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Sample records for repair radiation-induced breaks

  1. Repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks in isolated nuclei of Physarum polycephalum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brewer, E.N.

    1979-08-01

    Radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks are rejoined in homogenates and isolated nuclei of Physarum polycephalum. In agreement with results obtained previously for intact plasmodia, double-strand breaks are less extensively repaired in nuclei isolated from S-phase, as compared to G/sub 2/-phase, cultures. A corresponding propensity of DNA present in unirradiated nuclei of S-phase plasmodia toward breakage during incubation in vitro was observed. Repair of putative single-strand breaks, as ascertained from alkaline sucrose density-gradient centrifugation analysis, was not observed. The possible relationships between these phenomena are discussed.

  2. Recombinational repair of radiation-induced double-strand breaks occurs in the absence of extensive resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westmoreland, James W.; Resnick, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Recombinational repair provides accurate chromosomal restitution after double-strand break (DSB) induction. While all DSB recombination repair models include 5′-3′ resection, there are no studies that directly assess the resection needed for repair between sister chromatids in G-2 arrested cells of random, radiation-induced ‘dirty’ DSBs. Using our Pulse Field Gel Electrophoresis-shift approach, we determined resection at IR-DSBs in WT and mutants lacking exonuclease1 or Sgs1 helicase. Lack of either reduced resection length by half, without decreased DSB repair or survival. In the exo1Δ sgs1Δ double mutant, resection was barely detectable, yet it only took an additional hour to achieve a level of repair comparable to WT and there was only a 2-fold dose-modifying effect on survival. Results with a Dnl4 deletion strain showed that remaining repair was not due to endjoining. Thus, similar to what has been shown for a single, clean HO-induced DSB, a severe reduction in resection tract length has only a modest effect on repair of multiple, dirty DSBs in G2-arrested cells. Significantly, this study provides the first opportunity to directly relate resection length at DSBs to the capability for global recombination repair between sister chromatids. PMID:26503252

  3. Detection and repair of ionizing radiation induced DNA double strand breaks: new developments in non-homologous end joining

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Chen; Lees-Miller, Susan P.

    2013-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are considered the most cytotoxic form of DNA damage. In human cells, the major pathway for the repair of ionizing radiation (IR)-induced DSBs is non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Here we discuss recent developments in our understanding of the mechanism of NHEJ, the proteins involved and its regulation.

  4. Determination of human DNA polymerase utilization for the repair of a model ionizing radiation-induced DNA strand break lesion in a defined vector substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, T. A.; Russell, P. S.; Kohli, M.; Dar, M. E.; Neumann, R. D.; Jorgensen, T. J.

    1999-01-01

    Human DNA polymerase and DNA ligase utilization for the repair of a major class of ionizing radiation-induced DNA lesion [DNA single-strand breaks containing 3'-phosphoglycolate (3'-PG)] was examined using a novel, chemically defined vector substrate containing a single, site-specific 3'-PG single-strand break lesion. In addition, the major human AP endonuclease, HAP1 (also known as APE1, APEX, Ref-1), was tested to determine if it was involved in initiating repair of 3'-PG-containing single-strand break lesions. DNA polymerase beta was found to be the primary polymerase responsible for nucleotide incorporation at the lesion site following excision of the 3'-PG blocking group. However, DNA polymerase delta/straightepsilon was also capable of nucleotide incorporation at the lesion site following 3'-PG excision. In addition, repair reactions catalyzed by DNA polymerase beta were found to be most effective in the presence of DNA ligase III, while those catalyzed by DNA polymerase delta/straightepsilon appeared to be more effective in the presence of DNA ligase I. Also, it was demonstrated that the repair initiating 3'-PG excision reaction was not dependent upon HAP1 activity, as judged by inhibition of HAP1 with neutralizing HAP1-specific polyclonal antibody.

  5. A modified fluorimetric neutral filter elution method for analyzing radiation-induced double strand break and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goutham, Venkatesh H; Kamalesh, Mumbrekar D; Guruprasad, Parashiva K; Vadhiraja, Manjunath B; Satyamoorthy, Kapaettu; Rao Bola Satish, Sadashiva

    2011-07-15

    Neutral filter elution assay is one of the methods used for detection of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). However, it is laborious, expensive, and hazardous (radiolabeled precursors for DSB detection and scintillation counter for quantification), making it a less preferred method for DSB detection. In the present study, an attempt was made to improve the existing neutral filter elution assay by making use of fluorescent dye (PicoGreen) and microfiltration assembly for eluting the fragmented DNA, thereby reducing the cost and time required for the assay. We studied the effect of dye dilution, pH conditions, and cell number as a part of method standardization. X-ray dose-response and repair kinetics in lymphocytes as well as cell lines were studied for validating the sensitivity of the assay. A linear dose-response relationship for DSBs was observed at a cell number of 4×10(5)cells, a dye dilution of 500-fold, and at pH 10. Repair kinetics revealed a time-dependent repair of DSBs up to 360 min of posttreatment, indicating its usefulness in DSB repair studies. In conclusion, the present modified method is more efficient (in terms of cell number), cost effective, less time-consuming, and less hazardous compared to the existing method. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Individual repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks in lymphocytes. Implications for radiation-induced dermatitis in breast cancer; Die individuelle Reparatur von strahleninduzierten DNA-Doppelstrangbruechen in Lymphozyten. Implikationen fuer die radiogene Dermatitis beim Mammakarzinom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melchior, Patrick Wilhelm

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: Adjuvant 'whole breast radiotherapy' (WBRT) is the standard of care after breast conserving surgery in women with breast cancer. Throughout different cancer stages the addition of WBRT leads to significantly improved rates of freedom from local failure and overall survival. WBRT is generally well tolerated. A 5-10%-rate of severe acute or long-term side effects is commonly observed. For both radiation-mediated tumor-cell-elimination and induction of side effects, DNA-double-strand-breaks (DSB) presumably play the decisive role. The intensity of normal tissue reactions in radiotherapy can, in part, be attributed to the intrinsic DSB repair-capacity. In this study in vivo and in vitro experiments are carried through in order to assess DSB repair-kinetics in blood lymphocytes of women with breast cancer. These findings are to be correlated with the degree of radiation-induced normal tissue toxicity. Patients and Methods: Eighteen patients with breast cancer, in whom WBRT was indicated, were examined. A total WBRT dose of 50 Gy (single dose 2 Gy) with an additional boost-radiotherapy to the initial tumor-region to a total dose of 60-66 Gy was administered. DSB repair was determined by means of counting γ-H2AX foci in blood lymphocytes at predefined points in time, i.e. before and 0.5 h; 2.5 h; 5 h and 24 h after in vivo irradiation (1st fraction of WBRT) and before and 0.5 h; 2.5 h and 5 h after in vitro irradiation with increasing radiation doses in the range of 10 - 500 mGy. Acute normal tissue toxicity was scored on the basis of a modified RTOG-classification (main aspects were erythema and dry or moist skin desquamation). Results: DSB repair-halflife-times did not differ between patients with a higher or lower than average incidence of acute side effects. In patients with 'above average' side effects larger irradiation volumes were treated (volume surrounded by the 50%-isodose). Adjusted for these, no single patients showed elevated

  7. Impairment of the non-homologous end joining and homologous recombination pathways of DNA double strand break repair: Impact on spontaneous and radiation-induced mammary and intestinal tumour risk in Apc min/+ mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Jackie W; Coster, Margaret; Bouffler, Simon D

    2015-11-01

    Female Apc(min/+) mice carrying the BALB/c variant of Prkdc or heterozygous knockout for Xrcc2, were sham- or 2 Gy X-irradiated as adults to compare the effect of mild impairments of double-strand break (DSB) repair pathways, non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR) respectively on spontaneous and radiation-induced mammary and intestinal tumorigenesis. Mice with impaired NHEJ showed no difference in incidence of spontaneous mammary tumours, compared with matched controls, (2.46 fold, P=0.121) and significantly less following irradiation (radiation-induced excess; 0.35 fold, P=0.008). In contrast mice with impaired HR presented with significantly less spontaneous mammary tumours than matched controls (0.33 fold, P=0.027) and significantly more following irradiation (radiation-induced excess; 3.3 fold, P=0.016). Spontaneous and radiation-induced intestinal adenoma multiplicity in the same groups were significantly greater than matched controls for mice with impaired NHEJ (sham; 1.29 fold, P<0.001, radiation-induced excess; 2.55 fold, P<0.001) and mice with impaired HR showed no significant differences (sham; 0.92 fold, P=0.166, radiation-induced excess; 1.16, P=0.274). Genetic insertion events were common in spontaneous tumours from NHEJ impaired mice compared with matched controls. γH2AX foci analysis suggests a significantly faster rate of DSB repair (MANOVA P<0.001) in intestinal than mammary tissue; apoptosis was also higher in irradiated intestine. To conclude, results suggest that pathway of choice for repair of spontaneous and radiation-induced DSBs is influenced by tissue type. NHEJ appears to play a greater role in DSB repair in intestinal tissue since impairment by functional change of Prkdc significantly increases the rate of mis-repair in intestinal but not mammary tissue. HR appears to play a greater role in DSB repair in adult mammary tissue since impaired HR results in significant changes in mammary but not in the intestinal

  8. Feasibility of measuring radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks and their repair by pulsed field gel electrophoresis in freshly isolated cells from the mouse RIF-1 tumor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanWaarde, MAWH; vanAssen, AJ; Konings, AWT; Kampinga, HH

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the technical feasibility of pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) as a predictive assay for the radioresponsiveness of tumors. Induction and repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in a freshly prepared cell suspension from a RIF-1 tumor (irradiated ex vivo) was compared

  9. Adaptive response in mouse bone-marrow stromal cells exposed to 900-MHz radiofrequency fields: Gamma-radiation-induced DNA strand breaks and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yongxin; He, Qina; Sun, Yulong; Tong, Jian; Cao, Yi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether radiofrequency field (RF) preexposure induced adaptive responses (AR) in mouse bone-marrow stromal cells (BMSC) and the mechanisms underlying the observed findings. Cells were preexposed to 900-MHz radiofrequency fields (RF) at 120 μW/cm(2) power intensity for 4 h/d for 5 d. Some cells were subjected to 1.5 Gy γ-radiation (GR) 4 h following the last RF exposure. The intensity of strand breaks in the DNA was assessed immediately at 4 h. Subsequently, some BMSC were examined at 30, 60, 90, or 120 min utilizing the alkaline comet assay and γ-H2AX foci technique. Data showed no significant differences in number and intensity of strand breaks in DNA between RF-exposed and control cells. A significant increase in number and intensity of DNA strand breaks was noted in cells exposed to GR exposure alone. RF followed by GR exposure significantly decreased number of strand breaks and resulted in faster kinetics of repair of DNA strand breaks compared to GR alone. Thus, data suggest that RF preexposure protected cells from damage induced by GR. Evidence indicates that in RF-mediated AR more rapid repair kinetics occurs under conditions of GR-induced damage, which may be attributed to diminished DNA strand breakage.

  10. [Spontaneous and radiation-induced chromosome breaks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedeva, L I; Chubykin, V L

    1975-01-01

    It is shown by the study of the location of acentric fragments of chromosomes at metaphase and anaphase in the root cells of pea (cultivar "Capital"), in the cornea of rats (strain Wistar), in the bone marrow of mice (strain BALB), in the cultures of embryonic fibroblasts of mice (strain C57B1) and of embryonic human fibroblasts that some fragments are situated outside the equatorial plates, while others are situated within the plane of the equatorial plate. The fragments of the first type initiate mainly spontaneously, while the fragments of the second type are mainly induced by irradiation. These principles are observed in all the types of animal and plant cells studied. The location of the fragments observed in non-radiated cells could be explained if it be assumed, that all the chromosome breaks are realized before the prometaphase and by the beginning of the prometaphase the fragments are randomly distributed within the volume of the nucleus. At the prometaphase most fragments move from the equator to the pole of the cell and thus at the metaphase and anaphase are found to be located outside the equatorial plate. For the explanation of the observed ratio of the two types of fragments in an irradiated cell it is assumed that chromosome fragments resulting from breaks induced by irradiation are completely detached from chromosomes only after the beginning of the prometaphase. Possibly, the process of development of breaks is also not yet completed by this time, it continues and is completed at the metaphase, partially, at the anaphase of the mitosis.

  11. Radiatively induced breaking of conformal symmetry in a superpotential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbuzov, A. B.; Cirilo-Lombardo, D. J.

    2016-07-01

    Radiatively induced symmetry breaking is considered for a toy model with one scalar and one fermion field unified in a superfield. It is shown that the classical quartic self-interaction of the superfield possesses a quantum infrared singularity. Application of the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism for effective potential leads to the appearance of condensates and masses for both scalar and fermion components. That induces a spontaneous breaking of the initial classical symmetries: the supersymmetry and the conformal one. The energy scales for the scalar and fermion condensates appear to be of the same order, while the renormalization scale is many orders of magnitude higher. A possibility to relate the considered toy model to conformal symmetry breaking in the Standard Model is discussed.

  12. Radiatively Induced Breaking of Conformal Symmetry in a Superpotential

    CERN Document Server

    Arbuzov, A B

    2015-01-01

    Radiatively induced symmetry breaking is considered for a toy model with one scalar and one fermion field unified in a superfield. It is shown that the classical quartic self-interaction of the superfield possesses a quantum infrared singularity. Application of the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism for effective potential leads to the appearance of condensates and masses for both scalar and fermion components. That induces a spontaneous breaking of the initial classical symmetries: the supersymmetry and the conformal one. The energy scales for the scalar and fermion condensates appear to be of the same order, while the renormalization scale is many orders of magnitude higher. A possibility to relate the considered toy model to conformal symmetry breaking in the Standard Model is discussed.

  13. Radiatively induced breaking of conformal symmetry in a superpotential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbuzov, A.B. [Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Department of Higher Mathematics, Dubna State University, 141982 Dubna (Russian Federation); Cirilo-Lombardo, D.J., E-mail: diego777jcl@gmail.com [Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); National Institute of Plasma Physics (INFIP-CONICET), Department of Physics, FCEyN, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires 1428 (Argentina)

    2016-07-10

    Radiatively induced symmetry breaking is considered for a toy model with one scalar and one fermion field unified in a superfield. It is shown that the classical quartic self-interaction of the superfield possesses a quantum infrared singularity. Application of the Coleman–Weinberg mechanism for effective potential leads to the appearance of condensates and masses for both scalar and fermion components. That induces a spontaneous breaking of the initial classical symmetries: the supersymmetry and the conformal one. The energy scales for the scalar and fermion condensates appear to be of the same order, while the renormalization scale is many orders of magnitude higher. A possibility to relate the considered toy model to conformal symmetry breaking in the Standard Model is discussed.

  14. Radiation induced DNA double-strand breaks in radiology; Strahleninduzierte DNA-Doppelstrangbrueche in der Radiologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuefner, M.A. [Dornbirn Hospital (Austria). Dept. of Radiology; Brand, M.; Engert, C.; Uder, M. [Erlangen University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Schwab, S.A. [Radiologis, Oberasbach (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    Shortly after the discovery of X-rays, their damaging effect on biological tissues was observed. The determination of radiation exposure in diagnostic and interventional radiology is usually based on physical measurements or mathematical algorithms with standardized dose simulations. γ-H2AX immunofluorescence microscopy is a reliable and sensitive method for the quantification of radiation induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in blood lymphocytes. The detectable amount of these DNA damages correlates well with the dose received. However, the biological radiation damage depends not only on dose but also on other individual factors like radiation sensitivity and DNA repair capacity. Iodinated contrast agents can enhance the x-ray induced DNA damage level. After their induction DSB are quickly repaired. A protective effect of antioxidants has been postulated in experimental studies. This review explains the principle of the γ-H2AX technique and provides an overview on studies evaluating DSB in radiologic examinations.

  15. Excision repair of UV radiation-induced DNA damage in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartman, P.S.; Hevelone, J.; Dwarakanath, V.; Mitchell, D.L. (Texas Christian Univ., Fort Worth (USA))

    1989-06-01

    Radioimmunoassays were used to monitor the removal of antibody-binding sites associated with the two major UV radiation-induced DNA photoproducts (cyclobutane dimers and (6-4) photoproducts). Unlike with cultured human cells, where (6-4) photoproducts are removed more rapidly than cyclobutane dimers, the kinetics of repair were similar for both lesions. Repair capacity in wild type diminished throughout development. The radioimmunoassays were also employed to confirm the absence of photoreactivation in C. elegans. In addition, three radiation-sensitive mutants (rad-1, rad-2, rad-7) displayed normal repair capacities. An excision defect was much more pronounced in larvae than embryos in the fourth mutant tested (rad-3). This correlates with the hypersensitivity pattern of this mutant and suggests that DNA repair may be developmentally regulated in C. elegans. The mechanism of DNA repair in C. elegans as well as the relationship between the repair of specific photoproducts and UV radiation sensitivity during development are discussed.

  16. PTH1–34 Blocks Radiation-induced Osteoblast Apoptosis by Enhancing DNA Repair through Canonical Wnt Pathway*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Abhishek; Lin, Tiao; Zhu, Ji; Tong, Wei; Huo, Yanying; Jia, Haoruo; Zhang, Yejia; Liu, X. Sherry; Cengel, Keith; Xia, Bing; Qin, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Focal radiotherapy for cancer patients has detrimental effects on bones within the radiation field and the primary clinical signs of bone damage include the loss of functional osteoblasts. We reported previously that daily injection of parathyroid hormone (PTH, 1–34) alleviates radiation-induced osteopenia in a preclinical radiotherapy model by improving osteoblast survival. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms, we irradiated osteoblastic UMR 106-01 cells and calvarial organ culture and demonstrated an anti-apoptosis effect of PTH1–34 on these cultures. Inhibitor assay indicated that PTH exerts its radioprotective action mainly through protein kinase A/β-catenin pathway. γ-H2AX foci staining and comet assay revealed that PTH efficiently promotes the repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in irradiated osteoblasts via activating the β-catenin pathway. Interestingly, Wnt3a alone also blocked cell death and accelerated DNA repair in primary osteoprogenitors, osteoblastic and osteocytic cells after radiation through the canonical signaling. Further investigations revealed that both Wnt3a and PTH increase the amount of Ku70, a core protein for initiating the assembly of DSB repair machinery, in osteoblasts after radiation. Moreover, down-regulation of Ku70 by siRNA abrogated the prosurvival effect of PTH and Wnt3a on irradiated osteoblasts. In summary, our results identify a novel role of PTH and canonical Wnt signaling in regulating DSB repair machinery and apoptosis in osteoblasts and shed light on using PTH1–34 or Wnt agonist as possible therapy for radiation-induced osteoporosis. PMID:25336648

  17. Radiatively induced symmetry breaking and the conformally coupled magnetic monopole in AdS space

    CERN Document Server

    Edery, Ariel

    2013-01-01

    We implement quantum corrections for a magnetic monopole in a classically conformally invariant theory containing gravity. This yields the trace (conformal) anomaly and introduces a length scale in a natural fashion via the process of renormalization. We evaluate the one-loop effective potential and extract the vacuum expectation value (VEV) from it; spontaneous symmetry breaking is radiatively induced. The VEV is set at the renormalization scale $M$ and we exchange the dimensionless scalar coupling constant for the dimensionful VEV via dimensional transmutation. The asymptotic (background) spacetime is anti-de Sitter (AdS) and its Ricci scalar is determined entirely by the VEV. We obtain analytical asymptotic solutions to the coupled set of equations governing gravitational, gauge and scalar fields that yield the magnetic monopole in an AdS spacetime.

  18. DNA repair pathways in radiation induced cellular damage: a molecular approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.R. van Veelen (Lieneke)

    2005-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ DNA damage, especially double-strand breaks, can be induced by endogenous or exogenous darnaging agents, such as ionizing radiation. Repair of DNA damage is very important in maintaining genomic stability. Incorrect repair may lead to chromosomal aberrations,

  19. DNA repair pathways in radiation induced cellular damage: a molecular approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.R. van Veelen (Lieneke)

    2005-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ DNA damage, especially double-strand breaks, can be induced by endogenous or exogenous darnaging agents, such as ionizing radiation. Repair of DNA damage is very important in maintaining genomic stability. Incorrect repair may lead to chromosomal aberrations, translocat

  20. Deficiency of the DNA repair protein nibrin increases the basal but not the radiation induced mutation frequency in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wessendorf, Petra [Institute of Medical and Human Genetics, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, D-13353 Berlin (Germany); Vijg, Jan [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Michael F. Price Center, 1301 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Nussenzweig, André [Laboratory of Genome Integrity, National Cancer Institute, National Institute of Health, 37 Convent Drive, Room 1106, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Digweed, Martin, E-mail: martin.digweed@charite.de [Institute of Medical and Human Genetics, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, D-13353 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • lacZ mutant frequencies measured in vivo in mouse models of radiosensitive Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome. • Spontaneous mutation frequencies are increased in lymphatic tissue due to Nbn mutation. • Single base transitions, not deletions, dominate the mutation spectrum. • Radiation induced mutation frequencies are not increased due to Nbn mutation. - Abstract: Nibrin (NBN) is a member of a DNA repair complex together with MRE11 and RAD50. The complex is associated particularly with the repair of DNA double strand breaks and with the regulation of cell cycle check points. Hypomorphic mutation of components of the complex leads to human disorders characterised by radiosensitivity and increased tumour occurrence, particularly of the lymphatic system. We have examined here the relationship between DNA damage, mutation frequency and mutation spectrum in vitro and in vivo in mouse models carrying NBN mutations and a lacZ reporter plasmid. We find that NBN mutation leads to increased spontaneous DNA damage in fibroblasts in vitro and high basal mutation rates in lymphatic tissue of mice in vivo. The characteristic mutation spectrum is dominated by single base transitions rather than the deletions and complex rearrangements expected after abortive repair of DNA double strand breaks. We conclude that in the absence of wild type nibrin, the repair of spontaneous errors, presumably arising during DNA replication, makes a major contribution to the basal mutation rate. This applies also to cells heterozygous for an NBN null mutation. Mutation frequencies after irradiation in vivo were not increased in mice with nibrin mutations as might have been expected considering the radiosensitivity of NBS patient cells in vitro. Evidently apoptosis is efficient, even in the absence of wild type nibrin.

  1. Elucidaton of DNA methylation changes in response to ionizng radiation induced double strand breaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrlitz, Maren Linda

    2014-07-04

    would be an effect of overexpression or be indicative of a possible function in these nuclear subcompartments is yet to be elucidated. Additionally, by using flow cytometry analysis, exposure to IR and concomitant overexpression of TET2CD-GFP strongly induced 5hmC formation, therefore suggesting a function of TET2 in response to irradiation. Recruitment analysis showed that the TET2 catalytic domain was recruited to UV laser-induced but not X-rays- or heavy ion-induced damage sites. Endogenous TET2, which was analyzed in high TET2 expressing human fibroblasts, was recruited to damage sites after irradiation with heavy ions or X-rays. As 5hmC is the direct product of the catalytic activity of TET enzymes, local 5hmC formation and abundance at damage sites was investigated. It was observed that 5hmC accumulated at heavy ion- as well as X-ray-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). In addition, investigating 5hmC foci over time after irradiation with X-rays revealed that 5hmC formation and kinetics is similar to that of γH2AX foci, whereby every 5hmC focus co-localized with γH2AX. However, this did not hold true for all γH2AX foci, whose total number was always higher than that of 5hmC. Furthermore, 5hmC (and γH2AX) foci formation was almost unaffected by the inhibition of DNA-PKcs' enzymatic activity. Conversely, 5hmC and γH2AX foci persistence was significantly delayed after DNA-PKcs inhibition. Results obtained in this thesis show that DNA methylation changes (5hmC formation) take place within the time frame of one replication cycle after exposure to IR and that these changes can be observed at sites of DSBs. 5hmC at DSBs might be formed by the oxidative function of TET2, which was shown to be recruited to DSBs. However, involvement of the other TET enzymes in 5hmC production cannot be excluded. Therefore, these results suggest a role of 5hmC in the response to IR induced DSBs, whereby the here presented data suggest that the fast, radiation induced

  2. Molecular Mechanisms of Ultraviolet Radiation-Induced DNA Damage and Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh P. Rastogi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA is one of the prime molecules, and its stability is of utmost importance for proper functioning and existence of all living systems. Genotoxic chemicals and radiations exert adverse effects on genome stability. Ultraviolet radiation (UVR (mainly UV-B: 280–315 nm is one of the powerful agents that can alter the normal state of life by inducing a variety of mutagenic and cytotoxic DNA lesions such as cyclobutane-pyrimidine dimers (CPDs, 6-4 photoproducts (6-4PPs, and their Dewar valence isomers as well as DNA strand breaks by interfering the genome integrity. To counteract these lesions, organisms have developed a number of highly conserved repair mechanisms such as photoreactivation, base excision repair (BER, nucleotide excision repair (NER, and mismatch repair (MMR. Additionally, double-strand break repair (by homologous recombination and nonhomologous end joining, SOS response, cell-cycle checkpoints, and programmed cell death (apoptosis are also operative in various organisms with the expense of specific gene products. This review deals with UV-induced alterations in DNA and its maintenance by various repair mechanisms.

  3. Influence of XRCC1 Genetic Polymorphisms on Ionizing Radiation-Induced DNA Damage and Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterpone, Silvia; Cozzi, Renata

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that ionizing radiation (IR) can damage DNA through a direct action, producing single- and double-strand breaks on DNA double helix, as well as an indirect effect by generating oxygen reactive species in the cells. Mammals have evolved several and distinct DNA repair pathways in order to maintain genomic stability and avoid tumour cell transformation. This review reports important data showing a huge interindividual variability on sensitivity to IR and in susceptibility to developing cancer; this variability is principally represented by genetic polymorphisms, that is, DNA repair gene polymorphisms. In particular we have focussed on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of XRCC1, a gene that encodes for a scaffold protein involved basically in Base Excision Repair (BER). In this paper we have reported and presented recent studies that show an influence of XRCC1 variants on DNA repair capacity and susceptibility to breast cancer. PMID:20798883

  4. Influence of XRCC1 Genetic Polymorphisms on Ionizing Radiation-Induced DNA Damage and Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Sterpone

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that ionizing radiation (IR can damage DNA through a direct action, producing single- and double-strand breaks on DNA double helix, as well as an indirect effect by generating oxygen reactive species in the cells. Mammals have evolved several and distinct DNA repair pathways in order to maintain genomic stability and avoid tumour cell transformation. This review reports important data showing a huge interindividual variability on sensitivity to IR and in susceptibility to developing cancer; this variability is principally represented by genetic polymorphisms, that is, DNA repair gene polymorphisms. In particular we have focussed on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of XRCC1, a gene that encodes for a scaffold protein involved basically in Base Excision Repair (BER. In this paper we have reported and presented recent studies that show an influence of XRCC1 variants on DNA repair capacity and susceptibility to breast cancer.

  5. Syndrome-related chromosome-specific radiation-induced break points of various inherited human metabolic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radha, S; Marimuthu, K M

    2003-07-08

    The frequency, distribution pattern and localisation of gamma radiation-induced break points on the chromosomes of patients with various inherited metabolic disorders were studied to detect: (i) whether the break point distribution following irradiation is random and proportional to the length or the DNA content of the chromosome, or non-proportionally distributed on their length and at times clustering to form hot spots on certain region of the chromosomes; and (ii) to find whether there exists a syndrome-related chromosome-specific pattern of radiation-induced break points. Lymphocyte cultures from patients of haemophilia, ichthyosis, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, retinitis pigmentosa and alpha-thalassemia, whose defective gene loci were located by DNA probe method, were subjected to 3Gy of gamma radiation at G(0). The chromosomal break point analysis was carried out on all the 23 types of chromosomes (excluding Y chromosome) using G banding and FISH painting. The exact location of the break points on G-banded chromosomes was identified using a semi-automated microscope densitometer system (Leitz MPV2). In normal individuals in all the chromosomes except the chromosome 1, a random distribution of break points proportional to their length based on their DNA content was observed. However, in all the syndromes studied a mixture of hypersensitive chromosomes with a non-random distribution pattern of chromosomal break points invariably clustering to form hot spots, and chromosomes with random distribution of break points proportional to their length were observed. The hypersensitive chromosomes and their hot spots were syndrome-specific.

  6. Suppressed expression of non-DSB repair genes inhibits gamma-radiation-induced cytogenetic repair and cell cycle arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry H; Emami, Kamal; Hammond, Dianne; Casey, Rachael; Mehta, Satish K; Jeevarajan, Antony S; Pierson, Duane L; Wu, Honglu

    2008-11-01

    Changes of gene expression profile are one of the most important biological responses in living cells after ionizing radiation (IR) exposure. Although some studies have shown that genes up-regulated by IR may play important roles in DNA damage repair, the relationship between the regulation of gene expression by IR, particularly genes not known for their roles in double-strand break (DSB) repair, and its impact on cytogenetic responses has not been well studied. The purpose of this study is to identify new roles of IR inducible genes in regulating DSB repair and cell cycle progression. In this study, the expression of 25 genes selected on the basis of their transcriptional changes in response to IR was individually knocked down by small interfering RNA in human fibroblast cells. Frequency of micronuclei (MN) formation and chromosome aberrations were measured to determine efficiency of cytogenetic repair, especially DSB repair. In response to IR, the formation of MN was significantly increased by suppressed expression of five genes: Ku70 (DSB repair pathway), XPA (nucleotide excision repair pathway), RPA1 (mismatch repair pathway), RAD17 and RBBP8 (cell cycle control). Knocked-down expression of four genes (MRE11A, RAD51 in the DSB pathway, SESN1, and SUMO1) significantly inhibited cell cycle progression, possibly because of severe impairment of DNA damage repair. Moreover, decreased XPA, p21, or MLH1 expression resulted in both significantly enhanced cell cycle progression and increased yields of chromosome aberrations, indicating that these gene products modulate both cell cycle control and DNA damage repair. Nine of these eleven genes, whose knock-down expression affected cytogenetic repair, were up-regulated in cells exposed to gamma radiation, suggesting that genes transcriptionally modulated by IR were critical to regulate IR-induced biological consequences. Furthermore, eight non-DBS repair genes showed involvement in regulating DSB repair, indicating that

  7. In normal human fibroblasts variation in DSB repair capacity cannot be ascribed to radiation-induced changes in the localisation, expression or activity of major NHEJ proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasten-Pisula, Ulla; Vronskaja, Svetlana; Overgaard, Jens

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The aim of the present study was to test whether for normal human fibroblasts the variation in double-strand break (DSB) repair capacity results from radiation-induced differences in localisation, expression or activity of major non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) proteins....... MATERIALS AND METHODS: Experiments were performed with 11 normal human fibroblast strains AF01-11. NHEJ proteins were determined by Western blot and DNA-PK activity by pulldown-assay. RESULTS: The four NHEJ proteins tested (Ku70, Ku80, XRCC4 and DNA-PKcs) were found to be localised almost exclusively...... in the activity of the DNA-PK complex induced upon irradiation. CONCLUSIONS: For normal human fibroblasts, the level or activity of NHEJ proteins measured prior to or after irradiation cannot be used to predict the DSB repair capacity or cellular radiosensitivity. Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Mar...

  8. Repair of DNA Double-Strand Breaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Martin; Lukasova, Emilie; Kozubek, Stanislav

    The genetic information of cells continuously undergoes damage induced by intracellular processes including energy metabolism, DNA replication and transcription, and by environmental factors such as mutagenic chemicals and UV and ionizing radiation. This causes numerous DNA lesions, including double strand breaks (DSBs). Since cells cannot escape this damage or normally function with a damaged genome, several DNA repair mechanisms have evolved. Although most "single-stranded" DNA lesions are rapidly removed from DNA without permanent damage, DSBs completely break the DNA molecule, presenting a real challenge for repair mechanisms, with the highest risk among DNA lesions of incorrect repair. Hence, DSBs can have serious consequences for human health. Therefore, in this chapter, we will refer only to this type of DNA damage. In addition to the biochemical aspects of DSB repair, which have been extensively studied over a long period of time, the spatio-temporal organization of DSB induction and repair, the importance of which was recognized only recently, will be considered in terms of current knowledge and remaining questions.

  9. Telomerase antagonist imetelstat inhibits esophageal cancer cell growth and increases radiation-induced DNA breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xuping; Smavadati, Shirin; Nordfjäll, Katarina; Karlsson, Krister; Qvarnström, Fredrik; Simonsson, Martin; Bergqvist, Michael; Gryaznov, Sergei; Ekman, Simon; Paulsson-Karlsson, Ylva

    2012-12-01

    Telomerase is mainly active in human tumor cells, which provides an opportunity for a therapeutic window on telomerase targeting. We sought to evaluate the potential of the thio-phosphoramidate oligonucleotide inhibitor of telomerase, imetelstat, as a drug candidate for treatment of esophageal cancer. Our results showed that imetelstat inhibited telomerase activity in a dose-dependent manner in esophageal cancer cells. After only 1 week of imetelstat treatment, a reduction of colony formation ability of esophageal cancer cells was observed. Furthermore, long-term treatment with imetelstat decreased cell growth of esophageal cancer cells with different kinetics regarding telomere lengths. Short-term imetelstat treatment also increased γ-H2AX and 53BP1 foci staining in the esophageal cancer cell lines indicating a possible induction of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). We also found that pre-treatment with imetelstat led to increased number and size of 53BP1 foci after ionizing radiation. The increase of 53BP1 foci number was especially pronounced during the first 1h of repair whereas the increase of foci size was prominent later on. This study supports the potential of imetelstat as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of esophageal cancer.

  10. A human esophageal epithelial cell model for study of radiation induced cancer and DNA repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Janice; Patel, Zarana; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    For cancer risk assessment in astronauts and for countermeasure development, it is essential to understand the molecular mechanisms of radiation carcinogenesis and how these mechanisms are influenced by exposure to the types of radiation found in space. We are developing an in vitro model system for the study of radiation-induced initiation and progression of esophageal carcinoma. Development of squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus is associated with radiation exposure, as revealed by the significant enhanced in incidence rates for this type of cancer in the survivors of the atomic bomb detonations in Japan. It is also associated with poor nutritional status and micronutrient deficiencies, which are also important issues for long duration spaceflight. The possible synergies between nutritional issues and radiation exposure are unknown. Here we present the results of preliminary characterization of both normal and hTERT-immortalized esophageal epithelial cells grown in 2-dimensional culture. We analyzed DNA repair capacity by measuring the kinetics of formation and loss of gamma-H2AX foci following radiation exposure. Additionally, we analyzed induction of chromosomal aberrations using 3-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Data were generated using both low LET (gamma rays) and high LET ions (1000 MeV/nucleon iron.

  11. γ-H2AX分析电离辐射诱发小鼠神经元DNA双链断裂及修复%Ionizing radiation-induced DNA double-strand break and repair assessed by γ-H2AX roci analysis in neurons in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董晓荣; Ruebe Claudia; Ruebe Christian; 伍钢

    2009-01-01

    -deficient mouse strains (BALB/c, A-T and SCID mice) were analyzed at 0.5, 2.5, 5, 24 and 48 h after whole-body irradiation with 2 Gy. The mature neurons in the neocortex of brain tissue of sham-irradiated mice of each strain served as controls. γ-H2AX immunohistochemistry and γ-H2AX and NeuN double immunofluorescence analysis was used to measure DSBs formation and repair in the mature neurons in the neocortex of brain tissue of the different mouse strains. Results For the DSB formation experiment, γ-H2AX foci levels with a clear linear dose correlation and very low backgrounds in the nuclei in the neocortex of brain tissue were observed. Scoring the loss of γ-H12AX foci allowed us to verify the different, genetically determined DSB repair deficiencies, including the minor impairment of BALB/c mice. Repair-proficient C57BL/6 mice exhibited the fastest decrease in foei number with time, and displayed low levels of residual damage at 24 h and 48 h post-irradiation. In contrast, SCID mice showed highly increased γ-H2AX foci levels at all repair times (0.5 h to 48 h) while A-T mice exhibited a lesser defect which was most significant at later repair times (≥ 5 h). Radiosensitive BALB/c mice exhibited slighdy elevated foei numbers compared with C57BI./6 mice at 5 h and 24 h but not at 48 h post-irradiation. Conclusion Quantifying the γ-H2AX loci in normal tissue represents a sensitive tool for the detection of induction and repair of radiation-induced DSBs at clinically relevant doses in vivo.

  12. Delayed repair of radiation induced clustered DNA damage: Friend or foe?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eccles, Laura J., E-mail: laura.eccles@rob.ox.ac.uk [DNA Damage Group, Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus Research Building, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom); O' Neill, Peter, E-mail: peter.oneill@rob.ox.ac.uk [DNA Damage Group, Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus Research Building, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom); Lomax, Martine E., E-mail: martine.lomax@rob.ox.ac.uk [DNA Damage Group, Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus Research Building, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom)

    2011-06-03

    A signature of ionizing radiation exposure is the induction of DNA clustered damaged sites, defined as two or more lesions within one to two helical turns of DNA by passage of a single radiation track. Clustered damage is made up of double strand breaks (DSB) with associated base lesions or abasic (AP) sites, and non-DSB clusters comprised of base lesions, AP sites and single strand breaks. This review will concentrate on the experimental findings of the processing of non-DSB clustered damaged sites. It has been shown that non-DSB clustered damaged sites compromise the base excision repair pathway leading to the lifetime extension of the lesions within the cluster, compared to isolated lesions, thus the likelihood that the lesions persist to replication and induce mutation is increased. In addition certain non-DSB clustered damaged sites are processed within the cell to form additional DSB. The use of E. coli to demonstrate that clustering of DNA lesions is the major cause of the detrimental consequences of ionizing radiation is also discussed. The delayed repair of non-DSB clustered damaged sites in humans can be seen as a 'friend', leading to cell killing in tumour cells or as a 'foe', resulting in the formation of mutations and genetic instability in normal tissue.

  13. Radiation Induced DNA Double Strand Break Studies of a Metal Sensitive Novel Bacterial Isolate from East Calcutta Wetland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanhita Chowdhury

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: This study was an attempt to isolate anaerobic microbes with potential for DNA double strand break repair using methanogen specific medium (DSMZ 120 from East Calcutta Wetland in India. It also intended to verify the specificity of the medium for isolation of the desired family of microbe. Approach: Culture based technique was used to obtain the pure isolate that was further characterized in details. For double strand break repair studies, isolate was irradiated with different doses of 60Co gamma rays and its subsequent repair was observed using pulse field gel electrophoresis and asymmetric field inversion gel electrophoresis. Inhibitor was used to predict the mechanism of repair. Results: In this study we isolated and characterized a metal sensitive anaerobic microbial strain obtained using methanogen specific medium (DSMZ 120 from East Calcutta Wetland in India. The strain was one of the members of the group of uncultivated bacterium as evident from phylogenetic analysis, thus indicating the successful cultivation of an as yet uncultivable novel microbe (GenBank Acc. No. FJ 930097 and also the non-specific growth of microbes in prescribed medium. It was a Gram positive Bacilli, member of Fermicutes with optimum growth at 25°C and pH-7. The growth curve analysis showed a lag phase up to 24 h, log phase from 24-48 h, an early stationary phase from 96 h onwards. The strain could repair the DNA double strand break caused by irradiation with 60Co γ rays. The dose profile study revealed maximum repair at 60 Grays and thereafter a drop in repair ability with increase in irradiation dose. The time required for repair showed an essential incubation period of 4 h. The DNA polymerase inhibitor, Arabinose CTP inhibited the repair indicating the involvement of polymerase in the repair process and thus pointing towards homologous recombination as the underlying mechanism. Conclusion: In this study we were able to cultivate an as yet

  14. Mechanistic Modelling of DNA Repair and Cellular Survival Following Radiation-Induced DNA Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Stephen J.; Schuemann, Jan; Paganetti, Harald; Prise, Kevin M.

    2016-09-01

    Characterising and predicting the effects of ionising radiation on cells remains challenging, with the lack of robust models of the underlying mechanism of radiation responses providing a significant limitation to the development of personalised radiotherapy. In this paper we present a mechanistic model of cellular response to radiation that incorporates the kinetics of different DNA repair processes, the spatial distribution of double strand breaks and the resulting probability and severity of misrepair. This model enables predictions to be made of a range of key biological endpoints (DNA repair kinetics, chromosome aberration and mutation formation, survival) across a range of cell types based on a set of 11 mechanistic fitting parameters that are common across all cells. Applying this model to cellular survival showed its capacity to stratify the radiosensitivity of cells based on aspects of their phenotype and experimental conditions such as cell cycle phase and plating delay (correlation between modelled and observed Mean Inactivation Doses R2 > 0.9). By explicitly incorporating underlying mechanistic factors, this model can integrate knowledge from a wide range of biological studies to provide robust predictions and may act as a foundation for future calculations of individualised radiosensitivity.

  15. RNF4 is required for DNA double-strand break repair in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vyas, R; Kumar, R; Clermont, F

    2013-01-01

    for both homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining repair. To establish a link between Rnf4 and the DNA damage response (DDR) in vivo, we generated an Rnf4 allelic series in mice. We show that Rnf4-deficiency causes persistent ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage and signaling......Unrepaired DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) cause genetic instability that leads to malignant transformation or cell death. Cells respond to DSBs with the ordered recruitment of signaling and repair proteins to the sites of DNA lesions. Coordinated protein SUMOylation and ubiquitylation have crucial......, and that Rnf4-deficient cells and mice exhibit increased sensitivity to genotoxic stress. Mechanistically, we show that Rnf4 targets SUMOylated MDC1 and SUMOylated BRCA1, and is required for the loading of Rad51, an enzyme required for HR repair, onto sites of DNA damage. Similarly to inactivating mutations...

  16. Compound Poisson Processes and Clustered Damage of Radiation Induced DNA Double Strand Breaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudowska-Nowak, E.; Ritter, S.; Taucher-Scholz, G.; Kraft, G.

    2000-05-01

    Recent experimental data have demonstrated that DNA damage induced by densely ionizing radiation in mammalian cells is distributed along the DNA molecule in the form of clusters. The principal constituent of DNA damage are double-strand breaks (DSB) which are formed when the breaks occur in both DNA strands and are directly opposite or separated by only a few base pairs. DSBs are believed to be most important lesions produced in chromosomes by radiation; interaction between DSBs can lead to cell killing, mutation or carcinogenesis. The paper discusses a model of clustered DSB formation viewed in terms of compound Poisson process along with the predictive essay of the formalism in application to experimental data.

  17. Rejoining and misrejoining of radiation-induced chromatin breaks. I. experiments with human lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durante, M.; George, K.; Wu, H.; Yang, T. C.

    1996-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization with a composite probe for human chromosome 4 and a probe that stained all centromeres was used to study gamma-ray induced breakage, rejoining and misrejoining in prematurely condensed chromosomes in human lymphocytes. Dose-response curves for the induction of all types of aberrations in prematurely condensed human chromosomes 4 were determined immediately after irradiation and after 8 h postirradiation incubation. In addition, aberrations were measured after various incubation times from 0 to 18 h after a dose of 7 Gy. Unrejoined chromosome breaks were the most frequent type of aberration observed immediately after irradiation. Approximately 15% of total aberrations observed were chromosome exchanges. After 8 h postirradiation incubation, the frequency of breaks in prematurely condensed chromosomes declined to about 20% of the initial value, and chromosomal exchanges became the most frequent aberration. Results of metaphase analysis were similar to those for prematurely condensed chromosomes after 8 h incubation with the exception that a significantly lower frequency of fragments was observed. Symmetrical and asymmetrical interchanges were found at similar frequencies at all doses. No complex exchanges were observed in lymphocyte chromosomes immediately after exposure. They accounted for about 1% of total exchanges in metaphase chromosomes at doses <3 Gy and about 14% at 7 Gy. Incomplete exchanges amounted to approximately 15% of total exchanges at all doses. The kinetics of break rejoining was exponential, and the frequency of exchanges increased with kinetics similar to that observed for the rejoining of the breaks. This increase in the total exchanges as a function of the time between irradiation and fusion was due to a rapid increase in reciprocal interchanges, and a slower increase in complex exchanges; the frequency of incomplete exchanges increased initially, then decreased with prolonged incubation to the level observed

  18. Repair of the radiation induced rectovaginal fistulas without or with interposition of the bulbocavernosus muscle (Martius procedure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aartsen, E.J.; Sindram, I.S.

    1988-04-01

    Two local repair procedures, one without (9) and the other with (14) a bulbocavernosus muscle graft were performed on 20 patients with a radiation induced rectovaginal fistula. Four patients had two procedures successively. The initial success rate of both procedures was 7/9 and 14/14 respectively. Though the initial result of the bulbocavernosus graft was obviously better, in many of the local repair procedures, subclinical radiation damage progressed, resulting in recurrence of rectovaginal fistula (5), rectovesical fistula (4), pararectal abscess (2) etc. After a mean follow up of around 10 years, the success rate of fistula repair decreased to 5/9 and 13/14 and only 2/9 and 6/14 finally remained without a colostomy. A local repair operation should be restricted to carefully selected cases. The musculus gracilis is proposed as a better vascular graft. If the general condition of the patient does not allow more aggressive reconstructive procedures, fistula repair is better cancelled because there is a high risk of subsequent radiation damage.

  19. Nicotinamide enhances repair of ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage in human keratinocytes and ex vivo skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surjana, Devita; Halliday, Gary M; Damian, Diona L

    2013-05-01

    Nicotinamide (vitamin B3) protects from ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced carcinogenesis in mice and from UV-induced immunosuppression in mice and humans. Recent double-blinded randomized controlled Phase 2 studies in heavily sun-damaged individuals have shown that oral nicotinamide significantly reduces premalignant actinic keratoses, and may reduce new non-melanoma skin cancers. Nicotinamide is a precursor of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)), an essential coenzyme in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production. Previously, we showed that nicotinamide prevents UV-induced ATP decline in HaCaT keratinocytes. Energy-dependent DNA repair is a key determinant of cellular survival after exposure to DNA-damaging agents such as UV radiation. Hence, in this study we investigated whether nicotinamide protection from cellular energy loss influences DNA repair. We treated HaCaT keratinocytes with nicotinamide and exposed them to low-dose solar-simulated UV (ssUV). Excision repair was quantified using an assay of unscheduled DNA synthesis. Nicotinamide increased both the proportion of cells undergoing excision repair and the repair rate in each cell. We then investigated ssUV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8oxoG) formation and repair by comet assay in keratinocytes and with immunohistochemistry in human skin. Nicotinamide reduced CPDs and 8oxoG in both models and the reduction appeared to be due to enhancement of DNA repair. These results show that nicotinamide enhances two different pathways for repair of UV-induced photolesions, supporting nicotinamide's potential as an inexpensive, convenient and non-toxic agent for skin cancer chemoprevention.

  20. Escherichia coli radD (yejH) gene: a novel function involved in radiation resistance and double-strand break repair

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Stefanie H.; Byrne, Rose T.; Wood, Elizabeth A; Cox, Michael M.

    2015-01-01

    A transposon insertion screen implicated the yejH gene in the repair of ionizing radiation-induced damage. The yejH gene, which exhibits significant homology to the human transcription-coupled DNA repair gene XPB, is involved in the repair of double strand DNA breaks. Deletion of yejH significantly sensitized cells to agents that cause double strand breaks (ionizing radiation, UV radiation, ciprofloxacin). In addition, deletion of both yejH and radA hypersensitized the cells to ionizing radia...

  1. Nicotinamide enhances repair of ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage in primary melanocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Benjamin C; Surjana, Devita; Halliday, Gary M; Damian, Diona L

    2014-07-01

    Cutaneous melanoma is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Nicotinamide is a safe, widely available vitamin that reduces the immune suppressive effects of UV, enhances DNA repair in keratinocytes and has shown promise in the chemoprevention of non-melanoma skin cancer. Here, we report the effect of nicotinamide on DNA damage and repair in primary human melanocytes. Nicotinamide significantly enhanced the repair of oxidative DNA damage (8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine) and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers induced by UV exposure. It also enhanced the repair of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine induced by the culture conditions in unirradiated melanocytes. A significant increase in the percentage of melanocytes undergoing unscheduled but not scheduled DNA synthesis was observed, confirming that nicotinamide enhances DNA repair in human melanocytes. In summary, nicotinamide, by enhancing DNA repair in melanocytes, is a potential agent for the chemoprevention of cutaneous melanoma.

  2. Sp1 facilitates DNA double-strand break repair through a nontranscriptional mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beishline, Kate; Kelly, Crystal M; Olofsson, Beatrix A; Koduri, Sravanthi; Emrich, Jacqueline; Greenberg, Roger A; Azizkhan-Clifford, Jane

    2012-09-01

    Sp1 is a ubiquitously expressed transcription factor that is phosphorylated by ataxia telangiectasia mutated kinase (ATM) in response to ionizing radiation and H(2)O(2). Here, we show by indirect immunofluorescence that Sp1 phosphorylated on serine 101 (pSp1) localizes to ionizing radiation-induced foci with phosphorylated histone variant γH2Ax and members of the MRN (Mre11, Rad50, and Nbs1) complex. More precise analysis of occupancy of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) shows that Sp1, like Nbs1, resides within 200 bp of DSBs. Using laser microirradiation of cells, we demonstrate that pSp1 is present at DNA DSBs by 7.5 min after induction of damage and remains at the break site for at least 8 h. Depletion of Sp1 inhibits repair of site-specific DNA breaks, and the N-terminal 182-amino-acid peptide, which contains targets of ATM kinase but lacks the zinc finger DNA binding domain, is phosphorylated, localizes to DSBs, and rescues the repair defect resulting from Sp1 depletion. Together, these data demonstrate that Sp1 is rapidly recruited to the region immediately adjacent to sites of DNA DSBs and is required for DSB repair, through a mechanism independent of its sequence-directed transcriptional effects.

  3. TU-CD-303-02: Beyond Radiation Induced Double Strand Breaks - a New Horizon for Radiation Therapy Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, S. [UNC School of Medicine (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Recent advances in cancer research have shed new light on the complex processes of how therapeutic radiation initiates changes at cellular, tissue, and system levels that may lead to clinical effects. These new advances may transform the way we use radiation to combat certain types of cancers. For the past two decades many technological advancements in radiation therapy have been largely based on the hypothesis that direct radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks cause cell death and thus tumor control and normal tissue damage. However, new insights have elucidated that in addition to causing cellular DNA damage, localized therapeutic radiation also initiates cascades of complex downstream biological responses in tissue that extend far beyond where therapeutic radiation dose is directly deposited. For instance, studies show that irradiated dying tumor cells release tumor antigens that can lead the immune system to a systemic anti-cancer attack throughout the body of cancer patient; targeted irradiation to solid tumor also increases the migration of tumor cells already in bloodstream, the seeds of potential metastasis. Some of the new insights may explain the long ago discovered but still unexplained non-localized radiation effects (bystander effect and abscopal effect) and the efficacy of spatially fractionated radiation therapy (microbeam radiation therapy and GRID therapy) where many “hot” and “cold” spots are intentionally created throughout the treatment volume. Better understanding of the mechanisms behind the non-localized radiation effects creates tremendous opportunities to develop new and integrated cancer treatment strategies that are based on radiotherapy, immunology, and chemotherapy. However, in the multidisciplinary effort to advance new radiobiology, there are also tremendous challenges including a lack of multidisciplinary researchers and imaging technologies for the microscopic radiation-induced responses. A better grasp of the essence of

  4. Phosphorylation: The Molecular Switch of Double-Strand Break Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. C. Summers

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Repair of double-stranded breaks (DSBs is vital to maintaining genomic stability. In mammalian cells, DSBs are resolved in one of the following complex repair pathways: nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ, homologous recombination (HR, or the inclusive DNA damage response (DDR. These repair pathways rely on factors that utilize reversible phosphorylation of proteins as molecular switches to regulate DNA repair. Many of these molecular switches overlap and play key roles in multiple pathways. For example, the NHEJ pathway and the DDR both utilize DNA-PK phosphorylation, whereas the HR pathway mediates repair with phosphorylation of RPA2, BRCA1, and BRCA2. Also, the DDR pathway utilizes the kinases ATM and ATR, as well as the phosphorylation of H2AX and MDC1. Together, these molecular switches regulate repair of DSBs by aiding in DSB recognition, pathway initiation, recruitment of repair factors, and the maintenance of repair mechanisms.

  5. Radiation induced DNA damage and damage repair in three human tumour cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woudstra, EC; Brunsting, JF; Roesink, JM; Konings, AWT; Kampinga, HH

    1996-01-01

    Three human tumour cell lines (HX142, RT112 and MGH-U1) with different radiosensitivities were tested for differences in the rate and/or extent of DNA unwinding in alkali as well as for differences in the induction of DNA double strand breaks by means of the pulsed field gel electrophoresis, after

  6. Skin-resident T cells sense ultraviolet radiation-induced injury and contribute to DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, Amanda S; Rudolph, Ross; Corriden, Ross; Ye, Ivan; Garijo, Olivia; Havran, Wendy L

    2014-06-15

    Skin-resident T cells have been shown to play important roles in tissue homeostasis and wound repair, but their role in UV radiation (UVR)-mediated skin injury and subsequent tissue regeneration is less clear. In this study, we demonstrate that acute UVR rapidly activates skin-resident T cells in humans and dendritic epidermal γδ T cells (DETCs) in mice through mechanisms involving the release of ATP from keratinocytes. Following UVR, extracellular ATP leads to an increase in CD69 expression, proliferation, and IL-17 production, and to changes in DETC morphology. Furthermore, we find that the purinergic receptor P2X7 and caspase-1 are necessary for UVR-induced IL-1 production in keratinocytes, which increases IL-17 secretion by DETCs. IL-17, in turn, induces epidermal TNF-related weak inducer of apoptosis and growth arrest and DNA damage-associated gene 45, two molecules linked to the DNA repair response. Finally, we demonstrate that DETCs and human skin-resident T cells limit DNA damage in keratinocytes. Taken together, our findings establish a novel role for skin-resident T cells in the UVR-associated DNA repair response and underscore the importance of skin-resident T cells to overall skin regeneration.

  7. Non-DBS DNA Repair Genes Regulate Radiation-induced Cytogenetic Damage Repair and Cell Cycle Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry H.; Emami, Kamal; Casey, Rachael; Wu, Honglu

    2008-01-01

    Changes of gene expression profile are one of the most important biological responses in living cells after ionizing radiation (IR) exposure. Although some studies have shown that genes up-regulated by IR may play important roles in DNA damage repair, the relationship between the regulation of gene expression by IR, particularly genes not known for their roles in DSB repair, and its impact on cytogenetic responses has not been systematically studied. In the present study, the expression of 25 genes selected on the basis of their transcriptional changes in response to IR was individually knocked down by transfection with small interfering RNA in human fibroblast cells. The purpose of this study is to identify new roles of these selected genes on regulating DSB repair and cell cycle progression , as measured in the micronuclei formation and chromosome aberration. In response to IR, the formation of MN was significantly increased by suppressed expression of 5 genes: Ku70 in the DSB repair pathway, XPA in the NER pathway, RPA1 in the MMR pathway, and RAD17 and RBBP8 in cell cycle control. Knocked-down expression of 4 genes (MRE11A, RAD51 in the DSB pathway, SESN1, and SUMO1) significantly inhibited cell cycle progression, possibly because of severe impairment of DNA damage repair. Furthermore, loss of XPA, P21, or MLH1 expression resulted in both significantly enhanced cell cycle progression and increased yields of chromosome aberrations, indicating that these gene products modulate both cell cycle control and DNA damage repair. Most of the 11 genes that affected cytogenetic responses are not known to have clear roles influencing DBS repair. Nine of these 11 genes were up-regulated in cells exposed to gamma radiation, suggesting that genes transcriptionally modulated by IR were critical to regulate the biological consequences after IR.

  8. Non-DBS DNA Repair Genes Regulate Radiation-induced Cytogenetic Damage Repair and Cell Cycle Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry H.; Emami, Kamal; Casey, Rachael; Wu, Honglu

    2008-01-01

    Changes of gene expression profile are one of the most important biological responses in living cells after ionizing radiation (IR) exposure. Although some studies have shown that genes up-regulated by IR may play important roles in DNA damage repair, the relationship between the regulation of gene expression by IR, particularly genes not known for their roles in DSB repair, and its impact on cytogenetic responses has not been systematically studied. In the present study, the expression of 25 genes selected on the basis of their transcriptional changes in response to IR was individually knocked down by transfection with small interfering RNA in human fibroblast cells. The purpose of this study is to identify new roles of these selected genes on regulating DSB repair and cell cycle progression , as measured in the micronuclei formation and chromosome aberration. In response to IR, the formation of MN was significantly increased by suppressed expression of 5 genes: Ku70 in the DSB repair pathway, XPA in the NER pathway, RPA1 in the MMR pathway, and RAD17 and RBBP8 in cell cycle control. Knocked-down expression of 4 genes (MRE11A, RAD51 in the DSB pathway, SESN1, and SUMO1) significantly inhibited cell cycle progression, possibly because of severe impairment of DNA damage repair. Furthermore, loss of XPA, P21, or MLH1 expression resulted in both significantly enhanced cell cycle progression and increased yields of chromosome aberrations, indicating that these gene products modulate both cell cycle control and DNA damage repair. Most of the 11 genes that affected cytogenetic responses are not known to have clear roles influencing DBS repair. Nine of these 11 genes were up-regulated in cells exposed to gamma radiation, suggesting that genes transcriptionally modulated by IR were critical to regulate the biological consequences after IR.

  9. Genome instability in mismatch repair and its role on radiation-induced cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munakata, Nobuo; Morohoshi, Fumiko [National Cancer Center, Tokyo (Japan). Research Inst

    2000-02-01

    Studies on mismatch repair mechanism have been progressed using Caenorhabditis elegans, a nematode since its genetic analysis is comparatively easy. In this study, homologue gene for mismatch repairing of nematoda were investigated and 3 kinds of homologue genes of mut S; msh G, msh Z and msh F and two kinds of mut L homologue genes were identified. Based on these genes, each cDNA was isolated aiming to determine the sequence and clarify the phylogenetic relationship. Either of msh G, msh Z and msh F is present in the cDNA library, suggesting that these genes might be expressed in every stage of development. Northern analysis was made using the RNA fractions extracted from nematoda at various stages of development as a probe for cDNA of msh G and msh Z, and each corresponding bands were detected for the imago and the matured larva, but not so distinct for the larva and embryo, suggesting that both genes would be regulated in the transcription step at each development stage. Then, resistant larva in which Tcl transposon is activated was cultured and its DNA was extracted to use as a template DNA. Thus, Tcl transposon inserted strains for three of 8 repair related genes were obtained. The passages of these strains were kept comparatively stable. However, the sensitivities to ionizing radiation, ultraviolet light and alkyl agents of these inserted strains were not so different from the control. PCR reaction revealed that DNA fragments of which Tcl was excluded were produced in a certain stage of development. This suggest in vivo exclusion of Tcl in somatic cells. (M.N.)

  10. Repair of radiation-induced heat-labile sites is independent of DNA-PKcs, XRCC1 or PARP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenerl& #246; w, Bo; Karlsson, Karin H.; Radulescu, Irina; Rydberg, Bjorn; Stenerlow, Bo

    2008-04-29

    Ionizing radiation induces a variety of different DNA lesions: in addition to the most critical DNA damage, the DSB, numerous base alterations, SSBs and other modifications of the DNA double-helix are formed. When several non-DSB lesions are clustered within a short distance along DNA, or close to a DSB, they may interfere with the repair of DSBs and affect the measurement of DSB induction and repair. We have previously shown that a substantial fraction of DSBs measured by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) are in fact due to heat-labile sites (HLS) within clustered lesions, thus reflecting an artifact of preparation of genomic DNA at elevated temperature. To further characterize the influence of HLS on DSB induction and repair, four human cell lines (GM5758, GM7166, M059K, U-1810) with apparently normal DSB rejoining were tested for bi-phasic rejoining after gamma irradiation. When heat-released DSBs were excluded from the measurements the fraction of fast rejoining decreased to less than 50% of the total. However, neither the half-times of the fast (t{sub 1/2} = 7-8 min) or slow (t{sub 1/2} = 2.5 h) DSB rejoining were changed significantly. At t=0 the heat-released DSBs accounted for almost 40% of the DSBs, corresponding to 10 extra DSB/cell/Gy in the initial DSB yield. These heat-released DSBs were repaired within 60-90 min in all tested cells, including M059K cells treated with wortmannin or DNA-PKcs defect M059J cells. Furthermore, cells lacking XRCC1 or Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) rejoined both total DSBs and heat-released DSBs similar to normal cells. In summary, the presence of heat-labile sites have a substantial impact on DSB induction yields and DSB rejoining rates measured by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and HLS repair is independent of DNA-PKcs, XRCC1 and PARP.

  11. The DNA-dependent protein kinase: a multifunctional protein kinase with roles in DNA double strand break repair and mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jette, Nicholas; Lees-Miller, Susan P.

    2015-01-01

    The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is a serine/threonine protein kinase composed of a large catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) and the Ku70/80 heterodimer. Over the past two decades, significant progress has been made in elucidating the role of DNA-PK in non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), the major pathway for repair of ionizing radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks in human cells and recently, additional roles for DNA-PK have been reported. In this review, we will describe the biochemistry, structure and function of DNA-PK, its roles in DNA double strand break repair and its newly described roles in mitosis and other cellular processes. PMID:25550082

  12. Heavy Metal Exposure Influences Double Strand Break DNA Repair Outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria E Morales

    Full Text Available Heavy metals such as cadmium, arsenic and nickel are classified as carcinogens. Although the precise mechanism of carcinogenesis is undefined, heavy metal exposure can contribute to genetic damage by inducing double strand breaks (DSBs as well as inhibiting critical proteins from different DNA repair pathways. Here we take advantage of two previously published culture assay systems developed to address mechanistic aspects of DNA repair to evaluate the effects of heavy metal exposures on competing DNA repair outcomes. Our results demonstrate that exposure to heavy metals significantly alters how cells repair double strand breaks. The effects observed are both specific to the particular metal and dose dependent. Low doses of NiCl2 favored resolution of DSBs through homologous recombination (HR and single strand annealing (SSA, which were inhibited by higher NiCl2 doses. In contrast, cells exposed to arsenic trioxide preferentially repaired using the "error prone" non-homologous end joining (alt-NHEJ while inhibiting repair by HR. In addition, we determined that low doses of nickel and cadmium contributed to an increase in mutagenic recombination-mediated by Alu elements, the most numerous family of repetitive elements in humans. Sequence verification confirmed that the majority of the genetic deletions were the result of Alu-mediated non-allelic recombination events that predominantly arose from repair by SSA. All heavy metals showed a shift in the outcomes of alt-NHEJ repair with a significant increase of non-templated sequence insertions at the DSB repair site. Our data suggest that exposure to heavy metals will alter the choice of DNA repair pathway changing the genetic outcome of DSBs repair.

  13. Double strand break repair functions of histone H2AX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scully, Ralph, E-mail: rscully@bidmc.harvard.edu; Xie, Anyong

    2013-10-15

    Chromosomal double strand breaks provoke an extensive reaction in neighboring chromatin, characterized by phosphorylation of histone H2AX on serine 139 of its C-terminal tail (to form “γH2AX”). The γH2AX response contributes to the repair of double strand breaks encountered in a variety of different contexts, including those induced by ionizing radiation, physiologically programmed breaks that characterize normal immune cell development and the pathological exposure of DNA ends triggered by telomere dysfunction. γH2AX also participates in the evolutionarily conserved process of sister chromatid recombination, a homologous recombination pathway involved in the suppression of genomic instability during DNA replication and directly implicated in tumor suppression. At a biochemical level, the γH2AX response provides a compelling example of how the “histone code” is adapted to the regulation of double strand break repair. Here, we review progress in research aimed at understanding how γH2AX contributes to double strand break repair in mammalian cells.

  14. Microhomology directs diverse DNA break repair pathways and chromosomal translocations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana D Villarreal

    Full Text Available Chromosomal structural change triggers carcinogenesis and the formation of other genetic diseases. The breakpoint junctions of these rearrangements often contain small overlapping sequences called "microhomology," yet the genetic pathway(s responsible have yet to be defined. We report a simple genetic system to detect microhomology-mediated repair (MHMR events after a DNA double-strand break (DSB in budding yeast cells. MHMR using >15 bp operates as a single-strand annealing variant, requiring the non-essential DNA polymerase subunit Pol32. MHMR is inhibited by sequence mismatches, but independent of extensive DNA synthesis like break-induced replication. However, MHMR using less than 14 bp is genetically distinct from that using longer microhomology and far less efficient for the repair of distant DSBs. MHMR catalyzes chromosomal translocation almost as efficiently as intra-chromosomal repair. The results suggest that the intrinsic annealing propensity between microhomology sequences efficiently leads to chromosomal rearrangements.

  15. Radiation-induced DNA Double Strand Breaks and Their Modulations by Treatments with Moringa oleifera Lam. Leaf Extracts: A Cancer Cell Culture Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Boonsirichai

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Gamma radiation brings deleterious effects upon human cells by inducing oxidative stress and DNA damages. Antioxidants have been shown to confer protective effects on irradiated normal cells. Moringa oleifera Lam. is a widely used nutritional supplement with antioxidant activities. This report showed that antioxidant-containing supplements, in addition to protecting normal cells, could protect cancer cells against genotoxic effects of gamma radiation. -H2AX immunofluorescent foci were utilized as an indicator of radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks. MCF-7 human breast adenocarcinoma cells were irradiated with 2-8 Gy gamma radiation. A linear relationship between the formation of -H2AX foci and radiation dose was observed with an average of 10 foci per cell per Gy. A 30-minute pretreatment of the cells with either the aqueous or the ethanolic extract of M. oleifera leaves could partially protect the cells from radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks. A pretreatment with 500 µg/mL aqueous extract reduced the number of foci formed by 15% when assayed at 30 minutes post-irradiation. The ethanolic extract was more effective; 500 µg/mL of its concentration reduced the number of foci among irradiated cells by 30%. The results indicated that irradiated cancer cells responded similarly to nutritional supplements containing antioxidants as irradiated normal cells. These natural antioxidants could confer protective effects upon cancer cells against gamma radiation

  16. Double strand break (DSB) repair in heterochromatin and heterochromatin proteins in DSB repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaître, Charlène; Soutoglou, Evi

    2014-07-01

    Chromosomal translocations are a hallmark of cancer cells and they represent a major cause of tumorigenesis. To avoid chromosomal translocations, faithful repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) has to be ensured in the context of high ordered chromatin structure. However, chromatin compaction is proposed to represent a barrier for DSB repair. Here we review the different mechanisms cells use to alleviate the heterochromatic barrier for DNA repair. At the same time, we discuss the activating role of heterochromatin-associated proteins in this process, therefore proposing that chromatin structure, more than being a simple barrier, is a key modulator of DNA repair.

  17. Distributions of Low- and High-LET Radiation-Induced Breaks in Chromosomes are Associated with Inter- and Intrachromosome Exchanges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, Megumi; Zhang, Ye; Feiveson, Alan; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu

    2010-01-01

    To study the breakpoint along the length of the chromosome induced by low- and high-LET radiations, we exposed human epithelial cells in vitro to Cs-137 rays at both low and high dose rates, secondary neutrons at a low dose rate, and 600 MeV/u Fe ions at a high dose rate. The location of the breaks was identified using the multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) that paints Chromosome 3 in 23 different colored bands. The breakpoint distributions were found to be similar between rays of low and high dose rates and between the two high-LET radiation types. Detailed analysis of the chromosome break ends involved in inter- and intrachromosome exchanges revealed that only the break ends participating in interchromosome exchanges contributed to the hot spots found for low-LET. For break ends participating in intrachromosome exchanges, the distributions for all four radiation scenarios were similar with clusters of breaks found in three regions. Analysis of the locations of the two break ends in Chromosome 3 that joined to form an intrachromosome exchange demonstrated that two breaks with a greater genomic separation may be more likely to rejoin than two closer breaks, indicating that chromatin folding can play an important role in the rejoining of chromosome breaks. Our study demonstrated that the gene-rich regions do not necessarily contain more breaks. The breakpoint distribution depends more on the likelihood that a break will join with another break in the same chromosome or in a different chromosome.

  18. Nimotuzumab enhances radiation sensitivity of NSCLC H292 cells in vitro by blocking epidermal growth factor receptor nuclear translocation and inhibiting radiation-induced DNA damage repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teng K

    2015-04-01

    was more significant than that in H1975 cells.Conclusion: Our research revealed a possible mechanism to explain the radiosensitivity in H292 cells. Nimotuzumab decreased the radiation-induced activation of DNA-PK by blocking EGFR nuclear translocation and impairing DNA DSB repair, thus enhancing radiosensitivity in H292 cells. Because these results represent early research, the matters of how γ-H2AX and DNA-PK dynamically change simultaneously with nuclear EGFR and the best time to administer nimotuzumab will require further exploration. Keywords: nimotuzumab, NSCLC, EGFR, radiosensitivity, nuclear translocation, DNA-PK

  19. c-Myc Suppression of DNA Double-strand Break Repair12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhaozhong; Owonikoko, Taofeek K; Sun, Shi-Yong; Ramalingam, Suresh S; Doetsch, Paul W; Xiao, Zhi-Qiang; Khuri, Fadlo R; Curran, Walter J; Deng, Xingming

    2012-01-01

    c-Myc is a transcriptional factor that functions as a central regulator of cell growth, proliferation, and apoptosis. Overexpression of c-Myc also enhances DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), genetic instability, and tumorigenesis. However, the mechanism(s) involved remains elusive. Here, we discovered that γ-ray ionizing radiation-induced DSBs promote c-Myc to form foci and to co-localize with γ-H2AX. Conditional expression of c-Myc in HO15.19 c-Myc null cells using the Tet-Off/Tet-On inducible system results in down-regulation of Ku DNA binding and suppressed activities of DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) and DNA end-joining, leading to inhibition of DSB repair and enhanced chromosomal and chromatid breaks. Expression of c-Myc reduces both signal and coding joins with decreased fidelity during V(D)J recombination. Mechanistically, c-Myc directly interacts with Ku70 protein through its Myc box II (MBII) domain. Removal of the MBII domain from c-Myc abrogates its inhibitory effects on Ku DNA binding, DNA-PKcs, and DNA end-joining activities, which results in loss of c-Myc's ability to block DSB repair and V(D)J recombination. Interestingly, c-Myc directly disrupts the Ku/DNA-PKcs complex in vitro and in vivo. Thus, c-Myc suppression of DSB repair and V(D)J recombination may occur through inhibition of the nonhomologous end-joining pathway, which provides insight into the mechanism of c-Myc in the development of tumors through promotion of genomic instability. PMID:23308051

  20. More efficient repair of DNA double-strand breaks in skeletal muscle stem cells compared to their committed progeny

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyla Vahidi Ferdousi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The loss of genome integrity in adult stem cells results in accelerated tissue aging and is possibly cancerogenic. Adult stem cells in different tissues appear to react robustly to DNA damage. We report that adult skeletal stem (satellite cells do not primarily respond to radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs via differentiation and exhibit less apoptosis compared to other myogenic cells. Satellite cells repair these DNA lesions more efficiently than their committed progeny. Importantly, non-proliferating satellite cells and post-mitotic nuclei in the fiber exhibit dramatically distinct repair efficiencies. Altogether, reduction of the repair capacity appears to be more a function of differentiation than of the proliferation status of the muscle cell. Notably, satellite cells retain a high efficiency of DSB repair also when isolated from the natural niche. Finally, we show that repair of DSB substrates is not only very efficient but, surprisingly, also very accurate in satellite cells and that accurate repair depends on the key non-homologous end-joining factor DNA-PKcs.

  1. Double-strand break repair-adox: Restoration of suppressed double-strand break repair during mitosis induces genomic instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terasawa, Masahiro; Shinohara, Akira; Shinohara, Miki

    2014-12-01

    Double-strand breaks (DSBs) are one of the severest types of DNA damage. Unrepaired DSBs easily induce cell death and chromosome aberrations. To maintain genomic stability, cells have checkpoint and DSB repair systems to respond to DNA damage throughout most of the cell cycle. The failure of this process often results in apoptosis or genomic instability, such as aneuploidy, deletion, or translocation. Therefore, DSB repair is essential for maintenance of genomic stability. During mitosis, however, cells seem to suppress the DNA damage response and proceed to the next G1 phase, even if there are unrepaired DSBs. The biological significance of this suppression is not known. In this review, we summarize recent studies of mitotic DSB repair and discuss the mechanisms of suppression of DSB repair during mitosis. DSB repair, which maintains genomic integrity in other phases of the cell cycle, is rather toxic to cells during mitosis, often resulting in chromosome missegregation and aberration. Cells have multiple safeguards to prevent genomic instability during mitosis: inhibition of 53BP1 or BRCA1 localization to DSB sites, which is important to promote non-homologous end joining or homologous recombination, respectively, and also modulation of the non-homologous end joining core complex to inhibit DSB repair. We discuss how DSBs during mitosis are toxic and the multiple safeguard systems that suppress genomic instability.

  2. Nampt is involved in DNA double-strand break repair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bingtao Zhu; Xiaoli Deng; Yifan Sun; Lin Bai; Zhikai Xiahou; Yusheng Cong; Xingzhi Xu

    2012-01-01

    DNA double-strand break (DSB) is the most severe form of DNA damage,which is repaired mainly through high-fidelity homologous recombination (HR) or error-prone non-homologous end joining (NHEJ).Defects in the DNA damage response lead to genomic instability and ultimately predispose organs to cancer.Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt),which is involved in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide metabolism,is overexpressed in a variety of tumors.In this report,we found that Nampt physically associated with CtlP and DNA-PKcs/Ku80,which are key factors in HR and NHEJ,respectively.Depletion of Nampt by small interfering RNA (siRNA) led to defective NHEJ-mediated DSB repair and enhanced HR-mediated repair.Furthermore,the inhibition of Nampt expression promoted proliferation of cancer cells and normal human fibroblasts and decreased β-galactosidase staining,indicating a delay in the onset of cellular senescence in normal human fibroblasts.Taken together,our results suggest that Nampt is a suppressor of HR-mediated DSB repair and an enhancer of NHEJ-mediated DSB repair,contributing to the acceleration of cellular senescence.

  3. Dietary proanthocyanidins prevent ultraviolet radiation-induced non-melanoma skin cancer through enhanced repair of damaged DNA-dependent activation of immune sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katiyar, Santosh K; Pal, Harish C; Prasad, Ram

    2017-04-12

    Numerous plant products have been used to prevent and manage a wide variety of diseases for centuries. These products are now considered as promising options for the development of more effective and less toxic alternatives to the systems of medicine developed primarily in developed countries in the modern era. Grape seed proanthocyanidins (GSPs) are of great interest due to their anti-carcinogenic effects that have been demonstrated using various tumor models including ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced non-melanoma skin cancer. In a pre-clinical mouse model supplementation of a control diet (AIN76A) with GSPs at concentrations of 0.2% and 0.5% (w/w) significantly inhibits the growth and multiplicity of UVB radiation-induced skin tumors. In this review, we summarize the evidence that this inhibition of UVB-induced skin tumor development by dietary GSPs is mediated by a multiplicity of coordinated effects including: (i) Promotion of the repair of damaged DNA by nuclear excision repair mechanisms, and (ii) DNA repair-dependent stimulation of the immune system following the functional activation of dendritic cells and effector T cells. Dietary GSPs hold promise for the development of an effective alternative strategy for the prevention of excessive solar UVB radiation exposure-induced skin diseases including the risk of non-melanoma skin cancer in humans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Regulation of DNA double-strand break repair pathway choice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meena Shrivastav; Leyma P De Haro; Jac A Nickoloff

    2008-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are critical lesions that can result in cell death or a wide variety of genetic alterations including large- or small-scale deletions, loss of heterozygosity, translocations, and chromosome loss. DSBs are repaired by non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR), and defects in these pathways cause genome instability and promote tumorigenesis. DSBs arise from endogenous sources includ-ing reactive oxygen species generated during cellular metabolism, collapsed replication forks, and nucleases, and from exogenous sources including ionizing radiation and chemicals that directly or indirectly damage DNA and are commonly used in cancer therapy. The DSB repair pathways appear to compete for DSBs, but the balance between them differs widely among species, between different cell types of a single species, and during different cell cycle phases of a single cell type. Here we review the regulatory factors that regulate DSB repair by NHEJ and HR in yeast and higher eukaryotes. These factors include regulated expression and phosphorylation of repair proteins, chromatin modulation of repair factor accessibility, and the availability of homologous repair templates. While most DSB repair proteins appear to function exclusively in NHEJ or HR, a number of proteins influence both pathways, including the MRE11/RAD50/NBS1 (XRS2) complex, BRCA1, histone H2AX, PARP-1, RAD18, DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs), and ATM. DNA-PKcs plays a role in mammalian NHEJ, but it also influences HR through a complex regulatory network that may involve crosstalk with ATM, and the regulation of at least 12 proteins involved in HR that are phosphorylated by DNA-PKcs and/or ATM.

  5. DNA repair in modeled microgravity: Double strand break rejoining activity in human lymphocytes irradiated with {gamma}-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mognato, Maddalena, E-mail: maddalena.mognato@unipd.it [Dipartimento di Biologia, Universita di Padova, via U. Bassi 58 B, 35121 Padova (Italy); Girardi, Cristina; Fabris, Sonia [Dipartimento di Biologia, Universita di Padova, via U. Bassi 58 B, 35121 Padova (Italy); Celotti, Lucia [Dipartimento di Biologia, Universita di Padova, via U. Bassi 58 B, 35121 Padova (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, INFN, Padova (Italy)

    2009-04-26

    Cell response to ionising radiation depends, besides on genetic and physiological features of the biological systems, on environmental conditions occurring during DNA repair. Many data showed that microgravity, experienced by astronauts during space flights or modeled on Earth, causes apoptosis, cytoskeletal alteration, cell growth inhibition, increased frequency of mutations and chromosome aberrations. In this study, we analysed the progression of the rejoining of double strand breaks (DSBs) in human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) irradiated with {gamma}-rays and incubated in static condition (1g) or in modeled microgravity (MMG). {gamma}-H2AX foci formation and disappearance, monitored during the repair incubation, showed that the kinetics of DSBs rejoining was different in the two gravity conditions. The fraction of foci-positive cells decreased slower in MMG than in 1g at 6 and 24 h after irradiation (P < 0.01) and the mean number of {gamma}-H2AX foci per nucleus was significantly higher in MMG than in 1g at the same time-points (P < 0.001). In the same samples we determined apoptotic level and the rate of DSB rejoining during post-irradiation incubation. A significant induction of apoptosis was observed in MMG at 24 h after irradiation (P < 0.001), whereas at shorter times the level of apoptosis was slightly higher in MMG respect to 1g. In accordance with the kinetics of {gamma}-H2AX foci, the slower rejoining of radiation-induced DSBs in MMG was observed by DNA fragmentation analyses during the repair incubation; the data of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis assay showed that the fraction of DNA released in the gel was significantly higher in PBL incubated in MMG after irradiation with respect to cells maintained in 1g. Our results provide evidences that MMG incubation during DNA repair delayed the rate of radiation-induced DSB rejoining, and increased, as a consequence, the genotoxic effects of ionising radiation.

  6. Regulation of ATM in DNA double strand break repair accounts for the radiosensitivity in human cells exposed to high linear energy transfer ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue Lian, E-mail: xuelian@suda.edu.cn [School of Radiation Medicine and Public Health, Medical College of Soochow University, No. 199, Ren' ai Road, Suzhou 215123 (China); Yu Dong, E-mail: ydong@ncc.go.jp [Tumor Endocrinology Project, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Furusawa, Yoshiya; Okayasu, Ryuichi [Heavy-Ion Radiobiology Research Group, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba-shi 263-8555 (Japan); Tong Jian; Cao Jianping; Fan Saijun [School of Radiation Medicine and Public Health, Medical College of Soochow University, No. 199, Ren' ai Road, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2009-11-02

    High linear energy transfer (LET) radiation shows different biological effects from low-LET radiation. The complex nature of high LET radiation-induced damage, especially the clustered DNA damage, brings about slow repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), which finally lead to higher lethality and chromosome aberration. Ionizing radiation (IR) induced DNA DSBs are repaired by both non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination repair (HRR) pathways in mammalian cells. The novel function of ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) protein is its involvement in the DSB repair of slow kinetics for 'dirty' breaks rejoining by NHEJ, this suggests that ATM may play a more important role in high LET radiation-induced DNA damage. We show here that KU55933, an ATM inhibitor could distinctly lower the clonogenic survival in normal human skin fibroblast cells exposed to carbon ion radiation and dramatically impair the normal process for DSB repair. We also implicated the involvement of ATM in the two pathways of DNA DSB repair, with DNA-PKcs and Rad51 as the representative proteins. The phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs at Thr-2609 with both immunoblotting and immunofluorescent staining indicated an ATM-dependent change, while for Rad51, KU55933 pretreatment could postpone the formation of nuclear Rad51 foci. Interestingly, we also found that pretreatment with chloroquine, an ATM stimulator could protect cells from carbon ion radiation only at lower doses. For doses over 1 Gy, protection was no longer observed. There was a dose-dependent increase for ATM kinase activity, with saturation at about 1 Gy. Chloroquine pretreatment prior to 1 Gy of carbon ion radiation did not enhance the autophosphorylation of ATM at serine 1981. The function of ATM in G2/M checkpoint arrest facilitated DSB repair in high-LET irradiation. Our results provide a possible mechanism for the direct involvement of ATM in DSB repair by high-LET irradiation.

  7. Reduced Activity of Double-Strand Break Repair Genes in Prostate Cancer Patients With Late Normal Tissue Radiation Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oorschot, Bregje van, E-mail: b.vanoorschot@amc.uva.nl [Laboratory for Experimental Oncology and Radiobiology (LEXOR), Center for Molecular Medicine (CEMM), Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hovingh, Suzanne E. [Laboratory for Experimental Oncology and Radiobiology (LEXOR), Center for Molecular Medicine (CEMM), Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Moerland, Perry D. [Bioinformatics Laboratory, Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Medema, Jan Paul; Stalpers, Lukas J.A. [Laboratory for Experimental Oncology and Radiobiology (LEXOR), Center for Molecular Medicine (CEMM), Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vrieling, Harry [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Franken, Nicolaas A.P. [Laboratory for Experimental Oncology and Radiobiology (LEXOR), Center for Molecular Medicine (CEMM), Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate clinical parameters and DNA damage response as possible risk factors for radiation toxicity in the setting of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Clinical parameters of 61 prostate cancer patients, 34 with (overresponding, OR) and 27 without (non-responding, NR) severe late radiation toxicity were assembled. In addition, for a matched subset the DNA damage repair kinetics (γ-H2AX assay) and expression profiles of DNA repair genes were determined in ex vivo irradiated lymphocytes. Results: Examination of clinical data indicated none of the considered clinical parameters to be correlated with the susceptibility of patients to develop late radiation toxicity. Although frequencies of γ-H2AX foci induced immediately after irradiation were similar (P=.32), significantly higher numbers of γ-H2AX foci were found 24 hours after irradiation in OR compared with NR patients (P=.03). Patient-specific γ-H2AX foci decay ratios were significantly higher in NR patients than in OR patients (P<.0001). Consequently, NR patients seem to repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) more efficiently than OR patients. Moreover, gene expression analysis indicated several genes of the homologous recombination pathway to be stronger induced in NR compared with OR patients (P<.05). A similar trend was observed in genes of the nonhomologous end-joining repair pathway (P=.09). This is congruent with more proficient repair of DNA DSBs in patients without late radiation toxicity. Conclusions: Both gene expression profiling and DNA DSB repair kinetics data imply that less-efficient repair of radiation-induced DSBs may contribute to the development of late normal tissue damage. Induction levels of DSB repair genes (eg, RAD51) may potentially be used to assess the risk for late radiation toxicity.

  8. DNA double strand break repair, aging and the chromatin connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbunova, Vera; Seluanov, Andrei

    2016-06-01

    Are DNA damage and mutations possible causes or consequences of aging? This question has been hotly debated by biogerontologists for decades. The importance of DNA damage as a possible driver of the aging process went from being widely recognized to then forgotten, and is now slowly making a comeback. DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) are particularly relevant to aging because of their toxicity, increased frequency with age and the association of defects in their repair with premature aging. Recent studies expand the potential impact of DNA damage and mutations on aging by linking DNA DSB repair and age-related chromatin changes. There is overwhelming evidence that increased DNA damage and mutations accelerate aging. However, an ultimate proof of causality would be to show that enhanced genome and epigenome stability delays aging. This is not an easy task, as improving such complex biological processes is infinitely more difficult than disabling it. We will discuss the possibility that animal models with enhanced DNA repair and epigenome maintenance will be generated in the near future.

  9. Dynamic dependence on ATR and ATM for double-strand break repair in human embryonic stem cells and neural descendants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bret R Adams

    Full Text Available The DNA double-strand break (DSB is the most toxic form of DNA damage. Studies aimed at characterizing DNA repair during development suggest that homologous recombination repair (HRR is more critical in pluripotent cells compared to differentiated somatic cells in which nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ is dominant. We have characterized the DNA damage response (DDR and quality of DNA double-strand break (DSB repair in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs, and in vitro-derived neural cells. Resolution of ionizing radiation-induced foci (IRIF was used as a surrogate for DSB repair. The resolution of gamma-H2AX foci occurred at a slower rate in hESCs compared to neural progenitors (NPs and astrocytes perhaps reflective of more complex DSB repair in hESCs. In addition, the resolution of RAD51 foci, indicative of active homologous recombination repair (HRR, showed that hESCs as well as NPs have high capacity for HRR, whereas astrocytes do not. Importantly, the ATM kinase was shown to be critical for foci formation in astrocytes, but not in hESCs, suggesting that the DDR is different in these cells. Blocking the ATM kinase in astrocytes not only prevented the formation but also completely disassembled preformed repair foci. The ability of hESCs to form IRIF was abrogated with caffeine and siRNAs targeted against ATR, implicating that hESCs rely on ATR, rather than ATM for regulating DSB repair. This relationship dynamically changed as cells differentiated. Interestingly, while the inhibition of the DNA-PKcs kinase (and presumably non-homologous endjoining [NHEJ] in astrocytes slowed IRIF resolution it did not in hESCs, suggesting that repair in hESCs does not utilize DNA-PKcs. Altogether, our results show that hESCs have efficient DSB repair that is largely ATR-dependent HRR, whereas astrocytes critically depend on ATM for NHEJ, which, in part, is DNA-PKcs-independent.

  10. Transplantation of bone marrow stromal cells overexpressing human vascular endothelial growth factor 165 enhances tissue repair in a rat model of radiation-induced injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Tao; Liao Tian'an; Wang Hong; Deng Wei; Yu Dahai

    2014-01-01

    Background The multilineage differentiation potential ability of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) showed great potential in tissue engineering,while vascular endothelial growth factor 165 (VEGF165) promotes vasculogenesis and further promotes tissue regeneration.This study aimed to assess the ability of rat BMSCs expressing human VEGFA165 (hVEGF165) to promote tissue repair in rat model of radiation-induced injury.Methods Rat BMSCs were isolated from the tibia.Plasmid DNA expressing hVEGF165 was stably transfected into BMSCs using liposomes.The right hindlimb muscle of 40 rats was irradiated using a 60Co y source (total dose 30 Gy).The animals were divided into four groups (n=10):not injected with BMSCs (control; group 1) or intramuscularly injected two times (once in 2 weeks) with pcDNATM3.1-transfected BMSCs (group 2),untransfected BMSCs (group 3),or hVEGF165-transfected BMSCs (group 4).Angiography was performed 1 week after the last injection of BMSCs; samples of the hindlimb muscle were subjected to transmission electron microscopy,ultrastructural analysis,reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR),Western blotting,and immunohistochemistry.Results Rat BMSCs with multipotent differentiation capacity were isolated,hVEGF165-transfected BMSCs overexpressed hVEGF165 mRNA and protein.Injection of BMSCs (groups 2-4) increased the average vessel number,density,diameter,and cross-sectional area; mRNA expression of the myogenic markers including myoblast determination protein,myogenin,and α-smooth muscle actin; and CD31 protein expression; and promoted the repair of blood vessels and myofibers after radiation-induced injury compared to group 1; each of these parameters and hVEGF165 mRNA or protein expression were markedly improved in rats injected with hVEGF165-transfected BMSCs compared to groups 2 and 3.Conclusions BMSCs expressing hVEGF165 enhanced the repair of radiation-induced tissue injury by promoting vasculogenesis and muscle fiber regeneration.BMSCs expressing h

  11. DNA repair efficiency in germ cells and early mouse embryos and consequences for radiation-induced transgenerational genomic damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2009-01-18

    Exposure to ionizing radiation and other environmental agents can affect the genomic integrity of germ cells and induce adverse health effects in the progeny. Efficient DNA repair during gametogenesis and the early embryonic cycles after fertilization is critical for preventing transmission of DNA damage to the progeny and relies on maternal factors stored in the egg before fertilization. The ability of the maternal repair machinery to repair DNA damage in both parental genomes in the fertilizing egg is especially crucial for the fertilizing male genome that has not experienced a DNA repair-competent cellular environment for several weeks prior to fertilization. During the DNA repair-deficient period of spermatogenesis, DNA lesions may accumulate in sperm and be carried into the egg where, if not properly repaired, could result in the formation of heritable chromosomal aberrations or mutations and associated birth defects. Studies with female mice deficient in specific DNA repair genes have shown that: (i) cell cycle checkpoints are activated in the fertilized egg by DNA damage carried by the sperm; and (ii) the maternal genotype plays a major role in determining the efficiency of repairing genomic lesions in the fertilizing sperm and directly affect the risk for abnormal reproductive outcomes. There is also growing evidence that implicates DNA damage carried by the fertilizing gamete as a mediator of postfertilization processes that contribute to genomic instability in subsequent generations. Transgenerational genomic instability most likely involves epigenetic mechanisms or error-prone DNA repair processes in the early embryo. Maternal and embryonic DNA repair processes during the early phases of mammalian embryonic development can have far reaching consequences for the genomic integrity and health of subsequent generations.

  12. Sister chromatid gene conversion is a prominent double-strand break repair pathway in mammalian cells

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Roger D.; Jasin, Maria

    2000-01-01

    In mammalian cells, repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) occurs by both homologous and non-homologous mechanisms. By definition, homologous recombination requires a template with sufficient sequence identity to the damaged molecule in order to direct repair. We now show that the sister chromatid acts as a repair template in a substantial proportion of DSB repair events. The outcome of sister chromatid repair is primarily gene conversion unassociated with reciprocal exchange. This contras...

  13. Artemis is required to improve the accuracy of repair of double-strand breaks with 5'-blocked termini generated from non-DSB-clustered lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyarchuk, Svitlana; Castore, Reneau; Shi, Runhua; Harrison, Lynn

    2013-05-01

    Clustered DNA lesions are defined as ≥2 damage events within 20 bp. Oxidised bases, abasic (AP) sites, single-strand breaks and double-strand breaks (DSBs) exist in radiation-induced clusters, and these lesions are more difficult to repair and can be more mutagenic than single lesions. Understanding clustered lesion repair is therefore important for the design of complementary treatments to enhance radiotherapy. Non-DSB-clustered lesions consisting of opposing AP sites can be converted to DSBs by base excision repair, and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) plays a role in repairing these DSBs. Artemis is an endonuclease that removes blocking groups from DSB termini during NHEJ. Hence, we hypothesised that Artemis plays a role in the processing of DSBs or complex DSBs generated from non-DSB-clustered lesions. We examined the repair of clusters containing two or three lesions in wild-type (WT) or Artemis-deficient (ART(-/-)) mouse fibroblasts using a reporter plasmid. Each cluster contained two opposing tetrahydrofurans (an AP site analogue), which AP endonuclease can convert to a DSB with blocked 5' termini. Loss of Artemis did not decrease plasmid survival, but did result in more mutagenic repair with plasmids containing larger deletions. This increase in deletions did not occur with ClaI-linearised plasmid. Since Mre11 has been implicated in deletional NHEJ, we used small interfering RNA to reduce Mre11 in WT and ART(-/-) cells, but decreasing Mre11 did not change the size of deletions in the repair products. This work implicates Artemis in limiting the deletions introduced during repair of 5'-blocked termini DSBs generated from non-DSB-clustered lesions. Decreasing repair accuracy without decreasing repair capacity could result in mutated cells surviving irradiation. Inhibiting Artemis in normal cells could promote carcinogenesis, while in tumour cells enhanced mutagenic repair following irradiation could promote tumour recurrence.

  14. Genetics of x-ray induced double strand break repair in saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budd, M.E.

    1982-07-01

    The possible fates of x-ray-induced double-strand breaks in Saccharomyces cerevisiae were examined. One possible pathway which breaks can follow, the repair pathway, was studied by assaying strains with mutations in the RAD51, RAD54, and RAD57 loci for double-strand break repair. In order of increasing radiation sensitivity one finds: rad57-1(23/sup 0/)> rad51-1(30/sup 0/)> rad54-3(36/sup 0/). At 36/sup 0/, rad54-3 cells cannot repair double-strand breaks, while 23/sup 0/, they can. Strains with the rad57-1 mutation can rejoin broken chromosomes at both temperatures. However, the low survival at 36/sup 0/ shows that the assay is not distinguishing large DNA fragments which allow cell survival from those which cause cell death. A rad51-1 strain could also rejoin broken chromosomes, and was thus capable of incomplete repair. The data can be explained with the hypothesis that rad54-3 cells are blocked in an early step of repair, while rad51-1 and rad57-1 strains are blocked in a later step of repair. The fate of double-strand breaks when they are left unrepaired was investigated with the rad54-3 mutation. If breaks are prevented from entering the RAD54 repair pathway they become uncommitted lesions. These lesions are repaired slower than the original breaks. One possible fate for an uncommitted lesion is conversion into a fixed lesion, which is likely to be an unrepairable or misrepaired double-strand break. The presence of protein synthesis after irradiation increases the probability that a break will enter the repair pathway. Evidence shows that increased probability of repair results from enhanced synthesis of repair proteins shortly after radiation. (ERB)

  15. Double-strand break repair and G4 DNA stability in Caenorhabditis elegans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pontier, D.B.

    2010-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) can be repaired by three canonical repair pathways. Homologous recombination (HR) uses the sister chromatid or homologous chromosome as a template to repair the DSB in an error-free manner. In non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), the broken ends are ligated with little

  16. Meiotic and mitotic functions of mammalian RAD 18 in DNA double-strand break repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Inagaki (Akiko)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis focuses on the role of RAD 18 in DNA double-strand break (DSB ) repair. Much is known about the role of RAD 18, and its critical substrate PCNA in replication damage bypass (RDB ) repair. However, the roles of RAD 18 in DSB repair are still elusive, although several

  17. Double-strand break repair and G4 DNA stability in Caenorhabditis elegans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pontier, D.B.

    2010-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) can be repaired by three canonical repair pathways. Homologous recombination (HR) uses the sister chromatid or homologous chromosome as a template to repair the DSB in an error-free manner. In non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), the broken ends are ligated with little

  18. Meiotic and mitotic functions of mammalian RAD 18 in DNA double-strand break repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Inagaki (Akiko)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis focuses on the role of RAD 18 in DNA double-strand break (DSB ) repair. Much is known about the role of RAD 18, and its critical substrate PCNA in replication damage bypass (RDB ) repair. However, the roles of RAD 18 in DSB repair are still elusive, although several interacti

  19. Ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage and its repair in human cells. Final performance report, July 1992--June 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dizdaroglu, M.

    1995-12-31

    The studies of DNA damage in living cells in vitro and in vivo were continued. A variety of systems including cultured mammalian cells, animals, and human tissues were used to conduct these studies. In addition, enzymatic repair of DNA base damage was studied using several DNA glycosylases. To this end, substrate specificities of these enzymes were examined in terms of a large number of base lesions in DNA. In the first phase of the studies, the author sought to introduce improvements to his methodologies for measurement of DNA damage using the technique of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). In particular, the quantitative measurement of DNA base damage and DNA-protein crosslinks was improved by incorporation of isotope-dilution mass spectrometry into the methodologies. This is one of the most accurate techniques for quantification of organic compounds. Having improved the measurement technique, studies of DNA damage in living cells and DNA repair by repair enzymes were pursued. This report provides a summary of these studies with references to the original work.

  20. Radiosensitivity and capacity for radiation-induced sublethal damage repair of canine transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parfitt, S L; Milner, R J; Salute, M E; Hintenlang, D E; Farese, J P; Bacon, N J; Bova, F J; Rajon, D A; Lurie, D M

    2011-09-01

    Understanding the inherent radiosensitivity and repair capacity of canine transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) can aid in optimizing radiation protocols to treat this disease. The objective of this study was to evaluate the parameters surviving fraction at 2 Gy (SF(2) ), α/β ratio and capacity for sublethal damage repair (SLDR) in response to radiation. Dose-response and split-dose studies were performed using the clonogenic assay. The mean SF(2) for three established TCC cell lines was high at 0.61. All the three cell lines exhibited a low to moderate α/β ratio, with the mean being 3.27. Two cell lines exhibited statistically increased survival at 4 and 24 h in the dose-response assay. Overall, our results indicate that the cell lines are moderately radioresistant, have a high repair capacity and behave similarly to a late-responding normal tissue. These findings indicate that the radiation protocols utilizing higher doses with less fractionation may be more effective for treating TCC.

  1. Adriamycin does not affect the repair of X-ray induced DNA single strand breaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantoni, O.; Sestili, P.; Cattabeni, F.

    1985-06-01

    The ability of the antitumor antibiotic adriamycin (Ad) to inhibit the rejoining of DNA single strand breaks produced by X-rays was investigated in cultured cells. Chinese hamster ovary cells were given 400 rad and were allowed to repair in the presence or absence of Ad for 60 min at 37degC. The drug did not affect the ability of cells to repair DNA breaks and residual breaks found after the repair period were attributed to those induced by Ad alone. (author). 16 refs.

  2. Genetics of x-ray induced double strand break repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budd, M.E.

    1982-01-01

    This thesis examined the possible fates of x-ray induced double strand breaks in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. One possible pathway which breaks can follow is the repair pathway and this pathway was studied by assaying strains with mutations in RAD51, RAD54, and RAD57 loci for double strand break repair using neutral sucrose sedimentation. Rad54-3 strains were sensitive to x-ray at 36/sup 0/ and resistant at 23/sup 0/, while rad57-1 strains are sensitive to radiation at 23/sup 0/ and resistant at 36/sup 0/. In order of increasing radiation sensitivity one finds: rad57-1(23/sup 0/)> rad51-1(30/sup 0/)>rad54-3(36/sup 0/). At the restrictive temperature 36/sup 0/, rad54-3 cells are unaable to repair double strand breaks, while at the permissive temperature, 23/sup 0/, these strains are able to repair double strand breaks. On the other hand, strains with the rad57-1 mutation appear to be able to rejoin broken chromosomes at both the permissive and restrictive temperature. However, the low assay is not distinguishing large DNA fragments which allow cell survival from large DNA fragments which cause cell death. A rad51-1 strain also appeared able to rejoin broken chromosomes, and is thus capable of incomplete repair. The data can be explained with the hypotheses that rad54-3 cells are blocked in a later step of repair. The fate of double strand breaks when they are left unrepaired was also investigated with the temperature conditional rad54-3 mutation. If breaks are prevented from entering the RAD54 repair pathway they are modified and become uncommitted lesions. The rate these uncommitted lesions are repaired is slower than the rate the original breaks are repaired.

  3. Nrf2 facilitates repair of radiation induced DNA damage through homologous recombination repair pathway in a ROS independent manner in cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayakumar, Sundarraj; Pal, Debojyoti; Sandur, Santosh K., E-mail: sskumar@barc.gov.in

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Nrf2 inhibition in A549 cells led to attenuated DNA repair and radiosensitization. • Influence of Nrf2 on DNA repair is not linked to its antioxidant function. • Nrf2 influences DNA repair through homologous recombination (HR) repair pathway. • Many genes involved in HR pathway show ARE sequences in their upstream region. - Abstract: Nrf2 is a redox sensitive transcription factor that is involved in the co-ordinated transcription of genes involved in redox homeostasis. But the role of Nrf2 in DNA repair is not investigated in detail. We have employed A549 and MCF7 cells to study the role of Nrf2 on DNA repair by inhibiting Nrf2 using all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) or by knock down approach prior to radiation exposure (4 Gy). DNA damage and repair analysis was studied by γH2AX foci formation and comet assay. Results suggested that the inhibition of Nrf2 in A549 or MCF7 cells led to significant slowdown in DNA repair as compared to respective radiation controls. The persistence of residual DNA damage even in the presence of free radical scavenger N-acetyl cysteine, suggested that the influence of Nrf2 on DNA repair was not linked to its antioxidant functions. Further, its influence on non-homologous end joining repair pathway was studied by inhibiting both Nrf2 and DNA-PK together. This led to synergistic reduction of survival fraction, indicating that Nrf2 may not be influencing the NHEJ pathway. To investigate the role of homologous recombination repair (HR) pathway, RAD51 foci formation was monitored. There was a significant reduction in the foci formation in cells treated with ATRA or shRNA against Nrf2 as compared to their respective radiation controls. Further, Nrf2 inhibition led to significant reduction in mRNA levels of RAD51. BLAST analysis was also performed on upstream regions of DNA repair genes to identify antioxidant response element and found that many repair genes that are involved in HR pathway may be regulated by Nrf2

  4. The RSC and INO80 chromatin-remodeling complexes in DNA double-strand break repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Anna L; Downs, Jessica A

    2012-01-01

    In eukaryotes, DNA is packaged into chromatin and is therefore relatively inaccessible to DNA repair enzymes. In order to perform efficient DNA repair, ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling enzymes are required to alter the chromatin structure near the site of damage to facilitate processing and allow access to repair enzymes. Two of the best-studied remodeling complexes involved in repair are RSC (Remodels the Structure of Chromatin) and INO80 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which are both conserved in higher eukaryotes. RSC is very rapidly recruited to breaks and mobilizes nucleosomes to promote phosphorylation of H2A S129 and resection. INO80 enrichment at a break occurs later and is dependent on phospho-S129 H2A. INO80 activity at the break site also facilitates resection. Consequently, both homologous recombination and nonhomologous end-joining are defective in rsc mutants, while subsets of these repair pathways are affected in ino80 mutants.

  5. DNA Single-Strand Break Repair and Spinocerebellar Ataxia with Axonal Neuropathy-1

    OpenAIRE

    Caldecott, K. W.

    2007-01-01

    DNA single-strand breaks (SSBs) are the commonest DNA lesions arising spontaneously in cells, and if not repaired may block transcription or may be converted into potentially lethal/clastogenic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Recently, evidence has emerged that defects in the rapid repair of SSBs preferentially impact the nervous system. In particular, spinocerebellar ataxia with axonal neuropathy (SCAN1) is a human disease that is associated with mutation of TDP1 (tyrosyl DNA phosphodiester...

  6. DNA single-strand break repair and spinocerebellar ataxia with axonal neuropathy-1

    OpenAIRE

    El-Khamisy, S.F.; Caldecott, K. W.

    2007-01-01

    DNA single-strand breaks (SSBs) are the commonest DNA lesions arising spontaneously in cells, and if not repaired may block transcription or may be converted into potentially lethal/clastogenic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Recently, evidence has emerged that defects in the rapid repair of SSBs preferentially impact the nervous system. In particular, spinocerebellar ataxia with axonal neuropathy (SCAN1) is a human disease that is associated with mutation of TDP1 (tyrosyl DNA phosphodiester...

  7. A requirement for polymerized actin in DNA double-strand break repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrin, Christi; McDonald, Darin; Attwood, Kathleen M; Rodrigue, Amélie; Ghosh, Sunita; Mirzayans, Razmik; Masson, Jean-Yves; Dellaire, Graham; Hendzel, Michael J

    2012-07-01

    Nuclear actin is involved in several nuclear processes from chromatin remodeling to transcription. Here we examined the requirement for actin polymerization in DNA double-strand break repair. Double-strand breaks are considered the most dangerous type of DNA lesion. Double-strand break repair consists of a complex set of events that are tightly regulated. Failure at any step can have catastrophic consequences such as genomic instability, oncogenesis or cell death. Many proteins involved in this repair process have been identified and their roles characterized. We discovered that some DNA double-strand break repair factors are capable of associating with polymeric actin in vitro and specifically, that purified Ku70/80 interacts with polymerized actin under these conditions. We find that the disruption of polymeric actin inhibits DNA double strand break repair both in vitro and in vivo. Introduction of nuclear targeted mutant actin that cannot polymerize, or the depolymerization of endogenous actin filaments by the addition of cytochalasin D, alters the retention of Ku80 at sites of DNA damage in live cells. Our results suggest that polymeric actin is required for proper DNA double-strand break repair and may function through the stabilization of the Ku heterodimer at the DNA damage site.

  8. New tools to study DNA double-strand break repair pathway choice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Gomez-Cabello

    Full Text Available A broken DNA molecule is difficult to repair, highly mutagenic, and extremely cytotoxic. Such breaks can be repaired by homology-independent or homology-directed mechanisms. Little is known about the network that controls the repair pathway choice except that a licensing step for homology-mediated repair exists, called DNA-end resection. The choice between these two repair pathways is a key event for genomic stability maintenance, and an imbalance of the ratio is directly linked with human diseases, including cancer. Here we present novel reporters to study the balance between both repair options in human cells. In these systems, a double-strand break can be alternatively repaired by homology-independent or -dependent mechanisms, leading to the accumulation of distinct fluorescent proteins. These reporters thus allow the balance between both repair pathways to be analyzed in different experimental setups. We validated the reporters by analyzing the effect of protein downregulation of the DNA end resection and non-homologous end-joining pathways. Finally, we analyzed the role of the DNA damage response on double-strand break (DSB repair mechanism selection. Our reporters could be used in the future to understand the roles of specific factors, whole pathways, or drugs in DSB repair pathway choice, or for genome-wide screening. Moreover, our findings can be applied to increase gene-targeting efficiency, making it a beneficial tool for a broad audience in the biological sciences.

  9. The type and yield of ionising radiation induced chromosomal aberrations depend on the efficiency of different DSB repair pathways in mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natarajan, Adayapalam T.; Berni, Andrea; Marimuthu, Kodumudi M. [Department of Agrobiology and Agrochemistry, University of Tuscia, Via San Camillo de Lellis, 01100 Viterbo (Italy); Palitti, Fabrizio [Department of Agrobiology and Agrochemistry, University of Tuscia, Via San Camillo de Lellis, 01100 Viterbo (Italy)], E-mail: palitti@unitus.it

    2008-07-03

    In order to evaluate the relative role of two major DNA double strand break repair pathways, i.e., non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination repair (HRR), CHO mutants deficient in these two pathways and the parental cells (AA8) were X-irradiated with various doses. The cells were harvested at different times after irradiation, representing G{sub 2}, S and G{sub 1} phase at the time of irradiation, The mutant cell lines used were V33 (NHEJ deficient), Irs1SF, 51-D1 (HRR deficient). In addition to parental cell line (AA8), a revertant of V33, namely V33-155 was employed. Both types of mutant cells responded with increased frequencies of chromosomal aberrations at all recovery times in comparison to the parental and revertant cells. Mutant cells deficient in NHEJ were more sensitive in all cell stages in comparison to HRR deficient mutant cells, indicating NHEJ is the major repair pathway for DSB repair through out the cell cycle. Both chromosome and chromatid types of exchange aberrations were observed following G{sub 1} irradiation (16 and 24 h recovery). Interestingly, configurations involving both chromosome (dicentrics) and chromatid exchanges were encountered in G{sub 1} irradiated V33 cells. This may indicate that unrepaired DSBs accumulate in G{sub 1} in these mutant cells and carried over to S phase, where they are repaired by HRR or other pathways such as B-NHEJ (back up NHEJ), which appear to be highly error prone. Both NHEJ and HRR, which share some of the same proteins in their pathways, are involved in the repair of DSBs leading to chromosomal aberrations, but with a major role of NHEJ in all stages of cell cycle.

  10. Mouse RAD54 affects DNA double-strand break repair and sister chromatid exchange

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.B. Beverloo (Berna); R.D. Johnson (Roger); M. Jasin (Maria); R. Kanaar (Roland); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); M.L.G. Dronkert (Mies)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractCells can achieve error-free repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by homologous recombination through gene conversion with or without crossover. In contrast, an alternative homology-dependent DSB repair pathway, single-strand annealing (SSA), results in deletions. In this study, we

  11. Age and gender effects on DNA strand break repair in peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garm, Christian; Moreno-Villanueva, Maria; Bürkle, Alexander;

    2013-01-01

    single-strand breaks (SSBs) and double-strand breaks (DSBs) in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Of these lesions, DSBs are the least frequent but the most dangerous for cells. We have measured the level of endogenous SSBs, SSB repair capacity, γ-H2AX response, and DSB repair capacity...... in a study population consisting of 216 individuals from a population-based sample of twins aged 40-77 years. Age in this range did not seem to have any effect on the SSB parameters. However, γ-H2AX response and DSB repair capacity decreased with increasing age, although the associations did not reach...

  12. DNA double strand break repair, chromosome synapsis and transcriptional silencing in meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Akiko; Schoenmakers, Sam; Baarends, Willy M

    2010-05-16

    Chromosome pairing and synapsis during meiotic prophase requires the formation and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by the topoisomerase-like enzyme SPO11. Chromosomes, or chromosomal regions, that lack a pairing partner, such as the largely heterologous X and Y chromosomes, show delayed meiotic DSB repair and are transcriptionally silenced. Herein, we review meiosis-specific aspects of DSB repair in relation to homology recognition and meiotic silencing of heterologous regions. We propose a dynamic interplay between progression of synapsis and persistent meiotic DSBs. Signaling from these persistent breaks could inhibit heterologous synapsis and stimulate meiotic silencing of the X and Y chromosomes.

  13. Determination of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks for the biological dose monitoring in cardiac computerized tomography; Bestimmung von strahleninduzierten DNA-Doppelstrangbruechen zum Monitoring der biologischen Dosis in der Herz-Computertomographie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wegener, Jasmin

    2013-11-12

    Background and aims: X-rays cause relevant DNA damage to cells. DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are considered to be the most biologically significant radiation induced DNA-lesions. Recently a sensitive immunofluorescence microscopic method was developed to quantify x-ray induced DSBs as nuclear foci, even after doses as used in computed tomography. The method is based on the phosphorylation of the histone variant H2AX after formation of DSBs and distinct foci representing DSBs can be visualised. The number of foci correlates well with the delivered radiation dose. The importance of cardiac CT has increased during the last years. The radiation exposure of cardiac CT is rather high compared to other radiologic diagnostic procedures and techniques for dose-reduction receive increasing attention. In this context the purpose of this study was to determine to what extent the γ-H2AX-based method is able to measure x-ray induced DSBs in patients undergoing cardiac CT. Furthermore the objective was to evaluate whether CT-induced DSBs correlate with exposure parameters (dose length product, DLP) and to assess the influence of the scan protocols on the biological radiation damage. Materials and methods: 32 patients undergoing coronary CT angiography either using a 64-slice (n = 5: SOMATOM Sensation 64 {sup registered}) or a dual-source CT scanner (n = 27: SOMATOM Definition {sup registered}) were included in the study. Venous blood samples were taken before and 0.5 h, 2.5 h, and 24 h after the CT scan. Additional venous blood samples obtained before CT were irradiated in-vitro at various radiation doses (10 mGy, 50 mGy, 100 mGy) to obtain reference values of foci. Lymphocytes were separated and incubated with a specific γ-H2AX primary and a fluorescent secondary antibody. The number of γ-H2AX-foci was quantified using a fluorescence microscope. Every distinct focus represents one DNA-DSB. The number of radiation-induced DSBs was calculated by subtracting the foci number

  14. Genetic and environmental influence on DNA strand break repair: a twin study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garm, Christian; Moreno-Villanueva, Maria; Bürkle, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    factors are likely to influence DNA repair capacity. In order to gain more insight into the genetic and environmental contribution to the molecular basis of DNA repair, we have performed a human twin study, where we focused on the consequences of some of the most abundant types of DNA damage (single......Accumulation of DNA damage deriving from exogenous and endogenous sources has significant consequences for cellular survival, and is implicated in aging, cancer, and neurological diseases. Different DNA repair pathways have evolved in order to maintain genomic stability. Genetic and environmental......-strand breaks), and some of the most hazardous lesions (DNA double-strand breaks). DNA damage signaling response (Gamma-H2AX signaling), relative amount of endogenous damage, and DNA-strand break repair capacities were studied in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 198 twins (94 monozygotic and 104...

  15. IGF-1R inhibition enhances radiosensitivity and delays double-strand break repair by both non-homologous end-joining and homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitnis, M M; Lodhia, K A; Aleksic, T; Gao, S; Protheroe, A S; Macaulay, V M

    2014-11-06

    Inhibition of type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) enhances tumor cell sensitivity to ionizing radiation. It is not clear how this effect is mediated, nor whether this approach can be applied effectively in the clinic. We previously showed that IGF-1R depletion delays repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), unlikely to be explained entirely by reduction in homologous recombination (HR) repair. The current study tested the hypothesis that IGF-1R inhibition induces a repair defect that involves non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). IGF-1R inhibitor AZ12253801 blocked cell survival and radiosensitized IGF-1R-overexpressing murine fibroblasts but not isogenic IGF-1R-null cells, supporting specificity for IGF-1R. IGF-1R inhibition enhanced radiosensitivity in DU145, PC3 and 22Rv1 prostate cancer cells, comparable to effects of Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated inhibition. AZ12253801-treated DU145 cells showed delayed resolution of γH2AX foci, apparent within 1 h of irradiation and persisting for 24 h. In contrast, IGF-1R inhibition did not influence radiosensitivity or γH2AX focus resolution in LNCaP-LN3 cells, suggesting that radiosensitization tracks with the ability of IGF-1R to influence DSB repair. To differentiate effects on repair from growth and cell-survival responses, we tested AZ12253801 in DU145 cells at sub-SF50 concentrations that had no early (⩽48 h) effects on cell cycle distribution or apoptosis induction. Irradiated cultures contained abnormal mitoses, and after 5 days IGF-1R-inhibited cells showed enhanced radiation-induced polyploidy and nuclear fragmentation, consistent with the consequences of entry into mitosis with incompletely repaired DNA. AZ12253801 radiosensitized DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK)-proficient but not DNA-PK-deficient glioblastoma cells, and did not radiosensitize DNA-PK-inhibited DU145 cells, suggesting that in the context of DSB repair, IGF-1R functions in the same pathway as DNA

  16. Deletion-bias in DNA double-strand break repair differentially contributes to plant genome shrinkage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Giang T H; Cao, Hieu X; Reiss, Bernd; Schubert, Ingo

    2017-02-28

    In order to prevent genome instability, cells need to be protected by a number of repair mechanisms, including DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. The extent to which DSB repair, biased towards deletions or insertions, contributes to evolutionary diversification of genome size is still under debate. We analyzed mutation spectra in Arabidopsis thaliana and in barley (Hordeum vulgare) by PacBio sequencing of three DSB-targeted loci each, uncovering repair via gene conversion, single strand annealing (SSA) or nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ). Furthermore, phylogenomic comparisons between A. thaliana and two related species were used to detect naturally occurring deletions during Arabidopsis evolution. Arabidopsis thaliana revealed significantly more and larger deletions after DSB repair than barley, and barley displayed more and larger insertions. Arabidopsis displayed a clear net loss of DNA after DSB repair, mainly via SSA and NHEJ. Barley revealed a very weak net loss of DNA, apparently due to less active break-end resection and easier copying of template sequences into breaks. Comparative phylogenomics revealed several footprints of SSA in the A. thaliana genome. Quantitative assessment of DNA gain and loss through DSB repair processes suggests deletion-biased DSB repair causing ongoing genome shrinking in A. thaliana, whereas genome size in barley remains nearly constant.

  17. Ago2 facilitates Rad51 recruitment and DNA double-strand break repair by homologous recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Min; Wei, Wei; Li, Ming Hua

    2014-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are highly cytotoxic lesions and pose a major threat to genome stability if not properly repaired. We and others have previously shown that a class of DSB-induced small RNAs (diRNAs) is produced from sequences around DSB sites. DiRNAs are associated with Argonaute...... (Ago) proteins and play an important role in DSB repair, though the mechanism through which they act remains unclear. Here, we report that the role of diRNAs in DSB repair is restricted to repair by homologous recombination (HR) and that it specifically relies on the effector protein Ago2 in mammalian...

  18. Branch migration prevents DNA loss during double-strand break repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia S P Mawer

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The repair of DNA double-strand breaks must be accurate to avoid genomic rearrangements that can lead to cell death and disease. This can be accomplished by promoting homologous recombination between correctly aligned sister chromosomes. Here, using a unique system for generating a site-specific DNA double-strand break in one copy of two replicating Escherichia coli sister chromosomes, we analyse the intermediates of sister-sister double-strand break repair. Using two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis, we show that when double-strand breaks are formed in the absence of RuvAB, 4-way DNA (Holliday junctions are accumulated in a RecG-dependent manner, arguing against the long-standing view that the redundancy of RuvAB and RecG is in the resolution of Holliday junctions. Using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, we explain the redundancy by showing that branch migration catalysed by RuvAB and RecG is required for stabilising the intermediates of repair as, when branch migration cannot take place, repair is aborted and DNA is lost at the break locus. We demonstrate that in the repair of correctly aligned sister chromosomes, an unstable early intermediate is stabilised by branch migration. This reliance on branch migration may have evolved to help promote recombination between correctly aligned sister chromosomes to prevent genomic rearrangements.

  19. Homology Requirements and Competition between Gene Conversion and Break-Induced Replication during Double-Strand Break Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Anuja; Beach, Annette; Haber, James E

    2017-02-02

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae mating-type switching is initiated by a double-strand break (DSB) at MATa, leaving one cut end perfectly homologous to the HMLα donor, while the second end must be processed to remove a non-homologous tail before completing repair by gene conversion (GC). When homology at the matched end is ≤150 bp, efficient repair depends on the recombination enhancer, which tethers HMLα near the DSB. Thus, homology shorter than an apparent minimum efficient processing segment can be rescued by tethering the donor near the break. When homology at the second end is ≤150 bp, second-end capture becomes inefficient and repair shifts from GC to break-induced replication (BIR). But when pol32 or pif1 mutants block BIR, GC increases 3-fold, indicating that the steps blocked by these mutations are reversible. With short second-end homology, absence of the RecQ helicase Sgs1 promotes gene conversion, whereas deletion of the FANCM-related Mph1 helicase promotes BIR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Mechanistic Modelling and Bayesian Inference Elucidates the Variable Dynamics of Double-Strand Break Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks are lesions that form during metabolism, DNA replication and exposure to mutagens. When a double-strand break occurs one of a number of repair mechanisms is recruited, all of which have differing propensities for mutational events. Despite DNA repair being of crucial importance, the relative contribution of these mechanisms and their regulatory interactions remain to be fully elucidated. Understanding these mutational processes will have a profound impact on our knowledge of genomic instability, with implications across health, disease and evolution. Here we present a new method to model the combined activation of non-homologous end joining, single strand annealing and alternative end joining, following exposure to ionising radiation. We use Bayesian statistics to integrate eight biological data sets of double-strand break repair curves under varying genetic knockouts and confirm that our model is predictive by re-simulating and comparing to additional data. Analysis of the model suggests that there are at least three disjoint modes of repair, which we assign as fast, slow and intermediate. Our results show that when multiple data sets are combined, the rate for intermediate repair is variable amongst genetic knockouts. Further analysis suggests that the ratio between slow and intermediate repair depends on the presence or absence of DNA-PKcs and Ku70, which implies that non-homologous end joining and alternative end joining are not independent. Finally, we consider the proportion of double-strand breaks within each mechanism as a time series and predict activity as a function of repair rate. We outline how our insights can be directly tested using imaging and sequencing techniques and conclude that there is evidence of variable dynamics in alternative repair pathways. Our approach is an important step towards providing a unifying theoretical framework for the dynamics of DNA repair processes. PMID:27741226

  1. DEK is required for homologous recombination repair of DNA breaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Eric A; Gole, Boris; Willis, Nicholas A

    2017-01-01

    -deficiency phenotypes were thought to arise from a moderate attenuation of non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) repair, the role of DEK in DNA repair remains incompletely understood. We present new evidence demonstrating the observed decrease in NHEJ is insufficient to impact immunoglobulin class switching in DEK knockout...... mice. Furthermore, DEK knockout cells were sensitive to apoptosis with NHEJ inhibition. Thus, we hypothesized DEK plays additional roles in homologous recombination (HR). Using episomal and integrated reporters, we demonstrate that HR repair of conventional DSBs is severely compromised in DEK...... filament formation, stability, or function. These findings define DEK as an important and multifunctional mediator of HR, and establish a synthetic lethal relationship between DEK loss and NHEJ inhibition....

  2. Effect of 2-deoxy-D-glucose on DNA double strand break repair, cell survival and energy metabolism in euoxic Ehrlich ascites tumour cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jha, B.; Pohlit, W. (L.N. Mithila Univ., Darbhanga (India). Botany Dept.)

    1992-10-01

    Effects of 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) on DNA double strand break (dsb) repair, cell survival and on the energy metabolism were investigated in exponentially growing Ehrlich ascites tumour (EAT) cells. Cells in suspension were exposed to 40 Gy of X-rays and allowed to repair (up to 4h) with or without 2-DG at 37[sup o]C. DNA dsb rejoining was measured by means of clamped homogeneous electric field (CHEF), a pulsed field gel electrophoresis technique. The fraction of activity released (FAR) during electrophoresis (DNA associated [sup 14]C-thymidine) was used as a parameter to determine the number of dsb present in the DNA. Biphasic kinetics for dsb repair were observed. The presence of 2-DG significantly inhibited the slow component of dsb repair. The presence of 2-DG also enhanced radiation-induced cell killing. ATP content of cells was measured by a bioluminescence method. ATP content in exponentially growing cells was about 4 pg per cell. The level of ATP was reduced by 50% in presence of 2-DG (C[sub 2-DG]/C[sub G] = 1.0). (author).

  3. The role of the Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 complex in double-strand break repair-facts and myths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Shunichi; Hoa, Nguyen Ngoc; Sasanuma, Hiroyuki

    2016-08-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) initiates double-strand break (DSB) repair by digesting 5'-termini at DSBs, the biochemical reaction called DSB resection, during which DSBs are processed by nucleases to generate 3' single-strand DNA. Rad51 recombinase polymerizes along resected DNA, and the resulting Rad51-DNA complex undergoes homology search. Although DSB resection by the Mre11 nuclease plays a critical role in HR in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, it remains elusive whether DSB resection by Mre11 significantly contributes to HR-dependent DSB repair in mammalian cells. Depletion of Mre11 decreases the efficiency of DSB resection only by 2- to 3-fold in mammalian cells. We show that although Mre11 is required for efficient HR-dependent repair of ionizing-radiation-induced DSBs, Mre11 is largely dispensable for DSB resection in both chicken DT40 and human TK6 B cell lines. Moreover, a 2- to 3-fold decrease in DSB resection has virtually no impact on the efficiency of HR. Thus, although a large number of researchers have reported the vital role of Mre11-mediated DSB resection in HR, the role may not explain the very severe defect in HR in Mre11-deficient cells, including their lethality. We here show experimental evidence for the additional roles of Mre11 in (i) elimination of chemical adducts from DSB ends for subsequent DSB repair, and (ii) maintaining HR intermediates for their proper resolution.

  4. Colocalization of multiple DNA double-strand breaks at a single Rad52 repair centre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lisby, M.; Mortensen, Uffe Hasbro; Rothstein, R.

    2003-01-01

    DNA double-strand break repair (DSBR) is an essential process for preserving genomic integrity in all organisms. To investigate this process at the cellular level, we engineered a system of fluorescently marked DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to visualize...... in vivo DSBR in single cells. Using this system, we demonstrate for the first time that Rad52 DNA repair foci and DSBs colocalize. Time-lapse microscopy reveals that the relocalization of Rad52 protein into a focal assembly is a rapid and reversible process. In addition, analysis of DNA damage checkpoint......-deficient cells provides direct evidence for coordination between DNA repair and subsequent release from checkpoint arrest. Finally, analyses of cells experiencing multiple DSBs demonstrate that Rad52 foci are centres of DNA repair capable of simultaneously recruiting more than one DSB....

  5. Dose-dependent misrejoining of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks in human fibroblasts: Experimental and theoretical study for high and low LET radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rydberg, Bjorn; Cooper, Brian; Cooper, Priscilla K.; Holley, William; Chatterjee, Aloke

    2004-11-18

    Misrejoining of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) was measured in human primary fibroblasts after exposure to X-rays and high LET particles (He, N and Fe) in the dose range 10-80 Gy. To measure joining of wrong DNA ends, the integrity of a 3.2 Mbp restriction fragment was analyzed directly after exposure and after 16 hr of repair incubation. It was found that the misrejoining frequency for X-rays was non-linearly related to dose, with less probability of misrejoining at low doses than at high doses. The dose dependence for the high LET particles, on the other hand, was closer to being linear, with misrejoining frequencies higher than for X-rays particularly at the lower doses. These experimental results were simulated with a Monte-Carlo approach that includes a cell nucleus model with all 46 chromosomes present, combined with realistic track structure simulations to calculate the geometrical positions of all DSBs induced for each dose. The model assumes that the main determinant for misrejoining probability is the distance between two simultaneously present DSBs. With a Gaussian interaction probability function with distance, it was found that both the low and high LET data could be fitted with an interaction distance (sigma of the Gaussian curve) of 0.25 {micro}m. This is half the distance previously found to best fit chromosomal aberration data in human lymphocytes using the same methods (Holley et al. Radiat. Res . 158, 568-580 (2002)). The discrepancy may indicate inadequacies in the chromosome model, for example insufficient chromosomal overlap, but may also partly be due to differences between fibroblasts and lymphocytes. Although the experimental data was obtained at high doses, the Monte Carlo calculations could be extended to lower doses. It was found that a linear component of misrejoining versus dose dominated for doses below 1 Gy for all radiations, including X-rays. The calculated relative biological efficiency (RBE) for misrejoining at this low dose

  6. Double-strand break repair on sex chromosomes: challenges during male meiotic prophase

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Lin-Yu; Yu, Xiaochun

    2015-01-01

    During meiotic prophase, DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair-mediated homologous recombination (HR) occurs for exchange of genetic information between homologous chromosomes. Unlike autosomes or female sex chromosomes, human male sex chromosomes X and Y share little homology. Although DSBs are generated throughout male sex chromosomes, homologous recombination does not occur for most regions and DSB repair process is significantly prolonged. As a result, male sex chromosomes are coated with ...

  7. Making ends meet: repairing breaks in bacterial DNA by non-homologous end-joining

    OpenAIRE

    Bowater, Richard; Doherty, Aidan J.

    2006-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are one of the most dangerous forms of DNA lesion that can result in genomic instability and cell death. Therefore cells have developed elaborate DSB-repair pathways to maintain the integrity of genomic DNA. There are two major pathways for the repair of DSBs in eukaryotes: homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). Until very recently, the NHEJ pathway had been thought to be restricted to the eukarya. However, an evolutionarily related NHE...

  8. DNA double strand break repair via non-homologous end-joining

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Anthony J.; Chen, David J.

    2013-01-01

    DNA double-stranded breaks (DSB) are among the most dangerous forms of DNA damage. Unrepaired DSBs results in cells undergoing apoptosis or senescence whereas mis-processing of DSBs can lead to genomic instability and carcinogenesis. One important pathway in eukaryotic cells responsible for the repair of DSBs is non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). In this review we will discuss the interesting new insights into the mechanism of the NHEJ pathway and the proteins which mediate this repair proces...

  9. DNA repair and radiation sensitivity in mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, D.J.C.; Stackhouse, M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Chen, D.S. [Rochester Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    1993-02-01

    Ionizing radiation induces various types of damage in mammalian cells including DNA single-strand breaks, DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), DNA-protein cross links, and altered DNA bases. Although human cells can repair many of these lesions there is little detailed knowledge of the nature of the genes and the encoded enzymes that control these repair processes. We report here on the cellular and genetic analyses of DNA double-strand break repair deficient mammalian cells. It has been well established that the DNA double-strand break is one of the major lesions induced by ionizing radiation. Utilizing rodent repair-deficient mutant, we have shown that the genes responsible for DNA double-strand break repair are also responsible for the cellular expression of radiation sensitivity. The molecular genetic analysis of DSB repair in rodent/human hybrid cells indicate that at least 6 different genes in mammalian cells are responsible for the repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Mapping and the prospect of cloning of human radiation repair genes are reviewed. Understanding the molecular and genetic basis of radiation sensitivity and DNA repair in man will provide a rational foundation to predict the individual risk associated with radiation exposure and to prevent radiation-induced genetic damage in the human population.

  10. DNA repair and radiation sensitivity in mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, D.J.C.; Stackhouse, M. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Chen, D.S. (Rochester Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology)

    1993-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces various types of damage in mammalian cells including DNA single-strand breaks, DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), DNA-protein cross links, and altered DNA bases. Although human cells can repair many of these lesions there is little detailed knowledge of the nature of the genes and the encoded enzymes that control these repair processes. We report here on the cellular and genetic analyses of DNA double-strand break repair deficient mammalian cells. It has been well established that the DNA double-strand break is one of the major lesions induced by ionizing radiation. Utilizing rodent repair-deficient mutant, we have shown that the genes responsible for DNA double-strand break repair are also responsible for the cellular expression of radiation sensitivity. The molecular genetic analysis of DSB repair in rodent/human hybrid cells indicate that at least 6 different genes in mammalian cells are responsible for the repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Mapping and the prospect of cloning of human radiation repair genes are reviewed. Understanding the molecular and genetic basis of radiation sensitivity and DNA repair in man will provide a rational foundation to predict the individual risk associated with radiation exposure and to prevent radiation-induced genetic damage in the human population.

  11. Patching Broken DNA: Nucleosome Dynamics and the Repair of DNA Breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gursoy-Yuzugullu, Ozge; House, Nealia; Price, Brendan D

    2016-05-08

    The ability of cells to detect and repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is dependent on reorganization of the surrounding chromatin structure by chromatin remodeling complexes. These complexes promote access to the site of DNA damage, facilitate processing of the damaged DNA and, importantly, are essential to repackage the repaired DNA. Here, we will review the chromatin remodeling steps that occur immediately after DSB production and that prepare the damaged chromatin template for processing by the DSB repair machinery. DSBs promote rapid accumulation of repressive complexes, including HP1, the NuRD complex, H2A.Z and histone methyltransferases at the DSB. This shift to a repressive chromatin organization may be important to inhibit local transcription and limit mobility of the break and to maintain the DNA ends in close contact. Subsequently, the repressive chromatin is rapidly dismantled through a mechanism involving dynamic exchange of the histone variant H2A.Z. H2A.Z removal at DSBs alters the acidic patch on the nucleosome surface, promoting acetylation of the H4 tail (by the NuA4-Tip60 complex) and shifting the chromatin to a more open structure. Further, H2A.Z removal promotes chromatin ubiquitination and recruitment of additional DSB repair proteins to the break. Modulation of the nucleosome surface and nucleosome function during DSB repair therefore plays a vital role in processing of DNA breaks. Further, the nucleosome surface may function as a central hub during DSB repair, directing specific patterns of histone modification, recruiting DNA repair proteins and modulating chromatin packing during processing of the damaged DNA template.

  12. PARP-1 and Ku compete for repair of DNA double strand breaks by distinct NHEJ pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Minli; Wu, Weizhong; Wu, Wenqi; Rosidi, Bustanur; Zhang, Lihua; Wang, Huichen; Iliakis, George

    2006-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase 1 (PARP-1) recognizes DNA strand interruptions in vivo and triggers its own modification as well as that of other proteins by the sequential addition of ADP-ribose to form polymers. This modification causes a release of PARP-1 from DNA ends and initiates a variety of responses including DNA repair. While PARP-1 has been firmly implicated in base excision and single strand break repair, its role in the repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) remains unclear. Here, we show that PARP-1, probably together with DNA ligase III, operates in an alternative pathway of non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) that functions as backup to the classical pathway of NHEJ that utilizes DNA-PKcs, Ku, DNA ligase IV, XRCC4, XLF/Cernunnos and Artemis. PARP-1 binds to DNA ends in direct competition with Ku. However, in irradiated cells the higher affinity of Ku for DSBs and an excessive number of other forms of competing DNA lesions limit its contribution to DSB repair. When essential components of the classical pathway of NHEJ are absent, PARP-1 is recruited for DSB repair, particularly in the absence of Ku and non-DSB lesions. This form of DSB repair is sensitive to PARP-1 inhibitors. The results define the function of PARP-1 in DSB repair and characterize a candidate pathway responsible for joining errors causing genomic instability and cancer. PMID:17088286

  13. Writers, Readers, and Erasers of Histone Ubiquitylation in DNA Double-Strand Break Repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smeenk, Godelieve; Mailand, Niels

    2016-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are highly cytotoxic DNA lesions, whose faulty repair may alter the content and organization of cellular genomes. To counteract this threat, numerous signaling and repair proteins are recruited hierarchically to the chromatin areas surrounding DSBs to facilitate...... accurate lesion repair and restoration of genome integrity. In vertebrate cells, ubiquitin-dependent modifications of histones adjacent to DSBs by RNF8, RNF168, and other ubiquitin ligases have a key role in promoting the assembly of repair protein complexes, serving as direct recruitment platforms...... for a range of genome caretaker proteins and their associated factors. These DNA damage-induced chromatin ubiquitylation marks provide an essential component of a histone code for DSB repair that is controlled by multifaceted regulatory circuits, underscoring its importance for genome stability maintenance...

  14. Repair Pathway Choices and Consequences at the Double-Strand Break.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccaldi, Raphael; Rondinelli, Beatrice; D'Andrea, Alan D

    2016-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are cytotoxic lesions that threaten genomic integrity. Failure to repair a DSB has deleterious consequences, including genomic instability and cell death. Indeed, misrepair of DSBs can lead to inappropriate end-joining events, which commonly underlie oncogenic transformation due to chromosomal translocations. Typically, cells employ two main mechanisms to repair DSBs: homologous recombination (HR) and classical nonhomologous end joining (C-NHEJ). In addition, alternative error-prone DSB repair pathways, namely alternative end joining (alt-EJ) and single-strand annealing (SSA), have been recently shown to operate in many different conditions and to contribute to genome rearrangements and oncogenic transformation. Here, we review the mechanisms regulating DSB repair pathway choice, together with the potential interconnections between HR and the annealing-dependent error-prone DSB repair pathways.

  15. DNA Double-Strand Break Repair Pathway Choice Is Directed by Distinct MRE11 Nuclease Activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Shibata (Atsushi); D. Moiani (Davide); A.S. Arvai (Andrew); J. Perry (Jefferson); S.M. Harding (Shane); M.-M. Genois (Marie-Michelle); R. Maity (Ranjan); S.E. van Rossum-Fikkert (Sari); A. Kertokalio (Aryandi); F. Romoli (Filippo); A. Ismail (Amani); E. Ismalaj (Ermal); E. Petricci (Elena); M.J. Neale (Matthew); R.G. Bristow (Robert); J.-Y. Masson (Jean-Yves); C. Wyman (Claire); P.A. Jeggo (Penny); J.A. Tainer (John)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractMRE11 within the MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 (MRN) complex acts in DNA double-strand break repair (DSBR), detection, and signaling; yet, how its endo- and exonuclease activities regulate DSBR by nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) versus homologous recombination (HR) remains enigmatic. Here, we employ

  16. A role for small RNAs in DNA double-strand break repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, W.; Ba, Z.; Wu, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Eukaryotes have evolved complex mechanisms to repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) through coordinated actions of protein sensors, transducers, and effectors. Here we show that ∼21-nucleotide small RNAs are produced from the sequences in the vicinity of DSB sites in Arabidopsis and in human cel...

  17. The role of homologous recombination in mitotic and meiotic double-strand break repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, Femke Adriana Theodora de

    2007-01-01

    All organisms are composed of cells and the cell’s nucleus contains DNA. The induction of DNA damage is a threat to organisms. Signalling of DNA damage and subsequent repair is of substantial importance. Double-strand breaks (DSBs) in DNA can be induced by ionising radiation and DNA damaging agents

  18. DNA Double-Strand Break Repair Pathway Choice Is Directed by Distinct MRE11 Nuclease Activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Shibata (Atsushi); D. Moiani (Davide); A.S. Arvai (Andrew); J. Perry (Jefferson); S.M. Harding (Shane); M.-M. Genois (Marie-Michelle); R. Maity (Ranjan); S.E. van Rossum-Fikkert (Sari); A. Kertokalio (Aryandi); F. Romoli (Filippo); A. Ismail (Amani); E. Ismalaj (Ermal); E. Petricci (Elena); M.J. Neale (Matthew); R.G. Bristow (Robert); J.-Y. Masson (Jean-Yves); C. Wyman (Claire); P.A. Jeggo (Penny); J.A. Tainer (John)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractMRE11 within the MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 (MRN) complex acts in DNA double-strand break repair (DSBR), detection, and signaling; yet, how its endo- and exonuclease activities regulate DSBR by nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) versus homologous recombination (HR) remains enigmatic. Here, we

  19. Mammalian RAD52 Functions in Break-Induced Replication Repair of Collapsed DNA Replication Forks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sotiriou, Sotirios K; Kamileri, Irene; Lugli, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Human cancers are characterized by the presence of oncogene-induced DNA replication stress (DRS), making them dependent on repair pathways such as break-induced replication (BIR) for damaged DNA replication forks. To better understand BIR, we performed a targeted siRNA screen for genes whose depl...

  20. DNA double strand breaks repair pathways in mouse male germ cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed, E.A.

    2009-01-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) are induced by ionizing radiation, and during meiotic recombination. DSBs are repaired via two main pathways, homologous recombination (HR) and non homologous end-joining (NHEJ). There are three main types of male germ cells, spermatogonia, spermatocytes and spermatid

  1. Analysis of DNA double-strand break repair pathways in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brugmans, Linda [Department of Cell Biology and Genetics, Erasmus MC, Dr. Molewaterplein 50, PO Box 1738, Rotterdam 3015GE (Netherlands); Kanaar, Roland [Department of Cell Biology and Genetics, Erasmus MC, Dr. Molewaterplein 50, PO Box 1738, Rotterdam 3015GE (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC, PO Box 1738, 3000 DR Rotterdam (Netherlands); Essers, Jeroen [Department of Cell Biology and Genetics, Erasmus MC, Dr. Molewaterplein 50, PO Box 1738, Rotterdam 3015GE (Netherlands) and Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC, PO Box 1738, 3000 DR Rotterdam (Netherlands)]. E-mail: j.essers@erasmusmc.nl

    2007-01-03

    During the last years significant new insights have been gained into the mechanism and biological relevance of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair in relation to genome stability. DSBs are a highly toxic DNA lesion, because they can lead to chromosome fragmentation, loss and translocations, eventually resulting in cancer. DSBs can be induced by cellular processes such as V(D)J recombination or DNA replication. They can also be introduced by exogenous agents DNA damaging agents such as ionizing radiation or mitomycin C. During evolution several pathways have evolved for the repair of these DSBs. The most important DSB repair mechanisms in mammalian cells are nonhomologous end-joining and homologous recombination. By using an undamaged repair template, homologous recombination ensures accurate DSB repair, whereas the untemplated nonhomologous end-joining pathway does not. Although both pathways are active in mammals, the relative contribution of the two repair pathways to genome stability differs in the different cell types. Given the potential differences in repair fidelity, it is of interest to determine the relative contribution of homologous recombination and nonhomologous end-joining to DSB repair. In this review, we focus on the biological relevance of DSB repair in mammalian cells and the potential overlap between nonhomologous end-joining and homologous recombination in different tissues.

  2. DNA Repair Profiling Reveals Nonrandom Outcomes at Cas9-Mediated Breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Overbeek, Megan; Capurso, Daniel; Carter, Matthew M; Thompson, Matthew S; Frias, Elizabeth; Russ, Carsten; Reece-Hoyes, John S; Nye, Christopher; Gradia, Scott; Vidal, Bastien; Zheng, Jiashun; Hoffman, Gregory R; Fuller, Christopher K; May, Andrew P

    2016-08-18

    The repair outcomes at site-specific DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) generated by the RNA-guided DNA endonuclease Cas9 determine how gene function is altered. Despite the widespread adoption of CRISPR-Cas9 technology to induce DSBs for genome engineering, the resulting repair products have not been examined in depth. Here, the DNA repair profiles of 223 sites in the human genome demonstrate that the pattern of DNA repair following Cas9 cutting at each site is nonrandom and consistent across experimental replicates, cell lines, and reagent delivery methods. Furthermore, the repair outcomes are determined by the protospacer sequence rather than genomic context, indicating that DNA repair profiling in cell lines can be used to anticipate repair outcomes in primary cells. Chemical inhibition of DNA-PK enabled dissection of the DNA repair profiles into contributions from c-NHEJ and MMEJ. Finally, this work elucidates a strategy for using "error-prone" DNA-repair machinery to generate precise edits.

  3. Monitoring homology search during DNA double-strand break repair in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renkawitz, Jörg; Lademann, Claudio A; Kalocsay, Marian; Jentsch, Stefan

    2013-04-25

    Homologous recombination (HR) is crucial for genetic exchange and accurate repair of DNA double-strand breaks and is pivotal for genome integrity. HR uses homologous sequences for repair, but how homology search, the exploration of the genome for homologous DNA sequences, is conducted in the nucleus remains poorly understood. Here, we use time-resolved chromatin immunoprecipitations of repair proteins to monitor homology search in vivo. We found that homology search proceeds by a probing mechanism, which commences around the break and samples preferentially on the broken chromosome. However, elements thought to instruct chromosome loops mediate homology search shortcuts, and centromeres, which cluster within the nucleus, may facilitate homology search on other chromosomes. Our study thus reveals crucial parameters for homology search in vivo and emphasizes the importance of linear distance, chromosome architecture, and proximity for recombination efficiency. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Repair at single targeted DNA double-strand breaks in pluripotent and differentiated human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Fung

    Full Text Available Differences in ex vivo cell culture conditions can drastically affect stem cell physiology. We sought to establish an assay for measuring the effects of chemical, environmental, and genetic manipulations on the precision of repair at a single DNA double-strand break (DSB in pluripotent and somatic human cells. DSBs in mammalian cells are primarily repaired by either homologous recombination (HR or nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ. For the most part, previous studies of DSB repair in human cells have utilized nonspecific clastogens like ionizing radiation, which are highly nonphysiologic, or assayed repair at randomly integrated reporters. Measuring repair after random integration is potentially confounded by locus-specific effects on the efficiency and precision of repair. We show that the frequency of HR at a single DSB differs up to 20-fold between otherwise isogenic human embryonic stem cells (hESCs based on the site of the DSB within the genome. To overcome locus-specific effects on DSB repair, we used zinc finger nucleases to efficiently target a DSB repair reporter to a safe-harbor locus in hESCs and a panel of somatic human cell lines. We demonstrate that repair at a targeted DSB is highly precise in hESCs, compared to either the somatic human cells or murine embryonic stem cells. Differentiation of hESCs harboring the targeted reporter into astrocytes reduces both the efficiency and precision of repair. Thus, the phenotype of repair at a single DSB can differ based on either the site of damage within the genome or the stage of cellular differentiation. Our approach to single DSB analysis has broad utility for defining the effects of genetic and environmental modifications on repair precision in pluripotent cells and their differentiated progeny.

  5. Beyond repair foci: DNA double-strand break repair in euchromatic and heterochromatic compartments analyzed by transmission electron microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Lorat

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs generated by ionizing radiation pose a serious threat to the preservation of genetic and epigenetic information. The known importance of local chromatin configuration in DSB repair raises the question of whether breaks in different chromatin environments are recognized and repaired by the same repair machinery and with similar efficiency. An essential step in DSB processing by non-homologous end joining is the high-affinity binding of Ku70-Ku80 and DNA-PKcs to double-stranded DNA ends that holds the ends in physical proximity for subsequent repair. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Using transmission electron microscopy to localize gold-labeled pKu70 and pDNA-PKcs within nuclear ultrastructure, we monitored the formation and repair of actual DSBs within euchromatin (electron-lucent and heterochromatin (electron-dense in cortical neurons of irradiated mouse brain. RESULTS: While DNA lesions in euchromatin (characterized by two pKu70-gold beads, reflecting the Ku70-Ku80 heterodimer are promptly sensed and rejoined, DNA packaging in heterochromatin appears to retard DSB processing, due to the time needed to unravel higher-order chromatin structures. Complex pKu70-clusters formed in heterochromatin (consisting of 4 or ≥ 6 gold beads may represent multiple breaks in close proximity caused by ionizing radiation of highly-compacted DNA. All pKu70-clusters disappeared within 72 hours post-irradiation, indicating efficient DSB rejoining. However, persistent 53BP1 clusters in heterochromatin (comprising ≥ 10 gold beads, occasionally co-localizing with γH2AX, but not pKu70 or pDNA-PKcs, may reflect incomplete or incorrect restoration of chromatin structure rather than persistently unrepaired DNA damage. DISCUSSION: Higher-order organization of chromatin determines the accessibility of DNA lesions to repair complexes, defining how readily DSBs are detected and processed. DNA lesions in heterochromatin appear to be more

  6. REC-2006—A Fractionated Extract of Podophyllum hexandrum Protects Cellular DNA from Radiation-Induced Damage by Reducing the Initial Damage and Enhancing Its Repair In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Chaudhary

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Podophyllum hexandrum, a perennial herb commonly known as the Himalayan May Apple, is well known in Indian and Chinese traditional systems of medicine. P. hexandrum has been widely used for the treatment of venereal warts, skin infections, bacterial and viral infections, and different cancers of the brain, lung and bladder. This study aimed at elucidating the effect of REC-2006, a bioactive fractionated extract from the rhizome of P. hexandrum, on the kinetics of induction and repair of radiation-induced DNA damage in murine thymocytes in vivo. We evaluated its effect on non-specific radiation-induced DNA damage by the alkaline halo assay in terms of relative nuclear spreading factor (RNSF and gene-specific radiation-induced DNA damage via semi-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Whole body exposure of animals with gamma rays (10 Gy caused a significant amount of DNA damage in thymocytes (RNSF values 17.7 ± 0.47, 12.96 ± 1.64 and 3.3 ± 0.014 and a reduction in the amplification of β-globin gene to 0, 28 and 43% at 0, 15 and 60 min, respectively. Administrating REC-2006 at a radioprotective concentration (15 mg kg−1 body weight 1 h before irradiation resulted in time-dependent reduction of DNA damage evident as a decrease in RNSF values 6.156 ± 0.576, 1.647 ± 0.534 and 0.496 ± 0.012, and an increase in β-globin gene amplification 36, 95 and 99%, at 0, 15 and 60 min, respectively. REC-2006 scavenged radiation-induced hydroxyl radicals in a dose-dependent manner stabilized DPPH free radicals and also inhibited superoxide anions. Various polyphenols and flavonoides present in REC-2006 might contribute to scavenging of radiation-induced free radicals, thereby preventing DNA damage and stimulating its repair.

  7. The Heterochromatic Barrier to DNA Double Strand Break Repair: How to Get the Entry Visa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron A. Goodarzi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Over recent decades, a deep understanding of pathways that repair DNA double strand breaks (DSB has been gained from biochemical, structural, biophysical and cellular studies. DNA non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ and homologous recombination (HR represent the two major DSB repair pathways, and both processes are now well understood. Recent work has demonstrated that the chromatin environment at a DSB significantly impacts upon DSB repair and that, moreover, dramatic modifications arise in the chromatin surrounding a DSB. Chromatin is broadly divided into open, transcriptionally active, euchromatin (EC and highly compacted, transcriptionally inert, heterochromatin (HC, although these represent extremes of a spectrum. The HC superstructure restricts both DSB repair and damage response signaling. Moreover, DSBs within HC (HC-DSBs are rapidly relocalized to the EC-HC interface. The damage response protein kinase, ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM, is required for HC-DSB repair but is dispensable for the relocalization of HC-DSBs. It has been proposed that ATM signaling enhances HC relaxation in the DSB vicinity and that this is a prerequisite for HC-DSB repair. Hence, ATM is essential for repair of HC-DSBs. Here, we discuss how HC impacts upon the response to DSBs and how ATM overcomes the barrier that HC poses to repair.

  8. ERCC1-XPF endonuclease facilitates DNA double-strand break repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Anwaar; Robinson, Andria Rasile; Duensing, Anette; van Drunen, Ellen; Beverloo, H Berna; Weisberg, David B; Hasty, Paul; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Niedernhofer, Laura J

    2008-08-01

    ERCC1-XPF endonuclease is required for nucleotide excision repair (NER) of helix-distorting DNA lesions. However, mutations in ERCC1 or XPF in humans or mice cause a more severe phenotype than absence of NER, prompting a search for novel repair activities of the nuclease. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, orthologs of ERCC1-XPF (Rad10-Rad1) participate in the repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs). Rad10-Rad1 contributes to two error-prone DSB repair pathways: microhomology-mediated end joining (a Ku86-independent mechanism) and single-strand annealing. To determine if ERCC1-XPF participates in DSB repair in mammals, mutant cells and mice were screened for sensitivity to gamma irradiation. ERCC1-XPF-deficient fibroblasts were hypersensitive to gamma irradiation, and gammaH2AX foci, a marker of DSBs, persisted in irradiated mutant cells, consistent with a defect in DSB repair. Mutant mice were also hypersensitive to irradiation, establishing an essential role for ERCC1-XPF in protecting against DSBs in vivo. Mice defective in both ERCC1-XPF and Ku86 were not viable. However, Ercc1(-/-) Ku86(-/-) fibroblasts were hypersensitive to gamma irradiation compared to single mutants and accumulated significantly greater chromosomal aberrations. Finally, in vitro repair of DSBs with 3' overhangs led to large deletions in the absence of ERCC1-XPF. These data support the conclusion that, as in yeast, ERCC1-XPF facilitates DSB repair via an end-joining mechanism that is Ku86 independent.

  9. Making ends meet: repairing breaks in bacterial DNA by non-homologous end-joining.

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    Richard Bowater

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs are one of the most dangerous forms of DNA lesion that can result in genomic instability and cell death. Therefore cells have developed elaborate DSB-repair pathways to maintain the integrity of genomic DNA. There are two major pathways for the repair of DSBs in eukaryotes: homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ. Until very recently, the NHEJ pathway had been thought to be restricted to the eukarya. However, an evolutionarily related NHEJ apparatus has now been identified and characterized in the prokarya. Here we review the recent discoveries concerning bacterial NHEJ and discuss the possible origins of this repair system. We also examine the insights gained from the recent cellular and biochemical studies of this DSB-repair process and discuss the possible cellular roles of an NHEJ pathway in the life-cycle of prokaryotes and phages.

  10. Double-strand break repair on sex chromosomes: challenges during male meiotic prophase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lin-Yu; Yu, Xiaochun

    2015-01-01

    During meiotic prophase, DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair-mediated homologous recombination (HR) occurs for exchange of genetic information between homologous chromosomes. Unlike autosomes or female sex chromosomes, human male sex chromosomes X and Y share little homology. Although DSBs are generated throughout male sex chromosomes, homologous recombination does not occur for most regions and DSB repair process is significantly prolonged. As a result, male sex chromosomes are coated with many DNA damage response proteins and form a unique chromatin structure known as the XY body. Interestingly, associated with the prolonged DSB repair, transcription is repressed in the XY body but not in autosomes, a phenomenon known as meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI), which is critical for male meiosis. Here using mice as model organisms, we briefly summarize recent progress on DSB repair in meiotic prophase and focus on the mechanism and function of DNA damage response in the XY body.

  11. SCAI promotes DNA double-strand break repair in distinct chromosomal contexts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rebecca Kring; Mund, Andreas; Poulsen, Sara Lund;

    2016-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are highly cytotoxic DNA lesions, whose accurate repair by non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR) is crucial for genome integrity and is strongly influenced by the local chromatin environment. Here, we identify SCAI (suppressor of cancer...... cell invasion) as a 53BP1-interacting chromatin-associated protein that promotes the functionality of several DSB repair pathways in mammalian cells. SCAI undergoes prominent enrichment at DSB sites through dual mechanisms involving 53BP1-dependent recruitment to DSB-surrounding chromatin and 53BP1......-independent accumulation at resected DSBs. Cells lacking SCAI display reduced DSB repair capacity, hypersensitivity to DSB-inflicting agents and genome instability. We demonstrate that SCAI is a mediator of 53BP1-dependent repair of heterochromatin-associated DSBs, facilitating ATM kinase signalling at DSBs...

  12. Genetic variants in DNA double-strand break repair genes and risk of salivary gland carcinoma: a case-control study.

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    Li Xu

    Full Text Available DNA double strand break (DSB repair is the primary defense mechanism against ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage. Ionizing radiation is the only established risk factor for salivary gland carcinoma (SGC. We hypothesized that genetic variants in DSB repair genes contribute to individual variation in susceptibility to SGC. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a case-control study in which we analyzed 415 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in 45 DSB repair genes in 352 SGC cases and 598 controls. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to calculate odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs. Rs3748522 in RAD52 and rs13180356 in XRCC4 were significantly associated with SGC after Bonferroni adjustment; ORs (95% CIs for the variant alleles of these SNPs were 1.71 (1.40-2.09, P = 1.70 × 10(-7 and 0.58 (0.45-0.74, P = 2.00 × 10(-5 respectively. The genetic effects were modulated by histological subtype. The association of RAD52-rs3748522 with SGC was strongest for mucoepidermoid carcinoma (OR = 2.21, 95% CI: 1.55-3.15, P = 1.25 × 10(-5, n = 74, and the association of XRCC4-rs13180356 with SGC was strongest for adenoid cystic carcinoma (OR = 0.60, 95% CI: 0.42-0.87, P = 6.91 × 10(-3, n = 123. Gene-level association analysis revealed one gene, PRKDC, with a marginally significant association with SGC risk in non-Hispanic whites. To our knowledge, this study is the first to comprehensively evaluate the genetic effect of DSB repair genes on SGC risk. Our results indicate that genetic variants in the DSB repair pathways contribute to inter-individual differences in susceptibility to SGC and show that the impact of genetic variants differs by histological subtype. Independent studies are warranted to confirm these findings.

  13. Multiple-pathway analysis of double-strand break repair mutations in Drosophila.

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    Dena M Johnson-Schlitz

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of double-strand break (DSB repair is complicated by the existence of several pathways utilizing a large number of genes. Moreover, many of these genes have been shown to have multiple roles in DSB repair. To address this complexity we used a repair reporter construct designed to measure multiple repair outcomes simultaneously. This approach provides estimates of the relative usage of several DSB repair pathways in the premeiotic male germline of Drosophila. We applied this system to mutations at each of 11 repair loci plus various double mutants and altered dosage genotypes. Most of the mutants were found to suppress one of the pathways with a compensating increase in one or more of the others. Perhaps surprisingly, none of the single mutants suppressed more than one pathway, but they varied widely in how the suppression was compensated. We found several cases in which two or more loci were similar in which pathway was suppressed while differing in how this suppression was compensated. Taken as a whole, the data suggest that the choice of which repair pathway is used for a given DSB occurs by a two-stage "decision circuit" in which the DSB is first placed into one of two pools from which a specific pathway is then selected.

  14. Conservative Repair of a Chromosomal Double-Strand Break by Single-Strand DNA through Two Steps of Annealing▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Storici, Francesca; Snipe, Joyce R.; Chan, Godwin K.; Dmitry A Gordenin; Michael A Resnick

    2006-01-01

    The repair of chromosomal double-strand breaks (DSBs) is essential to normal cell growth, and homologous recombination is a universal process for DSB repair. We explored DSB repair mechanisms in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae using single-strand oligonucleotides with homology to both sides of a DSB. Oligonucleotide-directed repair occurred exclusively via Rad52- and Rad59-mediated single-strand annealing (SSA). Even the SSA domain of human Rad52 provided partial complementation for a null...

  15. Double-strand break damage and associated DNA repair genes predispose smokers to gene methylation

    OpenAIRE

    Leng, Shuguang; Stidley, Christine A.; Willink, Randy; Bernauer, Amanda; Do, Kieu; Picchi, Maria A.; Sheng, Xin; Frasco, Melissa, A.; Berg, David Van Den; Gilliland, Frank D.; Zima, Christopher; Crowell, Richard E.; Belinsky, Steven A.

    2008-01-01

    Gene promoter hypermethylation in sputum is a promising biomarker for predicting lung cancer. Identifying factors that predispose smokers to methylation of multiple gene promoters in the lung could impact strategies for early detection and chemoprevention. This study evaluated the hypothesis that double-strand break repair capacity and sequence variation in genes in this pathway are associated with a high methylation index in a cohort of current and former cancer-free smokers. A 50% reduction...

  16. Fluorometric analysis of the formation and repair of DNA breaks in irradiated cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryabchenko, N.I.; Proskuryakov, S.Ya.; Ivannik, B.P.; Kutmin, A.I. (Akademiya Meditsinskikh Nauk SSSR, Obninsk. Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Inst. Meditsinskoj Radiologii)

    A study was made of the dependence of the fluorescence of ethidium bromide upon NaOH concentration after staining of single- and double-strand DNA in cell lysates was demonstrated. The method of fluorometry was used to study the dose dependence of a change in the share of double-stranded DNA in the irradiated thymocytes and Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells which permitted to determine the appearance and repair of DNA breaks in these cells.

  17. Atypical Role for PhoU in Mutagenic Break Repair under Stress in Escherichia coli.

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    Janet L Gibson

    Full Text Available Mechanisms of mutagenesis activated by stress responses drive pathogen/host adaptation, antibiotic and anti-fungal-drug resistance, and perhaps much of evolution generally. In Escherichia coli, repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs by homologous recombination is high fidelity in unstressed cells, but switches to a mutagenic mode using error-prone DNA polymerases when the both the SOS and general (σS stress responses are activated. Additionally, the σE response promotes spontaneous DNA breakage that leads to mutagenic break repair (MBR. We identified the regulatory protein PhoU in a genetic screen for functions required for MBR. PhoU negatively regulates the phosphate-transport and utilization (Pho regulon when phosphate is in excess, including the PstB and PstC subunits of the phosphate-specific ABC transporter PstSCAB. Here, we characterize the PhoU mutation-promoting role. First, some mutations that affect phosphate transport and Pho transcriptional regulation decrease mutagenesis. Second, the mutagenesis and regulon-expression phenotypes do not correspond, revealing an apparent new function(s for PhoU. Third, the PhoU mutagenic role is not via activation of the σS, SOS or σE responses, because mutations (or DSBs that restore mutagenesis to cells defective in these stress responses do not restore mutagenesis to phoU cells. Fourth, the mutagenesis defect in phoU-mutant cells is partially restored by deletion of arcA, a gene normally repressed by PhoU, implying that a gene(s repressed by ArcA promotes mutagenic break repair. The data show a new role for PhoU in regulation, and a new regulatory branch of the stress-response signaling web that activates mutagenic break repair in E. coli.

  18. Atypical Role for PhoU in Mutagenic Break Repair under Stress in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Janet L; Lombardo, Mary-Jane; Aponyi, Ildiko; Vera Cruz, Diana; Ray, Mellanie P; Rosenberg, Susan M

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms of mutagenesis activated by stress responses drive pathogen/host adaptation, antibiotic and anti-fungal-drug resistance, and perhaps much of evolution generally. In Escherichia coli, repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs) by homologous recombination is high fidelity in unstressed cells, but switches to a mutagenic mode using error-prone DNA polymerases when the both the SOS and general (σS) stress responses are activated. Additionally, the σE response promotes spontaneous DNA breakage that leads to mutagenic break repair (MBR). We identified the regulatory protein PhoU in a genetic screen for functions required for MBR. PhoU negatively regulates the phosphate-transport and utilization (Pho) regulon when phosphate is in excess, including the PstB and PstC subunits of the phosphate-specific ABC transporter PstSCAB. Here, we characterize the PhoU mutation-promoting role. First, some mutations that affect phosphate transport and Pho transcriptional regulation decrease mutagenesis. Second, the mutagenesis and regulon-expression phenotypes do not correspond, revealing an apparent new function(s) for PhoU. Third, the PhoU mutagenic role is not via activation of the σS, SOS or σE responses, because mutations (or DSBs) that restore mutagenesis to cells defective in these stress responses do not restore mutagenesis to phoU cells. Fourth, the mutagenesis defect in phoU-mutant cells is partially restored by deletion of arcA, a gene normally repressed by PhoU, implying that a gene(s) repressed by ArcA promotes mutagenic break repair. The data show a new role for PhoU in regulation, and a new regulatory branch of the stress-response signaling web that activates mutagenic break repair in E. coli.

  19. Parp1-XRCC1 and the repair of DNA double strand breaks in mouse round spermatids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Emad A. [Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Faculty of Science, Utrecht University, Padualaan 8, 3584 CH Utrecht (Netherlands); Boer, Peter de [Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, 6500 HB Nijmegen (Netherlands); Philippens, Marielle E.P.; Kal, Henk B. [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands); Rooij, Dirk G. de, E-mail: d.g.derooij@uu.nl [Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Faculty of Science, Utrecht University, Padualaan 8, 3584 CH Utrecht (Netherlands); Center for Reproductive Medicine, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-01-05

    The repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in male germ cells is slower and differently regulated compared to that in somatic cells. Round spermatids show DSB repair and are radioresistant to apoptosis induction. Mutation induction studies using ionizing irradiation, indicated a high frequency of chromosome aberrations (CA) in the next generation. Since they are in a G1 comparable stage of the cell cycle, haploid spermatids are expected to repair DSBs by the non-homologous end-joining pathway (NHEJ). However, immunohistochemical evidence indicates that not all components of the classical NHEJ pathway are available since the presence of DNA-PKcs cannot be shown. Here, we demonstrate that round spermatids, as well as most other types of male germ cells express both Parp1 and XRCC1. Therefore, we have determined whether the alternative Parp1/XRCC1 dependent NHEJ pathway is active in these nuclei and also have tested for classical NHEJ activity by a genetic method. To evaluate DSB repair in SCID mice, deficient for DNA-PKcs, and to study the involvement of the Parp1/XRCC1 dependent NHEJ pathway in round spermatids, the loss of {gamma}-H2AX foci after irradiation has been determined in nucleus spreads of round spermatids of SCID mice and in nucleus spreads and histological sections of Parp1-inhibited mice and their respective controls. Results show that around half of the breaks in randomly selected round spermatids are repaired between 1 and 8 h after irradiation. The repair of 16% of the induced DSBs requires DNA-PKcs and 21% Parp1. Foci numbers in the Parp1-inhibited testes tend to be higher in spermatids of all epithelial stages reaching significance in stages I-III which indicates an active Parp1/XRCC1 pathway in round spermatids and a decreased repair capacity in later round spermatid stages. In Parp1-inhibited SCID mice only 14.5% of the breaks were repaired 8 h after irradiation indicating additivity of the two NHEJ pathways in round spermatids.

  20. DNA ligase IV and artemis act cooperatively to suppress homologous recombination in human cells: implications for DNA double-strand break repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosawa, Aya; Saito, Shinta; So, Sairei; Hashimoto, Mitsumasa; Iwabuchi, Kuniyoshi; Watabe, Haruka; Adachi, Noritaka

    2013-01-01

    Nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR) are two major pathways for repairing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs); however, their respective roles in human somatic cells remain to be elucidated. Here we show using a series of human gene-knockout cell lines that NHEJ repairs nearly all of the topoisomerase II- and low-dose radiation-induced DNA damage, while it negatively affects survival of cells harbouring replication-associated DSBs. Intriguingly, we find that loss of DNA ligase IV, a critical NHEJ ligase, and Artemis, an NHEJ factor with endonuclease activity, independently contribute to increased resistance to replication-associated DSBs. We also show that loss of Artemis alleviates hypersensitivity of DNA ligase IV-null cells to low-dose radiation- and topoisomerase II-induced DSBs. Finally, we demonstrate that Artemis-null human cells display increased gene-targeting efficiencies, particularly in the absence of DNA ligase IV. Collectively, these data suggest that DNA ligase IV and Artemis act cooperatively to promote NHEJ, thereby suppressing HR. Our results point to the possibility that HR can only operate on accidental DSBs when NHEJ is missing or abortive, and Artemis may be involved in pathway switching from incomplete NHEJ to HR.

  1. DNA ligase IV and artemis act cooperatively to suppress homologous recombination in human cells: implications for DNA double-strand break repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aya Kurosawa

    Full Text Available Nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ and homologous recombination (HR are two major pathways for repairing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs; however, their respective roles in human somatic cells remain to be elucidated. Here we show using a series of human gene-knockout cell lines that NHEJ repairs nearly all of the topoisomerase II- and low-dose radiation-induced DNA damage, while it negatively affects survival of cells harbouring replication-associated DSBs. Intriguingly, we find that loss of DNA ligase IV, a critical NHEJ ligase, and Artemis, an NHEJ factor with endonuclease activity, independently contribute to increased resistance to replication-associated DSBs. We also show that loss of Artemis alleviates hypersensitivity of DNA ligase IV-null cells to low-dose radiation- and topoisomerase II-induced DSBs. Finally, we demonstrate that Artemis-null human cells display increased gene-targeting efficiencies, particularly in the absence of DNA ligase IV. Collectively, these data suggest that DNA ligase IV and Artemis act cooperatively to promote NHEJ, thereby suppressing HR. Our results point to the possibility that HR can only operate on accidental DSBs when NHEJ is missing or abortive, and Artemis may be involved in pathway switching from incomplete NHEJ to HR.

  2. A Role for BLM in Double-Strand Break Repair Pathway Choice: Prevention of CtIP/Mre11-Mediated Alternative Nonhomologous End-Joining

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    Anastazja Grabarz

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The choice of the appropriate double-strand break (DSB repair pathway is essential for the maintenance of genomic stability. Here, we show that the Bloom syndrome gene product, BLM, counteracts CtIP/MRE11-dependent long-range deletions (>200 bp generated by alternative end-joining (A-EJ. BLM represses A-EJ in an epistatic manner with 53BP1 and RIF1 and is required for ionizing-radiation-induced 53BP1 focus assembly. Conversely, in the absence of 53BP1 or RIF1, BLM promotes formation of A-EJ long deletions, consistent with a role for BLM in DSB end resection. These data highlight a dual role for BLM that influences the DSB repair pathway choice: (1 protection against CtIP/MRE11 long-range deletions associated with A-EJ and (2 promotion of DNA resection. These antagonist roles can be regulated, according to cell-cycle stage, by interacting partners such as 53BP1 and TopIII, to avoid unscheduled resection that might jeopardize genome integrity.

  3. Depletion of Histone Demethylase Jarid1A Resulting in Histone Hyperacetylation and Radiation Sensitivity Does Not Affect DNA Double-Strand Break Repair.

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    Corina Penterling

    Full Text Available Histone demethylases have recently gained interest as potential targets in cancer treatment and several histone demethylases have been implicated in the DNA damage response. We investigated the effects of siRNA-mediated depletion of histone demethylase Jarid1A (KDM5A, RBP2, which demethylates transcription activating tri- and dimethylated lysine 4 at histone H3 (H3K4me3/me2, on growth characteristics and cellular response to radiation in several cancer cell lines. In unirradiated cells Jarid1A depletion lead to histone hyperacetylation while not affecting cell growth. In irradiated cells, depletion of Jarid1A significantly increased cellular radiosensitivity. Unexpectedly, the hyperacetylation phenotype did not lead to disturbed accumulation of DNA damage response and repair factors 53BP1, BRCA1, or Rad51 at damage sites, nor did it influence resolution of radiation-induced foci or rejoining of reporter constructs. We conclude that the radiation sensitivity observed following depletion of Jarid1A is not caused by a deficiency in repair of DNA double-strand breaks.

  4. DNA double-strand break repair: a tale of pathway choices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Li; Xingzhi Xu

    2016-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid double-strand breaks (DSBs) are cytotoxic lesions that must be repaired either through homologous recombination (HR) or non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathways.DSB repair is critical for genome integrity,cellular homeostasis and also constitutes the biological foundation for radiotherapy and the majority of chemotherapy.The choice between HR and NHEJ is a complex yet not completely understood process that will entail more future efforts.Herein we review our current understandings about how the choice is made over an antagonizing balance between p53-binding protein 1 and breast cancer 1 in the context of cell cycle stages,downstream effects,and distinct chromosomal histone marks.These exciting areas of research will surely bring more mechanistic insights about DSB repair and be utilized in the clinical settings.

  5. Sumoylation influences DNA break repair partly by increasing the solubility of a conserved end resection protein.

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    Prabha Sarangi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein modifications regulate both DNA repair levels and pathway choice. How each modification achieves regulatory effects and how different modifications collaborate with each other are important questions to be answered. Here, we show that sumoylation regulates double-strand break repair partly by modifying the end resection factor Sae2. This modification is conserved from yeast to humans, and is induced by DNA damage. We mapped the sumoylation site of Sae2 to a single lysine in its self-association domain. Abolishing Sae2 sumoylation by mutating this lysine to arginine impaired Sae2 function in the processing and repair of multiple types of DNA breaks. We found that Sae2 sumoylation occurs independently of its phosphorylation, and the two modifications act in synergy to increase soluble forms of Sae2. We also provide evidence that sumoylation of the Sae2-binding nuclease, the Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 complex, further increases end resection. These findings reveal a novel role for sumoylation in DNA repair by regulating the solubility of an end resection factor. They also show that collaboration between different modifications and among multiple substrates leads to a stronger biological effect.

  6. Sumoylation Influences DNA Break Repair Partly by Increasing the Solubility of a Conserved End Resection Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarangi, Prabha; Steinacher, Roland; Altmannova, Veronika; Fu, Qiong; Paull, Tanya T.; Krejci, Lumir; Whitby, Matthew C.; Zhao, Xiaolan

    2015-01-01

    Protein modifications regulate both DNA repair levels and pathway choice. How each modification achieves regulatory effects and how different modifications collaborate with each other are important questions to be answered. Here, we show that sumoylation regulates double-strand break repair partly by modifying the end resection factor Sae2. This modification is conserved from yeast to humans, and is induced by DNA damage. We mapped the sumoylation site of Sae2 to a single lysine in its self-association domain. Abolishing Sae2 sumoylation by mutating this lysine to arginine impaired Sae2 function in the processing and repair of multiple types of DNA breaks. We found that Sae2 sumoylation occurs independently of its phosphorylation, and the two modifications act in synergy to increase soluble forms of Sae2. We also provide evidence that sumoylation of the Sae2-binding nuclease, the Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 complex, further increases end resection. These findings reveal a novel role for sumoylation in DNA repair by regulating the solubility of an end resection factor. They also show that collaboration between different modifications and among multiple substrates leads to a stronger biological effect. PMID:25569253

  7. RAD50 is required for efficient initiation of resection and recombinational repair at random, gamma-induced double-strand break ends.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim Westmoreland

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Resection of DNA double-strand break (DSB ends is generally considered a critical determinant in pathways of DSB repair and genome stability. Unlike for enzymatically induced site-specific DSBs, little is known about processing of random "dirty-ended" DSBs created by DNA damaging agents such as ionizing radiation. Here we present a novel system for monitoring early events in the repair of random DSBs, based on our finding that single-strand tails generated by resection at the ends of large molecules in budding yeast decreases mobility during pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE. We utilized this "PFGE-shift" to follow the fate of both ends of linear molecules generated by a single random DSB in circular chromosomes. Within 10 min after gamma-irradiation of G2/M arrested WT cells, there is a near-synchronous PFGE-shift of the linearized circular molecules, corresponding to resection of a few hundred bases. Resection at the radiation-induced DSBs continues so that by the time of significant repair of DSBs at 1 hr there is about 1-2 kb resection per DSB end. The PFGE-shift is comparable in WT and recombination-defective rad52 and rad51 strains but somewhat delayed in exo1 mutants. However, in rad50 and mre11 null mutants the initiation and generation of resected ends at radiation-induced DSB ends is greatly reduced in G2/M. Thus, the Rad50/Mre11/Xrs2 complex is responsible for rapid processing of most damaged ends into substrates that subsequently undergo recombinational repair. A similar requirement was found for RAD50 in asynchronously growing cells. Among the few molecules exhibiting shift in the rad50 mutant, the residual resection is consistent with resection at only one of the DSB ends. Surprisingly, within 1 hr after irradiation, double-length linear molecules are detected in the WT and rad50, but not in rad52, strains that are likely due to crossovers that are largely resection- and RAD50-independent.

  8. RAD50 is required for efficient initiation of resection and recombinational repair at random, gamma-induced double-strand break ends.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim Westmoreland

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Resection of DNA double-strand break (DSB ends is generally considered a critical determinant in pathways of DSB repair and genome stability. Unlike for enzymatically induced site-specific DSBs, little is known about processing of random "dirty-ended" DSBs created by DNA damaging agents such as ionizing radiation. Here we present a novel system for monitoring early events in the repair of random DSBs, based on our finding that single-strand tails generated by resection at the ends of large molecules in budding yeast decreases mobility during pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE. We utilized this "PFGE-shift" to follow the fate of both ends of linear molecules generated by a single random DSB in circular chromosomes. Within 10 min after gamma-irradiation of G2/M arrested WT cells, there is a near-synchronous PFGE-shift of the linearized circular molecules, corresponding to resection of a few hundred bases. Resection at the radiation-induced DSBs continues so that by the time of significant repair of DSBs at 1 hr there is about 1-2 kb resection per DSB end. The PFGE-shift is comparable in WT and recombination-defective rad52 and rad51 strains but somewhat delayed in exo1 mutants. However, in rad50 and mre11 null mutants the initiation and generation of resected ends at radiation-induced DSB ends is greatly reduced in G2/M. Thus, the Rad50/Mre11/Xrs2 complex is responsible for rapid processing of most damaged ends into substrates that subsequently undergo recombinational repair. A similar requirement was found for RAD50 in asynchronously growing cells. Among the few molecules exhibiting shift in the rad50 mutant, the residual resection is consistent with resection at only one of the DSB ends. Surprisingly, within 1 hr after irradiation, double-length linear molecules are detected in the WT and rad50, but not in rad52, strains that are likely due to crossovers that are largely resection- and RAD50-independent.

  9. RAD50 Is Required for Efficient Initiation of Resection and Recombinational Repair at Random, γ-Induced Double-Strand Break Ends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westmoreland, Jim; Ma, Wenjian; Yan, Yan; Van Hulle, Kelly; Malkova, Anna; Resnick, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Resection of DNA double-strand break (DSB) ends is generally considered a critical determinant in pathways of DSB repair and genome stability. Unlike for enzymatically induced site-specific DSBs, little is known about processing of random “dirty-ended” DSBs created by DNA damaging agents such as ionizing radiation. Here we present a novel system for monitoring early events in the repair of random DSBs, based on our finding that single-strand tails generated by resection at the ends of large molecules in budding yeast decreases mobility during pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). We utilized this “PFGE-shift” to follow the fate of both ends of linear molecules generated by a single random DSB in circular chromosomes. Within 10 min after γ-irradiation of G2/M arrested WT cells, there is a near-synchronous PFGE-shift of the linearized circular molecules, corresponding to resection of a few hundred bases. Resection at the radiation-induced DSBs continues so that by the time of significant repair of DSBs at 1 hr there is about 1–2 kb resection per DSB end. The PFGE-shift is comparable in WT and recombination-defective rad52 and rad51 strains but somewhat delayed in exo1 mutants. However, in rad50 and mre11 null mutants the initiation and generation of resected ends at radiation-induced DSB ends is greatly reduced in G2/M. Thus, the Rad50/Mre11/Xrs2 complex is responsible for rapid processing of most damaged ends into substrates that subsequently undergo recombinational repair. A similar requirement was found for RAD50 in asynchronously growing cells. Among the few molecules exhibiting shift in the rad50 mutant, the residual resection is consistent with resection at only one of the DSB ends. Surprisingly, within 1 hr after irradiation, double-length linear molecules are detected in the WT and rad50, but not in rad52, strains that are likely due to crossovers that are largely resection- and RAD50-independent. PMID:19763170

  10. Alternative-NHEJ is a mechanistically distinct pathway of mammalian chromosome break repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Bennardo

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Characterizing the functional overlap and mutagenic potential of different pathways of chromosomal double-strand break (DSB repair is important to understand how mutations arise during cancer development and treatment. To this end, we have compared the role of individual factors in three different pathways of mammalian DSB repair: alternative-nonhomologous end joining (alt-NHEJ, single-strand annealing (SSA, and homology directed repair (HDR/GC. Considering early steps of repair, we found that the DSB end-processing factors KU and CtIP affect all three pathways similarly, in that repair is suppressed by KU and promoted by CtIP. In contrast, both KU and CtIP appear dispensable for the absolute level of total-NHEJ between two tandem I-SceI-induced DSBs. During later steps of repair, we find that while the annealing and processing factors RAD52 and ERCC1 are important to promote SSA, both HDR/GC and alt-NHEJ are significantly less dependent upon these factors. As well, while disruption of RAD51 causes a decrease in HDR/GC and an increase in SSA, inhibition of this factor did not affect alt-NHEJ. These results suggest that the regulation of DSB end-processing via KU/CtIP is a common step during alt-NHEJ, SSA, and HDR/GC. However, at later steps of repair, alt-NHEJ is a mechanistically distinct pathway of DSB repair, and thus may play a unique role in mutagenesis during cancer development and therapy.

  11. Preferential repair of DNA double-strand break at the active gene in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaurasia, Priyasri; Sen, Rwik; Pandita, Tej K; Bhaumik, Sukesh R

    2012-10-19

    Previous studies have demonstrated transcription-coupled nucleotide/base excision repair. We report here for the first time that DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair is also coupled to transcription. We generated a yeast strain by introducing a homing (Ho) endonuclease cut site followed by a nucleotide sequence for multiple Myc epitopes at the 3' end of the coding sequence of a highly active gene, ADH1. This yeast strain also contains the Ho cut site at the nearly silent or poorly active mating type α (MATα) locus and expresses Ho endonuclease under the galactose-inducible GAL1 promoter. Using this strain, DSBs were generated at the ADH1 and MATα loci in galactose-containing growth medium that induced HO expression. Subsequently, yeast cells were transferred to dextrose-containing growth medium to stop HO expression, and the DSB repair was monitored at the ADH1 and MATα loci by PCR, using the primer pairs flanking the Ho cut sites. Our results revealed a faster DSB repair at the highly active ADH1 than that at the nearly silent MATα locus, hence implicating a transcription-coupled DSB repair at the active gene in vivo. Subsequently, we extended this study to another gene, PHO5 (carrying the Ho cut site at its coding sequence), under transcriptionally active and inactive growth conditions. We found a fast DSB repair at the active PHO5 gene in comparison to its inactive state. Collectively, our results demonstrate a preferential DSB repair at the active gene, thus supporting transcription-coupled DSB repair in living cells.

  12. Alternative-NHEJ is a mechanistically distinct pathway of mammalian chromosome break repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Bennardo

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Characterizing the functional overlap and mutagenic potential of different pathways of chromosomal double-strand break (DSB repair is important to understand how mutations arise during cancer development and treatment. To this end, we have compared the role of individual factors in three different pathways of mammalian DSB repair: alternative-nonhomologous end joining (alt-NHEJ, single-strand annealing (SSA, and homology directed repair (HDR/GC. Considering early steps of repair, we found that the DSB end-processing factors KU and CtIP affect all three pathways similarly, in that repair is suppressed by KU and promoted by CtIP. In contrast, both KU and CtIP appear dispensable for the absolute level of total-NHEJ between two tandem I-SceI-induced DSBs. During later steps of repair, we find that while the annealing and processing factors RAD52 and ERCC1 are important to promote SSA, both HDR/GC and alt-NHEJ are significantly less dependent upon these factors. As well, while disruption of RAD51 causes a decrease in HDR/GC and an increase in SSA, inhibition of this factor did not affect alt-NHEJ. These results suggest that the regulation of DSB end-processing via KU/CtIP is a common step during alt-NHEJ, SSA, and HDR/GC. However, at later steps of repair, alt-NHEJ is a mechanistically distinct pathway of DSB repair, and thus may play a unique role in mutagenesis during cancer development and therapy.

  13. Mouse RAD54 Affects DNA Double-Strand Break Repair and Sister Chromatid Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dronkert, Mies L. G.; Beverloo, H. Berna; Johnson, Roger D.; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J.; Jasin, Maria; Kanaar, Roland

    2000-01-01

    Cells can achieve error-free repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by homologous recombination through gene conversion with or without crossover. In contrast, an alternative homology-dependent DSB repair pathway, single-strand annealing (SSA), results in deletions. In this study, we analyzed the effect of mRAD54, a gene involved in homologous recombination, on the repair of a site-specific I-SceI-induced DSB located in a repeated DNA sequence in the genome of mouse embryonic stem cells. We used six isogenic cell lines differing solely in the orientation of the repeats. The combination of the three recombination-test substrates used discriminated among SSA, intrachromatid gene conversion, and sister chromatid gene conversion. DSB repair was most efficient for the substrate that allowed recovery of SSA events. Gene conversion with crossover, indistinguishable from long tract gene conversion, preferentially involved the sister chromatid rather than the repeat on the same chromatid. Comparing DSB repair in mRAD54 wild-type and knockout cells revealed direct evidence for a role of mRAD54 in DSB repair. The substrate measuring SSA showed an increased efficiency of DSB repair in the absence of mRAD54. The substrate measuring sister chromatid gene conversion showed a decrease in gene conversion with and without crossover. Consistent with this observation, DNA damage-induced sister chromatid exchange was reduced in mRAD54-deficient cells. Our results suggest that mRAD54 promotes gene conversion with predominant use of the sister chromatid as the repair template at the expense of error-prone SSA. PMID:10757799

  14. [Studies of the repair of radiation-induced genetic damage in Drosophila]. Annual progress report, February 1, 1993--November 1, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawley, R.S.

    1998-09-01

    This research focuses on two repair deficient mutations in Drosophila melanogaster, namely mei-9, mei-41. In addition, the authors propose to extend this study to include the mus-312 mutation. They expect these studies to provide substantial insights into both the molecular mechanisms of DNA repair in Drosophila and the role these genes play in normal biological processes.

  15. [Studies of the repair of radiation-induced genetic damage in Drosophila]. Annual progress report, February 1, 1993--November 1, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawley, R.S.

    1998-09-01

    This research focuses on two repair deficient mutations in Drosophila melanogaster, namely mei-9, mei-41. In addition, the authors propose to extend this study to include the mus-312 mutation. They expect these studies to provide substantial insights into both the molecular mechanisms of DNA repair in Drosophila and the role these genes play in normal biological processes.

  16. Excess single-stranded DNA inhibits meiotic double-strand break repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Johnson

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available During meiosis, self-inflicted DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs are created by the protein Spo11 and repaired by homologous recombination leading to gene conversions and crossovers. Crossover formation is vital for the segregation of homologous chromosomes during the first meiotic division and requires the RecA orthologue, Dmc1. We analyzed repair during meiosis of site-specific DSBs created by another nuclease, VMA1-derived endonuclease (VDE, in cells lacking Dmc1 strand-exchange protein. Turnover and resection of the VDE-DSBs was assessed in two different reporter cassettes that can repair using flanking direct repeat sequences, thereby obviating the need for a Dmc1-dependent DNA strand invasion step. Access of the single-strand binding complex replication protein A, which is normally used in all modes of DSB repair, was checked in chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments, using antibody against Rfa1. Repair of the VDE-DSBs was severely inhibited in dmc1Delta cells, a defect that was associated with a reduction in the long tract resection required to initiate single-strand annealing between the flanking repeat sequences. Mutants that either reduce Spo11-DSB formation or abolish resection at Spo11-DSBs rescued the repair block. We also found that a replication protein A component, Rfa1, does not accumulate to expected levels at unrepaired single-stranded DNA (ssDNA in dmc1Delta cells. The requirement of Dmc1 for VDE-DSB repair using flanking repeats appears to be caused by the accumulation of large quantities of ssDNA that accumulate at Spo11-DSBs when Dmc1 is absent. We propose that these resected DSBs sequester both resection machinery and ssDNA binding proteins, which in wild-type cells would normally be recycled as Spo11-DSBs repair. The implication is that repair proteins are in limited supply, and this could reflect an underlying mechanism for regulating DSB repair in wild-type cells, providing protection from potentially harmful effects

  17. MOF phosphorylation by ATM regulates 53BP1-mediated double-strand break repair pathway choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Arun; Hunt, Clayton R; Hegde, Muralidhar L; Chakraborty, Sharmistha; Chakraborty, Sharmistha; Udayakumar, Durga; Horikoshi, Nobuo; Singh, Mayank; Ramnarain, Deepti B; Hittelman, Walter N; Namjoshi, Sarita; Asaithamby, Aroumougame; Hazra, Tapas K; Ludwig, Thomas; Pandita, Raj K; Tyler, Jessica K; Pandita, Tej K

    2014-07-10

    Cell-cycle phase is a critical determinant of the choice between DNA damage repair by nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR). Here, we report that double-strand breaks (DSBs) induce ATM-dependent MOF (a histone H4 acetyl-transferase) phosphorylation (p-T392-MOF) and that phosphorylated MOF colocalizes with γ-H2AX, ATM, and 53BP1 foci. Mutation of the phosphorylation site (MOF-T392A) impedes DNA repair in S and G2 phase but not G1 phase cells. Expression of MOF-T392A also blocks the reduction in DSB-associated 53BP1 seen in wild-type S/G2 phase cells, resulting in enhanced 53BP1 and reduced BRCA1 association. Decreased BRCA1 levels at DSB sites correlates with defective repairosome formation, reduced HR repair, and decreased cell survival following irradiation. These data support a model whereby ATM-mediated MOF-T392 phosphorylation modulates 53BP1 function to facilitate the subsequent recruitment of HR repair proteins, uncovering a regulatory role for MOF in DSB repair pathway choice during S/G2 phase.

  18. MOF Phosphorylation by ATM Regulates 53BP1-Mediated Double-Strand Break Repair Pathway Choice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Gupta

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Cell-cycle phase is a critical determinant of the choice between DNA damage repair by nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ or homologous recombination (HR. Here, we report that double-strand breaks (DSBs induce ATM-dependent MOF (a histone H4 acetyl-transferase phosphorylation (p-T392-MOF and that phosphorylated MOF colocalizes with γ-H2AX, ATM, and 53BP1 foci. Mutation of the phosphorylation site (MOF-T392A impedes DNA repair in S and G2 phase but not G1 phase cells. Expression of MOF-T392A also blocks the reduction in DSB-associated 53BP1 seen in wild-type S/G2 phase cells, resulting in enhanced 53BP1 and reduced BRCA1 association. Decreased BRCA1 levels at DSB sites correlates with defective repairosome formation, reduced HR repair, and decreased cell survival following irradiation. These data support a model whereby ATM-mediated MOF-T392 phosphorylation modulates 53BP1 function to facilitate the subsequent recruitment of HR repair proteins, uncovering a regulatory role for MOF in DSB repair pathway choice during S/G2 phase.

  19. DNA Double Strand Break Response and Limited Repair Capacity in Mouse Elongated Spermatids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emad A. Ahmed

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Spermatids are extremely sensitive to genotoxic exposures since during spermiogenesis only error-prone non homologous end joining (NHEJ repair pathways are available. Hence, genomic damage may accumulate in sperm and be transmitted to the zygote. Indirect, delayed DNA fragmentation and lesions associated with apoptotic-like processes have been observed during spermatid elongation, 27 days after irradiation. The proliferating spermatogonia and early meiotic prophase cells have been suggested to retain a memory of a radiation insult leading later to this delayed fragmentation. Here, we used meiotic spread preparations to localize phosphorylate histone H2 variant (γ-H2AX foci marking DNA double strand breaks (DSBs in elongated spermatids. This technique enabled us to determine the background level of DSB foci in elongated spermatids of RAD54/RAD54B double knockout (dko mice, severe combined immunodeficiency SCID mice, and poly adenosine diphosphate (ADP-ribose polymerase 1 (PARP1 inhibitor (DPQ-treated mice to compare them with the appropriate wild type controls. The repair kinetics data and the protein expression patterns observed indicate that the conventional NHEJ repair pathway is not available for elongated spermatids to repair the programmed and the IR-induced DSBs, reflecting the limited repair capacity of these cells. However, although elongated spermatids express the proteins of the alternative NHEJ, PARP1-inhibition had no effect on the repair kinetics after IR, suggesting that DNA damage may be passed onto sperm. Finally, our genetic mutant analysis suggests that an incomplete or defective meiotic recombinational repair of Spo11-induced DSBs may lead to a carry-over of the DSB damage or induce a delayed nuclear fragmentation during the sensitive programmed chromatin remodeling occurring in elongated spermatids.

  20. Distinct spatiotemporal patterns and PARP dependence of XRCC1 recruitment to single-strand break and base excision repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Campalans (Anna); R. Amouroux (Rachel); H. Menoni (Hervé); W. Vermeulen (Wim); J.P. Radicella (Pablo)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractSingle-strand break repair (SSBR) and base excision repair (BER) of modified bases and abasic sites share several players. Among them is XRCC1, an essential scaffold protein with no enzymatic activity, required for the coordination of both pathways. XRCC1 is recruited to SSBR by PARP-1,

  1. A robust network of double-strand break repair pathways governs genome integrity during C. elegans development.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pontier, D.B.; Tijsterman, M.

    2009-01-01

    To preserve genomic integrity, various mechanisms have evolved to repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Depending on cell type or cell cycle phase, DSBs can be repaired error-free, by homologous recombination, or with concomitant loss of sequence information, via nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) o

  2. A robust network of double-strand break repair pathways governs genome integrity during C. elegans development.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pontier, D.B.; Tijsterman, M.

    2009-01-01

    To preserve genomic integrity, various mechanisms have evolved to repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Depending on cell type or cell cycle phase, DSBs can be repaired error-free, by homologous recombination, or with concomitant loss of sequence information, via nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ)

  3. [Studies of the repair of radiation-induced genetic damage in Drosophila]. Annual progress report, October 1, 1988--June 1, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-12-31

    The primary goal of this study is to achieve a more thorough understanding of the mechanisms employed by higher organisms to repair DNA damage induced by both ionizing and nonionizing radiation. These studies are also contributing to an improved understanding of the processes of mutagenesis and carcinogenesis in higher eukaryotes. The studies employ Drosophila as a model organism for investigating repair functions that are common to all higher eukaryotes. Drosophila was chosen in the early phases of this study primarily because of the ease with which one can isolate and characterize repair-deficient mutants in a metazoan organism. The laboratory has gone on to investigate the metabolic defects of such mutants while others have performed complementary genetic and cytogenetic studies which relate DNA repair processes to mutagenesis and chromosome stability. The repair studies have exploited the capacity to introduce mutant Drosophila cells into tissue culture and thereby compare repair defects directly with those of homologous human disorders. Researchers are currently employing recombinant DNA technology to investigate the mechanisms of the DNA repair pathways defined by those mutants.

  4. Analysis of DNA Double-strand Break (DSB) Repair in Mammalian Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seluanov, Andrei; Mao, Zhiyong; Gorbunova, Vera

    2010-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks are the most dangerous DNA lesions that may lead to massive loss of genetic information and cell death. Cells repair DSBs using two major pathways: nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). Perturbations of NHEJ and HR are often associated with premature aging and tumorigenesis, hence it is important to have a quantitative way of measuring each DSB repair pathway. Our laboratory has developed fluorescent reporter constructs that allow sensitive and quantitative measurement of NHEJ and HR. The constructs are based on an engineered GFP gene containing recognition sites for a rare-cutting I-SceI endonuclease for induction of DSBs. The starting constructs are GFP negative as the GFP gene is inactivated by an additional exon, or by mutations. Successful repair of the I-SceI-induced breaks by NHEJ or HR restores the functional GFP gene. The number of GFP positive cells counted by flow cytometry provides quantitative measure of NHEJ or HR efficiency. PMID:20864925

  5. Analysis of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seluanov, Andrei; Mao, Zhiyong; Gorbunova, Vera

    2010-09-08

    DNA double-strand breaks are the most dangerous DNA lesions that may lead to massive loss of genetic information and cell death. Cells repair DSBs using two major pathways: nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). Perturbations of NHEJ and HR are often associated with premature aging and tumorigenesis, hence it is important to have a quantitative way of measuring each DSB repair pathway. Our laboratory has developed fluorescent reporter constructs that allow sensitive and quantitative measurement of NHEJ and HR. The constructs are based on an engineered GFP gene containing recognition sites for a rare-cutting I-SceI endonuclease for induction of DSBs. The starting constructs are GFP negative as the GFP gene is inactivated by an additional exon, or by mutations. Successful repair of the I-SceI-induced breaks by NHEJ or HR restores the functional GFP gene. The number of GFP positive cells counted by flow cytometry provides quantitative measure of NHEJ or HR efficiency.

  6. [Radiation induced tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez Bayard, L; Delgado López, L; Tirado Bejarano, C; Gómez Puerto, A; García Fernández, J L

    1998-04-01

    Radiations at cellular level produce different effects, depending on type of radiation and irradiated tissue. The radiation-induced cancers are associated to non-letals genetics mutations, and to classify like radiation induced tumors is necessary that appear in the treatment volume, a long latency period (years), histolo-different to the primary lesion, enough doses quantitatively and that exists a greater incidence in the irradiated populations. The genetics mutations affect at tumoral suppressors gen(Gen RB I, p53, BRCA I, BRCA 2) and repressors gen (hMSH 2, hMLH I,...), they could be longer and multifocals mutations, and produce lack of cellular control and a greater predisposition to develop tumors and a probable risk of increment of radiosensitivity. We present some of the more representatives studies about radiation-induced tumors.

  7. CtIP-BRCA1 modulates the choice of DNA double-strand break repair pathway throughout the cell cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Yun, Maximina H.; Hiom, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    The repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) is tightly regulated during the cell cycle. In G1 phase, the absence of a sister chromatid means that repair of DSB occurs through non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) or microhomology-mediated end-joining (MMEJ)1. These pathways often involve loss of DNA sequences at the break site and are therefore error-prone. In late S and G2 phases, even though DNA end-joining pathways remain functional2, there is an increase in repair of DSB by homologous recomb...

  8. [Double-strand DNA breaks induction and repair in human blood lymphocytes irradiated with adapting dose].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osipov, A N; Lizunova, E Iu; Vorob'eva, N Iu; Pelevina, I I

    2009-01-01

    Using a DNA-comet assay was shown that irradiation of human blood lymphocytes at G1 cell cycle with a low conditioning dose (5 cGy) induces an adaptive response (AR) manifested in reduction of the double-strand DNA (DSB) amount induced by challenging dose at 10 Gy. 24 h after conditioning irradiation (48 h after PHA addition) in cells irradiated at both conditioning and challenging doses a relative DBS amount was approximately 24% less in comparison to versus a control irradiated at challenging dose only. 48 h after adapting irradiation this index increased to approximately 35%, while 72 h after was decreased to approximately 29%. AR observed by us during 72 h after its induction did not accompanied by statistically significant changes in DBS repair enhancing. It is possible to assume that basic role in AR forming in lymphocytes under experimental conditions used by us playing the processes preventing radiation-induced DBS formation (antioxidant defense system activation, chromatin conformation changes ets).

  9. The Analysis of the Patterns of Radiation-Induced DNA Damage Foci by a Stochastic Monte Carlo Model of DNA Double Strand Breaks Induction by Heavy Ions and Image Segmentation Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarev, Artem; Cucinotta, F.

    2011-01-01

    To create a generalized mechanistic model of DNA damage in human cells that will generate analytical and image data corresponding to experimentally observed DNA damage foci and will help to improve the experimental foci yields by simulating spatial foci patterns and resolving problems with quantitative image analysis. Material and Methods: The analysis of patterns of RIFs (radiation-induced foci) produced by low- and high-LET (linear energy transfer) radiation was conducted by using a Monte Carlo model that combines the heavy ion track structure with characteristics of the human genome on the level of chromosomes. The foci patterns were also simulated in the maximum projection plane for flat nuclei. Some data analysis was done with the help of image segmentation software that identifies individual classes of RIFs and colocolized RIFs, which is of importance to some experimental assays that assign DNA damage a dual phosphorescent signal. Results: The model predicts the spatial and genomic distributions of DNA DSBs (double strand breaks) and associated RIFs in a human cell nucleus for a particular dose of either low- or high-LET radiation. We used the model to do analyses for different irradiation scenarios. In the beam-parallel-to-the-disk-of-a-flattened-nucleus scenario we found that the foci appeared to be merged due to their high density, while, in the perpendicular-beam scenario, the foci appeared as one bright spot per hit. The statistics and spatial distribution of regions of densely arranged foci, termed DNA foci chains, were predicted numerically using this model. Another analysis was done to evaluate the number of ion hits per nucleus, which were visible from streaks of closely located foci. In another analysis, our image segmentaiton software determined foci yields directly from images with single-class or colocolized foci. Conclusions: We showed that DSB clustering needs to be taken into account to determine the true DNA damage foci yield, which helps to

  10. Constitutional Chromothripsis Rearrangements Involve Clustered Double-Stranded DNA Breaks and Nonhomologous Repair Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wigard P. Kloosterman

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Chromothripsis represents a novel phenomenon in the structural variation landscape of cancer genomes. Here, we analyze the genomes of ten patients with congenital disease who were preselected to carry complex chromosomal rearrangements with more than two breakpoints. The rearrangements displayed unanticipated complexity resembling chromothripsis. We find that eight of them contain hallmarks of multiple clustered double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs on one or more chromosomes. In addition, nucleotide resolution analysis of 98 breakpoint junctions indicates that break repair involves nonhomologous or microhomology-mediated end joining. We observed that these eight rearrangements are balanced or contain sporadic deletions ranging in size between a few hundred base pairs and several megabases. The two remaining complex rearrangements did not display signs of DSBs and contain duplications, indicative of rearrangement processes involving template switching. Our work provides detailed insight into the characteristics of chromothripsis and supports a role for clustered DSBs driving some constitutional chromothripsis rearrangements.

  11. Maintenance of genome stability in plants: repairing DNA double strand breaks and chromatin structure stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujit eRoy

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Plant cells are subject to high levels of DNA damage resulting from plant’s obligatory dependence on sunlight and the associated exposure to environmental stresses like solar UV radiation, high soil salinity, drought, chilling injury and other air and soil pollutants including heavy metals and metabolic byproducts from endogenous processes. The irreversible DNA damages, generated by the environmental and genotoxic stresses affect plant growth and development, reproduction and crop productivity. Thus, for maintaining genome stability, plants have developed an extensive array of mechanisms for the detection and repair of DNA damages. This review will focus recent advances in our understanding of mechanisms regulating plant genome stability in the context of repairing of double stand breaks and chromatin structure maintenance.

  12. The involvement of human RECQL4 in DNA double-strand break repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Dharmendra Kumar; Karmakar, Parimal; Aamann, Maria Diget

    2010-01-01

    Rothmund-Thomson syndrome (RTS) is an autosomal recessive hereditary disorder associated with mutation in RECQL4 gene, a member of the human RecQ helicases. The disease is characterized by genomic instability, skeletal abnormalities and predisposition to malignant tumors, especially osteosarcomas....... The precise role of RECQL4 in cellular pathways is largely unknown; however, recent evidence suggests its involvement in multiple DNA metabolic pathways. This study investigates the roles of RECQL4 in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. The results show that RECQL4-deficient fibroblasts are moderately...... sensitive to gamma-irradiation and accumulate more gammaH2AX and 53BP1 foci than control fibroblasts. This is suggestive of defects in efficient repair of DSB's in the RECQL4-deficient fibroblasts. Real time imaging of live cells using laser confocal microscopy shows that RECQL4 is recruited early to laser...

  13. Deregulation of DNA double-strand break repair in multiple myeloma: implications for genome stability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana B Herrero

    Full Text Available Multiple myeloma (MM is a hematological malignancy characterized by frequent chromosome abnormalities. However, the molecular basis for this genome instability remains unknown. Since both impaired and hyperactive double strand break (DSB repair pathways can result in DNA rearrangements, we investigated the functionality of DSB repair in MM cells. Repair kinetics of ionizing-radiation (IR-induced DSBs was similar in MM and normal control lymphoblastoid cell lines, as revealed by the comet assay. However, four out of seven MM cell lines analyzed exhibited a subset of persistent DSBs, marked by γ-H2AX and Rad51 foci that elicited a prolonged G2/M DNA damage checkpoint activation and hypersensitivity to IR, especially in the presence of checkpoint inhibitors. An analysis of the proteins involved in DSB repair in MM cells revealed upregulation of DNA-PKcs, Artemis and XRCC4, that participate in non-homologous end joining (NHEJ, and Rad51, involved in homologous recombination (HR. Accordingly, activity of both NHEJ and HR were elevated in MM cells compared to controls, as determined by in vivo functional assays. Interestingly, levels of proteins involved in a highly mutagenic, translocation-promoting, alternative NHEJ subpathway (Alt-NHEJ were also increased in all MM cell lines, with the Alt-NHEJ protein DNA ligase IIIα, also overexpressed in several plasma cell samples isolated from MM patients. Overactivation of the Alt-NHEJ pathway was revealed in MM cells by larger deletions and higher sequence microhomology at repair junctions, which were reduced by chemical inhibition of the pathway. Taken together, our results uncover a deregulated DSB repair in MM that might underlie the characteristic genome instability of the disease, and could be therapeutically exploited.

  14. Chromatin modification and NBS1: their relationship in DNA double-strand break repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yuichiro; Zhou, Hui; Kobayashi, Junya

    2016-01-01

    The importance of chromatin modification, including histone modification and chromatin remodeling, for DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair, as well as transcription and replication, has been elucidated. Phosphorylation of H2AX to γ-H2AX is one of the first responses following DSB detection, and this histone modification is important for the DSB damage response by triggering several events, including the accumulation of DNA damage response-related proteins and subsequent homologous recombination (HR) repair. The roles of other histone modifications such as acetylation, methylation and ubiquitination have also been recently clarified, particularly in the context of HR repair. NBS1 is a multifunctional protein that is involved in various DNA damage responses. Its recently identified binding partner RNF20 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that facilitates the monoubiquitination of histone H2B, a process that is crucial for recruitment of the chromatin remodeler SNF2h to DSB damage sites. Evidence suggests that SNF2h functions in HR repair, probably through regulation of end-resection. Moreover, several recent reports have indicated that SNF2h can function in HR repair pathways as a histone remodeler and that other known histone remodelers can also participate in DSB damage responses. On the other hand, information about the roles of such chromatin modifications and NBS1 in non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) repair of DSBs and stalled fork-related damage responses is very limited; therefore, these aspects and processes need to be further studied to advance our understanding of the mechanisms and molecular players involved.

  15. Regulation of DNA double-strand break repair by ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like modifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwertman, Petra; Bekker-Jensen, Simon; Mailand, Niels

    2016-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are highly cytotoxic DNA lesions. The swift recognition and faithful repair of such damage is crucial for the maintenance of genomic stability, as well as for cell and organismal fitness. Signalling by ubiquitin, SUMO and other ubiquitin-like modifiers (UBLs......) orchestrates and regulates cellular responses to DSBs at multiple levels, often involving extensive crosstalk between these modifications. Recent findings have revealed compelling insights into the complex mechanisms by which ubiquitin and UBLs regulate protein interactions with DSB sites to promote accurate...

  16. SCAI promotes DNA double-strand break repair in distinct chromosomal contexts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rebecca Kring; Mund, Andreas; Poulsen, Sara Lund

    2016-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are highly cytotoxic DNA lesions, whose accurate repair by non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR) is crucial for genome integrity and is strongly influenced by the local chromatin environment. Here, we identify SCAI (suppressor of cancer...... in repressive chromatin environments. Moreover, we establish an important role of SCAI in meiotic recombination, as SCAI deficiency in mice leads to germ cell loss and subfertility associated with impaired retention of the DMC1 recombinase on meiotic chromosomes. Collectively, our findings uncover SCAI...

  17. The NF90/NF45 complex participates in DNA break repair via nonhomologous end joining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamanna, Raghavendra A; Hoque, Mainul; Lewis-Antes, Anita; Azzam, Edouard I; Lagunoff, David; Pe'ery, Tsafi; Mathews, Michael B

    2011-12-01

    Nuclear factor 90 (NF90), an RNA-binding protein implicated in the regulation of gene expression, exists as a heterodimeric complex with NF45. We previously reported that depletion of the NF90/NF45 complex results in a multinucleated phenotype. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that binucleated cells arise by incomplete abscission of progeny cells followed by fusion. Multinucleate cells arose through aberrant division of binucleated cells and displayed abnormal metaphase plates and anaphase chromatin bridges suggestive of DNA repair defects. NF90 and NF45 are known to interact with the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), which is involved in telomere maintenance and DNA repair by nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ). We hypothesized that NF90 modulates the activity of DNA-PK. In an in vitro NHEJ assay system, DNA end joining was reduced by NF90/NF45 immunodepletion or by RNA digestion to an extent similar to that for catalytic subunit DNA-PKcs immunodepletion. In vivo, NF90/NF45-depleted cells displayed increased γ-histone 2A.X foci, indicative of an accumulation of double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs), and increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation consistent with decreased DSB repair. Further, NF90/NF45 knockdown reduced end-joining activity in vivo. These results identify the NF90/NF45 complex as a regulator of DNA damage repair mediated by DNA-PK and suggest that structured RNA may modulate this process.

  18. Repair on the go: E. coli maintains a high proliferation rate while repairing a chronic DNA double-strand break.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise Darmon

    Full Text Available DNA damage checkpoints exist to promote cell survival and the faithful inheritance of genetic information. It is thought that one function of such checkpoints is to ensure that cell division does not occur before DNA damage is repaired. However, in unicellular organisms, rapid cell multiplication confers a powerful selective advantage, leading to a dilemma. Is the activation of a DNA damage checkpoint compatible with rapid cell multiplication? By uncoupling the initiation of DNA replication from cell division, the Escherichia coli cell cycle offers a solution to this dilemma. Here, we show that a DNA double-strand break, which occurs once per replication cycle, induces the SOS response. This SOS induction is needed for cell survival due to a requirement for an elevated level of expression of the RecA protein. Cell division is delayed, leading to an increase in average cell length but with no detectable consequence on mutagenesis and little effect on growth rate and viability. The increase in cell length caused by chronic DNA double-strand break repair comprises three components: two types of increase in the unit cell size, one independent of SfiA and SlmA, the other dependent of the presence of SfiA and the absence of SlmA, and a filamentation component that is dependent on the presence of either SfiA or SlmA. These results imply that chronic checkpoint induction in E. coli is compatible with rapid cell multiplication. Therefore, under conditions of chronic low-level DNA damage, the SOS checkpoint operates seamlessly in a cell cycle where the initiation of DNA replication is uncoupled from cell division.

  19. Synergistic decrease of DNA single-strand break repair rates in mouse neural cells lacking both Tdp1 and aprataxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Khamisy, Sherif F.; Katyal, Sachin; Patel, Poorvi; Ju, Limei; McKinnon, Peter J.; Caldecott, Keith W.

    2009-01-01

    Ataxia oculomotor apraxia-1 (AOA1) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease that results from mutations of aprataxin (APTX). APTX associates with the DNA single- and double-strand break repair machinery and is able to remove AMP from 5′-termini at DNA strand breaks in vitro. However, attempts to establish a DNA strand break repair defect in APTX-defective cells have proved conflicting and unclear. We reasoned that this may reflect that DNA strand breaks with 5′-AMP represent only a minor subset of breaks induced in cells, and/or the availability of alternative mechanisms for removing AMP from 5′-termini. Here, we have attempted to increase the dependency of chromosomal single- and double-strand break repair on aprataxin activity by slowing the rate of repair of 3′-termini in aprataxin-defective neural cells, thereby increasing the likelihood that the 5′-termini at such breaks become adenylated and/or block alternative repair mechanisms. To do this, we generated a mouse model in which APTX is deleted together with tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase (TDP1), an enzyme that repairs 3′-termini at a subset of single-strand breaks (SSBs), including those with 3′-topoisomerase-1 (Top1) peptide. Notably, the global rate of repair of oxidative and alkylation-induced SSBs was significantly slower in Tdp1−/−/Aptx−/− double knockout quiescent mouse astrocytes compared with Tdp1−/− or Aptx−/− single knockouts. In contrast, camptothecin-induced Top1-SSBs accumulated to similar levels in Tdp1−/− and Tdp1−/−/Aptx−/− double knockout astrocytes. Finally, we failed to identify a measurable defect in double-strand break repair in Tdp1−/−, Aptx−/− or Tdp1−/−/Aptx−/− astrocytes. These data provide direct evidence for a requirement for aprataxin during chromosomal single-strand break repair in primary neural cells lacking Tdp1. PMID:19303373

  20. The radioresistance kinase TLK1B protects the cells by promoting repair of double strand breaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Benedetti Arrigo

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mammalian protein kinase TLK1 is a homologue of Tousled, a gene involved in flower development in Arabidopsis thaliana. The function of TLK1 is not well known, although knockout of the gene in Drosophila or expression of a dominant negative mutant in mouse cells causes loss of nuclear divisions and missegregation of chromosomes probably, due to alterations in chromatin remodeling capacity. Overexpression of TLK1B, a spliced variant of the TLK1 mRNA, in a model mouse cell line increases it's resistance to ionizing radiation (IR or the radiomimetic drug doxorubicin, also likely due to changes in chromatin remodeling. TLK1B is translationally regulated by the availability of the translation factor eIF4E, and its synthesis is activated by IR. The reason for this mechanism of regulation is likely to provide a rapid means of promoting repair of DSBs. TLK1B specifically phosphorylates histone H3 and Asf1, likely resulting in changes in chromatin structure, particularly at double strand breaks (DSB sites. Results In this work, we provide several lines of evidence that TLK1B protects the cells from IR by facilitating the repair of DSBs. First, the pattern of phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of H2AX and H3 indicated that cells overexpressing TLK1B return to pre-IR steady state much more rapidly than controls. Second, the repair of episomes damaged with DSBs was much more rapid in cells overexpressing TLK1B. This was also true for repair of genomic damage. Lastly, we demonstrate with an in vitro repair system that the addition of recombinant TLK1B promotes repair of a linearized plasmid incubated with nuclear extract. In addition, TLK1B in this in vitro system promotes the assembly of chromatin as shown by the formation of more highly supercoiled topomers of the plasmid. Conclusion In this work, we provide evidence that TLK1B promotes the repair of DSBs, likely as a consequence of a change in chromatin remodeling capacity that

  1. Nuclear dynamics of radiation-induced foci in euchromatin and heterochromatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiolo, Irene; Tang, Jonathan; Georgescu, Walter; Costes, Sylvain V.

    2013-10-01

    Repair of double strand breaks (DSBs) is essential for cell survival and genome integrity. While much is known about the molecular mechanisms involved in DSB repair and checkpoint activation, the roles of nuclear dynamics of radiation-induced foci (RIF) in DNA repair are just beginning to emerge. Here, we summarize results from recent studies that point to distinct features of these dynamics in two different chromatin environments: heterochromatin and euchromatin. We also discuss how nuclear architecture and chromatin components might control these dynamics, and the need of novel quantification methods for a better description and interpretation of these phenomena. These studies are expected to provide new biomarkers for radiation risk and new strategies for cancer detection and treatment.

  2. Nuclear dynamics of radiation-induced foci in euchromatin and heterochromatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiolo, Irene; Georgescu, Walter; Tang, Jonathan; Costes, Sylvain V.

    2013-09-03

    Repair of double strand breaks (DSBs) is essential for cell survival and genome integrity. While much is known about the molecular mechanisms involved in DSB repair and checkpoint activation, the roles of nuclear dynamics of radiation-induced foci (RIF) in DNA repair are just beginning to emerge. Here, we summarize results from recent studies that point to distinct features of these dynamics in two different chromatin environments: heterochromatin and euchromatin. We also discuss how nuclear architecture and chromatin components might control these dynamics, and the need of novel quantification methods for a better description and interpretation of these phenomena. These studies are expected to provide new biomarkers for radiation risk and new strategies for cancer detection and treatment.

  3. Nicotinamide enhances repair of arsenic and ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage in HaCaT keratinocytes and ex vivo human skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin C Thompson

    Full Text Available Arsenic-induced skin cancer is a significant global health burden. In areas with arsenic contamination of water sources, such as China, Pakistan, Myanmar, Cambodia and especially Bangladesh and West Bengal, large populations are at risk of arsenic-induced skin cancer. Arsenic acts as a co-carcinogen with ultraviolet (UV radiation and affects DNA damage and repair. Nicotinamide (vitamin B3 reduces premalignant keratoses in sun-damaged skin, likely by prevention of UV-induced cellular energy depletion and enhancement of DNA repair. We investigated whether nicotinamide modifies DNA repair following exposure to UV radiation and sodium arsenite. HaCaT keratinocytes and ex vivo human skin were exposed to 2μM sodium arsenite and low dose (2J/cm2 solar-simulated UV, with and without nicotinamide supplementation. DNA photolesions in the form of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers were detected by immunofluorescence. Arsenic exposure significantly increased levels of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine in irradiated cells. Nicotinamide reduced both types of photolesions in HaCaT keratinocytes and in ex vivo human skin, likely by enhancing DNA repair. These results demonstrate a reduction of two different photolesions over time in two different models in UV and arsenic exposed cells. Nicotinamide is a nontoxic, inexpensive agent with potential for chemoprevention of arsenic induced skin cancer.

  4. Nicotinamide enhances repair of arsenic and ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage in HaCaT keratinocytes and ex vivo human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Benjamin C; Halliday, Gary M; Damian, Diona L

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic-induced skin cancer is a significant global health burden. In areas with arsenic contamination of water sources, such as China, Pakistan, Myanmar, Cambodia and especially Bangladesh and West Bengal, large populations are at risk of arsenic-induced skin cancer. Arsenic acts as a co-carcinogen with ultraviolet (UV) radiation and affects DNA damage and repair. Nicotinamide (vitamin B3) reduces premalignant keratoses in sun-damaged skin, likely by prevention of UV-induced cellular energy depletion and enhancement of DNA repair. We investigated whether nicotinamide modifies DNA repair following exposure to UV radiation and sodium arsenite. HaCaT keratinocytes and ex vivo human skin were exposed to 2μM sodium arsenite and low dose (2J/cm2) solar-simulated UV, with and without nicotinamide supplementation. DNA photolesions in the form of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers were detected by immunofluorescence. Arsenic exposure significantly increased levels of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine in irradiated cells. Nicotinamide reduced both types of photolesions in HaCaT keratinocytes and in ex vivo human skin, likely by enhancing DNA repair. These results demonstrate a reduction of two different photolesions over time in two different models in UV and arsenic exposed cells. Nicotinamide is a nontoxic, inexpensive agent with potential for chemoprevention of arsenic induced skin cancer.

  5. Double-strand break repair processes drive evolution of the mitochondrial genome in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shedge Vikas

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mitochondrial genome of higher plants is unusually dynamic, with recombination and nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ activities producing variability in size and organization. Plant mitochondrial DNA also generally displays much lower nucleotide substitution rates than mammalian or yeast systems. Arabidopsis displays these features and expedites characterization of the mitochondrial recombination surveillance gene MSH1 (MutS 1 homolog, lending itself to detailed study of de novo mitochondrial genome activity. In the present study, we investigated the underlying basis for unusual plant features as they contribute to rapid mitochondrial genome evolution. Results We obtained evidence of double-strand break (DSB repair, including NHEJ, sequence deletions and mitochondrial asymmetric recombination activity in Arabidopsis wild-type and msh1 mutants on the basis of data generated by Illumina deep sequencing and confirmed by DNA gel blot analysis. On a larger scale, with mitochondrial comparisons across 72 Arabidopsis ecotypes, similar evidence of DSB repair activity differentiated ecotypes. Forty-seven repeat pairs were active in DNA exchange in the msh1 mutant. Recombination sites showed asymmetrical DNA exchange within lengths of 50- to 556-bp sharing sequence identity as low as 85%. De novo asymmetrical recombination involved heteroduplex formation, gene conversion and mismatch repair activities. Substoichiometric shifting by asymmetrical exchange created the appearance of rapid sequence gain and loss in association with particular repeat classes. Conclusions Extensive mitochondrial genomic variation within a single plant species derives largely from DSB activity and its repair. Observed gene conversion and mismatch repair activity contribute to the low nucleotide substitution rates seen in these genomes. On a phenotypic level, these patterns of rearrangement likely contribute to the reproductive versatility of higher plants.

  6. TRF2 is required for repair of nontelomeric DNA double-strand breaks by homologous recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Zhiyong; Seluanov, Andrei; Jiang, Ying; Gorbunova, Vera

    2007-01-01

    TRF2 (telomeric repeat binding factor 2) is an essential component of the telomeric cap, where it forms and stabilizes the T-loop junctions. TRF2 forms the T-loops by stimulating strand invasion of the 3′ overhang into duplex DNA. TRF2 also has been shown to localize to nontelomeric DNA double-strand breaks, but its functional role in DNA repair has not been examined. Here, we present evidence that TRF2 is involved in homologous recombination (HR) repair of nontelomeric double-strand breaks. Depletion of TRF2 strongly inhibited HR and delayed the formation of Rad51 foci after γ-irradiation, whereas overexpression of TRF2 stimulated HR. Depletion of TRF2 had no effect on nonhomologous end-joining, and overexpression of TRF2 inhibited nonhomologous end-joining. We propose, based on our results and on the ability of TRF2 to mediate strand invasion, that TRF2 plays an essential role in HR by facilitating the formation of early recombination intermediates. PMID:17670947

  7. Mechanisms of radiation-induced neoplastic cell transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, T.C.H.; Tobias, C.A.

    1984-04-01

    Studies with cultured mammalian cells demonstrated clearly that radiation can transform cells directly and can enhance the cell transformation by oncogenic DNA viruses. In general, high-LET heavy-ion radiation can be more effective than X and gamma rays in inducing neoplastic cell transformation. Various experimental results indicate that radiation-induced DNA damage, most likely double-strand breaks, is important for both the initiation of cell transformation and for the enhancement of viral transformation. Some of the transformation and enhancement lesions can be repaired properly in the cell, and the amount of irrepairable lesions produced by a given dose depends on the quality of radiation. An inhibition of repair processes with chemical agents can increase the transformation frequency of cells exposed to radiation and/or oncogenic viruses, suggesting that repair mechanisms may play an important role in the radiation transformation. The progression of radiation-transformed cells appears to be a long and complicated process that can be modulated by some nonmutagenic chemical agents, e.g., DMSO. Normal cells can inhibit the expression of transforming properties of tumorigenic cells through an as yet unknown mechanism. The progression and expression of transformation may involve some epigenetic changes in the irradiated cells. 38 references, 15 figures, 1 table.

  8. Dual roles for DNA polymerase theta in alternative end-joining repair of double-strand breaks in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sze Ham Chan

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available DNA double-strand breaks are repaired by multiple mechanisms that are roughly grouped into the categories of homology-directed repair and non-homologous end joining. End-joining repair can be further classified as either classical non-homologous end joining, which requires DNA ligase 4, or "alternative" end joining, which does not. Alternative end joining has been associated with genomic deletions and translocations, but its molecular mechanism(s are largely uncharacterized. Here, we report that Drosophila melanogaster DNA polymerase theta (pol theta, encoded by the mus308 gene and previously implicated in DNA interstrand crosslink repair, plays a crucial role in DNA ligase 4-independent alternative end joining. In the absence of pol theta, end joining is impaired and residual repair often creates large deletions flanking the break site. Analysis of break repair junctions from flies with mus308 separation-of-function alleles suggests that pol theta promotes the use of long microhomologies during alternative end joining and increases the likelihood of complex insertion events. Our results establish pol theta as a key protein in alternative end joining in Drosophila and suggest a potential mechanistic link between alternative end joining and interstrand crosslink repair.

  9. Mutator Phenotype and DNA Double-Strand Break Repair in BLM Helicase-Deficient Human Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Tetsuya; Yasui, Manabu

    2016-01-01

    Bloom syndrome (BS), an autosomal recessive disorder of the BLM gene, predisposes sufferers to various cancers. To investigate the mutator phenotype and genetic consequences of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in BS cells, we developed BLM helicase-deficient human cells by disrupting the BLM gene. Cells with a loss of heterozygosity (LOH) due to homologous recombination (HR) or nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) can be restored with or without site-directed DSB induction. BLM cells exhibited a high frequency of spontaneous interallelic HR with crossover, but noncrossover events with long-tract gene conversions also occurred. Despite the highly interallelic HR events, BLM cells predominantly produced hemizygous LOH by spontaneous deletion. These phenotypes manifested during repair of DSBs. Both NHEJ and HR appropriately repaired DSBs in BLM cells, resulting in hemizygous and homozygous LOHs, respectively. However, the magnitude of the LOH was exacerbated in BLM cells, as evidenced by large deletions and long-tract gene conversions with crossover. BLM helicase suppresses the elongation of branch migration and crossover of double Holliday junctions (HJs) during HR repair, and a deficiency in this enzyme causes collapse, abnormal elongation, and/or preferable resolution to crossover of double HJs, resulting in a large-scale LOH. This mechanism underlies the predisposition for cancer in BS. PMID:27601585

  10. Homologous recombination preferentially repairs heat-induced DNA double-strand breaks in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Akihisa; Mori, Eiichiro; Nakagawa, Yosuke; Kajihara, Atsuhisa; Kirita, Tadaaki; Pittman, Douglas L; Hasegawa, Masatoshi; Ohnishi, Takeo

    2016-11-13

    Heat shock induces DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), but the precise mechanism of repairing heat-induced damage is unclear. Here, we investigated the DNA repair pathways involved in cell death induced by heat shock. B02, a specific inhibitor of human RAD51 (homologous recombination; HR), and NU7026, a specific inhibitor of DNA-PK (non-homologous end-joining; NHEJ), were used for survival assays of human cancer cell lines with different p53-gene status. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) lacking Lig4 (NHEJ) and/or Rad54 (HR) were used for survival assays and a phosphorylated histone H2AX at Ser139 (γH2AX) assay. MEFs lacking Rad51d (HR) were used for survival assays. SPD8 cells were used to measure HR frequency after heat shock. Human cancer cells were more sensitive to heat shock in the presence of B02 despite their p53-gene status, and the effect of B02 on heat sensitivity was specific to the G2 phase. Rad54-deficient MEFs were sensitive to heat shock and showed prolonged γH2AX signals following heat shock. Rad51d-deficient MEFs were also sensitive to heat shock. Moreover, heat shock-stimulated cells had increased HR. The HR pathway plays an important role in the survival of mammalian cells against death induced by heat shock via the repair of heat-induced DNA DSBs.

  11. Mutator Phenotype and DNA Double-Strand Break Repair in BLM Helicase-Deficient Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Tetsuya; Yasui, Manabu; Honma, Masamitsu

    2016-12-01

    Bloom syndrome (BS), an autosomal recessive disorder of the BLM gene, predisposes sufferers to various cancers. To investigate the mutator phenotype and genetic consequences of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in BS cells, we developed BLM helicase-deficient human cells by disrupting the BLM gene. Cells with a loss of heterozygosity (LOH) due to homologous recombination (HR) or nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) can be restored with or without site-directed DSB induction. BLM cells exhibited a high frequency of spontaneous interallelic HR with crossover, but noncrossover events with long-tract gene conversions also occurred. Despite the highly interallelic HR events, BLM cells predominantly produced hemizygous LOH by spontaneous deletion. These phenotypes manifested during repair of DSBs. Both NHEJ and HR appropriately repaired DSBs in BLM cells, resulting in hemizygous and homozygous LOHs, respectively. However, the magnitude of the LOH was exacerbated in BLM cells, as evidenced by large deletions and long-tract gene conversions with crossover. BLM helicase suppresses the elongation of branch migration and crossover of double Holliday junctions (HJs) during HR repair, and a deficiency in this enzyme causes collapse, abnormal elongation, and/or preferable resolution to crossover of double HJs, resulting in a large-scale LOH. This mechanism underlies the predisposition for cancer in BS. Copyright © 2016 Suzuki et al.

  12. Phosphorylation of Ku dictates DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway choice in S phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung-Jong; Saha, Janapriya; Sun, Jingxin; Fattah, Kazi R; Wang, Shu-Chi; Jakob, Burkhard; Chi, Linfeng; Wang, Shih-Ya; Taucher-Scholz, Gisela; Davis, Anthony J; Chen, David J

    2016-02-29

    Multiple DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathways are active in S phase of the cell cycle; however, DSBs are primarily repaired by homologous recombination (HR) in this cell cycle phase. As the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) factor, Ku70/80 (Ku), is quickly recruited to DSBs in S phase, we hypothesized that an orchestrated mechanism modulates pathway choice between HR and NHEJ via displacement of the Ku heterodimer from DSBs to allow HR. Here, we provide evidence that phosphorylation at a cluster of sites in the junction of the pillar and bridge regions of Ku70 mediates the dissociation of Ku from DSBs. Mimicking phosphorylation at these sites reduces Ku's affinity for DSB ends, suggesting that phosphorylation of Ku70 induces a conformational change responsible for the dissociation of the Ku heterodimer from DNA ends. Ablating phosphorylation of Ku70 leads to the sustained retention of Ku at DSBs, resulting in a significant decrease in DNA end resection and HR, specifically in S phase. This decrease in HR is specific as these phosphorylation sites are not required for NHEJ. Our results demonstrate that the phosphorylation-mediated dissociation of Ku70/80 from DSBs frees DNA ends, allowing the initiation of HR in S phase and providing a mechanism of DSB repair pathway choice in mammalian cells.

  13. Nicotinamide Enhances Repair of Arsenic and Ultraviolet Radiation-Induced DNA Damage in HaCaT Keratinocytes and Ex Vivo Human Skin

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Benjamin C.; Halliday, Gary M.; Damian, Diona L

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic-induced skin cancer is a significant global health burden. In areas with arsenic contamination of water sources, such as China, Pakistan, Myanmar, Cambodia and especially Bangladesh and West Bengal, large populations are at risk of arsenic-induced skin cancer. Arsenic acts as a co-carcinogen with ultraviolet (UV) radiation and affects DNA damage and repair. Nicotinamide (vitamin B3) reduces premalignant keratoses in sun-damaged skin, likely by prevention of UV-induced cellular energy ...

  14. Nicotinamide Enhances Repair of Arsenic and Ultraviolet Radiation-Induced DNA Damage in HaCaT Keratinocytes and Ex Vivo Human Skin

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Benjamin C.; Halliday, Gary M.; Damian, Diona L.

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic-induced skin cancer is a significant global health burden. In areas with arsenic contamination of water sources, such as China, Pakistan, Myanmar, Cambodia and especially Bangladesh and West Bengal, large populations are at risk of arsenic-induced skin cancer. Arsenic acts as a co-carcinogen with ultraviolet (UV) radiation and affects DNA damage and repair. Nicotinamide (vitamin B3) reduces premalignant keratoses in sun-damaged skin, likely by prevention of UV-induced cellular energy ...

  15. Normal repair of ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage in familial melanoma without CDKN2A or CDK4 gene mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, J A; Matias, C; Luxford, C; Kefford, R F; Mann, G J

    1999-04-01

    Excessive sun exposure and family history are strong risk factors for the development of cutaneous melanoma. Inherited susceptibility to this type of skin cancer could therefore result from constitutively impaired capacity to repair ultraviolet (UV)-induced DNA lesions. While a proportion of familial melanoma kindreds exhibit germline mutations in the cell cycle regulatory gene CDKN2A (p16INK4a) or its protein target, cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4), the biochemical basis of most familial melanoma is unknown. We have examined lymphoblastoid cell lines from melanoma-affected and unaffected individuals from large hereditary melanoma kindreds which are not attributable to CDKN2A or CDK4 gene mutation. These lines were tested for sensitivity of clonogenic growth to UV radiation and for their ability to repair transfected UV-damaged plasmid templates (host cell reactivation). Two of seven affected-unaffected pairs differed in colony survival after exposure to UVB radiation; however, no significant differences were observed in the host-cell reactivation assays. These results indicate that melanoma susceptibility genes other than CDKN2A and CDK4 do not impair net capacity to repair UV-induced DNA damage.

  16. Structural chromosome abnormalities, increased DNA strand breaks and DNA strand break repair deficiency in dermal fibroblasts from old female human donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalfalah, Faiza; Seggewiß, Sabine; Walter, Regina; Tigges, Julia; Moreno-Villanueva, María; Bürkle, Alexander; Ohse, Sebastian; Busch, Hauke; Boerries, Melanie; Hildebrandt, Barbara; Royer-Pokora, Brigitte; Boege, Fritz

    2015-02-01

    Dermal fibroblasts provide a paradigmatic model of cellular adaptation to long-term exogenous stress and ageing processes driven thereby. Here we addressed whether fibroblast ageing analysedex vivo entails genome instability. Dermal fibroblasts from human female donors aged 20-67 years were studied in primary culture at low population doubling. Under these conditions, the incidence of replicative senescence and rates of age-correlated telomere shortening were insignificant. Genome-wide gene expression analysis revealed age-related impairment of mitosis, telomere and chromosome maintenance and induction of genes associated with DNA repair and non-homologous end-joining, most notably XRCC4 and ligase 4. We observed an age-correlated drop in proliferative capacity and age-correlated increases in heterochromatin marks, structural chromosome abnormalities (deletions, translocations and chromatid breaks), DNA strand breaks and histone H2AX-phosphorylation. In a third of the cells from old and middle-aged donors repair of X-ray induced DNA strand breaks was impaired despite up-regulation of DNA repair genes. The distinct phenotype of genome instability, increased heterochromatinisation and (in 30% of the cases futile) up-regulation of DNA repair genes was stably maintained over several cell passages indicating that it represents a feature of geroconversion that is distinct from cellular senescence, as it does not encompass a block of proliferation.

  17. Lack of dependence on p53 for DNA double strand break repair of episomal vectors in human lymphoblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohli, M.; Jorgensen, T. J.

    1999-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor gene has been shown to be involved in a variety of repair processes, and recent findings have suggested that p53 may be involved in DNA double strand break repair in irradiated cells. The role of p53 in DNA double strand break repair, however, has not been fully investigated. In this study, we have constructed a novel Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-based shuttle vector, designated as pZEBNA, to explore the influence of p53 on DNA strand break repair in human lymphoblasts, since EBV-based vectors do not inactivate the p53 pathway. We have compared plasmid survival of irradiated, restriction enzyme linearized, and calf intestinal alkaline phosphatase (CIP)-treated pZEBNA with a Simian virus 40 (SV40)-based shuttle vector, pZ189, in TK6 (wild-type p53) and WTK1 (mutant p53) lymphoblasts and determined that p53 does not modulate DNA double strand break repair in these cell lines. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  18. Synthetic lethal targeting of DNA double strand break repair deficient cells by human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE1) inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Sultana, Rebeka; McNeill, Daniel R.; Abbotts, Rachel; Mohammed, Mohammed Z.; Zdzienicka, Małgorzata Z.; Qutob, Haitham; Seedhouse, Claire; Charles A. Laughton; Fischer, Peter M.; Patel, Poulam M.; Wilson, David M.; Madhusudan, Srinivasan

    2012-01-01

    An apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) site is an obligatory cytotoxic intermediate in DNA Base Excision Repair (BER) that is processed by human AP endonuclease 1 (APE1). APE1 is essential for BER and an emerging drug target in cancer. We have isolated novel small molecule inhibitors of APE1. In the current study we have investigated the ability of APE1 inhibitors to induce synthetic lethality in a panel of DNA double strand break (DSB) repair deficient and proficient cells; a) Chine...

  19. DNA replication and the repair of DNA strand breaks in nuclei of Physarum polycephalum. Terminal report, August 1, 1978-March 31, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brewer, E.N.; Evans, T.E.

    1980-01-01

    Nuclei isolated from Physarum are able to replicate approximately 15% of the total genome in a manner which is qualitatively similar to the DNA replication process occurring in the intact organism. Such nuclei, however, are defective in the joining of Okazaki intermediates in vitro. Two DNA polymerase species, isolated from nuclei or intact plasmodia of this organism, can be separated by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Total DNA polymerase activity is low in nuclei isolated during mitosis. A heat-stable glycoprotein material present in aqueous nuclear extracts stimulates DNA synthesis in well-washed nuclei. A sub-nuclear preparation active in DNA synthesis in vitro has been obtained from isolated nuclei of Physarum. Radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks are rejoined in intact plasmodia and isolated nuclei of Physarum in a cell cycle-dependent manner. This phenomenon does not appear to be due to an intrinsic difference in nuclear DNA endonuclease activity at different times of the mitotic cycle. DNA strand breaks and repair induced by the carcinogen 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide is similar in several respects to that resulting from exposure of the organism to ionizing radiation. Temperature sensitive strains of Physarum have been constructed and preliminary genetical and biochemical characterizations have been carried out. Two of the strains appear to be conditionally defective in DNA metabolism. An isogenic ploidal series of amoebae has been prepared and characterized as to uv and ionizing radiation sensitivity (in terms of cell survival). There is a direct relationship between ploidy and resistance to uv whereas ploidal change does not appear to affect the response to ionizing radiation.

  20. [Studies of the repair of radiation-induced genetic damage in Drosophila]. Annual progress report, June 1, 1992--June 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    The most interesting discovery made over the past year derives from sequence analysis of cDNAs from the putative mus308 gene. The theoretical translation product of this gene contains a DNA polymerase domain near the carboxy terminus and DNA/RNA helicase motifs near the amino terminus. There is currently no precedent in the literature for a single polypeptide containing both of these domains. The protein appears to be a novel DNA repair enzyme which should be fruitful ground for future enzymological analysis. The authors have identified two ORFs by sequence analysis of the transforming fragment containing the mei-41 gene and of corresponding cDNAs. ORF 1 includes the P element insertion sites and encodes a peptide of 757 amino acids. ORF 2 starts 900 base pairs downstream of ORF 1 and encodes a peptide of 1,037 amino acids. This putative peptide shows homology to the yeast DNA repair genes, rad50 of S. cerevisiae and rad3 of S. pombe.

  1. RecG Directs DNA Synthesis during Double-Strand Break Repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benura Azeroglu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Homologous recombination provides a mechanism of DNA double-strand break repair (DSBR that requires an intact, homologous template for DNA synthesis. When DNA synthesis associated with DSBR is convergent, the broken DNA strands are replaced and repair is accurate. However, if divergent DNA synthesis is established, over-replication of flanking DNA may occur with deleterious consequences. The RecG protein of Escherichia coli is a helicase and translocase that can re-model 3-way and 4-way DNA structures such as replication forks and Holliday junctions. However, the primary role of RecG in live cells has remained elusive. Here we show that, in the absence of RecG, attempted DSBR is accompanied by divergent DNA replication at the site of an induced chromosomal DNA double-strand break. Furthermore, DNA double-stand ends are generated in a recG mutant at sites known to block replication forks. These double-strand ends, also trigger DSBR and the divergent DNA replication characteristic of this mutant, which can explain over-replication of the terminus region of the chromosome. The loss of DNA associated with unwinding joint molecules previously observed in the absence of RuvAB and RecG, is suppressed by a helicase deficient PriA mutation (priA300, arguing that the action of RecG ensures that PriA is bound correctly on D-loops to direct DNA replication rather than to unwind joint molecules. This has led us to put forward a revised model of homologous recombination in which the re-modelling of branched intermediates by RecG plays a fundamental role in directing DNA synthesis and thus maintaining genomic stability.

  2. Low Dose Radiation-Induced Genome and Epigenome Instability Symposium and Epigenetic Mechanisms, DNA Repair, and Chromatin Symposium at the EMS 2008 Annual Meeting - October 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, William F; Kovalchuk, Olga; Dolinoy, Dana C; Dubrova, Yuri E; Coleman, Matthew A; Schär, Primo; Pogribny, Igor; Hendzel, Michael

    2010-02-19

    The Low Dose Radiation Symposium thoughtfully addressed ionizing radiation non-mutational but transmissable alterations in surviving cells. Deregulation of epigenetic processes has been strongly implicated in carcinogenesis, and there is increasing realization that a significant fraction of non-targeted and adaptive mechanisms in response to ionizing radiation are likely to be epigenetic in nature. Much remains to be learned about how chromatin and epigenetic regulators affect responses to low doses of radiation, and how low dose radiation impacts other epigenetic processes. The Epigenetic Mechanisms Symposium focused on on epigenetic mechanisms and their interplay with DNA repair and chromatin changes. Addressing the fact that the most well understood mediators of epigenetic regulation are histone modifications and DNA methylation. Low levels of radiation can lead to changes in the methylation status of certain gene promoters and the expression of DNA methyltransferases, However, epigenetic regulation can also involve changes in higher order chromosome structure.

  3. DNA double strand break repair enzymes function at multiple steps in retroviral infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agematsu Kazunaga

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA double strand break (DSB repair enzymes are thought to be necessary for retroviral infection, especially for the post-integration repair and circularization of viral cDNA. However, the detailed roles of DSB repair enzymes in retroviral infection remain to be elucidated. Results A GFP reporter assay showed that the infectivity of an HIV-based vector decreased in ATM- and DNA-PKcs-deficient cells when compared with their complemented cells, while that of an MLV-based vector was diminished in Mre11- and DNA-PKcs-deficient cells. By using a method based on inverse- and Alu-PCR, we analyzed sequences around 3' HIV-1 integration sites in ATM-, Mre11- and NBS1- deficient cells. Increased abnormal junctions between the HIV-1 provirus and the host DNA were found in these mutant cell lines compared to the complemented cell lines and control MRC5SV cells. The abnormal junctions contained two types of insertions: 1 GT dinucleotides, which are normally removed by integrase during integration, and 2 inserted nucleotides of unknown origin. Artemis-deficient cells also showed such abnormalities. In Mre11-deficient cells, part of a primer binding site sequence was also detected. The 5' host-virus junctions in the mutant cells also contained these types of abnormal nucleotides. Moreover, the host-virus junctions of the MLV provirus showed similar abnormalities. These findings suggest that DSB repair enzymes play roles in the 3'-processing reaction and protection of the ends of viral DNA after reverse transcription. We also identified both 5' and 3' junctional sequences of the same provirus by inverse PCR and found that only the 3' junctions were abnormal with aberrant short repeats, indicating that the integration step was partially impaired in these cells. Furthermore, the conserved base preferences around HIV-1 integration sites were partially altered in ATM-deficient cells. Conclusions These results suggest that DSB repair enzymes are

  4. RECQL4 Promotes DNA End Resection in Repair of DNA Double-Strand Breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Huiming; Shamanna, Raghavendra A; Keijzers, Guido; Anand, Roopesh; Rasmussen, Lene Juel; Cejka, Petr; Croteau, Deborah L; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2016-06-28

    The RecQ helicase RECQL4, mutated in Rothmund-Thomson syndrome, regulates genome stability, aging, and cancer. Here, we identify a crucial role for RECQL4 in DNA end resection, which is the initial and an essential step of homologous recombination (HR)-dependent DNA double-strand break repair (DSBR). Depletion of RECQL4 severely reduces HR-mediated repair and 5' end resection in vivo. RECQL4 physically interacts with MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 (MRN), which senses DSBs and initiates DNA end resection with CtIP. The MRE11 exonuclease regulates the retention of RECQL4 at laser-induced DSBs. RECQL4 also directly interacts with CtIP via its N-terminal domain and promotes CtIP recruitment to the MRN complex at DSBs. Moreover, inactivation of RECQL4's helicase activity impairs DNA end processing and HR-dependent DSBR without affecting its interaction with MRE11 and CtIP, suggesting an important role for RECQL4's unwinding activity in the process. Thus, we report that RECQL4 is an important participant in HR-dependent DSBR.

  5. RECQL4 Promotes DNA End Resection in Repair of DNA Double-Strand Breaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiming Lu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The RecQ helicase RECQL4, mutated in Rothmund-Thomson syndrome, regulates genome stability, aging, and cancer. Here, we identify a crucial role for RECQL4 in DNA end resection, which is the initial and an essential step of homologous recombination (HR-dependent DNA double-strand break repair (DSBR. Depletion of RECQL4 severely reduces HR-mediated repair and 5′ end resection in vivo. RECQL4 physically interacts with MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 (MRN, which senses DSBs and initiates DNA end resection with CtIP. The MRE11 exonuclease regulates the retention of RECQL4 at laser-induced DSBs. RECQL4 also directly interacts with CtIP via its N-terminal domain and promotes CtIP recruitment to the MRN complex at DSBs. Moreover, inactivation of RECQL4’s helicase activity impairs DNA end processing and HR-dependent DSBR without affecting its interaction with MRE11 and CtIP, suggesting an important role for RECQL4’s unwinding activity in the process. Thus, we report that RECQL4 is an important participant in HR-dependent DSBR.

  6. Activating Akt1 mutations alter DNA double strand break repair and radiosensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeck, S.; Al-Refae, K.; Riffkin, H.; Wiel, G.; Handrick, R.; Klein, D.; Iliakis, G.; Jendrossek, V.

    2017-01-01

    The survival kinase Akt has clinical relevance to radioresistance. However, its contributions to the DNA damage response, DNA double strand break (DSB) repair and apoptosis remain poorly defined and often contradictory. We used a genetic approach to explore the consequences of genetic alterations of Akt1 for the cellular radiation response. While two activation-associated mutants with prominent nuclear access, the phospho-mimicking Akt1-TDSD and the clinically relevant PH-domain mutation Akt1-E17K, accelerated DSB repair and improved survival of irradiated Tramp-C1 murine prostate cancer cells and Akt1-knockout murine embryonic fibroblasts in vitro, the classical constitutively active membrane-targeted myrAkt1 mutant had the opposite effects. Interestingly, DNA-PKcs directly phosphorylated Akt1 at S473 in an in vitro kinase assay but not vice-versa. Pharmacological inhibition of DNA-PKcs or Akt restored radiosensitivity in tumour cells expressing Akt1-E17K or Akt1-TDSD. In conclusion, Akt1-mediated radioresistance depends on its activation state and nuclear localization and is accessible to pharmacologic inhibition. PMID:28209968

  7. Chromosomal Integrity after UV Irradiation Requires FANCD2-Mediated Repair of Double Strand Breaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federico, María Belén; Vallerga, María Belén; Radl, Analía; Paviolo, Natalia Soledad; Bocco, José Luis; Di Giorgio, Marina; Soria, Gastón; Gottifredi, Vanesa

    2016-01-01

    Fanconi Anemia (FA) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by hypersensitivity to inter-strand crosslinks (ICLs). FANCD2, a central factor of the FA pathway, is essential for the repair of double strand breaks (DSBs) generated during fork collapse at ICLs. While lesions different from ICLs can also trigger fork collapse, the contribution of FANCD2 to the resolution of replication-coupled DSBs generated independently from ICLs is unknown. Intriguingly, FANCD2 is readily activated after UV irradiation, a DNA-damaging agent that generates predominantly intra-strand crosslinks but not ICLs. Hence, UV irradiation is an ideal tool to explore the contribution of FANCD2 to the DNA damage response triggered by DNA lesions other than ICL repair. Here we show that, in contrast to ICL-causing agents, UV radiation compromises cell survival independently from FANCD2. In agreement, FANCD2 depletion does not increase the amount of DSBs generated during the replication of UV-damaged DNA and is dispensable for UV-induced checkpoint activation. Remarkably however, FANCD2 protects UV-dependent, replication-coupled DSBs from aberrant processing by non-homologous end joining, preventing the accumulation of micronuclei and chromatid aberrations including non-homologous chromatid exchanges. Hence, while dispensable for cell survival, FANCD2 selectively safeguards chromosomal stability after UV-triggered replication stress. PMID:26765540

  8. RECQL4 Promotes DNA End Resection in Repair of DNA Double-Strand Breaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Huiming; Shamanna, Raghavendra A; Keijzers, Guido

    2016-01-01

    The RecQ helicase RECQL4, mutated in Rothmund-Thomson syndrome, regulates genome stability, aging, and cancer. Here, we identify a crucial role for RECQL4 in DNA end resection, which is the initial and an essential step of homologous recombination (HR)-dependent DNA double-strand break repair (DSBR......). Depletion of RECQL4 severely reduces HR-mediated repair and 5' end resection in vivo. RECQL4 physically interacts with MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 (MRN), which senses DSBs and initiates DNA end resection with CtIP. The MRE11 exonuclease regulates the retention of RECQL4 at laser-induced DSBs. RECQL4 also directly...... interacts with CtIP via its N-terminal domain and promotes CtIP recruitment to the MRN complex at DSBs. Moreover, inactivation of RECQL4's helicase activity impairs DNA end processing and HR-dependent DSBR without affecting its interaction with MRE11 and CtIP, suggesting an important role for RECQL4's...

  9. Tying the loose ends together in DNA double strand break repair with 53BP1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carpenter Phillip B

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract To maintain genomic stability and ensure the fidelity of chromosomal transmission, cells respond to various forms of genotoxic stress, including DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs, through the activation of DNA damage response signaling networks. In response to DSBs as induced by ionizing radiation (IR, during DNA replication, or through immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH rearrangements in B cells of lymphoid origin, the phosphatidyl inositol-like kinase (PIK kinases ATM (mutated in ataxia telangiectasia, ATR (ATM and Rad3-related kinase, and the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK activate signaling pathways that lead to DSB repair. DSBs are repaired by either of two major, non-mutually exclusive pathways: homologous recombination (HR that utilizes an undamaged sister chromatid template (or homologous chromosome and non- homologous end joining (NHEJ, an error prone mechanism that processes and joins broken DNA ends through the coordinated effort of a small set of ubiquitous factors (DNA-PKcs, Ku70, Ku80, artemis, Xrcc4/DNA lig IV, and XLF/Cernunnos. The PIK kinases phosphorylate a variety of effector substrates that propagate the DNA damage signal, ultimately resulting in various biological outputs that influence cell cycle arrest, transcription, DNA repair, and apoptosis. A variety of data has revealed a critical role for p53-binding protein 1 (53BP1 in the cellular response to DSBs including various aspects of p53 function. Importantly, 53BP1 plays a major role in suppressing translocations, particularly in B and T cells. This report will review past experiments and current knowledge regarding the role of 53BP1 in the DNA damage response.

  10. Deficiency of double-strand DNA break repair does not impair Mycobacterium tuberculosis virulence in multiple animal models of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaton, Brook E; Barkan, Daniel; Bongiorno, Paola; Karakousis, Petros C; Glickman, Michael S

    2014-08-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis persistence within its human host requires mechanisms to resist the effector molecules of host immunity, which exert their bactericidal effects through damaging pathogen proteins, membranes, and DNA. Substantial evidence indicates that bacterial pathogens, including M. tuberculosis, require DNA repair systems to repair the DNA damage inflicted by the host during infection, but the role of double-strand DNA break (DSB) repair systems is unclear. Double-strand DNA breaks are the most cytotoxic form of DNA damage and must be repaired for chromosome replication to proceed. M. tuberculosis elaborates three genetically distinct DSB repair systems: homologous recombination (HR), nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), and single-strand annealing (SSA). NHEJ, which repairs DSBs in quiescent cells, may be particularly relevant to M. tuberculosis latency. However, very little information is available about the phenotype of DSB repair-deficient M. tuberculosis in animal models of infection. Here we tested M. tuberculosis strains lacking NHEJ (a Δku ΔligD strain), HR (a ΔrecA strain), or both (a ΔrecA Δku strain) in C57BL/6J mice, C3HeB/FeJ mice, guinea pigs, and a mouse hollow-fiber model of infection. We found no difference in bacterial load, histopathology, or host mortality between wild-type and DSB repair mutant strains in any model of infection. These results suggest that the animal models tested do not inflict DSBs on the mycobacterial chromosome, that other repair pathways can compensate for the loss of NHEJ and HR, or that DSB repair is not required for M. tuberculosis pathogenesis.

  11. JNK Phosphorylates SIRT6 to Stimulate DNA Double-Strand Break Repair in Response to Oxidative Stress by Recruiting PARP1 to DNA Breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Meter, Michael; Simon, Matthew; Tombline, Gregory; May, Alfred; Morello, Timothy D; Hubbard, Basil P; Bredbenner, Katie; Park, Rosa; Sinclair, David A; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Gorbunova, Vera; Seluanov, Andrei

    2016-09-06

    The accumulation of damage caused by oxidative stress has been linked to aging and to the etiology of numerous age-related diseases. The longevity gene, sirtuin 6 (SIRT6), promotes genome stability by facilitating DNA repair, especially under oxidative stress conditions. Here we uncover the mechanism by which SIRT6 is activated by oxidative stress to promote DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. We show that the stress-activated protein kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), phosphorylates SIRT6 on serine 10 in response to oxidative stress. This post-translational modification facilitates the mobilization of SIRT6 to DNA damage sites and is required for efficient recruitment of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) to DNA break sites and for efficient repair of DSBs. Our results demonstrate a post-translational mechanism regulating SIRT6, and they provide the link between oxidative stress signaling and DNA repair pathways that may be critical for hormetic response and longevity assurance.

  12. JNK Phosphorylates SIRT6 to Stimulate DNA Double-Strand Break Repair in Response to Oxidative Stress by Recruiting PARP1 to DNA Breaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Van Meter

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation of damage caused by oxidative stress has been linked to aging and to the etiology of numerous age-related diseases. The longevity gene, sirtuin 6 (SIRT6, promotes genome stability by facilitating DNA repair, especially under oxidative stress conditions. Here we uncover the mechanism by which SIRT6 is activated by oxidative stress to promote DNA double-strand break (DSB repair. We show that the stress-activated protein kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK, phosphorylates SIRT6 on serine 10 in response to oxidative stress. This post-translational modification facilitates the mobilization of SIRT6 to DNA damage sites and is required for efficient recruitment of poly (ADP-ribose polymerase 1 (PARP1 to DNA break sites and for efficient repair of DSBs. Our results demonstrate a post-translational mechanism regulating SIRT6, and they provide the link between oxidative stress signaling and DNA repair pathways that may be critical for hormetic response and longevity assurance.

  13. Mre11 ATLD17/18 mutation retains Tel1/ATM activity but blocks DNA double-strand break repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O. Limbo (Oliver); D. Moiani (Davide); A. Kertokalio (Aryandi); C. Wyman (Claire); J.A. Tainer (John); P. Russell (Paul)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe Mre11 complex (Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 or MRN) binds double-strand breaks where it interacts with CtIP/Ctp1/Sae2 and ATM/Tel1 to preserve genome stability through its functions in homology-directed repair, checkpoint signaling and telomere maintenance. Here, we combine biochemical, structur

  14. Defective DNA Ligation during Short-Patch Single-Strand Break Repair in Ataxia Oculomotor Apraxia 1 ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, John J.; El-Khamisy, Sherif F.; Katyal, Sachin; Clements, Paula; McKinnon, Peter J.; Caldecott, Keith W.

    2009-01-01

    Ataxia oculomotor apraxia 1 (AOA1) results from mutations in aprataxin, a component of DNA strand break repair that removes AMP from 5′ termini. Despite this, global rates of chromosomal strand break repair are normal in a variety of AOA1 and other aprataxin-defective cells. Here we show that short-patch single-strand break repair (SSBR) in AOA1 cell extracts bypasses the point of aprataxin action at oxidative breaks and stalls at the final step of DNA ligation, resulting in the accumulation of adenylated DNA nicks. Strikingly, this defect results from insufficient levels of nonadenylated DNA ligase, and short-patch SSBR can be restored in AOA1 extracts, independently of aprataxin, by the addition of recombinant DNA ligase. Since adenylated nicks are substrates for long-patch SSBR, we reasoned that this pathway might in part explain the apparent absence of a chromosomal SSBR defect in aprataxin-defective cells. Indeed, whereas chemical inhibition of long-patch repair did not affect SSBR rates in wild-type mouse neural astrocytes, it uncovered a significant defect in Aptx−/− neural astrocytes. These data demonstrate that aprataxin participates in chromosomal SSBR in vivo and suggest that short-patch SSBR arrests in AOA1 because of insufficient nonadenylated DNA ligase. PMID:19103743

  15. RAD50, an SMC family member with multiple roles in DNA break repair: How does ATP affect function?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Kinoshita (Eri); E. van der Linden (Eddy); H. Sanchez (Humberto); C. Wyman (Claire)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe protein complex including Mre11, Rad50, and Nbs1 (MRN) functions in DNA double-strand break repair to recognize and process DNA ends as well as signal for cell cycle arrest. Amino acid sequence similarity and overall architecture make Rad50 a member of the structural maintenance of c

  16. DNA ligase 1 deficient plants display severe growth defects and delayed repair of both DNA single and double strand breaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bray Clifford M

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA ligase enzymes catalyse the joining of adjacent polynucleotides and as such play important roles in DNA replication and repair pathways. Eukaryotes possess multiple DNA ligases with distinct roles in DNA metabolism, with clear differences in the functions of DNA ligase orthologues between animals, yeast and plants. DNA ligase 1, present in all eukaryotes, plays critical roles in both DNA repair and replication and is indispensable for cell viability. Results Knockout mutants of atlig1 are lethal. Therefore, RNAi lines with reduced levels of AtLIG1 were generated to allow the roles and importance of Arabidopsis DNA ligase 1 in DNA metabolism to be elucidated. Viable plants were fertile but displayed a severely stunted and stressed growth phenotype. Cell size was reduced in the silenced lines, whilst flow cytometry analysis revealed an increase of cells in S-phase in atlig1-RNAi lines relative to wild type plants. Comet assay analysis of isolated nuclei showed atlig1-RNAi lines displayed slower repair of single strand breaks (SSBs and also double strand breaks (DSBs, implicating AtLIG1 in repair of both these lesions. Conclusion Reduced levels of Arabidopsis DNA ligase 1 in the silenced lines are sufficient to support plant development but result in retarded growth and reduced cell size, which may reflect roles for AtLIG1 in both replication and repair. The finding that DNA ligase 1 plays an important role in DSB repair in addition to its known function in SSB repair, demonstrates the existence of a previously uncharacterised novel pathway, independent of the conserved NHEJ. These results indicate that DNA ligase 1 functions in both DNA replication and in repair of both ss and dsDNA strand breaks in higher plants.

  17. Rtt107 phosphorylation promotes localisation to DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs and recombinational repair between sister chromatids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranav Ullal

    Full Text Available Efficient repair of DNA double-stranded breaks (DSB requires a coordinated response at the site of lesion. Nucleolytic resection commits repair towards homologous recombination, which preferentially occurs between sister chromatids. DSB resection promotes recruitment of the Mec1 checkpoint kinase to the break. Rtt107 is a target of Mec1 and serves as a scaffold during repair. Rtt107 plays an important role during rescue of damaged replication forks, however whether Rtt107 contributes to the repair of DSBs is unknown. Here we show that Rtt107 is recruited to DSBs induced by the HO endonuclease. Rtt107 phosphorylation by Mec1 and its interaction with the Smc5-Smc6 complex are both required for Rtt107 loading to breaks, while Rtt107 regulators Slx4 and Rtt101 are not. We demonstrate that Rtt107 has an effect on the efficiency of sister chromatid recombination (SCR and propose that its recruitment to DSBs, together with the Smc5-Smc6 complex is important for repair through the SCR pathway.

  18. The contribution of alu elements to mutagenic DNA double-strand break repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria E Morales

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Alu elements make up the largest family of human mobile elements, numbering 1.1 million copies and comprising 11% of the human genome. As a consequence of evolution and genetic drift, Alu elements of various sequence divergence exist throughout the human genome. Alu/Alu recombination has been shown to cause approximately 0.5% of new human genetic diseases and contribute to extensive genomic structural variation. To begin understanding the molecular mechanisms leading to these rearrangements in mammalian cells, we constructed Alu/Alu recombination reporter cell lines containing Alu elements ranging in sequence divergence from 0%-30% that allow detection of both Alu/Alu recombination and large non-homologous end joining (NHEJ deletions that range from 1.0 to 1.9 kb in size. Introduction of as little as 0.7% sequence divergence between Alu elements resulted in a significant reduction in recombination, which indicates even small degrees of sequence divergence reduce the efficiency of homology-directed DNA double-strand break (DSB repair. Further reduction in recombination was observed in a sequence divergence-dependent manner for diverged Alu/Alu recombination constructs with up to 10% sequence divergence. With greater levels of sequence divergence (15%-30%, we observed a significant increase in DSB repair due to a shift from Alu/Alu recombination to variable-length NHEJ which removes sequence between the two Alu elements. This increase in NHEJ deletions depends on the presence of Alu sequence homeology (similar but not identical sequences. Analysis of recombination products revealed that Alu/Alu recombination junctions occur more frequently in the first 100 bp of the Alu element within our reporter assay, just as they do in genomic Alu/Alu recombination events. This is the first extensive study characterizing the influence of Alu element sequence divergence on DNA repair, which will inform predictions regarding the effect of Alu element sequence

  19. Homologous recombination is a primary pathway to repair DNA double-strand breaks generated during DNA rereplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Lan N; Li, Yongjiang; Sun, Emily; Ang, Katrina; Hwang, Patty Yi-Hwa; Wu, Xiaohua

    2014-10-17

    Re-initiation of DNA replication at origins within a given cell cycle would result in DNA rereplication, which can lead to genome instability and tumorigenesis. DNA rereplication can be induced by loss of licensing control at cellular replication origins, or by viral protein-driven multiple rounds of replication initiation at viral origins. DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are generated during rereplication, but the mechanisms of how these DSBs are repaired to maintain genome stability and cell viability are poorly understood in mammalian cells. We generated novel EGFP-based DSB repair substrates, which specifically monitor the repair of rereplication-associated DSBs. We demonstrated that homologous recombination (HR) is an important mechanism to repair rereplication-associated DSBs, and sister chromatids are used as templates for such HR-mediated DSB repair. Micro-homology-mediated non-homologous end joining (MMEJ) can also be used but to a lesser extent compared to HR, whereas Ku-dependent classical non-homologous end joining (C-NHEJ) has a minimal role to repair rereplication-associated DSBs. In addition, loss of HR activity leads to severe cell death when rereplication is induced. Therefore, our studies identify HR, the most conservative repair pathway, as the primary mechanism to repair DSBs upon rereplication. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Radiation induced pesticidal microbes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ki Yup; Lee, Y. K.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, J. K.; Lee, S. J.; Lim, D. S

    2001-01-01

    To isolate pesticidal microbes against plant pathogenic fungi, 4 strains of bacteria(K1. K3, K4, YS1) were isolated from mushroom compost and hot spring. K4, K1, K3, YS1 strain showed wide antifungal spectrum and high antifungal activities against 12 kinds of fungi. Specific proteins and the specific transcribed genes were found from the YS1 and its radiation-induced mutants. And knock-out mutants of antifungal activity were derived by transposon mutagenesis. From these knock-out mutants, the antifungal activity related genes and its modification by gamma-ray radiation are going to be studied. These results suggested that radiation could be an useful tool for the induction of functional mutants.

  1. Radiation induced oral mucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P S Satheesh Kumar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients receiving radiotherapy or chemotherapy will receive some degree of oral mucositis The incidence of oral mucositis was especially high in patients: (i With primary tumors in the oral cavity, oropharynx, or nasopharynx; (ii who also received concomitant chemotherapy; (iii who received a total dose over 5,000 cGy; and (iv who were treated with altered fractionation radiation schedules. Radiation-induced oral mucositis affects the quality of life of the patients and the family concerned. The present day management of oral mucositis is mostly palliative and or supportive care. The newer guidelines are suggesting Palifermin, which is the first active mucositis drug as well as Amifostine, for radiation protection and cryotherapy. The current management should focus more on palliative measures, such as pain management, nutritional support, and maintenance, of good oral hygiene

  2. DNA Double-Strand Break Analysis by {gamma}-H2AX Foci: A Useful Method for Determining the Overreactors to Radiation-Induced Acute Reactions Among Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goutham, Hassan Venkatesh; Mumbrekar, Kamalesh Dattaram [Division of Radiobiology and Toxicology, Manipal Life Sciences Centre, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka (India); Vadhiraja, Bejadi Manjunath [Manipal Hospital, Bangalore, Karnataka (India); Fernandes, Donald Jerard; Sharan, Krishna [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Shiridi Sai Baba Cancer Hospital and Research Centre, Kasturba Hospital, Manipal, Karnataka (India); Kanive Parashiva, Guruprasad; Kapaettu, Satyamoorthy [Division of Biotechnology, Manipal Life Sciences Centre, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka (India); Bola Sadashiva, Satish Rao, E-mail: satishraomlsc@gmail.com [Division of Radiobiology and Toxicology, Manipal Life Sciences Centre, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka (India)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: Interindividual variability in normal tissue toxicity during radiation therapy is a limiting factor for successful treatment. Predicting the risk of developing acute reactions before initiation of radiation therapy may have the benefit of opting for altered radiation therapy regimens to achieve minimal adverse effects with improved tumor cure. Methods and Materials: DNA double-strand break (DSB) induction and its repair kinetics in lymphocytes of head-and-neck cancer patients undergoing chemoradiation therapy was analyzed by counting {gamma}-H2AX foci, neutral comet assay, and a modified version of neutral filter elution assay. Acute normal tissue reactions were assessed by Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. Results: The correlation between residual DSBs and the severity of acute reactions demonstrated that residual {gamma}-H2AX foci in head-and-neck cancer patients increased with the severity of oral mucositis and skin reaction. Conclusions: Our results suggest that {gamma}-H2AX analysis may have predictive implications for identifying the overreactors to mucositis and skin reactions among head-and-neck cancer patients prior to initiation of radiation therapy.

  3. DNA single-strand breaks, double-strand breaks, and crosslinks in rat testicular germ cells: Measurements of their formation and repair by alkaline and neutral filter elution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, M.O.; Dysart, G. (Merck Institute for Therapeutic Research, West Point, PA (USA))

    1985-06-01

    This work describes a neutral and alkaline elution method for measuring DNA single-strand breaks (SSBs), DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), and DNA-DNA crosslinks in rat testicular germ cells after treatments in vivo or in vitro with both chemical mutagens and gamma-irradiation. The methods depend upon the isolation of testicular germ cells by collagenase and trypsin digestion, followed by filtration and centrifugation. {sup 137}Cs irradiation induced both DNA SSBs and DSBs in germ cells held on ice in vitro. Irradiation of the whole animal indicated that both types of DNA breaks are induced in vivo and can be repaired. A number of germ cell mutagens induced either DNA SSBs, DSBs, or cross-links after in vivo and in vitro dosing. These chemicals included methyl methanesulfonate, ethyl methanesulfonate, ethyl nitrosourea, dibromochlorpropane, ethylene dibromide, triethylene melamine, and mitomycin C. These results suggest that the blood-testes barrier is relatively ineffective for these mutagens, which may explain in part their in vivo mutagenic potency. This assay should be a useful screen for detecting chemical attack upon male germ-cell DNA and thus, it should help in the assessment of the mutagenic risk of chemicals. In addition, this approach can be used to study the processes of SSB, DSB, and crosslink repair in DNA of male germ cells, either from all stages or specific stages of development.

  4. Spindle Checkpoint Factors Bub1 and Bub2 Promote DNA Double-Strand Break Repair by Nonhomologous End Joining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessulat, Matthew; Malty, Ramy H; Nguyen-Tran, Diem-Hang; Deineko, Viktor; Aoki, Hiroyuki; Vlasblom, James; Omidi, Katayoun; Jin, Ke; Minic, Zoran; Hooshyar, Mohsen; Burnside, Daniel; Samanfar, Bahram; Phanse, Sadhna; Freywald, Tanya; Prasad, Bhanu; Zhang, Zhaolei; Vizeacoumar, Franco; Krogan, Nevan J; Freywald, Andrew; Golshani, Ashkan; Babu, Mohan

    2015-07-01

    The nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway is essential for the preservation of genome integrity, as it efficiently repairs DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Previous biochemical and genetic investigations have indicated that, despite the importance of this pathway, the entire complement of genes regulating NHEJ remains unknown. To address this, we employed a plasmid-based NHEJ DNA repair screen in budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) using 369 putative nonessential DNA repair-related components as queries. Among the newly identified genes associated with NHEJ deficiency upon disruption are two spindle assembly checkpoint kinases, Bub1 and Bub2. Both observation of resulting phenotypes and chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated that Bub1 and -2, either alone or in combination with cell cycle regulators, are recruited near the DSB, where phosphorylated Rad53 or H2A accumulates. Large-scale proteomic analysis of Bub kinases phosphorylated in response to DNA damage identified previously unknown kinase substrates on Tel1 S/T-Q sites. Moreover, Bub1 NHEJ function appears to be conserved in mammalian cells. 53BP1, which influences DSB repair by NHEJ, colocalizes with human BUB1 and is recruited to the break sites. Thus, while Bub is not a core component of NHEJ machinery, our data support its dual role in mitotic exit and promotion of NHEJ repair in yeast and mammals. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA polymerase IV: possible involvement in double strand break DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leem, S H; Ropp, P A; Sugino, A

    1994-08-11

    We identified and purified a new DNA polymerase (DNA polymerase IV), which is similar to mammalian DNA polymerase beta, from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and suggested that it is encoded by YCR14C (POLX) on chromosome III. Here, we provided a direct evidence that the purified DNA polymerase IV is indeed encoded by POLX. Strains harboring a pol4 deletion mutation exhibit neither mitotic growth defect nor a meiosis defect, suggesting that DNA polymerase IV participates in nonessential functions in DNA metabolism. The deletion strains did not exhibit UV-sensitivity. However, they did show weak sensitivity to MMS-treatment and exhibited a hyper-recombination phenotype when intragenic recombination was measured during meiosis. Furthermore, MAT alpha pol4 delta segregants had a higher frequency of illegitimate mating with a MAT alpha tester strain than that of wild-type cells. These results suggest that DNA polymerase IV participates in a double-strand break repair pathway. A 3.2kb of the POL4 transcript was weakly expressed in mitotically growing cells. During meiosis, a 2.2 kb POL4 transcript was greatly induced, while the 3.2 kb transcript stayed at constant levels. This induction was delayed in a swi4 delta strain during meiosis, while no effect was observed in a swi6 delta strain.

  6. OsRAD51C Is Essential for Double Strand Break Repair in Rice Meiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding eTang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available RAD51C is one of the RAD51 paralogs that plays an important role in DNA double-strand break repair by homologous recombination. Here, we identified and characterized OsRAD51C, the rice homolog of human RAD51C. The Osrad51c mutant plant is normal in vegetative growth but exhibits complete male and female sterility. Cytological investigation revealed that homologous pairing and synapsis were severely disrupted. Massive chromosome fragmentation occurred during metaphase I in Osrad51c meiocytes, and was fully suppressed by the CRC1 mutation. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that OsRAD51C localized onto the chromosomes from leptotene to early pachytene during prophase I, and that normal loading of OsRAD51C was dependent on OsREC8, PAIR2, and PAIR3. Additionally, ZEP1 did not localize properly in Osrad51c, indicating that OsRAD51C is required for synaptonemal complex assembly. Our study also provided evidence in support of a functional divergence in RAD51C among organisms.

  7. DNA Double Strand Break Repair and its Association with Inherited Predispositions to Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Rodney J

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mutations in BRCA1 account for the majority of familial aggregations of early onset breast and ovarian cancer (~70% and about 1/5 of all early onset breast cancer families; in contrast, mutations in BRCA2 account for a smaller proportion of breast/ovarian cancer families and a similar proportion of early onset breast cancer families. BRCA2 has also been shown to be associated with a much more pleiotropic disease spectrum compared to BRCA1. Since the identification of both BRCA1 and BRCA2 investigations into the functions of these genes have revealed that both are associated with the maintenance of genomic integrity via their apparent roles in cellular response to DNA damage, especially their involvement in the process of double strand DNA break repair. This review will focus on the specific roles of both genes and how functional differences may account for the diverse clinical findings observed between families that harbour BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations.

  8. A multistep genomic screen identifies new genes required for repair of DNA double-strand breaks in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, Jennifer Summers; Sethi, Sunaina; Tripp, Jennifer DeMars; Nguyen, Thuy N; Sanderson, Brian A; Westmoreland, James W; Resnick, Michael A; Lewis, L Kevin

    2013-04-15

    Efficient mechanisms for rejoining of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are vital because misrepair of such lesions leads to mutation, aneuploidy and loss of cell viability. DSB repair is mediated by proteins acting in two major pathways, called homologous recombination and nonhomologous end-joining. Repair efficiency is also modulated by other processes such as sister chromatid cohesion, nucleosome remodeling and DNA damage checkpoints. The total number of genes influencing DSB repair efficiency is unknown. To identify new yeast genes affecting DSB repair, genes linked to gamma radiation resistance in previous genome-wide surveys were tested for their impact on repair of site-specific DSBs generated by in vivo expression of EcoRI endonuclease. Eight members of the RAD52 group of DNA repair genes (RAD50, RAD51, RAD52, RAD54, RAD55, RAD57, MRE11 and XRS2) and 73 additional genes were found to be required for efficient repair of EcoRI-induced DSBs in screens utilizing both MATa and MATα deletion strain libraries. Most mutants were also sensitive to the clastogenic chemicals MMS and bleomycin. Several of the non-RAD52 group genes have previously been linked to DNA repair and over half of the genes affect nuclear processes. Many proteins encoded by the protective genes have previously been shown to associate physically with each other and with known DNA repair proteins in high-throughput proteomics studies. A majority of the proteins (64%) share sequence similarity with human proteins, suggesting that they serve similar functions. We have used a genetic screening approach to detect new genes required for efficient repair of DSBs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The findings have spotlighted new genes that are critical for maintenance of genome integrity and are therefore of greatest concern for their potential impact when the corresponding gene orthologs and homologs are inactivated or polymorphic in human cells.

  9. Radiation Induced Genomic Instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, William F.

    2011-03-01

    Radiation induced genomic instability can be observed in the progeny of irradiated cells multiple generations after irradiation of parental cells. The phenotype is well established both in vivo (Morgan 2003) and in vitro (Morgan 2003), and may be critical in radiation carcinogenesis (Little 2000, Huang et al. 2003). Instability can be induced by both the deposition of energy in irradiated cells as well as by signals transmitted by irradiated (targeted) cells to non-irradiated (non-targeted) cells (Kadhim et al. 1992, Lorimore et al. 1998). Thus both targeted and non-targeted cells can pass on the legacy of radiation to their progeny. However the radiation induced events and cellular processes that respond to both targeted and non-targeted radiation effects that lead to the unstable phenotype remain elusive. The cell system we have used to study radiation induced genomic instability utilizes human hamster GM10115 cells. These cells have a single copy of human chromosome 4 in a background of hamster chromosomes. Instability is evaluated in the clonal progeny of irradiated cells and a clone is considered unstable if it contains three or more metaphase sub-populations involving unique rearrangements of the human chromosome (Marder and Morgan 1993). Many of these unstable clones have been maintained in culture for many years and have been extensively characterized. As initially described by Clutton et al., (Clutton et al. 1996) many of our unstable clones exhibit persistently elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (Limoli et al. 2003), which appear to be due dysfunctional mitochondria (Kim et al. 2006, Kim et al. 2006). Interestingly, but perhaps not surprisingly, our unstable clones do not demonstrate a “mutator phenotype” (Limoli et al. 1997), but they do continue to rearrange their genomes for many years. The limiting factor with this system is the target – the human chromosome. While some clones demonstrate amplification of this chromosome and thus lend

  10. Radiation induced genome instability: multiscale modelling and data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreev, Sergey; Eidelman, Yuri

    2012-07-01

    Genome instability (GI) is thought to be an important step in cancer induction and progression. Radiation induced GI is usually defined as genome alterations in the progeny of irradiated cells. The aim of this report is to demonstrate an opportunity for integrative analysis of radiation induced GI on the basis of multiscale modelling. Integrative, systems level modelling is necessary to assess different pathways resulting in GI in which a variety of genetic and epigenetic processes are involved. The multilevel modelling includes the Monte Carlo based simulation of several key processes involved in GI: DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) generation in cells initially irradiated as well as in descendants of irradiated cells, damage transmission through mitosis. Taking the cell-cycle-dependent generation of DNA/chromosome breakage into account ensures an advantage in estimating the contribution of different DNA damage response pathways to GI, as to nonhomologous vs homologous recombination repair mechanisms, the role of DSBs at telomeres or interstitial chromosomal sites, etc. The preliminary estimates show that both telomeric and non-telomeric DSB interactions are involved in delayed effects of radiation although differentially for different cell types. The computational experiments provide the data on the wide spectrum of GI endpoints (dicentrics, micronuclei, nonclonal translocations, chromatid exchanges, chromosome fragments) similar to those obtained experimentally for various cell lines under various experimental conditions. The modelling based analysis of experimental data demonstrates that radiation induced GI may be viewed as processes of delayed DSB induction/interaction/transmission being a key for quantification of GI. On the other hand, this conclusion is not sufficient to understand GI as a whole because factors of DNA non-damaging origin can also induce GI. Additionally, new data on induced pluripotent stem cells reveal that GI is acquired in normal mature

  11. Requirement for PBAF in transcriptional repression and repair at DNA breaks in actively transcribed regions of chromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Kakarougkas, Andreas; Ismail, Amani; Chambers, Anna; Riballo, Queti; Herbert, Alex; Kunzel, Julia; Lobrich, Markus; Jeggo, Penny; Downs, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    Summary Actively transcribed regions of the genome are vulnerable to genomic instability. Recently, it was discovered that transcription is repressed in response to neighboring DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). It is not known whether a failure to silence transcription flanking DSBs has any impact on DNA repair efficiency or whether chromatin remodelers contribute to the process. Here, we show that the PBAF remodeling complex is important for DSB-induced transcriptional silencing and promotes ...

  12. Development of novel visual-plus quantitative analysis systems for studying DNA double-strand break repairs in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingang; Gong, Lu; Chang, Changqing; Liu, Cong; Peng, Jinrong; Chen, Jun

    2012-09-20

    The use of reporter systems to analyze DNA double-strand break (DSB) repairs, based on the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and meganuclease such as I-Sce I, is usually carried out with cell lines. In this study, we developed three visual-plus quantitative assay systems for homologous recombination (HR), non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and single-strand annealing (SSA) DSB repair pathways at the organismal level in zebrafish embryos. To initiate DNA DSB repair, we used two I-Sce I recognition sites in opposite orientation rather than the usual single site. The NHEJ, HR and SSA repair pathways were separately triggered by the injection of three corresponding I-Sce I-cut constructions, and the repair of DNA lesion caused by I-Sce I could be tracked by EGFP expression in the embryos. Apart from monitoring the intensity of green fluorescence, the repair frequencies could also be precisely measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Analysis of DNA sequences at the DSB sites showed that NHEJ was predominant among these three repair pathways in zebrafish embryos. Furthermore, while HR and SSA reporter systems could be effectively decreased by the knockdown of rad51 and rad52, respectively, NHEJ could only be impaired by the knockdown of ligaseIV (lig4) when the NHEJ construct was cut by I-Sce I in vivo. More interestingly, blocking NHEJ with lig4-MO increased the frequency of HR, but decreased the frequency of SSA. Our studies demonstrate that the major mechanisms used to repair DNA DSBs are conserved from zebrafish to mammal, and zebrafish provides an excellent model for studying and manipulating DNA DSB repair at the organismal level.

  13. Development of Novel Visual-Plus Quantitative Analysis Systems for Studying DNA Double-Strand Break Repairs in Zebrafish

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingang Liu; Lu Gong; Changqing Chang; Cong Liu; Jinrong Peng; Jun Chen

    2012-01-01

    The use of reporter systems to analyze DNA double-strand break (DSB) repairs,based on the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and meganuclease such as I-Sce Ⅰ,is usually carried out with cell lines.In this study,we developed three visual-plus quantitative assay systems for homologous recombination (HR),non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and single-strand annealing (SSA) DSB repair pathways at the organismal level in zebrafish embryos.To initiate DNA DSB repair,we used two I-Sce Ⅰ recognition sites in opposite orientation rather than the usual single site.The NHEJ,HR and SSA repair pathways were separately triggered by the injection of three corresponding I-Sce I-cut constructions,and the repair of DNA lesion caused by I-Sce Ⅰ could be tracked by EGFP expression in the embryos.Apart from monitoring the intensity of green fluorescence,the repair frequencies could also be precisely measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR).Analysis of DNA sequences at the DSB sites showed that NHEJ was predominant among these three repair pathways in zebrafish embryos.Furthermore,while HR and SSA reporter systems could be effectively decreased by the knockdown of rad51 and rad52,respectively,NHEJ could only be impaired by the knockdown of ligaseⅣ (lig4) when the NHEJ construct was cut by I-Sce Ⅰ in vivo.More interestingly,blocking NHEJ with lig4-MO increased the frequency of HR,but decreased the frequency of SSA.Our studies demonstrate that the major mechanisms used to repair DNA DSBs are conserved from zebrafish to mammal,and zebrafish provides an excellent model for studying and manipulating DNA DSB repair at the organismal level.

  14. Enhanced radiation-induced cell killing by Herbimycin A pre-treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noguchi, Miho [Basic Radiation Research Group, Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirakata-Shirane, Toukai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Hirayama, Ryoichi; Druzhinin, Sergey [Heavy-Ion Radiobiology Research Group, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba-shi, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Okayasu, Ryuichi [Heavy-Ion Radiobiology Research Group, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba-shi, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)], E-mail: rokayasu@nirs.go.jp

    2009-12-15

    Herbimycin A (HA), as in Geldanamycin, binds to conserved pockets of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and inhibits its chaperone functions. Hsp90 plays an integral role in cancer cell growth and survival, because it maintains the stability of several key proteins by its chaperone's activity. It is known that some of the proteins associated with radiation responses are functionally stabilized by Hsp90. In this study, we investigated the effect of HA on radiosensitivity in human cancer cells and the mechanism related to the sensitization. In order to gain a mechanistic insight of this sensitization, we examined repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in irradiated human cancer cells pre-treated with HA, as unrepaired DSBs are thought to be the main cause of radiation-induced cell death. Cellular radiosensitivity was determined by clonogenic assay, and the DSB rejoining kinetics was examined by constant field gel electrophoresis. SQ-5, a lung squamous carcinoma cell line, showed synergistic increase in radiosensitivity when cells were pre-treated with HA. In addition, HA significantly inhibited repair of radiation-induced DSBs. These results suggest that the combination of HA and ionizing radiation may be a useful therapeutic strategy for treating certain cancer cells.

  15. DNA double-strand break repair: a theoretical framework and its application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Philip J; Cornelissen, Bart; Vallis, Katherine A; Chapman, S Jon

    2016-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are formed as a result of genotoxic insults, such as exogenous ionizing radiation, and are among the most serious types of DNA damage. One of the earliest molecular responses following DSB formation is the phosphorylation of the histone H2AX, giving rise to γH2AX. Many copies of γH2AX are generated at DSBs and can be detected in vitro as foci using well-established immuno-histochemical methods. It has previously been shown that anti-γH2AX antibodies, modified by the addition of the cell-penetrating peptide TAT and a fluorescent or radionuclide label, can be used to visualize and quantify DSBs in vivo. Moreover, when labelled with a high amount of the short-range, Auger electron-emitting radioisotope, (111)In, the amount of DNA damage within a cell can be increased, leading to cell death. In this report, we develop a mathematical model that describes how molecular processes at individual sites of DNA damage give rise to quantifiable foci. Equations that describe stochastic mean behaviours at individual DSB sites are derived and parametrized using population-scale, time-series measurements from two different cancer cell lines. The model is used to examine two case studies in which the introduction of an antibody (anti-γH2AX-TAT) that targets a key component in the DSB repair pathway influences system behaviour. We investigate: (i) how the interaction between anti-γH2AX-TAT and γH2AX effects the kinetics of H2AX phosphorylation and DSB repair and (ii) model behaviour when the anti-γH2AX antibody is labelled with Auger electron-emitting (111)In and can thus instigate additional DNA damage. This work supports the conclusion that DSB kinetics are largely unaffected by the introduction of the anti-γH2AX antibody, a result that has been validated experimentally, and hence the hypothesis that the use of anti-γH2AX antibody to quantify DSBs does not violate the image tracer principle. Moreover, it provides a novel model of DNA damage

  16. A New Powerful Method for Site-Specific Transgene Stabilization Based on Chromosomal Double-Strand Break Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchuk, Oksana; Savitsky, Mikhail

    2011-01-01

    Transgenic insects are a promising tool in sterile insect techniques and population replacement strategies. Such transgenic insects can be created using nonautonomous transposons, which cannot be transferred without a transposase source. In biocontrol procedures where large numbers of insects are released, there is increased risk of transgene remobilization caused by external transposase sources that can alter the characteristics of the transgenic organisms lead horizontal transgene transfer to other species. Here we describe a novel, effective method for transgene stabilization based on the introduction of directed double-strand breaks (DSB) into a genome-integrated sequence and their subsequent repair by the single-strand annealing (SSA) pathway. Due to the construct's organization, the repair pathway is predictable, such that all transposon and marker sequences can be deleted, while preserving integration of exogenous DNA in the genome. The exceptional conservation of DNA repair pathways makes this method suitable for a broad range of organisms. PMID:22022613

  17. Smc5–Smc6 mediate DNA double-strand-break repair by promoting sister-chromatid recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Piccoli, Giacomo; Cortes-Ledesma, Felipe; Ira, Gregory; Torres-Rosell, Jordi; Uhle, Stefan; Farmer, Sarah; Hwang, Ji-Young; Machin, Felix; Ceschia, Audrey; McAleenan, Alexandra; Cordon-Preciado, Violeta; Clemente-Blanco, Andrés; Vilella-Mitjana, Felip; Ullal, Pranav; Jarmuz, Adam; Leitao, Beatriz; Bressan, Debra; Dotiwala, Farokh; Papusha, Alma; Zhao, Xiaolan; Myung, Kyungjae; Haber, James E.; Aguilera, Andrés; Aragón, Luis

    2015-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) can arise during DNA replication, or after exposure to DNA-damaging agents, and their correct repair is fundamental for cell survival and genomic stability. Here, we show that the Smc5–Smc6 complex is recruited to DSBs de novo to support their repair by homologous recombination between sister chromatids. In addition, we demonstrate that Smc5–Smc6 is necessary to suppress gross chromosomal rearrangements. Our findings show that the Smc5–Smc6 complex is essential for genome stability as it promotes repair of DSBs by error-free sister-chromatid recombination (SCR), thereby suppressing inappropriate non-sister recombination events. PMID:16892052

  18. Double-strand breaks in heterochromatin move outside of a dynamic HP1a domain to complete recombinational repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiolo, Irene; Minoda, Aki; Colmenares, Serafin U; Polyzos, Aris; Costes, Sylvain V; Karpen, Gary H

    2011-03-04

    Double-strand breaks (DSBs) in heterochromatic repetitive DNAs pose significant threats to genome integrity, but information about how such lesions are processed and repaired is sparse. We observe dramatic expansion and dynamic protrusions of the heterochromatin domain in response to ionizing radiation (IR) in Drosophila cells. We also find that heterochromatic DSBs are repaired by homologous recombination (HR) but with striking differences from euchromatin. Proteins involved in early HR events (resection) are rapidly recruited to DSBs within heterochromatin. In contrast, Rad51, which mediates strand invasion, only associates with DSBs that relocalize outside of the domain. Heterochromatin expansion and relocalization of foci require checkpoint and resection proteins. Finally, the Smc5/6 complex is enriched in heterochromatin and is required to exclude Rad51 from the domain and prevent abnormal recombination. We propose that the spatial and temporal control of DSB repair in heterochromatin safeguards genome stability by preventing aberrant exchanges between repeats.

  19. A new powerful method for site-specific transgene stabilization based on chromosomal double-strand break repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artem Tkachuk

    Full Text Available Transgenic insects are a promising tool in sterile insect techniques and population replacement strategies. Such transgenic insects can be created using nonautonomous transposons, which cannot be transferred without a transposase source. In biocontrol procedures where large numbers of insects are released, there is increased risk of transgene remobilization caused by external transposase sources that can alter the characteristics of the transgenic organisms lead horizontal transgene transfer to other species. Here we describe a novel, effective method for transgene stabilization based on the introduction of directed double-strand breaks (DSB into a genome-integrated sequence and their subsequent repair by the single-strand annealing (SSA pathway. Due to the construct's organization, the repair pathway is predictable, such that all transposon and marker sequences can be deleted, while preserving integration of exogenous DNA in the genome. The exceptional conservation of DNA repair pathways makes this method suitable for a broad range of organisms.

  20. An in vitro DNA double-strand break repair assay based on end-joining of defined duplex oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Kamal; Purkayastha, Shubhadeep; Neumann, Ronald D; Winters, Thomas A

    2012-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are caused by endogenous cellular processes such as oxidative metabolism, or by exogenous events like exposure to ionizing radiation or other genotoxic agents. Repair of these DSBs is essential for the maintenance of cellular genomic integrity. In human cells, and cells of other higher eukaryotes, DSBs are primarily repaired by the nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) DSB repair pathway. Most in vitro assays that have been designed to measure NHEJ activity employ linear plasmid DNA as end-joining substrates, and such assays have made significant contributions to our understanding of the biochemical mechanisms of NHEJ. Here we describe an in vitro end-joining assay employing linear oligonucleotides that has distinct advantages over plasmid-based assays for the study of structure-function relationships between the proteins of the NHEJ pathway and synthetic DNA end-joining substrates possessing predetermined DSB configurations and chemistries.

  1. Contribution of DNA double-strand break repair gene XRCC3 genotypes to oral cancer susceptibility in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chia-Wen; Chang, Wen-Shin; Liu, Juhn-Cherng; Tsai, Ming-Hsui; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Bau, Da-Tian

    2014-06-01

    The DNA repair gene X-ray repair cross complementing protein 3 (XRCC3) is thought to play a major role in double-strand break repair and in maintaining genomic stability. Very possibly, defective double-strand break repair of cells can lead to carcinogenesis. Therefore, a case-control study was performed to reveal the contribution of XRCC3 genotypes to individual oral cancer susceptibility. In this hospital-based research, the association of XRCC3 rs1799794, rs45603942, rs861530, rs3212057, rs1799796, rs861539, rs28903081 genotypes with oral cancer risk in a Taiwanese population was investigated. In total, 788 patients with oral cancer and 956 age- and gender-matched healthy controls were genotyped. The results showed that there was significant differential distribution among oral cancer and controls in the genotypic (p=0.001428) and allelic (p=0.0013) frequencies of XRCC3 rs861539. As for the other polymorphisms, there was no difference between case and control groups. In gene-lifestyle interaction analysis, we have provided the first evidence showing that there is an obvious joint effect of XRCC3 rs861539 genotype with individual areca chewing habits on oral cancer risk. In conclusion, the T allele of XRCC3 rs861539, which has an interaction with areca chewing habit in oral carcinogenesis, may be an early marker for oral cancer in Taiwanese.

  2. CRISPR/Cas9-Induced Double-Strand Break Repair in Arabidopsis Nonhomologous End-Joining Mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hexi Shen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Double-strand breaks (DSBs are one of the most harmful DNA lesions. Cells utilize two main pathways for DSB repair: homologous recombination (HR and nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ. NHEJ can be subdivided into the KU-dependent classical NHEJ (c-NHEJ and the more error-prone KU-independent backup-NHEJ (b-NHEJ pathways, involving the poly (ADP-ribose polymerases (PARPs. However, in the absence of these factors, cells still seem able to adequately maintain genome integrity, suggesting the presence of other b-NHEJ repair factors or pathways independent from KU and PARPs. The outcome of DSB repair by NHEJ pathways can be investigated by using artificial sequence-specific nucleases such as CRISPR/Cas9 to induce DSBs at a target of interest. Here, we used CRISPR/Cas9 for DSB induction at the Arabidopsis cruciferin 3 (CRU3 and protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPO genes. DSB repair outcomes via NHEJ were analyzed using footprint analysis in wild-type plants and plants deficient in key factors of c-NHEJ (ku80, b-NHEJ (parp1 parp2, or both (ku80 parp1 parp2. We found that larger deletions of >20 bp predominated after DSB repair in ku80 and ku80 parp1 parp2 mutants, corroborating with a role of KU in preventing DSB end resection. Deletion lengths did not significantly differ between ku80 and ku80 parp1 parp2 mutants, suggesting that a KU- and PARP-independent b-NHEJ mechanism becomes active in these mutants. Furthermore, microhomologies and templated insertions were observed at the repair junctions in the wild type and all mutants. Since these characteristics are hallmarks of polymerase θ-mediated DSB repair, we suggest a possible role for this recently discovered polymerase in DSB repair in plants.

  3. CRISPR/Cas9-Induced Double-Strand Break Repair in Arabidopsis Nonhomologous End-Joining Mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hexi; Strunks, Gary D; Klemann, Bart J P M; Hooykaas, Paul J J; de Pater, Sylvia

    2017-01-05

    Double-strand breaks (DSBs) are one of the most harmful DNA lesions. Cells utilize two main pathways for DSB repair: homologous recombination (HR) and nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ). NHEJ can be subdivided into the KU-dependent classical NHEJ (c-NHEJ) and the more error-prone KU-independent backup-NHEJ (b-NHEJ) pathways, involving the poly (ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs). However, in the absence of these factors, cells still seem able to adequately maintain genome integrity, suggesting the presence of other b-NHEJ repair factors or pathways independent from KU and PARPs. The outcome of DSB repair by NHEJ pathways can be investigated by using artificial sequence-specific nucleases such as CRISPR/Cas9 to induce DSBs at a target of interest. Here, we used CRISPR/Cas9 for DSB induction at the Arabidopsis cruciferin 3 (CRU3) and protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPO) genes. DSB repair outcomes via NHEJ were analyzed using footprint analysis in wild-type plants and plants deficient in key factors of c-NHEJ (ku80), b-NHEJ (parp1 parp2), or both (ku80 parp1 parp2). We found that larger deletions of >20 bp predominated after DSB repair in ku80 and ku80 parp1 parp2 mutants, corroborating with a role of KU in preventing DSB end resection. Deletion lengths did not significantly differ between ku80 and ku80 parp1 parp2 mutants, suggesting that a KU- and PARP-independent b-NHEJ mechanism becomes active in these mutants. Furthermore, microhomologies and templated insertions were observed at the repair junctions in the wild type and all mutants. Since these characteristics are hallmarks of polymerase θ-mediated DSB repair, we suggest a possible role for this recently discovered polymerase in DSB repair in plants. Copyright © 2017 Shen et al.

  4. Comparison of repair of DNA double-strand breaks in identical sequences in primary human fibroblast and immortal hamster-human hybrid cells harboring a single copy of human chromosome 11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouladi, B.; Waldren, C. A.; Rydberg, B.; Cooper, P. K.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    We have optimized a pulsed-field gel electrophoresis assay that measures induction and repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs) in specific regions of the genome (Lobrich et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 92, 12050-12054, 1995). The increased sensitivity resulting from these improvements makes it possible to analyze the size distribution of broken DNA molecules immediately after the introduction of DSBs and after repair incubation. This analysis shows that the distribution of broken DNA pieces after exposure to sparsely ionizing radiation is consistent with the distribution expected from randomly induced DSBs. It is apparent from the distribution of rejoined DNA pieces after repair incubation that DNA ends continue to rejoin between 3 and 24 h postirradiation and that some of these rejoining events are in fact misrejoining events, since novel restriction fragments both larger and smaller than the original fragment are generated after repair. This improved assay was also used to study the kinetics of DSB rejoining and the extent of misrejoining in identical DNA sequences in human GM38 cells and human-hamster hybrid A(L) cells containing a single human chromosome 11. Despite the numerous differences between these cells, which include species and tissue of origin, levels of TP53, expression of telomerase, and the presence or absence of a homologous chromosome for the restriction fragments examined, the kinetics of rejoining of radiation-induced DSBs and the extent of misrejoining were similar in the two cell lines when studied in the G(1) phase of the cell cycle. Furthermore, DSBs were removed from the single-copy human chromosome in the hamster A(L) cells with similar kinetics and misrejoining frequency as at a locus on this hybrid's CHO chromosomes.

  5. The democratization of gene editing: Insights from site-specific cleavage and double-strand break repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasin, Maria; Haber, James E

    2016-08-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are dangerous lesions that if not properly repaired can lead to genomic change or cell death. Organisms have developed several pathways and have many factors devoted to repairing DSBs, which broadly occurs by homologous recombination, which relies on an identical or homologous sequence to template repair, or nonhomologous end-joining. Much of our understanding of these repair mechanisms has come from the study of induced DNA cleavage by site-specific endonucleases. In addition to their biological role, these cellular pathways can be co-opted for gene editing to study gene function or for gene therapy or other applications. While the first gene editing experiments were done more than 20 years ago, the recent discovery of RNA-guided endonucleases has simplified approaches developed over the years to make gene editing an approach that is available to the entire biomedical research community. Here, we review DSB repair mechanisms and site-specific cleavage systems that have provided insight into these mechanisms and led to the current gene editing revolution.

  6. Ubiquitin-specific protease 5 is required for the efficient repair of DNA double-strand breaks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Nakajima

    Full Text Available During the DNA damage response (DDR, ubiquitination plays an important role in the recruitment and regulation of repair proteins. However, little is known about elimination of the ubiquitination signal after repair is completed. Here we show that the ubiquitin-specific protease 5 (USP5, a deubiquitinating enzyme, is involved in the elimination of the ubiquitin signal from damaged sites and is required for efficient DNA double-strand break (DSB repair. Depletion of USP5 sensitizes cells to DNA damaging agents, produces DSBs, causes delayed disappearance of γH2AX foci after Bleocin treatment, and influences DSB repair efficiency in the homologous recombination pathway but not in the non-homologous end joining pathway. USP5 co-localizes to DSBs induced by laser micro-irradiation in a RAD18-dependent manner. Importantly, polyubiquitin chains at sites of DNA damage remained for longer periods in USP5-depleted cells. Our results show that disassembly of polyubiquitin chains by USP5 at sites of damage is important for efficient DSB repair.

  7. Coordination of Double Strand Break Repair and Meiotic Progression in Yeast by a Mek1- Ndt80 Negative Feedback Loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prugar, Evelyn; Burnett, Cameron; Chen, Xiangyu; Hollingsworth, Nancy M

    2017-03-01

    During meiosis, homologous chromosomes are physically connected by crossovers and sister chromatid cohesion. Interhomolog crossovers are generated by the highly regulated repair of programmed double strand breaks (DSBs). The meiosis-specific kinase, Mek1, is critical for this regulation. Mek1 down-regulates the mitotic recombinase Rad51, indirectly promoting interhomolog strand invasion by the meiosis-specific recombinase, Dmc1. Mek1 also promotes the formation of crossovers that are distributed throughout the genome by interference and is the effector kinase for a meiosis-specific checkpoint that delays entry into Meiosis I until DSBs have been repaired. The target of this checkpoint is a meiosis-specific transcription factor, Ndt80, which is necessary to express the polo-like kinase, CDC5, and the cyclin, CLB1, thereby allowing completion of recombination and meiotic progression. This work shows that Mek1 and Ndt80 negatively feedback on each other such that when DSB levels are high, Ndt80 is inactive due to high levels of Mek1 activity. As DSBs are repaired, chromosomes synapse and Mek1 activity is reduced below a threshold that allows activation of Ndt80. Ndt80 transcription of CDC5 results in degradation of Red1, a meiosis-specific protein required for Mek1 activation, thereby abolishing Mek1 activity completely. Elimination of Mek1 kinase activity allows Rad51-mediated repair of any remaining DSBs. In this way, cells do not enter Meiosis I until recombination is complete and all DSBs are repaired.

  8. Approach to the classical radiation biology. Ionizing radiation effects and repair mechanism of DNA double strand breaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utsumi, Hiroshi [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst

    2000-09-01

    Split-dose recovery has been observed under a variety of experimental conditions in many cell systems and believed to be the recovery of sublethal damage (SLD). It is considered to be one of the most widespread and important cellular responses in clinical radiotherapy. To study the molecular mechanism of this recovery, we analyzed the knockout mutants KU70{sup -/-}, RAD54{sup -/-}, and KU70{sup -/-}/ RAD54{sup -/-} of the chicken B-cell line, DT40. Rad54 participates in the homologous recombinational (HR) repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), while Ku proteins are involved in non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). Split-dose recovery was observed in the parent DT40 and KU70{sup -/-} cells. Moreover the split-dose survival enhancement had all of the characteristics of SLD recovery that had been demonstrated earlier: e.g., the reappearance of the shoulder of the survival curve with dose fractionation; repair at 25degC; and inhibition by the antibiotic actinomycin D. These results strongly suggest that SLD recovery is due to DSB repair via or mediated by HR, and that these breaks constitute SLD. The tonicity-sensitive potentially lethal damage (PLD) recovery was also found only in DT40 and KU70 {sup -/-} cells. Delayed-plating PLD recovery may be controlled by NHEJ repair that works through the cell cycle. These results lead to the conclusion that the repair of DSBs could explain the classical operational recovery phenomena. We have also investigated RBE/LET using those mutants. (author)

  9. An inverse switch in DNA base excision and strand break repair contributes to melphalan resistance in multiple myeloma cells.

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    Mirta M L Sousa

    Full Text Available Alterations in checkpoint and DNA repair pathways may provide adaptive mechanisms contributing to acquired drug resistance. Here, we investigated the levels of proteins mediating DNA damage signaling and -repair in RPMI8226 multiple myeloma cells and its Melphalan-resistant derivative 8226-LR5. We observed markedly reduced steady-state levels of DNA glycosylases UNG2, NEIL1 and MPG in the resistant cells and cross-resistance to agents inducing their respective DNA base lesions. Conversely, repair of alkali-labile sites was apparently enhanced in the resistant cells, as substantiated by alkaline comet assay, autoribosylation of PARP-1, and increased sensitivity to PARP-1 inhibition by 4-AN or KU58684. Reduced base-excision and enhanced single-strand break repair would both contribute to the observed reduction in genomic alkali-labile sites, which could jeopardize productive processing of the more cytotoxic Melphalan-induced interstrand DNA crosslinks (ICLs. Furthermore, we found a marked upregulation of proteins in the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ pathway of double-strand break (DSB repair, likely contributing to the observed increase in DSB repair kinetics in the resistant cells. Finally, we observed apparent upregulation of ATR-signaling and downregulation of ATM-signaling in the resistant cells. This was accompanied by markedly increased sensitivity towards Melphalan in the presence of ATR-, DNA-PK, or CHK1/2 inhibitors whereas no sensitizing effect was observed subsequent to ATM inhibition, suggesting that replication blocking lesions are primary triggers of the DNA damage response in the Melphalan resistant cells. In conclusion, Melphalan resistance is apparently contributed by modulation of the DNA damage response at multiple levels, including downregulation of specific repair pathways to avoid repair intermediates that could impair efficient processing of cytotoxic ICLs and ICL-induced DSBs. This study has revealed several novel

  10. ERCC1-XPF endonuclease facilitates DNA double-strand break repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A. Ahmad (Riris); A.R. Robinson (Andria Rasile); A. Duensing (Anette); E. van Drunen (Ellen); H.B. Beverloo (Berna); D.B. Weisberg (David); P. Hasty (Paul); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); L.J. Niedernhofer (Laura)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractERCC1-XPF endonuclease is required for nucleotide excision repair (NER) of helix-distorting DNA lesions. However, mutations in ERCC1 or XPF in humans or mice cause a more severe phenotype than absence of NER, prompting a search for novel repair activities of the nuclease. In Saccharomyce

  11. Nonrecurrent MECP2 duplications mediated by genomic architecture-driven DNA breaks and break-induced replication repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauters, Marijke; Van Esch, Hilde; Friez, Michael J; Boespflug-Tanguy, Odile; Zenker, Martin; Vianna-Morgante, Angela M; Rosenberg, Carla; Ignatius, Jaakko; Raynaud, Martine; Hollanders, Karen; Govaerts, Karen; Vandenreijt, Kris; Niel, Florence; Blanc, Pierre; Stevenson, Roger E; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Marynen, Peter; Schwartz, Charles E; Froyen, Guy

    2008-06-01

    Recurrent submicroscopic genomic copy number changes are the result of nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR). Nonrecurrent aberrations, however, can result from different nonexclusive recombination-repair mechanisms. We previously described small microduplications at Xq28 containing MECP2 in four male patients with a severe neurological phenotype. Here, we report on the fine-mapping and breakpoint analysis of 16 unique microduplications. The size of the overlapping copy number changes varies between 0.3 and 2.3 Mb, and FISH analysis on three patients demonstrated a tandem orientation. Although eight of the 32 breakpoint regions coincide with low-copy repeats, none of the duplications are the result of NAHR. Bioinformatics analysis of the breakpoint regions demonstrated a 2.5-fold higher frequency of Alu interspersed repeats as compared with control regions, as well as a very high GC content (53%). Unexpectedly, we obtained the junction in only one patient by long-range PCR, which revealed nonhomologous end joining as the mechanism. Breakpoint analysis in two other patients by inverse PCR and subsequent array comparative genomic hybridization analysis demonstrated the presence of a second duplicated region more telomeric at Xq28, of which one copy was inserted in between the duplicated MECP2 regions. These data suggest a two-step mechanism in which part of Xq28 is first inserted near the MECP2 locus, followed by breakage-induced replication with strand invasion of the normal sister chromatid. Our results indicate that the mechanism by which copy number changes occur in regions with a complex genomic architecture can yield complex rearrangements.

  12. Subtelomeric I-SceI-Mediated Double-Strand Breaks Are Repaired by Homologous Recombination in Trypanosoma cruzi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiurillo, Miguel A.; Moraes Barros, Roberto R.; Souza, Renata T.; Marini, Marjorie M.; Antonio, Cristiane R.; Cortez, Danielle R.; Curto, María Á.; Lorenzi, Hernán A.; Schijman, Alejandro G.; Ramirez, José L.; da Silveira, José F.

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi chromosome ends are enriched in surface protein genes and pseudogenes (e.g., trans-sialidases) surrounded by repetitive sequences. It has been proposed that the extensive sequence variability among members of these protein families could play a role in parasite infectivity and evasion of host immune response. In previous reports we showed evidence suggesting that sequences located in these regions are subjected to recombination. To support this hypothesis we introduced a double-strand break (DSB) at a specific target site in a T. cruzi subtelomeric region cloned into an artificial chromosome (pTAC). This construct was used to transfect T. cruzi epimastigotes expressing the I-SceI meganuclease. Examination of the repaired sequences showed that DNA repair occurred only through homologous recombination (HR) with endogenous subtelomeric sequences. Our findings suggest that DSBs in subtelomeric repetitive sequences followed by HR between them may contribute to increased variability in T. cruzi multigene families. PMID:28066363

  13. Subtelomeric I-SceI-Mediated Double-Strand Breaks Are Repaired by Homologous Recombination in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiurillo, Miguel A; Moraes Barros, Roberto R; Souza, Renata T; Marini, Marjorie M; Antonio, Cristiane R; Cortez, Danielle R; Curto, María Á; Lorenzi, Hernán A; Schijman, Alejandro G; Ramirez, José L; da Silveira, José F

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi chromosome ends are enriched in surface protein genes and pseudogenes (e.g., trans-sialidases) surrounded by repetitive sequences. It has been proposed that the extensive sequence variability among members of these protein families could play a role in parasite infectivity and evasion of host immune response. In previous reports we showed evidence suggesting that sequences located in these regions are subjected to recombination. To support this hypothesis we introduced a double-strand break (DSB) at a specific target site in a T. cruzi subtelomeric region cloned into an artificial chromosome (pTAC). This construct was used to transfect T. cruzi epimastigotes expressing the I-SceI meganuclease. Examination of the repaired sequences showed that DNA repair occurred only through homologous recombination (HR) with endogenous subtelomeric sequences. Our findings suggest that DSBs in subtelomeric repetitive sequences followed by HR between them may contribute to increased variability in T. cruzi multigene families.

  14. Classical and alternative end-joining pathways for repair of lymphocyte-specific and general DNA double-strand breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boboila, Cristian; Alt, Frederick W; Schwer, Bjoern

    2012-01-01

    Classical nonhomologous end joining (C-NHEJ) is one of the two major known pathways for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in mammalian cells. Our understanding of C-NHEJ has been derived, in significant part, through studies of programmed physiologic DNA DSBs formed during V(D)J recombination in the developing immune system. Studies of immunoglobulin heavy-chain (IgH) class-switch recombination (CSR) also have revealed that there is an "alternative" end-joining process (A-EJ) that can function, relatively robustly, in the repair of DSBs in activated mature B lymphocytes. This A-EJ process has also been implicated in the formation of oncogenic translocations found in lymphoid tumors. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of C-NHEJ and A-EJ in the context of V(D)J recombination, CSR, and the formation of chromosomal translocations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The NF90/NF45 Complex Participates in DNA Break Repair via Nonhomologous End Joining ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamanna, Raghavendra A.; Hoque, Mainul; Lewis-Antes, Anita; Azzam, Edouard I.; Lagunoff, David; Pe'ery, Tsafi; Mathews, Michael B.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear factor 90 (NF90), an RNA-binding protein implicated in the regulation of gene expression, exists as a heterodimeric complex with NF45. We previously reported that depletion of the NF90/NF45 complex results in a multinucleated phenotype. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that binucleated cells arise by incomplete abscission of progeny cells followed by fusion. Multinucleate cells arose through aberrant division of binucleated cells and displayed abnormal metaphase plates and anaphase chromatin bridges suggestive of DNA repair defects. NF90 and NF45 are known to interact with the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), which is involved in telomere maintenance and DNA repair by nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ). We hypothesized that NF90 modulates the activity of DNA-PK. In an in vitro NHEJ assay system, DNA end joining was reduced by NF90/NF45 immunodepletion or by RNA digestion to an extent similar to that for catalytic subunit DNA-PKcs immunodepletion. In vivo, NF90/NF45-depleted cells displayed increased γ-histone 2A.X foci, indicative of an accumulation of double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs), and increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation consistent with decreased DSB repair. Further, NF90/NF45 knockdown reduced end-joining activity in vivo. These results identify the NF90/NF45 complex as a regulator of DNA damage repair mediated by DNA-PK and suggest that structured RNA may modulate this process. PMID:21969602

  16. Preventing damage limitation: targeting DNA-PKcs and DNA double strand break repair pathways for ovarian cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela A Dungl

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Platinum-based chemotherapy is the cornerstone of ovarian cancer treatment, and its efficacy is dependent on the generation of DNA damage, with subsequent induction of apoptosis. Inappropriate or aberrant activation of the DNA damage response network is are associated with resistance to platinum, and defects in DNA repair pathways play critical roles in determining patient response to chemotherapy. In ovarian cancer, tumour cell defects in homologous recombination - a repair pathway activated in response to DNA double strand breaks (DSB - are most commonly associated with platinum sensitive disease. However, despite initial sensitivity, the emergence of resistance is frequent. Here, we review strategies for directly interfering with DNA repair pathways, with particular focus on direct inhibition of non-homologous end joining (NHEJ, another DSB repair pathway. DNA-PKcs is a core component of NHEJ and it has shown considerable promise as a chemosensitization target in numerous cancer types, including ovarian cancer where it functions to promote platinum-induced survival signalling, via AKT activation. The development of pharmacological inhibitors of DNA-PKcs is on-going, and clinic-ready agents offer real hope to patients with chemoresistant disease.

  17. Inhibition of DNA double-strand break repair by the Ku heterodimer in mrx mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasko, Brian M.; Holland, Cory L.; Resnick, Michael A.; Lewis, L. Kevin

    2009-01-01

    Yeast rad50 and mre11 nuclease mutants are hypersensitive to physical and chemical agents that induce DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). This sensitivity was suppressed by elevating intracellular levels of TLC1, the RNA subunit of telomerase. Suppression required proteins linked to homologous recombination, including Rad51, Rad52, Rad59 and Exo1, but not genes of the nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair pathway. Deletion mutagenesis experiments demonstrated that the 5′ end of TLC1 RNA was essential and a segment containing a binding site for the Yku70/Yku80 complex was sufficient for suppression. A mutant TLC1 RNA unable to associate with Yku80 protein did not increase resistance. These and other genetic studies indicated that association of the Ku heterodimer with broken DNA ends inhibits recombination in mrx mutants, but not in repair-proficient cells or in other DNA repair single mutants. In support of this model, DNA damage resistance of mrx cells was enhanced when YKU70 was co-inactivated. Defective recombinational repair of DSBs in mrx cells thus arises from at least two separate processes: loss of Mrx nuclease-associated DNA end-processing and inhibition of the Exo1-mediated secondary recombination pathway by Ku. PMID:18992851

  18. Beclin 1 and UVRAG confer protection from radiation-induced DNA damage and maintain centrosome stability in colorectal cancer cells.

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    Jae Myung Park

    Full Text Available Beclin 1 interacts with UV-irradiation-resistance-associated gene (UVRAG to form core complexes that induce autophagy. While cells with defective autophagy are prone to genomic instability that contributes to tumorigenesis, it is unknown whether Beclin1 or UVRAG can regulate the DNA damage/repair response to cancer treatment in established tumor cells. We found that siRNA knockdown of Beclin 1 or UVRAG can increase radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs, shown by pATM and γH2Ax, and promote colorectal cancer cell death. Furthermore, knockdown of Beclin 1, UVRAG or ATG5 increased the percentage of irradiated cells with nuclear foci expressing 53BP1, a marker of nonhomologous end joining but not RAD51 (homologous recombination, compared to control siRNA. Beclin 1 siRNA was shown to attenuate UVRAG expression. Cells with a UVRAG deletion mutant defective in Beclin 1 binding showed increased radiation-induced DSBs and cell death compared to cells with ectopic wild-type UVRAG. Knockdown of Beclin 1 or UVRAG, but not ATG5, resulted in a significant increase in centrosome number (γ-tubulin staining in irradiated cells compared to control siRNA. Taken together, these data indicate that Beclin 1 and UVRAG confer protection against radiation-induced DNA DSBs and may maintain centrosome stability in established tumor cells.

  19. Radiation-induced intestinal inflammation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meritxell Mollà; Julián Panés

    2007-01-01

    Radiation induces an important inflammatory response in the irradiated organs, characterized by leukocyte infiltration and vascular changes that are the main limiting factor in the application of this therapeutic modality for the treatment of cancer. Recently, a considerable investigative effort has been directed at determining the molecular mechanisms by which radiation induces leukocyte recruitment, in order to create strategies to prevent intestinal inflammatory damage. In these review, we consider current available evidence on the factors governing the process of leukocyte recruitment in irradiated organs, mainly derived from experimental studies, with special attention to adhesion molecules, and their value as therapeutic targets.

  20. The transcriptional histone acetyltransferase cofactor TRRAP associates with the MRN repair complex and plays a role in DNA double-strand break repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Flavie; Hardy, Sara; Nagy, Zita; Baldeyron, Céline; Murr, Rabih; Déry, Ugo; Masson, Jean-Yves; Papadopoulo, Dora; Herceg, Zdenko; Tora, Làszlò

    2006-01-01

    Transactivation-transformation domain-associated protein (TRRAP) is a component of several multiprotein histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complexes implicated in transcriptional regulation. TRRAP was shown to be required for the mitotic checkpoint and normal cell cycle progression. MRE11, RAD50, and NBS1 (product of the Nijmegan breakage syndrome gene) form the MRN complex that is involved in the detection, signaling, and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). By using double immunopurification, mass spectrometry, and gel filtration, we describe the stable association of TRRAP with the MRN complex. The TRRAP-MRN complex is not associated with any detectable HAT activity, while the isolated other TRRAP complexes, containing either GCN5 or TIP60, are. TRRAP-depleted extracts show a reduced nonhomologous DNA end-joining activity in vitro. Importantly, small interfering RNA knockdown of TRRAP in HeLa cells or TRRAP knockout in mouse embryonic stem cells inhibit the DSB end-joining efficiency and the precise nonhomologous end-joining process, further suggesting a functional involvement of TRRAP in the DSB repair processes. Thus, TRRAP may function as a molecular link between DSB signaling, repair, and chromatin remodeling.

  1. Considerations for comparing radiation-induced chromosome aberration data with predictions from biophysical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, H.; Furusawa, Y.; George, K.; Kawata, T.; Cucinotta, F.

    Biophysical models addressing the formation of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations are usually based on the assumption that chromosome aberrations are formed by DNA double strand break (DSB) misrejoining, via either the homologous or the non-homologous repair pathway. However, comparing chromosome aberration data with model predictions is not always straightforward. In this paper we discuss some of the aspects that must be considered to make these comparisons meaningful. Firstly, biophysical models are usually applied to DSB rejoining and misrejoining in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle, while most chromosome aberration data reported in the literature are analyzed in metaphase. Since cells must progress through the cell cycle check points in order to reach mitosis, model predictions that differ from the metaphase chromosome analysis may actually agree with the aberration data in chromosomes collected in interphase. Secondly, high- LET radiation generally produces more complex aberrations involving exchanges between three or more DSB. While some models have successfully provided quantitative predictions of high-LET radiation induced complex aberrations in human lymphocytes, applying such models to other cell types requires special considerations due to the lack of geometric symmetry of the nucleus. Chromosome aberration data for non-spherical human fibroblast cells bombarded from various directions by high-LET charged particles will be presented, and their implication on physical modeling will be discussed.

  2. Positive regulation of DNA double strand break repair activity during differentiation of long life span cells: the example of adipogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Meulle

    Full Text Available Little information is available on the ability of terminally differentiated cells to efficiently repair DNA double strand breaks (DSBs, and one might reasonably speculate that efficient DNA repair of these threatening DNA lesions, is needed in cells of long life span with no or limited regeneration from precursor. Few tissues are available besides neurons that allow the study of DNA DSBs repair activity in very long-lived cells. Adipocytes represent a suitable model since it is generally admitted that there is a very slow turnover of adipocytes in adult. Using both Pulse Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE and the disappearance of the phosphorylated form of the histone variant H2AX, we demonstrated that the ability to repair DSBs is increased during adipocyte differentiation using the murine pre-adipocyte cell line, 3T3F442A. In mammalian cells, DSBs are mainly repaired by the non-homologous end-joining pathway (NHEJ that relies on the DNA dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK activity. During the first 24 h following the commitment into adipogenesis, we show an increase in the expression and activity of the catalytic sub-unit of the DNA-PK complex, DNA-PKcs. The increased in DNA DSBs repair activity observed in adipocytes was due to the increase in DNA-PK activity as shown by the use of DNA-PK inhibitor or sub-clones of 3T3F442A deficient in DNA-PKcs using long term RNA interference. Interestingly, the up-regulation of DNA-PK does not regulate the differentiation program itself. Finally, similar positive regulation of DNA-PKcs expression and activity was observed during differentiation of primary culture of pre-adipocytes isolated from human sub-cutaneous adipose tissue. Our results show that DNA DSBs repair activity is up regulated during the early commitment into adipogenesis due to an up-regulation of DNA-PK expression and activity. In opposition to the general view that DNA DSBs repair is decreased during differentiation, our results demonstrate

  3. Disruption of Maternal DNA Repair Increases Sperm-DerivedChromosomal Aberrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchetti, Francesco; Essers, Jeroun; Kanaar, Roland; Wyrobek,Andrew J.

    2007-02-07

    The final weeks of male germ cell differentiation occur in aDNA repair-deficient environment and normal development depends on theability of the egg to repair DNA damage in the fertilizing sperm. Geneticdisruption of maternal DNA double-strand break repair pathways in micesignificantly increased the frequency of zygotes with chromosomalstructural aberrations after paternal exposure to ionizing radiation.These findings demonstrate that radiation-induced DNA sperm lesions arerepaired after fertilization by maternal factors and suggest that geneticvariation in maternal DNA repair can modulate the risk of early pregnancylosses and of children with chromosomal aberrations of paternalorigin.

  4. Recognition, signaling, and repair of DNA double-strand breaks produced by ionizing radiation in mammalian cells: the molecular choreography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Larry H

    2012-01-01

    The faithful maintenance of chromosome continuity in human cells during DNA replication and repair is critical for preventing the conversion of normal diploid cells to an oncogenic state. The evolution of higher eukaryotic cells endowed them with a large genetic investment in the molecular machinery that ensures chromosome stability. In mammalian and other vertebrate cells, the elimination of double-strand breaks with minimal nucleotide sequence change involves the spatiotemporal orchestration of a seemingly endless number of proteins ranging in their action from the nucleotide level to nucleosome organization and chromosome architecture. DNA DSBs trigger a myriad of post-translational modifications that alter catalytic activities and the specificity of protein interactions: phosphorylation, acetylation, methylation, ubiquitylation, and SUMOylation, followed by the reversal of these changes as repair is completed. "Superfluous" protein recruitment to damage sites, functional redundancy, and alternative pathways ensure that DSB repair is extremely efficient, both quantitatively and qualitatively. This review strives to integrate the information about the molecular mechanisms of DSB repair that has emerged over the last two decades with a focus on DSBs produced by the prototype agent ionizing radiation (IR). The exponential growth of molecular studies, heavily driven by RNA knockdown technology, now reveals an outline of how many key protein players in genome stability and cancer biology perform their interwoven tasks, e.g. ATM, ATR, DNA-PK, Chk1, Chk2, PARP1/2/3, 53BP1, BRCA1, BRCA2, BLM, RAD51, and the MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 complex. Thus, the nature of the intricate coordination of repair processes with cell cycle progression is becoming apparent. This review also links molecular abnormalities to cellular pathology as much a possible and provides a framework of temporal relationships.

  5. The power of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair testing to predict breast cancer susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keimling, Marlen; Deniz, Miriam; Varga, Dominic; Stahl, Andreea; Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Kreienberg, Rolf; Hoffmann, Isabell; König, Jochem; Wiesmüller, Lisa

    2012-05-01

    Most presently known breast cancer susceptibility genes have been linked to DSB repair. To identify novel markers that may serve as indicators for breast cancer risk, we performed DSB repair analyses using a case-control design. Thus, we examined 35 women with defined familial history of breast and/or ovarian cancer (first case group), 175 patients with breast cancer (second case group), and 245 healthy women without previous cancer or family history of breast cancer (control group). We analyzed DSB repair in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) by a GFP-based test system using 3 pathway-specific substrates. We found increases of microhomology-mediated nonhomologous end joining (mmNHEJ) and nonconservative single-strand annealing (SSA) in women with familial risk vs. controls (P=0.0001-0.0022) and patients with breast cancer vs. controls (P=0.0004-0.0042). Young age (DSB repair activities in PBLs as method to estimate breast cancer susceptibility beyond limitations of genotyping and to predict responsiveness to therapeutics targeting DSB repair-dysfunctional tumors.

  6. C. elegans germ cells switch between distinct modes of double-strand break repair during meiotic prophase progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiko Hayashi

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome inheritance during sexual reproduction relies on deliberate induction of double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs and repair of a subset of these breaks as interhomolog crossovers (COs. Here we provide a direct demonstration, based on our analysis of rad-50 mutants, that the meiotic program in Caenorhabditis elegans involves both acquisition and loss of a specialized mode of double-strand break repair (DSBR. In premeiotic germ cells, RAD-50 is not required to load strand-exchange protein RAD-51 at sites of spontaneous or ionizing radiation (IR-induced DSBs. A specialized meiotic DSBR mode is engaged at the onset of meiotic prophase, coincident with assembly of meiotic chromosome axis structures. This meiotic DSBR mode is characterized both by dependence on RAD-50 for rapid accumulation of RAD-51 at DSB sites and by competence for converting DSBs into interhomolog COs. At the mid-pachytene to late pachytene transition, germ cells undergo an abrupt release from the meiotic DSBR mode, characterized by reversion to RAD-50-independent loading of RAD-51 and loss of competence to convert DSBs into interhomolog COs. This transition in DSBR mode is dependent on MAP kinase-triggered prophase progression and coincides temporally with a major remodeling of chromosome architecture. We propose that at least two developmentally programmed switches in DSBR mode, likely conferred by changes in chromosome architecture, operate in the C. elegans germ line to allow formation of meiotic crossovers without jeopardizing genomic integrity. Our data further suggest that meiotic cohesin component REC-8 may play a role in limiting the activity of SPO-11 in generating meiotic DSBs and that RAD-50 may function in counteracting this inhibition.

  7. Targeted Modification of Gene Function Exploiting Homology-Directed Repair of TALEN-Mediated Double-Strand Breaks in Barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budhagatapalli, Nagaveni; Rutten, Twan; Gurushidze, Maia; Kumlehn, Jochen; Hensel, Goetz

    2015-07-06

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases open up new opportunities for targeted mutagenesis in eukaryotic genomes. Similar to zinc-finger nucleases, sequence-specific DNA-binding domains can be fused with effector domains like the nucleolytically active part of FokI to induce double-strand breaks and thereby modify the host genome on a predefined target site via nonhomologous end joining. More sophisticated applications of programmable endonucleases involve the use of a DNA repair template facilitating homology-directed repair (HDR) so as to create predefined rather than random DNA sequence modifications. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of editing the barley genome by precisely modifying a defined target DNA sequence resulting in a predicted alteration of gene function. We used gfp-specific transcription activator-like effector nucleases along with a repair template that, via HDR, facilitates conversion of gfp into yfp, which is associated with a single amino acid exchange in the gene product. As a result of co-bombardment of leaf epidermis, we detected yellow fluorescent protein accumulation in about three of 100 mutated cells. The creation of a functional yfp gene via HDR was unambiguously confirmed by sequencing of the respective genomic site. In addition to the allele conversion accomplished in planta, a readily screenable marker system is introduced that might be useful for optimization approaches in the field of genome editing.

  8. Increased repair of {gamma}-induced DNA double-strand breaks at lower dose-rate in CHO cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boucher, D.; Hindo, J.; Averbeck, D. [Centre Universitaire d' Orsay, Inst. Curie-Section de Recherche, Orsay CEDEX (France)]. E-mail: dietrich.averbeck@curie.u-psud.fr

    2004-02-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are highly cell damaging. We asked whether for a given dose a longer irradiation time would be advantageous for the repair of DSBs. Varying the {gamma}-irradiation dose and its delivery time (0.05 Gy/min low dose-rate (LDR) compared with 3.5 Gy/min high dose-rate), confluent Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1) and Ku80 mutant cells (xrs-6) deficient in nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) were irradiated in agarose plugs at room temperature using a cesium-137 {gamma}-ray source. We used pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) to measure DSBs in terms of the fraction of activity released (FAR). At LDR, one third of DSBs were repaired in CHO-K1 but not in xrs-6 cells, indicating the involvement of NHEJ in the repair of {gamma}-induced DSBs at a prolonged irradiation incubation time. To improve DSB measurements, we introduced in our PFGE protocol an antioxidant at the cell lysis step, thus avoiding free-radical side reactions on DNA and spurious DSBs. Addition of the metal chelator deferoxamine (DFO) decreased more efficiently the basal DSB level than did reduced glutathione (GSH), showing that measuring DSBs in the absence of DFO reduces precision and underestimates the role of NHEJ in the dose-rate effect on DSB yield. (author)

  9. c-Myc directly regulates the transcription of the NBS1 gene involved in DNA double-strand break repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Yu-Chi; Teng, Shu-Chun; Su, Yi-Ning; Hsieh, Fon-Jou; Wu, Kou-Juey

    2003-05-23

    The c-myc proto-oncogene encodes a ubiquitous transcription factor involved in the control of cell growth and implicated in inducing tumorigenesis. Understanding the function of c-Myc and its role in cancer depends upon the identification of c-Myc target genes. Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS) is a chromosomal-instability syndrome associated with cancer predisposition, radiosensitivity, and chromosomal instability. The NBS gene product, NBS1 (p95 or nibrin), is a part of the hMre11 complex, a central player associated with double-strand break (DSB) repair. NBS1 contains domains characteristic for proteins involved in DNA repair, recombination, and replication. Here we show that c-Myc directly activates NBS1. c-Myc-mediated induction of NBS1 gene transcription occurs in different tissues, is independent of cell proliferation, and is mediated by a c-Myc binding site in the intron 1 region of NBS1 gene. Overexpression of NBS1 in Rat1a cells increased cell proliferation. These results indicate that NBS1 is a direct transcriptional target of c-Myc and links the function of c-Myc to the regulation of DNA DSB repair pathway operating during DNA replication.

  10. Xbp1-mediated histone H4 deacetylation contributes to DNA double-strand break repair in yeast

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ran Tao; Hua Chen; Chan Gao; Pcng Xue; Fuquan Yang; Jing-Dong J Han; Bing Zhou; Ye-Guang Chen

    2011-01-01

    Xbp1 has been shown to regulate the cell cycle as a transcriptional repressor in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.In this study,we demonstrated that Xbp1 regulates DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair in S.cerevisiae.Xbp1 physically and genetically interacts with the histone deacetylase Rpd3 complex.Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that Xbp1 is required for efficient deacetylation of histone H4 flanking DSBs by the Rpd3 complex.Deletion of XBP1 leads to the delayed deacetylation of histone H4,which is coupled with increased nucleosome displacement,increased DNA end resection and decreased non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ).In response to DNA damage,Xbp1 is upregulated in a Mec1-Rad9-Rad53 checkpoint pathway-dependent manner and undergoes dephosphorylation.Cdk1,a central regulator of S.cerevisiae cell cycle,is responsible for Xbp1 phosphorylation at residues Ser146,Ser271 and Ser551.Substitution of these serine residues with alanine not only increases the association of Xbp1 with the Rpd3 complex and its recruitment to a DSB,but also promotes DSB repair.Together,our findings reveal a role for Xbp1 in DSB repair via NHEJ through regulation of histone H4 acetylation and nucleosome displacement in a positive feedback manner.

  11. The Caenorhabditis elegans homolog of Gen1/Yen1 resolvases links DNA damage signaling to DNA double-strand break repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aymeric P Bailly

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs can be repaired by homologous recombination (HR, which can involve Holliday junction (HJ intermediates that are ultimately resolved by nucleolytic enzymes. An N-terminal fragment of human GEN1 has recently been shown to act as a Holliday junction resolvase, but little is known about the role of GEN-1 in vivo. Holliday junction resolution signifies the completion of DNA repair, a step that may be coupled to signaling proteins that regulate cell cycle progression in response to DNA damage. Using forward genetic approaches, we identified a Caenorhabditis elegans dual function DNA double-strand break repair and DNA damage signaling protein orthologous to the human GEN1 Holliday junction resolving enzyme. GEN-1 has biochemical activities related to the human enzyme and facilitates repair of DNA double-strand breaks, but is not essential for DNA double-strand break repair during meiotic recombination. Mutational analysis reveals that the DNA damage-signaling function of GEN-1 is separable from its role in DNA repair. GEN-1 promotes germ cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via a pathway that acts in parallel to the canonical DNA damage response pathway mediated by RPA loading, CHK1 activation, and CEP-1/p53-mediated apoptosis induction. Furthermore, GEN-1 acts redundantly with the 9-1-1 complex to ensure genome stability. Our study suggests that GEN-1 might act as a dual function Holliday junction resolvase that may coordinate DNA damage signaling with a late step in DNA double-strand break repair.

  12. Break-induced ATR and Ddb1-Cul4(Cdt)² ubiquitin ligase-dependent nucleotide synthesis promotes homologous recombination repair in fission yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moss, Jennifer; Tinline-Purvis, Helen; Walker, Carol A

    2010-01-01

    Nucleotide synthesis is a universal response to DNA damage, but how this response facilitates DNA repair and cell survival is unclear. Here we establish a role for DNA damage-induced nucleotide synthesis in homologous recombination (HR) repair in fission yeast. Using a genetic screen, we found...... the Ddb1-Cul4(Cdt)² ubiquitin ligase complex and ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) to be required for HR repair of a DNA double-strand break (DSB). The Ddb1-Cul4(Cdt)² ubiquitin ligase complex is required for degradation of Spd1, an inhibitor of RNR in fission yeast. Accordingly, deleting spd1(+) suppressed...... through increasing Cdt2 nuclear levels in response to DNA damage. Our findings support a model in which break-induced Rad3 and Ddb1-Cul4(Cdt)² ubiquitin ligase-dependent Spd1 degradation and RNR activation promotes postsynaptic ssDNA gap filling during HR repair....

  13. Depletion of the bloom syndrome helicase stimulates homology-dependent repair at double-strand breaks in human chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yibin; Smith, Krissy; Waldman, Barbara Criscuolo; Waldman, Alan S

    2011-04-03

    Mutation of BLM helicase causes Blooms syndrome, a disorder associated with genome instability, high levels of sister chromatid exchanges, and cancer predisposition. To study the influence of BLM on double-strand break (DSB) repair in human chromosomes, we stably transfected a normal human cell line with a DNA substrate that contained a thymidine kinase (tk)-neo fusion gene disrupted by the recognition site for endonuclease I-SceI. The substrate also contained a closely linked functional tk gene to serve as a recombination partner for the tk-neo fusion gene. We derived two cell lines each containing a single integrated copy of the DNA substrate. In these cell lines, a DSB was introduced within the tk-neo fusion gene by expression of I-SceI. DSB repair events that occurred via homologous recombination (HR) or nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) were recovered by selection for G418-resistant clones. DSB repair was examined under conditions of either normal BLM expression or reduced BLM expression brought about by RNA interference. We report that BLM knockdown in both cell lines specifically increased the frequency of HR events that produced deletions by crossovers or single-strand annealing while leaving the frequency of gene conversions unchanged or reduced. We observed no change in the accuracy of individual HR events and no substantial alteration of the nature of individual NHEJ events when BLM expression was reduced. Our work provides the first direct evidence that BLM influences DSB repair pathway choice in human chromosomes and suggests that BLM deficiency can engender genomic instability by provoking an increased frequency of HR events of a potentially deleterious nature.

  14. RAD1 and RAD10, but not other excision repair genes, are required for double-strand break-induced recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, E L; Haber, J E

    1995-04-01

    HO endonuclease-induced double-strand breaks (DSBs) in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae can be repaired by the process of gap repair or, alternatively, by single-strand annealing if the site of the break is flanked by directly repeated homologous sequences. We have shown previously (J. Fishman-Lobell and J. E. Haber, Science 258:480-484, 1992) that during the repair of an HO-induced DSB, the excision repair gene RAD1 is needed to remove regions of nonhomology from the DSB ends. In this report, we present evidence that among nine genes involved in nucleotide excision repair, only RAD1 and RAD10 are required for removal of nonhomologous sequences from the DSB ends. rad1 delta and rad10 delta mutants displayed a 20-fold reduction in the ability to execute both gap repair and single-strand annealing pathways of HO-induced recombination. Mutations in RAD2, RAD3, and RAD14 reduced HO-induced recombination by about twofold. We also show that RAD7 and RAD16, which are required to remove UV photodamage from the silent HML, locus, are not required for MAT switching with HML or HMR as a donor. Our results provide a molecular basis for understanding the role of yeast nucleotide excision repair gene and their human homologs in DSB-induced recombination and repair.

  15. The deinococcal DdrB protein is involved in an early step of DNA double strand break repair and in plasmid transformation through its single-strand annealing activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouthier de la Tour, Claire; Boisnard, Stéphanie; Norais, Cédric; Toueille, Magali; Bentchikou, Esma; Vannier, Françoise; Cox, Michael M; Sommer, Suzanne; Servant, Pascale

    2011-12-10

    The Deinococcus radiodurans bacterium exhibits an extreme resistance to ionizing radiation. Here, we investigated the in vivo role of DdrB, a radiation-induced Deinococcus specific protein that was previously shown to exhibit some in vitro properties akin to those of SSB protein from Escherichia coli but also to promote annealing of single stranded DNA. First we report that the deletion of the C-terminal motif of the DdrB protein, which is similar to the SSB C-terminal motif involved in recruitment to DNA of repair proteins, did neither affect cell radioresistance nor DNA binding properties of purified DdrB protein. We show that, in spite of their different quaternary structure, DdrB and SSB occlude the same amount of ssDNA in vitro. We also show that DdrB is recruited early and transiently after irradiation into the nucleoid to form discrete foci. Absence of DdrB increased the lag phase of the extended synthesis-dependent strand annealing (ESDSA) process, affecting neither the rate of DNA synthesis nor the efficiency of fragment reassembly, as indicated by monitoring DNA synthesis and genome reconstitution in cells exposed to a sub-lethal ionizing radiation dose. Moreover, cells devoid of DdrB were affected in the establishment of plasmid DNA during natural transformation, a process that requires pairing of internalized plasmid single stranded DNA fragments, whereas they were proficient in transformation by a chromosomal DNA marker that integrates into the host chromosome through homologous recombination. Our data are consistent with a model in which DdrB participates in an early step of DNA double strand break repair in cells exposed to very high radiation doses. DdrB might facilitate the accurate assembly of the myriad of small fragments generated by extreme radiation exposure through a single strand annealing (SSA) process to generate suitable substrates for subsequent ESDSA-promoted genome reconstitution.

  16. An inhibitor of nonhomologous end-joining abrogates double-strand break repair and impedes cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Mrinal; Nambiar, Mridula; Sharma, Sheetal; Karki, Subhas S; Goldsmith, G; Hegde, Mahesh; Kumar, Sujeet; Pandey, Monica; Singh, Ram K; Ray, Pritha; Natarajan, Renuka; Kelkar, Madhura; De, Abhijit; Choudhary, Bibha; Raghavan, Sathees C

    2012-12-21

    DNA Ligase IV is responsible for sealing of double-strand breaks (DSBs) during nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ). Inhibiting Ligase IV could result in amassing of DSBs, thereby serving as a strategy toward treatment of cancer. Here, we identify a molecule, SCR7 that inhibits joining of DSBs in cell-free repair system. SCR7 blocks Ligase IV-mediated joining by interfering with its DNA binding but not that of T4 DNA Ligase or Ligase I. SCR7 inhibits NHEJ in a Ligase IV-dependent manner within cells, and activates the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. More importantly, SCR7 impedes tumor progression in mouse models and when coadministered with DSB-inducing therapeutic modalities enhances their sensitivity significantly. This inhibitor to target NHEJ offers a strategy toward the treatment of cancer and improvement of existing regimens. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Defective DNA single-strand break repair is responsible for senescence and neoplastic escape of epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassour, Joe; Martien, Sébastien; Martin, Nathalie; Deruy, Emeric; Tomellini, Elisa; Malaquin, Nicolas; Bouali, Fatima; Sabatier, Laure; Wernert, Nicolas; Pinte, Sébastien; Gilson, Eric; Pourtier, Albin; Pluquet, Olivier; Abbadie, Corinne

    2016-01-29

    The main characteristic of senescence is its stability which relies on the persistence of DNA damage. We show that unlike fibroblasts, senescent epithelial cells do not activate an ATM-or ATR-dependent DNA damage response (DDR), but accumulate oxidative-stress-induced DNA single-strand breaks (SSBs). These breaks remain unrepaired because of a decrease in PARP1 expression and activity. This leads to the formation of abnormally large and persistent XRCC1 foci that engage a signalling cascade involving the p38MAPK and leading to p16 upregulation and cell cycle arrest. Importantly, the default in SSB repair also leads to the emergence of post-senescent transformed and mutated precancerous cells. In human-aged skin, XRCC1 foci accumulate in the epidermal cells in correlation with a decline of PARP1, whereas DDR foci accumulate mainly in dermal fibroblasts. These findings point SSBs as a DNA damage encountered by epithelial cells with aging which could fuel the very first steps of carcinogenesis.

  18. Tandem repeat modification during double-strand break repair induced by an engineered TAL effector nuclease in zebrafish genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanxu Huang

    Full Text Available Tandem repeats (TRs are abundant and widely distributed in eukaryotic genomes. TRs are thought to have various functions in gene transcription, DNA methylation, nucleosome position and chromatin organization. Variation of repeat units in the genome is observed in association with a number of diseases, such as Fragile X Syndrome, Huntington's disease and Friedreich's ataxia. However, the underlying mechanisms involved are poorly understood, largely owing to the technical limitations in modification of TRs at definite sites in the genome in vivo. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs are widely used in recent years in gene targeting for their specific binding to target sequences when engineered in vitro. Here, we show that the repair of a double-strand break (DSB induced by TALENs adjacent to a TR can produce serial types of mutations in the TR region. Sequencing analysis revealed that there are three types of mutations induced by the DSB repair, including indels only within the TR region or within the flanking TALEN target region or simutaneously within both regions. Therefore, desired TR mutant types can be conveniently obtained by using engineered TALENs. These results demonstrate that TALENs can serve as a convenient tool for modifying TRs in the genome in studying the functions of TRs.

  19. Genetic requirements for the single-strand annealing pathway of double-strand break repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, E.L.; Sugawara, N.; Haber, J.E. [Brandeis Univ., Waltham, MA (United States)] [and others

    1996-03-01

    HO endonuclease-induced double-strand breaks (DSBs) within a direct duplication of Escherichia coli lacZ genes are repaired either by gene conversion or by single-strand annealing (SSA), with >80% being SSA. Previously it was demonstrated that the RAD52 gene is required for DSB-induced SSA. In the present study, the effects of other genes belonging to the RAD52 epistasis group were analyzed. We show that RAD51, RAD54, RAD55, and RAD57 genes are not required for SSA irrespective of whether recombination occurred in plasmid or chromosomal DNA. In both plasmid and chromosomal constructs with homologous sequences in direct orientation, the proportion of SSA events over gene conversion was significantly elevated in the mutant strains. However, gene conversion was not affected when the two lacZ sequences were in inverted orientation. These results suggest that there is a competition between SSA and gene conversion processes that favors SSA in the absence of RAD51, RAD54, RAD55 and RAD57. Mutations in RAD50 and XRS2 genes do not prevent the completion, but markedly retard the kinetics, of DSB repair by both mechanisms in the lacZ direct repeat plasmid, a result resembling the effects of these genes during mating-type (MAT) switching. 43 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Tel1 and Rif2 Regulate MRX Functions in End-Tethering and Repair of DNA Double-Strand Breaks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinne Cassani

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs is initiated by the MRX/MRN complex (Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 in yeast; Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 in mammals, which recruits the checkpoint kinase Tel1/ATM to DSBs. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the role of Tel1 at DSBs remains enigmatic, as tel1Δ cells do not show obvious hypersensitivity to DSB-inducing agents. By performing a synthetic phenotype screen, we isolated a rad50-V1269M allele that sensitizes tel1Δ cells to genotoxic agents. The MRV1269MX complex associates poorly to DNA ends, and its retention at DSBs is further reduced by the lack of Tel1. As a consequence, tel1Δ rad50-V1269M cells are severely defective both in keeping the DSB ends tethered to each other and in repairing a DSB by either homologous recombination (HR or nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ. These data indicate that Tel1 promotes MRX retention to DSBs and this function is important to allow proper MRX-DNA binding that is needed for end-tethering and DSB repair. The role of Tel1 in promoting MRX accumulation to DSBs is counteracted by Rif2, which is recruited to DSBs. We also found that Rif2 enhances ATP hydrolysis by MRX and attenuates MRX function in end-tethering, suggesting that Rif2 can regulate MRX activity at DSBs by modulating ATP-dependent conformational changes of Rad50.

  1. Organization and dynamics of the nonhomologous end-joining machinery during DNA double-strand break repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Dylan A; Keegan, Sarah; Leo-Macias, Alejandra; Watanabe, Go; Strande, Natasha T; Chang, Howard H; Oksuz, Betul Akgol; Fenyo, David; Lieber, Michael R; Ramsden, Dale A; Rothenberg, Eli

    2015-05-19

    Nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) is a major repair pathway for DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), involving synapsis and ligation of the broken strands. We describe the use of in vivo and in vitro single-molecule methods to define the organization and interaction of NHEJ repair proteins at DSB ends. Super-resolution fluorescence microscopy allowed the precise visualization of XRCC4, XLF, and DNA ligase IV filaments adjacent to DSBs, which bridge the broken chromosome and direct rejoining. We show, by single-molecule FRET analysis of the Ku/XRCC4/XLF/DNA ligase IV NHEJ ligation complex, that end-to-end synapsis involves a dynamic positioning of the two ends relative to one another. Our observations form the basis of a new model for NHEJ that describes the mechanism whereby filament-forming proteins bridge DNA DSBs in vivo. In this scheme, the filaments at either end of the DSB interact dynamically to achieve optimal configuration and end-to-end positioning and ligation.

  2. Synthetic lethal targeting of DNA double strand break repair deficient cells by human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE1) inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Rebeka; McNeill, Daniel R.; Abbotts, Rachel; Mohammed, Mohammed Z.; Zdzienicka, Małgorzata Z.; Qutob, Haitham; Seedhouse, Claire; Laughton, Charles A.; Fischer, Peter M.; Patel, Poulam M.; Wilson, David M.; Madhusudan, Srinivasan

    2013-01-01

    An apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) site is an obligatory cytotoxic intermediate in DNA Base Excision Repair (BER) that is processed by human AP endonuclease 1 (APE1). APE1 is essential for BER and an emerging drug target in cancer. We have isolated novel small molecule inhibitors of APE1. In the current study we have investigated the ability of APE1 inhibitors to induce synthetic lethality in a panel of DNA double strand break (DSB) repair deficient and proficient cells; a) Chinese hamster (CH) cells: BRCA2 deficient (V-C8), ATM deficient (V-E5), wild type (V79) and BRCA2 revertant (V-C8(Rev1)). b) Human cancer cells: BRCA1 deficient (MDA-MB-436), BRCA1 proficient (MCF-7), BRCA2 deficient (CAPAN-1 and HeLa SilenciX cells), BRCA2 proficient (PANC1 and control SilenciX cells). We also tested synthetic lethality (SL) in CH ovary cells expressing a dominant–negative form of APE1 (E8 cells) using ATM inhibitors and DNA-PKcs inhibitors (DSB inhibitors). APE1 inhibitors are synthetically lethal in BRCA and ATM deficient cells. APE1 inhibition resulted in accumulation of DNA DSBs and G2/M cell cycle arrest. Synthetic lethality was also demonstrated in CH cells expressing a dominant–negative form of APE1 treated with ATM or DNA-PKcs inhibitors. We conclude that APE1 is a promising synthetic lethality target in cancer. PMID:22377908

  3. Bi-directional routing of DNA mismatch repair protein human exonuclease 1 to replication foci and DNA double strand breaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liberti, Sascha E; Andersen, Sofie Dabros; Wang, Jing

    2011-01-01

    Human exonuclease 1 (hEXO1) is implicated in DNA metabolism, including replication, recombination and repair, substantiated by its interactions with PCNA, DNA helicases BLM and WRN, and several DNA mismatch repair (MMR) proteins. We investigated the sub-nuclear localization of hEXO1 during S......-phase progression and in response to laser-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). We show that hEXO1 and PCNA co-localize in replication foci. This apparent interaction is sustained throughout S-phase. We also demonstrate that hEXO1 is rapidly recruited to DNA DSBs. We have identified a PCNA interacting protein...... (PIP-box) region on hEXO1 located in its COOH-terminal ((788)QIKLNELW(795)). This motif is essential for PCNA binding and co-localization during S-phase. Recruitment of hEXO1 to DNA DSB sites is dependent on the MMR protein hMLH1. We show that two distinct hMLH1 interaction regions of hEXO1 (residues...

  4. Mitosis, double strand break repair, and telomeres: a view from the end: how telomeres and the DNA damage response cooperate during mitosis to maintain genome stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesare, Anthony J

    2014-11-01

    Double strand break (DSB) repair is suppressed during mitosis because RNF8 and downstream DNA damage response (DDR) factors, including 53BP1, do not localize to mitotic chromatin. Discovery of the mitotic kinase-dependent mechanism that inhibits DSB repair during cell division was recently reported. It was shown that restoring mitotic DSB repair was detrimental, resulting in repair dependent genome instability and covalent telomere fusions. The telomere DDR that occurs naturally during cellular aging and in cancer is known to be refractory to G2/M checkpoint activation. Such DDR-positive telomeres, and those that occur as part of the telomere-dependent prolonged mitotic arrest checkpoint, normally pass through mitosis without covalent ligation, but result in cell growth arrest in G1 phase. The discovery that suppressing DSB repair during mitosis may function primarily to protect DDR-positive telomeres from fusing during cell division reinforces the unique cooperation between telomeres and the DDR to mediate tumor suppression.

  5. Assembly and function of DNA double-strand break repair foci in mammalian cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekker-Jensen, Simon; Mailand, Niels

    2010-01-01

    phosphorylation, ubiquitylation, SUMOylation, and acetylation. Over the last decade, insight into the identity of proteins residing in IRIF and the molecular underpinnings of their retention at these structures has been vastly expanded. Despite such advances, however, our understanding of the biological relevance...... of such DNA repair foci still remains limited. In this review, we focus on recent discoveries on the mechanisms that govern the formation of IRIF, and discuss the implications of such findings in light of our understanding of the physiological importance of these structures....

  6. A Role for BLM in Double-Strand Break Repair Pathway Choice: Prevention of CtIP/Mre11-Mediated Alternative Nonhomologous End-Joining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grabarz, Anastazja; Guirouilh-Barbat, Josée; Barascu, Aurelia

    2013-01-01

    The choice of the appropriate double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway is essential for the maintenance of genomic stability. Here, we show that the Bloom syndrome gene product, BLM, counteracts CtIP/MRE11-dependent long-range deletions (>200 bp) generated by alternative end-joining (A-EJ). BLM r...

  7. Correlation between slowly repairable double-strand breaks and thermal radiosensitization in the human HeLa S3 cell line

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampinga, HH; Hiemstra, YS; Konings, AWT; Dikomey, E

    1997-01-01

    The effect of heat on double-strand breaks (dsb) repair was compared with thermal radiosensitization using HeLa S3 cells. Cells were exposed to a combined treatment of X-irradiation followed by heat (44 degrees C, 0.5 h) separated by time intervals up to 8h. DNA dsb were measured by PFGE and surviva

  8. Removal of nonhomologous DNA ends in double-strand break recombination: The role of the yeast ultraviolet repair gene RAD1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fishman-Lobell, J.; Habert, J.E. (Brandeis Univ., Waltham, MA (United States))

    1992-10-15

    Double-strand breaks (DSBs) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae can be repaired by gene conversions or by deletions resulting from single-strand annealing between direct repeats of homologous sequences. Although rad1 mutants are resistant to x-rays and can complete DSB-mediated mating-type switching, they could not complete recombination when the ends of the break contained approximately 60 base pairs of nonhomology. Recombination was restored when the ends of the break were made homologous to donor sequences. Additionally, the absence of RAD1 led to the frequent appearance of a previously unobserved type of recombination product. These data suggest RAD1 is required to remove nonhomologous DNA from the 3{prime} ends of recombining DNA, a process analogous to the excision of photodimers during repair of ultraviolet-damaged DNA.

  9. Frequent and efficient use of the sister chromatid for DNA double-strand break repair during budding yeast meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Goldfarb

    Full Text Available Recombination between homologous chromosomes of different parental origin (homologs is necessary for their accurate segregation during meiosis. It has been suggested that meiotic inter-homolog recombination is promoted by a barrier to inter-sister-chromatid recombination, imposed by meiosis-specific components of the chromosome axis. Consistent with this, measures of Holliday junction-containing recombination intermediates (joint molecules [JMs] show a strong bias towards inter-homolog and against inter-sister JMs. However, recombination between sister chromatids also has an important role in meiosis. The genomes of diploid organisms in natural populations are highly polymorphic for insertions and deletions, and meiotic double-strand breaks (DSBs that form within such polymorphic regions must be repaired by inter-sister recombination. Efforts to study inter-sister recombination during meiosis, in particular to determine recombination frequencies and mechanisms, have been constrained by the inability to monitor the products of inter-sister recombination. We present here molecular-level studies of inter-sister recombination during budding yeast meiosis. We examined events initiated by DSBs in regions that lack corresponding sequences on the homolog, and show that these DSBs are efficiently repaired by inter-sister recombination. This occurs with the same timing as inter-homolog recombination, but with reduced (2- to 3-fold yields of JMs. Loss of the meiotic-chromosome-axis-associated kinase Mek1 accelerates inter-sister DSB repair and markedly increases inter-sister JM frequencies. Furthermore, inter-sister JMs formed in mek1Δ mutants are preferentially lost, while inter-homolog JMs are maintained. These findings indicate that inter-sister recombination occurs frequently during budding yeast meiosis, with the possibility that up to one-third of all recombination events occur between sister chromatids. We suggest that a Mek1-dependent reduction in

  10. Members of the RAD52 Epistasis Group Contribute to Mitochondrial Homologous Recombination and Double-Strand Break Repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Alexis; Kalifa, Lidza; Sia, Elaine A

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondria contain an independently maintained genome that encodes several proteins required for cellular respiration. Deletions in the mitochondrial genome have been identified that cause several maternally inherited diseases and are associated with certain cancers and neurological disorders. The majority of these deletions in human cells are flanked by short, repetitive sequences, suggesting that these deletions may result from recombination events. Our current understanding of the maintenance and repair of mtDNA is quite limited compared to our understanding of similar events in the nucleus. Many nuclear DNA repair proteins are now known to also localize to mitochondria, but their function and the mechanism of their action remain largely unknown. This study investigated the contribution of the nuclear double-strand break repair (DSBR) proteins Rad51p, Rad52p and Rad59p in mtDNA repair. We have determined that both Rad51p and Rad59p are localized to the matrix of the mitochondria and that Rad51p binds directly to mitochondrial DNA. In addition, a mitochondrially-targeted restriction endonuclease (mtLS-KpnI) was used to produce a unique double-strand break (DSB) in the mitochondrial genome, which allowed direct analysis of DSB repair in vivo in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We find that loss of these three proteins significantly decreases the rate of spontaneous deletion events and the loss of Rad51p and Rad59p impairs the repair of induced mtDNA DSBs.

  11. Radiation-induced cardiovascular effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapio, Soile

    Recent epidemiological studies indicate that exposure to ionising radiation enhances the risk of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in a moderate but significant manner. Our goal is to identify molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cardiovascular disease using cellular and mouse models. Two radiation targets are studied in detail: the vascular endothelium that plays a pivotal role in the regulation of cardiac function, and the myocardium, in particular damage to the cardiac mitochondria. Ionising radiation causes immediate and persistent alterations in several biological pathways in the endothelium in a dose- and dose-rate dependent manner. High acute and cumulative doses result in rapid, non-transient remodelling of the endothelial cytoskeleton, as well as increased lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation of the heart tissue, independent of whether exposure is local or total body. Proteomic and functional changes are observed in lipid metabolism, glycolysis, mitochondrial function (respiration, ROS production etc.), oxidative stress, cellular adhesion, and cellular structure. The transcriptional regulators Akt and PPAR alpha seem to play a central role in the radiation-response of the endothelium and myocardium, respectively. We have recently started co-operation with GSI in Darmstadt to study the effect of heavy ions on the endothelium. Our research will facilitate the identification of biomarkers associated with adverse cardiac effects of ionising radiation and may lead to the development of countermeasures against radiation-induced cardiac damage.

  12. Smarcal1 promotes double-strand-break repair by nonhomologous end-joining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keka, Islam Shamima; Mohiuddin; Maede, Yuko; Rahman, Md Maminur; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Honma, Masamitsu; Yamamoto, Takashi; Takeda, Shunichi; Sasanuma, Hiroyuki

    2015-07-27

    Smarcal1 is a SWI/SNF-family protein with an ATPase domain involved in DNA-annealing activities and a binding site for the RPA single-strand-DNA-binding protein. Although the role played by Smarcal1 in the maintenance of replication forks has been established, it remains unknown whether Smarcal1 contributes to genomic DNA maintenance outside of the S phase. We disrupted the SMARCAL1 gene in both the chicken DT40 and the human TK6 B cell lines. The resulting SMARCAL1(-/-) clones exhibited sensitivity to chemotherapeutic topoisomerase 2 inhibitors, just as nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) null-deficient cells do. SMARCAL1(-/-) cells also exhibited an increase in radiosensitivity in the G1 phase. Moreover, the loss of Smarcal1 in NHEJ null-deficient cells does not further increase their radiosensitivity. These results demonstrate that Smarcal1 is required for efficient NHEJ-mediated DSB repair. Both inactivation of the ATPase domain and deletion of the RPA-binding site cause the same phenotype as does null-mutation of Smarcal1, suggesting that Smarcal1 enhances NHEJ, presumably by interacting with RPA at unwound single-strand sequences and then facilitating annealing at DSB ends. SMARCAL1(-/-)cells showed a poor accumulation of Ku70/DNA-PKcs and XRCC4 at DNA-damage sites. We propose that Smarcal1 maintains the duplex status of DSBs to ensure proper recruitment of NHEJ factors to DSB sites. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  13. Suppression of Sclerostin Alleviates Radiation-Induced Bone Loss by Protecting Bone-Forming Cells and Their Progenitors Through Distinct Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Abhishek; Lin, Tiao; Young, Tiffany; Tong, Wei; Ma, Xiaoyuan; Tseng, Wei-Ju; Kramer, Ina; Kneissel, Michaela; Levine, Michael A; Zhang, Yejia; Cengel, Keith; Liu, X. Sherry; Qin, Ling

    2017-01-01

    Focal radiotherapy is frequently associated with skeletal damage within the radiation field. Our previous in vitro study showed that activation of Wnt/β-catenin pathway can overcome radiation-induced DNA damage and apoptosis of osteoblastic cells. Neutralization of circulating sclerostin with a monoclonal antibody (Scl-Ab) is an innovative approach for treating osteoporosis by enhancing Wnt/β-catenin signaling in bone. Together with the fact that focal radiation increases sclerostin amount in bone, we sought to determine whether weekly treatment with Scl-Ab would prevent focal radiotherapy-induced osteoporosis in mice. Micro-CT and histomorphometric analyses demonstrated that Scl-Ab blocked trabecular bone structural deterioration after radiation by partially preserving osteoblast number and activity. Consistently, trabecular bone in sclerostin null mice was resistant to radiation via the same mechanism. Scl-Ab accelerated DNA repair in osteoblasts after radiation by reducing the number of γ-H2AX foci, a DNA double-strand break marker, and increasing the amount of Ku70, a DNA repair protein, thus protecting osteoblasts from radiation-induced apoptosis. In osteocytes, apart from using similar DNA repair mechanism to rescue osteocyte apoptosis, Scl-Ab restored the osteocyte canaliculi structure that was otherwise damaged by radiation. Using a lineage tracing approach that labels all mesenchymal lineage cells in the endosteal bone marrow, we demonstrated that radiation damage to mesenchymal progenitors mainly involves shifting their fate to adipocytes and arresting their proliferation ability but not inducing apoptosis, which are different mechanisms from radiation damage to mature bone forming cells. Scl-Ab treatment partially blocked the lineage shift but had no effect on the loss of proliferation potential. Taken together, our studies provide proof-of-principle evidence for a novel use of Scl-Ab as a therapeutic treatment for radiation-induced osteoporosis and

  14. Correlativity study between expression of DNA double-strand break repair protein and radiosensitivity of tumor cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang ZHUANG; Shiying YU; Xiaoyuan HUANG; Yang CAO; Huihua XIONG

    2009-01-01

    DNA double-strand break (DSB) is generally regarded as the most lethal of all DNA lesions after radiation. KuS0, DNA-PK catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) and ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) proteins are major DSB repair proteins. In this study, survival fraction at 2Gy (SF2) values of eight human tumor cell lines (including four human cervical carcinoma cell lines HeLa, SiHa, C33A, Caski, three human breast carcinoma cell lines MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-453, and one human lung carcinoma cell line A549) were acquired by clone formation assay, and western blot was applied to detect the expressions of Ku80, DNA-PKcs and ATM protein. The correlativity of protein expression with SF2 value was analyzed by Pearson linear correlation analysis. We found that the expression of the same protein in different cell lines and the expression of three proteins in the same cell line had a significant difference. The SF2 values were also different in eight tumor cell lines and there was a positive correlativity between the expression of DNA-PKcs and SF2 (r=0.723, P =0.043), but Ku80 and ATM expression had no correlation with SF2 (P>0.05). These findings suggest that the expression level of DNA-PKcs protein can be an indicator for predicting the radiosensitivity of tumor cells.

  15. The mismatch repair system modulates curcumin sensitivity through induction of DNA strand breaks and activation of G2-M checkpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhihua; Jin, ShunQian; Yalowich, Jack C; Brown, Kevin D; Rajasekaran, Baskaran

    2010-03-01

    The highly conserved mismatch (MMR) repair system corrects postreplicative errors and modulates cellular responses to genotoxic agents. Here, we show that the MMR system strongly influences cellular sensitivity to curcumin. Compared with MMR-proficient cells, isogenically matched MMR-deficient cells displayed enhanced sensitivity to curcumin. Similarly, cells suppressed for MLH1 or MSH2 expression by RNA interference displayed increased curcumin sensitivity. Curcumin treatment generated comparable levels of reactive oxygen species and the mutagenic adduct 8-oxo-guanine in MMR-proficient and MMR-deficient cells; however, accumulation of gammaH2AX foci, a marker for DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), occurred only in MMR-positive cells in response to curcumin treatment. Additionally, MMR-positive cells showed activation of Chk1 and induction of G(2)-M cell cycle checkpoint following curcumin treatment and inhibition of Chk1 by UCN-01 abrogated Chk1 activation and heightened apoptosis in MMR-proficient cells. These results indicate that curcumin triggers the accumulation of DNA DSB and induction of a checkpoint response through a MMR-dependent mechanism. Conversely, in MMR-compromised cells, curcumin-induced DSB is significantly blunted, and as a result, cells fail to undergo cell cycle arrest, enter mitosis, and die through mitotic catastrophe. The results have potential therapeutic value, especially in the treatment of tumors with compromised MMR function.

  16. Molecular Process Producing Oncogene Fusion in Lung Cancer Cells by Illegitimate Repair of DNA Double-Strand Breaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshitaka Seki

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Constitutive activation of oncogenes by fusion to partner genes, caused by chromosome translocation and inversion, is a critical genetic event driving lung carcinogenesis. Fusions of the tyrosine kinase genes ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase, ROS1 (c-ros oncogene 1, or RET (rearranged during transfection occur in 1%–5% of lung adenocarcinomas (LADCs and their products constitute therapeutic targets for kinase inhibitory drugs. Interestingly, ALK, RET, and ROS1 fusions occur preferentially in LADCs of never- and light-smokers, suggesting that the molecular mechanisms that cause these rearrangements are smoking-independent. In this study, using previously reported next generation LADC genome sequencing data of the breakpoint junction structures of chromosome rearrangements that cause oncogenic fusions in human cancer cells, we employed the structures of breakpoint junctions of ALK, RET, and ROS1 fusions in 41 LADC cases as “traces” to deduce the molecular processes of chromosome rearrangements caused by DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs and illegitimate joining. We found that gene fusion was produced by illegitimate repair of DSBs at unspecified sites in genomic regions of a few kb through DNA synthesis-dependent or -independent end-joining pathways, according to DSB type. This information will assist in the understanding of how oncogene fusions are generated and which etiological factors trigger them.

  17. Inhibition of proteasomal degradation of rpn4 impairs nonhomologous end-joining repair of DNA double-strand breaks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donghong Ju

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The proteasome homeostasis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is regulated by a negative feedback circuit in which the transcription factor Rpn4 induces the proteasome genes and is rapidly degraded by the assembled proteasome. The integrity of the Rpn4-proteasome feedback loop is critical for cell viability under stressed conditions. We have demonstrated that inhibition of Rpn4 degradation sensitizes cells to DNA damage, particularly in response to high doses of DNA damaging agents. The underlying mechanism, however, remains unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using yeast genetics and biochemical approach we show that inhibition of Rpn4 degradation displays a synthetic growth defect with deletion of the MEC1 checkpoint gene and sensitizes several checkpoint mutants to DNA damage. In addition, inhibition of Rpn4 degradation leads to a defect in repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs by nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ. The expression levels of several key NHEJ genes are downregulated and the recruitment of Yku70 to a DSB is reduced by inhibition of Rpn4 degradation. We find that Rpn4 and the proteasome are recruited to a DSB, suggesting their direct participation in NHEJ. Inhibition of Rpn4 degradation may result in a concomitant delay of release of Rpn4 and the proteasome from a DSB. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This study provides the first evidence for the role of proteasomal degradation of Rpn4 in NHEJ.

  18. XRCC3 is essential for proper double-strand break repair and homologous recombination in rice meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bingwei; Wang, Mo; Tang, Ding; Li, Yafei; Xu, Meng; Gu, Minghong; Cheng, Zhukuan; Yu, Hengxiu

    2015-09-01

    RAD51 paralogues play important roles in the assembly and stabilization of RAD51 nucleoprotein filaments, which promote homologous pairing and strand exchange reactions in organisms ranging from yeast to vertebrates. XRCC3, a RAD51 paralogue, has been characterized in budding yeast, mouse, and Arabidopsis. In the present study, XRCC3 in rice was identified and characterized. The rice xrcc3 mutant exhibited normal vegetative growth but complete male and female sterility. Cytological investigations revealed that homologous pairing and synapsis were severely disrupted in the mutant. Meiotic chromosomes were frequently entangled from diplotene to metaphase I, resulting in chromosome fragmentation at anaphase I. The immunostaining signals from γH2AX were regular, implying that double-strand break (DSB) formation was normal in xrcc3 meiocytes. However, COM1 was not detected on early prophase I chromosomes, suggesting that the DSB end-processing system was destroyed in the mutant. Moreover, abnormal chromosome localization of RAD51C, DMC1, ZEP1, ZIP4, and MER3 was observed in xrcc3. Taken together, the results suggest that XRCC3 plays critical roles in both DSB repair and homologous chromosome recombination during rice meiosis. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Haploid meiosis in Arabidopsis: double-strand breaks are formed and repaired but without synapsis and crossovers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Cifuentes

    Full Text Available Two hallmark features of meiosis are i the formation of crossovers (COs between homologs and ii the production of genetically-unique haploid spores that will fuse to restore the somatic ploidy level upon fertilization. In this study we analysed meiosis in haploid Arabidopsis thaliana plants and a range of haploid mutants to understand how meiosis progresses without a homolog. Extremely low chiasma frequency and very limited synapsis occurred in wild-type haploids. The resulting univalents segregated in two uneven groups at the first division, and sister chromatids segregated to opposite poles at the second division, leading to the production of unbalanced spores. DNA double-strand breaks that initiate meiotic recombination were formed, but in half the number compared to diploid meiosis. They were repaired in a RAD51- and REC8-dependent manner, but independently of DMC1, presumably using the sister chromatid as a template. Additionally, turning meiosis into mitosis (MiMe genotype in haploids resulted in the production of balanced haploid gametes and restoration of fertility. The variability of the effect on meiosis of the absence of homologous chromosomes in different organisms is then discussed.

  20. Haploid meiosis in Arabidopsis: double-strand breaks are formed and repaired but without synapsis and crossovers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifuentes, Marta; Rivard, Maud; Pereira, Lucie; Chelysheva, Liudmila; Mercier, Raphael

    2013-01-01

    Two hallmark features of meiosis are i) the formation of crossovers (COs) between homologs and ii) the production of genetically-unique haploid spores that will fuse to restore the somatic ploidy level upon fertilization. In this study we analysed meiosis in haploid Arabidopsis thaliana plants and a range of haploid mutants to understand how meiosis progresses without a homolog. Extremely low chiasma frequency and very limited synapsis occurred in wild-type haploids. The resulting univalents segregated in two uneven groups at the first division, and sister chromatids segregated to opposite poles at the second division, leading to the production of unbalanced spores. DNA double-strand breaks that initiate meiotic recombination were formed, but in half the number compared to diploid meiosis. They were repaired in a RAD51- and REC8-dependent manner, but independently of DMC1, presumably using the sister chromatid as a template. Additionally, turning meiosis into mitosis (MiMe genotype) in haploids resulted in the production of balanced haploid gametes and restoration of fertility. The variability of the effect on meiosis of the absence of homologous chromosomes in different organisms is then discussed.

  1. Post-irradiation chemical processing of DNA damage generates double-strand breaks in cells already engaged in repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Satyendra K.; Wang, Minli; Staudt, Christian; Iliakis, George

    2011-01-01

    In cells exposed to ionizing radiation (IR), double-strand breaks (DSBs) form within clustered-damage sites from lesions disrupting the DNA sugar–phosphate backbone. It is commonly assumed that these DSBs form promptly and are immediately detected and processed by the cellular DNA damage response (DDR) apparatus. This assumption is questioned by the observation that after irradiation of naked DNA, a fraction of DSBs forms minutes to hours after exposure as a result of temperature dependent, chemical processing of labile sugar lesions. Excess DSBs also form when IR-exposed cells are processed at 50°C, but have been hitherto considered method-related artifact. Thus, it remains unknown whether DSBs actually develop in cells after IR exposure from chemically labile damage. Here, we show that irradiation of ‘naked’ or chromatin-organized mammalian DNA produces lesions, which evolve to DSBs and add to those promptly induced, after 8–24 h in vitro incubation at 37°C or 50°C. The conversion is more efficient in chromatin-associated DNA, completed within 1 h in cells and delayed in a reducing environment. We conclude that IR generates sugar lesions within clustered-damage sites contributing to DSB formation only after chemical processing, which occurs efficiently at 37°C. This subset of delayed DSBs may challenge DDR, may affect the perceived repair kinetics and requires further characterization. PMID:21745815

  2. Human INO80 chromatin-remodelling complex contributes to DNA double-strand break repair via the expression of Rad54B and XRCC3 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun-Jung; Hur, Shin-Kyoung; Kwon, Jongbum

    2010-10-15

    Recent studies have shown that the SWI/SNF family of ATP-dependent chromatin-remodelling complexes play important roles in DNA repair as well as in transcription. The INO80 complex, the most recently described member of this family, has been shown in yeast to play direct role in DNA DSB (double-strand break) repair without affecting the expression of the genes involved in this process. However, whether this function of the INO80 complex is conserved in higher eukaryotes has not been investigated. In the present study, we found that knockdown of hINO80 (human INO80) confers DNA-damage hypersensitivity and inefficient DSB repair. Microarray analysis and other experiments have identified the Rad54B and XRCC3 (X-ray repair complementing defective repair in Chinese-hamster cells 3) genes, implicated in DSB repair, to be repressed by hINO80 deficiency. Chromatin immunoprecipitation studies have shown that hINO80 binds to the promoters of the Rad54B and XRCC3 genes. Re-expression of the Rad54B and XRCC3 genes rescues the DSB repair defect in hINO80-deficient cells. These results suggest that hINO80 assists DSB repair by positively regulating the expression of the Rad54B and XRCC3 genes. Therefore, unlike yeast INO80, hINO80 can contribute to DSB repair indirectly via gene expression, suggesting that the mechanistic role of this chromatin remodeller in DSB repair is evolutionarily diversified.

  3. Conditional deletion of Nbs1 in murine cells reveals its role in branching repair pathways of DNA double-strand breaks

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Yun-Gui; Saidi, Amal; Frappart, Pierre-Olivier; Min, WooKee; Barrucand, Christelle; Dumon-Jones, Valérie; Michelon, Jocelyne; Herceg, Zdenko; Wang, Zhao-Qi

    2006-01-01

    NBS1 forms a complex with MRE11 and RAD50 (MRN) that is proposed to act on the upstream of two repair pathways of DNA double-strand break (DSB), homologous repair (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). However, the function of Nbs1 in these processes has not fully been elucidated in mammals due to the lethal phenotype of cells and mice lacking Nbs1. Here, we have constructed mouse Nbs1-null embryonic fibroblasts and embryonic stem cells, through the Cre-loxP and sequential gene targeting...

  4. Repair of endonuclease-induced double-strand breaks in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: essential role for genes associated with nonhomologous end-joining.

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, L K; Westmoreland, J W; Resnick, M A

    1999-01-01

    Repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs) in chromosomal DNA by nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) is not well characterized in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here we demonstrate that several genes associated with NHEJ perform essential functions in the repair of endonuclease-induced DSBs in vivo. Galactose-induced expression of EcoRI endonuclease in rad50, mre11, or xrs2 mutants, which are deficient in plasmid DSB end-joining and some forms of recombination, resulted in G2 arrest and rapid ce...

  5. Protein Phosphatase 2A Inhibition with LB100 Enhances Radiation-Induced Mitotic Catastrophe and Tumor Growth Delay in Glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Ira K; Lu, Jie; Graves, Christian A; Huntoon, Kristin; Frerich, Jason M; Hanson, Ryan H; Wang, Xiaoping; Hong, Christopher S; Ho, Winson; Feldman, Michael J; Ikejiri, Barbara; Bisht, Kheem; Chen, Xiaoyuan S; Tandle, Anita; Yang, Chunzhang; Arscott, W Tristram; Ye, Donald; Heiss, John D; Lonser, Russell R; Camphausen, Kevin; Zhuang, Zhengping

    2015-07-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a tumor suppressor whose function is lost in many cancers. An emerging, though counterintuitive, therapeutic approach is inhibition of PP2A to drive damaged cells through the cell cycle, sensitizing them to radiotherapy. We investigated the effects of PP2A inhibition on U251 glioblastoma cells following radiation treatment in vitro and in a xenograft mouse model in vivo. Radiotherapy alone augmented PP2A activity, though this was significantly attenuated with combination LB100 treatment. LB100 treatment yielded a radiation dose enhancement factor of 1.45 and increased the rate of postradiation mitotic catastrophe at 72 and 96 hours. Glioblastoma cells treated with combination LB100 and radiotherapy maintained increased γ-H2AX expression at 24 hours, diminishing cellular repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Combination therapy significantly enhanced tumor growth delay and mouse survival and decreased p53 expression 3.68-fold, compared with radiotherapy alone. LB100 treatment effectively inhibited PP2A activity and enhanced U251 glioblastoma radiosensitivity in vitro and in vivo. Combination treatment with LB100 and radiation significantly delayed tumor growth, prolonging survival. The mechanism of radiosensitization appears to be related to increased mitotic catastrophe, decreased capacity for repair of DNA double-strand breaks, and diminished p53 DNA-damage response pathway activity.

  6. Establishment of a semi-biological phantom model for the study of the effect of dose reducing measures on radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks in CT using the example of risk organ based tube current modulation; Etablierung eines semibiologischen Phantommodells zur Untersuchung des Effekts dosisreduzierender Massnahmen auf strahleninduzierte DNA-Doppelstrangbrueche in der CT am Beispiel der risikoorganbasierten Roehrenstrommodulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer, Matthias

    2013-12-12

    The number of computed tomography (CT) examinations has been rising during the last decades. Therefore techniques for dose reduction receive increasing attention. Risk organ-based tube current modulation (RCM) in CT is a new approach and works by lowering the tube current, while the tube is in front of the patient's body. Therefore it should lead to a dose reduction for radiosensitive organs like the female breast, the eye lenses and the thyroid gland. Biological radiation effects cannot be estimated by physical-based dose measurements. γ-H2AX is a sensitive marker for the determination of x-ray induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSB). Hence the aim of this study was to establish a biological phantom model based on the γ-H2AX immunofluorescence microscopy method and to investigate the effect of RCM on radiation induced DNA damages. The γ-H2AX method is based on the phosphorylation of the histone variant H2AX. The phosphorylated histone γ-H2AX can be visualised using antibodies and is specific for radiation induced DSB. Blood lymphocytes from healthy volunteers, skin fibroblasts (LN) and mammary epithelial cells (HMEpC-p) were placed in different positions of an Alderson-phantom and exposed to x-rays using a 128-slice dual-source CT scanner. Standard head, neck and chest-CT scan protocols either with or without risk-organ based tube current modulation were used. RCM reduces the tube current to 20 percent at an angle of 130 degree anterior to the body, whereas tube current is increased at an angle of 230 degree posterior to the body. Afterwards cells were isolated, fixed on slides und stained with specific primary γ-H2AX antibodies and fluorescent secondary antibodies. Tiny green dots (named foci) can be detected and quantified with a fluorescence microscope and represent distinct DSB. Non-irradiated samples served as controls and CT-induced DSB were calculated by subtraction of pre- from post-exposure values. In this study a semibiological phantom model

  7. Defense mechanisms against radiation induced teratogenic damage in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, F.; Ootsuyama, A.; Nomoto, S.; Norimura, T. [Univ. of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu, (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    Experimental studies with mice have established that fetuses at midgestational stage are highly susceptible to malformation at high, but not low, doses of radiation. When DNA damage is produced by a small amount of radiation, it is efficiently eliminated by DNA repair. However, DNA repair is not perfect. There must be defense mechanisms other than DNA repair. In order to elucidate the essential role of p53 gene in apoptotic tissue repair, we compared the incidence of radiation-induced malformations and deaths (deaths after day 10) in wild-type p53 (+/+) mice and null p53 (-/-) mice. For p53 (+/+) mice, an X-ray dose of 2 Gy given at a high dose-rate (450 mGy/min) to fetuses at 9.5 days of gestation was highly lethal and considerably teratogenic whereas it was only slightly lethal but highly teratogenic for p53 (-/-) fetuses. This reciprocal relationship of radiosensitivity to malformations and deaths supports the notion that fetal tissues have a p53 -dependent idguardianln of the tissue that aborts cells bearing radiation-induced teratogenic DNA damage. When an equal dose of 2 Gy given at a 400-fold lower dose-rate (1.2 mGy/min), this dose became not teratogenic for p53 (+/+) fetuses exhibiting p53 -dependent apoptosis, whereas this dose remained teratogenic for p53 (-/-) fetuses unable to carry out apoptosis. Furthermore, when the dose was divided into two equal dose fractions (1+1 Gy) at high dose rate, separated by 24 hours, the incidences of malformations were equal with control level for p53 (+/+), but higher for p53 (-/-) mice. Hence, complete elimination of teratogenic damage from irradiated tissues requires a concerted cooperation of two mechanisms; proficient DNA repair and p53-dependent apoptotic tissue repair.

  8. Individual radiosensitivity does not correlate with radiation-induced apoptosis in lymphoblastoid cell lines or CD{sup 3+} lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wistop, A.; Keller, U.; Grabenbauer, G.G.; Sauer, R.; Distel, L.V.R. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Friedrich Alexander Univ. Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen (Germany); Sprung, C.N. [Div. of Research, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia)

    2005-05-01

    Background and purpose: spontaneous and radiation-induced apoptosis of lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) derived from healthy donors, cancer patients and donors with radiosensitivity syndromes as well as CD{sup 3+} lymphocytes from patients with {>=} grade 3 late toxicity were investigated as a possible marker for the detection of individual radiosensitivity. These investigations are based on the hypothesis that hypersensitive patients have reduced levels of apoptosis after in vitro irradiation as a result of a defect in the signaling pathway. Material and methods: Epstein-Barr virus-(EBV-)transformed LCLs derived from five healthy donors, seven patients with heterozygous or homozygous genotype for ataxia-telangiectasia or Nijmegen breakage syndrome and five patients with {>=} grade 3 late toxicity (RTOG) were investigated. In addition, CD{sup 3+} lymphocytes from 21 healthy individuals and 18 cancer patients including five patients with a proven cellular hypersensitivity to radiation were analyzed. Cells were irradiated in vitro with a dose of 2 and 5 Gy and were incubated for 48 h. Apoptotic rates were measured by the TUNEL assay followed by customized image analysis. Results: four out of seven radiosensitivity syndrome patients were identified to have an increased cellular radiosensitivity as determined by reduced apoptotic rates after irradiation of their respective LCLs. Comparatively, only two of the five hypersensitive cancer patients were clearly identified by reduced apoptotic rates. Spontaneous apoptotic rates were very homogeneous among all 39 samples from controls and patients, while lymphocytes of all cancer patients showed significantly lower radiation-induced rates. Conclusion: only a subgroup of hypersensitive patients may be identified by reduction of radiation-induced apoptotic rate. It is concluded that the hypothesis according to which hypersensitive cells have reduced levels of apoptosis is only conditionally true. The authors suggest that this

  9. p53-dependent apoptosis suppresses radiation-induced teratogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norimura, Toshiyuki [Univ. of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka (Japan). School of Medicine

    1999-06-01

    About half of human conceptions are estimated not to be implanted in the uterus, resulting in unrecognizable spontaneous abortions. Experimental studies with mice have established that irradiation during the preimplantation period of the embryo induces a high incidence of prenatal deaths but virtually no malformations. This suggests that some mechanism is screening out the damaged fetuses. In order to elucidate the mechanisms of tissue repair of radiation-induced teratogenic injury, we compared the incidences of radiation-induced malformations and abortions in p53 null (p53{sup -/-}) and wild-type (p53{sup +/+}) mice. After X-irradiation with 2 Gy on day 9.5 of gestation, p53{sup -/-} mice showed a 70% incidence of anomalies and a 7% incidence of deaths, whereas p53{sup +/+} mice had a 20% incidence of anomalies and a 60% incidence of deaths. Similar results were obtained after irradiation on day 3.5 of gestation. This reciprocal relationship of radiosensitivity to anomalies and to embryonic or fetal lethality supports the notion that the p53 gene protects embryos and fetuses against the teratogenic effects of radiation by eliminating cells that have been badly damaged. In fact, after X-irradiation, the frequency of dying cells by apoptosis was greatly increased in tissues of the p53{sup +/+} fetuses but not at all in those of the p53{sup -/-} fetuses. Mammals are protected from radiation-induced injury by two mechanisms, p53-dependent apoptotic tissue repair in addition to well known DNA repair. Therefore, there are threshold doses below which there is no induction of teratogenic and carcinogenic effects after exposure to low-level radiation. (author)

  10. Alkylation base damage is converted into repairable double-strand breaks and complex intermediates in G2 cells lacking AP endonuclease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjian Ma

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs are potent sources of genome instability. While there is considerable genetic and molecular information about the disposition of direct DSBs and breaks that arise during replication, relatively little is known about DSBs derived during processing of single-strand lesions, especially for the case of single-strand breaks (SSBs with 3'-blocked termini generated in vivo. Using our recently developed assay for detecting end-processing at random DSBs in budding yeast, we show that single-strand lesions produced by the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS can generate DSBs in G2-arrested cells, i.e., S-phase independent. These derived DSBs were observed in apn1/2 endonuclease mutants and resulted from aborted base excision repair leading to 3' blocked single-strand breaks following the creation of abasic (AP sites. DSB formation was reduced by additional mutations that affect processing of AP sites including ntg1, ntg2, and, unexpectedly, ogg1, or by a lack of AP sites due to deletion of the MAG1 glycosylase gene. Similar to direct DSBs, the derived DSBs were subject to MRX (Mre11, Rad50, Xrs2-determined resection and relied upon the recombinational repair genes RAD51, RAD52, as well as on the MCD1 cohesin gene, for repair. In addition, we identified a novel DNA intermediate, detected as slow-moving chromosomal DNA (SMD in pulsed field electrophoresis gels shortly after MMS exposure in apn1/2 cells. The SMD requires nicked AP sites, but is independent of resection/recombination processes, suggesting that it is a novel structure generated during processing of 3'-blocked SSBs. Collectively, this study provides new insights into the potential consequences of alkylation base damage in vivo, including creation of novel structures as well as generation and repair of DSBs in nonreplicating cells.

  11. Alkylation base damage is converted into repairable double-strand breaks and complex intermediates in G2 cells lacking AP endonuclease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjian Ma

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs are potent sources of genome instability. While there is considerable genetic and molecular information about the disposition of direct DSBs and breaks that arise during replication, relatively little is known about DSBs derived during processing of single-strand lesions, especially for the case of single-strand breaks (SSBs with 3'-blocked termini generated in vivo. Using our recently developed assay for detecting end-processing at random DSBs in budding yeast, we show that single-strand lesions produced by the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS can generate DSBs in G2-arrested cells, i.e., S-phase independent. These derived DSBs were observed in apn1/2 endonuclease mutants and resulted from aborted base excision repair leading to 3' blocked single-strand breaks following the creation of abasic (AP sites. DSB formation was reduced by additional mutations that affect processing of AP sites including ntg1, ntg2, and, unexpectedly, ogg1, or by a lack of AP sites due to deletion of the MAG1 glycosylase gene. Similar to direct DSBs, the derived DSBs were subject to MRX (Mre11, Rad50, Xrs2-determined resection and relied upon the recombinational repair genes RAD51, RAD52, as well as on the MCD1 cohesin gene, for repair. In addition, we identified a novel DNA intermediate, detected as slow-moving chromosomal DNA (SMD in pulsed field electrophoresis gels shortly after MMS exposure in apn1/2 cells. The SMD requires nicked AP sites, but is independent of resection/recombination processes, suggesting that it is a novel structure generated during processing of 3'-blocked SSBs. Collectively, this study provides new insights into the potential consequences of alkylation base damage in vivo, including creation of novel structures as well as generation and repair of DSBs in nonreplicating cells.

  12. Ku regulates the non-homologous end joining pathway choice of DNA double-strand break repair in human somatic cells.

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    Farjana Fattah

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs is critical for the maintenance of genomic integrity and viability for all organisms. Mammals have evolved at least two genetically discrete ways to mediate DNA DSB repair: homologous recombination (HR and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ. In mammalian cells, most DSBs are preferentially repaired by NHEJ. Recent work has demonstrated that NHEJ consists of at least two sub-pathways-the main Ku heterodimer-dependent or "classic" NHEJ (C-NHEJ pathway and an "alternative" NHEJ (A-NHEJ pathway, which usually generates microhomology-mediated signatures at repair junctions. In our study, recombinant adeno-associated virus knockout vectors were utilized to construct a series of isogenic human somatic cell lines deficient in the core C-NHEJ factors (Ku, DNA-PK(cs, XLF, and LIGIV, and the resulting cell lines were characterized for their ability to carry out DNA DSB repair. The absence of DNA-PK(cs, XLF, or LIGIV resulted in cell lines that were profoundly impaired in DNA DSB repair activity. Unexpectedly, Ku86-null cells showed wild-type levels of DNA DSB repair activity that was dominated by microhomology joining events indicative of A-NHEJ. Importantly, A-NHEJ DNA DSB repair activity could also be efficiently de-repressed in LIGIV-null and DNA-PK(cs-null cells by subsequently reducing the level of Ku70. These studies demonstrate that in human cells C-NHEJ is the major DNA DSB repair pathway and they show that Ku is the critical C-NHEJ factor that regulates DNA NHEJ DSB pathway choice.

  13. Ku regulates the non-homologous end joining pathway choice of DNA double-strand break repair in human somatic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farjana Fattah

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs is critical for the maintenance of genomic integrity and viability for all organisms. Mammals have evolved at least two genetically discrete ways to mediate DNA DSB repair: homologous recombination (HR and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ. In mammalian cells, most DSBs are preferentially repaired by NHEJ. Recent work has demonstrated that NHEJ consists of at least two sub-pathways-the main Ku heterodimer-dependent or "classic" NHEJ (C-NHEJ pathway and an "alternative" NHEJ (A-NHEJ pathway, which usually generates microhomology-mediated signatures at repair junctions. In our study, recombinant adeno-associated virus knockout vectors were utilized to construct a series of isogenic human somatic cell lines deficient in the core C-NHEJ factors (Ku, DNA-PK(cs, XLF, and LIGIV, and the resulting cell lines were characterized for their ability to carry out DNA DSB repair. The absence of DNA-PK(cs, XLF, or LIGIV resulted in cell lines that were profoundly impaired in DNA DSB repair activity. Unexpectedly, Ku86-null cells showed wild-type levels of DNA DSB repair activity that was dominated by microhomology joining events indicative of A-NHEJ. Importantly, A-NHEJ DNA DSB repair activity could also be efficiently de-repressed in LIGIV-null and DNA-PK(cs-null cells by subsequently reducing the level of Ku70. These studies demonstrate that in human cells C-NHEJ is the major DNA DSB repair pathway and they show that Ku is the critical C-NHEJ factor that regulates DNA NHEJ DSB pathway choice.

  14. Double-strand break repair and genetic recombination in topoisomerase and primase mutants of bacteriophage T4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbakov, Victor P; Kudryashova, Elena

    2014-09-01

    The effects of primase and topoisomerase II deficiency on the double-strand break (DSB) repair and genetic recombination in bacteriophage T4 were studied in vivo using focused recombination. Site-specific DSBs were induced by SegC endonuclease in the rIIB gene of one of the parents. The frequency/distance relationship was determined in crosses of the wild-type phage, topoisomerase II mutant amN116 (gene 39), and primase mutant E219 (gene 61). Ordinary two-factor (i×j) and three-factor (i k×j) crosses between point rII mutations were also performed. These data provide information about the frequency and distance distribution of the single-exchange (splice) and double-exchange (patch) events. In two-factor crosses ets1×i, the topoisomerase and primase mutants had similar recombinant frequencies in crosses at ets1-i distances longer than 1000 bp, comprising about 80% of the corresponding wild-type values. They, however, differ remarkably in crosses at shorter distances. In the primase mutant, the recombinant frequencies are similar to those in the wild-type crosses at distances less than 100 bp, being a bit diminished at longer distances. In two-factor crosses ets1×i of the topoisomerase mutant, the recombinant frequencies were reduced ten-fold at the shortest distances. In three-factor crosses a6 ets1×i, where we measure patch-related recombination, the primase mutant was quite proficient across the entire range of distances. The topoisomerase mutant crosses demonstrated virtually complete absence of rII(+) recombinants at distances up to 33 bp, with the frequencies increasing steadily at longer distances. The data were interpreted as follows. The primase mutant is fully recombination-proficient. An obvious difference from the wild-type state is some shortage of EndoVII function leading to prolonged existence of HJs and thus stretched out ds-branch migration. This is also true for the topoisomerase mutant. However, the latter is deficient in the ss

  15. Alternative end-joining and classical nonhomologous end-joining pathways repair different types of double-strand breaks during class-switch recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortizas, Elena M; Zahn, Astrid; Hajjar, Maurice E; Patenaude, Anne-Marie; Di Noia, Javier M; Verdun, Ramiro E

    2013-12-01

    Classical nonhomologous end-joining (C-NHEJ) and alternative end-joining (A-EJ) are the main DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathways when a sister chromatid is not available. However, it is not clear how one pathway is chosen over the other to process a given DSB. To address this question, we studied in mouse splenic B cells and CH12F3 cells how C-NHEJ and A-EJ repair DSBs initiated by the activation-induced deaminase during IgH (Igh) class-switch recombination (CSR). We show in this study that lowering the deamination density at the Igh locus increases DSB resolution by microhomology-mediated repair while decreasing C-NHEJ activity. This process occurs without affecting 53BP1 and γH2AX levels during CSR. Mechanistically, lowering deamination density increases exonuclease I recruitment and single-stranded DNA at the Igh locus and promotes C-terminal binding protein interacting protein and MSH2-dependent DSB repair during CSR. Indeed, reducing activation-induced deaminase levels increases CSR efficiency in C-NHEJ-defective cells, suggesting enhanced use of an A-EJ pathway. Our results establish a mechanism by which C-NHEJ and this C-terminal binding protein interacting protein/MSH2-dependent pathway that relies on microhomology can act concurrently but independently to repair different types of DSBs and reveal that the density of DNA lesions influences the choice of DSB repair pathway during CSR.

  16. Dominant negative mutant of Plasmodium Rad51 causes reduced parasite burden in host by abrogating DNA double-strand break repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Nabamita; Bhattacharyya, Sunanda; Chakrabarty, Swati; Laskar, Shyamasree; Babu, Somepalli Mastan; Bhattacharyya, Mrinal Kanti

    2014-10-01

    Malaria parasites survive through repairing a plethora of DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs) experienced during their asexual growth. In Plasmodium Rad51 mediated homologous recombination (HR) mechanism and homology-independent alternative end-joining mechanism have been identified. Here we address whether loss of HR activity can be compensated by other DSB repair mechanisms. Creating a transgenic Plasmodium line defective in HR function, we demonstrate that HR is the most important DSB repair pathway in malarial parasite. Using mouse malaria model we have characterized the dominant negative effect of PfRad51(K143R) mutant on Plasmodium DSB repair and host-parasite interaction. Our work illustrates that Plasmodium berghei harbouring the mutant protein (PfRad51(K143R)) failed to repair DSBs as evidenced by hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agent. Mice infected with mutant parasites lived significantly longer with markedly reduced parasite burden. To better understand the effect of mutant PfRad51(K143R) on HR, we used yeast as a surrogate model and established that the presence of PfRad51(K143R) completely inhibited DNA repair, gene conversion and gene targeting. Biochemical experiment confirmed that very low level of mutant protein was sufficient for complete disruption of wild-type PfRad51 activity. Hence our work provides evidence that HR pathway of Plasmodium could be efficiently targeted to curb malaria.

  17. The AtRAD21.1 and AtRAD21.3 Arabidopsis cohesins play a synergistic role in somatic DNA double strand break damage repair

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background The RAD21 cohesin plays, besides its well-recognised role in chromatid cohesion, a role in DNA double strand break (dsb) repair. In Arabidopsis there are three RAD21 paralog genes (AtRAD21.1, AtRAD21.2 and AtRAD21.3), yet only AtRAD21.1 has been shown to be required for DNA dsb damage repair. Further investigation of the role of cohesins in DNA dsb repair was carried out and is here reported. Results We show for the first time that not only AtRAD21.1 but also AtRAD21.3 play a role ...

  18. A role for the malignant brain tumour (MBT domain protein LIN-61 in DNA double-strand break repair by homologous recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas M Johnson

    Full Text Available Malignant brain tumour (MBT domain proteins are transcriptional repressors that function within Polycomb complexes. Some MBT genes are tumour suppressors, but how they prevent tumourigenesis is unknown. The Caenorhabditis elegans MBT protein LIN-61 is a member of the synMuvB chromatin-remodelling proteins that control vulval development. Here we report a new role for LIN-61: it protects the genome by promoting homologous recombination (HR for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs. lin-61 mutants manifest numerous problems associated with defective HR in germ and somatic cells but remain proficient in meiotic recombination. They are hypersensitive to ionizing radiation and interstrand crosslinks but not UV light. Using a novel reporter system that monitors repair of a defined DSB in C. elegans somatic cells, we show that LIN-61 contributes to HR. The involvement of this MBT protein in HR raises the possibility that MBT-deficient tumours may also have defective DSB repair.

  19. Dynamics and Cell-Type Specificity of the DNA Double-Strand Break Repair Protein RecN in the Developmental Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120.

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    Sheng Hu

    Full Text Available DNA replication and repair are two fundamental processes required in life proliferation and cellular defense and some common proteins are involved in both processes. The filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is capable of forming heterocysts for N2 fixation in the absence of a combined-nitrogen source. This developmental process is intimately linked to cell cycle control. In this study, we investigated the localization of the DNA double-strand break repair protein RecN during key cellular events, such as chromosome damaging, cell division, and heterocyst differentiation. Treatment by a drug causing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs induced reorganization of the RecN focus preferentially towards the mid-cell position. RecN-GFP was absent in most mature heterocysts. Furthermore, our results showed that HetR, a central player in heterocyst development, was involved in the proper positioning and distribution of RecN-GFP. These results showed the dynamics of RecN in DSB repair and suggested a differential regulation of DNA DSB repair in vegetative cell and heterocysts. The absence of RecN in mature heterocysts is compatible with the terminal nature of these cells.

  20. Dynamics and Cell-Type Specificity of the DNA Double-Strand Break Repair Protein RecN in the Developmental Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Sheng; Wang, Jinglan; Wang, Li; Zhang, Cheng-Cai; Chen, Wen-Li

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication and repair are two fundamental processes required in life proliferation and cellular defense and some common proteins are involved in both processes. The filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is capable of forming heterocysts for N2 fixation in the absence of a combined-nitrogen source. This developmental process is intimately linked to cell cycle control. In this study, we investigated the localization of the DNA double-strand break repair protein RecN during key cellular events, such as chromosome damaging, cell division, and heterocyst differentiation. Treatment by a drug causing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced reorganization of the RecN focus preferentially towards the mid-cell position. RecN-GFP was absent in most mature heterocysts. Furthermore, our results showed that HetR, a central player in heterocyst development, was involved in the proper positioning and distribution of RecN-GFP. These results showed the dynamics of RecN in DSB repair and suggested a differential regulation of DNA DSB repair in vegetative cell and heterocysts. The absence of RecN in mature heterocysts is compatible with the terminal nature of these cells.

  1. Identification of defective illegitimate recombinational repair of oxidatively-induced DNA double-strand breaks in ataxia-telangiectasia cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar, M. E.; Winters, T. A.; Jorgensen, T. J.

    1997-01-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is an autosomal-recessive lethal human disease. Homozygotes suffer from a number of neurological disorders, as well as very high cancer incidence. Heterozygotes may also have a higher than normal risk of cancer, particularly for the breast. The gene responsible for the disease (ATM) has been cloned, but its role in mechanisms of the disease remain unknown. Cellular A-T phenotypes, such as radiosensitivity and genomic instability, suggest that a deficiency in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) may be the primary defect; however, overall levels of DSB rejoining appear normal. We used the shuttle vector, pZ189, containing an oxidatively-induced DSB, to compare the integrity of DSB rejoining in one normal and two A-T fibroblast cells lines. Mutation frequencies were two-fold higher in A-T cells, and the mutational spectrum was different. The majority of the mutations found in all three cell lines were deletions (44-63%). The DNA sequence analysis indicated that 17 of the 17 plasmids with deletion mutations in normal cells occurred between short direct-repeat sequences (removing one of the repeats plus the intervening sequences), implicating illegitimate recombination in DSB rejoining. The combined data from both A-T cell lines showed that 21 of 24 deletions did not involve direct-repeats sequences, implicating a defect in the illegitimate recombination pathway. These findings suggest that the A-T gene product may either directly participate in illegitimate recombination or modulate the pathway. Regardless, this defect is likely to be important to a mechanistic understanding of this lethal disease.

  2. Influence of Double-Strand Break Repair on Radiation Therapy-Induced Acute Skin Reactions in Breast Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mumbrekar, Kamalesh Dattaram [Division of Radiobiology and Toxicology, School of Life Sciences, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka (India); Fernandes, Donald Jerard [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Shirdi Sai Baba Cancer Hospital and Research Centre, Kasturba Hospital, Manipal, Karnataka (India); Goutham, Hassan Venkatesh [Division of Radiobiology and Toxicology, School of Life Sciences, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka (India); Sharan, Krishna [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Shirdi Sai Baba Cancer Hospital and Research Centre, Kasturba Hospital, Manipal, Karnataka (India); Vadhiraja, Bejadi Manjunath [Manipal Hospital, Bangalore, Karnataka (India); Satyamoorthy, Kapaettu [Division of Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka (India); Bola Sadashiva, Satish Rao, E-mail: satishraomlsc@gmail.com [Division of Radiobiology and Toxicology, School of Life Sciences, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka (India)

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: Curative radiation therapy (RT)-induced toxicity poses strong limitations for efficient RT and worsens the quality of life. The parameter that explains when and to what extent normal tissue toxicity in RT evolves would be of clinical relevance because of its predictive value and may provide an opportunity for personalized treatment approach. Methods and Materials: DNA double-strand breaks and repair were analyzed by microscopic γ-H2AX foci analysis in peripheral lymphocytes from 38 healthy donors and 80 breast cancer patients before RT, a 2 Gy challenge dose of x-ray exposed in vitro. Results: The actual damage (AD) at 0.25, 3, and 6 hours and percentage residual damage (PRD) at 3 and 6 hours were used as parameters to measure cellular radiosensitivity and correlated with RT-induced acute skin reactions in patients stratified as non-overresponders (NOR) (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group [RTOG] grade <2) and overresponders (OR) (RTOG grade ≥2). The results indicated that the basal and induced (at 0.25 and 3 hours) γ-H2AX foci numbers were nonsignificant (P>.05) between healthy control donors and the NOR and OR groups, whereas it was significant between ORs and healthy donors at 6 hours (P<.001). There was a significantly higher PRD in OR versus NOR (P<.05), OR versus healthy donors (P<.001) and NOR versus healthy donors (P<.01), supported further by the trend analysis (r=.2392; P=.0326 at 6 hours). Conclusions: Our findings strongly suggest that the measurement of PRD by performing γ-H2AX foci analysis has the potential to be developed into a clinically useful predictive assay.

  3. Prevention of γ-radiation induced cellular genotoxicity by tempol: protection of hematopoietic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Lakshmy; Nair, Cherupally Krishnan Krishnan

    2012-09-01

    Tempol (TPL) under in vitro conditions reduced the extent of gamma radiation induced membrane lipid peroxidation and disappearance of covalently closed circular form of plasmid pBR322. TPL protected cellular DNA from radiation-induced damage in various tissues under ex vivo and in vivo conditions as evidenced by comet assay. TPL also prevented radiation induced micronuclei formation (in peripheral blood leucocytes) and chromosomal aberrations (in bone marrow cells) in whole body irradiated mice. TPL enhanced the rate of repair of cellular DNA (blood leucocytes and bone marrow cells) damage when administered immediately after radiation exposure as revealed from the increased Cellular DNA Repair Index (CRI). The studies thus provided compelling evidence to reveal the effectiveness of TPL to protect hematopoietic system from radiation injury.

  4. Importance of the cell cycle phase for the choice of the appropriate DSB repair pathway, for genome stability maintenance: the trans-S double-strand break repair model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delacôte, Fabien; Lopez, Bernard S

    2008-01-01

    A DNA double-strand break (DSB) is a highly harmful lesion that can lead to genome rearrangements. Two main pathways compete for DSB repair: homologous recombination (HR) and nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ). Depending on the cell cycle phase, the choice of one DSB repair pathway over the other will secure genome stability maintenance or in contrast will increase the risk of genetic instability. HR with the sister chromatid is an efficient way to maintain genome stability, for damage occurring at a post-replication stage. However, in G(1) checkpoint-defective cells, DSBs produced in the G(1) phase and not repaired by NHEJ, can progress through S phase and be processed by HR in late S/G(2) phase. We propose the "trans-S DSB repair" model to account for these data. In this situation HR cannot use the sister chromatid (which is also broken at the same locus) and is thus forced to use ectopic homologous sequences dispersed through the genome, increasing the risk of genetic instability. This shows that the two DSB repair pathways can compete through the cell cycle and underlines the importance of the association between the cell cycle checkpoint and the appropriate DNA repair pathway for genome stability maintenance.

  5. Evolution of DNA Double-Strand Break Repair by Gene Conversion: Coevolution Between a Phage and a Restriction-Modification System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahara, Koji; Horie, Ryota; Kobayashi, Ichizo; Sasaki, Akira

    2007-01-01

    The necessity to repair genome damage has been considered to be an immediate factor responsible for the origin of sex. Indeed, attack by a cellular restriction enzyme of invading DNA from several bacteriophages initiates recombinational repair by gene conversion if there is homologous DNA. In this work, we modeled the interaction between a bacteriophage and a bacterium carrying a restriction enzyme as antagonistic coevolution. We assume a locus on the bacteriophage genome has either a restriction-sensitive or a restriction-resistant allele, and another locus determines whether it is recombination/repair proficient or defective. A restriction break can be repaired by a co-infecting phage genome if one of them is recombination/repair proficient. We define the fitness of phage (resistant/sensitive and repair-positive/-negative) genotypes and bacterial (restriction-positive/-negative) genotypes by assuming random encounter of the genotypes, with given probabilities of single and double infections, and the costs of resistance, repair, and restriction. Our results show the evolution of the repair allele depends on \\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{pmc} \\pagestyle{empty} \\oddsidemargin -1.0in \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}b_{1}/b_{0},\\end{equation*}\\end{document} the ratio of the burst size \\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{pmc} \\pagestyle{empty} \\oddsidemargin -1.0in \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}b_{1}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} under damage to host cell physiology induced by an unrepaired double-strand break to the default burst size \\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage

  6. Viscosimetric analysis of the occurrence and repair of DNA single-strand breaks in irradiated animal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryabchenko, N I; Ivannik, B P; Proskuryakov SYa

    1982-04-01

    The yields of immediate DNA single-strand breaks in normal tumour tissues of irradiated animals were measured by a viscosimetric method of determination of high-polymer single-strand DNA molecular weight in alkaline nuclear lysates. It has been shown that in irradiated thymus, bone marrow leukocytes, Ehrlich ascitic carcinoma and Zaidel hepatoma cells (first group by tissues) in vivo the yields of DNA single-strand breaks were characterized by 80 to 130 eV per break. In in vivo irradiated liver, lymph node, spleen, and sarcoma 180 cells (second group of tissues) the yields of DNA single-strand breaks have been characterized by 30 to 40 eV per break. DNA single-strand breaks of the first group of tissues have rejoined 1 hour after the irradiation in vivo; DNA single-strand breaks of the second group have not done so.

  7. Viscosimetric analysis of the occurrence and repair of DNA single-strand breaks in irradiated animal tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryabchenko, N.I.; Ivannik, B.P.; Proskuryakov, S.Ya. (Akademiya Meditsinskikh Nauk SSSR, Obninsk. Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Inst. Meditsinskoj Radiologii)

    1982-04-01

    The yields of immediate DNA single-strand breaks in normal tumour tissues of ..gamma..-irradiated animals were measured by a viscosimetric method of determination of high-polymer single-strand DNA molecular weight in alkaline nuclear lysates. It has been shown that in irradiated thymus, bone marrow leukocytes, Ehrlich ascitic carcinoma and Zaidel hepatoma cells (first group of tissues) in vivo the yields of DNA single-strand breaks were characterized by 80 to 130 eV per break. In in vivo irradiated liver, lymph node, spleen, and sarcoma 180 cells (second group of tissues) the yields of DNA single-strand breaks have been characterized by 30 to 40 eV per break. DNA single-strand breaks of the first group of tissues have rejoined 1 hour after the irradiation in vivo; DNA single-strand breaks of the second group have not done so.

  8. Mechanisms of DNA repair and radio-induced mutagenesis in higher eukaryotes; Mecanismes de reparation et mutagenese radio-induite chez les eucaryotes superieurs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Averbeck, D. [Centre Universitaire d' Orsay, Institut Curie, Section de Recherche, Lab. Raymond-Latarjet, UMR 2027 CNRS, 91 (France)

    2000-10-01

    Cells of higher eukaryotes possess several very efficient systems for the repair of radiation-induced lesions in DNA. Different strategies have been adopted at the cellular level to remove or even tolerate various types of lesions in order to assure survival and limit the mutagenic consequences. In mammalian cells, the main DNA repair systems comprise direct reversion of damage, excision of damage and exchange mechanisms with intact DNA. Among these, the direct ligation of single strand breaks (SSB) by a DNA ligase and the multi-enzymatic repair systems of mismatch repair, base and nucleotide excision repair as well as the repair of double strand breaks (DSB) by homologous recombination or non homologous end-joining are the most important systems. Most of these processes are error-free except the non homologous end-joining pathway used for the repair of DSB. Moreover, certain lesions can be tolerated by more or less accurately acting polymerases capable of performing trans-lesion DNA syntheses. The DNA repair systems are intimately integrated in the network of cellular regulation. Some of their components are DNA damage inducible. Radiation-induced mutagenesis is largely due to unrepaired DNA damage but also involves error-prone repair processes like the repair of DSB by non-homologous end-joining. Generally, mammalian cells are well prepared to repair radiation-induced lesions. However, some questions remain to be asked about mechanistic details and efficiencies of the systems for removing certain types of radiation-damage and about their order and timing of action. The answers to these questions would be important for radioprotection as well as radiotherapy. (author)

  9. Association between Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in XRCC3 and Radiation-Induced Adverse Effects on Normal Tissue: A Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Zhe Song

    Full Text Available The X-ray repair cross-complementing group 3 (XRCC3 protein plays an important role in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks. The relationship between XRCC3 polymorphisms and the risk of radiation-induced adverse effects on normal tissue remains inconclusive. Thus, we performed a meta-analysis to elucidate the association between XRCC3 polymorphisms and radiation-induced adverse effects on normal tissue. All eligible studies up to December 2014 were identified through a search of the PubMed, Embase and Web of Science databases. Seventeen studies involving 656 cases and 2193 controls were ultimately included in this meta-analysis. The pooled odds ratios (ORs with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs were calculated to evaluate the association between XRCC3 polymorphisms and the risk of radiation-induced normal tissue adverse effects. We found that the XRCC3 p.Thr241Met (rs861539 polymorphism was significantly associated with early adverse effects induced by radiotherapy (OR = 1.99, 95%CI: 1.31-3.01, P = 0.001. A positive association lacking statistical significance with late adverse effects was also identified (OR = 1.28, 95%CI: 0.97-1.68, P = 0.08. In addition, the rs861539 polymorphism was significantly correlated with a higher risk of adverse effects induced by head and neck area irradiation (OR = 2.41, 95%CI: 1.49-3.89, p = 0.0003 and breast irradiation (OR = 1.41, 95%CI: 1.02-1.95, p = 0.04, whereas the correlation was not significant for lung irradiation or pelvic irradiation. Furthermore, XRCC3 rs1799794 polymorphism may have a protective effect against late adverse effects induced by radiotherapy (OR = 0.47, 95%CI: 0.26-0.86, P = 0.01. Well-designed large-scale clinical studies are required to further validate our results.

  10. Up-regulation of WRN and DNA ligase IIIalpha in chronic myeloid leukemia: consequences for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallmyr, Annahita; Tomkinson, Alan E; Rassool, Feyruz V

    2008-08-15

    Expression of oncogenic BCR-ABL in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) results in increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) that in turn cause increased DNA damage, including DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). We have previously shown increased error-prone repair of DSBs by nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) in CML cells. Recent reports have identified alternative NHEJ pathways that are highly error prone, prompting us to examine the role of the alternative NHEJ pathways in BCR-ABL-positive CML. Importantly, we show that key proteins in the major NHEJ pathway, Artemis and DNA ligase IV, are down-regulated, whereas DNA ligase IIIalpha, and the protein deleted in Werner syndrome, WRN, are up-regulated. DNA ligase IIIalpha and WRN form a complex that is recruited to DSBs in CML cells. Furthermore, "knockdown" of either DNA ligase IIIalpha or WRN leads to increased accumulation of unrepaired DSBs, demonstrating that they contribute to the repair of DSBs. These results indicate that altered DSB repair in CML cells is caused by the increased activity of an alternative NHEJ repair pathway, involving DNA ligase IIIalpha and WRN. We suggest that, although the repair of ROS-induced DSBs by this pathway contributes to the survival of CML cells, the resultant genomic instability drives disease progression.

  11. Orphan receptor TR3 enhances p53 transactivation and represses DNA double-strand break repair in hepatoma cells under ionizing radiation.

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    Zhao, Bi-xing; Chen, Hang-zi; Du, Xiao-dan; Luo, Jie; He, Jian-ping; Wang, Rong-hao; Wang, Yuan; Wu, Rong; Hou, Ru-rong; Hong, Ming; Wu, Qiao

    2011-08-01

    In response to ionizing radiation (IR)-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), cells elicit an evolutionarily conserved checkpoint response that induces cell cycle arrest and either DNA repair or apoptosis, thereby maintaining genomic stability. DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is a central enzyme involved in DSB repair for mammalian cells that comprises a DNA-PK catalytic subunit and the Ku protein, which act as regulatory elements. DNA-PK also functions as a signaling molecule to selectively regulate p53-dependent apoptosis in response to IR. Herein, we demonstrate that the orphan nuclear receptor TR3 suppresses DSB repair by blocking Ku80 DNA-end binding activity and promoting DNA-PK-induced p53 activity in hepatoma cells. We find that TR3 interacts with Ku80 and inhibits its binding to DNA ends, which then suppresses DSB repair. Furthermore, TR3 is a phosphorylation substrate for DNA-PK and interacts with DNA-PK catalytic subunit in a Ku80-independent manner. Phosphorylated TR3, in turn, enhances DNA-PK-induced phosphorylation and p53 transcription activity, thereby enhancing IR-induced apoptosis in hepatoma cells. Together, our findings reveal novel functions for TR3, not only in DSB repair regulation but also in IR-induced hepatoma cell apoptosis, and they suggest that TR3 is a potential target for cancer radiotherapy.

  12. In Vitro Expansion of Bone Marrow Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Alters DNA Double Strand Break Repair of Etoposide Induced DNA Damage

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    Ian Hare

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are of interest for use in diverse cellular therapies. Ex vivo expansion of MSCs intended for transplantation must result in generation of cells that maintain fidelity of critical functions. Previous investigations have identified genetic and phenotypic alterations of MSCs with in vitro passage, but little is known regarding how culturing influences the ability of MSCs to repair double strand DNA breaks (DSBs, the most severe of DNA lesions. To investigate the response to DSB stress with passage in vitro, primary human MSCs were exposed to etoposide (VP16 at various passages with subsequent evaluation of cellular damage responses and DNA repair. Passage number did not affect susceptibility to VP16 or the incidence and repair kinetics of DSBs. Nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ transcripts showed little alteration with VP16 exposure or passage; however, homologous recombination (HR transcripts were reduced following VP16 exposure with this decrease amplified as MSCs were passaged in vitro. Functional evaluations of NHEJ and HR showed that MSCs were unable to activate NHEJ repair following VP16 stress in cells after successive passage. These results indicate that ex vivo expansion of MSCs alters their ability to perform DSB repair, a necessary function for cells intended for transplantation.

  13. Concerted Activities of Distinct H4K20 Methyltransferases at DNA Double-Strand Breaks Regulate 53BP1 Nucleation and NHEJ-Directed Repair

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    Creighton T. Tuzon

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Although selective binding of 53BP1 to dimethylated histone H4 lysine 20 (H4K20me2 at DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs is a necessary and pivotal determinant of nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ-directed repair, the enzymes that generate H4K20me2 at DSBs were unclear. Here, we determined that the PR-Set7 monomethyltransferase (H4K20me1 regulates de novo H4K20 methylation at DSBs. Rapid recruitment of PR-Set7 to DSBs was dependent on the NHEJ Ku70 protein and necessary for NHEJ-directed repair. PR-Set7 monomethyltransferase activity was required, but insufficient, for H4K20me2 and 53BP1 nucleation at DSBs. We determined that PR-Set7-mediated H4K20me1 facilitates Suv4-20 methyltransferase recruitment and catalysis to generate H4K20me2 necessary for 53BP1 binding. The orchestrated and concerted activities of PR-Set7 and Suv4-20 were required for proficient 53BP1 nucleation and DSB repair. This report identifies PR-Set7 as an essential component of NHEJ and implicates PR-Set7 as a central determinant of NHEJ-directed repair early in mammalian DSB repair pathway choice.

  14. ZIP4H (TEX11 deficiency in the mouse impairs meiotic double strand break repair and the regulation of crossing over.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrie A Adelman

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available We have recently shown that hypomorphic Mre11 complex mouse mutants exhibit defects in the repair of meiotic double strand breaks (DSBs. This is associated with perturbation of synaptonemal complex morphogenesis, repair and regulation of crossover formation. To further assess the Mre11 complex's role in meiotic progression, we identified testis-specific NBS1-interacting proteins via two-hybrid screening in yeast. In this screen, Zip4h (Tex11, a male germ cell specific X-linked gene was isolated. Based on sequence and predicted structural similarity to the S. cerevisiae and A. thaliana Zip4 orthologs, ZIP4H appears to be the mammalian ortholog. In S. cerevisiae and A. thaliana, Zip4 is a meiosis-specific protein that regulates the level of meiotic crossovers, thus influencing homologous chromosome segregation in these organisms. As is true for hypomorphic Nbs1 (Nbs1(DeltaB/DeltaB mice, Zip4h(-/Y mutant mice were fertile. Analysis of spermatocytes revealed a delay in meiotic double strand break repair and decreased crossover formation as inferred from DMC1 and MLH1 staining patterns, respectively. Achiasmate chromosomes at the first meiotic division were also observed in Zip4h(-/Y mutants, consistent with the observed reduction in MLH1 focus formation. These results indicate that meiotic functions of Zip4 family members are conserved and support the view that the Mre11 complex and ZIP4H interact functionally during the execution of the meiotic program in mammals.

  15. Double-strand break repair based on short-homology regions is suppressed under terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase expression, as revealed by a novel vector system for analysing DNA repair by nonhomologous end joining.

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    Maezawa, So; Nakano, Saori; Kuniya, Takaaki; Koiwai, Osamu; Koiwai, Kotaro

    2016-01-01

    We have constructed a novel, nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) assay vector (NAV), containing mKate2, Venus and ccdB genes. Cotransfection of NAV with a construct expressing the restriction enzyme I-SceI generated a double-strand break (DSB) in NAV that excised mKate2 and ccdB. Repair of this DSB produced an intact vector that expressed Venus, a green fluorescent protein. Because cells bearing the repaired NAV lacked the ccdB gene which slows cell proliferation, the cultures were enriched in cells containing repaired DSBs. DNA sequence analysis of the DSB junctions indicated that the repair was carried out mainly by using the closest homology sequence. Use of the NAV yielded rapid results within 3 days after transfection. We then used the NAV to analyse NHEJ in cells overexpressing terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase (TdT). The results indicated that TdT suppresses DNA repair that is based on short (one- or two-base) homology regions, to efficiently add deoxynucleotides during VDJ recombination in lymphoid cells.

  16. Transmission of persistent ionizing radiation-induced foci through cell division in human primary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaurijoux, Aurelie; Voisin, Pascale; Freneau, Amelie; Barquinero, Joan Francesc; Gruel, Gaetan

    2017-03-01

    Unrepaired DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced by ionizing radiation are associated with lethal effects and genomic instability. After the initial breaks and chromatin destabilization, a set of post-translational modifications of histones occurs, including phosphorylation of serine 139 of histone H2AX (γH2AX), which leads to the formation of ionizing radiation-induced foci (IRIF). DSB repair results in the disappearance of most IRIF within hours after exposure, although some remain 24h after irradiation. Their relation to unrepaired DSBs is generally accepted but still controversial. This study evaluates the frequency and kinetics of persistent IRIF and analyzes their impact on cell proliferation. We observed persistent IRIF up to 7 days postirradiation, and more than 70% of cells exposed to 5Gy had at least one of these persistent IRIF 24h after exposure. Moreover we demonstrated that persistent IRIF did not block cell proliferation definitively. The frequency of IRIF was lower in daughter cells, due to asymmetric distribution of IRIF between some of them. We report a positive association between the presence of IRIF and the likelihood of DNA missegregation. Hence, the structure formed after the passage of a persistent IRI focus across the S and G2 phases may impede the correct segregation of the affected chromosome's sister chromatids. The ensuing abnormal resolution of anaphase might therefore cause the nature of IRIF in daughter-cell nuclei to differ before and after the first cell division. The resulting atypical chromosomal assembly may be lethal or result in a gene dosage imbalance and possibly enhanced genomic instability, in particular in the daughter cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Radiation-induced XRCC4 association with chromatin DNA analyzed by biochemical fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamdar, Radhika Pankaj; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa

    2010-01-01

    XRCC4, in association with DNA ligase IV, is thought to play a critical role in the ligation of two DNA ends in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair through non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway. In the present study, we captured radiation-induced chromatin-recruitment of XRCC4 by biochemical fractionation using detergent Nonidet P-40. A subpopulation of XRCC4 changed into a form that is resistant to the extraction with 0.5% Nonidet P-40-containing buffer after irradiation. This form of XRCC4 was liberated by micrococcal nuclease treatment, indicating that it had been tethered to chromatin DNA. This chromatin-recruitment of XRCC4 could be seen immediately (< 0.1 hr) after irradiation and remained up to 4 hr after 20 Gy irradiation. It was seen even after irradiation of small doses, i.e., 2 Gy, but the residence of XRCC4 on chromatin was very transient after 2 Gy irradiation, returning to near normal level in 0.2-0.5 hr after irradiation. The chromatin-bound XRCC4 represented only approximately 1% of total XRCC4 molecules even after 20 Gy irradiation and the quantitative analysis using purified protein as the reference suggested that only a few XRCC4-DNA ligase IV complexes were recruited to each DNA end. We further show that the chromatin-recruitment of XRCC4 was not attenuated by wortmannin, an inhibitor of DNA-PK, or siRNA-mediated knockdown of the DNA-PK catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs), indicating that this process does not require DNA-PKcs. These results would provide us with useful experimental tools and important insights to understand the DNA repair process through NHEJ pathway.

  18. Homologous, homeologous, and illegitimate repair of double-strand breaks during transformation of a wild-type strain and a rad52 mutant strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mezard, C.; Nicolas, A. [Universite Paris-Sud, Orsay (France)

    1994-02-01

    Different modes of in vivo repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs) have been described for various organisms: the recombinational DSB repair (DSBR) mode, the single-strand annealing (SSA) mode, and end-to-end joining. To investigate these modes of DSB repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we have examined the fate of in vitro linearized replicative plasmids during transformation with respect to several parameters. We found that (i) the efficiencies of both intramolecular and intermolecular linear plasmid DSB repair are homology dependent (according to the amount of DNA used during transformation [100 ng or less], recombination between similar but not identical [homeologous] P450s sequences sharing 73% identity is 2- to 18-fold lower than recombination between identical sequences); (ii) the RAD52 gene product is not essential for intramolecular recombination between homologous and homeologous direct repeats (as in the wild-type strain, recombination occurs with respect to the overall alignment of the parental sequences); (iii) in contrast, the RAD52 gene product is required for intermolecular interactions; (iv) similarly, sequencing data revealed examples of intramolecular joining within the few terminal nucleotides of the transforming DNA upon transformation with a linear plasmid with no repeat in the wild-type strain. The recombinant junctions of the rare illegitimate events obtained with S. cerevisiae are very similar to those observed in the repair of DSB in mammalian cells. Together, these and previous results suggest the existence of alternative modes for DSB repair during transformation which differ in their efficiencies and in the structure of their products. We discuss the implications of these results with respect to the existence of alternative pathways and the role of the RAD52 gene product. 67 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Inter-individual variation in DNA double-strand break repair in human fibroblasts before and after exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Paul F.; Nham, Peter B.; Urbin, Salustra S.; Hinz, John M.; Jones, Irene M. [Biosciences and Biotechnology Division, PO Box 808, L-452, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA, 94551-0808 (United States); Thompson, Larry H., E-mail: thompson14@llnl.gov [Biosciences and Biotechnology Division, PO Box 808, L-452, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA, 94551-0808 (United States)

    2010-01-05

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) are generally considered the most critical lesion induced by ionizing radiation (IR) and may initiate carcinogenesis and other disease. Using an immunofluorescence assay to simultaneously detect nuclear foci of the phosphorylated forms of histone H2AX and ATM kinase at sites of DSBs, we examined the response of 25 apparently normal and 10 DNA repair-deficient (ATM, ATR, NBN, LIG1, LIG4, and FANCG) primary fibroblast strains irradiated with low doses of {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-rays. Quiescent G{sub 0}/G{sub 1}-phase cultures were exposed to 5, 10, and 25 cGy and allowed to repair for 24 h. The maximum level of IR-induced foci (0.15 foci per cGy, at 10 or 30 min) in the normal strains showed much less inter-individual variation (CV {approx} 0.2) than the level of spontaneous foci, which ranged from 0.2-2.6 foci/cell (CV {approx} 0.6; mean {+-} SD of 1.00 {+-} 0.57). Significantly slower focus formation post-irradiation was observed in seven normal strains, similar to most mutant strains examined. There was variation in repair efficiency measured by the fraction of IR-induced foci remaining 24 h post-irradiation, curiously with the strains having slower focus formation showing more efficient repair after 25 cGy. Interestingly, the ranges of spontaneous and residual induced foci levels at 24 h in the normal strains were as least as large as those observed for the repair-defective mutant strains. The inter-individual variation in DSB foci parameters observed in cells exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation in this small survey of apparently normal people suggests that hypomorphic genetic variants in genomic maintenance and/or DNA damage signaling and repair genes may contribute to differential susceptibility to cancer induced by environmental mutagens.

  20. Double strand break repair by capture of retrotransposon sequences and reverse-transcribed spliced mRNA sequences in mouse zygotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Ryuichi; Ishii, Masayuki; Fujihara, Yoshitaka; Kitazawa, Moe; Usami, Takako; Kaneko-Ishino, Tomoko; Kanno, Jun; Ikawa, Masahito; Ishino, Fumitoshi

    2015-07-28

    The CRISPR/Cas system efficiently introduces double strand breaks (DSBs) at a genomic locus specified by a single guide RNA (sgRNA). The DSBs are subsequently repaired through non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR). Here, we demonstrate that DSBs introduced into mouse zygotes by the CRISPR/Cas system are repaired by the capture of DNA sequences deriving from retrotransposons, genomic DNA, mRNA and sgRNA. Among 93 mice analysed, 57 carried mutant alleles and 22 of them had long de novo insertion(s) at DSB-introduced sites; two were spliced mRNAs of Pcnt and Inadl without introns, indicating the involvement of reverse transcription (RT). Fifteen alleles included retrotransposons, mRNAs, and other sequences without evidence of RT. Two others were sgRNAs with one containing T7 promoter-derived sequence suggestive of a PCR product as its origin. In conclusion, RT-product-mediated DSB repair (RMDR) and non-RMDR repair were identified in the mouse zygote. We also confirmed that both RMDR and non-RMDR take place in CRISPR/Cas transfected NIH-3T3 cells. Finally, as two de novo MuERV-L insertions in C57BL/6 mice were shown to have characteristic features of RMDR in natural conditions, we hypothesize that RMDR contributes to the emergence of novel DNA sequences in the course of evolution.

  1. The Vitamin A Derivative All-Trans Retinoic Acid Repairs Amyloid-β-Induced Double-Strand Breaks in Neural Cells and in the Murine Neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruz-Gibelli, Emmanuelle; Chessel, Natacha; Allioux, Clélia; Marin, Pascale; Piotton, Françoise; Leuba, Geneviève; Herrmann, François R; Savioz, Armand

    2016-01-01

    The amyloid-β peptide or Aβ is the key player in the amyloid-cascade hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease. Aβ appears to trigger cell death but also production of double-strand breaks (DSBs) in aging and Alzheimer's disease. All-trans retinoic acid (RA), a derivative of vitamin A, was already known for its neuroprotective effects against the amyloid cascade. It diminishes, for instance, the production of Aβ peptides and their oligomerisation. In the present work we investigated the possible implication of RA receptor (RAR) in repair of Aβ-induced DSBs. We demonstrated that RA, as well as RAR agonist Am80, but not AGN 193109 antagonist, repair Aβ-induced DSBs in SH-SY5Y cells and an astrocytic cell line as well as in the murine cortical tissue of young and aged mice. The nonhomologous end joining pathway and the Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated kinase were shown to be involved in RA-mediated DSBs repair in the SH-SY5Y cells. Our data suggest that RA, besides increasing cell viability in the cortex of young and even of aged mice, might also result in targeted DNA repair of genes important for cell or synaptic maintenance. This phenomenon would remain functional up to a point when Aβ increase and RA decrease probably lead to a pathological state.

  2. Alignment of Homologous Chromosomes and Effective Repair of Programmed DNA Double-Strand Breaks during Mouse Meiosis Require the Minichromosome Maintenance Domain Containing 2 (MCMDC2) Protein.

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    Finsterbusch, Friederike; Ravindranathan, Ramya; Dereli, Ihsan; Stanzione, Marcello; Tränkner, Daniel; Tóth, Attila

    2016-10-01

    Orderly chromosome segregation during the first meiotic division requires meiotic recombination to form crossovers between homologous chromosomes (homologues). Members of the minichromosome maintenance (MCM) helicase family have been implicated in meiotic recombination. In addition, they have roles in initiation of DNA replication, DNA mismatch repair and mitotic DNA double-strand break repair. Here, we addressed the function of MCMDC2, an atypical yet conserved MCM protein, whose function in vertebrates has not been reported. While we did not find an important role for MCMDC2 in mitotically dividing cells, our work revealed that MCMDC2 is essential for fertility in both sexes due to a crucial function in meiotic recombination. Meiotic recombination begins with the introduction of DNA double-strand breaks into the genome. DNA ends at break sites are resected. The resultant 3-prime single-stranded DNA overhangs recruit RAD51 and DMC1 recombinases that promote the invasion of homologous duplex DNAs by the resected DNA ends. Multiple strand invasions on each chromosome promote the alignment of homologous chromosomes, which is a prerequisite for inter-homologue crossover formation during meiosis. We found that although DNA ends at break sites were evidently resected, and they recruited RAD51 and DMC1 recombinases, these recombinases were ineffective in promoting alignment of homologous chromosomes in the absence of MCMDC2. Consequently, RAD51 and DMC1 foci, which are thought to mark early recombination intermediates, were abnormally persistent in Mcmdc2-/- meiocytes. Importantly, the strand invasion stabilizing MSH4 protein, which marks more advanced recombination intermediates, did not efficiently form foci in Mcmdc2-/- meiocytes. Thus, our work suggests that MCMDC2 plays an important role in either the formation, or the stabilization, of DNA strand invasion events that promote homologue alignment and provide the basis for inter-homologue crossover formation during

  3. DNA-PK triggers histone ubiquitination and signaling in response to DNA double-strand breaks produced during the repair of transcription-blocking topoisomerase I lesions.

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    Cristini, Agnese; Park, Joon-Hyung; Capranico, Giovanni; Legube, Gaëlle; Favre, Gilles; Sordet, Olivier

    2016-02-18

    Although defective repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) leads to neurodegenerative diseases, the processes underlying their production and signaling in non-replicating cells are largely unknown. Stabilized topoisomerase I cleavage complexes (Top1cc) by natural compounds or common DNA alterations are transcription-blocking lesions whose repair depends primarily on Top1 proteolysis and excision by tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase-1 (TDP1). We previously reported that stabilized Top1cc produce transcription-dependent DSBs that activate ATM in neurons. Here, we use camptothecin (CPT)-treated serum-starved quiescent cells to induce transcription-blocking Top1cc and show that those DSBs are generated during Top1cc repair from Top1 peptide-linked DNA single-strand breaks generated after Top1 proteolysis and before excision by TDP1. Following DSB induction, ATM activates DNA-PK whose inhibition suppresses H2AX and H2A ubiquitination and the later assembly of activated ATM into nuclear foci. Inhibition of DNA-PK also reduces Top1 ubiquitination and proteolysis as well as resumption of RNA synthesis suggesting that DSB signaling further enhances Top1cc repair. Finally, we show that co-transcriptional DSBs kill quiescent cells. Together, these new findings reveal that DSB production and signaling by transcription-blocking Top1 lesions impact on non-replicating cell fate and provide insights on the molecular pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases such as SCAN1 and AT syndromes, which are caused by TDP1 and ATM deficiency, respectively.

  4. 3 cases of radiation-induced sarcoma

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    Shiba, K.; Fukuma, H.; Beppu, Y.; Hirota, T. (National Cancer Center, Tokyo (Japan). Hospital); Shinohara, N.

    1982-03-01

    Criteria for the diagnosis of radiation-induced sarcoma have been previously described. All cases must have a history of irradiation and the second neoplasm must have arisen in the area of the radiation field. A latent period of several years must have elapsed after irradiation before clinical evidence of a second malignant neoplasm. Most important thing is that, all suspected cases must have been proved histologically. We have experienced 3 cases of radiation-induced sarcoma, they were 42-years-old man who developed an osteosarcoma of the lumbar spine at the field of postoperative irradiation for seminoma 7 years previously, 69-years-old woman who developed a malignant fibrous histiocytoma of the buttock at the field of radical radiation for uterine carcinoma 7 years previously and 59-years-old woman who developed an extraskeletal osteosarcoma of the abdominal wall at the field of postoperative irradiation for uterine sarcoma 7 years previously. The last case is very rare and only 8 cases of radiation-induced extraskeletal osteosarcoma have been reported. Since there has been a definite trend in the treatment of cancer toward employing radiation for more favorable cases, in addition to technical improvements in the administration of radiotherapy and more modern equipment, survival data may have been altered considerably in many malignant tumors. Accordingly, more radiation-induced tumors may be encountered in the future. The clinical presentation and histopathology of these radiation-induced sarcomas are presented with a review of the literature.

  5. Radiation-induced brain injury: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eRobbins

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 100,000 primary and metastatic brain tumor patients/year in the US survive long enough (> 6 months to experience radiation-induced brain injury. Prior to 1970, the human brain was thought to be highly radioresistant; the acute CNS syndrome occurs after single doses > 30 Gy; white matter necrosis occurs at fractionated doses > 60 Gy. Although white matter necrosis is uncommon with modern techniques, functional deficits, including progressive impairments in memory, attention, and executive function have become important, because they have profound effects on quality of life. Preclinical studies have provided valuable insights into the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cognitive impairment. Given its central role in memory and neurogenesis, the majority of these studies have focused on the hippocampus. Irradiating pediatric and young adult rodent brains leads to several hippocampal changes including neuroinflammation and a marked reduction in neurogenesis. These data have been interpreted to suggest that shielding the hippocampus will prevent clinical radiation-induced cognitive impairment. However, this interpretation may be overly simplistic. Studies using older rodents, that more closely match the adult human brain tumor population, indicate that, unlike pediatric and young adult rats, older rats fail to show a radiation-induced decrease in neurogenesis or a loss of mature neurons. Nevertheless, older rats still exhibit cognitive impairment. This occurs in the absence of demyelination and/or white matter necrosis similar to what is observed clinically, suggesting that more subtle molecular, cellular and/or microanatomic modifications are involved in this radiation-induced brain injury. Given that radiation-induced cognitive impairment likely reflects damage to both hippocampal- and non-hippocampal-dependent domains, there is a critical need to investigate the microanatomic and functional effects of radiation in various brain

  6. ZTF-8 interacts with the 9-1-1 complex and is required for DNA damage response and double-strand break repair in the C. elegans germline.

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    Hyun-Min Kim

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Germline mutations in DNA repair genes are linked to tumor progression. Furthermore, failure in either activating a DNA damage checkpoint or repairing programmed meiotic double-strand breaks (DSBs can impair chromosome segregation. Therefore, understanding the molecular basis for DNA damage response (DDR and DSB repair (DSBR within the germline is highly important. Here we define ZTF-8, a previously uncharacterized protein conserved from worms to humans, as a novel factor involved in the repair of both mitotic and meiotic DSBs as well as in meiotic DNA damage checkpoint activation in the C. elegans germline. ztf-8 mutants exhibit specific sensitivity to γ-irradiation and hydroxyurea, mitotic nuclear arrest at S-phase accompanied by activation of the ATL-1 and CHK-1 DNA damage checkpoint kinases, as well as accumulation of both mitotic and meiotic recombination intermediates, indicating that ZTF-8 functions in DSBR. However, impaired meiotic DSBR progression partially fails to trigger the CEP-1/p53-dependent DNA damage checkpoint in late pachytene, also supporting a role for ZTF-8 in meiotic DDR. ZTF-8 partially co-localizes with the 9-1-1 DDR complex and interacts with MRT-2/Rad1, a component of this complex. The human RHINO protein rescues the phenotypes observed in ztf-8 mutants, suggesting functional conservation across species. We propose that ZTF-8 is involved in promoting repair at stalled replication forks and meiotic DSBs by transducing DNA damage checkpoint signaling via the 9-1-1 pathway. Our findings define a conserved function for ZTF-8/RHINO in promoting genomic stability in the germline.

  7. Either non-homologous ends joining or homologous recombination is required to repair double-strand breaks in the genome of macrophage-internalized Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

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    Anna Brzostek

    Full Text Available The intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb is constantly exposed to a multitude of hostile conditions and is confronted by a variety of potentially DNA-damaging assaults in vivo, primarily from host-generated antimicrobial toxic radicals. Exposure to reactive nitrogen species and/or reactive oxygen species causes different types of DNA damage, including oxidation, depurination, methylation and deamination, that can result in single- or double-strand breaks (DSBs. These breaks affect the integrity of the whole genome and, when left unrepaired, can lead to cell death. Here, we investigated the role of the DSB repair pathways, homologous recombination (HR and non-homologous ends joining (NHEJ, in the survival of Mtb inside macrophages. To this end, we constructed Mtb strains defective for HR (ΔrecA, NHEJ [Δ(ku,ligD], or both DSB repair systems [Δ(ku,ligD,recA]. Experiments using these strains revealed that either HR or NHEJ is sufficient for the survival and propagation of tubercle bacilli inside macrophages. Inhibition of nitric oxide or superoxide anion production with L-NIL or apocynin, respectively, enabled the Δ(ku,ligD,recA mutant strain lacking both systems to survive intracellularly. Complementation of the Δ(ku,ligD,recA mutant with an intact recA or ku-ligD rescued the ability of Mtb to propagate inside macrophages.

  8. Radiation-induced genomic instability in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huumonen, Katriina; Immonen, Hanna-Kaisa; Baverstock, Keith; Hiltunen, Mikko; Korkalainen, Merja; Lahtinen, Tapani; Parviainen, Juha; Viluksela, Matti; Wong, Garry; Naarala, Jonne; Juutilainen, Jukka

    2012-10-01

    Radiation-induced genomic instability has been well documented, particularly in vitro. However, the understanding of its mechanisms and their consequences in vivo is still limited. In this study, Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans; strain CB665) nematodes were exposed to X-rays at doses of 0.1, 1, 3 or 10Gy. The endpoints were measured several generations after exposure and included mutations in the movement-related gene unc-58, alterations in gene expression analysed with oligoarrays containing the entire C. elegans genome, and micro-satellite mutations measured by capillary electrophoresis. The progeny of the irradiated nematodes showed an increased mutation frequency in the unc-58 gene, with a maximum response observed at 1Gy. Significant differences were also found in gene expression between the irradiated (1Gy) and non-irradiated nematode lines. Differences in gene expression did not show clear clustering into certain gene categories, suggesting that the instability might be a chaotic process rather than a result of changes in the function of few specific genes such as, e.g., those responsible for DNA repair. Increased heterogeneity in gene expression, which has previously been described in irradiated cultured human lymphocytes, was also observed in the present study in C. elegans, the coefficient of variation of gene expression being higher in the progeny of irradiated nematodes than in control nematodes. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first publication reporting radiation-induced genomic instability in C. elegans.

  9. Cascade of chromosomal rearrangements caused by a heterogeneous T-DNA integration supports the double-strand break repair model for T-DNA integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yufei; Chen, Zhiyu; Zhuang, Chuxiong; Huang, Jilei

    2017-02-28

    Transferred DNA (T-DNA) from Agrobacterium tumefaciens can be integrated into the plant genome. The double-strand break repair (DSBR) pathway is a major model for T-DNA integration. From this model, we expect that two ends of a T-DNA molecule would invade into a single DNA double-strand break (DSB) or independent DSBs in the plant genome. We call the later phenomenon a heterogeneous T-DNA integration which has never been observed. In this work, we demonstrated it in an Arabidopsis T-DNA insertion mutant seb19. To resolve the chromosomal structural changes caused by T-DNA integration at both the nucleotide and chromosome levels, we performed inverse PCR, genome resequencing, fluorescence in situ hybridization and linkage analysis. We found, in seb19, a single T-DNA connected two different chromosomal loci and caused complex chromosomal rearrangements. The specific break-junction pattern in seb19 is consistent with the result of heterogeneous T-DNA integration but not of recombination between two T-DNA insertions. We demonstrated that, in seb19, heterogeneous T-DNA integration evoked a cascade of incorrect repair of seven DSBs on chromosome 4 and 5, and then produced translocation, inversion, duplication and deletion. Heterogeneous T-DNA integration supports the DSBR model and suggests that two ends of a T-DNA molecule could be integrated into the plant genome independently. Our results also show a new origin of chromosomal abnormalities. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Mouse BAZ1A (ACF1 is dispensable for double-strand break repair but is essential for averting improper gene expression during spermatogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A Dowdle

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers control DNA access for transcription, recombination, and other processes. Acf1 (also known as BAZ1A in mammals is a defining subunit of the conserved ISWI-family chromatin remodelers ACF and CHRAC, first purified over 15 years ago from Drosophila melanogaster embryos. Much is known about biochemical properties of ACF and CHRAC, which move nucleosomes in vitro and in vivo to establish ordered chromatin arrays. Genetic studies in yeast, flies and cultured human cells clearly implicate these complexes in transcriptional repression via control of chromatin structures. RNAi experiments in transformed mammalian cells in culture also implicate ACF and CHRAC in DNA damage checkpoints and double-strand break repair. However, their essential in vivo roles in mammals are unknown. Here, we show that Baz1a-knockout mice are viable and able to repair developmentally programmed DNA double-strand breaks in the immune system and germ line, I-SceI endonuclease-induced breaks in primary fibroblasts via homologous recombination, and DNA damage from mitomycin C exposure in vivo. However, Baz1a deficiency causes male-specific sterility in accord with its high expression in male germ cells, where it displays dynamic, stage-specific patterns of chromosomal localization. Sterility is caused by pronounced defects in sperm development, most likely a consequence of massively perturbed gene expression in spermatocytes and round spermatids in the absence of BAZ1A: the normal spermiogenic transcription program is largely intact but more than 900 other genes are mis-regulated, primarily reflecting inappropriate up-regulation. We propose that large-scale changes in chromatin composition that occur during spermatogenesis create a window of vulnerability to promiscuous transcription changes, with an essential function of ACF and/or CHRAC chromatin remodeling activities being to safeguard against these alterations.

  11. Coordination and processing of DNA ends during double-strand break repair: the role of the bacteriophage T4 Mre11/Rad50 (MR) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almond, Joshua R; Stohr, Bradley A; Panigrahi, Anil K; Albrecht, Dustin W; Nelson, Scott W; Kreuzer, Kenneth N

    2013-11-01

    The in vivo functions of the bacteriophage T4 Mre11/Rad50 (MR) complex (gp46/47) in double-strand-end processing, double-strand break repair, and recombination-dependent replication were investigated. The complex is essential for T4 growth, but we wanted to investigate the in vivo function during productive infections. We therefore generated a suppressed triple amber mutant in the Rad50 subunit to substantially reduce the level of complex and thereby reduce phage growth. Growth-limiting amounts of the complex caused a concordant decrease in phage genomic recombination-dependent replication. However, the efficiencies of double-strand break repair and of plasmid-based recombination-dependent replication remained relatively normal. Genetic analyses of linked markers indicated that double-strand ends were less protected from nuclease erosion in the depleted infection and also that end coordination during repair was compromised. We discuss models for why phage genomic recombination-dependent replication is more dependent on Mre11/Rad50 levels when compared to plasmid recombination-dependent replication. We also tested the importance of the conserved histidine residue in nuclease motif I of the T4 Mre11 protein. Substitution with multiple different amino acids (including serine) failed to support phage growth, completely blocked plasmid recombination-dependent replication, and led to the stabilization of double-strand ends. We also constructed and expressed an Mre11 mutant protein with the conserved histidine changed to serine. The mutant protein was found to be completely defective for nuclease activities, but retained the ability to bind the Rad50 subunit and double-stranded DNA. These results indicate that the nuclease activity of Mre11 is critical for phage growth and recombination-dependent replication during T4 infections.

  12. Release of Ku and MRN from DNA ends by Mre11 nuclease activity and Ctp1 is required for homologous recombination repair of double-strand breaks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Langerak

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The multifunctional Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 (MRN protein complex recruits ATM/Tel1 checkpoint kinase and CtIP/Ctp1 homologous recombination (HR repair factor to double-strand breaks (DSBs. HR repair commences with the 5'-to-3' resection of DNA ends, generating 3' single-strand DNA (ssDNA overhangs that bind Replication Protein A (RPA complex, followed by Rad51 recombinase. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 (MRX complex is critical for DSB resection, although the enigmatic ssDNA endonuclease activity of Mre11 and the DNA-end processing factor Sae2 (CtIP/Ctp1 ortholog are largely unnecessary unless the resection activities of Exo1 and Sgs1-Dna2 are also eliminated. Mre11 nuclease activity and Ctp1/CtIP are essential for DSB repair in Schizosaccharomyces pombe and mammals. To investigate DNA end resection in Schizo. pombe, we adapted an assay that directly measures ssDNA formation at a defined DSB. We found that Mre11 and Ctp1 are essential for the efficient initiation of resection, consistent with their equally crucial roles in DSB repair. Exo1 is largely responsible for extended resection up to 3.1 kb from a DSB, with an activity dependent on Rqh1 (Sgs1 DNA helicase having a minor role. Despite its critical function in DSB repair, Mre11 nuclease activity is not required for resection in fission yeast. However, Mre11 nuclease and Ctp1 are required to disassociate the MRN complex and the Ku70-Ku80 nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ complex from DSBs, which is required for efficient RPA localization. Eliminating Ku makes Mre11 nuclease activity dispensable for MRN disassociation and RPA localization, while improving repair of a one-ended DSB formed by replication fork collapse. From these data we propose that release of the MRN complex and Ku from DNA ends by Mre11 nuclease activity and Ctp1 is a critical step required to expose ssDNA for RPA localization and ensuing HR repair.

  13. β-HPV 5 and 8 E6 disrupt homology dependent double strand break repair by attenuating BRCA1 and BRCA2 expression and foci formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas A Wallace

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent work has explored a putative role for the E6 protein from some β-human papillomavirus genus (β-HPVs in the development of non-melanoma skin cancers, specifically β-HPV 5 and 8 E6. Because these viruses are not required for tumor maintenance, they are hypothesized to act as co-factors that enhance the mutagenic capacity of UV-exposure by disrupting the repair of the resulting DNA damage. Supporting this proposal, we have previously demonstrated that UV damage signaling is hindered by β-HPV 5 and 8 E6 resulting in an increase in both thymine dimers and UV-induced double strand breaks (DSBs. Here we show that β-HPV 5 and 8 E6 further disrupt the repair of these DSBs and provide a mechanism for this attenuation. By binding and destabilizing a histone acetyltransferase, p300, β-HPV 5 and 8 E6 reduce the enrichment of the transcription factor at the promoter of two genes critical to the homology dependent repair of DSBs (BRCA1 and BRCA2. The resulting diminished BRCA1/2 transcription not only leads to lower protein levels but also curtails the ability of these proteins to form repair foci at DSBs. Using a GFP-based reporter, we confirm that this reduced foci formation leads to significantly diminished homology dependent repair of DSBs. By deleting the p300 binding domain of β-HPV 8 E6, we demonstrate that the loss of robust repair is dependent on viral-mediated degradation of p300 and confirm this observation using a combination of p300 mutants that are β-HPV 8 E6 destabilization resistant and p300 knock-out cells. In conclusion, this work establishes an expanded ability of β-HPV 5 and 8 E6 to attenuate UV damage repair, thus adding further support to the hypothesis that β-HPV infections play a role in skin cancer development by increasing the oncogenic potential of UV exposure.

  14. H. pylori-Induced DNA Strand Breaks Are Introduced by Nucleotide Excision Repair Endonucleases and Promote NF-κB Target Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara L. Hartung

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The human bacterial pathogen Helicobacter pylori exhibits genotoxic properties that promote gastric carcinogenesis. H. pylori introduces DNA double strand breaks (DSBs in epithelial cells that trigger host cell DNA repair efforts. Here, we show that H. pylori-induced DSBs are repaired via error-prone, potentially mutagenic non-homologous end-joining. A genome-wide screen for factors contributing to DSB induction revealed a critical role for the H. pylori type IV secretion system (T4SS. Inhibition of transcription, as well as NF-κB/RelA-specific RNAi, abrogates DSB formation. DSB induction further requires β1-integrin signaling. DSBs are introduced by the nucleotide excision repair endonucleases XPF and XPG, which, together with RelA, are recruited to chromatin in a highly coordinated, T4SS-dependent manner. Interestingly, XPF/XPG-mediated DNA DSBs promote NF-κB target gene transactivation and host cell survival. In summary, H. pylori induces XPF/XPG-mediated DNA damage through activation of the T4SS/β1-integrin signaling axis, which promotes NF-κB target gene expression and host cell survival.

  15. Loss of the catalytic subunit of the DNA-dependent protein kinase in DNA double-strand-break-repair mutant mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, S R; Kurimasa, A; Oshimura, M; Dynan, W S; Bradbury, E M; Chen, D J

    1995-04-11

    The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) consists of three polypeptide components: Ku-70, Ku-80, and an approximately 350-kDa catalytic subunit (p350). The gene encoding the Ku-80 subunit is identical to the x-ray-sensitive group 5 complementing gene XRCC5. Expression of the Ku-80 cDNA rescues both DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair and V(D)J recombination in group 5 mutant cells. The involvement of Ku-80 in these processes suggests that the underlying defect in these mutant cells may be disruption of the DNA-PK holoenzyme. In this report we show that the p350 kinase subunit is deleted in cells derived from the severe combined immunodeficiency mouse and in the Chinese hamster ovary cell line V-3, both of which are defective in DSB repair and V(D)J recombination. A centromeric fragment of human chromosome 8 that complements the scid defect also restores p350 protein expression and rescues in vitro DNA-PK activity. These data suggest the scid gene may encode the p350 protein or regulate its expression and are consistent with a model whereby DNA-PK is a critical component of the DSB-repair pathway.

  16. Loss of the catalytic subunit of the DNA-dependent protein kinase in DNA double-strand-break-repair mutant mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, S.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)]|[Tottori Univ., Yonago (Japan); Kurimasa, Akihiro; Oshimura, Mitsuo [Tottori Univ., Yonago (Japan); Dynan, W.S. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Bradbury, E.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)]|[Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Chen, D.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-04-11

    The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) consists of three polypeptide components: Ku-70, Ku-80, and an {approx}350-kDa catalytic subunit (p350). The gene encoding the Ku-80 subunit is identical to the x-ray-sensitive group 5 complementing gene XRCC5. Expression of the Ku-80 cDNA rescues both DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair and V(D)J recombination in group 5 mutant cells. The involvement of Ku-80 in these processes suggests that the underlying defect in these mutant cells may be disruption of the DNA-PK holoenzyme. In this report we show that the p350 kinase subunit is deleted in cells derived from the severe combined immunodeficiency mouse and in the Chinese hamster ovary cell line V-3, both of which are defective in DSB repair and V(D)J recombination. A centromeric fragment of human chromosome 8 that complements the scid defect also restores p350 protein expression and rescues in vitro DNA-PK activity. These data suggest the scid gene may encode the p350 protein or regulate its expression and are consistent with a model whereby DNA-PK is a critical component of the DSB-repair pathway. 38 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Reducing radiation induced emesis in abdominal radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, K. (Royal Marsden Hospital, Sutton (United Kingdom))

    1994-06-01

    In patients with seminoma testes, a comparison was made between radiation induced emesis suffered by patients receiving 'dogleg' radiotherapy with those suffered by patients who received para-aortic radiotherapy. The same comparisons were made between the effects suffered by those patients who received the anti-emetic, Ondansetron, and those suffered by patients who received conventional anti-emetics. (UK).

  18. Hybrid model of the radiation-induced bystander effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braga, Viviane V.B.; Faria, Fernando Pereira de; Grynberg, Suely Epsztein, E-mail: vitoriabraga06@gmail.com, E-mail: fernandopereirabh@gmail.com, E-mail: seg@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) refer to biological alterations in non-irradiated cells that occupy the same medium (culture or tissue) of irradiated cells. The biochemical mechanisms of the RIBE are not completely elucidated. However, several experiments indicate its existence. The objective of this work is to quantify the effect via stochastic and deterministic approaches. The hypotheses of the model are: a) one non-irradiated healthy cell interacts with signals that propagate through the medium. These signals are released by irradiated cells. At the time of interaction cell-signal, the cell can become damaged and signaling or damage and not signaling; b) Both types of damage cells repair with certain rate becoming health cells; c) The diffusion of signals obey the discrete diffusion equation with decay in two dimensions. d) The signal concentration released by irradiated cells depends on the dose in the low dose range (< 0.3 Gy) and saturates for higher dose values. As expected, the temporal analysis of the model as a function of the repair rate shows that the survival fraction decreases as the repair rate is reduced. The analysis of the extent of damage triggered by a signal concentration released by a single irradiated cell at time zero show that the damage grows with the maximum simulation time. The results show good agreement with the experimental data. The stochastic and deterministic methods used are in qualitative agreement, as expected. (author)

  19. Bystander effects in radiation-induced genomic instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, William F.; Hartmann, Andreas; Limoli, Charles L.; Nagar, Shruti; Ponnaiya, Brian

    2002-01-01

    Exposure of GM10115 hamster-human hybrid cells to X-rays can result in the induction of chromosomal instability in the progeny of surviving cells. This instability manifests as the dynamic production of novel sub-populations of cells with unique cytogenetic rearrangements involving the "marker" human chromosome. We have used the comet assay to investigate whether there was an elevated level of endogenous DNA breaks in chromosomally unstable clones that could provide a source for the chromosomal rearrangements and thus account for the persistent instability observed. Our results indicate no significant difference in comet tail measurement between non-irradiated and radiation-induced chromosomally unstable clones. Using two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization we also investigated whether recombinational events involving the interstitial telomere repeat-like sequences in GM10115 cells were involved at frequencies higher than random processes would otherwise predict. Nine of 11 clones demonstrated a significantly higher than expected involvement of these interstitial telomere repeat-like sequences at the recombination junction between the human and hamster chromosomes. Since elevated levels of endogenous breaks were not detected in unstable clones we propose that epigenetic or bystander effects (BSEs) lead to the activation of recombinational pathways that perpetuate the unstable phenotype. Specifically, we expand upon the hypothesis that radiation induces conditions and/or factors that stimulate the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These reactive intermediates then contribute to a chronic pro-oxidant environment that cycles over multiple generations, promoting chromosomal recombination and other phenotypes associated with genomic instability.

  20. Homologous recombination contributes to the repair of DNA double-strand breaks induced by high-energy iron ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zafar, Faria; Seidler, Sara B.; Kronenberg, Amy; Schild, David; Wiese, Claudia

    2010-06-29

    To test the contribution of homologous recombinational repair (HRR) in repairing DNA damaged sites induced by high-energy iron ions, we used: (1) HRR-deficient rodent cells carrying a deletion in the RAD51D gene and (2) syngeneic human cells impaired for HRR by RAD51D or RAD51 knockdown using RNA interference. We show that in response to iron ions, HRR contributes to cell survival in rodent cells, and that HRR-deficiency abrogates RAD51 foci formation. Complementation of the HRR defect by human RAD51D rescues both enhanced cytotoxicity and RAD51 foci formation. For human cells irradiated with iron ions, cell survival is decreased, and, in p53 mutant cells, the levels of mutagenesis are increased when HRR is impaired. Human cells synchronized in S phase exhibit more pronounced resistance to iron ions as compared with cells in G1 phase, and this increase in radioresistance is diminished by RAD51 knockdown. These results implicate a role for RAD51-mediated DNA repair (i.e. HRR) in removing a fraction of clustered lesions induced by charged particle irradiation. Our results are the first to directly show the requirement for an intact HRR pathway in human cells in ensuring DNA repair and cell survival in response to high-energy high LET radiation.

  1. Repair Machinery for Radiation-Induced DNA Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-07-01

    titrations, different pHs were maintained with a buffer mixture of constant ionic strength composed of 25 mM of acetic acids and MES, and 50 mM of Trizma base...the region 1lq23.1-11q23.2. accession number P39287). IMAGE clone 663460 was chosen, se- Buffers and Reagents-All reagents were purchased from Sigma...was obtained quenced Tagged Site" data base at National Cancer Biology Institute, from Dharmacon Research (Boulder, CO). L buffer (Lysis buffer ) con

  2. Direct and inverted repeats elicit genetic instability by both exploiting and eluding DNA double-strand break repair systems in mycobacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewelina A Wojcik

    Full Text Available Repetitive DNA sequences with the potential to form alternative DNA conformations, such as slipped structures and cruciforms, can induce genetic instability by promoting replication errors and by serving as a substrate for DNA repair proteins, which may lead to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs. However, the contribution of each of the DSB repair pathways, homologous recombination (HR, non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ and single-strand annealing (SSA, to this sort of genetic instability is not fully understood. Herein, we assessed the genome-wide distribution of repetitive DNA sequences in the Mycobacterium smegmatis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Escherichia coli genomes, and determined the types and frequencies of genetic instability induced by direct and inverted repeats, both in the presence and in the absence of HR, NHEJ, and SSA. All three genomes are strongly enriched in direct repeats and modestly enriched in inverted repeats. When using chromosomally integrated constructs in M. smegmatis, direct repeats induced the perfect deletion of their intervening sequences ~1,000-fold above background. Absence of HR further enhanced these perfect deletions, whereas absence of NHEJ or SSA had no influence, suggesting compromised replication fidelity. In contrast, inverted repeats induced perfect deletions only in the absence of SSA. Both direct and inverted repeats stimulated excision of the constructs from the attB integration sites independently of HR, NHEJ, or SSA. With episomal constructs, direct and inverted repeats triggered DNA instability by activating nucleolytic activity, and absence of the DSB repair pathways (in the order NHEJ>HR>SSA exacerbated this instability. Thus, direct and inverted repeats may elicit genetic instability in mycobacteria by 1 directly interfering with replication fidelity, 2 stimulating the three main DSB repair pathways, and 3 enticing L5 site-specific recombination.

  3. DNA double-strand break repair is involved in desiccation resistance of Sinorhizobium meliloti, but is not essential for its symbiotic interaction with Medicago truncatula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuy, Pierre; Gourion, Benjamin; Sauviac, Laurent; Bruand, Claude

    2016-11-23

    The soil bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti, a nitrogen-fixing symbiont of legume plants, is exposed to numerous stress conditions in nature, some of which cause the formation of harmful DNA double strand breaks (DSB). In particular, the reactive oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen (RNS) species produced during symbiosis, and the desiccation occurring in dry soils, are conditions which induce DSB. Two major systems of DSB repair are known in S. meliloti: homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). However, their role in the resistance to ROS, RNS and desiccation has never been examined in this bacterial species, and the importance of DSB repair in the symbiotic interaction has not been properly evaluated. Here, we constructed S. meliloti strains deficient in HR (by deleting the recA gene) or in NHEJ (by deleting the four ku genes) or both. Interestingly, we observed that ku and/or recA genes are involved in S. meliloti resistance to ROS and RNS. Nevertheless, a S. meliloti strain deficient in both HR and NHEJ was not altered in its ability to establish and maintain an efficient nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with Medicago truncatula, showing that rhizobial DSB repair is not essential for this process. This result suggests either that DSB formation in S. meliloti is efficiently prevented during symbiosis, or that DSB are not detrimental for symbiosis efficiency. In contrast, we found for the first time that both recA and ku genes are involved in S. meliloti resistance to desiccation, suggesting that DSB repair could be important for rhizobium persistence in the soil.

  4. Androgen receptor in Sertoli cells regulates DNA double-strand break repair and chromosomal synapsis of spermatocytes partially through intercellular EGF-EGFR signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Su-Ren; Hao, Xiao-Xia; Zhang, Yan; Deng, Shou-Long; Wang, Zhi-Peng; Wang, Yu-Qian; Wang, Xiu-Xia; Liu, Yi-Xun

    2016-04-01

    Spermatogenesis does not progress beyond the pachytene stages of meiosis in Sertoli cell-specific AR knockout (SCARKO) mice. However, further evidence of meiotic arrest and underlying paracrine signals in SCARKO testes is still lacking. We utilized co-immunostaining of meiotic surface spreads to examine the key events during meiotic prophase I. SCARKO spermatocytes exhibited a failure in chromosomal synapsis observed by SCP1/SCP3 double-staining and CREST foci quantification. In addition, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) were formed but were not repaired in the mutant spermatocytes, as revealed by γ-H2AX staining and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity examination. The later stages of DSB repair, such as the accumulation of the RAD51 strand exchange protein and the localization of mismatch repair protein MLH1, were correspondingly altered in SCARKO spermatocytes. Notably, the expression of factors that guide RAD51 loading onto sites of DSBs, including TEX15, BRCA1/2 and PALB2, was severely impaired when either AR was down-regulated or EGF was up-regulated. We observed that some ligands in the epidermal growth factor (EGF) family were over-expressed in SCARKO Sertoli cells and that some receptors in the EGF receptor (EGFR) family were ectopically activated in the mutant spermatocytes. When EGF-EGFR signaling was repressed to approximately normal by the specific inhibitor AG1478 in the cultured SCARKO testis tissues, the arrested meiosis was partially rescued, and functional haploid cells were generated. Based on these data, we propose that AR in Sertoli cells regulates DSB repair and chromosomal synapsis of spermatocytes partially through proper intercellular EGF-EGFR signaling.

  5. Bypass of a 5',8-cyclopurine-2'-deoxynucleoside by DNA polymerase β during DNA replication and base excision repair leads to nucleotide misinsertions and DNA strand breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhongliang; Xu, Meng; Lai, Yanhao; Laverde, Eduardo E; Terzidis, Michael A; Masi, Annalisa; Chatgilialoglu, Chryssostomos; Liu, Yuan

    2015-09-01

    5',8-Cyclopurine-2'-deoxynucleosides including 5',8-cyclo-dA (cdA) and 5',8-cyclo-dG (cdG) are induced by hydroxyl radicals resulting from oxidative stress such as ionizing radiation. 5',8-cyclopurine-2'-deoxynucleoside lesions are repaired by nucleotide excision repair with low efficiency, thereby leading to their accumulation in the human genome and lesion bypass by DNA polymerases during DNA replication and base excision repair (BER). In this study, for the first time, we discovered that DNA polymerase β (pol β) efficiently bypassed a 5'R-cdA, but inefficiently bypassed a 5'S-cdA during DNA replication and BER. We found that cell extracts from pol β wild-type mouse embryonic fibroblasts exhibited significant DNA synthesis activity in bypassing a cdA lesion located in replication and BER intermediates. However, pol β knock-out cell extracts exhibited little DNA synthesis to bypass the lesion. This indicates that pol β plays an important role in bypassing a cdA lesion during DNA replication and BER. Furthermore, we demonstrated that pol β inserted both a correct and incorrect nucleotide to bypass a cdA at a low concentration. Nucleotide misinsertion was significantly stimulated by a high concentration of pol β, indicating a mutagenic effect induced by pol β lesion bypass synthesis of a 5',8-cyclopurine-2'-deoxynucleoside. Moreover, we found that bypass of a 5'S-cdA by pol β generated an intermediate that failed to be extended by pol β, resulting in accumulation of single-strand DNA breaks. Our study provides the first evidence that pol β plays an important role in bypassing a 5',8-cyclo-dA during DNA replication and repair, as well as new insight into mutagenic effects and genome instability resulting from pol β bypassing of a cdA lesion.

  6. Histone chaperone Anp32e removes H2A.Z from DNA double-strand breaks and promotes nucleosome reorganization and DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gursoy-Yuzugullu, Ozge; Ayrapetov, Marina K; Price, Brendan D

    2015-06-16

    The repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) requires open, flexible chromatin domains. The NuA4-Tip60 complex creates these flexible chromatin structures by exchanging histone H2A.Z onto nucleosomes and promoting acetylation of histone H4. Here, we demonstrate that the accumulation of H2A.Z on nucleosomes at DSBs is transient, and that rapid eviction of H2A.Z is required for DSB repair. Anp32e, an H2A.Z chaperone that interacts with the C-terminal docking domain of H2A.Z, is rapidly recruited to DSBs. Anp32e functions to remove H2A.Z from nucleosomes, so that H2A.Z levels return to basal within 10 min of DNA damage. Further, H2A.Z removal by Anp32e disrupts inhibitory interactions between the histone H4 tail and the nucleosome surface, facilitating increased acetylation of histone H4 following DNA damage. When H2A.Z removal by Anp32e is blocked, nucleosomes at DSBs retain elevated levels of H2A.Z, and assume a more stable, hypoacetylated conformation. Further, loss of Anp32e leads to increased CtIP-dependent end resection, accumulation of single-stranded DNA, and an increase in repair by the alternative nonhomologous end joining pathway. Exchange of H2A.Z onto the chromatin and subsequent rapid removal by Anp32e are therefore critical for creating open, acetylated nucleosome structures and for controlling end resection by CtIP. Dynamic modulation of H2A.Z exchange and removal by Anp32e reveals the importance of the nucleosome surface and nucleosome dynamics in processing the damaged chromatin template during DSB repair.

  7. TODRA, a lncRNA at the RAD51 Locus, Is Oppositely Regulated to RAD51, and Enhances RAD51-Dependent DSB (Double Strand Break) Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazy, Inbal; Zeevi, David A; Renbaum, Paul; Zeligson, Sharon; Eini, Lital; Bashari, Dana; Smith, Yoav; Lahad, Amnon; Goldberg, Michal; Ginsberg, Doron; Levy-Lahad, Ephrat

    2015-01-01

    Expression of RAD51, a crucial player in homologous recombination (HR) and DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair, is dysregulated in human tumors, and can contribute to genomic instability and tumor progression. To further understand RAD51 regulation we functionally characterized a long non-coding (lnc) RNA, dubbed TODRA (Transcribed in the Opposite Direction of RAD51), transcribed 69bp upstream to RAD51, in the opposite direction. We demonstrate that TODRA is an expressed transcript and that the RAD51 promoter region is bidirectional, supporting TODRA expression (7-fold higher than RAD51 in this assay, p = 0.003). TODRA overexpression in HeLa cells induced expression of TPIP, a member of the TPTE family which includes PTEN. Similar to PTEN, we found that TPIP co-activates E2F1 induction of RAD51. Analysis of E2F1's effect on the bidirectional promoter showed that E2F1 binding to the same site that promotes RAD51 expression, results in downregulation of TODRA. Moreover, TODRA overexpression induces HR in a RAD51-dependent DSB repair assay, and increases formation of DNA damage-induced RAD51-positive foci. Importantly, gene expression in breast tumors supports our finding that E2F1 oppositely regulates RAD51 and TODRA: increased RAD51 expression, which is associated with an aggressive tumor phenotype (e.g. negative correlation with positive ER (r = -0.22, p = 0.02) and positive PR status (r = -0.27, pDSB repair in malignancy. Importantly, gene expression in breast tumors supports our finding that E2F1 oppositely regulates RAD51 and TODRA: increased RAD51 expression, which is associated with an aggressive tumor phenotype (e.g. negative correlation with positive ER (r = -0.22, p = 0.02) and positive PR status (r = -0.27, pDSB repair in malignancy.

  8. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in lymphoma patients is associated with a decrease in the double strand break repair capacity of peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacoste, Sandrine; Bhatia, Smita; Chen, Yanjun; Bhatia, Ravi; O'Connor, Timothy R

    2017-01-01

    Patients who undergo autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (aHCT) for treatment of a relapsed or refractory lymphoma are at risk of developing therapy related- myelodysplasia/acute myeloid leukemia (t-MDS/AML). Part of the risk likely resides in inherent interindividual differences in their DNA repair capacity (DRC), which is thought to influence the effect chemotherapeutic treatments have on the patient's stem cells prior to aHCT. Measuring DRC involves identifying small differences in repair proficiency among individuals. Initially, we investigated the cell model in healthy individuals (primary lymphocytes and/or lymphoblastoid cell lines) that would be appropriate to measure genetically determined DRC using host-cell reactivation assays. We present evidence that interindividual differences in DRC double-strand break repair (by non-homologous end-joining [NHEJ] or single-strand annealing [SSA]) are better preserved in non-induced primary lymphocytes. In contrast, lymphocytes induced to proliferate are required to assay base excision (BER) or nucleotide excision repair (NER). We established that both NHEJ and SSA DRCs in lymphocytes of healthy individuals were inversely correlated with the age of the donor, indicating that DSB repair in lymphocytes is likely not a constant feature but rather something that decreases with age (~0.37% NHEJ DRC/year). To investigate the predictive value of pre-aHCT DRC on outcome in patients, we then applied the optimized assays to the analysis of primary lymphocytes from lymphoma patients and found that individuals who later developed t-MDS/AML (cases) were indistinguishable in their DRC from controls who never developed t-MDS/AML. However, when DRC was investigated shortly after aHCT in the same individuals (21.6 months later on average), aHCT patients (both cases and controls) showed a significant decrease in DSB repair measurements. The average decrease of 6.9% in NHEJ DRC observed among aHCT patients was much higher

  9. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in lymphoma patients is associated with a decrease in the double strand break repair capacity of peripheral blood lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacoste, Sandrine; Bhatia, Smita; Chen, Yanjun; Bhatia, Ravi; O’Connor, Timothy R.

    2017-01-01

    Patients who undergo autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (aHCT) for treatment of a relapsed or refractory lymphoma are at risk of developing therapy related- myelodysplasia/acute myeloid leukemia (t-MDS/AML). Part of the risk likely resides in inherent interindividual differences in their DNA repair capacity (DRC), which is thought to influence the effect chemotherapeutic treatments have on the patient’s stem cells prior to aHCT. Measuring DRC involves identifying small differences in repair proficiency among individuals. Initially, we investigated the cell model in healthy individuals (primary lymphocytes and/or lymphoblastoid cell lines) that would be appropriate to measure genetically determined DRC using host-cell reactivation assays. We present evidence that interindividual differences in DRC double-strand break repair (by non-homologous end-joining [NHEJ] or single-strand annealing [SSA]) are better preserved in non-induced primary lymphocytes. In contrast, lymphocytes induced to proliferate are required to assay base excision (BER) or nucleotide excision repair (NER). We established that both NHEJ and SSA DRCs in lymphocytes of healthy individuals were inversely correlated with the age of the donor, indicating that DSB repair in lymphocytes is likely not a constant feature but rather something that decreases with age (~0.37% NHEJ DRC/year). To investigate the predictive value of pre-aHCT DRC on outcome in patients, we then applied the optimized assays to the analysis of primary lymphocytes from lymphoma patients and found that individuals who later developed t-MDS/AML (cases) were indistinguishable in their DRC from controls who never developed t-MDS/AML. However, when DRC was investigated shortly after aHCT in the same individuals (21.6 months later on average), aHCT patients (both cases and controls) showed a significant decrease in DSB repair measurements. The average decrease of 6.9% in NHEJ DRC observed among aHCT patients was much

  10. The efficiency of homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining systems in repairing double-strand breaks during cell cycle progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Bee

    Full Text Available This study investigated the efficiency of Non-Homologous End Joining (NHEJ and Homologous Recombination (HR repair systems in rejoining DNA double-strand breaks (DSB induced in CCD-34Lu cells by different γ-ray doses. The kinetics of DNA repair was assessed by analyzing the fluorescence decrease of γ-H2AX foci measured by SOID (Sum Of Integrated Density parameter and counting foci number in the time-interval 0.5-24 hours after irradiation. Comparison of the two methods showed that the SOID parameter was useful in determining the amount and the persistence of DNA damage signal after exposure to high or low doses of ionizing radiation. The efficiency of DSB rejoining during the cell cycle was assessed by distinguishing G1, S, and G2 phase cells on the basis of nuclear fluorescence of the CENP-F protein. Six hours after irradiation, γ-H2AX foci resolution was higher in G2 compared to G1 cells in which both NHEJ and HR can cooperate. The rejoining of γ-H2AX foci in G2 phase cells was, moreover, decreased by RI-1, the chemical inhibitor of HR, demonstrating that homologous recombination is at work early after irradiation. The relevance of HR in DSB repair was assessed in DNA-PK-deficient M059J cells and in CCD-34Lu treated with the DNA-PKcs inhibitor, NU7026. In both conditions, the kinetics of γ-H2AX demonstrated that DSBs repair was markedly affected when NHEJ was absent or impaired, even in G2 phase cells in which HR should be at work. The recruitment of RAD51 at DSB sites was, moreover, delayed in M059J and in NU7026 treated-CCD-34Lu, with respect to DNA-PKcs proficient cells and continued for 24 hours despite the decrease in DNA repair. The impairment of NHEJ affected the efficiency of the HR system and significantly decreased cell survival after ionizing radiation, confirming that DSB rejoining is strictly dependent on the integrity of the NHEJ repair system.

  11. Atmospheric-pressure plasma jet induces DNA double-strand breaks that require a Rad51-mediated homologous recombination for repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoonna; Kim, Kangil; Kang, Kyu-Tae; Lee, Jong-Soo; Yang, Sang Sik; Chung, Woo-Hyun

    2014-10-15

    Non-thermal plasma generated under atmospheric pressure produces a mixture of chemically reactive molecules and has been developed for a number of biomedical applications. Recently, plasma jet has been proposed as novel cancer therapies based on the observation that free radicals generated by plasma jet induce mitochondria-mediated apoptotic cell death. We show here that air plasma jet induces DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in yeast chromosomes leading to genomic instability and loss of viability, which are alleviated by Rad51, the yeast homolog of Escherichiacoli RecA recombinase, through DNA damage repair by a homologous recombination (HR) process. Hypersensitivity of rad51 mutant to air plasma was not restored by antioxidant treatment unlike sod1 mutant that was highly sensitive to reactive oxygen species (ROS) challenge, suggesting that plasma jet induces DSB-mediated cell death independent of ROS generation. These results may provide a new insight into the mechanism of air plasma jet-induced cell death.

  12. DNA repair protein degradation mediated by helicase-like transcription factor in radiation-induced apoptotic cells%人类解旋酶样转录因子介导辐射凋亡细胞DNA修复蛋白的降解

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱应葆; 韩云; 孙艳; 梁莉; 贾廷珍

    2010-01-01

    目的 探讨人类解旋酶样转录因子(HLTF)转染对辐射诱导细胞凋亡时DNA修复相关蛋白水平的影响.方法 将野生型和RING结构域突变型HLTF分别转染人肺癌细胞A549,60Coγ射线15 Gy照射诱导细胞凋亡,用Western blot检测HRAD17和HRAD52蛋白水平的变化,免疫共沉淀检测特定复合物的存在.结果 γ射线诱导细胞凋亡时,野生型HLTF转染组与对照组相比,DNA修复蛋白HRAD17和HRAD52水平明显降低,而RING结构域突变组与对照组相比则没有明显变化;辐射诱导细胞凋亡时,HLTF可与HRAD17和HRAD52形成复合物.结论 HLTF可介导辐射诱导的凋亡细胞中HRAD17和HRAD52的降解,其机制可能是通过蛋白质复合物的相互作用使DNA修复蛋白泛素化而降解.%Objective To study the effects of helicase-like transcription factor (HLTF)transfection on DNA repair protein level in radiation-induced apoptotic cells.Methods Human lung carcinoma A549 cells were cultured and transfected with FLAG-tagged wild type HLTF (wild type HLTF transfection group),RING structure domain (ubiquitin conjugating region) mutatation HLTF expressing plasmid (mutant transfection group),empty plasmid (congtrol group) respectively.And the other cells were used as mock transfection group.All cells were irradiated with 15 Gy of 60Co γ-rays to induce apoptosis.Western blotting was used to detect the protein levels of the DNA repair proteins HRAD17 and HRAD52 in the transfected cells.Results The levels of HRAD17 and HRAD52 in the wild type HLTF transfection group was significantly lower than that of the control group.There was no significant difference in HRAD17 and HRAD52 levels between the mock transfection group and ubiquity in conjugating region mutation group.complexes of HLTF and HRAD17 and HRAD52 could be found in the irradiation-induced cells.Conclusions HLTF mediates the degradation of HRAD17 and HRAD52 in the irradiation-induced apoptotic cells possibly by the interaction of the

  13. Proteasome inhibitor bortezomib is a novel therapeutic agent for focal radiation-induced osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Abhishek; Wang, Luqiang; Young, Tiffany; Zhong, Leilei; Tseng, Wei-Ju; Levine, Michael A; Cengel, Keith; Liu, X Sherry; Zhang, Yejia; Pignolo, Robert J; Qin, Ling

    2017-08-31

    Bone atrophy and its related fragility fractures are frequent, late side effects of radiotherapy in cancer survivors and have a detrimental impact on their quality of life. In another study, we showed that parathyroid hormone 1-34 and anti-sclerostin antibody attenuates radiation-induced bone damage by accelerating DNA repair in osteoblasts. DNA damage responses are partially regulated by the ubiquitin proteasome pathway. In the current study, we examined whether proteasome inhibitors have similar bone-protective effects against radiation damage. MG132 treatment greatly reduced radiation-induced apoptosis in cultured osteoblastic cells. This survival effect was owing to accelerated DNA repair as revealed by γH2AX foci and comet assays and to the up-regulation of Ku70 and DNA-dependent protein kinase, catalytic subunit, essential DNA repair proteins in the nonhomologous end-joining pathway. Administration of bortezomib (Bzb) reversed the loss of trabecular bone structure and strength in mice at 4 wk after focal radiation. Histomorphometry revealed that Bzb significantly increased the number of osteoblasts and activity in the irradiated area and suppressed the number and activity of osteoclasts, regardless of irradiation. Two weeks of Bzb treatment accelerated DNA repair in bone-lining osteoblasts and thus promoted their survival. Meanwhile, it also inhibited bone marrow adiposity. Taken together, we demonstrate a novel role of proteasome inhibitors in treating radiation-induced osteoporosis.-Chandra, A., Wang, L., Young, T., Zhong, L., Tseng, W.-J., Levine, M. A., Cengel, K., Liu, X. S., Zhang, Y., Pignolo, R. J., Qin, L. Proteasome inhibitor bortezomib is a novel therapeutic agent for focal radiation-induced osteoporosis. © FASEB.

  14. Suppression of Sclerostin Alleviates Radiation-Induced Bone Loss by Protecting Bone-Forming Cells and Their Progenitors Through Distinct Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Abhishek; Lin, Tiao; Young, Tiffany; Tong, Wei; Ma, Xiaoyuan; Tseng, Wei-Ju; Kramer, Ina; Kneissel, Michaela; Levine, Michael A; Zhang, Yejia; Cengel, Keith; Liu, X Sherry; Qin, Ling

    2017-02-01

    Focal radiotherapy is frequently associated with skeletal damage within the radiation field. Our previous in vitro study showed that activation of Wnt/β-catenin pathway can overcome radiation-induced DNA damage and apoptosis of osteoblastic cells. Neutralization of circulating sclerostin with a monoclonal antibody (Scl-Ab) is an innovative approach for treating osteoporosis by enhancing Wnt/β-catenin signaling in bone. Together with the fact that focal radiation increases sclerostin amount in bone, we sought to determine whether weekly treatment with Scl-Ab would prevent focal radiotherapy-induced osteoporosis in mice. Micro-CT and histomorphometric analyses demonstrated that Scl-Ab blocked trabecular bone structural deterioration after radiation by partially preserving osteoblast number and activity. Consistently, trabecular bone in sclerostin null mice was resistant to radiation via the same mechanism. Scl-Ab accelerated DNA repair in osteoblasts after radiation by reducing the number of γ-H2AX foci, a DNA double-strand break marker, and increasing the amount of Ku70, a DNA repair protein, thus protecting osteoblasts from radiation-induced apoptosis. In osteocytes, apart from using similar DNA repair mechanism to rescue osteocyte apoptosis, Scl-Ab restored the osteocyte canaliculi structure that was otherwise damaged by radiation. Using a lineage tracing approach that labels all mesenchymal lineage cells in the endosteal bone marrow, we demonstrated that radiation damage to mesenchymal progenitors mainly involves shifting their fate to adipocytes and arresting their proliferation ability but not inducing apoptosis, which are different mechanisms from radiation damage to mature bone forming cells. Scl-Ab treatment partially blocked the lineage shift but had no effect on the loss of proliferation potential. Taken together, our studies provide proof-of-principle evidence for a novel use of Scl-Ab as a therapeutic treatment for radiation-induced osteoporosis and

  15. Analysis of Repair Mechanisms following an Induced Double-Strand Break Uncovers Recessive Deleterious Alleles in the Candida albicans Diploid Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feri, Adeline; Loll-Krippleber, Raphaël; Commere, Pierre-Henri; Maufrais, Corinne; Sertour, Natacha; Schwartz, Katja; Sherlock, Gavin; Bougnoux, Marie-Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The diploid genome of the yeast Candida albicans is highly plastic, exhibiting frequent loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH) events. To provide a deeper understanding of the mechanisms leading to LOH, we investigated the repair of a unique DNA double-strand break (DSB) in the laboratory C. albicans SC5314 strain using the I-SceI meganuclease. Upon I-SceI induction, we detected a strong increase in the frequency of LOH events at an I-SceI target locus positioned on chromosome 4 (Chr4), including events spreading from this locus to the proximal telomere. Characterization of the repair events by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing and whole-genome sequencing revealed a predominance of gene conversions, but we also observed mitotic crossover or break-induced replication events, as well as combinations of independent events. Importantly, progeny that had undergone homozygosis of part or all of Chr4 haplotype B (Chr4B) were inviable. Mining of genome sequencing data for 155 C. albicans isolates allowed the identification of a recessive lethal allele in the GPI16 gene on Chr4B unique to C. albicans strain SC5314 which is responsible for this inviability. Additional recessive lethal or deleterious alleles were identified in the genomes of strain SC5314 and two clinical isolates. Our results demonstrate that recessive lethal alleles in the genomes of C. albicans isolates prevent the occurrence of specific extended LOH events. While these and other recessive lethal and deleterious alleles are likely to accumulate in C. albicans due to clonal reproduction, their occurrence may in turn promote the maintenance of corresponding nondeleterious alleles and, consequently, heterozygosity in the C. albicans species. PMID:27729506

  16. Analysis of Repair Mechanisms following an Induced Double-Strand Break Uncovers Recessive Deleterious Alleles in the Candida albicans Diploid Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feri, Adeline; Loll-Krippleber, Raphaël; Commere, Pierre-Henri; Maufrais, Corinne; Sertour, Natacha; Schwartz, Katja; Sherlock, Gavin; Bougnoux, Marie-Elisabeth; d'Enfert, Christophe; Legrand, Mélanie

    2016-10-11

    The diploid genome of the yeast Candida albicans is highly plastic, exhibiting frequent loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH) events. To provide a deeper understanding of the mechanisms leading to LOH, we investigated the repair of a unique DNA double-strand break (DSB) in the laboratory C. albicans SC5314 strain using the I-SceI meganuclease. Upon I-SceI induction, we detected a strong increase in the frequency of LOH events at an I-SceI target locus positioned on chromosome 4 (Chr4), including events spreading from this locus to the proximal telomere. Characterization of the repair events by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing and whole-genome sequencing revealed a predominance of gene conversions, but we also observed mitotic crossover or break-induced replication events, as well as combinations of independent events. Importantly, progeny that had undergone homozygosis of part or all of Chr4 haplotype B (Chr4B) were inviable. Mining of genome sequencing data for 155 C. albicans isolates allowed the identification of a recessive lethal allele in the GPI16 gene on Chr4B unique to C. albicans strain SC5314 which is responsible for this inviability. Additional recessive lethal or deleterious alleles were identified in the genomes of strain SC5314 and two clinical isolates. Our results demonstrate that recessive lethal alleles in the genomes of C. albicans isolates prevent the occurrence of specific extended LOH events. While these and other recessive lethal and deleterious alleles are likely to accumulate in C. albicans due to clonal reproduction, their occurrence may in turn promote the maintenance of corresponding nondeleterious alleles and, consequently, heterozygosity in the C. albicans species.

  17. Analysis of Repair Mechanisms following an Induced Double-Strand Break Uncovers Recessive Deleterious Alleles in the Candida albicans Diploid Genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeline Feri

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The diploid genome of the yeast Candida albicans is highly plastic, exhibiting frequent loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH events. To provide a deeper understanding of the mechanisms leading to LOH, we investigated the repair of a unique DNA double-strand break (DSB in the laboratory C. albicans SC5314 strain using the I-SceI meganuclease. Upon I-SceI induction, we detected a strong increase in the frequency of LOH events at an I-SceI target locus positioned on chromosome 4 (Chr4, including events spreading from this locus to the proximal telomere. Characterization of the repair events by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP typing and whole-genome sequencing revealed a predominance of gene conversions, but we also observed mitotic crossover or break-induced replication events, as well as combinations of independent events. Importantly, progeny that had undergone homozygosis of part or all of Chr4 haplotype B (Chr4B were inviable. Mining of genome sequencing data for 155 C. albicans isolates allowed the identification of a recessive lethal allele in the GPI16 gene on Chr4B unique to C. albicans strain SC5314 which is responsible for this inviability. Additional recessive lethal or deleterious alleles were identified in the genomes of strain SC5314 and two clinical isolates. Our results demonstrate that recessive lethal alleles in the genomes of C. albicans isolates prevent the occurrence of specific extended LOH events. While these and other recessive lethal and deleterious alleles are likely to accumulate in C. albicans due to clonal reproduction, their occurrence may in turn promote the maintenance of corresponding nondeleterious alleles and, consequently, heterozygosity in the C. albicans species.

  18. Radiatively induced quark and lepton mass model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Takaaki; Okada, Hiroshi

    2016-10-01

    We propose a radiatively induced quark and lepton mass model in the first and second generation with extra U (1) gauge symmetry and vector-like fermions. Then we analyze the allowed regions which simultaneously satisfy the FCNCs for the quark sector, LFVs including μ- e conversion, the quark mass and mixing, and the lepton mass and mixing. Also we estimate the typical value for the (g - 2) μ in our model.

  19. Study of chemical and radiation induced carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chmura, A.

    1995-11-01

    The study of chemical and radiation induced carcinogenesis has up to now based many of its results on the detection of genetic aberrations using the fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) technique. FISH is time consuming and this tends to hinder its use for looking at large numbers of samples. We are currently developing new technological advances which will increase the speed, clarity and functionality of the FISH technique. These advances include multi-labeled probes, amplification techniques, and separation techniques.

  20. Radiation induced fracture of the scapula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riggs, J.H. III; Schultz, G.D.; Hanes, S.A. (Los Angeles College of Chiropractic, Whittier, CA (USA))

    1990-10-01

    A case of radiation induced osteonecrosis resulting in a fracture of the scapula in a 76-yr-old female patient with a history of breast carcinoma is presented. Diagnostic imaging, laboratory recommendations and clinical findings are discussed along with an algorithm for the safe management of patients with a history of cancer and musculoskeletal complaints. This case demonstrates the necessity of a thorough investigation of musculoskeletal complaints in patients with previous bone-seeking carcinomas.

  1. Dynamics of wound healing signaling as a potential therapeutic target for radiation-induced tissue damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yih-Lin; Pui, Newman N M

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized the histone deacetylase inhibitor phenylbutyrate (PB) has beneficial effects on radiation-induced injury by modulating the expression of DNA repair and wound healing genes. Hamsters received a radiosurgical dose of radiation (40 Gy) to the cheek and were treated with varying PB dosing regimens. Gross alteration of the irradiated cheeks, eating function, histological changes, and gene expression during the course of wound healing were compared between treatment groups. Pathological analysis showed decreased radiation-induced mucositis, facilitated epithelial cell growth, and preventing ulcerative wound formation, after short-term PB treatment, but not after vehicle or sustained PB. The radiation-induced wound healing gene expression profile exhibited a sequential transition from the inflammatory and DNA repair phases to the tissue remodeling phase in the vehicle group. Sustained PB treatment resulted in a prolonged wound healing gene expression profile and delayed the wound healing process. Short-term PB shortened the duration of inflammatory cytokine expression, triggered repeated pulsed expression of cell cycle and DNA repair-regulating genes, and promoted earlier oscillatory expression of tissue remodeling genes. Distinct gene expression patterns between sustained and short-term treatment suggest dynamic profiling of wound healing gene expression can be an important part of a biological therapeutic strategy to mitigate radiation-related tissue injury.

  2. Radiation induced glioblastoma. A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Naoki; Kayama, Takamasa; Sakurada, Kaori; Saino, Makoto; Kuroki, Akira [Yamagata Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-05-01

    We report a surgical case of a 54-year-old woman with a radiation induced glioblastoma. At the age of 34, the patient was diagnosed to have a non-functioning pituitary adenoma. It was partially removed followed by 50 Gy focal irradiation with a 5 x 5 cm lateral opposed field. Twenty years later, she suffered from rapidly increasing symptoms such as aphasia and right hemiparesis. MRI showed a large mass lesion in the left temporal lobe as well as small mass lesions in the brain stem and the right medial temporal lobe. These lesions situated within the irradiated field. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed relatively high lactate signal and decreased N-acetyl aspartate, choline, creatine and phosphocreatine signals. Increased lactate signal meant anaerobic metabolism that suggested the existence of a rapidly growing malignant tumor. Thus, we planned surgical removal of the left temporal lesion with the diagnosis of a radiation induced malignant glioma. The histological examination revealed a glioblastoma with radiation necrosis. MIB-1 staining index was 65%. Postoperatively, her symptoms improved, but she died from pneumonia 1 month after the surgery. A autopsy was obtained. The lesion of the left temporal lobe was found to have continuity to the lesion in the midbrain, the pons and the right temporal lobe as well. High MIB-1 staining index suggested that a radiation induced glioblastoma had high proliferative potential comparing with a de novo and secondary glioblastoma. (author)

  3. Spectrum of Radiation-Induced Clustered Non-DSB Damage - A Monte Carlo Track Structure Modeling and Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Ritsuko; Rahmanian, Shirin; Nikjoo, Hooshang

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this report is to present the spectrum of initial radiation-induced cellular DNA damage [with particular focus on non-double-strand break (DSB) damage] generated by computer simulations. The radiation types modeled in this study were monoenergetic electrons (100 eV-1.5 keV), ultrasoft X-ray photons Ck, AlK and TiK, as well as some selected ions including 3.2 MeV/u proton; 0.74 and 2.4 MeV/u helium ions; 29 MeV/u nitrogen ions and 950 MeV/u iron ions. Monte Carlo track structure methods were used to simulate damage induction by these radiation types in a cell-mimetic condition from a single-track action. The simulations took into account the action of direct energy deposition events and the reaction of hydroxyl radicals on atomistic linear B-DNA segments of a few helical turns including the water of hydration. Our results permitted the following conclusions: a. The absolute levels of different types of damage [base damage, simple and complex single-strand breaks (SSBs) and DSBs] vary depending on the radiation type; b. Within each damage class, the relative proportions of simple and complex damage vary with radiation type, the latter being higher with high-LET radiations; c. Overall, for both low- and high-LET radiations, the ratios of the yields of base damage to SSBs are similar, being about 3.0 ± 0.2; d. Base damage contributes more to the complexity of both SSBs and DSBs, than additional SSB damage and this is true for both low- and high-LET radiations; and e. The average SSB/DSB ratio for low-LET radiations is about 18, which is about 5 times higher than that for high-LET radiations. The hypothesis that clustered DNA damage is more difficult for cells to repair has gained currency among radiobiologists. However, as yet, there is no direct in vivo experimental method to validate the dependence of kinetics of DNA repair on DNA damage complexity (both DSB and non-DSB types). The data on the detailed spectrum of DNA damage presented here, in particular

  4. Non-homologous end joining is the responsible pathway for the repair of fludarabine-induced DNA double strand breaks in mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos-Nebel, Marcelo de [Departamento de Genetica, Instituto de Investigaciones Hematologicas Mariano R. Castex, Academia Nacional de Medicina, Buenos Aires (Argentina)], E-mail: mnebel@hematologia.anm.edu.ar; Larripa, Irene; Gonzalez-Cid, Marcela [Departamento de Genetica, Instituto de Investigaciones Hematologicas Mariano R. Castex, Academia Nacional de Medicina, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2008-11-10

    Fludarabine (FLU), an analogue of adenosine, interferes with DNA synthesis and inhibits the chain elongation leading to replication arrest and DNA double strand break (DSB) formation. Mammalian cells use two main pathways of DSB repair to maintain genomic stability: homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). The aim of the present work was to evaluate the repair pathways employed in the restoration of DSB formed following replication arrest induced by FLU in mammalian cells. Replication inhibition was induced in human lymphocytes and fibroblasts by FLU. DSB occurred in a dose-dependent manner on early/middle S-phase cells, as detected by {gamma}H2AX foci formation. To test whether conservative HR participates in FLU-induced DSB repair, we measured the kinetics of Rad51 nuclear foci formation in human fibroblasts. There was no significant induction of Rad51 foci after FLU treatment. To further confirm these results, we analyzed the frequency of sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) in both human cells. We did not find increased frequencies of SCE after FLU treatment. To assess the participation of NHEJ pathway in the repair of FLU-induced damage, we used two chemical inhibitors of the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs), vanillin and wortmannin. Human fibroblasts pretreated with DNA-PKcs inhibitors showed increased levels of chromosome breakages and became more sensitive to cell death. An active role of NHEJ pathway was also suggested from the analysis of Chinese hamster cell lines. XR-C1 (DNA-PKcs-deficient) and XR-V15B (Ku80-deficient) cells showed hypersensitivity to FLU as evidenced by the increased frequency of chromosome aberrations, decreased mitotic index and impaired survival rates. In contrast, CL-V4B (Rad51C-deficient) and V-C8 (Brca2-deficient) cell lines displayed a FLU-resistant phenotype. Together, our results suggest a major role for NHEJ repair in the preservation of genome integrity against FLU

  5. The Over-expression of the β2 Catalytic Subunit of the Proteasome Decreases Homologous Recombination and Impairs DNA Double-Strand Break Repair in Human Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Collavoli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available By a human cDNA library screening, we have previously identified two sequences coding two different catalytic subunits of the proteasome which increase homologous recombination (HR when overexpressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we investigated the effect of proteasome on spontaneous HR and DNA repair in human cells. To determine if the proteasome has a role in the occurrence of spontaneous HR in human cells, we overexpressed the β2 subunit of the proteasome in HeLa cells and determined the effect on intrachromosomal HR. Results showed that the overexpression of β2 subunit decreased HR in human cells without altering the cell proteasome activity and the Rad51p level. Moreover, exposure to MG132 that inhibits the proteasome activity reduced HR in human cells. We also found that the expression of the β2 subunit increases the sensitivity to the camptothecin that induces DNA double-strand break (DSB. This suggests that the β2 subunit has an active role in HR and DSB repair but does not alter the intracellular level of the Rad51p.

  6. Identification and Analysis of MS5(d): A Gene That Affects Double-Strand Break (DSB) Repair during Meiosis I in Brassica napus Microsporocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xinhua; Yan, Xiaohong; Yuan, Rong; Li, Keqi; Wu, Yuhua; Liu, Fang; Luo, Junling; Li, Jun; Wu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the identification of the Brassica-specific gene MS5(d), which is responsible for male sterility in Brassica napus. The MS5(d) gene is highly expressed in the microsporocyte and encodes a protein that localizes to the nucleus. Light microscopy analyses have demonstrated that the MS5(d) gene affects microsporocyte meiosis in the thermosensitive genic male sterility line TE5A. Sequence comparisons and genetic complementation revealed a C-to-T transition in MS5(d), encoding a Leu-to-Phe (L281F) substitution and causing abnormal male meiosis in TE5A. These findings suggest arrested meiotic chromosome dynamics at pachytene. Furthermore, immunofluorescence analyses showed that double-strand break (DSB) formation and axial elements were normal but that DSB repair and spindle behavior were aberrant in TE5A meiocytes. Collectively, our results indicate that MS5(d) likely encodes a protein required for chromosomal DSB repair at early stages of meiosis in B. napus.

  7. Collision of Trapped Topoisomerase 2 with Transcription and Replication: Generation and Repair of DNA Double-Strand Breaks with 5′ Adducts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Yan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Topoisomerase 2 (Top2 is an essential enzyme responsible for manipulating DNA topology during replication, transcription, chromosome organization and chromosome segregation. It acts by nicking both strands of DNA and then passes another DNA molecule through the break. The 5′ end of each nick is covalently linked to the tyrosine in the active center of each of the two subunits of Top2 (Top2cc. In this configuration, the two sides of the nicked DNA are held together by the strong protein-protein interactions between the two subunits of Top2, allowing the nicks to be faithfully resealed in situ. Top2ccs are normally transient, but can be trapped by cancer drugs, such as etoposide, and subsequently processed into DSBs in cells. If not properly repaired, these DSBs would lead to genome instability and cell death. Here, I review the current understanding of the mechanisms by which DSBs are induced by etoposide, the unique features of such DSBs and how they are repaired. Implications for the improvement of cancer therapy will be discussed.

  8. Are genetic polymorphisms in OGG1, XRCC1 and XRCC3 genes predictive for the DNA strand break repair phenotype and genotoxicity in workers exposed to low dose ionising radiations?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aka, Peter [Laboratory for Cell Genetics, Department of Biology, Free University of Brussels, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)]. E-mail: paka@vub.ac.be; Mateuca, Raluca [Laboratory for Cell Genetics, Department of Biology, Free University of Brussels, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Buchet, Jean-Pierre [Unit of Industrial Toxicology and Occupational Medicine, Catholic University of Louvain, Clos Chapelle, Aux-Champs, B-1200 Brussels (Belgium); Thierens, Hubert [Department of Biomedical Physics and Radiation Protection, University of Ghent, Proeftuinstraat 86, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Kirsch-Volders, Micheline [Laboratory for Cell Genetics, Department of Biology, Free University of Brussels, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2004-11-22

    Identification of higher risk individuals carrying genetic polymorphisms responsible for reduced DNA repair capacity has substantial preventive implications as these individuals could be targeted for cancer prevention. We have conducted a study to assess the predictivity of the OGG1, XRCC1 and XRCC3 genotypes and the in vitro single strand break repair phenotype for the induction of genotoxic effects. At the population level, a significant contribution of the OGG1 genotypes to the in vitro DNA strand break repair capacity was found. At an individual level, the OGG1 variants Ser/Cys and Cys/Cys genotypes showed a slower in vitro DNA repair than the Ser/Ser OGG1genotype. A multivariate analysis performed with genotypes, age, cumulative dose, exposure status and smoking as independent variables indicated that in the control population, repair capacity is influenced by age and OGG1 polymorphisms. In the exposed population, DNA damage is greater in older men and in smokers. Repair capacity is slower in individuals with Ser/Cys or Cys/Cys OGG1 genotypes compared to those with the Ser/Ser OGG1 genotype. Micronuclei (MN) frequencies increased with age and the cumulative dose of {gamma}-rays. Analysis of the total population revealed that genetic polymorphisms in XRCC1 resulted in higher residual DNA (RDNA) values and the Met/Met variant of XRCC3 resulted in an increased frequency of micronuclei. The analysis confirms that MN frequencies are reliable biomarkers for the assessment of genetic effects in workers exposed to ionising radiation (IR). A combined analysis of the three genotypes, OGG1, XRCC1 and XRCC3 polymorphisms is advised in order to assess individual susceptibility to ionising radiation. As an alternative or complement, the in vitro DNA strand break repair phenotype which integrates several repair pathways is recommended. Smokers with OGG1 polymorphisms who are exposed to ionising radiation represent a specific population requiring closer medical surveillance

  9. DNA breaks and repair in interstitial telomere sequences: Influence of chromatin structure; Etude des cassures de l'ADN et des mecanismes de reparation dans les sequences telomeriques interstitielles: Influence de la structure chromatinienne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Revaud, D.

    2009-06-15

    Interstitial Telomeric Sequences (ITS) are over-involved in spontaneous and radiationinduced chromosome aberrations in chinese hamster cells. We have performed a study to investigate the origin of their instability, spontaneously or after low doses irradiation. Our results demonstrate that ITS have a particular chromatin structure: short nucleotide repeat length, less compaction of the 30 nm chromatin fiber, presence of G-quadruplex structures. These features would modulate breaks production and would favour the recruitment of alternative DNA repair mechanisms, which are prone to produce chromosome aberrations. These pathways could be at the origin of chromosome aberrations in ITS whereas NHEJ and HR Double Strand Break repair pathways are rather required for a correct repair in these regions. (author)

  10. ATM alters the otherwise robust chromatin mobility at sites of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs in human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annabelle Becker

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation induces DNA double strand breaks (DSBs which can lead to the formation of chromosome rearrangements through error prone repair. In mammalian cells the positional stability of chromatin contributes to the maintenance of genome integrity. DSBs exhibit only a small, submicron scale diffusive mobility, but a slight increase in the mobility of chromatin domains by the induction of DSBs might influence repair fidelity and the formation of translocations. The radiation-induced local DNA decondensation in the vicinity of DSBs is one factor potentially enhancing the mobility of DSB-containing chromatin domains. Therefore in this study we focus on the influence of different chromatin modifying proteins, known to be activated by the DNA damage response, on the mobility of DSBs. IRIF (ionizing radiation induced foci in U2OS cells stably expressing 53BP1-GFP were used as a surrogate marker of DSBs. Low angle charged particle irradiation, known to trigger a pronounced DNA decondensation, was used for the defined induction of linear tracks of IRIF. Our results show that movement of IRIF is independent of the investigated chromatin modifying proteins like ACF1 or PARP1 and PARG. Also depletion of proteins that tether DNA strands like MRE11 and cohesin did not alter IRIF dynamics significantly. Inhibition of ATM, a key component of DNA damage response signaling, resulted in a pronounced confinement of DSB mobility, which might be attributed to a diminished radiation induced decondensation. This confinement following ATM inhibition was confirmed using X-rays, proving that this effect is not restricted to densely ionizing radiation. In conclusion, repair sites of DSBs exhibit a limited mobility on a small spatial scale that is mainly unaffected by depletion of single remodeling or DNA tethering proteins. However, it relies on functional ATM kinase which is considered to influence the chromatin structure after irradiation.

  11. On-chip microelectrophoresis for the study of in vitro nonhomologous end-joining DNA double-strand break repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Catherine; Ouedraogo, Moustapha; Belayew, Alexandra; Duez, Pierre

    2012-06-01

    Oligomerization of linearized plasmids by nuclear proteins extracts, a recognized measure of nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair capacity, is typically assessed through agarose gel electrophoresis, a labor-intensive procedure. In the current study, a more convenient NHEJ assay was developed using microchips that allow scaled-down separation and quantification. This microchip method allows a considerable reduction in sample amount and analysis time with similar costs and comparable or slightly better precision. Data obtained with quercetin and wortmannin show that the method can be applied to the screening of food components and natural products for positive and negative modulators of NHEJ, potential chemopreventive and indirect genotoxic compounds, respectively. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. High-LET radiation-induce malignant and benign tumors in rat skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, F.J. [Institute of Environmental Medicine, New York University Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Zhao, P.; Hiz, Z.; Chen, S.; Roy, N.

    1999-03-01

    In the multistage theory of carcinogenesis, cells progress to cancer through a series of mutations in cancer-relevant genes, and sometimes the intermediate stages become benign neoplastic lesions. Although cancer induction by low LET radiation is subject to repair or recovery in the sense that multiple exposures produce fewer cancers than the same single dose, this recovery is not seen following exposure to high LET radiation. Data are presented on squamous and basal cell carcinoma and fibroma induction in rat skin exposed to: 1. an electron beam (LET=0.34 kV/{mu}), 2. a neon ion beam (LET=30 kV/{mu} ) and 3. an argon ion beam (LET=125 kV/{mu}). Cancer yields were fitted by a LET-dependent quadratic equation, and equation parameters were estimated by regression analysis for each type of radiation. The results are consistent with the interpretation that carcinoma induction can be explained by a pathway involving 2 radiation-induced events, 1 radiation-induced mutation and 1 spontaneous mutation, while benign fibromas can be explained by a pathway involving 1 radiation-induced event and 1 radiation-induced mutation. (author)

  13. Radiation induces acute alterations in neuronal function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter H Wu

    Full Text Available Every year, nearly 200,000 patients undergo radiation for brain tumors. For both patients and caregivers the most distressing adverse effect is impaired cognition. Efforts to protect against this debilitating effect have suffered from inadequate understanding of the cellular mechanisms of radiation damage. In the past it was accepted that radiation-induced normal tissue injury resulted from a progressive reduction in the survival of clonogenic cells. Moreover, because radiation-induced brain dysfunction is believed to evolve over months to years, most studies have focused on late changes in brain parenchyma. However, clinically, acute changes in cognition are also observed. Because neurons are fully differentiated post-mitotic cells, little information exists on the acute effects of radiation on synaptic function. The purpose of our study was to assess the potential acute effects of radiation on neuronal function utilizing ex vivo hippocampal brain slices. The cellular localization and functional status of excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors was identified by immunoblotting. Electrophysiological recordings were obtained both for populations of neuronal cells and individual neurons. In the dentate gyrus region of isolated ex vivo slices, radiation led to early decreases in tyrosine phosphorylation and removal of excitatory N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs from the cell surface while simultaneously increasing the surface expression of inhibitory gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABA(ARs. These alterations in cellular localization corresponded with altered synaptic responses and inhibition of long-term potentiation. The non-competitive NMDAR antagonist memantine blocked these radiation-induced alterations in cellular distribution. These findings demonstrate acute effects of radiation on neuronal cells within isolated brain slices and open new avenues for study.

  14. Microhomology-mediated end joining is activated in irradiated human cells due to phosphorylation-dependent formation of the XRCC1 repair complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Arijit; Eckelmann, Bradley; Adhikari, Sanjay; Ahmed, Kazi Mokim; Sengupta, Shiladitya; Pandey, Arvind; Hegde, Pavana M; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Tainer, John A; Weinfeld, Michael; Hegde, Muralidhar L; Mitra, Sankar

    2017-03-17

    Microhomology-mediated end joining (MMEJ), an error-prone pathway for DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair, is implicated in genomic rearrangement and oncogenic transformation; however, its contribution to repair of radiation-induced DSBs has not been characterized. We used recircularization of a linearized plasmid with 3΄-P-blocked termini, mimicking those at X-ray-induced strand breaks, to recapitulate DSB repair via MMEJ or nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ). Sequence analysis of the circularized plasmids allowed measurement of relative activity of MMEJ versus NHEJ. While we predictably observed NHEJ to be the predominant pathway for DSB repair in our assay, MMEJ was significantly enhanced in preirradiated cells, independent of their radiation-induced arrest in the G2/M phase. MMEJ activation was dependent on XRCC1 phosphorylation by casein kinase 2 (CK2), enhancing XRCC1's interaction with the end resection enzymes MRE11 and CtIP. Both endonuclease and exonuclease activities of MRE11 were required for MMEJ, as has been observed for homology-directed DSB repair (HDR). Furthermore, the XRCC1 co-immunoprecipitate complex (IP) displayed MMEJ activity in vitro, which was significantly elevated after irradiation. Our studies thus suggest that radiation-mediated enhancement of MMEJ in cells surviving radiation therapy may contribute to their radioresistance and could be therapeutically targeted. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  15. Radiation induced erosion of autoelectron emitter surface

    CERN Document Server

    Mazilova, T I; Ksenofontov, V A

    2001-01-01

    The peculiarities of erosion of the needle-shaped autoemitter surface under the effect of the helium ions bombardment are studied. The analysis of the radiation-induced formation of the surface atomic roughness testifies to the nondynamic character of shifting the surface atoms by the ions energies below the threshold of the Frenkel stable pairs formation and cathode sputtering. The quasistatic mechanism of the surface erosion due to the atoms shift into the low-coordination positions by releasing the energy of the helium internodal atoms formation is discussed

  16. Radiation-induced intracranial malignant fibrous histiocytoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Vitale, J.C.; Slavin, R.E.; McQueen, J.D.

    1976-06-01

    An autopsy case of radiation-induced intracranial malignant fibrous histiocytoma (fibroxanthosarcoma) is reported. The tumor developed in the region of the sella turcica 11 years after high dose radiotherapy of a chromophobe adenoma of the pituitary. The tumor had infiltrated the base of the brain as well as the base of the skull. Metastases were not found. The tumor was composed of an admixture of bizarre fibroblasts, histiocytes and giant cells, xanthoma cells and siderophages, with a storiform fibrous stroma. This appears to be the first documented instance of a malignant fibrous histiocytoma occurring intracranially after local x irradiation.

  17. Caffeine impairs resection during DNA break repair by reducing the levels of nucleases Sae2 and Dna2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsabar, Michael; Eapen, Vinay V.; Mason, Jennifer M.; Memisoglu, Gonen; Waterman, David P.; Long, Marcus J.; Bishop, Douglas K.; Haber, James E.

    2015-01-01

    In response to chromosomal double-strand breaks (DSBs), eukaryotic cells activate the DNA damage checkpoint, which is orchestrated by the PI3 kinase-like protein kinases ATR and ATM (Mec1 and Tel1 in budding yeast). Following DSB formation, Mec1 and Tel1 phosphorylate histone H2A on serine 129 (known as γ-H2AX). We used caffeine to inhibit the checkpoint kinases after DSB induction. We show that prolonged phosphorylation of H2A-S129 does not require continuous Mec1 and Tel1 activity. Unexpectedly, caffeine treatment impaired homologous recombination by inhibiting 5′ to 3′ end resection, independent of Mec1 and Tel1 inhibition. Caffeine treatment led to the rapid loss, by proteasomal degradation, of both Sae2, a nuclease that plays a role in early steps of resection, and Dna2, a nuclease that facilitates one of two extensive resection pathways. Sae2's instability is evident in the absence of DNA damage. A similar loss is seen when protein synthesis is inhibited by cycloheximide. Caffeine treatment had similar effects on irradiated HeLa cells, blocking the formation of RPA and Rad51 foci that depend on 5′ to 3′ resection of broken chromosome ends. Our findings provide insight toward the use of caffeine as a DNA damage-sensitizing agent in cancer cells. PMID:26019182

  18. Radiation induced conductivity in space dielectric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, R.; Paulmier, T.; Molinie, P.; Belhaj, M.; Dirassen, B.; Payan, D.; Balcon, N.

    2014-01-01

    The radiation-induced conductivity of some polymers was described mainly in literature by a competition between ionization, trapping/detrapping, and recombination processes or by radiation assisted ageing mechanisms. Our aim is to revise the effect of the aforementioned mechanisms on the complex evolution of Teflon® FEP under space representative ionizing radiation. Through the definition of a new experimental protocol, revealing the effect of radiation dose and relaxation time, we have been able to demonstrate that the trapping/recombination model devised in this study agrees correctly with the observed experimental phenomenology at qualitative level and allows describing very well the evolution of radiation induced conductivity with irradiation time (or received radiation dose). According to this model, the complex behavior observed on Teflon® FEP may be basically ascribed to the competition between electron/hole pairs generation and recombination: electrons are deeply trapped and act as recombination centers for free holes. Relaxation effects have been characterized through successive irradiations steps and have been again well described with the defined model at qualitative level: recombination centers created by the irradiation induce long term alteration on the electric properties, especially the effective bulk conductivity. One-month relaxation does not allow a complete recovery of the material initial charging behavior.

  19. Radiation induced conductivity in space dielectric materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanna, R. [DESP, The French Aerospace Lab, 2 avenue Edouard Belin, 31055 Toulouse (France); Energie, SUPELEC, 3 rue Joliot Curie, 91192 Gif sur Yvette (France); CNES, 18 avenue Edouard Belin, 31401 Toulouse (France); Paulmier, T., E-mail: thierry.paulmier@onera.fr; Belhaj, M.; Dirassen, B. [DESP, The French Aerospace Lab, 2 avenue Edouard Belin, 31055 Toulouse (France); Molinie, P. [Energie, SUPELEC, 3 rue Joliot Curie, 91192 Gif sur Yvette (France); Payan, D.; Balcon, N. [CNES, 18 avenue Edouard Belin, 31401 Toulouse (France)

    2014-01-21

    The radiation-induced conductivity of some polymers was described mainly in literature by a competition between ionization, trapping/detrapping, and recombination processes or by radiation assisted ageing mechanisms. Our aim is to revise the effect of the aforementioned mechanisms on the complex evolution of Teflon{sup ®} FEP under space representative ionizing radiation. Through the definition of a new experimental protocol, revealing the effect of radiation dose and relaxation time, we have been able to demonstrate that the trapping/recombination model devised in this study agrees correctly with the observed experimental phenomenology at qualitative level and allows describing very well the evolution of radiation induced conductivity with irradiation time (or received radiation dose). According to this model, the complex behavior observed on Teflon{sup ®} FEP may be basically ascribed to the competition between electron/hole pairs generation and recombination: electrons are deeply trapped and act as recombination centers for free holes. Relaxation effects have been characterized through successive irradiations steps and have been again well described with the defined model at qualitative level: recombination centers created by the irradiation induce long term alteration on the electric properties, especially the effective bulk conductivity. One-month relaxation does not allow a complete recovery of the material initial charging behavior.

  20. Protection of DNA From Ionizing Radiation-Induced Lesions by Asiaticoside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy, Jisha; Alarifi, Saud; Alsuhaibani, Entissar; Nair, Cherupally K Krishnan

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate whether asiaticoside, a triterpene glycoside, can afford protection to DNA from alterations induced by gamma radiation under in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo conditions. In vitro studies were done on plasmid pBR322 DNA, ex vivo studies were done on cellular DNA of human peripheral blood leukocytes, and in vivo investigations were conducted on cellular DNA of spleen and bone marrow cells of mice exposed to whole-body gamma radiation. The supercoiled form of the plasmid pBR322 DNA upon exposure to the radiation was converted into relaxed open circular form due to induction of strand breaks. Presence of asiaticoside along with the DNA during irradiation prevented the relaxation of the supercoiled form to the open circular form. When human peripheral blood leukocytes were exposed to gamma radiation, the cellular DNA suffered strand breaks as evidenced by the increased comet parameters in an alkaline comet assay. Asiaticoside, when present along with blood during irradiation ex vivo, prevented the strand breaks and the comet parameters were closer to that of the controls. Whole-body exposure of mice to gamma radiation resulted in a significant increase in comet parameters of DNA of bone marrow and spleen cells of mice as a result of radiation-induced strand breaks in DNA. Administration of asiaticoside prior to whole-body radiation exposure of the mice prevented this increase in radiation-induced increase in comet parameters, which could be the result of protection to DNA under in vivo conditions of radiation exposure. Thus, it can be concluded from the results that asiaticoside can offer protection to DNA from radiation-induced alterations under in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo conditions.

  1. Role of neurotensin in radiation-induced hypothermia in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandasamy, S.B.; Hunt, W.A.; Harris, A.H. (Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1991-05-01

    The role of neurotensin in radiation-induced hypothermia was examined. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of neurotensin produced dose-dependent hypothermia. Histamine appears to mediate neurotensin-induced hypothermia because the mast cell stabilizer disodium cromoglycate and antihistamines blocked the hypothermic effects of neurotensin. An ICV pretreatment with neurotensin antibody attenuated neurotensin-induced hypothermia, but did not attenuate radiation-induced hypothermia, suggesting that radiation-induced hypothermia was not mediated by neurotensin.

  2. In vivo repair of DNA damage induced by X-rays in the early stages of mouse fertilization, and the influence of maternal PARP1 ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacchierotti, F., E-mail: francesca.pacchierotti@enea.it [Unit of Radiation Biology and Human Health, ENEA CR Casaccia, Via Anguillarese 301, 00123 Rome (Italy); Ranaldi, R. [Unit of Radiation Biology and Human Health, ENEA CR Casaccia, Via Anguillarese 301, 00123 Rome (Italy); Derijck, A.A.; Heijden, G.W. van der; Boer, P. de [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, P.O. Box 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2011-09-01

    Highlights: {yields} We measure {gamma}H2AX and chromosome aberrations in mouse zygotes irradiated in vivo. {yields} We compare effects between zygotes obtained from wild type or Parp1 knockout females. {yields} The rate of chromosome aberrations is as high as that previously induced in vitro. {yields} The rate of radiation-induced {gamma}H2AX foci is lower than that measured in other cells. {yields} Without Parp1 there are more {gamma}H2AX foci but chromosome aberration rate is unaffected. - Abstract: The early pronucleus stage of the mouse zygote has been characterised in vitro as radiosensitive, due to a high rate of induction of chromosome-type chromosome abnormalities (CA). We have investigated the repair of irradiation induced double strand DNA breaks in vivo by {gamma}H2AX foci and first cleavage metaphase analysis. Breaks were induced in sperm and in the early zygote stages comprising sperm chromatin remodelling and early pronucleus expansion. Moreover, the role of PARP1 in the formation and repair of spontaneous and radiation-induced double strand breaks in the zygote was evaluated by comparing observations in C57BL/6J and PARP1 genetically ablated females. The results confirmed in vivo that the rate of chromosome aberration induction by X-rays was approximately 3-fold higher in the zygote than in mouse lymphocytes. This finding was related to a diminished efficiency of double strand break signalling, as shown by a lower rate of {gamma}H2AX radiation-induced foci compared to that measured in most other somatic cell types. The spontaneous frequency of CA in PARP1 depleted zygotes was slightly but significantly higher than in wild type zygotes. Also, these zygotes showed some impairment of the radiation-induced DNA Damage Response when exposed closer to the start of S-phase, revealed by a higher number of {gamma}H2AX foci and a longer cell cycle delay. The rate of chromosome aberrations, however, was not elevated over that of wild type zygotes, possibly

  3. Structure of the catalytic region of DNA ligase IV in complex with an Artemis fragment sheds light on double-strand break repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochi, Takashi; Gu, Xiaolong; Blundell, Tom L

    2013-04-02

    Nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) is central to the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks throughout the cell cycle and plays roles in the development of the immune system. Although three-dimensional structures of most components of NHEJ have been defined, those of the catalytic region of DNA ligase IV (LigIV), a specialized DNA ligase known to work in NHEJ, and of Artemis have remained unresolved. Here, we report the crystal structure at 2.4 Å resolution of the catalytic region of LigIV (residues 1-609) in complex with an Artemis peptide. We describe interactions of the DNA-binding domain of LigIV with the continuous epitope of Artemis, which, together, form a three-helix bundle. A kink in the first helix of LigIV introduced by a conserved VPF motif gives rise to a hydrophobic pocket, which accommodates a conserved tryptophan from Artemis. We provide structural insights into features of LigIV among human DNA ligases.

  4. DNA replication and the repair of DNA strand breaks in nuclei of Physarum polycephalum. Progress report, September 1, 1977--July 31, 1978. [Monel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brewer, E.N.; Nygaard, O.F.; Kuncio, G.

    1978-08-01

    Isolated nuclei and intact plasmodia of Physarum contain a heat-stable stimulator of nuclear DNA replication. This substance has been purified extensively and found to contain both protein and carbohydrate. The molecular weight, estimated by gel filtration, is ca. 30,000 d. The purified material does not exhibit DNA polymerase or DNase activity, and does not stimulate DNA polymerase activity per se. In the presence of the stimulatory factor, DNA chain elongation occurs at an elevated rate, and continues for a longer time than in its absence, but G/sub 2/ nuclei are not stimulated to initiate DNA synthesis. Double-strand breaks in nuclear DNA of irradiated plasmodia are repaired in vitro to a greater extent following nuclear isolation during G/sub 2/, and the DNA of unirradiated plasmodia is less susceptible to double-strand breakage during cell-free nuclear incubation, than is the DNA of S-phase nuclei. This correlation suggests a common basis for both observations, for example an increase in deoxyribonuclease activity or a decrease in DNA ligase activity during the S period. This, in turn, may account for the cell cycle-dependent sensitivity of this organism, in terms of mitotic delay, to ionizing radiation.

  5. Triptolide Mitigates Radiation-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shanmin; Zhang, Mei; Chen, Chun; Cao, Yongbin; Tian, Yeping; Guo, Yangsong; Zhang, Bingrong; Wang, Xiaohui; Yin, Liangjie; Zhang, Zhenhuan; O'Dell, Walter; Okunieff, Paul; Zhang, Lurong

    2015-11-01

    Triptolide (TPL) may mitigate radiation-induced late pulmonary side effects through its inhibition of global pro-inflammatory cytokines. In this study, we evaluated the effect of TPL in C57BL/6 mice, the animals were exposed to radiation with vehicle (15 Gy), radiation with TPL (0.25 mg/kg i.v., twice weekly for 1, 2 and 3 months), radiation and celecoxib (CLX) (30 mg/kg) and sham irradiation. Cultured supernatant of irradiated RAW 264.7 and MLE-15 cells and lung lysate in different groups were enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays at 33 h. Respiratory rate, pulmonary compliance and pulmonary density were measured at 5 months in all groups. The groups exposed to radiation with vehicle and radiation with TPL exhibited significant differences in respiratory rate and pulmonary compliance (480 ± 75/min vs. 378 ± 76/min; 0.6 ± 0.1 ml/cm H2O/p kg vs. 0.9 ± 0.2 ml/cm H2O/p kg). Seventeen cytokines were significantly reduced in the lung lysate of the radiation exposure with TPL group at 5 months compared to that of the radiation with vehicle group, including profibrotic cytokines implicated in pulmonary fibrosis, such as IL-1β, TGF- β1 and IL-13. The radiation exposure with TPL mice exhibited a 41% reduction of pulmonary density and a 25% reduction of hydroxyproline in the lung, compared to that of radiation with vehicle mice. The trichrome-stained area of fibrotic foci and pathological scaling in sections of the mice treated with radiation and TPL mice were significantly less than those of the radiation with vehicle-treated group. In addition, the radiation with TPL-treated mice exhibited a trend of improved survival rate compared to that of the radiation with vehicle-treated mice at 5 months (83% vs. 53%). Three radiation-induced profibrotic cytokines in the radiation with vehicle-treated group were significantly reduced by TPL treatment, and this partly contributed to the trend of improved survival rate and pulmonary density and function and the decreased severity of

  6. Protection of radiation induced DNA and membrane damages by total triterpenes isolated from Ganoderma lucidum (Fr.) P. Karst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smina, T P; Maurya, D K; Devasagayam, T P A; Janardhanan, K K

    2015-05-25

    The total triterpenes isolated from the fruiting bodies of Ganoderma lucidum was examined for its potential to prevent γ-radiation induced membrane damage in rat liver mitochondria and microsomes. The effects of total triterpenes on γ-radiation-induced DNA strand breaks in pBR 322 plasmid DNA in vitro and human peripheral blood lymphocytes ex vivo were evaluated. The protective effect of total triterpenes against γ-radiation-induced micronuclei formations in mice bone marrow cells in vivo were also evaluated. The results indicated the significant effectiveness of Ganoderma triterpenes in protecting the DNA and membrane damages consequent to the hazardous effects of radiation. The findings suggest the potential use of Ganoderma triterpenes in radio therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Optimized CRISPR-Cas9 Genome Editing for Leishmania and Its Use To Target a Multigene Family, Induce Chromosomal Translocation, and Study DNA Break Repair Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen-Wei; Lypaczewski, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT CRISPR-Cas9-mediated genome editing has recently been adapted for Leishmania spp. parasites, the causative agents of human leishmaniasis. We have optimized this genome-editing tool by selecting for cells with CRISPR-Cas9 activity through cotargeting the miltefosine transporter gene; mutation of this gene leads to miltefosine resistance. This cotargeting strategy integrated into a triple guide RNA (gRNA) expression vector was used to delete all 11 copies of the A2 multigene family; this was not previously possible with the traditional gene-targeting method. We found that the Leishmania donovani rRNA promoter is more efficient than the U6 promoter in driving gRNA expression, and sequential transfections of the oligonucleotide donor significantly eased the isolation of edited mutants. A gRNA and Cas9 coexpression vector was developed that was functional in all tested Leishmania species, including L. donovani, L. major, and L. mexicana. By simultaneously targeting sites from two different chromosomes, all four types of targeted chromosomal translocations were generated, regardless of the polycistronic transcription direction from the parent chromosomes. It was possible to use this CRISPR system to create a single conserved amino acid substitution (A189G) mutation for both alleles of RAD51, a DNA recombinase involved in homology-directed repair. We found that RAD51 is essential for L. donovani survival based on direct observation of the death of mutants with both RAD51 alleles disrupted, further confirming that this CRISPR system can reveal gene essentiality. Evidence is also provided that microhomology-mediated end joining (MMEJ) plays a major role in double-strand DNA break repair in L. donovani. IMPORTANCE Leishmania parasites cause human leishmaniasis. To accelerate characterization of Leishmania genes for new drug and vaccine development, we optimized and simplified the CRISPR-Cas9 genome-editing tool for Leishmania. We show that co-CRISPR targeting

  8. Radiation-Induced Bystander Response: Mechanism and Clinical Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Keiji; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Absorption of energy from ionizing radiation (IR) to the genetic material in the cell gives rise to damage to DNA in a dose-dependent manner. There are two types of DNA damage; by a high dose (causing acute or deterministic effects) and by a low dose (related to chronic or stochastic effects), both of which induce different health effects. Among radiation effects, acute cutaneous radiation syndrome results from cell killing as a consequence of high-dose exposure. Recent advances: Recent advances in radiation biology and oncology have demonstrated that bystander effects, which are emerged in cells that have never been exposed, but neighboring irradiated cells, are also involved in radiation effects. Bystander effects are now recognized as an indispensable component of tissue response related to deleterious effects of IR. Critical issues: Evidence has indicated that nonapoptotic premature senescence is commonly observed in various tissues and organs. Senesced cells were found to secrete various proteins, including cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors, most of which are equivalent to those identified as bystander factors. Secreted factors could trigger cell proliferation, angiogenesis, cell migration, inflammatory response, etc., which provide a tissue microenvironment assisting tissue repair and remodeling. Future directions: Understandings of the mechanisms and physiological relevance of radiation-induced bystander effects are quite essential for the beneficial control of wound healing and care. Further studies should extend our knowledge of the mechanisms of bystander effects and mode of cell death in response to IR. PMID:24761341

  9. Radiation-induced bystander effect: early process and rapid assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongzhi; Yu, K N; Hou, Jue; Liu, Qian; Han, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) is a biological process that has received attention over the past two decades. RIBE refers to a plethora of biological effects in non-irradiated cells, including induction of genetic damages, gene expression, cell transformation, proliferation and cell death, which are initiated by receiving bystander signals released from irradiated cells. RIBE brings potential hazards to normal tissues in radiotherapy, and imparts a higher risk from low-dose radiation than we previously thought. Detection with proteins related to DNA damage and repair, cell cycle control, proliferation, etc. have enabled rapid assessment of RIBE in a number of research systems such as cultured cells, three-dimensional tissue models and animal models. Accumulated experimental data have suggested that RIBE may be initiated rapidly within a time frame as short as several minutes after radiation. These have led to the requirement of techniques capable of rapidly assessing RIBE itself as well as assessing the early processes involved. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Radiation-induced valvular heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gujral, Dorothy M; Lloyd, Guy; Bhattacharyya, Sanjeev

    2016-02-15

    Radiation to the mediastinum is a key component of treatment with curative intent for a range of cancers including Hodgkin's lymphoma and breast cancer. Exposure to radiation is associated with a risk of radiation-induced heart valve damage characterised by valve fibrosis and calcification. There is a latent interval of 10-20 years between radiation exposure and development of clinically significant heart valve disease. Risk is related to radiation dose received, interval from exposure and use of concomitant chemotherapy. Long-term outlook and the risk of valve surgery are related to the effects of radiation on mediastinal structures including pulmonary fibrosis and pericardial constriction. Dose prediction models to predict the risk of heart valve disease in the future and newer radiation techniques to reduce the radiation dose to the heart are being developed. Surveillance strategies for this cohort of cancer survivors at risk of developing significant heart valve complications are required.

  11. Radiation-Induced Esophagitis Exacerbated by Everolimus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Miura

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Everolimus, a potent mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR inhibitor, has shown anticancer activity against various types of cancer, including renal cell carcinoma (RCC; however, little information is available on the efficacy and safety of the combination of everolimus and radiotherapy. We report a case of radiation-induced esophagitis that might have been exacerbated by the sequential administration of everolimus. Case Presentation: A 63-year-old Japanese man with RCC complained of back pain, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed vertebral metastases. He received radiotherapy (30 Gy/10 fractions to the T6-10 vertebrae. Everolimus was administered immediately after the completion of radiotherapy. One week later, he complained of dysphagia, nausea and vomiting. An endoscopic examination of the esophagus showed erosive esophagitis in the middle to lower portions of his thoracic esophagus, corresponding to the irradiation field. Conclusion: Clinicians should be aware that everolimus might lead to the unexpected exacerbation of radiation toxicities.

  12. Radiation-induced esophagitis in lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baker S

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Sarah Baker, Alysa Fairchild Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada Abstract: Radiation-induced esophagitis is the most common local acute toxicity of radiotherapy (RT delivered for the curative or palliative intent treatment of lung cancer. Although concurrent chemotherapy and higher RT dose are associated with increased esophagitis risk, advancements in RT techniques as well as adherence to esophageal dosimetric constraints may reduce the incidence and severity. Mild acute esophagitis symptoms are generally self-limited, and supportive management options include analgesics, acid suppression, diet modification, treatment for candidiasis, and maintenance of adequate nutrition. Esophageal stricture is the most common late sequela from esophageal irradiation and can be addressed with endoscopic dilatation. Approaches to prevent or mitigate these toxicities are also discussed. Keywords: non–small cell lung cancer, acute, late, toxicity, stricture

  13. Radiation-induced mutations and plant breeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naqvi, S.H.M.

    1985-01-01

    Ionizing radiation could cause genetic changes in an organism and could modify gene linkages. The induction of mutation through radiation is random and the probability of getting the desired genetic change is low but can be increased by manipulating different parameters such as dose rate, physical conditions under which the material has been irradiated, etc. Induced mutations have been used as a supplement to conventional plant breeding, particularly for creating genetic variability for specific characters such as improved plant structure, pest and disease resistance, and desired changes in maturity period; more than 200 varieties of crop plants have been developed by this technique. The Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission has used this technique fruitfully to evolve better germplasm in cotton, rice, chickpea, wheat and mungbean; some of the mutants have become popular commercial varieties. This paper describes some uses of radiation induced mutations and the results achieved in Pakistan so far.

  14. TODRA, a lncRNA at the RAD51 Locus, Is Oppositely Regulated to RAD51, and Enhances RAD51-Dependent DSB (Double Strand Break) Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renbaum, Paul; Zeligson, Sharon; Eini, Lital; Bashari, Dana; Smith, Yoav; Lahad, Amnon; Goldberg, Michal; Ginsberg, Doron; Levy-Lahad, Ephrat

    2015-01-01

    Expression of RAD51, a crucial player in homologous recombination (HR) and DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair, is dysregulated in human tumors, and can contribute to genomic instability and tumor progression. To further understand RAD51 regulation we functionally characterized a long non-coding (lnc) RNA, dubbed TODRA (Transcribed in the Opposite Direction of RAD51), transcribed 69bp upstream to RAD51, in the opposite direction. We demonstrate that TODRA is an expressed transcript and that the RAD51 promoter region is bidirectional, supporting TODRA expression (7-fold higher than RAD51 in this assay, p = 0.003). TODRA overexpression in HeLa cells induced expression of TPIP, a member of the TPTE family which includes PTEN. Similar to PTEN, we found that TPIP co-activates E2F1 induction of RAD51. Analysis of E2F1's effect on the bidirectional promoter showed that E2F1 binding to the same site that promotes RAD51 expression, results in downregulation of TODRA. Moreover, TODRA overexpression induces HR in a RAD51-dependent DSB repair assay, and increases formation of DNA damage-induced RAD51-positive foci. Importantly, gene expression in breast tumors supports our finding that E2F1 oppositely regulates RAD51 and TODRA: increased RAD51 expression, which is associated with an aggressive tumor phenotype (e.g. negative correlation with positive ER (r = -0.22, p = 0.02) and positive PR status (r = -0.27, p<0.001); positive correlation with ki67 status (r = 0.36, p = 0.005) and HER2 amplification (r = 0.41, p = 0.001)), correlates as expected with lower TODRA and higher E2F1 expression. However, although E2F1 induction resulted in TPIP downregulation in cell lines, we find that TPIP expression in tumors is not reduced despite higher E2F1 expression, perhaps contributing to increased RAD51 expression. Our results identify TPIP as a novel E2F1 co-activator, suggest a similar role for other TPTEs, and indicate that the TODRA lncRNA affects RAD51 dysregulation and RAD51

  15. Radiation-induced gene expression in human subcutaneous fibroblasts is predictive of radiation-induced fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rødningen, Olaug Kristin; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Alsner, Jan

    2008-01-01

    with variable risk of RIF (grouped into five classes from low to high risk) were irradiated with two different schemes: 1x3.5Gy with RNA isolated 2 and 24h after irradiation, and a fractionated scheme with 3x3.5Gy in intervals of 24h with RNA isolated 2h after the last dose. RNA was also isolated from non......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Breast cancer patients show a large variation in normal tissue reactions after ionizing radiation (IR) therapy. One of the most common long-term adverse effects of ionizing radiotherapy is radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF), and several attempts have been made over the last...... years to develop predictive assays for RIF. Our aim was to identify basal and radiation-induced transcriptional profiles in fibroblasts from breast cancer patients that might be related to the individual risk of RIF in these patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fibroblast cell lines from 31 individuals...

  16. Initiation of DNA double strand break repair: signaling and single-stranded resection dictate the choice between homologous recombination, non-homologous end-joining and alternative end-joining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabarz, Anastazja; Barascu, Aurélia; Guirouilh-Barbat, Josée; Lopez, Bernard S

    2012-01-01

    A DNA double strand break (DSB) is a highly toxic lesion, which can generate genetic instability and profound genome rearrangements. However, DSBs are required to generate diversity during physiological processes such as meiosis or the establishment of the immune repertoire. Thus, the precise regulation of a complex network of processes is necessary for the maintenance of genomic stability, allowing genetic diversity but protecting against genetic instability and its consequences on oncogenesis. Two main strategies are employed for DSB repair: homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). HR is initiated by single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) resection and requires sequence homology with an intact partner, while NHEJ requires neither resection at initiation nor a homologous partner. Thus, resection is an pivotal step at DSB repair initiation, driving the choice of the DSB repair pathway employed. However, an alternative end-joining (A-EJ) pathway, which is highly mutagenic, has recently been described; A-EJ is initiated by ssDNA resection but does not require a homologous partner. The choice of the appropriate DSB repair system, for instance according the cell cycle stage, is essential for genome stability maintenance. In this context, controlling the initial events of DSB repair is thus an essential step that may be irreversible, and the wrong decision should lead to dramatic consequences. Here, we first present the main DSB repair mechanisms and then discuss the importance of the choice of the appropriate DSB repair pathway according to the cell cycle phase. In a third section, we present the early steps of DSB repair i.e., DSB signaling, chromatin remodeling, and the regulation of ssDNA resection. In the last part, we discuss the competition between the different DSB repair mechanisms. Finally, we conclude with the importance of the fine tuning of this network for genome stability maintenance and for tumor protection in fine.

  17. Radiation-induced cancer in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamashita, Shoji; Sekizuka, Eiichi [National Saitama Hospital, Wako (Japan); Yamashita, Hisao [Keio Cancer Center, Tokyo (Japan); Takami, Akira [Yamawaki Coll., Tokyo (Japan); Kubo, Atsushi [Keio Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    2001-12-01

    Results of two questionnaire surveys on radiation-induced malignant tumors conducted in 1977 and 1984 in Japan are briefly summarized. A total of 234 universities and general hospitals (139 in 1977, and 95 in 1984) responded and provided data from 1945 to 1977 and from 1978 to 1984. The number of patients with benign disease who developed secondary malignant tumors following radiation therapy was 150 in the first survey (1977) and 86 in the second survey (1984). The underlying benign diseases of these patients included tuberculous lymphadenitis, skin disease, hemangioma, and thyroid disease, and the most frequent radiation-induced malignant tumors in these patients were malignant tumors of the pharynx (80), cancer of the larynx (26), malignant tumors of the thyroid gland (22), cancer of the esophagus (219), and skin cancer (21). In patients with head and neck diseases the highest correlation between underlying benign disease and radiation-induced malignant tumors was between cervical tuberculous lymphadenitis and tumors of the pharynx (67 patients), followed by cancer of the larynx (19), and malignant tumors of the thyroid gland (11). There were also correlations between thyroid disease and malignant tumors of the thyroid gland (8 patients), hemangioma and skin cancer (7), and skin disease and skin cancer (8). The ratio of the observed values to predicted values (O/E ratio) in these patients was highest for cancer of the pharynxy (118), followed by cancer of the parotid gland (42), skin cancer (31), cancer of the esophagus (22), malignant tumors of the thyroid gland (21), and cancer of the larynx (16). The number of patients with malignant tumors who developed secondary malignant tumors following radiation therapy was 140 in 1977 and 108 in 1984, and the underlying malignant tumors in these patients included tumors of the uterus (106), breast (32), and head and neck (80). The most frequent secondary malignant tumors were soft tissue tumors, followed by leukemia

  18. How Magnetotactic Bacteria Respond to Radiation Induced Stress and Damage: Comparative Genomics Evidences for Evolutionary Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Pan, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Solar radiation and galactic cosmic radiation is believed to be major restriction factors influencing survival and evolution of life. On planet earth, geomagnetic field along with atmosphere protect living beings from the harmful radiation. During a geomagnetic reversal or excursion, however, the efflux of charged particles on earth surface would increase as the shielding effect of magnetic field decrease. The stratospheric ozone can also be partially stripped away by solar wind when the strength of the field is weak, leading to an increasing ultraviolet radiation penetration to the earth surface. However, studies on the mechanism of radiation induced stress and damage are focused only on bacteria that have no response to magnetic field. This study was motivated by the need to fill the gap upon knowledge of that on magnetic field sensitive microorganism. Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are a group of microbes that are able to synthesis intracellular nano-sized magnetic particles (named magnetosomes). These chain-arranged magnetosomes help MTB sense and swim along the magnetic field to find their optimal living environment efficiently. In this paper, in silico prediction of stress and damage repair genes in response to different radiation were carried out on the complete genome of four nonmagnetotactic and four magnetotactic spirilla. In silico analyses of the genomes of magnetic field sensitive and non-sensitive spirilla revealed: 1) all strains contain genes for regulate responses superoxide and peroxide stress, DNA pyrimidine dimer and string breaks; 2) non-magnetotactic spirilla have more genes dealing with oxidative stress, while magnetotactic spirilla may benefit from magnetotaxis by swimming into oxic-anoxic zone away from oxidative stress and direct radiation damage; yet, the lipid hydroperoxide peroxidase gene in MTB may be responsible for possible ROS generated by the membrane enveloped magnetite magnetosome; 3) magnetotactic spirilla possess SOS rec

  19. p53 isoform Δ113p53/Δ133p53 promotes DNA double-strand break repair to protect cell from death and senescence in response to DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Lu; Gong, Hongjian; Pan, Xiao; Chang, Changqing; Ou, Zhao; Ye, Shengfan; Yin, Le; Yang, Lina; Tao, Ting; Zhang, Zhenhai; Liu, Cong; Lane, David P; Peng, Jinrong; Chen, Jun

    2015-03-01

    The inhibitory role of p53 in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair seems contradictory to its tumor-suppressing property. The p53 isoform Δ113p53/Δ133p53 is a p53 target gene that antagonizes p53 apoptotic activity. However, information on its functions in DNA damage repair is lacking. Here we report that Δ113p53 expression is strongly induced by γ-irradiation, but not by UV-irradiation or heat shock treatment. Strikingly, Δ113p53 promotes DNA DSB repair pathways, including homologous recombination, non-homologous end joining and single-strand annealing. To study the biological significance of Δ113p53 in promoting DNA DSB repair, we generated a zebrafish Δ113p53(M/M) mutant via the transcription activator-like effector nuclease technique and found that the mutant is more sensitive to γ-irradiation. The human ortholog, Δ133p53, is also only induced by γ-irradiation and functions to promote DNA DSB repair. Δ133p53-knockdown cells were arrested at the G2 phase at the later stage in response to γ-irradiation due to a high level of unrepaired DNA DSBs, which finally led to cell senescence. Furthermore, Δ113p53/Δ133p53 promotes DNA DSB repair via upregulating the transcription of repair genes rad51, lig4 and rad52 by binding to a novel type of p53-responsive element in their promoters. Our results demonstrate that Δ113p53/Δ133p53 is an evolutionally conserved pro-survival factor for DNA damage stress by preventing apoptosis and promoting DNA DSB repair to inhibit cell senescence. Our data also suggest that the induction of Δ133p53 expression in normal cells or tissues provides an important tolerance marker for cancer patients to radiotherapy.

  20. Correct end use during end joining of multiple chromosomal double strand breaks is influenced by repair protein RAD50, DNA-dependent protein kinase DNA-PKcs, and transcription context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Amanda; Bennardo, Nicole; Cheng, Anita; Stark, Jeremy M

    2011-12-09

    During repair of multiple chromosomal double strand breaks (DSBs), matching the correct DSB ends is essential to limit rearrangements. To investigate the maintenance of correct end use, we examined repair of two tandem noncohesive DSBs generated by endonuclease I-SceI and the 3' nonprocessive exonuclease Trex2, which can be expressed as an I-SceI-Trex2 fusion. We examined end joining (EJ) repair that maintains correct ends (proximal-EJ) versus using incorrect ends (distal-EJ), which provides a relative measure of incorrect end use (distal end use). Previous studies showed that ATM is important to limit distal end use. Here we show that DNA-PKcs kinase activity and RAD50 are also important to limit distal end use, but that H2AX is dispensable. In contrast, we find that ATM, DNA-PKcs, and RAD50 have distinct effects on repair events requiring end processing. Furthermore, we developed reporters to examine the effects of the transcription context on DSB repair, using an inducible promoter. We find that a DSB downstream from an active promoter shows a higher frequency of distal end use, and a greater reliance on ATM for limiting incorrect end use. Conversely, DSB transcription context does not affect end processing during EJ, the frequency of homology-directed repair, or the role of RAD50 and DNA-PKcs in limiting distal end use. We suggest that RAD50, DNA-PKcs kinase activity, and transcription context are each important to limit incorrect end use during EJ repair of multiple DSBs, but that these factors and conditions have distinct roles during repair events requiring end processing.

  1. Trans-generational radiation-induced chromosomal instability in the female enhances the action of chemical mutagens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camats, Nuria [Institut de Biotecnologia i Biomedicina (IBB), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Departament de Biologia Cel.lular, Fisiologia i Immunologia, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Garcia, Francisca [Institut de Biotecnologia i Biomedicina (IBB), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Parrilla, Juan Jose [Servicio de Ginecologia y Obstetricia, Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca, 30120 El Palmar, Murcia (Spain); Calaf, Joaquim [Servei de Ginecologia i Obstetricia, Hospital Universitari de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, 08025 Barcelona (Spain); Martin, Miguel [Departament de Pediatria, d' Obstetricia i Ginecologia i de Medicina Preventiva, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Caldes, Montserrat Garcia [Institut de Biotecnologia i Biomedicina (IBB), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Departament de Biologia Cel.lular, Fisiologia i Immunologia, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: Montserrat.Garcia.Caldes@uab.es

    2008-04-02

    Genomic instability can be produced by ionising radiation, so-called radiation-induced genomic instability, and chemical mutagens. Radiation-induced genomic instability occurs in both germinal and somatic cells and also in the offspring of irradiated individuals, and it is characterised by genetic changes including chromosomal rearrangements. The majority of studies of trans-generational, radiation-induced genomic instability have been described in the male germ line, whereas the authors who have chosen the female as a model are scarce. The aim of this work is to find out the radiation-induced effects in the foetal offspring of X-ray-treated female rats and, at the same time, the possible impact of this radiation-induced genomic instability on the action of a chemical mutagen. In order to achieve both goals, the quantity and quality of chromosomal damage were analysed. In order to detect trans-generational genomic instability, a total of 4806 metaphases from foetal tissues from the foetal offspring of X-irradiated female rats (5 Gy, acute dose) were analysed. The study's results showed that there is radiation-induced genomic instability: the number of aberrant metaphases and the breaks per total metaphases studied increased and were found to be statistically significant (p {<=} 0.05), with regard to the control group. In order to identify how this trans-generational, radiation-induced chromosomal instability could influence the chromosomal behaviour of the offspring of irradiated rat females in front of a chemical agent (aphidicolin), a total of 2481 metaphases were studied. The observed results showed that there is an enhancement of the action of the chemical agent: chromosomal breaks per aberrant metaphases show significant differences (p {<=} 0.05) in the X-ray- and aphidicolin-treated group as regards the aphidicolin-treated group. In conclusion, our findings indicate that there is trans-generational, radiation-induced chromosomal instability in the foetal

  2. Operative treatment of radiation-induced fistulae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balslev, I.; Harling, H.

    1987-01-01

    Out of 136 patients with radiation-induced intestinal complications, 45 had fistulae. Twenty-eight patients had rectovaginal fistulae while the remainder had a total of 13 different types of fistulae. Thirty-seven patients were treated operatively and eight were treated conservatively. Thirty-three patients were submitted to operation for rectal fistulae. Of these, 28 were treated by defunctioning colostomy, three were treated by Hartmann's method and resection and primary anastomosis was carried out in two patients. In the course of the period of observation, 35% of the patients developed new radiation damage. The frequency in the basic material without fistulae was 21% (0.05

  3. Ionizing radiation induces stemness in cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Ghisolfi

    Full Text Available The cancer stem cell (CSC model posits the presence of a small number of CSCs in the heterogeneous cancer cell population that are ultimately responsible for tumor initiation, as well as cancer recurrence and metastasis. CSCs have been isolated from a variety of human cancers and are able to generate a hierarchical and heterogeneous cancer cell population. CSCs are also resistant to conventional chemo- and radio-therapies. Here we report that ionizing radiation can induce stem cell-like properties in heterogeneous cancer cells. Exposure of non-stem cancer cells to ionizing radiation enhanced spherogenesis, and this was accompanied by upregulation of the pluripotency genes Sox2 and Oct3/4. Knockdown of Sox2 or Oct3/4 inhibited radiation-induced spherogenesis and increased cellular sensitivity to radiation. These data demonstrate that ionizing radiation can activate stemness pathways in heterogeneous cancer cells, resulting in the enrichment of a CSC subpopulation with higher resistance to radiotherapy.

  4. Radiation-induced chromosomal hot spots at G 1 and G 2 stages of human lymphocytes in culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murugesan R

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation-induced chromosomal break points in cultured lymphocytes of normal healthy individuals as well as of those with certain genetic disorders are reported to be localized at certain specific loci (hot spots. These reports are based on studies carried out in lymphocytes irradiated at G 1 stage. The present study examines whether the location of hot spots and the frequency seen in cells irradiated at G 1 are similar to those irradiated at G 2 stage of the cell cycle and also tests whether cells of patients exhibit hot spots on irradiation.The results showed that the radiation induced chromosomal break points to be similar in those irradiated are G 1 and G 2 stages of the cell cycle and also that cells of patients exhibited chromosomal hot spots.

  5. The impact of heterochromatin on DSB repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodarzi, Aaron A; Noon, Angela T; Jeggo, Penny A

    2009-06-01

    DNA NHEJ (non-homologous end-joining) is the major DNA DSB (double-strand break) repair pathway in mammalian cells. Although NHEJ-defective cell lines show marked DSB-repair defects, cells defective in ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated) repair most DSBs normally. Thus NHEJ functions independently of ATM signalling. However, approximately 15% of radiation-induced DSBs are repaired with slow kinetics and require ATM and the nuclease Artemis. DSBs persisting in the presence of an ATM inhibitor, ATMi, localize to heterochromatin, suggesting that ATM is required for repairing DSBs arising within or close to heterochromatin. Consistent with this, we show that siRNA (small interfering RNA) of key heterochromatic proteins, including KAP-1 [KRAB (Krüppel-associated box) domain-associated protein 1], HP1 (heterochromatin protein 1) and HDAC (histone deacetylase) 1/2, relieves the requirement for ATM for DSB repair. Furthermore, ATMi addition to cell lines with genetic alterations that have an impact on heterochromatin, including Suv39H1/2 (suppressor of variegation 3-9 homologue 1/2)-knockout, ICFa (immunodeficiency, centromeric region instability, facial anomalies syndrome type a) and Hutchinson-Guilford progeria cell lines, fails to have an impact on DSB repair. KAP-1 is a highly dose-dependent, transient and ATM-specific substrate, and mutation of the ATM phosphorylation site on KAP-1 influences DSB repair. Collectively, the findings show that ATM functions to overcome the barrier to DSB repair posed by heterochromatin. However, even in the presence of ATM, gamma-H2AX (phosphorylated histone H2AX) foci form on the periphery rather than within heterochromatic centres. Finally, we show that KAP-1's association with heterochromatin is diminished as cells progress through mitosis. We propose that KAP-1 is a critical heterochromatic factor that undergoes specific modifications to promote DSB repair and mitotic progression in a manner that allows localized and transient

  6. Genetic variations in DNA repair genes, radiosensitivity to cancer and susceptibility to acute tissue reactions in radiotherapy-treated cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A. (Dept. of Pathology, Univ. of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh (US)); Voronova, Natalia V. (Dept. of Molecular Diagnostics, National Research Center GosNIIgenetika, Moscow (RU)); Chistiakov, Pavel A. (Dept. of Radiology, Cancer Research Center, Moscow (RU))

    2008-06-15

    Ionizing radiation is a well established carcinogen for human cells. At low doses, radiation exposure mainly results in generation of double strand breaks (DSBs). Radiation-related DSBs could be directly linked to the formation of chromosomal rearrangements as has been proven for radiation-induced thyroid tumors. Repair of DSBs presumably involves two main pathways, non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). A number of known inherited syndromes, such as ataxia telangiectasia, ataxia-telangiectasia like-disorder, radiosensitive severe combined immunodeficiency, Nijmegen breakage syndrome, and LIG4 deficiency are associated with increased radiosensitivity and/or cancer risk. Many of them are caused by mutations in DNA repair genes. Recent studies also suggest that variations in the DNA repair capacity in the general population may influence cancer susceptibility. In this paper, we summarize the current status of DNA repair proteins as potential targets for radiation-induced cancer risk. We will focus on genetic alterations in genes involved in HR- and NHEJ-mediated repair of DSBs, which could influence predisposition to radiation-related cancer and thereby explain interindividual differences in radiosensitivity or radioresistance in a general population

  7. Radiation-Induced Alopecia after Endovascular Embolization under Fluoroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vipawee Ounsakul

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation-induced alopecia after fluoroscopically guided procedures is becoming more common due to an increasing use of endovascular procedures. It is characterized by geometric shapes of nonscarring alopecia related to the area of radiation. We report a case of a 46-year-old man presenting with asymptomatic, sharply demarcated rectangular, nonscarring alopecic patch on the occipital scalp following cerebral angiography with fistula embolization under fluoroscopy. His presentations were compatible with radiation-induced alopecia. Herein, we also report a novel scalp dermoscopic finding of blue-grey dots in a target pattern around yellow dots and follicles, which we detected in the lesion of radiation-induced alopecia.

  8. Delayed Radiation-Induced Vasculitic Leukoencephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauch, Philipp J. [Departments of Pathology and Neurosurgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Faculty of Medicine, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Park, Henry S. [Departments of Pathology and Neurosurgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Knisely, Jonathan P.S. [Department of Radiation Medicine, North Shore University Hospital, Manhasset, New York (United States); Chiang, Veronica L. [Departments of Pathology and Neurosurgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Vortmeyer, Alexander O., E-mail: alexander.vortmeyer@yale.edu [Departments of Pathology and Neurosurgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Recently, single-fraction, high-dosed focused radiation therapy such as that administered by Gamma Knife radiosurgery has been used increasingly for the treatment of metastatic brain cancer. Radiation therapy to the brain can cause delayed leukoencephalopathy, which carries its own significant morbidity and mortality. While radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy is known to be clinically different from that following fractionated radiation, pathological differences are not well characterized. In this study, we aimed to integrate novel radiographic and histopathologic observations to gain a conceptual understanding of radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy. Methods and Materials: We examined resected tissues of 10 patients treated at Yale New Haven Hospital between January 1, 2009, and June 30, 2010, for brain metastases that had been previously treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery, who subsequently required surgical management of a symptomatic regrowing lesion. None of the patients showed pathological evidence of tumor recurrence. Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging data for each of the 10 patients were then studied retrospectively. Results: We provide evidence to show that radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy may present as an advancing process that extends beyond the original high-dose radiation field. Neuropathologic examination of the resected tissue revealed traditionally known leukoencephalopathic changes including demyelination, coagulation necrosis, and vascular sclerosis. Unexpectedly, small and medium-sized vessels revealed transmural T-cell infiltration indicative of active vasculitis. Conclusions: We propose that the presence of a vasculitic component in association with radiation-induced leukoencephalopathy may facilitate the progressive nature of the condition. It may also explain the resemblance of delayed leukoencephalopathy with recurring tumor on virtually all imaging modalities used for posttreatment follow-up.

  9. A case of radiation induced cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozawa, Kazuyoshi; Tsuchikawa, Kohzo; Sato, Akira; Kato, Joji (Nippon Dental Univ., Niigata (Japan). School of Dentistry at Niigata)

    1994-06-01

    A case of carcinoma on the right buccal mucosa is presented. The case was suspected to have been induced by irradiation therapy for a carcinoma on the left buccal mucosa. An external radiotherapy, 6-MeV Linac, had been done for the carcinoma on the left buccal mucosa in a 55-year-old female, with single lateral direction from the left to the right in 1977. In 1985, a papillary lesion on the right buccal mucosa was detected, and histological examination revealed a papilloma without atypism. In 1991, as an ulcer on the right upper buccal fold as well as three papillary lesions in the central portion of the right buccal mucosa were found, the patient was referred to our clinic. Microscopical findings were consistent with the early invasive carcinomas. A surgical excision of these whole lesions and skin graft were completed. The criteria of this case for the suspicion of radiation-induced carcinoma were as follows. There was a long latent period of 14 years. The previous dose of irradiation, 60 Gy, was sufficient. The right buccal mucosa was involved in the radiation field. A severe scar on the left cheek resulted from the previous irradiation. Anatomically, there is no evidence of the secondary carcinoma on the right buccal mucosa with the primary carcinoma on the left buccal mucosa. No evidence for recurrence of the tumors on both sides of buccal mucosa has been detected so far. Further observations will be necessary to detect other tumors in the irradiated field later on. (author).

  10. Role of ATP as a Key Signaling Molecule Mediating Radiation-Induced Biological Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Shuji; Ohshima, Yasuhiro; Nakatsukasa, Hiroko; Tsukimoto, Mitsutoshi

    2017-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) serves as a signaling molecule for adaptive responses to a variety of cytotoxic agents and plays an important role in mediating the radiation stress-induced responses that serve to mitigate or repair the injurious effects of γ radiation on the body. Indeed, low doses of radiation may have a net beneficial effect by activating a variety of protective mechanisms, including antitumor immune responses. On the other hand, ATP signaling may be involved in the radiation resistance of cancer cells. Here, focusing on our previous work, we review the evidence that low-dose γ irradiation (0.25-0.5 Gy) induces release of extracellular ATP, and that the released ATP mediates multiple radiation-induced responses, including increased intracellular antioxidant synthesis, cell-mediated immune responses, induction of DNA damage repair systems, and differentiation of regulatory T cells.

  11. Role of ATP as a Key Signaling Molecule Mediating Radiation-Induced Biological Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuji Kojima

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine triphosphate (ATP serves as a signaling molecule for adaptive responses to a variety of cytotoxic agents and plays an important role in mediating the radiation stress-induced responses that serve to mitigate or repair the injurious effects of γ radiation on the body. Indeed, low doses of radiation may have a net beneficial effect by activating a variety of protective mechanisms, including antitumor immune responses. On the other hand, ATP signaling may be involved in the radiation resistance of cancer cells. Here, focusing on our previous work, we review the evidence that low-dose γ irradiation (0.25-0.5 Gy induces release of extracellular ATP, and that the released ATP mediates multiple radiation-induced responses, including increased intracellular antioxidant synthesis, cell-mediated immune responses, induction of DNA damage repair systems, and differentiation of regulatory T cells.

  12. Role of ATP as a Key Signaling Molecule Mediating Radiation-Induced Biological Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshima, Yasuhiro; Nakatsukasa, Hiroko; Tsukimoto, Mitsutoshi

    2017-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) serves as a signaling molecule for adaptive responses to a variety of cytotoxic agents and plays an important role in mediating the radiation stress-induced responses that serve to mitigate or repair the injurious effects of γ radiation on the body. Indeed, low doses of radiation may have a net beneficial effect by activating a variety of protective mechanisms, including antitumor immune responses. On the other hand, ATP signaling may be involved in the radiation resistance of cancer cells. Here, focusing on our previous work, we review the evidence that low-dose γ irradiation (0.25-0.5 Gy) induces release of extracellular ATP, and that the released ATP mediates multiple radiation-induced responses, including increased intracellular antioxidant synthesis, cell-mediated immune responses, induction of DNA damage repair systems, and differentiation of regulatory T cells.

  13. Direct analysis of radiation-induced chromosome fragments and rings in unstimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes by means of the premature chromosome condensation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantelias, G E; Maillie, H D

    1985-03-01

    Development of the procedure to stimulate peripheral blood lymphocytes has greatly facilitated the understanding of chromosome aberration formation and repair mechanisms in human cells. Yet, because radiation induces far more initial chromosome breaks than are observed as aberrations in metaphase, it has not been possible to examine the kinetics of primary chromosome breakage and rejoining with this procedure. An improved method to induce premature chromosome condensation in unstimulated lymphocytes has been used to study primary chromosome breakage, rejoining, and ring formation at various times after irradiation with up to 800 rad of X-rays. The dose-response relations for chromosome fragments analyzed immediately or 1, 2, or 24 h after exposure were found to be linear. Rapid rejoining of chromosome fragments, which takes place in the first 3 h after X-ray exposure, was not correlated with a simultaneous increase in the formation of rings. The yield of rings per cell scored 24 h after irradiation, however, increased significantly and fit a linear quadratic equation. Both chromosome fragment rejoining and ring formation were completed about 6 h after irradiation. The frequency distributions of rings among cells followed a Poisson distribution, whereas chromosome fragments were overdispersed.

  14. Proximity Within Interphase Chromosome Contributes to the Breakpoint Distribution in Radiation-Induced Intrachromosomal Exchanges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Uhlemeyer, Jimmy; Hada, Megumi; Asaithamby, A.; Chen, David J.; Wu, Honglu

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we reported that breaks involved in chromosome aberrations were clustered in several regions of chromosome3 in human mammary epithelial cells after exposures to either low-or high-LET radiation. In particular, breaks in certain regions of the chromosome tended to rejoin with each other to form an intrachromosome exchange event. This study tests the hypothesis that proximity within a single chromosome in interphase cell nuclei contributes to the distribution of radiation-induced chromosome breaks. Chromosome 3 in G1 human mammary epithelial cells was hybridized with the multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) probes that distinguish the chromosome in six differently colored regions, and the location of these regions was measured with a laser confocal microscope. Results of the study indicated that, on a multi-mega base pair scale of the DNA, the arrangement of chromatin was non-random. Both telomere regions tended to be located towards the exterior of the chromosome domain, whereas the centromere region towards the interior. In addition, the interior of the chromosome domain was preferentially occupied by the p-arm of the chromatin, which is consistent with our previous finding of intrachromosome exchanges involving breaks on the p-arm and in the centromere region of chromosome3. Other factors, such as the fragile sites in the 3p21 band and gene regulation, may also contribute to the breakpoint distribution in radiation-induced chromosome aberrations. Further investigations suggest that the 3D chromosome folding is cell type and culture condition dependent.

  15. Radar detection of radiation-induced ionization in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalsami, Nachappa; Heifetz, Alexander; Chien, Hual-Te; Liao, Shaolin; Koehl, Eugene R.; Raptis, Apostolos C.

    2015-07-21

    A millimeter wave measurement system has been developed for remote detection of airborne nuclear radiation, based on electromagnetic scattering from radiation-induced ionization in air. Specifically, methods of monitoring radiation-induced ionization of air have been investigated, and the ionized air has been identified as a source of millimeter wave radar reflection, which can be utilized to determine the size and strength of a radiation source.

  16. Radiation-Induced Second Cancer Risk Estimates From Radionuclide Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarz, Bryan; Besemer, Abigail

    2017-09-01

    The use of radionuclide therapy in the clinical setting is expected to increase significantly over the next decade. There is an important need to understand the radiation-induced second cancer risk associated with these procedures. In this study the radiation-induced cancer risk in five radionuclide therapy patients was investigated. These patients underwent serial SPECT imaging scans following injection as part of a clinical trial testing the efficacy of a 131Iodine-labeled radiopharmaceutical. Using these datasets the committed absorbed doses to multiple sensitive structures were calculated using RAPID, which is a novel Monte Carlo-based 3D dosimetry platform developed for personalized dosimetry. The excess relative risk (ERR) for radiation-induced cancer in these structures was then derived from these dose estimates following the recommendations set forth in the BEIR VII report. The radiation-induced leukemia ERR was highest among all sites considered reaching a maximum value of approximately 4.5. The radiation-induced cancer risk in the kidneys, liver and spleen ranged between 0.3 and 1.3. The lifetime attributable risks (LARs) were also calculated, which ranged from 30 to 1700 cancers per 100,000 persons and were highest for leukemia and the liver for both males and females followed by radiation-induced spleen and kidney cancer. The risks associated with radionuclide therapy are similar to the risk associated with external beam radiation therapy.

  17. Relief of delayed oxidative stress by ascorbic acid can suppress radiation-induced cellular senescence in mammalian fibroblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobashigawa, Shinko; Kashino, Genro; Mori, Hiromu; Watanabe, Masami

    2015-03-01

    Ionizing radiation-induced cellular senescence is thought to be caused by nuclear DNA damage that cannot be repaired. However, here we found that radiation induces delayed increase of intracellular oxidative stress after irradiation. We investigated whether the relief of delayed oxidative stress by ascorbic acid would suppress the radiation-induced cellular senescence in Syrian golden hamster embryo (SHE) cells. We observed that the level of oxidative stress was drastically increased soon after irradiation, then declined to the level in non-irradiated cells, and increased again with a peak on day 3 after irradiation. We found that the inductions of cellular senescence after X-irradiation were reduced along with suppression of the delayed induction of oxidative stress by treatment with ascorbic acid, but not when oxidative stress occurred immediately after irradiation. Moreover, treatment of ascorbic acid inhibited p53 accumulation at 3 days after irradiation. Our data suggested a delayed increase of intracellular oxidative stress levels plays an important role in the process of radiation-induced cellular senescence by p53 accumulation.

  18. Mutagenicity of 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline in colon and liver of Big Blue rats: role of DNA adducts, strand breaks, DNA repair and oxidative stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moller, P.; Wallin, H.; Vogel, U.

    2002-01-01

    The contribution of oxidative stress, different types of DNA damage and expression of DNA repair enzymes in colon and liver mutagenesis induced by 2-amino-3-methylimidazo [4,5-f]quinoline (IQ) was investigated in four groups of six Big Blue rats fed diets with 0, 20, 70, and 200 mg IQ/kg for 3...... weeks. There were dose-response relationships of DNA adducts (P-32-postlabeling) and DNA strand breaks (comet assay) in colon and liver tissues, with the highest levels of DNA adducts and strand breaks in the colon. There was dose-dependent induction of mutations in both the colon and the liver....... Investigations of oxidative stress biomarkers produced inconclusive results. Oxidative DNA damage detected by the endonuclease III enzyme and 7-hydro-8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine in colon, liver and/or urine was unaltered by IQ. However, there was increased level of gamma-glutamyl semialdehyde in liver proteins...

  19. HIC1 (hypermethylated in cancer 1) SUMOylation is dispensable for DNA repair but is essential for the apoptotic DNA damage response (DDR) to irreparable DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paget, Sonia; Dubuissez, Marion; Dehennaut, Vanessa; Nassour, Joe; Harmon, Brennan T; Spruyt, Nathalie; Loison, Ingrid; Abbadie, Corinne; Rood, Brian R; Leprince, Dominique

    2017-01-10

    The tumor suppressor gene HIC1 (Hypermethylated In Cancer 1) encodes a transcriptional repressor mediating the p53-dependent apoptotic response to irreparable DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) through direct transcriptional repression of SIRT1. HIC1 is also essential for DSB repair as silencing of endogenous HIC1 in BJ-hTERT fibroblasts significantly delays DNA repair in functional Comet assays. HIC1 SUMOylation favours its interaction with MTA1, a component of NuRD complexes. In contrast with irreparable DSBs induced by 16-hours of etoposide treatment, we show that repairable DSBs induced by 1 h etoposide treatment do not increase HIC1 SUMOylation or its interaction with MTA1. Furthermore, HIC1 SUMOylation is dispensable for DNA repair since the non-SUMOylatable E316A mutant is as efficient as wt HIC1 in Comet assays. Upon induction of irreparable DSBs, the ATM-mediated increase of HIC1 SUMOylation is independent of its effector kinase Chk2. Moreover, irreparable DSBs strongly increase both the interaction of HIC1 with MTA1 and MTA3 and their binding to the SIRT1 promoter. To characterize the molecular mechanisms sustained by this increased repression potential, we established global expression profiles of BJ-hTERT fibroblasts transfected with HIC1-siRNA or control siRNA and treated or not with etoposide. We identified 475 genes potentially repressed by HIC1 with cell death and cell cycle as the main cellular functions identified by pathway analysis. Among them, CXCL12, EPHA4, TGFβR3 and TRIB2, also known as MTA1 target-genes, were validated by qRT-PCR analyses. Thus, our data demonstrate that HIC1 SUMOylation is important for the transcriptional response to non-repairable DSBs but dispensable for DNA repair.

  20. Recognition of double strand breaks by a mutator protein (MU2 in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghuvar Dronamraju

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Telomere capture, a rare event that stabilizes chromosome breaks, is associated with certain genetic abnormalities in humans. Studies pertaining to the generation, maintenance, and biological effects of telomere formation are limited in metazoans. A mutation, mu2(a, in Drosophila melanogaster decreases the rate of repair of double strand DNA breaks in oocytes, thus leading to chromosomes that have lost a natural telomere and gained a new telomere. Amino acid sequence, domain architecture, and protein interactions suggest that MU2 is an ortholog of human MDC1. The MU2 protein is a component of meiotic recombination foci and localizes to repair foci in S2 cells after irradiation in a manner similar to that of phosphorylated histone variant H2Av. Domain searches indicated that the protein contains an N-terminal FHA domain and a C-terminal tandem BRCT domain. Peptide pull-down studies showed that the BRCT domain interacts with phosphorylated H2Av, while the FHA domain interacts with the complex of MRE11, RAD50, and NBS. A frameshift mutation that eliminates the MU2 BRCT domain decreases the number and size of meiotic phospho-H2Av foci. MU2 is also required for the intra-S checkpoint in eye-antennal imaginal discs. MU2 participates at an early stage in the recognition of DNA damage at a step that is prerequisite for both DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint control. We propose a model suggesting that neotelomeres may arise when radiation-induced chromosome breaks fail to be repaired, fail to arrest progression through meiosis, and are deposited in the zygote, where cell cycle control is absent and rapid rounds of replication and telomere formation ensue.

  1. Clinical and dosimetric factors of radiation-induced esophageal injury: Radiation-induced esophageal toxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Bo Qiao; Yan-Hui Zhao; Yan-Bin Zhao; Rui-Zhi Wang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the clinical and dosimetric predictive factors for radiation-induced esophageal injury in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) during threedimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed 208 consecutive patients (146 men and 62 women) with NSCLC treated with 3D-CRT. The median age of the patients was 64 years (range 35-87 years). The clinical and treatment parameters including gender, age, performance status, sequential chemotherapy, concurrent chemotherapy, presence of carinal or subcarinal lymph nodes, pretreatment weight loss, mean dose to the entire esophagus, maximal point dose to the esophagus, and percentage of volume of esophagus receiving >55 Gy were studied. Clinical and dosimetric factors for radiation-induced acute and late grade 3-5 esophageal injury were analyzed according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) criteria.RESULTS: Twenty-five (12%) of the two hundred and eight patients developed acute or late grade 3-5 esophageal injury. Among them, nine patients had both acute and late grade 3-5 esophageal injury, two died of late esophageal perforation. Concurrent chemotherapy and maximal point dose to the esophagus ≥60 Gy were significantly associated with the risk of grade 3-5 esophageal injury. Fifty-four (26%) of the two hundred and eight patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Among them, 25 (46%) developed grade 3-5 esophageal injury (P = 0.0001<0.01). However, nograde 3-5 esophageal injury occurred in patients who received a maximal point dose to the esophagus <60 Gy (P= 0.0001<0.01).CONCLUSION: Concurrent chemotherapy and the maximal esophageal point dose ≥60 Gy are significantly associated with the risk of grade 3-5 esophageal injury in patients with NSCLC treated with 3D-CRT.

  2. Extensive ssDNA end formation at DNA double-strand breaks in non-homologous end-joining deficient cells during the S phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stenerlöw Bo

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Efficient and correct repair of DNA damage, especially DNA double-strand breaks, is critical for cellular survival. Defects in the DNA repair may lead to cell death or genomic instability and development of cancer. Non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ is the major repair pathway for DNA double-strand breaks in mammalian cells. The ability of other repair pathways, such as homologous recombination, to compensate for loss of NHEJ and the ways in which contributions of different pathways are regulated are far from fully understood. Results In this report we demonstrate that long single-stranded DNA (ssDNA ends are formed at radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks in NHEJ deficient cells. At repair times ≥ 1 h, processing of unrejoined DNA double-strand breaks generated extensive ssDNA at the DNA ends in cells lacking the NHEJ protein complexes DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK or DNA Ligase IV/XRCC4. The ssDNA formation was cell cycle dependent, since no ssDNA ends were observed in G1-synchronized NHEJ deficient cells. Furthermore, in wild type cells irradiated in the presence of DNA-PKcs (catalytic subunit of DNA-PK inhibitors, or in DNA-PKcs deficient cells complemented with DNA-PKcs mutated in six autophosphorylation sites (ABCDE, no ssDNA was formed. The ssDNA generation also greatly influences DNA double-strand break quantification by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, resulting in overestimation of the DNA double-strand break repair capability in NHEJ deficient cells when standard protocols for preparing naked DNA (i. e., lysis at 50°C are used. Conclusion We provide evidence that DNA Ligase IV/XRCC4 recruitment by DNA-PK to DNA double-strand breaks prevents the formation of long ssDNA ends at double-strand breaks during the S phase, indicating that NHEJ components may downregulate an alternative repair process where ssDNA ends are required.

  3. Radiation induced dynamic mutations and transgenerational effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Ohtsura

    2006-01-01

    Many studies have confirmed that radiation can induce genomic instability in whole body systems. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying induced genomic instability are not known at present, this interesting phenomenon could be the manifestation of a cellular fail-safe system in which fidelity of repair and replication is down-regulated to tolerate DNA damage. Two features of genomic instability namely, delayed mutation and untargeted mutation, require two mechanisms of ;damage memory' and ;damage sensing, signal transduction and execution' to induce mutations at a non damaged-site. In this report, the phenomenon of transgenerational genomic instability and possible mechanisms are discussed using mouse data collected in our laboratory as the main bases.

  4. Simulations of DSB Yields and Radiation-induced Chromosomal Aberrations in Human Cells Based on the Stochastic Track Structure iIduced by HZE Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarev, Artem; Plante, Ianik; George, Kerry; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    The formation of double-strand breaks (DSBs) and chromosomal aberrations (CAs) is of great importance in radiation research and, specifically, in space applications. We are presenting a new particle track and DNA damage model, in which the particle stochastic track structure is combined with the random walk (RW) structure of chromosomes in a cell nucleus. The motivation for this effort stems from the fact that the model with the RW chromosomes, NASARTI (NASA radiation track image) previously relied on amorphous track structure, while the stochastic track structure model RITRACKS (Relativistic Ion Tracks) was focused on more microscopic targets than the entire genome. We have combined chromosomes simulated by RWs with stochastic track structure, which uses nanoscopic dose calculations performed with the Monte-Carlo simulation by RITRACKS in a voxelized space. The new simulations produce the number of DSBs as function of dose and particle fluence for high-energy particles, including iron, carbon and protons, using voxels of 20 nm dimension. The combined model also calculates yields of radiation-induced CAs and unrejoined chromosome breaks in normal and repair deficient cells. The joined computational model is calibrated using the relative frequencies and distributions of chromosomal aberrations reported in the literature. The model considers fractionated deposition of energy to approximate dose rates of the space flight environment. The joined model also predicts of the yields and sizes of translocations, dicentrics, rings, and more complex-type aberrations formed in the G0/G1 cell cycle phase during the first cell division after irradiation. We found that the main advantage of the joined model is our ability to simulate small doses: 0.05-0.5 Gy. At such low doses, the stochastic track structure proved to be indispensable, as the action of individual delta-rays becomes more important.

  5. Simulations of DSB Yields and Radiation-induced Chromosomal Aberrations in Human Cells Based on the Stochastic Track Structure Induced by HZE Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarev, Artem; Plante, Ianik; George, Kerry; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    The formation of double-strand breaks (DSBs) and chromosomal aberrations (CAs) is of great importance in radiation research and, specifically, in space applications. We are presenting a new particle track and DNA damage model, in which the particle stochastic track structure is combined with the random walk (RW) structure of chromosomes in a cell nucleus. The motivation for this effort stems from the fact that the model with the RW chromosomes, NASARTI (NASA radiation track image) previously relied on amorphous track structure, while the stochastic track structure model RITRACKS (Relativistic Ion Tracks) was focused on more microscopic targets than the entire genome. We have combined chromosomes simulated by RWs with stochastic track structure, which uses nanoscopic dose calculations performed with the Monte-Carlo simulation by RITRACKS in a voxelized space. The new simulations produce the number of DSBs as function of dose and particle fluence for high-energy particles, including iron, carbon and protons, using voxels of 20 nm dimension. The combined model also calculates yields of radiation-induced CAs and unrejoined chromosome breaks in normal and repair deficient cells. The joined computational model is calibrated using the relative frequencies and distributions of chromosomal aberrations reported in the literature. The model considers fractionated deposition of energy to approximate dose rates of the space flight environment. The joined model also predicts of the yields and sizes of translocations, dicentrics, rings, and more complex-type aberrations formed in the G0/G1 cell cycle phase during the first cell division after irradiation. We found that the main advantage of the joined model is our ability to simulate small doses: 0.05-0.5 Gy. At such low doses, the stochastic track structure proved to be indispensable, as the action of individual delta-rays becomes more important.

  6. How to Relate Complex DNA Repair Genotypes to Pathway Function and, Ultimately, Health Risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, IM

    2002-01-09

    Exposure to ionizing radiation increases the incidence of cancer. However, predicting which individuals are at most risk from radiation exposure is a distant goal. Predictive ability is needed to guide policies that regulate radiation exposure and ensure that medical treatments have maximum benefit and minimum risk. Differences between people in susceptibility to radiation are largely based on their genotype, the genes inherited from their parents. Among the important genes are those that produce proteins that repair DNA damaged by radiation. Base Excision Repair (BER) proteins repair single strand breaks and oxidized bases in DNA. Double Strand Break Repair proteins repair broken chromosomes. Using technologies and information from the Human Genome Project, we have previously determined that the DNA sequence of DNA repair genes varies within the human population. An average of 3-4 different variants were found that affect the protein for each of 37 genes studied. The average frequency of these variants is 5%. Given the many genes in each DNA repair pathway and their many variants, technical ability to determine an individual's repair genotype greatly exceeds ability to interpret the information. A long-term goal is to relate DNA repair genotypes to health risk from radiation. This study focused on the BER pathway. The BER genes are known, variants of the genes have been identified at LLNL, and LLNL had recently developed an assay for BER function using white blood cells. The goal of this initial effort was to begin developing data that could be used to test the hypothesis that many different genotypes have similar DNA repair capacity phenotypes (function). Relationships between genotype and phenotype could then be used to group genotypes with similar function and ultimately test the association of groups of genotypes with health risk from radiation. Genotypes with reduced repair function are expected to increase risk of radiation-induced health effects. The

  7. Evidence that the Nijmegen breakage syndrome protein, an early sensor of double-strand DNA breaks (DSB), is involved in HIV-1 post-integration repair by recruiting the ataxia telangiectasia-mutated kinase in a process similar to, but distinct from, cellular DSB repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Johanna A; Wang, Feng-Xiang; Zhang, Hui; Wu, Kou-Juey; Williams, Kevin Jon; Daniel, René

    2008-01-22

    Retroviral transduction involves integrase-dependent linkage of viral and host DNA that leaves an intermediate that requires post-integration repair (PIR). We and others proposed that PIR hijacks the host cell double-strand DNA break (DSB) repair pathways. Nevertheless, the geometry of retroviral DNA integration differs considerably from that of DSB repair and so the precise role of host-cell mechanisms in PIR remains unclear. In the current study, we found that the Nijmegen breakage syndrome 1 protein (NBS1), an early sensor of DSBs, associates with HIV-1 DNA, recruits the ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) kinase, promotes stable retroviral transduction, mediates efficient integration of viral DNA and blocks integrase-dependent apoptosis that can arise from unrepaired viral-host DNA linkages. Moreover, we demonstrate that the ATM kinase, recruited by NBS1, is itself required for efficient retroviral transduction. Surprisingly, recruitment of the ATR kinase, which in the context of DSB requires both NBS1 and ATM, proceeds independently of these two proteins. A model is proposed emphasizing similarities and differences between PIR and DSB repair. Differences between the pathways may eventually allow strategies to block PIR while still allowing DSB repair.

  8. Mechanisms of radiation-induced gene responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woloschak, G.E.; Paunesku, T.

    1996-10-01

    In the process of identifying genes differentially expressed in cells exposed ultraviolet radiation, we have identified a transcript having a 26-bp region that is highly conserved in a variety of species including Bacillus circulans, yeast, pumpkin, Drosophila, mouse, and man. When the 5` region (flanking region or UTR) of a gene, the sequence is predominantly in +/+ orientation with respect to the coding DNA strand; while in the coding region and the 3` region (UTR), the sequence is most frequently in the +/-orientation with respect to the coding DNA strand. In two genes, the element is split into two parts; however, in most cases, it is found only once but with a minimum of 11 consecutive nucleotides precisely depicting the original sequence. The element is found in a large number of different genes with diverse functions (from human ras p21 to B. circulans chitonase). Gel shift assays demonstrated the presence of a protein in HeLa cell extracts that binds to the sense and antisense single-stranded consensus oligomers, as well as to the double- stranded oligonucleotide. When double-stranded oligomer was used, the size shift demonstrated as additional protein-oligomer complex larger than the one bound to either sense or antisense single-stranded consensus oligomers alone. It is speculated either that this element binds to protein(s) important in maintaining DNA is a single-stranded orientation for transcription or, alternatively that this element is important in the transcription-coupled DNA repair process.

  9. Therapeutic effects of human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells on the radiation-induced GI syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Se Hwan; Jang, Won Suk; Lee, Sun Joo; Park, Eun Young; Kim, Youn Joo; Jin, Sung Ho; Park, Sun Hoo; Lee, Seung Sook [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is one of the most radiosensitive organ systems in the body. Radiation-induced GI injury is described as destruction of crypt cell, decrease in villous height and number, ulceration, and necrosis of intestinal epithelium. Studies show that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) treatment may be useful in the repair or regeneration of damaged organs including bone, cartilage, or myocardium. MSCs from umbilical cord blood (UCB) have many advantages because of the immature nature of newborn cells compared to bone marrow derived MSCs. Moreover, UCB-MSCs provide no ethical barriers for basic studies and clinical applications. In this study, we explore the regeneration capability of human UCB-MSCs after radiation-induced GI injury

  10. Effects of ara A and fresh medium on chromosome damage and DNA double-strand break repair in X-irradiated stationary cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, P.E. (GSF-Abteilung fuer Biophysikalische Strahlenforschung, Frankfurt am Main (Germany, F.R.))

    1984-01-01

    The detailed kinetics of repair of dsb in Ehrlich ascites tumour cells over long repair intervals have been studied and compared under conditions simulating procedures known to cause large changes in cell survival, i.e. holding cells in stationary phase for 7 h after x-radiation, transference of cells to fresh growth medium immediately after x-radiation, and treatment with the DNA synthesis inhibitor 9-..beta..-D-arabinofuranosyladenine (ara A) for 30 min before, during and for 7 h after x-irradiation. These conditions have also been investigated for their effects on frequencies of chromosome abnormalities (anaphase bridges and fragments). Conditions leading to both an inhibition of dsb repair (in the presence of ara A) as well as an acceleration of dsb repair (by fresh growth medium) led to higher frequencies of chromosome abnormalities compared with those for cells under stationary conditions for 7 h after irradiation. Holding dsb open for long periods with ara A may maximize the probability of formation of aberrations, however, the data for fresh medium treatment showed it is not merely the rate at which dsb repair which determines the aberration frequency, and indicated the presence of other biochemical mechanisms in the cell determining the frequency of conversion of dsb into chromosome aberrations.

  11. Hyperbaric oxygen: Primary treatment of radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, J.P.; Neville, E.C.

    1989-07-01

    Of 8 patients with symptoms of advanced cystitis due to pelvic radiation treated with hyperbaric oxygen 7 are persistently improved during followup. All 6 patients treated for gross hematuria requiring hospitalization have been free of symptoms for an average of 24 months (range 6 to 43 months). One patient treated for stress incontinence currently is dry despite little change in bladder capacity, implying salutary effect from hyperbaric oxygen on the sphincter mechanism. One patient with radiation-induced prostatitis failed to respond. This experience suggests that hyperbaric oxygen should be considered the primary treatment for patients with symptomatic radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis.

  12. Radiation-induced osteosarcoma of the calvaria; Case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugita, Yasuo; Shigemori, Minoru; Miyagi, Jun; Ochiai, Satoshi; Lee, Souichi; Watanabe, Toshinori; Abe, Hitoshi; Morimatsu, Minoru (Kurume Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1992-01-01

    The authors report a case of radiation-induced calvarial osteosarcoma. A 58-year-old female received subtotal removal of the pituitary adenoma and 5000 rads postoperative irradiation. Seven years later, an osteoblastic osteosarcoma occurred in the frontotemporal region. She received total tumor removal and chemotherapy. However, computed tomography subsequently revealed multiple small lesions at the margin of the bone flap. A chest x-ray film demonstrated lung metastasis. Local recurrence and lung metastasis require careful attention in radiation-induced osteosarcoma patients. (author).

  13. Distinct mechanisms for opposite functions of homeoproteins Cdx2 and HoxB7 in double-strand break DNA repair in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soret, Christine; Martin, Elisabeth; Duluc, Isabelle; Dantzer, Françoise; Vanier, Marie; Gross, Isabelle; Freund, Jean-Noël; Domon-Dell, Claire

    2016-05-01

    Homeobox genes, involved in embryonic development and tissues homeostasis in adults, are often deregulated in cancer, but their relevance in pathology is far from being fully elucidated. In colon cancers, we report that the homeoproteins HoxB7 and Cdx2 exhibit different heterogeneous patterns, Cdx2 being localized in moderately altered neoplasic glands in contrast to HoxB7 which predominates in poorly-differentiated areas; they are coexpressed in few cancer cells. In human colon cancer cells, both homeoproteins interact with the DNA repair factor KU70/80, but functional studies reveal opposite effects: HoxB7 stimulates DNA repair and cell survival upon etoposide treatment, whereas Cdx2 inhibits both processes. The stimulatory effect of HoxB7 on DNA repair requires the transactivation domain linked to the homeodomain involved in the interaction with KU70/80, whereas the transactivation domain of Cdx2 is dispensable for its inhibitory function, which instead needs the homeodomain to interact with KU70/80 and the C-terminal domain. Thus, HoxB7 and Cdx2 respectively use transcription-dependent and -independent mechanisms to stimulate and inhibit DNA repair. In addition, in cells co-expressing both homeoproteins, Cdx2 lessens DNA repair activity through a novel mechanism of inhibition of the transcriptional function of HoxB7, whereby Cdx2 forms a molecular complex with HoxB7 and prevents it to recognize its target in the chromatin. These results point out the complex interplay between the DSB DNA repair activity and the homeoproteins HoxB7 and Cdx2 in colon cancer cells, making the balance between these factors a determinant and a potential indicator of the efficacy of genotoxic drugs.

  14. Radiation-induced genomic instability: Are epigenetic mechanisms the missing link?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aypar, Umut; Morgan, William F.; Baulch, Janet E.

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: This review examines the evidence for the hypothesis that epigenetics are involved in the initiation and perpetuation of radiation-induced genomic instability (RIGI). Conclusion: In addition to the extensively studied targeted effects of radiation, it is now apparent that non-targeted delayed effects such as RIGI are also important post-irradiation outcomes. In RIGI, unirradiated progeny cells display phenotypic changes at delayed times after radiation of the parental cell. RIGI is thought to be important in the process of carcinogenesis, however, the mechanism by which this occurs remains to be elucidated. In the genomically unstable clones developed by Morgan and colleagues, radiation-induced mutations, double-strand breaks, or changes in mRNA levels alone could not account for the initiation or perpetuation of RIGI. Since changes in the DNA sequence could not fully explain the mechanism of RIGI, inherited epigenetic changes may be involved. Epigenetics are known to play an important role in many cellular processes and epigenetic aberrations can lead to carcinogenesis. Recent studies in the field of radiation biology suggest that the changes in methylation patterns may be involved in RIGI. Together these clues have led us to hypothesize that epigenetics may be the missing link in understanding the mechanism behind RIGI.

  15. Double-strand break DNA repair genotype predictive of later mortality and cancer incidence in a cohort of non-smokers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neasham, David; Gallo, Valentina; Guarrera, Simonetta; Dunning, Alison; Overvad, Kim; Tjonneland, Anne; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Linseisen, Jakob P.; Malaveille, Christian; Ferrari, Pietro; Boeing, Heiner; Benetou, Vassiliki; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Palli, Domenico; Crosignani, Paolo; Tumino, Rosario; Panico, Salvatore; Bueno-De-Mesquita, H. Bas; Peeters, Petra H.; van Gib, Carla H.; Lund, Eiliv; Gonzalez, Carlos A.; Martinez, Carmen; Dorronsoro, Miren; Barricarte, Aurelio; Navarro, Carmen; Quiros, Jose R.; Berglund, Goran; Jarvholm, Bengt; Khaw, Kay Tee; Key, Timothy J.; Bingham, Sheila; Jose Diaz, Tormo M.; Riboli, Elio; Matullo, Giuseppe; Vineis, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    We followed-up for mortality and cancer incidence 1088 healthy non-smokers from a population-based study, who were characterized for 22 variants in 16 genes involved in DNA repair pathways. Follow-up was 100% complete. The association between polymorphism and mortality or cancer incidence was analyz

  16. Efficacy of DNA double-strand breaks repair in breast cancer is decreased in carriers of the variant allele of th