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Sample records for repeated intermittent exposure

  1. Defining "intermittent UVR exposure"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodekær, Mette; Philipsen, Peter Alshede; Petersen, Bibi Øager;

    2016-01-01

    to define and quantify “intermittent UVR exposure” by an objective measure. Methods: A broad study population of adults and children had data collected during a summer period. Data were personal UVR dosimetry measurements, from which the number of “intermittent days” was derived, sun behaviour diaries.......001). The corresponding numbers for prediction of nevi and lentigo density by retrospective questionnaire data was lower (R2 = 0.11, R2 = 0.26, p defined objective measure of intermittent UVR exposure. This measure may provide a better prediction of solar skin damage and CMM...

  2. Repeated Cycles of Chronic Intermittent Ethanol Exposure Increases Basal Glutamate in the Nucleus Accumbens of Mice without affecting glutamate transport

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    William C. Griffin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Repeated cycles of chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE exposure increase voluntary consumption of ethanol in mice. Previous work has shown that extracellular glutamate in the nucleus accumbens (NAc is significantly elevated in ethanol dependent mice and that pharmacologically manipulating glutamate concentrations in the NAc will alter ethanol drinking, indicating that glutamate homeostasis plays a crucial role in ethanol drinking in this model. The present studies were designed to measure extracellular glutamate at a time point in which mice would ordinarily be allowed voluntary access to ethanol in the CIE model and, additionally, to measure glutamate transport capacity in the NAc at the same time point. Extracellular glutamate was measured using quantitative microdialysis procedures. Glutamate transport capacity was measured under Na+ dependent and Na+ independent conditions to determine whether the function of excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs; also known as system XAG or of system Xc- (Glial cysteine-glutamate exchanger was influenced by CIE exposure. The results of the quantitative microdialysis experiment confirm increased extracellular glutamate (~2 –fold in the NAc of CIE exposed mice (i.e. ethanol-dependent compared to non-dependent mice in the NAc, consistent with earlier work. However, the increase in extracellular glutamate was not due to altered transporter function in the NAc of ethanol-dependent mice, because neither Na+ dependent nor Na+ independent glutamate transport was significantly altered by CIE exposure. These findings point to the possibility that hyperexcitability of cortical-striatal pathways underlies the increases in extracellular glutamate found in the nucleus accumbens of ethanol-dependent mice.

  3. Ventilatory long-term facilitation is evident after initial and repeated exposure to intermittent hypoxia in mice genetically depleted of brain serotonin.

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    Hickner, Stephen; Hussain, Najaah; Angoa-Perez, Mariana; Francescutti, Dina M; Kuhn, Donald M; Mateika, Jason H

    2014-02-01

    Our study was designed to determine if central nervous system (CNS) serotonin is required for the induction of ventilatory long-term facilitation (LTF) in intact, spontaneously breathing mice. Nineteen tryptophan hydroxylase 2-deficient (Tph2(-/-)) mice, devoid of serotonin in the CNS, and their wild-type counterparts (Tph2(+/+)) were exposed to intermittent hypoxia each day for 10 consecutive days. The ventilatory response to intermittent hypoxia was greater in the Tph2(+/+) compared with the Tph2(-/-) mice (1.10 ± 0.10 vs. 0.77 ± 0.01 ml min(-1)·percent(-1) oxygen; P ≤ 0.04). Ventilatory LTF, caused by increases in breathing frequency, was evident in Tph2(+/+) and Tph2(-/-) mice following exposure to intermittent hypoxia each day; however, the magnitude of the response was greater in the Tph2(+/+) compared with the Tph2(-/-) mice (1.11 ± 0.02 vs. 1.05 ± 0.01 normalized to baseline on each day; P ≤ 0.01). The magnitude of ventilatory LTF increased significantly from the initial to the finals days of the protocol in the Tph2(-/-) (1.06 ± 0.02 vs. 1.11 ± 0.03 normalized to baseline on the initial days; P ≤ 0.004) but not in the Tph2(+/+) mice. This enhanced response was mediated by increases in tidal volume. Body temperature and metabolic rate did not account for differences in the magnitude of ventilatory LTF observed between groups after acute and repeated daily exposure to intermittent hypoxia. We conclude that ventilatory LTF, after acute exposure to intermittent hypoxia, is mediated by increases in breathing frequency and occurs in the absence of serotonin, although the magnitude of the response is diminished. This weakened response is enhanced following repeated daily exposure to intermittent hypoxia, via increases in tidal volume, to a similar magnitude evident in Tph2(+/+) mice. Thus the magnitude of ventilatory LTF following repeated daily exposure to intermittent hypoxia is not dependent on the presence of CNS serotonin.

  4. Histopathology of repeated, intermittent exposure of chloramine-T to walleye (Sander vitreum) and (Ictalurus punctalus) channel catfish

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    Gaikowski, M.P.; Densmore, Christine L.; Blazer, V.S.

    2009-01-01

    Chloramine-T (Cl-T) has been used safely and effectively to control bacterial gill disease in salmonids at a maximum exposure regimen of up to four consecutive, once-daily exposures administered for 60??min at 20??mg/L. However, data to document safe treatment concentrations of Cl-T are lacking for freshwater-reared fish other than salmonids. We report the histopathology resultant from the administration of 12 consecutive, once-daily, 180-min static immersion baths of 0, 20, 50, or 80??mg Cl-T/L to walleye (20????C) and channel catfish (27????C). Twelve fish of each species were euthanized immediately before the first exposure (initial controls) and then after the twelfth exposure and 7 and 14??days after the twelfth exposure. Only initial controls and fish euthanized immediately after the twelfth exposure were processed for histological review because of the general lack of exposure-related lesions in exposed fish. The only exposure-related histological changes were in the spleen where significantly greater erythrocyte swelling and necrosis was observed in channel catfish exposed at 80??mg/L relative to exposure at 0??mg/L; similar histological changes were insignificant for walleye, though there appeared to be a shift in the general category of histological change with degenerative changes (necrosis, etc.) observed following exposure at 50 or 80??mg/L compared to the inflammatory and hemodynamic changes (congestion, leukocyte infiltrate, etc.) observed in walleye exposed at 0 or 20??mg/L. The only significant change in peripheral blood cytology was that walleye fingerlings exposed at 80??mg/L had significantly fewer mature red blood cells and significantly more immature red blood cells per oil-immersion field than controls. The histopathological changes observed following exposure to Cl-T under an exaggerated exposure regimen suggest that walleye or channel catfish therapeutically exposed to Cl-T will not have treatment-related histological changes.

  5. Repeated intermittent alcohol exposure during the third trimester-equivalent increases expression of the GABA(A) receptor δ subunit in cerebellar granule neurons and delays motor development in rats.

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    Diaz, Marvin R; Vollmer, Cyndel C; Zamudio-Bulcock, Paula A; Vollmer, William; Blomquist, Samantha L; Morton, Russell A; Everett, Julie C; Zurek, Agnieszka A; Yu, Jieying; Orser, Beverley A; Valenzuela, C Fernando

    2014-04-01

    Exposure to ethanol (EtOH) during fetal development can lead to long-lasting alterations, including deficits in fine motor skills and motor learning. Studies suggest that these are, in part, a consequence of cerebellar damage. Cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) are the gateway of information into the cerebellar cortex. Functionally, CGNs are heavily regulated by phasic and tonic GABAergic inhibition from Golgi cell interneurons; however, the effect of EtOH exposure on the development of GABAergic transmission in immature CGNs has not been investigated. To model EtOH exposure during the 3rd trimester-equivalent of human pregnancy, neonatal pups were exposed intermittently to high levels of vaporized EtOH from postnatal day (P) 2 to P12. This exposure gradually increased pup serum EtOH concentrations (SECs) to ∼60 mM (∼0.28 g/dl) during the 4 h of exposure. EtOH levels gradually decreased to baseline 8 h after the end of exposure. Surprisingly, basal tonic and phasic GABAergic currents in CGNs were not significantly affected by postnatal alcohol exposure (PAE). However, PAE increased δ subunit expression at P28 as detected by immunohistochemical and western blot analyses. Also, electrophysiological studies with an agonist that is highly selective for δ-containing GABA(A) receptors, 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[4,5-c]pyridine-3-ol (THIP), showed an increase in THIP-induced tonic current. Behavioral studies of PAE rats did not reveal any deficits in motor coordination, except for a delay in the acquisition of the mid-air righting reflex that was apparent at P15 to P18. These findings demonstrate that repeated intermittent exposure to high levels of EtOH during the equivalent of the last trimester of human pregnancy has significant but relatively subtle effects on motor coordination and GABAergic transmission in CGNs in rats.

  6. Intermittent endurance and repeated sprint ability in soccer players.

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    Chaouachi, Anis; Manzi, Vincenzo; Wong, Del P; Chaalali, Anis; Laurencelle, Louis; Chamari, Karim; Castagna, Carlo

    2010-10-01

    The ability to perform high-intensity intermittent exercise (i.e., Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test [Yo-Yo IR1]) and to repeat sprints with relatively short recovery times (i.e., 20- to 30-seconds, relatively short time interval [repeated sprint ability (RSA)]) has been shown to be relevant fitness variables in soccer. However, though they potentially share common features, it is not known whether these 2 abilities are associated. The aim of this study was to examine the relationships between Yo-Yo IR1 and RSA performances in elite soccer players. Twenty-three soccer players (age 19 ± 1 years, height 181 ± 5.7 cm, body mass 73.2 ± 4.1 kg, %body fat 11 ± 2.4) performed the Yo-Yo IR1 and a test for RSA (7 × 30 m with 25-second recovery). Results were 2,289 ± 409 m, 31.21 ± 1.13 seconds, and 4 ± 2.1% for Yo-Yo IR1, total sprint time, and sprint decrement, respectively. Yo-Yo IR1 showed a significant and moderate relationship with sprint decrement (r² = -0.44, p = 0.04). Splitting the sample into Best and Worst Yo-Yo IR1 performers according to median score (2,320 m), the Best group showed lower RSA total time (30.69 ± 0.99 vs. 31.79 ± 1.06, p Sprint-time deterioration over 30 m occurred earlier (from the second sprint on) in the Yo-YoWorst compared with in the Yo-YoBest group (from the fourth sprint on, p sprint bouts.

  7. Repeated episodes of chronic intermittent ethanol promote insensitivity to devaluation of the reinforcing effect of ethanol.

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    Lopez, M F; Becker, H C; Chandler, L J

    2014-11-01

    Studies in animal models have shown that repeated episodes of alcohol dependence and withdrawal promote escalation of drinking that is presumably associated with alterations in the addiction neurocircuitry. Using a lithium chloride-ethanol pairing procedure to devalue the reinforcing properties of ethanol, the present study determined whether multiple cycles of chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure by vapor inhalation also alters the sensitivity of drinking behavior to the devaluation of ethanol's reinforcing effects. The effect of devaluation on operant ethanol self-administration and extinction was examined in mice prior to initiation of CIE (short drinking history) and after repeated cycles of CIE or air control exposure (long drinking history). Devaluation significantly attenuated the recovery of baseline ethanol self-administration when tested either prior to CIE or in the air-exposed controls that had experienced repeated bouts of drinking but no CIE. In contrast, in mice that had undergone repeated cycles of CIE exposure that promoted escalation of ethanol drinking, self-administration was completely resistant to the effect of devaluation. Devaluation had no effect on the time course of extinction training in either pre-CIE or post-CIE mice. Taken together, these results are consistent with the suggestion that repeated cycles of ethanol dependence and withdrawal produce escalation of ethanol self-administration that is associated with a change in sensitivity to devaluation of the reinforcing properties of ethanol.

  8. The influence of basketball dribbling on repeated high-intensity intermittent runs

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    Zhaowei Kong

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: The results suggest that the Yo-Yo IE2 test could reflect the repeatability of high-intensity intermittent basketball dribbling performance, while dribbling skills may have different influences on high-intensity intermittent exercise capacity in adolescent players at different ages.

  9. Diagnosis of repeated/intermittent failures in discrete event systems.

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    Garcia, H. E.; Jiang, S.; Kumar, R.

    2003-04-01

    We introduce the notion of repeated failure diagnosability for diagnosing the occurrence of a repeated number of failures in discrete event systems. This generalizes the earlier notion of diagnosability that was used to diagnose the occurrence of a failure, but from which the information regarding the multiplicity of the occurrence of the failure could not be obtained. It is possible that in some systems the same type of failure repeats a multiple number of times. It is desirable to have a diagnoser which not only diagnoses that such a failure has occurred but also determines the number of times the failure has occurred. To aide such analysis we introduce the notions of K-diagnosability (K failures diagnosability), [1,K]-diagnosability (1 through K failures diagnosability), and [1,1]-diagnosability (1 through 1 failures diagnosability). Here the rst (resp., last) notion is the weakest (resp., strongest) of all three, and the earlier notion of diagnosability is the same as that of K-diagnosability or that of [1,K]- diagnosability with K = 1. We give polynomial algorithms for checking these various notions of repeated failure diagnosability, and also present a procedure of polynomial complexity for the on-line diagnosis of repeated failures.

  10. Thyroid function during intermittent exposure to hypobaric hypoxia

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    Sawhney, R. C.; Malhotra, A. S.

    1990-09-01

    Circulatory levels of triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) and their kinetics were studied in rabbits exposed to intermittent hypobaric hypoxia (5200 m, 395 mm Hg, PO2 83 mm Hg) 6 h daily for 5 weeks in a decompression chamber maintained at room temperature of 22° 24° C. Kinetics of T3 and T4 were studied on days 21 and 28 of hypoxic exposure. The T3 and T4 values were found to be significantly lower on day 8 of exposure to hypoxia compared to the pre-exposure values. The decreased levels were maintained throughout the entire period of hypoxic stress. The metabolic clearance rate, production rate, distribution space and extrathyroidal T3 and T4 pools were significantly decreased in animals under hypoxic stress compared to the control animals. The decline in thyroid hormone levels and their production in rabbits under hypoxic stress indicate an adaptive phenomenon under conditions of low oxygen availability.

  11. Intermittent exposure to xenon protects against gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity.

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    Ping Jia

    Full Text Available Aminoglycoside antibiotics, especially gentamicin, are widely used to treat Gram-negative infections due to their efficacy and low cost. Nevertheless the use of gentamicin is limited by its major side effect, nephrotoxicity. Xenon (Xe provided substantial organoprotective effects in acute injury of the brain and the heart and protected against renal ischemic-reperfusion injury. In this study, we investigated whether xenon could protect against gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity. Male Wistar rats were intermittently exposed to either 70% xenon or 70% nitrogen (N2 balanced with 30% oxygen before and during gentamicin administration at a dose of 100 mg/kg for 7 days to model gentamicin-induced kidney injury. We observed that intermittent exposure to Xe provided morphological and functional renoprotection, which was characterized by attenuation of renal tubular damage, apoptosis, and oxidative stress, but not a reduction in inflammation. We also found that Xe pretreatment upregulated hypoxia-inducible factor 2α (HIF-2α and its downstream effector vascular endothelial growth factor, but not HIF-1α. With regard to the three HIF prolyl hydroxylases, Xe pretreatment upregulated prolyl hydroxylase domain-containing protein-2 (PHD2, suppressed PHD1, and had no influence on PHD3 in the rat kidneys. Pretreatment with Xe also increased the expression of miR-21, a microRNA known to have anti-apoptotic effects. These results support Xe renoprotection against gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity.

  12. Intermittent hypoxic exposure does not improve sleep at 4300 m.

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    Jones, Juli E; Muza, Stephen R; Fulco, Charles S; Beidleman, Beth A; Tapia, Michael L; Cymerman, Allen

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine in sea-level residents if 6 to 7 consecutive days of normobaric intermittent hypoxic exposure (IHE) (hypoxia room: 2-h ambient PO2=90 mmHg sedentary and 1-h ambient PO2=110 mmHg exercising at 80+/-5% of maximum heart rate) improved sleep quality (awakenings per hour) and quantity at altitude (4300 m). We hypothesized that IHE would improve sleep arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) levels and decrease desaturation events, thereby contributing to improvements in sleep quality and quantity during subsequent exposure to high altitude. Ten sea-level residents (mean+/-SE: 22+/-1 yr, 179+/-2 cm, 79+/-3 kg) were assigned to an IHE group and six to a SHAM group (20+/-0.5 yr, 180+/-3 cm, 77+/-4 kg). Sleep quantity, SaO2, and heart rate (HR) were monitored at sea level and during high altitude (i.e., 4300 m in a hypobaric chamber) before pretest (PRE-T) and 60 h after posttest (POST-T) for the last IHE or SHAM treatment. Over the 6 to 7 days of IHE, resting SaO2 increased from 75+/-1% to 81+/-3% in the IHE group, while the SHAM group remained at 98+/-1%. From PRE-T to POST-T at 4300-m exposure, both the IHE and SHAM groups had significantly higher sleep SaO2, fewer desaturation events per hour, and an increase in the percentage of time asleep while sleeping (sleep percent). The IHE group, but not the SHAM group, had significantly lower sleep HR and a trend to more awakenings during the POST-T 4300-m exposure. These results indicate that although IHE treatment induced significant ventilatory acclimatization, relative to the SHAM group, IHE did not further improve sleep SaO2 quality and quantity following rapid ascent to 4300 m. Rather, it is likely that the acquired ventilatory acclimatization was lost in the 60 h between the last IHE session and the POST-T altitude exposure.

  13. Transient intermittent hypoxia exposure disrupts neonatal bone strength

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    Gyuyoup eKim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A brief intermittent hypoxia (IH, ambient O2 levels alternating between room air and 12% O2 for 1h immediately after birth resulted in pancreatic islet dysfunction associated with zinc deficiency as previously reported. We hypothesized that IH exposure modulates zinc homeostasis in bone as well, which leads to increased bone fragility. To test this hypothesis, we used neonatal rats and human osteoblasts. To examine IH-influences on osteoblasts devoid of neural influences, we quantified amounts of alkaline phosphatase and mineralization in IH-treated human osteoblasts. Bones harvested from IH-treated animals showed significantly reduced hardness and elasticity. The IH group also showed discretely decreased levels of alkaline phosphatase and mineralization amounts. The IH group showed a decreased expression of ZIP8 or Zrt and Irt-like protein 8 (a zinc uptake transporter, Runx2 (or Runt-related transcription factor 2, a master protein in bone formation, Collagen-1 (a major protein comprising the extracellular matrix of the bone, osteocalcin, and zinc content. When zinc was eliminated from the media containing human osteoblasts using a zinc chelate, and added later with zinc sulfate, Runx2, ZIP8 and osteocalcin expression decreased first, and recovered with zinc supplementation. Adenovirus-mediated ZIP8 over-expression in osteoblasts increased mineralization significantly as well. We conclude that IH impairs zinc homeostasis in bones and osteoblasts, and that such disturbances decrease bone strength, which can be recovered by zinc supplementation.

  14. Effects of Intermittent Neck Cooling During Repeated Bouts of High-Intensity Exercise

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    Andrew J. Galpin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this investigation was to determine the influence of intermittent neck cooling during exercise bouts designed to mimic combat sport competitions. Participants (n = 13, age = 25.3 ± 5.0 year height = 176.9 ± 7.5 cm, mass = 79.3 ± 9.0 kg, body fat = 11.8% ± 3.1% performed three trials on a cycle ergometer. Each trial consisted of two, 5-min high-intensity exercise (HEX intervals (HEX1 and HEX2—20 s at 50% peak power, followed by 15 s of rest, and a time to exhaustion (TTE test. One-minute rest intervals were given between each round (RI1 and RI2, during which researchers treated the participant’s posterior neck with either (1 wet-ice (ICE; (2 menthol spray (SPRAY; or (3 no treatment (CON. Neck (TNECK and chest (TCHEST skin temperatures were significantly lower following RI1 with ICE (vs. SPRAY. Thermal sensation decreased with ICE compared to CON following RI1, RI2, TTE, and a 2-min recovery. Rating of perceived exertion was also lower with ICE following HEX2 (vs. CON and after RI2 (vs. SPRAY. Treatment did not influence TTE (68.9 ± 18.9s. The ability of intermittent ICE to attenuate neck and chest skin temperature rises during the initial HEX stages likely explains why participants felt cooler and less exerted during equivalent HEX bouts. These data suggest intermittent ICE improves perceptual stress during short, repeated bouts of vigorous exercise.

  15. Chronic intermittent hypoxia exposure-induced atherosclerosis: a brief review.

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    Song, Dongmei; Fang, Guoqiang; Greenberg, Harly; Liu, Shu Fang

    2015-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is highly prevalent in the USA and is recognized as an independent risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Identification of atherosclerosis risk factor attributable to OSA may provide opportunity to develop preventive measures for cardiovascular risk reduction. Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) is a prominent feature of OSA pathophysiology and may be a major mechanism linking OSA to arteriosclerosis. Animal studies demonstrated that CIH exposure facilitated high-cholesterol diet (HCD)-induced atherosclerosis, accelerated the progression of existing atherosclerosis, and induced atherosclerotic lesions in the absence of other atherosclerosis risk factors, demonstrating that CIH is an independent causal factor of atherosclerosis. Comparative studies revealed major differences between CIH-induced and the classic HCD-induced atherosclerosis. Systemically, CIH was a much weaker inducer of atherosclerosis. CIH and HCD differentially activated inflammatory pathways. Histologically, CIH-induced atherosclerotic plaques had no clear necrotic core, contained a large number of CD31+ endothelial cells, and had mainly elastin deposition, whereas HCD-induced plaques had typical necrotic cores and fibrous caps, contained few endothelial cells, and had mainly collagen deposition. Metabolically, CIH caused mild, but HCD caused more severe dyslipidemia. Mechanistically, CIH did not, but HCD did, cause macrophage foam cell formation. NF-κB p50 gene deletion augmented CIH-induced, but not HCD-induced atherosclerosis. These differences reflect the intrinsic differences between the two types of atherosclerosis in terms of pathological nature and underlying mechanisms and support the notion that CIH-induced atherosclerosis is a new paradigm that differs from the classic HCD-induced atherosclerosis.

  16. Permanent relief from intermittent cold stress-induced fibromyalgia-like abnormal pain by repeated intrathecal administration of antidepressants

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    Mukae Takehiro

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fibromyalgia (FM is characterized by chronic widespread pain, which is often refractory to conventional painkillers. Numerous clinical studies have demonstrated that antidepressants are effective in treating FM pain. We previously established a mouse model of FM-like pain, induced by intermittent cold stress (ICS. Results In this study, we find that ICS exposure causes a transient increase in plasma corticosterone concentration, but not in anxiety or depression-like behaviors. A single intrathecal injection of an antidepressant, such as milnacipran, amitriptyline, mianserin or paroxetine, had an acute analgesic effect on ICS-induced thermal hyperalgesia at post-stress day 1 in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, repeated daily antidepressant treatments during post-stress days 1-5 gradually reversed the reduction in thermal pain threshold, and this recovery was maintained for at least 7 days after the final treatment. In addition, relief from mechanical allodynia, induced by ICS exposure, was also observed at day 9 after the cessation of antidepressant treatment. In contrast, the intravenous administration of these antidepressants at conventional doses failed to provide relief. Conclusions These results suggest that the repetitive intrathecal administration of antidepressants permanently cures ICS-induced FM pain in mice.

  17. CHRONIC DIETARY EXPOSURE WITH INTERMITTENT SPIKE DOSES OF CHLORPYRIFOS FAILS TO ALTER FLASH OR PATTERN REVERSAL EVOKED POTENTIALS IN RATS.

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    Human exposure to pesticides is often characterized by chronic low level exposure with intermittent spiked higher exposures. Visual disturbances are often reported following exposure to xenobiotics, and cholinesterase-inhibiting compounds have been reported to alter visual functi...

  18. Modeling repeated measurement data for occupational exposure assessment and epidemiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peretz, Chava

    2004-01-01

    Repeated measurements designs, occur frequently in the assessment of exposure to toxic chemicals. This thesis deals with the possibilities of using mixed effects models for occupational exposure assessment and in the analysis of exposure response relationships. The model enables simultaneous estima

  19. Advancing hypoxic training in team sports: from intermittent hypoxic training to repeated sprint training in hypoxia.

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    Faiss, Raphaël; Girard, Olivier; Millet, Grégoire P

    2013-12-01

    Over the past two decades, intermittent hypoxic training (IHT), that is, a method where athletes live at or near sea level but train under hypoxic conditions, has gained unprecedented popularity. By adding the stress of hypoxia during 'aerobic' or 'anaerobic' interval training, it is believed that IHT would potentiate greater performance improvements compared to similar training at sea level. A thorough analysis of studies including IHT, however, leads to strikingly poor benefits for sea-level performance improvement, compared to the same training method performed in normoxia. Despite the positive molecular adaptations observed after various IHT modalities, the characteristics of optimal training stimulus in hypoxia are still unclear and their functional translation in terms of whole-body performance enhancement is minimal. To overcome some of the inherent limitations of IHT (lower training stimulus due to hypoxia), recent studies have successfully investigated a new training method based on the repetition of short (training in hypoxia (RSH). The aims of the present review are therefore threefold: first, to summarise the main mechanisms for interval training and repeated sprint training in normoxia. Second, to critically analyse the results of the studies involving high-intensity exercises performed in hypoxia for sea-level performance enhancement by differentiating IHT and RSH. Third, to discuss the potential mechanisms underpinning the effectiveness of those methods, and their inherent limitations, along with the new research avenues surrounding this topic.

  20. Intermittent exposure to traces of green leaf volatiles trigger a plant response

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    Shiojiri, K.; Ozawa, R.; Matsui, K.; Sabelis, M.W.; Takabayashi, J.

    2012-01-01

    Plants are known to mount a defensive response when exposed to volatile chemicals from other plants, but the critical concentration required for this response is not known. We showed that intermittent exposure over a period of 3 weeks to trace amounts (less than 140 pptV) of green leaf volatiles emi

  1. The influence of intermittent altitude exposure to 4100 m on exercise capacity and blood variables

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    Lundby, C; Nielsen, T K; Dela, F

    2005-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the effects of intermittent hypoxic exposure on blood and exercise parameters. Eight sea level residents were exposed to 2 h daily stimulus to 4100 m altitude in a hypobaric chamber for a total of 14 days. Exercise performance was evaluated at sea level bef...

  2. 间歇采样转发干扰参数分析%Jamming Parameter Analysis for Intermittent Sampling Repeater

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    邬诚; 陈新年

    2014-01-01

    间歇采样转发干扰的参数设置对干扰效果有较大影响,干扰参数决定了间歇采样转发干扰信号进入雷达接收机后的脉压结果。通过数学理论推导给出了间歇采样周期和干扰信号占空比两类干扰参数与干扰效果的明确数学对应关系,并通过数字仿真验证了数学推导和理论分析的正确性。%Jamming parameter settings of intermittent sampling repeater for jamming effects have a greater impact. Jamming parameters determine the pulse compression results for intermittent sampling repeater jamming signals into the radar receiver. An explicit mathematics correspon-dence is given of intermittent sampling period and duty cycle for jamming effects through mathe-matical derivation and analysis. Finally, the correctness of mathematical derivation and analysis is validated with digital simulation.

  3. Effects of flow intermittency and pharmaceutical exposure on the structure and metabolism of stream biofilms.

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    Corcoll, Natàlia; Casellas, Maria; Huerta, Belinda; Guasch, Helena; Acuña, Vicenç; Rodríguez-Mozaz, Sara; Serra-Compte, Albert; Barceló, Damià; Sabater, Sergi

    2015-01-15

    Increasing concentrations of pharmaceutical compounds occur in many rivers, but their environmental risk remains poorly studied in stream biofilms. Flow intermittency shapes the structure and functions of ecosystems, and may enhance their sensitivity to toxicants. This study evaluates the effects of a long-term exposure of biofilm communities to a mixture of pharmaceutical compounds at environmental concentrations on biofilm bioaccumulation capacity, the structure and metabolic processes of algae and bacteria communities, and how their potential effects were enhanced or not by the occurrence of flow intermittency. To assess the interaction between those two stressors, an experiment with artificial streams was performed. Stream biofilms were exposed to a mixture of pharmaceuticals, as well as to a short period of flow intermittency. Results indicate that biofilms were negatively affected by pharmaceuticals. The algal biomass and taxa richness decreased and unicellular green algae relatively increased. The structure of the bacterial (based on denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of amplified 16S rRNA genes) changed and showed a reduction of the operational taxonomic units (OTUs) richness. Exposed biofilms showed higher rates of metabolic processes, such as primary production and community respiration, attributed to pharmaceuticals stimulated an increase of green algae and heterotrophs, respectively. Flow intermittency modulated the effects of chemicals on natural communities. The algal community became more sensitive to short-term exposure of pharmaceuticals (lower EC50 value) when exposed to water intermittency, indicating cumulative effects between the two assessed stressors. In contrast to algae, the bacterial community became less sensitive to short-term exposure of pharmaceuticals (higher EC50) when exposed to water intermittency, indicating co-tolerance phenomena. According to the observed effects, the environmental risk of pharmaceuticals in nature is high

  4. Physiological consequences of repeated exposures to conditioned fear.

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    Thompson, Robert S; Strong, Paul V; Fleshner, Monika

    2012-06-01

    Activation of the stress response evokes a cascade of physiological reactions that may be detrimental when repeated or chronic, and when triggered after exposure to psychological/emotional stressors. Investigation of the physiological mechanisms responsible for the health damaging effects requires animal paradigms that repeatedly evoke a response to psychological/emotional stressors. To this end, adult male Sprague Dawley rats were repeatedly exposed (2X per day for 20 days) to a context that they were conditioned to fear (conditioned fear test, CFT). Repeated exposure to CFT produced body weight loss, adrenal hypertrophy, thymic involution, and basal corticosterone elevation. In vivo biotelemetry measures revealed that CFT evokes sympathetic nervous system driven increases in heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and core body temperature. Extinction of behavioral (freezing) and physiological responses to CFT was prevented using minimal reinstatement footshock. MAP responses to the CFT did not diminish across 20 days of exposure. In contrast, HR and cardiac contractility responses declined by day 15, suggesting a shift toward vascular-dominated MAP (a pre-clinical marker of CV dysfunction). Flattened diurnal rhythms, common to stress-related mood/anxiety disorders, were found for most physiological measures. Thus, repeated CFT produces adaptations indicative of the health damaging effects of psychological/emotional stress.

  5. Physiological Consequences of Repeated Exposures to Conditioned Fear

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    Robert S. Thompson

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Activation of the stress response evokes a cascade of physiological reactions that may be detrimental when repeated or chronic, and when triggered after exposure to psychological/emotional stressors. Investigation of the physiological mechanisms responsible for the health damaging effects requires animal paradigms that repeatedly evoke a response to psychological/emotional stressors. To this end, adult male Sprague Dawley rats were repeatedly exposed (2X per day for 20 days to a context that they were conditioned to fear (conditioned fear test, CFT. Repeated exposure to CFT produced body weight loss, adrenal hypertrophy, thymic involution, and basal corticosterone elevation. In vivo biotelemetry measures revealed that CFT evokes sympathetic nervous system driven increases in heart rate (HR, mean arterial pressure (MAP, and core body temperature. Extinction of behavioral (freezing and physiological responses to CFT was prevented using minimal reinstatement footshock. MAP responses to the CFT did not diminish across 20 days of exposure. In contrast, HR and cardiac contractility responses declined by day 15, suggesting a shift toward vascular-dominated MAP (a pre-clinical marker of CV dysfunction. Flattened diurnal rhythms, common to stress-related mood/anxiety disorders, were found for most physiological measures. Thus, repeated CFT produces adaptations indicative of the health damaging effects of psychological/emotional stress.

  6. Repeated trauma exposure does not impair distress reduction during imaginal exposure for posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerud, Alissa B; Farach, Frank J; Bedard-Gilligan, Michele; Smith, Hillary; Zoellner, Lori A; Feeny, Norah C

    2017-08-01

    Based on experimental research on threat extinction, individuals exposed to repeated traumatic events may have impaired outcome in exposure therapy compared to those who have experienced a single trauma (Lang & McTeague, ). This study examined whether repeated trauma exposure predicts smaller changes in self-reported distress during imaginal exposure and worse outcomes for patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Adults (N = 116) with chronic PTSD received up to 10 sessions of prolonged exposure (PE) therapy. Trauma exposure was assessed via interview and number of traumatic events were summed for each participant. To examine reductions in distress during treatment, mean and peak values of distress during imaginal exposure were calculated for the first imaginal session (initial distress activation) and subsequent sessions (between-session change in distress). Change in PTSD symptoms from pre- to posttreatment and follow-up provided an additional index of outcome. In-session distress during imaginal exposure decreased over the course of treatment. PTSD symptoms also decreased over treatment, with gains being maintained through follow-up. Repeated trauma exposure was not significantly correlated with initial distress activation. Additionally, linear mixed-model analyses showed no significant association between repeated trauma exposure and between-session change in distress or PTSD symptoms. Contrary to recent speculation, repeated trauma exposure did not predict less change in self-reported distress during imaginal exposure or worse PTSD outcomes. The bench-to-bedside linkage of threat extinction to exposure therapy is discussed, noting strengths and weaknesses. Patients with repeated trauma exposure show reductions in distress with exposure treatment and benefit from PE as much as patients with single-exposure trauma histories. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Consequences of repeated ethanol exposure during early or late adolescence on conditioned taste aversions in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Saalfield

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol use is prevalent during adolescence, yet little is known about possible long-lasting consequences. Recent evidence suggests that adolescents are less sensitive than adults to ethanol's aversive effects, an insensitivity that may be retained into adulthood after repeated adolescent ethanol exposure. This study assessed whether intermittent ethanol exposure during early or late adolescence (early-AIE or late-AIE, respectively would affect ethanol conditioned taste aversions 2 days (CTA1 and >3 weeks (CTA2 post-exposure using supersaccharin and saline as conditioning stimuli (CS, respectively. Pair-housed male Sprague-Dawley rats received 4 g/kg i.g. ethanol (25% or water every 48 h from postnatal day (P 25–45 (early AIE or P45-65 (late AIE, or were left non-manipulated (NM. During conditioning, 30 min home cage access to the CS was followed by 0, 1, 1.5, 2 or 2.5 g/kg ethanol i.p., with testing 2 days later. Attenuated CTA relative to controls was seen among early and late AIE animals at both CTA1 and CTA2, an effect particularly pronounced at CTA1 after late AIE. Thus, adolescent exposure to ethanol was found to induce an insensitivity to ethanol CTA seen soon after exposure and lasting into adulthood, and evident with ethanol exposures not only early but also later in adolescence.

  8. Consequences of repeated ethanol exposure during early or late adolescence on conditioned taste aversions in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saalfield, Jessica; Spear, Linda

    2015-12-01

    Alcohol use is prevalent during adolescence, yet little is known about possible long-lasting consequences. Recent evidence suggests that adolescents are less sensitive than adults to ethanol's aversive effects, an insensitivity that may be retained into adulthood after repeated adolescent ethanol exposure. This study assessed whether intermittent ethanol exposure during early or late adolescence (early-AIE or late-AIE, respectively) would affect ethanol conditioned taste aversions 2 days (CTA1) and >3 weeks (CTA2) post-exposure using supersaccharin and saline as conditioning stimuli (CS), respectively. Pair-housed male Sprague-Dawley rats received 4g/kg i.g. ethanol (25%) or water every 48 h from postnatal day (P) 25-45 (early AIE) or P45-65 (late AIE), or were left non-manipulated (NM). During conditioning, 30 min home cage access to the CS was followed by 0, 1, 1.5, 2 or 2.5g/kg ethanol i.p., with testing 2 days later. Attenuated CTA relative to controls was seen among early and late AIE animals at both CTA1 and CTA2, an effect particularly pronounced at CTA1 after late AIE. Thus, adolescent exposure to ethanol was found to induce an insensitivity to ethanol CTA seen soon after exposure and lasting into adulthood, and evident with ethanol exposures not only early but also later in adolescence.

  9. Effect of intermittent cold exposure on brown fat activation, obesity, and energy homeostasis in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yann Ravussin

    Full Text Available Homeotherms have specific mechanisms to maintain a constant core body temperature despite changes in thermal environment, food supply, and metabolic demand. Brown adipose tissue, the principal thermogenic organ, quickly and efficiently increases heat production by dissipating the mitochondrial proton motive force. It has been suggested that activation of brown fat, via either environmental (i.e. cold exposure or pharmacologic means, could be used to increase metabolic rate and thus reduce body weight. Here we assess the effects of intermittent cold exposure (4°C for one to eight hours three times a week on C57BL/6J mice fed a high fat diet. Cold exposure increased metabolic rate approximately two-fold during the challenge and activated brown fat. In response, food intake increased to compensate fully for the increased energy expenditure; thus, the mice showed no reduction in body weight or adiposity. Despite the unchanged adiposity, the cold-treated mice showed transient improvements in glucose homeostasis. Administration of the cannabinoid receptor-1 inverse agonist AM251 caused weight loss and improvements in glucose homeostasis, but showed no further improvements when combined with cold exposure. These data suggest that intermittent cold exposure causes transient, meaningful improvements in glucose homeostasis, but without synergy when combined with AM251. Since energy expenditure is significantly increased during cold exposure, a drug that dissociates food intake from metabolic demand during cold exposure may achieve weight loss and further metabolic improvements.

  10. Cataract after repeated daily in vivo exposure to ultraviolet radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galichanin, Konstantin; Löfgren, Stefan; Söderberg, Per

    2014-12-01

    Epidemiological data indicate a correlation between lifelong exposure to ultraviolet radiation and cortical cataract. However, there is no quantitative experimental data on the effect of daily repeated in vivo exposures of the eye to UVR. Therefore, this experiment was designed to verify whether the dose additivity for UVR exposures holds through periods of time up to 30 d. Eighty rats were conditioned to a rat restrainer 5 d prior to exposure. All animals were divided into four exposure period groups of 1, 3, 10, and 30 d of exposure to UVR. Each exposure period group of 20 animals was randomly divided into five cumulated UVR dose subgroups. Eighteen-wk-old non-anesthetized albino Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed daily to UVR-300 nm for 15 min. One week after the last exposure, animals were sacrificed. The lenses were extracted for macroscopic imaging of dark-field anatomy, and degree of cataract was quantified by measurement of the intensity of forward lens light scattering. Maximum tolerable dose (MTD(2.3:16)), a statistically defined standard for sensitivity for the threshold for UVR cataract, was estimated for each exposure period. Exposed lenses developed cataract with varying appearance on the anterior surface. Single low doses of UVR accumulated to cause cataract during periods up to 30 d. MTD(2.3:16) for 1, 3, 10, and 30 d of repeated exposures was estimated to 4.70, 4.74, 4.80, and 6.00 kJ m(-2), respectively. In conclusion, the lens sensitivity to UVR-B for 18-wk-old Sprague-Dawley rats decreases with the increasing number of days being exposed.

  11. Hippocampal ER stress and learning deficits following repeated pyrethroid exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Muhammad M; DiCicco-Bloom, Emanuel; Richardson, Jason R

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is implicated as a significant contributor to neurodegeneration and cognitive dysfunction. Previously, we reported that the widely used pyrethroid pesticide deltamethrin causes ER stress-mediated apoptosis in SK-N-AS neuroblastoma cells. Whether or not this occurs in vivo remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate that repeated deltamethrin exposure (3 mg/kg every 3 days for 60 days) causes hippocampal ER stress and learning deficits in adult mice. Repeated exposure to deltamethrin caused ER stress in the hippocampus as indicated by increased levels of C/EBP-homologous protein (131%) and glucose-regulated protein 78 (96%). This was accompanied by increased levels of caspase-12 (110%) and activated caspase-3 (50%). To determine whether these effects resulted in learning deficits, hippocampal-dependent learning was evaluated using the Morris water maze. Deltamethrin-treated animals exhibited profound deficits in the acquisition of learning. We also found that deltamethrin exposure resulted in decreased BrdU-positive cells (37%) in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, suggesting potential impairment of hippocampal neurogenesis. Collectively, these results demonstrate that repeated deltamethrin exposure leads to ER stress, apoptotic cell death in the hippocampus, and deficits in hippocampal precursor proliferation, which is associated with learning deficits.

  12. Chronic intermittent high altitude exposure, occupation, and body mass index in workers of mining industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esenamanova, Marina K; Kochkorova, Firuza A; Tsivinskaya, Tatyana A; Vinnikov, Denis; Aikimbaev, Kairgeldy

    2014-09-01

    The obesity and overweight rates in population exposed to chronic intermittent exposure to high altitudes are not well studied. The aim of the retrospective study was to evaluate whether there are differences in body mass index in different occupation groups working in intermittent shifts at mining industry at high altitude: 3800-4500 meters above sea level. Our study demonstrated that obesity and overweight are common in workers of high altitude mining industry exposed to chronic intermittent hypoxia. The obesity rate was lowest among miners as compared to blue- and white-collar employees (9.5% vs. 15.6% and 14.7%, p=0.013). Obesity and overweight were associated with older age, higher rates of increased blood pressure (8.79% and 5.72% vs. 1.92%), cholesterol (45.8% and 45.6% vs. 32.8%) and glucose (4.3% and 1.26% vs. 0.57%) levels as compared to normal body mass index category (pmining industry exposed to intermittent high-altitude hypoxia. Therefore, assessment and monitoring of body mass index seems to be essential in those who live and work at high altitudes to supply the correct nutrition, modify risk factors, and prevent related disorders.

  13. CHRONIC DIETARY EXPOSURE WITH INTERMITTENT SPIKE DOSES OF CHLORPYRIFOS FALLS TO ALTER SOMATOSENSORY EVOKED POTENTIALS, COMPOUND NERVE ACTION POTENTIALS, OR NERVE CONDUCTION VELOCITY IN RATS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human exposure to pesticides is often characterized by chronic low level exposure with intermittent spiked higher exposures. Cholinergic transmission is involved in sensory modulation in the cortex and cerebellum, and therefore may be altered following chlorpyrifos (CPF) exposure...

  14. The relationship between childhood exposure to trauma and intermittent explosive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, Angela; Aderka, Idan M; Bryant, Richard A; Hofmann, Stefan G

    2012-05-15

    There has been a paucity of research linking intermittent explosive disorder (IED) to trauma and posttraumatic stress responses, despite evidence that trauma is strongly associated with anger reactions. The present study investigated the relationship between IED and a number of trauma-related factors, including trauma dosage, timing of first trauma, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Participants were 4844 trauma-exposed and 731 non trauma-exposed adults who took part in the National Comorbidity Survey-Replication (NCS-R). Findings indicated that IED was associated with greater trauma exposure, PTSD and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) diagnosis, and first exposure to traumatic events in childhood. Exploratory analyses investigating the link between IED and age at first trauma exposure across trauma types suggested that IED is related to childhood exposure to interpersonal traumatic events. These findings are discussed in the context of developmental trauma and cycles of violence models.

  15. Physiological responses of three species of unionid mussels to intermittent exposure to elevated carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, Kelly D.; Jeffrey, Jennifer D.; Hasler, Caleb T.; Suski, Cory D.

    2016-01-01

    Freshwater systems are at risk owing to increasing carbon dioxide (CO2) levels, and one of the possible reasons for these elevations is the deployment of non-physical fish barriers to prevent invasive fish movements. Carbon dioxide barriers have the potential to create short, chronic and intermittent exposures of CO2 for surrounding freshwater biota. Although intermittent exposures to a stressor may be more ecologically relevant, the majority of laboratory tests use chronic or short-term time periods to determine how organisms will respond to an environmental stressor. Measurements of the physiological responses of three species of unionid mussel, giant floaters (Pyganodon grandis), threeridge (Amblema plicata) and plain pocketbook (Lampsilis cardium), exposed to control pCO2 (~1000 µatm) or intermittent conditions of pCO2 (ranging from ~1000 to ~55 000 µatm) 12 times per day over a 28 day period were gathered. There was no indication of recovery in the physiological responses of mussels between applications of CO2, suggesting that the recovery time between CO2 pulses (1.5 h) was not sufficient for recovery from the CO2 exposure period (0.5 h). Observations of acid–base and stress responses were consistent with what has been observed in chronic studies of freshwater mussels exposed to elevated pCO2 (i.e. elevations in HCO3 −, Ca2+, Na+ and glucose, and decreases in Mg2+ and Cl−). However, species differences were observed across almost all variables measured, which emphasizes the need for multispecies studies. PMID:28066552

  16. Physiological responses of three species of unionid mussels to intermittent exposure to elevated carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, Kelly D; Jeffrey, Jennifer D; Hasler, Caleb T; Suski, Cory D

    2016-01-01

    Freshwater systems are at risk owing to increasing carbon dioxide (CO2) levels, and one of the possible reasons for these elevations is the deployment of non-physical fish barriers to prevent invasive fish movements. Carbon dioxide barriers have the potential to create short, chronic and intermittent exposures of CO2 for surrounding freshwater biota. Although intermittent exposures to a stressor may be more ecologically relevant, the majority of laboratory tests use chronic or short-term time periods to determine how organisms will respond to an environmental stressor. Measurements of the physiological responses of three species of unionid mussel, giant floaters (Pyganodon grandis), threeridge (Amblema plicata) and plain pocketbook (Lampsilis cardium), exposed to control pCO2 (~1000 µatm) or intermittent conditions of pCO2 (ranging from ~1000 to ~55 000 µatm) 12 times per day over a 28 day period were gathered. There was no indication of recovery in the physiological responses of mussels between applications of CO2, suggesting that the recovery time between CO2 pulses (1.5 h) was not sufficient for recovery from the CO2 exposure period (0.5 h). Observations of acid-base and stress responses were consistent with what has been observed in chronic studies of freshwater mussels exposed to elevated pCO2 (i.e. elevations in HCO3(-), Ca(2+), Na(+) and glucose, and decreases in Mg(2+) and Cl(-)). However, species differences were observed across almost all variables measured, which emphasizes the need for multispecies studies.

  17. Simulating Sleep Apnea by Exposure to Intermittent Hypoxia Induces Inflammation in the Lung and Liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darlan Pase da Rosa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep apnea is a breathing disorder that results from momentary and cyclic collapse of the upper airway, leading to intermittent hypoxia (IH. IH can lead to the formation of free radicals that increase oxidative stress, and this mechanism may explain the association between central sleep apnea and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. We assessed the level of inflammation in the lung and liver tissue from animals subjected to intermittent hypoxia and simulated sleep apnea. A total of 12 C57BL/6 mice were divided into two groups and then exposed to IH (n=6 or a simulated IH (SIH (n=6 for 35 days. We observed an increase in oxidative damage and other changes to endogenous antioxidant enzymes in mice exposed to IH. Specifically, the expression of multiple transcription factors, including hypoxia inducible factor (HIF-1α, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α, inducible NO synthase (iNOS, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, and cleaved caspase 3 were shown to be increased in the IH group. Overall, we found that exposure to intermittent hypoxia for 35 days by simulating sleep apnea leads to oxidative stress, inflammation, and increased activity of caspase 3 in the liver and lung.

  18. INDUCTION OF DRUG RESISTANCE IN PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM: AN INTERMITTENT DRUG EXPOSURE METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Nateghpour

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available The production of experimentally induced drug resistance in the laboratory provides valuable opportunities for investigators to study the nature and genetics of drug resistance mechanisms to a given agent, patterns of cross resistance and the mode of action of drugs. At the beginning the continuous drug exposure was chosen as a standard procedure to produce drug— resistant strains of P. falciparum,.but later on some other methods were also applied. An intermittent drug exposure method as a novel procedure has been introduced in this study. Intermittent exposure of chloroquine resistant Kl and chloroquine sensitive T9.96 strains of P. falciparum to halofantrine culminated in a relatively rapid reduction in sensitivity to the drug. The response of halofantrifle - resistnat K1HF and T9.96 strains and parent parasites to halofantrifle, inefloquine, quinine and chloroquine was determined. The results indicated that the effectiveness of halofantrine to K1HF and T9.96HF strains decreased 9 and 3 folds respectively, compared to the parent parasites. Cross -resistance occurred among halofantrine. mefloquine and quinine. Halofantrine resistance was associated with enhanced chloroquine sensitivity in the strain derived from chloroquine - resistant K1 strain, hut not in the strain derived from chloroquine - sensitive T9.96 parasites.

  19. Chronic intermittent ethanol exposure during adolescence: Effects on stress-induced social alterations and social drinking in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varlinskaya, Elena I; Kim, Esther U; Spear, Linda P

    2017-01-01

    We previously observed lasting and sex-specific detrimental consequences of early adolescent intermittent ethanol exposure (AIE), with male, but not female, rats showing social anxiety-like alterations when tested as adults. The present study used Sprague Dawley rats to assess whether social alterations induced by AIE (3.5g/kg, intragastrically, every other day, between postnatal days [P] 25-45) are further exacerbated by stressors later in life. Another aim was to determine whether AIE alone or in combination with stress influenced intake of a sweetened ethanol solution (Experiment 1) or a sweetened solution ("supersac") alone (Experiment 2) under social circumstances. Animals were exposed to restraint on P66-P70 (90min/day) or left nonstressed, with corticosterone (CORT) levels assessed on day 1 and day 5 in Experiment 2. Social anxiety-like behavior emerged after AIE in non-stressed males, but not females, whereas stress-induced social anxiety was evident only in water-exposed males and females. Adult-typical habituation of the CORT response to repeated restraint was not evident in adult animals after AIE, a lack of habituation reminiscent of that normally evident in adolescents. Neither AIE nor stress affected ethanol intake under social circumstances, although AIE and restraint independently increased adolescent-typical play fighting in males during social drinking. Among males, the combination of AIE and restraint suppressed "supersac" intake; this index of depression-like behavior was not seen in females. The results provide experimental evidence associating adolescent alcohol exposure, later stress, anxiety, and depression, with young adolescent males being particularly vulnerable to long-lasting adverse effects of repeated ethanol. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Adolescent plasticity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Erythrocyte deformability and aggregation responses to intermittent and continuous artificial gravity exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marijke, Grau; Vera, Abeln; Tobias, Vogt; Wilhelm, Bloch; Stefan, Schneider

    2017-02-01

    Artificial gravity protocols are used to improve g-tolerance of aviators and discussed as countermeasure during prolonged space flight. Little is known about the impact of artificial gravity on the red blood cells (RBC). The purpose of the study was to test how artificial gravity affects RBC deformability and aggregation, which are important determinants of microcirculation. Nine male subjects were exposed to two hypergravity protocols using a short arm human centrifuge: a continuous (CONT) protocol with constant +2 Gz for 30 min and an intermittent (INTER) protocol with repeated intervals of +2 Gz and rest. Blood was sampled pre and post interventions to measure basal blood parameters, RBC nitrite, RBC deformability, aggregation, and to determine the shear rate balancing aggregation and disaggregation (γ at dIsc min). To test for orthostasis effects, five male subjects were asked to stay for 46 min, corresponding to the length of the centrifuge protocols, with blood sampling pre and post intervention. Artificial gravity programs did not affect basal blood parameters or RBC nitrite levels; a marker for RBC deformability influencing nitric oxide. The INTER program did not affect any of the tested parameters. The CONT program did not remarkably affect RBC deformability or γ at dIsc min but significantly aggravated aggregation. Orthostasis effects were thus excluded. The results indicate that continuous artificial gravity, especially with higher g-forces applied, may negatively affect the RBC system and that for a prolonged space flight intermittent but not continuous artificial gravity might represent an appropriate countermeasure.

  1. Acute versus repeated chocolate exposure: effects on intake and cravings in restrained and unrestrained eaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Jennifer S; Nederkoorn, Chantal; Jansen, Anita

    2014-04-01

    The cue-reactivity model, which is based on conditioning processes, posits that repeated food exposure (in the absence of consumption) should decrease cue reactivity. To examine whether repeated chocolate exposure attenuates cravings and intake, relative to those exposed to an acute cue, a 2 (repeated vs acute cue) × 2 (restrained vs unrestrained eaters) design was employed. Fifty female participants were recruited. Repeated exposure reduced cravings in unrestrained eaters (relative to acute exposure), but increased cravings in restrained eaters. An interaction between restraint and exposure emerged on intake, such that restrained eaters ate less after acute exposure than did unrestrained eaters.

  2. NEUROBEHAVIORAL EFFECTS OF CHRONIC DIETARY AND REPEATED HIGH-LEVEL SPIKE EXPOSURE TO CHLORPYRIFOS IN RATS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study aimed to model long-term subtoxic human exposure to an organophosphorus pesticide, chlorpyrifos, and to examine the influence of that exposure on the response to intermittent high-dose acute challenges. Adult rats were maintained on a chlorpyrifos-containing diet to p...

  3. Genotoxicity of intermittent co-exposure to benzene and toluene in male CD-1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetmore, Barbara A; Struve, Melanie F; Gao, Pu; Sharma, Sheela; Allison, Neil; Roberts, Kay C; Letinski, Daniel J; Nicolich, Mark J; Bird, Michael G; Dorman, David C

    2008-06-17

    Benzene is an important industrial chemical. At certain levels, benzene has been found to produce aplastic anemia, pancytopenia, myeloblastic anemia and genotoxic effects in humans. Metabolism by cytochrome P450 monooxygenases and myeloperoxidase to hydroquinone, phenol, and other metabolites contributes to benzene toxicity. Other xenobiotic substrates for cytochrome P450 can alter benzene metabolism. At high concentrations, toluene has been shown to inhibit benzene metabolism and benzene-induced toxicities. The present study investigated the genotoxicity of exposure to benzene and toluene at lower and intermittent co-exposures. Mice were exposed via whole-body inhalation for 6h/day for 8 days (over a 15-day time period) to air, 50 ppm benzene, 100 ppm toluene, 50 ppm benzene and 50 ppm toluene, or 50 ppm benzene and 100 ppm toluene. Mice exposed to 50 ppm benzene exhibited an increased frequency (2.4-fold) of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (PCE) and increased levels of urinary metabolites (t,t-muconic acid, hydroquinone, and s-phenylmercapturic acid) vs. air-exposed controls. Benzene co-exposure with 100 ppm toluene resulted in similar urinary metabolite levels but a 3.7-fold increase in frequency of micronucleated PCE. Benzene co-exposure with 50 ppm toluene resulted in a similar elevation of micronuclei frequency as with 100 ppm toluene which did not differ significantly from 50 ppm benzene exposure alone. Both co-exposures - 50 ppm benzene with 50 or 100 ppm toluene - resulted in significantly elevated CYP2E1 activities that did not occur following benzene or toluene exposure alone. Whole blood glutathione (GSH) levels were similarly decreased following exposure to 50 ppm benzene and/or 100 ppm toluene, while co-exposure to 50 ppm benzene and 100 ppm toluene significantly decreased GSSG levels and increased the GSH/GSSG ratio. The higher frequency of micronucleated PCE following benzene and toluene co-exposure when compared with mice exposed to

  4. Comparison of intermittent and continuous exposures to inorganic mercury in the mussel, Mytilus edulis: accumulation and sub-lethal physiological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amachree, Dokuboba; Moody, A John; Handy, Richard D

    2014-11-01

    Aquatic organisms are often subject to intermittent exposure to pollutants in real ecosystems. This study aimed to compare mercury accumulation and the physiological responses of mussels, Mytilus edulis during continuous and intermittent exposure to the metal. Mussels were treated in a semi-static, triplicated design to either a control (no added Hg) or 50 µg l(-1) Hg as HgCl2 in continuous (daily) or intermittent (2 day exposure, 2 days in clean seawater alternately) exposure for 14 days. A time-dependent increase in Hg accumulation was observed in the continuous exposure, while the intermittent treatment showed step-wise changes in Hg concentrations with the exposure profile, especially in the gills. At the end of the experiment, tissue Hg concentrations were significantly increased in the continuous compared to the intermittent exposure for digestive gland (4 fold), gonad and remaining soft tissue (>2 fold), but not for the gill and adductor muscle. There was no observed oxidative damage at the end of the experiment as measured by the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) concentrations in tissues from all treatments. However, total glutathione was significantly decreased in the gill and digestive gland of both the continuous and intermittent exposure by the end of the experiment. The neutral red retention ability of the haemocytes was not affected, but total haemocyte counts were significantly decreased (<2 fold) in the intermittent compared to the continuous exposure. Histopathological examinations showed less pathology in the gill, but more inflammation in the digestive gland of mussels for the intermittent compared to the continuous exposure. Overall, the results showed that Hg accumulation from intermittent exposure was less than that of the continuous exposure regime, but the sub-lethal responses are sometimes more severe than expected in the former.

  5. Inhalation exposure system used for acute and repeated-dose methyl isocyanate exposures of laboratory animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkins, B; O'Connor, R W; Dement, J M

    1987-06-01

    Laboratory animals were exposed by inhalation for 2 hr/day (acute) or 6 hr/day (four consecutive days, repeated dose) to methyl isocyanate (MIC). Exposures were conducted in stainless steel and glass inhalation exposure chambers placed in stainless steel, wire mesh cages. MIC was delivered with nitrogen via stainless steel and Teflon supply lines. Chamber concentrations ranged from 0 to 60 ppm and were monitored continuously with infrared spectrophotometers to 1 ppm and at 2-hr intervals to 20 ppb with a high performance liquid chromatograph equipped with a fluorescence detector. Other operational parameters monitored on a continuous basis included chamber temperature (20-27 degrees C), relative humidity (31-64%), static (transmural) pressure (-0.3 in.), and flow (300-500 L/min). The computer-assistance system interfaced with the inhalation exposure laboratory is described in detail, including the analytical instrumentation calibration system used throughout this investigation.

  6. The Effects of Repeated Exposure to Graphic Fear Appeals on Cigarette Packages: A Field Experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, A.; Bos, C.

    2015-01-01

    Experimental studies on the effects of graphic fear appeals on cigarette packages typically expose smokers in a single session to a fear appeal, although in practice the exposure is always repeated. The present study applied an improved study design with repeated exposure to fear appeals on cigarett

  7. The Effects of Repeated Exposure to Graphic Fear Appeals on Cigarette Packages : A Field Experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Arie; Colin, Bos,

    2015-01-01

    Experimental studies on the effects of graphic fear appeals on cigarette packages typically expose smokers in a single session to a fear appeal, although in practice the exposure is always repeated. The present study applied an improved study design with repeated exposure to fear appeals on cigarett

  8. The Effects of Repeated Exposure to Graphic Fear Appeals on Cigarette Packages : A Field Experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Arie; Colin, Bos,

    2015-01-01

    Experimental studies on the effects of graphic fear appeals on cigarette packages typically expose smokers in a single session to a fear appeal, although in practice the exposure is always repeated. The present study applied an improved study design with repeated exposure to fear appeals on

  9. The Effects of Repeated Exposure to Graphic Fear Appeals on Cigarette Packages: A Field Experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, A.; Bos, C.

    2015-01-01

    Experimental studies on the effects of graphic fear appeals on cigarette packages typically expose smokers in a single session to a fear appeal, although in practice the exposure is always repeated. The present study applied an improved study design with repeated exposure to fear appeals on

  10. Dealing with Consumer Differences in Liking during Repeated Exposure to Food; Typical Dynamics in Rating Behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalenberg, Jelle R.; Nanetti, Luca; Renken, Remco J.; de Wijk, Rene A.; ter Horst, Gert J.

    2014-01-01

    Consumers show high interindividual variability in food liking during repeated exposure. To investigate consumer liking during repeated exposure, data is often interpreted on a product level by averaging results over all consumers. However, a single product may elicit inconsistent behaviors in

  11. Changes in the Adult GluN2B Associated Proteome following Adolescent Intermittent Ethanol Exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Scott Swartzwelder

    Full Text Available Adolescent alcohol use is the strongest predictor for alcohol use disorders. In rodents, adolescents have distinct responses to acute ethanol, and prolonged alcohol exposure during adolescence can maintain these phenotypes into adulthood. One brain region that is particularly sensitive to the effects of both acute and chronic ethanol exposure is the hippocampus. Adolescent intermittent ethanol exposure (AIE produces long lasting changes in hippocampal synaptic plasticity and dendritic morphology, as well as in the susceptibility to acute ethanol-induced spatial memory impairment. Given the pattern of changes in hippocampal structure and function, one potential target for these effects is the ethanol sensitive GluN2B subunit of the NMDA receptor, which is known to be involved in synaptic plasticity and dendritic morphology. Thus we sought to determine if there were persistent changes in hippocampal GluN2B signaling cascades following AIE. We employed a previously validated GluN2B-targeted proteomic strategy that was used to identify novel signaling mechanisms altered by chronic ethanol exposure in the adult hippocampus. We collected adult hippocampal tissue (P70 from rats that had been given 2 weeks of AIE from P30-45. Tissue extracts were fractionated into synaptic and non-synaptic pools, immuno-precipitated for GluN2B, and then analyzed using proteomic methods. We detected a large number of proteins associated with GluN2B. AIE produced significant changes in the association of many proteins with GluN2B in both synaptic and non-synaptic fractions. Intriguingly the number of proteins changed in the non-synaptic fraction was double that found in the synaptic fraction. Some of these proteins include those involved in glutamate signaling cytoskeleton rearrangement, calcium signaling, and plasticity. Disruptions in these pathways may contribute to the persistent cellular and behavioral changes found in the adult hippocampus following AIE. Further

  12. Effect of intermittent exposure to ethanol and MDMA during adolescence on learning and memory in adult mice

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    Vidal-Infer Antonio

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heavy binge drinking is increasingly frequent among adolescents, and consumption of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA is often combined with ethanol (EtOH. The long-lasting effects of intermittent exposure to EtOH and MDMA during adolescence on learning and memory were evaluated in adult mice using the Hebb-Williams maze. Methods Adolescent OF1 mice were exposed to EtOH (1.25 g/kg on two consecutive days at 48-h intervals over a 14-day period (from PD 29 to 42. MDMA (10 or 20 mg/kg was injected twice daily at 4-h intervals over two consecutive days, and this schedule was repeated six days later (PD 33, 34, 41 and 42, resulting in a total of eight injections. Animals were initiated in the Hebb-Williams maze on PND 64. The concentration of brain monoamines in the striatum and hippocampus was then measured. Results At the doses employed, both EtOH and MDMA, administered alone or together, impaired learning in the Hebb-Williams maze, as treated animals required more time to reach the goal than their saline-treated counterparts. The groups treated during adolescence with EtOH, alone or plus MDMA, also presented longer latency scores and needed more trials to reach the acquisition criterion score. MDMA induced a decrease in striatal DA concentration, an effect that was augmented by the co-administration of EtOH. All the treatment groups displayed an imbalance in the interaction DA/serotonin. Conclusions The present findings indicate that the developing brain is highly vulnerable to the damaging effects of EtOH and/or MDMA, since mice receiving these drugs in a binge pattern during adolescence exhibit impaired learning and memory in adulthood.

  13. Repeated exposures to blue light-activated eosin Y enhance inactivation of E. faecalis biofilms, in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinic, Karlo; Manoil, Daniel; Filieri, Anna; Wataha, John C; Schrenzel, Jacques; Lange, Norbert; Bouillaguet, Serge

    2015-09-01

    In dentistry, antibacterial photodynamic therapy (a-PDT) has shown promising results for inactivating bacterial biofilms causing carious, endodontic and periodontal diseases. In the current study, we assessed the ability of eosin Y exposed to 3 irradiation protocols at inactivating Enterococcus faecalis biofilms, in vitro. E. faecalis biofilms formed on hydroxyapatite disks were incubated with eosin Y (10-80μM), then activated with blue light using different irradiation protocols. Biofilms exposed to continuous exposure were incubated for 40min before being light-activated for 960 s. For the intermittent exposure, biofilms were exposed 4 times to the light/photosensitizer combination (960 s total) without renewing the photosensitizer. For repeated a-PDT, the same light dose was delivered in a series of 4 irradiation periods separated by dark periods; fresh photosensitizer was added between each light irradiation. After treatment, bacteria were immediately labeled with LIVE/DEAD BacLight Bacterial Viability kit and viability was assessed by flow cytometry (FCM). Results were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey multiple comparison intervals (α=0.05). The viability of E. faecalis biofilms exposed to 10μM eosin Y, was significantly reduced compared to controls (light only-eosin Y only). After a second exposure to blue light-activated eosin Y, viability significantly decreased from 58% to 12% whereas 6.5% of the bacterial biofilm remained live after a third exposure (p<0.05). Only 3.5% of the bacterial population survived after the fourth exposure. The results of this study indicate that blue light-activated eosin Y can photoinactivate E. faecalis biofilms grown on hydroxyapatite disks. Also, repeated exposures to blue light-activated eosin Y were shown to significantly improve efficacy. Further studies seem warranted to optimize the antibacterial activity of blue light-activated eosin Y on major oral pathogens. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All

  14. Intermittent hypoxia hypobaric exposure minimized oxidative stress and antioxidants in brain cells of Sprague Dawleymice

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    Wardaya Wardaya

    2013-05-01

    antioxidants in Sprague Dawley male mice.Methods: The experimental study was in February-April 2010 consisted of one control group and four exposed groups of male mice Sprague Dawley. Each groups consisted of 5 mice. The control group did not have IHH. The exposed groups (with an interval of one week had once, twice, three, or four times IHH using a chamber flight. All exposed groups were treated hypobaric equivalent to: 35,000 ft altitude (1 minutes, 25,000 ft (5 minutes, and 18,000 ft (25 minutes. All of their brains had 8-OHdG and SOD measured.Results: The 8-OHdG level among three time IHH exposures had already returned to the control value (P = 0.843. The SOD level increased progressively among two, three, and four times IHH. However after the second exposure, it was found that the SOD level was similar to the control value, 0.231 ± 0.042 (P = 0.191.Conclusion: In conclusion, three times of IHH may improve the effect of hypoxia hypobaric on oxidative stress and specific activity of antioxidants in Sprague Dawley male mice. The SOD level was increased at an earlier exposure, which was after one IHH exposure.Keywords: intermittent hypoxia hypobaric, oxidative stress, antioxidants

  15. COMPARISON OF LIVE HIGH: TRAIN LOW ALTITUDE AND INTERMITTENT HYPOXIC EXPOSURE

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    Clare E. Humberstone-Gough

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Live High:Train Low (LHTL altitude training is a popular ergogenic aid amongst athletes. An alternative hypoxia protocol, acute (60-90 min daily Intermittent Hypoxic Exposure (IHE, has shown potential for improving athletic performance. The aim of this study was to compare directly the effects of LHTL and IHE on the running and blood characteristics of elite triathletes. Changes in total haemoglobin mass (Hbmass, maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max, velocity at VO2max (vVO2max, time to exhaustion (TTE, running economy, maximal blood lactate concentration ([La] and 3 mM [La] running speed were compared following 17 days of LHTL (240 h of hypoxia, IHE (10.2 h of hypoxia or Placebo treatment in 24 Australian National Team triathletes (7 female, 17 male. There was a clear 3.2 ± 4.8% (mean ± 90% confidence limits increase in Hbmass following LHTL compared with Placebo, whereas the corresponding change of -1.4 ± 4.5% in IHE was unclear. Following LHTL, running economy was 2.8 ± 4.4% improved compared to IHE and 3mM [La] running speed was 4.4 ± 4.5% improved compared to Placebo. After IHE, there were no beneficial changes in running economy or 3mM [La] running speed compared to Placebo. There were no clear changes in VO2max, vVO2max and TTE following either method of hypoxia. The clear difference in Hbmass response between LHTL and IHE indicated that the dose of hypoxia in IHE was insufficient to induce accelerated erythropoiesis. Improved running economy and 3mM [La] running speed following LHTL suggested that this method of hypoxic exposure may enhance performance at submaximal running speeds. Overall, there was no evidence to support the use of IHE in elite triathletes

  16. Attenuated response to repeated daily ozone exposures in asthmatic subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, H. Jr.; Linn, W.S. [Rancho Low Amigos Medical Center, Downey, CA (United States); McManus, M.S. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The development of attenuated response ({open_quotes}tolerance{close_quotes}) to daily ozone (O{sub 3}) exposures in the laboratory is well established in healthy adult volunteers. However, the capability of asthmatics to develop tolerance during multiday ozone exposures in unclear. We exposed 10 adult volunteers with mild asthma to 0.4 ppm O{sub 3} in filtered air for 3 h/d on 5 consecutive d. Two similar filtered-air exposures during the preceding week served as controls. Follow-up O{sub 3} exposures were performed 4 and 7 d after the most recent consecutive exposure. All exposures were performed in an environmental chamber at 31 {degrees}C and 35% relative humidity. The subjects performed moderate exercise (mean ventilation rate of 32 l/min) for 15 min of each half-hour. Responses were measured with spirometry and symptom evaluations before and after each exposure, and a bronchial reactivity test (methacholine challenge) was conducted after each exposure. All response measurements showed clinically and statistically significant day-to-day variation. Symptom and forced-expiratory-volume-in-1-s responses were similarly large on the 1st and 2nd O{sub 3} exposure days, after which they diminished progressively, approaching filtered air response levels by the 5th consecutive O{sub 3} day. This tolerance was partially lost 4 and 7 d later. Bronchial reactivity peaked after the first O{sub 3} exposure and remained somewhat elevated after all subsequent O{sub 3} exposures, relative to its control level following filtered-air exposures. Individual responses varied widely; more severe initial responses to O{sub 3} predicted less rapid attenuation. We concluded that asthmatics can develop tolerance to frequent high-level O{sub 3} exposures in much the same manner as normal subjects, although the process may be slower and less fully effective in asthmatics. 27 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Distinctive adaptive response to repeated exposure to hydrogen peroxide associated with upregulation of DNA repair genes and cell cycle arrest

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    Gloria A. Santa-Gonzalez

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Many environmental and physiological stresses are chronic. Thus, cells are constantly exposed to diverse types of genotoxic insults that challenge genome stability, including those that induce oxidative DNA damage. However, most in vitro studies that model cellular response to oxidative stressors employ short exposures and/or acute stress models. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that chronic and repeated exposure to a micromolar concentration of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 could activate DNA damage responses, resulting in cellular adaptations. For this purpose, we developed an in vitro model in which we incubated mouse myoblast cells with a steady concentration of ~50 μM H2O2 for one hour daily for seven days, followed by a final challenge of a 10 or 20X higher dose of H2O2 (0.5 or 1 mM. We report that intermittent long-term exposure to this oxidative stimulus nearly eliminated cell toxicity and significantly decreased genotoxicity (in particular, a >5-fold decreased in double-strand breaks resulting from subsequent acute exposure to oxidative stress. This protection was associated with cell cycle arrest in G2/M and induction of expression of nine DNA repair genes. Together, this evidence supports an adaptive response to chronic, low-level oxidative stress that results in genomic protection and up-regulated maintenance of cellular homeostasis.

  18. Lens opacities after repeated exposure to ultraviolet radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, R; Löfgren, S; Söderberg, P G

    1999-12-01

    To investigate the effect of the interval between two, near-threshold exposures to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) on cataract development. One eye of Sprague-Dawley rats was exposed twice to 4 kJ/m2 narrow band UVR (lambdaMAX=300 nm) for 15 min each. The interval between exposures was 0, 6, 24 or 48 h. One week after the first exposure both lenses were removed for photography and measurement of the intensity of forward light scattering to quantify lens opacities. All exposed lenses developed cataract. Forward light scattering was the same after double exposure with no interval or a 6 h interval. Forward light scattering after a 24 or 48 h interval was nearly twofold greater than that following no interval or a 6 h interval. The exposed lenses in all groups had mild anterior surface opacities and intense equatorial opacities as judged with a stereomicroscope. Two, near-threshold UVR exposures at 0 or a 6 h interval produce the same degree of lens opacification. When the second exposure follows 24 or 48 h after the first, lenticular damage increases. Repair processes between 24 and 48 h after exposure appear to be sensitive to UVR, and an additional exposure during this time may aggravate cataract development.

  19. Positive affective interactions: The role of repeated exposure and copresence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shahid, S.; Krahmer, E.; Neerincx, M.; Swerts, M.

    2013-01-01

    We describe and evaluate a new interface to induce positive emotions in users: a digital, interactive adaptive mirror. We study whether the induced affect is repeatable after a fixed interval (Study 1) and how copresence influences the emotion induction (Study 2). Results show that participants syst

  20. Effects of hyperlipidemia on adaptive responses to repeated zinc exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    In individuals with underlying atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease (CHD), exposure to near-road air pollution correlates epidemiologically with deleterious health outcome. Associated cardiotoxicity purportedly involves generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activa...

  1. Repeated exposure to conditioned fear stress increases anxiety and delays sleep recovery following exposure to an acute traumatic stressor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin N Greenwood

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Repeated stressor exposure can sensitize physiological responses to novel stressors and facilitate the development of stress-related psychiatric disorders including anxiety. Disruptions in diurnal rhythms of sleep-wake behavior accompany stress-related psychiatric disorders and could contribute to their development. Complex stressors that include fear-eliciting stimuli can be a component of repeated stress experienced by humans, but whether exposure to repeated fear can prime the development of anxiety and sleep disturbances is unknown. In the current study, adult male F344 rats were exposed to either control conditions or repeated contextual fear conditioning for 22 days followed by exposure to either no, mild (10, or severe (100 acute uncontrollable tail shock stress. Exposure to acute stress produced anxiety-like behavior as measured by a reduction in juvenile social exploration and exaggerated shock-elicited freezing in a novel context. Prior exposure to repeated fear enhanced anxiety-like behavior as measured by shock-elicited freezing, but did not alter social exploratory behavior. The potentiation of anxiety produced by prior repeated fear was temporary; exaggerated fear was present 1 day but not 4 days following acute stress. Interestingly, exposure to acute stress reduced REM and NREM sleep during the hours immediately following acute stress. This initial reduction in sleep was followed by robust REM rebound and diurnal rhythm flattening of sleep / wake behavior. Prior repeated fear extended the acute stress-induced REM and NREM sleep loss, impaired REM rebound, and prolonged the flattening of the diurnal rhythm of NREM sleep following acute stressor exposure. These data suggest that impaired recovery of sleep / wake behavior following acute stress could contribute to the mechanisms by which a history of prior repeated stress increases vulnerability to subsequent novel stressors and stress-related disorders.

  2. Effects of repeated skin exposure to low nickel concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, N H; Menné, T; Kristiansen, J

    1999-01-01

    and nickel allergy, either on normal or on SLS-treated forearm skin. The present study strongly suggests that the changes observed were specific to nickel exposure. Standardized methods to assess trace to moderate nickel exposure on the hands, and the associated effects in nickel-sensitized subjects...... with a group of patients who immersed a finger into water. The nickel concentrations used also provoked significant inflammatory skin changes on sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS)-treated forearm skin of the patients, whereas inflammatory skin changes were not observed in healthy volunteers without hand eczema...

  3. Sensitization and Tolerance Following Repeated Exposure to Caffeine and Alcohol in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Christina E.; Haun, Harold L.; Griffin, William C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Energy drinks are popular mixers with alcohol. While energy drinks contain many ingredients, caffeine is an important pharmacologically active component and is generally present in larger amounts than in other caffeinated beverages. In these studies, we investigated the hypothesis that caffeine would influence the effects of alcohol (ethanol) on conditioned taste aversion, ataxia and locomotor activity after repeated exposure. Methods Four groups of mice were exposed by oral gavage twice daily to vehicle, ethanol (4 g/kg), caffeine (15 mg/kg), or the ethanol/caffeine combination. Conditioned taste aversion to saccharin and ataxia in the parallel rod task were evaluated after 8 or 16 gavages, respectively, using ethanol (1–3 g/kg) or ethanol/caffeine (3mg/kg + 2 g/kg) challenges. In addition, locomotor activity was evaluated initially and after repeated exposure to oral gavage of these drugs and doses. Results Repeated oral gavage of ethanol produced significant locomotor sensitization, with those mice increasing total distance traveled by 2-fold. The locomotor response to caffeine, while significantly greater than vehicle gavage, did not change with repeated exposure. On the other hand, repeated gavage of caffeine/ethanol combination produced a substantial increase in total distance traveled after repeated exposure (~4-fold increase). After repeated ethanol exposure, there was significant tolerance to ethanol in the conditioned taste aversion and parallel rod tests. However, neither a history of caffeine exposure nor including caffeine influenced ethanol-induced conditioned taste aversion. Interestingly, a history of caffeine exposure increased the ataxic response to the caffeine/ethanol combination and appeared to reduce the ataxic response to high doses of ethanol. Conclusion The data support the general hypothesis that repeated exposure to caffeine influences the response to ethanol. Together with previously published work, these data indicate

  4. Changes in carotid body and nTS neuronal excitability following neonatal sustained and chronic intermittent hypoxia exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, C A; Wilson, C G; MacFarlane, P M

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether pre-treatment with neonatal sustained hypoxia (SH) prior to chronic intermittent hypoxia (SH+CIH) would modify in vitro carotid body (CB) chemoreceptor activity and the excitability of neurons in the caudal nucleus of the solitary tract (nTS). Sustained hypoxia followed by CIH exposure simulates an oxygen paradigm experienced by extremely premature infants who developed persistent apnea. Rat pups were treated with 5 days of SH (11% O2) from postnatal age 1 (P1) followed by 10 days of subsequent chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH, 5% O2/5 min, 8 h/day, between P6 and P15) as described previously (Mayer et al., Respir. Physiol. Neurobiol. 187(2): 167-75, 2013). At the end of SH+CIH exposure (P16), basal firing frequency was enhanced, and the hypoxic sensory response of single unit CB chemoafferents was attenuated. Further, basal firing frequency and the amplitude of evoked excitatory post-synaptic currents (ESPC's) of nTS neurons was augmented compared to age-matched rats raised in normoxia. These effects were unique to SH+CIH exposure as neither SH or CIH alone elicited any comparable effect on chemoafferent activity or nTS function. These data indicated that pre-treatment with neonatal SH prior to CIH exposure uniquely modified mechanisms of peripheral (CB) and central (nTS) neural function in a way that would be expected to disturb the ventilatory response to acute hypoxia.

  5. Within-session effect of repeated stress exposure on extinction circuitry function in social anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åhs, Fredrik; Gingnell, Malin; Furmark, Tomas; Fredrikson, Mats

    2017-03-30

    Anxiety reduction following repeated exposure to stressful experiences is generally held to depend on neural processes involved in extinction of conditioned fear. We predicted that repeated exposure to stressful experiences would change activity throughout the circuitry serving extinction, including ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), the hippocampus and the amygdala. To test this prediction, 36 participants diagnosed with SAD performed two successive speeches in front of an observing audience while regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was recorded using positron emission tomography. To control for non-anxiolytic effects of repeated exposure, rCBF was also measured during repeated presentations of neutral and angry facial expressions. Results showed that anxiety ratings and heart rate decreased from the first to the second speech, indicating an anxiolytic effect of repeated exposure. Exposure attenuated rCBF in the amygdala whereas no change in rCBF was observed in the vmPFC or hippocampus. The rCBF-reductions in the amygdala were greater following repetition of the speech task than repetition of face exposure indicating that they were specific to anxiety attenuation and not due to a reduced novelty. Our findings suggest that amygdala-related attenuation processes are key to understanding the working mechanisms of exposure therapy.

  6. Comparison of biological effects between continuous and intermittent exposure to GSM-900-MHz mobile phone radiation: Detection of apoptotic cell-death features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavdoula, Evangelia D; Panagopoulos, Dimitris J; Margaritis, Lukas H

    2010-07-19

    In the present study we used a 6-min daily exposure of dipteran flies, Drosophila melanogaster, to GSM-900MHz (Global System for Mobile Telecommunications) mobile phone electromagnetic radiation (EMR), to compare the effects between the continuous and four different intermittent exposures of 6min total duration, and also to test whether intermittent exposure provides any cumulative effects on the insect's reproductive capacity as well as on the induction of apoptotic cell death. According to our previous experiments, a 6-min continuous exposure per day for 5 days to GSM-900MHz and DCS-1800MHz (Digital Cellular System) mobile phone radiation, brought about a large decrease in the insect's reproductive capacity, as defined by the number of F(1) pupae. This decrease was found to be non-thermal and correlated with an increased percentage of induced fragmented DNA in the egg chambers' cells at early- and mid-oogenesis. In the present experiments we show that intermittent exposure also decreases the reproductive capacity and alters the actin-cytoskeleton network of the egg chambers, another known aspect of cell death that was not investigated in previous experiments, and that the effect is also due to DNA fragmentation. Intermittent exposures with 10-min intervals between exposure sessions proved to be almost equally effective as continuous exposure of the same total duration, whereas longer intervals between the exposures seemed to allow the organism the time required to recover and partly overcome the above-mentioned effects of the GSM exposure.

  7. Development of aquarium fish models for environmental carcinogenesis: an intermittent-flow exposure system for volatile, hydrophobic chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, W.W.; Manning, C.S.; Overstreet, R.M.; Hawkins, W.E.

    1985-08-01

    An intermittent-flow exposure system was designed to provide stable and manipulative concentrations of volatile and hydrophobic compounds to small aquatic animals for uninterrupted long periods. Test species for 28-day experiments included two aquarium fishes, the Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) and the king cobra guppy (Poecilia reticulata). Test chemicals included trichloroethylene, vinylidene chloride, bis(2-chloroethyl)ether, ethylene dichloride, and a mixture of carbon tetrachloride, trichloroethylene, chloroform, bromodichloromethane, chlorodibromomethane and bromoform. These compounds are drinking water biorefractories and are potentially carcinogenic. Concentrated aqueous toxicant solutions, delivered from a remote triple carboy dispensing system, were mixed with diluent water within an isolated chamber containing exposure aquaria and test fish. Toxicant concentrations measured throughout each exposure period proved to be stable within acceptable variability ranges as indicated by coefficients of variation generally less than 15%.

  8. Striatal dopamine dynamics in mice following acute and repeated toluene exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apawu, Aaron K; Mathews, Tiffany A; Bowen, Scott E

    2015-01-01

    The abused inhalant toluene has potent behavioral effects, but only recently has progress been made in understanding the neurochemical actions that mediate the action of toluene in the brain. Available evidence suggests that toluene inhalation alters dopamine (DA) neurotransmission, but toluene's mechanism of action is unknown. The present study evaluated the effect of acute and repeated toluene inhalation (0, 2,000, or 4,000 ppm) on locomotor activity as well as striatal DA release and uptake using slice fast-scan cyclic voltammetry. Acutely, 2,000 and 4,000 ppm toluene increased locomotor activity, while neurochemically only 4,000 ppm toluene potentiated electrically evoked DA release across the caudate-putamen and the nucleus accumbens. Repeated administration of toluene resulted in sensitization to toluene's locomotor activity effects. Brain slices obtained from mice repeatedly exposed to toluene demonstrated no difference in stimulated DA release in the caudate-putamen as compared to control animals. Repeated exposure to 2,000 and 4,000 ppm toluene caused a concentration-dependent decrease of 25-50 % in evoked DA release in the nucleus accumbens core and shell relative to air-exposed mice. These voltammetric neurochemical findings following repeated toluene exposure suggest that there may be a compensatory downregulation of the DA system. Acute or repeated toluene exposure had no effect on the DA uptake kinetics. Taken together, these results demonstrate that acute toluene inhalation potentiates DA release, while repeated toluene exposure attenuates DA release in the nucleus accumbens only.

  9. Repeated cue exposure effects on subjective and physiological indices of chocolate craving

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gucht, D.; Vansteenwegen, D.; Beckers, T.; Hermans, D.; Baeyens, F.; Van den Bergh, O.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of repeated unreinforced exposure to chocolate cues in persons reporting chocolate craving. Participants in the experimental group (n ¼ 40) received 10 consecutive brief exposures to chocolate cues in each of two sessions, separated by 1-3 days.

  10. Repeated cue exposure effects on subjective and physiological indices of chocolate craving

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gucht, D.; Vansteenwegen, D.; Beckers, T.; Hermans, D.; Baeyens, F.; Van den Bergh, O.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of repeated unreinforced exposure to chocolate cues in persons reporting chocolate craving. Participants in the experimental group (n ¼ 40) received 10 consecutive brief exposures to chocolate cues in each of two sessions, separated by 1-3 days. Co

  11. Mid-Childhood Bone Mass After Exposure to Repeat Doses of Antenatal Glucocorticoids: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinlay, Christopher J D; Cutfield, Wayne S; Battin, Malcolm R; Dalziel, Stuart R; Crowther, Caroline A; Harding, Jane E

    2017-05-01

    Treatment of women at risk for preterm birth with repeat doses of glucocorticoids reduces neonatal morbidity, but could have adverse effects on skeletal development. We assessed whether exposure to repeat antenatal betamethasone alters bone mass in children whose mothers participated in the Australasian Collaborative Trial of Repeat Doses of Corticosteroids. Women were randomized to a single dose of betamethasone or placebo, ≥7 days after an initial course of glucocorticoids, repeated each week that they remained at risk for preterm birth at children underwent whole-body dual-energy radiograph absorptiometry at 6 to 8 years' corrected age. Of 212 eligible childhood survivors, 185 were studied (87%; 91 repeat betamethasone group; 94 placebo [single course] group). Children exposed to repeat antenatal betamethasone and those exposed to placebo had similar whole-body bone mineral content (median repeat betamethasone: 553 g, interquartile range: 442-712 g; placebo: 567 g, interquartile range: 447-750 g; geometric mean ratio: 0.99; 95% confidence interval: 0.94-1.03, P = .55) and bone area (median repeat betamethasone 832 cm(2), interquartile range: 693-963 cm(2); placebo: 822 cm(2), interquartile range: 710-1020 cm(2); geometric mean ratio: 0.99, 95% confidence interval: 0.92-1.07, P = .75). Exposure to repeat doses of antenatal betamethasone compared with a single course of glucocorticoids does not alter bone mass in mid-childhood. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  12. The Role of Repeated Exposure to Multimodal Input in Incidental Acquisition of Foreign Language Vocabulary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisson, Marie-Josée; van Heuven, Walter J B; Conklin, Kathy; Tunney, Richard J

    2014-12-01

    Prior research has reported incidental vocabulary acquisition with complete beginners in a foreign language (FL), within 8 exposures to auditory and written FL word forms presented with a picture depicting their meaning. However, important questions remain about whether acquisition occurs with fewer exposures to FL words in a multimodal situation and whether there is a repeated exposure effect. Here we report a study where the number of exposures to FL words in an incidental learning phase varied between 2, 4, 6, and 8 exposures. Following the incidental learning phase, participants completed an explicit learning task where they learned to recognize written translation equivalents of auditory FL word forms, half of which had occurred in the incidental learning phase. The results showed that participants performed better on the words they had previously been exposed to, and that this incidental learning effect occurred from as little as 2 exposures to the multimodal stimuli. In addition, repeated exposure to the stimuli was found to have a larger impact on learning during the first few exposures and decrease thereafter, suggesting that the effects of repeated exposure on vocabulary acquisition are not necessarily constant.

  13. Repeated exposure to noise increases tolerance in a coral reef fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedelec, Sophie L; Mills, Suzanne C; Lecchini, David; Nedelec, Brendan; Simpson, Stephen D; Radford, Andrew N

    2016-09-01

    Some anthropogenic noise is now considered pollution, with evidence building that noise from human activities such as transportation, construction and exploration can impact behaviour and physiology in a broad range of taxa. However, relatively little research has considered the effects of repeated or chronic noise; extended exposures may result in habituation or sensitisation, and thus changes in response. We conducted a field-based experiment at Moorea Island to investigate how repeated exposure to playback of motorboat noise affected a coral reef fish (Dascyllus trimaculatus). We found that juvenile D. trimaculatus increased hiding behaviour during motorboat noise after two days of repeated exposure, but no longer did so after one and two weeks of exposure. We also found that naïve individuals responded to playback of motorboat noise with elevated ventilation rates, but that this response was diminished after one and two weeks of repeated exposure. We found no strong evidence that baseline blood cortisol levels, growth or body condition were affected by three weeks of repeated motorboat-noise playback. Our study reveals the importance of considering how tolerance levels may change over time, rather than simply extrapolating from results of short-term studies, if we are to make decisions about regulation and mitigation.

  14. Ceftriaxone attenuates locomotor activity induced by acute and repeated cocaine exposure in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallarida, Christopher S; Corley, Gladys; Kovalevich, Jane; Yen, William; Langford, Dianne; Rawls, Scott M

    2013-11-27

    Ceftriaxone (CTX) decreases locomotor activation produced by initial cocaine exposure and attenuates development of behavioral sensitization produced by repeated cocaine exposure. An important question that has not yet been answered is whether or not CTX reduces behavioral sensitization to cocaine in cases in which the antibiotic is administered only during the period of cocaine absence that follows repeated cocaine exposure and precedes reintroduction to cocaine. We investigated this question using C57BL/6 mice. Mice pretreated with cocaine (15mg/kg×14 days) and then challenged with cocaine (15mg/kg) after 30 days of cocaine absence displayed sensitization of locomotor activity. For combination experiments, CTX injected during the 30 days of cocaine absence attenuated behavioral sensitization produced by cocaine challenge. In the case in which CTX was injected together with cocaine for 14 days, development of behavioral sensitization to cocaine challenge was also reduced. CTX attenuated the increase in locomotor activity produced by acute cocaine exposure; however, its efficacy was dependent on the dose of cocaine as inhibition was detected against 30mg/kg, but not 15mg/kg, of cocaine. These results from mice indicate that CTX attenuates locomotor activity produced by acute and repeated cocaine exposure and counters cocaine's locomotor activating properties in a paradigm in which the antibiotic is injected during the period of forced cocaine absence that follows repeated cocaine exposure.

  15. Repeated, Intermittent Social Defeat across the Entire Juvenile Period Resulted in Behavioral, Physiological, Hormonal, Immunological, and Neurochemical Alterations in Young Adult Male Golden Hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wei-Chun; Liu, Ching-Yi; Lai, Wen-Sung

    2016-01-01

    The developing brain is vulnerable to social defeat during the juvenile period. As complements of human studies, animal models of social defeat provide a straightforward approach to investigating the functional and neurobiological consequences of social defeats. Taking advantage of agonist behavior and social defeat in male golden hamster, a set of 6 experiments was conducted to investigate the consequences at multiple levels in young adulthood resulting from repeated, intermittent social defeats or "social threats" across the entire juvenile period. Male hamsters at postnatal day 28 (P28) were randomly assigned to either the social defeat, "social threat", or arena control group, and they correspondingly received a series of nine social interaction trials (i.e., either social defeat, "social threat", or arena control conditions) from P33 to P66. At the behavioral level (Experiment 1), we found that repeated social defeats (but not "social threats") significantly impacted locomotor activity in the familiar context and social interaction in the familiar/unfamiliar social contexts. At the physiological and hormonal levels (Experiments 2 and 3), repeated social defeat significantly enhanced the cortisol and norepinephrine concentrations in blood. Enlargement of the spleen was also found in the social defeat and "social threat" groups. At the immunological level (Experiment 4), the social defeat group showed lower levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the hypothalamus and hippocampus but higher concentration of IL-6 in the striatum compared to the other two groups. At the neurochemical level (Experiment 5), the socially defeated hamsters mainly displayed reductions of dopamine, dopamine metabolites, and 5-HT levels in the striatum and decreased level of 5-HT in the hippocampus. In Experiment 6, an increase in the spine density of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons was specifically observed in the "social threat" group. Collectively, our findings indicate that repeated

  16. Effects of Intermittent Alcohol Exposure on Emotion and Cognition: A Potential Role for the Endogenous Cannabinoid System and Neuroinflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Marin, Laura; Pavon, Francisco J.; Decara, Juan; Suarez, Juan; Gavito, Ana; Castilla-Ortega, Estela; Rodriguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Serrano, Antonia

    2017-01-01

    Intermittent alcohol exposure is a common pattern of adolescent alcohol use that can lead to binge drinking episodes. Alcohol use is known to modulate the endocannabinoid system (ECS), which is involved in neuronal communication, neuroplasticity, neuroinflammation and behavior. Adolescent male Wistar rats were exposed to 4-week intermittent alcohol intoxication (3 g/kg injections for 4 days/week) or saline (N = 12 per group). After alcohol deprivation, adult rats were assessed for emotionality and cognition and the gene expression of the ECS and other factors related to behavior and neuroinflammation was examined in the brain. Alcohol-exposed rats exhibited anxiogenic-like responses and impaired recognition memory but no motor alterations. There were brain region-dependent changes in the mRNA levels of the ECS and molecular signals compared with control rats. Thus, overall, alcohol-exposed rats expressed higher mRNA levels of endocannabinoid synthetic enzymes (N-acyl-phosphatidylethanolamine phospholipase D and diacylglycerol lipases) in the medial-prefrontal cortex (mPFC) but lower mRNA levels in the amygdala. Furthermore, we observed lower mRNA levels of receptors CB1 CB2 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α in the striatum. Regarding neuropeptide signaling, alcohol-exposed rats displayed lower mRNA levels of the neuropeptide Y signaling, particularly NPY receptor-2, in the amygdala and hippocampus and higher mRNA levels of corticotropin-releasing factor in the hippocampus. Additionally, we observed changes of several neuroinflammation-related factors. Whereas, the mRNA levels of toll-like receptor-4, tumor necrosis factor-α, cyclooxygenase-2 and glial fibrillary acidic protein were significantly increased in the mPFC, the mRNA levels of cyclooxygenase-2 and glial fibrillary acidic protein were decreased in the striatum and hippocampus. However, nuclear factor-κβ mRNA levels were lower in the mPFC and striatum and allograft inflammatory factor-1

  17. Effects of Intermittent Alcohol Exposure on Emotion and Cognition: A Potential Role for the Endogenous Cannabinoid System and Neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Marin, Laura; Pavon, Francisco J; Decara, Juan; Suarez, Juan; Gavito, Ana; Castilla-Ortega, Estela; Rodriguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Serrano, Antonia

    2017-01-01

    Intermittent alcohol exposure is a common pattern of adolescent alcohol use that can lead to binge drinking episodes. Alcohol use is known to modulate the endocannabinoid system (ECS), which is involved in neuronal communication, neuroplasticity, neuroinflammation and behavior. Adolescent male Wistar rats were exposed to 4-week intermittent alcohol intoxication (3 g/kg injections for 4 days/week) or saline (N = 12 per group). After alcohol deprivation, adult rats were assessed for emotionality and cognition and the gene expression of the ECS and other factors related to behavior and neuroinflammation was examined in the brain. Alcohol-exposed rats exhibited anxiogenic-like responses and impaired recognition memory but no motor alterations. There were brain region-dependent changes in the mRNA levels of the ECS and molecular signals compared with control rats. Thus, overall, alcohol-exposed rats expressed higher mRNA levels of endocannabinoid synthetic enzymes (N-acyl-phosphatidylethanolamine phospholipase D and diacylglycerol lipases) in the medial-prefrontal cortex (mPFC) but lower mRNA levels in the amygdala. Furthermore, we observed lower mRNA levels of receptors CB1 CB2 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α in the striatum. Regarding neuropeptide signaling, alcohol-exposed rats displayed lower mRNA levels of the neuropeptide Y signaling, particularly NPY receptor-2, in the amygdala and hippocampus and higher mRNA levels of corticotropin-releasing factor in the hippocampus. Additionally, we observed changes of several neuroinflammation-related factors. Whereas, the mRNA levels of toll-like receptor-4, tumor necrosis factor-α, cyclooxygenase-2 and glial fibrillary acidic protein were significantly increased in the mPFC, the mRNA levels of cyclooxygenase-2 and glial fibrillary acidic protein were decreased in the striatum and hippocampus. However, nuclear factor-κβ mRNA levels were lower in the mPFC and striatum and allograft inflammatory factor-1

  18. Repeated Exposure to Sublethal Doses of the Organophosphorus Compound VX Activates BDNF Expression in Mouse Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    cresyl/-4 H-1: 3: 2-benzodioxa- phosphorin-2-oxide (CBDP) on organophosphate poisoning and its therapy. Arch. Toxicol. 42, 207–216. French, S. J... organophosphates or other environmental insults, have a greater FIG. 4. Mice that received repeated exposure to low levels of VX (0.2 LD50 and 0.4 LD50...to neuro- behavioral deficits and neuropathology. Although exposure to organophosphates such as pesticides has been shown to affect the expression of

  19. Effects of Gestational and Postnatal Exposure to Chronic Intermittent Hypoxia on Diaphragm Muscle Contractile Function in the Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Fiona B.; Dempsey, Eugene M.; O'Halloran, Ken D.

    2016-01-01

    Alterations to the supply of oxygen during early life presents a profound stressor to physiological systems with aberrant remodeling that is often long-lasting. Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) is a feature of apnea of prematurity, chronic lung disease, and sleep apnea. CIH affects respiratory control but there is a dearth of information concerning the effects of CIH on respiratory muscles, including the diaphragm—the major pump muscle of breathing. We investigated the effects of exposure to gestational CIH (gCIH) and postnatal CIH (pCIH) on diaphragm muscle function in male and female rats. CIH consisted of exposure in environmental chambers to 90 s of hypoxia reaching 5% O2 at nadir, once every 5 min, 8 h a day. Exposure to gCIH started within 24 h of identification of a copulation plug and continued until day 20 of gestation; animals were studied on postnatal day 22 or 42. For pCIH, pups were born in normoxia and within 24 h of delivery were exposed with dams to CIH for 3 weeks; animals were studied on postnatal day 22 or 42. Sham groups were exposed to normoxia in parallel. Following gas exposures, diaphragm muscle contractile, and endurance properties were examined ex vivo. Neither gCIH nor pCIH exposure had effects on diaphragm muscle force-generating capacity or endurance in either sex. Similarly, early life exposure to CIH did not affect muscle tolerance of severe hypoxic stress determined ex vivo. The findings contrast with our recent observation of upper airway dilator muscle weakness following exposure to pCIH. Thus, the present study suggests a relative resilience to hypoxic stress in diaphragm muscle. Co-ordinated activity of thoracic pump and upper airway dilator muscles is required for optimal control of upper airway caliber. A mismatch in the force-generating capacity of the complementary muscle groups could have adverse consequences for the control of airway patency and respiratory homeostasis. PMID:27462274

  20. The levels of kerosene components in biological samples after repeated dermal exposure to kerosene in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujihara, Junko; Hieda, Yoko; Tsujino, Yoshio; Xue, Yuying; Takayama, Koji; Kimura, Kojiro; Dekio, Satoshi

    2004-04-01

    The current study was experimentally investigated using rats whether or not kerosene components are accumulated from daily repeated dermal exposure. Rats received daily 1h-exposure to kerosene for 5 days (5K), daily 1h-exposure for 4 days and left for 1 day (4KL), a single 1h-exposure (1K), a single 1h-exposure and left for 1 day (1KL), or a single 1h-exposure, sacrificed and left dead for 1 day (1KLD). Kerosene components, trimethylbenzenes (TMBs) and aliphatic hydrocarbons (AHCs) in blood and tissues were determined by GC-MS. In blood, almost the same concentrations of TMBs were detected in the rats sacrificed immediately after exposure (5K, 1K and 1KLD), and only trace levels were detected in the rats sacrificed 1 day after exposure (4 and 1KL). Almost the same levels of AHCs in blood were detected among groups except for the rats sacrificed 1 day after a single exposure (1KL), in which AHCs were slightly lower. These results suggest that (1) AHCs tend to be accumulated from daily exposure, while TMBs do not, (2) the proportions of detected kerosene components in blood can be an indicator of whether the last exposure occurred just before death or not, (3) the kerosene levels last at least 1 day without blood circulation.

  1. Sweet and sour preferences in young children and adults: role of repeated exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liem, D.G.; Graaf, de C.

    2004-01-01

    The authors investigated the influence of repeated exposure to orangeades with added sucrose and different concentrations of citric acid, on the taste preferences of 6- to-11-year-old children and young adults. During an intervention study of 8 days, 59 children (9.2±0.9 years) and 46 young adults (

  2. Repeated toluene exposure increases c-Fos in catecholaminergic cells of the nucleus accumbens shell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaszycki, Michelle L; Aulerich, Kelsey E; Bowen, Scott E

    2013-01-01

    Toluene is a frequently abused solvent. Previous studies have suggested that toluene acts like other drugs of abuse, specifically on the dopaminergic system in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and ventral tegmental area (VTA) of the mesolimbic pathway. Although changes in dopamine (DA) levels and c-Fos have been observed in both acute and repeated exposure paradigms, the extent to which c-Fos is localized to catecholaminergic cells is unknown. The present study tested the effects of repeated toluene exposure (1000-4000ppm) on locomotor activity and cells containing c-Fos, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), or both in the core and shell of the NAc, as well as the anterior and posterior VTA. We focused our study on adolescents, since adolescence is a time of great neural change and a time when individuals tend to be more susceptible to drug abuse. In early tests, toluene dose-dependently increased locomotor activity. Repeated exposure to the highest concentration of toluene resulted in sensitization to toluene's effects on locomotor activity. Although the number of cells immunopositive for c-Fos or TH did not significantly differ across groups, cells immunopositive for TH+c-Fos were higher in the NAc shell of animals exposed to 4000ppm than in animals exposed to air (control) or 1000ppm. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that repeated high dose toluene exposure increases locomotor activity as well as activation of catecholaminergic cells in the shell of the NAc. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of Repeated Exposures on Word Learning in Quiet and Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaiser, Kristina M.; Nelson, Peggy B.; Kohnert, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the impact of repeated exposures on word learning of preschool children with and without hearing loss (HL) in quiet and noise conditions. Participants were 19 children with HL and 17 peers with normal hearing (NH). Children were introduced to 16 words: 8 in quiet and 8 in noise conditions. Production and identification scores…

  4. Sweet and sour preferences in young children and adults: role of repeated exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liem, D.G.; Graaf, de C.

    2004-01-01

    The authors investigated the influence of repeated exposure to orangeades with added sucrose and different concentrations of citric acid, on the taste preferences of 6- to-11-year-old children and young adults. During an intervention study of 8 days, 59 children (9.2±0.9 years) and 46 young adults

  5. Effect of repeated exposures and sociality on novel food acceptance and consumption by orangutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardus, Madeleine E; Lameira, Adriano R; Wich, Serge A; de Vries, Han; Wahyudi, Rachmad; Shumaker, Robert W; Menken, Steph B J

    2015-01-01

    Hundreds of rehabilitant great apes have been released into the wild, and thousands await release. However, survival rates after release can be as low as 20%. Several factors influence individuals' survival rates, one of which is the capacity to obtain an adequate diet once released. Released individuals are faced with a mixture of familiar and novel foods in an unfamiliar forest; therefore, it is important to understand how they increase acceptance and consumption of novel foods. This is especially vital for omnivorous species, such as wild great apes, which consume several hundred species of different foods. We assessed the effects of repeated exposures and sociality (i.e. co-feeding in the presence of one or more other individuals) on the acceptance and consumption of novel foods by captive orangutans (Pongo sp). Repeated exposures of food (novel, at first) did not cause an increase of acceptance of food; in other words, the orangutans did not start to eat a food item after being exposed to that food more often, but repeated exposures of food increased consumption (i.e. quantity). After repeated exposures, the orangutans also became gradually more familiar with the food, decreasing their explorative behaviour. The presence of co-feeding conspecifics resulted in an increased acceptance of the novel food by orangutans, and they ate a larger amount of said foods than when alone. Repeated exposure and sociality may benefit rehabilitant great apes in augmenting and diversifying diet and, once practiced before release, may accelerate an individuals' adaptation to their new habitat, improving survival chances. Great ape rescue, rehabilitation and reintroduction require large financial and logistic investments; however, their effectiveness may be improved at low cost and low effort through the suggested measures.

  6. Intermittent PTHrP(1–34) Exposure Augments Chondrogenesis and Reduces Hypertrophy of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Jennifer; Aulmann, Antje; Dexheimer, Verena; Grossner, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Phenotype instability and premature hypertrophy prevent the use of human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) for cartilage regeneration. Aim of this study was to investigate whether intermittent supplementation of parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP), as opposed to constant treatment, can beneficially influence MSC chondrogenesis and to explore molecular mechanisms below catabolic and anabolic responses. Human MSCs subjected to chondrogenic induction in high-density culture received PTHrP(1–34), forskolin, dbcAMP, or PTHrP(7–34) either constantly or via 6-h pulses (three times weekly), before proteoglycan, collagen type II, and X deposition; gene expression; and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity were assessed. While constant application of PTHrP(1–34) suppressed chondrogenesis of MSCs, pulsed application significantly increased collagen type 2 (COL2A1) gene expression and the collagen type II, proteoglycan, and DNA content of pellets after 6 weeks. Collagen type 10 (COL10A1) gene expression was little affected but Indian hedgehog (IHH) expression and ALP activity were significantly downregulated by pulsed PTHrP. A faster response to PTHrP exposure was recorded for ALP activity over COL2A1 regulation, suggesting that signal duration is critical for catabolic versus anabolic reactions. Stimulation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling by forskolin reproduced major effects of both treatment modes, whereas application of PTHrP(7–34) capable of protein kinase C (PKC) signaling was ineffective. Pulsed PTHrP exposure of MSCs stimulated chondrogenesis and reduced endochondral differentiation apparently uncoupling chondrogenic matrix deposition from hypertrophic marker expression. cAMP/PKA was the major signaling pathway triggering the opposing effects of both treatment modes. Intermittent application of PTHrP represents an important novel means to improve chondrogenesis of MSCs and may be considered as a supporting clinical

  7. Can the Palatability of Healthy, Satiety-Promoting Foods Increase with Repeated Exposure during Weight Loss?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anguah, Katherene O.-B.; Lovejoy, Jennifer C.; Craig, Bruce A.; Gehrke, Malinda M.; Palmer, Philip A.; Eichelsdoerfer, Petra E.; McCrory, Megan A.

    2017-01-01

    Repeated exposure to sugary, fatty, and salty foods often enhances their appeal. However, it is unknown if exposure influences learned palatability of foods typically promoted as part of a healthy diet. We tested whether the palatability of pulse containing foods provided during a weight loss intervention which were particularly high in fiber and low in energy density would increase with repeated exposure. At weeks 0, 3, and 6, participants (n = 42; body mass index (BMI) 31.2 ± 4.3 kg/m2) were given a test battery of 28 foods, approximately half which had been provided as part of the intervention, while the remaining half were not foods provided as part of the intervention. In addition, about half of each of the foods (provided as part or not provided as part of the intervention) contained pulses. Participants rated the taste, appearance, odor, and texture pleasantness of each food, and an overall flavor pleasantness score was calculated as the mean of these four scores. Linear mixed model analyses showed an exposure type by week interaction effect for taste, texture and overall flavor pleasantness indicating statistically significant increases in ratings of provided foods in taste and texture from weeks 0 to 3 and 0 to 6, and overall flavor from weeks 0 to 6. Repeated exposure to these foods, whether they contained pulses or not, resulted in a ~4% increase in pleasantness ratings. The long-term clinical relevance of this small increase requires further study. PMID:28231094

  8. Extensive neuroadaptive changes in cortical gene-transcript expressions of the glutamate system in response to repeated intermittent MDMA administration in adolescent rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malki Rana

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many studies have focused on the implication of the serotonin and dopamine systems in neuroadaptive responses to the recreational drug 3,4-methylenedioxy-metamphetamine (MDMA. Less attention has been given to the major excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate known to be implicated in schizophrenia and drug addiction. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of repeated intermittent MDMA administration upon gene-transcript expression of the glutamate transporters (EAAT1, EAAT2-1, EAAT2-2, the glutamate receptor subunits of AMPA (GluR1, GluR2, GluR3, the glutamate receptor subunits of NMDA (NR1, NR2A and NR2B, as well as metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR1, mGluR2, mGluR3, mGluR5 in six different brain regions. Adolescent male Sprague Dawley rats received MDMA at the doses of 3 × 1 and 3 × 5 mg/kg/day, or 3× vehicle 3 hours apart, every 7th day for 4 weeks. The gene-transcript levels were assessed using real-time PCR validated with a range of housekeeping genes. Results The findings showed pronounced enhancements in gene-transcript expression of GluR2, mGluR1, mGluR5, NR1, NR2A, NR2B, EAAT1, and EAAT2-2 in the cortex at bregma +1.6. In the caudate putamen, mRNA levels of GluR3, NR2A, and NR2B receptor subunits were significantly increased. In contrast, the gene-transcript expression of GluR1 was reduced in the hippocampus. In the hypothalamus, there was a significant increase of GluR1, GluR3, mGluR1, and mGluR3 gene-transcript expressions. Conclusion Repeated intermittent MDMA administration induces neuroadaptive changes in gene-transcript expressions of glutamatergic NMDA and AMPA receptor subunits, metabotropic receptors and transporters in regions of the brain regulating reward-related associative learning, cognition, and memory and neuro-endocrine functions.

  9. A Preliminary Investigation of Continuous and Intermittent Exposures in the Treatment of Public Speaking Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seim, Richard W.; Waller, Stacey A.; Spates, C. Richard

    2010-01-01

    It is often argued that exposure-based treatments for anxiety disorders are only effective if the exposures are presented continuously until a marked decrement in anxiety is achieved (e.g. Foa & Kozak, 1986). However, the data supporting this conclusion is limited. This study compared two treatments for public speaking anxiety: one requiring…

  10. Intermittent Exposure to Social Defeat and Open-field Test in Rats : Acute and Long-term Effects on ECG, Body Temperature and Physical Activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sgoifo, Andrea; Pozzato, Chiara; Meerlo, Peter; Costoli, Tania; Manghi, Massimo; Stilli, Donatella; Olivetti, Giorgio; Musso, Ezio

    2002-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of exposure to an intermittent homotypic stressor on: (i) habituation of acute autonomic responsivity (i.e. cardiac sympathovagal balance and susceptibility to arrhythmias), and (ii) circadian rhythmicity of heart rate, body temperature, and physical activity. Aft

  11. Intermittent Exposure to Social Defeat and Open-field Test in Rats : Acute and Long-term Effects on ECG, Body Temperature and Physical Activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sgoifo, Andrea; Pozzato, Chiara; Meerlo, Peter; Costoli, Tania; Manghi, Massimo; Stilli, Donatella; Olivetti, Giorgio; Musso, Ezio

    2002-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of exposure to an intermittent homotypic stressor on: (i) habituation of acute autonomic responsivity (i.e. cardiac sympathovagal balance and susceptibility to arrhythmias), and (ii) circadian rhythmicity of heart rate, body temperature, and physical activity. Aft

  12. Effect of intermittent chronic exposure to hypoxia on feeding behaviour of rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S. B.; Selvamurthy, W.

    1993-12-01

    Healthy albino male rats were exposed to a simulated high altitude (HA) equivalent to 25000 ft (7620 m) for 6 h daily, continuously for 21 days to study the feeding behaviour. The 24-h food and water intake and body weight once in 3 days were recorded. Blood samples were drawn once a week from the retro-orbital venous plexus for blood sugar analysis. All the parameters were recorded before, during and after exposure to simulated HA. The results show a decrease in 24-h food and water intake and decreased gain in body weight during hypoxic exposure, which showed a tendency to come back to control during the post-exposure period. The blood sugar reflected a state of mild hyperglycaemia during exposure to HA.

  13. Repeated Ketamine Exposure Induces an Enduring Resilient Phenotype in Adolescent and Adult Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parise, Eric M.; Alcantara, Lyonna F.; Warren, Brandon L.; Wright, Katherine N.; Hadad, Roey; Sial, Omar K.; Kroeck, Kyle G.; Iñiguez, Sergio D.; Bolaños-Guzmán, Carlos A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) afflicts up to 10% of adolescents. However, nearly 50% of those afflicted are considered non-responsive to available treatments. Ketamine, a non-competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist has shown potential as a rapid-acting and long-lasting treatment for MDD in adults. Thus, the effectiveness and functional consequences of ketamine exposure during adolescence were explored. Methods Adolescent male rats (postnatal day [PD] 35) received two ketamine (0, 5, 10 or 20 mg/kg) injections, 4 hours apart, after exposure to day 1 of the forced swim test (FST). The next day, rats were re-exposed to the FST to assess ketamine-induced antidepressant-like responses. Separate groups were exposed to chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) to confirm findings from the FST. After these initial experiments, adolescent naïve rats were exposed to either 1 or 15 consecutive days (PD35–49) of ketamine (20 mg/kg) twice/daily. Ketamine's influence on behavioral reactivity to rewarding (i.e., sucrose preference) and aversive (i.e., elevated plus-maze, FST) circumstances was then assessed 2 months after treatment. To control for age-dependent effects, adult rats (PD75–89) were exposed to identical experimental conditions. Results Ketamine (20 mg/kg) reversed the CUS-induced depression-like behaviors in the FST. Repeated ketamine exposure resulted in anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like responses 2 months after drug exposure. None of the ketamine doses used were capable of inducing drug-seeking behaviors as measured by place preference conditioning. Conclusions Repeated ketamine exposure induces enduring resilient-like responses regardless of age of exposure. These findings point to ketamine, and its repeated exposure, as a potentially useful antidepressant during adolescence. PMID:23790225

  14. The effects of repeated exposure to graphic fear appeals on cigarette packages: A field experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, Arie; Bos, Colin

    2015-03-01

    Experimental studies on the effects of graphic fear appeals on cigarette packages typically expose smokers in a single session to a fear appeal, although in practice the exposure is always repeated. The present study applied an improved study design with repeated exposure to fear appeals on cigarette packages. In this field-experiment, 118 smokers were assigned to 1 of 2 conditions with either graphic fear appeals or textual warnings on their cigarette packages. During 3 weeks, fear and disgust were assessed 6 times. The intention to quit smoking after 3 weeks and quitting activity during the 3 weeks were the dependent measures. The effects of 3 pretest individual difference moderators were tested: disengagement beliefs, number of cigarettes smoked a day, and readiness to quit. Three weeks of exposure to the graphic fear appeals led to a stronger intention to quit, but only when smokers scored low on disengagement beliefs, or were heavier smokers. In addition, smokers low in disengagement more often reported to have cut down on smoking in the graphic condition. There were no indications of habituation of fear and disgust over the 3 weeks. The effects of graphic fear appeals depended on smokers' characteristics: The moderators may explain the mixed findings in the literature. The lack of habituation may be caused by the renewal of the graphics every few days. The used field-experimental design with natural repeated exposure to graphics is promising.

  15. Acquired (dis)liking of natural cheese in different repeated exposure environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, Jung-Eun; Kim, Mi-Ran; Chung, Seo-Jin

    2017-09-01

    This study investigated the development of (dis)liking of various types of natural cheese with repeated exposures among Korean young females in two environment settings. Six types of natural cheese with varying flavor and texture characteristics were selected: Brie, Emmental, Gorgonzola, Gouda, Parmigiano-Reggiano and sharp Cheddar. The subjects were randomly divided into two groups (individual evaluation vs. social interaction) and exposed to all six types of cheeses eight times for 4 weeks. The acceptance scores for these cheeses were monitored at the beginning (first taste test) and end (second taste test) of the exposure test as well as 1 month after the completion of exposure test (third taste test). The results showed that the acceptance of cheese was affected by the cheese type and the number of test trials but not by tasting environment. The acceptance levels were higher for Brie, Gouda and sharp Cheddar than for Emmental, Gorgonzola and Parmigiano-Reggiano. When the subjects were exposed to Brie, Emmental, Gouda, and sharp Cheddar repeatedly, their acceptance level increased significantly. This study demonstrated that the liking of natural cheese can occur through repeated exposure to the cheese, but with the outcome varying with the type of cheese. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A Novel Chip for Cyclic Stretch and Intermittent Hypoxia Cell Exposures Mimicking Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campillo, Noelia; Jorba, Ignasi; Schaedel, Laura; Casals, Blai; Gozal, David; Farré, Ramon; Almendros, Isaac; Navajas, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Intermittent hypoxia (IH), a hallmark of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of OSA-associated morbidities, especially in the cardiovascular and respiratory systems. Oxidative stress and inflammation induced by IH are suggested as main contributors of end-organ dysfunction in OSA patients and animal models. Since the molecular mechanisms underlying these in vivo pathological responses remain poorly understood, implementation of experimental in vitro cell-based systems capable of inducing high-frequency IH would be highly desirable. Here, we describe the design, fabrication, and validation of a versatile chip for subjecting cultured cells to fast changes in gas partial pressure and to cyclic stretch. The chip is fabricated with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and consists of a cylindrical well-covered by a thin membrane. Cells cultured on top of the membrane can be subjected to fast changes in oxygen concentration (equilibrium time ~6 s). Moreover, cells can be subjected to cyclic stretch at cardiac or respiratory frequencies independently or simultaneously. Rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) exposed to IH mimicking OSA and cyclic stretch at cardiac frequencies revealed that hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) expression was increased in response to both stimuli. Thus, the chip provides a versatile tool for the study of cellular responses to cyclical hypoxia and stretch. PMID:27524971

  17. A Novel Chip for Cyclic Stretch and Intermittent Hypoxia Cell Exposures Mimicking Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noelia Campillo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent hypoxia (IH, a hallmark of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of OSA-associated morbidities, especially in the cardiovascular and respiratory systems. Oxidative stress and inflammation induced by IH are suggested as main contributors of end-organ dysfunction in OSA patients and animal models. Since the molecular mechanisms underlying these in vivo pathological responses remain poorly understood, implementation of experimental in vitro cell-based systems capable of inducing high-frequency IH would be highly desirable. Here, we describe the design, fabrication and validation of a versatile chip for subjecting cultured cells to fast changes in gas partial pressure and to cyclic stretch. The chip is fabricated with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS and consists of a cylindrical well covered by a thin membrane. Cells cultured on top of the membrane can be subjected to fast changes in oxygen concentration (equilibrium time 6 s. Moreover, cells can be subjected to cyclic stretch at cardiac or respiratory frequencies independently or simultaneously. Rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs exposed to IH mimicking OSA and cyclic stretch at cardiac frequencies revealed that hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α expression was increased in response to both stimuli. Thus, the chip provides a versatile tool for the study of cellular responses to cyclical hypoxia and stretch.

  18. Oxidative stress in erythrocytes: a study on the effect of antioxidant mixtures during intermittent exposures to high altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vani, R.; Shiva Shankar Reddy, C. S.; Asha Devi, S.

    2010-09-01

    The aim of our study was to compare and assess the effectiveness of antioxidant mixtures on the erythrocytes (RBC) of adult male albino rats (Wister) subjected to simulated intermittent high altitudes—5,100 m (AL1) and 6,700 m (AL2)—to induce oxidative stress (OS). To achieve our objective, we pre-supplemented four sets of animals with different antioxidant mixtures [vitamin E (vit.E; 50 IU/kg BW), vitamin C (vit.C; 400 mg/kg) and l-carnitine (400 mg/kg)] in different combinations [M1 (vit.E+vit.C), M2 (vit.C+carnitine), M3 (vit.E+carnitine) and M4 (vit.C+vit.E+carnitine)] for 30 days prior to as well during exposure to intermittent hypobaric hypoxia (IHH). Membrane instability, in terms of osmotic fragility and hemolysis, decreased in RBCs of supplemented animals. There was a significant increase in the activity of glutathione peroxidase in the RBCs of supplemented animals. We confirmed OS imposed by IHH with assays relating to lipid [thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and lipofuscin (LF)] and protein (carbonyl, PrC) oxidation, and found a positive correlation between PrC and hemolysis, with a decrease in both upon supplementation with M3 and M4 mixtures. Fluorescence microscopic observation showed a maximum decrease in the LF content in rats administered M4 and M1 compared to those on M2 and M3 mixtures at both altitudes. We suggest that multiple antioxidant fortifications are effective in overcoming increased OS experienced by RBCs at high altitudes.

  19. Interactions of chronic lead exposure and intermittent stress: consequences for brain catecholamine systems and associated behaviors and HPA axis function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virgolini, Miriam B; Chen, Kevin; Weston, Doug D; Bauter, Mark R; Cory-Slechta, Deborah A

    2005-10-01

    Elevated lead (Pb) burden and high stress levels are co-occurring risk factors in low socioeconomic status (SES) children. Our previous work demonstrated that maternal Pb exposure can permanently alter hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function and responsivity to stress challenges in offspring. The current study sought to determine the consequences of chronic Pb exposures initiated later in development combined with variable intermittent stress challenges. Male rats were exposed chronically from weaning to 0, 50, or 150 ppm Pb acetate drinking solutions (producing blood Pb levels of challenges including novelty, cold, and restraint, was measured as changes in Fixed Interval (FI) schedule-controlled behavior in a subset of rats within each group. FI performance was modified by novelty stress only in Pb-treated rats, whereas cold and restraint stress effects were comparable across groups. Novelty elevated corticosterone equivalently across groups, but cold stress markedly increased corticosterone only in Pb-treated groups. The pattern of Pb-induced changes in serotonin (5-HT) or its metabolite 5-HIAA in frontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, striatum, and hypothalamus resembled that observed for basal corticosterone levels indicating a relationship between these variables. In addition to suggesting the potential for HPA axis-mediated effects of Pb on the central nervous system, these findings also raise questions about whether single chemicals studied in isolation from other relevant risk factors can adequately identify neurotoxic hazards.

  20. SU-E-I-34: Intermittent Low- and High-Dose Ethanol Exposure Alters Neurochemical Responses in Adult Rat Brain: An Ex Vivo 1H NMR Spectroscopy at 11.7 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Do-Wan; Kim, Sang-Young; Song, Kyu-Ho; Choe, Bo-Young [Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The first goal of this study was to determine the influence of the dose-dependent effects of intermittent ethanol intoxication on cerebral neurochemical responses among sham controls and low- and high-dose-ethanol-exposed rats with ex vivo high-resolution spectra. The second goal of this study was to determine the correlations between the metabolite-metabolite levels (pairs-of-metabolite levels) from all of the individual data from the frontal cortex of the intermittent ethanol-intoxicated rats. Methods: Eight-week-old male Wistar rats were divided into 3 groups. Twenty rats in the LDE (n = 10) and the HDE (n = 10) groups received ethanol doses of 1.5 g/kg and 2.5 g/kg, respectively, through oral gavage every 8-h for 4 days. At the end of the 4-day intermittent ethanol exposure, one-dimensional ex vivo 500-MHz proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra were acquired from 30 samples of the frontal cortex region (from the 3 groups). Results: Normalized total-N-acetylaspartate (tNAA: NAA + NAAG [N-acetylaspartyl-glutamate]), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and glutathione (GSH) levels were significantly lower in the frontal cortex of the HDE-exposed rats than that of the LDE-exposed rats. Moreover, compared to the CNTL group, the LDE rats exhibited significantly higher normalized GABA levels. The 6 pairs of normalized metabolite levels were positively (+) or negatively (−) correlated in the rat frontal cortex as follows: tNAA and GABA (+), tNAA and Aspartate (Asp) (−), myo-Inositol (mIns) and Asp (−), mIns and Alanine (+), mIns and Taurine (+), and mIns and tNAA (−). Conclusion: Our results suggested that repeated intermittent ethanol intoxication might result in neuronal degeneration and dysfunction, changes in the rate of GABA synthesis, and oxidative stress in the rat frontal cortex. Our ex vivo 1H high-resolution-magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy results suggested some novel metabolic markers for the dose

  1. A model of human nasal epithelial cells adapted for direct and repeated exposure to airborne pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardet, Gaëlle; Achard, Sophie; Loret, Thomas; Desauziers, Valérie; Momas, Isabelle; Seta, Nathalie

    2014-08-17

    Airway epithelium lining the nasal cavity plays a pivotal role in respiratory tract defense and protection mechanisms. Air pollution induces alterations linked to airway diseases such as asthma. Only very few in vitro studies to date have succeeded in reproducing physiological conditions relevant to cellular type and chronic atmospheric pollution exposure. We therefore, set up an in vitro model of human Airway Epithelial Cells of Nasal origin (hAECN) close to real human cell functionality, specifically adapted to study the biological effects of exposure to indoor gaseous pollution at the environmental level. hAECN were exposed under air-liquid interface, one, two, or three-times at 24 h intervals for 1 h, to air or formaldehyde (200 μg/m(3)), an indoor air gaseous pollutant. All experiments were ended at day 4, when both cellular viability and cytokine production were assessed. Optimal adherence and confluence of cells were obtained 96 h after cell seeding onto collagen IV-precoated insert. Direct and repeated exposure to formaldehyde did not produce any cellular damage or IL-6 production change, although weak lower IL-8 production was observed only after the third exposure. Our model is significantly better than previous ones due to cell type and the repeated exposure protocol.

  2. Repeated exposure to sublethal doses of the organophosphorus compound VX activates BDNF expression in mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizarro, Jose M; Chang, Wenling E; Bah, Mariama J; Wright, Linnzi K M; Saviolakis, George A; Alagappan, Arun; Robison, Christopher L; Shah, Jinesh D; Meyerhoff, James L; Cerasoli, Douglas M; Midboe, Eric G; Lumley, Lucille A

    2012-04-01

    The highly toxic organophosphorus compound VX [O-ethyl S-[2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl]methylphosphonate] is an irreversible inhibitor of the enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Prolonged inhibition of AChE increases endogenous levels of acetylcholine and is toxic at nerve synapses and neuromuscular junctions. We hypothesized that repeated exposure to sublethal doses of VX would affect genes associated with cell survival, neuronal plasticity, and neuronal remodeling, including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). We examined the time course of BDNF expression in C57BL/6 mouse brain following repeated exposure (1/day × 5 days/week × 2 weeks) to sublethal doses of VX (0.2 LD(50) and 0.4 LD(50)). BDNF messenger RNA expression was significantly (p VX exposure. BDNF protein expression, however, was only increased in the CA3 region of the hippocampus. Whether increased BDNF in response to sublethal doses of VX exposure is an adaptive response to prevent cellular damage or a precursor to impending brain damage remains to be determined. If elevated BDNF is an adaptive response, exogenous BDNF may be a potential therapeutic target to reduce the toxic effects of nerve agent exposure.

  3. HEARING LOSS IN THE RHESUS MONKEY AFTER REPEATED EXPOSURES TO IDENTICAL NOISES,

    Science.gov (United States)

    hearing loss in monkeys. Five animals were exposed to repeated single-pulse noises alternately at 72- and 96-hour intervals, to observe intersubject and intra-subject variations in hearing behavior under similar physical-noise conditions. Audiograms were taken periodically, from two minutes after exposure to 72 hours later, for 2 and 4 kc test tones. There were distinctive differences in individual-animal patterns of hearing loss and recovery. Two animals clearly showed smaller hearing losses during the later exposure sessions, and that loss

  4. Enhanced resistance to UV-B radiation in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 (Cyanophyceae) by repeated exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Hongjie; Li, Dunhai

    2014-07-01

    In natural habitats, organisms especially phytoplankton are not always continuously subjected to ultraviolet-B radiation (UVBR). By simulation of the natural situation, the N2-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 was subjected to UV-B exposure and recovery cycles. A series of morphological and physiological changes were observed in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 under repeated UVBR when compared with controls. Such as the breakage of filaments, intervals between heterocysts, heterocyst frequency, total carbohydrate, and carotenoids were increased, while the nitrogenase activity and photosynthetic activity were inhibited by repeated UVBR; however, these activities could recover when UV-B stress was removed. Unexpectedly, the over-compensatory growth was observed at the end of the second round of exposure and recovery cycle. Our results showed that discontinuous UVBR could increase the growth rate and the tolerance as well as repair capacity of Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. These results indicate that moderate UVBR may increase the growth of cyanobacteria in natural habitats.

  5. Eye lens radiation exposure and repeated head CT scans: A problem to keep in mind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michel, Morgane; Jacob, Sophie [Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, IRSN/DRPH/SRBE/Laboratoire d' Epidemiologie, BP 17, 92 262 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Roger, Gilles [Otolaryngology Department, Trousseau Hospital, Paris (France); Pelosse, Beatrice [Ophthalmology Department, Trousseau Hospital, Paris (France); Laurier, Dominique [Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, IRSN/DRPH/SRBE/Laboratoire d' Epidemiologie, BP 17, 92 262 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Le Pointe, Hubert Ducou [Radiology Department, Trousseau Hospital, Paris (France); Bernier, Marie-Odile, E-mail: marie-odile.bernier@irsn.fr [Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, IRSN/DRPH/SRBE/Laboratoire d' Epidemiologie, BP 17, 92 262 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2012-08-15

    Objectives: The deterministic character of radiation-induced cataract is being called into question, raising the possibility of a risk in patients, especially children, exposed to ionizing radiation in case of repeated head CT-scans. This study aims to estimate the eye lens doses of a pediatric population exposed to repeated head CTs and to assess the feasibility of an epidemiological study. Methods: Children treated for a cholesteatoma, who had had at least one CT-scan of the middle ear before their tenth birthday, were included. Radiation exposure has been assessed from medical records and telephone interviews. Results: Out of the 39 subjects contacted, 32 accepted to participate. A total of 76 CT-scans were retrieved from medical records. At the time of the interview (mean age: 16 years), the mean number of CT per child was 3. Cumulative mean effective and eye lens doses were 1.7 mSv and 168 mGy, respectively. Conclusion: A relatively high lens radiation dose was observed in children exposed to repeated CT-scans. Due to that exposure and despite the difficulties met when trying to reach patients' families, a large scale epidemiological study should be performed in order to assess the risk of radiation-induced cataracts associated with repeated head CT.

  6. Influence of repeated daily menthol exposure on human temperature regulation and perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillis, D Jason; Weston, Neil; House, James R; Tipton, Michael J

    2015-02-01

    A single exposure to menthol can, depending on concentration, enhance both cool sensations and encourage body heat storage. This study tested whether there is an habituation in either response after repeated-daily exposures. Twenty-two participants were assigned to one of three spray groups: Control (CON; n=6), 0.05% L-menthol (M(0.05%); n=8), and 0.2% L-menthol (M(0.2%); n=8). On Monday (20°C, 50% rh) participants were sprayed with 100 mL of solution and undertook 40 min of cycling at 45% of their peak power (Ex1), from Tuesday to Thursday (30°C, 50% rh) they were sprayed twice daily whilst resting (R1 to R6), Friday was a repeat of Monday (Ex2). Thermal sensation (TS), thermal comfort, perceived exertion, irritation, rectal and skin temperature (Tsk), skin blood flow (SkBF) and sweat rate were monitored. A two-way ANOVA (alpha=0.05) compared responses from the beginning (Ex1, R1) and end (Ex2, R5) of the testing week. M(0.2%) induced significantly (PMenthol caused a heat storage response, mediated by vasoconstriction, at the beginning and end of the week, suggesting the habituation of TS occurred in a pathway specific to sensation. In summary, the cooling influence of 0.2% menthol habituates after repeated-daily exposures, but with no habituation in heat storage.

  7. Effects of intermittent binge alcohol exposure on long-term motor function in young rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Ashley; Cooze, Jared; Malone, Craig; French, Vanessa; Weber, John T

    2013-03-01

    Ethanol has well described acute effects on motor function, and chronic alcoholism can damage the cerebellum, which is associated with motor coordination, as well as motor learning. Binge drinking is common among preadolescents and adolescents, and this type of ethanol exposure may lead to long-term nervous system damage. In the current study, we analyzed the effects of periadolsecent/adolescent ethanol exposure on motor function in both male and female Sprague-Dawley rats. To simulate binge drinking, animals received an intraperitoneal injection of 25% (v/v) ethanol (3 g/kg) on postnatal days (PND) 25, 26, 29, 30, 33, 34, 37 and 38. On PND 42 and PND 61 animals were tested on their ability to traverse both square and round beams. There were no significant differences in the time to traverse the beams, or the amount of foot slips, between treated and untreated animals. On PND 48 and PND 62, animals were tested using a horizontal ladder walking apparatus. On PND 48 there were no differences in the ability of treated and untreated animals to traverse the ladder. On PND 62, there were no differences in the time to traverse the ladder, but ethanol treated animals had more foot slips than controls. On PND 43, we conducted footprint analysis of control and treated animals, which included measurements of stride length, paw overlap, and angle of foot placement. There was a significant difference in the angle of foot placement between treated and control animals, and this finding was significant for both male and female animals. There was also a significant overall difference in paw overlap between treatment groups. Although this effect was manifested in male animals there was no significant difference in females. These findings suggest that adolescent ethanol exposure can produce long-lasting effects on motor coordination, and that overall, effects are similar in males and females. In a second set of experiments, male rats received i.p. ethanol (3 g/kg) for 7 days (P31

  8. Enhancing consumer liking of low salt tomato soup over repeated exposure by herb and spice seasonings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghawi, Sameer Khalil; Rowland, Ian; Methven, Lisa

    2014-10-01

    There is strong evidence for the link between high dietary sodium and increased risk of cardiovascular disease which drives the need to reduce salt content in foods. In this study, herb and spice blends were used to enhance consumer acceptability of a low salt tomato soup (0.26% w/w). Subjects (n = 148) scored their liking of tomato soup samples over 5 consecutive days. The first and last days were pre-and post-exposure visits where all participants rated three tomato soup samples; standard, low salt and low salt with added herbs and spices. The middle 3 days were the repeated exposure phase where participants were divided into three balanced groups; consuming the standard soup, the low salt soup, or the low salt soup with added herbs and spices. Reducing salt in the tomato soup led to a significant decline in consumer acceptability, and incorporating herbs and spices did not lead to an immediate enhancement in liking. However, inclusion of herbs and spices enhanced the perception of the salty taste of the low salt soup to the same level as the standard. Repeated exposure to the herbs and spice-modified soup led to a significant increase in the overall liking and liking of flavour, texture and aftertaste of the soup, whereas no changes in liking were observed for the standard and low salt tomato soups over repeated exposure. Moreover, a positive trend in increasing the post-exposure liking of the herbs and spices soup was observed. The findings suggest that the use of herbs and spices is a useful approach to reduce salt content in foods; however, herbs and spices should be chosen carefully to complement the food as large contrasts in flavour can polarise consumer liking. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Chronic intermittent ethanol exposure selectively alters the expression of Gα subunit isoforms and RGS subtypes in rat prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luessen, D J; Sun, H; McGinnis, M M; McCool, B A; Chen, R

    2017-10-01

    Chronic alcohol exposure induces pronounced changes in GPCR-mediated G-protein signaling. Recent microarray and RNA-seq analyses suggest associations between alcohol abuse and the expression of genes involved in G-protein signaling. The activity of G-proteins (e.g. Gαi/o and Gαq) is negatively modulated by regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) proteins which are implicated in drugs of abuse including alcohol. The present study used 7days of chronic intermittent ethanol exposure followed by 24h withdrawal (CIE) to investigate changes in mRNA and protein levels of G-protein subunit isoforms and RGS protein subtypes in rat prefrontal cortex, a region associated with cognitive deficit attributed to excessive alcohol drinking. We found that this ethanol paradigm induced differential expression of Gα subunits and RGS subtypes. For example, there were increased mRNA and protein levels of Gαi1/3 subunits and no changes in the expression of Gαs and Gαq subunits in ethanol-treated animals. Moreover, CIE increased the mRNA but not the protein levels of Gαo. Additionally, a modest increase in Gαi2 mRNA level by CIE was accompanied by a pronounced increase in its protein level. Interestingly, we found that CIE increased mRNA and protein levels of RGS2, RGS4, RGS7 and RGS19 but had no effect on the expression of RGS5, RGS6, RGS8, RGS12 or RGS17. Changes in the expression of Gα subunits and RGS subtypes could contribute to the functional alterations of certain GPCRs following chronic ethanol exposure. The present study suggests that RGS proteins may be potential new targets for intervention of alcohol abuse via modification of Gα-mediated GPCR function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Seroepidemiological studies indicate frequent and repeated exposure to Campylobacter spp. during childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, C W; Teunis, P F M; Herbrink, P; Keijser, J; Van Duynhoven, Y H T P; Visser, C E; Van Pelt, W

    2011-09-01

    The annual number of episodes of clinical gastroenteritis caused by Campylobacter spp. in The Netherlands is estimated to be 75 000, i.e. once per 200 person life-years. This number is based on extrapolation of culture results from population-based studies. The number of culture-confirmed cases of Campylobacter infection peaks in the first 3 years of life and again between the ages of 20 and 25 years. The seroepidemiology of Campylobacter describes the relationship between age and exposure to Campylobacter and reflects both symptomatic and asymptomatic infections. Using a validated ELISA system, antibodies to Campylobacter were measured in an age-stratified sample (n=456) of the PIENTER serum collection of the Dutch general population. The seroprevalence of Campylobacter IgG antibodies increased with age, reaching almost 100% at age 20 years. Antibody levels steadily increased with age until young adulthood, suggesting repeated exposure to Campylobacter. In conclusion, seroepidemiological data demonstrated repeated exposures to Campylobacter throughout life, most of which do not lead to clinical symptoms. From young adulthood, >95% of the population in The Netherlands had serological evidence for exposure to Campylobacter.

  11. 5-Day repeated inhalation and 28-day post-exposure study of graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jae Hoon; Han, Sung Gu; Kim, Jin Kwon; Kim, Boo Wook; Hwang, Joo Hwan; Lee, Jong Seong; Lee, Ji Hyun; Baek, Jin Ee; Kim, Tae Gyu; Kim, Keun Soo; Lee, Heon Sang; Song, Nam Woong; Ahn, Kangho; Yu, Il Je

    2015-01-01

    Graphene has recently been attracting increasing attention due to its unique electronic and chemical properties and many potential applications in such fields as semiconductors, energy storage, flexible electronics, biosensors and medical imaging. However, the toxicity of graphene in the case of human exposure has not yet been clarified. Thus, a 5-day repeated inhalation toxicity study of graphene was conducted using a nose-only inhalation system for male Sprague-Dawley rats. A total of three groups (20 rats per group) were compared: (1) control (ambient air), (2) low concentration (0.68 ± 0.14 mg/m(3) graphene) and (3) high concentration (3.86 ± 0.94 mg/m(3) graphene). The rats were exposed to graphene for 6 h/day for 5 days, followed by recovery for 1, 3, 7 or 28 days. The bioaccumulation and macrophage ingestion of the graphene were evaluated in the rat lungs. The exposure to graphene did not change the body weights or organ weights of the rats after the 5-day exposure and during the recovery period. No statistically significant difference was observed in the levels of lactate dehydrogenase, protein and albumin between the exposed and control groups. However, graphene ingestion by alveolar macrophages was observed in the exposed groups. Therefore, these results suggest that the 5-day repeated exposure to graphene only had a minimal toxic effect at the concentrations and time points used in this study.

  12. Effect of repeated benzene inhalation exposures on benzene metabolism, binding to hemoglobin, and induction of micronuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabourin, P J; Sun, J D; MacGregor, J T; Wehr, C M; Birnbaum, L S; Lucier, G; Henderson, R F

    1990-05-01

    Metabolism of benzene is thought to be necessary to produce the toxic effects, including carcinogenicity, associated with benzene exposure. To extrapolate from the results of rodent studies to potential health risks in man, one must know how benzene metabolism is affected by species, dose, dose rate, and repeated versus single exposures. The purpose of our studies was to determine the effect of repeated inhalation exposures on the metabolism of [14C]benzene by rodents. Benzene metabolism was assessed by characterizing and quantitating urinary metabolites, and by quantitating 14C bound to hemoglobin and micronuclei induction. F344/N rats and B6C3F1 mice were exposed, nose-only, to 600 ppm benzene or to air (control) for 6 hr/day, 5 days/week for 3 weeks. On the last day, both benzene-pretreated and control animals were exposed to 600 ppm, 14C-labeled benzene for 6 hr. Individual benzene metabolites in urine collected for 24 hr after the exposure were analyzed. There was a significant decrease in the respiratory rate of mice (but not rats) pretreated with benzene which resulted in lower levels of urinary [14C]benzene metabolites. The analyses indicated that the only effects of benzene pretreatment on the metabolite profile in rat or mouse urine were a slight shift from glucuronidation to sulfation in mice and a shift from sulfation to glucuronidation in rats. Benzene pretreatment also had no effect, in either species, on formation of [14C]benzene-derived hemoglobin adducts. Mice and rats had similar levels of hemoglobin adduct binding, despite the higher metabolism of benzene by mice. This indicates that hemoglobin adduct formation occurs with higher efficiency in rats. After 1 week of exposure to 600 ppm benzene, the frequency of micronucleated, polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs) in mice was significantly increased. Exposure to the same level of benzene for an additional 2 weeks did not further increase the frequency of micronuclei in PCEs. These results indicate

  13. An ontogenic study of the behavioral effects of chronic intermittent exposure to ayahuasca in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.F. Correa-Netto

    Full Text Available Ayahuasca is a beverage obtained from decoctions of the Banisteriopsis caapi plus Psychotria viridis. In religious contexts, ayahuasca is used by different age groups. However, little is known of the effects of ayahuasca during ontogenic development, particularly with regard to the functional characteristics of the central nervous system. Animal models are useful for studying the ontogenic effects of ayahuasca because they allow exclusion of the behavioral influence associated with the ritualistic use. We investigated the effects of exposure to ayahuasca (1.5 mL/kg, orally, twice a week on memory and anxiety in C57BL/6 mice, with the post-natal day (PND being used as the ontogenic criterion for classification: childhood (PND21 to PND35, adolescence (PND35 to PND63, adulthood (PND90-PND118, childhood-adolescence (PND21 to PND63, childhood-adulthood (PND21 to PND118 and adolescence-adulthood (PND35 to PND118. One day after the last ayahuasca exposure, the mice were subjected to the Morris water maze (MWM, open field and elevated plus maze tasks (EPM. Ayahuasca did not affect locomotion in the open field or open arms exploration in the EPM, but increased the risk assessment behavior in the childhood group. Ayahuasca did not cause any change in acquisition of spatial reference memory in the MWM task, but decreased the time spent on the platform quadrant during the test session in the adolescence group. These results suggest that, in mice, exposure to ayahuasca in childhood and adolescence promoted anxiety and memory impairment, respectively. However, these behavioral changes were not long-lasting since they were not observed in the childhood-adulthood and adolescence-adulthood groups.

  14. An ontogenic study of the behavioral effects of chronic intermittent exposure to ayahuasca in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa-Netto, N F; Masukawa, M Y; Nishide, F; Galfano, G S; Tamura, F; Shimizo, M K; Marcato, M P; Santos, J G; Linardi, A

    2017-06-05

    Ayahuasca is a beverage obtained from decoctions of the Banisteriopsis caapi plus Psychotria viridis. In religious contexts, ayahuasca is used by different age groups. However, little is known of the effects of ayahuasca during ontogenic development, particularly with regard to the functional characteristics of the central nervous system. Animal models are useful for studying the ontogenic effects of ayahuasca because they allow exclusion of the behavioral influence associated with the ritualistic use. We investigated the effects of exposure to ayahuasca (1.5 mL/kg, orally, twice a week) on memory and anxiety in C57BL/6 mice, with the post-natal day (PND) being used as the ontogenic criterion for classification: childhood (PND21 to PND35), adolescence (PND35 to PND63), adulthood (PND90-PND118), childhood-adolescence (PND21 to PND63), childhood-adulthood (PND21 to PND118) and adolescence-adulthood (PND35 to PND118). One day after the last ayahuasca exposure, the mice were subjected to the Morris water maze (MWM), open field and elevated plus maze tasks (EPM). Ayahuasca did not affect locomotion in the open field or open arms exploration in the EPM, but increased the risk assessment behavior in the childhood group. Ayahuasca did not cause any change in acquisition of spatial reference memory in the MWM task, but decreased the time spent on the platform quadrant during the test session in the adolescence group. These results suggest that, in mice, exposure to ayahuasca in childhood and adolescence promoted anxiety and memory impairment, respectively. However, these behavioral changes were not long-lasting since they were not observed in the childhood-adulthood and adolescence-adulthood groups.

  15. Chronic intermittent exposure to ayahuasca during aging does not affect memory in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.F. Correa-Netto

    Full Text Available The Quechua term ayahuasca refers to a beverage obtained from decoctions of the liana Banisteriopsis caapi with leaves of Psychotria viridis. The ritualistic use of ayahuasca is becoming a global phenomenon, with some individuals using this beverage throughout life, including in old age. Cognitive impairment is a common manifestation during aging. There are conflicting reports on the ability of some ayahuasca compounds to exert neuroprotective or neurotoxic effects that could improve or impair learning and memory. Animal models provide a relevant and accessible means of investigating the behavioral effects of ayahuasca without the environmental conditions associated with the ritualistic use of the beverage. In this study, we investigated the influence of chronic ayahuasca exposure throughout aging on the spatial reference and habituation memories of mice. Twenty-eight male c57bl/6 mice (6 months old received ayahuasca or water (1.5 mL/kg, orally twice a week for 12 months and were tested in the Morris water maze (MWM, open field and elevated plus maze (EPM tasks before and after treatment. During aging, there was significant impairment in the evocation (but not acquisition of spatial reference memory and in habituation to the open field. There was also a decrease in locomotor activity in the open field and EPM tests, whereas the anxiety parameters were unaltered. Ayahuasca treatment did not alter any of these parameters associated with aging. These findings indicate that chronic exposure to ayahuasca during aging did not affect memory in mice.

  16. Chronic intermittent exposure to ayahuasca during aging does not affect memory in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa-Netto, N F; Coelho, L S; Galfano, G S; Nishide, F; Tamura, F; Shimizu, M K; Santos, J G; Linardi, A

    2017-06-05

    The Quechua term ayahuasca refers to a beverage obtained from decoctions of the liana Banisteriopsis caapi with leaves of Psychotria viridis. The ritualistic use of ayahuasca is becoming a global phenomenon, with some individuals using this beverage throughout life, including in old age. Cognitive impairment is a common manifestation during aging. There are conflicting reports on the ability of some ayahuasca compounds to exert neuroprotective or neurotoxic effects that could improve or impair learning and memory. Animal models provide a relevant and accessible means of investigating the behavioral effects of ayahuasca without the environmental conditions associated with the ritualistic use of the beverage. In this study, we investigated the influence of chronic ayahuasca exposure throughout aging on the spatial reference and habituation memories of mice. Twenty-eight male c57bl/6 mice (6 months old) received ayahuasca or water (1.5 mL/kg, orally) twice a week for 12 months and were tested in the Morris water maze (MWM), open field and elevated plus maze (EPM) tasks before and after treatment. During aging, there was significant impairment in the evocation (but not acquisition) of spatial reference memory and in habituation to the open field. There was also a decrease in locomotor activity in the open field and EPM tests, whereas the anxiety parameters were unaltered. Ayahuasca treatment did not alter any of these parameters associated with aging. These findings indicate that chronic exposure to ayahuasca during aging did not affect memory in mice.

  17. Repeated low-dose exposures to sarin, soman, or VX affect acoustic startle in guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, C D; Lee, R B; Moran, A V; Sipos, M L

    2016-01-01

    Chemical warfare nerve agents (CWNAs) are known to cause behavioral abnormalities in cases of human exposures and in animal models. The behavioral consequences of single exposures to CWNAs that cause observable toxic signs are particularly well characterized in animals; however, less is known regarding repeated smaller exposures that may or may not cause observable toxic signs. In the current study, guinea pigs were exposed to fractions (0.1, 0.2, or 0.4) of a medial lethal dose (LD50) of sarin, soman, or VX for two weeks. On each exposure day, and for a post-exposure period, acoustic startle response (ASR) was measured in each animal. Although relatively few studies use guinea pigs to measure behavior, this species is ideal for CWNA-related experiments because their levels of carboxylesterases closely mimic those of humans, unlike rats or mice. Results showed that the 0.4 LD50 doses of soman and VX transiently increased peak startle amplitude by the second week of injections, with amplitude returning to baseline by the second week post-exposure. Sarin also increased peak startle amplitude independent of week. Latencies to peak startle and PPI were affected by agent exposure but not consistently among the three agents. Most of the changes in startle responses returned to baseline following the cessation of exposures. These data suggest that doses of CWNAs not known to produce observable toxic signs in guinea pigs can affect behavior in the ASR paradigm. Further, these deficits are transient and usually return to baseline shortly after the end of a two-week exposure period.

  18. Dealing with consumer differences in liking during repeated exposure to food; typical dynamics in rating behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalenberg, Jelle R; Nanetti, Luca; Renken, Remco J; de Wijk, René A; Ter Horst, Gert J

    2014-01-01

    Consumers show high interindividual variability in food liking during repeated exposure. To investigate consumer liking during repeated exposure, data is often interpreted on a product level by averaging results over all consumers. However, a single product may elicit inconsistent behaviors in consumers; averaging will mix and hide possible subgroups of consumer behaviors, leading to a misinterpretation of the results. To deal with the variability in consumer liking, we propose to use clustering on data from consumer-product combinations to investigate the nature of the behavioral differences within the complete dataset. The resulting behavioral clusters can then be used to describe product acceptance. To test this approach we used two independent data sets in which young adults were repeatedly exposed to drinks and snacks, respectively. We found that five typical consumer behaviors existed in both datasets. These behaviors differed both in the average level of liking as well as its temporal dynamics. By investigating the distribution of a single product across typical consumer behaviors, we provide more precise insight in how consumers divide in subgroups based on their product liking (i.e. product modality). This work shows that taking into account and using interindividual differences can unveil information about product acceptance that would otherwise be ignored.

  19. Assessing transferable residues from intermittent exposure to flea control collars containing the organophosphate insecticide chlorpyrifos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Janice E; Boone, J Scott; Davis, M Keith; Moran, John E; Tyler, John W

    2007-11-01

    Children can be exposed to pesticides from numerous residential sources such as carpet, house dust, toys and clothing from treated homes, and flea control remedies on pets. In the present studies, 48 pet dogs (24 in each of two studies) of different breeds and weights were treated with over-the-counter flea collars containing chlorpyrifos (CP), an organophosphorus insecticide. Transferable insecticide residues were quantified on cotton gloves used to rub the dogs for 5 min and on cotton tee shirts worn by a child (Study 2 only). First morning urine samples were also obtained from adults and children in both studies for metabolite (3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol) quantification. Blood samples were obtained from treated dogs in Study 1 and plasma cholinesterase (ChE) activity was monitored. Transferable residues on gloves for all compounds were highest near the neck of the dogs and were lowest in areas most distant from the neck. Rubbing samples (over the collar) at two weeks post-collar application contained 447+/-57 microg CP/glove while samples from the fur of the back contained 8+/-2 microg CP/glove. In Study 2, cotton tee shirts worn by children at 15 days post-collar application for 4 h showed CP levels of 134+/-66 ng/g shirt. There were significant differences between adults and children in the levels of urinary metabolites with children generally having higher urinary levels of metabolites than adults (grand mean+/-SE; 11.6+/-1.1 and 7.9+/-0.74 ng/mg creatinine for children and adults, respectively, compared to 9.4+/-0.8 and 6.9+/-0.5 ng/mg creatinine before collar placement). Therefore, there was little evidence that the use of this flea collar contributed to enhanced CP exposure of either children or adults.

  20. Optimization of intermittent oxygen/air exposure protocols prolongs the safe use of hyperoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haim Bitterman

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A steadily growing body of data indicates that hyperoxia (the use of oxygen at pressures that are higher than its normal atmospheric partial pressure exerts an extensive profile of physiologic and pharmacologic effects that improve tissue oxygenation, exert anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial effects, and augment tissue repair mechanisms. Such data establish the rational for the use of normobaric and hyperbaric hyperoxia in a list of clinical conditions characterized by tissue hypoxia, inflammation, infection, and impaired tissue healing. The major limitation confronting the clinical use of hyperoxia is its potential toxicity and the relatively narrow margin of safety that exists between its effective and toxic doses. The most obvious toxic manifestations of oxygen are those exerted on the respiratory and central nervous systems. At pressures higher than 0.6 ATA (atmospheres absolute, (e.g. 60% oxygen at normal atmospheric pressure, and up to 2.8 ATA the most important toxic effect of hyperoxia is a pulmonary inflammatory response that may culminate to a full blown ARDS (Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome. At pressures higher than 2.8 ATA the most prominent toxic effect of hyperoxia is on the brain, usually manifesting as tonic-clonic grand-mal type convulsions. Currently employed hyperoxic treatment protocols or exposures to oxygen in recreational and military diving are safe because they are restricted to durations that are significantly shorter than the latent period required for development of toxic effects. Another currently employed approach to effective safe use of hyperoxia is... [J Exp Integr Med 2012; 2(4: 283-285

  1. Energy intermittency

    CERN Document Server

    Sorensen, Bent

    2014-01-01

    The first book to consider intermittency as a key point of an energy system, Energy Intermittency describes different levels of variability for traditional and renewable energy sources, presenting detailed solutions for handling energy intermittency through trade, collaboration, demand management, and active energy storage. Addressing energy supply intermittency systematically, this practical text:Analyzes typical time-distributions and intervals between episodes of demand-supply mismatch and explores their dependence on system layouts and energy source characteristicsSimulates scenarios regar

  2. Assessing intermittent pesticide exposure from flea control collars containing the organophosphorus insecticide tetrachlorvinphos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, M Keith; Boone, J Scott; Moran, John E; Tyler, John W; Chambers, Janice E

    2008-11-01

    Fleas are a persistent problem for pets that require implementation of control measures. Consequently, pesticide use by homeowners for flea control is common and may increase pesticide exposure for adults and children. Fifty-five pet dogs (23 in study 1; 22 in study 2) of different breeds and weights were treated with over-the-counter flea collars containing tetrachlorvinphos (TCVP). During study 1, fur of treated dogs was monitored for transferable TCVP residues using cotton gloves to pet the dogs during 5-min rubbings post-collar application. Plasma cholinesterase (ChE) activity was also measured in treated dogs. Average amounts of TCVP transferred from the fur of the neck (rubbing over the collar) and from the back to gloves at 3 days post-collar application were 23,700+/-2100 and 260+/-50 microg/glove, respectively. No inhibition of plasma ChE was observed. During study 2, transferable TCVP residues to cotton gloves were monitored during 5-min rubbings post-collar application. Transferable residues were also monitored on cotton tee shirts worn by children and in the first morning urine samples obtained from adults and children. Average amounts of TCVP transferred to gloves at 5 days post-collar application from the neck (over the collar) and from the back were 22,400+/-2900 and 80+/-20 microg/glove, respectively. Tee shirts worn by children on days 7-11 contained 1.8+/-0.8 microg TCVP/g shirt. No significant differences were observed between adults and children in urinary 2,4,5-trichloromandelic acid (TCMA) levels; however, all TCMA residues (adults and children) were significantly greater than pretreatment concentrations (alpha=0.05). The lack of ChE inhibition in dogs and the low acute toxicity level of TCVP (rat oral LD(50) of 4-5 g/kg) strongly suggest that TCVP is rapidly detoxified and excreted and therefore poses a very low toxicological risk, despite these high residues.

  3. Repeated exposure to media violence is associated with diminished response in an inhibitory frontolimbic network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Christopher R; Grinband, Jack; Hirsch, Joy

    2007-12-05

    Media depictions of violence, although often claimed to induce viewer aggression, have not been shown to affect the cortical networks that regulate behavior. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we found that repeated exposure to violent media, but not to other equally arousing media, led to both diminished response in right lateral orbitofrontal cortex (right ltOFC) and a decrease in right ltOFC-amygdala interaction. Reduced function in this network has been previously associated with decreased control over a variety of behaviors, including reactive aggression. Indeed, we found reduced right ltOFC responses to be characteristic of those subjects that reported greater tendencies toward reactive aggression. Furthermore, the violence-induced reduction in right ltOFC response coincided with increased throughput to behavior planning regions. These novel findings establish that even short-term exposure to violent media can result in diminished responsiveness of a network associated with behaviors such as reactive aggression.

  4. The response of human nasal and bronchial organotypic tissue cultures to repeated whole cigarette smoke exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talikka, Marja; Kostadinova, Radina; Xiang, Yang; Mathis, Carole; Sewer, Alain; Majeed, Shoaib; Kuehn, Diana; Frentzel, Stefan; Merg, Celine; Geertz, Marcel; Martin, Florian; Ivanov, Nikolai V; Peitsch, Manuel C; Hoeng, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to cigarette smoke (CS) is linked to the development of respiratory diseases, and there is a need to understand the mechanisms whereby CS causes damage. Although animal models have provided valuable insights into smoking-related respiratory tract damage, modern toxicity testing calls for reliable in vitro models as alternatives for animal experimentation. We report on a repeated whole mainstream CS exposure of nasal and bronchial organotypic tissue cultures that mimic the morphological, physiological, and molecular attributes of the human respiratory tract. Despite the similar cellular staining and cytokine secretion in both tissue types, the transcriptomic analyses in the context of biological network models identified similar and diverse biological processes that were impacted by CS-exposed nasal and bronchial cultures. Our results demonstrate that nasal and bronchial tissue cultures are appropriate in vitro models for the assessment of CS-induced adverse effects in the respiratory system and promising alternative to animal experimentation.

  5. Repeated allergen exposure reduce early phase airway response and leukotriene release despite upregulation of 5-lipoxygenase pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Zhi-Hua

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Allergen induced early phase airway response and airway plasma exudation are predominantly mediated by inflammatory mast cell mediators including histamine, cysteinyl leukotrienes (cysLTs and thromboxane A2 (TXA2. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether repeated allergen exposure affects early phase airway response to allergen challenge. Methods A trimellitic anhydride (TMA sensitized guinea pig model was used to investigate the effects of low dose repeated allergen exposure on cholinergic airway responsiveness, early phase airway response and plasma exudation, as well as local airway production of mast cell derived cysteinyl leukotrienes and thromboxane B2 (TXB2 after allergen challenge. Results Repeated low dose allergen exposure increased cholinergic airway responsiveness. In contrast, early phase airway response and plasma exudation in response to a high-dose allergen challenge were strongly attenuated after repeated low dose allergen exposure. Inhibition of the airway response was unspecific to exposed allergen and independent of histamine receptor blocking. Furthermore, a significant reduction of cysteinyl leukotrienes and TXB2 was found in the airways of animals repeatedly exposed to a low dose allergen. However, in vitro stimulation of airway tissue from animals repeatedly exposed to a low dose allergen with arachidonic acid and calcium ionophore (A23187 induced production of cysteinyl leukotrienes and TXB2, suggesting enhanced activity of 5-lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase pathways. Conclusions The inhibition of the early phase airway response, cysteinyl leukotriene and TXB2 production after repeated allergen exposure may result from unresponsive effector cells.

  6. Early life exposure to chronic intermittent Hypoxia Primes Increased Susceptibility to Hypoxia-Induced Weakness in Rat Sternohyoid Muscle during adulthood.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McDonald, Fiona B

    2016-03-01

    Intermittent hypoxia is a feature of apnea of prematurity (AOP), chronic lung disease, and sleep apnea. Despite the clinical relevance, the long-term effects of hypoxic exposure in early life on respiratory control are not well defined. We recently reported that exposure to chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) during postnatal development (pCIH) causes upper airway muscle weakness in both sexes, which persists for several weeks. We sought to examine if there are persistent sex-dependent effects of pCIH on respiratory muscle function into adulthood and\\/or increased susceptibility to re-exposure to CIH in adulthood in animals previously exposed to CIH during postnatal development. We hypothesized that pCIH would cause long-lasting muscle impairment and increased susceptibility to subsequent hypoxia. Within 24 h of delivery, pups and their respective dams were exposed to CIH: 90 s of hypoxia reaching 5% O2 at nadir; once every 5 min, 8 h per day for 3 weeks. Sham groups were exposed to normoxia in parallel. Three groups were studied: sham; pCIH; and pCIH combined with adult CIH (p+aCIH), where a subset of the pCIH-exposed pups were re-exposed to the same CIH paradigm beginning at 13 weeks. Following gas exposures, sternohyoid and diaphragm muscle isometric contractile and endurance properties were examined ex vivo. There was no apparent lasting effect of pCIH on respiratory muscle function in adults. However, in both males and females, re-exposure to CIH in adulthood in pCIH-exposed animals caused sternohyoid (but not diaphragm) weakness. Exposure to this paradigm of CIH in adulthood alone had no effect on muscle function. Persistent susceptibility in pCIH-exposed airway dilator muscle to subsequent hypoxic insult may have implications for the control of airway patency in adult humans exposed to intermittent hypoxic stress during early life.

  7. Early Life Exposure to Chronic Intermittent Hypoxia Primes Increased Susceptibility to Hypoxia-Induced Weakness in Rat Sternohyoid Muscle During Adulthood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona B Mcdonald

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent hypoxia is a feature of apnea of prematurity, chronic lung disease and sleep apnea. Despite the clinical relevance, the long-term effects of hypoxic exposure in early life on respiratory control are not well defined. We recently reported that exposure to chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH during postnatal development (pCIH causes upper airway muscle weakness in both sexes, which persists for several weeks. We sought to examine if there are persistent sex-dependent effects of pCIH on respiratory muscle function into adulthood and/or increased susceptibility to re-exposure to CIH in adulthood in animals previously exposed to CIH during postnatal development. We hypothesized that pCIH would cause long-lasting muscle impairment and increased susceptibility to subsequent hypoxia. Within 24 hours of delivery, pups and their respective dams were exposed to CIH: 90s of hypoxia reaching 5% O2 at nadir; once every 5 min, 8 hrs per day for 3 weeks. Sham groups were exposed to normoxia in parallel. Three groups were studied: sham; pCIH; and pCIH combined with adult CIH (p+aCIH, where a subset of the pCIH-exposed pups were re-exposed to the same CIH paradigm beginning at 13 weeks. Following gas exposures, sternohyoid and diaphragm muscle isometric contractile and endurance properties were examined ex vivo. There was no apparent lasting effect of pCIH on respiratory muscle function in adults. However, in both males and females, re-exposure to CIH in adulthood in pCIH-exposed animals caused sternohyoid (but not diaphragm weakness. Exposure to this paradigm of CIH in adulthood alone had no effect on muscle function. Persistent susceptibility in pCIH-exposed airway dilator muscle to subsequent hypoxic insult may have implications for the control of airway patency in adult humans exposed to intermittent hypoxic stress during early life.

  8. Metabolic adaptations may counteract ventilatory adaptations of intermittent hypoxic exposure during submaximal exercise at altitudes up to 4000 m.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Faulhaber

    Full Text Available Intermittent hypoxic exposure (IHE has been shown to induce aspects of altitude acclimatization which affect ventilatory, cardiovascular and metabolic responses during exercise in normoxia and hypoxia. However, knowledge on altitude-dependent effects and possible interactions remains scarce. Therefore, we determined the effects of IHE on cardiorespiratory and metabolic responses at different simulated altitudes in the same healthy subjects. Eight healthy male volunteers participated in the study and were tested before and 1 to 2 days after IHE (7 × 1 hour at 4500 m. The participants cycled at 2 submaximal workloads (corresponding to 40% and 60% of peak oxygen uptake at low altitude at simulated altitudes of 2000 m, 3000 m, and 4000 m in a randomized order. Gas analysis was performed and arterial oxygen saturation, blood lactate concentrations, and blood gases were determined during exercise. Additionally baroreflex sensitivity, hypoxic and hypercapnic ventilatory response were determined before and after IHE. Hypoxic ventilatory response was increased after IHE (p<0.05. There were no altitude-dependent changes by IHE in any of the determined parameters. However, blood lactate concentrations and carbon dioxide output were reduced; minute ventilation and arterial oxygen saturation were unchanged, and ventilatory equivalent for carbon dioxide was increased after IHE irrespective of altitude. Changes in hypoxic ventilatory response were associated with changes in blood lactate (r = -0.72, p<0.05. Changes in blood lactate correlated with changes in carbon dioxide output (r = 0.61, p<0.01 and minute ventilation (r = 0.54, p<0.01. Based on the present results it seems that the reductions in blood lactate and carbon dioxide output have counteracted the increased hypoxic ventilatory response. As a result minute ventilation and arterial oxygen saturation did not increase during submaximal exercise at simulated altitudes between 2000 m and 4000 m.

  9. The effects of repeated low-level blast exposure on hearing in marines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina R Kubli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The study evaluates a group of Military Service Members specialized in blast explosive training called “Breachers” who are routinely exposed to multiple low-level blasts while teaching breaching at the U.S. Marine Corps in Quantico Virginia. The objective of this study was to determine if there are any acute or long-term auditory changes due to repeated low-level blast exposures used in training. The performance of the instructor group “Breachers” was compared to a control group, “Engineers”. Methods: A total of 11 Breachers and four engineers were evaluated in the study. The participants received comprehensive auditory tests, including pure-tone testing, speech-in-noise (SIN measures, and central auditory behavioral and objective tests using early and late (P300 auditory evoked potentials over a period of 17 months. They also received shorter assessments immediately following the blast-exposure onsite at Quantico. Results: No acute or longitudinal effects were identified. However, there were some interesting baseline effects found in both groups. Contrary to the expected, the onsite hearing thresholds and distortion product otoacoustic emissions were slightly better at a few frequencies immediately after blast-exposure than measurements obtained with the same equipment weeks to months after each blast-exposure. Conclusions: To date, the current study is the most comprehensive study that evaluates the long-term effects of blast-exposure on hearing. Despite extensive testing to assess changes, the findings of this study suggest that the levels of current exposures used in this military training environment do not seem to have an obvious deleterious effect on hearing.

  10. Intermittent degradation and schizotypy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew W. Roché

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent degradation refers to transient detrimental disruptions in task performance. This phenomenon has been repeatedly observed in the performance data of patients with schizophrenia. Whether intermittent degradation is a feature of the liability for schizophrenia (i.e., schizotypy is an open question. Further, the specificity of intermittent degradation to schizotypy has yet to be investigated. To address these questions, 92 undergraduate participants completed a battery of self-report questionnaires assessing schizotypy and psychological state variables (e.g., anxiety, depression, and their reaction times were recorded as they did so. Intermittent degradation was defined as the number of times a subject’s reaction time for questionnaire items met or exceeded three standard deviations from his or her mean reaction time after controlling for each item’s information processing load. Intermittent degradation scores were correlated with questionnaire scores. Our results indicate that intermittent degradation is associated with total scores on measures of positive and disorganized schizotypy, but unrelated to total scores on measures of negative schizotypy and psychological state variables. Intermittent degradation is interpreted as potentially derivative of schizotypy and a candidate endophenotypic marker worthy of continued research.

  11. The role of exposure history on HIV acquisition: insights from repeated low-dose challenge studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland R Regoes

    Full Text Available To assess the efficacy of HIV vaccine candidates or preventive treatment, many research groups have started to challenge monkeys repeatedly with low doses of the virus. Such challenge data provide a unique opportunity to assess the importance of exposure history for the acquisition of the infection. I developed stochastic models to analyze previously published challenge data. In the mathematical models, I allowed for variation of the animals' susceptibility to infection across challenge repeats, or across animals. In none of the studies I analyzed, I found evidence for an immunizing effect of non-infecting challenges, and in most studies, there is no evidence for variation in the susceptibilities to the challenges across animals. A notable exception was a challenge experiment by Letvin et al. Sci Translat Med (2011 conducted with the strain SIVsmE660. The challenge data of this experiment showed significant susceptibility variation from animal-to-animal, which is consistent with previously established genetic differences between the involved animals. For the studies which did not show significant immunizing effects and susceptibility differences, I conducted a power analysis and could thus exclude a very strong immunization effect for some of the studies. These findings validate the assumption that non-infecting challenges do not immunize an animal - an assumption that is central in the argument that repeated low-dose challenge experiments increase the statistical power of preclinical HIV vaccine trials. They are also relevant for our understanding of the role of exposure history for HIV acquisition and forecasting the epidemiological spread of HIV.

  12. ANESTHETIC MANAGEMENT FOR A PATIENT WITH ACUTE INTERMITTENT PORPHYRIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nenad Savić

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Acute intermittent porphyria is a rare metabolic disorder resulting from a partial deficiency of porphobilinogen deaminase, enzyme in the heme biosynthetic pathway. Its inheritance is autosomal dominant. A deficiency of porphobilinogen deaminase is not sufficient by its self to produce acute intermittent porphyria, and other activating factors must also be present. These include some drugs, hormones, infection, injury and alcohol. Besides others, anesthetics have been implicated in the triggering of a number of severe porphyric reactions. Although there is no clinical evidence, the fear of hypothesized porphyrinogenicity of repetitive anesthetics exposures still remains. Despite these doubts, we report here the case of uneventful repeated exposure to anesthetics in a patient suffering from acute intermittent porphyria, within a fifteen- month period. On both occasions, the patient was safely exposed to certain anesthetics included: propofol, sevoflurane, rocuronium, midazolam and fentanyl.

  13. Variability in prefrontal hemodynamic response during exposure to repeated self-selected music excerpts, a near-infrared spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghimi, Saba; Schudlo, Larissa; Chau, Tom; Guerguerian, Anne-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Music-induced brain activity modulations in areas involved in emotion regulation may be useful in achieving therapeutic outcomes. Clinical applications of music may involve prolonged or repeated exposures to music. However, the variability of the observed brain activity patterns in repeated exposures to music is not well understood. We hypothesized that multiple exposures to the same music would elicit more consistent activity patterns than exposure to different music. In this study, the temporal and spatial variability of cerebral prefrontal hemodynamic response was investigated across multiple exposures to self-selected musical excerpts in 10 healthy adults. The hemodynamic changes were measured using prefrontal cortex near infrared spectroscopy and represented by instantaneous phase values. Based on spatial and temporal characteristics of these observed hemodynamic changes, we defined a consistency index to represent variability across these domains. The consistency index across repeated exposures to the same piece of music was compared to the consistency index corresponding to prefrontal activity from randomly matched non-identical musical excerpts. Consistency indexes were significantly different for identical versus non-identical musical excerpts when comparing a subset of repetitions. When all four exposures were compared, no significant difference was observed between the consistency indexes of randomly matched non-identical musical excerpts and the consistency index corresponding to repetitions of the same musical excerpts. This observation suggests the existence of only partial consistency between repeated exposures to the same musical excerpt, which may stem from the role of the prefrontal cortex in regulating other cognitive and emotional processes.

  14. Effects of single and repeated exposure to biocidal active substances on the barrier function of the skin in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buist, H.E.; Sandt, J.J.M. van de; Burgsteden, J.A. van; Heer, C. de

    2005-01-01

    The dermal route of exposure is important in worker exposure to biocidal products. Many biocidal active substances which are used on a daily basis may decrease the barrier function of the skin to a larger extent than current risk assessment practice addresses, due to possible skin effects of repeate

  15. Effects of single and repeated exposure to biocidal active substances on the barrier function of the skin in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buist, H.E.; Sandt, J.J.M. van de; Burgsteden, J.A. van; Heer, C. de

    2005-01-01

    The dermal route of exposure is important in worker exposure to biocidal products. Many biocidal active substances which are used on a daily basis may decrease the barrier function of the skin to a larger extent than current risk assessment practice addresses, due to possible skin effects of repeate

  16. Repeated cocaine exposure increases fast-spiking interneuron excitability in the rat medial prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanac, Emilie; Hoffman, Dax A

    2013-06-01

    The medial prefrontal cortex plays a key role in cocaine addiction. However, how chronic cocaine exposure affects cortical networks remains unclear. Most studies have focused on layer 5 pyramidal neurons (the circuit output), while the response of local GABAergic interneurons to cocaine remains poorly understood. Here, we recorded from fast-spiking interneurons (FS-IN) after repeated cocaine exposure and found altered membrane excitability. After cocaine withdrawal, FS-IN showed an increase in the number of spikes evoked by positive current injection, increased input resistance, and decreased hyperpolarization-activated current. We also observed a reduction in miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents, whereas miniature inhibitory postsynaptic current activity was unaffected. We show that, in animals with cocaine history, dopamine receptor D(2) activation is less effective in increasing FS-IN intrinsic excitability. Interestingly, these alterations are only observed 1 wk or more after the last cocaine exposure. This suggests that the dampening of D(2)-receptor-mediated response may be a compensatory mechanism to rein down the excitability of FS-IN.

  17. Assessing variability and comparing short-term biomarkers of styrene exposure using a repeated measurements approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fustinoni, S; Manini, P; Campo, L; De Palma, G; Andreoli, R; Mutti, A; Bertazzi, P A; Rappaport, S M

    2010-01-15

    The aim of this work is to compare several short-term biomarkers of styrene exposure, namely urinary styrene (StyU), mercapturic acids (M1+M2), mandelic acid (MA), phenylglyoxylic acid (PGA), phenylglycine (PHG), and 4-vinylphenol conjugates (VP), for use as biomarkers of exposure in epidemiologic studies. A repeated measurements protocol (typically 4 measurements per worker over 6 weeks) was applied to measure airborne styrene (StyA) and urinary biomarkers in 10 varnish and 8 fiberglass reinforced plastic workers. Estimated geometric mean personal exposures to StyA were 2.96mg/m(3) in varnish workers and 15.7mg/m(3) in plastic workers. The corresponding levels of StyU, M1+M2, MA, PGA, MA+PGA, PHG and VP were 5.13microg/L, 0.111, 38.2, 22.7, 62.6, 0.978, and 3.97mg/g creatinine in varnish workers and 8.38microg/L, 0.303, 146, 83.4, 232, 2.85 and 3.97mg/g creatinine in plastic workers. Within-worker (sigma(wY)(2)) and between-worker (sigma(bY)(2)) variance components were estimated from the log-transformed data as were the corresponding fold ranges containing 95% of the respective lognormal distributions of daily levels ((w)R(0.95)) and subject-specific mean levels ((b)R(0.95)). Estimates of (w)R(0.95) (range: 4-26) were generally smaller than those of (b)R(0.95) (range: 5-790) for both environmental and biological markers; this indicates that exposures varied much more between workers than within workers in these groups. Since attenuation bias in an estimated exposure-response relationship increases with the variance ratio lambda=sigma(wY)(2)/sigma(bY)(2), we estimated values of lambda for all exposure measures in our study. Values of lambda were typically much less than one (median=0.220) and ranged from 0.089 for M1+M2 in plastic workers to 1.38 for PHG in varnish workers. Since values of lambda were 0.147 and 0.271 for StyA in varnish workers and plastic workers, respectively, compared to 0.178 and 0.210 for MA in the same groups, our results suggest that either

  18. Repeated exposure to iron oxide nanoparticles causes testicular toxicity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundarraj, Kiruthika; Manickam, Vijayprakash; Raghunath, Azhwar; Periyasamy, Madhivadhani; Viswanathan, Mangala Priya; Perumal, Ekambaram

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether repeated exposure to iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe2 O3 -NPs) could be toxic to mice testis. Fe2 O3 -NPs (25 and 50 mg/kg) were intraperitoneally administered into mice once a week for 4 weeks. Our study showed that Fe2 O3 -NPs have the ability to cross the blood-testis barrier to get into the testis. The findings showed that exposure resulted in the accumulation of Fe2 O3 -NPs which was evidenced from the iron content and accumulation in the testis. Furthermore, 25 and 50 mg/kg Fe2 O3 -NPs administration increased the reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyl content, glutathione peroxidase activity, and nitric oxide levels with a concomitant decrease in the levels of antioxidants-superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione, and vitamin C. Increased expression of Bax, cleaved-caspase-3, and cleaved-PARP confirms apoptosis. Serum testosterone levels increased with increased concentration of Fe2 O3 -NPs exposure. In addition, the histopathological lesions like vacuolization, detachment, and sloughing of germ cells were also observed in response to Fe2 O3 -NPs treatment. The data from our study entailed that testicular toxicity caused by Fe2 O3 -NPs exposure may be associated with Fe2 O3 -NPs accumulation leading to oxidative stress and apoptosis. Therefore, precautions should be taken in the safe use of Fe2 O3 -NPs to avoid complications in the fertility of males. Further research will unravel the possible molecular mechanisms on testicular toxicity of Fe2 O3 -NPs. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 594-608, 2017.

  19. The hidden price of repeated traumatic exposure: Different cognitive deficits in different first-responders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Einat eLevy-Gigi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Studies on first responders who are repeatedly exposed to traumatic events report low levels of PTSD symptoms and diagnosis. However, neuroimaging and behavioral studies show that traumatic exposure is associated with brain and cognitive dysfunctions. Taking together it may suggest that traumatic exposure have a price, which is not sufficiently defined by the standard PTSD measures. In a recent study we revealed that similar to individuals with PTSD, non-PTSD highly exposed firefighters display a selective impairment in hippocampal related functions. In the current study we aimed to test whether different first responders display a similar impairment. We concentrated on unique populations of active duty firefighters and criminal scene-investigators (CSI police, who are frequently exposed to similar levels and types of traumatic events, and compared them to civilian matched-controls with no history of trauma-exposure. We used a hippocampal dependent cue-context reversal paradigm, which separately evaluates reversal of negative and positive outcomes of cue and context related information. We predicted and found that all participants were equally able to acquire and retain stimulus-outcome associations. However, there were significant differences in reversal learning between the groups. Performance among firefighters replicated our prior findings; they struggled to learn that a previously negative context is later associated with a positive outcome. CSI police on the other hand showed a selective impairment in reversing the outcome of a negative cue. Hence after learning that a specific cue is associated with a negative outcome, they could not learn that later it is associated with a positive outcome. Performance in both groups did not correlate with levels of PTSD, anxiety, depression or behavioral inhibition symptoms. The results provide further evidence of the hidden price of traumatic exposure, suggesting that this price may differ as a

  20. Perfectionism Affects Blood Pressure in Response to Repeated Exposure to Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Phebe; Rice, Kenneth G; Caffee, Lauren

    2016-04-01

    This pilot study examined the effects of perfectionism on blood pressure (BP) in response to repeated exposure to mental arithmetic stressors. College students (N = 30) in a laboratory setting were administered a series of challenging mathematical tasks. BP was measured at baseline and after each task. Multilevel modelling analyses revealed that BP tended to decline over the course of the mathematical tasks. However, higher levels of performance standards predicted relatively stable levels of systolic BP, whereas moderate and lower levels of standards predicted declines in systolic BP. Higher levels of self-critical perfectionism predicted generally sustained levels of diastolic BP, with moderate and low self-criticism predicting declines in diastolic BP during the repeated stressors. These preliminary results suggest that students with higher levels of perfectionism may be at risk for physiological problems associated with stress reactivity, perhaps especially so in situations in which they experience persistent stress. Although results were qualified by a relatively small sample size, effects were statistically significant and supported the importance of examining the short-term and long-term implications of the effects of perfectionism on cardiovascular function and the different implications of elevations in systolic and diastolic BP.

  1. Increases in fruit intakes in older low consumers of fruit following two community-based repeated exposure interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleton, K M

    2013-03-14

    The present study investigated the value of two repeated exposure interventions for increasing intakes of fruit in older people. A total of ninety-five participants (aged 65 years and over) were randomised to receive either one (E1), five (E5) or five plus (E5+) exposures to fruit over a 5-week period. Fruit exposures occurred in community-based church and social groups, through fruit-tasting sessions involving familiar fruits and novel fruit products and dishes (E1, E5, E5+), and through fruit provision (E5+). Daily intakes of fruit and vegetables were assessed before and after all interventions. Liking for all fruits was also measured during repeated exposure (E5, E5+). In low consumers of fruit (one portion/d or less), fruit intakes increased significantly in the repeated exposure groups (E5, E5+) (t(30) = 5·79, Polder low consumers of fruit, although no benefits of additional fruit provision were found. Repeated exposure was also easy to implement, of low cost and enjoyable.

  2. Repeated Exposure to Dissection Does Not Influence Students’ Attitudes towards Human Body Donation for Anatomy Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Maseghe Mwachaka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of unclaimed bodies for anatomical dissection has been the main method of instruction at our institution. There is however a shortage of cadavers for dissection given the increase in the number of medical schools as well as in the number of students enrolling in these schools. This shortage could be mitigated by having voluntary human body donation programs. This study aimed at assessing the attitudes of medical students and surgical residents towards body donation for anatomy learning. We conducted an online survey involving 72 first-year medical students and 41 surgical residents at University of Nairobi who had completed one year of anatomy dissection. For the medical students, this was their first dissection experience while it was the second exposure for the surgery trainees. Most of the surgical trainees (70.7% and medical students (68.1% were opposed to self-body donation. This was mainly due to cultural (37% and religious (20% barriers. Surprisingly, of those not willing to donate themselves, 67.9% (82.8% surgical trainees, 59.2% medical students would recommend the practice to other people. Exposure to repeated dissection does not change the perceptions towards body donation. It is noteworthy that culture and religion rank high as clear barriers amongst this “highly informed” group of potential donors.

  3. Occupational hazards of traditional healers: repeated unprotected blood exposures risk infectious disease transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audet, Carolyn M; Salato, José; Blevins, Meridith; Silva, Wilson; González-Calvo, Lázaro; Vermund, Sten H; Gaspar, Felisbela

    2016-11-01

    Healers provide support for acute and chronic illnesses in rural Mozambique, such as socially acceptable traditional 'vaccinations' (subcutaneous cuts in the skin to rub herbs directly into the bloody lesion). We aimed to document the frequency of blood exposure by traditional practitioners in Mozambique. We conducted surveys with a simple random sample of 236 traditional healers in Zambézia province. Chi-square and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests were used to compare 'injection' behaviours across districts. Healers treated a median of eight patients in the past month (IQR: 4-15). About 75% conducted 'injections'. These healers 'injected' a median of four patients (IQR: 1-8), used a new razor a median of three times (IQR: 1-8), and almost never used gloves. Lifetime blood exposures among those who provided 'injections' during treatments were estimated to be 1758 over a healer's career. The majority of healers are exposed repeatedly to patient blood. Given the high prevalence of HIV, hepatitis B and C virus, and other blood-borne agents, specific healer practices are an occupational hazard and reuse of razors is risky for their clients. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Repeated exposure of acidic beverages on esthetic restorative materials: An in-vitro surface microhardness study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Arun M; Sunny, Steffy M; Rai, Kavita; Hegde, Amitha M

    2016-07-01

    A manifold increase in the consumption of aerated beverages has witnessed a twin increase in tooth wear and raised demand for esthetic restorative materials. This study aimed to evaluate the surface microhardness changes of esthetic restorative materials following treatment with aerated beverages in an in-vitro situation. The initial surface microhardness of the restorative materials GC Fuji II LC, GC Fuji IX, Nano Glass ionomer, Resin and Nano composite was recorded. These materials were studied under 3 groups that included those exposed to the acidic beverages daily, weekly once in a month and those that had no exposures at all. The final surface microhardness of the materials was recorded following experimentation and was subjected to statistical comparisons. The restorative materials were compared for their surface microhardness changes following respective treatments using the T-test and One-way ANOVA analysis. Inter-comparisons between the groups showed statistical significance (pmaterials revealed surface microhardness loss; the maximum reduction noticed with the Nano glass ionomer cement tested (pmaterials markedly reduced upon repeated exposures with acidic beverages; the product with phosphoric acid producing the maximum surface microhardness loss. Restorative materials, acidic beverages, surface microhardness, resin composites, glass ionomers.

  5. Repeated Exposure to Dissection Does Not Influence Students' Attitudes towards Human Body Donation for Anatomy Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwachaka, Philip Maseghe; Mandela, Pamela; Saidi, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    The use of unclaimed bodies for anatomical dissection has been the main method of instruction at our institution. There is however a shortage of cadavers for dissection given the increase in the number of medical schools as well as in the number of students enrolling in these schools. This shortage could be mitigated by having voluntary human body donation programs. This study aimed at assessing the attitudes of medical students and surgical residents towards body donation for anatomy learning. We conducted an online survey involving 72 first-year medical students and 41 surgical residents at University of Nairobi who had completed one year of anatomy dissection. For the medical students, this was their first dissection experience while it was the second exposure for the surgery trainees. Most of the surgical trainees (70.7%) and medical students (68.1%) were opposed to self-body donation. This was mainly due to cultural (37%) and religious (20%) barriers. Surprisingly, of those not willing to donate themselves, 67.9% (82.8% surgical trainees, 59.2% medical students) would recommend the practice to other people. Exposure to repeated dissection does not change the perceptions towards body donation. It is noteworthy that culture and religion rank high as clear barriers amongst this "highly informed" group of potential donors.

  6. Repeated exposure to media violence is associated with diminished response in an inhibitory frontolimbic network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher R Kelly

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Media depictions of violence, although often claimed to induce viewer aggression, have not been shown to affect the cortical networks that regulate behavior. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, we found that repeated exposure to violent media, but not to other equally arousing media, led to both diminished response in right lateral orbitofrontal cortex (right ltOFC and a decrease in right ltOFC-amygdala interaction. Reduced function in this network has been previously associated with decreased control over a variety of behaviors, including reactive aggression. Indeed, we found reduced right ltOFC responses to be characteristic of those subjects that reported greater tendencies toward reactive aggression. Furthermore, the violence-induced reduction in right ltOFC response coincided with increased throughput to behavior planning regions. CONCLUSIONS: These novel findings establish that even short-term exposure to violent media can result in diminished responsiveness of a network associated with behaviors such as reactive aggression.

  7. Respiratory toxicity of repeated exposure to particles produced by traffic and sugar cane burning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoli-Rocha, Flavia; Carvalho, Giovanna M C; Lanzetti, Manuella; Valença, Samuel S; Silva, Luiz F F; Saldiva, Paulo H N; Zin, Walter A; Faffe, Débora S

    2014-01-15

    We compared the toxicity of subchronic exposure to equivalent masses of particles from sugar cane burning and traffic. BALB/c mice received 3 intranasal instillations/week during 1, 2 or 4 weeks of either distilled water (C1, C2, C4) or particles (15μg) from traffic (UP1, UP2, UP4) or biomass burning (BP1, BP2, BP4). Lung mechanics, histology and oxidative stress were analyzed 24h after the last instillation. In all instances UP and BP groups presented worse pulmonary elastance, airway and tissue resistance, alveolar collapse, bronchoconstriction and macrophage influx into the lungs than controls. UP4, BP2 and BP4 presented more alveolar collapse than UP1 and BP1, respectively. UP and BP had worse bronchial and alveolar lesion scores than their controls; BP4 had greater bronchial lesion scores than UP4. Catalase was higher in UP4 and BP4 than in C4. In conclusion, biomass particles were more toxic than those from traffic after repeated exposures.

  8. Variability in prefrontal hemodynamic response during exposure to repeated self-selected music excerpts, a near-infrared spectroscopy study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saba Moghimi

    Full Text Available Music-induced brain activity modulations in areas involved in emotion regulation may be useful in achieving therapeutic outcomes. Clinical applications of music may involve prolonged or repeated exposures to music. However, the variability of the observed brain activity patterns in repeated exposures to music is not well understood. We hypothesized that multiple exposures to the same music would elicit more consistent activity patterns than exposure to different music. In this study, the temporal and spatial variability of cerebral prefrontal hemodynamic response was investigated across multiple exposures to self-selected musical excerpts in 10 healthy adults. The hemodynamic changes were measured using prefrontal cortex near infrared spectroscopy and represented by instantaneous phase values. Based on spatial and temporal characteristics of these observed hemodynamic changes, we defined a consistency index to represent variability across these domains. The consistency index across repeated exposures to the same piece of music was compared to the consistency index corresponding to prefrontal activity from randomly matched non-identical musical excerpts. Consistency indexes were significantly different for identical versus non-identical musical excerpts when comparing a subset of repetitions. When all four exposures were compared, no significant difference was observed between the consistency indexes of randomly matched non-identical musical excerpts and the consistency index corresponding to repetitions of the same musical excerpts. This observation suggests the existence of only partial consistency between repeated exposures to the same musical excerpt, which may stem from the role of the prefrontal cortex in regulating other cognitive and emotional processes.

  9. Preferences for daily or intermittent pre-exposure prophylaxis regimens and ability to anticipate sex among HIV uninfected members of Kenyan HIV serodiscordant couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Sarah T; Heffron, Renee; Ngure, Kenneth; Celum, Connie; Kurth, Ann; Curran, Kathryn; Mugo, Nelly; Baeten, Jared M

    2014-09-01

    Intermittent dosing for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) has been proposed as an alternative to daily PrEP to reduce cost and patient drug exposure and to improve adherence. One possible dosing regimen is pre-intercourse PrEP, which requires anticipating sex in advance. We examined preferences for daily versus pre-intercourse PrEP and ability to anticipate sex among 310 HIV uninfected members of HIV serodiscordant heterosexual couples in Thika, Kenya, with high HIV knowledge and experience with daily PrEP use in a clinical trial setting. Preferences were evenly split between daily PrEP (47.4 %) and pre-intercourse PrEP (50.7 %). Participants were more likely to prefer daily PrEP if they reported unprotected sex during the prior month (adjusted prevalence ratio [aPR] 1.48, 95 % CI 1.20-1.81) or 3 h in advance, with younger participants being less likely to do so (aPR 0.43, 95 % CI 0.23-0.83 for ages 18-29 vs. ≥40). Findings suggest that intermittent PrEP could be a popular option in this population, but that optimal adherence and sufficient drug levels might be challenging with a pre-intercourse regimen.

  10. Repeated exposure to odors induces affective habituation of perception and sniffing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille eFerdenzi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Olfactory perception, and especially hedonic evaluation of odors, is highly flexible, but some mechanisms involved in this flexibility remain to be elucidated. In the present study we aimed at better understanding how repeated exposure to odors can affect their pleasantness. We tested the hypothesis of an affective habituation to the stimuli, namely a decrease of emotional intensity over repetitions. More specifically, we tested whether this effect is subject to inter-individual variability and whether it can also be observed at the olfactomotor level. Twenty-six participants took part in the experiment during which they had to smell two odorants, anise and chocolate, presented twenty times each. On each trial, sniff duration and volume were recorded and paired with ratings of odor pleasantness and intensity. For each smell, we distinguished between likers and dislikers, namely individuals giving positive and negative initial hedonic evaluations. Results showed a significant decrease in pleasantness with time when the odor was initially pleasant (likers, while unpleasantness remained stable or slightly decreased when the odor was initially unpleasant (dislikers. This deviation towards neutrality was interpreted as affective habituation. This effect was all the more robust as it was observed for both odors and corroborated by sniffing, an objective measurement of odor pleasantness. Affective habituation to odors can be interpreted as an adaptive response to stimuli that prove over time to be devoid of positive or negative outcome on the organism. This study contributes to a better understanding of how olfactory preferences are shaped through exposure, depending on the individual’s own initial perception of the odor.

  11. Impact of product information and repeated exposure on consumer liking, sensory perception and concept associations of local apple juice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolzenbach, Sandra; Bredie, Wender Laurentius Petrus; Christensen, Rune Haubo Bojesen

    2013-01-01

    The impact of product information and repeated exposure of local apple juice on consumer liking, sensory perception and concept associations was studied. Findings showed that consumers had high expectations towards the studied local apples juices. Consequently, the liking for the local apple juic...

  12. Repeated exposures to cobalt or chromate on the hands of patients with hand eczema and contact allergy to that metal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, N H; Kristiansen, J; Borg, L

    2000-01-01

    The present study aimed at evaluating the effects of daily repeated exposures to low cobalt or chromate concentrations on the hands of patients with hand eczema and cobalt or chromate allergy. For 2 weeks, the patients immersed a finger for 10 min daily into the appropriate metal salt solution in...

  13. Effect of repeated and prolonged exposure to low concentrations of Low Molecular Weight chemicals on local lymph node responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong WH de; Beek M ter; Veenman C; Klerk A de; Loveren H van; TOX

    2006-01-01

    The results of the local lymph node assay are not for all compounds useful as starting point for a quantitative risk assessment. This study describes the effects after repeated exposure of the skin to a concentration of a sensitizer below the threshold used in the local lymph node assay. Positive re

  14. Effects of moxifloxacin exposure on the conjunctival flora and antibiotic resistance profile following repeated intravitreal injections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mustafa; Atas; Burhan; Baskan; Ayse; zkse; Fatma; Mutlu; Sarιgüzel; Süleyman; Demircan; Emine; Pangal

    2014-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate the effects of moxifloxacin exposure on the conjunctival flora and antibiotic resistance profile following repeated intravitreal injections.METHODS:Seventy-two eyes of 36 patients [36 eyes in control group, 36 eyes in intravitreal injection(IVI) group]were enrolled in the study. All the eyes had at least one IVI and had diabetic macular edema(DME) or age-related macular degeneration(ARMD). Moxifloxacin was prescribed to all the patients four times a day for five days following injection. Conjunctival cultures were obtained from the lower fornix via standardized technique with every possible effort made to minimize contamination from the lids, lashes, or skin. Before the application of any ophthalmic medication, conjunctival cultures were obtained from both eyes using sterile cotton culture. An automated microbiology system was used to identify the growing bacteria and determine antibiotic sensitivity.RESULTS:The bacterial cultures were isolated from 72 eyes of 36 patients, sixteen of whom patients(44.4%)were male and twenty(55.6%) were female. Average age was 68.4 ±9.0(range 50-86). The average number of injections before taking cultures was 3.1+1.0. Forty-eight(66.7%) of 72 eyes had at least one significant organism.There was no bacterial growth in 8(20.5%) of IVI eyes and in 16(44.4%) of control eyes(P =0.03). Of the bacteria isolated from culture, 53.8% of coagulase negative staphylococci(CoNS) in IVI eyes and 47.2%CoNS in control eyes. This difference between IVI eyes and control eyes about bacteria isolated from culture was not statistically significant(P =0.2). Eleven of 25 bacteria(44.0%) isolated from IVI eyes and 11(57.9%) of 19 bacteria isolated from control eyes were resistant to oxacillin. The difference in frequency of moxifloxacine resistance between two groups was not statistically significant(12.0% in IVI eyes and 21.1% in control eyes)(P =0.44). There were no cases of resistance to vancomycin, teicoplanin and linezolid

  15. Repeated exposure of adult rats to transient oxidative stress induces various long-lasting alterations in cognitive and behavioral functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshio Iguchi

    Full Text Available Exposure of neonates to oxidative stress may increase the risk of psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia in adulthood. However, the effects of moderate oxidative stress on the adult brain are not completely understood. To address this issue, we systemically administrated 2-cyclohexen-1-one (CHX to adult rats to transiently reduce glutathione levels. Repeated administration of CHX did not affect the acquisition or motivation of an appetitive instrumental behavior (lever pressing rewarded by a food outcome under a progressive ratio schedule. In addition, response discrimination and reversal learning were not affected. However, acute CHX administration blunted the sensitivity of the instrumental performance to outcome devaluation, and this effect was prolonged in rats with a history of repeated CHX exposure, representing pro-depression-like phenotypes. On the other hand, repeated CHX administration reduced immobility in forced swimming tests and blunted acute cocaine-induced behaviors, implicating antidepressant-like effects. Multivariate analyses segregated a characteristic group of behavioral variables influenced by repeated CHX administration. Taken together, these findings suggest that repeated administration of CHX to adult rats did not cause a specific mental disorder, but it induced long-term alterations in behavioral and cognitive functions, possibly related to specific neural correlates.

  16. Change in tensile properties of neoprene and nitrile gloves after repeated exposures to acetone and thermal decontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Pengfei; Tomasovic, Beth

    2005-11-01

    This study investigated the change in tensile properties of neoprene and nitrile gloves after repeated cycles of exposure to acetone, followed by thermal decontamination. The glove was exposed to acetone (outer surface in contact with chemical), subjected to thermal decontamination, and tested for the tensile strength and the ultimate elongation. Thermal decontamination was carried out inside an oven for 16 hours at 100 degrees C. The exposure/decontamination procedure was repeated for a maximum of 10 cycles. For neoprene versus acetone, the mean tensile strength consistently decreased after each exposure/decontamination cycle. Multiple comparisons indicated that the mean tensile strengths between the new swatches and each exposure/decontamination group were significantly different (p 0.05). The mean tensile strength for the new swatches was 37.1 MPa and the mean tensile strength after nine exposure/decontamination cycles was 36.0 MPa, with a loss less than 3%. The largest single cycle loss for ultimate elongation occurred during the first exposure/decontamination cycle for both glove materials. In our previous study, decisions regarding the effectiveness of the decontamination process were based on having no discernible change in the breakthrough time and steady-state permeation rate. The results of this study indicate that the effectiveness of the decontamination process cannot be based on permeation parameters alone but must also take into account the change in physical properties.

  17. Androgen receptor gene CAG repeat length as modifier of the association between Persistent Organohalogen Pollutant exposure markers and semen characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giwercman, Aleksander; Rylander, Lars; Rignell-Hydbom, Anna;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Exposure to persistent organohalogen pollutants was suggested to impair male reproductive function. A gene-environment interaction has been proposed. No genes modifying the effect of persistent organohalogen pollutants on reproductive organs have yet been identified. We aimed...... and morphology) and DNA fragmentation index (DFI) were determined. CAG and GGN repeat lengths were determined by direct sequencing of leukocyte DNA. RESULTS: A statistically significant interaction was found between the CB-153 group and CAG repeat category in relation to sperm concentration and total sperm count...

  18. Lipid Profile and Oxidative Stress Markers in Wistar Rats following Oral and Repeated Exposure to Fijk Herbal Mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluyomi Stephen Adeyemi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study determined the effect of the oral and repeated administration of Fijk herbal mixture on rat biochemical and morphological parameters. Twenty-four Wistar rats were distributed into four groups of 6. Group A served as control and received oral administration of distilled water daily. The experimental groups B, C, and D were daily and orally exposed to Fijk herbal mixture at 15, 30, and 45 mg/kg, respectively. Treatments lasted for 21 days. The rats were sacrificed under mild diethyl ether anesthesia 24 hr after cessation of treatment. The blood and liver samples were collected and used for the biochemical and morphological analyses. Oral exposure to Fijk caused elevated levels of rat plasma ALT, AST, triglycerides, LDL, and MDA. In contrast, rat plasma HDL, GSH, and ALP levels were lowered by Fijk oral exposure. Also, the herbal remedy caused a dose-dependent elevation in the plasma atherogenic index. The histopathology examinations of rat liver sections revealed inimical cellular alterations caused by repeated exposure to Fijk. Study provides evidence that oral and repeated exposure to Fijk in rats raised the atherogenic index and potentiated oxidative stress as well as hepatic injury.

  19. Changes on expected taste perception of probiotic and conventional yogurts made from goat milk after rapidly repeated exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, M P; Balthazar, C F; Franco, R M; Mársico, E T; Cruz, A G; Conte, C A

    2014-05-01

    Goat milk yogurt is an excellent source of fatty acids, protein, and minerals; however, it is not well accepted by many consumers, due to its typical flavor derived from caprylic, capric, and caproic acids present in this milk and dairy products. Recently, the repeated-exposure test has been used to increase the consumption of particular foods. This methodology has been used to increase children's willingness to eat food in some settings and has also been used to reduce sodium in soup. Based on these considerations, the aim of this study was to investigate whether repeated exposures may increase acceptance of both goat milk yogurt and probiotic goat milk yogurt. In a pre-exposure session, a total of 45 panelists (28 females and 17 males) from southeastern Brazil, who were not used to consuming dairy goat milk, evaluated the expected taste perception and the perceived liking after tasting 3 yogurt preparations. Then, consumers were randomly divided into 3 groups and participated in rapidly repeated exposure sessions performed within 6 d. Each panelist consumed only the yogurt that he or she would be exposed to. The day after the exposure sessions, all panelists returned to participate in the postexposure session and were asked to evaluate acceptance, familiarity, and the "goaty taste" characteristic of each yogurt. Regarding the expected liking before tasting, results showed higher expectations for cow milk yogurt compared with goat milk yogurt, which proved that consumers were not familiar with the goat milk yogurt. Likewise, only cow milk yogurt presented high acceptance and familiarity rates, confirming that these panelists were used to consuming cow milk products. With respect to the rapidly repeated exposure, 6 d were enough to significantly increase the consumers' familiarity with goat milk yogurt and probiotic goat milk yogurt. However, this method was not suitable to significantly increase the acceptance of such products. Nonetheless, a correlation existed

  20. Effect of hypoxia by intermittent altitude exposure on semen characteristics and testicular morphology of male rhesus monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, D. K.

    1995-09-01

    Semen characteristics and testicular morphology of rhesus monkeys were studied on exposure to a simulated high altitude of 4411 m for 21 days. There was a partially reversible decrease in the semen volume, sperm count and sperm motility, as well as an elevation of pH and fructose concentration. These changes were associated with degeneration of the germinal epithelium and spermatogenic arrest at the end of third week of exposure which had not recovered even 3 weeks after the exposure.

  1. Mediation of the Relationship between Maternal Phthalate Exposure and Preterm Birth by Oxidative Stress with Repeated Measurements across Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Kelly K; Chen, Yin-Hsiu; VanderWeele, Tyler J; McElrath, Thomas F; Meeker, John D; Mukherjee, Bhramar

    2017-03-01

    Mediation analysis is useful for understanding mechanisms and has been used minimally in the study of the environment and disease. We examined mediation of the association between phthalate exposure during pregnancy and preterm birth by oxidative stress. This nested case-control study of preterm birth (n = 130 cases, 352 controls) included women who delivered in Boston, Massachusestts, from 2006 through 2008. Phthalate metabolites and 8-isoprostane, an oxidative stress biomarker, were measured in urine from three visits in pregnancy. We applied four counterfactual mediation methods: method 1, utilizing exposure and mediator averages; method 2, using averages but allowing for an exposure-mediator interaction; method 3, incorporating longitudinal measurements of the exposure and mediator; and method 4, using longitudinal measurements and allowing for an exposure-mediator interaction. We observed mediation of the associations between phthalate metabolites and all preterm birth by 8-isoprostane, with the greatest estimated proportion mediated observed for spontaneous preterm births specifically. Fully utilizing repeated measures of the exposure and mediator improved precision of indirect (i.e., mediated) effect estimates, and including an exposure-mediator interaction increased the estimated proportion mediated. For example, for mono(2-ethyl-carboxy-propyl) phthalate (MECPP), a metabolite of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), the percent of the total effect mediated by 8-isoprostane increased from 47% to 60% with inclusion of an exposure-mediator interaction term, in reference to a total adjusted odds ratio of 1.67 or 1.48, respectively. This demonstrates mediation of the phthalate-preterm birth relationship by oxidative stress, and the utility of complex regression models in capturing mediated associations when repeated measures of exposure and mediator are available and an exposure-mediator interaction may exist. Citation: Ferguson KK, Chen YH, VanderWeele TJ, Mc

  2. Effects of Adolescent Intermittent Alcohol Exposure on the Expression of Endocannabinoid Signaling-Related Proteins in the Spleen of Young Adult Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, Mariam; Sánchez, Laura; Rivera, Patricia; Gavito, Ana; Mela, Virginia; Alén, Francisco; Decara, Juan; Suárez, Juan; Giné, Elena; López-Moreno, José Antonio; Chowen, Julie; Rodríguez-de-Fonseca, Fernando; Serrano, Antonia; Viveros, María Paz

    2016-01-01

    Intermittent alcohol exposure is a common pattern of alcohol consumption among adolescents and alcohol is known to modulate the expression of the endocannabinoid system (ECS), which is involved in metabolism and inflammation. However, it is unknown whether this pattern may have short-term consequences on the ECS in the spleen. To address this question, we examined the plasma concentrations of metabolic and inflammatory signals and the splenic ECS in early adult rats exposed to alcohol during adolescence. A 4-day drinking in the dark (DID) procedure for 4 weeks was used as a model of intermittent forced-alcohol administration (20%, v/v) in female and male Wistar rats, which were sacrificed 2 weeks after the last DID session. First, there was no liver damage or alterations in plasma metabolic parameters. However, certain plasma inflammatory signals were altered according to sex and alcohol exposition. Whereas fractalkine [chemokine (C-X3-C motif) ligand 1] was only affected by sex with lower concentration in male rats, there was an interaction between sex and alcohol exposure in the TNF-α and interleukin-6 concentrations and only female rats displayed changes. Regarding the mRNA and protein expression of the ECS, the receptors and endocannabinoid-synthesizing enzymes were found to be altered with area-specific expression patterns in the spleen. Overall, whereas the expression of the cannabinoid receptor CB1 and the nuclear peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor PPARα were lower in alcohol-exposed rats compared to control rats, the CB2 expression was higher. Additionally, the N-acyl-phosphatidylethanolamine-specific phospholipase D expression was high in female alcohol-exposed rats and low in male alcohol-exposed rats. In conclusion, intermittent alcohol consumption during adolescence may be sufficient to induce short-term changes in the expression of splenic endocannabinoid signaling-related proteins and plasma pro-inflammatory cytokines in young adult rats

  3. Effects of Adolescent Intermittent Alcohol Exposure on the Expression of Endocannabinoid Signaling-Related Proteins in the Spleen of Young Adult Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavón, Francisco Javier; Marco, Eva María; Vázquez, Mariam; Sánchez, Laura; Rivera, Patricia; Gavito, Ana; Mela, Virginia; Alén, Francisco; Decara, Juan; Suárez, Juan; Giné, Elena; López-Moreno, José Antonio; Chowen, Julie; Rodríguez-de-Fonseca, Fernando; Serrano, Antonia; Viveros, María Paz

    Intermittent alcohol exposure is a common pattern of alcohol consumption among adolescents and alcohol is known to modulate the expression of the endocannabinoid system (ECS), which is involved in metabolism and inflammation. However, it is unknown whether this pattern may have short-term consequences on the ECS in the spleen. To address this question, we examined the plasma concentrations of metabolic and inflammatory signals and the splenic ECS in early adult rats exposed to alcohol during adolescence. A 4-day drinking in the dark (DID) procedure for 4 weeks was used as a model of intermittent forced-alcohol administration (20%, v/v) in female and male Wistar rats, which were sacrificed 2 weeks after the last DID session. First, there was no liver damage or alterations in plasma metabolic parameters. However, certain plasma inflammatory signals were altered according to sex and alcohol exposition. Whereas fractalkine [chemokine (C-X3-C motif) ligand 1] was only affected by sex with lower concentration in male rats, there was an interaction between sex and alcohol exposure in the TNF-α and interleukin-6 concentrations and only female rats displayed changes. Regarding the mRNA and protein expression of the ECS, the receptors and endocannabinoid-synthesizing enzymes were found to be altered with area-specific expression patterns in the spleen. Overall, whereas the expression of the cannabinoid receptor CB1 and the nuclear peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor PPARα were lower in alcohol-exposed rats compared to control rats, the CB2 expression was higher. Additionally, the N-acyl-phosphatidylethanolamine-specific phospholipase D expression was high in female alcohol-exposed rats and low in male alcohol-exposed rats. In conclusion, intermittent alcohol consumption during adolescence may be sufficient to induce short-term changes in the expression of splenic endocannabinoid signaling-related proteins and plasma pro-inflammatory cytokines in young adult rats

  4. [A new method of short-term high volume (6 g of 5-FU in a week) intermittent hepatic arterial infusion using repeated transient catheter insertion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasuike, Yasunori; Tanigawa, Takahiko; Yamada, Masaharu; Minami, Yukiko; Ezumi, Koji; Okada, Atsuya

    2009-11-01

    We report a case of liver metastases, which had hepatectomy twice and a partial lung resection after sigmoidectomy with partial bladder resection for advanced sigmoid colon cancer. The patient could not be tolerated the systemic chemotherapy, and percutaneous implantation of a catheter also could not have done with subcutaneous reservoir for hepatic arterial infusion because of an anomaly of hepatic artery branched-out from super mesenteric artery. Therefore, we tried an intermittent hepatic arterial infusion using a transient insertion of catheter to control the liver metastases' growth. A total amount of 6 g of 5-FU was continuously injected in a week by one insertion of catheter at the hepatic artery taking one day rest at day 4. During the next 21 months, a total of 11 courses have been done. CEA and CA19-9 were changed from 15 ng/mL, 48 U/ mL to 18, 30, respectively. The patient was able to keep working except for the duration of this treatment. This procedure could be one of the hepatic arterial infusion options.

  5. Drinking hydrogen water and intermittent hydrogen gas exposure, but not lactulose or continuous hydrogen gas exposure, prevent 6-hydorxydopamine-induced Parkinson’s disease in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ito Mikako

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lactulose is a synthetic disaccharide that can be catalyzed only by intestinal bacteria in humans and rodents, and a large amount of hydrogen is produced by bacterial catalysis of lactulose. We previously reported marked effects of ad libitum administration of hydrogen water on prevention of a rat model of Parkinson’s disease (PD. Methods End-alveolar breath hydrogen concentrations were measured in 28 healthy subjects and 37 PD patients, as well as in 9 rats after taking hydrogen water or lactulose. Six-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA-induced hemi-PD model was stereotactically generated in rats. We compared effects of hydrogen water and lactulose on prevention of PD. We also analyzed effects of continuous and intermittent administration of 2% hydrogen gas. Results Hydrogen water increased breath hydrogen concentrations from 8.6 ± 2.1 to 32.6 ± 3.3 ppm (mean and SEM, n = 8 in 10 min in healthy subjects. Lactulose increased breath hydrogen concentrations in 86% of healthy subjects and 59% of PD patients. Compared to monophasic hydrogen increases in 71% of healthy subjects, 32% and 41% of PD patients showed biphasic and no increases, respectively. Lactulose also increased breath hydrogen levels monophasically in 9 rats. Lactulose, however, marginally ameliorated 6-OHDA-induced PD in rats. Continuous administration of 2% hydrogen gas similarly had marginal effects. On the other hand, intermittent administration of 2% hydrogen gas prevented PD in 4 of 6 rats. Conclusions Lack of dose responses of hydrogen and the presence of favorable effects with hydrogen water and intermittent hydrogen gas suggest that signal modulating activities of hydrogen are likely to be instrumental in exerting a protective effect against PD.

  6. Effects of acute versus repeated cocaine exposure on the expression of endocannabinoid signaling-related proteins in the mouse cerebellum

    OpenAIRE

    Ana ePalomino; Francisco Javier ePavon; Eduardo eBlanco Calvo; Antonia eSerrano; Sergio eArrabal; Patricia eRivera; Antonio eVargas; Ainhoa eBilbao; Leticia eRubio; Fernando eRodriguez de Fonseca; Juan eSuarez

    2014-01-01

    Growing awareness of cerebellar involvement in addiction is based on the cerebellum’s intermediary position between motor and reward, potentially acting as an interface between motivational and cognitive functions. Here, we examined the impact of acute and repeated cocaine exposure on the two main signaling systems in the mouse cerebellum: the endocannabinoid (eCB) and glutamate systems. To this end, we investigated whether eCB signaling-related gene and protein expression {cannabinoid recept...

  7. Inhibition of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels After Subchronic and Repeated Exposure of PC12 Cells to Different Classes of Insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Marieke; Brandsema, Joske A R; Nieuwenhuis, Desirée; Wijnolts, Fiona M J; Dingemans, Milou M L; Westerink, Remco H S

    2015-10-01

    We previously demonstrated that acute inhibition of voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) is a common mode of action for (sub)micromolar concentrations of chemicals, including insecticides. However, because human exposure to chemicals is usually chronic and repeated, we investigated if selected insecticides from different chemical classes (organochlorines, organophosphates, pyrethroids, carbamates, and neonicotinoids) also disturb calcium homeostasis after subchronic (24 h) exposure and after a subsequent (repeated) acute exposure. Effects on calcium homeostasis were investigated with single-cell fluorescence (Fura-2) imaging of PC12 cells. Cells were depolarized with high-K(+) saline to study effects of subchronic or repeated exposure on VGCC-mediated Ca(2+) influx. The results demonstrate that except for carbaryl and imidacloprid, all selected insecticides inhibited depolarization (K(+))-evoked Ca(2+) influx after subchronic exposure (IC50's: approximately 1-10 µM) in PC12 cells. These inhibitory effects were not or only slowly reversible. Moreover, repeated exposure augmented the inhibition of the K(+)-evoked increase in intracellular calcium concentration induced by subchronic exposure to cypermethrin, chlorpyrifos, chlorpyrifos-oxon, and endosulfan (IC50's: approximately 0.1-4 µM). In rat primary cortical cultures, acute and repeated chlorpyrifos exposure also augmented inhibition of VGCCs compared with subchronic exposure. In conclusion, compared with subchronic exposure, repeated exposure increases the potency of insecticides to inhibit VGCCs. However, the potency of insecticides to inhibit VGCCs upon repeated exposure was comparable with the inhibition previously observed following acute exposure, with the exception of chlorpyrifos. The data suggest that an acute exposure paradigm is sufficient for screening chemicals for effects on VGCCs and that PC12 cells are a sensitive model for detection of effects on VGCCs. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford

  8. Mitochondrial tolerance to single and repeat exposure to simulated sunlight in human epidermal and dermal skin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, J; Murphy, J E J

    2016-12-01

    Sunlight represents the primary threat to mitochondrial integrity in skin given the unique nature of the mitochondrial genome and its proximity to the electron transport chain. The accumulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations is a key factor in many human pathologies and this is linked to key roles of mitochondrial function in terms of energy production and cell regulation. The main objective of this study was to evaluate solar radiation induced changes in mitochondrial integrity, function and dynamics in human skin cells using a Q-Sun solar simulator to deliver a close match to the intensity of summer sunlight. Spontaneously immortalised human skin epidermal keratinocytes (HaCaT) and Human Dermal Fibroblasts (HDFn) were divided into two groups. Group A were irradiated once and Group B twice 7days apart and evaluated using cell survival, viability and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and mass at 1, 4 and 7days post one exposure for Group A and 1, 4, 7 and 14days post second exposure for Group B. Viability and survival of HaCaT and HDFn cells decreased after repeat exposure to Simulated Sunlight Irradiation (SSI) with no recovery. HDFn cells showed no loss in MMP after one or two exposures to SSI compared to HaCaT cells which showed a periodic loss of MMP after one exposure with a repeat exposure causing a dramatic decrease from which cells did not recover. Mitochondrial Mass in exposed HDFn cells was consistent with control after one or two exposures to SSI; however mitochondrial mass was significantly decreased in HaCaT cells. Data presented here suggests that mitochondria in epidermal cells are more sensitive to sunlight damage compared to mitochondria in dermal cells, despite their origin, confirming a skin layer specific sensitivity to sunlight, but not as expected. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of repeated exposure to malathion on growth, food consumption, and locomotor performance of the western fence lizard (Sceloporus occidentalis)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holem, Ryan R. [University of Georgia, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29801 (United States); ENTRIX, Inc., Okemos, MI 48864 (United States); Hopkins, William A. [University of Georgia, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29801 (United States); Department of Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States)], E-mail: hopkinsw@vt.edu; Talent, Larry G. [Natural Resource Ecology and Management, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States)

    2008-03-15

    Effects of repeated pollutant exposure on growth, locomotor performance, and behavior have rarely been evaluated in reptiles. We administered three doses of malathion (2.0, 20, or 100 mg/kg body weight) to western fence lizards (Sceloporus occidentalis) over an 81 day period. Eight and 23% mortality occurred at 20 and 100 mg/kg (p = 0.079) and 85% of lizards in the 100 mg/kg group exhibited clinical symptoms of poisoning. Growth, food consumption, body condition index, and terrestrial locomotor performance were not significantly influenced by malathion. However, arboreal sprint velocity was significantly reduced in lizards receiving 100 mg/kg. Fifty percent of lizards in the 100 mg/kg group also refused to sprint in the arboreal setting (p = 0.085). Based on these results, arboreal locomotor performance was the most sensitive metric of exposure we evaluated. Further study of compounds such as malathion is warranted due to highly variable application rates and exposure scenarios. - Repeated exposure of western fence lizards to malathion caused reduced arboreal performance and some mortality but growth, food consumption, and terrestrial performance were not affected.

  10. Effects of acute versus repeated cocaine exposure on the expression of endocannabinoid signaling-related proteins in the mouse cerebellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana ePalomino

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Growing awareness of cerebellar involvement in addiction is based on the cerebellum’s intermediary position between motor and reward, potentially acting as an interface between motivational and cognitive functions. Here, we examined the impact of acute and repeated cocaine exposure on the two main signaling systems in the mouse cerebellum: the endocannabinoid (eCB and glutamate systems. To this end, we investigated whether eCB signaling-related gene and protein expression (CB1 receptors and enzymes that produce (DAGLα/β and NAPE-PLD and degrade (MAGL and FAAH eCB were altered. In addition, we analyzed the gene expression of relevant components of the glutamate signaling system (glutamate synthesizing enzymes LGA and KGA, mGluR3/5 metabotropic receptors, and NR1/2A/2B/2C-NMDA and GluR1/2/3/4-AMPA ionotropic receptor subunits and the gene expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, the rate-limiting enzyme in catecholamine biosynthesis, because noradrenergic terminals innervate the cerebellar cortex. Results indicated that acute cocaine exposure decreased DAGLα expression, suggesting a down-regulation of 2-AG production, as well as gene expression of TH, KGA, mGluR3 and all ionotropic receptor subunits analyzed in the cerebellum. The acquisition of conditioned locomotion and sensitization after repeated cocaine exposure were associated with an increased NAPE-PLD/FAAH ratio, suggesting enhanced anandamide production, and a decreased DAGLβ/MAGL ratio, suggesting decreased 2-AG generation. Repeated cocaine also increased LGA gene expression but had no effect on glutamate receptors. These findings indicate that acute cocaine modulates the expression of the eCB and glutamate systems. Repeated cocaine results in normalization of glutamate receptor expression, although sustained changes in eCB is observed. We suggest that cocaine-induced alterations to cerebellar eCB should be considered when analyzing the adaptations imposed by psychostimulants that

  11. Ethanol withdrawal is required to produce persisting N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-dependent hippocampal cytotoxicity during chronic intermittent ethanol exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Anna R.; Berry, B. Jennifer N.; Sharrett-Field, Lynda; Prendergast, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic intermittent ethanol consumption is associated with neurodegeneration and cognitive deficits in preclinical laboratory animals and in the clinical population. While previous work suggests a role for neuroadaptations in the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor in the development of ethanol dependence and manifestation of withdrawal, the relative roles of ethanol exposure and ethanol withdrawal in producing these effects have not been fully characterized. To examine underlying cytotoxic mechanisms associated with CIE exposure, organotypic hippocampal slices were exposed to 1–3 cycles of ethanol (50 mM) in cell culture medium for 5 days, followed by 24-hours of ethanol withdrawal in which a portion of slices were exposed to competitive NMDA receptor antagonist (2R)-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (APV; 40 µM). Cytotoxicity was assessed using immunohistochemical labeling of neuron specific nuclear protein (NeuN; Fox-3), a marker of mature neurons, and thionine (2%) staining of Nissl bodies. Multiple cycles of CIE produced neurotoxicity, as reflected in persisting losses of neuron NeuN immunoreactivity and thionine staining in each of the primary cell layers of the hippocampal formation. Hippocampi aged in vitro were significantly more sensitive to the toxic effects of multiple CIEs than were non-aged hippocampi. This effect was not demonstrated in slices exposed to continuous ethanol, in the absence of withdrawal, or to a single exposure/withdrawal regimen. Exposure to APV significantly attenuated the cytotoxicity observed in the primary cell layers of the hippocampus. The present findings suggest that ethanol withdrawal is required to produce NMDA receptor-dependent hippocampal cytotoxicity, particularly in the aging hippocampus in vitro. PMID:25746220

  12. Glucoregulatory consequences and cardiorespiratory parameters in rats exposed to chronic-intermittent hypoxia: Effects of the duration of exposure and losartan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor B Fenik

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is associated with glucose intolerance. Both chronic sleep disruption and recurrent blood oxygen desaturations (chronic-intermittent hypoxia – CIH may cause, or exacerbate, metabolic derangements. Methods: To assess the impact of CIH alone, without accompanying upper airway obstructions, on the counter-regulatory response to glucose load and cardiorespiratory parameters, we exposed adult male Sprague-Dawley rats to CIH or sham room air exchanges for 10 h/day for 7, 21 or 35 days and then, one day after conclusion of CIH exposure, conducted intravenous glucose tolerance tests (ivgtt under urethane anesthesia. Additional rats underwent 35 days of CIH followed by 35 days of regular housing, or had 35 day-long CIH exposure combined with daily administration of the type 1 angiotensin II receptor antagonist, losartan (15 mg/kg, p.o., and then were also subjected to ivgtt. Results: Compared with the corresponding control groups, CIH rats had progressively reduced glucose-stimulated insulin release and impaired glucose clearance, only mildly elevated heart rate and/or arterial blood pressure and slightly reduced respiratory rate. The differences in insulin release between the CIH and sham-treated rats disappeared in the rats normally housed for 35 days after 35 days of CIH/sham exposure. The losartan-treated rats had improved insulin sensitivity, with no evidence of suppressed insulin release in the CIH group. Conclusions: In adult rats, the glucose-stimulated insulin release is gradually suppressed with the duration of exposure to CIH, but the effect is reversible. Elimination of the detrimental effect of CIH on insulin release by losartan suggests that CIH disrupts glucoregulation through angiotensin/catecholaminergic pathways. Accordingly, treatment with continuous positive airway pressure may ameliorate pre-diabetic conditions in OSA patients, in part, by reducing sympathoexcitatory effects of recurrent

  13. Distinct Effects of Nalmefene on Dopamine Uptake Rates and Kappa Opioid Receptor Activity in the Nucleus Accumbens Following Chronic Intermittent Ethanol Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie H. Rose

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The development of pharmacotherapeutics that reduce relapse to alcohol drinking in patients with alcohol dependence is of considerable research interest. Preclinical data support a role for nucleus accumbens (NAc κ opioid receptors (KOR in chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE exposure-induced increases in ethanol intake. Nalmefene, a high-affinity KOR partial agonist, reduces drinking in at-risk patients and relapse drinking in rodents, potentially due to its effects on NAc KORs. However, the effects of nalmefene on accumbal dopamine transmission and KOR function are poorly understood. We investigated the effects of nalmefene on dopamine transmission and KORs using fast scan cyclic voltammetry in NAc brain slices from male C57BL/6J mice following five weeks of CIE or air exposure. Nalmefene concentration-dependently reduced dopamine release similarly in air and CIE groups, suggesting that dynorphin tone may not be present in brain slices. Further, nalmefene attenuated dopamine uptake rates to a greater extent in brain slices from CIE-exposed mice, suggesting that dopamine transporter-KOR interactions may be fundamentally altered following CIE. Additionally, nalmefene reversed the dopamine-decreasing effects of a maximal concentration of a KOR agonist selectively in brain slices of CIE-exposed mice. It is possible that nalmefene may attenuate withdrawal-induced increases in ethanol consumption by modulation of dopamine transmission through KORs.

  14. Prediction of local irritant effects after repeated dermal and respiratory exposure to chemicals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rennen, M.A.J.; Nordheim, K.; Houben, G.F.; Heer, C. de

    2002-01-01

    Health risks resulting from occupational exposure to chemicals are controlled by the establishment of acceptable dermal and respiratory exposure levels. Due to a lack of route-specific toxicity data, acceptable levels are frequently established by means of route-to-route extrapolation. A pitfall in

  15. Prediction of local irritant effects after repeated dermal and respiratory exposure to chemicals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rennen, M.A.J.; Nordheim, K.; Houben, G.F.; Heer, C. de

    2002-01-01

    Health risks resulting from occupational exposure to chemicals are controlled by the establishment of acceptable dermal and respiratory exposure levels. Due to a lack of route-specific toxicity data, acceptable levels are frequently established by means of route-to-route extrapolation. A pitfall in

  16. Passive Response to Stress in Adolescent Female and Adult Male Mice after Intermittent Nicotine Exposure in Adolescence

    OpenAIRE

    Thanos, Panayotis; Delis, Foteini; Rosko, Lauren; Nora D Volkow

    2013-01-01

    Smoking is frequently co-morbid with depression. Although it is recognized that depression increases the risk for smoking, it is unclear if early smoking exposure may increase the risk for depression. To test this possibility we assessed the effects of adolescent nicotine exposure on the Forced Swim Test (FST), which is used as a measure of passive coping, and depressive-like behavior in rodents, and on the open field test (OFT), which is used as a measure of locomotion and exploratory behavi...

  17. Changes of lead speciation and microbial toxicity in soil treated with repeated Pb exposure in the presence of BDE209.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rong; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Gao; Lin, Kuangfei; Fu, Rongbing

    2016-03-01

    Lead (Pb) and decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE209) are main pollutants at electric waste (e-waste) recycling sites (EWRSs), and their joint toxicological effects have received extensive attention. Frequently, soil pollution at EWRSs usually results from the occurrence of repeated single or multiple pollution events, with continuous impacts on soil microorganisms. Therefore, a laboratory incubation study was conducted to determine Pb bioavailability and microbial toxicity in repeated Pb-polluted soil in the presence of BDE209 for the first time. We evaluated the impacts of repetitive exposure trials on chemical fractions of Pb, and the results showed that repeated single Pb pollution event resulted in an increase of carbonates fraction of Pb, which was different from one-off single Pb exposure. Moreover, one-off Pb-treated groups exhibited higher I R (reduced partition index) values on day 30 and all treatments remained the same I R level at the end of incubation period. The parameters of microbial toxicity were well reflected by soil enzymes. During the entire incubation, the dehydrogenase and urease activities were significantly inhibited by Pb (P soil enzymes were clearly observed (P < 0.05 or 0.01). Such observations would provide useful information for ecological effects of Pb and BDE209 at EWRSs.

  18. Protective effect of curcumin on pulmonary and cardiovascular effects induced by repeated exposure to diesel exhaust particles in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abderrahim Nemmar

    Full Text Available Particulate air pollution has been associated with increased risk of cardiopulmonary diseases. However, the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. We have previously demonstrated that single dose exposure to diesel exhaust particle (DEP causes lung inflammation and peripheral thrombotic events. Here, we exposed mice with repeated doses of DEP (15 µg/animal every 2(nd day for 6 days (a total of 4 exposures, and measured several cardiopulmonary endpoints 48 h after the end of the treatments. Moreover, the potential protective effect of curcumin (the yellow pigment isolated from turmeric on DEP-induced cardiopulmonary toxicity was assessed. DEP exposure increased macrophage and neutrophil numbers, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF α in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid, and enhanced airway resistance to methacoline measured invasively using Flexivent. DEP also significantly increased plasma C-reactive protein (CRP and TNF α concentrations, systolic blood pressure (SBP as well as the pial arteriolar thrombosis. It also significantly enhanced the plasma D-dimer and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1. Pretreatment with curcumin by oral gavage (45 mg/kg 1 h before exposure to DEP significantly prevented the influx of inflammatory cells and the increase of TNF α in BAL, and the increased airway resistance caused by DEP. Likewise, curcumin prevented the increase of SBP, CRP, TNF α, D-dimer and PAI-1. The thrombosis was partially but significantly mitigated. In conclusion, repeated exposure to DEP induced lung and systemic inflammation characterized by TNFα release, increased SBP, and accelerated coagulation. Our findings indicate that curcumin is a potent anti-inflammatory agent that prevents the release of TNFα and protects against the pulmonary and cardiovascular effects of DEP.

  19. Social disparities in children’s exposure to second hand smoke at home: a repeated cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pisinger Charlotta

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exposure to second hand smoke (SHS is an important preventable cause of morbidity and mortality in children. We hypothesised that there has been a growth in social inequality in children’s exposure to SHS at home over time. The purpose of this study was to investigate temporal change in smoking in homes including children, focusing on the socioeconomic differences. Methods Data is from a repeated cross-sectional survey, ‘Health Profiles of the Capital Region of Denmark’ conducted in 2007 and 2010, in 29 municipalities. The response rate was 52.3%, in both surveys. Our study included persons aged 25 to 64, living with children ≤15 years of age; N=9,289 in 2007 and 12,696 in 2010. Analyses were weighted for size of municipality and for non-response, which was higher among men and among persons who were younger, had a lower income, were living alone, were unemployed, and/or were of an ethnicity other than Danish. Regression analyses were used to investigate smoking in homes including children across parent/adult education levels, focusing on temporal changes. Results There were significant large socioeconomic differences in both 2007 and 2010. In 2010 it was more than 11 times more likely for a child to be exposed to SHS at home if the parent had very low education than if they were highly educated (p Conclusions Marked social inequalities in children’s exposure to SHS and a significant temporal decrease in exposure, independent of the education level of the parent/adult, were found in repeated large cross-sectional population-based studies. Social disparities have persisted over time, but not increased. Both clinical and population policy interventions will be needed in order to control child SHS exposure. We call for legislative protection of children from tobacco smoke inside their home as a supplement to parental education and support for smoking cessation.

  20. Repeated exposure to amphetamine during adolescence alters inhibitory tone in the medial prefrontal cortex following drug re-exposure in adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Charles L.; Gulley, Joshua M.

    2016-01-01

    Behavioral sensitization following repeated amphetamine (AMPH) exposure is associated with changes in GABA function in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). In rats exposed to AMPH during adolescence compared to adulthood, there are unique patterns of sensitization that may reflect age-dependent differences in drug effects on prefrontal GABAergic function. In the current study, we used a sensitizing regimen of repeated AMPH exposure in adolescent and adult rats to determine if a post-withdrawal AMPH challenge would alter inhibitory transmission in the mPFC in a manner that depends on age of exposure. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with saline or 3 mg/kg AMPH (i.p.) during adolescence [postnatal day (P) 27 to P45] or adulthood (P85 to P103) and were sacrificed either at similar ages in adulthood (~P133; Experiment 1) or after similar withdrawal times (3-4 weeks; Experiment 2). Spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) were recorded in vitro from deep layer pyramidal cells in the mPFC using the whole-cell configuration. We found no effect of AMPH pre-exposure on baseline sIPSC frequency. Subsequent application of AMPH (25 μM) produced a stable increase in sIPSC frequency in controls, suggesting that AMPH increases inhibitory tone in the mPFC. However, AMPH failed to increase sIPSCs in adolescent- or adult-exposed rats. In Experiment 2, where withdrawal period was kept similar for both exposure groups, AMPH induced a suppression of sIPSC activity in adolescent-exposed rats. These results suggest that sensitizing treatment with AMPH during adolescence or adulthood dampens inhibitory influences on mPFC pyramidal cells, but potentially through different mechanisms. PMID:27085589

  1. Repeated exposure of the developing rat brain to magnetic resonance imaging did not affect neurogenesis, cell death or memory function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Changlian [Center for Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Pediatrics, The Third Affiliated Hospital, Zhengzhou University (China); Gao, Jianfeng [Center for Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Pediatrics, The Third Affiliated Hospital, Zhengzhou University (China); Department of Physiology, Henan Traditional Medical University (China); Li, Qian; Huang, Zhiheng; Zhang, Yu; Li, Hongfu [Center for Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Pediatrics, The Third Affiliated Hospital, Zhengzhou University (China); Kuhn, Hans-Georg [Center for Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Blomgren, Klas, E-mail: klas.blomgren@neuro.gu.se [Center for Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Pediatric Oncology, The Queen Silvia Children' s Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} The effect of MRI on the developing brain is a matter of debate. {yields} Repeated exposure to MRI did not affect neurogenesis. {yields} Memory function was not affected by repeated MRI during development. {yields} Neither late gestation nor young postnatal brains were affected by MRI. {yields} Repeated MRI did not cause cell death in the neurogenic region of the hippocampus. -- Abstract: The effect of magnetic fields on the brain is a matter of debate. The objective of this study was to investigate whether repeated exposure to strong magnetic fields, such as during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), could elicit changes in the developing rat brain. Embryonic day 15 (E15) and postnatal day 14 (P14) rats were exposed to MRI using a 7.05 T MR system. The animals were anesthetized and exposed for 35 min per day for 4 successive days. Control animals were anesthetized but no MRI was performed. Body temperature was maintained at 37 {sup o}C. BrdU was injected after each session (50 mg/kg). One month later, cell proliferation, neurogenesis and astrogenesis in the dentate gyrus were evaluated, revealing no effects of MRI, neither in the E15, nor in the P14 group. DNA damage in the dentate gyrus in the P14 group was evaluated on P18, 1 day after the last session, using TUNEL staining. There was no difference in the number of TUNEL-positive cells after MRI compared with controls, neither in mature neurons, nor in newborn progenitors (BrdU/TUNEL double-labeled cells). Novel object recognition was performed to assess memory function 1 month after MRI. There was no difference in the recognition index observed after MRI compared with the control rats, neither for the E15, nor for the P14 group. In conclusion, repeated exposure to MRI did not appear to affect neurogenesis, cell death or memory function in rats, neither in late gestation (E15-E18) nor in young postnatal (P14-P17) rats.

  2. Effects of Repeated Ethanol Exposures on NMDA Receptor Expression and Locomotor Sensitization in Mice Expressing Ethanol Resistant NMDA Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Hartog, Carolina R.; Gilstrap, Meghin; Eaton, Bethany; Lench, Daniel H.; Mulholland, Patrick J.; Homanics, Gregg. E.; Woodward, John J.

    2017-01-01

    Evidence from a large number of preclinical studies suggests that chronic exposure to drugs of abuse, such as psychostimulants or ethanol induces changes in glutamatergic transmission in key brain areas associated with reward and control of behavior. These changes include alterations in the expression of ionotropic glutamate receptors including N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) that are important for regulating neuronal activity and synaptic plasticity. NMDA receptors are inhibited by ethanol and reductions in NMDA-mediated signaling are thought to trigger homestatic responses that limit ethanol's effects on glutamatergic transmission. Following repeated exposures to ethanol, these homeostatic responses may become unstable leading to an altered glutamatergic state that contributes to the escalations in drinking and cognitive deficits observed in alcohol-dependent subjects. An important unanswered question is whether ethanol-induced changes in NMDAR expression are modulated by the intrinsic sensitivity of the receptor to ethanol. In this study, we examined the effects of ethanol on NMDAR subunit expression in cortical (orbitofrontal, medial prefrontal), striatal (dorsal and ventral striatum) and limbic (dorsal hippocampus, basolateral amygdala) areas in mice genetically modified to express ethanol-resistant receptors (F639A mice). These mice have been previously shown to drink more ethanol than their wild-type counterparts and have altered behavioral responses to certain actions of ethanol. Following long-term voluntary drinking, F639A mice showed elevations in GluN2A but not GluN1 or GluN2B expression as compared to wild-type mice. Mice treated with repeated injections with ethanol (2–3.5 g/kg; i.p.) showed changes in NMDAR expression that varied in a complex manner with genotype, brain region, subunit type and exposure protocol all contributing to the observed response. F639A mice, but not wild-type mice, showed enhanced motor activity following repeated

  3. Distribution of dearomatised white spirit in brain, blood, and fat tissue after repeated exposure of rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lof, A.; Lam, Henrik Rye; Gullstrand, E.

    1999-01-01

    spirit was 1.5 and 5.6 mg/kg in blood; 7.1 and 17.1 mg/kg in brain; 432 and 1452 mg/kg in fat tissue at the exposure levels of 400 and 800 p.p.m., respectively. The concentrations of n-nonane, n-decane, n-undecane, and total white spirit in blood and brain were not affected by the duration of exposure....... Two hours after the end of exposure the n-decane concentration decreased to about 25% in blood and 50% in brain. A similar pattern of elimination was also observed for n-nonane, n-undecane and total white spirit in blood and brain. In fat tissue the concentrations of n-nonane, n-decane, n......-undecane, and total white spirit increased during the 3 weeks of exposure. The time to reach steady-state concentrations is longer than 3 weeks. After the 3 weeks' exposure the fat tissue concentration of n-nonane, n-decane, n-undecane, and total white spirit decreased very slowly compared with the rate of decrease...

  4. Effects of Repeated Cocaine Exposure on Habit Learning and Reversal by N-Acetylcysteine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbit, Laura H; Chieng, Billy C; Balleine, Bernard W

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to drugs of abuse can result in a loss of control over both drug- and nondrug-related actions by accelerating the transition from goal-directed to habitual control, an effect argued to reflect changes in glutamate homeostasis. Here we examined whether exposure to cocaine accelerates habit learning and used in vitro electrophysiology to investigate its effects on measures of synaptic plasticity in the dorsomedial (DMS) and dorsolateral (DLS) striatum, areas critical for actions and habits, respectively. We then administered N-acetylcysteine (NAC) in an attempt to normalize glutamate homeostasis and hence reverse the cellular and behavioral effects of cocaine exposure. Rats received daily injections of cocaine (30 mg/kg) for 6 days and were then trained to lever press for a food reward. We used outcome devaluation and whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology to assess the behavioral and cellular effects of cocaine exposure. We then examined the ability of NAC to reverse the effects of cocaine exposure on these measures. Cocaine treatment produced a deficit in goal-directed action, as assessed by outcome devaluation, and increased the frequency of spontaneous and miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) in the DMS but not in the DLS. Importantly, NAC treatment both normalized EPSC frequency and promoted goal-directed control in cocaine-treated rats. The promotion of goal-directed control has the potential to improve treatment outcomes in human cocaine addicts. PMID:24531561

  5. Passive Response to Stress in Adolescent Female and Adult Male Mice after Intermittent Nicotine Exposure in Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanos, Panayotis; Delis, Foteini; Rosko, Lauren; Volkow, Nora D

    2013-04-23

    Smoking is frequently co-morbid with depression. Although it is recognized that depression increases the risk for smoking, it is unclear if early smoking exposure may increase the risk for depression. To test this possibility we assessed the effects of adolescent nicotine exposure on the Forced Swim Test (FST), which is used as a measure of passive coping, and depressive-like behavior in rodents, and on the open field test (OFT), which is used as a measure of locomotion and exploratory behavior. Male and female mice received daily saline or nicotine (0.3 or 0.6 mg/kg) injections from postnatal day (PD) 30 to PD 44. FST and OFT were performed either 1 or 30 days after the last injection (PD 45 and PD 74, respectively). In females, treatment with 0.3 mg/kg nicotine lead to increased FST immobility (64%) and decreased OFT locomotor activity (12%) one day following the last nicotine injection (PD 45); while no effects were observed in adulthood (PD 74). In contrast, on PD45, nicotine treatment did not change the male FST immobility but lead to lower OFT locomotor activity (0.6 mg/kg, 10%). In adulthood (PD 74), both nicotine doses lead to higher FST immobility (87%) in males while 0.6 mg/kg nicotine to lower OFT locomotor activity (13%). The results (i) identify females as more vulnerable to the immediate withdrawal that follows nicotine discontinuation in adolescence and (ii) suggest that adolescent nicotine exposure may enhance the risk for passive response towards unavoidable stress in adult males.

  6. Safety, adherence and acceptability of intermittent tenofovir/emtricitabine as HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP among HIV-uninfected Ugandan volunteers living in HIV-serodiscordant relationships: a randomized, clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freddie M Kibengo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Efficacy of oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP in prevention of HIV acquisition has been evaluated using a daily regimen. However, adherence to long term daily medication is rarely perfect. Intermittent regimen may be a feasible alternative. Preclinical studies have demonstrated effectiveness of intermittent PrEP in SHIV prevention among animals. However, little is known about intermittent PrEP regimens. DESIGN: Seventy two HIV-uninfected volunteers in HIV serodiscordant couple relationships in Uganda were randomly assigned to receive daily oral Tenofovir/Emtricitabine (TDF/FTC-Truvada or placebo, or intermittent (Monday, Friday and within 2 hours after sex, not to exceed one dose per day oral TDF/FTC or placebo in a 2:1:2:1 ratio. Volunteers and study staff were blinded to drug assignment, but not to regimen assignment. METHODS: Volunteers were followed for 4 months after randomization, with monthly clinical and laboratory safety assessments and comprehensive HIV risk reduction services. Adherence was monitored using medication event monitoring system (MEMS and self-report. Sexual activity data were collected via daily short text message (SMS and self-report. HIV-specific immune responses were assessed by IFN-γ ELISPOT. RESULTS: Both daily and intermittent oral TDF/FTC regimens were well tolerated. Median MEMS adherence rates were 98% (IQR: 93-100 for daily PrEP regimen, 91% (IQR: 73-97 for fixed intermittent dosing and 45% (IQR: 20-63 for post-coital dosing. SMS response rate was 74%, but increased to 80% after excluding server outages; results may have been affected by the novelty of this measure. The majority of volunteers expressed willingness with no particular preference for either regimen. CONCLUSIONS: Both daily and intermittent oral PrEP dosing regimens were safe. Adherence was high for daily and fixed intermittent dosing; post-coital dosing was associated with poor adherence. Fixed intermittent PrEP regimens may be

  7. Metabolite profiles of rats in repeated dose toxicological studies after oral and inhalative exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabian, E; Bordag, N; Herold, M; Kamp, H; Krennrich, G; Looser, R; Ma-Hock, L; Mellert, W; Montoya, G; Peter, E; Prokudin, A; Spitzer, M; Strauss, V; Walk, T; Zbranek, R; van Ravenzwaay, B

    2016-07-25

    The MetaMap(®)-Tox database contains plasma-metabolome and toxicity data of rats obtained from oral administration of 550 reference compounds following a standardized adapted OECD 407 protocol. Here, metabolic profiles for aniline (A), chloroform (CL), ethylbenzene (EB), 2-methoxyethanol (ME), N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) and tetrahydrofurane (THF), dosed inhalatively for six hours/day, five days a week for 4 weeks were compared to oral dosing performed daily for 4 weeks. To investigate if the oral and inhalative metabolome would be comparable statistical analyses were performed. Best correlations for metabolome changes via both routes of exposure were observed for toxicants that induced profound metabolome changes. e.g. CL and ME. Liver and testes were correctly identified as target organs. In contrast, route of exposure dependent differences in metabolic profiles were noted for low profile strength e.g. female rats dosed inhalatively with A or THF. Taken together, the current investigations demonstrate that plasma metabolome changes are generally comparable for systemic effects after oral and inhalation exposure. Differences may result from kinetics and first pass effects. For compounds inducing only weak changes, the differences between both routes of exposure are visible in the metabolome.

  8. Effect of brief, repeated hyperbaric exposures on susceptibility to nitrogen narcosis.

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    Rogers, W H; Moeller, G

    1989-05-01

    We investigated the effect of brief, repetitive exposures to 5.5 ATA (148 fsw) in a hyperbaric chamber on adaptation to nitrogen narcosis. A standing-steadiness task, which measures body sway, was administered to 2 groups of 3 chamber-qualified men at 5.5 ATA and 1.3 ATA [10 fsw (control)] on each of 12 successive days to determine if an initial performance decrement at 5.5 ATA would be ameliorated with time. Standing steadiness was significantly worse at 5.5 ATA than at 1.3 ATA across all 12 exposures. There were also changes in standing steadiness from day to day, but these changes occurred in both the test and control depths. There was no day-x-depth interaction that would have indicated that the initial performance decrement at 5.5 ATA was reduced with repetitive exposures. These results are taken as evidence that there is little or no behavioral adaptation to nitrogen narcosis in response to brief, repetitive exposures to narcosis-inducing hyperbaric air.

  9. The development of behavioral and endocrine abnormalities in rats after repeated exposure to direct and indirect stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Willie Mark Uren; de Klerk Uys, Joachim; van Vuuren, Petra; Stein, Daniel Joseph

    2008-04-01

    The present study compared the effects of direct and indirect stress on the behavior and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis of rats. Animals were placed in a two compartment box. In one compartment the direct stressed rat was subjected to electric foot shocks randomly applied for 10 minutes (0.5 mA of 1 s duration). In the adjacent compartment, the indirect stressed rats witnessed the application of these electric foot shocks. Our data showed substantial behavioral changes in the open field test, but limited effects in the elevated plus maze. The findings suggested that single and repeated stress exposure may have different consequences, that the effects of stress exposure may develop over time and persist for an extended period, and that both direct and indirect stressed rats displayed a hyposensitive HPA axis following acute restraint stress. Overall our observations moderately indicate direct exposure to elicit behavioral changes, and both direct and indirect exposure to stress to result in aberrations within the neuroendocrine system. With additional development our stress models may be considered for studying the complex interrelationship between an external stressor, and the experience of the organism.

  10. Single and repeated sevoflurane or desflurane exposure does not impair spatial memory performance of young adult mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilicaslan, Alper; Belviranli, Muaz; Okudan, Nilsel; Nurullahoglu Atalik, Esra

    2013-12-01

    Volatile anesthetics are known to disturb the spatial memory in aged rodents, but there is insufficient information on their effects on young adult rodents. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of single and repeated exposure to desflurane and sevoflurane on spatial learning and memory functions in young adult mice. Balb/c mice (2 months old) were randomly divided into six equal groups (n = 8). The groups with single inhalation were exposed to 3.3% sevoflurane or 7.8% desflurane or vehicle gas for 4 h, respectively. The groups with repeated inhalation were exposed to 3.3% sevoflurane or 7.8% desflurane or vehicle gas for 2 h a day during 5 consecutive days. Spatial learning and memory were tested in the Morris water maze 24 h after exposure. In the learning phase, the parameters associated with finding the hidden platform and swimming speed, and in the memory phase, time spent in the target quadrant and the adjacent quadrants, were assessed and compared between the groups. In the 4-day learning process, there was no significant difference between the groups in terms of mean latency to platform, mean distance traveled and average speed (P > 0.05). During the memory-test phase, all mice exhibited spatial memory, but there was no significant difference between the groups in terms of time spent in the target quadrant (P > 0.05). Sevoflurane and desflurane anesthesia did not impair acquisition learning and retention memory in young adult mice.

  11. Neonatal Repeated Exposure to Isoflurane not Sevoflurane in Mice Reversibly Impaired Spatial Cognition at Juvenile-Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianhui; Zhao, Yanhong; Yang, Junjun; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Peijun

    2017-02-01

    Inhalation anesthetics facilitate surgical procedures in millions of children each year. However, animal studies demonstrate that exposure to the inhalation anesthetic isoflurane may cause neuronal cell death in developing brains. The long-term cytotoxic effects of sevoflurane, the most popular pediatric anesthetic, have not been compared with isoflurane. Thus, this study was designed to compare the effects of equipotent doses of these two anesthetics on neonatal long-term neurotoxicity. Postnatal 7-day-old (P7) C57/BL male mice were exposed to 1.5% isoflurane or 2.2% sevoflurane 2 h a day for 3 days. Non-anesthetized mice served as controls. The effects of anesthesia on learning and memory were assessed using the Morris Water Maze (MWM) at Postnatal days 30 (P30) and P60 respectively. The hippocampal content of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunits (NMDA), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and synaptophysin (Syn) were determined by Western Blot. Neuron structure and apoptosis were assessed via Nissl and TUNEL staining, respectively. The isoflurane group exhibited cognitive impairment at P30. Repeated inhalation of isoflurane or sevoflurane caused different degrees of apoptosis and damaged hippocampal neurons in neonatal mice, particularly isoflurane. In neonatal mice, repeated exposure to isoflurane, but not sevoflurane, caused spatial cognitive impairments in juvenile mice. Our findings suggest that isoflurane induces significantly greater neurodegeneration than an equipotent minimum alveolar concentration of sevoflurane.

  12. Effects of acute versus repeated cocaine exposure on the expression of endocannabinoid signaling-related proteins in the mouse cerebellum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomino, Ana; Pavón, Francisco-Javier; Blanco-Calvo, Eduardo; Serrano, Antonia; Arrabal, Sergio; Rivera, Patricia; Alén, Francisco; Vargas, Antonio; Bilbao, Ainhoa; Rubio, Leticia; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Suárez, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Growing awareness of cerebellar involvement in addiction is based on the cerebellum’s intermediary position between motor and reward, potentially acting as an interface between motivational and cognitive functions. Here, we examined the impact of acute and repeated cocaine exposure on the two main signaling systems in the mouse cerebellum: the endocannabinoid (eCB) and glutamate systems. To this end, we investigated whether eCB signaling-related gene and protein expression {cannabinoid receptor type 1 receptors and enzymes that produce [diacylglycerol lipase alpha/beta (DAGLα/β) and N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamine phospholipase D (NAPE-PLD)] and degrade [monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) and fatty acid amino hydrolase (FAAH)] eCB} were altered. In addition, we analyzed the gene expression of relevant components of the glutamate signaling system [glutamate synthesizing enzymes liver-type glutaminase isoform (LGA) and kidney-type glutaminase isoform (KGA), metabotropic glutamatergic receptor (mGluR3/5), NMDA-ionotropic glutamatergic receptor (NR1/2A/2B/2C) and AMPA-ionotropic receptor subunits (GluR1/2/3/4)] and the gene expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in catecholamine biosynthesis, because noradrenergic terminals innervate the cerebellar cortex. Results indicated that acute cocaine exposure decreased DAGLα expression, suggesting a down-regulation of 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG) production, as well as gene expression of TH, KGA, mGluR3 and all ionotropic receptor subunits analyzed in the cerebellum. The acquisition of conditioned locomotion and sensitization after repeated cocaine exposure were associated with an increased NAPE-PLD/FAAH ratio, suggesting enhanced anandamide production, and a decreased DAGLβ/MAGL ratio, suggesting decreased 2-AG generation. Repeated cocaine also increased LGA gene expression but had no effect on glutamate receptors. These findings indicate that acute cocaine modulates the expression of the eCB and

  13. Intermittent hypoxia and neurorehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Rothi, Elisa J; Lee, Kun-Ze; Dale, Erica A; Reier, Paul J; Mitchell, Gordon S; Fuller, David D

    2015-12-15

    In recent years, it has become clear that brief, repeated presentations of hypoxia [i.e., acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH)] can boost the efficacy of more traditional therapeutic strategies in certain cases of neurologic dysfunction. This hypothesis derives from a series of studies in animal models and human subjects performed over the past 35 yr. In 1980, Millhorn et al. (Millhorn DE, Eldridge FL, Waldrop TG. Respir Physiol 41: 87-103, 1980) showed that electrical stimulation of carotid chemoafferent neurons produced a persistent, serotonin-dependent increase in phrenic motor output that outlasts the stimulus for more than 90 min (i.e., a "respiratory memory"). AIH elicits similar phrenic "long-term facilitation" (LTF) by a mechanism that requires cervical spinal serotonin receptor activation and de novo protein synthesis. From 2003 to present, a series of studies demonstrated that AIH can induce neuroplasticity in the injured spinal cord, causing functional recovery of breathing capacity after cervical spinal injury. Subsequently, it was demonstrated that repeated AIH (rAIH) can induce recovery of limb function, and the functional benefits of rAIH are greatest when paired with task-specific training. Since uncontrolled and/or prolonged intermittent hypoxia can elicit pathophysiology, a challenge of intermittent hypoxia research is to ensure that therapeutic protocols are well below the threshold for pathogenesis. This is possible since many low dose rAIH protocols have induced functional benefits without evidence of pathology. We propose that carefully controlled rAIH is a safe and noninvasive modality that can be paired with other neurorehabilitative strategies including traditional activity-based physical therapy or cell-based therapies such as intraspinal transplantation of neural progenitors.

  14. Effects of repeated exposure of diazinon on cholinesterase activity and growth in snakehead fish (Channa striata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Nguyen Van; Phuong, Nguyen Thanh; Bayley, Mark

    2009-03-01

    The organophosphate insecticide diazinon is widely used in the Mekong river delta and often applied several times per rice crop. In the present study, juvenile snakehead fish Channa striata, which is a commercially important inhabitant of rice fields, were exposed twice to 4-day pulses of 0.016, 0.079 or 0.35mg/L of diazinon, separated by a 2 week interval to imitate the exposure conditions in the field. After the 4-day exposures to these environmentally realistic concentrations, the fish were moved to clean water for recovery. During this experiment, which lasted a total of 2 months, the individual growth rates and brain cholinesterase levels were measured. We show not only that diazinon caused long term inhibition of brain ChE activity, which was still significantly depressed at the termination of the experiment, but also that the highest of these realistic concentrations caused a significant 30% growth inhibition.

  15. Writing content predicts benefit from written expressive disclosure: Evidence for repeated exposure and self-affirmation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niles, Andrea N; Byrne Haltom, Kate E; Lieberman, Matthew D; Hur, Christopher; Stanton, Annette L

    2016-01-01

    Expressive disclosure regarding a stressful event improves psychological and physical health, yet predictors of these effects are not well established. The current study assessed exposure, narrative structure, affect word use, self-affirmation and discovery of meaning as predictors of anxiety, depressive and physical symptoms following expressive writing. Participants (N = 50) wrote on four occasions about a stressful event and completed self-report measures before writing and three months later. Essays were coded for stressor exposure (level of detail and whether participants remained on topic), narrative structure, self-affirmation and discovery of meaning. Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count software was used to quantify positive and negative affect word use. Controlling for baseline anxiety, more self-affirmation and detail about the event predicted lower anxiety symptoms, and more negative affect words (very high use) and more discovery of meaning predicted higher anxiety symptoms three months after writing. Findings highlight the importance of self-affirmation and exposure as predictors of benefit from expressive writing.

  16. Effects of chronic dietary selenomethionine exposure on repeat swimming performance, aerobic metabolism and methionine catabolism in adult zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jith K; Wiseman, Steve; Giesy, John P; Janz, David M

    2013-04-15

    In a previous study we reported impaired swimming performance and greater stored energy in adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) after chronic dietary exposure to selenomethionine (SeMet). The goal of the present study was to further investigate effects of chronic exposure to dietary SeMet on repeat swimming performance, oxygen consumption (MO2), metabolic capacities (standard metabolic rate [SMR], active metabolic rate [AMR], factorial aerobic scope [F-AS] and cost of transport [COT]) and gene expression of energy metabolism and methionine catabolism enzymes in adult zebrafish. Fish were fed SeMet at measured concentrations of 1.3, 3.4, 9.8 or 27.5 μg Se/g dry mass (d.m.) for 90 d. At the end of the exposure period, fish from each treatment group were divided into three subgroups: (a) no swim, (b) swim, and (c) repeat swim. Fish from the no swim group were euthanized immediately at 90 d and whole body triglycerides, glycogen and lactate, and gene expression of energy metabolism and methionine catabolism enzymes were determined. Individual fish from the swim group were placed in a swim tunnel respirometer and swimming performance was assessed by determining the critical swimming speed (U(crit)). After both Ucrit and MO2 analyses, fish were euthanized and whole body energy stores and lactate were determined. Similarly, individual fish from the repeat swim group were subjected to two U(crit) tests (U(crit-1) and U(crit-2)) performed with a 60 min recovery period between tests, followed by determination of energy stores and lactate. Impaired swim performance was observed in fish fed SeMet at concentrations greater than 3 μg Se/g in the diet. However, within each dietary Se treatment group, no significant differences between single and repeat U(crits) were observed. Oxygen consumption, SMR and COT were significantly greater, and F-AS was significantly lesser, in fish fed SeMet. Whole body triglycerides were proportional to the concentration of SeMet in the diet. While

  17. Repeated exposure to neurotoxic levels of chlorpyrifos alters hippocampal expression of neurotrophins and neuropeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young S; Lewis, John A; Ippolito, Danielle L; Hussainzada, Naissan; Lein, Pamela J; Jackson, David A; Stallings, Jonathan D

    2016-01-18

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF), an organophosphorus pesticide (OP), is one of the most widely used pesticides in the world. Subchronic exposures to CPF that do not cause cholinergic crisis are associated with problems in cognitive function (i.e., learning and memory deficits), but the biological mechanism(s) underlying this association remain speculative. To identify potential mechanisms of subchronic CPF neurotoxicity, adult male Long Evans (LE) rats were administered CPF at 3 or 10mg/kg/d (s.c.) for 21 days. We quantified mRNA and non-coding RNA (ncRNA) expression profiles by RNA-seq, microarray analysis and small ncRNA sequencing technology in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. Hippocampal slice immunohistochemistry was used to determine CPF-induced changes in protein expression and localization patterns. Neither dose of CPF caused overt clinical signs of cholinergic toxicity, although after 21 days of exposure, cholinesterase activity was decreased to 58% or 13% of control levels in the hippocampus of rats in the 3 or 10mg/kg/d groups, respectively. Differential gene expression in the CA1 region of the hippocampus was observed only in the 10mg/kg/d dose group relative to controls. Of the 1382 differentially expressed genes identified by RNA-seq and microarray analysis, 67 were common to both approaches. Differential expression of six of these genes (Bdnf, Cort, Crhbp, Nptx2, Npy and Pnoc) was verified in an independent CPF exposure study; immunohistochemistry demonstrated that CRHBP and NPY were elevated in the CA1 region of the hippocampus at 10mg/kg/d CPF. Gene ontology enrichment analysis suggested association of these genes with receptor-mediated cell survival signaling pathways. miR132/212 was also elevated in the CA1 hippocampal region, which may play a role in the disruption of neurotrophin-mediated cognitive processes after CPF administration. These findings identify potential mediators of CPF-induced neurobehavioral deficits following subchronic exposure to CPF at

  18. Hyperalgesic priming (type II) induced by repeated opioid exposure: maintenance mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araldi, Dioneia; Ferrari, Luiz F; Levine, Jon D

    2017-07-01

    We previously developed a model of opioid-induced neuroplasticity in the peripheral terminal of the nociceptor that could contribute to opioid-induced hyperalgesia, type II hyperalgesic priming. Repeated administration of mu-opioid receptor (MOR) agonists, such as DAMGO, at the peripheral terminal of the nociceptor, induces long-lasting plasticity expressed, prototypically as opioid-induced hyperalgesia and prolongation of prostaglandin E2-induced hyperalgesia. In this study, we evaluated the mechanisms involved in the maintenance of type II priming. Opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone, induced hyperalgesia in DAMGO-primed paws. When repeatedly injected, naloxone-induced hyperalgesia, and hyperalgesic priming, supporting the suggestion that maintenance of priming involves changes in MOR signaling. However, the knockdown of MOR with oligodeoxynucleotide antisense did not reverse priming. Mitogen-activated protein kinase and focal adhesion kinase, which are involved in the Src signaling pathway, previously implicated in type II priming, also inhibited the expression, but not maintenance of priming. However, when Src and mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors were coadministered, type II priming was reversed, in male rats. A second model of priming, latent sensitization, induced by complete Freund's adjuvant was also reversed, in males. In females, the inhibitor combination was only able to inhibit the expression and maintenance of DAMGO-induced priming when knockdown of G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor 30 (GPR30) in the nociceptor was performed. These findings demonstrate that the maintenance of DAMGO-induced type II priming, and latent sensitization is mediated by an interaction between, Src and MAP kinases, which in females is GPR30 dependent.

  19. Neurobehavioral toxicity of a repeated exposure (14 days to the airborne polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon fluorene in adult Wistar male rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Peiffer

    Full Text Available Fluorene is one of the most abundant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in air and may contribute to the neurobehavioral alterations induced by the environmental exposure of humans to PAHs. Since no data are available on fluorene neurotoxicity, this study was conducted in adult rats to assess the behavioral toxicity of repeated fluorene inhalation exposure. Male rats (n = 18/group were exposed nose-only to 1.5 or 150 ppb of fluorene 6 hours/day for 14 consecutive days, whereas the control animals were exposed to non-contaminated air. At the end of the exposure, animals were tested for activity and anxiety in an open-field and in an elevated-plus maze, for short-term memory in a Y-maze, and for spatial learning in an eight-arm maze. The results showed that the locomotor activity and the learning performances of the animals were unaffected by fluorene. In parallel, the fluorene-exposed rats showed a lower level of anxiety than controls in the open-field, but not in the elevated-plus maze, which is probably due to a possible difference in the aversive feature of the two mazes. In the same animals, increasing blood and brain levels of fluorene monohydroxylated metabolites (especially the 2-OH fluorene were detected at both concentrations (1.5 and 150 ppb, demonstrating the exposure of the animals to the pollutant and showing the ability of this compound to be metabolized and to reach the cerebral compartment. The present study highlights the possibility for a 14-day fluorene exposure to induce some specific anxiety-related behavioral disturbances, and argues in favor of the susceptibility of the adult brain when exposed to volatile fluorene.

  20. Effects of heat exposure and 3% dehydration achieved via hot water immersion on repeated cycle sprint performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Justin A; Green, James M; Bishop, Phillip A; Richardson, Mark T; Neggers, Yasmin H; Leeper, James D

    2011-03-01

    This study examined effects of heat exposure with and without dehydration on repeated anaerobic cycling. Males (n = 10) completed 3 trials: control (CT), water-bath heat exposure (∼39°C) to 3% dehydration (with fluid replacement) (HE), and similar heat exposure to 3% dehydration (DEHY). Hematocrit increased significantly from pre to postheat immersion in both HE and DEHY. Participants performed 6 × 15s cycle sprints (30s active recovery). Mean Power (MP) was significantly lower vs. CT (596 ± 66 W) for DEHY (569 ± 72 W), and the difference approached significance for HE (582 ± 76 W, p = 0.07). Peak Power (PP) was significantly lower vs. CT (900 ± 117 W) for HE (870 ± 128 W) and approached significance for DEHY (857 ± 145 W, p = 0.07). Postsprint ratings of perceived exertion was higher during DEHY (6.4 ± 2.0) and HE (6.3 ± 1.6) than CT (5.7 ± 2.1). Combined heat and dehydration impaired MP and PP (decrements greatest in later bouts) with HE performance intermediate to CT and DEHY.

  1. Chronic intermittent ethanol exposure and withdrawal alters (3α,5α)-3-hydroxy-pregnan-20-one immunostaining in cortical and limbic brain regions of C57BL/6J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado-Devincci, Antoniette M; Cook, Jason B; O'Buckley, Todd K; Morrow, Danielle H; McKinley, Raechel E; Lopez, Marcelo F; Becker, Howard C; Morrow, A Leslie

    2014-10-01

    The GABAergic neuroactive steroid (3α,5α)-3-hydroxy-pregnan-20-one (3α,5α-THP; allopregnanolone) has been studied during withdrawal from ethanol (EtOH) in humans, rats, and mice. Serum 3α,5α-THP levels decreased, and brain levels were not altered following acute EtOH administration (2 g/kg) in male C57BL/6J mice; however, the effects of chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure on 3α,5α-THP levels have not been examined. Given that CIE exposure changes subsequent voluntary EtOH drinking in a time-dependent fashion following repeated cycles of EtOH exposure, we conducted a time-course analysis of CIE effects on 3α,5α-THP levels in specific brain regions known to influence drinking behavior. Adult male C57BL/6J mice were exposed to 4 cycles of CIE to induce EtOH dependence. All mice were sacrificed and perfused at 1 of 2 time points, 8 or 72 hours following the final exposure cycle. Free-floating brain sections (40 μm; 3 to 5 sections/region/animal) were immunostained and analyzed to determine relative levels of cellular 3α,5α-THP. Withdrawal from CIE exposure produced time-dependent and region-specific effects on immunohistochemical detection of 3α,5α-THP levels across cortical and limbic brain regions. A transient reduction in 3α,5α-THP immunoreactivity was observed in the central nucleus of the amygdala 8 hours after withdrawal from CIE (-31.4 ± 9.3%). Decreases in 3α,5α-THP immunoreactivity were observed 72 hours following withdrawal in the medial prefrontal cortex (-25.0 ± 9.3%), nucleus accumbens core (-29.9 ± 6.6%), and dorsolateral striatum (-18.5 ± 6.0%), while an increase was observed in the CA3 pyramidal cell layer of the hippocampus (+42.8 ± 19.5%). Sustained reductions in 3α,5α-THP immunoreactivity were observed at both time points in the lateral amygdala (8 hours -28.3 ± 12.8%; 72 hours -27.5 ± 12.4%) and in the ventral tegmental area (8 hours -26.5 ± 9.9%; 72 hours -31.6 ± 13.8%). These data

  2. Motion sickness severity and physiological correlates during repeated exposures to a rotating optokinetic drum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Senqi; Grant, Wanda F.; Stern, Robert M.; Koch, Kenneth L.

    1991-01-01

    Fifty-two subjects were exposed to a rotating optokinetic drum. Ten of these subjects who became motion sick during the first session completed two additional sessions. Subjects' symptoms of motion sickness, perception of self-motion, electrogastrograms (EGGs), heart rate, mean successive differences of R-R intervals (RRI), and skin conductance were recorded for each session. The results from the first session indicated that the development of motion sickness was accompanied by increased EGG 4-9 cpm activity (gastric tachyarrhythmia), decreased mean succesive differences of RRI, increased skin conductance levels, and increased self-motion perception. The results from the subjects who had three repeated sessions showed that 4-9 cpm EGG activity, skin conductance levels, perception of self-motion, and symptoms of motion sickness all increased significantly during the drum rotation period of the first session, but increased significantly less during the following sessions. Mean successive differences of RRI decreased significantly during the drum rotation period for the first session, but decreased significantly less during the following sessions. Results show that the development of motion sickness is accompanied by an increase in gastric tachyarrhythmia, and an increase in sympathetic activity and a decrease in parasympathetic activity, and that adaptation to motion sickness is accompanied by the recovery of autonomic nervous system balance.

  3. 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy metabolite profiles of neonatal rat hippocampus and brainstem regions following early postnatal exposure to intermittent hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darnall, Robert A.; Chen, Xi; Nemani, Krishnamurthy V.; Sirieix, Chrystelle M.; Gimi, Barjor

    2017-03-01

    Most premature infants born at less than 30 weeks gestation are exposed to periods of mild intermittent hypoxia (IH) associated with apnea of prematurity and periodic breathing. In adults, IH associated with sleep apnea causes neurochemical and structural alterations in the brain. However, it is unknown whether IH in the premature infant leads to neurodevelopmental impairment. Quantification of biochemical markers that can precisely identify infants at risk of adverse neurodevelopmental outcome is essential. In vivo 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) facilitates the quantification of metabolites from distinct regions of the developing brain. We report the changes in metabolite profiles in the brainstem and hippocampal regions of developing rat brains, resulting from exposure to IH. Rat pups were chosen for study because there is rapid postnatal hippocampal development that occurs during the first 4 weeks in the developing rat brain, which corresponds to the first 2-3 postnatal years of development in humans. The brainstem was examined because of our interest in respiratory control disorders in the newborn and because of brainstem gliosis described in infants who succumb to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). Metabolite profiles were compared between hypoxia treated rat pups (n = 9) and normoxic controls (n = 6). Metabolite profiles were acquired using the Point-RESolved spectroscopy (PRESS) MRS sequence and were quantified using the TARQUIN software. There was a significant difference in the concentrations of creatine (p = 0.031), total creatine (creatine + phosphocreatine) (p = 0.028), and total choline (p = 0.001) in the brainstem, and glycine (p = 0.031) in the hippocampal region. The changes are consistent with altered cellular bioenergetics and metabolism associated with hypoxic insult.

  4. Tualang Honey Protects the Rat Midbrain and Lung against Repeated Paraquat Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, Siti Amrah

    2017-01-01

    Paraquat (PQ) is a dopaminergic neurotoxin and a well-known pneumotoxicant that exerts its toxic effect via oxidative stress-mediated cellular injuries. This study investigated the protective effects of Tualang honey against PQ-induced toxicity in the midbrain and lungs of rats. The rats were orally treated with distilled water (2 mL/kg/day), Tualang honey (1.0 g/kg/day), or ubiquinol (0.2 g/kg/day) throughout the experimental period. Two weeks after the respective treatments, the rats were injected intraperitoneally with saline (1 mL/kg/week) or PQ (10 mg/kg/week) once per week for four consecutive weeks. After four weekly exposures to PQ, the glutathione peroxidase activity and the number of tyrosine-hydroxylase immunopositive neurons in the midbrain were significantly decreased in animals from group PQ (p < 0.05). The lungs of animals from group PQ showed significantly decreased activity of superoxide dismutase and glutathione-S-transferase. Treatment with Tualang honey ameliorated the toxic effects observed in the midbrain and lungs. The beneficial effects of Tualang honey were comparable to those of ubiquinol, which was used as a positive control. These findings suggest that treatment with Tualang honey may protect against PQ-induced toxicity in the rat midbrain and lung. PMID:28127418

  5. Tualang Honey Protects the Rat Midbrain and Lung against Repeated Paraquat Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suk Peng Tang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Paraquat (PQ is a dopaminergic neurotoxin and a well-known pneumotoxicant that exerts its toxic effect via oxidative stress-mediated cellular injuries. This study investigated the protective effects of Tualang honey against PQ-induced toxicity in the midbrain and lungs of rats. The rats were orally treated with distilled water (2 mL/kg/day, Tualang honey (1.0 g/kg/day, or ubiquinol (0.2 g/kg/day throughout the experimental period. Two weeks after the respective treatments, the rats were injected intraperitoneally with saline (1 mL/kg/week or PQ (10 mg/kg/week once per week for four consecutive weeks. After four weekly exposures to PQ, the glutathione peroxidase activity and the number of tyrosine-hydroxylase immunopositive neurons in the midbrain were significantly decreased in animals from group PQ (p<0.05. The lungs of animals from group PQ showed significantly decreased activity of superoxide dismutase and glutathione-S-transferase. Treatment with Tualang honey ameliorated the toxic effects observed in the midbrain and lungs. The beneficial effects of Tualang honey were comparable to those of ubiquinol, which was used as a positive control. These findings suggest that treatment with Tualang honey may protect against PQ-induced toxicity in the rat midbrain and lung.

  6. Neuronal changes and oxidative stress in adolescent rats after repeated exposure to mephedrone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López-Arnau, Raúl; Martínez-Clemente, José [Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutic Chemistry (Pharmacology Section), Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Barcelona (Spain); Institute of Biomedicine (IBUB), Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Barcelona (Spain); Rodrigo, Teresa [Animal Experimentation Unit of Psychology and Pharmacy, University of Barcelona (Spain); Pubill, David [Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutic Chemistry (Pharmacology Section), Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Barcelona (Spain); Institute of Biomedicine (IBUB), Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Barcelona (Spain); Camarasa, Jorge, E-mail: jcamarasa@ub.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutic Chemistry (Pharmacology Section), Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Barcelona (Spain); Institute of Biomedicine (IBUB), Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Barcelona (Spain); Escubedo, Elena [Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutic Chemistry (Pharmacology Section), Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Barcelona (Spain); Institute of Biomedicine (IBUB), Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-07-01

    Mephedrone is a new designer drug of abuse. We have investigated the neurochemical/enzymatic changes after mephedrone administration to adolescent rats (3 × 25 mg/kg, s.c. in a day, with a 2 h interval between doses, for two days) at high ambient temperature (26 ± 2 °C), a schedule that intends to model human recreational abuse. In addition, we have studied the effect of mephedrone in spatial learning and memory. The drug caused a transient decrease in weight gain. After the first dose, animals showed hypothermia but, after the subsequent doses, temperature raised over the values of saline-treated group. We observed the development of tolerance to these thermoregulatory effects of mephedrone. Mephedrone induced a reduction of the densities of dopamine (30% in the frontal cortex) and serotonin (40% in the frontal cortex and the hippocampus and 48% in the striatum) transporters without microgliosis. These deficits were also accompanied by a parallel decrease in the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase and tryptophan hydroxylase 2. These changes matched with a down-regulation of D{sub 2} dopamine receptors in the striatum. Mephedrone also induced an oxidative stress evidenced by an increase of lipid peroxidation in the frontal cortex, and accompanied by a rise in glutathione peroxidase levels in all studied brain areas. Drug-treated animals displayed an impairment of the reference memory in the Morris water maze one week beyond the cessation of drug exposure, while the spatial learning process seems to be preserved. These findings raise concerns about the neuronal long-term effects of mephedrone. - Highlights: • We studied the dopaminergic and serotonergic neurotoxicity of mephedrone in rats. • Mephedrone induced a transient hypothermia following sustained hyperthermia. • In a weekend consumption pattern, mephedrone induced selective neurotoxicity. • Mephedrone generated oxidative stress. • Mephedrone induced an impairment in memory function.

  7. Effects of repeated exposure to 4-nonylphenol on the zooplankton community in littoral enclosures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Halloran, S.L.; Liber, K.; Gangl, J.A. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Superior, WI (United States). Lake Superior Research Inst.; Knuth, M.L. [Environmental Protection Agency, Duluth, MN (United States). Mid-Continent Ecology Div.

    1999-03-01

    The effects of 4-nonylphenol (NP) on freshwater zooplankton were evaluated in 18 littoral enclosure mesocosms in northeastern Minnesota. The 18 enclosures were allocated to three blocks of six units with each block including two untreated control enclosures and one enclosure for each of four NP treatments. Treated enclosures received 11 applications of NP over a 20-d period between July 8 and 28, 1993. Maximum NP concentrations measured in the water column 2 h after each application averaged ({+-} SD) 5 {+-} 4, 23 {+-} 11, 76 {+-} 21, and 243 {+-} 41 {micro}g/L over the 11 applications. Nonylphenol dissipated rapidly from the water column but was more persistent in sediments and in/on macrophytes. All cladoceran and copepod taxa were significantly reduced in abundance at 243 {+-} 41 {micro}g/L; some sensitive taxa were also affected by 76 {+-} 21 and 23 {+-} 11 {micro}g/L. While many rotifer taxa were unaffected at any of the test concentrations, several were affected at {ge} 76 {+-} 21 {micro}g/L. Ostracods were only affected at 2,243 {+-} 41 {micro}g/L. No zooplankton taxon was affected at 5 {+-} 4 {micro}g/L. The period of maximum impact usually occurred within 1 to 7 d of the last NP application, and recovery to control abundance levels generally occurred within 7 to 28 d of the last NP application. Two sensitive taxa, Acroperus and Calanoida, did not recover at {ge} 76 {+-} 21 {micro}g/L by the end of the study. The maximum acceptable toxicant concentration for protection of all zooplankton taxa was estimated at {approximately} 10 {micro}g/L, although overall community diversity was unaffected at 23 {+-} 11. The water was the most probable route of NP exposure, but the greater persistence of NP residues in/on macrophytes may have contributed to the lack of recovery of some macrophyte-associated taxa.

  8. Neuronal changes and oxidative stress in adolescent rats after repeated exposure to mephedrone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Arnau, Raúl; Martínez-Clemente, José; Rodrigo, Teresa; Pubill, David; Camarasa, Jorge; Escubedo, Elena

    2015-07-01

    Mephedrone is a new designer drug of abuse. We have investigated the neurochemical/enzymatic changes after mephedrone administration to adolescent rats (3×25 mg/kg, s.c. in a day, with a 2 h interval between doses, for two days) at high ambient temperature (26±2 °C), a schedule that intends to model human recreational abuse. In addition, we have studied the effect of mephedrone in spatial learning and memory. The drug caused a transient decrease in weight gain. After the first dose, animals showed hypothermia but, after the subsequent doses, temperature raised over the values of saline-treated group. We observed the development of tolerance to these thermoregulatory effects of mephedrone. Mephedrone induced a reduction of the densities of dopamine (30% in the frontal cortex) and serotonin (40% in the frontal cortex and the hippocampus and 48% in the striatum) transporters without microgliosis. These deficits were also accompanied by a parallel decrease in the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase and tryptophan hydroxylase 2. These changes matched with a down-regulation of D2 dopamine receptors in the striatum. Mephedrone also induced an oxidative stress evidenced by an increase of lipid peroxidation in the frontal cortex, and accompanied by a rise in glutathione peroxidase levels in all studied brain areas. Drug-treated animals displayed an impairment of the reference memory in the Morris water maze one week beyond the cessation of drug exposure, while the spatial learning process seems to be preserved. These findings raise concerns about the neuronal long-term effects of mephedrone.

  9. Responses of soil ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms to repeated exposure of single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qinglin; Wang, Hui; Yang, Baoshan; He, Fei; Han, Xuemei; Song, Ziheng

    2015-02-01

    The impacts of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) including single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) on soil microbial biomass and microbial community composition (especially on ammonium oxidizing microorganisms) have been evaluated. The first exposure of CNTs lowered the microbial biomass immediately, but the values recovered to the level of the control at the end of the experiment despite the repeated addition of CNTs. The abundance and diversity of ammonium-oxidizing archaea (AOA) were higher than that of ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) under the exposure of CNTs. The addition of CNTs decreased Shannon-Wiener diversity index of AOB and AOA. Two-way ANOVA analysis showed that CNTs had significant effects on the abundance and diversity of AOB and AOA. Dominant terminal restriction fragments (TRFs) of AOB exhibited a positive relationship with NH4(+), while AOA was on the contrary. It implied that AOB prefer for high-NH4(+) soils whereas AOA is favored in low NH4(+) soils in the CNT-contaminated soil. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The sensory response to capsaicin during repeated topical exposures: differential effects on sensations of itching and pungency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, B G; Shaffer, G S

    1993-06-01

    Changes in sensory irritation were measured during repeated topical exposures to capsaicin over 2 days. The perceived intensities of itching and pungent sensations, predominantly burning and stinging/pricking, were assessed every 60 sec during 5 applications of capsaicin at inter-stimulus intervals (ISI) of 90 min (Exp. 1) or 15 min (Exp. 2) and in follow-up tests 24 h later. Psychophysical measurements were obtained with a hand-held dynamometer in conjunction with the method of magnitude production. When the ISI was 90 min, itching and pungency were both significantly reduced (i.e., desensitization occurred) by the fifth exposure; however, the reduction occurred more rapidly and dramatically for itching. After 24 h, desensitization remained significant only for itching. When the ISI was 15 min, the sensations on day 1 first intensified in a manner consistent with sensitization, then declined in a manner consistent with desensitization; compared to pungency, itch exhibited less sensitization and more desensitization. On day 2, overall intensity was less for both categories of sensation, primarily because of a reduction in sensitization. Marked individual differences were observed in the overall sensitivity to capsaicin, the time course of sensation, the susceptibility to capsaicin-induced itch, and the rate and duration of sensitization and desensitization. The results are discussed in terms of current hypotheses about the sensory mechanisms that underlie chemically induced itch and the use of capsaicin as a topical analgesic and antipruritic.

  11. A Study for the Characteristic Changes Under the Repeated Thermal Exposure in the Process of Repairing Aircraft Sandwich Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yun Hae; Han, Joong Won; Kim, Don Won; Choi, Byung Keun; Murakami, R.

    Delamination can be observed in the sound areas during and/or after a couple times exposure to the elevated curing temperature due to the repeated repair condition. This study was conducted for checking the degree of degradation of properties of the cured parts and delamination between skin prepreg and honeycomb core. Specimens with glass honeycomb sandwich construction and glass/epoxy prepreg were prepared. The specimens were cured 1 to 5 times at 260°F in an autoclave and each additionally exposed 50, 100 and 150 hours in the 260°F oven. Each specimen was tested for tensile strength, compressive strength, flatwise tensile strength and interlaminar shear strength. To monitor the characteristics of the resin itself, the cured resin was tested using DMA and DSC. As a results, the decrease of Tg value were observed in the specific specimen which is exposed over 50 hrs at 260°F. This means the change or degradative of resin properties is also related to the decrease of flatwise tensile properties. Accordingly, minimal exposure on the curing temperature is recommended for parts in order to prevent the delation and maintain the better condition.

  12. Effect of repeated nicotine exposure on high-affinity nicotinic acetylcholine receptor density in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohnadel, Elizabeth J; Hernandez, Caterina M; Gearhart, Debra A; Terry, Alvin V

    Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) are often used as a model of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and to investigate the effects of hypertension on cognitive function. Further, they appear to have reduced numbers of central nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and, therefore, may be useful to model certain aspects of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other forms of dementia given that a decrease in nAChRs is thought to contribute to cognitive decline in these disorders. In the present study, based on reports that chronic nicotine exposure increases nAChRs in several mammalian models, we tested the hypothesis that repeated exposures to a relatively low dose of the alkaloid would ameliorate the receptor deficits in SHR. Thus, young-adult SHRs and age-matched Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) control rats were treated with either saline or nicotine twice a day for 14 days (total daily dose = 0.7 mg/kg nicotine base) and then sacrificed. Quantitative receptor autoradiography with [125I]-IPH, an epibatidine analog, revealed: (1) that high-affinity nAChRs were higher in saline-treated WKY (control) rats compared to saline-treated SHRs in 18 of the 19 brain region measured, although statistically different only in the mediodorsal thalamic nuclei, (2) that nicotine significantly increased nAChR binding in WKY rats in six brain areas including cortical regions and the anterior thalamic nucleus, (3) that there were no cases where nicotine significantly increased nAChR binding in SHRs. These results indicate that subjects deficient in nAChRs may be less sensitive to nAChR upregulation with nicotine than normal subjects and require higher doses or longer periods of exposure.

  13. Adaptation of the pituitary-adrenal axis to daily repeated forced swim exposure in rats is dependent on the temperature of water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabasa, Cristina; Delgado-Morales, Raúl; Gómez-Román, Almudena; Nadal, Roser; Armario, Antonio

    2013-11-01

    Comparison of exposure to certain predominantly emotional stressors reveals a qualitatively similar neuroendocrine response profile as well as a reduction of physiological responses after daily repeated exposure (adaptation). However, particular physical components of the stressor may interfere with adaptation. As defective adaptation to stress can enhance the probability to develop pathologies, we studied in adult male rats (n = 10/group) swimming behavior (struggling, immobility and mild swim) and physiological responses (ACTH, corticosterone and rectal temperature) to daily repeated exposure to forced swim (20 min, 13 d) at 25 or 36 °C (swim25 or swim36). Rats were repeatedly blood-sampled by tail-nick and hormones measured by radioimmunoassay. Some differences were observed between the two swim temperature groups after the first exposure to forced swim: (a) active behaviors were greater in swim25 than swim36 groups; (b) swim25 but not swim36 caused hypothermia; and (c) swim36 elicited the same ACTH response as swim25, but plasma corticosterone concentration was lower for swim36 at 30 min post-swim. After daily repeated exposure, adaptation in ACTH secretion was observed with swim36 already on day 4, whereas with swim25 adaptation was not observed until day 13 and was of lower magnitude. Nevertheless, after repeated exposure to swim25 a partial protection from hypothermia was observed and the two swim conditions resulted in progressive reduction of active behaviors. Thus, daily repeated swim at 25 °C impairs adaptation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis as compared to swim at 36 °C, supporting the hypothesis that certain physical components of predominantly emotional stressors can interfere with the process of adaptation.

  14. Quantification of print, radio and television exposure among previous blood donors in Kenya: an opportunity for encouraging repeat donation in a resource-limited setting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basavaraju, S V; Mwangi, J; Kellogg, T A; Odawo, L; Marum, L H

    2010-10-01

    Blood services in sub-Saharan Africa experience blood shortages and low retention of voluntary, non-remunerated donors. To boost collections by encouraging repeat donations, the Kenya National Blood Transfusion Service is exploring the likelihood of reaching previous donors through targeted print, radio and television advertising. We analysed data from a national AIDS Indicator Survey to determine whether previous donors have significant exposure to media. Respondents reporting history of blood donation had significantly higher exposure to print, radio and television media than those without history of blood donation. Targeted media campaigns encouraging repeat donation are likely to reach previous donors even in resource-limited settings.

  15. Effect of replacing sugar with non-caloric sweeteners in beverages on the reward value after repeated exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanne Griffioen-Roose

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The reward value of food is partly dependent on learned associations. It is not yet known whether replacing sugar with non-caloric sweeteners in food is affecting long-term acceptance. OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of replacing sugar with non-caloric sweeteners in a nutrient-empty drink (soft drink versus nutrient-rich drink (yoghurt drink on reward value after repeated exposure. DESIGN: We used a randomized crossover design whereby forty subjects (15 men, 25 women with a mean ± SD age of 21 ± 2 y and BMI of 21.5 ± 1.7 kg/m(2 consumed a fixed portion of a non-caloric sweetened (NS and sugar sweetened (SS versions of either a soft drink or a yoghurt drink (counterbalanced for breakfast which were distinguishable by means of colored labels. Each version of a drink was offered 10 times in semi-random order. Before and after conditioning the reward value of the drinks was assessed using behavioral tasks on wanting, liking, and expected satiety. In a subgroup (n=18 fMRI was performed to assess brain reward responses to the drinks. RESULTS: Outcomes of both the behavioral tasks and fMRI showed that conditioning did not affect the reward value of the NS and SS versions of the drinks significantly. Overall, subjects preferred the yoghurt drinks to the soft drinks and the ss drinks to the NS drinks. In addition, they expected the yoghurt drinks to be more satiating, they reduced hunger more, and delayed the first eating episode more. Conditioning did not influence these effects. CONCLUSION: Our study showed that repeated consumption of a non-caloric sweetened beverage, instead of a sugar sweetened version, appears not to result in changes in the reward value. It cannot be ruled out that learned associations between sensory attributes and food satiating capacity which developed preceding the conditioning period, during lifetime, affected the reward value of the drinks.

  16. Endangered North Atlantic right whales (Eubalaena glacialis) experience repeated, concurrent exposure to multiple environmental neurotoxins produced by marine algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucette, Gregory J; Mikulski, Christina M; King, Kristen L; Roth, Patricia B; Wang, Zhihong; Leandro, Luis F; DeGrasse, Stacey L; White, Kevin D; De Biase, Daniela; Gillett, Roxanne M; Rolland, Rosalind M

    2012-01-01

    The western North Atlantic population of right whales (Eubalaena glacialis) is one of the most critically endangered of any whale population in the world. Among the factors considered to have potentially adverse effects on the health and reproduction of E. glacialis are biotoxins produced by certain microalgae responsible for causing harmful algal blooms. The worldwide incidence of these events has continued to increase dramatically over the past several decades and is expected to remain problematic under predicted climate change scenarios. Previous investigations have demonstrated that N. Atlantic right whales are being exposed to at least two classes of algal-produced environmental neurotoxins-paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs) and domoic acid (DA). Our primary aims during this six-year study (2001-2006) were to assess whether the whales' exposure to these algal biotoxins occurred annually over multiple years, and to what extent individual whales were exposed repeatedly and/or concurrently to one or both toxin classes. Approximately 140 right whale fecal samples obtained across multiple habitats in the western N. Atlantic were analyzed for PSTs and DA. About 40% of these samples were attributed to individual whales in the North Atlantic Right Whale Catalog, permitting analysis of biotoxin exposure according to sex, age class, and reproductive status/history. Our findings demonstrate clearly that right whales are being exposed to both of these algal biotoxins on virtually an annual basis in multiple habitats for periods of up to six months (April through September), with similar exposure rates for females and males (PSTs: ∼70-80%; DA: ∼25-30%). Notably, only one of 14 lactating females sampled did not contain either PSTs or DA, suggesting the potential for maternal toxin transfer and possible effects on neonatal animals. Moreover, 22% of the fecal samples tested for PSTs and DA showed concurrent exposure to both neurotoxins, leading to questions of interactive

  17. Prevention of diabetes in NOD mice by repeated exposures to a contact allergen inducing a sub-clinical dermatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaare Engkilde

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease, while allergic contact dermatitis although immune mediated, is considered an exposure driven disease that develops due to epicutaneous contact with reactive low-molecular chemicals. The objective of the present study was to experimentally study the effect of contact allergens on the development of diabetes in NOD mice. As the link between contact allergy and diabetes is yet unexplained we also examined the effect of provocation with allergens on Natural Killer T (NKT cells, since involvement of NKT cells could suggest an innate connection between the two diseases. METHOD: NOD mice 4 weeks of age were exposed, on the ears, to two allergens, p-phenylenediamine and 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene respectively, to investigate the diabetes development. The mice were followed for a maximum of 32 weeks, and they were either repeatedly exposed to the allergens or only sensitized a week after arrival. The stimulation of NKT cells by the two allergens were additionally studied in C57BL/6 mice. The mice were sensitized and two weeks later provocated with the allergens. The mice were subsequently euthanized at different time points after the provocation. RESULTS: It was found that repeated application of p-phenylenediamine reduced the incidence of diabetes compared to application with water (47% vs. 93%, P = 0.004. Moreover it was shown that in C57BL/6 mice both allergens resulted in a slight increment in the quantity of NKT cells in the liver. Application of the allergens at the same time resulted in an increased number of NKT cells in the draining auricular lymph node, and the increase appeared to be somewhat allergen specific as the accumulation was stronger for p-phenylenediamine. CONCLUSION: The study showed that repeated topical application on the ears with a contact allergen could prevent the development of diabetes in NOD mice. The contact allergens gave a non-visible, sub-clinical dermatitis on the

  18. Prevention of Diabetes in NOD Mice by Repeated Exposures to a Contact Allergen Inducing a Sub-Clinical Dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engkilde, Kaare; Buschard, Karsten; Hansen, Axel Kornerup; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne Duus

    2010-01-01

    Background Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease, while allergic contact dermatitis although immune mediated, is considered an exposure driven disease that develops due to epicutanous contact with reactive low-molecular chemicals. The objective of the present study was to experimentally study the effect of contact allergens on the development of diabetes in NOD mice. As the link between contact allergy and diabetes is yet unexplained we also examined the effect of provocation with allergens on Natural Killer T (NKT) cells, since involvement of NKT cells could suggest an innate connection between the two diseases. Method NOD mice 4 weeks of age were exposed, on the ears, to two allergens, p-phenylenediamine and 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene respectively, to investigate the diabetes development. The mice were followed for a maximum of 32 weeks, and they were either repeatedly exposed to the allergens or only sensitized a week after arrival. The stimulation of NKT cells by the two allergens were additionally studied in C57BL/6 mice. The mice were sensitized and two weeks later provocated with the allergens. The mice were subsequently euthanized at different time points after the provocation. Results It was found that repeated application of p-phenylenediamine reduced the incidence of diabetes compared to application with water (47% vs. 93%, P = 0.004). Moreover it was shown that in C57BL/6 mice both allergens resulted in a slight increment in the quantity of NKT cells in the liver. Application of the allergens at the same time resulted in an increased number of NKT cells in the draining auricular lymph node, and the increase appeared to be somewhat allergen specific as the accumulation was stronger for p-phenylenediamine. Conclusion The study showed that repeated topical application on the ears with a contact allergen could prevent the development of diabetes in NOD mice. The contact allergens gave a non-visible, sub-clinical dermatitis on the application site. The

  19. Response of the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal System to Repeated Moderate Psychoemotional Stress Exposure Is Associated with Behavioral Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharova, N D; Chigarova, O A; Oganyan, T E

    2017-05-01

    Individual features of the response of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPAA) to repeated moderate stress exposure (daily 2-h restraint stress for 10 days) was studied in young female rhesus monkeys with healthy normal behavior and combined group of female rhesus monkeys with abnormal depression-like and anxious behavior. No between-group differences in the response of ACTH and cortisol were found on day 1. On day 10, a rapid and less pronounced increase in ACTH secretion was observed in all animals in comparison with day 1. Analysis of between-group differences in HPAA response showed higher increase in ACTH level and lower increase in cortisol concentration in animals with depression-like and anxious behavior. These changes were similar to the previously described differences in the response of the adenohypophysis and adrenal cortex to acute restraint stress in old monkeys with similar behavior. Thus, individuals with depression-like and anxious behavior demonstrate impaired stress-induced reactivity of HPAA as early as in young age.

  20. Inhibition of voltage-gated calcium channels after subchronic and repeated exposure of PC12 cells to different classes of insecticides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Marieke; Brandsema, Joske A R; Nieuwenhuis, Desirée; Wijnolts, Fiona M J; Dingemans, Milou M L; Westerink, Remco H S

    2015-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that acute inhibition of voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) is a common mode of action for (sub)micromolar concentrations of chemicals, including insecticides. However, since human exposure to chemicals is usually chronic and repeated, we investigated if selected insec

  1. Inhibition of voltage-gated calcium channels after subchronic and repeated exposure of PC12 cells to different classes of insecticides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Marieke; Brandsema, Joske A R; Nieuwenhuis, Desirée; Wijnolts, Fiona M J; Dingemans, Milou M L|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304834564; Westerink, Remco H S|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/239425952

    2015-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that acute inhibition of voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) is a common mode of action for (sub)micromolar concentrations of chemicals, including insecticides. However, since human exposure to chemicals is usually chronic and repeated, we investigated if selected insec

  2. Anti-Inflammatory and Antioxidant Effects of Repeated Exposure to Cruciferous Allyl Nitrile in Sensitizer-Induced Ear Edema in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanii, Hideji; Sugitani, Kayo; Saijoh, Kiyofumi

    2016-02-29

    Skin sensitizers induce allergic reactions through the induction of reactive oxygen species. Allyl nitrile from cruciferous vegetables has been reported to induce antioxidants and phase II detoxification enzymes in various tissues. We assessed the effects of repeated exposure to allyl nitrile on sensitizer-induced allergic reactions. Mice were dosed with allyl nitrile (0-200 µmol/kg), and then received a dermal application of 1 of 3 sensitizers on the left ear or 1 of 2 vehicles on the right ear. Quantitative assessment of edema was carried out by measuring the difference in weight between the portions taken from the right and left ears. We tested enzymes (superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) in ears. Repeated exposure to allyl nitrile reduced edemas induced by glutaraldehyde and by 2, 4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB), but not by formaldehyde. The repeated exposure decreased levels of TBARS, a marker of oxidative stress, induced by glutaraldehyde and by DNCB, but not by formaldehyde. Allyl nitrile elevated SOD levels for the 3 sensitizers, and CAT levels for formaldehyde and DNCB. Allyl nitrile also increased GPx levels for formaldehyde and DNCB, but not for glutaraldehyde. The reduced edemas were associated with changes in oxidative stress levels and antioxidant enzymes. Repeated exposure to allyl nitrile reduced allergic reactions induced by glutaraldehyde and by DNCB, but not by formaldehyde. This reduction was associated with changes in ROS levels and antioxidant enzyme activities.

  3. Cholinesterase inhibition and depression of the photic after discharge of flash evoked potentials following acute or repeated exposures to a mixture of carbaryl and propoxur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwanza, Jean-Claude; Lyke, Danielle F; Hertzberg, Richard C; Haber, Lynne; Kohrman-Vincent, Melissa; Li, Ruosha; Pan, Yi; Lyles, Robert H; Simmons, Jane Ellen; Macmillan, Denise K; Zehr, R Dan; Swank, Adam E; Herr, David W

    2012-06-01

    Previously, we reported that acute treatment with propoxur or carbaryl decreased the duration of the photic after discharge (PhAD) of flash evoked potentials (FEPs). In the current studies, we compared the effects of acute or repeated exposure to a mixture of carbaryl and propoxur (1:1.45 ratio; propoxur:carbaryl) on the duration of the PhAD and brain ChE activity in Long Evans rats. Animals were exposed (po) either to a single dose (0, 3, 10, 45 or 75 mg/kg), or 14 daily dosages (0, 3, 10, 30, 45 mg/kg), of the mixture. Acute and repeated treatment with 3mg/kg (or greater) of the mixture produced dose-related inhibition of brain ChE activity. Compared to controls, the PhAD duration decreased after acute administration of 75 mg/kg or repeated treatment with 30 mg/kg of the mixture. The linear relationship between the percent of control brain ChE activity and the PhAD duration was similar for both exposure paradigms. Dose-response models for the acute and repeated exposure data did not differ for brain ChE activity or the duration of the PhAD. Repeated treatment with the mixture resulted in slightly less (13-22%) erythrocyte ChE inhibition than acute exposure. Both acute and repeated treatment resulted in dose-additive results for the PhAD duration and less than dose-additive responses (6-16%) for brain ChE activity for the middle range of dosages. Acute treatment resulted in greater than dose-additive erythrocyte ChE inhibition (15-18%) at the highest dosages. In contrast, repeated treatment resulted in less than dose-additive erythrocyte ChE inhibition (16-22%) at the middle dosages. Brain and plasma levels of propoxur and carbaryl did not differ between the acute and repeated dosing paradigms. In summary, a physiological measure of central nervous system function and brain ChE activity had similar responses after acute or repeated treatment with the carbamate mixture, and brain ChE showed only small deviations from dose-additivity. Erythrocyte ChE activity had

  4. The impact of intermittent versus continuous exposure to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor on selection of EGFR T790M-mutant drug-resistant clones in a lung cancer cell line carrying activating EGFR mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youngjoo; Choi, Yu-Ra; Kim, Kyoung-Yeon; Shin, Dong Hoon

    2016-07-12

    Drug-resistant cell lines are essential tools for investigating the mechanisms of resistance to molecular-targeted anti-cancer drugs. However, little is known about how to establish clinically relevant drug-resistant cell lines. Our study examined the impact of a drug-free period on the establishment of a cell line with clinically relevant resistance to molecular-targeted drugs. We used PC9 cells, a lung cancer cell line carrying EGFR mutation, because this is a validated target for EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI). PC9 cells were intermittently or continuously exposed to increasing concentrations of gefitinib (0.01 μM to 1.0 μM) and the emergence of the most common acquired resistance mutation in EGFR, T790M, was determined. T790M was detected at a 25-fold lower drug concentration in cells continuously exposed to gefitinib (PC9/GRc) than in cells intermittently exposed to gefitinib (PC9/GRi) (0.04 μM vs 1.0 μM, respectively). The mutation frequencies at those drug concentrations were 19.8% and 8.0% in PC9/GRc and PC9/GRi cells, respectively. After drug-free culture for 8 weeks, resistance to gefitinib decreased in the PC9/GRi cells but not in the PC9/GRc cells. In the PC9/GRc cells, the frequency of the T790M mutation was consistently about 20% from 0.04 μM to 1.0 μM of gefitinib. In the PC9/GRc cells, the T790M mutation was detected in all single-cell clones, at frequencies ranging from 7.0% to 37.0%, with a median of 19.5% (95% confidence interval, 17.3%-20.9%). In conclusion, compared with intermittent drug exposure, continuous exposure might select better minor drug-resistant clones when creating cell lines resistant to molecular-targeted drugs.

  5. Effects of short-term repeated exposure to different flooring surfaces on the behavior and physiology of dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütz, K E; Cox, N R

    2014-05-01

    during the stand-off period. We observed no major effect of the repeated stand-off exposure. In summary, adding rubber matting onto concrete surfaces for stand-off purposes is beneficial for animal welfare. A well-managed wood chip surface offered the best welfare for dairy cows removed from pasture, and the findings of this study confirm that a concrete surface decreases the welfare of cows removed from pasture.

  6. Distribution of silver in rats following 28 days of repeated oral exposure to silver nanoparticles or silver acetate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The study investigated the distribution of silver after 28 days repeated oral administration of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and silver acetate (AgAc) to rats. Oral administration is a relevant route of exposure because of the use of silver nanoparticles in products related to food and food contact materials. Results AgNPs were synthesized with a size distribution of 14 ± 4 nm in diameter (90% of the nanoparticle volume) and stabilized in aqueous suspension by the polymer polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). The AgNPs remained stable throughout the duration of the 28-day oral toxicity study in rats. The organ distribution pattern of silver following administration of AgNPs and AgAc was similar. However the absolute silver concentrations in tissues were lower following oral exposure to AgNPs. This was in agreement with an indication of a higher fecal excretion following administration of AgNPs. Besides the intestinal system, the largest silver concentrations were detected in the liver and kidneys. Silver was also found in the lungs and brain. Autometallographic (AMG) staining revealed a similar cellular localization of silver in ileum, liver, and kidney tissue in rats exposed to AgNPs or AgAc. Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), nanosized granules were detected in the ileum of animals exposed to AgNPs or AgAc and were mainly located in the basal lamina of the ileal epithelium and in lysosomes of macrophages within the lamina propria. Using energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy it was shown that the granules in lysosomes consisted of silver, selenium, and sulfur for both AgNP and AgAc exposed rats. The diameter of the deposited granules was in the same size range as that of the administered AgNPs. No silver granules were detected by TEM in the liver. Conclusions The results of the present study demonstrate that the organ distribution of silver was similar when AgNPs or AgAc were administered orally to rats. The presence of silver granules containing

  7. Distribution of silver in rats following 28 days of repeated oral exposure to silver nanoparticles or silver acetate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mortensen Alicja

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The study investigated the distribution of silver after 28 days repeated oral administration of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs and silver acetate (AgAc to rats. Oral administration is a relevant route of exposure because of the use of silver nanoparticles in products related to food and food contact materials. Results AgNPs were synthesized with a size distribution of 14 ± 4 nm in diameter (90% of the nanoparticle volume and stabilized in aqueous suspension by the polymer polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP. The AgNPs remained stable throughout the duration of the 28-day oral toxicity study in rats. The organ distribution pattern of silver following administration of AgNPs and AgAc was similar. However the absolute silver concentrations in tissues were lower following oral exposure to AgNPs. This was in agreement with an indication of a higher fecal excretion following administration of AgNPs. Besides the intestinal system, the largest silver concentrations were detected in the liver and kidneys. Silver was also found in the lungs and brain. Autometallographic (AMG staining revealed a similar cellular localization of silver in ileum, liver, and kidney tissue in rats exposed to AgNPs or AgAc. Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM, nanosized granules were detected in the ileum of animals exposed to AgNPs or AgAc and were mainly located in the basal lamina of the ileal epithelium and in lysosomes of macrophages within the lamina propria. Using energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy it was shown that the granules in lysosomes consisted of silver, selenium, and sulfur for both AgNP and AgAc exposed rats. The diameter of the deposited granules was in the same size range as that of the administered AgNPs. No silver granules were detected by TEM in the liver. Conclusions The results of the present study demonstrate that the organ distribution of silver was similar when AgNPs or AgAc were administered orally to rats. The presence of silver

  8. Distribution of silver in rats following 28 days of repeated oral exposure to silver nanoparticles or silver acetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeschner, Katrin; Hadrup, Niels; Qvortrup, Klaus; Larsen, Agnete; Gao, Xueyun; Vogel, Ulla; Mortensen, Alicja; Lam, Henrik Rye; Larsen, Erik H

    2011-06-01

    The study investigated the distribution of silver after 28 days repeated oral administration of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and silver acetate (AgAc) to rats. Oral administration is a relevant route of exposure because of the use of silver nanoparticles in products related to food and food contact materials. AgNPs were synthesized with a size distribution of 14 ± 4 nm in diameter (90% of the nanoparticle volume) and stabilized in aqueous suspension by the polymer polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). The AgNPs remained stable throughout the duration of the 28-day oral toxicity study in rats. The organ distribution pattern of silver following administration of AgNPs and AgAc was similar. However the absolute silver concentrations in tissues were lower following oral exposure to AgNPs. This was in agreement with an indication of a higher fecal excretion following administration of AgNPs. Besides the intestinal system, the largest silver concentrations were detected in the liver and kidneys. Silver was also found in the lungs and brain. Autometallographic (AMG) staining revealed a similar cellular localization of silver in ileum, liver, and kidney tissue in rats exposed to AgNPs or AgAc. Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), nanosized granules were detected in the ileum of animals exposed to AgNPs or AgAc and were mainly located in the basal lamina of the ileal epithelium and in lysosomes of macrophages within the lamina propria. Using energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy it was shown that the granules in lysosomes consisted of silver, selenium, and sulfur for both AgNP and AgAc exposed rats. The diameter of the deposited granules was in the same size range as that of the administered AgNPs. No silver granules were detected by TEM in the liver. The results of the present study demonstrate that the organ distribution of silver was similar when AgNPs or AgAc were administered orally to rats. The presence of silver granules containing selenium and sulfur in the

  9. A review of the reporting and handling of missing data in cohort studies with repeated assessment of exposure measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karahalios Amalia

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Retaining participants in cohort studies with multiple follow-up waves is difficult. Commonly, researchers are faced with the problem of missing data, which may introduce biased results as well as a loss of statistical power and precision. The STROBE guidelines von Elm et al. (Lancet, 370:1453-1457, 2007; Vandenbroucke et al. (PLoS Med, 4:e297, 2007 and the guidelines proposed by Sterne et al. (BMJ, 338:b2393, 2009 recommend that cohort studies report on the amount of missing data, the reasons for non-participation and non-response, and the method used to handle missing data in the analyses. We have conducted a review of publications from cohort studies in order to document the reporting of missing data for exposure measures and to describe the statistical methods used to account for the missing data. Methods A systematic search of English language papers published from January 2000 to December 2009 was carried out in PubMed. Prospective cohort studies with a sample size greater than 1,000 that analysed data using repeated measures of exposure were included. Results Among the 82 papers meeting the inclusion criteria, only 35 (43% reported the amount of missing data according to the suggested guidelines. Sixty-eight papers (83% described how they dealt with missing data in the analysis. Most of the papers excluded participants with missing data and performed a complete-case analysis (n = 54, 66%. Other papers used more sophisticated methods including multiple imputation (n = 5 or fully Bayesian modeling (n = 1. Methods known to produce biased results were also used, for example, Last Observation Carried Forward (n = 7, the missing indicator method (n = 1, and mean value substitution (n = 3. For the remaining 14 papers, the method used to handle missing data in the analysis was not stated. Conclusions This review highlights the inconsistent reporting of missing data in cohort studies and the continuing

  10. A review of the reporting and handling of missing data in cohort studies with repeated assessment of exposure measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karahalios, Amalia; Baglietto, Laura; Carlin, John B; English, Dallas R; Simpson, Julie A

    2012-07-11

    Retaining participants in cohort studies with multiple follow-up waves is difficult. Commonly, researchers are faced with the problem of missing data, which may introduce biased results as well as a loss of statistical power and precision. The STROBE guidelines von Elm et al. (Lancet, 370:1453-1457, 2007); Vandenbroucke et al. (PLoS Med, 4:e297, 2007) and the guidelines proposed by Sterne et al. (BMJ, 338:b2393, 2009) recommend that cohort studies report on the amount of missing data, the reasons for non-participation and non-response, and the method used to handle missing data in the analyses. We have conducted a review of publications from cohort studies in order to document the reporting of missing data for exposure measures and to describe the statistical methods used to account for the missing data. A systematic search of English language papers published from January 2000 to December 2009 was carried out in PubMed. Prospective cohort studies with a sample size greater than 1,000 that analysed data using repeated measures of exposure were included. Among the 82 papers meeting the inclusion criteria, only 35 (43%) reported the amount of missing data according to the suggested guidelines. Sixty-eight papers (83%) described how they dealt with missing data in the analysis. Most of the papers excluded participants with missing data and performed a complete-case analysis (n=54, 66%). Other papers used more sophisticated methods including multiple imputation (n=5) or fully Bayesian modeling (n=1). Methods known to produce biased results were also used, for example, Last Observation Carried Forward (n=7), the missing indicator method (n=1), and mean value substitution (n=3). For the remaining 14 papers, the method used to handle missing data in the analysis was not stated. This review highlights the inconsistent reporting of missing data in cohort studies and the continuing use of inappropriate methods to handle missing data in the analysis. Epidemiological journals

  11. Protection Efficacy of the Extract of Ginkgo biloba against the Learning and Memory Damage of Rats under Repeated High Sustained +Gz Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang-En Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Repeated high sustained positive Gz (+Gz exposures are known for the harmful pathophysiological impact on the brain of rats, which is reflected as the interruption of normal performance of learning and memory. Interestingly, extract of Ginkgo biloba (EGb has been reported to have neuroprotective effects and cognition-enhancing effects. In this study, we are interested in evaluating the protective effects of EGb toward the learning and memory abilities. Morris Water Maze Test (MWM was used to evaluate the cognitive function, and the physiological status of the key components in central cholinergic system was also investigated. Our animal behavioral tests indicated that EGb can release the learning and memory impairment caused by repeated high sustained +Gz. Administration of EGb to rats can diminish some of the harmful physiological effects caused by repeated +Gz exposures. Moreover, EGb administration can increase the biological activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px but reduce the production of malondialdehyde (MDA. Taken together, our study showed that EGb can ameliorate the impairment of learning and memory abilities of rats induced by repeated high sustained +Gz exposure; the underlying mechanisms appeared to be related to the signal regulation on the cholinergic system and antioxidant enzymes system.

  12. Bound by Children: Intermittent Cohabitation and Living Together Apart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross-Barnet, Caitlin; Cherlin, Andrew; Burton, Linda

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we examine variations in low-income mothers' patterns of intermittent cohabitation and the voluntary and involuntary nature of these unions. Intermittent cohabitation involves couples living together and separating in repeating cycles. Using Three-City Study ethnographic data, we identified 45 low-income mothers involved in these…

  13. The Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsbo, Jens; Iaia, F. Marcello; Krustrup, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The two Yo-Yo intermittent recovery (IR) tests evaluate an individual's ability to repeatedly perform intense exercise. The Yo-Yo IR level 1 (Yo-Yo IR1) test focuses on the capacity to carry out intermittent exercise leading to a maximal activation of the aerobic system, whereas Yo-Yo IR level 2...... (Yo-Yo IR2) determines an individual's ability to recover from repeated exercise with a high contribution from the anaerobic system. Evaluations of elite athletes in various sports involving intermittent exercise showed that the higher the level of competition the better an athlete performs in the Yo-Yo...... IR tests. Performance in the Yo-Yo IR tests for young athletes increases with rising age. The Yo-Yo IR tests have shown to be a more sensitive measure of changes in performance than maximum oxygen uptake. The Yo-Yo IR tests provide a simple and valid way to obtain important information...

  14. 'Just a pinch of salt'. An experimental comparison of the effect of repeated exposure and flavor-flavor learning with salt or spice on vegetable acceptance in toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhlal, Sofia; Issanchou, Sylvie; Chabanet, Claire; Nicklaus, Sophie

    2014-12-01

    Children's vegetable intake is below the recommended amounts. No studies to date have tested the relevance of using salt or spices to increase children's vegetable acceptance. Our objective was to compare the effect of repeated exposure (RE) and of flavor-flavor learning (FFL) on toddlers' acceptance of a non-familiar vegetable. Two unconditioned stimuli were used: salt and a salt-associated spice. Toddlers attending six nurseries were assigned to 3 groups in a between subject design. Groups were exposed 8 times to a basic salsify puree (0.2% salt w/w; RE group; n = 47), a salty salsify puree (0.5% salt w/w; FFL-Salt group; n = 54) or a spiced salsify puree (0.2% salt and 0.02% nutmeg w/w; FFL-Nutmeg group; n = 50). Acceptance (intake and liking) of the target vegetable (basic salsify puree) and of a control vegetable (carrot puree) was evaluated at pre-exposure, at each exposure of the learning period, at post-exposure, and at 1, 3 and 6 months after exposure. In all groups, intake of the target vegetable increased from pre- to post-exposure. This increase was significantly higher in the RE group (64 ± 11 g) than in the FFL-Salt group (23 ± 11 g) and marginally higher than in the FFL-Nutmeg group (36 ± 11 g). No difference between groups was observed on the increase in liking of the target vegetable from pre- to post-exposure. The increase of the target vegetable intake was still observed after 6 months for all groups. Thus, repeated exposure appears to be the simplest choice to increase vegetable intake on the short and long term in toddlers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Repeated exposure to cat urine induces complex behavioral, hormonal, and c-fos mRNA responses in Norway rats ( Rattus norvegicus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Baofa; Gu, Chen; Lu, Yi; Hegab, Ibrahim M.; Yang, Shengmei; Wang, Aiqin; Wei, Wanhong

    2017-08-01

    Prey species show specific adaptations that allow recognition, avoidance, and defense against predators. This study was undertaken to investigate the processing of a chronic, life-threatening stimulus to Norway rats ( Rattus norvegicus). One hundred forty-four Norway rats were tested by repeated presentation of cat urine for 1 h at different days in a defensive withdrawal apparatus. Rats exposed to urine for short periods showed significantly larger defensive behavioral and medial hypothalamic c-fos messenger RNA (mRNA) responses than other groups. These defensive responses habituated shortly after the presentation of cat urine. Serum levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone and corticosterone increased significantly when animals were repeatedly exposed to cat urine. However, the hormonal responses took longer to habituate than the behavioral and molecular responses did. We conclude that the behavioral and c-fos mRNA responses are "primed" for habituation to repeated exposures to cat urine, while the hormonal responses show "resistance." The results support our hypothesis that the strongest anti-predator responses at three levels would occur during short-term exposure to cat urine and that these responses would subsequently disappear on prolonged exposure. This study assists understanding the way in which the different levels of defensive responses are integrated and react during chronic stress.

  16. Exposure to repeated immobilization stress inhibits cocaine-induced increase in dopamine extracellular levels in the rat ventral tegmental area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotomayor-Zárate, Ramón; Abarca, Jorge; Araya, Katherine A; Renard, Georgina M; Andrés, María E; Gysling, Katia

    2015-11-01

    A higher vulnerability to drug abuse has been observed in human studies of individuals exposed to chronic or persistent stress, as well as in animal models of drug abuse. Here, we explored the effect of repeated immobilization stress on cocaine-induced increase in dopamine extracellular levels in VTA and its regulation by corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and GABA systems. Cocaine (10mg/Kg i.p.) induced an increase of VTA DA extracellular levels in control rats. However, this effect was not observed in repeated stress rats. Considering the evidence relating stress with CRF, we decided to perfuse CRF and CP-154526 (selective antagonist of CRF1 receptor) in the VTA of control and repeated stress rats, respectively. We observed that perfusion of 20μM CRF inhibited the increase of VTA DA extracellular levels induced by cocaine in control rats. Interestingly, we observed that in the presence of 10μM CP-154526, cocaine induced a significant increase of VTA DA extracellular levels in repeated stress rats. Regarding the role of VTA GABA neurotransmission, cocaine administration induced a significant increase in VTA GABA extracellular levels only in repeated stress rats. Consistently, cocaine was able to increase VTA DA extracellular levels in repeated stress rats when 100μM bicuculline, an antagonist of GABAA receptor, was perfused intra VTA. Thus, both CRF and GABA systems are involved in the lack of response to cocaine in the VTA of repeated stress rats. It is tempting to suggest that the loss of response in VTA dopaminergic neurons to cocaine, after repeated stress, is due to an interaction between CRF and GABA systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Alteration of brain levels of neurotransmitters and amino acids in male F344 rats induced by three-week repeated inhalation exposure to 1-bromopropane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Megumi; Honma, Takeshi; Miyagawa, Muneyuki; Wang, Rui-Sheng

    2008-08-01

    The present study investigated the effects of 1-bromopropane (1BP) on brain neuroactive substances of rats to determine the extent of its toxicity to the central nervous system (CNS). We measured the changes in neurotransmitters (acetylcholine, catecholamine, serotonin and amino acids) and their metabolites or precursors in eight brain regions after inhalation exposure to 1BP at 50 to 1,000 ppm for 8 h per day for 7 d per week for 3 wk. Rats were sacrificed at 2 h (Case 1), or at 19 h (Case 2) after the end of exposure. In Case 1, the level of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5HIAA) was lowered in some brain regions by 1BP exposure. The decrease of 5HIAA in the frontal cortex was statistically significant at 50 ppm 1BP exposure. In Case 2, gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) and taurine were decreased in many brain regions of exposed rats, and a significant decrease of taurine in the midbrain occurred at 50 ppm 1BP exposure. In both cases of 2-h and 19-h intervals from the end of exposure to sacrifice, aspartate and glutamine levels were elevated in many brain regions, but the acetylcholine level did not change in any brain region. Three-week repeated exposure to 1BP produced significantly changes in amino acid contents of rat brains, particularly at 1,000 ppm.

  18. Effect of Intermittent Hypoxic Exposure on Insulin Sensitivity of Obese Rats%间歇低氧暴露对高脂膳食大鼠胰岛素敏感性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘哲浩; 翁锡全; 朱宪锋; 沈财利

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the effect of intermittent hypoxic exposure on the insulin sensitivity of obese rats induced by high-fat diet. Methods Forty male SD rats were randomly divided into normal diet(fed with standard chow)+ normoxic group,normal diet + intermittent hypoxic exposure group,high-fat diet (fed with high-fat diet)+ normoxic group and high-fat diet + intermittent hypoxic expose group. Rats in intermittent hypoxic groups were exposed in hypoxic atmospheric(15.4% oxygen), l0hrs/day. After 6 weeks intervention,visceral fat volume and serum FBG and FINS were tested,and insulin sensitivity index was calculated. Results As compared with normal diet + normoxic group,visceral fat amount, serum insulin level in high—fat diet + normoxic group decreased significantly (P < 0.01) ,Lee index and visceral fat volume decreased significantly (P < 0.05 ,P < 0.01) ,and insulin sensitivity index increased significantly (P< 0.05 )in normal diet + intermittent hypoxic exposure group. As compared with high—fat diet + normoxic group,Lee index,visceral fat volume and serum insulin level decreased significantly(P < 0.01),insulin sensitivity index increased significantly (P < 0.01 )in high-fat diet + intermittent hypoxic exposure group. Analysis showed that there were positive correlation between visceral fat volume and in-sulin level,and negative correlation between insulin level and insulin sensitivity index(P< 0.01). Conclusion Increase in visceral fat induces elevation of serum insulin level,and reduces insulin sensitivity, while intermittent hypoxia exposure reduces visceral fat content and increases insulin sensitivity%探讨间歇低氧暴露对高脂膳食肥胖大鼠胰岛素抵抗的影响.方法:40只雄性SD大鼠随机分为普通膳食常氧组、普通膳食间歇低氧组、高脂膳食常氧组、高脂膳食间歇低氧组.普通膳食采用普通饲料,高脂膳食采用高脂饲料,间歇低氧暴露采用常压低氧方法,氧浓度控制在15

  19. GT-repeat polymorphism in the heme oxygenase-1 gene promoter and the risk of carotid atherosclerosis related to arsenic exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Meei-Maan

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arsenic is a strong stimulus of heme oxygenase (HO-1 expression in experimental studies in response to oxidative stress caused by a stimulus. A functional GT-repeat polymorphism in the HO-1 gene promoter was inversely correlated to the development of coronary artery disease in diabetics and development of restenosis following angioplasty in patients. The role of this potential vascular protective factor in carotid atherosclerosis remains unclear. We previously reported a graded association of arsenic exposure in drinking water with an increased risk of carotid atherosclerosis. In this study, we investigated the relationship between HO-1 genetic polymorphism and the risk of atherosclerosis related to arsenic. Methods Three-hundred and sixty-seven participants with an indication of carotid atherosclerosis and an additional 420 participants without the indication, which served as the controls, from two arsenic exposure areas in Taiwan, a low arsenic-exposed Lanyang cohort and a high arsenic-exposed LMN cohort, were studied. Carotid atherosclerosis was evaluated using a duplex ultrasonographic assessment of the extracranial carotid arteries. Allelic variants of (GTn repeats in the 5'-flanking region of the HO-1 gene were identified and grouped into a short (S allele ( Results Analysis results showed that arsenic's effect on carotid atherosclerosis differed between carriers of the class S allele (OR 1.39; 95% CI 0.86-2.25; p = 0.181 and non-carriers (OR 2.65; 95% CI 1.03-6.82; p = 0.044 in the high-exposure LMN cohort. At arsenic exposure levels exceeding 750 μg/L, difference in OR estimates between class S allele carriers and non-carriers was borderline significant (p = 0.051. In contrast, no such results were found in the low-exposure Lanyang cohort. Conclusions This exploratory study suggests that at a relatively high level of arsenic exposure, carriers of the short (GTn allele (

  20. Field study of the urinary excretion of ethoxyacetic acid during repeated daily exposure to the ethyl ether of ethylene glycol and the ethyl ether of ethylene glycol acetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veulemans, H; Groeseneken, D; Masschelein, R; Van Vlem, E

    1987-06-01

    The urinary excretion of ethoxyacetic acid (EAA) was studied in a group of five women daily exposed to the ethyl ether of ethylene glycol (EGEE) and the ethyl ether of ethylene glycol acetate (EGEE-Ac) during 5 d of normal production and 7 d after a 12-d production stop. The mean combined exposure concentration of EGEE and EGEE-Ac (expressed in equivalent weight of EGEE) was 14.0 mg/m3 with occasional slight excursions above the current Belgian occupational exposure limit. The daily combined exposure profiles for EGEE and EGEE-Ac were rather constant during the first observation period, but they tended to decrease during the last week. The urinary EAA excretion clearly increased during the work week. Over the weekends the elimination was far from complete, and even after a prolonged nonexposure period of 12 d traces of the metabolite were still detectable. Based on the observations from the first period, a good linear correlation (r = 0.92) was found between the average exposure over 5 d (14.4 mg/m3) and the EAA excretion at the end of the week (105.7 mg/g creatinine). An EAA estimate of 150 +/- 35 mg/g was found to correspond with repeated 5-d full-shift exposures to the respective occupational exposure limit of EGEE (19 mg/m3) or EGEE-Ac (27 mg/m3).

  1. Narrative exposure therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder associated with repeated interpersonal trauma in patients with severe mental illness: a mixed methods design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauritz, Maria W.; Van Gaal, Betsie G. I.; Jongedijk, Ruud A.; Schoonhoven, Lisette; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W. G.; Goossens, Peter J. J.

    2016-01-01

    Background In the Netherlands, most patients with severe mental illness (SMI) receive flexible assertive community treatment (FACT) provided by multidisciplinary community mental health teams. SMI patients with comorbid posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are sometimes offered evidence-based trauma-focused treatment like eye movement desensitization reprocessing or prolonged exposure. There is a large amount of evidence for the effectiveness of narrative exposure therapy (NET) within various vulnerable patient groups with repeated interpersonal trauma. Some FACT-teams provide NET for patients with comorbid PTSD, which is promising, but has not been specifically studied in SMI patients. Objectives The primary aim is to evaluate NET in SMI patients with comorbid PTSD associated with repeated interpersonal trauma to get insight into whether (1) PTSD and dissociative symptoms changes and (2) changes occur in the present SMI symptoms, care needs, quality of life, global functioning, and care consumption. The second aim is to gain insight into patients’ experiences with NET and to identify influencing factors on treatment results. Methods This study will have a mixed methods convergent design consisting of quantitative repeated measures and qualitative semi-structured in-depth interviews based on Grounded Theory. The study population will include adult SMI outpatients (n=25) with comorbid PTSD and receiving NET. The quantitative study parameters will be existence and severity of PTSD, dissociative, and SMI symptoms; care needs; quality of life; global functioning; and care consumption. In a longitudinal analysis, outcomes will be analyzed using mixed models to estimate the difference in means between baseline and repeated measurements. The qualitative study parameters will be experiences with NET and perceived factors for success or failure. Integration of quantitative and qualitative results will be focused on interpreting how qualitative results enhance the

  2. Allergic inflammation in the upper respiratory tract of the rat upon repeated inhalation exposure to the contact allergen dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Triel, J.J. van; Arts, J.H.; Muijser, H.; Kuper, C.F.

    2010-01-01

    Previously, the contact allergen dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) was identified as a sensitizer by inhalation in BALB/c mice; in addition, DNCB induced a lymphocytic infiltrate in the larynx of dermally sensitized Th1-prone Wistar rats upon a single inhalation challenge. In the present study, repeated

  3. Repeated exposure to heat stress results in a diaphragm phenotype that resists ventilator-induced diaphragm dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihara, Toshinori; Ichinoseki-Sekine, Noriko; Kakigi, Ryo; Tsuzuki, Takamasa; Sugiura, Takao; Powers, Scott K; Naito, Hisashi

    2015-11-01

    Controlled mechanical ventilation (CMV) is a life-saving intervention for patients in respiratory failure. Unfortunately, prolonged mechanical ventilation (MV) results in diaphragmatic atrophy and contractile dysfunction, both of which are predicted to contribute to problems in weaning patients from the ventilator. Therefore, developing a strategy to protect the diaphragm against ventilator-induced weakness is important. We tested the hypothesis that repeated bouts of heat stress result in diaphragm resistance against CMV-induced atrophy and contractile dysfunction. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into six experimental groups: 1) control; 2) single bout of whole body heat stress; 3) repeated bouts of whole body heat stress; 4) 12 h CMV; 5) single bout of whole body heat stress 24 h before CMV; and 6) repeated bouts of whole body heat stress 1, 3, and 5 days before 12 h of CMV. Our results revealed that repeated bouts of heat stress resulted in increased levels of heat shock protein 72 in the diaphragm and protection against both CMV-induced diaphragmatic atrophy and contractile dysfunction at submaximal stimulation frequencies. The specific mechanisms responsible for this protection remain unclear: this heat stress-induced protection against CMV-induced diaphragmatic atrophy and weakness may be partially due to reduced diaphragmatic oxidative stress, diminished activation of signal transducer/transcriptional activator-3, lower caspase-3 activation, and decreased autophagy in the diaphragm.

  4. Allergic inflammation in the upper respiratory tract of the rat upon repeated inhalation exposure to the contact allergen dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Triel, J.J. van; Arts, J.H.; Muijser, H.; Kuper, C.F.

    2010-01-01

    Previously, the contact allergen dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) was identified as a sensitizer by inhalation in BALB/c mice; in addition, DNCB induced a lymphocytic infiltrate in the larynx of dermally sensitized Th1-prone Wistar rats upon a single inhalation challenge. In the present study, repeated i

  5. Detection of local inflammation induced by repeated exposure to contact allergens by use of IVIS SpectrumCT analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten M; Schmidt, Jonas Damgård; Christensen, Jan P

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Contact allergy is characterized by local skin inflammation that, in some cases, can result in systemic immune activation. OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether IVIS SpectrumCT analyses can be used to detect the immune response induced by contact allergens. METHODS: Mice were repeatedly ...

  6. Effects of repeated hyperbaric nitrogen-oxygen exposures on the striatal dopamine release and on motor disturbances in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoute, Cécile; Weiss, Michel; Rostain, Jean-Claude

    2005-09-14

    Previous studies have demonstrated disruptions of motor activities and a decrease of extracellular dopamine level in the striatum of rats exposed to high pressure of nitrogen. Men exposed to nitrogen pressure develop also motor and cognitive disturbances related to inert gas narcosis. After repetitive exposures, adaptation to narcosis was subjectively reported. To study the effects of repetitive exposures to hyperbaric nitrogen-oxygen, male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted in the striatum with multifiber carbon dopamine-sensitive electrodes. After recovery from surgery, free-moving rats were exposed for 2 h up to 3 MPa of nitrogen-oxygen mixture before and after one daily exposure to 1 MPa of nitrogen-oxygen, for 5 consecutive days. Dopamine release was measured by differential pulse voltammetry and motor activities were quantified using piezo-electric captor. At the first exposure to 3 MPa, the striatal dopamine level decreased during the compression (-15%) to reach -20% during the stay at 3 MPa. Motor activities were increased during compression (+15%) and the first 60 min at constant pressure (+10%). In contrast, at the second exposure to 3 MPa, an increase of dopamine of +15% was obtained during the whole exposure. However, total motor activities remained unchanged as compared to the first exposure. Our results confirm that nitrogen exposure at 3 MPa led to a decreased striatal dopamine release and increased motor disturbances in naïve rats. Repetitive exposures to 1 MPa of nitrogen induced a reversal effect on the dopamine release which suggests a neurochemical change at the level of the neurotransmitter regulation processes of the basal ganglia. In contrast, motor activity remained quantitatively unchanged, thus suggesting that dopamine is not involved alone in modulating these motor disturbances.

  7. The effects of chronic cadmium exposure on repeat swimming performance and anaerobic metabolism in brown trout (Salmo trutta) and lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunningham, Jessie L.; McGeer, James C., E-mail: jmcgeer@wlu.ca

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Exposure to 18 nM waterborne Cd induced plasma Ca loss that recovered by day 30 for lake whitefish but not brown trout. • Ucrit measured after an initial swim to 85% of Ucrit and a 30 min rest period was reduced in 18 nM Cd exposed fish compared to controls. • Swimming to 85% of Ucrit resulted in decreased muscle glycogen and increased lactate that was not recovered in the 30 min recovery period. • Second swim impairment is not related to metabolic processes in white muscle. - Abstract: This study investigates the effect of chronic Cd exposure on the ability to perform repeat swim challenges in brown trout (Salmo trutta) and lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis). Fish were exposed to waterborne Cd (18 nM) in moderately hard water (120 mg L{sup −1} CaCO{sub 3}) for 30 days. This level of exposure has been shown to cause sublethal physiological disruption and acclimation responses but no impairment of sustained swimming capacity (U{sub crit}) in single swim challenges. Swim trials were done over the course of the exposure and each one consisted of an initial swim to 85% of the U{sub crit} of control fish, a 30 min recovery period and finally a second swim challenge to determine U{sub crit}. Plasma and tissue samples were collected before and after each of the swim periods. As expected from previous studies, Cd exposure resulted in significant accumulation of Cd in gills, liver and kidney but not in white muscle. Exposure also induced a loss of plasma Ca followed by subsequent recovery (in lake whitefish but not brown trout) with few mortalities (100% survival for lake whitefish and 93% for brown trout). Both control and exposed fish swam to 85% of the single swim U{sub crit} and no differences in performance were seen. The Ucrit of unexposed controls in the second swim challenges were not different from the single swim Ucrit. However, second swim performance was significantly reduced in Cd exposed fish, particularly after a week of exposure

  8. Decreased level of Nurr1 in heterozygous young adult mice leads to exacerbated acute and long-term toxicity after repeated methamphetamine exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Luo

    Full Text Available The abuse of psychostimulants, such as methamphetamine (METH, is prevalent in young adults and could lead to long-term adaptations in the midbrain dopamine system in abstinent human METH abusers. Nurr1 is a gene that is critical for the survival and maintenance of dopaminergic neurons and has been implicated in dopaminergic neuron related disorders. In this study, we examined the synergistic effects of repeated early exposure to methamphetamine in adolescence and reduction in Nurr1 gene levels. METH binge exposure in adolescence led to greater damage in the nigrostrial dopaminergic system when mice were exposed to METH binge later in life, suggesting a long-term adverse effect on the dopaminergic system. Compared to naïve mice that received METH binge treatment for the first time, mice pretreated with METH in adolescence showed a greater loss of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH immunoreactivity in striatum, loss of THir fibers in the substantia nigra reticulata (SNr as well as decreased dopamine transporter (DAT level and compromised DA clearance in striatum. These effects were further exacerbated in Nurr1 heterozygous mice. Our data suggest that a prolonged adverse effect exists following adolescent METH binge exposure which may lead to greater damage to the dopaminergic system when exposed to repeated METH later in life. Furthermore, our data support that Nurr1 mutations or deficiency could be a potential genetic predisposition which may lead to higher vulnerability in some individuals.

  9. Repeated measures of inflammation, blood pressure, and heart rate variability associated with personal traffic exposures in healthy adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: Previous human exposure studies of traffic-related air pollutants have demonstrated adverse health effects in human populations by comparing areas of high and low traffic, but few studies have utilized microenvironmental monitoring of pollutants at multiple traffic lo...

  10. Repeated measures of inflammation, blood pressure, and heart rate variability associated with personal traffic exposures in healthy adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: Previous human exposure studies of traffic-related air pollutants have demonstrated adverse health effects in human populations by comparing areas of high and low traffic, but few studies have utilized microenvironmental monitoring of pollutants at multiple traffic lo...

  11. The effect of sensory-nutrient congruency on food intake after repeated exposure: do texture and/or energy density matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogenkamp, P S

    2014-09-01

    Sensory properties guide the amount that people eat. In particular, food texture plays an important role in a food's 'expected satiation', which in turn affects the food-related decision making process. One hypothesis is that incongruent pairing of a textural cue with a post-ingestive outcome compromises this process, leading to poor energy compensation. Several studies examined the effect of both energy density and sensory characteristics (i.e. increased creaminess and thickness) on expectations, subjective appetite and food intake. To add to this literature, a re-analysis of data assessed whether the effect of sensory-nutrient pairings on energy intake compensation persisted after repeated exposure to a food. In this cross-over design, 27 participants consumed two preloads with 'congruent' (low-energy/liquid; high-energy/semi-solid) and two preloads with 'incongruent' (low-energy/semi-solid; high-energy/liquid) texture-nutrient combinations for nine subsequent meals, during which ad libitum intake was measured. Intake at first exposure did not differ between the low-energy (280±150kcal) and high-energy preloads (292±183kcal) in the incongruent conditions. By contrast, it was greater after the low-energy (332±203kcal) than after the high-energy (236±132kcal) preload in the congruent conditions (energy∗incongruent/congruent, p=0.04). Post-exposure, this pattern changed: intake depended on the energy density of the preloads in all conditions, and was greater after low-energy preloads (day∗energy∗incongruent/congruent-interaction for breakfast: p=0.02). Thus, manipulating the sensory properties of a food influenced energy compensation and meal size, but only at initial exposure. Repeated exposure 'corrected' the initial lack of compensation observed in conditions with incongruent sensory-nutrient pairings.

  12. Comparative systems toxicology analysis of cigarette smoke and aerosol from a candidate modified risk tobacco product in organotypic human gingival epithelial cultures: A 3-day repeated exposure study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanetti, Filippo; Titz, Bjoern; Sewer, Alain; Lo Sasso, Giuseppe; Scotti, Elena; Schlage, Walter K; Mathis, Carole; Leroy, Patrice; Majeed, Shoaib; Torres, Laura Ortega; Keppler, Brian R; Elamin, Ashraf; Trivedi, Keyur; Guedj, Emmanuel; Martin, Florian; Frentzel, Stefan; Ivanov, Nikolai V; Peitsch, Manuel C; Hoeng, Julia

    2017-03-01

    Smoking is one of the major lifestyle-related risk factors for periodontal diseases. Modified risk tobacco products (MRTP) offer a promising alternative in the harm reduction strategy for adult smokers unable to quit. Using a systems toxicology approach, we investigated and compared the exposure effects of a reference cigarette (3R4F) and a heat-not-burn technology-based candidate MRTP, the Tobacco Heating System (THS) 2.2. Human gingival epithelial organotypic cultures were repeatedly exposed (3 days) for 28 min at two matching concentrations of cigarette smoke (CS) or THS2.2 aerosol. Results showed only minor histopathological alterations and minimal cytotoxicity upon THS2.2 aerosol exposure compared to CS (1% for THS2.2 aerosol vs. 30% for CS, at the high concentration). Among the 14 proinflammatory mediators analyzed, only 5 exhibited significant alterations with THS2.2 exposure compared with 11 upon CS exposure. Transcriptomic and metabolomic analysis indicated a general reduction of the impact in THS2.2 aerosol-exposed samples with respect to CS (∼79% lower biological impact for the high THS2.2 aerosol concentration compared to CS, and 13 metabolites significantly perturbed for THS2.2 vs. 181 for CS). This study indicates that exposure to THS2.2 aerosol had a lower impact on the pathophysiology of human gingival organotypic cultures than CS. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Narrative exposure therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder associated with repeated interpersonal trauma in patients with severe mental illness: a mixed methods design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria W. Mauritz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the Netherlands, most patients with severe mental illness (SMI receive flexible assertive community treatment (FACT provided by multidisciplinary community mental health teams. SMI patients with comorbid posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD are sometimes offered evidence-based trauma-focused treatment like eye movement desensitization reprocessing or prolonged exposure. There is a large amount of evidence for the effectiveness of narrative exposure therapy (NET within various vulnerable patient groups with repeated interpersonal trauma. Some FACT-teams provide NET for patients with comorbid PTSD, which is promising, but has not been specifically studied in SMI patients. Objectives: The primary aim is to evaluate NET in SMI patients with comorbid PTSD associated with repeated interpersonal trauma to get insight into whether (1 PTSD and dissociative symptoms changes and (2 changes occur in the present SMI symptoms, care needs, quality of life, global functioning, and care consumption. The second aim is to gain insight into patients’ experiences with NET and to identify influencing factors on treatment results. Methods: This study will have a mixed methods convergent design consisting of quantitative repeated measures and qualitative semi-structured in-depth interviews based on Grounded Theory. The study population will include adult SMI outpatients (n=25 with comorbid PTSD and receiving NET. The quantitative study parameters will be existence and severity of PTSD, dissociative, and SMI symptoms; care needs; quality of life; global functioning; and care consumption. In a longitudinal analysis, outcomes will be analyzed using mixed models to estimate the difference in means between baseline and repeated measurements. The qualitative study parameters will be experiences with NET and perceived factors for success or failure. Integration of quantitative and qualitative results will be focused on interpreting how qualitative results

  14. The effects of chronic cadmium exposure on repeat swimming performance and anaerobic metabolism in brown trout (Salmo trutta) and lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Jessie L; McGeer, James C

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates the effect of chronic Cd exposure on the ability to perform repeat swim challenges in brown trout (Salmo trutta) and lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis). Fish were exposed to waterborne Cd (18nM) in moderately hard water (120mgL(-1) CaCO3) for 30 days. This level of exposure has been shown to cause sublethal physiological disruption and acclimation responses but no impairment of sustained swimming capacity (Ucrit) in single swim challenges. Swim trials were done over the course of the exposure and each one consisted of an initial swim to 85% of the Ucrit of control fish, a 30min recovery period and finally a second swim challenge to determine Ucrit. Plasma and tissue samples were collected before and after each of the swim periods. As expected from previous studies, Cd exposure resulted in significant accumulation of Cd in gills, liver and kidney but not in white muscle. Exposure also induced a loss of plasma Ca followed by subsequent recovery (in lake whitefish but not brown trout) with few mortalities (100% survival for lake whitefish and 93% for brown trout). Both control and exposed fish swam to 85% of the single swim Ucrit and no differences in performance were seen. The Ucrit of unexposed controls in the second swim challenges were not different from the single swim Ucrit. However, second swim performance was significantly reduced in Cd exposed fish, particularly after a week of exposure where 31% and 38% reductions were observed for brown trout and lake whitefish respectively. Swimming to 85% Ucrit resulted in metabolic expenditure with little recovery after 30min. Few differences were observed between control and Cd exposed fish with the exception of a reduction in resting white muscle ATP stores of Cd exposed fish after 1 week of exposure. The results show that chronic sublethal Cd exposure results in an impairment of swimming ability in repeat swim challenges but this impairment is generally not related to metabolic processes

  15. Reactive Oxygen Species-mediated Loss of Phenotype of Parvalbumin Interneurons Contributes to Long-term Cognitive Impairments After Repeated Neonatal Ketamine Exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Sun, Xiao-Ru; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Zhen-Zhen; Zhao, Hong-Ting; Li, Hui-Hui; Ji, Mu-Huo; Li, Kuan-Yu; Yang, Jian-Jun

    2016-11-01

    Ketamine, a common anesthetic used for pediatric patients, has been shown to induce neurotoxicity and alter adolescent behaviors in rats when administered during neonatal period. However, the mechanisms underlying this kind of neurotoxicity remain largely to be determined. Herein, we studied whether the reactive oxygen species (ROS) due to the increased NOX2 mediates loss of phenotype of PV interneurons and thus contributes to long-term cognitive impairments after repeated ketamine exposures. Sprague-Dawley male rat pups received a daily administration of ketamine intraperitoneally (75 mg/kg) from postnatal day 6 (P6) to P8 for three consecutive days. For the interventional study, pups were treated with a NADPH oxidase inhibitor, apocynin (Apo). Learning and memory abilities were tested by the open field, fear conditioning, and Morris water maze on P40, P42-44, and P50-56, respectively. For histological and biochemical assays, a separate cohort of rats was killed on P9 or P60, and the brain tissues were harvested. Our results showed the upregulation of 8-OHdG and gp91/NOX2 and downregulation of PV and glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67) after repeated ketamine exposures, which co-occurred with the long-term cognitive impairments as evidenced by the decreased freezing time to context. However, Apo treatment attenuated these abnormalities. Our results suggest that oxidative damage, probably due to the increased NOX2, mediates loss of phenotype of PV interneurons and thus contributes to long-term cognitive impairments after repeated ketamine exposures. Moreover, the inhibition of NADPH oxidase may protect against cognitive dysfunction.

  16. Chronic intermittent ethanol exposure alters stress effects on (3α,5α-3-hydroxy-pregnan-20-one (3α,5α-THP immunolabeling of amygdala neurons in C57BL/6J mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoniette M Maldonado-Devincci

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The GABAergic neuroactive steroid (3α,5α-3-hydroxy-pregnan-20-one (3α,5α-THP, allopregnanolone is decreased in various brain regions of C57BL/6J mice following exposure to an acute stressor or chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE exposure and withdrawal. It is well established that there are complex interactions between stress and ethanol drinking, with mixed literature regarding the effects of stress on ethanol intake. However, there is little research examining how chronic ethanol exposure alters stress responses. The present work examined the impact of CIE exposure and withdrawal on changes in brain levels of 3α,5α-THP, hormonal, and behavioral responses to forced swim stress (FSS. Adult male C57BL/6J mice were exposed to four cycles of CIE to induce ethanol dependence. Following 8 or 72 hr withdrawal, mice were subjected to FSS for 10 min, and 50 min later brains were collected for immunohistochemical analysis of cellular 3α,5α-THP. Behavioral and circulating corticosterone responses to the FSS were quantified. Following 8 hr withdrawal, ethanol exposure potentiated the corticosterone response to FSS. Following 72 hr withdrawal, this difference was no longer observed. Following 8 hr withdrawal, stress-exposed mice showed no differences in immobility, swimming or struggling behavior. However, following 72 hr withdrawal, ethanol-exposed mice showed less immobility and greater swimming behavior compared to air-exposed mice. Interestingly, cellular 3α,5α-THP levels were increased in the lateral amygdala 8 hr and 72 hr post-withdrawal in stressed ethanol-exposed mice compared to ethanol-exposed/non-stressed mice. In the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, stress exposure decreased 3α,5α-THP levels compared to controls following 72 hr withdrawal, but no differences were observed 8 hr post-withdrawal. There were no differences in cellular 3α,5α-THP levels in the nucleus accumbens shell at either withdrawal time point. These data

  17. Exposure to hot and cold environmental conditions does not affect the decision making ability of soccer referees following an intermittent sprint protocol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee eTaylor

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Soccer referees enforce the laws of the game and the decisions they make can directly affect match results. Fixtures within European competitions take place in climatic conditions that are often challenging (e.g. Moscow ~ -5oC, Madrid ~30oC. Effects of these temperatures on player performance are well documented; however, little is known how this environmental stress may impair cognitive performance of soccer referees and if so, whether exercise exasperates this. The present study aims to investigate the effect of cold (COLD; 5oC, 40% relative humidity (RH, hot (HOT; 30oC, 40% RH and temperate (CONT; 18oC, 40% RH conditions on decision making during soccer specific exercise. On separate occasions within each condition, thirteen physically active males; either semi-professional referees or semi-professional soccer players completed three 90 min intermittent treadmill protocols that simulated match play, interspersed with 4 computer delivered cognitive tests to measure vigilance and dual task capacity. Core and skin temperature, heart rate, rating of perceived exertion and thermal sensation were recorded throughout the protocol. There was no significant difference between conditions for decision making (p > 0.05 despite significant differences in measured physiological variables (skin temperature = HOT 34.5 ± 5.1°C; CONT 31.2 ± 0.1°C and COLD 26.7 ± 0.5°C; p < 0.05. It is hypothesised that the lack of difference observed in decision making ability between conditions was due to the exercise protocol used, as it may not have elicited an appropriate and valid soccer specific internal load to alter cognitive functioning.

  18. Intermittent Explosive Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lut Tamam

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent explosive disorder is an impulse control disorder characterized by the occurrence of discrete episodes of failure to resist aggressive impulses that result in violent assault or destruction of property. Though the prevalence intermittent explosive disorder has been reported to be relatively rare in frontier studies on the field, it is now common opinion that intermittent explosive disorder is far more common than previously thought especially in clinical psychiatry settings. Etiological studies displayed the role of both psychosocial factors like childhood traumas and biological factors like dysfunctional neurotransmitter systems and genetics. In differential diagnosis of the disorder, disorders involving agression as a symptom such as alcohol and drug intoxication, antisocial and borderline personality disorders, personality changes due to general medical conditions and behavioral disorder should be considered. A combination of pharmacological and psychotherapeutic approaches are suggested in the treatment of the disorder. This article briefly reviews the historical background, diagnostic criteria, epidemiology, etiology and treatment of intermittent explosive disorder.

  19. In utero exposure to nanosized carbon black (Printex90) does not induce tandem repeat mutations in female murine germ cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boisen, Anne Mette Zenner; Shipley, Thomas; Jackson, Petra

    2013-01-01

    J mice were exposed four times during gestation by intratracheal instillation of 67μg/animal of nanosized carbon black Printex90 or vehicle (gestation days 7, 10, 15 and 18). Female offspring were raised to maturity and mated with unexposed CBA males. Expanded simple tandem repeat (ESTR) germline...... mutation rates in the resulting F2 generation were determined from full pedigrees (mother, father, offspring) of F1 female mice (178 CB-exposed and 258 control F2 offspring). ESTR mutation rates in CB-exposed F2 female offspring were not statistically different from those of F2 female control offspring....

  20. Enhanced hepatotoxicity induced by repeated exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin in combination in male rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yimei Wang; Chunfeng Lu; Zhiguo Sheng; Gang Liu; Ze Fu; Benzhan Zhu; Shuangqing Peng

    2011-01-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are among persistent polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbons that exist as complex mixtures in the environment worldwide. The present study was attempted to investigate the hepatotoxicity following repeated exposure to TCDD and PCBs in combination in male rats, and to reveal the involvement of potential mechanisms. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to TCDD (10 μg/kg) and Aroclor 1254 (10 mg/kg, a representative mixture of PCBs) alone or in combination by intragastric administration. After 12-day exposure, all treatments produced significant hepatotoxicity as characterized by changes of plasma biochemistry and histopathological changes. These effects were more prominent in the combined group. Furthermore, all treatments induced hepatic cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) expression, and the maximal level of CYP1A1 expression was observed in the combined group, as in the case of the most severe hepatotoxicity evoked by the combined exposure.These findings indicated that the hepatotoxicity induced by TCDD and Aroclor 1254 might be ascribed to the high expression of hepatic CYP1A1. The present study demonstrates the enhanced hepatotoxicity after exposure to TCDD and PCBs in combination in rats.

  1. An integrated approach to biomonitoring exposure to styrene and styrene-(7,8)-oxide using a repeated measurements sampling design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fustinoni, S; Campo, L; Manini, P; Buratti, M; Waidyanatha, S; De Palma, G; Mutti, A; Foa, V; Colombi, A; Rappaport, S M

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate urinary analytes and haemoglobin and albumin adducts as biomarkers of exposure to airborne styrene (Sty) and styrene-(7,8)-oxide (StyOX) and to evaluate the influence of smoking habit and genetic polymorphism of metabolic enzymes GSTM1 and GSTT1 on these biomarkers. We obtained three or four air and urine samples from each exposed worker (eight reinforced plastics workers and 13 varnish workers), one air and urine samples from 22 control workers (automobile mechanics) and one blood sample from all subjects. Median levels of exposure to Sty and StyOX, respectively, were 18.2 mg m(-3) and 133 microg m(-3) for reinforced plastics workers, 3.4 mg m(-3) and 12 microg m(-3) for varnish workers, and <0.3 mg m(-3) and <5 microg m(-3) for controls. Urinary levels of styrene, mandelic acid, phenylglyoxylic acid, phenylglycine (PHG), 4-vinylphenol (VP) and mercapturic acids (M1+M2), as well as cysteinyl adducts of serum albumin (but not those of haemoglobin) were significantly associated with exposure status (controlsexposure, suggestive of saturable metabolism. Levels of the protein adducts were not associated with exposure to either Sty or StyOX among exposed subjects.

  2. Association between secondhand smoke exposure at home and cigarette gifting and sharing in Zhejiang, China: a repeat cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yue; Xu, ShuiYang; Wu, QingQing; Guo, YuJie

    2016-03-03

    The aims of the current study were to assess the prevalence of household cigarette gifting and sharing, and to evaluate the relationship between secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure, and cigarette gifting and sharing, in Zhejiang, China. A repeat cross-sectional design. 10 sites in 5 cities in Zhejiang, China. Two surveys were conducted with adults in Zhejiang, China, in 2010 (N=2112) and 2012 (N=2279), respectively. At both waves, the same questionnaire was used; respondents were asked questions on residence, number of family smokers, indoor smoking rules, household income and cigarette gifting and sharing. The findings revealed that more than half of respondents' families (54.50% in 2010, 52.79% in 2012) reported exposure to SHS. Many families (54.73% in 2010, 47.04% in 2012) shared cigarettes with others, and a minority (14.91% in 2010, 14.17% in 2012) reported their family giving cigarettes as a gift. There was a significant decrease in cigarette sharing from 2010 to 2012, irrespective of household with SHS exposure status; and the cigarette gifting was significantly decreased in household without SHS exposure. Compared to households without SHS exposure, the prevalence of cigarette gifting and sharing in households with SHS exposure was more obvious. Encouraging and promoting a smoke-free household environment is necessary to change public smoking customs in Zhejiang, China. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  3. Dexmedetomidine attenuates repeated propofol exposure-induced hippocampal apoptosis, PI3K/Akt/Gsk-3β signaling disruption, and juvenile cognitive deficits in neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yujie; Wu, Changyi; Han, Bin; Xu, Fei; Mao, Mingfeng; Guo, Xiangyang; Wang, Jun

    2016-07-01

    Propofol is one of the most widely used intravenous anesthetics. However, repeated exposure to propofol may cause neurodegeneration in the developing brain. Dexmedetomidine (Dex), an α2 adrenoceptor agonist, has been previously demonstrated to provide neuroprotection against neuroapoptosis and neurocognitive impairments induced by several anesthetics. Thus, the current study aimed to investigate the effect of Dex on neonatal propofol-induced neuroapoptosis and juvenile spatial learning/memory deficits. Propofol (30 mg/kg) was intraperiotoneally administered to 7‑day‑old Sprague Dawley rats (n=75) three times each day at 90 min intervals for seven consecutive days with or without Dex (75 µg/kg) treatment 20 min prior to propofol injection. Following repeated propofol exposure, reduced Akt and GSK‑3β phosphorylation, increased cleaved caspase‑3 expression levels, an increased Bax/Bcl‑2 ratio, and increased terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase‑mediated dUTP nick‑end labeling (TUNEL)‑positive cells in the CA1 hippocampal subregion were observed. Morris Water Maze testing at postnatal day 29 also demonstrated spatial learning and memory deficits following propofol treatment compared with the control group. Notably, these changes were significantly attenuated by Dex pretreatment. The results of the current study demonstrated that Dex ameliorates the neurocognitive impairment induced by repeated neonatal propofol challenge in rats, partially via its anti‑apoptotic action and normalization of the disruption to the PI3K/Akt/GSK‑3β signaling pathway. The present study provides preliminary evidence demonstrating the safety of propofol on the neonatal brain and the potential use of dexmedetomidine pretreatment in pediatric patients.

  4. Eosinophilia and biotoxin exposure in bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) from a coastal area impacted by repeated mortality events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwacke, Lori H., E-mail: Lori.Schwacke@noaa.gov [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Ocean Service, Center for Human Health Risks, 331 Fort Johnson Road, Charleston, SC 29412 (United States); Twiner, Michael J. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Ocean Service, Center for Coastal Environmental Health and Biomolecular Research, 219 Fort Johnson Road, Charleston, SC 29412 (United States); De Guise, Sylvain [University of Connecticut, Department of Pathobiology and Veterinary Science, 61 North Eagleville Road, U-89, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States); Balmer, Brian C.; Wells, Randall S. [Chicago Zoological Society, c/o Mote Marine Laboratory, 1600 Ken Thompson Parkway, Sarasota, FL 34236 (United States); Townsend, Forrest I. [Bayside Hospital for Animals, 251 N.E. Racetrack Road, Fort Walton Beach, FL 32547 (United States); Rotstein, David C. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Marine Fisheries Service, Office of Protected Resources, Marine Mammal Health and Stranding Response Program, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910 (United States); Varela, Rene A. [Ocean Embassy Inc, 6433 Pinecastle Blvd, Ste 2, Orlando, FL 32809 (United States); Hansen, Larry J. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Marine Fisheries Service Southeast Fisheries Science Center,101 Pivers Island Road, Beaufort, NC 28516 (United States); Zolman, Eric S. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Ocean Service, Center for Coastal Environmental Health and Biomolecular Research, 219 Fort Johnson Road, Charleston, SC 29412 (United States); Spradlin, Trevor R. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Marine Fisheries Service, Office of Protected Resources, Marine Mammal Health and Stranding Response Program, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910 (United States); and others

    2010-08-15

    Bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) inhabiting coastal waters in the northern Gulf of Mexico have been impacted by recurrent unusual mortality events over the past few decades. Several of these mortality events along the Florida panhandle have been tentatively attributed to poisoning from brevetoxin produced by the dinoflagellate Karenia brevis. While dolphins in other regions of the Florida coast are often exposed to K. brevis blooms, large-scale dolphin mortality events are relatively rare and the frequency and magnitude of die-offs along the Panhandle raise concern for the apparent vulnerability of dolphins in this region. We report results from dolphin health assessments conducted near St. Joseph Bay, Florida, an area impacted by 3 unusual die-offs within a 7-year time span. An eosinophilia syndrome, manifested as an elevated blood eosinophil count without obvious cause, was observed in 23% of sampled dolphins. Elevated eosinophil counts were associated with decreased T-lymphocyte proliferation and increased neutrophil phagocytosis. In addition, indication of chronic low-level exposure to another algal toxin, domoic acid produced by the diatom Pseudo-nitzschia spp., was determined. Previous studies of other marine mammal populations exposed recurrently to Pseudo-nitzschia blooms have suggested a possible link between the eosinophilia and domoic acid exposure. While the chronic eosinophilia syndrome could over the long-term produce organ damage and alter immunological status and thereby increase vulnerability to other challenges, the significance of the high prevalence of the syndrome to the observed mortality events in the St. Joseph Bay area is unclear. Nonetheless, the unusual immunological findings and concurrent evidence of domoic acid exposure in this sentinel marine species suggest a need for further investigation to elucidate potential links between chronic, low-level exposure to algal toxins and immune health.

  5. Effects of repeated prenatal glucocorticoid exposure on long-term potentiation in the juvenile guinea-pig hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiawan, Elaine; Jackson, Michael F; MacDonald, John F; Matthews, Stephen G

    2007-06-15

    Synthetic glucocorticoids (sGCs) are routinely used to treat women at risk of preterm labour to promote fetal lung maturation. There is now strong evidence that exposure to excess glucocorticoid during periods of rapid brain development has permanent consequences for endocrine function and behaviour in the offspring. Prenatal exposure to sGC alters the expression of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDA-R) subunits in the fetal and neonatal hippocampus. Given the integral role of the NMDA-R in synaptic plasticity, we hypothesized that prenatal sGC exposure will have effects on hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) after birth. Further, this may occur in either the presence or absence of elevated cortisol concentrations, in vitro. Pregnant guinea-pigs were injected with betamethasone (Beta, 1 mg kg(-1)) or vehicle on gestational days (gd) 40, 41, 50, 51, 60 and 61 (term approximately 70 days), a regimen comparable to that given to pregnant women. On postnatal day 21, LTP was examined at Schaffer collateral synapses in the CA1 region of hippocampal slices prepared from juvenile animals exposed to betamethasone or vehicle, in utero. Subsequently, the acute glucocorticoid receptor (GR)- and mineralocorticoid receptor (MR)-dependent effects of cortisol (0.1-10 microM; bath applied 30 min before LTP induction) were examined. There was no effect of prenatal sGC treatment on LTP under basal conditions. The application of 10 microM cortisol depressed excitatory synaptic transmission in all treatment groups regardless of sex. Similarly, LTP was depressed by 10 microM cortisol in all groups, with the exception of Beta-exposed females, in which LTP was unaltered. Hippocampal MR and GR protein levels were increased in Beta-exposed females, but not in any other prenatal treatment group. This study reveals sex-specific effects of prenatal exposure to sGC on LTP in the presence of elevated cortisol, a situation that would occur in vivo during stress.

  6. Intermittent rainfall in dynamic multimedia fate modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertwich, E G

    2001-03-01

    It has been shown that steady-state multimedia models (level III fugacity models) lead to a substantial underestimate of air concentrations for chemicals with a low Henry's law constant (H multimedia models are used to estimate the spatial range or inhalation exposure. A dynamic model of pollutant fate is developed for conditions of intermittent rainfall to calculate the time profile of pollutant concentrations in different environmental compartments. The model utilizes a new, mathematically efficient approach to dynamic multimedia fate modeling that is based on the convolution of solutions to the initial conditions problem. For the first time, this approach is applied to intermittent conditions. The investigation indicates that the time-averaged pollutant concentrations under intermittent rainfall can be approximated by the appropriately weighted average of steady-state concentrations under conditions with and without rainfall.

  7. Repeated exposure of adolescent rats to oral methylphenidate does not induce behavioral sensitization or cross-sensitization to nicotine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.C. Justo

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Several lines of evidence indicate that the use of stimulant drugs, including methylphenidate (MPD, increases tobacco smoking. This has raised concerns that MPD use during adolescence could facilitate nicotine abuse. Preclinical studies have shown that repeated treatment with an addictive drug produces sensitization to that drug and usually cross-sensitization to other drugs. Behavioral sensitization has been implicated in the development of drug addiction. We examined whether repeated oral MPD administration during adolescence could induce behavioral sensitization to MPD and long-lasting cross-sensitization to nicotine. Adolescent male Wistar rats were treated orally with 10 mg/kg MPD or saline (SAL from postnatal day (PND 27 to 33. To evaluate behavioral sensitization to MPD in adolescent rats (PND 39, the SAL pretreated group was subdivided into two groups that received intragastric SAL (1.0 mL/kg or MPD (10 mg/kg; MPD pretreated rats received MPD (10 mg/kg. Cross-sensitization was evaluated on PND 39 or PND 70 (adulthood. To this end, SAL- and MPD-pretreated groups received subcutaneous injections of SAL (1.0 mL/kg or nicotine (0.4 mg/kg. All groups had 8 animals. Immediately after injections, locomotor activity was determined. The locomotor response to MPD challenge of MPD-pretreated rats was not significantly different from that of the SAL-pretreated group. Moreover, the locomotor response of MPD-pretreated rats to nicotine challenge was not significantly different from that of the SAL-pretreated group. This lack of sensitization and cross-sensitization suggests that MPD treatment during adolescence does not induce short- or long-term neuroadaptation in rats that could increase sensitivity to MPD or nicotine.

  8. Decreased extracellular adenosine levels lead to loss of hypoxia-induced neuroprotection after repeated episodes of exposure to hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Cui

    Full Text Available Achieving a prolonged neuroprotective state following transient ischemic attacks (TIAs is likely to effectively reduce the brain damage and neurological dysfunction associated with recurrent stroke. HPC is a phenomenon in which advanced exposure to mild hypoxia reduces the stroke volume produced by a subsequent TIA. However, this neuroprotection is not long-lasting, with the effects reaching a peak after 3 days. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the use of multiple episodes of hypoxic exposure at different time intervals to induce longer-term protection in a mouse stroke model. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to different hypoxic preconditioning protocols: a single episode of HPC or five identical episodes at intervals of 3 days (E3d HPC or 6 days (E6d HPC. Three days after the last hypoxic exposure, temporary middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO was induced. The effects of these HPC protocols on hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF regulated gene mRNA expression were measured by quantitative PCR. Changes in extracellular adenosine concentrations, known to exert neuroprotective effects, were also measured using in vivo microdialysis and high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC. Neuroprotection was provided by E6d HPC but not E3d HPC. HIF-regulated target gene expression increased significantly following all HPC protocols. However, E3d HPC significantly decreased extracellular adenosine and reduced cerebral blood flow in the ischemic region with upregulated expression of the adenosine transporter, equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (ENT1. An ENT1 inhibitor, propentofylline increased the cerebral blood flow and re-established neuroprotection in E3d HPC. Adenosine receptor specific antagonists showed that adenosine mainly through A1 receptor mediates HPC induced neuroprotection. Our data indicate that cooperation of HIF-regulated genes and extracellular adenosine is necessary for HPC-induced neuroprotection.

  9. Prevention of diabetes in NOD mice by repeated exposures to a contact allergen inducing a sub-clinical dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engkilde, Kaare; Buschard, Karsten; Hansen, Axel Jacob Kornerup

    2010-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease, while allergic contact dermatitis although immune mediated, is considered an exposure driven disease that develops due to epicutaneous contact with reactive low-molecular chemicals. The objective of the present study was to experimentally study the effect...... of contact allergens on the development of diabetes in NOD mice. As the link between contact allergy and diabetes is yet unexplained we also examined the effect of provocation with allergens on Natural Killer T (NKT) cells, since involvement of NKT cells could suggest an innate connection between the two...

  10. Mechanisms of adaptation from a multiple to a single step recovery strategy following repeated exposure to forward loss of balance in older adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher P Carty

    Full Text Available When released from an initial, static, forward lean angle and instructed to recover with a single step, some older adults are able to meet the task requirements, whereas others either stumble or fall. The purpose of the present study was to use the concept of margin of stability (MoS to investigate balance recovery responses in the anterior-posterior direction exhibited by older single steppers, multiple steppers and those that are able to adapt from multiple to single steps following exposure to repeated forward loss of balance. One hundred and fifty-one healthy, community dwelling, older adults, aged 65-80 years, participated in the study. Participants performed four trials of the balance recovery task from each of three initial lean angles. Balance recovery responses in the anterior-posterior direction were quantified at three events; cable release (CR, toe-off (TO and foot contact (FC, for trials performed at the intermediate lean angle. MoS was computed as the anterior-posterior distance between the forward boundary of the Base of Support (BoS and the vertical projection of the velocity adjusted centre of mass position (XCoM. Approximately one-third of participants adapted from a multiple to a single step recovery strategy following repeated exposure to the task. MoS at FC for the single and multiple step trials in the adaptation group were intermediate between the exclusively single step group and the exclusively multiple step group, with the single step trials having a significant, 3.7 times higher MoS at FC than the multiple step trials. Consistent with differences between single and multiple steppers, adaptation from multiple to single steps was attributed to an increased BoS at FC, a reduced XCoM at FC and an increased rate of BoS displacement from TO to FC. Adaptations occurred within a single test session and suggest older adults that are close to the threshold of successful recovery can rapidly improve dynamic stability following

  11. Acute Onset of Vancomycin Anaphylaxis With Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation in an Orthopedic Patient Despite Prior Repeated Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Brock; Roboubi, Babak; Henshaw, Robert

    2015-12-01

    Vancomycin is a glycopeptide antibiotic that exhibits bactericidal activity against gram-positive cocci. It is commonly recommended for surgical prophylaxis in cases of suspected bacterial resistance or penicillin allergy. There are 2 main types of hypersensitivity reactions associated with vancomycin. Red man syndrome is an anaphylactoid reaction caused by direct release of histamine. The second is an anaphylactic reaction, which is an immunoglobulin E-mediated response. We present the case of a 55-year-old woman with a history of metastatic giant cell tumor of the right proximal tibia. She had undergone multiple surgeries for this and other nonorthopedic conditions. The patient received vancomycin for the majority of these procedures and extended courses of vancomycin on 2 separate occasions. In the present case, the patient was taken to the operating room for a prosthetic infection, and vancomycin was given after cultures were taken. The patient immediately developed signs consistent with anaphylaxis and disseminated intravascular coagulation. This was treated acutely with hemodynamic resuscitation, replacement of blood components, steroids, and repeated boluses of epinephrine. She recovered and was taken back to the operating room during that same admission without incident. The patient has since been treated with systemic daptomycin and a tobramycin cement spacer without further incident.

  12. Repeated sedimentation and exposure of glacial Lake Missoula sediments: A lake-level history at Garden Gulch, Montana, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Larry N.

    2017-01-01

    Glaciolacustrine sediments record lake transgression, regression, and subaerial modification of the silty lake-bottom of glacial Lake Missoula in the Clark Fork River valley. The sequence preserved at Garden Gulch, MT documents lake-level fluctuations at >65% of its full-pool volume. Twelve sedimentary cycles fine upwards from (1) very fine-grained sandy silt to (2) silt with climbing ripples to (3) rhythmically laminated silt and some clay. The cycles are fine-grained turbidites capped locally by thin layers of angular gravel derived from local bedrock outcrops. The gravels appear to be the toes of mass wasting lobes carried onto the exposed lakebed surface during repeated lake-level lowerings. Periglacial wedges, small rotational faults, involutions, and clastic dikes deform the tops of eleven cycles. The wedges are 10-30 cm wide, penetrate 30-70 cm deep, are spaced seven cycles. The Garden Gulch section may represent as few as seven and as many as twelve substantial fillings and partial to complete drainings of glacial Lake Missoula.

  13. Repeated inhalation exposure to octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane produces hepatomegaly, transient hepatic hyperplasia, and sustained hypertrophy in female Fischer 344 rats in a manner similar to phenobarbital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKim, J M; Kolesar, G B; Jean, P A; Meeker, L S; Wilga, P C; Schoonhoven, R; Swenberg, J A; Goodman, J I; Gallavan, R H; Meeks, R G

    2001-04-15

    Octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4) has been described as a phenobarbital-like inducer of hepatic enzymes. Phenobarbital (PB) and phenobarbital-like chemicals induce transient hepatic and thyroid hyperplasia and sustained hypertrophy in rats and mice. The extent to which these processes are involved with D4-induced hepatomegaly is not known. The present study has evaluated the effects of repeated inhalation exposure to D4 vapors on hepatic and thyroid cell proliferation and hypertrophy with respect to time and exposure concentration. Female Fischer 344 rats were exposed via whole body inhalation to 0 ppm D4, 700 ppm D4 vapors (6 h/day; 5 days/week), or 0.05% PB in drinking water over a 4-week period. Incorporation of 5'-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and the abundance of proliferating cell nuclear antigen were used as indicators of cell proliferation. Designated animals from each treatment group were euthanized on study days 6, 13, and 27. The effect of D4 exposure concentration on hepatic cell proliferation was evaluated at 0, 7, 30, 70, 150, 300, or 700 ppm. Liver-to-body weight ratios in animals exposed to 700 ppm D4 were increased 18, 20, and 22% over controls while PB-treated animals showed increases of 33, 27, and 27% over controls on days 6, 13, and 27 respectively. Hepatic incorporation of BrdU following exposure to D4 was highest on day 6 (labeling index = 15-22%) and was at or below control values by day 27. This pattern of transient hyperplasia was observed in all hepatic lobes examined and was similar to the pattern observed following treatment with PB.

  14. Disposition of Lead (Pb) in Saliva and Blood of Sprague-Dawley Rats Following a Single or Repeated Oral Exposure to Pb-Acetate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timchalk, Chuck; Lin, Yuehe; Weitz, Karl K.; Wu, Hong; Gies, Richard A.; Moore, Dean A.; Yantasee, Wassana

    2006-05-01

    Biological monitoring for lead (Pb) is usually based upon a determination of blood Pb concentration; however, saliva has been suggested as a non-invasive biological matrix for assessing exposure. To further evaluate the potential utility of saliva for biomonitoring, the disposition of Pb was evaluated in whole blood (WB), red blood cells (RBC), plasma, parotid gland, bone, and saliva following either a single oral dose of 100 mg Pb-acetate/kg body weight in rats or {approx}1-week after 5 sequential daily oral gavage doses of 1, 10, or 100 mg Pb-acetate/kg/day. Saliva volume, pH, total saliva protein, and ?-amylase activity were also determined. At specified times post-dosing groups of animals were anethetized and administered pilocarpine to induce salivation. Saliva was collected, the animals were humanely sacrificed, and tissue samples were likewise collected, weighed, and processed for Pb analysis. Following a single dose exposure to PB-acetate, Pb was detectable in all samples by 30 min post-dosing. For both the single and repeated dose treatments the concentration of Pb was highest in WB and RBC relative to plasma and saliva. However, the Pb rapidly redistributed (within 5-days post-treatment) from the blood into the bone compartment based on the substantial decrease in WB and RBC Pb concentration, and the concurrent increase in bone Pb following repeated exposure at all dose levels. Although there is clear variability in the observed Pb concentrations in plasma and saliva, there was a reasonable correlation (r2=0.922) between the average Pb concentrations in these biological matrices which was consistent with previous observations. The single oral dose of Pb-acetate resulted in a decrease in salivary pH which recovered by 24 hr post-dosing and a decrease in ?-amylase enzyme activity which did recover within 5-days of ceasing exposure. It is currently unclear what impact these slight functional changes may or may not have on Pb salivary clearance rates. These

  15. Development of immunity against viral and bacterial antigens after repeated exposures to suberythemal doses of ultraviolet light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Snopov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of ultraviolet (UV radiation on human infectious immunity are not well studied. On the one hand, solar and artificial UU sources have been shown to change cytokine levels in human skin, lymphocyte subpopulation counts in parepheral blood, lymphocyte DNA synthesis and prolifarative response to mitogens. On the other hand, there are just only one or two observations suggesting an influence of UV radiation on human infection course. For instance, UV irradiations have been reported to induce a reccurence of orofacial vesicular lesions caused by herpes siplex virus. Moreover, there is a lack of data concerning immune effects of suberythtemal doses of UV in spite of a long history of using them by Russian prophylactic medicine. In this work we questioned whether such suberythemal UV exposures can affect the immune responses of children to infectious conjunctivitis, to simultaneous measles and polio vaccinations and to simultaneous polio and diphtheria-tetanus vaccinations. In peripheral blood of vaccinated children we examined leukocyte counts (monocytes, neutrophils, eosinophils, lymphocytes, percentages of lymphocyte subpopulations (CD3+, CD20+, CD4+, CD8+, CD25+, HLADR+, concentrations of cytokines (IL-1 beta, TNF-alpha, IFN- amma и IL-10, DNA-synthetic activity of lymphocytes and titres of antibodies against measles and diphtheria toxin. We observed no local or systemic reactions to the vaccines in the UV-group while a moderate rise in body temperature occured in several children from unexposed group. In the blood of childeren from UV-group we found increases in CD25+ и HLADR+ cell percentages, IL- 1 beta and IL-10 concentrations, PWMinduced DNA synthesis in mononuclears, and no decreases in formation of antibodies against measles and diphreria. We concluded that suberythemal UV exposures of children modulated their further responses to imminisations perhaps through the activation of a T helper 2-like

  16. Greater sensitivity to novelty in rats is associated with increased motor impulsivity following repeated exposure to a stimulating environment: implications for the etiology of impulse control deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferland, Jacqueline-Marie N; Zeeb, Fiona D; Yu, Katrina; Kaur, Sukhbir; Taves, Matthew D; Winstanley, Catharine A

    2014-12-01

    Heightened motor impulsivity and increased novelty-seeking commonly co-occur in psychiatric disorders, including drug addiction. However, the relationship between these two phenomena remains unclear. One-time tests of novelty sensitivity commonly used in preclinical experiments, such as the open-field or novel-object test, fail to capture the fact that novelty-seekers repeatedly experience novel, stimulating situations. The present study therefore investigated whether repeated exposure to a novel, stimulating environment (SE) altered impulsive action. Male Long-Evans rats were trained to perform the five-choice serial reaction time task (5CSRTT) which measures motor impulsivity in the form of premature responding as well as attention and motivation. Animals were then exposed to a novel SE (1 h/day for 16 days) immediately prior to the 5CSRTT. Significant increases in premature responding were observed in a subgroup of reactive animals termed high responders (HR-SE). These rats were not more impulsive at baseline, and levels of impulsivity normalised once exposure to the SE was discontinued. No other aspect of 5CSRTT performance was affected by the SE challenge. We also determined that HR-SE rats were hyperactive in a novel environment. Biochemical analyses revealed changes in gene and protein expression within the dorsal hippocampus of HR-SE rats, including decreases in mRNA encoding the dopamine D1 receptor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. These results indicate a novel mechanism by which impulsivity and novelty-reactivity interact that may enhance addiction vulnerability synergistically. Furthermore, studying such context-induced impulsivity may provide insight into the process by which environmental load precipitates psychiatric symptoms in impulse control disorders.

  17. Effects of repeated low-dose exposure of the nerve agent VX on monoamine levels in different brain structures in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziani, S; Christin, D; Daulon, S; Breton, P; Perrier, N; Taysse, L

    2014-05-01

    In a previous report, alterations of the serotonin metabolism were previously reported in mice intoxicated with repeated low doses of soman. In order to better understand the effects induced by repeated low-dose exposure to organophosphorus compounds on physiological and behavioural functions, the levels of endogenous monoamines (serotonin and dopamine) in different brain areas in mice intoxicated with sublethal dose of (O-ethyl-S-[2(di-isopropylamino) ethyl] methyl phosphonothioate) (VX) were analysed by HPLC method with electrochemical detection. Animals were injected once a day for three consecutive days with 0.10 LD50 of VX (5 μg/kg, i.p). Neither severe signs of cholinergic toxicity nor pathological changes in brain tissue of exposed animals were observed. Cholinesterase (ChE) activity was only inhibited in plasma (a maximum of 30% inhibition 24 h after the last injection of VX), but remained unchanged in the brain. Serotonin and dopamine (DA) metabolism appeared significantly modified. During the entire period of investigation, at least one of the three parameters investigated (i.e. DA and DOPAC levels and DOPAC/DA ratio) was modified. During the toxic challenge, an increase of the serotonin metabolism was noted in hippocampus (HPC), hypothalamus/thalamus, pons medulla and cerebellum (CER). This increase was maintained 4 weeks after exposure in HPC, pons medulla and CER whereas a decrease in cortex 3 weeks after the toxic challenge was observed. The lack of correlation between brain ChE activity and neurochemical outcomes points out to independent mechanisms. The involvement in possibly long-lasting behavioural disorders is discussed.

  18. Biochemical and histopathological changes in the kidney and adrenal gland of rats following repeated exposure to lambda-cyhalothrin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassina Khaldoun Oularbi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Lambda-cyhalothrin (LCT is a type II pyrethroid insecticide widely used in pest management. This study was undertaken to evaluate the toxic effects of LCT on the kidneys and adrenal glands of rats after subacute exposure. Twenty-eight 6-week-old male albino Rattus norvegicus rats were randomly assigned to four groups. Group 1 was the control group, which received distilled water. The experimental groups 2, 3 and 4 received 20.4, 30.6 and 61.2 mg/kg body weight, respectively, of LCT, administered orally over 28 days. The effects of the insecticide on various biochemical parameters were evaluated at 14 and 28 days. Histopathological studies were carried out in the kidneys and adrenal glands at the end of the experiment. Lambda-cyhalothrin, as a pyrethroid insecticide, induced significant increases (P≤0.05 in plasma urea, creatinine, uric acid and glucose concentrations, and alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activities after 14 and 28 days. In the rat plasma samples after 28 days, residual concentrations of LCT 1R, cis,

  19. Intermittency and exotic channels

    CERN Document Server

    Bialas, A

    1994-01-01

    It is pointed out that accurate measurements of short-range two-particle correlations in like-charge K\\pi and in \\pi^ 0\\pi^ 0 channels should be very helpful in determining the origin of the \\lq\\lq intermittency\\rq\\rq\\ phenomenon observed recently for the like-charge pion pairs.

  20. INFLUENCE OF MORINGA OLEIFERA (DRUM-STICK FRUIT EXTRACT ON HAEMATOLOGICAL PROFILE FOLLOWING REPEATED EXPOSURE TO LOW LEVELS OF ARSENIC THROUGH FEED ON RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaibhav R. Pachade

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Effect of Moringa oleifera fruits hot methanolic extract (MFE, if any, in minimizing the adverse reactions of repeated exposure to arsenic trioxide (AT in feed was investigated in Wistar rats with reference to haematological profile. Three groups of rats each containing 10 (5male+5female were used. The group I served as negative control. Rats of group II were fed arsenic trioxide (AT alone @ 100 ppm in feed while those of group III simultaneously received AT (@100 ppm and MFE (50 mg/kg/day for 28 days. Blood samples were collected from retroorbital plexus for estimation of hematological parameters (haemoglobin, PCV, TEC, MCH, MCHC, MCV of different groups on 0 day, 15th day and 29th day respectively. Exposure to AT through feed in group II resulted in significant (P<0.05 decrease in haemoglobin, TEC and MCHC, accompanied by increased MCV, with no significant alteration of PCV or MCH of the rats. While rats of group III treated with AT (@100 ppm and MFE (50 mg/kg/day also resulted in same consequences as it was in group II but it was slightly less than that of group II suggesting of mild non significant protective effect.

  1. Repeated PM2.5 exposure inhibits BEAS-2B cell P53 expression through ROS-Akt-DNMT3B pathway-mediated promoter hypermethylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei; Tian, Dongdong; He, Jun; Wang, Yimei; Zhang, Lijun; Cui, Lan; Jia, Li; Zhang, Li; Li, Lizhong; Shu, Yulei; Yu, Shouzhong; Zhao, Jun; Yuan, Xiaoyan; Peng, Shuangqing

    2016-04-12

    Long-term exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) has been reported to be closely associated with the increased lung cancer risk in populations, but the mechanisms underlying PM-associated carcinogenesis are not yet clear. Previous studies have indicated that aberrant epigenetic alterations, such as genome-wide DNA hypomethylation and gene-specific DNA hypermethylation contribute to lung carcinogenesis. And silence or mutation of P53 tumor suppressor gene is the most prevalent oncogenic driver in lung cancer development. To explore the effects of PM2.5 on global and P53 promoter methylation changes and the mechanisms involved, we exposed human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) to low concentrations of PM2.5 for 10 days. Our results indicated that PM2.5-induced global DNA hypomethylation was accompanied by reduced DNMT1 expression. PM2.5 also induced hypermethylation of P53 promoter and inhibited its expression by increasing DNMT3B protein level. Furthermore, ROS-induced activation of Akt was involved in PM2.5-induced increase in DNMT3B. In conclusion, our results strongly suggest that repeated exposure to PM2.5 induces epigenetic silencing of P53 through ROS-Akt-DNMT3B pathway-mediated promoter hypermethylation, which not only provides a possible explanation for PM-induced lung cancer, but also may help to identify specific interventions to prevent PM-induced lung carcinogenesis.

  2. Repeated inhalation exposure of rats to an anionic high molecular weight polymer aerosol: application of prediction models to better understand pulmonary effects and modes of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauluhn, Jürgen

    2014-08-01

    Opposed to the wealth of information available for kinetic lung overload-related effects of poorly-soluble, low-toxicity particles (PSP), only limited information is available on biodegradable high molecular weight (HMW) organic polymers (molecular weight >20,000 Da). It is hypothesized that such types of polymers may exert a somewhat similar volume displacement-related mode of action in alveolar macrophages as PSP; however, with a differing biokinetics of the material retained in the lung. This polyurethane polymer was examined in single and 2-/13-week repeated exposure rat inhalation bioassays. The design of studies was adapted to that commonly applied for PSP. Rats were nose-only exposed for 6h/day for the respective study duration, followed by 1-, 2- and 4-week postexposure periods in the single, 2- and 13-week studies, respectively. While the findings in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and histopathology were consistent with those typical of PSP, they appear to be superimposed by pulmonary phospholipidosis and a much faster reversibility of pulmonary inflammation. Kinetic modeling designed to estimate the accumulated lung burden of biopersistent PSP was also suitable to simulate the overload-dependent outcomes of this biodegradable polymer as long as the faster than normal elimination kinetics was observed and an additional 'void space volume' was added to adjust for the phagocytosed additional fraction of pulmonary phospholipids. The changes observed following repeated inhalation exposure appear to be consistent with a retention-related etiopathology (kinetic overload). In summary, this study did not reveal evidence of any polymer-specific pulmonary irritation or parenchymal injury. Taking all findings into account, 7 mg polymer/m(3) (exposure 6h/day, 5-days/week on 13 consecutive weeks) constitutes the point of departure for lower respiratory tract findings that represent a transitional state from effects attributable to an overload-dependent pulmonary

  3. Effects of repeated whole-body cold exposures on serum concentrations of growth hormone, thyrotropin, prolactin and thyroid hormones in healthy women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolander, Juhani; Leppäluoto, Juhani; Westerlund, Tarja; Oksa, Juha; Dugue, Benoit; Mikkelsson, Marja; Ruokonen, Aimo

    2009-06-01

    Cold therapy is used to relieve pain and inflammatory symptoms. Humoral changes may account for the pain alleviation related to the cold exposures. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of two types of cold therapy, winter swimming in ice-cold water (WS) and whole body cryotherapy (WBC), on the serum levels of the growth hormone, prolactin, thyrotropin and free fractions of thyroid hormones (fT3, fT4). One group of healthy females (n = 6) was exposed to WS (water 0-2 degrees C) for 20 s and another group (n = 6) to WBC (air 110 degrees C) for 2 min, three times a week for 12 weeks. Blood samples used for the hormone measurements were taken on weeks 1, 4 and 12 before and 35 min after the cold exposures and on the days of the respective weeks, when the cold exposures were not performed. During the WS treatments, serum thyrotropin increased significantly at 35 min on weeks 1 (p < 0.01) and 4 (p < 0.05), but the responses were within the health-related reference interval. During the WS, the serum prolactin measured at 35 min on week 12 was lower than during the control treatment, and no changes in fT3 or fT4 were observed. During the WBC, no changes in the serum levels of the studied hormones were observed during the 12 weeks. In conclusion, repeated WS and WBC treatments for healthy females do not lead to disorders related to altered secretions of the growth hormone, prolactin, thyrotropin, or thyroid hormones.

  4. Fate in intermittent claudication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelnes, Rolf; Gaardsting, O; Hougaard Jensen, K

    1986-01-01

    The fate of 257 consecutive patients (100 women) aged 36-85 years (mean 65) first seen with intermittent claudication in 1977 was analysed after a mean of 6.5 (SD 0.5) years. When first seen none of the patients complained of rest pain or had ulcers or gangrenous lesions on the feet. At follow up....... The rate of clinical progression of the arteriosclerotic disease (that is, rest pain or gangrene) of the worst affected leg was 7.5% in the first year after referral. Thereafter the rate was 2.2% a year. An ankle systolic blood pressure below 70 mm Hg, a toe systolic blood pressure below 40 mm Hg......, or an ankle/arm pressure index below 50% were individually significantly associated with progression of the arteriosclerotic disease. These findings show the importance of peripheral blood pressure measurements in the management of patients with intermittent claudication due to arteriosclerotic disease....

  5. The Effects of a Single Whole-Body Cryotherapy Exposure on Physiological, Performance, and Perceptual Responses of Professional Academy Soccer Players After Repeated Sprint Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Mark; Birch, Jack; Love, Thomas; Cook, Christian J; Bracken, Richard M; Taylor, Tom; Swift, Eamon; Cockburn, Emma; Finn, Charlie; Cunningham, Daniel; Wilson, Laura; Kilduff, Liam P

    2017-02-01

    Russell, M, Birch, J, Love, T, Cook, CJ, Bracken, RM, Taylor, T, Swift, E, Cockburn, E, Finn, C, Cunningham, D, Wilson, L, and Kilduff, LP. The effects of a single whole-body cryotherapy exposure on physiological, performance, and perceptual responses of professional academy soccer players after repeated sprint exercise. J Strength Cond Res 31(2): 415-421, 2017-In professional youth soccer players, the physiological, performance, and perceptual effects of a single whole-body cryotherapy (WBC) session performed shortly after repeated sprint exercise were investigated. In a randomized, counterbalanced, and crossover design, 14 habituated English Premier League academy soccer players performed 15 × 30 m sprints (each followed by a 10 m forced deceleration) on 2 occasions. Within 20 minutes of exercise cessation, players entered a WBC chamber (Cryo: 30 seconds at -60° C, 120 seconds at -135° C) or remained seated (Con) indoors in temperate conditions (∼25° C). Blood and saliva samples, peak power output (countermovement jump), and perceptual indices of recovery and soreness were assessed pre-exercise and immediately, 2-hour and 24-hour postexercise. When compared with Con, a greater testosterone response was observed at 2-hour (+32.5 ± 32.3 pg·ml, +21%) and 24-hour (+50.4 ± 48.9 pg·ml, +28%) postexercise (both P = 0.002) in Cryo (trial × treatment interaction: P = 0.001). No between-trial differences were observed for other salivary (cortisol and testosterone/cortisol ratio), blood (lactate and creatine kinase), performance (peak power output), or perceptual (recovery or soreness) markers (all trial × treatment interactions: P > 0.05); all of which were influenced by exercise (time effects: all P ≤ 0.05). A single session of WBC performed within 20 minutes of repeated sprint exercise elevated testosterone concentrations for 24 hours but did not affect any other performance, physiological, or perceptual measurements taken. Although unclear, WBC may be

  6. Feigning Acute Intermittent Porphyria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rania Elkhatib

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP is an autosomal dominant genetic defect in heme synthesis. Patients with this illness can have episodic life-threatening attacks characterized by abdominal pain, neurological deficits, and psychiatric symptoms. Feigning this illness has not been reported in the English language literature to date. Here, we report on a patient who presented to the hospital with an acute attack of porphyria requesting opiates. Diligent assessment of extensive prior treatment records revealed thirteen negative tests for AIP.

  7. Detection of the effects of repeated dose combined propoxur and heavy metal exposure by measurement of certain toxicological, haematological and immune function parameters in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Institóris, L; Siroki, O; Undeger, U; Basaran, N; Banerjee, B D; Dési, I

    2001-06-21

    In the present study, an immunotoxicity test system, containing general toxicological (body weight gain, organ weights), haematological (WBC,RBC, Ht, mean cell volume of the RBCs, cell content of the femoral bone marrow), and immune function (PFC assay, DTH reaction) investigations, was used for detection the effects of a 4 weeks repeated low dose combined oral exposure of male Wistar rats with propoxur and the heavy metals arsenic or mercury. Two doses of the compounds were used: a higher one (the lowest dose which resulted in significant change of at least one parameter examined in previous dose-effect experiments), and a lower one (the highest dose which proved to be non-effective). The applied doses were: 8.51 and 0.851 mg kg(-1) of propoxur, 13.3 and 3.33 mg kg(-1) of NaAsO(2), and 3.20 and 0.40 mg kg(-1) of HgCl(2). In the combination treatment, the high dose of propoxur was combined with the low dose of arsenic or mercury, and the high doses of each heavy metals were combined with the low dose of propoxur. The main finding of this study was that some of the combinations significantly altered the relative weight of liver, adrenals and kidneys, related to both the untreated and the high dose internal control. Among the immune functions examined, only the PFC content of the spleen showed a trend of changes in certain combinations versus the corresponding high dose control. According to the present results, combined exposure with propoxur and the heavy metals examined can modify the detection limit of the single compounds and/or may alter their toxic effects.

  8. Controlling urinary tract infections associated with intermittent bladder catheterization in geriatric hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, R; Gaujard, S; Pergay, V; Pornon, P; Martin Gaujard, G; Vieux, C; Bourguignon, L

    2015-07-01

    Controlling urinary tract infections (UTIs) associated with intermittent catheterization in geriatric patients. After a local epidemiological study identified high rates of UTI, a multi-disciplinary working group implemented and evaluated corrective measures. In 2009, a one-month prospective study measured the incidence of UTI, controlled for risk factors and exposure, in six geriatric hospitals. In 2010, a self-administered questionnaire on practices was administered to physicians and nurses working in these geriatric units. In 2011, the working group developed a multi-modal programme to: improve understanding of micturition, measurement of bladder volume and indications for catheter drainage; limit available medical devices; and improve prescription and traceability procedures. Detailed training was provided to all personnel on all sites. The epidemiological study was repeated in 2012 to assess the impact of the programme. Over 1500 patients were included in the 2009 study. The incidence of acquired infection was 4.8%. The infection rate was higher in patients with intermittent catheters than in patients with indwelling catheters (29.7 vs 9.9 UTI per 100 patients, P = 0.1013) which contradicts the literature. In 2010, the 269 responses to the questionnaire showed that staff did not consider catheterization to place patients at risk of infection, staff had poor knowledge of the recommended indications and techniques, and the equipment varied widely between units. Following implementation of the programme, the study was repeated in 2012 with over 1500 patients. The frequency of UTI in patients with intermittent catheters fell to rates in the published literature. Multi-modal programmes are an effective means to control UTI. Copyright © 2015 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Pediatric Brain: Repeated Exposure to Linear Gadolinium-based Contrast Material Is Associated with Increased Signal Intensity at Unenhanced T1-weighted MR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flood, Thomas F; Stence, Nicholas V; Maloney, John A; Mirsky, David M

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether repeated exposure of the pediatric brain to a linear gadolinium-based contrast agent (GBCA) is associated with an increase in signal intensity (SI) relative to that in GBCA-naive control subjects at unenhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Materials and Methods This single-center, retrospective study was approved by the institutional review board and compliant with HIPAA. The authors evaluated 46 pediatric patients who had undergone at least three GBCA-enhanced MR examinations (30 patients for two-group analysis and 16 for pre- and post-GBCA exposure comparisons) and 57 age-matched GBCA-naive control subjects. The SI in the globus pallidus, thalamus, dentate nucleus, and pons was measured at unenhanced T1-weighted MR imaging. Globus pallidus-thalamus and dentate nucleus-pons SI ratios were calculated and compared between groups and relative to total cumulative gadolinium dose, age, sex, and number of and mean time between GBCA-enhanced examinations. Analysis included the Wilcoxon signed rank test, Wilcoxon rank sum test, and Spearman correlation coefficient. Results Patients who underwent multiple GBCA-enhanced examinations had increased SI ratios within the dentate nucleus (mean SI ratio ± standard error of the mean for two-group comparison: 1.007 ± 0.0058 for GBCA-naive group and 1.046 ± 0.0060 for GBCA-exposed group [P mean SI ratio for pre- and post-GBCA comparison: 0.995 ± 0.0062 for pre-GBCA group and 1.035 ± 0.0063 for post-GBCA group [P mean SI ratio for two-group comparison: 1.131 ± 0.0070 for GBCA-naive group and 1.014 ± 0.0091 for GBCA-exposed group [P = .21]; mean SI ratio for pre- and post-GBCA comparison: 1.068 ± 0.0094 for pre-GBCA group and 1.093 ± 0.0134 for post-GBCA group [P = .12]). There was a significant correlation between dentate nucleus SI and total cumulative gadolinium dose (r = 0.4; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.03, 0.67; P = .03), but not between dentate nucleus SI and patient age

  10. Intermittency in Complex Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Mahjoub, Otman; Redondo, Jose M.

    2017-04-01

    Experimental results of the complex turbulent wake of a cilinder in 2D [1] and 3D flows [2] were used to investigate the scaling of structure functions, similar research was also performed on wave propagation and breaking in the Ocean [3], in the the stratified Atmosphere (ABL) [4] and in a 100large flume (UPC) for both regular and irregular waves, where long time series of waves propagating and generating breaking turbulence velocity rms and higher order measurements were taken in depth. [3,5] by means of a velocimeter SONTEK3-D. The probability distribution functions of the velocity differences and their non Gaussian distribution related to the energy spectrum indicate that irregularity is an important source of turbulence. From Kolmogorov's K41 and K61 intermittency correction: the p th-order longitudinal velocity structure function δul at scale l in the inertial range of three-dimensional fully developed turbulence is related by ⟨δup⟩ = ⟨(u(x+ l)- u(x))p⟩ ˜ ɛp0/3lp/3 l where ⟨...⟩ represents the spatial average over flow domain, with ɛ0 the mean energy dissipation per unit mass and l is the separation distance. The importance of the random nature of the energy dissipation led to the K62 theory of intermittency, but locality and non-homogeneity are key issues. p p/3 p/3 ξd ⟨δul⟩ ˜ ⟨ɛl ⟩l ˜ l and ξp = p 3 + τp/3 , where now ɛl is a fractal energy dissipation at scale l, τp/3 is the scaling of and ξp is the scaling exponent of the velocity structure function of order p. Both in K41 and K62, the structure functions of third order related to skewness is ξ3 = 1. But this is not true either. We show that scaling exponents ξp do deviate from early studies that only investigated homogeneous turbulence, where a large inertial range dominates. The use of multi-fractal analysis and improvements on Structure function calculations on standard Enhanced mixing is an essential property of turbulence and efforts to alter and to control

  11. Prospective study of leptospirosis transmission in an urban slum community: role of poor environment in repeated exposures to the Leptospira agent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ridalva D M Felzemburgh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leptospirosis has emerged as an urban health problem as slum settlements have rapidly spread worldwide and created conditions for rat-borne transmission. Prospective studies have not been performed to determine the disease burden, identify risk factors for infection and provide information needed to guide interventions in these marginalized communities. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We enrolled and followed a cohort of 2,003 residents from a slum community in the city of Salvador, Brazil. Baseline and one-year serosurveys were performed to identify primary and secondary Leptospira infections, defined as respectively, seroconversion and four-fold rise in microscopic agglutination titers. We used multinomial logistic regression models to evaluate risk exposures for acquiring primary and secondary infection. A total of 51 Leptospira infections were identified among 1,585 (79% participants who completed the one-year follow-up protocol. The crude infection rate was 37.8 per 1,000 person-years. The secondary infection rate was 2.3 times higher than that of primary infection rate (71.7 and 31.1 infections per 1,000 person-years, respectively. Male gender (OR 2.88; 95% CI 1.40-5.91 and lower per capita household income (OR 0.54; 95% CI, 0.30-0.98 for an increase of $1 per person per day were independent risk factors for primary infection. In contrast, the 15-34 year age group (OR 10.82, 95% CI 1.38-85.08, and proximity of residence to an open sewer (OR 0.95; 0.91-0.99 for an increase of 1 m distance were significant risk factors for secondary infection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study found that slum residents had high risk (>3% per year for acquiring a Leptospira infection. Re-infection is a frequent event and occurs in regions of slum settlements that are in proximity to open sewers. Effective prevention of leptospirosis will therefore require interventions that address the infrastructure deficiencies that contribute to repeated

  12. Critical velocity during continuous and intermittent exercises in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthoin, Serge; Baquet, Georges; Dupont, Gregory; Van Praagh, Emmanuel

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to apply the "critical velocity" concept to short intermittent high-intensity running exercises in prepubescent girls and boys and to compare the running performances obtained either by intermittent or continuous exercise runs. Eleven 8 to 11-year-old children underwent a maximal graded field test to determine peak oxygen uptake (peakVO2) and maximal aerobic velocity (MAV). During the six following sessions, they randomly performed three continuous runs (90, 100, and 110% of MAV) and three intermittent runs (120, 130, and 140% of MAV) until exhaustion. Intermittent exercises consisted of repeated 15 s runs each one separated by a 15 s passive recovery interval. For continuous as well as intermittent exercises, distance versus time to exhaustion (TTE) relationships were calculated to determine continuous (CVc) and intermittent (CVi) critical velocities. Values for peakVO2 and MAV were 45.8 +/- 5.3 ml x kg(-1) x min(-1) and 10.5 +/- 1.0 km h(-1), respectively. For the whole population, a significant relationship was found between the distance to exhaustion (DTE) and TTE for continuous (r2= 0.99, P < 0.05) and intermittent exercises (r2 = 0.99, P < 0.05). Significant relationships were found between peakVO2 and both CVc (r2= 0.60, P < 0.01) and CVi (r2= 0.47, P < 0.05). In conclusion, as for continuous exercises, a linear relationship was found between DTE and TTE for short high-intensity intermittent exercises. CVc was significantly related to peakVO2, while a significant lower relationship was found between peakVO2 and CVi.

  13. Comment on "Intermittent plate tectonics?".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korenaga, Jun

    2008-06-06

    Silver and Behn (Reports, 4 January 2008, p. 85) proposed that intermittent plate tectonics may resolve a long-standing paradox in Earth's thermal evolution. However, their analysis misses one important term, which subsequently brings their main conclusion into question. In addition, the Phanerozoic eustasy record indicates that the claimed effect of intermittency is probably weak.

  14. The 30-15 intermittent fitness test: accuracy for individualizing interval training of young intermittent sport players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchheit, Martin

    2008-03-01

    The objective of this study was to gather evidence supporting the accuracy of the 30-15 Intermittent Fitness Test (30-15IFT) for individualizing interval training of young intermittent sport players. In 59 young intermittent sport players (age, 16.2 +/- 2.3 years), we observed the relationships between the maximal running speed (MRS) reached at the end of the 30-15IFT (MRS30-15IFT) and physiological variables elicited by shuttle intermittent runs, including maximal oxygen uptake, explosive power of lower limbs, and the ability to repeat intense exercise bouts through cardiorespiratory recovery kinetics during exercise. To observe the capacity of the 30-15IFT to prescribe suitable running intensities for interval training sessions, we compared heart rates (HRs) reached during 3 series of intermittent runs, where distances were set according to the MRS30-15IFT and to MRS reached with 2 popular continuous field tests: the University of Montreal track test and the 20-m shuttle run test. The results show that the MRS30-15IFT is significantly correlated with all physiological variables elicited by shuttle intermittent runs (P intermittent runs, HR recorded during the runs based on MRS30-15IFT presented significantly less interindividual variation than when the continuously determined MRS were used as reference speeds. In conclusion, we can say that the 30-15IFT leads to an MRS that simultaneously takes into account various physiological qualities elicited when performing shuttle intermittent runs. For scheduling interval training sessions, the MRS30-15IFT appears to be an accurate reference speed for getting players with different physiological profiles to a similar level of cardiorespiratory demand and thus for standardizing training content.

  15. Metabolic Effects of Intermittent Fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Ruth E; Sears, Dorothy D

    2017-08-21

    The objective of this review is to provide an overview of intermittent fasting regimens, summarize the evidence on the health benefits of intermittent fasting, and discuss physiological mechanisms by which intermittent fasting might lead to improved health outcomes. A MEDLINE search was performed using PubMed and the terms "intermittent fasting," "fasting," "time-restricted feeding," and "food timing." Modified fasting regimens appear to promote weight loss and may improve metabolic health. Several lines of evidence also support the hypothesis that eating patterns that reduce or eliminate nighttime eating and prolong nightly fasting intervals may result in sustained improvements in human health. Intermittent fasting regimens are hypothesized to influence metabolic regulation via effects on (a) circadian biology, (b) the gut microbiome, and (c) modifiable lifestyle behaviors, such as sleep. If proven to be efficacious, these eating regimens offer promising nonpharmacological approaches to improving health at the population level, with multiple public health benefits.

  16. Acute intermittent porphyria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrick, Ariane L; McColl, Kenneth E L

    2005-04-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is characterised by neurovisceral crises the most common clinical presentation of which is abdominal pain. It is an autosomal dominant condition with incomplete penetrance and is potentially life-threatening. The key point in management is to suspect and confirm the diagnosis as early as possible in order to treat the attack and to avoid inappropriate treatments which may exacerbate the crisis. In this chapter we briefly outline the haem biosynthetic pathway and how deficiencies in individual enzymes give rise to the different porphyrias. We then describe the clinical features and diagnosis of AIP, followed by a discussion of pathogenesis, highlighting advances in the molecular biology of AIP and introducing the debate as to whether neurovisceral crises might result from porphyrin precursor neurotoxicity or from haem deficiency. Finally we discuss management, including family screening, avoidance of triggering factors, analgesia, maintenance of a high calorie intake, and administration of haem derivatives.

  17. Intermittent hypoxia-activated cyclooxygenase pathway: role in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautier-Veyret, Elodie; Arnaud, Claire; Bäck, Magnus; Pépin, Jean-Louis; Petri, Marcelo H; Baguet, Jean-Philippe; Tamisier, Renaud; Lévy, Patrick; Stanke-Labesque, Françoise

    2013-08-01

    Intermittent hypoxia, the main stimulus of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), induces inflammation, leading to early atherosclerosis. Whether the cyclooxygenase (COX) pathway contributes to intermittent hypoxia-induced atherosclerosis remains to be determined. We studied the effects of 8-weeks of intermittent hypoxia exposure on COX-pathway gene expression and atherosclerosis, and the influence of COX-1 inhibition by SC-560 on atherosclerosis progression in aortas of apolipoprotein E(-/-) mice. Urinary 11-dehydrothromboxane B2 (11-dTXB2) was assessed in 50 OSA subjects free of cardiovascular risk factor matched for age and body mass index with 25 controls, and 56 OSA with cardiovascular risk factor. Intermittent hypoxia significantly increased atherosclerotic lesion sizes, mRNA levels of COX-1 and thromboxane synthase (TXBS). Lesion sizes correlated to COX-1 (r = 0.654, p = 0.0003) and TXBS (r = 0.693, pintermittent hypoxia mice only (p = 0.04). Urinary 11-dTXB2 was similar in OSA subjects free of cardiovascular risk factor and controls, but was increased by 13% (p = 0.007) in OSA subjects with cardiovascular risk factor compared with those without. Although OSA itself was not associated with increased urinary 11-dTXB2 concentration, the COX-1 pathway was activated in intermittent hypoxia-exposed mice and in OSA subjects presenting with cardiovascular risk factor, and may contribute to intermittent hypoxia-induced atherogenesis. COX-1 inhibition could be of clinical interest in the prevention of cardiovascular morbidity in OSA.

  18. Assessment of the Effects of Acute and Repeated Exposure to Blast Overpressure in Rodents: Towards a Greater Understanding of Blast and the Potential Ramifications for Injury in Humans Exposed to Blast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Thomas Ahlers

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI resulting from exposure to improvised explosive devices (IEDs has fueled a requirement to develop animals models that mirror this condition using exposure to blast overpressure (BOP. En route to developing a model of repeated exposure to BOP we sought to initially characterize the effects of acute BOP exposure in rodents, focusing specifically on the levels of BOP exposure that produced clinical mTBI symptoms. We first measured BOP effects on gross motor function on a balance beam. Separate groups of unanesthetized rats were exposed (in different orientations to 40 kPa, 75 kPa and 120 kPa BOP exposure inside a pneumatically driven shock tube. Results demonstrated that rats exposed to 120 kPa demonstrated transient alterations or loss of consciousness indicated by a transient loss of righting and by increased latencies on the balance beam. The 120 kPa exposure was the threshold for overt pathology for acute BOP exposure with approximately 30% of rats presenting with evidence of subdural hemorrhage and cortical contusions. All animals exposed to 120 kPa BOP manifested evidence of significant pulmonary hemorrhage. Anterograde memory deficits were observed in rats exposed to 75 kPa facing the BOP wave and rats exposed to 120 kPa in the lateral (side orientation. We next assessed repeated exposure to either lateral or frontal 40 kPa BOP in anesthetized rats, once per day for 12 days. Results showed that repeated exposure in the frontal, but not side, orientation to the BOP wave produced a transitory learning deficit on a Morris water maze (MWM task as shown by significantly longer latencies to reach the submerged platform in the second and third blocks of a four block session. Implications of these data are discussed in relation to the manifestation of mTBI in military personnel exposed to IEDs. Finally, we suggest that there are multiple types of brain injury from blast.

  19. The preventive effect of vitamin C on the cellular and functional integrity of kidney cells in rats following repeated exposure to paraquat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Nnamdi Okolonkwo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Paraquat (PQ is a bipyridylium herbicide that is applied around trees in orchards and between crop rows to control broad-leaved and grassy weeds. Its oxidation results in the formation of superoxides which causes damage to cellular components. In this study, we determined the antioxidant effect vitamin C has on the cellular integrity of kidney function in rats following repeated exposure to PQ. Ninety-six male rats, grouped twelve rats per subgroup (A, Avit.c, B, Bvit.c, C, Cvit.c, D and Dvit.c were intraperitoneally injected with different sublethal increasing doses (0, 0, 2, 2, 4, 4, 6 and 6 mg/kg body weight of PQ respectively on biweekly (14 days intervals over a period of three months (84 days. Subsequently, the subgrouped animals (Avit.c, Bvit.c, Cvit.c and Dvit.c were maintained orally with 1 g/L vitamin C, while the other subgrouped animals (A, B, C and D received drinking water with negligible vitamin content throughout the study period. At the end of each monthly (28 days treatment, four animals per subgroup were selected. Urine samples were collected from each of the selected rats, after which each of the animals were anaesthetized with gaseous isoflurane and 5 mL of blood samples were collected using cardiac puncture procedure. The animals were later decapitated and their kidneys harvested. The samples collected were analyzed for urine [specific gravity (SG, pH, protein and glucose], blood (urea, creatinine, total protein and glucose, and the histological studies on kidney slides. The dose and exposure- time dependent PQ toxicity resulted in the reduction in urinary pH, elevation in urinary SG, and the detectable presence of protein and glucose in urine. It also caused marked elevation in serum urea and creatinine levels with reduction in serum protein and glucose levels and alterations in the cellular integrity of the renal architecture, especially the glomeruli and tubular tissues. Treatments on the PQ insulted animals with vitamin

  20. Intermittent hypoxia: a low-risk research tool with therapeutic value in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateika, Jason H; El-Chami, Mohamad; Shaheen, David; Ivers, Blake

    2015-03-01

    Intermittent hypoxia has generally been perceived as a high-risk stimulus, particularly in the field of sleep medicine, because it is thought to initiate detrimental cardiovascular, respiratory, cognitive, and metabolic outcomes. In contrast, the link between intermittent hypoxia and beneficial outcomes has received less attention, perhaps because it is not universally understood that outcome measures following exposure to intermittent hypoxia may be linked to the administered dose. The present review is designed to emphasize the less recognized beneficial outcomes associated with intermittent hypoxia. The review will consider the role intermittent hypoxia has in cardiovascular and autonomic adaptations, respiratory motor plasticity, and cognitive function. Each section will highlight the literature that contributed to the belief that intermittent hypoxia leads primarily to detrimental outcomes. The second segment of each section will consider the possible risks associated with experimentally rather than naturally induced intermittent hypoxia. Finally, the body of literature indicating that intermittent hypoxia initiates primarily beneficial outcomes will be considered. The overarching theme of the review is that the use of intermittent hypoxia in research investigations, coupled with reasonable safeguards, should be encouraged because of the potential benefits linked to the administration of a variety of low-risk intermittent hypoxia protocols.

  1. Prolonged Increase in the Sensitivity of the Posterior Ventral Tegmental Area to the Reinforcing Effects of Ethanol following Repeated Exposure to Cycles of Ethanol Access and Deprivation

    OpenAIRE

    Rodd, Zachary A.; Bell, Richard L.; McQueen, Victoria K.; Davids, Michelle R.; Hsu, Cathleen C.; Murphy, James M.; Li, Ting-Kai; Lumeng, Lawrence; McBride, William J.

    2005-01-01

    The posterior ventral tegmental area (VTA) is a neuroanatomical substrate mediating the reinforcing effects of ethanol in rats. Repeated alcohol deprivations produce robust ethanol intakes of alcohol-preferring (P) rats during relapse and increase the reinforcing effects of oral alcohol self-administration. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that alcohol drinking and repeated alcohol deprivations will increase the reinforcing effects of ethanol within the posterior VTA of ...

  2. Physical activity attenuates intermittent hypoxia-induced spatial learning deficits and oxidative stress

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gozal, David; Nair, Deepti; Goldbart, Aviv D

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to intermittent hypoxia (IH), such as occurs in sleep-disordered breathing, is associated with substantial cognitive impairments, oxidative stress and inflammation, and increased neuronal cell losses in brain regions underlying...

  3. Prevention of rectal SHIV transmission in macaques by daily or intermittent prophylaxis with emtricitabine and tenofovir.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gerardo García-Lerma

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the absence of an effective vaccine, HIV continues to spread globally, emphasizing the need for novel strategies to limit its transmission. Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP with antiretroviral drugs could prove to be an effective intervention strategy if highly efficacious and cost-effective PrEP modalities are identified. We evaluated daily and intermittent PrEP regimens of increasing antiviral activity in a macaque model that closely resembles human transmission. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We used a repeat-exposure macaque model with 14 weekly rectal virus challenges. Three drug treatments were given once daily, each to a different group of six rhesus macaques. Group 1 was treated subcutaneously with a human-equivalent dose of emtricitabine (FTC, group 2 received orally the human-equivalent dosing of both FTC and tenofovir-disoproxil fumarate (TDF, and group 3 received subcutaneously a similar dosing of FTC and a higher dose of tenofovir. A fourth group of six rhesus macaques (group 4 received intermittently a PrEP regimen similar to group 3 only 2 h before and 24 h after each weekly virus challenge. Results were compared to 18 control macaques that did not receive any drug treatment. The risk of infection in macaques treated in groups 1 and 2 was 3.8- and 7.8-fold lower than in untreated macaques (p = 0.02 and p = 0.008, respectively. All six macaques in group 3 were protected. Breakthrough infections had blunted acute viremias; drug resistance was seen in two of six animals. All six animals in group 4 that received intermittent PrEP were protected. CONCLUSIONS: This model suggests that single drugs for daily PrEP can be protective but a combination of antiretroviral drugs may be required to increase the level of protection. Short but potent intermittent PrEP can provide protection comparable to that of daily PrEP in this SHIV/macaque model. These findings support PrEP trials for HIV prevention in humans and identify promising Pr

  4. Intermedia and Intermittency

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    Veres Bálint

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available It is commonly known that medial reflections have been initiated by attempts to secure the borders of discrete medial forms and to define the modus operandi of each essentialized medial area. Later on, the focus of study has shifted to plurimedial formations and the interactions between predefined medial genres. In the last few decades, taxonomic approaches to various multi-, inter-, and transmedial phenomena dominated the discussions, which offered invaluable support in mapping the terrain, but at the same time hindered the analysis of the ephemeral, time-dependent aspects of plurimedial operations. While we explore the properties of each medial configuration, we lose sight of the actual historical drivers that produce ever-new configurations. My thesis is that any discourse on intermediality should be paralleled by a discourse on cultural intermittency, and consequently, media studies should involve an approach that focuses on the “ecosystem” of the constantly renewing media configurations from the point of view of their vitalizing potential and capability to trigger heightened experiences. This approach draws much inspiration from K. Ludwig Pfeiffer’s media anthropology that gives orientation in my paper.

  5. Intermittency in spiral Poiseuille flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heise, M; Abshagen, J; Menck, A; Pflster, G [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, University of Kiel, 24098 Kiel (Germany)

    2005-01-01

    The results of an experimental study on intermittent spiral vortices observed in a counter-rotating Taylor-Couette system with an additional axial through flow, i.e. Spiral-Poiseuille flow, are presented. Convectively unstable upstream propagating spiral vortices appear in the laminar basic flow from an oscillatory instability and in general become absolutely unstable at higher inner cylinder Reynolds number. It is found that at Reynolds numbers above the absolute stability border the spiral vortices become unstable and a complex flow state showing intermittent bursts appears. The intermittent flow state is characterised by an irregular alternation between clearly distinguishable 'laminar' phases corresponding to up-and downstream propagating spiral vortices as well as propagating Taylor vortices. For a sufficiently high rate of axial through flow it is found that intermittency can occur directly from the convectively unstable regime of the upstream propagating spiral vortices.

  6. Acute intermittent porphyria in the puerperium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sparić Radmila

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Acute intermittent porphyria emerges as a result of partial defect of porphobilinogen deaminase and is manifested by repeated episodes of somatic, psychiatric and neurological disorders. The disease is conducted via the autosomaldominant gene of variable penetration, so most of the carriers never experience seizures. Timely making of diagnosis, screening of blood relatives of the patient and education of patients on avoidance of provoking factors are the key to adequate treatment. Case Outline. A 23-year-old patient having born the third child was hospitalized due to pains in the abdomen and convulsive seizures nine days after the vaginal delivery. At admittance, she suffered a generalized convulsive seizure of clonic-tonic type. The patient immediately underwent a complete clinical, laboratory, bacteriological and ultrasound examination. Bearing in mind the fact that the patient had several convulsive seizures even after the given neurological therapy, haem-arginate was introduced into therapy during four days. The administration of haem-arginate led to the normalization of blood pressure, pulse and bowel function. The administration of haem-arginate led to the normalization of blood pressure, pulse and bowel function. The patient was treated by a team of doctors, in the intensive care ward, with the use of medicaments, which are allowed in the case of acute porphyria. Sixteen days after the admittance, with clean neurological status and gynaecological and ultra-sound findings, she was released for ambulatory treatment. Conclusion. The presented case exhibits the gravity of making a diagnosis of acute intermittent porphyria in puerperium and the necessity of multi-disciplinary approach in treating this disease. Acute intermittent porphyria should be considered in cases of ambiguous abdominal pain, as well as in patients having abdominal pains followed by neuro-psychiatric disorders.

  7. Coho salmon dependence on intermittent streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    P.J. Wigington; J.L. Ebersole; M.E. Colvin; S.G. Leibowitz; B. Miller; B. Hansen; H. Lavigne; D. White; J.P. Baker; M.R. Church; J.R. Brooks; M.A. Cairns; J.E. Compton

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we quantify the contributions of intermittent streams to coho salmon production in an Oregon coastal watershed. We provide estimates of (1) proportion of spawning that occurred in intermittent streams, (2) movement of juveniles into intermittent streams, (3) juvenile survival in intermittent and perennial streams during winter, and (4) relative size of...

  8. Influence of Dehydration on Intermittent Sprint Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jon-Kyle; Laurent, C Matt; Allen, Kimberly E; Green, J Matt; Stolworthy, Nicola I; Welch, Taylor R; Nevett, Michael E

    2015-09-01

    This study examined the effects of dehydration on intermittent sprint performance and perceptual responses. Eight male collegiate baseball players completed intermittent sprints either dehydrated (DEHY) by 3% body mass or euhydrated (EU). Body mass was reduced through exercise in the heat with controlled fluid restriction occurring 1 day before the trial. Participants completed twenty-four 30-m sprints divided into 3 bouts of 8 sprints with 45 seconds of rest between each sprint and 3 minutes between each bout. Perceived recovery status (PRS) scale was recorded before the start of each trial. Heart rate (HR), ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) (0-10 OMNI scale), and perceived readiness (PR) scale were recorded after every sprint, and session RPE (SRPE) was recorded 20 minutes after completing the entire session. A 2 (condition) × 3 (bout of sprints) repeated-measures ANOVA revealed a significant main effect of condition on mean sprint time (p = 0.03), HR (p Dehydration impaired sprint performance, negatively altered perception of recovery status before exercise, and increased RPE and HR response.

  9. Intermittent acceleration as a countermeasure to soleus muscle atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Aunno, Dominick S.; Robinson, Ronald R.; Smith, Gregory S.; Thomason, Donald B.; Booth, Frank W.

    1992-01-01

    The effectiveness of using intermittent acceleration as a countermeasure to muscle atrophy was investigated in rats subjected to 7 days of hindlimb suspension interrupted by daily periods of 1.2 g acceleration, for 15-min periods evenly spaced over 12-hr interval. It was found that this regimen, when repeated for 7 days, failed to completely maintain the mass of soleus muscle, which was 84 percent of control.

  10. Scintillation-Induced Intermittency in SETI

    CERN Document Server

    Cordes, J M; Sagan, Carl Edward; Cordes, James M.; Sagan, Carl

    1997-01-01

    We consider interstellar scintillations as a cause of intermittency in radio signals from extraterrestrial intelligence (ETI). We demonstrate that scintillations are very likely to allow initial detections of narrowband signals from distant sources (> 100 pc), while making redetections improbable. We consider three models in order to assess the non-repeating, narrowband events found in recent SETI and to analyze large surveys in general: (I) Radiometer noise; (II) A population of constant Galactic sources undergoing interstellar scintillation,; and (III) Real, transient signals (or hardware errors) of either terrestrial or ET origin. We apply likelihood and Bayesian tests of the models to The Planetary Society/Harvard META data. We find that Models II and III are both highly preferred to Model I, but that Models II and III are about equally likely. Ruling out Model II in favor of Model III requires many more reobservations than were conducted in META *or* the reobservation threshold must be much lower than wa...

  11. Deployment Repeatability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    controlled to great precision, but in a Cubesat , there may be no attitude determination at all. Such a Cubesat might treat sun angle and tumbling rates as...could be sensitive to small differences in motor controller timing. In these cases, the analyst might choose to model the entire deployment path, with...knowledge of the material damage model or motor controller timing precision. On the other hand, if many repeated and environmentally representative

  12. Effects of continuous and intermittent magnetic fields on oxidative parameters in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coşkun, Sule; Balabanli, Barbaros; Canseven, Ayşe; Seyhan, Nesrin

    2009-02-01

    Continuous and intermittent 50 Hz, 1.5 mT magnetic field with the exposure period of 4 h/day for 4 days was used to investigate its possible effect on adult guinea pigs. Tissues and plasma specimens were assessed by biochemical parameters. Malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), nitric oxide (NO) levels and myeloperoxidase activity (MPO) were examined in plasma, liver and brain tissues. All parameters were determined by spectrophotometer. While intermittent magnetic field was effective on plasma lipid peroxidation, continuous magnetic field was found to be effective on plasma MPO activity and NO levels. Augmentation of lipid peroxidation was also observed in liver tissue both intermittent and continuous magnetic field exposures. These results indicate that both the intermittent and continuous magnetic field exposures affect various tissues in a distinct manner because of having different tissue antioxidant status and responses.

  13. The Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test : a useful tool for evaluation of physical performance in intermittent sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangsbo, Jens; Iaia, F Marcello; Krustrup, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The two Yo-Yo intermittent recovery (IR) tests evaluate an individual's ability to repeatedly perform intense exercise. The Yo-Yo IR level 1 (Yo-Yo IR1) test focuses on the capacity to carry out intermittent exercise leading to a maximal activation of the aerobic system, whereas Yo-Yo IR level 2 (Yo-Yo IR2) determines an individual's ability to recover from repeated exercise with a high contribution from the anaerobic system. Evaluations of elite athletes in various sports involving intermittent exercise showed that the higher the level of competition the better an athlete performs in the Yo-Yo IR tests. Performance in the Yo-Yo IR tests for young athletes increases with rising age. The Yo-Yo IR tests have shown to be a more sensitive measure of changes in performance than maximum oxygen uptake. The Yo-Yo IR tests provide a simple and valid way to obtain important information of an individual's capacity to perform repeated intense exercise and to examine changes in performance.

  14. Effect of restrictions on television food advertising to children on exposure to advertisements for 'less healthy' foods: repeat cross-sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Adams

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In 2007, new scheduling restrictions on television food advertising to children in the UK were announced. The aim of the restrictions was to "reduce significantly the exposure of children under 16 to high fat, salt or sugar (HFSS advertising". We explored the impact of the restrictions on relative exposure to HFSS food advertising among all viewers and among child television viewers, as well as adherence to the restrictions. METHODS: We conducted two cross-sectional studies of all advertisements broadcast in one region of the UK over one week periods--the first (week 1 six months before the restrictions were introduced, and the second (week 2 six months after. Data on what products were advertised were linked to data on how many people watched each advertisement. Nutritional content of foods advertised was added to the dataset and used to calculate HFSS status. Relative exposure was calculated as the proportion of all advertising person-minute-views (PMVs that were for HFSS foods. RESULTS: 1,672,417 advertising PMV were included. 14.6% of advertising PMV were for food and 51.1% of these were for HFSS food. Relative exposure of all viewers to HFSS food advertising increased between study weeks 1 and 2 (odds ratio (99% confidence intervals = 1·54 (1·51 to 1·57. Exposure of children to HFSS food advertising did not change between study weeks 1 and 2 (odds ratio (99% confidence intervals = 1·05 (0·99 to 1·12. There was almost universal adherence to the restrictions. CONCLUSIONS: Despite good adherence to the restrictions, they did not change relative exposure of children to HFSS advertising and were associated with an increase in relative exposure of all viewers to HFSS advertising. Stronger restrictions targeting a wider range of advertisements are necessary to reduce exposure of children to marketing of less healthful foods.

  15. Effect of restrictions on television food advertising to children on exposure to advertisements for 'less healthy' foods: repeat cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Jean; Tyrrell, Rachel; Adamson, Ashley J; White, Martin

    2012-01-01

    In 2007, new scheduling restrictions on television food advertising to children in the UK were announced. The aim of the restrictions was to "reduce significantly the exposure of children under 16 to high fat, salt or sugar (HFSS) advertising". We explored the impact of the restrictions on relative exposure to HFSS food advertising among all viewers and among child television viewers, as well as adherence to the restrictions. We conducted two cross-sectional studies of all advertisements broadcast in one region of the UK over one week periods--the first (week 1) six months before the restrictions were introduced, and the second (week 2) six months after. Data on what products were advertised were linked to data on how many people watched each advertisement. Nutritional content of foods advertised was added to the dataset and used to calculate HFSS status. Relative exposure was calculated as the proportion of all advertising person-minute-views (PMVs) that were for HFSS foods. 1,672,417 advertising PMV were included. 14.6% of advertising PMV were for food and 51.1% of these were for HFSS food. Relative exposure of all viewers to HFSS food advertising increased between study weeks 1 and 2 (odds ratio (99% confidence intervals) = 1·54 (1·51 to 1·57)). Exposure of children to HFSS food advertising did not change between study weeks 1 and 2 (odds ratio (99% confidence intervals) = 1·05 (0·99 to 1·12)). There was almost universal adherence to the restrictions. Despite good adherence to the restrictions, they did not change relative exposure of children to HFSS advertising and were associated with an increase in relative exposure of all viewers to HFSS advertising. Stronger restrictions targeting a wider range of advertisements are necessary to reduce exposure of children to marketing of less healthful foods.

  16. Repeated whole cigarette smoke exposure alters cell differentiation and augments secretion of inflammatory mediators in air-liquid interface three-dimensional co-culture model of human bronchial tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Shinkichi; Ito, Shigeaki

    2017-02-01

    In vitro models of human bronchial epithelium are useful for toxicological testing because of their resemblance to in vivo tissue. We constructed a model of human bronchial tissue which has a fibroblast layer embedded in a collagen matrix directly below a fully-differentiated epithelial cell layer. The model was applied to whole cigarette smoke (CS) exposure repeatedly from an air-liquid interface culture while bronchial epithelial cells were differentiating. The effects of CS exposure on differentiation were determined by histological and gene expression analyses on culture day 21. We found a decrease in ciliated cells and perturbation of goblet cell differentiation. We also analyzed the effects of CS exposure on the inflammatory response, and observed a significant increase in secretion of IL-8, GRO-α, IL-1β, and GM-CSF. Interestingly, secretion of these mediators was augmented with repetition of whole CS exposure. Our data demonstrate the usefulness of our bronchial tissue model for in vitro testing and the importance of exposure repetition in perturbing the differentiation and inflammation processes.

  17. Heart rate variability and DNA methylation levels are altered after short-term metal fume exposure among occupational welders: a repeated-measures panel study

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background: In occupational settings, boilermakers are exposed to high levels of metallic fine particulate matter (PM2.5) generated during the welding process. The effect of welding PM2.5 on heart rate variability (HRV) has been described, but the relationship between PM2.5, DNA methylation, and HRV is not known. Methods: In this repeated-measures panel study, we recorded resting HRV and measured DNA methylation levels in transposable elements Alu and long interspersed nuclear element-1 (LINE...

  18. Bursts in intermittent aeolian saltation

    CERN Document Server

    Carneiro, M V; Herrmann, H J

    2014-01-01

    Close to the onset of Aeolian particle transport through saltation we find in wind tunnel experiments a regime of intermittent flux characterized by bursts of activity. Scaling laws are observed in the time delay between each burst and in the measurements of the wind fluctuations at the critical Shields number $\\theta_c$. The time delay between each burst decreases on average with the increase of the Shields number until saltation becomes non-intermittent and the sand flux becomes continuous. A numerical model for saltation including the wind-entrainment from the turbulent fluctuations can reproduce these observations and gives insight about their origin. We present here also for the first time measurements showing that with feeding it becomes possible to sustain intermittent flux even below the threshold $\\theta_c$ for natural saltation initiation.

  19. Intermittency in spherical Couette dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Raynaud, Raphaël; 10.1103/PhysRevE.87.033011

    2013-01-01

    We investigate dynamo action in three-dimensional numerical simulations of turbulent spherical Couette flows. Close to the onset of dynamo action, the magnetic field exhibits an intermittent behavior, characterized by a series of short bursts of the magnetic energy separated by low-energy phases. We show that this behavior corresponds to the so-called on-off intermittency. This behavior is here reported for dynamo action with realistic boundary conditions. We investigate the role of magnetic boundary conditions in this phenomenon.

  20. Expression of nuclear factor-kappa B in hepatic tissue and its significance in rats after repeated and sustained +10Gz exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei LIU

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To observe the injury to liver cells, and to investigate the changes in nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB in the liver tissue after exposure to positive ten acceleration (+10Gz. Methods Twenty-four adult male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to four groups: blank control, exposure groups A, B, and C. The rats of three exposure groups were subjected to centrifugal force of +10Gz for 0.5, 24, and 48h respectively, which was carried out in an Air Force Institute of Aviation Medicine. Plasma aspartate aminotransferase (AST and alanine aminotransferase (ALT were determined. Liver tissue was harvested for immunohistochemistry, and Western blotting was performed for expression of NF-κB. Results After +10 Gz exposure, rats of the group A showed shaggy hair, apathetic to food, and laid still, while group B rats showed shaggy hair, took a little food with lowering of activity level. The rats in group C showed normal activities. Both the levels of serum AST and ALT were elevated, and they were higher in group B than that of groups A and C (P0.05. Western blotting and immunohistochemical staining showed that the NF-κB expression levels were significantly higher in exposure groups than in control group (P0.05. Immunohistochemical examination revealed NF-κBpositive products were localized predominantly in the hepatocytes, and also in the inflammatory cells and Kupffer cells. These products could be divided into three types: cytosolic type, karyotype, and nuclear-cytoplasm type, and they existed alone or in combination. Conclusion Exposure to +10Gz, especially in the early stage, acts as a stress to induce the activation of NF-κB, suggesting that NF-κB plays an important role in the cascade reactions and adaptation to the acceleration stress. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.07.17

  1. Locomotor sensitization to intermittent ketamine administration is associated with nucleus accumbens plasticity in male and female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, C E; Schoepfer, K J; Dossat, A M; Saland, S K; Wright, K N; Kabbaj, M

    2017-07-15

    Clinical evidence suggests superior antidepressant response over time with a repeated, intermittent ketamine treatment regimen as compared to a single infusion. However, the club drug ketamine is commonly abused. Therefore, the abuse potential of repeated ketamine injections at low doses needs to be investigated. In this study, we investigated the abuse potential of repeated exposure to either 0, 2.5, or 5 mg/kg ketamine administered once weekly for seven weeks. Locomotor activity and conditioned place preference (CPP) were assayed to evaluate behavioral sensitization to the locomotor activating effects of ketamine and its rewarding properties, respectively. Our results show that while neither males nor females developed CPP, males treated with 5 mg/kg and females treated with either 2.5 or 5 mg/kg ketamine behaviorally sensitized. Furthermore, dendritic spine density was increased in the NAc of both males and females administered 5 mg/kg ketamine, an effect specific to the NAc shell (NAcSh) in males but to both the NAc core (NAcC) and NAcSh in females. Additionally, males administered 5 mg/kg ketamine displayed increased protein expression of ΔfosB, calcium calmodulin kinase II alpha (CaMKIIα), and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), an effect not observed in females administered either dose of ketamine. However, males and females administered 5 mg/kg ketamine displayed increased protein expression of AMPA receptors (GluA1). Taken together, low-dose ketamine, when administered intermittently, induces behavioral sensitization at a lower dose in females than males, accompanied by an increase in spine density in the NAc and protein expression changes in pathways commonly implicated in addiction. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Repeat Victimization in a High-Risk Neighborhood Sample of Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menard, Scott; Huizinga, David

    2001-01-01

    Used longitudinal Denver Youth Survey data to examine repeat victimization and concentration of victimization among a relatively few high-frequency victims and intermittency of victimization in a sample of adolescents in a high-risk neighborhood. Chronic, multiple, intermittent victimization was the usual pattern among respondents. Men had higher…

  3. Human intermittent hypoxia-induced respiratory plasticity is not caused by inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudin, Andrew E; Waltz, Xavier; Pun, Matiram; Wynne-Edwards, Katherine E; Ahmed, Sofia B; Anderson, Todd J; Hanly, Patrick J; Poulin, Marc J

    2015-10-01

    Ventilatory instability, reflected by enhanced acute hypoxic (AHVR) and hypercapnic (AHCVR) ventilatory responses is a fundamental component of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) pathogenesis. Intermittent hypoxia-induced inflammation is postulated to promote AHVR enhancement in OSA, although the role of inflammation in intermittent hypoxia-induced respiratory changes in humans has not been examined. Thus, this study assessed the role of inflammation in intermittent hypoxia-induced respiratory plasticity in healthy humans.In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomised crossover study design, 12 males were exposed to 6 h of intermittent hypoxia on three occasions. Prior to intermittent hypoxia exposures, participants ingested (for 4  days) either placebo or the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs indomethacin (nonselective cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor) and celecoxib (selective COX-2 inhibitor). Pre- and post-intermittent hypoxia resting ventilation, AHVR, AHCVR and serum concentration of the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α were assessed.Pre-intermittent hypoxia resting ventilation, AHVR, AHCVR and TNF-α concentrations were similar across all three conditions (p≥0.093). Intermittent hypoxia increased resting ventilation and the AHVR similarly across all conditions (p=0.827), while the AHCVR was increased (p=0.003) and TNF-α was decreased (p=0.006) with only selective COX-2 inhibition.These findings indicate that inflammation does not contribute to human intermittent hypoxia-induced respiratory plasticity. Moreover, selective COX-2 inhibition augmented the AHCVR following intermittent hypoxia exposure, suggesting that selective COX-2 inhibition could exacerbate OSA severity by increasing ventilatory instability.

  4. Intermittent control of coexisting attractors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Wiercigroch, Marian; Ing, James; Pavlovskaia, Ekaterina

    2013-06-28

    This paper proposes a new control method applicable for a class of non-autonomous dynamical systems that naturally exhibit coexisting attractors. The central idea is based on knowledge of a system's basins of attraction, with control actions being applied intermittently in the time domain when the actual trajectory satisfies a proximity constraint with regards to the desired trajectory. This intermittent control uses an impulsive force to perturb one of the system attractors in order to switch the system response onto another attractor. This is carried out by bringing the perturbed state into the desired basin of attraction. The method has been applied to control both smooth and non-smooth systems, with the Duffing and impact oscillators used as examples. The strength of the intermittent control force is also considered, and a constrained intermittent control law is introduced to investigate the effect of limited control force on the efficiency of the controller. It is shown that increasing the duration of the control action and/or the number of control actuations allows one to successfully switch between the stable attractors using a lower control force. Numerical and experimental results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  5. Repeated exposure to corticosterone increases depression-like behavior in two different versions of the forced swim test without altering nonspecific locomotor activity or muscle strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Wendie; Fournier, Neil M; Kalynchuk, Lisa E

    2009-08-01

    We have recently shown that repeated high dose injections of corticosterone (CORT) reliably increase depression-like behavior on a modified one-day version of the forced swim test. The main purpose of this experiment was to compare the effect of these CORT injections on our one-day version of the forced swim test and the more traditional two-day version of the test. A second purpose was to determine whether altered behavior in the forced swim test could be due to nonspecific changes in locomotor activity or muscle strength. Separate groups of rats received a high dose CORT injection (40 mg/kg) or a vehicle injection once per day for 21 consecutive days. Then, half the rats from each group were exposed to the traditional two-day forced swim test and the other half were exposed to our one-day forced swim test. After the forced swim testing, all the rats were tested in an open field and in a wire suspension grip strength test. The CORT injections significantly increased the time spent immobile and decreased the time spent swimming in both versions of the forced swim test. However, they had no significant effect on activity in the open field or grip strength in the wire suspension test. These results show that repeated CORT injections increase depression-like behavior regardless of the specific parameters of forced swim testing, and that these effects are independent of changes in locomotor activity or muscle strength.

  6. [Intermittent Explosive Disorder: A Controversial Diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Juan Pablo; Palacio, Juan David

    2016-01-01

    Intermittent explosive disorder (IED) is aan externalizing externalising disorder characterized characterised by recurrent aggression episodes. Even though this disorder was described several decades ago, and it carries personal and social consequences, there is little in the medical scientific literature on this. bibliographic production about it is scanty. To perform a conceptualization conceptualisation of this disorder, through the review and bibliometric analysis of the available scientific articles. A search was performed in databases with the english English terms intermittent explosive disorder, impulse disorders control [MeSH], in combination with other terms. A bibliometric analysis in the GoPubMed® search engineer was also performed using all data obtained in the search. was also perfomed. IED prevalence ranges from 1.4% to 7%, it presents more frequently during middle adolescence, and with more noticeable repercussions in men males than in womenfemales. The psychopathological core of IED is the impulsive aggressive behaviour that presents in the form of «attacks» that occurs in response to a lower precipitating stimulus. Scientific publications about IED are few and relatively recent, and the vast majority is provided bycomes from the United States (56.56%), and headed by a single author. This fact highlights the need to replicate the findings described about the IED in order to demonstrate the validity and reliability of its diagnostic criteria. It is possible that doubts about the existence of a diagnosis lead have led to such a scant literature about the IED. Available studies about IED allow have allowed characterizing a group of subjects with episodes of impulsive aggression to be characterised, but this description requires replication in different latitudesneeds to be repeated in different areas. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of cyclic intermittent hypoxia on ET-1 responsiveness and endothelial dysfunction of pulmonary arteries in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuo Wang

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA is a risk factor for cardiovascular disorders and in some cases is complication of pulmonary hypertension. We simulated OSA by exposing rats to cyclic intermittent hypoxia (CIH to investigate its effect on pulmonary vascular endothelial dysfunction. Sprague-Dawley Rats were exposed to CIH (FiO2 9% for 1 min, repeated every 2 min for 8 h/day, 7 days/wk for 3 wk, and the pulmonary arteries of normoxia and CIH treated rats were analyzed for expression of endothelin-1 (ET-1 and ET receptors by histological, immunohistochemical, RT-PCR and Western Blot analyses, as well as for contractility in response to ET-1. In the pulmonary arteries, ET-1 expression was increased, and ET-1 more potently elicited constriction of the pulmonary artery in CIH rats than in normoxic rats. Exposure to CIH induced marked endothelial cell damage associated with a functional decrease of endothelium-dependent vasodilatation in the pulmonary artery. Compared with normoxic rats, ETA receptor expression was increased in smooth muscle cells of the CIH rats, while the expression of ETB receptors was decreased in endothelial cells. These results demonstrated endothelium-dependent vasodilation was impaired and the vasoconstrictor responsiveness increased by CIH. The increased responsiveness to ET-1 induced by intermittent hypoxia in pulmonary arteries of rats was due to increased expression of ETA receptors predominantly, meanwhile, decreased expression of ETB receptors in the endothelium may also participate in it.

  8. Curcumin exposure induces expression of the Parkinson's disease-associated leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) in rat mesencephalic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Ortiz, Miguel A; Morán, José M; Ruiz-Mesa, Luz M; Niso-Santano, Mireia; Bravo-SanPedro, José M; Gómez-Sánchez, Rubén; González-Polo, Rosa A; Fuentes, José M

    2010-01-04

    Turmeric (curry powder), an essential ingredient of culinary preparations of Southeast Asia, contains a major polyphenolic compound known as curcumin or diferuloylmethane. Curcumin is a widely studied phytochemical with a variety of biological activities. In addition to its anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial/antiviral properties, curcumin is considered as a cancer chemopreventive agent as well as a modulator of gene expression and a potent antioxidant. Since oxidative stress has been implicated in the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra in Parkinson's disease (PD), curcumin has been proposed to have potential therapeutic value for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases such as PD. Following age, a family history of PD is the most commonly reported risk factor, suggesting a genetic component of the disease in a subgroup of patients. The LRRK2 gene has emerged as the gene most commonly associated with both familial and sporadic PD. Here, we report that exposure of rat mesencephalic cells to curcumin induces the expression of LRRK2 mRNA and protein in a time-dependent manner. The expression of other PD-related genes, such alpha-synuclein and parkin, was not affected by exposure to curcumin, and PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) was not expressed in rat mesencephalic cells. As LRRK2 overexpression is strongly associated with the pathological inclusions found in several neurodegenerative disorders, further studies are needed to evaluate the effects of curcumin as a therapeutic agent for neurodegenerative diseases.

  9. Subclinical effects of groundwater contaminants. Pt. 4. Effects of repeated oral exposure to combinations of benzene and toluene on regional brain monoamine metabolism in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, G.C.; Parker, R.D.R. (Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (USA). Dept. of Biology); Sharma, R.P. (Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (USA). Dept. of Animal, Dairy and Veterinary Sciences)

    1990-11-01

    The effect of combined treatment with benzene and toluene on the endogenous concentrations of the catecholamines norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine (DA), the catecholamine metabolites vanillylmandelic acid (VMA), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA), and the indoleamine serotonin (5-HT) and its metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), were investigated in six discrete brain regions of CD-1 mice. Groups of male, adult mice were continuously exposed to benzene (166 mg/l), toluene (80 and 325 mg/l), and combinations of benzene + toluene (80 or 325 mg/l) in drinking water for 4 weeks. Benzene produced increases of NE in the hypothalamus, cortex, midbrain and medulla oblongata, DA in the hypothalamus and corpus striatum, and 5-HT in all dissected brain regions except cerebellum. Elevated levels of various monoamine metabolites were also observed in these brain areas. Toluene ingestion alone also significantly increased the concentrations of NE, DA, 5-HT, and their metabolites in several brain regions. Mice given the combined treatments exhibited raised regional neurochemical levels when compared to the untreated controls. Increased concentrations of biogenic amine metabolites in several brain regions were greater in the combined exposures of benzene and toluene than when either chemical was used alone. The findings were different from those observed on immune parameters using similar treatment protocols, where simultaneous exposure to toluene prevented the immunotoxic effects of benzene. (orig./MG).

  10. Intermittent exotropia: Surgical treatment strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jai Aditya Kelkar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical management of intermittent exotropias (IXTs is ambiguous, with techniques of management varying widely between institutions. This review aims to examine available literature on the surgical management of IXT. A literature search was performed using PubMed, Web of Knowledge, LILACS, and the University of Liverpool Orthoptic Journals and Conference Transactions Database. All English-language papers published between 1958 and the present day were considered.

  11. Power-constrained intermittent control

    OpenAIRE

    Gawthrop, P.; Wagg, D.; Neild, S.; Wang, L

    2013-01-01

    In this article, input power, as opposed to the usual input amplitude, constraints are introduced in the context of intermittent control. They are shown to result in a combination of quadratic optimisation and quadratic constraints. The main motivation for considering input power constraints is its similarity with semi-active control. Such methods are commonly used to provide damping in mechanical systems and structures. It is shown that semi-active control can be re-expressed and generalised...

  12. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor knockout rats are insensitive to the pathological effects of repeated oral exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrill, Joshua A; Layko, Debra; Nyska, Abraham; Hukkanen, Renee R; Manno, Rosa Anna; Grassetti, Andrea; Lawson, Marie; Martin, Greg; Budinsky, Robert A; Rowlands, J Craig; Thomas, Russell S

    2016-06-01

    Sustained activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is believed to be the initial key event in AHR receptor-mediated tumorigenesis in the rat liver. The role of AHR in mediating pathological changes in the liver prior to tumor formation was investigated in a 4-week, repeated-dose study using adult female wild-type (WT) and AHR knockout (AHR-KO) rats treated with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Beginning at 8 weeks of age, AHR-KO and WT rats were dosed by oral gavage with varying concentrations of TCDD (0, 3, 22, 100, 300 and 1000 ng kg(-1)  day(-1) ). Lung, liver and thymus histopathology, hematology, serum chemistry and the distribution of TCDD in liver and adipose tissue were examined. Treatment-related increases in the severity of liver and thymus pathology were observed in WT, but not AHR-KO rats. In the liver, these included hepatocellular hypertrophy, bile duct hyperplasia, multinucleated hepatocytes and inflammatory cell foci. A loss of cellularity in the thymic cortex and thymic atrophy was observed. Treatment-related changes in serum chemistry parameters were also observed in WT, but not AHR-KO rats. Finally, dose-dependent accumulation of TCDD was observed primarily in the liver of WT rats and primarily in the adipose tissue of AHR-KO rats. The results suggest that AHR activation is the initial key event underlying the progression of histological effects leading to liver tumorigenesis following TCDD treatment. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Sex differences associated with intermittent swim stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Timothy A; Libman, Matthew K; Wooten, Katherine L; Drugan, Robert C

    2013-11-01

    Various animal models of depression have been used to seek a greater understanding of stress-related disorders. However, there is still a great need for novel research in this area, as many individuals suffering from depression are resistant to current treatment methods. Women have a higher rate of depression, highlighting the need to investigate mechanisms of sex differences. Therefore, we employed a new animal model to assess symptoms of depression, known as intermittent swim stress (ISS). In this model, the animal experiences 100 trials of cold water swim stress. ISS has already been shown to cause signs of behavioral depression in males, but has yet to be assessed in females. Following ISS exposure, we looked at sex differences in the Morris water maze and forced swim test. The results indicated a spatial learning effect only in the hidden platform task between male and female controls, and stressed and control males. A consistent spatial memory effect was only seen for males exposed to ISS. In the forced swim test, both sexes exposed to ISS exhibited greater immobility, and the same males and females also showed attenuated climbing and swimming, respectively. The sex differences could be due to different neural substrates for males and females. The goal of this study was to provide the first behavioral examination of sex differences following ISS exposure, so the stage of estrous cycle was not assessed for the females. This is a necessary future direction for subsequent experiments. The current article highlights the importance of sex differences in response to stress.

  14. Repeated exposure of human fibroblasts to ionizing radiation reveals an adaptive response that is not mediated by interleukin-6 or TGF-{beta}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dieriks, Birger, E-mail: birger.dieriks@ugent.be [Bio-imaging and Cytometry Unit, Department of Molecular Biotechnology, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, 9000 Gent (Belgium); De Vos, Winnok [Bio-imaging and Cytometry Unit, Department of Molecular Biotechnology, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, 9000 Gent (Belgium); Baatout, Sarah [Bio-imaging and Cytometry Unit, Department of Molecular Biotechnology, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, 9000 Gent (Belgium); Radiobiology Unit, Laboratory Molecular and Cellular Biology, Radiobiology Unit, Belgian Nuclear Research Center, SCK.CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Van Oostveldt, Patrick, E-mail: Patrick.VanOostveldt@UGent.be [Bio-imaging and Cytometry Unit, Department of Molecular Biotechnology, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, 9000 Gent (Belgium)

    2011-10-01

    Exposing cells to a low dose can protect them against a subsequent higher exposure. This phenomenon is known as adaptive response and is frequently observed in a variety of cells. Even though similarities are suspected with other non-targeted effects, such as bystander effects, the exact mechanism behind adaptive response is not fully clarified. In this study human primary fibroblasts were tested for their response to ionizing radiation (IR) after administrating a low priming dose (0.1-0.5 Gy). Both the abundance of {gamma}H2AX as a marker for double-stranded breaks and the levels of cytokines, secreted in the medium, were monitored in time. Upon challenge, IR-primed cells showed modified {gamma}H2AX spot size distributions and altered repair kinetics, consistent with an adaptive response. In addition, 24 h after priming with IR, four cytokines were significantly upregulated in the medium - GM-CSF (1.33x); IL6 (4.24x); IL8 (1.33x); TGF-{beta} (1.46x). In order to mimick the protective effect of IR priming, we primed the cells with either IL6 or TGF-{beta}. This did not elicit an altered {gamma}H2AX response as observed in IR-primed cells, indicating that the adaptive response in these primary fibroblasts is regulated in an IL-6 and TGF-{beta} independent manner.

  15. School-based intervention with children. Peer-modeling, reward and repeated exposure reduce food neophobia and increase liking of fruits and vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laureati, Monica; Bergamaschi, Valentina; Pagliarini, Ella

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of the 'Food Dudes' school-based intervention consisting of rewards, peer-modeling and food exposure on food neophobia and the liking of fruits and vegetables (FV) in a large cohort of children. Five-hundred sixty children recruited from three schools were assigned to the experimental or control group. For 16 days, children in the experimental group watched motivational videos, were read letters to encourage them to eat FV and received a small reward for eating one portion of both a fruit and a vegetable. The control group was only provided with FV for the same time period. Food neophobia and liking were measured in both groups of children before and after the intervention, and a follow-up measurement was carried out 6 months later. The intervention was effective in reducing food neophobia and, most importantly, a persistent effect was observed 6 months after the intervention as children of the experimental group showed significantly lower neophobia scores than the control group. Additionally, the program was effective in increasing liking for both FV; however, this effect was maintained only for fruit after 6 months.

  16. Contraction stress test by intermittent nipple stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huddleston, J F; Sutliff, G; Robinson, D

    1984-05-01

    Although the nonstress test has generally supplanted the contraction stress test as the primary test for assessment of fetal well-being, the contraction stress test continues to be useful. Objectionable factors of the contraction stress test have included the time required to complete the test and the frequent necessity for intravenous oxytocin. The authors developed a contraction stress test protocol using contractions produced by intermittent nipple stimulation and used the method for 345 tests on 193 high-risk pregnancies during a 15-month period. The women were instructed to stimulate one breast, through their clothes, for two minutes and then to rest for five minutes. This cycle was repeated as necessary, but was interrupted whenever contractions began. Using this protocol, the authors were successful in achieving an adequate contraction frequency with every attempt, and hyperstimulation was not more frequent than previously reported with the standard contraction stress test. The average time requirement was 45 minutes. No unexplained stillbirths occurred after a negative test.

  17. Repeated sprint training in normobaric hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvin, Harvey M; Cooke, Karl; Sumners, David P; Mileva, Katya N; Bowtell, Joanna L

    2013-12-01

    Repeated sprint ability (RSA) is a critical success factor for intermittent sport performance. Repeated sprint training has been shown to improve RSA, we hypothesised that hypoxia would augment these training adaptations. Thirty male well-trained academy rugby union and rugby league players (18.4 ± 1.5 years, 1.83 ± 0.07 m, 88.1 ± 8.9 kg) participated in this single-blind repeated sprint training study. Participants completed 12 sessions of repeated sprint training (10 × 6 s, 30 s recovery) over 4 weeks in either hypoxia (13% FiO₂) or normoxia (21% FiO₂). Pretraining and post-training, participants completed sports specific endurance and sprint field tests and a 10 × 6 s RSA test on a non-motorised treadmill while measuring speed, heart rate, capillary blood lactate, muscle and cerebral deoxygenation and respiratory measures. Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Level 1 test performance improved after RS training in both groups, but gains were significantly greater in the hypoxic (33 ± 12%) than the normoxic group (14 ± 10%, prepeated aerobic high intensity workout than an equivalent normoxic training. Performance gains are evident in the short term (4 weeks), a period similar to a preseason training block.

  18. Intermittent hypoxia alters gut microbiota diversity in a mouse model of sleep apnoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Indias, Isabel; Torres, Marta; Montserrat, Josep M; Sanchez-Alcoholado, Lidia; Cardona, Fernando; Tinahones, Francisco J; Gozal, David; Poroyko, Valeryi A; Navajas, Daniel; Queipo-Ortuño, Maria I; Farré, Ramon

    2015-04-01

    We assessed whether intermittent hypoxia, which emulates one of the hallmarks of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), leads to altered faecal microbiome in a murine model. In vivo partial pressure of oxygen was measured in colonic faeces during intermittent hypoxia in four anesthetised mice. 10 mice were subjected to a pattern of chronic intermittent hypoxia (20 s at 5% O2 and 40 s at room air for 6 h·day(-1)) for 6 weeks and 10 mice served as normoxic controls. Faecal samples were obtained and microbiome composition was determined by 16S rRNA pyrosequencing and bioinformatic analysis by Quantitative Insights into Microbial Ecology. Intermittent hypoxia exposures translated into hypoxia/re-oxygenation patterns in the faeces proximal to the bowel epithelium (intermittent hypoxia on global microbial community structure was found. Intermittent hypoxia increased the α-diversity (Shannon index, pintermittent hypoxia-exposed mice showed a higher abundance of Firmicutes and a smaller abundance of Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria phyla than controls. Faecal microbiota composition and diversity are altered as a result of intermittent hypoxia realistically mimicking OSA, suggesting the possibility that physiological interplays between host and gut microbiota could be deregulated in OSA.

  19. In vitro systems toxicology approach to investigate the effects of repeated cigarette smoke exposure on human buccal and gingival organotypic epithelial tissue cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlage, Walter K.; Kostadinova, Radina; Xiang, Yang; Sewer, Alain; Majeed, Shoaib; Kuehn, Diana; Frentzel, Stefan; Talikka, Marja; Geertz, Marcel; Mathis, Carole; Ivanov, Nikolai; Hoeng, Julia; Peitsch, Manuel C.

    2014-01-01

    Smoking has been associated with diseases of the lung, pulmonary airways and oral cavity. Cytologic, genomic and transcriptomic changes in oral mucosa correlate with oral pre-neoplasia, cancer and inflammation (e.g. periodontitis). Alteration of smoking-related gene expression changes in oral epithelial cells is similar to that in bronchial and nasal epithelial cells. Using a systems toxicology approach, we have previously assessed the impact of cigarette smoke (CS) seen as perturbations of biological processes in human nasal and bronchial organotypic epithelial culture models. Here, we report our further assessment using in vitro human oral organotypic epithelium models. We exposed the buccal and gingival organotypic epithelial tissue cultures to CS at the air–liquid interface. CS exposure was associated with increased secretion of inflammatory mediators, induction of cytochrome P450s activity and overall weak toxicity in both tissues. Using microarray technology, gene-set analysis and a novel computational modeling approach leveraging causal biological network models, we identified CS impact on xenobiotic metabolism-related pathways accompanied by a more subtle alteration in inflammatory processes. Gene-set analysis further indicated that the CS-induced pathways in the in vitro buccal tissue models resembled those in the in vivo buccal biopsies of smokers from a published dataset. These findings support the translatability of systems responses from in vitro to in vivo and demonstrate the applicability of oral organotypical tissue models for an impact assessment of CS on various tissues exposed during smoking, as well as for impact assessment of reduced-risk products. PMID:25046638

  20. Reductions in blood lead overestimate reductions in brain lead following repeated succimer regimens in a rodent model of childhood lead exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stangle, Diane E; Strawderman, Myla S; Smith, Donald; Kuypers, Mareike; Strupp, Barbara J

    2004-03-01

    Although many studies have demonstrated the efficacy of succimer chelation in reducing blood and brain lead levels, the relative efficacy of the drug in the two tissues is less well understood. This issue is important because blood lead levels after chelation are used clinically to estimate reductions in the brain, the most critical organ in considering lead-induced neurotoxicity. The present study was designed to further investigate this issue, using multiple chelation regimens. Long-Evans rats were exposed to one of three lead exposure regimens from birth until postnatal day 40, followed by treatment with succimer (one or two 3-week regimens) or vehicle. The results indicated that one succimer regimen was significantly superior to vehicle treatment in lowering lead levels in both blood and brain across the entire 8-week follow-up period. Similarly, a second succimer regimen offered significant additional benefit relative to one regimen for both blood and brain across the 4-week follow-up period. However, several findings revealed that succimer-induced reductions in brain lead lagged behind reductions in blood lead and were generally smaller in magnitude. Furthermore, a rebound was detected in blood, but not brain, lead levels after both succimer regimens. Given the results of this study, we urge caution in using blood lead as a surrogate for brain lead levels, particularly during and immediately after chelation treatment when reductions in blood lead levels overestimate reductions in brain lead levels. The present results suggest that, in clinical use, succimer treatment may need to extend beyond the point at which blood lead levels have dropped to an "acceptable" target value in order to effectively reduce brain lead levels and minimize neurotoxicity.

  1. In vitro systems toxicology approach to investigate the effects of repeated cigarette smoke exposure on human buccal and gingival organotypic epithelial tissue cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlage, Walter K; Iskandar, Anita R; Kostadinova, Radina; Xiang, Yang; Sewer, Alain; Majeed, Shoaib; Kuehn, Diana; Frentzel, Stefan; Talikka, Marja; Geertz, Marcel; Mathis, Carole; Ivanov, Nikolai; Hoeng, Julia; Peitsch, Manuel C

    2014-10-01

    Smoking has been associated with diseases of the lung, pulmonary airways and oral cavity. Cytologic, genomic and transcriptomic changes in oral mucosa correlate with oral pre-neoplasia, cancer and inflammation (e.g. periodontitis). Alteration of smoking-related gene expression changes in oral epithelial cells is similar to that in bronchial and nasal epithelial cells. Using a systems toxicology approach, we have previously assessed the impact of cigarette smoke (CS) seen as perturbations of biological processes in human nasal and bronchial organotypic epithelial culture models. Here, we report our further assessment using in vitro human oral organotypic epithelium models. We exposed the buccal and gingival organotypic epithelial tissue cultures to CS at the air-liquid interface. CS exposure was associated with increased secretion of inflammatory mediators, induction of cytochrome P450s activity and overall weak toxicity in both tissues. Using microarray technology, gene-set analysis and a novel computational modeling approach leveraging causal biological network models, we identified CS impact on xenobiotic metabolism-related pathways accompanied by a more subtle alteration in inflammatory processes. Gene-set analysis further indicated that the CS-induced pathways in the in vitro buccal tissue models resembled those in the in vivo buccal biopsies of smokers from a published dataset. These findings support the translatability of systems responses from in vitro to in vivo and demonstrate the applicability of oral organotypical tissue models for an impact assessment of CS on various tissues exposed during smoking, as well as for impact assessment of reduced-risk products.

  2. Efficacy of Acute Intermittent Hypoxia on Physical Function and Health Status in Humans with Spinal Cord Injury: A Brief Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd A. Astorino

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI results in a loss of motor and sensory function and is consequent with reductions in locomotion, leading to a relatively sedentary lifestyle which predisposes individuals to premature morbidity and mortality. Many exercise modalities have been employed to improve physical function and health status in SCI, yet they are typically expensive, require many trained clinicians to implement, and are thus relegated to specialized rehabilitation centers. These characteristics of traditional exercise-based rehabilitation in SCI make their application relatively impractical considering the time-intensive nature of these regimens and patients’ poor access to exercise. A promising approach to improve physical function in persons with SCI is exposure to acute intermittent hypoxia (IH in the form of a small amount of sessions of brief, repeated exposures to low oxygen gas mixtures interspersed with normoxic breathing. This review summarizes the clinical application of IH in humans with SCI, describes recommended dosing and potential side effects of IH, and reviews existing data concerning the efficacy of relatively brief exposures of IH to modify health and physical function. Potential mechanisms explaining the effects of IH are also discussed. Collectively, IH appears to be a safe, time-efficient, and robust approach to enhance physical function in chronic, incomplete SCI.

  3. Intermittent Hypoxia Alters Gene Expression in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells of Healthy Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polotsky, Vsevolod Y; Bevans-Fonti, Shannon; Grigoryev, Dmitry N; Punjabi, Naresh M

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea is associated with high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Intermittent hypoxia of obstructive sleep apnea is implicated in the development and progression of insulin resistance and atherosclerosis, which have been attributed to systemic inflammation. Intermittent hypoxia leads to pro-inflammatory gene up-regulation in cell culture, but the effects of intermittent hypoxia on gene expression in humans have not been elucidated. A cross-over study was performed exposing eight healthy men to intermittent hypoxia or control conditions for five hours with peripheral blood mononuclear cell isolation before and after exposures. Total RNA was isolated followed by gene microarrays and confirmatory real time reverse transcriptase PCR. Intermittent hypoxia led to greater than two fold up-regulation of the pro-inflammatory gene toll receptor 2 (TLR2), which was not increased in the control exposure. We hypothesize that up-regulation of TLR2 by intermittent hypoxia may lead to systemic inflammation, insulin resistance and atherosclerosis in patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

  4. Intermittent redesign of continuous controllers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawthrop, Peter J.; Wang, Liuping

    2010-08-01

    The reverse-engineering idea developed by Maciejowski in the context of model-based predictive control is applied to the redesign of continuous-time compensators as intermittent controllers. Not only does this give a way of designing constrained input and state versions of continuous-time compensators but also provides a method for turning continuous-time compensators into event-driven versions. The procedure is illustrated by three examples: an event-driven PID controller relevant to the human balance control problem, a constrained version of the classical mechanical vibration absorber of den Hartog and an event driven and constrained vibration absorber.

  5. Three hours of intermittent hypoxia increases circulating glucose levels in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newhouse, Lauren P; Joyner, Michael J; Curry, Timothy B; Laurenti, Marcello C; Man, Chiara Dalla; Cobelli, Claudio; Vella, Adrian; Limberg, Jacqueline K

    2017-01-01

    An independent association exists between sleep apnea and diabetes. Animal models suggest exposure to intermittent hypoxia, a consequence of sleep apnea, results in altered glucose metabolism and fasting hyperglycemia. However, it is unknown if acute exposure to intermittent hypoxia increases glucose concentrations in nondiabetic humans. We hypothesized plasma glucose would be increased from baseline following 3 h of intermittent hypoxia in healthy humans independent of any effect on insulin sensitivity. Eight (7M/1F, 21-34 years) healthy subjects completed two study visits randomized to 3 h of intermittent hypoxia or continuous normoxia, followed by an oral glucose tolerance test. Intermittent hypoxia consisted of 25 hypoxic events per hour where oxygen saturation (SpO2) was significantly reduced (Normoxia: 97 ± 1%, Hypoxia: 90 ± 2%, P  0.05). In contrast, circulating glucose concentrations were increased after 3 h of intermittent hypoxia when compared to baseline (5.0 ± 0.2 vs. 5.3 ± 0.2 mmol/L, P = 0.01). There were no detectable changes in insulin sensitivity following intermittent hypoxia when compared to continuous normoxia, as assessed by the oral glucose tolerance test (P > 0.05). Circulating glucose is increased after 3 h of intermittent hypoxia in healthy humans, independent of any lasting changes in insulin sensitivity. These novel findings could explain, in part, the high prevalence of diabetes in patients with sleep apnea and warrant future studies to identify underlying mechanisms.

  6. Predicting intermittent running performance: critical velocity versus endurance index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchheit, M; Laursen, P B; Millet, G P; Pactat, F; Ahmaidi, S

    2008-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the ability of the critical velocity (CV) and the endurance index (EI) to assess endurance performance during intermittent exercise. Thirteen subjects performed two intermittent runs: 15-s runs intersected with 15 s of passive recovery (15/15) and 30-s runs with 30-s rest (30/30). Runs were performed until exhaustion at three intensities (100, 95 and 90 % of the speed reached at the end of the 30 - 15 intermittent fitness test, V (IFT)) to calculate i) CV from the slope of the linear relationship between the total covered distance and exhaustion time (ET) (iCV); ii) anaerobic distance capacity from the Y-intercept of the distance/duration relationship (iADC); and iii) EI from the relationship between the fraction of V (IFT) at which the runs were performed and the log-transformed ET (iEI). Anaerobic capacity was indirectly assessed by the final velocity achieved during the Maximal Anaerobic Running Test (VMART). ET was longer for 15/15 than for 30/30 runs at similar intensities. iCV (15/15) and iCV (30/30) were not influenced by changes in ET and were highly dependent on V (IFT). Neither iADC (15/15) nor iADC (30/30) were related to VMART. In contrast, iEI (15/15) was higher than iEI (30/30), and corresponded with the higher ET. In conclusion, only iEI estimated endurance capacity during repeated intermittent running.

  7. Randomized controlled trial for intermittent versus continuous propofol sedation for pediatric brain and spine magnetic resonance imaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Nabil E; Betz, Bradford W; Cole, Morgan R; Wincek, Jeni; Reischman, Diann; Sanfilippo, Dominic J; Winterhalter-Rzeszutko, Kim M; Kopec, John S

    2011-11-01

    Intermittent bolus propofol is an effective agent for pediatric magnetic resonance imaging sedation but requires constant vigilance and dose titration. Magnetic resonance imaging-compatible infusion pumps may make it possible to continuously infuse propofol, achieving a steady level of sedation at a lower total dose. This study investigates total propofol dose, recovery time, and magnetic resonance image quality in children receiving intermittent vs. continuously infused propofol sedation in children undergoing brain and spine magnetic resonance imaging studies. An open-label, prospective, randomized, controlled study. A single-blinded radiologist rated the quality of magnetic resonance images. Children's hospital pediatric radiology sedation center. One hundred seventy children age 1 month to 18 yrs undergoing deep sedation for brain, spine, or both brain and spine magnetic resonance imaging. After informed consent, patients were randomly assigned to two groups: group 1 (intermittent) received a propofol bolus of 2-4 mg/kg, followed by repeat boluses of 0.5-2 mg/kg/dose as needed. Group C (continuous) received a bolus of propofol 2-4 mg/kg, followed by a continuous infusion of 100 μg/kg/min with 1-mg/kg/dose boluses with drip titration to effect. Patient demographics, sedation risk assessment, propofol dose, sedation recovery times, incidence of complications, and quality of the magnetic resonance imaging studies were measured. A total of 170 children were enrolled in the study, with 75 in group C and 95 in group I. Both groups were similar with regard to age, weight, gender, and magnetic resonance imaging study type. Group C required a lesser dose of propofol (132 ± 54 μg/kg/min) compared to (162 ± 74 μg/kg/min) in that required in group I (p = .018). There were no differences between the two groups with regard to quality of the imaging study, recovery time, or incidence of complications. Compared to intermittent bolus dosing, continuous propofol infusion

  8. Intermittent ethanol access schedule in rats as a preclinical model of alcohol abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnicella, Sebastien; Ron, Dorit; Barak, Segev

    2014-05-01

    One of the major challenges in preclinical studies of alcohol abuse and dependence remains the development of paradigms that will elicit high ethanol intake and mimic the progressive transition from low or moderate social drinking to excessive alcohol consumption. Exposure of outbred rats to repeated cycles of free-choice ethanol intake and withdrawal with the use of intermittent access to 20% ethanol in a 2-bottle choice procedure (IA2BC) has been shown to induce a gradual escalation of voluntary ethanol intake and preference, eventually reaching ethanol consumption levels of 5-6 g/kg/24 h, and inducing pharmacologically relevant blood ethanol concentrations (BECs). This procedure has recently been gaining popularity due to its simplicity, high validity, and reliable outcomes. Here we review experimental and methodological data related to IA2BC, and discuss the usefulness and advantages of this procedure as a valuable pre-training method for initiating operant ethanol self-administration of high ethanol intake, as well as conditioned place preference (CPP). Despite some limitations, we provide evidence that IA2BC and related operant procedures provide the possibility to operationalize multiple aspects of alcohol abuse and addiction in a rat model, including transition from social-like drinking to excessive alcohol consumption, binge drinking, alcohol seeking, relapse, and neuroadaptations related to excessive alcohol intake. Hence, IA2BC appears to be a useful and relevant procedure for preclinical evaluation of potential therapeutic approaches against alcohol abuse disorders.

  9. Muscle involvement during intermittent contraction patterns with different target force feedback modes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjøgaard, G; Jørgensen, L V; Ekner, D

    2000-01-01

    and following 30 min of intermittent contractions showed larger fatigue development with proprioceptive feedback than visual feedback. Also rating of perceived exertion increased more during proprioceptive feedback than visual feedback. This may in part be explained by small differences in the mechanics during...... timing and force level is generally not specified. DESIGN: Repeated measure design in which six subjects in randomized order performed two experimental conditions only differing in feedback mode. METHODS: Intermittent static elbow flexion was performed against either a fixed-force transducer (visual...... and consequently the development muscle fatigue and disorders....

  10. Radiation characteristics of intermittence exhaust noise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Shengdun; SHANG Chunyang; ZHAO Zhigang; SHI Weixiang

    2000-01-01

    Aerodynamic characteristics, the noise characteristics in the course of intermittence exhaust are investigated and the expressions for sound pressure level of the noise generated by single-pole source and quadrupole source in the intermittence exhaust noise are established. The effects of all parameters in pneumatic system on the noise are also comprehensively studied.

  11. COHO SALMON DEPENDENCE ON INTERMITTENT STREAMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    In February 2006, the US Supreme Court heard cases that may affect whether intermittent streams are jurisdictional waters under the Clean Water Act. In June 2006, however, the cases were remanded to the circuit court, leaving the status of intermittent streams uncertain once agai...

  12. Intermittent hypoxia with or without hypercapnia is associated with tumorigenesis by decreasing the expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor and miR-34a in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Jing; Guo Xu; Shi Yanwei; Ma Jing; Wang Guangfa

    2014-01-01

    Background Very recent studies revealed that obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is a contributor of the increased incidence and mortality of cancer in humans,but mechanisms of how OSA promotes tumorigenesis remains largely unknown.We investigated whether intermittent hypoxia with and without hypercapnia plays a role in tumorigenesis.Methods First,Sprague-Dawley (SD) male rats (12 weeks old) were subjected to different hypoxia exposures:intermittent hypoxia and intermittent hypoxia with hypercapnia; continuous hypoxia and normal air.The systemic application of chronic fast rate hypoxia with or without hypercapnia mimicked severe OSA patients with apnoea/hypopnea index equivalent to 60 events per hour.Then routine blood tests were performed and the levels of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and miR-34a were examined.Results In contrast to intermittent hypoxia with hypercapnia,both intermittent hypoxia and continuous hypoxia treatments caused significantly higher levels of haematology parameters than normoxia treatments.Compared to normoxia,intermittent hypoxia with hypercapnia exposure resulted in substantial decrease of serum BDNF and,miR-34a in the lower brainstem,while less pronounced results were found in intermittent hypoxia and continuous hypoxia exposure.Conclusions The exposure of intermittent hypoxia with or without hypercapnia,mimicking the situations in severe OSA patients,was associated with,or even promoted tumorigenesis.

  13. Kinetic intermittency in magnetized plasma turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Teaca, Bogdan; Told, Daniel; Jenko, Frank

    2016-01-01

    We employ magnetized plasma turbulence, described by a gyrokinetic formalism in an interval ranging from the end of the fluid scales to the electron gyroradius, to introduce the first study of kinetic intermittency, in which nonlinear structures formed directly in the distribution functions are analyzed by accounting for velocity space correlations generated by linear (Landau resonance) and nonlinear phase mixing. Electron structures are found to be strongly intermittent and dominated by linear phase mixing, while nonlinear phase mixing dominates the weakly intermittent ions. This is the first time spatial intermittency and linear phase mixing are shown to be self-consistently linked for the electrons and, as the magnetic field follows the intermittency of the electrons at small scales, explain why magnetic islands are places dominated by Landau damping in steady state turbulence.

  14. Optical diagnostics of intermittent flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okulov, V.L.; Naumov, I.V.; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2007-01-01

    The efficiency of combined use of different optical techniques for flow diagnostics is demonstrated with the practically important case of intense swirling flows. It is shown that, when applied separately, commonly used optical measuring techniques, such as laser Doppler anemometry and particle...... image velocimetry, frequently give erroneous results, especially for the transition flow and developed nonstationary flow. However, their combined use in diagnostics of unsteady (intermittent) flows significantly improves both the temporal and spatial resolution of measurements. Such a complex approach...... is for the first time applied for diagnostics of the flow pattern in a closed cylinder with a rotating end face with the aim of studying the changeover from the steady axisymmetric to unsteady asymmetric flow over a wide range of flow parameters. It is found that such a transition is notable for azimuthal...

  15. Intermittent transport in edge plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, O.E.; Naulin, V.; Nielsen, A.H.; Juul Rasmussen, J. [Association EURATOM-Riso National Laboratory, Optics and Plasma Research, Roskilde (Denmark)

    2004-07-01

    The properties of low-frequency convective fluctuations and transport are investigated for the boundary region of magnetized plasmas. We employ a two-dimensional fluid model for the evolution of the global plasma quantities in a geometry and with parameters relevant to the scrape-off layer of confined toroidal plasmas. Strongly intermittent plasma transport is regulated by self-consistently generated sheared poloidal flows and is mediated by burst ejection of particles and heat from the bulk plasma in the form of blobs. Coarse grained probe signals reveal a highly skewed and flat distribution on short time scales, but tends towards a normal distribution at large time scales. Conditionally averaged signals are in perfect agreement with experimental measurements. (authors)

  16. Cooperative controls with intermittent communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Dan; Chen, Genshe; Cruz, Jose B., Jr.; Pham, Khanh; Blasch, Erik; Lynch, Robert

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a solution to the cooperative path planning with limited communication problem in two phases. In the first (offline) phase, a Pareto-optimal path problem is formulated to find a reference path and the graph cuts minimization method is used to speedily calculate the optimal solution. In the second (online) phase, a foraging algorithm is used to dynamically refine the reference path to meet the dynamic constraints of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAVs), during which an open-loop feedback optimal (OLFO) controller is used to estimate the states which may be unavailable due to infrequent battlefield information updates. Furthermore, an adaptive Markov decision process is proposed to deal with intermittent asynchronous information flow. The method is demonstrated in a simulation for a swarm of Unmanned Air Vehicle (UAV) teams with various communication ranges.

  17. Intermittent dystonia in Hartnup disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darras, B T; Ampola, M G; Dietz, W H; Gilmore, H E

    1989-01-01

    A 6-month-old girl developed intermittent dystonic posture of the legs and eczematous dermatitis without ataxia. Qualitative and quantitative urine amino acid testing confirmed the diagnosis of Hartnup disease. Cranial computed tomography, electroencephalogram, electromyogram/nerve conduction study, posterior tibial somatosensory evoked potentials, 24-hour electroencephalographic telemetry, and metrizamide myelogram were normal. Spinal fluid hydroxy-indoleacetic acid concentration was less than or equal to 2 S.D. of normal; oral tryptophan loading (70 mg/kg) resulted in a two-fold rise in cerebrospinal fluid 5-hydroxy-indoleacetic acid concentration. Tryptophan administered alone or with nicotinic acid failed to improve the dystonia; however, trihexyphenidyl (1-2 mg/kg/day) dramatically improved it. Hartnup disease should be considered in children with unexplained dystonia.

  18. Lattice splitting under intermittent flows

    CERN Document Server

    Schläpfer, Markus

    2010-01-01

    We study the splitting of regular square lattices subject to stochastic intermittent flows. By extensive Monte Carlo simulations we reveal how the time span until the occurence of a splitting depends on various flow patterns imposed on the lattices. Increasing the flow fluctuation frequencies shortens this time span which reaches a minimum before rising again due to inertia effects incorporated in the model. The size of the largest connected component after the splitting is rather independent of the flow fluctuations but sligthly decreases with the link capacities. Our results are relevant for assessing the robustness of real-life systems, such as electric power grids with a large share of renewable energy sources including wind turbines and photovoltaic systems.

  19. Intermittent Metronomic Drug Schedule Is Essential for Activating Antitumor Innate Immunity and Tumor Xenograft Regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong-Sheng Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Metronomic chemotherapy using cyclophosphamide (CPA is widely associated with antiangiogenesis; however, recent studies implicate other immune-based mechanisms, including antitumor innate immunity, which can induce major tumor regression in implanted brain tumor models. This study demonstrates the critical importance of drug schedule: CPA induced a potent antitumor innate immune response and tumor regression when administered intermittently on a 6-day repeating metronomic schedule but not with the same total exposure to activated CPA administered on an every 3-day schedule or using a daily oral regimen that serves as the basis for many clinical trials of metronomic chemotherapy. Notably, the more frequent metronomic CPA schedules abrogated the antitumor innate immune and therapeutic responses. Further, the innate immune response and antitumor activity both displayed an unusually steep dose-response curve and were not accompanied by antiangiogenesis. The strong recruitment of innate immune cells by the 6-day repeating CPA schedule was not sustained, and tumor regression was abolished, by a moderate (25% reduction in CPA dose. Moreover, an ~20% increase in CPA dose eliminated the partial tumor regression and weak innate immune cell recruitment seen in a subset of the every 6-day treated tumors. Thus, metronomic drug treatment must be at a sufficiently high dose but also sufficiently well spaced in time to induce strong sustained antitumor immune cell recruitment. Many current clinical metronomic chemotherapeutic protocols employ oral daily low-dose schedules that do not meet these requirements, suggesting that they may benefit from optimization designed to maximize antitumor immune responses.

  20. Analytical approach to continuous and intermittent bottleneck flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helbing, D.; Johansson, A.; Mathiesen, Joachim Kaj;

    2006-01-01

    Many-particle-inspired theory, Continuous and Intermittent Bottleneck Flows Udgivelsesdato: Oct. 20......Many-particle-inspired theory, Continuous and Intermittent Bottleneck Flows Udgivelsesdato: Oct. 20...

  1. Scattered vignettes from repeated radiant exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Lawrence D.

    2012-10-01

    In this presentation selected applications from the fields of Radiometry and Scattering are mingled with personal experiences to provide illumination upon William Wolfe's teaching, mentorship, insights and wit. Professor Wolfe served as the presenter's dissertation advisor from 1979-1982, but occasional industry interactions before and after that 3-year period provided the author a unique before-during-after sampling of this industry leader, author and teacher of Radiometry and applications of infrared technology to optical systems. The collection of selected topics begins with a brief review of the contribution of Max Planck, specifically his discovery of the blackbody radiation law in 1900. The assumption in Planck's equation not only provided the foundation of Quantum Physics, but the venerable equation itself today still serves as convenient basis for self-radiative source characterization in radiation transfer modeling for infrared systems. Subsequent topics of a more personal experience nature will include a successful application example of an advisor's counsel; an insider's life at the early days of Optical Sciences Annex; how history turned on an unlikely OSA scatter paper presentation; social optical engineering observations; the BRDF and development of the first Arizona computer-automated scatterometer; and a Swiss Army knife gift and metaphor. Via this review process, the author will not only reinforce existing Wolfe paradigms, but perhaps add some unique colors to the Wolfe spectrum, illustrating through one person's perspective of how over the decades Professor Wolfe has positively influenced the optical community in general, and one former Ph.D. student's career in particular.

  2. Repeat-until-success quantum repeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruschi, David Edward; Barlow, Thomas M.; Razavi, Mohsen; Beige, Almut

    2014-09-01

    We propose a repeat-until-success protocol to improve the performance of probabilistic quantum repeaters. Conventionally, these rely on passive static linear-optics elements and photodetectors to perform Bell-state measurements (BSMs) with a maximum success rate of 50%. This is a strong impediment for entanglement swapping between distant quantum memories. Every time a BSM fails, entanglement needs to be redistributed between the corresponding memories in the repeater link. The key ingredients of our scheme are repeatable BSMs. Under ideal conditions, these turn probabilistic quantum repeaters into deterministic ones. Under realistic conditions, our protocol too might fail. However, using additional threshold detectors now allows us to improve the entanglement generation rate by almost orders of magnitude, at a nominal distance of 1000 km, compared to schemes that rely on conventional BSMs. This improvement is sufficient to make the performance of our scheme comparable to the expected performance of some deterministic quantum repeaters.

  3. Effect of intermittent hypoxia on the reproduction of rats exposed to high altitude in the Chilean Altiplano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cikutovic, Marcos; Fuentes, Nelson; Bustos-Obregón, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    Environmental parameters such as the large day-night temperature differences, high light radiation, and low humidity may have a synergistic effect with low oxygen pressure. To evaluate the effects of the exposure to intermittent chronic hypobaric hypoxia (ICHH) in nature on rat reproduction, a group of rats was alternately moved to a location at 3400 meters over sea level (moml) for 7 days and returned the subsequent week to sea level; this procedure was repeated six times. Hematological and reproductive parameters were measured and analyzed. At the end of the experimental protocol, hematocrit and hemoglobin concentrations were significantly greater in the ICHH group compared to the control group (Nx) (p < 0.05). The diameter of the seminiferous tubule and the height of the spermatogenic epithelium in ICHH rats presented a significant decrease in relation to Nx rats (p < 0.05). Consequently, the number of epididymal spermatozoa in the experimental animals decreased compared to normal rats, with no evidence of recovery after 84 days. The offspring of the different matings between normal and hypoxic animals decreased proportionally to hypoxia exposure. The low oxygen and the changes in testicular temperature homeostasis would provide a novel local mechanism to explain the decrease in sperm cell production and the reduced number of puppies born. The alterations of the reproductive parameters of the hypoxic female, plus testicular injuries and diminished sperm in males, result in a significant decrease in the reproductive activity of the animals.

  4. Assessing Relative Volatility/Intermittency/Energy Dissipation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole E.; Pakkanen, Mikko; Schmiegel, Jürgen

    We introduce the notion of relative volatility/intermittency and demonstrate how relative volatility statistics can be used to estimate consistently the temporal variation of volatility/intermittency even when the data of interest are generated by a non-semimartingale, or a Brownian semistationary...... process in particular. While this estimation method is motivated by the assessment of relative energy dissipation in empirical data of turbulence, we apply it also to energy price data. Moreover, we develop a probabilistic asymptotic theory for relative power variations of Brownian semistationary...... processes and Ito semimartingales and discuss how it can be used for inference on relative volatility/intermittency....

  5. Intermittent Voluntary Ethanol Drinking during Periadolescence Impairs Adult Spatial Learning after a Long Abstinence Period in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Ana; Garcia-Burgos, David; Manrique, Tatiana; Gonzalez, Felisa; Gallo, Milagros

    2011-01-01

    Although previous findings point to the long-term impact of ethanol exposure during periadolescence on hippocampal-dependent learning tasks, comparisons considering different onset and exposure periods during this developmental range of ages are still needed. The aim of this experiment was to determine whether intermittent voluntary chronic…

  6. Sympathetic enhancement in futsal players but not in football players after repeated sprint ability test

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yung-Sheng; Liao, Chih-Jung; Lu, Wan-An; Kuo, Cheng-Deng

    2015-01-01

    Background Heart rate variability (HRV) can disclose the specific adaptation of sympathovagal modulation to exercise. This study investigated the change in HRV measures after anaerobic and aerobic intermittent exercises in university football and futsal players. Method 36 male university students with physically active lifestyle (n=14), football (n=12), and futsal (n=10) participated in this study. The participants completed the repeated sprint ability (RSA) test and Yo-Yo (YY) intermittent r...

  7. Continuous and intermittent exposure of neonatal rat calvarial cells to PTHrP (1-36 inhibits bone nodule mineralization in vitro by downregulating bone sialoprotein expression via the cAMP signaling pathway [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/18x

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzan A Kamel

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The development and growth of the skeleton in the absence of parathyroid-hormone-related protein (PTHrP is abnormal.  The shortening of appendicular bones in PTHrP gene null mice is explained by an effect of PTHrP on endochondral bone growth.  Whether or not PTHrP influences intramembranous ossification is less clear.  The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of exogenous PTHrP on intramembranous ossification in vitro.  Neonatal rat calvarial cells maintained in primary cell culture conditions that permit spontaneous formation of woven bone nodules by intramembranous ossification were studied. The expression of PTHrP, parathyroid hormone 1 receptor (PTH1R, and alkaline phosphatase (AP by osteogenic cells in developing nodules and the effects of PTHrP (1-36 on nodule development was determined over 3-18 days. PTHrP and PTH1R were detected colonies of osteogenic cells on culture day three, and AP was detected on day six. PTHrP and its receptor were localized in pre-osteoblasts, osteoblasts, and osteocytes, and AP activity was detected in pre-osteoblasts and osteoblasts but not osteocytes. Continuous and intermittent exposure to PTHrP (1-36 decreased the number of mineralized bone nodules and bone sialoprotein (BSP mRNA and protein, but had no effect on the number of AP-positive osteogenic cell colonies, cell proliferation, apoptosis, or osteopontin (OPN mRNA. These results demonstrate that osteogenic cells that participate in the formation of woven bone nodules in vitro exhibit PTHrP and PTH1R before they demonstrate AP activity. Exogenous PTHrP (1-36 inhibits the mineralization of woven bone deposited during bone nodule formation in vitro, possibly by reducing the expression of BSP.

  8. Sky dancer: an intermittent system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cros, Anne; Rodríguez Romero, Jesse Alexander; Damián Díaz Andrade, Oscar

    2009-11-01

    Sky dancers attract people sight to make advertising. What is the origin of those large vertical tubes fluctuations above an air blower? This study complements the previous one [1] about the system analysis from a dynamical system point of view. As a difference from the ``garden hose-instability'' [2], the tube shape has got ``break points''. Those ``break points'' separate the air-filled bottom tube portion from its deflated top portion. We record the tube dynamics with a high-speed videocamera simultaneously that we measure the pressure at the air blower exit. The intermittent pressure evolution displays picks when the tube fluctuates. We compare those overpressure values with the ones that appears in a rigid tube whose exit is partially obstructed. [1] F. Castillo Flores & A. Cros ``Transition to chaos of a vertical collapsible tube conveying air flow'' J. Phys.: Conf. Ser. 166, 012017 (2009). [2] A. S. Greenwald & J. Dungundji ``Static and dynamic instabilities of a propellant line'' MIT Aeroelastic and Structures Research Lab, AFOSR Sci. Report: AFOSR 67-1395 (1967).

  9. Intermittent chaotic chimeras for coupled rotators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olmi, Simona; Martens, Erik Andreas; Thutupalli, Shashi

    2015-01-01

    Two symmetrically coupled populations of N oscillators with inertia m display chaotic solutions with broken symmetry similar to experimental observations with mechanical pendulums. In particular, we report evidence of intermittent chaotic chimeras, where one population is synchronized and the other...

  10. Improved Intermittency Analysis of Single Event Data

    OpenAIRE

    Janik, R. A.; Ziaja, B.

    1998-01-01

    The intermittency analysis of single event data (particle moments) in multiparticle production is improved, taking into account corrections due to the reconstruction of history of a particle cascade. This approach is tested within the framework of the $\\alpha$-model.

  11. On-line intermittent connector anomaly detection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This paper investigates a non-traditional use of differential current sensor and current sensor to detect intermittent disconnection problems in connectors. An...

  12. 间断性水平位站立对尾吊大鼠胫骨骨小梁结构影响的micro-CT评价%Evaluation of the effect of intermittent standing exposure on the tibia trabecular structure in tail-suspended rats using micro-CT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡泽兵; 周涛; 王冰; 曹新生; 杜挺媛; 张舒

    2013-01-01

    目的 应用micro-CT研究尾吊大鼠胫骨骨小梁微结构的变化,以此评价间断性水平位站立对抗模拟失重导致的骨微结构退化的效果.方法 24只SD雄性大鼠随机等分为3组:对照组(CON组)、尾吊组(SUS组)、水平位站立对抗组(ST组).尾吊组大鼠始终保持约30°头低位及后肢自由悬垂不负重状态,水平位站立对抗组在尾吊处理的基础上,大鼠每天固定时间水平站立1 h.实验3周后处死各组大鼠,取其右侧胫骨行micro CT扫描及三维重建,对其骨微结构进行定量分析.结果 选定感兴趣区(ROI)行定量分析及三维可视化后,与CON组相比,SUS组胫骨骨体积分数(BVF)、骨小梁数量(Tb.N)、骨小梁厚度(Tb.Th)均显著降低,而骨表面积/体积(BS/BV)、骨小梁间隙(Tb.Sp)及骨小梁模式因子(Trabecular Pattern Factor,TPF)均显著升高;ST组的变化介于SUS组和CON组之间;三维可视化图像结果与物理参数结果趋势一致.应用One-Way ANOVA分析及多重比较LSD-t检验,三组各参数之间统计学差异显著(P<0.05).结论 间断性水平位站立可明显减弱尾吊大鼠胫骨的微结构退化和骨质丢失,而micro CT可以有效地辨别胫骨松质骨微结构的精细变化.%Objective To study the changes of the tibia trabecular' microstructure in tail -suspended rats using micro CT, in order to evaluate the effect of intermittent standing exposure on microstructure degeneration induced by hind limp unloading. Methods Twenty-four male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly and equally divided into 3 groups: control group ( CON), suspension group ( SUS), and intermittent standing group ( ST). The tail-suspended rats were kept approximately 30° head-down-tilt and tail-suspension for 3 weeks, and the rats in intermittent standing group were granted hind limb reloading for 1 hour per day at fixed time on the basis of tail-suspension. After 3-week treatment, all the rats were euthanized, and the right tibias

  13. Beneficial effects of intermittent suction and pressure treatment in intermittent claudication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehlsen, J; Himmelstrup, H; Himmelstrup, Bodil

    1993-01-01

    The present study reports on the effects of a physical treatment modality in patients with intermittent claudication. During this treatment a major part of the skin surface is subjected to intermittent suction and pressure. In a previous, preliminary study the authors found a beneficial effect...... administration. The treatment caused significant increments in the ADP thresholds for platelet aggregation, while the effects on fibrinolysis were uncertain. It is concluded that intermittent suction and pressure treatment offers a new approach for conservative treatment of intermittent claudication....

  14. Lacunarity and intermittency in fluid turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L. A.; Fournier, J.-D.; Spiegel, E. A.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that oscillations in the high-order moments of turbulent velocity fields are inherent to the fractal character of intermittent turbulence and are a feature of the lacunarity of fractal sets. Oscillations in simple Cantor sets are described, and a single parameter to measure lacunarity is identified. The connection between oscillations in fractals and in the turbulent velocity correlations is discussed using the phenomenological beta model of intermittent turbulence (Frisch et al., 1978).

  15. Effects of high intensity intermittent exercise on serum Immunoglobulin’s and Complement system response in youth soccer players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossain Shirvani

    2013-11-01

    Conclusion: In general, it seems that performing a 90- minute intermittent exercise session by young soccer players can cause stress and act as a suppressive factor against immunoglobulin G and A. Hence, it is likely that repeating such an exercise makes young soccer players prone to upper respiratory tract infection, resulting in the reduction of the two major immunoglobulins.

  16. Intermittent filtration of bacteria and colloids in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auset, Maria; Keller, Arturo A.; Brissaud, François; Lazarova, Valentina

    2005-09-01

    Intermittent filtration through porous media used for water and wastewater treatment can achieve high pathogen and colloid removal efficiencies. To predict the removal of bacteria, the effects of cyclic infiltration and draining events (transient unsaturated flow) were investigated. Using physical micromodels, we visualized the intermittent transport of bacteria and other colloids in unsaturated porous media. Column experiments provided quantitative measurements of the phenomena observed at the pore scale. Tagged Escherichia coli and a conservative tracer (NaI) were introduced in an initial pulse into a 1.5 m sand column. Subsequent hydraulic flushes without tagged bacteria or tracer were repeated every 4 hours for the next 4 days, during which outflow concentrations were monitored. Breakthrough behavior between colloids and dissolved tracer differed significantly, reflecting the differences in transport processes. Advancement of the wetting front remobilized bacteria which were held in thin water films, attached to the air-water interface (AWI), or entrapped in stagnant pore water between gas bubbles. In contrast, the tracer was only remobilized by diffusion from immobile to mobile water. Remobilization led to successive concentration peaks of bacteria and tracer in the effluent but with significant temporal differences. Observations at the pore-scale indicated that the colloids were essentially irreversibly attached to the solid-water interface, which explained to some extent the high removal efficiency of microbes in the porous media. Straining, cluster filtration, cell lysis, protozoa grazing, and bacteriophage parasitism could also contribute to the removal efficiency of bacteria.

  17. Intermittent Hypoxia Regulates Stem-like Characteristics and Differentiation of Neuroblastoma Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Vasantha Kumar Bhaskara; Indra Mohanam; Jasti S Rao; Sanjeeva Mohanam

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neuroblastomas are the most common extracranial solid tumors in children. Neuroblastomas are derived from immature cells of the sympathetic nervous system and are characterized by clinical and biological heterogeneity. Hypoxia has been linked to tumor progression and increased malignancy. Intermittent hypoxia or repeated episodes of hypoxia followed by re-oxygenation is a common phenomenon in solid tumors including neuroblastoma and it has a significant influence on the outcome of...

  18. Liver transplantation for acute intermittent porphyria:a viable treatment?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Faisal S Dar; Koji Asai; Ali Raza Haque; Thomas Cherian; Mohamed Rela; Nigel Heaton

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is the most common hepatic porphyria. Its clinical presentation includes severe disabling and life-threatening neurovisceral symptoms and acute psychiatric symptoms. These symptoms result from the overproduction and accumulation of porphyrin precursors, 5-aminoleuvulinic acid (ALA) and porphobilinogen (PBG). The effect of medical treatment is transient and is not effective once irreversible neurological damage has occurred. Liver transplantation (LT) replaces hepatic enzymes and can restore normal excretion of ALA and PBG and prevent acute attacks. METHOD:Two cases of LT for AIP were identiifed retro-spectively from a prospectively maintained LT database. RESULT:LT was successful with resolution of AIP in two patients who suffered from repeated acute attacks. CONCLUSION:LT can correct the underlying metabolic abnormality in AIP and improves quality of life signiifcantly.

  19. Behavioral components of tolerance to repeated inhalation of trichloroethylene (TCE) in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushnell, P J; Oshiro, W M

    2000-01-01

    The possibility that the acute neurotoxic effects of organic solvents change with repeated exposure will affect risk assessment of these pollutants. We observed previously that rats inhaling trichloroethylene (TCE) showed a progressive attenuation of impairment of signal detection behavior across several weeks of intermittent exposure, suggesting the development of tolerance. Here, we explored the development of tolerance to TCE during two weeks of daily exposures, and the degree to which learned behavioral modifications ("behavioral tolerance") could account for the effect. Adult Long-Evans rats were trained to perform a visual signal detection task (SDT) in which a press on one lever yielded food if a visual stimulus (a "signal") had occurred on that trial, and a press on a second lever produced food if no signal had been presented. In two experiments, with 2000 and 2400 ppm of TCE respectively, trained rats were divided into two groups (n = 8/group) with equivalent accuracy and then exposed to TCE in two-phase studies. In Phase 1, one group of rats received daily SDT tests paired with 70-min TCE exposures, followed by 70-min exposures to clean air after testing. The other group received daily SDT tests in clean air, followed by 70-min exposures to TCE (unpaired exposure and testing). All rats thus received the same number and daily sequence of exposures to TCE that differed only in the pairing with SDT testing. Both concentrations of TCE disrupted performance of the paired groups and this disruption abated over the 9 days of exposure. In Phase 2, the pairing of exposure and test conditions were reversed for the two groups. The groups that were shifted from unpaired to paired exposures (Unpaired-Paired groups) showed qualitatively similar patterns of deficit and recovery as did the rats whose tests were initially paired with TCE (Paired-Unpaired groups), indicating that task-specific learning was involved in the development of tolerance. Quantitative differences

  20. Intermittent changing axis deviation with intermittent left anterior hemiblock during atrial flutter with subclinical hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patanè, Salvatore; Marte, Filippo

    2009-06-26

    Subclinical hyperthyroidism is an increasingly recognized entity that is defined as a normal serum free thyroxine and free triiodothyronine levels with a thyroid-stimulating hormone level suppressed below the normal range and usually undetectable. It has been reported that subclinical hyperthyroidism is not associated with CHD or mortality from cardiovascular causes but it is usually associated with a higher heart rate and a higher risk of supraventricular arrhythmias including atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter. Intermittent changing axis deviation during atrial fibrillation has also rarely been reported. We present a case of intermittent changing axis deviation with intermittent left anterior hemiblock in a 59-year-old Italian man with atrial flutter and subclinical hyperthyroidism. To our knowledge, this is the first report of intermittent changing axis deviation with intermittent left anterior hemiblock in a patient with atrial flutter.

  1. Intermittent ephemeral river-breaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reniers, A. J.; MacMahan, J. H.; Gallagher, E. L.; Shanks, A.; Morgan, S.; Jarvis, M.; Thornton, E. B.; Brown, J.; Fujimura, A.

    2012-12-01

    In the summer of 2011 we performed a field experiment in Carmel River State Beach, CA, at a time when the intermittent natural breaching of the ephemeral Carmel River occurred due to an unusually rainy period prior to the experiment associated with El Nino. At this time the river would fill the lagoon over the period of a number of days after which a breach would occur. This allowed us to document a number of breaches with unique pre- and post-breach topographic surveys, accompanying ocean and lagoon water elevations as well as extremely high flow (4m/s) velocities in the river mouth during the breaching event. The topographic surveys were obtained with a GPS-equipped backpack mounted on a walking human and show the evolution of the river breaching with a gradually widening and deepening river channel that cuts through the pre-existing beach and berm. The beach face is qualified as a steep with an average beach slope of 1:10 with significant reflection of the incident waves (MacMahan et al., 2012). The wave directions are generally shore normal as the waves refract over the deep canyon that is located offshore of the beach. The tide is mixed semi-diurnal with a range on the order of one meter. Breaching typically occurred during the low-low tide. Grain size is highly variable along the beach with layers of alternating fine and coarse material that could clearly be observed as the river exit channel was cutting through the beach. Large rocky outcroppings buried under the beach sand are also present along certain stretches of the beach controlling the depth of the breaching channel. The changes in the water level measured within the lagoon and the ocean side allows for an estimate of the volume flux associated with the breach as function of morphology, tidal elevation and wave conditions as well as an assessment of the conditions and mechanisms of breach closure, which occurred on the time scale of O(0.5 days). Exploratory model simulations will be presented at the

  2. Insulin production hampered by intermittent hypoxia via impaired zinc homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eung-Kwon Pae

    Full Text Available Without zinc, pancreatic beta cells cannot either assemble insulin molecules or precipitate insulin crystals; thus, a lack of zinc concentration in the beta cells would result in a decreased insulin production. ZIP8 is one of the zinc uptake transporters involved in zinc influx into the cytosol of beta cells. Thus, if ZIP8 is down-regulated, a decreased insulin production would result. We assumed that intermittent hypoxic exposure to the beta cells may result in a decreased production of insulin due to a lack of zinc. To test this hypothesis we harvested pancreatic islets from the rats conditioned under intermittent hypoxia (IH (fluctuating between 20.5% and 10% every 4 min for 1 h and compared the results with those from control animals and islets. We also compared their insulin and glucose homeostasis using glucose tolerance tests (GTT after 3 weeks. GTT results show a significant delay (P<0.05 in recovery of the blood glucose level in IH treated pups. ZIP8 expression in the beta cell membrane was down-regulated. The zinc concentration in the cell as well as insulin production was significantly decreased in the islets harvested from IH animals. However, mRNA for insulin and C-peptide/insulin protein levels in the total cell lysates remained the same as those of controls. When we treated the beta cells using siRNA mediated ZIP8, we observed the commensurate results from the IH-treated islets. We conclude that a transient IH exposure could knockdown ZIP8 transporters at mRNA as well as protein levels in the beta cells, which would decrease the level of blood insulin. However, the transcriptional activity of insulin remains the same. We conclude that the precipitation process of insulin crystal may be disturbed by a lack of zinc in the cytosol that is modulated by mainly ZIP8 after IH exposure.

  3. Intermittency in 2D soap film turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Cerbus, R T

    2013-01-01

    The Reynolds number dependency of intermittency for 2D turbulence is studied in a flowing soap film. The Reynolds number used here is the Taylor microscale Reynolds number R_{\\lambda}, which ranges from 20 to 800. Strong intermittency is found for both the inverse energy and direct enstrophy cascades as measured by (a) the pdf of velocity differences P(\\delta u(r)) at inertial scales r, (b) the kurtosis of P(\\partial_x u), and (c) the scaling of the so-called intermittency exponent \\mu, which is zero if intermittency is absent. Measures (b) and (c) are quantitative, while (a) is qualitative. These measurements are in disagreement with some previous results but not all. The velocity derivatives are nongaussian at all R_{\\lambda} but show signs of becoming gaussian as R_{\\lambda} increases beyond the largest values that could be reached. The kurtosis of P(\\delta u(r)) at various r indicates that the intermittency is scale dependent. The structure function scaling exponents also deviate strongly from the Kraichn...

  4. Digital repeat analysis; setup and operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nol, J; Isouard, G; Mirecki, J

    2006-06-01

    Since the emergence of digital imaging, there have been questions about the necessity of continuing reject analysis programs in imaging departments to evaluate performance and quality. As a marketing strategy, most suppliers of digital technology focus on the supremacy of the technology and its ability to reduce the number of repeats, resulting in less radiation doses given to patients and increased productivity in the department. On the other hand, quality assurance radiographers and radiologists believe that repeats are mainly related to positioning skills, and repeat analysis is the main tool to plan training needs to up-skill radiographers. A comparative study between conventional and digital imaging was undertaken to compare outcomes and evaluate the need for reject analysis. However, digital technology still being at its early development stages, setting a credible reject analysis program became the major task of the study. It took the department, with the help of the suppliers of the computed radiography reader and the picture archiving and communication system, over 2 years of software enhancement to build a reliable digital repeat analysis system. The results were supportive of both philosophies; the number of repeats as a result of exposure factors was reduced dramatically; however, the percentage of repeats as a result of positioning skills was slightly on the increase for the simple reason that some rejects in the conventional system qualifying for both exposure and positioning errors were classified as exposure error. The ability of digitally adjusting dark or light images reclassified some of those images as positioning errors.

  5. A protocol of intermittent exercise (shuttle runs) to train young basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadro, Ivan; Sepulcri, Luigino; Lazzer, Stefano; Fregolent, Rudy; Zamparo, Paola

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to set up a protocol of intermittent exercise to train young basketball players. Twenty-one players were asked to complete (a) an incremental test to determine maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), the speed at the ventilatory threshold (vthr) and the energy cost of "linear" running (Cr) and (b) an intermittent test composed of 10 shuttle runs of 10-second duration and 30-seconds of recovery (total duration: about 6 minutes). The exercise intensity (the running speed, vi) was set at 130% of vthr. During the intermittent tests, oxygen uptake (VO2) and blood lactate concentration (Lab) were measured. The average pretraining VO2 calculated for a single bout (131 ± 9 ml · min(-1) kg(-1)) was about 2.4 times greater than the subjects' measured VO2max (54.7 ± 4.6 ml · min(-1) · kg(-1)). The net energy cost of running (9.2 ± 0.9 J · m(-1) · kg(-1)) was about 2.4 times higher than that measured at constant "linear" speed (3.9 ± 0.3 J · m(-1) · kg(-1)). The intermittent test was repeated after 7 weeks of training: 9 subjects (control group [CG]) maintained their traditional training schedule, whereas for 12 subjects (experimental group [EG]) part of the training was replaced by intermittent exercise (the same shuttle test as described above). After training, the VO2 measured during the intermittent test was significantly reduced (p young basketball players.

  6. 参芪花粉片对高原慢性间歇性缺氧暴露期间脱习服的疗效观察%Curative effect observation of Shenqipollen tablet on deacclimatization during exposure period of the chronic intermittent hypoxia in high altitude regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    娄晓敏; 张雪峰; 周其全; 王胜玉

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the intervention effects of Shenqi pollen tablets on deacclimatization during exposure period of chronic plateau intermittent hypoxic hypoxia. METHODS Selected 380 young healthy workers from the plains and low lying areas into the work area altitude 4 300m, with weekly indoor at an altitude of 4 300m for 5 working days, then returned to the elevation of 2 800m fixed base rest mode, continuously observed the intervention effect of Shenqi pollen tablets on symptom occurrence rate of plateau deacclimatization during rest period exposure period of 3 years in the highlands at an altitude of 2 800m. RESULTS The total detectable rate of altitude deacclimatization was 82.37% (313/380); the top 10 symptoms and the order were: lethargy (66.31%) , fatigue (42.37%) , dizziness (35.78%) , insomnia (30.79%) , decreased appetite (29.73%), upset (29.21%), general malaise (28.95%), depression (27.89%), palpitation (27.10%), and chest tightness (24.47%). The crowd in need of treatment with altitude deacclimatization were detected in the total de-acclimation of those 34.18% (107/313). The intervention effect of Shenqi pollen tablets made the symptoms completely disappear in 92.52% (99/ 107) after medication of 15 days, recurrence rate (cured) was 78.79% (78/99) in who without continue medication in half of one year, even?there were some symptoms and self-medication to ease (CR) 21.21% (21/99) , free remission or partial remission, but often needed medication (inactive) had 7.48% (8/107). There were no adverse drug reactions during observation period. CONCLUSION The high altitude deacclimatization during exposure period of chronic plateau intermittent hypoxic hypoxia has a higher prevalence. Shenqi pollen tablets have better short-term effect and long-term prevention, and is an effective disease prevention and treatment.%目的 探讨参芪花粉片对高原慢性间歇性缺氧暴露期间脱习服的干预效果.方法 选择由平原

  7. Magnetic field generation by intermittent convection

    CERN Document Server

    Chertovskih, R; Chimanski, E V

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic field generation by convective flows in transition to weak turbulence is studied numerically. By fixing the Prandtl number at P=0.3 and varying the Rayleigh number (Ra) as a control parameter in three-dimensional Rayleigh-Benard convection of an electrically conducting fluid, a recently reported route to hyperchaos involving quasiperiodic regimes, crises and chaotic intermittent attractors is followed, and the critical magnetic Prandtl number ($P_m^c$) for dynamo action is determined as a function of Ra. A mechanism for the onset of on-off intermittency in the magnetic energy is described, the most beneficial convective regimes for dynamo action are identified, and how intermittency affects the dependence of $P_m^c$ on Ra is discussed.

  8. Chaos synchronization based on intermittent state observer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Guo-Hui; Zhou Shi-Ping; Xu De-Ming

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the method of synchronizing slave to the master trajectory using an intermittent state observer by constructing a synchronizer which drives the response system globally tracing the driving system asymptotically. It has been shown from the theory of synchronization error-analysis that a satisfactory result of chaos synchronization is expected under an appropriate intermittent period and state observer. Compared with continuous control method,the proposed intermittent method can target the desired orbit more efficiently. The application of the method is demonstrated on the hyperchaotic Rossler systems. Numerical simulations show that the length of the synchronization interval rs is of crucial importance for our scheme, and the method is robust with respect to parameter mismatch.

  9. Forces and energetics of intermittent swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floryan, Daniel; Van Buren, Tyler; Smits, Alexander J.

    2017-08-01

    Experiments are reported on intermittent swimming motions. Water tunnel experiments on a nominally two-dimensional pitching foil show that the mean thrust and power scale linearly with the duty cycle, from a value of 0.2 all the way up to continuous motions, indicating that individual bursts of activity in intermittent motions are independent of each other. This conclusion is corroborated by particle image velocimetry (PIV) flow visualizations, which show that the main vortical structures in the wake do not change with duty cycle. The experimental data also demonstrate that intermittent motions are generally energetically advantageous over continuous motions. When metabolic energy losses are taken into account, this conclusion is maintained for metabolic power fractions less than 1.

  10. Intermittency in Switching Power Converters: Theoretical Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Yu-fei; CHEN Jun-ning; TSE Chi K.; QIU Shui-sheng; KE Dao-ming; SHI Long-xing; SUN Wei-feng

    2006-01-01

    In view of reasonable explanation of intermittent subharmonics and chaos that can be gained from coupling filter between circuits,this paper discusses a method that maps time bifurcation with parameter bifurcation.Based on this mapping method,the general analysis method of characteristic multiplier,which is originally aimed at parameter bifurcation,can be used for the study of intermittency,i.e.,time bifurcation.In this paper,all researches coming from characteristic multipliers,parameter-bifurcation diagrams,and the largest Lyapunov exponent indicate the same results as those produced by simulation and experiment.Thus,it is proved theoretically that the intermittency in switching power converter can be explained in terms of coupling of spurious interference.

  11. Assessing relative volatility/intermittency/energy dissipation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole E.; Pakkanen, Mikko S.; Schmiegel, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the notion of relative volatility/intermittency and demonstrate how relative volatility statistics can be used to estimate consistently the temporal variation of volatility/intermittency when the data of interest are generated by a non-semimartingale, or a Brownian semistationary...... process in particular. This estimation method is motivated by the assessment of relative energy dissipation in empirical data of turbulence, but it is also applicable in other areas. We develop a probabilistic asymptotic theory for realised relative power variations of Brownian semistationary processes......, and introduce inference methods based on the theory. We also discuss how to extend the asymptotic theory to other classes of processes exhibiting stochastic volatility/intermittency. As an empirical application, we study relative energy dissipation in data of atmospheric turbulence....

  12. Synchronization of Intermittently Coupled Dynamical Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the synchronization phenomenon of an intermittently coupled dynamical network in which the coupling among nodes can occur only at discrete instants and the coupling configuration of the network is time varying. A model of intermittently coupled dynamical network consisting of identical nodes is introduced. Based on the stability theory for impulsive differential equations, some synchronization criteria for intermittently coupled dynamical networks are derived. The network synchronizability is shown to be related to the second largest and the smallest eigenvalues of the coupling matrix, the coupling strength, and the impulsive intervals. Using the chaotic Chua system and Lorenz system as nodes of a dynamical network for simulation, respectively, the theoretical results are verified and illustrated.

  13. Physical growth and changes in intermittent endurance run performance in young male Basque soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Humberto M; Bidaurrazaga-Letona, Iraia; Lekue, José António; Amado, Markos; Figueiredo, António J; Gil, Susana M

    2014-01-01

    The present 4-year longitudinal study examined physical growth and development of intermittent endurance run performance in young Basque soccer players aged 10-15 years applying multilevel regression modeling. Anthropometry, predicted adult stature and Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery level 1 test (Yo-Yo IR1) of players from the under-11 teams from the Athletic Club of Bilbao were measured at pre- and end-season (two measurements per year of study, n = 33 considered for analysis). A non-linear effect of age on intermittent endurance run was observed, with significantly higher increases in Yo-Yo IR1 between 10-11 year-old and 14-15 year-old players. The development of Yo-Yo IR1 performance in all the years of the study was influenced positively by training exposure during the seasons (P 0.05). The steady development of intermittent endurance run performance during pubertal years in adolescent Basque soccer players is partially influenced by training exposure.

  14. Assessment of intermittent trace element pollution by moss bags

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cesa, M. [Dipartimento di Biologia, Universita di Trieste, Via Giorgieri 10, I-34127 Trieste (Italy)]. E-mail: mcesa@units.it; Bizzotto, A. [ARPAV Dipartimento di Vicenza, Servizio Territoriale di Bassano del Grappa, Via Cereria 15, I-36061 Bassano del Grappa (VI) (Italy); Ferraro, C. [ARPAV Dipartimento di Vicenza, Servizio Territoriale di Bassano del Grappa, Via Cereria 15, I-36061 Bassano del Grappa (VI) (Italy); Fumagalli, F. [Dipartimento di Biologia, Universita di Trieste, Via Giorgieri 10, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Nimis, P.L. [Dipartimento di Biologia, Universita di Trieste, Via Giorgieri 10, I-34127 Trieste (Italy)

    2006-12-15

    Moss bags of the aquatic bryophyte Rhynchostegium riparioides (Hedw.) C. Jens. were transplanted into an irrigation ditch in the Province of Vicenza (NE Italy), affected by intermittent trace element contamination due to galvanics. The study aimed at: (a) testing the ability of mosses to detect different patterns of pollution (b) providing information about intensity and temporal extension of pollution events, and (c) localising the main sources. Moss bags were collected after 20, 34, 48 and 62 days of exposure. The concentrations of As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn in the desiccated apical shoots of mosses were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The mean concentrations measured in non-contaminated stations of a previous work were adopted as background values, to calculate the contamination factor (CF). Transplants were able to: (a) detect spatial patterns of bioaccumulation (b) reveal chronic contamination by Pb and Cu, intermittent contamination by Cr, Zn, and Ni, and a release of Cd by moss bags, and (c) localise the main emission sources. - Transplanted bryophytes are able to detect accidental trace element pollution in freshwaters of industrial areas.

  15. Recent Progress in the Treatment of Advanced Prostate Cancer With Intermittent Dose-Intense Calcitriol (DN-101).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brawer, Michael K

    2007-01-01

    Docetaxel is becoming standard therapy for androgen-independent prostate cancer (AIPC), and investigational agents are being added to docetaxel to assess potential additive effects and synergy. Although one of these agents, calcitriol, has repeatedly demonstrated antiproliferative properties against cancer of the prostate, breast, colon, and lung, the antineoplastic activity of calcitriol requires superphysiologic levels. Unfortunately, chronic exposure to superphysiologic levels of calcitriol causes hypercalcemia and resulting toxicity. Therefore, a host of analogues of calcitriol have been investigated for antineoplastic function, including intermittent dose-intense calcitriol, or DN-101. Because of encouraging results from phase II studies of DN-101 combined with docetaxel, the ASCENT (AIPC Study of Calcitriol Enhancement of Taxotere) phase II trial investigated docetaxel plus DN-101 versus docetaxel plus placebo in 250 men with metastatic AIPC and an abnormal baseline prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level. Although the ASCENT trial did not achieve its primary endpoint for increased PSA response, there was a significant trend in PSA response rate in the DN-101 arm. DN-101 in combination with docetaxel seems to improve overall survival and, interestingly, has a favorable safety profile compared with docetaxel alone. The DN-101/docetaxel combination is currently being studied in a much larger international trial, ASCENT-2.

  16. Quantum repeated games revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Frackiewicz, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    We present a scheme for playing quantum repeated 2x2 games based on the Marinatto and Weber's approach to quantum games. As a potential application, we study twice repeated Prisoner's Dilemma game. We show that results not available in classical game can be obtained when the game is played in the quantum way. Before we present our idea, we comment on the previous scheme of playing quantum repeated games.

  17. Intermittently connected mobile ad hoc networks

    CERN Document Server

    Jamalipour, Abbas

    2011-01-01

    In the last few years, there has been extensive research activity in the emerging area of Intermittently Connected Mobile Ad Hoc Networks (ICMANs). By considering the nature of intermittent connectivity in most real word mobile environments without any restrictions placed on users' behavior, ICMANs are eventually formed without any assumption with regard to the existence of a end-to-end path between two nodes wishing to communicate. It is different from the conventional Mobile Ad Hoc Networks (MANETs), which have been implicitly viewed as a connected graph with established complete paths betwe

  18. Repeated-sprint and effort ability in rugby league players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Rich D; Gabbett, Tim J

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to (a) investigate the influence of tackling on repeated-sprint performance; (b) determine whether repeated-sprint ability (RSA) and repeated-effort ability (REA) are 2 distinct qualities; and (c) assess the test-retest reliability of repeated-sprint and repeated-effort tests in rugby league. Twelve rugby league players performed a repeated-sprint (12 × 20-m sprints performed on a 20-second cycle) and a repeated-effort (12 × 20-m sprints with intermittent tackling, performed on a 20-second cycle) test 7 days apart. The test-retest reliability of these tests was also established. Heart rate and rating of perceived exertion were recorded throughout the tests. There was a significantly greater (p ≤ 0.05) and large effect size (ES) differences for total sprint time (ES = 1.19), average heart rate (ES = 1.64), peak heart rate (ES = 1.35), and perceived exertion (ES = 3.39) for the repeated-effort test compared with the repeated-sprint test. A large difference (ES = 1.02, p = 0.06) was detected for percentage decrement between the 2 tests. No significant relationship was found between the repeated-sprint and repeated-effort tests for any of the dependent variables. Both tests proved reliable, with total sprint time being the most reliable method of assessing performance. This study demonstrates that the addition of tackling significantly increases the physiological response to repeated-sprint exercise and reduces repeated-sprint performance in rugby league players. Furthermore, RSA and REA appear to be 2 distinct qualities that can be reliably assessed with total time being the most reliable measure of performance.

  19. Time to exhaustion at continuous and intermittent maximal lactate steady state during running exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, Naiandra; de Lucas, Ricardo Dantas; Beneke, Ralph; Guglielmo, Luiz Guilherme

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the time to exhaustion (TE) and the physiological responses at continuous and intermittent (ratio 5:1) maximal lactate steady state (MLSS) in well-trained runners. Ten athletes (32.7 ± 6.9 y, VO2max 61.7 ± 3.9 mL · kg-1 · min-1) performed an incremental treadmill test, three to five 30-min constant-speed tests to determine the MLSS continuous and intermittent (5 min of running, interspaced by 1 min of passive rest), and 2 randomized TE tests at such intensities. Two-way ANOVA with repeated measures was used to compare the changes in physiological variables during the TE tests and between continuous and intermittent exercise. The intermittent MLSS velocity (MLSSint = 15.26 ± 0.97 km/h) was higher than in the continuous model (MLSScon = 14.53 ± 0.93 km/h), while the TE at MLSScon was longer than MLSSint (68 ± 11 min and 58 ± 15 min, P heart rate, ventilation, and rating of perceived exertion presented a significant increase in the last portion of the tests. The results showed a higher tolerance to exercising during MLSScon than during MLSSint in trained runners. Thus, the training volume of an extensive interval session (ratio 5:1) designed at MLSS intensity should take into consideration this higher speed at MLSS and also the lower TE than with continuous exercise.

  20. Intermittent oral iron supplementation during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Rosas, Juan Pablo; De-Regil, Luz Maria; Gomez Malave, Heber; Flores-Urrutia, Monica C; Dowswell, Therese

    2015-10-19

    Anaemia is a frequent condition during pregnancy, particularly among women in low- and middle-income countries. Traditionally, gestational anaemia has been prevented with daily iron supplements throughout pregnancy, but adherence to this regimen due to side effects, interrupted supply of the supplements, and concerns about safety among women with an adequate iron intake, have limited the use of this intervention. Intermittent (i.e. two or three times a week on non-consecutive days) supplementation has been proposed as an alternative to daily supplementation. To assess the benefits and harms of intermittent supplementation with iron alone or in combination with folic acid or other vitamins and minerals to pregnant women on neonatal and pregnancy outcomes. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (31 July 2015), the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (31 July 2015) and contacted relevant organisations for the identification of ongoing and unpublished studies (31 July 2015). Randomised or quasi-randomised trials. We assessed the methodological quality of trials using standard Cochrane criteria. Two review authors independently assessed trial eligibility, extracted data and conducted checks for accuracy. This review includes 27 trials from 15 countries, but only 21 trials (with 5490 women) contributed data to the review. All studies compared daily versus intermittent iron supplementation. The methodological quality of included studies was mixed and most had high levels of attrition.The overall assessment of the quality of the evidence for primary infant outcomes was low and for maternal outcomes very low.Of the 21 trials contributing data, three studies provided intermittent iron alone, 14 intermittent iron + folic acid and four intermittent iron plus multiple vitamins and minerals in comparison with the same composition of supplements provided in a daily regimen.Overall, for women receiving any intermittent

  1. New Zealand Blackcurrant Extract Improves High-Intensity Intermittent Running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Ian Craig; Vine, Sarah Anne; Blacker, Sam David; Willems, Mark Elisabeth Theodorus

    2015-10-01

    We examined the effect of New Zealand blackcurrant (NZBC) extract on high-intensity intermittent running and postrunning lactate responses. Thirteen active males (age: 25 ± 4 yrs, height: 1.82 ± 0.07 m, body mass: 81 ± 14 kg, VO2max: 56 ± 4 ml·kg-1·min-1, vVO2max: 17.6 ± 0.8 km·h-1) performed a treadmill running protocol to exhaustion, which consisted of stages with 6 × 19 s of sprints with 15 s of low-intensity running between sprints. Interstage rest time was 1 min and stages were repeated with increasing sprint speeds. Subjects consumed capsuled NZBC extract (300 mg·day-1 CurraNZ; containing 105 mg anthocyanin) or placebo for 7 days (double-blind, randomized, crossover design, wash-out at least 14 days). Blood lactate was collected for 30 min postexhaustion. NZBC increased total running distance by 10.6% (NZBC: 4282 ± 833 m, placebo: 3871 ± 622 m, p = .02), with the distance during sprints increased by 10.8% (p = .02). Heart rate, oxygen uptake, lactate and rating of perceived exertion were not different between conditions for the first 4 stages completed by all subjects. At exhaustion, blood lactate tended to be higher for NZBC (NZBC: 6.01 ± 1.07 mmol·L-1, placebo: 5.22 ± 1.52 mmol·L-1, p = .07). There was a trend for larger changes in lactate following 15 min (NZBC: -2.89 ± 0.51 mmol·L-1, placebo: -2.46 ± 0.39 mmol·L-1, p = .07) of passive recovery. New Zealand blackcurrant extract (CurraNZ) may enhance performance in sports characterized by high-intensity intermittent exercise as greater distances were covered with repeated sprints, there was higher lactate at exhaustion, and larger changes in lactate during early recovery after repeated sprints to exhaustion.

  2. Pharm GKB: Porphyria, Acute Intermittent [PharmGKB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Overview Alternate Names: PharmGKB Accession Id: PA166048717 External Vocabularies NDFRT: Porphyria, Acute... Intermittent (N0000003536) Common Searches Search Medline Plus Search CTD Pharm GKB: Porphyria, Acute Intermittent ...

  3. Intermittent demand : Linking forecasting to inventory obsolescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teunter, Ruud H.; Syntetos, Aris A.; Babai, M. Zied

    2011-01-01

    The standard method to forecast intermittent demand is that by Croston. This method is available in ERP-type solutions such as SAP and specialised forecasting software packages (e.g. Forecast Pro), and often applied in practice. It uses exponential smoothing to separately update the estimated demand

  4. Intermittent resistive faults in digital cmos circuits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhoff, Hans G.; Ebrahimi, H.

    2015-01-01

    A major threat in extremely dependable high-end process node integrated systems in e.g. Avionics are no failures found (NFF). One category of NFFs is the intermittent resistive fault, often originating from bad (e.g. Via or TSV-based) interconnections. This paper will show the impact of these faults

  5. Current drive induced by intermittent trapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakach, R. [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA/Cadarache, Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee (DRFC), 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Gell, Y. [CET, Israel (Israel)

    1999-02-01

    We propose a mechanism for driving a current in a dispersive plasma based on intermittent trapping of electrons in a ponderomotive well generated by two- counterpropagating electron cyclotron waves. By choosing properly the parameters of the system, this mechanism is expected to induce a high efficiency current drive. (authors)

  6. Intermittent Swimming with a Flexible Propulsor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akoz, Emre; Zeyghami, Samane; Moored, Keith

    2016-11-01

    Some animals propel themselves by using an intermittent swimming gait known as a burst-and-glide or a burst-and-coast motion. These swimmers tend to have a more pronounced pitching of their caudal fins than heaving leading to low non-dimensional heave-to-pitch ratios. Recent work has shown that when this ratio is sufficiently low the efficiency of an intermittently heaving/pitching airfoil can be significantly improved over a continuously oscillating airfoil. However, fish that swim with an intermittent gait, such as cod and saithe, do not have rigid fins, but instead have highly flexible fins. To examine the performance and flow structures of an intermittent swimmer with a flexible propulsor, a fast boundary element method solver strongly coupled with a torsional-spring structural model was developed. A self-propelled virtual body combined with a flexible-hinged pitching airfoil is used to model a free-swimming animal and its flexible caudal fin. The duty cycle of the active to the coasting phase of motion, the torsional spring flexibility and the forcing frequency are all varied. The cost-of-transport and the swimming speed are measured and connected to the observed wake patterns. Supported by the Office of Naval Research under Program Director Dr. Bob Brizzolara, MURI Grant Number N00014-14-1-0533.

  7. INTERMITTENCY, A TEST FOR STRING FRAGMENTATION PROCESSES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHOLTEN, O

    The Artru-Mennessier and the string fragmentation procedure as implemented in the code VENUS have been compared. The two fragmentation prescriptions predict a similar rapidity spectrum including its energy dependence and event multiplicities, but give rise to very different intermittency results.

  8. Management of patients with intermittent claudication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Spronk (Sandra)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractIntermittent claudication is the first and mildest manifestation of peripheral arterial disease, caused by the atherosclerotic process of progressive narrowing of one or more of the arteries of the peripheral circulation.1 If the arterial system fails, it results in a progressive oxygen

  9. Repeated morphine treatment influences operant and spatial learning differentially

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mei-Na WANG; Zhi-Fang DONG; Jun CAO; Lin XU

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether repeated morphine exposure or prolonged withdrawal could influence operant and spatial learning differentially. Methods Animals were chronically treated with morphine or subjected to morphine withdrawal. Then, they were subjected to two kinds of learning: operant conditioning and spatial learning.Results The acquisition of both simple appetitive and cued operant learning was impaired after repeated morphine treatment. Withdrawal for 5 weeks alleviated the impairments. Single morphine exposure disrupted the retrieval of operant memory but had no effect on rats after 5-week withdrawal. Contrarily, neither chronic morphine exposure nor 5-week withdrawal influenced spatial learning task of the Morris water maze. Nevertheless, the retrieval of spatial memory was impaired by repeated morphine exposure but not by 5-week withdrawal. Conclusion These observations suggest that repeated morphine exposure can influence different types of learning at different aspects, implicating that the formation of opiate addiction may usurp memory mechanisms differentially.

  10. Sympathoexcitation and arterial hypertension associated with obstructive sleep apnea and cyclic intermittent hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, J Woodrow; Tamisier, Renaud; Liu, Yuzhen

    2015-12-15

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by repetitive episodes of upper airway obstruction during sleep. These obstructive episodes are characterized by cyclic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), by sleep fragmentation, and by hemodynamic instability, and they result in sustained sympathoexcitation and elevated arterial pressure that persist during waking, after restoration of normoxia. Early studies established that 1) CIH, rather than sleep disruption, accounts for the increase in arterial pressure; 2) the increase in arterial pressure is a consequence of the sympathoactivation; and 3) arterial hypertension after CIH exposure requires an intact peripheral chemoreflex. More recently, however, evidence has accumulated that sympathoactivation and hypertension after CIH are also dependent on altered central sympathoregulation. Furthermore, although many molecular pathways are activated in both the carotid chemoreceptor and in the central nervous system by CIH exposure, two specific neuromodulators-endothelin-1 and angiotensin II-appear to play crucial roles in mediating the sympathetic and hemodynamic response to intermittent hypoxia.

  11. Effects of repeated exposure to high static magnetic fields during NMR imaging on the end point of reproduction and development in the animal model; Auswirkungen wiederholter Exposition mit starken statischen Magnetfeldern des MRI auf die Endpunkte Fortpflanzung und Entwicklung im Tiermodell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winterhager, E.; Gruemmer, R.; Ladd, M.E.

    2011-12-15

    In the present study, the effects of repeated exposure to strong static magnetic fields up to a flux density of 7 Tesla on spermatogenesis in adult male mice as well as on pregnancy and embryogenesis in female mice were studied. In addition, the fertility of male and female mice which were exposed daily to these static magnetic fields throughout their entire embryonic development in utero was investigated. Six experimental groups were examined: (1) cage controls, (2) sham-exposed controls, (3) exposure at the bore entrance and (4) in the isocenter of a 1.5T MRI, (5) exposure at the bore entrance and (6) in the isocenter of a 7T MRI. Overall, 895 adult mice, 944 offspring, and 2007 embryos were analyzed in this study.

  12. Mouse intermittent hypoxia mimicking apnoea of prematurity: effects on myelinogenesis and axonal maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jun; Tuong, Chi Minh; Zhang, Yiping; Shields, Christopher B; Guo, Gang; Fu, Hui; Gozal, David

    2012-02-01

    Premature babies are at high risk for both infantile apnoea and long-term neurobehavioural deficits. Recent studies suggest that diffuse structural changes in brain white matter are a positive predictor of poor cognitive outcomes. Since oligodendrocyte maturation, myelination, axon development, and synapse formation mainly occur in the third trimester of gestation and first postnatal year, infantile apnoea could lead to and/or exaggerate white matter impairments in preterm neonates. Therefore, we investigated oligodendroglia and axon development in a neonatal mouse model of intermittent hypoxia between postnatal days 2 and 10. During critical phases of central nervous system development, intermittent hypoxia induced hypomyelination in the corpus callosum, striatum, fornix, and cerebellum, but not in the pons or spinal cord. Intermittent hypoxia-elicited alterations in myelin-forming processes were reflected by decreased expression of myelin proteins, including MBP, PLP, MAG, and CNPase, possibly due to arrested maturation of oligodendrocytes. Ultrastructural abnormalities were apparent in the myelin sheath and axon. Immature oligodendrocytes were more vulnerable to neonatal intermittent hypoxia exposures than developing axons, suggesting that hypomyelination may contribute, at least partially, to axonal deficits. Insufficient neurofilament synthesis with anomalous components of neurofilament subunits, β-tubulin, and MAP2 isoforms indicated immaturity of axons in intermittent hypoxia-exposed mouse brains. In addition, down-regulation of synapsin I, synaptophysin, and Gap-43 phosphorylation suggested a potential stunt in axonogenesis and synaptogenesis. The region-selective and complex impairment in brain white matter induced by intermittent hypoxia was further associated with electrophysiological changes that may underlie long-term neurobehavioural sequelae.

  13. Short-duration intermittent hypoxia enhances endurance capacity by improving muscle fatty acid metabolism in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Junichi

    2016-04-01

    This study was designed to (1) investigate the effects of acute short-duration intermittent hypoxia on musclemRNAand microRNAexpression levels; and (2) clarify the mechanisms by which short-duration intermittent hypoxia improves endurance capacity. Experiment-1: Male mice were subjected to either acute 1-h hypoxia (12% O2), acute short-duration intermittent hypoxia (12% O2for 15 min, room air for 10 min, 4 times, Int-Hypo), or acute endurance exercise (Ex). The expression of vascular endothelial growth factor-AmRNAwas significantly greater than the control at 0 h post Ex and 6 h post Int-Hypo in the deep red region of the gastrocnemius muscle. miR-16 expression levels were significantly lower at 6 and 10 h post Int-Hypo. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α)mRNAlevels were significantly greater than the control at 3 h post Ex and 6 h post Int-Hypo. miR-23a expression levels were lower than the control at 6-24 h post Int-Hypo. Experiment-2: Mice were subjected to normoxic exercise training with or without intermittent hypoxia for 3 weeks. Increases in maximal exercise capacity were significantly greater by training with short-duration intermittent hypoxia (IntTr) than without hypoxia. Both 3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA-dehydrogenase and total carnitine palmitoyl transferase activities were significantly enhanced in IntTr. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta andPGC-1α mRNAlevels were both significantly greater in IntTr than in the sedentary controls. These results suggest that exercise training under normoxic conditions with exposure to short-duration intermittent hypoxia represents a beneficial strategy for increasing endurance performance by enhancing fatty acid metabolism in skeletal muscle.

  14. Intermittent Aeration in Biological Treatment of Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Doan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: E-coating process is widely used to provide a protective coating layer on metal parts in the automotive and metal finishing industry. The wastewater from the coating process contains organic compounds that are used in the cleaning, pretreatment and coating steps. Organic pollutants can be removed biologically. In the aerobic biological treatment, water aeration accounts for a significant portion of the total operating cost of the treatment process. Intermittent aeration is thus of benefit since it would reduce the energy consumption in the wastewater treatment. In the present study, wastewater from an electro-coating process was treated biologically using a packed column as an aerator where the wastewater was aerated by a countercurrent air flow. The objective was to obtain an optimum aeration cycle. Approach: Intermittent aeration time was varied at different preset cycles. An operational optimum of the aeration time (or air-water contacting time in the column was determined from the BOD5 removal after a certain treatment period. For continuous aeration of the wastewater, the air-liquid contacting time in the column was 52 min for 24 h of treatment. A unit energy consumption for pumping liquid and air, which was defined as the energy consumption per percent BOD5 removed, was used as a criterion to determine the optimum contacting time. Results: Optimum air-liquid contacting times were found to be about 38, 26 and 22 min for the treatment times of 24, 48 and 72 h, consecutively. This indicates that 27-58% saving on the unit energy consumption can be achieved using intermittent aeration of the wastewater. On the basis of the overall BOD5 removal, 17% and 23% savings in energy were observed with the intermittent aeration as compared to the continuous aeration of the wastewater for 48 and 72 h. Conclusion: The results obtained indicate that an appropriate intermittent aeration cycle can bring about a substantial energy saving

  15. 40 CFR 51.119 - Intermittent control systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intermittent control systems. 51.119... Intermittent control systems. (a) The use of an intermittent control system (ICS) may be taken into account in... of any constant pollution control system which was in use before December 31, 1970, or the...

  16. Transfer of contaminants from surface to hands : experimental assessment of linearity of the exposure process, adherence to the skin, and area exposed during fixed pressure and repeated contact with surfaces contaminated with a powder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, D.H.; Kroese, R.; Hemmen, J.J. van

    1999-01-01

    Estimation of dermal exposure in the workplace resulting from contact with contaminated surfaces is important in risk assessment. Models have been developed to describe the process of exposure due to transfer, but for major input parameters - that is, contact area surface and adherence - defaults ar

  17. Effect of intermittent, supine cervical traction on the myoelectric activity of the upper trapezius muscle in subjects with neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jette, D U; Falkel, J E; Trombly, C

    1985-08-01

    This study was undertaken to compare the myoelectric activity of the upper trapezius muscle before, during, and after intermittent, supine cervical traction. Twelve people with diagnosed disease or injury of the cervical spine served as subjects. Electromyographic recordings were taken from the upper trapezius muscle with bipolar surface electrodes. The subjects were treated with 20 minutes of intermittent, cervical traction at a force of 8% of their body weight. Recordings were taken with the subjects in the supine position before the traction, during one pull and release phase of the 10th and 20th minutes of traction, and after completion of the traction treatment. An analysis of variance with repeated measures showed no significant differences in the myoelectrical activity during the six time periods measured. The results of this study do not support the clinical use of intermittent, supine traction to produce cervical muscle relaxation.

  18. Repeated high-intensity running and sprinting in elite women’s soccer competition

    OpenAIRE

    Gabbett, Tim J; Wiig, Håvard; Spencer, Matt

    2013-01-01

    Background: To the authors’ knowledge, no study has investigated the concurrent repeated, high-intensity (RHIA) and repeated-sprint activity (RSA) of intermittent team-sport competition. Purpose: In this study, they report on the RSA of elite women’s football competition. In addition, they describe the nature of RHIA (eg, striding and sprinting activities) that involve a high energy cost and are associated with short (ie, ≤20 s) recovery periods. Methods: Thirteen elite women soccer players u...

  19. Reconfigurable multiport EPON repeater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Masayuki; Inohara, Ryo; Agata, Akira; Horiuchi, Yukio

    2009-11-01

    An extended reach EPON repeater is one of the solutions to effectively expand FTTH service areas. In this paper, we propose a reconfigurable multi-port EPON repeater for effective accommodation of multiple ODNs with a single OLT line card. The proposed repeater, which has multi-ports in both OLT and ODN sides, consists of TRs, BTRs with the CDR function and a reconfigurable electrical matrix switch, can accommodate multiple ODNs to a single OLT line card by controlling the connection of the matrix switch. Although conventional EPON repeaters require full OLT line cards to accommodate subscribers from the initial installation stage, the proposed repeater can dramatically reduce the number of required line cards especially when the number of subscribers is less than a half of the maximum registerable users per OLT. Numerical calculation results show that the extended reach EPON system with the proposed EPON repeater can save 17.5% of the initial installation cost compared with a conventional repeater, and can be less expensive than conventional systems up to the maximum subscribers especially when the percentage of ODNs in lightly-populated areas is higher.

  20. Revisiting the TALE repeat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Dong; Yan, Chuangye; Wu, Jianping; Pan, Xiaojing; Yan, Nieng

    2014-04-01

    Transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors specifically bind to double stranded (ds) DNA through a central domain of tandem repeats. Each TAL effector (TALE) repeat comprises 33-35 amino acids and recognizes one specific DNA base through a highly variable residue at a fixed position in the repeat. Structural studies have revealed the molecular basis of DNA recognition by TALE repeats. Examination of the overall structure reveals that the basic building block of TALE protein, namely a helical hairpin, is one-helix shifted from the previously defined TALE motif. Here we wish to suggest a structure-based re-demarcation of the TALE repeat which starts with the residues that bind to the DNA backbone phosphate and concludes with the base-recognition hyper-variable residue. This new numbering system is consistent with the α-solenoid superfamily to which TALE belongs, and reflects the structural integrity of TAL effectors. In addition, it confers integral number of TALE repeats that matches the number of bound DNA bases. We then present fifteen crystal structures of engineered dHax3 variants in complex with target DNA molecules, which elucidate the structural basis for the recognition of bases adenine (A) and guanine (G) by reported or uncharacterized TALE codes. Finally, we analyzed the sequence-structure correlation of the amino acid residues within a TALE repeat. The structural analyses reported here may advance the mechanistic understanding of TALE proteins and facilitate the design of TALEN with improved affinity and specificity.

  1. δ-Opioid receptor (DOR) signaling and reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediate intermittent hypoxia induced protection of canine myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Juan A; Williams, Arthur G; Sun, Jie; Gonzalez, Leticia; Downey, H Fred; Caffrey, James L; Mallet, Robert T

    2016-03-01

    Intermittent, normobaric hypoxia confers robust cardioprotection against ischemia-induced myocardial infarction and lethal ventricular arrhythmias. δ-Opioid receptor (DOR) signaling and reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in cardioprotective phenomena, but their roles in intermittent hypoxia are unknown. This study examined the contributions of DOR and ROS in mediating intermittent hypoxia-induced cardioprotection. Mongrel dogs completed a 20 day program consisting of 5-8 daily, 5-10 min cycles of moderate, normobaric hypoxia (FIO2 0.095-0.10), with intervening 4 min room air exposures. Subsets of dogs received the DOR antagonist naltrindole (200 μg/kg, sc) or antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (250 mg/kg, po) before each hypoxia session. Twenty-four hours after the last session, the left anterior descending coronary artery was occluded for 60 min and then reperfused for 5 h. Arrhythmias detected by electrocardiography were scored according to the Lambeth II conventions. Left ventricles were sectioned and stained with 2,3,5-triphenyl-tetrazolium-chloride, and infarct sizes were expressed as percentages of the area at risk (IS/AAR). Intermittent hypoxia sharply decreased IS/AAR from 41 ± 5 % (n = 12) to 1.8 ± 0.9 % (n = 9; P intermittent hypoxia). N-acetylcysteine (n = 6) interfered to a similar degree, with IS/AAR 42 ± 3 % and arrhythmia score 4.7 ± 0.3 (P intermittent hypoxia). Without the intervening reoxygenations, hypoxia (n = 4) was not cardioprotective (IS/AAR 50 ± 8 %; arrhythmia score 4.5 ± 0.5; P intermittent hypoxia). Thus DOR, ROS and cyclic reoxygenation were obligatory participants in the gradually evolving cardioprotection produced by intermittent hypoxia.

  2. Angiographic improvement after rapid intermittent compression treatment [ArtAssist] for small vessel obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bemmelen, Paul; Char, Daniel; Giron, Fabio; Ricotta, John J

    2003-03-01

    A case is presented of a female ex-smoker who underwent bypass or exploration of all three below-knee arteries with failed results. Three separate arteriograms, performed at other academic institutions, demonstrated progressive, severe involvement of the pedal arteries. Therefore, the patient was prepared to undergo below-knee amputation surgery for uncontrollable rest pain and progressive necrosis of the forefoot; instead, the patient underwent 4 months of intermittent compression treatment. A fourth arteriogram, performed after 4 months of intermittent compression treatment (using rapid inflation/deflation and high-pressure cycle; ArtAssist demonstrated marked improvement of the posterior tibial artery runoff and development of more extensive collateral arteries in the calf. The patient's rest pain subsided and successful limb salvage was accomplished with a modified transmetatarsal amputation. This case could encourage other practitioners to repeat arteriography after compression treatments, which may redirect the treatment plan for selected patients with critical limb ischemia and nonreconstructable peripheral vascular disease.

  3. Three-Dimensional Simulations of Tearing and Intermittency in Coronal Jets

    CERN Document Server

    Wyper, P F; Karpen, J T; Lynch, B J

    2016-01-01

    Observations of coronal jets increasingly suggest that local fragmentation and intermittency play an important role in the dynamics of these events. In this work we investigate this fragmentation in high-resolution simulations of jets in the closed-field corona. We study two realizations of the embedded-bipole model, whereby impulsive helical outflows are driven by reconnection between twisted and untwisted field across the domed fan plane of a magnetic null. We find that the reconnection region fragments following the onset of a tearing-like instability, producing multiple magnetic null points and flux-rope structures within the current layer. The flux ropes formed within the weak-field region in the center of the current layer are associated with "blobs" of density enhancement that become filamentary threads as the flux ropes are ejected from the layer, whereupon new flux ropes form behind them. This repeated formation and ejection of flux ropes provides a natural explanation for the intermittent outflows, ...

  4. Recursive quantum repeater networks

    CERN Document Server

    Van Meter, Rodney; Horsman, Clare

    2011-01-01

    Internet-scale quantum repeater networks will be heterogeneous in physical technology, repeater functionality, and management. The classical control necessary to use the network will therefore face similar issues as Internet data transmission. Many scalability and management problems that arose during the development of the Internet might have been solved in a more uniform fashion, improving flexibility and reducing redundant engineering effort. Quantum repeater network development is currently at the stage where we risk similar duplication when separate systems are combined. We propose a unifying framework that can be used with all existing repeater designs. We introduce the notion of a Quantum Recursive Network Architecture, developed from the emerging classical concept of 'recursive networks', extending recursive mechanisms from a focus on data forwarding to a more general distributed computing request framework. Recursion abstracts independent transit networks as single relay nodes, unifies software layer...

  5. A simple model for turbulence intermittencies

    CERN Document Server

    Rimbert, Nicolas

    2009-01-01

    Whether turbulence intermittencies shall be described by a log-Poisson, a log-stable pdf or other distributions is still debated nowadays. In this paper, a bridge between polymer physics, self-avoiding walk and random vortex stretching is established which may help in getting a new insight on this topics. Actually a very simple relationship between stability index of the stable law and the well known Flory exponent stemming from polymer physics is established. Moreover the scaling of turbulence intermittencies with Reynolds number is also obtained and the overall picture is very close to Tennekes' simple model for the fine scale structure of turbulence [Phys. Fluids, 11, 3 (1968)] : vortex tubes of Kolmogorov length width are bend by bigger vortices of Taylor length scale. This thus results in both a simple and sound model with no fitting parameter needed.

  6. Insights from intermittent binocular rivalry and EEG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A Pitts

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Novel stimulation and analytical approaches employed in EEG studies of ambiguous figures have recently been applied to binocular rivalry. The combination of intermittent stimulus presentation and EEG source imaging has begun to shed new light on the neural underpinnings of binocular rivalry. Here, we review the basics of the intermittent paradigm and highlight methodological issues important for interpreting previous results and designing future experiments. We then outline current analytical approaches, including EEG microstates, event-related potentials, and statistically-based source estimation, and propose a spatio-temporal model that integrates findings from several studies. Finally, we discuss the advantages and limitations of using binocular rivalry as a tool to investigate the neural basis of perceptual awareness.

  7. Towards an intermittency-friendly energy system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blarke, Morten

    2012-01-01

    . However, well-designed heat pump concepts are more cost-effective than electric boilers, and in future markets where the gas/electricity price ratio is likely to increase, compression heat pumps in combination with intermediate thermal storages represent a superior potential for combining an intermittency-friendly...... are capitulating as wind power penetration levels are moving above 25%; some operators are retiring cogeneration units entirely, while other operators are making way for heat-only boilers. This development is jeopardizing the system-wide energy, economic, and environmental benefits that distributed cogeneration...... using low-temperature heat recovered from flue gasses in combination with an intermediate cold storage, which enables the independent operation of heat pump and cogenerator. It is found that an electric boiler provides consistent improvements in the intermittency-friendliness of distributed cogeneration...

  8. INTERMITTENCY AND SCALING IN TURBULENT CONVECTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Emily S. C. CHING

    2003-01-01

    Both the velocity and temperature measurements taken in turbulent Rayleigh-B'enard convection experiments have been analyzed. It is found that both the velocity and temperature fluctuations are intermittent and can be well-described by the She-Leveque hierarchical structure. A positive correlation between the vertical velocity and the temperature differences is found both at the center,near the sidewall and near the bottom of the convection cell, supporting that buoyancy is significant in the Bolgiano regime. Moreover, the intermittent nature of the temperature fluctuations in the Bolgiano regime can be attributed to the variations in the temperature dissipation rate. However, the relations between the velocity and temperature structure functions and their correlations implied by the Bolgiano-Obukhov scaling are not supported by experimental measurements.

  9. Scaling and Intermittency in Animal Behavior

    CERN Document Server

    Harnos, A; Lawrence, A B; Vattay, G

    1999-01-01

    Scale-invariant spatial or temporal patterns and Lévy flight motion have been observed in a large variety of biological systems. It has been argued that animals in general might perform Lévy flight motion with power law distribution of times between two changes of the direction of motion. Here we study the temporal behaviour of nesting gilts. The time spent by a gilt in a given form of activity has power law probability distribution without finite average. Further analysis reveals intermittent eruption of certain periodic behavioural sequences which are responsible for the scaling behaviour and indicates the existence of a critical state. We show that this behaviour is in close analogy with temporal sequences of velocity found in turbulent flows, where random and regular sequences alternate and form an intermittent sequence.

  10. Influence of intermittent preventive treatment on antibodies to VAR2CSA in pregnant Cameroonian women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babakhanyan, Anna; Tutterrow, Yeung L; Bobbili, Naveen;

    2016-01-01

    Intermittent preventive treatment (IPT) and insecticide-treated bed nets are the standard of care for preventing malaria in pregnant women. Since these preventive measures reduce exposure to malaria, their influence on the antibody (Ab) response to the parasite antigen VAR2CSA was evaluated...... in pregnant Cameroonian women exposed to holoendemic malaria. Ab levels to full-length VAR2CSA (FV2), variants of the six Duffy binding like (DBL) domains, and proportion of high avidity Ab to FV2 were measured longitudinally in 92 women before and 147 women after IPT. As predicted, reduced exposure...

  11. Bladder calculi complicating intermittent clean catheterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amendola, M A; Sonda, L P; Diokno, A C; Vidyasagar, M

    1983-10-01

    Eight male patients on clean intermittent catheterization programs for neurogenic bladder dysfunction developed vesical calculi around pubic hairs inadvertently introduced into the bladder, acting as a nidus for incrustation. In three patients, the radiographic appearance of serpentine calcifications in the pelvis was highly consistent with calcareous deposits on strands of hair. Familiarity with this radiologic appearance should suggest the diagnosis in the appropriate clinical setting and help avoid misinterpretation of these calcifications, atypical of usual bladder stones.

  12. Intermittent chaotic chimeras for coupled rotators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmi, Simona; Martens, Erik A; Thutupalli, Shashi; Torcini, Alessandro

    2015-09-01

    Two symmetrically coupled populations of N oscillators with inertia m display chaotic solutions with broken symmetry similar to experimental observations with mechanical pendulums. In particular, we report evidence of intermittent chaotic chimeras, where one population is synchronized and the other jumps erratically between laminar and turbulent phases. These states have finite lifetimes diverging as a power law with N and m. Lyapunov analyses reveal chaotic properties in quantitative agreement with theoretical predictions for globally coupled dissipative systems.

  13. AN ELDERLY WOMAN WITH INTERMITTENT CLAUDICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayyer Naveed Wazir

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report illustrates the misdiagnosis of intermittent claudication in an elderly with multiple cardiac risk factors. Careful clinical evaluation and imaging shifts the diagnosis from peripheral vascular disease to spinal stenosis. The decision whether to offer conservative therapy or proceed to spinal surgery requires an accurate assessment of the severity of the symptoms without ignoring the important role of patient preferences.

  14. Cardiac calcification in acute intermittent porphyria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanmoy Ghatak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aetiology of pericardial calcifications can be multifactorial. Tuberculosis has been reported as the most common cause. Other known causes include uraemia, asbestosis, post-traumatic or postoperative. We report a rare case of pericardial calcification seen in a patient with established acute intermittent porphyria. A direct causal relationship cannot be established between porphyria and pericardial calcification, but it may be due to deposition of the porphyrin in the pericardium.

  15. Treatment of febrile seizures with intermittent clobazam

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    Fifty children, 24 female and 26 male, with ages varying from 6 to 72 months (mean=23.7 m.) that experienced at least one febrile seizure (FS) entered a prospective study of intermittent therapy with clobazam. Cases with severe neurological abnormalities, progressive neurological disease, afebrile seizures, symptomatic seizures of other nature, or seizures during a central nervous system infection were excluded. Seizures were of the simple type in 25 patients, complex in 20 and unclassified i...

  16. Intermittent radio galaxies and source statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Reynolds, C S

    1997-01-01

    We suggest that extragalactic radio sources are intermittent on timescales of 10^4-10^5 yr. Using a simple spherical model of a cocoon/shock system, it is found that inactive sources fade rapidly in radio luminosity but the shock in the ambient medium continues to expand supersonically, thereby keeping the whole source structure intact during the inactive phases. The fading of inactive sources, and the effect of the intermittency on the expansion velocity, can readily explain the observed over-abundance of small radio sources. In particular, the plateau in the observed distribution of sizes found by O'Dea & Baum (1997) can be interpreted as being due to intermittency. The model predicts that very young sources will be particularly radio luminous, once the effects of absorption have been accounted for. Furthermore, it predicts the existence of a significant number of faint `coasting' sources. These might be detectable in deep, low-frequency radio maps, or via the X-ray and optical emission line properties ...

  17. Repeated Witnessing of Conspecifics in Pain : Effects on Emotional Contagion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carrillo, Maria; Migliorati, Filippo; Bruls, Rune; Han, Yingying; Heinemans, Mirjam; Pruis, Ilanah; Gazzola, V.; Keysers, C.

    2015-01-01

    Witnessing of conspecifics in pain has been shown to elicit socially triggered freezing in rodents. It is unknown how robust this response is to repeated exposure to a cage-mate experiencing painful stimulation. To address this question, shock-experienced Observer rats repeatedly witnessed familiar

  18. Intermittency as a universal characteristic of the complete chromosome DNA sequences of eukaryotes: From protozoa to human genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybalko, S.; Larionov, S.; Poptsova, M.; Loskutov, A.

    2011-10-01

    Large-scale dynamical properties of complete chromosome DNA sequences of eukaryotes are considered. Using the proposed deterministic models with intermittency and symbolic dynamics we describe a wide spectrum of large-scale patterns inherent in these sequences, such as segmental duplications, tandem repeats, and other complex sequence structures. It is shown that the recently discovered gene number balance on the strands is not of a random nature, and certain subsystems of a complete chromosome DNA sequence exhibit the properties of deterministic chaos.

  19. The Pentapeptide Repeat Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetting,M.; Hegde, S.; Fajardo, J.; Fiser, A.; Roderick, S.; Takiff, H.; Blanchard, J.

    2006-01-01

    The Pentapeptide Repeat Protein (PRP) family has over 500 members in the prokaryotic and eukaryotic kingdoms. These proteins are composed of, or contain domains composed of, tandemly repeated amino acid sequences with a consensus sequence of [S, T,A, V][D, N][L, F]-[S, T,R][G]. The biochemical function of the vast majority of PRP family members is unknown. The three-dimensional structure of the first member of the PRP family was determined for the fluoroquinolone resistance protein (MfpA) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The structure revealed that the pentapeptide repeats encode the folding of a novel right-handed quadrilateral {beta}-helix. MfpA binds to DNA gyrase and inhibits its activity. The rod-shaped, dimeric protein exhibits remarkable size, shape and electrostatic similarity to DNA.

  20. The effect of intermittent dosing of Nicotiana glauca on teratogenesis in goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, K D; Panter, K E; Lee, S T; Gardner, D R

    2015-01-01

    Sustained inhibition of fetal movement in livestock species, induced by several poisonous plants, can result in numerous skeletal-contracture malformations. Lupines are responsible for a condition in cattle referred to as "crooked calf syndrome" that occurs when pregnant cattle graze teratogenic lupines. Similar malformations are also seen in animals poisoned by Conium maculatum (coniine) and Nicotiana glauca (anabasine). A proposed management strategy to limit these types of birth defects includes utilizing an intermittent grazing schedule to allow short durations of grazing lupine-infested areas interrupted by movement to a lupine-free pasture. The objective of this study was to use a goat model to determine if an intermittent schedule of five continuous days on treatment followed by two days off treatment would be sufficient to decrease, or prevent, the incidence of anabasine-induced malformations. The data from this study suggest that, for N. glauca in goats, the intermittent grazing program of five days exposure with two days of non-exposure is insufficient to prevent significant skeletal malformations from occurring. However, this study did demonstrate an inverse relationship between the amount of serum anabasine in the dam and the extent of fetal movement.

  1. Repeating the Past

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, John W.

    1998-05-01

    As part of the celebration of the Journal 's 75th year, we are scanning each Journal issue from 25, 50, and 74 years ago. Many of the ideas and practices described are so similar to present-day "innovations" that George Santayana's adage (1) "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it" comes to mind. But perhaps "condemned" is too strong - sometimes it may be valuable to repeat something that was done long ago. One example comes from the earliest days of the Division of Chemical Education and of the Journal.

  2. Evolution of Determinant Factors of Repeated Sprint Ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja-Blanco, Fernando; Suarez-Arrones, Luis; Rodríguez-Rosell, David; López-Segovia, Manuel; Jiménez-Reyes, Pedro; Bachero-Mena, Beatriz; González-Badillo, Juan José

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in the relationships between repeated sprint ability (RSA) and anthropometric measures as well as fitness qualities in soccer players. Twenty-one professional soccer players performed several anthropometric and physical tests including countermovement vertical jumps (CMJs), a straight-line 30 m sprint (T30), an RSA test (6 x 20 + 20 m with 20 s recovery), a progressive isoinertial loading test in a full squat, a Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test Level-1 (YYIRT-1) and a 20 m shuttle run test (20mSRT). The mean (RSAmean), the fastest (RSAbest), each single sprint time, and the percentage in a sprint decrease (%Dec) in the RSA test were calculated. RSAbest correlated significantly with RSAmean (r = .82) and with all single sprints (p sprints performed increased. No significant relationship was observed between the %Dec and RSA performance. CMJs and the T30 also showed a correlation with RSA performance, whereas lower limb strength did not show any relationship with RSA performance. RSAmean showed significant (p repeated sprints increased. The 20mSRT showed minimal relationships with RSA performance. In conclusion, maximal sprint capacity seems to be relevant for the RSA performance, mainly in the first sprints. However, high intermittent endurance capacity and low adiposity might help enhance the RSA performance when increasing the number of repeated sprints.

  3. Coherent structure and Intermittent Turbulence in the Solar Wind Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sondhiya, Deepak Kumar; Gwal, Ashok Kumar; Kasde, Satish Kumar

    2016-07-01

    We analyze the coherent structures and intermittent turbulence in the solar wind plasma using measurements from the Wind spacecraft. Previously established novel wavelet and higher order statistics are used in this work. We analyze the wavelet power spectrum of various solar wind plasma parameters. We construct a statistical significance level in the wavelet power spectrum to quantify the interference effects arising from filling missing data in the time series, allowing extraction of significant power from the measured data. We analyze each wavelet power spectra for transient coherency, and global periodicities resulting from the superposition of repeating coherent structures. Furthermore, these coherent structures are preferentially found in plasma unstable to the mirror and firehose instabilities. These results offer a new understanding of various processes in a turbulent regime. Finally, we discuss the implications of our results for current theories of solar wind generation and describe future work for determining the relationship between the coherent structures in our ionic composition data and the structure of the coronal magnetic field. Keywords: Wavelet Power Spectrum, Coherent structure and Solar wind plasma

  4. Exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons among never smokers in Golestan Province, Iran, an area of high incidence of esophageal cancer – a cross-sectional study with repeated measurement of urinary 1-OHPG in two seasons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad eIslami

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Studies have suggested a possible role of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs in the etiology of esophageal cancer in Golestan Province, Iran, where incidence of this cancer is very high. In order to investigate the patterns of non-smoking related exposure to PAHs in Golestan, we conducted a cross-sectional study collecting questionnaire data, genotyping polymorphisms related to PAH metabolism, and measuring levels of 1-hydroxypyrene glucuronide (1-OHPG, a PAH metabolite, in urine samples collected in two seasons from the same group of 111 randomly-selected never-smoking women. Beta-coefficients for correlations between 1-OHPG as dependent variable and other variables were calculated using linear regression models. The creatinine-adjusted 1-OHPG levels in both winter and summer samples were approximately 110 μmol/molCr (P for seasonal difference= 0.40. In winter, red meat intake (β= 0.208; P= 0.03, processed meat intake (β= 0.218; P= 0.02 and GSTT1-02 polymorphism (null genotype: β= 0.228; P= 0.02 showed significant associations with 1-OHPG levels, while CYP1B1-07 polymorphism (GG versus AA+GA genotypes: β= –0.256; P= 0.008 showed an inverse association. In summer, making bread at home (>weekly versus never: β= 0.203; P= 0.04, second-hand smoke (exposure to ≥3 cigarettes versus no exposure: β= 0.254; P= 0.01, and GSTM1-02 null genotype (β= 0.198; P= 0.04 showed significant associations with 1-OHPG levels, but GSTP1-02 polymorphism (CT+TT versus CC: β= –0.218; P= 0.03 showed an inverse association. This study confirms high exposure of the general population in Golestan to PAHs and suggests that certain foods, cooking methods, and genetic polymorphisms increase exposure to PAHs.

  5. All-optical repeater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberberg, Y

    1986-06-01

    An all-optical device containing saturable gain, saturable loss, and unsaturable loss is shown to transform weak, distorted optical pulses into uniform standard-shape pulses. The proposed device performs thresholding, amplification, and pulse shaping as required from an optical repeater. It is shown that such a device could be realized by existing semiconductor technology.

  6. Bidirectional Manchester repeater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, J.

    1980-01-01

    Bidirectional Manchester repeater is inserted at periodic intervals along single bidirectional twisted pair transmission line to detect, amplify, and transmit bidirectional Manchester 11 code signals. Requiring only 18 TTL 7400 series IC's, some line receivers and drivers, and handful of passive components, circuit is simple and relatively inexpensive to build.

  7. UNSTEADY INTERMITTENT FLOW IN A ROTATING CURVED PIPE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Jian-an; SHEN Xin-rong; CHEN Hua-jun; ZHANG Ben-zhao

    2004-01-01

    The effects of rotation and intermittent fre quency on the flow transition of secondary flow and, main flow were examined in detail. Certain hitherto unknown flow patterns were found. A numerical study was performed to study the characteristics of unsteady intermittent flow in a rotating curved pipe. Due to the rotation, both the Coriolis force and the centrifugal force could contribute to the unsteady intermittent flow and some complicated phenomena can be found. The results indicate that the unsteady intermittent flow are mainly characterized by five parameters: the Dean number Dn , the curvatureκ, the maximal force ratio F (of the Coriolis force to the centrifugal force in a cycle), the intermittent frequency parameter η(the ratio of a pulslating time to the cycle period), and the Womersley number α. Present works shows the natures of the unsteady intermittent flow in a rotating curved pipe.

  8. Study on Intermittent Irrigation for Paddy Rice:I.Water Use Efficiency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUJUN; T.HIRASAWA

    2001-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted in a well-puddled paddy field developed on the Tama River alluvial soil in the Farm of Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology,Japan,to study the effect of intermittent irrigation on water use efficiency of paddy rice,Four treatments were arranged with 2 replicates:continuous flooding irrigation treatments(CFI),and three intermittent irrigation treatments Ⅱ-0,Ⅱ-1 and Ⅱ-2,in which plants were re-irrigated when the soil water potential.fell below 0,-10,and -20 kPa,respectively,at soil depth of about 5 cm,Water consumption wa lower in treatment Ⅱ-0 than in treatment CFI because the percolation rate was reduced by the reduction in the hydraulic head of ponded water .Intermittent irrigation led to soil repeated shrinking and swelling in Ⅱ-1 and Ⅱ-2 plots and ,therefore,soil cracks developed rapidly.Since they became the major routes of water percolation,the soil cracks increased waer consumption in treatments Ⅱ-1 and Ⅱ-2.there were no significant differenes in dry matter production and grain yields between treatment Ⅱ-0 and treatment CFI,but the dry matter production and grain yields in treatments Ⅱ-0 and CFI were significantly higher than those in treatments Ⅱ-1 and Ⅱ-2,Therefore,the eater use efficiency in the treatments was in the order of Ⅱ-0>CFI>Ⅱ-2>Ⅱ-1.

  9. Cardiovascular risk factors in children after repeat doses of antenatal glucocorticoids: an RCT

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McKinlay, Christopher J D; Cutfield, Wayne S; Battin, Malcolm R; Dalziel, Stuart R; Crowther, Caroline A; Harding, Jane E

    2015-01-01

    .... We assessed whether exposure to repeat antenatal betamethasone increased risk factors for later cardiometabolic disease in children whose mothers participated in the Australasian Collaborative Trial...

  10. Clinical investigation of surgery for intermittent exotropia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chong-qing YANG; Ye SHEN; Yang-shun GU; Wei HAN

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the time and postoperative binocular vision of strabismus surgery for children with intermittent exotropia (X (T)). Methods: A retrospective investigation was conducted in 80 child patients with intermittent exotropia. Pre- and postoperative angles of deviation fixating at near (33cm) and distant targets (6m) were measured with the prolonged alternate cover testing. The binocular function was assessed with synoptophore. Twenty-one patients took the postoperative synoptophore exercise. Results: (1) A week after surgery, 96.2% of the 80 patients had binocular normotopia, while a year after surgery, 91.3% of the 80 patients had binocular normotopia; (2) Preoperatively, 58 patients had near stereoacuity, while postoperatively, 72 patients achieved near stereoacuity (P<0.05); (3) Preoperatively, 64 patients had Grade I for the synoptophore evaluation and postoperatively, 76 patients achieved Grade I. Meanwhile, 55 patients had Grade Ⅱpreoperatively and 72 achieved Grade Ⅱ postoperatively. For Grade Ⅲ, there were 49 patients preoperatively and 64 patients postoperatively (P<0.05); (4) Patients of 5~8 years old had a significantly better recovery rate of binocular vision than those of 9~18 years old (P<0.05); (5)Patients taking postoperative synoptophore exercise had a better binocular vision than those taking no exercise (P<0.05). Conclusions: (1) Strabismus surgery can help to preserve or restore the binocular vision for intermittent exotropia; (2) Receiving the surgery at young ages may develop better postoperative binocular vision; (3) The postoperative synoptophore exercise can help to restore the binocular vision.

  11. Hovering and intermittent flight in birds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobalske, Bret W, E-mail: bret.tobalske@mso.umt.ed [Field Research Station at Fort Missoula, Division of Biological Sciences, University of Montana, Missoula, MT 59812 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    Two styles of bird locomotion, hovering and intermittent flight, have great potential to inform future development of autonomous flying vehicles. Hummingbirds are the smallest flying vertebrates, and they are the only birds that can sustain hovering. Their ability to hover is due to their small size, high wingbeat frequency, relatively large margin of mass-specific power available for flight and a suite of anatomical features that include proportionally massive major flight muscles (pectoralis and supracoracoideus) and wing anatomy that enables them to leave their wings extended yet turned over (supinated) during upstroke so that they can generate lift to support their weight. Hummingbirds generate three times more lift during downstroke compared with upstroke, with the disparity due to wing twist during upstroke. Much like insects, hummingbirds exploit unsteady mechanisms during hovering including delayed stall during wing translation that is manifest as a leading-edge vortex (LEV) on the wing and rotational circulation at the end of each half stroke. Intermittent flight is common in small- and medium-sized birds and consists of pauses during which the wings are flexed (bound) or extended (glide). Flap-bounding appears to be an energy-saving style when flying relatively fast, with the production of lift by the body and tail critical to this saving. Flap-gliding is thought to be less costly than continuous flapping during flight at most speeds. Some species are known to shift from flap-gliding at slow speeds to flap-bounding at fast speeds, but there is an upper size limit for the ability to bound ({approx}0.3 kg) and small birds with rounded wings do not use intermittent glides.

  12. Intermittent Microwave Drying of Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) Seeds

    OpenAIRE

    Yan Li; Tao Zhang; Chenglai Wu; Chunqing Zhang

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of present study was to characterize the intermittent microwave drying of wheat seeds. Results revealed that microwave on time percentage (MOTP) and initial moisture content were the main parameters which influenced the intermittent microwave drying rate and the germination capacity of dried seeds. Best intermittent microwave drying (power: 800 W; seed sample weight: 100 g, microwave on time in each cycle: 32 s) without significantly decreasing the germination rate was...

  13. Long term and transitional intermittent smokers: a longitudinal study.

    OpenAIRE

    Lindström, Martin; Isacsson, Sven-Olof

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate differences in snuff consumption, sociodemographic and psychosocial characteristics between baseline intermittent smokers that had become daily smokers, stopped smoking or remained intermittent smokers at the one year follow up. Design/setting/participants/measurements: A population of 12 507 individuals interviewed at baseline in 1992-94 and at a one year follow up, aged 45-69 years, was investigated in a longitudinal study. The three groups of baseline intermittent...

  14. Intermittent fasting: a "new" historical strategy for controlling seizures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Adam L; Rubenstein, James E; Kossoff, Eric H

    2013-05-01

    In antiquity, fasting was a treatment for epilepsy and a rationale for the ketogenic diet (KD). Preclinical data indicate the KD and intermittent fasting do not share identical anticonvulsant mechanisms. We implemented an intermittent fasting regimen in six children with an incomplete response to a KD. Three patients adhered to the combined intermittent fasting/KD regimen for 2 months and four had transient improvement in seizure control, albeit with some hunger-related adverse reactions.

  15. Intermittent oral iron supplementation during pregnancy (Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Rosas, Juan Pablo; De-Regil, Luz Maria; Dowswell, Therese; Viteri, Fernando E

    2014-01-01

    Background Anaemia is a frequent condition during pregnancy, particularly among women from developing countries who have insufficient iron intake to meet increased iron needs of both the mother and the fetus. Traditionally, gestational anaemia has been prevented with the provision of daily iron supplements throughout pregnancy, but adherence to this regimen due to side effects, interrupted supply of the supplements, and concerns about safety among women with an adequate iron intake, have limited the use of this intervention. Intermittent (i.e. one, two or three times a week on non-consecutive days) supplementation with iron alone or in combination with folic acid or other vitamins and minerals has recently been proposed as an alternative to daily supplementation. Objectives To assess the benefits and harms of intermittent supplementation with iron alone or in combination with folic acid or other vitamins and minerals to pregnant women on neonatal and pregnancy outcomes. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (23 March 2012). We also searched the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) for ongoing studies and contacted relevant organisations for the identification of ongoing and unpublished studies (23 March 2012). Selection criteria Randomised or quasi-randomised trials. Data collection and analysis We assessed the methodological quality of trials using standard Cochrane criteria. Two review authors independently assessed trial eligibility, extracted data and conducted checks for accuracy. Main results This review includes 21 trials from 13 different countries, but only 18 trials (with 4072 women) reported on our outcomes of interest and contributed data to the review. All of these studies compared daily versus intermittent iron supplementation. Three studies provided iron alone, 12 iron+folic acid and three more iron plus multiple vitamins and minerals. Their methodological quality was mixed

  16. [Acute intermittent porphyria and inappropriate ADH syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tébar, M T; Aguilera, L

    2010-05-01

    A 44-year-old woman complained of abdominal pain of 4 days' duration accompanied by vomiting and painful urination. The admitting physician noted neurologic signs consistent with axonal polyneuropathy and hyponatremia. In the absence of other explanations for the syndrome, SIADH was diagnosed. Because of the nonspecific nature of the observations, the patient was assessed by various specialists and admitted to the anesthetic recovery unit due to worsening of neurologic signs and suspicion of acute intermittent porphyria. The diagnosis was confirmed by laboratory findings of elevated d-aminolevulinic acid and porphobilinogen levels and normal stool porphyrins. The patient improved with intravenous hematin infused over 4 days.

  17. Intermittent Atrioventricular Block following Fingolimod Initiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Gialafos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 47-year-old female patient with multiple sclerosis (MS developed symptomatic intermittent 2nd degree atrioventricular block (AVB of five-hour duration, five hours after the first two doses of fingolimod, that resolved completely. Frequency domain analysis of heart rate variability (HRV revealed increased parasympathetic activity and decreased sympathetic tone, while modified Ewing tests were suggestive of impaired cardiac sympathetic function. We hypothesize that expression of this particular arrhythmia might be related to autonomic nervous system (ANS dysfunction due to demyelinating lesions in the upper thoracic spinal cord, possibly augmented by the parasympathetic effect of the drug.

  18. Muscle coordination changes during intermittent cycling sprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billaut, François; Basset, Fabien A; Falgairette, Guy

    2005-06-03

    Maximal muscle power is reported to decrease during explosive cyclical exercises owing to metabolic disturbances, muscle damage, and adjustments in the efferent neural command. The aim of the present study was to analyze the influence of inter-muscle coordination in fatigue occurrence during 10 intermittent 6-s cycling sprints, with 30-s recovery through electromyographic activity (EMG). Results showed a decrease in peak power output with sprint repetitions (sprint 1 versus sprint 10: -11%, Pcycling sprints of short duration, decreased possibly due to the inability of muscles to maintain maximal force. This reduction in maximal power output occurred in parallel to changes in the muscle coordination pattern after fatigue.

  19. Transition to turbulence, intermittence, and vortex fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bershadskii, A.G.

    1985-09-01

    A model is developed which describes the fluctuation coalescence of vortices at moderately high Reynolds numbers. The model is found to be in good agreement with experimental data on (1) flow intermittence in a boundary layer, a round jet, and a plane wake; (2) the effect of a magnetic field on the formation of a turbulent energy spectrum behind a grid and on turbulent fluctuations and friction in ducts; (3) formation of a turbulent energy spectrum in a boundary layer and in ducts. 12 references.

  20. Repeated in utero and lactational 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin exposure affects male gonads in offspring, leading to sex ratio changes in F2 progeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Masahiko; Tamura, Masashi; Yamashita, Junko; Suzuki, Chinatsu; Tomita, Takako

    2005-08-15

    The effects of in utero and lactational 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) on the reproductive system of male rat offspring (F1) and the sex ratio of the subsequent generation (F2) were examined. Female Holtzman rats were gavaged with an initial loading dose of 400 ng/kg TCDD prior to mating, followed by weekly maintenance doses of 80 ng/kg during mating, pregnancy, and the lactation period. Maternal exposure to TCDD had no significant effects on fetus/pup (F1) mortality, litter size, or sex ratio on gestation day (GD) 20 or postnatal day (PND) 2. The TCDD concentration in maternal livers and adipose tissue on GD20 was 1.21 and 1.81 ng/kg, respectively, and decreased at weaning to 0.72 in the liver and 0.84 in the adipose tissue. In contrast, the TCDD concentration in pup livers was 1.32 ng/kg on PND2 and increased to 1.80 ng/kg at weaning. Ventral prostate weight of male offspring was significantly decreased by TCDD exposure on PND28 and 120 compared with that of controls. Weight of the testes, cauda epididymides, and seminal vesicle, and sperm number in the cauda epididymis were not changed by TCDD exposure at PND120. TCDD- or vehicle-exposed male offspring were mated with unexposed females. The sex ratio (percentage of male pups) of F2 offspring was significantly reduced in the TCDD-exposed group compared with controls. These results suggest that in utero and lactational TCDD exposures affect the development of male gonads in offspring (F1), leading to changes in the sex ratio of the subsequent generation (F2).

  1. Diagnosing Intermittent and Persistent Faults using Static Bayesian Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megshoel, Ole Jakob

    2010-01-01

    Both intermittent and persistent faults may occur in a wide range of systems. We present in this paper the introduction of intermittent fault handling techniques into ProDiagnose, an algorithm that previously only handled persistent faults. We discuss novel algorithmic techniques as well as how our static Bayesian networks help diagnose, in an integrated manner, a range of intermittent and persistent faults. Through experiments with data from the ADAPT electrical power system test bed, generated as part of the Second International Diagnostic Competition (DXC-10), we show that this novel variant of ProDiagnose diagnoses intermittent faults accurately and quickly, while maintaining strong performance on persistent faults.

  2. Control of on-off intermittency by slow parametric modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reategui, Rider Jaimes; Pisarchik, Alexander N

    2004-06-01

    We study on-off intermittent behavior in two coupled double-well Duffing oscillators with stochastic driving and demonstrate that, by using slow harmonic modulation applied to an accessible system parameter, the intermittent attractors can be completely eliminated. The influence of noise is also investigated. Power-law scaling of the average laminar time with a critical exponent of -1 as a function of both the amplitude and frequency of the control modulation is found near the onset of intermittency, which is a signature of on-off intermittency.

  3. Intermittent lag synchronization in a driven system of coupled oscillators

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Alexander N Pisarchik; Rider Jaimes-Reátegui

    2005-04-01

    We study intermittent lag synchronization in a system of two identical mutually coupled Duffing oscillators with parametric modulation in one of them. This phenomenon in a periodically forced system can be seen as intermittent jump from phase to lag synchronization, during which the chaotic trajectory visits a periodic orbit closely. We demonstrate different types of intermittent lag synchronizations, that occur in the vicinity of saddle-node bifurcations where the system changes its dynamical state, and characterize the simplest case of period-one intermittent lag synchronization.

  4. Infiltration Effects on Residential Pollutant Concentrations for Continuous and Intermittent Mechanical Ventilation Approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherman, Max; Logue, Jennifer; Singer, Brett

    2010-06-01

    The prevailing residential ventilation standard in North America, American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 62.2, specifies volumetric airflow requirements as a function of the overall size of the home and the number of bedrooms, assumes a fixed, minimal amount of infiltration, and requires mechanical ventilation to achieve the remainder. The standard allows for infiltration credits and intermittent ventilation patterns that can be shown to provide comparable performance. Whole-house ventilation methods have a substantial effect on time-varying indoor pollutant concentrations. If alternatives specified by Standard 62.2, such as intermittent ventilation, are used, short-term pollutant concentrations could exceed acute health standards even if chronic health standards are met.The authors present a methodology for comparing ASHRAE- and non-ASHRAE-specified ventilation scenarios on relative indoor pollutant concentrations. We use numerical modeling to compare the maximum time-averaged concentrations for acute exposure relevant (1-hour, 8-hour, 24-hour ) and chronic exposure relevant (1-year) time periods for four different ventilation scenarios in six climates with a range of normalized leakage values. The results suggest that long-term concentrations are the most important metric for assessing the effectiveness of whole-house ventilation systems in meeting exposure standards and that, if chronic health exposure standards are met, acute standards will also be met.

  5. Time-Course Analysis of Brain Regional Expression Network Responses to Chronic Intermittent Ethanol and Withdrawal: Implications for Mechanisms Underlying Excessive Ethanol Consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Maren L; Lopez, Marcelo F; Archer, Kellie J; Wolen, Aaron R; Becker, Howard C; Miles, Michael F

    2016-01-01

    Long lasting abusive consumption, dependence, and withdrawal are characteristic features of alcohol use disorders (AUD). Mechanistically, persistent changes in gene expression are hypothesized to contribute to brain adaptations leading to ethanol toxicity and AUD. We employed repeated chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure by vapor chamber as a mouse model to simulate the cycles of ethanol exposure and withdrawal commonly seen with AUD. This model has been shown to induce progressive ethanol consumption in rodents. Brain CIE-responsive expression networks were identified by microarray analysis across five regions of the mesolimbic dopamine system and extended amygdala with tissue harvested from 0-hours to 7-days following CIE. Weighted Gene Correlated Network Analysis (WGCNA) was used to identify gene networks over-represented for CIE-induced temporal expression changes across brain regions. Differential gene expression analysis showed that long-lasting gene regulation occurred 7-days after the final cycle of ethanol exposure only in prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus. Across all brain regions, however, ethanol-responsive expression changes occurred mainly within the first 8-hours after removal from ethanol. Bioinformatics analysis showed that neuroinflammatory responses were seen across multiple brain regions at early time-points, whereas co-expression modules related to neuroplasticity, chromatin remodeling, and neurodevelopment were seen at later time-points and in specific brain regions (PFC or HPC). In PFC a module containing Bdnf was identified as highly CIE responsive in a biphasic manner, with peak changes at 0 hours and 5 days following CIE, suggesting a possible role in mechanisms underlying long-term molecular and behavioral response to CIE. Bioinformatics analysis of this network and several other modules identified Let-7 family microRNAs as potential regulators of gene expression changes induced by CIE. Our results suggest a complex temporal

  6. Time-Course Analysis of Brain Regional Expression Network Responses to Chronic Intermittent Ethanol and Withdrawal: Implications for Mechanisms Underlying Excessive Ethanol Consumption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maren L Smith

    Full Text Available Long lasting abusive consumption, dependence, and withdrawal are characteristic features of alcohol use disorders (AUD. Mechanistically, persistent changes in gene expression are hypothesized to contribute to brain adaptations leading to ethanol toxicity and AUD. We employed repeated chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE exposure by vapor chamber as a mouse model to simulate the cycles of ethanol exposure and withdrawal commonly seen with AUD. This model has been shown to induce progressive ethanol consumption in rodents. Brain CIE-responsive expression networks were identified by microarray analysis across five regions of the mesolimbic dopamine system and extended amygdala with tissue harvested from 0-hours to 7-days following CIE. Weighted Gene Correlated Network Analysis (WGCNA was used to identify gene networks over-represented for CIE-induced temporal expression changes across brain regions. Differential gene expression analysis showed that long-lasting gene regulation occurred 7-days after the final cycle of ethanol exposure only in prefrontal cortex (PFC and hippocampus. Across all brain regions, however, ethanol-responsive expression changes occurred mainly within the first 8-hours after removal from ethanol. Bioinformatics analysis showed that neuroinflammatory responses were seen across multiple brain regions at early time-points, whereas co-expression modules related to neuroplasticity, chromatin remodeling, and neurodevelopment were seen at later time-points and in specific brain regions (PFC or HPC. In PFC a module containing Bdnf was identified as highly CIE responsive in a biphasic manner, with peak changes at 0 hours and 5 days following CIE, suggesting a possible role in mechanisms underlying long-term molecular and behavioral response to CIE. Bioinformatics analysis of this network and several other modules identified Let-7 family microRNAs as potential regulators of gene expression changes induced by CIE. Our results suggest a

  7. Adaptive intermittent control: A computational model explaining motor intermittency observed in human behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Yutaka; Tanaka, Masato; Inoue, Yasuyuki

    2015-07-01

    It is a fundamental question how our brain performs a given motor task in a real-time fashion with the slow sensorimotor system. Computational theory proposed an influential idea of feed-forward control, but it has mainly treated the case that the movement is ballistic (such as reaching) because the motor commands should be calculated in advance of movement execution. As a possible mechanism for operating feed-forward control in continuous motor tasks (such as target tracking), we propose a control model called "adaptive intermittent control" or "segmented control," that brain adaptively divides the continuous time axis into discrete segments and executes feed-forward control in each segment. The idea of intermittent control has been proposed in the fields of control theory, biological modeling and nonlinear dynamical system. Compared with these previous models, the key of the proposed model is that the system speculatively determines the segmentation based on the future prediction and its uncertainty. The result of computer simulation showed that the proposed model realized faithful visuo-manual tracking with realistic sensorimotor delays and with less computational costs (i.e., with fewer number of segments). Furthermore, it replicated "motor intermittency", that is, intermittent discontinuities commonly observed in human movement trajectories. We discuss that the temporally segmented control is an inevitable strategy for brain which has to achieve a given task with small computational (or cognitive) cost, using a slow control system in an uncertain variable environment, and the motor intermittency is the side-effect of this strategy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Intermittent heat instabilities in an air plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Mouël, Jean-Louis; Kossobokov, Vladimir G.; Perrier, Frederic; Morat, Pierre

    2016-08-01

    We report the results of heating experiments carried out in an abandoned limestone quarry close to Paris, in an isolated room of a volume of about 400 m3. A heat source made of a metallic resistor of power 100 W was installed on the floor of the room, at distance from the walls. High-quality temperature sensors, with a response time of 20 s, were fixed on a 2 m long bar. In a series of 24 h heating experiments the bar had been set up horizontally at different heights or vertically along the axis of the plume to record changes in temperature distribution with a sampling time varying from 20 to 120 s. When taken in averages over 24 h, the temperatures present the classical shape of steady-state plumes, as described by classical models. On the contrary, the temperature time series show a rich dynamic plume flow with intermittent trains of oscillations, spatially coherent, of large amplitude and a period around 400 s, separated by intervals of relative quiescence whose duration can reach several hours. To our knowledge, no specific theory is available to explain this behavior, which appears to be a chaotic interaction between a turbulent plume and a stratified environment. The observed behavior, with first-order factorization of a smooth spatial function with a global temporal intermittent function, could be a universal feature of some turbulent plumes in geophysical environments.

  9. Duct Leakage Repeatability Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Iain [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sherman, Max [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Duct leakage often needs to be measured to demonstrate compliance with requirements or to determine energy or Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) impacts. Testing is often done using standards such as ASTM E1554 (ASTM 2013) or California Title 24 (California Energy Commission 2013 & 2013b), but there are several choices of methods available within the accepted standards. Determining which method to use or not use requires an evaluation of those methods in the context of the particular needs. Three factors that are important considerations are the cost of the measurement, the accuracy of the measurement and the repeatability of the measurement. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the repeatability of the three most significant measurement techniques using data from the literature and recently obtained field data. We will also briefly discuss the first two factors. The main question to be answered by this study is to determine if differences in the repeatability of these tests methods is sufficient to indicate that any of these methods is so poor that it should be excluded from consideration as an allowed procedure in codes and standards.

  10. Regionalization of patterns of flow intermittence from gauging station records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snelder, T. H.; Datry, T.; Lamouroux, N.; Larned, S. T.; Sauquet, E.; Pella, H.; Catalogne, C.

    2013-07-01

    Understanding large-scale patterns in flow intermittence is important for effective river management. The duration and frequency of zero-flow periods are associated with the ecological characteristics of rivers and have important implications for water resources management. We used daily flow records from 628 gauging stations on rivers with minimally modified flows distributed throughout France to predict regional patterns of flow intermittence. For each station we calculated two annual times series describing flow intermittence; the frequency of zero-flow periods (consecutive days of zero flow) in each year of record (FREQ; yr-1), and the total number of zero-flow days in each year of record (DUR; days). These time series were used to calculate two indices for each station, the mean annual frequency of zero-flow periods (mFREQ; yr-1), and the mean duration of zero-flow periods (mDUR; days). Approximately 20% of stations had recorded at least one zero-flow period in their record. Dissimilarities between pairs of gauges calculated from the annual times series (FREQ and DUR) and geographic distances were weakly correlated, indicating that there was little spatial synchronization of zero flow. A flow-regime classification for the gauging stations discriminated intermittent and perennial stations, and an inte