithm based on the repeat-cycle asymptotic self-learning and self-evolving disturbance (RC-SSCS) is proposed. A disturbance operation is added into the algorithm by constructing a disturbance factor to make a more careful and thorough search near the bird's nests location. In order to select a reasonable repeat-cycled disturbance number, a further study on the choice of disturbance times is made. Finally, six typical test functions are adopted to carry out simulation experiments, meanwhile, compare algorithms of this paper with two typical swarm intelligence algorithms particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm and artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithm. The results show that the improved cuckoo search algorithm has better convergence velocity and optimization accuracy.

  15. Cuckoo Search Algorithm Based on Repeat-Cycle Asymptotic Self-Learning and Self-Evolving Disturbance for Function Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie-sheng Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve convergence velocity and optimization accuracy of the cuckoo search (CS algorithm for solving the function optimization problems, a new improved cuckoo search algorithm based on the repeat-cycle asymptotic self-learning and self-evolving disturbance (RC-SSCS is proposed. A disturbance operation is added into the algorithm by constructing a disturbance factor to make a more careful and thorough search near the bird’s nests location. In order to select a reasonable repeat-cycled disturbance number, a further study on the choice of disturbance times is made. Finally, six typical test functions are adopted to carry out simulation experiments, meanwhile, compare algorithms of this paper with two typical swarm intelligence algorithms particle swarm optimization (PSO algorithm and artificial bee colony (ABC algorithm. The results show that the improved cuckoo search algorithm has better convergence velocity and optimization accuracy.

  16. Pattern Nulling of Linear Antenna Arrays Using Backtracking Search Optimization Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerim Guney

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An evolutionary method based on backtracking search optimization algorithm (BSA is proposed for linear antenna array pattern synthesis with prescribed nulls at interference directions. Pattern nulling is obtained by controlling only the amplitude, position, and phase of the antenna array elements. BSA is an innovative metaheuristic technique based on an iterative process. Various numerical examples of linear array patterns with the prescribed single, multiple, and wide nulls are given to illustrate the performance and flexibility of BSA. The results obtained by BSA are compared with the results of the following seventeen algorithms: particle swarm optimization (PSO, genetic algorithm (GA, modified touring ant colony algorithm (MTACO, quadratic programming method (QPM, bacterial foraging algorithm (BFA, bees algorithm (BA, clonal selection algorithm (CLONALG, plant growth simulation algorithm (PGSA, tabu search algorithm (TSA, memetic algorithm (MA, nondominated sorting GA-2 (NSGA-2, multiobjective differential evolution (MODE, decomposition with differential evolution (MOEA/D-DE, comprehensive learning PSO (CLPSO, harmony search algorithm (HSA, seeker optimization algorithm (SOA, and mean variance mapping optimization (MVMO. The simulation results show that the linear antenna array synthesis using BSA provides low side-lobe levels and deep null levels.

  17. Nature-inspired Cuckoo Search Algorithm for Side Lobe Suppression in a Symmetric Linear Antenna Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. N. Abdul Rani

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we proposed a newly modified cuckoo search (MCS algorithm integrated with the Roulette wheel selection operator and the inertia weight controlling the search ability towards synthesizing symmetric linear array geometry with minimum side lobe level (SLL and/or nulls control. The basic cuckoo search (CS algorithm is primarily based on the natural obligate brood parasitic behavior of some cuckoo species in combination with the Levy flight behavior of some birds and fruit flies. The CS metaheuristic approach is straightforward and capable of solving effectively general N-dimensional, linear and nonlinear optimization problems. The array geometry synthesis is first formulated as an optimization problem with the goal of SLL suppression and/or null prescribed placement in certain directions, and then solved by the newly MCS algorithm for the optimum element or isotropic radiator locations in the azimuth-plane or xy-plane. The study also focuses on the four internal parameters of MCS algorithm specifically on their implicit effects in the array synthesis. The optimal inter-element spacing solutions obtained by the MCS-optimizer are validated through comparisons with the standard CS-optimizer and the conventional array within the uniform and the Dolph-Chebyshev envelope patterns using MATLABTM. Finally, we also compared the fine-tuned MCS algorithm with two popular evolutionary algorithm (EA techniques include particle swarm optimization (PSO and genetic algorithms (GA.

  18. Search for cosmic gamma rays with the Carpet-2 extensive air shower array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhappuev, D. D.; Petkov, V. B.; Kudzhaev, A. U.; Klimenko, N. F.; Lidvansky, A. S.; Troitsky, S. V.

    2016-06-01

    The present-day status of the problem of searching for primary cosmic gamma rays at energies above 100 TeV is discussed, as well as a proposal for a new experiment in this field. It is shown that an increase of the area of the muon detector of the Carpet-2 air shower array up to 410 square meters, to be realized in 2016, will make this array quite competitive with past and existing experiments, especially at modest energies. Some preliminary results of measurements made with smaller area of the muon detector are presented together with estimates of expected results to be obtained with a coming large-area muon detector.

  19. Search for cosmic gamma rays with the Carpet-2 extensive air shower array

    CERN Document Server

    Dzhappuev, D D; Kudzhaev, A U; Klimenko, N F; Lidvansky, A S; Troitsky, S V

    2015-01-01

    The present-day status of the problem of searching for primary cosmic gamma rays at energies above 100 TeV is discussed, as well as a proposal for a new experiment in this field. It is shown that an increase of the area of the muon detector of the Carpet-2 air shower array up to 410 square meters, to be realized in 2016, will make this array quite competitive with past and existing experiments, especially at modest energies. Some preliminary results of measurements made with smaller area of the muon detector are presented together with estimates of expected results to be obtained with the coming large-area muon detector.

  20. Search for the gravitational wave memory effect with the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Jingbo; Wang, Na

    2012-01-01

    Gravitational wave bursts produced by supermassive binary black hole mergers will leave a persistent imprint on the space-time metric. Such gravitational wave memory signals are detectable by pulsar timing arrays as a glitch event that would seem to occur simultaneously for all pulsars. In this paper, we describe an initial algorithm which can be used to search for gravitational wave memory signals. We apply this algorithm to the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array data set. No significant gravitational wave memory signal is founded in the data set.

  1. Cued search algorithm with uncertain detection performance for phased array radars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianbin Lu; Hui Xiao; Zemin Xi; Mingmin Zhang

    2013-01-01

    A cued search algorithm with uncertain detection per-formance is proposed for phased array radars. Firstly, a target search model based on the information gain criterion is presented with known detection performance, and the statistical characteris-tic of the detection probability is calculated by using the fluctuant model of the target radar cross section (RCS). Secondly, when the detection probability is completely unknown, its probability den-sity function is modeled with a beta distribution, and its posterior probability distribution with the radar observation is derived based on the Bayesian theory. Final y simulation results show that the cued search algorithm with a known RCS fluctuant model can achieve the best performance, and the algorithm with the detection probability modeled as a beta distribution is better than that with a random selected detection probability because the model parame-ters can be updated by the radar observation to approach to the real value of the detection probability.

  2. Including the pulsar-term in continuous gravitational-wave searches using pulsar timing arrays: a blessing and a curse

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, Stephen; Gair, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    We describe several new techniques which accelerate Bayesian searches for continuous gravitational-wave emission from supermassive black-hole binaries using pulsar timing arrays. These techniques mitigate the problematic increase of search-dimensionality with the size of the pulsar array which arises from having to include an extra parameter per pulsar as the array is expanded. This extra parameter corresponds to searching over the phase of the gravitational-wave as it propagates past each pulsar so that we can coherently include the pulsar-term in our search strategies. Our techniques make the analysis tractable with powerful evidence-evaluation packages like MultiNest. We find good agreement of our techniques with the parameter-estimation and Bayes factor evaluation performed with full signal templates, and conclude that these techniques make excellent first-cut tools for detection and characterisation of continuous gravitational-wave signals with pulsar timing arrays. Crucially, at low to moderate signal-t...

  3. Genetic rearrangements of variable di-residue (RVD)-containing repeat arrays in a baculoviral TALEN system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Cia-Hin; Zhu, Haibao; Tay, Johan Chin-Kang; Li, Zhendong; Tay, Felix Chang; Chen, Can; Tan, Wee-Kiat; Du, Shouhui; Sia, Vic-Ki; Phang, Rui-Zhe; Tang, Shin-Yi; Yang, Chiyun; Chi, Zhixia; Liang, Chieh-Ching; Ning, Er; Wang, Shu

    2014-01-01

    Virus-derived gene transfer vectors have been successfully employed to express the transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) in mammalian cells. Since the DNA-binding domains of TALENs consist of the variable di-residue (RVD)-containing tandem repeat modules and virus genome with repeated sequences is susceptible to genetic recombination, we investigated several factors that might affect TALEN cleavage efficiency of baculoviral vectors. Using a TALEN system designed to target the AAVS1 locus, we observed increased sequence instability of the TALE repeat arrays when a higher multiplicity of infection (MOI) of recombinant viruses was used to produce the baculoviral vectors. We also detected more deleterious mutations in the TALE DNA-binding domains when both left and right TALEN arms were placed into a single expression cassette as compared to the viruses containing one arm only. The DNA sequence changes in the domains included deletion, addition, substitution, and DNA strand exchange between the left and right TALEN arms. Based on these observations, we have developed a protocol using a low MOI to produce baculoviral vectors expressing TALEN left and right arms separately. Cotransduction of the viruses produced by this optimal protocol provided an improved TALEN cleavage efficiency and enabled effective site-specific transgene integration in human cells.

  4. Pulsar timing array based search for supermassive black hole binaries in the SKA era

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    The advent of next generation radio telescope facilities, such as the Square Kilometer Array (SKA), will usher in an era where a Pulsar Timing Array (PTA) based search for gravitational waves (GWs) will be able to use hundreds of well timed millisecond pulsars rather than the few dozens in existing PTAs. A realistic assessment of the performance of such an extremely large PTA must take into account the data analysis challenge posed by an exponential increase in the parameter space volume due to the large number of so-called pulsar phase parameters. We address this problem and present such an assessment for isolated supermassive black hole binary (SMBHB) searches using a SKA era PTA containing $10^3$ pulsars. We find that an all-sky search will be able to confidently detect non-evolving sources with redshifted chirp mass of $10^{10}$ $M_\\odot$ out to a redshift of about $28$. The detection of GW signals from optically identified SMBHB candidates similar to PSO J334+01 is assured. If no SMBHB detections occur, ...

  5. Searching for gravitational wave memory bursts with the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, J B; Coles, W; Shannon, R M; Zhu, X J; Madison, D R; Kerr, M; Ravi, V; Keith, M J; Manchester, R N; Levin, Y; Bailes, M; Bhat, N D R; Burke-Spolaor, S; Dai, S; Oslowski, S; van Straten, W; Toomey, L; Wang, N; Wen, L

    2014-01-01

    Anisotropic bursts of gravitational radiation produced by events such as super-massive black hole mergers leave permanent imprints on space. Such gravitational wave "memory" (GWM) signals are, in principle, detectable through pulsar timing as sudden changes in the apparent pulse frequency of a pulsar. If an array of pulsars is monitored as a GWM signal passes over the Earth, the pulsars would simultaneously appear to change pulse frequency by an amount that varies with their sky position in a quadrupolar fashion. Here we describe a search algorithm for such events and apply the algorithm to approximately six years of data from the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array. We find no GWM events and set an upper bound on the rate for events which could have been detected. We show, using simple models of black hole coalescence rates, that this non-detection is not unexpected.

  6. Real-time volumetric visualization of high-resolution array and toroidal volume search sonar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Robert A.

    1998-09-01

    The Advanced Volume Visualization Display (AVVD) research program is a joint research program between the Fraunhofer Center for Research in Computer Graphics, Inc. and Innovative Research and Development Corp. It is dedicated the application of the human visual system to real-time visualization of high- resolution volumetric sensor data sets. The AVVD program has successfully demonstrated its application to undersea imaging using data from the Naval Undersea Warfare Center -- Division Newport's High Resolution Array (HRA), and from the Naval Surface Warfare Center -- Coastal System Stations's Toroidal Volume Search Sonar (TVSS).

  7. Search for annihilating Dark Matter towards dwarf galaxies with the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morselli, Aldo; Rodríguez, Gonzalo

    2017-03-01

    The standard model of cosmology indicates that approximately 27% of the energy density of the Universe is in the form of dark matter. The nature of dark matter is an open question in modern physics. Indirect dark matter searches with imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes are playing a crucial role in constraining the nature of the dark matter particle through the study of their potential annihilation that could produce very high energy gamma rays from different astrophysical structures. The Cherenkov Telescope Array will provide an unprecedented sensitivity over a range of dark matter mass from 100 GeV to 30 TeV. In this contribution we review the status of indirect dark matter searches at dwarf spheroidal galaxies.

  8. The Interplay of Episodic and Semantic Memory in Guiding Repeated Search in Scenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Melissa L.-H.; Wolfe, Jeremy M.

    2013-01-01

    It seems intuitive to think that previous exposure or interaction with an environment should make it easier to search through it and, no doubt, this is true in many real-world situations. However, in a recent study, we demonstrated that previous exposure to a scene does not necessarily speed search within that scene. For instance, when observers…

  9. Two-Stage Chaos Optimization Search Application in Maximum Power Point Tracking of PV Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihua Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to deliver the maximum available power to the load under the condition of varying solar irradiation and environment temperature, maximum power point tracking (MPPT technologies have been used widely in PV systems. Among all the MPPT schemes, the chaos method is one of the hot topics in recent years. In this paper, a novel two-stage chaos optimization method is presented which can make search faster and more effective. In the process of proposed chaos search, the improved logistic mapping with the better ergodic is used as the first carrier process. After finding the current optimal solution in a certain guarantee, the power function carrier as the secondary carrier process is used to reduce the search space of optimized variables and eventually find the maximum power point. Comparing with the traditional chaos search method, the proposed method can track the change quickly and accurately and also has better optimization results. The proposed method provides a new efficient way to track the maximum power point of PV array.

  10. Copy number analysis of the low-copy repeats at the primate NPHP1 locus by array comparative genomic hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Bo; Liu, Pengfei; Rogers, Jeffrey; Lupski, James R

    2016-06-01

    Array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) has been widely used to detect copy number variants (CNVs) in both research and clinical settings. A customizable aCGH platform may greatly facilitate copy number analyses in genomic regions with higher-order complexity, such as low-copy repeats (LCRs). Here we present the aCGH analyses focusing on the 45 kb LCRs [1] at the NPHP1 region with diverse copy numbers in humans. Also, the interspecies aCGH analysis comparing human and nonhuman primates revealed dynamic copy number transitions of the human 45 kb LCR orthologues during primate evolution and therefore shed light on the origin of complexity at this locus. The original aCGH data are available at GEO under GSE73962.

  11. An Opportunistic Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) with the Murchison Widefield Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tingay, S. J.; Tremblay, C.; Walsh, A.; Urquhart, R.

    2016-08-01

    A spectral line image cube generated from 115 minutes of MWA data that covers a field of view of 400 sq, deg. around the Galactic Center is used to perform the first Search for ExtraTerrestrial Intelligence (SETI) with the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA). Our work constitutes the first modern SETI experiment at low radio frequencies, here between 103 and 133 MHz, paving the way for large-scale searches with the MWA and, in the future, the low-frequency Square Kilometre Array. Limits of a few hundred mJy beam-1 for narrowband emission (10 kHz) are derived from our data, across our 400 sq. deg. field of view. Within this field, 45 exoplanets in 38 planetary systems are known. We extract spectra at the locations of these systems from our image cube to place limits on the presence of narrow line emission from these systems. We then derive minimum isotropic transmitter powers for these exoplanets; a small handful of the closest objects (10 s of pc) yield our best limits of order 1014 W (Equivalent Isotropic Radiated Power). These limits lie above the highest power directional transmitters near these frequencies currently operational on Earth. A SETI experiment with the MWA covering the full accessible sky and its full frequency range would require approximately one month of observing time. The MWA frequency range, its southern hemisphere location on an extraordinarily radio quiet site, its very large field of view, and its high sensitivity make it a unique facility for SETI.

  12. An Opportunistic Search for ExtraTerrestrial Intelligence (SETI) with the Murchison Widefield Array

    CERN Document Server

    Tingay, S J; Walsh, A; Urquhart, R

    2016-01-01

    A spectral line image cube generated from 115 minutes of MWA data that covers a field of view of 400 sq. deg. around the Galactic Centre is used to perform the first Search for ExtraTerrestrial Intelligence (SETI) with the Murchison Widefield Array. Our work constitutes the first modern SETI experiment at low radio frequencies, here between 103 and 133 MHz, paving the way for large-scale searches with the MWA and, in the future, the low frequency Square Kilometre Array. Limits of a few hundred mJy/beam for narrow band emission (10 kHz) are derived from our data, across our 400 sq. deg. field of view. Within this field, 45 exoplanets in 38 planetary systems are known. We extract spectra at the locations of these systems from our image cube, to place limits on the presence of narrow line emission from these systems. We then derive minimum isotropic transmitter powers for these exoplanets; a small handful of the closest objects (10s of pc) yield our best limits of order $10^{14}$ W (Equivalent Isotropic Radiated...

  13. Hybridization of Strength Pareto Multiobjective Optimization with Modified Cuckoo Search Algorithm for Rectangular Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Rani, Khairul Najmy; Abdulmalek, Mohamedfareq; A. Rahim, Hasliza; Siew Chin, Neoh; Abd Wahab, Alawiyah

    2017-04-01

    This research proposes the various versions of modified cuckoo search (MCS) metaheuristic algorithm deploying the strength Pareto evolutionary algorithm (SPEA) multiobjective (MO) optimization technique in rectangular array geometry synthesis. Precisely, the MCS algorithm is proposed by incorporating the Roulette wheel selection operator to choose the initial host nests (individuals) that give better results, adaptive inertia weight to control the positions exploration of the potential best host nests (solutions), and dynamic discovery rate to manage the fraction probability of finding the best host nests in 3-dimensional search space. In addition, the MCS algorithm is hybridized with the particle swarm optimization (PSO) and hill climbing (HC) stochastic techniques along with the standard strength Pareto evolutionary algorithm (SPEA) forming the MCSPSOSPEA and MCSHCSPEA, respectively. All the proposed MCS-based algorithms are examined to perform MO optimization on Zitzler-Deb-Thiele’s (ZDT’s) test functions. Pareto optimum trade-offs are done to generate a set of three non-dominated solutions, which are locations, excitation amplitudes, and excitation phases of array elements, respectively. Overall, simulations demonstrates that the proposed MCSPSOSPEA outperforms other compatible competitors, in gaining a high antenna directivity, small half-power beamwidth (HPBW), low average side lobe level (SLL) suppression, and/or significant predefined nulls mitigation, simultaneously.

  14. Putamen Activation Represents an Intrinsic Positive Prediction Error Signal for Visual Search in Repeated Configurations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Susanne; Pollmann, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    We investigated fMRI responses to visual search targets appearing at locations that were predicted by the search context. Based on previous work in visual category learning we expected an intrinsic reward prediction error signal in the putamen whenever the target appeared at a location that was predicted with some degree of uncertainty. Comparing target appearance at locations predicted with 50% probability to either locations predicted with 100% probability or unpredicted locations, increased activation was observed in left posterior putamen and adjacent left posterior insula. Thus, our hypothesis of an intrinsic prediction error-like signal was confirmed. This extends the observation of intrinsic prediction error-like signals, driven by intrinsic rather than extrinsic reward, to memory-driven visual search.

  15. Putamen Activation Represents an Intrinsic Positive Prediction Error Signal for Visual Search in Repeated Configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Susanne; Pollmann, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    We investigated fMRI responses to visual search targets appearing at locations that were predicted by the search context. Based on previous work in visual category learning we expected an intrinsic reward prediction error signal in the putamen whenever the target appeared at a location that was predicted with some degree of uncertainty. Comparing target appearance at locations predicted with 50% probability to either locations predicted with 100% probability or unpredicted locations, increased activation was observed in left posterior putamen and adjacent left posterior insula. Thus, our hypothesis of an intrinsic prediction error-like signal was confirmed. This extends the observation of intrinsic prediction error-like signals, driven by intrinsic rather than extrinsic reward, to memory-driven visual search. PMID:27867436

  16. Non-RVD mutations that enhance the dynamics of the TAL repeat array along the superhelical axis improve TALEN genome editing efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tochio, Naoya; Umehara, Kohei; Uewaki, Jun-ichi; Flechsig, Holger; Kondo, Masaharu; Dewa, Takehisa; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Saitoh, Takashi; Togashi, Yuichi; Tate, Shin-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) nuclease (TALEN) is widely used as a tool in genome editing. The DNA binding part of TALEN consists of a tandem array of TAL-repeats that form a right-handed superhelix. Each TAL-repeat recognises a specific base by the repeat variable diresidue (RVD) at positions 12 and 13. TALEN comprising the TAL-repeats with periodic mutations to residues at positions 4 and 32 (non-RVD sites) in each repeat (VT-TALE) exhibits increased efficacy in genome editing compared with a counterpart without the mutations (CT-TALE). The molecular basis for the elevated efficacy is unknown. In this report, comparison of the physicochemical properties between CT- and VT-TALEs revealed that VT-TALE has a larger amplitude motion along the superhelical axis (superhelical motion) compared with CT-TALE. The greater superhelical motion in VT-TALE enabled more TAL-repeats to engage in the target sequence recognition compared with CT-TALE. The extended sequence recognition by the TAL-repeats improves site specificity with limiting the spatial distribution of FokI domains to facilitate their dimerization at the desired site. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed that the non-RVD mutations alter inter-repeat hydrogen bonding to amplify the superhelical motion of VT-TALE. The TALEN activity is associated with the inter-repeat hydrogen bonding among the TAL repeats. PMID:27883072

  17. HD CAGnome: a search tool for huntingtin CAG repeat length-correlated genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina I Galkina

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The length of the huntingtin (HTT CAG repeat is strongly correlated with both age at onset of Huntington's disease (HD symptoms and age at death of HD patients. Dichotomous analysis comparing HD to controls is widely used to study the effects of HTT CAG repeat expansion. However, a potentially more powerful approach is a continuous analysis strategy that takes advantage of all of the different CAG lengths, to capture effects that are expected to be critical to HD pathogenesis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used continuous and dichotomous approaches to analyze microarray gene expression data from 107 human control and HD lymphoblastoid cell lines. Of all probes found to be significant in a continuous analysis by CAG length, only 21.4% were so identified by a dichotomous comparison of HD versus controls. Moreover, of probes significant by dichotomous analysis, only 33.2% were also significant in the continuous analysis. Simulations revealed that the dichotomous approach would require substantially more than 107 samples to either detect 80% of the CAG-length correlated changes revealed by continuous analysis or to reduce the rate of significant differences that are not CAG length-correlated to 20% (n = 133 or n = 206, respectively. Given the superior power of the continuous approach, we calculated the correlation structure between HTT CAG repeat lengths and gene expression levels and created a freely available searchable website, "HD CAGnome," that allows users to examine continuous relationships between HTT CAG and expression levels of ∼20,000 human genes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results reveal limitations of dichotomous approaches compared to the power of continuous analysis to study a disease where human genotype-phenotype relationships strongly support a role for a continuum of CAG length-dependent changes. The compendium of HTT CAG length-gene expression level relationships found at the HD CAGnome now provides

  18. A First Search for Cosmogenic Neutrinos with the ARIANNA Hexagonal Radio Array

    CERN Document Server

    Barwick, S W; Besson, D Z; Binder, G; Binns, W R; Boersma, D; Bose, R G; Braun, D L; Buckley, J H; Bugaev, V; Buitink, S; Dookayka, K; Dowkontt, P F; Duffin, T; Euler, S; Gerhardt, L; Gustafsson, L; Hallgren, A; Hanson, J C; Israel, M H; Kiryluk, J; Klein, S; Kleinfelder, S; Niederhausen, H; Olevitch, M A; Persichelli, C; Ratzlaff, K; Rauch, B F; Reed, C; Roumi, M; Samanta, A; Simburger, G E; Stezelberger, T; Tatar, J; Uggerhoj, U; Walker, J; Young, R

    2014-01-01

    The ARIANNA experiment seeks to observe the diffuse flux of neutrinos in the 10^8 - 10^10 GeV energy range using a grid of radio detectors at the surface of the Ross Ice Shelf of Antarctica. The detector measures the coherent Cherenkov radiation produced at radio frequencies, from about 100 MHz to 1 GHz, by charged particle showers generated by neutrino interactions in the ice. The ARIANNA Hexagonal Radio Array (HRA) is being constructed as a prototype for the full array. During the 2013-14 austral summer, three HRA stations collected radio data which was wirelessly transmitted off site in nearly real-time. The performance of these stations is described and a simple analysis to search for neutrino signals is presented. The analysis employs a set of three cuts that reject background triggers while preserving 90% of simulated cosmogenic neutrino triggers. No neutrino candidates are found in the data and a model-independent 90% confidence level Neyman upper limit is placed on the all flavor neutrino+antineutrino...

  19. Discovery of gigantic molecular nanostructures using a flow reaction array as a search engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Hong-Ying; de la Oliva, Andreu Ruiz; Miras, Haralampos N; Long, De-Liang; McBurney, Roy T; Cronin, Leroy

    2014-04-28

    The discovery of gigantic molecular nanostructures like coordination and polyoxometalate clusters is extremely time-consuming since a vast combinatorial space needs to be searched, and even a systematic and exhaustive exploration of the available synthetic parameters relies on a great deal of serendipity. Here we present a synthetic methodology that combines a flow reaction array and algorithmic control to give a chemical 'real-space' search engine leading to the discovery and isolation of a range of new molecular nanoclusters based on [Mo(2)O(2)S(2)](2+)-based building blocks with either fourfold (C4) or fivefold (C5) symmetry templates and linkers. This engine leads us to isolate six new nanoscale cluster compounds: 1, {Mo(10)(C5)}; 2, {Mo(14)(C4)4(C5)2}; 3, {Mo(60)(C4)10}; 4, {Mo(48)(C4)6}; 5, {Mo(34)(C4)4}; 6, {Mo(18)(C4)9}; in only 200 automated experiments from a parameter space spanning ~5 million possible combinations.

  20. FAILURE CORRECTION OF LINEAR ARRAY ANTENNA WITH MULTIPLE NULL PLACEMENT USING CUCKOO SEARCH ALGORITHM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Muralidaran

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of evolutionary algorithms enhanced its scope of getting its existence in almost every complex optimization problems. In this paper, cuckoo search algorithm, an algorithm based on the brood parasite behavior along with Levy weights has been proposed for the radiation pattern correction of a linear array of isotropic antennas with uniform spacing when failed with more than one antenna element. Even though deterioration produced by the failure of antenna elements results in various undesirable effects, consideration in this paper is given to the correction of side lobe level and null placement at two places. Various articles in the past have already shown that the idea to correct the radiation pattern is to alter the amplitude weights of the remaining unfailed elements, instead of replacing the faulty elements. This approach is made use of modifying the current excitations of unfailed elements using cuckoo search algorithm such that the resulting radiation pattern is similar to the unfailed original pattern in terms of side lobe level and null placement at two places. Examples shown in this paper demonstrate the effectiveness of this algorithm in achieving the desired objectives.

  1. Discovery of gigantic molecular nanostructures using a flow reaction array as a search engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Hong-Ying; de La Oliva, Andreu Ruiz; Miras, Haralampos N.; Long, De-Liang; McBurney, Roy T.; Cronin, Leroy

    2014-04-01

    The discovery of gigantic molecular nanostructures like coordination and polyoxometalate clusters is extremely time-consuming since a vast combinatorial space needs to be searched, and even a systematic and exhaustive exploration of the available synthetic parameters relies on a great deal of serendipity. Here we present a synthetic methodology that combines a flow reaction array and algorithmic control to give a chemical ‘real-space’ search engine leading to the discovery and isolation of a range of new molecular nanoclusters based on [Mo2O2S2]2+-based building blocks with either fourfold (C4) or fivefold (C5) symmetry templates and linkers. This engine leads us to isolate six new nanoscale cluster compounds: 1, {Mo10(C5)}; 2, {Mo14(C4)4(C5)2}; 3, {Mo60(C4)10}; 4, {Mo48(C4)6}; 5, {Mo34(C4)4}; 6, {Mo18(C4)9}; in only 200 automated experiments from a parameter space spanning ~5 million possible combinations.

  2. Searching for Survivors through Random Human-Body Movement Outdoors by Continuous-Wave Radar Array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuantao; Chen, Fuming; Qi, Fugui; Liu, Miao; Li, Zhao; Liang, Fulai; Jing, Xijing; Lu, Guohua; Wang, Jianqi

    2016-01-01

    It is a major challenge to search for survivors after chemical or nuclear leakage or explosions. At present, biological radar can be used to achieve this goal by detecting the survivor's respiration signal. However, owing to the random posture of an injured person at a rescue site, the radar wave may directly irradiate the person's head or feet, in which it is difficult to detect the respiration signal. This paper describes a multichannel-based antenna array technology, which forms an omnidirectional detection system via 24-GHz Doppler biological radar, to address the random positioning relative to the antenna of an object to be detected. Furthermore, since the survivors often have random body movement such as struggling and twitching, the slight movements of the body caused by breathing are obscured by these movements. Therefore, a method is proposed to identify random human-body movement by utilizing multichannel information to calculate the background variance of the environment in combination with a constant-false-alarm-rate detector. The conducted outdoor experiments indicate that the system can realize the omnidirectional detection of random human-body movement and distinguish body movement from environmental interference such as movement of leaves and grass. The methods proposed in this paper will be a promising way to search for survivors outdoors.

  3. Searching for Dark Matter signatures in dwarf spheroidal galaxies with the ASTRI mini-array in the framework of Cherenkov Telescope Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giammaria, P.; Lombardi, S.; Antonelli, L. A.; Brocato, E.; Bigongiari, C.; Di Pierro, F.; Stamerra, A.; ASTRI Collaboration; CTA Consortium, the

    2016-07-01

    The nature of Dark Matter (DM) is an open issue of modern physics. Cosmological considerations and observational evidences indicate a behaviour beyond the Standard Model for feasible DM particle candidates. Non-baryonic DM is compatible with cold and weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) expected to have a mass in the range between ∼10 GeV and ∼100 TeV. Indirect DM searches with imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes may play a crucial role in constraining the nature of the DM particle(s) through the study of their annihilation in very high energy (VHE) gamma rays from promising targets, such as the dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies (dSphs) of the Milky Way. Here, we focus on indirect DM searches in dSphs, presenting the preliminary prospects of this research beyond the TeV mass region achievable with the ASTRI mini-array, proposed to be installed at the Cherenkov Telescope Array southern site.

  4. Searching for Grendel: origin and global spread of the C9ORF72 repeat expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliner, Hannah A; Mann, David M; Traynor, Bryan J

    2014-03-01

    Recent advances are uncovering more and more of the genetic architecture underlying amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a fatal neurodegenerative condition that affects ~6,000 Americans annually. Chief among these was the discovery that a large repeat expansion in the C9ORF72 gene is responsible for an unprecedented portion of familial and sporadic ALS cases. Much has been published on how this expansion disrupts neuronal homeostasis and how gene-based therapy might be an effective treatment in the future. Nevertheless, it is instructive to look back at the origins of this important mutation. In this opinion piece, we attempt to answer three key questions concerning C9ORF72. First, how many times did the expansion occur throughout human history? Second, how old is the expansion? And finally and perhaps most importantly, how did the expansion spread throughout Europe? We speculate that the expansion occurred only once in the past, that this event took place in the Finnish population and that the Vikings and their descendants were responsible for disseminating this mutation throughout the rest of the continent.

  5. Accuracy of 3 Tesla pelvic phased-array multiparametric MRI in diagnosing prostate cancer at repeat biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Pepe

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Multiparametric pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI accuracy in prostate cancer (PCa diagnosis was evaluated. Materials and Methods. From June 2011 to December 2013, 168 patients (median 65 years with negative digital rectal examination underwent repeat transperineal saturation biopsy (SPBx; median 28 cores for persistently high or increasing PSA values, PSA >10 ng/ml or PSA values between 4.1-10 o r 2.6-4 ng/ml with free/total PSA < 25% and < 20%, respectively. All patients underwent mpMRI using a 3.0 Tesla scanner equipped with surface 16 channels phased-array coil and lesions suspicious for PCa were submitted to additional targeted biopsies. Results. A T1c PCa was found in 66 (39% cases; SPBx and mpMRI-suspicious targeted biopsy diagnosed 60 (91% and 52 (78.8% cancers missing 6 (all of the anterior zone and 14 cancers (12 and 2 of the lateral margins and anterior zone, respectively; in detail, mpMRI missed 12 (18.1% PCa charaterized by microfocal (1 positive core with greatest percentage of cancer and Gleason score equal to 5% and 6, respectively disease at risk for insignificant cancer. The diameter of the suspicious mpMRI lesion was directly correlated to the diagnosis of PCa with poor Gleason score (p < 0.05; detection rate of cancer for each suspicious mpMRI core was 35.3%. Diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value of mpMRI in diagnosing PCa was 75.7%, 82.5%, 71.8%, 78.9%, 87.9%, respectively. Conclusion. Multiparametric pMRI improved SPBx accuracy in diagnosing significant anterior PCa; the diameter of mpMRI suspicious lesion resulted significantly predictive of aggressive cancers.

  6. A Deep Search for Prompt Radio Emission from Thermonuclear Supernovae with the Very Large Array

    CERN Document Server

    Chomiuk, Laura; Chevalier, Roger A; Bruzewski, Seth; Foley, Ryan J; Parrent, Jerod; Strader, Jay; Badenes, Carles; Fransson, Claes; Kamble, Atish; Margutti, Raffaella; Rupen, Michael P; Simon, Joshua D

    2015-01-01

    Searches for circumstellar material around Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are one of the most powerful tests of the nature of SN Ia progenitors, and radio observations provide a particularly sensitive probe of this material. Here we report radio observations for SNe Ia and their lower-luminosity thermonuclear cousins. We present the largest, most sensitive, and spectroscopically diverse study of prompt (delta t <~ 1 yr) radio observations of 85 thermonuclear SNe, including 25 obtained by our team with the unprecedented depth of the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. With these observations, SN 2012cg joins SN 2011fe and SN 2014J as a SN Ia with remarkably deep radio limits and excellent temporal coverage (six epochs, spanning 5--216 days after explosion, yielding Mdot/v_w <~ 5 x 10^-9 M_sun/yr / (100 km/s), assuming epsilon_B = 0.1 and epsilon_e = 0.1). All observations yield non-detections, placing strong constraints on the presence of circumstellar material. We present analytical models for the temporal an...

  7. A sensitive search for predicted methanol maser transitions with the Australia Telescope Compact Array

    CERN Document Server

    Chipman, Antony; Sobolev, Andrej; Cragg, Dinah

    2016-01-01

    We have used the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) to search for a number of centimetre wavelength methanol transitions which are predicted to show weak maser emission towards star formation regions. Sensitive, high spatial and spectral resolution observations towards four high-mass star formation regions which show emission in a large number of class II methanol maser transitions did not result in any detections. From these observations we are able to place an upper limit of <~1300K on the brightness temperature of any emission from the $3_1$A$^+$-$3_1$A$^-$, $17_{-2}$-$18_{-3}$E ($v_t=1$), $12_4$-$13_3$A$^-$, $12_4$-$13_3$A$^+$ and $4_1$A$^+$-$4_1$A$^-$ transitions of methanol in these sources on angular scales of 2 arcseconds. This upper limit is consistent with current models for class II methanol masers in high-mass star formation regions and better constraints than those provided here will likely require observations with next-generation radio telescopes.

  8. Search for high-frequency periodicities in time-tagged event data from gamma ray bursts and soft gamma repeaters

    CERN Document Server

    Kruger, A T; Wasserman, I M; Kruger, Adam T.; Loredo, Thomas J.; Wasserman, Ira

    2002-01-01

    We analyze the Time-Tagged Event (TTE) data from observations of gamma ray bursts (GRBs) and soft gamma repeaters (SGRs) by the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE). These data provide the best available time resolution for GRBs and SGRs. We have performed an extensive search for weak periodic signals in the frequency range 400 Hz to 2500 Hz using the burst records for 2203 GRBs and 152 SGR flares. The study employs the Rayleigh power as a test statistic to evaluate the evidence for periodic emissions. We find no evidence of periodic emissions from these events at these frequencies. In all but a very few cases the maximum power values obtained are consistent with what would be expected by chance from a non-periodic signal. In those few instances where there is marginal evidence for periodicity there are problems with the data that cast doubt on the reality of the signal. For classical GRBs, the largest Rayleigh power occurs in bursts whose TTE data appear to be corrupted. For SGRs, our largest Raylei...

  9. A Search for Radio Gravitational Lenses, Using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the Very Large Array

    CERN Document Server

    Boyce, E R; Bolton, A S; Hewitt, J N; Burles, S; Boyce, Edward R.; Bowman, Judd D.; Bolton, Adam S.; Hewitt, Jacqueline N.; Burles, Scott

    2006-01-01

    We report on a novel search for radio gravitational lenses. Using the Very Large Array, we imaged ten candidates with both dual redshifts in Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectra and 1.4 GHz radio flux >2 mJy in the FIRST survey. The VLA maps show that in each case the radio emission is associated with the foreground galaxy rather than being lensed emission from the background galaxy, although at least four of our targets are strong lenses at optical wavelengths. These SDSS dual-redshift systems do not have lensed radio emission at the sensitivity of current radio surveys.

  10. Repeatable, accurate, and high speed multi-level programming of memristor 1T1R arrays for power efficient analog computing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merced-Grafals, Emmanuelle J; Dávila, Noraica; Ge, Ning; Williams, R Stanley; Strachan, John Paul

    2016-09-09

    Beyond use as high density non-volatile memories, memristors have potential as synaptic components of neuromorphic systems. We investigated the suitability of tantalum oxide (TaOx) transistor-memristor (1T1R) arrays for such applications, particularly the ability to accurately, repeatedly, and rapidly reach arbitrary conductance states. Programming is performed by applying an adaptive pulsed algorithm that utilizes the transistor gate voltage to control the SET switching operation and increase programming speed of the 1T1R cells. We show the capability of programming 64 conductance levels with programming speed and programming error. The algorithm is also utilized to program 16 conductance levels on a population of cells in the 1T1R array showing robustness to cell-to-cell variability. In general, the proposed algorithm results in approximately 10× improvement in programming speed over standard algorithms that do not use the transistor gate to control memristor switching. In addition, after only two programming pulses (an initialization pulse followed by a programming pulse), the resulting conductance values are within 12% of the target values in all cases. Finally, endurance of more than 10(6) cycles is shown through open-loop (single pulses) programming across multiple conductance levels using the optimized gate voltage of the transistor. These results are relevant for applications that require high speed, accurate, and repeatable programming of the cells such as in neural networks and analog data processing.

  11. Repeatable, accurate, and high speed multi-level programming of memristor 1T1R arrays for power efficient analog computing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merced-Grafals, Emmanuelle J.; Dávila, Noraica; Ge, Ning; Williams, R. Stanley; Strachan, John Paul

    2016-09-01

    Beyond use as high density non-volatile memories, memristors have potential as synaptic components of neuromorphic systems. We investigated the suitability of tantalum oxide (TaOx) transistor-memristor (1T1R) arrays for such applications, particularly the ability to accurately, repeatedly, and rapidly reach arbitrary conductance states. Programming is performed by applying an adaptive pulsed algorithm that utilizes the transistor gate voltage to control the SET switching operation and increase programming speed of the 1T1R cells. We show the capability of programming 64 conductance levels with cells in the 1T1R array showing robustness to cell-to-cell variability. In general, the proposed algorithm results in approximately 10× improvement in programming speed over standard algorithms that do not use the transistor gate to control memristor switching. In addition, after only two programming pulses (an initialization pulse followed by a programming pulse), the resulting conductance values are within 12% of the target values in all cases. Finally, endurance of more than 106 cycles is shown through open-loop (single pulses) programming across multiple conductance levels using the optimized gate voltage of the transistor. These results are relevant for applications that require high speed, accurate, and repeatable programming of the cells such as in neural networks and analog data processing.

  12. Time-Lapse Seismic Monitoring using a Sparse Seismic Array: Pre-Injection Assessment of Repeatability at the Aquistore CO2 Storage Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, L. A.; White, D.; Roberts, B.

    2013-12-01

    Aquistore is a deep saline geological storage project. An estimated 2000 tonnes/day of CO2 will be captured and injected at approximately 3200m - 3350m into a sandstone reservoir. CO2 injection is expected to create a measurable change in the seismic properties within the reservoir. Our goal is to utilize a sparse seismic array to improve cost effectiveness and time-lapse SNR by improved repeatability. A permanent surface seismic array has been deployed at the Aquistore CO2 storage site comprising 630 vertical-component geophones deployed at a depth of 20m over a 2.5 x 2.5 km grid. Receiver lines are spaced at intervals of 144m, with an in-line geophone spacing of 72m and with geophones along adjacent lines staggered by 32m in the in-line direction. To assess the repeatability of seismic data acquired using this sparse seismic array, two 3D seismic surveys were conducted prior to the start of CO2 injection. The baseline survey was acquired in March, 2012 with a subsequent monitor survey in April, 2013. Sources consisted of 1kg dynamite shots detonated at 15m depth over a 3 x 3 km grid, with 12 shot lines spaced at 288m and 144m in-line spacing. The permanent receiver array provided for 100% collocated receiver positions, while 90% of the shot points of the repeat survey were placed within 2m of the shots of the baseline survey. These elements of the survey design serve to reduce the non-repeatability that may be related to acquisition effects and seasonal variations. Before processing, the datasets were matched so that the number of common shots and receivers was 256 and 599 respectively which results in a nominal fold of 40. Our preliminary approach of 3D time-lapse processing was to process each vintage separately while applying identical flows with the same parameters (e.g. mutes and time gates) to the repeat dataset. The normalized root-mean-square (nRMS) of the difference of the two data sets was used as the metric for repeatability in assessing the similarity

  13. An all-sky search for continuous gravitational waves in the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array data set

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, X -J; Wen, L; Coles, W A; Wang, J -B; Shannon, R M; Manchester, R N; Bailes, M; Bhat, N D R; Burke-Spolaor, S; Dai, S; Keith, M J; Kerr, M; Levin, Y; Madison, D R; Osłowski, S; Ravi, V; Toomey, L; van Straten, W

    2014-01-01

    We present results of an all-sky search in the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array (PPTA) Data Release 1 data set for continuous gravitational waves (GWs) in the frequency range from $5\\times 10^{-9}$ to $2\\times 10^{-7}$ Hz. Such signals could be produced by individual supermassive binary black hole systems in the early stage of coalescence. We phase up the pulsar timing array data set to form, for each position on the sky, two data streams that correspond to the two GW polarizations and then carry out an optimal search for GW signals on these data streams. Since no statistically significant GWs were detected, we place upper limits on the intrinsic GW strain amplitude $h_0$ for a range of GW frequencies. For example, at $10^{-8}$ Hz our analysis has excluded with $95\\%$ confidence the presence of signals with $h_0\\geqslant 1.7\\times 10^{-14}$. Our new limits are about a factor of four more stringent than those of Yardley et al. (2010) based on an earlier PPTA data set and a factor of two better than those reported in...

  14. Searching for giga-Jansky fast radio bursts from the Milky Way with a global array of low-cost radio receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maoz, Dan; Loeb, Abraham

    2017-06-01

    If fast radio bursts (FRBs) originate from galaxies at cosmological distances, then their all-sky rate implies that the Milky Way may host an FRB every 30-1500 yr, on average. If many FRBs persistently repeat for decades or more, a local giant FRB could be active now, with 1 GHz radio pulses of flux ˜3 × 1010 Jy, comparable with the fluxes and frequencies detectable by cellular communication devices (cell phones, Wi-Fi and GPS). We propose searching for Galactic FRBs using a global array of low-cost radio receivers. One possibility is the ˜1 GHz communication channel in cellular phones, through a Citizens-Science downloadable application. Participating phones would continuously listen for and record candidate FRBs and would periodically upload information to a central data-processing website which will identify the signature of a real, globe-encompassing, FRB from an astronomical distance. Triangulation of the GPS-based pulse arrival times reported from different Earth locations will provide the FRB sky position, potentially to arcsecond accuracy. Pulse arrival times versus frequency, from reports from phones operating at diverse frequencies, or from fast signal de-dispersion by the application, will yield the dispersion measure (DM). Compared to a Galactic DM model, it will indicate the source distance within the Galaxy. A variant approach uses the built-in ˜100 MHz FM-radio receivers present in cell phones for an FRB search at lower frequencies. Alternatively, numerous 'software-defined radio' devices, costing ˜$10 US each, could be deployed and plugged into USB ports of personal computers (particularly in radio-quiet locations) to establish the global network of receivers.

  15. Searching for Ultra-high Energy Neutrinos with Data from a Prototype Station of the Askaryan Radio Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Eugene S.

    The observed GZK cutoff in the cosmic ray spectrum has led to a strongly motivated expectation of an ultra-high energy (UHE) neutrino flux arising from the interactions between the highest energy cosmic rays and cosmic microwave background photons. Aside from these diffuse neutrinos, UHE neutrinos are also expected to be produced in the same astrophysics sources producing the UHE cosmic rays such as Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRB) and AGNs. Here, we discuss two UHE neutrino searches using data from the Askaryan Radio Array (ARA) prototype Testbed station: one search for a diffuse neutrino flux and another for neutrinos from GRBs. Testbed data from 2011 to 2012 are used for the searches in the thesis. We discuss how we define the analysis cuts, optimize the analysis cut parameters for maximum sensitivity to UHE neutrinos, estimate the number of background and neutrino events, and set neutrino flux constraints in the UHE region (>1017eV). We use an optimistic flux model from Kotera et. al. 2010 as our baseline model and optimize our analysis cuts for this model. The GRB neutrino search follows the same analysis technique as the diffuse neutrino flux search with some modifications. A timing constraint for each GRB reduces the estimated background dramatically and therefore we can loosen some of our analysis cuts for the GRB neutrino search. We also present detailed descriptions about tools that are used for the searches such as AraSim, a Monte-Carlo simulation that we developed, and RaySolver, a code to carry out ray tracing in ice with a depth-dependent index of refraction model. We present constraints on the neutrino flux from the ARA Testbed for diffuse neutrinos and GRB neutrinos separately. These neutrino flux constraints and analysis techniques from the Testbed will provide a benchmark for the future deep ARA stations' analyses which are expected to improve neutrino flux constraints by a factor of three or more due to differences in the design of the stations.

  16. Evaluating the effectiveness of Washington state repeated job search services on the employment rate of prime-age female welfare recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Cheng; Shen, Yan; Wang, Boqing; Weeks, Greg

    2008-07-01

    This paper uses an unbalanced panel dataset to evaluate how repeated job search services (JSS) and personal characteristics affect the employment rate of the prime-age female welfare recipients in the State of Washington. We propose a transition probability model to take into account issues of sample attrition, sample refreshment and duration dependence. We also generalize Honoré and Kyriazidou's [Honoré, B.E., Kyriazidou, E., 2000. Panel data discrete choice models with lagged dependent variables. Econometrica 68 (4), 839-874] conditional maximum likelihood estimator to allow for the presence of individual-specific effects. A limited information test is suggested to test for selection issues in non-experimental data. The specification tests indicate that the (conditional on the set of the confounding variables considered) assumptions of no selection due to unobservables and/or no unobserved individual-specific effects are not violated. Our findings indicate that the first job search service does have positive and significant impacts on the employment rate. However, providing repeated JSS to the same client has no significant impact. Further, we find that there are significant experience-enhancing effects. These findings suggest that providing one job search services training to individuals may have a lasting impact on raising their employment rates.

  17. FASTERp: A Feature Array Search Tool for Estimating Resemblance of Protein Sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macklin, Derek; Egan, Rob; Wang, Zhong

    2014-03-14

    Metagenome sequencing efforts have provided a large pool of billions of genes for identifying enzymes with desirable biochemical traits. However, homology search with billions of genes in a rapidly growing database has become increasingly computationally impractical. Here we present our pilot efforts to develop a novel alignment-free algorithm for homology search. Specifically, we represent individual proteins as feature vectors that denote the presence or absence of short kmers in the protein sequence. Similarity between feature vectors is then computed using the Tanimoto score, a distance metric that can be rapidly computed on bit string representations of feature vectors. Preliminary results indicate good correlation with optimal alignment algorithms (Spearman r of 0.87, ~;;1,000,000 proteins from Pfam), as well as with heuristic algorithms such as BLAST (Spearman r of 0.86, ~;;1,000,000 proteins). Furthermore, a prototype of FASTERp implemented in Python runs approximately four times faster than BLAST on a small scale dataset (~;;1000 proteins). We are optimizing and scaling to improve FASTERp to enable rapid homology searches against billion-protein databases, thereby enabling more comprehensive gene annotation efforts.

  18. The effect of small inter-pulsar distance variations in stochastic gravitational wave background searches with Pulsar Timing Arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Mingarelli, Chiara M F

    2014-01-01

    One of the primary objectives for Pulsar Timing Arrays (PTAs) is to detect a stochastic background generated by the incoherent superposition of gravitational waves (GWs), in particular from the cosmic population of supermassive black hole binaries. Current stochastic background searches assume that pulsars in a PTA are separated from each other and the Earth by many GW wavelengths. As more millisecond pulsars are discovered and added to PTAs, some may be separated by only a few radiation wavelengths or less, resulting in correlated GW phase changes between close pulsars in the array. Here we investigate how PTA overlap reduction functions (ORFs), up to quadrupole order, are affected by these additional correlated phase changes, and how they are in turn affected by relaxing the assumption that all pulsars are equidistant from the solar system barycenter. We find that in the low frequency GW background limit of $f\\sim10^{-9}$~Hz, and for pulsars at varying distances from the Earth, that these additional correla...

  19. Next Generation Millimeter/Submillimeter Array to Search for 2nd Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Saito, Masao

    2011-01-01

    ALMA is a revolutionary radio telescope at present and its full operation will start from 2012. It is expected that ALMA will resolve several cosmic questions and will show a new cosmic view to us. Our passion for astronomy naturally goes beyond ALMA because we believe that the 21st-century Astronomy should pursue the new scientific frontier. In this conference, we propose a project of the future radio telescope to search for Habitable planets and finally detect 2nd Earth as a Migratable planet. The detection of 2nd Earth is one of ultimate dreams for not only astronomers but also people.

  20. Accelerating object detection via a visual-feature-directed search cascade: algorithm and field programmable gate array implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrkou, Christos; Theocharides, Theocharis

    2016-07-01

    Object detection is a major step in several computer vision applications and a requirement for most smart camera systems. Recent advances in hardware acceleration for real-time object detection feature extensive use of reconfigurable hardware [field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs)], and relevant research has produced quite fascinating results, in both the accuracy of the detection algorithms as well as the performance in terms of frames per second (fps) for use in embedded smart camera systems. Detecting objects in images, however, is a daunting task and often involves hardware-inefficient steps, both in terms of the datapath design and in terms of input/output and memory access patterns. We present how a visual-feature-directed search cascade composed of motion detection, depth computation, and edge detection, can have a significant impact in reducing the data that needs to be examined by the classification engine for the presence of an object of interest. Experimental results on a Spartan 6 FPGA platform for face detection indicate data search reduction of up to 95%, which results in the system being able to process up to 50 1024×768 pixels images per second with a significantly reduced number of false positives.

  1. The BlackGEM array in search of black hole mergers: integrated performance modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelfsema, Ronald; Klein Wolt, Marc; Bloemen, Steven; Groot, Paul; Bettonvil, Felix; Balster, Harry; Dolron, Peter; van Elteren, Arjen; Engels, Arno; de Haan, Menno; ter Horst, Rik; Kragt, Jan; Navarro, Ramon; Nelemans, Gijs; Paalberends, Willem Jelle; Pal, Sari; Raskin, Gert; Rutten, Harrie; Scheers, Bart; Schuil, Menno; Sybilski, Piotr

    2016-07-01

    The Radboud University Nijmegen in collaboration with the NOVA Optical Infrared Instrumentation group at ASTRON is currently leading the development and realization of the BlackGEM observing facility. The BlackGEM science team aims to be the first to catch the optical counterpart of a gravitational wave event. The BlackGEM project will put an array of three medium-sized optical telescopes at the La Silla site of the European Southern Observatory in Chile. It is uniquely equipped to achieve a combination of wide-field and high sensitivity through its array-like approach. Each BlackGEM unit telescope is a modified Dall-Kirkham-type telescope consisting of a 65cm primary mirror, a 21cm spherical secondary mirror and a triplet corrector lens. The spatial resolution on the sky will be 0.56 asec/pixel and the total field-of-view per telescope is 2.7 square degrees. The main requirement is to achieve a 5-sigma sensitivity of 23rd magnitude within a 5-minute exposure under 15 m/s wind gust conditions. This demands a very stable optical system with tight control of all the error contributions. This has been realized with a spreadsheet based integrated instrument model. The model contains all relevant telescope instrument parameters and environmental conditions. The spreadsheet is partly used for performance calculations and partly used to combine and integrate the output from several other sources. The spreadsheet model calculates the overall performance based on an Exposure Time Calculator using the Noise Equivalent Area metric (NEA). The NEA is further budgeted over 7 main High Level Requirements. The spreadsheet model is coupled to 1) a ZEMAX telescope optical model 2) a telescope FEM analysis to predict the optomechanical response under various gravity, temperature and wind load conditions, 3) a Matlab Simulink thermal model to predict the transient temperature behaviour of the most important telescope elements and 4) a Matlab Simulink control model to predict the

  2. First array of enriched Zn$^{82}$Se bolometers to search for double beta decay

    CERN Document Server

    Artusa, D R; Beeman, J W; Bellini, F; Biassoni, M; Brofferio, C; Camacho, A; Capelli, S; Cardani, L; Carniti, P; Casali, N; Cassina, L; Clemenza, M; Cremonesi, O; Cruciani, A; D'Addabbo, A; Dafinei, I; Di Domizio, S; di Vacri, M L; Ferroni, F; Gironi, L; Giuliani, A; Gotti, C; Keppel, G; Maino, M; Mancuso, M; Martinez, M; Morganti, S; Nagorny, S; Nastasi, M; Nisi, S; Nones, C; Orio, F; Orlandi, D; Pagnanini, L; Pallavicini, M; Palmieri, V; Pattavina, L; Pavan, M; Pessina, G; Pettinacci, V; Pirro, S; Pozzi, S; Previtali, E; Puiu, A; Rusconi, C; Schaeffner, K; Tomei, C; Vignati, M; Zolotarova, A

    2016-01-01

    The R&D activity performed during the last years proved the potential of ZnSe scintillating bolometers to the search for neutrino-less double beta decay, motivating the realization of the first large-mass experiment based on this technology: CUPID-0. The isotopic enrichment in $^{82}$Se, the Zn$^{82}$Se crystals growth, as well as the light detectors production have been accomplished, and the experiment is now in construction at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (Italy). In this paper we present the results obtained testing the first three Zn$^{82}$Se crystals operated as scintillating bolometers, and we prove that their performance in terms of energy resolution, background rejection capability and intrinsic radio-purity complies with the requirements of CUPID-0.

  3. Search for Anisotropy of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays with the Telescope Array Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Abu-Zayyad, T; Allen, M; Anderson, R; Azuma, R; Barcikowski, E; Belz, J W; Bergman, D R; Blake, S A; Cady, R; Cheon, B G; Chiba, J; Chikawa, M; Cho, E J; Cho, W R; Fujii, H; Fujii, T; Fukuda, T; Fukushima, M; Hanlon, W; Hayashi, K; Hayashi, Y; Hayashida, N; Hibino, K; Hiyama, K; Honda, K; Iguchi, T; Ikeda, D; Ikuta, K; Inoue, N; Ishii, T; Ishimori, R; Ivanov, D; Iwamoto, S; Jui, C C H; Kadota, K; Kakimoto, F; Kalashev, O; Kanbe, T; Kasahara, K; Kawai, H; Kawakami, S; Kawana, S; Kido, E; Kim, H B; Kim, H K; Kim, J H; Kim, J H; Kitamoto, K; Kitamura, S; Kitamura, Y; Kobayashi, K; Kobayashi, Y; Kondo, Y; Kuramoto, K; Kuzmin, V; Kwon, Y J; Lim, S I; Machida, S; Martens, K; Martineau, J; Matsuda, T; Matsuura, T; Matsuyama, T; Matthews, J N; Minamino, M; Miyata, K; Murano, Y; Myers, I; Nagasawa, K; Nagataki, S; Nakamura, T; Nam, S W; Nonaka, T; Ogio, S; Ohnishi, M; Ohoka, H; Oki, K; Oku, D; Okuda, T; Oshima, A; Ozawa, S; Park, I H; Pshirkov, M S; Rodriguez, D C; Roh, S Y; Rubtsov, G; Ryu, D; Sagawa, H; Sakurai, N; Sampson, A L; Scott, L M; Shah, P D; Shibata, F; Shibata, T; Shimodaira, H; Shin, B K; Shin, J I; Shirahama, T; Smith, J D; Sokolsky, P; Sonley, T J; Springer, R W; Stokes, B T; Stratton, S R; Stroman, T; Suzuki, S; Takahashi, Y; Takeda, M; Taketa, A; Takita, M; Tameda, Y; Tanaka, H; Tanaka, K; Tanaka, M; Thomas, S B; Thomson, G B; Tinyakov, P; Tkachev, I; Tokuno, H; Tomida, T; Troitsky, S; Tsunesada, Y; Tsutsumi, K; Tsuyuguchi, Y; Uchihori, Y; Udo, S; Ukai, H; Vasiloff, G; Wada, Y; Wong, T; Wood, M; Yamakawa, Y; Yamane, R; Yamaoka, H; Yamazaki, K; Yang, J; Yoneda, Y; Yoshida, S; Yoshii, H; Zhou, X; Zollinger, R; Zundel, Z

    2012-01-01

    We study the anisotropy of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Ray (UHECR) events collected by the Telescope Array (TA) detector in the first 40 months of operation. Following earlier studies, we examine event sets with energy thresholds of 10 EeV, 40 EeV, and 57 EeV. We find that the distributions of the events in right ascension and declination are compatible with an isotropic distribution in all three sets. We then compare with previously reported clustering of the UHECR events at small angular scales. No significant clustering is found in the TA data. We then check the events with E>57 EeV for correlations with nearby active galactic nuclei. No significant correlation is found. Finally, we examine all three sets for correlations with the large-scale structure of the Universe. We find that the two higher-energy sets are compatible with both an isotropic distribution and the hypothesis that UHECR sources follow the matter distribution of the Universe (the LSS hypothesis), while the event set with E>10 EeV is compatibl...

  4. Linear Array Geometry Synthesis with Minimum Side Lobe Level and Null Control Using Dynamic Multi-Swarm Particle Swarm Optimizer with Local Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Pradipta; Zafar, Hamim

    Linear antenna array design is one of the most important electromagnetic optimization problems of current interest. This paper describes the synthesis method of linear array geometry with minimum side lobe level and null control by the Dynamic Multi-Swarm Particle Swarm Optimizer with Local Search (DMSPSO) which optimizes the spacing between the elements of the linear array to produce a radiation pattern with minimum side lobe level and null placement control. The results of the DMSPSO algorithm have been shown to meet or beat the results obtained using other state-of-the-art metaheuristics like the Genetic Algorithm (GA),General Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO), Memetic Algorithms (MA), and Tabu Search (TS) in a statistically meaningful way. Three design examples are presented that illustrate the use of the DMSPSO algorithm, and the optimization goal in each example is easily achieved.

  5. A Very Large Array Search for Intermediate-Mass Black Holes in Globular Clusters in M81

    CERN Document Server

    Wrobel, J M; Middleton, M J

    2016-01-01

    Nantais et al. used the Hubble Space Telescope to localize probable globular clusters (GCs) in M81, a spiral galaxy at a distance of 3.63 Mpc. Theory predicts that GCs can host intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) with masses M_BH \\sim 100 - 100,000 M_sun. Finding IMBHs in GCs could validate a formation channel for seed BHs in the early universe, bolster gravitational-wave predictions for space missions, and test scaling relations between stellar systems and the central BHs they host. We used the NRAO Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) to search for the radiative signatures of IMBH accretion from 206 probable GCs in a mosaic of M81. The observing wavelength was 5.5 cm and the spatial resolution was 1.5 arcsec (26.4 pc). None of the individual GCs are detected, nor are weighted-mean image stacks of the 206 GCs and the 49 massive GCs with stellar masses M_star \\gtrsim 200,000 M_sun. We apply a semi-empirical model to predict the mass of an IMBH that, if undergoing accretion in the long-lived hard X-ray stat...

  6. A VLA (Very Large Array) Search for 5 GHz Radio Transients and Variables at Low Galactic Latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofek, E. O.; Frail, D. A.; Breslauer, B.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Chandra, P.; Gal-Yam, A.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Gehrels, N.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a 5GHz survey with the Very Large Array (VLA) and the expanded VLA, designed to search for short-lived (approx 1.8mJy) = 0.039(exp +0.13,+0.18) (sub .0.032,.0.038) / sq. deg (1, 2 sigma confidence errors). This areal density is consistent with the sky surface density of transients from the Bower et al. survey extrapolated to 1.8mJy. Our observed transient areal density is consistent with a Neutron Stars (NSs) origin for these events. Furthermore, we use the data to measure the sources variability on days to years time scales, and we present the variability structure function of 5GHz sources. The mean structure function shows a fast increase on approximately 1 day time scale, followed by a slower increase on time scales of up to 10 days. On time scales between 10 - 60 days the structure function is roughly constant. We find that approx > 30% of the unresolved sources brighter than 1.8mJy are variable at the > 4-sigma confidence level, presumably due mainly to refractive scintillation.

  7. A search for small and medium scale anisotropy of cosmic rays above 1 PeV registered at the Tunka-133 array

    CERN Document Server

    Zotov, M Yu

    2014-01-01

    A search for anisotropy at different scales in the arrival directions of cosmic rays with energies above 1 PeV is performed with data of the Tunka-133 array. A number of regions with angular sizes up to approximately 30 degrees that deviate from the uniform background with a statistical significance greater than three standard deviations are found using the shuffling technique both in the complete data set and its subsets in different energy ranges. Some regions with an excess of cosmic rays correlate with the distribution of possible cosmic ray sources. A comparison of the results with a similar analysis of the legacy data of the EAS MSU array is presented.

  8. Search of primary cosmic rays sources at 5x10**13 - 5x10**14 eV with Tien Shan CHRONOTRON - KLARA array

    CERN Document Server

    Gudkova, E N

    2015-01-01

    The primary cosmic ray sources are searched by means of CHRONOTRON - KLARA separate array of the P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute Tien Shan station. It was done on the base of 35 millions observed PCR extensive air showers from 5x10**13 to 5x10**14 eV energies. The data analysis was carried on the method of the direct selection of local areas in equatorial coordinates where the deviation of event numbers exceeded the definite value from normal Gaussian standard. These directions are compared with other arrays observed results and with coordinates of astrophysical sources.

  9. Search for correlations of the arrival directions of ultra-high energy cosmic ray with extragalactic objects as observed by the telescope array experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Abu-Zayyad, T; Allen, M; Anderson, R; Azuma, R; Barcikowski, E; Belz, J W; Bergman, D R; Blake, S A; Cady, R; Cheon, B G; Chiba, J; Chikawa, M; Cho, E J; Cho, W R; Fujii, H; Fujii, T; Fukuda, T; Fukushima, M; Hanlon, W; Hayashi, K; Hayashi, Y; Hayashida, N; Hibino, K; Hiyama, K; Honda, K; Iguchi, T; Ikeda, D; Ikuta, K; Inoue, N; Ishii, T; Ishimori, R; Ito, H; Ivanov, D; Iwamoto, S; Jui, C C H; Kadota, K; Kakimoto, F; Kalashev, O; Kanbe, T; Kasahara, K; Kawai, H; Kawakami, S; Kawana, S; Kido, E; Kim, H B; Kim, H K; Kim, J H; Kitamoto, K; Kitamura, S; Kitamura, Y; Kobayashi, K; Kobayashi, Y; Kondo, Y; Kuramoto, K; Kuzmin, V; Kwon, Y J; Lan, J; Lim, S I; Lundquist, J P; Machida, S; Martens, K; Matsuda, T; Matsuura, T; Matsuyama, T; Matthews, J N; Minamino, M; Miyata, K; Murano, Y; Myers, I; Nagasawa, K; Nagataki, S; Nakamura, T; Nam, S W; Nonaka, T; Ogio, S; Ohnishi, M; Ohoka, H; Oki, K; Oku, D; Okuda, T; Ono, M; Oshima, A; Ozawa, S; Park, I H; Pshirkov, M S; Rodriguez, D C; Roh, S Y; Rubtsov, G; Ryu, D; Sagawa, H; Sakurai, N; Sampson, A L; Scott, L M; Shah, P D; Shibata, F; Shibata, T; Shimodaira, H; Shin, B K; Shin, J I; Shirahama, T; Smith, J D; Sokolsky, P; Springer, R W; Stokes, B T; Stratton, S R; Stroman, T; Suzuki, S; Takahashi, Y; Takeda, M; Taketa, A; Takita, M; Tameda, Y; Tanaka, H; Tanaka, K; Tanaka, M; Thomas, S B; Thomson, G B; Tinyakov, P; Tkachev, I; Tokuno, H; Tomida, T; Troitsky, S; Tsunesada, Y; Tsutsumi, K; Tsuyuguchi, Y; Uchihori, Y; Udo, S; Ukai, H; Urban, F; Vasiloff, G; Wada, Y; Wong, T; Yamakawa, Y; Yamane, R; Yamaoka, H; Yamazaki, K; Yang, J; Yoneda, Y; Yoshida, S; Yoshii, H; Zhou, X; Zollinger, R; Zundel, Z

    2013-01-01

    We search for correlations between positions of extragalactic objects and arrival directions of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECRs) with primary energy $E \\ge 40$ EeV as observed by the surface detector array of the Telescope Array (TA) experiment during the first 40 months of operation. We examined several public astronomical object catalogs, including the Veron-Cetty and Veron catalog of active galactic nuclei. We counted the number of TA events correlated with objects in each catalog as a function of three parameters: the maximum angular separation between a TA event and an object, the minimum energy of the events, and the maximum redshift of the objects. We determine combinations of these parameters which maximize the correlations, and calculate the chance probabilities of having the same levels of correlations from an isotropic distribution of UHECR arrival directions. No statistically significant correlations are found when penalties for scanning over the above parameters and for searching in several...

  10. Search for pulsed multi-TeV gamma rays from the Crab pulsar using the Tibet-III air shower array

    CERN Document Server

    Amenomori, M

    2007-01-01

    We searched for pulsed gamma-ray emissions from the Crab pulsar using data of the Tibet-III air shower array from November 1999 through November 2005. No evidence for the pulsed emissions was found in our analysis. Upper limits at different energies were calculated for a $3 \\sigma$ confidence level in the energy range of multi-TeV to several hundred TeV.

  11. SEARCH FOR GAMMA RAYS ABOVE 100 TeV FROM THE CRAB NEBULA WITH THE TIBET AIR SHOWER ARRAY AND THE 100 m{sup 2} MUON DETECTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amenomori, M. [Department of Physics, Hirosaki University, Hirosaki 036-8561 (Japan); Bi, X. J.; Chen, W. Y.; Ding, L. K.; Feng, Zhaoyang; Gou, Q. B.; Guo, Y. Q.; He, H. H.; Hu, H. B.; Huang, J. [Key Laboratory of Particle Astrophysics, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Chen, D. [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Chen, T. L.; Danzengluobu; Hu, Haibing [Department of Mathematics and Physics, Tibet University, Lhasa 850000 (China); Cui, S. W.; He, Z. T. [Department of Physics, Hebei Normal University, Shijiazhuang 050016 (China); Feng, C. F. [Department of Physics, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Feng, Z. Y. [Institute of Modern Physics, SouthWest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Hibino, K. [Faculty of Engineering, Kanagawa University, Yokohama 221-8686 (Japan); Hotta, N. [Faculty of Education, Utsunomiya University, Utsunomiya 321-8505 (Japan); Collaboration: Tibet ASγ Collaboration; and others

    2015-11-10

    A 100 m{sup 2} muon detector (MD) was successfully constructed under the existing Tibet air shower (AS) array in the late fall of 2007. The sensitivity of the Tibet AS array to cosmic gamma rays can be improved by selecting muon-poor events with the MD. Our MC simulation of the MD response reasonably agrees with the experimental data in terms of the charge distribution for one-muon events and the background rejection power. Using the data collected by the Tibet AS array and the 100 m{sup 2} MD taken from 2008 March to 2010 February, we search for continuous gamma-ray emission from the Crab Nebula above ∼100 TeV. No significant excess is found, and the most stringent upper limit is obtained above 140 TeV.

  12. Search for 100 TeV gamma rays from the Crab Nebula with the Tibet Air Shower Array and the 100 m2 muon detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sako, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    The 100 m ^{2} muon detector (MD) was constructed under the Tibet air shower (AS) array in the late autumn of 2007. By selecting muon-poor events with the MD, the sensitivity of the Tibet AS array to cosmic gamma rays can be improved. Our MC simulation of the MD response is in reasonable agreement with the experimental data, with regard to the charge distribution for one-muon events and the background rejection power. Using the data taken from 2008 March to 2010 February by the Tibet AS array and the 100 m ^{2} MD, we search for continuous 100 TeV gamma-ray emission from the Crab Nebula. No significant excess is detected, and the world's best upper limit is obtained above 140 TeV.

  13. Distance equation of infrared focal plane array rotation search system%红外面阵旋转搜索系统作用距离方程

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱惟贤; 陈钱; 顾国华

    2011-01-01

    The infrared focal plane array rotation search system(IFPARSS) is controversial and denied by the mainstream view. In this paper, the multiple pixels' correlation (MPC) of IFPARSS in space domain and time doamin was studied. MPC was used to increase the SNR of the target effectively after the process of pixel's gray accumulation, and thus improve the target detecting distance. Moreover, according the MPC, the IFPARSS point target detecting distance equation was deduced. And through this equation, the superiorty of IFPARSS was proven. Then the simulations of distance equation were carried out. And the focal plane array search system with rotation and static state by distance range, the focal plane array search system and the linear array search system by the distance equation were compared. The simulation results show that the IFPARSS is useful and the view that denies the IFPARSS is wrong.%红外面阵旋转搜索系统一直倍受争议,文中对此进行了讨论.研究了红外面阵旋转搜索系统存在的多像元探测相关性,对多像元相关性进行相关像素灰度积累可以有效提高目标探测信噪比,并最终提升探测作用距离.基于多像元相关性,文中推导了面阵旋转搜索系统考虑多像元相关性的点源探测作用距离方程,以及考虑数据关联等作用的有效作用距离方程.对面阵旋转的作用距离方程、有效作用距离方程进行了仿真,同时对面阵旋转与静止时的作用距离、面阵旋转搜索系统和线阵旋转搜索系统的性能进行了比较.最终通过仿真数据证明了面阵旋转搜索系统的实用价值.

  14. The noise properties of 42 millisecond pulsars from the European Pulsar Timing Array and their impact on gravitational wave searches

    CERN Document Server

    Caballero, R N; Lentati, L; Desvignes, G; Champion, D J; Verbiest, J P W; Janssen, G H; Stappers, B W; Kramer, M; Lazarus, P; Possenti, A; Tiburzi, C; Perrodin, D; Osłowski, S; Babak, S; Bassa, C G; Brem, P; Burgay, M; Cognard, I; Gair, J R; Graikou, E; Guillemot, L; Hessels, J W T; Karuppusamy, R; Lassus, A; Liu, K; McKee, J; Mingarelli, C M F; Petiteau, A; Purver, M B; Rosado, P A; Sanidas, S; Sesana, A; Shaifullah, G; Smits, R; Taylor, S R; Theureau, G; van Haasteren, R; Vecchio, A

    2015-01-01

    The sensitivity of Pulsar Timing Arrays to gravitational waves depends critically on the noise present in the individual pulsar timing data. Noise may be either intrinsic or extrinsic to the pulsar. Intrinsic sources of noise might come from rotational instabilities, for example. Extrinsic sources of noise include contributions from physical processes which are not sufficiently well modelled, for example, dispersion and scattering effects, analysis errors and instrumental instabilities. We present the results from a noise analysis for 42 millisecond pulsars (MSPs) observed with the European Pulsar Timing Array. For characterising the low-frequency, stochastic and achromatic noise component, or "timing noise", we employ two methods, based on Bayesian and frequentist statistics. For 25 MSPs, we achieve statistically significant measurements of their timing noise parameters and find that the two methods give consistent results. For the remaining 17 MSPs, we place upper limits on the timing noise amplitude at the...

  15. Double-constraint flexible tree search-based orthogonal matching pursuit for DOA estimation using dynamic sensor arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui; Wan, Qun; Fan, Rong

    2016-05-01

    Greedy algorithms have leveraged sparse signal models for parameter estimation purposes in applications including bearing estimation and direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation. A dictionary whose elements correspond to observations for a sampling of the angle space is used for sparse approximation of the received signals; the resulting sparse coefficient vector's support identifies the DOA estimates. Increasing the angle space sampling resolution provides better sparse approximations for arbitrary observations, while the resulting high dictionary coherence hampers the performance of standard sparse approximation, preventing accurate DOA estimation. To alleviate this shortcoming, in the each iteration, we use the structured sparsity model that keeps high coherent and close spacing dictionary elements. Besides, the proposed approach allows exploitation of the array orientation diversity (achievable via array dynamics) in the compressive sensing framework to address challenging array signal processing problems such as left-right ambiguity and poor estimation performance. And the simulation results show that our proposed algorithm can offer significantly improved performance in single-snapshot scenario with multiple sources.

  16. Searching African skies the square kilometre array and South Africa's quest to hear the songs of the stars

    CERN Document Server

    Wild, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    An ambitious scientific project is unfolding in the desert of South Africa, with a multi-decade timeline that will eventually see expansion into Western Australia-a project that is detailed and celebrated in this book on the Square Kilometre Array (SKA). The SKA will be the largest and most sensitive radio telescope, expanding the capabilities of scientific probing and addressing significant unanswered questions about the universe, such as on the formation of galaxies and the nature of gravity. Keen technology correspondent Sarah Wild covers the important development with this exploration of i

  17. Coherent Operations, Entanglement, and Progress Toward Quantum Search in a Large 2D Array of Neutral Atom Qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-18

    tune the Ti:S to another wavelength in the future, for example to set the traps to a magic wavelength (Carr and Saffman [71]). We use a Coherent Verdi ...gives sufficient on/off contrast. The light is then fiber coupled for delivery of 2.5 W to the trap array optics. 108 Verdi V18 532 nm 18 W MSquared...Ti:Sappire laser system consisting of a Coherent Verdi V18 pump and MSquared SolsTiS. The two AOMs in series are used to get sufficient shutoff suppression

  18. The Telescope Array RADAR (TARA) Project and the Search for the Radar Signature of Cosmic Ray Induced Extensive Air Showers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prohira, Steven; TARA Collaboration; Telescope Array Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The TARA (Telescope Array Radar) cosmic ray detector has been in operation since May 2013. It is the most ambitious effort to date to test an idea that originated in the 1940's: that ionization produced by cosmic ray extensive air showers should reflect electromagnetic radiation. The observation of this effect would open the possibility that remote-sensing radar technology could be used to detect and reconstruct extensive air showers, thus increasing the aperture available for the study of the highest-energy cosmic rays. TARA employs a bi-static radar configuration, consisting of a 25 kW, 5 MW ERP transmitter at 54.1 MHz broadcasting across the Telescope Array surface detector. 40 km distant, a set of log-periodic receiver antennas are read out by two independent data acquisition systems employing different techniques to select signals of the form expected for radar targets moving at close to the speed of light. In this talk, we describe the TARA detector and present the first quantitative limits on the radar cross-section of extensive air showers.

  19. Status of the Germanium Detector Array (GERDA) in the search of neutrinoless ββ decays of 76Ge at LNGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönert, S.; Abt, I.; Altmann, M.; Bakalyarov, A. M.; Barabanov, I.; Bauer, C.; Bauer, M.; Bellotti, E.; Belogurov, S.; Belyaev, S. T.; Bettini, A.; Bezrukov, L.; Brudanin, V.; Bolotsky, V. P.; Caldwell, A.; Cattadori, C.; Chirchenko, M. V.; Chkvorets, O.; Demidova, E.; di Vacri, A.; Eberth, J.; Egorov, V.; Farnea, E.; Gangapshev, A.; Gasparro, J.; Grabmayr, P.; Grigoriev, G. Y.; Gurentsov, V.; Gusev, K.; Hampel, W.; Heusser, G.; Heisel, M.; Hofmann, W.; Hult, M.; Inzhechik, L. V.; Jochum, J.; Junker, M.; Katulina, S.; Kiko, J.; Kirpichnikov, I. V.; Klimenko, A.; Knapp, M.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Kochetov, O.; Kornoukhov, V. N.; Kröninger, K.; Kuzminov, V. V.; Laubenstein, M.; Lebedev, V. I.; Liu, X.; Majorovits, B.; Marissens, G.; Nemchenok, I.; Pandola, L.; Peiffer, P.; Pullia, A.; Alvarez, C. R.; Sandukovsky, V.; Scholl, S.; Schreiner, J.; Schwan, U.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Simgen, H.; Smolnikov, A.; Stelzer, F.; Tikhomirov, A. V.; Tomei, C.; Ur, C. A.; Vasenko, A. A.; Vasiliev, S.; Weißhaar, D.; Wojcik, M.; Yanovich, E.; Yurkowski, J.; Zhukov, S. V.; Zocca, F.; Zuzel, G.

    2006-12-01

    The Germanium Detector Array (GERDA) in the search for neutrinoless ββ decays of 76Ge at LNGS will operate bare germanium diodes enriched in 76Ge in an (optional active) cryogenic fluid shield to investigate neutrinoless ββ decay with a sensitivity of T 1/2 > 2 × 1026 yr after an exposure of 100 kg yr. Recent progress includes the installation of the first underground infrastructures at Gran Sasso, the completion of the enrichment of 37.5 kg of germanium material for detector construction, prototyping of low-mass detector support and contacts, and front-end and DAQ electronics, as well as the preparation for construction of the cryogenic vessel and water tank.

  20. Search for correlations between the arrival directions of IceCube neutrino events and ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays detected by the Pierre Auger Observatory and the Telescope Array

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collaboration, The IceCube; Aartsen, M. G.; Abraham, K.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Altmann, D.; Anderson, T.; Ansseau, I.; Archinger, M.; Arguelles, C.; Arlen, T. C.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Barwick, S. W.; Baum, V.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Tjus, J. Becker; Becker, K. -H.; Beiser, E.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bernhard, A.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Blumenthal, J.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohm, C.; Börner, M.; Bos, F.; Bose, D.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Braun, J.; Brayeur, L.; Bretz, H. -P.; Buzinsky, N.; Casey, J.; Casier, M.; Cheung, E.; Chirkin, D.; Christov, A.; Clark, K.; Classen, L.; Coenders, S.; Cowen, D. F.; Silva, A. H. Cruz; Daughhetee, J.; Davis, J. C.; Day, M.; André, J. P. A. M. de; Clercq, C. De; Rosendo, E. del Pino; Dembinski, H.; Ridder, S. De; Desiati, P.; Vries, K. D. de; Wasseige, G. de; With, M. de; DeYoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Lorenzo, V. di; Dumm, J. P.; Dunkman, M.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Eichmann, B.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fahey, S.; Fazely, A. R.; Feintzeig, J.; Felde, J.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Fischer-Wasels, T.; Flis, S.; Fösig, C. -C.; Fuchs, T.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gaior, R.; Gallagher, J.; Gerhardt, L.; Ghorbani, K.; Gier, D.; Gladstone, L.; Glagla, M.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Golup, G.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Góra, D.; Grant, D.; Griffith, Z.; Groß, A.; Ha, C.; Haack, C.; Ismail, A. Haj; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hansen, E.; Hansmann, B.; Hanson, K.; Hebecker, D.; Heereman, D.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Hickford, S.; Hignight, J.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Holzapfel, K.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Huang, F.; Huber, M.; Huelsnitz, W.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; In, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobi, E.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jeong, M.; Jero, K.; Jurkovic, M.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Kauer, M.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, J.; Kheirandish, A.; Kiryluk, J.; Kläs, J.; Klein, S. R.; Kohnen, G.; Koirala, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Konietz, R.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krings, K.; Kroll, G.; Kroll, M.; Krückl, G.; Kunnen, J.; Kurahashi, N.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Lanfranchi, J. L.; Larson, M. J.; Lesiak-Bzdak, M.; Leuermann, M.; Leuner, J.; Lu, L.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Mandelartz, M.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; Maunu, R.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Medici, M.; Meli, A.; Menne, T.; Merino, G.; Meures, T.; Miarecki, S.; Middell, E.; Mohrmann, L.; Montaruli, T.; Morse, R.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naumann, U.; Neer, G.; Niederhausen, H.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Pollmann, A. Obertacke; Olivas, A.; Omairat, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; Palczewski, T.; Pandya, H.; Pankova, D. V.; Paul, L.; Pepper, J. A.; Heros, C. Pérez de los; Pfendner, C.; Pieloth, D.; Pinat, E.; Posselt, J.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Quinnan, M.; Raab, C.; Rädel, L.; Rameez, M.; Rawlins, K.; Reimann, R.; Relich, M.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Richman, M.; Richter, S.; Riedel, B.; Robertson, S.; Rongen, M.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ryckbosch, D.; Sabbatini, L.; Sander, H. -G.; Sandrock, A.; Sandroos, J.; Sarkar, S.; Schatto, K.; Schimp, M.; Schmidt, T.; Schoenen, S.; Schöneberg, S.; Schönwald, A.; Schulte, L.; Schumacher, L.; Seckel, D.; Seunarine, S.; Soldin, D.; Song, M.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stahlberg, M.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stasik, A.; Steuer, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stößl, A.; Ström, R.; Strotjohann, N. L.; Sullivan, G. W.; Sutherland, M.; Taavola, H.; Taboada, I.; Tatar, J.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Terliuk, A.; Tešić, G.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Tobin, M. N.; Toscano, S.; Tosi, D.; Tselengidou, M.; Turcati, A.; Unger, E.; Usner, M.; Vallecorsa, S.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Eijndhoven, N. van; Vanheule, S.; Santen, J. van; Veenkamp, J.; Vehring, M.; Voge, M.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Wallace, A.; Wallraff, M.; Wandkowsky, N.; Weaver, Ch; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wille, L.; Williams, D. R.; Wissing, H.; Wolf, M.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Xu, Y.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Collaboration, M. Zoll The Pierre Auger; Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Samarai, I. Al; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Castillo, J. Alvarez; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Batista, R. Alves; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andrada, B.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Arqueros, F.; Arsene, N.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Avila, G.; Awal, N.; Badescu, A. M.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blaess, S. G.; Blanco, A.; Blanco, M.; Blazek, J.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Borodai, N.; Botti, A. M.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Bretz, T.; Bridgeman, A.; Briechle, F. L.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Diaz, J. C. Chirinos; Chudoba, J.; Clay, R. W.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Dallier, R.; D'Amico, S.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; Almeida, R. M. de; Jong, S. J. de; Mauro, G. De; Neto, J. R. T. de Mello; Mitri, I. De; Oliveira, J. de; Souza, V. de; Debatin, J.; Peral, L. del; Deligny, O.; Dhital, N.; Giulio, C. Di; Matteo, A. Di; Castro, M. L. Díaz; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dorofeev, A.; Anjos, R. C. dos; Dova, M. T.; Dundovic, A.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fratu, O.; Freire, M. M.; Fujii, T.; Fuster, A.; Gallo, F.; García, B.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Gherghel-Lascu, A.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Głas, D.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Golup, G.; Berisso, M. Gómez; Vitale, P. F. Gómez; González, N.; Gookin, B.; Gordon, J.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Hasankiadeh, Q.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Johnsen, J. A.; Josebachuili, M.; Kääpä, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Keilhauer, B.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Kuempel, D.; Mezek, G. Kukec; Kunka, N.; Awad, A. Kuotb; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Oliveira, M. A. Leigui de; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lopes, L.; López, R.; Casado, A. López; Lucero, A.; Malacari, M.; Mallamaci, M.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Mariş, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martinez, H.; Bravo, O. Martínez; Meza, J. J. Masías; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Mello, V. B. B.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Müller, G.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, S.; Naranjo, I.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nguyen, P. H.; Niculescu-Oglinzanu, M.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nožka, H.; Núñez, L. A.; Ochilo, L.; Oikonomou, F.; Olinto, A.; Pacheco, N.; Selmi-Dei, D. Pakk; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pękala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Peña-Rodriguez, J.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Reinert, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Carvalho, W. Rodrigues de; Rojo, J. Rodriguez; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Rogozin, D.; Rosado, J.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Greus, F. Salesa; Salina, G.; Gomez, J. D. Sanabria; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santos, E. M.; Santos, E.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sarmiento-Cano, C.; Sato, R.; Scarso, C.; Schauer, M.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schmidt, D.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F. G.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Schumacher, J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sonntag, S.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Stanca, D.; Stanič, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Strafella, F.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Durán, M. Suarez; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Tepe, A.; Theodoro, V. M.; Timmermans, C.; Peixoto, C. J. Todero; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Elipe, G. Torralba; Machado, D. Torres; Travnicek, P.; Trini, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Galicia, J. F. Valdés; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; Aar, G. van; Bodegom, P. van; Berg, A. M. van den; Vliet, A. van; Varela, E.; Cárdenas, B. Vargas; Varner, G.; Vasquez, R.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyński, H.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yang, L.; Yapici, T.; Yushkov, A.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zepeda, A.; Zimmermann, B.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zong, Z.; Collaboration, F. Zuccarello The Telescope Array; Abbasi, R. U.; Abe, M.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Allen, M.; Azuma, R.; Barcikowski, E.; Belz, J. W.; Bergman, D. R.; Blake, S. A.; Cady, R.; Chae, M. J.; Cheon, B. G.; Chiba, J.; Chikawa, M.; Cho, W. R.; Fujii, T.; Fukushima, M.; Goto, T.; Hanlon, W.; Hayashi, Y.; Hayashida, N.; Hibino, K.; Honda, K.; Ikeda, D.; Inoue, N.; Ishii, T.; Ishimori, R.; Ito, H.; Ivanov, D.; Jui, C. C. H.; Kadota, K.; Kakimoto, F.; Kalashev, O.; Kasahara, K.; Kawai, H.; Kawakami, S.; Kawana, S.; Kawata, K.; Kido, E.; Kim, H. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, J. H.; Kitamura, S.; Kitamura, Y.; Kuzmin, V.; Kwon, Y. J.; Lan, J.; Lim, S. I.; Lundquist, J. P.; Machida, K.; Martens, K.; Matsuda, T.; Matsuyama, T.; Matthews, J. N.; Minamino, M.; Mukai, Y.; Myers, I.; Nagasawa, K.; Nagataki, S.; Nakamura, T.; Nonaka, T.; Nozato, A.; Ogio, S.; Ogura, J.; Ohnishi, M.; Ohoka, H.; Oki, K.; Okuda, T.; Ono, M.; Oshima, A.; Ozawa, S.; Park, I. H.; Pshirkov, M. S.; Rodriguez, D. C.; Rubtsov, G.; Ryu, D.; Sagawa, H.; Sakurai, N.; Scott, L. M.; Shah, P. D.; Shibata, F.; Shibata, T.; Shimodaira, H.; Shin, B. K.; Shin, H. S.; Smith, J. D.; Sokolsky, P.; Springer, R. W.; Stokes, B. T.; Stratton, S. R.; Stroman, T. A.; Suzawa, T.; Takamura, M.; Takeda, M.; Takeishi, R.; Taketa, A.; Takita, M.; Tameda, Y.; Tanaka, H.; Tanaka, K.; Tanaka, M.; Thomas, S. B.; Thomson, G. B.; Tinyakov, P.; Tkachev, I.; Tokuno, H.; Tomida, T.; Troitsky, S.; Tsunesada, Y.; Tsutsumi, K.; Uchihori, Y.; Udo, S.; Urban, F.; Vasiloff, G.; Wong, T.; Yamane, R.; Yamaoka, H.; Yamazaki, K.; Yang, J.; Yashiro, K.; Yoneda, Y.; Yoshida, S.; Yoshii, H.; Zollinger, R.; Zundel, Z.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results of different searches for correlations between very high-energy neutrino candidates detected by IceCube and the highest-energy cosmic rays measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory and the Telescope Array. We first consider samples of cascade neutrino events and of

  1. Search for correlations between the arrival directions of IceCube neutrino events and ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays detected by the Pierre Auger Observatory and the Telescope Array

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collaboration, The IceCube; Aartsen, M. G.; Abraham, K.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Altmann, D.; Anderson, T.; Ansseau, I.; Archinger, M.; Arguelles, C.; Arlen, T. C.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Barwick, S. W.; Baum, V.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Tjus, J. Becker; Becker, K. -H.; Beiser, E.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bernhard, A.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Blumenthal, J.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohm, C.; Börner, M.; Bos, F.; Bose, D.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Braun, J.; Brayeur, L.; Bretz, H. -P.; Buzinsky, N.; Casey, J.; Casier, M.; Cheung, E.; Chirkin, D.; Christov, A.; Clark, K.; Classen, L.; Coenders, S.; Cowen, D. F.; Silva, A. H. Cruz; Daughhetee, J.; Davis, J. C.; Day, M.; André, J. P. A. M. de; Clercq, C. De; Rosendo, E. del Pino; Dembinski, H.; Ridder, S. De; Desiati, P.; Vries, K. D. de; Wasseige, G. de; With, M. de; DeYoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Lorenzo, V. di; Dumm, J. P.; Dunkman, M.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Eichmann, B.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fahey, S.; Fazely, A. R.; Feintzeig, J.; Felde, J.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Fischer-Wasels, T.; Flis, S.; Fösig, C. -C.; Fuchs, T.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gaior, R.; Gallagher, J.; Gerhardt, L.; Ghorbani, K.; Gier, D.; Gladstone, L.; Glagla, M.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Golup, G.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Góra, D.; Grant, D.; Griffith, Z.; Groß, A.; Ha, C.; Haack, C.; Ismail, A. Haj; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hansen, E.; Hansmann, B.; Hanson, K.; Hebecker, D.; Heereman, D.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Hickford, S.; Hignight, J.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Holzapfel, K.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Huang, F.; Huber, M.; Huelsnitz, W.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; In, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobi, E.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jeong, M.; Jero, K.; Jurkovic, M.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Kauer, M.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, J.; Kheirandish, A.; Kiryluk, J.; Kläs, J.; Klein, S. R.; Kohnen, G.; Koirala, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Konietz, R.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krings, K.; Kroll, G.; Kroll, M.; Krückl, G.; Kunnen, J.; Kurahashi, N.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Lanfranchi, J. L.; Larson, M. J.; Lesiak-Bzdak, M.; Leuermann, M.; Leuner, J.; Lu, L.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Mandelartz, M.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; Maunu, R.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Medici, M.; Meli, A.; Menne, T.; Merino, G.; Meures, T.; Miarecki, S.; Middell, E.; Mohrmann, L.; Montaruli, T.; Morse, R.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naumann, U.; Neer, G.; Niederhausen, H.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Pollmann, A. Obertacke; Olivas, A.; Omairat, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; Palczewski, T.; Pandya, H.; Pankova, D. V.; Paul, L.; Pepper, J. A.; Heros, C. Pérez de los; Pfendner, C.; Pieloth, D.; Pinat, E.; Posselt, J.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Quinnan, M.; Raab, C.; Rädel, L.; Rameez, M.; Rawlins, K.; Reimann, R.; Relich, M.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Richman, M.; Richter, S.; Riedel, B.; Robertson, S.; Rongen, M.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ryckbosch, D.; Sabbatini, L.; Sander, H. -G.; Sandrock, A.; Sandroos, J.; Sarkar, S.; Schatto, K.; Schimp, M.; Schmidt, T.; Schoenen, S.; Schöneberg, S.; Schönwald, A.; Schulte, L.; Schumacher, L.; Seckel, D.; Seunarine, S.; Soldin, D.; Song, M.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stahlberg, M.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stasik, A.; Steuer, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stößl, A.; Ström, R.; Strotjohann, N. L.; Sullivan, G. W.; Sutherland, M.; Taavola, H.; Taboada, I.; Tatar, J.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Terliuk, A.; Tešić, G.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Tobin, M. N.; Toscano, S.; Tosi, D.; Tselengidou, M.; Turcati, A.; Unger, E.; Usner, M.; Vallecorsa, S.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Eijndhoven, N. van; Vanheule, S.; Santen, J. van; Veenkamp, J.; Vehring, M.; Voge, M.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Wallace, A.; Wallraff, M.; Wandkowsky, N.; Weaver, Ch; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wille, L.; Williams, D. R.; Wissing, H.; Wolf, M.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Xu, Y.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Collaboration, M. Zoll The Pierre Auger; Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Samarai, I. Al; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Castillo, J. Alvarez; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Batista, R. Alves; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andrada, B.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Arqueros, F.; Arsene, N.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Avila, G.; Awal, N.; Badescu, A. M.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blaess, S. G.; Blanco, A.; Blanco, M.; Blazek, J.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Borodai, N.; Botti, A. M.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Bretz, T.; Bridgeman, A.; Briechle, F. L.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Diaz, J. C. Chirinos; Chudoba, J.; Clay, R. W.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Dallier, R.; D'Amico, S.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; Almeida, R. M. de; Jong, S. J. de; Mauro, G. De; Neto, J. R. T. de Mello; Mitri, I. De; Oliveira, J. de; Souza, V. de; Debatin, J.; Peral, L. del; Deligny, O.; Dhital, N.; Giulio, C. Di; Matteo, A. Di; Castro, M. L. Díaz; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dorofeev, A.; Anjos, R. C. dos; Dova, M. T.; Dundovic, A.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fratu, O.; Freire, M. M.; Fujii, T.; Fuster, A.; Gallo, F.; García, B.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Gherghel-Lascu, A.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Głas, D.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Golup, G.; Berisso, M. Gómez; Vitale, P. F. Gómez; González, N.; Gookin, B.; Gordon, J.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Hasankiadeh, Q.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Johnsen, J. A.; Josebachuili, M.; Kääpä, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Keilhauer, B.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Kuempel, D.; Mezek, G. Kukec; Kunka, N.; Awad, A. Kuotb; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Oliveira, M. A. Leigui de; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lopes, L.; López, R.; Casado, A. López; Lucero, A.; Malacari, M.; Mallamaci, M.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Mariş, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martinez, H.; Bravo, O. Martínez; Meza, J. J. Masías; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Mello, V. B. B.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Müller, G.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, S.; Naranjo, I.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nguyen, P. H.; Niculescu-Oglinzanu, M.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nožka, H.; Núñez, L. A.; Ochilo, L.; Oikonomou, F.; Olinto, A.; Pacheco, N.; Selmi-Dei, D. Pakk; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pękala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Peña-Rodriguez, J.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Reinert, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Carvalho, W. Rodrigues de; Rojo, J. Rodriguez; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Rogozin, D.; Rosado, J.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Greus, F. Salesa; Salina, G.; Gomez, J. D. Sanabria; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santos, E. M.; Santos, E.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sarmiento-Cano, C.; Sato, R.; Scarso, C.; Schauer, M.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schmidt, D.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F. G.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Schumacher, J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sonntag, S.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Stanca, D.; Stanič, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Strafella, F.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Durán, M. Suarez; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Tepe, A.; Theodoro, V. M.; Timmermans, C.; Peixoto, C. J. Todero; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Elipe, G. Torralba; Machado, D. Torres; Travnicek, P.; Trini, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Galicia, J. F. Valdés; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; Aar, G. van; Bodegom, P. van; Berg, A. M. van den; Vliet, A. van; Varela, E.; Cárdenas, B. Vargas; Varner, G.; Vasquez, R.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyński, H.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yang, L.; Yapici, T.; Yushkov, A.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zepeda, A.; Zimmermann, B.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zong, Z.; Collaboration, F. Zuccarello The Telescope Array; Abbasi, R. U.; Abe, M.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Allen, M.; Azuma, R.; Barcikowski, E.; Belz, J. W.; Bergman, D. R.; Blake, S. A.; Cady, R.; Chae, M. J.; Cheon, B. G.; Chiba, J.; Chikawa, M.; Cho, W. R.; Fujii, T.; Fukushima, M.; Goto, T.; Hanlon, W.; Hayashi, Y.; Hayashida, N.; Hibino, K.; Honda, K.; Ikeda, D.; Inoue, N.; Ishii, T.; Ishimori, R.; Ito, H.; Ivanov, D.; Jui, C. C. H.; Kadota, K.; Kakimoto, F.; Kalashev, O.; Kasahara, K.; Kawai, H.; Kawakami, S.; Kawana, S.; Kawata, K.; Kido, E.; Kim, H. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, J. H.; Kitamura, S.; Kitamura, Y.; Kuzmin, V.; Kwon, Y. J.; Lan, J.; Lim, S. I.; Lundquist, J. P.; Machida, K.; Martens, K.; Matsuda, T.; Matsuyama, T.; Matthews, J. N.; Minamino, M.; Mukai, Y.; Myers, I.; Nagasawa, K.; Nagataki, S.; Nakamura, T.; Nonaka, T.; Nozato, A.; Ogio, S.; Ogura, J.; Ohnishi, M.; Ohoka, H.; Oki, K.; Okuda, T.; Ono, M.; Oshima, A.; Ozawa, S.; Park, I. H.; Pshirkov, M. S.; Rodriguez, D. C.; Rubtsov, G.; Ryu, D.; Sagawa, H.; Sakurai, N.; Scott, L. M.; Shah, P. D.; Shibata, F.; Shibata, T.; Shimodaira, H.; Shin, B. K.; Shin, H. S.; Smith, J. D.; Sokolsky, P.; Springer, R. W.; Stokes, B. T.; Stratton, S. R.; Stroman, T. A.; Suzawa, T.; Takamura, M.; Takeda, M.; Takeishi, R.; Taketa, A.; Takita, M.; Tameda, Y.; Tanaka, H.; Tanaka, K.; Tanaka, M.; Thomas, S. B.; Thomson, G. B.; Tinyakov, P.; Tkachev, I.; Tokuno, H.; Tomida, T.; Troitsky, S.; Tsunesada, Y.; Tsutsumi, K.; Uchihori, Y.; Udo, S.; Urban, F.; Vasiloff, G.; Wong, T.; Yamane, R.; Yamaoka, H.; Yamazaki, K.; Yang, J.; Yashiro, K.; Yoneda, Y.; Yoshida, S.; Yoshii, H.; Zollinger, R.; Zundel, Z.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results of different searches for correlations between very high-energy neutrino candidates detected by IceCube and the highest-energy cosmic rays measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory and the Telescope Array. We first consider samples of cascade neutrino events and of hig

  2. Search for correlations between the arrival directions of IceCube neutrino events and ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays detected by the Pierre Auger Observatory and the Telescope Array

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collaboration, The IceCube; Aartsen, M. G.; Abraham, K.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Altmann, D.; Anderson, T.; Ansseau, I.; Archinger, M.; Arguelles, C.; Arlen, T. C.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Barwick, S. W.; Baum, V.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Tjus, J. Becker; Becker, K. -H.; Beiser, E.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bernhard, A.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Blumenthal, J.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohm, C.; Börner, M.; Bos, F.; Bose, D.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Braun, J.; Brayeur, L.; Bretz, H. -P.; Buzinsky, N.; Casey, J.; Casier, M.; Cheung, E.; Chirkin, D.; Christov, A.; Clark, K.; Classen, L.; Coenders, S.; Cowen, D. F.; Silva, A. H. Cruz; Daughhetee, J.; Davis, J. C.; Day, M.; André, J. P. A. M. de; Clercq, C. De; Rosendo, E. del Pino; Dembinski, H.; Ridder, S. De; Desiati, P.; Vries, K. D. de; Wasseige, G. de; With, M. de; DeYoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Lorenzo, V. di; Dumm, J. P.; Dunkman, M.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Eichmann, B.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fahey, S.; Fazely, A. R.; Feintzeig, J.; Felde, J.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Fischer-Wasels, T.; Flis, S.; Fösig, C. -C.; Fuchs, T.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gaior, R.; Gallagher, J.; Gerhardt, L.; Ghorbani, K.; Gier, D.; Gladstone, L.; Glagla, M.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Golup, G.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Góra, D.; Grant, D.; Griffith, Z.; Groß, A.; Ha, C.; Haack, C.; Ismail, A. Haj; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hansen, E.; Hansmann, B.; Hanson, K.; Hebecker, D.; Heereman, D.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Hickford, S.; Hignight, J.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Holzapfel, K.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Huang, F.; Huber, M.; Huelsnitz, W.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; In, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobi, E.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jeong, M.; Jero, K.; Jurkovic, M.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Kauer, M.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, J.; Kheirandish, A.; Kiryluk, J.; Kläs, J.; Klein, S. R.; Kohnen, G.; Koirala, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Konietz, R.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krings, K.; Kroll, G.; Kroll, M.; Krückl, G.; Kunnen, J.; Kurahashi, N.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Lanfranchi, J. L.; Larson, M. J.; Lesiak-Bzdak, M.; Leuermann, M.; Leuner, J.; Lu, L.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Mandelartz, M.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; Maunu, R.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Medici, M.; Meli, A.; Menne, T.; Merino, G.; Meures, T.; Miarecki, S.; Middell, E.; Mohrmann, L.; Montaruli, T.; Morse, R.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naumann, U.; Neer, G.; Niederhausen, H.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Pollmann, A. Obertacke; Olivas, A.; Omairat, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; Palczewski, T.; Pandya, H.; Pankova, D. V.; Paul, L.; Pepper, J. A.; Heros, C. Pérez de los; Pfendner, C.; Pieloth, D.; Pinat, E.; Posselt, J.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. 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U.; Abe, M.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Allen, M.; Azuma, R.; Barcikowski, E.; Belz, J. W.; Bergman, D. R.; Blake, S. A.; Cady, R.; Chae, M. J.; Cheon, B. G.; Chiba, J.; Chikawa, M.; Cho, W. R.; Fujii, T.; Fukushima, M.; Goto, T.; Hanlon, W.; Hayashi, Y.; Hayashida, N.; Hibino, K.; Honda, K.; Ikeda, D.; Inoue, N.; Ishii, T.; Ishimori, R.; Ito, H.; Ivanov, D.; Jui, C. C. H.; Kadota, K.; Kakimoto, F.; Kalashev, O.; Kasahara, K.; Kawai, H.; Kawakami, S.; Kawana, S.; Kawata, K.; Kido, E.; Kim, H. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, J. H.; Kitamura, S.; Kitamura, Y.; Kuzmin, V.; Kwon, Y. J.; Lan, J.; Lim, S. I.; Lundquist, J. P.; Machida, K.; Martens, K.; Matsuda, T.; Matsuyama, T.; Matthews, J. N.; Minamino, M.; Mukai, Y.; Myers, I.; Nagasawa, K.; Nagataki, S.; Nakamura, T.; Nonaka, T.; Nozato, A.; Ogio, S.; Ogura, J.; Ohnishi, M.; Ohoka, H.; Oki, K.; Okuda, T.; Ono, M.; Oshima, A.; Ozawa, S.; Park, I. H.; Pshirkov, M. S.; Rodriguez, D. C.; Rubtsov, G.; Ryu, D.; Sagawa, H.; Sakurai, N.; Scott, L. M.; Shah, P. D.; Shibata, F.; Shibata, T.; Shimodaira, H.; Shin, B. K.; Shin, H. S.; Smith, J. D.; Sokolsky, P.; Springer, R. W.; Stokes, B. T.; Stratton, S. R.; Stroman, T. A.; Suzawa, T.; Takamura, M.; Takeda, M.; Takeishi, R.; Taketa, A.; Takita, M.; Tameda, Y.; Tanaka, H.; Tanaka, K.; Tanaka, M.; Thomas, S. B.; Thomson, G. B.; Tinyakov, P.; Tkachev, I.; Tokuno, H.; Tomida, T.; Troitsky, S.; Tsunesada, Y.; Tsutsumi, K.; Uchihori, Y.; Udo, S.; Urban, F.; Vasiloff, G.; Wong, T.; Yamane, R.; Yamaoka, H.; Yamazaki, K.; Yang, J.; Yashiro, K.; Yoneda, Y.; Yoshida, S.; Yoshii, H.; Zollinger, R.; Zundel, Z.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results of different searches for correlations between very high-energy neutrino candidates detected by IceCube and the highest-energy cosmic rays measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory and the Telescope Array. We first consider samples of cascade neutrino events and of hig

  3. Search for correlations between the arrival directions of IceCube neutrino events and ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays detected by the Pierre Auger Observatory and the Telescope Array

    OpenAIRE

    Collaboration, The IceCube; Aartsen, M. G.; Abraham, K.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M; Altmann, D.; Anderson, T.; Ansseau, I.; Archinger, M.; Arguelles, C.; Arlen, T. C.; Auffenberg, J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of different searches for correlations between very high-energy neutrino candidates detected by IceCube and the highest-energy cosmic rays measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory and the Telescope Array. We first consider samples of cascade neutrino events and of high-energy neutrino-induced muon tracks, which provided evidence for a neutrino flux of astrophysical origin, and study their cross-correlation with the ultrahigh-energy cosmic ray (UHECR) samples as...

  4. Search for correlations between the arrival directions of IceCube neutrino events and ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays detected by the Pierre Auger Observatory and the Telescope Array

    OpenAIRE

    Aartsen, M. G.; Abraham, K.; Ackermann, Markus; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M; Altmann, D.; Anderson, T.; Ansseau, I.; Archinger, M.; Arguelles, C.; Arlen, T. C.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.

    2016-01-01

    Replaced with published version. Added journal reference and DOI; International audience; This paper presents the results of different searches for correlations between very high-energy neutrino candidates detected by IceCube and the highest-energy cosmic rays measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory and the Telescope Array. We first consider samples of cascade neutrino events and of high-energy neutrino-induced muon tracks, which provided evidence for a neutrino flux of astrophysical origin,...

  5. Deployment Repeatability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    controlled to great precision, but in a Cubesat , there may be no attitude determination at all. Such a Cubesat might treat sun angle and tumbling rates as...could be sensitive to small differences in motor controller timing. In these cases, the analyst might choose to model the entire deployment path, with...knowledge of the material damage model or motor controller timing precision. On the other hand, if many repeated and environmentally representative

  6. 基于共形天线阵的免搜索来波方向估计算法研究%Search-free DOA estimation algorithms based on conformal antenna array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨鹏; 杨峰; 聂在平; 周海京

    2012-01-01

    The major problem of traditional direction-of-arrival(DOA) estimation algorithms based on subspace-divided method is that it requires massive calculations and cannot be applied on arbitrary array structures.Based on an actual hemisphere conformal array,several search-free algorithms which can be applied on arbitrary arrays are studied.The performances of these algorithms on conformal antenna array are compared.Theoretic analysis and numerical simulations show that these algorithms can achieve good performance on conformal array under certain conditions.%运算量大,受阵列拓扑结构限制是传统基于子空间分解的来波方向(DOA)估计算法的主要问题,这些问题大大限制了其在实际工程中的应用。针对共形天线阵的特殊性,结合实际的共形阵,研究了几种可以应用于任意阵列结构的免搜索DOA估计算法,并比较了这些算法在共形阵上的性能。理论分析和数值仿真表明:在一定条件下这些算法均可在共形阵上取得较优的估计性能。

  7. Search for correlations between the arrival directions of IceCube neutrino events and ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays detected by the Pierre Auger Observatory and the Telescope Array

    CERN Document Server

    Aartsen, M G; Ackermann, M; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Ahrens, M; Altmann, D; Anderson, T; Ansseau, I; Archinger, M; Arguelles, C; Arlen, T C; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Barwick, S W; Baum, V; Bay, R; Beatty, J J; Tjus, J Becker; Becker, K -H; Beiser, E; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bernhard, A; Besson, D Z; Binder, G; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Börner, M; Bos, F; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Braun, J; Brayeur, L; Bretz, H -P; Buzinsky, N; Casey, J; Casier, M; Cheung, E; Chirkin, D; Christov, A; Clark, K; Classen, L; Coenders, S; Cowen, D F; Silva, A H Cruz; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; Day, M; de André, J P A M; De Clercq, C; Rosendo, E del Pino; Dembinski, H; De Ridder, S; Desiati, P; de Vries, K D; de Wasseige, G; de With, M; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; di Lorenzo, V; Dumm, J P; Dunkman, M; Eberhardt, B; Ehrhardt, T; Eichmann, B; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fahey, S; Fazely, A R; Feintzeig, J; Felde, J; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Flis, S; Fösig, C -C; Fuchs, T; Gaisser, T K; Gaior, R; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Ghorbani, K; Gier, D; Gladstone, L; Glagla, M; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Golup, G; Gonzalez, J G; Góra, D; Grant, D; Griffith, Z; Groß, A; Ha, C; Haack, C; Ismail, A Haj; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hansen, E; Hansmann, B; Hanson, K; Hebecker, D; Heereman, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hickford, S; Hignight, J; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, R; Holzapfel, K; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Huang, F; Huber, M; Huelsnitz, W; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; In, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Japaridze, G S; Jeong, M; Jero, K; Jurkovic, M; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kauer, M; Keivani, A; Kelley, J L; Kemp, J; Kheirandish, A; Kiryluk, J; Kläs, J; Klein, S R; Kohnen, G; Koirala, R; Kolanoski, H; Konietz, R; Köpke, L; Kopper, C; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Krings, K; Kroll, G; Kroll, M; Krückl, G; Kunnen, J; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Lanfranchi, J L; Larson, M J; Lesiak-Bzdak, M; Leuermann, M; Leuner, J; Lu, L; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Maggi, G; Mahn, K B M; Mandelartz, M; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; Maunu, R; McNally, F; Meagher, K; Medici, M; Meli, A; Menne, T; Merino, G; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Mohrmann, L; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Nahnhauer, R; Naumann, U; Neer, G; Niederhausen, H; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Pollmann, A Obertacke; Olivas, A; Omairat, A; O'Murchadha, A; Palczewski, T; Pandya, H; Pankova, D V; Paul, L; Pepper, J A; Heros, C Pérez de los; Pfendner, C; Pieloth, D; Pinat, E; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Quinnan, M; Raab, C; Rädel, L; Rameez, M; Rawlins, K; Reimann, R; Relich, M; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Richman, M; Richter, S; Riedel, B; Robertson, S; Rongen, M; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Ryckbosch, D; Sabbatini, L; Sander, H -G; Sandrock, A; Sandroos, J; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Schimp, M; Schmidt, T; Schoenen, S; Schöneberg, S; Schönwald, A; Schulte, L; Schumacher, L; Seckel, D; Seunarine, S; Soldin, D; Song, M; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stahlberg, M; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stasik, A; Steuer, A; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stößl, A; Ström, R; Strotjohann, N L; Sullivan, G W; Sutherland, M; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tatar, J; Ter-Antonyan, S; Terliuk, A; Tešić, G; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Tobin, M N; Toscano, S; Tosi, D; Tselengidou, M; Turcati, A; Unger, E; Usner, M; Vallecorsa, S; Vandenbroucke, J; van Eijndhoven, N; Vanheule, S; van Santen, J; Veenkamp, J; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Vraeghe, M; Walck, C; Wallace, A; Wallraff, M; Wandkowsky, N; Weaver, Ch; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whelan, B J; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Wille, L; Williams, D R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Xu, Y; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; :,; Aab, A; Abreu, P; Aglietta, M; Ahn, E J; Samarai, I Al; Albuquerque, I F M; Allekotte, I; Allison, P; Almela, A; Castillo, J Alvarez; Alvarez-Muñiz, J; Batista, R Alves; Ambrosio, M; Aminaei, A; Anchordoqui, L; Andrada, B; Andringa, S; Aramo, C; Arqueros, F; Arsene, N; Asorey, H; Assis, P; Aublin, J; Avila, G; Awal, N; Badescu, A M; Baus, C; Becker, K H; Bellido, J A; Berat, C; Bertaina, M E; Bertou, X; Biermann, P L; Billoir, P; Blaess, S G; Blanco, A; Blanco, M; Blazek, J; Bleve, C; Blümer, H; Boháčová, M; Boncioli, D; Bonifazi, C; Borodai, N; Botti, A M; Brack, J; Brancus, I; Bretz, T; Bridgeman, A; Briechle, F L; Buchholz, P; Bueno, A; Buitink, S; Buscemi, M; Caballero-Mora, K S; Caccianiga, B; Caccianiga, L; Candusso, M; Caramete, L; Caruso, R; Castellina, A; Cataldi, G; Cazon, L; Cester, R; Chavez, A G; Chiavassa, A; Chinellato, J A; Diaz, J C Chirinos; Chudoba, J; Clay, R W; Colalillo, R; Coleman, A; Collica, L; Coluccia, M R; Conceição, R; Contreras, F; Cooper, M J; Cordier, A; Coutu, S; Covault, C E; Dallier, R; D'Amico, S; Daniel, B; Dasso, S; Daumiller, K; Dawson, B R; de Almeida, R M; de Jong, S J; De Mauro, G; Neto, J R T de Mello; De Mitri, I; de Oliveira, J; de Souza, V; Debatin, J; del Peral, L; Deligny, O; Dhital, N; Di Giulio, C; Di Matteo, A; Castro, M L Díaz; Diogo, F; Dobrigkeit, C; Docters, W; D'Olivo, J C; Dorofeev, A; Anjos, R C dos; Dova, M T; Dundovic, A; Ebr, J; Engel, R; Erdmann, M; Erfani, M; Escobar, C O; Espadanal, J; Etchegoyen, A; Falcke, H; Fang, K; Farrar, G; Fauth, A C; Fazzini, N; Ferguson, A P; Fick, B; Figueira, J M; Filevich, A; Filipčič, A; Fratu, O; Freire, M M; Fujii, T; Fuster, A; Gallo, F; García, B; Garcia-Gamez, D; Garcia-Pinto, D; Gate, F; Gemmeke, H; Gherghel-Lascu, A; Ghia, P L; Giaccari, U; Giammarchi, M; Giller, M; Głas, D; Glaser, C; Glass, H; Berisso, M Gómez; Vitale, P F Gómez; González, N; Gookin, B; Gordon, J; Gorgi, A; Gorham, P; Gouffon, P; Griffith, N; Grillo, A F; Grubb, T D; Guarino, F; Guedes, G P; Hampel, M R; Hansen, P; Harari, D; Harrison, T A; Harton, J L; Hasankiadeh, Q; Haungs, A; Hebbeker, T; Heck, D; Heimann, P; Herve, A E; Hojvat, C; Hollon, N; Holt, E; Homola, P; Hörandel, J R; Horvath, P; Hrabovský, M; Huege, T; Insolia, A; Isar, P G; Jandt, I; Jansen, S; Jarne, C; Johnsen, J A; Josebachuili, M; Kääpä, A; Kambeitz, O; Kampert, K H; Kasper, P; Katkov, I; Keilhauer, B; Kemp, E; Kieckhafer, R M; Klages, H O; Kleifges, M; Kleinfeller, J; Krause, R; Krohm, N; Kuempel, D; Mezek, G Kukec; Kunka, N; Awad, A Kuotb; LaHurd, D; Latronico, L; Lauer, R; Lauscher, M; Lautridou, P; Lebrun, D; Lebrun, P; de Oliveira, M A Leigui; Letessier-Selvon, A; Lhenry-Yvon, I; Link, K; Lopes, L; López, R; Casado, A López; Lucero, A; Malacari, M; Mallamaci, M; Mandat, D; Mantsch, P; Mariazzi, A G; Marin, V; Mariş, I C; Marsella, G; Martello, D; Martinez, H; Bravo, O Martínez; Meza, J J Masías; Mathes, H J; Mathys, S; Matthews, J; Matthews, J A J; Matthiae, G; Maurizio, D; Mayotte, E; Mazur, P O; Medina, C; Medina-Tanco, G; Mello, V B B; Melo, D; Menshikov, A; Messina, S; Micheletti, M I; Middendorf, L; Minaya, I A; Miramonti, L; Mitrica, B; Molina-Bueno, L; Mollerach, S; Montanet, F; Morello, C; Mostafá, M; Moura, C A; Müller, G; Muller, M A; Müller, S; Navas, S; Necesal, P; Nellen, L; Nelles, A; Neuser, J; Nguyen, P H; Niculescu-Oglinzanu, M; Niechciol, M; Niemietz, L; Niggemann, T; Nitz, D; Nosek, D; Novotny, V; Nožka, H; Núñez, L A; Ochilo, L; Oikonomou, F; Olinto, A; Pacheco, N; Selmi-Dei, D Pakk; Palatka, M; Pallotta, J; Papenbreer, P; Parente, G; Parra, A; Paul, T; Pech, M; Pękala, J; Pelayo, R; Peña-Rodriguez, J; Pepe, I M; Perrone, L; Petermann, E; Peters, C; Petrera, S; Phuntsok, J; Piegaia, R; Pierog, T; Pieroni, P; Pimenta, M; Pirronello, V; Platino, M; Plum, M; Porowski, C; Prado, R R; Privitera, P; Prouza, M; Quel, E J; Querchfeld, S; Quinn, S; Rautenberg, J; Ravel, O; Ravignani, D; Reinert, D; Revenu, B; Ridky, J; Risse, M; Ristori, P; Rizi, V; de Carvalho, W Rodrigues; Rojo, J Rodriguez; Rodríguez-Frías, M D; Rogozin, D; Rosado, J; Roth, M; Roulet, E; Rovero, A C; Saffi, S J; Saftoiu, A; Salazar, H; Saleh, A; Greus, F Salesa; Salina, G; Gomez, J D Sanabria; Sánchez, F; Sanchez-Lucas, P; Santos, E M; Santos, E; Sarazin, F; Sarkar, B; Sarmento, R; Sarmiento-Cano, C; Sato, R; Scarso, C; Schauer, M; Scherini, V; Schieler, H; Schmidt, D; Scholten, O; Schoorlemmer, H; Schovánek, P; Schröder, F G; Schulz, A; Schulz, J; Schumacher, J; Segreto, A; Settimo, M; Shadkam, A; Shellard, R C; Sigl, G; Sima, O; Śmiałkowski, A; Šmída, R; Snow, G R; Sommers, P; Sonntag, S; Sorokin, J; Squartini, R; Stanca, D; Stanič, S; Stapleton, J; Stasielak, J; Stephan, M; Strafella, F; Stutz, A; Suarez, F; Durán, M Suarez; Suomijärvi, T; Supanitsky, A D; Sutherland, M S; Swain, J; Szadkowski, Z; Taborda, O A; Tapia, A; Tepe, A; Theodoro, V M; Tibolla, O; Timmermans, C; Peixoto, C J Todero; Toma, G; Tomankova, L; Tomé, B; Tonachini, A; Elipe, G Torralba; Machado, D Torres; Travnicek, P; Trini, M; Ulrich, R; Unger, M; Urban, M; Galicia, J F Valdés; Valiño, I; Valore, L; van Aar, G; van Bodegom, P; Berg, A M van den; van Vliet, A; Varela, E; Cárdenas, B Vargas; Varner, G; Vasquez, R; Vázquez, J R; Vázquez, R A; Veberič, D; Verzi, V; Vicha, J; Videla, M; Villaseñor, L; Vorobiov, S; Wahlberg, H; Wainberg, O; Walz, D; Watson, A A; Weber, M; Weidenhaupt, K; Weindl, A; Wiencke, L; Wilczyński, H; Winchen, T; Wittkowski, D; Wundheiler, B; Wykes, S; Yang, L; Yapici, T; Yushkov, A; Zas, E; Zavrtanik, D; Zavrtanik, M; Zepeda, A; Zimmermann, B; Ziolkowski, M; Zong, Z; Abbasi, R U; Abe, M; Abu-Zayyad, T; Allen, M; Azuma, R; Barcikowski, E; Belz, J W; Bergman, D R; Blake, S A; Cady, R; Chae, M J; Cheon, B G; Chiba, J; Chikawa, M; Cho, W R; Fukushima, M; Goto, T; Hanlon, W; Hayashi, Y; Hayashida, N; Hibino, K; Honda, K; Ikeda, D; Inoue, N; Ishii, T; Ishimori, R; Ito, H; Ivanov, D; Jui, C C H; Kadota, K; Kakimoto, F; Kalashev, O; Kasahara, K; Kawai, H; Kawakami, S; Kawana, S; Kawata, K; Kido, E; Kim, H B; Kim, J H; Kitamura, S; Kitamura, Y; Kuzmin, V; Kwon, Y J; Lan, J; Lim, S I; Lundquist, J P; Machida, K; Martens, K; Matsuda, T; Matsuyama, T; Matthews, J N; Minamino, M; Mukai, Y; Myers, I; Nagasawa, K; Nagataki, S; Nakamura, T; Nonaka, T; Nozato, A; Ogio, S; Ogura, J; Ohnishi, M; Ohoka, H; Oki, K; Okuda, T; Ono, M; Oshima, A; Ozawa, S; Park, I H; Pshirkov, M S; Rodriguez, D C; Rubtsov, G; Ryu, D; Sagawa, H; Sakurai, N; Scott, L M; Shah, P D; Shibata, F; Shibata, T; Shimodaira, H; Shin, B K; Shin, H S; Smith, J D; Sokolsky, P; Springer, R W; Stokes, B T; Stratton, S R; Stroman, T A; Suzawa, T; Takamura, M; Takeda, M; Takeishi, R; Taketa, A; Takita, M; Tameda, Y; Tanaka, H; Tanaka, K; Tanaka, M; Thomas, S B; Thomson, G B; Tinyakov, P; Tkachev, I; Tokuno, H; Tomida, T; Troitsky, S; Tsunesada, Y; Tsutsumi, K; Uchihori, Y; Udo, S; Urban, F; Vasiloff, G; Wong, T; Yamane, R; Yamaoka, H; Yamazaki, K; Yang, J; Yashiro, K; Yoneda, Y; Yoshii, H; Zollinger, R; Zundel, Z

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of different searches for correlations between very high-energy neutrino candidates detected by IceCube and the highest-energy cosmic rays measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory and the Telescope Array. We first consider samples of cascade neutrino events and of high-energy neutrino-induced muon tracks, which provided evidence for a neutrino flux of astrophysical origin, and study their cross-correlation with the ultrahigh-energy cosmic ray (UHECR) samples as a function of angular separation. We also study their possible directional correlations using a likelihood method stacking the neutrino arrival directions and adopting different assumptions on the size of the UHECR magnetic deflections. Finally, we perform another likelihood analysis stacking the UHECR directions and using a sample of through-going muon tracks optimized for neutrino point-source searches with sub-degree angular resolution. No indications of correlations at discovery level are obtained for any of the sear...

  8. An Updated Search of Steady TeV $\\gamma-$Ray Point Sources in Northern Hemisphere Using the Tibet Air Shower Array

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Y

    2008-01-01

    Using the data taken from Tibet II High Density (HD) Array (1997 February-1999 September) and Tibet-III array (1999 November-2005 November), our previous northern sky survey for TeV $\\gamma-$ray point sources has now been updated by a factor of 2.8 improved statistics. From $0.0^{\\circ}$ to $60.0^{\\circ}$ in declination (Dec) range, no new TeV $\\gamma-$ray point sources with sufficiently high significance were identified while the well-known Crab Nebula and Mrk421 remain to be the brightest TeV $\\gamma-$ray sources within the field of view of the Tibet air shower array. Based on the currently available data and at the 90% confidence level (C.L.), the flux upper limits for different power law index assumption are re-derived, which are approximately improved by 1.7 times as compared with our previous reported limits.

  9. An updated search of steady TeV γ-ray point sources in northern hemisphere using the Tibet air shower array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Using the data taken from Tibet Ⅱ High Density (HD) Array (1997 February--1999 September) and Tibet-Ⅲ array (1999 November--2005 November), our previous northern sky survey for TeV γ-ray point sources has now been updated by a factor of 2.8 improved statistics. From 0.0° to 60.0° in declination (Dec) range, no new TeV γ-ray point sources with sufficiently high significance were identified while the well-known Crab Nebula and Mrk421 remain to be the brightest TeV T-ray sources within the field of view of the Tibet air shower array. Based on the currently available data and at the 90% confidence level (C.L.), the flux upper limits for different power law index assumption are re-derived, which are approximately improved by 1.7 times as compared with our previous reported limits.

  10. Search for correlations between the arrival directions of IceCube neutrino events and ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays detected by the Pierre Auger Observatory and the Telescope Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    IceCube Collaboration; Pierre Auger Collaboration; Telescope Array Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of different searches for correlations between very high-energy neutrino candidates detected by IceCube and the highest-energy cosmic rays measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory and the Telescope Array. We first consider samples of cascade neutrino events and of high-energy neutrino-induced muon tracks, which provided evidence for a neutrino flux of astrophysical origin, and study their cross-correlation with the ultrahigh-energy cosmic ray (UHECR) samples as a function of angular separation. We also study their possible directional correlations using a likelihood method stacking the neutrino arrival directions and adopting different assumptions on the size of the UHECR magnetic deflections. Finally, we perform another likelihood analysis stacking the UHECR directions and using a sample of through-going muon tracks optimized for neutrino point-source searches with sub-degree angular resolution. No indications of correlations at discovery level are obtained for any of the searches performed. The smallest of the p-values comes from the search for correlation between UHECRs with IceCube high-energy cascades, a result that should continue to be monitored.

  11. Pacific Array (Transportable Broadband Ocean Floor Array)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakatsu, Hitoshi; Ekstrom, Goran; Evans, Rob; Forsyth, Don; Gaherty, Jim; Kennett, Brian; Montagner, Jean-Paul; Utada, Hisashi

    2016-04-01

    Based on recent developments on broadband ocean bottom seismometry, we propose a next generation large-scale array experiment in the ocean. Recent advances in ocean bottom broadband seismometry1, together with advances in the seismic analysis methodology, have enabled us to resolve the regional 1-D structure of the entire lithosphere/asthenosphere system, including seismic anisotropy (azimuthal, and hopefully radial), with deployments of ~15 broadband ocean bottom seismometers (BBOBSs). Having ~15 BBOBSs as an array unit for a 2-year deployment, and repeating such deployments in a leap-frog way or concurrently (an array of arrays) for a decade or so would enable us to cover a large portion of the Pacific basin. Such efforts, not only by giving regional constraints on the 1-D structure beneath Pacific ocean, but also by sharing waveform data for global scale waveform tomography, would drastically increase our knowledge of how plate tectonics works on this planet, as well as how it worked for the past 150 million years. International collaborations is essential: if three countries/institutions participate this endeavor together, Pacific Array may be accomplished within five-or-so years.

  12. Search Engines for Tomorrow's Scholars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagan, Jody Condit

    2011-01-01

    Today's scholars face an outstanding array of choices when choosing search tools: Google Scholar, discipline-specific abstracts and index databases, library discovery tools, and more recently, Microsoft's re-launch of their academic search tool, now dubbed Microsoft Academic Search. What are these tools' strengths for the emerging needs of…

  13. Reward modulation of contextual cueing: Repeated context overshadows repeated target location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifian, Fariba; Contier, Oliver; Preuschhof, Claudia; Pollmann, Stefan

    2017-08-07

    Contextual cueing can be enhanced by reward. However, there is a debate if reward is associated with the repeated target-distractor configurations or with the repeated target locations that occur in both repeated and new displays. Based on neuroimaging evidence, we hypothesized that reward becomes associated with the target location only in new displays, but not in repeated displays, where the repeated target location is overshadowed by the more salient repeated target-distractor configuration. To test this hypothesis, we varied the reward value associated with the same target location in repeated and new displays. The results confirmed the overshadowing hypothesis in that search facilitation in repeated target-distractor configurations was modulated by the variable value associated with the target location. This effect was observed mainly in early learning.

  14. Mastering Search Analytics Measuring SEO, SEM and Site Search

    CERN Document Server

    Chaters, Brent

    2011-01-01

    Many companies still approach Search Engine Optimization (SEO) and paid search as separate initiatives. This in-depth guide shows you how to use these programs as part of a comprehensive strategy-not just to improve your site's search rankings, but to attract the right people and increase your conversion rate. Learn how to measure, test, analyze, and interpret all of your search data with a wide array of analytic tools. Gain the knowledge you need to determine the strategy's return on investment. Ideal for search specialists, webmasters, and search marketing managers, Mastering Search Analyt

  15. Repeat-until-success quantum repeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruschi, David Edward; Barlow, Thomas M.; Razavi, Mohsen; Beige, Almut

    2014-09-01

    We propose a repeat-until-success protocol to improve the performance of probabilistic quantum repeaters. Conventionally, these rely on passive static linear-optics elements and photodetectors to perform Bell-state measurements (BSMs) with a maximum success rate of 50%. This is a strong impediment for entanglement swapping between distant quantum memories. Every time a BSM fails, entanglement needs to be redistributed between the corresponding memories in the repeater link. The key ingredients of our scheme are repeatable BSMs. Under ideal conditions, these turn probabilistic quantum repeaters into deterministic ones. Under realistic conditions, our protocol too might fail. However, using additional threshold detectors now allows us to improve the entanglement generation rate by almost orders of magnitude, at a nominal distance of 1000 km, compared to schemes that rely on conventional BSMs. This improvement is sufficient to make the performance of our scheme comparable to the expected performance of some deterministic quantum repeaters.

  16. National Foster Care and Adoption Directory Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cultural Competence Diverse Populations and Communities Domestic Violence Human Trafficking Laws & Policies Mental Health Service Array Statistics Substance Abuse Well-Being Youth Library Search Our ...

  17. Searching for novel modes of toxic actions of oil spill using E. coli live cell array reporter system - A Hebei Spirit oil spill study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Dawoon; Guan, Miao; Lee, Sangwoo; Kim, Cheolmin; Shin, Hyesoo; Hong, Seongjin; Yim, Un Hyuk; Shim, Won Joon; Giesy, John P; Khim, Jong Seong; Zhang, Xiaowei; Choi, Kyungho

    2017-02-01

    Oil is a complex mixture of numerous compounds. Therefore, oil spills near shore can cause various adverse effects on coastal ecosystems. However, most toxicological assessments conducted on oil spill sites have focused on limited modes of toxic actions. In the present study, we utilized the Escherichia coli (E. coli) live cell array system (LCA) to identify novel modes of toxicities of the oil spill-affected sediments. For this purpose, sediment samples were collected from an area heavily polluted by Hebei Spirit oil spill (HSOS) incident of 2007. A total of 93 E. coli reporter genes were used to study responses to the chemicals in the mixture. E. coli K12 strains were exposed to extracts of oil or the sediment, and changes in gene expression were measured. Exposure to extracts of crude and weathered oil resulted in decreased expression in ∼30% of tested genes. However, changes in expression observed after exposure to sediment extracts varied. Sediment extracts containing large concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) caused down-regulation of >70% of the genes, while extracts containing lesser total concentrations of PAHs exhibited different trends: genes involved in drug resistance were generally up-regulated, while genes responsive to DNA damage were up-regulated in only two extracts. Results suggest that oil pollution can modulate several toxic response pathways related to DNA repair and antibiotic responses. Results from LCA obtained from the sediment and oil samples were different from those observed in the H4IIE-luc assay. Toxicological implications of such observations deserve further examination. Overall, LCA is a promising tool for screening samples and identifying potential modes of toxicities of environmental samples associated with oil spills.

  18. Method of photovoltaic array maximum power point tracking based on golden section search%基于黄金分割搜索的光伏阵列最大功率点跟踪方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪艳; 潘东方; 姚海峰; 武朗

    2014-01-01

    In order to obtain the maximum power output of the solar photovoltaic array ,it is necessary to track the maximum power point of the array .In view of the deficiency of the traditional algorithm of maximum power point tracking (MPPT ) ,the variable step size method of golden section search is introduced ,whose principle is to change the step size dynamically so as to determine the search range ,and then to approach the maximum power point step by step through the interaction .As a result ,the method has the characteristic of fast convergence in practical engineering .Based on the establishment of mathematical model ,the simulation and analysis in Matlab/Simulink ,and the comparison between the simulation result and the result by the tra-ditional algorithm of MPPT ,it is concluded that the presented method can rapidly track the optimal point of photovoltaic power generation system ,effectively improve the efficiency of photovoltaic power generation sys-tem and has features of high control precision and rate .%为了获得太阳能光伏阵列最大功率输出,需要对光伏阵列最大功率点实行跟踪,针对传统M PPT 算法的不足,文章引入变步长黄金分割搜索法,其原理是动态改变步长确定搜索范围,再通过迭代逐步逼近最大功率点,使得在实际工程中具有快速收敛特性。通过建立数学模型并在Matlab/Simulink上进行仿真分析,将所得的仿真结果与传统的M PPT算法比较,该算法能快速地实现光伏发电系统最佳工作点的跟踪,提高了光伏发电系统的发电效率,同时具有控制精度高和控制速率快的特点。

  19. Adaptive Large Neighbourhood Search

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røpke, Stefan

    Large neighborhood search is a metaheuristic that has gained popularity in recent years. The heuristic repeatedly moves from solution to solution by first partially destroying the solution and then repairing it. The best solution observed during this search is presented as the final solution....... This tutorial introduces the large neighborhood search metaheuristic and the variant adaptive large neighborhood search that dynamically tunes parameters of the heuristic while it is running. Both heuristics belong to a broader class of heuristics that are searching a solution space using very large...... neighborhoods. The tutorial also present applications of the adaptive large neighborhood search, mostly related to vehicle routing problems for which the heuristic has been extremely successful. We discuss how the heuristic can be parallelized and thereby take advantage of modern desktop computers...

  20. Searches for Large-Scale Anisotropy in the Arrival Directions of Cosmic Rays Detected above Energy of $10^{19}$ eV at the Pierre Auger Observatory and the Telescope Array

    CERN Document Server

    Auger, The Pierre; Aab, A; Abreu, P; Aglietta, M; Ahn, E J; Al, I; Albuquerque, I F M; Allekotte, I; Allen, J; Allison, P; Almela, A; Alvarez, J; Alvarez-Muñiz, J; Alves, R; Ambrosio, M; Aminaei, A; Anchordoqui, L; Andringa, S; Aramo, C; Arqueros, F; Asorey, H; Assis, P; Aublin, J; Ave, M; Avenier, M; Avila, G; Badescu, A M; Barber, K B; Bäuml, J; Baus, C; Beatty, J J; Becker, K H; Bellido, J A; Berat, C; Bertou, X; Biermann, P L; Billoir, P; Blanco, M; Bleve, C; Blümer, H; Boháčová, M; Boncioli, D; Bonifazi, C; Bonino, R; Borodai, N; Brack, J; Brancus, I; Brogueira, P; Brown, W C; Buchholz, P; Bueno, A; Buitink, S; Buscemi, M; Caballero-Mora, K S; Caccianiga, B; Caccianiga, L; Candusso, M; Caramete, L; Caruso, R; Castellina, A; Cataldi, G; Cazon, L; Cester, R; Chavez, A G; Chiavassa, A; Chinellato, J A; Chudoba, J; Cilmo, M; Clay, R W; Cocciolo, G; Colalillo, R; Coleman, A; Collica, L; Coluccia, M R; Conceição, R; Contreras, F; Cooper, M J; Cordier, A; Coutu, S; Covault, C E; Cronin, J; Curutiu, A; Dallier, R; Daniel, B; Dasso, S; Daumiller, K; Dawson, B R; de, R M; De, M; de, S J; de, J R T; De, I; de, J; de, V; del, L; Deligny, O; Dembinski, H; Dhital, N; Di, C; Di, A; Diaz, J C; Díaz, M L; Diogo, F; Dobrigkeit, C; Docters, W; D'Olivo, J C; Dorofeev, A; Dorosti, Q; Dova, M T; Ebr, J; Engel, R; Erdmann, M; Erfani, M; Escobar, C O; Espadanal, J; Etchegoyen, A; Facal, P; Falcke, H; Fang, K; Farrar, G; Fauth, A C; Fazzini, N; Ferguson, A P; Fernandes, M; Fick, B; Figueira, J M; Filevich, A; Filipčič, A; Fox, B D; Fratu, O; Fröhlich, U; Fuchs, B; Fuji, T; Gaior, R; García, B; Garcia, S T; Garcia-Gamez, D; Garcia-Pinto, D; Garilli, G; Gascon, A; Gate, F; Gemmeke, H; Ghia, P L; Giaccari, U; Giammarchi, M; Giller, M; Glaser, C; Glass, H; Gómez, M; Gómez, P F; Gonçalves, P; Gonzalez, J G; González, N; Gookin, B; Gorgi, A; Gorham, P; Gouffon, P; Grebe, S; Griffith, N; Grillo, A F; Grubb, T D; Guardincerri, Y; Guarino, F; Guedes, G P; Hampel, M R; Hansen, P; Harari, D; Harrison, T A; Hartmann, S; Harton, J L; Haungs, A; Hebbeker, T; Heck, D; Heimann, P; Herve, A E; Hill, G C; Hojvat, C; Hollon, N; Holt, E; Homola, P; Hörandel, J R; Horvath, P; Hrabovský, M; Huber, D; Huege, T; Insolia, A; Isar, P G; Islo, K; Jandt, I; Jansen, S; Jarne, C; Josebachuili, M; Kääpä, A; Kambeitz, O; Kampert, K H; Kasper, P; Katkov, I; Kégl, B; Keilhauer, B; Keivani, A; Kemp, E; Kieckhafer, R M; Klages, H O; Kleifges, M; Kleinfeller, J; Krause, R; Krohm, N; Krömer, O; Kruppke-Hansen, D; Kuempel, D; Kunka, N; La, G; LaHurd, D; Latronico, L; Lauer, R; Lauscher, M; Lautridou, P; Le, S; Leão, M S A B; Lebrun, D; Lebrun, P; Leigui, M A; Letessier-Selvon, A; Lhenry-Yvon, I; Link, K; López, R; Lopez, A; Louedec, K; Lozano, J; Lu, L; Lucero, A; Ludwig, M; Maccarone, M C; Malacari, M; Maldera, S; Mallamaci, M; Maller, J; Mandat, D; Mantsch, P; Mariazzi, A G; Marin, V; Mariş, I C; Marsella, G; Martello, D; Martin, L; Martinez, H; Martínez, O; Martraire, D; Masías, J J; Mathes, H J; Mathys, S; Matthews, J A J; Matthews, J; Matthiae, G; Maurel, D; Maurizio, D; Mayotte, E; Mazur, P O; Medina, C; Medina-Tanco, G; Melissas, M; Melo, D; Menichetti, E; Menshikov, A; Messina, S; Meyhandan, R; Mićanović, S; Micheletti, M I; Middendorf, L; Minaya, I A; Miramonti, L; Mitrica, B; Molina-Bueno, L; Mollerach, S; Monasor, M; Monnier, D; Montanet, F; Morello, C; Mostafá, M; Moura, C A; Muller, M A; Müller, G; Münchmeyer, M; Mussa, R; Navarra, G; Navas, S; Necesal, P; Nellen, L; Nelles, A; Neuser, J; Niechciol, M; Niemietz, L; Niggemann, T; Nitz, D; Nosek, D; Novotny, V; Nožka, L; Ochilo, L; Olinto, A; Oliveira, M; Pacheco, N; Pakk, D; Palatka, M; Pallotta, J; Palmieri, N; Papenbreer, P; Parente, G; Parra, A; Paul, T; Pech, M; Pȩkala, J; Pelayo, R; Pepe, I M; Perrone, L; Pesce, R; Petermann, E; Peters, C; Petrera, S; Petrolini, A; Petrov, Y; Phuntsok, J; Piegaia, R; Pierog, T; Pieroni, P; Pimenta, M; Pirronello, V; Platino, M; Plum, M; Porcelli, A; Porowski, C; Prado, R R; Privitera, P; Prouza, M; Purrello, V; Quel, E J; Querchfeld, S; Quinn, S; Rautenberg, J; Ravel, O; Ravignani, D; Revenu, B; Ridky, J; Riggi, S; Risse, M; Ristori, P; Rizi, V; Roberts, J; Rodrigues, W; Rodriguez, I; Rodriguez, G; Rodriguez, J; Rodríguez-Frías, M D; Ros, G; Rosado, J; Rossler, T; Roth, M; Roulet, E; Rovero, A C; Saffi, S J; Saftoiu, A; Salamida, F; Salazar, H; Saleh, A; Salesa, F; Salina, G; Sánchez, F; Sanchez-Lucas, P; Santo, C E; Santos, E; Santos, E M; Sarazin, F; Sarkar, B; Sarmento, R; Sato, R; Scharf, N; Scherini, V; Schieler, H; Schiffer, P; Scholten, O; Schoorlemmer, H; Schovánek, P; Schulz, A; Schulz, J; Schumacher, J; Sciutto, S J; Segreto, A; Settimo, M; Shadkam, A; Shellard, R C; Sidelnik, I; Sigl, G; Sima, O; Śmiał, A; Šmída, R; Snow, G R; Sommers, P; Sorokin, J; Squartini, R; Srivastava, Y N; Stanič, S; Stapleton, J; Stasielak, J; Stephan, M; Stutz, A; Suarez, F; Suomijärvi, T; Supanitsky, A D; Sutherland, M S; Swain, J; Szadkowski, Z; Szuba, M; Taborda, O A; Tapia, A; Tartare, M; Theodoro, V M; Timmermans, C; Todero, C J; Toma, G; Tomankova, L; Tomé, B; Tonachini, A; Torralba, G; Torres, D; Travnicek, P; Trovato, E; Tueros, M; Ulrich, R; Unger, M; Urban, M; Valdés, J F; Valiño, I; Valore, L; van, G; van, A M; van, S; van, A; Varela, E; Vargas, B; Varner, G; Vázquez, J R; Vázquez, R A; Veberič, D; Verzi, V; Vicha, J; Videla, M; Villaseñor, L; Vlcek, B; Vorobiov, S; Wahlberg, H; Wainberg, O; Walz, D; Watson, A A; Weber, M; Weidenhaupt, K; Weindl, A; Werner, F; Widom, A; Wiencke, L; Wilczyńska, B; Wilczyński, H; Will, M; Williams, C; Winchen, T; Wittkowski, D; Wundheiler, B; Wykes, S; Yamamoto, T; Yapici, T; Younk, P; Yuan, G; Yushkov, A; Zamorano, B; Zas, E; Zavrtanik, D; Zavrtanik, M; Zaw, I; Zepeda, A; Zhou, J; Zhu, Y; Zimbres, M; Ziolkowski, M; Abbasi, R U; Abe, M; Abu-Zayyad, T; Allen, M; Anderson, R; Azuma, R; Barcikowski, E; Belz, J W; Bergman, D R; Blake, S A; Cady, R; Chae, M J; Cheon, B G; Chiba, J; Chikawa, M; Cho, W R; Fujii, T; Fukushima, M; Goto, T; Hanlon, W; Hayashi, Y; Hayashida, N; Hibino, K; Honda, K; Ikeda, D; Inoue, N; Ishii, T; Ishimori, R; Ito, H; Ivanov, D; Jui, C C H; Kadota, K; Kakimoto, F; Kalashev, O; Kasahara, K; Kawai, H; Kawakami, S; Kawana, S; Kawata, K; Kido, E; Kim, H B; Kim, J H; Kitamura, S; Kitamura, Y; Kuzmin, V; Kwon, Y J; Lan, J; Lim, S I; Lundquist, J P; Machida, K; Martens, K; Matsuda, T; Matsuyama, T; Matthews, J N; Minamino, M; Mukai, K; Myers, I; Nagasawa, K; Nagataki, S; Nakamura, T; Nonaka, T; Nozato, A; Ogio, S; Ogura, J; Ohnishi, M; Ohoka, H; Oki, K; Okuda, T; Ono, M; Oshima, A; Ozawa, S; Park, I H; Pshirkov, M S; Rodriguez, D C; Rubtsov, G; Ryu, D; Sagawa, H; Sakurai, N; Sampson, A L; Scott, L M; Shah, P D; Shibata, F; Shibata, T; Shimodaira, H; Shin, B K; Smith, J D; Sokolsky, P; Springer, R W; Stokes, B T; Stratton, S R; Stroman, T A; Suzawa, T; Takamura, M; Takeda, M; Takeishi, R; Taketa, A; Takita, M; Tameda, Y; Tanaka, H; Tanaka, K; Tanaka, M; Thomas, S B; Thomson, G B; Tinyakov, P; Tkachev, I; Tokuno, H; Tomida, T; Troitsky, S; Tsunesada, Y; Tsutsumi, K; Uchihori, Y; Udo, S; Urban, F; Vasiloff, G; Wong, T; Yamane, R; Yamaoka, H; Yamazaki, K; Yang, J; Yashiro, K; Yoneda, Y; Yoshida, S; Yoshii, H; Zollinger, R; Zundel, Z

    2014-01-01

    Spherical harmonic moments are well-suited for capturing anisotropy at any scale in the flux of cosmic rays. An unambiguous measurement of the full set of spherical harmonic coefficients requires full-sky coverage. This can be achieved by combining data from observatories located in both the northern and southern hemispheres. To this end, a joint analysis using data recorded at the Telescope Array and the Pierre Auger Observatory above $10^{19}$ eV is presented in this work. The resulting multipolar expansion of the flux of cosmic rays allows us to perform a series of anisotropy searches, and in particular to report on the angular power spectrum of cosmic rays above $10^{19}$ eV. No significant deviation from isotropic expectations is found throughout the analyses performed. Upper limits on the amplitudes of the dipole and quadrupole moments are derived as a function of the direction in the sky, varying between 7% and 13% for the dipole and between 7% and 10% for a symmetric quadrupole.

  1. Searches for large-scale anisotropy in the arrival directions of cosmic rays detected above energy of 10{sup 19} eV at the Pierre Auger observatory and the telescope array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aab, A. [Universität Siegen, Siegen (Germany); Abreu, P.; Andringa, S. [Laboratório de Instrumentação e Física Experimental de Partículas-LIP and Instituto Superior Técnico-IST, Universidade de Lisboa-UL (Portugal); Aglietta, M. [Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino (INAF), Università di Torino and Sezione INFN, Torino (Italy); Ahn, E. J. [Fermilab, Batavia, IL (United States); Al Samarai, I. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire d' Orsay (IPNO), Université Paris 11, CNRS-IN2P3, Orsay (France); Albuquerque, I. F. M. [Universidade de São Paulo, Instituto de Física, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Allekotte, I.; Asorey, H. [Centro Atómico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro (CNEA-UNCuyo-CONICET), San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Allen, J. [New York University, New York, NY (United States); Allison, P. [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Almela, A. [Universidad Tecnológica Nacional - Facultad Regional Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Castillo, J. Alvarez [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D. F. (Mexico); Alvarez-Muñiz, J. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Batista, R. Alves [Universität Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); Ambrosio, M.; Aramo, C. [Università di Napoli " Federico II" and Sezione INFN, Napoli (Italy); Aminaei, A. [IMAPP, Radboud University Nijmegen (Netherlands); Anchordoqui, L. [University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Arqueros, F. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Collaboration: Pierre Auger Collaboration; Telescope Array Collaboration; and others

    2014-10-20

    Spherical harmonic moments are well-suited for capturing anisotropy at any scale in the flux of cosmic rays. An unambiguous measurement of the full set of spherical harmonic coefficients requires full-sky coverage. This can be achieved by combining data from observatories located in both the northern and southern hemispheres. To this end, a joint analysis using data recorded at the Telescope Array and the Pierre Auger Observatory above 10{sup 19} eV is presented in this work. The resulting multipolar expansion of the flux of cosmic rays allows us to perform a series of anisotropy searches, and in particular to report on the angular power spectrum of cosmic rays above 10{sup 19} eV. No significant deviation from isotropic expectations is found throughout the analyses performed. Upper limits on the amplitudes of the dipole and quadrupole moments are derived as a function of the direction in the sky, varying between 7% and 13% for the dipole and between 7% and 10% for a symmetric quadrupole.

  2. Searches for Large-Scale Anisotropy in the Arrival Directions of Cosmic Rays Detected above Energy of $10^{19}$ eV at the Pierre Auger Observatory and the Telescope Array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aab, Alexander; et al,

    2014-10-07

    Spherical harmonic moments are well-suited for capturing anisotropy at any scale in the flux of cosmic rays. An unambiguous measurement of the full set of spherical harmonic coefficients requires full-sky coverage. This can be achieved by combining data from observatories located in both the northern and southern hemispheres. To this end, a joint analysis using data recorded at the Telescope Array and the Pierre Auger Observatory above 1019 eV is presented in this work. The resulting multipolar expansion of the flux of cosmic rays allows us to perform a series of anisotropy searches, and in particular to report on the angular power spectrum of cosmic rays above 1019 eV. No significant deviation from isotropic expectations is found throughout the analyses performed. Upper limits on the amplitudes of the dipole and quadrupole moments are derived as a function of the direction in the sky, varying between 7% and 13% for the dipole and between 7% and 10% for a symmetric quadrupole.

  3. Repeat-induced gene silencing in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrick, D; Fiering, S; Martin, D I; Whitelaw, E

    1998-01-01

    In both plants and Drosophila melanogaster, expression from a transgenic locus may be silenced when repeated transgene copies are arranged as a concatameric array. This repeat-induced gene silencing is frequently manifested as a decrease in the proportion of cells that express the transgene, resulting in a variegated pattern of expression. There is also some indication that, in transgenic mammals, the number of transgene copies within an array can exert a repressive influence on expression, with several mouse studies reporting a decrease in the level of expression per copy as copy number increases. However, because these studies compare different sites of transgene integration as well as arrays with different numbers of copies, the expression levels observed may be subject to varying position effects as well as the influence of the multicopy array. Here we describe use of the lox/Cre system of site-specific recombination to generate transgenic mouse lines in which different numbers of a transgene are present at the same chromosomal location, thereby eliminating the contribution of position effects and allowing analysis of the effect of copy number alone on transgene silencing. Reduction in copy number results in a marked increase in expression of the transgene and is accompanied by decreased chromatin compaction and decreased methylation at the transgene locus. These findings establish that the presence of multiple homologous copies of a transgene within a concatameric array can have a repressive effect upon gene expression in mammalian systems.

  4. CRISPRDetect: A flexible algorithm to define CRISPR arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Ambarish; Staals, Raymond H J; Morales, Sergio E; Fineran, Peter C; Brown, Chris M

    2016-05-17

    CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) RNAs provide the specificity for noncoding RNA-guided adaptive immune defence systems in prokaryotes. CRISPR arrays consist of repeat sequences separated by specific spacer sequences. CRISPR arrays have previously been identified in a large proportion of prokaryotic genomes. However, currently available detection algorithms do not utilise recently discovered features regarding CRISPR loci. We have developed a new approach to automatically detect, predict and interactively refine CRISPR arrays. It is available as a web program and command line from bioanalysis.otago.ac.nz/CRISPRDetect. CRISPRDetect discovers putative arrays, extends the array by detecting additional variant repeats, corrects the direction of arrays, refines the repeat/spacer boundaries, and annotates different types of sequence variations (e.g. insertion/deletion) in near identical repeats. Due to these features, CRISPRDetect has significant advantages when compared to existing identification tools. As well as further support for small medium and large repeats, CRISPRDetect identified a class of arrays with 'extra-large' repeats in bacteria (repeats 44-50 nt). The CRISPRDetect output is integrated with other analysis tools. Notably, the predicted spacers can be directly utilised by CRISPRTarget to predict targets. CRISPRDetect enables more accurate detection of arrays and spacers and its gff output is suitable for inclusion in genome annotation pipelines and visualisation. It has been used to analyse all complete bacterial and archaeal reference genomes.

  5. Quantum repeated games revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Frackiewicz, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    We present a scheme for playing quantum repeated 2x2 games based on the Marinatto and Weber's approach to quantum games. As a potential application, we study twice repeated Prisoner's Dilemma game. We show that results not available in classical game can be obtained when the game is played in the quantum way. Before we present our idea, we comment on the previous scheme of playing quantum repeated games.

  6. Wavenumber response of Shanghai Seismic Array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@Seismic array can be traced back to 1950s when it mainly aimed at detecting and distinguishing the signals of nuclear explosion and seismic signals. The research on seismic array includes seismic array techniques and applications of array in geophysics. Array techniques involve array design and data processing methods (Anne, 1990). Nowadays, the continuous development of seismic array¢s theory could relate to many scientific issues in geophysical field (Tormod, 1989; Mykkeltveit, Bungum, 1984). Seismic array is mainly applied to detect weak events. The response characteristic of array is an important indication of array¢s detection ability. Therefore, when we study an array or construct an array, one of the neces-sary works is to calculate the response characteristics of the array (Harjes, 1990). The aperture and layout of array are two dominating geometrical features. The typical aperture of interna-tional array is generally from several to tens kilometers. For instance, arrays with aperture of dozens kilometers aperture are KSA, WRA, YKA, etc, while arrays with several kilometer aperture are ARC, FIN, GEE, etc. Moreo-ver, in the view of array¢s layout, NOR, GER, etc have circle layout, while WRA, YKA, etc have decussating layout. This paper mainly discusses the relation between deployment of array and wavenumber response. With the example of constructing Shanghai Seismic Array, this paper provides one practical solution to search the proper array deployment. In this paper, the simple delay beam technique is adopted to calculate the response characteris-tics of array. Certainly, the different processing methods have different result, but the result from the simple delay beam processing could be enough to reflect the feature of an array.

  7. Characterization of simple sequence repeats (SSRs from Phlebotomus papatasi (Diptera: Psychodidae expressed sequence tags (ESTs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamarsheh Omar

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phlebotomus papatasi is a natural vector of Leishmania major, which causes cutaneous leishmaniasis in many countries. Simple sequence repeats (SSRs, or microsatellites, are common in eukaryotic genomes and are short, repeated nucleotide sequence elements arrayed in tandem and flanked by non-repetitive regions. The enrichment methods used previously for finding new microsatellite loci in sand flies remain laborious and time consuming; in silico mining, which includes retrieval and screening of microsatellites from large amounts of sequence data from sequence data bases using microsatellite search tools can yield many new candidate markers. Results Simple sequence repeats (SSRs were characterized in P. papatasi expressed sequence tags (ESTs derived from a public database, National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI. A total of 42,784 sequences were mined, and 1,499 SSRs were identified with a frequency of 3.5% and an average density of 15.55 kb per SSR. Dinucleotide motifs were the most common SSRs, accounting for 67% followed by tri-, tetra-, and penta-nucleotide repeats, accounting for 31.1%, 1.5%, and 0.1%, respectively. The length of microsatellites varied from 5 to 16 repeats. Dinucleotide types; AG and CT have the highest frequency. Dinucleotide SSR-ESTs are relatively biased toward an excess of (AXn repeats and a low GC base content. Forty primer pairs were designed based on motif lengths for further experimental validation. Conclusion The first large-scale survey of SSRs derived from P. papatasi is presented; dinucleotide SSRs identified are more frequent than other types. EST data mining is an effective strategy to identify functional microsatellites in P. papatasi.

  8. Comparative genomics and molecular dynamics of DNA repeats in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Guy-Franck; Kerrest, Alix; Dujon, Bernard

    2008-12-01

    Repeated elements can be widely abundant in eukaryotic genomes, composing more than 50% of the human genome, for example. It is possible to classify repeated sequences into two large families, "tandem repeats" and "dispersed repeats." Each of these two families can be itself divided into subfamilies. Dispersed repeats contain transposons, tRNA genes, and gene paralogues, whereas tandem repeats contain gene tandems, ribosomal DNA repeat arrays, and satellite DNA, itself subdivided into satellites, minisatellites, and microsatellites. Remarkably, the molecular mechanisms that create and propagate dispersed and tandem repeats are specific to each class and usually do not overlap. In the present review, we have chosen in the first section to describe the nature and distribution of dispersed and tandem repeats in eukaryotic genomes in the light of complete (or nearly complete) available genome sequences. In the second part, we focus on the molecular mechanisms responsible for the fast evolution of two specific classes of tandem repeats: minisatellites and microsatellites. Given that a growing number of human neurological disorders involve the expansion of a particular class of microsatellites, called trinucleotide repeats, a large part of the recent experimental work on microsatellites has focused on these particular repeats, and thus we also review the current knowledge in this area. Finally, we propose a unified definition for mini- and microsatellites that takes into account their biological properties and try to point out new directions that should be explored in a near future on our road to understanding the genetics of repeated sequences.

  9. Professional Microsoft search fast search, Sharepoint search, and search server

    CERN Document Server

    Bennett, Mark; Kehoe, Miles; Voskresenskaya, Natalya

    2010-01-01

    Use Microsoft's latest search-based technology-FAST search-to plan, customize, and deploy your search solutionFAST is Microsoft's latest intelligent search-based technology that boasts robustness and an ability to integrate business intelligence with Search. This in-depth guide provides you with advanced coverage on FAST search and shows you how to use it to plan, customize, and deploy your search solution, with an emphasis on SharePoint 2010 and Internet-based search solutions.With a particular appeal for anyone responsible for implementing and managing enterprise search, this book presents t

  10. Reconfigurable multiport EPON repeater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Masayuki; Inohara, Ryo; Agata, Akira; Horiuchi, Yukio

    2009-11-01

    An extended reach EPON repeater is one of the solutions to effectively expand FTTH service areas. In this paper, we propose a reconfigurable multi-port EPON repeater for effective accommodation of multiple ODNs with a single OLT line card. The proposed repeater, which has multi-ports in both OLT and ODN sides, consists of TRs, BTRs with the CDR function and a reconfigurable electrical matrix switch, can accommodate multiple ODNs to a single OLT line card by controlling the connection of the matrix switch. Although conventional EPON repeaters require full OLT line cards to accommodate subscribers from the initial installation stage, the proposed repeater can dramatically reduce the number of required line cards especially when the number of subscribers is less than a half of the maximum registerable users per OLT. Numerical calculation results show that the extended reach EPON system with the proposed EPON repeater can save 17.5% of the initial installation cost compared with a conventional repeater, and can be less expensive than conventional systems up to the maximum subscribers especially when the percentage of ODNs in lightly-populated areas is higher.

  11. Revisiting the TALE repeat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Dong; Yan, Chuangye; Wu, Jianping; Pan, Xiaojing; Yan, Nieng

    2014-04-01

    Transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors specifically bind to double stranded (ds) DNA through a central domain of tandem repeats. Each TAL effector (TALE) repeat comprises 33-35 amino acids and recognizes one specific DNA base through a highly variable residue at a fixed position in the repeat. Structural studies have revealed the molecular basis of DNA recognition by TALE repeats. Examination of the overall structure reveals that the basic building block of TALE protein, namely a helical hairpin, is one-helix shifted from the previously defined TALE motif. Here we wish to suggest a structure-based re-demarcation of the TALE repeat which starts with the residues that bind to the DNA backbone phosphate and concludes with the base-recognition hyper-variable residue. This new numbering system is consistent with the α-solenoid superfamily to which TALE belongs, and reflects the structural integrity of TAL effectors. In addition, it confers integral number of TALE repeats that matches the number of bound DNA bases. We then present fifteen crystal structures of engineered dHax3 variants in complex with target DNA molecules, which elucidate the structural basis for the recognition of bases adenine (A) and guanine (G) by reported or uncharacterized TALE codes. Finally, we analyzed the sequence-structure correlation of the amino acid residues within a TALE repeat. The structural analyses reported here may advance the mechanistic understanding of TALE proteins and facilitate the design of TALEN with improved affinity and specificity.

  12. Search Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/cloud.html Search Cloud To use the sharing features on this ... of Top 110 zoster vaccine Share the MedlinePlus search cloud with your users by embedding our search ...

  13. Filter arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Page, Ralph H.; Doty, Patrick F.

    2017-08-01

    The various technologies presented herein relate to a tiled filter array that can be used in connection with performance of spatial sampling of optical signals. The filter array comprises filter tiles, wherein a first plurality of filter tiles are formed from a first material, the first material being configured such that only photons having wavelengths in a first wavelength band pass therethrough. A second plurality of filter tiles is formed from a second material, the second material being configured such that only photons having wavelengths in a second wavelength band pass therethrough. The first plurality of filter tiles and the second plurality of filter tiles can be interspersed to form the filter array comprising an alternating arrangement of first filter tiles and second filter tiles.

  14. Recursive quantum repeater networks

    CERN Document Server

    Van Meter, Rodney; Horsman, Clare

    2011-01-01

    Internet-scale quantum repeater networks will be heterogeneous in physical technology, repeater functionality, and management. The classical control necessary to use the network will therefore face similar issues as Internet data transmission. Many scalability and management problems that arose during the development of the Internet might have been solved in a more uniform fashion, improving flexibility and reducing redundant engineering effort. Quantum repeater network development is currently at the stage where we risk similar duplication when separate systems are combined. We propose a unifying framework that can be used with all existing repeater designs. We introduce the notion of a Quantum Recursive Network Architecture, developed from the emerging classical concept of 'recursive networks', extending recursive mechanisms from a focus on data forwarding to a more general distributed computing request framework. Recursion abstracts independent transit networks as single relay nodes, unifies software layer...

  15. Search Recipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tips A to Z Map Search Enter your search term 98 results • Advanced Search Everything News Videos e- ... usda.gov https://www.whatscooking.fns.usda.gov/search/solr-results/im_field_term_program/child-nutrition-cnp-163 We would like ...

  16. Search Patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Morville, Peter

    2010-01-01

    What people are saying about Search Patterns "Search Patterns is a delight to read -- very thoughtful and thought provoking. It's the most comprehensive survey of designing effective search experiences I've seen." --Irene Au, Director of User Experience, Google "I love this book! Thanks to Peter and Jeffery, I now know that search (yes, boring old yucky who cares search) is one of the coolest ways around of looking at the world." --Dan Roam, author, The Back of the Napkin (Portfolio Hardcover) "Search Patterns is a playful guide to the practical concerns of search interface design. It cont

  17. Do Gamma-Ray Burst Sources Repeat?

    OpenAIRE

    Meegan, Charles A.; Hartmann, Dieter H.; Brainerd, J. J.; Briggs, Michael S.; Paciesas, William S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Fishman, Gerald; Blumenthal, George; Brock, Martin

    1995-01-01

    The demonstration of repeated gamma-ray bursts from an individual source would severely constrain burst source models. Recent reports (Quashnock and Lamb 1993; Wang and Lingenfelter 1993) of evidence for repetition in the first BATSE burst catalog have generated renewed interest in this issue. Here, we analyze the angular distribution of 585 bursts of the second BATSE catalog (Meegan et al. 1994). We search for evidence of burst recurrence using the nearest and farthest neighbor statistic and...

  18. The Pentapeptide Repeat Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetting,M.; Hegde, S.; Fajardo, J.; Fiser, A.; Roderick, S.; Takiff, H.; Blanchard, J.

    2006-01-01

    The Pentapeptide Repeat Protein (PRP) family has over 500 members in the prokaryotic and eukaryotic kingdoms. These proteins are composed of, or contain domains composed of, tandemly repeated amino acid sequences with a consensus sequence of [S, T,A, V][D, N][L, F]-[S, T,R][G]. The biochemical function of the vast majority of PRP family members is unknown. The three-dimensional structure of the first member of the PRP family was determined for the fluoroquinolone resistance protein (MfpA) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The structure revealed that the pentapeptide repeats encode the folding of a novel right-handed quadrilateral {beta}-helix. MfpA binds to DNA gyrase and inhibits its activity. The rod-shaped, dimeric protein exhibits remarkable size, shape and electrostatic similarity to DNA.

  19. Repeating the Past

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, John W.

    1998-05-01

    As part of the celebration of the Journal 's 75th year, we are scanning each Journal issue from 25, 50, and 74 years ago. Many of the ideas and practices described are so similar to present-day "innovations" that George Santayana's adage (1) "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it" comes to mind. But perhaps "condemned" is too strong - sometimes it may be valuable to repeat something that was done long ago. One example comes from the earliest days of the Division of Chemical Education and of the Journal.

  20. Highlights from the Telescope Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, J. N.

    2016-11-01

    The Telescope Array measures the properties of ultra high energy cosmic ray induced extensive air showers. We do this using a variety of techniques including an array of scintillator detectors to sample the footprint of the air shower when it reaches the Earth's surface and telescopes to measure the fluorescence and Cerenkov light of the air shower. From this we determine the energy spectrum and chemical composition of the primary particles. We also search for sources of cosmic rays and anisotropy. We have found evidence of a possible source of ultra high energy cosmic rays in the northern sky. The experiment and its most recent measurements will be discussed.

  1. Refined repetitive sequence searches utilizing a fast hash function and cross species information retrievals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reneker Jeff

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Searching for small tandem/disperse repetitive DNA sequences streamlines many biomedical research processes. For instance, whole genomic array analysis in yeast has revealed 22 PHO-regulated genes. The promoter regions of all but one of them contain at least one of the two core Pho4p binding sites, CACGTG and CACGTT. In humans, microsatellites play a role in a number of rare neurodegenerative diseases such as spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1. SCA1 is a hereditary neurodegenerative disease caused by an expanded CAG repeat in the coding sequence of the gene. In bacterial pathogens, microsatellites are proposed to regulate expression of some virulence factors. For example, bacteria commonly generate intra-strain diversity through phase variation which is strongly associated with virulence determinants. A recent analysis of the complete sequences of the Helicobacter pylori strains 26695 and J99 has identified 46 putative phase-variable genes among the two genomes through their association with homopolymeric tracts and dinucleotide repeats. Life scientists are increasingly interested in studying the function of small sequences of DNA. However, current search algorithms often generate thousands of matches – most of which are irrelevant to the researcher. Results We present our hash function as well as our search algorithm to locate small sequences of DNA within multiple genomes. Our system applies information retrieval algorithms to discover knowledge of cross-species conservation of repeat sequences. We discuss our incorporation of the Gene Ontology (GO database into these algorithms. We conduct an exhaustive time analysis of our system for various repetitive sequence lengths. For instance, a search for eight bases of sequence within 3.224 GBases on 49 different chromosomes takes 1.147 seconds on average. To illustrate the relevance of the search results, we conduct a search with and without added annotation terms for the

  2. All-optical repeater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberberg, Y

    1986-06-01

    An all-optical device containing saturable gain, saturable loss, and unsaturable loss is shown to transform weak, distorted optical pulses into uniform standard-shape pulses. The proposed device performs thresholding, amplification, and pulse shaping as required from an optical repeater. It is shown that such a device could be realized by existing semiconductor technology.

  3. Bidirectional Manchester repeater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, J.

    1980-01-01

    Bidirectional Manchester repeater is inserted at periodic intervals along single bidirectional twisted pair transmission line to detect, amplify, and transmit bidirectional Manchester 11 code signals. Requiring only 18 TTL 7400 series IC's, some line receivers and drivers, and handful of passive components, circuit is simple and relatively inexpensive to build.

  4. Personalized Search

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)749939

    2015-01-01

    As the volume of electronically available information grows, relevant items become harder to find. This work presents an approach to personalizing search results in scientific publication databases. This work focuses on re-ranking search results from existing search engines like Solr or ElasticSearch. This work also includes the development of Obelix, a new recommendation system used to re-rank search results. The project was proposed and performed at CERN, using the scientific publications available on the CERN Document Server (CDS). This work experiments with re-ranking using offline and online evaluation of users and documents in CDS. The experiments conclude that the personalized search result outperform both latest first and word similarity in terms of click position in the search result for global search in CDS.

  5. Search Combinators

    CERN Document Server

    Schrijvers, Tom; Wuille, Pieter; Samulowitz, Horst; Stuckey, Peter J

    2012-01-01

    The ability to model search in a constraint solver can be an essential asset for solving combinatorial problems. However, existing infrastructure for defining search heuristics is often inadequate. Either modeling capabilities are extremely limited or users are faced with a general-purpose programming language whose features are not tailored towards writing search heuristics. As a result, major improvements in performance may remain unexplored. This article introduces search combinators, a lightweight and solver-independent method that bridges the gap between a conceptually simple modeling language for search (high-level, functional and naturally compositional) and an efficient implementation (low-level, imperative and highly non-modular). By allowing the user to define application-tailored search strategies from a small set of primitives, search combinators effectively provide a rich domain-specific language (DSL) for modeling search to the user. Remarkably, this DSL comes at a low implementation cost to the...

  6. The Submillimeter Array Polarimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Marrone, Daniel P

    2008-01-01

    We describe the Submillimeter Array (SMA) Polarimeter, a polarization converter and feed multiplexer installed on the SMA. The polarimeter uses narrow-band quarter-wave plates to generate circular polarization sensitivity from the linearly-polarized SMA feeds. The wave plates are mounted in rotation stages under computer control so that the polarization handedness of each antenna is rapidly selectable. Positioning of the wave plates is found to be highly repeatable, better than 0.2 degrees. Although only a single polarization is detected at any time, all four cross correlations of left- and right-circular polarization are efficiently sampled on each baseline through coordinated switching of the antenna polarizations in Walsh function patterns. The initial set of anti-reflection coated quartz and sapphire wave plates allows polarimetry near 345 GHz; these plates have been have been used in observations between 325 and 350 GHz. The frequency-dependent cross-polarization of each antenna, largely due to the varia...

  7. Visual search

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toet, A.; Bijl, P.

    2003-01-01

    Visual search, with or without the aid of optical or electro-optical instruments, plays a significant role in various types of military and civilian operations (e.g., reconnaissance, surveillance, and search and rescue). Advance knowledge of human visual search and target acquisition performance is

  8. Global Arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Daily, Jeffrey A.; Vishnu, Abhinav; Palmer, Bruce J.

    2015-11-01

    Global Arrays (GA) is a distributed-memory programming model that allows for shared-memory-style programming combined with one-sided communication, to create a set of tools that combine high performance with ease-of-use. GA exposes a relatively straightforward programming abstraction, while supporting fully-distributed data structures, locality of reference, and high-performance communication. GA was originally formulated in the early 1990’s to provide a communication layer for the Northwest Chemistry (NWChem) suite of chemistry modeling codes that was being developed concurrently.

  9. Zinc-finger directed double-strand breaks within CAG repeat tracts promote repeat instability in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittelman, David; Moye, Christopher; Morton, Jason; Sykoudis, Kristen; Lin, Yunfu; Carroll, Dana; Wilson, John H

    2009-06-16

    Expanded triplet repeats have been identified as the genetic basis for a growing number of neurological and skeletal disorders. To examine the contribution of double-strand break repair to CAG x CTG repeat instability in mammalian systems, we developed zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) that recognize and cleave CAG repeat sequences. Engineered ZFNs use a tandem array of zinc fingers, fused to the FokI DNA cleavage domain, to direct double-strand breaks (DSBs) in a site-specific manner. We first determined that the ZFNs cleave CAG repeats in vitro. Then, using our previously described tissue culture assay for identifying modifiers of CAG repeat instability, we found that transfection of ZFN-expression vectors induced up to a 15-fold increase in changes to the CAG repeat in human and rodent cell lines, and that longer repeats were much more sensitive to cleavage than shorter ones. Analysis of individual colonies arising after treatment revealed a spectrum of events consistent with ZFN-induced DSBs and dominated by repeat contractions. We also found that expressing a dominant-negative form of RAD51 in combination with a ZFN, dramatically reduced the effect of the nuclease, suggesting that DSB-induced repeat instability is mediated, in part, through homology directed repair. These studies identify a ZFN as a useful reagent for characterizing the effects of DSBs on CAG repeats in cells.

  10. Coherent magnetic semiconductor nanodot arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu Faxian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In searching appropriate candidates of magnetic semiconductors compatible with mainstream Si technology for future spintronic devices, extensive attention has been focused on Mn-doped Ge magnetic semiconductors. Up to now, lack of reliable methods to obtain high-quality MnGe nanostructures with a desired shape and a good controllability has been a barrier to make these materials practically applicable for spintronic devices. Here, we report, for the first time, an innovative growth approach to produce self-assembled and coherent magnetic MnGe nanodot arrays with an excellent reproducibility. Magnetotransport experiments reveal that the nanodot arrays possess giant magneto-resistance associated with geometrical effects. The discovery of the MnGe nanodot arrays paves the way towards next-generation high-density magnetic memories and spintronic devices with low-power dissipation.

  11. Duct Leakage Repeatability Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Iain [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sherman, Max [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Duct leakage often needs to be measured to demonstrate compliance with requirements or to determine energy or Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) impacts. Testing is often done using standards such as ASTM E1554 (ASTM 2013) or California Title 24 (California Energy Commission 2013 & 2013b), but there are several choices of methods available within the accepted standards. Determining which method to use or not use requires an evaluation of those methods in the context of the particular needs. Three factors that are important considerations are the cost of the measurement, the accuracy of the measurement and the repeatability of the measurement. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the repeatability of the three most significant measurement techniques using data from the literature and recently obtained field data. We will also briefly discuss the first two factors. The main question to be answered by this study is to determine if differences in the repeatability of these tests methods is sufficient to indicate that any of these methods is so poor that it should be excluded from consideration as an allowed procedure in codes and standards.

  12. Finger Search in the Implicit Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Nielsen, Jesper Asbjørn Sindahl; Truelsen, Jakob

    2012-01-01

    We address the problem of creating a dictionary with the finger search property in the strict implicit model, where no information is stored between operations, except the array of elements. We show that for any implicit dictionary supporting finger searches in q(t) = Ω(logt) time, the time to mo...... returned by the last query...

  13. Sparse array design using statistical restricted isometry property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaumond, Charles F; Edelmann, Geoffrey F

    2013-08-01

    The numerical application of the statistical reduced isometry property (StRIP) and statistical null space property (SNSP) is presented and demonstrated for the design of underwater acoustic line arrays. This recent approach predicts the theoretical utility of specific subsampled arrays for compressive sensing. Three subsamplings are presented: Random, Golomb, and Wichmann. The Golomb array has no repeated spacings. The Wichmann array includes every possible interval of spacings. The SNSP is shown insensitive to the cases presented. The StRIP of the Golomb array predicts superior invertibility and is shown to perform well using at-sea data.

  14. Faceted Search

    CERN Document Server

    Tunkelang, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    We live in an information age that requires us, more than ever, to represent, access, and use information. Over the last several decades, we have developed a modern science and technology for information retrieval, relentlessly pursuing the vision of a "memex" that Vannevar Bush proposed in his seminal article, "As We May Think." Faceted search plays a key role in this program. Faceted search addresses weaknesses of conventional search approaches and has emerged as a foundation for interactive information retrieval. User studies demonstrate that faceted search provides more

  15. Repeatability of Cryogenic Multilayer Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W. L.; Vanderlaan, M.; Wood, J. J.; Rhys, N. O.; Guo, W.; Van Sciver, S.; Chato, D. J.

    2017-01-01

    Due to the variety of requirements across aerospace platforms, and one off projects, the repeatability of cryogenic multilayer insulation has never been fully established. The objective of this test program is to provide a more basic understanding of the thermal performance repeatability of MLI systems that are applicable to large scale tanks. There are several different types of repeatability that can be accounted for: these include repeatability between multiple identical blankets, repeatability of installation of the same blanket, and repeatability of a test apparatus. The focus of the work in this report is on the first two types of repeatability. Statistically, repeatability can mean many different things. In simplest form, it refers to the range of performance that a population exhibits and the average of the population. However, as more and more identical components are made (i.e. the population of concern grows), the simple range morphs into a standard deviation from an average performance. Initial repeatability testing on MLI blankets has been completed at Florida State University. Repeatability of five GRC provided coupons with 25 layers was shown to be +/- 8.4 whereas repeatability of repeatedly installing a single coupon was shown to be +/- 8.0. A second group of 10 coupons have been fabricated by Yetispace and tested by Florida State University, through the first 4 tests, the repeatability has been shown to be +/- 16. Based on detailed statistical analysis, the data has been shown to be statistically significant.

  16. The collinear coaxial array antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brammer, D. J.; Williams, D.

    1981-03-01

    A design of a coaxial vertical antenna proposed in the ARRL antenna handbook is analyzed. A numerical analysis was carried out using the moment method. A variety of antenna configurations in the 160 MHz design frequency are analyzed and current distribution, gain, polar diagrams and impedances are calculated. The analysis is carried out for simple configurations and extended to a case with 16 repeated center sections. The effects of using lossy cable in the construction is also investigated. A defect in the original ARRL design is rectified. An array of an overall length 5.33 wavelengths is shown to have a gain of 10.69 dB.

  17. Autonomous search

    CERN Document Server

    Hamadi, Youssef; Saubion, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    Autonomous combinatorial search (AS) represents a new field in combinatorial problem solving. Its major standpoint and originality is that it considers that problem solvers must be capable of self-improvement operations. This is the first book dedicated to AS.

  18. A Novel Algorithm for Finding Interspersed Repeat Regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dongdong Li; Zhengzhi Wang; Qingshan Ni

    2004-01-01

    The analysis of repeats in the DNA sequences is an important subject in bioinformatics. In this paper, we propose a novel projection-assemble algorithm to find unknown interspersed repeats in DNA sequences. The algorithm employs random projection algorithm to obtain a candidate fragment set, and exhaustive search algorithm to search each pair of fragments from the candidate fragment set to find potential linkage, and then assemble them together. The complexity of our projection-assemble algorithm is nearly linear to the length of the genome sequence, and its memory usage is limited by the hardware. We tested our algorithm with both simulated data and real biology data, and the results show that our projection-assemble algorithm is efficient. By means of this algorithm, we found an un-labeled repeat region that occurs five times in Escherichia coli genome, with its length more than 5,000 bp, and a mismatch probability less than 4%.

  19. Coupling in reflector arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appel-Hansen, Jørgen

    1968-01-01

    In order to reduce the space occupied by a reflector array, it is desirable to arrange the array antennas as close to each other as possible; however, in this case coupling between the array antennas will reduce the reflecting properties of the reflector array. The purpose of the present communic...

  20. Exploring the repeat protein universe through computational protein design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunette, T J; Parmeggiani, Fabio; Huang, Po-Ssu; Bhabha, Gira; Ekiert, Damian C; Tsutakawa, Susan E; Hura, Greg L; Tainer, John A; Baker, David

    2015-12-24

    A central question in protein evolution is the extent to which naturally occurring proteins sample the space of folded structures accessible to the polypeptide chain. Repeat proteins composed of multiple tandem copies of a modular structure unit are widespread in nature and have critical roles in molecular recognition, signalling, and other essential biological processes. Naturally occurring repeat proteins have been re-engineered for molecular recognition and modular scaffolding applications. Here we use computational protein design to investigate the space of folded structures that can be generated by tandem repeating a simple helix-loop-helix-loop structural motif. Eighty-three designs with sequences unrelated to known repeat proteins were experimentally characterized. Of these, 53 are monomeric and stable at 95 °C, and 43 have solution X-ray scattering spectra consistent with the design models. Crystal structures of 15 designs spanning a broad range of curvatures are in close agreement with the design models with root mean square deviations ranging from 0.7 to 2.5 Å. Our results show that existing repeat proteins occupy only a small fraction of the possible repeat protein sequence and structure space and that it is possible to design novel repeat proteins with precisely specified geometries, opening up a wide array of new possibilities for biomolecular engineering.

  1. Highlights from the Telescope Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthews J.N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Telescope Array measures the properties of ultra high energy cosmic ray induced extensive air showers. We do this using a variety of techniques including an array of scintillator detectors to sample the footprint of the air shower when it reaches the Earth’s surface and telescopes to measure the fluorescence and Cerenkov light of the air shower. From this we determine the energy spectrum and chemical composition of the primary particles. We also search for sources of cosmic rays and anisotropy. We have found evidence of a possible source of ultra high energy cosmic rays in the northern sky. The experiment and its most recent measurements will be discussed.

  2. Expansion of protein domain repeats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asa K Björklund

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Many proteins, especially in eukaryotes, contain tandem repeats of several domains from the same family. These repeats have a variety of binding properties and are involved in protein-protein interactions as well as binding to other ligands such as DNA and RNA. The rapid expansion of protein domain repeats is assumed to have evolved through internal tandem duplications. However, the exact mechanisms behind these tandem duplications are not well-understood. Here, we have studied the evolution, function, protein structure, gene structure, and phylogenetic distribution of domain repeats. For this purpose we have assigned Pfam-A domain families to 24 proteomes with more sensitive domain assignments in the repeat regions. These assignments confirmed previous findings that eukaryotes, and in particular vertebrates, contain a much higher fraction of proteins with repeats compared with prokaryotes. The internal sequence similarity in each protein revealed that the domain repeats are often expanded through duplications of several domains at a time, while the duplication of one domain is less common. Many of the repeats appear to have been duplicated in the middle of the repeat region. This is in strong contrast to the evolution of other proteins that mainly works through additions of single domains at either terminus. Further, we found that some domain families show distinct duplication patterns, e.g., nebulin domains have mainly been expanded with a unit of seven domains at a time, while duplications of other domain families involve varying numbers of domains. Finally, no common mechanism for the expansion of all repeats could be detected. We found that the duplication patterns show no dependence on the size of the domains. Further, repeat expansion in some families can possibly be explained by shuffling of exons. However, exon shuffling could not have created all repeats.

  3. Exact Tandem Repeats Analyzer (E-TRA): A new program for DNA sequence mining

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mehmet Karaca; Mehmet Bilgen; A. Naci Onus; Ayse Gul Ince; Safinaz Y. Elmasulu

    2005-04-01

    Exact Tandem Repeats Analyzer 1.0 (E-TRA) combines sequence motif searches with keywords such as ‘organs’, ‘tissues’, ‘cell lines’ and ‘development stages’ for finding simple exact tandem repeats as well as non-simple repeats. E-TRA has several advanced repeat search parameters/options compared to other repeat finder programs as it not only accepts GenBank, FASTA and expressed sequence tags (EST) sequence files, but also does analysis of multiple files with multiple sequences. The minimum and maximum tandem repeat motif lengths that E-TRA finds vary from one to one thousand. Advanced user defined parameters/options let the researchers use different minimum motif repeats search criteria for varying motif lengths simultaneously. One of the most interesting features of genomes is the presence of relatively short tandem repeats (TRs). These repeated DNA sequences are found in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, distributed almost at random throughout the genome. Some of the tandem repeats play important roles in the regulation of gene expression whereas others do not have any known biological function as yet. Nevertheless, they have proven to be very beneficial in DNA profiling and genetic linkage analysis studies. To demonstrate the use of E-TRA, we used 5,465,605 human EST sequences derived from 18,814,550 GenBank EST sequences. Our results indicated that 12.44% (679,800) of the human EST sequences contained simple and non-simple repeat string patterns varying from one to 126 nucleotides in length. The results also revealed that human organs, tissues, cell lines and different developmental stages differed in number of repeats as well as repeat composition, indicating that the distribution of expressed tandem repeats among tissues or organs are not random, thus differing from the un-transcribed repeats found in genomes.

  4. DWI Repeaters and Non-Repeaters: A Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeber, Stan

    1981-01-01

    Discussed how driving-while-intoxicated (DWI) repeaters differed signigicantly from nonrepeaters on 4 of 23 variables tested. Repeaters were more likely to have zero or two dependent children, attend church frequently, drink occasionally and have one or more arrests for public intoxication. (Author)

  5. To Repeat or Not to Repeat a Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Michael J.; Biktimirov, Ernest N.

    2013-01-01

    The difficult transition from high school to university means that many students need to repeat (retake) 1 or more of their university courses. The authors examine the performance of students repeating first-year core courses in an undergraduate business program. They used data from university records for 116 students who took a total of 232…

  6. $A$ searches

    CERN Document Server

    Beacham, James

    The Standard Model of particle physics encompasses three of the four known fundamental forces of nature, and has remarkably withstood all of the experimental tests of its predictions, a fact solidified by the discovery, in 2012, of the Higgs boson. However, it cannot be the complete picture. Many measurements have been made that hint at physics beyond the Standard Model, and the main task of the high- energy experimental physics community is to conduct searches for new physics in as many di↵erent places and regimes as possible. I present three searches for new phenomena in three di↵erent high-energy collider experiments, namely, a search for events with at least three photons in the final state, which is sensitive to an exotic decay of a Higgs boson into four photons via intermediate pseudoscalar particles, a, with ATLAS, at the Large Hadron Collider; a search for a dark photon, also known as an A0 , with APEX, at Thomas Je↵erson National Accelerator Facility; and a search for a Higgs decaying into four...

  7. Mutations in DNMT3B Modify Epigenetic Repression of the D4Z4 Repeat and the Penetrance of Facioscapulohumeral Dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boogaard, M.L. van den; Lemmers, R.J.; Balog, J.; Wohlgemuth, M.; Auranen, M.; Mitsuhashi, S.; Vliet, P.J.C. Van; Straasheijm, K.R.; Akker, R.F. van den; Kriek, M.; Laurense-Bik, M.E.; Raz, V.; Ostaijen-ten Dam, M.M. van; Hansson, K.B.; Kooi, E.L. van der; Kiuru-Enari, S.; Udd, B.; Tol, M.J. van; Nishino, I.; Tawil, R.; Tapscott, S.J.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Maarel, S.M. van der

    2016-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) is associated with somatic chromatin relaxation of the D4Z4 repeat array and derepression of the D4Z4-encoded DUX4 retrogene coding for a germline transcription factor. Somatic DUX4 derepression is caused either by a 1-10 unit repeat-array contraction (FSHD1) or

  8. Intra-genomic variation in the ribosomal repeats of nematodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly M Bik

    Full Text Available Ribosomal loci represent a major tool for investigating environmental diversity and community structure via high-throughput marker gene studies of eukaryotes (e.g. 18S rRNA. Since the estimation of species' abundance is a major goal of environmental studies (by counting numbers of sequences, understanding the patterns of rRNA copy number across species will be critical for informing such high-throughput approaches. Such knowledge is critical, given that ribosomal RNA genes exist within multi-copy repeated arrays in a genome. Here we measured the repeat copy number for six nematode species by mapping the sequences from whole genome shotgun libraries against reference sequences for their rRNA repeat. This revealed a 6-fold variation in repeat copy number amongst taxa investigated, with levels of intragenomic variation ranging from 56 to 323 copies of the rRNA array. By applying the same approach to four C. elegans mutation accumulation lines propagated by repeated bottlenecking for an average of ~400 generations, we find on average a 2-fold increase in repeat copy number (rate of increase in rRNA estimated at 0.0285-0.3414 copies per generation, suggesting that rRNA repeat copy number is subject to selection. Within each Caenorhabditis species, the majority of intragenomic variation found across the rRNA repeat was observed within gene regions (18S, 28S, 5.8S, suggesting that such intragenomic variation is not a product of selection for rRNA coding function. We find that the dramatic variation in repeat copy number among these six nematode genomes would limit the use of rRNA in estimates of organismal abundance. In addition, the unique pattern of variation within a single genome was uncorrelated with patterns of divergence between species, reflecting a strong signature of natural selection for rRNA function. A better understanding of the factors that control or affect copy number in these arrays, as well as their rates and patterns of evolution

  9. Academic colorectal surgery job search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalady, Matthew F

    2014-06-01

    The field of academic colorectal surgery encompasses a vast array of possibilities. Clinical care accompanied by research, teaching, innovation, and/or administration provides the foundation for what is considered an academic career. For those choosing academic colorectal surgery, the process of finding and selecting a first job can provoke much angst. This article describes some strategies to approach the academic colorectal job search and provides insight into deciding a career focus, exploring relevant positions, weighing specific factors, and negotiating your first offer.

  10. Science with the Murchison Widefield Array

    CERN Document Server

    Bowman, Judd D; Kaplan, David L; Murphy, Tara; Oberoi, Divya; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Arcus, Wayne; Barnes, David G; Bernardi, Gianni; Briggs, Frank H; Brown, Shea; Bunton, John D; Burgasser, Adam J; Cappallo, Roger J; Chatterjee, Shami; Corey, Brian E; Coster, Anthea; Deshpande, Avinash; deSouza, Ludi; Emrich, David; Erickson, Philip; Goeke, Robert F; Gaensler, B M; Greenhill, Lincoln J; Harvey-Smith, Lisa; Hazelton, Bryna J; Herne, David; Hewitt, Jacqueline N; Johnston-Hollitt, Melanie; Kasper, Justin C; Kincaid, Barton B; Koenig, Ronald; Kratzenberg, Eric; Lonsdale, Colin J; Lynch, Mervyn J; Matthews, Lynn D; McWhirter, S Russell; Mitchell, Daniel A; Morales, Miguel F; Morgan, Edward H; Ord, Stephen M; Pathikulangara, Joseph; Thiagaraj, Prabu; Remillard, Ronald A; Robishaw, Timothy; Rogers, Alan E E; Roshi, Anish A; Salah, Joseph E; Sault, Robert J; Shankar, N Udaya; Srivani, K S; Stevens, Jamie B; Subrahmanyan, Ravi; Tingay, Steven J; Wayth, Randall B; Waterson, Mark; Webster, Rachel L; Whitney, Alan R; Williams, Andrew J; Williams, Christopher L; Wyithe, J Stuart B

    2012-01-01

    Significant new opportunities for astrophysics and cosmology have been identified at low radio frequencies. The Murchison Widefield Array is the first telescope in the Southern Hemisphere designed specifically to explore the low-frequency astronomical sky between 80 and 300 MHz with arcminute angular resolution and high survey efficiency. The telescope will enable new advances along four key science themes, including searching for redshifted 21 cm emission from the epoch of reionisation in the early Universe; Galactic and extragalactic all-sky southern hemisphere surveys; time-domain astrophysics; and solar, heliospheric, and ionospheric science and space weather. The Murchison Widefield Array is located in Western Australia at the site of the planned Square Kilometre Array (SKA) low-band telescope and is the only low-frequency SKA precursor facility. In this paper, we review the performance properties of the Murchison Widefield Array and describe its primary scientific objectives.

  11. Nifty Nines and Repeating Decimals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    The traditional technique for converting repeating decimals to common fractions can be found in nearly every algebra textbook that has been published, as well as in many precalculus texts. However, students generally encounter repeating decimal numerals earlier than high school when they study rational numbers in prealgebra classes. Therefore, how…

  12. Nifty Nines and Repeating Decimals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    The traditional technique for converting repeating decimals to common fractions can be found in nearly every algebra textbook that has been published, as well as in many precalculus texts. However, students generally encounter repeating decimal numerals earlier than high school when they study rational numbers in prealgebra classes. Therefore, how…

  13. All-photonic quantum repeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Koji; Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2015-01-01

    Quantum communication holds promise for unconditionally secure transmission of secret messages and faithful transfer of unknown quantum states. Photons appear to be the medium of choice for quantum communication. Owing to photon losses, robust quantum communication over long lossy channels requires quantum repeaters. It is widely believed that a necessary and highly demanding requirement for quantum repeaters is the existence of matter quantum memories. Here we show that such a requirement is, in fact, unnecessary by introducing the concept of all-photonic quantum repeaters based on flying qubits. In particular, we present a protocol based on photonic cluster-state machine guns and a loss-tolerant measurement equipped with local high-speed active feedforwards. We show that, with such all-photonic quantum repeaters, the communication efficiency scales polynomially with the channel distance. Our result paves a new route towards quantum repeaters with efficient single-photon sources rather than matter quantum memories. PMID:25873153

  14. DNA profiling of extended tracts of primitive DNA repeats: Direct identification of unstable simple repeat loci in complex genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogaeva, E.A.; Korovaitseva, G.; St. George-Hyslop, P. [Univ. of Toronto (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The most simple DNA repetitive elements, with repetitive monomer units of only 1-10 bp in tandem tracts, are an abundant component of the human genome. The expansion of at least one type of these repeats ((CCG)n and (CTG)n) have been detected for a several neurological diseases with anticipation in successive generations. We propose here a simple method for the identification of particularly expanded repeats and for the recovery of flanking sequences. We generated DNA probes using PCR to create long concatamers (n>100) by amplification of the di-, tri-, tetra-, penta- and hexa-nucleotide repeat oligonucleotide primer pairs. To reduce the complexity of the background band pattern, the genomic DNA was restricted with a mixture of at least five different endonucleases, thereby reducing the size of restriction fragments containing short simple repeat arrays while leaving intact the large fragments containing the longer simple repeats arrays. Direct blot hybridization has shown different {open_quotes}DNA fingerprint{close_quotes} patterns with all arbitrary selected di-hexa nucleotide repeat probes. Direct hybridization of the (CTG)n and (CCG)n probes revealed simple or multiple band patterns depending upon stringency conditions. We were able to detect the presence of expanded unstable tri-nucleotide alleles by (CCG)n probe for some FRAXA subjects and by (CTG)n probe for some myotonic dystrophy subjects which were not present in the parental DNA patterns. The cloning of the unstable alleles for simple repeats can be performed by direct recover from agarose gels of the aberrant unstable bands detected above. The recovered flanking regions can be cloned, sequenced and used for PCR detection of expanded alleles or can be used to screen cDNA. This method may be used for testing of small families with diseases thought to display clinical evidence of anticipation.

  15. Internet Search Engines

    OpenAIRE

    Fatmaa El Zahraa Mohamed Abdou

    2004-01-01

    A general study about the internet search engines, the study deals main 7 points; the differance between search engines and search directories, components of search engines, the percentage of sites covered by search engines, cataloging of sites, the needed time for sites appearance in search engines, search capabilities, and types of search engines.

  16. Internet Search Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatmaa El Zahraa Mohamed Abdou

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available A general study about the internet search engines, the study deals main 7 points; the differance between search engines and search directories, components of search engines, the percentage of sites covered by search engines, cataloging of sites, the needed time for sites appearance in search engines, search capabilities, and types of search engines.

  17. A pilot trial assessing urinary gene expression profiling with an mRNA array for diabetic nephropathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Zheng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The initiation and progression of diabetic nephropathy (DN is complex. Quantification of mRNA expression in urinary sediment has emerged as a novel strategy for studying renal diseases. Considering the numerous molecules involved in DN development, a high-throughput platform with parallel detection of multiple mRNAs is needed. In this study, we constructed a self-assembling mRNA array to analyze urinary mRNAs in DN patients with aims to reveal its potential in searching novel biomarkers. METHODS: mRNA array containing 88 genes were fabricated and its performance was evaluated. A pilot study with 9 subjects including 6 DN patients and 3 normal controls were studied with the array. DN patients were assigned into two groups according to their estimate glomerular rate (eGFR: DNI group (eGFR>60 ml/min/1.73 m(2, n = 3 and DNII group (eGFR<60 ml/min/1.73 m(2, n = 3. Urinary cell pellet was collected from each study participant. Relative abundance of these target mRNAs from urinary pellet was quantified with the array. RESULTS: The array we fabricated displayed high sensitivity and specificity. Moreover, the Cts of Positive PCR Controls in our experiments were 24±0.5 which indicated high repeatability of the array. A total of 29 mRNAs were significantly increased in DN patients compared with controls (p<0.05. Among these genes, α-actinin4, CDH2, ACE, FAT1, synaptopodin, COL4α, twist, NOTCH3 mRNA expression were 15-fold higher than those in normal controls. In contrast, urinary TIMP-1 mRNA was significantly decreased in DN patients (p<0.05. It was shown that CTGF, MCP-1, PAI-1, ACE, CDH1, CDH2 mRNA varied significantly among the 3 study groups, and their mRNA levels increased with DN progression (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: Our pilot study demonstrated that mRNA array might serve as a high-throughput and sensitive tool for detecting mRNA expression in urinary sediment. Thus, this primary study indicated that mRNA array probably could be a

  18. Haptic Influence on Visual Search

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Grabowecky

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Information from different sensory modalities influences perception and attention in tasks such as visual search. We have previously reported identity-based crossmodal influences of audition on visual search (Iordanescu, Guzman-Martinez, Grabowecky, & Suzuki, 2008; Iordanescu, Grabowecky, Franconeri, Theeuwes, and Suzuki, 2010; Iordanescu, Grabowecky and Suzuki, 2011. Here, we extend those results and demonstrate a novel crossmodal interaction between haptic shape information and visual attention. Manually-explored, but unseen, shapes facilitated visual search for similarly-shaped objects. This effect manifests as a reduction in both overall search times and initial saccade latencies when the haptic shape (eg, a sphere is consistent with a visual target (eg, an orange compared to when it is inconsistent with a visual target (eg, a hockey puck]. This haptic-visual interaction occurred even though the manually held shapes were not predictive of the visual target's shape or location, suggesting that the interaction occurs automatically. Furthermore, when the haptic shape was consistent with a distracter in the visual search array (instead of with the target, initial saccades toward the target were disrupted. Together, these results demonstrate a robust shape-specific haptic influence on visual search.

  19. The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence: Fact, not Fiction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarter, Jill (SETI Institute, Director)

    2009-03-11

    Jill Tarter, director of the Center for SETI (Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) Research, will discuss the new Allen Telescope Array being developed for SETI that will provide the first systematic look at the transient radio universe.

  20. RAPSearch: a fast protein similarity search tool for short reads

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ye, Yuzhen; Choi, Jeong-Hyeon; Tang, Haixu

    2011-01-01

    ... of the very sizes of the short read datasets. We developed a fast protein similarity search tool RAPSearch that utilizes a reduced amino acid alphabet and suffix array to detect seeds of flexible length. For short reads...

  1. Clocked combustor can array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Won-Wook; McMahan, Kevin Weston; Srinivasan, Shiva Kumar

    2017-01-17

    The present application provides a clocked combustor can array for coherence reduction in a gas turbine engine. The clocked combustor can array may include a number of combustor cans positioned in a circumferential array. A first set of the combustor cans may have a first orientation and a second set of the combustor cans may have a second orientation.

  2. Axiom turkey genotyping array

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Axiom®Turkey Genotyping Array interrogates 643,845 probesets on the array, covering 643,845 SNPs. The array development was led by Dr. Julie Long of the USDA-ARS Beltsville Agricultural Research Center under a public-private partnership with Hendrix Genetics, Aviagen, and Affymetrix. The Turk...

  3. Clocked combustor can array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Won-Wook; McMahan, Kevin Weston; Srinivasan, Shiva Kumar

    2017-01-17

    The present application provides a clocked combustor can array for coherence reduction in a gas turbine engine. The clocked combustor can array may include a number of combustor cans positioned in a circumferential array. A first set of the combustor cans may have a first orientation and a second set of the combustor cans may have a second orientation.

  4. Search for $\

    OpenAIRE

    Astier, P.; Autiero, D.; Baldisseri, A.; Baldo-Ceolin, M.; Banner, M.; Bassompierre, G.; Benslama, K.; Besson, N.; Bird, I.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bobisut, F.; J. Bouchez; Boyd, S.; A. Bueno; Bunyatov, S.

    2003-01-01

    Neutrinos; We present the results of a search for nu_mu → nu_e oscillations in the NOMAD experiment at Cern. The experiment looked for the appearance of nu_e in a predominantly nu_mu wide-band neutrino beam at the CERN SPS. No evidence for oscillations was found. The 90% confidence limits obtained are Delta m^2 ~ 10 eV^2.

  5. Search for $\

    CERN Document Server

    Astier, Pierre; Baldisseri, Alberto; Baldo-Ceolin, Massimilla; Banner, M; Bassompierre, Gabriel; Benslama, K; Besson, N; Bird, I; Blumenfeld, B; Bobisut, F; Bouchez, J; Boyd, S; Bueno, A G; Bunyatov, S A; Camilleri, L L; Cardini, A; Cattaneo, Paolo Walter; Cavasinni, V; Cervera-Villanueva, A; Challis, R C; Chukanov, A; Collazuol, G; Conforto, G; Conta, C; Contalbrigo, M; Cousins, R D; Daniels, D; De Santo, A; Degaudenzi, H M; Del Prete, T; Di Lella, L; Dignan, T; Dumarchez, J; Feldman, G J; Ferrari, A; Ferrari, R; Ferrère, D; Flaminio, Vincenzo; Fraternali, M; Gaillard, J M; Gangler, E; Geiser, A; Geppert, D; Gibin, D; Gninenko, S N; Godley, A; Gosset, J; Gouanère, M; Grant, A; Graziani, G; Guglielmi, A M; Gómez-Cadenas, J J; Gössling, C; Hagner, C; Hernando, J; Hong, T M; Hubbard, D B; Hurst, P; Hyett, N; Iacopini, E; Joseph, C L; Juget, F R; Kent, N; Kirsanov, M M; Klimov, O; Kokkonen, J; Kovzelev, A; Krasnoperov, A V; Kustov, D; La Rotonda, L; Lacaprara, S; Lachaud, C; Lakic, B; Lanza, A; Laveder, M; Letessier-Selvon, A A; Linssen, Lucie; Ljubicic, A; Long, J; Lupi, A; Lévy, J M; Marchionni, A; Martelli, F; Mendiburu, J P; Meyer, J P; Mezzetto, Mauro; Mishra, S R; Moorhead, G F; Méchain, X; Naumov, D V; Nefedov, Yu A; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nédélec, P; Orestano, D; Pastore, F; Peak, L S; Pennacchio, E; Pessard, H; Petti, R; Placci, A; Polesello, G; Pollmann, D; Polyarush, A Yu; Popov, B; Poulsen, C; Rebuffi, L; Renò, R; Rico, J; Riemann, P; Roda, C; Rubbia, André; Salvatore, F; Schahmaneche, K; Schmidt, B; Schmidt, T; Sconza, A; Sevior, M E; Shih, D; Sillou, D; Soler, F J P; Sozzi, G; Steele, D; Stiegler, U; Stipcevic, M; Stolarczyk, T; Tareb-Reyes, M; Taylor, G N; Tereshchenko, V V; Toropin, A N; Touchard, A M; Tovey, Stuart N; Tran, M T; Tsesmelis, E; Ulrichs, J; Vacavant, L; Valdata-Nappi, M; Valuev, V Yu; Vannucci, François; Varvell, K E; Veltri, M; Vercesi, V; Vidal-Sitjes, G; Vieira, J M; Vinogradova, T G; Weber, F V; Weisse, T; Wilson, F F; Winton, L J; Yabsley, B D; Zaccone, Henri; Zuber, K; Zuccon, P; do Couto e Silva, E

    2003-01-01

    We present the results of a search for nu_mu → nu_e oscillations in the NOMAD experiment at Cern. The experiment looked for the appearance of nu_e in a predominantly nu_mu wide-band neutrino beam at the CERN SPS. No evidence for oscillations was found. The 90% confidence limits obtained are Delta m^2 ~ 10 eV^2.

  6. Search for $\

    CERN Document Server

    Astier, Pierre; Baldisseri, Alberto; Baldo-Ceolin, Massimilla; Banner, M; Bassompierre, Gabriel; Benslama, K; Besson, N; Bird, I; Blumenfeld, B; Bobisut, F; Bouchez, J; Boyd, S; Bueno, A G; Bunyatov, S; Camilleri, L L; Cardini, A; Cattaneo, Paolo Walter; Cavasinni, V; Cervera-Villanueva, A; Challis, R C; Chukanov, A; Collazuol, G; Conforto, G; Conta, C; Contalbrigo, M; Cousins, R; Daniels, D; Degaudenzi, H M; Del Prete, T; De Santo, A; Dignan, T; Di Lella, L; do Couto e Silva, E; Dumarchez, J; Ellis, M; Feldman, G J; Ferrari, R; Ferrère, D; Flaminio, Vincenzo; Fraternali, M; Gaillard, J M; Gangler, E; Geiser, A; Geppert, D; Gibin, D; Gninenko, S N; Godley, A; Gómez-Cadenas, J J; Gosset, J; Gössling, C; Gouanère, M; Grant, A; Graziani, G; Guglielmi, A M; Hagner, C; Hernando, J A; Hubbard, D B; Hurst, P; Hyett, N; Iacopini, E; Joseph, C L; Juget, F R; Kent, N; Kirsanov, M M; Klimov, O; Kokkonen, J; Kovzelev, A; Krasnoperov, A V; Kustov, D; Lacaprara, S; Lachaud, C; Lakic, B; Lanza, A; La Rotonda, L; Laveder, M; Letessier-Selvon, A A; Lévy, J M; Linssen, Lucie; Ljubicic, A; Long, J; Lupi, A; Marchionni, A; Martelli, F; Méchain, X; Mendiburu, J P; Meyer, J P; Mezzetto, Mauro; Mishra, S R; Moorhead, G F; Naumov, D V; Nédélec, P; Nefedov, Yu A; Nguyen-Mau, C; Orestano, D; Pastore, F; Peak, L S; Pennacchio, E; Pessard, H; Petti, R; Placci, A; Polesello, G; Pollmann, D; Polyarush, A Yu; Popov, B; Poulsen, C; Rebuffi, L; Renò, R; Rico, J; Riemann, P; Roda, C; Rubbia, André; Salvatore, F; Schahmaneche, K; Schmidt, B; Schmidt, T; Sconza, A; Sevior, M E; Sillou, D; Soler, F J P; Sozzi, G; Steele, D; Stiegler, U; Stipcevic, M; Stolarczyk, T; Tareb-Reyes, M; Taylor, G; Tereshchenko, V V; Toropin, A N; Touchard, A M; Tovey, Stuart N; Tran, M T; Tsesmelis, E; Ulrichs, J; Vacavant, L; Valdata-Nappi, M; Valuev, V Y; Vannucci, François; Varvell, K E; Veltri, M; Vercesi, V; Vidal-Sitjes, G; Vieira, J M; Vinogradova, T G; Weber, F V; Weisse, T; Wilson, F F; Winton, L J; Yabsley, B D; Zaccone, Henri; Zuber, K; Zuccon, P

    2001-01-01

    We present the results of a search for nu(mu)-->nu(e) oscillations in the NOMAD experiment at CERN. The experiment looked for the appearance of nu(e) in a predominantly nu(mu) wide-band neutrino beam at the CERN SPS. No evidence for oscillations was found. The 90% confidence limits obtained are delta m^2 10 eV^2.

  7. Analysis of repeated measures data

    CERN Document Server

    Islam, M Ataharul

    2017-01-01

    This book presents a broad range of statistical techniques to address emerging needs in the field of repeated measures. It also provides a comprehensive overview of extensions of generalized linear models for the bivariate exponential family of distributions, which represent a new development in analysing repeated measures data. The demand for statistical models for correlated outcomes has grown rapidly recently, mainly due to presence of two types of underlying associations: associations between outcomes, and associations between explanatory variables and outcomes. The book systematically addresses key problems arising in the modelling of repeated measures data, bearing in mind those factors that play a major role in estimating the underlying relationships between covariates and outcome variables for correlated outcome data. In addition, it presents new approaches to addressing current challenges in the field of repeated measures and models based on conditional and joint probabilities. Markov models of first...

  8. ACCA phosphopeptide recognition by the BRCT repeats of BRCA1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Hind; Moreau, Karen; Dizin, Eva; Callebaut, Isabelle; Venezia, Nicole Dalla

    2006-06-16

    The tumour suppressor gene BRCA1 encodes a 220 kDa protein that participates in multiple cellular processes. The BRCA1 protein contains a tandem of two BRCT repeats at its carboxy-terminal region. The majority of disease-associated BRCA1 mutations affect this region and provide to the BRCT repeats a central role in the BRCA1 tumour suppressor function. The BRCT repeats have been shown to mediate phospho-dependant protein-protein interactions. They recognize phosphorylated peptides using a recognition groove that spans both BRCT repeats. We previously identified an interaction between the tandem of BRCA1 BRCT repeats and ACCA, which was disrupted by germ line BRCA1 mutations that affect the BRCT repeats. We recently showed that BRCA1 modulates ACCA activity through its phospho-dependent binding to ACCA. To delineate the region of ACCA that is crucial for the regulation of its activity by BRCA1, we searched for potential phosphorylation sites in the ACCA sequence that might be recognized by the BRCA1 BRCT repeats. Using sequence analysis and structure modelling, we proposed the Ser1263 residue as the most favourable candidate among six residues, for recognition by the BRCA1 BRCT repeats. Using experimental approaches, such as GST pull-down assay with Bosc cells, we clearly showed that phosphorylation of only Ser1263 was essential for the interaction of ACCA with the BRCT repeats. We finally demonstrated by immunoprecipitation of ACCA in cells, that the whole BRCA1 protein interacts with ACCA when phosphorylated on Ser1263.

  9. Design optimization methods for genomic DNA tiling arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertone, Paul; Trifonov, Valery; Rozowsky, Joel S; Schubert, Falk; Emanuelsson, Olof; Karro, John; Kao, Ming-Yang; Snyder, Michael; Gerstein, Mark

    2006-02-01

    A recent development in microarray research entails the unbiased coverage, or tiling, of genomic DNA for the large-scale identification of transcribed sequences and regulatory elements. A central issue in designing tiling arrays is that of arriving at a single-copy tile path, as significant sequence cross-hybridization can result from the presence of non-unique probes on the array. Due to the fragmentation of genomic DNA caused by the widespread distribution of repetitive elements, the problem of obtaining adequate sequence coverage increases with the sizes of subsequence tiles that are to be included in the design. This becomes increasingly problematic when considering complex eukaryotic genomes that contain many thousands of interspersed repeats. The general problem of sequence tiling can be framed as finding an optimal partitioning of non-repetitive subsequences over a prescribed range of tile sizes, on a DNA sequence comprising repetitive and non-repetitive regions. Exact solutions to the tiling problem become computationally infeasible when applied to large genomes, but successive optimizations are developed that allow their practical implementation. These include an efficient method for determining the degree of similarity of many oligonucleotide sequences over large genomes, and two algorithms for finding an optimal tile path composed of longer sequence tiles. The first algorithm, a dynamic programming approach, finds an optimal tiling in linear time and space; the second applies a heuristic search to reduce the space complexity to a constant requirement. A Web resource has also been developed, accessible at http://tiling.gersteinlab.org, to generate optimal tile paths from user-provided DNA sequences.

  10. The Long Wavelength Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, G. B.

    2006-08-01

    The Long Wavelength Array (LWA) will be a new, open, user-oriented astronomical instrument operating in the poorly explored window from 20-80 MHz at arcsecond level resolution and mJy level sensitivity. Key science drivers include (1) acceleration, propagation, and turbulence in the ISM, including the space-distribution and spectrum of Galactic cosmic rays, supernova remnants, and pulsars; (2) the high redshift universe, including the most distant radio galaxies and clusters - tools for understanding the earliest black holes and the cosmological evolution of Dark Matter and Dark Energy; (3) planetary, solar, and space science, including space weather prediction and extra-solar planet searches; and (4) the radio transient universe: including the known (e.g., SNe, GRBs) and the unknown. Because the LWA will explore one of the last and least investigated regions of the spectrum, the potential for new discoveries, including new classes of physical phenomena, is high, and there is a strong synergy with exciting new X-ray and Gamma-ray measurements, e.g. for cosmic ray acceleration, transients, and galaxy clusters. Operated by the University of New Mexico on behalf of the South West Consortium (SWC) the LWA will also provide a unique training ground for the next generation of radio astronomers. Students may also put skills learned on the LWA to work in computer science, electrical engineering, and the communications industry, among others. The development of the LWA will follow a phased build, which benefits from lessons learned at each phase. Four university-based Scientific Testing and Evaluation (ST&E) teams with different areas of concentration (1. High resolution imaging and particle acceleration; 2. Wide field imaging and large scale structures; 3. Ionosphere, and 4. RFI suppression and transient detection) will provide the feedback needed to assure that science objectives are met as the build develops. Currently in its first year of construction funding, the LWA

  11. Plasmonic Properties of Vertically Aligned Nanowire Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Qi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanowires (NWs/Ag sheath composites were produced to investigate plasmonic coupling between vertically aligned NWs for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS applications. In this investigation, two types of vertical NW arrays were studied; those of ZnO NWs grown on nanosphere lithography patterned sapphire substrate via vapor-liquid-solid (VLS mechanism and Si NW arrays produced by wet chemical etching. Both types of vertical NW arrays were coated with a thin layer of silver by electroless silver plating for SERS enhancement studies. The experimental results show extremely strong SERS signals due to plasmonic coupling between the NWs, which was verified by COMSOL electric field simulations. We also compared the SERS enhancement intensity of aligned and random ZnO NWs, indicating that the aligned NWs show much stronger and repeatable SERS signal than those grown in nonaligned geometries.

  12. Slowed Search in the Context of Unimpaired Grouping in Autism: Evidence from Multiple Conjunction Search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keehn, Brandon; Joseph, Robert M

    2016-03-01

    In multiple conjunction search, the target is not known in advance but is defined only with respect to the distractors in a given search array, thus reducing the contributions of bottom-up and top-down attentional and perceptual processes during search. This study investigated whether the superior visual search skills typically demonstrated by individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) would be evident in multiple conjunction search. Thirty-two children with ASD and 32 age- and nonverbal IQ-matched typically developing (TD) children were administered a multiple conjunction search task. Contrary to findings from the large majority of studies on visual search in ASD, response times of individuals with ASD were significantly slower than those of their TD peers. Evidence of slowed performance in ASD suggests that the mechanisms responsible for superior ASD performance in other visual search paradigms are not available in multiple conjunction search. Although the ASD group failed to exhibit superior performance, they showed efficient search and intertrial priming levels similar to the TD group. Efficient search indicates that ASD participants were able to group distractors into distinct subsets. In summary, while demonstrating grouping and priming effects comparable to those exhibited by their TD peers, children with ASD were slowed in their performance on a multiple conjunction search task, suggesting that their usual superior performance in visual search tasks is specifically dependent on top-down and/or bottom-up attentional and perceptual processes.

  13. A Search Model for Imperfectly Detected Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahumada, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Under the assumptions that 1) the search region can be divided up into N non-overlapping sub-regions that are searched sequentially, 2) the probability of detection is unity if a sub-region is selected, and 3) no information is available to guide the search, there are two extreme case models. The search can be done perfectly, leading to a uniform distribution over the number of searches required, or the search can be done with no memory, leading to a geometric distribution for the number of searches required with a success probability of 1/N. If the probability of detection P is less than unity, but the search is done otherwise perfectly, the searcher will have to search the N regions repeatedly until detection occurs. The number of searches is thus the sum two random variables. One is N times the number of full searches (a geometric distribution with success probability P) and the other is the uniform distribution over the integers 1 to N. The first three moments of this distribution were computed, giving the mean, standard deviation, and the kurtosis of the distribution as a function of the two parameters. The model was fit to the data presented last year (Ahumada, Billington, & Kaiwi, 2 required to find a single pixel target on a simulated horizon. The model gave a good fit to the three moments for all three observers.

  14. Searches For Primeval Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Collins, C A

    1998-01-01

    A primeval galaxy represents the earliest stages of a galaxy's life and as such provides clues to the early history of the Universe and the evolution of stars and galaxies. Over the last 20 years astronomers have been engaged in the quest to detect the faint signals from these objects, believed to lie at a distance comparable with the size of the Universe. A wide variety of observational techniques have been employed in this search, with astronomers eagerly awaiting each new generation of astronomical telescope or detector in the hope of finally solving the mystery to the origin of galaxies -- or at least placing new and interesting constraints. Until recently, primeval galaxies have eluded detection in these searches, however experiments over the last couple of years which use either 10m-class optical telescopes or state-of-the-art submillimetre array detectors, may hold the clue to the origin of structure as they have finally uncovered what appears to be a widespread population of young galaxies.

  15. Autonomous Search

    CERN Document Server

    Hamadi, Youssef; Saubion, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    Decades of innovations in combinatorial problem solving have produced better and more complex algorithms. These new methods are better since they can solve larger problems and address new application domains. They are also more complex which means that they are hard to reproduce and often harder to fine-tune to the peculiarities of a given problem. This last point has created a paradox where efficient tools are out of reach of practitioners. Autonomous search (AS) represents a new research field defined to precisely address the above challenge. Its major strength and originality consist in the

  16. Search in

    OpenAIRE

    Gaona Román, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    "Search in" consiste en una instalación artística compuesta por escultura y video con un trasfondo conceptual sobre la identidad. Es una obra que invita al espectador a rodearla e introducirse en ella viéndose así como parte de la obra, al igual que el concepto de identidad puede vivirse desde la sensación del “yo” separado del mundo y a su vez desde el “yo” como parte de la sociedad. Nos hace viajar desde nuestros inicios como sociedad y seres conscientes hasta la actualidad, la era de las c...

  17. The Square Kilometer Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordes, James M.

    2006-06-01

    The SKA is an observatory for m/cm wavelengths that will provide quantum leaps in studies of the early universe, the high-energy universe, and astrobiology. Key science areas include:(1) Galaxy Evolution and Large-Scale Structure, including Dark Energy;(2) Probing the Dark Ages through studies of highly redshifted hydrogen and carbon monoxide;(3) Cosmic magnetism;(4) Probing Gravity with Pulsars and Black Holes; and(5) The Cradle of Life, including real-time images of protoplanetary disks, inventory of organic molecules, and the search for signals from extraterrestrial intelligence.From a phase-space point of view, the SKA will expand enormously our ability to discover new and known phenomena, including transient sources with time scales from nano-seconds to years. Particular examples include coherent emissions from extrasolar planets and gamma-ray burst afterglows, detectable at levels 100 times smaller than currently. Specifications needed to meet the science requirements are technically quite challenging: a frequency range of approximately 0.1 to 25 GHz; wide field of view, tens of square degrees (frequency dependent); high dynamic range and image fidelity; flexibility in imaging on scales from sub-mas to degrees; and sampling the time-frequency domain as demanded by transient objects. Meeting these specifications requires collaboration of a world-wide group of engineers and scientists. For this and other reasons, the SKA will be realized internationally. Initially, several concepts have been explored for building inexpensive collecting area that provides broad frequency coverage. The Reference Design now specifies an SKA based on a large number of small-diameter dish antennas with "smart feeds." Complementary to the dishes is a phased aperture array that will provide very wide-field capability. I will discuss the Reference Design, along with a timeline for developing the technology, building the first 10% of the SKA, and finishing the full SKA, along with the

  18. (Efficient identification and analysis of low and medium frequency repeats)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jurka, J.

    1991-08-28

    The effective starting date of this grant was May 15. In the first three months of this project we focused primarily on organizational and technical aspects of our research which included: organization of the database of repeats in primates; preparation of software for rapid and sensitive search of novel repetitive elements in GenBank; purchase and installation of the Sun workstation; and research on the mammal-specific MAR1 family of repetitive elements (to be communicated in October).

  19. Search for CP Violation in Positronium Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartram, Chelsea

    2014-09-01

    We present a new experiment to search for CP violation in the charged lepton sector by studying positronium decays. Positronium, a bound state of an electron and positron, occurs in both a singlet and triplet state. The triplet state, orthopositronium, decays primarily into three photons. Our experiment searches for CP-violating correlations between the directions of the three gamma-rays using the APEX annular array of NaI detectors, combined with a tagged source. This array will increase the angular acceptance by a factor 25 over previous experiments. We will present the current status of the experiment and a projected sensitivity. We present a new experiment to search for CP violation in the charged lepton sector by studying positronium decays. Positronium, a bound state of an electron and positron, occurs in both a singlet and triplet state. The triplet state, orthopositronium, decays primarily into three photons. Our experiment searches for CP-violating correlations between the directions of the three gamma-rays using the APEX annular array of NaI detectors, combined with a tagged source. This array will increase the angular acceptance by a factor 25 over previous experiments. We will present the current status of the experiment and a projected sensitivity. UNC and TUNL.

  20. TPRpred: a tool for prediction of TPR-, PPR- and SEL1-like repeats from protein sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Söding Johannes

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Solenoid repeat proteins of the Tetratrico Peptide Repeat (TPR family are involved as scaffolds in a broad range of protein-protein interactions. Several resources are available for the prediction of TPRs, however, they often fail to detect divergent repeat units. Results We have developed TPRpred, a profile-based method which uses a P-value-dependent score offset to include divergent repeat units and which exploits the tendency of repeats to occur in tandem. TPRpred detects not only TPR-like repeats, but also the related Pentatrico Peptide Repeats (PPRs and SEL1-like repeats. The corresponding profiles were generated through iterative searches, by varying the threshold parameters for inclusion of repeat units into the profiles, and the best profiles were selected based on their performance on proteins of known structure. We benchmarked the performance of TPRpred in detecting TPR-containing proteins and in delineating the individual repeats therein, against currently available resources. Conclusion TPRpred performs significantly better in detecting divergent repeats in TPR-containing proteins, and finds more individual repeats than the existing methods. The web server is available at http://tprpred.tuebingen.mpg.de, and the C++ and Perl sources of TPRpred along with the profiles can be downloaded from ftp://ftp.tuebingen.mpg.de/ebio/protevo/TPRpred/.

  1. Electronic Switch Arrays for Managing Microbattery Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojarradi, Mohammad; Alahmad, Mahmoud; Sukumar, Vinesh; Zghoul, Fadi; Buck, Kevin; Hess, Herbert; Li, Harry; Cox, David

    2008-01-01

    Integrated circuits have been invented for managing the charging and discharging of such advanced miniature energy-storage devices as planar arrays of microscopic energy-storage elements [typically, microscopic electrochemical cells (microbatteries) or microcapacitors]. The architecture of these circuits enables implementation of the following energy-management options: dynamic configuration of the elements of an array into a series or parallel combination of banks (subarrarys), each array comprising a series of parallel combination of elements; direct addressing of individual banks for charging/or discharging; and, disconnection of defective elements and corresponding reconfiguration of the rest of the array to utilize the remaining functional elements to obtain the desited voltage and current performance. An integrated circuit according to the invention consists partly of a planar array of field-effect transistors that function as switches for routing electric power among the energy-storage elements, the power source, and the load. To connect the energy-storage elements to the power source for charging, a specific subset of switches is closed; to connect the energy-storage elements to the load for discharging, a different specific set of switches is closed. Also included in the integrated circuit is circuitry for monitoring and controlling charging and discharging. The control and monitoring circuitry, the switching transistors, and interconnecting metal lines are laid out on the integrated-circuit chip in a pattern that registers with the array of energy-storage elements. There is a design option to either (1) fabricate the energy-storage elements in the corresponding locations on, and as an integral part of, this integrated circuit; or (2) following a flip-chip approach, fabricate the array of energy-storage elements on a separate integrated-circuit chip and then align and bond the two chips together.

  2. Limitations on quantum key repeaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäuml, Stefan; Christandl, Matthias; Horodecki, Karol; Winter, Andreas

    2015-04-23

    A major application of quantum communication is the distribution of entangled particles for use in quantum key distribution. Owing to noise in the communication line, quantum key distribution is, in practice, limited to a distance of a few hundred kilometres, and can only be extended to longer distances by use of a quantum repeater, a device that performs entanglement distillation and quantum teleportation. The existence of noisy entangled states that are undistillable but nevertheless useful for quantum key distribution raises the question of the feasibility of a quantum key repeater, which would work beyond the limits of entanglement distillation, hence possibly tolerating higher noise levels than existing protocols. Here we exhibit fundamental limits on such a device in the form of bounds on the rate at which it may extract secure key. As a consequence, we give examples of states suitable for quantum key distribution but unsuitable for the most general quantum key repeater protocol.

  3. Hysteresis of magnetostructural transitions: Repeatable and non-repeatable processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Provenzano, Virgil [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Della Torre, Edward; Bennett, Lawrence H. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); ElBidweihy, Hatem, E-mail: Hatem@gwmail.gwu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    The Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 2}Si{sub 2} alloy and the off-stoichiometric Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 35}In{sub 15} Heusler alloy belong to a special class of metallic materials that exhibit first-order magnetostructural transitions near room temperature. The magnetic properties of this class of materials have been extensively studied due to their interesting magnetic behavior and their potential for a number of technological applications such as refrigerants for near-room-temperature magnetic refrigeration. The thermally driven first-order transitions in these materials can be field-induced in the reverse order by applying a strong enough field. The field-induced transitions are typically accompanied by the presence of large magnetic hysteresis, the characteristics of which are a complicated function of temperature, field, and magneto-thermal history. In this study we show that the virgin curve, the major loop, and sequentially measured MH loops are the results of both repeatable and non-repeatable processes, in which the starting magnetostructural state, prior to the cycling of field, plays a major role. Using the Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 2}Si{sub 2} and Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 35}In{sub 15} alloys, as model materials, we show that a starting single phase state results in fully repeatable processes and large magnetic hysteresis, whereas a mixed phase starting state results in non-repeatable processes and smaller hysteresis.

  4. Broadband DOA Estimation Based on Nested Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-bo Shen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Direction of arrival (DOA estimation is a crucial problem in electronic reconnaissance. A novel broadband DOA estimation method utilizing nested arrays is devised in this paper, which is capable of estimating the frequencies and DOAs of multiple narrowband signals in broadbands, even though they may have different carrier frequencies. The proposed method converts the DOA estimation of multiple signals with different frequencies into the spatial frequency estimation. Then, the DOAs and frequencies are pair matched by sparse recovery. It is possible to significantly increase the degrees of freedom (DOF with the nested arrays and the number of sources can be more than that of sensor array. In addition, the method can achieve high estimation precision without the two-dimensional search process in frequency and angle domain. The validity of the proposed method is verified by theoretic analysis and simulation results.

  5. Array Antenna Limitations

    CERN Document Server

    Jonsson, B L G; Hussain, N

    2013-01-01

    This letter defines a physical bound based array figure of merit that provides a tool to compare the performance of both single and multi-band array antennas with respect to return-loss, thickness of the array over the ground-plane, and scan-range. The result is based on a sum-rule result of Rozanov-type for linear polarization. For single-band antennas it extends an existing limit for a given fixed scan-angle to include the whole scan-range of the array, as well as the unit-cell structure in the bound. The letter ends with an investigation of the array figure of merit for some wideband and/or wide-scan antennas with linear polarization. We find arrays with a figure of merit >0.6 that empirically defines high-performance antennas with respect to this measure.

  6. Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lin, Yuehe; Yantasee, Wassana; Liu, Guodong; Lu, Fang; Tu, Yi

    2008-11-18

    The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

  7. Dynamically Reconfigurable Microphone Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    Static + 2 Wireless Using only a standard computer sound card, a robot is limited to binaural inputs. Even when using wireless microphones, the audio...Abstract—Robotic sound localization has traditionally been restricted to either on-robot microphone arrays or embedded microphones in aware...a microphone array has a significant impact on the mathematics of sound source localization. Arrays, for instance, are commonly designed to

  8. Web Search Engines: Search Syntax and Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojala, Marydee

    2002-01-01

    Presents a chart that explains the search syntax, features, and commands used by the 12 most widely used general Web search engines. Discusses Web standardization, expanded types of content searched, size of databases, and search engines that include both simple and advanced versions. (LRW)

  9. Web Search Engines: Search Syntax and Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojala, Marydee

    2002-01-01

    Presents a chart that explains the search syntax, features, and commands used by the 12 most widely used general Web search engines. Discusses Web standardization, expanded types of content searched, size of databases, and search engines that include both simple and advanced versions. (LRW)

  10. Integrated avalanche photodiode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Eric S.

    2015-07-07

    The present disclosure includes devices for detecting photons, including avalanche photon detectors, arrays of such detectors, and circuits including such arrays. In some aspects, the detectors and arrays include a virtual beveled edge mesa structure surrounded by resistive material damaged by ion implantation and having side wall profiles that taper inwardly towards the top of the mesa structures, or towards the direction from which the ion implantation occurred. Other aspects are directed to masking and multiple implantation and/or annealing steps. Furthermore, methods for fabricating and using such devices, circuits and arrays are disclosed.

  11. EAMJ Dec. Repeatability.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-12-12

    Dec 12, 2008 ... Results:Kappa values for four-week repeatability for the wheeze and asthma questions were 0.61 ... for logistic, cultural and ethical reasons, to use ... individual with baseline forced expiratory volume in .... period is likely to also include the effects of true ... data, the writing of the manuscript or the decision.

  12. Gene cassette transcription in a large integron-associated array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Carolyn A

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The integron/gene cassette system is a diverse and effective adaptive resource for prokaryotes. Short cassette arrays, with less than 10 cassettes adjacent to an integron, provide this resource through the expression of cassette-associated genes by an integron-borne promoter. However, the advantage provided by large arrays containing hundreds of cassettes is less obvious. In this work, using the 116-cassette array of Vibrio sp. DAT722 as a model, we investigated the theory that the majority of genes contained within large cassette arrays are widely expressed by intra-array promoters in addition to the integron-borne promoter. Results We demonstrated that the majority of the cassette-associated genes in the subject array were expressed. We further showed that cassette expression was conditional and that the conditionality varied across the array. We finally showed that this expression was mediated by a diversity of cassette-borne promoters within the array capable of responding to environmental stressors. Conclusions Widespread expression within large gene cassette arrays could provide an adaptive advantage to the host in proportion to the size of the array. Our findings explained the existence and maintenance of large cassette arrays within many prokaryotes. Further, we suggested that repeated rearrangement of cassettes containing genes and/or promoters within large arrays could result in the assembly of operon-like groups of co-expressed cassettes within an array. These findings add to our understanding of the adaptive repertoire of the integron/gene cassette system in prokaryotes and consequently, the evolutionary impact of this system.

  13. Focal plane array with modular pixel array components for scalability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kay, Randolph R; Campbell, David V; Shinde, Subhash L; Rienstra, Jeffrey L; Serkland, Darwin K; Holmes, Michael L

    2014-12-09

    A modular, scalable focal plane array is provided as an array of integrated circuit dice, wherein each die includes a given amount of modular pixel array circuitry. The array of dice effectively multiplies the amount of modular pixel array circuitry to produce a larger pixel array without increasing die size. Desired pixel pitch across the enlarged pixel array is preserved by forming die stacks with each pixel array circuitry die stacked on a separate die that contains the corresponding signal processing circuitry. Techniques for die stack interconnections and die stack placement are implemented to ensure that the desired pixel pitch is preserved across the enlarged pixel array.

  14. Array radars solve communication jams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, H. D.

    1982-04-01

    The possibilities of incorporating mobile radar units as slave stations in communications relay applications during times of disrupted communications is examined. The limitations on uses of search, tracking, and multifunction radars are examined, noting that employment of the mobile system entails some tracking by the master phased-arrays to keep the mobile units in focus. The tracking patterns and dwell times are outlined, and the possibility of 700-1000 dwell times of 1220 microsec duration/sec is mentioned as opening the opportunity for high quality data transmissions. Signal-to-noise ratios are formulated for jamming situations, with offsetting tactical features for the jamming including the directivity and gain of the master antenna, the master station's power aperture product, on-axis to off-axis gain ratio, and antenna positioning ability. A slave station must be equipped with a transponder for communications, which are best achieved with pseudo-random coded waveforms.

  15. Analysis of VCSEL Array Module Using a Simple Microlens Array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hen-Wai; Tsao; Shyh-Lin; Tsao

    2003-01-01

    A simple microlens array is designed between VCSEL array and fiber array for integration of array module. We increase the optical coupling efficiency from -32.057 dBm to -0.9054 dBm by using our designed microlens array.

  16. Analysis of VCSEL Array Module Using a Simple Microlens Array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Ming Cheng; Hen-Wai Tsao; Shyh-Lin Tsao

    2003-01-01

    A simple microlens array is designed between VCSEL array and fiber array for integration of array module. We increase the optical coupling efficiency from-32.057 dBm to-0.9054 dBm by using our designed microlens array.

  17. Evolution of ribosomal DNA-derived satellite repeat in tomato genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hur Cheol-Goo

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tandemly repeated DNA, also called as satellite DNA, is a common feature of eukaryotic genomes. Satellite repeats can expand and contract dramatically, which may cause genome size variation among genetically-related species. However, the origin and expansion mechanism are not clear yet and needed to be elucidated. Results FISH analysis revealed that the satellite repeat showing homology with intergenic spacer (IGS of rDNA present in the tomato genome. By comparing the sequences representing distinct stages in the divergence of rDNA repeat with those of canonical rDNA arrays, the molecular mechanism of the evolution of satellite repeat is described. Comprehensive sequence analysis and phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that a long terminal repeat retrotransposon was interrupted into each copy of the 18S rDNA and polymerized by recombination rather than transposition via an RNA intermediate. The repeat was expanded through doubling the number of IGS into the 25S rRNA gene, and also greatly increasing the copy number of type I subrepeat in the IGS of 25-18S rDNA by segmental duplication. Homogenization to a single type of subrepeat in the satellite repeat was achieved as the result of amplifying copy number of the type I subrepeat but eliminating neighboring sequences including the type II subrepeat and rRNA coding sequence from the array. FISH analysis revealed that the satellite repeats are commonly present in closely-related Solanum species, but vary in their distribution and abundance among species. Conclusion These results represent that the dynamic satellite repeats were originated from intergenic spacer of rDNA unit in the tomato genome. This result could serve as an example towards understanding the initiation and the expansion of the satellite repeats in complex eukaryotic genome.

  18. Detecting nanohertz gravitational waves with pulsar timing arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Xing-Jiang; Hobbs, George; Manchester, Richard N; Shannon, Ryan M

    2015-01-01

    Complementary to ground-based laser interferometers, pulsar timing array experiments are being carried out to search for nanohertz gravitational waves. Using the world's most powerful radio telescopes, three major international collaborations have collected $\\sim$10-year high precision timing data for tens of millisecond pulsars. In this paper we give an overview on pulsar timing experiments, gravitational wave detection in the nanohertz regime, and recent results obtained by various timing array projects.

  19. Optimal array of sand fences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Izael A; Araújo, Ascânio D; Parteli, Eric J R; Andrade, José S; Herrmann, Hans J

    2017-03-24

    Sand fences are widely applied to prevent soil erosion by wind in areas affected by desertification. Sand fences also provide a way to reduce the emission rate of dust particles, which is triggered mainly by the impacts of wind-blown sand grains onto the soil and affects the Earth's climate. Many different types of fence have been designed and their effects on the sediment transport dynamics studied since many years. However, the search for the optimal array of fences has remained largely an empirical task. In order to achieve maximal soil protection using the minimal amount of fence material, a quantitative understanding of the flow profile over the relief encompassing the area to be protected including all employed fences is required. Here we use Computational Fluid Dynamics to calculate the average turbulent airflow through an array of fences as a function of the porosity, spacing and height of the fences. Specifically, we investigate the factors controlling the fraction of soil area over which the basal average wind shear velocity drops below the threshold for sand transport when the fences are applied. We introduce a cost function, given by the amount of material necessary to construct the fences. We find that, for typical sand-moving wind velocities, the optimal fence height (which minimizes this cost function) is around 50 cm, while using fences of height around 1.25 m leads to maximal cost.

  20. Solar array deployment mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calassa, Mark C.; Kackley, Russell

    1995-05-01

    This paper describes a Solar Array Deployment Mechanism (SADM) used to deploy a rigid solar array panel on a commercial spacecraft. The application required a deployment mechanism design that was not only lightweight, but also could be produced and installed at the lowest possible cost. This paper covers design, test, and analysis of a mechanism that meets these requirements.

  1. Array for detecting microbes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, Gary L.; DeSantis, Todd D.

    2014-07-08

    The present embodiments relate to an array system for detecting and identifying biomolecules and organisms. More specifically, the present embodiments relate to an array system comprising a microarray configured to simultaneously detect a plurality of organisms in a sample at a high confidence level.

  2. Using Repeating Decimals As An Alternative To Prime Numbers In Encryption

    CERN Document Server

    Zirkind, Givon

    2010-01-01

    This article is meant to provide an additional point of view, applying known knowledge, to supply keys that have a series of non-repeating digits, in a manner that is not usually thought of. Traditionally, prime numbers are used in encryption as keys that have non-repeating sequences. Usually, non-repetition, especially of digits in a key, is very sought after in encryption. Uniqueness in a digit sequence defeats decryption. In searching for methods of non-decryptable encryption as well as ways to provide unique sequences, other than using prime numbers [5], the idea of using repeating decimals came to me. Applied correctly, a repeating decimal series of sufficient length will stand in as well for a prime number. This is so, because only numbers prime to each other will produce repeating decimals and; within the repeating sequence there is uniqueness of digit sequence.

  3. Using Repeating Decimals As An Alternative To Prime Numbers In Encryption

    CERN Document Server

    Zirkind, Givon

    2010-01-01

    This article is meant to provide an additional point of view, applying known knowledge, to supply keys that have a series of non-repeating digits, in a manner that is not usually thought of. Traditionally, prime numbers are used in encryption as keys that have non-repeating sequences. Non-repetition of digits in a key is very sought after in encryption. Uniqueness in a digit sequence defeats decryption by method. In searching for methods of non-decryptable encryption as well as ways to provide unique sequences, other than using prime numbers, the idea of using repeating decimals came to me. Applied correctly, a repeating decimal series of sufficient length will stand in as well for a prime number. This is so, because only numbers prime to each other will produce repeating decimals and; within the repeating sequence there is uniqueness of digit sequence.

  4. Improved Scatter Search Using Cuckoo Search

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed T.Sadiq Al-Obaidi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The Scatter Search (SS is a deterministic strategy that has been applied successfully to some combinatorial and continuous optimization problems. Cuckoo Search (CS is heuristic search algorithm which is inspired by the reproduction strategy of cuckoos. This paper presents enhanced scatter search algorithm using CS algorithm. The improvement provides Scatter Search with random exploration for search space of problem and more of diversity and intensification for promising solutions. The original and improved Scatter Search has been tested on Traveling Salesman Problem. A computational experiment with benchmark instances is reported. The results demonstrate that the improved Scatter Search algorithms produce better performance than original Scatter Search algorithm. The improvement in the value of average fitness is 23.2% comparing with original SS. The developed algorithm has been compared with other algorithms for the same problem, and the result was competitive with some algorithm and insufficient with another.

  5. Photovoltaic array loss mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Charles

    1986-10-01

    Loss mechanisms which come into play when solar cell modules are mounted in arrays are identified. Losses can occur either from a reduction in the array electrical performance or with nonoptimal extraction of power from the array. Electrical performance degradation is caused by electrical mismatch, transmission losses from cell surface soiling and steep angle of reflectance, and electrical losses from field wiring resistance and the voltage drop across blocking diodes. The second type of loss, concerned with the operating points of the array, can involve nonoptimal load impedance and limiting the operating envelope of the array to specific ranges of voltage and current. Each of the loss mechanisms are discussed and average energy losses expected from soiling, steep reflectance angles and circuit losses are calculated.

  6. Microfabricated ion trap array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blain, Matthew G.; Fleming, James G.

    2006-12-26

    A microfabricated ion trap array, comprising a plurality of ion traps having an inner radius of order one micron, can be fabricated using surface micromachining techniques and materials known to the integrated circuits manufacturing and microelectromechanical systems industries. Micromachining methods enable batch fabrication, reduced manufacturing costs, dimensional and positional precision, and monolithic integration of massive arrays of ion traps with microscale ion generation and detection devices. Massive arraying enables the microscale ion traps to retain the resolution, sensitivity, and mass range advantages necessary for high chemical selectivity. The reduced electrode voltage enables integration of the microfabricated ion trap array with on-chip circuit-based rf operation and detection electronics (i.e., cell phone electronics). Therefore, the full performance advantages of the microfabricated ion trap array can be realized in truly field portable, handheld microanalysis systems.

  7. Directionality switchable gain stabilized linear repeater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Takayuki; Ohmachi, Tadashi; Aida, Kazuo

    2004-10-01

    We propose a new approach to realize a bidirectional linear repeater suitable for future optical internet networks and fault location in repeater chain with OTDR. The proposed approach is the linear repeater of simple configuration whose directionality is rearranged dynamically by electrical control signal. The repeater is composed of a magneto-optical switch, a circulator, a dynamically gain stabilized unidirectional EDFA, and control circuits. The repeater directionality is rearranged as fast as 0.1ms by an electrical control pulse. It is experimentally confirmed that OTDR with the directionality switchable repeater is feasible for repeater chain. The detailed design and performance of the repeater are also discussed, including the multi-pass interference (MPI) which may arise in the proposed repeater, the effect of the MPI on SNR degradation of the repeater chain and the feed-forward EDFA gain control circuit.

  8. Social value and information quality in online health information search

    OpenAIRE

    Hameed, Tahir; Swar, Bobby

    2016-01-01

    This paper extends and validates a model of value-driven online healthcare information search in online shared contexts. Perceived value is an important factor behind users' decisions concerning search, consumption and reuse of products and services. The role of utilitarian, hedonic and epistemic value of information in user satisfaction and intention to repeat online search is well recognized, but little support has been found for social value affecting user satisfaction critical for such de...

  9. Measurement-based quantum repeaters

    CERN Document Server

    Zwerger, M; Briegel, H J

    2012-01-01

    We introduce measurement-based quantum repeaters, where small-scale measurement-based quantum processors are used to perform entanglement purification and entanglement swapping in a long-range quantum communication protocol. In the scheme, pre-prepared entangled states stored at intermediate repeater stations are coupled with incoming photons by simple Bell-measurements, without the need of performing additional quantum gates or measurements. We show how to construct the required resource states, and how to minimize their size. We analyze the performance of the scheme under noise and imperfections, with focus on small-scale implementations involving entangled states of few qubits. We find measurement-based purification protocols with significantly improved noise thresholds. Furthermore we show that already resource states of small size suffice to significantly increase the maximal communication distance. We also discuss possible advantages of our scheme for different set-ups.

  10. A Repeating Fast Radio Burst

    CERN Document Server

    Spitler, L G; Hessels, J W T; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J; Ferdman, R D; Freire, P C C; Kaspi, V M; Lazarus, P; Lynch, R; Madsen, E C; McLaughlin, M A; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Seymour, A; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; van Leeuwen, J; Zhu, W W

    2016-01-01

    Fast Radio Bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measures (i.e. integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of the fast radio bursts has led several authors to hypothesise that they originate in cataclysmic astrophysical events. Here we report the detection of ten additional bursts from the direction of FRB121102, using the 305-m Arecibo telescope. These new bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and wh...

  11. Repeatability of Harris Corner Detector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Lili

    2003-01-01

    Interest point detectors are commonly employed to reduce the amount of data to be processed. The ideal interest point detector would robustly select those features which are most appropriate or salient for the application and data at hand. This paper shows that interest points are geometrically stable under different transformations.This property makes interest points very successful in the context of image matching. To measure this property quantatively, we introduce a evaluation criterion: repeatability rate.

  12. Phased array ultrasonic inspection of Friction Stir Weldments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarre, André; Moles, Michael; Lupien, Vincent

    2000-05-01

    Phased array ultrasonic inspection methods have been developed for the rapid inspection of Friction Stir Weldments (FSW) on Delta rocket cryogenic tanks. A comprehensive review was performed to identify NDE methods that are suitable for the detection of defects in this new welding process. The search included a review of traditional and advanced NDE methods that were capable of demonstrating both the sensitivity and inspection rates required for this examination. This paper will discuss the theory behind phased array techniques, fundamentals of several probe designs for FSW configurations, and the advantages of using phased arrays over conventional NDE methods for this applications.

  13. Search and analysis of superdeformed and oblate states in {sup 193}Pb nucleus with the EUROGAM II multidetector array; Recherche et analyse des etats superdeformes et aplatis dans le noyau {sup 193}Pb a l'aide du multidetecteur EUROGAM II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ducroux, L. [Lyon-1 Univ., 69 - Villeurbanne (France). Inst. de Physique Nucleaire]|[Universite Claude Bernard, 69 - Lyon (France)

    1997-01-09

    This work is devoted to the search and analysis of superdeformed and oblate states in {sup 193}Pb nucleus. High spin states of this isotope, populated via fusion-evaporation reaction {sup 168}Er ({sup 30}Si, 5n) {sup 193}Pb, have been studied with the EUROGAM II {gamma} multidetector array located near the VIVITRON accelerator in Strasbourg. New sorting and analysis programs have been developed in particular related to the background treatment. Angular distribution and linear polarisation analysis allowed us to assign the {gamma} transition multipolarities. Five dipole bands, corresponding to a weakly oblate-deformed shape of the nucleus, have been observed and connected to the low-lying states. The level scheme has been considerably extended up to a spin of 61/2 {Dirac_h} and an excitation energy of about 8 MeV. These structures have been interpreted as based on a high-K two-quasi-proton excitation coupled to rotation aligned quasi-neutrons. Six superdeformed bands, corresponding to a high prolate-deformed shape of the nucleus, have been observed. These six bands have been interpreted as three pairs of signature partners based on quasineutron excitations. The extraction of the g-factor of a K=9/2 neutron superdeformed orbital has been done for the first time in lead isotopes, giving access to the magnetic properties of the extreme nuclear matter. All these results have been discussed in terms of microscopic mean field self-consistent Hartree-Fock calculations using the microscopic 'rotor + particle(s)' model. (author)

  14. Widespread Recurrent Patterns of Rapid Repeat Evolution in the Kinetochore Scaffold KNL1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tromer, Eelco; Snel, Berend; Kops, Geert J P L

    2015-01-01

    The outer kinetochore protein scaffold KNL1 is essential for error-free chromosome segregation during mitosis and meiosis. A critical feature of KNL1 is an array of repeats containing MELT-like motifs. When phosphorylated, these motifs form docking sites for the BUB1-BUB3 dimer that regulates chromo

  15. Comparison of Two Detection Combination Algorithms for Phased Array Radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    weapon guidance. It can also be used effectively for secure communications [1]. In an MFR, the radar surveillance plays a critical role to optimize the...horizon/surface search, detection confirmation, multi-target tracking and cued search. The simulated radar has an aperture of 1 m2. The antennas...Comparison of Two Detection Combination Algorithms for Phased Array Radars Zhen Ding and Peter Moo Wide Area Surveillance Radar Group Radar

  16. Introduction to adaptive arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Monzingo, Bob; Haupt, Randy

    2011-01-01

    This second edition is an extensive modernization of the bestselling introduction to the subject of adaptive array sensor systems. With the number of applications of adaptive array sensor systems growing each year, this look at the principles and fundamental techniques that are critical to these systems is more important than ever before. Introduction to Adaptive Arrays, 2nd Edition is organized as a tutorial, taking the reader by the hand and leading them through the maze of jargon that often surrounds this highly technical subject. It is easy to read and easy to follow as fundamental concept

  17. Piezoelectric transducer array microspeaker

    KAUST Repository

    Carreno, Armando Arpys Arevalo

    2016-12-19

    In this paper we present the fabrication and characterization of a piezoelectric micro-speaker. The speaker is an array of micro-machined piezoelectric membranes, fabricated on silicon wafer using advanced micro-machining techniques. Each array contains 2n piezoelectric transducer membranes, where “n” is the bit number. Every element of the array has a circular shape structure. The membrane is made out four layers: 300nm of platinum for the bottom electrode, 250nm or lead zirconate titanate (PZT), a top electrode of 300nm and a structural layer of 50

  18. P systems with array objects and array rewriting rules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K.G. Subramanian; R. Saravanan; M. Geethalakshmi; P. Helen Chandra; M. Margenstern

    2007-01-01

    Array P systems were introduced by Pǎun Gh. which is linking the two areas of membrane computing and picture grammars. Puzzle grammars were introduced by us for generating connected picture arrays in the two-dimensional plane, motivated by the problem of tiling the plane. On the other hand, incorporating into arrays the developmental type of generation used in the well-known biologically motivated L systems, Siromoney and Siromoney proposed a very general rectangular array generating model, called extended controlled tabled L array system (ECTLAS). In this paper we introduce two variations of the array P system, called BPG array P system and parallel array P system. The former has in the regions array objects and basic puzzle grammar rules (BPG), which are a specific kind of puzzle grammar rules. In the latter, the regions have rectangular array objects and tables of context-free rules. We examine these two types of P systems for their array generative power.

  19. Origin and fate of repeats in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achaz, G; Rocha, E P C; Netter, P; Coissac, E

    2002-07-01

    We investigated 53 complete bacterial chromosomes for intrachromosomal repeats. In previous studies on eukaryote chromosomes, we proposed a model for the dynamics of repeats based on the continuous genesis of tandem repeats, followed by an active process of high deletion rate, counteracted by rearrangement events that may prevent the repeats from being deleted. The present study of long repeats in the genomes of Bacteria and Archaea suggests that our model of interspersed repeats dynamics may apply to them. Thus the duplication process might be a consequence of very ancient mechanisms shared by all three domains. Moreover, we show that there is a strong negative correlation between nucleotide composition bias and the repeat density of genomes. We hypothesise that in highly biased genomes, non-duplicated small repeats arise more frequently by random effects and are used as primers for duplication mechanisms, leading to a higher density of large repeats.

  20. History effects in visual search for monsters: search times, choice biases, and liking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetverikov, Andrey; Kristjansson, Árni

    2015-02-01

    Repeating targets and distractors on consecutive visual search trials facilitates search performance, whereas switching targets and distractors harms search. In addition, search repetition leads to biases in free choice tasks, in that previously attended targets are more likely to be chosen than distractors. Another line of research has shown that attended items receive high liking ratings, whereas ignored distractors are rated negatively. Potential relations between the three effects are unclear, however. Here we simultaneously measured repetition benefits and switching costs for search times, choice biases, and liking ratings in color singleton visual search for "monster" shapes. We showed that if expectations from search repetition are violated, targets are liked to be less attended than otherwise. Choice biases were, on the other hand, affected by distractor repetition, but not by target/distractor switches. Target repetition speeded search times but had little influence on choice or liking. Our findings suggest that choice biases reflect distractor inhibition, and liking reflects the conflict associated with attending to previously inhibited stimuli, while speeded search follows both target and distractor repetition. Our results support the newly proposed affective-feedback-of-hypothesis-testing account of cognition, and additionally, shed new light on the priming of visual search.

  1. Tandemly repeated DNA is a target for the partial replacement of thymine by beta-D-glucosyl-hydroxymethyluracil in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, F; Kieft, R; Cross, M; Borst, P

    2000-07-01

    In the DNA of African trypanosomes a small fraction of thymine is replaced by the modified base beta-D-glucosyl-hydroxymethyluracil (J). The function of this large base is unknown. The presence of J in the silent variant surface glycoprotein gene expression sites and the lack of J in the transcribed expression site indicates that DNA modification might play a role in control of gene repression. However, the abundance of J in the long telomeric repeat tracts and in subtelomeric arrays of simple repeats suggests that J may also have specific functions in repetitive DNA. We have now analyzed chromosome-internal repetitive sequences in the genome of Trypanosoma brucei and found J in the minichromosomal 177-bp repeats, in the long arrays of 5S RNA gene repeats, and in the spliced-leader RNA gene repeats. No J was found in the rDNA locus or in dispersed repetitive transposon-like elements. Remarkably, the rDNA of T. brucei is not organized in long arrays of tandem repeats, as in many other eukaryotes. T. brucei contains only approximately 15-20 rDNA repeat units that are divided over six to seven chromosomes. Our results show that J is present in many tandemly repeated sequences, either at a telomere or chromosome internal. The presence of J might help to stabilize the long arrays of repeats in the genome.

  2. Cascade category-aware visual search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shiliang; Tian, Qi; Huang, Qingming; Gao, Wen; Rui, Yong

    2014-06-01

    Incorporating image classification into image retrieval system brings many attractive advantages. For instance, the search space can be narrowed down by rejecting images in irrelevant categories of the query. The retrieved images can be more consistent in semantics by indexing and returning images in the relevant categories together. However, due to their different goals on recognition accuracy and retrieval scalability, it is hard to efficiently incorporate most image classification works into large-scale image search. To study this problem, we propose cascade category-aware visual search, which utilizes weak category clue to achieve better retrieval accuracy, efficiency, and memory consumption. To capture the category and visual clues of an image, we first learn category-visual words, which are discriminative and repeatable local features labeled with categories. By identifying category-visual words in database images, we are able to discard noisy local features and extract image visual and category clues, which are hence recorded in a hierarchical index structure. Our retrieval system narrows down the search space by: 1) filtering the noisy local features in query; 2) rejecting irrelevant categories in database; and 3) preforming discriminative visual search in relevant categories. The proposed algorithm is tested on object search, landmark search, and large-scale similar image search on the large-scale LSVRC10 data set. Although the category clue introduced is weak, our algorithm still shows substantial advantages in retrieval accuracy, efficiency, and memory consumption than the state-of-the-art.

  3. Protein Functionalized Nanodiamond Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu YL

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Various nanoscale elements are currently being explored for bio-applications, such as in bio-images, bio-detection, and bio-sensors. Among them, nanodiamonds possess remarkable features such as low bio-cytotoxicity, good optical property in fluorescent and Raman spectra, and good photostability for bio-applications. In this work, we devise techniques to position functionalized nanodiamonds on self-assembled monolayer (SAMs arrays adsorbed on silicon and ITO substrates surface using electron beam lithography techniques. The nanodiamond arrays were functionalized with lysozyme to target a certain biomolecule or protein specifically. The optical properties of the nanodiamond-protein complex arrays were characterized by a high throughput confocal microscope. The synthesized nanodiamond-lysozyme complex arrays were found to still retain their functionality in interacting with E. coli.

  4. STRING: a web-server to retrieve and display the repeatedly occurring neighbourhood of a gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snel, B; Lehmann, G; Bork, P; Huynen, M A

    2000-09-15

    The repeated occurrence of genes in each other's neighbourhood on genomes has been shown to indicate a functional association between the proteins they encode. Here we introduce STRING (search tool for recurring instances of neighbouring genes), a tool to retrieve and display the genes a query gene repeatedly occurs with in clusters on the genome. The tool performs iterative searches and visualises the results in their genomic context. By finding the genomically associated genes for a query, it delineates a set of potentially functionally associated genes. The usefulness of STRING is illustrated with an example that suggests a functional context for an RNA methylase with unknown specificity.

  5. Google Ajax Search API

    CERN Document Server

    Fitzgerald, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Use the Google Ajax Search API to integrateweb search, image search, localsearch, and other types of search intoyour web site by embedding a simple, dynamicsearch box to display search resultsin your own web pages using a fewlines of JavaScript. For those who do not want to write code,the search wizards and solutions builtwith the Google Ajax Search API generatecode to accomplish common taskslike adding local search results to a GoogleMaps API mashup, adding videosearch thumbnails to your web site, oradding a news reel with the latest up todate stories to your blog. More advanced users can

  6. Improving repeatability by improving quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronen, Shuki; Ackers, Mark; Schlumberger, Geco-Prakla; Brink, Mundy

    1998-12-31

    Time lapse (4-D) seismic is a promising tool for reservoir characterization and monitoring. The method is apparently simple: to acquire data repeatedly over the same reservoir, process and interpret the data sets, then changes between the data sets indicate changes in the reservoir. A problem with time lapse seismic data is that reservoirs are a relatively small part of the earth and important reservoir changes may cause very small differences to the time lapse data. The challenge is to acquire and process economical time lapse data such that reservoir changes can be detected above the noise of varying acquisition and environment. 7 refs., 9 figs.

  7. Coordinated hybrid automatic repeat request

    KAUST Repository

    Makki, Behrooz

    2014-11-01

    We develop a coordinated hybrid automatic repeat request (HARQ) approach. With the proposed scheme, if a user message is correctly decoded in the first HARQ rounds, its spectrum is allocated to other users, to improve the network outage probability and the users\\' fairness. The results, which are obtained for single- and multiple-antenna setups, demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed approach in different conditions. For instance, with a maximum of M retransmissions and single transmit/receive antennas, the diversity gain of a user increases from M to (J+1)(M-1)+1 where J is the number of users helping that user.

  8. Improved array illuminators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmann, A W; Sinzinger, S

    1992-09-10

    The job of an array illuminator is to provide an array of optical gates or smart pixels with photon power or with synchronous clock signals. So far it has been common to take the power from one big laser and distribute it to perhaps a million gates. An obvious alternative is to assign one private small source to each gate. We favor an in-between approach: a few medium-size sources share the job of providing photons. This hybrid approach has several advantages, such as better homogeneity, less coherent noise, and a distributed risk of source failure. We propose several setups and present some experimental results. Our concept calls for an array of incoherent point sources. We simulate such an array experimentally with a single source, which is virtually expanded into a source array by grating diffraction. Ordinarily these virtual sources are mutually coherent, which is undesirable for our aims. We destroy the mutual coherence by moving the grating during the photographic recording of the output array.

  9. A survey of FRB fields: Limits on repeatability

    CERN Document Server

    Petroff, E; Keane, E F; van Straten, W; Bailes, M; Barr, E D; Barsdell, B R; Burke-Spolaor, S; Caleb, M; Champion, D J; Flynn, C; Jameson, A; Kramer, M; Ng, C; Possenti, A; Stappers, B W

    2015-01-01

    Several theories exist to explain the source of the bright, millisecond duration pulses known as fast radio bursts (FRBs). If the progenitors of FRBs are non-cataclysmic, such as giant pulses from pulsars, pulsar-planet binaries, or magnetar flares, FRB emission may be seen to repeat. We have undertaken a survey of the fields of eight known FRBs from the High Time Resolution Universe survey to search for repeating pulses. Although no repeat pulses were detected the survey yielded the detection of a new FRB, described in Petroff et al. (2015a). From our observations we rule out periodic repeating sources with periods P $\\leq$ 8.6 hours and rule out sources with periods 8.6 < P < 21 hours at the 90% confidence level. At P $\\geq$ 21 hours our limits fall off as ~1/P. Dedicated and persistent observations of FRB source fields are needed to rule out repetition on longer timescales, a task well-suited to next generation wide-field transient detectors.

  10. What is a microsatellite: a computational and experimental definition based upon repeat mutational behavior at A/T and GT/AC repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelkar, Yogeshwar D; Strubczewski, Noelle; Hile, Suzanne E; Chiaromonte, Francesca; Eckert, Kristin A; Makova, Kateryna D

    2010-01-01

    Microsatellites are abundant in eukaryotic genomes and have high rates of strand slippage-induced repeat number alterations. They are popular genetic markers, and their mutations are associated with numerous neurological diseases. However, the minimal number of repeats required to constitute a microsatellite has been debated, and a definition of a microsatellite that considers its mutational behavior has been lacking. To define a microsatellite, we investigated slippage dynamics for a range of repeat sizes, utilizing two approaches. Computationally, we assessed length polymorphism at repeat loci in ten ENCODE regions resequenced in four human populations, assuming that the occurrence of polymorphism reflects strand slippage rates. Experimentally, we determined the in vitro DNA polymerase-mediated strand slippage error rates as a function of repeat number. In both approaches, we compared strand slippage rates at tandem repeats with the background slippage rates. We observed two distinct modes of mutational behavior. At small repeat numbers, slippage rates were low and indistinguishable from background measurements. A marked transition in mutability was observed as the repeat array lengthened, such that slippage rates at large repeat numbers were significantly higher than the background rates. For both mononucleotide and dinucleotide microsatellites studied, the transition length corresponded to a similar number of nucleotides (approximately 10). Thus, microsatellite threshold is determined not by the presence/absence of strand slippage at repeats but by an abrupt alteration in slippage rates relative to background. These findings have implications for understanding microsatellite mutagenesis, standardization of genome-wide microsatellite analyses, and predicting polymorphism levels of individual microsatellite loci.

  11. Crowding by a repeating pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Sarah; Pelli, Denis G

    2015-01-01

    Theinability to recognize a peripheral target among flankers is called crowding. For a foveal target, crowding can be distinguished from overlap masking by its sparing of detection, linear scaling with eccentricity, and invariance with target size.Crowding depends on the proximity and similarity of the flankers to the target. Flankers that are far from or dissimilar to the target do not crowd it. On a gray page, text whose neighboring letters have different colors, alternately black and white, has enough dissimilarity that it might escape crowding. Since reading speed is normally limited by crowding, escape from crowding should allow faster reading. Yet reading speed is unchanged (Chung & Mansfield, 2009). Why? A recent vernier study found that using alternating-color flankers produces strong crowding (Manassi, Sayim, & Herzog, 2012). Might that effect occur with letters and reading? Critical spacing is the minimum center-to-center target-flanker spacing needed to correctly identify the target. We measure it for a target letter surrounded by several equidistant flanker letters of the same polarity, opposite polarity, or mixed polarity: alternately white and black. We find strong crowding in the alternating condition, even though each flanker letter is beyond its own critical spacing (as measured in a separate condition). Thus a periodic repeating pattern can produce crowding even when the individual elements do not. Further, in all conditions we find that, once a periodic pattern repeats (two cycles), further repetition does not affect critical spacing of the innermost flanker.

  12. Association between CAG repeat polymorphisms and the risk of prostate cancer: a meta-analysis by race, study design and the number of (CAG)n repeat polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jun-Hyun; Lee, Sang-Ah

    2013-11-01

    Although a number of studies have been conducted on the association between prostate cancer and CAG repeat polymorphisms of the androgen receptor gene, this association remains elusive and controversial. In this meta-analysis, we aimed to evaluate the effects of (CAG)n repeat genetic polymorphisms on the incidence of prostate cancer, particularly as regards race, study design and the number of (CAG)n repeats. To collect articles published on the association between CAG repeats and prostate cancer, publications were identified from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database of epidemiological studies published up to October 2011; our identification of publications was not limited by a language barrier. The following search keywords were used: prostate cancer risk, CAG repeat polymorphism, androgen receptor gene and human. Stata version 10 was used for the meta-analysis and the publication bias was measured through the Begg's test and Egger's test. This meta-analysis included 47 studies with 13,346 cases and 15,172 control or non-cases and consisted of 31 reports based on Caucasians, ten on Asians, one on Hispanics and four on combined ethnic groups. The carriers of a shorter CAG repeat sequence had an increased risk of prostate cancer (OR 1.21, 95% CI 1.10-1.34 for all subjects; OR 1.21, 95% CI 1.10-1.34 for prospective studies; OR 1.32, 95% CI 1.15-1.51 for retrospective studies) regardless of the exact length of the CAG repeat, compared with carriers of a longer repeat sequence. In terms of race, the risk of carrying a shorter CAG repeat sequence was 1.10- and 1.83-fold higher than that of a longer repeat sequence in Caucasians and Asians, respectively. For the specific number of CAG repeat polymorphisms, carriers of repeats were observed to have a higher risk of prostate cancer (OR 1.16, 95% CI 1.04-1.29) compared with carriers with ≥ 22 CAG repeat polymorphisms, particularly for Asians (OR 2.06, 95% CI 1.00-4.24). This meta

  13. Automatization and familiarity in repeated checking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dek, Eliane C P; van den Hout, Marcel A.; Giele, Catharina L.; Engelhard, Iris M.

    2014-01-01

    Repeated checking paradoxically increases memory uncertainty. This study investigated the underlying mechanism of this effect. We hypothesized that as a result of repeated checking, familiarity with stimuli increases, and automatization of the checking procedure occurs, which should result in decrea

  14. CDC Vital Signs: Preventing Repeat Teen Births

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... file Error processing SSI file Preventing Repeat Teen Births Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On this ... Too many teens, ages 15–19, have repeat births. Nearly 1 in 5 births to teens, ages ...

  15. SNP Array in Hematopoietic Neoplasms: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinming Song

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cytogenetic analysis is essential for the diagnosis and prognosis of hematopoietic neoplasms in current clinical practice. Many hematopoietic malignancies are characterized by structural chromosomal abnormalities such as specific translocations, inversions, deletions and/or numerical abnormalities that can be identified by karyotype analysis or fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH studies. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP arrays offer high-resolution identification of copy number variants (CNVs and acquired copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity (LOH/uniparental disomy (UPD that are usually not identifiable by conventional cytogenetic analysis and FISH studies. As a result, SNP arrays have been increasingly applied to hematopoietic neoplasms to search for clinically-significant genetic abnormalities. A large numbers of CNVs and UPDs have been identified in a variety of hematopoietic neoplasms. CNVs detected by SNP array in some hematopoietic neoplasms are of prognostic significance. A few specific genes in the affected regions have been implicated in the pathogenesis and may be the targets for specific therapeutic agents in the future. In this review, we summarize the current findings of application of SNP arrays in a variety of hematopoietic malignancies with an emphasis on the clinically significant genetic variants.

  16. Expanded complexity of unstable repeat diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Polak, Urszula; McIvor, Elizabeth; Dent, Sharon Y.R.; Wells, Robert D.; Napierala, Marek.

    2012-01-01

    Unstable Repeat Diseases (URDs) share a common mutational phenomenon of changes in the copy number of short, tandemly repeated DNA sequences. More than 20 human neurological diseases are caused by instability, predominantly expansion, of microsatellite sequences. Changes in the repeat size initiate a cascade of pathological processes, frequently characteristic of a unique disease or a small subgroup of the URDs. Understanding of both the mechanism of repeat instability and molecular consequen...

  17. Neural correlates of context-dependent feature conjunction learning in visual search tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reavis, Eric A; Frank, Sebastian M; Greenlee, Mark W; Tse, Peter U

    2016-06-01

    Many perceptual learning experiments show that repeated exposure to a basic visual feature such as a specific orientation or spatial frequency can modify perception of that feature, and that those perceptual changes are associated with changes in neural tuning early in visual processing. Such perceptual learning effects thus exert a bottom-up influence on subsequent stimulus processing, independent of task-demands or endogenous influences (e.g., volitional attention). However, it is unclear whether such bottom-up changes in perception can occur as more complex stimuli such as conjunctions of visual features are learned. It is not known whether changes in the efficiency with which people learn to process feature conjunctions in a task (e.g., visual search) reflect true bottom-up perceptual learning versus top-down, task-related learning (e.g., learning better control of endogenous attention). Here we show that feature conjunction learning in visual search leads to bottom-up changes in stimulus processing. First, using fMRI, we demonstrate that conjunction learning in visual search has a distinct neural signature: an increase in target-evoked activity relative to distractor-evoked activity (i.e., a relative increase in target salience). Second, we demonstrate that after learning, this neural signature is still evident even when participants passively view learned stimuli while performing an unrelated, attention-demanding task. This suggests that conjunction learning results in altered bottom-up perceptual processing of the learned conjunction stimuli (i.e., a perceptual change independent of the task). We further show that the acquired change in target-evoked activity is contextually dependent on the presence of distractors, suggesting that search array Gestalts are learned. Hum Brain Mapp 37:2319-2330, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. 47 CFR 97.205 - Repeater station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Repeater station. 97.205 Section 97.205... SERVICE Special Operations § 97.205 Repeater station. (a) Any amateur station licensed to a holder of a Technician, General, Advanced or Amateur Extra Class operator license may be a repeater. A holder of...

  19. 47 CFR 22.1015 - Repeater operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Repeater operation. 22.1015 Section 22.1015... Offshore Radiotelephone Service § 22.1015 Repeater operation. Offshore central stations may be used as repeater stations provided that the licensee is able to maintain control of the station, and in...

  20. ProtRepeatsDB: a database of amino acid repeats in genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chauhan Virander S

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome wide and cross species comparisons of amino acid repeats is an intriguing problem in biology mainly due to the highly polymorphic nature and diverse functions of amino acid repeats. Innate protein repeats constitute vital functional and structural regions in proteins. Repeats are of great consequence in evolution of proteins, as evident from analysis of repeats in different organisms. In the post genomic era, availability of protein sequences encoded in different genomes provides a unique opportunity to perform large scale comparative studies of amino acid repeats. ProtRepeatsDB http://bioinfo.icgeb.res.in/repeats/ is a relational database of perfect and mismatch repeats, access to which is designed as a resource and collection of tools for detection and cross species comparisons of different types of amino acid repeats. Description ProtRepeatsDB (v1.2 consists of perfect as well as mismatch amino acid repeats in the protein sequences of 141 organisms, the genomes of which are now available. The web interface of ProtRepeatsDB consists of different tools to perform repeat s; based on protein IDs, organism name, repeat sequences, and keywords as in FASTA headers, size, frequency, gene ontology (GO annotation IDs and regular expressions (REGEXP describing repeats. These tools also allow formulation of a variety of simple, complex and logical queries to facilitate mining and large-scale cross-species comparisons of amino acid repeats. In addition to this, the database also contains sequence analysis tools to determine repeats in user input sequences. Conclusion ProtRepeatsDB is a multi-organism database of different types of amino acid repeats present in proteins. It integrates useful tools to perform genome wide queries for rapid screening and identification of amino acid repeats and facilitates comparative and evolutionary studies of the repeats. The database is useful for identification of species or organism specific

  1. Sound Search Engine Concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2006-01-01

    Sound search is provided by the major search engines, however, indexing is text based, not sound based. We will establish a dedicated sound search services with based on sound feature indexing. The current demo shows the concept of the sound search engine. The first engine will be realased June...

  2. Sound Search Engine Concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2006-01-01

    Sound search is provided by the major search engines, however, indexing is text based, not sound based. We will establish a dedicated sound search services with based on sound feature indexing. The current demo shows the concept of the sound search engine. The first engine will be realased June...

  3. Web Search Engines

    OpenAIRE

    Rajashekar, TB

    1998-01-01

    The World Wide Web is emerging as an all-in-one information source. Tools for searching Web-based information include search engines, subject directories and meta search tools. We take a look at key features of these tools and suggest practical hints for effective Web searching.

  4. CRF: detection of CRISPR arrays using random forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Wang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available CRISPRs (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats are particular repeat sequences found in wide range of bacteria and archaea genomes. Several tools are available for detecting CRISPR arrays in the genomes of both domains. Here we developed a new web-based CRISPR detection tool named CRF (CRISPR Finder by Random Forest. Different from other CRISPR detection tools, a random forest classifier was used in CRF to filter out invalid CRISPR arrays from all putative candidates and accordingly enhanced detection accuracy. In CRF, particularly, triplet elements that combine both sequence content and structure information were extracted from CRISPR repeats for classifier training. The classifier achieved high accuracy and sensitivity. Moreover, CRF offers a highly interactive web interface for robust data visualization that is not available among other CRISPR detection tools. After detection, the query sequence, CRISPR array architecture, and the sequences and secondary structures of CRISPR repeats and spacers can be visualized for visual examination and validation. CRF is freely available at http://bioinfolab.miamioh.edu/crf/home.php.

  5. Large Neighborhood Search

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pisinger, David; Røpke, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Heuristics based on large neighborhood search have recently shown outstanding results in solving various transportation and scheduling problems. Large neighborhood search methods explore a complex neighborhood by use of heuristics. Using large neighborhoods makes it possible to find better...... candidate solutions in each iteration and hence traverse a more promising search path. Starting from the large neighborhood search method,we give an overview of very large scale neighborhood search methods and discuss recent variants and extensions like variable depth search and adaptive large neighborhood...... search....

  6. Evaporating metal nanocrystal arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue; Joy, James C.; Zhao, Chenwei; Kim, Jin Ho; Fernandes, Gustavo; Xu, J. M.; Valles, James M., Jr.

    2017-03-01

    Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) substrates with a self-ordered triangular array of nanopores provide the means to fabricate multiple forms of nano materials, such as nanowires and nanoparticles. This study focuses on nanostructures that emerge in thin films of metals thermally evaporated onto the surface of AAO. Previous work showed that films of different evaporated metals assume dramatically different structures, e.g. an ordered triangular array of nearly monodisperse nanoparticles forms for lead (Pb) while a polycrystalline nanohoneycomb structure forms for silver (Ag). Here, we present investigations of the effects of substrate temperature and deposition angle that reveal the processes controlling the nano particle array formation. Our findings indicate that arrays form provided the grain nucleation density exceeds the pore density and the atomic mobility is high enough to promote grain coalescence. They introduce a method for producing films with anisotropic grain array structure. The results provide insight into the influence of substrate nano-morphology on thin film growth energetics and kinetics that can be harnessed for creating films with other novel nano-structures.

  7. ARRAYS OF BOTTLES OF PLUTONIUM NITRATE SOLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margaret A. Marshall

    2012-09-01

    In October and November of 1981 thirteen approaches-to-critical were performed on a remote split table machine (RSTM) in the Critical Mass Laboratory of Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in Richland, Washington using planar arrays of polyethylene bottles filled with plutonium (Pu) nitrate solution. Arrays of up to sixteen bottles were used to measure the critical number of bottles and critical array spacing with a tight fitting Plexiglas® reflector on all sides of the arrays except the top. Some experiments used Plexiglas shells fitted around each bottles to determine the effect of moderation on criticality. Each bottle contained approximately 2.4 L of Pu(NO3)4 solution with a Pu content of 105 g Pu/L and a free acid molarity H+ of 5.1. The plutonium was of low 240Pu (2.9 wt.%) content. These experiments were sponsored by Rockwell Hanford Operations because of the lack of experimental data on the criticality of arrays of bottles of Pu solution such as might be found in storage and handling at the Purex Facility at Hanford. The results of these experiments were used “to provide benchmark data to validate calculational codes used in criticality safety assessments of [the] plant configurations” (Ref. 1). Data for this evaluation were collected from the published report (Ref. 1), the approach to critical logbook, the experimenter’s logbook, and communication with the primary experimenter, B. Michael Durst. Of the 13 experiments preformed 10 were evaluated. One of the experiments was not evaluated because it had been thrown out by the experimenter, one was not evaluated because it was a repeat of another experiment and the third was not evaluated because it reported the critical number of bottles as being greater than 25. Seven of the thirteen evaluated experiments were determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments. A similar experiment using uranyl nitrate was benchmarked as U233-SOL-THERM-014.

  8. Pentatricopeptide repeat proteins in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkan, Alice; Small, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins constitute one of the largest protein families in land plants, with more than 400 members in most species. Over the past decade, much has been learned about the molecular functions of these proteins, where they act in the cell, and what physiological roles they play during plant growth and development. A typical PPR protein is targeted to mitochondria or chloroplasts, binds one or several organellar transcripts, and influences their expression by altering RNA sequence, turnover, processing, or translation. Their combined action has profound effects on organelle biogenesis and function and, consequently, on photosynthesis, respiration, plant development, and environmental responses. Recent breakthroughs in understanding how PPR proteins recognize RNA sequences through modular base-specific contacts will help match proteins to potential binding sites and provide a pathway toward designing synthetic RNA-binding proteins aimed at desired targets.

  9. Two-dimensional quantum repeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallnöfer, J.; Zwerger, M.; Muschik, C.; Sangouard, N.; Dür, W.

    2016-11-01

    The endeavor to develop quantum networks gave rise to a rapidly developing field with far-reaching applications such as secure communication and the realization of distributed computing tasks. This ultimately calls for the creation of flexible multiuser structures that allow for quantum communication between arbitrary pairs of parties in the network and facilitate also multiuser applications. To address this challenge, we propose a two-dimensional quantum repeater architecture to establish long-distance entanglement shared between multiple communication partners in the presence of channel noise and imperfect local control operations. The scheme is based on the creation of self-similar multiqubit entanglement structures at growing scale, where variants of entanglement swapping and multiparty entanglement purification are combined to create high-fidelity entangled states. We show how such networks can be implemented using trapped ions in cavities.

  10. General benchmarks for quantum repeaters

    CERN Document Server

    Pirandola, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Using a technique based on quantum teleportation, we simplify the most general adaptive protocols for key distribution, entanglement distillation and quantum communication over a wide class of quantum channels in arbitrary dimension. Thanks to this method, we bound the ultimate rates for secret key generation and quantum communication through single-mode Gaussian channels and several discrete-variable channels. In particular, we derive exact formulas for the two-way assisted capacities of the bosonic quantum-limited amplifier and the dephasing channel in arbitrary dimension, as well as the secret key capacity of the qubit erasure channel. Our results establish the limits of quantum communication with arbitrary systems and set the most general and precise benchmarks for testing quantum repeaters in both discrete- and continuous-variable settings.

  11. Hungarian repeat station survey, 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Péter Kovács

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The last Hungarian repeat station survey was completed between October 2010 and February 2011. Declination, inclination and the total field were observed using one-axial DMI fluxgate magnetometer mounted on Zeiss20A theodolite and GSM 19 Overhauser magnetometer. The magnetic elements of the sites were reduced to the epoch of 2010.5 on the basis of the continuous recordings of Tihany Geophysical Observatory. In stations located far from the reference observatory, the observations were carried out in the morning and afternoon in order to decrease the effect of the distant temporal correction. To further increase the accuracy, on-site dIdD variometer has also been installed near the Aggtelek station, in the Baradla cave, during the survey of the easternmost sites. The paper presents the technical details and the results of our last campaign. The improvement of the accuracy of the temporal reduction by the use of the local variometer is also reported.

  12. Quality control during repeated fryings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuesta, C.

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available Most of the debate ¡s about how the slow or frequent turnover of fresh fat affects the deterioration, of fat used in frying. Then, the modification of different oils used in repeated fryings of potatoes without or with turnover of fresh oil, under similar frying conditions, was evaluated by two criteria: by measuring the total polar component isolated by column chromatography and by the evaluation of the specific compounds related to thermoxidative and hydrolytic alteration by High Performance Size Exclusion Chromatography (HPSEC. The results indicate that with frequent turnover of fresh oil, the critical level of 25% of polar material is rarely reached, and there are fewer problems with fat deterioration because the frying tended to increase the level of polar material and thermoxidative compounds (polymers and dimers of triglycerides and oxidized triglycerides in the fryer oil during the first fryings, followed by minor changes and a tendency to reach a near-steady state in successive fryings. However, in repeated frying of potatoes using a null turnover the alteration rate was higher being linear the relationship found between polar material or the different thermoxidative compounds and the number of fryings. On the other hand chemical reactions produced during deep-fat frying can be minimized by using proper oils. In addition the increased level of consumers awareness toward fat composition and its impact on human health could had an impact on the selection of fats for snacks and for industry. In this way monoenic fats are the most adequate from a nutritional point of view and for its oxidative stability during frying.

  13. Transient Astrophysics with the Square Kilometre Array

    CERN Document Server

    Fender, Rob; Macquart, Jean-Pierre; Donnarumma, Immacolata; Murphy, Tara; Deller, Adam; Paragi, Zsolt; Chatterjee, Shami

    2015-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of the possibilities for transient and variable-source astrophysics with the Square Kilometre Array. While subsequent chapters focus on the astrophysics of individual events, we focus on the broader picture, and how to maximise the science coming from the telescope. The SKA as currently designed will be a fantastic and ground-breaking facility for radio transient studies, but the scientifc yield will be dramatically increased by the addition of (i) near-real-time commensal searches of data streams for events, and (ii) on occasion, rapid robotic response to Target-of-Opprtunity style triggers.

  14. Wireless Josephson Junction Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Laura

    2015-03-01

    We report low temperature, microwave transmission measurements on a wireless two- dimensional network of Josephson junction arrays composed of superconductor-insulator -superconductor tunnel junctions. Unlike their biased counterparts, by removing all electrical contacts to the arrays and superfluous microwave components and interconnects in the transmission line, we observe new collective behavior in the transmission spectra. In particular we will show emergent behavior that systematically responds to changes in microwave power at fixed temperature. Likewise we will show the dynamic and collective response of the arrays while tuning the temperature at fixed microwave power. We discuss these spectra in terms of the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition and Shapiro steps. We gratefully acknowledge the support Prof. Steven Anlage at the University of Maryland and Prof. Allen Goldman at the University of Minnesota. Physics and School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

  15. The Search Performance Evaluation and Prediction in Exploratory Search

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The exploratory search for complex search tasks requires an effective search behavior model to evaluate and predict user search performance. Few studies have investigated the relationship between user search behavior and search performance in exploratory search. This research adopts a mixed approach combining search system development, user search experiment, search query log analysis, and multivariate regression analysis to resolve the knowledge gap. Through this study, it is shown that expl...

  16. The Search Performance Evaluation and Prediction in Exploratory Search

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Fei

    2016-01-01

    The exploratory search for complex search tasks requires an effective search behavior model to evaluate and predict user search performance. Few studies have investigated the relationship between user search behavior and search performance in exploratory search. This research adopts a mixed approach combining search system development, user search experiment, search query log analysis, and multivariate regression analysis to resolve the knowledge gap. Through this study, it is shown that expl...

  17. Photovoltaic array performance model.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kratochvil, Jay A.; Boyson, William Earl; King, David L.

    2004-08-01

    This document summarizes the equations and applications associated with the photovoltaic array performance model developed at Sandia National Laboratories over the last twelve years. Electrical, thermal, and optical characteristics for photovoltaic modules are included in the model, and the model is designed to use hourly solar resource and meteorological data. The versatility and accuracy of the model has been validated for flat-plate modules (all technologies) and for concentrator modules, as well as for large arrays of modules. Applications include system design and sizing, 'translation' of field performance measurements to standard reporting conditions, system performance optimization, and real-time comparison of measured versus expected system performance.

  18. The Submillimeter Array

    CERN Document Server

    Ho, P T P; Lo, K Y; Ho, Paul T.P.; Moran, James M.; Lo, Kwok Yung

    2004-01-01

    The Submillimeter Array (SMA), a collaborative project of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) and the Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics (ASIAA), has begun operation on Mauna Kea in Hawaii. A total of eight 6-m telescopes comprise the array, which will cover the frequency range of 180-900 GHz. All eight telescopes have been deployed and are operational. First scientific results utilizing the three receiver bands at 230, 345, and 690 GHz have been obtained and are presented in the accompanying papers.

  19. Wire Array Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner-Evans, Dan

    Over the past five years, the cost of solar panels has dropped drastically and, in concert, the number of installed modules has risen exponentially. However, solar electricity is still more than twice as expensive as electricity from a natural gas plant. Fortunately, wire array solar cells have emerged as a promising technology for further lowering the cost of solar. Si wire array solar cells are formed with a unique, low cost growth method and use 100 times less material than conventional Si cells. The wires can be embedded in a transparent, flexible polymer to create a free-standing array that can be rolled up for easy installation in a variety of form factors. Furthermore, by incorporating multijunctions into the wire morphology, higher efficiencies can be achieved while taking advantage of the unique defect relaxation pathways afforded by the 3D wire geometry. The work in this thesis shepherded Si wires from undoped arrays to flexible, functional large area devices and laid the groundwork for multijunction wire array cells. Fabrication techniques were developed to turn intrinsic Si wires into full p-n junctions and the wires were passivated with a-Si:H and a-SiNx:H. Single wire devices yielded open circuit voltages of 600 mV and efficiencies of 9%. The arrays were then embedded in a polymer and contacted with a transparent, flexible, Ni nanoparticle and Ag nanowire top contact. The contact connected >99% of the wires in parallel and yielded flexible, substrate free solar cells featuring hundreds of thousands of wires. Building on the success of the Si wire arrays, GaP was epitaxially grown on the material to create heterostructures for photoelectrochemistry. These cells were limited by low absorption in the GaP due to its indirect bandgap, and poor current collection due to a diffusion length of only 80 nm. However, GaAsP on SiGe offers a superior combination of materials, and wire architectures based on these semiconductors were investigated for multijunction

  20. Selecting Sums in Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Jørgensen, Allan Grønlund

    2008-01-01

    In an array of n numbers each of the \\binomn2+nUnknown control sequence '\\binom' contiguous subarrays define a sum. In this paper we focus on algorithms for selecting and reporting maximal sums from an array of numbers. First, we consider the problem of reporting k subarrays inducing the k larges...... an algorithm with this running time and by proving a matching lower bound. Finally, we combine the ideas and obtain an O(n· max {1,log(k/n)}) time algorithm that selects a subarray storing the k’th largest sum among all subarrays of length at least l and at most u....

  1. Genome-wide analysis of tandem repeats in Tribolium castaneum genome reveals abundant and highly dynamic tandem repeat families with satellite DNA features in euchromatic chromosomal arms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlek, Martina; Gelfand, Yevgeniy; Plohl, Miroslav; Meštrović, Nevenka

    2015-12-01

    Although satellite DNAs are well-explored components of heterochromatin and centromeres, little is known about emergence, dispersal and possible impact of comparably structured tandem repeats (TRs) on the genome-wide scale. Our bioinformatics analysis of assembled Tribolium castaneum genome disclosed significant contribution of TRs in euchromatic chromosomal arms and clear predominance of satellite DNA-typical 170 bp monomers in arrays of ≥5 repeats. By applying different experimental approaches, we revealed that the nine most prominent TR families Cast1-Cast9 extracted from the assembly comprise ∼4.3% of the entire genome and reside almost exclusively in euchromatic regions. Among them, seven families that build ∼3.9% of the genome are based on ∼170 and ∼340 bp long monomers. Results of phylogenetic analyses of 2500 monomers originating from these families show high-sequence dynamics, evident by extensive exchanges between arrays on non-homologous chromosomes. In addition, our analysis shows that concerted evolution acts more efficiently on longer than on shorter arrays. Efficient genome-wide distribution of nine TR families implies the role of transposition only in expansion of the most dispersed family, and involvement of other mechanisms is anticipated. Despite similarities in sequence features, FISH experiments indicate high-level compartmentalization of centromeric and euchromatic tandem repeats.

  2. Texas Supernova Search: A Wide Field Search for Nearby SNe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quimby, R. M.; Castro, F.; Gerardy, C. L.; Hoeflich, P.; Kannappan, S. J.; Mondol, P.; Sellers, M.; Wheeler, J. C.

    2005-12-01

    ROTSE-IIIb is one four robotic telescopes built by the University of Michigan to observe the prompt optical afterglows associated with gamma-ray bursts. At just 0.45m in diameter, it is the smallest research telescope at McDonald, but its 1.85 x 1.85 deg field of view and autonomous operation make it an excellent survey instrument for rare transient phenomena. We have been using ROTSE-IIIb for the past year to search for supernovae in nearby galaxy clusters such as the Virgo, Coma, and Ursa Major clusters. ROTSE-IIIb's wide field of view allows us to search the thousands of galaxies in these clusters, which cover hundreds of square degrees on the sky, in just a few tens of exposures. We can therefore observe all of these fields in a single night, and repeat the search every night. When we identify a new supernova candidate, we invoke our target of opportunity time on the neighboring 9.2m Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) the following night to obtain a spectrum. Because of the rolling search and the quick spectral turn-around possible with the HET, we are able to capture spectra of the earliest phases of the explosion. By combining this information with spectra taken at later epochs, we can construct a complete description of the explosion. Through this work we aim to better understand the physical conditions of supernova explosions, identify any systematic effects that may affect how Type Ia supernovae are calibrated as standard candles and used to probe cosmology, and also to better calibrate Type II supernovae as standard candles.

  3. Double Exchange Genetic Algorithm for the Synthesis of Linear Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Jian-Hua

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of Synthesis of Linear array put forward higher request for complex optimization solutions. This article improves the basic genetic algorithm according to the traditional genetic algorithm easily prematuring convergence and later evolution slow convergence shortcoming. And then, adopt double exchange operator in reproductive strategies and implement dynamic mutation rate in variation operations. Combined characteristics of guarantee to the population diversity based on fitness shared niche while iteration times exponential diminishing, this article creats niche double exchangegenetic algorithm, and applies in pattern synthesis of homogeneous linear array, and simulates multi-objective complex array problem. The result turns out much better in effectively preventing premature and improving the searching efficiency of genetic algorithm than original genetic algorithm and immune genetic algorithm, what will achieve the broad prospect in the antenna array comprehensive field.

  4. Modified Fruit Fly Optimization Algorithm for Analysis of Large Antenna Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nattaset Mhudtongon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This research paper deals with the optimization of a large antenna array for maximum directivity using a modified fruit fly optimization algorithm (MFOA with random search of two groups of swarm and adaptive fruit fly swarm population size. The MFOA is utilized to determine three nonlinear mathematical test functions, analysis of the optimal number of elements and optimal element spacing of the large antenna array, and analysis of nonuniform amplitude of antenna array. The numerical results demonstrate that the MFOA is effective in solving all test function and electromagnetic problems. The advantages of the proposed algorithm are ease of implementation, large search range, less processing time, and reduced memory requirement.

  5. Comparative Genomic Hybridization Selection of Blastocysts for Repeated Implantation Failure Treatment: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Ermanno; Bono, Sara; Ruberti, Alessandra; Lobascio, Anna Maria; Greco, Pierfrancesco; Biricik, Anil; Spizzichino, Letizia; Greco, Alessia; Tesarik, Jan; Minasi, Maria Giulia; Fiorentino, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine if the use of preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) by array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) and transfer of a single euploid blastocyst in patients with repeated implantation failure (RIF) can improve clinical results. Three patient groups are compared: 43 couples with RIF for whom embryos were selected by array CGH (group RIF-PGS), 33 couples with the same history for whom array CGH was not performed (group RIF NO PGS), and 45 good prognosis infertile couples with array CGH selected embryos (group NO RIF PGS). A single euploid blastocyst was transferred in groups RIF-PGS and NO RIF PGS. Array CGH was not performed in group RIF NO PGS in which 1-2 blastocysts were transferred. One monoembryonic sac with heartbeat was found in 28 patients of group RIF PGS and 31 patients of group NO RIF PGS showing similar clinical pregnancy and implantation rates (68.3% and 70.5%, resp.). In contrast, an embryonic sac with heartbeat was only detected in 7 (21.2%) patients of group RIF NO PGS. In conclusion, PGS by array CGH with single euploid blastocyst transfer appears to be a successful strategy for patients with multiple failed IVF attempts. PMID:24779011

  6. Shallow repeating slow-slip-events along the convergent block boundary in northern Hokkaido, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, S.; Heki, K.; Kimura, T.

    2015-12-01

    The Japanese Islands are divided into several crustal blocks [e.g. Loveless and Meade, 2010 JGR]. In the Northern Hokkaido, the boundary between the Amurian and the North American Plates run north-south between 44.0N and 45.4N. The east-west block convergence is considered to be as fast as ~1 cm/year there, but few large earthquakes are known to have occurred along this boundary. Recently, a slow slip event (SSE) is reported to have occurred in a segment at ~45.0N over a 4 months period from 2012 summer to the early 2013 [Ohzono et al., 2014 GJI]. The maximum surface movements was about 15 mm, and the moment magnitude of the SSE would not exceed 6.0 (fault slip is estimated as 10 cm). This suggests that plate convergence takes place as episodic SSEs in this block boundary. In this research, we looked for signatures of repeating SSEs along this block boundary using continuous GNSS data of the dense array GEONET in Japan. In order to detect faint signatures of SSEs in the coordinate time series, we adopted the method using AIC (Akaike's Information Criterion) similar to Nishimura et al. [2013 JGR] and Nishimura [2014 PEPS]. As a result, we were able to find numbers of SSE signals in various segments along the boundary. The detected SSEs are all fairly small, and surface movements did not exceed a few millimeters (except the 2012-2013 SSE reported in Ohzono et al. [2014]). We also searched earthquakes that may have triggered these SSEs. Although the 2012 SSE seems to have been triggered by a deep earthquake beneath Sakhalin on Aug. 14, 2012, no clear triggering earthquakes were identified for other SSEs. SSEs in subduction zones are known to recur fairly regularly, e.g. biannually repeating SSE in the SW part of the Ryukyu Arc [Heki and Kataoka, 2008 JGR]. However, shallow SSEs along the block boundary in the northern Hokkaido did not show such regular occurrences. We plan to confirm these SSE occurrences by comparing GNSS data with the Hi-Net tiltmeter records.

  7. Bandwidth Reconfigurable Metamaterial Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathanael J. Smith

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Metamaterial structures provide innovative ways to manipulate electromagnetic wave responses to realize new applications. This paper presents a conformal wideband metamaterial array that achieves as much as 10 : 1 continuous bandwidth. This was done by using interelement coupling to concurrently achieve significant wave slow-down and cancel the inductance stemming from the ground plane. The corresponding equivalent circuit of the resulting array is the same as that of classic metamaterial structures. In this paper, we present a wideband Marchand-type balun with validation measurements demonstrating the metamaterial (MTM array’s bandwidth from 280 MHz to 2800 MHz. Bandwidth reconfiguration of this class of array is then demonstrated achieving a variety of band-pass or band-rejection responses within its original bandwidth. In contrast with previous bandwidth and frequency response reconfigurations, our approach does not change the aperture’s or ground plane’s geometry, nor does it introduce external filtering structures. Instead, the new responses are realized by making simple circuit changes into the balanced feed integrated with the wideband MTM array. A variety of circuit changes can be employed using MEMS switches or variable lumped loads within the feed and 5 example band-pass and band-rejection responses are presented. These demonstrate the potential of the MTM array’s reconfiguration to address a variety of responses.

  8. Visible Genotype Sensor Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Imai

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A visible sensor array system for simultaneous multiple SNP genotyping has been developed using a new plastic base with specific surface chemistry. Discrimination of SNP alleles is carried out by an allele-specific extension reaction using immobilized oligonucleotide primers. The 3’-ends of oligonucleotide primers are modified with a locked nucleic acid to enhance their efficiency in allelic discrimination. Biotin-dUTPs included in the reaction mixture are selectively incorporated into extending primer sequences and are utilized as tags for alkaline phosphatase-mediated precipitation of colored chemical substrates onto the surface of the plastic base. The visible precipitates allow immediate inspection of typing results by the naked eye and easy recording by a digital camera equipped on a commercial mobile phone. Up to four individuals can be analyzed on a single sensor array and multiple sensor arrays can be handled in a single operation. All of the reactions can be performed within one hour using conventional laboratory instruments. This visible genotype sensor array is suitable for “focused genomics” that follows “comprehensive genomics”.

  9. Extended Array Evaluation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-31

    irregular structure of the Mohorovicic discontinuity (Moho) underneath the NORSAR array. • Time delay anomalies (deviation from plane wave propagation...appears that most of the amplitude vari- ations may be explained by scattering effects due to the irregular structure of the Mohorovicic discontinuity

  10. Array processors in chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostlund, N.S.

    1980-01-01

    The field of attached scientific processors (''array processors'') is surveyed, and an attempt is made to indicate their present and possible future use in computational chemistry. The current commercial products from Floating Point Systems, Inc., Datawest Corporation, and CSP, Inc. are discussed.

  11. TANGO Array.. 2. Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauleo, P.; Bonifazi, C.; Filevich, A.

    2004-01-01

    The angular and energy resolutions of the TANGO Array were obtained using extensive Monte Carlo simulations performed with a double purpose: (1) to determine the appropriate parameters for the array fitting to the desired range of sensitivity (the knee energy region), and (2) to construct a reliable shower database required for reference in the analysis of experimental data. The AIRES code, with the SIBYLL hadronic collision package, was used to simulate Extended Air Showers produced by primary cosmic rays (assuming protons and iron nuclei), with energies ranging from 10 14 to 10 18 eV. These data were fed into a realistic code which simulates the response of the detectors (water Cherenkov detectors), including the electronics, pickup noise, and the signal attenuation in the connecting cables. The trigger stage was considered in the simulations in order to estimate the trigger efficiency of the array and to verify the accuracy of the reconstruction codes. This paper delineates the simulations performed to obtain the expected behavior of the array, and describes the simulated data. The results of these simulations suggest that we can expect an error in the energy of the primary cosmic-ray of ˜60% of the estimated value and that the error in the measurement of the direction of arrival can be estimated as ˜4°. The present simulations also indicate that unambiguous assignments of the primary energy cannot be obtained because of the uncertainty in the nature of the primary cosmic ray.

  12. TANGO Array. 2. Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauleo, P. E-mail: pablo.bauleo@colostate.edu; Bonifazi, C.; Filevich, A

    2004-01-11

    The angular and energy resolutions of the TANGO Array were obtained using extensive Monte Carlo simulations performed with a double purpose: (1) to determine the appropriate parameters for the array fitting to the desired range of sensitivity (the knee energy region), and (2) to construct a reliable shower database required for reference in the analysis of experimental data. The AIRES code, with the SIBYLL hadronic collision package, was used to simulate Extended Air Showers produced by primary cosmic rays (assuming protons and iron nuclei), with energies ranging from 10{sup 14} to 10{sup 18} eV. These data were fed into a realistic code which simulates the response of the detectors (water Cherenkov detectors), including the electronics, pickup noise, and the signal attenuation in the connecting cables. The trigger stage was considered in the simulations in order to estimate the trigger efficiency of the array and to verify the accuracy of the reconstruction codes. This paper delineates the simulations performed to obtain the expected behavior of the array, and describes the simulated data. The results of these simulations suggest that we can expect an error in the energy of the primary cosmic-ray of {approx}60% of the estimated value and that the error in the measurement of the direction of arrival can be estimated as {approx}4 deg. . The present simulations also indicate that unambiguous assignments of the primary energy cannot be obtained because of the uncertainty in the nature of the primary cosmic ray.

  13. The Murchison Widefield Array

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mitchell, Daniel A.; Greenhill, Lincoln J.; Ord, Stephen M.; Bernardi, Gianni

    2010-01-01

    It is shown that the excellent Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory site allows the Murchison Widefield Array to employ a simple RFI blanking scheme and still calibrate visibilities and form images in the FM radio band. The techniques described are running autonomously in our calibration and imagin

  14. Microelectronic Stimulator Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-08-09

    retinal prosthesis test device. Figure 3b shows an enlarged view of a nano-channel glass (NCG) electrode array. Figure 4 shows a conceptual layout (floor...against a visual cortex. 10 This involves invasive brain surgery through the cranium . From a surgical point of view, the intra ocular approach is

  15. TRMM Solar Array Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    This final report presents conclusions/recommendations concerning the TRMM Solar Array; deliverable list and schedule summary; waivers and deviations; as-shipped performance data, including flight panel verification matrix, panel output detail, shadow test summary, humidity test summary, reverse bias test panel; and finally, quality assurance summary.

  16. MUSIC 2D-DOA Estimation using Split Vertical Linear and Circular Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasser Albagory

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the MUSIC 2D-DOA estimation is estimated by splitting the angle into elevation and azimuth components. This technique is based on an array that is composed by a vertical uniform linear array located perpendicularly at the center of another uniform circular array. This array configuration is proposed to reduce the computational burden faced in MUSIC 2D-DOA estimation where the vertical array is used to determine the elevation DOAs (θs which are used subsequently to determine the azimuth DOAs (∅s by the circular array instead of searching in all space of the two angles in the case of using circular array only. The new Split beamformer is investigated and the performance of the MUSIC 2D-DOA under several signal conditions in the presence of noise is studied.

  17. A Dark Matter Search with MALBEK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giovanetti, G. K.; Abgrall, N.; Aguayo, Estanislao; Avignone, Frank T.; Barabash, Alexander S.; Bertrand, F.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, Matthew; Byram, D.; Caldwell, A. S.; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Christofferson, Cabot-Ann; Combs, Dustin C.; Cuesta, C.; Detwiler, Jason A.; Doe, Peter J.; Efremenko, Yuri; Egorov, Viatcheslav; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Fast, James E.; Finnerty, P.; Fraenkle, Florian; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Goett, J.; Green, M. P.; Gruszko, J.; Guiseppe, Vincente; Gusev, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Hazama, R.; Hegai, A.; Henning, Reyco; Hoppe, Eric W.; Howard, Stanley; Howe, M. A.; Keeter, K.; Kidd, M. F.; Kochetov, Oleg; Konovalov, S.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Laferriere, Brian D.; Leon, Jonathan D.; Leviner, L.; Loach, J. C.; MacMullin, J.; MacMullin, S.; Martin, R. D.; Meijer, S. J.; Mertens, S.; Nomachi, Masaharu; Orrell, John L.; O' Shaughnessy, C.; Overman, Nicole R.; Phillips, D.; Poon, Alan; Pushkin, K.; Radford, D. C.; Rager, J.; Rielage, Keith; Robertson, R. G. H.; Romero-Romero, E.; Ronquest, M. C.; Schubert, Alexis G.; Shanks, B.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Snavely, Kyle J.; Snyder, N.; Suriano, Anne-Marie; Thompson, J.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, W.; Trimble, J. E.; Varner, R. L.; Vasilyev, Sergey; Vetter, Kai; Vorren, Kris R.; White, Brandon R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wiseman, C.; Xu, W.; Yakushev, E.; Young, A.; Yu, Chang-Hong; Yumatov, Vladimir

    2015-06-01

    The Majorana Demonstrator is an array of natural and enriched high purity germanium detectors that will search for the neutrinoless double-beta decay of 76Ge and perform a search for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) with masses below 10 GeV. As part of the Majorana research and development efforts, we have deployed a modified, low-background broad energy germanium detector at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility. With its sub-keV energy threshold, this detector is potentially sensitive to non-Standard Model physics, including interactions with WIMPs. We discuss the backgrounds present in the WIMP region of interest and present results from a WIMP search with 221.49 live days of data from this detector.

  18. A Dark Matter Search with MALBEK

    CERN Document Server

    Giovanetti, G K; Aguayo, E; Avignone, F T; Barabash, A S; Bertrand, F E; Boswell, M; Brudanin, V; Busch, M; Byram, D; Caldwell, A S; Chan, Y-D; Christofferson, C D; Combs, D C; Cuesta, C; Detwiler, J A; Doe, P J; Efremenko, Yu; Egorov, V; Ejiri, H; Elliott, S R; Fast, J E; Finnerty, P; Fraenkle, F M; Galindo-Uribarri, A; Goett, J; Green, M P; Gruszko, J; Guiseppe, V E; Gusev, K; Hallin, A L; Hazama, R; Hegai, A; Henning, R; Hoppe, E W; Howard, S; Howe, M A; Keeter, K J; Kidd, M F; Kochetov, O; Konovalov, S I; Kouzes, R T; LaFerriere, B D; Leon, J; Leviner, L E; Loach, J C; MacMullin, J; MacMullin, S; Martin, R D; Meijer, S; Mertens, S; Nomachi, M; Orrell, J L; O'Shaughnessy, C; Overman, N R; Phillips, D G; Poon, A W P; Pushkin, K; Radford, D C; Rager, J; Rielage, K; Robertson, R G H; Romero-Romero, E; Ronquest, M C; Schubert, A G; Shanks, B; Shima, T; Shirchenko, M; Snavely, K J; Snyder, N; Suriano, A M; Thompson, J; Timkin, V; Tornow, W; Trimble, J E; Varner, R L; Vasilyev, S; Vetter, K; Vorren, K; White, B R; Wilkerson, J F; Wiseman, C; Xu, W; Yakushev, E; Young, A R; Yu, C -H; Yumatov, V

    2014-01-01

    The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is an array of natural and enriched high purity germanium detectors that will search for the neutrinoless double-beta decay of 76-Ge and perform a search for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) with masses below 10 GeV. As part of the MAJORANA research and development efforts, we have deployed a modified, low-background broad energy germanium detector at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility. With its sub-keV energy threshold, this detector is sensitive to potential non-Standard Model physics, including interactions with WIMPs. We discuss the backgrounds present in the WIMP region of interest and explore the impact of slow surface event contamination when searching for a WIMP signal.

  19. A Search and Matching Approach to Labor Markets: Did the Natural Rate of Unemployment Rise?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mary C. Daly; Bart Hobijn; Ayşcegül Şahin; Robert G. Valletta

    2012-01-01

    .... Relying on a standard job search and matching framework and empirical evidence from a wide array of labor market indicators, we examine whether the natural rate of unemployment has increased since...

  20. Molecular cytogenetic analysis and genomic organization of major DNA repeats in castor bean (Ricinus communis L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, O S; Karlov, G I

    2016-04-01

    This article addresses the bioinformatic, molecular genetic, and cytogenetic study of castor bean (Ricinus communis, 2n = 20), which belongs to the monotypic Ricinus genus within the Euphorbiaceae family. Because castor bean chromosomes are small, karyotypic studies are difficult. However, the use of DNA repeats has yielded new prospects for karyotypic research and genome characterization. In the present study, major DNA repeat sequences were identified, characterized and localized on mitotic metaphase and meiotic pachytene chromosomes. Analyses of the nucleotide composition, curvature models, and FISH localization of the rcsat39 repeat suggest that this repeat plays a key role in building heterochromatic arrays in castor bean. Additionally, the rcsat390 sequences were determined to be chromosome-specific repeats located in the pericentromeric region of mitotic chromosome A (pachytene chromosome 1). The localization of rcsat39, rcsat390, 45S and 5S rDNA genes allowed for the development of cytogenetic landmarks for chromosome identification. General questions linked to heterochromatin formation, DNA repeat distribution, and the evolutionary emergence of the genome are discussed. The article may be of interest to biologists studying small genome organization and short monomer DNA repeats.

  1. Quantum search simulation with Wolfram Mathematica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokopenya, Alexander N.

    2016-09-01

    We consider Grover's algorithm of quantum search for one or several integers out of N = 2n, where n is a number of quantum bits in the memory register. There is a black-box or subroutine containing information about hidden integers and it can easily recognize these integers but we do not know which ones out of N they are. To find the hidden items we can do no better with a classical computer than to apply the subroutine repeatedly to all possible integers until we hit on the special one and in the worst case we have to repeat this procedure N times. We have analyzed the Grover algorithm carefully and showed that it enables to speed up this search quadratically, although its realization requires to know a number of hidden items. The lower bound for the probability of successful solving the search problem has been obtained. The validity of the results was demonstrated by simulation of the Grover search algorithm using the package QuantumCircuit written in the Wolfram Mathematica language.

  2. Strengthening concept learning by repeated testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiklund-Hörnqvist, Carola; Jonsson, Bert; Nyberg, Lars

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether repeated testing with feedback benefits learning compared to rereading of introductory psychology key-concepts in an educational context. The testing effect was examined immediately after practice, after 18 days, and at a five-week delay in a sample of undergraduate students (n = 83). The results revealed that repeated testing with feedback significantly enhanced learning compared to rereading at all delays, demonstrating that repeated retrieval enhances retention compared to repeated encoding in the short- and the long-term. In addition, the effect of repeated testing was beneficial for students irrespectively of working memory capacity. It is argued that teaching methods involving repeated retrieval are important to consider by the educational system.

  3. Repeat concussions in the national football league.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casson, Ira R; Viano, David C; Powell, John W; Pellman, Elliot J

    2011-01-01

    Repeat concussion is an important issue in the National Football League (NFL). An initial description of repeat injuries was published for 6 years (1996-2001). The characteristics and frequency of repeat concussion in the NFL have not changed in the subsequent 6 years (2002-2007). Case control. From 1996 to 2007, concussions were reported using a standardized form documenting signs and symptoms, loss of consciousness and medical action taken. Data on repeat concussions were analyzed for the 12 years and compared between the 2 periods. In 2002-2007, 152 players had repeat concussions (vs 160 in 1996-2001); 44 had 3+ head injuries (vs 52). The positions most often associated with repeat concussion in 2002-2007 were the defensive secondary, kick unit, running back, and linebacker. The odds for repeat concussion were elevated for wide receivers, tight ends, and linebackers but lower than in the earlier period. During 2002-2007, over half of players with repeat concussion were removed from play, and fewer immediately returned (vs 1996-2001). The average duration between concussions was 1.25 years for 2002-2007 and 1.65 years for the 12-year period. Over 12 years, 7.6% of all repeat concussions occurred within 2 weeks of the prior concussion. The defensive secondary, kick unit, running back, and linebacker have the highest incidence of repeat concussion. During 2002-2007, more than half of players with repeat concussion were removed from play, and only a fraction immediately returned. Although concussion was managed more conservatively by team physicians in the recent 6 years, repeat concussions occurred at similar rates during both periods.

  4. Automated quality checks on repeat prescribing.

    OpenAIRE

    Rogers, Jeremy E; Wroe, Christopher J; Roberts, Angus; Swallow, Angela; Stables, David; Cantrill, Judith A; Rector, Alan L.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Good clinical practice in primary care includes periodic review of repeat prescriptions. Markers of prescriptions that may need review have been described, but manually checking all repeat prescriptions against the markers would be impractical. AIM: To investigate the feasibility of computerising the application of repeat prescribing quality checks to electronic patient records in United Kingdom (UK) primary care. DESIGN OF STUDY: Software performance test against benchmark manual...

  5. Short Tandem Repeat DNA Internet Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 130 Short Tandem Repeat DNA Internet Database (Web, free access)   Short Tandem Repeat DNA Internet Database is intended to benefit research and application of short tandem repeat DNA markers for human identity testing. Facts and sequence information on each STR system, population data, commonly used multiplex STR systems, PCR primers and conditions, and a review of various technologies for analysis of STR alleles have been included.

  6. Searching Databases with Keywords

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan Wang; Kun-Long Zhang

    2005-01-01

    Traditionally, SQL query language is used to search the data in databases. However, it is inappropriate for end-users, since it is complex and hard to learn. It is the need of end-user, searching in databases with keywords, like in web search engines. This paper presents a survey of work on keyword search in databases. It also includes a brief introduction to the SEEKER system which has been developed.

  7. Integrated vs. Federated Search

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løvschall, Kasper

    2009-01-01

    Oplæg om forskelle og ligheder mellem integrated og federated search i bibliotekskontekst. Holdt ved temadag om "Integrated Search - samsøgning i alle kilder" på Danmarks Biblioteksskole den 22. januar 2009.......Oplæg om forskelle og ligheder mellem integrated og federated search i bibliotekskontekst. Holdt ved temadag om "Integrated Search - samsøgning i alle kilder" på Danmarks Biblioteksskole den 22. januar 2009....

  8. Radar techniques using array antennas

    CERN Document Server

    Wirth, Wulf-Dieter

    2013-01-01

    Radar Techniques Using Array Antennas is a thorough introduction to the possibilities of radar technology based on electronic steerable and active array antennas. Topics covered include array signal processing, array calibration, adaptive digital beamforming, adaptive monopulse, superresolution, pulse compression, sequential detection, target detection with long pulse series, space-time adaptive processing (STAP), moving target detection using synthetic aperture radar (SAR), target imaging, energy management and system parameter relations. The discussed methods are confirmed by simulation stud

  9. How doctors search

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Marianne; Price, Susan; Delcambre, Lois

    2012-01-01

    to context-specific aspects of the main topic of the documents. We have tested the model in an interactive searching study with family doctors with the purpose to explore doctors’ querying behaviour, how they applied the means for specifying a search, and how these features contributed to the search outcome...

  10. The Information Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doraiswamy, Uma

    2011-01-01

    This paper in the form of story discusses a college student's information search process. In this story we see Kuhlthau's information search process: initiation, selection, exploration, formulation, collection, and presentation. Katie is a student who goes in search of information for her class research paper. Katie's class readings, her interest…

  11. Search and the city

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A. Gautier; C.N. Teulings

    2009-01-01

    We develop a model of an economy with several regions, which differ in scale. Within each region, workers have to search for a job-type that matches their skill. They face a trade-off between match quality and the cost of extended search. This trade-off differs between regions, because search is mor

  12. Timed arrays wideband and time varying antenna arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Haupt, Randy L

    2015-01-01

    Introduces timed arrays and design approaches to meet the new high performance standards The author concentrates on any aspect of an antenna array that must be viewed from a time perspective. The first chapters briefly introduce antenna arrays and explain the difference between phased and timed arrays. Since timed arrays are designed for realistic time-varying signals and scenarios, the book also reviews wideband signals, baseband and passband RF signals, polarization and signal bandwidth. Other topics covered include time domain, mutual coupling, wideband elements, and dispersion. The auth

  13. How Soft Gamma Repeaters May Make Fast Radio Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, J I

    2015-01-01

    The high brightness of Fast Radio Bursts requires coherent emission by particles "bunched" by plasma instability at powers far in excess of those of pulsar spindown. Dissipation of magnetic energy in a neutron star magnetosphere, as in popular models of Soft Gamma Repeaters, can meet the energy requirement and produces an electron-positron pair plasma. Annihilation gamma rays are scattered by cooler plasma, producing a broad beam of electrons. The resulting electron distribution function is unstable to the "bump-on-tail" plasma instability. Electron plasma waves grow exponentially, scattering on density gradients to produce propagating electromagnetic waves, in analogy to Solar Type III Radio Bursts. Galactic SGR may make Galactic FRB, many orders of magnitude brighter than FRB at "cosmological" distances, that could be observed by radio telescopes out of beam or by modest arrays of dipole antennas.

  14. Atacama Compact Array Antennas

    CERN Document Server

    Saito, Masao; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Naoi, Takahiro; Yamada, Masumi; Saito, Hiro; Ikenoue, Bungo; Kato, Yoshihiro; Morita, Kou-ichiro; Mizuno, Norikazu; Iguchi, Satoru

    2011-01-01

    We report major performance test results of the Atacama Compact Array (ACA) 7-m and 12-m antennas of ALMA (Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array). The four major performances of the ACA antennas are all-sky pointing (to be not more than 2.0 arcsec), offset pointing (to be < 0.6 arcsec) surface accuracy (< 25(20) micrometer for 12(7)m-antenna), stability of path-length (15 micrometer over 3 min), and high servo capability (6 degrees/s for Azimuth and 3 degrees/s for Elevation). The high performance of the ACA antenna has been extensively evaluated at the Site Erection Facility area at an altitude of about 2900 meters. Test results of pointing performance, surface performance, and fast motion capability are demonstrated.

  15. The Cherenkov Telescope Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connaughton, Valerie

    2014-03-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is a large collaborative effort dedicated to the design and operation of the next-generation ground-based very high-energy gamma-ray observatory. CTA will improve by about one order of magnitude the sensitivity with respect to the current major arrays (VERITAS, H.E.S.S., and MAGIC) in the core energy range of 100 GeV to 10 TeV, and will extend the viability of the imaging atmospheric Cherenkov technique (IACT) down to tens of GeV and above 100 TeV. In order to achieve such improved performance at both a northern and southern CTA site, four 23m diameter Large Size Telescopes (LST) optimized for low energy gamma rays will be deployed close to the centre of the array. A larger number of Medium Size Telescopes (MST) will be optimized for the core IACT energy range. The southern site will include 25 12m single-mirror MSTs and a US contribution of up to 24 novel dual-mirror design Schwarzschild-Couder (SC) type MSTs with a primary mirror of 9.5m diameter, and will also include an array of Small Size Telescopes (SST) to observe the highest-energy gamma rays from galactic sources. The SSTs can be smaller and more widely separated because more energetic gamma rays produce a larger Cherenkov light pool with many photons. The SSTs achieve a large collection area by covering a wide (10 sq km) footprint on the ground. The CTA project is finishing its preparatory phase, and the pre-production phase will start this year. I will review the status and the expected performance of CTA as well as the main scientific goals for the observatory.

  16. Solar collector array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, John Champlin; Martins, Guy Lawrence

    2015-09-06

    A method and apparatus for efficient manufacture, assembly and production of solar energy. In one aspect, the apparatus may include a number of modular solar receiver assemblies that may be separately manufactured, assembled and individually inserted into a solar collector array housing shaped to receive a plurality of solar receivers. The housing may include optical elements for focusing light onto the individual receivers, and a circuit for electrically connecting the solar receivers.

  17. Photovoltaic cell array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliason, J. T. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A photovoltaic cell array consisting of parallel columns of silicon filaments is described. Each fiber is doped to produce an inner region of one polarity type and an outer region of an opposite polarity type to thereby form a continuous radial semi conductor junction. Spaced rows of electrical contacts alternately connect to the inner and outer regions to provide a plurality of electrical outputs which may be combined in parallel or in series.

  18. YBCO Josephson Junction Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-07-14

    40, 489 (1961). [8] W. H. Press, B. P. Flannery, S. A. Teukolsky and W. T. Vetterling, Numerical recipes: the art of scientific computing (Cambridge...has recently become a commercial product. He has developed processes for depositing state-of-the art YBCO films on buffered sapphire substrates. His...technology can most improve and on what subsystems would benefit most from the pt.. .imance available from these arrays. Aqppoved f or publicO re󈧎OSI AIR

  19. Pulsar Timing Arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Joshi, Bhal Chandra

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, the use of an ensemble of radio pulsars to constrain the characteristic strain caused by a stochastic gravitational wave background has advanced the cause of detection of very low frequency gravitational waves significantly. This electromagnetic means of gravitational wave detection, called Pulsar Timing Array(PTA), is reviewed in this article. The principle of operation of PTA, the current operating PTAs and their status is presented along-with a discussion of the main ch...

  20. The TALE Infill Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Douglas

    2009-05-01

    The TALE Infill Array in conjunction with the TALE Tower Detector will provide hybrid coverage of the cosmic ray energy spectrum down to 3x10^16 eV. It will consist of about 100, two square meter scintillators on the surface spaced at 400 m; and 24 buried twelve square meter scintillators. The combination of surface and underground detectors will allow for the determination of the muon content of showers and thus give a handle on cosmic ray composition.

  1. CRISPRstrand: predicting repeat orientations to determine the crRNA-encoding strand at CRISPR loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkhnbashi, Omer S.; Costa, Fabrizio; Shah, Shiraz Ali

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: The discovery of CRISPR-Cas systems almost 20 years ago rapidly changed our perception of the bacterial and archaeal immune systems. CRISPR loci consist of several repetitive DNA sequences called repeats, inter-spaced by stretches of variable length sequences called spacers. This CRISPR...... array is transcribed and processed into multiple mature RNA species (crRNAs). A single crRNA is integrated into an interference complex, together with CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins, to bind and degrade invading nucleic acids. Although existing bioinformatics tools can recognize CRISPR loci...... by their characteristic repeat-spacer architecture, they generally output CRISPR arrays of ambiguous orientation and thus do not determine the strand from which crRNAs are processed. Knowledge of the correct orientation is crucial for many tasks, including the classification of CRISPR conservation, the detection...

  2. Episodic retrieval and feature facilitation in intertrial priming of visual search

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asgeirsson, Arni Gunnar; Kristjánsson, Árni

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Huang, Holcombe, and Pashler (Memory & Cognition, 32, 12–20, 2004) found that priming from repetition of different features of a target in a visual search task resulted in significant response time (RT) reductions when both target brightness and size were repeated. But when only one...... feature was repeated and the other changed, RTs were longer than when neither feature was repeated. From this, they argued that priming in visual search reflected episodic retrieval of memory traces, rather than facilitation of repeated features. We tested different varia- tions of the search task...... introduced by Huang et al., with the aim of uncovering when priming is episodic and when feature based. We found that varying the signal strength of target against distractors had a strong effect on the priming pattern. In difficult search with low signal-to-noise ratios of target against distractors...

  3. Faceted Semantic Search for Personalized Social Search

    CERN Document Server

    Mas, Massimiliano Dal

    2012-01-01

    Actual social networks (like Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin, ...) need to deal with vagueness on ontological indeterminacy. In this paper is analyzed the prototyping of a faceted semantic search for personalized social search using the "joint meaning" in a community environment. User researches in a "collaborative" environment defined by folksonomies can be supported by the most common features on the faceted semantic search. A solution for the context-aware personalized search is based on "joint meaning" understood as a joint construal of the creators of the contents and the user of the contents using the faced taxonomy with the Semantic Web. A proof-of concept prototype shows how the proposed methodological approach can also be applied to existing presentation components, built with different languages and/or component technologies.

  4. Mir Cooperative Solar Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skor, Mike; Hoffman, Dave J.

    1997-01-01

    The Mir Cooperative Solar Array (MCSA), produced jointly by the United States and Russia, was deployed on the Mir Russian space station on May 25, 1996. The MCSA is a photovoltaic electrical power system that can generate up to 6 kW. The power from the MCSA is needed to extend Mir's lifetime and to support experiments conducted there by visiting U.S. astronauts. The MCSA was brought to Mir via the Space Shuttle Atlantis on the STS-74 mission, launched November 12, 1995. This cooperative venture combined the best technology of both countries: the United States provided high-efficiency, lightweight photovoltaic panel modules, whereas Russia provided the array structure and deployment mechanism. Technology developed in the Space Station Freedom Program, and now being used in the International Space Station, was used to develop MCSA's photovoltaic panel. Performance data obtained from MCSA operation on Mir will help engineers better understand the performance of the photovoltaic panel modules in orbit. This information will be used to more accurately predict the performance of the International Space Station solar arrays. Managed by the NASA Lewis Research Center for NASA's International Space Station Program Office in Houston, Texas, the MCSA Project was completed on time and under budget despite a very aggressive schedule.

  5. DSN Array Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikidjian, Raffi; Mackey, Ryan

    2008-01-01

    The DSN Array Simulator (wherein 'DSN' signifies NASA's Deep Space Network) is an updated version of software previously denoted the DSN Receive Array Technology Assessment Simulation. This software (see figure) is used for computational modeling of a proposed DSN facility comprising user-defined arrays of antennas and transmitting and receiving equipment for microwave communication with spacecraft on interplanetary missions. The simulation includes variations in spacecraft tracked and communication demand changes for up to several decades of future operation. Such modeling is performed to estimate facility performance, evaluate requirements that govern facility design, and evaluate proposed improvements in hardware and/or software. The updated version of this software affords enhanced capability for characterizing facility performance against user-defined mission sets. The software includes a Monte Carlo simulation component that enables rapid generation of key mission-set metrics (e.g., numbers of links, data rates, and date volumes), and statistical distributions thereof as functions of time. The updated version also offers expanded capability for mixed-asset network modeling--for example, for running scenarios that involve user-definable mixtures of antennas having different diameters (in contradistinction to a fixed number of antennas having the same fixed diameter). The improved version also affords greater simulation fidelity, sufficient for validation by comparison with actual DSN operations and analytically predictable performance metrics.

  6. Spaceborne Processor Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Edward T.; Schatzel, Donald V.; Whitaker, William D.; Sterling, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    A Spaceborne Processor Array in Multifunctional Structure (SPAMS) can lower the total mass of the electronic and structural overhead of spacecraft, resulting in reduced launch costs, while increasing the science return through dynamic onboard computing. SPAMS integrates the multifunctional structure (MFS) and the Gilgamesh Memory, Intelligence, and Network Device (MIND) multi-core in-memory computer architecture into a single-system super-architecture. This transforms every inch of a spacecraft into a sharable, interconnected, smart computing element to increase computing performance while simultaneously reducing mass. The MIND in-memory architecture provides a foundation for high-performance, low-power, and fault-tolerant computing. The MIND chip has an internal structure that includes memory, processing, and communication functionality. The Gilgamesh is a scalable system comprising multiple MIND chips interconnected to operate as a single, tightly coupled, parallel computer. The array of MIND components shares a global, virtual name space for program variables and tasks that are allocated at run time to the distributed physical memory and processing resources. Individual processor- memory nodes can be activated or powered down at run time to provide active power management and to configure around faults. A SPAMS system is comprised of a distributed Gilgamesh array built into MFS, interfaces into instrument and communication subsystems, a mass storage interface, and a radiation-hardened flight computer.

  7. TANGO ARRAY II: Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauleo, P.; Bonifazi, C.; Filevich, A.

    The angular and energy resolution of the TANGO Array has been obtained using Monte Carlo simulations. The AIRES code, with the SYBILL hadronic collision package, was used to simulate Extended Air Showers produced by primary cosmic rays (protons and iron nuclei), with energies ranging from 1014 eV to 1018 eV. These data were fed into a realistic code which simulates the response of the detector stations (water ˇCerenkov detectors), including the electronics, pick up noise, and the signal attenuation in the connecting cabling. The trigger stage is taken into account in order to produce estimates of the trigger efficiency of the array and to check the accuracy of the reconstruction codes. This paper describes the simulations performed to obtain the expected behavior of the array, and presents the simulated data. These simulations indicate that the accuracy of the cosmic ray primary energy determination is expected to be ˜ 60 % and the precision in the measurement of the direction of arrival can be estimated as ˜ 4 degrees.

  8. The Telescope Array Ultra High Energy Cosmic Ray Obsrevatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, John

    2016-07-01

    The Telescope Array measures the properties of ultra high energy cosmic ray induced extensive air showers. We do this using a variety of techniques including an array of scintillator detectors to sample the footprint of the air shower when it reaches the Earth's surface and telescopes to measure the fluorescence and Cerenkov light of the air shower. From this we determine the energy spectrum and chemical composition of the primary particles. We also search for sources of cosmic rays and anisotropy. We have found evidence of a possible source of ultra high energy cosmic rays in the northern sky. The experiment and its most recent measurements will be discussed.

  9. Keyword Search in Databases

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Jeffrey Xu; Chang, Lijun

    2009-01-01

    It has become highly desirable to provide users with flexible ways to query/search information over databases as simple as keyword search like Google search. This book surveys the recent developments on keyword search over databases, and focuses on finding structural information among objects in a database using a set of keywords. Such structural information to be returned can be either trees or subgraphs representing how the objects, that contain the required keywords, are interconnected in a relational database or in an XML database. The structural keyword search is completely different from

  10. Fast 2D DOA Estimation Algorithm by an Array Manifold Matching Method with Parallel Linear Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lisheng; Liu, Sheng; Li, Dong; Jiang, Qingping; Cao, Hailin

    2016-02-23

    In this paper, the problem of two-dimensional (2D) direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation with parallel linear arrays is addressed. Two array manifold matching (AMM) approaches, in this work, are developed for the incoherent and coherent signals, respectively. The proposed AMM methods estimate the azimuth angle only with the assumption that the elevation angles are known or estimated. The proposed methods are time efficient since they do not require eigenvalue decomposition (EVD) or peak searching. In addition, the complexity analysis shows the proposed AMM approaches have lower computational complexity than many current state-of-the-art algorithms. The estimated azimuth angles produced by the AMM approaches are automatically paired with the elevation angles. More importantly, for estimating the azimuth angles of coherent signals, the aperture loss issue is avoided since a decorrelation procedure is not required for the proposed AMM method. Numerical studies demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approaches.

  11. Evaluating search effectiveness of some selected search engines ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluating search effectiveness of some selected search engines. ... AFRICAN JOURNALS ONLINE (AJOL) · Journals · Advanced Search · USING AJOL ... seek for information on the World Wide Web (WWW) using variety of search engines.

  12. Judging the Capability of Search Engines and Search Terms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anna Kaushik

    2012-01-01

    .... The present study aims to judge the capability of five selected search engines and search terms on the basis of first ten results and to identify most appropriate search term and search engine...

  13. Repeatability & Workability Evaluation of SIGMOD 2009

    KAUST Repository

    Manegold, Stefan

    2010-12-15

    SIGMOD 2008 was the first database conference that offered to test submitters\\' programs against their data to verify the repeatability of the experiments published [1]. Given the positive feedback concerning the SIGMOD 2008 repeatability initiative, SIGMOD 2009 modified and expanded the initiative with a workability assessment.

  14. Mixed Frequency Ultrasound Phased Array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    香勇; 霍健; 施克仁; 陈以方

    2004-01-01

    A mixed frequency ultrasonic phased array (MPA) was developed to improve the focus, in which the element excitation frequencies are not all the same as in a normal constant frequency phased array. A theoretical model of the mixed frequency phased array based on the interference principle was used to simulate the array's sound distribution. The pressure intensity in the array focal area was enhanced and the scanning area having effective contrast resolution was enlarged. The system is especially useful for high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) with more powerful energy and ultrasound imaging diagnostics with improved signal to noise ratios, improved beam forming and more uniform imaging quality.

  15. Childhood experiences and repeated suicidal behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Gertrud; Nielsen, Bent; Rask, P

    1991-01-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the influence of various events in childhood on suicidal behavior in adult age. For this purpose, 99 patients admitted to the Department of Psychiatry of Odense University Hospital after making a suicide attempt were followed for 5 years, to register repeated...... suicidal behavior. The results showed that three fourths of the patients attempted suicide more than once (62% nonfatal and 14% fatal outcome). The sex distribution was about the same among the first-evers as among the repeaters. Most repeaters were younger people in their twenties and thirties......, and the first-evers on average were past the age of 40. Somewhat unexpectedly, significantly more repeaters than first-evers had grown up with both their parents. However, the results also showed that significantly more repeaters than first-evers had had an unhappy childhood. This indicates...

  16. UK 2009-2010 repeat station report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J.G. Shanahan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The British Geological Survey is responsible for conducting the UK geomagnetic repeat station programme. Measurements made at the UK repeat station sites are used in conjunction with the three UK magnetic observatories: Hartland, Eskdalemuir and Lerwick, to produce a regional model of the local field each year. The UK network of repeat stations comprises 41 stations which are occupied at approximately 3-4 year intervals. Practices for conducting repeat station measurements continue to evolve as advances are made in survey instrumentation and as the usage of the data continues to change. Here, a summary of the 2009 and 2010 UK repeat station surveys is presented, highlighting the measurement process and techniques, density of network, reduction process and recent results.

  17. Searching for neutrino radio flashes from the Moon with LOFAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buitink, Stijn; Corstanje, Arthur; Enriquez, Emilio; Falcke, Heino; Frieswijk, Wilfred; Hörandel, Jörg; Mevius, Maaijke; Nelles, Anna; Thoudam, Satyendra; Schellart, Pim; Scholten, Olaf; ter Veen, Sander; van den Akker, Martin; LOFAR Collaboration, [No Value

    2013-01-01

    Ultra-high-energy neutrinos and cosmic rays produce short radio flashes through the Askaryan effect when they impact on the Moon. Earthbound radio telescopes can search the Lunar surface for these signals. A new generation of lowfrequency, digital radio arrays, spearheaded by LOFAR, will allow for s

  18. Search for neutrinos from Gamma-Ray Bursts with ANTARES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Presani, E.

    2011-01-01

    A method to search for neutrino induced showers from gamma‐ray bursts in the ANTARES detector is presented. ANTARES consists of a three‐dimensional array of photosensitive devices that measure Cherenkov light induced by charged particles produced by high energy neutrinos interacting in the detector

  19. Motion of an Antarctic glacier by repeated tidally modulated earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoet, Lucas K.; Anandakrishnan, Sridhar; Alley, Richard B.; Nyblade, Andrew A.; Wiens, Douglas A.

    2012-09-01

    Between debris-laden glacial ice and bedrock, basal seismicity can develop that yields information about bed properties, stress distribution, outburst flooding, and crevassing and calving. Basal seismicity in response to glacial motion is linked to variations in both stress and lubrication of bedrock by water and till. Here we analyse data from the Transantarctic Mountains Seismic Experiment array in 2002-2003 to investigate seismic behaviour at David Glacier, a large outlet glacier that drains 4% of East Antarctica's ice sheet into the Ross Sea. We identify about 20,000 seismic events that are larger in magnitude and duration than typical for glacial sources and repeat at regular intervals of about 25min. These events are consistent with stick-slip behaviour of debris-laden ice moving over a single obstacle of rough bedrock, modulated by relatively small stress changes from the ocean tides. In the years before and after the interval of repeating events, seismic events with irregular and generally longer intervals were detected at the same location, and are consistent with combined stick-slip and continuous sliding of the subglacial interface. We suggest that the observed transitions in seismicity patterns capture the dynamic behaviour of the ice stream, and that--despite lower ice-flow velocities--sliding in the stick-slip regime enhances subglacial erosion.

  20. University Students' Online Information Searching Strategies in Different Search Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Meng-Jung; Liang, Jyh-Chong; Hou, Huei-Tse; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the role of search context played in university students' online information searching strategies. A total of 304 university students in Taiwan were surveyed with questionnaires in which two search contexts were defined as searching for learning, and searching for daily life information. Students' online search strategies…

  1. [Advanced online search techniques and dedicated search engines for physicians].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahum, Yoav

    2008-02-01

    In recent years search engines have become an essential tool in the work of physicians. This article will review advanced search techniques from the world of information specialists, as well as some advanced search engine operators that may help physicians improve their online search capabilities, and maximize the yield of their searches. This article also reviews popular dedicated scientific and biomedical literature search engines.

  2. The Contribution of Genetic Recombination to CRISPR Array Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupczok, Anne; Landan, Giddy; Dagan, Tal

    2015-06-16

    CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) is a microbial immune system against foreign DNA. Recognition sequences (spacers) encoded within the CRISPR array mediate the immune reaction in a sequence-specific manner. The known mechanisms for the evolution of CRISPR arrays include spacer acquisition from foreign DNA elements at the time of invasion and array erosion through spacer deletion. Here, we consider the contribution of genetic recombination between homologous CRISPR arrays to the evolution of spacer repertoire. Acquisition of spacers from exogenic arrays via recombination may confer the recipient with immunity against unencountered antagonists. For this purpose, we develop a novel method for the detection of recombination in CRISPR arrays by modeling the spacer order in arrays from multiple strains from the same species. Because the evolutionary signal of spacer recombination may be similar to that of pervasive spacer deletions or independent spacer acquisition, our method entails a robustness analysis of the recombination inference by a statistical comparison to resampled and perturbed data sets. We analyze CRISPR data sets from four bacterial species: two Gammaproteobacteria species harboring CRISPR type I and two Streptococcus species harboring CRISPR type II loci. We find that CRISPR array evolution in Escherichia coli and Streptococcus agalactiae can be explained solely by vertical inheritance and differential spacer deletion. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, we find an excess of single spacers potentially incorporated into the CRISPR locus during independent acquisition events. In Streptococcus thermophilus, evidence for spacer acquisition by recombination is present in 5 out of 70 strains. Genetic recombination has been proposed to accelerate adaptation by combining beneficial mutations that arose in independent lineages. However, for most species under study, we find that CRISPR evolution is shaped mainly by spacer acquisition and

  3. Identification of polymorphic tandem repeats by direct comparison of genome sequence from different bacterial strains : a web-based resource

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vergnaud Gilles

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymorphic tandem repeat typing is a new generic technology which has been proved to be very efficient for bacterial pathogens such as B. anthracis, M. tuberculosis, P. aeruginosa, L. pneumophila, Y. pestis. The previously developed tandem repeats database takes advantage of the release of genome sequence data for a growing number of bacteria to facilitate the identification of tandem repeats. The development of an assay then requires the evaluation of tandem repeat polymorphism on well-selected sets of isolates. In the case of major human pathogens, such as S. aureus, more than one strain is being sequenced, so that tandem repeats most likely to be polymorphic can now be selected in silico based on genome sequence comparison. Results In addition to the previously described general Tandem Repeats Database, we have developed a tool to automatically identify tandem repeats of a different length in the genome sequence of two (or more closely related bacterial strains. Genome comparisons are pre-computed. The results of the comparisons are parsed in a database, which can be conveniently queried over the internet according to criteria of practical value, including repeat unit length, predicted size difference, etc. Comparisons are available for 16 bacterial species, and the orthopox viruses, including the variola virus and three of its close neighbors. Conclusions We are presenting an internet-based resource to help develop and perform tandem repeats based bacterial strain typing. The tools accessible at http://minisatellites.u-psud.fr now comprise four parts. The Tandem Repeats Database enables the identification of tandem repeats across entire genomes. The Strain Comparison Page identifies tandem repeats differing between different genome sequences from the same species. The "Blast in the Tandem Repeats Database" facilitates the search for a known tandem repeat and the prediction of amplification product sizes. The "Bacterial

  4. Search for the Giant Pulses Search for the Giant Pulses - an extreme phenomenon in radio pulsar emission

    CERN Document Server

    Kazantsev, A N

    2016-01-01

    Here we present results of our search for Giant Pulses(GPs) from pulsars of Northern Hemisphere. Our survey was carried out at a frequency of 111 MHz using the Large Phased Array (LPA) radio telescope. Up to now we have detected regular generation of strong pulses satisfying the criteria of GPs from 2 pulsars: B1133+16, B1237+25.

  5. Tracking of intercalary DNA sequences integrated into tandem repeat arrays in rye Secale vavilovii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Achrem

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The structure of repetitive sequences of the JNK block present in the pericentromeric region of the 2RL chromosome was studied in Secale vavilovii. Amplification of sequences present between the JNK sequences led to the identification of seven abnormal DNA fragments. Two of these fragments showed high similarity to the glutamate 5-kinase gene and putative alcohol dehydrogenase gene of trypanosomatid from the genus Leishmania, whose presence can be explained by horizontal gene transfer (HGT. Other fragments were similar to mitochondrial gene for ribosomal protein S4 in plants and to the glycoprotein (G gene of the IHNV virus. Presumably, they are pseudogenes inserted into the JNK heterochromatin region. Within this region, also fragments similar to the rye repetitive sequence and chromosome 3B in wheat were found. There is no known mechanism that would explain how foreign sequences were inserted into the block region of tandem repetitive sequences of the JNK family.

  6. Improving DNA capture on micro-arrays by integrated repeated denaturing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Servoli, E.; Feitsma, H.M.; Kaptheijns, B.; Van der Zaag, P.J.; Wimberger-Friedl, R.

    2012-01-01

    Hybridization of nucleic acids to microarrays is a crucial step forseveral biological and biomedical applications. However, the poor efficiency and resulting long incubation times are major drawbacks. Inaddition to diffusion limitation, back-hybridization to complementary strands in solution is show

  7. Improving DNA capture on micro-arrays by integrated repeated denaturing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Servoli, E.; Feitsma, H.M.; Kaptheijns, B.; Van der Zaag, P.J.; Wimberger-Friedl, R.

    2012-01-01

    Hybridization of nucleic acids to microarrays is a crucial step forseveral biological and biomedical applications. However, the poor efficiency and resulting long incubation times are major drawbacks. Inaddition to diffusion limitation, back-hybridization to complementary strands in solution is show

  8. Compact Transducers and Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-05-01

    Soc. Am., 104, pp.64-71 44 25.Decarpigny, J.N., J.C. Debus, B. Tocquet & D. Boucher. 1985. "In-Air Analysis Of Piezoelectric Tonpilz Transducers In A... Transducers and Arrays Final Report May 2005 Contacts: Dr. Robert E. Newnham The Pennsylvania State University, 251 MRL, University Park, PA 16802 phone...814) 865-1612 fax: (814) 865-2326 email: ....c xx.....i.i.....ht.. .u a.p.u..c.e.du. Dr. Richard J. Meyer, Jr. Systems Engineering ( Transducers ), ARL

  9. Modulation of CRISPR locus transcription by the repeat-binding protein Cbp1 in Sulfolobus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deng, Ling; Kenchappa, Chandra Shekar; Peng, Xu

    2012-01-01

    CRISPR loci are essential components of the adaptive immune system of archaea and bacteria. They consist of long arrays of repeats separated by DNA spacers encoding guide RNAs (crRNA), which target foreign genetic elements. Cbp1 (CRISPR DNA repeat binding protein) binds specifically to the multiple...... direct repeats of CRISPR loci of members of the acidothermophilic, crenarchaeal order Sulfolobales. cbp1 gene deletion from Sulfolobus islandicus REY15A produced a strong reduction in pre-crRNA yields from CRISPR loci but did not inhibit the foreign DNA targeting capacity of the CRISPR/Cas system....... Conversely, overexpression of Cbp1 in S. islandicus generated an increase in pre-crRNA yields while the level of reverse strand transcripts from CRISPR loci remained unchanged. It is proposed that Cbp1 modulates production of longer pre-crRNA transcripts from CRISPR loci. A possible mechanism...

  10. A CONTACT SEARCHING ALGORITHM FOR CONTACT-IMPACT PROBLEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Fujun; Cheng Jiangang; Yao Zhenhan

    2000-01-01

    A new contact searching algorithm for contact-impact systems is proposed in this paper. In terms of the cell structure and the linked-list, this algorithm solves the problem of sorting and searching contacts in three dimensions by transforming it to a retrieving process from two one-dimensional arrays, and binary searching is no longer required. Using this algorithm, the cost of contact searching is reduced to the order of O(N) instead of O(Nlog2N) for traditional ones, where N is the node number in the system. Moreover, this algorithm can handle contact systems with arbitrary mesh layouts. Due to the simplicity of this algorithm it can be easily implemented in a dynamic explicit finite element Program. Our numerical experimental result shows that this algorithm is reliable and efficient for contact searching of three dimensional systems.

  11. Supporting complex search tasks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gäde, Maria; Hall, Mark; Huurdeman, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    There is broad consensus in the field of IR that search is complex in many use cases and applications, both on the Web and in domain specific collections, and both professionally and in our daily life. Yet our understanding of complex search tasks, in comparison to simple look up tasks, is fragme......There is broad consensus in the field of IR that search is complex in many use cases and applications, both on the Web and in domain specific collections, and both professionally and in our daily life. Yet our understanding of complex search tasks, in comparison to simple look up tasks......, and recommendations, and supporting exploratory search to sensemaking and analytics, UI and UX design pose an overconstrained challenge. How do we know that our approach is any good? Supporting complex search task requires new collaborations across the whole field of IR, and the proposed workshop will bring together...

  12. Search on Rugged Landscapes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Billinger, Stephan; Stieglitz, Nils; Schumacher, Terry

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents findings from a laboratory experiment on human decision-making in a complex combinatorial task. We find strong evidence for a behavioral model of adaptive search. Success narrows down search to the neighborhood of the status quo, while failure promotes gradually more explorative...... search. Task complexity does not have a direct effect on behavior, but systematically affects the feedback conditions that guide success-induced exploitation and failure-induced exploration. The analysis also shows that human participants were prone to over-exploration, since they broke off the search...... for local improvements too early. We derive stylized decision rules that generate the search behavior observed in the experiment and discuss the implications of our findings for individual decision-making and organizational search....

  13. Supporting complex search tasks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gäde, Maria; Hall, Mark; Huurdeman, Hugo;

    2015-01-01

    There is broad consensus in the field of IR that search is complex in many use cases and applications, both on the Web and in domain specific collections, and both professionally and in our daily life. Yet our understanding of complex search tasks, in comparison to simple look up tasks......, is fragmented at best. The workshop addressed the many open research questions: What are the obvious use cases and applications of complex search? What are essential features of work tasks and search tasks to take into account? And how do these evolve over time? With a multitude of information, varying from...... introductory to specialized, and from authoritative to speculative or opinionated, when to show what sources of information? How does the information seeking process evolve and what are relevant differences between different stages? With complex task and search process management, blending searching, browsing...

  14. Javascript Library for Developing Interactive Micro-Level Animations for Teaching and Learning Algorithms on One-Dimensional Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Végh, Ladislav

    2016-01-01

    The first data structure that first-year undergraduate students learn during the programming and algorithms courses is the one-dimensional array. For novice programmers, it might be hard to understand different algorithms on arrays (e.g. searching, mirroring, sorting algorithms), because the algorithms dynamically change the values of elements. In…

  15. The child accident repeater: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J G

    1980-04-01

    The child accident repeater is defined as one who has at least three accidents that come to medical attention within a year. The accident situation has features in common with those of the child who has a single accident through simple "bad luck", but other factors predispose him to repeated injury. In the child who has a susceptible personality, a tendency for accident repetition may be due to a breakdown in adjustment to a stressful environment. Prevention of repeat accidents should involve the usual measures considered appropriate for all children as well as an attempt to provide treatment of significant maladjustment and modification of a stressful environment.

  16. Federated Search Scalability

    OpenAIRE

    Txurruka Alberdi, Beñat

    2015-01-01

    The search of images on the internet has become a natural process for the internet surfer. Most of the search engines use complex algorithms to look up for images but their metadata is mostly ignored, in part because many image hosting sites remove metadata when the image is uploaded. The JPSearch standard has been developed to handle interoperability in metadata based searches, but it seems that the market is not interested on supporting it. The starting point of this proje...

  17. Mastering ElasticSearch

    CERN Document Server

    Kuc, Rafal

    2013-01-01

    A practical tutorial that covers the difficult design, implementation, and management of search solutions.Mastering ElasticSearch is aimed at to intermediate users who want to extend their knowledge about ElasticSearch. The topics that are described in the book are detailed, but we assume that you already know the basics, like the query DSL or data indexing. Advanced users will also find this book useful, as the examples are getting deep into the internals where it is needed.

  18. ElasticSearch cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Paro, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Written in an engaging, easy-to-follow style, the recipes will help you to extend the capabilities of ElasticSearch to manage your data effectively.If you are a developer who implements ElasticSearch in your web applications, manage data, or have decided to start using ElasticSearch, this book is ideal for you. This book assumes that you've got working knowledge of JSON and Java

  19. Search For CP Violation in Positronium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartram, Chelsea

    2015-04-01

    We propose to search for CP violation in the charged lepton sector by studying positronium decays. Positronium, a bound state of an electron and positron, occurs in both a singlet and triplet state. The triplet state, orthopositronium, decays primarily into three gamma rays. CP violation could potentially manifest itself in angular correlations between the directions of the three gamma rays. We will use the APEX annular array of NaI detectors, combined with a tagged source and a novel, conventional electromagnet. This array will increase the angular acceptance by a factor of 25 over previous experiments. We will present the current status of the experiment. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics.

  20. Google Power Search

    CERN Document Server

    Spencer, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    Behind Google's deceptively simple interface is immense power for both market and competitive research-if you know how to use it well. Sure, basic searches are easy, but complex searches require specialized skills. This concise book takes you through the full range of Google's powerful search-refinement features, so you can quickly find the specific information you need. Learn techniques ranging from simple Boolean logic to URL parameters and other advanced tools, and see how they're applied to real-world market research examples. Incorporate advanced search operators such as filetype:, intit

  1. Delaying information search

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaniv Shani

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In three studies, we examined factors that may temporarily attenuate information search. People are generally curious and dislike uncertainty, which typically encourages them to look for relevant information. Despite these strong forces that promote information search, people sometimes deliberately delay obtaining valuable information. We find they may do so when they are concerned that the information might interfere with future pleasurable activities. Interestingly, the decision to search or to postpone searching for information is influenced not only by the value and importance of the information itself but also by well-being maintenance goals related to possible detrimental effects that negative knowledge may have on unrelated future plans.

  2. Nonlinear phased array imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croxford, Anthony J.; Cheng, Jingwei; Potter, Jack N.

    2016-04-01

    A technique is presented for imaging acoustic nonlinearity within a specimen using ultrasonic phased arrays. Acoustic nonlinearity is measured by evaluating the difference in energy of the transmission bandwidth within the diffuse field produced through different focusing modes. The two different modes being classical beam forming, where delays are applied to different element of a phased array to physically focus the energy at a single location (parallel firing) and focusing in post processing, whereby one element at a time is fired and a focused image produced in post processing (sequential firing). Although these two approaches are linearly equivalent the difference in physical displacement within the specimen leads to differences in nonlinear effects. These differences are localized to the areas where the amplitude is different, essentially confining the differences to the focal point. Direct measurement at the focal point are however difficult to make. In order to measure this the diffuse field is used. It is a statistical property of the diffuse field that it represents the total energy in the system. If the energy in the diffuse field for both the sequential and parallel firing case is measured then the difference between these, within the input signal bandwidth, is largely due to differences at the focal spot. This difference therefore gives a localized measurement of where energy is moving out of the transmission bandwidth due to nonlinear effects. This technique is used to image fatigue cracks and other damage types undetectable with conventional linear ultrasonic measurements.

  3. Microplasma generating array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopwood, Jeffrey A.; Wu, Chen; Hoskinson, Alan R.; Sonkusale, Sameer

    2016-10-04

    A microplasma generator includes first and second conductive resonators disposed on a first surface of a dielectric substrate. The first and second conductive resonators are arranged in line with one another with a gap defined between a first end of each resonator. A ground plane is disposed on a second surface of the dielectric substrate and a second end of each of the first and second resonators is coupled to the ground plane. A power input connector is coupled to the first resonator at a first predetermined distance from the second end chosen as a function of the impedance of the first conductive resonator. A microplasma generating array includes a number of resonators in a dielectric material substrate with one end of each resonator coupled to ground. A micro-plasma is generated at the non-grounded end of each resonator. The substrate includes a ground electrode and the microplasmas are generated between the non-grounded end of the resonator and the ground electrode. The coupling of each resonator to ground may be made through controlled switches in order to turn each resonator off or on and therefore control where and when a microplasma will be created in the array.

  4. Search Pathways: Modeling GeoData Search Behavior to Support Usable Application Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarmey, L.; Rosati, A.; Tressel, S.

    2014-12-01

    Recent technical advances have enabled development of new scientific data discovery systems. Metadata brokering, linked data, and other mechanisms allow users to discover scientific data of interes across growing volumes of heterogeneous content. Matching this complex content with existing discovery technologies, people looking for scientific data are presented with an ever-growing array of features to sort, filter, subset, and scan through search returns to help them find what they are looking for. This paper examines the applicability of available technologies in connecting searchers with the data of interest. What metrics can be used to track success given shifting baselines of content and technology? How well do existing technologies map to steps in user search patterns? Taking a user-driven development approach, the team behind the Arctic Data Explorer interdisciplinary data discovery application invested heavily in usability testing and user search behavior analysis. Building on earlier library community search behavior work, models were developed to better define the diverse set of thought processes and steps users took to find data of interest, here called 'search pathways'. This research builds a deeper understanding of the user community that seeks to reuse scientific data. This approach ensures that development decisions are driven by clearly articulated user needs instead of ad hoc technology trends. Initial results from this research will be presented along with lessons learned for other discovery platform development and future directions for informatics research into search pathways.

  5. Linking Search Space Structure, Run-Time Dynamics, and Problem Difficulty: A Step Toward Demystifying Tabu Search

    CERN Document Server

    Howe, A E; Whitley, L D; 10.1613/jair.1576

    2011-01-01

    Tabu search is one of the most effective heuristics for locating high-quality solutions to a diverse array of NP-hard combinatorial optimization problems. Despite the widespread success of tabu search, researchers have a poor understanding of many key theoretical aspects of this algorithm, including models of the high-level run-time dynamics and identification of those search space features that influence problem difficulty. We consider these questions in the context of the job-shop scheduling problem (JSP), a domain where tabu search algorithms have been shown to be remarkably effective. Previously, we demonstrated that the mean distance between random local optima and the nearest optimal solution is highly correlated with problem difficulty for a well-known tabu search algorithm for the JSP introduced by Taillard. In this paper, we discuss various shortcomings of this measure and develop a new model of problem difficulty that corrects these deficiencies. We show that Taillards algorithm can be modeled with ...

  6. Electromagnetically Clean Solar Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stem, Theodore G.; Kenniston, Anthony E.

    2008-01-01

    The term 'electromagnetically clean solar array' ('EMCSA') refers to a panel that contains a planar array of solar photovoltaic cells and that, in comparison with a functionally equivalent solar-array panel of a type heretofore used on spacecraft, (1) exhibits less electromagnetic interferences to and from other nearby electrical and electronic equipment and (2) can be manufactured at lower cost. The reduction of electromagnetic interferences is effected through a combination of (1) electrically conductive, electrically grounded shielding and (2) reduction of areas of current loops (in order to reduce magnetic moments). The reduction of cost is effected by designing the array to be fabricated as a more nearly unitary structure, using fewer components and fewer process steps. Although EMCSAs were conceived primarily for use on spacecraft they are also potentially advantageous for terrestrial applications in which there are requirements to limit electromagnetic interference. In a conventional solar panel of the type meant to be supplanted by an EMCSA panel, the wiring is normally located on the back side, separated from the cells, thereby giving rise to current loops having significant areas and, consequently, significant magnetic moments. Current-loop geometries are chosen in an effort to balance opposing magnetic moments to limit far-0field magnetic interactions, but the relatively large distances separating current loops makes full cancellation of magnetic fields problematic. The panel is assembled from bare photovoltaic cells by means of multiple sensitive process steps that contribute significantly to cost, especially if electomagnetic cleanliness is desired. The steps include applying a cover glass and electrical-interconnect-cell (CIC) sub-assemble, connecting the CIC subassemblies into strings of series-connected cells, laying down and adhesively bonding the strings onto a panel structure that has been made in a separate multi-step process, and mounting the

  7. A recurrent neural network for adaptive beamforming and array correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Hangjun; Li, Chuandong; He, Xing; Huang, Tingwen

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a recurrent neural network (RNN) is proposed for solving adaptive beamforming problem. In order to minimize sidelobe interference, the problem is described as a convex optimization problem based on linear array model. RNN is designed to optimize system's weight values in the feasible region which is derived from arrays' state and plane wave's information. The new algorithm is proven to be stable and converge to optimal solution in the sense of Lyapunov. So as to verify new algorithm's performance, we apply it to beamforming under array mismatch situation. Comparing with other optimization algorithms, simulations suggest that RNN has strong ability to search for exact solutions under the condition of large scale constraints.

  8. SearchResultFinder: federated search made easy

    OpenAIRE

    Trieschnigg, Rudolf Berend; Tjin-Kam-Jet, Kien; Hiemstra, Djoerd

    2013-01-01

    Building a federated search engine based on a large number existing web search engines is a challenge: implementing the programming interface (API) for each search engine is an exacting and time-consuming job. In this demonstration we present SearchResultFinder, a browser plugin which speeds up determining reusable XPaths for extracting search result items from HTML search result pages. Based on a single search result page, the tool presents a ranked list of candidate extraction XPaths and al...

  9. The Moral Maturity of Repeater Delinquents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petronio, Richard J.

    1980-01-01

    Differences in moral development (as conceived by Kohlberg) were examined in a sample of delinquent teenagers. The repeater group was not found, as had been hypothesized, to be lower on moral maturity than those who engaged in less delinquency. (GC)

  10. Electrodynamic Arrays Having Nanomaterial Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigwell, Steven (Inventor); Biris, Alexandru S. (Inventor); Calle, Carlos I. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An electrodynamic array of conductive nanomaterial electrodes and a method of making such an electrodynamic array. In one embodiment, a liquid solution containing nanomaterials is deposited as an array of conductive electrodes on a substrate, including rigid or flexible substrates such as fabrics, and opaque or transparent substrates. The nanomaterial electrodes may also be grown in situ. The nanomaterials may include carbon nanomaterials, other organic or inorganic nanomaterials or mixtures.

  11. Combinatorial aspects of covering arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles J. Colbourn

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Covering arrays generalize orthogonal arrays by requiring that t -tuples be covered, but not requiring that the appearance of t -tuples be balanced.Their uses in screening experiments has found application in software testing, hardware testing, and a variety of fields in which interactions among factors are to be identified. Here a combinatorial view of covering arrays is adopted, encompassing basic bounds, direct constructions, recursive constructions, algorithmic methods, and applications.

  12. Long-Term Priming of Visual Search Prevails against the Passage of Time and Counteracting Instructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruijne, Wouter; Meeter, Martijn

    2016-01-01

    Studies on "intertrial priming" have shown that in visual search experiments, the preceding trial automatically affects search performance: facilitating it when the target features repeat and giving rise to switch costs when they change--so-called (short-term) intertrial priming. These effects also occur at longer time scales: When 1 of…

  13. Star repeaters for fiber optic links.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, D H; Gravel, R L

    1977-02-01

    A star repeater combines the functions of a passive star coupler and a signal regenerating amplifier. By more effectively utilizing the light power radiated by a light emitting diode, the star repeater can, when used with small diameter channels, couple as much power to all receivers of a multiterminal link as would be coupled to the single receiver of a simple point-to-point link.

  14. Citation Searching: Search Smarter & Find More

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Chelsea C.; Brown, Stephanie Willen

    2008-01-01

    The staff at University of Connecticut are participating in Elsevier's Student Ambassador Program (SAmP) in which graduate students train their peers on "citation searching" research using Scopus and Web of Science, two tremendous citation databases. They are in the fourth semester of these training programs, and they are wildly successful: They…

  15. Citation Searching: Search Smarter & Find More

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Chelsea C.; Brown, Stephanie Willen

    2008-01-01

    The staff at University of Connecticut are participating in Elsevier's Student Ambassador Program (SAmP) in which graduate students train their peers on "citation searching" research using Scopus and Web of Science, two tremendous citation databases. They are in the fourth semester of these training programs, and they are wildly successful: They…

  16. Array calibration of angularly dependent gain and phase uncertainties with carry-on instrumental sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Buhong; WANG Yongliang; CHEN Hui; GUO Ying

    2004-01-01

    Array calibration with angularly dependent gain and phase uncertainties has long been a difficult problem. Although many array calibration methods have been reported extensively in the literature, they almost all assumed an angularly independent model for array uncertainties. Few calibration methods have been developed for the angularly dependent array uncertainties. A novel and efficient auto-calibration method for angularly dependent gain and phase uncertainties is proposed in this paper, which is called ISM (Instrumental Sensors Method). With the help of a few well-calibrated instrumental sensors, the ISM is able to achieve favorable and unambiguous direction-of-arrivals (DOAs) estimate and the corresponding angularly dependent gain and phase estimate simultaneously, even in the case of multiple non-disjoint sources. Since the mutual coupling and sensor position errors can all be described as angularly dependent gain/phase uncertainties, the ISM proposed still works in the presence of a combination of all these array perturbations. The ISM can be applied to arbitrary array geometries including linear arrays. The ISM is computationally efficient and requires only one-dimensional search, with no high-dimensional nonlinear search and convergence burden involved. Besides, no small error assumption is made, which is always an essential prerequisite for many existing array calibration techniques. The estimation performance of the ISM is analyzed theoretically and simulation results are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness and behavior of the proposed ISM.

  17. Digital repeat analysis; setup and operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nol, J; Isouard, G; Mirecki, J

    2006-06-01

    Since the emergence of digital imaging, there have been questions about the necessity of continuing reject analysis programs in imaging departments to evaluate performance and quality. As a marketing strategy, most suppliers of digital technology focus on the supremacy of the technology and its ability to reduce the number of repeats, resulting in less radiation doses given to patients and increased productivity in the department. On the other hand, quality assurance radiographers and radiologists believe that repeats are mainly related to positioning skills, and repeat analysis is the main tool to plan training needs to up-skill radiographers. A comparative study between conventional and digital imaging was undertaken to compare outcomes and evaluate the need for reject analysis. However, digital technology still being at its early development stages, setting a credible reject analysis program became the major task of the study. It took the department, with the help of the suppliers of the computed radiography reader and the picture archiving and communication system, over 2 years of software enhancement to build a reliable digital repeat analysis system. The results were supportive of both philosophies; the number of repeats as a result of exposure factors was reduced dramatically; however, the percentage of repeats as a result of positioning skills was slightly on the increase for the simple reason that some rejects in the conventional system qualifying for both exposure and positioning errors were classified as exposure error. The ability of digitally adjusting dark or light images reclassified some of those images as positioning errors.

  18. Quantum Key Distribution over Probabilistic Quantum Repeaters

    CERN Document Server

    Amirloo, Jeyran; Majedi, A Hamed

    2010-01-01

    A feasible route towards implementing long-distance quantum key distribution (QKD) systems relies on probabilistic schemes for entanglement distribution and swapping as proposed in the work of Duan, Lukin, Cirac, and Zoller (DLCZ) [Nature 414, 413 (2001)]. Here, we calculate the conditional throughput and fidelity of entanglement for DLCZ quantum repeaters, by accounting for the DLCZ self-purification property, in the presence of multiple excitations in the ensemble memories as well as loss and other sources of inefficiency in the channel and measurement modules. We then use our results to find the generation rate of secure key bits for QKD systems that rely on DLCZ quantum repeaters. We compare the key generation rate per logical memory employed in the two cases of with and without a repeater node. We find the cross-over distance beyond which the repeater system outperforms the non-repeater one. That provides us with the optimum inter-node distancing in quantum repeater systems. We also find the optimal exci...

  19. Remarkable selective constraints on exonic dinucleotide repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haasl, Ryan J; Payseur, Bret A

    2014-09-01

    Long dinucleotide repeats found in exons present a substantial mutational hazard: mutations at these loci occur often and generate frameshifts. Here, we provide clear and compelling evidence that exonic dinucleotides experience strong selective constraint. In humans, only 18 exonic dinucleotides have repeat lengths greater than six, which contrasts sharply with the genome-wide distribution of dinucleotides. We genotyped each of these dinucleotides in 200 humans from eight 1000 Genomes Project populations and found a near-absence of polymorphism. More remarkably, divergence data demonstrate that repeat lengths have been conserved across the primate phylogeny in spite of what is likely considerable mutational pressure. Coalescent simulations show that even a very low mutation rate at these loci fails to explain the anomalous patterns of polymorphism and divergence. Our data support two related selective constraints on the evolution of exonic dinucleotides: a short-term intolerance for any change to repeat length and a long-term prevention of increases to repeat length. In general, our results implicate purifying selection as the force that eliminates new, deleterious mutants at exonic dinucleotides. We briefly discuss the evolution of the longest exonic dinucleotide in the human genome--a 10 x CA repeat in fibroblast growth factor receptor-like 1 (FGFRL1)--that should possess a considerably greater mutation rate than any other exonic dinucleotide and therefore generate a large number of deleterious variants. © 2014 The Author(s). Evolution © 2014 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  20. Dynamic combinatorial libraries of artificial repeat proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Margarita; Shumacher, Inbal; Cohen-Luria, Rivka; Ashkenasy, Gonen

    2013-06-15

    Repeat proteins are found in almost all cellular systems, where they are involved in diverse molecular recognition processes. Recent studies have suggested that de novo designed repeat proteins may serve as universal binders, and might potentially be used as practical alternative to antibodies. We describe here a novel chemical methodology for producing small libraries of repeat proteins, and screening in parallel the ligand binding of library members. The first stage of this research involved the total synthesis of a consensus-based three-repeat tetratricopeptide (TPR) protein (~14 kDa), via sequential attachment of the respective peptides. Despite the effectiveness of the synthesis and ligation steps, this method was found to be too demanding for the production of proteins containing variable number of repeats. Additionally, the analysis of binding of the individual proteins was time consuming. Therefore, we designed and prepared novel dynamic combinatorial libraries (DCLs), and show that their equilibration can facilitate the formation of TPR proteins containing up to eight repeating units. Interestingly, equilibration of the library building blocks in the presence of the biologically relevant ligands, Hsp90 and Hsp70, induced their oligomerization into forming more of the proteins with large recognition surfaces. We suggest that this work presents a novel simple and rapid tool for the simultaneous screening of protein mixtures with variable binding surfaces, and for identifying new binders for ligands of interest.

  1. Human memory search

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davelaar, E.J.; Raaijmakers, J.G.W.; Hills, T.T.; Robbins, T.W.; Todd, P.M.

    2012-01-01

    The importance of understanding human memory search is hard to exaggerate: we build and live our lives based on what whe remember. This chapter explores the characteristics of memory search, with special emphasis on the use of retrieval cues. We introduce the dependent measures that are obtained

  2. Distributed Deep Web Search

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjin-Kam-Jet, Kien

    2013-01-01

    The World Wide Web contains billions of documents (and counting); hence, it is likely that some document will contain the answer or content you are searching for. While major search engines like Bing and Google often manage to return relevant results to your query, there are plenty of situations in

  3. With News Search Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Holly

    2005-01-01

    Although there are many news search engines on the Web, finding the news items one wants can be challenging. Choosing appropriate search terms is one of the biggest challenges. Unless one has seen the article that one is seeking, it is often difficult to select words that were used in the headline or text of the article. The limited archives of…

  4. Towards Accessible Search Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serdyukov, Pavel; Hiemstra, Djoerd; Ruthven, Ian

    2010-01-01

    The SIGIR workshop Towards Accessible Search Systems was the first workshop in the field to raise the discussion on how to make search engines accessible for different types of users. We report on the results of the workshop that was held on 23 July 2010 in conjunction with the 33rd Annual ACM SIGIR

  5. Searches for Supersymmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Ventura, Andrea; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    New and recents results on Supersymmetry searches are shown for the ATLAS and the CMS experiments. Analyses with about 36 fb^-1 are considered for searches concerning light squarks and gluinos, direct pair production of 3rd generation squarks, electroweak production of charginos, neutralinos, sleptons, R-parity violating scenarios and long-lived particles.

  6. Distributed deep web search

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjin-Kam-Jet, Kien-Tsoi Theodorus Egbert

    2013-01-01

    The World Wide Web contains billions of documents (and counting); hence, it is likely that some document will contain the answer or content you are searching for. While major search engines like Bing and Google often manage to return relevant results to your query, there are plenty of situations in

  7. Fixing Dataset Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynnes, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Three current search engines are queried for ozone data at the GES DISC. The results range from sub-optimal to counter-intuitive. We propose a method to fix dataset search by implementing a robust relevancy ranking scheme. The relevancy ranking scheme is based on several heuristics culled from more than 20 years of helping users select datasets.

  8. ElasticSearch cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Paro, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    If you are a developer who implements ElasticSearch in your web applications and want to sharpen your understanding of the core elements and applications, this is the book for you. It is assumed that you've got working knowledge of JSON and, if you want to extend ElasticSearch, of Java and related technologies.

  9. Search and Recommendation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogers, Toine

    2014-01-01

    -scale application by companies like Amazon, Facebook, and Netflix. But are search and recommendation really two different fields of research that address different problems with different sets of algorithms in papers published at distinct conferences? In my talk, I want to argue that search and recommendation...

  10. Cascading Constrained 2-D Arrays using Periodic Merging Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forchhammer, Søren; Laursen, Torben Vaarby

    2003-01-01

    We consider a method for designing 2-D constrained codes by cascading finite width arrays using predefined finite width periodic merging arrays. This provides a constructive lower bound on the capacity of the 2-D constrained code. Examples include symmetric RLL and density constrained codes....... Numerical results for the capacities are presented....

  11. Improving protein array performance: focus on washing and storage conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Nidhi; Hurst, Robin; Hook, Brad; Meisenheimer, Poncho; Zhao, Kate Q; Nassif, Nadine; Bulleit, Robert F; Storts, Douglas R

    2008-10-01

    For protein microarrays, maintaining protein stability during the slide processing steps of washing, drying, and storage is of major concern. Although several studies have focused on the stability of immobilized antibodies in antibody microarrays, studies on protein-protein interaction arrays and enzyme arrays are lacking. In this paper we used five bait-prey protein interaction pairs and three enzymes to optimize the washing, drying, and storage conditions for protein arrays. The protein arrays for the study were fabricated by combining HaloTag technology and cell-free protein expression. The HaloTag technology, in combination with cell-free expression, allowed rapid expression and immobilization of fusion proteins on hydrogel-coated glass slides directly from cell extracts without any prior purification. Experimental results indicate enzyme captured on glass slides undergoes significant loss of activity when washed and spin-dried using only phosphate buffer, as is typically done with antibody arrays. The impact of washing and spin-drying in phosphate buffer on protein-protein interaction arrays was minimal. However, addition of 5% glycerol to the wash buffer helps retain enzyme activity during washing and drying. We observed significant loss of enzyme activity when slides were stored dry at 4 degrees C, however immobilized enzymes remained active for 30 days when stored at -20 degrees C in 50% glycerol. We also found that cell-free extract containing HaloTag-fused enzymes could undergo multiple freeze/thaw cycles without any adverse impact on enzyme activity. The findings indicate that for large ongoing studies, proteins of interest expressed in cell-free extract can be stored at -70 degrees C and repeatedly used to print small batches of protein array slides to be used over a few weeks.

  12. Tales from the Field: Search Strategies Applied in Web Searching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soohyung Joo

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In their web search processes users apply multiple types of search strategies, which consist of different search tactics. This paper identifies eight types of information search strategies with associated cases based on sequences of search tactics during the information search process. Thirty-one participants representing the general public were recruited for this study. Search logs and verbal protocols offered rich data for the identification of different types of search strategies. Based on the findings, the authors further discuss how to enhance web-based information retrieval (IR systems to support each type of search strategy.

  13. Diagnosable structured logic array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Sterling (Inventor); Miles, Lowell (Inventor); Gambles, Jody (Inventor); Maki, Gary K. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A diagnosable structured logic array and associated process is provided. A base cell structure is provided comprising a logic unit comprising a plurality of input nodes, a plurality of selection nodes, and an output node, a plurality of switches coupled to the selection nodes, where the switches comprises a plurality of input lines, a selection line and an output line, a memory cell coupled to the output node, and a test address bus and a program control bus coupled to the plurality of input lines and the selection line of the plurality of switches. A state on each of the plurality of input nodes is verifiably loaded and read from the memory cell. A trusted memory block is provided. The associated process is provided for testing and verifying a plurality of truth table inputs of the logic unit.

  14. Array biosensor: recent developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Joel P.; Rowe-Taitt, Chris A.; Feldstein, Mark J.; Ligler, Frances S.

    1999-05-01

    A fluorescence-based immunosensor has been developed for simultaneous analyses of multiple samples for 1 to 6 different antigens. A patterned array of recognition antibodies immobilized on the surface of a planar waveguide is used to 'capture' analyte present in samples. Bound analyte is then quantified by means of fluorescent detector molecules. Upon excitation of the fluorescent label by a small diode laser, a CCD camera detects the pattern of fluorescent antigen:antibody complexes on the sensor surface. Image analysis software correlates the position of fluorescent signals with the identity of the analyte. A new design for a fluidics distribution system is shown, as well as results from assays for physiologically relevant concentrations of staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB), F1 antigen from Yersinia pestis, and D- dimer, a marker of sepsis and thrombotic disorders.

  15. PAPPA: Primordial Anisotropy Polarization Pathfinder Array

    CERN Document Server

    Kogut, A; Fixsen, D; Hinshaw, G F; Limon, M; Moseley, S H; Phillips, N; Sharp, E; Wollack, E J; U-Yen, K; Cao, N; Stevenson, T; Hsieh, W; Devlin, M; Dicker, S; Semisch, C; Irwin, K

    2006-01-01

    The Primordial Anisotropy Polarization Pathfinder Array (PAPPA) is a balloon-based instrument to measure the polarization of the cosmic microwave background and search for the signal from gravity waves excited during an inflationary epoch in the early universe. PAPPA will survey a 20 x 20 deg patch at the North Celestial Pole using 32 pixels in 3 passbands centered at 89, 212, and 302 GHz. Each pixel uses MEMS switches in a superconducting microstrip transmission line to combine the phase modulation techniques used in radio astronomy with the sensitivity of transition-edge superconducting bolometers. Each switched circuit modulates the incident polarization on a single detector, allowing nearly instantaneous characterization of the Stokes I, Q, and U parameters. We describe the instrument design and status.

  16. CADC Advanced Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, D. N.

    2012-09-01

    The Canadian Astronomy Data Centre's (CADC) Advanced Search web application is a modern search tool to access data across the CADC archives. It allows searching in different units, and is well averse in wild card characters and numeric operations. Search results are displayed in a sortable and filterable manner allowing quick and accurate access to downloadable data. The Advanced Search interface makes extremely good use of the Astronomical Data Query Language (ADQL) to scour the Common Archive Observation Model (CAOM) Table Access Protocol (TAP) query service and the vast CADC Archive Data (AD) storage system. A new tabular view of the query form and the results data makes it easy to view the query, then return to the query form to make further changes, or, alternatively, filter the data from the paginated table. Results are displayed using a rich, open-source, JavaScript-based VOTable viewer called voview.

  17. Search and Disrupt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørding Olsen, Anders

    This paper analyzes how external search is affected by strategic interest alignment among knowledge sources. I focus on misalignment arising from the heterogeneous effects of disruptive technologies by analyzing the influence of incumbents on 2,855 non-incumbents? external knowledge search efforts....... The efforts most likely to solve innovation problems obtained funding from the European Commission?s 7th Framework Program (2007-2013). The results show that involving incumbents improves search in complementary technologies, while demoting it when strategic interests are misaligned in disruptive technologies....... However, incumbent sources engaged in capability reconfiguration to accommodate disruption improve search efforts in disruptive technologies. The paper concludes that the value of external sources is contingent on more than their knowledge. Specifically, interdependence of sources in search gives rise...

  18. Search and Disrupt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørding Olsen, Anders

    This paper analyzes how external search is affected by strategic interest alignment among knowledge sources. I focus on misalignment arising from the heterogeneous effects of disruptive technologies by analyzing the influence of incumbents on 2,855 non-incumbents? external knowledge search efforts....... The efforts most likely to solve innovation problems obtained funding from the European Commission?s 7th Framework Program (2007-2013). The results show that involving incumbents improves search in complementary technologies, while demoting it when strategic interests are misaligned in disruptive technologies....... However, incumbent sources engaged in capability reconfiguration to accommodate disruption improve search efforts in disruptive technologies. The paper concludes that the value of external sources is contingent on more than their knowledge. Specifically, interdependence of sources in search gives rise...

  19. Impact of CAG repeat length in the androgen receptor gene on male infertility - a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Feifan; Lan, Aihua; Lin, Zhidi; Song, Jianfei; Zhang, Yuening; Li, Jiatong; Gu, Kailong; Lv, Baihao; Zhao, Dong; Zeng, Siping; Zhang, Ruoheng; Zhao, Wei; Pan, Zhengyan; Deng, Xiaozhen; Yang, Xiaoli

    2016-07-01

    CAG repeats are polymorphic nucleotide repeats present in the androgen receptor gene. Many studies have estimated the association between CAG repeat length and male infertility, but the conclusions are controversial. Previous meta-analyses have come to different conclusions; however, new studies have been published. An updated meta-analysis was conducted. PubMed, CBM, CNKI and Web of Science databases were systematically searched for studies published from 1 January 2000 to 1 October 2015. Case-control studies on the association between CAG repeat length and male infertility using appropriate methodology were included. Forty studies were selected, including 3858 cases and 3161 controls. Results showed statistically significantly longer CAG repeat length among cases compared with controls (SMD = 0.14; 95% CI, 0.02-0.26). Shorter repeat length was associated with a lower risk of male infertility compared with a longer repeat length in the overall analysis (OR = 0.79, 95% CI: 0.66-0.95). Moreover, CAG repeat length was associated with male infertility in Caucasian populations, but not Asian or Egyptian populations. Subgroup analysis revealed no significant difference in German populations, but CAG repeat length was associated with male infertility in China and the USA. There were no significant differences between cases and controls in azoospermia and severe oligozoospermia.

  20. Job Search, Search Intensity, and Labor Market Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloemen, Hans G.

    2005-01-01

    Job searches by both the unemployed and employed jobseekers are studied through an empirical structural job search model using a choice variable of search intensity. The resulting influence of search intensity on the labor market transitions is analyzed to give the estimation results of the search and the impact of the benefit level on the search…

  1. How Users Search the Library from a Single Search Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lown, Cory; Sierra, Tito; Boyer, Josh

    2013-01-01

    Academic libraries are turning increasingly to unified search solutions to simplify search and discovery of library resources. Unfortunately, very little research has been published on library user search behavior in single search box environments. This study examines how users search a large public university library using a prominent, single…

  2. Molecular cloning and expression of a novel human cDNA containing CAG repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, T; Chen, B K; Qiu, Y; Sonobe, H; Ohtsuki, Y

    1997-12-19

    A novel human cDNA containing CAG repeats, designated B120, was cloned by PCR amplification. An approximately 300-bp 3' untranslated region in this cDNA was followed by a 3426-bp coding region containing the CAG repeats. A computer search failed to find any significant homology between this cDNA and previously reported genes. The number of CAG trinucleotide repeats appeared to vary from seven to 12 in analyses of genomic DNA from healthy volunteers. An approximately 8-kb band was detected in brain, skeletal muscle and thymus by Northern blot analysis. The deduced amino-acid sequence had a polyglutamine chain encoded by CAG repeats as well as glutamine- and tyrosine-rich repeats, which has also been reported for several RNA binding proteins. We immunized mice with recombinant gene product and established a monoclonal antibody to it. On Western immunoblotting, this antibody detected an approximately 120-kDa protein in human brain tissue. In addition, immunohistochemical staining showed that the cytoplasm of neural cells was stained with this antibody. These findings indicated that B120 is a novel cDNA with a CAG repeat length polymorphism and that its gene product is a cytoplasmic protein with a molecular mass of 120 kDa.

  3. Developing optimal search strategies for retrieving clinically relevant qualitative studies in EMBASE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Leslie A; Wilczynski, Nancy L; Haynes, R Brian

    2006-01-01

    Qualitative researchers address many issues relevant to patient health care. Their studies appear in an array of journals, making literature searching difficult. Large databases such as EMBASE provide a means of retrieving qualitative research, but these studies represent only a minuscule fraction of published articles, making electronic retrieval problematic. Little work has been done on developing search strategies for the detection of qualitative studies. The objective of this study was to develop optimal search strategies to retrieve qualitative studies in EMBASE for the 2000 publishing year. The authors conducted an analytic survey, comparing hand searches of journals with retrievals from EMBASE for candidate search terms and combinations. Search strategies reached peak sensitivities at 94.2% and peak specificities of 99.7%. Combining search terms to optimize the combination of sensitivity and specificity resulted in values over 89% for both. The authors identified search strategies with high performance for retrieving qualitative studies in EMBASE.

  4. Validity and reliability of rectus femoris ultrasound measurements: Comparison of curved-array and linear-array transducers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendra Hammond, MD

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Muscle-mass loss augers increased morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Muscle-mass loss can be assessed by wide linear-array ultrasound transducers connected to cumbersome, expensive console units. Whether cheaper, hand-carried units equipped with curved-array transducers can be used as alternatives is unknown. Accordingly, our primary aim was to investigate in 15 nondisabled subjects the validity of measurements of rectus femoris cross-sectional area by using a curved-array transducer against a linear-array transducer—the reference-standard technique. In these subjects, we also determined the reliability of measurements obtained by a novice operator versus measurements obtained by an experienced operator. Lastly, the relationship between quadriceps strength and rectus area recorded by two experienced operators with a curved-array transducer was assessed in 17 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. In nondisabled subjects, the rectus cross-sectional area measured with the curved-array transducer by the novice and experienced operators was valid (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC]: 0.98, typical percentage error [%TE]: 3.7% and reliable (ICC: 0.79, %TE: 9.7%. In the subjects with COPD, both reliability (ICC: 0.99 and repeatability (%TE: 7.6% and 9.8% were high. Rectus area was related to quadriceps strength in COPD for both experienced operators (coefficient of determination: 0.67 and 0.70. In conclusion, measurements of rectus femoris cross-sectional area recorded with a curved-array transducer connected to a hand-carried unit are valid, reliable, and reproducible, leading us to contend that this technique is suitable for cross-sectional and longitudinal studies.

  5. Automated genotyping of dinucleotide repeat markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perlin, M.W.; Hoffman, E.P. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)]|[Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The dinucleotide repeats (i.e., microsatellites) such as CA-repeats are a highly polymorphic, highly abundant class of PCR-amplifiable markers that have greatly streamlined genetic mapping experimentation. It is expected that over 30,000 such markers (including tri- and tetranucleotide repeats) will be characterized for routine use in the next few years. Since only size determination, and not sequencing, is required to determine alleles, in principle, dinucleotide repeat genotyping is easily performed on electrophoretic gels, and can be automated using DNA sequencers. Unfortunately, PCR stuttering with these markers generates not one band for each allele, but a pattern of bands. Since closely spaced alleles must be disambiguated by human scoring, this poses a key obstacle to full automation. We have developed methods that overcome this obstacle. Our model is that the observed data is generated by arithmetic superposition (i.e., convolution) of multiple allele patterns. By quantitatively measuring the size of each component band, and exploiting the unique stutter pattern associated with each marker, closely spaced alleles can be deconvolved; this unambiguously reconstructs the {open_quotes}true{close_quotes} allele bands, with stutter artifact removed. We used this approach in a system for automated diagnosis of (X-linked) Duchenne muscular dystrophy; four multiplexed CA-repeats within the dystrophin gene were assayed on a DNA sequencer. Our method accurately detected small variations in gel migration that shifted the allele size estimate. In 167 nonmutated alleles, 89% (149/167) showed no size variation, 9% (15/167) showed 1 bp variation, and 2% (3/167) showed 2 bp variation. We are currently developing a library of dinucleotide repeat patterns; together with our deconvolution methods, this library will enable fully automated genotyping of dinucleotide repeats from sizing data.

  6. Multivariate search for differentially expressed gene combinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klebanov Lev

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To identify differentially expressed genes, it is standard practice to test a two-sample hypothesis for each gene with a proper adjustment for multiple testing. Such tests are essentially univariate and disregard the multidimensional structure of microarray data. A more general two-sample hypothesis is formulated in terms of the joint distribution of any sub-vector of expression signals. Results By building on an earlier proposed multivariate test statistic, we propose a new algorithm for identifying differentially expressed gene combinations. The algorithm includes an improved random search procedure designed to generate candidate gene combinations of a given size. Cross-validation is used to provide replication stability of the search procedure. A permutation two-sample test is used for significance testing. We design a multiple testing procedure to control the family-wise error rate (FWER when selecting significant combinations of genes that result from a successive selection procedure. A target set of genes is composed of all significant combinations selected via random search. Conclusions A new algorithm has been developed to identify differentially expressed gene combinations. The performance of the proposed search-and-testing procedure has been evaluated by computer simulations and analysis of replicated Affymetrix gene array data on age-related changes in gene expression in the inner ear of CBA mice.

  7. On site calibration for new fluorescence detectors of the telescope array experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokuno, H. [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan)], E-mail: htokuno@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Murano, Y. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Kawana, S. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Tameda, Y. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Taketa, A.; Ikeda, D.; Udo, S. [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Ogio, S. [Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, Sumiyoshi, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Fukushima, M. [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Azuma, R.; Fukuda, M. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Inoue, N. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Kadota, K. [Faculty of Knowledge Engineering, Musashi Institute of Technology, Setagaya, Tokyo 158-8557 (Japan); Kakimoto, F. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Sagawa, H.; Sakurai, N.; Shibata, T.; Takeda, M. [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Tsunesada, Y. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan)

    2009-04-01

    The Telescope Array experiment is searching for the origin of ultra-high energy cosmic rays using a ground array of particle detectors and three fluorescence telescope stations. The precise calibration of the fluorescence detectors is important for small systematic errors in shower reconstruction. This paper details the process of calibrating cameras for two of the fluorescence telescope stations. This paper provides the operational results of these camera calibrations.

  8. True Time Delay Scheme for X-band Phased Array Radar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zheng

    2007-01-01

    The system of a true-time delay line for X-band and 8-unit phased array antennas is introduced. Changing the length of a chirp grating with piezotranslator(PZT), the variable delay is obtained. The scheme is applied to X-band phased array radar whose searching data rate is 56/s. It is simulated that the beam squinting is influenced by the error of real time delay. The relation between the beamforming mode and its modifying volt is discussed.

  9. Genomic rearrangements at the FRA2H common fragile site frequently involve non-homologous recombination events across LTR and L1(LINE) repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brueckner, Lena M; Sagulenko, Evgeny; Hess, Elisa M; Zheglo, Diana; Blumrich, Anne; Schwab, Manfred; Savelyeva, Larissa

    2012-08-01

    Common fragile sites (cFSs) are non-random chromosomal regions that are prone to breakage under conditions of replication stress. DNA damage and chromosomal alterations at cFSs appear to be critical events in the development of various human diseases, especially carcinogenesis. Despite the growing interest in understanding the nature of cFS instability, only a few cFSs have been molecularly characterised. In this study, we fine-mapped the location of FRA2H using six-colour fluorescence in situ hybridisation and showed that it is one of the most active cFSs in the human genome. FRA2H encompasses approximately 530 kb of a gene-poor region containing a novel large intergenic non-coding RNA gene (AC097500.2). Using custom-designed array comparative genomic hybridisation, we detected gross and submicroscopic chromosomal rearrangements involving FRA2H in a panel of 54 neuroblastoma, colon and breast cancer cell lines. The genomic alterations frequently involved different classes of long terminal repeats and long interspersed nuclear elements. An analysis of breakpoint junction sequence motifs predominantly revealed signatures of microhomology-mediated non-homologous recombination events. Our data provide insight into the molecular structure of cFSs and sequence motifs affected by their activation in cancer. Identifying cFS sequences will accelerate the search for DNA biomarkers and targets for individualised therapies.

  10. DNA tandem repeat instability in the Escherichia coli chromosome is stimulated by mismatch repair at an adjacent CAG·CTG trinucleotide repeat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwood, John K.; Okely, Ewa A.; Zahra, Rabaab; Eykelenboom, John K.; Leach, David R. F.

    2010-01-01

    Approximately half the human genome is composed of repetitive DNA sequences classified into microsatellites, minisatellites, tandem repeats, and dispersed repeats. These repetitive sequences have coevolved within the genome but little is known about their potential interactions. Trinucleotide repeats (TNRs) are a subclass of microsatellites that are implicated in human disease. Expansion of CAG·CTG TNRs is responsible for Huntington disease, myotonic dystrophy, and a number of spinocerebellar ataxias. In yeast DNA double-strand break (DSB) formation has been proposed to be associated with instability and chromosome fragility at these sites and replication fork reversal (RFR) to be involved either in promoting or in preventing instability. However, the molecular basis for chromosome fragility of repetitive DNA remains poorly understood. Here we show that a CAG·CTG TNR array stimulates instability at a 275-bp tandem repeat located 6.3 kb away on the Escherichia coli chromosome. Remarkably, this stimulation is independent of both DNA double-strand break repair (DSBR) and RFR but is dependent on a functional mismatch repair (MMR) system. Our results provide a demonstration, in a simple model system, that MMR at one type of repetitive DNA has the potential to influence the stability of another. Furthermore, the mechanism of this stimulation places a limit on the universality of DSBR or RFR models of instability and chromosome fragility at CAG·CTG TNR sequences. Instead, our data suggest that explanations of chromosome fragility should encompass the possibility of chromosome gaps formed during MMR. PMID:21149728

  11. Search for the decay [ital D][sup 0][r arrow][mu][sup +][mu][sup [minus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, C.S.; Brown, C.N.; Cooper, W.E.; Gounder, K. (Fermilab, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States)); Kaplan, D.M.; Martin, V.M.; Preston, R.S.; Sa, J.; Tanikella, V. (Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, Illinois 60115 (United States)); Isenhower, L.D.; Sadler, M.E.; Schnathorst, R. (Abilene Christian University, Abilene, Texas 79699 (United States)); Lederman, L.M.; Schub, M.H. (University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)); Gidal, G.; Kowitt, M.S.; Luk, K.B. (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)); Carey, T.A.; Jeppesen, R.E.; Kapustinsky, J.S.; Lane, D.W.; Leitch, M.J.; Lillberg, J.W.; McGaughey, P.L.; Moss, J.M.; Peng, J.C. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)); Childers, R.L.; Darden, C.W. (University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina 29208 (United States)); Teng, P.K. (Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei (Taiwan

    1994-07-01

    Using a silicon-microstrip detector array to identify secondary vertices occurring downstream of a short platinum target, we have searched for the decay [ital D][sup 0][r arrow][mu][sup +][mu][sup [minus

  12. Automated Solar-Array Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soffa, A.; Bycer, M.

    1982-01-01

    Large arrays are rapidly assembled from individual solar cells by automated production line developed for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Apparatus positions cells within array, attaches interconnection tabs, applies solder flux, and solders interconnections. Cells are placed in either straight or staggered configurations and may be connected either in series or in parallel. Are attached at rate of one every 5 seconds.

  13. The OncoArray Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amos, Christopher I; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Zhaoming

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Common cancers develop through a multistep process often including inherited susceptibility. Collaboration among multiple institutions, and funding from multiple sources, has allowed the development of an inexpensive genotyping microarray, the OncoArray. The array includes a genome-wi...

  14. Tremor as observed by the Array of Arrays in Cascadia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, A.; Vidale, J. E.; Creager, K. C.

    2010-12-01

    We are capturing the intimate details of tremor activity in Cascadia with 8 small-aperture seismic arrays in northwestern Washington. The Array of Arrays (AoA) focuses on the tremor-active megathrust, including the area we previously imaged with a solo seismic array in 2008 [Ghosh et al., GRL, 2009, 2010]. Each array consists of 10 to 20 three-component sensors recording in continuous mode. Since it became operational in June 2009, the AoA has recorded several minor tremor episodes, and the recent episodic tremor and slip (ETS) event in August 2010. During the ETS event, each array was augmented by 10 additional single-channel, vertical-component sensors. We have already started to analyze seismic data for tremor episodes in July 2009, and March 2010. At each array, we apply a beamforming technique to stack the seismic energy at every 0.2 Hz from 2 to 15 Hz. During active tremor, the arrays show stable slowness, and azimuth over time, and up to 15 Hz energy on vertical channels, and 6 Hz on horizontals, with slowness consistent with the P and S waves respectively (Figure 1). Vidale et al. in this meeting provide a detailed description of a weeklong tremor episode in March 2010. The ETS started early second week of August about 60 km south of our arrays, and in a week or so, migrated along-strike to the north passing directly underneath the arrays. Strong tremor is still active about 50 km north of the arrays as we write this abstract. We will imminently analyze this data, and by the time of AGU, have preliminary results to present. Currently, we are developing an algorithm to focus as many arrays as possible to locate the tremor sources. With fine tremor detection capability and good azimuthal coverage, our AoA will better resolve the various confounding features of tremor spatiotemporal distribution (e.g., tremor patches, bands, streaks, rapid tremor reversals, low frequency earthquakes) that have been recently discovered in Cascadia. The AoA is poised to provide

  15. [Efficient identification and analysis of low and medium frequency repeats]. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jurka, J.

    1991-08-28

    The effective starting date of this grant was May 15. In the first three months of this project we focused primarily on organizational and technical aspects of our research which included: organization of the database of repeats in primates; preparation of software for rapid and sensitive search of novel repetitive elements in GenBank; purchase and installation of the Sun workstation; and research on the mammal-specific MAR1 family of repetitive elements (to be communicated in October).

  16. Passive microfluidic array card and reader

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugan, Lawrence Christopher [Modesto, CA; Coleman, Matthew A [Oakland, CA

    2011-08-09

    A microfluidic array card and reader system for analyzing a sample. The microfluidic array card includes a sample loading section for loading the sample onto the microfluidic array card, a multiplicity of array windows, and a transport section or sections for transporting the sample from the sample loading section to the array windows. The microfluidic array card reader includes a housing, a receiving section for receiving the microfluidic array card, a viewing section, and a light source that directs light to the array window of the microfluidic array card and to the viewing section.

  17. Custom Search Engines: Tools & Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notess, Greg R.

    2008-01-01

    Few have the resources to build a Google or Yahoo! from scratch. Yet anyone can build a search engine based on a subset of the large search engines' databases. Use Google Custom Search Engine or Yahoo! Search Builder or any of the other similar programs to create a vertical search engine targeting sites of interest to users. The basic steps to…

  18. Skewed Binary Search Trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Moruz, Gabriel

    2006-01-01

    It is well-known that to minimize the number of comparisons a binary search tree should be perfectly balanced. Previous work has shown that a dominating factor over the running time for a search is the number of cache faults performed, and that an appropriate memory layout of a binary search tree...... can reduce the number of cache faults by several hundred percent. Motivated by the fact that during a search branching to the left or right at a node does not necessarily have the same cost, e.g. because of branch prediction schemes, we in this paper study the class of skewed binary search trees....... For all nodes in a skewed binary search tree the ratio between the size of the left subtree and the size of the tree is a fixed constant (a ratio of 1/2 gives perfect balanced trees). In this paper we present an experimental study of various memory layouts of static skewed binary search trees, where each...

  19. Myanmar Language Search Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pann Yu Mon

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available With the enormous growth of the World Wide Web, search engines play a critical role in retrieving information from the borderless Web. Although many search engines are available for the major languages, but they are not much proficient for the less computerized languages including Myanmar. The main reason is that those search engines are not considering the specific features of those languages. A search engine which capable of searching the Web documents written in those languages is highly needed, especially when more and more Web sites are coming up with localized content in multiple languages. In this study, the design and the architecture of language specific search engine for Myanmar language is proposed. The main feature of the system are, (1 it can search the multiple encodings of the Myanmar Web page, (2 the system is designed to comply with the specific features of the Myanmar language. Finally the experiment has been done to prove whether it meets the design requirements.

  20. Report for Detection of Biothreat Agents and Environmental Samples using the LLNL Virulence Array for DHS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaing, Crystal [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gardner, Shea [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McLoughlin, Kevin [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Thissen, James [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jackson, Paul [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-04-18

    The objective of this project is to provide DHS a comprehensive evaluation of the current genomic technologies including genotyping, Taqman PCR, multiple locus variable tandem repeat analysis (MLVA), microarray and high-throughput DNA sequencing in the analysis of biothreat agents from complex environmental samples. This report focuses on the design, testing and results of samples on the Virulence Array.

  1. Sequences spanning the leader-repeat junction mediate CRISPR adaptation to phage in Streptococcus thermophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yunzhou; Chesne, Megan T; Terns, Rebecca M; Terns, Michael P

    2015-02-18

    CRISPR-Cas systems are RNA-based immune systems that protect prokaryotes from invaders such as phages and plasmids. In adaptation, the initial phase of the immune response, short foreign DNA fragments are captured and integrated into host CRISPR loci to provide heritable defense against encountered foreign nucleic acids. Each CRISPR contains a ∼100-500 bp leader element that typically includes a transcription promoter, followed by an array of captured ∼35 bp sequences (spacers) sandwiched between copies of an identical ∼35 bp direct repeat sequence. New spacers are added immediately downstream of the leader. Here, we have analyzed adaptation to phage infection in Streptococcus thermophilus at the CRISPR1 locus to identify cis-acting elements essential for the process. We show that the leader and a single repeat of the CRISPR locus are sufficient for adaptation in this system. Moreover, we identified a leader sequence element capable of stimulating adaptation at a dormant repeat. We found that sequences within 10 bp of the site of integration, in both the leader and repeat of the CRISPR, are required for the process. Our results indicate that information at the CRISPR leader-repeat junction is critical for adaptation in this Type II-A system and likely other CRISPR-Cas systems.

  2. Nanocoax Arrays for Sensing Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizal, Binod

    We have adapted a nanocoax array architecture for high sensitivity, all-electronic, chemical and biological sensing. Arrays of nanocoaxes with various dielectric annuli were developed using polymer replicas of Si nanopillars made via soft lithography. These arrays were implemented in the development of two different kinds of chemical detectors. First, arrays of nanocoaxes constructed with different porosity dielectric annuli were employed to make capacitive detectors for gaseous molecules and to investigate the role of dielectric porosity in the sensitivity of the device. Second, arrays of nanocoaxes with partially hollowed annuli were used to fabricate three-dimensional electrochemical biosensors within which we studied the role of nanoscale gap between electrodes on device sensitivity. In addition, we have employed a molecular imprint technique to develop a non-conducting molecularly imprinted polymer thin film of thickness comparable to size of biomolecules as an "artificial antibody" architecture for the detection of biomolecules.

  3. Digital electrostatic acoustic transducer array

    KAUST Repository

    Carreno, Armando Arpys Arevalo

    2016-12-19

    In this paper we present the fabrication and characterization of an array of electrostatic acoustic transducers. The array is micromachined on a silicon wafer using standard micro-machining techniques. Each array contains 2n electrostatic transducer membranes, where “n” is the bit number. Every element of the array has a hexagonal membrane shape structure, which is separated from the substrate by 3µm air gap. The membrane is made out 5µm thick polyimide layer that has a bottom gold electrode on the substrate and a gold top electrode on top of the membrane (250nm). The wafer layout design was diced in nine chips with different array configurations, with variation of the membrane dimensions. The device was tested with 90 V giving and sound output level as high as 35dB, while actuating all the elements at the same time.

  4. Chunking of Large Multidimensional Arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rotem, Doron; Otoo, Ekow J.; Seshadri, Sridhar

    2007-02-28

    Data intensive scientific computations as well on-lineanalytical processing applications as are done on very large datasetsthat are modeled as k-dimensional arrays. The storage organization ofsuch arrays on disks is done by partitioning the large global array intofixed size hyper-rectangular sub-arrays called chunks or tiles that formthe units of data transfer between disk and memory. Typical queriesinvolve the retrieval of sub-arrays in a manner that accesses all chunksthat overlap the query results. An important metric of the storageefficiency is the expected number of chunks retrieved over all suchqueries. The question that immediately arises is "what shapes of arraychunks give the minimum expected number of chunks over a query workload?"In this paper we develop two probabilistic mathematical models of theproblem and provide exact solutions using steepest descent and geometricprogramming methods. Experimental results, using synthetic workloads onreal life data sets, show that our chunking is much more efficient thanthe existing approximate solutions.

  5. Search Engine Bias and the Demise of Search Engine Utopianism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, E.

    Due to search engines' automated operations, people often assume that search engines display search results neutrally and without bias. However, this perception is mistaken. Like any other media company, search engines affirmatively control their users' experiences, which has the consequence of skewing search results (a phenomenon called "search engine bias"). Some commentators believe that search engine bias is a defect requiring legislative correction. Instead, this chapter argues that search engine bias is the beneficial consequence of search engines optimizing content for their users. The chapter further argues that the most problematic aspect of search engine bias, the "winner-take-all" effect caused by top placement in search results, will be mooted by emerging personalized search technology.

  6. Job-search persistence during unemployment: a 10-wave longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanberg, Connie R; Glomb, Theresa M; Song, Zhaoli; Sorenson, Sarah

    2005-05-01

    Dynamic predictors of job-search intensity over time are examined in a large 10-wave longitudinal study of unemployed individuals. Two sets of variables relevant to the examination of job search from a dynamic, self-regulatory perspective--core self-evaluations (T. A. Judge, A. Erez, & J. E. Bono, 1998) and the theory of planned behavior (I. Ajzen, 1991)--were used to guide our examination. Results suggest core self-evaluation is related to average levels of job-search intensity over time. Job-search intentions mediated the relationship between subjective norms and job-search self-efficacy in the prediction of job-search intensity in the following 2 weeks. Both Time 1 and cumulative job-search intensity predict reemployment. This repeated-measures study contributes to research on job search that has been primarily cross-sectional or included few time waves.

  7. SAQC: SNP Array Quality Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ling-Hui

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP arrays containing hundreds of thousands of SNPs from the human genome have proven useful for studying important human genome questions. Data quality of SNP arrays plays a key role in the accuracy and precision of downstream data analyses. However, good indices for assessing data quality of SNP arrays have not yet been developed. Results We developed new quality indices to measure the quality of SNP arrays and/or DNA samples and investigated their statistical properties. The indices quantify a departure of estimated individual-level allele frequencies (AFs from expected frequencies via standardized distances. The proposed quality indices followed lognormal distributions in several large genomic studies that we empirically evaluated. AF reference data and quality index reference data for different SNP array platforms were established based on samples from various reference populations. Furthermore, a confidence interval method based on the underlying empirical distributions of quality indices was developed to identify poor-quality SNP arrays and/or DNA samples. Analyses of authentic biological data and simulated data show that this new method is sensitive and specific for the detection of poor-quality SNP arrays and/or DNA samples. Conclusions This study introduces new quality indices, establishes references for AFs and quality indices, and develops a detection method for poor-quality SNP arrays and/or DNA samples. We have developed a new computer program that utilizes these methods called SNP Array Quality Control (SAQC. SAQC software is written in R and R-GUI and was developed as a user-friendly tool for the visualization and evaluation of data quality of genome-wide SNP arrays. The program is available online (http://www.stat.sinica.edu.tw/hsinchou/genetics/quality/SAQC.htm.

  8. Array gain for a cylindrical array with baffle scatter effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertilone, Derek C; Killeen, Damien S; Bao, Chaoying

    2007-11-01

    Cylindrical arrays used in sonar for passive underwater surveillance often have sensors surrounding a cylindrical metal baffle. In some operational sonars, the phones in each stave (i.e., each line of phones aligned with the cylinder axis) are hardwired together so that the array is equivalent to a baffled circular array of directional elements, where each element corresponds to a line array of omnidirectional phones steered to broadside. In this paper a model is introduced for computing the array gain of such an array at high frequencies, which incorporates baffle scatter using infinite, rigid cylinder scattering theory, and with ambient noise described by an angular spectral density function. In practice the phones are often offset from the baffle surface, and the acoustic field sampled by the staves is distorted at high frequencies due to interference between the incident and scattered fields. Examples are given to illustrate the resulting array gain degradation, using three noise distributions that are frequently used in sonar performance modeling: three-dimensional isotropic, two-dimensional isotropic, and surface dipole noise.

  9. Improving Search Engine Reliability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruthi, Jyoti; Kumar, Ela

    2010-11-01

    Search engines on the Internet are used daily to access and find information. While these services are providing an easy way to find information globally, they are also suffering from artificially created false results. This paper describes two techniques that are being used to manipulate the search engines: spam pages (used to achieve higher rankings on the result page) and cloaking (used to feed falsified data into search engines). This paper also describes two proposed methods to fight this kind of misuse, algorithms for both of the formerly mentioned cases of spamdexing.

  10. Modified harmony search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Najihah; Lutfi Amri Ramli, Ahmad; Majid, Ahmad Abd; Piah, Abd Rahni Mt

    2017-09-01

    A metaheuristic algorithm, called Harmony Search is quite highly applied in optimizing parameters in many areas. HS is a derivative-free real parameter optimization algorithm, and draws an inspiration from the musical improvisation process of searching for a perfect state of harmony. Propose in this paper Modified Harmony Search for solving optimization problems, which employs a concept from genetic algorithm method and particle swarm optimization for generating new solution vectors that enhances the performance of HS algorithm. The performances of MHS and HS are investigated on ten benchmark optimization problems in order to make a comparison to reflect the efficiency of the MHS in terms of final accuracy, convergence speed and robustness.

  11. ElasticSearch server

    CERN Document Server

    Rogozinski, Marek

    2014-01-01

    This book is a detailed, practical, hands-on guide packed with real-life scenarios and examples which will show you how to implement an ElasticSearch search engine on your own websites.If you are a web developer or a user who wants to learn more about ElasticSearch, then this is the book for you. You do not need to know anything about ElastiSeach, Java, or Apache Lucene in order to use this book, though basic knowledge about databases and queries is required.

  12. An ancient repeat sequence in the ATP synthase beta-subunit gene of forcipulate sea stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foltz, David W

    2007-11-01

    A novel repeat sequence with a conserved secondary structure is described from two nonadjacent introns of the ATP synthase beta-subunit gene in sea stars of the order Forcipulatida (Echinodermata: Asteroidea). The repeat is present in both introns of all forcipulate sea stars examined, which suggests that it is an ancient feature of this gene (with an approximate age of 200 Mya). Both stem and loop regions show high levels of sequence constraint when compared to flanking nonrepetitive intronic regions. The repeat was also detected in (1) the family Pterasteridae, order Velatida and (2) the family Korethrasteridae, order Velatida. The repeat was not detected in (1) the family Echinasteridae, order Spinulosida, (2) the family Astropectinidae, order Paxillosida, (3) the family Solasteridae, order Velatida, or (4) the family Goniasteridae, order Valvatida. The repeat lacks similarity to published sequences in unrestricted GenBank searches, and there are no significant open reading frames in the repeat or in the flanking intron sequences. Comparison via parametric bootstrapping to a published phylogeny based on 4.2 kb of nuclear and mitochondrial sequence for a subset of these species allowed the null hypothesis of a congruent phylogeny to be rejected for each repeat, when compared separately to the published phylogeny. In contrast, the flanking nonrepetitive sequences in each intron yielded separate phylogenies that were each congruent with the published phylogeny. In four species, the repeat in one or both introns has apparently experienced gene conversion. The two introns also show a correlated pattern of nucleotide substitutions, even after excluding the putative cases of gene conversion.

  13. Isolation and characterization of human cerebellum cDNAs containing polymorphic CAG trinucleotide repeats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igarashi, S.; Onodera, O.; Tanaka, H. [Niigata Univ. (Japan)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    It has been discovered that neurologic diseases such as X linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy, Huntington`s disease, spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1), and dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA) are caused by unstable expansions of CAG repeats, which shed a light on a new mechanism of human hereditary diseases. The genetic anticipation, a common genetic feature in these diseases, can be explained by the trinucleotide repeat expansions, and an inverse correlation between the ages of onset and the numbers of trinucleotide repeats is demonstrated in these diseases. Furthermore, there have been diseases such as spinocerebellar ataxia 2 (SCA2) and Machado-Joseph disease showing similar genetic anticipation, which suggests that their causative mutations are unstable expansions of trinucleotide repeats. To identify candidate genes for neurodegenerative diseases which are expressed in human cerebellum and contain CAG repeats, we screened a human cerebellum cDNA library with an oligonucleotide (CAG){sub 10}, labelled with [{gamma}{sup 32}P]ATP. Out of 78 clones we have isolated, 43 clones were partially sequenced and 31 clones were shown to contain CAG or CTG tinucleotide repeats. From homology searches, 12 of the 59 clones were identified to contain known sequences including human MAR/SAR DNA binding protein, human glial fibrillary acidic protein, human myelin transcription factor 1, human neuronal growth protein 43 and human myocyte-specific enhancer 2. From 6 clones out of the 43 novel genes, we were able to develop primer pairs flanking CAG repeats and determined chromosomal localizations with human and rodent hybrid mapping panels. These CAG repeats were shown to be polymorphic and mapped to 1, 15, 17 and 18. These novel cDNAs will be useful as candidate genes for hereditary neurologic diseases showing genetic anticipation.

  14. Mining of simple sequence repeats in the Genome of Gentianaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Sathishkumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Simple sequence repeats (SSRs or short tandem repeats are short repeat motifs that show high level of length polymorphism due to insertion or deletion mutations of one or more repeat types. Here, we present the detection and abundance of microsatellites or SSRs in nucleotide sequences of Gentianaceae family. A total of 545 SSRs were mined in 4698 nucleotide sequences downloaded from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI. Among the SSR sequences, the frequency of repeat type was about 429 -mono repeats, 99 -di repeats, 15 -tri repeats, and 2 --hexa repeats. Mononucleotide repeats were found to be abundant repeat types, about 78%, followed by dinucleotide repeats (18.16% among the SSR sequences. An attempt was made to design primer pairs for 545 identified SSRs but these were found only for 169 sequences.

  15. Quantum searching application in search based software engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Nan; Song, FangMin; Li, Xiangdong

    2013-05-01

    The Search Based Software Engineering (SBSE) is widely used in software engineering for identifying optimal solutions. However, there is no polynomial-time complexity solution used in the traditional algorithms for SBSE, and that causes the cost very high. In this paper, we analyze and compare several quantum search algorithms that could be applied for SBSE: quantum adiabatic evolution searching algorithm, fixed-point quantum search (FPQS), quantum walks, and a rapid modified Grover quantum searching method. The Grover's algorithm is thought as the best choice for a large-scaled unstructured data searching and theoretically it can be applicable to any search-space structure and any type of searching problems.

  16. PolyQ repeat expansions in ATXN2 associated with ALS are CAA interrupted repeats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenming Yu

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a devastating, rapidly progressive disease leading to paralysis and death. Recently, intermediate length polyglutamine (polyQ repeats of 27-33 in ATAXIN-2 (ATXN2, encoding the ATXN2 protein, were found to increase risk for ALS. In ATXN2, polyQ expansions of ≥ 34, which are pure CAG repeat expansions, cause spinocerebellar ataxia type 2. However, similar length expansions that are interrupted with other codons, can present atypically with parkinsonism, suggesting that configuration of the repeat sequence plays an important role in disease manifestation in ATXN2 polyQ expansion diseases. Here we determined whether the expansions in ATXN2 associated with ALS were pure or interrupted CAG repeats, and defined single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs rs695871 and rs695872 in exon 1 of the gene, to assess haplotype association. We found that the expanded repeat alleles of 40 ALS patients and 9 long-repeat length controls were all interrupted, bearing 1-3 CAA codons within the CAG repeat. 21/21 expanded ALS chromosomes with 3CAA interruptions arose from one haplotype (GT, while 18/19 expanded ALS chromosomes with <3CAA interruptions arose from a different haplotype (CC. Moreover, age of disease onset was significantly earlier in patients bearing 3 interruptions vs fewer, and was distinct between haplotypes. These results indicate that CAG repeat expansions in ATXN2 associated with ALS are uniformly interrupted repeats and that the nature of the repeat sequence and haplotype, as well as length of polyQ repeat, may play a role in the neurological effect conferred by expansions in ATXN2.

  17. Segmentation by depth does not always facilitate visual search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlayson, Nonie J; Remington, Roger W; Retell, James D; Grove, Philip M

    2013-07-11

    In visual search, target detection times are relatively insensitive to set size when targets and distractors differ on a single feature dimension. Search can be confined to only those elements sharing a single feature, such as color (Egeth, Virzi, & Garbart, 1984). These findings have been taken as evidence that elementary feature dimensions support a parallel segmentation of a scene into discrete sets of items. Here we explored if relative depth (signaled by binocular disparity) could support a similar parallel segmentation by examining the effects of distributing distracting elements across two depth planes. Three important empirical findings emerged. First, when the target was a feature singleton on the target depth plane, but a conjunction search among distractors on the nontarget plane, search efficiency increased compared to a single depth plane. Second, benefits of segmentation in depth were only observed when the target depth plane was known in advance. Third, no benefit of segmentation in depth was observed when both planes required a conjunction search, even with prior knowledge of the target depth plane. Overall, the benefit of distributing the elements of a search set across two depth planes was observed only when the two planes differed both in binocular disparity and in the elementary feature composition of individual elements. We conclude that segmentation of the search array into two depth planes can facilitate visual search, but unlike color or other elementary properties, does not provide an automatic, preattentive segmentation.

  18. Tandem repeat regions within the Burkholderia pseudomallei genome and their application for high resolution genotyping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harvey Steven P

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The facultative, intracellular bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, a serious infectious disease of humans and animals. We identified and categorized tandem repeat arrays and their distribution throughout the genome of B. pseudomallei strain K96243 in order to develop a genetic typing method for B. pseudomallei. We then screened 104 of the potentially polymorphic loci across a diverse panel of 31 isolates including B. pseudomallei, B. mallei and B. thailandensis in order to identify loci with varying degrees of polymorphism. A subset of these tandem repeat arrays were subsequently developed into a multiple-locus VNTR analysis to examine 66 B. pseudomallei and 21 B. mallei isolates from around the world, as well as 95 lineages from a serial transfer experiment encompassing ~18,000 generations. Results B. pseudomallei contains a preponderance of tandem repeat loci throughout its genome, many of which are duplicated elsewhere in the genome. The majority of these loci are composed of repeat motif lengths of 6 to 9 bp with 4 to 10 repeat units and are predominately located in intergenic regions of the genome. Across geographically diverse B. pseudomallei and B.mallei isolates, the 32 VNTR loci displayed between 7 and 28 alleles, with Nei's diversity values ranging from 0.47 and 0.94. Mutation rates for these loci are comparable (>10-5 per locus per generation to that of the most diverse tandemly repeated regions found in other less diverse bacteria. Conclusion The frequency, location and duplicate nature of tandemly repeated regions within the B. pseudomallei genome indicate that these tandem repeat regions may play a role in generating and maintaining adaptive genomic variation. Multiple-locus VNTR analysis revealed extensive diversity within the global isolate set containing B. pseudomallei and B. mallei, and it detected genotypic differences within clonal lineages of both species that were

  19. Repeatability of peripheral aberrations in young emmetropes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskaran, Karthikeyan; Theagarayan, Baskar; Carius, Staffan; Gustafsson, Jörgen

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the intrasession repeatability of ocular aberration measurements in the peripheral visual field with a commercially available Shack-Hartmann aberrometer (complete ophthalmic analysis system-high definition-vision research). The higher-order off-axis aberrations data in young healthy emmetropic eyes are also reported. The aberrations of the right eye of 18 emmetropes were measured using an aberrometer with an open field of view that allows peripheral measurements. Five repeated measures of ocular aberrations were obtained and assessed in steps of 10° out to ±40° in the horizontal visual field (nasal + and temporal -) and -20° in the inferior visual field. The coefficient of repeatability, coefficient of variation, and the intraclass correlation coefficient were calculated as a measure of intrasession repeatability. In all eccentric angles, the repeatability of the third- and fourth-order aberrations was better than the fifth and sixth order aberrations. The coefficient of variation was coefficient was >0.90 for the third and fourth order but reduced gradually for higher orders. There was no statistical significant difference in variance of total higher-order root mean square between on- and off-axis measurements (p > 0.05). The aberration data in this group of young emmetropes showed that the horizontal coma (C(3)(1)) was most positive at 40° in the temporal field, decreasing linearly toward negative values with increasing off-axis angle into the nasal field, whereas all other higher-order aberrations showed little or no change. The complete ophthalmic analysis system-high definition-vision research provides fast, repeatable, and valid peripheral aberration measurements and can be used efficiently to measure off-axis aberrations in the peripheral visual field.

  20. Safety of Repeated Yttrium-90 Radioembolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, Marnix G. E. H.; Louie, John D. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Interventional Radiology (United States); Iagaru, Andrei H.; Goris, Michael L. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Nuclear Medicine (United States); Sze, Daniel Y., E-mail: dansze@stanford.edu [Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Interventional Radiology (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: Repeated radioembolization (RE) treatments carry theoretically higher risk of radiation-induced hepatic injury because of the liver's cumulative memory of previous exposure. We performed a retrospective safety analysis on patients who underwent repeated RE. Methods: From 2004 to 2011, a total of 247 patients were treated by RE. Eight patients (5 men, 3 women, age range 51-71 years) underwent repeated treatment of a targeted territory, all with resin microspheres (SIR-Spheres; Sirtex, Lane Cove, Australia). Adverse events were graded during a standardized follow-up. In addition, the correlation between the occurrence of RE-induced liver disease (REILD) and multiple variables was investigated in univariate and multivariate analyses in all 247 patients who received RE. Results: Two patients died shortly after the second treatment (at 84 and 107 days) with signs and symptoms of REILD. Both patients underwent whole liver treatment twice (cumulative doses 3.08 and 2.66 GBq). The other 6 patients demonstrated only minor toxicities after receiving cumulative doses ranging from 2.41 to 3.88 GBq. All patients experienced objective tumor responses. In the whole population, multifactorial analysis identified three risk factors associated with REILD: repeated RE (p = 0.036), baseline serum total bilirubin (p = 0.048), and baseline serum aspartate aminotransferase (p = 0.043). Repeated RE proved to be the only independent risk factor for REILD in multivariate analysis (odds ratio 9.6; p = 0.002). Additionally, the administered activity per target volume (in GBq/L) was found to be an independent risk factor for REILD, but only in whole liver treatments (p = 0.033). Conclusion: The risk of REILD appears to be elevated for repeated RE. Objective tumor responses were observed, but establishment of safety limits will require improvement in dosimetric measurement and prediction.

  1. Repeat Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Trigeminal Neuralgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubuchon, Adam C., E-mail: acaubuchon@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Chan, Michael D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Lovato, James F. [Department of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Balamucki, Christopher J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Ellis, Thomas L.; Tatter, Stephen B. [Department of Neurosurgery, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); McMullen, Kevin P.; Munley, Michael T.; Deguzman, Allan F.; Ekstrand, Kenneth E.; Bourland, J. Daniel; Shaw, Edward G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Repeat gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKRS) for recurrent or persistent trigeminal neuralgia induces an additional response but at the expense of an increased incidence of facial numbness. The present series summarized the results of a repeat treatment series at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, including a multivariate analysis of the data to identify the prognostic factors for treatment success and toxicity. Methods and Materials: Between January 1999 and December 2007, 37 patients underwent a second GKRS application because of treatment failure after a first GKRS treatment. The mean initial dose in the series was 87.3 Gy (range, 80-90). The mean retreatment dose was 84.4 Gy (range, 60-90). The dosimetric variables recorded included the dorsal root entry zone dose, pons surface dose, and dose to the distal nerve. Results: Of the 37 patients, 81% achieved a >50% pain relief response to repeat GKRS, and 57% experienced some form of trigeminal dysfunction after repeat GKRS. Two patients (5%) experienced clinically significant toxicity: one with bothersome numbness and one with corneal dryness requiring tarsorraphy. A dorsal root entry zone dose at repeat treatment of >26.6 Gy predicted for treatment success (61% vs. 32%, p = .0716). A cumulative dorsal root entry zone dose of >84.3 Gy (72% vs. 44%, p = .091) and a cumulative pons surface dose of >108.5 Gy (78% vs. 44%, p = .018) predicted for post-GKRS numbness. The presence of any post-GKRS numbness predicted for a >50% decrease in pain intensity (100% vs. 60%, p = .0015). Conclusion: Repeat GKRS is a viable treatment option for recurrent trigeminal neuralgia, although the patient assumes a greater risk of nerve dysfunction to achieve maximal pain relief.

  2. Expression of Anaplasma marginale ankyrin repeat-containing proteins during infection of the mammalian host and tick vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using searches of the NCBI conserved domain database and SMART genomic architecture analysis, we identified three ankyrin repeat-containing genes in Anaplasma marginale: AM705, AM926 and AM638. Recombinant protein was used to immunize mice and generate fusion hybridomas secreting protein-specific mo...

  3. Quasi-periodic Oscillations in Short Recurring Bursts of the Soft Gamma Repeater J1550-5418

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Huppenkothen; C. D'Angelo; A.L. Watts; L.M. Heil; M. van der Klis; A.J. van der Horst; C. Kouveliotou; M.G. Baring; E. Gögüs; J. Granot; Y. Kaneko; L. Lin; A. von Kienlin; G. Younes

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in magnetar giant flares has opened up prospects for neutron star asteroseismology. The scarcity of giant flares makes a search for QPOs in the shorter, far more numerous bursts from soft gamma repeaters (SGRs) desirable. In Huppenkothen et al., we

  4. The Cherenkov Telescope Array

    CERN Document Server

    Bigongiari, Ciro

    2016-01-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is planned to be the next generation ground based observatory for very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray astronomy. Gamma-rays provide a powerful insight into the non-thermal universe and hopefully a unique probe for new physics. Imaging Cherenkov telescopes have already discovered more than 170 VHE gamma-ray emitters providing plentiful of valuable data and clearly demonstrating the power of this technique. In spite of the impressive results there are indications that the known sources represent only the tip of the iceberg. A major step in sensitivity is needed to increase the number of detected sources, observe short time-scale variability and improve morphological studies of extended sources. An extended energy coverage is advisable to observe far-away extragalactic objects and improve spectral analysis. CTA aims to increase the sensitivity by an order of magnitude compared to current facilities, to extend the accessible gamma-ray energies from a few tens of GeV to a hundred o...

  5. Conformal Array Pattern Synthesis and Activated Elements Selection Strategy Based on PSOGSA Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The pattern synthesis and activated element selection for conformal array is investigated based on hybrid particle swarm optimization-gravitational search algorithm (PSOGSA in this paper. With the introduction of PSOGSA algorithm which is a novel hybrid optimization technique, the element excitations are optimized to obtain the desired pattern for conformal array in the case of considering uncoupled and coupled element pattern. Numerical simulation and full-wave electromagnetic calculation verify the advantage and efficiency of our method. Then, a novel strategy of activated element selection based on PSOGSA algorithm is proposed for saving the energy consumption in conformal array.

  6. P2-21: Searching for Multiple Targets Using the iPad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Thornton

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Search for multiple targets is constrained by both retrospective (i.e., where you've been and prospective (i.e., where you're planning to go components of performance. Previous studies using the Multi-Item Localisation (MILO task have demonstrated that participants accurately remember and discount locations they have already visited and that they plan future actions up to 2 or 3 items ahead (Thornton & Horowitz, 2004 Perception & Psychophysics 66 38–50. A prominent feature of the MILO serial-reaction time (SRT function is a highly elevated, that is slowed, response, to T1 compared to T2 and all the other items. This “prospective gap” is typically between 600 ms and 1000 ms. Here we present three experiments that use the MILO iPad app to explore this “prospective gap”. In Experiment 1, we “shuffled” the position of future targets each time a response was made. This blocks planning and thus slows all responses to the level of first target, effectively eliminating the gap. In Experiment 2, participants responded to eight identical targets, removing the need to plan a specific sequence of actions. In this situation, absolute response time is greatly reduced and the T1–T2 gap shrinks to around 350 ms. In Experiment 3, participants repeated their search through the same array 10 times. Under these circumstances, the gap systematically reduced from 1300 ms on trial 1 to 300 ms on trial 10. Together, these results suggest that the previously observed prospective gap is a combination of set-up time for registering a new visual layout, response preparation, and sequence planning.

  7. Collaboration during visual search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcolmson, Kelly A; Reynolds, Michael G; Smilek, Daniel

    2007-08-01

    Two experiments examine how collaboration influences visual search performance. Working with a partner or on their own, participants reported whether a target was present or absent in briefly presented search displays. We compared the search performance of individuals working together (collaborative pairs) with the pooled responses of the individuals working alone (nominal pairs). Collaborative pairs were less likely than nominal pairs to correctly detect a target and they were less likely to make false alarms. Signal detection analyses revealed that collaborative pairs were more sensitive to the presence of the target and had a more conservative response bias than the nominal pairs. This pattern was observed even when the presence of another individual was matched across pairs. The results are discussed in the context of task-sharing, social loafing and current theories of visual search.

  8. Chemical Search Web Utility

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Chemical Search Web Utility is an intuitive web application that allows the public to easily find the chemical that they are interested in using, and which...

  9. Transplant Center Search Form

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share Your Story Give Us Feedback - A + A Transplant Center Search Form Welcome to the Blood & Marrow ... transplant centers for patients with a particular disease. Transplant Center login Username: * Password: * Request new password Join ...

  10. Diphoton searches (CMS)

    CERN Document Server

    Quittnat, Milena Eleonore

    2016-01-01

    Many physics scenarios beyond the standard model predict the existence of heavy resonances decaying to diphotons. This talk presents searches for BSM physics in the diphoton final state at CMS, focusing on the recent results.

  11. Automated search for supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kare, J.T.

    1984-11-15

    This thesis describes the design, development, and testing of a search system for supernovae, based on the use of current computer and detector technology. This search uses a computer-controlled telescope and charge coupled device (CCD) detector to collect images of hundreds of galaxies per night of observation, and a dedicated minicomputer to process these images in real time. The system is now collecting test images of up to several hundred fields per night, with a sensitivity corresponding to a limiting magnitude (visual) of 17. At full speed and sensitivity, the search will examine some 6000 galaxies every three nights, with a limiting magnitude of 18 or fainter, yielding roughly two supernovae per week (assuming one supernova per galaxy per 50 years) at 5 to 50 percent of maximum light. An additional 500 nearby galaxies will be searched every night, to locate about 10 supernovae per year at one or two percent of maximum light, within hours of the initial explosion.

  12. An Evidence-Based Review of Academic Web Search Engines, 2014-2016: Implications for Librarians' Practice and Research Agenda

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jody Condit Fagan

    2017-01-01

    Academic web search engines have become central to scholarly research. While the fitness of Google Scholar for research purposes has been examined repeatedly, Microsoft Academic and Google Books have not received much attention...

  13. Supersymmetry searches in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Torro Pastor, Emma; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Weak scale supersymmetry remains one of the best motivated and studied Standard Model extensions. This talk summarises recent ATLAS results for searches for supersymmetric (SUSY) particles. Weak and strong production in both R-Parity conserving and R-Parity violating SUSY scenarios are considered. The searches involved final states including jets, missing transverse momentum, light leptons, taus or photons, as well as long-lived particle signatures.

  14. SUSY searches in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    ATLAS, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    Despite the absence of experimental evidence, weak scale supersymmetry remains one of the best motivated and studied Standard Model extensions. This talk summarises recent ATLAS results for searches for supersymmetric (SUSY) particles. Weak and strong production in both R-Parity conserving and R-Parity violating SUSY scenarios are considered. The searches involved final states including jets, missing transverse momentum, light leptons, taus or photons, as well as long-lived particle signatures.

  15. Supersymmetry Searches in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00237280; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Despite the absence of experimental evidence, weak scale supersymmetry remains one of the best motivated and studied Standard Model extensions. This talk summarises recent ATLAS results for searches for supersymmetric (SUSY) particles. Weak and strong production in both R-Parity conserving and R-Parity violating SUSY scenarios are considered. The searches involved final states including jets, missing transverse momentum, light leptons, taus or photons, as well as long-lived particle signatures.

  16. SUSY Searches in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Zhuang, Xuai; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Despite the absence of experimental evidence, weak scale supersymmetry remains one of the best motivated and studied Standard Model extensions. This talk summarises recent ATLAS results for searches for supersymmetric (SUSY) particles, with focus on those obtained using proton-proton collisions at a centre of mass energy of 13 TeV using 2015+2016 data. The searches with final states including jets, missing transverse momentum, light leptons will be presented.

  17. Supersymmetry Searches with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Hill, Ewan; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Supersymmetry is one of the best motivated and studied theories of physics beyond the Standard Model. This talk summarises recent ATLAS results on searches for supersymmetric particles. Weak and strong production Supersymmetry scenarios are considered, along with direct production of third generation supersymmtric particles. The searches involve final states including jets, missing transverse momentum, leptons, and long lived particles. Sensitivity projections for the 13 TeV data are also presented.

  18. Scalable Automated Model Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-20

    of processing. 6. FUTURE WORK We note that these optimizations are just the tip of the iceberg in solving this problem faster. Advanced model ...Scalable Automated Model Search Evan Sparks Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences University of California at Berkeley Technical Report No...2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Scalable Automated Model Search 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR

  19. General Search Market Equilibrium

    OpenAIRE

    Albrecht, James W.; Axell, Bo

    1982-01-01

    In this paper we extend models of “search market equilibrium” to incorporate general equilibrium considerations. The model we treat is one with a single product market and a single labor market. Imperfectly informed individuals follow optimal strategies in searching for a suitably low price and high wage. For any distribution of price and wage offers across firms these optimal strategies generate product demand and labor supply schedules. Firms then choose prices and wages to maximize expecte...

  20. Search and Disrupt

    OpenAIRE

    Ørding Olsen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyzes how external search is affected by strategic interest alignment among knowledge sources. I focus on misalignment arising from the heterogeneous effects of disruptive technologies by analyzing the influence of incumbents on 2,855 non-incumbents? external knowledge search efforts. The efforts most likely to solve innovation problems obtained funding from the European Commission?s 7th Framework Program (2007-2013). The results show that involving incumbents improv...

  1. The polymorphic integumentary mucin B.1 from Xenopus laevis contains the short consensus repeat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probst, J C; Hauser, F; Joba, W; Hoffmann, W

    1992-03-25

    The frog integumentary mucin B.1 (FIM-B.1), discovered by molecular cloning, contains a cysteine-rich C-terminal domain which is homologous with von Willebrand factor. With the help of the polymerase chain reaction, we now characterize a contiguous region 5' to the von Willebrand factor domain containing the short consensus repeat typical of many proteins from the complement system. Multiple transcripts have been cloned, which originate from a single animal and differ by a variable number of tandem repeats (rep-33 sequences). These different transcripts probably originate solely from two genes and are generated presumably by alternative splicing of an huge array of functional cassettes. This model is supported by analysis of genomic FIM-B.1 sequences from Xenopus laevis. Here, rep-33 sequences are arranged in an interrupted array of individual units. Additionally, results of Southern analysis revealed genetic polymorphism between different animals which is predicted to be within the tandem repeats. A first investigation of the predicted mucins with the help of a specific antibody against a synthetic peptide determined the molecular mass of FIM-B.1 to greater than 200 kDa. Here again, genetic polymorphism between different animals is detected.

  2. Observing Pulsars with a Phased Array Feed at the Parkes Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, X.; Chippendale, A. P.; Hobbs, G.; Johnston, S.; Dai, S.; George, D.; Kramer, M.; Karuppusamy, R.; Malenta, M.; Spitler, L.; Tzioumis, T.; Wieching, G.

    2017-07-01

    During 2016 February, CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science and the Max-Planck-Institute for Radio Astronomy installed, commissioned, and carried out science observations with a phased array feed receiver system on the 64-m diameter Parkes radio telescope. Here, we demonstrate that the phased array feed can be used for pulsar observations and we highlight some unique capabilities. We demonstrate that the pulse profiles obtained using the phased array feed can be calibrated and that multiple pulsars can be simultaneously observed. Significantly, we find that an intrinsic polarisation leakage of -31 dB can be achieved with a phased array feed beam offset from the centre of the field of view. We discuss the possibilities for using a phased array feed for future pulsar observations and for searching for fast radio bursts with the Parkes and Effelsberg telescopes.

  3. Copy number of tandem direct repeats within the inverted repeats of Marek's disease virus DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamori, A; Nakajima, K; Ikuta, K; Ueda, S; Kato, S; Hirai, K

    1986-12-01

    We previously reported that DNA of the oncogenic strain BC-1 of Marek's disease virus serotype 1 (MDV1) contains three units of tandem direct repeats with 132 base pair (bp) repeats within the inverted repeats of the long regions of the MDV1 genome, whereas the attenuated, nononcogenic viral DNA contains multiple units of tandem direct repeats (Maotani et al., 1986). In the present study, the difference in the copy numbers of 132 bp repeats of oncogenic and nononcogenic MDV1 DNAs in other strains of MDV1 was investigated by Southern blot hybridization. The main copy numbers in different oncogenic MDV1 strains differed: those of BC-1, JM and highly oncogenic Md5 were 3, 5 to 12 and 2, respectively. The viral DNA population with two units of repeats was small, but detectable, in cells infected with either the oncogenic BC-1 or JM strain. The MDV1 DNA in various MD cell lines contained either two units or both two and three units of repeats. The significance of the copy number of repeats in oncogenicity of MDV1 is discussed.

  4. Imaging Properties of Planar Microlens Arrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The planar microlens arrays is a two-dimensional array of optical component which is fabricated monolithically available. Imaging properties of planar microlens arrays are described, which provide both image multiplexer and erect, unit magnification images.

  5. Association Sorting Algorithm Design for Error Searching System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Dong, Zhenghong; Li, Mengwei

    2017-02-01

    For the searching results of error searching system for Integrated Decision Information System (IDIS), this paper proposed a method to carry out association sorting according to degree of association of searched results by keywords, which can priorily recommend user interested searching results. Errors of IDIS platform are occurred very often. Because those errors belong to different stages like setup, configuration, and operation, or those errors may occurred in different services, applications, or IP ports, or may be happened in different system software, different version of software, and those errors are also can be classified into different types. As there will be many error information are searched out, it is required to sort them according to degree of association, and provide user interested results. This paper proposed a method to carry out association sorting for the searching results according to the times of searched repeated results by keywords, which effectively put results with high degree of association in the front and increase the searching efficiency.

  6. Improved Search Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albornoz, Caleb Ronald

    2012-01-01

    Thousands of millions of documents are stored and updated daily in the World Wide Web. Most of the information is not efficiently organized to build knowledge from the stored data. Nowadays, search engines are mainly used by users who rely on their skills to look for the information needed. This paper presents different techniques search engine users can apply in Google Search to improve the relevancy of search results. According to the Pew Research Center, the average person spends eight hours a month searching for the right information. For instance, a company that employs 1000 employees wastes $2.5 million dollars on looking for nonexistent and/or not found information. The cost is very high because decisions are made based on the information that is readily available to use. Whenever the information necessary to formulate an argument is not available or found, poor decisions may be made and mistakes will be more likely to occur. Also, the survey indicates that only 56% of Google users feel confident with their current search skills. Moreover, just 76% of the information that is available on the Internet is accurate.

  7. Global OpenSearch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, D. J.; Mitchell, A. E.

    2015-12-01

    At AGU 2014, NASA EOSDIS demonstrated a case-study of an OpenSearch framework for Earth science data discovery. That framework leverages the IDN and CWIC OpenSearch API implementations to provide seamless discovery of data through the 'two-step' discovery process as outlined by the Federation for Earth Sciences (ESIP) OpenSearch Best Practices. But how would an Earth Scientist leverage this framework and what are the benefits? Using a client that understands the OpenSearch specification and, for further clarity, the various best practices and extensions, a scientist can discovery a plethora of data not normally accessible either by traditional methods (NASA Earth Data Search, Reverb, etc) or direct methods (going to the source of the data) We will demonstrate, via the CWICSmart web client, how an earth scientist can access regional data on a regional phenomena in a uniform and aggregated manner. We will demonstrate how an earth scientist can 'globalize' their discovery. You want to find local data on 'sea surface temperature of the Indian Ocean'? We can help you with that. 'European meteorological data'? Yes. 'Brazilian rainforest satellite imagery'? That too. CWIC allows you to get earth science data in a uniform fashion from a large number of disparate, world-wide agencies. This is what we mean by Global OpenSearch.

  8. Airborne Repeat Pass Interferometry for Deformation Measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, J.; Otten, M.; Halsema, E. van

    2000-01-01

    In ground engineering the need for deformation measurements is urgent. SAR interferometry can be used to measure small (sub-wavelength) deformations. An experiment to investigate this for dike deformations was set up, using the C-band SAR system PHARUS (PHased ARray Universal SAR). This paper descri

  9. SEARCHES FOR SUPERSYMMETRY IN ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Da; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    A wide range of supersymmetric searches are presented. All searches are based on the proton- proton collision dataset collected by the ATLAS experiment during the 2015 and 2016 (before summer) run with a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV, corresponding to an integrated lumi- nosity of 36.1 (36.7) fb-1. The searches are categorized into inclusive gluino and squark search, third generation search, electroweak search, prompt RPV search and long-lived par- ticle search. No evidence of new physics is observed. The results are intepreted in various models and expressed in terms of limits on the masses of new particles.

  10. Searching for What I Want

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Fei; Xiao, Bo Sophia; Lim, Eric

    2016-01-01

    of anticipa-tory system as our theoretical foundation to articulate the relationships between two salient types of search controls, namely search anticipation and search efficiency. We empirically validate our re-search model by conducting a field survey with 77 university students on an online restaurant...... review website that is modelled after its actual counterpart and populated with real restaurant review data. Findings from this study suggest that both search determination control and search manipulation con-trol enhance search result anticipation, which in turn improves search efficiency. Theoretical...

  11. Antenna arrays a computational approach

    CERN Document Server

    Haupt, Randy L

    2010-01-01

    This book covers a wide range of antenna array topics that are becoming increasingly important in wireless applications, particularly in design and computer modeling. Signal processing and numerical modeling algorithms are explored, and MATLAB computer codes are provided for many of the design examples. Pictures of antenna arrays and components provided by industry and government sources are presented with explanations of how they work. Antenna Arrays is a valuable reference for practicing engineers and scientists in wireless communications, radar, and remote sensing, and an excellent textbook for advanced antenna courses.

  12. Fundamentals of ultrasonic phased arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Schmerr, Lester W

    2014-01-01

    This book describes in detail the physical and mathematical foundations of ultrasonic phased array measurements.?The book uses linear systems theory to develop a comprehensive model of the signals and images that can be formed with phased arrays. Engineers working in the field of ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) will find in this approach a wealth of information on how to design, optimize and interpret ultrasonic inspections with phased arrays. The fundamentals and models described in the book will also be of significant interest to other fields, including the medical ultrasound and

  13. Fiber Optic Geophysics Sensor Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grochowski, Lucjan

    1989-01-01

    The distributed optical sensor arrays are analysed in view of specific needs of 3-D seismic explorations methods. There are compared advantages and disadventages of arrays supported by the sensors which are modulated in intensity and phase. In these systems all-fiber optic structures and their compabilities with digital geophysic formats are discussed. It was shown that the arrays based on TDM systems with the intensity modulated sensors are economically and technically the best matched for geophysic systems supported by a large number of the sensors.

  14. Terahertz superconducting plasmonic hole array

    CERN Document Server

    Tian, Zhen; Han, Jiaguang; Gu, Jianqiang; Xing, Qirong; Zhang, Weili

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate thermally tunable superconductor hole array with active control over their resonant transmission induced by surface plasmon polaritons . The array was lithographically fabricated on high temperature YBCO superconductor and characterized by terahertz-time domain spectroscopy. We observe a clear transition from the virtual excitation of the surface plasmon mode to the real surface plasmon mode. The highly tunable superconducting plasmonic hole arrays may have promising applications in the design of low-loss, large dynamic range amplitude modulation, and surface plasmon based terahertz devices.

  15. Genetic Association Between Androgen Receptor Gene CAG Repeat Length Polymorphism and Male Infertility: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Bihui; Li, Rui; Chen, Yao; Tang, Qiuqin; Wu, Wei; Chen, Liping; Lu, Chuncheng; Pan, Feng; Ding, Hongjuan; Xia, Yankai; Hu, Lingqing; Chen, Daozhen; Sha, Jiahao; Wang, Xinru

    2016-03-01

    The association between polymorphism of androgen receptor gene CAG (AR-CAG) and male infertility in several studies was controversial. Based on studies on association between AR-CAG repeat length and male infertility in recent years, an updated meta-analysis is needed. We aimed to evaluate the association between AR-CAG repeat length and male infertility in advantage of the data in all published reports.We searched for reports published before August 2015 using PubMed, CNKI, VIP, and WanFang. Data on sample size, mean, and standard deviation (SD) of AR-CAG repeat length were extracted independently by 3 investigators.Forty-four reports were selected based on criteria. The overall infertile patients and azoospermic patients were found to have longer AR-CAG repeat length (standard mean difference (SMD) = 0.19, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.10-0.28, P CAG repeat length was longer in infertile men in Asian, Caucasian, and mixed races (SMD = 0.25, 95% CI: 0.08-0.43, P CAG repeat length was associated with male infertility. The subgroup study on races shows that increased AR-CAG repeat length was associated with male infertility in Asian, Caucasian, and mixed races. Increased AR-CAG repeat length was also associated with azoospermia.This meta-analysis supports that increased androgen receptor CAG length is capable of causing male infertility susceptibility.

  16. STEPS: a grid search methodology for optimized peptide identification filtering of MS/MS database search results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piehowski, Paul D; Petyuk, Vladislav A; Sandoval, John D; Burnum, Kristin E; Kiebel, Gary R; Monroe, Matthew E; Anderson, Gordon A; Camp, David G; Smith, Richard D

    2013-03-01

    For bottom-up proteomics, there are wide variety of database-searching algorithms in use for matching peptide sequences to tandem MS spectra. Likewise, there are numerous strategies being employed to produce a confident list of peptide identifications from the different search algorithm outputs. Here we introduce a grid-search approach for determining optimal database filtering criteria in shotgun proteomics data analyses that is easily adaptable to any search. Systematic Trial and Error Parameter Selection--referred to as STEPS--utilizes user-defined parameter ranges to test a wide array of parameter combinations to arrive at an optimal "parameter set" for data filtering, thus maximizing confident identifications. The benefits of this approach in terms of numbers of true-positive identifications are demonstrated using datasets derived from immunoaffinity-depleted blood serum and a bacterial cell lysate, two common proteomics sample types.

  17. On the Statics for Micro-Array Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urushibara, Tomoko; Akasaka, Shizu; Ito, Makiko; Suzuki, Tomonori; Miyazaki, Satoru

    2010-01-01

    Recently after human genome sequence has been determined almost perfectly, more and more researchers have been studying genes in detail. Therefore, we are sure that accumulated gene information for human will be getting more important in the near future to develop customized medicine and to make gene interactions clear. Among plenty of information, micro array might be one of the most important analysis method for genes because it is the technique that can get big amount of the gene expressions data from one time experiment and also can be used for DNA isolation. To get the novel knowledge from micro array data, we need to enrich statistical tools for its data analysis. So far, many mathematical theories and definition have been proposing. However, many of those proposals are tested with strict conditions or customized to data for specific species. In this paper, we reviewed existing typical statistical methods for micro array analysis and discussed the repeatability of the analysis, construction the guideline with more general procedure. First we analyzed the micro array data for TG rats, with statistical methods of family-wise error rate (FWER) control approach and False Discovery Rate (FDR) control approach. As existing report, no significantly different gene could be detected with FWER control approach. On the other hand, we could find several genes significantly with FDR control approach even q=0.5. To find out the reliability of FDR control approach with micro array conditions, we have analyzed 2 more pieces of data from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) public database on the web site with SAM in addition to FWER and FDR control approaches. We could find a certain number of significantly different genes with BH method and SAM in the case of q=0.05. However, we have to note that the number and kinds of detected genes are different when we compare our result with the one from the published paper. Even if the same approach is used to analyze the same micro array

  18. Silicon Heat Pipe Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Karl Y.; Ganapathi, Gani B.; Sunada, Eric T.; Bae, Youngsam; Miller, Jennifer R.; Beinsford, Daniel F.

    2013-01-01

    Improved methods of heat dissipation are required for modern, high-power density electronic systems. As increased functionality is progressively compacted into decreasing volumes, this need will be exacerbated. High-performance chip power is predicted to increase monotonically and rapidly with time. Systems utilizing these chips are currently reliant upon decades of old cooling technology. Heat pipes offer a solution to this problem. Heat pipes are passive, self-contained, two-phase heat dissipation devices. Heat conducted into the device through a wick structure converts the working fluid into a vapor, which then releases the heat via condensation after being transported away from the heat source. Heat pipes have high thermal conductivities, are inexpensive, and have been utilized in previous space missions. However, the cylindrical geometry of commercial heat pipes is a poor fit to the planar geometries of microelectronic assemblies, the copper that commercial heat pipes are typically constructed of is a poor CTE (coefficient of thermal expansion) match to the semiconductor die utilized in these assemblies, and the functionality and reliability of heat pipes in general is strongly dependent on the orientation of the assembly with respect to the gravity vector. What is needed is a planar, semiconductor-based heat pipe array that can be used for cooling of generic MCM (multichip module) assemblies that can also function in all orientations. Such a structure would not only have applications in the cooling of space electronics, but would have commercial applications as well (e.g. cooling of microprocessors and high-power laser diodes). This technology is an improvement over existing heat pipe designs due to the finer porosity of the wick, which enhances capillary pumping pressure, resulting in greater effective thermal conductivity and performance in any orientation with respect to the gravity vector. In addition, it is constructed of silicon, and thus is better

  19. Y Se Repite = And It Repeats Itself

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzew, Adriana

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses Y Se Repite [And It Repeats Itself], a project she conceptualized due to the growing number of Latino/a Mexican migrant workers in dairy farms in the state of Vermont. In 2006, approximately 2,000 Latinos/as--most of them undocumented Mexican migrant workers--worked throughout the state's dairy farms, yet…

  20. Repeater For A Digital-Communication Bus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Guzman, Esteban; Olson, Stephen; Heaps, Tim

    1993-01-01

    Digital repeater circuit designed to extend range of communication on MIL-STD-1553 bus beyond original maximum allowable length of 300 ft. Circuit provides two-way communication, one way at time, and conforms to specifications of MIL-STD-1553. Crosstalk and instability eliminated.

  1. Episodes of repeated sudden deafness following pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlak-Osinska, Katarzyna; Burduk, Pawel K; Kopczynski, Andrzej

    2009-04-01

    Sex hormones influence and provoke changes in hearing levels. Sudden deafness is rarely observed in pregnant women. The effective treatment of sudden deafness in pregnant women is a challenging problem. We present a case of repeatable, completely regressed sudden deafness in a woman during her first and second pregnancies.

  2. Repeated sprint training in normobaric hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvin, Harvey M; Cooke, Karl; Sumners, David P; Mileva, Katya N; Bowtell, Joanna L

    2013-12-01

    Repeated sprint ability (RSA) is a critical success factor for intermittent sport performance. Repeated sprint training has been shown to improve RSA, we hypothesised that hypoxia would augment these training adaptations. Thirty male well-trained academy rugby union and rugby league players (18.4 ± 1.5 years, 1.83 ± 0.07 m, 88.1 ± 8.9 kg) participated in this single-blind repeated sprint training study. Participants completed 12 sessions of repeated sprint training (10 × 6 s, 30 s recovery) over 4 weeks in either hypoxia (13% FiO₂) or normoxia (21% FiO₂). Pretraining and post-training, participants completed sports specific endurance and sprint field tests and a 10 × 6 s RSA test on a non-motorised treadmill while measuring speed, heart rate, capillary blood lactate, muscle and cerebral deoxygenation and respiratory measures. Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Level 1 test performance improved after RS training in both groups, but gains were significantly greater in the hypoxic (33 ± 12%) than the normoxic group (14 ± 10%, prepeated aerobic high intensity workout than an equivalent normoxic training. Performance gains are evident in the short term (4 weeks), a period similar to a preseason training block.

  3. Adaptation and complexity in repeated games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maenner, Eliot Alexander

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents a learning model for two-player infinitely repeated games. In an inference step players construct minimally complex inferences of strategies based on observed play, and in an adaptation step players choose minimally complex best responses to an inference. When players randomly ...

  4. A Structured Group Program for Repeat Dieters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Kathleen

    1989-01-01

    Describes a structured group program for women who repeatedly diet and may be at risk of developing more serious eating disorders. Discusses sessions focusing on eating behavior as well as internal factors that contribute to low body esteem and food and weight preoccupation. Evaluates effectiveness of program by self-reports of members of two…

  5. Why Do Students Repeat Admissions Tests?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Martha S.

    Attitudes and beliefs about the admissions process, especially the role of standardized testing in admissions, were examined for students who took a standardized admissions test more than once. Their attitudes were compared with those of students who did not repeat the test. About 200 preveterinary students who had taken the Veterinary Aptitude…

  6. The Effect of Repeaters on Equating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, HeeKyoung; Kolen, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Test equating might be affected by including in the equating analyses examinees who have taken the test previously. This study evaluated the effect of including such repeaters on Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) equating using a population invariance approach. Three-parameter logistic (3-PL) item response theory (IRT) true score and…

  7. Triggering of repeating earthquakes in central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chunquan; Gomberg, Joan; Ben-Naim, Eli; Johnson, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic stresses carried by transient seismic waves have been found capable of triggering earthquakes instantly in various tectonic settings. Delayed triggering may be even more common, but the mechanisms are not well understood. Catalogs of repeating earthquakes, earthquakes that recur repeatedly at the same location, provide ideal data sets to test the effects of transient dynamic perturbations on the timing of earthquake occurrence. Here we employ a catalog of 165 families containing ~2500 total repeating earthquakes to test whether dynamic perturbations from local, regional, and teleseismic earthquakes change recurrence intervals. The distance to the earthquake generating the perturbing waves is a proxy for the relative potential contributions of static and dynamic deformations, because static deformations decay more rapidly with distance. Clear changes followed the nearby 2004 Mw6 Parkfield earthquake, so we study only repeaters prior to its origin time. We apply a Monte Carlo approach to compare the observed number of shortened recurrence intervals following dynamic perturbations with the distribution of this number estimated for randomized perturbation times. We examine the comparison for a series of dynamic stress peak amplitude and distance thresholds. The results suggest a weak correlation between dynamic perturbations in excess of ~20 kPa and shortened recurrence intervals, for both nearby and remote perturbations.

  8. A Repeater in the Language Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, B. T.

    1969-01-01

    Discusses the feasilility of the use of repeater devices in the language laboratory in order to enable the student to "recapitulate effortlessly and and indefinitely any utterance of any length which is causing him difficulty or is of special interest. (FWB)

  9. The Differential Effects of Repeating Kindergarten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkam, David T.; LoGerfo, Laura; Ready, Doug; Lee, Valerie E.

    2007-01-01

    We use the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study to investigate national patterns addressing (a) who repeats kindergarten, and (b) the subsequent cognitive effects of this event. Using OLS regression techniques, we investigate 1st-time kindergartners who are promoted, 1st-time kindergartners who are retained, and children who are already repeating…

  10. Preventing Repeat Teen Births PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-04-02

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the April 2013 CDC Vital Signs report, which discusses repeat teen births and ways teens, parents and guardians, health care providers, and communities can help prevent them.  Created: 4/2/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 4/2/2013.

  11. Epigenetics and triplet repeat neurological diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathiji eNageshwaran

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The term ‘junk DNA’ has been reconsidered following the delineation of the functional significance of repetitive DNA regions. Typically associated with centromeres and telomeres, DNA repeats are found in nearly all organisms throughout their genomes. Repetitive regions are frequently heterchromatinised resulting in silencing of intrinsic and nearby genes. However, this is not a uniform rule, with several genes known to require such an environment to permit transcription. Repetitive regions frequently exist as dinucleotide, trinucleotide and tetranucleotide repeats. The association between repetitive regions and disease was emphasised following the discovery of abnormal trinucleotide repeats underlying spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (Kennedy’s disease and fragile X syndrome of mental retardation (FRAXA in 1991. In this review we provide a brief overview of epigenetic mechanisms and then focus on several diseases caused by DNA triplet-repeat expansions, which exhibit diverse epigenetic effects. It is clear that the emerging field of epigenetics is already generating novel potential therapeutic avenues for this group of largely incurable diseases.

  12. Costly renegotiation in repeated Bertand games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Ola; Wengström, Erik Roland

    2010-01-01

    This paper extends the concept of weak renegotiation-proof equilibrium (WRP) to allow for costly renegotiation and shows that even small renegotiation costs can have dramatic effects on the set of equilibria. More specifically, the paper analyzes the infinitely repeated Bertrand game. It is shown...

  13. EVOLUTION AND RECOMBINATION OF BOVINE DNA REPEATS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JOBSE, C; BUNTJER, JB; HAAGSMA, N; BREUKELMAN, HJ; BEINTEMA, JJ; LENSTRA, JA

    The history of the abundant repeat elements in the bovine genome has been studied by comparative hybridization and PCR. The Bov-A and Bov-B SINE elements both emerged just after the divergence of the Camelidae and the true ruminants. A 31-bp subrepeat motif in satellites of the Bovidae species

  14. Building Fluency through the Repeated Reading Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Joshua

    2011-01-01

    For the last two years the author has used Repeated Reading (RR) to teach reading fluency in English as a Foreign Language classrooms in colleges and universities in Japan. RR is a method where the student reads and rereads a text silently or aloud from two to four times to reach a predetermined level of speed, accuracy, and comprehension. RR…

  15. History repeats itself: genomic divergence in copepods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaut, Sébastien; Dion-Côté, Anne-Marie

    2016-04-01

    Press stop, erase everything from now till some arbitrary time in the past and start recording life as it evolves once again. Would you see the same tape of life playing itself over and over, or would a different story unfold every time? The late Steven Jay Gould called this experiment replaying the tape of life and argued that any replay of the tape would lead evolution down a pathway radically different from the road actually taken (Gould 1989). This thought experiment has puzzled evolutionary biologists for a long time: how repeatable are evolutionary events? And if history does indeed repeat itself, what are the factors that may help us predict the path taken? A powerful means to address these questions at a small evolutionary scale is to study closely related populations that have evolved independently, under similar environmental conditions. This is precisely what Pereira et al. (2016) set out to do using marine copepods Tigriopus californicus, and present their results in this issue of Molecular Ecology. They show that evolution can be repeatable and even partly predictable, at least at the molecular level. As expected from theory, patterns of divergence were shaped by natural selection. At the same time, strong genetic drift due to small population sizes also constrained evolution down a similar evolutionary road, and probably contributed to repeatable patterns of genomic divergence.

  16. Costly renegotiation in repeated Bertand games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Ola; Wengström, Erik Roland

    2010-01-01

    This paper extends the concept of weak renegotiation-proof equilibrium (WRP) to allow for costly renegotiation and shows that even small renegotiation costs can have dramatic effects on the set of equilibria. More specifically, the paper analyzes the infinitely repeated Bertrand game. It is shown...

  17. Photometric Repeatability of Scanned Imagery: UVIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanahan, Clare E.; McCullough, Peter; Baggett, Sylvia

    2017-08-01

    We provide the preliminary results of a study on the photometric repeatability of spatial scans of bright, isolated white dwarf stars with the UVIS channel of the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). We analyze straight-line scans from the first pair of identical orbits of HST program 14878 to assess if sub 0.1% repeatability can be attained with WFC3/UVIS. This study is motivated by the desire to achieve better signal-to-noise in the UVIS contamination and stability monitor, in which observations of standard stars in staring mode have been taken from the installation of WFC3 in 2009 to the present to assess temporal photometric stability. Higher signal to noise in this program would greatly benefit the sensitivity to detect contamination, and to better characterize the observed small throughput drifts over time. We find excellent repeatability between identical visits of program 14878, with sub 0.1% repeatability achieved in most filters. These! results support the initiative to transition the staring mode UVIS contamination and photometric stability monitor from staring mode images to spatial scans.

  18. Repeat surgery after failed midurethral slings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss Hansen, Margrethe; Lose, Gunnar; Kesmodel, Ulrik Schiøler

    2016-01-01

    MUS from 1998 through 2007. The outcome was repeat surgery with any subsequent procedure code for urinary incontinence within a 5-year period of the first procedure. RESULTS: A total of 5,820 women (mean age 55.4 years, ± 12.1) were registered with a synthetic MUS, and 354 (6 %) underwent reoperation...

  19. EVOLUTION AND RECOMBINATION OF BOVINE DNA REPEATS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JOBSE, C; BUNTJER, JB; HAAGSMA, N; BREUKELMAN, HJ; BEINTEMA, JJ; LENSTRA, JA

    1995-01-01

    The history of the abundant repeat elements in the bovine genome has been studied by comparative hybridization and PCR. The Bov-A and Bov-B SINE elements both emerged just after the divergence of the Camelidae and the true ruminants. A 31-bp subrepeat motif in satellites of the Bovidae species cattl

  20. Multivariate linear models and repeated measurements revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Methods for generalized analysis of variance based on multivariate normal theory have been known for many years. In a repeated measurements context, it is most often of interest to consider transformed responses, typically within-subject contrasts or averages. Efficiency considerations leads...