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Sample records for repeat loci electronic

  1. Markerless modification of trinucleotide repeat loci in BACs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzow, Kellie A; Koob, Michael D

    2013-01-01

    Transcription and splicing of human genes are regulated by nucleotide sequences encoded across large segments of our genome, and trinucleotide repeat expansion mutations can have both profound and subtle effects on these processes. In the course of our work to understand the impact of the Spinocerebellar Ataxia type 8 (SCA8) CTG repeat expansion on the transcription and splicing of the RNAs encoded near the SCA8 locus, we have developed a set of reagents and protocols for modifying large genomic BAC clones of this region. We describe the two-step procedure that allows us to precisely replace unexpanded trinucleotide repeats with expanded variants of these repeat sequences without leaving any exogenous sequences in the final constructs, and we discuss how this approach can be adapted to make other desired sequence changes to these genomic clones.

  2. Improved haplotype analysis of human myelin basic protein short tandem repeat loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, G; Umetsu, K; Yuasa, I; Suzuki, T

    2000-06-01

    We report an improved haplotype analysis of the human myelin basic protein gene (MBP) short tandem repeat (STR) polymorphism. The polymorphic G-->A transition and 2 conventional STR polymorphisms, MBPA and MBPB, were simultaneously determined by an amplified product length polymorphism technique. After the MBPC fragments containing MBPA and MBPB were amplified, the linkage of these 2 STR loci was determined by a second amplification, using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique, of the isolated MBPC fragments. The present haplotype analysis dispensed with family studies for the haplotyping of MBPA and MBPB. Polymorphisms of the MBP loci studied in German and Japanese populations showed a high genomic variation. Haplotype analysis of the MBP loci showed distinct differences between the German and the Japanese populations. Consequently, haplotype analysis of the MBP loci promises to be useful in forensic identification and paternity testing.

  3. Turkish population data with the CODIS multiplex short tandem repeat loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbasak, B S; Budowle, B; Reeder, D J; Redman, J; Kline, M C

    2001-12-01

    Allele frequencies for 13 tetrameric short tandem repeat (STR) loci, CSF1PO, D18S51, D3S1358, D21S11, D5S818, FGA, D7S820, HUMTH01, D8S1179, TPOX, D13S317, VWA, and D16S539 were determined on 198 Turkish blood samples.

  4. Typing dinucleotide repeat loci using microplate array diagonal gel electrophoresis: proof of principle.

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    Rodríguez, Santiago; Chen, Xiao-He; Day, Ian N M

    2004-04-01

    Polymorphic dinucleotide repeat loci ('microsatellite markers') are found in varying abundance throughout the genomes of most organisms. They have been extensively used for genetic studies, but conventional techniques used for their genotyping require sophisticated equipment. Microplate array diagonal gel electrophoresis (MADGE) has previously been extended to economical high-throughput genotyping of trinucleotide and tetranucleotide microsatellite amplicons. However, the capability of this technique to resolve the alleles of dinucleotide repeat loci has not been explored previously. Here we show that a modified microsatellite-MADGE approach can provide sufficient resolution for dinucleotide repeat typing. This enables economical and convenient set up for analysis of single markers in many samples in parallel, suitable, for example, for population association studies.

  5. Global genetic variation at nine short tandem repeat loci and implications on forensic genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guangyun; McGarvey, Stephen T; Bayoumi, Riad; Mulligan, Connie J; Barrantes, Ramiro; Raskin, Salmo; Zhong, Yixi; Akey, Joshua; Chakraborty, Ranajit; Deka, Ranjan

    2003-01-01

    We have studied genetic variation at nine autosomal short tandem repeat loci in 20 globally distributed human populations defined by geographic and ethnic origins, viz., African, Caucasian, Asian, Native American and Oceanic. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the utility and applicability of these nine loci in forensic analysis in worldwide populations. The levels of genetic variation measured by number of alleles, allele size variance and heterozygosity are high in all populations irrespective of their effective sizes. Single- as well as multi-locus genotype frequencies are in conformity with the assumptions of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Further, alleles across the entire set of nine loci are mutually independent in all populations. Gene diversity analysis shows that pooling of population data by major geographic groupings does not introduce substructure effects beyond the levels recommended by the National Research Council, validating the establishment of population databases based on major geographic and ethnic groupings. A network tree based on genetic distances further supports this assertion, in which populations of common ancestry cluster together. With respect to the power of discrimination and exclusion probabilities, even the relatively reduced levels of genetic variation at these nine STR loci in smaller and isolated populations provide an exclusionary power over 99%. However, in paternity testing with unknown genotype of the mother, the power of exclusion could fall below 80% in some isolated populations, and in such cases use of additional loci supplementing the battery of the nine loci is recommended.

  6. CRISPRstrand: predicting repeat orientations to determine the crRNA-encoding strand at CRISPR loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkhnbashi, Omer S.; Costa, Fabrizio; Shah, Shiraz Ali;

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: The discovery of CRISPR-Cas systems almost 20 years ago rapidly changed our perception of the bacterial and archaeal immune systems. CRISPR loci consist of several repetitive DNA sequences called repeats, inter-spaced by stretches of variable length sequences called spacers. This CRISPR...... array is transcribed and processed into multiple mature RNA species (crRNAs). A single crRNA is integrated into an interference complex, together with CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins, to bind and degrade invading nucleic acids. Although existing bioinformatics tools can recognize CRISPR loci...

  7. Inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) loci mapping in the genome of perennial ryegrass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pivorienė, O; Pašakinskienė, I; Brazauskas, G;

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify and characterize new ISSR markers and their loci in the genome of perennial ryegrass. A subsample of the VrnA F2 mapping family of perennial ryegrass comprising 92 individuals was used to develop a linkage map including inter-simple sequence repeat markers...... demonstrated a 70% similarity to the Hordeum vulgare germin gene GerA. Inter-SSR mapping will provide useful information for gene targeting, quantitative trait loci mapping and marker-assisted selection in perennial ryegrass....

  8. Mutations of short tandem repeat loci in cases of paternity testing in Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mao; Zhang, XiaoNan; Wu, Dan; Shen, Qi; Wu, YuanMing; Fu, ShanMin

    2016-09-01

    In order to find out the characteristics of genetic mutations in 15 short tandem repeat (STR) loci, 3734 parentage cases were analyzed using AmpFlSTR Sinofiler kit. The allele source, mutation rate, and mutation rule of the STR loci were determined. Seventy mutations were observed in all cases for paternity testing. Among 15 STR loci, the highest mutation rate was observed in D12S391 (0.21 %), but the D5S818 gene mutation rate was relatively low (0.02 %). One-step mutation cases accounted for 95.7 % of all of the cases monitored. And the mutations in this study mainly showed paternal mutation (64/70). The research results are of great significance for identification and paternity tests and for the improvement of genetic studies on Chinese population in the future.

  9. CRISPRstrand: predicting repeat orientations to determine the crRNA-encoding strand at CRISPR loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkhnbashi, Omer S.; Costa, Fabrizio; Shah, Shiraz Ali

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: The discovery of CRISPR-Cas systems almost 20 years ago rapidly changed our perception of the bacterial and archaeal immune systems. CRISPR loci consist of several repetitive DNA sequences called repeats, inter-spaced by stretches of variable length sequences called spacers. This CRISPR...... array is transcribed and processed into multiple mature RNA species (crRNAs). A single crRNA is integrated into an interference complex, together with CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins, to bind and degrade invading nucleic acids. Although existing bioinformatics tools can recognize CRISPR loci...... by their characteristic repeat-spacer architecture, they generally output CRISPR arrays of ambiguous orientation and thus do not determine the strand from which crRNAs are processed. Knowledge of the correct orientation is crucial for many tasks, including the classification of CRISPR conservation, the detection...

  10. [Genetic variability and phylogenetic analysis of 39 short tandem repeat loci in Beijing Han population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiuyan, Ruan; Weini, Wang; Yaran, Yang; Bingbing, Xie; Jing, Chen; Yacheng, Liu; Jiangwei, Yan

    2015-07-01

    In this study, we studied the genetic polymorphisms of short tandem repeat (STR) loci from 13 CODIS and 26 non-CODIS system in Beijing Han population for the first time, and established a database of 39 STR loci whose forensic parameters were further evaluated. Our results demonstrated no significant deviation from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium of 39 STR loci and no pairwise linkage disequilibrium between them. The power of discriminations, expected heterozygosity, polymorphic information content, and power of exclusion of 39 STR loci ranged from 0.7740-0.9818, 0.6000-0.9350, 0.5317-0.9047 and 0.2909-0.8673. The cumulated discrimination power and cumulative probability of exclusion were 0.999999999999999999999999999999999999999964971 and 0.999999999973878, respectively. Moreover, the genetic distance was calculated based on allele frequency and phylogenetic tree was built using STR loci data from Beijing Han and other 11 Chinese ethnic groups.This study provides important basic data for Chinese forensic DNA database and population genetics database, and has important significance in carrying out forensic individual identification, paternity testing, and population genetic study.

  11. Isolation, characterization and amplification of simple sequence repeat loci in coffee

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    Marco-Aurelio Cristancho

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Simple sequence repeat (microsatellite loci in coffee were identified in clones isolated from enriched andrandom genomic libraries. It was shown that coffee is a plant species with low microsatellite frequency. However, the averagedistance between two loci, estimated at 127kb for poly (AG, is one of the shortest of all plant genomes. In contrast, thedistance between two poly (AC loci, estimated at 769kb, is one of the largest in plant genomes. Coffee (ACn microsatellites arefrequently associated with other microsatellites, mainly (ATn motifs, while (AGn microsatellites are not normally associatedwith other microsatellites and have a higher number of perfect motifs. Dinucleotide repeats (AG and (AC were found in ATrichregions in coffee. Sequence analysis of (ACn microsatellites identified in coffee revealed the possible association of theserepeated elements with miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs. In addition, some of the evaluated SSRmarkers produced transposon-like amplification patterns in tetraploid genotypes. Of 12 SSR markers developed, nine werepolymorphic in diploid genotypes while 5 were polymorphic in tetraploid genotypes, confirming a greater genetic diversity indiploid species.

  12. [Discriminatory power of variable number on tandem repeats loci for genotyping Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H X; Cai, C; Liu, J Y; Zhang, Z G; Yuan, M; Jia, J N; Sun, Z G; Huang, H R; Gao, J M; Li, W M

    2017-06-10

    Objective: Using the standard genotype method, variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR), we constructed a VNTR database to cover all provinces and proposed a set of optimized VNTR loci combinations for each province, in order to improve the preventive and control programs on tuberculosis, in China. Methods: A total of 15 loci VNTR was used to analyze 4 116 Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains, isolated from national survey of Drug Resistant Tuberculosis, in 2007. Hunter-Gaston Index (HGI) was also used to analyze the discriminatory power of each VNTR site. A set combination of 12-VNTR, 10-VNTR, 8-VNTR and 5-VNTR was respectively constructed for each province, based on 1) epidemic characteristics of M. tuberculosis lineages in China, with high discriminatory power and genetic stability. Results: Through the completed 15 loci VNTR patterns of 3 966 strains under 96.36% (3 966/4 116) coverage, we found seven high HGI loci (including QUB11b and MIRU26) as well as low stable loci (including QUB26, MIRU16, Mtub21 and QUB11b) in several areas. In all the 31 provinces, we found an optimization VNTR combination as 10-VNTR loci in Inner Mongolia, Chongqing and Heilongjiang, but with 8-VNTR combination shared in other provinces. Conclusions: It is necessary to not only use the VNTR database for tracing the source of infection and cluster of M. tuberculosis in the nation but also using the set of optimized VNTR combinations in monitoring those local epidemics and M. tuberculosis (genetics in local) population.

  13. [Analysis of allelic drop-out at short tandem repeat loci].

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    Chen, Wen-jing; Li, Yue; Wu, Xiao-jie; Zhang, Yin-ming; Liu, Su-juan; Chen, Yong; Chen, Wei-hong; Sun, Hong-yu

    2012-06-01

    To explore the cause for allelic drop-out at short tandem repeat (STR) loci upon paternity testing with a PowerPlex® 16 kit. A total of 10 642 DNA confirmed paternity testing cases (18 314 parent/child allelic transfers) were analyzed with the PowerPlex® 16 kit. Samples suspected for having allelic drop-out were verified with an Identifiler™ kit and/or locus-specific singleplex amplification systems. PCR products of null alleles were separated and directly sequenced. Eight cases of allelic drop-out were found. The overall rate of null allele in the PowerPlex® 16 system was 0.437 × 10(-3). DNA sequencing has confirmed single base variations within the binding region of published primers, in which 4 cases involved the D18S51 locus (2 cases with G>A transitions at 79 bp upstream of the repeats, 1 case with G>T transversion at 162 bp downstream of the repeats and 1 case with G>C transversion at 74 bp upstream of the repeats), 2 cases involved the D21S11 locus (1 case with C>A transversion at 17 bp upstream of the repeats and 1 case with A>G transition at 12 bp upstream of the repeats). One case involved the FGA locus (1 case with G>A transition at 142 bp downstream of the repeats) and 1 case involved TPOX locus (1 case with G>A transition at 198 bp downstream of the repeats). Base variation in the primer binding region may cause failed PCR and result in null allele reports. Alternative primer sets should be used to verify the suspected allelic drop-out. Attention should be paid to this during paternity testing and data exchange for personal identification.

  14. Marked variation in predicted and observed variability of tandem repeat loci across the human genome

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    Shields Denis C

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tandem repeat (TR variants in the human genome play key roles in a number of diseases. However, current models predicting variability are based on limited training sets. We conducted a systematic analysis of TRs of unit lengths 2–12 nucleotides in Whole Genome Shotgun (WGS sequences to define the extent of variation of 209,214 unique repeat loci throughout the genome. Results We applied a multivariate statistical model to predict TR variability. Predicted heterozygosity correlated with heterozygosity in the CEPH polymorphism database (correlation ρ = 0.29, p Conclusion Variability among 2–12-mer TRs in the genome can be modeled by a few parameters, which do not markedly differ according to unit length, consistent with a common mechanism for the generation of variability among such TRs. Analysis of the distributions of observed and predicted variants across the genome showed a general concordance, indicating that the repeat variation dataset does not exhibit strong regional ascertainment biases. This revealed a deficit of variant repeats in chromosomes 19 and Y – likely to reflect a reduction in 2-mer repeats in the former and a reduced level of recombination in the latter – and excesses in chromosomes 6, 13, 20 and 21.

  15. Polymorphism Profile of Nine Short Tandem Repeat Loci in the Han Chinese

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuangding Li; Chunxia Yan; Yajun Deng; Ruilin Wang; Jian Wang; Huanming Yang; Shengbin Li

    2003-01-01

    Nine short tandem repeat (STR) markers (D3S1358, VWA, FGA, THO1, TPOX,CSFIPO, D5S818, D13S317, and D7S820) and a sex-identification marker (Amel-ogenin locus) were amplified with multiplex PCR and were genotyped with afour-color fluorescence method in samples from 174 unrelated Han individuals inNorth China. The allele frequencies, genotype frequencies, heterozygosity, prob-ability of discrimination powers, probability of paternity exclusion and Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium expectations were determined. The results demonstratedthat the genotypes at all these STR loci in Han population conform to Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium expectations. The combined discrimination power (DP) was1.05 × 10-10 within nine STR loci analyzed and the probability of paternity exclusion(EPP) was 0.9998. The results indicate that these nine STR loci and the Amelo-genin locus are useful markers for human identification, paternity and maternitytesting and sex determination in forensic sciences.

  16. [Polymorphisms of 21 short tandem repeat loci of Salar minority ethnic group in Qinghai Province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jun; Wang, Yan-bin; Li, Kai; Wang, Jian-wen

    2013-10-01

    To investigate the polymorphisms of 21 short tandem repeat (STR)loci of Salar minority ethnic group in Qinghai Province. Blood samples were collected from 120 unrelated healthy Salar individuals from Gandu town in Hualong county. DNA templates were screened by home-made AGCU21+1 kit. The findings were further compared with those of Hans in Zhejiang Province, Hans in Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region, Tibetans in Tibet Autonomous Region, and Tujias in Hubei Province. The allele frequencies of 21 STR loci ranged 0.0042-0.4917, the genotype frequencies ranged 0.0083-0.3750, the power of discrimination ranged 0.796-0.948, the heterozygosity ranged 0.650-0.817, the polymorphism information contents ranged 0.590-0.810, and the power of exclusion ranged 0.355-0.630. The cumulative coupling probability was 1.75×10(-20), and the cumulative power of exclusion was 0.9999999. Significant differences were found at 14, 12, 12, 13 of the 21 STR loci between Salar and Hans of Zhejiang Province, Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region, Tibetans of Tibet Autonomous Region, and Tujias of Hubei Province (Pethnic group from Qinghai Province and therefore suitable for population genetics study, screening of disease-related genes, and forensic individual identification.

  17. A NORTHWEST DATABASE MODEL OF SHORT TANDEM REPEAT LOCI IN FORENSIC MEDICINE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王振原; 朱波峰; 刘雅诚; 严江伟; 霍振义; 金天博; 李涛; 樊拴良; 方杰

    2003-01-01

    Objective To establish the northwest database of short tandem repeat(STR) loci in forensic medicine. Methods Bloodstains or whole blood samples were collected from the unrelated prisoners in Xi'an city. Genetic distribution for 13 STR loci and amelogenin locus were determined in prisons based on GeneScan. One primer for each locus was labeled with the fluorescent by 5-FAM, JOE, or NED. The forensic database were generated by using multiple amplification, GeneScan, genotype, and genetic distribution analysis. Results 113 alleles and 302 genotypes were observed, with the corresponding frequency between 0.0050-0.5250 and 0.0100-0.4100. The mean H was 0.7667. The accumulative DP was 0.9999999,. The accumulative EPP was 0.9999999. The scope of PIC was 0.6036-0.8562. PM was less than 10-11. The observed and expected genotype frequencies were evaluated using χ2-test and all were in accordance with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (P>0.05). Conclusion STR loci is an ideal genetic marker with powerful polymorphism and stable heredity. It can be used for individual identification and paternity in forensic medicine. The forensic DNA database model can be established successfully.

  18. Genetic structure of the Azores Islands: a study using 15 autosomal short tandem repeat loci.

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    Santos, Cristina; Alvarez, Luis; Aluja, Maria Pilar; Bruges-Armas, Jacome; Lima, Manuela

    2009-12-01

    The Azores archipelago (Portugal), located in the Atlantic Ocean, 1,500 km from the European mainland, is formed by nine islands of volcanic origin. The relative position of these islands allows the definition of three geographical groups: Eastern, Central and Western. Previous studies of the Azores using Short Tandem Repeats (STRs) have highlighted differences in the frequencies of several loci, when compared to Mainland Portugal or Madleira Island. Furthermore, linkage disequilibrium (LD), described for Azorean samples has been tentatively explained as reflecting the presence of genetic sub-structuring in the archipelago. To provide information concerning the genetic profile of the Azores Islands and to evaluate the presence of substructuring we have determined the allelic frequencies of 15 autosomal STR loci, using the AmpFlSTR Identifiler Kit, in representative samples from the Azorean Islands. Either considering the Azores as a whole, or analysing by island all the loci were in conformity with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Average gene diversity ranged from 0.7669 in Corvo to 0.7972 in Terceira Island. Allelic independence between loci, tested for the global sample, detected significant LD (after correction for multiple tests) for pairs D21S11/D7S820 and D3S1358/D5S818. The exact test of population differentiation, combining the information of the 15 markers analysed, revealed significant differences between the three groups of islands, and between islands. Inter-island analysis reinforces the previous data that suggested the existence of sub-structuring in the Azores archipelago. Moreover, the data generated by this study can be used in a future forensic genetic database of the Azores after the appropriate enlacement of sample size by island, preventing, in that way, misinterpretations caused by population substructuring and small sample sizes.

  19. Fourteen non-CODIS autosomal short tandem repeat loci multiplex data from Taiwanese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwa, Hsiao-Lin; Chang, Yih-Yuan; Lee, James Chun-I; Yin, Hsiang-Yi; Tseng, Li-Hui; Su, Yi-Ning; Ko, Tsang-Ming

    2011-03-01

    Interest in the development of polymorphic short tandem repeat (STR) markers unlinked to the CODIS loci is growing among forensic practitioners. We developed a multiplex system in which14 autosomal STR (D3S1744, D4S2366, D8S1110, D12S1090, D13S765, D14S608, Penta E, D17S1294, D18S536, D18S1270, D20S470, D21S1437, Penta D, and D22S683) could be amplified in one single polymerase chain reaction. DNA samples from 572 unrelated Taiwanese Han subjects were analyzed using this 14 STR multiplex system. Thirty parent-child pairs of parentage testing cases with a combined paternity index (CPI) below 1,000 and 32 parent-child pairs with single-step mutations found in AmpFℓSTR Identifiler loci were also recruited for validation of the newly developed system. DNA sequencing was performed for novel STRs and novel alleles found in these subjects. The distributions of allelic frequencies for these autosomal STRs and sequence data, allele nomenclature for the STRs, and forensic parameters are presented. The discrimination power in our multiplex loci ranged from 0.6858 (D18S536) to 0.9168 (Penta E), with a combined discrimination power of 0.999999999. It provides additional power to distinguish the possible single-step mutations in parent-child pairs and improves the ability to prove parentage by increasing the CPI. The combined power of exclusion of these 14 loci in Taiwanese Han in this study was 0.9999995913. In conclusion, this 14-autosomal STRs multiplex system provides highly informative STR data and appears useful in forensic casework and parentage testing.

  20. Evaluation and selection of tandem repeat loci for Streptococcus pneumoniae MLVA strain typing

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    Valjevac Samina

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Precise identification of bacterial pathogens at the strain level is essential for epidemiological purposes. In Streptococcus pneumoniae, the existence of 90 different serotypes makes the typing particularly difficult and requires the use of highly informative tools. Available methods are relatively expensive and cannot be used for large-scale or routine typing of any new isolate. We explore here the potential of MLVA (Multiple Loci VNTR Analysis; VNTR, Variable Number of Tandem Repeats, a method of growing importance in the field of molecular epidemiology, for genotyping of Streptococcus pneumoniae. Results Available genome sequences were searched for polymorphic tandem repeats. The loci identified were typed across a collection of 56 diverse isolates and including a group of serotype 1 isolates from Africa. Eventually a set of 16 VNTRs was proposed for MLVA-typing of S. pneumoniae. These robust markers were sufficient to discriminate 49 genotypes and to aggregate strains on the basis of the serotype and geographical origin, although some exceptions were found. Such exceptions may reflect serotype switching or horizontal transfer of genetic material. Conclusion We describe a simple PCR-based MLVA genotyping scheme for S. pneumoniae which may prove to be a powerful complement to existing tools for epidemiological studies. Using this technique we uncovered a clonal population of strains, responsible for infections in Burkina Faso. We believe that the proposed MLVA typing scheme can become a standard for epidemiological studies of S. pneumoniae.

  1. ALLELE DISTRIBUTION OF FIVE X-CHROMOSOME SHORT TANDEM REPEAT LOCI IN EWENKE POPULATION OF NORTH CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan-zhi Gu; Teng Chen; Qing-bo Liu; Bing Yu; Sheng-bin Li

    2005-01-01

    Objective To study the allele genetic polymorphism of five short tandem repeat (STR) loci on X-chromosome in Ewenke population of north China and to provide basic data for forensic identification.Methods Genomic DNA was extracted from EDTA-whole blood of Ewenke population by Chelex-100. The DNA samples were amplified by PCR and were analyzed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and silver staining. The sequence length variations of DXS6799, DXS8378, DXS101, HPRTB, and DXS6789 loci on X-chromosome in 98unrelated Ewenke individuals were investigated.Results All five loci analyzed showed high polymorphism and genetic stability. The data of the five X-chromosome STR loci in Ewenke ethnic group of China was in accordance with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium by Chi-square test.Conclusion Allele polymorphism of five X-chromosome STR loci can be used as a genetic marker for forensic identification and population genetic research.

  2. Population genetic study of 10 short tandem repeat loci from 600 domestic dogs in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Seo Hyun; Jang, Yoon-Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Dogs have long shared close relationships with many humans. Due to the large number of dogs in human populations, they are often involved in crimes. Occasionally, canine biological evidence such as saliva, bloodstains and hairs can be found at crime scenes. Accordingly, canine DNA can be used as forensic evidence. The use of short tandem repeat (STR) loci from biological evidence is valuable for forensic investigations. In Korea, canine STR profiling-related crimes are being successfully analyzed, leading to diverse crimes such as animal cruelty, dog-attacks, murder, robbery, and missing and abandoned dogs being solved. However, the probability of random DNA profile matches cannot be analyzed because of a lack of canine STR data. Therefore, in this study, 10 STR loci were analyzed in 600 dogs in Korea (344 dogs belonging to 30 different purebreds and 256 crossbred dogs) to estimate canine forensic genetic parameters. Among purebred dogs, a separate statistical analysis was conducted for five major subgroups, 97 Maltese, 47 Poodles, 31 Shih Tzus, 32 Yorkshire Terriers, and 25 Pomeranians. Allele frequencies, expected (Hexp) and observed heterozygosity (Hobs), fixation index (F), probability of identity (P(ID)), probability of sibling identity (P(ID)sib) and probability of exclusion (PE) were then calculated. The Hexp values ranged from 0.901 (PEZ12) to 0.634 (FHC2079), while the P(ID)sib values were between 0.481 (FHC2079) and 0.304 (PEZ12) and the P(ID)sib was about 3.35 × 10−5 for the combination of all 10 loci. The results presented herein will strengthen the value of canine DNA to solving dog-related crimes. PMID:26645337

  3. Evaluation and selection of tandem repeat loci for a Brucella MLVA typing assay

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    Denoeud France

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The classification of Brucella into species and biovars relies on phenotypic characteristics and sometimes raises difficulties in the interpretation of the results due to an absence of standardization of the typing reagents. In addition, the resolution of this biotyping is moderate and requires the manipulation of the living agent. More efficient DNA-based methods are needed, and this work explores the suitability of multiple locus variable number tandem repeats analysis (MLVA for both typing and species identification. Results Eighty tandem repeat loci predicted to be polymorphic by genome sequence analysis of three available Brucella genome sequences were tested for polymorphism by genotyping 21 Brucella strains (18 reference strains representing the six 'classical' species and all biovars as well as 3 marine mammal strains currently recognized as members of two new species. The MLVA data efficiently cluster the strains as expected according to their species and biovar. For practical use, a subset of 15 loci preserving this clustering was selected and applied to the typing of 236 isolates. Using this MLVA-15 assay, the clusters generated correspond to the classical biotyping scheme of Brucella spp. The 15 markers have been divided into two groups, one comprising 8 user-friendly minisatellite markers with a good species identification capability (panel 1 and another complementary group of 7 microsatellite markers with higher discriminatory power (panel 2. Conclusion The MLVA-15 assay can be applied to large collections of Brucella strains with automated or manual procedures, and can be proposed as a complement, or even a substitute, of classical biotyping methods. This is facilitated by the fact that MLVA is based on non-infectious material (DNA whereas the biotyping procedure itself requires the manipulation of the living agent. The data produced can be queried on a dedicated MLVA web service site.

  4. Isolation of human minisatellite loci detected by synthetic tandem repeat probes: direct comparison with cloned DNA fingerprinting probes.

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    Armour, J A; Vergnaud, G; Crosier, M; Jeffreys, A J

    1992-08-01

    As a direct comparison with cloned 'DNA fingerprinting' probes, we present the results of screening an ordered array Charomid library for hypervariable human loci using synthetic tandem repeat (STR) probes. By recording the coordinates of positive hybridization signals, the subset of clones within the library detected by each STR probe can be defined, and directly compared with the set of clones detected by naturally occurring (cloned) DNA fingerprinting probes. The STR probes vary in the efficiency of detection of polymorphic minisatellite loci; among the more efficient probes, there is a strong overlap with the sets of clones detected by the DNA fingerprinting probes. Four new polymorphic loci were detected by one or more of the STR probes but not by any of the naturally occurring repeats. Sequence comparisons with the probe(s) used to detect the locus suggest that a relatively poor match, for example 10 out of 14 bases in a limited region of each repeat, is sufficient for the positive detection of tandem repeats in a clone in this type of library screening by hybridization. These results not only provide a detailed evaluation of the usefulness of STR probes in the isolation of highly variable loci, but also suggest strategies for the use of these multi-locus probes in screening libraries for clones from hypervariable loci.

  5. DNA Fingerprint Analysis of Three Short Tandem Repeat (STR) Loci for Biochemistry and Forensic Science Laboratory Courses

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    McNamara-Schroeder, Kathleen; Olonan, Cheryl; Chu, Simon; Montoya, Maria C.; Alviri, Mahta; Ginty, Shannon; Love, John J.

    2006-01-01

    We have devised and implemented a DNA fingerprinting module for an upper division undergraduate laboratory based on the amplification and analysis of three of the 13 short tandem repeat loci that are required by the Federal Bureau of Investigation Combined DNA Index System (FBI CODIS) data base. Students first collect human epithelial (cheek)…

  6. DNA Fingerprint Analysis of Three Short Tandem Repeat (STR) Loci for Biochemistry and Forensic Science Laboratory Courses

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    McNamara-Schroeder, Kathleen; Olonan, Cheryl; Chu, Simon; Montoya, Maria C.; Alviri, Mahta; Ginty, Shannon; Love, John J.

    2006-01-01

    We have devised and implemented a DNA fingerprinting module for an upper division undergraduate laboratory based on the amplification and analysis of three of the 13 short tandem repeat loci that are required by the Federal Bureau of Investigation Combined DNA Index System (FBI CODIS) data base. Students first collect human epithelial (cheek)…

  7. Comparative population genetic analysis of bocaccio rockfish Sebastes paucispinis using anonymous and gene-associated simple sequence repeat loci.

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    Buonaccorsi, Vincent P; Kimbrell, Carol A; Lynn, Eric A; Hyde, John R

    2012-01-01

    Comparative population genetic analyses of traditional and emergent molecular markers aid in determining appropriate use of new technologies. The bocaccio rockfish Sebastes paucispinis is a high gene-flow marine species off the west coast of North America that experienced strong population decline over the past 3 decades. We used 18 anonymous and 13 gene-associated simple sequence repeat (SSR) loci (expressed sequence tag [EST]-SSRs) to characterize range-wide population structure with temporal replicates. No F(ST)-outliers were detected using the LOSITAN program, suggesting that neither balancing nor divergent selection affected the loci surveyed. Consistent hierarchical structuring of populations by geography or year class was not detected regardless of marker class. The EST-SSRs were less variable than the anonymous SSRs, but no correlation between F(ST) and variation or marker class was observed. General linear model analysis showed that low EST-SSR variation was attributable to low mean repeat number. Comparative genomic analysis with Gasterosteus aculeatus, Takifugu rubripes, and Oryzias latipes showed consistently lower repeat number in EST-SSRs than SSR loci that were not in ESTs. Purifying selection likely imposed functional constraints on EST-SSRs resulting in low repeat numbers that affected diversity estimates but did not affect the observed pattern of population structure.

  8. Population data on 6 short tandem repeat loci in a sample of Caucasian-Mestizos from Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunis, J J; García, O; Uriarte, I; Yunis, E J

    2000-01-01

    Blood samples from 409-452 unrelated Colombian Caucasian-Mestizo individuals were amplified and typed for six short tandem repeat (STR) markers (HUMF13A01, HUMFES/FPS, HUMVWA, HUMCSF1PO, HUMTPOX, HUMTH01). The allele frequencies, genotype frequencies, heterozygosity, mean paternity exclusion chance, polymorphism information content, discrimination power, assumption of independence within and between loci and Hardy Weinberg equilibrium were determined. The results demonstrate that all markers conform to Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium expectations. In addition, the results demonstrate the assumption of independence within and between the loci analysed. The mean exclusion chance (MEC) was 0.9851 for all six STR loci analysed and the discrimination power (DP) was 0.9999973. Therefore, this Colombian population database can be used in identity testing to estimate the frequency of a multiple PCR-based locus DNA profile in forensic cases as well as in paternity testing.

  9. Diversity of nuclear short tandem repeat loci in representative sample of North-eastern Bosnian and Herzegovina population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadžiavdić Vesna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diversity of nuclear microsatellite markers were analyzed in a reference sample of the population of northeast Bosnia and Herzegovina. 437 samples taken from unrelated individuals were processed and three samples of paternity proof were shown. Detection effectiveness profile of the research, points to a valid choice of method of extraction, amplification and genotyping short tandem repeat (STR loci with PowerPlextm16 kit. Genetic analysis of allelic variants of the 15 STR loci PowerPlextm16 kit detected 17 samples determined as rare allelic variants or microvariants. Samples were divided into 15 different allelic variants at 7 different loci, and are: in locus D7S820, D16S539, D3S1358, D18S51, PENTA D, PENTA E and in locus vWA. Genetic analysis of mutations in cases of paternity determined three examples of single-step mutations in the loci FGA, Penta D and D3S1358. Genetic analysis of observed STR loci detected three allelic variant of genotype combination 7/10/11.3 in locus D7S820 Type II. Population genetic analysis of STR loci in a representative sample of the population of northeast Bosnia and Herzegovina included the application of the assessment tests of within-population genetic diversity and interpopulation diversity, as well as genetic differentiation between populations: North-eastern Bosnia and Herzegovina (BH and BH general reference, then the Croatian population, Macedonian, Serbian and Slovenian. Based on the result analysis of specific forensic parameters, it can be assumed that the most informative marker is PENTA E for population genetic analysis and forensic testing in the population of northeast Bosnia and Herzegovina. Research results fit regional STR database of this part of Europe.

  10. DNA profiling of extended tracts of primitive DNA repeats: Direct identification of unstable simple repeat loci in complex genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogaeva, E.A.; Korovaitseva, G.; St. George-Hyslop, P. [Univ. of Toronto (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The most simple DNA repetitive elements, with repetitive monomer units of only 1-10 bp in tandem tracts, are an abundant component of the human genome. The expansion of at least one type of these repeats ((CCG)n and (CTG)n) have been detected for a several neurological diseases with anticipation in successive generations. We propose here a simple method for the identification of particularly expanded repeats and for the recovery of flanking sequences. We generated DNA probes using PCR to create long concatamers (n>100) by amplification of the di-, tri-, tetra-, penta- and hexa-nucleotide repeat oligonucleotide primer pairs. To reduce the complexity of the background band pattern, the genomic DNA was restricted with a mixture of at least five different endonucleases, thereby reducing the size of restriction fragments containing short simple repeat arrays while leaving intact the large fragments containing the longer simple repeats arrays. Direct blot hybridization has shown different {open_quotes}DNA fingerprint{close_quotes} patterns with all arbitrary selected di-hexa nucleotide repeat probes. Direct hybridization of the (CTG)n and (CCG)n probes revealed simple or multiple band patterns depending upon stringency conditions. We were able to detect the presence of expanded unstable tri-nucleotide alleles by (CCG)n probe for some FRAXA subjects and by (CTG)n probe for some myotonic dystrophy subjects which were not present in the parental DNA patterns. The cloning of the unstable alleles for simple repeats can be performed by direct recover from agarose gels of the aberrant unstable bands detected above. The recovered flanking regions can be cloned, sequenced and used for PCR detection of expanded alleles or can be used to screen cDNA. This method may be used for testing of small families with diseases thought to display clinical evidence of anticipation.

  11. Radiation-induced mutation at tandem repeat DNA Loci in the mouse germline: spectra and doubling doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrova, Yuri E

    2005-02-01

    The spectra and dose response for mutations at expanded simple tandem repeat (ESTR) loci in the germline of male mice acutely exposed to low-LET X or gamma rays at pre-meiotic stages of spermatogenesis were compared in five strains of laboratory mice. Most mutation events involved the gain or loss of a relatively small number of repeat units, and the distributions of length changes were indistinguishable between the exposed and control males. Overall, a significant bias toward gains of repeats was detected, with approximately 60% of mutants showing gains. The values for ESTR mutation induction did not differ substantially between strains. The highest values of doubling dose were obtained for two genetically related strains, BALB/c and C.B17 (mean value 0.98 Gy). The estimates of doubling dose for three other strains (CBA/H, C57BL/6 x CBA/H F1 and 129SVJ x C57BL/6) were lower, with a mean value of 0.44 Gy. The dose response for ESTR mutation across all five strains was very close to that for the specific loci (Russell 7-locus test). The mechanisms of ESTR mutation induction and applications of this system for monitoring radiation-induced mutation in the mouse germline are discussed.

  12. A Case of Maternal Half-sisters Sharing Alleles at 18 X-chromosomal Short Tandem Repeat Loci

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    Qiu-Ling Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of X-chromosome short tandem repeats (STRs is very helpful in deficiency paternity testing. Here, we reported a case of kinship analysis that showed a potentially erroneous inclusion of paternal sisters between two women. The two women shared alleles at 18 X-chromosomal STR loci spanned from 14.76cM (DXS6807 to 184.19cM (DXS7423. When their relatives were not available for testing, biostatistical analysis for the 18 X-chromosomal STR loci and 24 autosomal STR loci revealed the most possible relationship between the two women was paternal sisters. However, when the father of one woman was available, the other father-daughter possibility was excluded. In the end, the likelihood ratio of STR marker and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA sequences confirmed the two women were maternal sisters. This case emphasizes a cautionary interpretation of X chromosomal marker in deficiency paternity cases with female offspring. Even though large parts of the X-chromosome haplotypes shared by two females, additional relatives and extended DNA typing (such as mtDNA may be needed further to ascertain whether they are paternal or maternal sisters.

  13. Selection pressure on human STR loci and its relevance in repeat expansion disease

    KAUST Repository

    Shimada, Makoto K.

    2016-06-11

    Short Tandem Repeats (STRs) comprise repeats of one to several base pairs. Because of the high mutability due to strand slippage during DNA synthesis, rapid evolutionary change in the number of repeating units directly shapes the range of repeat-number variation according to selection pressure. However, the remaining questions include: Why are STRs causing repeat expansion diseases maintained in the human population; and why are these limited to neurodegenerative diseases? By evaluating the genome-wide selection pressure on STRs using the database we constructed, we identified two different patterns of relationship in repeat-number polymorphisms between DNA and amino-acid sequences, although both patterns are evolutionary consequences of avoiding the formation of harmful long STRs. First, a mixture of degenerate codons is represented in poly-proline (poly-P) repeats. Second, long poly-glutamine (poly-Q) repeats are favored at the protein level; however, at the DNA level, STRs encoding long poly-Qs are frequently divided by synonymous SNPs. Furthermore, significant enrichments of apoptosis and neurodevelopment were biological processes found specifically in genes encoding poly-Qs with repeat polymorphism. This suggests the existence of a specific molecular function for polymorphic and/or long poly-Q stretches. Given that the poly-Qs causing expansion diseases were longer than other poly-Qs, even in healthy subjects, our results indicate that the evolutionary benefits of long and/or polymorphic poly-Q stretches outweigh the risks of long CAG repeats predisposing to pathological hyper-expansions. Molecular pathways in neurodevelopment requiring long and polymorphic poly-Q stretches may provide a clue to understanding why poly-Q expansion diseases are limited to neurodegenerative diseases. © 2016, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  14. Analysis of genetic polymorphism of nine short tandem repeat loci in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-03-15

    Mar 15, 2012 ... Short tandem repeat (STR) is widely used today for gene mapping ... minatory power for some difficult cases, such as complex kinship analysis ... Arlequin version 3.5 software (Computational and Molecular. Population ...

  15. Genotyping of Bacillus anthracis strains based on automated capillary 25-loci Multiple Locus Variable-Number Tandem Repeats Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciervo Alessandra

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genome of Bacillus anthracis, the etiological agent of anthrax, is highly monomorphic which makes differentiation between strains difficult. A Multiple Locus Variable-number tandem repeats (VNTR Analysis (MLVA assay based on 20 markers was previously described. It has considerable discrimination power, reproducibility, and low cost, especially since the markers proposed can be typed by agarose-gel electrophoresis. However in an emergency situation, faster genotyping and access to representative databases is necessary. Results Genotyping of B. anthracis reference strains and isolates from France and Italy was done using a 25 loci MLVA assay combining 21 previously described loci and 4 new ones. DNA was amplified in 4 multiplex PCR reactions and the length of the resulting 25 amplicons was estimated by automated capillary electrophoresis. The results were reproducible and the data were consistent with other gel based methods once differences in mobility patterns were taken into account. Some alleles previously unresolved by agarose gel electrophoresis could be resolved by capillary electrophoresis, thus further increasing the assay resolution. One particular locus, Bams30, is the result of a recombination between a 27 bp tandem repeat and a 9 bp tandem repeat. The analysis of the array illustrates the evolution process of tandem repeats. Conclusion In a crisis situation of suspected bioterrorism, standardization, speed and accuracy, together with the availability of reference typing data are important issues, as illustrated by the 2001 anthrax letters event. In this report we describe an upgrade of the previously published MLVA method for genotyping of B. anthracis and apply the method to the typing of French and Italian B. anthracis strain collections. The increased number of markers studied compared to reports using only 8 loci greatly improves the discrimination power of the technique. An Italian strain belonging to the

  16. Complex organization of the soybean mitochondrial genome: recombination repeats and multiple transcripts at the atpA loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanut, F A; Grabau, E A; Gesteland, R F

    1993-03-01

    Identification of the soybean mitochondrial atpA open reading frame (atpA ORF) was based on sequence similarity with atpA genes in other plant mitochondria and partial protein sequencing. The atpA reading frame ends with four tandem UGA codons which overlap four tandem AUG codons initiating an unidentified reading frame, orf214. The atpA-orf214 region is found in multiple sequence contexts in soybean mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), which can be attributed to the presence of two recombination repeats. A 1-kb repeat spans 600 nucleotides (nt) of atpA N-terminal coding region and 400 nt of upstream sequence. Its four configurations correspond to two full-length atpA-orf214 genes and two truncated pseudogenes. A 2-kb repeat lies 3 kb downstream from the 1-kb repeat. Restriction maps of cosmid clones suggest that a 10-kb segment containing both repeats is itself duplicated in the mt genome. With two recombination repeats present in a total of three copies per genome, soybean mtDNA is expected to consist of a complex population of subgenomic molecules. Transcription of the atpA loci was analysed by Northern blotting and S1 nuclease protection. The atpA genes express multiple transcripts with one major 3' end and heterogeneous 5' sequences extending several kb upstream of the atpA coding region. The atpA gene and orf214 are co-transcribed on all major transcripts. The pseudogenes do not express stable RNAs.

  17. Analysis of thirteen trinucleotide repeat loci as candidate genes for Schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, S.; Leggo, J.; Ferguson-Smith, M.A.; Rubinsztein, D.C. [Addenbrooke`s NHS Trust, Cambridge (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1996-04-09

    A group of diseases are due to abnormal expansions of trinucleotide repeats. These diseases all affect the nervous system. In addition, they manifest the phenomenon of anticipation, in which the disease tends to present at an earlier age or with greater severity in successive generations. Many additional genes with trinucleotide repeats are believed to be expressed in the human brain. As anticipation has been reported in schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder, we have examined allele distributions of 13 trinucleotide repeat-containing genes, many novel and all expressed in the brain, in genomic DNA from schizophrenic (n = 20-97) and bipolar affective disorder patients (23-30) and controls (n = 43-146). No evidence was obtained to implicate expanded alleles in these 13 genes as causal factors in these diseases. 26 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  18. Population variation at the CODIS core short tandem repeat loci in Europeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budowle, B; Chakraborty, R

    2001-03-01

    Substantial STR population data exist to estimate F(ST) (or theta) values across Europeans. Eleven populations across Europe were analyzed, and the estimate over all 13 CODIS core STR loci is 0.0028. This value is much less than the conservative estimate of 0.01 advocated by the second National Research Council Report in 1996. Because of the low value for theta, whether independence is assumed or an adjustment for substructure is employed, there is little practical consequence for forensic purposes for estimating the frequency of a multiple locus DNA profile. If theta is used, a value of 0.01 is very conservative for Europeans. The same STR population data can be used for evolutionary studies on Europeans, and the calculated genetic distances are consistent with the ethnohistory of the populations.

  19. Genome-wide association analyses using electronic health records identify new loci influencing blood pressure variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Thomas J; Ehret, Georg B; Nandakumar, Priyanka; Ranatunga, Dilrini; Schaefer, Catherine; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Iribarren, Carlos; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Risch, Neil

    2017-01-01

    Longitudinal electronic health records on 99,785 Genetic Epidemiology Research on Adult Health and Aging (GERA) cohort individuals provided 1,342,814 systolic and diastolic blood pressure measurements for a genome-wide association study on long-term average systolic, diastolic, and pulse pressure. We identified 39 new loci among 75 genome-wide significant loci (P ≤ 5 × 10(-8)), with most replicating in the combined International Consortium for Blood Pressure (ICBP; n = 69,396) and UK Biobank (UKB; n = 152,081) studies. Combining GERA with ICBP yielded 36 additional new loci, with most replicating in UKB. Combining all three studies (n = 321,262) yielded 241 additional genome-wide significant loci, although no replication sample was available for these. All associated loci explained 2.9%, 2.5%, and 3.1% of variation in systolic, diastolic, and pulse pressure, respectively, in GERA non-Hispanic whites. Using multiple blood pressure measurements in GERA doubled the variance explained. A normalized risk score was associated with time to onset of hypertension (hazards ratio = 1.18, P = 8.2 × 10(-45)). Expression quantitative trait locus analysis of blood pressure loci showed enrichment in aorta and tibial artery.

  20. Implementation of a Consensus Set of Hypervariable Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive-Unit-Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Loci in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Molecular Epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trovato, Alberto; Tafaj, Silva; Battaglia, Simone; Alagna, Riccardo; Bardhi, Donika; Kapisyzi, Perlat; Bala, Silvana; Haldeda, Migena; Borroni, Emanuele; Hafizi, Hasan; Cirillo, Daniela Maria

    2016-02-01

    This study shows that the addition of a consensus 4-locus set of hypervariable mycobacterial interspersed repetitive-unit-variable-number tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR) loci to the spoligotyping-24-locus MIRU-VNTR typing strategy is a well-standardized approach that can contribute to an improvement of the true cluster definition while retaining high typeability in non-Beijing strains.

  1. Fifteen non-CODIS autosomal short tandem repeat loci multiplex data from nine population groups living in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwa, Hsiao-Lin; Chang, Yih-Yuan; Lee, James Chun-I; Lin, Chun-Yen; Yin, Hsiang-Yi; Tseng, Li-Hui; Su, Yi-Ning; Ko, Tsang-Ming

    2012-07-01

    The analysis of autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) loci is a powerful tool in forensic genetics. We developed a multiplex system in which 15 non-Combined DNA Index System autosomal STRs (D3S1744, D4S2366, D8S1110, D10S2325, D12S1090, D13S765, D14S608, Penta E, D17S1294, D18S536, D18S1270, D20S470, D21S1437, Penta D, and D22S683) could be amplified in one single polymerase chain reaction. DNA samples from 1,098 unrelated subjects of nine population groups living in Taiwan, including Taiwanese Han, indigenous Taiwanese of Taiwan Island, Tao, mainland Chinese, Filipinos, Thais, Vietnamese, Indonesians, and Caucasians, were collected and analyzed using this system. The distributions of the allelic frequencies and the forensic parameters of each population group were presented. The combined discrimination power and the combined power of exclusion were high in all population groups tested in this study. A multidimensional scaling plot of these nine population groups based on the Reynolds' genetic distances calculated from 15 autosomal STRs was constructed, and the genetic substructure in this area was presented. In conclusion, this 15 autosomal STR multiplex system provides highly informative STR data and appears useful in forensic casework and parentage testing in different populations.

  2. Assessment of application value of 19 autosomal short tandem repeat loci of GoldenEye 20A kit in forensic paternity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yan-Mei; Wang, Jie; Jiao, Zhangping; Yang, Liu; Zhang, Xinning; Tang, Hui; Liu, Yacheng

    2013-05-01

    This study was carried out to assess the application value of 19 autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) loci of GoldenEye 20A kit, in which 13 combined DNA index system core STR loci and PentaE, PentaD, D2S1338, D19S433, D12S391, and D6S1043 of six STR loci could be used in forensic paternity testing in Chinese population. We amplified the genomic DNA from blood samples on FTA paper of 289 paternity testing cases by using the GoldenEye 20A kit. The amplified products were detected by capillary electrophoresis, and then the genotypes of 20 genetic markers including 19 STR loci as well as Amelogenin for sex determination were analyzed by GeneMapper v3.2 and GeneMarker HID Software. The results of genotypes were compared to the three commonly used commercial kits including AmpFℓSTR Identifiler, PowerPlex16, and AmpFℓSTR Sinofiler kits. Compared to the three other common commercial kits, the GoldenEye 20A kit had higher value of combined paternity index in certainty of paternity or non-exclusion paternity cases, and more numbers of STR loci were excluded in exclusionary paternity cases. Our data in this study showed that the GoldenEye 20A kit has a higher application value in forensic paternity testing and will be of help for kinship analysis.

  3. Population data on the thirteen CODIS core short tandem repeat loci in African Americans, U.S. Caucasians, Hispanics, Bahamians, Jamaicans, and Trinidadians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budowle, B; Moretti, T R; Baumstark, A L; Defenbaugh, D A; Keys, K M

    1999-11-01

    Allele distributions for 13 tetrameric short tandem repeat (STR) loci, CSF1PO, FGA, TH01, TPOX, VWA, D3S1358, D5S818, D7S820, D8S1179, D13S317, D16S539, D18S51, and D21S11, were determined in African American, United States Caucasian, Hispanic, Bahamian, Jamaican, and Trinidadian sample populations. There was little evidence for departures from Hardy-Weinberg expectations (HWE) in any of the populations. Based on the exact test, the loci that departed significantly from HWE are: D21S11 (p = 0.010, Bahamians); CSF1PO (p = 0.014, Trinidadians); TPOX (p = 0.011, Jamaicans and p = 0.035, U.S. Caucasians); and D16S539 (p = 0.043, Bahamians). After employing the Bonferroni correction for the number of loci analyzed (i.e., 13 loci per database), these observations are not likely to be significant. There is little evidence for association of alleles between the loci in these databases. The allelic frequency data are similar to other comparable data within the same major population group.

  4. Hypermethylation of CpG island loci and hypomethylation of LINE-1 and Alu repeats in prostate adenocarcinoma and their relationship to clinicopathological features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, N-Y; Kim, B-H; Choi, M; Yoo, E J; Moon, K C; Cho, Y-M; Kim, D; Kang, G H

    2007-02-01

    Promoter CpG island hypermethylation is an important carcinogenic event in prostate adenocarcinoma. Regardless of tissue type, human cancers have in common both focal CpG island hypermethylation and global genomic hypomethylation. The present study evaluated CpG island loci hypermethylation and LINE-1 and Alu repeat hypomethylation in prostate adenocarcinoma, analysed the relationship between them, and correlated these findings with clinicopathological features. We examined 179 cases of prostate adenocarcinoma and 30 cases of benign prostate hypertrophy for the methylation status of 22 CpG island loci and the methylation levels of LINE-1 and Alu repeats using methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction and combined bisulphite restriction analysis, respectively. The following 16 CpG island loci were found to display cancer-related hypermethylation: RASSF1A, GSTP1, RARB, TNFRSF10C, APC, BCL2, MDR1, ASC, TIG1, RBP1, COX2, THBS1, TNFRSF10D, CD44, p16, and RUNX3. Except for the last four CpG island loci, hypermethylation of each of the remaining 12 CpG island loci displayed a close association with one or more of the prognostic parameters (ie preoperative serum prostate specific antigen level, Gleason score sum, and clinical stage). Prostate adenocarcinoma with hypermethylation of each of ASC, COX2, RARB, TNFRSF10C, MDR1, TIG1, RBP1, NEUROG1, RASSF1A, and GSTP1 showed a significantly lower methylation level of Alu or LINE-1 than prostate adenocarcinoma without hypermethylation. In addition, hypomethylation of Alu or LINE-1 was closely associated with one or more of the above prognostic parameters. These data suggest that in tumour progression a close relationship exists between CpG island hypermethylation and the hypomethylation of repetitive elements, and that CpG island hypermethylation and DNA hypomethylation contribute to cancer progression.

  5. Development of a Multiple Loci Variable Number of Tandem Repeats Analysis (MLVA to Unravel the Intra-Pathovar Structure of Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae Populations Worldwide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Ciarroni

    Full Text Available The bacterial canker of kiwifruit by Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae is an emblematic example of a catastrophic disease of fruit crops. In 2008 a new, extremely virulent form of the pathogen emerged and rapidly devastated many Actinidia spp. orchards all over the world. In order to understand differences in populations within this pathovar and to elucidate their diffusion and movements on world scale, it is necessary to be able to quickly and on a routine basis compare new isolates with previous records. In this report a worldwide collection of 142 strains was analyzed by MLVA, chosen as investigative technique for its efficacy, reproducibility, simplicity and low cost. A panel of 13 Variable Number of Tandem Repeats (VNTR loci was identified and used to describe the pathogen population. The MLVA clustering is highly congruent with the population structure as previously established by other molecular approaches including whole genome sequencing and correlates with geographic origin, time of isolation and virulence. For convenience, we divided the VNTR loci in two panels. Panel 1 assay, using six loci, recognizes 23 different haplotypes, clustered into ten complexes with highest congruence with previous classifications. Panel 2, with seven VNTR loci, provides discriminatory power. Using the total set of 13 VNTR loci, 58 haplotypes can be distinguished. The recent hypervirulent type shows very limited diversity and includes, beside the strains from Europe, New Zealand and Chile, a few strains from Shaanxi, China. A broad genetic variability is observed in China, but different types are also retrievable in Japan and Korea. The low virulent strains cluster together and are very different from the other MLVA genotypes. Data were used to generate a public database in MLVAbank. MLVA represents a very promising first-line assay for large-scale routine genotyping, prior to whole genome sequencing of only the most relevant samples.

  6. Development of a Multiple Loci Variable Number of Tandem Repeats Analysis (MLVA) to Unravel the Intra-Pathovar Structure of Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae Populations Worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarroni, Serena; Gallipoli, Lorenzo; Taratufolo, Maria C; Butler, Margi I; Poulter, Russell T M; Pourcel, Christine; Vergnaud, Gilles; Balestra, Giorgio M; Mazzaglia, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial canker of kiwifruit by Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae is an emblematic example of a catastrophic disease of fruit crops. In 2008 a new, extremely virulent form of the pathogen emerged and rapidly devastated many Actinidia spp. orchards all over the world. In order to understand differences in populations within this pathovar and to elucidate their diffusion and movements on world scale, it is necessary to be able to quickly and on a routine basis compare new isolates with previous records. In this report a worldwide collection of 142 strains was analyzed by MLVA, chosen as investigative technique for its efficacy, reproducibility, simplicity and low cost. A panel of 13 Variable Number of Tandem Repeats (VNTR) loci was identified and used to describe the pathogen population. The MLVA clustering is highly congruent with the population structure as previously established by other molecular approaches including whole genome sequencing and correlates with geographic origin, time of isolation and virulence. For convenience, we divided the VNTR loci in two panels. Panel 1 assay, using six loci, recognizes 23 different haplotypes, clustered into ten complexes with highest congruence with previous classifications. Panel 2, with seven VNTR loci, provides discriminatory power. Using the total set of 13 VNTR loci, 58 haplotypes can be distinguished. The recent hypervirulent type shows very limited diversity and includes, beside the strains from Europe, New Zealand and Chile, a few strains from Shaanxi, China. A broad genetic variability is observed in China, but different types are also retrievable in Japan and Korea. The low virulent strains cluster together and are very different from the other MLVA genotypes. Data were used to generate a public database in MLVAbank. MLVA represents a very promising first-line assay for large-scale routine genotyping, prior to whole genome sequencing of only the most relevant samples.

  7. Allele frequency data of 21 autosomal short tandem repeat loci in Mesan and Basra provinces in South Iraq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imad Hadi Hameed

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We focused on a sample of 100 unrelated persons from the provinces of southern Iraq. This is an analysis of the allele frequency and genotyping of those STR loci in an Iraqi population and this is the first study of its kind in Iraq. As such the data available could be utilized in the Iraqi database for the STR polymorphic markers. Chelex® kit was utilized to extract DNA then Power Plex21® kit (D3S1358, D13S317, PentaE, D16S539, D18S51, D2S1338, CSF1PO, Penta D, THO1, vWA, D21S11, D7S820, TPOX, D8S1179, FGA, D2S1338, D5S818, D6S1043, D12S391, D19S433 was used to amplify the isolated DNA. The mean PIC values and heterozygosity observed across 21 loci were 0.713 and 0.696, respectively. This shows high gene diversity. Those loci can be safely used to establish a DNA-based database for the Iraqi population because the power of discrimination values for all tested loci was from 71% to 97%.

  8. Development of new VNTR markers for pike and assessment of variability at di- and tetranucleotide repeat microsatellite loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Møller; Taggart, J.B.; Meldrup, Dorte

    1999-01-01

    -0.57), though one highly variable microsatellite (13 alleles; expected heterozygosity 0.79) was identified. In combination with previously published microsatellites a set consisting of nine polymorphic loci appeared to be useful for discriminating populations, as determined by assignment tests. (C) 1999...

  9. Conserved loci of leaf and stem rust fungi of wheat share synteny interrupted by lineage-specific influx of repeat elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fellers John P

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wheat leaf rust (Puccinia triticina Eriks; Pt and stem rust fungi (P. graminis f.sp. tritici; Pgt are significant economic pathogens having similar host ranges and life cycles, but different alternate hosts. The Pt genome, currently estimated at 135 Mb, is significantly larger than Pgt, at 88 Mb, but the reason for the expansion is unknown. Three genomic loci of Pt conserved proteins were characterized to gain insight into gene content, genome complexity and expansion. Results A bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC library was made from P. triticina race 1, BBBD and probed with Pt homologs of genes encoding two predicted Pgt secreted effectors and a DNA marker mapping to a region of avirulence. Three BACs, 103 Kb, 112 Kb, and 166 Kb, were sequenced, assembled, and open reading frames were identified. Orthologous genes were identified in Pgt and local conservation of gene order (microsynteny was observed. Pairwise protein identities ranged from 26 to 99%. One Pt BAC, containing a RAD18 ortholog, shares syntenic regions with two Pgt scaffolds, which could represent both haplotypes of Pgt. Gene sequence is diverged between the species as well as within the two haplotypes. In all three BAC clones, gene order is locally conserved, however, gene shuffling has occurred relative to Pgt. These regions are further diverged by differing insertion loci of LTR-retrotransposon, Gypsy, Copia, Mutator, and Harbinger mobile elements. Uncharacterized Pt open reading frames were also found; these proteins are high in lysine and similar to multiple proteins in Pgt. Conclusions The three Pt loci are conserved in gene order, with a range of gene sequence divergence. Conservation of predicted haustoria expressed secreted protein genes between Pt and Pgt is extended to the more distant poplar rust, Melampsora larici-populina. The loci also reveal that genome expansion in Pt is in part due to higher occurrence of repeat-elements in this species.

  10. Lack of expansion of triplet repeats in the FMR1, FRAXE, and FRAXF loci in male multiplex families with autism and pervasive developmental disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holden, J.J.A.; Julien-Inalsingh, C. [Queen`s Univ., Kingston (Canada); Wing, M. [Ongwanada Resource Centre, Kingston (Canada)] [and others

    1996-08-09

    Sib, twin, and family studies have shown that a genetic cause exists in many cases of autism, with a portion of cases associated with a fragile X chromosome. Three folate-sensitive fragile sites in the Xq27{r_arrow}Xq28 region have been cloned and found to have polymorphic trinucleotide repeats at the respective sites; these repeats are amplified and methylated in individuals who are positive for the different fragile sites. We have tested affected boys and their mothers from 19 families with two autistic/PDD boys for amplification and/or instability of the triplet repeats at these loci and concordance of inheritance of alleles by affected brothers. In all cases, the triplet repeat numbers were within the normal range, with no individuals having expanded or premutation-size alleles. For each locus, there was no evidence for an increased frequency of concordance, indicating that mutations within these genes are unlikely to be responsible for the autistic/PDD phenotypes in the affected boys. Thus, we think it is important to retest those autistic individuals who were cytogenetically positive for a fragile X chromosome, particularly cases where there is no family history of the fragile X syndrome, using the more accurate DNA-based testing procedures. 29 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  11. Comparative cytogenomics of poultry: mapping of single gene and repeat loci in the Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Marla C; Robinson, Charmaine M; Gehlen, Lida P; Delany, Mary E

    2014-04-01

    Well-characterized molecular and cytogenetic maps are yet to be established in Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica). The aim of the current study was to cytogenetically map and determine linkage of specific genes and gene complexes in Japanese quail through the use of chicken (Gallus gallus) and turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) genomic DNA probes and conduct a comparative study among the three genomes. Chicken and turkey clones were used as probes on mitotic metaphase and meiotic pachytene stage chromosomes of the three species for the purpose of high-resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The genes and complexes studied included telomerase RNA (TR), telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), 5S rDNA, 18S-5.8S-28S rDNA (i.e., nucleolus organizer region (NOR)), and the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). The telomeric profile of Japanese quail was investigated through the use of FISH with a TTAGGG-PNA probe. A range of telomeric array sizes were confirmed as found for the other poultry species. Three NOR loci were identified in Japanese quail, and single loci each for TR, TERT, 5S rDNA and the MHC-B. The MHC-B and one NOR locus were linked on a microchromosome in Japanese quail. We confirmed physical linkage of 5S rDNA and the TR gene on an intermediate-sized chromosome in quail, similar to both chicken and turkey. TERT localized to CJA 2 in quail and the orthologous chromosome region in chicken (GGA 2) and in turkey (MGA 3). The cytogenetic profile of Japanese quail was further developed by this study and synteny was identified among the three poultry species.

  12. Determination of mini-short tandem repeat (miniSTR) loci by using the combination of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and microchip electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xuexia; Wu, Jing; Li, Haifang; Wang, Zhihua; Lin, Jin-Ming

    2013-09-30

    In this work, a simple and convenient method for the detection of mini-short tandem repeat (miniSTR) loci has been developed by the combination of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and microchip electrophoresis (MCE). Degraded or inhibitor DNA greatly limited STR loci analysis. Therefore, The proper primers was designed as close as possible to the STRs region to produce smaller size STRs, and made the assay suitable for the destroyed samples. Two annealing temperatures were applied in one PCR procedure and the corresponding cycle numbers were studied to improve the sensitivity of PCR reaction. Under optimal conditions, 0.001 ng DNA templates were enough to generate miniSTRs. The relative standard deviations (n=3) of the size fifteen miniSTRs from DNA9947A ranged from 0.49% to 4.41%. The RSDs of concentrations were between 0.94% and 4.95%. Fifteen miniSTRs were also well produced from human hair, indicating that the method has great potential application in criminal identification and paternity testing.

  13. A graphical simulation model of the entire DNA process associated with the analysis of short tandem repeat loci

    OpenAIRE

    Gill, Peter; Curran, James; Elliot, Keith

    2005-01-01

    The use of expert systems to interpret short tandem repeat DNA profiles in forensic, medical and ancient DNA applications is becoming increasingly prevalent as high-throughput analytical systems generate large amounts of data that are time-consuming to process. With special reference to low copy number (LCN) applications, we use a graphical model to simulate stochastic variation associated with the entire DNA process starting with extraction of sample, followed by the processing associated wi...

  14. Deleterious epistatic interactions between electron transport system protein-coding loci in the copepod Tigriopus californicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, Christopher S

    2006-07-01

    The nature of epistatic interactions between genes encoding interacting proteins in hybrid organisms can have important implications for the evolution of postzygotic reproductive isolation and speciation. At this point very little is known about the fitness differences caused by specific closely interacting but evolutionarily divergent proteins in hybrids between populations or species. The intertidal copepod Tigriopus californicus provides an excellent model in which to study such interactions because the species range includes numerous genetically divergent populations that are still capable of being crossed in the laboratory. Here, the effect on fitness due to the interactions of three complex III proteins of the electron transport system in F2 hybrid copepods resulting from crosses of a pair of divergent populations is examined. Significant deviations from Mendelian inheritance are observed for each of the three genes in F2 hybrid adults but not in nauplii (larvae). The two-way interactions between these genes also have a significant impact upon the viability of these hybrid copepods. Dominance appears to play an important role in mediating the interactions between these loci as deviations are caused by heterozygote/homozygote deleterious interactions. These results suggest that the fitness consequences of the interactions of these three complex III-associated genes could influence reproductive isolation in this system.

  15. XML Genetic Structure of SSR1 & SSR2 loci from Iranian Mycobacterium Avium Subspecies Paratuberculosis Isolates by a Short Sequence Repeat Analysis Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida Chalesh (MSc

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Paratuberculosis has been repeatedly reported from Iranian ruminant herds. The extrem fastidious nature of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculsos hinders genomic diversity studies of the pathogen. Short Sequence Repeat analysis is one of the genome-based approches recently developed to overcome this difficulty. In this study we describe the application of SSR genotyping on three Iranian MAP type strains plus the III & V vaccinal strain. Methods: All the bacteria were examined by PCR-F57 and PCR-IS900 experiments in order to authenticate their identity as MAP. SSR genotyping using SSR1 & SSR2 loci was conducted according to the Amonsin method. PCR amplicons were sequenced to guarantee the accuracy of findings. Results: At SSR1 locus two allels were identified, a larger allel of 770 bp and a smaller allel of 763 bp long. At SSR2 only a single allele, 800 bp long, was detected. Two Iranian bovine and ovine MAP isolates along with the vaccinal III & V strain shared a single SSR1/SSR2 pattern while a different SSR1/SSR2 was represented by the third (caprine Iranian MAP isolate. Conclusion: While finding a shared SSR type between the two Iranian MAP isolates and the III & V strain might represent a mutual ancestral background but this has to be assessed through further studies. Detection of two SSR genotypes between three Iranian type strains is likely a reflection of more MAP clones in Iran.

  16. A graphical simulation model of the entire DNA process associated with the analysis of short tandem repeat loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Peter; Curran, James; Elliot, Keith

    2005-01-01

    The use of expert systems to interpret short tandem repeat DNA profiles in forensic, medical and ancient DNA applications is becoming increasingly prevalent as high-throughput analytical systems generate large amounts of data that are time-consuming to process. With special reference to low copy number (LCN) applications, we use a graphical model to simulate stochastic variation associated with the entire DNA process starting with extraction of sample, followed by the processing associated with the preparation of a PCR reaction mixture and PCR itself. Each part of the process is modelled with input efficiency parameters. Then, the key output parameters that define the characteristics of a DNA profile are derived, namely heterozygote balance (Hb) and the probability of allelic drop-out p(D). The model can be used to estimate the unknown efficiency parameters, such as pi(extraction). 'What-if' scenarios can be used to improve and optimize the entire process, e.g. by increasing the aliquot forwarded to PCR, the improvement expected to a given DNA profile can be reliably predicted. We demonstrate that Hb and drop-out are mainly a function of stochastic effect of pre-PCR molecular selection. Whole genome amplification is unlikely to give any benefit over conventional PCR for LCN.

  17. [A case of environmental infection with pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex disease from a residential bathroom of a patient suggested by variable-number tandem-repeat typing of Mycobacterium avium tandem repeat loci].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taga, Shu; Niimi, Masaki; Kurokawa, Kazuhiro; Nakagawa, Taku; Ogawa, Kenji

    2012-05-01

    A 63-year-old woman was referred to our hospital because of bilateral infiltrations and nodular opacities in her chest radiograph taken in the mass radiography screening in September 2010. The chest computed tomography showed patchy infiltrations with bronchiectasis in the lower lung fields on both sides. She was diagnosed with pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) disease based on the bacteria recovered from the sputum and the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. To elucidate an environmental MAC source, we investigated her home, and isolated M. avium and M. gordonae from the bathtub and shower tap, respectively, in her residential bathroom. Analysis of the hsp65-PRA variants digested with BamHI and some insertion sequences showed that the clinical strains recovered from sputum and strains from the bathtub were M. avium subsp. hominissuis. A dendrogram of the Mycobacterium avium tandem repeat loci variable-number tandem-repeat (MATR-VNTR) analysis of the MAC strains showed that the bathtub strains formed a polyclonal colonization, and that 1 of the 5 MATR-VNTR patterns was identical to the corresponding pattern of the sputum strain from the patient. In conclusion, we believe that the residential bathroom of the patient was the environmental source of her pulmonary MAC disease, as has been previously reported.

  18. The effect of seed electrons on the repeatability of atmospheric pressure plasma plume propagation: I. Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, L.; Chang, L.; Xian, Y.; Lu, X.

    2016-09-01

    One of the significant differences between the traditional streamers and the plasma jets is the repeatability of their propagation. In this paper, the effect of the seed electron density on the repeatability of the plasma jets is investigated. The seed electron density plays an essential role in the propagation of plasma plume which is in either repeatable mode or random mode depending on the frequency of the applied voltage and the mixture percentage of the working gas. By measuring the propagation velocities and the ignition delay time, it is found that the propagation velocities of the plasma plume are independent of the seed electron density. However, the jitter of the ignition delay time strongly depends on the frequency of the applied voltage and the mixture percentage of the working gas. After detailed analyzing of the experiment results, it is concluded that the minimum seed electron density required for the plasma bullet to propagate in repeatable mode is on the order of 108 cm-3 for gas pressure of 2 × 104 Pa. The minimum required seed electron density for the gas pressure of 4 × 103 Pa is on the order of 107 cm-3. Further analysis shows that, at one atmospheric pressure, the required minimum seed electron density for repeatable mode is on the order of 109 cm-3.

  19. The effect of seed electrons on the repeatability of atmospheric pressure plasma plume propagation. II. Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, L.; Nie, L.; Xian, Y.; Lu, X.

    2016-12-01

    One of the distinguishable features of plasma jets compared with the traditional streamers is their repeatable propagation. As an initial objective, the effect of seed electrons on the repeatability of plasma plume propagation is investigated numerically. Besides residual electrons left from previous pulses, the electrons detached from O2 - ions could also be a significant source of the seed electrons to affect the repeatability of plasma plume propagation when an electronegative gas admixture is presented. In this investigation, a global plasma chemical kinetics model is developed to investigate the temporal evolution of the electron and O2 - ions in the afterglow of a plasma plume driven by microsecond pulse direct current voltages, at a total gas pressure of 2 × 104 Pa or 4 × 103 Pa in helium or helium-oxygen mixtures with an air impurity of 0.025%. In addition, a Monte Carlo technique has been applied to calculate the O2 - detachment rate coefficient. Accordingly, the seed electron density due to detachment from O2 - ions for different percentages of oxygen is obtained. Finally, the minimum seed electron density required for the plasma bullets to propagate in a repeatable mode is obtained according to the critical frequency from the experiments. It is found that the order of minimum seed electron number density required for repeatable propagation mode is independent of oxygen concentrations in the helium-oxygen mixture. It is 10 8 cm - 3 for 20 kPa and 10 7 cm - 3 for 4 kPa. Furthermore, for the helium with an air impurity of 0.025%, the residual electrons left over from previous discharges are the main source of seed electrons. On the other hand, when 0.5% of O2 is added, the detachment of O2 - is the main source of the seed electrons.

  20. Genetic diversity in domesticated soybean (Glycine max) and its wild progenitor (Glycine soja) for simple sequence repeat and single-nucleotide polymorphism loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying-Hui; Li, Wei; Zhang, Chen; Yang, Liang; Chang, Ru-Zhen; Gaut, Brandon S; Qiu, Li-Juan

    2010-10-01

    • The study of genetic diversity between a crop and its wild relatives may yield fundamental insights into evolutionary history and the process of domestication. • In this study, we genotyped a sample of 303 accessions of domesticated soybean (Glycine max) and its wild progenitor Glycine soja with 99 microsatellite markers and 554 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers. • The simple sequence repeat (SSR) loci averaged 21.5 alleles per locus and overall Nei's gene diversity of 0.77. The SNPs had substantially lower genetic diversity (0.35) than SSRs. A SSR analyses indicated that G. soja exhibited higher diversity than G. max, but SNPs provided a slightly different snapshot of diversity between the two taxa. For both marker types, the primary division of genetic diversity was between the wild and domesticated accessions. Within taxa, G. max consisted of four geographic regions in China. G. soja formed six subgroups. Genealogical analyses indicated that cultivated soybean tended to form a monophyletic clade with respect to G. soja. • G. soja and G. max represent distinct germplasm pools. Limited evidence of admixture was discovered between these two species. Overall, our analyses are consistent with the origin of G. max from regions along the Yellow River of China.

  1. Structural determination of Streptococcus pneumoniae repeat units in serotype 41A and 41F capsular polysaccharides to probe gene functions in the corresponding capsular biosynthetic loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Bent O.; Skovsted, Ian C.; Paulsen, Berit Smestad

    2014-01-01

    We report the repeating unit structures ofthe native capsular polysaccharidesof S. pneumoniaeserotypes 41A and 41F. Structuraldeterminationsyieldedsix carbohydrate units in the doubly branched repeating unit to givethe following structure for serotype 41A:The structure determinations were motivat...

  2. Genetic polymorphism and forensic parameters of nine short tandem repeat loci in Ngöbé and Emberá Amerindians of Panama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Edgardo A; Trejos, Diomedes E; Berovides-Alvarez, Vicente; Arias, Tomás D; Ramos, Carlos W

    2007-10-01

    Nine STR loci (CSF1PO, TPOX, TH01, F13A01, FESFPS, VWA, D16S539, D7S820, and D13S317) were analyzed in unrelated Ngöbé and Emberá Amerindians of Panama. The chi-square test demonstrated statistically significant differences (P linguistic stock [Chibchan (Ngöbé) and Chocoan (Emberá)], both retain strong similarities in their allele-frequency distributions. Three loci (TPOX, VWA, and F13A01) in the Ngöbé and two loci (TH01 and TPOX) in the Emberá departed from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The analysis of the STR markers demonstrates that, despite their low levels of genetic polymorphisms, most of them could be informative for forensic purposes, showing a combined power of discrimination of 0.9999 for both Amerindian populations. However, powers of exclusion in the Ngöbé were very low, particularly at the TH01 (0.04) and FESFPS (0.08) loci. The combined powers of exclusion were 0.9338 and 0.9890 for the Ngöbé and the Emberá, respectively. Furthermore, the combined typical paternity index in the Ngöbé was considerably low (2.58), and in the Emberá it was 40.44, which is also very low. The low genetic polymorphism levels suggest that theuse of additional loci supplementing the battery of the nine loci is recommended for paternity and forensic tests in both populations, particularly for the Ngöbé.

  3. 扩展的简单串联重复位点诱发突变在遗传毒理学的应用进展%Expanded simple tandem repeat loci induced mutation in genetic toxicology and its progress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁春柳; 姚朗; 张天宝

    2011-01-01

    Expanded simple tandem repeats (ESTRs) are unstable tandem repetitive DNA loci , which are applied largely in induced mutation of germline, because of the high spontaneous mutation rate. So far,three types of repeat sequences have been found. They are named a small satellite, microsatellite and ESTRs, respectively. While pedigree and single-molecule PCR are used to monitor changes in repeat sequences . However, the mutation mechanisms of these repeat sequences are exactly unknown till now. So, in this paper reviewed, the similar and differences of three different repeatitive loci, the advantages and disadvantages of the two methods , as well as the mutation mechanism were focused.%扩展的简单串联重复(ESTRs)序列是基因组DNA上高不稳定的一类重复序列.由于其自发突变和诱发突变率高,因而在生殖细胞诱发突变中的研究中得到广泛的应用.随着研究的深入,目前发现有3类重复序列——小卫星、微卫星和ESTRs,主要通过系谱法和单分子PCR法来研究这些重复序列的变化.但迄今为止,这些重复序列的突变机制还不明确.本文主要综述了目前国内外对这3种重复序列的异同、ESTRs突变研究方法的优缺点以及突变机制.

  4. Polymorphisms of 15 short tandem repeat loci in Mongolian nationality of Gansu province%甘肃蒙古族人群15个短串联重复序列基因座遗传多态性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范瑾; 任甫

    2012-01-01

    目的:调查甘肃蒙古族人群无关个体的15个短串联重复序列(STR)基因座(D8S1179,D21S11,D7S820,CSF1P0,D3S1358,D5S818,D13S317,D16S539,D2S1338,D19S433,vWA,D12S391,D18S51,D6S1043,FGA)的遗传多态性.方法:采用AmpFeSTR Sinofiler荧光标记复合扩增系统对198名甘肃肃北地区蒙古族个体血样DNA进行15个STR基因座的复合扩增,用3130 xl遗传分析仪对扩增产物进行检测.结果:15个STR基因座均符合Hardy-Weinberg平衡,杂合度在0.707 1~0.873 7之间,累积个人识别概率和累积非父排除率分别为0.999 999 3和0.999 999 997.结论:上述15个STR基因座在甘肃蒙古族人群中等位基因分布较好,个体识别率高,适合法医个体识别和亲子鉴定.%Objective: To investigate the polymorphism of 15 short tandem repeat (STR) loci (D8S1179, D21S11, D7S820, CSF1P0, D3S1358, D5S818, D13S317, D16S539, D2S1338, D19S433, vWA, D12S391, D18S51, D6S1043, FGA) in Mongolian nationality of Gansu province. Methods: The genotypes of 15 STR loci in Mongolian population of Gansu province were generated by multiplexing PCR using the Sinofiler PCR system and genotyping using ABI 3130 xl Genetic Analyzer. Results: All loci met Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium expectations. The heterozygosity of the 15 STR loci was between 0. 707 1 and 0. 873 7, cumulate PE was 0. 999 999 3, and cumulate DP was 0. 999 999 997. Conclusion: The genetic polymorphisms of the 15 STR loci in Mongolian population of Gansu province are high. Present data suggest that the 15 loci of Sinofiler system can be applied as candidate markers of forensic individual identification and paternity testing.

  5. Analysis of Short Tandem Repeat and Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Loci From Single-Source Samples Using a Custom HaloPlex Target Enrichment System Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, Frank R; Zeng, Xiangpei; Churchill, Jennifer D; King, Jonathan L; Budowle, Bruce

    2016-06-01

    Short tandem repeats and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are used to individualize biological evidence samples. Short tandem repeat alleles are characterized by size separation during capillary electrophoresis (CE). Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) offers an alternative that can overcome limitations of the CE. With MPS, libraries are prepared for each sample, entailing target enrichment and bar coding, purification, and normalization. The HaloPlex Target Enrichment System (Agilent Technologies) uses a capture-based enrichment system with restriction enzyme digestion to generate fragments containing custom-selected markers. It offers another possible workflow for typing reference samples. Its efficacy was assessed using a panel of 275 human identity SNPs, 88 short tandem repeats, and amelogenin. The data analyzed included locus typing success, depth of sequence coverage, heterozygote balance, and concordance. The results indicate that the HaloPlex Target Enrichment System provides genetic data similar to that obtained by conventional polymerase chain reaction-CE methods with the advantage of analyzing substantially more markers in 1 sequencing run. The genetic typing performance of HaloPlex is comparable to other MPS-based sample preparation systems that utilize primer-based target enrichment.

  6. Allele frequencies of combined DNA index system (CODIS) and non-CODIS short tandem repeat loci in Goiás, Central Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodovalho, R G; Santos, G S; Cavalcanti, L M; Moura, B F S M; Rodrigues, E L; Lima, P R; Gigonzac, M A D; Vieira, T C

    2015-01-01

    In studies of human identification, obtaining a high standard of outcomes and satisfactory conclusions are directly related to the use of highly polymorphic molecular markers. In addition to the combined DNA index system (CODIS) group, it is also important to implement non-CODIS markers into the analysis, as they increase the power of discrimination. During the identification process, it is essential to consider the genetic variation among distinct groups of populations, as the allele frequencies are directly associated with the power of discrimination. However, the population of Goiás, a State located in Central Brazil, is characterized by a highly mixed population due to its diverse ethnic origins. In this study, a survey of the allelic frequencies in the Goiás population was carried out using a molecular assembly composed of 21 autosomal loci both from and external to the CODIS group. The new data, for some of the markers used, were statistically similar to those from previous studies. This consistency means that the use of these markers might serve as a parameter for future population comparisons. The results from these analyses further our knowledge of the study of human identification.

  7. Distribution of antimicrobial resistance determinants, virulence-associated factors and clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats loci in isolates of Enterococcus faecalis from various settings and genetic lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawryszewska, Iwona; Malinowska, Katarzyna; Kuch, Alicja; Chrobak-Chmiel, Dorota; Trokenheim, Lucja Laniewska-; Hryniewicz, Waleria; Sadowy, Ewa

    2017-03-01

    Enterococcus faecalis represents an important factor of hospital-associated infections (HAIs). The knowledge on its evolution from a commensal to an opportunistic pathogen is still limited; thus, we performed a study to characterise distribution of factors that may contribute to this adaptation. Using a collection obtained from various settings (hospitalised patients, community carriers, animals, fresh food, sewage, water), we investigated differences in antimicrobial susceptibility, distribution of antimicrobial resistance genes, virulence-associated determinants and phenotypes, and CRISPR loci in the context of the clonal relatedness of isolates. Bayesian Analysis of Population Structure revealed the presence of three major groups; two subgroups comprised almost exclusively HAI isolates, belonging to previously proposed enterococcal high-risk clonal complexes (HiRECCs) 6 and 28. Isolates of these two subgroups were significantly enriched in antimicrobial resistance genes, presumably produced a polysaccharide capsule and often carried the aggregation substance asa1; distribution of other virulence-associated genes, such as esp and cyl, formation of a biofilm and gelatinase production were more variable. Moreover, both subgroups showed a low prevalence of CRISPR-Cas 1 and 3 and presence of small CRISPR2 variants. Our study confirms the importance of HiRECCs in the population of E. faecalis and their confinement to the hospital settings. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Structural determination of Streptococcus pneumoniae repeat units in serotype 41A and 41F capsular polysaccharides to probe gene functions in the corresponding capsular biosynthetic loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Bent O; Skovsted, Ian C; Paulsen, Berit Smestad; Redondo, Antonio R; Meier, Sebastian

    2014-12-05

    We report the repeating unit structures of the native capsular polysaccharides of Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes 41A and 41F. Structural determinations yielded six carbohydrate units in the doubly branched repeating unit to give the following structure for serotype 41A: The structure determinations were motivated (1) by an ambition to help close the remaining gaps in S. pneumoniae capsular polysaccharide structures, and (2) by the attempt to derive functional annotations of carbohydrate active enzymes in the biosynthesis of bacterial polysaccharides from the determined structures. An activity present in 41F but not 41A is identified as an acetyltransferase acting on the rhamnopyranosyl sidechain E. The genes encoding the formation of the six glycosidic bonds in serogroup 41 were determined from the capsular polysaccharide structures of serotype 41A, 41F, and genetically related serotypes, in conjunction with corresponding genomic information and computational homology searches. In combination with complementary information, NMR spectroscopy considerably simplifies the functional annotation of carbohydrate active enzymes in the biosynthesis of bacterial polysaccharides.

  9. Simple and Practical Approaches for Upgrading Installed Electronic-Repeater-Based Fiber Systems to Optically Amplified Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pasu; Kaewplung; Wadis; Kasantikul

    2003-01-01

    We propose simple and practical approaches to upgrade electronic-repeated systems by using optical amplifiers and zero-dispersion wavelength transmission. Possibility of increasing data rate from 560 Mbit/s to 80 Gbit/s in 1,318-km-long Thai-Malaysia system is demonstrated.

  10. 短串联重复序列基因座在石蜡包埋组织中的应用%Application of short tandem repeats loci genotyping in paraffin embedded tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赖力; 韩莉莉; 沈晓丽

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the difference of the short tandem repeats (STR) loci genotyping in paraffin embedded tissue by using three kits .Methods DNA were extracted from intestinal tumor in paraffin‐embedded tis‐sue which was preservd for a month by using Qiagen method ,fluorescent multiplex PCR by using identifiler kit ,Pow‐erPlex 21 kit and Investigator HDplex kit ,capillary electrophoresis and fragment analysis technique were used to de‐tect STR loci .Comparing the recalling rations of STR loci of three kits and the genotype of the homologous normal samples which include paraffin embedded tissue ,blood ,hair and oral swab .Results DNA concentration extracted from paraffin‐embedded tissue were detected between 6-85 ng/μL ,OD=1 .7 -2 .2 .when DNA concentration >15 ng/μL ,the full STR loci genotype was detected by identifiler kit ,and when DNA concentration was 85 ng/μL ,the full STR loci genotype was detected by PowerPlex 21 kit ,however ,there was no full peaks of all the STR loci by using HDplex kit .There were several different STR loci genotype between paraffin embedded tissue and other homologous normal samples .There were allelic imbalance and drop‐outs in D6S474 ,D4S2366 and D21S2055 .Conclusion The concentration and purity of DNA extracted from paraffin embedded tissue were the important influential factors for STR loci genotype .The phenomenon of missing genetic information was related to sample properties and the detec‐ting system .There was high practical value for STR loci genotyping in paraffin embedded tissue by using identifiler kit .%目的:探讨3种STR基因座分型系统在石蜡包埋组织基因座分型的差异。方法采用Qiagen法对保存1个月的石蜡包埋组织进行DNA提取,用Identifiler系统、PowerPlex 21系统及Investigator HDplex 系统对STR基因座进行聚合酶链反应复合扩增、毛细管电泳、荧光检测及片段分析,比较3种系统的STR基因座检出率,并且采集组织同一个

  11. Genetic polymorphism of four X-short tandem repeat loci in She ethnic population in Zhejiang%浙江畲族群体X染色体四个基因座遗传多态性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴淑珍; 夏露; 陈引蕾; 庞玲霞

    2011-01-01

    目的:了解浙江畲族群体4个X染色体短串联重复序列(short tandem repeat,X-STR)基因座DXS7132、DXS6804、DXS6799、DXS9898的等位基因及基因型频率分布.方法:从无血缘关系的260名浙江畲族个体的抗凝血中提取DNA,进行PCR扩增,聚丙烯酰胺凝胶垂直电泳(PAGE)并银染.结果:4个基因座检出6、6、6、7个等位基因,4个基因座基因型频率分布(女性个体)均符合Hardy -Weignberg平衡(P>0.05);观测杂合度大于0.4759,多态信息含量均大于0.4663,女性个体识别力均大于0.7096,男性个体识别力均大于0.4147.结论:4个基因座均具有较高的遗传多态性,是较理想的遗传标记系统,为浙江畲族人群法医个体识别、亲子鉴定及遗传学研究提供依据.%Objective: To investigate the alleles and genotype frequency of DXS7132. DXS6804.DXS6799.DXS9898 short tandem repeats (STRs) loci in She ethnic population of Zhejiang. Methods: DNA were extracted respectively from anticoagulant of 260 unrelated individuals sample of She ethnic population living in Zhejiang, then were analyzed by multiplex poly-merase chain reaction (PCR) and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and silver stain detection. Results: 6. 6. 6. 7 alleles were observed respectively in DXS7132, DXS6804, DXS6799, DXS9898 loci, and the distribution of genotype frequency (in female) match the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (P>0. 05). The heterozygote (H) in these four loci was more than 0.4759. The polymorphism information content (PIC) were more than 0.4663. The combined power of discrimination (DP) in female and male was more than 0.7096 and 0.4147. Conclusion: The results showed that all the 4 STR loci in this study were found to have high heterozygosity and polymorphic information content, so they could provide useful markers for genetic purposes. The data obtained can be used in individual identification, paternity test and population genetics investigation of She ethnic population living in

  12. A Cluster of Nucleotide-Binding Site-Leucine-Rich Repeat Genes Resides in a Barley Powdery Mildew Resistance Quantitative Trait Loci on 7HL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantalapiedra, Carlos P; Contreras-Moreira, Bruno; Silvar, Cristina; Perovic, Dragan; Ordon, Frank; Gracia, María Pilar; Igartua, Ernesto; Casas, Ana M

    2016-07-01

    Powdery mildew causes severe yield losses in barley production worldwide. Although many resistance genes have been described, only a few have already been cloned. A strong QTL (quantitative trait locus) conferring resistance to a wide array of powdery mildew isolates was identified in a Spanish barley landrace on the long arm of chromosome 7H. Previous studies narrowed down the QTL position, but were unable to identify candidate genes or physically locate the resistance. In this study, the exome of three recombinant lines from a high-resolution mapping population was sequenced and analyzed, narrowing the position of the resistance down to a single physical contig. Closer inspection of the region revealed a cluster of closely related NBS-LRR (nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat containing protein) genes. Large differences were found between the resistant lines and the reference genome of cultivar Morex, in the form of PAV (presence-absence variation) in the composition of the NBS-LRR cluster. Finally, a template-guided assembly was performed and subsequent expression analysis revealed that one of the new assembled candidate genes is transcribed. In summary, the results suggest that NBS-LRR genes, absent from the reference and the susceptible genotypes, could be functional and responsible for the powdery mildew resistance. The procedure followed is an example of the use of NGS (next-generation sequencing) tools to tackle the challenges of gene cloning when the target gene is absent from the reference genome.

  13. A Cluster of Nucleotide-Binding Site–Leucine-Rich Repeat Genes Resides in a Barley Powdery Mildew Resistance Quantitative Trait Loci on 7HL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos P. Cantalapiedra

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Powdery mildew causes severe yield losses in barley production worldwide. Although many resistance genes have been described, only a few have already been cloned. A strong QTL (quantitative trait locus conferring resistance to a wide array of powdery mildew isolates was identified in a Spanish barley landrace on the long arm of chromosome 7H. Previous studies narrowed down the QTL position, but were unable to identify candidate genes or physically locate the resistance. In this study, the exome of three recombinant lines from a high-resolution mapping population was sequenced and analyzed, narrowing the position of the resistance down to a single physical contig. Closer inspection of the region revealed a cluster of closely related NBS-LRR (nucleotide-binding site–leucine-rich repeat containing protein genes. Large differences were found between the resistant lines and the reference genome of cultivar Morex, in the form of PAV (presence-absence variation in the composition of the NBS-LRR cluster. Finally, a template-guided assembly was performed and subsequent expression analysis revealed that one of the new assembled candidate genes is transcribed. In summary, the results suggest that NBS-LRR genes, absent from the reference and the susceptible genotypes, could be functional and responsible for the powdery mildew resistance. The procedure followed is an example of the use of NGS (next-generation sequencing tools to tackle the challenges of gene cloning when the target gene is absent from the reference genome.

  14. Genetic polymorphisms of short tandem repeat loci D13S305, D13S631 and D13S634 in the Han population of Tianjin, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yunfang; Li, Xiaozhou; Ju, Duan; Li, Yan; Zhang, Xiuling; Zhang, Ying

    2015-08-01

    Short tandem repeat (STR) markers, also known as microsatellites, are extensively used in mapping studies, forensics and disease diagnosis due to their small dimension and low mutation and high polymorphism rates. In recent years quantitative fluorescence polymerase chain reaction (QF-PCR) has been successfully used to amplify STR markers in the prenatal diagnosis of common chromosomal abnormalities. This method provides a diagnosis of common aneuploidies 24-48 h after sampling with low error rates and cost; however, the size of different alleles, frequency, heterozygosity and distribution of STR markers vary among different populations. In the present study three STR markers, D13S305, D13S631 and D13S634, on chromosome 13 were analyzed in 350 unrelated individuals (200 males and 150 females) from the Han population of Tianjin, China using QF-PCR. Eleven, seven and 11 alleles of each marker were observed, respectively. The frequencies of the genotypes were in good agreement with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (P>0.05). The results showed that these three STR markers were highly polymorphic in the Han population of Tianjin, China. The study has provided basic data for use in the prenatal diagnosis of Patau syndrome.

  15. DNA cassette exchange in ES cells mediated by Flp recombinase: an efficient strategy for repeated modification of tagged loci by marker-free constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibler, J; Schübeler, D; Fiering, S; Groudine, M; Bode, J

    1998-05-05

    The repeated modification of a genomic locus is a technically demanding but powerful strategy to analyze the function of a particular gene product or the role of cis-regulatory DNA elements in mammalian cells. The initial step is "tagging" a site with a selectable marker which is done by homologous recombination (HR) to modify a known locus or by random integration to study cis-regulatory elements at a reproducibly accessible genomic location. The tag is then used to target the construct of choice during an exchange step. Presented here is a novel technique in which the exchange is independent of HR and does not introduce vector sequences. It relies on our previous studies on the replacement of DNA cassettes by FLP-recombinase, whereby some common limitations can be overcome. To this end, the tag, a hygtk positive/negative selection marker, is integrated into the genome of embryonic stem (ES) cells. This marker is flanked by a wild-type Flp-recognition target (FRT) site on one end and by a modified heterospecific FRT site on the other. Successful Flp-mediated replacement of the hygtk cassette is enriched by ganciclovir (GANC) selection for cells that lack the encoded fusion protein. Thereby, the hygtk gene can be exchanged for virtually any sequence in a single efficient step without the need of introducing a positive selectable marker. The system can hence be used to analyze the function of either a gene product or regulatory sequences in ES cells or the transgenic mice derived thereof.

  16. 四川省夹江县人群18个STR位点的遗传多态性%Genetic Polymorphism of 18 Short Tandem Repeat Loci in Jiajiang County of Sichuan Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王乐; 赵兴春; 张建; 陈婷; 王邦义; 白雪; 叶健

    2015-01-01

    目的:利用DNATyperTM19试剂盒研究18个短串联重复序列(Short Tandem Repeat,STR)位点(D5S818、D21S11、D7S820、CSF1PO、D2S1338、D3S1358、vWA、D8S1179、D16S539、Pent E、TPOX、TH01、D19S433、D18S51、FGA、D6S1043、D13S317、D12S391)在四川省夹江县人群中的基因频率分布和群体遗传学参数,并计算DNATyperTM19试剂盒的相关技术参数.方法:利用血卡直接作为模板,采用PCR扩增和毛细管电泳检测技术对226名个体的18个STR基因座进行分析,并使用PowerStatsV12软件统计分析.结果:共检出202种等位基因,基因频率分布在0.002~0.527之间.18个STR基因型分布均符合Hardy-Weinberg平衡(P>0.05),杂合度均不低于0.633,随机匹配概率均不低于0.018,个人识别能力均不小于0.790,多态信息含量均不小于0.56,非父排除概率均不小于0.332,典型父权指数均不小于1.36.结论:本文研究了四川省夹江县人群18个STR位点的遗传多态性,为人类群体遗传学及法医学后续研究提供详实可靠的基础数据.DNATyperTM19试剂盒的累积随机匹配概率达到3.477× 10-22,累积非父排除概率为0.999999974.%Objective:The aim of this study was to determine the allele frequencies and population genetic parameters of 18 STR (short tandem repeat) loci (D5S818,D21S11,D7S820,CSF1PO,D2S1338,D3S1358,vWA,D8S1179,D16S539,Penta E,TPOX,TH01,D19S433,D18S51,FGA,D6S1043,D13S317,and D12S391) in Jiajiang county of Sichuan province and to calculate the technical parameters of the DNATyperTm19 kit.Methods:PCR amplification using blood as template directly and capillary electrophoresis technologies were employed to determine the genotypes of 18 STR loci for 226 individuals.PowerStatsV12 software was used for analysis and statistics.Results:202 alleles were recognized,with frequencies ranging from 0.002 to 0.527.No departures from Hardy-Weinberg expectations were detected for all 18 loci studied (P>0.05).The statistical analysis of 18 STR

  17. Essays on diffusion and repeat sales of consumer durables : a study of the consumer electronics market

    OpenAIRE

    Kaya, Maria

    2008-01-01

    Although repeat purchases dominate overall sales of consumer durables, diffusion of innovations research has paid them far less attention than new product adoptions. A large survey of 8,077 households allowed a detailed investigation of the differences between households in terms of their repeat purchase behavior of durables. Asymmetric effects were investigated using competing hazard models and showed that consumer innovativeness has a strong impact on discretionary replacements. A modified ...

  18. 温州汉族人群9个STR基因座的遗传多态性%Genetic polymorphism of nine short tandem repeat loci in han ethnic population in Wenzhou

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴淑珍; 张洪勤

    2015-01-01

    目的:分析温州汉族人群9个STR基因座(D18S1364、D12S391、D13S325、D6S1043、D2S1172、D11S2368、D22-GATA198B05、D8S1132、D7S3048)的等位基因及基因型频率分布。方法:从无血缘关系的355例温州汉族个体的抗凝血中提取DNA,用STR_Typer_10_v1试剂盒对9个STR基因座进行复合PCR扩增,用AB公司310遗传分析仪和GeneMapper ID 3.2v软件作STR分型,用PowerState V12.xls分析软件进行等位基因频率和法医学常用参数统计分析。结果:该9个基因座检出15、12、9、17、15、13、11、10、12个等位基因,9个基因座基因型频率分布均符合Hardy-Weignberg平衡(P>0.05);观测杂合度大于0.7831,多态信息含量均大于0.7666,个体识别能力(Dp)均大于0.9266。结论:温州汉族人群的9个基因座均具有较高的遗传多态性,是较理想的遗传标记系统,本研究所得数据可为温州汉族人群法医个体识别、亲权鉴定及遗传学研究提供依据。%Objective:To analyze the alleles and genotype frequencies of nine short tandem repeats loci, those are D18S1364, D12S391, D13S325, D6S1043, D2S1172, D11S2368, D22-GATA198B05, D8S1132, D7S3048, of Han Ethnic Population in Wenzhou. Methods:extract DNA respectively from anticoagulant of 355 unrelated individual samples of Han Ethnic population living in Wenzhou. Deal the nine STR loci of the samples with multiple PCR ampliifcation by STR_Typer_10_v1 kit. Analyze the PCR products by 310 genetic analyzer and GeneMapper ID 3.2v software of AB company. Deal the results with statistical analysis on the allele frequen-cy and common forensic parameters by PowerState V12.xls software. Results:15, 12, 9, 17, 15, 13, 11, 10 and 12 alleles were observed respectively from the nine STR loci. The distribution of genotype frequencies matched the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, P was more than 0.05. The heterozygote was more than 0.7831. The poly-morphism information content was more than

  19. Impact of repeated stress on traumatic brain injury-induced mitochondrial electron transport chain expression and behavioral responses in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqiang eXing

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A significant proportion of the military personnel returning from Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts have suffered from both mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD. The mechanisms are unknown. We used a rat model of repeated stress and mTBI to examine brain activity and behavioral function. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups: Naïve; 3 days repeated tail-shock stress; lateral fluid percussion mTBI; and repeated stress followed by mTBI (S-mTBI. Open field activity, sensorimotor responses, and acoustic startle responses were measured after mTBI. The protein expression of mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC complex subunits (CI-V and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDHE1α1 were determined in 4 brain regions at day 7 post mTBI. Compared to Naïves, repeated stress decreased horizontal activity; repeated stress and mTBI both decreased vertical activity; and the mTBI and S-mTBI groups were impaired in sensorimotor and acoustic startle responses. Repeated stress significantly increased CI, CII, and CIII protein levels in the prefrontal cortex (PFC, but decreased PDHE1α1 protein in the PFC and cerebellum, and decreased CIV protein in the hippocampus. The mTBI treatment decreased CV protein levels in the ipsilateral hippocampus. The S-mTBI treatment resulted in increased CII, CIII, CIV, and CV protein levels in the PFC, increased CI level in the cerebellum, and increased CIII and CV levels in the cerebral cortex, but decreased CI, CII, CIV, and PDHE1α1 protein levels in the hippocampus. Thus, repeated stress or mTBI alone differentially altered ETC expression in heterogeneous brain regions. Repeated stress followed by mTBI had synergistic effects on brain ETC expression, and resulted in more severe behavioral deficits. These results suggest that repeated stress could have contributed to the high incidence of long-term neurologic and neuropsychiatric morbidity in military personnel with or without

  20. Analysis of allelic drop-out at short tandem repeat loci%短串联重复序列基因座等位基因丢失现象的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈文静; 李越; 吴小洁; 张胤鸣; 刘素娟; 陈勇; 陈维红; 孙宏钰

    2012-01-01

    [Objective]To explore the cause for allelic drop-out at short tandem repeat (STR) loci upon paternity testing with a PowerPlex(R) 16 kit.[Methods] A total of 10 642 DNA-confirmed paternity testing cases (18 314 parent/child allelic transfers) were analyzed with the PowerPlex(R) 16 kit.Samples suspected for having allelic drop-out were verified with an IdentifilerTM kit and/or locus-specific singleplex amplification systems.PCR products of null alleles were separated and directly sequenced.[Results] Eight cases of allelic drop-out were found.The overall rate of null allele in the PowerPlex(R)16 system was 0.437×10-3,DNA sequencing has confirmed single base variations within the binding region of published primers,in which 4 cases involved the D18S51 locus (2 cases with G>A transitions at 79 bp upstream of the repeats,1 case with G>T transversion at 162 bp downstream of the repeats and 1 case with G>C transversion at 74 bp upstream of the repeats),2 cases involved the D21Sll locus (1 case with C>A transversion at 17 bp upstream of the repeats and 1 case with A>G transition at 12 bp upstream of the repeats).One case involved the FGA locus (1 case with G>A transition at 142 bp downstream of the repeats) and 1 case involved TPOX locus (1 case with G>A transition at 198 bp downstream of the repeats).[Conclusion] Base variation in the primer binding region may cause tailed PCR and result in null allele reports.Alternative primer sets should be used to verify the suspected allelic drop-out.Attention should be paid to this during paternity testing and data exchange for personal identification.%目的 探讨用PowerPlex(R) 16体系短串联重复(short tandem repeat,STR)基因座分型时等位基因丢失的现象及原因.方法 分析10 642宗肯定亲权的亲子鉴定案件(涉及18 314次减数分裂),对PowerPlex(R) 16体系疑似发生等位基因丢失的样本采用IdentifilerTM体系和单基因座引物体系进行验证,分离丢失的等位基

  1. Sub-typing of extended-spectrum-β-lactamase-producing isolates from a nosocomial outbreak: application of a 10-loci generic Escherichia coli multi-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Karami

    Full Text Available Extended-spectrum β-lactamase producing Escherichia coli (ESBL-E. coli were isolated from infants hospitalized in a neonatal, post-surgery ward during a four-month-long nosocomial outbreak and six-month follow-up period. A multi-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA, using 10 loci (GECM-10, for 'generic' (i.e., non-STEC E. coli was applied for sub-species-level (i.e., sub-typing delineation and characterization of the bacterial isolates. Ten distinct GECM-10 types were detected among 50 isolates, correlating with the types defined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE, which is recognized to be the 'gold-standard' method for clinical epidemiological analyses. Multi-locus sequence typing (MLST, multiplex PCR genotyping of bla CTX-M, bla TEM, bla OXA and bla SHV genes and antibiotic resistance profiling, as well as a PCR assay specific for detecting isolates of the pandemic O25b-ST131 strain, further characterized the outbreak isolates. Two clusters of isolates with distinct GECM-10 types (G06-04 and G07-02, corresponding to two major PFGE types and the MLST-based sequence types (STs 131 and 1444, respectively, were confirmed to be responsible for the outbreak. The application of GECM-10 sub-typing provided reliable, rapid and cost-effective epidemiological characterizations of the ESBL-producing isolates from a nosocomial outbreak that correlated with and may be used to replace the laborious PFGE protocol for analyzing generic E. coli.

  2. 中国南方汉族人群9个STR基因座多态性分析%Genetic Polymorphism Analysis of Nine Short Tandem Repeat Loci in Han Population of Southern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    童大跃; 孙宏钰; 伍新尧; 陆惠玲; 李建金; 陈丽娴

    2009-01-01

    [目的] 分析中国南方汉族人群9个STR基因座的遗传多态性. [方法] 用STR_Typer_10_v1荧光标记试剂盒,对1 619例中国南方汉族无关个体的9个STR基因座(D11S2368,D12S391,D13S325 D18S1364,D22-GATA198B05,D6S1043,D2S1772,D7S3048,D8S1132)进行扩增,用AB公司3100遗传分析仪和GeneMapper 3.1v软件作STR分型,用PowerState V12.xls分析软件进行等位基因频率和法医学常用参数统计分析,用Arlequin 3.11v软件包作Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium平衡检验.[结果] 在中国南方汉族人群中,该9个STR基因座的遗传多态性高,杂合度(H)分布在0.818 ~ 0.879之间,随机匹配(MP)率分布在0.031 ~ 0.063之间,个体识别力(PD)在 0.937 ~ 0.970之间,非父排除率(PE)在0.632 ~ 0.753之间,多态性息含量(PIC)在0.80 ~ 0.88之间,典型父权指数(TPI)在2.74 ~ 4.13之间.统计分析证明这些群体资料均达到Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium(P > 0.05).[结论] 中国南方汉族人群9个STR基因座具有较高多态性,可以用于法医学亲权鉴定和个体识别,也可以用于人类学和遗传学研究.%[Objective] To investigate the genetic polymorphism of nine short tandem repeat (STR) loci in Han population of Southern China.[Methods] The 9 STR loci (D11S2368,D12S391,D13S325,D18S1364,D22-GATA198B05,D6S1043,D2S1772,D7S3048,D8S1132) were amplified with STR_Typer_10_v1 kit for 1619 unrelated individuals of Han population in Southern China.The PCR products were analyzed with 3100 genetic analyzer and GeneMapper ID 3.1v software.The forensic efficiency parameters were calculated by PowerState V12.xls and the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was tested with Arlequin 3.11v software.[Results] The genetic polymorphism of 9 STR loci in Han population of Southern China was quite high.The heterozygosities (H) ranged from 0.818 to 0.879.The match probabilities (MP) ranged from 0.031 to 0.063.The powers of discrimination (PD) ranged from 0.937 to 0.970,the probabilities of

  3. Effect of repeated sterilization cycles on the physical properties of scaling instruments: a scanning electron microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porto, Alessandra Nogueira; Borges, Álvaro Henrique; Semenoff-Segundo, Alex; Raslan, Suzane A; Pedro, Fábio Luis Miranda; Jorge, Antônio Olavo Cardoso; Bandeca, Matheus Coelho

    2015-05-01

    Repeated sterilizations cycles cause undesirable alterations in the material properties of the instruments, such as corrosion, alterations in the hardness of the metal and the loss of the cutting sharpness of the instrument. This research examined the effect of repeated dry heat sterilization and autoclaves cycles on carbon steel (CS) and stainless steel (SS) curettes during the scaling and root planning. A total of 77 Gracey curettes were used in this study. Of these, 35 were SS and 42 were CS curettes submitted in different process: Dry heat, autoclave, inhibition of corrosion and autoclave, scaling, root planning and dry heat, scaling, root planning, inhibition of corrosion and autoclave. The inhibition of corrosion used on the carbon curettes (prior to sterilization in the autoclave) was sodium nitrite at 2%. The curettes received 10 consecutive cycles of sterilization and after that the cutting edges were examined in the electronic microscope, at 60 and 100 magnification times. The images were evaluated by three independent examiners, who compared the photographs of each group with the control group. The surface corrosion products and a deterioration of the edges were observed and the results showed that the SS curettes suffered little alteration with sterilization, scaling, root planning whereas the CS curettes were visibly affected by sterilization in the autoclave, but when the inhibition of corrosion was used prior to the sterilization, the oxidation was considerably reduced.

  4. Discrimination power evaluation for 45 loci of variable number tandem repeats in Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains isolated from China%45个可变数目串联重复序列位点用于中国结核分枝杆菌基因型鉴定的分辨力评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕冰; 李兆娜; 刘梅; 刘志广; 赵秀芹; 万康林

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the discriminatory efficiency of multiple loci of variable numbers of tandem repeats (VNTR) in Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome.Genotyping and identification on Chinese M.tuberculosis clinical strains were used to locate a series of high discriminated loci,so as to provide the basis for creating a standardized multiple loci VNTR analysis (MLVA) to distribute fast typing and identification on Chinese M.tuberculosis.Methods VNTR loci which were chosen from the website http://minisatellites.u-psud.fr/ and referenced to the genome sequence of M.tuberculosis standard strain H37Rv were tested in Chinese M.tuberculosis clinical strains and H37Rv by means of PCR.The primers were designed by DNAStar software.The repeat member of VNTR unit was estimated by the result of PCR.The discrimination power of single locus or multiple loci was confirmed by the Hunter-Gaston index.Results 45 VNTR loci were tested in 135 Chinese M.tuberculosis clinical strains and H37Rv.The discrimination power of these loci appeared different from each other,with the biggest Hunter-Gaston index as 0.814 (0.797-0.830),the smallest one as 0.015 (0.001-0.028),and there were 13 loci with which the Hunter-Gaston index was bigger than 0.5.Results showed that the discrimination power was increasing by different loci that associated with each other.The more loci that were combined,the bigger the Hunter-Gaston index was,For example,the Hunter-Gaston index of Qub11-b associated with Qub 18 was 0.936,by which 136 strains could be divided into 44 groups.With the combination of 9 loci including Qub11-b,Qub18,Mtub21,Rv2372,MIRU26,Qub26,Qub4156c,Qub11-a and Qub15,the HunterGaston index could have reached 1 and by which the 136 strains could be divided into 136 groups,also showing that the biggest discrimination power to strain identification,viz.strain level genotype were reached.Conclusion The discrimination power of different locus was different.The discrimination power of multiple loci was

  5. Significant variation for fitness impacts of ETS loci in hybrids between populations of Tigriopus californicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, Christopher S

    2008-01-01

    The connections between the genes that cause hybrid incompatibilities and the physiological processes disrupted in hybrids by these incompatibilities are not well understood. The interactions between proteins in the electron transport system (ETS) in the copepod, Tigriopus californicus, have emerged as a potential model system to explore such connections. In this study, the effects on hybrid fitness of 3 different nuclear loci encoding proteins of the ETS are examined in hybrid copepods obtained from crosses of genetically divergent populations of this species. The potential interactions between these genes and mitochondrial-encoded proteins of the ETS are also explored; these interactions have been shown to have diverged functionally between these populations in other studies. Large deviations from Mendelian inheritance are found in genotypic ratios at each of the 3 loci in adults but not in nauplii, demonstrating genotype-based selection during development. The length of developmental time of hybrids appears to influence the pattern of deviations in these loci, likely in conjunction with levels of competition in these crosses. The major finding of this study is that in repeated crosses, the nature of deviations at these ETS loci shows dramatic differences suggesting that slight perturbations in initial conditions can dramatically shift the patterns of selection at these ETS loci in interpopulation hybrids.

  6. Observation and Analysis of Mutation of 10 Short Tandem Repeat Loci%亲子鉴定中常用10个STR基因座突变的观察和分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡金洪; 汤美云; 黄健

    2013-01-01

    Objective The rates of mutated STR loci is counted in paternity testing cases of the forensic institute. Methods A total of 360 paternity testing cases were studied using PowerplexTM16system, and a total of paternity testing cases were studied using SinofilerTMsystem. The mutation rates of the two systems were analysed in the paternity testing. Results Mutations involving a single STR locus were observed in 13 cases of 360 paternity testing cases, and mutations involving a single STR locus were observed in 5 cases of 159 paternity testing cases. Conclusion The rates of mutated STR loci is 2.32% in this study.%目的 对本中心日常检案进行STR基因座突变率进行统计,以供同行参考.方法 用PowerplexTM16system试剂盒检测360例亲子鉴定案例,用SinofilerTMsystem试剂盒检测159例亲子鉴定案例,观测和分析两个试剂盒在亲子鉴定中的基因突变率.结果 360例亲子鉴定中观察到13例均为1个STR基因座发生突变;159例亲子鉴定中观察到5例均为1个STR 基因座发生突变.结论 本研究中观察到STR基因座突变率为2.32%.

  7. Three new loci for determining x chromosome inactivation patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Birgitte; Tümer, Zeynep; Ravn, Kirstine

    2011-01-01

    on two differentially methylated restriction enzyme sites (HpaII) and a polymorphic repeat located within this locus. Although highly informative, this locus is not always sufficient to evaluate the X-inactivation status in X-linked disorders. We have identified three new loci that can be used...... to determine XCI patterns in a methylation-sensitive PCR-based assay. All three loci contain polymorphic repeats and a methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme (HpaII) site, methylation of which was shown to correlate with XCI. DNA from 60 females was used to estimate the heterozygosity of these new loci...

  8. 极端嗜盐古菌中CRISPR结构的生物信息学分析%Comparative analysis of Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPRs) loci in the genomes of halophilic archaea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张帆; 张兵; 向华; 胡松年

    2009-01-01

    [Objective] Clustered Regularly Interspaeed Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR) is a widespread system that provides acquired resistance against phages in bacteria and archaea. Here we aim to genome-widely analyze the CRISPR in extreme halophilic arehaea, of which the whole genome sequences are available at present time.[Methods] We used bioinformatics methods including alignment, conservation analysis, GC content and RNA structure prediction to analyze the CRISPR structures of 7 haloarehaeal genomes. [Results] We identified the CRISPR structures in 5 halophilic archaea and revealed a conserved palindromic motif in the flanking regions of these CRISPR structures. In addition, we found that the repeat sequences of large CRISPR structures in halophilie arehaea were greatly conserved, and two types of predicted RNA secondary structures derived from the repeat sequences were likely determined by the fourth base of the repeat sequence. [Conclusion] Our results support the proposal that the leader sequence may function as recognition site by having palindromic structures in flanking regions, and the stem-loop secondary structure formed by repeat sequences may function in mediating the interaction between foreign genetic elements and CAS-encoded proteins.%[目的]利用生物信息学方法了解目前拥有全基因组序列的极端嗜盐古菌中CRISPR结构的特征.[方法]通过比对,保守性分析,GC含量分析,RNA结构预测等方法对已有全基因组序列的嗜盐古菌基因组进行研究.[结果]在5株嗜盐古菌基因组中发现CRISPR结构,在leader序列内得到具有回文性质的保守motif.发现在大CRISPR结构内repeat序列具有很强的保守性.同时根据第四位碱基的不同,repeat序列可形成两类不同的RNA二级结构.[结论]leader序列中回文结构的发现对其可能为蛋白结合位点的假设提供了进一步的理论依据.Repeat序列RNA二级结构的形成提示其可能介导外源DNA或RNA与CAS编码蛋白的相互作用.

  9. A revised nomenclature for transcribed human endogenous retroviral loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayer Jens

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs and ERV-like sequences comprise 8% of the human genome. A hitherto unknown proportion of ERV loci are transcribed and thus contribute to the human transcriptome. A small proportion of these loci encode functional proteins. As the role of ERVs in normal and diseased biological processes is not yet established, transcribed ERV loci are of particular interest. As more transcribed ERV loci are likely to be identified in the near future, the development of a systematic nomenclature is important to ensure that all information on each locus can be easily retrieved. Results Here we present a revised nomenclature of transcribed human endogenous retroviral loci that sorts loci into groups based on Repbase classifications. Each symbol is of the format ERV + group symbol + unique number. Group symbols are based on a mixture of Repbase designations and well-supported symbols used in the literature. The presented guidelines will allow newly identified loci to be easily incorporated into the scheme. Conclusions The naming system will be employed by the HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee for naming transcribed human ERV loci. We hope that the system will contribute to clarifying a certain aspect of a sometimes confusing nomenclature for human endogenous retroviruses. The presented system may also be employed for naming transcribed loci of human non-ERV repeat loci.

  10. Allele frequencies of 5 short tandem repeat loci of Kashin-Beck disease patients on chromosome 12%大骨节病患者12号染色体5个短串联重复序列位点基因频率分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    平智广; 刘莉; 郭雄

    2008-01-01

    Objective To analyze the allele frequencies of 5 short tandem repeat(STR)loci(D12S313,D12S304,D12S1640,D12S1708 and D12S1583)on chromosome 12 among Kashin-Beck disease(KBD)patients and the control population living in the area suffered from KBD.Methods Fifty KBD patient8 and 50 non-KBD patients were chosen in endemic afea of Shaanxi Province,5 STR loci on chromosome 12 were genotyped by the technology of polymerase chain reacfion(PCR)and capillary electmphoresis.The pelymorphisms of STR in these popIllations were analyzed.The allele and genotype frequencies of each STR in the corresponding groups were caleulated and compared. Results In KBD group,the 5 STR loci had 8,6,7,5 and 11 types ofalleles and 17,11,15,8 and 28 genotypes, respectively;while in the control group,the number of aUele types of 5 STR loci were 6,8,6,4 and 10,the number of genotype of those loci were 13,21,14,8 and 23,respectively The allele frequence of D12S304 locus was statiBtically significant between KBD patients and controls(P<0.05),especially for the 319 bp allele(P<0.006 25). Conclusion There is an association between D12S304 locus and KBD.The 319 bp allele might play the key role.%目的 分析大骨节病(Kashin-Beck disease,KBD)病区患者与非患者在12号染色体上5个短串联重复序列(short tandem repeat,STR)位点的多态性并比较其差异.方法 在陕西省KBD病区选择KBD患者(病例组)和非KBD患者(对照组)各50人,采集静脉血,利用PCR扩增和毛细管电泳技术,对12号染色体上5个STR位点(D12S313、D12S304、D12S1640、D12S1708和D12S1583)进行分型,分析各位点在上述人群中的多态性,计算5个位点在相应人群中等位基因与基因型频率,对各位点的等位基冈及基因型频率进行比较.结果 上述5种位点,病例组分别检出8,6、7、5和11种等位基因以及17、11、15、8和28种基因型;在对照组中检出6、8、6、4和10种等位基因以及13、21、14、8和23种基因型;在D12S304位点,病

  11. Genetic polymorphisms of 9 non-combined of DNA index system short tandem repeat loci in Guangdong Han population%九个非DNA联合索引系统核心短串联重复序列基因座在广东汉族人群的遗传多态性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晋湘; 薛天羽; 李海霞; 孙宏钰; 成建定

    2009-01-01

    目的 调查D7S3048等9个非DNA联合索引系统(combined of DNA index system,CODIS)指定的核心短串联重复序列(short tandem repeat,STR)基因座在广东汉族人群的遗传多态性.方法 采用荧光标记复合扩增和毛细管电泳技术,对广东汉族500名无关个体的DNA进行9个STR基因座分型.结果 500名无关个体在D7S3048等9个非CODIS核心STR基因座共检出115个等位基因,160种基因型,各基因座杂合度为0.824~0.884,个人识别能力为0.925~0.969,多态信息总量为0.77~0.86,均符合Hardy-Weinberg平衡(P>0.05),9个STR基因座的累计个体识别力达1.00×10~(-13),三联体累计非父排除率为0.999989488,二联体累计非父排除率为0.873436.结论 D7S3048等9个STR基因座在个体识别及亲子鉴定中是一个高效的检测系统,在二联体亲子鉴定中可作为补充基因座满足疑难、单亲和突变案件的需求.%Objective To investigate the genetic polymorphisms and their forensic application of 9 non-combined of DNA index system (CODIS) short tandem repeat (STR) loci in Guangdong Han population. Methods DNA samples from 500 unrelated individuals were extracted and amplified with fluorescence labeled multiplex PCR system. PCR products were separated and genotyped with capillary electrophoresis. Results One hundred and fifteen alleles and 160 genotypes were observed in the 9 STR loci, respectively. The heterozygosity was 0. 824-0. 884, the discrimination power (DP) was 0. 925-0. 969 and the polymorphism information content (PIC) was 0. 77-0. 86, respectively. The distribution met the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (P>0.05). The total discrimination power was 1.00×10~(-13), the combined probability of exclusion for trio-paternity testing was 0. 999989488. The combined probability of exclusion for duo-paternity testing was 0. 873436. Conclusion The 9 STR loci are powerful and reliable for personal identification and paternity testing. They can be used as supplementary loci

  12. 广西毛南族17个Y染色体短串联重复序列基因座遗传多态性%Genetic polymorphisms of seventeen Y-chromosomeal short tandem repeats loci in Maonan nationality in Guangxi province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    滕少康; 曹林枝; 黄世宁; 黄昌盛; 侯一平

    2009-01-01

    目的:调查17个Y染色体短串联重复序列(Y-STR)基因座及其单倍型在广西毛南族人群中的分布情况.方法:应用AmpFlSTR~((R)) Yfiler~(TM)荧光标记复合扩增系统,对毛南族208名无关男性个体血样进行17个Y-STR位点的复合扩增,用ABI PRISM310遗传分析仪对扩增产物进行检测分析.结果:DYS456、 DYS389Ⅰ、 DYS390、 DYS389Ⅱ、 DYS458、 DYS19、 DYS385a\\b、 DYS393、 DYS391、 DYS439、 DYS635、 DYS392、 Y-GATA-H4、 DYS437、 DYS438、 DYS448各位点遗传多样性(GD值)分布在0 5852~0 9770之间.17个Y-STR位点共同构成的单倍型205种,其单倍型多样性为0 999785.广西毛南族与其他群体的Y-STR位点等位基因分布差异具有统计学意义.结论:广西毛南族17个Y-STR位点具有丰富的遗传多样性,可为父权鉴定和父系进化研究提供有价值的遗传学资料.%Objective:To investigate the Allelic and haplotype frequency distribution of seventeen short tandem repeat loci of Y chromosome in Maonan nationality in Guangxi province. Methods:Seventeen Y-STR loci, of which the template DNAs were extracted from blood samples of 184 unrelated male individuals in Maonan population, were amplified by using the AmpFISTR~((R)) Yfiler~(TM) The PCR products were genotyped with ABI PRISM 310 genetic analyzer. Results:The gene diversity ranged from 0.585 2 to 0.977 0 at DYS456, DYS389 Ⅰ , DYS390, DYS389 Ⅱ , DYS458, DYS19, DYS385a\\b, DYS393, DYS391, DYS439, DYS635, DYS392, Y-GATA-H4, DYS437, DYS438 and DYS448. A total of 205 different haplotypes were observed. The haplotype diversity value calculated from all 17 loci combined was 0. 999 785. The significant difference of the allelic frequency distribution in Y-STR loci was observed between Maonan population and other observed populations. Conclusion:The 17 Y-STR loci in Maonan population of Guangxi province are highly affluent genetic polymorphic and can offer valuable genetic data for paternity testing and

  13. Reimplantation and Repeat Infection After Cardiac-Implantable Electronic Device Infections: Experience From the MEDIC (Multicenter Electrophysiologic Device Infection Cohort) Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Thomas A; Uslan, Daniel Z; Prutkin, Jordan M; Greenspon, Arnold J; Baddour, Larry M; Danik, Stephan B; Tolosana, Jose M; Le, Katherine; Miro, Jose M; Peacock, James; Sohail, Muhammad R; Vikram, Holenarasipur R; Carrillo, Roger G

    2017-03-01

    Infection is a serious complication of cardiovascular-implantable electronic device implantation and necessitates removal of all hardware for optimal treatment. Strategies for reimplanting hardware after infection vary widely and have not previously been analyzed using a large, multicenter study. The MEDIC (Multicenter Electrophysiologic Device Infection Cohort) prospectively enrolled subjects with cardiovascular-implantable electronic device infections at multiple institutions in the United States and abroad between 2009 and 2012. Reimplantation strategies were evaluated overall, and every patient who relapsed within 6 months was individually examined for clinical information that could help explain the negative outcome. Overall, 434 patients with cardiovascular-implantable electronic device infections were prospectively enrolled at participating centers. During the initial course of therapy, complete device removal was done in 381 patients (87.8%), and 220 of them (57.7%) were ultimately reimplanted with new devices. Overall, the median time between removal and reimplantation was 10 days, with an interquartile range of 6 to 19 days. Eleven of the 434 patients had another infection within 6 months, but only 4 of them were managed with cardiovascular-implantable electronic device removal and reimplantation during the initial infection. Thus, the repeat infection rate was low (1.8%) in those who were reimplanted. Patients who retained original hardware had a 11.3% repeat infection rate. Our study findings confirm that a broad range of reimplant strategies are used in clinical practice. They suggest that it is safe to reimplant cardiac devices after extraction of previously infected hardware and that the risk of a second infection is low, regardless of reimplant timing. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. 重庆土家族11个Y染色体短串联重复序列多态性及与16个群体遗传关系的分析%Polymorphisms of 11 Y-chromosomal short tandem repeat loci in Chongqing Tujia ethnic group and genetic relationships with 16 populations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石美森; 百茹峰; 万立华; 于晓军

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the genetic polymorphisms of 11 Y-chromosomal short tandem repeats (STR) loci in Chongqing Tujia population, and to evaluate their forensic application values and genetic relatiomhips with the other 16 populations of China. Methods Eleven Y-STR loci in 215 unrelated Tujia individuals from Chongqing were amplified with PowerPlex Y System, and the PCR products were analyzed by 310 Genetic Analyzer. Ouster analy-sis and phylogenic trees were applied to show the genetic distance among the populations. Results A total of 195 hap-lotypes were identified and the overall haplotypes diversity for the 11 Y-STR loci was 0.9942. The gene diversity values (GD) for each locus ranged from 0.3757 (DYS391) to 0.9170 (DYS385a/b). Comparing with other 16 populations, the genetic distance between Tujia and Tibetan was the nearest (0.02467), that between the Tujia and Korean ethnic groups was the farthest (0.25350). Conclusion The genetic distribution of the 11 Y-SIR loci in Chongqing Tujia pop-ulation showed favorable polymorphisms. They are suitable for forensic identification and paternity testing in the local area. The study of genetic diversity among different populations is useful in understanding their origins, migrations and their relationships.%目的 调查重庆土家族群体11个Y染色体短串联重复序列(Y-chromosomal short tandem re-peat,Y-STR)基因座的多态性分布,探讨其群体遗传学及法医学应用价值.方法 应用PowerPlex Y System荧光标记复合扩增系统检测215名土家族无关男性个体的11个Y-SIR基因座,用ABI310遗传分析仪进行基因分型,计算等位基因和单倍型频率,并与国内其他16个群体相应基因座的分布进行比较,分析其遗传距离和聚类关系.结果 土家族个体中共检出195种单倍型,单倍型频率多样性0.9942,基因多样性值0.3757(DYS391)~0.9170(DYS385a/b);从遗传距离分析发现,土家族和藏族的遗传距离最小(0.02467),与

  15. 成都地区汉族人群17个Y短串联重复序列基因座遗传多态性分析%Analysis of the genetic polymorphism of 17 Y-chromosomal short tandem repeat loci in the Han population in Chengdu

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋兴勃; 范红; 应斌武; 陆小军; 王军; 叶远馨

    2009-01-01

    Objective To obtain the population genetic data of 17 Y-chromosomal short tandem repeat (Y-STR) in the Han population in Chengdu of Sichuan Province. Methods The 17 Y-STR loci were amplified from the blood samples of 111 unrelated Chengdu Han individuals using the AmpF1STR~(R)Yfiler~(TM) system. The PCR products were genotyped with an ABI 3130 genetic analyzer. Results In the loci of in DYS456, DYS389I, DYS390, DYS389II, DYS458, DYS19, DYS385a/b, DYS393, DYS391, DYS439, DYS635, DYS392, Y-GATA-H4, DYS437, DYS438, and DYS448, 3 to 8 alleles were detected in the Han population in Chengdu, and 36 alleles were detected in the locus DYS385a/b, with the minimal gene diversity (GD) value of 0.3970 (DYS391) and maximal value of 0.9561 (DYS385a/b). The DNA samples of 16 women and 7 different species of animals were amplified, but no specific products were found for the 17 Y-STR loci. No mutations of the 17 Y-STR alleles were observed in 20 father-son pairs as confirmed by autosomal STR analysis. Conclusion The 17 Y-STR loci are highly polymorphic and are suitable for personal identification, paternity testing, population genetics and anthropology studies.%目的 获得17个Y染色体短串联重复序列(Y-STR)基因座在成都汉族人群中的群体遗传学数据.方法 应用AmpFISTR(R)Yfiler~(TM)荧光标记复合扩增系统,对成都地区111名无关男性个体血样进行17个Y-STR基因座的复合扩增,用ABl3130遗传分析仪对扩增产物进行检测分析.结果 DYS456、DYS389 Ⅰ、DYS390、DYS389 Ⅱ、DYS458、DYS19、DYS385a/b、DYS393、DYS391、DYS439、DYS635、DYS392、Y-GATA-H4、DYS437、DYS438、DYS448基因座在成都地区汉族群体分别检出3~8个等位基因,DYS385a/b检出36个等位基因组,各基因座基因多样性最低为0.3970(DYS391),最高为0.9561(DYS385a/b).检测16例女性血样和7种动物血样,17个Y-STR基因座均无扩增产物.另对20个二代父性家系调查显示同一家系成员17个Y-STR基因座单倍

  16. Genetic polymorphisms of seventeen Y-chromosomal short tandem repeats loci in She nationality of Fujian province%福建畲族17个染色体短串联重复序列基因座遗传多态性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    滕少康; 曹林枝; 林燕燕; 陈桐君; 郭月丽

    2012-01-01

    目的:调查Y染色体17个短串联重复序列(Y-STR)基因座的多态性及其单倍型在福建畲族人群的分布情况.方法:应用AmpFlSTR(@)YfilerTM荧光标记复合扩增系统,对福建畲族152名无关男性个体血液样本进行17个Y-STR位点的复合扩增,应用ABI PRISM 310遗传分析仪对扩增产物进行检测分析.结果:DYS456、DYS389 Ⅰ、DYS390、DYS389Ⅱ、DYS458、DYS19、DYS385a\\b、DYS393、DYS391、DYS439、DYS635、DYS392、Y-GATA-H4、DYS437、DYS438、DYS448各位点遗传多样性(gene diversity,GD值)分布在0.419 6~0.944 7之间.17个Y-STR位点共同构成的单倍型150种,其单倍型多样性为0.999 825 7.结论:福建畲族17个Y-STR位点具有丰富的遗传多样性,可为父权鉴定和父系进化研究提供有价值的遗传学资料.%Objective: To investigate the Allelic and haplotype frequency distribution of seventeen short tandem repeat (STR) loci of Y chromosome in She nationality in Fujian province. Methods: Seventeen Y-STR loci, of which the template DNAs were extracted from blood samples of 152 unrelated male individuals in She population of Fujian province, were amplified by using the AmpFlSTR(R) Yfiler TM. The PCR products were genotyped with ABI PRISM 310 genetic analyzer. Results: The Gene diversity ranged from 0. 419 6-0. 944 7 at DYS456, DYS389 Ⅰ , DYS390, DYS389 Ⅱ , DYS458, DYS19, DYS385a\\b, DYS393, DYS391, DYS439, DYS635, DYS392, Y-GATA-H4, DYS437, DYS438, DYS448. A total of 150 different hap-lotypes were observed. The haplotype diversity value calculated from all 17 loci combined was 0. 999 825 7. Conclusion: The 17 Y-STR loci in She population of Fujian province are highly affluent genetic polymorphic and can offer valuable genetic data for paternity testing and paternal genetic lineages evolution.

  17. 河北中南部地区汉族群体15个STR基因座遗传多态性研究%A Study on Genetic Polymorphism of 15 Short Tandem Repeat Loci in the Han Nationality People in Central-South Area of Hebei Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴小华; 焦保权; 张洁

    2016-01-01

    目的 研究PowerplexTM 16荧光标记复合扩增系统的15个STR基因座在河北中南部地区汉族个体的多态性分布,建立河北中南部地区汉族群体的遗传学基础数据.方法 采用Chelex-100法应用PowerplexTM 16荧光标记复合扩增系统和ABI 3130遗传分析仪对25295例河北中南部地区汉族个体血样DNA进行检测,统计15个STR基因座的基因型分布、基因频率、杂合度(heterozygosity,Ho)、多态信息量(polymorphism information contents,PIC)、个体识别率(discrimination power,DP)、非父排除率(probability of paternity exclusion,PE)等群体遗传学参数,并进行Hand-y-Weinberg平衡检验.结果 15个基因座在群体中具有较高多态性,基因型分布均符合Handy-Weinberg平衡定律(P>0.05).共检测出293个等位基因,1364种基因型,基因频率在0.002%~51.58%之间,Ho在0.6206~0.9146之间,PIC在0.5610~0.8967之间;累积个人识别率为0.999999999999999996156,累积非父排除率为0.999999663.结论 PowerplexTM 16荧光标记复合扩增系统的15个STR基因座适合作为河北中南部汉族群体的遗传标记.%Objective To establish the genetic database of the Han nationality people from Central-South of He-bei Province by studying the genetic polymorphism of 15 short tandem repeat ( STR) loci of PowerplexTM 16 fluorescence labeling composite amplification system in the Han nationality individuals from Central-South area of Hebei Province. Methods DNA in the 25295 blood samples were detected by Chelex-100 method using PowerplexTM 16 fluorescence la-beling composite amplification system and ABI 3130 genetic analyser, and population genetics parameters in the 15 STR loci such as genotype distribution, gene frequency, heterozygosity ( Ho) , polymorphism information content ( PIC) , indi-vidual discrimination power (DP), probability of paternity exclusion (PE) were tested, and Handy-Weinberg balance test was performed. Results The 15 STR loci had abundant genetic

  18. 江西部分地区汉族人群六个短串联重复序列基因座的遗传多态性%The genetic polymorphisms of 6 short tandem repeat loci in native Han population in Jiangxi province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙瑜; 肖莉; 吴红; 熊莉; 余薇; 唐绮; 李国良; 傅颖媛

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate the genetic polymorphisms of 6 short tandem repeats (STR)loci, namely, D6S1043, D2S1772, D7S3048, D22-GATA198B05, D8Sl132 and D11S2368 in native Han population of Jiangxi province, China. Methods Two hundred and twelve blood samples of unrelated subjects of Han population in Jiangxi province were collected. Genotyping was performed by using multiplex polymerase chain reaction-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Results Thirteen alleles and 52 genotypes in the D6S1043 locus, 13 alleles and 66 genotypes in D2S1772, 12 alleles and 48 genotypes in D7S3048, 11 alleles and 44 genotypes in D22-GATA198B05, 10 alleles and 38 genotypes in D8Sl132, 10 alleles and 41 genotypes in D11S2368 locus, were detected in the 212 subjects. The observed heterozygosity (h) in D6S1043, D2S1772, D7S3048, D22-GATA198B05, D8S1132 and D11S2368 loci ranged from 0.8019 to 0.8774. The expected heterozygosity (H) varied from 0. 8553 to 0.8896. The discriminating power (DP)ranged from 0.9559 to 0.9735. The probability of exclusion (PE) ranged from 0.7053 to 0.7751. The polymorphism information content (PIC) varied from 0.8452 to 0.8774. Conclusion All the 6 loci were of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The genetic polymorphism of the 6 STR loci in Han population of Jiangxi province was high. The allelic distribution data at the 6 loci are valuable in population study, individual identification and paternity test for this population.%目的 调查江西除赣州地区外其余地区汉族人群无关个体6个短串联重复序列(short tandem repeat,STR)基因座的遗传多态性,积累遗传学数据.方法 采集江西部分地区212名汉族无关个体EDTA抗凝全血,应用聚合酶链反应复合扩增与聚丙烯酰胺凝胶电泳检测技术检测D6S1043、D2S1772、D7S3048、D22-GATA198B05、D8S1132与D11S2368这6个STR基因座的等位基因.结果 在212名江西部分地区汉族人群中观察到D6S1043基因座位13种等位基因,52种基因型;D2S1772

  19. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci in the intertidal sponge Halichondria panicea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlton, A.L.; Pierson, Barbara J.; Talbot, S.L.; Highsmith, R.C.

    2003-01-01

    GA- and CA-enriched genomic libraries were constructed for the intertidal sponge Halichondria panicea. Unique repeat motifs identified varied from the expected simple dinucleotide repeats to more complex repeat units. All sequences tended to be highly repetitive but did not necessarily contain the targeted motifs. Seven microsatellite loci were evaluated on sponges from the clone source population. All seven were polymorphic with 5.43??0.92 mean number of alleles. Six of the seven loci that could be resolved had mean heterozygosities of 0.14-0.68. The loci identified here will be useful for population studies.

  20. Deployment Repeatability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    controlled to great precision, but in a Cubesat , there may be no attitude determination at all. Such a Cubesat might treat sun angle and tumbling rates as...could be sensitive to small differences in motor controller timing. In these cases, the analyst might choose to model the entire deployment path, with...knowledge of the material damage model or motor controller timing precision. On the other hand, if many repeated and environmentally representative

  1. Mutation Rate at Commonly Used Forensic STR Loci: Paternity Testing Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faruk Aşıcıoğlua

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Paternity tests are carried out by the analysis of hypervariable short tandem repeat DNA loci. These microsatellite sequences mutate at a higher rate than that of bulk DNA. The occurrence of germline mutations at STR loci posses problems in interpretation of resulting genetic profiles. We recently analyzed 59–159 parent/child allele transfers at 13 microsatellite loci. We identified 12 mutations in 7 microsatellite loci. No mutations were occurred in other 6 loci. The highest mutation rate was observed with 5 mutations at D8S1179 locus at different alleles. The event was always single repeat related. The mutation rate was between 0 and 1.5 x 10-2 per locus per gamete per generation. The mutation event is very crucial for forensic DNA testing and accumulation of STR mutation data is extremely important for genetic profile interpretation.

  2. Genetic polymorphism of 15 STR loci in El Salvador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Pablo; Pinto de Erazo, Eugenia Leticia; Baeza, Carlos; Arroyo-Pardo, Eduardo; López-Parra, Ana Maria

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the allelic frequencies of the 15 short tandem repeat (STR) loci included in AmpFlSTRIdentifiler PCR Amplification Kit. Biological samples were obtained from 109 unrelated individuals from El Salvador. Allelic frequencies and forensic parameters were calculated. All loci showed no departure from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium after Bonferroni correction. The obtained frequencies were compared with other previously reported population data. The multidimensional scaling plot and the neighbor-joining phylogeny supported a high native Mesoamerican contribution.

  3. 九个非DNA联合索引系统短串联重复序列基因座在河北汉族群体的遗传学调查及在亲子鉴定中的应用%Genetic polymorphisms of nine non-DNA combined index system short tandem repeat loci in Hebei Han population and application in paternity testing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    关亚卿; 付丽红; 张晓静; 李淑瑾; 丛斌; 马春玲

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the polymorphisms of 9 non-DNA combined index system(CODIS) short tandem repeats (STRs), i. e., D7S3048, D8S1132, D11S2368, D2S1772, D6S1043,D13S325, D12S391, GATA198B05, D18S1364 in Hebei Han population, and evaluate the usage of them in paternity testing. Methods One hundred and forty-seven unrelated healthy individuals from the Han population of Hebei province were genotyped using STRtyper10G kit including 9 STR loci on ABI 3130 Genetic Analyzer. Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and population genetic parameters were calculated. Fourteen cases of motherless paternity testing and 2 cases of standard trios with mutation in 1 locus were detected using STRtyper 10G. Results (1) Ninety-nine alleles and 336 genotypes were observed in the 9 STR loci in the population. The cumulative discrimination power(DP) was higher than 0. 999 999 999. The cumulative probability of exclusion(PE) for trios and duos were 0. 999 974 and 0. 998 759 respectively. Departure from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was not observed in any of the 9 loci. (2) The combined paternity index (PI)of the 14 cases of motherless paternity testing ranged from 103-104 for 15 STR loci in ID, whereas it reached 105-109 for 22 independent STR loci included in ID and STRtyper 10G. Possible mutation in FGA and vWA was observed in 2 cases of trios, and the combined PI was 5945 and 1840 respectively for 15 STR loci in ID.Adding STRtyper 10G to detect these 2 cases, the combined PI reached 2. 76 × 107 and 4. 88 × 107respectively. Conclusion The genetic polymorphism of the 9 non-CODIS STR loci included in STRtyper 10G was quite high in Chinese Hebei Han population, indicating the 9 STR loci are valuable as complement markers for ID and PP16 kit in motherless paternity testing, paternity testing with mutation and other kinds of complicated paternity testing.%目的 调查9个非DNA联合索引系统(DNA combined index system,CODIS)的短串联重复序列(short tandem repeat,STR)基因座在河北

  4. Novel multiplex format of an extended multilocus variable-number-tandem-repeat analysis of Clostridium difficile correlates with tandem repeat sequence typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Mie Birgitte Frid; Engberg, Jørgen; Larsson, Jonas T; Olsen, Katharina E P; Torpdahl, Mia

    2015-03-01

    Subtyping of Clostridium difficile is crucial for outbreak investigations. An extended multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (eMLVA) of 14 variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) loci was validated in multiplex format compatible with a routine typing laboratory and showed excellent concordance with tandem repeat sequence typing (TRST) and high discriminatory power.

  5. Schubert varieties and degeneracy loci

    CERN Document Server

    Fulton, William

    1998-01-01

    Schubert varieties and degeneracy loci have a long history in mathematics, starting from questions about loci of matrices with given ranks. These notes, from a summer school in Thurnau, aim to give an introduction to these topics, and to describe recent progress on these problems. There are interesting interactions with the algebra of symmetric functions and combinatorics, as well as the geometry of flag manifolds and intersection theory and algebraic geometry.

  6. Library Spirit and Genius Loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlkild, Nan

    2009-01-01

    The architecture and design of Nyborg Public Library in the light of the concepts "Library Spirit" and "Genius Loci", related to contemporary social and cultural movements, the development of the early welfare state and the "Scandinavian Style".......The architecture and design of Nyborg Public Library in the light of the concepts "Library Spirit" and "Genius Loci", related to contemporary social and cultural movements, the development of the early welfare state and the "Scandinavian Style"....

  7. Isolation and characterization of the bovine microsatellite loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, H Y; Kim, T H; Choi, B H; Jang, G W; Lee, J W; Lee, K T; Ha, J M

    2006-12-01

    Microsatellite loci were isolated using five repetitive probes for Korean native cattle. Eleven microsatellite loci were developed based on a biotin hybrid capture method, and enrichment of the genomic libraries (AAAT, TG, AG, T, and TGC repeats) was performed using Sau3AI adapters. The isolated markers were tested in two half-sib Korean cattle families and four imported breeds (Angus, Limousine, Holstein, and Shorthorn). Nine informative microsatellite loci were observed, and two microsatellite loci were revealed as monomorphic in Korean cattle. In the imported breeds, however, all of the markers were informative. In total, 213 alleles were obtained at the 11 loci across five breeds, and the average number of alleles found per locus, considering all populations, was 4.26. Heterozygosity was 0.71 (expected) and 0.57 (observed). The range of the polymorphic information content for the markers in all cattle populations was 0.43-0.69. Eleven percent of genetic variation was attributed to differentiation between populations as determined by the mean F (ST) values. The remaining 89% corresponded to differences among individuals. The isolated markers may be used to identify and classify the local breeds on a molecular basis.

  8. Remarkable selective constraints on exonic dinucleotide repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haasl, Ryan J; Payseur, Bret A

    2014-09-01

    Long dinucleotide repeats found in exons present a substantial mutational hazard: mutations at these loci occur often and generate frameshifts. Here, we provide clear and compelling evidence that exonic dinucleotides experience strong selective constraint. In humans, only 18 exonic dinucleotides have repeat lengths greater than six, which contrasts sharply with the genome-wide distribution of dinucleotides. We genotyped each of these dinucleotides in 200 humans from eight 1000 Genomes Project populations and found a near-absence of polymorphism. More remarkably, divergence data demonstrate that repeat lengths have been conserved across the primate phylogeny in spite of what is likely considerable mutational pressure. Coalescent simulations show that even a very low mutation rate at these loci fails to explain the anomalous patterns of polymorphism and divergence. Our data support two related selective constraints on the evolution of exonic dinucleotides: a short-term intolerance for any change to repeat length and a long-term prevention of increases to repeat length. In general, our results implicate purifying selection as the force that eliminates new, deleterious mutants at exonic dinucleotides. We briefly discuss the evolution of the longest exonic dinucleotide in the human genome--a 10 x CA repeat in fibroblast growth factor receptor-like 1 (FGFRL1)--that should possess a considerably greater mutation rate than any other exonic dinucleotide and therefore generate a large number of deleterious variants. © 2014 The Author(s). Evolution © 2014 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  9. Developing criteria and data to determine best options for expanding the core CODIS loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge Jianye

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, the Combined DNA Index System (CODIS Core Loci Working Group established by the US Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI reviewed and recommended changes to the CODIS core loci. The Working Group identified 20 short tandem repeat (STR loci (composed of the original CODIS core set loci (minus TPOX, four European recommended loci, PentaE, and DYS391 plus the Amelogenin marker as the new core set. Before selecting and finalizing the core loci, some evaluations are needed to provide guidance for the best options of core selection. Method The performance of current and newly proposed CODIS core loci sets were evaluated with simplified analyses for adventitious hit rates in reasonably large datasets under single-source profile comparisons, mixture comparisons and kinship searches, and for international data sharing. Informativeness (for example, match probability, average kinship index (AKI and mutation rates of each locus were some of the criteria to consider for loci selection. However, the primary factor was performance with challenged forensic samples. Results The current battery of loci provided in already validated commercial kits meet the needs for single-source profile comparisons and international data sharing, even with relatively large databases. However, the 13 CODIS core loci are not sufficiently powerful for kinship analyses and searching potential contributors of mixtures in larger databases; 19 or more autosomal STR loci perform better. Y-chromosome STR (Y-STR loci are very useful to trace paternal lineage, deconvolve female and male mixtures, and resolve inconsistencies with Amelogenin typing. The DYS391 locus is of little theoretical or practical use. Combining five or six Y-chromosome STR loci with existing autosomal STR loci can produce better performance than the same number of autosomal loci for kinship analysis and still yield a sufficiently low match probability for single-source profile comparisons

  10. Diversity, Activity, and Evolution of CRISPR Loci in Streptococcus thermophilus▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Horvath, Philippe; Romero, Dennis A.; Coûté-Monvoisin, Anne-Claire; Richards, Melissa; Deveau, Hélène; Moineau, Sylvain; Boyaval, Patrick; Fremaux, Christophe; Barrangou, Rodolphe

    2007-01-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) are hypervariable loci widely distributed in prokaryotes that provide acquired immunity against foreign genetic elements. Here, we characterize a novel Streptococcus thermophilus locus, CRISPR3, and experimentally demonstrate its ability to integrate novel spacers in response to bacteriophage. Also, we analyze CRISPR diversity and activity across three distinct CRISPR loci in several S. thermophilus strains. We show that both ...

  11. Modulation of CRISPR locus transcription by the repeat-binding protein Cbp1 in Sulfolobus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deng, Ling; Kenchappa, Chandra Shekar; Peng, Xu

    2012-01-01

    CRISPR loci are essential components of the adaptive immune system of archaea and bacteria. They consist of long arrays of repeats separated by DNA spacers encoding guide RNAs (crRNA), which target foreign genetic elements. Cbp1 (CRISPR DNA repeat binding protein) binds specifically to the multiple...... direct repeats of CRISPR loci of members of the acidothermophilic, crenarchaeal order Sulfolobales. cbp1 gene deletion from Sulfolobus islandicus REY15A produced a strong reduction in pre-crRNA yields from CRISPR loci but did not inhibit the foreign DNA targeting capacity of the CRISPR/Cas system....... Conversely, overexpression of Cbp1 in S. islandicus generated an increase in pre-crRNA yields while the level of reverse strand transcripts from CRISPR loci remained unchanged. It is proposed that Cbp1 modulates production of longer pre-crRNA transcripts from CRISPR loci. A possible mechanism...

  12. High-throughput sequencing of core STR loci for forensic genetic investigations using the Roche Genome Sequencer FLX platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fordyce, Sarah L; Avila-Arcos, Maria C; Rockenbauer, Eszter;

    2011-01-01

    The analysis and profiling of short tandem repeat (STR) loci is routinely used in forensic genetics. Current methods to investigate STR loci, including PCR-based standard fragment analyses and capillary electrophoresis, only provide amplicon lengths that are used to estimate the number of STR...... repeat units. These methods do not allow for the full resolution of STR base composition that sequencing approaches could provide. Here we present an STR profiling method based on the use of the Roche Genome Sequencer (GS) FLX to simultaneously sequence multiple core STR loci. Using this method...

  13. Polymorphic microsatellite loci identified through development and cross-species amplification within shorebirds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, I.; Guzzetti, B.M.; Gust, Judy R.; Sage, G.K.; Gill, R.E.; Tibbitts, T.L.; Sonsthagen, S.A.; Talbot, S.L.

    2012-01-01

    We developed microsatellite loci for demographic assessments of shorebirds, a group with limited markers. First, we isolated five dinucleotide repeat microsatellite loci from the Black Oystercatcher (Haematopodidae: Haematopus bachmani), and three from the Bristle-thighed Curlew (Scolopacidae: Numenius tahitiensis); both species are of conservation concern. All eight loci were polymorphic in their respective target species. Hbaμ loci were characterized by two to three alleles with observed heterozygosity ranging from 0.07 to 0.33, and two to nine alleles were detected for Nut loci with observed heterozygosity ranging from 0.08 to 0.72. No linkage disequilibrium or departures from Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium were observed. The eight loci were also tested for cross-species amplification in 12 other species within Charadriidae and Scolopacidae, and the results demonstrated transferability across several genera. We further tested all 14 species at 12 additional microsatellite markers developed for other shorebirds: Dunlin (Calidris alpina; four loci) and Ruff (Philomachus pugnax; eight loci). Two markers (Hbaμ4 and Ruff6) were polymorphic in 13 species, while two (Calp6 and Ruff9) were monomorphic. The remaining eight markers revealed polymorphism in one to nine species each. Our results provide further evidence that locus Ruff10 is sex-linked, contrary to the initial description. These markers can be used to enhance our understanding of shorebird biology by, for example, helping to determine migratory connectivity among breeding and wintering populations and detecting relatedness among individuals.

  14. Population data on 10 non-CODIS STR loci in Japanese population using a newly developed multiplex PCR system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asamura, H; Ota, M; Fukushima, H

    2008-11-01

    This paper describes a newly devised autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) systems for 10 loci (D1S1656, D2S1353, D8S1132, D12S1090, D14S608, D18S535, D19S253, D20S480, D21S226, and D22S689) unlinked to the core STR loci (non-CODIS loci). Of 252 samples taken from the Japanese population, PCR products ranged in length from 107 bp to 319 bp. No significant deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium were observed at any of the 10 loci. The accumulated power of discrimination and power of exclusion for the 10 loci were 0.999999999998 and 0.99991, respectively. We conclude that the present multiplex system for the 10 non-CODIS loci represents a powerful tool for forensic applications.

  15. CODIS STR loci data from 41 sample populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budowle, B; Shea, B; Niezgoda, S; Chakraborty, R

    2001-05-01

    Allele distributions for 12 or 13 CODIS core tetrameric short tandem repeat (STR) loci CSFIPO, D3S1358, D5S818, D7S820, D8S1179, D13S317, D16S539, D18S51, D21S11, FGA, TH01, TPOX, and vWA were determined in 41 population data sets. The major population groups comprise African Americans, U.S. Caucasians, Hispanics, Far East Asians, and Native Americans. There was little evidence for departures from Hardy-Weinberg expectations (HWE) in any of the populations. The FST estimates over all thirteen STR loci are 0.0006 for African Americans, -0.0005 for Caucasians, 0.0021 for Hispanics, 0.0039 for Asians, and 0.0282 for Native Americans.

  16. Poisson modules and degeneracy loci

    CERN Document Server

    Gualtieri, Marco

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we study the interplay between modules and sub-objects in holomorphic Poisson geometry. In particular, we define a new notion of "residue" for a Poisson module, analogous to the Poincar\\'e residue of a meromorphic volume form. Of particular interest is the interaction between the residues of the canonical line bundle of a Poisson manifold and its degeneracy loci---where the rank of the Poisson structure drops. As an application, we provide new evidence in favour of Bondal's conjecture that the rank \\leq 2k locus of a Fano Poisson manifold always has dimension \\geq 2k+1. In particular, we show that the conjecture holds for Fano fourfolds. We also apply our techniques to a family of Poisson structures defined by Fe\\u{\\i}gin and Odesski\\u{\\i}, where the degeneracy loci are given by the secant varieties of elliptic normal curves.

  17. Human Short Tandem Repeat (STR Markers for Paternity Testing in Pig-Tailed Macaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DYAH PERWITASARI-FARAJALLAH

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the use of human short tandem repeat (STR or microsatellite loci markers for assessing paternity and genetic structure of pig-tailed macaques (Macaca nemestrina breeding colony. Four human microsatellite primer pairs located at human map position D1S548, D3S1768, D5S820, and D2S1777, were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR for pig-tailed macaques. Four loci were found to be clearly and reliably amplified, and three loci exhibited high levels of genetic heterogeneity. These loci were sufficiently informative to differentiate discretely between related and unrelated pairs.

  18. Detection of quantitative trait loci and heterotic loci for plant height using an immortalized F2 population in maize

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG JiHua; MA XiQing; TENG WenTao; YAN JianBing; WU WeiRen; DAI JingRui; LI JianSheng

    2007-01-01

    A set of recombinant inbred lines (RIL) derived from Yuyu22, an elite hybrid widespread in China, was used to construct an immortalized F2 (IF2) population comprising 441 different crosses. Genetic linkage maps were constructed containing 10 linkages groups with 263 simple sequence repeat (SSR) molecular markers. Twelve and ten quantitative trait loci (QTL) were detected for plant height in the IF2 and RIL populations respectively, using the composite interval mapping method, and six same QTL were identified in the two populations. In addition, ten unique heterotic loci (HL) located on seven different chromosomes were revealed for plant height using the mid-parent heterosis as the input data. These HL explained 1.26%-8.41% of the genotypic variance in plant height heterosis and most expressed overdominant effects. Only three QTL and HL were located in the same chromosomal region, it implied that plant height and its heterosis might be controlled by two types of genetic mechanisms.

  19. Multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis of Neisseria meningitidis yields groupings similar to those obtained by multilocus sequence typing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.M. Schouls; A. van der Ende; M. Damen; I. van de Pol

    2006-01-01

    We identified many variable-number tandem repeat (VNTR) loci in the genomes of Neisseria meningitidis serogroups A, B, and C and utilized a number of these loci to develop a multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA). Eighty-five N. meningitidis serogroup B and C isolates obtained

  20. Multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis of Neisseria meningitidis yields groupings similar to those obtained by multilocus sequence typing.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouls, Leo M; Ende, Arie van der; Damen, Marjolein; Pol, Ingrid van de

    2006-01-01

    We identified many variable-number tandem repeat (VNTR) loci in the genomes of Neisseria meningitidis serogroups A, B, and C and utilized a number of these loci to develop a multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA). Eighty-five N. meningitidis serogroup B and C isolates obtained

  1. Repeat-until-success quantum repeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruschi, David Edward; Barlow, Thomas M.; Razavi, Mohsen; Beige, Almut

    2014-09-01

    We propose a repeat-until-success protocol to improve the performance of probabilistic quantum repeaters. Conventionally, these rely on passive static linear-optics elements and photodetectors to perform Bell-state measurements (BSMs) with a maximum success rate of 50%. This is a strong impediment for entanglement swapping between distant quantum memories. Every time a BSM fails, entanglement needs to be redistributed between the corresponding memories in the repeater link. The key ingredients of our scheme are repeatable BSMs. Under ideal conditions, these turn probabilistic quantum repeaters into deterministic ones. Under realistic conditions, our protocol too might fail. However, using additional threshold detectors now allows us to improve the entanglement generation rate by almost orders of magnitude, at a nominal distance of 1000 km, compared to schemes that rely on conventional BSMs. This improvement is sufficient to make the performance of our scheme comparable to the expected performance of some deterministic quantum repeaters.

  2. Has growth in electronic cigarette use by smokers been responsible for the decline in use of licensed nicotine products? Findings from repeated cross-sectional surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, Emma; Brown, Jamie; McNeill, Ann; Michie, Susan; West, Robert

    2015-10-01

    The rise in electronic cigarette use by smokers may be responsible for the decreased use of licensed nicotine products and/or increased overall use of non-tobacco nicotine-containing products. This paper reports findings from the Smoking Toolkit Study (STS) tracking use of electronic cigarettes and licensed nicotine products to address this issue. Data were obtained from monthly surveys involving 14 502 cigarette smokers in England between March 2011 and November 2014. Smokers were asked about their use of electronic cigarettes and licensed nicotine products. Prevalence of electronic cigarette use increased rapidly from 2.2% (95% CI 1.4% to 3.2%) in quarter 2 of 2011 to 20.8% (95% CI 18.3% to 23.4%) in quarter 3 of 2013, after which there was no change. Prevalence of licensed nicotine product use in smokers remained stable from quarter 2 of 2011 (17.4%, 95% CI 15.3% to 19.8%) to quarter 3 of 2013 (17.9%, 95% CI 15.62% to 20.5%), and thereafter declined steadily to 7.9% (95% CI 6.0% to 10.4%). Prevalence of use of any product was stable to quarter 1 of 2012, after which it increased from 18.5% (95% CI 16.3% to 21.0%) to 33.3% (95% CI 30.4% to 36.3%) in quarter 3 of 2013, and then decreased to 22.7% (95% CI 19.3% to 26.3%). The shapes of trajectories since 2011 suggest that electronic cigarettes are probably not responsible for the decline in use of licensed nicotine products. Electronic cigarettes appear to have increased the total market for use of non-tobacco nicotine-containing products. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  3. [Genetic polymorphisms of X-STR loci in Chinese Yugur ethnic group and its application].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan-Jiong; Chen, Feng; Xin, Na; Zhang, Hong Bo; Zheng, Hai Bo; Yu, Bing; Li, Sheng-Bin; Chen, Teng

    2008-09-01

    To study the genetic polymorphism of nine short tandem repeats (STRs) loci (DXS7130, DXS7132, DXS6804, DXS7423, DXS7424, DXS6789, DXS6799, DXS8378, and HPRTB) on X chromosome in Chinese Yugur ethnic group. The allele and genotype frequency of nine X-STR loci among 120 unrelated individuals (55 female, 65 male) from Yugur ethnic group were analyzed using PCR and followed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and silver staining. The numbers of alleles in the nine X-STR loci were 8, 6, 6, 5, 6, 7, 6, 4, and 6, respectively; the numbers of genotypes in the nine loci were 16, 14, 13, 6, 13, 20, 11, 6, and 12, respectively. The genotype frequencies in females were in accordance with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (P>0.05). The nine X-STR loci were relatively abundant in polymorphic information for individual identification, paternity testing and population genetics. A total of 15 haplotypes were detected in DXS7130 and DXS8378 loci, and 55 haplotypes were detected in DXS6789, DXS6799, DXS7424, and DXS6804 loci. The haplotype diversity reached 0.8212 and 0.9947, respectively. Phylogeny tree and cluster analysis based on X-STR allele frequencies in genesis showed that Yugur ethnic group share a close relationship with Mongolian ethnic group and Chinese Han, Tibetan population and far from Hui and Uygur ethnic group, who dwell in the northwest of China.

  4. Differential pre-amplification of STR loci for fragmented forensic DNA profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Seon-Kyu; Kim, Se-Yong; Seo, Bo Young; Woo, Kwang-Man; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Choi, Cheol Yong

    2016-11-01

    DNA profiling of short tandem repeats (STR) has been successfully used for the identification of individuals in forensic samples, accidents and natural disasters. However, STR profiling of DNA isolated from old crime scenes and damaged biological samples is difficult due to DNA degradation and fragmentation. Here, we show that pre-amplification of STR loci using biotinylated primers for the STR loci is an efficient strategy to obtain STR profiling results from fragmented forensic samples. Analysis of STR loci with longer amplicon sizes is generally hampered, since these relatively long loci are vulnerable to DNA fragmentation. This problem was overcome by using reduced or increased primer concentrations for loci with shorter or longer amplicon sizes, respectively, in our pre-amplification strategy. In addition, pre-amplification of STR loci into two groups of short or long amplicon size increases the efficiency of STR profiling from highly fragmented forensic DNA samples. Therefore, differential pre-amplification of STR loci is an effective way to obtain DNA profiling results from fragmented forensic samples. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. A global analysis of Y-chromosomal haplotype diversity for 23 STR loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Purps, Josephine; Siegert, Sabine; Willuweit, Sascha

    2014-01-01

    In a worldwide collaborative effort, 19,630 Y-chromosomes were sampled from 129 different populations in 51 countries. These chromosomes were typed for 23 short-tandem repeat (STR) loci (DYS19, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS385ab, DYS437, DYS438, DYS439, DYS448, DYS456, DY...

  6. Genetic sub-structure in western Mediterranean populations revealed by 12 Y-chromosome STR loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodríguez, V; Tomas Mas, Carmen; Sánchez, J J

    2008-01-01

    Haplotype and allele frequencies of 12 Y-chromosome short tandem repeat (Y-STR) loci (DYS19, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS385 a/b, DYS437, DYS438 and DYS439) included in the Powerplex(R) Y System were determined in seven western Mediterranean populations from Valencia, Ma...

  7. Genetic data for the 13 CODIS STR loci in Singapore Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, S E S; Tan-Siew, W F; Syn, C K C; Ang, H C; Chow, S T; Budowle, Bruce

    2005-02-10

    Allele frequencies for the 13 CODIS short tandem repeat (STR) loci included in the AmpFISTR Profiler Plus and AmpFISTR Cofiler kits (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, USA) were determined in a sample of 174 unrelated Indians in Singapore.

  8. Heterogeneity of breast cancer associations with five susceptibility loci by clinical and pathological characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia-Closas, M.; Hall, P.; Nevanlinna, H.

    2008-01-01

    A three-stage genome-wide association study recently identified single nucleotide polymorphisms ( SNPs) in five loci ( fibroblast growth receptor 2 ( FGFR2), trinucleotide repeat containing 9 ( TNRC9), mitogen-activated protein kinase 3 K1 (MAP3K1), 8q24, and lymphocyte- specific protein 1 ( LSP1...

  9. Structural and Functional Characterization of an Archaeal Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeat (CRISPR)-associated Complex for Antiviral Defense (CASCADE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lintner, Nathanael G; Kerou, Melina; Brumfield, Susan K

    2011-01-01

    In response to viral infection, many prokaryotes incorporate fragments of virus-derived DNA into loci called clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs). The loci are then transcribed, and the processed CRISPR transcripts are used to target invading viral DNA and RNA....... The Escherichia coli "CRISPR-associated complex for antiviral defense" (CASCADE) is central in targeting invading DNA. Here we report the structural and functional characterization of an archaeal CASCADE (aCASCADE) from Sulfolobus solfataricus. Tagged Csa2 (Cas7) expressed in S. solfataricus co-purifies with Cas5......a-, Cas6-, Csa5-, and Cas6-processed CRISPR-RNA (crRNA). Csa2, the dominant protein in aCASCADE, forms a stable complex with Cas5a. Transmission electron microscopy reveals a helical complex of variable length, perhaps due to substoichiometric amounts of other CASCADE components. A recombinant Csa2...

  10. Automated quality checks on repeat prescribing.

    OpenAIRE

    Rogers, Jeremy E; Wroe, Christopher J; Roberts, Angus; Swallow, Angela; Stables, David; Cantrill, Judith A; Rector, Alan L.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Good clinical practice in primary care includes periodic review of repeat prescriptions. Markers of prescriptions that may need review have been described, but manually checking all repeat prescriptions against the markers would be impractical. AIM: To investigate the feasibility of computerising the application of repeat prescribing quality checks to electronic patient records in United Kingdom (UK) primary care. DESIGN OF STUDY: Software performance test against benchmark manual...

  11. Genetic analysis of 20 autosomal STR loci in the Miao ethnic group from Yunnan Province, Southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiufeng; Hu, Liping; Du, Lei; Nie, Aiting; Rao, Min; Pang, Jing Bo; Xiran, Zeng; Nie, Shengjie

    2017-05-01

    The genetic polymorphisms of 20 autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) loci included in the PowerPlex(®) 21 kit were evaluated from 748 unrelated healthy individuals of the Miao ethnic minority living in the Yunnan province in southwestern China. All of the loci reached Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. These loci were examined to determine allele frequencies and forensic statistical parameters. The genetic relationship between the Miao population and other Chinese populations were also estimated. The combined discrimination power and probability of excluding paternity of the 20 STR loci were 0.999 999 999 999 999 999 999 991 26 and 0.999 999 975, respectively. The results suggested that the 20 STR loci were highly polymorphic, which makes them suitable for forensic personal identification and paternity testing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Spare PRELI gene loci: failsafe chromosome insurance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenbin Ma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: LEA (late embryogenesis abundant proteins encode conserved N-terminal mitochondrial signal domains and C-terminal (A/TAEKAK motif repeats, long-presumed to confer cell resistance to stress and death cues. This prompted the hypothesis that LEA proteins are central to mitochondria mechanisms that connect bioenergetics with cell responses to stress and death signaling. In support of this hypothesis, recent studies have demonstrated that mammalian LEA protein PRELI can act as a biochemical hub, which upholds mitochondria energy metabolism, while concomitantly promoting B cell resistance to stress and induced death. Hence, it is important to define in vivo the physiological relevance of PRELI expression. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Given the ubiquitous PRELI expression during mouse development, embryo lethality could be anticipated. Thus, conditional gene targeting was engineered by insertion of flanking loxP (flox/Cre recognition sites on PRELI chromosome 13 (Chr 13 locus to abort its expression in a tissue-specific manner. After obtaining mouse lines with homozygous PRELI floxed alleles (PRELI(f/f, the animals were crossed with CD19-driven Cre-recombinase transgenic mice to investigate whether PRELI inactivation could affect B-lymphocyte physiology and survival. Mice with homozygous B cell-specific PRELI deletion (CD19-Cre/Chr13 PRELI(-/- bred normally and did not show any signs of morbidity. Histopathology and flow cytometry analyses revealed that cell lineage identity, morphology, and viability were indistinguishable between wild type CD19-Cre/Chr13 PRELI(+/+ and CD19-Cre/Chr13 PRELI(-/- deficient mice. Furthermore, B cell PRELI gene expression seemed unaffected by Chr13 PRELI gene targeting. However, identification of additional PRELI loci in mouse Chr1 and Chr5 provided an explanation for the paradox between LEA-dependent cytoprotection and the seemingly futile consequences of Chr 13 PRELI gene inactivation. Importantly, PRELI expression

  13. A Set of Plastid Loci for Use in Multiplex Fragment Length Genotyping for Intraspecific Variation in Pinus (Pinaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Austin M. Wofford

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Recently released Pinus plastome sequences support characterization of 15 plastid simple sequence repeat (cpSSR loci originally published for P. contorta and P. thunbergii. This allows selection of loci for single-tube PCR multiplexed genotyping in any subsection of the genus. Methods: Unique placement of primers and primer conservation across the genus were investigated, and a set of six loci were selected for single-tube multiplexing. We compared interspecific variation between cpSSRs and nucleotide sequences ofycf1 and tested intraspecific variation for cpSSRs using 911 samples in the P. ponderosa species complex. Results: The cpSSR loci contain mononucleotide and complex repeats with additional length variation in flanking regions. They are not located in hypervariable regions, and most primers are conserved across the genus. A single PCR per sample multiplexed for six loci yielded 45 alleles in 911 samples. Discussion: The protocol allows efficient genotyping of many samples. The cpSSR loci are too variable for Pinus phylogenies but are useful for the study of genetic structure within and among populations. The multiplex method could easily be extended to other plant groups by choosing primers for cpSSR loci in a plastome alignment for the target group.

  14. A set of plastid loci for use in multiplex fragment length genotyping for intraspecific variation in Pinus (Pinaceae)1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wofford, Austin M.; Finch, Kristen; Bigott, Adam; Willyard, Ann

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Recently released Pinus plastome sequences support characterization of 15 plastid simple sequence repeat (cpSSR) loci originally published for P. contorta and P. thunbergii. This allows selection of loci for single-tube PCR multiplexed genotyping in any subsection of the genus. • Methods: Unique placement of primers and primer conservation across the genus were investigated, and a set of six loci were selected for single-tube multiplexing. We compared interspecific variation between cpSSRs and nucleotide sequences of ycf1 and tested intraspecific variation for cpSSRs using 911 samples in the P. ponderosa species complex. • Results: The cpSSR loci contain mononucleotide and complex repeats with additional length variation in flanking regions. They are not located in hypervariable regions, and most primers are conserved across the genus. A single PCR per sample multiplexed for six loci yielded 45 alleles in 911 samples. • Discussion: The protocol allows efficient genotyping of many samples. The cpSSR loci are too variable for Pinus phylogenies but are useful for the study of genetic structure within and among populations. The multiplex method could easily be extended to other plant groups by choosing primers for cpSSR loci in a plastome alignment for the target group. PMID:25202625

  15. DNA Slippage Occurs at Microsatellite Loci without Minimal Threshold Length in Humans: A Comparative Genomic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclercq, Sébastien; Rivals, Eric; Jarne, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    The dynamics of microsatellite, or short tandem repeats (STRs), is well documented for long, polymorphic loci, but much less is known for shorter ones. For example, the issue of a minimum threshold length for DNA slippage remains contentious. Model-fitting methods have generally concluded that slippage only occurs over a threshold length of about eight nucleotides, in contradiction with some direct observations of tandem duplications at shorter repeated sites. Using a comparative analysis of the human and chimpanzee genomes, we examined the mutation patterns at microsatellite loci with lengths as short as one period plus one nucleotide. We found that the rates of tandem insertions and deletions at microsatellite loci strongly deviated from background rates in other parts of the human genome and followed an exponential increase with STR size. More importantly, we detected no lower threshold length for slippage. The rate of tandem duplications at unrepeated sites was higher than expected from random insertions, providing evidence for genome-wide action of indel slippage (an alternative mechanism generating tandem repeats). The rate of point mutations adjacent to STRs did not differ from that estimated elsewhere in the genome, except around dinucleotide loci. Our results suggest that the emergence of STR depends on DNA slippage, indel slippage, and point mutations. We also found that the dynamics of tandem insertions and deletions differed in both rates and size at which these mutations take place. We discuss these results in both evolutionary and mechanistic terms. PMID:20624737

  16. Investigation of single nucleotide polymorphism loci susceptible to degradation by ultraviolet light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, Mitsuyo; Taki, Takashi; Shimada, Ryo; Kibayashi, Kazuhiko

    2016-10-01

    DNA in biological fluids is often degraded by environmental factors. Given that single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analyses require shorter amplicons than short tandem repeat (STR) analyses do, their use in human identification using degraded samples has recently attracted attention. Although various SNP loci are used to analyze degraded samples, it is unclear which ones are more appropriate. To characterize and identify SNP loci that are susceptible or resistant to degradation, we artificially degraded DNA, obtained from buccal swabs from 11 volunteers, by exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light for different durations (254 nm for 5, 15, 30, 60, or 120 min) and analyzed the resulting SNP loci. DNA degradation was assessed using gel electrophoresis, STR, and SNP profiling. DNA fragmentation occurred within 5 min of UV irradiation, and successful STR and SNP profiling decreased with increasing duration. However, 73% of SNP loci were still detected correctly in DNA samples irradiated for 120 min, a dose that rendered STR loci undetectable. The unsuccessful SNP typing and the base call failure of nucleotides neighboring the SNPs were traced to rs1031825, and we found that this SNP was susceptible to UV light. When comparing the detection efficiencies of STR and SNP loci, SNP typing was more successful than STR typing, making it effective when using degraded DNA. However, it is important to use rs1031825 with caution when interpreting SNP analyses of degraded DNA.

  17. Development of microsatellite loci for the invasive weed Wedelia trilobata (Asteraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei; Zhou, Ren-Chao; Huang, Hui-Run; Ge, Xue-Jun

    2010-11-01

    Microsatellite markers were developed to help elucidate the population genetics of the invasive species Wedelia trilobata. • Using the Fast Isolation by AFLP of Sequences COntaining (FIASCO) repeats protocol, 23 sets of primers for amplifying microsatellite loci were identified in W. trilobata, 10 of which showed polymorphism (two to five alleles per locus) in samples of two populations of W. trilobata, one from China and one from Peru. Six of these loci were successfully amplified from samples of the native congener W. chinensis, with expected sizes. • These markers may be useful for further investigation of population genetics of Wedelia trilobata and other congener species.

  18. Identification and characterization of variant alleles at CODIS STR loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allor, Catherine; Einum, David D; Scarpetta, Marco

    2005-09-01

    Short tandem repeat (STR) profiles from 32,671 individuals generated by the ABI Profiler Plus and Cofiler systems were screened for variant alleles not represented within manufacturer-provided allelic ladders. A total of 85 distinct variants were identified at 12 of the 13 CODIS loci, most of which involve a truncated tetranucleotide repeat unit. Twelve novel alleles, identified at D3S1358, FGA, D18S51, D5S818, D7S820 and TPOX, were confirmed by nucleotide sequence analysis and include both insertions and deletions involving the repeat units themselves as well as DNA flanking the repeat regions. Population genetic data were collected for all variants and frequencies range from 0.0003 (many single observations) to 0.0042 (D7S820 '10.3' in North American Hispanics). In total, the variant alleles identified in this study are carried by 1.6% of the estimated 1 million individuals tested annually in the U.S. for the purposes of parentage resolution. A paternity case involving a recombination event of paternal origin is presented and demonstrates how variant alleles can significantly strengthen the genetic evidence in troublesome cases. In such instances, increased costs and turnaround time associated with additional testing may be eliminated.

  19. Population genetic analysis of the GlobalFiler STR loci in 748 individuals from the Kazakh population of Xinjiang in northwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Honghua; Yang, Shuping; Guo, Wei; Ren, Bo; Pu, Liwen; Ma, Teng; Xia, Mingying; Jin, Li; Li, Liming; Li, Shilin

    2016-09-01

    The six-dye GlobalFiler™ Express PCR amplification kit incorporates 21 commonly used autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) loci and three gender determination loci. In this study, we analyzed the GlobalFiler STR loci on 748 unrelated individuals from a Chinese Kazakh population of Xinjiang, China. No significant deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and linkage disequilibrium were observed within and between 21 autosomal STR loci. SE33 showed the greatest power of discrimination in Kazakh population. The combined power of discrimination of Kazakh was 99.999999999999999999999996797 %. No significant differences of allele frequencies were observed between Kazakh and Uyghur at all 15 tested STR loci, as well as Mongolian. Significant differences were only observed between Kazakh and the other Chinese populations at TH01. Multiple STR loci showed significant differences between Kazakh and Arab, as well as South Portuguese. The multidimensional scaling plot (MDS) plot and neighbor-joining tree also showed Kazakh is genetically close to Uyghur.

  20. Characterization of copy number variation in genomic regions containing STR loci using array comparative genomic hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repnikova, Elena A; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Bailes, Andrea; Weber, Cecilia; Erdman, Linda; McKinney, Aimee; Ramsey, Sarah; Hashimoto, Sayaka; Lamb Thrush, Devon; Astbury, Caroline; Reshmi, Shalini C; Shaffer, Lisa G; Gastier-Foster, Julie M; Pyatt, Robert E

    2013-09-01

    Short tandem repeat (STR) loci are commonly used in forensic casework, familial analysis for human identification, and for monitoring hematopoietic cell engraftment after bone marrow transplant. Unexpected genetic variation leading to sequence and length differences in STR loci can complicate STR typing, and presents challenges in casework interpretation. Copy number variation (CNV) is a relatively recently identified form of genetic variation consisting of genomic regions present at variable copy numbers within an individual compared to a reference genome. Large scale population studies have demonstrated that likely all individuals carry multiple regions with CNV of 1kb in size or greater in their genome. To date, no study correlating genomic regions containing STR loci with CNV has been conducted. In this study, we analyzed results from 32,850 samples sent for clinical array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analysis for the presence of CNV at regions containing the 13 CODIS (Combined DNA Index System) STR, and the Amelogenin X (AMELX) and Amelogenin Y (AMELY) loci. Thirty-two individuals with CNV involving STR loci on chromosomes 2, 4, 7, 11, 12, 13, 16, and 21, and twelve with CNV involving the AMELX/AMELY loci were identified. These results were correlated with data from publicly available databases housing information on CNV identified in normal populations and additional clinical cases. These collective results demonstrate the presence of CNV in regions containing 9 of the 13 CODIS STR and AMELX/Y loci. Further characterization of STR profiles within regions of CNV, additional cataloging of these variants in multiple populations, and contributing such examples to the public domain will provide valuable information for reliable use of these loci.

  1. Quantum repeated games revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Frackiewicz, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    We present a scheme for playing quantum repeated 2x2 games based on the Marinatto and Weber's approach to quantum games. As a potential application, we study twice repeated Prisoner's Dilemma game. We show that results not available in classical game can be obtained when the game is played in the quantum way. Before we present our idea, we comment on the previous scheme of playing quantum repeated games.

  2. Optimizing selection of microsatellite loci from 454 pyrosequencing via post-sequencing bioinformatic analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Silva, Iria; Toonen, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    The comparatively low cost of massive parallel sequencing technology, also known as next-generation sequencing (NGS), has transformed the isolation of microsatellite loci. The most common NGS approach consists of obtaining large amounts of sequence data from genomic DNA or enriched microsatellite libraries, which is then mined for the discovery of microsatellite repeats using bioinformatics analyses. Here, we describe a bioinformatics approach to isolate microsatellite loci, starting from the raw sequence data through a subset of microsatellite primer pairs. The primary difference to previously published approaches includes analyses to select the most accurate sequence data and to eliminate repetitive elements prior to the design of primers. These analyses aim to minimize the testing of primer pairs by identifying the most promising microsatellite loci.

  3. Polymorphic Microsatellite Loci for Virola sebifera (Myristicaceae Derived from Shotgun 454 Pyrosequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Wei

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Polymorphic microsatellite loci were characterized in the dioecious neotropical rainforest tree Virola sebifera. The markers will be used to study ecological and genetic impacts of hunting and landscape change in this vertebrate-dispersed, insect-pollinated tree species. Methods and Results: Simple sequence repeat (SSR markers were screened from genomic libraries of South American V. sebifera obtained by shotgun 454 pyrosequencing. Primer pairs were tested on Panamanian samples (N = 42. Approximately 52% of the 61 tested SSR markers amplified, and 16% were polymorphic. Ten selected polymorphic SSR loci contained seven to 15 alleles per locus, and polymorphic information content averaged 0.694. Observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.465 to 0.905, and expected heterozygosity was between 0.477 and 0.876. Conclusions: The 10 polymorphic loci will be useful in studying gene flow and genetic structure at local and regional spatial scales in V. sebifera.

  4. A Repeating Fast Radio Burst

    CERN Document Server

    Spitler, L G; Hessels, J W T; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J; Ferdman, R D; Freire, P C C; Kaspi, V M; Lazarus, P; Lynch, R; Madsen, E C; McLaughlin, M A; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Seymour, A; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; van Leeuwen, J; Zhu, W W

    2016-01-01

    Fast Radio Bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measures (i.e. integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of the fast radio bursts has led several authors to hypothesise that they originate in cataclysmic astrophysical events. Here we report the detection of ten additional bursts from the direction of FRB121102, using the 305-m Arecibo telescope. These new bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and wh...

  5. Repeat-based Sequence Typing of Carnobacterium maltaromaticum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Abdur; El Kheir, Sara M; Back, Alexandre; Mangavel, Cécile; Revol-Junelles, Anne-Marie; Borges, Frédéric

    2016-06-01

    Carnobacterium maltaromaticum is a Lactic Acid Bacterium (LAB) of technological interest for the food industry, especially the dairy as bioprotection and ripening flora. The industrial use of this LAB requires accurate and resolutive typing tools. A new typing method for C. maltaromaticum inspired from MLVA analysis and called Repeat-based Sequence Typing (RST) is described. Rather than electrophoresis analysis, our RST method is based on sequence analysis of multiple loci containing Variable-Number Tandem-Repeats (VNTRs). The method described here for C. maltaromaticum relies on the analysis of three VNTR loci, and was applied to a collection of 24 strains. For each strain, a PCR product corresponding to the amplification of each VNTR loci was sequenced. Sequence analysis allowed delineating 11, 11, and 12 alleles for loci VNTR-A, VNTR-B, and VNTR-C, respectively. Considering the allele combination exhibited by each strain allowed defining 15 genotypes, ending in a discriminatory index of 0.94. Comparison with MLST revealed that both methods were complementary for strain typing in C. maltaromaticum.

  6. Report of the European DNA Profiling Group (EDNAP)--an investigation of the hypervariable STR loci ACTBP2, APOAI1 and D11S554 and the compound loci D12S391 and D1S1656

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gill, P; d'Aloja, E; Dupuy, B;

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the results of three collaborative exercises which continues the EDNAP theme to explore whether uniformity of DNA profiling results could be achieved between European laboratories using STRs. In an earlier exercise, complex hypervariable AAAG-repeat STR loci were investigated...

  7. Analysis of the features of 45 identified CRISPR loci in 32 Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Siyu; Liu, Jing; Shao, Fuye; Wang, Pengfei; Duan, Guangcai; Yang, Haiyan

    2015-08-28

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a common pathogen that can cause serious infections, even death. Because of the horizontal gene transfer (HGT) of antibiotic resistance genes, the drug resistant condition is becoming increasingly prevalent. Recently, an adaptive immunity system, named clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR), was discovered and demonstrated to confer a defense against foreign invading elements that may carry the antibiotic resistance genes. In this study, we reveal the features of 45 identified CRISPR loci and the CRISPR associated gene (Cas) in 32 S. aureus strains from CRISPR database. Five spacers of S. aureus 08BA02176 and MSHR1132 were homologous with foreign genetic sequences from phages or plasmids, even containing a spacer sequence identical to part of some phages' genomes containing lukPV gene that encodes the PVL toxin. Many S. aureus strains with the same CRISPR type shared the same MLST type. CRISPR loci that had 3 or more similar protein loci mostly belonged to the same CRISPR type. We came to the conclusion that the CRISPR/Cas of strains 08BA02176 and MSHR1132 were inherited from a common ancestor or recombined from Staphylococcus lugdunensis. CRISPR loci can be mobilized and can transfer among different but closely related species, and the same types of MLST strains exhibit a higher affinity to the same types of CRISPR loci. Bacteriophages may be the predominant challenge facing S. aureus. The CRISPR/Cas structure may limit the transmission of bacterial virulence among S. aureus.

  8. Reconfigurable multiport EPON repeater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Masayuki; Inohara, Ryo; Agata, Akira; Horiuchi, Yukio

    2009-11-01

    An extended reach EPON repeater is one of the solutions to effectively expand FTTH service areas. In this paper, we propose a reconfigurable multi-port EPON repeater for effective accommodation of multiple ODNs with a single OLT line card. The proposed repeater, which has multi-ports in both OLT and ODN sides, consists of TRs, BTRs with the CDR function and a reconfigurable electrical matrix switch, can accommodate multiple ODNs to a single OLT line card by controlling the connection of the matrix switch. Although conventional EPON repeaters require full OLT line cards to accommodate subscribers from the initial installation stage, the proposed repeater can dramatically reduce the number of required line cards especially when the number of subscribers is less than a half of the maximum registerable users per OLT. Numerical calculation results show that the extended reach EPON system with the proposed EPON repeater can save 17.5% of the initial installation cost compared with a conventional repeater, and can be less expensive than conventional systems up to the maximum subscribers especially when the percentage of ODNs in lightly-populated areas is higher.

  9. Revisiting the TALE repeat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Dong; Yan, Chuangye; Wu, Jianping; Pan, Xiaojing; Yan, Nieng

    2014-04-01

    Transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors specifically bind to double stranded (ds) DNA through a central domain of tandem repeats. Each TAL effector (TALE) repeat comprises 33-35 amino acids and recognizes one specific DNA base through a highly variable residue at a fixed position in the repeat. Structural studies have revealed the molecular basis of DNA recognition by TALE repeats. Examination of the overall structure reveals that the basic building block of TALE protein, namely a helical hairpin, is one-helix shifted from the previously defined TALE motif. Here we wish to suggest a structure-based re-demarcation of the TALE repeat which starts with the residues that bind to the DNA backbone phosphate and concludes with the base-recognition hyper-variable residue. This new numbering system is consistent with the α-solenoid superfamily to which TALE belongs, and reflects the structural integrity of TAL effectors. In addition, it confers integral number of TALE repeats that matches the number of bound DNA bases. We then present fifteen crystal structures of engineered dHax3 variants in complex with target DNA molecules, which elucidate the structural basis for the recognition of bases adenine (A) and guanine (G) by reported or uncharacterized TALE codes. Finally, we analyzed the sequence-structure correlation of the amino acid residues within a TALE repeat. The structural analyses reported here may advance the mechanistic understanding of TALE proteins and facilitate the design of TALEN with improved affinity and specificity.

  10. Evolution of Microsatellite Loci of Tropical and Temperate Anguilla Eels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Chen Tseng

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Anguilla eels are divided into temperate and tropical eels, based on their major distributions. The present study collected two temperate eels, Anguilla japonica and Anguilla anguilla, and two tropical eels, Anguilla marmorata and Anguilla bicolor pacifica, to examine two questions: do temperate and tropical Anguilla eels have different genetic polymorphic patterns?; and do temperate Anguilla japonica and Anguilla anguilla have a closer relationship to each other than to tropical eels? In total, 274 sequences were cloned and sequenced from six conserved microsatellite loci to examine polymorphic patterns of these four catadromous eels. Different mutational events, including substitutions, and repeat-unit deletions and insertions, appeared in major regions, while different point mutations were observed in flanking regions. The results implied that parallel patterns of microsatellite sequences occurred within both tropical and temperate freshwater eels. Consensus flanking sequences of six homologous loci from each of the four species were constructed. Genetic distances ranged from 0.044 (Anguilla bicolor pacifica vs. Anguilla marmorata to 0.061 (Anguilla marmorata vs. Anguilla anguilla. The tree topology suggests the hypothesis of Anguilla japonica and Anguilla anguilla being a sister group must be rejected.

  11. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci in the common milkweed, Asclepias syriaca (Apocynaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabat, Susan M; Dick, Christopher W; Hunter, Mark D

    2010-05-01

    Microsatellite primers were developed for the common milkweed, Asclepias syriaca L., to assist in genet identification and the analysis of spatial genetic structure. Using an enrichment cloning protocol, eight microsatellite loci were isolated and characterized in a Michigan population of A. syriaca. The primers amplified di- and trinucleotide repeats with 4-13 alleles per locus. The primers will be useful for studies of clonality and gene flow in natural populations.

  12. Recursive quantum repeater networks

    CERN Document Server

    Van Meter, Rodney; Horsman, Clare

    2011-01-01

    Internet-scale quantum repeater networks will be heterogeneous in physical technology, repeater functionality, and management. The classical control necessary to use the network will therefore face similar issues as Internet data transmission. Many scalability and management problems that arose during the development of the Internet might have been solved in a more uniform fashion, improving flexibility and reducing redundant engineering effort. Quantum repeater network development is currently at the stage where we risk similar duplication when separate systems are combined. We propose a unifying framework that can be used with all existing repeater designs. We introduce the notion of a Quantum Recursive Network Architecture, developed from the emerging classical concept of 'recursive networks', extending recursive mechanisms from a focus on data forwarding to a more general distributed computing request framework. Recursion abstracts independent transit networks as single relay nodes, unifies software layer...

  13. Genetic polymorphism at 15 STR loci among three important subpopulation of Bihar, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashma, R; Kashyap, V K

    2002-11-05

    Genotype polymorphism studies at 15 highly polymorphic short tandem repeat (STR) loci were carried out in three genetically important minor caste groups (Yadav, Kurmi and Baniya) of Bihar, a eastern state of India to evaluate their significance in human identification and population genetics study. The selected communities practice endogamy. Despite of same geographical area, the physical features of Yadavs and Baniyas resemble North Indian Indo-Caucasoids whereas Kurmis resemble more to Indo-Austroloids. Among the chosen 15 loci, two are penta-nucleotide repeat: Penta-D and Penta-E, and 13 are tetra-nucleotide repeat: vWA D8S1179, TPOX, FGA, D5S818, D13S317, D7S820, D16S539, D3S1358, THO1, CSF1PO, D21S11, D18S51 and are validated for other population of India and world for forensic testing and human population study. Thirteen of these STR loci are present in the combined DNA index system (CODIS) [J. Forensic Sci. 44 (1999) 1277] and world-wide data is available.

  14. Genome-wide characterization of simple sequence repeats in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Philipp W

    2010-10-01

    comparable to the density of poplar, grapevine and rice, and was richest in AT dinucleotides. Using an electronic PCR strategy, we investigated the polymorphism between 9930 and Gy14 at 1,006 SSR loci, and found unexpectedly high degree of polymorphism (48.3% between the two genotypes. The level of polymorphism seems to be positively associated with the number of repeat units in the microsatellite. The in silico PCR results were validated empirically in 660 of the 1,006 SSR loci. In addition, primer sequences for more than 83,000 newly-discovered cucumber microsatellites, and their exact positions in the Gy14 genome assembly were made publicly available. Conclusions The cucumber genome is rich in microsatellites; AT and AAG are the most abundant repeat motifs in genomic and EST sequences of cucumber, respectively. Considering all the species investigated, some commonalities were noted, especially within the monocot and dicot groups, although the distribution of motifs and the frequency of certain repeats were characteristic of the species examined. The large number of SSR markers developed from this study should be a significant contribution to the cucurbit research community.

  15. The Pentapeptide Repeat Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetting,M.; Hegde, S.; Fajardo, J.; Fiser, A.; Roderick, S.; Takiff, H.; Blanchard, J.

    2006-01-01

    The Pentapeptide Repeat Protein (PRP) family has over 500 members in the prokaryotic and eukaryotic kingdoms. These proteins are composed of, or contain domains composed of, tandemly repeated amino acid sequences with a consensus sequence of [S, T,A, V][D, N][L, F]-[S, T,R][G]. The biochemical function of the vast majority of PRP family members is unknown. The three-dimensional structure of the first member of the PRP family was determined for the fluoroquinolone resistance protein (MfpA) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The structure revealed that the pentapeptide repeats encode the folding of a novel right-handed quadrilateral {beta}-helix. MfpA binds to DNA gyrase and inhibits its activity. The rod-shaped, dimeric protein exhibits remarkable size, shape and electrostatic similarity to DNA.

  16. Development and characterization of simple sequence repeats for Bipolaris sorokiniana and cross transferability to related species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajolu, Oluseyi L; Wadl, Phillip A; Vu, Andrea L; Gwinn, Kimberly D; Scheffler, Brian E; Trigiano, Robert N; Ownley, Bonnie H

    2013-01-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSR) markers were developed from a small insert genomic library for Bipolaris sorokiniana, a mitosporic fungal pathogen that causes spot blotch and root rot in switchgrass. About 59% of sequenced clones (n = 384) harbored SSR motifs. After eliminating redundant sequences, 196 SSR loci were identified, of which 84.7% were dinucleotide repeats and 9.7% and 5.6% were tri- and tetra-nucleotide repeats, respectively. Primer pairs were designed for 105 loci and 85 successfully amplified loci. Sixteen polymorphic loci were characterized with 15 B. sorokiniana isolates obtained from infected switchgrass plant materials collected from five states in USA. These loci successfully cross-amplified isolates from at least one related species, including Bipolaris oryzae, Bipolaris spicifera and Bipolaris victoriae, that causes leaf spot on switchgrass. Haploid gene diversity per locus across all isolates studied varied 0.633-0.861. Principal component analysis of SSR data clustered isolates according to their respective species. These SSR markers will be a valuable tool for genetic variability and population studies of B. sorokiniana and related species that are pathogenic on switchgrass and other host plants. In addition, these markers are potential diagnostic tools for species in the genus Bipolaris.

  17. Quantifying missing heritability at known GWAS loci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Gusev

    Full Text Available Recent work has shown that much of the missing heritability of complex traits can be resolved by estimates of heritability explained by all genotyped SNPs. However, it is currently unknown how much heritability is missing due to poor tagging or additional causal variants at known GWAS loci. Here, we use variance components to quantify the heritability explained by all SNPs at known GWAS loci in nine diseases from WTCCC1 and WTCCC2. After accounting for expectation, we observed all SNPs at known GWAS loci to explain 1.29 x more heritability than GWAS-associated SNPs on average (P=3.3 x 10⁻⁵. For some diseases, this increase was individually significant: 2.07 x for Multiple Sclerosis (MS (P=6.5 x 10⁻⁹ and 1.48 x for Crohn's Disease (CD (P = 1.3 x 10⁻³; all analyses of autoimmune diseases excluded the well-studied MHC region. Additionally, we found that GWAS loci from other related traits also explained significant heritability. The union of all autoimmune disease loci explained 7.15 x more MS heritability than known MS SNPs (P 20,000 Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA samples typed on ImmunoChip, with 2.37 x more heritability from all SNPs at GWAS loci (P = 2.3 x 10⁻⁶ and 5.33 x more heritability from all autoimmune disease loci (P < 1 x 10⁻¹⁶ compared to known RA SNPs (including those identified in this cohort. Our methods adjust for LD between SNPs, which can bias standard estimates of heritability from SNPs even if all causal variants are typed. By comparing adjusted estimates, we hypothesize that the genome-wide distribution of causal variants is enriched for low-frequency alleles, but that causal variants at known GWAS loci are skewed towards common alleles. These findings have important ramifications for fine-mapping study design and our understanding of complex disease architecture.

  18. Repeating the Past

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, John W.

    1998-05-01

    As part of the celebration of the Journal 's 75th year, we are scanning each Journal issue from 25, 50, and 74 years ago. Many of the ideas and practices described are so similar to present-day "innovations" that George Santayana's adage (1) "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it" comes to mind. But perhaps "condemned" is too strong - sometimes it may be valuable to repeat something that was done long ago. One example comes from the earliest days of the Division of Chemical Education and of the Journal.

  19. Genotype profiles for the Costa Rican population at 7 PCR-based loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernal Morera

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Complete electronic DNA profiles of 2006 randomly selected Costa Ricans, typed for 7 PCR-based loci, are presented. Such data may prove valuable for anthropological and forensic studies of the Costa Rican population. Rev. Biol. Trop. 52(3: 713-715. Epub 2004 Dic 15.Se presenta una versión electrónica de los perfiles genéticos completos de 2006 individuos de Costa Rica seleccionados al azar, quienes fueron caracterizados para loci 6 basados en PCR. Tales datos podrían ser valiosos para estudios antropológicos y forenses de la población costarricense.

  20. [Evaluation of variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) isolates of Mycobacterium bovis in Algeria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahraoui, Naima; Muller, Borna; Djamel, Yala; Fadéla, Boulahbal; Rachid, Ouzrout; Jakob, Zinsstag; Djamel, Guetarni

    2010-01-01

    The discriminatory potency of variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR), based on 7 loci (MIRU 26, 27 and 5 ETRs A, B, C, D, E) was assayed on Mycobacterium bovis strains obtained from samples due to tuberculosis in two slaughterhouses in Algeria. The technique of MIRU-VNTR has been evaluated on 88 strains of M. bovis and one strain of M. caprea and shows 41 different profiles. Results showed that the VNTR were highly discriminatory with an allelic diversity of 0.930 when four loci (ETR A, B, C and MIRU 27) were highly discriminatory (h>0.25) and three loci (ETR D and E MIRU 26) moderately discriminatory (0.11loci were highly discriminatory be adequate for the first proper differentiation of strains of M. bovis in Algeria. The VNTR technique has proved a valuable tool for further development and application of epidemiological research for the of tuberculosis transmission in Algeria.

  1. Isolation and Characterization of Eleven Polymorphic Microsatellite Loci for the Valuable Medicinal Plant Dendrobium huoshanense and Cross-Species Amplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Wang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Dendrobium huoshanense (Orchidaceae is a perennial herb and a widely used medicinal plant in Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM endemic to Huoshan County town in Anhui province in Southeast China. A microsatellite-enriched genomic DNA library of D. huoshanense was developed and screened to identify marker loci. Eleven polymorphic loci were isolated and analyzed by screening 25 individuals collected from a natural population. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 2 to 5. The observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.227 to 0.818 and from 0.317 to 0.757, respectively. Two loci showed significant deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and four of the pairwise comparisons of loci revealed linkage disequilibrium (p < 0.05. These microsatellite loci were cross-amplified for five congeneric species and seven loci can be amplified in all species. These simple sequence repeats (SSR markers are useful in genetic studies of D. huoshanense and other related species and in conservation decision-making.

  2. Identification of chloroplast genome loci suitable for high-resolution phylogeographic studies of Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott (Araceae) and closely related taxa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Ibrar; Matthews, Peter J; Biggs, Patrick J; Naeem, Muhammad; McLenachan, Patricia A; Lockhart, Peter J

    2013-09-01

    Recently, we reported the chloroplast genome-wide association of oligonucleotide repeats, indels and nucleotide substitutions in aroid chloroplast genomes. We hypothesized that the distribution of oligonucleotide repeat sequences in a single representative genome can be used to identify mutational hotspots and loci suitable for population genetic, phylogenetic and phylogeographic studies. Using information on the location of oligonucleotide repeats in the chloroplast genome of taro (Colocasia esculenta), we designed 30 primer pairs to amplify and sequence polymorphic loci. The primers have been tested in a range of intra-specific to intergeneric comparisons, including ten taro samples (Colocasia esculenta) from diverse geographical locations, four other Colocasia species (C. affinis, C. fallax, C. formosana, C. gigantea) and three other aroid genera (represented by Remusatia vivipara, Alocasia brisbanensis and Amorphophallus konjac). Multiple sequence alignments for the intra-specific comparison revealed nucleotide substitutions (point mutations) at all 30 loci and microsatellite polymorphisms at 14 loci. The primer pairs reported here reveal levels of genetic variation suitable for high-resolution phylogeographic and evolutionary studies of taro and other closely related aroids. Our results confirm that information on repeat distribution can be used to identify loci suitable for such studies, and we expect that this approach can be used in other plant groups.

  3. All-optical repeater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberberg, Y

    1986-06-01

    An all-optical device containing saturable gain, saturable loss, and unsaturable loss is shown to transform weak, distorted optical pulses into uniform standard-shape pulses. The proposed device performs thresholding, amplification, and pulse shaping as required from an optical repeater. It is shown that such a device could be realized by existing semiconductor technology.

  4. Bidirectional Manchester repeater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, J.

    1980-01-01

    Bidirectional Manchester repeater is inserted at periodic intervals along single bidirectional twisted pair transmission line to detect, amplify, and transmit bidirectional Manchester 11 code signals. Requiring only 18 TTL 7400 series IC's, some line receivers and drivers, and handful of passive components, circuit is simple and relatively inexpensive to build.

  5. Two sex-chromosome-linked microsatellite loci show geographic variance among North American Ostrinia nubilalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad S. Coates

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available PCR-based O. nubilalis population and pedigree analysis indicated female specificity of a (GAAAATn microsatellite, and male specificity of a CAYCARCGTCACTAA repeat unit marker. These loci were respectively named Ostrinia nubilalis W-chromosome 1 (ONW1 and O. nubilalis Z-chromosome 1 (ONZ1. Intact repeats of three, four, or five GAAAAT units are present among ONW1 alleles, and biallelic variation exists at the ONZ1 locus. Screening of 493 male at ONZ1 and 448 heterogametic females at ONZ1 and ONW1 loci from eleven North American sample sites was used to construct genotypic data. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA and F-statistics indicated no female haplotype or male ONZ1 allele frequency differentiation between voltinism ecotypes. Four subpopulations from northern latitudes, Minnesota and South Dakota, showed the absence of a single female haplotype, a significant deviation of ONZ1 data from Hardy-Weinberg expectation, and low-level geographic divergence from other subpopulations. Low ONZ1 and ONW1 allele diversity could be attributed either to large repeat unit sizes, low repeat number, reduced effective population (Ne size of sex chromosomes, or the result of recent O. nubilalis introduction and population expansion, but likely could not be due to inbreeding. These sequences have been deposited in GenBank AF442958, and AY102618 to AY102620.

  6. 52 Genetic Loci Influencing Myocardial Mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Harst, Pim; van Setten, Jessica; Verweij, Niek; Vogler, Georg; Franke, Lude; Maurano, Matthew T.; Wang, Xinchen; Leach, Irene Mateo; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Hayward, Caroline; Sorice, Rossella; Meirelles, Osorio; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Polašek, Ozren; Tanaka, Toshiko; Arking, Dan E.; Ulivi, Sheila; Trompet, Stella; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Smith, Albert V.; Dörr, Marcus; Kerr, Kathleen F.; Magnani, Jared W.; Fabiola Del Greco, M.; Zhang, Weihua; Nolte, Ilja M.; Silva, Claudia T.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Tragante, Vinicius; Esko, Tõnu; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Adriaens, Michiel E.; Andersen, Karl; Barnett, Phil; Bis, Joshua C.; Bodmer, Rolf; Buckley, Brendan M.; Campbell, Harry; Cannon, Megan V.; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chen, Lin Y.; Delitala, Alessandro; Devereux, Richard B.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Ford, Ian; Gieger, Christian; Harris, Tamara B.; Haugen, Eric; Heinig, Matthias; Hernandez, Dena G.; Hillege, Hans L.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hofman, Albert; Hubner, Norbert; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Iorio, Annamaria; Kähönen, Mika; Kellis, Manolis; Kolcic, Ivana; Kooner, Ishminder K.; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Kors, Jan A.; Lakatta, Edward G.; Lage, Kasper; Launer, Lenore J.; Levy, Daniel; Lundby, Alicia; Macfarlane, Peter W.; May, Dalit; Meitinger, Thomas; Metspalu, Andres; Nappo, Stefania; Naitza, Silvia; Neph, Shane; Nord, Alex S.; Nutile, Teresa; Okin, Peter M.; Olsen, Jesper V.; Oostra, Ben A.; Penninger, Josef M.; Pennacchio, Len A.; Pers, Tune H.; Perz, Siegfried; Peters, Annette; Pinto, Yigal M.; Pfeufer, Arne; Pilia, Maria Grazia; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Prins, Bram P.; Raitakari, Olli T.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Rice, Ken M.; Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Schafer, Sebastian; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Carsten O.; Sehmi, Jobanpreet; Silljé, Herman H.W.; Sinagra, Gianfranco; Sinner, Moritz F.; Slowikowski, Kamil; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Spector, Timothy D.; Spiering, Wilko; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A.; Stolk, Ronald P.; Strauch, Konstantin; Tan, Sian-Tsung; Tarasov, Kirill V.; Trinh, Bosco; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; van den Boogaard, Malou; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Viikari, Jorma S.; Visscher, Peter M.; Vitart, Veronique; Völker, Uwe; Waldenberger, Melanie; Weichenberger, Christian X.; Westra, Harm-Jan; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.; Yang, Jian; Bezzina, Connie R.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Snieder, Harold; Wright, Alan F.; Rudan, Igor; Boyer, Laurie A.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Stricker, Bruno H.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Ciullo, Marina; Sanna, Serena; Lehtimäki, Terho; Wilson, James F.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Alonso, Alvaro; Gasparini, Paolo; Jukema, J. Wouter; Kääb, Stefan; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Felix, Stephan B.; Heckbert, Susan R.; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Hicks, Andrew A.; Chambers, John C.; Jamshidi, Yalda; Visel, Axel; Christoffels, Vincent M.; Isaacs, Aaron; Samani, Nilesh J.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Myocardial mass is a key determinant of cardiac muscle function and hypertrophy. Myocardial depolarization leading to cardiac muscle contraction is reflected by the amplitude and duration of the QRS complex on the electrocardiogram (ECG). Abnormal QRS amplitude or duration reflect changes in myocardial mass and conduction, and are associated with increased risk of heart failure and death. OBJECTIVES This meta-analysis sought to gain insights into the genetic determinants of myocardial mass. METHODS We carried out a genome-wide association meta-analysis of 4 QRS traits in up to 73,518 individuals of European ancestry, followed by extensive biological and functional assessment. RESULTS We identified 52 genomic loci, of which 32 are novel, that are reliably associated with 1 or more QRS phenotypes at p < 1 × 10−8. These loci are enriched in regions of open chromatin, histone modifications, and transcription factor binding, suggesting that they represent regions of the genome that are actively transcribed in the human heart. Pathway analyses provided evidence that these loci play a role in cardiac hypertrophy. We further highlighted 67 candidate genes at the identified loci that are preferentially expressed in cardiac tissue and associated with cardiac abnormalities in Drosophila melanogaster and Mus musculus. We validated the regulatory function of a novel variant in the SCN5A/SCN10A locus in vitro and in vivo. CONCLUSIONS Taken together, our findings provide new insights into genes and biological pathways controlling myocardial mass and may help identify novel therapeutic targets. PMID:27659466

  7. Interval Mapping of Multiple Quantitative Trait Loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Ritsert C.

    1993-01-01

    The interval mapping method is widely used for the mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) in segregating generations derived from crosses between inbred lines. The efficiency of detecting and the accuracy of mapping multiple QTLs by using genetic markers are much increased by employing multiple Q

  8. Toward Male Individualization with Rapidly Mutating Y-Chromosomal Short Tandem Repeats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Ballantyne (Kaye); A. Ralf (Arwin); R. Aboukhalid (Rachid); N.M. Achakzai (Niaz); T. Anjos (Tania); Q. Ayub (Qasim); J. Balažic (Jože); J. Ballantyne (Jack); D.J. Ballard (David); B. Berger (Burkhard); C. Bobillo (Cecilia); M. Bouabdellah (Mehdi); H. Burri (Helen); T. Capal (Tomas); S. Caratti (Stefano); J. Cárdenas (Jorge); F. Cartault (François); E.F. Carvalho (Elizeu); M. de Carvalho (Margarete); B. Cheng (Baowen); M.D. Coble (Michael); D. Comas (David); D. Corach (Daniel); M. D'Amato (Mauro); S. Davison (Sean); P. de Knijff (Peter); M.C.A. de Ungria (Maria Corazon); R. Decorte (Ronny); T. Dobosz (Tadeusz); B.M. Dupuy (Berit); S. Elmrghni (Samir); M. Gliwiński (Mateusz); S.C. Gomes (Sara); L. Grol (Laurens); C. Haas (Cordula); E. Hanson (Erin); J. Henke (Jürgen); L. Henke (Lotte); F. Herrera-Rodríguez (Fabiola); C.R. Hill (Carolyn); G. Holmlund (Gunilla); K. Honda (Katsuya); U.-D. Immel (Uta-Dorothee); S. Inokuchi (Shota); R. Jobling; M. Kaddura (Mahmoud); J.S. Kim (Jong); S.H. Kim (Soon); W. Kim (Wook); T.E. King (Turi); E. Klausriegler (Eva); D. Kling (Daniel); L. Kovačević (Lejla); L. Kovatsi (Leda); P. Krajewski (Paweł); S. Kravchenko (Sergey); M.H.D. Larmuseau (Maarten); E.Y. Lee (Eun Young); R. Lessig (Rüdiger); L.A. Livshits (Ludmila); D. Marjanović (Damir); M. Minarik (Marek); N. Mizuno (Natsuko); H. Moreira (Helena); N. Morling (Niels); M. Mukherjee (Meeta); P. Munier (Patrick); J. Nagaraju (Javaregowda); F. Neuhuber (Franz); S. Nie (Shengjie); P. Nilasitsataporn (Premlaphat); T. Nishi (Takeki); H.H. Oh (Hye); S. Olofsson (Sylvia); V. Onofri (Valerio); J. Palo (Jukka); H. Pamjav (Horolma); W. Parson (Walther); M. Petlach (Michal); C. Phillips (Christopher); R. Ploski (Rafal); S.P.R. Prasad (Samayamantri P.); D. Primorac (Dragan); G.A. Purnomo (Gludhug); J. Purps (Josephine); H. Rangel-Villalobos (Hector); K. Reogonekbała (Krzysztof); B. Rerkamnuaychoke (Budsaba); D.R. Gonzalez (Danel Rey); C. Robino (Carlo); L. Roewer (Lutz); A. de Rosa (Anna); A. Sajantila (Antti); A. Sala (Andrea); J.M. Salvador (Jazelyn); P. Sanz (Paula); C. Schmitt (Christian); A.K. Sharma (Anisha K.); D.A. Silva (Dayse); K.-J. Shin (Kyoung-Jin); T. Sijen (Titia); M. Sirker (Miriam); D. Siváková (Daniela); V. Škaro (Vedrana); C. Solano-Matamoros (Carlos); L. Souto (L.); V. Stenzl (Vlastimil); H. Sudoyo (Herawati); D. Syndercombe-Court (Denise); A. Tagliabracci (Adriano); D. Taylor (Duncan); A. Tillmar (Andreas); I.S. Tsybovsky (Iosif); C. Tyler-Smith (Chris); K. van der Gaag (Kristiaan); D. Vanek (Daniel); A. Völgyi (Antónia); D. Ward (Denise); P. Willemse (Patricia); E.P.H. Yap (Eric); Z-Y. Yong (Ze-Yie); I.Z. Pajnič (Irena Zupanič); M.H. Kayser (Manfred)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractRelevant for various areas of human genetics, Y-chromosomal short tandem repeats (Y-STRs) are commonly used for testing close paternal relationships among individuals and populations, and for male lineage identification. However, even the widely used 17-loci Yfiler set cannot resolve

  9. Toward Male Individualization with Rapidly Mutating Y-Chromosomal Short Tandem Repeats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Ballantyne (Kaye); A. Ralf (Arwin); R. Aboukhalid (Rachid); N.M. Achakzai (Niaz); T. Anjos (Tania); Q. Ayub (Qasim); J. Balažic (Jože); J. Ballantyne (Jack); D.J. Ballard (David); B. Berger (Burkhard); C. Bobillo (Cecilia); M. Bouabdellah (Mehdi); H. Burri (Helen); T. Capal (Tomas); S. Caratti (Stefano); J. Cárdenas (Jorge); F. Cartault (François); E.F. Carvalho (Elizeu); M. de Carvalho (Margarete); B. Cheng (Baowen); M.D. Coble (Michael); D. Comas (David); D. Corach (Daniel); M. D'Amato (Mauro); S. Davison (Sean); P. de Knijff (Peter); M.C.A. de Ungria (Maria Corazon); R. Decorte (Ronny); T. Dobosz (Tadeusz); B.M. Dupuy (Berit); S. Elmrghni (Samir); M. Gliwiński (Mateusz); S.C. Gomes (Sara); L. Grol (Laurens); C. Haas (Cordula); E. Hanson (Erin); J. Henke (Jürgen); L. Henke (Lotte); F. Herrera-Rodríguez (Fabiola); C.R. Hill (Carolyn); G. Holmlund (Gunilla); K. Honda (Katsuya); U.-D. Immel (Uta-Dorothee); S. Inokuchi (Shota); R. Jobling; M. Kaddura (Mahmoud); J.S. Kim (Jong); S.H. Kim (Soon); W. Kim (Wook); T.E. King (Turi); E. Klausriegler (Eva); D. Kling (Daniel); L. Kovačević (Lejla); L. Kovatsi (Leda); P. Krajewski (Paweł); S. Kravchenko (Sergey); M.H.D. Larmuseau (Maarten); E.Y. Lee (Eun Young); R. Lessig (Rüdiger); L.A. Livshits (Ludmila); D. Marjanović (Damir); M. Minarik (Marek); N. Mizuno (Natsuko); H. Moreira (Helena); N. Morling (Niels); M. Mukherjee (Meeta); P. Munier (Patrick); J. Nagaraju (Javaregowda); F. Neuhuber (Franz); S. Nie (Shengjie); P. Nilasitsataporn (Premlaphat); T. Nishi (Takeki); H.H. Oh (Hye); S. Olofsson (Sylvia); V. Onofri (Valerio); J. Palo (Jukka); H. Pamjav (Horolma); W. Parson (Walther); M. Petlach (Michal); C. Phillips (Christopher); R. Ploski (Rafal); S.P.R. Prasad (Samayamantri P.); D. Primorac (Dragan); G.A. Purnomo (Gludhug); J. Purps (Josephine); H. Rangel-Villalobos (Hector); K. Reogonekbała (Krzysztof); B. Rerkamnuaychoke (Budsaba); D.R. Gonzalez (Danel Rey); C. Robino (Carlo); L. Roewer (Lutz); A. de Rosa (Anna); A. Sajantila (Antti); A. Sala (Andrea); J.M. Salvador (Jazelyn); P. Sanz (Paula); C. Schmitt (Christian); A.K. Sharma (Anisha K.); D.A. Silva (Dayse); K.-J. Shin (Kyoung-Jin); T. Sijen (Titia); M. Sirker (Miriam); D. Siváková (Daniela); V. Škaro (Vedrana); C. Solano-Matamoros (Carlos); L. Souto (L.); V. Stenzl (Vlastimil); H. Sudoyo (Herawati); D. Syndercombe-Court (Denise); A. Tagliabracci (Adriano); D. Taylor (Duncan); A. Tillmar (Andreas); I.S. Tsybovsky (Iosif); C. Tyler-Smith (Chris); K. van der Gaag (Kristiaan); D. Vanek (Daniel); A. Völgyi (Antónia); D. Ward (Denise); P. Willemse (Patricia); E.P.H. Yap (Eric); Z-Y. Yong (Ze-Yie); I.Z. Pajnič (Irena Zupanič); M.H. Kayser (Manfred)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractRelevant for various areas of human genetics, Y-chromosomal short tandem repeats (Y-STRs) are commonly used for testing close paternal relationships among individuals and populations, and for male lineage identification. However, even the widely used 17-loci Yfiler set cannot resolve ind

  10. [Information behavior of 7 STR loci on chromosome 9p in gene scanning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Zhao-Yang; Xiong, Wei; Xiong, Fang; Shen, Shou-Rong; Li, Xiao-Ling; Li, Wei-Fang; Wang, Rong; Xiao, Bing-Yi; Fan, Song-Qing; Huang, He; Zhou, Ming; Li, Gui-Yuan

    2003-09-01

    To get genotype and allele frequency distributions of seven short tandem repeat (STR) loci of chromosome 9p,D9S288,D9S157,D9S1748,D9S171,D9S161,D9S1817 and D9S1805 in Chinese Han population in Hunan area,blood samples were collected from the random Han individual in Hunan and the whole genomic DNA was extracted.STR loci were amplified by multiplex-PCR technique and genotyped by ABI 377 sequencer.Seventy-five alleles were detected,with frequencies ranging from 0.002 to 0.800,and constituted 243 genotypes. All the seven loci met Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The statistical analysis of seven STR loci showed H(heterozygosity) ranging from 0.347 to 0.844,DP(discrimination power) ranging from 0.346 to 0.841,PPE(probabilities of paternity exclusion) ranging from 0.308 to 0.738 and PIC(polymorphic information content) ranging from 0.328 to 0.822. The result indicated that there was a significant difference between Han ethnic group and the white and the black.

  11. Duct Leakage Repeatability Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Iain [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sherman, Max [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Duct leakage often needs to be measured to demonstrate compliance with requirements or to determine energy or Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) impacts. Testing is often done using standards such as ASTM E1554 (ASTM 2013) or California Title 24 (California Energy Commission 2013 & 2013b), but there are several choices of methods available within the accepted standards. Determining which method to use or not use requires an evaluation of those methods in the context of the particular needs. Three factors that are important considerations are the cost of the measurement, the accuracy of the measurement and the repeatability of the measurement. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the repeatability of the three most significant measurement techniques using data from the literature and recently obtained field data. We will also briefly discuss the first two factors. The main question to be answered by this study is to determine if differences in the repeatability of these tests methods is sufficient to indicate that any of these methods is so poor that it should be excluded from consideration as an allowed procedure in codes and standards.

  12. Characterization of microsatellite loci for the littorine snail Bembicium vittatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennington, W J; Lukehurst, S S; Johnson, M S

    2008-11-01

    We describe the isolation and development of 17 polymorphic microsatellite loci for the intertidal snail Bembicium vittatum (Gastropoda: Littorinidae). The loci were tested in 46 individuals from a single population situated near the centre of the species distribution. No evidence of linkage disequilibrium was detected between any pair of loci. However, two loci showed significant departures from Hardy-Weinberg expectations. The number of alleles per locus ranged from two to 15. © 2008 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2008 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Flanking region variation of ForenSeq™ DNA Signature Prep Kit STR and SNP loci in Yavapai Native Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, Frank R; King, Jonathan L; Novroski, Nicole M M; Churchill, Jennifer D; Ng, Jillian; Oldt, Robert F; McCulloh, Kelly L; Weise, Jessica A; Smith, David Glenn; Kanthaswamy, Sreetharan; Budowle, Bruce

    2017-02-27

    Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) offers advantages over current capillary electrophoresis-based analysis of short tandem repeat (STR) loci for human identification testing. In particular STR repeat motif sequence information can be obtained, thereby increasing the discrimination power of some loci. While sequence variation within the repeat region is observed relatively frequently in some of the commonly used STRs, there is an additional degree of variation found in the flanking regions adjacent to the repeat motif. Repeat motif and flanking region sequence variation have been described for major population groups, however, not for more isolated populations. Flanking region sequence variation in STR and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) loci in the Yavapai population was analyzed using the ForenSeq™ DNA Signature Prep Kit and STRait Razor v2s. Seven and 14 autosomal STRs and identity-informative single nucleotide polymorphisms (iiSNPs), respectively, had some degree of flanking region variation. Three and four of these identity-informative loci, respectively, showed ≥5% increase in expected heterozygosity. The combined length- and sequence-based random match probabilities (RMPs) for 27 autosomal STRs were 6.11×10(-26) and 2.79×10(-29), respectively. When combined with 94 iiSNPs (a subset of which became microhaplotypes) the combined RMP was 5.49×10(-63). Analysis of length-based and sequence-based autosomal STRs in STRUCTURE indicated that the Yavapai are most similar to the Hispanic population. While producing minimal increase in X- and Y-STR discrimination potential, access to flanking region data enabled identification of one novel X-STR and three Y-STR alleles relative to previous reports. Five ancestry-informative SNPs (aiSNPs) and two phenotype-informative SNPs (piSNPs) exhibited notable flanking region variation.

  14. Microsatellite loci for genetic mapping in the turkey (Meleagris gallopavo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, K M; Chaves, L D; Hall, M K; Knutson, T P; Rowe, J A; Torgerson, A J

    2003-11-01

    New microsatellite loci for the turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) were developed from two small insert DNA libraries. Polymorphism at these new loci was examined in domestic birds and two resource populations designed for genetic linkage mapping. The majority of loci (152 of 168) was polymorphic in domestic turkeys and informative in two mapping resource populations and thus will be useful for genetic linkage mapping.

  15. Characterization of Microsatellite Loci in Castilleja sessiliflora and Transferability to 24 Castilleja Species (Orobanchaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremie B. Fant

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Microsatellite primers were developed in the hemiparasitic perennial forb Castilleja sessiliflora to investigate patterns of gene flow and genetic diversity within and among populations. Methods and Results: Twelve polymorphic loci were identified in C. sessiliflora and tested on three populations (32 individuals each sampled across the range of the species. The loci amplified di- and trinucleotide repeats with 3–14 alleles per locus. To assess cross-amplification, primer pairs were also tested on 24 additional Castilleja species that represent the morphological and geographic diversity of the genus. We provide reports of their effectiveness in all 25 taxa. Conclusions: These results indicate the utility of these primers in C. sessiliflora for future studies of genetic structure and gene flow, as well as their widespread applicability in other members of the diverse and complex genus Castilleja.

  16. Genetic Analysis of 15 STR Loci in Chinese Han Population from West China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ya-Jun Deng; Jiang-Wei Yan; Xiao-Guang Yu; Yuan-Zhe Li; Hao-Fang Mu; Yan-Qing Huang; Xiao-Tie Shi; Wei-Min Sun

    2007-01-01

    Allele frequencies for 15 short tandem repeat (STR) loci (D8S1179, D21S11, D7S820, CSF1PO, D3S1358, TH01, D13S317, D16S539, D2S1338, D19S433, vWA, TPOX, D18S51, D5S818, and FGA) were obtained from 7,636 unrelated individuals of Chinese Han population living in Qinghai and Chongqing, China. Totally 206 alleles were observed, with the corresponding allele frequencies ranging from 0.0001-0.4982. Chi-square test showed that all of the STR loci agreed with the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. We also compared our data with previously published population data of other ethnics or areas. The results are valuable for human identification and paternity testing in Chinese Han population.

  17. Tandem repeat regions within the Burkholderia pseudomallei genome and their application for high resolution genotyping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harvey Steven P

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The facultative, intracellular bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, a serious infectious disease of humans and animals. We identified and categorized tandem repeat arrays and their distribution throughout the genome of B. pseudomallei strain K96243 in order to develop a genetic typing method for B. pseudomallei. We then screened 104 of the potentially polymorphic loci across a diverse panel of 31 isolates including B. pseudomallei, B. mallei and B. thailandensis in order to identify loci with varying degrees of polymorphism. A subset of these tandem repeat arrays were subsequently developed into a multiple-locus VNTR analysis to examine 66 B. pseudomallei and 21 B. mallei isolates from around the world, as well as 95 lineages from a serial transfer experiment encompassing ~18,000 generations. Results B. pseudomallei contains a preponderance of tandem repeat loci throughout its genome, many of which are duplicated elsewhere in the genome. The majority of these loci are composed of repeat motif lengths of 6 to 9 bp with 4 to 10 repeat units and are predominately located in intergenic regions of the genome. Across geographically diverse B. pseudomallei and B.mallei isolates, the 32 VNTR loci displayed between 7 and 28 alleles, with Nei's diversity values ranging from 0.47 and 0.94. Mutation rates for these loci are comparable (>10-5 per locus per generation to that of the most diverse tandemly repeated regions found in other less diverse bacteria. Conclusion The frequency, location and duplicate nature of tandemly repeated regions within the B. pseudomallei genome indicate that these tandem repeat regions may play a role in generating and maintaining adaptive genomic variation. Multiple-locus VNTR analysis revealed extensive diversity within the global isolate set containing B. pseudomallei and B. mallei, and it detected genotypic differences within clonal lineages of both species that were

  18. Complex Loci in human and mouse genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engström, Pär G; Suzuki, Harukazu; Ninomiya, Noriko; Akalin, Altuna; Sessa, Luca; Lavorgna, Giovanni; Brozzi, Alessandro; Luzi, Lucilla; Tan, Sin Lam; Yang, Liang; Kunarso, Galih; Ng, Edwin Lian-Chong; Batalov, Serge; Wahlestedt, Claes; Kai, Chikatoshi; Kawai, Jun; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Wells, Christine; Bajic, Vladimir B; Orlando, Valerio; Reid, James F; Lenhard, Boris; Lipovich, Leonard

    2006-04-01

    Mammalian genomes harbor a larger than expected number of complex loci, in which multiple genes are coupled by shared transcribed regions in antisense orientation and/or by bidirectional core promoters. To determine the incidence, functional significance, and evolutionary context of mammalian complex loci, we identified and characterized 5,248 cis-antisense pairs, 1,638 bidirectional promoters, and 1,153 chains of multiple cis-antisense and/or bidirectionally promoted pairs from 36,606 mouse transcriptional units (TUs), along with 6,141 cis-antisense pairs, 2,113 bidirectional promoters, and 1,480 chains from 42,887 human TUs. In both human and mouse, 25% of TUs resided in cis-antisense pairs, only 17% of which were conserved between the two organisms, indicating frequent species specificity of antisense gene arrangements. A sampling approach indicated that over 40% of all TUs might actually be in cis-antisense pairs, and that only a minority of these arrangements are likely to be conserved between human and mouse. Bidirectional promoters were characterized by variable transcriptional start sites and an identifiable midpoint at which overall sequence composition changed strand and the direction of transcriptional initiation switched. In microarray data covering a wide range of mouse tissues, genes in cis-antisense and bidirectionally promoted arrangement showed a higher probability of being coordinately expressed than random pairs of genes. In a case study on homeotic loci, we observed extensive transcription of nonconserved sequences on the noncoding strand, implying that the presence rather than the sequence of these transcripts is of functional importance. Complex loci are ubiquitous, host numerous nonconserved gene structures and lineage-specific exonification events, and may have a cis-regulatory impact on the member genes.

  19. Complex Loci in human and mouse genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pär G Engström

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian genomes harbor a larger than expected number of complex loci, in which multiple genes are coupled by shared transcribed regions in antisense orientation and/or by bidirectional core promoters. To determine the incidence, functional significance, and evolutionary context of mammalian complex loci, we identified and characterized 5,248 cis-antisense pairs, 1,638 bidirectional promoters, and 1,153 chains of multiple cis-antisense and/or bidirectionally promoted pairs from 36,606 mouse transcriptional units (TUs, along with 6,141 cis-antisense pairs, 2,113 bidirectional promoters, and 1,480 chains from 42,887 human TUs. In both human and mouse, 25% of TUs resided in cis-antisense pairs, only 17% of which were conserved between the two organisms, indicating frequent species specificity of antisense gene arrangements. A sampling approach indicated that over 40% of all TUs might actually be in cis-antisense pairs, and that only a minority of these arrangements are likely to be conserved between human and mouse. Bidirectional promoters were characterized by variable transcriptional start sites and an identifiable midpoint at which overall sequence composition changed strand and the direction of transcriptional initiation switched. In microarray data covering a wide range of mouse tissues, genes in cis-antisense and bidirectionally promoted arrangement showed a higher probability of being coordinately expressed than random pairs of genes. In a case study on homeotic loci, we observed extensive transcription of nonconserved sequences on the noncoding strand, implying that the presence rather than the sequence of these transcripts is of functional importance. Complex loci are ubiquitous, host numerous nonconserved gene structures and lineage-specific exonification events, and may have a cis-regulatory impact on the member genes.

  20. A comparison of SNP and STR loci for delineating population structure and performing individual genetic assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Technological advances have lead to the rapid increase in availability of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a range of organisms, and there is a general optimism that SNPs will become the marker of choice for a range of evolutionary applications. Here, comparisons between 300 polymorphic SNPs and 14 short tandem repeats (STRs) were conducted on a data set consisting of approximately 500 Atlantic salmon arranged in 10 samples/populations. Results Global FST ranged from 0.033-0.115 and -0.002-0.316 for the 14 STR and 300 SNP loci respectively. Global FST was similar among 28 linkage groups when averaging data from mapped SNPs. With the exception of selecting a panel of SNPs taking the locus displaying the highest global FST for each of the 28 linkage groups, which inflated estimation of genetic differentiation among the samples, inferred genetic relationships were highly similar between SNP and STR data sets and variants thereof. The best 15 SNPs (30 alleles) gave a similar level of self-assignment to the best 4 STR loci (83 alleles), however, addition of further STR loci did not lead to a notable increase assignment whereas addition of up to 100 SNP loci increased assignment. Conclusion Whilst the optimal combinations of SNPs identified in this study are linked to the samples from which they were selected, this study demonstrates that identification of highly informative SNP loci from larger panels will provide researchers with a powerful approach to delineate genetic relationships at the individual and population levels. PMID:20051144

  1. CASFISH: CRISPR/Cas9-mediated in situ labeling of genomic loci in fixed cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Wulan; Shi, Xinghua; Tjian, Robert; Lionnet, Timothée; Singer, Robert H

    2015-09-22

    Direct visualization of genomic loci in the 3D nucleus is important for understanding the spatial organization of the genome and its association with gene expression. Various DNA FISH methods have been developed in the past decades, all involving denaturing dsDNA and hybridizing fluorescent nucleic acid probes. Here we report a novel approach that uses in vitro constituted nuclease-deficient clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated caspase 9 (Cas9) complexes as probes to label sequence-specific genomic loci fluorescently without global DNA denaturation (Cas9-mediated fluorescence in situ hybridization, CASFISH). Using fluorescently labeled nuclease-deficient Cas9 (dCas9) protein assembled with various single-guide RNA (sgRNA), we demonstrated rapid and robust labeling of repetitive DNA elements in pericentromere, centromere, G-rich telomere, and coding gene loci. Assembling dCas9 with an array of sgRNAs tiling arbitrary target loci, we were able to visualize nonrepetitive genomic sequences. The dCas9/sgRNA binary complex is stable and binds its target DNA with high affinity, allowing sequential or simultaneous probing of multiple targets. CASFISH assays using differently colored dCas9/sgRNA complexes allow multicolor labeling of target loci in cells. In addition, the CASFISH assay is remarkably rapid under optimal conditions and is applicable for detection in primary tissue sections. This rapid, robust, less disruptive, and cost-effective technology adds a valuable tool for basic research and genetic diagnosis.

  2. GLANET: genomic loci annotation and enrichment tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otlu, Burçak; Firtina, Can; Keles, Sündüz; Tastan, Oznur

    2017-09-15

    Genomic studies identify genomic loci representing genetic variations, transcription factor (TF) occupancy, or histone modification through next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies. Interpreting these loci requires evaluating them with known genomic and epigenomic annotations. We present GLANET as a comprehensive annotation and enrichment analysis tool which implements a sampling-based enrichment test that accounts for GC content and/or mappability biases, jointly or separately. GLANET annotates and performs enrichment analysis on these loci with a rich library. We introduce and perform novel data-driven computational experiments for assessing the power and Type-I error of its enrichment procedure which show that GLANET has attained high statistical power and well-controlled Type-I error rate. As a key feature, users can easily extend its library with new gene sets and genomic intervals. Other key features include assessment of impact of single nucleotide variants (SNPs) on TF binding sites and regulation based pathway enrichment analysis. GLANET can be run using its GUI or on command line. GLANET's source code is available at https://github.com/burcakotlu/GLANET . Tutorials are provided at https://glanet.readthedocs.org . burcak@ceng.metu.edu.tr or oznur.tastan@cs.bilkent.edu.tr. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  3. What is a microsatellite: a computational and experimental definition based upon repeat mutational behavior at A/T and GT/AC repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelkar, Yogeshwar D; Strubczewski, Noelle; Hile, Suzanne E; Chiaromonte, Francesca; Eckert, Kristin A; Makova, Kateryna D

    2010-01-01

    Microsatellites are abundant in eukaryotic genomes and have high rates of strand slippage-induced repeat number alterations. They are popular genetic markers, and their mutations are associated with numerous neurological diseases. However, the minimal number of repeats required to constitute a microsatellite has been debated, and a definition of a microsatellite that considers its mutational behavior has been lacking. To define a microsatellite, we investigated slippage dynamics for a range of repeat sizes, utilizing two approaches. Computationally, we assessed length polymorphism at repeat loci in ten ENCODE regions resequenced in four human populations, assuming that the occurrence of polymorphism reflects strand slippage rates. Experimentally, we determined the in vitro DNA polymerase-mediated strand slippage error rates as a function of repeat number. In both approaches, we compared strand slippage rates at tandem repeats with the background slippage rates. We observed two distinct modes of mutational behavior. At small repeat numbers, slippage rates were low and indistinguishable from background measurements. A marked transition in mutability was observed as the repeat array lengthened, such that slippage rates at large repeat numbers were significantly higher than the background rates. For both mononucleotide and dinucleotide microsatellites studied, the transition length corresponded to a similar number of nucleotides (approximately 10). Thus, microsatellite threshold is determined not by the presence/absence of strand slippage at repeats but by an abrupt alteration in slippage rates relative to background. These findings have implications for understanding microsatellite mutagenesis, standardization of genome-wide microsatellite analyses, and predicting polymorphism levels of individual microsatellite loci.

  4. Repeatability of Cryogenic Multilayer Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W. L.; Vanderlaan, M.; Wood, J. J.; Rhys, N. O.; Guo, W.; Van Sciver, S.; Chato, D. J.

    2017-01-01

    Due to the variety of requirements across aerospace platforms, and one off projects, the repeatability of cryogenic multilayer insulation has never been fully established. The objective of this test program is to provide a more basic understanding of the thermal performance repeatability of MLI systems that are applicable to large scale tanks. There are several different types of repeatability that can be accounted for: these include repeatability between multiple identical blankets, repeatability of installation of the same blanket, and repeatability of a test apparatus. The focus of the work in this report is on the first two types of repeatability. Statistically, repeatability can mean many different things. In simplest form, it refers to the range of performance that a population exhibits and the average of the population. However, as more and more identical components are made (i.e. the population of concern grows), the simple range morphs into a standard deviation from an average performance. Initial repeatability testing on MLI blankets has been completed at Florida State University. Repeatability of five GRC provided coupons with 25 layers was shown to be +/- 8.4 whereas repeatability of repeatedly installing a single coupon was shown to be +/- 8.0. A second group of 10 coupons have been fabricated by Yetispace and tested by Florida State University, through the first 4 tests, the repeatability has been shown to be +/- 16. Based on detailed statistical analysis, the data has been shown to be statistically significant.

  5. Global Design Analysis for Highly Repeatable Solid-state Klystron Modulators

    CERN Document Server

    Anthony, Dal Gobbo

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the repeatability issue in the electrical-to-radio frequency conversion chains using pulsed klystrons. The focus is on the power electronics used in klystron modulators. Repeatability definition is presented and simulation results allow deriving important conclusions regarding the voltage repeatability harmonic content versus power electronics design directions. The trade-off between klystron modulator and low level RF controls is a key point for optimizing the global system repeatability performance.

  6. Mining and validation of pyrosequenced simple sequence repeats (SSRs) from American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, H; Senalik, D; McCown, B H; Zeldin, E L; Speers, J; Hyman, J; Bassil, N; Hummer, K; Simon, P W; Zalapa, J E

    2012-01-01

    The American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.) is a major commercial fruit crop in North America, but limited genetic resources have been developed for the species. Furthermore, the paucity of codominant DNA markers has hampered the advance of genetic research in cranberry and the Ericaceae family in general. Therefore, we used Roche 454 sequencing technology to perform low-coverage whole genome shotgun sequencing of the cranberry cultivar 'HyRed'. After de novo assembly, the obtained sequence covered 266.3 Mb of the estimated 540-590 Mb in cranberry genome. A total of 107,244 SSR loci were detected with an overall density across the genome of 403 SSR/Mb. The AG repeat was the most frequent motif in cranberry accounting for 35% of all SSRs and together with AAG and AAAT accounted for 46% of all loci discovered. To validate the SSR loci, we designed 96 primer-pairs using contig sequence data containing perfect SSR repeats, and studied the genetic diversity of 25 cranberry genotypes. We identified 48 polymorphic SSR loci with 2-15 alleles per locus for a total of 323 alleles in the 25 cranberry genotypes. Genetic clustering by principal coordinates and genetic structure analyzes confirmed the heterogeneous nature of cranberries. The parentage composition of several hybrid cultivars was evident from the structure analyzes. Whole genome shotgun 454 sequencing was a cost-effective and efficient way to identify numerous SSR repeats in the cranberry sequence for marker development.

  7. [Polymorphism of 17 Y-STR loci in She ethnic population in Fujian and genetic relationship with 11 populations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Ru-Feng; Yang, Li-Hai; Yuan, Li; Liang, Quan-Zeng; Lu, Di; Yang, Xue; Shi, Mei-Sen

    2012-08-01

    To investigate the genetic polymorphisms of 17 Y-chromosomal short tandem repeats(Y-STR) loci in She ethnic population from Fujian province, and to evaluate their forensic application values and genetic relationship with other 11 populations, 152 unrelated male individuals of She ethnic population in Fujian were used to determine the distribution of allele frequencies and haplotypes by using Y-filerTM System. Cluster analysis and phylogenic trees were applied to show the genetic distance among the populations. As a result, 50 haplotypes were found in DYS385a/b loci, and 3~11 alleles were found in the rest 15 Y-STR loci. The GD value was from 0.4037(DYS391) to 0. 9725(DYS385a/b). This study has also revealed "off-ladder" alleles at several Y-loci, namely DYS448, DYS393, DYS458 and DYS635, and several occurrences of duplications at the DYS385a/b, DYS19 and DYS390 loci. One hundred and forty-four haplotypes were found in 17 Y-STR loci, of which 138 were unique, 5 were found in 2 individuals, 1 was found in 4 individuals, and the observed haplotypes diversity value was 0.9990. Comparing with 11 populations, the genetic distance between She ethnic and Han population in Zhejiang was the smallest (0.0042), while it was the largest between She ethnic and Tibet ethnic population (0.2380). Cluster analysis and phylogenetic tree both demonstrated that genetic distance between She ethnic and several south Han populations is closer than between She ethnic and non-Han populations. Multiplex detection of the 17 Y-STR loci revealed a highly polymorphic genetic distribution, which would be very powerful for establishing a Y-STR database, for population genetics and forensic practice.

  8. MiniSTR multiplex systems based on non-CODIS loci for analysis of degraded DNA samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asamura, H; Fujimori, S; Ota, M; Fukushima, H

    2007-11-15

    We describe two short amplicon autosomal short tandem repeat (miniSTR) quadruplex systems for eight loci D1S1171, D2S1242, D3S1545, D4S2366, D12S391, D16S3253, D20S161, and D21S1437, unlinked from the combined DNA index system (non-CODIS) loci, using newly designed primer sets. The results of an assay of 411 Japanese individuals showed that polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products within the eight loci were less than 150bp in size, without the seven additional bases for adenylation. The frequency distributions in the loci showed no deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium expectations. The accumulated power of discrimination and power of exclusion for the eight loci were 0.9999999991 and 0.998, respectively. For assay of highly degraded DNA, including artificially degraded samples and the degraded forensic casework samples assessed with the present miniSTR quadruplex systems, the systems proved quite effective in analyzing degraded DNA.

  9. Genetic polymorphisms of 24 Y-STR loci in Hani ethnic minority from Yunnan Province, Southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Liping; Gu, Tao; Fan, Xiaodong; Yuan, Xiaokun; Rao, Min; Pang, Jing Bo; Nie, Aiting; Du, Lei; Zhang, Xiufeng; Nie, Shengjie

    2017-01-27

    In the present study, 24 Y-chromosomal short tandem repeat (Y-STR) loci were analyzed in 250 unrelated Hani male individuals from Lvchun county, Honghe Hani and Yi Autonomous Prefecture, Yunnan Province, Southwest China. The gene diversity of the 24 Y-STR loci in the studied Hani group ranged from 0.2683 (DYS437) to 0.8837 (DYS447). According to haplotypic analysis of the 24 Y-STR loci, 204 different haplotypes were obtained, 174 of which were unique. The haplotype diversity and discrimination capacity in Hani group were 0.9977 and 0.8160 at 24 STR loci, respectively. Six single non-fraction off-ladder alleles were observed at DYS447 in 103 samples, in addition to the alleles 19 to 28 included in the allelic ladder, alleles 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, and 18 were also observed at DYS447. One intermediate allele 20.2 was observed in one individual at DYS527a/b. We analyzed interpopulation differentiations by making comparisons between Yunnan Hani group and other 17 groups. The results of pairwise genetic distances, multidimensional scaling plot, and neighbor-joining tree at the same set of 17 Y-filer loci indicated that Yunnan Hani group had the closer genetic relationships with Yunnan Han group. The present results may provide useful information for paternal lineages in forensic cases and can also increase our understanding of the genetic relationships between Hani and other groups.

  10. Chromatin structure of repeating CTG/CAG and CGG/CCG sequences in human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuh-Hwa

    2007-05-01

    In eukaryotic cells, chromatin structure organizes genomic DNA in a dynamic fashion, and results in regulation of many DNA metabolic processes. The CTG/CAG and CGG/CCG repeating sequences involved in several neuromuscular degenerative diseases display differential abilities for the binding of histone octamers. The effect of the repeating DNA on nucleosome assembly could be amplified as the number of repeats increases. Also, CpG methylation, and sequence interruptions within the triplet repeats exert an impact on the formation of nucleosomes along these repeating DNAs. The two most common triplet expansion human diseases, myotonic dystrophy 1 and fragile X syndrome, are caused by the expanded CTG/CAG and CGG/CCG repeats, respectively. In addition to the expanded repeats and CpG methylation, histone modifications, chromatin remodeling factors, and noncoding RNA have been shown to coordinate the chromatin structure at both myotonic dystrophy 1 and fragile X loci. Alterations in chromatin structure at these two loci can affect transcription of these disease-causing genes, leading to disease symptoms. These observations have brought a new appreciation that a full understanding of disease gene expression requires a knowledge of the structure of the chromatin domain within which the gene resides.

  11. CRISPR loci reveal networks of gene exchange in archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brodt Avital

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CRISPR (Clustered, Regularly, Interspaced, Short, Palindromic Repeats loci provide prokaryotes with an adaptive immunity against viruses and other mobile genetic elements. CRISPR arrays can be transcribed and processed into small crRNA molecules, which are then used by the cell to target the foreign nucleic acid. Since spacers are accumulated by active CRISPR/Cas systems, the sequences of these spacers provide a record of the past "infection history" of the organism. Results Here we analyzed all currently known spacers present in archaeal genomes and identified their source by DNA similarity. While nearly 50% of archaeal spacers matched mobile genetic elements, such as plasmids or viruses, several others matched chromosomal genes of other organisms, primarily other archaea. Thus, networks of gene exchange between archaeal species were revealed by the spacer analysis, including many cases of inter-genus and inter-species gene transfer events. Spacers that recognize viral sequences tend to be located further away from the leader sequence, implying that there exists a selective pressure for their retention. Conclusions CRISPR spacers provide direct evidence for extensive gene exchange in archaea, especially within genera, and support the current dogma where the primary role of the CRISPR/Cas system is anti-viral and anti-plasmid defense. Open peer review This article was reviewed by: Profs. W. Ford Doolittle, John van der Oost, Christa Schleper (nominated by board member Prof. J Peter Gogarten

  12. A global analysis of Y-chromosomal haplotype diversity for 23 STR loci

    OpenAIRE

    Purps, J.; Siegert, S.; Willuweit, S.; Nagy, M.; C. Alves; Salazar, R.; Angustia, S.M.T.; Santos,L.H.; Anslinger, K.; Bayer, B.; Ayub, Q.; Wei, W; Xue, Y.; Tyler-Smith, C; Bafalluy, M.B.

    2014-01-01

    In a worldwide collaborative effort, 19,630 Y-chromosomes were sampled from 129 different\\ud populations in 51 countries. These chromosomes were typed for 23 short-tandem repeat (STR) loci\\ud (DYS19, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS385ab, DYS437, DYS438, DYS439,\\ud DYS448, DYS456, DYS458, DYS635, GATAH4, DYS481, DYS533, DYS549, DYS570, DYS576, and DYS643)\\ud and using the PowerPlex Y23 System (PPY23, Promega Corporation, Madison, WI). Locus-specific allelic\\ud spectra of...

  13. Plant-symbiotic fungi as chemical engineers: multi-genome analysis of the clavicipitaceae reveals dynamics of alkaloid loci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher L Schardl

    Full Text Available The fungal family Clavicipitaceae includes plant symbionts and parasites that produce several psychoactive and bioprotective alkaloids. The family includes grass symbionts in the epichloae clade (Epichloë and Neotyphodium species, which are extraordinarily diverse both in their host interactions and in their alkaloid profiles. Epichloae produce alkaloids of four distinct classes, all of which deter insects, and some-including the infamous ergot alkaloids-have potent effects on mammals. The exceptional chemotypic diversity of the epichloae may relate to their broad range of host interactions, whereby some are pathogenic and contagious, others are mutualistic and vertically transmitted (seed-borne, and still others vary in pathogenic or mutualistic behavior. We profiled the alkaloids and sequenced the genomes of 10 epichloae, three ergot fungi (Claviceps species, a morning-glory symbiont (Periglandula ipomoeae, and a bamboo pathogen (Aciculosporium take, and compared the gene clusters for four classes of alkaloids. Results indicated a strong tendency for alkaloid loci to have conserved cores that specify the skeleton structures and peripheral genes that determine chemical variations that are known to affect their pharmacological specificities. Generally, gene locations in cluster peripheries positioned them near to transposon-derived, AT-rich repeat blocks, which were probably involved in gene losses, duplications, and neofunctionalizations. The alkaloid loci in the epichloae had unusual structures riddled with large, complex, and dynamic repeat blocks. This feature was not reflective of overall differences in repeat contents in the genomes, nor was it characteristic of most other specialized metabolism loci. The organization and dynamics of alkaloid loci and abundant repeat blocks in the epichloae suggested that these fungi are under selection for alkaloid diversification. We suggest that such selection is related to the variable life histories

  14. Plant-symbiotic fungi as chemical engineers: multi-genome analysis of the clavicipitaceae reveals dynamics of alkaloid loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schardl, Christopher L; Young, Carolyn A; Hesse, Uljana; Amyotte, Stefan G; Andreeva, Kalina; Calie, Patrick J; Fleetwood, Damien J; Haws, David C; Moore, Neil; Oeser, Birgitt; Panaccione, Daniel G; Schweri, Kathryn K; Voisey, Christine R; Farman, Mark L; Jaromczyk, Jerzy W; Roe, Bruce A; O'Sullivan, Donal M; Scott, Barry; Tudzynski, Paul; An, Zhiqiang; Arnaoudova, Elissaveta G; Bullock, Charles T; Charlton, Nikki D; Chen, Li; Cox, Murray; Dinkins, Randy D; Florea, Simona; Glenn, Anthony E; Gordon, Anna; Güldener, Ulrich; Harris, Daniel R; Hollin, Walter; Jaromczyk, Jolanta; Johnson, Richard D; Khan, Anar K; Leistner, Eckhard; Leuchtmann, Adrian; Li, Chunjie; Liu, JinGe; Liu, Jinze; Liu, Miao; Mace, Wade; Machado, Caroline; Nagabhyru, Padmaja; Pan, Juan; Schmid, Jan; Sugawara, Koya; Steiner, Ulrike; Takach, Johanna E; Tanaka, Eiji; Webb, Jennifer S; Wilson, Ella V; Wiseman, Jennifer L; Yoshida, Ruriko; Zeng, Zheng

    2013-01-01

    The fungal family Clavicipitaceae includes plant symbionts and parasites that produce several psychoactive and bioprotective alkaloids. The family includes grass symbionts in the epichloae clade (Epichloë and Neotyphodium species), which are extraordinarily diverse both in their host interactions and in their alkaloid profiles. Epichloae produce alkaloids of four distinct classes, all of which deter insects, and some-including the infamous ergot alkaloids-have potent effects on mammals. The exceptional chemotypic diversity of the epichloae may relate to their broad range of host interactions, whereby some are pathogenic and contagious, others are mutualistic and vertically transmitted (seed-borne), and still others vary in pathogenic or mutualistic behavior. We profiled the alkaloids and sequenced the genomes of 10 epichloae, three ergot fungi (Claviceps species), a morning-glory symbiont (Periglandula ipomoeae), and a bamboo pathogen (Aciculosporium take), and compared the gene clusters for four classes of alkaloids. Results indicated a strong tendency for alkaloid loci to have conserved cores that specify the skeleton structures and peripheral genes that determine chemical variations that are known to affect their pharmacological specificities. Generally, gene locations in cluster peripheries positioned them near to transposon-derived, AT-rich repeat blocks, which were probably involved in gene losses, duplications, and neofunctionalizations. The alkaloid loci in the epichloae had unusual structures riddled with large, complex, and dynamic repeat blocks. This feature was not reflective of overall differences in repeat contents in the genomes, nor was it characteristic of most other specialized metabolism loci. The organization and dynamics of alkaloid loci and abundant repeat blocks in the epichloae suggested that these fungi are under selection for alkaloid diversification. We suggest that such selection is related to the variable life histories of the

  15. Next generation sequencing (NGS database for tandem repeats with multiple pattern 2°-shaft multicore string matching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinta Someswara Rao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Next generation sequencing (NGS technologies have been rapidly applied in biomedical and biological research in recent years. To provide the comprehensive NGS resource for the research, in this paper , we have considered 10 loci/codi/repeats TAGA, TCAT, GAAT, AGAT, AGAA, GATA, TATC, CTTT, TCTG and TCTA. Then we developed the NGS Tandem Repeat Database (TandemRepeatDB for all the chromosomes of Homo sapiens, Callithrix jacchus, Chlorocebus sabaeus, Gorilla gorilla, Macaca fascicularis, Macaca mulatta, Nomascus leucogenys, Pan troglodytes, Papio anubis and Pongo abelii genome data sets for all those locis. We find the successive occurence frequency for all the above 10 SSR (simple sequence repeats in the above genome data sets on a chromosome-by-chromosome basis with multiple pattern 2° shaft multicore string matching.

  16. Next generation sequencing (NGS) database for tandem repeats with multiple pattern 2°-shaft multicore string matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Someswara Rao, Chinta; Raju, S. Viswanadha

    2016-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have been rapidly applied in biomedical and biological research in recent years. To provide the comprehensive NGS resource for the research, in this paper , we have considered 10 loci/codi/repeats TAGA, TCAT, GAAT, AGAT, AGAA, GATA, TATC, CTTT, TCTG and TCTA. Then we developed the NGS Tandem Repeat Database (TandemRepeatDB) for all the chromosomes of Homo sapiens, Callithrix jacchus, Chlorocebus sabaeus, Gorilla gorilla, Macaca fascicularis, Macaca mulatta, Nomascus leucogenys, Pan troglodytes, Papio anubis and Pongo abelii genome data sets for all those locis. We find the successive occurence frequency for all the above 10 SSR (simple sequence repeats) in the above genome data sets on a chromosome-by-chromosome basis with multiple pattern 2° shaft multicore string matching. PMID:26981434

  17. Next generation sequencing (NGS) database for tandem repeats with multiple pattern 2°-shaft multicore string matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Someswara Rao, Chinta; Raju, S Viswanadha

    2016-03-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have been rapidly applied in biomedical and biological research in recent years. To provide the comprehensive NGS resource for the research, in this paper , we have considered 10 loci/codi/repeats TAGA, TCAT, GAAT, AGAT, AGAA, GATA, TATC, CTTT, TCTG and TCTA. Then we developed the NGS Tandem Repeat Database (TandemRepeatDB) for all the chromosomes of Homo sapiens, Callithrix jacchus, Chlorocebus sabaeus, Gorilla gorilla, Macaca fascicularis, Macaca mulatta, Nomascus leucogenys, Pan troglodytes, Papio anubis and Pongo abelii genome data sets for all those locis. We find the successive occurence frequency for all the above 10 SSR (simple sequence repeats) in the above genome data sets on a chromosome-by-chromosome basis with multiple pattern 2° shaft multicore string matching.

  18. Solution properties of the archaeal CRISPR DNA repeat-binding homeodomain protein Cbp2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kenchappa, Chandra; Heiðarsson, Pétur Orri; Kragelund, Birthe;

    2013-01-01

    in facilitating high affinity DNA binding of Cbp2 by tethering the two domains. Structural studies on mutant proteins provide support for Cys(7) and Cys(28) enhancing high thermal stability of Cbp2(Hb) through disulphide bridge formation. Consistent with their proposed CRISPR transcriptional regulatory role, Cbp2......Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) form the basis of diverse adaptive immune systems directed primarily against invading genetic elements of archaea and bacteria. Cbp1 of the crenarchaeal thermoacidophilic order Sulfolobales, carrying three imperfect repeats, binds...... specifically to CRISPR DNA repeats and has been implicated in facilitating production of long transcripts from CRISPR loci. Here, a second related class of CRISPR DNA repeat-binding protein, denoted Cbp2, is characterized that contains two imperfect repeats and is found amongst members of the crenarchaeal...

  19. Solution properties of the archaeal CRISPR DNA repeat-binding homeodomain protein Cbp2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kenchappa, Chandra; Heiðarsson, Pétur Orri; Kragelund, Birthe

    2013-01-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) form the basis of diverse adaptive immune systems directed primarily against invading genetic elements of archaea and bacteria. Cbp1 of the crenarchaeal thermoacidophilic order Sulfolobales, carrying three imperfect repeats, binds...... specifically to CRISPR DNA repeats and has been implicated in facilitating production of long transcripts from CRISPR loci. Here, a second related class of CRISPR DNA repeat-binding protein, denoted Cbp2, is characterized that contains two imperfect repeats and is found amongst members of the crenarchaeal...... in facilitating high affinity DNA binding of Cbp2 by tethering the two domains. Structural studies on mutant proteins provide support for Cys(7) and Cys(28) enhancing high thermal stability of Cbp2(Hb) through disulphide bridge formation. Consistent with their proposed CRISPR transcriptional regulatory role, Cbp2...

  20. Fine mapping of quantitative trait loci using linkage disequilibria with closely linked marker loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meuwissen, T.H.E.; Goddard, M.E.

    2000-01-01

    A multimarker linkage disequilibrium mapping method was developed for the fine mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL) using a dense marker map. The method compares the expected covariances between haplotype effects given a postulated QTL position to the covariances that are found in the data. The

  1. Reconstructing recent human phylogenies with forensic STR loci: A statistical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Faisal

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Forensic Short Tandem Repeat (STR loci are effective for the purpose of individual identification, and other forensic applications. Most of these markers have high allelic variability and mutation rate because of which they have limited use in the phylogenetic reconstruction. In the present study, we have carried out a meta-analysis to explore the possibility of using only five STR loci (TPOX, FES, vWA, F13A and Tho1 to carry out phylogenetic assessment based on the allele frequency profile of 20 world population and north Indian Hindus analyzed in the present study. Results Phylogenetic analysis based on two different approaches – genetic distance and maximum likelihood along with statistical bootstrapping procedure involving 1000 replicates was carried out. The ensuing tree topologies and PC plots were further compared with those obtained in earlier phylogenetic investigations. The compiled database of 21 populations got segregated and finely resolved into three basal clusters with very high bootstrap values corresponding to three geo-ethnic groups of African, Orientals, and Caucasians. Conclusion Based on this study we conclude that if appropriate and logistic statistical approaches are followed then even lesser number of forensic STR loci are powerful enough to reconstruct the recent human phylogenies despite of their relatively high mutation rates.

  2. Reconstructing recent human phylogenies with forensic STR loci: a statistical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Suraksha; Khan, Faisal

    2005-09-28

    Forensic Short Tandem Repeat (STR) loci are effective for the purpose of individual identification, and other forensic applications. Most of these markers have high allelic variability and mutation rate because of which they have limited use in the phylogenetic reconstruction. In the present study, we have carried out a meta-analysis to explore the possibility of using only five STR loci (TPOX, FES, vWA, F13A and Tho1) to carry out phylogenetic assessment based on the allele frequency profile of 20 world population and north Indian Hindus analyzed in the present study. Phylogenetic analysis based on two different approaches - genetic distance and maximum likelihood along with statistical bootstrapping procedure involving 1000 replicates was carried out. The ensuing tree topologies and PC plots were further compared with those obtained in earlier phylogenetic investigations. The compiled database of 21 populations got segregated and finely resolved into three basal clusters with very high bootstrap values corresponding to three geo-ethnic groups of African, Orientals, and Caucasians. Based on this study we conclude that if appropriate and logistic statistical approaches are followed then even lesser number of forensic STR loci are powerful enough to reconstruct the recent human phylogenies despite of their relatively high mutation rates.

  3. Development and Characterization of Microsatellite Loci for the Moroccan Endemic Endangered Species Argania spinosa (Sapotaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmina El Bahloul

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Microsatellite loci were developed for the Moroccan endemic endangered species Argania spinosa with a combination of a typical library enrichment procedure and a 454 GS FLX Titanium–based high-throughput sequencing approach. Methods and Results: A genomic DNA library was enriched and further screened using (GA15, (GTA8, and (TTC8 biotin-labeled probes coupled with chemi-luminescence detection. To increase simple sequence repeat (SSR loci number, an ultra-high-throughput sequencing-based approach was used. Evaluation of all primer pairs was performed with labeled dUTP on an ABI 3130xl sequencer. Eleven polymorphic SSR loci were selected out of 79 SSR regions and extensively characterized on 150 individuals from eight populations. Total alleles ranged from six to 19 alleles per locus while expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.618 to 0.869. Conclusions: The SSRs developed here will be used to further characterize the genetic diversity of A. spinosa across its distribution range, mainly in the southern part of Morocco and southwestern Algeria. They may also be transferable to other Sapotaceae species.

  4. Development and characterization of microsatellite loci for the Moroccan endemic endangered species Argania spinosa (Sapotaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Bahloul, Yasmina; Dauchot, Nicolas; Machtoun, Ikrame; Gaboun, Fatima; Van Cutsem, Pierre

    2014-04-01

    Microsatellite loci were developed for the Moroccan endemic endangered species Argania spinosa with a combination of a typical library enrichment procedure and a 454 GS FLX Titanium-based high-throughput sequencing approach. • A genomic DNA library was enriched and further screened using (GA)15, (GTA)8, and (TTC)8 biotin-labeled probes coupled with chemi-luminescence detection. To increase simple sequence repeat (SSR) loci number, an ultra-high-throughput sequencing-based approach was used. Evaluation of all primer pairs was performed with labeled dUTP on an ABI 3130xl sequencer. Eleven polymorphic SSR loci were selected out of 79 SSR regions and extensively characterized on 150 individuals from eight populations. Total alleles ranged from six to 19 alleles per locus while expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.618 to 0.869. • The SSRs developed here will be used to further characterize the genetic diversity of A. spinosa across its distribution range, mainly in the southern part of Morocco and southwestern Algeria. They may also be transferable to other Sapotaceae species.

  5. Development and characterization of microsatellite loci for the Moroccan endemic endangered species Argania spinosa (Sapotaceae)1

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Bahloul, Yasmina; Dauchot, Nicolas; Machtoun, Ikrame; Gaboun, Fatima; Van Cutsem, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Microsatellite loci were developed for the Moroccan endemic endangered species Argania spinosa with a combination of a typical library enrichment procedure and a 454 GS FLX Titanium–based high-throughput sequencing approach. • Methods and Results: A genomic DNA library was enriched and further screened using (GA)15, (GTA)8, and (TTC)8 biotin-labeled probes coupled with chemi-luminescence detection. To increase simple sequence repeat (SSR) loci number, an ultra-high-throughput sequencing-based approach was used. Evaluation of all primer pairs was performed with labeled dUTP on an ABI 3130xl sequencer. Eleven polymorphic SSR loci were selected out of 79 SSR regions and extensively characterized on 150 individuals from eight populations. Total alleles ranged from six to 19 alleles per locus while expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.618 to 0.869. • Conclusions: The SSRs developed here will be used to further characterize the genetic diversity of A. spinosa across its distribution range, mainly in the southern part of Morocco and southwestern Algeria. They may also be transferable to other Sapotaceae species. PMID:25202614

  6. Development of Microsatellite Loci for Cyclocarya paliurus (Juglandaceae, A Monotypic Species in Subtropical China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng-Mei Fan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Microsatellite loci were developed for a monotypic species endemic to subtropical China, Cyclocarya paliurus, to help infer the evolutionary histories of ancient monotypic genera in subtropical China. Methods and Results: Using the Fast Isolation by AFLP of Sequences Containing repeats (FIASCO protocol, 28 primer sets were identified in two wild populations. All loci were polymorphic, with the number of alleles per locus ranging from two to eight. The expected and observed heterozygosities ranged from 0.153 to 0.802 and from 0 to 0.750, respectively. The transferability of the 28 primer pairs was tested on Juglans regia, Pterocarya stenoptera, and Platycarya strobilacea. Twenty-one (75.0%, 22 (78.6%, and 15 (53.6% markers were successfully amplified in J. regia, P. stenoptera, and P. strobilacea, respectively. Conclusions: These loci will be useful for in-depth analysis of genetic diversity and phylogeographical variation throughout the distribution range of C. paliurus.

  7. Development and characterization of microsatellite loci for Ocotea species (Lauraceae) threatened with extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, E M; Martinelli, G; Arbetman, M P; Lamont, R W; Simões-Araújo, J L; Powell, D; Ciampi-Guillardi, M; Baldauf, C; Quinet, A; Galisa, P; Shapcott, A

    2014-07-07

    The Atlantic rainforest species Ocotea catharinensis, Ocotea odorifera, and Ocotea porosa have been extensively harvested in the past for timber and oil extraction and are currently listed as threatened due to overexploitation. To investigate the genetic diversity and population structure of these species, we developed 8 polymorphic microsatellite markers for O. odorifera from an enriched microsatellite library by using 2 dinucleotide repeats. The microsatellite markers were tested for cross-amplification in O. catharinensis and O. porosa. The average number of alleles per locus was 10.2, considering all loci over 2 populations of O. odorifera. Observed and expected heterozygosities for O. odorifera ranged from 0.39 to 0.93 and 0.41 to 0.92 across populations, respectively. Cross-amplification of all loci was successfully observed in O. catharinensis and O. porosa except 1 locus that was found to lack polymorphism in O. porosa. Combined probabilities of identity in the studied Ocotea species were very low ranging from 1.0 x 10-24 to 7.7 x 10-24. The probability of exclusion over all loci estimated for O. odorifera indicated a 99.9% chance of correctly excluding a random nonparent individual. The microsatellite markers described in this study have high information content and will be useful for further investigations on genetic diversity within these species and for subsequent conservation purposes.

  8. Novel genetic loci associated with hippocampal volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibar, Derrek P.; Adams, Hieab H. H.; Jahanshad, Neda; Chauhan, Ganesh; Stein, Jason L.; Hofer, Edith; Renteria, Miguel E.; Bis, Joshua C.; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Ikram, M. Kamran; Desrivières, Sylvane; Vernooij, Meike W.; Abramovic, Lucija; Alhusaini, Saud; Amin, Najaf; Andersson, Micael; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; Aribisala, Benjamin S.; Armstrong, Nicola J.; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Axelsson, Tomas; Beecham, Ashley H.; Beiser, Alexa; Bernard, Manon; Blanton, Susan H.; Bohlken, Marc M.; Boks, Marco P.; Bralten, Janita; Brickman, Adam M.; Carmichael, Owen; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R. K.; Chouraki, Vincent; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; Crivello, Fabrice; Den Braber, Anouk; Doan, Nhat Trung; Ehrlich, Stefan; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L.; Gottesman, Rebecca F.; Grimm, Oliver; Griswold, Michael E.; Guadalupe, Tulio; Gutman, Boris A.; Hass, Johanna; Haukvik, Unn K.; Hoehn, David; Holmes, Avram J.; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Jørgensen, Kjetil N.; Karbalai, Nazanin; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H.; Liewald, David C. M.; Lopez, Lorna M.; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Marquand, Andre F.; Matarin, Mar; Mather, Karen A.; Mattheisen, Manuel; McKay, David R.; Milaneschi, Yuri; Muñoz Maniega, Susana; Nho, Kwangsik; Nugent, Allison C.; Nyquist, Paul; Loohuis, Loes M. Olde; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Papmeyer, Martina; Pirpamer, Lukas; Pütz, Benno; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Richards, Jennifer S.; Risacher, Shannon L.; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rommelse, Nanda; Ropele, Stefan; Rose, Emma J.; Royle, Natalie A.; Rundek, Tatjana; Sämann, Philipp G.; Saremi, Arvin; Satizabal, Claudia L.; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J.; Shen, Li; Shin, Jean; Shumskaya, Elena; Smith, Albert V.; Sprooten, Emma; Strike, Lachlan T.; Teumer, Alexander; Tordesillas-Gutierrez, Diana; Toro, Roberto; Trabzuni, Daniah; Trompet, Stella; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Van der Grond, Jeroen; Van der Lee, Sven J.; Van der Meer, Dennis; Van Donkelaar, Marjolein M. J.; Van Eijk, Kristel R.; Van Erp, Theo G. M.; Van Rooij, Daan; Walton, Esther; Westlye, Lars T.; Whelan, Christopher D.; Windham, Beverly G.; Winkler, Anderson M.; Wittfeld, Katharina; Woldehawariat, Girma; Wolf, Christiane; Wolfers, Thomas; Yanek, Lisa R.; Yang, Jingyun; Zijdenbos, Alex; Zwiers, Marcel P.; Agartz, Ingrid; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Amouyel, Philippe; Andreassen, Ole A.; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A.; Barral, Sandra; Bastin, Mark E.; Becker, Diane M.; Becker, James T.; Bennett, David A.; Blangero, John; van Bokhoven, Hans; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Brodaty, Henry; Brouwer, Rachel M.; Brunner, Han G.; Buckner, Randy L.; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Bulayeva, Kazima B.; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D.; Cannon, Dara M.; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Cichon, Sven; Cookson, Mark R.; Corvin, Aiden; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Curran, Joanne E.; Czisch, Michael; Dale, Anders M.; Davies, Gareth E.; De Craen, Anton J. M.; De Geus, Eco J. C.; De Jager, Philip L.; De Zubicaray, Greig I.; Deary, Ian J.; Debette, Stéphanie; DeCarli, Charles; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; DeStefano, Anita; Dillman, Allissa; Djurovic, Srdjan; Donohoe, Gary; Drevets, Wayne C.; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D.; Enzinger, Christian; Erk, Susanne; Espeseth, Thomas; Fedko, Iryna O.; Fernández, Guillén; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fisher, Simon E.; Fleischman, Debra A.; Ford, Ian; Fornage, Myriam; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Fox, Peter T.; Francks, Clyde; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Glahn, David C.; Gollub, Randy L.; Göring, Harald H. H.; Green, Robert C.; Gruber, Oliver; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Guelfi, Sebastian; Håberg, Asta K.; Hansell, Narelle K.; Hardy, John; Hartman, Catharina A.; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Hernandez, Dena G.; Heslenfeld, Dirk J.; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hofman, Albert; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hosten, Norbert; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Huentelman, Matthew; Pol, Hilleke E. Hulshoff; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack Jr, Clifford R.; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Jönsson, Erik G.; Jukema, J. Wouter; Kahn, René S.; Kanai, Ryota; Kloszewska, Iwona; Knopman, David S.; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B.; Lawrie, Stephen M.; Lemaître, Hervé; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L.; Lopez, Oscar L.; Lovestone, Simon; Martinez, Oliver; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Mattay, Venkata S.; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M.; McMahon, Francis J.; McMahon, Katie L.; Mecocci, Patrizia; Melle, Ingrid; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W.; Morris, Derek W.; Mosley, Thomas H.; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nalls, Michael A.; Nauck, Matthias; Nichols, Thomas E.; Niessen, Wiro J.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Nyberg, Lars; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L.; Ophoff, Roel A.; Pandolfo, Massimo; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Pike, G. Bruce; Potkin, Steven G.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Roffman, Joshua L.; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rotter, Jerome I.; Ryten, Mina; Sacco, Ralph L.; Sachdev, Perminder S.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Schmidt, Reinhold; Schmidt, Helena; Schofield, Peter R.; Sigursson, Sigurdur; Simmons, Andrew; Singleton, Andrew; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Smith, Colin; Smoller, Jordan W.; Soininen, Hilkka; Steen, Vidar M.; Stott, David J.; Sussmann, Jessika E.; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W.; Traynor, Bryan J.; Troncoso, Juan; Tsolaki, Magda; Tzourio, Christophe; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Hernández, Maria C. Valdés; Van der Brug, Marcel; van der Lugt, Aad; van der Wee, Nic J. A.; Van Haren, Neeltje E. M.; van 't Ent, Dennis; Van Tol, Marie-Jose; Vardarajan, Badri N.; Vellas, Bruno; Veltman, Dick J.; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Wassink, Thomas H.; Weale, Michael E.; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Weiner, Michael W.; Wen, Wei; Westman, Eric; White, Tonya; Wong, Tien Y.; Wright, Clinton B.; Zielke, Ronald H.; Zonderman, Alan B.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Wright, Margaret J.; Longstreth, W. T.; Schumann, Gunter; Grabe, Hans J.; Franke, Barbara; Launer, Lenore J.; Medland, Sarah E.; Seshadri, Sudha; Thompson, Paul M.; Ikram, M. Arfan

    2017-01-01

    The hippocampal formation is a brain structure integrally involved in episodic memory, spatial navigation, cognition and stress responsiveness. Structural abnormalities in hippocampal volume and shape are found in several common neuropsychiatric disorders. To identify the genetic underpinnings of hippocampal structure here we perform a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 33,536 individuals and discover six independent loci significantly associated with hippocampal volume, four of them novel. Of the novel loci, three lie within genes (ASTN2, DPP4 and MAST4) and one is found 200 kb upstream of SHH. A hippocampal subfield analysis shows that a locus within the MSRB3 gene shows evidence of a localized effect along the dentate gyrus, subiculum, CA1 and fissure. Further, we show that genetic variants associated with decreased hippocampal volume are also associated with increased risk for Alzheimer's disease (rg=−0.155). Our findings suggest novel biological pathways through which human genetic variation influences hippocampal volume and risk for neuropsychiatric illness. PMID:28098162

  9. Perpetual points and periodic perpetual loci in maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudkowski, Dawid; Prasad, Awadhesh; Kapitaniak, Tomasz

    2016-10-01

    We introduce the concepts of perpetual points and periodic perpetual loci in discrete-time systems (maps). The occurrence and analysis of these points/loci are shown and basic examples are considered. We discuss the potential usage and properties of the introduced concepts. The comparison of perpetual points and loci in discrete-time and continuous-time systems is presented. The discussed methods can be widely applied in other dynamical systems.

  10. Structural and Functional Characterization of an Archaeal Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeat (CRISPR)-associated Complex for Antiviral Defense (CASCADE)*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lintner, Nathanael G.; Kerou, Melina; Brumfield, Susan K.; Graham, Shirley; Liu, Huanting; Naismith, James H.; Sdano, Matthew; Peng, Nan; She, Qunxin; Copié, Valérie; Young, Mark J.; White, Malcolm F.; Lawrence, C. Martin

    2011-01-01

    In response to viral infection, many prokaryotes incorporate fragments of virus-derived DNA into loci called clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs). The loci are then transcribed, and the processed CRISPR transcripts are used to target invading viral DNA and RNA. The Escherichia coli “CRISPR-associated complex for antiviral defense” (CASCADE) is central in targeting invading DNA. Here we report the structural and functional characterization of an archaeal CASCADE (aCASCADE) from Sulfolobus solfataricus. Tagged Csa2 (Cas7) expressed in S. solfataricus co-purifies with Cas5a-, Cas6-, Csa5-, and Cas6-processed CRISPR-RNA (crRNA). Csa2, the dominant protein in aCASCADE, forms a stable complex with Cas5a. Transmission electron microscopy reveals a helical complex of variable length, perhaps due to substoichiometric amounts of other CASCADE components. A recombinant Csa2-Cas5a complex is sufficient to bind crRNA and complementary ssDNA. The structure of Csa2 reveals a crescent-shaped structure unexpectedly composed of a modified RNA-recognition motif and two additional domains present as insertions in the RNA-recognition motif. Conserved residues indicate potential crRNA- and target DNA-binding sites, and the H160A variant shows significantly reduced affinity for crRNA. We propose a general subunit architecture for CASCADE in other bacteria and Archaea. PMID:21507944

  11. Structural and functional characterization of an archaeal clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-associated complex for antiviral defense (CASCADE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lintner, Nathanael G; Kerou, Melina; Brumfield, Susan K; Graham, Shirley; Liu, Huanting; Naismith, James H; Sdano, Matthew; Peng, Nan; She, Qunxin; Copié, Valérie; Young, Mark J; White, Malcolm F; Lawrence, C Martin

    2011-06-17

    In response to viral infection, many prokaryotes incorporate fragments of virus-derived DNA into loci called clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs). The loci are then transcribed, and the processed CRISPR transcripts are used to target invading viral DNA and RNA. The Escherichia coli "CRISPR-associated complex for antiviral defense" (CASCADE) is central in targeting invading DNA. Here we report the structural and functional characterization of an archaeal CASCADE (aCASCADE) from Sulfolobus solfataricus. Tagged Csa2 (Cas7) expressed in S. solfataricus co-purifies with Cas5a-, Cas6-, Csa5-, and Cas6-processed CRISPR-RNA (crRNA). Csa2, the dominant protein in aCASCADE, forms a stable complex with Cas5a. Transmission electron microscopy reveals a helical complex of variable length, perhaps due to substoichiometric amounts of other CASCADE components. A recombinant Csa2-Cas5a complex is sufficient to bind crRNA and complementary ssDNA. The structure of Csa2 reveals a crescent-shaped structure unexpectedly composed of a modified RNA-recognition motif and two additional domains present as insertions in the RNA-recognition motif. Conserved residues indicate potential crRNA- and target DNA-binding sites, and the H160A variant shows significantly reduced affinity for crRNA. We propose a general subunit architecture for CASCADE in other bacteria and Archaea.

  12. [Comparative genomics and evolutionary analysis of CRISPR loci in acetic acid bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kai, Xia; Xinle, Liang; Yudong, Li

    2015-12-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) is a widespread adaptive immunity system that exists in most archaea and many bacteria against foreign DNA, such as phages, viruses and plasmids. In general, CRISPR system consists of direct repeat, leader, spacer and CRISPR-associated sequences. Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) play an important role in industrial fermentation of vinegar and bioelectrochemistry. To investigate the polymorphism and evolution pattern of CRISPR loci in acetic acid bacteria, bioinformatic analyses were performed on 48 species from three main genera (Acetobacter, Gluconacetobacter and Gluconobacter) with whole genome sequences available from the NCBI database. The results showed that the CRISPR system existed in 32 species of the 48 strains studied. Most of the CRISPR-Cas system in AAB belonged to type I CRISPR-Cas system (subtype E and C), but type II CRISPR-Cas system which contain cas9 gene was only found in the genus Acetobacter and Gluconacetobacter. The repeat sequences of some CRISPR were highly conserved among species from different genera, and the leader sequences of some CRISPR possessed conservative motif, which was associated with regulated promoters. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis of cas1 demonstrated that they were suitable for classification of species. The conservation of cas1 genes was associated with that of repeat sequences among different strains, suggesting they were subjected to similar functional constraints. Moreover, the number of spacer was positively correlated with the number of prophages and insertion sequences, indicating the acetic acid bacteria were continually invaded by new foreign DNA. The comparative analysis of CRISR loci in acetic acid bacteria provided the basis for investigating the molecular mechanism of different acetic acid tolerance and genome stability in acetic acid bacteria.

  13. Expansion of protein domain repeats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asa K Björklund

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Many proteins, especially in eukaryotes, contain tandem repeats of several domains from the same family. These repeats have a variety of binding properties and are involved in protein-protein interactions as well as binding to other ligands such as DNA and RNA. The rapid expansion of protein domain repeats is assumed to have evolved through internal tandem duplications. However, the exact mechanisms behind these tandem duplications are not well-understood. Here, we have studied the evolution, function, protein structure, gene structure, and phylogenetic distribution of domain repeats. For this purpose we have assigned Pfam-A domain families to 24 proteomes with more sensitive domain assignments in the repeat regions. These assignments confirmed previous findings that eukaryotes, and in particular vertebrates, contain a much higher fraction of proteins with repeats compared with prokaryotes. The internal sequence similarity in each protein revealed that the domain repeats are often expanded through duplications of several domains at a time, while the duplication of one domain is less common. Many of the repeats appear to have been duplicated in the middle of the repeat region. This is in strong contrast to the evolution of other proteins that mainly works through additions of single domains at either terminus. Further, we found that some domain families show distinct duplication patterns, e.g., nebulin domains have mainly been expanded with a unit of seven domains at a time, while duplications of other domain families involve varying numbers of domains. Finally, no common mechanism for the expansion of all repeats could be detected. We found that the duplication patterns show no dependence on the size of the domains. Further, repeat expansion in some families can possibly be explained by shuffling of exons. However, exon shuffling could not have created all repeats.

  14. DWI Repeaters and Non-Repeaters: A Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeber, Stan

    1981-01-01

    Discussed how driving-while-intoxicated (DWI) repeaters differed signigicantly from nonrepeaters on 4 of 23 variables tested. Repeaters were more likely to have zero or two dependent children, attend church frequently, drink occasionally and have one or more arrests for public intoxication. (Author)

  15. To Repeat or Not to Repeat a Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Michael J.; Biktimirov, Ernest N.

    2013-01-01

    The difficult transition from high school to university means that many students need to repeat (retake) 1 or more of their university courses. The authors examine the performance of students repeating first-year core courses in an undergraduate business program. They used data from university records for 116 students who took a total of 232…

  16. Variability of United States isolates of Macrophomina phaseolina based on simple sequence repeats and cross genus transferability to related Botryosphaeraceae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twelve simple sequence repeat (SSRs) loci were used to evaluate genetic diversity of 109 isolates of Macrophomina phaseolina collected from different geographical regions and host species throughout the United States (U.S.). Genetic diversity was assessed using Nei’s minimum genetic distance and th...

  17. Population data of 21 non-CODIS STR loci in Han population of northern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Li; Ge, Jianye; Lu, Di; Yang, Xue

    2012-07-01

    Allele frequencies and forensic statistics of 21 autosomal short tandem repeat loci (i.e., D6S474, D12ATA63, D22S1045, D10S1248, D1S1677, D11S4463, D1S1627, D3S4529, D2S441, D6S1017, D4S2408, D19S433, D17S1301, D1GATA113, D18S853, D20S482, D14S1434, D9S1122, D2S1776, D10S1435 and D5S2500) were estimated in Han population from northern China (n = 220). Significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was detected only for D22S1045. The observed heterozygosity, the expected heterozygosity, the discrimination power, the probability of paternity exclusion in trios, the probability of paternity exclusion in duos and the polymorphic information content ranged from 0.591 to 0.836, 0.594 to 0.830, 0.762 to 0.948, 0.341 to 0.659, 0.189 to 0.487 and 0.535 to 0.807, respectively. Triallelic patterns were observed at D19S433 and D10S1435. Mutations occurred at D22ATA63, D10S1248, D19S433 and D14S1434 loci with all single-step mutations. The expected mutation rates of these four loci are 0.0042 with 95% confidence interval [0.0001, 0.0232] in a total of 238 meioses. Our results show that these 21 non-CODIS STR loci are highly polymorphic and can be useful for human identification and kinship analysis in Northern Han population in China.

  18. A method for rapid and simultaneous mapping of genetic loci and introgression sizes in nematode species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Cheung; Bi, Yu; Yin, Da; Zhao, Zhongying

    2012-01-01

    Caenorhabditis briggsae is emerging as an attractive model organism not only in studying comparative biology against C. elegans, but also in developing novel experimentation avenues. In particular, recent identification of a new Caenorhabditis species, C. sp.9 with which it can mate and produce viable progeny provides an opportunity for studying the genetics of hybrid incompatibilities (HI) between the two. Mapping of a specific HI locus demands repeated backcrossing to get hold of the specific genomic region underlying an observed phenotype. To facilitate mapping of HI loci between C. briggsae and C. sp.9, an efficient mapping method and a genetic map ideally consisting of dominant markers are required for systematic introgression of genomic fragments between the two species. We developed a fast and cost-effective method for high throughput mapping of dominant loci with resolution up to 1 million bps in C. briggsae. The method takes advantage of the introgression between C. briggsae and C. sp.9 followed by PCR genotyping using C. briggsae specific primers. Importantly, the mapping results can not only serve as an effective way for estimating the chromosomal position of a genetic locus in C. briggsae, but also provides size information for the introgression fragment in an otherwise C. sp.9 background. In addition, it also helps generate introgression line as a side-product that is invaluable for the subsequent mapping of HI loci. The method will greatly facilitate the construction of a genetic map consisting of dominant markers and pave the way for systematic isolation of HI loci between C. briggsae and C. sp.9 which has so far not been attempted between nematode species. The method is designed for mapping of a dominant allele, but can be easily adapted for mapping of any other type of alleles in any other species if introgression between a sister species pair is feasible.

  19. Dynamic of Mutational Events in Variable Number Tandem Repeats of Escherichia coli O157:H7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Bustamante

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available VNTRs regions have been successfully used for bacterial subtyping; however, the hypervariability in VNTR loci is problematic when trying to predict the relationships among isolates. Since few studies have examined the mutation rate of these markers, our aim was to estimate mutation rates of VNTRs specific for verotoxigenic E. coli O157:H7. The knowledge of VNTR mutational rates and the factors affecting them would make MLVA more effective for epidemiological or microbial forensic investigations. For this purpose, we analyzed nine loci performing parallel, serial passage experiments (PSPEs on 9 O157:H7 strains. The combined 9 PSPE population rates for the 8 mutating loci ranged from 4.4 × 10−05 to 1.8 × 10−03 mutations/generation, and the combined 8-loci mutation rate was of 2.5 × 10−03 mutations/generation. Mutations involved complete repeat units, with only one point mutation detected. A similar proportion between single and multiple repeat changes was detected. Of the 56 repeat mutations, 59% were insertions and 41% were deletions, and 72% of the mutation events corresponded to O157-10 locus. For alleles with up to 13 UR, a constant and low mutation rate was observed; meanwhile longer alleles were associated with higher and variable mutation rates. Our results are useful to interpret data from microevolution and population epidemiology studies and particularly point out that the inclusion or not of O157-10 locus or, alternatively, a differential weighting data according to the mutation rates of loci must be evaluated in relation with the objectives of the proposed study.

  20. Variation in the complex carbohydrate biosynthesis loci of Acinetobacter baumannii genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna J Kenyon

    Full Text Available Extracellular polysaccharides are major immunogenic components of the bacterial cell envelope. However, little is known about their biosynthesis in the genus Acinetobacter, which includes A. baumannii, an important nosocomial pathogen. Whether Acinetobacter sp. produce a capsule or a lipopolysaccharide carrying an O antigen or both is not resolved. To explore these issues, genes involved in the synthesis of complex polysaccharides were located in 10 complete A. baumannii genome sequences, and the function of each of their products was predicted via comparison to enzymes with a known function. The absence of a gene encoding a WaaL ligase, required to link the carbohydrate polymer to the lipid A-core oligosaccharide (lipooligosaccharide forming lipopolysaccharide, suggests that only a capsule is produced. Nine distinct arrangements of a large capsule biosynthesis locus, designated KL1 to KL9, were found in the genomes. Three forms of a second, smaller variable locus, likely to be required for synthesis of the outer core of the lipid A-core moiety, were designated OCL1 to OCL3 and also annotated. Each K locus includes genes for capsule export as well as genes for synthesis of activated sugar precursors, and for glycosyltransfer, glycan modification and oligosaccharide repeat-unit processing. The K loci all include the export genes at one end and genes for synthesis of common sugar precursors at the other, with a highly variable region that includes the remaining genes in between. Five different capsule loci, KL2, KL6, KL7, KL8 and KL9 were detected in multiply antibiotic resistant isolates belonging to global clone 2, and two other loci, KL1 and KL4, in global clone 1. This indicates that this region is being substituted repeatedly in multiply antibiotic resistant isolates from these clones.

  1. lociNGS: a lightweight alternative for assessing suitability of next-generation loci for evolutionary analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah M Hird

    Full Text Available Genomic enrichment methods and next-generation sequencing produce uneven coverage for the portions of the genome (the loci they target; this information is essential for ascertaining the suitability of each locus for further analysis. lociNGS is a user-friendly accessory program that takes multi-FASTA formatted loci, next-generation sequence alignments and demographic data as input and collates, displays and outputs information about the data. Summary information includes the parameters coverage per locus, coverage per individual and number of polymorphic sites, among others. The program can output the raw sequences used to call loci from next-generation sequencing data. lociNGS also reformats subsets of loci in three commonly used formats for multi-locus phylogeographic and population genetics analyses - NEXUS, IMa2 and Migrate. lociNGS is available at https://github.com/SHird/lociNGS and is dependent on installation of MongoDB (freely available at http://www.mongodb.org/downloads. lociNGS is written in Python and is supported on MacOSX and Unix; it is distributed under a GNU General Public License.

  2. Mapping Quantitative Trait Loci in Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liti, Gianni; Warringer, Jonas; Blomberg, Anders

    2017-08-01

    Natural Saccharomyces strains isolated from the wild differ quantitatively in molecular and organismal phenotypes. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping is a powerful approach for identifying sequence variants that alter gene function. In yeast, QTL mapping has been used in designed crosses to map functional polymorphisms. This approach, outlined here, is often the first step in understanding the molecular basis of quantitative traits. New large-scale sequencing surveys have the potential to directly associate genotypes with organismal phenotypes, providing a broader catalog of causative genetic variants. Additional analysis of intermediate phenotypes (e.g., RNA, protein, or metabolite levels) can produce a multilayered and integrated view of individual variation, producing a high-resolution view of the genotype-phenotype map. © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  3. Cloning, characterization, and properties of seven triplet repeat DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshima, K; Kang, S; Larson, J E; Wells, R D

    1996-07-12

    Several neuromuscular and neurodegenerative diseases are caused by genetically unstable triplet repeat sequences (CTG.CAG, CGG.CCG, or AAG.CTT) in or near the responsible genes. We implemented novel cloning strategies with chemically synthesized oligonucleotides to clone seven of the triplet repeat sequences (GTA.TAC, GAT.ATC, GTT.AAC, CAC.GTG, AGG.CCT, TCG.CGA, and AAG.CTT), and the adjoining paper (Ohshima, K., Kang, S., Larson, J. E., and Wells, R. D.(1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 16784-16791) describes studies on TTA.TAA. This approach in conjunction with in vivo expansion studies in Escherichia coli enabled the preparation of at least 81 plasmids containing the repeat sequences with lengths of approximately 16 up to 158 triplets in both orientations with varying extents of polymorphisms. The inserts were characterized by DNA sequencing as well as DNA polymerase pausings, two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis, and chemical probe analyses to evaluate the capacity to adopt negative supercoil induced non-B DNA conformations. AAG.CTT and AGG.CCT form intramolecular triplexes, and the other five repeat sequences do not form any previously characterized non-B structures. However, long tracts of TCG.CGA showed strong inhibition of DNA synthesis at specific loci in the repeats as seen in the cases of CTG.CAG and CGG.CCG (Kang, S., Ohshima, K., Shimizu, M., Amirhaeri, S., and Wells, R. D.(1995) J. Biol. Chem. 270, 27014-27021). This work along with other studies (Wells, R. D.(1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 2875-2878) on CTG.CAG, CGG.CCG, and TTA.TAA makes available long inserts of all 10 triplet repeat sequences for a variety of physical, molecular biological, genetic, and medical investigations. A model to explain the reduction in mRNA abundance in Friedreich's ataxia based on intermolecular triplex formation is proposed.

  4. Characterization of comparative genome-derived simple sequence repeats for acanthopterygian fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotoh, Ryo O; Tamate, Satoshi; Yokoyama, Jun; Tamate, Hidetoshi B; Hanzawa, Naoto

    2013-05-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) have become one of the most popular molecular markers for population genetic studies. The application of SSR markers has often been limited to source species because SSR loci are too labile to be maintained in even closely related species. However, a few extremely conserved SSR loci have been reported. Here, we tested for the presence of conserved SSR loci in acanthopterygian fishes, which include over 14 000 species, by comparing the genome sequences of four acanthopterygian fishes. We also examined the comparative genome-derived SSRs (CG-SSRs) for their transferability across acanthopterygian fishes and their applicability to population genetic analysis. Forty-six SSR loci with conserved flanking regions were detected and examined for their transferability among seven nonacanthopterygian and 27 acanthopterygian fishes. The PCR amplification success rate in nonacanthopterygian fishes was low, ranging from 2.2% to 21.7%, except for Lophius litulon (Lophiiformes; 80.4%). Conversely, the rate in most acanthopterygian fishes exceeded 70.0%. Sequencing of these 46 loci revealed the presence of SSRs suitable for scoring while fragment analysis of 20 loci revealed polymorphisms in most of the acanthopterygian fishes. Population genetic analysis of Cottus pollux (Scorpaeniformes) and Sphaeramia orbicularis (Perciformes) using CG-SSRs showed that these populations did not deviate from linkage equilibrium or Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Furthermore, almost no loci showed evidence of null alleles, suggesting that CG-SSRs have strong resolving power for population genetic analysis. Our findings will facilitate the use of these markers in species in which markers remain to be identified.

  5. Nifty Nines and Repeating Decimals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    The traditional technique for converting repeating decimals to common fractions can be found in nearly every algebra textbook that has been published, as well as in many precalculus texts. However, students generally encounter repeating decimal numerals earlier than high school when they study rational numbers in prealgebra classes. Therefore, how…

  6. Nifty Nines and Repeating Decimals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    The traditional technique for converting repeating decimals to common fractions can be found in nearly every algebra textbook that has been published, as well as in many precalculus texts. However, students generally encounter repeating decimal numerals earlier than high school when they study rational numbers in prealgebra classes. Therefore, how…

  7. Integration of novel SSR and gene-based SNP marker loci in the chickpea genetic map and establishment of new anchor points with Medicago truncatula genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Spurthi N.; Zhu, Hongyan; Varghese, Nicy; Datta, Subhojit; Choi, Hong-Kyu; Horres, Ralf; Jüngling, Ruth; Singh, Jagbir; Kavi Kishor, P. B.; Sivaramakrishnan, S.; Hoisington, Dave A.; Kahl, Günter; Winter, Peter; Cook, Douglas R.

    2010-01-01

    This study presents the development and mapping of simple sequence repeat (SSR) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers in chickpea. The mapping population is based on an inter-specific cross between domesticated and non-domesticated genotypes of chickpea (Cicer arietinum ICC 4958 × C. reticulatum PI 489777). This same population has been the focus of previous studies, permitting integration of new and legacy genetic markers into a single genetic map. We report a set of 311 novel SSR markers (designated ICCM—ICRISAT chickpea microsatellite), obtained from an SSR-enriched genomic library of ICC 4958. Screening of these SSR markers on a diverse panel of 48 chickpea accessions provided 147 polymorphic markers with 2–21 alleles and polymorphic information content value 0.04–0.92. Fifty-two of these markers were polymorphic between parental genotypes of the inter-specific population. We also analyzed 233 previously published (H-series) SSR markers that provided another set of 52 polymorphic markers. An additional 71 gene-based SNP markers were developed from transcript sequences that are highly conserved between chickpea and its near relative Medicago truncatula. By using these three approaches, 175 new marker loci along with 407 previously reported marker loci were integrated to yield an improved genetic map of chickpea. The integrated map contains 521 loci organized into eight linkage groups that span 2,602 cM, with an average inter-marker distance of 4.99 cM. Gene-based markers provide anchor points for comparing the genomes of Medicago and chickpea, and reveal extended synteny between these two species. The combined set of genetic markers and their integration into an improved genetic map should facilitate chickpea genetics and breeding, as well as translational studies between chickpea and Medicago. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00122-010-1265-1) contains supplementary material, which is

  8. All-photonic quantum repeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Koji; Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2015-01-01

    Quantum communication holds promise for unconditionally secure transmission of secret messages and faithful transfer of unknown quantum states. Photons appear to be the medium of choice for quantum communication. Owing to photon losses, robust quantum communication over long lossy channels requires quantum repeaters. It is widely believed that a necessary and highly demanding requirement for quantum repeaters is the existence of matter quantum memories. Here we show that such a requirement is, in fact, unnecessary by introducing the concept of all-photonic quantum repeaters based on flying qubits. In particular, we present a protocol based on photonic cluster-state machine guns and a loss-tolerant measurement equipped with local high-speed active feedforwards. We show that, with such all-photonic quantum repeaters, the communication efficiency scales polynomially with the channel distance. Our result paves a new route towards quantum repeaters with efficient single-photon sources rather than matter quantum memories. PMID:25873153

  9. Discovery and refinement of loci associated with lipid levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willer, Cristen J; Schmidt, Ellen M; Sengupta, Sebanti; Peloso, Gina M; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Ganna, Andrea; Chen, Jin; Buchkovich, Martin L; Mora, Samia; Beckmann, Jacques S; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; Chang, Hsing-Yi; Demirkan, Ayşe; Den Hertog, Heleen M; Do, Ron; Donnelly, Louise A; Ehret, Georg B; Esko, Tõnu; Feitosa, Mary F; Ferreira, Teresa; Fischer, Krista; Fontanillas, Pierre; Fraser, Ross M; Freitag, Daniel F; Gurdasani, Deepti; Heikkilä, Kauko; Hyppönen, Elina; Isaacs, Aaron; Jackson, Anne U; Johansson, Asa; Johnson, Toby; Kaakinen, Marika; Kettunen, Johannes; Kleber, Marcus E; Li, Xiaohui; Luan, Jian'an; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Mangino, Massimo; Mihailov, Evelin; Montasser, May E; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nolte, Ilja M; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Palmer, Cameron D; Perola, Markus; Petersen, Ann-Kristin; Sanna, Serena; Saxena, Richa; Service, Susan K; Shah, Sonia; Shungin, Dmitry; Sidore, Carlo; Song, Ci; Strawbridge, Rona J; Surakka, Ida; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teslovich, Tanya M; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Van den Herik, Evita G; Voight, Benjamin F; Volcik, Kelly A; Waite, Lindsay L; Wong, Andrew; Wu, Ying; Zhang, Weihua; Absher, Devin; Asiki, Gershim; Barroso, Inês; Been, Latonya F; Bolton, Jennifer L; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Brambilla, Paolo; Burnett, Mary S; Cesana, Giancarlo; Dimitriou, Maria; Doney, Alex S F; Döring, Angela; Elliott, Paul; Epstein, Stephen E; Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur Ingi; Gigante, Bruna; Goodarzi, Mark O; Grallert, Harald; Gravito, Martha L; Groves, Christopher J; Hallmans, Göran; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hayward, Caroline; Hernandez, Dena; Hicks, Andrew A; Holm, Hilma; Hung, Yi-Jen; Illig, Thomas; Jones, Michelle R; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Kastelein, John J P; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Eric; Klopp, Norman; Komulainen, Pirjo; Kumari, Meena; Langenberg, Claudia; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lin, Shih-Yi; Lindström, Jaana; Loos, Ruth J F; Mach, François; McArdle, Wendy L; Meisinger, Christa; Mitchell, Braxton D; Müller, Gabrielle; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Narisu, Narisu; Nieminen, Tuomo V M; Nsubuga, Rebecca N; Olafsson, Isleifur; Ong, Ken K; Palotie, Aarno; Papamarkou, Theodore; Pomilla, Cristina; Pouta, Anneli; Rader, Daniel J; Reilly, Muredach P; Ridker, Paul M; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Ruokonen, Aimo; Samani, Nilesh; Scharnagl, Hubert; Seeley, Janet; Silander, Kaisa; Stancáková, Alena; Stirrups, Kathleen; Swift, Amy J; Tiret, Laurence; Uitterlinden, Andre G; van Pelt, L Joost; Vedantam, Sailaja; Wainwright, Nicholas; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wild, Sarah H; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wilson, James F; Young, Elizabeth H; Zhao, Jing Hua; Adair, Linda S; Arveiler, Dominique; Assimes, Themistocles L; Bandinelli, Stefania; Bennett, Franklyn; Bochud, Murielle; Boehm, Bernhard O; Boomsma, Dorret I; Borecki, Ingrid B; Bornstein, Stefan R; Bovet, Pascal; Burnier, Michel; Campbell, Harry; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chambers, John C; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Collins, Francis S; Cooper, Richard S; Danesh, John; Dedoussis, George; de Faire, Ulf; Feranil, Alan B; Ferrières, Jean; Ferrucci, Luigi; Freimer, Nelson B; Gieger, Christian; Groop, Leif C; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Harris, Tamara B; Hingorani, Aroon; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Hofman, Albert; Hovingh, G Kees; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Humphries, Steve E; Hunt, Steven C; Hveem, Kristian; Iribarren, Carlos; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kesäniemi, Antero; Kivimaki, Mika; Kooner, Jaspal S; Koudstaal, Peter J; Krauss, Ronald M; Kuh, Diana; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Laakso, Markku; Lakka, Timo A; Lind, Lars; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Martin, Nicholas G; März, Winfried; McCarthy, Mark I; McKenzie, Colin A; Meneton, Pierre; Metspalu, Andres; Moilanen, Leena; Morris, Andrew D; Munroe, Patricia B; Njølstad, Inger; Pedersen, Nancy L; Power, Chris; Pramstaller, Peter P; Price, Jackie F; Psaty, Bruce M; Quertermous, Thomas; Rauramaa, Rainer; Saleheen, Danish; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanghera, Dharambir K; Saramies, Jouko; Schwarz, Peter E H; Sheu, Wayne H-H; Shuldiner, Alan R; Siegbahn, Agneta; Spector, Tim D; Stefansson, Kari; Strachan, David P; Tayo, Bamidele O; Tremoli, Elena; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uusitupa, Matti; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Vollenweider, Peter; Wallentin, Lars; Wareham, Nicholas J; Whitfield, John B; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R; Ordovas, Jose M; Boerwinkle, Eric; Palmer, Colin N A; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Chasman, Daniel I; Rotter, Jerome I; Franks, Paul W; Ripatti, Samuli; Cupples, L Adrienne; Sandhu, Manjinder S; Rich, Stephen S; Boehnke, Michael; Deloukas, Panos; Kathiresan, Sekar; Mohlke, Karen L; Ingelsson, Erik; Abecasis, Gonçalo R

    2013-01-01

    Levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, triglycerides and total cholesterol are heritable, modifiable risk factors for coronary artery disease. To identify new loci and refine known loci influencing these lipids, we examined 188,577 individual

  10. Subanalytic Bundles and Tubular Neighbourhoods of Zero-Loci

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vishwambhar Pati

    2003-08-01

    We introduce the natural and fairly general notion of a subanalytic bundle (with a finite dimensional vector space of sections) on a subanalytic subset of a real analytic manifold , and prove that when is compact, there is a Baire subset of sections in whose zero-loci in have tubular neighbourhoods, homeomorphic to the restriction of the given bundle to these zero-loci.

  11. Study design for the identification of loci affecting human longevity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijmans, B.T.; Kluft, C.; Bots, M.L.; Lagaay, A.M.; Brand, A.; Grobbee, D.E.; Knook, D.L.; Slagboom, P.E.

    1996-01-01

    The genetic component of human longevity is estimated at 30%. Which genes are involved in determining human longevity, however, is largely unknown. Genes that may affect human survival are susceptibility loci for major age related pathologies. Many studies are being performed to identify such loci f

  12. Discovery and refinement of loci associated with lipid levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willer, Cristen J; Schmidt, Ellen M; Sengupta, Sebanti; Peloso, Gina M; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Ganna, Andrea; Chen, Jin; Buchkovich, Martin L; Mora, Samia; Beckmann, Jacques S; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; Chang, Hsing-Yi; Demirkan, Ayşe; Den Hertog, Heleen M; Do, Ron; Donnelly, Louise A; Ehret, Georg B; Esko, Tõnu; Feitosa, Mary F; Ferreira, Teresa; Fischer, Krista; Fontanillas, Pierre; Fraser, Ross M; Freitag, Daniel F; Gurdasani, Deepti; Heikkilä, Kauko; Hyppönen, Elina; Isaacs, Aaron; Jackson, Anne U; Johansson, Asa; Johnson, Toby; Kaakinen, Marika; Kettunen, Johannes; Kleber, Marcus E; Li, Xiaohui; Luan, Jian'an; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Mangino, Massimo; Mihailov, Evelin; Montasser, May E; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nolte, Ilja M; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Palmer, Cameron D; Perola, Markus; Petersen, Ann-Kristin; Sanna, Serena; Saxena, Richa; Service, Susan K; Shah, Sonia; Shungin, Dmitry; Sidore, Carlo; Song, Ci; Strawbridge, Rona J; Surakka, Ida; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teslovich, Tanya M; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Van den Herik, Evita G; Voight, Benjamin F; Volcik, Kelly A; Waite, Lindsay L; Wong, Andrew; Wu, Ying; Zhang, Weihua; Absher, Devin; Asiki, Gershim; Barroso, Inês; Been, Latonya F; Bolton, Jennifer L; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Brambilla, Paolo; Burnett, Mary S; Cesana, Giancarlo; Dimitriou, Maria; Doney, Alex S F; Döring, Angela; Elliott, Paul; Epstein, Stephen E; Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur Ingi; Gigante, Bruna; Goodarzi, Mark O; Grallert, Harald; Gravito, Martha L; Groves, Christopher J; Hallmans, Göran; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hayward, Caroline; Hernandez, Dena; Hicks, Andrew A; Holm, Hilma; Hung, Yi-Jen; Illig, Thomas; Jones, Michelle R; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Kastelein, John J P; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Eric; Klopp, Norman; Komulainen, Pirjo; Kumari, Meena; Langenberg, Claudia; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lin, Shih-Yi; Lindström, Jaana; Loos, Ruth J F; Mach, François; McArdle, Wendy L; Meisinger, Christa; Mitchell, Braxton D; Müller, Gabrielle; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Narisu, Narisu; Nieminen, Tuomo V M; Nsubuga, Rebecca N; Olafsson, Isleifur; Ong, Ken K; Palotie, Aarno; Papamarkou, Theodore; Pomilla, Cristina; Pouta, Anneli; Rader, Daniel J; Reilly, Muredach P; Ridker, Paul M; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Ruokonen, Aimo; Samani, Nilesh; Scharnagl, Hubert; Seeley, Janet; Silander, Kaisa; Stancáková, Alena; Stirrups, Kathleen; Swift, Amy J; Tiret, Laurence; Uitterlinden, Andre G; van Pelt, L Joost; Vedantam, Sailaja; Wainwright, Nicholas; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wild, Sarah H; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wilson, James F; Young, Elizabeth H; Zhao, Jing Hua; Adair, Linda S; Arveiler, Dominique; Assimes, Themistocles L; Bandinelli, Stefania; Bennett, Franklyn; Bochud, Murielle; Boehm, Bernhard O; Boomsma, Dorret I; Borecki, Ingrid B; Bornstein, Stefan R; Bovet, Pascal; Burnier, Michel; Campbell, Harry; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chambers, John C; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Collins, Francis S; Cooper, Richard S; Danesh, John; Dedoussis, George; de Faire, Ulf; Feranil, Alan B; Ferrières, Jean; Ferrucci, Luigi; Freimer, Nelson B; Gieger, Christian; Groop, Leif C; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Harris, Tamara B; Hingorani, Aroon; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Hofman, Albert; Hovingh, G Kees; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Humphries, Steve E; Hunt, Steven C; Hveem, Kristian; Iribarren, Carlos; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kesäniemi, Antero; Kivimaki, Mika; Kooner, Jaspal S; Koudstaal, Peter J; Krauss, Ronald M; Kuh, Diana; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Laakso, Markku; Lakka, Timo A; Lind, Lars; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Martin, Nicholas G; März, Winfried; McCarthy, Mark I; McKenzie, Colin A; Meneton, Pierre; Metspalu, Andres; Moilanen, Leena; Morris, Andrew D; Munroe, Patricia B; Njølstad, Inger; Pedersen, Nancy L; Power, Chris; Pramstaller, Peter P; Price, Jackie F; Psaty, Bruce M; Quertermous, Thomas; Rauramaa, Rainer; Saleheen, Danish; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanghera, Dharambir K; Saramies, Jouko; Schwarz, Peter E H; Sheu, Wayne H-H; Shuldiner, Alan R; Siegbahn, Agneta; Spector, Tim D; Stefansson, Kari; Strachan, David P; Tayo, Bamidele O; Tremoli, Elena; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uusitupa, Matti; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Vollenweider, Peter; Wallentin, Lars; Wareham, Nicholas J; Whitfield, John B; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R; Ordovas, Jose M; Boerwinkle, Eric; Palmer, Colin N A; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Chasman, Daniel I; Rotter, Jerome I; Franks, Paul W; Ripatti, Samuli; Cupples, L Adrienne; Sandhu, Manjinder S; Rich, Stephen S; Boehnke, Michael; Deloukas, Panos; Kathiresan, Sekar; Mohlke, Karen L; Ingelsson, Erik; Abecasis, Gonçalo R

    2013-01-01

    Levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, triglycerides and total cholesterol are heritable, modifiable risk factors for coronary artery disease. To identify new loci and refine known loci influencing these lipids, we examined 188,577

  13. Discovery and refinement of loci associated with lipid levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willer, C. J.; Schmidt, E. M.; Sengupta, S.

    2013-01-01

    Levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, triglycerides and total cholesterol are heritable, modifiable risk factors for coronary artery disease. To identify new loci and refine known loci influencing these lipids, we examined 188,577 individ...

  14. lobSTR: A short tandem repeat profiler for personal genomes

    OpenAIRE

    Gymrek, Melissa; Golan, David; Rosset, Saharon; Erlich, Yaniv

    2012-01-01

    Short tandem repeats (STRs) have a wide range of applications, including medical genetics, forensics, and genetic genealogy. High-throughput sequencing (HTS) has the potential to profile hundreds of thousands of STR loci. However, mainstream bioinformatics pipelines are inadequate for the task. These pipelines treat STR mapping as gapped alignment, which results in cumbersome processing times and a biased sampling of STR alleles. Here, we present lobSTR, a novel method for profiling STRs in p...

  15. [Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats: structure, function and application--a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yujun; Li, Yanjun; Yan, Yanfeng; Yang, Ruifu

    2008-11-01

    CRISPRs (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats), the basis of spoligotyping technology, can provide prokaryotes with heritable adaptive immunity against phages' invasion. Studies on CRISPR loci and their associated elements, including various CAS (CRISPR-associated) proteins and leader sequences, are still in its infant period. We introduce the brief history', structure, function, bioinformatics research and application of this amazing immunity system in prokaryotic organism for inspiring more scientists to find their interest in this developing topic.

  16. CTCF cis-regulates trinucleotide repeat instability in an epigenetic manner: a novel basis for mutational hot spot determination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randell T Libby

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available At least 25 inherited disorders in humans result from microsatellite repeat expansion. Dramatic variation in repeat instability occurs at different disease loci and between different tissues; however, cis-elements and trans-factors regulating the instability process remain undefined. Genomic fragments from the human spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7 locus, containing a highly unstable CAG tract, were previously introduced into mice to localize cis-acting "instability elements," and revealed that genomic context is required for repeat instability. The critical instability-inducing region contained binding sites for CTCF -- a regulatory factor implicated in genomic imprinting, chromatin remodeling, and DNA conformation change. To evaluate the role of CTCF in repeat instability, we derived transgenic mice carrying SCA7 genomic fragments with CTCF binding-site mutations. We found that CTCF binding-site mutation promotes triplet repeat instability both in the germ line and in somatic tissues, and that CpG methylation of CTCF binding sites can further destabilize triplet repeat expansions. As CTCF binding sites are associated with a number of highly unstable repeat loci, our findings suggest a novel basis for demarcation and regulation of mutational hot spots and implicate CTCF in the modulation of genetic repeat instability.

  17. Development of eighteen microsatellite loci in walleye (Sander vitreus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coykendall, Dolly K.; Morrison, Cheryl L.; Stott, Wendylee; Springmann, Marcus J.

    2014-01-01

    A suite of tri- and tetra-nucleotide microsatellite loci were developed for walleye (Sander vitreus) from 454 pyrosequencing data. Eighteen of the 50 primer sets tested amplified consistently in 35 walleye from two lakes on Isle Royale, Lake Superior: Chickenbone Lake and Whittlesey Lake. The loci displayed moderate levels of allelic diversity (average 5.5 alleles/locus) and heterozygosity (average 35.8 %). Levels of genetic diversity were sufficient to produce unique multi-locus genotypes and detect phylogeographic structuring as individuals assigned back to their population of origin. Cross-species amplification within S. canadensis(sauger) was successful for 15 loci, and 11 loci were diagnostic to species. The loci characterized here will be useful for detecting fine-scale spatial structuring, resolving the taxonomic status of Sander species and sub-species, and detecting walleye/sauger hybrids.

  18. Genetic analysis of 24 Y-STR loci in the Miao ethnic minority from Yunnan Province, southwestern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiufeng; Gu, Tao; Yao, Jinyong; Yang, Canming; Du, Lei; Pang, Jing Bo; Rao, Min; Nie, Aiting; Hu, Liping; Nie, Shengjie

    2017-02-14

    In the present study, 24 Y-chromosomal short tandem repeat (Y-STR) loci were analyzed in 252 unrelated Miao male individuals from Pingbian county, Honghe Hani and Yi Autonomous Prefecture, Yunnan province, southwestern China. The gene diversity of the 24 Y-STR loci in the studied group ranged from 0.2683 (DYS391) to 0.9312 (DYS527a/b). According to haplotypic analysis of the 24 Y-STR loci, 214 different haplotypes were obtained, 186 of which were unique. The overall haplotype diversity and discrimination capacity were calculated to be 0.9983 and 0.8492, respectively. In addition, three different triplications were observed at the DYS527a/b marker, and 1 intermediate allele and six single off-ladder alleles were observed at four markers. We analyzed interpopulation differentiations by making comparisons between the Yunnan Miao ethnic minority and 18 other ethnic groups. The results obtained using pairwise genetic distances, multidimensional scaling plot, and neighbor-joining tree at the same set of 17 Y-filer loci indicated that Yunnan Miao had a closer genetic relationship with Yunnan Han and Hunan Miao individuals. The present results may provide useful information for paternal lineages in forensic cases and can also increase our understanding of the genetic relationship between Miao individuals and other groups.

  19. Intra-genomic variation in the ribosomal repeats of nematodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly M Bik

    Full Text Available Ribosomal loci represent a major tool for investigating environmental diversity and community structure via high-throughput marker gene studies of eukaryotes (e.g. 18S rRNA. Since the estimation of species' abundance is a major goal of environmental studies (by counting numbers of sequences, understanding the patterns of rRNA copy number across species will be critical for informing such high-throughput approaches. Such knowledge is critical, given that ribosomal RNA genes exist within multi-copy repeated arrays in a genome. Here we measured the repeat copy number for six nematode species by mapping the sequences from whole genome shotgun libraries against reference sequences for their rRNA repeat. This revealed a 6-fold variation in repeat copy number amongst taxa investigated, with levels of intragenomic variation ranging from 56 to 323 copies of the rRNA array. By applying the same approach to four C. elegans mutation accumulation lines propagated by repeated bottlenecking for an average of ~400 generations, we find on average a 2-fold increase in repeat copy number (rate of increase in rRNA estimated at 0.0285-0.3414 copies per generation, suggesting that rRNA repeat copy number is subject to selection. Within each Caenorhabditis species, the majority of intragenomic variation found across the rRNA repeat was observed within gene regions (18S, 28S, 5.8S, suggesting that such intragenomic variation is not a product of selection for rRNA coding function. We find that the dramatic variation in repeat copy number among these six nematode genomes would limit the use of rRNA in estimates of organismal abundance. In addition, the unique pattern of variation within a single genome was uncorrelated with patterns of divergence between species, reflecting a strong signature of natural selection for rRNA function. A better understanding of the factors that control or affect copy number in these arrays, as well as their rates and patterns of evolution

  20. 浅谈影响大型电子汽车衡重复性的主要因素%On the impact of large-scale electronic truck scale repeatability of the main factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史光明

    2012-01-01

    大型电子汽车衡的重复性直接影响其准确性,本文就对影响重复性的诸多因素作全面分析,以便在对其进行维修、调试、检定时做出正确的判断。%Large scale electronic truck scale repetitive direct impact on' its accuracy, this paper will influent the reproducibility of the many factors to make the comprehensive analysis, in order to carry on the repair, debug, test to make correct judgment.

  1. Genetic diversity study on 12 X-STR loci of investigator® Argus X STR kit in Bangladeshi population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sufian, Abu; Hosen, Md Ismail; Fatema, Kaniz; Hossain, Tania; Hasan, Md Mahamud; Mazumder, Ashish Kumar; Akhteruzzaman, Sharif

    2016-12-08

    The X-chromosome short tandem repeat (STR) loci are of particular interest for solving complex kinship and paternity cases. Here, we report the genetic data from 209 unrelated Bangladeshi individuals (102 males and 107 females) that were genotyped using the 12 X-chromosomal STR markers included in the Investigator® Argus X-12 kit (Qiagen). The 12 X-STR markers are located in four linkage groups (linkage group I: DXS10135, DXS10148, and DXS8378; linkage group II: DXS7132, DXS10079, and DXS10074; linkage group III: DXS10103, HPRTB, and DXS10101; and linkage group IV: DXS10146, DXS10134, and DXS7423). Allelic frequencies of the 12 X-STR loci and haplotype frequencies of the four linkage groups were investigated. No significant difference was observed in the allele frequencies of males and females. Distributions of heterozygosity were observed from 64.5 to 92.5% among the studied 12 X STR loci. DXS10135 and DXS10101 loci were found to be most polymorphic. For all the four linkage groups, the haplotype diversity was found to be greater than 0.986. A total of 95, 73, 66, and 74 haplotypes were observed in linkage groups I, II, III, and IV, respectively. Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium tests showed no significant deviation from expected values for all 12 loci (p > 0.05). The exact test for pairwise linkage disequilibrium for the 12 loci in the male samples did not show any significant linkage disequilibrium except the DXS10103 and DXS10101 loci after the p values were corrected by Bonferroni's correction for multiple testing (p > 0.05/66). A combined power of discrimination in male and female individuals were 0.999999998159791 and 0.999999999999993, respectively. The combined mean exclusion chance were 0.999997635 in deficiency cases, 0.999999996 in normal trio cases, and 0.999999178 in duo cases. The currently investigated Bangladeshi population showed significant differences when compared with previously reported X-STR data from other 12 populations. The results of the

  2. Variation in the genomic locations and sequence conservation of STAR elements among staphylococcal species provides insight into DNA repeat evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purves Joanne

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylococcus aureus Repeat (STAR elements are a type of interspersed intergenic direct repeat. In this study the conservation and variation in these elements was explored by bioinformatic analyses of published staphylococcal genome sequences and through sequencing of specific STAR element loci from a large set of S. aureus isolates. Results Using bioinformatic analyses, we found that the STAR elements were located in different genomic loci within each staphylococcal species. There was no correlation between the number of STAR elements in each genome and the evolutionary relatedness of staphylococcal species, however higher levels of repeats were observed in both S. aureus and S. lugdunensis compared to other staphylococcal species. Unexpectedly, sequencing of the internal spacer sequences of individual repeat elements from multiple isolates showed conservation at the sequence level within deep evolutionary lineages of S. aureus. Whilst individual STAR element loci were demonstrated to expand and contract, the sequences associated with each locus were stable and distinct from one another. Conclusions The high degree of lineage and locus-specific conservation of these intergenic repeat regions suggests that STAR elements are maintained due to selective or molecular forces with some of these elements having an important role in cell physiology. The high prevalence in two of the more virulent staphylococcal species is indicative of a potential role for STAR elements in pathogenesis.

  3. Variation in the genomic locations and sequence conservation of STAR elements among staphylococcal species provides insight into DNA repeat evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purves, Joanne; Blades, Matthew; Arafat, Yasrab; Malik, Salman A; Bayliss, Christopher D; Morrissey, Julie A

    2012-09-28

    Staphylococcus aureus Repeat (STAR) elements are a type of interspersed intergenic direct repeat. In this study the conservation and variation in these elements was explored by bioinformatic analyses of published staphylococcal genome sequences and through sequencing of specific STAR element loci from a large set of S. aureus isolates. Using bioinformatic analyses, we found that the STAR elements were located in different genomic loci within each staphylococcal species. There was no correlation between the number of STAR elements in each genome and the evolutionary relatedness of staphylococcal species, however higher levels of repeats were observed in both S. aureus and S. lugdunensis compared to other staphylococcal species. Unexpectedly, sequencing of the internal spacer sequences of individual repeat elements from multiple isolates showed conservation at the sequence level within deep evolutionary lineages of S. aureus. Whilst individual STAR element loci were demonstrated to expand and contract, the sequences associated with each locus were stable and distinct from one another. The high degree of lineage and locus-specific conservation of these intergenic repeat regions suggests that STAR elements are maintained due to selective or molecular forces with some of these elements having an important role in cell physiology. The high prevalence in two of the more virulent staphylococcal species is indicative of a potential role for STAR elements in pathogenesis.

  4. Association mapping of partitioning loci in barley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mackay Ian J

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Association mapping, initially developed in human disease genetics, is now being applied to plant species. The model species Arabidopsis provided some of the first examples of association mapping in plants, identifying previously cloned flowering time genes, despite high population sub-structure. More recently, association genetics has been applied to barley, where breeding activity has resulted in a high degree of population sub-structure. A major genotypic division within barley is that between winter- and spring-sown varieties, which differ in their requirement for vernalization to promote subsequent flowering. To date, all attempts to validate association genetics in barley by identifying major flowering time loci that control vernalization requirement (VRN-H1 and VRN-H2 have failed. Here, we validate the use of association genetics in barley by identifying VRN-H1 and VRN-H2, despite their prominent role in determining population sub-structure. Results By taking barley as a typical inbreeding crop, and seasonal growth habit as a major partitioning phenotype, we develop an association mapping approach which successfully identifies VRN-H1 and VRN-H2, the underlying loci largely responsible for this agronomic division. We find a combination of Structured Association followed by Genomic Control to correct for population structure and inflation of the test statistic, resolved significant associations only with VRN-H1 and the VRN-H2 candidate genes, as well as two genes closely linked to VRN-H1 (HvCSFs1 and HvPHYC. Conclusion We show that, after employing appropriate statistical methods to correct for population sub-structure, the genome-wide partitioning effect of allelic status at VRN-H1 and VRN-H2 does not result in the high levels of spurious association expected to occur in highly structured samples. Furthermore, we demonstrate that both VRN-H1 and the candidate VRN-H2 genes can be identified using association mapping

  5. Analysis of repeated measures data

    CERN Document Server

    Islam, M Ataharul

    2017-01-01

    This book presents a broad range of statistical techniques to address emerging needs in the field of repeated measures. It also provides a comprehensive overview of extensions of generalized linear models for the bivariate exponential family of distributions, which represent a new development in analysing repeated measures data. The demand for statistical models for correlated outcomes has grown rapidly recently, mainly due to presence of two types of underlying associations: associations between outcomes, and associations between explanatory variables and outcomes. The book systematically addresses key problems arising in the modelling of repeated measures data, bearing in mind those factors that play a major role in estimating the underlying relationships between covariates and outcome variables for correlated outcome data. In addition, it presents new approaches to addressing current challenges in the field of repeated measures and models based on conditional and joint probabilities. Markov models of first...

  6. Improving DNA data exchange: validation studies on a single 6 dye STR kit with 24 loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Pablo; de Simón, Lourdes Fernández; Luque, Gracia; Farfán, María José; Alonso, Antonio

    2014-11-01

    The idea of developing a new multiplex STR amplification system was conceived in 2011 as an effective way to implement the new European standard set (ESS) of 12 STR markers adopted by The Council of the European Union in 2009 while maintaining an effective compatibility and information exchange with the historical DNA profiles contained in the Spanish national DNA database (around 200,000 DNA profiles) mainly based on the 13 CODIS core STR loci plus D19S433 and D2S1338 markers. With this goal in mind we proposed to test and validate a single STR amplification system for simultaneous analysis of 21 STR markers covering both CODIS and ESS core STR loci plus three additional markers (D19S433, D2S1338, and SE33) also contained in commonly used STR kits and national DNA databases. In 2012, we started the first beta-testing with a 6-dye STR kit prototype containing 24 loci (now known as the GlobalFiler™ PCR Amplification Kit) developed by Life Technologies in response to the CODIS Core Loci Working Group's recommendation to expand the CODIS Core Loci. This prototype included our proposal of 21 autosomal STR markers and two Y-chromosome markers (DYS391 and Y-indel) and maximizes concordance with established databases and previously analyzed samples by maintaining primer sequences of previous Identifiler(®)/NGM SElect™ kits for the 21 STR markers except for TPOX. This paper describes the validation studies conducted with the first commercial available 6-dye STR kit for casework using a 3500 genetic analyzer for fragment detection that included the analysis of the following parameters and aspects: analytical threshold, sensitivity & stochastic threshold, heterozygous balance, stutter threshold, precision and accuracy, repeatability and reproducibility, genotype concordance, DNA mixtures, species specificity, and stability studies with case type samples. The studies demonstrated that the GlobalFiler™ system provided equivalent overall performance to previous forensic

  7. Allelic frequencies and statistical data obtained from 12 codis STR loci in an admixed population of the Brazilian Amazon

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa Francez, Pablo Abdon; Rodrigues, Elzemar Martins Ribeiro; Frazão, Gleycianne Furtado; dos Reis Borges, Nathalia Danielly; dos Santos, Sidney Emanuel Batista

    2011-01-01

    The allelic frequencies of 12 short tandem repeat loci were obtained from a sample of 307 unrelated individuals living in Macapá, a city in the northern Amazon region, Brazil. These loci are the most commonly used in forensics and paternity testing. Based on the allele frequency obtained for the population of Macapá, we estimated an interethnic admixture for the three parental groups (European, Native American and African) of, respectively, 46%, 35% and 19%. Comparing these allele frequencies with those of other Brazilian populations and of the Iberian Peninsula population, no significant distances were observed. The interpopulation genetic distances (FST coefficients) to the present database ranged from FST = 0.0016 between Macapá and Belém to FST = 0.0036 between Macapá and the Iberian Peninsula. PMID:21637540

  8. Allelic frequencies and statistical data obtained from 12 codis STR loci in an admixed population of the Brazilian Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Abdon da Costa Francez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The allelic frequencies of 12 short tandem repeat loci were obtained from a sample of 307 unrelated individuals living in Macapá, a city in the northern Amazon region, Brazil. These loci are the most commonly used in forensics and paternity testing. Based on the allele frequency obtained for the population of Macapá, we estimated an interethnic admixture for the three parental groups (European, Native American and African of, respectively, 46%, 35% and 19%. Comparing these allele frequencies with those of other Brazilian populations and of the Iberian Peninsula population, no significant distances were observed. The interpopulation genetic distances (F ST coefficients to the present database ranged from F ST = 0.0016 between Macapá and Belém to F ST = 0.0036 between Macapá and the Iberian Peninsula.

  9. Allelic frequencies and statistical data obtained from 12 codis STR loci in an admixed population of the Brazilian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa Francez, Pablo Abdon; Rodrigues, Elzemar Martins Ribeiro; Frazão, Gleycianne Furtado; Dos Reis Borges, Nathalia Danielly; Dos Santos, Sidney Emanuel Batista

    2011-01-01

    The allelic frequencies of 12 short tandem repeat loci were obtained from a sample of 307 unrelated individuals living in Macapá, a city in the northern Amazon region, Brazil. These loci are the most commonly used in forensics and paternity testing. Based on the allele frequency obtained for the population of Macapá, we estimated an interethnic admixture for the three parental groups (European, Native American and African) of, respectively, 46%, 35% and 19%. Comparing these allele frequencies with those of other Brazilian populations and of the Iberian Peninsula population, no significant distances were observed. The interpopulation genetic distances (F(ST) coefficients) to the present database ranged from F(ST) = 0.0016 between Macapá and Belém to F(ST) = 0.0036 between Macapá and the Iberian Peninsula.

  10. Meiosis study in a population sample from Nigeria: allele frequencies and mutation rates of 16 STR loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohoff, Carsten; Schürenkamp, Marianne; Brinkmann, Bernd

    2009-05-01

    Allele frequencies for the 16 short tandem repeat (STR) loci D2S1338, D3S1358, D5S818, D7S820, D8S1179, D13S317, D16S539, D18S51, D19S433, D21S11, ACTBP2, CSF1PO, FGA, TH01, TPOX and VWA were determined for 337 immigrants from Nigeria. All loci were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. More than 6,000 meiotic transfers were investigated and ten mutations were observed. Single mutations were observed in the STR systems D2S1338, D3S1358, D7S820, D8S1179, D16S539 and FGA, whereas two mutations were observed in the systems D21S11 and VWA.

  11. Investigation of a Quadruplex-Forming Repeat Sequence Highly Enriched in Xanthomonas and Nostoc sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehm, Charlotte; Wurmthaler, Lena A; Li, Yuanhao; Frickey, Tancred; Hartig, Jörg S

    2015-01-01

    In prokaryotes simple sequence repeats (SSRs) with unit sizes of 1-5 nucleotides (nt) are causative for phase and antigenic variation. Although an increased abundance of heptameric repeats was noticed in bacteria, reports about SSRs of 6-9 nt are rare. In particular G-rich repeat sequences with the propensity to fold into G-quadruplex (G4) structures have received little attention. In silico analysis of prokaryotic genomes show putative G4 forming sequences to be abundant. This report focuses on a surprisingly enriched G-rich repeat of the type GGGNATC in Xanthomonas and cyanobacteria such as Nostoc. We studied in detail the genomes of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris ATCC 33913 (Xcc), Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri str. 306 (Xac), and Nostoc sp. strain PCC7120 (Ana). In all three organisms repeats are spread all over the genome with an over-representation in non-coding regions. Extensive variation of the number of repetitive units was observed with repeat numbers ranging from two up to 26 units. However a clear preference for four units was detected. The strong bias for four units coincides with the requirement of four consecutive G-tracts for G4 formation. Evidence for G4 formation of the consensus repeat sequences was found in biophysical studies utilizing CD spectroscopy. The G-rich repeats are preferably located between aligned open reading frames (ORFs) and are under-represented in coding regions or between divergent ORFs. The G-rich repeats are preferentially located within a distance of 50 bp upstream of an ORF on the anti-sense strand or within 50 bp from the stop codon on the sense strand. Analysis of whole transcriptome sequence data showed that the majority of repeat sequences are transcribed. The genetic loci in the vicinity of repeat regions show increased genomic stability. In conclusion, we introduce and characterize a special class of highly abundant and wide-spread quadruplex-forming repeat sequences in bacteria.

  12. Genetic loci for retinal arteriolar microcirculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Xueling; Jensen, Richard A; Ikram, M Kamran; Cotch, Mary Frances; Li, Xiaohui; MacGregor, Stuart; Xie, Jing; Smith, Albert Vernon; Boerwinkle, Eric; Mitchell, Paul; Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara E K; Glazer, Nicole L; Lumley, Thomas; McKnight, Barbara; Psaty, Bruce M; de Jong, Paulus T V M; Hofman, Albert; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Aspelund, Thor; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Harris, Tamara B; Jonasson, Fridbert; Launer, Lenore J; Attia, John; Baird, Paul N; Harrap, Stephen; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Inouye, Michael; Rochtchina, Elena; Scott, Rodney J; Viswanathan, Ananth; Li, Guo; Smith, Nicholas L; Wiggins, Kerri L; Kuo, Jane Z; Taylor, Kent D; Hewitt, Alex W; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Sun, Cong; Young, Terri L; Mackey, David A; van Zuydam, Natalie R; Doney, Alex S F; Palmer, Colin N A; Morris, Andrew D; Rotter, Jerome I; Tai, E Shyong; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Vingerling, Johannes R; Siscovick, David S; Wang, Jie Jin; Wong, Tien Y

    2013-01-01

    Narrow arterioles in the retina have been shown to predict hypertension as well as other vascular diseases, likely through an increase in the peripheral resistance of the microcirculatory flow. In this study, we performed a genome-wide association study in 18,722 unrelated individuals of European ancestry from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology consortium and the Blue Mountain Eye Study, to identify genetic determinants associated with variations in retinal arteriolar caliber. Retinal vascular calibers were measured on digitized retinal photographs using a standardized protocol. One variant (rs2194025 on chromosome 5q14 near the myocyte enhancer factor 2C MEF2C gene) was associated with retinal arteriolar caliber in the meta-analysis of the discovery cohorts at genome-wide significance of P-value <5×10(-8). This variant was replicated in an additional 3,939 individuals of European ancestry from the Australian Twins Study and Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (rs2194025, P-value = 2.11×10(-12) in combined meta-analysis of discovery and replication cohorts). In independent studies of modest sample sizes, no significant association was found between this variant and clinical outcomes including coronary artery disease, stroke, myocardial infarction or hypertension. In conclusion, we found one novel loci which underlie genetic variation in microvasculature which may be relevant to vascular disease. The relevance of these findings to clinical outcomes remains to be determined.

  13. Genetic loci for retinal arteriolar microcirculation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueling Sim

    Full Text Available Narrow arterioles in the retina have been shown to predict hypertension as well as other vascular diseases, likely through an increase in the peripheral resistance of the microcirculatory flow. In this study, we performed a genome-wide association study in 18,722 unrelated individuals of European ancestry from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology consortium and the Blue Mountain Eye Study, to identify genetic determinants associated with variations in retinal arteriolar caliber. Retinal vascular calibers were measured on digitized retinal photographs using a standardized protocol. One variant (rs2194025 on chromosome 5q14 near the myocyte enhancer factor 2C MEF2C gene was associated with retinal arteriolar caliber in the meta-analysis of the discovery cohorts at genome-wide significance of P-value <5×10(-8. This variant was replicated in an additional 3,939 individuals of European ancestry from the Australian Twins Study and Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (rs2194025, P-value = 2.11×10(-12 in combined meta-analysis of discovery and replication cohorts. In independent studies of modest sample sizes, no significant association was found between this variant and clinical outcomes including coronary artery disease, stroke, myocardial infarction or hypertension. In conclusion, we found one novel loci which underlie genetic variation in microvasculature which may be relevant to vascular disease. The relevance of these findings to clinical outcomes remains to be determined.

  14. Allelic frequency distributions of 21 non-combined DNA index system STR loci in a Russian ethnic minority group from Inner Mongolia, China*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-dan; Shen, Chun-mei; Liu, Wen-juan; Zhang, Yu-dang; Yang, Guang; Yan, Jiang-wei; Qin, Hai-xia; Zhu, Bo-feng

    2013-01-01

    We studied the allelic frequency distributions and statistical forensic parameters of 21 new short tandem repeat (STR) loci and the amelogenin locus, which are not included in the combined DNA index system (CODIS), in a Russian ethnic minority group from the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, China. A total of 114 bloodstain samples from unrelated individuals were extracted and co-amplified with four fluorescence-labeled primers in a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) system. Using capillary electrophoresis, the PCR products of the 21 STR loci were separated and genotyped. A total of 161 alleles were observed in the Russian ethnic minority group, and corresponding allelic frequencies ranged from 0.0044 to 0.5965. The 21 non-CODIS STR loci of the Russian ethnic minority group were characterized by high genetic diversity and therefore may be useful for elucidating the population’s genetic background, for individual identification, and for paternity testing in forensic practice. PMID:23733431

  15. Allelic frequency distributions of 21 non-combined DNA index system STR loci in a Russian ethnic minority group from Inner Mongolia, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-dan; Shen, Chun-mei; Liu, Wen-juan; Zhang, Yu-dang; Yang, Guang; Yan, Jiang-wei; Qin, Hai-xia; Zhu, Bo-feng

    2013-06-01

    We studied the allelic frequency distributions and statistical forensic parameters of 21 new short tandem repeat (STR) loci and the amelogenin locus, which are not included in the combined DNA index system (CODIS), in a Russian ethnic minority group from the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, China. A total of 114 bloodstain samples from unrelated individuals were extracted and co-amplified with four fluorescence-labeled primers in a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) system. Using capillary electrophoresis, the PCR products of the 21 STR loci were separated and genotyped. A total of 161 alleles were observed in the Russian ethnic minority group, and corresponding allelic frequencies ranged from 0.0044 to 0.5965. The 21 non-CODIS STR loci of the Russian ethnic minority group were characterized by high genetic diversity and therefore may be useful for elucidating the population's genetic background, for individual identification, and for paternity testing in forensic practice.

  16. Simple sequence repeats in watermelon (Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. & Nakai).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarret, R L; Merrick, L C; Holms, T; Evans, J; Aradhya, M K

    1997-08-01

    Simple sequence repeat length polymorphisms were utilized to examine genetic relatedness among accessions of watermelon (Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. & Nakai). A size-fractionated TaqI genomic library was screened for the occurrence of dimer and trimer simple sequence repeats (SSRs). A total of 96 (0.53%) SSR-bearing clones were identified and the inserts from 50 of these were sequenced. The dinucleotide repeats (CT)n and (GA)n accounted for 82% of the SSRs sequenced. PCR primer pairs flanking seven SSR loci were used to amplify SSRs from 32 morphologically variable watermelon genotypes from Africa, Europe, Asia, and Mexico and a single accession of Citrullus colocynthis from Chad. Cluster analysis of SSR length polymorphisms delineated 4 groups at the 25% level of genetic similarity. The largest group contained C. lanatus var. lanatus accessions. The second largest group contained only wild and cultivated "citron"-type or C. lanatus var. citroides accessions. The third group contained an accession tentatively identified as C. lanatus var. lanatus but which perhaps is a hybrid between C. lanatus var. lanatus and C. lanatus var. citroides. The fourth group consisted of a single accession identified as C. colocynthis. "Egusi"-type watermelons from Nigeria grouped with C. lanatus var. lanatus. The use of SSRs for watermelon germplasm characterization and genetic diversity studies is discussed.

  17. Polymorphic microsatellite loci for the crimson snapper (Lutjanus erythropterus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L; Lin, L; Li, C H; Xu, S N; Liu, Y; Zhou, Y B

    2014-07-24

    We isolated and characterized 22 polymorphic microsatellite loci in Lutjanus erythropterus using a (GT)13-enriched genomic library. We found between 2 and 8 alleles per locus, with a mean of 4.85. The observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.065 to 0.867 and from 0.085 to 0.832, respectively, with means of 0.461 and 0.529, respectively. Allele frequencies in three loci were found to deviate from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Evidence for null alleles was found for three loci. These markers will be useful for distinguishing released captive-bred L. erythropterus individuals from wild individuals.

  18. Novel loci and pathways significantly associated with longevity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Yi; Nie, Chao; Min, Junxia

    2016-01-01

    Only two genome-wide significant loci associated with longevity have been identified so far, probably because of insufficient sample sizes of centenarians, whose genomes may harbor genetic variants associated with health and longevity. Here we report a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of Han...... Chinese with a sample size 2.7 times the largest previously published GWAS on centenarians. We identified 11 independent loci associated with longevity replicated in Southern-Northern regions of China, including two novel loci (rs2069837-IL6; rs2440012-ANKRD20A9P) with genome-wide significance...

  19. Microsatellite instability at tetranucleotide repeats in sporadic colorectal cancer in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Kanae; Kanazawa, Shinsaku; Koike, Junichi; Sugiyama, Hisahiko; Xu, Can; Funahashi, Kimihiko; Boland, C Richard; Koi, Minoru; Hemmi, Hiromichi

    2010-02-01

    Most tumors of patients with Lynch syndrome and a fraction of sporadic colorectal cancers (CRCs) exhibit high levels of microsatellite instability (MSI) at mono- and dinucleotide repeat loci. A different type of instability, elevated microsatellite alterations at selected tetranucleotide repeats (EMAST) has been found in non-colonic cancers. Our previous study demonstrated that EMAST is common in sporadic CRC. Here, we focused on the relationships between EMAST and other genomic instability parameters or clinicopathological features in an unselected series of 88 sporadic CRCs. Of the tumors in the sample, 4 (4.5%) were MSI-high (MSI-H), 9 (10.2%) were MSI-low (MSI-L) and 75 (85.2%) were microsatellite stable. EMAST status was determined using 7 EMAST markers. Fifty-three (60.2%) tumors without MSI-H showed instability at >or=1 EMAST loci. All 4 MSI-H tumors showed instability at several EMAST loci. Instability profiles of MSI-H tumors at EMAST loci were more complex than those of non-MSI-H tumors. A tendency of positive association was observed between MSI-L and EMAST (P=0.023). The frequency of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) for the 14 loci in EMAST-positive tumors was significantly higher than negative tumors (P=0.048). Among the clinicopathological parameters, only tumor location at the distal colon was associated with EMAST-negative tumors (P=0.0084, one-tailed). A relatively higher frequency of well-differentiated adenocarcinomas was observed in EMAST tumors as opposed to non-EMAST tumors, though the survival rate was similar. These results suggest that overlapping mechanisms that cause MSI-L, EMAST and LOH in CRCs may exist.

  20. Genetic data and de novo mutation rates in father-son pairs of 23 Y-STR loci in Southern Brazil population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Fré, Nicole Nascimento; Rodenbusch, Rodrigo; Gastaldo, André Zoratto; Hanson, Erin; Ballantyne, Jack; Alho, Clarice Sampaio

    2015-11-01

    We evaluated haplotype and allele frequencies, as well as statistical forensic parameters, for 23 Y-chromosome short tandem repeats (STRs) loci of the PowerPlex®Y23 system (DYS19, DYS385a/b, DYS389I/II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS437, DYS438, DYS439, DYS448, DYS456, DYS458, DYS635, Y-GATA-H4, DYS481, DYS533, DYS549, DYS570, DYS576, DYS643) in a sample of 150 apparently healthy males, resident in South Brazil. A total of 150 different haplotypes were identified. The highest gene diversity (GD) was observed for the single locus marker DYS570 (GD = 0.7888) and for a two-locus system DYS385 (GD = 0.9009). We also examined 150 father-son pairs by the same system, and a total of 13 mutations were identified in the 3450 father-son allelic transfers, with an overall mutation rate across the 23 loci of 3.768 × 10(-3) (95% CI: 3.542 × 10(-3) to 3.944 × 10(-3)). In all cases there was only one locus mutated with gain/loss of repeats in the son (5 one-repeat gains, and 7 one-repeat and 1 two-repeat losses); we observed no instances of mutations involving a non-integral number of repeats.

  1. Extreme variation in patterns of tandem repeats in mitochondrial control region of yellow-browed tits (Sylviparus modestus, Paridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyang; Liu, Nian; Zhang, Hongli; Yang, Xiao-Jun; Huang, Yuan; Lei, Fumin

    2015-08-19

    To investigate the evolutionary pattern and origins of tandem repeats in the mitochondrial control region of the yellow-browed tit (Sylviparus modestus), the control region and another four mitochondrial loci from fifteen individuals were analyzed. A 117-bp tandem repeat unit that repeated once, twice or three times in different individuals was found, and a rarely reported arrangement for this tandem repeats region that a 5' imperfect copy at its downstream and a 3' imperfect copy at its upstream was observed. The haplotype network, phylogenetic trees, and ancestral state reconstruction of the combined dataset of five loci suggested multiple origins of the same repeat number. The turnover model via slipped-strand mispairing was introduced to interpret the results, because mispairing occurred so frequently that multiple origins of certain repeat number were observed. Insertion via recombination should be a better explanation for the origin of this tandem repeat unit, considering characteristics of the combined sequence of the 3' and 5' imperfect copy, including identification of its homolog in other passerines and its predicted secondary structure.

  2. Two developmentally temporal quantitative trait loci underlie convergent evolution of increased branchial bone length in sticklebacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Priscilla A; Glazer, Andrew M; Cleves, Phillip A; Smith, Alyson S; Miller, Craig T

    2014-08-07

    In convergent evolution, similar phenotypes evolve repeatedly in independent populations, often reflecting adaptation to similar environments. Understanding whether convergent evolution proceeds via similar or different genetic and developmental mechanisms offers insight towards the repeatability and predictability of evolution. Oceanic populations of threespine stickleback fish, Gasterosteus aculeatus, have repeatedly colonized countless freshwater lakes and streams, where new diets lead to morphological adaptations related to feeding. Here, we show that heritable increases in branchial bone length have convergently evolved in two independently derived freshwater stickleback populations. In both populations, an increased bone growth rate in juveniles underlies the convergent adult phenotype, and one population also has a longer cartilage template. Using F2 crosses from these two freshwater populations, we show that two quantitative trait loci (QTL) control branchial bone length at distinct points in development. In both populations, a QTL on chromosome 21 controls bone length throughout juvenile development, and a QTL on chromosome 4 controls bone length only in adults. In addition to these similar developmental profiles, these QTL show similar chromosomal locations in both populations. Our results suggest that sticklebacks have convergently evolved longer branchial bones using similar genetic and developmental programmes in two independently derived populations. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  3. Evidence for heterozygote instability in microsatellite loci in house wrens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Brian S; Johnson, L Scott; Johnson, Bonnie G P; Brubaker, Jessica L; Sakaluk, Scott K; Thompson, Charles F

    2011-02-23

    Microsatellite loci have high mutation rates and high levels of allelic variation, but the factors influencing their mutation rate are not well understood. The proposal that heterozygosity may increase mutation rates has profound implications for understanding the evolution of microsatellite loci, but currently has limited empirical support. We examined 20 microsatellite mutations identified in an analysis of 12 260 meiotic events across three loci in two populations of a songbird, the house wren (Troglodytes aedon). We found that for an allele of a given length, mutation was significantly more likely when there was a relatively large difference in size between the allele and its homologue (i.e. a large 'allele span'). Our results support the proposal of heterozygote instability at microsatellite loci.

  4. CHARACTERIZATION OF MICROSATELLITE LOCI IN SCHOENOPLECTUS AMERICANUS (CYPERACEAE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenoplectus americanus is a model organism for studying ecological and ecosystem responses of salt marsh plant communities to global climate change. Here we characterize 16 microsatellite loci in S. americanus to facilitate studies on the genetic basis of phenotypic responses...

  5. Subsequent yield loci of 5754O aluminum alloy sheet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hai-bo; WAN Min; WU Xiang-dong; YAN Yu

    2009-01-01

    Complex loading paths were realized with cruciform specimens and biaxial loading testing machine. Experimental method for determining the subsequent yield locus of sheet metal was established. With this method, the subsequent yield loci of 5754O aluminum alloy sheet were obtained under complex loading paths. Theoretical subsequent yield loci based on Yld2000-2d yield criterion and three kinds of hardening modes were calculated and compared with the experimental results. The results show that the theoretical subsequent yield loci based on mixed hardening mode describe the experimental subsequent yield loci well, whereas isotropic hardening mode, which is widely used in sheet metal forming fields, predicts values larger than the experimental results. Kinematic hardening mode predicts values smaller than the experimental results and its errors are the largest.

  6. Collapsed methylation quantitative trait loci analysis for low frequency and rare variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Tom G; Shihab, Hashem A; Hemani, Gibran; Zheng, Jie; Hannon, Eilis; Mill, Jonathan; Carnero-Montoro, Elena; Bell, Jordana T; Lyttleton, Oliver; McArdle, Wendy L; Ring, Susan M; Rodriguez, Santiago; Campbell, Colin; Smith, George Davey; Relton, Caroline L; Timpson, Nicholas J; Gaunt, Tom R

    2016-10-01

    Single variant approaches have been successful in identifying DNA methylation quantitative trait loci (mQTL), although as with complex traits they lack the statistical power to identify the effects from rare genetic variants. We have undertaken extensive analyses to identify regions of low frequency and rare variants that are associated with DNA methylation levels. We used repeated measurements of DNA methylation from five different life stages in human blood, taken from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) cohort. Variants were collapsed across CpG islands and their flanking regions to identify variants collectively associated with methylation, where no single variant was individually responsible for the observed signal. All analyses were undertaken using the sequence kernel association test. For loci where no individual variant mQTL was observed based on a single variant analysis, we identified 95 unique regions where the combined effect of low frequency variants (MAF ≤ 5%) provided strong evidence of association with methylation. For loci where there was previous evidence of an individual variant mQTL, a further 3 regions provided evidence of association between multiple low frequency variants and methylation levels. Effects were observed consistently across 5 different time points in the lifecourse and evidence of replication in the TwinsUK and Exeter cohorts was also identified. We have demonstrated the potential of this novel approach to mQTL analysis by analysing the combined effect of multiple low frequency or rare variants. Future studies should benefit from applying this approach as a complementary follow up to single variant analyses. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  7. Patterns of genetic diversity at the nine forensically approved STR loci in the Indian populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Ranjan; Reddy, B Mohan; Chattopadhyay, P; Kashyap, V K; Sun, Guangyun; Deka, Ranjan

    2002-02-01

    Genetic diversity at the nine short tandem repeat (STR) loci, which are universally approved and widely used for forensic investigations, has been studied among nine Indian populations with diverse ethnic, linguistic, and geographic backgrounds. The nine STR loci were profiled on 902 individuals using fluorescent detection methods on an ABI377 System, with the aid of an Amp-F1 Profiler Plus Kit. The studied populations include two upper castes, Brahmin and Kayastha; a tribe, Garo, from West Bengal; a Hindu caste, Meitei, with historical links to Bengal Brahmins; a migrant group of Muslims; three tribal groups, Naga, Kuki and Hmar, from Manipur in northeast India; and a middle-ranking caste, Golla, who are seminomadic herders from Andhra Pradesh. Gene diversity analysis suggests that the average heterozygosity is uniformly high (>0.8) in the studied populations, with the coefficient of gene differentiation at 0.050 +/- 0.0054. Both neighbor-joining (NJ) and unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) trees based on DA distances bring out distinct clusters that are consistent with ethnic, linguistic, and/or geographic backgrounds of the populations. The fit of the Harpending and Ward model of regression of average heterozygosity on the gene frequency centroid is found to be good, and the observed outliers are consistent with the population structure and history of the studied populations. Our study suggests that the nine STR loci, used so far mostly for forensic investigations, can be used fruitfully for microevolutionary studies as well, and for reconstructing the phylogenetic history of human populations, at least at the local level.

  8. Characterization of conservative somatic instability of the CAG repeat region in Huntington`s disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, F.V.; Calikoglu, A.S.; Whetsell, L.H. [H.A. Chapman Research Institute of Medical Genetics, Tulsa, OK (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Instability and enlargement of a CAG repeat region at the beginning of the huntingtin gene (IT-15) has been linked with Huntington`s disease. The CAG repeat size shows a highly significant correlation with age-of-onset of clinicial features in individuals with 40 or more repeats who have Huntington disease. The clinical status of nonsymptomatic individuals with 30 to 39 CAG repeats is considered ambiguous. In order to define more carefully the nature of the HD expansion instability, we examined patients in our HD population using a discriminating fluorescence-based PCR approach. The degree of somatic mutation increases with both earlier age of onset and the size of the inherited allele. A single prominent band one repeat larger than the index peak was typical in individuals with 40-41 CAG repeats. Three to four larger bands are typically discerned in individuals with 50 or more repeats. In an extreme example, an individual with approximately 95 repeats had at least 8 prominent bands. Plotting the degree of somatic mutation relative to the size of the HD allele shows somatic mutation activity increases with size. By this approach 40-60% of the alleles in a 40-41 CAG repeat HD loci is represented in the primary allele. In contrast, the primary allele represents a relatively minor proportion of the total alleles for expansions greater than 50 CAG repeats (10-20%). The limited range of somatic mutation suggest that the instability is restricted to very early stages of embryogenesis before tissue development diverges or that persistent somatic instability occurs at a slow rate. Therefore, the properties of somatic instability in Huntington`s disease have aspects that are both in common but also different from that found in other trinucleotide repeat expanding diseases such as myotonic muscular dystrophy and fragile X syndrome.

  9. Interactions between Glu-1 and Glu-3 loci and associations of selected molecular markers with quality traits in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) DH lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krystkowiak, Karolina; Langner, Monika; Adamski, Tadeusz; Salmanowicz, Bolesław P; Kaczmarek, Zygmunt; Krajewski, Paweł; Surma, Maria

    2017-02-01

    The quality of wheat depends on a large complex of genes and environmental factors. The objective of this study was to identify quantitative trait loci controlling technological quality traits and their stability across environments, and to assess the impact of interaction between alleles at loci Glu-1 and Glu-3 on grain quality. DH lines were evaluated in field experiments over a period of 4 years, and genotyped using simple sequence repeat markers. Lines were analysed for grain yield (GY), thousand grain weight (TGW), protein content (PC), starch content (SC), wet gluten content (WG), Zeleny sedimentation value (ZS), alveograph parameter W (APW), hectolitre weight (HW), and grain hardness (GH). A number of QTLs for these traits were identified in all chromosome groups. The Glu-D1 locus influenced TGW, PC, SC, WG, ZS, APW, GH, while locus Glu-B1 affected only PC, ZS, and WG. Most important marker-trait associations were found on chromosomes 1D and 5D. Significant effects of interaction between Glu-1 and Glu-3 loci on technological properties were recorded, and in all types of this interaction positive effects of Glu-D1 locus on grain quality were observed, whereas effects of Glu-B1 locus depended on alleles at Glu-3 loci. Effects of Glu-A3 and Glu-D3 loci per se were not significant, while their interaction with alleles present at other loci encoding HMW and LMW were important. These results indicate that selection of wheat genotypes with predicted good bread-making properties should be based on the allelic composition both in Glu-1 and Glu-3 loci, and confirm the predominant effect of Glu-D1d allele on technological properties of wheat grains.

  10. Limitations on quantum key repeaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäuml, Stefan; Christandl, Matthias; Horodecki, Karol; Winter, Andreas

    2015-04-23

    A major application of quantum communication is the distribution of entangled particles for use in quantum key distribution. Owing to noise in the communication line, quantum key distribution is, in practice, limited to a distance of a few hundred kilometres, and can only be extended to longer distances by use of a quantum repeater, a device that performs entanglement distillation and quantum teleportation. The existence of noisy entangled states that are undistillable but nevertheless useful for quantum key distribution raises the question of the feasibility of a quantum key repeater, which would work beyond the limits of entanglement distillation, hence possibly tolerating higher noise levels than existing protocols. Here we exhibit fundamental limits on such a device in the form of bounds on the rate at which it may extract secure key. As a consequence, we give examples of states suitable for quantum key distribution but unsuitable for the most general quantum key repeater protocol.

  11. Allele distribution and genetic diversity of VNTR loci in Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis isolates from different sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartkus Joanne M

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis is a zoonotic pathogen, which can be found in many sources including animals and the environment. However, little is known about the molecular relatedness among S. Enteritidis isolates from different sources. We have applied multiple-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA to study the genetic diversity of S. Enteritidis isolates from human and non-human sources. Results We identified 38 unique MLVA types using nine VNTR loci markers for discrimination between 145 S. Enteritidis isolates from different sources including humans (n = 41, chickens (n = 45, and eggs (n = 40. There were 20 distinct MLVA types identified from human isolates, 17 distinct MLVA types from chicken isolates, and 5 from egg isolates. We compared allele distribution and frequency for each VNTR marker and measured allelic polymorphism within each VNTR locus of S. Enteritidis isolates from the sources using Nei's diversity index (D. Differences in allele distribution and frequency were detected in most loci of study isolates. Different genetic diversity for certain loci was identified in isolates from different sources. The average of genetic diversity (D was lower in egg isolates (0.16 compared to human (0.41 and chicken (0.30. However, for loci SE3, SE7, and SE9, human isolates showed significantly higher diversity than both chicken and egg isolates. Whereas for loci SE5 and SE10, chicken isolates had significantly higher diversity than both human and egg isolates. Minimum-spanning tree (MST comprised one major cluster, a minor cluster, and four clonal expansions. MLVA application enabled a cluster analysis by the MST of the S. Enteritidis isolates by sources, which allows a great insight into the genetic relatedness and the possible flow of these organisms between different reservoirs and humans. Conclusion Differences in allele distribution and genetic diversity of VNTR loci in S

  12. Discovery and Refinement of Loci Associated with Lipid Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peloso, Gina M.; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Ganna, Andrea; Chen, Jin; Buchkovich, Martin L.; Mora, Samia; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; Chang, Hsing-Yi; Demirkan, Ayşe; Den Hertog, Heleen M.; Do, Ron; Donnelly, Louise A.; Ehret, Georg B.; Esko, Tõnu; Feitosa, Mary F.; Ferreira, Teresa; Fischer, Krista; Fontanillas, Pierre; Fraser, Ross M.; Freitag, Daniel F.; Gurdasani, Deepti; Heikkilä, Kauko; Hyppönen, Elina; Isaacs, Aaron; Jackson, Anne U.; Johansson, Åsa; Johnson, Toby; Kaakinen, Marika; Kettunen, Johannes; Kleber, Marcus E.; Li, Xiaohui; Luan, Jian’an; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Magnusson, Patrik K.E.; Mangino, Massimo; Mihailov, Evelin; Montasser, May E.; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nolte, Ilja M.; O’Connell, Jeffrey R.; Palmer, Cameron D.; Perola, Markus; Petersen, Ann-Kristin; Sanna, Serena; Saxena, Richa; Service, Susan K.; Shah, Sonia; Shungin, Dmitry; Sidore, Carlo; Song, Ci; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Surakka, Ida; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teslovich, Tanya M.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Van den Herik, Evita G.; Voight, Benjamin F.; Volcik, Kelly A.; Waite, Lindsay L.; Wong, Andrew; Wu, Ying; Zhang, Weihua; Absher, Devin; Asiki, Gershim; Barroso, Inês; Been, Latonya F.; Bolton, Jennifer L.; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Brambilla, Paolo; Burnett, Mary S.; Cesana, Giancarlo; Dimitriou, Maria; Doney, Alex S.F.; Döring, Angela; Elliott, Paul; Epstein, Stephen E.; Ingi Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur; Gigante, Bruna; Goodarzi, Mark O.; Grallert, Harald; Gravito, Martha L.; Groves, Christopher J.; Hallmans, Göran; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hayward, Caroline; Hernandez, Dena; Hicks, Andrew A.; Holm, Hilma; Hung, Yi-Jen; Illig, Thomas; Jones, Michelle R.; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Kastelein, John J.P.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Eric; Klopp, Norman; Komulainen, Pirjo; Kumari, Meena; Langenberg, Claudia; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lin, Shih-Yi; Lindström, Jaana; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Mach, François; McArdle, Wendy L; Meisinger, Christa; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Müller, Gabrielle; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Narisu, Narisu; Nieminen, Tuomo V.M.; Nsubuga, Rebecca N.; Olafsson, Isleifur; Ong, Ken K.; Palotie, Aarno; Papamarkou, Theodore; Pomilla, Cristina; Pouta, Anneli; Rader, Daniel J.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Ridker, Paul M.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Ruokonen, Aimo; Samani, Nilesh; Scharnagl, Hubert; Seeley, Janet; Silander, Kaisa; Stančáková, Alena; Stirrups, Kathleen; Swift, Amy J.; Tiret, Laurence; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; van Pelt, L. Joost; Vedantam, Sailaja; Wainwright, Nicholas; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wild, Sarah H.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wilson, James F.; Young, Elizabeth H.; Zhao, Jing Hua; Adair, Linda S.; Arveiler, Dominique; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Bennett, Franklyn; Bochud, Murielle; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Bovet, Pascal; Burnier, Michel; Campbell, Harry; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chambers, John C.; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Collins, Francis S.; Cooper, Richard S.; Danesh, John; Dedoussis, George; de Faire, Ulf; Feranil, Alan B.; Ferrières, Jean; Ferrucci, Luigi; Freimer, Nelson B.; Gieger, Christian; Groop, Leif C.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Harris, Tamara B.; Hingorani, Aroon; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hofman, Albert; Hovingh, G. Kees; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Humphries, Steve E.; Hunt, Steven C.; Hveem, Kristian; Iribarren, Carlos; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kesäniemi, Antero; Kivimaki, Mika; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Koudstaal, Peter J.; Krauss, Ronald M.; Kuh, Diana; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kyvik, Kirsten O.; Laakso, Markku; Lakka, Timo A.; Lind, Lars; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Martin, Nicholas G.; März, Winfried; McCarthy, Mark I.; McKenzie, Colin A.; Meneton, Pierre; Metspalu, Andres; Moilanen, Leena; Morris, Andrew D.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Njølstad, Inger; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Power, Chris; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Price, Jackie F.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Quertermous, Thomas; Rauramaa, Rainer; Saleheen, Danish; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanghera, Dharambir K.; Saramies, Jouko; Schwarz, Peter E.H.; Sheu, Wayne H-H; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Siegbahn, Agneta; Spector, Tim D.; Stefansson, Kari; Strachan, David P.; Tayo, Bamidele O.; Tremoli, Elena; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uusitupa, Matti; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Vollenweider, Peter; Wallentin, Lars; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Whitfield, John B.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.R.; Ordovas, Jose M.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Palmer, Colin N.A.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Chasman, Daniel I.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Franks, Paul W.; Ripatti, Samuli; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Sandhu, Manjinder S.; Rich, Stephen S.

    2013-01-01

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, triglycerides, and total cholesterol are heritable, modifiable, risk factors for coronary artery disease. To identify new loci and refine known loci influencing these lipids, we examined 188,578 individuals using genome-wide and custom genotyping arrays. We identify and annotate 157 loci associated with lipid levels at P < 5×10−8, including 62 loci not previously associated with lipid levels in humans. Using dense genotyping in individuals of European, East Asian, South Asian, and African ancestry, we narrow association signals in 12 loci. We find that loci associated with blood lipids are often associated with cardiovascular and metabolic traits including coronary artery disease, type 2 diabetes, blood pressure, waist-hip ratio, and body mass index. Our results illustrate the value of genetic data from individuals of diverse ancestries and provide insights into biological mechanisms regulating blood lipids to guide future genetic, biological, and therapeutic research. PMID:24097068

  13. Regulation of alternative splicing in human obesity loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminska, Dorota; Käkelä, Pirjo; Nikkola, Elina; Venesmaa, Sari; Ilves, Imre; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Kolehmainen, Marjukka; Karhunen, Leila; Kuusisto, Johanna; Gylling, Helena; Pajukanta, Päivi; Laakso, Markku; Pihlajamäki, Jussi

    2016-10-01

    Multiple obesity susceptibility loci have been identified by genome-wide association studies, yet the mechanisms by which these loci influence obesity remain unclear. Alternative splicing could contribute to obesity by regulating the transcriptomic and proteomic diversity of genes in these loci. Based on a database search, 72 of the 136 genes at the 13 obesity loci encoded multiple protein isoforms. Thus, alternative splicing of these genes in adipose tissue samples was analyzed from the Metabolic Syndrome in Men population-based study and from two weight loss intervention studies (surgical and very low calorie diet). Alternative splicing was confirmed in 11 genes with PCR capillary electrophoresis in human subcutaneous adipose tissue. Interestingly, differential splicing of TRA2B, BAG6, and MSH5 was observed between lean individuals with normoglycemia and overweight individuals with type 2 diabetes. Of these genes, we detected fat depot-dependent splicing of TRA2B and BAG6 and weight loss-induced regulation of MSH5 splicing in the intervention studies. Finally, body mass index was a major determinant of TRA2B, BAG6, and MSH5 splicing in the combined data. This study provides evidence for alternative splicing in obesity loci, suggesting that alternative splicing at least in part mediates the obesity-associated risk in these loci. © 2016 The Obesity Society.

  14. Creation and maintenance of variation in allorecognition loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Louise Nydam

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Allorecognition is the ability of an organism to differentiate self or close relatives from unrelated individuals. Effective allorecognition systems are critical to the survival of organisms; they prevent inbreeding, protect against pathogens, and facilitate fusions between close relatives. Where the loci governing allorecognition outcomes have been identified, the corresponding proteins often exhibit exceptional polymorphism. Two important questions about this polymorphism remain unresolved: how is it created, and how is it maintained. Studies on the evolution of polymorphism in allorecognition loci have traditionally been restricted to the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC. But because the genetic bases of several allorecognition systems have now been identified, including alr2 in Hydractinia, FuHC in Botryllus, the het (vic loci in fungi, lagB1 and lagC1 in Dictyostelium, and self-incompatibility (SI loci in several plant families, we are now poised to achieve a clearer understanding of how these loci evolve. In this review, we summarize what is currently know about the evolution of allorecognition loci, highlight open questions, and suggest future directions.

  15. Physical Modeling of Dynamic Coupling between Chromosomal Loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampo, Thomas J; Kennard, Andrew S; Spakowitz, Andrew J

    2016-01-19

    The motion of chromosomal DNA is essential to many biological processes, including segregation, transcriptional regulation, recombination, and packaging. Physical understanding of these processes would be dramatically enhanced through predictive, quantitative modeling of chromosome dynamics of multiple loci. Using a polymer dynamics framework, we develop a prediction for the correlation in the velocities of two loci on a single chromosome or otherwise connected by chromatin. These predictions reveal that the signature of correlated motion between two loci can be identified by varying the lag time between locus position measurements. In general, this theory predicts that as the lag time interval increases, the dual-loci dynamic behavior transitions from being completely uncorrelated to behaving as an effective single locus. This transition corresponds to the timescale of the stress communication between loci through the intervening segment. This relatively simple framework makes quantitative predictions based on a single timescale fit parameter that can be directly compared to the in vivo motion of fluorescently labeled chromosome loci. Furthermore, this theoretical framework enables the detection of dynamically coupled chromosome regions from the signature of their correlated motion.

  16. Escherichia coli Chromosomal Loci Segregate from Midcell with Universal Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cass, Julie A; Kuwada, Nathan J; Traxler, Beth; Wiggins, Paul A

    2016-06-21

    The structure of the Escherichia coli chromosome is inherently dynamic over the duration of the cell cycle. Genetic loci undergo both stochastic motion around their initial positions and directed motion to opposite poles of the rod-shaped cell during segregation. We developed a quantitative method to characterize cell-cycle dynamics of the E. coli chromosome to probe the chromosomal steady-state mobility and segregation process. By tracking fluorescently labeled chromosomal loci in thousands of cells throughout the entire cell cycle, our method allows for the statistical analysis of locus position and motion, the step-size distribution for movement during segregation, and the locus drift velocity. The robust statistics of our detailed analysis of the wild-type E. coli nucleoid allow us to observe loci moving toward midcell before segregation occurs, consistent with a replication factory model. Then, as segregation initiates, we perform a detailed characterization of the average segregation velocity of loci. Contrary to origin-centric models of segregation, which predict distinct dynamics for oriC-proximal versus oriC-distal loci, we find that the dynamics of loci were universal and independent of genetic position.

  17. Hysteresis of magnetostructural transitions: Repeatable and non-repeatable processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Provenzano, Virgil [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Della Torre, Edward; Bennett, Lawrence H. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); ElBidweihy, Hatem, E-mail: Hatem@gwmail.gwu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    The Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 2}Si{sub 2} alloy and the off-stoichiometric Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 35}In{sub 15} Heusler alloy belong to a special class of metallic materials that exhibit first-order magnetostructural transitions near room temperature. The magnetic properties of this class of materials have been extensively studied due to their interesting magnetic behavior and their potential for a number of technological applications such as refrigerants for near-room-temperature magnetic refrigeration. The thermally driven first-order transitions in these materials can be field-induced in the reverse order by applying a strong enough field. The field-induced transitions are typically accompanied by the presence of large magnetic hysteresis, the characteristics of which are a complicated function of temperature, field, and magneto-thermal history. In this study we show that the virgin curve, the major loop, and sequentially measured MH loops are the results of both repeatable and non-repeatable processes, in which the starting magnetostructural state, prior to the cycling of field, plays a major role. Using the Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 2}Si{sub 2} and Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 35}In{sub 15} alloys, as model materials, we show that a starting single phase state results in fully repeatable processes and large magnetic hysteresis, whereas a mixed phase starting state results in non-repeatable processes and smaller hysteresis.

  18. Genetic Polymorphisms of Nine X-STR Loci in Four Population Groups from Inner Mongolia, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiao-Fang Hou; Bin Yu; Sheng-Bin Li

    2007-01-01

    Nine short tandem repeat (STR) markers on the X chromosome (DXS101, DXS6789, DXS6799, DXS6804, DXS7132, DXS7133, DXS7423, DXS8378, and HPRTB) were analyzed in four population groups (Mongol, Ewenki, Oroqen, and Daur) from Inner Mongolia, China, in order to learn about the genetic diversity, forensic suitability, and possible genetic affinities of the populations. Frequency estimates, Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, and other parameters of forensic interest were computed. The results revealed that the nine markers have a moderate degree of variability in the population groups. Most heterozygosity values for the nine loci range from 0.480 to 0.891, and there are evident differences of genetic variability among the populations. A UPGMA tree constructed on the basis of the generated data shows very low genetic distance betweent Mongol and Han (Xi'an) populations. Our results based on genetic distance analysis are consistent with the results of earlier studies based on linguistics and the immigration history and origin of these populations. The minisatellite loci on the X chromosome studied here are not only useful in showing significant genetic variation between the populations, but also are suitable for human identity testing among Inner Mongolian populations.

  19. The first genetic map of the American cranberry: exploration of synteny conservation and quantitative trait loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgi, Laura; Johnson-Cicalese, Jennifer; Honig, Josh; Das, Sushma Parankush; Rajah, Veeran D; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Bassil, Nahla; Rowland, Lisa J; Polashock, James; Vorsa, Nicholi

    2013-03-01

    The first genetic map of cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) has been constructed, comprising 14 linkage groups totaling 879.9 cM with an estimated coverage of 82.2 %. This map, based on four mapping populations segregating for field fruit-rot resistance, contains 136 distinct loci. Mapped markers include blueberry-derived simple sequence repeat (SSR) and cranberry-derived sequence-characterized amplified region markers previously used for fingerprinting cranberry cultivars. In addition, SSR markers were developed near cranberry sequences resembling genes involved in flavonoid biosynthesis or defense against necrotrophic pathogens, or conserved orthologous set (COS) sequences. The cranberry SSRs were developed from next-generation cranberry genomic sequence assemblies; thus, the positions of these SSRs on the genomic map provide information about the genomic location of the sequence scaffold from which they were derived. The use of SSR markers near COS and other functional sequences, plus 33 SSR markers from blueberry, facilitates comparisons of this map with maps of other plant species. Regions of the cranberry map were identified that showed conservation of synteny with Vitis vinifera and Arabidopsis thaliana. Positioned on this map are quantitative trait loci (QTL) for field fruit-rot resistance (FFRR), fruit weight, titratable acidity, and sound fruit yield (SFY). The SFY QTL is adjacent to one of the fruit weight QTL and may reflect pleiotropy. Two of the FFRR QTL are in regions of conserved synteny with grape and span defense gene markers, and the third FFRR QTL spans a flavonoid biosynthetic gene.

  20. Genetic analysis of 19 X chromosome STR loci for forensic purposes in four Chinese ethnic groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xingyi; Zhang, Xiaofang; Zhu, Junyong; Chen, Linli; Liu, Changhui; Feng, Xingling; Chen, Ling; Wang, Huijun; Liu, Chao

    2017-01-01

    A new 19 X- short tandem repeat (STR) multiplex PCR system has recently been developed, though its applicability in forensic studies has not been thoroughly assessed. In this study, 932 unrelated individuals from four Chinese ethnic groups (Han, Tibet, Uighur and Hui) were successfully genotyped using this new multiplex PCR system. Our results showed significant linkage disequilibrium between markers DXS10103 and DXS10101 in all four ethnic groups; markers DXS10159 and DXS10162, DXS6809 and DXS6789, and HPRTB and DXS10101 in Tibetan populations; and markers DXS10074 and DXS10075 in Uighur populations. The combined powers of discrimination in males and females were calculated according to haplotype frequencies from allele distributions rather than haplotype counts in the relevant population and were high in four ethnic groups. The cumulative powers of discrimination of the tested X-STR loci were 1.000000000000000 and 0.999999999997940 in females and males, respectively. All 19 X-STR loci are highly polymorphic. The highest Reynolds genetic distances were observed for the Tibet-Uighur pairwise comparisons. This study represents an extensive report on X-STR marker variation in minor Chinese populations and a comprehensive analysis of the diversity of these 19 X STR markers in four Chinese ethnic groups. PMID:28211539

  1. Identification of SSR loci in Betula luminifera using birch EST data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Yong-quan; LI Hai-ying; JIA Qing; HUANG Hua-hong; TONG Zai-kang

    2011-01-01

    Expressed sequence tags (ESTs) are generated from single-pass sequencing of randomly picked cDNA clones and can be used for development of simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers or microsatellites.However,EST databases have been developed for only a small number of species.This paper provides a case study of the utility of freely available birch EST reources for the development of markers necessary for the genetic analysis of Betula luminifera.Based on birch EST data,primers for 80 EST-SSR candidate loci were developed and tested in birch.Of these,59 EST-SSR loci yielded single,stable and clear PCR products.We then tested the utility of those 59 markers in B.luminifera.The results showed 28 (47.6%) yielded stable and clear PCR products for at least one B.luminifera genotype.In addition,this study describes a rapid and inexpensive alternative for the development of SSRs in species with scarce available sequence data.

  2. Analysis of the CODIS autosomal STR loci in four main Colombian regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, Manuel; Galindo, Aida; Bernal, Margarita; Avila, Sandra; Andrade, Diana; Vergara, Carlos; Rincón, Magner; Romero, Rosa Elena; Navarrete, Mayda; Cárdenas, Martha; Ortega, Janeth; Suarez, Dayana; Cifuentes, Adriana; Salas, Antonio; Carracedo, Angel

    2003-10-14

    Genotype polymorphism studies at the 13 loci STRs included in the combined DNA index system [CODIS and PCR-based short tandem repeat loci, in: Proceedings of the Second European Symposium on Human Identification, Promega Corporation, Madison, WI, 1998, pp. 73-88; J. Forensic Sci. 46 (2001) 453] (CODIS: D3S1358, HUMvWA31, HUMFGA, D8S1179 D21S11, D18S51, D5S818, D13S317, D7S820, HUMTH01, HUMTPOX, HUMCSF1PO and D16S539) were carried out in a sample of 1429 unrelated Colombian individuals belonging to 25 different departments. As many other countries in Latino-America, Colombia shows an important admixture component, basically integrated by Amerindians, European-descendants and African-descendants. Due to the fact that only partial population analyses have been carried out in the country, the main aim of the present analysis is to establish a database of forensic interest based on the widely used CODIS systems covering the main Colombian regions.

  3. Quantitative Trait Loci Mapping for Bacterial Blight Resistance in Rice Using Bulked Segregant Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueying Han

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Oryza meyeriana is highly resistant to rice bacterial blight (BB and this resistance trait has been transferred to cultivated rice (O. sativa using asymmetric somatic hybridization. However, no resistance genes have yet been cloned. In the present study, a progeny of the somatic hybridization with high BB resistance was crossed with a rice cultivar with high BB susceptibility to develop an F2 population. Using bulked segregant analysis (BSA, 17 polymorphic markers that were linked to rice BB resistance were obtained through scanning a total of 186 simple sequence repeats (SSR and sequence-tagged site (STS markers, evenly distributed on 12 chromosomes. A genetic linkage map was then constructed based on the 17 linkage markers and the F2 segregating population, which was followed by mapping for quantitative trait loci (QTLs for BB resistance. Three QTLs were identified on chromosomes 1, 3 and 5, respectively, and the alleles of the resistant parent at any of the QTLs increased BB resistance. All of the three QTLs had a strong effect on resistance, explaining about 21.5%, 12.3% and 39.2% of the resistance variance, respectively. These QTLs were different from the loci of the BB resistance genes that have been identified in previous studies. The QTLs mapped in this work will facilitate the isolation of novel BB resistance genes and their utilization in rice resistance breeding.

  4. Identification of Quantitative Trait Loci for Lipid Metabolism in Rice Seeds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie-Zheng Ying; Jun-Xiang Shan; Ji-Ping Gao; Mei-Zhen Zhu; Min Shi; Hong-Xuan Lin

    2012-01-01

    Plant seed oil is important for human dietary consumption and industrial application.The oil trait is controlled by quantitative trait loci(QTLs),but no QTLs for fatty acid composition are known in rice,the monocot model plant.QTL analysis was performed using F2 and F2∶3 progeny from a cross of an indica variety and a japonica variety.Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry(GC-MS)analysis revealed significant differences between parental lines in fatty acid composition of brown rice oil,and 29 associated QTLs in F2 and/or F2∶3 populations were identified throughout the rice genome,except chromosomes 9 and 10.Eight QTLs were repeatedly identified in both populations across different environments.Five loci pleiotropically controlled different traits,contributing to complex interactions of oil with fatty acids and between fatty acids.Nine rice orthologs of Arabidopsis genes encoding key enzymes in lipid metabolism co-localized with 11 mapped QTLs.A strong QTL for oleic(18:1)and linoleic(18:2)acid were associated with a rice ortholog of a gene encoding acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase(DGAT),and another for palmitic acid(16:0)mapped similarly to the acylACP thioesterase(FatB)gene ortholog.Our approach rapidly and efficiently identified candidate genes for mapped QTLs controlling fatty acid composition and oil concentration,providing information for improving rice grain quality by marker assisted selection.

  5. A unique epigenetic signature is associated with active DNA replication loci in human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bing; Su, Trent; Ferrari, Roberto; Li, Jing-Yu; Kurdistani, Siavash K

    2014-02-01

    The cellular epigenetic landscape changes as pluripotent stem cells differentiate to somatic cells or when differentiated cells transform to a cancerous state. These epigenetic changes are commonly correlated with differences in gene expression. Whether active DNA replication is also associated with distinct chromatin environments in these developmentally and phenotypically diverse cell types has not been known. Here, we used BrdU-seq to map active DNA replication loci in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), normal primary fibroblasts and a cancer cell line, and correlated these maps to the epigenome. In all cell lines, the majority of BrdU peaks were enriched in euchromatin and at DNA repetitive elements, especially at microsatellite repeats, and coincided with previously determined replication origins. The most prominent BrdU peaks were shared between all cells but a sizable fraction of the peaks were specific to each cell type and associated with cell type-specific genes. Surprisingly, the BrdU peaks that were common to all cell lines were associated with H3K18ac, H3K56ac, and H4K20me1 histone marks only in hESCs but not in normal fibroblasts or cancer cells. Depletion of the histone acetyltransferases for H3K18 and H3K56 dramatically decreased the number and intensity of BrdU peaks in hESCs. Our data reveal a unique epigenetic signature that distinguishes active replication loci in hESCs from normal somatic or malignant cells.

  6. Genetic polymorphisms of nine X-STR loci in four population groups from Inner Mongolia, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Qiao-Fang; Yu, Bin; Li, Sheng-Bin

    2007-02-01

    Nine short tandem repeat (STR) markers on the X chromosome (DXS101, DXS6789, DXS6799, DXS6804, DXS7132, DXS7133, DXS7423, DXS8378, and HPRTB) were analyzed in four population groups (Mongol, Ewenki, Oroqen, and Daur) from Inner Mongolia, China, in order to learn about the genetic diversity, forensic suitability, and possible genetic affinities of the populations. Frequency estimates, Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, and other parameters of forensic interest were computed. The results revealed that the nine markers have a moderate degree of variability in the population groups. Most heterozygosity values for the nine loci range from 0.480 to 0.891, and there are evident differences of genetic variability among the populations. A UPGMA tree constructed on the basis of the generated data shows very low genetic distance between Mongol and Han (Xi'an) populations. Our results based on genetic distance analysis are consistent with the results of earlier studies based on linguistics and the immigration history and origin of these populations. The minisatellite loci on the X chromosome studied here are not only useful in showing significant genetic variation between the populations, but also are suitable for human identity testing among Inner Mongolian populations.

  7. Genetic analysis of 19 X chromosome STR loci for forensic purposes in four Chinese ethnic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xingyi; Zhang, Xiaofang; Zhu, Junyong; Chen, Linli; Liu, Changhui; Feng, Xingling; Chen, Ling; Wang, Huijun; Liu, Chao

    2017-02-17

    A new 19 X- short tandem repeat (STR) multiplex PCR system has recently been developed, though its applicability in forensic studies has not been thoroughly assessed. In this study, 932 unrelated individuals from four Chinese ethnic groups (Han, Tibet, Uighur and Hui) were successfully genotyped using this new multiplex PCR system. Our results showed significant linkage disequilibrium between markers DXS10103 and DXS10101 in all four ethnic groups; markers DXS10159 and DXS10162, DXS6809 and DXS6789, and HPRTB and DXS10101 in Tibetan populations; and markers DXS10074 and DXS10075 in Uighur populations. The combined powers of discrimination in males and females were calculated according to haplotype frequencies from allele distributions rather than haplotype counts in the relevant population and were high in four ethnic groups. The cumulative powers of discrimination of the tested X-STR loci were 1.000000000000000 and 0.999999999997940 in females and males, respectively. All 19 X-STR loci are highly polymorphic. The highest Reynolds genetic distances were observed for the Tibet-Uighur pairwise comparisons. This study represents an extensive report on X-STR marker variation in minor Chinese populations and a comprehensive analysis of the diversity of these 19 X STR markers in four Chinese ethnic groups.

  8. Evaluation of a 13-loci STR multiplex system for Cannabis sativa genetic identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Rachel; Birck, Matthew; Hughes-Stamm, Sheree; Gangitano, David

    2016-05-01

    Marijuana (Cannabis sativa) is the most commonly used illicit substance in the USA. The development of a validated method using Cannabis short tandem repeats (STRs) could aid in the individualization of samples as well as serve as an intelligence tool to link multiple cases. For this purpose, a modified 13-loci STR multiplex method was optimized and evaluated according to ISFG and SWGDAM guidelines. A real-time PCR quantification method for C. sativa was developed and validated, and a sequenced allelic ladder was also designed to accurately genotype 199 C. sativa samples from 11 U.S. Customs and Border Protection seizures. Distinguishable DNA profiles were generated from 127 samples that yielded full STR profiles. Four duplicate genotypes within seizures were found. The combined power of discrimination of this multilocus system is 1 in 70 million. The sensitivity of the multiplex STR system is 0.25 ng of template DNA. None of the 13 STR markers cross-reacted with any of the studied species, except for Humulus lupulus (hops) which generated unspecific peaks. Phylogenetic analysis and case-to-case pairwise comparison of 11 cases using F st as genetic distance revealed the genetic association of four groups of cases. Moreover, due to their genetic similarity, a subset of samples (N = 97) was found to form a homogeneous population in Hardy-Weinberg and linkage equilibrium. The results of this research demonstrate the applicability of this 13-loci STR system in associating Cannabis cases for intelligence purposes.

  9. Identification of quantitative trait loci and candidate genes for cadmium tolerance in Populus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Induri, Brahma R [West Virginia University; Ellis, Danielle R [West Virginia University; Slavov, Goncho T. [West Virginia University; Yin, Tongming [ORNL; Zhang, Xinye [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; DiFazio, Steven P [West Virginia University

    2012-01-01

    Understanding genetic variation for the response of Populus to heavy metals like cadmium (Cd) is an important step in elucidating the underlying mechanisms of tolerance. In this study, a pseudo-backcross pedigree of Populus trichocarpa Torr. & Gray and Populus deltoides Bart. was characterized for growth and performance traits after Cd exposure. A total of 16 quantitative trait loci (QTL) at logarithm of odds (LOD) ratio 2.5 were detected for total dry weight, its components and root volume. Major QTL for Cd responses were mapped to two different linkage groups and the relative allelic effects were in opposing directions on the two chromosomes, suggesting differential mechanisms at these two loci. The phenotypic variance explained by Cd QTL ranged from 5.9 to 11.6% and averaged 8.2% across all QTL. A whole-genome microarray study led to the identification of nine Cd-responsive genes from these QTL. Promising candidates for Cd tolerance include an NHL repeat membrane-spanning protein, a metal transporter and a putative transcription factor. Additional candidates in the QTL intervals include a putative homolog of a glutamate cysteine ligase, and a glutathione-S-transferase. Functional characterization of these candidate genes should enhance our understanding of Cd metabolism and transport and phytoremediation capabilities of Populus.

  10. Insertion device and method for accurate and repeatable target insertion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubeli, III, Joseph F.; Shinn, Michelle D.; Bevins, Michael E.; Dillon-Townes, Lawrence; Neil, George R.

    2017-07-04

    The present invention discloses a device and a method for inserting and positioning a target within a free electron laser, particle accelerator, or other such device that generates or utilizes a beam of energy or particles. The system includes a three-point registration mechanism that insures angular and translational accuracy and repeatability of positioning upon multiple insertions within the same structure.

  11. Quantitative Trait Loci Mapping of Leaf Morphological Traits and Chlorophyll Content in Cultivated Tetraploid Cotton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xian-Liang SONG; Wang-Zhen GUO; Zhi-Guo HAN; Tian-Zhen ZHANG

    2005-01-01

    Genetic mapping provides a powerful tool for quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis at the molecular level. A simple sequence repeat (SSR) genetic map containing 590 markers and a BC1 population from two cultivated tetraploid cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) cultivars, namely TM-1 and Hai 7124 (G.barbadense L.), were used to map and analyze QTL using the composite interval mapping (CIM) method.Thirty one QTLs, 10 for lobe length, 13 for lobe width, six for lobe angle, and two for leaf chlorophyll content,were detected on 15 chromosomes or linkage groups at logarithm of odds (LOD) ≥ 2.0, of which 15 were found for leaf morphology at LOD ≥.3.0. The genetic effects of the QTL were estimated. These results are fundamental for marker-assisted selection (MAS) of these traits in tetraploid cotton breeding.

  12. Development of microsatellite loci in Mediterranean sarsaparilla (Smilax aspera; Smilacaceae) using transcriptome data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zhe-Chen; Shen, Chao; Han, Yu-Wei; Shen, Wei; Yang, Man; Liu, Jinliang; Liang, Zong-Suo; Li, Pan; Fu, Cheng-Xin

    2017-04-01

    Although several microsatellite markers of Smilax aspera (Smilacaceae) have been reported in a previous study, due to universality issues in cross-population amplification, we have newly developed microsatellite markers for S. aspera based on transcriptome data to further investigate gene flow and genetic structure of its circum-Mediterranean, East African, and South Asian populations. A total of 4854 simple sequence repeat (SSR) primer pairs were designed from 99,193 contigs acquired from public transcriptome data of S. bona-nox. Forty-six microsatellite loci were selected for further genotyping in 12 S. aspera populations. The number of alleles varied from three to 28, and 93.5% of the developed microsatellite markers could be cross-amplified in least one of three congeneric Smilax species. The SSR markers developed in this study will facilitate further studies on genetic diversity and phylogeographic patterns of S. aspera in intercontinental geographical scales.

  13. Genetic polymorphism of 21 non-CODIS STR loci in the Chinese Mongolian ethnic minority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Lagabaiyila; Liu, Ying; Guo, Yadong; Li, Jun; Wang, Ke; Geng, Kun; Liao, Qiao; Liu, Jinshan; Chen, Hanchun; Cai, Jifeng

    2014-03-01

    In this research, we investigated the allele frequencies and forensic parameters of 21 non-, CODIS short tandem repeat (STR) loci (D6S474, D12ATA63, D22S1045, D10S1248, D1S1677, D11S4463, D1S1627, D3S4529, D2S441, D6S1017, D4S2408, D19S433, D17S1301, D1GATA113, D18S853, D20S482, D14S1434, D9S1122, D2S1776, D10S1435 and D5S2500) among 523 unrelated, Chinese Mongolians in the city of Tongliao, Horqin district, Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region.

  14. Isolation and Characterization of Sixteen Polymorphic Microsatellite Loci in the Golden Apple Snail Pomacea canaliculata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Liu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We report the characterization of 16 polymorphic microsatellite markers in the golden apple snail, Pomacea canaliculata, a pest registered in the list of “100 of the world’s worst invasive alien species”. The fast isolation by AFLP (Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism of sequences containing repeats (FIASCO method was used to isolate microsatellite loci, and polymorphism was explored with 29 individuals collected in an invasive region from China. These primers showed a number of alleles per locus ranging from three to 13. The ranges of observed and expected heterozygosity were 0.310–0.966 and 0.523–0.898, respectively. These microsatellite markers described here will be useful for population genetic studies of P. canaliculata.

  15. Construction of a library of cloned short tandem repeat (STR) alleles as universal templates for allelic ladder preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Le; Zhao, Xing-Chun; Ye, Jian; Liu, Jin-Jie; Chen, Ting; Bai, Xue; Zhang, Jian; Ou, Yuan; Hu, Lan; Jiang, Bo-Wei; Wang, Feng

    2014-09-01

    Short tandem repeat (STR) genotyping methods are widely used for human identity testing applications, including forensic DNA analysis. Samples of DNA containing the length-variant STR alleles are typically separated and genotyped by comparison to an allelic ladder. Here, we describe a newly devised library of cloned STR alleles. The library covers alleles X and Y for the sex-determining locus Amelogenin and 259 other alleles for 22 autosomal STR loci (TPOX, D3S1358, FGA, D5S818, CSF1PO, D7S820, D8S1179, TH01, vWA, D13S317, D16S539, D18S51, D21S11, D2S1338, D6S1043, D12S391, Penta E, D19S433, D11S4463, D17S974, D3S4529 and D12ATA63). New primers were designed for all these loci to construct recombinant plasmids so that the library retains core repeat elements of STR as well as 5'- and 3'-flanking sequences of ∼500 base pairs. Since amplicons of commercial STR genotyping kits and systems developed in laboratories are usually distributed from 50 to STR alleles. The sequencing results showed all repeat structures we obtained for TPOX, CSF1PO, D7S820, TH01, D16S539, D18S51 and Penta E were the same as reported. However, we identified 102 unreported repeat structures from the other 15 STR loci, supplementing our current knowledge of repeat structures and leading to further understanding of these widely used loci.

  16. Allelic frequency distributions of 21 non-combined DNA index system STR loci in a Russian ethnic minority group from Inner Mongolia, China*

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Hong-Dan; Shen, Chun-Mei; Liu, Wen-Juan; Zhang, Yu-Dang; Yang, Guang; Yan, Jiang-wei; Qin, Hai-Xia; Zhu, Bo-Feng

    2013-01-01

    We studied the allelic frequency distributions and statistical forensic parameters of 21 new short tandem repeat (STR) loci and the amelogenin locus, which are not included in the combined DNA index system (CODIS), in a Russian ethnic minority group from the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, China. A total of 114 bloodstain samples from unrelated individuals were extracted and co-amplified with four fluorescence-labeled primers in a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) system. Using capi...

  17. Characterizing leader sequences of CRISPR loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkhnbashi, Omer; Shah, Shiraz Ali; Garrett, Roger Antony

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR-Cas system is an adaptive immune system in many archaea and bacteria, which provides resistance against invading genetic elements. The first phase of CRISPR-Cas immunity is called adaptation, in which small DNA fragments are excised from genetic elements and are inserted into a CRISPR...... array generally adjacent to its so called leader sequence at one end of the array. It has been shown that transcription initiation and adaptation signals of the CRISPR array are located within the leader. However, apart from promoters, there is very little knowledge of sequence or structural motifs...... sequences by focusing on the consensus repeat of the adjacent CRISPR array and weak upstream conservation signals. We applied our tool to the analysis of a comprehensive genomic database and identified several characteristic properties of leader sequences specific to archaea and bacteria, ranging from...

  18. Linker histone variant H1T targets rDNA repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Ruiko; Hayakawa, Koji; Tanaka, Satoshi; Shiota, Kunio

    2016-04-02

    H1T is a linker histone H1 variant that is highly expressed at the primary spermatocyte stage through to the early spermatid stage of spermatogenesis. While the functions of the somatic types of H1 have been extensively investigated, the intracellular role of H1T is unclear. H1 variants specifically expressed in germ cells show low amino acid sequence homology to somatic H1s, which suggests that the functions or target loci of germ cell-specific H1T differ from those of somatic H1s. Here, we describe the target loci and function of H1T. H1T was expressed not only in the testis but also in tumor cell lines, mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs), and some normal somatic cells. To elucidate the intracellular localization and target loci of H1T, fluorescent immunostaining and ChIP-seq were performed in tumor cells and mESCs. We found that H1T accumulated in nucleoli and predominantly targeted rDNA repeats, which differ from somatic H1 targets. Furthermore, by nuclease sensitivity assay and RT-qPCR, we showed that H1T repressed rDNA transcription by condensing chromatin structure. Imaging analysis indicated that H1T expression affected nucleolar formation. We concluded that H1T plays a role in rDNA transcription, by distinctively targeting rDNA repeats.

  19. Utilizing next generation sequencing to characterize microsatellite loci in a tropical aquatic plant species Cryptocoryne cordata var. cordata (Araceae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosazlina, Rusly; Jacobsen, Niels; Ørgaard, Marian

    2015-01-01

    designed and tested for efficiency in polymerase chain reaction amplification. Using these primer sets, 11 new microsatellite marker loci were successfully amplified with unambiguous polymorphic alleles exhibited across 30 individuals examined. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 2 to 6, while...... for the species using next generation sequencing (Roche 454 pyrosequencing) from genomic DNA. A total of 41,653 reads was generated, of which 3636 fragments contained at least one repeat motif. Seventy two primer sets in the flanking region of dinucleotide, trinucleotide and tetranucleotides repeat motifs were...

  20. EAMJ Dec. Repeatability.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-12-12

    Dec 12, 2008 ... Results:Kappa values for four-week repeatability for the wheeze and asthma questions were 0.61 ... for logistic, cultural and ethical reasons, to use ... individual with baseline forced expiratory volume in .... period is likely to also include the effects of true ... data, the writing of the manuscript or the decision.

  1. Development of a new nomenclature for Salmonella Typhimurium multilocus variable number of tandem repeats analysis (MLVA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, JT; Torpdahl, M; Petersen, RF;

    2009-01-01

    Multilocus variable number of tandem repeats analysis (MLVA) has recently become a widely used highly discriminatory molecular method for typing of the foodborne pathogen Salmonella Typhimurium. This method is based on amplification and fragment size analysis of five repeat loci. To be able...... to easily compare MLVA results between laboratories there is a need for a simple and definitive nomenclature for MLVA profiles. Based on MLVA results for all human S. Typhimurium isolates in Denmark from the last five years and sequence analysis of a selection of these isolates, we propose a MLVA...... nomenclature that indicates the actual number of repeat units in each locus. This nomenclature is independent of the equipment used for fragment analysis and, in principle, independent of the primers used. A set of reference strains is developed that can be used for easy normalisation of fragment sizes in each...

  2. Multiple loci associated with renal function in African Americans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Shriner

    Full Text Available The incidence of chronic kidney disease varies by ethnic group in the USA, with African Americans displaying a two-fold higher rate than European Americans. One of the two defining variables underlying staging of chronic kidney disease is the glomerular filtration rate. Meta-analysis in individuals of European ancestry has identified 23 genetic loci associated with the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR. We conducted a follow-up study of these 23 genetic loci using a population-based sample of 1,018 unrelated admixed African Americans. We included in our follow-up study two variants in APOL1 associated with end-stage kidney disease discovered by admixture mapping in admixed African Americans. To address confounding due to admixture, we estimated local ancestry at each marker and global ancestry. We performed regression analysis stratified by local ancestry and combined the resulting regression estimates across ancestry strata using an inverse variance-weighted fixed effects model. We found that 11 of the 24 loci were significantly associated with eGFR in our sample. The effect size estimates were not significantly different between the subgroups of individuals with two copies of African ancestry vs. two copies of European ancestry for any of the 11 loci. In contrast, allele frequencies were significantly different at 10 of the 11 loci. Collectively, the 11 loci, including four secondary signals revealed by conditional analyses, explained 14.2% of the phenotypic variance in eGFR, in contrast to the 1.4% explained by the 24 loci in individuals of European ancestry. Our findings provide insight into the genetic basis of variation in renal function among admixed African Americans.

  3. GENETIC VARIATION IN RED RASPBERRIES (RUBUS IDAEUS L.; ROSACEAE) FROM SITES DIFFERING IN ORGANIC POLLUTANTS COMPARED WITH SYNTHETIC TANDEM REPEAT DNA PROBES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two synthetic tandem repetitive DNA probes were used to compare genetic variation at variable-number-tandem-repeat (VNTR) loci among Rubus idaeus L. var. strigosus (Michx.) Maxim. (Rosaceae) individuals sampled at eight sites contaminated by pollutants (N = 39) and eight adjacent...

  4. Airborne Radar Interferometric Repeat-Pass Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Scott; Michel, Thierry R.; Jones, Cathleen E.; Muellerschoen, Ronald J.; Chapman, Bruce D.; Fore, Alexander; Simard, Marc; Zebker, Howard A.

    2011-01-01

    Earth science research often requires crustal deformation measurements at a variety of time scales, from seconds to decades. Although satellites have been used for repeat-track interferometric (RTI) synthetic-aperture-radar (SAR) mapping for close to 20 years, RTI is much more difficult to implement from an airborne platform owing to the irregular trajectory of the aircraft compared with microwave imaging radar wavelengths. Two basic requirements for robust airborne repeat-pass radar interferometry include the ability to fly the platform to a desired trajectory within a narrow tube and the ability to have the radar beam pointed in a desired direction to a fraction of a beam width. Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) is equipped with a precision auto pilot developed by NASA Dryden that allows the platform, a Gulfstream III, to nominally fly within a 5 m diameter tube and with an electronically scanned antenna to position the radar beam to a fraction of a beam width based on INU (inertial navigation unit) attitude angle measurements.

  5. Hybrid quantum repeater using bright coherent light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Loock, P; Ladd, T D; Sanaka, K; Yamaguchi, F; Nemoto, Kae; Munro, W J; Yamamoto, Y

    2006-06-23

    We describe a quantum repeater protocol for long-distance quantum communication. In this scheme, entanglement is created between qubits at intermediate stations of the channel by using a weak dispersive light-matter interaction and distributing the outgoing bright coherent-light pulses among the stations. Noisy entangled pairs of electronic spin are then prepared with high success probability via homodyne detection and postselection. The local gates for entanglement purification and swapping are deterministic and measurement-free, based upon the same coherent-light resources and weak interactions as for the initial entanglement distribution. Finally, the entanglement is stored in a nuclear-spin-based quantum memory. With our system, qubit-communication rates approaching 100 Hz over 1280 km with fidelities near 99% are possible for reasonable local gate errors.

  6. Diversity of five novel Y-STR loci and their application in studies of north Chinese populations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zhaoyang Xu; Haiming Sun; Yang Yu; Yan Jin; Xaingning Meng; Donglin Sun; Jing Bai; Feng Chen; Songbin Fu

    2010-04-01

    Y-chromosomal short tandem repeats (Y-STRs) show sufficient variability among individuals in a population and high degree of geographical differentiation, so their polymorphic character makes them especially suited for population genetic studies. In this study, five novel Y-STR loci were analysed in 174 samples from five minority populations residing in north China (Daur, Kazak, Xibe, Uighur and Kirgiz) to determine the diversity of these loci in north China and to evaluate their usefulness in population study. Ninety-seven haplotypes were constructed, with 30 in Daur, 24 in Kazak, 28 in Uighur, 27 in Xibe and 16 in Kirgiz. Sixty-six (68.04%) of them were unique. The $R_{\\text{ST}}$ showed that there was no significant difference in Daur and Xibe ($R_{\\text{ST}} = 0.02231$, $P \\gt 0.05$), while among the Kazak, Uighur and Kirgiz, who reside in northwest China, there were significant differences. These results showed that these five Y-STR loci were polymorphic in the five populations. The results of AMOVA showed that majority of the differences were found within populations. By $R_{\\text{ST}}$, the relationships of the five populations were accordance with the historical records: Xibe migrated to Xinjiang during the Qing Dynasty, and Kazak, Uighur and Kirgiz have different ancestors.

  7. Analysis of quantitative trait loci affecting chlorophyll content of rice leaves in a double haploid population and two backcross populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Gonghao; Zeng, Jing; He, Yuqing

    2014-02-25

    Chlorophyll content, one of the most important physiological parameters related to plant photosynthesis, is usually used to predict yield potential. To map the quantitative trait loci (QTLs) underlying the chlorophyll content of rice leaves, a double haploid (DH) population was developed from an indica/japonica (Zhenshan 97/Wuyujing 2) crossing and two backcross populations were established subsequently by backcrossing DH lines with each of their parents. The contents of chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b were determined by using a spectrophotometer to directly measure the leaf chlorophyll extracts. To determine the leaf chlorophyll retention along with maturation, all measurements were performed on the day of heading and were repeated 30 days later. A total of 60 QTLs were resolved for all the traits using these three populations. These QTLs were distributed on 10 rice chromosomes, except chromosomes 5 and 10; the closer the traits, the more clustering of the QTLs residing on common rice chromosomal regions. In general, the majority of QTLs that specify chlorophyll a content also play a role in determining chlorophyll b content. Strangely, chlorophyll content in this study was found mostly to be lacking or to have a negative correlation with yield. In both backcross F1 populations, overdominant (or underdominant) loci were more important than complete or partially dominant loci for main-effect QTLs and epistatic QTLs, thereby supporting previous findings that overdominant effects are the primary genetic basis for depression in inbreeding and heterosis in rice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Genetic polymorphism of milk protein loci in Argentinian Holstein cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonvillani Adriana Gloria

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Some alleles of milk protein loci are associated with superior cheese production characteristics. The genetic polymorphism of the milk protein loci alphas1-casein, beta-casein, k-casein and beta-lactoglobulin was examined in Argentinian Holstein cattle. Samples from 12 herds of four regions of Córdoba were analyzed by starch gel electrophoresis. The chi² test was used to assess whether the populations were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Genotypic diversity was analyzed by the Shannon-Weaver index. The observed genotypic frequencies were analyzed by Hedrick's genetic identity and the genetic distance of Balakrishnan and Sanghvi. The allelic and genotypic frequencies were similar to those of other Holstein populations. The genotypic frequencies of the alphas1-casein and beta-casein loci were in equilibrium, whereas in some populations the k-casein and beta-lactoglobulin loci were not. According to the Shannon-Weaver index the total genetic diversity within each herd was greater than 96%. The high values of identity agreed with the low genetic distances among populations. We conclude that there is extensive genetic homogeneity in Holstein cattle in Córdoba Province and that it would be feasible to select for B alleles at the k-casein and b-lactoglobulin loci in order to improve the quality of milk available for cheese manufacturing.

  9. Plasmodium genetic loci linked to host cytokine and chemokine responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattaradilokrat, S; Li, J; Wu, J; Qi, Y; Eastman, R T; Zilversmit, M; Nair, S C; Huaman, M C; Quinones, M; Jiang, H; Li, N; Zhu, J; Zhao, K; Kaneko, O; Long, C A; Su, X-z

    2014-01-01

    Both host and parasite factors contribute to disease severity of malaria infection; however, the molecular mechanisms responsible for the disease and the host-parasite interactions involved remain largely unresolved. To investigate the effects of parasite factors on host immune responses and pathogenesis, we measured levels of plasma cytokines/chemokines (CCs) and growth rates in mice infected with two Plasmodium yoelii strains having different virulence phenotypes and in progeny from a genetic cross of the two parasites. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis linked levels of many CCs, particularly IL-1β, IP-10, IFN-γ, MCP-1 and MIG, and early parasite growth rate to loci on multiple parasite chromosomes, including chromosomes 7, 9, 10, 12 and 13. Comparison of the genome sequences spanning the mapped loci revealed various candidate genes. The loci on chromosomes 7 and 13 had significant (P<0.005) additive effects on IL-1β, IL-5 and IP-10 responses, and the chromosome 9 and 12 loci had significant (P=0.017) interaction. Infection of knockout mice showed critical roles of MCP-1 and IL-10 in parasitemia control and host mortality. These results provide important information for a better understanding of malaria pathogenesis and can be used to examine the role of these factors in human malaria infection.

  10. Fully integrated, fully automated generation of short tandem repeat profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The generation of short tandem repeat profiles, also referred to as ‘DNA typing,’ is not currently performed outside the laboratory because the process requires highly skilled technical operators and a controlled laboratory environment and infrastructure with several specialized instruments. The goal of this work was to develop a fully integrated system for the automated generation of short tandem repeat profiles from buccal swab samples, to improve forensic laboratory process flow as well as to enable short tandem repeat profile generation to be performed in police stations and in field-forward military, intelligence, and homeland security settings. Results An integrated system was developed consisting of an injection-molded microfluidic BioChipSet cassette, a ruggedized instrument, and expert system software. For each of five buccal swabs, the system purifies DNA using guanidinium-based lysis and silica binding, amplifies 15 short tandem repeat loci and the amelogenin locus, electrophoretically separates the resulting amplicons, and generates a profile. No operator processing of the samples is required, and the time from swab insertion to profile generation is 84 minutes. All required reagents are contained within the BioChipSet cassette; these consist of a lyophilized polymerase chain reaction mix and liquids for purification and electrophoretic separation. Profiles obtained from fully automated runs demonstrate that the integrated system generates concordant short tandem repeat profiles. The system exhibits single-base resolution from 100 to greater than 500 bases, with inter-run precision with a standard deviation of ±0.05 - 0.10 bases for most alleles. The reagents are stable for at least 6 months at 22°C, and the instrument has been designed and tested to Military Standard 810F for shock and vibration ruggedization. A nontechnical user can operate the system within or outside the laboratory. Conclusions The integrated system represents the

  11. High-Density Genotyping of Immune Loci in Koreans and Europeans Identifies Eight New Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk Loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwangwoo; Bang, So-Young; Lee, Hye-Soon; Cho, Soo-Kyung; Choi, Chan-Bum; Sung, Yoon-Kyoung; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Jun, Jae-Bum; Yoo, Dae Hyun; Kang, Young Mo; Kim, Seong-Kyu; Suh, Chang-Hee; Shim, Seung-Cheol; Lee, Shin-Seok; Lee, Jisoo; Chung, Won Tae; Choe, Jung-Yoon; Shin, Hyoung Doo; Lee, Jong-Young; Han, Bok-Ghee; Nath, Swapan K.; Eyre, Steve; Bowes, John; Pappas, Dimitrios A.; Kremer, Joel M.; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Luis; Ärlestig, Lisbeth; Okada, Yukinori; Diogo, Dorothée; Liao, Katherine P.; Karlson, Elizabeth W.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Martin, Javier; Klareskog, Lars; Padyukov, Leonid; Gregersen, Peter K.; Worthington, Jane; Greenberg, Jeffrey D.; Plenge, Robert M.; Bae, Sang-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    Objective A highly polygenic etiology and high degree of allele-sharing between ancestries have been well-elucidated in genetic studies of rheumatoid arthritis. Recently, the high-density genotyping array Immunochip for immune disease loci identified 14 new rheumatoid arthritis risk loci among individuals of European ancestry. Here, we aimed to identify new rheumatoid arthritis risk loci using Korean-specific Immunochip data. Methods We analyzed Korean rheumatoid arthritis case-control samples using the Immunochip and GWAS array to search for new risk alleles of rheumatoid arthritis with anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies. To increase power, we performed a meta-analysis of Korean data with previously published European Immunochip and GWAS data, for a total sample size of 9,299 Korean and 45,790 European case-control samples. Results We identified 8 new rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility loci (TNFSF4, LBH, EOMES, ETS1–FLI1, COG6, RAD51B, UBASH3A and SYNGR1) that passed a genome-wide significance threshold (p<5×10−8), with evidence for three independent risk alleles at 1q25/TNFSF4. The risk alleles from the 7 new loci except for the TNFSF4 locus (monomorphic in Koreans), together with risk alleles from previously established RA risk loci, exhibited a high correlation of effect sizes between ancestries. Further, we refined the number of SNPs that represent potentially causal variants through a trans-ethnic comparison of densely genotyped SNPs. Conclusion This study demonstrates the advantage of dense-mapping and trans-ancestral analysis for identification of potentially causal SNPs. In addition, our findings support the importance of T cells in the pathogenesis and the fact of frequent overlap of risk loci among diverse autoimmune diseases. PMID:24532676

  12. High-density genotyping of immune loci in Koreans and Europeans identifies eight new rheumatoid arthritis risk loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwangwoo; Bang, So-Young; Lee, Hye-Soon; Cho, Soo-Kyung; Choi, Chan-Bum; Sung, Yoon-Kyoung; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Jun, Jae-Bum; Yoo, Dae Hyun; Kang, Young Mo; Kim, Seong-Kyu; Suh, Chang-Hee; Shim, Seung-Cheol; Lee, Shin-Seok; Lee, Jisoo; Chung, Won Tae; Choe, Jung-Yoon; Shin, Hyoung Doo; Lee, Jong-Young; Han, Bok-Ghee; Nath, Swapan K; Eyre, Steve; Bowes, John; Pappas, Dimitrios A; Kremer, Joel M; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Luis; Ärlestig, Lisbeth; Okada, Yukinori; Diogo, Dorothée; Liao, Katherine P; Karlson, Elizabeth W; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Martin, Javier; Klareskog, Lars; Padyukov, Leonid; Gregersen, Peter K; Worthington, Jane; Greenberg, Jeffrey D; Plenge, Robert M; Bae, Sang-Cheol

    2015-03-01

    A highly polygenic aetiology and high degree of allele-sharing between ancestries have been well elucidated in genetic studies of rheumatoid arthritis. Recently, the high-density genotyping array Immunochip for immune disease loci identified 14 new rheumatoid arthritis risk loci among individuals of European ancestry. Here, we aimed to identify new rheumatoid arthritis risk loci using Korean-specific Immunochip data. We analysed Korean rheumatoid arthritis case-control samples using the Immunochip and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) array to search for new risk alleles of rheumatoid arthritis with anticitrullinated peptide antibodies. To increase power, we performed a meta-analysis of Korean data with previously published European Immunochip and GWAS data for a total sample size of 9299 Korean and 45,790 European case-control samples. We identified eight new rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility loci (TNFSF4, LBH, EOMES, ETS1-FLI1, COG6, RAD51B, UBASH3A and SYNGR1) that passed a genome-wide significance threshold (p<5×10(-8)), with evidence for three independent risk alleles at 1q25/TNFSF4. The risk alleles from the seven new loci except for the TNFSF4 locus (monomorphic in Koreans), together with risk alleles from previously established RA risk loci, exhibited a high correlation of effect sizes between ancestries. Further, we refined the number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that represent potentially causal variants through a trans-ethnic comparison of densely genotyped SNPs. This study demonstrates the advantage of dense-mapping and trans-ancestral analysis for identification of potentially causal SNPs. In addition, our findings support the importance of T cells in the pathogenesis and the fact of frequent overlap of risk loci among diverse autoimmune diseases. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  13. Development of simple sequence repeats (SSR) markers of ramie and comparison of SSR and inter-SSR marker systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Jianlin; JIE Yucheng; JIANG Yanbo; ZHONG Yingli; LIU Yunhai; ZHANG Jian

    2005-01-01

    Ramie (Boehmeria nivea L. ) is an important bast fiber crop. To study genetic background of this species, we isolated and characterized microsatellite markers of ramie. A genomic library containing inserts of rapid amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD)fragments was constructed, and screened by PCR amplification using anchored simple sequence repeats as primers. A total of 26 clones were identified as positives, and 13 microsatellite loci were found after sequencing. The polymorphism of these 13 microsatellite loci was examined and the utility of simple sequence repeats (SSR) and inter-SSR (ISSR) marker systems for genetic characterization compared using 19 selected ramie cultivars. Both approaches successfully discriminated the 19 cultivars which differed in the amount of polymorphism detected. The level of polymorphism detected by SSR was 95.0 %, higher than that by ISSR (72.3 % ), but the average polymorphism information content (PIC) of ISSR (0. 651) was higher than that of SSR (0. 441). The higher PIC value of ISSR suggests that ISSR is more efficient for fingerprinting ramie cultivars than SSR markers. However, because the SSR loci are codominant, they are more suitable for determining the homozygosity levels of ramie, constructing linkage map, quantitative trait loci study of complex traits and marker-as-sisted selection.

  14. Directionality switchable gain stabilized linear repeater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Takayuki; Ohmachi, Tadashi; Aida, Kazuo

    2004-10-01

    We propose a new approach to realize a bidirectional linear repeater suitable for future optical internet networks and fault location in repeater chain with OTDR. The proposed approach is the linear repeater of simple configuration whose directionality is rearranged dynamically by electrical control signal. The repeater is composed of a magneto-optical switch, a circulator, a dynamically gain stabilized unidirectional EDFA, and control circuits. The repeater directionality is rearranged as fast as 0.1ms by an electrical control pulse. It is experimentally confirmed that OTDR with the directionality switchable repeater is feasible for repeater chain. The detailed design and performance of the repeater are also discussed, including the multi-pass interference (MPI) which may arise in the proposed repeater, the effect of the MPI on SNR degradation of the repeater chain and the feed-forward EDFA gain control circuit.

  15. [Mutation in microsatellite repeats of DNA and embryonal death in humans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitina, T V; Nazarenko, S A

    2000-07-01

    In the analysis of tetranucleotide DNA repeats inheritance carried out in 55 families with a history of spontaneous miscarriages and normal karyotypes in respect to 21 loci located on seven autosomes, 8 embryos (14.5%) demonstrating 12 cases of the presence of alleles absent in both parents were described. The study of chromosome segregation using other DNA markers permitted highly probable exclusion of false paternity as well as uniparental disomy as the reasons for parent/child allele mismatches. The high probability of paternity together with the presence of a "new" allele at any offspring locus points to the mutation having occurred during game-togenesis in one of the parents. Examination of mutation in spontaneous abortuses revealed an increased number of tandem repeat units at microsatellite loci in three cases and an decreased number of these repeats in six cases. In two abortuses, a third allele absent in both parents, which resulted from a somatic mutation that occurred during embryonic development, was observed. The prevalence of the male germline mutations, revealed during investigation of the mutation origin, was probably associated with an increased number of DNA replication cycles in sperm compared to the oocytes. In spontaneous abortuses, the mean mutation rate of the tetranucleotide repeat complexes analyzed was 9.8 x 10(-3) per locus per gamete per generation. This was about five times higher than the spontaneous mutation rate of these STR loci. It can be suggested that genome instability detected at the level of repeated DNA sequences can involve not only genetically neutral loci but also active genomic regions crucial for embryonic viability. This results in cell death and termination of embryonic development. Our findings indicate that the death of embryos with normal karyotypes in most cases is associated with an increased frequency of germline and somatic microsatellite mutations. The data of the present study also provide a practical tool for

  16. Measurement-based quantum repeaters

    CERN Document Server

    Zwerger, M; Briegel, H J

    2012-01-01

    We introduce measurement-based quantum repeaters, where small-scale measurement-based quantum processors are used to perform entanglement purification and entanglement swapping in a long-range quantum communication protocol. In the scheme, pre-prepared entangled states stored at intermediate repeater stations are coupled with incoming photons by simple Bell-measurements, without the need of performing additional quantum gates or measurements. We show how to construct the required resource states, and how to minimize their size. We analyze the performance of the scheme under noise and imperfections, with focus on small-scale implementations involving entangled states of few qubits. We find measurement-based purification protocols with significantly improved noise thresholds. Furthermore we show that already resource states of small size suffice to significantly increase the maximal communication distance. We also discuss possible advantages of our scheme for different set-ups.

  17. Repeatability of Harris Corner Detector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Lili

    2003-01-01

    Interest point detectors are commonly employed to reduce the amount of data to be processed. The ideal interest point detector would robustly select those features which are most appropriate or salient for the application and data at hand. This paper shows that interest points are geometrically stable under different transformations.This property makes interest points very successful in the context of image matching. To measure this property quantatively, we introduce a evaluation criterion: repeatability rate.

  18. Evaluation of the discriminatory power of variable number of tandem repeat typing of Mycobacterium bovis isolates from southern Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlokwe, T M; van Helden, P; Michel, A

    2013-11-01

    The usefulness of variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) typing based on limited numbers of loci has previously proven inferior compared to IS6110-RFLP typing when applied to the study of the molecular epidemiology of bovine tuberculosis (BTB) in both livestock and wildlife in southern Africa. In this study, the discriminatory power of 29 published VNTR loci in the characterization of 131 Mycobacterium bovis strains isolated predominantly from wildlife and a smaller number from livestock in southern Africa was assessed. Allelic diversities calculated when loci were evaluated on a selected panel of 23 M. bovis isolates with identified varying degrees of genetic relatedness from different geographic origins as well as M. bovis BCG ranged from 0.00 to 0.63. Of the 29 loci tested, 13 were polymorphic (QUB 11a, QUB 11b, QUB 18, ETR-B and -C, Mtub 21, MIRU 16 and 26, ETR-E, QUB 26, MIRU 23, ETR-A, and Mtub 12). In addition, a comparative evaluation of the 13 loci on a panel of 65 isolates previously characterized by IS6110 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) typing and further evaluation on 41 isolates with no typing history from Kruger National Park (KNP) highlighted that M. bovis from epidemiologically unrelated cases of BTB in different geographic regions can be adequately distinguished. However, there is a need for improvement of the method to fully discriminate between the parental KNP strain and its clones to allow the detection of evolutionary events causing transmission between and within wildlife species.

  19. Genetic variation and population structure of Sudanese populations as indicated by 15 Identifiler sequence-tagged repeat (STR loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babiker Hiba MA

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is substantial ethnic, cultural and linguistic diversity among the people living in east Africa, Sudan and the Nile Valley. The region around the Nile Valley has a long history of succession of different groups, coupled with demographic and migration events, potentially leading to genetic structure among humans in the region. Result We report the genotypes of the 15 Identifiler microsatellite markers for 498 individuals from 18 Sudanese populations representing different ethnic and linguistic groups. The combined power of exclusion (PE was 0.9999981, and the combined match probability was 1 in 7.4 × 1017. The genotype data from the Sudanese populations was combined with previously published genotype data from Egypt, Somalia and the Karamoja population from Uganda. The Somali population was found to be genetically distinct from the other northeast African populations. Individuals from northern Sudan clustered together with those from Egypt, and individuals from southern Sudan clustered with those from the Karamoja population. The similarity of the Nubian and Egyptian populations suggest that migration, potentially bidirectional, occurred along the Nile river Valley, which is consistent with the historical evidence for long-term interactions between Egypt and Nubia. Conclusion We show that despite the levels of population structure in Sudan, standard forensic summary statistics are robust tools for personal identification and parentage analysis in Sudan. Although some patterns of population structure can be revealed with 15 microsatellites, a much larger set of genetic markers is needed to detect fine-scale population structure in east Africa and the Nile Valley.

  20. Mutation analysis of 24 short tandem repeats in Chinese Han population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dejian; Liu, Qiuling; Wu, Weiwei; Zhao, Hu

    2012-03-01

    Germline mutations of 24 short tandem repeat (STR) loci (TPOX, D3S1358, FGA, D5S818, CSF1PO, D7S820, D8S1179, TH01, vWA, D13S317, Penta E, D16S539, D18S51, Penta D, D21S11, D2S1772, D6S1043, D7S3048, D8S1132, D11S2368, D12S391, D13S325, D18S1364, and GATA198B05) were studied for 6,441 parent-child meioses taken from the paternity testing cases in Chinese Han population. In total, 195 mutations were identified at 22 of the 24 loci. Among them, 189 (96.92%) mutations were one step, five mutations (2.56%) were two step, and one mutation (0.51%) was three step. No mutation was found at the TH01 and TPOX loci. The overall mutation rate estimated was 0.0013 (95% CI 0.0011-0.0015), and the locus-specific mutation rate estimated ranged from 0 to 0.0034. There was a bias in the STR mutations that repeat gains were more common than losses (∼1.7:1). Mutation events in the male germline were more frequent than in the female germline (∼4.3:1). Furthermore, loci with a larger heterozygosity tended to have a higher mutation rate. Mutation in short alleles was biased towards expansion, whereas mutation in long alleles favored contraction. The long alleles have a higher allelic mutational probability than short alleles.

  1. Colocalization of Multiple DNA Loci: A Physical Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Valentino; Scialdone, Antonio; Nicodemi, Mario

    2012-01-01

    A variety of important cellular processes require, for functional purposes, the colocalization of multiple DNA loci at specific time points. In most cases, the physical mechanisms responsible for bringing them in close proximity are still elusive. Here we show that the interaction of DNA loci with a concentration of diffusing molecular factors can induce spontaneously their colocalization, through a mechanism based on a thermodynamic phase transition. We consider up to four DNA loci and different valencies for diffusing molecular factors. In particular, our analysis illustrates that a variety of nontrivial stable spatial configurations is allowed in the system, depending on the details of the molecular factor/DNA binding-sites interaction. Finally, we discuss as a case study an application of our model to the pairing of X chromosome at X inactivation, one of the best-known examples of DNA colocalization. We also speculate on the possible links between X colocalization and inactivation. PMID:23200056

  2. Physiologic characterization of type 2 diabetes-related loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grarup, Niels; Sparsø, Thomas; Hansen, Torben

    2010-01-01

    of these variants influence pancreatic ß-cell function. However, risk alleles in five loci seem to have a primary impact on insulin sensitivity. Investigations of more detailed physiologic phenotypes, such as the insulin response to intravenous glucose or the incretion hormones, are now emerging and give...... indications of more specific pathologic mechanisms for diabetes-related risk variants. Such studies have shed light on the function of some loci but also underlined the complex nature of disease mechanism. In the future, sequencing-based discovery of low-frequency variants with higher impact on intermediate...

  3. Strategie di spazializzazione dei contenuti nel GeniusLoci Digitale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Gasperi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available GeniusLoci Digitale is a software architecture of virtual tour that integrates various multimedia technologies (3D computer graphics, panoramas, dynamic maps, movies, pictures to represent the identity of places. The designer is interested in reproducing virtually complex aspects that define a context, which means the effect of meaning that distinguishes one place. GeniusLoci Digitale is in fact an architecture that evolves in search of a reproductive and communicative function which is recognizable to extend its development to the Open Source community.

  4. 52 Genetic Loci Influencing Myocardial Mass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Harst, Pim; van Setten, Jessica; Verweij, Niek

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Myocardial mass is a key determinant of cardiac muscle function and hypertrophy. Myocardial depolarization leading to cardiac muscle contraction is reflected by the amplitude and duration of the QRS complex on the electrocardiogram (ECG). Abnormal QRS amplitude or duration reflect......, and transcription factor binding, suggesting that they represent regions of the genome that are actively transcribed in the human heart. Pathway analyses provided evidence that these loci play a role in cardiac hypertrophy. We further highlighted 67 candidate genes at the identified loci that are preferentially...

  5. Confirmation of novel type 1 diabetes risk loci in families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooper, J D; Howson, J M M; Smyth, D

    2012-01-01

    Over 50 regions of the genome have been associated with type 1 diabetes risk, mainly using large case/control collections. In a recent genome-wide association (GWA) study, 18 novel susceptibility loci were identified and replicated, including replication evidence from 2,319 families. Here, we......, the Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium (T1DGC), aimed to exclude the possibility that any of the 18 loci were false-positives due to population stratification by significantly increasing the statistical power of our family study....

  6. Origin and fate of repeats in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achaz, G; Rocha, E P C; Netter, P; Coissac, E

    2002-07-01

    We investigated 53 complete bacterial chromosomes for intrachromosomal repeats. In previous studies on eukaryote chromosomes, we proposed a model for the dynamics of repeats based on the continuous genesis of tandem repeats, followed by an active process of high deletion rate, counteracted by rearrangement events that may prevent the repeats from being deleted. The present study of long repeats in the genomes of Bacteria and Archaea suggests that our model of interspersed repeats dynamics may apply to them. Thus the duplication process might be a consequence of very ancient mechanisms shared by all three domains. Moreover, we show that there is a strong negative correlation between nucleotide composition bias and the repeat density of genomes. We hypothesise that in highly biased genomes, non-duplicated small repeats arise more frequently by random effects and are used as primers for duplication mechanisms, leading to a higher density of large repeats.

  7. Extended gene diversity at the FMR1 locus and neighbouring CA repeats in a sub-Saharan population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiurazzi, Genuardi, M.; Neri, G. [Instituto di Genetica Medica, Roma (Italy)] [and others

    1996-07-12

    We report on the allele distributions in a normal black African population at two microsatellite loci neighbouring the FRAXA locus and at the CGG repeat in the 5{prime} end of the FMR1 gene, which causes the fragile X syndrome. The CGG repeat distribution was found to be similar to that of other ethnic groups, as well as to that of other non-human primates, possibly predicting a comparable prevalence of fragile X in Africa. Significant linkage disequilibrium has been observed between fragile X mutations and alleles of the DXS548 and FRAXAC1 loci in European and Asian populations, and some founder chromosomes may be extremely old. Those associated with FRAXAC1-A and DXS548-2 alleles are not present in the Asian fragile X samples. We searched for these alleles and their frequency in the well defined Bamileke population of Cameroon. All previously described alleles and some new ones were found in this sample, supporting the hypothesis of their pre-existence and subsequent loss in Asian populations. Finally, the heterozygosity of the Bamileke sample was significantly higher at both marker loci and comparable to that of Europeans at the CGG repeat, confirming the notion that genetic diversity is greater in Africans than in other groups and supporting the view that evolution of modern man started in Africa. 31 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  8. Genome-wide stochastic adaptive DNA amplification at direct and inverted DNA repeats in the parasite Leishmania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Michel Ubeda

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Gene amplification of specific loci has been described in all kingdoms of life. In the protozoan parasite Leishmania, the product of amplification is usually part of extrachromosomal circular or linear amplicons that are formed at the level of direct or inverted repeated sequences. A bioinformatics screen revealed that repeated sequences are widely distributed in the Leishmania genome and the repeats are chromosome-specific, conserved among species, and generally present in low copy number. Using sensitive PCR assays, we provide evidence that the Leishmania genome is continuously being rearranged at the level of these repeated sequences, which serve as a functional platform for constitutive and stochastic amplification (and deletion of genomic segments in the population. This process is adaptive as the copy number of advantageous extrachromosomal circular or linear elements increases upon selective pressure and is reversible when selection is removed. We also provide mechanistic insights on the formation of circular and linear amplicons through RAD51 recombinase-dependent and -independent mechanisms, respectively. The whole genome of Leishmania is thus stochastically rearranged at the level of repeated sequences, and the selection of parasite subpopulations with changes in the copy number of specific loci is used as a strategy to respond to a changing environment.

  9. Genome-wide stochastic adaptive DNA amplification at direct and inverted DNA repeats in the parasite Leishmania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubeda, Jean-Michel; Raymond, Frédéric; Mukherjee, Angana; Plourde, Marie; Gingras, Hélène; Roy, Gaétan; Lapointe, Andréanne; Leprohon, Philippe; Papadopoulou, Barbara; Corbeil, Jacques; Ouellette, Marc

    2014-05-01

    Gene amplification of specific loci has been described in all kingdoms of life. In the protozoan parasite Leishmania, the product of amplification is usually part of extrachromosomal circular or linear amplicons that are formed at the level of direct or inverted repeated sequences. A bioinformatics screen revealed that repeated sequences are widely distributed in the Leishmania genome and the repeats are chromosome-specific, conserved among species, and generally present in low copy number. Using sensitive PCR assays, we provide evidence that the Leishmania genome is continuously being rearranged at the level of these repeated sequences, which serve as a functional platform for constitutive and stochastic amplification (and deletion) of genomic segments in the population. This process is adaptive as the copy number of advantageous extrachromosomal circular or linear elements increases upon selective pressure and is reversible when selection is removed. We also provide mechanistic insights on the formation of circular and linear amplicons through RAD51 recombinase-dependent and -independent mechanisms, respectively. The whole genome of Leishmania is thus stochastically rearranged at the level of repeated sequences, and the selection of parasite subpopulations with changes in the copy number of specific loci is used as a strategy to respond to a changing environment.

  10. Improving repeatability by improving quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronen, Shuki; Ackers, Mark; Schlumberger, Geco-Prakla; Brink, Mundy

    1998-12-31

    Time lapse (4-D) seismic is a promising tool for reservoir characterization and monitoring. The method is apparently simple: to acquire data repeatedly over the same reservoir, process and interpret the data sets, then changes between the data sets indicate changes in the reservoir. A problem with time lapse seismic data is that reservoirs are a relatively small part of the earth and important reservoir changes may cause very small differences to the time lapse data. The challenge is to acquire and process economical time lapse data such that reservoir changes can be detected above the noise of varying acquisition and environment. 7 refs., 9 figs.

  11. Coordinated hybrid automatic repeat request

    KAUST Repository

    Makki, Behrooz

    2014-11-01

    We develop a coordinated hybrid automatic repeat request (HARQ) approach. With the proposed scheme, if a user message is correctly decoded in the first HARQ rounds, its spectrum is allocated to other users, to improve the network outage probability and the users\\' fairness. The results, which are obtained for single- and multiple-antenna setups, demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed approach in different conditions. For instance, with a maximum of M retransmissions and single transmit/receive antennas, the diversity gain of a user increases from M to (J+1)(M-1)+1 where J is the number of users helping that user.

  12. Nine Loci for Ocular Axial Length Identified through Genome-wide Association Studies, Including Shared Loci with Refractive Error

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Ching-Yu; Schache, Maria; Ikram, M. Kamran; Young, Terri L.; Guggenheim, Jeremy A.; Vitart, Veronique; MacGregor, Stuart; Verhoeven, Virginie J.M.; Barathi, Veluchamy A.; Liao, Jiemin; Hysi, Pirro G.; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E.; St. Pourcain, Beate; Kemp, John P.; McMahon, George

    2013-01-01

    Refractive errors are common eye disorders of public health importance worldwide. Ocular axial length (AL) is the major determinant of refraction and thus of myopia and hyperopia. We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for AL, combining 12,531 Europeans and 8,216 Asians. We identified eight genome-wide significant loci for AL (RSPO1, C3orf26, LAMA2, GJD2, ZNRF3, CD55, MIP, and ALPPL2) and confirmed one previously reported AL locus (ZC3H11B). Of the nine loci, five (LA...

  13. Microsatellite loci for the invasive colonial hydrozoan Cordylophora caspia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordylophora caspia, a colonial hydrozoan native to the Ponto-Caspian region, has become a common invader of both fresh and brackish water ecosystems of North America and Europe. Here we describe 11 polymorphic microsatellite loci for this species. Preliminary analyses indicate ...

  14. Genetic mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) with effects on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-02-05

    Feb 5, 2008 ... 2Department of Crop Protection and Environmental Biology, ... identify genetic loci associated with the expression of resistance to FTh. ... indicated that resistance to FTh may be controlled by ... population or to pyramid resistance into new populations. .... environment and human health (Eigenbrode and.

  15. Combined effects of multiple linked loci on pairwise sibling tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Tomonori; Osawa, Motoki; Kakimoto, Yu; Ochiai, Eriko; Suzuki, Takanori; Nakamura, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    The advanced multiplex STR system, PowerPlex Fusion, includes four linked locus pairs. The conventional Identifiler system has one pair of linked loci. Therefore, sibling tests conducted using the advanced system might be more affected by linkage than those conducted using the conventional system. This study simulated single and combined effects of the four linked locus pairs on pairwise sibling tests. Simulated genotypes of 100,000 pairs of full siblings and nonrelatives were constructed according to allele frequencies of the Japanese population. The single linkage effect was evaluated for simulated genotype data by calculating both the likelihood ratio accounting for the linkage between two loci and the likelihood ratio ignoring the linkage. The combined effect was obtained by multiplication of the respective single effects. Furthermore, we investigated the possibility that ignoring the linkage affects subject classification by introducing a scale of the likelihood ratio into sibling tests. The single effect in the Identifiler analysis was 0.645-1.746 times if the linkage was ignored. Overestimations and underestimations were predictable from the identical-by-state status at two linked loci. The combined effect in the PowerPlex Fusion analysis was 0.217-7.390 times. Ignoring the linkage rarely caused a false conclusive or inconclusive result, even from PowerPlex Fusion analysis. Application of the advanced system improved sibling tests considerably. The additional examined loci were more beneficial than the adverse effect of the linkage derived from the four linked locus pairs.

  16. Linkage relationships of 19 enzyme Loci in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, M M; Stuber, C W; Newton, K; Weissinger, H H

    1980-11-01

    Linkage relationships of 19 enzyme loci have been examined. The chromosomal locations of eight of these loci are formally reported for the first time in this paper. These localizations should assist in the construction of additional useful chromosome marker stocks, especially since several of these enzyme loci lie in regions that were previously poorly mapped. Six loci are on the long arm of chromosome 1. The arrangement is (centromere)-Mdh4-mmm-Pgm1-Adh1-Phi-Gdh1, with about 46% recombination between Mdh4 and Gdh1.-Linkage studies with a2 and pr have resulted in the localization of four enzyme genes to chromosome 5 with arrangement Pgm2-Mdh5-Got3-a2-(centromere)-pr-Got2. Pgm2 lies approximately 35 map units distal to a2 in a previously unmapped region of the short arm of 5, beyond ameiotic.-Approximately 23% recombination was observed between Mdh4 and Pgm1 on chromosome 1, while 17% recombination occurred between Mdh5 and Pgm2 on chromosome 5. Similarly, linkages between Idh1 and Mdh1, about 22 map units apart on chromosome 8, and between Mdh2 and Idh2, less than 5 map units apart on chromosome 6, were observed. Thus, segments of chromosomes 1 and 5 and segments of 6 and 8 may represent duplications on nonhomologous chromosomes.

  17. A multigene phylogeny of the Dothideomycetes using four nuclear loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoch, C.; Shoemaker, R.A.; Seifert, K.; Hambleton, S.; Spatafora, J.W.; Crous, P.W.

    2006-01-01

    We present an expanded multigene phylogeny of the Dothideomycetes. The final data matrix consisted of four loci (nuc SSU rDNA, nuc LSU rDNA, TEF1, RPB2) for 96 taxa, representing five of the seven orders in the current classification of Dothideomycetes and several outgroup taxa representative of the

  18. Failure Loci of Suction Caisson Foundations Under Combined Loading Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Dong; JIN Xia

    2008-01-01

    Suction caissons are widely used to support offshore fixed platforms in coastal areas. The loadings transferred to suction caissons include the eccentric lateral force induced by waves and self weight of the platform structure. However, under this kind of combined loading conditions, the failure mechanism of caissons with shallow embedment depths is quite different from conventional deep foundations or onshore shallow footings. The behaviour of caissons subjected to combined loadings may be described with the "failure locus" in force resultant spaces. Here the failure loci of smooth caissons are studied by use of finite element approach, with the embedment ratio of caissons varying in the range of 0.25~1.0 and eccentricity ratio of horizontal loadings in 0~10. The platform settlement and tilt limits are involved into determination of failure loci, thus the platforms can avoid significant displacements for the combined loadings located inside the failure locus. Three families of loading paths are used to map out the locus. It is found that the shape of failure loci depends on 3 non-dimensional parameters, and the failure locus of a given caisson changes gradually from the elliptical curve to hooked curve with increasing shear strength of soil. The lateral capacity of short caissons may be enhanced by vertical forces, compared with the maximum lateral capacity of long caissons occurring at the vertical force being zero. The critical embedment ratios partitioning elliptical and hooked loci are proposed.

  19. Novel Associations of Nonstructural Loci with Paraoxonase Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen E. Quillen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The high-density-lipoprotein-(HDL- associated esterase paraoxonase 1 (PON1 is a likely contributor to the antioxidant and antiatherosclerotic capabilities of HDL. Two nonsynonymous mutations in the structural gene, PON1, have been associated with variation in activity levels, but substantial interindividual differences remain unexplained and are greatest for substrates other than the eponymous paraoxon. PON1 activity levels were measured for three substrates—organophosphate paraoxon, arylester phenyl acetate, and lactone dihydrocoumarin—in 767 Mexican American individuals from San Antonio, Texas. Genetic influences on activity levels for each substrate were evaluated by association with approximately one million single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs while conditioning on PON1 genotypes. Significant associations were detected at five loci including regions on chromosomes 4 and 17 known to be associated with atherosclerosis and lipoprotein regulation and loci on chromosome 3 that regulate ubiquitous transcription factors. These loci explain 7.8% of variation in PON1 activity with lactone as a substrate, 5.6% with the arylester, and 3.0% with paraoxon. In light of the potential importance of PON1 in preventing cardiovascular disease/events, these novel loci merit further investigation.

  20. Geometry of Brill-Noether loci on Prym varieties

    CERN Document Server

    Hoering, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Given the Prym variety of an \\'etale double cover one can define analogues of the classical Brill-Noether loci on Jacobians of curves. Recent work by Lahoz and Naranjo shows that the Brill-Noether locus V^2 completely determines the covering. In this paper we describe the singular locus and the irreducible components of V^2.

  1. A multigene phylogeny of the Dothideomycetes using four nuclear loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoch, C.L.; Shoemaker, R.A.; Seifert, K.A.; Hambleton, S.; Spatafora, J.W.; Crous, P.W.

    2006-01-01

    We present an expanded multigene phylogeny of the Dothideomycetes. The final data matrix consisted of four loci (nuc SSU rDNA, nuc LSU rDNA, TEF1, RPB2) for 96 taxa, representing five of the seven orders in the current classification of Dothideomycetes and several outgroup taxa representative of the

  2. Hidden landscapes: the metropolitan garden and the genius loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De wit, S.I.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis aims at the landscape architecture of the enclosed garden as an expression of the genius loci: definition, analysis, typology and transformation. The process of metropolisation tends to eliminate, or at least hide, the underlying landscape. The research addresses the question of how the

  3. STR data for the 13 CODIS loci in Singapore Malays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, H C; Sornarajah, R; Lim, S E S; Syn, C K C; Tan-Siew, W F; Chow, S T; Budowle, Bruce

    2005-03-10

    Allele frequencies for the 13 CODIS (Combined DNA Index System, USA) STR loci included in the AmpFISTR Profiler Plus and AmpFISTR Cofiler kits (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, USA) were determined in a sample of 197 unrelated Malays in Singapore.

  4. Overdominant quantitative trait loci for yield and fitness in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semel, Yaniv; Nissenbaum, Jonathan; Menda, Naama; Zinder, Michael; Krieger, Uri; Issman, Noa; Pleban, Tzili; Lippman, Zachary; Gur, Amit; Zamir, Dani

    2006-08-29

    Heterosis, or hybrid vigor, is a major genetic force that contributes to world food production. The genetic basis of heterosis is not clear, and the importance of loci with overdominant (ODO) effects is debated. One problem has been the use of whole-genome segregating populations, where interactions often mask the effects of individual loci. To assess the contribution of ODO to heterosis in the absence of epistasis, we carried out quantitative genetic and phenotypic analyses on a population of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) introgression lines (ILs), which carry single marker-defined chromosome segments from the distantly related wild species Solanum pennellii. The ILs revealed 841 quantitative trait loci (QTL) for 35 diverse traits measured in the field on homozygous and heterozygous plants. ILs showing greater reproductive fitness were characterized by the prevalence of ODO QTL, which were virtually absent for the nonreproductive traits. ODO can result from true ODO due to allelic interactions of a single gene or from pseudoODO that involves linked loci with dominant alleles in repulsion. The fact that we detected dominant and recessive QTL for all phenotypic categories but ODO only for the reproductive traits indicates that pseudoODO due to random linkage is unlikely to explain heterosis in the ILs. Thus, we favor the true ODO model involving a single functional Mendelian locus. We propose that the alliance of ODO QTL with higher reproductive fitness was selected for in evolution and was domesticated by man to improve yields of crop plants.

  5. Blood Pressure Loci Identified with a Gene-Centric Array

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnson, Toby; Gaunt, Tom R.; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Kumari, Meena; Morris, Richard W.; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; O'Brien, Eoin T.; Poulter, Neil R.; Sever, Peter; Shields, Denis C.; Thom, Simon; Wannamethee, Sasiwarang G.; Whincup, Peter H.; Brown, Morris J.; Connell, John M.; Dobson, Richard J.; Howard, Philip J.; Mein, Charles A.; Onipinla, Abiodun; Shaw-Hawkins, Sue; Zhang, Yun; Smith, George Davey; Day, Ian N. M.; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Goodall, Alison H.; Fowkes, F. Gerald; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Elliott, Paul; Gateva, Vesela; Braund, Peter S.; Burton, Paul R.; Nelson, Christopher P.; Tobin, Martin D.; van der Harst, Pim; Glorioso, Nicola; Neuvrith, Hani; Salvi, Erika; Staessen, Jan A.; Stucchi, Andrea; Devos, Nabila; Jeunemaitre, Xavier; Plouin, Pierre-Francois; Tichet, Jean; Juhanson, Peeter; Org, Elin; Putku, Margus; Sober, Siim; Veldre, Gudrun; Viigimaa, Margus; Levinsson, Anna; Rosengren, Annika; Thelle, Dag S.; Hastie, Claire E.; Hedner, Thomas; Lee, Wai K.; Melander, Olle; Wahlstrand, Bjoern; Hardy, Rebecca; Wong, Andrew; Cooper, Jackie A.; Palmen, Jutta; Chen, Li; Stewart, Alexandre F. R.; Wells, George A.; Westra, Harm-Jan; Wolfs, Marcel G. M.; Clarke, Robert; Franzosi, Maria Grazia; Goel, Anuj; Hamsten, Anders; Lathrop, Mark; Peden, John F.; Seedorf, Udo; Watkins, Hugh; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Sambrook, Jennifer; Stephens, Jonathan; Casas, Juan-Pablo; Drenos, Fotios; Holmes, Michael V.; Kivimaki, Mika; Shah, Sonia; Shah, Tina; Talmud, Philippa J.; Whittaker, John; Wallace, Chris; Delles, Christian; Laan, Mans; Kuh, Diana; Humphries, Steve E.; Nyberg, Fredrik; Cusi, Daniele; Roberts, Robert; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Franke, Lude; Stanton, Alice V.; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Farrall, Martin; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Munroe, Patricia B.

    2011-01-01

    Raised blood pressure (BP) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Previous studies have identified 47 distinct genetic variants robustly associated with BP, but collectively these explain only a few percent of the heritability for BP phenotypes. To find additional BP loci, we used a

  6. Blood Pressure Loci Identified with a Gene-Centric Array

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnson, Toby; Gaunt, Tom R.; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Kumari, Meena; Morris, Richard W.; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; O'Brien, Eoin T.; Poulter, Neil R.; Sever, Peter; Shields, Denis C.; Thom, Simon; Wannamethee, Sasiwarang G.; Whincup, Peter H.; Brown, Morris J.; Connell, John M.; Dobson, Richard J.; Howard, Philip J.; Mein, Charles A.; Onipinla, Abiodun; Shaw-Hawkins, Sue; Zhang, Yun; Smith, George Davey; Day, Ian N. M.; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Goodall, Alison H.; Fowkes, F. Gerald; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Elliott, Paul; Gateva, Vesela; Braund, Peter S.; Burton, Paul R.; Nelson, Christopher P.; Tobin, Martin D.; van der Harst, Pim; Glorioso, Nicola; Neuvrith, Hani; Salvi, Erika; Staessen, Jan A.; Stucchi, Andrea; Devos, Nabila; Jeunemaitre, Xavier; Plouin, Pierre-Francois; Tichet, Jean; Juhanson, Peeter; Org, Elin; Putku, Margus; Sober, Siim; Veldre, Gudrun; Viigimaa, Margus; Levinsson, Anna; Rosengren, Annika; Thelle, Dag S.; Hastie, Claire E.; Hedner, Thomas; Lee, Wai K.; Melander, Olle; Wahlstrand, Bjoern; Hardy, Rebecca; Wong, Andrew; Cooper, Jackie A.; Palmen, Jutta; Chen, Li; Stewart, Alexandre F. R.; Wells, George A.; Westra, Harm-Jan; Wolfs, Marcel G. M.; Clarke, Robert; Franzosi, Maria Grazia; Goel, Anuj; Hamsten, Anders; Lathrop, Mark; Peden, John F.; Seedorf, Udo; Watkins, Hugh; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Sambrook, Jennifer; Stephens, Jonathan; Casas, Juan-Pablo; Drenos, Fotios; Holmes, Michael V.; Kivimaki, Mika; Shah, Sonia; Shah, Tina; Talmud, Philippa J.; Whittaker, John; Wallace, Chris; Delles, Christian; Laan, Mans; Kuh, Diana; Humphries, Steve E.; Nyberg, Fredrik; Cusi, Daniele; Roberts, Robert; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Franke, Lude; Stanton, Alice V.; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Farrall, Martin; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Munroe, Patricia B.

    2011-01-01

    Raised blood pressure (BP) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Previous studies have identified 47 distinct genetic variants robustly associated with BP, but collectively these explain only a few percent of the heritability for BP phenotypes. To find additional BP loci, we used a besp

  7. Quantitative trait loci associated with anthracnose resistance in sorghum

    Science.gov (United States)

    With an aim to develop a durable resistance to the fungal disease anthracnose, two unique genetic sources of resistance were selected to create genetic mapping populations to identify regions of the sorghum genome that encode anthracnose resistance. A series of quantitative trait loci were identifi...

  8. Ancient conservation of trinucleotide microsatellite loci in polistine wasps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ezenwa, V O; Peters, J M; Zhu, Y

    1998-01-01

    Microsatellites have proven to be very useful genetic markers for studies of kinship, parentage, and gene mapping. If microsatellites are conserved among species, then those developed for one species can be used on related species, which would save the time and effort of developing new loci. We e...

  9. Distribution and characterization of staphylococcal interspersed repeat units (SIRUs) and potential use for strain differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hardy, K.J.; Ussery, David; Oppenheim, B.A.;

    2004-01-01

    in copy numbers were observed in all loci, within both the sequenced genomes and the UK epidemic methicillin-resistant S. aureus (EMRSA) isolates. Clonally related UK EMRSA isolates were clustered using SIRUs, which provided a greater degree of discrimination than multi-locus sequence typing, indicating......Variable-number tandem repeats (VNTRs) have been shown to be a powerful tool in the determination of evolutionary relationships and population genetics of bacteria. The sequencing of a number of Staphylococcus aureus genomes has allowed the identification of novel VNTR sequences in S. aureus, which...

  10. Crowding by a repeating pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Sarah; Pelli, Denis G

    2015-01-01

    Theinability to recognize a peripheral target among flankers is called crowding. For a foveal target, crowding can be distinguished from overlap masking by its sparing of detection, linear scaling with eccentricity, and invariance with target size.Crowding depends on the proximity and similarity of the flankers to the target. Flankers that are far from or dissimilar to the target do not crowd it. On a gray page, text whose neighboring letters have different colors, alternately black and white, has enough dissimilarity that it might escape crowding. Since reading speed is normally limited by crowding, escape from crowding should allow faster reading. Yet reading speed is unchanged (Chung & Mansfield, 2009). Why? A recent vernier study found that using alternating-color flankers produces strong crowding (Manassi, Sayim, & Herzog, 2012). Might that effect occur with letters and reading? Critical spacing is the minimum center-to-center target-flanker spacing needed to correctly identify the target. We measure it for a target letter surrounded by several equidistant flanker letters of the same polarity, opposite polarity, or mixed polarity: alternately white and black. We find strong crowding in the alternating condition, even though each flanker letter is beyond its own critical spacing (as measured in a separate condition). Thus a periodic repeating pattern can produce crowding even when the individual elements do not. Further, in all conditions we find that, once a periodic pattern repeats (two cycles), further repetition does not affect critical spacing of the innermost flanker.

  11. Establishment of Multiple Locus Variable-number Tandem Repeat Analysis Assay for Genotyping of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato Detected in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Xin; HOU Xue Xia; GENG Zhen; ZHAO Rui; WAN Kang Lin; HAO Qin

    2014-01-01

    Objective Human Lyme Borreliosis (LB), which is caused by Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (B. burgdorferi), has been identified as a major arthropod-borne infectious disease in China. We aimed to develop a multiple locus variable-number tandem repeat (VNTR) analysis (MLVA) assay for the genotyping of Borrelia burgdorferi strains detected in China. Methods B. garinii PBi complete 904.246 kb chromosome and two plasmids (cp26 and lp54) were screened by using Tandem Repeats Finder program for getting potential VNTR loci, the potential VNTR loci were analyzed and identified with PCR and the VNTR loci data were analyzed and MLVA clustering tree were constrcted by using the categorical coefficient and the unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic means (UPGMA). Results We identified 5 new VNTR loci through analyzing 47 potential VNTR loci. We used the MLVA protocol to analyse 101 B. burgdorferi strains detected in China and finally identified 51 unique genotypes in 4 major clusters including B. burgdorferi sensu stricto (B.b.s.s), B. garinii, B. afzelii, and B. valaisiana, consistent with the current MLSA phylogeny studies. The allele numbers of VNTR-1, VNTR-2, VNTR-3, VNTR-4, and VNTR-5 were 7, 3, 9, 7, and 6. The Hunter-Gaston index (HGI) of five VNTR loci were 0.79, 0.22, 0.77, 0.71, and 0.67, respectively. The combined HGI of five VNTR loci was 0.96. Clustering of the strains of Xinjiang, Inner Mongolia and Heilongjiang was confirmed, and this situation was consistent with the close geographical distribution of those provinces. Conclusion The MLVA protocol esytablished in this study is easy and can show strains’ phylogenetic relationships to distinguish the strains of Borrelia species. It is useful for further phylogenetic and epidemiological analyses of Borrelia strains.

  12. Selecting representative microsatellite loci for genetic monitoring and analyzing genetic structure of an outbred population of orange tabby cats in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, X Y; Yi, S; Huo, X Y; Wang, C; Liu, D F; Ren, W Z; Chen, Z W

    2015-03-13

    We optimized a panel of microsatellite markers from cat and tiger genetic data for efficient genetic monitoring and used it to analyze the genetic structure of an outbred cat stock in China. We selected a set of rich polymorphic microsatellite loci from 131 cat microsatellite loci and 3 Sumatran tiger microsatellite loci using agarose gel electrophoresis. Next, the set of optimized genetic markers was used to analyze the genetic variation in an outbred population of orange tabby cats in China by simple-tandem repeat scanning. Thirty-one loci rich in polymorphisms were selected and the highest allele number in a single locus was 8. Analysis of the orange tabby cat population illustrated that the average observed number of alleles, mean effective allele number, mean Shannon's information index, mean expected heterozygosity, and observed heterozygosity were 3.8387, 2.4027, 0.9787, 0.5565, and 0.5528, respectively. The 31 microsatellite markers used were polymorphic and suitable for analyzing the genetic structure of cats. The population of orange tabby cats was confirmed to be a well-outbred stock.

  13. Determining the Risk of Intra-Community Transmission of Tuberculosis in the Northwest of Iran Through 15 Loci Miru-Vntr Typing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afaghi-Gharamaleki, Ali; Moaddab, Seyyedreza; Darbouy, Mojtaba; Ansarin, Khalil; Hanifian, Shahram

    2017-01-01

    This study was carried out in order to investigating the effect of travelling on the transmission of tuberculosis from high- to low-burden TB countries. Mycobacteria samples isolated from patients of distinct and relatively co-related countries (Azerbaijan Republic and Tabriz [located in the northwest of Iran]) were analyzed through 15 loci MIRU-VNTR typing method. PCR was done using special primers for each of the loci; then the number of allele repeats for all loci were determined by the size of their fragments. Finally, the created numeric patterns for each isolate were analyzed and clustered, using MIRU-VNTRplus.org website. All 119 isolates dispersing at 106 distinct patterns were composed of 10 clusters with 23 members and 96 unique patterns. Nine and five loci had high and moderate discriminatory power, respectively, but only one of them was poor in clustering. The study showed that 89.08% of TB cases involved resulted from the reactivation pattern and 10.92% were related to ongoing transmission. Although Azerbaijan Republic is a higher-burden TB region than Tabriz and Azerbaijan people make frequent tours to Tabriz to receive low or free medical services, the findings showed no TB transmission from the regions at least during the year of the study.

  14. Automatization and familiarity in repeated checking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dek, Eliane C P; van den Hout, Marcel A.; Giele, Catharina L.; Engelhard, Iris M.

    2014-01-01

    Repeated checking paradoxically increases memory uncertainty. This study investigated the underlying mechanism of this effect. We hypothesized that as a result of repeated checking, familiarity with stimuli increases, and automatization of the checking procedure occurs, which should result in decrea

  15. CDC Vital Signs: Preventing Repeat Teen Births

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... file Error processing SSI file Preventing Repeat Teen Births Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On this ... Too many teens, ages 15–19, have repeat births. Nearly 1 in 5 births to teens, ages ...

  16. Origins of amino acid transporter loci in trypanosomatid parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson Andrew P

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Large amino acid transporter gene families were identified from the genome sequences of three parasitic protists, Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania major. These genes encode molecular sensors of the external host environment for trypanosomatid cells and are crucial to modulation of gene expression as the parasite passes through different life stages. This study provides a comprehensive phylogenetic account of the origins of these genes, redefining each locus according to a positional criterion, through the integration of phyletic identity with comparative gene order information. Results Each locus was individually specified by its surrounding gene order and associated with homologs showing the same position ('homoeologs' in other species, where available. Bayesian and maximum likelihood phylogenies were in general agreement on systematic relationships and confirmed several 'orthology sets' of genes retained since divergence from the common ancestor. Reconciliation analysis quantified the scale of duplication and gene loss, as well as identifying further apparent orthology sets, which lacked conservation of genomic position. These instances suggested substantial genomic restructuring or transposition. Other analyses identified clear instances of evolutionary rate changes post-duplication, the effects of concerted evolution within tandem gene arrays and gene conversion events between syntenic loci. Conclusion Despite their importance to cell function and parasite development, the repertoires of AAT loci in trypanosomatid parasites are relatively fluid in both complement and gene dosage. Some loci are ubiquitous and, after an ancient origin through transposition, originated through descent from the ancestral trypanosomatid. However, reconciliation analysis demonstrated that unilateral expansions of gene number through tandem gene duplication, transposition of gene duplicates to otherwise well conserved genomic

  17. Expanded complexity of unstable repeat diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Polak, Urszula; McIvor, Elizabeth; Dent, Sharon Y.R.; Wells, Robert D.; Napierala, Marek.

    2012-01-01

    Unstable Repeat Diseases (URDs) share a common mutational phenomenon of changes in the copy number of short, tandemly repeated DNA sequences. More than 20 human neurological diseases are caused by instability, predominantly expansion, of microsatellite sequences. Changes in the repeat size initiate a cascade of pathological processes, frequently characteristic of a unique disease or a small subgroup of the URDs. Understanding of both the mechanism of repeat instability and molecular consequen...

  18. 47 CFR 97.205 - Repeater station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Repeater station. 97.205 Section 97.205... SERVICE Special Operations § 97.205 Repeater station. (a) Any amateur station licensed to a holder of a Technician, General, Advanced or Amateur Extra Class operator license may be a repeater. A holder of...

  19. 47 CFR 22.1015 - Repeater operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Repeater operation. 22.1015 Section 22.1015... Offshore Radiotelephone Service § 22.1015 Repeater operation. Offshore central stations may be used as repeater stations provided that the licensee is able to maintain control of the station, and in...

  20. ProtRepeatsDB: a database of amino acid repeats in genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chauhan Virander S

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome wide and cross species comparisons of amino acid repeats is an intriguing problem in biology mainly due to the highly polymorphic nature and diverse functions of amino acid repeats. Innate protein repeats constitute vital functional and structural regions in proteins. Repeats are of great consequence in evolution of proteins, as evident from analysis of repeats in different organisms. In the post genomic era, availability of protein sequences encoded in different genomes provides a unique opportunity to perform large scale comparative studies of amino acid repeats. ProtRepeatsDB http://bioinfo.icgeb.res.in/repeats/ is a relational database of perfect and mismatch repeats, access to which is designed as a resource and collection of tools for detection and cross species comparisons of different types of amino acid repeats. Description ProtRepeatsDB (v1.2 consists of perfect as well as mismatch amino acid repeats in the protein sequences of 141 organisms, the genomes of which are now available. The web interface of ProtRepeatsDB consists of different tools to perform repeat s; based on protein IDs, organism name, repeat sequences, and keywords as in FASTA headers, size, frequency, gene ontology (GO annotation IDs and regular expressions (REGEXP describing repeats. These tools also allow formulation of a variety of simple, complex and logical queries to facilitate mining and large-scale cross-species comparisons of amino acid repeats. In addition to this, the database also contains sequence analysis tools to determine repeats in user input sequences. Conclusion ProtRepeatsDB is a multi-organism database of different types of amino acid repeats present in proteins. It integrates useful tools to perform genome wide queries for rapid screening and identification of amino acid repeats and facilitates comparative and evolutionary studies of the repeats. The database is useful for identification of species or organism specific

  1. Characterization of WAP2 gene in Aegilops tauschii and comparison with homoeologous loci in wheat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shun-Zong NING; Qi-Jiao CHEN; Zhong-Wei YUAN; Lian-Quan ZHANG; Ze-Hong YAN; You-Liang ZHENG; Deng-Cai LIU

    2009-01-01

    The Q/q gene, also known as WAP2, is an important gene for wheat domestication and is a member of the AP2 (APETALA2) class of transcription factors. In the present study, we first isolated the W~t AP2 allele (where the superscript "t" refers to the speciese source, in this case "tauschii") on chromosome 5D from Aegilops tauschii Coss., the D-genome donor species of common wheat. We found that W~t AP2 and the AP2 gene from Arabidopsis share a central core of the AP2 polypeptide, a highly basic 10-amino acid domain, and an AASSGF box, although there are many differences in the 37-amino acid serine-rich acidic domain and the remaining regions. In addition, W~t AP2 was highly homologous to the homoeologous loci on 5A and 5B of wheat at both the nucleotide and amino acid level. However, there were some variations that are probably related to gene function. In the first AP2 domain, the amino acids VYL on the 5D and 5A loci were replaced with LLR on 5B. In the 37-amino acid serine-rich acidic domain, W~t AP2 on 5D had an extra amino acid insertion. There was also a variation at the 329 amino acid position, which is thought to be related to the appearance of free-threshing wheat. At this position, the amino acid is isoleucine on 5A for the Q allele and valine for the q allele, whereas the amino acid is leucine on 5D and 5B. Furthermore, a Stowaway miniature terminal inverted repeat element (MITE) insertion was present in the ninth intron of WAP2 on 5B of all common wheats and partial tetraploid Triticum turgidum wheats. These results provide new clues for studies into the evolutionary biology of WAP2 and the origin of common wheat.

  2. Thousands of microsatellite loci from the venomous coralsnake (Micrurus fulvius) and variability of select loci across populations and related species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castoe, Todd A.; Streicher, Jeffrey W.; Meik, Jesse M.; Ingrasci, Matthew J.; Poole, Alexander W.; de Koning, A.P. Jason; Campbell, Jonathan A.; Parkinson, Christopher L.; Smith, Eric N.; Pollock, David D.

    2012-01-01

    Studies of population genetics increasingly use next-generation DNA sequencing to identify microsatellite loci in non-model organisms. There are, however, relatively few studies that validate the feasibility of transitioning from marker development to experimental application across populations and species. North American coralsnakes of the Micrurus fulvius species complex occur in the United States and Mexico, and little is known about their population structure and phylogenetic relationships. This absence of information and population genetics markers is particularly concerning because they are highly venomous and have important implications on human health. To alleviate this problem in coralsnakes, we investigated the feasibility of using 454 shotgun sequences for microsatellite marker development. First, a genomic shotgun library from a single individual was sequenced (~7.74 megabases; 26,831 reads) to identify potentially amplifiable microsatellite loci (PALs). We then hierarchically sampled 76 individuals from throughout the geographic distribution of the species complex and examined whether PALs were amplifiable and polymorphic. Approximately half of the loci tested were readily amplifiable from all individuals, and 80% of the loci tested for variation were variable and thus informative as population genetic markers. To evaluate the repetitive landscape characteristics across multiple snakes, we also compared microsatellite content between the coralsnake and two other previously sampled snakes, the venomous copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix) and Burmese python (Python molurus). PMID:22938699

  3. Thousands of microsatellite loci from the venomous coralsnake Micrurus fulvius and variability of select loci across populations and related species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castoe, Todd A; Streicher, Jeffrey W; Meik, Jesse M; Ingrasci, Matthew J; Poole, Alexander W; de Koning, A P Jason; Campbell, Jonathan A; Parkinson, Christopher L; Smith, Eric N; Pollock, David D

    2012-11-01

    Studies of population genetics increasingly use next-generation DNA sequencing to identify microsatellite loci in nonmodel organisms. There are, however, relatively few studies that validate the feasibility of transitioning from marker development to experimental application across populations and species. North American coralsnakes of the Micrurus fulvius species complex occur in the United States and Mexico, and little is known about their population structure and phylogenetic relationships. This absence of information and population genetics markers is particularly concerning because they are highly venomous and have important implications on human health. To alleviate this problem in coralsnakes, we investigated the feasibility of using 454 shotgun sequences for microsatellite marker development. First, a genomic shotgun library from a single individual was sequenced (approximately 7.74 megabases; 26,831 reads) to identify potentially amplifiable microsatellite loci (PALs). We then hierarchically sampled 76 individuals from throughout the geographic distribution of the species complex and examined whether PALs were amplifiable and polymorphic. Approximately half of the loci tested were readily amplifiable from all individuals, and 80% of the loci tested for variation were variable and thus informative as population genetic markers. To evaluate the repetitive landscape characteristics across multiple snakes, we also compared microsatellite content between the coralsnake and two other previously sampled snakes, the venomous copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix) and Burmese python (Python molurus). © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Genetic association studies in complex disease : Disentangling additional predisposing loci from associated neutral loci using a constrained - permutation approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spijker, G T; Nolte, I.M.; Jansen, R.C.; te Meerman, G.J.

    2005-01-01

    In the process of genetically mapping a complex disease, the question may arise whether a certain polymorphism is the only causal variant in a region. A number of methods can answer this question, but unfortunately these methods are optimal for bi-allelic loci only. We wanted to develop a method tha

  5. A high-density consensus map of barley linking DArT markers to SSR, RFLP and STS loci and agricultural traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Junping

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular marker technologies are undergoing a transition from largely serial assays measuring DNA fragment sizes to hybridization-based technologies with high multiplexing levels. Diversity Arrays Technology (DArT is a hybridization-based technology that is increasingly being adopted by barley researchers. There is a need to integrate the information generated by DArT with previous data produced with gel-based marker technologies. The goal of this study was to build a high-density consensus linkage map from the combined datasets of ten populations, most of which were simultaneously typed with DArT and Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR, Restriction Enzyme Fragment Polymorphism (RFLP and/or Sequence Tagged Site (STS markers. Results The consensus map, built using a combination of JoinMap 3.0 software and several purpose-built perl scripts, comprised 2,935 loci (2,085 DArT, 850 other loci and spanned 1,161 cM. It contained a total of 1,629 'bins' (unique loci, with an average inter-bin distance of 0.7 ± 1.0 cM (median = 0.3 cM. More than 98% of the map could be covered with a single DArT assay. The arrangement of loci was very similar to, and almost as optimal as, the arrangement of loci in component maps built for individual populations. The locus order of a synthetic map derived from merging the component maps without considering the segregation data was only slightly inferior. The distribution of loci along chromosomes indicated centromeric suppression of recombination in all chromosomes except 5H. DArT markers appeared to have a moderate tendency toward hypomethylated, gene-rich regions in distal chromosome areas. On the average, 14 ± 9 DArT loci were identified within 5 cM on either side of SSR, RFLP or STS loci previously identified as linked to agricultural traits. Conclusion Our barley consensus map provides a framework for transferring genetic information between different marker systems and for deploying DArT markers in

  6. Impacts of Instructor and Student Loci of Commitment on Biology Learning for Prospective Elementary School Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscovici, Hedy

    1998-01-01

    Explores the dynamics in the loci of commitment of several participants in a university-level biology course developed for elementary school teachers. Concentrates on two instructors with almost opposing loci of commitment. Contains 19 references. (DDR)

  7. Impacts of Instructor and Student Loci of Commitment on Biology Learning for Prospective Elementary School Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscovici, Hedy

    1998-01-01

    Explores the dynamics in the loci of commitment of several participants in a university-level biology course developed for elementary school teachers. Concentrates on two instructors with almost opposing loci of commitment. Contains 19 references. (DDR)

  8. Low penetrance breast cancer susceptibility loci are associated with specific breast tumor subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broeks, Annegien; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Sherman, Mark E

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancers demonstrate substantial biological, clinical and etiological heterogeneity. We investigated breast cancer risk associations of eight susceptibility loci identified in GWAS and two putative susceptibility loci in candidate genes in relation to specific breast tumor subtypes. Subtype...

  9. Sequences spanning the leader-repeat junction mediate CRISPR adaptation to phage in Streptococcus thermophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yunzhou; Chesne, Megan T; Terns, Rebecca M; Terns, Michael P

    2015-02-18

    CRISPR-Cas systems are RNA-based immune systems that protect prokaryotes from invaders such as phages and plasmids. In adaptation, the initial phase of the immune response, short foreign DNA fragments are captured and integrated into host CRISPR loci to provide heritable defense against encountered foreign nucleic acids. Each CRISPR contains a ∼100-500 bp leader element that typically includes a transcription promoter, followed by an array of captured ∼35 bp sequences (spacers) sandwiched between copies of an identical ∼35 bp direct repeat sequence. New spacers are added immediately downstream of the leader. Here, we have analyzed adaptation to phage infection in Streptococcus thermophilus at the CRISPR1 locus to identify cis-acting elements essential for the process. We show that the leader and a single repeat of the CRISPR locus are sufficient for adaptation in this system. Moreover, we identified a leader sequence element capable of stimulating adaptation at a dormant repeat. We found that sequences within 10 bp of the site of integration, in both the leader and repeat of the CRISPR, are required for the process. Our results indicate that information at the CRISPR leader-repeat junction is critical for adaptation in this Type II-A system and likely other CRISPR-Cas systems.

  10. Changes in Variable Number of Tandem Repeats in 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' through Insect Transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Katoh

    Full Text Available Citrus greening (huanglongbing is the most destructive citrus disease worldwide. The disease is associated with three species of 'Candidatus Liberibacter' among which 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus' has the widest distribution. 'Ca. L. asiaticus' is commonly transmitted by a phloem-feeding insect vector, the Asian citrus psyllid Diaphorina citri. A previous study showed that isolates of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' were clearly differentiated by variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR profiles at four loci in the genome. In this study, the VNTR analysis was further validated by assessing the stability of these repeats after multiplication of the pathogen upon host-to-host transmission using a 'Ca. L. asiaticus' strain from Japan. The results showed that some tandem repeats showed detectable changes after insect transmission. To our knowledge, this is the first report to demonstrate that the repeat numbers VNTR 002 and 077 of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' change through psyllid transmission. VNTRs in the recipient plant were apparently unrelated to the growing phase of the vector. In contrast, changes in the number of tandem repeats increased with longer acquisition and inoculation access periods, whereas changes were not observed through psyllid transmission after relatively short acquisition and inoculation access periods, up to 20 and 19 days, respectively.

  11. Characterization of new Schistosoma mansoni microsatellite loci in sequences obtained from public DNA databases and microsatellite enriched genomic libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigues NB

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade microsatellites have become one of the most useful genetic markers used in a large number of organisms due to their abundance and high level of polymorphism. Microsatellites have been used for individual identification, paternity tests, forensic studies and population genetics. Data on microsatellite abundance comes preferentially from microsatellite enriched libraries and DNA sequence databases. We have conducted a search in GenBank of more than 16,000 Schistosoma mansoni ESTs and 42,000 BAC sequences. In addition, we obtained 300 sequences from CA and AT microsatellite enriched genomic libraries. The sequences were searched for simple repeats using the RepeatMasker software. Of 16,022 ESTs, we detected 481 (3% sequences that contained 622 microsatellites (434 perfect, 164 imperfect and 24 compounds. Of the 481 ESTs, 194 were grouped in 63 clusters containing 2 to 15 ESTs per cluster. Polymorphisms were observed in 16 clusters. The 287 remaining ESTs were orphan sequences. Of the 42,017 BAC end sequences, 1,598 (3.8% contained microsatellites (2,335 perfect, 287 imperfect and 79 compounds. The 1,598 BAC end sequences 80 were grouped into 17 clusters containing 3 to 17 BAC end sequences per cluster. Microsatellites were present in 67 out of 300 sequences from microsatellite enriched libraries (55 perfect, 38 imperfect and 15 compounds. From all of the observed loci 55 were selected for having the longest perfect repeats and flanking regions that allowed the design of primers for PCR amplification. Additionally we describe two new polymorphic microsatellite loci.

  12. Characterization of new Schistosoma mansoni microsatellite loci in sequences obtained from public DNA databases and microsatellite enriched genomic libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, N B; Loverde, P T; Romanha, A J; Oliveira, G

    2002-01-01

    In the last decade microsatellites have become one of the most useful genetic markers used in a large number of organisms due to their abundance and high level of polymorphism. Microsatellites have been used for individual identification, paternity tests, forensic studies and population genetics. Data on microsatellite abundance comes preferentially from microsatellite enriched libraries and DNA sequence databases. We have conducted a search in GenBank of more than 16,000 Schistosoma mansoni ESTs and 42,000 BAC sequences. In addition, we obtained 300 sequences from CA and AT microsatellite enriched genomic libraries. The sequences were searched for simple repeats using the RepeatMasker software. Of 16,022 ESTs, we detected 481 (3%) sequences that contained 622 microsatellites (434 perfect, 164 imperfect and 24 compounds). Of the 481 ESTs, 194 were grouped in 63 clusters containing 2 to 15 ESTs per cluster. Polymorphisms were observed in 16 clusters. The 287 remaining ESTs were orphan sequences. Of the 42,017 BAC end sequences, 1,598 (3.8%) contained microsatellites (2,335 perfect, 287 imperfect and 79 compounds). The 1,598 BAC end sequences 80 were grouped into 17 clusters containing 3 to 17 BAC end sequences per cluster. Microsatellites were present in 67 out of 300 sequences from microsatellite enriched libraries (55 perfect, 38 imperfect and 15 compounds). From all of the observed loci 55 were selected for having the longest perfect repeats and flanking regions that allowed the design of primers for PCR amplification. Additionally we describe two new polymorphic microsatellite loci.

  13. Pentatricopeptide repeat proteins in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkan, Alice; Small, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins constitute one of the largest protein families in land plants, with more than 400 members in most species. Over the past decade, much has been learned about the molecular functions of these proteins, where they act in the cell, and what physiological roles they play during plant growth and development. A typical PPR protein is targeted to mitochondria or chloroplasts, binds one or several organellar transcripts, and influences their expression by altering RNA sequence, turnover, processing, or translation. Their combined action has profound effects on organelle biogenesis and function and, consequently, on photosynthesis, respiration, plant development, and environmental responses. Recent breakthroughs in understanding how PPR proteins recognize RNA sequences through modular base-specific contacts will help match proteins to potential binding sites and provide a pathway toward designing synthetic RNA-binding proteins aimed at desired targets.

  14. Two-dimensional quantum repeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallnöfer, J.; Zwerger, M.; Muschik, C.; Sangouard, N.; Dür, W.

    2016-11-01

    The endeavor to develop quantum networks gave rise to a rapidly developing field with far-reaching applications such as secure communication and the realization of distributed computing tasks. This ultimately calls for the creation of flexible multiuser structures that allow for quantum communication between arbitrary pairs of parties in the network and facilitate also multiuser applications. To address this challenge, we propose a two-dimensional quantum repeater architecture to establish long-distance entanglement shared between multiple communication partners in the presence of channel noise and imperfect local control operations. The scheme is based on the creation of self-similar multiqubit entanglement structures at growing scale, where variants of entanglement swapping and multiparty entanglement purification are combined to create high-fidelity entangled states. We show how such networks can be implemented using trapped ions in cavities.

  15. General benchmarks for quantum repeaters

    CERN Document Server

    Pirandola, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Using a technique based on quantum teleportation, we simplify the most general adaptive protocols for key distribution, entanglement distillation and quantum communication over a wide class of quantum channels in arbitrary dimension. Thanks to this method, we bound the ultimate rates for secret key generation and quantum communication through single-mode Gaussian channels and several discrete-variable channels. In particular, we derive exact formulas for the two-way assisted capacities of the bosonic quantum-limited amplifier and the dephasing channel in arbitrary dimension, as well as the secret key capacity of the qubit erasure channel. Our results establish the limits of quantum communication with arbitrary systems and set the most general and precise benchmarks for testing quantum repeaters in both discrete- and continuous-variable settings.

  16. Hungarian repeat station survey, 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Péter Kovács

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The last Hungarian repeat station survey was completed between October 2010 and February 2011. Declination, inclination and the total field were observed using one-axial DMI fluxgate magnetometer mounted on Zeiss20A theodolite and GSM 19 Overhauser magnetometer. The magnetic elements of the sites were reduced to the epoch of 2010.5 on the basis of the continuous recordings of Tihany Geophysical Observatory. In stations located far from the reference observatory, the observations were carried out in the morning and afternoon in order to decrease the effect of the distant temporal correction. To further increase the accuracy, on-site dIdD variometer has also been installed near the Aggtelek station, in the Baradla cave, during the survey of the easternmost sites. The paper presents the technical details and the results of our last campaign. The improvement of the accuracy of the temporal reduction by the use of the local variometer is also reported.

  17. Quality control during repeated fryings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuesta, C.

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available Most of the debate ¡s about how the slow or frequent turnover of fresh fat affects the deterioration, of fat used in frying. Then, the modification of different oils used in repeated fryings of potatoes without or with turnover of fresh oil, under similar frying conditions, was evaluated by two criteria: by measuring the total polar component isolated by column chromatography and by the evaluation of the specific compounds related to thermoxidative and hydrolytic alteration by High Performance Size Exclusion Chromatography (HPSEC. The results indicate that with frequent turnover of fresh oil, the critical level of 25% of polar material is rarely reached, and there are fewer problems with fat deterioration because the frying tended to increase the level of polar material and thermoxidative compounds (polymers and dimers of triglycerides and oxidized triglycerides in the fryer oil during the first fryings, followed by minor changes and a tendency to reach a near-steady state in successive fryings. However, in repeated frying of potatoes using a null turnover the alteration rate was higher being linear the relationship found between polar material or the different thermoxidative compounds and the number of fryings. On the other hand chemical reactions produced during deep-fat frying can be minimized by using proper oils. In addition the increased level of consumers awareness toward fat composition and its impact on human health could had an impact on the selection of fats for snacks and for industry. In this way monoenic fats are the most adequate from a nutritional point of view and for its oxidative stability during frying.

  18. How Soft Gamma Repeaters May Make Fast Radio Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, J I

    2015-01-01

    The high brightness of Fast Radio Bursts requires coherent emission by particles "bunched" by plasma instability at powers far in excess of those of pulsar spindown. Dissipation of magnetic energy in a neutron star magnetosphere, as in popular models of Soft Gamma Repeaters, can meet the energy requirement and produces an electron-positron pair plasma. Annihilation gamma rays are scattered by cooler plasma, producing a broad beam of electrons. The resulting electron distribution function is unstable to the "bump-on-tail" plasma instability. Electron plasma waves grow exponentially, scattering on density gradients to produce propagating electromagnetic waves, in analogy to Solar Type III Radio Bursts. Galactic SGR may make Galactic FRB, many orders of magnitude brighter than FRB at "cosmological" distances, that could be observed by radio telescopes out of beam or by modest arrays of dipole antennas.

  19. Multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) genotyping of human Brucella isolates in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Bee Yong; Ahmad, Norazah; Hashim, Rohaidah; Mohamed Zahidi, Jama'ayah; Thong, Kwai Lin; Koh, Xiu Pei; Mohd Noor, Azura

    2015-06-02

    Brucellosis is one of the most common zoonotic diseases worldwide. It can cause acute febrile illness in human and is a major health problem. Studies in human brucellosis in Malaysia is limited and so far no genotyping studies has been done on Brucella isolates. The aim of the study was to determine the genetic diversity among Brucella species isolated from human brucellosis, obtained over a 6-year period (2009-2014). In this study, the genotypic characteristics of 43 human Brucella melitensis isolates were analysed using multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) which consisted of eight minisatellite loci (panel 1) and eight microsatellite loci; panels 2A (3 microsatellite loci) and panel 2B (5 microsatellite loci). Two human Brucella suis isolates were also investigated using the MLVA assay. Using panel 1 (MLVA8), two genotypes namely genotype 43 and 44 were obtained from the 43 B. melitensis isolates. Using the combination of panels 1 and 2A loci (MLVA11), two genotypes were obtained while using the complete panels 1, 2A and 2B, nine genotypes were obtained. The polymorphisms in using the complete panels (MLVA16) were observed in three loci from panel 2B, which showed a diversity index higher than 0.17. All B. melitensis isolates were closely related to the East Mediterranean group. For B. suis isolates, only genotype 6 and genotype 33 were obtained using panel 1 and MLVA11 respectively. In conclusion, the results of the present study showed a low genetic diversity among B. melitensis and B. suis isolates from human patients. Based on the MLVA16 assay, B. melitensis belonging to the East Mediterranean group is responsible for the vast majority of Brucella infections in our Malaysian patients. To our knowledge, this is the first genotyping study of human Brucella isolates in Malaysia.

  20. Investigation of a Quadruplex-Forming Repeat Sequence Highly Enriched in Xanthomonas and Nostoc sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Rehm

    Full Text Available In prokaryotes simple sequence repeats (SSRs with unit sizes of 1-5 nucleotides (nt are causative for phase and antigenic variation. Although an increased abundance of heptameric repeats was noticed in bacteria, reports about SSRs of 6-9 nt are rare. In particular G-rich repeat sequences with the propensity to fold into G-quadruplex (G4 structures have received little attention. In silico analysis of prokaryotic genomes show putative G4 forming sequences to be abundant. This report focuses on a surprisingly enriched G-rich repeat of the type GGGNATC in Xanthomonas and cyanobacteria such as Nostoc. We studied in detail the genomes of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris ATCC 33913 (Xcc, Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri str. 306 (Xac, and Nostoc sp. strain PCC7120 (Ana. In all three organisms repeats are spread all over the genome with an over-representation in non-coding regions. Extensive variation of the number of repetitive units was observed with repeat numbers ranging from two up to 26 units. However a clear preference for four units was detected. The strong bias for four units coincides with the requirement of four consecutive G-tracts for G4 formation. Evidence for G4 formation of the consensus repeat sequences was found in biophysical studies utilizing CD spectroscopy. The G-rich repeats are preferably located between aligned open reading frames (ORFs and are under-represented in coding regions or between divergent ORFs. The G-rich repeats are preferentially located within a distance of 50 bp upstream of an ORF on the anti-sense strand or within 50 bp from the stop codon on the sense strand. Analysis of whole transcriptome sequence data showed that the majority of repeat sequences are transcribed. The genetic loci in the vicinity of repeat regions show increased genomic stability. In conclusion, we introduce and characterize a special class of highly abundant and wide-spread quadruplex-forming repeat sequences in bacteria.

  1. Simple Sequence Repeat Genetic Linkage Maps of A-genome Diploid Cotton (Gossypium arboreum)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Xia Ma; Bao-Liang Zhou; Yan-Hui Lü; Wang-Zhen Guo; Tian-Zhen Zhang

    2008-01-01

    This study introduces the construction of the first intraspacific genetic linkage map of the A-genome diploid cotton with newly developed simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers using 189 F2 plants derived from the cross of two Asiatic parents were detected using 6 092 pairs of SSR primers. Two-hundred and sixty-eight pairs of SSR pdmers with better polymorphisms were picked out to analyze the F2 population. In total, 320 polymorphic bands were generated and used to construct a linkage map with JoinMap3.0. Two-hundred and sixty-seven loci, Including three phenotypic traits were mapped at a logarithms of odds ratio (LOD) ≥ 3.0 on 13 linkage groups. The total length of the map was 2 508.71 cM, and the average distance between adjacent markers was 9.40 cM. Chromosome assignments were according to the association of linkages with our backbone tetraploid specific map using the 89 similar SSR loci. Comparisons among the 13 suites of orthologous linkage groups revealed that the A-genome chromosomes are largely collinear with the At and Dt sub-genome chromosomes. Chromosomes associated with inversions suggested that allopolyploidization was accompanied by homologous chromosomal rearrangement. The inter-chromosomal duplicated loci supply molecular evidence that the A-genome diploid Asiatic cotton is paleopolyploid.

  2. A comparison of SNP and STR loci for delineating population structure and performing individual genetic assignment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glover, Kevin A.; Hansen, Michael Møller; Lien, Sigbjørn

    2010-01-01

    between SNP and STR data sets and variants thereof. The best 15 SNPs (30 alleles) gave a similar level of self-assignment to the best 4 STR loci (83 alleles), however, addition of further STR loci did not lead to a notable increase assignment whereas addition of up to 100 SNP loci increased assignment...

  3. The expected performance of single nucleotide polymorphism loci in paternity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, Karen L

    2005-11-25

    We discuss the utility of single nucleotide polymorphism loci for full trio and mother-unavailable paternity testing cases, in the presence of population substructure and relatedness of putative and actual fathers. We focus primarily on the expected number of loci required to gain specified probabilities of mismatches, and report the expected proportion of paternity indices greater than three threshold values for these loci.

  4. Identification of four novel susceptibility loci for oestrogen receptor negative breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Couch, Fergus J; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Mendoza-Fandino, Gustavo A; Nord, Silje; Lilyquist, Janna; Olswold, Curtis; Hallberg, Emily; Agata, Simona; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Ambrosone, Christine; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Arun, Banu K; Arver, Brita; Barile, Monica; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Barrowdale, Daniel; Beckmann, Lars; Beckmann, Matthias W; Benitez, Javier; Blank, Stephanie V; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Burwinkel, Barbara; Buys, Saundra S; Caldes, Trinidad; Caligo, Maria A; Canzian, Federico; Carpenter, Jane; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J; Chung, Wendy K; Claes, Kathleen B M; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Cunningham, Julie M; Czene, Kamila; Daly, Mary B; Damiola, Francesca; Darabi, Hatef; de la Hoya, Miguel; Devilee, Peter; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan C; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Domchek, Susan M; Dorfling, Cecilia M; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dumont, Martine; Dunning, Alison M; Eccles, Diana M; Ehrencrona, Hans; Ekici, Arif B; Eliassen, Heather; Ellis, Steve; Fasching, Peter A; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Försti, Asta; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D; Friebel, Tara; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Gabrielson, Marike; Gammon, Marilie D; Ganz, Patricia A; Gapstur, Susan M; Garber, Judy; Gaudet, Mia M; Gayther, Simon A; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ghoussaini, Maya; Giles, Graham G; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K; Goldberg, Mark S; Goldgar, David E; González-Neira, Anna; Greene, Mark H; Gronwald, Jacek; Guénel, Pascal; Gunter, Marc; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V O; Hart, Steven; Healey, Sue; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Henderson, Brian E; Herzog, Josef; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hooning, Maartje J; Hoover, Robert N; Hopper, John L; Humphreys, Keith; Hunter, David J; Huzarski, Tomasz; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kar, Siddhartha; Karlan, Beth Y; Khan, Sofia; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Knight, Julia A; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela; Kwong, Ava; Laitman, Yael; Lambrechts, Diether; Lazaro, Conxi; Lee, Eunjung; Le Marchand, Loic; Lester, Jenny; Lindblom, Annika; Lindor, Noralane; Lindstrom, Sara; Liu, Jianjun; Long, Jirong; Lubinski, Jan; Mai, Phuong L; Makalic, Enes; Malone, Kathleen E; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Martens, John W M; McGuffog, Lesley; Meindl, Alfons; Miller, Austin; Milne, Roger L; Miron, Penelope; Montagna, Marco; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Mulligan, Anna M; Muranen, Taru A; Nathanson, Katherine L; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nussbaum, Robert L; Offit, Kenneth; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Olson, Janet E; Osorio, Ana; Park, Sue K; Peeters, Petra H; Peissel, Bernard; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Phelan, Catherine M; Pilarski, Robert; Poppe, Bruce; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rahman, Nazneen; Rantala, Johanna; Rappaport, Christine; Rennert, Gad; Richardson, Andrea; Robson, Mark; Romieu, Isabelle; Rudolph, Anja; Rutgers, Emiel J; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Santella, Regina M; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmidt, Daniel F; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schmutzler, Rita K; Schumacher, Fredrick; Scott, Rodney; Senter, Leigha; Sharma, Priyanka; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa; Steinemann, Doris; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Swerdlow, Anthony; Szabo, Csilla I; Tamimi, Rulla; Tapper, William; Teixeira, Manuel R; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary B; Thomassen, Mads; Thompson, Deborah; Tihomirova, Laima; Toland, Amanda E; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Tomlinson, Ian; Truong, Thérèse; Tsimiklis, Helen; Teulé, Alex; Tumino, Rosario; Tung, Nadine; Turnbull, Clare; Ursin, Giski; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wang, Zhaoming; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Whittemore, Alice; Wildiers, Hans; Winqvist, Robert; Yang, Xiaohong R; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Yao, Song; Zamora, M Pilar; Zheng, Wei; Hall, Per; Kraft, Peter; Vachon, Celine; Slager, Susan; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D P; Monteiro, Alvaro A N; García-Closas, Montserrat; Easton, Douglas F; Antoniou, Antonis C

    2016-01-01

    Common variants in 94 loci have been associated with breast cancer including 15 loci with genome-wide significant associations (P<5 × 10(-8)) with oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer and BRCA1-associated breast cancer risk. In this study, to identify new ER-negative susceptibility loci, w

  5. Multi-ethnic fine-mapping of 14 central adiposity loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Ching-Ti; Buchkovich, Martin L; Winkler, Thomas W;

    2014-01-01

    The Genetic Investigation of Anthropometric Traits (GIANT) consortium identified 14 loci in European Ancestry (EA) individuals associated with waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) adjusted for body mass index. These loci are wide and narrowing the signals remains necessary. Twelve of 14 loci identified in GI...

  6. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci from the yellow-eyed penguin (Megadyptes antipodes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boessenkool, S; King, T M; Seddon, P J; Waters, J M

    2008-09-01

    Twelve microsatellite loci were isolated and characterized in the endangered yellow-eyed penguin (Megadyptes antipodes) using enriched genomic libraries. Polymorphic loci revealed two to eight alleles per locus and observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.21 to 0.77. These loci will be suitable for assessing current and historical patterns of genetic variability in yellow-eyed penguins.

  7. Identification of four novel susceptibility loci for oestrogen receptor negative breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Couch, Fergus J; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Mendoza-Fandino, Gustavo A; Nord, Silje; Lilyquist, Janna; Olswold, Curtis; Hallberg, Emily; Agata, Simona; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Ambrosone, Christine; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Arun, Banu K; Arver, Brita; Barile, Monica; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Barrowdale, Daniel; Beckmann, Lars; Beckmann, Matthias W; Benitez, Javier; Blank, Stephanie V; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Burwinkel, Barbara; Buys, Saundra S; Caldes, Trinidad; Caligo, Maria A; Canzian, Federico; Carpenter, Jane; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J; Chung, Wendy K; Claes, Kathleen B M; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Cunningham, Julie M; Czene, Kamila; Daly, Mary B; Damiola, Francesca; Darabi, Hatef; de la Hoya, Miguel; Devilee, Peter; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan C; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Domchek, Susan M; Dorfling, Cecilia M; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dumont, Martine; Dunning, Alison M; Eccles, Diana M; Ehrencrona, Hans; Ekici, Arif B; Eliassen, Heather; Ellis, Steve; Fasching, Peter A; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Försti, Asta; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D; Friebel, Tara; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Gabrielson, Marike; Gammon, Marilie D; Ganz, Patricia A; Gapstur, Susan M; Garber, Judy; Gaudet, Mia M; Gayther, Simon A; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ghoussaini, Maya; Giles, Graham G; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K; Goldberg, Mark S; Goldgar, David E; González-Neira, Anna; Greene, Mark H; Gronwald, Jacek; Guénel, Pascal; Gunter, Marc; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V O; Hart, Steven; Healey, Sue; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Henderson, Brian E; Herzog, Josef; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hooning, Maartje J; Hoover, Robert N; Hopper, John L; Humphreys, Keith; Hunter, David J; Huzarski, Tomasz; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kar, Siddhartha; Karlan, Beth Y; Khan, Sofia; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Knight, Julia A; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela; Kwong, Ava; Laitman, Yael; Lambrechts, Diether; Lazaro, Conxi; Lee, Eunjung; Le Marchand, Loic; Lester, Jenny; Lindblom, Annika; Lindor, Noralane; Lindstrom, Sara; Liu, Jianjun; Long, Jirong; Lubinski, Jan; Mai, Phuong L; Makalic, Enes; Malone, Kathleen E; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Martens, John W M; McGuffog, Lesley; Meindl, Alfons; Miller, Austin; Milne, Roger L; Miron, Penelope; Montagna, Marco; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Mulligan, Anna M; Muranen, Taru A; Nathanson, Katherine L; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nussbaum, Robert L; Offit, Kenneth; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Olson, Janet E; Osorio, Ana; Park, Sue K; Peeters, Petra H; Peissel, Bernard; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Phelan, Catherine M; Pilarski, Robert; Poppe, Bruce; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rahman, Nazneen; Rantala, Johanna; Rappaport, Christine; Rennert, Gad; Richardson, Andrea; Robson, Mark; Romieu, Isabelle; Rudolph, Anja; Rutgers, Emiel J; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Santella, Regina M; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmidt, Daniel F; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schmutzler, Rita K; Schumacher, Fredrick; Scott, Rodney; Senter, Leigha; Sharma, Priyanka; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa; Steinemann, Doris; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Swerdlow, Anthony; Szabo, Csilla I; Tamimi, Rulla; Tapper, William; Teixeira, Manuel R; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary B; Thomassen, Mads; Thompson, Deborah; Tihomirova, Laima; Toland, Amanda E; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Tomlinson, Ian; Truong, Thérèse; Tsimiklis, Helen; Teulé, Alex; Tumino, Rosario; Tung, Nadine; Turnbull, Clare; Ursin, Giski; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wang, Zhaoming; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Whittemore, Alice; Wildiers, Hans; Winqvist, Robert; Yang, Xiaohong R; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Yao, Song; Zamora, M Pilar; Zheng, Wei; Hall, Per; Kraft, Peter; Vachon, Celine; Slager, Susan; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D P; Monteiro, Alvaro A N; García-Closas, Montserrat; Easton, Douglas F; Antoniou, Antonis C

    2016-01-01

    Common variants in 94 loci have been associated with breast cancer including 15 loci with genome-wide significant associations (P<5 × 10(-8)) with oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer and BRCA1-associated breast cancer risk. In this study, to identify new ER-negative susceptibility loci,

  8. Identification of four novel susceptibility loci for oestrogen receptor negative breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couch, Fergus J; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Michailidou, Kyriaki

    2016-01-01

    Common variants in 94 loci have been associated with breast cancer including 15 loci with genome-wide significant associations (P<5 × 10(-8)) with oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer and BRCA1-associated breast cancer risk. In this study, to identify new ER-negative susceptibility loci...

  9. Population genetic data of the AmpFℓSTR® Identifiler® Plus and PowerPlex® 16 HS STR loci in four Canadian populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurin, Nancy; Milot, Emmanuel

    2014-03-01

    Allele frequencies and forensically relevant population statistics were estimated for the short tandem repeat (STR) loci of the AmpFℓSTR® Identifiler® Plus and PowerPlex® 16 HS amplification kits, including D2S1338, D19S433, Penta D, and Penta E, for three First Nations Aboriginal populations and for Caucasians in Canada. The cumulative power of discrimination was ≥ 0.999999999999984 and the cumulative power of exclusion was ≥ 0.999929363 for both amplification systems in all populations. No significant departure from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was detected for D2S1338, D19S433, Penta D, and Penta E or the 13 Combined DNA Index System core STR loci after correction for multiple testing. Significant genetic diversity was observed between these four populations. Comparison with published frequency data for other populations is also presented.

  10. Fine genetic mapping of the Batten disease locus (CLN3) by haplotype analysis and demonstration of allelic association with chromosome 16p microsatellite loci

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchison, H.M.; McKay, T.R. [Univ. College London Medical School (United Kingdom); Thompson, A.D.; Mulley, J.C.; Kozman, H.M.; Richards, R.I.; Callen, D.F. [Women and Children`s Hospital, Adelaide (Australia); Stallings, R.L.; Doggett, N.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Attwood, J. [Galton Lab., London (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1993-05-01

    Batten disease, juvenile onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by accumulation of autofluorescent lipopigment in neurons and other cell types. The disease locus (CLN3) has previously been assigned to chromosome 16p. The genetic localization of CLN3 has been refined by analyzing 70 families using a high-resolution map of 15 marker loci encompassing the CLN3 region on 16p. Crossovers in three maternal meioses allowed localization of CLN3 to the interval between D16S297 and D16S57. Within that interval alleles at three highly polymorphic dinucleotide repeat loci (D16S288, D16S298, D16S299) were found to be in strong linkage disequilibrium with CLN3. Analysis of haplotypes suggests that a majority of CLN3 chromosomes have arisen from a single founder mutation. 15 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. RECG maintains plastid and mitochondrial genome stability by suppressing extensive recombination between short dispersed repeats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Odahara

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Maintenance of plastid and mitochondrial genome stability is crucial for photosynthesis and respiration, respectively. Recently, we have reported that RECA1 maintains mitochondrial genome stability by suppressing gross rearrangements induced by aberrant recombination between short dispersed repeats in the moss Physcomitrella patens. In this study, we studied a newly identified P. patens homolog of bacterial RecG helicase, RECG, some of which is localized in both plastid and mitochondrial nucleoids. RECG partially complements recG deficiency in Escherichia coli cells. A knockout (KO mutation of RECG caused characteristic phenotypes including growth delay and developmental and mitochondrial defects, which are similar to those of the RECA1 KO mutant. The RECG KO cells showed heterogeneity in these phenotypes. Analyses of RECG KO plants showed that mitochondrial genome was destabilized due to a recombination between 8-79 bp repeats and the pattern of the recombination partly differed from that observed in the RECA1 KO mutants. The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA instability was greater in severe phenotypic RECG KO cells than that in mild phenotypic ones. This result suggests that mitochondrial genomic instability is responsible for the defective phenotypes of RECG KO plants. Some of the induced recombination caused efficient genomic rearrangements in RECG KO mitochondria. Such loci were sometimes associated with a decrease in the levels of normal mtDNA and significant decrease in the number of transcripts derived from the loci. In addition, the RECG KO mutation caused remarkable plastid abnormalities and induced recombination between short repeats (12-63 bp in the plastid DNA. These results suggest that RECG plays a role in the maintenance of both plastid and mitochondrial genome stability by suppressing aberrant recombination between dispersed short repeats; this role is crucial for plastid and mitochondrial functions.

  12. Development of novel simple sequence repeat markers in bitter gourd (Momordica charantia L.) through enriched genomic libraries and their utilization in analysis of genetic diversity and cross-species transferability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Swati; Singh, Archana; Archak, Sunil; Behera, Tushar K; John, Joseph K; Meshram, Sudhir U; Gaikwad, Ambika B

    2015-01-01

    Microsatellite or simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers are the preferred markers for genetic analyses of crop plants. The availability of a limited number of such markers in bitter gourd (Momordica charantia L.) necessitates the development and characterization of more SSR markers. These were developed from genomic libraries enriched for three dinucleotide, five trinucleotide, and two tetranucleotide core repeat motifs. Employing the strategy of polymerase chain reaction-based screening, the number of clones to be sequenced was reduced by 81 % and 93.7 % of the sequenced clones contained in microsatellite repeats. Unique primer-pairs were designed for 160 microsatellite loci, and amplicons of expected length were obtained for 151 loci (94.4 %). Evaluation of diversity in 54 bitter gourd accessions at 51 loci indicated that 20 % of the loci were polymorphic with the polymorphic information content values ranging from 0.13 to 0.77. Fifteen Indian varieties were clearly distinguished indicative of the usefulness of the developed markers. Markers at 40 loci (78.4 %) were transferable to six species, viz. Momordica cymbalaria, Momordica subangulata subsp. renigera, Momordica balsamina, Momordica dioca, Momordica cochinchinesis, and Momordica sahyadrica. The microsatellite markers reported will be useful in various genetic and molecular genetic studies in bitter gourd, a cucurbit of immense nutritive, medicinal, and economic importance.

  13. Seven newly identified loci for autoimmune thyroid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Jason D; Simmonds, Matthew J; Walker, Neil M; Burren, Oliver; Brand, Oliver J; Guo, Hui; Wallace, Chris; Stevens, Helen; Coleman, Gillian; Franklyn, Jayne A; Todd, John A; Gough, Stephen C L

    2012-12-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), including Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), is one of the most common of the immune-mediated diseases. To further investigate the genetic determinants of AITD, we conducted an association study using a custom-made single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array, the ImmunoChip. The SNP array contains all known and genotype-able SNPs across 186 distinct susceptibility loci associated with one or more immune-mediated diseases. After stringent quality control, we analysed 103 875 common SNPs (minor allele frequency >0.05) in 2285 GD and 462 HT patients and 9364 controls. We found evidence for seven new AITD risk loci (P < 1.12 × 10(-6); a permutation test derived significance threshold), five at locations previously associated and two at locations awaiting confirmation, with other immune-mediated diseases.

  14. Informativeness of the CODIS STR loci for admixture analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S; Pfaff, Carrie L; Chakraborty, Ranajit; Long, Jeffrey C

    2005-11-01

    Population admixture (or ancestry) is used as an approach to gene discovery in complex diseases, particularly when the disease prevalence varies widely across geographic populations. Admixture analysis could be useful for forensics because an indication of a perpetrator's ancestry would narrow the pool of suspects for a particular crime. The purpose of this study was to use Fisher's information to identify informative sets of markers for admixture analysis. Using published founding population allele frequencies we test three marker sets for efficacy for estimating admixture: the FBI CODIS Core STR loci, the HGDP-CEPH Human Genome Diversity Cell Line Panel and the set of 39 ancestry informative SNPS from the Shriver lab at Pennsylvania State University. We conclude that the FBI CODIS Core STR set is valid for admixture analysis, but not the most precise. We recommend using a combination of the most informative markers from the HGDP-CEPH and Shriver loci sets.

  15. PROPERTY IDENTIFICATION OF SINGULARITY LOCI OF GOUGH-STEWART MANIPULATOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The problem of identifying the property of singularity loci of Gough-Stewart manipulators is addressed. After constructing the Jacobian matrix of the Gough-Stewart manipulator, a cubic polynomial expression in the mobile platform position parameters, which represents the constantorientation singularity locus of the manipulator, is derived. Graphical representations of the singularity locus of the manipulator for different orientations are illustrated with examples. Further,the singularity locus of the manipulator in the principal-section, where the mobile platform lies, is analyzed. It shows that singularity loci of the manipulator in parallel pfincipal-sections are all quadratic expressions including a parabola, four pairs of intersecting straight lines and infinite hyperbolas. Their geometric and kinematic properties are also researched as well.

  16. Molecular identification and characterization of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) in a urease-positive thermophilic Campylobacter sp. (UPTC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasaki, E; Hirayama, J; Tazumi, A; Hayashi, K; Hara, Y; Ueno, H; Moore, J E; Millar, B C; Matsuda, M

    2012-02-01

    Novel clustered regularly-interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) locus [7,500 base pairs (bp) in length] occurred in the urease-positive thermophilic Campylobacter (UPTC) Japanese isolate, CF89-12. The 7,500 bp gene loci consisted of the 5'-methylaminomethyl-2-thiouridylate methyltransferase gene, putative (P) CRISPR associated (p-Cas), putative open reading frames, Cas1 and Cas2, leader sequence region (146 bp), 12 CRISPRs consensus sequence repeats (each 36 bp) separated by a non-repetitive unique spacer region of similar length (26-31 bp) and the phosphatidyl glycerophosphatase A gene. When the CRISPRs loci in the UPTC CF89-12 and five C. jejuni isolates were compared with one another, these six isolates contained p-Cas, Cas1 and Cas2 within the loci. Four to 12 CRISPRs consensus sequence repeats separated by a non-repetitive unique spacer region occurred in six isolates and the nucleotide sequences of those repeats gave approximately 92-100% similarity with each other. However, no sequence similarity occurred in the unique spacer regions among these isolates. The putative σ(70) transcriptional promoter and the hypothetical ρ-independent terminator structures for the CRISPRs and Cas were detected. No in vivo transcription of p-Cas, Cas1 and Cas2 was confirmed in the UPTC cells.

  17. The CRISPRdb database and tools to display CRISPRs and to generate dictionaries of spacers and repeats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vergnaud Gilles

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Archeae and Bacteria, the repeated elements called CRISPRs for "clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats" are believed to participate in the defence against viruses. Short sequences called spacers are stored in-between repeated elements. In the current model, motifs comprising spacers and repeats may target an invading DNA and lead to its degradation through a proposed mechanism similar to RNA interference. Analysis of intra-species polymorphism shows that new motifs (one spacer and one repeated element are added in a polarised fashion. Although their principal characteristics have been described, a lot remains to be discovered on the way CRISPRs are created and evolve. As new genome sequences become available it appears necessary to develop automated scanning tools to make available CRISPRs related information and to facilitate additional investigations. Description We have produced a program, CRISPRFinder, which identifies CRISPRs and extracts the repeated and unique sequences. Using this software, a database is constructed which is automatically updated monthly from newly released genome sequences. Additional tools were created to allow the alignment of flanking sequences in search for similarities between different loci and to build dictionaries of unique sequences. To date, almost six hundred CRISPRs have been identified in 475 published genomes. Two Archeae out of thirty-seven and about half of Bacteria do not possess a CRISPR. Fine analysis of repeated sequences strongly supports the current view that new motifs are added at one end of the CRISPR adjacent to the putative promoter. Conclusion It is hoped that availability of a public database, regularly updated and which can be queried on the web will help in further dissecting and understanding CRISPR structure and flanking sequences evolution. Subsequent analyses of the intra-species CRISPR polymorphism will be facilitated by CRISPRFinder and the

  18. A study of allelic polymorphism of four short tandem repeats in the population of northwestern Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aseev, M.V.; Skakun, V.N.; Baranov, V.S. [Ott Institute of Obstetrics and Gynecology, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1995-06-01

    Characteristics of the allelic polymorphisms of the trimeric AGC repeat of the androgen receptor gene (Xq11-12), exon 1 (AR); the tetrameric ATCT repeat of the von Willebrand factor gene (12p12), intron 40 (vWF); the AGAT repeat of the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase gene (Xq26) (HPRT); and the AGAT repeat of anonymous DNA sequences of the short arm of chromosome X (STRX1) were studied in 160 DNA samples from unrelated inhabitants of northwestern Russia using the method of polymerase chain reaction. Seventeen, ten, eight, and nine alleles were revealed electrophoretically for short tandem repeats of AR, vWF, HPRT, and STRX1, respectively. The heterozygosity indices for these repeats were 0.80, 0.70, 0.54, and 0.58, respectively. The values for AR and vWF correlated with those expected according to the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, whereas the values for HPRT and STRX1 differed significantly from those theoretically expected. The individualization potentials were 0.045, 0.135, 0.095, and 0.061 for the short tandem repeats of AR, vWF, HPRT, and STRX1, respectively. The distribution of genotypes for the set of these four loci in the population studied was determined. The possibilities of using the studied polymorphic marker systems in molecular diagnosis of the corresponding monogenic diseases - spinal and bulbar muscle atrophy (AR), Lesch-Nyhan disease (HPRT), and von Willebrand disease (vWF) - as well as in population human genetics, testing of personal identity, and molecular approaches to the estimation of mutagenic activity are discussed. 17 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. Large-scale assessment of polyglutamine repeat expansions in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lisa; Aasly, Jan O; Annesi, Grazia; Bardien, Soraya; Bozi, Maria; Brice, Alexis; Carr, Jonathan; Chung, Sun J; Clarke, Carl; Crosiers, David; Deutschländer, Angela; Eckstein, Gertrud; Farrer, Matthew J; Goldwurm, Stefano; Garraux, Gaetan; Hadjigeorgiou, Georgios M; Hicks, Andrew A; Hattori, Nobutaka; Klein, Christine; Jeon, Beom; Kim, Yun J; Lesage, Suzanne; Lin, Juei-Jueng; Lynch, Timothy; Lichtner, Peter; Lang, Anthony E; Mok, Vincent; Jasinska-Myga, Barbara; Mellick, George D; Morrison, Karen E; Opala, Grzegorz; Pihlstrøm, Lasse; Pramstaller, Peter P; Park, Sung S; Quattrone, Aldo; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Ross, Owen A; Stefanis, Leonidas; Stockton, Joanne D; Silburn, Peter A; Theuns, Jessie; Tan, Eng K; Tomiyama, Hiroyuki; Toft, Mathias; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Uitti, Ryan J; Wirdefeldt, Karin; Wszolek, Zbigniew; Xiromerisiou, Georgia; Yueh, Kuo-Chu; Zhao, Yi; Gasser, Thomas; Maraganore, Demetrius M; Krüger, Rejko; Sharma, Manu

    2015-10-13

    We aim to clarify the pathogenic role of intermediate size repeat expansions of SCA2, SCA3, SCA6, and SCA17 as risk factors for idiopathic Parkinson disease (PD). We invited researchers from the Genetic Epidemiology of Parkinson's Disease Consortium to participate in the study. There were 12,346 cases and 8,164 controls genotyped, for a total of 4 repeats within the SCA2, SCA3, SCA6, and SCA17 genes. Fixed- and random-effects models were used to estimate the summary risk estimates for the genes. We investigated between-study heterogeneity and heterogeneity between different ethnic populations. We did not observe any definite pathogenic repeat expansions for SCA2, SCA3, SCA6, and SCA17 genes in patients with idiopathic PD from Caucasian and Asian populations. Furthermore, overall analysis did not reveal any significant association between intermediate repeats and PD. The effect estimates (odds ratio) ranged from 0.93 to 1.01 in the overall cohort for the SCA2, SCA3, SCA6, and SCA17 loci. Our study did not support a major role for definite pathogenic repeat expansions in SCA2, SCA3, SCA6, and SCA17 genes for idiopathic PD. Thus, results of this large study do not support diagnostic screening of SCA2, SCA3, SCA6, and SCA17 gene repeats in the common idiopathic form of PD. Likewise, this largest multicentered study performed to date excludes the role of intermediate repeats of these genes as a risk factor for PD. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  20. 52 Genetic Loci Influencing Myocardial Mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Harst, Pim; van Setten, Jessica; Verweij, Niek; Vogler, Georg; Franke, Lude; Maurano, Matthew T; Wang, Xinchen; Mateo Leach, Irene; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Hayward, Caroline; Sorice, Rossella; Meirelles, Osorio; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Polašek, Ozren; Tanaka, Toshiko; Arking, Dan E; Ulivi, Sheila; Trompet, Stella; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Smith, Albert V; Dörr, Marcus; Kerr, Kathleen F; Magnani, Jared W; Del Greco M, Fabiola; Zhang, Weihua; Nolte, Ilja M; Silva, Claudia T; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Tragante, Vinicius; Esko, Tõnu; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Adriaens, Michiel E; Andersen, Karl; Barnett, Phil; Bis, Joshua C; Bodmer, Rolf; Buckley, Brendan M; Campbell, Harry; Cannon, Megan V; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chen, Lin Y; Delitala, Alessandro; Devereux, Richard B; Doevendans, Pieter A; Dominiczak, Anna F; Ferrucci, Luigi; Ford, Ian; Gieger, Christian; Harris, Tamara B; Haugen, Eric; Heinig, Matthias; Hernandez, Dena G; Hillege, Hans L; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Hofman, Albert; Hubner, Norbert; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Iorio, Annamaria; Kähönen, Mika; Kellis, Manolis; Kolcic, Ivana; Kooner, Ishminder K; Kooner, Jaspal S; Kors, Jan A; Lakatta, Edward G; Lage, Kasper; Launer, Lenore J; Levy, Daniel; Lundby, Alicia; Macfarlane, Peter W; May, Dalit; Meitinger, Thomas; Metspalu, Andres; Nappo, Stefania; Naitza, Silvia; Neph, Shane; Nord, Alex S; Nutile, Teresa; Okin, Peter M; Olsen, Jesper V; Oostra, Ben A; Penninger, Josef M; Pennacchio, Len A; Pers, Tune H; Perz, Siegfried; Peters, Annette; Pinto, Yigal M; Pfeufer, Arne; Pilia, Maria Grazia; Pramstaller, Peter P; Prins, Bram P; Raitakari, Olli T; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Rice, Ken M; Rossin, Elizabeth J; Rotter, Jerome I; Schafer, Sebastian; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Carsten O; Sehmi, Jobanpreet; Silljé, Herman H W; Sinagra, Gianfranco; Sinner, Moritz F; Slowikowski, Kamil; Soliman, Elsayed Z; Spector, Timothy D; Spiering, Wilko; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Stolk, Ronald P; Strauch, Konstantin; Tan, Sian-Tsung; Tarasov, Kirill V; Trinh, Bosco; Uitterlinden, Andre G; van den Boogaard, Malou; van Duijn, Cornelia M; van Gilst, Wiek H; Viikari, Jorma S; Visscher, Peter M; Vitart, Veronique; Völker, Uwe; Waldenberger, Melanie; Weichenberger, Christian X; Westra, Harm-Jan; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H; Yang, Jian; Bezzina, Connie R; Munroe, Patricia B; Snieder, Harold; Wright, Alan F; Rudan, Igor; Boyer, Laurie A; Asselbergs, Folkert W; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Stricker, Bruno H; Psaty, Bruce M; Ciullo, Marina; Sanna, Serena; Lehtimäki, Terho; Wilson, James F; Bandinelli, Stefania; Alonso, Alvaro; Gasparini, Paolo; Jukema, J Wouter; Kääb, Stefan; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Felix, Stephan B; Heckbert, Susan R; de Boer, Rudolf A; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Hicks, Andrew A; Chambers, John C; Jamshidi, Yalda; Visel, Axel; Christoffels, Vincent M; Isaacs, Aaron; Samani, Nilesh J; de Bakker, Paul I W

    2016-09-27

    Myocardial mass is a key determinant of cardiac muscle function and hypertrophy. Myocardial depolarization leading to cardiac muscle contraction is reflected by the amplitude and duration of the QRS complex on the electrocardiogram (ECG). Abnormal QRS amplitude or duration reflect changes in myocardial mass and conduction, and are associated with increased risk of heart failure and death. This meta-analysis sought to gain insights into the genetic determinants of myocardial mass. We carried out a genome-wide association meta-analysis of 4 QRS traits in up to 73,518 individuals of European ancestry, followed by extensive biological and functional assessment. We identified 52 genomic loci, of which 32 are novel, that are reliably associated with 1 or more QRS phenotypes at p < 1 × 10(-8). These loci are enriched in regions of open chromatin, histone modifications, and transcription factor binding, suggesting that they represent regions of the genome that are actively transcribed in the human heart. Pathway analyses provided evidence that these loci play a role in cardiac hypertrophy. We further highlighted 67 candidate genes at the identified loci that are preferentially expressed in cardiac tissue and associated with cardiac abnormalities in Drosophila melanogaster and Mus musculus. We validated the regulatory function of a novel variant in the SCN5A/SCN10A locus in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, our findings provide new insights into genes and biological pathways controlling myocardial mass and may help identify novel therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Genomic Loci Modulating the Retinal Transcriptome in Wound Healing

    OpenAIRE

    Vázquez-Chona, Félix R; Lu Lu; Robert W Williams; Geisert, Eldon E.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The present study predicts and tests genetic networks that modulate gene expression during the retinal wound-healing response.Methods: Upstream modulators and target genes were defined using meta-analysis and bioinfor matic approaches. Quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for retinal acute phase genes (Vazquez-Chona et al. 2005) were defi ned using QTL analysis of CNS gene expression (Chesler et al. 2005). Candidate modulators were defi ned using computational analysis of gene and motif se...

  2. Incomplete Lineage Sorting: Consistent Phylogeny Estimation From Multiple Loci

    CERN Document Server

    Mossel, Elchanan

    2008-01-01

    We introduce a simple algorithm for reconstructing phylogenies from multiple gene trees in the presence of incomplete lineage sorting, that is, when the topology of the gene trees may differ from that of the species tree. We show that our technique is statistically consistent under standard stochastic assumptions, that is, it returns the correct tree given sufficiently many unlinked loci. We also show that it can tolerate moderate estimation errors.

  3. Balancing selection maintains polymorphisms at neurogenetic loci in field experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonn, Eija; Koskela, Esa; Mappes, Tapio; Mokkonen, Mikael; Sims, Angela M; Watts, Phillip C

    2017-04-04

    Most variation in behavior has a genetic basis, but the processes determining the level of diversity at behavioral loci are largely unknown for natural populations. Expression of arginine vasopressin receptor 1a (Avpr1a) and oxytocin receptor (Oxtr) in specific regions of the brain regulates diverse social and reproductive behaviors in mammals, including humans. That these genes have important fitness consequences and that natural populations contain extensive diversity at these loci implies the action of balancing selection. In Myodes glareolus, Avpr1a and Oxtr each contain a polymorphic microsatellite locus located in their 5' regulatory region (the regulatory region-associated microsatellite, RRAM) that likely regulates gene expression. To test the hypothesis that balancing selection maintains diversity at behavioral loci, we released artificially bred females and males with different RRAM allele lengths into field enclosures that differed in population density. The length of Avpr1a and Oxtr RRAMs was associated with reproductive success, but population density and the sex interacted to determine the optimal genotype. In general, longer Avpr1a RRAMs were more beneficial for males, and shorter RRAMs were more beneficial for females; the opposite was true for Oxtr RRAMs. Moreover, Avpr1a RRAM allele length is correlated with the reproductive success of the sexes during different phases of reproduction; for males, RRAM length correlated with the numbers of newborn offspring, but for females selection was evident on the number of weaned offspring. This report of density-dependence and sexual antagonism acting on loci within the arginine vasopressin-oxytocin pathway explains how genetic diversity at Avpr1a and Oxtr could be maintained in natural populations.

  4. Simultaneous mapping of multiple gene loci with pooled segregants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Claesen

    Full Text Available The analysis of polygenic, phenotypic characteristics such as quantitative traits or inheritable diseases remains an important challenge. It requires reliable scoring of many genetic markers covering the entire genome. The advent of high-throughput sequencing technologies provides a new way to evaluate large numbers of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs as genetic markers. Combining the technologies with pooling of segregants, as performed in bulked segregant analysis (BSA, should, in principle, allow the simultaneous mapping of multiple genetic loci present throughout the genome. The gene mapping process, applied here, consists of three steps: First, a controlled crossing of parents with and without a trait. Second, selection based on phenotypic screening of the offspring, followed by the mapping of short offspring sequences against the parental reference. The final step aims at detecting genetic markers such as SNPs, insertions and deletions with next generation sequencing (NGS. Markers in close proximity of genomic loci that are associated to the trait have a higher probability to be inherited together. Hence, these markers are very useful for discovering the loci and the genetic mechanism underlying the characteristic of interest. Within this context, NGS produces binomial counts along the genome, i.e., the number of sequenced reads that matches with the SNP of the parental reference strain, which is a proxy for the number of individuals in the offspring that share the SNP with the parent. Genomic loci associated with the trait can thus be discovered by analyzing trends in the counts along the genome. We exploit the link between smoothing splines and generalized mixed models for estimating the underlying structure present in the SNP scatterplots.

  5. The Isoconditioning Loci of Planar Three-DOF Parallel Manipulators

    CERN Document Server

    Chablat, Damien; Caro, Stéphane; Angeles, Jorge

    2007-01-01

    The subject of this paper is a special class of three-degree-of-freedom parallel manipulators. The singular configurations of the two Jacobian matrices are first studied. The isotropic configurations are then found based on the characteristic length of this manipulator. The isoconditioning loci for the Jacobian matrices are plotted to define a global performance index allowing the comparison of the different working modes. The index thus resulting is compared with the Cartesian workspace surface and the average of the condition number.

  6. Adaptive Linkage Disequilibrium Between Two Esterase Loci of a Salamander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, T. Preston

    1973-01-01

    In some populations of the salamander Plethodon cinereus, two polymorphic esterase loci are in linkage disequilibrium. Short-term stability of the linkage disequilibrium is demonstrated by an age class analysis. Long, perhaps very long, term stability is suggested by its distribution. This stability and concordant geographic variation in allelic frequencies imply selective origin and maintenance. Data on the frequencies of two color morphs suggest that formation of the linkage disequilibrium is dependent on the genetic background. Images PMID:4515614

  7. Identification of Single-Nucleotide Polymorphic Loci Associated with Biomass Yield under Water Deficit in Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) Using Genome-Wide Sequencing and Association Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Long-Xi

    2017-01-01

    Alfalfa is a worldwide grown forage crop and is important due to its high biomass production and nutritional value. However, the production of alfalfa is challenged by adverse environmental factors such as drought and other stresses. Developing drought resistance alfalfa is an important breeding target for enhancing alfalfa productivity in arid and semi-arid regions. In the present study, we used genotyping-by-sequencing and genome-wide association to identify marker loci associated with biomass yield under drought in the field in a panel of diverse germplasm of alfalfa. A total of 28 markers at 22 genetic loci were associated with yield under water deficit, whereas only four markers associated with the same trait under well-watered condition. Comparisons of marker-trait associations between water deficit and well-watered conditions showed non-similarity except one. Most of the markers were identical across harvest periods within the treatment, although different levels of significance were found among the three harvests. The loci associated with biomass yield under water deficit located throughout all chromosomes in the alfalfa genome agreed with previous reports. Our results suggest that biomass yield under drought is a complex quantitative trait with polygenic inheritance and may involve a different mechanism compared to that of non-stress. BLAST searches of the flanking sequences of the associated loci against DNA databases revealed several stress-responsive genes linked to the drought resistance loci, including leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase, B3 DNA-binding domain protein, translation initiation factor IF2, and phospholipase-like protein. With further investigation, those markers closely linked to drought resistance can be used for MAS to accelerate the development of new alfalfa cultivars with improved resistance to drought and other abiotic stresses.

  8. Identification of Single-Nucleotide Polymorphic Loci Associated with Biomass Yield under Water Deficit in Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. Using Genome-Wide Sequencing and Association Mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long-Xi Yu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Alfalfa is a worldwide grown forage crop and is important due to its high biomass production and nutritional value. However, the production of alfalfa is challenged by adverse environmental factors such as drought and other stresses. Developing drought resistance alfalfa is an important breeding target for enhancing alfalfa productivity in arid and semi-arid regions. In the present study, we used genotyping-by-sequencing and genome-wide association to identify marker loci associated with biomass yield under drought in the field in a panel of diverse germplasm of alfalfa. A total of 28 markers at 22 genetic loci were associated with yield under water deficit, whereas only four markers associated with the same trait under well-watered condition. Comparisons of marker-trait associations between water deficit and well-watered conditions showed non-similarity except one. Most of the markers were identical across harvest periods within the treatment, although different levels of significance were found among the three harvests. The loci associated with biomass yield under water deficit located throughout all chromosomes in the alfalfa genome agreed with previous reports. Our results suggest that biomass yield under drought is a complex quantitative trait with polygenic inheritance and may involve a different mechanism compared to that of non-stress. BLAST searches of the flanking sequences of the associated loci against DNA databases revealed several stress-responsive genes linked to the drought resistance loci, including leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase, B3 DNA-binding domain protein, translation initiation factor IF2, and phospholipase-like protein. With further investigation, those markers closely linked to drought resistance can be used for MAS to accelerate the development of new alfalfa cultivars with improved resistance to drought and other abiotic stresses.

  9. Genetic polymorphisms of loci D18S53, D18S59, and D18S488 in fetuses from a Chinese Tianjin Han population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X Z; Liu, J; Shi, Y F; Ju, D; Zhang, Y; Yue, T F

    2016-06-16

    We investigated the genetic polymorphisms of three short tandem repeat (STR) loci, D18S53, D18S59, and D18S488, on chromosome 18 in fetuses from a Chinese Tianjin Han population. Sixty-four villus samples and 374 amniotic fluid samples were collected from fetuses. Quantitative fluorescence polymerase chain reaction was performed to amplify the STR loci, followed by scanned electrophoresis and quantitative analysis of the fluorescence signals. Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) analysis was performed based on the genotype distributions of the STR loci to obtain the following population genetic data: genotype frequency, heterozygosity of observation (HO), polymorphism information content (PIC), probability of discrimination power (PD), and probability of exclusion (PE). We detected 15, 13, and 15 alleles of D18S53, D18S59, and D18S488, respectively. The genotype frequencies were found to be in line with HWE. The HO values of the three loci, D18S53, D18S59, and D18S488, were 0.797, 0.847, and 0.792; the PIC values were 0.81, 0.75, and 0.73; the PD values were 0.944, 0.901, and 0.881; and the PE values were 0.593, 0.689, and 0.585, respectively. D18S53, D18S59, and D18S488 loci are good genetic markers of chromosome 18, and show potential for use in the prenatal genetic diagnosis of Edwards' syndrome.

  10. An incest case with three biological brothers as alleged fathers: Even 22 autosomal STR loci analysis would not suffice without the mother.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canturk, Kemal Murat; Emre, Ramazan; Gurkan, Cemal; Komur, Ilhami; Muslumanoglu, Omer; Dogan, Muhammed

    2016-07-01

    Here, we report an incest paternity case involving three biological brothers as alleged fathers (AFs), their biological sister and her child that was investigated using the Investigator ESSplex Plus, AmpFLSTR Identifiler Plus/Investigator IDplex Plus and PowerPlex 16 kits. Initial duo paternity investigations using 15-loci autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) analyses failed to exclude any of the AFs. Despite the fact that one of the brothers, AF1, had a mismatch with the child at a single locus (D2S1338), the possibility of a single-step mutation could not be ruled out. When the number of autosomal STR loci analysed was increased to 22 without the inclusion of the mother, AF2 and AF3 still could not be excluded, since both of them again had no mismatches with the child. A breakthrough was possible only upon inclusion of the mother so that trio paternity investigations were carried out. This time AF1 and AF2 could be excluded at two loci (D2S1338 and D1S1656) and six loci (vWa, D1S1656, D12S391, FGA, PENTA E and PENTA D), respectively, and AF3 was then the only brother who could not be excluded from paternity. Subsequent statistical analyses suggested that AF3 could be the biological father of the child with a combined paternity index >100 billion and a probability of paternity >99.99999999%. These findings consolidate the fact that complex paternity cases such as those involving incest could benefit more from the inclusion of the mother than simply increasing the number of STR loci analysed.

  11. Genotyping of French Bacillus anthracis strains based on 31-loci multi locus VNTR analysis: epidemiology, marker evaluation, and update of the internet genotype database.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Thierry

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacillus anthracis is known to have low genetic variability. In spite of this lack of diversity, multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat (VNTR analysis (MLVA and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs including the canonical SNPs assay (canSNP have proved to be highly effective to differentiate strains. Five different MLVA schemes based on a collection of 31 VNTR loci (MLVA8, MLVA15, MLVA20, MLVA25 and MLVA31 with increased resolving power have been described. RESULTS: MLVA31 was applied to characterize the French National Reference Laboratory collection. The total collection of 130 strains is resolved in 35 genotypes. The 119 veterinary and environmental strains collection in France were resolved into 26 genotypes belonging to three canSNP lineages and four MLVA clonal complexes (CCs with particular geographical clustering. A subset of seven loci (MLVA7 is proposed to constitute a first line assay. The loci are compatible with moderate resolution equipment such as agarose gel electrophoresis and show a good congruence value with MLVA31. The associated MLVA and SNP data was imported together with published genotyping data by taking advantage of major enhancements to the MLVAbank software and web site. CONCLUSIONS: The present report provides a wide coverage of the genetic diversity of naturally occurring B. anthracis strains in France as can be revealed by MLVA. The data obtained suggests that once such coverage is achieved, it becomes possible to devise optimized first-line MLVA assays comprising a sufficiently low number of loci to be typed either in one multiplex PCR or on agarose gels. Such a selection of seven loci is proposed here, and future similar investigations in additional countries will indicate to which extend the same selection can be used worldwide as a common minimum set. It is hoped that this approach will contribute to an efficient and low-cost routine surveillance of important pathogens for biosecurity such as

  12. Genetic Variation of 25 Y-Chromosomal and 15 Autosomal STR Loci in the Han Chinese Population of Liaoning Province, Northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jun; Wang, Bao-Jie

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the genetic characteristics of 25 Y-chromosomal and 15 autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) loci in 305 unrelated Han Chinese male individuals from Liaoning Province using AmpFISTR® Yfiler® Plus and IdentifilerTM PCR amplification kits. Population comparison was performed between Liaoning Han population and different ethnic groups to better understand the genetic background of the Liaoning Han population. For Y-STR loci, the overall haplotype diversity was 0.9997 and the discrimination capacity was 0.9607. Gene diversity values ranged from 0.4525 (DYS391) to 0.9617 (DYS385). Rst and two multi-dimensional scaling plots showed that minor differences were observed when the Liaoning Han population was compared to the Jilin Han Chinese, Beijing Han Chinese, Liaoning Manchu, Liaoning Mongolian, Liaoning Xibe, Shandong Han Chinese, Jiangsu Han Chinese, Anhui Han Chinese, Guizhou Han Chinese and Liaoning Hui populations; by contrast, major differences were observed when the Shanxi Han Chinese, Yunnan Bai, Jiangxi Han Chinese, Guangdong Han Chinese, Liaoning Korean, Hunan Tujia, Guangxi Zhuang, Gansu Tibetan, Xishuangbanna Dai, South Korean, Japanese and Hunan Miao populations. For autosomal STR loci, DP ranged from 0.9621 (D2S1338) to 0.8177 (TPOX), with PE distributing from 0.7521 (D18S51) to 0.2988 (TH01). A population comparison was performed and no statistically significant differences were detected at any STR loci between Liaoning Han, China Dong, and Shaanxi Han populations. The results showed that the 25 Y-STR and 15 autosomal STR loci in the Liaoning Han population were valuable for forensic applications and human genetics, and Liaoning Han was an independent endogenous ethnicity with a unique subpopulation structure.

  13. Four loci explain 83% of size variation in the horse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shokouh Makvandi-Nejad

    Full Text Available Horse body size varies greatly due to intense selection within each breed. American Miniatures are less than one meter tall at the withers while Shires and Percherons can exceed two meters. The genetic basis for this variation is not known. We hypothesize that the breed population structure of the horse should simplify efforts to identify genes controlling size. In support of this, here we show with genome-wide association scans (GWAS that genetic variation at just four loci can explain the great majority of horse size variation. Unlike humans, which are naturally reproducing and possess many genetic variants with weak effects on size, we show that horses, like other domestic mammals, carry just a small number of size loci with alleles of large effect. Furthermore, three of our horse size loci contain the LCORL, HMGA2 and ZFAT genes that have previously been found to control human height. The LCORL/NCAPG locus is also implicated in cattle growth and HMGA2 is associated with dog size. Extreme size diversification is a hallmark of domestication. Our results in the horse, complemented by the prior work in cattle and dog, serve to pinpoint those very few genes that have played major roles in the rapid evolution of size during domestication.

  14. Genome-wide search for strabismus susceptibility loci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujiwara H

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to search for chromosomal susceptibility loci for comitant strabismus. Genomic DNA was isolated from 10mL blood taken from each member of 30 nuclear families in which 2 or more siblings are affected by either esotropia or exotropia. A genome-wide search was performed with amplification by polymerase chain reaction of 400 markers in microsatellite regions with approximately 10 cM resolution. For each locus, non-parametric affected sib-pair analysis and non-parametric linkage analysis for multiple pedigrees (Genehunter software, http://linkage.rockefeller.edu/soft/ were used to calculate multipoint lod scores and non-parametric linkage (NPL scores, respectively. In sib-pair analysis, lod scores showed basically flat lines with several peaks of 0.25 on all chromosomes. In non-parametric linkage analysis for multiple pedigrees, NPL scores showed one peak as high as 1.34 on chromosomes 1, 2, 4, 7, 10, 15, and 16, while 2 such peaks were found on chromosomes 3, 9, 11, 12, 18, and 20. Non-parametric linkage analysis for multiple pedigrees of 30 families with comitant strabismus suggested a number of chromosomal susceptibility loci. Our ongoing study involving a larger number of families will refine the accuracy of statistical analysis to pinpoint susceptibility loci for comitant strabismus.

  15. Genome-wide association study identifies five new schizophrenia loci.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ripke, Stephan

    2011-10-01

    We examined the role of common genetic variation in schizophrenia in a genome-wide association study of substantial size: a stage 1 discovery sample of 21,856 individuals of European ancestry and a stage 2 replication sample of 29,839 independent subjects. The combined stage 1 and 2 analysis yielded genome-wide significant associations with schizophrenia for seven loci, five of which are new (1p21.3, 2q32.3, 8p23.2, 8q21.3 and 10q24.32-q24.33) and two of which have been previously implicated (6p21.32-p22.1 and 18q21.2). The strongest new finding (P = 1.6 × 10(-11)) was with rs1625579 within an intron of a putative primary transcript for MIR137 (microRNA 137), a known regulator of neuronal development. Four other schizophrenia loci achieving genome-wide significance contain predicted targets of MIR137, suggesting MIR137-mediated dysregulation as a previously unknown etiologic mechanism in schizophrenia. In a joint analysis with a bipolar disorder sample (16,374 affected individuals and 14,044 controls), three loci reached genome-wide significance: CACNA1C (rs4765905, P = 7.0 × 10(-9)), ANK3 (rs10994359, P = 2.5 × 10(-8)) and the ITIH3-ITIH4 region (rs2239547, P = 7.8 × 10(-9)).

  16. Evolution of V genes from the TRV loci of mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivieri, David N; Gambón-Cerdá, Santiago; Gambón-Deza, Francisco

    2015-07-01

    Information concerning the evolution of T lymphocyte receptors (TCR) can be deciphered from that part of the molecule that recognizes antigen presented by major histocompatibility complex (MHC), namely the variable (V) regions. The genes that code for these variable regions are found within the TCR loci. Here, we describe a study of the evolutionary origin of V genes that code for the α and β chains of the TCR loci of mammals. In particular, we demonstrate that most of the 35 TRAV and 25 TRBV conserved genes found in Primates are also found in other Eutheria, while in Marsupials, Monotremes, and Reptiles, these genes diversified in a different manner. We also show that in mammals, all TRAV genes are derived from five ancestral genes, while all TRBV genes originate from four such genes. In Reptiles, the five TRAV and three out of the four TRBV ancestral genes exist, as well as other V genes not found in mammals. We also studied the TRGV and TRDV loci from all mammals, and we show a relationship of the TRDV to the TRAV locus throughout evolutionary time.

  17. Electronics and electronic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Olsen, George H

    1987-01-01

    Electronics and Electronic Systems explores the significant developments in the field of electronics and electronic devices. This book is organized into three parts encompassing 11 chapters that discuss the fundamental circuit theory and the principles of analog and digital electronics. This book deals first with the passive components of electronic systems, such as resistors, capacitors, and inductors. These topics are followed by a discussion on the analysis of electronic circuits, which involves three ways, namely, the actual circuit, graphical techniques, and rule of thumb. The remaining p

  18. Simple sequence repeat marker development and genetic mapping in quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D. E. Jarvis; O. R. Kopp; E. N. Jellen; M. A. Mallory; J. Pattee; A. Bonifacio; C. E. Coleman; M. R. Stevens; D. J. Fairbanks; P. J. Maughan

    2008-04-01

    Quinoa is a regionally important grain crop in the Andean region of South America. Recently quinoa has gained international attention for its high nutritional value and tolerances of extreme abiotic stresses. DNA markers and linkage maps are important tools for germplasm conservation and crop improvement programmes. Here we report the development of 216 new polymorphic SSR (simple sequence repeats) markers from libraries enriched for GA, CAA and AAT repeats, as well as 6 SSR markers developed from bacterial artificial chromosome-end sequences (BES-SSRs). Heterozygosity (H) values of the SSR markers ranges from 0.12 to 0.90, with an average value of 0.57. A linkage map was constructed for a newly developed recombinant inbred lines (RIL) population using these SSR markers. Additional markers, including amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs), two 11S seed storage protein loci, and the nucleolar organizing region (NOR), were also placed on the linkage map. The linkage map presented here is the first SSR-based map in quinoa and contains 275 markers, including 200 SSR. The map consists of 38 linkage groups (LGs) covering 913 cM. Segregation distortion was observed in the mapping population for several marker loci, indicating possible chromosomal regions associated with selection or gametophytic lethality. As this map is based primarily on simple and easily-transferable SSR markers, it will be particularly valuable for research in laboratories in Andean regions of South America.

  19. Simple sequence repeat marker development and genetic mapping in quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, D E; Kopp, O R; Jellen, E N; Mallory, M A; Pattee, J; Bonifacio, A; Coleman, C E; Stevens, M R; Fairbanks, D J; Maughan, P J

    2008-04-01

    Quinoa is a regionally important grain crop in the Andean region of South America. Recently quinoa has gained international attention for its high nutritional value and tolerances of extreme abiotic stresses. DNA markers and linkage maps are important tools for germplasm conservation and crop improvement programmes. Here we report the development of 216 new polymorphic SSR (simple sequence repeats) markers from libraries enriched for GA, CAA and AAT repeats, as well as 6 SSR markers developed from bacterial artificial chromosome-end sequences (BES-SSRs). Heterozygosity (H) values of the SSR markers ranges from 0.12 to 0.90, with an average value of 0.57. A linkage map was constructed for a newly developed recombinant inbred lines (RIL) population using these SSR markers. Additional markers, including amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs), two 11S seed storage protein loci, and the nucleolar organizing region (NOR), were also placed on the linkage map. The linkage map presented here is the first SSR-based map in quinoa and contains 275 markers, including 200 SSR. The map consists of 38 linkage groups (LGs) covering 913 cM. Segregation distortion was observed in the mapping population for several marker loci, indicating possible chromosomal regions associated with selection or gametophytic lethality. As this map is based primarily on simple and easily-transferable SSR markers, it will be particularly valuable for research in laboratories in Andean regions of South America.

  20. Microchip-based forensic short tandem repeat genotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Tae; Heo, Hyun Young; Oh, Shin Hye; Lee, Seung Hwan; Kim, Do Hyun; Seo, Tae Seok

    2015-08-01

    Micro total analysis system (μTAS) or lab-on-a-chip (LOC) technology has advanced over decades, and the high performance for chemical and biological analysis has been well demonstrated with advantages of low sample consumption, rapid analysis time, high-throughput screening, and portability. In particular, μTAS or LOC based genetic applications have been extensively explored, and the short tandem repeat (STR) typing on a chip has garnered attention in the forensic community due to its special use for human identification in the field of mass disaster and missing person investigation, paternity testing, and perpetrator identification. The STR typing process consists of sample collection, DNA extraction, DNA quantitation, STR loci amplification, capillary electrophoretic separation, and STR profiling. Recent progress of microtechnology shows its ability to substitute the conventional analytical tools, and furthermore demonstrates total integration of the whole STR processes on a single wafer for on-site STR typing. In this review article, we highlighted some representative results for fluorescence labeling techniques, microchip-based DNA purification, on-chip polymerase chain reaction (PCR), a capillary electrophoretic microdevice, and a fully integrated microdevice for STR typing.

  1. Systematic Profiling of Short Tandem Repeats in the Cattle Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lingyang; Haasl, Ryan J; Sun, Jiajie; Zhou, Yang; Bickhart, Derek M; Li, Junya; Song, Jiuzhou; Sonstegard, Tad S; Van Tassell, Curtis P; Lewin, Harris A; Liu, George E

    2017-01-01

    Short tandem repeats (STRs), or microsatellites, are genetic variants with repetitive 2–6 base pair motifs in many mammalian genomes. Using high-throughput sequencing and experimental validations, we systematically profiled STRs in five Holsteins. We identified a total of 60,106 microsatellites and generated the first high-resolution STR map, representing a substantial pool of polymorphism in dairy cattle. We observed significant STRs overlap with functional genes and quantitative trait loci (QTL). We performed evolutionary and population genetic analyses using over 20,000 common dinucleotide STRs. Besides corroborating the well-established positive correlation between allele size and variance in allele size, these analyses also identified dozens of outlier STRs based on two anomalous relationships that counter expected characteristics of neutral evolution. And one STR locus overlaps with a significant region of a summary statistic designed to detect STR-related selection. Additionally, our results showed that only 57.1% of STRs located within SNP-based linkage disequilibrium (LD) blocks whereas the other 42.9% were out of blocks. Therefore, a substantial number of STRs are not tagged by SNPs in the cattle genome, likely due to STR's distinct mutation mechanism and elevated polymorphism. This study provides the foundation for future STR-based studies of cattle genome evolution and selection.

  2. Meta-Analysis of DNA Tumor-Viral Integration Site Selection Indicates a Role for Repeats, Gene Expression and Epigenetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet M. Doolittle-Hall

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Oncoviruses cause tremendous global cancer burden. For several DNA tumor viruses, human genome integration is consistently associated with cancer development. However, genomic features associated with tumor viral integration are poorly understood. We sought to define genomic determinants for 1897 loci prone to hosting human papillomavirus (HPV, hepatitis B virus (HBV or Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV. These were compared to HIV, whose enzyme-mediated integration is well understood. A comprehensive catalog of integration sites was constructed from the literature and experimentally-determined HPV integration sites. Features were scored in eight categories (genes, expression, open chromatin, histone modifications, methylation, protein binding, chromatin segmentation and repeats and compared to random loci. Random forest models determined loci classification and feature selection. HPV and HBV integrants were not fragile site associated. MCPyV preferred integration near sensory perception genes. Unique signatures of integration-associated predictive genomic features were detected. Importantly, repeats, actively-transcribed regions and histone modifications were common tumor viral integration signatures.

  3. Analysis of short tandem repeat (STR polymorphisms by the powerplex 16 system and capillary electrophoresis: application to forensic practice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okamoto O

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Allele and genotype frequencies for 15 short tandem repeat (STR polymorphisms--D3S1358, TH01, D21S11, D18S51, Penta E, D5S818, D13S317, D7S820, D16S539, CSF1PO, Penta D, vWA, D8S1179, TPOX and FGA--in a Japanese population were estimated. No deviations of the observed allele frequency from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium expectations were found for any of the systems studied. Between 2 new pentanucleotide STR loci, Penta E and Penta D, for which there is only limited data regarding the allelic distribution in Japanese, the Penta E locus was found to be highly polymorphic and exhibited a tri- or tetra-modal distribution pattern having allelic peaks with 5, 11, 15 and 20 repeats. The distribution was significantly different from that of the other ethnic groups. Statistical parameters of forensic importance, the power of discrimination (PD, observed and expected heterozygosity values (H, polymorphism information content (PIC, power of discrimination (PD, matching probability (pM, power of exclusion (PE, and typical paternity index (PI, were calculated for the loci. These parameters indicated the usefulness of the loci in forensic personal identification and paternity testing among Japanese. The systems Penta E, FGA, D18S51 and D8S1179 were the most informative. This method was successfully applied to forensic personal identification and paternity testing among Japanese, thereby confirming its efficacy for forensic practice.

  4. Strengthening concept learning by repeated testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiklund-Hörnqvist, Carola; Jonsson, Bert; Nyberg, Lars

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether repeated testing with feedback benefits learning compared to rereading of introductory psychology key-concepts in an educational context. The testing effect was examined immediately after practice, after 18 days, and at a five-week delay in a sample of undergraduate students (n = 83). The results revealed that repeated testing with feedback significantly enhanced learning compared to rereading at all delays, demonstrating that repeated retrieval enhances retention compared to repeated encoding in the short- and the long-term. In addition, the effect of repeated testing was beneficial for students irrespectively of working memory capacity. It is argued that teaching methods involving repeated retrieval are important to consider by the educational system.

  5. Characterization of new microsatellite loci for population genetic studies in the Smooth Cauliflower Coral (Stylophora sp.)

    KAUST Repository

    Banguera-Hinestroza, E.

    2013-01-09

    A total of one hundred microsatellites loci were selected from the draft genome of Stylophora pistillata and evaluated in previously characterized samples of Stylophora cf pistillata from the Red Sea. 17 loci were amplified successfully and tested in 24 individuals from samples belonging to a single population from the central region of the Red Sea. The number of alleles ranged from 3 to 15 alleles per locus, while observed heterozygosity ranged from 0. 292 to 0. 95. Six of these loci showed significant deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) expectations, and 4/136 paired loci comparisons suggested linkage disequilibrium after Bonferroni corrections. After excluding loci with significant HWE deviation and evidence of null alleles, average genetic diversity over loci in the population studied (N = 24, Nloci = 11) was 0. 701 ± 0. 380. This indicates that these loci can be used effectively to evaluate genetic diversity and undertake population genetics studies in Stylophora sp. populations. 2013 The Author(s).

  6. Evolutionary history of chloridoid grasses estimated from 122 nuclear loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Amanda E; Hasenstab, Kristen M; Bell, Hester L; Blaine, Ellen; Ingram, Amanda L; Columbus, J Travis

    2016-12-01

    Chloridoideae (chloridoid grasses) are a subfamily of ca. 1700 species with high diversity in arid habitats. Until now, their evolutionary relationships have primarily been studied with DNA sequences from the chloroplast, a maternally inherited organelle. Next-generation sequencing is able to efficiently recover large numbers of nuclear loci that can then be used to estimate the species phylogeny based upon bi-parentally inherited data. We sought to test our chloroplast-based hypotheses of relationships among chloridoid species with 122 nuclear loci generated through targeted-enrichment next-generation sequencing, sometimes referred to as hyb-seq. We targeted putative single-copy housekeeping genes, as well as genes that have been implicated in traits characteristic of, or particularly labile in, chloridoids: e.g., drought and salt tolerance. We recovered ca. 70% of the targeted loci (122 of 177 loci) in all 47 species sequenced using hyb-seq. We then analyzed the nuclear loci with Bayesian and coalescent methods and the resulting phylogeny resolves relationships between the four chloridoid tribes. Several novel findings with this data were: the sister lineage to Chloridoideae is unresolved; Centropodia+Ellisochloa are excluded from Chloridoideae in phylogenetic estimates using a coalescent model; Sporobolus subtilis is more closely related to Eragrostis than to other species of Sporobolus; and Tragus is more closely related to Chloris and relatives than to a lineage of mainly New World species. Relationships in Cynodonteae in the nuclear phylogeny are quite different from chloroplast estimates, but were not robust to changes in the method of phylogenetic analysis. We tested the data signal with several partition schemes, a concatenation analysis, and tests of alternative hypotheses to assess our confidence in this new, nuclear estimate of evolutionary relationships. Our work provides markers and a framework for additional phylogenetic studies that sample more

  7. STELLAR LOCI. I. METALLICITY DEPENDENCE AND INTRINSIC WIDTHS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Haibo; Liu, Xiaowei [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Xiang, Maosheng; Huang, Yang; Chen, Bingqiu, E-mail: yuanhb4861@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: x.liu@pku.edu.cn [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2015-02-01

    Stellar loci are widely used for selection of interesting outliers, reddening determinations, and calibrations. However, until now, the dependence of stellar loci on metallicity has not been fully explored, and their intrinsic widths are unclear. In this paper, by combining the spectroscopic and recalibrated imaging data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82, we have built a large, clean sample of dwarf stars with accurate colors and well-determined metallicities to investigate the metallicity dependence and intrinsic widths of the SDSS stellar loci. Typically, 1 dex decrease in metallicity causes 0.20 and 0.02 mag decrease in colors u – g and g – r and 0.02 and 0.02 mag increase in colors r – i and i – z, respectively. The variations are larger for metal-rich stars than for metal-poor ones, and larger for F/G/K stars than for A/M ones. Using the sample, we have performed two-dimensional polynomial fitting to the u – g, g – r, r – i, and i – z colors as a function of color g – i and metallicity [Fe/H]. The residuals, at the level of 0.029, 0.008, 0.008, and 0.011 mag for the u – g, g – r, r – i, and i – z colors, respectively, can be fully accounted for by the photometric errors and metallicity uncertainties, suggesting that the intrinsic widths of the loci are at maximum a few millimagnitudes. The residual distributions are asymmetric, revealing that a significant fraction of stars are binaries. In a companion paper, we will present an unbiased estimate of the binary fraction for field stars. Other potential applications of the metallicity-dependent stellar loci are briefly discussed.

  8. Thousands of microsatellite loci from the venomous coralsnake (Micrurus fulvius) and variability of select loci across populations and related species

    OpenAIRE

    Castoe, Todd A.; Streicher, Jeffrey W.; Jesse M Meik; Ingrasci, Matthew J.; Poole, Alexander W.; de Koning, A. P. Jason; Campbell, Jonathan A.; Parkinson, Christopher L; Eric N. Smith; Pollock, David D.

    2012-01-01

    Studies of population genetics increasingly use next-generation DNA sequencing to identify microsatellite loci in non-model organisms. There are, however, relatively few studies that validate the feasibility of transitioning from marker development to experimental application across populations and species. North American coralsnakes of the Micrurus fulvius species complex occur in the United States and Mexico, and little is known about their population structure and phylogenetic relationship...

  9. Genetic differentiation revealed by selective loci of drought-responding EST-SSRs between upland and lowland rice in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Xia

    Full Text Available Upland and lowland rice (Oryza sativa L. represent two of the most important rice ecotypes adapted to ago-ecosystems with contrasting soil-water conditions. Upland rice, domesticated in the water-limited environment, contains valuable drought-resistant characters that can be used in water-saving breeding. Knowledge about the divergence between upland and lowland rice will provide valuable cues for the evolution of drought-resistance in rice. Genetic differentiation between upland and lowland rice was explored by 47 Simple Sequence Repeats (SSRs located in drought responding expressed sequence tags (ESTs among 377 rice landraces. The morphological traits of drought-resistance were evaluated in the field experiments. Different outlier loci were detected in the japonica and indica subspecies, respectively. Considerable genetic differentiation between upland and lowland rice on these outlier loci was estimated in japonica (Fst = 0.258 and indica (Fst = 0.127. Furthermore, populations of the upland and lowland ecotypes were clustered separately on these outlier loci. A significant correlation between genetic distance matrices and the dissimilarity matrices of drought-resistant traits was determined, indicating a certain relationship between the upland-lowland rice differentiation and the drought-resistance. Divergent selections occur between upland and lowland rice on the drought-resistance as the Qsts of some drought-resistant traits are significantly higher than the neutral Fst. In addition, the upland- and lowland-preferable alleles responded differently among ecotypes or allelic types under osmotic stress. This shows the evolutionary signature of drought resistance at the gene expression level. The findings of this study can strengthen our understanding of the evolution of drought-resistance in rice with significant implications in the improvement of rice drought-resistance.

  10. Repeat concussions in the national football league.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casson, Ira R; Viano, David C; Powell, John W; Pellman, Elliot J

    2011-01-01

    Repeat concussion is an important issue in the National Football League (NFL). An initial description of repeat injuries was published for 6 years (1996-2001). The characteristics and frequency of repeat concussion in the NFL have not changed in the subsequent 6 years (2002-2007). Case control. From 1996 to 2007, concussions were reported using a standardized form documenting signs and symptoms, loss of consciousness and medical action taken. Data on repeat concussions were analyzed for the 12 years and compared between the 2 periods. In 2002-2007, 152 players had repeat concussions (vs 160 in 1996-2001); 44 had 3+ head injuries (vs 52). The positions most often associated with repeat concussion in 2002-2007 were the defensive secondary, kick unit, running back, and linebacker. The odds for repeat concussion were elevated for wide receivers, tight ends, and linebackers but lower than in the earlier period. During 2002-2007, over half of players with repeat concussion were removed from play, and fewer immediately returned (vs 1996-2001). The average duration between concussions was 1.25 years for 2002-2007 and 1.65 years for the 12-year period. Over 12 years, 7.6% of all repeat concussions occurred within 2 weeks of the prior concussion. The defensive secondary, kick unit, running back, and linebacker have the highest incidence of repeat concussion. During 2002-2007, more than half of players with repeat concussion were removed from play, and only a fraction immediately returned. Although concussion was managed more conservatively by team physicians in the recent 6 years, repeat concussions occurred at similar rates during both periods.

  11. Short Tandem Repeat DNA Internet Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 130 Short Tandem Repeat DNA Internet Database (Web, free access)   Short Tandem Repeat DNA Internet Database is intended to benefit research and application of short tandem repeat DNA markers for human identity testing. Facts and sequence information on each STR system, population data, commonly used multiplex STR systems, PCR primers and conditions, and a review of various technologies for analysis of STR alleles have been included.

  12. Nine Loci for Ocular Axial Length Identified through Genome-wide Association Studies, Including Shared Loci with Refractive Error

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ching-Yu; Schache, Maria; Ikram, M. Kamran; Young, Terri L.; Guggenheim, Jeremy A.; Vitart, Veronique; MacGregor, Stuart; Verhoeven, Virginie J.M.; Barathi, Veluchamy A.; Liao, Jiemin; Hysi, Pirro G.; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E.; St. Pourcain, Beate; Kemp, John P.; McMahon, George; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Evans, David M.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Mishra, Aniket; Wang, Ya Xing; Wang, Jie Jin; Rochtchina, Elena; Polasek, Ozren; Wright, Alan F.; Amin, Najaf; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M.; Wilson, James F.; Pennell, Craig E.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; de Jong, Paulus T.V.M.; Vingerling, Johannes R.; Zhou, Xin; Chen, Peng; Li, Ruoying; Tay, Wan-Ting; Zheng, Yingfeng; Chew, Merwyn; Rahi, Jugnoo S.; Hysi, Pirro G.; Yoshimura, Nagahisa; Yamashiro, Kenji; Miyake, Masahiro; Delcourt, Cécile; Maubaret, Cecilia; Williams, Cathy; Guggenheim, Jeremy A.; Northstone, Kate; Ring, Susan M.; Davey-Smith, George; Craig, Jamie E.; Burdon, Kathryn P.; Fogarty, Rhys D.; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Igo, Robert P.; Chew, Emily; Janmahasathian, Sarayut; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Igo, Robert P.; Chew, Emily; Janmahasathian, Sarayut; Stambolian, Dwight; Wilson, Joan E. Bailey; MacGregor, Stuart; Lu, Yi; Jonas, Jost B.; Xu, Liang; Saw, Seang-Mei; Baird, Paul N.; Rochtchina, Elena; Mitchell, Paul; Wang, Jie Jin; Jonas, Jost B.; Nangia, Vinay; Hayward, Caroline; Wright, Alan F.; Vitart, Veronique; Polasek, Ozren; Campbell, Harry; Vitart, Veronique; Rudan, Igor; Vatavuk, Zoran; Vitart, Veronique; Paterson, Andrew D.; Hosseini, S. Mohsen; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Igo, Robert P.; Fondran, Jeremy R.; Young, Terri L.; Feng, Sheng; Verhoeven, Virginie J.M.; Klaver, Caroline C.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Metspalu, Andres; Haller, Toomas; Mihailov, Evelin; Pärssinen, Olavi; Wedenoja, Juho; Wilson, Joan E. Bailey; Wojciechowski, Robert; Baird, Paul N.; Schache, Maria; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Höhn, René; Pang, Chi Pui; Chen, Peng; Meitinger, Thomas; Oexle, Konrad; Wegner, Aharon; Yoshimura, Nagahisa; Yamashiro, Kenji; Miyake, Masahiro; Pärssinen, Olavi; Yip, Shea Ping; Ho, Daniel W.H.; Pirastu, Mario; Murgia, Federico; Portas, Laura; Biino, Genevra; Wilson, James F.; Fleck, Brian; Vitart, Veronique; Stambolian, Dwight; Wilson, Joan E. Bailey; Hewitt, Alex W.; Ang, Wei; Verhoeven, Virginie J.M.; Klaver, Caroline C.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Saw, Seang-Mei; Wong, Tien-Yin; Teo, Yik-Ying; Fan, Qiao; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Zhou, Xin; Ikram, M. Kamran; Saw, Seang-Mei; Teo, Yik-Ying; Fan, Qiao; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Zhou, Xin; Ikram, M. Kamran; Saw, Seang-Mei; Wong, Tien-Yin; Teo, Yik-Ying; Fan, Qiao; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Zhou, Xin; Ikram, M. Kamran; Saw, Seang-Mei; Wong, Tien-Yin; Teo, Yik-Ying; Fan, Qiao; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Zhou, Xin; Ikram, M. Kamran; Saw, Seang-Mei; Tai, E-Shyong; Teo, Yik-Ying; Fan, Qiao; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Zhou, Xin; Ikram, M. Kamran; Saw, Seang-Mei; Teo, Yik-Ying; Fan, Qiao; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Zhou, Xin; Ikram, M. Kamran; Mackey, David A.; MacGregor, Stuart; Hammond, Christopher J.; Hysi, Pirro G.; Deangelis, Margaret M.; Morrison, Margaux; Zhou, Xiangtian; Chen, Wei; Paterson, Andrew D.; Hosseini, S. Mohsen; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; Meguro, Akira; Lehtimäki, Terho; Mäkelä, Kari-Matti; Raitakari, Olli; Kähönen, Mika; Burdon, Kathryn P.; Craig, Jamie E.; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Igo, Robert P.; Lass, Jonathan H.; Reinhart, William; Belin, Michael W.; Schultze, Robert L.; Morason, Todd; Sugar, Alan; Mian, Shahzad; Soong, Hunson Kaz; Colby, Kathryn; Jurkunas, Ula; Yee, Richard; Vital, Mark; Alfonso, Eduardo; Karp, Carol; Lee, Yunhee; Yoo, Sonia; Hammersmith, Kristin; Cohen, Elisabeth; Laibson, Peter; Rapuano, Christopher; Ayres, Brandon; Croasdale, Christopher; Caudill, James; Patel, Sanjay; Baratz, Keith; Bourne, William; Maguire, Leo; Sugar, Joel; Tu, Elmer; Djalilian, Ali; Mootha, Vinod; McCulley, James; Bowman, Wayne; Cavanaugh, H. Dwight; Verity, Steven; Verdier, David; Renucci, Ann; Oliva, Matt; Rotkis, Walter; Hardten, David R.; Fahmy, Ahmad; Brown, Marlene; Reeves, Sherman; Davis, Elizabeth A.; Lindstrom, Richard; Hauswirth, Scott; Hamilton, Stephen; Lee, W. Barry; Price, Francis; Price, Marianne; Kelly, Kathleen; Peters, Faye; Shaughnessy, Michael; Steinemann, Thomas; Dupps, B.J.; Meisler, David M.; Mifflin, Mark; Olson, Randal; Aldave, Anthony; Holland, Gary; Mondino, Bartly J.; Rosenwasser, George; Gorovoy, Mark; Dunn, Steven P.; Heidemann, David G.; Terry, Mark; Shamie, Neda; Rosenfeld, Steven I.; Suedekum, Brandon; Hwang, David; Stone, Donald; Chodosh, James; Galentine, Paul G.; Bardenstein, David; Goddard, Katrina; Chin, Hemin; Mannis, Mark; Varma, Rohit; Borecki, Ingrid; Chew, Emily Y.; Haller, Toomas; Mihailov, Evelin; Metspalu, Andres; Wedenoja, Juho; Simpson, Claire L.; Wojciechowski, Robert; Höhn, René; Mirshahi, Alireza; Zeller, Tanja; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Lackner, Karl J.; Donnelly, Peter; Barroso, Ines; Blackwell, Jenefer M.; Bramon, Elvira; Brown, Matthew A.; Casas, Juan P.; Corvin, Aiden; Deloukas, Panos; Duncanson, Audrey; Jankowski, Janusz; Markus, Hugh S.; Mathew, Christopher G.; Palmer, Colin N.A.; Plomin, Robert; Rautanen, Anna; Sawcer, Stephen J.; Trembath, Richard C.; Viswanathan, Ananth C.; Wood, Nicholas W.; Spencer, Chris C.A.; Band, Gavin; Bellenguez, Céline; Freeman, Colin; Hellenthal, Garrett; Giannoulatou, Eleni; Pirinen, Matti; Pearson, Richard; Strange, Amy; Su, Zhan; Vukcevic, Damjan; Donnelly, Peter; Langford, Cordelia; Hunt, Sarah E.; Edkins, Sarah; Gwilliam, Rhian; Blackburn, Hannah; Bumpstead, Suzannah J.; Dronov, Serge; Gillman, Matthew; Gray, Emma; Hammond, Naomi; Jayakumar, Alagurevathi; McCann, Owen T.; Liddle, Jennifer; Potter, Simon C.; Ravindrarajah, Radhi; Ricketts, Michelle; Waller, Matthew; Weston, Paul; Widaa, Sara; Whittaker, Pamela; Barroso, Ines; Deloukas, Panos; Mathew, Christopher G.; Blackwell, Jenefer M.; Brown, Matthew A.; Corvin, Aiden; Spencer, Chris C.A.; Bettecken, Thomas; Meitinger, Thomas; Oexle, Konrad; Pirastu, Mario; Portas, Laura; Nag, Abhishek; Williams, Katie M.; Yonova-Doing, Ekaterina; Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara E.; Hosseini, S. Mohsen; Paterson, Andrew D.; Genuth, S.; Nathan, D.M.; Zinman, B.; Crofford, O.; Crandall, J.; Reid, M.; Brown-Friday, J.; Engel, S.; Sheindlin, J.; Martinez, H.; Shamoon, H.; Engel, H.; Phillips, M.; Gubitosi-Klug, R.; Mayer, L.; Pendegast, S.; Zegarra, H.; Miller, D.; Singerman, L.; Smith-Brewer, S.; Novak, M.; Quin, J.; Dahms, W.; Genuth, Saul; Palmert, M.; Brillon, D.; Lackaye, M.E.; Kiss, S.; Chan, R.; Reppucci, V.; Lee, T.; Heinemann, M.; Whitehouse, F.; Kruger, D.; Jones, J.K.; McLellan, M.; Carey, J.D.; Angus, E.; Thomas, A.; Galprin, A.; Bergenstal, R.; Johnson, M.; Spencer, M.; Morgan, K.; Etzwiler, D.; Kendall, D.; Aiello, Lloyd Paul; Golden, E.; Jacobson, A.; Beaser, R.; Ganda, O.; Hamdy, O.; Wolpert, H.; Sharuk, G.; Arrigg, P.; Schlossman, D.; Rosenzwieg, J.; Rand, L.; Nathan, D.M.; Larkin, M.; Ong, M.; Godine, J.; Cagliero, E.; Lou, P.; Folino, K.; Fritz, S.; Crowell, S.; Hansen, K.; Gauthier-Kelly, C.; Service, J.; Ziegler, G.; Luttrell, L.; Caulder, S.; Lopes-Virella, M.; Colwell, J.; Soule, J.; Fernandes, J.; Hermayer, K.; Kwon, S.; Brabham, M.; Blevins, A.; Parker, J.; Lee, D.; Patel, N.; Pittman, C.; Lindsey, P.; Bracey, M.; Lee, K.; Nutaitis, M.; Farr, A.; Elsing, S.; Thompson, T.; Selby, J.; Lyons, T.; Yacoub-Wasef, S.; Szpiech, M.; Wood, D.; Mayfield, R.; Molitch, M.; Schaefer, B.; Jampol, L.; Lyon, A.; Gill, M.; Strugula, Z.; Kaminski, L.; Mirza, R.; Simjanoski, E.; Ryan, D.; Kolterman, O.; Lorenzi, G.; Goldbaum, M.; Sivitz, W.; Bayless, M.; Counts, D.; Johnsonbaugh, S.; Hebdon, M.; Salemi, P.; Liss, R.; Donner, T.; Gordon, J.; Hemady, R.; Kowarski, A.; Ostrowski, D.; Steidl, S.; Jones, B.; Herman, W.H.; Martin, C.L.; Pop-Busui, R.; Sarma, A.; Albers, J.; Feldman, E.; Kim, K.; Elner, S.; Comer, G.; Gardner, T.; Hackel, R.; Prusak, R.; Goings, L.; Smith, A.; Gothrup, J.; Titus, P.; Lee, J.; Brandle, M.; Prosser, L.; Greene, D.A.; Stevens, M.J.; Vine, A.K.; Bantle, J.; Wimmergren, N.; Cochrane, A.; Olsen, T.; Steuer, E.; Rath, P.; Rogness, B.; Hainsworth, D.; Goldstein, D.; Hitt, S.; Giangiacomo, J.; Schade, D.S.; Canady, J.L.; Chapin, J.E.; Ketai, L.H.; Braunstein, C.S.; Bourne, P.A.; Schwartz, S.; Brucker, A.; Maschak-Carey, B.J.; Baker, L.; Orchard, T.; Silvers, N.; Ryan, C.; Songer, T.; Doft, B.; Olson, S.; Bergren, R.L.; Lobes, L.; Rath, P. Paczan; Becker, D.; Rubinstein, D.; Conrad, P.W.; Yalamanchi, S.; Drash, A.; Morrison, A.; Bernal, M.L.; Vaccaro-Kish, J.; Malone, J.; Pavan, P.R.; Grove, N.; Iyer, M.N.; Burrows, A.F.; Tanaka, E.A.; Gstalder, R.; Dagogo-Jack, S.; Wigley, C.; Ricks, H.; Kitabchi, A.; Murphy, M.B.; Moser, S.; Meyer, D.; Iannacone, A.; Chaum, E.; Yoser, S.; Bryer-Ash, M.; Schussler, S.; Lambeth, H.; Raskin, P.; Strowig, S.; Zinman, B.; Barnie, A.; Devenyi, R.; Mandelcorn, M.; Brent, M.; Rogers, S.; Gordon, A.; Palmer, J.; Catton, S.; Brunzell, J.; Wessells, H.; de Boer, I.H.; Hokanson, J.; Purnell, J.; Ginsberg, J.; Kinyoun, J.; Deeb, S.; Weiss, M.; Meekins, G.; Distad, J.; Van Ottingham, L.; Dupre, J.; Harth, J.; Nicolle, D.; Driscoll, M.; Mahon, J.; Canny, C.; May, M.; Lipps, J.; Agarwal, A.; Adkins, T.; Survant, L.; Pate, R.L.; Munn, G.E.; Lorenz, R.; Feman, S.; White, N.; Levandoski, L.; Boniuk, I.; Grand, G.; Thomas, M.; Joseph, D.D.; Blinder, K.; Shah, G.; Boniuk; Burgess; Santiago, J.; Tamborlane, W.; Gatcomb, P.; Stoessel, K.; Taylor, K.; Goldstein, J.; Novella, S.; Mojibian, H.; Cornfeld, D.; Lima, J.; Bluemke, D.; Turkbey, E.; van der Geest, R.J.; Liu, C.; Malayeri, A.; Jain, A.; Miao, C.; Chahal, H.; Jarboe, R.; Maynard, J.; Gubitosi-Klug, R.; Quin, J.; Gaston, P.; Palmert, M.; Trail, R.; Dahms, W.; Lachin, J.; Cleary, P.; Backlund, J.; Sun, W.; Braffett, B.; Klumpp, K.; Chan, K.; Diminick, L.; Rosenberg, D.; Petty, B.; Determan, A.; Kenny, D.; Rutledge, B.; Younes, Naji; Dews, L.; Hawkins, M.; Cowie, C.; Fradkin, J.; Siebert, C.; Eastman, R.; Danis, R.; Gangaputra, S.; Neill, S.; Davis, M.; Hubbard, L.; Wabers, H.; Burger, M.; Dingledine, J.; Gama, V.; Sussman, R.; Steffes, M.; Bucksa, J.; Nowicki, M.; Chavers, B.; O’Leary, D.; Polak, J.; Harrington, A.; Funk, L.; Crow, R.; Gloeb, B.; Thomas, S.; O’Donnell, C.; Soliman, E.; Zhang, Z.M.; Prineas, R.; Campbell, C.; Ryan, C.; Sandstrom, D.; Williams, T.; Geckle, M.; Cupelli, E.; Thoma, F.; Burzuk, B.; Woodfill, T.; Low, P.; Sommer, C.; Nickander, K.; Budoff, M.; Detrano, R.; Wong, N.; Fox, M.; Kim, L.; Oudiz, R.; Weir, G.; Espeland, M.; Manolio, T.; Rand, L.; Singer, D.; Stern, M.; Boulton, A.E.; Clark, C.; D’Agostino, R.; Lopes-Virella, M.; Garvey, W.T.; Lyons, T.J.; Jenkins, A.; Virella, G.; Jaffa, A.; Carter, Rickey; Lackland, D.; Brabham, M.; McGee, D.; Zheng, D.; Mayfield, R.K.; Boright, A.; Bull, S.; Sun, L.; Scherer, S.; Zinman, B.; Natarajan, R.; Miao, F.; Zhang, L.; Chen;, Z.; Nathan, D.M.; Makela, Kari-Matti; Lehtimaki, Terho; Kahonen, Mika; Raitakari, Olli; Yoshimura, Nagahisa; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Chen, Li Jia; Pang, Chi Pui; Yip, Shea Ping; Yap, Maurice K.H.; Meguro, Akira; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Foster, Paul J.; Zhao, Jing Hua; Vithana, Eranga; Tai, E-Shyong; Fan, Qiao; Xu, Liang; Campbell, Harry; Fleck, Brian; Rudan, Igor; Aung, Tin; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G.; Bencic, Goran; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Forward, Hannah; Pärssinen, Olavi; Mitchell, Paul; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hewitt, Alex W.; Williams, Cathy; Oostra, Ben A.; Teo, Yik-Ying; Hammond, Christopher J.; Stambolian, Dwight; Mackey, David A.; Klaver, Caroline C.W.; Wong, Tien-Yin; Saw, Seang-Mei; Baird, Paul N.

    2013-01-01

    Refractive errors are common eye disorders of public health importance worldwide. Ocular axial length (AL) is the major determinant of refraction and thus of myopia and hyperopia. We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for AL, combining 12,531 Europeans and 8,216 Asians. We identified eight genome-wide significant loci for AL (RSPO1, C3orf26, LAMA2, GJD2, ZNRF3, CD55, MIP, and ALPPL2) and confirmed one previously reported AL locus (ZC3H11B). Of the nine loci, five (LAMA2, GJD2, CD55, ALPPL2, and ZC3H11B) were associated with refraction in 18 independent cohorts (n = 23,591). Differential gene expression was observed for these loci in minus-lens-induced myopia mouse experiments and human ocular tissues. Two of the AL genes, RSPO1 and ZNRF3, are involved in Wnt signaling, a pathway playing a major role in the regulation of eyeball size. This study provides evidence of shared genes between AL and refraction, but importantly also suggests that these traits may have unique pathways. PMID:24144296

  13. Nine loci for ocular axial length identified through genome-wide association studies, including shared loci with refractive error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ching-Yu; Schache, Maria; Ikram, M Kamran; Young, Terri L; Guggenheim, Jeremy A; Vitart, Veronique; MacGregor, Stuart; Verhoeven, Virginie J M; Barathi, Veluchamy A; Liao, Jiemin; Hysi, Pirro G; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E; St Pourcain, Beate; Kemp, John P; McMahon, George; Timpson, Nicholas J; Evans, David M; Montgomery, Grant W; Mishra, Aniket; Wang, Ya Xing; Wang, Jie Jin; Rochtchina, Elena; Polasek, Ozren; Wright, Alan F; Amin, Najaf; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M; Wilson, James F; Pennell, Craig E; van Duijn, Cornelia M; de Jong, Paulus T V M; Vingerling, Johannes R; Zhou, Xin; Chen, Peng; Li, Ruoying; Tay, Wan-Ting; Zheng, Yingfeng; Chew, Merwyn; Burdon, Kathryn P; Craig, Jamie E; Iyengar, Sudha K; Igo, Robert P; Lass, Jonathan H; Chew, Emily Y; Haller, Toomas; Mihailov, Evelin; Metspalu, Andres; Wedenoja, Juho; Simpson, Claire L; Wojciechowski, Robert; Höhn, René; Mirshahi, Alireza; Zeller, Tanja; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Lackner, Karl J; Bettecken, Thomas; Meitinger, Thomas; Oexle, Konrad; Pirastu, Mario; Portas, Laura; Nag, Abhishek; Williams, Katie M; Yonova-Doing, Ekaterina; Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara E; Hosseini, S Mohsen; Paterson, Andrew D; Makela, Kari-Matti; Lehtimaki, Terho; Kahonen, Mika; Raitakari, Olli; Yoshimura, Nagahisa; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Chen, Li Jia; Pang, Chi Pui; Yip, Shea Ping; Yap, Maurice K H; Meguro, Akira; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Foster, Paul J; Zhao, Jing Hua; Vithana, Eranga; Tai, E-Shyong; Fan, Qiao; Xu, Liang; Campbell, Harry; Fleck, Brian; Rudan, Igor; Aung, Tin; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G; Bencic, Goran; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Forward, Hannah; Pärssinen, Olavi; Mitchell, Paul; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hewitt, Alex W; Williams, Cathy; Oostra, Ben A; Teo, Yik-Ying; Hammond, Christopher J; Stambolian, Dwight; Mackey, David A; Klaver, Caroline C W; Wong, Tien-Yin; Saw, Seang-Mei; Baird, Paul N

    2013-08-08

    Refractive errors are common eye disorders of public health importance worldwide. Ocular axial length (AL) is the major determinant of refraction and thus of myopia and hyperopia. We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for AL, combining 12,531 Europeans and 8,216 Asians. We identified eight genome-wide significant loci for AL (RSPO1, C3orf26, LAMA2, GJD2, ZNRF3, CD55, MIP, and ALPPL2) and confirmed one previously reported AL locus (ZC3H11B). Of the nine loci, five (LAMA2, GJD2, CD55, ALPPL2, and ZC3H11B) were associated with refraction in 18 independent cohorts (n = 23,591). Differential gene expression was observed for these loci in minus-lens-induced myopia mouse experiments and human ocular tissues. Two of the AL genes, RSPO1 and ZNRF3, are involved in Wnt signaling, a pathway playing a major role in the regulation of eyeball size. This study provides evidence of shared genes between AL and refraction, but importantly also suggests that these traits may have unique pathways. Copyright © 2013 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Novel Centromeric Loci of the Wine and Beer Yeast Dekkera bruxellensis CEN1 and CEN2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishchuk, Olena P.; Vojvoda Zeljko, Tanja; Schifferdecker, Anna J.; Mebrahtu Wisén, Sofia; Hagström, Åsa K.; Rozpędowska, Elżbieta; Rørdam Andersen, Mikael; Hellborg, Linda; Ling, Zhihao; Sibirny, Andrei A.

    2016-01-01

    The wine and beer yeast Dekkera bruxellensis thrives in environments that are harsh and limiting, especially in concentrations with low oxygen and high ethanol. Its different strains’ chromosomes greatly vary in number (karyotype). This study isolates two novel centromeric loci (CEN1 and CEN2), which support both the yeast’s autonomous replication and the stable maintenance of plasmids. In the sequenced genome of the D. bruxellensis strain CBS 2499, CEN1 and CEN2 are each present in one copy. They differ from the known “point” CEN elements, and their biological activity is retained within ~900–1300 bp DNA segments. CEN1 and CEN2 have features of both “point” and “regional” centromeres: They contain conserved DNA elements, ARSs, short repeats, one tRNA gene, and transposon-like elements within less than 1 kb. Our discovery of a miniature inverted-repeat transposable element (MITE) next to CEN2 is the first report of such transposons in yeast. The transformants carrying circular plasmids with cloned CEN1 and CEN2 undergo a phenotypic switch: They form fluffy colonies and produce three times more biofilm. The introduction of extra copies of CEN1 and CEN2 promotes both genome rearrangements and ploidy shifts, with these effects mediated by homologous recombination (between circular plasmid and genome centromere copy) or by chromosome breakage when integrated. Also, the proximity of the MITE-like transposon to CEN2 could translocate CEN2 within the genome or cause chromosomal breaks, so promoting genome dynamics. With extra copies of CEN1 and CEN2, the yeast’s enhanced capacities to rearrange its genome and to change its gene expression could increase its abilities for exploiting new and demanding niches. PMID:27560164

  15. Novel Centromeric Loci of the Wine and Beer Yeast Dekkera bruxellensis CEN1 and CEN2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishchuk, Olena P; Vojvoda Zeljko, Tanja; Schifferdecker, Anna J; Mebrahtu Wisén, Sofia; Hagström, Åsa K; Rozpędowska, Elżbieta; Rørdam Andersen, Mikael; Hellborg, Linda; Ling, Zhihao; Sibirny, Andrei A; Piškur, Jure

    2016-01-01

    The wine and beer yeast Dekkera bruxellensis thrives in environments that are harsh and limiting, especially in concentrations with low oxygen and high ethanol. Its different strains' chromosomes greatly vary in number (karyotype). This study isolates two novel centromeric loci (CEN1 and CEN2), which support both the yeast's autonomous replication and the stable maintenance of plasmids. In the sequenced genome of the D. bruxellensis strain CBS 2499, CEN1 and CEN2 are each present in one copy. They differ from the known "point" CEN elements, and their biological activity is retained within ~900-1300 bp DNA segments. CEN1 and CEN2 have features of both "point" and "regional" centromeres: They contain conserved DNA elements, ARSs, short repeats, one tRNA gene, and transposon-like elements within less than 1 kb. Our discovery of a miniature inverted-repeat transposable element (MITE) next to CEN2 is the first report of such transposons in yeast. The transformants carrying circular plasmids with cloned CEN1 and CEN2 undergo a phenotypic switch: They form fluffy colonies and produce three times more biofilm. The introduction of extra copies of CEN1 and CEN2 promotes both genome rearrangements and ploidy shifts, with these effects mediated by homologous recombination (between circular plasmid and genome centromere copy) or by chromosome breakage when integrated. Also, the proximity of the MITE-like transposon to CEN2 could translocate CEN2 within the genome or cause chromosomal breaks, so promoting genome dynamics. With extra copies of CEN1 and CEN2, the yeast's enhanced capacities to rearrange its genome and to change its gene expression could increase its abilities for exploiting new and demanding niches.

  16. [Application of 17 Y-chromosome specific STR loci in paternity testing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhi-Hui; Li, Qian; Wu, Shuang; Li, Da-Cheng; Yang, Bao-Cheng

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the ability of discrimination of the AmpFlSTR Yfiler PCR amplification kit containing 17 Y-STR loci and the allelic mutation in the practice of paternity testing in Chinese population. 36 non-paternity father/son pairs and 84 confirmed father/son pairs, which had been previously genotyped by using Reliagene Y-PLEX 6 commercial kit and the "9 Y-STR multiplex with reduced-size amplicons" developed by our laboratory, were subjected to Y-STR genotyping at 17 loci using the AmpFlSTR Yfiler PCR amplification kit. 17 Y-STR loci were amplified in single multiplex and the PCR products were detected by using ABI Prism 3100 DNA Sequencer. The number of Y-STR exclusion for each non-paternity father/son pair and the mutation events for each confirmed father/son pair were calculated and the observed results were compared with our previous reported data determined by Reliagene Y-PLEX 6 kit and the "9 Y-STR multiplex with reduced-size amplicons". The results showed that out of 36 non-paternity father/son pairs subjected to Y-STR genotyping by using the AmpFlSTR Yfiler kit, one case with no Y-STR exclusion of paternity and 35 cases with more than 3 Y-STR exclusions for each father/son pair were observed. The percentage of cases with more than 3 Y-STR exclusions in all the tested non-paternity cases for Yfiler kit was 97.22% (35/36), which was more than that of Reliagene Y-PLEX 6 kit (92.11%, 35/38) and our "9 Y-STR multiplex with reduced-size amplicons" (91.67%, 33/36). Except for single father/son pair with no Y-STR exclusion, an average of 11.3 Y-STR exclusions was observed in other 35 non-paternity father/son pairs. In the 84 confirmed father/son pairs, 5 mutation events with a single unit repeat change at DYS437, DYS439, DYS635, DYS389II and DYS19, respectively, were identified using the Yfiler kit. The average mutation rate was estimated at 3.50 x 10(-3) per locus per generation. The cases with Y-STR mutation events in all tested

  17. An extended river buffalo (Bubalus bubalis, 2n = 50) cytogenetic map: assignment of 68 autosomal loci by FISH-mapping and R-banding and comparison with human chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Meo, G P; Perucatti, A; Floriot, S; Hayes, H; Schibler, L; Incarnato, D; Di Berardino, D; Williams, J; Cribiu, E; Eggen, A; Iannuzzi, L

    2008-01-01

    We report an extended river buffalo (Bubalus bubalis, 2n = 50; BBU) cytogenetic map including 388 loci, of which 68 have been FISH-mapped on autosomes in the present study. Ovine and caprine BAC clones containing both type I loci (known genes) and type II loci (simple sequence repeats (SRs), microsatellite marker, sequence-tagged sites (STSs)), previously assigned to sheep chromosomes, have been localized on R-banded river buffalo chromosomes (BBU), which expands the cytogenetic map of this important domestic species and increases our knowledge of the physical organization of its genome. The loci mapped in the present study correspond to loci already localized on homoeologous cattle (and sheep) chromosomes and chromosome bands, further confirming the high degree of chromosome homoeologies among bovids. The comparison of the integrated cytogenetic maps of BBU2p/BBU10 and BBU5p/BBU16 with those of human chromosomes (HSA) 6 and 11, respectively, identified, at least, nine conserved chromosome segments in each case and complex rearrangements differentiating river buffalo (and cattle) and human chromosomes.

  18. Microsatellite Loci in the Gypsophyte Lepidium subulatum (Brassicaceae, and Transferability to Other Lepidieae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Gabriel Segarra-Moragues

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed for the Ibero-North African, strict gypsophyte Lepidium subulatum to unravel the effects of habitat fragmentation in levels of genetic diversity, genetic structure and gene flow among its populations. Using 454 pyrosequencing 12 microsatellite loci including di- and tri-nucleotide repeats were characterized in L. subulatum. They amplified a total of 80 alleles (2–12 alleles per locus in a sample of 35 individuals of L. subulatum, showing relatively high levels of genetic diversity, HO = 0.645, HE = 0.627. Cross-species transferability of all 12 loci was successful for the Iberian endemics Lepidium cardamines, Lepidium stylatum, and the widespread, Lepidium graminifolium and one species each of two related genera, Cardaria draba and Coronopus didymus. These microsatellite primers will be useful to investigate genetic diversity, population structure and to address conservation genetics in species of Lepidium.

  19. Historical divergence and gene flow: coalescent analyses of mitochondrial, autosomal and sex-linked loci in Passerina buntings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carling, Matthew D; Lovette, Irby J; Brumfield, Robb T

    2010-06-01

    Quantifying the role of gene flow during the divergence of closely related species is crucial to understanding the process of speciation. We collected DNA sequence data from 20 loci (one mitochondrial, 13 autosomal, and six sex-linked) for population samples of Lazuli Buntings (Passerina amoena) and Indigo Buntings (Passerina cyanea) (Aves: Cardinalidae) to test explicitly between a strict allopatric speciation model and a model in which divergence occurred despite postdivergence gene flow. Likelihood ratio tests of coalescent-based population genetic parameter estimates indicated a strong signal of postdivergence gene flow and a strict allopatric speciation model was rejected. Analyses of partitioned datasets (mitochondrial, autosomal, and sex-linked) suggest the overall gene flow patterns are driven primarily by autosomal gene flow, as there is no evidence of mitochondrial gene flow and we were unable to reject an allopatric speciation model for the sex-linked data. This pattern is consistent with either a parapatric divergence model or repeated periods of allopatry with gene flow occurring via secondary contact. These results are consistent with the low fitness of female avian hybrids under Haldane's rule and demonstrate that sex-linked loci likely are important in the initial generation of reproductive isolation, not just its maintenance.

  20. Physical localization and DNA methylation of 45S rRNA gene loci in Jatropha curcas L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyun Gong

    Full Text Available In eukaryotes, 45S rRNA genes are arranged in tandem arrays of repeat units, and not all copies are transcribed during mitosis. DNA methylation is considered to be an epigenetic marker for rDNA activation. Here, we established a clear and accurate karyogram for Jatropha curcas L. The chromosomal formula was found to be 2n=2x=22=12m+10 sm. We found that the 45S rDNA loci were located at the termini of chromosomes 7 and 9 in J. curcas. The distribution of 45S rDNA has no significant difference in J. curcas from different sources. Based on the hybridization signal patterns, there were two forms of rDNA - dispersed and condensed. The dispersed type of signals appeared during interphase and prophase, while the condensed types appeared during different stages of mitosis. DNA methylation analysis showed that when 45S rDNA stronger signals were dispersed and connected to the nucleolus, DNA methylation levels were lower at interphase and prophase. However, when the 45S rDNA loci were condensed, especially during metaphase, they showed different forms of DNA methylation.

  1. Quantitative trait loci detection of Edwardsiella tarda resistance in Japanese flounder Paralichthys olivaceus using bulked segregant analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoxia; Xu, Wenteng; Liu, Yang; Wang, Lei; Sun, Hejun; Wang, Lei; Chen, Songlin

    2016-11-01

    In recent years, Edwardsiella tarda has become one of the most deadly pathogens of Japanese flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus), causing serious annual losses in commercial production. In contrast to the rapid advances in the aquaculture of P. olivaceus, the study of E. tarda resistance-related markers has lagged behind, hindering the development of a disease-resistant strain. Thus, a marker-trait association analysis was initiated, combining bulked segregant analysis (BSA) and quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping. Based on 180 microsatellite loci across all chromosomes, 106 individuals from the F1333 (♀: F0768 ×♂: F0915) (Nomenclature rule: F+year+family number) were used to detect simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and QTLs associated with E. tarda resistance. After a genomic scan, three markers (Scaffold 404-21589, Scaffold 404-21594 and Scaffold 270-13812) from the same linkage group (LG)-1 exhibited a significant difference between DNA, pooled/bulked from the resistant and susceptible groups (P CIM). These six QTLs, designated qE1-6, explained 16.0%-89.5% of the phenotypic variance. Two of the QTLs, qE-2 and qE-4, were located at the 66.7 cM region, which was considered a major candidate region for E. tarda resistance. This study will provide valuable data for further investigations of E. tarda resistance genes and facilitate the selective breeding of disease-resistant Japanese flounder in the future.

  2. Analysis of 15 autosomal STR loci from Mar del Plata and Bahia Blanca (Central Region of Argentina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parolin, María Laura; Carreras-Torres, Robert; Sambuco, Lorena Andrea; Jaureguiberry, Stella Maris; Iudica, Celia Estela

    2014-05-01

    Allele frequencies for the 15 short tandem repeats (STRs) loci included in the AmpFlSTR® Identifiler kit were estimated in a sample of unrelated individuals from Mar del Plata (MDQ; N = 180) and Bahia Blanca (BB; N = 85) (Buenos Aires, Argentina). Biological samples were obtained from voluntary donors and forensic cases. Both populations were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium after Bonferroni correction, except for locus vWA in MDQ and D2S1338 in BB. FGA was the most informative locus, and the least discriminating locus was TPOX in both samples. The combined power of discrimination (PDc) and the combined probability of exclusion (PEc) were similar in MDQ and BB samples (0.999999998 < PDc < 0.999999999 and 0.999999979 < PEc < 0.999999989). The multidimentional scaling plot from Rst genetic distance matrix and the interethnic admixture estimation supported a higher European contribution in populations of the central region compared with populations from other regions of Argentina with higher Amerindian composition. These results enlarge the Argentine databases of autosomal STR loci, revealed as an excellent tool for human identification tests and population genetic analysis.

  3. Lessons from a Phenotyping Center Revealed by the Genome-Guided Mapping of Powdery Mildew Resistance Loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadle-Davidson, Lance; Gadoury, David; Fresnedo-Ramírez, Jonathan; Yang, Shanshan; Barba, Paola; Sun, Qi; Demmings, Elizabeth M; Seem, Robert; Schaub, Michelle; Nowogrodzki, Anna; Kasinathan, Hema; Ledbetter, Craig; Reisch, Bruce I

    2016-10-01

    The genomics era brought unprecedented opportunities for genetic analysis of host resistance, but it came with the challenge that accurate and reproducible phenotypes are needed so that genomic results appropriately reflect biology. Phenotyping host resistance by natural infection in the field can produce variable results due to the uncontrolled environment, uneven distribution and genetics of the pathogen, and developmentally regulated resistance among other factors. To address these challenges, we developed highly controlled, standardized methodologies for phenotyping powdery mildew resistance in the context of a phenotyping center, receiving samples of up to 140 grapevine progeny per F1 family. We applied these methodologies to F1 families segregating for REN1- or REN2-mediated resistance and validated that some but not all bioassays identified the REN1 or REN2 locus. A point-intercept method (hyphal transects) to quantify colony density objectively at 8 or 9 days postinoculation proved to be the phenotypic response most reproducibly predicted by these resistance loci. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping with genotyping-by-sequencing maps defined the REN1 and REN2 loci at relatively high resolution. In the reference PN40024 genome under each QTL, nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat candidate resistance genes were identified-one gene for REN1 and two genes for REN2. The methods described here for centralized resistance phenotyping and high-resolution genetic mapping can inform strategies for breeding resistance to powdery mildews and other pathogens on diverse, highly heterozygous hosts.

  4. Evolution of multiple additive loci caused divergence between Drosophila yakuba and D. santomea in wing rowing during male courtship.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Cande

    Full Text Available In Drosophila, male flies perform innate, stereotyped courtship behavior. This innate behavior evolves rapidly between fly species, and is likely to have contributed to reproductive isolation and species divergence. We currently understand little about the neurobiological and genetic mechanisms that contributed to the evolution of courtship behavior. Here we describe a novel behavioral difference between the two closely related species D. yakuba and D. santomea: the frequency of wing rowing during courtship. During courtship, D. santomea males repeatedly rotate their wing blades to face forward and then back (rowing, while D. yakuba males rarely row their wings. We found little intraspecific variation in the frequency of wing rowing for both species. We exploited multiplexed shotgun genotyping (MSG to genotype two backcross populations with a single lane of Illumina sequencing. We performed quantitative trait locus (QTL mapping using the ancestry information estimated by MSG and found that the species difference in wing rowing mapped to four or five genetically separable regions. We found no evidence that these loci display epistasis. The identified loci all act in the same direction and can account for most of the species difference.

  5. Tandem repeats and G-rich sequences are enriched at human CNV breakpoints.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Promita Bose

    Full Text Available Chromosome breakage in germline and somatic genomes gives rise to copy number variation (CNV responsible for genomic disorders and tumorigenesis. DNA sequence is known to play an important role in breakage at chromosome fragile sites; however, the sequences susceptible to double-strand breaks (DSBs underlying CNV formation are largely unknown. Here we analyze 140 germline CNV breakpoints from 116 individuals to identify DNA sequences enriched at breakpoint loci compared to 2800 simulated control regions. We find that, overall, CNV breakpoints are enriched in tandem repeats and sequences predicted to form G-quadruplexes. G-rich repeats are overrepresented at terminal deletion breakpoints, which may be important for the addition of a new telomere. Interstitial deletions and duplication breakpoints are enriched in Alu repeats that in some cases mediate non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR between the two sides of the rearrangement. CNV breakpoints are enriched in certain classes of repeats that may play a role in DNA secondary structure, DSB susceptibility and/or DNA replication errors.

  6. Identification of Quantitative Trait Loci for Rice Quality in a Population of Chromosome Segment Substitution Lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Hao; MeiZhen Zhu; JiPing Gao; ShiYong Sun; HongXuan Lin

    2009-01-01

    The demand for high quality rice represents a major issue in rice production. The primary components of rice grain quality include appearance, eating, cooking, physico-chemical, milling and nutritional qualities. Most of these traits are complex and controlled by quantitative trait loci (QTLs), so the genetic characterization of these traits is more difficult than that of traits controlled by a single gene. The detection and genetic identification of QTLs can provide insights into the genetic mechanisms underlying quality traits. Chromosome segment substitution lines (CSSLs) are effective tools used in mapping QTLs. In this study, we constructed 154 CSSLs from backcross progeny (BC3F2) derived from a cross between 'Koshihikari' (an Oryza sativa L. Ssp. Japonica variety) as the recurrent parent and 'Nona Bokra' (an O. Sativa L. Ssp. Indica variety) as the donor parent. In this process, we carried out marker-assisted selection by using 102 cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence and simple sequence repeat markers covering most of the rice genome. Finally, this set of CSSLs was used to identify QTLs for rice quality traits. Ten QTLs for rice appearance quality traits were detected and eight QTLs concerned physico-chemical traits. These results supply the foundation for further genetic studies and breeding for the improvement of grain quality.

  7. A global analysis of Y-chromosomal haplotype diversity for 23 STR loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purps, Josephine; Siegert, Sabine; Willuweit, Sascha; Nagy, Marion; Alves, Cíntia; Salazar, Renato; Angustia, Sheila M.T.; Santos, Lorna H.; Anslinger, Katja; Bayer, Birgit; Ayub, Qasim; Wei, Wei; Xue, Yali; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Bafalluy, Miriam Baeta; Martínez-Jarreta, Begoña; Egyed, Balazs; Balitzki, Beate; Tschumi, Sibylle; Ballard, David; Court, Denise Syndercombe; Barrantes, Xinia; Bäßler, Gerhard; Wiest, Tina; Berger, Burkhard; Niederstätter, Harald; Parson, Walther; Davis, Carey; Budowle, Bruce; Burri, Helen; Borer, Urs; Koller, Christoph; Carvalho, Elizeu F.; Domingues, Patricia M.; Chamoun, Wafaa Takash; Coble, Michael D.; Hill, Carolyn R.; Corach, Daniel; Caputo, Mariela; D’Amato, Maria E.; Davison, Sean; Decorte, Ronny; Larmuseau, Maarten H.D.; Ottoni, Claudio; Rickards, Olga; Lu, Di; Jiang, Chengtao; Dobosz, Tadeusz; Jonkisz, Anna; Frank, William E.; Furac, Ivana; Gehrig, Christian; Castella, Vincent; Grskovic, Branka; Haas, Cordula; Wobst, Jana; Hadzic, Gavrilo; Drobnic, Katja; Honda, Katsuya; Hou, Yiping; Zhou, Di; Li, Yan; Hu, Shengping; Chen, Shenglan; Immel, Uta-Dorothee; Lessig, Rüdiger; Jakovski, Zlatko; Ilievska, Tanja; Klann, Anja E.; García, Cristina Cano; de Knijff, Peter; Kraaijenbrink, Thirsa; Kondili, Aikaterini; Miniati, Penelope; Vouropoulou, Maria; Kovacevic, Lejla; Marjanovic, Damir; Lindner, Iris; Mansour, Issam; Al-Azem, Mouayyad; Andari, Ansar El; Marino, Miguel; Furfuro, Sandra; Locarno, Laura; Martín, Pablo; Luque, Gracia M.; Alonso, Antonio; Miranda, Luís Souto; Moreira, Helena; Mizuno, Natsuko; Iwashima, Yasuki; Neto, Rodrigo S. Moura; Nogueira, Tatiana L.S.; Silva, Rosane; Nastainczyk-Wulf, Marina; Edelmann, Jeanett; Kohl, Michael; Nie, Shengjie; Wang, Xianping; Cheng, Baowen; Núñez, Carolina; Pancorbo, Marian Martínez de; Olofsson, Jill K.; Morling, Niels; Onofri, Valerio; Tagliabracci, Adriano; Pamjav, Horolma; Volgyi, Antonia; Barany, Gusztav; Pawlowski, Ryszard; Maciejewska, Agnieszka; Pelotti, Susi; Pepinski, Witold; Abreu-Glowacka, Monica; Phillips, Christopher; Cárdenas, Jorge; Rey-Gonzalez, Danel; Salas, Antonio; Brisighelli, Francesca; Capelli, Cristian; Toscanini, Ulises; Piccinini, Andrea; Piglionica, Marilidia; Baldassarra, Stefania L.; Ploski, Rafal; Konarzewska, Magdalena; Jastrzebska, Emila; Robino, Carlo; Sajantila, Antti; Palo, Jukka U.; Guevara, Evelyn; Salvador, Jazelyn; Ungria, Maria Corazon De; Rodriguez, Jae Joseph Russell; Schmidt, Ulrike; Schlauderer, Nicola; Saukko, Pekka; Schneider, Peter M.; Sirker, Miriam; Shin, Kyoung-Jin; Oh, Yu Na; Skitsa, Iulia; Ampati, Alexandra; Smith, Tobi-Gail; Calvit, Lina Solis de; Stenzl, Vlastimil; Capal, Thomas; Tillmar, Andreas; Nilsson, Helena; Turrina, Stefania; De Leo, Domenico; Verzeletti, Andrea; Cortellini, Venusia; Wetton, Jon H.; Gwynne, Gareth M.; Jobling, Mark A.; Whittle, Martin R.; Sumita, Denilce R.; Wolańska-Nowak, Paulina; Yong, Rita Y.Y.; Krawczak, Michael; Nothnagel, Michael; Roewer, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    In a worldwide collaborative effort, 19,630 Y-chromosomes were sampled from 129 different populations in 51 countries. These chromosomes were typed for 23 short-tandem repeat (STR) loci (DYS19, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS385ab, DYS437, DYS438, DYS439, DYS448, DYS456, DYS458, DYS635, GATAH4, DYS481, DYS533, DYS549, DYS570, DYS576, and DYS643) and using the PowerPlex Y23 System (PPY23, Promega Corporation, Madison, WI). Locus-specific allelic spectra of these markers were determined and a consistently high level of allelic diversity was observed. A considerable number of null, duplicate and off-ladder alleles were revealed. Standard single-locus and haplotype-based parameters were calculated and compared between subsets of Y-STR markers established for forensic casework. The PPY23 marker set provides substantially stronger discriminatory power than other available kits but at the same time reveals the same general patterns of population structure as other marker sets. A strong correlation was observed between the number of Y-STRs included in a marker set and some of the forensic parameters under study. Interestingly a weak but consistent trend toward smaller genetic distances resulting from larger numbers of markers became apparent. PMID:24854874

  8. Allelic structure and distribution of 103 STR loci in a Southern Tunisian population

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abdellatif Maalej; Ahmed Rebai; Adnen Ayadi; Jomaa Jouida; Hafedh Makni; Hammadi Ayadi

    2004-04-01

    Genotypes of 103 short tandem repeat (STR) markers distributed at an average of 40 cM intervals throughout the genome were determined for 40 individuals from the village of BirEl Hfai (BEH). This village of approximately 31.000 individuals is localized in the south-west of Tunisia. The allele frequency distributions in BEH were compared with those obtained for individuals in the CEPH (Centre d’Etude du Polymorphisme Humain) data using a Kolmogorov–Smirnov two-sample test. Fourteen out of the 103 markers (13.2%) showed significant differences ($P\\lt 0.05$) in distribution between the two populations. Population heterogeneity in BEH was indicated by an excess of observed homozygosity deviations from Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium at 3 loci ($P\\lt 0.0005$). No evidence for genotypic disequilibrium was found for any of the marker pairs. This demonstrated that in spite of a high inbreeding level in the population, few markers showed evidence for a different pattern of allelic distribution compared to CEPH.

  9. Psoriasis regression analysis of MHC loci identifies shared genetic variants with vitiligo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun-Ju Zhu

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is a common inflammatory skin disease with genetic components of both immune system and the epidermis. PSOR1 locus (6q21 has been strongly associated with psoriasis; however, it is difficult to identify additional independent association due to strong linkage disequilibrium in the MHC region. We performed stepwise regression analyses of more than 3,000 SNPs in the MHC region genotyped using Human 610-Quad (Illumina in 1,139 cases with psoriasis and 1,132 controls of Han Chinese population to search for additional independent association. With four regression models obtained, two SNPs rs9468925 in HLA-C/HLA-B and rs2858881 in HLA-DQA2 were repeatedly selected in all models, suggesting that multiple loci outside PSOR1 locus were associated with psoriasis. More importantly we find that rs9468925 in HLA-C/HLA-B is associated with both psoriasis and vitiligo, providing first important evidence that two major skin diseases share a common genetic locus in the MHC, and a basis for elucidating the molecular mechanism of skin disorders.

  10. Quantitative trait loci × environment interactions for plant morphology vary over ontogeny in Brassica rapa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dechaine, Jennifer M; Brock, Marcus T; Iniguez-Luy, Federico L; Weinig, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    Growth in plants occurs via the addition of repeating modules, suggesting that the genetic architecture of similar subunits may vary between earlier- and later-developing modules. These complex environment × ontogeny interactions are not well elucidated, as studies examining quantitative trait loci (QTLs) expression over ontogeny have not included multiple environments. Here, we characterized the genetic architecture of vegetative traits and onset of reproduction over ontogeny in recombinant inbred lines of Brassica rapa in the field and glasshouse. The magnitude of genetic variation in plasticity of seedling internodes was greater than in those produced later in ontogeny. We correspondingly detected that QTLs for seedling internode length were environment-specific, whereas later in ontogeny the majority of QTLs affected internode lengths in all treatments. The relationship between internode traits and onset of reproduction varied with environment and ontogenetic stage. This relationship was observed only in the glasshouse environment and was largely attributable to one environment-specific QTL. Our results provide the first evidence of a QTL × environment × ontogeny interaction, and provide QTL resolution for differences between early- and later-stage plasticity for stem elongation. These results also suggest potential constraints on morphological evolution in early vs later modules as a result of associations with reproductive timing.

  11. Genetic Identification of Quantitative Trait Loci for Contents of Mineral Nutrients in Rice Grain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ana Luisa Garcia-Oliveira; Lubin Tan; Yongcai Fu; Chuanqing Sun

    2009-01-01

    In present study, Fe, Zn, Mn, Cu, Ca, Mg, P and K contents of 85 Introgression linee (ILs) derived from a cross between an elite indica cultivar Teqing and the wild rice (Oryza rufipogon) were measured by inductively coupled argon plasma (ICAP) spectrometry. Substantial variation was observed for all traits and most of the mineral elements were significantly positive correlated or independent except for Fe with Cu. A total of 31 putative quantitative trait loci (QTLs) were detected for these eight mineral elements by single point analysis. Wild rice (O. rufipogon) contributed favorable alleles for most of the QTLs (26 QTLs), and chromosomes 1, 9 and 12 exhibited 14 QTLs (45%) for these traits. One major effect of QTL for zinc content accounted for the largest proportion of phenotypic variation (11%-19%) was detected near the simple sequence repeats marker RM152 on chromosome 8. The co-locations of QTLs for some mineral elements observed in this mapping population suggested the relationship was at a molecular level among these traits and could be helpful for simultaneous improvement of these traits in rice grain by marker assisted selection.

  12. Identification of two quantitative trait loci involved in antibody production on mouse chromosome 8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puel, A; Mevel, J C; Bouthillier, Y; Decreusefond, C; Fridman, W H; Feingold, N; Mouton, D

    1998-03-01

    Several quantitative trait loci (QTLs) contributing to the extreme phenotypes of the selected high (H) and low (L) antibody-responder lines of mice were mapped on distinct chromosomes. Successive backcrosses were bred to reduce the length of the QTL-bearing segment detected on chromosome 8 and to produce congenic lines to test gene effect independently of the other QTLs. An increase in antibody responses was repeatedly found to be associated with inheritance of the H-line allele at two markers separated by 30 cM on that chromosome. In the successive backcrosses, background and unlinked involved genes of H-line origin were progressively eliminated; however, unexpected within-progeny variations persisted in the third and even fourth backcross. Nevertheless, the presence of two QTLs within the considered interval was definitely demonstrated in distinct progenies of the fourth backcross which separately inherited one of the two gene-marker H-line alleles. The previously identified chromosome 8 segment therefore contains at least two QTLs involved in antibody responsiveness.

  13. Molecular Tagging and Mapping of Quantitative Trait Loci for Lint Percentage and Morphological Marker Genes in Upland Cotton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Using 219 F2 individuals developed by crossing the genetic standard line TM-1 and the multiple dominant marker line T586 in Gossypium hirsutum L., a genetic linkage map with 19 linkage groups was constructed based on simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. Compared with our tetraploid backboned molecular genetic map from a (TM-1xHai 7124)xTM-1 BC1 population, 17 of the 19 linkage groups were combined and anchored to 12 chromosomes (sub-genomes). Of these groups, four morphological marker genes in T586 had been mapped into the molecular linkage map. Meanwhile, three quantitative trait loci for lint percentage were tagged and mapped separately on the A03 linkage group and chromosome 6.

  14. Mathematic principles of interrupted-sampling repeater jamming (ISRJ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG XueSong; LIU JianCheng; ZHANG WenMing; FU QiXiang; LIU Zhong; XIE XiaoXia

    2007-01-01

    Coherent jamming is one of the important trends in modern radar electronic warfare. High-speed sampling of wideband radio frequency (RF) signals and high isolation of two receive-transmit antennas are key technologies for the realization of coherent jamming. However, these technologies present significant challenges to engineering application. In this paper, a novel repeater jamming based on interrupted sampling technique is presented. For a jammer with a receive-transmit time-sharing antenna, a radar signal is sampled with a low rate by the jammer. Then, a train of false targets will be achieved after the jamming signal feed the matched filter of a pulse compression radar. For the case of the linear frequency modulated (LFM) pulse compression radars, mathematic principles of the interrupted-sam- pling repeater jamming is developed, and then the efficiency of the jamming is described and stated as expressions of key parameters which are also beneficial to the jamming design for other coherent radars.

  15. Characterization of simple sequence repeats (SSRs from Phlebotomus papatasi (Diptera: Psychodidae expressed sequence tags (ESTs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamarsheh Omar

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phlebotomus papatasi is a natural vector of Leishmania major, which causes cutaneous leishmaniasis in many countries. Simple sequence repeats (SSRs, or microsatellites, are common in eukaryotic genomes and are short, repeated nucleotide sequence elements arrayed in tandem and flanked by non-repetitive regions. The enrichment methods used previously for finding new microsatellite loci in sand flies remain laborious and time consuming; in silico mining, which includes retrieval and screening of microsatellites from large amounts of sequence data from sequence data bases using microsatellite search tools can yield many new candidate markers. Results Simple sequence repeats (SSRs were characterized in P. papatasi expressed sequence tags (ESTs derived from a public database, National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI. A total of 42,784 sequences were mined, and 1,499 SSRs were identified with a frequency of 3.5% and an average density of 15.55 kb per SSR. Dinucleotide motifs were the most common SSRs, accounting for 67% followed by tri-, tetra-, and penta-nucleotide repeats, accounting for 31.1%, 1.5%, and 0.1%, respectively. The length of microsatellites varied from 5 to 16 repeats. Dinucleotide types; AG and CT have the highest frequency. Dinucleotide SSR-ESTs are relatively biased toward an excess of (AXn repeats and a low GC base content. Forty primer pairs were designed based on motif lengths for further experimental validation. Conclusion The first large-scale survey of SSRs derived from P. papatasi is presented; dinucleotide SSRs identified are more frequent than other types. EST data mining is an effective strategy to identify functional microsatellites in P. papatasi.

  16. Repeatability & Workability Evaluation of SIGMOD 2009

    KAUST Repository

    Manegold, Stefan

    2010-12-15

    SIGMOD 2008 was the first database conference that offered to test submitters\\' programs against their data to verify the repeatability of the experiments published [1]. Given the positive feedback concerning the SIGMOD 2008 repeatability initiative, SIGMOD 2009 modified and expanded the initiative with a workability assessment.

  17. Clustering of Beijing genotype Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from the Mekong delta in Vietnam on the basis of variable number of tandem repeat versus restriction fragment length polymorphism typing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huyen Mai NT

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In comparison to restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP typing, variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR typing is easier to perform, faster and yields results in a simple, numerical format. Therefore, this technique has gained recognition as the new international gold standard in typing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. However, some reports indicated that VNTR typing may be less suitable for Beijing genotype isolates. We therefore compared the performance of internationally standardized RFLP and 24 loci VNTR typing to discriminate among 100 Beijing genotype isolates from the Southern Vietnam. Methods Hundred Beijing genotype strains defined by spoligotyping were randomly selected and typed by RFLP and VNTR typing. The discriminatory power of VNTR and RFLP typing was compared using the Bionumerics software. Results Among 95 Beijing strains available for analysis, 14 clusters were identified comprising 34 strains and 61 unique profiles in 24 loci VNTR typing ((Hunter Gaston Discrimination Index (HGDI = 0.994. 13 clusters containing 31 strains and 64 unique patterns in RFLP typing (HGDI = 0.994 were found. Nine RFLP clusters were subdivided by VNTR typing and 12 VNTR clusters were split by RFLP. Five isolates (5% revealing double alleles or no signal in two or more loci in VNTR typing could not be analyzed. Conclusions Overall, 24 loci VNTR typing and RFLP typing had similar high-level of discrimination among 95 Beijing strains from Southern Vietnam. However, loci VNTR 154, VNTR 2461 and VNTR 3171 had hardly added any value to the level of discrimination.

  18. A tandem repeats database for bacterial genomes: application to the genotyping of Yersinia pestis and Bacillus anthracis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denoeud France

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some pathogenic bacteria are genetically very homogeneous, making strain discrimination difficult. In the last few years, tandem repeats have been increasingly recognized as markers of choice for genotyping a number of pathogens. The rapid evolution of these structures appears to contribute to the phenotypic flexibility of pathogens. The availability of whole-genome sequences has opened the way to the systematic evaluation of tandem repeats diversity and application to epidemiological studies. Results This report presents a database (http://minisatellites.u-psud.fr of tandem repeats from publicly available bacterial genomes which facilitates the identification and selection of tandem repeats. We illustrate the use of this database by the characterization of minisatellites from two important human pathogens, Yersinia pestis and Bacillus anthracis. In order to avoid simple sequence contingency loci which may be of limited value as epidemiological markers, and to provide genotyping tools amenable to ordinary agarose gel electrophoresis, only tandem repeats with repeat units at least 9 bp long were evaluated. Yersinia pestis contains 64 such minisatellites in which the unit is repeated at least 7 times. An additional collection of 12 loci with at least 6 units, and a high internal conservation were also evaluated. Forty-nine are polymorphic among five Yersinia strains (twenty-five among three Y. pestis strains. Bacillus anthracis contains 30 comparable structures in which the unit is repeated at least 10 times. Half of these tandem repeats show polymorphism among the strains tested. Conclusions Analysis of the currently available bacterial genome sequences classifies Bacillus anthracis and Yersinia pestis as having an average (approximately 30 per Mb density of tandem repeat arrays longer than 100 bp when compared to the other bacterial genomes analysed to date. In both cases, testing a fraction of these sequences for

  19. Practical use of the repeating patterns in mask writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Masahiro; Inoue, Tadao; Yamabe, Masaki

    2010-03-01

    In May 2006, the Mask Design, Drawing, and Inspection Technology Research Department (Mask D2I) at the Association of Super-Advanced Electronics Technologies (ASET) launched a 4-year program for reducing mask manufacturing cost and TAT by concurrent optimization of MDP, mask writing, and mask inspection. As one of the tasks being pursued at the Mask Design Data Technology Research Laboratory, we have evaluated the effect of reducing the drawing shot counts by utilizing the repeating patterns, and showed positive impact on mask making by using CP drawing. During the past four years, we have developed a software to extract repeating patterns from fractured OPCed mask data which can be used to minimize the shot counts. In this evaluation, we have used an actual device production data obtained from the member companies of MaskD2I. To the extraction software we added new functions for extracting common repeating patterns from a set of multiple masks, and studied how this step can reduce the counts in comparison to the shot counts required during the conventional mask writing techniques. We have also developed software that uses the extraction result of repeating patterns and prepares drawing-data for the MCC/CP drawing system, which has been developed at the Mask Writing Equipment Technology Research Laboratory. With this software, we have simulated EB proximity effect on CP writing and examined how it affect the shot count reduction where CP shots with large CD errors are to be divided into VSB shots. In this paper, we will report the evaluation result of the practical application of repeating patterns in mask writing with this software.

  20. Reward modulation of contextual cueing: Repeated context overshadows repeated target location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifian, Fariba; Contier, Oliver; Preuschhof, Claudia; Pollmann, Stefan

    2017-08-07

    Contextual cueing can be enhanced by reward. However, there is a debate if reward is associated with the repeated target-distractor configurations or with the repeated target locations that occur in both repeated and new displays. Based on neuroimaging evidence, we hypothesized that reward becomes associated with the target location only in new displays, but not in repeated displays, where the repeated target location is overshadowed by the more salient repeated target-distractor configuration. To test this hypothesis, we varied the reward value associated with the same target location in repeated and new displays. The results confirmed the overshadowing hypothesis in that search facilitation in repeated target-distractor configurations was modulated by the variable value associated with the target location. This effect was observed mainly in early learning.

  1. Childhood experiences and repeated suicidal behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Gertrud; Nielsen, Bent; Rask, P

    1991-01-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the influence of various events in childhood on suicidal behavior in adult age. For this purpose, 99 patients admitted to the Department of Psychiatry of Odense University Hospital after making a suicide attempt were followed for 5 years, to register repeated...... suicidal behavior. The results showed that three fourths of the patients attempted suicide more than once (62% nonfatal and 14% fatal outcome). The sex distribution was about the same among the first-evers as among the repeaters. Most repeaters were younger people in their twenties and thirties......, and the first-evers on average were past the age of 40. Somewhat unexpectedly, significantly more repeaters than first-evers had grown up with both their parents. However, the results also showed that significantly more repeaters than first-evers had had an unhappy childhood. This indicates...

  2. UK 2009-2010 repeat station report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J.G. Shanahan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The British Geological Survey is responsible for conducting the UK geomagnetic repeat station programme. Measurements made at the UK repeat station sites are used in conjunction with the three UK magnetic observatories: Hartland, Eskdalemuir and Lerwick, to produce a regional model of the local field each year. The UK network of repeat stations comprises 41 stations which are occupied at approximately 3-4 year intervals. Practices for conducting repeat station measurements continue to evolve as advances are made in survey instrumentation and as the usage of the data continues to change. Here, a summary of the 2009 and 2010 UK repeat station surveys is presented, highlighting the measurement process and techniques, density of network, reduction process and recent results.

  3. Characterization and Exploitation of CRISPR Loci in Bifidobacterium longum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Hidalgo-Cantabrana

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Diverse CRISPR-Cas systems provide adaptive immunity in many bacteria and most archaea, via a DNA-encoded, RNA-mediated, nucleic-acid targeting mechanism. Over time, CRISPR loci expand via iterative uptake of invasive DNA sequences into the CRISPR array during the adaptation process. These genetic vaccination cards thus provide insights into the exposure of strains to phages and plasmids in space and time, revealing the historical predatory exposure of a strain. These genetic loci thus constitute a unique basis for genotyping of strains, with potential of resolution at the strain-level. Here, we investigate the occurrence and diversity of CRISPR-Cas systems in the genomes of various Bifidobacterium longum strains across three sub-species. Specifically, we analyzed the genomic content of 66 genomes belonging to B. longum subsp. longum, B. longum subsp. infantis and B. longum subsp. suis, and identified 25 strains that carry 29 total CRISPR-Cas systems. We identify various Type I and Type II CRISPR-Cas systems that are widespread in this species, notably I-C, I-E, and II-C. Noteworthy, Type I-C systems showed extended CRISPR arrays, with extensive spacer diversity. We show how these hypervariable loci can be used to gain insights into strain origin, evolution and phylogeny, and can provide discriminatory sequences to distinguish even clonal isolates. By investigating CRISPR spacer sequences, we reveal their origin and implicate phages and prophages as drivers of CRISPR immunity expansion in this species, with redundant targeting of select prophages. Analysis of CRISPR spacer origin also revealed novel PAM sequences. Our results suggest that CRISPR-Cas immune systems are instrumental in mounting diversified viral resistance in B. longum, and show that these sequences are useful for typing across three subspecies.

  4. Blood pressure loci identified with a gene-centric array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Toby; Gaunt, Tom R; Newhouse, Stephen J; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Kumari, Meena; Morris, Richard W; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; O'Brien, Eoin T; Poulter, Neil R; Sever, Peter; Shields, Denis C; Thom, Simon; Wannamethee, Sasiwarang G; Whincup, Peter H; Brown, Morris J; Connell, John M; Dobson, Richard J; Howard, Philip J; Mein, Charles A; Onipinla, Abiodun; Shaw-Hawkins, Sue; Zhang, Yun; Davey Smith, George; Day, Ian N M; Lawlor, Debbie A; Goodall, Alison H; Fowkes, F Gerald; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Elliott, Paul; Gateva, Vesela; Braund, Peter S; Burton, Paul R; Nelson, Christopher P; Tobin, Martin D; van der Harst, Pim; Glorioso, Nicola; Neuvrith, Hani; Salvi, Erika; Staessen, Jan A; Stucchi, Andrea; Devos, Nabila; Jeunemaitre, Xavier; Plouin, Pierre-François; Tichet, Jean; Juhanson, Peeter; Org, Elin; Putku, Margus; Sõber, Siim; Veldre, Gudrun; Viigimaa, Margus; Levinsson, Anna; Rosengren, Annika; Thelle, Dag S; Hastie, Claire E; Hedner, Thomas; Lee, Wai K; Melander, Olle; Wahlstrand, Björn; Hardy, Rebecca; Wong, Andrew; Cooper, Jackie A; Palmen, Jutta; Chen, Li; Stewart, Alexandre F R; Wells, George A; Westra, Harm-Jan; Wolfs, Marcel G M; Clarke, Robert; Franzosi, Maria Grazia; Goel, Anuj; Hamsten, Anders; Lathrop, Mark; Peden, John F; Seedorf, Udo; Watkins, Hugh; Ouwehand, Willem H; Sambrook, Jennifer; Stephens, Jonathan; Casas, Juan-Pablo; Drenos, Fotios; Holmes, Michael V; Kivimaki, Mika; Shah, Sonia; Shah, Tina; Talmud, Philippa J; Whittaker, John; Wallace, Chris; Delles, Christian; Laan, Maris; Kuh, Diana; Humphries, Steve E; Nyberg, Fredrik; Cusi, Daniele; Roberts, Robert; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Franke, Lude; Stanton, Alice V; Dominiczak, Anna F; Farrall, Martin; Hingorani, Aroon D; Samani, Nilesh J; Caulfield, Mark J; Munroe, Patricia B

    2011-12-09

    Raised blood pressure (BP) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Previous studies have identified 47 distinct genetic variants robustly associated with BP, but collectively these explain only a few percent of the heritability for BP phenotypes. To find additional BP loci, we used a bespoke gene-centric array to genotype an independent discovery sample of 25,118 individuals that combined hypertensive case-control and general population samples. We followed up four SNPs associated with BP at our p < 8.56 × 10(-7) study-specific significance threshold and six suggestively associated SNPs in a further 59,349 individuals. We identified and replicated a SNP at LSP1/TNNT3, a SNP at MTHFR-NPPB independent (r(2) = 0.33) of previous reports, and replicated SNPs at AGT and ATP2B1 reported previously. An analysis of combined discovery and follow-up data identified SNPs significantly associated with BP at p < 8.56 × 10(-7) at four further loci (NPR3, HFE, NOS3, and SOX6). The high number of discoveries made with modest genotyping effort can be attributed to using a large-scale yet targeted genotyping array and to the development of a weighting scheme that maximized power when meta-analyzing results from samples ascertained with extreme phenotypes, in combination with results from nonascertained or population samples. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and transcript expression data highlight potential gene regulatory mechanisms at the MTHFR and NOS3 loci. These results provide candidates for further study to help dissect mechanisms affecting BP and highlight the utility of studying SNPs and samples that are independent of those studied previously even when the sample size is smaller than that in previous studies.

  5. Positive Selection on Loci Associated with Drug and Alcohol Dependence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brooke Sadler

    Full Text Available Much of the evolution of human behavior remains a mystery, including how certain disadvantageous behaviors are so prevalent. Nicotine addiction is one such phenotype. Several loci have been implicated in nicotine related phenotypes including the nicotinic receptor gene clusters (CHRNs on chromosomes 8 and 15. Here we use 1000 Genomes sequence data from 3 populations (Africans, Asians and Europeans to examine whether natural selection has occurred at these loci. We used Tajima's D and the integrated haplotype score (iHS to test for evidence of natural selection. Our results provide evidence for strong selection in the nicotinic receptor gene cluster on chromosome 8, previously found to be significantly associated with both nicotine and cocaine dependence, as well as evidence selection acting on the region containing the CHRNA5 nicotinic receptor gene on chromosome 15, that is genome wide significant for risk for nicotine dependence. To examine the possibility that this selection is related to memory and learning, we utilized genetic data from the Collaborative Studies on the Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA to test variants within these regions with three tests of memory and learning, the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS Block Design, WAIS Digit Symbol and WAIS Information tests. Of the 17 SNPs genotyped in COGA in this region, we find one significantly associated with WAIS digit symbol test results. This test captures aspects of reaction time and memory, suggesting that a phenotype relating to memory and learning may have been the driving force behind selection at these loci. This study could begin to explain why these seemingly deleterious SNPs are present at their current frequencies.

  6. Alterations at chromosome 17 loci in peripheral nerve sheath tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lothe, R.A.; Slettan, A.; Saeter, G. [Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo (Norway)] [and others

    1995-01-01

    Little is known about the molecular genetic changes in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST). Inactivation of the TP53 gene in l7p has been reported in a few tumors. The MPNST is one of the manifestations of neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1), suggesting that the NF1 gene in 17q might be important. We present a study of 15 neurofibromas and MPNST from nine individuals. Seven patients had NF1 and six of these developed MPNST. Genetic alterations at nine polymorphic loci on chromosome 17 were examined. Allelic imbalance was detected only in the malignant tumors from NF1 patients (4/6). Complete loss of heterozygosity of 17q loci was found in three of these tumors, all including loci within the NF1 gene. Two of the malignant tumors also showed deletions on 17p. No mutations were detected within exon 5-8 of the TP53 in any of the MPNST, and none of them were TP53 protein-positive using immunostaining with mono- and polyclonal antibodies against TP53. The numbers of chromosome 17 present in each tumor were evaluated by use of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on interphase nuclei with a centromere-specific probe. A deviation from the disomic status of chromosome 17 was observed in two of the MPNST from NF1 patients. These results support the hypothesis of inactivation of both NF1 gene alleles during development of MPNST in patients with NF1. In contrast to other reports, we did not find evidence for a homozygous mutated condition of the TP53 gene in the same tumors. Finally, FISH analysis was in accordance with the DNA analysis in the deduction of the numbers of chromosome 17 in these tumors. 29 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Efficient development of highly polymorphic microsatellite markers based on polymorphic repeats in transcriptome sequences of multiple individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukosavljev, M; Esselink, G D; van 't Westende, W P C; Cox, P; Visser, R G F; Arens, P; Smulders, M J M

    2015-01-01

    The first hurdle in developing microsatellite markers, cloning, has been overcome by next-generation sequencing. The second hurdle is testing to differentiate polymorphic from nonpolymorphic loci. The third hurdle, somewhat hidden, is that only polymorphic markers with a large effective number of alleles are sufficiently informative to be deployed in multiple studies. Both steps are laborious and still performed manually. We have developed a strategy in which we first screen reads from multiple genotypes for repeats that show the most length variants, and only these are subsequently developed into markers. We validated our strategy in tetraploid garden rose using Illumina paired-end transcriptome sequences of 11 roses. Of 48 tested two markers failed to amplify, but all others were polymorphic. Ten loci amplified more than one locus, indicating duplicated genes or gene families. Completely avoiding duplicated loci will be difficult because the range of numbers of predicted alleles of highly polymorphic single- and multilocus markers largely overlapped. Of the remainder, half were replicate markers (i.e. multiple primer pairs for one locus), indicating the difficulty of correctly filtering short reads containing repeat sequences. We subsequently refined the approach to eliminate multiple primer sets to the same loci. The remaining 18 markers were all highly polymorphic, amplifying on average 11.7 alleles per marker (range = 6-20) in 11 tetraploid roses, exceeding the 8.2 alleles per marker of the 24 most polymorphic markers genotyped previously. This strategy therefore represents a major step forward in the development of highly polymorphic microsatellite markers.

  8. Mapping autism risk loci using genetic linkage and chromosomal rearrangements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szatmari, Peter; Paterson, Andrew; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Roberts, Wendy; Brian, Jessica; Liu, Xiao-Qing; Vincent, John; Skaug, Jennifer; Thompson, Ann; Senman, Lili; Feuk, Lars; Qian, Cheng; Bryson, Susan; Jones, Marshall; Marshall, Christian; Scherer, Stephen; Vieland, Veronica; Bartlett, Christopher; Mangin, La Vonne; Goedken, Rhinda; Segre, Alberto; Pericak-Vance, Margaret; Cuccaro, Michael; Gilbert, John; Wright, Harry; Abramson, Ruth; Betancur, Catalina; Bourgeron, Thomas; Gillberg, Christopher; Leboyer, Marion; Buxbaum, Joseph; Davis, Kenneth; Hollander, Eric; Silverman, Jeremy; Hallmayer, Joachim; Lotspeich, Linda; Sutcliffe, James; Haines, Jonathan; Folstein, Susan; Piven, Joseph; Wassink, Thomas; Sheffield, Val; Geschwind, Daniel; Bucan, Maja; Brown, Ted; Cantor, Rita; Constantino, John; Gilliam, Conrad; Herbert, Martha; Lajonchere, Clara; Ledbetter, David; Lese-Martin, Christa; Miller, Janet; Nelson, Stan; Samango-Sprouse, Carol; Spence, Sarah; State, Matthew; Tanzi, Rudolph; Coon, Hilary; Dawson, Geraldine; Devlin, Bernie; Estes, Annette; Flodman, Pamela; Klei, Lambertus; Mcmahon, William; Minshew, Nancy; Munson, Jeff; Korvatska, Elena; Rodier, Patricia; Schellenberg, Gerard; Smith, Moyra; Spence, Anne; Stodgell, Chris; Tepper, Ping Guo; Wijsman, Ellen; Yu, Chang-En; Rogé, Bernadette; Mantoulan, Carine; Wittemeyer, Kerstin; Poustka, Annemarie; Felder, Bärbel; Klauck, Sabine; Schuster, Claudia; Poustka, Fritz; Bölte, Sven; Feineis-Matthews, Sabine; Herbrecht, Evelyn; Schmötzer, Gabi; Tsiantis, John; Papanikolaou, Katerina; Maestrini, Elena; Bacchelli, Elena; Blasi, Francesca; Carone, Simona; Toma, Claudio; Van Engeland, Herman; De Jonge, Maretha; Kemner, Chantal; Koop, Frederieke; Langemeijer, Marjolein; Hijmans, Channa; Staal, Wouter; Baird, Gillian; Bolton, Patrick; Rutter, Michael; Weisblatt, Emma; Green, Jonathan; Aldred, Catherine; Wilkinson, Julie-Anne; Pickles, Andrew; Le Couteur, Ann; Berney, Tom; Mcconachie, Helen; Bailey, Anthony; Francis, Kostas; Honeyman, Gemma; Hutchinson, Aislinn; Parr, Jeremy; Wallace, Simon; Monaco, Anthony; Barnby, Gabrielle; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Lamb, Janine; Sousa, Ines; Sykes, Nuala; Cook, Edwin; Guter, Stephen; Leventhal, Bennett; Salt, Jeff; Lord, Catherine; Corsello, Christina; Hus, Vanessa; Weeks, Daniel; Volkmar, Fred; Tauber, Maïté; Fombonne, Eric; Shih, Andy; Meyer, Kacie

    2007-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are common, heritable neurodevelopmental conditions. The genetic architecture of ASD is complex, requiring large samples to overcome heterogeneity. Here we broaden coverage and sample size relative to other studies of ASD by using Affymetrix 10K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays and 1168 families with ≥ 2 affected individuals to perform the largest linkage scan to date, while also analyzing copy number variation (CNV) in these families. Linkage and CNV analyses implicate chromosome 11p12-p13 and neurexins, respectively, amongst other candidate loci. Neurexins team with previously-implicated neuroligins for glutamatergic synaptogenesis, highlighting glutamate-related genes as promising candidates for ASD. PMID:17322880

  9. DNA polymorphism at the casein loci in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Gregorio, P; Rando, A; Pieragostini, E; Masina, P

    1991-01-01

    By using seven endonucleases and four bovine cDNA probes specific for alpha S1-, alpha S2-, beta-, and kappa-casein genes, nine restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) have been found in the sheep orthologous DNA regions. In contrast to the low level of variation observed at the protein level, these DNA polymorphisms determine a high level of heterozygosity and, therefore, represent useful tools for genetic analyses since they can also be obtained without the need for gene expression. In fact, informative matings suggest that in sheep, as in cattle, the four loci are linked.

  10. Quantitative Trait Loci for Fertility Traits in Finnish Ayrshire Cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulman, Nina F; Sahana, Goutam; Lund, Mogens S

    2008-01-01

    A whole genome scan was carried out to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) for fertility traits in Finnish Ayrshire cattle. The mapping population consisted of 12 bulls and 493 sons. Estimated breeding values for days open, fertility treatments, maternal calf mortality and paternal non-return rate...... if these effects were due to a pleiotropic QTL affecting fertility and milk yield traits or to linked QTL causing the effects. This distinction could only be made with confidence on BTA1 where a QTL affecting milk yield is linked to a pleiotropic QTL affecting days open and fertility treatments...

  11. Nine microsatellite loci developed from the octocoral, Paragorgia arborea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coykendall, Dolly K.; Morrison, Cheryl L.

    2015-01-01

    Paragorgia arborea, or bubblegum coral, occurs in continental slope habitats worldwide, which are increasingly threatened by human activities such as energy development and fisheries practices. From 101 putative loci screened, nine microsatellite markers were developed from samples taken from Baltimore canyon in the western North Atlantic Ocean. The number of alleles ranged from two to thirteen per locus and each displayed equilibrium. These nuclear resources will help further research on population connectivity in threatened coral species where mitochondrial markers are known to lack fine-scale genetic diversity.