WorldWideScience

Sample records for repairing membrane damage

  1. Repair of Nerve Cell Membrane Damage by Calcium-Dependent, Membrane-Binding Proteins (Revised)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Alzheimer disease amyloid beta protein forms calcium channels in bilayer membranes: blockade by tromethamine and aluminum , Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A...Calcium signaling and amyloid toxicity in Alzheimer disease, J Biol Chem 285 (2010) 12463-12468. [14] H.A. Lashuel, P.T. Lansbury, Are amyloid

  2. Repair of Nerve Cell Membrance Damage by Calcium-Dependent, Membrane-Binding Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    signaling and amyloid toxicity in Alzheimer disease, J Biol Chem 285 (2010) 12463-12468. [14] H.A. Lashuel, P.T. Lansbury, Are amyloid diseases caused by...protein aggregates that mimic bacterial pore-forming toxins?, Q Rev Biophys 39 (2006) 167-201. [15] N. Arispe, E. Rojas, H.B. Pollard, Alzheimer ...disease amyloid beta protein forms calcium channels in bilayer membranes: blockade by tromethamine and aluminum , Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 90 (1993) 567

  3. Inhibitory effect of membrane-binding drugs on excision repair of DNA damage in UV-irradiated Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todo, T.; Yonei, S. (Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Lab. of Radiation Biology)

    1983-04-01

    The effects of procaine and lidocaine on DNA-repair processes were investigated in UV-irradiated cells of E. coli with different DNA-repair capacities. The cells were irradiated with various doses of UV and then incubated at 37/sup 0/C in M9 buffer (liquid-holding) or in EM9 medium in the presence or absence of membrane-binding drugs. The results obtained are as follows. (1) In strains H/r30 (wild-type for DNA repair) and NG30 (recA/sup -/), the increase in survival with increase in time of liquid-holding was almost completely inhibited by the addition of procaine and lidocaine. The same trends were observable under conditions of post-irradiation incubation in EM9 medium, more efficiently in recA/sup -/ strain than in the wild-type strain. (2) The addition of these drugs gave an apparent enhancement of the frequency of UV-induced mutation to arginine prototrophy, corresponding to a decrease in survival. (3) There were negligible effects of the drugs on survival and mutation in the excision-repair-defective strain, Hs30 (uvrB/sup -/). (4) The removal of thymine dimers from DNA was actually reduced by the addition of procaine.

  4. Chromatin structure and DNA damage repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinant Christoffel

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The integrity of the genome is continuously challenged by both endogenous and exogenous DNA damaging agents. These damaging agents can induce a wide variety of lesions in the DNA, such as double strand breaks, single strand breaks, oxidative lesions and pyrimidine dimers. The cell has evolved intricate DNA damage response mechanisms to counteract the genotoxic effects of these lesions. The two main features of the DNA damage response mechanisms are cell-cycle checkpoint activation and, at the heart of the response, DNA repair. For both damage signalling and repair, chromatin remodelling is most likely a prerequisite. Here, we discuss current knowledge on chromatin remodelling with respect to the cellular response to DNA damage, with emphasis on the response to lesions resolved by nucleotide excision repair. We will discuss the role of histone modifications as well as their displacement or exchange in nucleotide excision repair and make a comparison with their requirement in transcription and double strand break repair.

  5. 49 CFR 1242.42 - Administration, repair and maintenance, machinery repair, equipment damaged, dismantling retired...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Administration, repair and maintenance, machinery repair, equipment damaged, dismantling retired property, fringe benefits, other casualties and insurance... maintenance, machinery repair, equipment damaged, dismantling retired property, fringe benefits,...

  6. Damage, DNA Repair, Aging, and Neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Scott; Fang, Evandro Fei; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Croteau, Deborah L.; Bohr, Vilhelm A.

    2017-01-01

    Aging in mammals is accompanied by a progressive atrophy of tissues and organs, and stochastic damage accumulation to the macromolecules DNA, RNA, proteins, and lipids. The sequence of the human genome represents our genetic blueprint, and accumulating evidence suggests that loss of genomic maintenance may causally contribute to aging. Distinct evidence for a role of imperfect DNA repair in aging is that several premature aging syndromes have underlying genetic DNA repair defects. Accumulation of DNA damage may be particularly prevalent in the central nervous system owing to the low DNA repair capacity in postmitotic brain tissue. It is generally believed that the cumulative effects of the deleterious changes that occur in aging, mostly after the reproductive phase, contribute to species-specific rates of aging. In addition to nuclear DNA damage contributions to aging, there is also abundant evidence for a causative link between mitochondrial DNA damage and the major phenotypes associated with aging. Understanding the mechanistic basis for the association of DNA damage and DNA repair with aging and age-related diseases, such as neurodegeneration, would give insight into contravening age-related diseases and promoting a healthy life span. PMID:26385091

  7. Civil liability for ecologic damage and repairing

    OpenAIRE

    Basílio, Patrícia Droeber; Faculdades de Vitória, Espírito Santo, Brasil

    2009-01-01

    This article analyses how civil liability takes position regarding situations connected to damages caused to the environment, defined ways in our legislation reprimanding damages caused and existent ways of prevention and repairing. The text contemplates how law disciplines such issue, looking for efficient and effective solutions and also checking evolution and modification from law which are relevant to the environment, the environmental law, whereas we observe it is a serious issue that ha...

  8. High-Throughput Microplate-Based Assay to Monitor Plasma Membrane Wounding and Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarika Pathak-Sharma

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The plasma membrane of mammalian cells is susceptible to disruption by mechanical and biochemical damages that frequently occur within tissues. Therefore, efficient and rapid repair of the plasma membrane is essential for maintaining cellular homeostasis and survival. Excessive damage of the plasma membrane and defects in its repair are associated with pathological conditions such as infections, muscular dystrophy, heart failure, diabetes, and lung and neurodegenerative diseases. The molecular events that remodel the plasma membrane during its repair remain poorly understood. In the present work, we report the development of a quantitative high-throughput assay that monitors the efficiency of the plasma membrane repair in real time using a sensitive microplate reader. In this assay, the plasma membrane of living cells is perforated by the bacterial pore-forming toxin listeriolysin O and the integrity and recovery of the membrane are monitored at 37°C by measuring the fluorescence intensity of the membrane impermeant dye propidium iodide. We demonstrate that listeriolysin O causes dose-dependent plasma membrane wounding and activation of the cell repair machinery. This assay was successfully applied to cell types from different origins including epithelial and muscle cells. In conclusion, this high-throughput assay provides a novel opportunity for the discovery of membrane repair effectors and the development of new therapeutic compounds that could target membrane repair in various pathological processes, from degenerative to infectious diseases.

  9. Processo de reparação de lesões da córnea e a membrana amniótica na oftalmologia Repair process of corneal damage and the amniotic membrane in ophthalmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Cristine de Sousa Pontes

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Os eventos que fazem parte do processo de reparação de lesões da córnea ocorrem simultaneamente e envolvem proliferação, migração, diferenciação e apoptose celular, além da comunicação intercelular. Vários fatores solúveis, além de proteínas da matriz mesenquimal, proteoglicanos, enzimas proteolíticas e alguns tipos celulares são abordados nesta revisão, na qual explicam-se os processos de reparação de lesões superficiais ou penetrantes da córnea. A membrana amniótica, muito utilizada na cirurgia oftálmica, foi estudada por apresentar funções que colaboram com o processo de reparação. Entretanto, tais funções poderão ser perdidas quando tal tecido for submetido à conservação. Assim, torna-se importante conhecer o processo de reparação de lesões que envolvem, ou não, a córnea em toda a sua espessura e escolher a melhor forma de utilização da membrana amniótica quando ela for indicada na terapia para estas lesões.The events included in the process of repair of corneal damage occur simultaneously and involve proliferation, migration, differentiation, cell apoptosis and intercellular communication. Several soluble factors, mesenchymal matrix proteins, proteoglycans, proteolytic enzymes and some cell types are covered in this review, which explains the processes of repair of corneal wounds, either superficial or penetrating. The amniotic membrane, used in ophthalmic surgery, was studied because of the contribution of its functions to the repair process. However, these functions may be lost when the amniotic membrane is subjected to conservation. Therefore, it is important to understand the repair process of lesions involving or not the entire thickness of the cornea, and choose the best use of the amniotic membrane, when it is indicated for the treatment of these lesions.

  10. A progression of damage repair capability in self-repairing composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dry, Carolyn

    2014-04-01

    This paper covers several projects in which the author sought to determine the extent of damage against which self repair would be effective. So far no limits have been reached beyond those of the fiber/matrix itself. Starting with repair of barely visible damage in airplane wings consisting of graphite fiber/resin matrix composites progression was next to self repair of ballistic damage to vinyl ester walls and epoxy resin walls and finally blast damage self repair of walls and then blast and ballistic damage were combined.

  11. Microvesicle shedding and lysosomal repair fulfill divergent cellular needs during the repair of streptolysin O-induced plasmalemmal damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander P Atanassoff

    Full Text Available Pathogenic bacteria secrete pore-forming toxins that permeabilize the plasma membrane of host cells. Nucleated cells possess protective mechanisms that repair toxin-damaged plasmalemma. Currently two putative repair scenarios are debated: either the isolation of the damaged membrane regions and their subsequent expulsion as microvesicles (shedding or lysosome-dependent repair might allow the cell to rid itself of its toxic cargo and prevent lysis. Here we provide evidence that both mechanisms operate in tandem but fulfill diverse cellular needs. The prevalence of the repair strategy varies between cell types and is guided by the severity and the localization of the initial toxin-induced damage, by the morphology of a cell and, most important, by the incidence of the secondary mechanical damage. The surgically precise action of microvesicle shedding is best suited for the instant elimination of individual toxin pores, whereas lysosomal repair is indispensable for mending of self-inflicted mechanical injuries following initial plasmalemmal permeabilization by bacterial toxins. Our study provides new insights into the functioning of non-immune cellular defenses against bacterial pathogens.

  12. Repair of damaged supraglottic airway devices: A novel method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapoor Dheeraj

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Damage of laryngeal mask airway and other supraglottic airway devices has always been a matter of concern. Although manufacturer recommends maximum 40 uses of LMA (and its congeners but damage before 40 uses needs to be evaluated. We hereby, describe a novel method of repair of supraglottic devices when damage occurs at mask inflation line or pilot balloon valve assembly.

  13. Damage diagnosis and compatible repair mortars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hees, R.P.J. van

    1999-01-01

    Mortars for repair and maintenance of historic masonry have to meet specific requirements. Several authors have made contributions, however many cases of failure show that there still is quite a lack of knowledge on the compatibility of repair mortars for historic masonry. The diagnosis of the cause

  14. Choreography of oxidative damage repair in mammalian genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Sankar; Izumi, Tadahide; Boldogh, Istvan; Bhakat, Kishor K; Hill, Jeff W; Hazra, Tapas K

    2002-07-01

    The lesions induced by reactive oxygen species in both nuclear and mitochondrial genomes include altered bases, abasic (AP) sites, and single-strand breaks, all repaired primarily via the base excision repair (BER) pathway. Although the basic BER process (consisting of five sequential steps) could be reconstituted in vitro with only four enzymes, it is now evident that repair of oxidative damage, at least in mammalian cell nuclei, is more complex, and involves a number of additional proteins, including transcription- and replication-associated factors. These proteins may be required in sequential repair steps in concert with other cellular changes, starting with nuclear targeting of the early repair enzymes in response to oxidative stress, facilitation of lesion recognition, and access by chromatin unfolding via histone acetylation, and formation of metastable complexes of repair enzymes and other accessory proteins. Distinct, specific subclasses of protein complexes may be formed for repair of oxidative lesions in the nucleus in transcribed vs. nontranscribed sequences in chromatin, in quiescent vs. cycling cells, and in nascent vs. parental DNA strands in replicating cells. Characterizing the proteins for each repair subpathway, their signaling-dependent modifications and interactions in the nuclear as well as mitochondrial repair complexes, will be a major focus of future research in oxidative damage repair.

  15. Human longevity and variation in DNA damage response and repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debrabant, Birgit; Soerensen, Mette; Flachsbart, Friederike

    2014-01-01

    others. Data were applied on 592 SNPs from 77 genes involved in nine sub-processes: DNA-damage response, base excision repair (BER), nucleotide excision repair, mismatch repair, non-homologous end-joining, homologous recombinational repair (HRR), RecQ helicase activities (RECQ), telomere functioning...... and mitochondrial DNA processes. The study population was 1089 long-lived and 736 middle-aged Danes. A self-contained set-based test of all SNPs displayed association with longevity (P-value=9.9 × 10-5), supporting that the overall pathway could affect longevity. Investigation of the nine sub-processes using...

  16. Repairable-conditionally repairable damage model based on dual Poisson processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, B K; Persson, L M; Edgren, M R; Hedlöf, I; Brahme, A

    2003-09-01

    The advent of intensity-modulated radiation therapy makes it increasingly important to model the response accurately when large volumes of normal tissues are irradiated by controlled graded dose distributions aimed at maximizing tumor cure and minimizing normal tissue toxicity. The cell survival model proposed here is very useful and flexible for accurate description of the response of healthy tissues as well as tumors in classical and truly radiobiologically optimized radiation therapy. The repairable-conditionally repairable (RCR) model distinguishes between two different types of damage, namely the potentially repairable, which may also be lethal, i.e. if unrepaired or misrepaired, and the conditionally repairable, which may be repaired or may lead to apoptosis if it has not been repaired correctly. When potentially repairable damage is being repaired, for example by nonhomologous end joining, conditionally repairable damage may require in addition a high-fidelity correction by homologous repair. The induction of both types of damage is assumed to be described by Poisson statistics. The resultant cell survival expression has the unique ability to fit most experimental data well at low doses (the initial hypersensitive range), intermediate doses (on the shoulder of the survival curve), and high doses (on the quasi-exponential region of the survival curve). The complete Poisson expression can be approximated well by a simple bi-exponential cell survival expression, S(D) = e(-aD) + bDe(-cD), where the first term describes the survival of undamaged cells and the last term represents survival after complete repair of sublethal damage. The bi-exponential expression makes it easy to derive D(0), D(q), n and alpha, beta values to facilitate comparison with classical cell survival models.

  17. Inducible repair of oxidative DNA damage in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demple, B; Halbrook, J

    Hydrogen peroxide is lethal to many cell types, including the bacterium Escherichia coli. Peroxides yield transient radical species that can damage DNA and cause mutations. Such partially reduced oxygen species are occasionally released during cellular respiration and are generated by lethal and mutagenic ionizing radiation. Because cells live in an environment where the threat of oxidative DNA damage is continual, cellular mechanisms may have evolved to avoid and repair this damage. Enzymes are known which evidently perform these functions. We report here that resistance to hydrogen peroxide toxicity can be induced in E. coli, that this novel induction is specific and occurs, in part, at the level of DNA repair.

  18. Lipid raft-dependent plasma membrane repair interferes with the activation of B lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Heather; Castro-Gomes, Thiago; Corrotte, Matthias; Tam, Christina; Maugel, Timothy K; Andrews, Norma W; Song, Wenxia

    2015-12-21

    Cells rapidly repair plasma membrane (PM) damage by a process requiring Ca(2+)-dependent lysosome exocytosis. Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) released from lysosomes induces endocytosis of injured membrane through caveolae, membrane invaginations from lipid rafts. How B lymphocytes, lacking any known form of caveolin, repair membrane injury is unknown. Here we show that B lymphocytes repair PM wounds in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. Wounding induces lysosome exocytosis and endocytosis of dextran and the raft-binding cholera toxin subunit B (CTB). Resealing is reduced by ASM inhibitors and ASM deficiency and enhanced or restored by extracellular exposure to sphingomyelinase. B cell activation via B cell receptors (BCRs), a process requiring lipid rafts, interferes with PM repair. Conversely, wounding inhibits BCR signaling and internalization by disrupting BCR-lipid raft coclustering and by inducing the endocytosis of raft-bound CTB separately from BCR into tubular invaginations. Thus, PM repair and B cell activation interfere with one another because of competition for lipid rafts, revealing how frequent membrane injury and repair can impair B lymphocyte-mediated immune responses.

  19. Damage tolerance of bonded composite aircraft repairs for metallic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Randal John

    This thesis describes the development and validation of methods for damage tolerance substantiation of bonded composite repairs applied to cracked plates. This technology is used to repair metal aircraft structures, offering improvements in fatigue life, cost, manufacturability, and inspectability when compared to riveted repairs. The work focuses on the effects of plate thickness and bending on repair life, and covers fundamental aspects of fracture and fatigue of cracked plates and bonded joints. This project falls under the UBC Bonded Composite Repair Program, which has the goal of certification and widespread use of bonded repairs in civilian air transportation. This thesis analyses the plate thickness and transverse stress effects on fracture of repaired plates and the related problem of induced geometrically nonlinear bending in unbalanced (single-sided) repairs. The author begins by developing a classification scheme for assigning repair damage tolerance substantiation requirements based upon stress-based adhesive fracture/fatigue criteria and the residual strength of the original structure. The governing equations for bending of cracked plates are then reformulated and line-spring models are developed for linear and nonlinear coupled bending and extension of reinforced cracks. The line-spring models were used to correct the Wang and Rose energy method for the determination of the long-crack limit stress intensity, and to develop a new interpolation model for repaired cracks of arbitrary length. The analysis was validated using finite element models and data from mechanical tests performed on hybrid bonded joints and repair specimens that are representative of an in-service repair. This work will allow designers to evaluate the damage tolerance of the repaired plate, the adhesive, and the composite patch, which is an airworthiness requirement under FAR (Federal Aviation Regulations) 25.571. The thesis concludes by assessing the remaining barriers to

  20. Repair of ultraviolet-light-induced damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, B.M.

    1981-01-01

    Studies are reviewed which present three major new findings in the photobiology of skin. First, detectable numbers of dimers are formed even at sub-erythymal doses. Second, excision of dimers is much more rapid than would be predicted from results obtained in cell culture. Third, comparison of the rates of excision and photoreactivation in skin indicates that in normal sunlight exposure, photoreactivation may well be the predominant repair pathway in skin. (ACR)

  1. Repairing Damaged Power-Cable Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, G. E.

    1984-01-01

    Simple method saves time, money, and material. In new method cable remains in place while new insulation is applied to damaged portion. Method results in new terminations with safety factor equal to that of any portion of cable.

  2. Differential repair of UV damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terleth, C; van Sluis, C A; van de Putte, P

    1989-06-26

    Preferential repair of UV-induced damage is a phenomenon by which mammalian cells might enhance their survival. This paper presents the first evidence that preferential repair occurs in the lower eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Moreover an unique approach is reported to compare identical sequences present on the same chromosome and only differing in expression. We determined the removal of pyrimidine dimers from two identical alpha-mating type loci and we were able to show that the active MAT alpha locus is repaired preferentially to the inactive HML alpha locus. In a sir-3 mutant, in which both loci are active this preference is not observed.

  3. Biomarkers of oxidative damage to DNA and repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loft, Steffen; Høgh Danielsen, Pernille; Mikkelsen, Lone

    2008-01-01

    Oxidative-stress-induced damage to DNA includes a multitude of lesions, many of which are mutagenic and have multiple roles in cancer and aging. Many lesions have been characterized by MS-based methods after extraction and digestion of DNA. These preparation steps may cause spurious base oxidation...... DNA glycosylase 1), responsible for repair of 8-oxodG, by genotyping. Products of repair in DNA or the nucleotide pool, such as 8-oxodG, excreted into the urine can be assessed by MS-based methods and generally reflects the rate of damage. Experimental and population-based studies indicate that many...

  4. DNA damage, repair and tanning acceleration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vink, A.A.; Berg, P.T.M. van den; Roza, L.

    1999-01-01

    Exposure of the skin to solar ultraviolet radiation (UV) leads to various adverse effects, such as the induction of cellular damage and mutations, suppression of the skin's immune system, and the induction of skin cancer. These effects are the consequence of various molecular alterations in the skin

  5. UV Radiation Damage and Bacterial DNA Repair Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zion, Michal; Guy, Daniel; Yarom, Ruth; Slesak, Michaela

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on a simple hands-on laboratory procedure for high school students in studying both radiation damage and DNA repair systems in bacteria. The sensitivity to ultra-violet (UV) radiation of both "Escherichia coli" and "Serratia marcescens" is tested by radiating them for varying time periods. Two growth temperatures are used in…

  6. Damage and repair of ancient DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitchell, David; Willerslev, Eske; Hansen, Anders

    2005-01-01

    , and extensive degradation. In the course of this review, we will discuss the current aDNA literature describing the importance of aDNA studies as they relate to important biological questions and the difficulties associated with extracting useful information from highly degraded and damaged substrates derived......Under certain conditions small amounts of DNA can survive for long periods of time and can be used as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) substrates for the study of phylogenetic relationships and population genetics of extinct plants and animals, including hominids. Because of extensive DNA...... degradation, these studies are limited to species that lived within the past 10(4)-10(5) years (Late Pleistocene), although DNA sequences from 10(6) years have been reported. Ancient DNA (aDNA) has been used to study phylogenetic relationships of protists, fungi, algae, plants, and higher eukaryotes...

  7. UV exposed electronically activated damage and photoreactivation repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohr, Henrik; Malik, Bary

    2007-03-01

    An investigation of the possible physics underlying the damage caused to DNA by UV radiation and its subsequent repair via a photoreactivation mechanism is presented in this study. An electronic pathway starting from the initial damage to the final repair process is proposed. UV radiation is absorbed to create a hole-excited thymine or other pyrimidine that subsequently is responsible for the formation of the thymine dimer. The negative-ion of the cofactor riboflavin, FADH-, formed by the exposure of the photolyase protein to visible light interacts with the hole-excited electronic orbital of the thymine dimer inducing a photon-less Auger transition, which restores the two thymines to the ground state, thereby detaching the lesion and repairing the DNA. Due to energy balance, the process has to involve an electronic excited state (s). The mechanism involves the least amount of energy dissipation and is charge neutral. It also avoids radiation damage in the repair process, that is, is a radiationless process.

  8. Decreased repair of gamma damaged DNA in progeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rainbow, A.J.; Howes, M.

    1977-01-01

    A sensitive host-cell reactivation technique was used to examine the DNA repair ability of fibroblasts from two patients with classical progeria. Fibroblasts were infected with either non-irradiated or gamma-irradiated adenovirus type 2 and at 48 hrs after infection cells were examined for the presence of viral structural antigens using immunofluorescent staining. The production of viral structural antigens was considerably reduced in the progeria lines as compared to normal fibroblasts when gamma-irradiated virus was used, indicating a defect in the repair of gamma ray damaged DNA in the progeria cells.

  9. Protein damage and repair controlling seed vigor and longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogé, Laurent; Broyart, Caroline; Collet, Boris; Godin, Béatrice; Jallet, Denis; Bourdais, Gildas; Job, Dominique; Grappin, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    The formation of abnormal isoaspartyl residues derived from aspartyl or asparaginyl residues is a major source of spontaneous protein misfolding in cells. The repair enzyme protein L: -isoaspartyl methyltransferase (PIMT) counteracts such damage by catalyzing the conversion of abnormal isoaspartyl residues to their normal aspartyl forms. Thus, this enzyme contributes to the survival of many organisms, including plants. Analysis of the accumulation of isoaspartyl-containing proteins and its modulation by the PIMT repair pathway, using germination tests, immunodetection, enzymatic assays, and HPLC analysis, gives new insights in understanding controlling mechanisms of seed longevity and vigor.

  10. Homologous recombination in DNA repair and DNA damage tolerance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuan Li; Wolf-Dietrich Heyer

    2008-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) comprises a series of interrelated pathways that function in the repair of DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs) and interstrand crosslinks (ICLs). In addition, recombination provides critical sup-port for DNA replication in the recovery of stalled or broken replication forks, contributing to tolerance of DNA damage. A central core of proteins, most critically the RecA homolog Rad51, catalyzes the key reactions that typify HR: homology search and DNA strand invasion. The diverse functions of recombination are reflected in the need for context-specific factors that perform supplemental functions in conjunction with the core proteins. The inability to properly repair complex DNA damage and resolve DNA replication stress leads to genomic instability and contributes to cancer etiology. Mutations in the BRCA2 recombination gene cause predisposition to breast and ovarian cancer as well as Fanconi anemia, a cancer predisposition syndrome characterized by a defect in the repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks. The cellular functions of recombination are also germane to DNA-based treatment modaUties of cancer, which target replicating cells by the direct or indirect induction of DNA lesions that are substrates for recombination pathways. This review focuses on mechanistic aspects of HR relating to DSB and ICL repair as well as replication fork support.

  11. Simulated microgravity influenced the expression of DNA damage repair genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meng; Sun, Yeqing; Jiawei, Liu; Wang, Ting

    2016-07-01

    Ionizing radiation and microgravity were considered to be the most important stress factors of space environmental the respective study of the biological effects of the radiation and microgravity carried out earlier, but the interaction of the effects of radiation with microgravity started later, and due to difference of the materials and methods the result of this experiment were not consistent. To further investigate the influence of microgravity on the expression of the radiation damage repair genes, the seed of Arabidopsis (Col) and its gravity-insensitive mutant (PIN2) were exposed to 0.1Gy of the dose of energetic carbon-ion beam radiation (LET = 30KeV / μm), and the germinated seed were than fixed in the 3D random positioning apparatus immediately for a 10-day simulated microgravity. By measuring the deflection angle of root tip and the changes of the expression of Ku70 and RAD51 protein, we investigated the impact of microgravity effect on radiation damage repair systems. The results shown that radiation, microgravity and microgravity with radiation could increase the angle of the root of the Col significantly, but no obvious effect on PIN2 type. The radiation could increase the expression of Ku70 significantly in both Col and PIN2, microgravity does not affect the expression, but the microgravity with radiation could decrease the expression of Ku70. This result shown that the microgravity could influence the radiation damage repair systems in molecular level. Moreover, our findings were important to understand the molecular mechanism of the impact of microgravity effect on radiation damage repair systems in vivo.

  12. Characterization of oxidative guanine damage and repair in mammalian telomeres.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhilong Wang

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG and 2,6-diamino-4-hydroxy-5-formamidopyrimidine (FapyG are among the most common oxidative DNA lesions and are substrates for 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1-initiated DNA base excision repair (BER. Mammalian telomeres consist of triple guanine repeats and are subject to oxidative guanine damage. Here, we investigated the impact of oxidative guanine damage and its repair by OGG1 on telomere integrity in mice. The mouse cells were analyzed for telomere integrity by telomere quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization (telomere-FISH, by chromosome orientation-FISH (CO-FISH, and by indirect immunofluorescence in combination with telomere-FISH and for oxidative base lesions by Fpg-incision/Southern blot assay. In comparison to the wild type, telomere lengthening was observed in Ogg1 null (Ogg1(-/- mouse tissues and primary embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs cultivated in hypoxia condition (3% oxygen, whereas telomere shortening was detected in Ogg1(-/- mouse hematopoietic cells and primary MEFs cultivated in normoxia condition (20% oxygen or in the presence of an oxidant. In addition, telomere length abnormalities were accompanied by altered telomere sister chromatid exchanges, increased telomere single- and double-strand breaks, and preferential telomere lagging- or G-strand losses in Ogg1(-/- mouse cells. Oxidative guanine lesions were increased in telomeres in Ogg1(-/- mice with aging and primary MEFs cultivated in 20% oxygen. Furthermore, oxidative guanine lesions persisted at high level in Ogg1(-/- MEFs after acute exposure to hydrogen peroxide, while they rapidly returned to basal level in wild-type MEFs. These findings indicate that oxidative guanine damage can arise in telomeres where it affects length homeostasis, recombination, DNA replication, and DNA breakage repair. Our studies demonstrate that BER pathway is required in repairing oxidative guanine damage in telomeres and maintaining telomere integrity

  13. Calcium influx affects intracellular transport and membrane repair following nanosecond pulsed electric field exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Gary Lee; Roth, Caleb C; Dalzell, Danielle R; Kuipers, Marjorie; Ibey, Bennett L

    2014-05-01

    The cellular response to subtle membrane damage following exposure to nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) is not well understood. Recent work has shown that when cells are exposed to nsPEF, ion permeable nanopores (2  nm) created by longer micro- and millisecond duration pulses. Nanoporation of the plasma membrane by nsPEF has been shown to cause a transient increase in intracellular calcium concentration within milliseconds after exposure. Our research objective is to determine the impact of nsPEF on calcium-dependent structural and repair systems in mammalian cells. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells were exposed in the presence and absence of calcium ions in the outside buffer to either 1 or 20, 600-ns duration electrical pulses at 16.2  kV/cm, and pore size was determined using propidium iodide and calcium green. Membrane organization was observed with morphological changes and increases in FM1-43 fluorescence. Migration of lysosomes, implicated in membrane repair, was followed using confocal microscopy of red fluorescent protein-tagged LAMP1. Microtubule structure was imaged using mEmerald-tubulin. We found that at high 600-ns PEF dosage, calcium-induced membrane restructuring and microtubule depolymerization coincide with interruption of membrane repair via lysosomal exocytosis.

  14. Self-Repair and Patterning of 2D Membrane-Like Peptoid Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiao, Fang [School of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241 China; Physical Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Chen, Yulin [Physical Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Jin, Haibao [Physical Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; He, Pingang [School of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241 China; Chen, Chun-Long [Physical Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; De Yoreo, James J. [Physical Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle WA 98195 USA

    2016-08-31

    Two-dimensional materials are of increasing interest for use in filtration, sensing, nanoelectronics, and biomedical devices. Peptoids are a class of biomimetic sequence-defined polymers for which certain amphiphillic sequences self-assemble into 2D crystalline materials with properties that mimic those of cell membranes. Using in situ AFM to both dissect these membrane-like materials and image their subsequent behavior, we explore their ability to self-repair on a range of solid substrates. We show that, in a suitable range of pH, self-repair occurs on both negatively and positively charged substrates and can even occur in the absence of an underlying surface. Following dissection of pre-assembled peptoid membranes and upon introduction of a peptoid monomer solution, peptoids repair the damage by assembling at the newly created edges. The speed of the advancing edge depends on the edge orientation, reflecting the two-fold symmetry of the underlying peptoid lattice. Moreover, because the membranes are stabilized by hydrophobic interactions, if the solution contains peptoids possessing an identical sequence in the hydrophobic block but a distinct hydrophilic block, filling of the defects creates membranes that are patterned at the nanoscale. Consequently, we can utilize this ability to create nm-sized patterns of distinct functional groups within a single coherent membrane.

  15. Probing and repairing damaged surfaces with nanoparticle-containing microcapsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratz, Katrina; Narasimhan, Amrit; Tangirala, Ravisubhash; Moon, Sungcheal; Revanur, Ravindra; Kundu, Santanu; Kim, Hyun Suk; Crosby, Alfred J.; Russell, Thomas P.; Emrick, Todd; Kolmakov, German; Balazs, Anna C.

    2012-02-01

    Nanoparticles have useful properties, but it is often important that they only start working after they are placed in a desired location. The encapsulation of nanoparticles allows their function to be preserved until they are released at a specific time or location, and this has been exploited in the development of self-healing materials and in applications such as drug delivery. Encapsulation has also been used to stabilize and control the release of substances, including flavours, fragrances and pesticides. We recently proposed a new technique for the repair of surfaces called `repair-and-go'. In this approach, a flexible microcapsule filled with a solution of nanoparticles rolls across a surface that has been damaged, stopping to repair any defects it encounters by releasing nanoparticles into them, then moving on to the next defect. Here, we experimentally demonstrate the repair-and-go approach using droplets of oil that are stabilized with a polymer surfactant and contain CdSe nanoparticles. We show that these microcapsules can find the cracks on a surface and selectively deliver the nanoparticle contents into the crack, before moving on to find the next crack. Although the microcapsules are too large to enter the cracks, their flexible walls allow them to probe and adhere temporarily to the interior of the cracks. The release of nanoparticles is made possible by the thin microcapsule wall (comparable to the diameter of the nanoparticles) and by the favourable (hydrophobic-hydrophobic) interactions between the nanoparticle and the cracked surface.

  16. Extra lethal damage due to residual incompletely repaired sublethal damage in hyperfractionated and continuous radiation treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J.; van de Geijn, J.; Goffman, T. (ROB, DCT, NCI, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (US))

    1991-05-01

    In the conventional linear--quadratic model of single-dose response, the {alpha} and {beta} terms reflect lethal damage created {ital during} the delivery of a dose, from two different presumed molecular processes, one linear with dose, the other quadratic. With the conventional one-fraction-per-day (or less) regimens, the sublethal damage (SLD), presumably repairing exponentially over time, is essentially completely fixed by the time of the next dose of radiation. If this assumption is true, the effects of subsequent fractions of radiation should be independent, that is, there should be little, if any, reversible damage left from previous fractions, at the time of the next dose. For multiple daily fractions, or for the limiting case, continuous radiation, this simplification may overlook damaged cells that have had insufficient time for repair. A generalized method is presented for accounting for extra lethal damage (ELD) arising from such residual SLD for hyperfractionation and continuous irradiation schemes. It may help to predict differences in toxicity and tumor control, if any, obtained with unconventional'' treatment regimens. A key element in the present model is the finite size and the dynamic character of the pool of sublethal damage. Besides creating the usual linear and quadratic components of lethal damage, each new fraction converts a certain fraction of the existing SLD into ELD, and creates some new SLD.

  17. DNA Mismatch Repair and Oxidative DNA Damage: Implications for Cancer Biology and Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bridge, Gemma; Rashid, Sukaina; Martin, Sarah A., E-mail: sarah.martin@qmul.ac.uk [Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, Charterhouse Square, London EC1M 6BQ (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-05

    Many components of the cell, including lipids, proteins and both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, are vulnerable to deleterious modifications caused by reactive oxygen species. If not repaired, oxidative DNA damage can lead to disease-causing mutations, such as in cancer. Base excision repair and nucleotide excision repair are the two DNA repair pathways believed to orchestrate the removal of oxidative lesions. However, recent findings suggest that the mismatch repair pathway may also be important for the response to oxidative DNA damage. This is particularly relevant in cancer where mismatch repair genes are frequently mutated or epigenetically silenced. In this review we explore how the regulation of oxidative DNA damage by mismatch repair proteins may impact on carcinogenesis. We discuss recent studies that identify potential new treatments for mismatch repair deficient tumours, which exploit this non-canonical role of mismatch repair using synthetic lethal targeting.

  18. Interplay between mechanisms of damage and repair in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadelmann, Christine; Brück, Wolfgang

    2008-03-01

    The neuropathology of multiple sclerosis is characterised by focal damage to white matter. However, tissue damage is also present in the cortical grey matter, with a particularly high prevalence of cortical demyelination being observed in secondary progressive and primary progressive forms of the disease. The presence of meningeal B-cell follicle-like structures, which frequently appear during the secondary progressive phase of disease, may be involved in the formation of these subpial cortical lesions. Diffuse white matter inflammation accompanied by axonal damage can also be observed in normal appearing white matter and, again, this is more prominent in chronic progressive forms of multiple sclerosis than in acute stages of disease. Axonal damage is a particularly important component of the pathology of multiple sclerosis and appears to be a critical determinant of clinical outcome. Axons appear to become vulnerable to injury as a result of loss of their myelin sheaths. Remyelination represents an important mechanism of tissue repair in multiple sclerosis and already occurs at an early stage of lesion development and in both white and grey matter lesions. The extent of remyelination appears to be greater in cortical lesions and in lesions further from the ventricles. There is important heterogeneity between patients in terms of the extent of remyelination, which may reflect underlying differences in pathogenetic mechanisms between patients.

  19. Recombinant human erythropoietin for repair of white matter damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhou; Xiao Rong; Li Tao; Weineng Lu

    2011-01-01

    Erythropoietin has been shown to exhibit neuroprotective effects in animal models. A neonatal rat model of hypoxic-ischemic white matter damage was established via bilateral carotid artery ligation in 4-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats. The rats were subsequently treated with recombinant human erythropoietin to observe pathological changes in the brain and long-term neurobehavioral functions before and after intervention. Results showed that the number of myelin basic protein-positive cells, which reflected myelin/oligodendrocyte damage, significantly increased, although the number of amyloid precursor protein-positive cells, which reflected axonal injury, significantly decreased in periventricular white matter at 72 hours and 7 days following erythropoietin intervention. The number of glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive cells, indicating astrocytic damage, significantly decreased in periventricular white matter of erythropoietin-treated rats at 48 hours, 72 hours, 7 days, and 26 days. Following erythropoietin intervention in the 30-day-old rats, head-turning time in the slope test was shortened and open-field test scores increased. These results suggested that erythropoietin promoted repair of white matter damage, as well as improved neurobehavioral functions in a rat model of hypoxic-ischemic injury.

  20. International congress on DNA damage and repair: Book of abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    This document contains the abstracts of 105 papers presented at the Congress. Topics covered include the Escherichia coli nucleotide excision repair system, DNA repair in malignant transformations, defective DNA repair, and gene regulation. (TEM)

  1. Potentially lethal damage repair by total and quiescent tumor cells following various DNA-damaging treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masunaga, Shin-ichiro; Ono, Koji; Suzuki, Minoru; Kinashi, Yuko; Takagaki, Masao [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst; Hori, Hitoshi; Kasai, Soko; Nagasawa, Hideko; Uto, Yoshihiro

    1999-08-01

    After continuous labeling of proliferating (P) cells with 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) for 5 days, SCC VII tumor-bearing mice received various kinds of DNA-damaging treatments: gamma-ray irradiation, tirapazamine (TPZ, hypoxia-specific cytotoxin) administration, or cisplatin injection. From 0.5 to 72 hr after treatment, tumors were excised, minced, and trypsinized. Single tumor cell suspensions were incubated for 48 hr with a cytokinesis-blocker, cytochalasin-B. Then, the micronucleus (MN) frequency for BrdU-unlabeled cells, quiescent (Q) cells at treatment, was determined using immunofluorescence staining for BrdU. The MN frequency for total (P+Q) cells was obtained from tumors that were not pretreated with BrdU labeling. The sensitivity to each DNA-damaging treatment was evaluated in terms of the frequency of induced micronuclei in binuclear tumor cells (MN frequency). Treatment with gamma-rays or cisplatin resulted in a larger MN frequency in total cells than in Q cells. In contrast, TPZ treatment produced a smaller MN frequency in total cells than in Q cells. Regardless of the treatment used, Q cells showed greater repair capacities than total cells. However, TPZ caused much smaller repair capacity in both total and Q cells, compared with gamma-rays or cisplatin. Gamma-rays and cisplatin produced similar repair patterns. Differences in sensitivity between total and Q cells and repair patterns of the two cell populations were thought to depend on differences between the two cell populations in the toxicity of the DNA-damaging treatment and distribution pattern of the anticancer agent. (author)

  2. Repair of postirradiation damage to colorectum: a progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bricker, E.M.; Johnston, W.D.; Patwardhan, R.V.

    1981-05-01

    The results of 21 operations for repair of rectovaginal fistula and/or stricture secondary to irradiation for pelvic cancer are presented. The operations rely on the use of proximal nonirradiated colon with normal blood supply for effecting the repair. In patients having had a previous colostomy, it is possible to use the proximal end of the bypassed colon for this purpose. There is minimal dissection of the rectal ampulla and the presacral space is never entered. Continuity is established by anastomosis to the anterior rectal wall via an abdominal approach alone, or by a combined abdominovaginal or abdominoperineal approach. It has been found that nonirradiated colon of normal vascularity can be expected to heal to irradiated colon or rectum, thus making the extensive resections associated with correction of these abnormalities unnecessary. The functional result in 18 of 19 patients who underwent this procedure was satisfactory to excellent. One patient had a poor result because of partial rectal incontinence. Two operations out of the 21 were total failures and one of these patients died of complications secondary to irradiation damage to the small intestine. One patient has not yet had final colostomy closure. The results are considered promising enough to warrant continued trial.

  3. 49 CFR 192.713 - Transmission lines: Permanent field repair of imperfections and damages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Maintenance § 192.713 Transmission lines: Permanent field repair of imperfections and damages. (a) Each imperfection or damage that impairs the serviceability of pipe in a steel transmission line operating at or... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Transmission lines: Permanent field repair...

  4. Role of Rad54, Rad54b and Snm1 in DNA damage repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Wesoly (Joanna)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of this thesis is to investigate the function of a number of genes involved in mammalian DNA damage repair, in particular in repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Among a large number of different damages that can be introduced to DNA, DSBs are especially toxic. If left unre

  5. Role of Rad54, Rad54b and Snm1 in DNA damage repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Wesoly (Joanna)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of this thesis is to investigate the function of a number of genes involved in mammalian DNA damage repair, in particular in repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Among a large number of different damages that can be introduced to DNA, DSBs are especially toxic. If

  6. DNA repair pathways in radiation induced cellular damage: a molecular approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.R. van Veelen (Lieneke)

    2005-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ DNA damage, especially double-strand breaks, can be induced by endogenous or exogenous darnaging agents, such as ionizing radiation. Repair of DNA damage is very important in maintaining genomic stability. Incorrect repair may lead to chromosomal aberrations,

  7. DNA repair pathways in radiation induced cellular damage: a molecular approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.R. van Veelen (Lieneke)

    2005-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ DNA damage, especially double-strand breaks, can be induced by endogenous or exogenous darnaging agents, such as ionizing radiation. Repair of DNA damage is very important in maintaining genomic stability. Incorrect repair may lead to chromosomal aberrations, translocat

  8. Helicobacter pylori Disrupts Host Cell Membranes, Initiating a Repair Response and Cell Proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsueh-Fen Juan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori, the human stomach pathogen, lives on the inner surface of the stomach and causes chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric cancer. Plasma membrane repair response is a matter of life and death for human cells against physical and biological damage. We here test the hypothesis that H. pylori also causes plasma membrane disruption injury, and that not only a membrane repair response but also a cell proliferation response are thereby activated. Vacuolating cytotoxin A (VacA and cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA have been considered to be major H. pylori virulence factors. Gastric cancer cells were infected with H. pylori wild type (vacA+/cagA+, single mutant (ΔvacA or ΔcagA or double mutant (ΔvacA/ΔcagA strains and plasma membrane disruption events and consequent activation of membrane repair components monitored. H. pylori disrupts the host cell plasma membrane, allowing localized dye and extracellular Ca2+ influx. Ca2+-triggered members of the annexin family, A1 and A4, translocate, in response to injury, to the plasma membrane, and cell surface expression of an exocytotic maker of repair, LAMP-2, increases. Additional forms of plasma membrane disruption, unrelated to H. pylori exposure, also promote host cell proliferation. We propose that H. pylori activation of a plasma membrane repair is pro-proliferative. This study might therefore provide new insight into potential mechanisms of H. pylori-induced gastric carcinogenesis.

  9. Mystery of DNA repair: the role of the MRN complex and ATM kinase in DNA damage repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czornak, Kamila; Chughtai, Sanaullah; Chrzanowska, Krystyna H

    2008-01-01

    Genomes are subject to a number of exogenous or endogenous DNA-damaging agents that cause DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). These critical DNA lesions can result in cell death or a wide variety of genetic alterations, including deletions, translocations, loss of heterozygosity, chromosome loss, or chromosome fusions, which enhance genome instability and can trigger carcinogenesis. The cells have developed an efficient mechanism to cope with DNA damages by evolving the DNA repair machinery. There are 2 major DSB repair mechanisms: nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). One element of the repair machinery is the MRN complex, consisting of MRE11, RAD50 and NBN (previously described as NBS1), which is involved in DNA replication, DNA repair, and signaling to the cell cycle checkpoints. A number of kinases, like ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated), ATR (ataxia-telangiectasia and Rad-3-related), and DNA PKcs (DNA protein kinase catalytic subunit), phosphorylate various protein targets in order to repair the damage. If the damage cannot be repaired, they direct the cell to apoptosis. The MRN complex as well as repair kinases are also involved in telomere maintenance and genome stability. The dysfunction of particular elements involved in the repair mechanisms leads to genome instability disorders, like ataxia telangiectasia (A-T), A-T-like disorder (ATLD) and Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS). The mutated genes responsible for these disorders code for proteins that play key roles in the process of DNA repair. Here we present a detailed review of current knowledge on the MRN complex, kinases engaged in DNA repair, and genome instability disorders.

  10. A matter of life or death: modeling DNA damage and repair in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karschau, Jens; de Almeida, Camila; Richard, Morgiane C; Miller, Samantha; Booth, Ian R; Grebogi, Celso; de Moura, Alessandro P S

    2011-02-16

    DNA damage is a hazard all cells must face, and evolution has created a number of mechanisms to repair damaged bases in the chromosome. Paradoxically, many of these repair mechanisms can create double-strand breaks in the DNA molecule which are fatal to the cell. This indicates that the connection between DNA repair and death is far from straightforward, and suggests that the repair mechanisms can be a double-edged sword. In this report, we formulate a mathematical model of the dynamics of DNA damage and repair, and we obtain analytical expressions for the death rate. We predict a counterintuitive relationship between survival and repair. We can discriminate between two phases: below a critical threshold in the number of repair enzymes, the half-life decreases with the number of repair enzymes, but becomes independent of the number of repair enzymes above the threshold. We are able to predict quantitatively the dependence of the death rate on the damage rate and other relevant parameters. We verify our analytical results by simulating the stochastic dynamics of DNA damage and repair. Finally, we also perform an experiment with Escherichia coli cells to test one of the predictions of our model.

  11. Plasma membrane repair: the adaptable cell life-insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Ana Joaquina; Perez, Franck

    2017-08-01

    The plasma membrane is the most basic element necessary for the cell to exist and be distinguishable from its environment. Regulated mechanisms allow tightly controlled communication between intacellular and extracellular medium allowing the maintenance of a specific biochemical environment, optimized for cellular functions. The anarchic and uncontrolled opening of a hole in the PM induces a change in the concentration of ions and oxidizing agents perturbing homeostasis. Fortunately, the cell possesses mechanisms that are capable of reacting to sudden extracellular medium entry and to block the leakage locally. Here we summarize the known mechanisms of membrane repair and how the size of the wound and the resulting calcium entry activates preferentially one or another mechanism adapted to the magnitude of the injury. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Assessment of Damage to Nucleic Acids and Repair Machinery in Salmonella typhimurium Exposed to Chlorine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Phe

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Water disinfection is usually evaluated using mandatory methods based on cell culturability. However, such methods do not consider the potential of cells to recover, which should also be kept as low as possible. In this paper, we hypothesized that a successful disinfection is achieved only when the applied chlorine leads to both intracellular nucleic acid damage and strong alterations of the DNA repair machinery. Monitoring the SOS system responsiveness with a umuC'-‘lacZ reporter fusion, we found that the expression of this important cellular machinery was altered after the beginning of membrane permeabilization but prior to the total decline of both the cell culturability and the nucleic acid integrity as revealed by Sybr-II staining. Rapid measurement of such nucleic acid alterations by fluorochrome-based staining could be used as an alternative method for assessing the effectiveness of disinfection with chlorine.

  13. DNA damage by reactive species: Mechanisms, mutation and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jena, N R

    2012-07-01

    DNA is continuously attacked by reactive species that can affect its structure and function severely. Structural modifications to DNA mainly arise from modifications in its bases that primarily occur due to their exposure to different reactive species. Apart from this, DNA strand break, inter- and intra-strand crosslinks and DNA-protein crosslinks can also affect the structure of DNA significantly. These structural modifications are involved in mutation, cancer and many other diseases. As it has the least oxidation potential among all the DNA bases, guanine is frequently attacked by reactive species, producing a plethora of lethal lesions. Fortunately, living cells are evolved with intelligent enzymes that continuously protect DNA from such damages. This review provides an overview of different guanine lesions formed due to reactions of guanine with different reactive species. Involvement of these lesions in inter- and intra-strand crosslinks, DNA-protein crosslinks and mutagenesis are discussed. How certain enzymes recognize and repair different guanine lesions in DNA are also presented.

  14. DNA damage by reactive species: Mechanisms, mutation and repair

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N R Jena

    2012-07-01

    DNA is continuously attacked by reactive species that can affect its structure and function severely. Structural modifications to DNA mainly arise from modifications in its bases that primarily occur due to their exposure to different reactive species. Apart from this, DNA strand break, inter- and intra-strand crosslinks and DNA–protein crosslinks can also affect the structure of DNA significantly. These structural modifications are involved in mutation, cancer and many other diseases. As it has the least oxidation potential among all the DNA bases, guanine is frequently attacked by reactive species, producing a plethora of lethal lesions. Fortunately, living cells are evolved with intelligent enzymes that continuously protect DNA from such damages. This review provides an overview of different guanine lesions formed due to reactions of guanine with different reactive species. Involvement of these lesions in inter- and intra-strand crosslinks, DNA–protein crosslinks and mutagenesis are discussed. How certain enzymes recognize and repair different guanine lesions in DNA are also presented.

  15. GENETIC AND MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF DNA DAMAGE REPAIR AND TOLERANCE PATHWAYS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SUTHERLAND, B.M.

    2001-07-26

    Radiation can damage cellular components, including DNA. Organisms have developed a panoply of means of dealing with DNA damage. Some repair paths have rather narrow substrate specificity (e.g. photolyases), which act on specific pyrimidine photoproducts in a specific type (e.g., DNA) and conformation (double-stranded B conformation) of nucleic acid. Others, for example, nucleotide excision repair, deal with larger classes of damages, in this case bulky adducts in DNA. A detailed discussion of DNA repair mechanisms is beyond the scope of this article, but one can be found in the excellent book of Friedberg et al. [1] for further detail. However, some DNA damages and paths for repair of those damages important for photobiology will be outlined below as a basis for the specific examples of genetic and molecular analysis that will be presented below.

  16. Nicotinamide enhances repair of ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage in primary melanocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Benjamin C; Surjana, Devita; Halliday, Gary M; Damian, Diona L

    2014-07-01

    Cutaneous melanoma is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Nicotinamide is a safe, widely available vitamin that reduces the immune suppressive effects of UV, enhances DNA repair in keratinocytes and has shown promise in the chemoprevention of non-melanoma skin cancer. Here, we report the effect of nicotinamide on DNA damage and repair in primary human melanocytes. Nicotinamide significantly enhanced the repair of oxidative DNA damage (8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine) and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers induced by UV exposure. It also enhanced the repair of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine induced by the culture conditions in unirradiated melanocytes. A significant increase in the percentage of melanocytes undergoing unscheduled but not scheduled DNA synthesis was observed, confirming that nicotinamide enhances DNA repair in human melanocytes. In summary, nicotinamide, by enhancing DNA repair in melanocytes, is a potential agent for the chemoprevention of cutaneous melanoma.

  17. Self-repairing of material damage. Sonsho wo jiko shufuku yokushisuru zairyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuoka, S. (National Research Inst. for Metals, Tsukuba (Japan))

    1994-07-01

    In order to control the damage like crack or void formed during the use of structural material by the material itself, it is required to self-detect the damage, to self-judge the state of damage, and to self-control or self-repair the damage finally. Based on the parameter of length, the repair and control is classified into the 1mm-scale functional fine wire and thin film utilization type, 1[mu]m-scale microcapsule type, and 1nm-scale trace element utilization type. For the damage repair and control of functional fine wire and thin film utilization type, the damage is repaired and controlled by pasting thin film or by embedding fine wire of functional material, such as shape memory alloy, Ti-Ni, and piezoelectric ceramics PZT (lead zirconate titanate), on the material surface or inside the material. For the damage repair and control of microcapsule type, is illustrated the control mechanism of high temperature fatigue crack propagation by Y2O3 particles dispersed in the Fe-20Cr alloy. Furthermore, the formation mechanism of self-repairing film by the trace element is also illustrated. 13 refs., 5 figs.

  18. REPAIR TECHNOLOGY OF THE COMPOSITE WING OF A LIGHT PLANE DAMAGED DURING AN AIRCRAFT CRASH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej ŚWIĄTONIOWSKI

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The increasing use of composite structures in aircraft constructions has made it necessary to develop repair methods that will restore the component’s original design strength without compromising its structural integrity. In this paper, the complex repair technology of the composite wing of a light plane, which was damaged during an aircraft crash, is described. The applied repair scheme should meet all the original design requirements for the plane structure.

  19. Study on Repaired Earthquake-Damaged Bridge Piers under Seismic Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Deng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The concrete bridge pier damaged during earthquakes need be repaired to meet the design standards. Steel tube as a traditional material or FRP as a novel material has become popular to repair the damaged reinforced concrete (RC bridge piers. In this paper, experimental and finite element (FE studies are employed to analyze the confinement effectiveness of the different repair materials. The FE method was used to calculate the hysteretic behavior of three predamaged circle RC bridge piers repaired with steel tube, basalt fiber reinforced polymer (BFRP, and carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP, respectively. Meanwhile, the repaired predamaged circle concrete bridge piers were tested by pseudo-static cyclic loading to study the seismic behavior and evaluate the confinement effectiveness of the different repair materials and techniques. The FE analysis and experimental results showed that the repaired piers had similar hysteretic curves with the original specimens and all the three repair techniques can restore the seismic performance of the earthquake-damaged piers. Steel tube jacketing can significantly improve the lateral stiffness and peak load of the damaged pier, while the BFRP and CFRP sheets cannot improve these properties due to their thin thickness.

  20. Repair of corrosion-damaged columns using FRP wraps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiyasi, Mohamad Imad

    Many bridge columns in Michigan are damaged by chloride contamination resulting in the corrosion of the steel reinforcement, and swelling and spalling of the concrete and use of the bridges is typically continued. This in itself may not be a serious problem since most columns in Michigan are over-designed and the loss of strength is not a significant issue. However, the lack of any method to minimize or prevent corrosion of the steel results in continued deterioration and unsightly columns. Polymer composite (also known as fiber-reinforced polymer or FRP) jackets offer a possible remedy to this problem. They offer a rapid repair technique with the potential to enhance the longterm durability and compression strength of damaged columns due to the confinement that is provided when fibers are oriented in the hoop direction. Fibers oriented in the vertical direction can enhance the bending strength. Experiments were conducted to assess the effects of using FRP wraps with fibers oriented in the hoop direction for rehabilitating corrosion-damaged columns. Issues that were explored are: (1) effect of freeze-thaw and wet-dry cycles on the properties of FRP panels; (2) freeze-thaw durability of concrete square and cylindrical specimens wrapped with glass and carbon FRP and subjected to an internal expansive force; and (3) effect of wrapping on the rate of corrosion in an accelerated corrosion test. The results of the freeze-thaw experiment indicate that freeze-thaw cycles have no statistically significant effect on the compressive strength of glass and carbon wrapped specimens. For round specimens, glass and carbon wraps increased the strength by a factor of about 2.3 and 2.6, respectively. For square specimens, glass and carbon wraps increased the strength by a factor of 1.4--1.5. Freeze-thaw conditioning generally reduced the longitudinal failure strain of wrapped specimens. The square wrapped specimens had lower compressive strength compared to the round specimens, even

  1. Non-DBS DNA Repair Genes Regulate Radiation-induced Cytogenetic Damage Repair and Cell Cycle Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry H.; Emami, Kamal; Casey, Rachael; Wu, Honglu

    2008-01-01

    Changes of gene expression profile are one of the most important biological responses in living cells after ionizing radiation (IR) exposure. Although some studies have shown that genes up-regulated by IR may play important roles in DNA damage repair, the relationship between the regulation of gene expression by IR, particularly genes not known for their roles in DSB repair, and its impact on cytogenetic responses has not been systematically studied. In the present study, the expression of 25 genes selected on the basis of their transcriptional changes in response to IR was individually knocked down by transfection with small interfering RNA in human fibroblast cells. The purpose of this study is to identify new roles of these selected genes on regulating DSB repair and cell cycle progression , as measured in the micronuclei formation and chromosome aberration. In response to IR, the formation of MN was significantly increased by suppressed expression of 5 genes: Ku70 in the DSB repair pathway, XPA in the NER pathway, RPA1 in the MMR pathway, and RAD17 and RBBP8 in cell cycle control. Knocked-down expression of 4 genes (MRE11A, RAD51 in the DSB pathway, SESN1, and SUMO1) significantly inhibited cell cycle progression, possibly because of severe impairment of DNA damage repair. Furthermore, loss of XPA, P21, or MLH1 expression resulted in both significantly enhanced cell cycle progression and increased yields of chromosome aberrations, indicating that these gene products modulate both cell cycle control and DNA damage repair. Most of the 11 genes that affected cytogenetic responses are not known to have clear roles influencing DBS repair. Nine of these 11 genes were up-regulated in cells exposed to gamma radiation, suggesting that genes transcriptionally modulated by IR were critical to regulate the biological consequences after IR.

  2. Non-DBS DNA Repair Genes Regulate Radiation-induced Cytogenetic Damage Repair and Cell Cycle Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry H.; Emami, Kamal; Casey, Rachael; Wu, Honglu

    2008-01-01

    Changes of gene expression profile are one of the most important biological responses in living cells after ionizing radiation (IR) exposure. Although some studies have shown that genes up-regulated by IR may play important roles in DNA damage repair, the relationship between the regulation of gene expression by IR, particularly genes not known for their roles in DSB repair, and its impact on cytogenetic responses has not been systematically studied. In the present study, the expression of 25 genes selected on the basis of their transcriptional changes in response to IR was individually knocked down by transfection with small interfering RNA in human fibroblast cells. The purpose of this study is to identify new roles of these selected genes on regulating DSB repair and cell cycle progression , as measured in the micronuclei formation and chromosome aberration. In response to IR, the formation of MN was significantly increased by suppressed expression of 5 genes: Ku70 in the DSB repair pathway, XPA in the NER pathway, RPA1 in the MMR pathway, and RAD17 and RBBP8 in cell cycle control. Knocked-down expression of 4 genes (MRE11A, RAD51 in the DSB pathway, SESN1, and SUMO1) significantly inhibited cell cycle progression, possibly because of severe impairment of DNA damage repair. Furthermore, loss of XPA, P21, or MLH1 expression resulted in both significantly enhanced cell cycle progression and increased yields of chromosome aberrations, indicating that these gene products modulate both cell cycle control and DNA damage repair. Most of the 11 genes that affected cytogenetic responses are not known to have clear roles influencing DBS repair. Nine of these 11 genes were up-regulated in cells exposed to gamma radiation, suggesting that genes transcriptionally modulated by IR were critical to regulate the biological consequences after IR.

  3. PARP-1: Friend or Foe of DNA Damage and Repair in Tumorigenesis?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swindall, Amanda F.; Stanley, Jennifer A. [Department of Radiation Oncology Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine, 176F HSROC Suite 2232B, 1700 6th Avenue South, Birmingham, AL 35249 (United States); Yang, Eddy S., E-mail: eyang@uab.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine, 176F HSROC Suite 2232B, 1700 6th Avenue South, Birmingham, AL 35249 (United States); Department of Cell, Developmental and Integrative Biology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35249 (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35249 (United States)

    2013-07-26

    Oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species can result in DNA damage within cells and subsequently increase risk for carcinogenesis. This may be averted by repair of DNA damage through the base or nucleotide excision repair (BER/NER) pathways. PARP, a BER protein, is known for its role in DNA-repair. However, multiple lesions can occur within a small range of DNA, known as oxidative clustered DNA lesions (OCDLs), which are difficult to repair and may lead to the more severe DNA double-strand break (DSB). Inefficient DSB repair can then result in increased mutagenesis and neoplastic transformation. OCDLs occur more frequently within a variety of tumor tissues. Interestingly, PARP is highly expressed in several human cancers. Additionally, chronic inflammation may contribute to tumorigenesis through ROS-induced DNA damage. Furthermore, PARP can modulate inflammation through interaction with NFκB and regulating the expression of inflammatory signaling molecules. Thus, the upregulation of PARP may present a double-edged sword. PARP is needed to repair ROS-induced DNA lesions, but PARP expression may lead to increased inflammation via upregulation of NFκB signaling. Here, we discuss the role of PARP in the repair of oxidative damage versus the formation of OCDLs and speculate on the feasibility of PARP inhibition for the treatment and prevention of cancers by exploiting its role in inflammation.

  4. Self-Repairing Membranes for Inflatable Structures Inspired by a Rapid Wound Sealing Process of Climbing Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Markus Rampf; Olga Speck; Thomas Speck; Rolf H. Luchsinger

    2011-01-01

    A new self-repairing membrane for inflatable light weight structures such as rubber boats or Tensairity(R) constructions is presented. Inspired by rapid self-sealing processes in plants, a thin soft cellular polyurethane foam coating is applied on the inside of a fabric substrate, which closes the fissure if the membrane is punctured with a spike. Experimental tests are carried out with a purpose built setup by measuring the air mass flow through a leak in a damaged membrane sample. It is shown that the weight per unit area of the self-repairing foam as well as the curing of the two component PU-foam under an overpressure influence the repair efficiency. Curing the foam under overpressure affects the relative density as well as the microstructure of the foam coatings. Maximal median repair efficiencies of 0.999 have been obtained with 0.16 g·cm-2 foam cured at 1 bar overpressure. These results suggest that the bio-inspired technique has the potential to extend the functional integrity of injured inflatable structures dramatically.

  5. DNA Repair and the Accumulation of Oxidatively Damaged DNA Are Affected by Fruit Intake in Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Croteau, Deborah L; de Souza-Pinto, Nadja C; Harboe, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    Aging is associated with elevated oxidative stress and DNA damage. To achieve healthy aging, we must begin to understand how diet affects cellular processes. We postulated that fruit-enriched diets might initiate a program of enhanced DNA repair and thereby improve genome integrity. C57Bl/6 J mice...... were fed for 14 weeks a control diet or a diet with 8% peach or nectarine extract. The activities of DNA repair enzymes, the level of DNA damage, and gene expression changes were measured. Our study showed that repair of various oxidative DNA lesions was more efficient in liver extracts derived from......-fed mice. Taken together, these results suggest that an increased intake of fruits might modulate the efficiency of DNA repair, resulting in altered levels of DNA damage....

  6. Rapid repair of severely earthquake-damaged bridge piers with flexural-shear failure mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhiguo; Wang, Dongsheng; Du, Xiuli; Si, Bingjun

    2011-12-01

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate the feasibility of a proposed rapid repair technique for severely earthquake-damaged bridge piers with flexural-shear failure mode. Six circular pier specimens were first tested to severe damage in flexural-shear mode and repaired using early-strength concrete with high-fluidity and carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRP). After about four days, the repaired specimens were tested to failure again. The seismic behavior of the repaired specimens was evaluated and compared to the original specimens. Test results indicate that the proposed repair technique is highly effective. Both shear strength and lateral displacement of the repaired piers increased when compared to the original specimens, and the failure mechanism of the piers shifted from flexural-shear failure to ductile flexural failure. Finally, a simple design model based on the Seible formulation for post-earthquake repair design was compared to the experimental results. It is concluded that the design equation for bridge pier strengthening before an earthquake could be applicable to seismic repairs after an earthquake if the shear strength contribution of the spiral bars in the repaired piers is disregarded and 1.5 times more FRP sheets is provided.

  7. DNA repair decline during mouse spermiogenesis results in the accumulation of heritable DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchetti, Francesco; Marchetti, Francesco; Wryobek, Andrew J

    2008-02-21

    The post-meiotic phase of mouse spermatogenesis (spermiogenesis) is very sensitive to the genomic effects of environmental mutagens because as male germ cells form mature sperm they progressively lose the ability to repair DNA damage. We hypothesized that repeated exposures to mutagens during this repair-deficient phase result in the accumulation of heritable genomic damage in mouse sperm that leads to chromosomal aberrations in zygotes after fertilization. We used a combination of single or fractionated exposures to diepoxybutane (DEB), a component of tobacco smoke, to investigate how differential DNA repair efficiencies during the three weeks of spermiogenesis affected the accumulation of DEB-induced heritable damage in early spermatids (21-15 days before fertilization, dbf), late spermatids (14-8 dbf) and sperm (7- 1 dbf). Analysis of chromosomalaberrations in zygotic metaphases using PAINT/DAPI showed that late spermatids and sperm are unable to repair DEB-induced DNA damage as demonstrated by significant increases (P<0.001) in the frequencies of zygotes with chromosomal aberrations. Comparisons between single and fractionated exposures suggested that the DNA repair-deficient window during late spermiogenesis may be less than two weeks in the mouse and that during this repair-deficient window there is accumulation of DNA damage in sperm. Finally, the dose-response study in sperm indicated a linear response for both single and repeated exposures. These findings show that the differential DNA repair capacity of post-meioitic male germ cells has a major impact on the risk of paternally transmitted heritable damage and suggest that chronic exposures that may occur in the weeks prior to fertilization because of occupational or lifestyle factors (i.e, smoking) can lead to an accumulation of genetic damage in sperm and result in heritable chromosomal aberrations of paternal origin.

  8. DNA Repair Decline During Mouse Spermiogenesis Results in the Accumulation of Heritable DNA Damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchetti, Francesco; Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2007-12-01

    The post-meiotic phase of mouse spermatogenesis (spermiogenesis) is very sensitive to the genomic effects of environmental mutagens because as male germ cells form mature sperm they progressively lose the ability to repair DNA damage. We hypothesized that repeated exposures to mutagens during this repair-deficient phase result in the accumulation of heritable genomic damage in mouse sperm that leads to chromosomal aberrations in zygotes after fertilization. We used a combination of single or fractionated exposures to diepoxybutane (DEB), a component of tobacco smoke, to investigate how differential DNA repair efficiencies during the three weeks of spermiogenesis affected the accumulation of DEB-induced heritable damage in early spermatids (21-15 days before fertilization, dbf), late spermatids (14-8 dbf) and sperm (7-1 dbf). Analysis of chromosomal aberrations in zygotic metaphases using PAINT/DAPI showed that late spermatids and sperm are unable to repair DEB-induced DNA damage as demonstrated by significant increases (P<0.001) in the frequencies of zygotes with chromosomal aberrations. Comparisons between single and fractionated exposures suggested that the DNA repair-deficient window during late spermiogenesis may be less than two weeks in the mouse and that during this repair-deficient window there is accumulation of DNA damage in sperm. Finally, the dose-response study in sperm indicated a linear response for both single and repeated exposures. These findings show that the differential DNA repair capacity of post-meioitic male germ cells has a major impact on the risk of paternally transmitted heritable damage and suggest that chronic exposures that may occur in the weeks prior to fertilization because of occupational or lifestyle factors (i.e, smoking) can lead to an accumulation of genetic damage in sperm and result in heritable chromosomal aberrations of paternal origin.

  9. Repair of traumatic plasmalemmal damage to neurons and other eukar yotic cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    George D. Bittner; Christopher S. Spaeth§; Andrew D. Poon; Zachary S. Burgess; Christopher H. McGill

    2016-01-01

    The repair (sealing) of plasmalemmal damage, consisting of small holes to complete transections, is criti-cal for cell survival, especially for neurons that rarely regenerate cell bodies. We ifrst describe and evaluate different measures of cell sealing. Some measures, including morphological/ultra-structural observations, membrane potential, and input resistance, provide very ambiguous assessments of plasmalemmal sealing. In contrast, measures of ionic current lfow and dye barriers can, if appropriately used, provide more ac-curate assessments. We describe the effects of various substances (calcium, calpains, cytoskeletal proteins, ESCRT proteins, mUNC-13, NSF, PEG) and biochemical pathways (PKA, PKC, PLC, Epac, cytosolic ox-idation) on plasmalemmal sealing probability, and suggest that substances, pathways, and cellular events associated with plasmalemmal sealing have undergone a very conservative evolution. During sealing, calcium ion inlfux mobilizes vesicles and other membranous structures (lysosomes, mitochondria, etc.) in a continuous fashion to form a vesicular plug that gradually restricts diffusion of increasingly smaller molecules and ions over a period of seconds to minutes. Furthermore, we find no direct evidence that sealing occurs through the collapse and fusion of severed plasmalemmal lealfets, or in a single step involv-ing the fusion of one large wound vesicle with the nearby, undamaged plasmalemma. We describe how increases in perikaryal calcium levels following axonal transection account for observations that cell body survival decreases the closer an axon is transected to the perikaryon. Finally, we speculate on relationships between plasmalemmal sealing, Wallerian degeneration, and the ability of polyethylene glycol (PEG) to seal cell membranes and rejoin severed axonal ends–an important consideration for the future treatment of trauma to peripheral nerves. A better knowledge of biochemical pathways and cytoplasmic structures in-volved in

  10. Repair of traumatic plasmalemmal damage to neurons and other eukaryotic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George D Bittner

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The repair (sealing of plasmalemmal damage, consisting of small holes to complete transections, is critical for cell survival, especially for neurons that rarely regenerate cell bodies. We first describe and evaluate different measures of cell sealing. Some measures, including morphological/ultra-structural observations, membrane potential, and input resistance, provide very ambiguous assessments of plasmalemmal sealing. In contrast, measures of ionic current flow and dye barriers can, if appropriately used, provide more accurate assessments. We describe the effects of various substances (calcium, calpains, cytoskeletal proteins, ESCRT proteins, mUNC-13, NSF, PEG and biochemical pathways (PKA, PKC, PLC, Epac, cytosolic oxidation on plasmalemmal sealing probability, and suggest that substances, pathways, and cellular events associated with plasmalemmal sealing have undergone a very conservative evolution. During sealing, calcium ion influx mobilizes vesicles and other membranous structures (lysosomes, mitochondria, etc. in a continuous fashion to form a vesicular plug that gradually restricts diffusion of increasingly smaller molecules and ions over a period of seconds to minutes. Furthermore, we find no direct evidence that sealing occurs through the collapse and fusion of severed plasmalemmal leaflets, or in a single step involving the fusion of one large wound vesicle with the nearby, undamaged plasmalemma. We describe how increases in perikaryal calcium levels following axonal transection account for observations that cell body survival decreases the closer an axon is transected to the perikaryon. Finally, we speculate on relationships between plasmalemmal sealing, Wallerian degeneration, and the ability of polyethylene glycol (PEG to seal cell membranes and rejoin severed axonal ends – an important consideration for the future treatment of trauma to peripheral nerves. A better knowledge of biochemical pathways and cytoplasmic structures

  11. Damage induced by continued corrosion in concrete repair systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luckovic, M.; Savija, B.; Schlangen, E.

    2014-01-01

    Corrosion of steel reinforcement is the main cause of deterioration in reinforced concrete structures. After the repair, corrosion of the steel might continue and even accelerate. While the development of the corrosion cell depends on many parameters and is difficult to control, the occurrence of vi

  12. MOF and H4 K16 Acetylation Play Important Roles in DNA Damage Repair by Modulating Recruitment of DNA Damage Repair Protein Mdc1 ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangzhi; Corsa, Callie Ann Sprunger; Pan, Patricia W.; Wu, Lipeng; Ferguson, David; Yu, Xiaochun; Min, Jinrong; Dou, Yali

    2010-01-01

    MOF (MYST1) is the major enzyme to catalyze acetylation of histone H4 lysine 16 (K16) and is highly conserved through evolution. Using a conditional knockout mouse model and the derived mouse embryonic fibroblast cell lines, we showed that loss of Mof led to a global reduction of H4 K16 acetylation, severe G2/M cell cycle arrest, massive chromosome aberration, and defects in ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage repair. We further showed that although early DNA damage sensing and signaling by ATM were normal in Mof-null cells, the recruitment of repair mediator protein Mdc1 and its downstream signaling proteins 53bp1 and Brca1 to DNA damage foci was completely abolished. Mechanistic studies suggested that Mof-mediated H4 K16 acetylation and an intact acidic pocket on H2A.X were essential for the recruitment of Mdc1. Removal of Mof and its associated proteins phenocopied a charge-neutralizing mutant of H2A.X. Given the well-characterized H4-H2A trans interactions in regulating higher-order chromatin structure, our study revealed a novel chromatin-based mechanism that regulates the DNA damage repair process. PMID:20837706

  13. Nucleotide Excision Repair and Transcription-coupled DNA Repair Abrogate the Impact of DNA Damage on Transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadkarni, Aditi; Burns, John A; Gandolfi, Alberto; Chowdhury, Moinuddin A; Cartularo, Laura; Berens, Christian; Geacintov, Nicholas E; Scicchitano, David A

    2016-01-01

    DNA adducts derived from carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons like benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) and benzo[c]phenanthrene (B[c]Ph) impede replication and transcription, resulting in aberrant cell division and gene expression. Global nucleotide excision repair (NER) and transcription-coupled DNA repair (TCR) are among the DNA repair pathways that evolved to maintain genome integrity by removing DNA damage. The interplay between global NER and TCR in repairing the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-derived DNA adducts (+)-trans-anti-B[a]P-N(6)-dA, which is subject to NER and blocks transcription in vitro, and (+)-trans-anti-B[c]Ph-N(6)-dA, which is a poor substrate for NER but also blocks transcription in vitro, was tested. The results show that both adducts inhibit transcription in human cells that lack both NER and TCR. The (+)-trans-anti-B[a]P-N(6)-dA lesion exhibited no detectable effect on transcription in cells proficient in NER but lacking TCR, indicating that NER can remove the lesion in the absence of TCR, which is consistent with in vitro data. In primary human cells lacking NER, (+)-trans-anti-B[a]P-N(6)-dA exhibited a deleterious effect on transcription that was less severe than in cells lacking both pathways, suggesting that TCR can repair the adduct but not as effectively as global NER. In contrast, (+)-trans-anti-B[c]Ph-N(6)-dA dramatically reduces transcript production in cells proficient in global NER but lacking TCR, indicating that TCR is necessary for the removal of this adduct, which is consistent with in vitro data showing that it is a poor substrate for NER. Hence, both global NER and TCR enhance the recovery of gene expression following DNA damage, and TCR plays an important role in removing DNA damage that is refractory to NER.

  14. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia: To repair on or off extracorporeal membrane oxygenation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Keijzer (Richard); D.E. Wilschut (Dorien); R.J.M. Houmes (Robert Jan); K. van de Ven (Kees); L. de Jongste-van den Hout (Lieke); I. Sluijter (Ilona); P. Rycus (Peter); N.M.A. Bax (Klaas); D. Tibboel (Dick)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) can be repaired on or off extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). In many centers, operating off ECMO is advocated to prevent bleeding complications. We aimed to compare surgery-related bleeding complications between repair on or off

  15. Repair of Pd/α-Al2O3 composite membrane with defects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李安武; 熊国兴

    1999-01-01

    A palladium composite membrane with a large number of defects was repaired using the electroless plating combined with the technique of osmosis. The loose structure of palladium film prepared by the conventional electroless plating was densified. Defects were repaired. Hydrogen selectivity was thus significantly increased without significantly increasing palladium film thickness and reducing hydrogen permeability.

  16. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia: To repair on or off extracorporeal membrane oxygenation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Keijzer (Richard); D.E. Wilschut (Dorien); R.J.M. Houmes (Robert Jan); K. van de Ven (Kees); L. de Jongste-van den Hout (Lieke); I. Sluijter (Ilona); P. Rycus (Peter); N.M.A. Bax (Klaas); D. Tibboel (Dick)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) can be repaired on or off extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). In many centers, operating off ECMO is advocated to prevent bleeding complications. We aimed to compare surgery-related bleeding complications between repair on or off

  17. Living with cracks: Damage and repair in human bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, David; Hazenberg, Jan G.; Lee, T. Clive

    2007-04-01

    Our bones are full of cracks, which form and grow as a result of daily loading activities. Bone is the major structural material in our bodies. Although weaker than many engineering materials, it has one trick that keeps it ahead - it can repair itself. Small cracks, which grow under cyclic stresses by the mechanism of fatigue, can be detected and removed before they become long enough to be dangerous. This article reviews the work that has been done to understand how cracks form and grow in bone, and how they can be detected and repaired in a timely manner. This is truly an interdisciplinary research field, requiring the close cooperation of materials scientists, biologists and engineers.

  18. Estimating the effect of human base excision repair protein variants on the repair of oxidative DNA base damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokhansanj, Bahrad A; Wilson, David M

    2006-05-01

    Epidemiologic studies have revealed a complex association between human genetic variance and cancer risk. Quantitative biological modeling based on experimental data can play a critical role in interpreting the effect of genetic variation on biochemical pathways relevant to cancer development and progression. Defects in human DNA base excision repair (BER) proteins can reduce cellular tolerance to oxidative DNA base damage caused by endogenous and exogenous sources, such as exposure to toxins and ionizing radiation. If not repaired, DNA base damage leads to cell dysfunction and mutagenesis, consequently leading to cancer, disease, and aging. Population screens have identified numerous single-nucleotide polymorphism variants in many BER proteins and some have been purified and found to exhibit mild kinetic defects. Epidemiologic studies have led to conflicting conclusions on the association between single-nucleotide polymorphism variants in BER proteins and cancer risk. Using experimental data for cellular concentration and the kinetics of normal and variant BER proteins, we apply a previously developed and tested human BER pathway model to (i) estimate the effect of mild variants on BER of abasic sites and 8-oxoguanine, a prominent oxidative DNA base modification, (ii) identify ranges of variation associated with substantial BER capacity loss, and (iii) reveal nonintuitive consequences of multiple simultaneous variants. Our findings support previous work suggesting that mild BER variants have a minimal effect on pathway capacity whereas more severe defects and simultaneous variation in several BER proteins can lead to inefficient repair and potentially deleterious consequences of cellular damage.

  19. Solid protein solder-doped biodegradable polymer membranes for laser-assisted tissue repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Diane E.; McNally-Heintzelman, Karen M.; Welch, Ashley J.

    2000-05-01

    Solid protein solder-doped polymer membranes have been developed for laser-assisted tissue repair. Biodegradable polymer films of controlled porosity were fabricated with poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) using a solvent-casting and particulate-leaching technique. The films provided a porous scaffold that readily absorbed the traditional protein solder mix composed of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and indocyanine green (ICG) dye. In vitro investigations were conducted to assess the influence of various processing parameters on the strength of tissue repairs formed using the new membranes. These parameters included the PLGA copolymer and PLGA/PEG blend ratio, the salt particle size, the initial bovine serum albumin (BSA) weight fraction, and the laser irradiance used to denature the solder. Altering the PLGA copolymer ratio had little effect on repair strength, however, it influenced the membrane degradation rate. Repair strength increased with increased membrane pore size and BSA concentration. The addition of PEG during the film casting stage increased the flexibility of the membranes but not necessarily the repair strength. The repair strength increased with increasing irradiance from 12 W/cm2 to 15 W/cm2. The new solder-doped polymer membranes provide all of the benefits associated with solid protein solders including high repair strength and improved edge coaptation. In addition, the flexible and moldable nature of the new membranes offer the capability of tailoring the membranes to a wide range of tissue geometries, and consequently, improved clinical applicability of laser- assisted tissue repair.

  20. The Cartography of UV-induced DNA Damage Formation and DNA Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jinchuan; Adar, Sheera

    2017-01-01

    DNA damage presents a barrier to DNA-templated biochemical processes, including gene expression and faithful DNA replication. Compromised DNA repair leads to mutations, enhancing the risk for genetic diseases and cancer development. Conventional experimental approaches to study DNA damage required a researcher to choose between measuring bulk damage over the entire genome, with little or no resolution regarding a specific location, and obtaining data specific to a locus of interest, without a global perspective. Recent advances in high-throughput genomic tools overcame these limitations and provide high-resolution measurements simultaneously across the genome. In this review, we discuss the available methods for measuring DNA damage and their repair, focusing on genomewide assays for pyrimidine photodimers, the major types of damage induced by ultraviolet irradiation. These new genomic assays will be a powerful tool in identifying key components of genome stability and carcinogenesis. © 2016 The American Society of Photobiology.

  1. Comparative DNA Damage and Repair in Echinoderm Coelomocytes Exposed to Genotoxicants

    OpenAIRE

    El-Bibany, Ameena H.; Bodnar, Andrea G.; Reinardy, Helena C.

    2014-01-01

    The capacity to withstand and repair DNA damage differs among species and plays a role in determining an organism's resistance to genotoxicity, life history, and susceptibility to disease. Environmental stressors that affect organisms at the genetic level are of particular concern in ecotoxicology due to the potential for chronic effects and trans-generational impacts on populations. Echinoderms are valuable organisms to study the relationship between DNA repair and resistance to genotoxic st...

  2. Association between age and repair of oxidatively damaged DNA in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løhr, Mille; Jensen, Annie; Eriksen, Louise

    2015-01-01

    It has been hypothesised that positive associations between age and levels of oxidative stress-generated damage to DNA may be related to an age-dependent decline in DNA repair activity. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between age and repair activity of oxidatively...... assay. There was an inverse association between age and DNA repair activity with a 0.65% decline in activity per year from age 18 to 83 (95% confidence interval: 0.16-1.14% per year). Univariate regression analysis also indicated inverse associations between DNA repair activity and waist-hip ratio (P...... indicating that the decline in repair activity was not mediated by metabolic risk factors. In summary...

  3. The 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry The Discovery of Essential Mechanisms that Repair DNA Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Tomas; Modrich, Paul; Sancar, Aziz

    2016-01-01

    The Royal Swedish Academy awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for 2015 to Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich and Aziz Sancar for their discoveries in fundamental mechanisms of DNA repair. This pioneering research described three different essential pathways that correct DNA damage, safeguard the integrity of the genetic code to ensure its accurate replication through generations, and allow proper cell division. Working independently of each other, Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich and Aziz Sancar delineated the mechanisms of base excision repair, mismatch repair and nucleotide excision repair, respectively. These breakthroughs challenged and dismissed the early view that the DNA molecule was very stable, paving the way for the discovery of human hereditary diseases associated with distinct DNA repair deficiencies and a susceptibility to cancer. It also brought a deeper understanding of cancer as well as neurodegenerative or neurological diseases, and let to novel strategies to treat cancer.

  4. Optical modulation study of repaired damage morphologies of fused silica by scalar diffraction theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Zhou, Qingyan; Jiang, Yong; Xiang, Xia; Liao, Wei; Jiang, Xiaolong; Wang, Haijun; Luan, Xiaoyu; Zheng, Wanguo; Yuan, Xiaodong

    2017-01-01

    The cone and Gaussian repaired damage craters are two typical morphologies induced by CO2 laser evaporation and nonevaporation technologies. The mathematical models are built for these two types of repaired craters, and the light modulation at 355 nm induced by the millimeter-scale repaired damage morphology is studied by scalar diffraction theory. The results show that the modulation of the Gaussian repaired morphology has one peak and then decreases with the increasing distance from 0 to 30 cm. While the modulation for cone repaired morphology remains stable after decreasing quickly with the increasing distance. When the horizontal radius increases, the modulation looks like a saw-tooth. However, the modulation has irregular variations for two kinds of morphologies with the increasing vertical depth. The simulated results agree well with experimental results. The horizontal and vertical dimensions, and downstream distance have different influences on the modulation. The risk of damage to downstream optical components can be suppressed to improve the stability of the optical system if the shape and size of repaired craters are well controlled and the positions of downstream optical components are selected appropriately.

  5. Photodynamic DNA damage induced by phycocyanin and its repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pádula

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we analyzed DNA damage induced by phycocyanin (PHY in the presence of visible light (VL using a set of repair endonucleases purified from Escherichia coli. We demonstrated that the profile of DNA damage induced by PHY is clearly different from that induced by molecules that exert deleterious effects on DNA involving solely singlet oxygen as reactive species. Most of PHY-induced lesions are single strand breaks and, to a lesser extent, base oxidized sites, which are recognized by Nth, Nfo and Fpg enzymes. High pressure liquid chromatography coupled to electrochemical detection revealed that PHY photosensitization did not induce 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodGuo at detectable levels. DNA repair after PHY photosensitization was also investigated. Plasmid DNA damaged by PHY photosensitization was used to transform a series of Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA repair mutants. The results revealed that plasmid survival was greatly reduced in rad14 mutants, while the ogg1 mutation did not modify the plasmid survival when compared to that in the wild type. Furthermore, plasmid survival in the ogg1 rad14 double mutant was not different from that in the rad14 single mutant. The results reported here indicate that lethal lesions induced by PHY plus VL are repaired differently by prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Morever, nucleotide excision repair seems to play a major role in the recognition and repair of these lesions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  6. Chromatin Dynamics in Genome Stability: Roles in Suppressing Endogenous DNA Damage and Facilitating DNA Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi Nair

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Genomic DNA is compacted into chromatin through packaging with histone and non-histone proteins. Importantly, DNA accessibility is dynamically regulated to ensure genome stability. This is exemplified in the response to DNA damage where chromatin relaxation near genomic lesions serves to promote access of relevant enzymes to specific DNA regions for signaling and repair. Furthermore, recent data highlight genome maintenance roles of chromatin through the regulation of endogenous DNA-templated processes including transcription and replication. Here, we review research that shows the importance of chromatin structure regulation in maintaining genome integrity by multiple mechanisms including facilitating DNA repair and directly suppressing endogenous DNA damage.

  7. In vitro sublethal damage repair in tumour subpopulations from a heterogeneous human colon tumour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leith, J.T.; Vayer, A.V. Jr.; DeWyngaert, J.K.; Amols, H.; Peck, R.A. Jr.; Glicksman, A.S. (Rhode Island Hospital (USA); Brown Univ., Providence, RI (USA))

    1984-01-01

    The repair of sublethal radiation damage in two asynchronously growing tumour cell subpopulations (clones A and D) obtained from a single human adenocarcinoma biopsy specimen has been studied. The survival data found after generation of complete survival curves from split dose experiments in which exposures were separated by 3, 6, 12, or 24 h were examined. It was found that the method of performing irradiations (e.g., suspension cultures versus monolayer cultures) affected the shape of the single dose response curves, and as a result the interpretation of the amount of sublethal damage repair occurring after split dose irradiation.

  8. Damage escape and repair in dried Chroococcidiopsis spp. from hot and cold deserts exposed to simulated space and martian conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billi, Daniela; Viaggiu, Emanuela; Cockell, Charles S; Rabbow, Elke; Horneck, Gerda; Onofri, Silvano

    2011-01-01

    The cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis, overlain by 3 mm of Antarctic sandstone, was exposed as dried multilayers to simulated space and martian conditions. Ground-based experiments were conducted in the context of Lichens and Fungi Experiments (EXPOSE-E mission, European Space Agency), which were performed to evaluate, after 1.5 years on the International Space Station, the survival of cyanobacteria (Chroococcidiopsis), lichens, and fungi colonized on Antarctic rock. The survival potential and the role played by protection and repair mechanisms in the response of dried Chroococcidiopsis cells to ground-based experiments were both investigated. Different methods were employed, including evaluation of the colony-forming ability, single-cell analysis of subcellular integrities based on membrane integrity molecular and redox probes, evaluation of the photosynthetic pigment autofluorescence, and assessment of the genomic DNA integrity with a PCR-based assay. Desiccation survivors of strain CCMEE 123 (coastal desert, Chile) were better suited than CCMEE 134 (Beacon Valley, Antarctica) to withstand cellular damage imposed by simulated space and martian conditions. Exposed dried cells of strain CCMEE 123 formed colonies, maintained subcellular integrities, and, depending on the exposure conditions, also escaped DNA damage or repaired the induced damage upon rewetting.

  9. Injection technologies for the repair of damaged concrete structures

    CERN Document Server

    Panasyuk, V V; Sylovanyuk, V P

    2014-01-01

    This book analyzes the most important achievements in science and engineering practice concerning operational factors that cause damage to concrete and reinforced concrete structures. It includes methods for assessing their strength and service life, especially those that are based on modern concepts of the fracture mechanics of materials. It also includes basic approaches to the prediction of the remaining service life for long-term operational structures. Much attention is paid to injection technologies for restoring the serviceability of damaged concrete and reinforced concrete structures. In particular, technologies for remedying holes, cracks, corrosion damages etc. The books contains sample cases in which the above technologies have been used to restore structural integrity and extend the reliable service life of concrete and reinforced concrete constructions, especially NPPs, underground railways, bridges, seaports and historical relics.

  10. Glycolipid biosurfactants, mannosylerythritol lipids, repair the damaged hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Tomotake; Kitagawa, Masaru; Yamamoto, Shuhei; Sogabe, Atsushi; Imura, Tomohiro; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Kitamoto, Dai

    2010-01-01

    Mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs), are produced from feedstock by the genus Pseudozyma, and are the most promising biosurfactants known due to its versatile interfacial and biochemical actions. In order to broaden the application in cosmetics, the hair care properties of MELs were investigated using damaged hair. On electron microscopic observation, the damaged hair was dramatically recovered with applying MEL-A and MEL-B. The tensile strength of the damaged hair increased by treatment with MEL-A (122.0 +/- 13.5 gf/p), MEL-B (119.4 +/- 7.6 gf/p) and ceramide (100.7 +/- 15.9 gf/p) compared with only lauryl glucoside (96.7 +/- 12.7 gf/p), indicating the advantage of MELs on hair care treatment. In addition, the average friction coefficient of the damaged hair was maintained after treatment with MEL-A (0.108 +/- 0.002), MEL-B (0.107 +/- 0.003) and the ceramide (0.111 +/- 0.003), although lauryl glucoside treatment increased the average friction coefficient (0.126 +/- 0.003). The increase of bending rigidity by treatment with lauryl glucoside (0.204 +/- 0.002) was prevented by treatment with MEL-A (0.129 +/- 0.002), MEL-B (0.176 +/- 0.003) and the ceramide (0.164 +/- 0.002). Consequently, MELs are proposed to be the new hair care ingredient, which are the highly useful agent for not only for the recovery of damaged hair but also for providing the smooth and flexible hair.

  11. Role of Nicotinamide in DNA Damage, Mutagenesis, and DNA Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devita Surjana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinamide is a water-soluble amide form of niacin (nicotinic acid or vitamin B3. Both niacin and nicotinamide are widely available in plant and animal foods, and niacin can also be endogenously synthesized in the liver from dietary tryptophan. Nicotinamide is also commercially available in vitamin supplements and in a range of cosmetic, hair, and skin preparations. Nicotinamide is the primary precursor of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+, an essential coenzyme in ATP production and the sole substrate of the nuclear enzyme poly-ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1. Numerous in vitro and in vivo studies have clearly shown that PARP-1 and NAD+ status influence cellular responses to genotoxicity which can lead to mutagenesis and cancer formation. This paper will examine the role of nicotinamide in the protection from carcinogenesis, DNA repair, and maintenance of genomic stability.

  12. Self-repairing control for damaged robotic manipulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisler, G.R.; Robinett, R.D.; Dohrmann, C.R.; Driessen, B.J. [and others

    1997-03-01

    Algorithms have been developed allowing operation of robotic systems under damaged conditions. Specific areas addressed were optimal sensor location, adaptive nonlinear control, fault-tolerant robot design, and dynamic path-planning. A seven-degree-of-freedom, hydraulic manipulator, with fault-tolerant joint design was also constructed and tested. This report completes this project which was funded under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program.

  13. Repair of an oroantral communication by a human amniotic membrane: a novel technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmi, Subha; Bharani, Siva; Ambardar, Kalhan

    2015-08-01

    The amniotic membrane is the innermost layer of fetal membrane and is attached to the chorion in the placenta. This membrane has been used for nearly a century in varied fields such as ophthalmology, reconstructive surgery, and burn treatment. In this case report, we used a human amniotic membrane to repair an iatrogenic oroantral communication that occurred during the extraction of the patient's right upper second molar. A splint was given after the perforation was covered with human amniotic membrane and healing was clinically evaluated at various intervals. The outcome of the study revealed that the human amniotic membrane was an efficient graft material for repairing the defect caused by an iatrogenic oroantral communication following tooth extraction.

  14. Difference in membrane repair capacity between cancer cell lines and a normal cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Stine Krog; McNeil, Anna K.; Novak, Ivana

    2016-01-01

    Electroporation-based treatments and other therapies that permeabilize the plasma membrane have been shown to be more devastating to malignant cells than to normal cells. In this study, we asked if a difference in repair capacity could explain this observed difference in sensitivity. Membrane...... repair was investigated by disrupting the plasma membrane using laser followed by monitoring fluorescent dye entry over time in seven cancer cell lines, an immortalized cell line, and a normal primary cell line. The kinetics of repair in living cells can be directly recorded using this technique...... cancer cell lines (p cell line (p membrane permeabilization by electroporation. Viability in the primary normal cell line (98 % viable cells) was higher...

  15. Cell membrane damage by iron nanoparticles: an invitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gelare Hajsalimi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Application of nanotechnology in medicinal and biological fields has attracted a great interest in the recent yeras. In this paper the cell membrane leakage induced by iron nanoparticles (Fe-NP against PC12 cell line which is known as a model of nervous system cell line was investigated by the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH test. Therefore, PC12 cells were incubated with different concentration of Fe-NP and test was performed after 48h of incubation of the cells with Fe-NP. The resulting data showed that the Fe-NP induced the damage of PC12 cell membrane in a concentration dependent manner. Hence, it may be concluded that the different cytotoxicty effect of NPs may be referred to the concentration of NPs, type of the NPs and the cells. Indeed, the kind of cytotoxic impacts of NPs on the cells can be reduced by the considering of above-mentioned parameters. The resulting data showed that the Fe-NP induced the damage of PC12 cell membrane in a concentration dependent manner. Hence, it may be concluded that the different cytotoxicty effect of NPs may be referred to the concentration of NPs, type of the NPs and the cells. Indeed, the kind of cytotoxic impacts of NPs on the cells can be reduced by the considering of above-mentioned parameters.

  16. DNA damage response and repair data with pharmacological modulators of Tousled

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash Srinivasan Timiri Shanmugam

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Human Tousled kinase 1 (TLK1 plays an important role in chromatin remodeling, replication, and DNA damage response and repair. TLK1 activity is immediately, but transiently, downregulated after genotoxic insult, and its recovery is important for exit from checkpoint arrest and cell survival after radiation. The data in this article compliments research presented in the paper titled, “Tousled kinase activator, gallic acid, promotes DNA repair and suppresses radiation cytotoxicity in salivary gland cells” [1]. The identification of small molecule activators and inhibitors of TLK1 provided an opportunity to pharmacologically alter the protein׳s activity to elucidate its role in DNA damage response pathways. TLK1 effectors, gallic acid (GA and thioridazine (THD activate and inhibit the kinase, respectively, and the data report on the impact of these compounds and the significance of TLK1 to DNA break repair and the survival of human salivary acinar cells.

  17. New discoveries linking transcription to DNA repair and damage tolerance pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Susan E; Walker, Graham C

    2011-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, the transcription elongation factor NusA is associated with all elongating RNA polymerases where it functions in transcription termination and antitermination. Here, we review our recent results implicating NusA in the recruitment of DNA repair and damage tolerance mechanisms to sites of stalled transcription complexes.

  18. The Fanconi anemia DNA damage repair pathway in the spotlight for germline predisposition to colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban-Jurado, Clara; Franch-Expósito, Sebastià; Muñoz, Jenifer; Ocaña, Teresa; Carballal, Sabela; López-Cerón, Maria; Cuatrecasas, Miriam; Vila-Casadesús, Maria; Lozano, Juan José; Serra, Enric; Beltran, Sergi; Brea-Fernández, Alejandro; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Castells, Antoni; Bujanda, Luis; Garre, Pilar; Caldés, Trinidad; Cubiella, Joaquín; Balaguer, Francesc; Castellví-Bel, Sergi

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common neoplasms in the world. Fanconi anemia (FA) is a very rare genetic disease causing bone marrow failure, congenital growth abnormalities and cancer predisposition. The comprehensive FA DNA damage repair pathway requires the collaboration of 53 proteins and it is necessary to restore genome integrity by efficiently repairing damaged DNA. A link between FA genes in breast and ovarian cancer germline predisposition has been previously suggested. We selected 74 CRC patients from 40 unrelated Spanish families with strong CRC aggregation compatible with an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance and without mutations in known hereditary CRC genes and performed germline DNA whole-exome sequencing with the aim of finding new candidate germline predisposition variants. After sequencing and data analysis, variant prioritization selected only those very rare alterations, producing a putative loss of function and located in genes with a role compatible with cancer. We detected an enrichment for variants in FA DNA damage repair pathway genes in our familial CRC cohort as 6 families carried heterozygous, rare, potentially pathogenic variants located in BRCA2/FANCD1, BRIP1/FANCJ, FANCC, FANCE and REV3L/POLZ. In conclusion, the FA DNA damage repair pathway may play an important role in the inherited predisposition to CRC. PMID:27165003

  19. Differential contributions of mammalian Rad54 paralogs to recombination, DNA damage repair, and meiosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Wesoly (Joanna); S. Agarwal (Sheba); S. Sigurdsson (Stefan); W. Bussen (Wendy); S. Komen (Stephen); J. Qin (Jian); H. van Steeg (Harry); J. van Benthem (Jan); E. Wassenaar (Evelyne); W.M. Baarends (Willy); M. Ghazvini (Mehrnaz); A. Tafel (Agnieszka); H. Heath (Helen); N.J. Galjart (Niels); J. Essers (Jeroen); J.A. Grootegoed (Anton); N. Arnheim (Norman); O.Y. Bezzubova (Olga); J-M. Buerstedde; P. Sung (Patrick); R. Kanaar (Roland)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractHomologous recombination is a versatile DNA damage repair pathway requiring Rad51 and Rad54. Here we show that a mammalian Rad54 paralog, Rad54B, displays physical and functional interactions with Rad51 and DNA that are similar to those of Rad54. While ablation of Rad54 in mouse embryoni

  20. A bivariate optimal replacement policy with cumulative repair cost limit under cumulative damage model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MIN-T SAI LAI; SHIH-CHIH CHEN

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a bivariate replacement policy (n, T) for a cumulative shock damage process is presented that included the concept of cumulative repair cost limit. The arrival shocks can be divided into two kinds of shocks. Each type-I shock causes a random amount of damage and these damages are additive. When the total damage exceeds a failure level, the system goes into serious failure. Type-II shock causes the system into minor failure and such a failure can be corrected by minimal repair. When a minor failure occurs, the repaircost will be evaluated and minimal repair is executed if the accumulated repair cost is less than a predetermined limit L. The system is replaced at scheduled time T, at n-th minor failure, or at serious failure. The long-term expected cost per unit time is derived using the expected costs as the optimality criterion. The minimum-cost policy is derived, and existence and uniqueness of the optimal n* and T* are proved. This bivariate optimal replacement policy (n, T) is showed to be better than the optimal T* and the optimal n* policy.

  1. Human embryonic stem cells have enhanced repair of multiple forms of DNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maynard, Scott; Swistowska, Anna Maria; Lee, Jae Wan

    2008-01-01

    fibroblasts (WI-38, hs27) and, with the exception of UV-C damage, HeLa cells. Microarray gene expression analysis showed that mRNA levels of several DNA repair genes are elevated in human embryonic stem cells compared with their differentiated forms (embryoid bodies). These data suggest that genomic...

  2. Human papillomavirus mediated inhibition of DNA damage sensing and repair drives skin carcinogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Hufbauer (Martin); J. Cooke (James); G.T.J. van der Horst (Gijsbertus); H. Pfister (Herbert); A. Storey (Alan); B. Akgül (Baki)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The failure to mount an effective DNA damage response to repair UV induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) results in an increased propensity to develop cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC). High-risk patient groups, such as organ transplant recipients (OTRs)

  3. Influence of XRCC1 Genetic Polymorphisms on Ionizing Radiation-Induced DNA Damage and Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterpone, Silvia; Cozzi, Renata

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that ionizing radiation (IR) can damage DNA through a direct action, producing single- and double-strand breaks on DNA double helix, as well as an indirect effect by generating oxygen reactive species in the cells. Mammals have evolved several and distinct DNA repair pathways in order to maintain genomic stability and avoid tumour cell transformation. This review reports important data showing a huge interindividual variability on sensitivity to IR and in susceptibility to developing cancer; this variability is principally represented by genetic polymorphisms, that is, DNA repair gene polymorphisms. In particular we have focussed on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of XRCC1, a gene that encodes for a scaffold protein involved basically in Base Excision Repair (BER). In this paper we have reported and presented recent studies that show an influence of XRCC1 variants on DNA repair capacity and susceptibility to breast cancer. PMID:20798883

  4. Influence of XRCC1 Genetic Polymorphisms on Ionizing Radiation-Induced DNA Damage and Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Sterpone

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that ionizing radiation (IR can damage DNA through a direct action, producing single- and double-strand breaks on DNA double helix, as well as an indirect effect by generating oxygen reactive species in the cells. Mammals have evolved several and distinct DNA repair pathways in order to maintain genomic stability and avoid tumour cell transformation. This review reports important data showing a huge interindividual variability on sensitivity to IR and in susceptibility to developing cancer; this variability is principally represented by genetic polymorphisms, that is, DNA repair gene polymorphisms. In particular we have focussed on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of XRCC1, a gene that encodes for a scaffold protein involved basically in Base Excision Repair (BER. In this paper we have reported and presented recent studies that show an influence of XRCC1 variants on DNA repair capacity and susceptibility to breast cancer.

  5. Are glutathione S transferases involved in DNA damage signalling? Interactions with DNA damage and repair revealed from molecular epidemiology studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dusinska, Maria, E-mail: Maria.DUSINSKA@nilu.no [CEE-Health Effects Group, NILU - Norwegian Institute for Air Research, Kjeller (Norway); Staruchova, Marta; Horska, Alexandra [Department of Experimental and Applied Genetics, Slovak Medical University, Bratislava (Slovakia); Smolkova, Bozena [Laboratory of Cancer Genetics, Cancer Research Institute of the Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava (Slovakia); Collins, Andrew [Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo (Norway); Bonassi, Stefano [Unit of Clinical and Molecular Epidemiology, IRCCS San Raffaele Pisana, Rome (Italy); Volkovova, Katarina [Department of Experimental and Applied Genetics, Slovak Medical University, Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2012-08-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are members of a multigene family of isoenzymes that are important in the control of oxidative stress and in phase II metabolism. Acting non-enzymically, GSTs can modulate signalling pathways of cell proliferation, cell differentiation and apoptosis. Using a molecular epidemiology approach, we have investigated a potential involvement of GSTs in DNA damage processing, specifically the modulation of DNA repair in a group of 388 healthy adult volunteers; 239 with at least 5 years of occupational exposure to asbestos, stone wool or glass fibre, and 149 reference subjects. We measured DNA damage in lymphocytes using the comet assay (alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis): strand breaks (SBs) and alkali-labile sites, oxidised pyrimidines with endonuclease III, and oxidised purines with formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase. We also measured GST activity in erythrocytes, and the capacity for base excision repair (BER) in a lymphocyte extract. Polymorphisms in genes encoding three GST isoenzymes were determined, namely deletion of GSTM1 and GSTT1 and single nucleotide polymorphism Ile105Val in GSTP1. Consumption of vegetables and wine correlated negatively with DNA damage and modulated BER. GST activity correlated with oxidised bases and with BER capacity, and differed depending on polymorphisms in GSTP1, GSTT1 and GSTM1. A significantly lower BER rate was associated with the homozygous GSTT1 deletion in all asbestos site subjects and in the corresponding reference group. Multifactorial analysis revealed effects of sex and exposure in GSTP1 Ile/Val heterozygotes but not in Ile/Ile homozygotes. These variants affected also SBs levels, mainly by interactions of GSTP1 genotype with exposure, with sex, and with smoking habit; and by an interaction between sex and smoking. Our results show that GST polymorphisms and GST activity can apparently influence DNA stability and repair of oxidised bases, suggesting a potential new role for these

  6. Location of DNA damage by charge exchanging repair enzymes: effects of cooperativity on location time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eriksen Kasper

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background How DNA repair enzymes find the relatively rare sites of damage is not known in great detail. Recent experiments and molecular data suggest that individual repair enzymes do not work independently of each other, but interact with each other through charges exchanged along the DNA. A damaged site in the DNA hinders this exchange. The hypothesis is that the charge exchange quickly liberates the repair enzymes from error-free stretches of DNA. In this way, the sites of damage are located more quickly; but how much more quickly is not known, nor is it known whether the charge exchange mechanism has other observable consequences. Results Here the size of the speed-up gained from this charge exchange mechanism is calculated and the characteristic length and time scales are identified. In particular, for Escherichia coli, I estimate the speed-up is 50000/N, where N is the number of repair enzymes participating in the charge exchange mechanism. Even though N is not exactly known, a speed-up of order 10 is not entirely unreasonable. Furthermore, upon over expression of all the repair enzymes, the location time only varies as N-1/2 and not as 1/N. Conclusion The revolutionary hypothesis that DNA repair enzymes use charge exchange along DNA to locate damaged sites more efficiently is actually sound from a purely theoretical point of view. Furthermore, the predicted collective behavior of the location time is important in assessing the impact of stress-ful and radioactive environments on individual cell mutation rates.

  7. [Application of amniotic membrane dressings in patients with skin damage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrera González, Elier; Noa Hernández, Jose Eduardo; Marín Rojo, Carlos A

    2011-01-01

    The application of amniotic membranes in patients diagnosed with skin damage is a valid treatment option. A care plan following the Virginia Henderson model and NANDA, NOC and NIC taxonomy was applied to 36 patients admitted to the Dr. Miguel Enríquez hospital with different cutaneous lesions. This membrane has already been used for years due to its healing properties. These are attributed to antimicrobial properties reducing infection risk and promoting epithelial activity. They can decrease the need for the use of antibiotics, expendable materials, and can be applied during long periods of healing. This decreases the cost of wide spectrum antibiotic treatments, as well as the time patients spend in hospital. We present the results of this application in cases with several types of skin lesions.

  8. Chromium-induced membrane damage: protective role of ascorbic acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Importance of chromium as environmental toxicant is largely due to impact on the body to produce cellular toxicity. The impact of chromium and their supplementation with ascorbic acid was studied on plasma membrane of liver and kidney in male Wistar rats (80 - 100gbody weight). It has been observed that the intoxication with chromium ( i. p. ) at the dose of 0.8 mg/100g body weight per day for a period of 28 days causes significant increase in the level of cholesterol and decrease in the level of phospbolipid of both liver and kidney. The alkaline pbosphatase, total ATPase and Na + -K + -ATPase activities were significantly decreased in both liver and kidney after chromium treatment,except total ATPase activity of kidney. It is suggested that chromium exposure at the present dose and duration induce for the alterations of structure and function of both liver and kidney plasma membrane. Ascorbic acid ( i.p. at the dose of 0.5 mg,/100g body weight per day for period of 28 days) supplementation can reduce these structural changes in the plasma membrane of liver and kidney. But the functional changes can not be completely replenished by the ascorbic acid supplementation in response to chromium exposure. So it is also suggested that ascorbic acid (nutritional antioxidant) is useful free radical scavenger to restrain the chromium-induced membrane damage.

  9. Systematic analysis of DNA damage induction and DNA repair pathway activation by continuous wave visible light laser micro-irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britta Muster

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Laser micro-irradiation can be used to induce DNA damage with high spatial and temporal resolution, representing a powerful tool to analyze DNA repair in vivo in the context of chromatin. However, most lasers induce a mixture of DNA damage leading to the activation of multiple DNA repair pathways and making it impossible to study individual repair processes. Hence, we aimed to establish and validate micro-irradiation conditions together with inhibition of several key proteins to discriminate different types of DNA damage and repair pathways using lasers commonly available in confocal microscopes. Using time-lapse analysis of cells expressing fluorescently tagged repair proteins and also validation of the DNA damage generated by micro-irradiation using several key damage markers, we show that irradiation with a 405 nm continuous wave laser lead to the activation of all repair pathways even in the absence of exogenous sensitization. In contrast, we found that irradiation with 488 nm laser lead to the selective activation of non-processive short-patch base excision and single strand break repair, which were further validated by PARP inhibition and metoxyamine treatment. We conclude that these low energy conditions discriminated against processive long-patch base excision repair, nucleotide excision repair as well as double strand break repair pathways.

  10. Difference in Membrane Repair Capacity Between Cancer Cell Lines and a Normal Cell Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frandsen, Stine Krog; McNeil, Anna K; Novak, Ivana; McNeil, Paul L; Gehl, Julie

    2016-08-01

    Electroporation-based treatments and other therapies that permeabilize the plasma membrane have been shown to be more devastating to malignant cells than to normal cells. In this study, we asked if a difference in repair capacity could explain this observed difference in sensitivity. Membrane repair was investigated by disrupting the plasma membrane using laser followed by monitoring fluorescent dye entry over time in seven cancer cell lines, an immortalized cell line, and a normal primary cell line. The kinetics of repair in living cells can be directly recorded using this technique, providing a sensitive index of repair capacity. The normal primary cell line of all tested cell lines exhibited the slowest rate of dye entry after laser disruption and lowest level of dye uptake. Significantly, more rapid dye uptake and a higher total level of dye uptake occurred in six of the seven tested cancer cell lines (p normal cell line (98 % viable cells) was higher than in the three tested cancer cell lines (81-88 % viable cells). These data suggest more effective membrane repair in normal, primary cells and supplement previous explanations why electroporation-based therapies and other therapies permeabilizing the plasma membrane are more effective on malignant cells compared to normal cells in cancer treatment.

  11. Time-dependent cell membrane damage under mechanical tension: Experiments and modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Bo; Chang, Jay Han-Chieh; Tai, Yu-Chong

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports a study of cancer cell membrane damage during filtration caused by cell membrane tension. The membrane tension was induced when cells were captured on a microfabricated parylene-C filter during the constant-pressure-driven filtration. This work includes both experiments and modeling to explore the underlying biomechanics of the cell membrane damage. The developed model not only agrees with our time-dependent cell damage data, but also fits well with previous results on red ...

  12. Oxidative DNA damage background estimated by a system model of base excision repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokhansanj, Bahrad A; Wilson, David M

    2004-08-01

    Human DNA can be damaged by natural metabolism through free radical production. It has been suggested that the equilibrium between innate damage and cellular DNA repair results in an oxidative DNA damage background that potentially contributes to disease and aging. Efforts to quantitatively characterize the human oxidative DNA damage background level, based on measuring 8-oxoguanine lesions as a biomarker, have led to estimates that vary over three to four orders of magnitude, depending on the method of measurement. We applied a previously developed and validated quantitative pathway model of human DNA base excision repair, integrating experimentally determined endogenous damage rates and model parameters from multiple sources. Our estimates of at most 100 8-oxoguanine lesions per cell are consistent with the low end of data from biochemical and cell biology experiments, a result robust to model limitations and parameter variation. Our findings show the power of quantitative system modeling to interpret composite experimental data and make biologically and physiologically relevant predictions for complex human DNA repair pathway mechanisms and capacity.

  13. Oxidative DNA damage background estimated by a system model of base excision repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokhansanj, B A; Wilson, III, D M

    2004-05-13

    Human DNA can be damaged by natural metabolism through free radical production. It has been suggested that the equilibrium between innate damage and cellular DNA repair results in an oxidative DNA damage background that potentially contributes to disease and aging. Efforts to quantitatively characterize the human oxidative DNA damage background level based on measuring 8-oxoguanine lesions as a biomarker have led to estimates varying over 3-4 orders of magnitude, depending on the method of measurement. We applied a previously developed and validated quantitative pathway model of human DNA base excision repair, integrating experimentally determined endogenous damage rates and model parameters from multiple sources. Our estimates of at most 100 8-oxoguanine lesions per cell are consistent with the low end of data from biochemical and cell biology experiments, a result robust to model limitations and parameter variation. Our results show the power of quantitative system modeling to interpret composite experimental data and make biologically and physiologically relevant predictions for complex human DNA repair pathway mechanisms and capacity.

  14. Relationships between chromatin remodeling and DNA damage repair induced by 8-methoxypsoralen and UVA in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavínia Almeida Cruz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic cells have developed mechanisms to prevent genomic instability, such as DNA damage detection and repair, control of cell cycle progression and cell death induction. The bifunctional compound furocumarin 8-methoxy-psoralen (8-MOP is widely used in the treatment of various inflammatory skin diseases. In this review, we summarize recent data about the role of chromatin remodeling in the repair of DNA damage induced by treatment with 8-methoxypsoralen plus UVA (8-MOP+UVA, focusing on repair proteins in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, an established model system for studying DNA repair pathways. The interstrand crosslinks (ICL formed by the 8-MOP+UVA treatment are detrimental lesions that can block transcription and replication, leading to cell death if not repaired. Current data show the involvement of different pathways in ICL processing, such as nucleotide excision repair (NER, base excision repair (BER, translesion repair (TLS and double-strand break repair. 8-MOP+UVA treatment in yeast enhances the expression of genes involved in the DNA damage response, double strand break repair by homologous replication, as well as genes related to cell cycle regulation. Moreover, alterations in the expression of subtelomeric genes and genes related to chromatin remodeling are consistent with structural modifications of chromatin relevant to DNA repair. Taken together, these findings indicate a specific profile in 8-MOP+UVA responses related to chromatin remodeling and DNA repair.

  15. Experimental assessment of concrete damage due to exposure to high temperature and efficacy of the repair system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guruprasad Y.K.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study experimentally evaluates the performance of control (standard cylinder specimen, damaged (mechanical loading after thermal exposure and repaired / retrofitted normal plain concrete cylinders using different repair schemes such as on use of FRP wraps, Geo-polymers, etc., to restore the capacity of damaged structural concrete elements. The control-companion specimen in the series provides the reference frame against which both, specimen damage levels were quantified and the benefits of a specimen repaired subsequent to damage were assessed.

  16. DNA damage and repair in plants under ultraviolet and ionizing radiations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Sarvajeet S; Anjum, Naser A; Gill, Ritu; Jha, Manoranjan; Tuteja, Narendra

    2015-01-01

    Being sessile, plants are continuously exposed to DNA-damaging agents present in the environment such as ultraviolet (UV) and ionizing radiations (IR). Sunlight acts as an energy source for photosynthetic plants; hence, avoidance of UV radiations (namely, UV-A, 315-400 nm; UV-B, 280-315 nm; and UV-C, exposure, plants make use of several DNA repair mechanisms. In the light of recent breakthrough, the current minireview (a) introduces UV/IR and overviews UV/IR-mediated DNA damage products and (b) critically discusses the biochemistry and genetics of major pathways responsible for the repair of UV/IR-accrued DNA damage. The outcome of the discussion may be helpful in devising future research in the current context.

  17. [Study on repair capacity of DNA damage associated with chronic benzene poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Cai-hong; Ji, Zhi-ying; Li, Gui-lan; Yin, Song-nian

    2006-07-01

    To explore the repair capacity of DNA damage associated with chronic benzene poisonings. 63 workers suffered from chronic benzene poisonings and 45 workers exposed to benzene, who were engaged in the same job title, were investigated. Comet assay and cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) detection were used to evaluate gamma-radiation-induced DNA and chromosomal damage and repair capacity in peripheral blood lymphocyte. The comet tail length difference of the benzene poisoning group (4.64 +/- 1.57 microm) was significantly higher than that of the control group (3.77 +/- 1.30 microm) (P = 0.0029). There was no significant difference of the 3AB index between the poisoning group and the control group. The relative risk of benzene poisoning in the subject with comet tail length difference > 3.81 was significantly higher than that in the subject with comet tail length difference poisoning in the subject with 3AB index or = 0.20. DNA repair capacity on DNA-strand level might tightly associate with chronic benzene poisoning. The DNA repair capacity on DNA-strand level would be worse, and the benzene poisoning risk could be higher. There was no clear relation between the DNA repair capacity on chromosome level and the benzene poisoning risk.

  18. Membrane damage by bile salts: the protective function of phospholipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, G P; Marriott, C

    1981-12-01

    The direct toxicity of sodium deoxycholate (SDC) and lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) to biological membranes was assessed by measurement of goldfish overturn time. When phosphatidylcholine (PC) was incorporated into the aqueous media, the toxicity of both SDC and LPC was reduced, as indicated by increased overturn time. Fish were also pretreated for various times in media containing (a) 1 mM SDC and (b) 1 mM SDC with 1 mM PC. Subsequent transfer to solution, 100 mg litre-1 quinalbarbitone sodium showed that reciprocal overturn times for fish treated using method (a) increased linearly with duration of pretreatment up to a limiting value, obtained after 20 min exposure; 40 min exposure to 1 mM SDC was directly toxic. Fish pretreated using regimen (b) survived longer when challenged with barbiturate, and the reciprocal overturn times were a linear function of time of pretreatment up to at least 40 min. PC also provided protection against membrane damage caused by the synthetic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulphate. Mixed micelle formation between PC and surfactant is thought to account for the protective effects. The results are of significance in the consideration of reflux hypothesis for the aetiology of gastric ulceration and also the possible formulation of drug delivery systems intended to enhance absorption whilst minimizing gastrointestinal damage.

  19. Human telomeres are hypersensitive to UV-induced DNA Damage and refractory to repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick J Rochette

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Telomeric repeats preserve genome integrity by stabilizing chromosomes, a function that appears to be important for both cancer and aging. In view of this critical role in genomic integrity, the telomere's own integrity should be of paramount importance to the cell. Ultraviolet light (UV, the preeminent risk factor in skin cancer development, induces mainly cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD which are both mutagenic and lethal. The human telomeric repeat unit (5'TTAGGG/CCCTAA3' is nearly optimal for acquiring UV-induced CPD, which form at dipyrimidine sites. We developed a ChIP-based technique, immunoprecipitation of DNA damage (IPoD, to simultaneously study DNA damage and repair in the telomere and in the coding regions of p53, 28S rDNA, and mitochondrial DNA. We find that human telomeres in vivo are 7-fold hypersensitive to UV-induced DNA damage. In double-stranded oligonucleotides, this hypersensitivity is a property of both telomeric and non-telomeric repeats; in a series of telomeric repeat oligonucleotides, a phase change conferring UV-sensitivity occurs above 4 repeats. Furthermore, CPD removal in the telomere is almost absent, matching the rate in mitochondria known to lack nucleotide excision repair. Cells containing persistent high levels of telomeric CPDs nevertheless proliferate, and chronic UV irradiation of cells does not accelerate telomere shortening. Telomeres are therefore unique in at least three respects: their biophysical UV sensitivity, their prevention of excision repair, and their tolerance of unrepaired lesions. Utilizing a lesion-tolerance strategy rather than repair would prevent double-strand breaks at closely-opposed excision repair sites on opposite strands of a damage-hypersensitive repeat.

  20. The Comet-FISH assay for the analysis of DNA damage and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivak, Graciela

    2010-01-01

    In this chapter, I describe the alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis (Comet assay) combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technology, used in our laboratory, to study the incidence and repair of lesions induced in human cells by ultraviolet light. The Comet-FISH method permits the simultaneous and comparative analysis of DNA damage and its repair throughout the genome and in defined chromosomal regions. This very sensitive approach can be applied to any lesion, such as those induced by chemical carcinogens and products of cellular metabolism that can be converted to DNA single- or double-strand breaks. The unique advantages and limitations of the method for particular applications are discussed.

  1. Neuromuscular Damage and Repair after Dry Needling in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ares Domingo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Some dry needling treatments involve repetitive and rapid needle insertions into myofascial trigger points. This type of treatment causes muscle injury and can also damage nerve fibers. The aim of this study is to determine the injury caused by 15 repetitive punctures in the muscle and the intramuscular nerves in healthy mouse muscle and its ulterior regeneration. Methods. We repeatedly needled the levator auris longus muscle of mice, and then the muscles were processed with immunohistochemistry, methylene blue, and electron microscopy techniques. Results. Three hours after the dry needling procedure, the muscle fibers showed some signs of an inflammatory response, which progressed to greater intensity 24 hours after the procedure. Some inflammatory cells could still be seen when the muscle regeneration was almost complete seven days after the treatment. One day after the treatment, some changes in the distribution of receptors could be observed in the denervated postsynaptic component. Reinnervation was complete by the third day after the dry needling procedure. We also saw very fine axonal branches reinnervating all the postsynaptic components and some residual sprouts the same day. Conclusion. Repeated dry needling punctures in muscle do not perturb the different stages of muscle regeneration and reinnervation.

  2. From repairing the damaged landscape to restoration project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline Granjou

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The study adopts an empirical sociological approach to analyse how the objectives behind the revegetation of ski trails and runs in the French alpine resort of Alpe d’Huez have evolved since the 1970s. A revegetation programme was first introduced to repair the scars left by the works conducted to equip the resort with infrastructures, and then, over time, it became a more complex restoration project. At first, revegetation techniques were developed to fight soil erosion, but soon also became associated with the idea of “turning the mountain green again”. Now, 40 years later, revegetation is aimed at restoring both a natural ecosystem and a cultural landscape. The ski resort’s managers, local farmers, technicians, and those conducting research in the area share a common desire to promote autochthony, which in some cases runs the risk of reproducing folklore. Far from adopting an overriding ethical perspective, the study suggests that the area’s physical characteristics, specific history and configuration of local actors have shaped and continue to shape both the manner in which ecological restoration is implemented, through political choices and technical decisions, and the debates it gives rise to. The study concludes by examining the specificity of the findings for Alpe d’Huez and discussing their validity for other alpine ski resorts.A partir d’une approche sociologique empirique, ce texte propose une analyse de la mise en œuvre de la revégétalisation sur la station de l’Alpe d’Huez depuis les années 1970. Il montre comment la revégétalisation est passée d’un objectif de réparation des cicatrices provoquées par les aménagements à une entreprise plus complexe de restauration. S’il s’agissait au départ de répondre à un objectif technique de lutte contre l’érosion, la revégétalisation a pris rapidement une tournure paysagère (reverdissement ; elle a ensuite été pensée dans une perspective de

  3. Dietary Berries and Ellagic Acid Prevent Oxidative DNA Damage and Modulate Expression of DNA Repair Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh C. Gupta

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available DNA damage is a pre-requisite for the initiation of cancer and agents that reduce this damage are useful in cancer prevention. In this study, we evaluated the ability of whole berries and berry phytochemical, ellagic acid to reduce endogenous oxidative DNA damage. Ellagic acid was selected based on > 95% inhibition of 8-oxodeoxyguosine (8-oxodG and other unidentified oxidative DNA adducts induced by 4-hydroxy-17B;-estradiol and CuCl2 in vitro. Inhibition of the latter occurred at lower concentrations (10 u(microM than that for 8-oxodG (100 u(microM. In the in vivo study, female CD-1 mice (n=6 were fed either a control diet or diet supplemented with ellagic acid (400 ppm and dehydrated berries (5% w/w with varying ellagic acid contents -- blueberry (low, strawberry (medium and red raspberry (high, for 3 weeks. Blueberry and strawberry diets showed moderate reductions in endogenous DNA adducts (25%. However, both red raspberry and ellagic acid diets showed a significant reduction of 59% (p < 0.001 and 48% (p < 0.01, respectively. Both diets also resulted in a 3-8 fold over-expression of genes involved in DNA repair such as xeroderma pigmentosum group A complementing protein (XPA, DNA excision repair protein (ERCC5 and DNA ligase III (DNL3. These results suggest that red raspberry and ellagic acid reduce endogenous oxidative DNA damage by mechanisms which may involve increase in DNA repair.

  4. Repair of Damaged M-Chromium-Aluminum-Yttrium Coatings Targeting Petroleum Industry Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhat, Rabab

    The increase in efficiency of furnace and refinery components in petroleum industries has been the target of many studies. However, the repair technology for damaged pieces is still to be developed. During prolonged service, a degradation of developed coatings occurs as a result of the harsh environment. Therefore, a repair technology, which can extend the life of the coatings, is now under consideration. In this work, electrospark deposition (ESD) has been investigated to understand the solidification behavior and its possibility to repair damaged MCrAlY coatings. Ni-based alloys with different compositions were deposited on Ni substrate using ESD to understand crystal structure of the solidified deposit and the effect of the dissimilar weld composition on dilution. The electrode samples were prepared by spark plasma sintering (SPS). Firstly, different coatings with single and bi-phase microstructure were deposited on pure Ni substrate. Secondly, NiCoCrAlY and CoNiCrAlY were deposited on the damaged spot of the oxidized NiCoCrAlY and CoNiCrAlY respectively. A fine microstructure of metastable phases obtained from each deposit. Also, it was found that an epitaxial growth of NiCoCrAlY and CoNiCrAlY were obtained on the damaged spots. In addition, α-Al 2O3 was obtained on the surface of the deposit after 24hr oxidation at 1000°C.

  5. Incident laser modulation of a repaired damage site with a rim in fused silica rear subsurface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Li; Xiang Xia; Zu Xiao-Tao; Yuan Xiao-Dong; He Shao-Bo; Jiang Xiao-Dong; Zheng Wan-Guo

    2012-01-01

    Local CO2 laser treatment has proved to be an effective method to prevent the 351-nm laser-induced damage sitesin a fused silica surface from exponentially growing,which is responsible for limiting the lifetime of optics in high fluence laser systems.However,the CO2 laser induced ablation crater is often surrounded by a raised rim at the edge,which can also result in the intensification of transmitted ultraviolet light that may damage the downstream optics.In this work,the three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain method is developed to simulate the distribution of electrical field intensity in the vicinity of the CO2 laser mitigated damage site located in the exit subsurface of fused silica.The simulated results show that the repaired damage sites with raised rims cause more notable modulation to the incident laser than those without rims.Specifically,we present a theoretical model of using dimpled patterning to control the rim structure around the edge of repaired damage sites to avoid damage to downstream optics.The calculated results accord well with previous experimental results and the underlying physical mechanism is analysed in detail.

  6. Delayed repair of radiation induced clustered DNA damage: Friend or foe?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eccles, Laura J., E-mail: laura.eccles@rob.ox.ac.uk [DNA Damage Group, Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus Research Building, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom); O' Neill, Peter, E-mail: peter.oneill@rob.ox.ac.uk [DNA Damage Group, Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus Research Building, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom); Lomax, Martine E., E-mail: martine.lomax@rob.ox.ac.uk [DNA Damage Group, Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus Research Building, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom)

    2011-06-03

    A signature of ionizing radiation exposure is the induction of DNA clustered damaged sites, defined as two or more lesions within one to two helical turns of DNA by passage of a single radiation track. Clustered damage is made up of double strand breaks (DSB) with associated base lesions or abasic (AP) sites, and non-DSB clusters comprised of base lesions, AP sites and single strand breaks. This review will concentrate on the experimental findings of the processing of non-DSB clustered damaged sites. It has been shown that non-DSB clustered damaged sites compromise the base excision repair pathway leading to the lifetime extension of the lesions within the cluster, compared to isolated lesions, thus the likelihood that the lesions persist to replication and induce mutation is increased. In addition certain non-DSB clustered damaged sites are processed within the cell to form additional DSB. The use of E. coli to demonstrate that clustering of DNA lesions is the major cause of the detrimental consequences of ionizing radiation is also discussed. The delayed repair of non-DSB clustered damaged sites in humans can be seen as a 'friend', leading to cell killing in tumour cells or as a 'foe', resulting in the formation of mutations and genetic instability in normal tissue.

  7. Involvement of Caveolin-1 in repair of DNA damage through both homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Zhu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Caveolin-1 (Cav-1, the major component of caveolae, is a 21-24 kDa integral membrane protein that interacts with a number of signaling molecules. By acting as a scaffolding protein, Cav-1 plays crucial roles in the regulation of various physiologic and patho-physiologic processes including oncogenic transformation and tumorigenesis, and tumor invasion and metastasis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present study we sought to explore the role of Cav-1 in response to DNA damage and the mechanism involved. We found that the level of Cav-1 was up-regulated rapidly in cells treated with ionizing radiation. The up-regulation of Cav-1 following DNA damage occurred only in cells expressing endogenous Cav-1, and was associated with the activation of DNA damage response pathways. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the expression of Cav-1 protected cells against DNA damage through modulating the activities of both the homologous recombination (HR and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ repair systems, as evidenced by the inhibitory effects of the Cav-1-targeted siRNA on cell survival, HR frequency, phosphorylation of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK, and nuclear translocation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR following DNA damage, and by the stimulatory effect of the forced expression of Cav-1 on NHEJ frequency. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate that Cav-1 may play a critical role in sensing genotoxic stress and in orchestrating the response of cells to DNA damage through regulating the important molecules involved in maintaining genomic integrity.

  8. Rad54 and Mus81 cooperation promotes DNA damage repair and restrains chromosome missegregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghamrasni, S El; Cardoso, R; Li, L;

    2016-01-01

    Rad54 and Mus81 mammalian proteins physically interact and are important for the homologous recombination DNA repair pathway; however, their functional interactions in vivo are poorly defined. Here, we show that combinatorial loss of Rad54 and Mus81 results in hypersensitivity to DNA......-damaging agents, defects on both the homologous recombination and non-homologous DNA end joining repair pathways and reduced fertility. We also observed that while Mus81 deficiency diminished the cleavage of common fragile sites, very strikingly, Rad54 loss impaired this cleavage to even a greater extent....... The inefficient repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in Rad54(-/-)Mus81(-/-) cells was accompanied by elevated levels of chromosome missegregation and cell death. Perhaps as a consequence, tumor incidence in Rad54(-/-)Mus81(-/-) mice remained comparable to that in Mus81(-/-) mice. Our study highlights...

  9. Evaluation of radioinduced damage and repair capacity in blood lymphocytes of breast cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.A. Nascimento

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Genetic damage caused by ionizing radiation and repair capacity of blood lymphocytes from 3 breast cancer patients and 3 healthy donors were investigated using the comet assay. The comets were analyzed by two parameters: comet tail length and visual classification. Blood samples from the donors were irradiated in vitro with a 60Co source at a dose rate of 0.722 Gy/min, with a dose range of 0.2 to 4.0 Gy and analyzed immediately after the procedure and 3 and 24 h later. The basal level of damage and the radioinduced damage were higher in lymphocytes from breast cancer patients than in lymphocytes from healthy donors. The radioinduced damage showed that the two groups had a similar response when analyzed immediately after the irradiations. Therefore, while the healthy donors presented a considerable reduction of damage after 3 h, the patients had a higher residual damage even 24 h after exposure. The repair capacity of blood lymphocytes from the patients was slower than that of lymphocytes from healthy donors. The possible influence of age, disease stage and mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are discussed. Both parameters adopted proved to be sensitive and reproducible: the dose-response curves for DNA migration can be used not only for the analysis of cellular response but also for monitoring therapeutic interventions. Lymphocytes from the breast cancer patients presented an initial radiosensitivity similar to that of healthy subjects but a deficient repair mechanism made them more vulnerable to the genotoxic action of ionizing radiation. However, since lymphocytes from only 3 patients and 3 normal subjects were analyzed in the present paper, additional donors will be necessary for a more accurate evaluation.

  10. Repair work continues on the external tank of Space Shuttle Discovery after damage from hail

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    In the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB), United Space Alliance technician Robert Williams sands the repaired areas near the top of Space Shuttle Discovery's external tank. Repairs were required for damage caused by hail during recent storms. Because access to all of the damaged areas was not possible at the pad, the Shuttle was rolled back from Pad 39B to the VAB. The work is expected to take two to three days, allowing Discovery to roll back to the pad late this week for launch of mission STS-96, the 94th launch in the Space Shuttle Program. Liftoff will occur no earlier than May 27. STS-96 is a logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-shared experiment.

  11. Arsenic Biotransformation as a Cancer Promoting Factor by Inducing DNA Damage and Disruption of Repair Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor D. Martinez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic exposure to arsenic in drinking water poses a major global health concern. Populations exposed to high concentrations of arsenic-contaminated drinking water suffer serious health consequences, including alarming cancer incidence and death rates. Arsenic is biotransformed through sequential addition of methyl groups, acquired from s-adenosylmethionine (SAM. Metabolism of arsenic generates a variety of genotoxic and cytotoxic species, damaging DNA directly and indirectly, through the generation of reactive oxidative species and induction of DNA adducts, strand breaks and cross links, and inhibition of the DNA repair process itself. Since SAM is the methyl group donor used by DNA methyltransferases to maintain normal epigenetic patterns in all human cells, arsenic is also postulated to affect maintenance of normal DNA methylation patterns, chromatin structure, and genomic stability. The biological processes underlying the cancer promoting factors of arsenic metabolism, related to DNA damage and repair, will be discussed here.

  12. Increasing Melanoma—Too Many Skin Cell Damages or Too Few Repairs?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Örjan Hallberg

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Skin melanoma rates have been increasing for a long time in many Western countries. The object of this study was to apply modern problem-solving theory normally used to clear industrial problems to search for roots and causes of this medical question. Increasing cancer rates can be due to too many cell damage incidents or to too few repairs. So far, it has been assumed that the melanoma epidemic mainly is caused by increasing sun tanning habits. In order to explore this problem in more detail, we used cancer statistics from several countries over time and space. Detailed analysis of data obtained and a model study to evaluate the effects from increased damages or decreased repairs clearly indicate that the main reason behind the melanoma problem is a disturbed immune system. The possibility to introduce efficient corrective actions is apparent.

  13. Oxidatively damaged DNA and its repair after experimental exposure to wood smoke in healthy humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Pernille Høgh; Bräuner, Elvira Vaclavik; Barregard, Lars

    2008-01-01

    Particulate matter from wood smoke may cause health effects through generation of oxidative stress with resulting damage to DNA. We investigated oxidatively damaged DNA and related repair capacity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and measured the urinary excretion of repair products...... after controlled short-term exposure of human volunteers to wood smoke. Thirteen healthy adults were exposed first to clean air and then to wood smoke in a chamber during 4h sessions, 1 week apart. Blood samples were taken 3h after exposure and on the following morning, and urine was collected after...... chromatography with mass spectrometry. The morning following exposure to wood smoke the PBMC levels of SB were significantly decreased and the mRNA levels of hOGG1 significantly increased. FPG sites, hOGG1 activity, expression of hNUDT1 and hHO1, urinary excretion of 8-oxodG and 8-oxoGua did not change...

  14. Granular Effect of Fly Ash Repairs Damage of Recycled Coarse Aggregate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jiu-su; XIAO Han-ning; GONG Jian-qing

    2008-01-01

    Repairing effect of fly ash (FA) on damage of recycled coarse aggregate was evaluated by characteristics of pores and cracks in the vicinity of interracial transition zone (ITZ). The interracial structure between the virgin aggregate and the attached old mortar was investigated and compared with ITZ of recycled aggregate concrete in the presence of FA or ultra-fine FA(UFA) by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM). Diam- eter and plumpness frequency distribution of pores as well as width of the old ITZ, length of contacting points and cracks density were analyzed. The SEM results reveal that the diameter of pores is decreases significantly but pores plumpness increases. A decreased ITZ width and cracks density as well as an increased bonding zone length can also been observed, which indicates that FA or UFA repairs damage of recycled coarse aggregate due to its granular effect.

  15. Rotator Interval Lesion and Damaged Subscapularis Tendon Repair in a High School Baseball Player

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyuki Muto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2013, a 16-year-old baseball pitcher visited Nobuhara Hospital complaining of shoulder pain and limited range of motion in his throwing shoulder. High signal intensity in the rotator interval (RI area (ball sign, injured subscapularis tendon, and damage to both the superior and middle glenohumeral ligaments were identified using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Repair of the RI lesion and partially damaged subscapularis tendon was performed in this pitcher. During surgery, an opened RI and dropping of the subscapularis tendon were observed. The RI was closed in a 90° externally rotated and abducted position. To reconfirm the exact repaired state of the patient, arthroscopic examination was performed from behind. However, suture points were not visible in the >30° externally rotated position, which indicates that the RI could not be correctly repaired with the arthroscopic procedure. One year after surgery, the patient obtained full function of the shoulder and returned to play at a national convention. Surgical repair of the RI lesion should be performed in exactly the correct position of the upper extremity.

  16. Repair of damage to wind turbine foundations. Nondestructive ultrasonic testing; Sanierung von Fundamentschaeden. Zerstoerungsfreie Pruefung mittels Ultraschall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmer, Hans-Peter [CONCRETE CARE, Berlin (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Damage of foundations is often not visible from the surface. And even visible cracks do not show how far they reach inside the foundation. Prior to any repair measures, detailed analysis and a careful and precise description of the damage pattern are required. The biggest challenge is the detection of hidden damage and its correct description. Nondestructive methods are the method of choice. (orig.)

  17. DNA Damage Response and DNA Repair in Skeletal Myocytes From a Mouse Model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayzullina, Saniya; Martin, Lee J

    2016-09-01

    We studied DNA damage response (DDR) and DNA repair capacities of skeletal muscle cells from a mouse model of infantile spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) caused by loss-of-function mutation of survival of motor neuron (Smn). Primary myocyte cultures derived from skeletal muscle satellite cells of neonatal control and mutant SMN mice had similar myotube length, myonuclei, satellite cell marker Pax7 and differentiated myotube marker myosin, and acetylcholine receptor clustering. DNA damage was induced in differentiated skeletal myotubes by γ-irradiation, etoposide, and methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). Unexposed control and SMA myotubes had stable genome integrity. After γ-irradiation and etoposide, myotubes repaired most DNA damage equally. Control and mutant myotubes exposed to MMS exhibited equivalent DNA damage without repair. Control and SMA myotube nuclei contained DDR proteins phospho-p53 and phospho-H2AX foci that, with DNA damage, dispersed and then re-formed similarly after recovery. We conclude that mouse primary satellite cell-derived myotubes effectively respond to and repair DNA strand-breaks, while DNA alkylation repair is underrepresented. Morphological differentiation, genome stability, genome sensor, and DNA strand-break repair potential are preserved in mouse SMA myocytes; thus, reduced SMN does not interfere with myocyte differentiation, genome integrity, and DNA repair, and faulty DNA repair is unlikely pathogenic in SMA.

  18. Low velocity impact response and damage evolution in unreinforced resin systems and self-repairing polymer matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motuku, Molefi

    The low velocity impact response and damage evolution in unreinforced polymer matrices, conventional polymer matrix composites, and self-repairing polymer matrix composites was investigated. The impact response study of unreinforced matrices and conventional laminates was undertaken because the failure initiation energies, threshold energy levels, failure characteristics and damage evolution in both the matrix material (unreinforced resin plaques) and the composite are intrinsic to proper design of a self-repairing composite. The self-repairing concept was investigated due to its attractive potential to alleviate damage problems in polymer matrix composites. Self-repairing composites, which fall under the category of passive smart polymer composites, have the potential to self repair both micro- and macro-damage resulting from impacts as well as non-impact loading. The self-repairing mechanism is achieved through the incorporation of hollow fibers in addition to the normal solid reinforcing fibers. The hollow fibers store the damage-repairing solution or chemicals that are released into the matrix or damaged zone upon fiber failure to repair and/or arrest damage progression. The room temperature low velocity impact response and damage evolution in DERAKANE 411-350 and 411-C50 vinyl ester unreinforced resin systems was investigated as a function of impact energy level, sample thickness, matrix material and catalyst system. The low velocity impact response of conventional and self-repairing glass reinforced polymer composites was investigated by addressing the fabrication and some of the parameters that influence their response to low velocity impact loading. Specific issues addressed by this study include developing a process to fabricate self-repairing laminates, processing quality; selection of storage material for the repairing solution; release and transportation of repairing solution; the effect of the number, type and spatial distribution of the repairing

  19. Repair of a Perforated Sinus Membrane with a Subepithelial Palatal Conjunctive Flap: Technique Report and Evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Gehrke, S. A.; S. Taschieri; Del Fabbro, M.; Corbella, S.

    2012-01-01

    The maxillary sinus grafting procedure has proven to be an acceptable modality for bone augmentation to provide a base for endosseous implants, routinely used for the rehabilitation of posterior maxilla. Perforation of the membrane is the most common complication in this type of procedure. This paper presents a technique for repairing a perforated Schneiderian membrane with a conjunctive connective tissue graft harvested from the palate and shows the histological and radiographic evaluation o...

  20. Maintaining Genetic Integrity Under Extreme Conditions: Novel DNA Damage Repair Biology in the Archaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-23

    DeRuggiero (Johns Hopkins University). Chromosome behaviour was monitored in wild-type and ∆nreA cells treated with MMC for 1 hour and during a 10...MacNeill, undergraduate students Agnieszka Janska and Jason Woodier) In bacteria , RecJ has an important role in DNA damage repair, in particular in...is an NAD-dependent enzyme the gene for which was apparently acquired by lateral gene transfer from bacteria . Biochemical analysis of LigN function

  1. Human POLD1 modulates cell cycle progression and DNA damage repair

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Jing; Hong, Ping; Liu, Chengeng; Zhang, Yueqi; Wang, Jinling; Wang, Peichang

    2015-01-01

    Background The activity of eukaryotic DNA polymerase delta (Pol ?) plays an essential role in genome stability through its effects on DNA replication and repair. The p125 catalytic subunit of Pol ? is encoded by POLD1 gene in human cells. To clarify biological functions of POLD1, we investigated the effects of POLD1 overexpression or downregulation on cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, DNA synthesis and oxidative DNA damage induced by H2O2. Methods HEK293 cells were transfected with ...

  2. DNA Damage and Repair in Plants under Ultraviolet and Ionizing Radiations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarvajeet S. Gill

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Being sessile, plants are continuously exposed to DNA-damaging agents present in the environment such as ultraviolet (UV and ionizing radiations (IR. Sunlight acts as an energy source for photosynthetic plants; hence, avoidance of UV radiations (namely, UV-A, 315–400 nm; UV-B, 280–315 nm; and UV-C, <280 nm is unpreventable. DNA in particular strongly absorbs UV-B; therefore, it is the most important target for UV-B induced damage. On the other hand, IR causes water radiolysis, which generates highly reactive hydroxyl radicals (OH• and causes radiogenic damage to important cellular components. However, to maintain genomic integrity under UV/IR exposure, plants make use of several DNA repair mechanisms. In the light of recent breakthrough, the current minireview (a introduces UV/IR and overviews UV/IR-mediated DNA damage products and (b critically discusses the biochemistry and genetics of major pathways responsible for the repair of UV/IR-accrued DNA damage. The outcome of the discussion may be helpful in devising future research in the current context.

  3. Influence of LET on repair of DNA damages in Deinococcus radiodurans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Y.; Tanaka, A.; Kikuchi, M.; Shimizu, T.; Watanabe, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment; Cao, J.P.; Taucher-Scholz, G.

    1997-03-01

    Inactivation caused by heavy ions was studied in dry cells of radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. All survival curves were characterized by a large shoulder of the curves. No final slopes of the exponential part of survival curves for heavy ion irradiation were steeper than that for 2.0 MeV electron irradiation. The plots of RBE versus LET showed no obvious peaks, suggesting that this bacterium can repair not only DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) but also clustered damage in DNA which may be induced by heavy ions. The genomic DNA of D. radiodurans was cleaved into large fragments with restriction enzyme Not I after post-irradiation incubation and the fragments were separated using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). DSBs induction and rejoining process were analyzed by detection of the reappearance of ladder pattern of DNA fragments. The required repair time after heavy ions irradiation was longer than the repair time for electrons at the same dose of irradiation, however, the rate of repair enzyme induction was almost similar to each other between electrons and heavy ions, suggesting that the same repair system is likely to be used after both low and high LET irradiations. (author)

  4. DNA damage and repair in white blood cells at occupational exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georgieva, R T; Zaharieva, E K; Rupova, I M; Acheva, A R; Nikolov, V N [Department of Radiobiology, National Center of Radiobiology and Radiation Protection, Sofia, 1756 (Bulgaria)], E-mail: r.georgieva@ncrrp.org

    2008-02-01

    : The present work was aimed at finding appropriate biomarkers applicable in molecular epidemiological surveys of occupationally exposed individuals and/or population in order to prove low dose effects. Blood samples were taken from NPP workers, in the 'strict regimen' area (exposed group) and from the administration staff (control group). The spontaneous and induced (exposed to a challenge dose of 2,0 Gy gamma irradiation) DNA repair synthesis in leucocytes, the level of DNA damage by single cell gel-electrophoresis in lymphocytes and the concentration of malonedialdehyde in blood serum, were analyzed. A significant decrease of potentially lethal damage in leucocytes as well as reduction of DNA double strand breaks level in lymphocytes of persons with 'mean annual dose' lower or equal to 5 mSv/a was found, compared to the control group. A higher repair capacity corresponding to elevated protein synthesis after a challenging dose of 2,0 Gy gamma rays and a significant decrease in the level of oxidative stress in the blood plasma were established in persons from the same group. The present investigation showed that annual doses not higher than twice the natural radiation background exert positive effects on DNA damage and repair, increase cellular resistance and decrease oxidative stress.

  5. Modeling damage complexity-dependent non-homologous end-joining repair pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongfeng Li

    Full Text Available Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ is the dominant DNA double strand break (DSB repair pathway and involves several repair proteins such as Ku, DNA-PKcs, and XRCC4. It has been experimentally shown that the choice of NHEJ proteins is determined by the complexity of DSB. In this paper, we built a mathematical model, based on published data, to study how NHEJ depends on the damage complexity. Under an appropriate set of parameters obtained by minimization technique, we can simulate the kinetics of foci track formation in fluorescently tagged mammalian cells, Ku80-EGFP and DNA-PKcs-YFP for simple and complex DSB repair, respectively, in good agreement with the published experimental data, supporting the notion that simple DSB undergo fast repair in a Ku-dependent, DNA-PKcs-independent manner, while complex DSB repair requires additional DNA-PKcs for end processing, resulting in its slow repair, additionally resulting in slower release rate of Ku and the joining rate of complex DNA ends. Based on the numerous experimental descriptions, we investigated several models to describe the kinetics for complex DSB repair. An important prediction of our model is that the rejoining of complex DSBs is through a process of synapsis formation, similar to a second order reaction between ends, rather than first order break filling/joining. The synapsis formation (SF model allows for diffusion of ends before the synapsis formation, which is precluded in the first order model by the rapid coupling of ends. Therefore, the SF model also predicts the higher number of chromosomal aberrations observed with high linear energy transfer (LET radiation due to the higher proportion of complex DSBs compared to low LET radiation, and an increased probability of misrejoin following diffusion before the synapsis is formed, while the first order model does not provide a mechanism for the increased effectiveness in chromosomal aberrations observed.

  6. Particle-based simulations of bilayer membranes: self-assembly, structural analysis, and shock-wave damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhauser, Martin O.; Schindler, Tanja

    2016-08-01

    We report on the results of particle-based, coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of amphiphilic lipid molecules in aqueous environment where the membrane structures at equilibrium are subsequently exposed to strong shock waves, and their damage is analyzed. The lipid molecules self-assemble from unbiased random initial configurations to form stable bilayer membranes, including closed vesicles. During self-assembly of lipid molecules, we observe several stages of clustering, starting with many small clusters of lipids, gradually merging together to finally form one single bilayer membrane. We find that the clustering of lipids sensitively depends on the hydrophobic interaction h_c of the lipid tails in our model and on temperature T of the system. The self-assembled bilayer membranes are quantitatively analyzed at equilibrium with respect to their degree of order and their local structure. We also show that—by analyzing the membrane fluctuations and using a linearized theory— we obtain area compression moduli K_A and bending stiffnesses κ_B for our bilayer membranes which are within the experimental range of in vivo and in vitro measurements of biological membranes. We also discuss the density profile and the pair correlation function of our model membranes at equilibrium which has not been done in previous studies of particle-based membrane models. Furthermore, we present a detailed phase diagram of our lipid model that exhibits a sol-gel transition between quasi-solid and fluid domains, and domains where no self-assembly of lipids occurs. In addition, we present in the phase diagram the conditions for temperature T and hydrophobicity h_c of the lipid tails of our model to form closed vesicles. The stable bilayer membranes obtained at equilibrium are then subjected to strong shock waves in a shock tube setup, and we investigate the damage in the membranes due to their interaction with shock waves. Here, we find a transition from self-repairing

  7. Particle-based simulations of bilayer membranes: self-assembly, structural analysis, and shock-wave damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhauser, Martin O.; Schindler, Tanja

    2017-01-01

    We report on the results of particle-based, coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of amphiphilic lipid molecules in aqueous environment where the membrane structures at equilibrium are subsequently exposed to strong shock waves, and their damage is analyzed. The lipid molecules self-assemble from unbiased random initial configurations to form stable bilayer membranes, including closed vesicles. During self-assembly of lipid molecules, we observe several stages of clustering, starting with many small clusters of lipids, gradually merging together to finally form one single bilayer membrane. We find that the clustering of lipids sensitively depends on the hydrophobic interaction h_c of the lipid tails in our model and on temperature T of the system. The self-assembled bilayer membranes are quantitatively analyzed at equilibrium with respect to their degree of order and their local structure. We also show that—by analyzing the membrane fluctuations and using a linearized theory— we obtain area compression moduli K_A and bending stiffnesses κ _B for our bilayer membranes which are within the experimental range of in vivo and in vitro measurements of biological membranes. We also discuss the density profile and the pair correlation function of our model membranes at equilibrium which has not been done in previous studies of particle-based membrane models. Furthermore, we present a detailed phase diagram of our lipid model that exhibits a sol-gel transition between quasi-solid and fluid domains, and domains where no self-assembly of lipids occurs. In addition, we present in the phase diagram the conditions for temperature T and hydrophobicity h_c of the lipid tails of our model to form closed vesicles. The stable bilayer membranes obtained at equilibrium are then subjected to strong shock waves in a shock tube setup, and we investigate the damage in the membranes due to their interaction with shock waves. Here, we find a transition from self-repairing

  8. Retinal Damage Induced by Internal Limiting Membrane Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Gelman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The internal limiting membrane (ILM, the basement membrane of the Müller cells, serves as the interface between the vitreous body and the retinal nerve fiber layer. It has a fundamental role in the development, structure, and function of the retina, although it also is a pathologic component in the various vitreoretinal disorders, most notably in macular holes. It was not until understanding of the evolution of idiopathic macular holes and the advent of idiopathic macular hole surgery that the idea of adjuvant ILM peeling in the treatment of tractional maculopathies was explored. Today intentional ILM peeling is a commonly applied surgical technique among vitreoretinal surgeons as it has been found to increase the rate of successful macular hole closure and improve surgical outcomes in other vitreoretinal diseases. Though ILM peeling has refined surgery for tractional maculopathies, like all surgical procedures it is not immune to perioperative risk. The essential role of the ILM to the integrity of the retina and risk of trauma to retinal tissue spurs suspicion with regard to its routine removal. Several authors have investigated the retinal damage induced by ILM peeling and these complications have been manifested across many different diagnostic studies.

  9. Comparative DNA damage and repair in echinoderm coelomocytes exposed to genotoxicants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Bibany, Ameena H; Bodnar, Andrea G; Reinardy, Helena C

    2014-01-01

    The capacity to withstand and repair DNA damage differs among species and plays a role in determining an organism's resistance to genotoxicity, life history, and susceptibility to disease. Environmental stressors that affect organisms at the genetic level are of particular concern in ecotoxicology due to the potential for chronic effects and trans-generational impacts on populations. Echinoderms are valuable organisms to study the relationship between DNA repair and resistance to genotoxic stress due to their history and use as ecotoxicological models, little evidence of senescence, and few reported cases of neoplasia. Coelomocytes (immune cells) have been proposed to serve as sensitive bioindicators of environmental stress and are often used to assess genotoxicity; however, little is known about how coelomocytes from different echinoderm species respond to genotoxic stress. In this study, DNA damage was assessed (by Fast Micromethod) in coelomocytes of four echinoderm species (sea urchins Lytechinus variegatus, Echinometra lucunter lucunter, and Tripneustes ventricosus, and a sea cucumber Isostichopus badionotus) after acute exposure to H2O2 (0-100 mM) and UV-C (0-9999 J/m2), and DNA repair was analyzed over a 24-hour period of recovery. Results show that coelomocytes from all four echinoderm species have the capacity to repair both UV-C and H2O2-induced DNA damage; however, there were differences in repair capacity between species. At 24 hours following exposure to the highest concentration of H2O2 (100 mM) and highest dose of UV-C (9999 J/m2) cell viability remained high (>94.6 ± 1.2%) but DNA repair ranged from 18.2 ± 9.2% to 70.8 ± 16.0% for H2O2 and 8.4 ± 3.2% to 79.8 ± 9.0% for UV-C exposure. Species-specific differences in genotoxic susceptibility and capacity for DNA repair are important to consider when evaluating ecogenotoxicological model organisms and assessing overall impacts of genotoxicants in the environment.

  10. Comparative DNA damage and repair in echinoderm coelomocytes exposed to genotoxicants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameena H El-Bibany

    Full Text Available The capacity to withstand and repair DNA damage differs among species and plays a role in determining an organism's resistance to genotoxicity, life history, and susceptibility to disease. Environmental stressors that affect organisms at the genetic level are of particular concern in ecotoxicology due to the potential for chronic effects and trans-generational impacts on populations. Echinoderms are valuable organisms to study the relationship between DNA repair and resistance to genotoxic stress due to their history and use as ecotoxicological models, little evidence of senescence, and few reported cases of neoplasia. Coelomocytes (immune cells have been proposed to serve as sensitive bioindicators of environmental stress and are often used to assess genotoxicity; however, little is known about how coelomocytes from different echinoderm species respond to genotoxic stress. In this study, DNA damage was assessed (by Fast Micromethod in coelomocytes of four echinoderm species (sea urchins Lytechinus variegatus, Echinometra lucunter lucunter, and Tripneustes ventricosus, and a sea cucumber Isostichopus badionotus after acute exposure to H2O2 (0-100 mM and UV-C (0-9999 J/m2, and DNA repair was analyzed over a 24-hour period of recovery. Results show that coelomocytes from all four echinoderm species have the capacity to repair both UV-C and H2O2-induced DNA damage; however, there were differences in repair capacity between species. At 24 hours following exposure to the highest concentration of H2O2 (100 mM and highest dose of UV-C (9999 J/m2 cell viability remained high (>94.6 ± 1.2% but DNA repair ranged from 18.2 ± 9.2% to 70.8 ± 16.0% for H2O2 and 8.4 ± 3.2% to 79.8 ± 9.0% for UV-C exposure. Species-specific differences in genotoxic susceptibility and capacity for DNA repair are important to consider when evaluating ecogenotoxicological model organisms and assessing overall impacts of genotoxicants in the environment.

  11. Thermal spray and weld repair alloys for the repair of cavitation damage in turbines and pumps: A technical note

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashok; Boy, J.; Zatorski, Ray; Stephenson, L. D.

    2005-06-01

    The cavitation and erosion resistance of 21 thermal spray coatings and four weld repair materials were investigated in the laboratory using cavitation jet and slurry erosion testing. Of the thermal spray coatings, Stellite® 6 deposited by the high velocity oxyfuel (HVOF) process had the lowest cavitation rate (11.7 mg/h). This was higher than the corresponding cavitation rate (3.2 mg/h) of 308 stainless steel weld metal currently used as a reference. In the slurry erosion testing, the volume loss of Stellite® 6 applied by the HVOF process was 5.33 cubic mm/h, much lower than the corresponding loss (11.17 cubic mm/h) in the currently used stainless steel 304 reference. Furthermore, the electrochemical potential difference between the carbon steel and HVOF sprayed Stellite 6 coating was 0.25 volts, half the potential difference between the 304 stainless steel carbon steel substrate, and will result in reduced galvanic corrosion of the substrate near the contact areas. Stellite 6 deposited by the HVOF process was recommended for repair of damage resulting from erosion and subsequent cavitation by caused by surface roughening.

  12. The effect of aging on the DNA damage and repair capacity in 2BS cells undergoing oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin-Ling; Wang, Pei-Chang

    2012-01-01

    Aging is associated with a reduction in the DNA repair capacity under oxidative stress. However, whether the DNA damage and repair capacity can be a biomarker of aging remains controversial. In this study, we demonstrated two cause-and-effect relationships, the one is between the DNA damage and repair capacity and the cellular age, another is between DNA damage and repair capacity and the level of oxidative stress in human embryonic lung fibroblasts (2BS) exposed to different doses of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). To clarify the mechanisms of the age-related reduction in DNA damage and repair capacity, we preliminarily evaluated the expressions of six kinds of pivotal enzymes involved in the two classical DNA repair pathways. The DNA repair capacity was observed in human fibroblasts cells using the comet assay; the age-related DNA repair enzymes were selected by RT-PCR and then verified by Western blot in vitro. Results showed that the DNA repair capacity was negatively and linearly correlated with (i) cumulative population doubling (PD) levels only in the group of low concentration of hydrogen peroxide treatment, (ii) with the level of oxidative stress only in the group of young PD cells. The mRNA expression of DNA polymerase δ1 decreased substantially in senescent cells and showed negative linear-correlation with PD levels; the protein expression level was well consistent with the mRNA level. Taken together, DNA damage and repair capacity can be a biomarker of aging. Reduced expression of DNA polymerase δ1 may be responsible for the decrease of DNA repair capacity in senescent cells.

  13. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for repair of tracheal injury during transhiatal esophagectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilibeth Fermin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO for repair of tracheal injury during transhiatal esophagectomy Tracheal injury is a rare but potentially fatal complication of esophagectomies requiring prompt recognition and treatment. We describe a case of tracheal injury recognized in the operative period of an open transhiatal esophagectomy for squamous cell carcinoma of the mid to distal esophagus. When injury was discovered, attempts to improve oxygenation and ventilation by conventional methods were unsuccessful. Therefore, peripheral ECMO was used to support oxygenation during the tracheal defect repair. The use of ECMO for the repair of a tracheal injury during esophagectomy is very uncommon but, in our case, provided adequate oxygenation and ventilation while the surgeon repaired the injury and the patient was able to be promptly weaned from ECMO support and extubated not long after.

  14. DNA-damage foci to detect and characterize DNA repair alterations in children treated for pediatric malignancies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Schuler

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: In children diagnosed with cancer, we evaluated the DNA damage foci approach to identify patients with double-strand break (DSB repair deficiencies, who may overreact to DNA-damaging radio- and chemotherapy. In one patient with Fanconi anemia (FA suffering relapsing squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity we also characterized the repair defect in biopsies of skin, mucosa and tumor. METHODS AND MATERIALS: In children with histologically confirmed tumors or leukemias and healthy control-children DSB repair was investigated by counting γH2AX-, 53BP1- and pATM-foci in blood lymphocytes at defined time points after ex-vivo irradiation. This DSB repair capacity was correlated with treatment-related normal-tissue responses. For the FA patient the defective repair was also characterized in tissue biopsies by analyzing DNA damage response proteins by light and electron microscopy. RESULTS: Between tumor-children and healthy control-children we observed significant differences in mean DSB repair capacity, suggesting that childhood cancer is based on genetic alterations affecting DNA repair. Only 1 out of 4 patients with grade-4 normal-tissue toxicities revealed an impaired DSB repair capacity. The defective DNA repair in FA patient was verified in irradiated blood lymphocytes as well as in non-irradiated mucosa and skin biopsies leading to an excessive accumulation of heterochromatin-associated DSBs in rapidly cycling cells. CONCLUSIONS: Analyzing human tissues we show that DSB repair alterations predispose to cancer formation at younger ages and affect the susceptibility to normal-tissue toxicities. DNA damage foci analysis of blood and tissue samples allows one to detect and characterize DSB repair deficiencies and enables identification of patients at risk for high-grade toxicities. However, not all treatment-associated normal-tissue toxicities can be explained by DSB repair deficiencies.

  15. Bacterial dynamin as a membrane puncture repair kit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Sousa Borges, Anabela; Scheffers, Dirk-Jan

    2016-01-01

    Dynamin(-like) proteins (DLPs) are widely distributed inbacteria, and both structural and biochemical data haveclearly demonstrated that, like their eukaryotic counter-parts, these proteins can function in membrane modelling.Although various functions for bacterial DLPs have beenhypothesized, a clea

  16. 49 CFR 1242.36 - Machinery repair and equipment damaged (accounts XX-26-40 and XX-26-48).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Machinery repair and equipment damaged (accounts XX-26-40 and XX-26-48). 1242.36 Section 1242.36 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... FOR RAILROADS 1 Operating Expenses-Equipment § 1242.36 Machinery repair and equipment...

  17. DNA Damage Follows Repair Factor Depletion and Portends Genome Variation in Cancer Cells after Pore Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irianto, Jerome; Xia, Yuntao; Pfeifer, Charlotte R; Athirasala, Avathamsa; Ji, Jiazheng; Alvey, Cory; Tewari, Manu; Bennett, Rachel R; Harding, Shane M; Liu, Andrea J; Greenberg, Roger A; Discher, Dennis E

    2017-01-23

    Migration through micron-size constrictions has been seen to rupture the nucleus, release nuclear-localized GFP, and cause localized accumulations of ectopic 53BP1-a DNA repair protein. Here, constricted migration of two human cancer cell types and primary mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) increases DNA breaks throughout the nucleoplasm as assessed by endogenous damage markers and by electrophoretic "comet" measurements. Migration also causes multiple DNA repair proteins to segregate away from DNA, with cytoplasmic mis-localization sustained for many hours as is relevant to delayed repair. Partial knockdown of repair factors that also regulate chromosome copy numbers is seen to increase DNA breaks in U2OS osteosarcoma cells without affecting migration and with nucleoplasmic patterns of damage similar to constricted migration. Such depletion also causes aberrant levels of DNA. Migration-induced nuclear damage is nonetheless reversible for wild-type and sub-cloned U2OS cells, except for lasting genomic differences between stable clones as revealed by DNA arrays and sequencing. Gains and losses of hundreds of megabases in many chromosomes are typical of the changes and heterogeneity in bone cancer. Phenotypic differences that arise from constricted migration of U2OS clones are further illustrated by a clone with a highly elongated and stable MSC-like shape that depends on microtubule assembly downstream of the transcription factor GATA4. Such changes are consistent with reversion to a more stem-like state upstream of cancerous osteoblastic cells. Migration-induced genomic instability can thus associate with heritable changes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. An immunochemical approach to the study of DNA damage and repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, S.S. (Vermont Univ., Burlington, VT (United States). Dept. of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics); Erlanger, B.F. (Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Microbiology)

    1992-05-01

    The overall objective of this project has been to develop immunochemical methods to quantitate unique DNA base damages in order to facilitate studies on radiation-induced damage production and repair. Specifically, we have been using antibodies raised to damaged bases to quantitate unique lesions in model systems in order to evaluate their potential biological consequences. Our approach has been to synthesize modified nucleotides or nucleosides, conjugate them to protein carriers, and use the conjugates as immunogens in rabbits or to prepare monoclonal antibodies. We have been studying damages that are stable radiolysis products found in X-irradiated DNA and thus of potential biological consequence. Our aim is to build an in vitro and in vivo data base on the interactions between model DNA lesions and such cellular enzymes as DNA polymerases and repair endonucleases. Initial studies have focused on pyrimidine ring saturation products (thymine glycol.and dihydrothymine), products resulting from ring fragmentation or base loss (urea, {Beta}-ureidoisobutyric acid, abasic sites), 7-hydro-8-oxopurines, and more recently, cytosine radiolysis products. These modified bases serve as useful models for examining the potential lethal and/or mutagenic (carcinogenic) effects of the products of DNA radiolysis.

  19. The role of DNA damage and repair in decitabine-mediated apoptosis in multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Ken; De Smedt, Eva; Lemaire, Miguel; De Raeve, Hendrik; Menu, Eline; Van Valckenborgh, Els; McClue, Steve; Vanderkerken, Karin; De Bruyne, Elke

    2014-05-30

    DNA methyltransferase inhibitors (DNMTi) and histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) are under investigation for the treatment of cancer, including the plasma cell malignancy multiple myeloma (MM). Evidence exists that DNA damage and repair contribute to the cytotoxicity mediated by the DNMTi decitabine. Here, we investigated the DNA damage response (DDR) induced by decitabine in MM using 4 human MM cell lines and the murine 5T33MM model. In addition, we explored how the HDACi JNJ-26481585 affects this DDR. Decitabine induced DNA damage (gamma-H2AX foci formation), followed by a G0/G1- or G2/M-phase arrest and caspase-mediated apoptosis. JNJ-26481585 enhanced the anti-MM effect of decitabine both in vitro and in vivo. As JNJ-26481585 did not enhance decitabine-mediated gamma-H2AX foci formation, we investigated the DNA repair response towards decitabine and/or JNJ-26481585. Decitabine augmented RAD51 foci formation (marker for homologous recombination (HR)) and/or 53BP1 foci formation (marker for non-homologous end joining (NHEJ)). Interestingly, JNJ-26481585 negatively affected basal or decitabine-induced RAD51 foci formation. Finally, B02 (RAD51 inhibitor) enhanced decitabine-mediated apoptosis. Together, we report that decitabine-induced DNA damage stimulates HR and/or NHEJ. JNJ-26481585 negatively affects RAD51 foci formation, thereby providing an additional explanation for the combinatory effect between decitabine and JNJ-26481585.

  20. Actualities on molecular pathogenesis and repairing processes of cerebral damage in perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Distefano, Giuseppe; Praticò, Andrea D

    2010-09-16

    Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is the most important cause of cerebral damage and long-term neurological sequelae in the perinatal period both in term and preterm infant. Hypoxic-ischemic (H-I) injuries develop in two phases: the ischemic phase, dominated by necrotic processes, and the reperfusion phase, dominated by apoptotic processes extending beyond ischemic areas. Due to selective ischemic vulnerability, cerebral damage affects gray matter in term newborns and white matter in preterm newborns with the typical neuropathological aspects of laminar cortical necrosis in the former and periventricular leukomalacia in the latter. This article summarises the principal physiopathological and biochemical processes leading to necrosis and/or apoptosis of neuronal and glial cells and reports recent insights into some endogenous and exogenous cellular and molecular mechanisms aimed at repairing H-I cerebral damage.

  1. Actualities on molecular pathogenesis and repairing processes of cerebral damage in perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praticò Andrea D

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE is the most important cause of cerebral damage and long-term neurological sequelae in the perinatal period both in term and preterm infant. Hypoxic-ischemic (H-I injuries develop in two phases: the ischemic phase, dominated by necrotic processes, and the reperfusion phase, dominated by apoptotic processes extending beyond ischemic areas. Due to selective ischemic vulnerability, cerebral damage affects gray matter in term newborns and white matter in preterm newborns with the typical neuropathological aspects of laminar cortical necrosis in the former and periventricular leukomalacia in the latter. This article summarises the principal physiopathological and biochemical processes leading to necrosis and/or apoptosis of neuronal and glial cells and reports recent insights into some endogenous and exogenous cellular and molecular mechanisms aimed at repairing H-I cerebral damage.

  2. Proteasome inhibition enhances resistance to DNA damage via upregulation of Rpn4-dependent DNA repair genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpov, Dmitry S; Spasskaya, Daria S; Tutyaeva, Vera V; Mironov, Alexander S; Karpov, Vadim L

    2013-09-17

    The 26S proteasome is an ATP-dependent multi-subunit protease complex and the major regulator of intracellular protein turnover and quality control. However, its role in the DNA damage response is controversial. We addressed this question in yeast by disrupting the transcriptional regulation of the PRE1 proteasomal gene. The mutant strain has decreased proteasome activity and is hyper-resistant to various DNA-damaging agents. We found that Rpn4-target genes MAG1, RAD23, and RAD52 are overexpressed in this strain due to Rpn4 stabilisation. These genes represent three different pathways of base excision, nucleotide excision and double strand break repair by homologous recombination (DSB-HR). Consistently, the proteasome mutant displays increased DSB-HR activity. Our data imply that the proteasome may have a negative role in DNA damage response.

  3. Dietary phytochemicals, HDAC inhibition, and DNA damage/repair defects in cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendran Praveen

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Genomic instability is a common feature of cancer etiology. This provides an avenue for therapeutic intervention, since cancer cells are more susceptible than normal cells to DNA damaging agents. However, there is growing evidence that the epigenetic mechanisms that impact DNA methylation and histone status also contribute to genomic instability. The DNA damage response, for example, is modulated by the acetylation status of histone and non-histone proteins, and by the opposing activities of histone acetyltransferase and histone deacetylase (HDAC enzymes. Many HDACs overexpressed in cancer cells have been implicated in protecting such cells from genotoxic insults. Thus, HDAC inhibitors, in addition to unsilencing tumor suppressor genes, also can silence DNA repair pathways, inactivate non-histone proteins that are required for DNA stability, and induce reactive oxygen species and DNA double-strand breaks. This review summarizes how dietary phytochemicals that affect the epigenome also can trigger DNA damage and repair mechanisms. Where such data is available, examples are cited from studies in vitro and in vivo of polyphenols, organosulfur/organoselenium compounds, indoles, sesquiterpene lactones, and miscellaneous agents such as anacardic acid. Finally, by virtue of their genetic and epigenetic mechanisms, cancer chemopreventive agents are being redefined as chemo- or radio-sensitizers. A sustained DNA damage response coupled with insufficient repair may be a pivotal mechanism for apoptosis induction in cancer cells exposed to dietary phytochemicals. Future research, including appropriate clinical investigation, should clarify these emerging concepts in the context of both genetic and epigenetic mechanisms dysregulated in cancer, and the pros and cons of specific dietary intervention strategies.

  4. Repair of skin damage during fractionated irradiation with gamma rays and low-LET carbon ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Koichi; Koike, Sachiko; Uzawa, Akiko; Takai, Nobuhiko; Fukawa, Takeshi; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Aoki, Mizuho; Hirayama, Ryoichi

    2006-06-01

    In clinical use of carbon-ion beams, a deep-seated tumor is irradiated with a Spread-Out Bragg peak (SOBP) with a high-LET feature, whereas surface skin is irradiated with an entrance plateau, the LET of which is lower than that of the peak. The repair kinetics of murine skin damage caused by an entrance plateau of carbon ions was compared with that caused by photons using a scheme of daily fractionated doses followed by a top-up dose. Right hind legs received local irradiations with either 20 keV/microm carbon ions or gamma rays. The skin reaction of the irradiated legs was scored every other day up to Day 35 using a scoring scale that consisted of 10 steps, ranging from 0.5 to 5.0. An isoeffect dose to produce a skin reaction score of 3.0 was used to obtain a total dose and a top-up dose for each fractionation. Dependence on a preceding dose and on the time interval of a top-up dose was examined using gamma rays. For fractionated gamma rays, the total dose linearly increased while the top-up dose linearly decreased with an increase in the number of fractions. The magnitude of damage repair depended on the size of dose per fraction, and was larger for 5.2 Gy than 12.5 Gy. The total dose of carbon ions with 5.2 Gy per fraction did not change till 2 fractions, but abruptly increased at the 3rd fraction. Factors such as rapid repopulation, induced repair and cell cycle synchronization are possible explanations for the abrupt increase. As an abrupt increase/decrease of normal tissue damage could be caused by changing the number of fractions in carbon-ion radiotherapy, we conclude that, unlike photon therapy, skin damage should be carefully studied when the number of fractions is changed in new clinical trials.

  5. Anhydrobiosis-associated nuclear DNA damage and repair in the sleeping chironomid: linkage with radioresistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Gusev

    Full Text Available Anhydrobiotic chironomid larvae can withstand prolonged complete desiccation as well as other external stresses including ionizing radiation. To understand the cross-tolerance mechanism, we have analyzed the structural changes in the nuclear DNA using transmission electron microscopy and DNA comet assays in relation to anhydrobiosis and radiation. We found that dehydration causes alterations in chromatin structure and a severe fragmentation of nuclear DNA in the cells of the larvae despite successful anhydrobiosis. Furthermore, while the larvae had restored physiological activity within an hour following rehydration, nuclear DNA restoration typically took 72 to 96 h. The DNA fragmentation level and the recovery of DNA integrity in the rehydrated larvae after anhydrobiosis were similar to those of hydrated larvae irradiated with 70 Gy of high-linear energy transfer (LET ions ((4He. In contrast, low-LET radiation (gamma-rays of the same dose caused less initial damage to the larvae, and DNA was completely repaired within within 24 h. The expression of genes encoding the DNA repair enzymes occurred upon entering anhydrobiosis and exposure to high- and low-LET radiations, indicative of DNA damage that includes double-strand breaks and their subsequent repair. The expression of antioxidant enzymes-coding genes was also elevated in the anhydrobiotic and the gamma-ray-irradiated larvae that probably functions to reduce the negative effect of reactive oxygen species upon exposure to these stresses. Indeed the mature antioxidant proteins accumulated in the dry larvae and the total activity of antioxidants increased by a 3-4 fold in association with anhydrobiosis. We conclude that one of the factors explaining the relationship between radioresistance and the ability to undergo anhydrobiosis in the sleeping chironomid could be an adaptation to desiccation-inflicted nuclear DNA damage. There were also similarities in the molecular response of the larvae to

  6. Laser induced wounding of the plasma membrane and methods to study the repair process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Ana J; Maiuri, Paolo; Lafaurie-Janvore, Julie; Perez, Franck; Piel, Matthieu

    2015-01-01

    Cells are constantly exposed to agents that can trigger the perforation of their plasma membrane. This damage occurs naturally, and the frequency and intensity depends on how much cells are exposed to damaging threats. The following protocol is a simple and powerful method to damage the plasma membrane using laser ablation. It allows the induction of a single and localized wound at the plasma membrane of cultured cells, which can be followed with fast time-lapse imaging. The first part of the protocol describes simple cell culture techniques and the material ideal to make the experiments. A second part of the protocol gives advice about the procedures to make effective wounds in cells while ensuring a good survival rate. We also propose different ways to follow the opening and closure of the plasma membrane. Finally, we describe the procedure to efficiently analyze the data acquired after single cell photodamage to characterize the wounding process.

  7. Comparative acoustic performance and mechanical properties of silk membranes for the repair of chronic tympanic membrane perforations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allardyce, Benjamin J; Rajkhowa, Rangam; Dilley, Rodney J; Xie, Zhigang; Campbell, Luke; Keating, Adrian; Atlas, Marcus D; von Unge, Magnus; Wang, Xungai

    2016-12-01

    The acoustic and mechanical properties of silk membranes of different thicknesses were tested to determine their suitability as a repair material for tympanic membrane perforations. Membranes of different thickness (10-100μm) were tested to determine their frequency response and their resistance to pressure loads in a simulated ear canal model. Their mechanical rigidity to pressure loads was confirmed by tensile testing. These membranes were tested alongside animal cartilage, currently the strongest available myringoplasty graft as well as paper, which is commonly used for simpler procedures. Silk membranes showed resonant frequencies within the human hearing range and a higher vibrational amplitude than cartilage, suggesting that silk may offer good acoustic energy transfer characteristics. Silk membranes were also highly resistant to simulated pressure changes in the middle ear, suggesting they can resist retraction, a common cause of graft failure resulting from chronic negative pressures in the middle ear. Part of this strength can be explained by the substantially higher modulus of silk films compared with cartilage. This allows for the production of films that are much thinner than cartilage, with superior acoustic properties, but that still provide the same level of mechanical support as thicker cartilage. Together, these in vitro results suggest that silk membranes may provide good hearing outcomes while offering similar levels of mechanical support to the reconstructed middle ear.

  8. Effect of caffeine and adenosine on G2 repair: mitotic delay and chromosome damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Fernández, A; Hernández, P; López-Sáez, J F

    1985-04-01

    Proliferating plant cells treated during the late S period with 5-aminouracil (AU), give the typical response that DNA-damaging agents induce, characterized by: an important mitotic delay, and a potentiation of the chromosome damage by caffeine post-treatment. The study of labelled prophases, after a tritiated thymidine pulse, allowed evaluation of the mitotic delay induced by AU as well as its reversion by caffeine, while chromosome damage was estimated by the percentage of anaphases and telophases showing chromosomal aberrations. Post-treatment with adenosine alone has shown no effect on mitotic delay or chromosomal damage. However, when cells after AU were incubated in caffeine plus adenosine, the chromosome damage potentiation was abolished without affecting the caffeine action on mitotic delay. As a consequence, we postulate that caffeine could have two effects on G2 cells with damaged DNA: the first, to cancel their mitotic delay and the second to inhibit some DNA-repair pathway(s). Only this last effect could be reversed by adenosine.

  9. Damage assessment of the equine sperm membranes by fluorimetric technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eneiva Carla Carvalho Celeghini

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available To validate a practical technique of simultaneous evaluation of the plasma, acrosomal and mitochondrial membranes in equine spermatozoa three fluorescent probes (PI, FITC-PSA and MITO were associated. Four ejaculates from three stallions (n=12 were diluted in TALP medium and split into 2 aliquots, 1 aliquot was flash frozen in liquid nitrogen to induce damage in cellular membranes. Three treatments were prepared with the following fixed ratios of fresh semen: flash frozen semen: 100:0 (T100, 50:50 (T50, and 0:100 (T0. A 150-µL aliquot of diluted semen of each treatment was added of 2 µL of PI, 2 µL of MITO and 80 µL of FITC-PSA; incubated at 38.5ºC/8 min, and sperm cells were evaluated by epifluorescent microscopy. Based in regression analysis, this could be an efficient and practical technique to assess damage in equine spermatozoa, as it was able to determine the sperm percentage more representative of the potential to fertilize the oocyte.Para validar uma técnica prática de avaliação simultânea das membranas plasmática, acrossomal e mitocondrial em espermatozóides eqüinos três sondas fluorescentes (PI, FITC-PSA e MITO foram associadas. Quatro ejaculados de três garanhões (n=12 foram diluídos em meio TALP e divididos em duas alíquotas, uma alíquota foi submetida a flash frozen em nitrogênio líquido para induzir danos nas membranas celulares. Três tratamentos foram preparados com as seguintes proporções de sêmen fresco: sêmen flash frozen: 100:0 (T100, 50:50 (T50, e 0:100 (T0. Uma amostra de 150 µL de sêmen diluído de cada tratamento foi adicionada de 2 µL de PI, 2 µL de MITO e 80 µL de FITC-PSA; incubadas à 38,5ºC/8 min, e as células espermáticas foram avaliadas por microscopia de epifluorescência. Baseados na análise de regressão esta é uma técnica eficiente e prática para determinar danos em espermatozóides eqüinos, capaz de determinar a porcentagem de espermatozóides mais representativa do

  10. Repair work begins on the external tank of Space Shuttle Discovery after damage from hail

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    United Space Alliance technician Don Pataky repairs one of the hail-created divots in the foam insulation on the external tank of Space Shuttle Discovery. The Shuttle was rolled back from Pad 39B to the Vehicle Assemby Building for repairs because access to all of the damaged areas was not possible at the pad. The work is expected to take two to three days, allowing Discovery to roll back to the pad late this week for launch of mission STS-96, the 94th launch in the Space Shuttle Program. Liftoff will occur no earlier than May 27. STS-96 is a logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-shared experiment.

  11. Repair work begins on the external tank of Space Shuttle Discovery after damage from hail

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Standing inside a protective tent around the external tank of Space Shuttle Discovery in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB), United Space Alliance technician Don Pataky repairs divots caused by hail storms. The Shuttle was rolled back from Pad 39B to the VAB for repairs because access to all of the damaged areas was not possible at the pad. The work is expected to take two to three days, allowing Discovery to roll back to the pad late this week for launch of mission STS-96, the 94th launch in the Space Shuttle Program. Liftoff will occur no earlier than May 27. STS- 96 is a logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student- shared experiment.

  12. Space Transportation System (STS)-117 External Tank (ET)-124 Hail Damage Repair Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Timmy R.; Gentz, Steven J.; Barth, Timothy S.; Minute, Stephen A.; Flowers, Cody P.; Hamilton, David A.; Null, Cynthia H.; Schafer, Charles F.

    2009-01-01

    Severe thunderstorms with associated hail and high winds struck the STS-117 stack on February 26, 2007. Peak winds were recorded at 62 knots with hail sizes ranging from 0.3 inch to 0.8 inch in diameter. As a result of the storm, the North Carolina Foam Institute (NCFI) type 24-124 Thermal Protection System (TPS) foam on the liquid oxygen (LO2) ogive acreage incurred significant impact damage. The NCFI on the ET intertank and the liquid hydrogen (LH2) acreage sustained hail damage. The Polymer Development Laboratory (PDL)-1034 foam of the LO2 ice frost ramps (IFRs) and the Super-Lightweight Ablator (SLA) of the LO2 cable tray also suffered minor damage. NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) was asked to assess the technical feasibility of repairing the ET TPS, the reasonableness of conducting those repairs with the vehicle in a vertical, integrated configuration at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Vehicle Assemble Building (VAB), and to address attendant human factors considerations including worker fatigue and the potential for error. The outcome of the assessment is recorded in this document.

  13. Effect of the repaired damage morphology of fused silica on the modulation of incident laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, X.; Jiang, Y.; Qiu, R.; Zhou, Q.; Zuo, R.; Zhou, G. R.; Yao, K.

    2017-02-01

    Local CO2 laser treatment has proved to be the most promising method to extend the life-time of fused silica. However, previous experimental data show that some raised rims are observed around the mitigated sites left from the mitigation process, which will result in hazardous light modulation to the downstream optics. In this work, the morphology features of mitigated sites on the surface of fused silica optics were analyzed in detail. According to measured morphology features, a 3D analytical model for simulating the modulation value induced by mitigated site has been developed based on the scalar diffraction theory. The diffraction patterns at a discrete distance downstream from each mitigated site are measured. The influences of geometry, laser wavelength and refractive index of substrates on the modulation by repaired damage morphology at different distances are discussed, respectively. The analytical model is usable and representative to evaluate the hazardous modulation induced by repaired damage morphology to downstream optics. Results on this research suggest that the downstream intensification can be suppressed by controlling the morphology features of mitigated sites, which provides a direction for the development and improvement of the mitigated techniques of damage optics.

  14. Assessment of okadaic acid effects on cytotoxicity, DNA damage and DNA repair in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdiglesias, Vanessa; Méndez, Josefina; Pásaro, Eduardo; Cemeli, Eduardo; Anderson, Diana; Laffon, Blanca

    2010-07-07

    Okadaic acid (OA) is a phycotoxin produced by several types of dinoflagellates causing diarrheic shellfish poisoning (DSP) in humans. Symptoms induced by DSP toxins are mainly gastrointestinal, but the intoxication does not appear to be fatal. Despite this, this toxin presents a potential threat to human health even at concentrations too low to induce acute toxicity, since previous animal studies have shown that OA has very potent tumour promoting activity. However, its concrete action mechanism has not been described yet and the results reported with regard to OA cytotoxicity and genotoxicity are often contradictory. In the present study, the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of OA on three different types of human cells (peripheral blood leukocytes, HepG2 hepatoma cells, and SHSY5Y neuroblastoma cells) were evaluated. Cells were treated with a range of OA concentrations in the presence and absence of S9 fraction, and MTT test and Comet assay were performed in order to evaluate cytotoxicity and genotoxicity, respectively. The possible effects of OA on DNA repair were also studied by means of the DNA repair competence assay, using bleomycin as DNA damage inductor. Treatment with OA in absence of S9 fraction induced not statistically significant decrease in cell viability and significant increase in DNA damage in all cell types at the highest concentrations investigated. However, only SHSY5Y cells showed OA induced genotoxic and cytotoxic effects in presence of S9 fraction. Furthermore, we found that OA can induce modulations in DNA repair processes when exposure was performed prior to BLM treatment, in co-exposure, or during the subsequent DNA repair process. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Nrf2 facilitates repair of radiation induced DNA damage through homologous recombination repair pathway in a ROS independent manner in cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayakumar, Sundarraj; Pal, Debojyoti; Sandur, Santosh K., E-mail: sskumar@barc.gov.in

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Nrf2 inhibition in A549 cells led to attenuated DNA repair and radiosensitization. • Influence of Nrf2 on DNA repair is not linked to its antioxidant function. • Nrf2 influences DNA repair through homologous recombination (HR) repair pathway. • Many genes involved in HR pathway show ARE sequences in their upstream region. - Abstract: Nrf2 is a redox sensitive transcription factor that is involved in the co-ordinated transcription of genes involved in redox homeostasis. But the role of Nrf2 in DNA repair is not investigated in detail. We have employed A549 and MCF7 cells to study the role of Nrf2 on DNA repair by inhibiting Nrf2 using all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) or by knock down approach prior to radiation exposure (4 Gy). DNA damage and repair analysis was studied by γH2AX foci formation and comet assay. Results suggested that the inhibition of Nrf2 in A549 or MCF7 cells led to significant slowdown in DNA repair as compared to respective radiation controls. The persistence of residual DNA damage even in the presence of free radical scavenger N-acetyl cysteine, suggested that the influence of Nrf2 on DNA repair was not linked to its antioxidant functions. Further, its influence on non-homologous end joining repair pathway was studied by inhibiting both Nrf2 and DNA-PK together. This led to synergistic reduction of survival fraction, indicating that Nrf2 may not be influencing the NHEJ pathway. To investigate the role of homologous recombination repair (HR) pathway, RAD51 foci formation was monitored. There was a significant reduction in the foci formation in cells treated with ATRA or shRNA against Nrf2 as compared to their respective radiation controls. Further, Nrf2 inhibition led to significant reduction in mRNA levels of RAD51. BLAST analysis was also performed on upstream regions of DNA repair genes to identify antioxidant response element and found that many repair genes that are involved in HR pathway may be regulated by Nrf2

  16. Bacillus thuringiensis membrane-damaging toxins acting on mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celandroni, Francesco; Salvetti, Sara; Senesi, Sonia; Ghelardi, Emilia

    2014-12-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is widely used as a biopesticide in forestry and agriculture, being able to produce potent species-specific insecticidal toxins and considered nonpathogenic to other animals. More recently, however, repeated observations are documenting the association of this microorganism with various infectious diseases in humans, such as food-poisoning-associated diarrheas, periodontitis, bacteremia, as well as ocular, burn, and wound infections. Similar to B. cereus, B. thuringiensis produces an array of virulence factors acting against mammalian cells, such as phosphatidylcholine- and phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC and PI-PLC), hemolysins, in particular hemolysin BL (HBL), and various enterotoxins. The contribution of some of these toxins to B. thuringiensis pathogenicity has been studied in animal models of infection, following intravitreous, intranasal, or intratracheal inoculation. These studies lead to the speculation that the activities of PC-PLC, PI-PLC, and HBL are responsible for most of the pathogenic properties of B. thuringiensis in nongastrointestinal infections in mammals. This review summarizes data regarding the biological activity, the genetic basis, and the structural features of these membrane-damaging toxins.

  17. Repair of damaged connectors of tunneled cuffed catheters with a two-piece adaptor for peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letachowicz, Krzysztof; Letachowicz, Waldemar; Weyde, Waclaw; Gołębiowski, Tomasz; Kusztal, Mariusz; Wątorek, Ewa; Klinger, Marian

    2012-01-01

    Although catheter use exposes the patient to several complications, tunneled cuffed catheters are widely applied for temporary or long-term vascular access. The aim of the study was to establish the rate of tunneled dialysis catheter damage and report our experience with breakage repair. All 363 cuffed tunneled hemodialysis catheters inserted into 309 patients from May 2000 to December 2008 were followed up. When connector damage was encountered, repair with a two-piece adaptor for peritoneal dialysis was attempted. Mechanical breakage occurred in 33 (9.1%) of catheters with an incidence of 0.36/1000 catheter-days. The most frequent was connector damage, found in 25 cases (67.6%). Catheter repair using a peritoneal dialysis Luer adaptor was performed with good early and long-term outcome. Tunneled catheter breakage is a relatively rare complication. Catheter repair using the adaptor for peritoneal dialysis is easy to perform, safe, and cost-effective.

  18. DNA repair efficiency in germ cells and early mouse embryos and consequences for radiation-induced transgenerational genomic damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2009-01-18

    Exposure to ionizing radiation and other environmental agents can affect the genomic integrity of germ cells and induce adverse health effects in the progeny. Efficient DNA repair during gametogenesis and the early embryonic cycles after fertilization is critical for preventing transmission of DNA damage to the progeny and relies on maternal factors stored in the egg before fertilization. The ability of the maternal repair machinery to repair DNA damage in both parental genomes in the fertilizing egg is especially crucial for the fertilizing male genome that has not experienced a DNA repair-competent cellular environment for several weeks prior to fertilization. During the DNA repair-deficient period of spermatogenesis, DNA lesions may accumulate in sperm and be carried into the egg where, if not properly repaired, could result in the formation of heritable chromosomal aberrations or mutations and associated birth defects. Studies with female mice deficient in specific DNA repair genes have shown that: (i) cell cycle checkpoints are activated in the fertilized egg by DNA damage carried by the sperm; and (ii) the maternal genotype plays a major role in determining the efficiency of repairing genomic lesions in the fertilizing sperm and directly affect the risk for abnormal reproductive outcomes. There is also growing evidence that implicates DNA damage carried by the fertilizing gamete as a mediator of postfertilization processes that contribute to genomic instability in subsequent generations. Transgenerational genomic instability most likely involves epigenetic mechanisms or error-prone DNA repair processes in the early embryo. Maternal and embryonic DNA repair processes during the early phases of mammalian embryonic development can have far reaching consequences for the genomic integrity and health of subsequent generations.

  19. Regulation of Ceramide Synthase-Mediated Crypt Epithelium Apoptosis by DNA Damage Repair Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotolo, Jimmy A.; Mesicek, Judith; Maj, Jerzy; Truman, Jean-Philip; Haimovitz-Friedman, Adriana; Kolesnick, Richard; Fuks, Zvi

    2015-01-01

    Acute endothelial cell apoptosis and microvascular compromise couple GI tract irradiation to reproductive death of intestinal crypt stem cell clonogens (SCCs) following high-dose radiation. Genetic or pharmacologic inhibition of endothelial apoptosis prevents intestinal damage, but as the radiation dose is escalated, SCCs become directly susceptible to an alternate cell death mechanism, mediated via ceramide synthase (CS)-stimulated de novo synthesis of the pro-apoptotic sphingolipid ceramide, and p53-independent apoptosis of crypt SCCs. We previously reported that ATM deficiency resets the primary radiation lethal pathway, allowing CS-mediated apoptosis at the low-dose range of radiation. The mechanism for this event, termed target reordering, remains unknown. Here we show that inactivation of DNA damage repair pathways signal CS-mediated apoptosis in crypt SCCs, presumably via persistent unrepaired DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). Genetic loss-of-function of sensors and transducers of DNA DSB repair confers the CS-mediated lethal pathway in intestines of sv129/B6Mre11ATLD1/ATLD1 and C57BL/6Prkdc/SCID (SCID) mice exposed to low-dose radiation. In contrast, CS-mediated SCC lethality was mitigated in irradiated gain-of-function Rad50S/S mice, and epistasis studies order Rad50 upstream of Mre11. These studies suggest unrepaired DNA DSBs as causative in target re-ordering in intestinal SCCs. As such, we provide an in vivo model of DNA damage repair that is standardized, can be exploited to understand allele-specific regulation in intact tissue, and is pharmacologically tractable. PMID:20086180

  20. DNA damage and repair activity after broccoli intake in young healthy smokers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riso, Patrizia; Martini, Daniela; Møller, Peter;

    2010-01-01

    Cruciferous vegetables contain compounds with antioxidant properties (e.g. carotenoids, vitamin C and folates) and can alter the activity of xenobiotic metabolism (i.e. isothiocyanates). These constituents may be particularly important for subjects who are exposed to free radicals and genotoxic....... Blood was collected before and after each period. The level of oxidatively damaged DNA lesions (formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase-sensitive sites), resistance to ex vivo H(2)O(2) treatment and repair of oxidised DNA lesions were measured in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We also measured...

  1. Reduced inflammation accompanies diminished myelin damage and repair in the NG2 null mouse spinal cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kucharova Karolina

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple sclerosis (MS is a demyelinating disease in which blood-derived immune cells and activated microglia damage myelin in the central nervous system. While oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs are essential for generating oligodendrocytes for myelin repair, other cell types also participate in the damage and repair processes. The NG2 proteoglycan is expressed by OPCs, pericytes, and macrophages/microglia. In this report we investigate the effects of NG2 on these cell types during spinal cord demyelination/remyelination. Methods Demyelinated lesions were created by microinjecting 1% lysolecithin into the lumbar spinal cord. Following demyelination, NG2 expression patterns in wild type mice were studied via immunostaining. Immunolabeling was also used in wild type and NG2 null mice to compare the extent of myelin damage, the kinetics of myelin repair, and the respective responses of OPCs, pericytes, and macrophages/microglia. Cell proliferation was quantified by studies of BrdU incorporation, and cytokine expression levels were evaluated using qRT-PCR. Results The initial volume of spinal cord demyelination in wild type mice is twice as large as in NG2 null mice. However, over the ensuing 5 weeks there is a 6-fold improvement in myelination in wild type mice, versus only a 2-fold improvement in NG2 null mice. NG2 ablation also results in reduced numbers of each of the three affected cell types. BrdU incorporation studies reveal that reduced cell proliferation is an important factor underlying NG2-dependent decreases in each of the three key cell populations. In addition, NG2 ablation reduces macrophage/microglial cell migration and shifts cytokine expression from a pro-inflammatory to anti-inflammatory phenotype. Conclusions Loss of NG2 expression leads to decreased proliferation of OPCs, pericytes, and macrophages/microglia, reducing the abundance of all three cell types in demyelinated spinal cord lesions. As a result

  2. Probing the molecular structures of plasma-damaged and surface-repaired low-k dielectrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoxian; Myers, John N; Lin, Qinghuang; Bielefeld, Jeffery D; Chen, Zhan

    2015-10-21

    Fully understanding the effect and the molecular mechanisms of plasma damage and silylation repair on low dielectric constant (low-k) materials is essential to the design of low-k dielectrics with defined properties and the integration of low-k dielectrics into advanced interconnects of modern electronics. Here, analytical techniques including sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), contact angle goniometry (CA) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) have been employed to provide a comprehensive characterization of the surface and bulk structure changes of poly(methyl)silsesquioxane (PMSQ) low-k thin films before and after O2 plasma treatment and silylation repair. O2 plasma treatment altered drastically both the molecular structures and water structures at the surfaces of the PMSQ film while no bulk structural change was detected. For example, ∼34% Si-CH3 groups were removed from the PMSQ surface, and the Si-CH3 groups at the film surface tilted toward the surface after the O2 plasma treatment. The oxidation by the O2 plasma made the PMSQ film surface more hydrophilic and thus enhanced the water adsorption at the film surface. Both strongly and weakly hydrogen bonded water were detected at the plasma-damaged film surface during exposure to water with the former being the dominate component. It is postulated that this enhancement of both chemisorbed and physisorbed water after the O2 plasma treatment leads to the degradation of low-k properties and reliability. The degradation of the PMSQ low-k film can be recovered by repairing the plasma-damaged surface using a silylation reaction. The silylation method, however, cannot fully recover the plasma induced damage at the PMSQ film surface as evidenced by the existence of hydrophilic groups, including C-O/C[double bond, length as m-dash]O and residual Si-OH groups. This work provides a molecular level picture on the surface structural changes of low

  3. DNA damage and its repair in Dictyostelium discoideum irradiated by health lamp light (UV-B)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okaichi, K.; Kajitani, N.; Nakajima, K.; Nozu, K.; Ohnishi, T. (Nara Medical Univ., Kashihara (Japan))

    1989-07-01

    Irradiation by health lamp (HL) light (280-320 nm) more efficiently induced cell killing and mutation in a radiation sensitive mutant (TW8) of Dictyostelium discoideum as compared with the parental wild-type strain (NC4). This light as well as a germicidal lamp-light (254 nm) produced pyrimidine dimers. The dimers were removed from DNA molecules by excision repair in NC4, but more slowly in TW8. It is suggested that pyrimidine dimers are the main DNA damage caused by HL light in D. discoideum, and that this results in cell killing and induced mutation. (author).

  4. Human POLD1 modulates cell cycle progression and DNA damage repair

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Jing; Hong, Ping; Liu, Chengeng; Zhang, Yueqi; Wang, Jinling; Wang, Peichang

    2015-01-01

    Background The activity of eukaryotic DNA polymerase delta (Pol δ) plays an essential role in genome stability through its effects on DNA replication and repair. The p125 catalytic subunit of Pol δ is encoded by POLD1 gene in human cells. To clarify biological functions of POLD1, we investigated the effects of POLD1 overexpression or downregulation on cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, DNA synthesis and oxidative DNA damage induced by H2O2. Methods HEK293 cells were transfected with ...

  5. Digital Restoration from Start to Finish How to repair old and damaged photographs

    CERN Document Server

    Ctein,

    2010-01-01

    Digital Restoration: Start to Finish 2nd edition guides you step-by-step through the entire process of restoring old photographs and repairing new ones using Adobe Photoshop, Picture Window, and now Elements. Nothing is left out, from choosing the right hardware and software and getting the photographs into the computer, to getting the finished photo out of the computer and preserving it for posterity.  LEARN HOW TO: Scan faded and damaged prints or films Improve snapshots with Shadow/Highlight adjustment Correct uneven exposure Fix color and skin tones quickly with Curves, plug-ins, a

  6. The Use of Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in the Surgical Repair of Bronchial Rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju-Hee Park

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO has been used successfully in critically ill patients with traumatic lung injury and offers an additional treatment modality. ECMO is mainly used as a bridge treatment to delayed surgical management; however, only a few case reports have presented the successful application of ECMO as intraoperative support during the surgical repair of traumatic bronchial injury. A 38-year-old man visited our hospital after a blunt chest trauma. His chest imaging showed hemopneumothorax in the left hemithorax and a finding suspicious for left main bronchus rupture. Bronchoscopy was performed and confirmed a tear in the left main bronchus and a congenital tracheal bronchus. We decided to provide venovenous ECMO support during surgery for bronchial repair. We successfully performed main bronchial repair in this traumatic patient with a congenital tracheal bronchus. We suggest that venovenous ECMO offers a good option for the treatment of bronchial rupture when adequate ventilation is not possible.

  7. Perforated schneiderian membrane repair during sinus augmentation in conjunction with immediate implant placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Hameed Fathima

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental implant associated rehabilitation of the posterior maxilla poses unique challenge owing to the presence of pneumatized sinuses and atrophied alveolar bone. Sinus augmentation procedure to manage expanded sinuses frequently results in membrane tear resulting in unfavorable stabilization of the graft and associated bone regeneration. Simultaneous implant placement during sinus augmentation procedures frequently requires a minimal alveolar bone height, which when not present forces clinician to defer implant placement resulting in extended treatment duration and multiple surgical appointments. The present case report is about a piezosurgery assisted lateral wall osteotomy approach for sinus augmentation associated with membrane repair with simultaneous implant placement in the posterior maxilla.

  8. DNA damage and radical reactions: Mechanistic aspects, formation in cells and repair studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadet, J.; Ravanat, J.L. [CEA Grenoble, Inst Nanosci and Cryogenie, SCIB-UMR-E 3, Lab Les Acides Nucl, UJF, F-38054 Grenoble 9 (France); Carell, T. [Univ Munich, Dept Chem and Biochem, Ctr Integrat Prot Sci, D-81377 Munich (Germany); Cellai, L. [CNR, Ist Cristalog, Monterotondo Stn, I-00016 Rome (Italy); Chatgilialoglu, Ch. [CNR, ISOF, I-40129 Bologna, (Italy); Gimisis, Th. [Univ Athens, Dept Chem, Organ Chem Lab, Athens 15784, (Greece); Miranda, M. [Univ Politecn Valencia, Inst Technol Quim, Dept Quim, Valencia 46022 (Spain); O' Neill, P. [Univ Oxford, Oxford OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom); Robert, M. [Univ Paris 07, CNRS, UMR 7591, Electrochim Mol Lab, F-75251 Paris 05 (France)

    2008-07-01

    Several examples of oxidative and reductive reactions of DNA components that lead to single and tandem modifications are discussed in this review. These include nucleophilic addition reactions of the one-electron oxidation-mediated guanine radical cation and the one-electron reduced intermediate of 8-bromo-purine 2'-de-oxy-ribo-nucleosides that give rise to either an oxidizing guanine radical or related 5',8-cyclo-purine nucleosides. In addition, mechanistic insights into the reductive pathways involved in the photolyase induced reversal of cyclo-buta-cli-pyrimidine and pyrimidine (6-4) pyrimidone photoproducts are provided. Evidence for the occurrence and validation in cellular DNA of (OH){sup {center_dot}} radical degradation pathways of guanine that have been established in model systems has been gained from the accurate measurement of degradation products. Relevant information on biochemical aspects of the repair of single and clustered oxidatively generated damage to DNA has been gained from detailed investigations that rely on the synthesis of suitable modified probes. Thus the preparation of stable carbocyclic derivatives of purine nucleoside containing defined sequence oligonucleotides has allowed detailed crystallographic studies of the recognition step of the base damage by enzymes implicated in the base excision repair (BER) pathway. Detailed insights are provided on the BER processing of non-double strand break bi-stranded clustered damage that may consist of base lesions, a single strand break or abasic sites and represent one of the main deleterious classes of radiation-induced DNA damage. (authors)

  9. Discovery of Novel Small Molecules that Activate Satellite Cell Proliferation and Enhance Repair of Damaged Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billin, Andrew N; Bantscheff, Marcus; Drewes, Gerard; Ghidelli-Disse, Sonja; Holt, Jason A; Kramer, Henning F; McDougal, Alan J; Smalley, Terry L; Wells, Carrow I; Zuercher, William J; Henke, Brad R

    2016-02-19

    Skeletal muscle progenitor stem cells (referred to as satellite cells) represent the primary pool of stem cells in adult skeletal muscle responsible for the generation of new skeletal muscle in response to injury. Satellite cells derived from aged muscle display a significant reduction in regenerative capacity to form functional muscle. This decrease in functional recovery has been attributed to a decrease in proliferative capacity of satellite cells. Hence, agents that enhance the proliferative abilities of satellite cells may hold promise as therapies for a variety of pathological settings, including repair of injured muscle and age- or disease-associated muscle wasting. Through phenotypic screening of isolated murine satellite cells, we identified a series of 2,4-diaminopyrimidines (e.g., 2) that increased satellite cell proliferation. Importantly, compound 2 was effective in accelerating repair of damaged skeletal muscle in an in vivo mouse model of skeletal muscle injury. While these compounds were originally prepared as c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 (JNK-1) inhibitors, structure-activity analyses indicated JNK-1 inhibition does not correlate with satellite cell activity. Screening against a broad panel of kinases did not result in identification of an obvious molecular target, so we conducted cell-based proteomics experiments in an attempt to identify the molecular target(s) responsible for the potentiation of the satellite cell proliferation. These data provide the foundation for future efforts to design improved small molecules as potential therapeutics for muscle repair and regeneration.

  10. The Role of Altered Nucleotide Excision Repair and UVB-Induced DNA Damage in Melanomagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Budden

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available UVB radiation is the most mutagenic component of the UV spectrum that reaches the earth’s surface and causes the development of DNA damage in the form of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and 6-4 photoproducts. UV radiation usually results in cellular death, but if left unchecked, it can affect DNA integrity, cell and tissue homeostasis and cause mutations in oncogenes and tumour-suppressor genes. These mutations, if unrepaired, can lead to abnormal cell growth, increasing the risk of cancer development. Epidemiological data strongly associates UV exposure as a major factor in melanoma development, but the exact biological mechanisms involved in this process are yet to be fully elucidated. The nucleotide excision repair (NER pathway is responsible for the repair of UV-induced lesions. Patients with the genetic disorder Xeroderma Pigmentosum have a mutation in one of eight NER genes associated with the XP complementation groups XP-A to XP-G and XP variant (XP-V. XP is characterized by diminished repair capacity, as well as a 1000-fold increase in the incidence of skin cancers, including melanoma. This has suggested a significant role for NER in melanoma development as a result of UVB exposure. This review discusses the current research surrounding UVB radiation and NER capacity and how further investigation of NER could elucidate the role of NER in avoiding UV-induced cellular death resulting in melanomagenesis.

  11. A Novel Repair Technique for the Internal Thermal Control System Dual-Membrane Gas Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Patel, Vipul; Reeves, Daniel R.; Holt, James M.

    2005-01-01

    A dual-membrane gas trap is currently used to remove gas bubbles from the Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS) coolant on board the International Space Station (ISS). The gas trap consists of concentric tube membrane pairs, comprised of outer hydrophilic tubes and inner hydrophobic fibers. Liquid coolant passes through the outer hydrophilic membrane, which traps the gas bubbles. The inner hydrophobic fiber allows the trapped gas bubbles to pass through and vent to the ambient atmosphere in the cabin. The gas trap was designed to last for the entire lifetime of the ISS, and therefore was not designed to be repaired. However, repair of these gas traps is now a necessity due to contamination from the on-orbit ITCS fluid and other sources on the ground as well as a limited supply of flight gas traps. This paper describes a novel repair technique that has been developed that will allow the refurbishment of contaminated gas traps and their return to flight use.

  12. Histone deacetylase inhibitors mediate DNA damage repair in ameliorating hemorrhagic cystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldar, Subhash; Dru, Christopher; Mishra, Rajeev; Tripathi, Manisha; Duong, Frank; Angara, Bryan; Fernandez, Ana; Arditi, Moshe; Bhowmick, Neil A

    2016-12-20

    Hemorrhagic cystitis is an inflammatory and ulcerative bladder condition associated with systemic chemotherapeutics, like cyclophosphomide. Earlier, we reported reactive oxygen species resulting from cyclophosphamide metabolite, acrolein, causes global methylation followed by silencing of DNA damage repair genes. Ogg1 (8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase) is one such silenced base excision repair enzyme that can restore DNA integrity. The accumulation of DNA damage results in subsequent inflammation associated with pyroptotic death of bladder smooth muscle cells. We hypothesized that reversing inflammasome-induced imprinting in the bladder smooth muscle could prevent the inflammatory phenotype. Elevated recruitment of Dnmt1 and Dnmt3b to the Ogg1 promoter in acrolein treated bladder muscle cells was validated by the pattern of CpG methylation revealed by bisulfite sequencing. Knockout of Ogg1 in detrusor cells resulted in accumulation of reactive oxygen mediated 8-Oxo-dG and spontaneous pyroptotic signaling. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), restored Ogg1 expression in cells treated with acrolein and mice treated with cyclophosphamide superior to the standard of care, mesna or nicotinamide-induced DNA demethylation. SAHA restored cyclophosphamide-induced bladder pathology to that of untreated control mice. The observed epigenetic imprinting induced by inflammation suggests a new therapeutic target for the treatment of hemorrhagic cystitis.

  13. Real-time fluorescence imaging of the DNA damage repair response during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, Shinji; Yano, Shuya; Yamamoto, Mako; Matsumoto, Yasunori; Uehara, Fuminari; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Toneri, Makoto; Murakami, Takashi; Kimura, Hiroaki; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Yamamoto, Norio; Efimova, Elena V; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Hoffman, Robert M

    2015-04-01

    The response to DNA damage during mitosis was visualized using real-time fluorescence imaging of focus formation by the DNA-damage repair (DDR) response protein 53BP1 linked to green fluorescent protein (GFP) (53BP1-GFP) in the MiaPaCa-2(Tet-On) pancreatic cancer cell line. To observe 53BP1-GFP foci during mitosis, MiaPaCa-2(Tet-On) 53BP1-GFP cells were imaged every 30 min by confocal microscopy. Time-lapse imaging demonstrated that 11.4 ± 2.1% of the mitotic MiaPaCa-2(Tet-On) 53BP1-GFP cells had increased focus formation over time. Non-mitotic cells did not have an increase in 53BP1-GFP focus formation over time. Some of the mitotic MiaPaCa-2(Tet-On) 53BP1-GFP cells with focus formation became apoptotic. The results of the present report suggest that DNA strand breaks occur during mitosis and undergo repair, which may cause some of the mitotic cells to enter apoptosis in a phenomenon possibly related to mitotic catastrophe.

  14. Histone deacetylase inhibitors mediate DNA damage repair in ameliorating hemorrhagic cystitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldar, Subhash; Dru, Christopher; Mishra, Rajeev; Tripathi, Manisha; Duong, Frank; Angara, Bryan; Fernandez, Ana; Arditi, Moshe; Bhowmick, Neil A.

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic cystitis is an inflammatory and ulcerative bladder condition associated with systemic chemotherapeutics, like cyclophosphomide. Earlier, we reported reactive oxygen species resulting from cyclophosphamide metabolite, acrolein, causes global methylation followed by silencing of DNA damage repair genes. Ogg1 (8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase) is one such silenced base excision repair enzyme that can restore DNA integrity. The accumulation of DNA damage results in subsequent inflammation associated with pyroptotic death of bladder smooth muscle cells. We hypothesized that reversing inflammasome-induced imprinting in the bladder smooth muscle could prevent the inflammatory phenotype. Elevated recruitment of Dnmt1 and Dnmt3b to the Ogg1 promoter in acrolein treated bladder muscle cells was validated by the pattern of CpG methylation revealed by bisulfite sequencing. Knockout of Ogg1 in detrusor cells resulted in accumulation of reactive oxygen mediated 8-Oxo-dG and spontaneous pyroptotic signaling. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), restored Ogg1 expression in cells treated with acrolein and mice treated with cyclophosphamide superior to the standard of care, mesna or nicotinamide-induced DNA demethylation. SAHA restored cyclophosphamide-induced bladder pathology to that of untreated control mice. The observed epigenetic imprinting induced by inflammation suggests a new therapeutic target for the treatment of hemorrhagic cystitis. PMID:27995963

  15. DNA Damage/Repair and Polymorphism of the hOGG1 Gene in Lymphocytes of AMD Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Wozniak

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD. We determined the extent of oxidative DNA damage and the kinetics of its removal as well as the genotypes of the Ser326Cys polymorphism of the hOGG1 gene in lymphocytes of 30 wet AMD patients and 30 controls. Oxidative DNA damage induced by hydrogen peroxide and its repair were evaluated by the comet assay and DNA repair enzymes. We observed a higher extent of endogenous oxidative DNA damage and a lower efficacy of its repair in AMD patients as compared with the controls. We did not find any correlation between the extent of DNA damage and efficacy of DNA repair with genotypes of the Ser326Cys polymorphism. The results obtained suggest that oxidative DNA damage and inefficient DNA repair can be associated with AMD and the variability of the hOOG1 gene may not contribute to this association.

  16. The Molecular Mechanisms and the Role of hnRNP K Protein Post- Translational Modification in DNA Damage Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jing; Gao, Feng-Hou

    2017-01-01

    DNA damage repair is a kind of cellular self-protection mechanism in which some relevant proteins are activated when DNA damage response occurs in order to maintain the intracellular function stability and structure integrity. Post-translational modifications (PTMs) of proteins can rapidly confer to them more complicated structure and sophisticated function by covalently combining different small molecules with target proteins, which in turn plays an important regulatory role in DNA damage repair. It was reported that heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) could be involved in DNA damage repair process under the regulation of its many post-translational modifications, including methylation, ubiquitination, sumoylation and phosphorylation. Here, we reviewed molecular mechanisms of hnRNP K protein post-translational modifications and their role in DNA damage repair, which will promote our understanding of how hnRNP K participating in the repair process to maintain the normal operation of biological activities in the cells. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  17. DNA damage induced by boron neutron capture therapy is partially repaired by DNA ligase IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Natsuko; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Hirota, Yuki; Tanaka, Hiroki; Watanabe, Tsubasa; Nakagawa, Yosuke; Narabayashi, Masaru; Kinashi, Yuko; Miyatake, Shin-ichi; Hasegawa, Masatoshi; Suzuki, Minoru; Masunaga, Shin-ichiro; Ohnishi, Takeo; Ono, Koji

    2016-03-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a particle radiation therapy that involves the use of a thermal or epithermal neutron beam in combination with a boron ((10)B)-containing compound that specifically accumulates in tumor. (10)B captures neutrons and the resultant fission reaction produces an alpha ((4)He) particle and a recoiled lithium nucleus ((7)Li). These particles have the characteristics of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation and therefore have marked biological effects. High-LET radiation is a potent inducer of DNA damage, specifically of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The aim of the present study was to clarify the role of DNA ligase IV, a key player in the non-homologous end-joining repair pathway, in the repair of BNCT-induced DSBs. We analyzed the cellular sensitivity of the mouse embryonic fibroblast cell lines Lig4-/- p53-/- and Lig4+/+ p53-/- to irradiation using a thermal neutron beam in the presence or absence of (10)B-para-boronophenylalanine (BPA). The Lig4-/- p53-/- cell line had a higher sensitivity than the Lig4+/+ p53-/-cell line to irradiation with the beam alone or the beam in combination with BPA. In BNCT (with BPA), both cell lines exhibited a reduction of the 50 % survival dose (D 50) by a factor of 1.4 compared with gamma-ray and neutron mixed beam (without BPA). Although it was found that (10)B uptake was higher in the Lig4+/+ p53-/- than in the Lig4-/- p53-/- cell line, the latter showed higher sensitivity than the former, even when compared at an equivalent (10)B concentration. These results indicate that BNCT-induced DNA damage is partially repaired using DNA ligase IV.

  18. Modification of radiation-induced oxidative damage in liposomal and microsomal membrane by eugenol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, B.N. [Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Lathika, K.M. [Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Mishra, K.P. [Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)]. E-mail: kpm@magnum.barc.ernet.in

    2006-03-15

    Radiation-induced membrane oxidative damage, and their modification by eugenol, a natural antioxidant, was investigated in liposomes and microsomes. Liposomes prepared with DPH showed decrease in fluorescence after {gamma}-irradiation, which was prevented significantly by eugenol and correlated with magnitude of oxidation of phospholipids. Presence of eugenol resulted in substantial inhibition in MDA formation in irradiated liposomes/microsomes, which was less effective when added after irradiation. Similarly, the increase in phospholipase C activity observed after irradiation in microsomes was inhibited in samples pre-treated with eugenol. Results suggest association of radio- oxidative membrane damage with alterations in signaling molecules, and eugenol significantly prevented these membrane damaging events.

  19. Modification of radiation-induced oxidative damage in liposomal and microsomal membrane by eugenol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, B. N.; Lathika, K. M.; Mishra, K. P.

    2006-03-01

    Radiation-induced membrane oxidative damage, and their modification by eugenol, a natural antioxidant, was investigated in liposomes and microsomes. Liposomes prepared with DPH showed decrease in fluorescence after γ-irradiation, which was prevented significantly by eugenol and correlated with magnitude of oxidation of phospholipids. Presence of eugenol resulted in substantial inhibition in MDA formation in irradiated liposomes/microsomes, which was less effective when added after irradiation. Similarly, the increase in phospholipase C activity observed after irradiation in microsomes was inhibited in samples pre-treated with eugenol. Results suggest association of radio- oxidative membrane damage with alterations in signaling molecules, and eugenol significantly prevented these membrane damaging events.

  20. Dynamics and mechanism of UV-damaged DNA repair in indole-thymine dimer adduct: molecular origin of low repair quantum efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xunmin; Liu, Zheyun; Song, Qinhua; Wang, Lijuan; Zhong, Dongping

    2015-02-26

    Many biomimetic chemical systems for repair of UV-damaged DNA showed very low repair efficiency, and the molecular origin is still unknown. Here, we report our systematic characterization of the repair dynamics of a model compound of indole-thymine dimer adduct in three solvents with different polarity. By resolving all elementary steps including three electron-transfer processes and two bond-breaking and bond-formation dynamics with femtosecond resolution, we observed the slow electron injection in 580 ps in water, 4 ns in acetonitrile, and 1.38 ns in dioxane, the fast back electron transfer without repair in 120, 150, and 180 ps, and the slow bond splitting in 550 ps, 1.9 ns, and 4.5 ns, respectively. The dimer bond cleavage is clearly accelerated by the solvent polarity. By comparing with the biological repair machine photolyase with a slow back electron transfer (2.4 ns) and a fast bond cleavage (90 ps), the low repair efficiency in the biomimetic system is mainly determined by the fast back electron transfer and slow bond breakage. We also found that the model system exists in a dynamic heterogeneous C-clamped conformation, leading to a stretched dynamic behavior. In water, we even identified another stacked form with ultrafast cyclic electron transfer, significantly reducing the repair efficiency. Thus, the comparison of the repair efficiency in different solvents is complicated and should be cautious, and only the dynamics by resolving all elementary steps can finally determine the total repair efficiency. Finally, we use the Marcus electron-transfer theory to analyze all electron-transfer reactions and rationalize all observed electron-transfer dynamics.

  1. Repair of a Perforated Sinus Membrane with a Subepithelial Palatal Conjunctive Flap: Technique Report and Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Gehrke

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The maxillary sinus grafting procedure has proven to be an acceptable modality for bone augmentation to provide a base for endosseous implants, routinely used for the rehabilitation of posterior maxilla. Perforation of the membrane is the most common complication in this type of procedure. This paper presents a technique for repairing a perforated Schneiderian membrane with a conjunctive connective tissue graft harvested from the palate and shows the histological and radiographic evaluation of the results. Ten consecutives cases with the occurrence of membrane perforation were included in this study. All were repaired with a flap of tissue removed from the palatine portion near to the surgical site. The technique is demonstrated through a clinical case. The results showed successful integration of 88.8% of the implants after 12 months from prosthesis installation. Histological evaluation of the samples showed that the use of nanocrystalized hydroxyapatite showed an adequate stimulation of boné neoformation within 6 months. Radiographic evaluation revealed a small apical implant bone loss, not compromising their anchorages and proservation. Thus, it can be concluded that the use of conjunctive technique with collected palate flap for sealing the perforation of the membrane of the sinus may have predictable result.

  2. The potential of nanoporous anodic aluminium oxide membranes to influence skin wound repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Leigh G; Giles, Natalie L; Adcroft, Katharine F; Fear, Mark W; Wood, Fiona M; Poinern, Gerard E

    2009-12-01

    Cells respond to changes in the environment by altering their phenotype. The ability to influence cell behavior by modifying their environment provides an opportunity for therapeutic application, for example, to promote faster wound healing in response to skin injury. Here, we have modified the preparation of an aluminium oxide template to generate large uniform membranes with differing nano-pore sizes. Epidermal cells (keratinocytes) and dermal cells (fibroblasts) readily adhere to these nanoporous membranes. The pore size appears to influence the rate of cell proliferation and migration, important aspects of cell behavior during wound healing. The suitability of the membrane to act as a dressing after a burn injury was assessed in vivo; application of the membrane demonstrated adherence and conformability to the skin surface of a pig, with no observed degradation or detrimental effect on the repair. Our results suggest that keratinocytes are sensitive to changes in topography at the nanoscale level and that this property may be exploited to improve wound repair after tissue injury.

  3. Biological consequences of potential repair intermediates of clustered base damage site in Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shikazono, Naoya, E-mail: shikazono.naoya@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Advanced Research Science Center, 2-4 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); O' Neill, Peter [Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom)

    2009-10-02

    Clustered DNA damage induced by a single radiation track is a unique feature of ionizing radiation. Using a plasmid-based assay in Escherichia coli, we previously found significantly higher mutation frequencies for bistranded clusters containing 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) and 5,6-dihydrothymine (DHT) than for either a single 8-oxoG or a single DHT in wild type and in glycosylase-deficient strains of E. coli. This indicates that the removal of an 8-oxoG from a clustered damage site is most likely retarded compared to the removal of a single 8-oxoG. To gain further insights into the processing of bistranded base lesions, several potential repair intermediates following 8-oxoG removal were assessed. Clusters, such as DHT + apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) and DHT + GAP have relatively low mutation frequencies, whereas clusters, such as AP + AP or GAP + AP, significantly reduce the number of transformed colonies, most probably through formation of a lethal double strand break (DSB). Bistranded AP sites placed 3' to each other with various interlesion distances also blocked replication. These results suggest that bistranded base lesions, i.e., single base lesions on each strand, but not clusters containing only AP sites and strand breaks, are repaired in a coordinated manner so that the formation of DSBs is avoided. We propose that, when either base lesion is initially excised from a bistranded base damage site, the remaining base lesion will only rarely be converted into an AP site or a single strand break in vivo.

  4. Development and Evaluation of Cement-Based Materials for Repair of Corrosion-Damaged Reinforced Concrete Slabs

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Rongtang; Olek, J.

    2001-01-01

    In this study, the results of an extensive laboratory investigation conducted to evaluate the properties of concrete mixes used as patching materials to repair reinforced concrete slabs damaged by corrosion are reported. Seven special concrete mixes containing various combinations of chemical or mineral admixtures were developed and used as a patching material to improve the durability of the repaired slabs. Physical and mechanical properties of these mixes, such as compressive strength, stat...

  5. p38γ regulates UV-induced checkpoint signaling and repair of UV-induced DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chia-Cheng; Wu, Xiaohua; Han, Jiahuai; Sun, Peiqing

    2010-06-01

    In eukaryotic cells, DNA damage triggers activation of checkpoint signaling pathways that coordinate cell cycle arrest and repair of damaged DNA. These DNA damage responses serve to maintain genome stability and prevent accumulation of genetic mutations and development of cancer. The p38 MAPK was previously implicated in cellular responses to several types of DNA damage. However, the role of each of the four p38 isoforms and the mechanism for their involvement in DNA damage responses remained poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrate that p38γ, but not the other p38 isoforms, contributes to the survival of UV-treated cells. Deletion of p38γ sensitizes cells to UV exposure, accompanied by prolonged S phase cell cycle arrest and increased rate of apoptosis. Further investigation reveal that p38γ is essential for the optimal activation of the checkpoint signaling caused by UV, and for the efficient repair of UV-induced DNA damage. These findings have established a novel role of p38γ in UV-induced DNA damage responses, and suggested that p38γ contributes to the ability of cells to cope with UV exposure by regulating the checkpoint signaling pathways and the repair of damaged DNA.

  6. Damage detection in membrane structures using non-contact laser excitation and wavelet transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huda, Feblil; Kajiwara, Itsuro; Hosoya, Naoki

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, a vibration testing and health monitoring system based on an impulse response excited by laser is proposed to detect damage in membrane structures. A high power Nd: YAG pulse laser is used to supply an ideal impulse to a membrane structure by generating shock waves via laser-induced breakdown in air. A health monitoring apparatus is developed with this vibration testing system and a damage detecting algorithm which only requires the vibration mode shape of the damaged membrane. Artificial damage is induced in membrane structure by cutting and tearing the membrane. The vibration mode shapes of the membrane structure extracted from vibration testing by using the laser-induced breakdown and laser Doppler vibrometer are then analyzed by 2-D continuous wavelet transformation. The location of damage is determined by the dominant peak of the wavelet coefficient which can be seen clearly by applying a boundary treatment and the concept of an iso-surface to the 2-D wavelet coefficient. The applicability of the present approach is verified by finite element analysis and experimental results, demonstrating the ability of the method to detect and identify the positions of damage induced on the membrane structure.

  7. Rapid Repair of Earthquake Damaged RC Interior Beam-wide Column Joints and Beam-wall Joints Using FRP Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Bing; LIM Chee Leong

    2009-01-01

    This paper studies the seismic performance of FRP-strengthened RC interior non-seismically detailed beam-wide columns and beam-wall joints after limited seismic damage. Four eccentric and concentric beam-wide column joints and two beam-wall joints, initially damaged in a previous study, were repaired and tested under constant axial loads (0. \\fc'Ag and 0. 35 fc'Ag ) and lateral cyclic loading. The rapid repair technique developed, aimed to restore the original strength and to provide minimum drift capacity. The repair schemes were characterized by the use of; (a) epoxy injections and polymer modified cementitious mortar to seal the cracks and replace spalled concrete; and (b) glass (GFRP) and carbon (CFRP) sheets to enhance the joint performance. The FRP sheets were effectively prevented against possible debonding through the use of fiber anchors. Comparison between responses of specimens before and after repair clearly indicated reasonable restoration in strength, drift capacity, stiffness and cumulative energy dissipation capacity. All specimens failed with delamination of FRP sheets at beam-column joint interfaces. The rapid repair technique developed in this study is recommended for mass upgrading or repair of earthquake damaged beam-column joints.

  8. Both membrane-dependent and DNA damage-dependent signal transduction chains are activated following UV irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blattner, C.; Knebel, A.; Bender, K.; Rahmsdorf, H.J.; Herrlich, P. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. fuer Genetik

    1997-03-01

    Irradiation of cultured cells with short wave length ultraviolet light (UVC) activates at least two types of signal transduction chains which ultimately lead to changes in gene expression. One type involves cell surface receptors and is activated with very rapid kinetics. One or several membrane associated protein tyrosine phosphatases are inhibited in less than one minute following UV exposure. Consequently the dephosphorylation of tyrosine-phosphorylated growth factor receptors is impaired. This process is ligand-independent and suggests spontaneous autophosphorylation activity of receptor tyrosine kinases. The UV-induced auto-phosphorylations trigger-signal transduction to the nucleus and activate transcription of immediate early genes such as c-fos. The other type of signal transduction chain has its origin in DNA damage. It occurs with delayed kinetics. We analyzed several human fibroblastic cell lines with distinct deficiencies in nucleotide excision repair mechanisms for the dose dependence of UV-induced late appearing and stable collagenase I mRNA. Several cell lines with deficiencies in the preferential repair of transcribed genes required lower doses of UV than wild type cells or cells solely deficient in the repair of the overall genome. These data suggest the existence of a signal transduction cascade whose stimulation is elicited by lesions in transcribed genes. It appears that similar or identical transcription factors are activated by both types of UV-induced signal transduction. For instance the transcription factor NF{kappa}B is activated by both, a DNA damage independent and a DNA damage dependent signal transduction chain. (authors)

  9. Accelerating repaired basement membrane after bevacizumab treatment on alkali-burned mouse cornea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koon-Ja Lee

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available To understand the corneal regeneration induced by bevacizumab,we investigated the structure changes of stroma andbasement membrane regeneration. A Stick soaked in 0.5 NNaOH onto the mouse cornea and 2.5 mg/ml of bevacizumabwas delivered into an alkali-burned cornea (2 μl by subconjunctivalinjections at 1 hour and 4 days after injury. At 7 daysafter injury, basement membrane regeneration was observedby transmission electron microscope. Uneven and thin epithelialbasement membrane, light density of hemidesmosomes,and edematous collagen fibril bundles are shown in thealkali-burned cornea. Injured epithelial basement membraneand hemidesmosomes and edematous collagen fibril bundlesresulting from alkali-burned mouse cornea was repaired bybevacizumab treatment. This study demonstrates that bevacizumabcan play an important role in wound healing in thecornea by accelerating the reestablishment of basementmembrane integrity that leads to barriers for scar formation.[BMB Reports 2013; 46(4: 195-200

  10. Ortho-phthalaldehyde-induced skin mucous membrane damage from inadequate washing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Horikiri, Masaru; Park, Susam; Matsui, Takahiro; Suzuki, Komei; Matsuoka, Takanori

    2011-01-01

    .... The authors report a patient with widespread, severe skin and mucous membrane damage of the lip, tongue, pharynx and oesophagus areas that was attributed to inadequate washing after the sterilisation...

  11. Modulation of Wound Healing and Scar Formation by MG53 Protein-mediated Cell Membrane Repair*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haichang; Duann, Pu; Lin, Pei-Hui; Zhao, Li; Fan, Zhaobo; Tan, Tao; Zhou, Xinyu; Sun, Mingzhai; Fu, Minghuan; Orange, Matthew; Sermersheim, Matthew; Ma, Hanley; He, Duofen; Steinberg, Steven M.; Higgins, Robert; Zhu, Hua; John, Elizabeth; Zeng, Chunyu; Guan, Jianjun; Ma, Jianjie

    2015-01-01

    Cell membrane repair is an important aspect of physiology, and disruption of this process can result in pathophysiology in a number of different tissues, including wound healing, chronic ulcer and scarring. We have previously identified a novel tripartite motif family protein, MG53, as an essential component of the cell membrane repair machinery. Here we report the functional role of MG53 in the modulation of wound healing and scarring. Although MG53 is absent from keratinocytes and fibroblasts, remarkable defects in skin architecture and collagen overproduction are observed in mg53−/− mice, and these animals display delayed wound healing and abnormal scarring. Recombinant human MG53 (rhMG53) protein, encapsulated in a hydrogel formulation, facilitates wound healing and prevents scarring in rodent models of dermal injuries. An in vitro study shows that rhMG53 protects against acute injury to keratinocytes and facilitates the migration of fibroblasts in response to scratch wounding. During fibrotic remodeling, rhMG53 interferes with TGF-β-dependent activation of myofibroblast differentiation. The resulting down-regulation of α smooth muscle actin and extracellular matrix proteins contributes to reduced scarring. Overall, these studies establish a trifunctional role for MG53 as a facilitator of rapid injury repair, a mediator of cell migration, and a modulator of myofibroblast differentiation during wound healing. Targeting the functional interaction between MG53 and TGF-β signaling may present a potentially effective means for promoting scarless wound healing. PMID:26306047

  12. Perspectives in radiation biophysics: From radiation track structure simulation to mechanistic models of DNA damage and repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikjoo, H.; Taleei, R.; Liamsuwan, T.; Liljequist, D.; Emfietzoglou, D.

    2016-11-01

    In radiation targeted therapy and genetic risk estimation of low dose radiation protection there is a crucial need for full description of DNA damage response and repair (DDR) leading to cell death and cell mutation. We propose such a description can be arrived through realistic track-structure simulations together with mechanistic mathematical formulation of DDR and the availability of experimental data for testing the proof of principle. In this paper we review briefly first the state of the art in DNA damage and repair, and then the recent advances in the physics of track structure which represents an essential tool in radiation biophysics.

  13. Repair of ultraviolet-damaged transforming DNA in a mismatch repair-deficient strain of Haemophilus influenzae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagci, H.; Stuy, J.H. (Florida State Univ., Tallahassee (USA). Dept. of Biological Science)

    1982-03-01

    Ultraviolet inactivation of Haemophilus influenzae transforming DNA followed inverse square root kinetics in both mismatch repair-proficient (hex/sup +/) and deficient (hex-1) recipients. No DNA concentration effect was seen with UV-excision repair-deficient (uvr/sup -/) strains. Low-efficiency genetic markers remained more sensitive than high-efficiency ones when they were assayed on excision repair-deficient hex/sup +/ uvr/sup -/ strains. They were equally resistant when hex/sup -/ uvr/sup -/ recipients were used. This was explained by assuming that recombinational repair of UV lesions in the donor strand and mismatch repair of the recipient strand may overlap and cause double strand interruptions. This will eliminate low-efficiency transformants.

  14. Alpha-phellandrene-induced DNA damage and affect DNA repair protein expression in WEHI-3 murine leukemia cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jen-Jyh; Wu, Chih-Chung; Hsu, Shu-Chun; Weng, Shu-Wen; Ma, Yi-Shih; Huang, Yi-Ping; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-11-01

    Although there are few reports regarding α-phellandrene (α-PA), a natural compound from Schinus molle L. essential oil, there is no report to show that α-PA induced DNA damage and affected DNA repair associated protein expression. Herein, we investigated the effects of α-PA on DNA damage and repair associated protein expression in murine leukemia cells. Flow cytometric assay was used to measure the effects of α-PA on total cell viability and the results indicated that α-PA induced cell death. Comet assay and 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride staining were used for measuring DNA damage and condensation, respectively, and the results indicated that α-PA induced DNA damage and condensation in a concentration-dependent manner. DNA gel electrophoresis was used to examine the DNA damage and the results showed that α-PA induced DNA damage in WEHI-3 cells. Western blotting assay was used to measure the changes of DNA damage and repair associated protein expression and the results indicated that α-PA increased p-p53, p-H2A.X, 14-3-3-σ, and MDC1 protein expression but inhibited the protein of p53, MGMT, DNA-PK, and BRCA-1.

  15. Bisdemethoxycurcumin induces DNA damage and inhibits DNA repair associated protein expressions in NCI-H460 human lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chien-Chih; Yang, Su-Tso; Huang, Wen-Wen; Peng, Shu-Fen; Huang, An-Cheng; Tang, Nou-Ying; Liu, Hsin-Chung; Yang, Mei-Due; Lai, Kuang-Chi; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2016-12-01

    Nonsmall cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) is a devastating primary lung tumor resistant to conventional therapies. Bisdemethoxycurcumin (BDMC) is one of curcumin derivate from Turmeric and has been shown to induce NSCLC cell death. Although there is one report to show BDMC induced DNA double strand breaks, however, no available information to show BDMC induced DNA damage action with inhibited DNA repair protein in lung cancer cells in detail. In this study, we tested BDMC-induced DNA damage and condensation in NCI-H460 cells by using Comet assay and DAPI staining examinations, respectively and we found BDMC induced DNA damage and condension. Western blotting was used to examine the effects of BDMC on protein expression associated with DNA damage and repair and results indicated that BDMC suppressed the protein levels associated with DNA damage and repair, such as 14-3-3σ (an important checkpoint keeper of DDR), O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase, DNA repair proteins breast cancer 1, early onset, mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 but activate phosphorylated p53 and p-H2A.X (phospho Ser140) in NCI-H460 cells. Confocal laser systems microscopy was used for examining the protein translocation and results show that BDMC increased the translocation of p-p53 and p-H2A.X (phospho Ser140) from cytosol to nuclei in NCI-H460 cells. In conclusion, BDMC induced DNA damage and condension and affect DNA repair proteins in NCI-H460 cells in vitro. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 1859-1868, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Calpains, cleaved mini-dysferlinC72, and L-type channels underpin calcium-dependent muscle membrane repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lek, Angela; Evesson, Frances J; Lemckert, Frances A; Redpath, Gregory M I; Lueders, Ann-Katrin; Turnbull, Lynne; Whitchurch, Cynthia B; North, Kathryn N; Cooper, Sandra T

    2013-03-20

    Dysferlin is proposed as a key mediator of calcium-dependent muscle membrane repair, although its precise role has remained elusive. Dysferlin interacts with a new membrane repair protein, mitsugumin 53 (MG53), an E3 ubiquitin ligase that shows rapid recruitment to injury sites. Using a novel ballistics assay in primary human myotubes, we show it is not full-length dysferlin recruited to sites of membrane injury but an injury-specific calpain-cleavage product, mini-dysferlinC72. Mini-dysferlinC72-rich vesicles are rapidly recruited to injury sites and fuse with plasma membrane compartments decorated by MG53 in a process coordinated by L-type calcium channels. Collective interplay between activated calpains, dysferlin, and L-type channels explains how muscle cells sense a membrane injury and mount a specialized response in the unique local environment of a membrane injury. Mini-dysferlinC72 and MG53 form an intricate lattice that intensely labels exposed phospholipids of injury sites, then infiltrates and stabilizes the membrane lesion during repair. Our results extend functional parallels between ferlins and synaptotagmins. Whereas otoferlin exists as long and short splice isoforms, dysferlin is subject to enzymatic cleavage releasing a synaptotagmin-like fragment with a specialized protein- or phospholipid-binding role for muscle membrane repair.

  17. Vitamin E-coated dialysis membranes reduce the levels of oxidative genetic damage in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Ribera, Lara; Corredor, Zuray; Silva, Irene; Díaz, Juan Manuel; Ballarín, José; Marcos, Ricard; Pastor, Susana; Coll, Elisabet

    2017-03-01

    End-stage renal disease patients present oxidative stress status that increases when they are submitted to hemodialysis (HD). This increase in oxidative stress can affect their genetic material, among other targets. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of using polysulfone membranes coated with vitamin E, during the HD sessions, on the levels of genetic damage of HD patients. Forty-six patients were followed for 6 months, of whom 29 changed from conventional HD to the use of membranes coated with vitamin E. The level of genetic damage was measured using the micronucleus and the comet assays, both before and after the follow-up period. Serum vitamin E concentration was also checked. The obtained results showed that 24% of our patients presented vitamin E deficiency, and this was normalized in those patients treated with vitamin E-coated membranes. Patients with vitamin E deficiency showed higher levels of oxidative DNA damage. After the use of vitamin E-coated membranes we detected a significant decrease in the levels of oxidative damage. Additionally, hemoglobin values increased significantly with the use of vitamin E-coated membranes. In conclusion, the use of vitamin E-coated membranes supposes a decrease on the levels of oxidative DNA damage, and improves the uremic anemia status. Furthermore, the use of this type of membrane was also effective in correcting vitamin E deficiency.

  18. Direct detection and quantification of abasic sites for in vivo studies of DNA damage and repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Yanming [Division of Radiopharmaceutical Science, Case Center for Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44122 (United States)], E-mail: yanming.wang@case.edu; Liu Lili [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44122 (United States); Wu Chunying [Division of Radiopharmaceutical Science, Case Center for Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44122 (United States); Bulgar, Alina [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44122 (United States); Somoza, Eduardo; Zhu Wenxia [Division of Radiopharmaceutical Science, Case Center for Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44122 (United States); Gerson, Stanton L. [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44122 (United States)

    2009-11-15

    Use of chemotherapeutic agents to induce cytotoxic DNA damage and programmed cell death is a key strategy in cancer treatments. However, the efficacy of DNA-targeted agents such as temozolomide is often compromised by intrinsic cellular responses such as DNA base excision repair (BER). Previous studies have shown that BER pathway resulted in formation of abasic or apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites, and blockage of AP sites led to a significant enhancement of drug sensitivity due to reduction of DNA base excision repair. Since a number of chemotherapeutic agents also induce formation of AP sites, monitoring of these sites as a clinical correlate of drug effect will provide a useful tool in the development of DNA-targeted chemotherapies aimed at blocking abasic sites from repair. Here we report an imaging technique based on positron emission tomography (PET) that allows for direct quantification of AP sites in vivo. For this purpose, positron-emitting carbon-11 has been incorporated into methoxyamine ([{sup 11}C]MX) that binds covalently to AP sites with high specificity. The binding specificity of [{sup 11}C]MX for AP sites was demonstrated by in vivo blocking experiments. Using [{sup 11}C]MX as a radiotracer, animal PET studies have been conducted in melanoma and glioma xenografts for quantification of AP sites. Following induction of AP sites by temozolomide, both tumor models showed significant increase of [{sup 11}C]MX uptake in tumor regions in terms of radioactivity concentration as a function of time, which correlates well with conventional aldehyde reactive probe (ARP)-based bioassays for AP sites.

  19. Tamoxifen inhibits mitochondrial membrane damage caused by disulfiram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavón, Natalia; Buelna-Chontal, Mabel; Correa, Francisco; Yoval-Sánchez, Belem; Belmont, Javier; Hernández-Esquivel, Luz; Rodríguez-Zavala, José S; Chávez, Edmundo

    2017-10-01

    In this work, we studied the protective effects of tamoxifen (TAM) on disulfiram (Dis)-induced mitochondrial membrane insult. The results indicate that TAM circumvents the inner membrane leakiness manifested as Ca(2+) release, mitochondrial swelling, and collapse of the transmembrane electric gradient. Furthermore, it was found that TAM prevents inactivation of the mitochondrial enzyme aconitase and detachment of cytochrome c from the inner membrane. Interestingly, TAM also inhibited Dis-promoted generation of hydrogen peroxide. Given that TAM is an antioxidant molecule, it is plausible that its protection may be due to the inhibition of Dis-induced oxidative stress.

  20. Repair of ultraviolet light-induced DNA damage in cholera bacteriophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palit, B.N.; Das, G.; Das, J. (Indian Inst. of Chemical Biology, Calcutta. Dept. of Biophysics)

    1983-08-01

    DNA repair-proficient and -deficient strains of Vibrio cholerae were used to examine host cell reactivation, Weigle reactivation and photoreactivation of u.v.-irradiated cholera bacteriophages. U.v. light-induced DNA damage in phages of different morphological and serological groups could be efficiently photoreactivated. Host cell reactivation of irradiated phages of different groups was different on the same indicator host. Phage phi149 was the most sensitive, and phi138 the most resistant to u.v. irradiation. While phi138 showed appreciable host cell reactivation, this was minimal for phi149. Attempts to demonstrate Weigle reactivation of u.v.-irradiated cholera phages were not successful, although u.v.-induced filamentation of host cells was observed.

  1. Tai chi improves oxidative stress response and DNA damage/repair in young sedentary females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xing-Yu; Eungpinichpong, Wichai; Silsirivanit, Atit; Nakmareong, Saowanee; Wu, Xiu-Hua

    2014-06-01

    [Purpose] This study was to examine the effects of 12 weeks of Tai Chi (TC) exercise on antioxidant capacity, and DNA damage/repair in young females who did not perform regular physical exercise. [Subjects and Methods] Ten female students from a Chinese university voluntarily participated in this program. All of them practiced the 24-form simplified Tai Chi, 5 times weekly, for 12 weeks. Plasma levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), hydroxyl radical inhibiting capacity (OH·-IC), 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), and 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1) were measured at 0, 8, and 12 weeks. Heart rate (HR) was monitored during the last set of the training session at 4, 8, and 12 weeks. [Results] Plasma SOD and OH·-IC levels were increased at 8 and 12 weeks compared to the baseline (0 weeks). Gpx and GSH levels did not change significantly throughout the study period. The plasma MDA level was decreased significantly at 8 weeks but not at 12 weeks compared to the baseline value. While the plasma 8-OHdG level did not change throughout the study period, the plasma OGG1 level was significantly increased at 8 and 12 weeks compared to the baseline value. [Conclusion] TC practice for 12 weeks efficiently improved the oxidative stress response in young females who did not perform regular physical exercise. The TC exercise also increased the DNA repairing capacity.

  2. RadA: A protein involved in DNA damage repair processes of Deinococcus radiodurans R1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Qing; ZHANG Xinjue; XU Hong; XU Bujin; HUA Yuejin

    2006-01-01

    RadA is highly conserved in bacteria and belongs to the RecA/RadA/Rad51 protein superfamily found in bacteria, archaea and eukarya. In Archaea, it plays a critical role in homologous recombination process due to its RecA-like function. In Escherichia coli, it takes part in conjugational recombination and DNA repair but is not as important as that of archaea. Using PSI-BLAST searches, we found that Deinococcus radiodurans RadA had a higher similarity to that of bacteria than archaea and eukarya. Disruption of radA gene in D. radiodurans resulted in a modestly decreased resistance to gamma radiation and ultraviolet, but had no effect on the resistance to hydrogen peroxide. Complementation of the radA disruptant by both E. coli radA and D.radiodurans radA could fully restore its resistance to gamma radiation and ultraviolet irradiation. Further domain function analyses of D. radiodurans RadA showed that the absence of the zinc finger domain resulted in a slightly more sensitive phenotype togamma and UV radiation than that of the radA mutant,while the absence of the Lon protease domain exhibited a slightly increased resistance to gamma and UV radiation. These data suggest that D. radiodurans RadA does play an important role in the DNA damage repair processes and its three different domains have different functions.

  3. The role of Holliday junction resolvases in the repair of spontaneous and induced DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agmon, Neta; Yovel, Moran; Harari, Yaniv; Liefshitz, Batia; Kupiec, Martin

    2011-09-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and other lesions occur frequently during cell growth and in meiosis. These are often repaired by homologous recombination (HR). HR may result in the formation of DNA structures called Holliday junctions (HJs), which need to be resolved to allow chromosome segregation. Whereas HJs are present in most HR events in meiosis, it has been proposed that in vegetative cells most HR events occur through intermediates lacking HJs. A recent screen in yeast has shown HJ resolution activity for a protein called Yen1, in addition to the previously known Mus81/Mms4 complex. Yeast strains deleted for both YEN1 and MMS4 show a reduction in growth rate, and are very sensitive to DNA-damaging agents. In addition, we investigate the genetic interaction of yen1 and mms4 with mutants defective in different repair pathways. We find that in the absence of Yen1 and Mms4 deletion of RAD1 or RAD52 have no further effect, whereas additional sensitivity is seen if RAD51 is deleted. Finally, we show that yeast cells are unable to carry out meiosis in the absence of both resolvases. Our results show that both Yen1 and Mms4/Mus81 play important (although not identical) roles during vegetative growth and in meiosis.

  4. Harnessing neural activity to promote repair of the damaged corticospinal system after spinal cord injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John H. Martin

    2016-01-01

    As most spinal cord injuries (SCIs) are incomplete, an important target for promoting neural repair and recovery of lost motor function is to promote the connections of spared descending spinal pathways with spinal motor circuits. Among the pathways, the corticospinal tract (CST) is most associated with skilled voluntary functions in humans and many animals. CST loss, whether at its origin in the motor cortex or in the white matter tracts subcortically and in the spinal cord, leads to movement impairments and paraly-sis. To restore motor function after injury will require repair of the damaged CST. In this review, I discuss how knowledge of activity-dependent development of the CST—which establishes connectional speci-ifcity through axon pruning, axon outgrowth, and synaptic competition among CST terminals—informed a novel activity-based therapy for promoting sprouting of spared CST axons after injur in mature animals. This therapy, which comprises motor cortex electrical stimulation with and without concurrent trans-spi-nal direct current stimulation, leads to an increase in the gray matter axon length of spared CST axons in the rat spinal cord and, after a pyramidal tract lesion, restoration of skilled locomotor movements. I discuss how this approach is now being applied to a C4 contusion rat model.

  5. Harnessing neural activity to promote repair of the damaged corticospinal system after spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John H Martin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As most spinal cord injuries (SCIs are incomplete, an important target for promoting neural repair and recovery of lost motor function is to promote the connections of spared descending spinal pathways with spinal motor circuits. Among the pathways, the corticospinal tract (CST is most associated with skilled voluntary functions in humans and many animals. CST loss, whether at its origin in the motor cortex or in the white matter tracts subcortically and in the spinal cord, leads to movement impairments and paralysis. To restore motor function after injury will require repair of the damaged CST. In this review, I discuss how knowledge of activity-dependent development of the CST-which establishes connectional specificity through axon pruning, axon outgrowth, and synaptic competition among CST terminals-informed a novel activity-based therapy for promoting sprouting of spared CST axons after injur in mature animals. This therapy, which comprises motor cortex electrical stimulation with and without concurrent trans-spinal direct current stimulation, leads to an increase in the gray matter axon length of spared CST axons in the rat spinal cord and, after a pyramidal tract lesion, restoration of skilled locomotor movements. I discuss how this approach is now being applied to a C 4 contusion rat model.

  6. Assessment by Southern blot analysis of UV-induced damage and repair in human immunoglobulin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, M S; Bianchi, N O; de la Chapelle, A

    1990-09-01

    Irradiation of DNA with UV light induces pyrimidine dimers and (6-4) photoproducts. The presence of one of these photolesions in the restriction site of a given endonuclease inhibits DNA cleavage and induces the formation of fragments by incomplete DNA digestion which appear as additional, facultative bands in Southern hybridization autoradiograms. The number and size of these fragments show a positive correlation with the UV dose. The response to UV light of immunoglobulin light-chain constant kappa and heavy-chain constant mu genes was analyzed with 2 specific probes. Constant kappa and mu genes when irradiated as part of the chromatin of living lymphocytes showed a UV sensitivity similar to that of naked DNA. The same genes from granulocytes had 50-60 times lower UV sensitivity. When cells were allowed to repair photolesions for 24 h the facultative bands from granulocytes disappeared indicating that these cells were able to remove photolesions from constant kappa and mu genes. Facultative bands from lymphocytes showed a smaller decrease of density after 24 h repair. This suggests that lymphocytes are less efficient than granulocytes in removing UV damage from constant kappa and mu genes.

  7. The Fanconi anemia pathway: Repairing the link between DNA damage and squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romick-Rosendale, Lindsey E. [Division of Oncology, Cancer and Blood Diseases Institute, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45229 (United States); Lui, Vivian W.Y.; Grandis, Jennifer R. [Department of Otolaryngology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Wells, Susanne I., E-mail: Susanne.Wells@cchmc.org [Division of Oncology, Cancer and Blood Diseases Institute, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45229 (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare inherited recessive disease caused by mutations in one of fifteen genes known to encode FA pathway components. In response to DNA damage, nuclear FA proteins associate into high molecular weight complexes through a cascade of post-translational modifications and physical interactions, followed by the repair of damaged DNA. Hematopoietic cells are particularly sensitive to the loss of these interactions, and bone marrow failure occurs almost universally in FA patients. FA as a disease is further characterized by cancer susceptibility, which highlights the importance of the FA pathway in tumor suppression, and will be the focus of this review. Acute myeloid leukemia is the most common cancer type, often subsequent to bone marrow failure. However, FA patients are also at an extreme risk of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the head and neck and gynecological tract, with an even greater incidence in those individuals who have received a bone marrow transplant and recovered from hematopoietic disease. FA tumor suppression in hematopoietic versus epithelial compartments could be mechanistically similar or distinct. Definition of compartment specific FA activities is now critical to assess the effects of today's bone marrow failure treatments on tomorrow's solid tumor development. It is our hope that current therapies can then be optimized to decrease the risk of malignant transformation in both hematopoietic and epithelial cells. Here we review our current understanding of the mechanisms of action of the Fanconi anemia pathway as it contributes to stress responses, DNA repair and squamous cell carcinoma susceptibility.

  8. Methotrexate induces DNA damage and inhibits homologous recombination repair in choriocarcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie L

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Lisha Xie,1,* Tiancen Zhao,1,2,* Jing Cai,1 You Su,1 Zehua Wang,1 Weihong Dong1 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Central Hospital of Wuhan, Wuhan, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate the mechanism of sensitivity to methotrexate (MTX in human choriocarcinoma cells regarding DNA damage response. Methods: Two choriocarcinoma cancer cell lines, JAR and JEG-3, were utilized in this study. An MTX-sensitive osteosarcoma cell line MG63, an MTX-resistant epithelial ovarian cancer cell line A2780 and an MTX-resistant cervical adenocarcinoma cell line Hela served as controls. Cell viability assay was carried out to assess MTX sensitivity of cell lines. MTX-induced DNA damage was evaluated by comet assay. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was used to detect the mRNA levels of BRCA1, BRCA2, RAD51 and RAD52. The protein levels of γH2AX, RAD 51 and p53 were analyzed by Western blot. Results: Remarkable DNA strand breaks were observed in MTX-sensitive cell lines (JAR, JEG-3 and MG63 but not in MTX-resistant cancer cells (A2780 and Hela after 48 h of MTX treatment. Only in the choriocarcinoma cells, the expression of homologous recombination (HR repair gene RAD51 was dramatically suppressed by MTX in a dose- and time-dependent manner, accompanied with the increase in p53. Conclusion: The MTX-induced DNA strand breaks accompanied by deficiencies in HR repair may contribute to the hypersensitivity to chemotherapy in choriocarcinoma. Keywords: choriocarcinoma, chemotherapy hypersensitivity, DNA double-strand break, RAD51, p53

  9. ShaPINg cell fate upon DNA damage:role of Pin1 isomerase in DNA damage-induced cell death and repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas G Hofmann

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase Pin1 acts as a molecular timer in proline-directed Ser/Thr kinase signaling and shapes cellular responses based on recognition of phosphorylation marks and implementing conformational changes in its substrates. Accordingly, Pin1 has been linked to numerous phosphorylation-controlled signaling pathways and cellular processes such as cell cycle progression, proliferation and differentiation. In addition, Pin1 plays a pivotal role in DNA damage-triggered cell fate decisions. Whereas moderate DNA damage is balanced by DNA repair, cells confronted with massive genotoxic stress are eliminated by the induction of programmed cell death or cellular senescence. In this review we summarize and discuss the current knowledge on how Pin1 specifies cell fate through regulating key players of the apoptotic and the repair branch of the DNA damage response.

  10. Erythrocyte Shape Abnormalities, Membrane Oxidative Damage, and β -Actin Alterations: An Unrecognized Triad in Classical Autism

    OpenAIRE

    Lucia Ciccoli; Claudio De Felice; Eugenio Paccagnini; Silvia Leoncini; Alessandra Pecorelli; Cinzia Signorini; Giuseppe Belmonte; Roberto Guerranti; Alessio Cortelazzo; Mariangela Gentile; Gloria Zollo; Thierry Durand; Giuseppe Valacchi; Marcello Rossi; Joussef Hayek

    2013-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are a complex group of neurodevelopment disorders steadily rising in frequency and treatment refractory, where the search for biological markers is of paramount importance. Although red blood cells (RBCs) membrane lipidomics and rheological variables have been reported to be altered, with some suggestions indicating an increased lipid peroxidation in the erythrocyte membrane, to date no information exists on how the oxidative membrane damage may affect cytoske...

  11. Coordination of altered DNA repair and damage pathways in arsenite-exposed keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamadeh, Hisham K; Trouba, Kevin J; Amin, Rupesh P; Afshari, Cynthia A; Germolec, Dori

    2002-10-01

    Human exposure to arsenic, a ubiquitous and toxic environmental pollutant, is associated with an increased incidence of skin cancer. However, the mechanism(s) associated with AsIII-mediated toxicity and carcinogenesis at low levels of exposure remains elusive. Aberrations in cell proliferation, oxidative damage, and DNA-repair fidelity have been implicated in sodium arsenite (AsIII)-mediated carcinogenicity and toxicity, but these events have been examined in isolation in the majority of biological models of arsenic exposure. We hypothesized that the simultaneous interaction of these effects may be important in arsenic-mediated neoplasia in the skin. To evaluate this, normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK) were exposed to nontoxic doses (0.005-5 micro M) of AsIII and monitored for several physiological endpoints at the times when cells were harvested for gene expression measurements (1-24 h). Two-fluor cDNA microarray analyses indicated that AsIII treatment decreased the expression of genes associated with DNA repair (e.g., p53 and Damage-specific DNA-binding protein 2) and increased the expression of genes indicative of the cellular response to oxidative stress (e.g., Superoxide dismutase 1, NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase, and Serine/threonine kinase 25). AsIII also modulated the expression of certain transcripts associated with increased cell proliferation (e.g., Cyclin G1, Protein kinase C delta), oncogenes, and genes associated with cellular transformation (e.g., Gro-1 and V-yes). These observations correlated with measurements of cell proliferation and mitotic measurements as AsIII treatment resulted in a dose-dependent increase in cellular mitoses at 24 h and an increase in cell proliferation at 48 h of exposure. Data in this manuscript demonstrates that AsIII exposure simultaneously modulates DNA repair, cell proliferation, and redox-related gene expression in nontransformed, normal NHEK. It is anticipated that data in this report will serve as a

  12. A cell-free system for studying a priming factor involved in repair of bleomycin-damaged DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seki,Shuji

    1989-04-01

    Full Text Available A simple cell-free system for studying a priming factor involved in the repair of bleomycin-damaged DNA was established. The template-primer used for the repair DNA synthesis was prepared by treating the closed circular, superhelical form of pUC19 plasmid DNA with 2.2 microM bleomycin and 20 microM ferrous ions. Single-strand breaks were introduced into pUC19 DNA by the bleomycin treatment, and the DNA was consequently converted largely into the open circular form. A system for repair of this bleomycin-damaged DNA was constructed with a priming factor, DNA polymerase (DNA polymerase beta or Klenow fragment of DNA polymerase I, ATP, T4 DNA ligase and four deoxynucleoside triphosphates. After incubation, the conformation of the DNA was analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis and electron microscopy. The open circular DNA was largely converted to the closed circular DNA, indicating that the single-strand breaks of DNA were repaired. When the priming factor was omitted, DNA repair did not occur. The present system seemed to be applicable to the study of priming factors involved in the repair of DNA with single-strand breaks caused not only by bleomycin but also by ionizing radiation or active oxygen.

  13. Association Between Polymorphisms of DNA Repair Gene XRCC1 and DNA Damage in Asbestos-Exposed Workers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO-HONG ZHAO; GUANG JIA; YONG-QUAN LIU; SHAO-WEI LIU; LEI YAN; YU JIN; NIAN LIU

    2006-01-01

    Objective To compare the asbestos-induced DNA damage and repair capacities of DNA damage between 104 asbestos exposed workers and 101 control workers in Qingdao City of China and to investigate the possible association between polymorphisms in codon 399 of XRCC1 and susceptibility to asbestosis. Methods DNA damage levels in peripheral bloodlymphocytes were determined by comet assay, and XRCC 1 genetic polymorphisms of DNA samples from 51 asbestosis cases and 53 non-asbestosis workers with a similar asbestos exposure history were analyzed by PCR/RFLP. Results The basal comet scores (3.95±2.95) were significantly higher in asbestos-exposed workers than in control workers (0.10±0.28). After 1 h H2O2 stimulation, DNA damage of lymphocytes exhibited different increases. After a 4 h repair period, the comet scores were 50.98±19.53 in asbestos-exposed workers and 18.32±12.04 in controls. The residual DNA damage (RD) was significantly greater (P<0.01) in asbestos-exposed workers (35.62%) than in controls (27.75%). XRCC1 genetic polymorphism in 104 asbestos-exposed workers was not associated with increased risk of asbestosis. But compared with polymorphisms in the DNA repair gene XRCC1 (polymorphisms in codon 399) and the DNA damage induced by asbestos, the comet scores in asbestosis cases with Gln/Gln, Gln/Arg, and Arg/Arg were 40.26±18.94, 38.03±28.22, and 32.01±11.65, respectively, which were higher than those in non-asbestosis workers with the same genotypes (25.58±11.08, 37.08±14.74, and 29.38±10.15). There were significant differences in the comet scores between asbestosis cases and non-asbestosis workers with Gln/Gln by Student's t-test (P<0.05 or 0.01). The comet scores were higher in asbestosis workers with Gln/Gln than in those with Arg/Arg and in non-asbestosis workers exposed to asbestos, but without statistically significant difference. Conclusions Exposure to asbestos may be related to DNA damage or the capacity of cells to repair H2O2-induced

  14. Assessment of the repair and damage of DNA induced by parent and reduced RSU-1069, a 2-nitroimidazole-aziridine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Neill, P.; Cunniffe, S.M.

    1989-04-01

    The cellular repair and damage of DNA induced by parent and reduced RSU-1069, a 2-nitroimidazole-aziridine, was assessed at both the molecular and cellular level. At the molecular level, after in vitro incubation with parent or reduced RSU-1069, plasmid DNA was transfected into Escherichia coli (AB1157) with subsequent selection for gene expression. For equivalent levels of DNA strand breakage following such treatment it is evident from the relative transformation frequencies that interactions with reduced RSU-1069 lead to DNA damage consistent with bifunctional action of a metabolite(s). At the cellular level, the cytoxicity of RSU-1069 was determined for a series of repair deficient mutants of E. coli under both aerobic and hypoxic conditions. The differential aerobic:hypoxic cytotoxicity ratio is approximately 3. We conclude that the repair of cellular DNA damage induced by RSU-1069 involves activation of the gene products under the control of the recA gene and not those under the control of the ada gene. The ability of cellular systems to repair damage induced by RSU-1069 may play a significant role in determining its efficiency to act as a hypoxic cell radiosensitizer and a hypoxia selective cytotoxin.

  15. Cell and gene therapy for arrhythmias: Repair of cardiac conduction damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Fu Xiao

    2011-01-01

    Action potentials generated in the sinoatrial node(SAN)dominate the rhythm and rate of a healthy human heart.Subsequently,these action potentials propagate to the whole heart via its conduction system .Abnormalities of impulse generation and/or propagation in a heart can cause arrhythmias.For example,SAN dysfunction or conduction block of the atrioventricular node can lead to serious bradycardia which is currently treated with an implanted electronic pacemaker.On the other hand conduction damage may cause reentrant tachyarrhythmias which are primarily treated pharmacologically or by medical device-based therapies,including defibrillation and tissue ablation.However,drug therapies sometimes may not be effective or are associated with serious side effects.Device-based therapies for cardiac arrhythmias,even with well developed technology,still face inadequacies,limitations,hardware complications,and other challenges.Therefore,scientists are actively seeking other alternatives for antiarrhythmic therapy.In particular,cells and genes used for repairing cardiac conduction damage/defect have been investigated in various studies both in vitro and in vivo.Despite the complexities of the excitation and conduction systems of the heart,cell and gene-based strategies provide novel alternatives for treatment or cure of cardiac anhythmias.This review summarizes some highlights of recent research progress in this field.

  16. Regenerative repair of damaged meniscus with autologous adipose tissue-derived stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Jaewoo; Lee, Jung Hun; Lee, Sang Hee

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are defined as pluripotent cells found in numerous human tissues, including bone marrow and adipose tissue. Such MSCs, isolated from bone marrow and adipose tissue, have been shown to differentiate into bone and cartilage, along with other types of tissues. Therefore, MSCs represent a promising new therapy in regenerative medicine. The initial treatment of meniscus tear of the knee is managed conservatively with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and physical therapy. When such conservative treatment fails, an arthroscopic resection of the meniscus is necessary. However, the major drawback of the meniscectomy is an early onset of osteoarthritis. Therefore, an effective and noninvasive treatment for patients with continuous knee pain due to damaged meniscus has been sought. Here, we present a review, highlighting the possible regenerative mechanisms of damaged meniscus with MSCs (especially adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASCs)), along with a case of successful repair of torn meniscus with significant reduction of knee pain by percutaneous injection of autologous ASCs into an adult human knee.

  17. In situ repair of vagus nerve stimulator lead damage: technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralston, Ashley; Ogden, Patti; Kohrman, Michael H; Frim, David M

    2016-12-01

    Vagus nerve stimulators (VNSs) are currently an accepted treatment for intractable epilepsy not amenable to ablative surgery. Battery death and lead damage are the main reasons for reoperation in patients with VNSs. In general, any damage to the lead requires revision surgery to remove the helical electrodes from the vagus nerve and replace the electrode array and wire. The electrodes are typically scarred and difficult to remove from the vagus nerve without injury. The authors describe 6 patients with VNSs who presented with low lead impedance on diagnostic testing, leading to the intraoperative finding of lead insulation disruption, or who were found incidentally at the time of implantable pulse generator battery replacement to have a tear in the outer insulation of the electrode wire. Instead of replacement, the wire insulation was repaired and reinforced in situ, leading to normal impedance testing. All 6 devices remained functional over a follow-up period of up to 87 months, with 2 of the 6 patients having a relatively shorter follow-up of only 12 months. This technique, applicable in a subset of patients with VNSs requiring lead exploration, obviates the need for lead replacement with its attendant risks.

  18. Biodegradable polymer nanofiber membrane for the repair of cutaneous wounds in dogs - two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lívia Gomes Amaral

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The study of wound healing and its treatment is extremely important in veterinary medicine due to the high frequency of wounds and the difficulty in treating wounds by second intention. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate the use of a nanofiber membrane made of biodegradable polymers as a method of wound treatment in dogs. This study comprised two dogs with bite wounds. Debridement and cleaning was performed followed by the application of the membrane. In one dog, the wound was in the left proximal calcaneal region with clinical signs of infection, necrotic tissue, and muscle and the gastrocnemius tendon were exposed. The wound displayed rapid formation of granulation tissue which became excessive, so it was necessary to debride several times. However, with the suspension of the use of the membrane, formation of this tissue was not observed, and the wound evolved to epithelialization and fast contraction. In the second dog, there was a deep wound on the medial aspect of the proximal right hind limb, with clinical signs of infection, with muscle exposure. Once the membrane was placed, granulation tissue formed, and the membrane was used until the level of this tissue reached the skin. The wound underwent rapid epithelialization and contraction, without developing exuberant granulation tissue. Efficient wound repair was observed and the dogs exhibited greater comfort during application and use of the membrane. More studies should be conducted in dogs focusing on the application of this membrane until the appearance of healthy granulation tissue, as continued use seems to stimulate the formation of exuberant granulation tissue.

  19. Protein expression of DNA damage repair proteins dictates response to topoisomerase and PARP inhibitors in triple-negative breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie L Boerner

    Full Text Available Patients with metastatic triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC have a poor prognosis. New approaches for the treatment of TNBC are needed to improve patient survival. The concept of synthetic lethality, brought about by inactivating complementary DNA repair pathways, has been proposed as a promising therapeutic option for these tumors. The TNBC tumor type has been associated with BRCA mutations, and inhibitors of Poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP, a family of proteins that facilitates DNA repair, have been shown to effectively kill BRCA defective tumors by preventing cells from repairing DNA damage, leading to a loss of cell viability and clonogenic survival. Here we present preclinical efficacy results of combining the PARP inhibitor, ABT-888, with CPT-11, a topoisomerase I inhibitor. CPT-11 binds to topoisomerase I at the replication fork, creating a bulky adduct that is recognized as damaged DNA. When DNA damage was stimulated with CPT-11, protein expression of the nucleotide excision repair enzyme ERCC1 inversely correlated with cell viability, but not clonogenic survival. However, 4 out of the 6 TNBC cells were synergistically responsive by cell viability and 5 out of the 6 TNBC cells were synergistically responsive by clonogenic survival to the combination of ABT-888 and CPT-11. In vivo, the BRCA mutant cell line MX-1 treated with CPT-11 alone demonstrated significant decreased tumor growth; this decrease was enhanced further with the addition of ABT-888. Decrease in tumor growth correlated with an increase in double strand DNA breaks as measured by γ-H2AX phosphorylation. In summary, inhibiting two arms of the DNA repair pathway simultaneously in TNBC cell lines, independent of BRCA mutation status, resulted in un-repairable DNA damage and subsequent cell death.

  20. Nicotinamide enhances repair of ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage in human keratinocytes and ex vivo skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surjana, Devita; Halliday, Gary M; Damian, Diona L

    2013-05-01

    Nicotinamide (vitamin B3) protects from ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced carcinogenesis in mice and from UV-induced immunosuppression in mice and humans. Recent double-blinded randomized controlled Phase 2 studies in heavily sun-damaged individuals have shown that oral nicotinamide significantly reduces premalignant actinic keratoses, and may reduce new non-melanoma skin cancers. Nicotinamide is a precursor of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)), an essential coenzyme in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production. Previously, we showed that nicotinamide prevents UV-induced ATP decline in HaCaT keratinocytes. Energy-dependent DNA repair is a key determinant of cellular survival after exposure to DNA-damaging agents such as UV radiation. Hence, in this study we investigated whether nicotinamide protection from cellular energy loss influences DNA repair. We treated HaCaT keratinocytes with nicotinamide and exposed them to low-dose solar-simulated UV (ssUV). Excision repair was quantified using an assay of unscheduled DNA synthesis. Nicotinamide increased both the proportion of cells undergoing excision repair and the repair rate in each cell. We then investigated ssUV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8oxoG) formation and repair by comet assay in keratinocytes and with immunohistochemistry in human skin. Nicotinamide reduced CPDs and 8oxoG in both models and the reduction appeared to be due to enhancement of DNA repair. These results show that nicotinamide enhances two different pathways for repair of UV-induced photolesions, supporting nicotinamide's potential as an inexpensive, convenient and non-toxic agent for skin cancer chemoprevention.

  1. Assessment of primary, oxidative and excision repaired DNA damage in hospital personnel handling antineoplastic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarini, Milena; Dominici, Luca; Piccinini, Renza; Fatigoni, Cristina; Ambrogi, Maura; Curti, Gianluca; Morucci, Piero; Muzi, Giacomo; Monarca, Silvano; Moretti, Massimo

    2011-05-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer has classified several antineoplastic drugs in Group 1 (human carcinogens), among which chlorambucil, cyclophosphamide (CP) and tamoxifen, Group 2A (probable human carcinogens), among which cisplatin, etoposide, N-ethyl- and N-methyl-N-nitrosourea, and Group 2B (possible human carcinogens), among which bleomycins, merphalan and mitomycin C. The widespread use of these mutagenic/carcinogenic drugs in the treatment of cancer has led to anxiety about possible genotoxic hazards to medical personnel handling these drugs. The aim of the present study was to evaluate work environment contamination by antineoplastic drugs in a hospital in Central Italy and to assess the genotoxic risks associated with antineoplastic drug handling. The study group comprised 52 exposed subjects and 52 controls. Environmental contamination was assessed by taking wipe samples from different surfaces in preparation and administration rooms and nonwoven swabs were used as pads for the surrogate evaluation of dermal exposure, 5-fluorouracil and cytarabine were chosen as markers of exposure to antineoplastic drugs in the working environment. The actual exposure to antineoplastic drugs was evaluated by determining the urinary excretion of CP. The extent of primary, oxidative and excision repaired DNA damage was measured in peripheral blood leukocytes with the alkaline comet assay. To evaluate the role, if any, of genetic variants in the extent of genotoxic effects related to antineoplastic drug occupational exposure, the study subjects were genotyped for GSTM1, GSTT1, GSTP1 and TP53 polymorphisms. Primary DNA damage significantly increased in leukocytes of exposed nurses compared to controls. The use of personal protective equipment (i.e. gloves and/mask) was associated with a decrease in the extent of primary DNA damage.

  2. Dehydration rate determines the degree of membrane damage and desiccation tolerance in bryophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz de Carvalho, Ricardo; Catalá, Myriam; Branquinho, Cristina; Marques da Silva, Jorge; Barreno, Eva

    2017-03-01

    Desiccation tolerant (DT) organisms are able to withstand an extended loss of body water and rapidly resume metabolism upon rehydration. This ability, however, is strongly dependent on a slow dehydration rate. Fast dehydration affects membrane integrity leading to intracellular solute leakage upon rehydration and thereby impairs metabolism recovery. We test the hypothesis that the increased cell membrane damage and membrane permeability observed under fast dehydration, compared with slow dehydration, is related to an increase in lipid peroxidation. Our results reject this hypothesis because following rehydration lipid peroxidation remains unaltered, a fact that could be due to the high increase of NO upon rehydration. However, in fast-dried samples we found a strong signal of red autofluorescence upon rehydration, which correlates with an increase in ROS production and with membrane leakage, particularly the case of phenolics. This could be used as a bioindicator of oxidative stress and membrane damage.

  3. Characterization of environmental chemicals with potential for DNA damage using isogenic DNA repair-deficient chicken DT40 cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kimiyo N; Hirota, Kouji; Kono, Koichi; Takeda, Shunichi; Sakamuru, Srilatha; Xia, Menghang; Huang, Ruili; Austin, Christopher P; Witt, Kristine L; Tice, Raymond R

    2011-08-01

    Included among the quantitative high throughput screens (qHTS) conducted in support of the US Tox21 program are those being evaluated for the detection of genotoxic compounds. One such screen is based on the induction of increased cytotoxicity in seven isogenic chicken DT40 cell lines deficient in DNA repair pathways compared to the parental DNA repair-proficient cell line. To characterize the utility of this approach for detecting genotoxic compounds and identifying the type(s) of DNA damage induced, we evaluated nine of 42 compounds identified as positive for differential cytotoxicity in qHTS (actinomycin D, adriamycin, alachlor, benzotrichloride, diglycidyl resorcinol ether, lovastatin, melphalan, trans-1,4-dichloro-2-butene, tris(2,3-epoxypropyl)isocyanurate) and one non-cytotoxic genotoxic compound (2-aminothiamine) for (1) clastogenicity in mutant and wild-type cells; (2) the comparative induction of γH2AX positive foci by melphalan; (3) the extent to which a 72-hr exposure duration increased assay sensitivity or specificity; (4) the use of 10 additional DT40 DNA repair-deficient cell lines to better analyze the type(s) of DNA damage induced; and (5) the involvement of reactive oxygen species in the induction of DNA damage. All compounds but lovastatin and 2-aminothiamine were more clastogenic in at least one DNA repair-deficient cell line than the wild-type cells. The differential responses across the various DNA repair-deficient cell lines provided information on the type(s) of DNA damage induced. The results demonstrate the utility of this DT40 screen for detecting genotoxic compounds, for characterizing the nature of the DNA damage, and potentially for analyzing mechanisms of mutagenesis.

  4. Evaluation of radioinduced damage and repair capacity in human breast cancer cells, MCDF-7 and T4-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valgode, F.G.S.; Soares, C.R.J.; Bartolini, P.; Okazaki, K. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares IPEN/CNEN-SP, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: kokazaki@ipen.br

    2007-07-01

    Ionizing radiation is an established etiologic agent for breast cancer, but on the other hand it is a therapeutic modality used in cancer treatment. Accumulation of DNA damage and deficient DNA repair are considered as factors of susceptibility that predispose individuals to breast cancer development. In the present study, genetic damage induced by gamma radiation and repair capacity in the target cells, i.e. cells originating of breast cancer, were analyzed using micronucleus test and comet assay (single-cell alkaline gel electrophoresis). So, two breast tumor cell line, MCF-7 and T-47D were irradiated in a {sup 60}Co source (0.722 Gy/min) with various doses (0.5; 1.0; 2.0; 4.0 and 5.0 Gy). Cytogenetic data showed similar spontaneous damage of two cell lines, the radioinduced damage, however, was higher in T-47D, starting from 2 Gy, with a more accelerated proliferation rate than MCF- 7 at all doses analyzed. Both tumor cell lines were capable to repair a considerable part of radioinduced damage within 1 hour after exposure, indicating a relative radioresistance of theses cell lines to the genotoxic action of ionizing radiation. (author)

  5. A DNA2 Homolog Is Required for DNA Damage Repair, Cell Cycle Regulation, and Meristem Maintenance in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Ning; Liu, Xiaomin; Gao, Hongbo

    2016-05-01

    Plant meristem cells divide and differentiate in a spatially and temporally regulated manner, ultimately giving rise to organs. In this study, we isolated the Arabidopsis jing he sheng 1 (jhs1) mutant, which exhibited retarded growth, an abnormal pattern of meristem cell division and differentiation, and morphological defects such as fasciation, an irregular arrangement of siliques, and short roots. We identified JHS1 as a homolog of human and yeast DNA Replication Helicase/Nuclease2, which is known to be involved in DNA replication and damage repair. JHS1 is strongly expressed in the meristem of Arabidopsis. The jhs1 mutant was sensitive to DNA damage stress and had an increased DNA damage response, including increased expression of genes involved in DNA damage repair and cell cycle regulation, and a higher frequency of homologous recombination. In the meristem of the mutant plants, cell cycle progression was delayed at the G2 or late S phase and genes essential for meristem maintenance were misregulated. These results suggest that JHS1 plays an important role in DNA replication and damage repair, meristem maintenance, and development in plants. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage and its repair in human cells. Final performance report, July 1992--June 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dizdaroglu, M.

    1995-12-31

    The studies of DNA damage in living cells in vitro and in vivo were continued. A variety of systems including cultured mammalian cells, animals, and human tissues were used to conduct these studies. In addition, enzymatic repair of DNA base damage was studied using several DNA glycosylases. To this end, substrate specificities of these enzymes were examined in terms of a large number of base lesions in DNA. In the first phase of the studies, the author sought to introduce improvements to his methodologies for measurement of DNA damage using the technique of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). In particular, the quantitative measurement of DNA base damage and DNA-protein crosslinks was improved by incorporation of isotope-dilution mass spectrometry into the methodologies. This is one of the most accurate techniques for quantification of organic compounds. Having improved the measurement technique, studies of DNA damage in living cells and DNA repair by repair enzymes were pursued. This report provides a summary of these studies with references to the original work.

  7. Modulation of wound healing and scar formation by MG53 protein-mediated cell membrane repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haichang; Duann, Pu; Lin, Pei-Hui; Zhao, Li; Fan, Zhaobo; Tan, Tao; Zhou, Xinyu; Sun, Mingzhai; Fu, Minghuan; Orange, Matthew; Sermersheim, Matthew; Ma, Hanley; He, Duofen; Steinberg, Steven M; Higgins, Robert; Zhu, Hua; John, Elizabeth; Zeng, Chunyu; Guan, Jianjun; Ma, Jianjie

    2015-10-02

    Cell membrane repair is an important aspect of physiology, and disruption of this process can result in pathophysiology in a number of different tissues, including wound healing, chronic ulcer and scarring. We have previously identified a novel tripartite motif family protein, MG53, as an essential component of the cell membrane repair machinery. Here we report the functional role of MG53 in the modulation of wound healing and scarring. Although MG53 is absent from keratinocytes and fibroblasts, remarkable defects in skin architecture and collagen overproduction are observed in mg53(-/-) mice, and these animals display delayed wound healing and abnormal scarring. Recombinant human MG53 (rhMG53) protein, encapsulated in a hydrogel formulation, facilitates wound healing and prevents scarring in rodent models of dermal injuries. An in vitro study shows that rhMG53 protects against acute injury to keratinocytes and facilitates the migration of fibroblasts in response to scratch wounding. During fibrotic remodeling, rhMG53 interferes with TGF-β-dependent activation of myofibroblast differentiation. The resulting down-regulation of α smooth muscle actin and extracellular matrix proteins contributes to reduced scarring. Overall, these studies establish a trifunctional role for MG53 as a facilitator of rapid injury repair, a mediator of cell migration, and a modulator of myofibroblast differentiation during wound healing. Targeting the functional interaction between MG53 and TGF-β signaling may present a potentially effective means for promoting scarless wound healing. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Thermodynamics of the DNA damage repair steps of human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikita A Kuznetsov

    Full Text Available Human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (hOGG1 is a key enzyme responsible for initiating the base excision repair of 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanosine (oxoG. In this study a thermodynamic analysis of the interaction of hOGG1 with specific and non-specific DNA-substrates is performed based on stopped-flow kinetic data. The standard Gibbs energies, enthalpies and entropies of specific stages of the repair process were determined via kinetic measurements over a temperature range using the van't Hoff approach. The three steps which are accompanied with changes in the DNA conformations were detected via 2-aminopurine fluorescence in the process of binding and recognition of damaged oxoG base by hOGG1. The thermodynamic analysis has demonstrated that the initial step of the DNA substrates binding is mainly governed by energy due to favorable interactions in the process of formation of the recognition contacts, which results in negative enthalpy change, as well as due to partial desolvation of the surface between the DNA and enzyme, which results in positive entropy change. Discrimination of non-specific G base versus specific oxoG base is occurring in the second step of the oxoG-substrate binding. This step requires energy consumption which is compensated by the positive entropy contribution. The third binding step is the final adjustment of the enzyme/substrate complex to achieve the catalytically competent state which is characterized by large endothermicity compensated by a significant increase of entropy originated from the dehydration of the DNA grooves.

  9. Beryllium chloride-induced oxidative DNA damage and alteration in the expression patterns of DNA repair-related genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attia, Sabry M; Harisa, Gamaleldin I; Hassan, Memy H; Bakheet, Saleh A

    2013-09-01

    Beryllium metal has physical properties that make its use essential for very specific applications, such as medical diagnostics, nuclear/fusion reactors and aerospace applications. Because of the widespread human exposure to beryllium metals and the discrepancy of the genotoxic results in the reported literature, detail assessments of the genetic damage of beryllium are warranted. Mice exposed to beryllium chloride at an oral dose of 23mg/kg for seven consecutive days exhibited a significant increase in the level of DNA-strand breaking and micronuclei formation as detected by a bone marrow standard comet assay and micronucleus test. Whereas slight beryllium chloride-induced oxidative DNA damage was detected following formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase digestion, digestion with endonuclease III resulted in considerable increases in oxidative DNA damage after the 11.5 and 23mg/kg/day treatment as detected by enzyme-modified comet assays. Increased 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine was also directly correlated with increased bone marrow micronuclei formation and DNA strand breaks, which further confirm the involvement of oxidative stress in the induction of bone marrow genetic damage after exposure to beryllium chloride. Gene expression analysis on the bone marrow cells from beryllium chloride-exposed mice showed significant alterations in genes associated with DNA damage repair. Therefore, beryllium chloride may cause genetic damage to bone marrow cells due to the oxidative stress and the induced unrepaired DNA damage is probably due to the down-regulation in the expression of DNA repair genes, which may lead to genotoxicity and eventually cause carcinogenicity.

  10. Reactive oxygen species, DNA damage, and error-prone repair: a model for genomic instability with progression in myeloid leukemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassool, Feyruz V; Gaymes, Terry J; Omidvar, Nader; Brady, Nicola; Beurlet, Stephanie; Pla, Marika; Reboul, Murielle; Lea, Nicholas; Chomienne, Christine; Thomas, Nicholas S B; Mufti, Ghulam J; Padua, Rose Ann

    2007-09-15

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) comprise a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, with an increased propensity to develop acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). The molecular basis for MDS progression is unknown, but a key element in MDS disease progression is loss of chromosomal material (genomic instability). Using our two-step mouse model for myeloid leukemic disease progression involving overexpression of human mutant NRAS and BCL2 genes, we show that there is a stepwise increase in the frequency of DNA damage leading to an increased frequency of error-prone repair of double-strand breaks (DSB) by nonhomologous end-joining. There is a concomitant increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) in these transgenic mice with disease progression. Importantly, RAC1, an essential component of the ROS-producing NADPH oxidase, is downstream of RAS, and we show that ROS production in NRAS/BCL2 mice is in part dependent on RAC1 activity. DNA damage and error-prone repair can be decreased or reversed in vivo by N-acetyl cysteine antioxidant treatment. Our data link gene abnormalities to constitutive DNA damage and increased DSB repair errors in vivo and provide a mechanism for an increase in the error rate of DNA repair with MDS disease progression. These data suggest treatment strategies that target RAS/RAC pathways and ROS production in human MDS/AML.

  11. NDR1 modulates the UV-induced DNA-damage checkpoint and nucleotide excision repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jeong-Min; Choi, Ji Ye [Department of Biological Science, Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Joo Mi [Research Center, Dongnam Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Jin Woong; Leem, Sun-Hee; Koh, Sang Seok [Department of Biological Science, Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Tae-Hong, E-mail: thkang@dau.ac.kr [Department of Biological Science, Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-05

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is the sole mechanism of UV-induced DNA lesion repair in mammals. A single round of NER requires multiple components including seven core NER factors, xeroderma pigmentosum A–G (XPA–XPG), and many auxiliary effector proteins including ATR serine/threonine kinase. The XPA protein helps to verify DNA damage and thus plays a rate-limiting role in NER. Hence, the regulation of XPA is important for the entire NER kinetic. We found that NDR1, a novel XPA-interacting protein, modulates NER by modulating the UV-induced DNA-damage checkpoint. In quiescent cells, NDR1 localized mainly in the cytoplasm. After UV irradiation, NDR1 accumulated in the nucleus. The siRNA knockdown of NDR1 delayed the repair of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in both normal cells and cancer cells. It did not, however, alter the expression levels or the chromatin association levels of the core NER factors following UV irradiation. Instead, the NDR1-depleted cells displayed reduced activity of ATR for some set of its substrates including CHK1 and p53, suggesting that NDR1 modulates NER indirectly via the ATR pathway. - Highlights: • NDR1 is a novel XPA-interacting protein. • NDR1 accumulates in the nucleus in response to UV irradiation. • NDR1 modulates NER (nucleotide excision repair) by modulating the UV-induced DNA-damage checkpoint response.

  12. Enhanced Critical Size Defect Repair in Rabbit Mandible by Electrospun Gelatin/β-TCP Composite Nanofibrous Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingming Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The design and fabrication of biodegradable barrier membranes with satisfactory structure and composition remain a considerable challenge for periodontal tissue regeneration. We have developed a biomimetic nanofibrous membrane made from a composite of gelatin and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP. We previously confirmed the in vitro biological performance of the membrane material, but the efficacy of the membranes in promoting bone repair in situ has not yet been examined. Gelatin/β-TCP composite nanofibers were fabricated by incorporation of 20 wt.% β-TCP nanoparticles into electrospun gelatin nanofibers. Electron microscopy showed that the composite membranes presented a nonwoven structure with an interconnected porous network and had a rough surface due to the β-TCP nanoparticles, which were distributed widely and uniformly throughout the gelatin-fiber matrix. The repair efficacy of rabbit mandible defects implanted with bone substitute (Bio-Oss and covered with the gelatin/β-TCP composite nanofibrous membrane was evaluated in comparison with pure gelatin nanofibrous membrane. Gross observation, histological examination, and immunohistochemical analysis showed that new bone formation and defect closure were significantly enhanced by the composite membranes compared to the pure gelatin ones. From these results, we conclude that nanofibrous gelatin/β-TCP composite membranes could serve as effective barrier membranes for guided tissue regeneration.

  13. Genome-wide analysis of human global and transcription-coupled excision repair of UV damage at single-nucleotide resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jinchuan; Adar, Sheera; Selby, Christopher P; Lieb, Jason D; Sancar, Aziz

    2015-05-01

    We developed a method for genome-wide mapping of DNA excision repair named XR-seq (excision repair sequencing). Human nucleotide excision repair generates two incisions surrounding the site of damage, creating an ∼30-mer. In XR-seq, this fragment is isolated and subjected to high-throughput sequencing. We used XR-seq to produce stranded, nucleotide-resolution maps of repair of two UV-induced DNA damages in human cells: cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and (6-4) pyrimidine-pyrimidone photoproducts [(6-4)PPs]. In wild-type cells, CPD repair was highly associated with transcription, specifically with the template strand. Experiments in cells defective in either transcription-coupled excision repair or general excision repair isolated the contribution of each pathway to the overall repair pattern and showed that transcription-coupled repair of both photoproducts occurs exclusively on the template strand. XR-seq maps capture transcription-coupled repair at sites of divergent gene promoters and bidirectional enhancer RNA (eRNA) production at enhancers. XR-seq data also uncovered the repair characteristics and novel sequence preferences of CPDs and (6-4)PPs. XR-seq and the resulting repair maps will facilitate studies of the effects of genomic location, chromatin context, transcription, and replication on DNA repair in human cells.

  14. Differential repair of UV damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is cell cycle dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terleth, C; Waters, R; Brouwer, J; van de Putte, P

    1990-09-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae the transcriptionally active MAT alpha locus is repaired preferentially to the inactive HML alpha locus after UV irradiation. Here we analysed the repair of both loci after irradiating yeast cells at different stages of the mitotic cell cycle. In all stages repair of the active MAT alpha locus occurs at a rate of 30% removal of dimers per hour after a UV dose of 60 J/m2. The inactive HML alpha is repaired as efficiently as MAT alpha following irradiation in G2 whereas repair of HML alpha is less efficient in the other stages. Thus differential repair is observed in G1 and S but not in G2. Apparently, in G2 a chromatin structure exists in which repair does not discriminate between transcriptionally active and inactive DNA or, alternatively, an additional repair mechanism might exist which is only operational during G2.

  15. Perichondrium/cartilage composite graft for repairing large tympanic membrane perforations and hearing improvement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xiao-wei; YANG Hua; GAO Ru-zhen; YU Rong; GAO Zhi-qiang

    2010-01-01

    Background The main risk factors for postoperative failure in tympanoplasties are large perforations that are difficult to repair, annular perforations, and a tympanic membrane (TM) with extensive granular myringitis that require middle ear exploration and mastoidectomy. The aim of this study was to investigate a novel technique of perichondrium/cartilage composite graft for repairing the large TM perforation in the patient of otitis media.Methods Retrospective chart reviews were conducted for 102 patients with large tympanic membrane perforations, who had undergone tympanoplasty from August 2005 to August 2008. Tympanoplasty or tympanomastoidectomy using a perichondrium/cartilage composite graft was analyzed. The tragal or conchal perichondrium/cartilage was used to replace the tympanic membrane in patients.Results Patients aged from 13 to 67 years were followed up in average for 24 months (10-36 months). Seventy-four ears (72.61%) were used the tragal perichondrium/cartilage as graft material and 27 ears (27.39%) were used the conchal perichondrium/cartilage. Graft take was successful in all patients. Postoperative complications such as wound infection, hematoma, or sensorineural hearing loss were not identified. Nine patients (8.82%) had the partial ossicular replacement prosthesis, 14 patients (13.72%) using the autologous curved incus and 79 patients (77.45%) without prosthesis. Successful closure occurred in 92% of the ears. A total of 85.8% patients achieved a postoperative hearing improvement.Conclusions The graft underlay tympanoplasty using perichonddum/cartilage composite is effective for the majority of patients with large perforation. The hearing was improved even if the mastoidectomy was required in the patients with otitis media with extensive granulation.

  16. BRCA1-associated exclusion of 53BP1 from DNA damage sites underlies temporal control of DNA repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, J. Ross; Sossick, Alex J.; Boulton, Simon J.; Jackson, Stephen P.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Following irradiation, numerous DNA-damage-responsive proteins rapidly redistribute into microscopically visible subnuclear aggregates, termed ionising-radiation-induced foci (IRIF). How the enrichment of proteins on damaged chromatin actually relates to DNA repair remains unclear. Here, we use super-resolution microscopy to examine the spatial distribution of BRCA1 and 53BP1 proteins within single IRIF at subdiffraction-limit resolution, yielding an unprecedented increase in detail that was not previously apparent by conventional microscopy. Consistent with a role for 53BP1 in promoting DNA double-strand break repair by non-homologous end joining, 53BP1 enrichment in IRIF is most prominent in the G0/G1 cell cycle phases, where it is enriched in dense globular structures. By contrast, as cells transition through S phase, the recruitment of BRCA1 into the core of IRIF is associated with an exclusion of 53BP1 to the focal periphery, leading to an overall reduction of 53BP1 occupancy at DNA damage sites. Our data suggest that the BRCA1-associated IRIF core corresponds to chromatin regions associated with repair by homologous recombination, and the enrichment of BRCA1 in IRIF represents a temporal switch in the DNA repair program. We propose that BRCA1 antagonises 53BP1-dependent DNA repair in S phase by inhibiting its interaction with chromatin proximal to damage sites. Furthermore, the genomic instability exhibited by BRCA1-deficient cells might result from a failure to efficiently exclude 53BP1 from such regions during S phase. PMID:22553214

  17. Electrochemical performance of a localized repair. Effect of applying a primer and a bonding membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castro-Borges, P.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available It is customary, in the constructions at the North of Yucatán, to employ primers to the rebars as a repair method in reinforced concrete, it has been observed in the literature that using primers alone presents an electrochemical behaviour still under discussion. Under these circumstances, several investigations have focused on the evaluation of the factor against or in favour of using primers as a repair method in a tropical marine environment. In this paper, the effects of applying a bonding membrane and the galvanic effect generated by the repair are also discussed. Small reinforced concrete columns were prepared and exposed under accelerated degradation cycles. After the activation of the rebars, the columns were repaired applying three types of primers, leaving one bar as control. After curing, the columns were exposed again to the same environment and their electrochemical behaviour was monitored. Corrosion potentials, polarization resistance, carbonation and chloride content were measured as a function of time. Conclusions suggest that the bonding membrane reduces the corrosion rates for the conditions and exposure time studied. The galvanic effect was observed after repairing the columns with and without bonding membrane, but with a tendency to reduce with time. The primers applied helped to reduce the galvanic effect of the repair, and to increase the polarization resistance.

    En las construcciones del norte de Yucatán se emplean, por costumbre, las imprimaciones al refuerzo como método de reparación al hormigón armado. Se ha observado en la literatura que la utilización sólo de imprimaciones presenta un comportamiento electroquímico, motivo éste, aún, de amplia discusión. Ante estas situaciones se llevaron a cabo varias investigaciones que tienen como objetivo la evaluación de las situaciones que favorezcan o no la utilización de las imprimaciones como método de reparación en un ambiente tropical marino. En este

  18. Phosphoramide mustard exposure induces DNA adduct formation and the DNA damage repair response in rat ovarian granulosa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, Shanthi; Keating, Aileen F

    2015-02-01

    Phosphoramide mustard (PM), the ovotoxic metabolite of the anti-cancer agent cyclophosphamide (CPA), destroys rapidly dividing cells by forming NOR-G-OH, NOR-G and G-NOR-G adducts with DNA, potentially leading to DNA damage. A previous study demonstrated that PM induces ovarian DNA damage in rat ovaries. To investigate whether PM induces DNA adduct formation, DNA damage and induction of the DNA repair response, rat spontaneously immortalized granulosa cells (SIGCs) were treated with vehicle control (1% DMSO) or PM (3 or 6μM) for 24 or 48h. Cell viability was reduced (Padduct was detected after 24h of 6μM PM exposure, while the more cytotoxic G-NOR-G DNA adduct was formed after 48h by exposure to both PM concentrations. Phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX), a marker of DNA double stranded break occurrence, was also increased by PM exposure, coincident with DNA adduct formation. Additionally, induction of genes (Atm, Parp1, Prkdc, Xrcc6, and Brca1) and proteins (ATM, γH2AX, PARP-1, PRKDC, XRCC6, and BRCA1) involved in DNA repair were observed in both a time- and dose-dependent manner. These data support that PM induces DNA adduct formation in ovarian granulosa cells, induces DNA damage and elicits the ovarian DNA repair response.

  19. Genetic polymorphisms of DNA repair genes and chromosomal damage in workers exposed to 1,3-butadiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Wang, Ai-hong; Tan, Hong-shan; Feng, Nan-nan; Ye, Yun-jie; Feng, Xiao-qing; Liu, Geoffrey; Zheng, Yu-xin; Xia, Zhao-lin

    2010-05-01

    The base excision repair (BER) pathway is important in repairing DNA damage incurred from occupational exposure to 1,3-butadiene (BD). This study examines the relationship between inherited polymorphisms of the BER pathway (x-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) Arg194Trp, Arg280His, Arg399Gln, T-77C, ADPRT Val762Ala, MGMT Leu84Phe and APE1 Asp148Glu) and chromosomal damage in BD-exposed workers, using the cytokinesis-blocked (CB) micronucleus (MN) assay in peripheral lymphocytes of 166 workers occupationally exposed to BD and 41 non-exposed healthy individuals. The MN frequency of exposed workers (3.39 +/- 2.42) per thousand was higher than that of the non-exposed groups (1.48 +/- 1.26) per thousand (P damage among BD-exposed workers. In workers exposed to BD, multiple BER polymorphisms and a XRCC1 haplotype were associated with differential levels of chromosome damage.

  20. Protective effect of Apocynum venetum (罗布麻) against lipid peroxidation damage of erythrocyte membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Benhong; Liu Gang; Hu Xianmin

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the protective effect of Apocynum venetum on lipid peroxidation damage of erythrocyte membrane. Methods: Model of lipid peroxidation of erythrocyte membrane was manufactured by three kinds of radicals generation systems. To set up a normal control group (NC), a model control group (MC), and four Apocynum venetum groups(A.V). Observation was made on the content of malondialdehyde (MDA). Results: Compared with MC group, all of the four Apocynum venetum groups dose-dependently inhibited the increases of MDA content in the membrane induced by xanthine - xanthine oxidase system, H2O2 or UV light. Conclusions: Apocynum venetum may protect erythrocyte membrane from the lipid peroxidative damage induced by radicals.

  1. Phosphoramide mustard exposure induces DNA adduct formation and the DNA damage repair response in rat ovarian granulosa cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganesan, Shanthi, E-mail: shanthig@iastate.edu; Keating, Aileen F., E-mail: akeating@iastate.edu

    2015-02-01

    Phosphoramide mustard (PM), the ovotoxic metabolite of the anti-cancer agent cyclophosphamide (CPA), destroys rapidly dividing cells by forming NOR-G-OH, NOR-G and G-NOR-G adducts with DNA, potentially leading to DNA damage. A previous study demonstrated that PM induces ovarian DNA damage in rat ovaries. To investigate whether PM induces DNA adduct formation, DNA damage and induction of the DNA repair response, rat spontaneously immortalized granulosa cells (SIGCs) were treated with vehicle control (1% DMSO) or PM (3 or 6 μM) for 24 or 48 h. Cell viability was reduced (P < 0.05) after 48 h of exposure to 3 or 6 μM PM. The NOR-G-OH DNA adduct was detected after 24 h of 6 μM PM exposure, while the more cytotoxic G-NOR-G DNA adduct was formed after 48 h by exposure to both PM concentrations. Phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX), a marker of DNA double stranded break occurrence, was also increased by PM exposure, coincident with DNA adduct formation. Additionally, induction of genes (Atm, Parp1, Prkdc, Xrcc6, and Brca1) and proteins (ATM, γH2AX, PARP-1, PRKDC, XRCC6, and BRCA1) involved in DNA repair were observed in both a time- and dose-dependent manner. These data support that PM induces DNA adduct formation in ovarian granulosa cells, induces DNA damage and elicits the ovarian DNA repair response. - Highlights: • PM forms ovarian DNA adducts. • DNA damage marker γH2AX increased by PM exposure. • PM induces ovarian DNA double strand break repair.

  2. Modulation of DNA Damage and Repair Pathways by Human Tumour Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Hollingworth

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available With between 10% and 15% of human cancers attributable to viral infection, there is great interest, from both a scientific and clinical viewpoint, as to how these pathogens modulate host cell functions. Seven human tumour viruses have been identified as being involved in the development of specific malignancies. It has long been known that the introduction of chromosomal aberrations is a common feature of viral infections. Intensive research over the past two decades has subsequently revealed that viruses specifically interact with cellular mechanisms responsible for the recognition and repair of DNA lesions, collectively known as the DNA damage response (DDR. These interactions can involve activation and deactivation of individual DDR pathways as well as the recruitment of specific proteins to sites of viral replication. Since the DDR has evolved to protect the genome from the accumulation of deleterious mutations, deregulation is inevitably associated with an increased risk of tumour formation. This review summarises the current literature regarding the complex relationship between known human tumour viruses and the DDR and aims to shed light on how these interactions can contribute to genomic instability and ultimately the development of human cancers.

  3. Damage-induced hydrolyses modelling of biodegradable polymers for tendons and ligaments repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, André C; Guedes, Rui M; Tita, Volnei

    2015-09-18

    The use of biodegradable synthetic grafts to repair injured ligaments may overcome the disadvantages of other solutions. Apart from biological compatibility, these devices shall also be functionally compatible and temporarily displayed, during the healing process, adequate mechanical support. Laxity of these devices is an important concern. This can cause failure since it may result in joint instability. Laxity results from a progressive accumulation of plastic strain during the cyclic loading. The functional compatibility of a biodegradable synthetic graft and, therefore, the global mechanical properties of the scaffold during degradation, can be optimised using computer-aiding and numerical tools. Therefore, in this work, the ability of numerical tools to predict the mechanical behaviour of the device during its degradation is discussed. Computational approaches based on elastoplastic and viscoplastic constitutive models are also presented. These models enable to simulate the plastic strain accumulation. These computational approaches, where the material model parameters depend on the hydrolytic degradation damage, are calibrated using experimental data measured from biodegradable suture fibres at different degradation steps. Due to durability requirements the selected materials are polydioxone (PDO) and polylactic acid and poly-caprolactone blend (PLA-PCL). Computational approaches investigated are able to predict well the experimental results for both materials, in full strain range until rupture and for different degradation steps. These approaches can be further used in more complex fibrous structures, to predict its global mechanical behaviour during degradation process.

  4. Highly stable and self-repairing membrane-mimetic 2D nanomaterials assembled from lipid-like peptoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Haibao; Jiao, Fang; Daily, Michael D.; Chen, Yulin; Yan, Feng; Ding, Yan-Huai; Zhang, Xin; Robertson, Ellen J.; Baer, Marcel D.; Chen, Chun-Long

    2016-07-01

    An ability to develop sequence-defined synthetic polymers that both mimic lipid amphiphilicity for self-assembly of highly stable membrane-mimetic 2D nanomaterials and exhibit protein-like functionality would revolutionize the development of biomimetic membranes. Here we report the assembly of lipid-like peptoids into highly stable, crystalline, free-standing and self-repairing membrane-mimetic 2D nanomaterials through a facile crystallization process. Both experimental and molecular dynamics simulation results show that peptoids assemble into membranes through an anisotropic formation process. We further demonstrated the use of peptoid membranes as a robust platform to incorporate and pattern functional objects through large side-chain diversity and/or co-crystallization approaches. Similar to lipid membranes, peptoid membranes exhibit changes in thickness upon exposure to external stimuli; they can coat surfaces in single layers and self-repair. We anticipate that this new class of membrane-mimetic 2D nanomaterials will provide a robust matrix for development of biomimetic membranes tailored to specific applications.

  5. Analysis of roof membranes damaged by mechanical and climatic loads – pilot research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čurpek Jakub

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Realization of roof construction has many hidden risks, especially in buildings with diverse architecture. There is a problem about cooperation of individual works (vertical and horizontal constructions on roof in this type of architecture, during the process of realization. Purpose of this research is to reveal risks in form of the group of major source of defects by mechanical damages. The most often types of mechanical damages were chosen in this research, which then were applied on individual types of roof membranes. Response of this damage was found out during the test procedure of water pressure by special laboratory machines. Furthermore, samples of roof membranes were subjected to the Impact test, which was actually focused on damage by hailstone impact from the atmosphere. The final outcomes of the measurements show that the material composition of each roof membrane can influence their whole waterproofing after application of certain type of mechanical damage. In the Impact test, samples were suffered from impact of the hails. This test signified that the choice of base material of thermal insulation below the roof membrane plays an important role.

  6. The Flocculating Cationic Polypetide from Moringa oleifera Seeds Damages Bacterial Cell Membranes by Causing Membrane Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebek, Kevin; Schantz, Allen B; Sines, Ian; Lauser, Kathleen; Velegol, Stephanie; Kumar, Manish

    2015-04-21

    A cationic protein isolated from the seeds of the Moringa oleifera tree has been extensively studied for use in water treatment in developing countries and has been proposed for use in antimicrobial and therapeutic applications. However, the molecular basis for the antimicrobial action of this peptide, Moringa oleifera cationic protein (MOCP), has not been previously elucidated. We demonstrate here that a dominant mechanism of MOCP antimicrobial activity is membrane fusion. We used a combination of cryogenic electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and fluorescence assays to observe and study the kinetics of fusion of membranes in liposomes representing model microbial cells. We also conducted cryo-EM experiments on E. coli cells where MOCP was seen to fuse the inner and outer membranes. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of membrane vesicles with MOCP molecules were used to elucidate steps in peptide adsorption, stalk formation, and fusion between membranes.

  7. Fluorescence studies on radiation oxidative damage to membranes with implications to cellular radiosensitivity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K P Mishra

    2002-12-01

    Radiation oxidative damage to plasma membrane and its consequences to cellular radiosensitivity have received increasing attention in the past few years. This review gives a brief account of radiation oxidative damage in model and cellular membranes with particular emphasis on results from our laboratory. Fluorescence and ESR spin probes have been employed to investigate the structural and functional alterations in membranes after g-irradiation. Changes in the lipid bilayer in irradiated unilamellar liposomes prepared from egg yolk lecithin (EYL) were measured by using diphenylhexatriene (DPH) as a probe. The observed increase in DPH polarization and decrease in fluorescence intensity after g-irradiation of liposomes imply radiationinduced decrease in bilayer fluidity. Inclusion of cholesterol in liposome was found to protect lipids against radiation damage, possibly by modulation of bilayer organization e.g. lipid packing. Measurements on dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) liposomes loaded with 6-carboxyfluorescein (CF) showed radiation dose-dependent release of the probe indicating radiation-induced increased permeability. Changes in plasma membrane permeability of thymocytes were monitored by fluorescein diacetate (FDA) and induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were determined by 2,7-dichlorodihydro fluorescein diacetate (DCH-FDA). Results suggest a correlation between ROS generation and membrane permeability changes induced by radiation within therapeutic doses (0-10 Gy). It is concluded that increase in membrane permeability was the result of ROS-mediated oxidative reactions, which might trigger processes leading to apoptotic cell death after radiation exposure.

  8. No effect of 600 grams fruit and vegetables per day on oxidative DNA damage and repair in healthy nonsmokers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moller, P.; Vogel, Ulla Birgitte; Pedersen, A.;

    2003-01-01

    In several epidemiological studies, high intakes of fruits and vegetables have been associated with a lower incidence of cancer. Theoretically, intake of antioxidants by consumption of fruits and vegetables should protect against reactive oxygen species and decrease the formation of oxidative DNA......-oxo-2'-deoxyguanine was measured in urine. The expressions of oxoguanine glycosylase I and excision repair cross complementing I DNA repair genes, determined by real-time reverse transcription-PCR of mRNAs, were investigated in leukocytes. Consumption of fruits and vegetables or vitamins and minerals...... had no effect on oxidative DNA damage measured in mononuclear cell DNA or urine. Hydrogen peroxide sensitivity, detected by the comet assay, did not differ between the groups. Expression of excision repair cross complementing I and oxoguanine glycosylase I in leukocytes was not related to the diet...

  9. Ultraviolet damage, DNA repair and vitamin D in nonmelanoma skin cancer and in malignant melanoma: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichrath, Jörg; Rass, Knuth

    2014-01-01

    Skin exposure with UV radiation (UV) is the main cause of skin cancer development. Epidemiological data indicate that excessive or cumulative UV exposure takes place years and decades before the resulting malignancies arise. The most important defense mechanisms that protect human skin against UV radiation involve melanin synthesis and active repair mechanisms. DNA is the major target of direct or indirect UV-induced cellular damage. Low pigmentation capacity in white Caucasians and rare congenital defects in DNA repair are mainly responsible for protection failures. The important function of nucleotide excision DNA repair (NER) to protect against skin cancer becomes obvious by the rare genetic disease xeroderma pigmentosum, in which diverse NER genes are mutated. In animal models, it has been demonstrated that UVB is more effective to induce skin cancer than UVA. UV-induced DNA photoproducts are able to cause specific mutations (UV-signature) in susceptible genes for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC). In SCC development, UV-signature mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene are the most common event, as precancerous lesions reveal -80% and SCCs > 90% UV-specific p53 mutations. Mutations in Hedgehog pathway related genes, especially PTCH1, are well known to represent the most significant pathogenic event in BCC. However, specific UV-induced mutations can be found only in -50% of sporadic BCCs. Thus, cumulative UVB radiation cannot be considered to represent the only etiologic risk factor for BCC development. During the last decades, experimental animal models, including genetically engineered mice, the Xiphophorus hybrid fish, the South American oppossum and human skin xenografts, have further elucidated the important role of the DNA repair system in the multi-step process of UV-induced melanomagenesis. An increasing body of evidence now indicates that nucleotide excision repair is not the only DNA repair pathway that is involved in UV

  10. Repair Effect of Seaweed Polysaccharides with Different Contents of Sulfate Group and Molecular Weights on Damaged HK-2 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Bhadja

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The structure–activity relationships and repair mechanism of six low-molecular-weight seaweed polysaccharides (SPSs on oxalate-induced damaged human kidney proximal tubular epithelial cells (HK-2 were investigated. These SPSs included Laminaria japonica polysaccharide, degraded Porphyra yezoensis polysaccharide, degraded Gracilaria lemaneiformis polysaccharide, degraded Sargassum fusiforme polysaccharide, Eucheuma gelatinae polysaccharide, and degraded Undaria pinnatifida polysaccharide. These SPSs have a narrow difference of molecular weight (from 1968 to 4020 Da after degradation by controlling H2O2 concentration. The sulfate group (–SO3H content of the six SPSs was 21.7%, 17.9%, 13.3%, 8.2%, 7.0%, and 5.5%, respectively, and the –COOH contents varied between 1.0% to 1.7%. After degradation, no significant difference was observed in the contents of characteristic –SO3H and –COOH groups of polysaccharides. The repair effect of polysaccharides was determined using cell-viability test by CCK-8 assay and cell-morphology test by hematoxylin-eosin staining. The results revealed that these SPSs within 0.1–100 μg/mL did not express cytotoxicity in HK-2 cells, and each polysaccharide had a repair effect on oxalate-induced damaged HK-2 cells. Simultaneously, the content of polysaccharide –SO3H was positively correlated with repair ability. Furthermore, the low-molecular-weight degraded polysaccharides showed better repair activity on damaged HK-2 cells than their undegraded counterpart. Our results can provide reference for inhibiting the formation of kidney stones and for developing original anti-stone polysaccharide drugs.

  11. Nucleotide sequence, DNA damage location and protein stoichiometry influence base excision repair outcome at CAG/CTG repeats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goula, Agathi-Vasiliki; Pearson, Christopher E.; Della Maria, Julie; Trottier, Yvon; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Wilson, David M.; Merienne, Karine

    2012-01-01

    Expansion of CAG/CTG repeats is the underlying cause of >fourteen genetic disorders, including Huntington’s disease (HD) and myotonic dystrophy. The mutational process is ongoing, with increases in repeat size enhancing the toxicity of the expansion in specific tissues. In many repeat diseases the repeats exhibit high instability in the striatum, whereas instability is minimal in the cerebellum. We provide molecular insights as to how base excision repair (BER) protein stoichiometry may contribute to the tissue-selective instability of CAG/CTG repeats by using specific repair assays. Oligonucleotide substrates with an abasic site were mixed with either reconstituted BER protein stoichiometries mimicking the levels present in HD mouse striatum or cerebellum, or with protein extracts prepared from HD mouse striatum or cerebellum. In both cases, repair efficiency at CAG/CTG repeats and at control DNA sequences was markedly reduced under the striatal conditions, likely due to the lower level of APE1, FEN1 and LIG1. Damage located towards the 5’ end of the repeat tract was poorly repaired accumulating incompletely processed intermediates as compared to an AP lesion in the centre or at the 3’ end of the repeats or within a control sequences. Moreover, repair of lesions at the 5’ end of CAG or CTG repeats involved multinucleotide synthesis, particularly under the cerebellar stoichiometry, suggesting that long-patch BER processes lesions at sequences susceptible to hairpin formation. Our results show that BER stoichiometry, nucleotide sequence and DNA damage position modulate repair outcome, and suggest that a suboptimal LP-BER activity promotes CAG/CTG repeat instability. PMID:22497302

  12. Kaempferol induces DNA damage and inhibits DNA repair associated protein expressions in human promyelocytic leukemia HL-60 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lung-Yuan; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Chou, Yu-Cheng; Shih, Yung-Luen; Bau, Da-Tian; Chen, Jaw-Chyun; Hsu, Shu-Chun; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-01-01

    Numerous evidences have shown that plant flavonoids (naturally occurring substances) have been reported to have chemopreventive activities and protect against experimental carcinogenesis. Kaempferol, one of the flavonoids, is widely distributed in fruits and vegetables, and may have cancer chemopreventive properties. However, the precise underlying mechanism regarding induced DNA damage and suppressed DNA repair system are poorly understood. In this study, we investigated whether kaempferol induced DNA damage and affected DNA repair associated protein expression in human leukemia HL-60 cells in vitro. Percentages of viable cells were measured via a flow cytometry assay. DNA damage was examined by Comet assay and DAPI staining. DNA fragmentation (ladder) was examined by DNA gel electrophoresis. The changes of protein levels associated with DNA repair were examined by Western blotting. Results showed that kaempferol dose-dependently decreased the viable cells. Comet assay indicated that kaempferol induced DNA damage (Comet tail) in a dose-dependent manner and DAPI staining also showed increased doses of kaempferol which led to increased DNA condensation, these effects are all of dose-dependent manners. Western blotting indicated that kaempferol-decreased protein expression associated with DNA repair system, such as phosphate-ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (p-ATM), phosphate-ataxia-telangiectasia and Rad3-related (p-ATR), 14-3-3 proteins sigma (14-3-3σ), DNA-dependent serine/threonine protein kinase (DNA-PK), O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), p53 and MDC1 protein expressions, but increased the protein expression of p-p53 and p-H2AX. Protein translocation was examined by confocal laser microscopy, and we found that kaempferol increased the levels of p-H2AX and p-p53 in HL-60 cells. Taken together, in the present study, we found that kaempferol induced DNA damage and suppressed DNA repair and inhibited DNA repair associated protein expression in HL-60

  13. Evidence for repair of ultraviolet light-damaged herpes virus in human fibroblasts by a recombination mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, J.D.; Featherston, J.D.; Almy, R.E.

    1980-09-01

    Human cells were either singly or multiply infected with herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) damaged by ultraviolet (uv) light, and the fraction of cells able to produce infectious virus was measured. The fraction of virus-producing cells was considerably greater for multiply infected cells than for singly infected cells at each uv dose examined. These high survival levels of uv-irradiated virus in multiply infected cells demonstrated that multiplicity-dependent repair, possibly due to genetic exchanges between damaged HSV-1 genomes, was occurring in these cells. To test whether uv light is recombinogenic for HSV-1, the effect of uv irradiation on the yield of temperature-resistant viral recombinants in cells infected with pairs of temperature-sensitive mutants was also investigated. The results of these experiments showed that the defective functions in these mutant host cells are not required for multiplicity-dependent repair or uv-stimulated viral recombination in herpes-infected cells.

  14. Association between DNA damage response and repair genes and risk of invasive serous ovarian cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joellen M Schildkraut

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We analyzed the association between 53 genes related to DNA repair and p53-mediated damage response and serous ovarian cancer risk using case-control data from the North Carolina Ovarian Cancer Study (NCOCS, a population-based, case-control study. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The analysis was restricted to 364 invasive serous ovarian cancer cases and 761 controls of white, non-Hispanic race. Statistical analysis was two staged: a screen using marginal Bayes factors (BFs for 484 SNPs and a modeling stage in which we calculated multivariate adjusted posterior probabilities of association for 77 SNPs that passed the screen. These probabilities were conditional on subject age at diagnosis/interview, batch, a DNA quality metric and genotypes of other SNPs and allowed for uncertainty in the genetic parameterizations of the SNPs and number of associated SNPs. Six SNPs had Bayes factors greater than 10 in favor of an association with invasive serous ovarian cancer. These included rs5762746 (median OR(odds ratio(per allele = 0.66; 95% credible interval (CI = 0.44-1.00 and rs6005835 (median OR(per allele = 0.69; 95% CI = 0.53-0.91 in CHEK2, rs2078486 (median OR(per allele = 1.65; 95% CI = 1.21-2.25 and rs12951053 (median OR(per allele = 1.65; 95% CI = 1.20-2.26 in TP53, rs411697 (median OR (rare homozygote = 0.53; 95% CI = 0.35 - 0.79 in BACH1 and rs10131 (median OR( rare homozygote = not estimable in LIG4. The six most highly associated SNPs are either predicted to be functionally significant or are in LD with such a variant. The variants in TP53 were confirmed to be associated in a large follow-up study. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Based on our findings, further follow-up of the DNA repair and response pathways in a larger dataset is warranted to confirm these results.

  15. DNA repair and damage pathway related cancer suppressor genes in low-dose-rate irradiated AKR/J an IR mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, Hyun Soon; Bong, Jin Jong; Kang, Yumi; Choi, Moo Hyun; Lee, Hae Un; Yoo, Jae Young; Choi, Seung Jin; Kim, Hee Sun [Radiation Health Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyung Mi [Global Research Lab, BAERI Institute, Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    It has been reported that low-dose-rate radiation stimulates the immune response, prolongs life span and inhibits carcinogenesis. The high dose-rate radiation influences the expression of DNA repair and damage-related genes. In contrast, DNA repair and damage signaling triggered by low-dose-rate irradiation remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated the differential expression of DNA repair and damage pathway related genes in the thymus of AKR/J and ICR mice after 100th day low-dose-rate irradiation. Our findings demonstrated that low-dose-rate γ -radiation suppressed tumorigenesis.

  16. Neurons efficiently repair glutamate-induced oxidative DNA damage by a process involving CREB-mediated up-regulation of apurinic endonuclease 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Jenq-Lin; Tadokoro, Takashi; Keijzers, Guido

    2010-01-01

    damage after glutamate treatment, suggesting that APE1 is a key repair protein for glutamate-induced DNA damage. A cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) binding sequence is present in the Ape1 gene (encodes APE1 protein) promoter and treatment of neurons with a Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase......-mediated DNA damage that is then rapidly repaired by a mechanism involving Ca(2+)-induced, CREB-mediated APE1 expression. Our findings reveal a previously unknown ability of neurons to efficiently repair oxidative DNA lesions after transient activation of glutamate receptors....

  17. Reactive Effect of Low Intensity He-Ne Laser upon Damaged Ultrastructure of Human Erythrocyte Membrane in Fenton System by Atomic Force Microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanhong CUI; Zhouyi GUO; Yanping ZHAO; Ying ZHENG; Yanfang QIAO; Jiye CAI; Songhao LIU

    2007-01-01

    To find out the mechanism of modulating the deformability of erythrocytes with low intensity He-Ne laser action, we studied the effect of low intensity He-Ne laser on the ultrastructure of human erythrocyte membrane. Erythrocytes were treated with free radicals from a Fenton reaction system before exposing them to low intensity He-Ne laser. The ultrastructure of damaged erythrocyte membrane was examined by atomic force microscopy. The results showed that the erythrocyte membrane became very rough and the molecules on the surface of the membrane congregated into particles of different magnitudes sizes after treating with free radicals. Comparing the degree of congregation of the molecular particles in the non-irradiated group and the He-Ne laser irradiated (9 mW and 18 mW) group, we found the average size of molecular particles in the laser irradiated group was smaller than that in the non-irradiated group, indicating that the low intensity laser had repairing function to the damage of erythrocyte membrane produced by the free radicals.

  18. Lung Basal Stem Cells Rapidly Repair DNA Damage Using the Error-Prone Nonhomologous End-Joining Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeden, Clare E; Chen, Yunshun; Ma, Stephen B; Hu, Yifang; Ramm, Georg; Sutherland, Kate D; Smyth, Gordon K; Asselin-Labat, Marie-Liesse

    2017-01-01

    Lung squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC), the second most common subtype of lung cancer, is strongly associated with tobacco smoking and exhibits genomic instability. The cellular origins and molecular processes that contribute to SqCC formation are largely unexplored. Here we show that human basal stem cells (BSCs) isolated from heavy smokers proliferate extensively, whereas their alveolar progenitor cell counterparts have limited colony-forming capacity. We demonstrate that this difference arises in part because of the ability of BSCs to repair their DNA more efficiently than alveolar cells following ionizing radiation or chemical-induced DNA damage. Analysis of mice harbouring a mutation in the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs), a key enzyme in DNA damage repair by nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), indicated that BSCs preferentially repair their DNA by this error-prone process. Interestingly, polyploidy, a phenomenon associated with genetically unstable cells, was only observed in the human BSC subset. Expression signature analysis indicated that BSCs are the likely cells of origin of human SqCC and that high levels of NHEJ genes in SqCC are correlated with increasing genomic instability. Hence, our results favour a model in which heavy smoking promotes proliferation of BSCs, and their predilection for error-prone NHEJ could lead to the high mutagenic burden that culminates in SqCC. Targeting DNA repair processes may therefore have a role in the prevention and therapy of SqCC.

  19. Preventing damage limitation: targeting DNA-PKcs and DNA double strand break repair pathways for ovarian cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela A Dungl

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Platinum-based chemotherapy is the cornerstone of ovarian cancer treatment, and its efficacy is dependent on the generation of DNA damage, with subsequent induction of apoptosis. Inappropriate or aberrant activation of the DNA damage response network is are associated with resistance to platinum, and defects in DNA repair pathways play critical roles in determining patient response to chemotherapy. In ovarian cancer, tumour cell defects in homologous recombination - a repair pathway activated in response to DNA double strand breaks (DSB - are most commonly associated with platinum sensitive disease. However, despite initial sensitivity, the emergence of resistance is frequent. Here, we review strategies for directly interfering with DNA repair pathways, with particular focus on direct inhibition of non-homologous end joining (NHEJ, another DSB repair pathway. DNA-PKcs is a core component of NHEJ and it has shown considerable promise as a chemosensitization target in numerous cancer types, including ovarian cancer where it functions to promote platinum-induced survival signalling, via AKT activation. The development of pharmacological inhibitors of DNA-PKcs is on-going, and clinic-ready agents offer real hope to patients with chemoresistant disease.

  20. Aircraft Battle Damage Repair (ABDR) 2000: Will ABDR Become the Logistics Center of Gravity by the Year 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-01

    damage repair comes from the conflict in Southeast Asia CSEA ) and data available from the Arab-Israeli 1973 Yom Kippur war. Battle damage experience data...Performance." Air Force Journal of Loglutics, Vol. VIII, No. 4. Fall 1984, p. 9. 3. Department of the A~r Forcei Headquarters U.S. Air Force. "R&M 2000...Key to Combat Strength." 1.jr Force Journal of Logistl, Winter 1988, pp. 5-6. 17. Kitfield, James. "Concern Over Composites." ° Forum, January-February

  1. Comparison of the tendon damage caused by four different anchor systems used in transtendon rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qing-Song; Liu, Sen; Zhang, Qiuyang; Xue, Yun; Ge, Dongxia; O'Brien, Michael J; Savoie, Felix H; You, Zongbing

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. The objective of this study was to compare the damage to the rotator cuff tendons caused by four different anchor systems. Methods. 20 cadaveric human shoulder joints were used for transtendon insertion of four anchor systems. The Healix Peek, Fastin RC, Bio-Corkscrew Suture, and Healix Transtend anchors were inserted through the tendons using standard transtendon procedures. The areas of tendon damage were measured. Results. The areas of tendon damage (mean ± standard deviation, n = 7) were 29.1 ± 4.3 mm(2) for the Healix Peek anchor, 20.4 ± 2.3 mm(2) for the Fastin RC anchor, 23.4 ± 1.2 mm(2) for the Bio-Corkscrew Suture anchor, 13.7 ± 3.2 mm(2) for the Healix Transtend anchor inserted directly, and 9.1 ± 2.1 mm(2) for the Healix Transtend anchor inserted through the Percannula system (P anchors). Conclusions. In a cadaver transtendon rotator cuff repair model, smaller anchors caused less damage to the tendon tissues. The Healix Transtend implant system caused the least damage to the tendon tissues. Our findings suggest that smaller anchors should be considered when performing transtendon procedures to repair partial rotator cuff tears.

  2. Excision repair of UV radiation-induced DNA damage in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartman, P.S.; Hevelone, J.; Dwarakanath, V.; Mitchell, D.L. (Texas Christian Univ., Fort Worth (USA))

    1989-06-01

    Radioimmunoassays were used to monitor the removal of antibody-binding sites associated with the two major UV radiation-induced DNA photoproducts (cyclobutane dimers and (6-4) photoproducts). Unlike with cultured human cells, where (6-4) photoproducts are removed more rapidly than cyclobutane dimers, the kinetics of repair were similar for both lesions. Repair capacity in wild type diminished throughout development. The radioimmunoassays were also employed to confirm the absence of photoreactivation in C. elegans. In addition, three radiation-sensitive mutants (rad-1, rad-2, rad-7) displayed normal repair capacities. An excision defect was much more pronounced in larvae than embryos in the fourth mutant tested (rad-3). This correlates with the hypersensitivity pattern of this mutant and suggests that DNA repair may be developmentally regulated in C. elegans. The mechanism of DNA repair in C. elegans as well as the relationship between the repair of specific photoproducts and UV radiation sensitivity during development are discussed.

  3. INO80 and gamma-H2AX interaction links ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling to DNA damage repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Ashby J; Highland, Jessica; Krogan, Nevan J; Arbel-Eden, Ayelet; Greenblatt, Jack F; Haber, James E; Shen, Xuetong

    2004-12-17

    While the role of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling in transcription is well established, a link between chromatin remodeling and DNA repair has remained elusive. We have found that the evolutionarily conserved INO80 chromatin remodeling complex directly participates in the repair of a double-strand break (DSB) in yeast. The INO80 complex is recruited to a HO endonuclease-induced DSB through a specific interaction with the DNA damage-induced phosphorylated histone H2A (gamma-H2AX). This interaction requires Nhp10, an HMG-like subunit of the INO80 complex. The loss of Nhp10 or gamma-H2AX results in reduced INO80 recruitment to the DSB. Finally, components of the INO80 complex show synthetic genetic interactions with the RAD52 DNA repair pathway, the main pathway for DSB repair in yeast. Our findings reveal a new role of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling in nuclear processes and suggest that an ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complex can read a DNA repair histone code.

  4. Gypenosides causes DNA damage and inhibits expression of DNA repair genes of human oral cancer SAS cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Kung-Wen; Chen, Jung-Chou; Lai, Tung-Yuan; Yang, Jai-Sing; Weng, Shu-Wen; Ma, Yi-Shih; Tang, Nou-Ying; Lu, Pei-Jung; Weng, Jing-Ru; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2010-01-01

    Gypenosides (Gyp) are the major components of Gynostemma pentaphyllum Makino, a Chinese medical plant. Recently, Gyp has been shown to induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in many human cancer cell lines. However, there is no available information to address the effects of Gyp on DNA damage and DNA repair-associated gene expression in human oral cancer cells. Therefore, we investigated whether Gyp induced DNA damage and DNA repair gene expression in human oral cancer SAS cells. The results from flow cytometric assay indicated that Gyp-induced cytotoxic effects led to a decrease in the percentage of viable SAS cells. The results from comet assay revealed that the incubation of SAS cells with Gyp led to a longer DNA migration smear (comet tail) when compared with control and this effect was dose-dependent. The results from real-time PCR analysis indicated that treatment of SAS cells with 180 mug/ml of Gyp for 24 h led to a decrease in 14-3-3sigma, DNA-dependent serine/threonine protein kinase (DNAPK), p53, ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), ataxia-telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR) and breast cancer gene 1 (BRCA1) mRNA expression. These observations may explain the cell death caused by Gyp in SAS cells. Taken together, Gyp induced DNA damage and inhibited DNA repair-associated gene expressions in human oral cancer SAS cells in vitro.

  5. Tendon repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repair of tendon ... Tendon repair can be performed using: Local anesthesia (the immediate area of the surgery is pain-free) ... a cut on the skin over the injured tendon. The damaged or torn ends of the tendon ...

  6. Nanosecond pulsed electric field induced cytoskeleton, nuclear membrane and telomere damage adversely impact cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, M; Fox, P; Buescher, S; Kolb, J

    2011-10-01

    We investigated the effects of nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) on three human cell lines and demonstrated cell shrinkage, breakdown of the cytoskeleton, nuclear membrane and chromosomal telomere damage. There was a differential response between cell types coinciding with cell survival. Jurkat cells showed cytoskeleton, nuclear membrane and telomere damage that severely impacted cell survival compared to two adherent cell lines. Interestingly, disruption of the actin cytoskeleton in adherent cells prior to nsPEF exposure significantly reduced cell survival. We conclude that nsPEF applications are able to induce damage to the cytoskeleton and nuclear membrane. Telomere sequences, regions that tether and stabilize DNA to the nuclear membrane, are severely compromised as measured by a pan-telomere probe. Internal pore formation following nsPEF applications has been described as a factor in induced cell death. Here we suggest that nsPEF induced physical changes to the cell in addition to pore formation need to be considered as an alternative method of cell death. We suggest nsPEF electrochemical induced depolymerization of actin filaments may account for cytoskeleton and nuclear membrane anomalies leading to sensitization.

  7. DNA Damage and Repair Biomarkers in Cervical Cancer Patients Treated with Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy: An Exploratory Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia Vici

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer cells commonly harbour a defective G1/S checkpoint owing to the interaction of viral oncoproteins with p53 and retinoblastoma protein. The activation of the G2/M checkpoint may thus become essential for protecting cancer cells from genotoxic insults, such as chemotherapy. In 52 cervical cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy, we investigated whether the levels of phosphorylated Wee1 (pWee1, a key G2/M checkpoint kinase, and γ-H2AX, a marker of DNA double-strand breaks, discriminated between patients with a pathological complete response (pCR and those with residual disease. We also tested the association between pWee1 and phosphorylated Chk1 (pChk1, a kinase acting upstream Wee1 in the G2/M checkpoint pathway. pWee1, γ-H2AX and pChk1 were retrospectively assessed in diagnostic biopsies by immunohistochemistry. The degrees of pWee1 and pChk1 expression were defined using three different classification methods, i.e., staining intensity, Allred score, and a multiplicative score. γ-H2AX was analyzed both as continuous and categorical variable. Irrespective of the classification used, elevated levels of pWee1 and γ-H2AX were significantly associated with a lower rate of pCR. In univariate and multivariate analyses, pWee1 and γ-H2AX were both associated with reduced pCR. Internal validation conducted through a re-sampling without replacement procedure confirmed the robustness of the multivariate model. Finally, we found a significant association between pWee1 and pChk1. The message conveyed by the present analysis is that biomarkers of DNA damage and repair may predict the efficacy of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in cervical cancer. Further studies are warranted to prospectively validate these encouraging findings.

  8. Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers photolyase from extremophilic microalga: Remarkable UVB resistance and efficient DNA damage repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Chongjie [Key Laboratory of Marine Bioactive Substance, The First Institute of Oceanography, State Oceanic Administration, Qingdao 266061 (China); Ma, Li [Key Laboratory of Biofuels, and Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Energy Genetics, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao 266101 (China); Mou, Shanli [Yellow Sea Fisheries Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Fishery Sciences, Qingdao (China); Wang, Yibin, E-mail: wangyibin@fio.org.cn [Key Laboratory of Marine Bioactive Substance, The First Institute of Oceanography, State Oceanic Administration, Qingdao 266061 (China); Zheng, Zhou; Liu, Fangming; Qi, Xiaoqing; An, Meiling; Chen, Hao [Key Laboratory of Marine Bioactive Substance, The First Institute of Oceanography, State Oceanic Administration, Qingdao 266061 (China); Miao, Jinlai, E-mail: miaojinlai@163.com [Key Laboratory of Marine Bioactive Substance, The First Institute of Oceanography, State Oceanic Administration, Qingdao 266061 (China); State Key Laboratory of Biological Fermentation Engineering of Beer (In Preparation), Qingdao (China)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L photolyase gene PHR2 is first cloned and expressed in E. coli. • PHR2 complemented E. coli could efficiently survival from UV radiation. • Expressed PHR2 photolyase has distinct photo-reactivation activity in vitro. - Abstract: Bacteria living in the Antarctic region have developed several adaptive features for growth and survival under extreme conditions. Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-Lis well adapted to high levels of solar UV radiation. A putative photolyase was identified in the Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L transcriptome. The complete cDNA sequence was obtained by RACE-PCR. This PHR encoding includes a polypeptide of 579 amino acids with clear photolyase signatures belonging to class II CPD-photolyases, sharing a high degree of homology with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (68%). Real-time PCR was performed to investigate the potential DNA damage and responses following UVB exposure. CPD photolyase mRNA expression level increased over 50-fold in response to UVB radiation for 6 h. Using photolyase complementation assay, we demonstrated that DNA photolyase increased photo-repair more than 116-fold in Escherichia coli strain SY2 under 100 μw/cm{sup 2} UVB radiation. To determine whether photolyase is active in vitro, CPD photolyase was over-expressed. It was shown that pyrimidine dimers were split by the action of PHR2. This study reports the unique structure and high activity of the enzyme. These findings are relevant for further understanding of molecular mechanisms of photo-reactivation, and will accelerate the utilization of photolyase in the medical field.

  9. Contributions of DNA repair and damage response pathways to the non-linear genotoxic responses of alkylating agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapacz, Joanna; Pottenger, Lynn H.; Engelward, Bevin P.; Heinen, Christopher D.; Johnson, George E.; Clewell, Rebecca A.; Carmichael, Paul L.; Adeleye, Yeyejide; Andersen, Melvin E.

    2016-01-01

    From a risk assessment perspective, DNA-reactive agents are conventionally assumed to have genotoxic risks at all exposure levels, thus applying a linear extrapolation for low-dose responses. New approaches discussed here, including more diverse and sensitive methods for assessing DNA damage and DNA repair, strongly support the existence of measurable regions where genotoxic responses with increasing doses are insignificant relative to control. Model monofunctional alkylating agents have in vitro and in vivo datasets amenable to determination of points of departure (PoDs) for genotoxic effects. A session at the 2013 Society of Toxicology meeting provided an opportunity to survey the progress in understanding the biological basis of empirically-observed PoDs for DNA alkylating agents. Together with the literature published since, this review discusses cellular pathways activated by endogenous and exogenous alkylation DNA damage. Cells have evolved conserved processes that monitor and counteract a spontaneous steady-state level of DNA damage. The ubiquitous network of DNA repair pathways serves as the first line of defense for clearing of the DNA damage and preventing mutation. Other biological pathways discussed here that are activated by genotoxic stress include post-translational activation of cell cycle networks and transcriptional networks for apoptosis/cell death. The interactions of various DNA repair and DNA damage response pathways provide biological bases for the observed PoD behaviors seen with genotoxic compounds. Thus, after formation of DNA adducts, the activation of cellular pathways can lead to the avoidance a mutagenic outcome. The understanding of the cellular mechanisms acting within the low-dose region will serve to better characterize risks from exposures to DNA-reactive agents at environmentally-relevant concentrations. PMID:27036068

  10. Collagen insulated from tensile damage by domains that unfold reversibly: in situ X-ray investigation of mechanical yield and damage repair in the mussel byssus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Matthew J; Gupta, Himadri S; Fratzl, Peter; Waite, J Herbert

    2009-07-01

    The byssal threads of the California mussel, Mytilus californianus, are highly hysteretic, elastomeric fibers that collectively perform a holdfast function in wave-swept rocky seashore habitats. Following cyclic loading past the mechanical yield point, threads exhibit a damage-dependent reduction in mechanical performance. However, the distal portion of the byssal thread is capable of recovering initial material properties through a time-dependent healing process in the absence of active cellular metabolism. Byssal threads are composed almost exclusively of multi-domain hybrid collagens known as preCols, which largely determine the mechanical properties of the thread. Here, the structure-property relationships that govern thread mechanical performance are further probed. The molecular rearrangements that occur during yield and damage repair were investigated using time-resolved in situ wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) coupled with cyclic tensile loading of threads and through thermally enhanced damage-repair studies. Results indicate that the collagen domains in byssal preCols are mechanically protected by the unfolding of sacrificial non-collagenous domains that refold on a slower time-scale. Time-dependent healing is primarily attributed to stochastic recoupling of broken histidine-metal coordination complexes.

  11. Myelin basic protein induces neuron-specific toxicity by directly damaging the neuronal plasma membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhang

    Full Text Available The central nervous system (CNS insults may cause massive demyelination and lead to the release of myelin-associated proteins including its major component myelin basic protein (MBP. MBP is reported to induce glial activation but its effect on neurons is still little known. Here we found that MBP specifically bound to the extracellular surface of the neuronal plasma membrane and induced neurotoxicity in vitro. This effect of MBP on neurons was basicity-dependent because the binding was blocked by acidic lipids and competed by other basic proteins. Further studies revealed that MBP induced damage to neuronal membrane integrity and function by depolarizing the resting membrane potential, increasing the permeability to cations and other molecules, and decreasing the membrane fluidity. At last, artificial liposome vesicle assay showed that MBP directly disturbed acidic lipid bilayer and resulted in increased membrane permeability. These results revealed that MBP induces neurotoxicity through its direct interaction with acidic components on the extracellular surface of neuronal membrane, which may suggest a possible contribution of MBP to the pathogenesis in the CNS disorders with myelin damage.

  12. On the role of baculovirus photolyases in DNA repair upon UV damage of occlusion bodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biernat, M.A.; Caballero, P.; Vlak, J.M.; Oers, van M.M.

    2013-01-01

    The use of baculoviruses in insect biocontrol is hampered by their sensitivity to ultraviolet (UV) light. This irradiation induces cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) in DNA. CPD-photolyases repair CPDs using visible light. Plusiine baculoviruses encode photolyases, which could potentially repair

  13. A modelling study of drying shrinkage damage in concrete repair systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lukovic, M.; Savija, B.; Schlangen, E.; Ye, G.; van Breugel, K.

    2014-01-01

    Differential shrinkage between repair material and concrete substrate is considered to be the main cause of premature failure of repair systems (Martinola, Sadouki et al. 2001, Beushausen and Alexander 2007). Magnitude of induced stresses depends on many factors, for example the amount of restraint,

  14. Repairing Fetal Membranes with a Self-adhesive Ultrathin Polymeric Film: Evaluation in Mid-gestational Rabbit Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pensabene, Virginia; Patel, Premal P; Williams, Phillip; Cooper, Trisha L; Kirkbride, Kellye C; Giorgio, Todd D; Tulipan, Noel B

    2015-08-01

    Preterm premature rupture of membranes causes 40% of all preterm births, affecting 150000 women each year in the United States. Prenatal diagnostic procedures and surgical interventions increase incidence of adverse events, leading to iatrogenic membrane rupture after a fetoscopic procedure in 45% of cases. We propose an ultrathin, self-adherent, poly-L-lactic acid patch ("nanofilm") as a reparative wound closure after endoscopic/fetoscopic procedures. These nanofilms are compatible with application in wet conditions and with minimally invasive instrumentation. Ex vivo studies to evaluate the nanofilm were conducted using human chorion-amnion (CA) membranes. A custom-built inflation device was used for mechanical characterization of CA membranes and for assessment of nanofilm adhesion and sealing of membrane defects up to 3 mm in size. These ex vivo tests demonstrated the ability of the nanofilm to seal human CA defects ranging in size from 1 to 3 mm in diameter. In vivo survival studies were conducted in 25 mid-gestational rabbits, defects were created by perforating the uterus and the CA membranes and subsequently using the nanofilm to seal these wounds. These in vivo studies confirmed the successful sealing of defects smaller than 3 mm observed ex vivo. Histological analysis of whole harvested uteri 7 days after surgery showed intact uterine walls in 59% of the nanofilm repaired fetuses, along with increased uterine size and intrauterine development in 63% of the cases. In summary, we have developed an ultrathin, self-adhesive nanofilm for repair of uterine membrane defects.

  15. Ebselen attenuates oxidative DNA damage and enhances its repair activity in the thalamus after focal cortical infarction in hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Meixia; Xing, Shihui; Yang, Bo; Zhao, Liqun; Hua, Haiying; Liang, Zhijian; Zhou, Wenliang; Zeng, Jinsheng; Pei, Zhong

    2007-11-21

    Oxidative DNA damage has been proposed to be a major contributor to focal cerebral ischemic injury. However, little is known about the role of oxidative DNA damage in remote damage secondary to the primary infarction. In the present study, we investigated oxidative damage within the ventroposterior nucleus (VPN) after distal middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in hypertensive rats. We also examined the possible protective effect of ebselen, one glutathione peroxidase mimic, on delayed degeneration in the VPN after distal MCAO. Neuronal damage in the ipsilateral VPN was examined by Nissl staining. Oxidative DNA damage and base repair enzyme activity were assessed by analyzing immunoreactivity of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-ohdG) and 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1), respectively. The number of intact neurons in the ipsilateral VPN decreased by 52% compared to the contralateral side in ischemia group 2 weeks after distal cerebral cortical infarction. The immunoreactivity of 8-ohdG significantly increased while OGG1 immunoreactivity significantly decreased in the ipsilateral VPN 2 weeks after distal cortical infarction (all pVPN (all pVPN region following distal MCAO. Furthermore, ebselen protects against the delayed damage in the VPN when given at 24 h following distal MCAO.

  16. DNA damage and repair kinetics of the Alternaria mycotoxins alternariol, altertoxin II and stemphyltoxin III in cultured cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, Stefanie C; Sauter, Friederike; Pfeiffer, Erika; Metzler, Manfred; Hartwig, Andrea; Köberle, Beate

    2016-03-01

    The Alternaria mycotoxins alternariol (AOH) and altertoxin II (ATX II) have previously been shown to elicit mutagenic and genotoxic effects in bacterial and mammalian cells, although with vastly different activities. For example, ATX II was about 50 times more mutagenic than AOH. We now report that stemphyltoxin III (STTX III) is also highly mutagenic. The more pronounced effects of the perylene quinones ATX II and STTX III at lower concentrations compared to the dibenzo-α-pyrone AOH indicate a marked dependence of the genotoxic potential on the chemical structure and furthermore suggest that the underlying modes of action may be different. We have now further investigated the type of DNA damage induced by AOH, ATX II and STTX III, as well as the repair kinetics and their dependence on the status of nucleotide excision repair (NER). DNA double strand breaks induced by AOH due to poisoning of topoisomerase IIα were completely repaired in less than 2h. Under cell-free conditions, inhibition of topoisomerase IIα could also be measured for ATX II and STTX III at low concentrations, but the perylene quinones were catalytic inhibitors rather than topoisomerase poisons and did not induce DSBs. DNA strand breaks induced by ATX II and STTX III were more persistent and not completely repaired within 24h. A dependence of the repair rate on the NER status could only be demonstrated for STTX III, resulting in an accumulation of DNA damage in NER-deficient cells. Together with the finding that the DNA glycosylase formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (Fpg), but not T4 endonuclease V, is able to generate additional DNA strand breaks measurable by the alkaline unwinding assay, we conclude that the genotoxicity of the perylene quinones with an epoxide group is probably caused by the formation of DNA adducts which may be converted to Fpg sensitive sites.

  17. The UV-damaged DNA binding protein mediates efficient targeting of the nucleotide excision repair complex to UV-induced photo lesions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moser, J; Volker, M; Kool, H; Alekseev, S; Vrieling, H; Yasui, A; van Zeeland, AA; Mullenders, LHF

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies point to the XPC-hHR23B complex as the principal initiator of global genome nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway, responsible for the repair of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) and 6-4 photoproducts (6-4PP) in human cells. However, the UV-damaged DNA binding protei

  18. Self repair of impacts, higher energy impacts, and earthquake damage in critical targets such as infrastructure components made of polymers and concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dry, Carolyn

    2007-04-01

    The goal of our research has been to develop self-repairing matrices with unique toughness and strength for infrastructure and vehicles. Our revolutionary approach involves the autonomous release of repair chemicals from within the matrix itself. The repair agents are contained in hollow, structural fibers or beads that are embedded within the matrix. Under stress, the matrix senses external environmental factors and reacts by releasing the repair agents from within the hollow vessels. This autonomous response occurs wherever and whenever cracking, debonding or other matrix damage transpires. Superior performance over the life of the matrix is achieved through this self-repairing mechanism. The advantages are safely executed trips, fewer repairs and eventually lighter bridges and vehicles. Research to assess and clarify the impact of the various factors involved in self-repair of matrix materials has been the focus of our work for several years. Our research has addressed the issues by correlating the impact of the various factors, such as 1) delivery vessel, shape/size, coating, chemicals released, release trigger and efficacy and impact on matrix properties 2) influence of end use such as the importance of speed and force of release (airplane skin repair) 3) impact of processing methods that involve heat and pressure on the repair vessels. Our self repairing system can: be processed at temperatures of 350F, repairs in less than 30 seconds, and does not damage the matrix by repair fiber insertion. Unique toughness and strength is developed at damaged areas and material interfaces. Findings are based on testing in compression after impact, compression, fatigue, flexural toughness and flexure modes. The presentation will focus on highlighting the issues that were resolved in creating autonomous, self-repairing structures and vehicles.

  19. An immunochemical approach to the study of DNA damage and repair. Technical progress report, May 1, 1989--April 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, S.S. [Vermont Univ., Burlington, VT (United States). Dept. of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics; Erlanger, B.F. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Microbiology

    1992-05-01

    The overall objective of this project has been to develop immunochemical methods to quantitate unique DNA base damages in order to facilitate studies on radiation-induced damage production and repair. Specifically, we have been using antibodies raised to damaged bases to quantitate unique lesions in model systems in order to evaluate their potential biological consequences. Our approach has been to synthesize modified nucleotides or nucleosides, conjugate them to protein carriers, and use the conjugates as immunogens in rabbits or to prepare monoclonal antibodies. We have been studying damages that are stable radiolysis products found in X-irradiated DNA and thus of potential biological consequence. Our aim is to build an in vitro and in vivo data base on the interactions between model DNA lesions and such cellular enzymes as DNA polymerases and repair endonucleases. Initial studies have focused on pyrimidine ring saturation products (thymine glycol.and dihydrothymine), products resulting from ring fragmentation or base loss (urea, {Beta}-ureidoisobutyric acid, abasic sites), 7-hydro-8-oxopurines, and more recently, cytosine radiolysis products. These modified bases serve as useful models for examining the potential lethal and/or mutagenic (carcinogenic) effects of the products of DNA radiolysis.

  20. Modulation of DNA-induced damage and repair capacity in humans after dietary intervention with lutein-enriched fermented milk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Herrero-Barbudo

    Full Text Available Dietary factors provide protection against several forms of DNA damage. Additionally, consumer demand for natural products favours the development of bioactive food ingredients with health benefits. Lutein is a promising biologically active component in the food industry. The EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies considers that protection from oxidative damage may be a beneficial physiological effect but that a cause and effect relationship has not been established. Thus, our aim was to evaluate the safety and potential functional effect of a lutein-enriched milk product using the Comet Assay in order to analyze the baseline, the induced DNA-damage and the repair capacity in the lymphocytes of 10 healthy donors before and after the intake of the mentioned product. Our data suggest that the regular consumption of lutein-enriched fermented milk results in a significant increase in serum lutein levels and this change is associated with an improvement in the resistance of DNA to damage and the capacity of DNA repair in lymphocytes. Our results also support the lack of a genotoxic effect at the doses supplied as well as the absence of interactions and side effects on other nutritional and biochemicals markers.

  1. The role of C/EBPβ phosphorylation in modulating membrane phospholipids repairing in LPS-induced human lung/bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Shiyu; Xu, Yan; Xie, Ling; Ouyang, Yufang

    2017-09-20

    study of underlying mechanism show that the activity of C/EBP β depends on its phosphorylation:LPS stimulation reduced C/EBP β phosphorylation and suppressed the transcription of CCSP1 in BEAS-2B cells, which resulted in enhanced PLA2 and the consequent membrane damage. And further study shows that overexpression of CDK2(Cyclindependent kinase 2), promoted the phosphorylation of C/EBP β and inhibited PLA2 through the C/EBP β/CCSP1/PLA2 pathway, so as to attenuate membrane damage. The significance of this study lies in that artificial C/EBP β phosphorylation regulation may ease the membrane damage in ALI and improve membrane repair. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. ERCC2/XPD Lys751Gln alter DNA repair efficiency of platinum-induced DNA damage through P53 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guopei; Guan, Yangyang; Zhao, Yuejiao; van der Straaten, Tahar; Xiao, Sha; Xue, Ping; Zhu, Guolian; Liu, Qiufang; Cai, Yuan; Jin, Cuihong; Yang, Jinghua; Wu, Shengwen; Lu, Xiaobo

    2017-02-01

    Platinum-based treatment causes Pt-DNA adducts which lead to cell death. The platinum-induced DNA damage is recognized and repaired by the nucleotide excision repair (NER) system of which ERCC2/XPD is a critical enzyme. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in ERCC2/XPD have been found to be associated with platinum resistance. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether ERCC2/XPD Lys751Gln (rs13181) polymorphism is causally related to DNA repair capacity of platinum-induced DNA damage. First, cDNA clones expressing different genotypes of the polymorphism was transfected to an ERCC2/XPD defective CHO cell line (UV5). Second, all cells were treated with cisplatin. Cellular survival rate were investigated by MTT growth inhibition assay, DNA damage levels were investigated by comet assay and RAD51 staining. The distribution of cell cycle and the change of apoptosis rates were detected by a flow cytometric method (FCM). Finally, P53mRNA and phospho-P53 protein levels were further investigated in order to explore a possible explanation. As expected, there was a significantly increased in viability of UV5(ERCC2 (AA)) as compared to UV5(ERCC2 (CC)) after cisplatin treatment. The DNA damage level of UV5(ERCC2 (AA)) was significant decreased compared to UV5(ERCC2 (CC)) at 24 h of treatment. Mutation of ERCC2rs13181 AA to CC causes a prolonged S phase in cell cycle. UV5(ERCC2 (AA)) alleviated the apoptosis compared to UV5(ERCC2 (CC)), meanwhile P53mRNA levels in UV(ERCC2 (AA)) was also lower when compared UV5(ERCC2 (CC)). It co-incides with a prolonged high expression of phospho-P53, which is relevant for cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, and the DNA damage response (DDR). We concluded that ERCC2/XPD rs13181 polymorphism is possibly related to the DNA repair capacity of platinum-induced DNA damage. This functional study provides some clues to clarify the relationship between cisplatin resistance and ERCC2/XPDrs13181 polymorphism.

  3. Protecting DNA from errors and damage: an overview of DNA repair mechanisms in plants compared to mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spampinato, Claudia P

    2017-05-01

    The genome integrity of all organisms is constantly threatened by replication errors and DNA damage arising from endogenous and exogenous sources. Such base pair anomalies must be accurately repaired to prevent mutagenesis and/or lethality. Thus, it is not surprising that cells have evolved multiple and partially overlapping DNA repair pathways to correct specific types of DNA errors and lesions. Great progress in unraveling these repair mechanisms at the molecular level has been made by several talented researchers, among them Tomas Lindahl, Aziz Sancar, and Paul Modrich, all three Nobel laureates in Chemistry for 2015. Much of this knowledge comes from studies performed in bacteria, yeast, and mammals and has impacted research in plant systems. Two plant features should be mentioned. Plants differ from higher eukaryotes in that they lack a reserve germline and cannot avoid environmental stresses. Therefore, plants have evolved different strategies to sustain genome fidelity through generations and continuous exposure to genotoxic stresses. These strategies include the presence of unique or multiple paralogous genes with partially overlapping DNA repair activities. Yet, in spite (or because) of these differences, plants, especially Arabidopsis thaliana, can be used as a model organism for functional studies. Some advantages of this model system are worth mentioning: short life cycle, availability of both homozygous and heterozygous lines for many genes, plant transformation techniques, tissue culture methods and reporter systems for gene expression and function studies. Here, I provide a current understanding of DNA repair genes in plants, with a special focus on A. thaliana. It is expected that this review will be a valuable resource for future functional studies in the DNA repair field, both in plants and animals.

  4. Expression of MLL-AF4 or AF4-MLL fusions does not impact the efficiency of DNA damage repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaño, Julio; Herrero, Ana B; Bursen, Aldeheid; González, Federico; Marschalek, Rolf; Gutiérrez, Norma C; Menendez, Pablo

    2016-05-24

    The most frequent rearrangement of the human MLL gene fuses MLL to AF4 resulting in high-risk infant B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). MLL fusions are also hallmark oncogenic events in secondary acute myeloid leukemia. They are a direct consequence of mis-repaired DNA double strand breaks (DNA-DSBs) due to defects in the DNA damage response associated with exposure to topoisomerase-II poisons such as etoposide. It has been suggested that MLL fusions render cells susceptible to additional chromosomal damage upon exposure to etoposide. Conversely, the genome-wide mutational landscape in MLL-rearranged infant B-ALL has been reported silent. Thus, whether MLL fusions compromise the recognition and/or repair of DNA damage remains unanswered. Here, the fusion proteins MLL-AF4 (MA4) and AF4-MLL (A4M) were CRISPR/Cas9-genome edited in the AAVS1 locus of HEK293 cells as a model to study MLL fusion-mediated DNA-DSB formation/repair. Repair kinetics of etoposide- and ionizing radiation-induced DSBs was identical in WT, MA4- and A4M-expressing cells, as revealed by flow cytometry, by immunoblot for γH2AX and by comet assay. Accordingly, no differences were observed between WT, MA4- and A4M-expressing cells in the presence of master proteins involved in non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ; i.e.KU86, KU70), alternative-NHEJ (Alt-NHEJ; i.e.LigIIIa, WRN and PARP1), and homologous recombination (HR, i.e.RAD51). Moreover, functional assays revealed identical NHEJ and HR efficiency irrespective of the genotype. Treatment with etoposide consistently induced cell cycle arrest in S/G2/M independent of MA4/A4M expression, revealing a proper activation of the DNA damage checkpoints. Collectively, expression of MA4 or A4M does neither influence DNA signaling nor DNA-DSB repair.

  5. Role of mucus in the repair of gastric epithelial damage in the rat. Inhibition of epithelial recovery by mucolytic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, J L; Whittle, B J

    1986-09-01

    A role for mucus in providing a microenvironment over sites of gastric damage, which is conducive to reepithelialization, has been proposed. We tested this hypothesis by examining the effects of disruption of such mucus on the recovery of epithelial integrity after damage induced by 50% ethanol. Exposure of an ex vivo chambered gastric mucosa to topically applied 50% ethanol resulted in copious release of mucus, cellular debris, and plasma, which formed a continuous cap over the mucosal surface. Ethanol-induced gastric damage was accompanied by extensive surface epithelial cell damage and a marked decrease in transmucosal potential difference. During the 30 min after ethanol was removed from the chamber, the epithelium became reestablished and the potential difference gradually recovered to 94% of the level before ethanol treatment. However, if the mucolytic agents N-acetylcysteine (5%) or pepsin (0.5%) were added to the bathing solutions, the "mucoid cap" disintegrated and the recovery of potential difference was significantly retarded (recovering to only 51% and 52% of levels before ethanol treatment). Histologic evaluation confirmed that mucosae treated with either agent had significantly less (p less than 0.005) intact epithelium at the end of the experiment. Removal of the mucoid cap with forceps caused a similar inhibition of the repair of the epithelium and the recovery of potential difference. Both mechanical and chemical (N-acetylcysteine) disruption of the mucoid cap resulted in a significant increase in the mucosal leakage of albumin and hemoglobin, supporting previous histologic evidence that the mucoid cap traps blood components over the damaged mucosa. These studies support the hypothesis that mucus released in response to topical application of an irritant plays an important role in the repair of epithelial damage through the process of restitution.

  6. Anatomical basis of neuropathies and damage to the ilioinguinal nerve during repairs of groin hernias. (about 100 dissections).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndiaye, A; Diop, M; Ndoye, J M; Konaté, I; Ndiaye, A I; Mané, L; Nazarian, S; Dia, A

    2007-12-01

    Surgical access to the inguinal region, notably during hernia repairs, exposes the ilioinguinal nerve to the risk of damage at the origin of the neuralgia. The incidence of these post-operative neuropathies and their medicolegal consequences justify this study about the anatomical variations of the ilioinguinal nerve. With the aim of preventing its damage during repairs of groin hernias and identifying the factors of onset of chronic spontaneous neuropathy of the ilioinguinal nerve, we dissected 100 inguinal regions of 51 fresh adult corpses. The nerve was absent in seven cases and double in one case. Out of the 94 ilioinguinal nerves observed, we analyzed the path in relation to the inguinal ligament and the connections with the walls of the inguinal canal and its content. The ilioinguinal nerve travels along the superficial surface of the internal oblique muscle, passing on average 1.015 cm from the inguinal ligament. In one case, the fibers of the internal oblique muscle spanned it in several places. The nerve was antero-funicular in 78.72% of cases and perforated the fascia of the external oblique in 28.72% of cases. The terminal division took place in the inguinal canal in 86% of cases, with terminal branches that sometimes perforated the fascia of the external oblique. These results enabled us to better understand the etiopathogenic aspects of certain neuropathies of the groin and to propose techniques useful for the protection of the nerve during repairs of groin hernias.

  7. Application of a molecular biology concept for the detection of DNA damage and repair during UV disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Süss, Jacqueline; Volz, Sabrina; Obst, Ursula; Schwartz, Thomas

    2009-08-01

    As nucleic acids are major targets in bacteria during standardised UV disinfection (254 nm), inactivation rates also depend on bacterial DNA repair. Due to UV-related DNA modifications, PCR-based approaches allow for a direct detection of DNA damage and repair during UV disinfection. By applying different primer sets, the correlation between amplicon length and PCR amplification became obvious. The longer the targeted DNA fragment was, the more UV-induced DNA lesions inhibited the PCR. Regeneration of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus faecium, and complex wastewater communities was recorded over a time period of 66 h. While phases of intensive repair and proliferation were found for P. aeruginosa, no DNA repair was detected by qPCR in E. faecium. Cultivation experiments verified these results. Despite high UV mediated inactivation rates original wastewater bacteria seem to express an enhanced robustness against irradiation. Regeneration of dominant and proliferation of low-abundant, probably UV-resistant species contributed to a strong post-irradiation recovery accompanied by a selection for beta-Proteobacteria.

  8. DNA-membrane complex damages in mammalian cells after gamma irradiation and chemical agent action and role of the complex in DNA replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saenko, A.S.; Kiseleva, V.I.; Synzynys, B.I. (Akademiya Meditsinskikh Nauk SSSR, Obninsk. Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Inst. Meditsinskoj Radiologii)

    1982-06-22

    The sedimentation behavior of the DNA-membrane complex (DMC) from Ehrlich ascites tumor (EAT) cells after gamma irradiation and carminomycin (CM) treatment was studied. The DNA and membrane containing material released by alkaline lysis from EAT cells had an anomalous sedimentation relative to denatured DNA. The DMC sediments with a great sedimentation constant (255 S). Both the chemical and physical agents induced DNA single-strand breaks and damage of the DMC. It was shown that 0.01 g/ml CM did not affect the incorporation of exogenic thymidine into DNA but the DMC was completely disrupted by this CM dose. There was no correlation between postirradiation repair kinetics of the DMC and the kinetics of /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation into DNA of ETA cells.

  9. Guanidination of notexin alters its membrane-damaging activity in response to sphingomyelin and cholesterol

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pei-Hsiu Kao; Yi-Ling Chiou; Shinne-Ren Lin; Long-Sen Chang

    2010-12-01

    To elucidate the contribution of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity of notexin to its ability to perturb membranes, comparative studies on the interaction of notexin and guanidinated notexin (Gu-notexin) with egg yolk phosphatidylcholine (EYPC), EYPC/egg yolk sphingomyelin (EYSM) and EYPC/EYSM/cholesterol vesicles were conducted. EYSM notably reduced the membrane-damaging activity of notexin against EYPC vesicles, but had an insignificant influence on that of Gu-notexin. Unlike the effects noted with notexin, inactivation of PLA2 activity by EDTA led to a reduction in the ability of Gu-notexin to induce EYPC/EYSM vesicle leakage and to increase Gu-notexin-induced membrane permeability of EYPC/EYSM/cholesterol vesicles. The geometrical arrangement of notexin and Gu-notexin in contact with either EYPC/EYSM vesicles or EYPC/EYSM/cholesterol vesicles differed. Moreover, global conformation of notexin and Gu-notexin differed in either Ca2+-bound or metal-free states. These results indicate that notexin and Gu-notexin could induce membrane permeability without the involvement of PLA2 activity, and suggest that guanidination alters the membrane-bound mode of notexin on damaging phospholipid vesicles containing sphingomyelin and cholesterol.

  10. Endoscopic observation of different repair patterns in human traumatic tympanic membrane perforations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Peng; Zhang, Shujun; Gong, Xinhong; Wang, Xuesong; Lou, Zi-Han

    2017-08-03

    In the last decade, there has been an increasing use of biomaterial patches in the regeneration of traumatic tympanic membrane perforations. The major advantages of biomaterial patches are to provisionally restore the physiological function of the middle ear, thereby immediately improving ear symptoms, and act as a scaffold for epithelium migration. However, whether there are additional biological effects on eardrum regeneration is unclear for biological material patching in the clinic. This study evaluated the healing response for different repair patterns in human traumatic tympanic membrane perforations by endoscopic observation. In total, 114 patients with traumatic tympanic membrane perforations were allocated sequentially to two groups: the spontaneous healing group (n=57) and Gelfoam patch-treated group (n=57). The closure rate, closure time, and rate of otorrhea were compared between the groups at 3 months. Ultimately, 107 patients were analyzed in the two groups (52 patients in the spontaneous healing group vs. 55 patients in the Gelfoam patch-treated group). The overall closure rate at the end of the 3 month follow-up period was 90.4% in the spontaneous healing group and 94.5% in the Gelfoam patch-treated group; the difference was not statistically significant (p>0.05). However, the total average closure time was significantly different between the two groups (26.8±9.1 days in the spontaneous healing group vs. 14.7±9.1 days in the Gelfoam patch-treated group, p<0.01). In addition, the closure rate was not significantly different between the spontaneous healing group and Gelfoam patch-treated group regardless of the perforation size. The closure time in the Gelfoam patch-treated group was significantly shorter than that in the spontaneous healing group regardless of the perforation size (small perforations: 7.1±1.6 days vs. 12.6±3.9, medium-sized perforations: 13.3±2.2 days vs. 21.8±4.2 days, and large perforations: 21.2±4.7 days vs. 38.4±5.7 days

  11. Alkylation damage in DNA and RNA--repair mechanisms and medical significance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drabløs, Finn; Feyzi, Emadoldin; Aas, Per Arne

    2004-01-01

    Alkylation lesions in DNA and RNA result from endogenous compounds, environmental agents and alkylating drugs. Simple methylating agents, e.g. methylnitrosourea, tobacco-specific nitrosamines and drugs like temozolomide or streptozotocin, form adducts at N- and O-atoms in DNA bases. These lesions...... are mainly repaired by direct base repair, base excision repair, and to some extent by nucleotide excision repair (NER). The identified carcinogenicity of O(6)-methylguanine (O(6)-meG) is largely caused by its miscoding properties. Mutations from this lesion are prevented by O(6)-alkylG-DNA alkyltransferase......, inactivation of the MMR system in an AGT-defective background causes resistance to the killing effects of O(6)-alkylating agents, but not to the mutagenic effect. Bifunctional alkylating agents, such as chlorambucil or carmustine (BCNU), are commonly used anti-cancer drugs. DNA lesions caused by these agents...

  12. RESTORING A DAMAGED 16-YEAR -OLD INSULATING POLYMER CONCRETE DIKE OVERLAY: REPAIR MATERIALS AND TECHNOLOGIES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SUGAMA,T.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this program was to design and formulate organic polymer-based material systems suitable for repairing and restoring the overlay panels of insulating lightweight polymer concrete (ILPC) from the concrete floor and slope wall of a dike at KeySpan liquefied natural gas (LNG) facility in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, NY, just over sixteen years ago. It also included undertaking a small-scale field demonstration to ensure that the commercial repairing technologies were applicable to the designed and formulated materials.

  13. Molecular Mechanisms of Ultraviolet Radiation-Induced DNA Damage and Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh P. Rastogi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA is one of the prime molecules, and its stability is of utmost importance for proper functioning and existence of all living systems. Genotoxic chemicals and radiations exert adverse effects on genome stability. Ultraviolet radiation (UVR (mainly UV-B: 280–315 nm is one of the powerful agents that can alter the normal state of life by inducing a variety of mutagenic and cytotoxic DNA lesions such as cyclobutane-pyrimidine dimers (CPDs, 6-4 photoproducts (6-4PPs, and their Dewar valence isomers as well as DNA strand breaks by interfering the genome integrity. To counteract these lesions, organisms have developed a number of highly conserved repair mechanisms such as photoreactivation, base excision repair (BER, nucleotide excision repair (NER, and mismatch repair (MMR. Additionally, double-strand break repair (by homologous recombination and nonhomologous end joining, SOS response, cell-cycle checkpoints, and programmed cell death (apoptosis are also operative in various organisms with the expense of specific gene products. This review deals with UV-induced alterations in DNA and its maintenance by various repair mechanisms.

  14. DSB repair model for mammalian cells in early S and G1 phases of the cell cycle: application to damage induced by ionizing radiation of different quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taleei, Reza; Girard, Peter M; Nikjoo, Hooshang

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this work is to test the hypothesis that kinetics of double strand breaks (DSB) repair is governed by complexity of DSB. To test the hypothesis we used our recent published mechanistic mathematical model of DSB repair for DSB induced by selected protons, deuterons, and helium ions of different energies representing radiations of different qualities. In light of recent advances in experimental and computational techniques, the most appropriate method to study cellular responses in radiation therapy, and exposures to low doses of ionizing radiations is using mechanistic approaches. To this end, we proposed a 'bottom-up' approach to study cellular response that starts with the DNA damage. Monte Carlo track structure method was employed to simulate initial damage induced in the genomic DNA by direct and indirect effects. Among the different types of DNA damage, DSB are known to be induced in simple and complex forms. The DSB repair model in G1 and early S phases of the cell cycle was employed to calculate the repair kinetics. The model considers the repair of simple and complex DSB, and the DSB produced in the heterochromatin. The inverse sampling method was used to calculate the repair kinetics for each individual DSB. The overall repair kinetics for 500 DSB induced by single tracks of the radiation under test were compared with experimental results. The results show that the model is capable of predicting the repair kinetics for the DSB induced by radiations of different qualities within an accepted range of uncertainty.

  15. The Base Excision Repair system of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium counteracts DNA damage by host nitric oxide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony R Richardson

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular pathogens must withstand nitric oxide (NO. generated by host phagocytes. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium interferes with intracellular trafficking of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and possesses multiple systems to detoxify NO.. Consequently, the level of NO. stress encountered by S. Typhimurium during infection in vivo has been unknown. The Base Excision Repair (BER system recognizes and repairs damaged DNA bases including cytosine and guanine residues modified by reactive nitrogen species. Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP sites generated by BER glycosylases require subsequent processing by AP endonucleases. S. Typhimurium xth nfo mutants lacking AP endonuclease activity exhibit increased NO. sensitivity resulting from chromosomal fragmentation at unprocessed AP sites. BER mutant strains were thus used to probe the nature and extent of nitrosative damage sustained by intracellular bacteria during infection. Here we show that an xth nfo S. Typhimurium mutant is attenuated for virulence in C3H/HeN mice, and virulence can be completely restored by the iNOS inhibitor L-NIL. Inactivation of the ung or fpg glycosylase genes partially restores virulence to xth nfo mutant S. Typhimurium, demonstrating that NO. fluxes in vivo are sufficient to modify cytosine and guanine bases, respectively. Mutants lacking ung or fpg exhibit NO.-dependent hypermutability during infection, underscoring the importance of BER in protecting Salmonella from the genotoxic effects of host NO.. These observations demonstrate that host-derived NO. damages Salmonella DNA in vivo, and the BER system is required to maintain bacterial genomic integrity.

  16. Damaged beyond repair? Characterising the damage zone of a fault late in its interseismic cycle, the Alpine Fault, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jack N.; Toy, Virginia G.; Massiot, Cécile; McNamara, David D.; Wang, Ting

    2016-09-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) scans of drill-core, recovered from the first phase of the Deep Fault Drilling Project (DFDP-1) through New Zealand's Alpine Fault, provide an excellent opportunity to study the damage zone of a plate-bounding continental scale fault, late in its interseismic cycle. Documentation of the intermediate-macro scale damage zone structures observed in the CT images show that there is no increase in the density of these structures towards the fault's principal slip zones (PSZs), at least within the interval sampled, which is 30 m above and below the PSZs. This is in agreement with independent analysis using borehole televiewer data. Instead, we conclude the density of damage zone structures to correspond to lithology. We find that 72% of fractures are fully healed, by a combination of clays, calcite and quartz, with an additional 24% partially healed. This fracture healing is consistent with the Alpine Fault's late interseismic state, and the fact that the interval of damage zone sampled coincides with an alteration zone, an interval of extensive fluid-rock interaction. These fractures do not impose a reduction of P-wave velocity, as measured by wireline methods. Outside the alteration zone there is indirect evidence of less extensive fracture healing.

  17. Urban seismic risk assessment: statistical repair cost data and probable structural losses based on damage scenario—correlation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleftheriadou, Anastasia K.; Baltzopoulou, Aikaterini D.; Karabinis, Athanasios I.

    2016-06-01

    The current seismic risk assessment is based on two discrete approaches, actual and probable, validating afterwards the produced results. In the first part of this research, the seismic risk is evaluated from the available data regarding the mean statistical repair/strengthening or replacement cost for the total number of damaged structures (180,427 buildings) after the 7/9/1999 Parnitha (Athens) earthquake. The actual evaluated seismic risk is afterwards compared to the estimated probable structural losses, which is presented in the second part of the paper, based on a damage scenario in the referring earthquake. The applied damage scenario is based on recently developed damage probability matrices (DPMs) from Athens (Greece) damage database. The seismic risk estimation refers to 750,085 buildings situated in the extended urban region of Athens. The building exposure is categorized in five typical structural types and represents 18.80 % of the entire building stock in Greece. The last information is provided by the National Statistics Service of Greece (NSSG) according to the 2000-2001 census. The seismic input is characterized by the ratio, a g/ a o, where a g is the regional peak ground acceleration (PGA) which is evaluated from the earlier estimated research macroseismic intensities, and a o is the PGA according to the hazard map of the 2003 Greek Seismic Code. Finally, the collected investigated financial data derived from different National Services responsible for the post-earthquake crisis management concerning the repair/strengthening or replacement costs or other categories of costs for the rehabilitation of earthquake victims (construction and function of settlements for earthquake homeless, rent supports, demolitions, shorings) are used to determine the final total seismic risk factor.

  18. Essential and distinct roles of the F-box and helicase domains of Fbh1 in DNA damage repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinagawa Hideo

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs are induced by exogenous insults such as ionizing radiation and chemical exposure, and they can also arise as a consequence of stalled or collapsed DNA replication forks. Failure to repair DSBs can lead to genomic instability or cell death and cancer in higher eukaryotes. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe fbh1 gene encodes an F-box DNA helicase previously described to play a role in the Rhp51 (an orthologue of S. cerevisiae RAD51-dependent recombinational repair of DSBs. Fbh1 fused to GFP localizes to discrete nuclear foci following DNA damage. Results To determine the functional roles of the highly conserved F-box and helicase domains, we have characterized fbh1 mutants carrying specific mutations in these domains. We show that the F-box mutation fbh1-fb disturbs the nuclear localization of Fbh1, conferring an fbh1 null-like phenotype. Moreover, nuclear foci do not form in fbh1-fb cells with DNA damage even if Fbh1-fb is targeted to the nucleus by fusion to a nuclear localization signal sequence. In contrast, the helicase mutation fbh1-hl causes the accumulation of Fbh1 foci irrespective of the presence of DNA damage and confers damage sensitivity greater than that conferred by the null allele. Additional mutation of the F-box alleviates the hypermorphic phenotype of the fbh1-hl mutant. Conclusion These results suggest that the F-box and DNA helicase domains play indispensable but distinct roles in Fbh1 function. Assembly of the SCFFbh1 complex is required for both the nuclear localization and DNA damage-induced focus formation of Fbh1 and is therefore prerequisite for the Fbh1 recombination function.

  19. Induction and repair of DNA damage measured by the comet assay in human T lymphocytes separated by immunomagnetic cell sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bausinger, Julia; Speit, Günter

    2014-11-01

    The comet assay is widely used in human biomonitoring to measure DNA damage in whole blood or isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) as a marker of exposure to genotoxic agents. Cytogenetic assays with phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated cultured T lymphocytes are also frequently performed in human biomonitoring. Cytogenetic effects (micronuclei, chromosome aberrations, sister chromatid exchanges) may be induced in vivo but also occur ex vivo during the cultivation of lymphocytes as a consequence of DNA damage present in lymphocytes at the time of sampling. To better understand whether DNA damage measured by the comet assay in PBMC is representative for DNA damage in T cells, we comparatively investigated DNA damage and its repair in PBMC and T cells obtained by immunomagnetic cell sorting. PBMC cultures and T cell cultures were exposed to mutagens with different modes of genotoxic action and DNA damage was measured by the comet assay after the end of a 2h exposure and after 18h post-incubation. The mutagens tested were methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), (±)-anti-B[a]P-7,8-dihydrodiol-9,10-epoxide (BPDE), 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO), styrene oxide and potassium bromate. MMS and potassium bromate were also tested by the modified comet assay with formamido pyrimidine glycosylase (FPG) protein. The results indicate that the mutagens tested induce DNA damage in PBMC and T cells in the same range of concentrations and removal of induced DNA lesions occurs to a comparable extent. Based on these results, we conclude that the comet assay with PBMC is suited to predict DNA damage and its removal in T cells.

  20. Mitochondrial DNA damage associated with lipid peroxidation of the mitochondrial membrane induced by Fe2+-citrate

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Iron imbalance/accumulation has been implicated in oxidative injury associated with many degenerative diseases such as hereditary hemochromatosis, beta-thalassemia, and Friedreich's ataxia. Mitochondria are particularly sensitive to iron-induced oxidative stress - high loads of iron cause extensive lipid peroxidation and membrane permeabilization in isolated mitochondria. Here we detected and characterized mitochondrial DNA damage in isolated rat liver mitochondria exposed to a Fe2+-citrate c...

  1. Drought-induced xylem pit membrane damage in aspen and balsam poplar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillabrand, Rachel M; Hacke, Uwe G; Lieffers, Victor J

    2016-10-01

    Drought induces an increase in a tree's vulnerability to a loss of its hydraulic conductivity in many tree species, including two common in western Canada, trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides) and balsam poplar (Populus balsamifera). Termed 'cavitation fatigue' or 'air-seeding fatigue', the mechanism of this phenomenon is not well understood, but hypothesized to be a result of damage to xylem pit membranes. To examine the validity of this hypothesis, the effect of drought on the porosity of pit membranes in aspen and balsam poplar was investigated. Controlled drought and bench dehydration treatments were used to induce fatigue and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to image pit membranes for relative porosity evaluations from air-dried samples after ethanol dehydration. A significant increase in the diameter of the largest pore was found in the drought and dehydration treatments of aspen, while an increase in the percentage of porous pit membranes was found in the dehydration treatments of both species. Additionally, the location of the largest pore per pit membrane was observed to tend toward the periphery of the membrane.

  2. Repair of oxidative DNA damage, cell-cycle regulation and neuronal death may influence the clinical manifestation of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aderbal R T Silva

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is characterized by progressive cognitive decline associated with a featured neuropathology (neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Several studies have implicated oxidative damage to DNA, DNA repair, and altered cell-cycle regulation in addition to cell death in AD post-mitotic neurons. However, there is a lack of studies that systematically assess those biological processes in patients with AD neuropathology but with no evidence of cognitive impairment. We evaluated markers of oxidative DNA damage (8-OHdG, H2AX, DNA repair (p53, BRCA1, PTEN, and cell-cycle (Cdk1, Cdk4, Cdk5, Cyclin B1, Cyclin D1, p27Kip1, phospho-Rb and E2F1 through immunohistochemistry and cell death through TUNEL in autopsy hippocampal tissue samples arrayed in a tissue microarray (TMA composed of three groups: I "clinical-pathological AD" (CP-AD--subjects with neuropathological AD (Braak ≥ IV and CERAD = B or C and clinical dementia (CDR ≥ 2, IQCODE>3.8; II "pathological AD" (P-AD--subjects with neuropathological AD (Braak ≥ IV and CERAD = B or C and without cognitive impairment (CDR 0, IQCODE<3.2; and III "normal aging" (N--subjects without neuropathological AD (Braak ≤ II and CERAD 0 or A and with normal cognitive function (CDR 0, IQCODE<3.2. Our results show that high levels of oxidative DNA damage are present in all groups. However, significant reductions in DNA repair and cell-cycle inhibition markers and increases in cell-cycle progression and cell death markers in subjects with CP-AD were detected when compared to both P-AD and N groups, whereas there were no significant differences in the studied markers between P-AD individuals and N subjects. This study indicates that, even in the setting of pathological AD, healthy cognition may be associated with a preserved repair to DNA damage, cell-cycle regulation, and cell death in post-mitotic neurons.

  3. The interplay among chromatin dynamics, cell cycle checkpoints and repair mechanisms modulates the cellular response to DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzaro, Federico; Giannattasio, Michele; Muzi-Falconi, Marco; Plevani, Paolo

    2007-06-01

    Cells are continuously under the assault of endogenous and exogenous genotoxic stress that challenges the integrity of DNA. To cope with such a formidable task cells have evolved surveillance mechanisms, known as checkpoints, and a variety of DNA repair systems responding to different types of DNA lesions. These lesions occur in the context of the chromatin structure and, as expected for all DNA transactions, the cellular response to DNA damage is going to be influenced by the chromatin enviroment. In this review, we will discuss recent studies implicating chromatin remodelling factors and histone modifications in the response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and in checkpoint activation in response to UV lesions.

  4. Electron Beam Irradiation Dose Dependently Damages the Bacillus Spore Coat and Spore Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Fiester

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective control of spore-forming bacilli begs suitable physical or chemical methods. While many spore inactivation techniques have been proven effective, electron beam (EB irradiation has been frequently chosen to eradicate Bacillus spores. Despite its widespread use, there are limited data evaluating the effects of EB irradiation on Bacillus spores. To study this, B. atrophaeus spores were purified, suspended in sterile, distilled water, and irradiated with EB (up to 20 kGy. Irradiated spores were found (1 to contain structural damage as observed by electron microscopy, (2 to have spilled cytoplasmic contents as measured by spectroscopy, (3 to have reduced membrane integrity as determined by fluorescence cytometry, and (4 to have fragmented genomic DNA as measured by gel electrophoresis, all in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, cytometry data reveal decreased spore size, increased surface alterations, and increased uptake of propidium iodide, with increasing EB dose, suggesting spore coat alterations with membrane damage, prior to loss of spore viability. The present study suggests that EB irradiation of spores in water results in substantial structural damage of the spore coat and inner membrane, and that, along with DNA fragmentation, results in dose-dependent spore inactivation.

  5. Reconstitution studies on the involvement of radiation-induced lipid peroxidation in damage to membrane enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yukawa, O; Nagatsuka, S; Nakazawa, T

    1983-04-01

    The effect of radiation on the drug-metabolizing enzyme system of microsomes, reconstituted with liposomes of microsomal phospholipids, NADPH-cytochrome P-450 reductase and cytochrome P-450, was examined to elucidate the role of lipid peroxidation of membranes in radiation-induced damage to membrane-bound enzymes. The reconstituted system of non-irradiated enzymes with irradiated liposomes showed a low activity of hexobarbital hydroxylation, whereas irradiated enzymes combined with non-irradiated liposomes exhibited an activity equal to that of unirradiated controls. Irradiation of liposomes caused a decrease in cytochrome P-450 content by destruction of the haem of cytochrome P-450 and also inhibited the binding capacity of cytochrome P-450 for hexobarbital. The relationship between radiation-induced lipid peroxidation and membrane-bound enzymes is discussed.

  6. Reconstitution studies on the involvement of radiation-induced lipid peroxidation in damage to membrane enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yukawa, O.; Nagatsuka, S.; Nakazawa, T. (National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan))

    1983-04-01

    The effect of ..gamma..-radiation on the drug-metabolizing enzyme system of microsomes, reconstituted with liposomes of microsomal phospholipids, NADPH-cytochrome P-450 reductase and cytochrome P-450, was examined to elucidate the role of lipid peroxidation of membranes in radiation-induced damage to membrane-bound enzymes. The reconstituted system of non-irradiated enzymes with irradiated liposomes showed a low activity of hexobarbital hydroxylation, whereas irradiated enzymes combined with non-irradiated liposomes exhibited an activity equal to that of unirradiated controls. Irradiation of liposomes caused a decrease in cytochrome P-450 content by destruction of the haem of cytochrome P-450 and also inhibited the binding capacity of cytochrome P-450 for hexobarbital. The relationship between radiation-induced lipid peroxidation and membrane-bound enzymes is discussed.

  7. Checkpoint Kinase ATR Promotes Nucleotide Excision Repair of UV-induced DNA Damage via Physical Interaction with Xeroderma Pigmentosum Group A*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shell, Steven M.; Li, Zhengke; Shkriabai, Nikolozi; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; Brosey, Chris; Serrano, Moises A.; Chazin, Walter J.; Musich, Phillip R.; Zou, Yue

    2009-01-01

    In response to DNA damage, eukaryotic cells activate a series of DNA damage-dependent pathways that serve to arrest cell cycle progression and remove DNA damage. Coordination of cell cycle arrest and damage repair is critical for maintenance of genomic stability. However, this process is still poorly understood. Nucleotide excision repair (NER) and the ATR-dependent cell cycle checkpoint are the major pathways responsible for repair of UV-induced DNA damage. Here we show that ATR physically interacts with the NER factor Xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA). Using a mass spectrometry-based protein footprinting method, we found that ATR interacts with a helix-turn-helix motif in the minimal DNA-binding domain of XPA where an ATR phosphorylation site (serine 196) is located. XPA-deficient cells complemented with XPA containing a point mutation of S196A displayed a reduced repair efficiency of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers as compared with cells complemented with wild-type XPA, although no effect was observed for repair of (6-4) photoproducts. This suggests that the ATR-dependent phosphorylation of XPA may promote NER repair of persistent DNA damage. In addition, a K188A point mutation of XPA that disrupts the ATR-XPA interaction inhibits the nuclear import of XPA after UV irradiation and, thus, significantly reduced DNA repair efficiency. By contrast, the S196A mutation has no effect on XPA nuclear translocation. Taken together, our results suggest that the ATR-XPA interaction mediated by the helix-turn-helix motif of XPA plays an important role in DNA-damage responses to promote cell survival and genomic stability after UV irradiation. PMID:19586908

  8. Too hot to handle? Synchrotron X-ray damage of lipid membranes and mesophases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherezov, Vadim; Riedl, Ken M; Caffrey, Martin

    2002-11-01

    The call for brighter synchrotron X-radiation sources for use in structural biology research is barely audible as we enter the new millennium. Our brightest sources are already creating havoc when used at design specifications because of radiation damage. The time is long overdue to take stock of where we are and where we wish to go with regards to using existing sources and to designing new ones. The problem of radiation damage is particularly acute in studies involving kinetics and mechanisms where cryo-techniques are not always viable. Accordingly, we need to understand the very nature of radiation damage and to devise means of minimizing it. This is the thrust of the current report as applied to lipid membranes and mesophases. The experiments were performed at the most brilliant beamlines at CHESS, the APS and the ESRF. Two very different types of radiation damage are reported here. One involves a dramatic phase transformation and the other a disordering of lamellar stacking. How beam energy and dose rate affect damage is also discussed. The work highlights the free-radical-mediated nature of the damage process and the need for additional studies if the most efficient use is to be made of an important resource, synchrotron radiation.

  9. Effect of creatine supplementation on muscle damage and repair following eccentrically-induced damage to the elbow flexor muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, Neal B; Graham, Mitchell T; Tiidus, Peter M

    2012-01-01

    We investigated effects of creatine (Cr) supplementation (CrS) on exercise-induced muscle damage. Untrained males and females (N = 27) ages 18-25, with no CrS history in the past 4 months, were randomly assigned to CrS (creatine and carbohydrate) (n = 9), placebo (P) (carbohydrate only) (n = 9), or control (C) (no supplements) groups (n = 9). Participants followed a 5-day Cr loading protocol of 40 g·day(-1), divided for 5 days prior to exercise, reduced to 10 g g·day(-1) for 5 days following exercise. Testing consisted of 5 maximal isometric contractions at 90 arm flexion with the preferred arm on a CYBEX NORM dynamometer, assessed prior to, immediately following, and 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours post muscle-damaging procedures. Damage was induced to the elbow flexor muscles using 6 sets of 10 eccentric contractions at 75 °/sec, 90 °/sec and 120 °/sec. Participants were asked to rate their muscle soreness on a scale of 1-10. Data was analyzed using repeated-measures ANOVA, with an alpha of 0.05. No significant differences were found between muscle force loss and rate of recovery or muscle soreness between groups over the 96 hr recovery period (p > 0.05). Across all 3 experimental groups an initial decrease in force was observed, followed by a gradual recovery. Significant differences were found between baseline and all others times (p = 0.031,0 .022, 0.012, 0.001 respectively), and between the 48 hour and 96 hour time periods (p = 0.034). A weak negative correlation between subjectively rated muscle soreness and mean peak isometric force loss (R(2) = 0.0374 at 96 hours), suggested that muscle soreness and muscle force loss may not be directly related. In conclusion, 5 days of Cr loading, followed by a Cr maintenance protocol did not reduce indices of muscle damage or speed recovery of upper body muscles following eccentrically induced muscle damage.

  10. EFFECT OF CREATINE SUPPLEMENTATION ON MUSCLE DAMAGE AND REPAIR FOLLOWING ECCENTRICALLY-INDUCED DAMAGE TO THE ELBOW FLEXOR MUSCLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neal B. McKinnon

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigated effects of creatine (Cr supplementation (CrS on exercise-induced muscle damage. Untrained males and females (N = 27 ages 18-25, with no CrS history in the past 4 months, were randomly assigned to CrS (creatine and carbohydrate (n = 9, placebo (P (carbohydrate only (n = 9, or control (C (no supplements groups (n = 9. Participants followed a 5-day Cr loading protocol of 40 g·day-1, divided for 5 days prior to exercise, reduced to 10 g g·day-1 for 5 days following exercise. Testing consisted of 5 maximal isometric contractions at 90 arm flexion with the preferred arm on a CYBEX NORM dynamometer, assessed prior to, immediately following, and 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours post muscle-damaging procedures. Damage was induced to the elbow flexor muscles using 6 sets of 10 eccentric contractions at 75 °/sec, 90 °/sec and 120 °/sec. Participants were asked to rate their muscle soreness on a scale of 1-10. Data was analyzed using repeated-measures ANOVA, with an alpha of 0.05. No significant differences were found between muscle force loss and rate of recovery or muscle soreness between groups over the 96 hr recovery period (p > 0.05. Across all 3 experimental groups an initial decrease in force was observed, followed by a gradual recovery. Significant differences were found between baseline and all others times (p = 0.031,0 .022, 0.012, 0.001 respectively, and between the 48 hour and 96 hour time periods (p = 0.034. A weak negative correlation between subjectively rated muscle soreness and mean peak isometric force loss (R2 = 0.0374 at 96 hours, suggested that muscle soreness and muscle force loss may not be directly related. In conclusion, 5 days of Cr loading, followed by a Cr maintenance protocol did not reduce indices of muscle damage or speed recovery of upper body muscles following eccentrically induced muscle damage

  11. Regulators of global genome repair do not respond to DNA damaging therapy but correlate with survival in melanoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikola A Bowden

    Full Text Available Nucleotide excision repair (NER orchestrates the repair of helix distorting DNA damage, induced by both ultraviolet radiation (UVR and cisplatin. There is evidence that the global genome repair (GGR arm of NER is dysfunctional in melanoma and it is known to have limited induction in melanoma cell lines after cisplatin treatment. The aims of this study were to examine mRNA transcript levels of regulators of GGR and to investigate the downstream effect on global transcript expression in melanoma cell lines after cisplatin treatment and in melanoma tumours. The GGR regulators, BRCA1 and PCNA, were induced in melanocytes after cisplatin, but not in melanoma cell lines. Transcripts associated with BRCA1, BRCA2, ATM and CHEK2 showed altered expression in melanoma cell lines after cisplatin treatment. In melanoma tumour tissue BRCA1 transcript expression correlated with poor survival and XPB expression correlated with solar elastosis levels. Taken together, these findings provide evidence of the mechanisms underlying NER deficiency in melanoma.

  12. Endonuclease IV Is the Main Base Excision Repair Enzyme Involved in DNA Damage Induced by UVA Radiation and Stannous Chloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen S. Motta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Stannous chloride (SnCl2 and UVA induce DNA lesions through ROS. The aim of this work was to study the toxicity induced by UVA preillumination, followed by SnCl2 treatment. E. coli BER mutants were used to identify genes which could play a role in DNA lesion repair generated by these agents. The survival assays showed (i The nfo mutant was the most sensitive to SnCl2; (ii lethal synergistic effect was observed after UVA pre-illumination, plus SnCl2 incubation, the nfo mutant being the most sensitive; (iii wild type and nfo mutants, transformed with pBW21 plasmid (nfo+ had their survival increased following treatments. The alkaline agarose gel electrophoresis assays pointed that (i UVA induced DNA breaks and fpg mutant was the most sensitive; (ii SnCl2-induced DNA strand breaks were higher than those from UVA and nfo mutant had the slowest repair kinetics; (iii UVA+SnCl2 promoted an increase in DNA breaks than SnCl2 and, again, nfo mutant displayed the slowest repair kinetics. In summary, Nfo protects E. coli cells against damage induced by SnCl2 and UVA+ SnCl2.

  13. Radiosensitivity and capacity for radiation-induced sublethal damage repair of canine transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parfitt, S L; Milner, R J; Salute, M E; Hintenlang, D E; Farese, J P; Bacon, N J; Bova, F J; Rajon, D A; Lurie, D M

    2011-09-01

    Understanding the inherent radiosensitivity and repair capacity of canine transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) can aid in optimizing radiation protocols to treat this disease. The objective of this study was to evaluate the parameters surviving fraction at 2 Gy (SF(2) ), α/β ratio and capacity for sublethal damage repair (SLDR) in response to radiation. Dose-response and split-dose studies were performed using the clonogenic assay. The mean SF(2) for three established TCC cell lines was high at 0.61. All the three cell lines exhibited a low to moderate α/β ratio, with the mean being 3.27. Two cell lines exhibited statistically increased survival at 4 and 24 h in the dose-response assay. Overall, our results indicate that the cell lines are moderately radioresistant, have a high repair capacity and behave similarly to a late-responding normal tissue. These findings indicate that the radiation protocols utilizing higher doses with less fractionation may be more effective for treating TCC.

  14. DNA damage induction and/or repair as mammalian cell biomarker for the prediction of cellular radiation response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumstark-Khan, C.

    DNA damage and its repair processes are key factors in cancer induction and also in the treatment of malignancies. Cancer prevention during extended space missions becomes a topic of great importance for space radiobiology. The knowledge of individual responsiveness would allow the protection strategy to be tailored optimally in each case. Radiobiological analysis of cultured cells derived from tissue explants from individuals has shown that measurement of the surviving fraction after 2 Gy (SF2) may be used to predict the individual responsiveness. However, clonogenic assays are timeconsuming, thus alternative assays for the determination of radiore-sponse are being sought. For that reason CHO cell strains having different repair capacities were used for examining whether DNA strand break repair is a suitable experimental design to allow predictive statements. Cellular survival (CFA assay) and DNA strand breaks (total DNA strand breaks: FADU technique; DSBs: non-denaturing elution) were determined in parallel immediately after irradiation as well as after a 24 hour recovery period according to dose. There were no correlations between the dose-response curves of the initial level of DNA strand breaks and parameters that describe clonogenic survival curves (SF2). A good correlation exists between intrinsic cellular radioresistance and the extent of residual DNA strand breaks.

  15. System and method for laser-based, non-evaporative repair of damage sites in the surfaces of fused silica optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, John J.; Bolourchi, Masoud; Bude, Jeffrey D.; Guss, Gabriel M.; Jarboe, Jeffery A.; Matthews, Manyalibo J.; Nostrand, Michael C; Wegner, Paul J.

    2016-09-06

    A method for repairing a damage site on a surface of an optical material is disclosed. The method may involve focusing an Infrared (IR) laser beam having a predetermined wavelength, with a predetermined beam power, to a predetermined full width ("F/W") 1/e.sup.2 diameter spot on the damage site. The focused IR laser beam is maintained on the damage site for a predetermined exposure period corresponding to a predetermined acceptable level of downstream intensification. The focused IR laser beam heats the damage site to a predetermined peak temperature, which melts and reflows material at the damage site of the optical material to create a mitigated site.

  16. Effects of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor on the repair of vessel intima damaged by balloon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xing-hua; MA Xiao-jing; ZHAO Tong

    2005-01-01

    Background The dysfunction of vascular endothelial cells plays a key role in starting and facilitating restenosis. The acceleration of intima repair and the recovery of endothelial function would reduce the restenosis rate. This study was undertaken to assess the effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) on the repair of damaged iliac arteries.Methods Twenty-four male New Zealand white rabbits undergoing primary iliac artery deendothelialization were randomly divided into two groups (GM-CSF group and control group). The GM-CSF group received a subcutaneous injection of GM-CSF (10 μg·kg-1·d-1), and the control group was given a subcutaneous injection of equivalent saline. The iliac arteries of all animals were damaged by balloon after 7 days. The levels of nitric oxide (NO) were detected before, 1 week, 2 weeks and 4 weeks after angioplasty. The repair and hyperplasia of the intima were observed microscopically and the indices of stenosis were evaluated by computerized planimetry after 4 weeks of angioplasty.Results The NO levels of the GM-CSF group were higher than those of the control group 2 weeks and 4 weeks after angioplasty [(91.92±11.57) μmol/L vs. (81.67±12.18) μmol/L; (97.67±10.13) μmol/L vs. (83.16±12.64) μmol/L]. Four weeks after balloon damage, histological examination showed that neointima formation, vascular smooth muscle cells and fibrous tissue of the GM-CSF group were less than those of the control group. The endothelium of the GM-CSF group was more integrated, and stenosis of lumen was slighter than that of the control group. Morphometry showed the lumen area of the GM-CSF group was larger than that of the control group [(1.27±0.31) mm2 vs. (0.92±0.24) mm2], the neointimal area and percent of intima hyperplasia were significantly smaller than those of the control group [(0.85±0.34) mm2 vs. (1.18±0.38) mm2; (40±7)% vs. (55±6)%].Conclusion GM-CSF could facilitate the repair of the intima, reduce neointima

  17. Radiosensitization of metformin in pancreatic cancer cells via abrogating the G2 checkpoint and inhibiting DNA damage repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng; Lai, Song-Tao; Ma, Ning-Yi; Deng, Yun; Liu, Yong; Wei, Dong-Ping; Zhao, Jian-Dong; Jiang, Guo-Liang

    2015-12-01

    Recent evidences have demonstrated the potential of metformin as a novel agent for cancer prevention and treatment. Here, we investigated its ability of radiosensitization and the underlying mechanisms in human pancreatic cancer cells. In this study, we found that metformin at 5 mM concentration enhanced the radiosensitivity of MIA PaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells, with sensitization enhancement ratios of 1.39 and 1.27, respectively. Mechanistically, metformin caused abrogation of the G2 checkpoint and increase of mitotic catastrophe, associated with suppression of Wee1 kinase and in turn CDK1 Tyr15 phosphorylation. Furthermore, metformin inhibited both expression and irradiation-induced foci formation of Rad51, a key player in homologous recombination repair, ultimately leading to persistent DNA damage, as reflected by γ-H2AX and 53BP1 signaling. Finally, metformin-mediated AMPK/mTOR/p70S6K was identified as a possible upstream pathway controlling translational regulation of Wee1 and Rad51. Our data suggest that metformin radiosensitizes pancreatic cancer cells in vitro via abrogation of the G2 checkpoint and inhibition of DNA damage repair. However, the in vivo study is needed to further confirm the findings from the in vitro study.

  18. DNA damage and gene therapy of xeroderma pigmentosum, a human DNA repair-deficient disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupuy, Aurélie [Laboratory of Genetic Instability and Oncogenesis UMR8200CNRS, Institut Gustave Roussy and University Paris-Sud, Villejuif (France); Sarasin, Alain, E-mail: alain.sarasin@gustaveroussy.fr [Laboratory of Genetic Instability and Oncogenesis UMR8200CNRS, Institut Gustave Roussy and University Paris-Sud, Villejuif (France); Service de Génétique, Institut Gustave Roussy (France)

    2015-06-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Full correction of mutation in the XPC gene by engineered nucleases. • Meganucleases and TALENs are inhibited by 5-MeC for inducing double strand breaks. • Gene therapy of XP cells is possible using homologous recombination for DSB repair. - Abstract: Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a genetic disease characterized by hypersensitivity to ultra-violet and a very high risk of skin cancer induction on exposed body sites. This syndrome is caused by germinal mutations on nucleotide excision repair genes. No cure is available for these patients except a complete protection from all types of UV radiations. We reviewed the various techniques to complement or to correct the genetic defect in XP cells. We, particularly, developed the correction of XP-C skin cells using the fidelity of the homologous recombination pathway during repair of double-strand break (DSB) in the presence of XPC wild type sequences. We used engineered nucleases (meganuclease or TALE nuclease) to induce a DSB located at 90 bp of the mutation to be corrected. Expression of specific TALE nuclease in the presence of a repair matrix containing a long stretch of homologous wild type XPC sequences allowed us a successful gene correction of the original TG deletion found in numerous North African XP patients. Some engineered nucleases are sensitive to epigenetic modifications, such as cytosine methylation. In case of methylated sequences to be corrected, modified nucleases or demethylation of the whole genome should be envisaged. Overall, we showed that specifically-designed TALE-nuclease allowed us to correct a 2 bp deletion in the XPC gene leading to patient's cells proficient for DNA repair and showing normal UV-sensitivity. The corrected gene is still in the same position in the human genome and under the regulation of its physiological promoter. This result is a first step toward gene therapy in XP patients.

  19. Post-irradiation chemical processing of DNA damage generates double-strand breaks in cells already engaged in repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Satyendra K.; Wang, Minli; Staudt, Christian; Iliakis, George

    2011-01-01

    In cells exposed to ionizing radiation (IR), double-strand breaks (DSBs) form within clustered-damage sites from lesions disrupting the DNA sugar–phosphate backbone. It is commonly assumed that these DSBs form promptly and are immediately detected and processed by the cellular DNA damage response (DDR) apparatus. This assumption is questioned by the observation that after irradiation of naked DNA, a fraction of DSBs forms minutes to hours after exposure as a result of temperature dependent, chemical processing of labile sugar lesions. Excess DSBs also form when IR-exposed cells are processed at 50°C, but have been hitherto considered method-related artifact. Thus, it remains unknown whether DSBs actually develop in cells after IR exposure from chemically labile damage. Here, we show that irradiation of ‘naked’ or chromatin-organized mammalian DNA produces lesions, which evolve to DSBs and add to those promptly induced, after 8–24 h in vitro incubation at 37°C or 50°C. The conversion is more efficient in chromatin-associated DNA, completed within 1 h in cells and delayed in a reducing environment. We conclude that IR generates sugar lesions within clustered-damage sites contributing to DSB formation only after chemical processing, which occurs efficiently at 37°C. This subset of delayed DSBs may challenge DDR, may affect the perceived repair kinetics and requires further characterization. PMID:21745815

  20. Effect of the XRCC1 codon 399 polymorphism on the repair of vinyl chloride metabolite-induced DNA damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yongliang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recent epidemiologic evidence suggests that the common polymorphism at amino acid residue 399 of the x-ray cross complementing-1 (XRCC1 protein, a key component of the base excision repair (BER pathway for DNA damage, plays a significant role in the genetic variability of individuals in terms of the mutagenic damage they experience following exposure to the carcinogen vinyl chloride (VC. The aim of this study was to provide support for the biological plausibility of these epidemiologic observations with experimental data derived from cell lines in culture from individuals who were either homozygous wild-type or homozygous variant for this XRCC1 polymorphism following exposure to chloroethylene oxide (CEO, the active metabolite of VC, with measurement of the induced etheno-DNA adducts before and after repair. Materials and Methods: Immortalized lymphoblast cell lines from seven VC workers (four homozygous wild-type and three homozygous variant for the 399 XRCC1 polymorphism were exposed to CEO, and etheno-adenosine (εA adduct levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA pre-exposure and at 0, 4, 8 and 24 h following exposure. Results: The average εA adduct levels were statistically significantly higher in the variant cells compared to the wild-type cells at 8 and 24 h following exposure (P< 0.05 with an overall average repair efficiency of 32% in the variant cells compared to 82% in the wild-type cells. Conclusion: These results are consistent with the epidemiologic findings of the types of VC-induced biomarkers observed in exposed individuals and the mutational spectra found in the resultant tumors as well as the key role that BER, especially XRCC1, plays in this carcinogenic pathway.

  1. Monte Carlo simulation of base and nucleotide excision repair of clustered DNA damage sites. I. Model properties and predicted trends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semenenko, Vladimir; Stewart, Robert D.; Ackerman, Eric J.

    2005-12-31

    Single-cell irradiators and new experimental assays are rapidly expanding our ability to quantify the molecular mechanisms responsible for phenomena such as toxicant-induced adaptations in DNA repair and signal-mediated changes to the genome stability of cells not directly damaged by radiation (i.e., bystander cells). To advance our understanding of, and ability to predict and mitigate, the potentially harmful effects of radiological agents, effective strategies must be devised to incorporate information from molecular and cellular studies into mechanism-based, hierarchical models. A key advantage of the hierarchical modeling approach is that information from DNA repair and other in vitro assays can be systematically integrated into higher-level cell transformation and, eventually, carcinogenesis models. This presentation will outline the hierarchical modeling strategy used to integrate information from in vitro studies into the Virtual Cell (VC) radiobiology software (see Endnote). A new multi-path genomic instability model will be introduced and used to link biochemical processing of double strand breaks (DSBs) to neoplastic cell transformation. Bystander and directly damaged cells are treated explicitly in the model using a microdosimetric approach, although many of the details of the bystander response model are of a necessarily preliminary nature. The new model will be tested against several published radiobiological datasets. Results illustrating how hypothesized bystander mechanisms affect the shape of dose-response curves for neoplastic transformation as a function of Linear Energy Transfer (LET) will be presented. EndNote: R.D. Stewart, Virtual Cell (VC) Radiobiology Software. PNNL-13579, July 2001. Available at http://www.pnl.gov/berc/kbem/vc/ The DNA repair model used in the VC computer program is based on the Two-Lesion Kinetic (TLK) model [Radiat. Res. 156(4), 365-378 October 2001].

  2. Goat milk with and without increased concentrations of lysozyme improves repair of intestinal cell damage induced by enteroaggregative Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carvalho Eunice B

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC causes diarrhea, malnutrition and poor growth in children. Human breast milk decreases disease-causing bacteria by supplying nutrients and antimicrobial factors such as lysozyme. Goat milk with and without human lysozyme (HLZ may improve the repair of intestinal barrier function damage induced by EAEC. This work investigates the effect of the milks on intestinal barrier function repair, bacterial adherence in Caco-2 and HEp-2 cells, intestinal cell proliferation, migration, viability and apoptosis in IEC-6 cells in the absence or presence of EAEC. Methods Rat intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6, ATCC, Rockville, MD were used for proliferation, migration and viability assays and human colon adenocarcinoma (Caco-2, ATCC, Rockville, MD and human larynx carcinoma (HEp-2, ATCC, Rockville, MD cells were used for bacterial adhesion assays. Goats expressing HLZ in their milk were generated and express HLZ in milk at concentration of 270 μg/ml . Cells were incubated with pasteurized milk from either transgenic goats expressing HLZ or non-transgenic control goats in the presence and absence of EAEC strain 042 (O44:H18. Results Cellular proliferation was significantly greater in the presence of both HLZ transgenic and control goat milk compared to cells with no milk. Cellular migration was significantly decreased in the presence of EAEC alone but was restored in the presence of milk. Milk from HLZ transgenic goats had significantly more migration compared to control milk. Both milks significantly reduced EAEC adhesion to Caco-2 cells and transgenic milk resulted in less colonization than control milk using a HEp-2 assay. Both milks had significantly increased cellular viability as well as less apoptosis in both the absence and presence of EAEC. Conclusions These data demonstrated that goat milk is able to repair intestinal barrier function damage induced by EAEC and that goat milk with a higher

  3. In vivo and in vitro evaluation of an Acetobacter xylinum synthesized microbial cellulose membrane intended for guided tissue repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Lima-Neto João

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Barrier materials as cellulose membranes are used for guided tissue repair. However, it is essential that the surrounding tissues accept the device. The present study histologically evaluated tissue reaction to a microbial cellulose membrane after subcutaneous implantation in mice. Furthermore, the interaction between mesenchymal stem cells and the biomaterial was studied in vitro to evaluate its ability to act as cellular scaffold for tissue engineering. Methods Twenty-five Swiss Albino mice were used. A 10 × 10 mm cellulose membrane obtained through biosynthesis using Acetobacter xylinum bacteria was implanted into the lumbar subcutaneous tissue of each mouse. The mice were euthanatized at seven, 15, 30, 60, and 90 days, and the membrane and surrounding tissues were collected and examined by histology. Results A mild inflammatory response without foreign body reaction was observed until 30 days post-surgery around the implanted membrane. Polarized microscopy revealed that the membrane remained intact at all evaluation points. Scanning electron microscopy of the cellulose membrane surface showed absence of pores. The in vitro evaluation of the interaction between cells and biomaterial was performed through viability staining analysis of the cells over the biomaterial, which showed that 95% of the mesenchymal stem cells aggregating to the cellulose membrane were alive and that 5% were necrotic. Scanning electron microscopy showed mesenchymal stem cells with normal morphology and attached to the cellulose membrane surface. Conclusion The microbial cellulose membrane evaluated was found to be nonresorbable, induced a mild inflammatory response and may prove useful as a scaffold for mesenchymal stem cells.

  4. Highly stable and self-repairing membrane-mimetic 2D nanomaterials assembled from lipid-like peptoids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Haibao; Jiao, Fang; Daily, Michael D.; Chen, Yulin; Yan, Feng; Ding, Yanhuai; Zhang, Xin; Robertson, Ellen J.; Baer, Marcel D.; Chen, Chunlong

    2016-07-12

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials with molecular-scale thickness have attracted increasing interest for separation, electronic, catalytic, optical, energy and biomedical applications.1-4 Although extensive research on 2D materials, such as graphene and graphene oxide, has been performed in recent years, progress is limited on self-assembly of 2D materials from sequence-specific macromolecules,5-7 especially from synthetic sequences that could exhibit lipid-like self-assembly of bilayer sheets and mimic membrane proteins for functions. The creation of such new class of materials could enable development of highly stable biomimetic membranes that exhibit cell-membrane-like molecular transport with exceptional selectively and high transport rates.8,9 Here we demonstrate self-assembly of lipid-like 12-mer peptoids into extremely stable, crystalline, flexible and free-standing 2D membrane materials. As with cell membranes, upon exposure to external stimuli, these materials exhibit changes in thickness,10 varying from 3.5 nm to 5.6 nm. We find that self-assembly occurs through a facile crystallization process, in which inter-peptoid hydrogen bonds and enhanced hydrophobic interactions drive the formation of a highly-ordered structure. Molecular simulation confirms this is the energetically favored structure. Displaying functional groups at arbitrary locations of membrane-forming peptoids produces membranes with similar structures. This research further shows that single-layer membranes can be coated onto substrate surfaces. Moreover, membranes with mechanically-induced defects can self-repair. Given that peptoids are sequence-specific and exhibit protein-like molecular recognition with enhanced stability,11 we anticipate our membranes to be a robust platform tailored to specific applications.

  5. STS-96 Crew Training, Mission Animation, Crew Interviews, STARSHINE, Discovery Rollout and Repair of Hail Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Live footage shows the crewmembers of STS-96, Commander Kent V. Rominger, Pilot Rick D. Husband, Mission Specialists Ellen Ochoa, Tamara E. Jernigan, Daniel T. Barry, Julie Payette and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev during various training activities. Scenes include astronaut suit-up, EVA training in the Virtual Reality Lab, Orbiter space vision training, bailout training, and crew photo session. Footage also shows individual crew interviews, repair activities to the external fuel tank, and Discovery's return to the launch pad. The engineers are seen sanding, bending, and painting the foam used in repairing the tank. An animation of the deployment of the STARSHINE satellite, International Space Station, and the STS-96 Mission is presented. Footage shows the students from Edgar Allen Poe Middle School sanding, polishing, and inspecting the mirrors for the STARSHINE satellite. Live footage also includes students from St. Michael the Archangel School wearing bunny suits and entering the clean room at Goddard Space Flight Center.

  6. Oligodendrocyte, Astrocyte, and Microglia Crosstalk in Myelin Development, Damage, and Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingues, Helena S.; Portugal, Camila C.; Socodato, Renato; Relvas, João B.

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes are the myelinating glia of the central nervous system. Myelination of axons allows rapid saltatory conduction of nerve impulses and contributes to axonal integrity. Devastating neurological deficits caused by demyelinating diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, illustrate well the importance of the process. In this review, we focus on the positive and negative interactions between oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, and microglia during developmental myelination and remyelination. Even though many lines of evidence support a crucial role for glia crosstalk during these processes, the nature of such interactions is often neglected when designing therapeutics for repair of demyelinated lesions. Understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying glial cell communication and how they influence oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination is fundamental to uncover novel therapeutic strategies for myelin repair. PMID:27551677

  7. Cryo-EM Imaging of DNA-PK DNA Damage Repair Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phoebe L. Stewart

    2005-06-27

    Exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation causes DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that must be repaired for cell survival. Higher eukaryotes respond to DSBs by arresting the cell cycle, presumably to repair the DNA lesions before cell division. In mammalian cells, the nonhomologous end-joining DSB repair pathway is mediated by the 470 kDa DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) together with the DNA-binding factors Ku70 and Ku80. Mouse knock-out models of these three proteins are all exquisitely sensitive to low doses of ionizing radiation. In the presence of DNA ends, Ku binds to the DNA and then recruits DNA-PKcs. After formation of the complex, the kinase activity associated with DNA-PKcs becomes activated. This kinase activity has been shown to be essential for repairing DNA DSBs in vivo since expression of a kinase-dead form of DNA-PKcs in a mammalian cell line that lacks DNA-PKcs fails to complement the radiosensitive phenotype. The immense size of DNA-PKcs suggests that it may also serve as a docking site for other DNA repair proteins. Since the assembly of the DNA-PK complex onto DNA is a prerequisite for DSB repair, it is critical to obtain structural information on the complex. Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and single particle reconstruction methods provide a powerful way to image large macromolecular assemblies at near atomic (10-15 ?) resolution. We have already used cryo-EM methods to examine the structure of the isolated DNA-PKcs protein. This structure reveals numerous cavities throughout the protein that may allow passage of single or double-stranded DNA. Pseudo two-fold symmetry was found for the monomeric protein, suggesting that DNA-PKcs may interact with two DNA ends or two Ku heterodimers simultaneously. Here we propose to study the structure of the cross-linked DNA-PKcs/Ku/DNA complex. Difference imaging with our published DNA-PKcs structure will enable us to elucidate the architecture of the complex. A second

  8. DNA damage and gene therapy of xeroderma pigmentosum, a human DNA repair-deficient disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuy, Aurélie; Sarasin, Alain

    2015-06-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a genetic disease characterized by hypersensitivity to ultra-violet and a very high risk of skin cancer induction on exposed body sites. This syndrome is caused by germinal mutations on nucleotide excision repair genes. No cure is available for these patients except a complete protection from all types of UV radiations. We reviewed the various techniques to complement or to correct the genetic defect in XP cells. We, particularly, developed the correction of XP-C skin cells using the fidelity of the homologous recombination pathway during repair of double-strand break (DSB) in the presence of XPC wild type sequences. We used engineered nucleases (meganuclease or TALE nuclease) to induce a DSB located at 90 bp of the mutation to be corrected. Expression of specific TALE nuclease in the presence of a repair matrix containing a long stretch of homologous wild type XPC sequences allowed us a successful gene correction of the original TG deletion found in numerous North African XP patients. Some engineered nucleases are sensitive to epigenetic modifications, such as cytosine methylation. In case of methylated sequences to be corrected, modified nucleases or demethylation of the whole genome should be envisaged. Overall, we showed that specifically-designed TALE-nuclease allowed us to correct a 2 bp deletion in the XPC gene leading to patient's cells proficient for DNA repair and showing normal UV-sensitivity. The corrected gene is still in the same position in the human genome and under the regulation of its physiological promoter. This result is a first step toward gene therapy in XP patients.

  9. Double-strand break damage and associated DNA repair genes predispose smokers to gene methylation

    OpenAIRE

    Leng, Shuguang; Stidley, Christine A.; Willink, Randy; Bernauer, Amanda; Do, Kieu; Picchi, Maria A.; Sheng, Xin; Frasco, Melissa, A.; Berg, David Van Den; Gilliland, Frank D.; Zima, Christopher; Crowell, Richard E.; Belinsky, Steven A.

    2008-01-01

    Gene promoter hypermethylation in sputum is a promising biomarker for predicting lung cancer. Identifying factors that predispose smokers to methylation of multiple gene promoters in the lung could impact strategies for early detection and chemoprevention. This study evaluated the hypothesis that double-strand break repair capacity and sequence variation in genes in this pathway are associated with a high methylation index in a cohort of current and former cancer-free smokers. A 50% reduction...

  10. Choreography of the DNA damage response: spatiotemporal relationships among checkpoint and repair proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisby, Michael; Barlow, Jacqueline H; Burgess, Rebecca C; Rothstein, Rodney

    2004-09-17

    DNA repair is an essential process for preserving genome integrity in all organisms. In eukaryotes, recombinational repair is choreographed by multiprotein complexes that are organized into centers (foci). Here, we analyze the cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and replication stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The Mre11 nuclease and the ATM-related Tel1 kinase are the first proteins detected at DSBs. Next, the Rfa1 single-strand DNA binding protein relocalizes to the break and recruits other key checkpoint proteins. Later and only in S and G2 phase, the homologous recombination machinery assembles at the site. Unlike the response to DSBs, Mre11 and recombination proteins are not recruited to hydroxyurea-stalled replication forks unless the forks collapse. The cellular response to DSBs and DNA replication stress is likely directed by the Mre11 complex detecting and processing DNA ends in conjunction with Sae2 and by RP-A recognizing single-stranded DNA and recruiting additional checkpoint and repair proteins.

  11. Use of the comet-FISH assay to compare DNA damage and repair in p53 and hTERT genes following ionizing radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Declan J McKenna

    Full Text Available The alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay can be combined with fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH methodology in order to investigate the localisation of specific gene domains within an individual cell. The number and position of the fluorescent signal(s provides information about the relative damage and subsequent repair that is occurring in the targeted gene domain(s. In this study, we have optimised the comet-FISH assay to detect and compare DNA damage and repair in the p53 and hTERT gene regions of bladder cancer cell-lines RT4 and RT112, normal fibroblasts and Cockayne Syndrome (CS fibroblasts following γ-radiation. Cells were exposed to 5Gy γ-radiation and repair followed for up to 60 minutes. At each repair time-point, the number and location of p53 and hTERT hybridisation spots was recorded in addition to standard comet measurements. In bladder cancer cell-lines and normal fibroblasts, the p53 gene region was found to be rapidly repaired relative to the hTERT gene region and the overall genome, a phenomenon that appeared to be independent of hTERT transcriptional activity. However, in the CS fibroblasts, which are defective in transcription coupled repair (TCR, this rapid repair of the p53 gene region was not observed when compared to both the hTERT gene region and the overall genome, proving the assay can detect variations in DNA repair in the same gene. In conclusion, we propose that the comet-FISH assay is a sensitive and rapid method for detecting differences in DNA damage and repair between different gene regions in individual cells in response to radiation. We suggest this increases its potential for measuring radiosensitivity in cells and may therefore have value in a clinical setting.

  12. The Caenorhabditis elegans homolog of Gen1/Yen1 resolvases links DNA damage signaling to DNA double-strand break repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aymeric P Bailly

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs can be repaired by homologous recombination (HR, which can involve Holliday junction (HJ intermediates that are ultimately resolved by nucleolytic enzymes. An N-terminal fragment of human GEN1 has recently been shown to act as a Holliday junction resolvase, but little is known about the role of GEN-1 in vivo. Holliday junction resolution signifies the completion of DNA repair, a step that may be coupled to signaling proteins that regulate cell cycle progression in response to DNA damage. Using forward genetic approaches, we identified a Caenorhabditis elegans dual function DNA double-strand break repair and DNA damage signaling protein orthologous to the human GEN1 Holliday junction resolving enzyme. GEN-1 has biochemical activities related to the human enzyme and facilitates repair of DNA double-strand breaks, but is not essential for DNA double-strand break repair during meiotic recombination. Mutational analysis reveals that the DNA damage-signaling function of GEN-1 is separable from its role in DNA repair. GEN-1 promotes germ cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via a pathway that acts in parallel to the canonical DNA damage response pathway mediated by RPA loading, CHK1 activation, and CEP-1/p53-mediated apoptosis induction. Furthermore, GEN-1 acts redundantly with the 9-1-1 complex to ensure genome stability. Our study suggests that GEN-1 might act as a dual function Holliday junction resolvase that may coordinate DNA damage signaling with a late step in DNA double-strand break repair.

  13. Mitosis, double strand break repair, and telomeres: a view from the end: how telomeres and the DNA damage response cooperate during mitosis to maintain genome stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesare, Anthony J

    2014-11-01

    Double strand break (DSB) repair is suppressed during mitosis because RNF8 and downstream DNA damage response (DDR) factors, including 53BP1, do not localize to mitotic chromatin. Discovery of the mitotic kinase-dependent mechanism that inhibits DSB repair during cell division was recently reported. It was shown that restoring mitotic DSB repair was detrimental, resulting in repair dependent genome instability and covalent telomere fusions. The telomere DDR that occurs naturally during cellular aging and in cancer is known to be refractory to G2/M checkpoint activation. Such DDR-positive telomeres, and those that occur as part of the telomere-dependent prolonged mitotic arrest checkpoint, normally pass through mitosis without covalent ligation, but result in cell growth arrest in G1 phase. The discovery that suppressing DSB repair during mitosis may function primarily to protect DDR-positive telomeres from fusing during cell division reinforces the unique cooperation between telomeres and the DDR to mediate tumor suppression.

  14. The Molecular Mechanism in the Damage of Erythrocyte Membrane of the Cows with Hemoglobinuria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The molecular mechanism in the damage of erythrocyte membrane of the cows with hemoglobinuria was studied with the field cases and the group comparison.The field cases were devided into three groups:the hemoglobinuria group(HG),the low-phosphorous group(LPG)and the control group(CG).The content of phospholipid constituents in the erythrocyte membrane and the protein constituents in membrane skeleton were determined molecularly and the shape of erythrocyte was examined with the scanning electron microscope.The result showed that:(1)the concentration of phosphatidylethanolamine(PE)in HG was lower significantly than that in LPG and CG;the concentration of sphingomyeline(SM) and phosphatidylcholine(PC)+phosphatidylserine(PS) in HG was significantly lower than that in the other groups;the content of PC+PS was lower and the concentration of SM was higher in LPG with comparing that in CG,the significant positive correlation was observed between the concentration of phosphorus in serum and the concentration of PE,respectively.The significant negative correlation was observed between the content of phosphorus in serum and the content of SM,respectively.(2)the difference of protein constituent in membrane skeleton between LPG and CG was not found,however,the concentration of spectin in band Ⅰ,Ⅱ and the content of protein in band Ⅳ-2 was lower and the concentration of protein in band Ⅲ significantly higher in HG than that in LPG and CG(P<0.01);(3)the form of erythrocyte observed with scanning electron microscope changed from discal to the spinal,to spheric form,to hemolysis ultimately following the reduction of the concentration of phosphorus in serum.It was concluded that the change of the constituent of phospholipid in erythrocyte membrane and protein in membrane skeleton and the form of erythrocyte is the most important factors in hemolysis for hypophosphatemia.

  15. Repair activity of oxidatively damaged DNA and telomere length in human lung epithelial cells after exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borghini, Andrea; Roursgaard, Martin; Andreassi, Maria Grazia;

    2017-01-01

    the cells toward replicative senescence, assessed by attrition of telomeres. To investigate this, H2O2 and KBrO3 were used to induce DNA damage in the cells and the effect of pre-exposure to MWCNT tested for a change in repair activity inside the cells or in the extract of treated cells. The effect of MWCNT...... exposure on telomere length was investigated for concentration and time response. We report a significantly increased repair activity in A549 cells exposed to MWCNTs compared to non-exposed cells, suggesting that DNA repair activity may be influenced by exposure to MWCNTs. The telomere length was decreased...

  16. DNA damage targets PKC{eta} to the nuclear membrane via its C1b domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamarkin, Ana; Zurgil, Udi; Braiman, Alex; Hai, Naama; Krasnitsky, Ella; Maissel, Adva; Ben-Ari, Assaf; Yankelovich, Liat; Livneh, Etta, E-mail: etta@bgumail.bgu.ac.il

    2011-06-10

    Translocation to cellular membranes is one of the hallmarks of PKC activation, occurring as a result of the generation of lipid secondary messengers in target membrane compartments. The activation-induced translocation of PKCs and binding to membranes is largely directed by their regulatory domains. We have previously reported that PKC{eta}, a member of the novel subfamily and an epithelial specific isoform, is localized at the cytoplasm and ER/Golgi and is translocated to the plasma membrane and the nuclear envelope upon short-term activation by PMA. Here we show that PKC{eta} is shuttling between the cytoplasm and the nucleus and that upon etoposide induced DNA damage is tethered at the nuclear envelope. Although PKC{eta} expression and its phosphorylation on the hydrophobic motif (Ser675) are increased by etoposide, this phosphorylation is not required for its accumulation at the nuclear envelope. Moreover, we demonstrate that the C1b domain is sufficient for translocation to the nuclear envelope. We further show that, similar to full-length PKC{eta}, the C1b domain could also confer protection against etoposide-induced cell death. Our studies demonstrate translocation of PKC{eta} to the nuclear envelope, and suggest that its spatial regulation could be important for its cellular functions including effects on cell death.

  17. Insights into the epigenetic mechanisms involving histone lysine methylation and demethylation in ischemia induced damage and repair has therapeutic implication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, Sumana; Jhelum, Priya; Bhat, Unis Ahmad; Rajan, Wenson D; Maitra, Swati; Pathak, Salil S; Patel, Anant B; Kumar, Arvind

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral ischemic stroke is one of the leading causes of death and disability worldwide. Therapeutic interventions to minimize ischemia-induced neural damage are limited due to poor understanding of molecular mechanisms mediating complex pathophysiology in stroke. Recently, epigenetic mechanisms mostly histone lysine (K) acetylation and deacetylation have been implicated in ischemic brain damage and have expanded the dimensions of potential therapeutic intervention to the systemic/local administration of histone deacetylase inhibitors. However, the role of other epigenetic mechanisms such as histone lysine methylation and demethylation in stroke-induced damage and subsequent recovery process is elusive. Here, we established an Internal Carotid Artery Occlusion (ICAO) model in CD1 mouse that resulted in mild to moderate level of ischemic damage to the striatum, as suggested by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), TUNEL and histopathological staining along with an evaluation of neurological deficit score (NDS), grip strength and rotarod performance. The molecular investigations show dysregulation of a number of histone lysine methylases (KMTs) and few of histone lysine demethylases (KDMs) post-ICAO with significant global attenuation in the transcriptionally repressive epigenetic mark H3K9me2 in the striatum. Administration of Dimethyloxalylglycine (DMOG), an inhibitor of KDM4 or JMJD2 class of histone lysine demethylases, significantly ameliorated stroke-induced NDS by restoring perturbed H3K9me2 levels in the ischemia-affected striatum. Overall, these results highlight the novel role of epigenetic regulatory mechanisms controlling the epigenetic mark H3K9me2 in mediating the stroke-induced striatal damage and subsequent repair following mild to moderate cerebral ischemia.

  18. Polychlorinated biphenyl quinone induces oxidative DNA damage and repair responses: The activations of NHEJ, BER and NER via ATM-p53 signaling axis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Hui; Shi, Qiong; Song, Xiufang; Fu, Juanli; Hu, Lihua; Xu, Demei; Su, Chuanyang; Xia, Xiaomin; Song, Erqun; Song, Yang, E-mail: songyangwenrong@hotmail.com

    2015-07-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) quinone induced oxidative DNA damage in HepG2 cells. To promote genomic integrity, DNA damage response (DDR) coordinates cell-cycle transitions, DNA repair and apoptosis. PCB quinone-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis have been documented, however, whether PCB quinone insult induce DNA repair signaling is still unknown. In this study, we identified the activation of DDR and corresponding signaling events in HepG2 cells upon the exposure to a synthetic PCB quinone, PCB29-pQ. Our data illustrated that PCB29-pQ induces the phosphorylation of p53, which was mediated by ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein kinase. The observed phosphorylated histone H2AX (γ-H2AX) foci and the elevation of 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) indicated that DDR was stimulated by PCB29-pQ treatment. Additionally, we found PCB29-pQ activates non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), base excision repair (BER) and nucleotide excision repair (NER) signalings. However, these repair pathways are not error-free processes and aberrant repair of DNA damage may cause the potential risk of carcinogenesis and mutagenesis. - Highlights: • Polychlorinated biphenyl quinone induces oxidative DNA damage in HepG2 cells. • The elevation of γ-H2AX and 8-OHdG indicates the activation of DNA damage response. • ATM-p53 signaling acts as the DNA damage sensor and effector. • Polychlorinated biphenyl quinone activates NHEJ, BER and NER signalings.

  19. Melatonin and Structurally-Related Compounds Protect Synaptosomal Membranes from Free Radical Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María A. Sáenz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Since biological membranes are composed of lipids and proteins we tested the in vitro antioxidant properties of several indoleamines from the tryptophan metabolic pathway in the pineal gland against oxidative damage to lipids and proteins of synaptosomes isolated from the rat brain. Free radicals were generated by incubation with 0.1 mM FeCl3, and 0.1 mM ascorbic acid. Levels of malondialdehyde (MDA plus 4-hydroxyalkenal (4-HDA, and carbonyl content in the proteins were measured as indices of oxidative damage to lipids and proteins, respectively. Pinoline was the most powerful antioxidant evaluated, with melatonin, N-acetylserotonin, 5-hydroxytryptophan, 5-methoxytryptamine, 5-methoxytryptophol, and tryptoline also acting as antioxidants.

  20. Antibacterial Activity of Shikimic Acid from Pine Needles of Cedrus deodara against Staphylococcus aureus through Damage to Cell Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Jinrong; Wu, Yanping; Liu, Xiaoyan; Zhong, Kai; Huang, Yina; Gao, Hong

    2015-11-13

    Shikimic acid (SA) has been reported to possess antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, whereas the mode of action of SA is still elusive. In this study, the antibacterial activity and mechanism of SA toward S. aureus by cell membrane damage was investigated. After SA treatment, massive K+ and nucleotide leakage from S. aureus, and a significant change in the membrane potential was observed, suggesting SA may act on the membrane by destroying the cell membrane permeability. Through transmission electron microscopic observations we further confirmed that SA can disrupt the cell membrane and membrane integrity. Meanwhile, SA was found to be capable of reducing the membrane fluidity of the S. aureus cell. Moreover, the fluorescence experiments indicated that SA could quench fluorescence of Phe residues of the membrane proteins, thus demonstrating that SA can bind to S. aureus membrane proteins. Therefore, these results showed the antibacterial activity of SA against S. aureus could be caused by the interactions of SA with S. aureus membrane proteins and lipids, resulting in causing cell membrane dysfunction and bacterial damage or even death. This study reveals the potential use of SA as an antibacterial agent.

  1. Effects of combined physical exercise training on DNA damage and repair capacity: role of oxidative stress changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Jorge Pinto; Silva, Amélia M; Oliveira, Maria Manuel; Peixoto, Francisco; Gaivão, Isabel; Mota, Maria Paula

    2015-06-01

    Regular physical exercise has been shown to be one of the most important lifestyle influences on improving functional performance, decreasing morbidity and all causes of mortality among older people. However, it is known that acute physical exercise may induce an increase in oxidative stress and oxidative damage in several structures, including DNA. Considering this, the purpose of this study was to identify the effects of 16 weeks of combined physical exercise in DNA damage and repair capacity in lymphocytes. In addition, we aimed to investigate the role of oxidative stress involved in those changes. Fifty-seven healthy men (40 to 74 years) were enrolled in this study. The sample was divided into two groups: the experimental group (EG), composed of 31 individuals, submitted to 16 weeks of combined physical exercise training; and the control group (CG), composed of 26 individuals, who did not undergo any specifically orientated physical activity. We observed an improvement of overall physical performance in the EG, after the physical exercise training. A significant decrease in DNA strand breaks and FPG-sensitive sites was found after the physical exercise training, with no significant changes in 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase enzyme activity. An increase was observed in antioxidant activity, and a decrease was found in lipid peroxidation levels after physical exercise training. These results suggest that physical exercise training induces protective effects against DNA damage in lymphocytes possibly related to the increase in antioxidant capacity.

  2. Hypothermia postpones DNA damage repair in irradiated cells and protects against cell killing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baird, Brandon J.; Dickey, Jennifer S.; Nakamura, Asako J.; Redon, Christophe E.; Parekh, Palak [Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacology, CCR, NCI, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Griko, Yuri V. [Radiation and Space Biotechnology Branch, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Aziz, Khaled; Georgakilas, Alexandros G. [Biology Department, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 27858 (United States); Bonner, William M. [Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacology, CCR, NCI, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Martin, Olga A., E-mail: sedelnio@mail.nih.gov [Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacology, CCR, NCI, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2011-06-03

    Hibernation is an established strategy used by some homeothermic organisms to survive cold environments. In true hibernation, the core body temperature of an animal may drop to below 0 {sup o}C and metabolic activity almost cease. The phenomenon of hibernation in humans is receiving renewed interest since several cases of victims exhibiting core body temperatures as low as 13.7 {sup o}C have been revived with minimal lasting deficits. In addition, local cooling during radiotherapy has resulted in normal tissue protection. The experiments described in this paper were prompted by the results of a very limited pilot study, which showed a suppressed DNA repair response of mouse lymphocytes collected from animals subjected to 7-Gy total body irradiation under hypothermic (13 {sup o}C) conditions, compared to normothermic controls. Here we report that human BJ-hTERT cells exhibited a pronounced radioprotective effect on clonogenic survival when cooled to 13 {sup o}C during and 12 h after irradiation. Mild hypothermia at 20 and 30 {sup o}C also resulted in some radioprotection. The neutral comet assay revealed an apparent lack on double strand break (DSB) rejoining at 13 {sup o}C. Extension of the mouse lymphocyte study to ex vivo-irradiated human lymphocytes confirmed lower levels of induced phosphorylated H2AX ({gamma}-H2AX) and persistence of the lesions at hypothermia compared to the normal temperature. Parallel studies of radiation-induced oxidatively clustered DNA lesions (OCDLs) revealed partial repair at 13 {sup o}C compared to the rapid repair at 37 {sup o}C. For both {gamma}-H2AX foci and OCDLs, the return of lymphocytes to 37 {sup o}C resulted in the resumption of normal repair kinetics. These results, as well as observations made by others and reviewed in this study, have implications for understanding the radiobiology and protective mechanisms underlying hypothermia and potential opportunities for exploitation in terms of protecting normal tissues against

  3. The chromatin-remodeling factor CHD4 coordinates signaling and repair after DNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Dorthe Helena; Poinsignon, Catherine; Gudjonsson, Thorkell

    2010-01-01

    In response to ionizing radiation (IR), cells delay cell cycle progression and activate DNA repair. Both processes are vital for genome integrity, but the mechanisms involved in their coordination are not fully understood. In a mass spectrometry screen, we identified the adenosine triphosphate...... and extended cell cycle delay. At DNA double-strand breaks, depletion of CHD4 disrupts the chromatin response at the level of the RNF168 ubiquitin ligase, which in turn impairs local ubiquitylation and BRCA1 assembly. These cell cycle and chromatin defects are accompanied by elevated spontaneous and IR...

  4. Identification of CdnL, a Putative Transcriptional Regulator Involved in Repair and Outgrowth of Heat-Damaged Bacillus cereus Spores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicja K Warda

    Full Text Available Spores are widely present in the environment and are common contaminants in the food chain, creating a challenge for food industry. Nowadays, heat treatments conventionally applied in food processing may become milder to comply with consumer desire for products with higher sensory and nutritional values. Consequently subpopulations of spores may emerge that are sublethally damaged rather than inactivated. Such spores may germinate, repair damage, and eventually grow out leading to uncontrolled spoilage and safety issues. To gain insight into both the behaviour of damaged Bacillus cereus spores, and the process of damage repair, we assessed the germination and outgrowth performance using OD595 measurements and microscopy combined with genome-wide transcription analysis of untreated and heat-treated spores. The first two methods showed delayed germination and outgrowth of heat-damaged B. cereus ATCC14579 spores. A subset of genes uniquely expressed in heat-treated spores was identified with putative roles in the outgrowth of damaged spores, including cdnL (BC4714 encoding the putative transcriptional regulator CdnL. Next, a B. cereus ATCC14579 cdnL (BC4714 deletion mutant was constructed and assessment of outgrowth from heat-treated spores under food relevant conditions showed increased damage compared to wild type spores. The approach used in this study allows for identification of candidate genes involved in spore damage repair. Further identification of cellular parameters and characterisation of the molecular processes contributing to spore damage repair may provide leads for better control of spore outgrowth in foods.

  5. Alpha particle induced DNA damage and repair in normal cultured thyrocytes of different proliferation status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyckesvärd, Madeleine Nordén; Delle, Ulla; Kahu, Helena

    2014-01-01

    mechanism as (131)I [1], in cancer treatment has increased during recent years because of its high efficiency in inducing biological damage and beneficial dose distribution when compared to low-LET radiation. Most knowledge of the DNA damage response in thyroid is from studies using low-LET irradiation...... and much less is known of high-LET irradiation. In this paper we investigated the DNA damage response and biological consequences to photons from Cobolt-60 ((60)Co) and alpha particles from (211)At in normal primary thyrocytes of different cell cycle status. For both radiation qualities the intensity....... Increasing ratios of micronuclei per cell nuclei were seen up to 1Gy (211)At. We found that primary thyrocytes were much more sensitive to alpha particle exposure compared with low-LET photons. Calculations of the relative biological effectiveness yielded higher RBE for cycling cells compared with stationary...

  6. A miR-590/Acvr2a/Rad51b Axis Regulates DNA Damage Repair during mESC Proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qidong Liu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic stem cells (ESCs enable rapid proliferation that also causes DNA damage. To maintain genomic stabilization during rapid proliferation, ESCs must have an efficient system to repress genotoxic stress. Here, we show that withdrawal of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF, which maintains the self-renewal capability of mouse ESCs (mESCs, significantly inhibits the cell proliferation and DNA damage of mESCs and upregulates the expression of miR-590. miR-590 promotes single-strand break (SSB and double-strand break (DSB damage repair, thus slowing proliferation of mESCs without influencing stemness. miR-590 directly targets Activin receptor type 2a (Acvr2a to mediate Activin signaling. We identified the homologous recombination-mediated repair (HRR gene, Rad51b, as a downstream molecule of the miR-590/Acvr2a pathway regulating the SSB and DSB damage repair and cell cycle. Our study shows that a miR-590/Acvr2a/Rad51b signaling axis ensures the stabilization of mESCs by balancing DNA damage repair and rapid proliferation during self-renewal.

  7. Participation of gap junction communication in potentially lethal damage repair and DNA damage in human fibroblasts exposed to low- or high-LET radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autsavapromporn, Narongchai; Suzuki, Masao; Plante, Ianik; Liu, Cuihua; Uchihori, Yukio; Hei, Tom K.; Azzam, Edouard I.; Murakami, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Existing research has not fully explained how different types of ionizing radiation (IR) modulate the responses of cell populations or tissues. In our previous work, we showed that gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) mediates the propagation of stressful effects among irradiated cells exposed to high linear energy transfer (LET) radiations, in which almost every cells is traversed by an IR track. In the present study, we conducted an in-depth study of the role of GJIC in modulating the repair of potentially lethal damage (PLDR) and micronuclei formation in cells exposed to low- or high-LET IR. Confluent human fibroblasts were exposed in the presence or absence of a gap junction inhibitor to 200 kV X rays (LET ∼ 1.7 keV/µm), carbon ions (LET ∼ 76 keV/µm), silicon ions (LET ∼ 113 keV/µm) or iron ions (LET ∼ 400 keV/µm) that resulted in isosurvival levels. The fibroblasts were incubated for various times at 37 °C. As expected, high-LET IR were more effective than were low-LET X rays at killing cells and damaging DNA shortly after irradiation. However, when cells were held in a confluent state for several hours, PLDR associated with a reduction in DNA damage, occurred only in cells exposed to X rays. Interestingly, inhibition of GJIC eliminated the enhancement of toxic effects, which resulted in an increase of cell survival and reduction in the level of micronucleus formation in cells exposed to high, but not in those exposed to low-LET IR. The experiment shows that gap-junction communication plays an important role in the propagation of stressful effects among irradiated cells exposed to high-LET IR while GJIC has only a minimal effect on PLDR and DNA damage following low-LET irradiation. Together, our results show that PLDR and induction of DNA damage clearly depend on gap-junction communication and radiation quality. PMID:23867854

  8. Recent advances in the study of ionizing radiation damage and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrand, J E; Michael, B D

    1992-06-01

    This workshop, organized under the auspices of the EC Concerted Action Programme on DNA Repair and Cancer, was held at the CRC Gray Laboratory, Northwood, Middlesex, UK, 23-25 October 1991. The 42 participants were drawn mainly from laboratories participating in the EC Concerted Action, with a few visitors from elsewhere. The discussions centred on the increasing convergence of classical radiobiology and biophysics with molecular biology and mammalian cell genetics to study mechanisms of DNA strand break accumulation and repair following exposure to ionizing radiation. There was a strong emphasis on the application of this research both to cancer radiotherapy and to detection of individuals at risk from cancer due to exposure to ionizing radiation. The first two days were organized as six workshop sessions; on the third day we joined forces with Julie Denekamp and dedicated a session to the memory of our late friend and colleague, Nic McNally. The rest of this day was devoted to reviews by his colleagues and collaborators of the fields of research to which he contributed so much. An evening of music and readings, organized by Joanna and Rachel McNally, completed the memorial. Here we review the first seven sessions of the workshop, emphasizing the more recent approaches and the new information they have given us.

  9. Damage and repair of the peripheral myelin sheath and node of Ranvier after treatment with trypsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, R C; Bunge, R P

    1975-01-01

    Cultures of whole fetal rat sensory ganglia which had matured and myelinated in culture were treated for 1-3 h with a pulse of 0.2% trypsin. The tissue was observed during the period of treatment and during subsequent weeks using both light and electron microscopy. Within minutes after trypsin addition the matrix of the culture was altered and the nerve fascicles loosened. Progressive changes included the retraction of Schwann cell processes from the nodal region the detachment of the myelin-related paranodal Schwann cell loops from the axon, and lengthening of the nodal region as the axon was bared. The retraction of myelin from nodal stabilized several hours after trypsin withdrawal. Breakdown of the altered myelin segments was rare. There were no discernable changes in neurons or their processes after this exposure to trypsin. The partial repair which occured over a period of several weeks included the reattachment of paranodal Schwann cell loops to the axolemma and the insertion of new myelin segments where a substantial length of axolemma had been bared. The significance of these observations to the characterization of the Schwann cell-axolemmal junctions on myelinated nerve fibers is discussed. The dramatic degree of myelin change that can occur without concomitant myelin breakdown is particularly noted, as is the observation that these altered myelin segments are, in part, repaired.

  10. Mechanistic Modelling of DNA Repair and Cellular Survival Following Radiation-Induced DNA Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Stephen J.; Schuemann, Jan; Paganetti, Harald; Prise, Kevin M.

    2016-09-01

    Characterising and predicting the effects of ionising radiation on cells remains challenging, with the lack of robust models of the underlying mechanism of radiation responses providing a significant limitation to the development of personalised radiotherapy. In this paper we present a mechanistic model of cellular response to radiation that incorporates the kinetics of different DNA repair processes, the spatial distribution of double strand breaks and the resulting probability and severity of misrepair. This model enables predictions to be made of a range of key biological endpoints (DNA repair kinetics, chromosome aberration and mutation formation, survival) across a range of cell types based on a set of 11 mechanistic fitting parameters that are common across all cells. Applying this model to cellular survival showed its capacity to stratify the radiosensitivity of cells based on aspects of their phenotype and experimental conditions such as cell cycle phase and plating delay (correlation between modelled and observed Mean Inactivation Doses R2 > 0.9). By explicitly incorporating underlying mechanistic factors, this model can integrate knowledge from a wide range of biological studies to provide robust predictions and may act as a foundation for future calculations of individualised radiosensitivity.

  11. Regulated expression of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA repair gene RAD7 in response to DNA damage and during sporulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J S; Prakash, L; Prakash, S

    1990-06-11

    The RAD7 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae affects the proficiency of excision repair of DNA damaged by UV light. Here, we report our studies on the regulation of the RAD7 gene in response to UV irradiation and during sporulation. RAD7 transcript levels increased 6-fold within 40 min of exposure of cells to 37 J/m2 of UV light. Higher UV doses also elicited rapid increases in the level of RAD7 mRNA. RAD7 mRNA levels increased in sporulating MATa/MAT alpha diploid cells, but not in the asporogenous MATa/MATa strain exposed to sporulation conditions. The increase in RAD7 mRNA level in MATa/MAT alpha cells was 15-fold after 6 h and 9-fold after 7 h in sporulation medium; thereafter, RAD7 mRNA levels declined. Periodic transcription of RAD7 during sporulation suggests a role for RAD7 in this process.

  12. Histological study of SlNPV infection on body weight and peritrophic membrane damage of Spodoptera litura larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NANIN DIAH KURNIAWATI

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Sanjaya, Machmudin D, Kurniawati ND. 2010. Histological study of SlNPV infection on body weight and peritrophic membrane damage of Spodoptera litura larvae. Nusantara Bioscience 2: 135-140. The effect of SlNPV infection on body weight and peritrophic membrane damage of Spodoptera litura Fab. larvae has been carried out. The method was used Probit analysis, and based on LD 50 the virus was infected to know body weight and post infection damage.The damage of histological structure caused by SlNPV (0, 315, 390, 465, 540 dan 615 PIB/mL was investigated after 0, 12, 24, 72 and 96 hours post infection. The histological material was prepared by using parafin method after fixation with Bouin Solution, then slice into 7 um and colored with Hematoxilin-Eosin. The result showed that the exposure SlNPV cause decreasing food consumption especially on 540 PIB/mL give average rate as amount of 0.1675 mg. The descriptive obsevation on structural intact of peritrophic membrane histology caused by SlNPV infection shows a tendency to decrease, while in control, there was no damage at all. The longer the exposition of virion in the midgut lumen the more damage on peritrophic membrane occurred. The severest damage occurred 96 hour after infection. The result prove that haNPV virion can destroy hystological structure of midgut.

  13. TPhP exposure disturbs carbohydrate metabolism, lipid metabolism, and the DNA damage repair system in zebrafish liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhongkun; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Guowei; Peng, Jianbiao; Wang, Zunyao; Gao, Shixiang

    2016-02-01

    Triphenyl phosphate is a high production volume organophosphate flame retardant that has been detected in multiple environmental media at increasing concentrations. The environmental and health risks of triphenyl phosphate have drawn attention because of the multiplex toxicity of this chemical compound. However, few studies have paid close attention to the impacts of triphenyl phosphate on liver metabolism. We investigated hepatic histopathological, metabolomic and transcriptomic responses of zebrafish after exposure to 0.050 mg/L and 0.300 mg/L triphenyl phosphate for 7 days. Metabolomic analysis revealed significant changes in the contents of glucose, UDP-glucose, lactate, succinate, fumarate, choline, acetylcarnitine, and several fatty acids. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that related pathways, such as the glycosphingolipid biosynthesis, PPAR signaling pathway and fatty acid elongation, were significantly affected. These results suggest that triphenyl phosphate exposure markedly disturbs hepatic carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in zebrafish. Moreover, DNA replication, the cell cycle, and non-homologous end-joining and base excision repair were strongly affected, thus indicating that triphenyl phosphate hinders the DNA damage repair system in zebrafish liver cells. The present study provides a systematic analysis of the triphenyl phosphate-induced toxic effects in zebrafish liver and demonstrates that low concentrations of triphenyl phosphate affect normal metabolism and cell cycle.

  14. Honey bee (Apis mellifera) drones survive oxidative stress due to increased tolerance instead of avoidance or repair of oxidative damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li-Byarlay, Hongmei; Huang, Ming Hua; Simone-Finstrom, Michael; Strand, Micheline K; Tarpy, David R; Rueppell, Olav

    2016-10-01

    Oxidative stress can lead to premature aging symptoms and cause acute mortality at higher doses in a range of organisms. Oxidative stress resistance and longevity are mechanistically and phenotypically linked; considerable variation in oxidative stress resistance exists among and within species and typically covaries with life expectancy. However, it is unclear whether stress-resistant, long-lived individuals avoid, repair, or tolerate molecular damage to survive longer than others. The honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) is an emerging model system that is well-suited to address this question. Furthermore, this species is the most economically important pollinator, whose health may be compromised by pesticide exposure, including oxidative stressors. Here, we develop a protocol for inducing oxidative stress in honey bee males (drones) via Paraquat injection. After injection, individuals from different colony sources were kept in common social conditions to monitor their survival compared to saline-injected controls. Oxidative stress was measured in susceptible and resistant individuals. Paraquat drastically reduced survival but individuals varied in their resistance to treatment within and among colony sources. Longer-lived individuals exhibited higher levels of lipid peroxidation than individuals dying early. In contrast, the level of protein carbonylation was not significantly different between the two groups. This first study of oxidative stress in male honey bees suggests that survival of an acute oxidative stressor is due to tolerance, not prevention or repair, of oxidative damage to lipids. It also demonstrates colony differences in oxidative stress resistance that might be useful for breeding stress-resistant honey bees. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. BRCA1 and BRCA2 heterozygosity and repair of X-ray-induced DNA damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuis, B.; Van Assen-Bolt, AJ; van Waarde-Verhagen, Maria; Sijmons, R.J.; van der Hout, A.H.; Bauch, T; Streffer, C; Kampinga, H.H.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Up to 90% of hereditary breast cancer cases are linked to germ-line mutations in one of the two copies of the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes. Brca1 and Brca2 proteins are both involved in the cellular defence against DNA damage, although the precise function of the proteins is still not known. Some s

  16. Base excision repair of oxidative DNA damage and association with cancer and aging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maynard, Scott; Schurman, Shepherd H; Harboe, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    Aging has been associated with damage accumulation in the genome and with increased cancer incidence. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced from endogenous sources, most notably the oxidative metabolism in the mitochondria, and from exogenous sources, such as ionizing radiation. ROS attack D...

  17. Damage and Repair in the Inner Ear: From Experimental Research to Clinical Aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bremer, H.G.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis, fundamental research is performed on the sensory epithelia of the inner ear in guinea pigs and mice. The outcomes of these fundamental studies are discussed in relation to clinical vestibular research. Methods to efficiently, repeatedly and reproducibly damage the sensory epithelia o

  18. SIRT1 inhibition impairs non-homologous end joining DNA damage repair by increasing Ku70 acetylation in chronic myeloid leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenjun; Wu, Haixia; Yang, Meng; Ye, Shiguang; Li, Liang; Zhang, Hong; Hu, Jiong; Wang, Xuguang; Xu, Jun; Liang, Aibin

    2016-03-22

    Most chemotherapeutic agents for leukemia are DNA damaging agents. However, DNA lesions can be repaired by activities of DNA repair systems. Increasing evidence have shown that enhanced DNA damage repair capacity contributes to chemotherapy resistance in leukemia cells. Thus, targeting DNA repair mechanisms is a promising strategy for novel leukemia treatment. SIRT1 expressions were downregulated by lentivirus-delivered SIRT1 shRNA in myeloid leukemia cells. SIRT1 mRNA and protein levels were analyzed by real-time PCR and Western blot, respectively. Flow cytometry was carried out to analyze cell cycle progression, apoptosis and DNA damage repair efficiency. DNA damage levels were assessed by alkaline comet assay, and H2AX phosphorylation was analyzed by immunoblotting and immunofluorescence. A mouse leukemia model was established by transplanting lentivirus-infected K562 cells containing SIRT1 shRNA into sublethally irradiated NOD/SCID mice, and tumorigenesis was evaluated by detecting tumor weights and mice survival. SIRT1 expressions were upregulated in myeloid leukemic patients. Downregulation of SIRT1 by RNAi promoted etoposide-induced DNA damage in myeloid leukemia cells accompanied by reduced NHEJ activity, and increased Ku70 acetylation. Furthermore, SIRT1 knockdown resulted in cell cycle arrest, induction of apoptosis and reduction of K562 cell proliferation accompanied by enhanced p53 and FOXO1 acetylation in K562 cells after etoposide treatment. Importantly, SIRT1 downregulation reduced the tumorigenesis ability of K562 cells in mouse xenografts following chemotherapy treatment. These results revealed that SIRT1 promotes the NHEJ repair pathway by deacetylating Ku70 in K562 cells, suggesting that SIRT1 is a novel therapeutic target for treating myeloid leukemia.

  19. Topoisomerase II-mediated DNA damage is differently repaired during the cell cycle by non-homologous end joining and homologous recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo de Campos-Nebel

    Full Text Available Topoisomerase II (Top2 is a nuclear enzyme involved in several metabolic processes of DNA. Chemotherapy agents that poison Top2 are known to induce persistent protein-mediated DNA double strand breaks (DSB. In this report, by using knock down experiments, we demonstrated that Top2alpha was largely responsible for the induction of gammaH2AX and cytotoxicity by the Top2 poisons idarubicin and etoposide in normal human cells. As DSB resulting from Top2 poisons-mediated damage may be repaired by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ or homologous recombination (HR, we aimed to analyze both DNA repair pathways. We found that DNA-PKcs was rapidly activated in human cells, as evidenced by autophosphorylation at serine 2056, following Top2-mediated DNA damage. The chemical inhibition of DNA-PKcs by wortmannin and vanillin resulted in an increased accumulation of DNA DSB, as evaluated by the comet assay. This was supported by a hypersensitive phenotype to Top2 poisons of Ku80- and DNA-PKcs- defective Chinese hamster cell lines. We also showed that Rad51 protein levels, Rad51 foci formation and sister chromatid exchanges were increased in human cells following Top2-mediated DNA damage. In support, BRCA2- and Rad51C- defective Chinese hamster cells displayed hypersensitivity to Top2 poisons. The analysis by immunofluorescence of the DNA DSB repair response in synchronized human cell cultures revealed activation of DNA-PKcs throughout the cell cycle and Rad51 foci formation in S and late S/G2 cells. Additionally, we found an increase of DNA-PKcs-mediated residual repair events, but not Rad51 residual foci, into micronucleated and apoptotic cells. Therefore, we conclude that in human cells both NHEJ and HR are required, with cell cycle stage specificity, for the repair of Top2-mediated reversible DNA damage. Moreover, NHEJ-mediated residual repair events are more frequently associated to irreversibly damaged cells.

  20. H2O2-mediated DNA damage and repair in the brain cells in the aging rats detected by comet assay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suming ZhangM.D., Ph.D; Zongchao Han, M.D.; Siyu Fang, M.D.; Ruan Yang, M.D; Wei Wang, M.D., Ph. D

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To identify the relation between DNA damage susceptibility/ DNA repair capability and aging process after insults, an observation of H2O2_induced DNA damage and the kinetics of DNA repair in senescent murine brain cells with the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE/Comet assay) was made. Methods: The dissociated brain cells harvested in the area of the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, basal gang]ion from 3-month (n=10), 8-month (n=8) and 26-month (n=5) old rats were respectively treated with H2O2 in gradient doses for 10 min, or without H2O2 as controls. The cells embedded in agarose were lysed, helix-untied, electrophoresed, stained with a fluorescence DNA binding stain, viewed under a fluorescence microscope. Individual image was optically recorded. The frequency of the tailed cells and the grade of tails wereused to analyze single strand breaks of DNA and injury intensity. Results: By the cell and DNA image like comets, a linear increase was noticed in vulnerability of DNA both to H2O2 doses and to the age. Regarding the damaged region of the brain, the cortex cells were more vulnerable to the insult than the hippocampus/basal ganglionic cells. Whatever aging or not the cells were, the maximum of ratio of DNA repair was only within 1 hour during the incubation for 0.5-4 hours after the insults. Furthermore, the more aging, the less ratio of DNA repair of sick cells. Conclusion: The DNA damagesusceptibility and the DNA repair capability of individual cells, whatever its age is, can be detected by this brain cell injury model. Comet assay is a sensitive way to find out DNA damage and repair of the cells. It should be more difficult for the cells to cope with an acute and excessive than with a persistent, chronic and mild DNA damage which is more related to an accumulating injury, the aging.

  1. Nicotinamide Enhances Repair of Arsenic and Ultraviolet Radiation-Induced DNA Damage in HaCaT Keratinocytes and Ex Vivo Human Skin

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Benjamin C.; Halliday, Gary M.; Damian, Diona L

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic-induced skin cancer is a significant global health burden. In areas with arsenic contamination of water sources, such as China, Pakistan, Myanmar, Cambodia and especially Bangladesh and West Bengal, large populations are at risk of arsenic-induced skin cancer. Arsenic acts as a co-carcinogen with ultraviolet (UV) radiation and affects DNA damage and repair. Nicotinamide (vitamin B3) reduces premalignant keratoses in sun-damaged skin, likely by prevention of UV-induced cellular energy ...

  2. Nicotinamide Enhances Repair of Arsenic and Ultraviolet Radiation-Induced DNA Damage in HaCaT Keratinocytes and Ex Vivo Human Skin

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Benjamin C.; Halliday, Gary M.; Damian, Diona L.

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic-induced skin cancer is a significant global health burden. In areas with arsenic contamination of water sources, such as China, Pakistan, Myanmar, Cambodia and especially Bangladesh and West Bengal, large populations are at risk of arsenic-induced skin cancer. Arsenic acts as a co-carcinogen with ultraviolet (UV) radiation and affects DNA damage and repair. Nicotinamide (vitamin B3) reduces premalignant keratoses in sun-damaged skin, likely by prevention of UV-induced cellular energy ...

  3. Ultrastructural analysis of miltefosine-induced surface membrane damage in adult Schistosoma mansoni BH strain worms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertão, Humberto Gonçalves; da Silva, Renata Alexandre Ramos; Padilha, Rafael José R; de Azevedo Albuquerque, Mônica Camelo Pessôa; Rádis-Baptista, Gandhi

    2012-06-01

    Schistosomiasis is an infectious parasitic disease caused by helminths from the genus Schistosoma; it affects over 200 million people globally and is endemic in 70 countries. In Brazil, 6 million individuals are infected with Schistosoma mansoni. Furthermore, as the prevalence of S. mansoni infections is increasing, approximately 26 million citizens in 19 Brazilian states are at risk for infection. Schistosomiasis disease control involves predominately the administration of a single drug, praziquantel. Although praziquantel exhibits chemotherapeutic efficacy and safety, its massive use in endemic zones, the possibility of the emergence of drug-resistant Schistosoma parasites, and the lack of another efficacious antischistosomal drug demand the discovery of new schistosomicidal compounds. First developed as anti-tumor drug, miltefosine is an alkylphospholipid derivative that exhibits bioactivity against Leishmania and Trypanosoma parasites, free-living protozoa, bacteria, and fungi. With its anti-parasite activity, miltefosine was the first orally administered drug against visceral and cutaneous leishmaniasis approved. Previously, by means of the MTT cytotoxic assay and a DNA fragmentation test, we verified that, at doses of 100 and 200 μM (40 and 80 μg/mL), miltefosine exhibited in vitro schistosomicidal activity against adult S. mansoni worms. Here, we present ultrastructural evidence of rapid, severe miltefosine-induced surface membrane damage in S. mansoni following drug treatment. The number of dead parasites was concentration- and time-dependent following miltefosine treatment. At a miltefosine concentration of 200 μM (∼80 μg/mL), in vitro parasite killing was initiated as early as 3 h post-incubation, and it was maximal after 24 h of treatment. The parasite death was preceded by progressive surface membrane damage, characterized by tegument peeling, spine reduction and erosion, blister formation and rupture, and the emergence of holes. According to our

  4. Repairing DNA damage in xeroderma pigmentosum: T4N5 lotion and gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahid, Sarwar; Brownell, Isaac

    2008-04-01

    Patients with xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) have defective DNA repair and are at a high risk for cutaneous malignancies. Standard treatments for XP are limited in scope and effectiveness. Understanding the molecular etiology of XP has led to the development of novel therapeutic approaches, including enzyme and gene therapies. One new topical treatment utilizing bacteriophage T4 endonuclease 5 (T4N5) in a liposomal lotion is currently in clinical trials and has received a Fast Track designation from the FDA. Gene therapy for XP, while making leaps in preclinical studies, has been slower to develop due to tactical hurdles, but seems to have much potential for future treatment. If these treatments prove effective in lowering the risk of cancer in patients with XP, they may also be found useful in reducing skin cancers in other at-risk patient populations.

  5. ZTF-8 interacts with the 9-1-1 complex and is required for DNA damage response and double-strand break repair in the C. elegans germline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Min Kim

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Germline mutations in DNA repair genes are linked to tumor progression. Furthermore, failure in either activating a DNA damage checkpoint or repairing programmed meiotic double-strand breaks (DSBs can impair chromosome segregation. Therefore, understanding the molecular basis for DNA damage response (DDR and DSB repair (DSBR within the germline is highly important. Here we define ZTF-8, a previously uncharacterized protein conserved from worms to humans, as a novel factor involved in the repair of both mitotic and meiotic DSBs as well as in meiotic DNA damage checkpoint activation in the C. elegans germline. ztf-8 mutants exhibit specific sensitivity to γ-irradiation and hydroxyurea, mitotic nuclear arrest at S-phase accompanied by activation of the ATL-1 and CHK-1 DNA damage checkpoint kinases, as well as accumulation of both mitotic and meiotic recombination intermediates, indicating that ZTF-8 functions in DSBR. However, impaired meiotic DSBR progression partially fails to trigger the CEP-1/p53-dependent DNA damage checkpoint in late pachytene, also supporting a role for ZTF-8 in meiotic DDR. ZTF-8 partially co-localizes with the 9-1-1 DDR complex and interacts with MRT-2/Rad1, a component of this complex. The human RHINO protein rescues the phenotypes observed in ztf-8 mutants, suggesting functional conservation across species. We propose that ZTF-8 is involved in promoting repair at stalled replication forks and meiotic DSBs by transducing DNA damage checkpoint signaling via the 9-1-1 pathway. Our findings define a conserved function for ZTF-8/RHINO in promoting genomic stability in the germline.

  6. Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD27 complements its Escherichia coli homolog in damage repair but not mutation avoidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Gaku; Daigaku, Yasukazu; Nagata, Yuki; Ihara, Makoto; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2004-06-01

    In eukaryotes, the flap endonuclease of Rad27/Fen-1 is thought to play a critical role in lagging-strand DNA replication by removing ribonucleotides present at the 5' ends of Okazaki fragments, and in base excision repair by cleaving a 5' flap structure that may result during base excision repair. Saccharomyces cerevisiae rad27Delta mutants further display a repeat tract instability phenotype and a high rate of forward mutations to canavanine resistance that result from duplications of DNA sequence, indicating a role in mutation avoidance. Two conserved motifs in Rad27/Fen-1 show homology to the 5' --> 3' exonuclease domain of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I. The strain defective in the 5' --> 3' exonuclease domain in DNA polymerase I shows essentially the same phenotype as the yeast rad27Delta strain. In this study, we expressed the yeast RAD27 gene in an E. coli strain lacking the 5' --> 3' exonuclease domain in DNA polymerase I in order to test whether eukaryotic RAD27/FEN-1 can complement the defect of its bacterial homolog. We found that the yeast Rad27 protein complements sensitivity to methyl methanesulfonate in an E. coli mutant. On the other hand, Rad27 protein did not reduce the high rate of spontaneous mutagenesis in the E. coli tonB gene which results from duplication of DNA. These results indicate that the yeast Rad27 and E. coli 5' --> 3' exonuclease act on the same substrate. We argue that the lack of mutation avoidance of yeast RAD27 in E. coli results from a lack of interaction between the yeast Rad27 protein and the E. coli replication clamp (beta-clamp).

  7. YNK1, the yeast homolog of human metastasis suppressor NM23, is required for repair of UV radiation- and etoposide-induced DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Mengmeng; Jarrett, Stuart G.; Craven, Rolf [Department of Molecular and Biomedical Pharmacology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0298 (United States); Kaetzel, David M. [Department of Molecular and Biomedical Pharmacology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0298 (United States)], E-mail: dmkaetz@uky.edu

    2009-01-15

    In humans, NM23-H1 is a metastasis suppressor whose expression is reduced in metastatic melanoma and breast carcinoma cells, and which possesses the ability to inhibit metastatic growth without significant impact on the transformed phenotype. NM23-H1 exhibits three enzymatic activities in vitro, each with potential to maintain genomic stability, a 3'-5' exonuclease and two kinases, nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDPK), and protein histidine kinase. Herein we have investigated the potential contributions of NM23 proteins to DNA repair in the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which contains a single NM23 homolog, YNK1. Ablation of YNK1 delayed repair of UV- and etoposide-induced nuclear DNA damage by 3-6 h. However, YNK1 had no impact upon the kinetics of MMS-induced DNA repair. Furthermore, YNK1 was not required for repair of mitochondrial DNA damage. To determine whether the nuclear DNA repair deficit manifested as an increase in mutation frequency, the CAN1 forward assay was employed. An YNK1 deletion was associated with increased mutation rates following treatment with either UV (2.6x) or MMS (1.6x). Mutation spectral analysis further revealed significantly increased rates of base substitution and frameshift mutations following UV treatment in the ynk1{delta} strain. This study indicates a novel role for YNK1 in DNA repair in yeast, and suggests an anti-mutator function that may contribute to the metastasis suppressor function of NM23-H1 in humans.

  8. Membrane phospholipids, lipoxidative damage and molecular integrity: a causal role in aging and longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamplona, Reinald

    2008-10-01

    Nonenzymatic molecular modifications induced by reactive carbonyl species (RCS) generated by peroxidation of membrane phospholipids acyl chains play a causal role in the aging process. Most of the biological effects of RCS, mainly alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes, di-aldehydes, and keto-aldehydes, are due to their capacity to react with cellular constituents, forming advanced lipoxidation end-products (ALEs). Compared to reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, lipid-derived RCS are stable and can diffuse within or even escape from the cell and attack targets far from the site of formation. Therefore, these soluble reactive intermediates, precursors of ALEs, are not only cytotoxic per se, but they also behave as mediators and propagators of oxidative stress and cellular and tissue damage. The consequent loss-of-function and structural integrity of modified biomolecules can have a wide range of downstream functional consequences and may be the cause of subsequent cellular dysfunctions and tissue damage. The causal role of ALEs in aging and longevity is inferred from the findings that follow: a) its accumulation with aging in several tissues and species; b) physiological interventions (dietary restriction) that increase longevity, decrease ALEs content; c) the longer the longevity of a species, the lower is the lipoxidation-derived molecular damage; and finally d) exacerbated levels of ALEs are associated with pathological states.

  9. The alterations in the extracellular matrix composition guide the repair of damaged liver tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaas, Mariliis; Kangur, Triin; Viil, Janeli; Mäemets-Allas, Kristina; Minajeva, Ave; Vadi, Krista; Antsov, Mikk; Lapidus, Natalia; Järvekülg, Martin; Jaks, Viljar

    2016-06-06

    While the cellular mechanisms of liver regeneration have been thoroughly studied, the role of extracellular matrix (ECM) in liver regeneration is still poorly understood. We utilized a proteomics-based approach to identify the shifts in ECM composition after CCl4 or DDC treatment and studied their effect on the proliferation of liver cells by combining biophysical and cell culture methods. We identified notable alterations in the ECM structural components (eg collagens I, IV, V, fibronectin, elastin) as well as in non-structural proteins (eg olfactomedin-4, thrombospondin-4, armadillo repeat-containing x-linked protein 2 (Armcx2)). Comparable alterations in ECM composition were seen in damaged human livers. The increase in collagen content and decrease in elastic fibers resulted in rearrangement and increased stiffness of damaged liver ECM. Interestingly, the alterations in ECM components were nonhomogenous and differed between periportal and pericentral areas and thus our experiments demonstrated the differential ability of selected ECM components to regulate the proliferation of hepatocytes and biliary cells. We define for the first time the alterations in the ECM composition of livers recovering from damage and present functional evidence for a coordinated ECM remodelling that ensures an efficient restoration of liver tissue.

  10. R-Roscovitine (Seliciclib) prevents DNA damage-induced cyclin A1 upregulation and hinders non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federico, Mario; Symonds, Catherine E; Bagella, Luigi; Rizzolio, Flavio; Fanale, Daniele; Russo, Antonio; Giordano, Antonio

    2010-08-04

    CDK-inhibitors can diminish transcriptional levels of cell cycle-related cyclins through the inhibition of E2F family members and CDK7 and 9. Cyclin A1, an E2F-independent cyclin, is strongly upregulated under genotoxic conditions and functionally was shown to increase NHEJ activity. Cyclin A1 outcompetes with cyclin A2 for CDK2 binding, possibly redirecting its activity towards DNA repair. To see if we could therapeutically block this switch, we analyzed the effects of the CDK-inhibitor R-Roscovitine on the expression levels of cyclin A1 under genotoxic stress and observed subsequent DNA damage and repair mechanisms. We found that R-Roscovitine alone was unable to alter cyclin A1 transcriptional levels, however it was able to reduce protein expression through a proteosome-dependent mechanism. When combined with DNA damaging agents, R-Roscovitine was able to prevent the DNA damage-induced upregulation of cyclin A1 on a transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. This, moreover resulted in a significant decrease in non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) paired with an increase in DNA DSBs and overall DNA damage over time. Furthermore, microarray analysis demonstrated that R-Roscovitine affected DNA repair mechanisms in a more global fashion. Our data reveal a new mechanism of action for R-Roscovitine on DNA repair through the inhibition of the molecular switch between cyclin A family members under genotoxic conditions resulting in reduced NHEJ capability.

  11. Erythrocyte shape abnormalities, membrane oxidative damage, and β-actin alterations: an unrecognized triad in classical autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccoli, Lucia; De Felice, Claudio; Paccagnini, Eugenio; Leoncini, Silvia; Pecorelli, Alessandra; Signorini, Cinzia; Belmonte, Giuseppe; Guerranti, Roberto; Cortelazzo, Alessio; Gentile, Mariangela; Zollo, Gloria; Durand, Thierry; Valacchi, Giuseppe; Rossi, Marcello; Hayek, Joussef

    2013-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are a complex group of neurodevelopment disorders steadily rising in frequency and treatment refractory, where the search for biological markers is of paramount importance. Although red blood cells (RBCs) membrane lipidomics and rheological variables have been reported to be altered, with some suggestions indicating an increased lipid peroxidation in the erythrocyte membrane, to date no information exists on how the oxidative membrane damage may affect cytoskeletal membrane proteins and, ultimately, RBCs shape in autism. Here, we investigated RBC morphology by scanning electron microscopy in patients with classical autism, that is, the predominant ASDs phenotype (age range: 6-26 years), nonautistic neurodevelopmental disorders (i.e., "positive controls"), and healthy controls (i.e., "negative controls"). A high percentage of altered RBCs shapes, predominantly elliptocytes, was observed in autistic patients, but not in both control groups. The RBCs altered morphology in autistic subjects was related to increased erythrocyte membrane F2-isoprostanes and 4-hydroxynonenal protein adducts. In addition, an oxidative damage of the erythrocyte membrane β-actin protein was evidenced. Therefore, the combination of erythrocyte shape abnormalities, erythrocyte membrane oxidative damage, and β-actin alterations constitutes a previously unrecognized triad in classical autism and provides new biological markers in the diagnostic workup of ASDs.

  12. Erythrocyte Shape Abnormalities, Membrane Oxidative Damage, and β-Actin Alterations: An Unrecognized Triad in Classical Autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Ciccoli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs are a complex group of neurodevelopment disorders steadily rising in frequency and treatment refractory, where the search for biological markers is of paramount importance. Although red blood cells (RBCs membrane lipidomics and rheological variables have been reported to be altered, with some suggestions indicating an increased lipid peroxidation in the erythrocyte membrane, to date no information exists on how the oxidative membrane damage may affect cytoskeletal membrane proteins and, ultimately, RBCs shape in autism. Here, we investigated RBC morphology by scanning electron microscopy in patients with classical autism, that is, the predominant ASDs phenotype (age range: 6–26 years, nonautistic neurodevelopmental disorders (i.e., “positive controls”, and healthy controls (i.e., “negative controls”. A high percentage of altered RBCs shapes, predominantly elliptocytes, was observed in autistic patients, but not in both control groups. The RBCs altered morphology in autistic subjects was related to increased erythrocyte membrane F2-isoprostanes and 4-hydroxynonenal protein adducts. In addition, an oxidative damage of the erythrocyte membrane β-actin protein was evidenced. Therefore, the combination of erythrocyte shape abnormalities, erythrocyte membrane oxidative damage, and β-actin alterations constitutes a previously unrecognized triad in classical autism and provides new biological markers in the diagnostic workup of ASDs.

  13. [Studies of the repair of radiation-induced genetic damage in Drosophila]. Annual progress report, October 1, 1988--June 1, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-12-31

    The primary goal of this study is to achieve a more thorough understanding of the mechanisms employed by higher organisms to repair DNA damage induced by both ionizing and nonionizing radiation. These studies are also contributing to an improved understanding of the processes of mutagenesis and carcinogenesis in higher eukaryotes. The studies employ Drosophila as a model organism for investigating repair functions that are common to all higher eukaryotes. Drosophila was chosen in the early phases of this study primarily because of the ease with which one can isolate and characterize repair-deficient mutants in a metazoan organism. The laboratory has gone on to investigate the metabolic defects of such mutants while others have performed complementary genetic and cytogenetic studies which relate DNA repair processes to mutagenesis and chromosome stability. The repair studies have exploited the capacity to introduce mutant Drosophila cells into tissue culture and thereby compare repair defects directly with those of homologous human disorders. Researchers are currently employing recombinant DNA technology to investigate the mechanisms of the DNA repair pathways defined by those mutants.

  14. A trans-well-based cellular model for the rapid pre-evaluation of tympanic membrane repair materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Shih-Han; Su, Chin-Hui; Tseng, How

    2016-08-01

    It is important to have a standardized tympanic membrane (TM) perforation platform to evaluate the various myringoplasty materials that have been studied and developed extensively during recent years. However, currently there are no cellular models specifically designed for this purpose, and animal models remain unsatisfactory. The purpose of this study is to propose an inexpensive, readily available, well-controlled, and easy-to-create cellular model as a substitute for use in the evaluation of TM repairing materials. A trans-well model was created using a cell culture insert with a round hole created at the center of the polycarbonate membrane. HaCaT cells were cultured on the fenestrated culture insert, and the desired myringoplasty graft was placed at the center of the window for one week and observed by fluorescent microscopy under vital staining. Under this cellular model, there was notable migration of HaCaT cells onto the positive control graft (rabbit fascia), while only a few cell clusters were observed on the negative control graft (paper). Model validation showed that the cell migration ratio for the PLLA + 1% hyaluronic acid (HA) graft is significantly higher than using myringoplasty paper, poly L-lactide (PLLA), or PLLA + 0.5% HA (p model might be a useful pre-evaluation platform for the evaluation of TM repairing materials. The model is inexpensive, readily available, easy to create, and standardized for use.

  15. Repair pathways independent of the Fanconi anemia nuclear core complex play a predominant role in mitigating formaldehyde-induced DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noda, Taichi [Department of Biology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); Department of Dermatology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); Takahashi, Akihisa [Department of Biology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); Kondo, Natsuko [Particle Radiation Oncology Research Center, Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Mori, Eiichiro [Department of Biology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); Okamoto, Noritomo [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); Nakagawa, Yosuke [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); Ohnishi, Ken [Department of Biology, Ibaraki Prefectual University of Health Sciences, 4669-2 Ami, Ami-mati, Inasiki-gun, Ibaraki 300-0394 (Japan); Zdzienicka, Malgorzata Z. [Department of Molecular Cell Genetics, Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz, Nicolaus-Copernicus-University in Torun, ul. Sklodowskiej-Curie 9, 85-094 Bydgoszcz (Poland); Thompson, Larry H. [Biosciences and Biotechnology Division, L452, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, CA 94551-0808 (United States); Helleday, Thomas [Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus Research Building, Off Roosevelt Drive, Oxford, OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom); Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Asada, Hideo [Department of Dermatology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); and others

    2011-01-07

    The role of the Fanconi anemia (FA) repair pathway for DNA damage induced by formaldehyde was examined in the work described here. The following cell types were used: mouse embryonic fibroblast cell lines FANCA{sup -/-}, FANCC{sup -/-}, FANCA{sup -/-}C{sup -/-}, FANCD2{sup -/-} and their parental cells, the Chinese hamster cell lines FANCD1 mutant (mt), FANCGmt, their revertant cells, and the corresponding wild-type (wt) cells. Cell survival rates were determined with colony formation assays after formaldehyde treatment. DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) were detected with an immunocytochemical {gamma}H2AX-staining assay. Although the sensitivity of FANCA{sup -/-}, FANCC{sup -/-} and FANCA{sup -/-}C{sup -/-} cells to formaldehyde was comparable to that of proficient cells, FANCD1mt, FANCGmt and FANCD2{sup -/-} cells were more sensitive to formaldehyde than the corresponding proficient cells. It was found that homologous recombination (HR) repair was induced by formaldehyde. In addition, {gamma}H2AX foci in FANCD1mt cells persisted for longer times than in FANCD1wt cells. These findings suggest that formaldehyde-induced DSBs are repaired by HR through the FA repair pathway which is independent of the FA nuclear core complex. -- Research highlights: {yields} We examined to clarify the repair pathways of formaldehyde-induced DNA damage. Formaldehyde induces DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). {yields} DSBs are repaired through the Fanconi anemia (FA) repair pathway. {yields} This pathway is independent of the FA nuclear core complex. {yields} We also found that homologous recombination repair was induced by formaldehyde.

  16. Damage tolerance assessment of bonded composite doubler repairs for commercial aircraft applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roach, D.

    1998-08-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration has sponsored a project at its Airworthiness Assurance NDI Validation Center (AANC) to validate the use of bonded composite doublers on commercial aircraft. A specific application was chosen in order to provide a proof-of-concept driving force behind this test and analysis project. However, the data stemming from this study serves as a comprehensive evaluation of bonded composite doublers for general use. The associated documentation package provides guidance regarding the design, analysis, installation, damage tolerance, and nondestructive inspection of these doublers. This report describes a series of fatigue and strength tests which were conducted to study the damage tolerance of Boron-Epoxy composite doublers. Tension-tension fatigue and ultimate strength tests attempted to grow engineered flaws in coupons with composite doublers bonded to aluminum skin. An array of design parameters, including various flaw scenarios, the effects of surface impact, and other off-design conditions, were studied. The structural tests were used to: (1) assess the potential for interply delaminations and disbonds between the aluminum and the laminate, and (2) determine the load transfer and crack mitigation capabilities of composite doublers in the presence of severe defects. A series of specimens were subjected to ultimate tension tests in order to determine strength values and failure modes. It was demonstrated that even in the presence of extensive damage in the original structure (cracks, material loss) and in spite of non-optimum installations (adhesive disbonds), the composite doubler allowed the structure to survive more than 144,000 cycles of fatigue loading. Installation flaws in the composite laminate did not propagate over 216,000 fatigue cycles. Furthermore, the added impediments of impact--severe enough to deform the parent aluminum skin--and hot-wet exposure did not effect the doubler`s performance. Since the tests were conducting

  17. Oxidative DNA damage and repair in skeletal muscle of humans exposed to high-altitude hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby, Carsten; Pilegaard, Henriette; van Hall, Gerrit

    2003-01-01

    ) was unaltered by prolonged hypoxia, in accordance with the notion that HO-1 is an acute stress response protein. In conclusion, our data indicate high-altitude hypoxia may serve as a good model for oxidative stress and that antioxidant genes are not upregulated in muscle tissue by prolonged hypoxia despite......Recent research suggests that high-altitude hypoxia may serve as a model for prolonged oxidative stress in healthy humans. In this study, we investigated the consequences of prolonged high-altitude hypoxia on the basal level of oxidative damage to nuclear DNA in muscle cells, a major oxygen...

  18. Damage Detection and Self-Repair in Inflatable/Deployable Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, Erik; Studor, George; Banks, DAvid; Curry, Mark; Broccato, Robert; Jackson, Tom; Champaigne, Kevin; Sottos, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    Inflatable/deployable structures are under consideration for applications as varied as expansion modules for the International Space Station to destinations for space tourism to habitats for the lunar surface. Monitoring and maintaining the integrity of the physical structure is critical, particularly since these structures rely on non-traditional engineering materials such as fabrics, foams, and elastomeric polymers to provide the primary protection for the human crew. The closely related prior concept of monitoring structural integrity by use of built-in or permanently attached sensors has been applied to structures made of such standard engineering materials as metals, alloys, and rigid composites. To effect monitoring of flexible structures comprised mainly of soft goods, however, it will be necessary to solve a different set of problems - especially those of integrating power and data-transfer cabling that can withstand, and not unduly interfere with, stowage and subsequent deployment of the structures. By incorporating capabilities for self-repair along with capabilities for structural health monitoring, successful implementation of these technologies would be a significant step toward semi-autonomous structures, which need little human intervention to maintain. This would not only increase the safety of these structures, but also reduce the inspection and maintenance costs associated with more conventional structures.

  19. DNA damage repair is unaffected by mimicked heterozygous levels of BRCA2 in HT-29 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Tannenbaum, Tobechukwu Mofunanya, Alan R. Schoenfeld

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional loss of both alleles of the breast cancer susceptibility gene, BRCA2, facilitates tumorigenesis. However, the direct effects of BRCA2 heterozygosity remain unclear. Here, BRCA2 heterozygosity was mimicked in HT-29 colon cells by reducing levels of BRCA2 through stable RNA interference. No difference in RAD51 subcellular localization and focus formation was observed between control and mimicked heterozygous cell lines. DNA repair ability, as measured by colony survival following mitomycin C treatment and ultraviolet radiation exposure, was also unaffected by reduced levels of BRCA2. Interestingly, the growth rate of the mimicked BRCA2 heterozygous cell line was significantly lower than that of control cells. Increased expression of p53 in the mimicked heterozygous cells was observed, perhaps in response to BRCA2 deficiency. Levels of p27 were also found to be slightly increased in cells with reduced BRCA2, perhaps contributing to the slower growth rate. Overall, these results suggest that tumors are unlikely to arise directly from BRCA2 heterozygous cells without other genetic events such as loss of the wild-type BRCA2 allele and/or loss of p53 function or other cell cycle inhibitors.

  20. Investigations of DNA damage induction and repair resulting from cellular exposure to high dose-rate pulsed proton beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renis, M.; Malfa, G.; Tomasello, B. [Drug Sciences Department, University of Catania, Catania (Italy); Borghesi, M.; Schettino, G. [Queen' s University Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Favetta, M.; Romano, F.; Cirrone, G. A. P. [National Institute for Nuclear Physics (INFN-LNS), Catania (Italy); Manti, L. [Physics Science Department, University of Naples Federico II, Naples, and National Institute for Nuclear Physics (INFN), Naples (Italy)

    2013-07-26

    following irradiation in a dose-dependent manner. The analysis of repair capability showed that the cells irradiated with 1 and 2 Gy almost completely recovered from the damage, but not, however, 3 Gy treated cells in which DNA damage was not recovered. In addition, the results indicate the importance of the use of an appropriate control in radiobiological in vitro analysis.

  1. Cut1/separase-dependent roles of multiple phosphorylation of fission yeast cohesion subunit Rad21 in post-replicative damage repair and mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Yoh; Kokubu, Aya; Ebe, Masahiro; Nagao, Koji; Yanagida, Mitsuhiro

    2008-03-15

    Cohesin is a multiprotein complex essential for sister-chromatid cohesion. It plays a pivotal role in proper chromosome segregation and DNA damage repair. The mitotic behavior of cohesin is controlled through its phosphorylation, which possibly induces the dissociation of cohesin from chromosomes and enhances its susceptibility to separase. Here, we report using mass spectrometry and anti-phospho antibodies that the central domain of Rad21, the separase-target subunit of Schizosaccharomyces pombe cohesin, is regulated by various kinase-induced phosphorylation at nine residues, indicating the multiple roles for S. pombe cohesin. In vegetative and non-dividing G(0) cells, Rad21 is phosphorylated by unknown S/TP-consensus kinases, in mitotic and non-mitotic cells by polo/Plo1 and CDK, and in DNA-damaged cells by Rad3/ATR. While mitotic phosphorylation is implicated in the dissociation of Rad21 and its cleavage by separase in anaphase, the Rad3/ATR-dependent damage-induced phosphorylation occurs intensively at the time of repair completion, and only in post-replicative cells. This damage-induced Rad21 phosphorylation is involved in the recovery process of cells from checkpoint arrest, and needed for the removal of cohesin by separase after the completion of damage repair. These complex phospho-regulations of Rad21 indicate the functional significance of cohesin in cell adaptation to a variety of cellular conditions.

  2. Monte carlo simulation of base and nucleotide excision repair of clustered DNA damage sites. II. Comparisons of model predictions to measured data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenenko, V A; Stewart, R D

    2005-08-01

    Clustered damage sites other than double-strand breaks (DSBs) have the potential to contribute to deleterious effects of ionizing radiation, such as cell killing and mutagenesis. In the companion article (Semenenko et al., Radiat. Res. 164, 180-193, 2005), a general Monte Carlo framework to simulate key steps in the base and nucleotide excision repair of DNA damage other than DSBs is proposed. In this article, model predictions are compared to measured data for selected low-and high-LET radiations. The Monte Carlo model reproduces experimental observations for the formation of enzymatic DSBs in Escherichia coli and cells of two Chinese hamster cell lines (V79 and xrs5). Comparisons of model predictions with experimental values for low-LET radiation suggest that an inhibition of DNA backbone incision at the sites of base damage by opposing strand breaks is active over longer distances between the damaged base and the strand break in hamster cells (8 bp) compared to E. coli (3 bp). Model estimates for the induction of point mutations in the human hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) gene by ionizing radiation are of the same order of magnitude as the measured mutation frequencies. Trends in the mutation frequency for low- and high-LET radiation are predicted correctly by the model. The agreement between selected experimental data sets and simulation results provides some confidence in postulated mechanisms for excision repair of DNA damage other than DSBs and suggests that the proposed Monte Carlo scheme is useful for predicting repair outcomes.

  3. Significant accumulation of persistent organic pollutants and dysregulation in multiple DNA damage repair pathways in the electronic-waste-exposed populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaobo; Jing, Yaqing; Wang, Jianhai; Li, Keqiu; Yang, Qiaoyun; Zhao, Yuxia; Li, Ran; Ge, Jie; Qiu, Xinghua; Li, Guang

    2015-02-01

    Electronic waste (e-waste) has created a worldwide environmental and health problem, by generating a diverse group of hazardous compounds such as persistent organic pollutants (POPs). Our previous studies demonstrated that populations from e-waste exposed region have a significantly higher level of chromosomal aberrancy and incidence of DNA damage. In this study, we further demonstrated that various POPs persisted at a significantly higher concentration in the exposed group than those in the unexposed group. The level of reactive oxygen species and micronucleus rate were also significantly elevated in the exposed group. RNA sequencing analysis revealed 31 genes in DNA damage responses and repair pathways that were differentially expressed between the two groups (Log2 ratio >1 or waste disposing and POPs accumulation, DNA lesions and dysregulation of multiple DNA damage repair mechanisms in the residents of the e-waste exposed region.

  4. Peritoneal Cell-free DNA: an innovative method for determining acute cell damage in peritoneal membrane and for monitoring the recovery process after peritonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virzì, Grazia Maria; Milan Manani, Sabrina; Brocca, Alessandra; Cantaluppi, Vincenzo; de Cal, Massimo; Pastori, Silvia; Tantillo, Ilaria; Zambon, Roberto; Crepaldi, Carlo; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-02-01

    Cell-free DNA (cfDNA) is present in the peritoneal effluent of stable peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients, but there are no data on cfDNA in PD patients with peritonitis. We investigated the variation of peritoneal cfDNA levels subsequent to peritonitis in PD patients. We enrolled 53 PD patients: 30 without any history of systemic inflammation or peritonitis in the last 3 months (group A) and 23 with acute peritonitis (group B). CfDNA was quantified in the peritoneal effluent. Peritoneal samples on days 1, 3, 10, 30 and until day 120 from the start of peritonitis were collected for white blood cells (WBC) count and cfDNA evaluation in group B. Quantitative analysis of cfDNA showed significantly higher levels in group B on day 1, 3, 10 and 30 compared with group A (p peritoneal cfDNA levels tended to progressively decline during follow-up of peritonitis. From this decreasing curve, we estimated that 49 days are necessary to reach the value of 51 genome equivalents (GE)/ml (75th percentile in controls) and 63 days to reach 31 GE/ml (median). Our results demonstrate that cfDNA increases in peritoneal effluent of PD patients with peritonitis and tends to progressively decline in step with peritonitis resolution and membrane repair process. Peritoneal cfDNA quantification could be an innovative method to determine acute damage and an inverse index of the repair process.

  5. Pim-3 contributes to radioresistance through regulation of the cell cycle and DNA damage repair in pancreatic cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiang-Yuan; Wang, Zhen [Cancer Research Institute, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Li, Bei [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Zhang, Ying-Jian, E-mail: yjzhang111@aliyun.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Li, Ying-Yi, E-mail: liyingyi@fudan.edu.cn [Cancer Research Institute, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)

    2016-04-22

    Resistance of cancer cells to chemoradiotherapy is a major clinical problem in pancreatic cancer treatment. Therefore, understanding the molecular basis of cellular resistance and identifying novel targets are essential for improving treatment efficacy for pancreatic cancer patients. Previous studies have demonstrated a significant role for Pim-3 in pancreatic cancer survival against gemcitabine-induced genotoxic stress. Here, we observed that radiation treatment enhanced Pim-3 expression in human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. Stable overexpression of Pim-3 in pancreatic cancer cells significantly protected cells against radiation treatment by attenuating G2/M phase cell cycle arrest and DNA damage response. Silencing of Pim-3 expression significantly elevated the phosphorylation of histone variant H2AX, a marker of DNA double strand breaks, and decreased the activation of ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) kinase, along with its downstream targets, eventually enhancing the radiosensitivity of human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Hence, we demonstrated a novel function for Pim-3 in human pancreatic cancer cell survival against radiation. Targeting Pim-3 may be a promising way to improve treatment efficacy in combination with radiotherapy in human pancreatic cancer. - Highlights: • This is first study to demonstrate that Pim-3 is endogenously induced by ionizing radiation in pancreatic cancer cells, and Pim-3 overexpression enhanced radioresistance of pancreatic cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. • This is first study to provide evidence that radioresistance induced by Pim-3 is mainly attributed to Pim-3 induces activation of ATM, which subsequently activates checkpoint 1, leading to amplification of DNA repair through cell cycle arrest and DNA repair pathways. • This is first study to indicate that targeting Pim-3 may be a promising strategy to provide better treatment efficacy in combination with radiotherapy in human pancreatic

  6. Histochemical and immunohistochemical study in melasma: evidence of damage in the basal membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Álvarez, Bertha; Mesa-Garza, Iraida G; Castanedo-Cázares, Juan P; Fuentes-Ahumada, Cornelia; Oros-Ovalle, Cuauhtémoc; Navarrete-Solis, Josefina; Moncada, Benjamin

    2011-05-01

    The pathogenesis of melasma has not been clearly elucidated. Using Fontana Masson; diastase-resistant periodic acid-Schiff stains; and immunohistochemistry to stem cell factor (SCF), its receptor c-kit, anti-mast cell tryptase, and anti-collagen type IV antibody, we evaluated melasma lesions and compared them with perilesional skin and photoprotected skin. Samples were taken from lesional and photoprotected nonlesional skin in 24 patients. In other 24 patients, we took biopsies of lesional and perilesional skin. With Fontana Masson, we observed many pigmented basal cells protruding into the dermis of the melasma skin. Periodic acid-Schiff stain and anti-collagen type IV showed damage on the basal membrane in 95.5% and 83%, respectively, in melasma lesion. The immunoreactivity of SCF and the prevalence of mast cells were increased in the dermis of melasma compared with perilesional dermis. The expression of c-kit was significantly increased at lesional epidermis; a frequent protrusion of c-kit-positive basal cells into the dermis was evident in 70% versus that in 29% of perilesional skin. The expression of c-kit was increased at lesional dermis of melasma compared with perilesional skin. We found a low correlation between c-kit expression and prevalence of mast cells; these were increased in melasma skin. The results may suggest a role of SCF, c-kit, and mast cells in the pathogenesis of melasma. We were surprised by the unexpected evidence of damage to basal membrane (BM), which could facilitate the fall or the migration of active melanocytes and melanin into the dermis allowing the constant hyperpigmentation in melasma.

  7. A Cross-Cancer Genetic Association Analysis of the DNA repair and DNA Damage Signaling Pathways for Lung, Ovary, Prostate, Breast and Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarbrough, Peter M.; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Iversen, Edwin S.; Brhane, Yonathan; Amos, Christopher I.; Kraft, Peter; Hung, Rayjean J.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Witte, John S.; Pharoah, Paul; Henderson, Brian E.; Gruber, Stephen B.; Hunter, David J.; Garber, Judy E.; Joshi, Amit D.; McDonnell, Kevin; Easton, Doug F.; Eeles, Ros; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Muir, Kenneth; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.

    2015-01-01

    Background DNA damage is an established mediator of carcinogenesis, though GWAS have identified few significant loci. This cross-cancer site, pooled analysis was performed to increase the power to detect common variants of DNA repair genes associated with cancer susceptibility. Methods We conducted a cross-cancer analysis of 60,297 SNPs, at 229 DNA repair gene regions, using data from the NCI Genetic Associations and Mechanisms in Oncology (GAME-ON) Network. Our analysis included data from 32 GWAS and 48,734 controls and 51,537 cases across five cancer sites (breast, colon, lung, ovary, and prostate). Because of the unavailability of individual data, data were analyzed at the aggregate level. Meta-analysis was performed using the Association analysis for SubSETs (ASSET) software. To test for genetic associations that might escape individual variant testing due to small effect sizes, pathway analysis of eight DNA repair pathways was performed using hierarchical modeling. Results We identified three susceptibility DNA repair genes, RAD51B (p < 5.09 × 10−6), MSH5 (p < 5.09 × 10−6) and BRCA2 (p = 5.70 × 10−6). Hierarchical modeling identified several pleiotropic associations with cancer risk in the base excision repair, nucleotide excision repair, mismatch repair, and homologous recombination pathways. Conclusions Only three susceptibility loci were identified which had all been previously reported. In contrast, hierarchical modeling identified several pleiotropic cancer risk associations in key DNA repair pathways. Impact Results suggest that many common variants in DNA repair genes are likely associated with cancer susceptibility through small effect sizes that do not meet stringent significance testing criteria. PMID:26637267

  8. Effect of ionizing radiation in sensory ganglion neurons: organization and dynamics of nuclear compartments of DNA damage/repair and their relationship with transcription and cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casafont, Iñigo; Palanca, Ana; Lafarga, Vanesa; Berciano, Maria T; Lafarga, Miguel

    2011-10-01

    Neurons are very sensitive to DNA damage induced by endogenous and exogenous genotoxic agents, as defective DNA repair can lead to neurodevelopmental disorders, brain tumors and neurodegenerative diseases with severe clinical manifestations. Understanding the impact of DNA damage/repair mechanisms on the nuclear organization, particularly on the regulation of transcription and cell cycle, is essential to know the pathophysiology of defective DNA repair syndromes. In this work, we study the nuclear architecture and spatiotemporal organization of chromatin compartments involved in the DNA damage response (DDR) in rat sensory ganglion neurons exposed to X-ray irradiation (IR). We demonstrate that the neuronal DDR involves the formation of two categories of DNA-damage processing chromatin compartments: transient, disappearing within the 1 day post-IR, and persistent, where unrepaired DNA is accumulated. Both compartments concentrate components of the DDR pathway, including γH2AX, pATM and 53BP1. Furthermore, DNA damage does not induce neuronal apoptosis but triggers the G0-G1 cell cycle phase transition, which is mediated by the activation of the ATM-p53 pathway and increased protein levels of p21 and cyclin D1. Moreover, the run on transcription assay reveals a severe inhibition of transcription at 0.5 h post-IR, followed by its rapid recovery over the 1 day post-IR in parallel with the progression of DNA repair. Therefore, the response of healthy neurons to DNA damage involves a transcription- and cell cycle-dependent but apoptosis-independent process. Furthermore, we propose that the segregation of unrepaired DNA in a few persistent chromatin compartments preserves genomic stability of undamaged DNA and the global transcription rate in neurons.

  9. Revisiting the membrane interaction mechanism of a membrane-damaging β-barrel pore-forming toxin Vibrio cholerae cytolysin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Anand Kumar; Chattopadhyay, Kausik

    2015-09-01

    Vibrio cholerae cytolysin (VCC) permeabilizes target cell membranes by forming transmembrane oligomeric β-barrel pores. VCC has been shown to associate with the target membranes via amphipathicity-driven spontaneous partitioning into the membrane environment. More specific interaction(s) of VCC with the membrane components have also been documented. In particular, specific binding of VCC with the membrane lipid components is believed to play a crucial role in determining the efficacy of the pore-formation process. However, the structural basis and the functional implications of the VCC interaction with the membrane lipids remain unclear. Here we show that the distinct loop sequences within the membrane-proximal region of VCC play critical roles to determine the functional interactions of the toxin with the membrane lipids. Alterations of the loop sequences via structure-guided mutagenesis allow amphipathicity-driven partitioning of VCC to the membrane lipid bilayer. Alterations of the loop sequences, however, block specific interactions of VCC with the membrane lipids and abort the oligomerization, membrane insertion, pore-formation and cytotoxic activity of the toxin. Present study identifies the structural signatures in VCC implicated for its functional interactions with the membrane lipid components, a process that presumably acts to drive the subsequent steps of the oligomeric β-barrel pore-formation and cytotoxic responses.

  10. Significant accumulation of persistent organic pollutants and dysregulation in multiple DNA damage repair pathways in the electronic-waste-exposed populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Xiaobo; Jing, Yaqing; Wang, Jianhai; Li, Keqiu [Basic Medical College, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070 (China); Yang, Qiaoyun [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070 (China); Zhao, Yuxia [Basic Medical College, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070 (China); Li, Ran [State Key Joint Laboratory for Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control, College of Environmental Sciences and Engineering and Center for Environment and Health, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Ge, Jie [Department of Breast Surgery, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin 300060 (China); Key Laboratory of Breast Cancer Prevention and Treatment of the Ministry of Education, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin 300060 (China); Qiu, Xinghua, E-mail: xhqiu@pku.edu.cn [State Key Joint Laboratory for Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control, College of Environmental Sciences and Engineering and Center for Environment and Health, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Li, Guang, E-mail: lig@tijmu.edu.cn [Basic Medical College, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070 (China)

    2015-02-15

    Electronic waste (e-waste) has created a worldwide environmental and health problem, by generating a diverse group of hazardous compounds such as persistent organic pollutants (POPs). Our previous studies demonstrated that populations from e-waste exposed region have a significantly higher level of chromosomal aberrancy and incidence of DNA damage. In this study, we further demonstrated that various POPs persisted at a significantly higher concentration in the exposed group than those in the unexposed group. The level of reactive oxygen species and micronucleus rate were also significantly elevated in the exposed group. RNA sequencing analysis revealed 31 genes in DNA damage responses and repair pathways that were differentially expressed between the two groups (Log 2 ratio >1 or <−1). Our data demonstrated that both females and males of the exposed group have activated a series of DNA damage response genes; however many important DNA repair pathways have been dysregulated. Expressions of NEIL1/3 and RPA3, which are critical in initiating base pair and nucleotide excision repairs respectively, have been downregulated in both females and males of the exposed group. In contrast, expression of RNF8, an E3 ligase involved in an error prone non-homologous end joining repair for DNA double strand break, was upregulated in both genders of the exposed group. The other genes appeared to be differentially expressed only when the males or females of the two groups were compared respectively. Importantly, the expression of cell cycle regulatory gene CDC25A that has been implicated in multiple kinds of malignant transformation was significantly upregulated among the exposed males while downregulated among the exposed females. In conclusion, our studies have demonstrated significant correlations between e-waste disposing and POPs accumulation, DNA lesions and dysregulation of multiple DNA damage repair mechanisms in the residents of the e-waste exposed region. - Highlights:

  11. Elevated oxidative membrane damage associated with genetic modifiers of Lyst-mutant phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colleen M Trantow

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available LYST is a large cytosolic protein that influences the biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles, and mutation of the encoding gene, LYST, can cause Chediak-Higashi syndrome. Recently, Lyst-mutant mice were recognized to also exhibit an iris disease resembling exfoliation syndrome, a common cause of glaucoma in humans. Here, Lyst-mutant iris phenotypes were used in a search for genes that influence Lyst pathways. In a candidate gene-driven approach, albino Lyst-mutant mice homozygous for a mutation in Tyr, whose product is key to melanin synthesis within melanosomes, exhibited complete rescue of Lyst-mutant iris phenotypes. In a genetic background-driven approach using a DBA/2J strain of congenic mice, an interval containing Tyrp1 enhanced Lyst-dependent iris phenotypes. Thus, both experimental approaches implicated the melanosome, an organelle that is a potential source of oxidative stress, as contributing to the disease phenotype. Confirming an association with oxidative damage, Lyst mutation resulted in genetic context-sensitive changes in iris lipid hydroperoxide levels, being lowest in albino and highest in DBA/2J mice. Surprisingly, the DBA/2J genetic background also exposed a late-onset neurodegenerative phenotype involving cerebellar Purkinje-cell degeneration. These results identify an association between oxidative damage to lipid membranes and the severity of Lyst-mutant phenotypes, revealing a new mechanism that contributes to pathophysiology involving LYST.

  12. Influence of 1.8-GHz (GSM) radiofrequency radiation (RFR) on DNA damage and repair induced by X-rays in human leukocytes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhijian, Chen; Xiaoxue, Li; Yezhen, Lu; Deqiang, Lu; Shijie, Chen; Lifen, Jin; Jianlin, Lou; Jiliang, He

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, the in vitro comet assay was used to determine whether 1.8-GHz radiofrequency radiation (RFR) can influence DNA repair in human leukocytes exposed to X-rays. The specific energy absorption rate (SAR) of 2 W/kg (the current European safety limit) was applied. The leukocytes from four young healthy donors were intermittently exposed to RFR for 24 h (fields on for 5 min, fields off for 10 min), and then irradiated with X-rays at doses of 0.25, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 Gy. DNA damage to human leukocytes was detected using the comet assay at 0, 15, 45, 90, 150 and 240 min after exposure to X-rays. Using the comet assay, the percent of DNA in the tail (% tail DNA) served as the indicator of DNA damage; the DNA repair percentage (DRP) served as the indicator of the DNA repair speed. The results demonstrated that (1) the DNA repair speeds of human leukocytes after X-ray exposure exhibited individual differences among the four donors; (2) the intermittent exposures of 1.8-GHz RFR at the SAR of 2 W/kg for 24 h did not directly induce DNA damage or exhibit synergistic effects with X-rays on human leukocytes.

  13. UvrD Participation in Nucleotide Excision Repair Is Required for the Recovery of DNA Synthesis following UV-Induced Damage in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelley N. Newton

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available UvrD is a DNA helicase that participates in nucleotide excision repair and several replication-associated processes, including methyl-directed mismatch repair and recombination. UvrD is capable of displacing oligonucleotides from synthetic forked DNA structures in vitro and is essential for viability in the absence of Rep, a helicase associated with processing replication forks. These observations have led others to propose that UvrD may promote fork regression and facilitate resetting of the replication fork following arrest. However, the molecular activity of UvrD at replication forks in vivo has not been directly examined. In this study, we characterized the role UvrD has in processing and restoring replication forks following arrest by UV-induced DNA damage. We show that UvrD is required for DNA synthesis to recover. However, in the absence of UvrD, the displacement and partial degradation of the nascent DNA at the arrested fork occur normally. In addition, damage-induced replication intermediates persist and accumulate in uvrD mutants in a manner that is similar to that observed in other nucleotide excision repair mutants. These data indicate that, following arrest by DNA damage, UvrD is not required to catalyze fork regression in vivo and suggest that the failure of uvrD mutants to restore DNA synthesis following UV-induced arrest relates to its role in nucleotide excision repair.

  14. Role of protein synthesis in the repair of sublethal x-ray damage in a mutant Chinese hamster ovary cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yezzi, M.J.

    1985-04-01

    A temperature-sensitive mutant for protein synthesis, CHO-TSH1, has been compared to the wild-type cell, CHO-sC1, in single- and split-radiation-dose schemes. When the exponentially growing TS mutant and the wild-type cells were treated at 40/sub 0/C for up to 2 hrs prior to graded doses of x rays, the survival curves were identical and were the same as those obtained without heat treatment. If the cultures were incubated at 40/sup 0/C for 2 hrs before a first dose and maintained at 40/sup 0/C during a 2 hr dose fractionation interval, repair of radiation damage was reduced in the mutant compared to the wild type. These observations implied that a pool of proteins was involved in the repair of sublethal x-ray damage. However, if repair was measured by the alkaline-unwinding technique under the same time and temperature schemes, no difference in the kientics of DNA strand rejoining was observed. Misrepair processes may permit restoration of DNA strand integrity but not allow functional repair. The effect of diminished repair under conditions of inhibition of protein synthesis was found to be cell-cycle dependent in survival studies with synchronized mutant cell populations. Repair was found to be almost completely eliminated if the temperature sequence described above was applied in the middle of the DNA synthetic phase. Treatment of cell populations in the middle of G/sub 1/-phase yielded repair inhibition comparable to that observed with the asynchronous cells. Splitdose experiments were done using pre-incubation with cycloheximide to chemically inhibit protein synthesis. WT cells and TS cells were treated with cycloheximide at 35/sup 0/C for 2 hrs before a first dose and during a 2 hr dose fractionation interval. 23 figs., 7 tabs.

  15. Impaired Cytogenetic Damage Repair and Cell Cycle Regulation in Response to Ionizing Radiation in Human Fibroblast Cells with Individual Knock-down of 25 Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry; Emami, Kamal; Hammond, Dianne; Casey, Rachael; Mehta, Satish; Jeevarajan, Antony; Pierson, Duane; Wu, Honglu

    2008-01-01

    Changes of gene expression profile are one of the most important biological responses in living cells after ionizing radiation (IR) exposure. Although some studies have demonstrated that genes with upregulated expression induced by IR may play important roles in DNA damage sensing, cell cycle checkpoint and chromosomal repair, the relationship between the regulation of gene expression by IR and its impact on cytogenetic responses to ionizing radiation has not been systematically studied. In our present study, the expression of 25 genes selected based on their transcriptional changes in response to IR or from their known DNA repair roles were individually knocked down by siRNA transfection in human fibroblast cells. Chromosome aberrations (CA) and micronuclei (MN) formation were measured as the cytogenetic endpoints. Our results showed that the yield of MN and/or CA formation were significantly increased by suppressed expression of 5 genes that included Ku70 in the DSB repair pathway; XPA in the NER pathway; RPA1 in the MMR pathway; RAD17 and RBBP8 in cell cycle control. Knocked-down expression of 4 genes including MRE11A, RAD51 in the DSB pathway, and SESN1 and SUMO1 showed significant inhibition of cell cycle progression, possibly because of severe impairment of DNA damage repair. Furthermore, loss of XPA, p21 and MLH1 expression resulted in both enhanced cell cycle progression and significantly higher yield of cytogenetic damage, indicating the involvement of these gene products in both cell cycle control and DNA damage repair. Of these 11 genes that affected the cytogenetic response, 9 were up-regulated in the cells exposed to gamma radiation, suggesting that genes transcriptionally modulated by IR were critical to regulating the biological consequences after IR. Failure to express these IR-responsive genes, such as by gene mutation, could seriously change the outcome of the post IR scenario and lead to carcinogenesis.

  16. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell-loaded amniotic membrane for the repair of radial nerve injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi Li; Hanjiao Qin; Zishan Feng; Wei Liu; Ye Zhou; Lifeng Yang; Wei Zhao; Youjun Li

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we loaded human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells onto human amniotic membrane with epithelial cells to prepare nerve conduits, i.e., a relatively closed nerve regeneration chamber. After neurolysis, the injured radial nerve was enwrapped with the prepared nerve conduit, which was fixed to the epineurium by sutures, with the cellon the inner surface of the conduit. Simultaneously, a 1.0 mL aliquot of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cellsuspension was injected into the distal and proximal ends of the injured radial nerve with 1.0 cm intervals. A total of 1.75 × 107 cells were seeded on the amniotic membrane. In the control group, patients received only neurolysis. At 12 weeks after celltransplantation, more than 80%of patients exhibited obvious improvements in muscular strength, and touch and pain sensations. In contrast, these improve-ments were observed only in 55-65% of control patients. At 8 and 12 weeks, muscular electro-physiological function in the region dominated by the injured radial nerve was significantly better in the transplantation group than the control group. After celltransplantation, no immunological rejec-tions were observed. These findings suggest that human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cel-loaded amniotic membrane can be used for the repair of radial nerve injury.

  17. Genetic Control or Repair and Adaptive Response to Low-Level DNA Damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. E. Haber

    2009-10-05

    Research was focused on how a single double-strand break - a model of low-dose ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage - could be studied in a simple model system, budding yeast. Breaks were induced in several different ways. We used the site-specific HO endonuclease to create a single DSB in all cells of the population so that its fate could be extensively analyzed genetically and molecularly. We also used two heterologous systems, the plant DS element and the Rag1/Rag2 proteins, to generate different types of DSBs, these containing hairpin ends that needed to be cleaved open before end-joining could take place. All three approaches yielded important new findings. We also extended our analysis of the Mre11 protein that plays key roles in both NHEJ and in homologous recombination. Finally we analyzed the poorly understood recombination events that were independent of the key recombination protein, Rad52. This line of inquiry was strongly motivated by the fact that vertebrate cells do not rely strongly on Rad52 for homologous recombination, so that some clues about alternative mechanisms could be gained by understanding how Rad52-independent recombination occurred. We found that the Mre11 complex was the most important element in Rad52-independent recombination.

  18. Astragalin from Cassia alata induces DNA adducts in vitro and repairable DNA damage in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Samuel; Silva, Givaldo; Santos, Regineide Xavier; Gosmann, Grace; Pungartnik, Cristina; Brendel, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Reverse phase-solid phase extraction from Cassia alata leaves (CaRP) was used to obtain a refined extract. Higher than wild-type sensitivity to CaRP was exhibited by 16 haploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants with defects in DNA repair and membrane transport. CaRP had a strong DPPH free radical scavenging activity with an IC(50) value of 2.27 μg mL(-1) and showed no pro-oxidant activity in yeast. CaRP compounds were separated by HPLC and the three major components were shown to bind to DNA in vitro. The major HPLC peak was identified as kampferol-3-O-β-d-glucoside (astragalin), which showed high affinity to DNA as seen by HPLC-UV measurement after using centrifugal ultrafiltration of astragalin-DNA mixtures. Astragalin-DNA interaction was further studied by spectroscopic methods and its interaction with DNA was evaluated using solid-state FTIR. These and computational (in silico) docking studies revealed that astragalin-DNA binding occurs through interaction with G-C base pairs, possibly by intercalation stabilized by H-bond formation.

  19. Large Extremity Peripheral Nerve Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    71. Burman S, Tejwani S, Vemuganti GK. Ophthalmic applications of preserved human amniotic membrane: a review of current indications. Cell Tissue Bank...segmental nerve deficit repair using isograft show the best performing wrap/ fixation method to be sutureless photochemical tissue bonding with the...crosslinked amnion wrap. Autograft is often unavailable in wounded warriors, due to extensive tissue damage and amputation and, importantly, we also

  20. Effects of 3-monochloropropane-1,2-diol (3-MCPD) and its metabolites on DNA damage and repair under in vitro conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcagli, Eren; Alpertunga, Buket; Fenga, Concettina; Berktas, Mehmet; Tsitsimpikou, Christina; Wilks, Martin F; Tsatsakis, Αristidis M

    2016-03-01

    3-monochloropropane-1,2-diol (3-MCPD) is a food contaminant that occurs during industrial production processes and can be found mainly in fat and salt containing products. 3-MCPD has exhibited mutagenic activity in vitro but not in vivo, however, a genotoxic mechanism for the occurrence of kidney tumors has not so far been excluded. The main pathway of mammalian 3-MCPD metabolism is via the formation of β--chlorolactatic acid and formation of glycidol has been demonstrated in bacterial metabolism. The aim of this study was to investigate genotoxic and oxidative DNA damaging effects of 3-MCPD and its metabolites, and to provide a better understanding of their roles in DNA repair processes. DNA damage was assessed by alkaline comet assay in target rat kidney epithelial cell lines (NRK-52E) and human embryonic kidney cells (HEK-293). Purine and pyrimidine base damage, H2O2 sensitivity and DNA repair capacity were assessed via modified comet assay. The results revealed in vitro evidence for increased genotoxicity and H2O2 sensitivity. No association was found between oxidative DNA damage and DNA repair capacity with the exception of glycidol treatment at 20 μg/mL. These findings provide further insights into the mechanisms underlying the in vitro genotoxic potential of 3-MCPD and metabolites.

  1. Listeriolysin O Membrane Damaging Activity Involves Arc Formation and Lineaction -- Implication for Listeria monocytogenes Escape from Phagocytic Vacuole.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Ruan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Listeriolysin-O (LLO plays a crucial role during infection by Listeria monocytogenes. It enables escape of bacteria from phagocytic vacuole, which is the basis for its spread to other cells and tissues. It is not clear how LLO acts at phagosomal membranes to allow bacterial escape. The mechanism of action of LLO remains poorly understood, probably due to unavailability of suitable experimental tools that could monitor LLO membrane disruptive activity in real time. Here, we used high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM featuring high spatio-temporal resolution on model membranes and optical microscopy on giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs to investigate LLO activity. We analyze the assembly kinetics of toxin oligomers, the prepore-to-pore transition dynamics and the membrane disruption in real time. We reveal that LLO toxin efficiency and mode of action as a membrane-disrupting agent varies strongly depending on the membrane cholesterol concentration and the environmental pH. We discovered that LLO is able to form arc pores as well as damage lipid membranes as a lineactant, and this leads to large-scale membrane defects. These results altogether provide a mechanistic basis of how large-scale membrane disruption leads to release of Listeria from the phagocytic vacuole in the cellular context.

  2. XRCC1 deficiency increased the DNA damage induced by γ-ray in HepG2 cell: Involvement of DSB repair and cell cycle arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Yujie; Zhang, Xing; Zheng, Yuxin; Zhang, Rong

    2013-09-01

    γ-ray irradiation can induce DNA damages which include base damages, single-strand breaks and double-strand breaks in various type cells. The DNA repair protein XRCC1, as a part of the BER pathway, forms complexes with DNA polymerase beta, DNA ligase III and poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) in the repair of DNA single strand breaks and also affects the repair of double strand breaks. However, it is still not known well whether XRCC1 contributes to affect the irradiation sensitivity and DNA damage in HepG2 cell and the potential mechanism. Hence, the purpose of this study was to explore whether abrogation of XRCC1 gene expression by shRNA could reduce DNA repair and thus sensitize HepG2 cells to γ-ray. Cell viability was measured by Trypan blue staining and cloning efficiency assay. The DNA damage was detected by Comet assay. Apoptosis and cell cycle were detected by flow cytometry. The DNA-PKcs and gadd153 mRNA expression were determined by Real-time PCR. Our results showed that abrogation of XRCC 1 could sensitize HepG2 cells to γ-ray. This enhanced sensitivity could be attributed to the increased DNA damage and increased cell cycle arrest, which might be related with the increasing of DNA-PKcs and gadd153 mRNA expression. Therefore, our results suggested that the γ-ray irradiation sensitivity could be increased by targeting inhibition of XRCC1 in HepG2 cell.

  3. Rapid assessment of repair of ultraviolet DNA damage with a modified host-cell reactivation assay using a luciferase reporter gene and correlation with polymorphisms of DNA repair genes in normal human lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiao Yawei; Spitz, Margaret R.; Guo Zhaozheng; Hadeyati, Mohammad; Grossman, Lawrence; Kraemer, Kenneth H.; Wei Qingyi

    2002-11-30

    As DNA repair plays an important role in genetic susceptibility to cancer, assessment of the DNA repair phenotype is critical for molecular epidemiological studies of cancer. In this report, we compared use of the luciferase (luc) reporter gene in a host-cell reactivation (HCR) (LUC) assay of repair of ultraviolet (UV) damage to DNA to use of the chloramphenicol (cat) gene-based HCR (CAT) assay we used previously for case-control studies. We performed both the assays on cryopreserved lymphocytes from 102 healthy non-Hispanic white subjects. There was a close correlation between DNA repair capacity (DRC) as measured by the LUC and CAT assays. Although these two assays had similar variation, the LUC assay was faster and more sensitive. We also analyzed the relationship between DRC and the subjects' previously determined genotypes for four polymorphisms of two nucleotide-excision repair (NER) genes (in intron 9 of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) C and exons 6, 10 and 23 of XPD) and one polymorphism of a base-excision repair gene in exon 10 of X-ray complementing group 1 (XRCC1). The DRC was significantly lower in subjects homozygous for one or more polymorphisms of the two NER genes than in subjects with other genotypes (P=0.010). In contrast, the polymorphic XRCC1 allele had no significant effect on DRC. These results suggest that the post-UV LUC assay measures NER phenotype and that polymorphisms of XPC and XPD genes modulate DRC. For population studies of the DNA repair phenotype, many samples need to be evaluated, and so the LUC assay has several advantages over the CAT assay: the LUC assay was more sensitive, had less variation, was not radioactive, was easier to perform, and required fewer cryopreserved cells. These features make the LUC-based HCR assay suitable for molecular epidemiological studies.

  4. Potential of human γD-crystallin for hair damage repair: insights into the mechanical properties and biocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, A; Matamá, T; Cruz, C F; Gomes, A C; Cavaco-Paulo, A M

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this work was to develop a new strategy to physically 'repair' chemically damaged hair. Hence the human eye γD-crystallin, a protein from the superfamily characterized structurally by the Greek key motif, was studied. The human γD-crystallin was chosen based on the ability of proteins belonging to this superfamily to be involved in the coating of specific structures. Two crystallins were used on the study, the wild type (Protein Data Bank ID: 1HK0) and the mutant protein. The mutant form was intended to induce a strong and quick protein polymerization as well to have new possible points of anchorage to hair. The ability of both crystallins to bind to damaged hair and even penetrate into its cortex was checked by fluorescence microscopy, confocal microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Furthermore the reinforcement of hair mechanical resistance, the potential cytotoxic/inflammatory effect of crystallins were studied in order to have a fully comprehension about the protein based formulation. Although the chemical over-bleaching treatment induced a decrease of 20% on the resistance of the hair, the crystallins which bind and penetrate the hair fibre were able to recover and even to improve its mechanical properties when compared to the virgin hair. Moreover none of the crystallins displayed a toxic effect in fibroblasts for all the range of tested concentrations upon 72 h of exposure. The active aggregation process of mutant crystallin induced an inflammatory response in fibroblasts in the first 24 h of contact, measured by the amount of released pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6 to the medium. In contrast contact with wild type crystallin did not lead to significant inflammation. Outcome from protein formulation characterization supports the hypothesis that the γD-crystallin it is able to recover and improve the mechanical properties of chemical damaged hair. Therefore it can be considered as a very promising strengthening agent for the

  5. The AtRAD21.1 and AtRAD21.3 Arabidopsis cohesins play a synergistic role in somatic DNA double strand break damage repair

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background The RAD21 cohesin plays, besides its well-recognised role in chromatid cohesion, a role in DNA double strand break (dsb) repair. In Arabidopsis there are three RAD21 paralog genes (AtRAD21.1, AtRAD21.2 and AtRAD21.3), yet only AtRAD21.1 has been shown to be required for DNA dsb damage repair. Further investigation of the role of cohesins in DNA dsb repair was carried out and is here reported. Results We show for the first time that not only AtRAD21.1 but also AtRAD21.3 play a role ...

  6. Apn1 AP-endonuclease is essential for the repair of oxidatively damaged DNA bases in yeast frataxin-deficient cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefevre, Sophie; Brossas, Caroline; Auchère, Françoise; Boggetto, Nicole; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Santos, Renata

    2012-09-15

    Frataxin deficiency results in mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress and it is the cause of the hereditary neurodegenerative disease Friedreich ataxia (FA). Here, we present evidence that one of the pleiotropic effects of oxidative stress in frataxin-deficient yeast cells (Δyfh1 mutant) is damage to nuclear DNA and that repair requires the Apn1 AP-endonuclease of the base excision repair pathway. Major phenotypes of Δyfh1 cells are respiratory deficit, disturbed iron homeostasis and sensitivity to oxidants. These phenotypes are weak or absent under anaerobiosis. We show here that exposure of anaerobically grown Δyfh1 cells to oxygen leads to down-regulation of antioxidant defenses, increase in reactive oxygen species, delay in G1- and S-phases of the cell cycle and damage to mitochondrial and nuclear DNA. Nuclear DNA lesions in Δyfh1 cells are primarily caused by oxidized bases and single-strand breaks that can be detected 15-30 min after oxygen exposition. The Apn1 enzyme is essential for the repair of the DNA lesions in Δyfh1 cells. Compared with Δyfh1, the double Δyfh1Δapn1 mutant shows growth impairment, increased mutagenesis and extreme sensitivity to H(2)O(2). On the contrary, overexpression of the APN1 gene in Δyfh1 cells decreases spontaneous and induced mutagenesis. Our results show that frataxin deficiency in yeast cells leads to increased DNA base oxidation and requirement of Apn1 for repair, suggesting that DNA damage and repair could be important features in FA disease progression.

  7. Permethrin may disrupt testosterone biosynthesis via mitochondrial membrane damage of Leydig cells in adult male mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shu-Yun; Ito, Yuki; Yamanoshita, Osamu; Yanagiba, Yukie; Kobayashi, Miya; Taya, Kazuyoshi; Li, ChunMei; Okamura, Ai; Miyata, Maiko; Ueyama, Jun; Lee, Chul-Ho; Kamijima, Michihiro; Nakajima, Tamie

    2007-08-01

    Permethrin, a popular synthetic pyrethroid insecticide used to control noxious insects in agriculture, forestry, households, horticulture, and public health throughout the world, poses risks of environmental exposure. Here we evaluate the reproductive toxicity of cis-permethrin in adult male ICR mice that were orally administered cis-permethrin (0, 35, or 70 mg/kg d) for 6 wk. Caudal epididymal sperm count and sperm motility in the treated groups were statistically reduced in a dose-dependent manner. Testicular testosterone production and plasma testosterone concentration were significantly and dose-dependently decreased with an increase in LH, and a significant regression was observed between testosterone levels and cis-permethrin residues in individual mice testes after exposure. However, no significant changes were observed in body weight, reproductive organ absolute and relative weights, sperm morphology, and plasma FSH concentration after cis-permethrin treatment. Moreover, cis-permethrin exposure significantly diminished the testicular mitochondrial mRNA expression levels of peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR), steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), and cytochrome P450 side-chain cleavage (P450scc) and enzyme and protein expression levels of StAR and P450scc. At the electron microscopic level, mitochondrial membrane damage was found in Leydig cells of the exposed mouse testis. Our results suggest that the insecticide permethrin may cause mitochondrial membrane impairment in Leydig cells and disrupt testosterone biosynthesis by diminishing the delivery of cholesterol into the mitochondria and decreasing the conversion of cholesterol to pregnenolone in the cells, thus reducing subsequent testosterone production.

  8. DNA damage and decreased DNA repair in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in individuals exposed to arsenic and lead in a mining site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasso-Pineda, Yolanda; Díaz-Barriga, Fernando; Calderón, Jaqueline; Yáñez, Leticia; Carrizales, Leticia; Pérez-Maldonado, Iván N

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate DNA damage and the capacity for DNA repair in children exposed to arsenic and lead. During 2006, we studied a total of 85 healthy children (aged 4-11 years) who were residents of Villa de la Paz (community A), Matehuala (community B), and Soledad de Graciano Sanchez (community C) in San Luis Potosi, Mexico. The quantification of arsenic in urine (AsU) and lead in blood (PbB) was performed by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The alkaline comet assay was used to evaluate DNA damage and DNA repair. The highest levels of AsU and PbB in children were found in community A (44.5 μg/g creatinine for arsenic and 11.4 μg/dL for lead), followed by community B (16.8 μg/g creatinine for arsenic and 7.3 μg/dL for lead) and finally by children living in community C (12.8 μg/g creatinine for arsenic and 5.3 μg/dL for lead). When DNA damage was assessed, children living in community A had the highest DNA damage. Analysis of these same cells 1 h after a challenge with H(2)O(2) 10 μM showed a dramatic increase in DNA damage in the cells of children living in community B and community C, but not in the cells of children living in community A. Moreover, significantly higher levels of DNA damage were observed 3 h after the challenge ended (repair period) in cells from individuals living in community A. Our results show that children exposed to metals might be more susceptible to DNA alterations.

  9. Cytosolic peroxidases protect the lysosome of bloodstream African trypanosomes from iron-mediated membrane damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinna Hiller

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available African trypanosomes express three virtually identical non-selenium glutathione peroxidase (Px-type enzymes which preferably detoxify lipid-derived hydroperoxides. As shown previously, bloodstream Trypanosoma brucei lacking the mitochondrial Px III display only a weak and transient proliferation defect whereas parasites that lack the cytosolic Px I and Px II undergo extremely fast lipid peroxidation and cell lysis. The phenotype can completely be rescued by supplementing the medium with the α-tocopherol derivative Trolox. The mechanism underlying the rapid cell death remained however elusive. Here we show that the lysosome is the origin of the cellular injury. Feeding the px I-II knockout parasites with Alexa Fluor-conjugated dextran or LysoTracker in the presence of Trolox yielded a discrete lysosomal staining. Yet upon withdrawal of the antioxidant, the signal became progressively spread over the whole cell body and was completely lost, respectively. T. brucei acquire iron by endocytosis of host transferrin. Supplementing the medium with iron or transferrin induced, whereas the iron chelator deferoxamine and apo-transferrin attenuated lysis of the px I-II knockout cells. Immunofluorescence microscopy with MitoTracker and antibodies against the lysosomal marker protein p67 revealed that disintegration of the lysosome precedes mitochondrial damage. In vivo experiments confirmed the negligible role of the mitochondrial peroxidase: Mice infected with px III knockout cells displayed only a slightly delayed disease development compared to wild-type parasites. Our data demonstrate that in bloodstream African trypanosomes, the lysosome, not the mitochondrion, is the primary site of oxidative damage and cytosolic trypanothione/tryparedoxin-dependent peroxidases protect the lysosome from iron-induced membrane peroxidation. This process appears to be closely linked to the high endocytic rate and distinct iron acquisition mechanisms of the infective

  10. Nicotinamide enhances repair of arsenic and ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage in HaCaT keratinocytes and ex vivo human skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin C Thompson

    Full Text Available Arsenic-induced skin cancer is a significant global health burden. In areas with arsenic contamination of water sources, such as China, Pakistan, Myanmar, Cambodia and especially Bangladesh and West Bengal, large populations are at risk of arsenic-induced skin cancer. Arsenic acts as a co-carcinogen with ultraviolet (UV radiation and affects DNA damage and repair. Nicotinamide (vitamin B3 reduces premalignant keratoses in sun-damaged skin, likely by prevention of UV-induced cellular energy depletion and enhancement of DNA repair. We investigated whether nicotinamide modifies DNA repair following exposure to UV radiation and sodium arsenite. HaCaT keratinocytes and ex vivo human skin were exposed to 2μM sodium arsenite and low dose (2J/cm2 solar-simulated UV, with and without nicotinamide supplementation. DNA photolesions in the form of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers were detected by immunofluorescence. Arsenic exposure significantly increased levels of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine in irradiated cells. Nicotinamide reduced both types of photolesions in HaCaT keratinocytes and in ex vivo human skin, likely by enhancing DNA repair. These results demonstrate a reduction of two different photolesions over time in two different models in UV and arsenic exposed cells. Nicotinamide is a nontoxic, inexpensive agent with potential for chemoprevention of arsenic induced skin cancer.

  11. Nicotinamide enhances repair of arsenic and ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage in HaCaT keratinocytes and ex vivo human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Benjamin C; Halliday, Gary M; Damian, Diona L

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic-induced skin cancer is a significant global health burden. In areas with arsenic contamination of water sources, such as China, Pakistan, Myanmar, Cambodia and especially Bangladesh and West Bengal, large populations are at risk of arsenic-induced skin cancer. Arsenic acts as a co-carcinogen with ultraviolet (UV) radiation and affects DNA damage and repair. Nicotinamide (vitamin B3) reduces premalignant keratoses in sun-damaged skin, likely by prevention of UV-induced cellular energy depletion and enhancement of DNA repair. We investigated whether nicotinamide modifies DNA repair following exposure to UV radiation and sodium arsenite. HaCaT keratinocytes and ex vivo human skin were exposed to 2μM sodium arsenite and low dose (2J/cm2) solar-simulated UV, with and without nicotinamide supplementation. DNA photolesions in the form of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers were detected by immunofluorescence. Arsenic exposure significantly increased levels of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine in irradiated cells. Nicotinamide reduced both types of photolesions in HaCaT keratinocytes and in ex vivo human skin, likely by enhancing DNA repair. These results demonstrate a reduction of two different photolesions over time in two different models in UV and arsenic exposed cells. Nicotinamide is a nontoxic, inexpensive agent with potential for chemoprevention of arsenic induced skin cancer.

  12. Effects of UV-B radiation on tetraspores of Chondrus ocellatus Holm (Rhodophyta), and effects of red and blue light on repair of UV-B-induced damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Qing; Xiao, Hui; Wang, You; Tang, Xuexi

    2015-05-01

    We evaluated the effects of red and blue light on the repair of UV-B radiation-induced damage in tetraspores of Chondrus ocellatus Holm. Tetraspores of C. ocellatus were treated with different UV-B radiation levels (0, 36, 72, 108, 144 and 180 J/m2), and thereafter subjected to PAR, darkness, or red or blue light during a 2-h repair stage, each day for 48 days. The diameters and cellular contents of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimmers (CPDs), chlorophyll a (Chl a), phycoerythrin, and UV-B-absorbing mycosporinelike amino acids (MAAs) contents of the tetraspores were determined. Our results show that low doses of UV-B radiation (36 and 72 J/m2) promoted the growth of C. ocellatus; however, increased UV-B radiation gradually reduced the C. ocellatus growth (greater than 72 J/m2). The MAAs (palythine and asterina-330) in C. ocellatus were detected and analyzed by LC/MS. Our results suggest that moderate red light could induce the growth of this alga in aquaculture. In addition, photorepair was inhibited by red light, so there may be some other DNA repair mechanism activated by red light. Blue light promoted the activity of DNA photolyase, greatly improving remediation efficiency. Red and blue lights were found to reduce the capacity of C. ocellatus to form MAAs. Therefore, PAR, red light, and blue light play different roles during the repair processes for damage induced by UV-B radiation.

  13. Characterisation of Human Keratinocytes by Measuring Cellular Repair Capacity of UVB-Induced DNA Damage and Monitoring of Cytogenetic Changes in Melanoma Cell Lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greinert, R.; Breibart, E.W.; Mitchell, D.; Smida, J.; Volkmer, B

    2000-07-01

    The molecular mechanisms for UV-induced photocarcinogenesis are far from being understood in detail, especially in the case of malignant melanoma of the skin. Nevertheless, it is known that deficiencies in cellular repair processes of UV-induced DNA damage (e.g. in the case of Xeroderma pigmentosum) represent important aetiological factors in the multistep development of skin cancer. The repair kinetics have therefore been studied of an established skin cell line (HaCaT), primary human keratinocytes, melanocytes and melanoma cell lines, using fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Our data show a high degree of interindividual variability in cellular repair capacity for UV-induced DNA lesions, which might be due to individual differences in the degree of tolerable damage and/or the onsets of saturation of the enzymatic repair system. The cytogenetic analysis of melanoma cell lines, using spectral karyotyping (SKY) furthermore proves that malignant melanoma of the skin are characterised by high numbers of chromosomal aberrations. (author)

  14. Kinetic Modeling Reveals the Roles of Reactive Oxygen Species Scavenging and DNA Repair Processes in Shaping the Dose-Response Curve of KBrO₃-Induced DNA Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spassova, Maria A; Miller, David J; Nikolov, Alexander S

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a kinetic model to investigate how DNA repair processes and scavengers of reactive oxygen species (ROS) can affect the dose-response shape of prooxidant induced DNA damage. We used as an example chemical KBrO3 which is activated by glutathione and forms reactive intermediates that directly interact with DNA to form 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine DNA adducts (8-OH-dG). The single strand breaks (SSB) that can result from failed base excision repair of these adducts were considered as an effect downstream from 8-OH-dG. We previously demonstrated that, in the presence of effective base excision repair, 8-OH-dG can exhibit threshold-like dose-response dependence, while the downstream SSB can still exhibit a linear dose-response. Here we demonstrate that this result holds for a variety of conditions, including low levels of GSH, the presence of additional SSB repair mechanisms, or a scavenger. It has been shown that melatonin, a terminal scavenger, inhibits KBrO3-caused oxidative damage. Our modeling revealed that sustained exposure to KBrO3 can lead to fast scavenger exhaustion, in which case the dose-response shapes for both endpoints are not substantially affected. The results are important to consider when forming conclusions on a chemical's toxicity dose dependence based on the dose-response of early genotoxic events.

  15. Seasonal variation of DNA damage and repair in patients with non-melanoma skin cancer and referents with and without psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, P; Knudsen, Lisbeth E.; Frentz, G;

    1998-01-01

    Quadruples of skin cancer patients with and without psoriasis and referents with and without psoriasis (4 x 20 study persons) were identified and examined for DNA damage by single cell gel electrophoresis (comet-assay) and DNA-repair by UV-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) in mononuclear...... to solar radiation. When the comet tail moment data were stratified by sampling period, an interaction between psoriasis and skin cancer was detected, with patients with psoriasis and skin cancer exhibiting more DNA damage. Patients with psoriasis and skin cancer also had lower UDS compared to healthy...

  16. R-Roscovitine (Seliciclib prevents DNA damage-induced cyclin A1 upregulation and hinders non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ DNA repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Mario

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CDK-inhibitors can diminish transcriptional levels of cell cycle-related cyclins through the inhibition of E2F family members and CDK7 and 9. Cyclin A1, an E2F-independent cyclin, is strongly upregulated under genotoxic conditions and functionally was shown to increase NHEJ activity. Cyclin A1 outcompetes with cyclin A2 for CDK2 binding, possibly redirecting its activity towards DNA repair. To see if we could therapeutically block this switch, we analyzed the effects of the CDK-inhibitor R-Roscovitine on the expression levels of cyclin A1 under genotoxic stress and observed subsequent DNA damage and repair mechanisms. Results We found that R-Roscovitine alone was unable to alter cyclin A1 transcriptional levels, however it was able to reduce protein expression through a proteosome-dependent mechanism. When combined with DNA damaging agents, R-Roscovitine was able to prevent the DNA damage-induced upregulation of cyclin A1 on a transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. This, moreover resulted in a significant decrease in non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ paired with an increase in DNA DSBs and overall DNA damage over time. Furthermore, microarray analysis demonstrated that R-Roscovitine affected DNA repair mechanisms in a more global fashion. Conclusions Our data reveal a new mechanism of action for R-Roscovitine on DNA repair through the inhibition of the molecular switch between cyclin A family members under genotoxic conditions resulting in reduced NHEJ capability.

  17. Association between Genetic Polymorphisms of DNA Repair Genes and Chromosomal Damage for 1,3-Butadiene-Exposed Workers in a Matched Study in China

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the association between polymorphisms of DNA repair genes and chromosomal damage of 1,3-butadiene- (BD-) exposed workers. The study was conducted in 45 pairs of occupationally exposed workers in a BD product workshop and matched control workers in an administrative office and a circulatory water workshop in China. Newly developed biomarkers (micronuclei, MNi; nucleoplasmic bridges, NPBs; nuclear buds, NBUDs) in the cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus (CBMN) cy...

  18. Repair of DNA Alkylation Damage by the Escherichia coli Adaptive Response Protein AlkB as Studied by ESI-TOF Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deyu Li

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA alkylation can cause mutations, epigenetic changes, and even cell death. All living organisms have evolved enzymatic and non-enzymatic strategies for repairing such alkylation damage. AlkB, one of the Escherichia coli adaptive response proteins, uses an α-ketoglutarate/Fe(II-dependent mechanism that, by chemical oxidation, removes a variety of alkyl lesions from DNA, thus affording protection of the genome against alkylation. In an effort to understand the range of acceptable substrates for AlkB, the enzyme was incubated with chemically synthesized oligonucleotides containing alkyl lesions, and the reaction products were analyzed by electrospray ionization time-of-flight (ESI-TOF mass spectrometry. Consistent with the literature, but studied comparatively here for the first time, it was found that 1-methyladenine, 1,N 6-ethenoadenine, 3-methylcytosine, and 3-ethylcytosine were completely transformed by AlkB, while 1-methylguanine and 3-methylthymine were partially repaired. The repair intermediates (epoxide and possibly glycol of 3,N 4-ethenocytosine are reported for the first time. It is also demonstrated that O 6-methylguanine and 5-methylcytosine are refractory to AlkB, lending support to the hypothesis that AlkB repairs only alkyl lesions attached to the nitrogen atoms of the nucleobase. ESI-TOF mass spectrometry is shown to be a sensitive and efficient tool for probing the comparative substrate specificities of DNA repair proteins in vitro.

  19. In Vitro Expansion of Bone Marrow Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Alters DNA Double Strand Break Repair of Etoposide Induced DNA Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Hare

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are of interest for use in diverse cellular therapies. Ex vivo expansion of MSCs intended for transplantation must result in generation of cells that maintain fidelity of critical functions. Previous investigations have identified genetic and phenotypic alterations of MSCs with in vitro passage, but little is known regarding how culturing influences the ability of MSCs to repair double strand DNA breaks (DSBs, the most severe of DNA lesions. To investigate the response to DSB stress with passage in vitro, primary human MSCs were exposed to etoposide (VP16 at various passages with subsequent evaluation of cellular damage responses and DNA repair. Passage number did not affect susceptibility to VP16 or the incidence and repair kinetics of DSBs. Nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ transcripts showed little alteration with VP16 exposure or passage; however, homologous recombination (HR transcripts were reduced following VP16 exposure with this decrease amplified as MSCs were passaged in vitro. Functional evaluations of NHEJ and HR showed that MSCs were unable to activate NHEJ repair following VP16 stress in cells after successive passage. These results indicate that ex vivo expansion of MSCs alters their ability to perform DSB repair, a necessary function for cells intended for transplantation.

  20. Association between Genetic Polymorphisms of DNA Repair Genes and Chromosomal Damage for 1,3-Butadiene-Exposed Workers in a Matched Study in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Menglong; Sun, Lei; Dong, Xiaomei; Yang, Huan; Liu, Wen-bin; Zhou, Niya; Han, Xue; Zhou, Ziyuan; Cui, Zhihong; Liu, Jing-yi; Cao, Jia; Ao, Lin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the association between polymorphisms of DNA repair genes and chromosomal damage of 1,3-butadiene- (BD-) exposed workers. The study was conducted in 45 pairs of occupationally exposed workers in a BD product workshop and matched control workers in an administrative office and a circulatory water workshop in China. Newly developed biomarkers (micronuclei, MNi; nucleoplasmic bridges, NPBs; nuclear buds, NBUDs) in the cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus (CBMN) cytome assay were adopted to detect chromosomal damage. PCR and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) are adopted to analyze polymorphisms of DNA repair genes, such as X-ray repair cross-complementing Group 1 (XRCC1), O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), poly (adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerases (ADPRT), and apurinic/apyrimidinic endonucleases (APE1). The BD-exposed workers exhibited increased frequencies of MNi and NPBs when compared to subjects in the control group. The results also show that the BD-exposed workers carrying XRCC1 diplotypes TCGA-CCGG (4.25 ± 2.06 ‰) (FR = 2.10, 95% CI: 1.03-4.28) and TCGG-TCGA (5.80 ± 3.56 ‰) (FR = 2.75, 95% CI: 0.76-2.65) had statistically higher NBUD frequencies than those who carried diplotype TCGG-TCGG (1.89 ± 1.27 ‰). Our study suggests that polymorphisms of XRCC1 gene may influence chromosomal damage in BD-exposed workers.

  1. The novel quinolone CHM-1 induces DNA damage and inhibits DNA repair gene expressions in a human osterogenic sarcoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hung-Yi; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Yang, Jai-Sing; Kuo, Sheng-Chu; Lo, Chyi; Yang, Mei-Due; Chiu, Tsan-Hung; Chueh, Fu-Shin; Ho, Heng-Chien; Ko, Yang-Ching; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2010-10-01

    20-Fluoro-6,7-methylenedioxy-2-phenyl-4-quino-lone (CHM-1) has been reported to induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in many types of cancer cells. However, there is no available information to show CHM-1 affecting DNA damage and expression of associated repair genes. Herein, we investigated whether or not CHM-1 induced DNA damage and affected DNA repair gene expression in U-2 OS human osterogenic sarcoma cells. The comet assay showed that incubation of U-2 OS cells with 0, 0.75, 1.5, 3 and 6 μM of CHM-1 led to a longer DNA migration smear (comet tail). DNA gel electrophoresis showed that 3 μM of CHM-1 for 24 and 48 h treatment induced DNA fragmentation in U-2 OS cells. Real-time PCR analysis showed that treatment with 3 μM of CHM-1 for 24 h reduced the mRNA expression levels of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), ataxia-telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR), breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1), 14-3-3sigma (14-3-3σ), DNA-dependent serine/threonine protein kinase (DNA-PK) and O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) genes in a time-dependent manner. Taken together, the results indicate that CHM-1 caused DNA damage and reduced DNA repair genes in U-2 OS cells, which may be the mechanism for CHM-1-inhibited cell growth and induction of apoptosis.

  2. 40 CFR 798.5500 - Differential growth inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: âBacterial DNA damage or repair tests.â 798.5500 Section... inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA damage or repair tests.” (a... killing or growth inhibition of repair deficient bacteria in a set of repair proficient and deficient...

  3. Comparative kinetics of damage to the plasma and mitochondrial membranes by intra-cellularly synthesized and externally-provided photosensitizers using multi-color FACS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haupt, Sara; Malik, Zvi; Ehrenberg, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) of cancer involves inflicting lethal damage to the cells of malignant tumors, primarily by singlet oxygen that is generated following light-absorption in a photosensitizer molecule. Dysfunction of cells is manifested in many ways, including peroxidation of cellular components, membrane rupture, depolarization of electric potentials, termination of mitochondrial activity, onset of apoptosis and necrosis and eventually cell lysis. These events do not necessarily occur in linear fashion and different types of damage to cell components occur, most probably, in parallel. In this report we measured the relative rates of damage to two cellular membranes: the plasma membrane and the mitochondrial membrane. We employed photosensitizers of diverse hydrophobicities and used different incubation procedures, which lead to their different intra-cellular localizations. We monitored the damage that was inflicted on these membranes, by employing optical probes of membrane integrity, in a multi-color FACS experiment. The potentiometric indicator JC-1 monitored the electric cross-membrane potential of the mitochondria and the fluorometric indicator Draq7 monitored the rupture of the plasma membrane. We show that the electric depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane and the damage to the enveloping plasma membrane proceed with different kinetics that reflect the molecular character and intracellular location of the sensitizer: PpIX that is synthesized in the cells from ALA causes rapid mitochondrial damage and very slow damage to the plasma membrane, while externally added PpIX has an opposite effect. The hydrophilic sensitizer HypS4 can be taken up by the cells by different incubation conditions, and these affect its intracellular location, and as a consequence either the plasma membrane or the mitochondria is damaged first. A similar correlation was found for additional extracellularly-provided photosensitizers HP and PpIX.

  4. Impact of 1.8-GHz radiofrequency radiation (RFR) on DNA damage and repair induced by doxorubicin in human B-cell lymphoblastoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhijian, Chen; Xiaoxue, Li; Yezhen, Lu; Shijie, Chen; Lifen, Jin; Jianlin, Lou; Deqiang, Lu; Jiliang, He

    2010-01-01

    In the present in vitro study, a comet assay was used to determine whether 1.8-GHz radiofrequency radiation (RFR, SAR of 2W/kg) can influence DNA repair in human B-cell lymphoblastoid cells exposed to doxorubicin (DOX) at the doses of 0microg/ml, 0.05microg/ml, 0.075microg/ml, 0.10microg/ml, 0.15microg/ml and 0.20microg/ml. The combinative exposures to RFR with DOX were divided into five categories. DNA damage was detected at 0h, 6h, 12h, 18h and 24h after exposure to DOX via the comet assay, and the percent of DNA in the tail (% tail DNA) served as the indicator of DNA damage. The results demonstrated that (1) RFR could not directly induce DNA damage of human B-cell lymphoblastoid cells; (2) DOX could significantly induce DNA damage of human B-cell lymphoblastoid cells with the dose-effect relationship, and there were special repair characteristics of DNA damage induced by DOX; (3) E-E-E type (exposure to RFR for 2h, then simultaneous exposure to RFR and DOX, and exposure to RFR for 6h, 12h, 18h and 24h after exposure to DOX) combinative exposure could obviously influence DNA repair at 6h and 12h after exposure to DOX for four DOX doses (0.075microg/ml, 0.10microg/ml, 0.15microg/ml and 0.20microg/ml) in human B-cell lymphoblastoid cells. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. BioSentinel: Mission Development of a Radiation Biosensor to Gauge DNA Damage and Repair Beyond Low Earth Orbit on a 6U Nanosatellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Hugo; Lewis, Brian; Hanel, Robert

    2015-01-01

    We are designing and developing a 6U (10 x 22 x 34 cm; 14 kg) nanosatellite as a secondary payload to fly aboard NASAs Space Launch System (SLS) Exploration Mission (EM) 1, scheduled for launch in late 2017. For the first time in over forty years, direct experimental data from biological studies beyond low Earth orbit (LEO) will be obtained during BioSentinels 12- to 18-month mission. BioSentinel will measure the damage and repair of DNA in a biological organism and allow us to compare that to information from onboard physical radiation sensors. In order to understand the relative contributions of the space environments two dominant biological perturbations, reduced gravity and ionizing radiation, results from deep space will be directly compared to data obtained in LEO (on ISS) and on Earth. These data points will be available for validation of existing biological radiation damage and repair models, and for extrapolation to humans, to assist in mitigating risks during future long-term exploration missions beyond LEO. The BioSentinel Payload occupies 4U of the spacecraft and will utilize the monocellular eukaryotic organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) to report DNA double-strand-break (DSB) events that result from ambient space radiation. DSB repair exhibits striking conservation of repair proteins from yeast to humans. Yeast was selected because of 1) its similarity to cells in higher organisms, 2) the well-established history of strains engineered to measure DSB repair, 3) its spaceflight heritage, and 4) the wealth of available ground and flight reference data. The S. cerevisiae flight strain will include engineered genetic defects to prevent growth and division until a radiation-induced DSB activates the yeasts DNA repair mechanisms. The triggered culture growth and metabolic activity directly indicate a DSB and its successful repair. The yeast will be carried in the dry state within the 1-atm PL container in 18 separate fluidics cards with each card

  6. XRCC1 coordinates disparate responses and multiprotein repair complexes depending on the nature and context of the DNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanssen-Bauer, Audun; Solvang-Garten, Karin; Sundheim, Ottar

    2011-01-01

    XRCC1 is a scaffold protein capable of interacting with several DNA repair proteins. Here we provide evidence for the presence of XRCC1 in different complexes of sizes from 200 to 1500 kDa, and we show that immunoprecipitates using XRCC1 as bait are capable of complete repair of AP sites via both...

  7. Human longevity and variation in DNA damage response and repair: study of the contribution of sub-processes using competitive gene-set analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debrabant, Birgit; Soerensen, Mette; Flachsbart, Friederike; Dato, Serena; Mengel-From, Jonas; Stevnsner, Tinna; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Kruse, Torben A; Schreiber, Stefan; Nebel, Almut; Christensen, Kaare; Tan, Qihua; Christiansen, Lene

    2014-09-01

    DNA-damage response and repair are crucial to maintain genetic stability, and are consequently considered central to aging and longevity. Here, we investigate whether this pathway overall associates to longevity, and whether specific sub-processes are more strongly associated with longevity than others. Data were applied on 592 SNPs from 77 genes involved in nine sub-processes: DNA-damage response, base excision repair (BER), nucleotide excision repair, mismatch repair, non-homologous end-joining, homologous recombinational repair (HRR), RecQ helicase activities (RECQ), telomere functioning and mitochondrial DNA processes. The study population was 1089 long-lived and 736 middle-aged Danes. A self-contained set-based test of all SNPs displayed association with longevity (P-value=9.9 × 10(-5)), supporting that the overall pathway could affect longevity. Investigation of the nine sub-processes using the competitive gene-set analysis by Wang et al indicated that BER, HRR and RECQ associated stronger with longevity than the respective remaining genes of the pathway (P-values=0.004-0.048). For HRR and RECQ, only one gene contributed to the significance, whereas for BER several genes contributed. These associations did, however, generally not pass correction for multiple testing. Still, these findings indicate that, of the entire pathway, variation in BER might influence longevity the most. These modest sized P-values were not replicated in a German sample. This might, though, be due to differences in genotyping procedures and investigated SNPs, potentially inducing differences in the coverage of gene regions. Specifically, five genes were not covered at all in the German data. Therefore, investigations in additional study populations are needed before final conclusion can be drawn.

  8. Prevalence of Germline Mutations in Genes Engaged in DNA Damage Repair by Homologous Recombination in Patients with Triple-Negative and Hereditary Non-Triple-Negative Breast Cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Domagala

    Full Text Available This study sought to assess the prevalence of common germline mutations in several genes engaged in the repair of DNA double-strand break by homologous recombination in patients with triple-negative breast cancers and hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancers. Tumors deficient in this type of DNA damage repair are known to be especially sensitive to DNA cross-linking agents (e.g., platinum drugs and to poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP inhibitors.Genetic testing was performed for 36 common germline mutations in genes engaged in the repair of DNA by homologous recombination, i.e., BRCA1, BRCA2, CHEK2, NBN, ATM, PALB2, BARD1, and RAD51D, in 202 consecutive patients with triple-negative breast cancers and hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancers.Thirty five (22.2% of 158 patients in the triple-negative group carried mutations in genes involved in DNA repair by homologous recombination, while 10 (22.7% of the 44 patients in the hereditary non-triple-negative group carried such mutations. Mutations in BRCA1 were most frequent in patients with triple-negative breast cancer (18.4%, and mutations in CHEK2 were most frequent in patients with hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancers (15.9%. In addition, in the triple-negative group, mutations in CHEK2, NBN, and ATM (3.8% combined were found, while mutations in BRCA1, NBN, and PALB2 (6.8% combined were identified in the hereditary non-triple-negative group.Identifying mutations in genes engaged in DNA damage repair by homologous recombination other than BRCA1/2 can substantially increase the proportion of patients with triple-negative breast cancer and hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancer who may be eligible for therapy using PARP inhibitors and platinum drugs.

  9. Studies of DNA repair in saccharomyces cerevisiae. I. Characterization of a new allele of RAD6. II. Investigation of events in the first cell cycle after DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douthwright-Fasse, Jane Ann

    1979-01-01

    Studies in two independent, but related, areas of DNA repair have been carried out in Saccharomyces cerevisiae; characterization of a new allele in the RAD6 gene which suggests that the gene is multifunctional, and utilization of photoreactivation as a probe of events occurring during the first cell cycle after DNA damage. Strains carrying the new allele, designated rad6-4, are as sensitive to uv and ionizing radiation as those carrying rad6-1 or rad6-3 but, unlike them, are capable of induced mutagenesis and sporulation. Although rad6-4 may well be a missense mutation, the evidence shows that it is unlikely that this phenotype is due to leakiness. Instead, the data suggest that the RAD6 gene is multifunctional. One function is necessary to recover from DNA damage in an error-free manner, and the other is concerned with mutagenic processes and sporulation. Rad6-1 and rad6-3 strains are deficient in both of these functions, while rad6-4 strains are deficient only in the error-free function. The loss of photoreversibility (LOP) of ultraviolet induced mutations to arginine independence in an excision defective strain carrying arg4-17 examines the events occurring in the first cell cycle after DNA damage. LOP is dependent upon de novo protein synthesis. LOP begins immediately after UV irradiation, before semiconservative DNA synthesis takes place, and is complete after four hours in growth medium.There is no evidence indicating whether the normal function of the protein is involved in excision repair, or in one of the two repair processes believed to be inducible; induced mutagenesis or recombinational repair.

  10. Is the Oxidative DNA Damage Level of Human Lymphocyte Correlated with the Antioxidant Capacity of Serum or the Base Excision Repair Activity of Lymphocyte?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Chih Tsai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A random screening of human blood samples from 24 individuals of nonsmoker was conducted to examine the correlation between the oxidative DNA damage level of lymphocytes and the antioxidant capacity of serum or the base excision repair (BER activity of lymphocytes. The oxidative DNA damage level was measured with comet assay containing Fpg/Endo III cleavage, and the BER activity was estimated with a modified comet assay including nuclear extract of lymphocytes for enzymatic cleavage. Antioxidant capacity was determined with trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity assay. We found that though the endogenous DNA oxidation levels varied among the individuals, each individual level appeared to be steady for at least 1 month. Our results indicate that the oxidative DNA damage level is insignificantly or weakly correlated with antioxidant capacity or BER activity, respectively. However, lymphocytes from carriers of Helicobacter pylori (HP or Hepatitis B virus (HBV tend to give higher levels of oxidative DNA damage (P<0.05. Though sera of this group of individuals show no particular tendency with reduced antioxidant capacity, the respective BER activities of lymphocytes are lower in average (P<0.05. Thus, reduction of repair activity may be associated with the genotoxic effect of HP or HBV infection.

  11. Small RNA-mediated repair of UV-induced DNA lesions by the DNA DAMAGE-BINDING PROTEIN 2 and ARGONAUTE 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalk, Catherine; Cognat, Valérie; Graindorge, Stéfanie; Vincent, Timothée; Voinnet, Olivier; Molinier, Jean

    2017-04-04

    As photosynthetic organisms, plants need to prevent irreversible UV-induced DNA lesions. Through an unbiased, genome-wide approach, we have uncovered a previously unrecognized interplay between Global Genome Repair and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) in the recognition of DNA photoproducts, prevalently in intergenic regions. Genetic and biochemical approaches indicate that, upon UV irradiation, the DNA DAMAGE-BINDING PROTEIN 2 (DDB2) and ARGONAUTE 1 (AGO1) of Arabidopsis thaliana form a chromatin-bound complex together with 21-nt siRNAs, which likely facilitates recognition of DNA damages in an RNA/DNA complementary strand-specific manner. The biogenesis of photoproduct-associated siRNAs involves the noncanonical, concerted action of RNA POLYMERASE IV, RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE-2, and DICER-LIKE-4. Furthermore, the chromatin association/dissociation of the DDB2-AGO1 complex is under the control of siRNA abundance and DNA damage signaling. These findings reveal unexpected nuclear functions for DCL4 and AGO1, and shed light on the interplay between small RNAs and DNA repair recognition factors at damaged sites.

  12. Protection of radiation induced DNA and membrane damages by total triterpenes isolated from Ganoderma lucidum (Fr.) P. Karst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smina, T P; Maurya, D K; Devasagayam, T P A; Janardhanan, K K

    2015-05-25

    The total triterpenes isolated from the fruiting bodies of Ganoderma lucidum was examined for its potential to prevent γ-radiation induced membrane damage in rat liver mitochondria and microsomes. The effects of total triterpenes on γ-radiation-induced DNA strand breaks in pBR 322 plasmid DNA in vitro and human peripheral blood lymphocytes ex vivo were evaluated. The protective effect of total triterpenes against γ-radiation-induced micronuclei formations in mice bone marrow cells in vivo were also evaluated. The results indicated the significant effectiveness of Ganoderma triterpenes in protecting the DNA and membrane damages consequent to the hazardous effects of radiation. The findings suggest the potential use of Ganoderma triterpenes in radio therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Suppression of Jab1/CSN5 induces radio- and chemo-sensitivity in nasopharyngeal carcinoma through changes to the DNA damage and repair pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Y; Zhang, Q; Atsaves, V; Yang, H; Claret, F X

    2013-05-30

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is an Epstein-Barr virus-associated malignancy most common in East Asia and Africa. Radiotherapy and cisplatin-based chemotherapy are the main treatment options. Unfortunately, disease response to concurrent chemoradiotherapy varies among patients with NPC, and many cases are resistant to cisplatin. Increased DNA damage repair is one of the mechanisms contributing to this resistance. Jab1/CSN5 is a multifunctional protein that participates in controlling cell proliferation and the stability of multiple proteins. Jab1 overexpression has been found to correlate with poor prognosis in several tumor types. However, the biological significance of Jab1 activity in response to cancer treatment is unclear. In this study, we used three NPC cell lines (CNE1, CNE2 and HONE1) to investigate the hypothesis that Jab1 positively regulates the DNA repair protein Rad51 and, in turn, cellular response to treatment with DNA-damaging agents such as cisplatin, ionizing radiation (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) radiation. We found that Jab1 was overexpressed in two relatively cisplatin-, IR- and UV-resistant NPC cell lines, and knocking down its expression conferred sensitivity to cisplatin, IR and UV radiation. By contrast, exogenous Jab1 expression enhanced the resistance of NPC cells to cisplatin, IR and UV radiation. Moreover, we provide a mechanism by which Jab1 positively regulated Rad51 through p53-dependent pathway, and increased ectopic expression of Rad51 conferred cellular resistance to cisplatin, IR and UV radiation in Jab1-deficient cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that Jab1 has an important role in the cellular response to cisplatin and irradiation by regulating DNA damage and repair pathways. Therefore, Jab1 is a novel biomarker for predicting the outcome of patients with NPC who are treated with DNA-damaging agents.

  14. Partial loss of the DNA repair scaffolding protein, Xrcc1, results in increased brain damage and reduced recovery from ischemic stroke in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Somnath; Canugovi, Chandrika; Yoon, Jeong Seon; Wilson, David M; Croteau, Deborah L; Mattson, Mark P; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2015-07-01

    Oxidative DNA damage is mainly repaired by base excision repair (BER). Previously, our laboratory showed that mice lacking the BER glycosylases 8-oxoguanine glycosylase 1 (Ogg1) or nei endonuclease VIII-like 1 (Neil1) recover more poorly from focal ischemic stroke than wild-type mice. Here, a mouse model was used to investigate whether loss of 1 of the 2 alleles of X-ray repair cross-complementing protein 1 (Xrcc1), which encodes a nonenzymatic scaffold protein required for BER, alters recovery from stroke. Ischemia and reperfusion caused higher brain damage and lower functional recovery in Xrcc1(+/-) mice than in wild-type mice. Additionally, a greater percentage of Xrcc1(+/-) mice died as a result of the stroke. Brain samples from human individuals who died of stroke and individuals who died of non-neurological causes were assayed for various steps of BER. Significant losses of thymine glycol incision, abasic endonuclease incision, and single nucleotide incorporation activities were identified, as well as lower expression of XRCC1 and NEIL1 proteins in stroke brains compared with controls. Together, these results suggest that impaired BER is a risk factor in ischemic brain injury and contributes to its recovery.

  15. Comprehensive SNP scan of DNA repair and DNA damage response genes reveal multiple susceptibility loci conferring risk to tobacco associated leukoplakia and oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Pinaki; Datta, Sayantan; Maiti, Guru Prasad; Baral, Aradhita; Jha, Ganga Nath; Panda, Chinmay Kumar; Chowdhury, Shantanu; Ghosh, Saurabh; Roy, Bidyut; Roychoudhury, Susanta

    2013-01-01

    Polymorphic variants of DNA repair and damage response genes play major role in carcinogenesis. These variants are suspected as predisposition factors to Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC). For identification of susceptible variants affecting OSCC development in Indian population, the "maximally informative" method of SNP selection from HapMap data to non-HapMap populations was applied. Three hundred twenty-five SNPs from 11 key genes involved in double strand break repair, mismatch repair and DNA damage response pathways were genotyped on a total of 373 OSCC, 253 leukoplakia and 535 unrelated control individuals. The significantly associated SNPs were validated in an additional cohort of 144 OSCC patients and 160 controls. The rs12515548 of MSH3 showed significant association with OSCC both in the discovery and validation phases (discovery P-value: 1.43E-05, replication P-value: 4.84E-03). Two SNPs (rs12360870 of MRE11A, P-value: 2.37E-07 and rs7003908 of PRKDC, P-value: 7.99E-05) were found to be significantly associated only with leukoplakia. Stratification of subjects based on amount of tobacco consumption identified SNPs that were associated with either high or low tobacco exposed group. The study reveals a synergism between associated SNPs and lifestyle factors in predisposition to OSCC and leukoplakia.

  16. Normal repair of ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage in familial melanoma without CDKN2A or CDK4 gene mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, J A; Matias, C; Luxford, C; Kefford, R F; Mann, G J

    1999-04-01

    Excessive sun exposure and family history are strong risk factors for the development of cutaneous melanoma. Inherited susceptibility to this type of skin cancer could therefore result from constitutively impaired capacity to repair ultraviolet (UV)-induced DNA lesions. While a proportion of familial melanoma kindreds exhibit germline mutations in the cell cycle regulatory gene CDKN2A (p16INK4a) or its protein target, cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4), the biochemical basis of most familial melanoma is unknown. We have examined lymphoblastoid cell lines from melanoma-affected and unaffected individuals from large hereditary melanoma kindreds which are not attributable to CDKN2A or CDK4 gene mutation. These lines were tested for sensitivity of clonogenic growth to UV radiation and for their ability to repair transfected UV-damaged plasmid templates (host cell reactivation). Two of seven affected-unaffected pairs differed in colony survival after exposure to UVB radiation; however, no significant differences were observed in the host-cell reactivation assays. These results indicate that melanoma susceptibility genes other than CDKN2A and CDK4 do not impair net capacity to repair UV-induced DNA damage.

  17. Mechanism of Inhibition of Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide-Induced Membrane Damage by a Small Organic Fluorogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoxu; Wan, Mingwei; Gao, Lianghui; Fang, Weihai

    2016-02-01

    Human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) is believed to be responsible for the death of insulin-producing β-cells. However, the mechanism of membrane damage at the molecular level has not been fully elucidated. In this article, we employ coarse- grained dissipative particle dynamics simulations to study the interactions between a lipid bilayer membrane composed of 70% zwitterionic lipids and 30% anionic lipids and hIAPPs with α-helical structures. We demonstrated that the key factor controlling pore formation is the combination of peptide charge-induced electroporation and peptide hydrophobicity-induced lipid disordering and membrane thinning. According to these mechanisms, we suggest that a water-miscible tetraphenylethene BSPOTPE is a potent inhibitor to rescue hIAPP-induced cytotoxicity. Our simulations predict that BSPOTPE molecules can bind directly to the helical regions of hIAPP and form oligomers with separated hydrophobic cores and hydrophilic shells. The micelle-like hIAPP-BSPOTPE clusters tend to be retained in the water/membrane interface and aggregate therein rather than penetrate into the membrane. Electrostatic attraction between BSPOTPE and hIAPP also reduces the extent of hIAPP binding to the anionic lipid bilayer. These two modes work together and efficiently prevent membrane poration.

  18. Mitochondrial DNA damage associated with lipid peroxidation of the mitochondrial membrane induced by Fe2+-citrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa M. Almeida

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Iron imbalance/accumulation has been implicated in oxidative injury associated with many degenerative diseases such as hereditary hemochromatosis, beta-thalassemia, and Friedreich's ataxia. Mitochondria are particularly sensitive to iron-induced oxidative stress - high loads of iron cause extensive lipid peroxidation and membrane permeabilization in isolated mitochondria. Here we detected and characterized mitochondrial DNA damage in isolated rat liver mitochondria exposed to a Fe2+-citrate complex, a small molecular weight complex. Intense DNA fragmentation was induced after the incubation of mitochondria with the iron complex. The detection of 3' phosphoglycolate ends at the mtDNA strand breaks by a 32P-postlabeling assay, suggested the involvement of hydroxyl radical in the DNA fragmentation induced by Fe2+-citrate. Increased levels of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine also suggested that Fe2+-citrate-induced oxidative stress causes mitochondrial DNA damage. In conclusion, our results show that iron-mediated lipid peroxidation was associated with intense mtDNA damage derived from the direct attack of reactive oxygen species.Desequilíbrio/acúmulo de ferro tem sido implicado em injúria oxidativa associada a diversas doenças degenerativas tais como, hemocromatose hereditária, beta-talassemia e ataxia de Friedreich. As mitocôndrias são particularmente sensíveis a estresse oxidativo induzido por ferro - um carregamento alto de ferro em mitocôndrias isoladas pode causar uma extensiva peroxidação lipídica e a permeabilização de membrana. Nesse estudo, nós detectamos e caracterizamos danos do DNA mitocondrial em mitocôndrias isoladas de fígado de rato, expostas ao complexo Fe2+-citrato, um dos complexos de baixo peso molecular. A intensa fragmentação do DNA foi induzida após a incubação das mitocôndrias com o complexo de ferro. A detecção de finais 3' de fosfoglicolato nas quebras de fitas de DNA mitocondrial pelo ensaio 32

  19. Impact of Neuronal Membrane Damage on the Local Field Potential in a Large-Scale Simulation of Cerebral Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L. Boothe

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Within multiscale brain dynamics, the structure–function relationship between cellular changes at a lower scale and coordinated oscillations at a higher scale is not well understood. This relationship may be particularly relevant for understanding functional impairments after a mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI when current neuroimaging methods do not reveal morphological changes to the brain common in moderate to severe TBI such as diffuse axonal injury or gray matter lesions. Here, we created a physiology-based model of cerebral cortex using a publicly released modeling framework (GEneral NEural SImulation System to explore the possibility that performance deficits characteristic of blast-induced mTBI may reflect dysfunctional, local network activity influenced by microscale neuronal damage at the cellular level. We operationalized microscale damage to neurons as the formation of pores on the neuronal membrane based on research using blast paradigms, and in our model, pores were simulated by a change in membrane conductance. We then tracked changes in simulated electrical activity. Our model contained 585 simulated neurons, comprised of 14 types of cortical and thalamic neurons each with its own compartmental morphology and electrophysiological properties. Comparing the functional activity of neurons before and after simulated damage, we found that simulated pores in the membrane reduced both action potential generation and local field potential (LFP power in the 1–40 Hz range of the power spectrum. Furthermore, the location of damage modulated the strength of these effects: pore formation on simulated axons reduced LFP power more strongly than did pore formation on the soma and the dendrites. These results indicate that even small amounts of cellular damage can negatively impact functional activity of larger scale oscillations, and our findings suggest that multiscale modeling provides a promising avenue to elucidate these relationships.

  20. [Effect of damage integrity rat brain synaptic membranes on the functional activity GABA(A)-receptor/Cl(-)-ionophore complex in the CNC].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebrov, I G; Kalinina, M V

    2013-01-01

    Functional activity of the CGABA(A)-receptor/Cl(-) ionophore complex was investigated the muscimol-stimulated entry of the radioactive isotope 36Cl(-) in synaptoneurosomes in changing the structure and permeability of neuronal membranes. Integrity of the membranes was damaged by removal of Ca(+2) and Mg(+2) from the incubation medium and by the method of freezing-thawing synaptoneurosomes. In both cases, an increase in basal 36Cl(-) entry into synaptoneurosomes, indicating increased nonspecific permeability of neuronal membranes, and decreased activity the CABA(A)-receptor/Cl(-) ionophore complex. The conclusion about the relationship of processes damage neuronal membranes and reducing the inhibitory processes in the epileptic focus.

  1. Effect of increased intake of dietary animal fat and fat energy on oxidative damage, mutation frequency, DNA adduct level and DNA repair in rat colon and liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Ulla; Daneshvar, Bahram; Autrup, Herman;

    2003-01-01

    was observed. Intake of lard fat resulted in increased ascorbate synthesis and affected markers of oxidative damage to proteins in liver cytosol, but not in plasma. The effect was observed at all lard doses and was not dose-dependent. However, no evidence of increased oxidative DNA damage was found in liver...... supplemented with 0, 3, 10 or 30% w/w lard. After 3 weeks, the mutation frequency, DNA repair gene expression, DNA damage and oxidative markers were determined in liver, colon and plasma. The mutation frequency of the lambda gene cII did not increase with increased fat or energy intake in colon or liver....... The DNA-adduct level measured by 32P-postlabelling decreased in both liver and colon with increased fat intake. In liver, this was accompanied by a 2-fold increase of the mRNA level of nucleotide excision repair (NER) gene ERCC1. In colon, a non-statistically significant increase in the ERCC1 mRNA levels...

  2. Effect of increased intake of dietary animal fat and fat energy on oxidative damage, mutation frequency, DNA adduct level and DNA repair in rat colon and liver